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Sample records for neural mechanisms underlie

  1. Increased synchronization and decreased neural complexity underlie thalamocortical oscillatory dynamics in mild cognitive impairment.

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    Cantero, Jose L; Atienza, Mercedes; Cruz-Vadell, Abel; Suarez-Gonzalez, Aida; Gil-Neciga, Eulogio

    2009-07-15

    Abnormal patterns of electroencephalographic (EEG) alpha oscillations in preclinical stages of dementia reveal a selective vulnerability of thalamocortical circuits to the cascade of neurodegenerative events heralding Alzheimer's disease (AD). EEG-alpha slowing characterizes both mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and healthy aging, but it remains ambiguous whether different neural mechanisms underlie this oscillatory behavior in normal and pathological senescence. In this study, we show that the strength of phase coupling and the level of phase predictability between thalamocortical and cortico-cortical EEG sources of low alpha frequency are abnormally facilitated in MCI patients when compared to healthy elderly subjects. Additionally, we found a loss of neural complexity intrinsic to both thalamic and cortical generators of lower alpha in MCI patients, which likely influenced the aberrant phase synchronization behavior between EEG-alpha sources in this high risk group of AD. Taken together, these results suggest that different neural mechanisms account for the well known slowing of alpha rhythm present in normal aging and MCI patients. Whether these anomalous neural coding mechanisms of lower alpha generation in MCI patients represent a potential electrophysiological marker of mild AD is a topic for future research.

  2. Distinct neural and neuromuscular strategies underlie independent evolution of simplified advertisement calls.

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    Leininger, Elizabeth C; Kelley, Darcy B

    2013-04-07

    Independent or convergent evolution can underlie phenotypic similarity of derived behavioural characters. Determining the underlying neural and neuromuscular mechanisms sheds light on how these characters arose. One example of evolutionarily derived characters is a temporally simple advertisement call of male African clawed frogs (Xenopus) that arose at least twice independently from a more complex ancestral pattern. How did simplification occur in the vocal circuit? To distinguish shared from divergent mechanisms, we examined activity from the calling brain and vocal organ (larynx) in two species that independently evolved simplified calls. We find that each species uses distinct neural and neuromuscular strategies to produce the simplified calls. Isolated Xenopus borealis brains produce fictive vocal patterns that match temporal patterns of actual male calls; the larynx converts nerve activity faithfully into muscle contractions and single clicks. In contrast, fictive patterns from isolated Xenopus boumbaensis brains are short bursts of nerve activity; the isolated larynx requires stimulus bursts to produce a single click of sound. Thus, unlike X. borealis, the output of the X. boumbaensis hindbrain vocal pattern generator is an ancestral burst-type pattern, transformed by the larynx into single clicks. Temporally simple advertisement calls in genetically distant species of Xenopus have thus arisen independently via reconfigurations of central and peripheral vocal neuroeffectors.

  3. Neural regions that underlie reinforcement learning are also active for social expectancy violations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Lasana T; Fiske, Susan T

    2010-01-01

    Prediction error, the difference between an expected and an actual outcome, serves as a learning signal that interacts with reward and punishment value to direct future behavior during reinforcement learning. We hypothesized that similar learning and valuation signals may underlie social expectancy violations. Here, we explore the neural correlates of social expectancy violation signals along the universal person-perception dimensions trait warmth and competence. In this context, social learning may result from expectancy violations that occur when a target is inconsistent with an a priori schema. Expectancy violation may activate neural regions normally implicated in prediction error and valuation during appetitive and aversive conditioning. Using fMRI, we first gave perceivers high warmth or competence behavioral information that led to dispositional or situational attributions for the behavior. Participants then saw pictures of people responsible for the behavior; they represented social groups either inconsistent (rated low on either warmth or competence) or consistent (rated high on either warmth or competence) with the behavior information. Warmth and competence expectancy violations activate striatal regions that represent evaluative and prediction error signals. Social cognition regions underlie consistent expectations. These findings suggest that regions underlying reinforcement learning may work in concert with social cognition regions in warmth and competence social expectancy. This study illustrates the neural overlap between neuroeconomics and social neuroscience.

  4. Distinct neural circuits underlie assessment of a diversity of natural dangers by American crows.

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    Cross, Donna J; Marzluff, John M; Palmquist, Ila; Minoshima, Satoshi; Shimizu, Toru; Miyaoka, Robert

    2013-08-22

    Social animals encountering natural dangers face decisions such as whether to freeze, flee or harass the threat. The American crow, Corvus brachyrhynchos, conspicuously mobs dangers. We used positron emission tomography to test the hypothesis that distinct neuronal substrates underlie the crow's consistent behavioural response to different dangers. We found that crows activated brain regions associated with attention and arousal (nucleus isthmo-opticus/locus coeruleus), and with motor response (arcopallium), as they fixed their gaze on a threat. However, despite this consistent behavioural and neural response, the sight of a person who previously captured the crow, a person holding a dead crow and a taxidermy-mounted hawk activated distinct forebrain regions (amygdala, hippocampus and portion of the caudal nidopallium, respectively). We suggest that aspects of mobbing behaviour are guided by unique neural circuits that respond to differences in mental processing-learning, memory formation and multisensory discrimination-required to appropriately nuance a risky behaviour to specific dangers.

  5. Compensatory mechanisms underlie intact task-switching performance in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamadar, S; Michie, P; Karayanidis, F

    2010-04-01

    Individuals with schizophrenia tend to perform poorly on many measures of cognitive control. However, recent task-switching studies suggest that they show intact task-switching performance, despite the fact that the regions involved in task-switching are known to be structurally and functionally impaired in the disorder. Behavioral, event-related potential (ERP) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) measures were used to compare the temporal and spatial dynamics of task-switching performance in individuals with schizophrenia and controls. Consistent with previous studies, reaction time (RT) switch cost and its reduction with anticipatory preparation did not differ between groups. There were also no group differences on cue-locked ERP components associated with anticipatory preparation processes. However, both stimulus- and response-locked ERPs were significantly disrupted in schizophrenia, suggesting difficulty with task-set implementation. fMRI analyses indicated that individuals with schizophrenia showed hyperactivity in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and posterior parietal cortex. RT-fMRI and ERP-fMRI associations suggested that individuals with schizophrenia employ compensatory mechanisms to overcome difficulties in task-set implementation and thereby achieve the same behavioral outcomes as controls.

  6. Mechanisms that underlie coordination in children with developmental coordination disorder.

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    O'Brien, Jane Clifford; Williams, Harriet G; Bundy, Anita; Lyons, Jim; Mittal, Amita

    2008-01-01

    The authors examined potential mechanisms underlying motor coordination in children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD). Because children with DCD experience difficulty processing visual, auditory, and vibrotactile information, the authors explored patterns of choice reaction time (RT) in young (6-7 years) and older (9-10 years) children with and without DCD by using a compatibility-incompatibility paradigm and different sensory modalities. Young children responded more slowly than older children to visual, auditory, and vibrotactile stimuli. Children with DCD took longer than typical children to process visual and vibrotactile stimuli under more complex stimulus-response mappings. Young children with DCD responded more slowly than typical children to visual and vibrotactile information under incompatible conditions. Children with DCD responded faster than unaffected children to auditory stimuli. The results suggest that there is a developmental nature in the processing of visual and auditory input and imply that the vibrotactile sensory modality may be key to the motor coordination difficulties of children with DCD.

  7. Midgut microbiota and host immunocompetence underlie Bacillus thuringiensis killing mechanism.

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    Caccia, Silvia; Di Lelio, Ilaria; La Storia, Antonietta; Marinelli, Adriana; Varricchio, Paola; Franzetti, Eleonora; Banyuls, Núria; Tettamanti, Gianluca; Casartelli, Morena; Giordana, Barbara; Ferré, Juan; Gigliotti, Silvia; Ercolini, Danilo; Pennacchio, Francesco

    2016-08-23

    Bacillus thuringiensis is a widely used bacterial entomopathogen producing insecticidal toxins, some of which are expressed in insect-resistant transgenic crops. Surprisingly, the killing mechanism of B. thuringiensis remains controversial. In particular, the importance of the septicemia induced by the host midgut microbiota is still debated as a result of the lack of experimental evidence obtained without drastic manipulation of the midgut and its content. Here this key issue is addressed by RNAi-mediated silencing of an immune gene in a lepidopteran host Spodoptera littoralis, leaving the midgut microbiota unaltered. The resulting cellular immunosuppression was characterized by a reduced nodulation response, which was associated with a significant enhancement of host larvae mortality triggered by B. thuringiensis and a Cry toxin. This was determined by an uncontrolled proliferation of midgut bacteria, after entering the body cavity through toxin-induced epithelial lesions. Consequently, the hemolymphatic microbiota dramatically changed upon treatment with Cry1Ca toxin, showing a remarkable predominance of Serratia and Clostridium species, which switched from asymptomatic gut symbionts to hemocoelic pathogens. These experimental results demonstrate the important contribution of host enteric flora in B. thuringiensis-killing activity and provide a sound foundation for developing new insect control strategies aimed at enhancing the impact of biocontrol agents by reducing the immunocompetence of the host.

  8. Differential neural correlates underlie judgment of learning and subsequent memory performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan eYang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Judgment of learning (JOL plays a pivotal role in self-regulated learning. Although the JOLs are in general accurate, important deviations from memory performance are often reported, especially when the JOLs are made immediately after learning. Nevertheless, existing studies have not clearly dissociated the neural processes underlying subjective JOL and objective memory. In the present study, participants were asked to study a list of words that would be tested one day later. Immediately after learning, participants predicted how likely they would remember that item. Critically, the JOL was performed on only half of the studied items to avoid its contamination on subsequent memory. We found that during encoding, compared to items later judged as will be forgotten, those judged as will be remembered showed stronger activities in the default-mode network, including the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (PFC and posterior cingulate cortex, as well as weaker functional connectivity between the left dorsolateral PFC and the visual cortex. The exact opposite pattern was found when comparing items that were actually remembered with that were later forgotten. These important neural dissociations between JOL and memory performance shed light on the neural mechanisms of human metamemory bias.

  9. Neural mechanisms of pain: an overview.

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    Casey, K L

    1982-01-01

    There are two essential components of pain: discriminative and affective. The discriminative component includes the ability to identify the stimulus as originating from somatic or visceral tissue, determine some of the physical properties of the stimulus, and localize it in space, time, and along a continuum of intensities. The affective component is the experience of aversiveness which motivates escape, avoidance, and protective behavior. Both of these components of pain were acknowledged by Sir Charles Sherrington (1947) and must be considered in any discussion of the neurophysiological basis of pain. The neural mechanisms subserving discrimination and affect are different and may be differentially affected by drugs or surgical procedures. A consideration of pain mechanisms must also include the neural systems modulating pain, for it is well known that pain can be profoundly influenced by other somatic stimuli and by attentional, emotional, and cognitive factors. A thorough and detailed discussion of pain mechanisms is beyond the scope of this brief overview, but I will cover major features of the neural mechanisms currently thought to underlie the discriminative and affective dimensions of pain and the mechanisms by which pain may be modulated.

  10. Coupled neural systems underlie the production and comprehension of naturalistic narrative speech.

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    Silbert, Lauren J; Honey, Christopher J; Simony, Erez; Poeppel, David; Hasson, Uri

    2014-10-28

    Neuroimaging studies of language have typically focused on either production or comprehension of single speech utterances such as syllables, words, or sentences. In this study we used a new approach to functional MRI acquisition and analysis to characterize the neural responses during production and comprehension of complex real-life speech. First, using a time-warp based intrasubject correlation method, we identified all areas that are reliably activated in the brains of speakers telling a 15-min-long narrative. Next, we identified areas that are reliably activated in the brains of listeners as they comprehended that same narrative. This allowed us to identify networks of brain regions specific to production and comprehension, as well as those that are shared between the two processes. The results indicate that production of a real-life narrative is not localized to the left hemisphere but recruits an extensive bilateral network, which overlaps extensively with the comprehension system. Moreover, by directly comparing the neural activity time courses during production and comprehension of the same narrative we were able to identify not only the spatial overlap of activity but also areas in which the neural activity is coupled across the speaker's and listener's brains during production and comprehension of the same narrative. We demonstrate widespread bilateral coupling between production- and comprehension-related processing within both linguistic and nonlinguistic areas, exposing the surprising extent of shared processes across the two systems.

  11. Increased levels of apoptosis in the prefusion neural folds underlie the craniofacial disorder, Treacher Collins syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dixon, J; Brakebusch, C; Fässler, R

    2000-01-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder of human craniofacial development that results from loss-of-function mutations in the gene TCOF1. Although this gene has been demonstrated to encode the nucleolar phosphoprotein treacle, the developmental mechanism underlying TCS...

  12. Pain-related mediators underlie incision-induced mechanical nociception in the dorsal root ganglia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiuhong Yuan; Xiangyan Liu; Qiuping Tang; Yunlong Deng

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 50-70% of patients experience incision-induced mechanical nociception after sur-gery. However, the mechanism underlying incision-induced mechanical nociception is stil unclear. Interleukin-10 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor are important pain mediators, but whether in-terleukin-10 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor are involved in incision-induced mechanical no-ciception remains uncertain. In this study, forty rats were divided randomly into the incision surgery (n=32) and sham surgery (n=8) groups. Plantar incision on the central part of left hind paw was performed under anesthesia in rats from the surgery group. Rats in the sham surgery group re-ceived anesthesia, but not an incision. Von Frey test results showed that, compared with the sham surgery group, incision surgery decreased the withdrawal threshold of rats at 0.5, 3, 6 and 24 hours after incision. Immunofluorescence staining in the dorsal root ganglia of the spinal cord (L 3-5 ) showed that interleukin-10 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor were expressed mainly on smal-and medium-sized neurons (diameter40μm) at 6 and 24 hours after incision surgery, which corresponded to the decreased mechanical withdrawal threshold of rats in the surgery group. These experimental findings suggest that expression pattern shift of interleukin-10 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor induced by inci-sion surgery in dorsal root ganglia of rats was closely involved in lowering the threshold to me-chanical stimulus in the hind paw fol owing incision surgery. Pain-related mediators induced by in-cision surgery in dorsal root ganglia of rats possibly underlie mechanical nociception in ipsilateral hind paws.

  13. Brain mechanisms that underlie the effects of motivational audiovisual stimuli on psychophysiological responses during exercise.

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    Bigliassi, Marcelo; Silva, Vinícius B; Karageorghis, Costas I; Bird, Jonathan M; Santos, Priscila C; Altimari, Leandro R

    2016-05-01

    Motivational audiovisual stimuli such as music and video have been widely used in the realm of exercise and sport as a means by which to increase situational motivation and enhance performance. The present study addressed the mechanisms that underlie the effects of motivational stimuli on psychophysiological responses and exercise performance. Twenty-two participants completed fatiguing isometric handgrip-squeezing tasks under two experimental conditions (motivational audiovisual condition and neutral audiovisual condition) and a control condition. Electrical activity in the brain and working muscles was analyzed by use of electroencephalography and electromyography, respectively. Participants were asked to squeeze the dynamometer maximally for 30s. A single-item motivation scale was administered after each squeeze. Results indicated that task performance and situational motivational were superior under the influence of motivational stimuli when compared to the other two conditions (~20% and ~25%, respectively). The motivational stimulus downregulated the predominance of low-frequency waves (theta) in the right frontal regions of the cortex (F8), and upregulated high-frequency waves (beta) in the central areas (C3 and C4). It is suggested that motivational sensory cues serve to readjust electrical activity in the brain; a mechanism by which the detrimental effects of fatigue on the efferent control of working muscles is ameliorated.

  14. Wittgenstein running: neural mechanisms of collective intentionality and we-mode.

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    Becchio, Cristina; Bertone, Cesare

    2004-03-01

    In this paper we discuss the problem of the neural conditions of shared attitudes and intentions: which neural mechanisms underlie "we-mode" processes or serve as precursors to such processes? Neurophysiological and neuropsychological evidence suggests that in different areas of the brain neural representations are shared by several individuals. This situation, on the one hand, creates a potential problem for correct attribution. On the other hand, it may provide the conditions for shared attitudes and intentions.

  15. Neural mechanisms for voice recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andics, A.V.; McQueen, J.M.; Petersson, K.M.; Gal, V.; Rudas, G.; Vidnyanszky, Z.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated neural mechanisms that support voice recognition in a training paradigm with fMRI. The same listeners were trained on different weeks to categorize the mid-regions of voice-morph continua as an individual's voice. Stimuli implicitly defined a voice-acoustics space, and training expli

  16. Neural Mechanisms of Attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-05-21

    young rat’s ability to modify its response when changing from food to water deprivation. Behavioural Brain Research , 19,89-92. Brenner, E., & Mirmiran, M...environmental stimuli in rabbits. Behavioural Brain Research , j3,231-240. Fontani, G., Grazzi, F., & Meucci, M. (1984b). Effect of piracetam plus... Behavioural Brain Research , 23,147-157. Meck, W. H. (1991). Modality-specific circadian rhythmicities influence mechanisms of attention and memory

  17. Neural mechanisms of mental fatigue.

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    Ishii, Akira; Tanaka, Masaaki; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Fatigue is defined as a decline in the ability and efficiency of mental and/or physical activities that is caused by excessive mental and/or physical activities. Fatigue can be classified as physical or mental. Mental fatigue manifests as potentially impaired cognitive function and is one of the most significant causes of accidents in modern society. Recently, it has been shown that the neural mechanisms of mental fatigue related to cognitive task performance are more complex than previously thought and that mental fatigue is not caused only by impaired activity in task-related brain regions. There is accumulating evidence supporting the existence of mental facilitation and inhibition systems. These systems are involved in the neural mechanisms of mental fatigue, modulating the activity of task-related brain regions to regulate cognitive task performance. In this review, we propose a new conceptual model: the dual regulation system of mental fatigue. This model contributes to our understanding of the neural mechanisms of mental fatigue and the regulatory mechanisms of cognitive task performance in the presence of mental fatigue.

  18. The mechanics of state-dependent neural correlations.

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    Doiron, Brent; Litwin-Kumar, Ashok; Rosenbaum, Robert; Ocker, Gabriel K; Josić, Krešimir

    2016-03-01

    Simultaneous recordings from large neural populations are becoming increasingly common. An important feature of population activity is the trial-to-trial correlated fluctuation of spike train outputs from recorded neuron pairs. Similar to the firing rate of single neurons, correlated activity can be modulated by a number of factors, from changes in arousal and attentional state to learning and task engagement. However, the physiological mechanisms that underlie these changes are not fully understood. We review recent theoretical results that identify three separate mechanisms that modulate spike train correlations: changes in input correlations, internal fluctuations and the transfer function of single neurons. We first examine these mechanisms in feedforward pathways and then show how the same approach can explain the modulation of correlations in recurrent networks. Such mechanistic constraints on the modulation of population activity will be important in statistical analyses of high-dimensional neural data.

  19. Neural mechanisms of communicative innovation.

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    Stolk, Arjen; Verhagen, Lennart; Schoffelen, Jan-Mathijs; Oostenveld, Robert; Blokpoel, Mark; Hagoort, Peter; van Rooij, Iris; Toni, Ivan

    2013-09-01

    Human referential communication is often thought as coding-decoding a set of symbols, neglecting that establishing shared meanings requires a computational mechanism powerful enough to mutually negotiate them. Sharing the meaning of a novel symbol might rely on similar conceptual inferences across communicators or on statistical similarities in their sensorimotor behaviors. Using magnetoencephalography, we assess spectral, temporal, and spatial characteristics of neural activity evoked when people generate and understand novel shared symbols during live communicative interactions. Solving those communicative problems induced comparable changes in the spectral profile of neural activity of both communicators and addressees. This shared neuronal up-regulation was spatially localized to the right temporal lobe and the ventromedial prefrontal cortex and emerged already before the occurrence of a specific communicative problem. Communicative innovation relies on neuronal computations that are shared across generating and understanding novel shared symbols, operating over temporal scales independent from transient sensorimotor behavior.

  20. Cryptochromes define a novel circadian clock mechanism in monarch butterflies that may underlie sun compass navigation.

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    Haisun Zhu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The circadian clock plays a vital role in monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus migration by providing the timing component of time-compensated sun compass orientation, a process that is important for successful navigation. We therefore evaluated the monarch clockwork by focusing on the functions of a Drosophila-like cryptochrome (cry, designated cry1, and a vertebrate-like cry, designated cry2, that are both expressed in the butterfly and by placing these genes in the context of other relevant clock genes in vivo. We found that similar temporal patterns of clock gene expression and protein levels occur in the heads, as occur in DpN1 cells, of a monarch cell line that contains a light-driven clock. CRY1 mediates TIMELESS degradation by light in DpN1 cells, and a light-induced TIMELESS decrease occurs in putative clock cells in the pars lateralis (PL in the brain. Moreover, monarch cry1 transgenes partially rescue both biochemical and behavioral light-input defects in cry(b mutant Drosophila. CRY2 is the major transcriptional repressor of CLOCK:CYCLE-mediated transcription in DpN1 cells, and endogenous CRY2 potently inhibits transcription without involvement of PERIOD. CRY2 is co-localized with clock proteins in the PL, and there it translocates to the nucleus at the appropriate time for transcriptional repression. We also discovered CRY2-positive neural projections that oscillate in the central complex. The results define a novel, CRY-centric clock mechanism in the monarch in which CRY1 likely functions as a blue-light photoreceptor for entrainment, whereas CRY2 functions within the clockwork as the transcriptional repressor of a negative transcriptional feedback loop. Our data further suggest that CRY2 may have a dual role in the monarch butterfly's brain-as a core clock element and as an output that regulates circadian activity in the central complex, the likely site of the sun compass.

  1. Neural mechanisms underlying breathing complexity.

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    Agathe Hess

    Full Text Available Breathing is maintained and controlled by a network of automatic neurons in the brainstem that generate respiratory rhythm and receive regulatory inputs. Breathing complexity therefore arises from respiratory central pattern generators modulated by peripheral and supra-spinal inputs. Very little is known on the brainstem neural substrates underlying breathing complexity in humans. We used both experimental and theoretical approaches to decipher these mechanisms in healthy humans and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. COPD is the most frequent chronic lung disease in the general population mainly due to tobacco smoke. In patients, airflow obstruction associated with hyperinflation and respiratory muscles weakness are key factors contributing to load-capacity imbalance and hence increased respiratory drive. Unexpectedly, we found that the patients breathed with a higher level of complexity during inspiration and expiration than controls. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, we scanned the brain of the participants to analyze the activity of two small regions involved in respiratory rhythmogenesis, the rostral ventro-lateral (VL medulla (pre-Bötzinger complex and the caudal VL pons (parafacial group. fMRI revealed in controls higher activity of the VL medulla suggesting active inspiration, while in patients higher activity of the VL pons suggesting active expiration. COPD patients reactivate the parafacial to sustain ventilation. These findings may be involved in the onset of respiratory failure when the neural network becomes overwhelmed by respiratory overload We show that central neural activity correlates with airflow complexity in healthy subjects and COPD patients, at rest and during inspiratory loading. We finally used a theoretical approach of respiratory rhythmogenesis that reproduces the kernel activity of neurons involved in the automatic breathing. The model reveals how a chaotic activity in

  2. Presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms underlie paired pulse depression at single GABAergic boutons in rat collicular cultures.

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    Kirischuk, Sergei; Clements, John D; Grantyn, Rosemarie

    2002-08-15

    Paired pulse depression (PPD) is a common form of short-term synaptic plasticity. The aim of this study was to characterise PPD at the level of a single inhibitory bouton. Low-density collicular cultures were loaded with the Ca2+ indicator Oregon Green-1, active boutons were stained with RH414, and action potentials were blocked with TTX. Evoked IPSCs (eIPSCs) and presynaptic Ca2+ transients were recorded in response to direct presynaptic depolarisation of an individual bouton. The single bouton eIPSCs had a low failure rate (independent presynaptic mechanisms and one release-dependent postsynaptic mechanism.

  3. In silico exploration of the mechanisms that underlie parasite-induced anorexia in sheep.

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    Laurenson, Yan C S M; Bishop, Stephen C; Kyriazakis, Ilias

    2011-10-01

    A model was used to investigate two mechanisms describing reductions in food intake (anorexia) observed during gastrointestinal parasitism in lambs, and to explore relationships between anorexia and food composition. The mechanisms were either a reduction in intrinsic growth rate, leading to a consequent reduction in food intake (mechanism 1; M1), or a direct reduction in food intake (mechanism 2; M2). For both mechanisms, lambs growing from 2 to 6 months of age were modelled, with one of three levels of trickle challenge with Teladorsagia circumcincta. Scenarios were simulated for feeds varying in either protein or energy content, or both. Major differences were found between the predictions resulting from M1 and M2 on low-energy foods that constrained the intake of uninfected lambs through bulk. With M1, food intake was governed by the first operating constraint, whereas with M2 an additivity of constraints was observed. On the other foods, the duration of anorexia increased with increasing energy content of feed for M1, whilst the duration of anorexia decreased with increasing protein content of feed for M2.For foods that did not have an impact upon lambs' gastrointestinal tract capacity, published data were consistent with predictions of M2. Due to an absence of experimental data, no conclusions could be drawn for relationships between anorexia and food composition in the presence of other limiting constraints, such as bulk for low-energy foods. In conclusion, available experimental data and model predictions were consistent with anorexia having an impact directly on food intake, and with impacts of anorexia increasing with decreasing protein content.

  4. Distinct Mechanisms Underlie Quiescence during Two Caenorhabditis elegans Sleep-Like States.

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    Trojanowski, Nicholas F; Nelson, Matthew D; Flavell, Steven W; Fang-Yen, Christopher; Raizen, David M

    2015-10-28

    Electrophysiological recordings have enabled identification of physiologically distinct yet behaviorally similar states of mammalian sleep. In contrast, sleep in nonmammals has generally been identified behaviorally and therefore regarded as a physiologically uniform state characterized by quiescence of feeding and locomotion, reduced responsiveness, and rapid reversibility. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans displays sleep-like quiescent behavior under two conditions: developmentally timed quiescence (DTQ) occurs during larval transitions, and stress-induced quiescence (SIQ) occurs in response to exposure to cellular stressors. Behaviorally, DTQ and SIQ appear identical. Here, we use optogenetic manipulations of neuronal and muscular activity, pharmacology, and genetic perturbations to uncover circuit and molecular mechanisms of DTQ and SIQ. We find that locomotion quiescence induced by DTQ- and SIQ-associated neuropeptides occurs via their action on the nervous system, although their neuronal target(s) and/or molecular mechanisms likely differ. Feeding quiescence during DTQ results from a loss of pharyngeal muscle excitability, whereas feeding quiescence during SIQ results from a loss of excitability in the nervous system. Together these results indicate that, as in mammals, quiescence is subserved by different mechanisms during distinct sleep-like states in C. elegans.

  5. The molecular mechanisms that underlie the tumor suppressor function of LKB1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dahua Fan; Chao Ma; Haitao Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Germline mutations of the LKB1 tumor suppressor gene result in Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) charac-terized by intestinal hamartomas and increased inci-dence of epithelial cancers. Inactivating mutations in LKB1 have also been found in certain sporadic human cancers and with particularly high frequency in lung cancer. LKB1 has now been demonstrated to play a crucial role in pulmonary tumorigenesis, controlling initiation, differentiation, and metastasis. Recent evi-dences showed that LKB1 is a multitasking kinase, with great potential in orchestrating cell activity. Thus far, LKB1 has been found to play a role in cell polarity, energy metabolism, apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, and cell proliferation, all of which may require the tumor sup-pressor function of this kinase and/or its catalytic activity. This review focuses on remarkable recent find-ings concerning the molecular mechanism by which the LKB1 protein kinase operates as a tumor suppressor and discusses the rational treatment strategies to indi-viduals suffering from PJS and other common dis-orders related to LKB1 signaling.

  6. Enhancement of inhibitory neurotransmission and inhibition of excitatory mechanisms underlie the anticonvulsant effects of Mallotus oppositifolius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kennedy Kwami Edem Kukuia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Mallotus oppositifolius is a shrub that is used traditionally to treat epilepsy, but its potential has not been scientifically validated. Aims: This study investigated the anticonvulsant properties and possible mechanism of action of the 70% v/v hydroalcoholic extract of the leaves of M. oppositifolius.Materials and Methods: Inprinting control region (ICR mice (25–30 g were pretreated with the M. oppositifolius leaf extract (10–100 mg/kg before administering the respective convulsants (pentylenetetrazole [PTZ], picrotoxin [PTX], strychnine [STR], 4-aminopyridine [4-AP], and pilocarpine. The effect of the extract in maximal electroshock seizure (MES model was investigated also. Statistical Analysis: Data were presented as mean ± standard error of the mean and were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA or two-way ANOVA where appropriate with Newman–Keuls or Bonferroni post hoc test respectively. P< 0.05 was considered significant. Results: In both PTX and PTZ test, extract delayed the onset of seizures and reduced the frequency and duration of seizures. In the STR-induced seizure test, the extract significantly delayed the onset of seizures and reduced the duration of seizures. The extract also delayed the onset of clonic and tonic seizures as well as increasing the survival of mice in the 4-AP-induced seizure test. It further reduced the duration of tonic limb extensions in the MES test. In the pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus, the extract significantly delayed the onset of clonic convulsions and reduced the frequency and duration of seizures. Moreover, the anticonvulsant effect of the extract was attenuated by flumazenil, a benzodiazepine/gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA receptor antagonist. Conclusion: These findings show that the extract has anticonvulsant effect possible mediated by GABAergic, glycinergic neurotransmission, and potassium channel conductions. It may also be acting by antagonizing muscarinic

  7. DNA repair pathways underlie a common genetic mechanism modulating onset in polyglutamine diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettencourt, Conceição; Hensman‐Moss, Davina; Flower, Michael; Wiethoff, Sarah; Brice, Alexis; Goizet, Cyril; Stevanin, Giovanni; Koutsis, Georgios; Karadima, Georgia; Panas, Marios; Yescas‐Gómez, Petra; García‐Velázquez, Lizbeth Esmeralda; Alonso‐Vilatela, María Elisa; Lima, Manuela; Raposo, Mafalda; Traynor, Bryan; Sweeney, Mary; Wood, Nicholas; Giunti, Paola; Durr, Alexandra; Holmans, Peter; Houlden, Henry; Tabrizi, Sarah J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The polyglutamine diseases, including Huntington's disease (HD) and multiple spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs), are among the commonest hereditary neurodegenerative diseases. They are caused by expanded CAG tracts, encoding glutamine, in different genes. Longer CAG repeat tracts are associated with earlier ages at onset, but this does not account for all of the difference, and the existence of additional genetic modifying factors has been suggested in these diseases. A recent genome‐wide association study (GWAS) in HD found association between age at onset and genetic variants in DNA repair pathways, and we therefore tested whether the modifying effects of variants in DNA repair genes have wider effects in the polyglutamine diseases. Methods We assembled an independent cohort of 1,462 subjects with HD and polyglutamine SCAs, and genotyped single‐nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) selected from the most significant hits in the HD study. Results In the analysis of DNA repair genes as a group, we found the most significant association with age at onset when grouping all polyglutamine diseases (HD+SCAs; p = 1.43 × 10–5). In individual SNP analysis, we found significant associations for rs3512 in FAN1 with HD+SCAs (p = 1.52 × 10–5) and all SCAs (p = 2.22 × 10–4) and rs1805323 in PMS2 with HD+SCAs (p = 3.14 × 10–5), all in the same direction as in the HD GWAS. Interpretation We show that DNA repair genes significantly modify age at onset in HD and SCAs, suggesting a common pathogenic mechanism, which could operate through the observed somatic expansion of repeats that can be modulated by genetic manipulation of DNA repair in disease models. This offers novel therapeutic opportunities in multiple diseases. Ann Neurol 2016;79:983–990 PMID:27044000

  8. Analysis of the mechanisms that underlie absorption of botulinum toxin by the inhalation route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Saleem, Fetweh H; Ancharski, Denise M; Joshi, Suresh G; Elias, M; Singh, Ajay; Nasser, Zidoon; Simpson, Lance L

    2012-12-01

    Botulinum toxin is a highly potent oral and inhalation poison, which means that the toxin must have an efficient mechanism for penetration of epithelial barriers. To date, three models for toxin passage across epithelial barriers have been proposed: (i) the toxin itself undergoes binding and transcytosis; (ii) an auxiliary protein, HA35, transports toxin from the apical to the basal side of epithelial cells; and (iii) an auxiliary protein, HA35, acts on the basal side of epithelial cells to disrupt tight junctions, and this permits paracellular flux of toxin. These models were evaluated by studying toxin absorption following inhalation exposure in mice. Three types of experiments were conducted. In the first, the potency of pure neurotoxin was compared with that of progenitor toxin complex, which contains HA35. The results showed that the rate and extent of toxin absorption, as well as the potency of absorbed toxin, did not depend upon, nor were they enhanced by, the presence of HA35. In the second type of experiment, the potencies of pure neurotoxin and progenitor toxin complex were compared in the absence or presence of antibodies on the apical side of epithelial cells. Antibodies directed against the neurotoxin protected against challenge, but antibodies against HA35 did not. In the final type of experiment, the potency of pure neurotoxin and toxin complex was compared in animals pretreated to deliver antibodies to the basal side of epithelial cells. Once again, antibodies directed against the neurotoxin provided resistance to challenge, but antibodies directed against HA35 did not. Taken collectively, the data indicate that the toxin by itself is capable of crossing epithelial barriers. The data do not support any hypothesis in which HA35 is essential for toxin penetration of epithelial barriers.

  9. A Comparison of the neural correlates that underlie rule-based and information-integration category learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Kathryn L; Wills, Andy J; Benattayallah, Abdelmalek; Milton, Fraser

    2016-10-01

    The influential competition between verbal and implicit systems (COVIS) model proposes that category learning is driven by two competing neural systems-an explicit, verbal, system, and a procedural-based, implicit, system. In the current fMRI study, participants learned either a conjunctive, rule-based (RB), category structure that is believed to engage the explicit system, or an information-integration category structure that is thought to preferentially recruit the implicit system. The RB and information-integration category structures were matched for participant error rate, the number of relevant stimulus dimensions, and category separation. Under these conditions, considerable overlap in brain activation, including the prefrontal cortex, basal ganglia, and the hippocampus, was found between the RB and information-integration category structures. Contrary to the predictions of COVIS, the medial temporal lobes and in particular the hippocampus, key regions for explicit memory, were found to be more active in the information-integration condition than in the RB condition. No regions were more activated in RB than information-integration category learning. The implications of these results for theories of category learning are discussed. Hum Brain Mapp 37:3557-3574, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Linking Cellular Mechanisms to Behavior: Entorhinal Persistent Spiking and Membrane Potential Oscillations May Underlie Path Integration, Grid Cell Firing, and Episodic Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E. Hasselmo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The entorhinal cortex plays an important role in spatial memory and episodic memory functions. These functions may result from cellular mechanisms for integration of the afferent input to entorhinal cortex. This article reviews physiological data on persistent spiking and membrane potential oscillations in entorhinal cortex then presents models showing how both these cellular mechanisms could contribute to properties observed during unit recording, including grid cell firing, and how they could underlie behavioural functions including path integration. The interaction of oscillations and persistent firing could contribute to encoding and retrieval of trajectories through space and time as a mechanism relevant to episodic memory.

  11. Neural mechanisms of cue-approach training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakkour, Akram; Lewis-Peacock, Jarrod A; Poldrack, Russell A; Schonberg, Tom

    2017-05-01

    Biasing choices may prove a useful way to implement behavior change. Previous work has shown that a simple training task (the cue-approach task), which does not rely on external reinforcement, can robustly influence choice behavior by biasing choice toward items that were targeted during training. In the current study, we replicate previous behavioral findings and explore the neural mechanisms underlying the shift in preferences following cue-approach training. Given recent successes in the development and application of machine learning techniques to task-based fMRI data, which have advanced understanding of the neural substrates of cognition, we sought to leverage the power of these techniques to better understand neural changes during cue-approach training that subsequently led to a shift in choice behavior. Contrary to our expectations, we found that machine learning techniques applied to fMRI data during non-reinforced training were unsuccessful in elucidating the neural mechanism underlying the behavioral effect. However, univariate analyses during training revealed that the relationship between BOLD and choices for Go items increases as training progresses compared to choices of NoGo items primarily in lateral prefrontal cortical areas. This new imaging finding suggests that preferences are shifted via differential engagement of task control networks that interact with value networks during cue-approach training. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Neural circuit mechanisms of posttraumatic epilepsy

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    Robert F Hunt

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI greatly increases the risk for a number of mental health problems and is one of the most common causes of medically intractable epilepsy in humans. Several models of TBI have been developed to investigate the relationship between trauma, seizures, and epilepsy-related changes in neural circuit function. These studies have shown that the brain initiates immediate neuronal and glial responses following an injury, usually leading to significant cell loss in areas of the injured brain. Over time, long-term changes in the organization of neural circuits, particularly in neocortex and hippocampus, lead to an imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission and increased risk for spontaneous seizures. These include alterations to inhibitory interneurons and formation of new, excessive recurrent excitatory synaptic connectivity. Here, we review in vivo models of TBI as well as key cellular mechanisms of synaptic reorganization associated with posttraumatic epilepsy. The potential role of inflammation and increased blood brain barrier permeability in the pathophysiology of posttraumatic epilepsy is also discussed. A better understanding of mechanisms that promote the generation of epileptic activity versus those that promote compensatory brain repair and functional recovery should aid development of successful new therapies for posttraumatic epilepsy.

  13. Multiscale Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Simulations with Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Lin; Wu, Jingheng; Yang, Weitao

    2016-10-11

    Molecular dynamics simulation with multiscale quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods is a very powerful tool for understanding the mechanism of chemical and biological processes in solution or enzymes. However, its computational cost can be too high for many biochemical systems because of the large number of ab initio QM calculations. Semiempirical QM/MM simulations have much higher efficiency. Its accuracy can be improved with a correction to reach the ab initio QM/MM level. The computational cost on the ab initio calculation for the correction determines the efficiency. In this paper we developed a neural network method for QM/MM calculation as an extension of the neural-network representation reported by Behler and Parrinello. With this approach, the potential energy of any configuration along the reaction path for a given QM/MM system can be predicted at the ab initio QM/MM level based on the semiempirical QM/MM simulations. We further applied this method to three reactions in water to calculate the free energy changes. The free-energy profile obtained from the semiempirical QM/MM simulation is corrected to the ab initio QM/MM level with the potential energies predicted with the constructed neural network. The results are in excellent accordance with the reference data that are obtained from the ab initio QM/MM molecular dynamics simulation or corrected with direct ab initio QM/MM potential energies. Compared with the correction using direct ab initio QM/MM potential energies, our method shows a speed-up of 1 or 2 orders of magnitude. It demonstrates that the neural network method combined with the semiempirical QM/MM calculation can be an efficient and reliable strategy for chemical reaction simulations.

  14. Two distinct neural mechanisms underlying indirect reciprocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takamitsu; Takezawa, Masanori; Nakawake, Yo; Kunimatsu, Akira; Yamasue, Hidenori; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Miyashita, Yasushi; Masuda, Naoki

    2014-03-18

    Cooperation is a hallmark of human society. Humans often cooperate with strangers even if they will not meet each other again. This so-called indirect reciprocity enables large-scale cooperation among nonkin and can occur based on a reputation mechanism or as a succession of pay-it-forward behavior. Here, we provide the functional and anatomical neural evidence for two distinct mechanisms governing the two types of indirect reciprocity. Cooperation occurring as reputation-based reciprocity specifically recruited the precuneus, a region associated with self-centered cognition. During such cooperative behavior, the precuneus was functionally connected with the caudate, a region linking rewards to behavior. Furthermore, the precuneus of a cooperative subject had a strong resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) with the caudate and a large gray matter volume. In contrast, pay-it-forward reciprocity recruited the anterior insula (AI), a brain region associated with affective empathy. The AI was functionally connected with the caudate during cooperation occurring as pay-it-forward reciprocity, and its gray matter volume and rsFC with the caudate predicted the tendency of such cooperation. The revealed difference is consistent with the existing results of evolutionary game theory: although reputation-based indirect reciprocity robustly evolves as a self-interested behavior in theory, pay-it-forward indirect reciprocity does not on its own. The present study provides neural mechanisms underlying indirect reciprocity and suggests that pay-it-forward reciprocity may not occur as myopic profit maximization but elicit emotional rewards.

  15. The neural mechanisms of learning from competitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard-Jones, Paul A; Bogacz, Rafal; Yoo, Jee H; Leonards, Ute; Demetriou, Skevi

    2010-11-01

    Learning from competitors poses a challenge for existing theories of reward-based learning, which assume that rewarded actions are more likely to be executed in the future. Such a learning mechanism would disadvantage a player in a competitive situation because, since the competitor's loss is the player's gain, reward might become associated with an action the player should themselves avoid. Using fMRI, we investigated the neural activity of humans competing with a computer in a foraging task. We observed neural activity that represented the variables required for learning from competitors: the actions of the competitor (in the player's motor and premotor cortex) and the reward prediction error arising from the competitor's feedback. In particular, regions positively correlated with the unexpected loss of the competitor (which was beneficial to the player) included the striatum and those regions previously implicated in response inhibition. Our results suggest that learning in such contexts may involve the competitor's unexpected losses activating regions of the player's brain that subserve response inhibition, as the player learns to avoid the actions that produced them.

  16. Peer influence: neural mechanisms underlying in-group conformity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stallen, Mirre; Smidts, A.; Sanfey, A.G.

    2013-01-01

    People often conform to the behavior of others with whom they identify. However, it is unclear what fundamental mechanisms underlie this type of conformity. Here, we investigate the processes mediating in-group conformity by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Participants completed

  17. Peer influence: Neural mechanisms underlying in-group conformity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Stallen (Mirre); A. Smidts (Ale); A.G. Sanfey (Alan)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractPeople often conform to the behavior of others with whom they identify. However, it is unclear what fundamental mechanisms underlie this type of conformity. Here, we investigate the processes mediating in-group conformity by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Participant

  18. Peer influence: neural mechanisms underlying in-group conformity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stallen, Mirre; Smidts, A.; Sanfey, A.G.

    2013-01-01

    People often conform to the behavior of others with whom they identify. However, it is unclear what fundamental mechanisms underlie this type of conformity. Here, we investigate the processes mediating in-group conformity by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Participants completed

  19. Peer influence: Neural mechanisms underlying in-group conformity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Stallen (Mirre); A. Smidts (Ale); A.G. Sanfey (Alan)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractPeople often conform to the behavior of others with whom they identify. However, it is unclear what fundamental mechanisms underlie this type of conformity. Here, we investigate the processes mediating in-group conformity by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).

  20. Complementary vascular and matrix regulatory pathways underlie the beneficial mechanism of action of sorafenib in liver fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thabut, Dominique; Routray, Chittaranjan; Lomberk, Gwen; Shergill, Uday; Glaser, Kevin; Huebert, Robert; Patel, Leena; Masyuk, Tetyana; Blechacz, Boris; Vercnocke, Andrew; Ritman, Erik; Ehman, Richard; Urrutia, Raul; Shah, Vijay

    2011-01-01

    Background Paracrine signaling between hepatic stellate cells (HSC) and liver endothelial cells (LEC) modulates fibrogenesis, angiogenesis, and portal hypertension. However, mechanisms regulating these processes are not fully defined. Sorafenib is a receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor that blocks growth factor signaling in tumor cells but also displays important and not yet fully characterized effects on liver nonparenchymal cells including HSC and LEC. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that sorafenib influences paracrine signaling between HSC and LEC and thereby regulates matrix and vascular changes associated with chronic liver injury. Results Complementary magnetic resonance elastography, micro-CT, and histochemical analyses indicate that sorafenib attenuates the changes in both matrix and vascular compartments that occur in response to bile-duct ligation induced liver injury in rats. Cell biology studies demonstrate that sorafenib markedly reduces cell to cell apposition and junctional complexes, thus reducing the proximity typically observed between these sinusoidal barrier cells. At the molecular level, sorafenib down-regulates angiopoietin-1 and fibronectin, both released by HSC in a manner dependent on the transcription factor KLF6, suggesting that this pathway underlies both matrix and vascular changes associated with chronic liver disease. Conclusion Collectively, our results demonstrate that sorafenib inhibits both matrix restructuring and vascular remodeling that accompany chronic liver diseases and characterize cell and molecular mechanisms underlying this effect. These data may help to refine future therapies for advanced gastrointestinal and liver diseases characterized by abundant fibrosis and neovascularization. PMID:21567441

  1. Offspring neuroimmune consequences of maternal malnutrition: Potential mechanism for behavioral impairments that underlie metabolic and neurodevelopmental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, B L; Reyes, T M

    2017-07-20

    Maternal malnutrition significantly increases offspring risk for both metabolic and neurodevelopmental disorders. Animal models of maternal malnutrition have identified behavioral changes in the adult offspring related to executive function and reward processing. Together, these changes in executive and reward-based behaviors likely contribute to the etiology of both metabolic and neurodevelopmental disorders associated with maternal malnutrition. Concomitant with the behavioral effects, maternal malnutrition alters offspring expression of reward-related molecules and inflammatory signals in brain pathways that control executive function and reward. Neuroimmune pathways and microglial interactions in these specific brain circuits, either in early development or later in adulthood, could directly contribute to the maternal malnutrition-induced behavioral phenotypes. Understanding these mechanisms will help advance treatment strategies for metabolic and neurodevelopmental disorders, especially noninvasive dietary supplementation interventions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Preliminary evidence that different mechanisms underlie the anger superiority effect in children with and without Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko eIsomura

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have demonstrated that angry faces capture humans’ attention more rapidly than emotionally positive faces. This phenomenon is referred to as the anger superiority effect (ASE. Despite atypical emotional processing, adults and children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD have been reported to show ASE as well as typically developed (TD individuals. So far, however, few studies have clarified whether or not the mechanisms underlying ASE are the same for both TD and ASD individuals. Here, we tested how TD and ASD children process schematic emotional faces during detection by employing a recognition task in combination with a face-in-the-crowd task. Results of the face-in-the-crowd task revealed the prevalence of ASE both in TD and ASD children. However, the results of the recognition task revealed group differences: In TD children, detection of angry faces required more configural face processing and disrupted the processing of local features. In ASD children, on the other hand, it required more feature-based processing rather than configural processing. Despite the small sample sizes, these findings provide preliminary evidence that children with ASD, in contrast to TD children, show quick detection of angry faces by extracting local features in faces.

  3. Molecular Mechanisms That Underlie the Dynamic Adaptation of Innate Monocyte Memory to Varying Stimulant Strength of TLR Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ruoxi; Geng, Shuo; Li, Liwu

    2016-01-01

    In adaptation to rising stimulant strength, innate monocytes can be dynamically programed to preferentially express either pro- or anti-inflammatory mediators. Such dynamic innate adaptation or programing may bear profound relevance in host health and disease. However, molecular mechanisms that govern innate adaptation to varying strength of stimulants are not well understood. Using lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the model stimulant of toll-like-receptor 4 (TLR4), we reported that the expressions of pro-inflammatory mediators are preferentially sustained in monocytes adapted by lower doses of LPS, and suppressed/tolerized in monocytes adapted by higher doses of LPS. Mechanistically, monocytes adapted by super-low dose LPS exhibited higher levels of transcription factor, interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5), and reduced levels of transcriptional modulator B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein-1 (Blimp-1). Intriguingly, the inflammatory monocyte adaptation by super-low dose LPS is dependent upon TRAM/TRIF but not MyD88. Similar to LPS, we also observed biphasic inflammatory adaptation and tolerance in monocytes challenged with varying dosages of TLR7 agonist. In sharp contrast, rising doses of TLR3 agonist preferentially caused inflammatory adaptation without inducing tolerance. At the molecular level, the differential regulation of IRF5 and Blimp-1 coincides with unique monocyte adaptation dynamics by TLR4/7 and TLR3 agonists. Our study provides novel clue toward the understanding of monocyte adaptation and memory toward distinct TLR ligands.

  4. The Neuro-Mechanical Processes That Underlie Goal-Directed Medio-Lateral APA during Gait Initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honeine, Jean-Louis; Schieppati, Marco; Crisafulli, Oscar; Do, Manh-Cuong

    2016-01-01

    Gait initiation (GI) involves passing from bipedal to unipedal stance. It requires a rapid movement of the center of foot pressure (CoP) towards the future swing foot and of the center of mass (CoM) in the direction of the stance foot prior to the incoming step. This anticipatory postural adjustment (APA) allows disengaging the swing leg from the ground and establishing favorable conditions for stepping. This study aimed to describe the neuro-mechanical process that underlies the goal-directed medio-lateral (ML) APA. We hypothesized that controlled knee flexion of the stance leg contributes to the initial ML displacement of the CoP and to the calibration of the first step. Fourteen subjects initiated gait starting from three different initial stance widths of 15 cm (Small), 30 cm (Medium), and 45 cm (Large). Optoelectronic, force platform and electromyogram (EMG) measurements were performed. During APA, soleus activity diminished bilaterally, while tibialis anterior (TA) activity increased, more so in the stance leg than in the swing leg, and to a larger extent with increasing initial stance width. Knee flexion of the stance leg was observed during APA and correlated with the ML CoP displacement towards the swing leg. ML CoP and CoM displacements during APA increased with increasing stance width. The activity of stance-leg TA was correlated with the degree of knee flexion. Swing-leg tensor fasciae latae (TFL) was also active during APA. Across subjects, when stance-leg tibialis activity was low, TFL activity was large and vice versa. The modulation of the ML CoP position during APA allowed the gravity-driven torque to place the CoM just lateral to the stance foot during step execution. Accordingly, the gravity-driven torque, the ML CoM velocity during step execution, and the step width at foot contact (FC) were lower in the Small and greater in the Large condition. Consequently, the position of the stepping foot at FC remained close to the sagittal plane in all

  5. The Neuro-Mechanical Processes That Underlie Goal-Directed Medio-Lateral APA during Gait Initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honeine, Jean-Louis; Schieppati, Marco; Crisafulli, Oscar; Do, Manh-Cuong

    2016-01-01

    Gait initiation (GI) involves passing from bipedal to unipedal stance. It requires a rapid movement of the center of foot pressure (CoP) towards the future swing foot and of the center of mass (CoM) in the direction of the stance foot prior to the incoming step. This anticipatory postural adjustment (APA) allows disengaging the swing leg from the ground and establishing favorable conditions for stepping. This study aimed to describe the neuro-mechanical process that underlies the goal-directed medio-lateral (ML) APA. We hypothesized that controlled knee flexion of the stance leg contributes to the initial ML displacement of the CoP and to the calibration of the first step. Fourteen subjects initiated gait starting from three different initial stance widths of 15 cm (Small), 30 cm (Medium), and 45 cm (Large). Optoelectronic, force platform and electromyogram (EMG) measurements were performed. During APA, soleus activity diminished bilaterally, while tibialis anterior (TA) activity increased, more so in the stance leg than in the swing leg, and to a larger extent with increasing initial stance width. Knee flexion of the stance leg was observed during APA and correlated with the ML CoP displacement towards the swing leg. ML CoP and CoM displacements during APA increased with increasing stance width. The activity of stance-leg TA was correlated with the degree of knee flexion. Swing-leg tensor fasciae latae (TFL) was also active during APA. Across subjects, when stance-leg tibialis activity was low, TFL activity was large and vice versa. The modulation of the ML CoP position during APA allowed the gravity-driven torque to place the CoM just lateral to the stance foot during step execution. Accordingly, the gravity-driven torque, the ML CoM velocity during step execution, and the step width at foot contact (FC) were lower in the Small and greater in the Large condition. Consequently, the position of the stepping foot at FC remained close to the sagittal plane in all

  6. The neuro-mechanical processes that underlie goal-directed medio-lateral APA during gait initiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Louis HONEINE

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Gait initiation involves passing from bipedal to unipedal stance. It requires a rapid movement of the center of foot pressure (CoP towards the future swing foot and of the center of mass (CoM in the direction of the stance foot prior to the incoming step. This anticipatory postural adjustment (APA allows disengaging the swing leg from the ground and establishing favorable conditions for stepping. This study aimed to describe the neuro-mechanical process that underlies the goal-directed medio-lateral APA. We hypothesized that controlled knee flexion of the stance leg contributes to the initial medio-lateral (ML displacement of the CoP and to the calibration of the first step. Nine subjects initiated gait starting from three different initial stance widths of 15 cm (Small, 30 cm (Medium, and 45 cm (Large. Optoelectronic, force platform and EMG measurements were performed. During APA, soleus activity diminished bilaterally, while tibialis anterior activity increased, more so in the stance leg than in the swing leg, and to a larger extent with increasing initial stance width. Knee flexion of the stance leg was observed during APA and correlated with the ML CoP displacement towards the swing leg. ML CoP and CoM displacements during APA increased with increasing stance width. The activity of stance-leg tibialis anterior was correlated with the degree of knee flexion. Swing-leg tensor fasciae latae was also active during APA. Across subjects, when stance-leg tibialis activity was low, tensor fasciae latae activity was large and vice versa. The modulation of the ML CoP position during APA allowed the gravity-driven torque to place the CoM just lateral to the stance foot during step execution. Accordingly, the gravity-driven torque, the ML CoM velocity during step execution, and the step width at foot contact were lower in the Small and greater in the Large condition. Consequently, the position of the stepping foot at foot contact remained close to the

  7. Neural Control Mechanisms and Body Fluid Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Alan Kim

    1998-01-01

    The goal of the proposed research was to study the nature of afferent signals to the brain that reflect the status of body fluid balance and to investigate the central neural mechanisms that process this information for the activation of response systems which restore body fluid homeostasis. That is, in the face of loss of fluids from intracellular or extracellular fluid compartments, animals seek and ingest water and ionic solutions (particularly Na(+) solutions) to restore the intracellular and extracellular spaces. Over recent years, our laboratory has generated a substantial body of information indicating that: (1) a fall in systemic arterial pressure facilitates the ingestion of rehydrating solutions and (2) that the actions of brain amine systems (e.g., norepinephrine; serotonin) are critical for precise correction of fluid losses. Because both acute and chronic dehydration are associated with physiological stresses, such as exercise and sustained exposure to microgravity, the present research will aid in achieving a better understanding of how vital information is handled by the nervous system for maintenance of the body's fluid matrix which is critical for health and well-being.

  8. THE POTENTIAL NEURAL MECHANISMS OF ACUTE INDIRECT VIBRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darryl J. Cochrane

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available There is strong evidence to suggest that acute indirect vibration acts on muscle to enhance force, power, flexibility, balance and proprioception suggesting neural enhancement. Nevertheless, the neural mechanism(s of vibration and its potentiating effect have received little attention. One proposal suggests that spinal reflexes enhance muscle contraction through a reflex activity known as tonic vibration stretch reflex (TVR, which increases muscle activation. However, TVR is based on direct, brief, and high frequency vibration (>100 Hz which differs to indirect vibration, which is applied to the whole body or body parts at lower vibration frequency (5-45 Hz. Likewise, muscle tuning and neuromuscular aspects are other candidate mechanisms used to explain the vibration phenomenon. But there is much debate in terms of identifying which neural mechanism(s are responsible for acute vibration; due to a number of studies using various vibration testing protocols. These protocols include: different methods of application, vibration variables, training duration, exercise types and a range of population groups. Therefore, the neural mechanism of acute vibration remain equivocal, but spinal reflexes, muscle tuning and neuromuscular aspects are all viable factors that may contribute in different ways to increasing muscular performance. Additional research is encouraged to determine which neural mechanism(s and their contributions are responsible for acute vibration. Testing variables and vibration applications need to be standardised before reaching a consensus on which neural mechanism(s occur during and post-vibration

  9. Dysregulation of Wnt-Signaling and a Candidate Set of miRNAs Underlie the Effect of Metformin on Neural Crest Cell Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Poulomi; Dutta, Sunit; Pal, Rajarshi

    2016-02-01

    Neural crest cells (NCC) are a population of epithelial cells that arise from the dorsal tube and undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) eventually generating tissues from peripheral nervous system, melanocytes, craniofacial cartilage, and bone. The antidiabetic drug metformin reportedly inhibits EMT in physiological conditions like cancer and fibrosis. We hypothesize that perturbation of EMT may also contribute to developmental disabilities associated with neural crest (NC) development. To understand the molecular network underlying metformin action during NC formation, we first differentiated murine embryonic stem (ES) cells into NCC and characterized them by demonstrating spatiotemporal regulation of key markers. Metformin treatment prompted a delay in delamination of NCC by inhibiting key markers like Sox-1, Sox-9, HNK-1, and p-75. We then revealed that metformin impedes Wnt axis, a major signaling pathway active during NC formation via DVL-3 inhibition and impairment in nuclear translocation of β-catenin. Concomitantly we identified and tested a candidate set of miRNAs that play a crucial role in NC cell fate determination. Further studies involving loss and gain of function confirmed that NCC specifiers like Sox-1 and Sox-9 are direct targets of miR-200 and miR-145, respectively and that they are essentially modulated by metformin. Our in vitro findings were strongly supported by in vivo studies in zebrafish. Given that metformin is a widely used drug, for the first time we demonstrate that it can induce a delayed onset of developmental EMT during NC formation by interfering with canonical Wnt signaling and mysregulation of miR-145 and miR-200.

  10. Apraxia: neural mechanisms and functional recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foundas, Anne L

    2013-01-01

    Apraxia is a cognitive-motor disorder that impacts the performance of learned, skilled movements. Limb apraxia, which is the topic of this chapter, is specific to disordered movements of the upper limb that cannot be explained by weakness, sensory loss, abnormalities of posture/tone/movement, or a lack of understanding/cooperation. Patients with limb apraxia have deficits in the control or programming of the spatial-temporal organization and sequencing of goal-directed movements. People with limb apraxia can have difficulty manipulating and using tools including cutting with scissors or making a cup of coffee. Two praxis systems have been identified including a production system (action plan and production) and a conceptual system (action knowledge). Dysfunction of the former produces ideomotor apraxia (e.g., difficulty using scissors), and dysfunction of the latter induces ideational apraxia (e.g., difficulty making a cup of coffee). Neural mechanisms, including how to evaluate apraxia, will be presented in the context of these two praxis systems. Information about these praxis systems, including the nature of the disordered limb movement, is important for rehabilitation clinicians to understand for several reasons. First, limb apraxia is a common disorder. It is common in patients who have had a stroke, in neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer disease, in traumatic brain injury, and in developmental disorders. Second, limb apraxia has real world consequences. Patients with limb apraxia have difficulty managing activities of daily living. This factor impacts healthcare costs and contributes to increased caregiver burden. Unfortunately, very few treatments have been systematically studied in large numbers of patients with limb apraxia. This overview of limb apraxia should help rehabilitation clinicians to educate patients and caregivers about this debilitating problem, and should facilitate the development of better treatments that could benefit many people in

  11. Cellular mechanisms of posterior neural tube morphogenesis in the zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Michael J; Chalasani, Kavita; Brewster, Rachel

    2010-03-01

    The zebrafish is a well established model system for studying neural development, yet neurulation remains poorly understood in this organism. In particular, the morphogenetic movements that shape the posterior neural tube (PNT) have not been described. Using tools for imaging neural tissue and tracking the behavior of cells in real time, we provide the first comprehensive analysis of the cellular events shaping the PNT. We observe that this tissue is formed in a stepwise manner, beginning with merging of presumptive neural domains in the tailbud (Stage 1); followed by neural convergence and infolding to shape the neural rod (Stage 2); and continued elongation of the PNT, in absence of further convergence (Stage 3). We further demonstrate that cell proliferation plays only a minimal role in PNT elongation. Overall, these mechanisms resemble those previously described in anterior regions, suggesting that, in contrast to amniotes, neurulation is a fairly uniform process in zebrafish.

  12. NbIT--a new information theory-based analysis of allosteric mechanisms reveals residues that underlie function in the leucine transporter LeuT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael V LeVine

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Complex networks of interacting residues and microdomains in the structures of biomolecular systems underlie the reliable propagation of information from an input signal, such as the concentration of a ligand, to sites that generate the appropriate output signal, such as enzymatic activity. This information transduction often carries the signal across relatively large distances at the molecular scale in a form of allostery that is essential for the physiological functions performed by biomolecules. While allosteric behaviors have been documented from experiments and computation, the mechanism of this form of allostery proved difficult to identify at the molecular level. Here, we introduce a novel analysis framework, called N-body Information Theory (NbIT analysis, which is based on information theory and uses measures of configurational entropy in a biomolecular system to identify microdomains and individual residues that act as (i-channels for long-distance information sharing between functional sites, and (ii-coordinators that organize dynamics within functional sites. Application of the new method to molecular dynamics (MD trajectories of the occluded state of the bacterial leucine transporter LeuT identifies a channel of allosteric coupling between the functionally important intracellular gate and the substrate binding sites known to modulate it. NbIT analysis is shown also to differentiate residues involved primarily in stabilizing the functional sites, from those that contribute to allosteric couplings between sites. NbIT analysis of MD data thus reveals rigorous mechanistic elements of allostery underlying the dynamics of biomolecular systems.

  13. NbIT--a new information theory-based analysis of allosteric mechanisms reveals residues that underlie function in the leucine transporter LeuT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeVine, Michael V; Weinstein, Harel

    2014-05-01

    Complex networks of interacting residues and microdomains in the structures of biomolecular systems underlie the reliable propagation of information from an input signal, such as the concentration of a ligand, to sites that generate the appropriate output signal, such as enzymatic activity. This information transduction often carries the signal across relatively large distances at the molecular scale in a form of allostery that is essential for the physiological functions performed by biomolecules. While allosteric behaviors have been documented from experiments and computation, the mechanism of this form of allostery proved difficult to identify at the molecular level. Here, we introduce a novel analysis framework, called N-body Information Theory (NbIT) analysis, which is based on information theory and uses measures of configurational entropy in a biomolecular system to identify microdomains and individual residues that act as (i)-channels for long-distance information sharing between functional sites, and (ii)-coordinators that organize dynamics within functional sites. Application of the new method to molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories of the occluded state of the bacterial leucine transporter LeuT identifies a channel of allosteric coupling between the functionally important intracellular gate and the substrate binding sites known to modulate it. NbIT analysis is shown also to differentiate residues involved primarily in stabilizing the functional sites, from those that contribute to allosteric couplings between sites. NbIT analysis of MD data thus reveals rigorous mechanistic elements of allostery underlying the dynamics of biomolecular systems.

  14. NbIT - A New Information Theory-Based Analysis of Allosteric Mechanisms Reveals Residues that Underlie Function in the Leucine Transporter LeuT

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeVine, Michael V.; Weinstein, Harel

    2014-01-01

    Complex networks of interacting residues and microdomains in the structures of biomolecular systems underlie the reliable propagation of information from an input signal, such as the concentration of a ligand, to sites that generate the appropriate output signal, such as enzymatic activity. This information transduction often carries the signal across relatively large distances at the molecular scale in a form of allostery that is essential for the physiological functions performed by biomolecules. While allosteric behaviors have been documented from experiments and computation, the mechanism of this form of allostery proved difficult to identify at the molecular level. Here, we introduce a novel analysis framework, called N-body Information Theory (NbIT) analysis, which is based on information theory and uses measures of configurational entropy in a biomolecular system to identify microdomains and individual residues that act as (i)-channels for long-distance information sharing between functional sites, and (ii)-coordinators that organize dynamics within functional sites. Application of the new method to molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories of the occluded state of the bacterial leucine transporter LeuT identifies a channel of allosteric coupling between the functionally important intracellular gate and the substrate binding sites known to modulate it. NbIT analysis is shown also to differentiate residues involved primarily in stabilizing the functional sites, from those that contribute to allosteric couplings between sites. NbIT analysis of MD data thus reveals rigorous mechanistic elements of allostery underlying the dynamics of biomolecular systems. PMID:24785005

  15. Music listening after stroke: beneficial effects and potential neural mechanisms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Särkämö, Teppo; Soto, David

    2012-01-01

    .... Then we will present findings about the short‐ and long‐term effects of music listening on the recovery of cognitive function in stroke patients and the underlying neural mechanisms of these music effects...

  16. New mechanism for neural stem cell maintenance in early embryos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Teamning up with co-workers from Japan, UK and US,CAS biochemists have revealed a novel mechanism for maintaining neural stem cells in early embryos. Their work was published on the 6 August issue of Cell Development.

  17. The Potential Neural Mechanisms of Acute Indirect Vibration

    OpenAIRE

    Cochrane, Darryl J.

    2011-01-01

    There is strong evidence to suggest that acute indirect vibration acts on muscle to enhance force, power, flexibility, balance and proprioception suggesting neural enhancement. Nevertheless, the neural mechanism(s) of vibration and its potentiating effect have received little attention. One proposal suggests that spinal reflexes enhance muscle contraction through a reflex activity known as tonic vibration stretch reflex (TVR), which increases muscle activation. However, TVR is based on direct...

  18. On the neural mechanisms subserving consciousness and attention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine eTallon-Baudry

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Consciousness, as described in the experimental literature, is a multi-faceted phenomenon, that impinges on other well-studied concepts such as attention and control. Do consciousness and attention refer to different aspects of the same core phenomenon, or do they correspond to distinct functions? One possibility to address this question is to examine the neural mechanisms underlying consciousness and attention. If consciousness and attention pertain to the same concept, they should rely on shared neural mechanisms. Conversely, if their underlying mechanisms are distinct, then consciousness and attention should be considered as distinct entities. This paper therefore reviews neurophysiological facts arguing in favor or against a tight relationship between consciousness and attention. Three neural mechanisms that have been associated with both attention and consciousness are examined (neural amplification, involvement of the fronto-parietal network, and oscillatory synchrony, to conclude that the commonalities between attention and consciousness at the neural level may have been overestimated. Last but not least, experiments in which both attention and consciousness were probed at the neural level point toward a dissociation between the two concepts. It therefore appears from this review that consciousness and attention rely on distinct neural properties, although they can interact at the behavioral level. It is proposed that a "cumulative influence model", in which attention and consciousness correspond to distinct neural mechanisms feeding a single decisional process leading to behavior, fits best with available neural and behavioral data. In this view, consciousness should not be considered as a top-level executive function but should rather be defined by its experiential properties.

  19. Microhomology-mediated mechanisms underlie non-recurrent disease-causing microdeletions of the FOXL2 gene or its regulatory domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Verdin

    Full Text Available Genomic disorders are often caused by recurrent copy number variations (CNVs, with nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR as the underlying mechanism. Recently, several microhomology-mediated repair mechanisms--such as microhomology-mediated end-joining (MMEJ, fork stalling and template switching (FoSTeS, microhomology-mediated break-induced replication (MMBIR, serial replication slippage (SRS, and break-induced SRS (BISRS--were described in the etiology of non-recurrent CNVs in human disease. In addition, their formation may be stimulated by genomic architectural features. It is, however, largely unexplored to what extent these mechanisms contribute to rare, locus-specific pathogenic CNVs. Here, fine-mapping of 42 microdeletions of the FOXL2 locus, encompassing FOXL2 (32 or its regulatory domain (10, serves as a model for rare, locus-specific CNVs implicated in genetic disease. These deletions lead to blepharophimosis syndrome (BPES, a developmental condition affecting the eyelids and the ovary. For breakpoint mapping we used targeted array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH, quantitative PCR (qPCR, long-range PCR, and Sanger sequencing of the junction products. Microhomology, ranging from 1 bp to 66 bp, was found in 91.7% of 24 characterized breakpoint junctions, being significantly enriched in comparison with a random control sample. Our results show that microhomology-mediated repair mechanisms underlie at least 50% of these microdeletions. Moreover, genomic architectural features, like sequence motifs, non-B DNA conformations, and repetitive elements, were found in all breakpoint regions. In conclusion, the majority of these microdeletions result from microhomology-mediated mechanisms like MMEJ, FoSTeS, MMBIR, SRS, or BISRS. Moreover, we hypothesize that the genomic architecture might drive their formation by increasing the susceptibility for DNA breakage or promote replication fork stalling. Finally, our locus-centered study

  20. Neural tube closure: cellular, molecular and biomechanical mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolopoulou, Evanthia; Galea, Gabriel L; Rolo, Ana; Greene, Nicholas D E; Copp, Andrew J

    2017-02-15

    Neural tube closure has been studied for many decades, across a range of vertebrates, as a paradigm of embryonic morphogenesis. Neurulation is of particular interest in view of the severe congenital malformations - 'neural tube defects' - that result when closure fails. The process of neural tube closure is complex and involves cellular events such as convergent extension, apical constriction and interkinetic nuclear migration, as well as precise molecular control via the non-canonical Wnt/planar cell polarity pathway, Shh/BMP signalling, and the transcription factors Grhl2/3, Pax3, Cdx2 and Zic2. More recently, biomechanical inputs into neural tube morphogenesis have also been identified. Here, we review these cellular, molecular and biomechanical mechanisms involved in neural tube closure, based on studies of various vertebrate species, focusing on the most recent advances in the field.

  1. Neural responses to macronutrients: hedonic and homeostatic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulloch, Alastair J; Murray, Susan; Vaicekonyte, Regina; Avena, Nicole M

    2015-05-01

    The brain responds to macronutrients via intricate mechanisms. We review how the brain's neural systems implicated in homeostatic control of feeding and hedonic responses are influenced by the ingestion of specific types of food. We discuss how these neural systems are dysregulated in preclinical models of obesity. Findings from these studies can increase our understanding of overeating and, perhaps in some cases, the development of obesity. In addition, a greater understanding of the neural circuits affected by the consumption of specific macronutrients, and by obesity, might lead to new treatments and strategies for preventing unhealthy weight gain. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Pain pathoetiology after TBI: neural and nonneural mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, William C

    2004-01-01

    Individuals recovering from traumatic brain injury (TBI) frequently experience acute and chronic pain. Their pain experience is the net effect of many interacting and very complex physiologic, biochemical, and psychological mechanisms involving both the peripheral and central nervous system. This article reviews the basics of neural mechanisms and pathways of pain after TBI, and discusses clinical implications. Numerous intracranial and extracranial tissues must be considered in the evaluation of pain after TBI, with the specific mechanism of trauma influencing the anatomic distribution of injuries. The differential diagnosis usually falls into one of the following pathoetiologic classifications: primary or secondary musculoskeletal, vascular, visceral, and neural pain syndromes.

  3. Bird brains and songs : Neural mechanisms of auditory memory and perception in zebra finches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gobes, S.M.H.

    2009-01-01

    Songbirds, such as zebra finches, learn their songs from a ‘tutor’ (usually the father), early in life. There are strong parallels between the behavioural, cognitive and neural processes that underlie vocal learning in humans and songbirds. In both cases there is a sensitive period for auditory lear

  4. Neural mechanisms underlying morphine withdrawal in addicted patients: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nima Babhadiashar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Morphine is one of the most potent alkaloid in opium, which has substantial medical uses and needs and it is the first active principle purified from herbal source. Morphine has commonly been used for relief of moderate to severe pain as it acts directly on the central nervous system; nonetheless, its chronic abuse increases tolerance and physical dependence, which is commonly known as opiate addiction. Morphine withdrawal syndrome is physiological and behavioral symptoms that stem from prolonged exposure to morphine. A majority of brain regions are hypofunctional over prolonged abstinence and acute morphine withdrawal. Furthermore, several neural mechanisms are likely to contribute to morphine withdrawal. The present review summarizes the literature pertaining to neural mechanisms underlying morphine withdrawal. Despite the fact that morphine withdrawal is a complex process, it is suggested that neural mechanisms play key roles in morphine withdrawal.

  5. Realistic thermodynamic and statistical-mechanical measures for neural synchronization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Yoon; Lim, Woochang

    2014-04-15

    Synchronized brain rhythms, associated with diverse cognitive functions, have been observed in electrical recordings of brain activity. Neural synchronization may be well described by using the population-averaged global potential VG in computational neuroscience. The time-averaged fluctuation of VG plays the role of a "thermodynamic" order parameter O used for describing the synchrony-asynchrony transition in neural systems. Population spike synchronization may be well visualized in the raster plot of neural spikes. The degree of neural synchronization seen in the raster plot is well measured in terms of a "statistical-mechanical" spike-based measure Ms introduced by considering the occupation and the pacing patterns of spikes. The global potential VG is also used to give a reference global cycle for the calculation of Ms. Hence, VG becomes an important collective quantity because it is associated with calculation of both O and Ms. However, it is practically difficult to directly get VG in real experiments. To overcome this difficulty, instead of VG, we employ the instantaneous population spike rate (IPSR) which can be obtained in experiments, and develop realistic thermodynamic and statistical-mechanical measures, based on IPSR, to make practical characterization of the neural synchronization in both computational and experimental neuroscience. Particularly, more accurate characterization of weak sparse spike synchronization can be achieved in terms of realistic statistical-mechanical IPSR-based measure, in comparison with the conventional measure based on VG. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Peer influence: neural mechanisms underlying in-group conformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallen, Mirre; Smidts, Ale; Sanfey, Alan G

    2013-01-01

    People often conform to the behavior of others with whom they identify. However, it is unclear what fundamental mechanisms underlie this type of conformity. Here, we investigate the processes mediating in-group conformity by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Participants completed a perceptual decision-making task while undergoing fMRI, during which they were exposed to the judgments of both in-group and out-group members. Our data suggest that conformity to the in-group is mediated by both positive affect as well as the cognitive capacity of perspective taking. Examining the processes that drive in-group conformity by utilizing a basic decision-making paradigm combined with neuroimaging methods provides important insights into the potential mechanisms of conformity. These results may provide an integral step in developing more effective campaigns using group conformity as a tool for behavioral change.

  7. Peer influence: Neural mechanisms underlying in-group conformity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirre eStallen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available People often conform to the behavior of others with whom they identify. However, it is unclear what fundamental mechanisms underlie this type of conformity. Here, we investigate the processes mediating in-group conformity by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Participants completed a perceptual decision-making task while undergoing fMRI, during which they were exposed to the judgments of both in-group and out-group members. Our data suggest that conformity to the in-group is mediated by both positive affect as well as the cognitive capacity of perspective taking. Examining the processes that drive in-group conformity by utilizing a basic decision-making paradigm combined with neuroimaging methods provides important insights into the potential mechanisms of conformity. These results may provide an integral step in developing more effective campaigns using group conformity as a tool for behavioral change.

  8. Neural Circuitry and Plasticity Mechanisms Underlying Delay Eyeblink Conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, John H.; Steinmetz, Adam B.

    2011-01-01

    Pavlovian eyeblink conditioning has been used extensively as a model system for examining the neural mechanisms underlying associative learning. Delay eyeblink conditioning depends on the intermediate cerebellum ipsilateral to the conditioned eye. Evidence favors a two-site plasticity model within the cerebellum with long-term depression of…

  9. Neural and cognitive mechanisms of creativity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akbari Chermahini, Soghra

    2011-01-01

    The studies of this thesis provide empirical evidence that creativity is not a homogeneous concept; rather it reflects the interplay of separate, dissociable processes such as convergent and divergent thinking (e.g., Guilford, 1967). The cognitive mechanism of these two processes is different, but n

  10. Neural and cognitive mechanisms of creativity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akbari Chermahini, Soghra

    2011-01-01

    The studies of this thesis provide empirical evidence that creativity is not a homogeneous concept; rather it reflects the interplay of separate, dissociable processes such as convergent and divergent thinking (e.g., Guilford, 1967). The cognitive mechanism of these two processes is different, but n

  11. Neural and computational mechanisms of postponed decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-García, Marina; Rolls, Edmund T.; Deco, Gustavo; Romo, Ranulfo

    2011-01-01

    We consider the mechanisms that enable decisions to be postponed for a period after the evidence has been provided. Using an information theoretic approach, we show that information about the forthcoming action becomes available from the activity of neurons in the medial premotor cortex in a sequential decision-making task after the second stimulus is applied, providing the information for a decision about whether the first or second stimulus is higher in vibrotactile frequency. The information then decays in a 3-s delay period in which the neuronal activity declines before the behavioral response can be made. The information then increases again when the behavioral response is required. We model this neuronal activity using an attractor decision-making network in which information reflecting the decision is maintained at a low level during the delay period, and is then selectively restored by a nonspecific input when the response is required. One mechanism for the short-term memory is synaptic facilitation, which can implement a mechanism for postponed decisions that can be correct even when there is little neuronal firing during the delay period before the postponed decision. Another mechanism is graded firing rates by different neurons in the delay period, with restoration by the nonspecific input of the low-rate activity from the higher-rate neurons still firing in the delay period. These mechanisms can account for the decision making and for the memory of the decision before a response can be made, which are evident in the activity of neurons in the medial premotor cortex. PMID:21709222

  12. Tau蛋白过度磷酸化机制及其在阿尔茨海默病神经元变性中的作用%Molecular Mechanisms Underlie Alzheimer-like Tau Hyperphosphorylation and Neurodegeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王建枝; 田青

    2012-01-01

    Tau蛋白是神经元中含量最高的微管相关蛋白,其经典生物学功能是促进微管组装和维持微管的稳定性.在阿尔茨海默病(Alzheimer's disease,AD)患者,异常过度磷酸化的Tau蛋白以配对螺旋丝结构形成神经原纤维缠结并在神经元内聚积.大量研究提示,Tau蛋白异常在AD患者神经变性和学习记忆障碍的发生发展中起重要作用.本课题组对Tau蛋白异常磷酸化的机制及其对细胞的影响进行了系列研究,发现Tau蛋白表达和磷酸化具有调节细胞生存命运的新功能,并由此对AD神经细胞变性的本质提出了新见解.本文主要综述作者实验室有关Tau蛋白的部分研究结果.%Tau is the most abundant microtubule associated protein. The normal function of Tau is to promote microtubule assembly and stabilize microtubules. In Alzheimer's disease, Tau is abnormally hyperphosphorylated and the hyperphosphorylated Tau accumulates, in the form of paired helical filaments (PHF), in the neuron to form neurofibrillary tangles. Numerous studies indicate that the abnormal Tau modifications play a crucial role in AD neurodegeneration and the cognitive deficits. We have studied systemically the mechanisms underlie Tau hyperphosphorylation and the effects of Tau phosphorylation on cell viability. We found unexpectedly that expression of the hyperphosphorylated Tau, at certain point, renders the cells more resistant to the exogenously induced cell apoptosis, whereas dephosphorylation of Tau promotes cell apoptosis. We also found that persistent Tau hyperphosphorylation and the cellular accumulation damage the neural functions and thus decrease the viability. Based on these findings, we propose that Tau hyperphosphorylation may play a dual role in leading the neurons to abort from an acute apoptosis and at the same time triggering a chronic neurodegeneration, which may explain why the degenerated neurons observed in the postmortem Alzheimer's brain are enriched

  13. Language and Cognition Interaction Neural Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    emotional mechanisms and their fundamental role in cognition and world understand- ing, including role of aesthetic emotions, beautiful , sublime, and...sounds; also suffixes control verbs and moods. Therefore, sounds are closely fused with meanings. This strong connection between sounds and meanings...contributes to beauty and affectivity of Classical Arabic texts including Quran. On the other hand, creation of new meanings in Classical Arabic is

  14. Mathematically Reduced Chemical Reaction Mechanism Using Neural Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziaul Huque

    2007-08-31

    This is the final technical report for the project titled 'Mathematically Reduced Chemical Reaction Mechanism Using Neural Networks'. The aim of the project was to develop an efficient chemistry model for combustion simulations. The reduced chemistry model was developed mathematically without the need of having extensive knowledge of the chemistry involved. To aid in the development of the model, Neural Networks (NN) was used via a new network topology known as Non-linear Principal Components Analysis (NPCA). A commonly used Multilayer Perceptron Neural Network (MLP-NN) was modified to implement NPCA-NN. The training rate of NPCA-NN was improved with the GEneralized Regression Neural Network (GRNN) based on kernel smoothing techniques. Kernel smoothing provides a simple way of finding structure in data set without the imposition of a parametric model. The trajectory data of the reaction mechanism was generated based on the optimization techniques of genetic algorithm (GA). The NPCA-NN algorithm was then used for the reduction of Dimethyl Ether (DME) mechanism. DME is a recently discovered fuel made from natural gas, (and other feedstock such as coal, biomass, and urban wastes) which can be used in compression ignition engines as a substitute for diesel. An in-house two-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code was developed based on Meshfree technique and time marching solution algorithm. The project also provided valuable research experience to two graduate students.

  15. Neural mechanisms of selective attention in the somatosensory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Ramirez, Manuel; Hysaj, Kristjana; Niebur, Ernst

    2016-09-01

    Selective attention allows organisms to extract behaviorally relevant information while ignoring distracting stimuli that compete for the limited resources of their central nervous systems. Attention is highly flexible, and it can be harnessed to select information based on sensory modality, within-modality feature(s), spatial location, object identity, and/or temporal properties. In this review, we discuss the body of work devoted to understanding mechanisms of selective attention in the somatosensory system. In particular, we describe the effects of attention on tactile behavior and corresponding neural activity in somatosensory cortex. Our focus is on neural mechanisms that select tactile stimuli based on their location on the body (somatotopic-based attention) or their sensory feature (feature-based attention). We highlight parallels between selection mechanisms in touch and other sensory systems and discuss several putative neural coding schemes employed by cortical populations to signal the behavioral relevance of sensory inputs. Specifically, we contrast the advantages and disadvantages of using a gain vs. spike-spike correlation code for representing attended sensory stimuli. We favor a neural network model of tactile attention that is composed of frontal, parietal, and subcortical areas that controls somatosensory cells encoding the relevant stimulus features to enable preferential processing throughout the somatosensory hierarchy. Our review is based on data from noninvasive electrophysiological and imaging data in humans as well as single-unit recordings in nonhuman primates.

  16. Potential Mechanisms and Functions of Intermittent Neural Synchronization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungwoo Ahn

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Neural synchronization is believed to play an important role in different brain functions. Synchrony in cortical and subcortical circuits is frequently variable in time and not perfect. Few long intervals of desynchronized dynamics may be functionally different from many short desynchronized intervals although the average synchrony may be the same. Recent analysis of imperfect synchrony in different neural systems reported one common feature: neural oscillations may go out of synchrony frequently, but primarily for a short time interval. This study explores potential mechanisms and functional advantages of this short desynchronizations dynamics using computational neuroscience techniques. We show that short desynchronizations are exhibited in coupled neurons if their delayed rectifier potassium current has relatively large values of the voltage-dependent activation time-constant. The delayed activation of potassium current is associated with generation of quickly-rising action potential. This “spikiness” is a very general property of neurons. This may explain why very different neural systems exhibit short desynchronization dynamics. We also show how the distribution of desynchronization durations may be independent of the synchronization strength. Finally, we show that short desynchronization dynamics requires weaker synaptic input to reach a pre-set synchrony level. Thus, this dynamics allows for efficient regulation of synchrony and may promote efficient formation of synchronous neural assemblies.

  17. Shared neural mechanisms underlying social warmth and physical warmth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Tristen K; Eisenberger, Naomi I

    2013-11-01

    Many of people's closest bonds grow out of socially warm exchanges and the warm feelings associated with being socially connected. Indeed, the neurobiological mechanisms underlying thermoregulation may be shared by those that regulate social warmth, the experience of feeling connected to other people. To test this possibility, we placed participants in a functional MRI scanner and asked them to (a) read socially warm and neutral messages from friends and family and (b) hold warm and neutral-temperature objects (a warm pack and a ball, respectively). Findings showed an overlap between physical and social warmth: Participants felt warmer after reading the positive (compared with neutral) messages and more connected after holding the warm pack (compared with the ball). In addition, neural activity during social warmth overlapped with neural activity during physical warmth in the ventral striatum and middle insula, but neural activity did not overlap during another pleasant task (soft touch). Together, these results suggest that a common neural mechanism underlies physical and social warmth.

  18. Multiple neural mechanisms for coloring words in synesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Takemasa; Noguchi, Yasuki; Koga, Hiroki; Tachibana, Ryosuke; Saiki, Jun; Kakigi, Ryusuke; Kita, Shinichi

    2014-07-01

    Grapheme-color synesthesia is a phenomenon in which achromatic letters/digits automatically induce particular colors. When multiple letters are integrated into a word, some synesthetes perceive that all those letters are changed into the same color, reporting lexical color to that word. Previous psychological studies found several "rules" that determine those lexical colors. The colors to most words are determined by the first letters of the words, while some words in ordinal sequences have their specific colors. Recent studies further reported the third case where lexical colors might be influenced by semantic information of words. Although neural mechanisms determining those lexical colors remained unknown, here we identified three separate neural systems in the synesthete's brain underlying three rules for illusory coloring of words. In addition to the occipito-temporal and parietal regions previously found to be associated with the grapheme-color synesthesia, neural systems for lexical coloring extended to linguistic areas in the left inferior frontal and anterior temporal regions that were engaged in semantic analyses of words. Those results indicate an involvement of wider and higher neural networks than previously assumed in a production of synesthetic colors to visual stimuli and further showed a multiplicity of synesthetic mechanisms represented in the single brain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Language and cognition interaction neural mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlovsky, Leonid

    2011-01-01

    How language and cognition interact in thinking? Is language just used for communication of completed thoughts, or is it fundamental for thinking? Existing approaches have not led to a computational theory. We develop a hypothesis that language and cognition are two separate but closely interacting mechanisms. Language accumulates cultural wisdom; cognition develops mental representations modeling surrounding world and adapts cultural knowledge to concrete circumstances of life. Language is acquired from surrounding language "ready-made" and therefore can be acquired early in life. This early acquisition of language in childhood encompasses the entire hierarchy from sounds to words, to phrases, and to highest concepts existing in culture. Cognition is developed from experience. Yet cognition cannot be acquired from experience alone; language is a necessary intermediary, a "teacher." A mathematical model is developed; it overcomes previous difficulties and leads to a computational theory. This model is consistent with Arbib's "language prewired brain" built on top of mirror neuron system. It models recent neuroimaging data about cognition, remaining unnoticed by other theories. A number of properties of language and cognition are explained, which previously seemed mysterious, including influence of language grammar on cultural evolution, which may explain specifics of English and Arabic cultures.

  20. Language and Cognition Interaction Neural Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonid Perlovsky

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available How language and cognition interact in thinking? Is language just used for communication of completed thoughts, or is it fundamental for thinking? Existing approaches have not led to a computational theory. We develop a hypothesis that language and cognition are two separate but closely interacting mechanisms. Language accumulates cultural wisdom; cognition develops mental representations modeling surrounding world and adapts cultural knowledge to concrete circumstances of life. Language is acquired from surrounding language “ready-made” and therefore can be acquired early in life. This early acquisition of language in childhood encompasses the entire hierarchy from sounds to words, to phrases, and to highest concepts existing in culture. Cognition is developed from experience. Yet cognition cannot be acquired from experience alone; language is a necessary intermediary, a “teacher.” A mathematical model is developed; it overcomes previous difficulties and leads to a computational theory. This model is consistent with Arbib's “language prewired brain” built on top of mirror neuron system. It models recent neuroimaging data about cognition, remaining unnoticed by other theories. A number of properties of language and cognition are explained, which previously seemed mysterious, including influence of language grammar on cultural evolution, which may explain specifics of English and Arabic cultures.

  1. Mechanical Properties Prediction of the Mechanical Clinching Joints Based on Genetic Algorithm and BP Neural Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LONG Jiangqi; LAN Fengchong; CHEN Jiqing; YU Ping

    2009-01-01

    For optimal design of mechanical clinching steel-aluminum joints, the back propagation (BP) neural network is used to research the mapping relationship between joining technique parameters including sheet thickness, sheet hardness, joint bottom diameter etc., and mechanical properties of shearing and peeling in order to investigate joining technology between various material plates in the steel-aluminum hybrid structure car body. Genetic algorithm (GA) is adopted to optimize the back-propagation neural network connection weights. The training and validating samples are made by the BTM(R) Tog-L-Loc system with different technologic parameters. The training samples' parameters and the corresponding joints' mechanical properties are supplied to the artificial neural network (ANN) for training. The validating samples' experimental data is used for checking up the prediction outputs. The calculation results show that GA can improve the model's prediction precision and generalization ability of BP neural network. The comparative analysis between the experimental data and the prediction outputs shows that ANN prediction models after training can effectively predict the mechanical properties of mechanical clinching joints and prove the feasibility and reliability of the intelligent neural networks system when used in the mechanical properties prediction of mechanical clinching joints. The prediction results can be used for a reference in the design of mechanical clinching steel-aluminum joints.

  2. Prefrontal cortex and neural mechanisms of executive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funahashi, Shintaro; Andreau, Jorge Mario

    2013-12-01

    Executive function is a product of the coordinated operation of multiple neural systems and an essential prerequisite for a variety of cognitive functions. The prefrontal cortex is known to be a key structure for the performance of executive functions. To accomplish the coordinated operations of multiple neural systems, the prefrontal cortex must monitor the activities in other cortical and subcortical structures and control and supervise their operations by sending command signals, which is called top-down signaling. Although neurophysiological and neuroimaging studies have provided evidence that the prefrontal cortex sends top-down signals to the posterior cortices to control information processing, the neural correlate of these top-down signals is not yet known. Through use of the paired association task, it has been demonstrated that top-down signals are used to retrieve specific information stored in long-term memory. Therefore, we used a paired association task to examine the neural correlates of top-down signals in the prefrontal cortex. The preliminary results indicate that 32% of visual neurons exhibit pair-selectivity, which is similar to the characteristics of pair-coding activities in temporal neurons. The latency of visual responses in prefrontal neurons was longer than bottom-up signals but faster than top-down signals in inferior temporal neurons. These results suggest that pair-selective visual responses may be top-down signals that the prefrontal cortex provides to the temporal cortex, although further studies are needed to elucidate the neural correlates of top-down signals and their characteristics to understand the neural mechanism of executive control by the prefrontal cortex.

  3. Age of acquisition: its neural and computational mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Arturo E; Li, Ping

    2007-07-01

    The acquisition of new skills over a life span is a remarkable human ability. This ability, however, is constrained by age of acquisition (AoA); that is, the age at which learning occurs significantly affects the outcome. This is most clearly reflected in domains such as language, music, and athletics. This article provides a perspective on the neural and computational mechanisms underlying AoA in language acquisition. The authors show how AoA modulates both monolingual lexical processing and bilingual language acquisition. They consider the conditions under which syntactic processing and semantic processing may be differentially sensitive to AoA effects in second-language acquisition. The authors conclude that AoA effects are pervasive and that the neural and computational mechanisms underlying learning and sensorimotor integration provide a general account of these effects.

  4. Music listening after stroke: beneficial effects and potential neural mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Särkämö, Teppo; Soto, David

    2012-04-01

    Music is an enjoyable leisure activity that also engages many emotional, cognitive, and motor processes in the brain. Here, we will first review previous literature on the emotional and cognitive effects of music listening in healthy persons and various clinical groups. Then we will present findings about the short- and long-term effects of music listening on the recovery of cognitive function in stroke patients and the underlying neural mechanisms of these music effects. First, our results indicate that listening to pleasant music can have a short-term facilitating effect on visual awareness in patients with visual neglect, which is associated with functional coupling between emotional and attentional brain regions. Second, daily music listening can improve auditory and verbal memory, focused attention, and mood as well as induce structural gray matter changes in the early poststroke stage. The psychological and neural mechanisms potentially underlying the rehabilitating effect of music after stroke are discussed. © 2012 New York Academy of Sciences.

  5. A perspective on neural and cognitive mechanisms of error commission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven eHoffmann

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Behavioral adaptation and cognitive control are crucial for goal-reaching behaviors. Every creature is ubiquitously faced with choices between behavioral alternatives. Common sense suggests that errors are an important source of information in the regulation of such processes. Several theories exist regarding cognitive control and the processing of undesired outcomes. However, most of these models focus on the consequences of an error, and less attention has been paid to the mechanisms that underlie the commissioning of an error. In this article, we present an integrative review of neuro-cognitive models that detail the determinants of the occurrence of response errors. The factors that may determine the likelihood of committing errors are likely related to the stability of task-representations in prefrontal networks, attentional selection mechanisms and mechanisms of action selection in basal ganglia circuits. An important conclusion is that the likelihood of committing an error is not stable over time but rather changes depending on the interplay of different functional neuro-anatomical and neuro-biological systems. We describe factors that might determine the time-course of cognitive control and the need to adapt behavior following response errors. Finally, we outline the mechanisms that may proof useful for predicting the outcomes of cognitive control and the emergence of response errors in future research.

  6. Neural representations and mechanisms for the performance of simple speech sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohland, Jason W; Bullock, Daniel; Guenther, Frank H

    2010-07-01

    Speakers plan the phonological content of their utterances before their release as speech motor acts. Using a finite alphabet of learned phonemes and a relatively small number of syllable structures, speakers are able to rapidly plan and produce arbitrary syllable sequences that fall within the rules of their language. The class of computational models of sequence planning and performance termed competitive queuing models have followed K. S. Lashley [The problem of serial order in behavior. In L. A. Jeffress (Ed.), Cerebral mechanisms in behavior (pp. 112-136). New York: Wiley, 1951] in assuming that inherently parallel neural representations underlie serial action, and this idea is increasingly supported by experimental evidence. In this article, we developed a neural model that extends the existing DIVA model of speech production in two complementary ways. The new model includes paired structure and content subsystems [cf. MacNeilage, P. F. The frame/content theory of evolution of speech production. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 21, 499-511, 1998 ] that provide parallel representations of a forthcoming speech plan as well as mechanisms for interfacing these phonological planning representations with learned sensorimotor programs to enable stepping through multisyllabic speech plans. On the basis of previous reports, the model's components are hypothesized to be localized to specific cortical and subcortical structures, including the left inferior frontal sulcus, the medial premotor cortex, the basal ganglia, and the thalamus. The new model, called gradient order DIVA, thus fills a void in current speech research by providing formal mechanistic hypotheses about both phonological and phonetic processes that are grounded by neuroanatomy and physiology. This framework also generates predictions that can be tested in future neuroimaging and clinical case studies.

  7. Separating monocular and binocular neural mechanisms mediating chromatic contextual interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Antona, Anthony D; Christiansen, Jens H; Shevell, Steven K

    2014-04-17

    When seen in isolation, a light that varies in chromaticity over time is perceived to oscillate in color. Perception of that same time-varying light may be altered by a surrounding light that is also temporally varying in chromaticity. The neural mechanisms that mediate these contextual interactions are the focus of this article. Observers viewed a central test stimulus that varied in chromaticity over time within a larger surround that also varied in chromaticity at the same temporal frequency. Center and surround were presented either to the same eye (monocular condition) or to opposite eyes (dichoptic condition) at the same frequency (3.125, 6.25, or 9.375 Hz). Relative phase between center and surround modulation was varied. In both the monocular and dichoptic conditions, the perceived modulation depth of the central light depended on the relative phase of the surround. A simple model implementing a linear combination of center and surround modulation fit the measurements well. At the lowest temporal frequency (3.125 Hz), the surround's influence was virtually identical for monocular and dichoptic conditions, suggesting that at this frequency, the surround's influence is mediated primarily by a binocular neural mechanism. At higher frequencies, the surround's influence was greater for the monocular condition than for the dichoptic condition, and this difference increased with temporal frequency. Our findings show that two separate neural mechanisms mediate chromatic contextual interactions: one binocular and dominant at lower temporal frequencies and the other monocular and dominant at higher frequencies (6-10 Hz).

  8. Predictive Acoustic Tracking with an Adaptive Neural Mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaikh, Danish; Manoonpong, Poramate

    2017-01-01

    has previously been validated in simulation and via robotic trials to track a continuous pure tone acoustic signal with a semi-circular motion trajectory and a constant but unknown angular velocity. The neural machinery has been shown to be able to learn different target angular velocities...... in independent trials. Here we extend our previous work by demonstrating that an identical instance of the mechanism can be used to successfully predict the future spatial location of an acoustic signal with an identical semi-circular motion trajectory and a constant but unknown angular velocity. We evaluate...... the prediction performance of the simulated mechanism in independent trials for three different angular velocities....

  9. Neural mechanism of optimal limb coordination in crustacean swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Calvin; Guy, Robert D; Mulloney, Brian; Zhang, Qinghai; Lewis, Timothy J

    2014-09-23

    A fundamental challenge in neuroscience is to understand how biologically salient motor behaviors emerge from properties of the underlying neural circuits. Crayfish, krill, prawns, lobsters, and other long-tailed crustaceans swim by rhythmically moving limbs called swimmerets. Over the entire biological range of animal size and paddling frequency, movements of adjacent swimmerets maintain an approximate quarter-period phase difference with the more posterior limbs leading the cycle. We use a computational fluid dynamics model to show that this frequency-invariant stroke pattern is the most effective and mechanically efficient paddling rhythm across the full range of biologically relevant Reynolds numbers in crustacean swimming. We then show that the organization of the neural circuit underlying swimmeret coordination provides a robust mechanism for generating this stroke pattern. Specifically, the wave-like limb coordination emerges robustly from a combination of the half-center structure of the local central pattern generating circuits (CPGs) that drive the movements of each limb, the asymmetric network topology of the connections between local CPGs, and the phase response properties of the local CPGs, which we measure experimentally. Thus, the crustacean swimmeret system serves as a concrete example in which the architecture of a neural circuit leads to optimal behavior in a robust manner. Furthermore, we consider all possible connection topologies between local CPGs and show that the natural connectivity pattern generates the biomechanically optimal stroke pattern most robustly. Given the high metabolic cost of crustacean swimming, our results suggest that natural selection has pushed the swimmeret neural circuit toward a connection topology that produces optimal behavior.

  10. Mathematically Reduced Chemical Reaction Mechanism Using Neural Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson Butuk

    2005-12-01

    This is an annual technical report for the work done over the last year (period ending 9/30/2005) on the project titled ''Mathematically Reduced Chemical Reaction Mechanism Using Neural Networks''. The aim of the project is to develop an efficient chemistry model for combustion simulations. The reduced chemistry model will be developed mathematically without the need of having extensive knowledge of the chemistry involved. To aid in the development of the model, Neural Networks (NN) will be used via a new network topology know as Non-linear Principal Components Analysis (NPCA). We report on the development of a novel procedure to speed up the training of NPCA. The same procedure termed L{sub 2}Boost can be used to increase the order of approximation of the Generalized Regression Neural Network (GRNN). It is pointed out that GRNN is a basic procedure for the emerging mesh free CFD. Also reported is an efficient simple approach of computing the derivatives of GRNN function approximation using complex variables or the Complex Step Method (CSM). The results presented demonstrate the significance of the methods developed and will be useful in many areas of applied science and engineering.

  11. Neural mechanisms of mindfulness and meditation: Evidence from neuroimaging studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    William; R; Marchand

    2014-01-01

    Mindfulness is the dispassionate,moment-by-moment awareness of sensations,emotions and thoughts.Mindfulness-based interventions are being increasingly used for stress,psychological well being,coping with chronic illness as well as adjunctive treatments for psychiatric disorders.However,the neural mechanisms associated with mindfulness have not been well characterized.Recent functional and structural neuroimaging studies are beginning to provide insights into neural processes associated with the practice of mindfulness.A review of this literature revealed compelling evidence that mindfulness impacts the function of the medial cortex and associated default mode network as well as insula and amygdala.Additionally,mindfulness practice appears to effect lateral frontal regions and basal ganglia,at least in some cases.Structural imaging studies are consistent with these findings and also indicate changes in the hippocampus.While many questions remain unanswered,the current literature provides evidence of brain regions and networks relevant for understanding neural processes associated with mindfulness.

  12. The neural sociometer: brain mechanisms underlying state self-esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberger, Naomi I; Inagaki, Tristen K; Muscatell, Keely A; Byrne Haltom, Kate E; Leary, Mark R

    2011-11-01

    On the basis of the importance of social connection for survival, humans may have evolved a "sociometer"-a mechanism that translates perceptions of rejection or acceptance into state self-esteem. Here, we explored the neural underpinnings of the sociometer by examining whether neural regions responsive to rejection or acceptance were associated with state self-esteem. Participants underwent fMRI while viewing feedback words ("interesting," "boring") ostensibly chosen by another individual (confederate) to describe the participant's previously recorded interview. Participants rated their state self-esteem in response to each feedback word. Results demonstrated that greater activity in rejection-related neural regions (dorsal ACC, anterior insula) and mentalizing regions was associated with lower-state self-esteem. Additionally, participants whose self-esteem decreased from prescan to postscan versus those whose self-esteem did not showed greater medial prefrontal cortical activity, previously associated with self-referential processing, in response to negative feedback. Together, the results inform our understanding of the origin and nature of our feelings about ourselves.

  13. Neural mechanisms of discourse comprehension: a human lesion study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbey, Aron K; Colom, Roberto; Grafman, Jordan

    2014-01-01

    Discourse comprehension is a hallmark of human social behaviour and refers to the act of interpreting a written or spoken message by constructing mental representations that integrate incoming language with prior knowledge and experience. Here, we report a human lesion study (n = 145) that investigates the neural mechanisms underlying discourse comprehension (measured by the Discourse Comprehension Test) and systematically examine its relation to a broad range of psychological factors, including psychometric intelligence (measured by the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale), emotional intelligence (measured by the Mayer, Salovey, Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test), and personality traits (measured by the Neuroticism-Extraversion-Openness Personality Inventory). Scores obtained from these factors were submitted to voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping to elucidate their neural substrates. Stepwise regression analyses revealed that working memory and extraversion reliably predict individual differences in discourse comprehension: higher working memory scores and lower extraversion levels predict better discourse comprehension performance. Lesion mapping results indicated that these convergent variables depend on a shared network of frontal and parietal regions, including white matter association tracts that bind these areas into a coordinated system. The observed findings motivate an integrative framework for understanding the neural foundations of discourse comprehension, suggesting that core elements of discourse processing emerge from a distributed network of brain regions that support specific competencies for executive and social function.

  14. Neural mechanisms of order information processing in working memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Dolenc

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The ability to encode and maintain the exact order of short sequences of stimuli or events is often crucial to our ability for effective high-order planning. However, it is not yet clear which neural mechanisms underpin this process. Several studies suggest that in comparison with item recognition temporal order coding activates prefrontal and parietal brain regions. Results of various studies tend to favour the hypothesis that the order of the stimuli is represented and encoded on several stages, from primacy and recency estimates to the exact position of the item in a sequence. Different brain regions play a different role in this process. Dorsolateral prefrontal cortex has a more general role in attention, while the premotor cortex is more involved in the process of information grouping. Parietal lobe and hippocampus also play a significant role in order processing as they enable the representation of distance. Moreover, order maintenance is associated with the existence of neural oscillators that operate at different frequencies. Electrophysiological studies revealed that theta and alpha oscillations play an important role in the maintenance of temporal order information. Those EEG oscillations are differentially associated with processes that support the maintenance of order information and item recognition. Various studies suggest a link between prefrontal areas and memory for temporal order, implying that EEG neural oscillations in the prefrontal cortex may play a role in the maintenance of information on temporal order.

  15. Neural dynamics and circuit mechanisms of decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Jing

    2012-12-01

    In this review, I briefly summarize current neurobiological studies of decision-making that bear on two general themes. The first focuses on the nature of neural representation and dynamics in a decision circuit. Experimental and computational results suggest that ramping-to-threshold in the temporal domain and trajectory of population activity in the state space represent a duality of perspectives on a decision process. Moreover, a decision circuit can display several different dynamical regimes, such as the ramping mode and the jumping mode with distinct defining properties. The second is concerned with the relationship between biologically-based mechanistic models and normative-type models. A fruitful interplay between experiments and these models at different levels of abstraction have enabled investigators to pose increasingly refined questions and gain new insights into the neural basis of decision-making. In particular, recent work on multi-alternative decisions suggests that deviations from rational models of choice behavior can be explained by established neural mechanisms.

  16. Computer simulations of neural mechanisms explaining upper and lower limb excitatory neural coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferris Daniel P

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When humans perform rhythmic upper and lower limb locomotor-like movements, there is an excitatory effect of upper limb exertion on lower limb muscle recruitment. To investigate potential neural mechanisms for this behavioral observation, we developed computer simulations modeling interlimb neural pathways among central pattern generators. We hypothesized that enhancement of muscle recruitment from interlimb spinal mechanisms was not sufficient to explain muscle enhancement levels observed in experimental data. Methods We used Matsuoka oscillators for the central pattern generators (CPG and determined parameters that enhanced amplitudes of rhythmic steady state bursts. Potential mechanisms for output enhancement were excitatory and inhibitory sensory feedback gains, excitatory and inhibitory interlimb coupling gains, and coupling geometry. We first simulated the simplest case, a single CPG, and then expanded the model to have two CPGs and lastly four CPGs. In the two and four CPG models, the lower limb CPGs did not receive supraspinal input such that the only mechanisms available for enhancing output were interlimb coupling gains and sensory feedback gains. Results In a two-CPG model with inhibitory sensory feedback gains, only excitatory gains of ipsilateral flexor-extensor/extensor-flexor coupling produced reciprocal upper-lower limb bursts and enhanced output up to 26%. In a two-CPG model with excitatory sensory feedback gains, excitatory gains of contralateral flexor-flexor/extensor-extensor coupling produced reciprocal upper-lower limb bursts and enhanced output up to 100%. However, within a given excitatory sensory feedback gain, enhancement due to excitatory interlimb gains could only reach levels up to 20%. Interconnecting four CPGs to have ipsilateral flexor-extensor/extensor-flexor coupling, contralateral flexor-flexor/extensor-extensor coupling, and bilateral flexor-extensor/extensor-flexor coupling could enhance

  17. A model of neural mechanisms in monocular transparent motion perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raudies, Florian; Neumann, Heiko

    2010-01-01

    Transparent motion is perceived when multiple motions are presented in the same part of visual space that move in different directions or with different speeds. Several psychophysical as well as physiological experiments have studied the conditions under which motion transparency occurs. Few computational mechanisms have been proposed that allow to segregate multiple motions. We present a novel neural model which investigates the necessary mechanisms underlying initial motion detection, the required representations for velocity coding, and the integration and segregation of motion stimuli to account for the perception of transparent motion. The model extends a previously developed architecture for neural computations along the dorsal pathway, particularly, in cortical areas V1, MT, and MSTd. It emphasizes the role of feedforward cascade processing and feedback from higher to earlier processing stages for selective feature enhancement and tuning. Our results demonstrate that the model reproduces several key psychophysical findings in perceptual motion transparency using random dot stimuli. Moreover, the model is able to process transparent motion as well as opaque surface motion in real-world sequences of 3-d scenes. As a main thesis, we argue that the perception of transparent motion relies on the representation of multiple velocities at one spatial location; however, this feature is necessary but not sufficient to perceive transparency. It is suggested that the activations simultaneously representing multiple activities are subsequently integrated by separate mechanisms leading to the segregation of different overlapping segments.

  18. Neural Affective Mechanisms Predict Market-Level Microlending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genevsky, Alexander; Knutson, Brian

    2015-09-01

    Humans sometimes share with others whom they may never meet or know, in violation of the dictates of pure self-interest. Research has not established which neuropsychological mechanisms support lending decisions, nor whether their influence extends to markets involving significant financial incentives. In two studies, we found that neural affective mechanisms influence the success of requests for microloans. In a large Internet database of microloan requests (N = 13,500), we found that positive affective features of photographs promoted the success of those requests. We then established that neural activity (i.e., in the nucleus accumbens) and self-reported positive arousal in a neuroimaging sample (N = 28) predicted the success of loan requests on the Internet, above and beyond the effects of the neuroimaging sample's own choices (i.e., to lend or not). These findings suggest that elicitation of positive arousal can promote the success of loan requests, both in the laboratory and on the Internet. They also highlight affective neuroscience's potential to probe neuropsychological mechanisms that drive microlending, enhance the effectiveness of loan requests, and forecast market-level behavior.

  19. A simple mechanical system for studying adaptive oscillatory neural networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jouffroy, Guillaume; Jouffroy, Jerome

    that the network oscillates in a suitable way, this tuning being a non trivial task. It also appears that the link with the physical body that these oscillatory entities control has a fundamental importance, and it seems that most bodies used for experimental validation in the literature (walking robots, lamprey...... model, etc.) might be too complex to study. In this paper, we use a comparatively simple mechanical system, the nonholonomic vehicle referred to as the Roller-Racer, as a means towards testing different learning strategies for an Recurrent Neural Network-based (RNN) controller/guidance system. After...

  20. Chemo-mechanical control of neural stem cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geishecker, Emily R.

    Cellular processes such as adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation are controlled in part by cell interactions with the microenvironment. Cells can sense and respond to a variety of stimuli, including soluble and insoluble factors (such as proteins and small molecules) and externally applied mechanical stresses. Mechanical properties of the environment, such as substrate stiffness, have also been suggested to play an important role in cell processes. The roles of both biochemical and mechanical signaling in fate modification of stem cells have been explored independently. However, very few studies have been performed to study well-controlled chemo-mechanotransduction. The objective of this work is to design, synthesize, and characterize a chemo-mechanical substrate to encourage neuronal differentiation of C17.2 neural stem cells. In Chapter 2, Polyacrylamide (PA) gels of varying stiffnesses are functionalized with differing amounts of whole collagen to investigate the role of protein concentration in combination with substrate stiffness. As expected, neurons on the softest substrate were more in number and neuronal morphology than those on stiffer substrates. Neurons appeared locally aligned with an expansive network of neurites. Additional experiments would allow for statistical analysis to determine if and how collagen density impacts C17.2 differentiation in combination with substrate stiffness. Due to difficulties associated with whole protein approaches, a similar platform was developed using mixed adhesive peptides, derived from fibronectin and laminin, and is presented in Chapter 3. The matrix elasticity and peptide concentration can be individually modulated to systematically probe the effects of chemo-mechanical signaling on differentiation of C17.2 cells. Polyacrylamide gel stiffness was confirmed using rheological techniques and found to support values published by Yeung et al. [1]. Cellular growth and differentiation were assessed by cell counts

  1. How Tissue Mechanical Properties Affect Enteric Neural Crest Cell Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, N R; Gazguez, E; Bidault, L; Guilbert, T; Vias, C; Vian, E; Watanabe, Y; Muller, L; Germain, S; Bondurand, N; Dufour, S; Fleury, V

    2016-02-18

    Neural crest cells (NCCs) are a population of multipotent cells that migrate extensively during vertebrate development. Alterations to neural crest ontogenesis cause several diseases, including cancers and congenital defects, such as Hirschprung disease, which results from incomplete colonization of the colon by enteric NCCs (ENCCs). We investigated the influence of the stiffness and structure of the environment on ENCC migration in vitro and during colonization of the gastrointestinal tract in chicken and mouse embryos. We showed using tensile stretching and atomic force microscopy (AFM) that the mesenchyme of the gut was initially soft but gradually stiffened during the period of ENCC colonization. Second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy revealed that this stiffening was associated with a gradual organization and enrichment of collagen fibers in the developing gut. Ex-vivo 2D cell migration assays showed that ENCCs migrated on substrates with very low levels of stiffness. In 3D collagen gels, the speed of the ENCC migratory front decreased with increasing gel stiffness, whereas no correlation was found between porosity and ENCC migration behavior. Metalloprotease inhibition experiments showed that ENCCs actively degraded collagen in order to progress. These results shed light on the role of the mechanical properties of tissues in ENCC migration during development.

  2. Neural mechanisms tracking popularity in real-world social networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerubavel, Noam; Bearman, Peter S.; Weber, Jochen; Ochsner, Kevin N.

    2015-01-01

    Differences in popularity are a key aspect of status in virtually all human groups and shape social interactions within them. Little is known, however, about how we track and neurally represent others’ popularity. We addressed this question in two real-world social networks using sociometric methods to quantify popularity. Each group member (perceiver) viewed faces of every other group member (target) while whole-brain functional MRI data were collected. Independent functional localizer tasks were used to identify brain systems supporting affective valuation (ventromedial prefrontal cortex, ventral striatum, amygdala) and social cognition (dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, precuneus, temporoparietal junction), respectively. During the face-viewing task, activity in both types of neural systems tracked targets’ sociometric popularity, even when controlling for potential confounds. The target popularity–social cognition system relationship was mediated by valuation system activity, suggesting that observing popular individuals elicits value signals that facilitate understanding their mental states. The target popularity–valuation system relationship was strongest for popular perceivers, suggesting enhanced sensitivity to differences among other group members’ popularity. Popular group members also demonstrated greater interpersonal sensitivity by more accurately predicting how their own personalities were perceived by other individuals in the social network. These data offer insights into the mechanisms by which status guides social behavior. PMID:26598684

  3. Neural mechanisms of rhythm perception: current findings and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grahn, Jessica A

    2012-10-01

    Perception of temporal patterns is fundamental to normal hearing, speech, motor control, and music. Certain types of pattern understanding are unique to humans, such as musical rhythm. Although human responses to musical rhythm are universal, there is much we do not understand about how rhythm is processed in the brain. Here, I consider findings from research into basic timing mechanisms and models through to the neuroscience of rhythm and meter. A network of neural areas, including motor regions, is regularly implicated in basic timing as well as processing of musical rhythm. However, fractionating the specific roles of individual areas in this network has remained a challenge. Distinctions in activity patterns appear between "automatic" and "cognitively controlled" timing processes, but the perception of musical rhythm requires features of both automatic and controlled processes. In addition, many experimental manipulations rely on participants directing their attention toward or away from certain stimulus features, and measuring corresponding differences in neural activity. Many temporal features, however, are implicitly processed whether attended to or not, making it difficult to create controlled baseline conditions for experimental comparisons. The variety of stimuli, paradigms, and definitions can further complicate comparisons across domains or methodologies. Despite these challenges, the high level of interest and multitude of methodological approaches from different cognitive domains (including music, language, and motor learning) have yielded new insights and hold promise for future progress.

  4. Neural mechanisms underlying social conformity in an ultimatum game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenyu eWei

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available When individuals’ actions are incongruent with those of the group they belong to, they may change their initial behavior in order to conform to the group norm. This phenomenon is known as social conformity. In the present study, we used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to investigate brain activity in response to group opinion during an ultimatum game. Results showed that participants changed their choices when these choices conflicted with the normative opinion of the group they were members of, especially in conditions of unfair treatment. The fMRI data revealed that a conflict with group norms activated the brain regions involved in norm violations and behavioral adjustment. Furthermore, in the reject-unfair condition, we observed that a conflict with group norms activated the medial frontal gyrus. These findings contribute to recent research examining neural mechanisms involved in detecting violations of social norms, and provide information regarding the neural representation of conformity behavior in an economic game.

  5. Radial basis function (RBF) neural network control for mechanical systems design, analysis and Matlab simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jinkun

    2013-01-01

    Radial Basis Function (RBF) Neural Network Control for Mechanical Systems is motivated by the need for systematic design approaches to stable adaptive control system design using neural network approximation-based techniques. The main objectives of the book are to introduce the concrete design methods and MATLAB simulation of stable adaptive RBF neural control strategies. In this book, a broad range of implementable neural network control design methods for mechanical systems are presented, such as robot manipulators, inverted pendulums, single link flexible joint robots, motors, etc. Advanced neural network controller design methods and their stability analysis are explored. The book provides readers with the fundamentals of neural network control system design.   This book is intended for the researchers in the fields of neural adaptive control, mechanical systems, Matlab simulation, engineering design, robotics and automation. Jinkun Liu is a professor at Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronauti...

  6. Consciousness, awareness of insight and neural mechanisms of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touskova, Tereza; Bob, Petr

    2015-01-01

    According to recent research, disturbances of self-awareness and conscious experience have a critical role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, and in this context, schizophrenia is currently understood as a disorder characterized by distortions of acts of awareness, self-consciousness, and self-monitoring. Together, these studies suggest that the processes of disrupted awareness and conscious disintegration in schizophrenia might be related and represented by similar disruptions on the brain level, which, in principle, could be explained by various levels of disturbed connectivity and information disintegration that may negatively affect usual patterns of synchronous activity constituting adaptive integrative functions of consciousness. On the other hand, mental integration based on self-awareness and insight may significantly increase information integration and directly influence neural mechanisms underlying basic pathophysiological processes in schizophrenia.

  7. Predictive Acoustic Tracking with an Adaptive Neural Mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaikh, Danish; Manoonpong, Poramate

    2017-01-01

    has previously been validated in simulation and via robotic trials to track a continuous pure tone acoustic signal with a semi-circular motion trajectory and a constant but unknown angular velocity. The neural machinery has been shown to be able to learn different target angular velocities...... in independent trials. Here we extend our previous work by demonstrating that an identical instance of the mechanism can be used to successfully predict the future spatial location of an acoustic signal with an identical semi-circular motion trajectory and a constant but unknown angular velocity. We evaluate......Tracking an acoustic signal in motion is pertinent in several domains such as human-robot interaction and search-and-rescue robotics. Conventional approaches to acoustic tracking acquire time-of-arrival-difference signals from multi-microphone arrays and localise the acoustic signal using Kalman...

  8. Neural circuit mechanisms of short-term memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Mark

    Memory over time scales of seconds to tens of seconds is thought to be maintained by neural activity that is triggered by a memorized stimulus and persists long after the stimulus is turned off. This presents a challenge to current models of memory-storing mechanisms, because the typical time scales associated with cellular and synaptic dynamics are two orders of magnitude smaller than this. While such long time scales can easily be achieved by bistable processes that toggle like a flip-flop between a baseline and elevated-activity state, many neuronal systems have been observed experimentally to be capable of maintaining a continuum of stable states. For example, in neural integrator networks involved in the accumulation of evidence for decision making and in motor control, individual neurons have been recorded whose activity reflects the mathematical integral of their inputs; in the absence of input, these neurons sustain activity at a level proportional to the running total of their inputs. This represents an analog form of memory whose dynamics can be conceptualized through an energy landscape with a continuum of lowest-energy states. Such continuous attractor landscapes are structurally non-robust, in seeming violation of the relative robustness of biological memory systems. In this talk, I will present and compare different biologically motivated circuit motifs for the accumulation and storage of signals in short-term memory. Challenges to generating robust memory maintenance will be highlighted and potential mechanisms for ameliorating the sensitivity of memory networks to perturbations will be discussed. Funding for this work was provided by NIH R01 MH065034, NSF IIS-1208218, Simons Foundation 324260, and a UC Davis Ophthalmology Research to Prevent Blindness Grant.

  9. Does a nonclassical signaling mechanism underlie an increase of estradiol-mediated gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor binding in ovine pituitary cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Tracy L; Whitesell, Jennifer D; Cantlon, Jeremy D; Clay, Colin M; Nett, Terry M

    2011-10-01

    Estradiol-17beta (E2) is the major regulator of GnRH receptor (GnRHR) gene expression and number during the periovulatory period; however, the mechanisms underlying E2 regulation of the GNRHR gene remain undefined. Herein, we find that E2 conjugated to BSA (E2-BSA) mimics the stimulatory effect of E2 on GnRH binding in primary cultures of ovine pituitary cells. The time course for maximal GnRH analog binding was similar for both E2 and E2-BSA. The ability of E2 and E2-BSA to increase GnRH analog binding was blocked by the estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist ICI 182,780. Also, increased GnRH analog binding in response to E2 and the selective ESR1 agonist propylpyrazole triol was blocked by expression of a dominant-negative form of ESR1 (L540Q). Thus, membrane-associated ESR1 is the likely candidate for mediating E2 activation of the GNRHR gene. As cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) is an established target for E2 activation in gonadotrophs, we next explored a potential role for this protein as an intracellular mediator of the E2 signal. Consistent with this possibility, adenoviral-mediated expression of a dominant-negative form of CREB (A-CREB) completely abolished the ability of E2 to increase GnRH analog binding in primary cultures of ovine pituitary cells. Finally, the presence of membrane-associated E2 binding sites on ovine pituitary cells was demonstrated using a fluorescein isothiocyanate conjugate of E2-BSA. We suggest that E2 regulation of GnRHR number during the preovulatory period reflects a membrane site of action and may proceed through a nonclassical signaling mechanism, specifically a CREB-dependent pathway.

  10. Mechanisms involving Ang II and MAPK/ERK1/2 signaling pathways underlie cardiac and renal alterations during chronic undernutrition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo A Silva

    Full Text Available Several studies have correlated protein restriction associated with other nutritional deficiencies with the development of cardiovascular and renal diseases. The driving hypothesis for this study was that Ang II signaling pathways in the heart and kidney are affected by chronic protein, mineral and vitamin restriction.Wistar rats aged 90 days were fed from weaning with either a control or a deficient diet that mimics those used in impoverished regions worldwide. Such restriction simultaneously increased ouabain-insensitive Na+-ATPase and decreased (Na++K+ATPase activity in the same proportion in cardiomyocytes and proximal tubule cells. Type 1 angiotensin II receptor (AT1R was downregulated by that restriction in both organs, whereas AT2R decreased only in the kidney. The PKC/PKA ratio increased in both tissues and returned to normal values in rats receiving Losartan daily from weaning. Inhibition of the MAPK pathway restored Na+-ATPase activity in both organs. The undernourished rats presented expanded plasma volume, increased heart rate, cardiac hypertrophy, and elevated systolic pressure, which also returned to control levels with Losartan. Such restriction led to electrical cardiac remodeling represented by prolonged ventricular repolarization parameters, induced triggered activity, early after-depolarization and delayed after-depolarization, which were also prevented by Losartan.The mechanisms responsible for these alterations are underpinned by an imbalance in the PKC- and PKA-mediated pathways, with participation of angiotensin receptors and by activation of the MAPK/ERK1/2 pathway. These cellular and molecular alterations culminate in cardiac electric remodeling and in the onset of hypertension in adulthood.

  11. Neural mechanism of facilitation system during physical fatigue.

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    Masaaki Tanaka

    Full Text Available An enhanced facilitation system caused by motivational input plays an important role in supporting performance during physical fatigue. We tried to clarify the neural mechanisms of the facilitation system during physical fatigue using magnetoencephalography (MEG and a classical conditioning technique. Twelve right-handed volunteers participated in this study. Participants underwent MEG recording during the imagery of maximum grips of the right hand guided by metronome sounds for 10 min. Thereafter, fatigue-inducing maximum handgrip trials were performed for 10 min; the metronome sounds were started 5 min after the beginning of the handgrip trials. The metronome sounds were used as conditioned stimuli and maximum handgrip trials as unconditioned stimuli. The next day, they were randomly assigned to two groups in a single-blinded, two-crossover fashion to undergo two types of MEG recordings, that is, for the control and motivation sessions, during the imagery of maximum grips of the right hand guided by metronome sounds for 10 min. The alpha-band event-related desynchronizations (ERDs of the motivation session relative to the control session within the time windows of 500 to 700 and 800 to 900 ms after the onset of handgrip cue sounds were identified in the sensorimotor areas. In addition, the alpha-band ERD within the time window of 400 to 500 ms was identified in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (Brodmann's area 46. The ERD level in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex was positively associated with that in the sensorimotor areas within the time window of 500 to 700 ms. These results suggest that the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex is involved in the neural substrates of the facilitation system and activates the sensorimotor areas during physical fatigue.

  12. Central chemoreceptors and neural mechanisms of cardiorespiratory control

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    T.S. Moreira

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The arterial partial pressure (P CO2 of carbon dioxide is virtually constant because of the close match between the metabolic production of this gas and its excretion via breathing. Blood gas homeostasis does not rely solely on changes in lung ventilation, but also to a considerable extent on circulatory adjustments that regulate the transport of CO2 from its sites of production to the lungs. The neural mechanisms that coordinate circulatory and ventilatory changes to achieve blood gas homeostasis are the subject of this review. Emphasis will be placed on the control of sympathetic outflow by central chemoreceptors. High levels of CO2 exert an excitatory effect on sympathetic outflow that is mediated by specialized chemoreceptors such as the neurons located in the retrotrapezoid region. In addition, high CO2 causes an aversive awareness in conscious animals, activating wake-promoting pathways such as the noradrenergic neurons. These neuronal groups, which may also be directly activated by brain acidification, have projections that contribute to the CO2-induced rise in breathing and sympathetic outflow. However, since the level of activity of the retrotrapezoid nucleus is regulated by converging inputs from wake-promoting systems, behavior-specific inputs from higher centers and by chemical drive, the main focus of the present manuscript is to review the contribution of central chemoreceptors to the control of autonomic and respiratory mechanisms.

  13. Neural mechanisms of attentional control in mindfulness meditation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eMalinowski

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The scientific interest in meditation and mindfulness practice has recently seen an unprecedented surge. After an initial phase of presenting beneficial effects of mindfulness practice in various domains, research is now seeking to unravel the underlying psychological and neurophysiological mechanisms. Advances in understanding these processes are required for improving and fine-tuning mindfulness-based interventions that target specific conditions such as eating disorders or attention deficit hyperactivity disorders. This review presents a theoretical framework that emphasizes the central role of attentional control mechanisms in the development of mindfulness skills. It discusses the phenomenological level of experience during meditation, the different attentional functions that are involved, and relates these to the brain networks that subserve these functions. On the basis of currently available empirical evidence specific processes as to how attention exerts its positive influence are considered and it is concluded that meditation practice appears to positively impact attentional functions by improving resource allocation processes. As a result, attentional resources are allocated more fully during early processing phases which subsequently enhance further processing. Neural changes resulting from a pure form of mindfulness practice that is central to most mindfulness programs are considered from the perspective that they constitute a useful reference point for future research. Furthermore, possible interrelations between the improvement of attentional control and emotion regulation skills are discussed.

  14. Neural regulation of the stress response: glucocorticoid feedback mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.P. Herman

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian stress response is an integrated physiological and psychological reaction to real or perceived adversity. Glucocorticoids are an important component of this response, acting to redistribute energy resources to both optimize survival in the face of challenge and to restore homeostasis after the immediate challenge has subsided. Release of glucocorticoids is mediated by the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis, driven by a neural signal originating in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN. Stress levels of glucocorticoids bind to glucocorticoid receptors in multiple body compartments, including the brain, and consequently have wide-reaching actions. For this reason, glucocorticoids serve a vital function in negative feedback inhibition of their own secretion. Negative feedback inhibition is mediated by a diverse collection of mechanisms, including fast, non-genomic feedback at the level of the PVN, stress-shut-off at the level of the limbic system, and attenuation of ascending excitatory input through destabilization of mRNAs encoding neuropeptide drivers of the HPA axis. In addition, there is evidence that glucocorticoids participate in stress activation via feed-forward mechanisms at the level of the amygdala. Feedback deficits are associated with numerous disease states, underscoring the necessity for adequate control of glucocorticoid homeostasis. Thus, rather than having a single, defined feedback ‘switch’, control of the stress response requires a wide-reaching feedback ‘network’ that coordinates HPA activity to suit the overall needs of multiple body systems.

  15. Mechanisms underlie ginsenosides regulating spontaneous sleep architecture in rats%人参皂甙调节大鼠自发睡眠脑电结构的机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪芬芳; 王新; 杨树龙; 张大雷; 杨蓓; 吴磊

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study the underling mechanism of the effect of ginsenosides(GS) on spontaneous sleep. Methods Adult SD rats were randomly divided into the control, GS 10 mg/kg (low dose) and 100 mg/kg (high dose ) groups. Rats were instrumented with sleep-wake recording electrodes. After recovery front surgical operation, rats were orally administered GS 10 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg or water once per day for 6 days. On GS administration day 1 and day 6, Polygraphic signs of undisturbed sleep-wake activities were recorded for 12 h (07:30 ~ 19:30) after GS administration. Results On GS administration day 1 (acute) , 10 mg/kg GS slightly (P >0.05) but 100 mg/kg GS significantly (P 0. 05 ) but enhanced the expressions of GABAA receptor α, β not γ subunits in rat hy-pothalamus ( P 0. 05) but high dose GS significantly (P 0. 05 ). Conclusions These primary results suggest that GS can regulate spontaneous sleep architecture in time and dose-dependent manner in which acute GS treatment is related to its up-regulating GABAA receptor α,β subtypes whereas chronic GS administration involved in the raised GABA product produced by its over-expressing GAD in rat hypothalamus.%目的 初步探索人参皂甙(GS)调节自发睡眠的作用机制.方法 大鼠随机分为对照、GS低和高(10和100 mg/kg)剂量组.在大鼠体内植入无线发射器,术后每日1次灌胃给药,共6 d.第1(急性)和6天(慢性)给药后记录自由活动大鼠脑电活动12 h.于第1和6天取下丘脑组织用免疫印迹方法检测GABAAergic系统蛋白表达.结果GS灌胃给药第1天,高剂量GS显著增加非快动眼睡眠(NREM)[(8.002±0.427)hvs (6.363±0.542)h,P<0.05]和总睡眠时间[(9.397±0.313)h vs (7.548±0.562)h,P<0.01],减少觉醒[(2.463±0.288)h vs (4.376±0.572)h,P<0.01];GS低和高剂量都增强了下丘脑GABAA受体a、β亚型表达(P<0.05).第6天,低、高剂量GS均显著提高NREM睡眠[(7.587±0.174)h,(7.610±0.204)h vs (6.799±0.302)h,P<0.05]

  16. Subcortical neural coding mechanisms for auditory temporal processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisina, R D

    2001-08-01

    Biologically relevant sounds such as speech, animal vocalizations and music have distinguishing temporal features that are utilized for effective auditory perception. Common temporal features include sound envelope fluctuations, often modeled in the laboratory by amplitude modulation (AM), and starts and stops in ongoing sounds, which are frequently approximated by hearing researchers as gaps between two sounds or are investigated in forward masking experiments. The auditory system has evolved many neural processing mechanisms for encoding important temporal features of sound. Due to rapid progress made in the field of auditory neuroscience in the past three decades, it is not possible to review all progress in this field in a single article. The goal of the present report is to focus on single-unit mechanisms in the mammalian brainstem auditory system for encoding AM and gaps as illustrative examples of how the system encodes key temporal features of sound. This report, following a systems analysis approach, starts with findings in the auditory nerve and proceeds centrally through the cochlear nucleus, superior olivary complex and inferior colliculus. Some general principles can be seen when reviewing this entire field. For example, as one ascends the central auditory system, a neural encoding shift occurs. An emphasis on synchronous responses for temporal coding exists in the auditory periphery, and more reliance on rate coding occurs as one moves centrally. In addition, for AM, modulation transfer functions become more bandpass as the sound level of the signal is raised, but become more lowpass in shape as background noise is added. In many cases, AM coding can actually increase in the presence of background noise. For gap processing or forward masking, coding for gaps changes from a decrease in spike firing rate for neurons of the peripheral auditory system that have sustained response patterns, to an increase in firing rate for more central neurons with

  17. [Neural mechanism underlying autistic savant and acquired savant syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahata, Keisuke; Kato, Motoichiro

    2008-07-01

    It is well known that the cases with savant syndrome, demonstrate outstanding mental capability despite coexisting severe mental disabilities. In many cases, savant skills are characterized by its domain-specificity, enhanced memory capability, and excessive focus on low-level perceptual processing. In addition, impaired integrative cognitive processing such as social cognition or executive function, restricted interest, and compulsive repetition of the same act are observed in savant individuals. All these are significantly relevant to the behavioral characteristics observed in individuals with autistic spectrum disorders (ASD). A neurocognitive model of savant syndrome should explain these cognitive features and the juxtaposition of outstanding talents with cognitive disabilities. In recent neuropsychological studies, Miller (1998) reported clinical cases of "acquired savant," i.e., patients who improved or newly acquired an artistic savant-like skill in the early stage of frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Although the relationship between an autistic savant and acquired savant remains to be elucidated, the advent of neuroimaging study of ASD and the clarification of FTD patients with savant-like skills may clarify the shared neural mechanisms of both types of talent. In this review, we classified current cognitive models of savant syndrome into the following 3 categories. (1) A hypermnesic model that suggests that savant skills develop from existing or dormant cognitive functions such as memory. However, recent findings obtained through neuropsychological examinations imply that savant individuals solve problems using a strategy that is fairly different from a non-autistic one. (2) A paradoxical functional facilitation model (Kapur, 1996) that offers possible explanations about how pathological states in the brain lead to development of prodigious skills. This model emphasizes the role of reciprocal inhibitory interaction among adjacent or distant cortical regions

  18. Mechanical roles of apical constriction, cell elongation, and cell migration during neural tube formation in Xenopus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Makoto; Watanabe, Tadashi; Yasue, Naoko; Tateo, Itsuki; Adachi, Taiji; Ueno, Naoto

    2016-12-01

    Neural tube closure is an important and necessary process during the development of the central nervous system. The formation of the neural tube structure from a flat sheet of neural epithelium requires several cell morphogenetic events and tissue dynamics to account for the mechanics of tissue deformation. Cell elongation changes cuboidal cells into columnar cells, and apical constriction then causes them to adopt apically narrow, wedge-like shapes. In addition, the neural plate in Xenopus is stratified, and the non-neural cells in the deep layer (deep cells) pull the overlying superficial cells, eventually bringing the two layers of cells to the midline. Thus, neural tube closure appears to be a complex event in which these three physical events are considered to play key mechanical roles. To test whether these three physical events are mechanically sufficient to drive neural tube formation, we employed a three-dimensional vertex model and used it to simulate the process of neural tube closure. The results suggest that apical constriction cued the bending of the neural plate by pursing the circumference of the apical surface of the neural cells. Neural cell elongation in concert with apical constriction further narrowed the apical surface of the cells and drove the rapid folding of the neural plate, but was insufficient for complete neural tube closure. Migration of the deep cells provided the additional tissue deformation necessary for closure. To validate the model, apical constriction and cell elongation were inhibited in Xenopus laevis embryos. The resulting cell and tissue shapes resembled the corresponding simulation results.

  19. Neural mechanisms underlying the induction and relief of perceptual curiosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieke eJepma

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Curiosity is one of the most basic biological drives in both animals and humans, and has been identified as a key motive for learning and discovery. Despite the importance of curiosity and related behaviors, the topic has been largely neglected in human neuroscience; hence little is known about the neurobiological mechanisms underlying curiosity. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to investigate what happens in our brain during the induction and subsequent relief of perceptual curiosity. Our core findings were that (i the induction of perceptual curiosity, through the presentation of ambiguous visual input, activated the anterior insula and anterior cingulate cortex, brain regions sensitive to conflict and arousal; (ii the relief of perceptual curiosity, through visual disambiguation, activated regions of the striatum that have been related to reward processing; and (iii the relief of perceptual curiosity was associated with hippocampal activation and enhanced incidental memory. These findings provide the first demonstration of the neural basis of human perceptual curiosity. Our results provide neurobiological support for a classic psychological theory of curiosity, which holds that curiosity is an aversive condition of increased arousal whose termination is rewarding and facilitates memory.

  20. Neural mechanisms underlying the induction and relief of perceptual curiosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jepma, Marieke; Verdonschot, Rinus G; van Steenbergen, Henk; Rombouts, Serge A R B; Nieuwenhuis, Sander

    2012-01-01

    Curiosity is one of the most basic biological drives in both animals and humans, and has been identified as a key motive for learning and discovery. Despite the importance of curiosity and related behaviors, the topic has been largely neglected in human neuroscience; hence little is known about the neurobiological mechanisms underlying curiosity. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate what happens in our brain during the induction and subsequent relief of perceptual curiosity. Our core findings were that (1) the induction of perceptual curiosity, through the presentation of ambiguous visual input, activated the anterior insula and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), brain regions sensitive to conflict and arousal; (2) the relief of perceptual curiosity, through visual disambiguation, activated regions of the striatum that have been related to reward processing; and (3) the relief of perceptual curiosity was associated with hippocampal activation and enhanced incidental memory. These findings provide the first demonstration of the neural basis of human perceptual curiosity. Our results provide neurobiological support for a classic psychological theory of curiosity, which holds that curiosity is an aversive condition of increased arousal whose termination is rewarding and facilitates memory.

  1. A neural model of mechanisms of empathy deficits in narcissism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowiak-Siuda, Kamila; Zajkowski, Wojciech

    2013-11-05

    From a multidimensional perspective, empathy is a process that includes affective sharing and imagining and understanding the emotions of others. The primary brain structures involved in mediating the components of empathy are the anterior insula (AI), the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), and specific regions of the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC). The AI and ACC are the main nodes in the salience network (SN), which selects and coordinates the information flow from the intero- and exteroreceptors. AI might play a role as a crucial hub - a dynamic switch between 2 separate networks of cognitive processing: the central executive network (CEN), which is concerned with effective task execution, and the default mode network (DMN), which is involved with self-reflective processes. Given various classifications, a deficit in empathy may be considered a central dysfunctional trait in narcissism. A recent fMRI study suggests that deficit in empathy is due to a dysfunction in the right AI. Based on the acquired data, we propose a theoretical model of imbalanced SN functioning in narcissism in which the dysfunctional AI hub is responsible for constant DMN activation, which, in turn, centers one's attention on the self. This might hinder the ability to affectively share and understand the emotions of others. This review paper on neural mechanisms of empathy deficits in narcissism aims to inspire and direct future research in this area.

  2. Neural mechanisms underlying the induction and relief of perceptual curiosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jepma, Marieke; Verdonschot, Rinus G.; van Steenbergen, Henk; Rombouts, Serge A. R. B.; Nieuwenhuis, Sander

    2012-01-01

    Curiosity is one of the most basic biological drives in both animals and humans, and has been identified as a key motive for learning and discovery. Despite the importance of curiosity and related behaviors, the topic has been largely neglected in human neuroscience; hence little is known about the neurobiological mechanisms underlying curiosity. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate what happens in our brain during the induction and subsequent relief of perceptual curiosity. Our core findings were that (1) the induction of perceptual curiosity, through the presentation of ambiguous visual input, activated the anterior insula and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), brain regions sensitive to conflict and arousal; (2) the relief of perceptual curiosity, through visual disambiguation, activated regions of the striatum that have been related to reward processing; and (3) the relief of perceptual curiosity was associated with hippocampal activation and enhanced incidental memory. These findings provide the first demonstration of the neural basis of human perceptual curiosity. Our results provide neurobiological support for a classic psychological theory of curiosity, which holds that curiosity is an aversive condition of increased arousal whose termination is rewarding and facilitates memory. PMID:22347853

  3. Fear Generalization and Anxiety: Behavioral and Neural Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunsmoor, Joseph E; Paz, Rony

    2015-09-01

    Fear can be an adaptive emotion that helps defend against potential danger. Classical conditioning models elegantly describe how animals learn which stimuli in the environment signal danger, but understanding how this learning is generalized to other stimuli that resemble aspects of a learned threat remains a challenge. Critically, the overgeneralization of fear to harmless stimuli or situations is a burden to daily life and characteristic of posttraumatic stress disorder and other anxiety disorders. Here, we review emerging evidence on behavioral and neural mechanisms of generalization of emotional learning with the goal of encouraging further research on generalization in anxiety disorders. We begin by placing research on fear generalization in a rich historical context of stimulus generalization dating back to Pavlov, which lays the foundation for theoretical and experimental approaches used today. We then transition to contemporary behavioral and neurobiological research on generalization of emotional learning in humans and nonhuman animals and discuss the factors that promote generalization on the one hand from discrimination on the other hand.

  4. A neural mechanism for recognizing speech spoken by different speakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreitewolf, Jens; Gaudrain, Etienne; von Kriegstein, Katharina

    2014-05-01

    Understanding speech from different speakers is a sophisticated process, particularly because the same acoustic parameters convey important information about both the speech message and the person speaking. How the human brain accomplishes speech recognition under such conditions is unknown. One view is that speaker information is discarded at early processing stages and not used for understanding the speech message. An alternative view is that speaker information is exploited to improve speech recognition. Consistent with the latter view, previous research identified functional interactions between the left- and the right-hemispheric superior temporal sulcus/gyrus, which process speech- and speaker-specific vocal tract parameters, respectively. Vocal tract parameters are one of the two major acoustic features that determine both speaker identity and speech message (phonemes). Here, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we show that a similar interaction exists for glottal fold parameters between the left and right Heschl's gyri. Glottal fold parameters are the other main acoustic feature that determines speaker identity and speech message (linguistic prosody). The findings suggest that interactions between left- and right-hemispheric areas are specific to the processing of different acoustic features of speech and speaker, and that they represent a general neural mechanism when understanding speech from different speakers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Mechanical and neural function of triceps surae in elite racewalking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, Neil J; Hanley, Brian; Bissas, Athanassios

    2016-07-01

    Racewalking is a unique event combining mechanical elements of walking with speeds associated with running. It is currently unclear how racewalking technique impacts lower limb muscle-tendon function despite the relevance of this to muscle economy and overall performance. The present study examined triceps surae neuromechanics in 11 internationally competitive racewalkers (age 25 ± 11 yr) walking and running on a treadmill at speeds between 4.5 and 13.8 km/h while triceps surae fascicle lengths, electromyography, and kinematic data were recorded. Cumulative muscle activity required to traverse a unit distance (CMAPD) was calculated for each muscle. Medial gastrocnemius (MG) and soleus fascicle lengths/velocities were determined using an automated tracking algorithm, and muscle-tendon unit lengths were determined. Running was associated with net shortening of muscle fascicles during stance, combined with substantial lengthening of the muscle-tendon unit, implying energy storage in the Achilles tendon. When the same participants racewalked at the same speed, the fascicles shortened (soleus) or lengthened (MG), coinciding with rapid shortening followed by a relatively small increase in muscle-tendon length during stance. Consequently, compared with running at the same speed, racewalking decreased the energy-saving role of the Achilles tendon. Moreover, CMAPD was generally highest in racewalking, implying that in individual muscles, the energy cost of racewalking was higher than running. Together these results suggest that racewalking is neurally and mechanically costly relative to running at a given speed. As racewalking events are typically between 10 and 50 km, neuromechanical inefficiencies that occur with each stride likely result in substantial energetic penalties.

  6. Neural Network Identification Model for Technology Selection of Fully-Mechanized Top-Coal Caving Mining

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟宪锐; 徐永勇; 汪进

    2001-01-01

    This paper mainly discusses the selection of the technical parameters of fully-mechanized top-coal caving mining using the neural network technique. The comparison between computing results and experiment data shows that the set-up neural network model has high accuracy and decision-making benefit.

  7. Sensory entrainment mechanisms in auditory perception: neural synchronization and cortico-striatal activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catia M Sameiro-Barbosa

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The auditory system displays modulations in sensitivity that can align with the temporal structure of the acoustic environment. This sensory entrainment can facilitate sensory perception and is particularly relevant for audition. Systems neuroscience is slowly uncovering the neural mechanisms underlying the behaviorally observed sensory entrainment effects in the human sensory system. The present article summarizes the prominent behavioral effects of sensory entrainment and reviews our current understanding of the neural basis of sensory entrainment, such as synchronized neural oscillations and, potentially, neural activation in the cortico-striatal system.

  8. Neural mechanism of acupuncture-modulated gastric motility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Qing Li; Bing Zhu; Pei-Jing Rong; Hui Ben; Yan-Hua Li

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the acupuncture-modulated gastric motility and its underlying neural mechanism.METHODS: Intragastric pressure and/or waves of gastric contraction in rats were recorded by intrapyloric balloon and changes of gastric motility induced by acupuncture stimulation were compared with the background activity before any stimulation. Gastrovagal or splanchnic-sympathetic nerves were recorded or cut respectively for investigating the involvement of autonomic nerve pathways. Spinalization experiment was also performed.RESULTS: Acupuncture-stimulation by exciting Aδ and/or C afferent fibers, could only modulate gastric motility.Acupuncture-stimulation on fore- and hind-limbs evoked a moderate gastric motility followed by increased vagus discharges with unchanged sympathetic activity, while the same stimulus to the acupoints in abdomen resulted in reversed effects on gastric motility and autonomic nervous activities. The inhibitory gastric response was completely abolished by splanchnic denervation, but the facilitative gastric response to stimulation of acupoints in limbs was not influenced, which was opposite to the effect when vagotomy was performed. The similar depressive effects were produced by the stimulation at the acupoints homo-segmental to the gastric innervation in the animals with or without spinalization. However, the facilitation induced by the stimulation at the acupoints heteto-segmental to the gastric innervation was not observed in the spinalized animals.CONCLUSION: Facilitative effects of stimulating hetero-segmental acupoints are involved in the intact preparation of vagal nerves and spinal cord, while the inhibitory response induced by stimulating homosegmental acupoints is involved in the intact preparation of sympathetic nerves. Only the acupuncture-stimulation with intensity over the threshold of Aδ and/or C afferent fibers can markedly modulate gastrointestinal motility.

  9. Axial level-dependent molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the genesis of the embryonic neural plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondoh, Hisato; Takada, Shinji; Takemoto, Tatsuya

    2016-06-01

    The transcription factor gene Sox2, centrally involved in neural primordial regulation, is activated by many enhancers. During the early stages of embryonic development, Sox2 is regulated by the enhancers N2 and N1 in the anterior neural plate (ANP) and posterior neural plate (PNP), respectively. This differential use of the enhancers reflects distinct regulatory mechanisms underlying the genesis of ANP and PNP. The ANP develops directly from the epiblast, triggered by nodal signal inhibition, and via the combined action of TFs SOX2, OTX2, POU3F1, and ZIC2, which promotes the the ANP development and inhibits other cell lineages. In contrast, the PNP is derived from neuromesodermal bipotential axial stem cells that develop into the neural plate when Sox2 is activated by the N1 enhancer, whereas they develop into the paraxial mesoderm when the N1 enhancer is repressed by the action of TBX6. The axial stem cells are maintained by the activity of WNT3a and T (Brachyury). However, at axial levels more anterior to the 8th somites (cervical levels), the development of both the neural plate and somite proceeds in the absence of WNT3a, T, or TBX6. These observations indicate that distinct molecular and cellular mechanisms determine neural plate genesis based on the axial level, and contradict the classical concept of the term "neural induction," which assumes a pan-neural plate mechanism.

  10. Neural mechanisms supporting the extraction of general knowledge across episodic memories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sweegers, C.C.G.; Takashima, A.; Fernández, G.; Talamini, L.M.

    2014-01-01

    General knowledge acquisition entails the extraction of statistical regularities from the environment. At high levels of complexity, this may involve the extraction, and consolidation, of associative regularities across event memories. The underlying neural mechanisms would likely involve a

  11. Neural mechanisms supporting the extraction of general knowledge across episodic memories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sweegers, C.C.; Takashima, A.; Fernandez, G.S.E.; Talamini, L.M.

    2014-01-01

    General knowledge acquisition entails the extraction of statistical regularities from the environment. At high levels of complexity, this may involve the extraction, and consolidation, of associative regularities across event memories. The underlying neural mechanisms would likely involve a hippocam

  12. Activity of the anterior cingulate cortex and ventral hippocampus underlie increases in contextual fear generalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Patrick K; Gilman, T Lee; Winiecki, Patrick; Riccio, David C; Jasnow, Aaron M

    2015-10-01

    Memories for context become less specific with time resulting in animals generalizing fear from training contexts to novel contexts. Though much attention has been given to the neural structures that underlie the long-term consolidation of a context fear memory, very little is known about the mechanisms responsible for the increase in fear generalization that occurs as the memory ages. Here, we examine the neural pattern of activation underlying the expression of a generalized context fear memory in male C57BL/6J mice. Animals were context fear conditioned and tested for fear in either the training context or a novel context at recent and remote time points. Animals were sacrificed and fluorescent in situ hybridization was performed to assay neural activation. Our results demonstrate activity of the prelimbic, infralimbic, and anterior cingulate (ACC) cortices as well as the ventral hippocampus (vHPC) underlie expression of a generalized fear memory. To verify the involvement of the ACC and vHPC in the expression of a generalized fear memory, animals were context fear conditioned and infused with 4% lidocaine into the ACC, dHPC, or vHPC prior to retrieval to temporarily inactivate these structures. The results demonstrate that activity of the ACC and vHPC is required for the expression of a generalized fear memory, as inactivation of these regions returned the memory to a contextually precise form. Current theories of time-dependent generalization of contextual memories do not predict involvement of the vHPC. Our data suggest a novel role of this region in generalized memory, which should be incorporated into current theories of time-dependent memory generalization. We also show that the dorsal hippocampus plays a prolonged role in contextually precise memories. Our findings suggest a possible interaction between the ACC and vHPC controls the expression of fear generalization.

  13. Mechanism of the differentiation of neural responses to excitatory input signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, D. G.; Kuznetsov, A. S.

    2012-08-01

    A dynamical mechanism of the generation of qualitatively different neural responses to typical excitatory stimuli such as an applied current or AMPA and NMDA synaptic currents has been presented. The mechanism is based on a nonlinearity simulating the calcium-dependent potassium current. It has been shown with the FitzHugh-Nagumo equation that, in the presence of such a nonlinearity, only the NMDA synaptic current can strongly increase the frequency of self-sustained oscillations, whereas other stimuli suppress neural activity.

  14. Novel CoQ10 antidiabetic mechanisms underlie its positive effect: modulation of insulin and adiponectine receptors, Tyrosine kinase, PI3K, glucose transporters, sRAGE and visfatin in insulin resistant/diabetic rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed M Amin

    Full Text Available As a nutritional supplement, coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 was tested previously in several models of diabetes and/or insulin resistance (IR; however, its exact mechanisms have not been profoundly explicated. Hence, the objective of this work is to verify some of the possible mechanisms that underlie its therapeutic efficacy. Moreover, the study aimed to assess the potential modulatory effect of CoQ10 on the antidiabetic action of glimebiride. An insulin resistance/type 2 diabetic model was adopted, in which rats were fed high fat/high fructose diet (HFFD for 6 weeks followed by a single sub-diabetogenic dose of streptozotocin (35 mg/kg, i.p.. At the end of the 7(th week animals were treated with CoQ10 (20 mg/kg, p.o and/or glimebiride (0.5 mg/kg, p.o for 2 weeks. CoQ10 alone opposed the HFFD effect and increased the hepatic/muscular content/activity of tyrosine kinase (TK, phosphatidylinositol kinase (PI3K, and adiponectin receptors. Conversely, it decreased the content/activity of insulin receptor isoforms, myeloperoxidase and glucose transporters (GLUT4; 2. Besides, it lowered significantly the serum levels of glucose, insulin, fructosamine and HOMA index, improved the serum lipid panel and elevated the levels of glutathione, sRAGE and adiponectin. On the other hand, CoQ10 lowered the serum levels of malondialdehyde, visfatin, ALT and AST. Surprisingly, CoQ10 effect surpassed that of glimepiride in almost all the assessed parameters, except for glucose, fructosamine, TK, PI3K, and GLUT4. Combining CoQ10 with glimepiride enhanced the effect of the latter on the aforementioned parameters.These results provided a new insight into the possible mechanisms by which CoQ10 improves insulin sensitivity and adjusts type 2 diabetic disorder. These mechanisms involve modulation of insulin and adiponectin receptors, as well as TK, PI3K, glucose transporters, besides improving lipid profile, redox system, sRAGE, and adipocytokines. The study also points to the

  15. Prediction of mechanical property of E4303 electrode using artificial neural network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐越兰; 黄俊; 王克鸿

    2004-01-01

    Based on the method of artificial neural network, a new approach has been devised to predict the mechanical property of E4303 electrode. The outlined predication model for determining the mechanical property of electrode was built upon the production data. The research leverages a back propagation algorithm as the neural network's learning rule. The result indicates that there are positive correlations between the predicted results and the practical production data. Hence, using the neural network, predication of electrode property can be realized. For the first time, this research provides a more scientific method for designing electrode.

  16. Dissociating neural mechanisms of temporal sequencing and processing phonemes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfand, Jenna R; Bookheimer, Susan Y

    2003-06-01

    Using fMRI, we sought to determine whether the posterior, superior portion of Broca's area performs operations on phoneme segments specifically or implements processes general to sequencing discrete units. Twelve healthy volunteers performed two sequence manipulation tasks and one matching task, using strings of syllables and hummed notes. The posterior portion of Broca's area responded specifically to the sequence manipulation tasks, independent of whether the stimuli were composed of phonemes or hummed notes. In contrast, the left supramarginal gyrus was somewhat more specific to sequencing phoneme segments. These results suggest a functional dissociation of the canonical left hemisphere language regions encompassing the "phonological loop," with the left posterior inferior frontal gyrus responding not to the sound structure of language but rather to sequential operations that may underlie the ability to form words out of dissociable elements.

  17. Neural mechanisms of uncon-scious visual motion priming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The neural correlates of the motion priming were examined in normal young subjects using event-related brain potentials (ERPs) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Visual motion perception can be uncon-sciously biased in favor of a particular direction by a pre-ceding motion in that direction. Motion priming first in-volved an enhancement of ERP amplitude about 100 ms fol-lowing the onset of motion. The amplitudes of ERP compo-nents after 350 ms were also increased. The fMRI results suggest that the early-latency effect reflects modulation of neural responses in extrastriate cortex. Higher-level visual processing areas, including cortical regions MT/MST and the intraparietal cortices were also activated. The findings provide direct evidence that unconscious priming of motion perception is the result of interaction of direction-selective neural responses to motion stimuli. The results cannot be accounted for by refractoriness of neural responses, but in-stead support a theory of motion priming based on motion opponency, as proposed in computational models.

  18. Neural mechanisms of context-driven conscious visual perception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klink, P.C.

    2011-01-01

    There is an extensive neural puzzle to be solved between the moment that patterns of light first excite the photoreceptors in our retinas and the moment that we become aware of a visual scene. The effortlessness with which the brain usually solves this puzzle indicates that there must be an elaborat

  19. Mechanics of neurulation: From classical to current perspectives on the physical mechanics that shape, fold, and form the neural tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayraghavan, Deepthi S; Davidson, Lance A

    2016-09-13

    Neural tube defects arise from mechanical failures in the process of neurulation. At the most fundamental level, formation of the neural tube relies on coordinated, complex tissue movements that mechanically transform the flat neural epithelium into a lumenized epithelial tube (Davidson, 2012). The nature of this mechanical transformation has mystified embryologists, geneticists, and clinicians for more than 100 years. Early embryologists pondered the physical mechanisms that guide this transformation. Detailed observations of cell and tissue movements as well as experimental embryological manipulations allowed researchers to generate and test elementary hypotheses of the intrinsic and extrinsic forces acting on the neural tissue. Current research has turned toward understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying neurulation. Genetic and molecular perturbation have identified a multitude of subcellular components that correlate with cell behaviors and tissue movements during neural tube formation. In this review, we focus on methods and conceptual frameworks that have been applied to the study of amphibian neurulation that can be used to determine how molecular and physical mechanisms are integrated and responsible for neurulation. We will describe how qualitative descriptions and quantitative measurements of strain, force generation, and tissue material properties as well as simulations can be used to understand how embryos use morphogenetic programs to drive neurulation. Birth Defects Research (Part A), 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Neural mechanisms underlying auditory feedback control of speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourville, Jason A; Reilly, Kevin J; Guenther, Frank H

    2008-02-01

    The neural substrates underlying auditory feedback control of speech were investigated using a combination of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and computational modeling. Neural responses were measured while subjects spoke monosyllabic words under two conditions: (i) normal auditory feedback of their speech and (ii) auditory feedback in which the first formant frequency of their speech was unexpectedly shifted in real time. Acoustic measurements showed compensation to the shift within approximately 136 ms of onset. Neuroimaging revealed increased activity in bilateral superior temporal cortex during shifted feedback, indicative of neurons coding mismatches between expected and actual auditory signals, as well as right prefrontal and Rolandic cortical activity. Structural equation modeling revealed increased influence of bilateral auditory cortical areas on right frontal areas during shifted speech, indicating that projections from auditory error cells in posterior superior temporal cortex to motor correction cells in right frontal cortex mediate auditory feedback control of speech.

  1. Psychological and neural mechanisms of experimental extinction: a selective review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delamater, Andrew R; Westbrook, R Frederick

    2014-02-01

    The present review examines key psychological concepts in the study of experimental extinction and implications these have for an understanding of the underlying neurobiology of extinction learning. We suggest that many of the signature characteristics of extinction learning (spontaneous recovery, renewal, reinstatement, rapid reacquisition) can be accommodated by the standard associative learning theory assumption that extinction results in partial erasure of the original learning together with new inhibitory learning. Moreover, we consider recent behavioral and neural evidence that supports the partial erasure view of extinction, but also note shortcomings in our understanding of extinction circuits as these relate to the negative prediction error concept. Recent work suggests that common prediction error and stimulus-specific prediction error terms both may be required to explain neural plasticity both in acquisition and extinction learning. In addition, we suggest that many issues in the content of extinction learning have not been fully addressed in current research, but that neurobiological approaches should be especially helpful in addressing such issues. These include questions about the nature of extinction learning (excitatory CS-No US, inhibitory CS-US learning, occasion setting processes), especially as this relates to studies of the micro-circuitry of extinction, as well as its representational content (sensory, motivational, response). An additional understudied problem in extinction research is the role played by attention processes and their underlying neural networks, although some research and theory converge on the idea that extinction is accompanied by attention decrements (i.e., habituation-like processes).

  2. Expert Diagnosing System for a Rotation Mechanism Based on a Neural Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    By combining the artificial neural network with the rule reasoning expert system,an expert diagnosing system for a rotation mechanism was established. This expert system takes advantage of both a neural network and a rule reasoning expert system; it can also make use of all kinds of knowledge in the repository to diagnose the fault with the positive and negative mixing reasoning mode. The binary system was adopted to denote all kinds of fault in a rotation mechanism. The neural networks were trained with a random parallel algorithm (Alopex). The expert system overcomes the self-learning difficulty of the rule reasoning expert system and the shortcoming of poor system control of the neural network.The expert system developed in this paper has powerful diagnosing ability.

  3. More than spikes: common oscillatory mechanisms for content specific neural representations during perception and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watrous, Andrew J; Fell, Juergen; Ekstrom, Arne D; Axmacher, Nikolai

    2015-04-01

    Although previous research into the mechanisms underlying sensory and episodic representations has primarily focused on changes in neural firing rate, more recent evidence suggests that neural oscillations also contribute to these representations. Here, we argue that multiplexed oscillatory power and phase contribute to neural representations at the mesoscopic scale, complementary to neuronal firing. Reviewing recent studies which used oscillatory activity to decipher content-specific neural representations, we identify oscillatory mechanisms common to both sensory and episodic memory representations and incorporate these into a model of episodic encoding and retrieval. This model advances the idea that oscillations provide a reference frame for phase-coded item representations during memory encoding and that shifts in oscillatory frequency and phase coordinate ensemble activity during memory retrieval.

  4. Use of Artificial Neural Network for Predicting the Mechanical Property of Low Carbon Steel

    OpenAIRE

    Somkuwar, Vandana

    2013-01-01

    For product development manufacturers and designers need information about the existing materials and new material and its properties as early as possible. This paper presents a method of predicting the properties of unknown material using artificial neural network. The developed neural network model is employed for simulations of the relationship between mechanical property and the chemical composition of low carbon steel. Simulating and analyzing result shows that network model can effectiv...

  5. Mechanical Property Prediction of Commercially Pure Titanium Welds with Artificial Neural Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanhong WEI; H.K.D.H.Bhadeshia; T. Sourmail

    2005-01-01

    Factors that affect weld mechanical properties of commercially pure titanium have been investigated using artificial neural networks. Input data were obtained from mechanical testing of single-pass, autogenous welds, and neural network models were used to predict the ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, elongation, reduction of area,Vickers hardness and Rockwell B hardness. The results show that both oxygen and nitrogen have the most significant effects on the strength while hydrogen has the least effect over the range investigated. Predictions of the mechanical properties are shown and agree well with those obtained using the 'oxygen equivalent' (OE) equations.

  6. Neural mechanisms underlying melodic perception and memory for pitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatorre, R J; Evans, A C; Meyer, E

    1994-04-01

    The neural correlates of music perception were studied by measuring cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes with positron emission tomography (PET). Twelve volunteers were scanned using the bolus water method under four separate conditions: (1) listening to a sequence of noise bursts, (2) listening to unfamiliar tonal melodies, (3) comparing the pitch of the first two notes of the same set of melodies, and (4) comparing the pitch of the first and last notes of the melodies. The latter two conditions were designed to investigate short-term pitch retention under low or high memory load, respectively. Subtraction of the obtained PET images, superimposed on matched MRI scans, provides anatomical localization of CBF changes associated with specific cognitive functions. Listening to melodies, relative to acoustically matched noise sequences, resulted in CBF increases in the right superior temporal and right occipital cortices. Pitch judgments of the first two notes of each melody, relative to passive listening to the same stimuli, resulted in right frontal-lobe activation. Analysis of the high memory load condition relative to passive listening revealed the participation of a number of cortical and subcortical regions, notably in the right frontal and right temporal lobes, as well as in parietal and insular cortex. Both pitch judgment conditions also revealed CBF decreases within the left primary auditory cortex. We conclude that specialized neural systems in the right superior temporal cortex participate in perceptual analysis of melodies; pitch comparisons are effected via a neural network that includes right prefrontal cortex, but active retention of pitch involves the interaction of right temporal and frontal cortices.

  7. Neural Mechanisms of Cognitive Dissonance (Revised): An EEG Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colosio, Marco; Shestakova, Anna; Nikulin, Vadim V; Blagovechtchenski, Evgeny; Klucharev, Vasily

    2017-05-17

    Cognitive dissonance theory suggests that our preferences are modulated by the mere act of choosing. A choice between two similarly valued alternatives creates psychological tension (cognitive dissonance) that is reduced by a postdecisional reevaluation of the alternatives. We measured EEG of human subjects during rest and free-choice paradigm. Our study demonstrates that choices associated with stronger cognitive dissonance trigger a larger negative frontocentral evoked response similar to error-related negativity, which has in turn been implicated in general performance monitoring. Furthermore, the amplitude of the evoked response is correlated with the reevaluation of the alternatives. We also found a link between individual neural dynamics (long-range temporal correlations) of the frontocentral cortices during rest and follow-up neural and behavioral effects of cognitive dissonance. Individuals with stronger resting-state long-range temporal correlations demonstrated a greater postdecisional reevaluation of the alternatives and larger evoked brain responses associated with stronger cognitive dissonance. Thus, our results suggest that cognitive dissonance is reflected in both resting-state and choice-related activity of the prefrontal cortex as part of the general performance-monitoring circuitry.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Contrary to traditional decision theory, behavioral studies repeatedly demonstrate that our preferences are modulated by the mere act of choosing. Difficult choices generate psychological (cognitive) dissonance, which is reduced by the postdecisional devaluation of unchosen options. We found that decisions associated with a higher level of cognitive dissonance elicited a stronger negative frontocentral deflection that peaked ∼60 ms after the response. This activity shares similar spatial and temporal features as error-related negativity, the electrophysiological correlate of performance monitoring. Furthermore, the frontocentral resting

  8. Behavioral and Neural Mechanisms of Overgeneralization in Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufer, Offir; Israeli, David; Paz, Rony

    2016-03-21

    Overgeneralization of dangerous stimuli is a possible etiological account for anxiety disorders, yet the underlying behavioral and neural origins remain vague. Specifically, it is unclear whether this is a choice behavior in an unsafe environment ("better safe than sorry") or also a fundamental change in how the stimulus is perceived. We show that anxiety patients have wider generalization for loss-conditioned tone when compared to controls and do so even in a safe context that requires a different behavioral policy. Moreover, patients overgeneralized for gain-conditioned tone as well. Imaging (fMRI) revealed that in anxiety only, activations during conditioning in the dACC and the putamen were correlated with later overgeneralization of loss and gain, respectively, whereas valence distinction in the amygdala and hippocampus during conditioning mediated the difference between loss and gain generalization. During generalization itself, neural discrimination based on multivoxel patterns in auditory cortex and amygdala revealed specific stimulus-related plasticity. Our results suggest that overgeneralization in anxiety has perceptual origins and involves affective modulation of stimulus representations in primary cortices and amygdala.

  9. Neural Mechanism of Facial Expression Perception in Intellectually Gifted Adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Tongran; Xiao, Tong; Li, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    The current study investigated the relationship between general intelligence and the three stages of facial expression processing. Two groups of adolescents with different levels of general intelligence were required to identify three types of facial expressions (happy, sad, and neutral faces...... average IQ adolescents during the facial expression identification task. The electrophysiological responses showed that no significant IQ-related differences were found for P1 responses during the early visual processing stage. During the middle processing stage, high IQ adolescents had faster structural...... attentional modulation, with larger late positive potential (LPP) amplitudes compared to adolescents with average IQ. The current study revealed that adolescents with different intellectual levels used different neural dynamic processes during these three stages in the processing of facial expressions....

  10. Neural Mechanisms of Hierarchical Planning in a Virtual Subway Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaguer, Jan; Spiers, Hugo; Hassabis, Demis; Summerfield, Christopher

    2016-05-18

    Planning allows actions to be structured in pursuit of a future goal. However, in natural environments, planning over multiple possible future states incurs prohibitive computational costs. To represent plans efficiently, states can be clustered hierarchically into "contexts". For example, representing a journey through a subway network as a succession of individual states (stations) is more costly than encoding a sequence of contexts (lines) and context switches (line changes). Here, using functional brain imaging, we asked humans to perform a planning task in a virtual subway network. Behavioral analyses revealed that humans executed a hierarchically organized plan. Brain activity in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex and premotor cortex scaled with the cost of hierarchical plan representation and unique neural signals in these regions signaled contexts and context switches. These results suggest that humans represent hierarchical plans using a network of caudal prefrontal structures. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  11. Movement-Based Priming: Clinical Applications and Neural Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoykov, Mary Ellen; Corcos, Daniel Montie; Madhavan, Sangeetha

    2017-01-01

    Priming can be described as behavior change generated by preceding stimuli. Although various types of priming have been long studied in the field of psychology, priming that targets motor cortex is a relatively new topic of research in the fields of motor control and rehabilitation. In reference to a rehabilitation intervention, priming is categorized as a restorative approach. There are a myriad of possible priming approaches including noninvasive brain stimulation, motor imagery, and sensory-based priming, to name a few. The authors report on movement-based priming which, compared to other priming types, is less frequently examined and under reported. Movement-based priming includes, but is not limited to, bilateral motor priming, unilateral priming, and aerobic exercise. Clinical and neural mechanistic aspects of movement-based priming techniques are explored.

  12. Neural regulatory mechanism of desire for food: revealed by magnetoencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Takahiro; Tanaka, Masaaki; Ishii, Akira; Fujimoto, Shigeo; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi

    2014-01-16

    Currently, little is known about the brain function that allows individuals to suppress eating behavior. The present study used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to examine changes in neural activity over time that were related to suppression of motivation to eat in 11 healthy males. The MEG experiment consisted of four motivation sessions and four suppression sessions in an alternating and counterbalanced order. During MEG recordings, participants viewed a set of food pictures and mosaic pictures projected onto a screen, and were then asked to rate their motivation to eat and the suppression of the motivation to eat during the recordings. The present study demonstrated a higher β-band (13-25 Hz) event-related synchronization (ERS) level during the suppression sessions relative to the motivation sessions in the left supplementary motor area (SMA) 200-300 ms after the start of food picture presentation. Similar differences were also observed in θ-band (4-8 Hz) event-related desynchronization (ERD) in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) after 500-600 ms. Negative relationships were observed between these levels of MEG responses and the number of food items for which the participants reported the motivation to eat during the MEG recordings. These findings indicate that the left DLPFC and SMA, particularly the DLPFC, play prominent roles in the suppression of motivation to eat. This may help to clarify the temporal aspects of the neural basis of self-control of appetitive motivation as well as aid development of self-control strategies such as cognitive behavioral therapy for patients with disordered appetite.

  13. Hippocampus: cognitive processes and neural representations that underlie declarative memory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eichenbaum, Howard

    2004-01-01

    .... Recent studies using functional brain imaging in humans and neuropsychological analyses of humans and animals with hippocampal damage have revealed some of the elemental cognitive processes mediated by the hippocampus...

  14. Neural Mechanisms of Illusory Motion: Evidence from ERP Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Y. A. N. Yun

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available ERPs were used to examine the neural correlates of illusory motion, by presenting the Rice Wave illusion (CI, its two variants (WI and NI and a real motion video (RM. Results showed that: Firstly, RM elicited a more negative deflection than CI, NI and WI between 200–350ms. Secondly, between 500–600ms, CI elicited a more positive deflection than NI and WI, and RM elicited a more positive deflection than CI, what's more interesting was the sequential enhancement of brain activity with the corresponding motion strength. We inferred that the former component might reflect the successful encoding of the local motion signals in detectors at the lower stage; while the latter one might be involved in the intensive representations of visual input in real/illusory motion perception, this was the whole motion-signal organization in the later stage of motion perception. Finally, between 1185–1450 ms, a significant positive component was found between illusory/real motion tasks than NI (no motion. Overall, we demonstrated that there was a stronger deflection under the corresponding lager motion strength. These results reflected not only the different temporal patterns between illusory and real motion but also extending to their distinguishing working memory representation and storage.

  15. Neural mechanism underlying autobiographical memory modulated by remoteness and emotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Ruiyang; Fu, Yan; Wang, DaHua; Yao, Li; Long, Zhiying

    2012-03-01

    Autobiographical memory is the ability to recollect past events from one's own life. Both emotional tone and memory remoteness can influence autobiographical memory retrieval along the time axis of one's life. Although numerous studies have been performed to investigate brain regions involved in retrieving processes of autobiographical memory, the effect of emotional tone and memory age on autobiographical memory retrieval remains to be clarified. Moreover, whether the involvement of hippocampus in consolidation of autobiographical events is time dependent or independent has been controversial. In this study, we investigated the effect of memory remoteness (factor1: recent and remote) and emotional valence (factor2: positive and negative) on neural correlates underlying autobiographical memory by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technique. Although all four conditions activated some common regions known as "core" regions in autobiographical memory retrieval, there are some other regions showing significantly different activation for recent versus remote and positive versus negative memories. In particular, we found that bilateral hippocampal regions were activated in the four conditions regardless of memory remoteness and emotional valence. Thus, our study confirmed some findings of previous studies and provided further evidence to support the multi-trace theory which believes that the role of hippocampus involved in autobiographical memory retrieval is time-independent and permanent in memory consolidation.

  16. Neural mechanisms of perceptual grouping in human visual cortex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAO Lihua; HAN Shihui; GUO Chunyan; JIANG Yi

    2004-01-01

    The current work examined neural substrates of perceptual grouping in human visual cortex using event-related potential (ERP) recording. Stimulus arrays consisted of local elements that were either evenly spaced (uniform stimuli) or grouped into columns or rows by proximity or color similarity (grouping stimuli). High-density ERPs were recorded while subjects identified orientations of perceptual groups in stimulus arrays that were presented randomly in one of the four quadrants of the visual field. Both uniform and grouping stimulus arrays elicited an early ERP component (C1), which peaked at about 70 ms after stimulus onset and changed its polarity as a function of stimulated elevations. Dipole modeling based on realistic- head boundary-element models revealed generators of the C1 component in the calcarine cortex. The C1 was modulated by perceptual grouping of local elements based on proximity, and this grouping effect was stronger in the upper than in the lower visual field. The findings provide ERP evidence for the engagement of human primary visual cortex in the early stage of perceptual grouping.

  17. Neural Mechanism for Mirrored Self-face Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Motoaki; Miyauchi, Carlos Makoto; Kotozaki, Yuka; Akimoto, Yoritaka; Nozawa, Takayuki; Yomogida, Yukihito; Hanawa, Sugiko; Yamamoto, Yuki; Sakuma, Atsushi; Nakagawa, Seishu; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2015-09-01

    Self-face recognition in the mirror is considered to involve multiple processes that integrate 2 perceptual cues: temporal contingency of the visual feedback on one's action (contingency cue) and matching with self-face representation in long-term memory (figurative cue). The aim of this study was to examine the neural bases of these processes by manipulating 2 perceptual cues using a "virtual mirror" system. This system allowed online dynamic presentations of real-time and delayed self- or other facial actions. Perception-level processes were identified as responses to only a single perceptual cue. The effect of the contingency cue was identified in the cuneus. The regions sensitive to the figurative cue were subdivided by the response to a static self-face, which was identified in the right temporal, parietal, and frontal regions, but not in the bilateral occipitoparietal regions. Semantic- or integration-level processes, including amodal self-representation and belief validation, which allow modality-independent self-recognition and the resolution of potential conflicts between perceptual cues, respectively, were identified in distinct regions in the right frontal and insular cortices. The results are supportive of the multicomponent notion of self-recognition and suggest a critical role for contingency detection in the co-emergence of self-recognition and empathy in infants.

  18. Quantification of Internal Stress-Strain Fields in Human Tendon: Unraveling the Mechanisms that Underlie Regional Tendon Adaptations and Mal-Adaptations to Mechanical Loading and the Effectiveness of Therapeutic Eccentric Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maganaris, Constantinos N.; Chatzistergos, Panagiotis; Reeves, Neil D.; Narici, Marco V.

    2017-01-01

    By virtue of their anatomical location between muscles and bones, tendons make it possible to transform contractile force to joint rotation and locomotion. However, tendons do not behave as rigid links, but exhibit viscoelastic tensile properties, thereby affecting the length and contractile force in the in-series muscle, but also storing and releasing elastic stain energy as some tendons are stretched and recoiled in a cyclic manner during locomotion. In the late 90s, advancements were made in the application of ultrasound scanning that allowed quantifying the tensile deformability and mechanical properties of human tendons in vivo. Since then, the main principles of the ultrasound-based method have been applied by numerous research groups throughout the world and showed that tendons increase their tensile stiffness in response to exercise training and chronic mechanical loading, in general, by increasing their size and improving their intrinsic material. It is often assumed that these changes occur homogenously, in the entire body of the tendon, but recent findings indicate that the adaptations may in fact take place in some but not all tendon regions. The present review focuses on these regional adaptability features and highlights two paradigms where they are particularly evident: (a) Chronic mechanical loading in healthy tendons, and (b) tendinopathy. In the former loading paradigm, local tendon adaptations indicate that certain regions may “see,” and therefore adapt to, increased levels of stress. In the latter paradigm, local pathological features indicate that certain tendon regions may be “stress-shielded” and degenerate over time. Eccentric exercise protocols have successfully been used in the management of tendinopathy, without much sound understanding of the mechanisms underpinning their effectiveness. For insertional tendinopathy, in particular, it is possible that the effectiveness of a loading/rehabilitation protocol depends on the topography

  19. A mechanism regulating the onset of Sox2 expression in the embryonic neural plate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costis Papanayotou

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In vertebrate embryos, the earliest definitive marker for the neural plate, which will give rise to the entire central nervous system, is the transcription factor Sox2. Although some of the extracellular signals that regulate neural plate fate have been identified, we know very little about the mechanisms controlling Sox2 expression and thus neural plate identity. Here, we use electroporation for gain- and loss-of-function in the chick embryo, in combination with bimolecular fluorescence complementation, two-hybrid screens, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and reporter assays to study protein interactions that regulate expression of N2, the earliest enhancer of Sox2 to be activated and which directs expression to the largest part of the neural plate. We show that interactions between three coiled-coil domain proteins (ERNI, Geminin, and BERT, the heterochromatin proteins HP1alpha and HP1gamma acting as repressors, and the chromatin-remodeling enzyme Brm acting as activator control the N2 enhancer. We propose that this mechanism regulates the timing of Sox2 expression as part of the process of establishing neural plate identity.

  20. Studies of the neural mechanisms of deep brain stimulation in rodent models of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jing-Yu; Shi, Li-Hong; Luo, Fei; Zhang, Wang-Ming; Woodward, Donald J

    2008-01-01

    Several rodent models of deep brain stimulation (DBS) have been developed in recent years. Electrophysiological and neurochemical studies have been performed to examine the mechanisms underlying the effects of DBS. In vitro studies have provided deep insights into the role of ion channels in response to brain stimulation. In vivo studies reveal neural responses in the context of intact neural circuits. Most importantly, recording of neural responses to behaviorally effective DBS in freely moving animals provides a direct means for examining how DBS modulates the basal ganglia thalamocortical circuits and thereby improves motor function. DBS can modulate firing rate, normalize irregular burst firing patterns and reduce low frequency oscillations associated with the Parkinsonian state. Our current efforts are focused on elucidating the mechanisms by which DBS effects on neural circuitry improve motor performance. New behavioral models and improved recording techniques will aide researchers conducting future DBS studies in a variety of behavioral modalities and enable new treatment strategies to be explored, such as closed-loop stimulations based on real time computation of ensemble neural activity.

  1. A novel mechanism for switching a neural system from one state to another

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chethan Pandarinath

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available An animal’s ability to rapidly adjust to new conditions is essential to its survival. The nervous system, then, must be built with the flexibility to adjust, or shift, its processing capabilities on the fly. To understand how this flexibility comes about, we tracked a well-known behavioral shift, a visual integration shift, down to its underlying circuitry, and found that it is produced by a novel mechanism – a change in gap junction coupling that can turn a cell class on and off. The results showed that the turning on and off of a cell class shifted the circuit’s behavior from one state to another, and, likewise, the animal’s behavior. The widespread presence of similar gap junction-coupled networks in the brain suggests that this mechanism may underlie other behavioral shifts as well.

  2. Mechanisms and Neural Basis of Object and Pattern Recognition: A Study with Chess Experts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilalic, Merim; Langner, Robert; Erb, Michael; Grodd, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Comparing experts with novices offers unique insights into the functioning of cognition, based on the maximization of individual differences. Here we used this expertise approach to disentangle the mechanisms and neural basis behind two processes that contribute to everyday expertise: object and pattern recognition. We compared chess experts and…

  3. Believing versus interacting: Behavioural and neural mechanisms underlying interpersonal coordination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konvalinka, Ivana; Bauer, Markus; Kilner, James

    When two people engage in a bidirectional interaction with each other, they use both bottom-up sensorimotor mechanisms such as monitoring and adapting to the behaviour of the other, as well as top-down cognitive processes, modulating their beliefs and allowing them to make decisions. Most researc...

  4. An adaptive neural mechanism for acoustic motion perception with varying sparsity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaikh, Danish; Manoonpong, Poramate

    2017-01-01

    extracts directional information via a model of the peripheral auditory system of lizards. The mechanism uses only this directional information obtained via specific motor behaviour to learn the angular velocity of unoccluded sound stimuli in motion. In nature however the stimulus being tracked may.......e. extracting information about its direction and velocity. Here we focus on auditory motion perception of sound stimuli, which is poorly understood as compared to its visual counterpart. In earlier work we have developed a bio-inspired neural learning mechanism for acoustic motion perception. The mechanism......Hz in both simulation and practice. Three instances of each stimuli are employed, differing in their movement velocities–0.5 deg / time step, 1.0 deg / time step and 1.5 deg / time step. To validate the approach in practice, we implement the proposed neural mechanism on a wheeled mobile robot and evaluate...

  5. Glucocorticoids and the Brain: Neural Mechanisms Regulating the Stress Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazi, Shawn N; Friedman, Aaron R; Kaufer, Daniela; Sakhai, Samuel A

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, we describe the central role of the brain in the glucocorticoid mediated stress response. We describe the mechanisms by which the brain gauges the severity of stress, mechanisms of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) regulation, and how various sub-systems of the brain respond to glucocorticoid (GC) signaling to regulate stress behavior. In particular, we focus on the hippocampus, pre-frontal cortex, and amygdala, where GCs can induce a series of changes. Finally, we briefly discuss an apparent paradox in GC signaling: while exposure to glucocorticoids promotes the survival of an organism during acute stress, these same hormones in chronic excess can also cause damage and promote illness.

  6. Non-reward neural mechanisms in the orbitofrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolls, Edmund T; Deco, Gustavo

    2016-10-01

    Single neurons in the primate orbitofrontal cortex respond when an expected reward is not obtained, and behaviour must change. The human lateral orbitofrontal cortex is activated when non-reward, or loss occurs. The neuronal computation of this negative reward prediction error is fundamental for the emotional changes associated with non-reward, and with changing behaviour. Little is known about the neuronal mechanism. Here we propose a mechanism, which we formalize into a neuronal network model, which is simulated to enable the operation of the mechanism to be investigated. A single attractor network has a reward population (or pool) of neurons that is activated by expected reward, and maintain their firing until, after a time, synaptic depression reduces the firing rate in this neuronal population. If a reward outcome is not received, the decreasing firing in the reward neurons releases the inhibition implemented by inhibitory neurons, and this results in a second population of non-reward neurons to start and continue firing encouraged by the spiking-related noise in the network. If a reward outcome is received, this keeps the reward attractor active, and this through the inhibitory neurons prevents the non-reward attractor neurons from being activated. If an expected reward has been signalled, and the reward attractor neurons are active, their firing can be directly inhibited by a non-reward outcome, and the non-reward neurons become activated because the inhibition on them is released. The neuronal mechanisms in the orbitofrontal cortex for computing negative reward prediction error are important, for this system may be over-reactive in depression, under-reactive in impulsive behaviour, and may influence the dopaminergic 'prediction error' neurons.

  7. Shared Neural Mechanisms Underlying Social Warmth and Physical Warmth

    OpenAIRE

    Inagaki, TK; Eisenberger, NI

    2013-01-01

    Many of people's closest bonds grow out of socially warm exchanges and the warm feelings associated with being socially connected. Indeed, the neurobiological mechanisms underlying thermoregulation may be shared by those that regulate social warmth, the experience of feeling connected to other people. To test this possibility, we placed participants in a functional MRI scanner and asked them to (a) read socially warm and neutral messages from friends and family and (b) hold warm and neutral-t...

  8. Neural and behavioral mechanisms of proactive and reactive inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Heidi C; Bucci, David J

    2016-10-01

    Response inhibition is an important component of adaptive behavior. Substantial prior research has focused on reactive inhibition, which refers to the cessation of a motor response that is already in progress. More recently, a growing number of studies have begun to examine mechanisms underlying proactive inhibition, whereby preparatory processes result in a response being withheld before it is initiated. It has become apparent that proactive inhibition is an essential component of the overall ability to regulate behavior and has implications for the success of reactive inhibition. Moreover, successful inhibition relies on learning the meaning of specific environmental cues that signal when a behavioral response should be withheld. Proactive inhibitory control is mediated by stopping goals, which reflect the desired outcome of inhibition and include information about how and when inhibition should be implemented. However, little is known about the circuits and cellular processes that encode and represent features in the environment that indicate the necessity for proactive inhibition or how these representations are implemented in response inhibition. In this article, we will review the brain circuits and systems involved in implementing inhibitory control through both reactive and proactive mechanisms. We also comment on possible cellular mechanisms that may contribute to inhibitory control processes, noting that substantial further research is necessary in this regard. Furthermore, we will outline a number of ways in which the temporal dynamics underlying the generation of the proactive inhibitory signal may be particularly important for parsing out the neurobiological correlates that contribute to the learning processes underlying various aspects of inhibitory control.

  9. Acupuncture for Visceral Pain: Neural Substrates and Potential Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuping Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Visceral pain is the most common form of pain caused by varied diseases and a major reason for patients to seek medical consultation. Despite much advances, the pathophysiological mechanism is still poorly understood comparing with its somatic counterpart and, as a result, the therapeutic efficacy is usually unsatisfactory. Acupuncture has long been used for the management of numerous disorders in particular pain and visceral pain, characterized by the high therapeutic benefits and low adverse effects. Previous findings suggest that acupuncture depresses pain via activation of a number of neurotransmitters or modulators including opioid peptides, serotonin, norepinephrine, and adenosine centrally and peripherally. It endows us, by advancing the understanding of the role of ion channels and gut microbiota in pain process, with novel perspectives to probe the mechanisms underlying acupuncture analgesia. In this review, after describing the visceral innervation and the relevant afferent pathways, in particular the ion channels in visceral nociception, we propose three principal mechanisms responsible for acupuncture induced benefits on visceral pain. Finally, potential topics are highlighted regarding the future studies in this field.

  10. Neural Acupuncture Unit: A New Concept for Interpreting Effects and Mechanisms of Acupuncture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhang-Jin; Wang, Xiao-Min; McAlonan, Grainne M.

    2012-01-01

    When an acupuncture needle is inserted into a designated point on the body and mechanical or electrical stimulation is delivered, various neural and neuroactive components are activated. The collection of the activated neural and neuroactive components distributed in the skin, muscle, and connective tissues surrounding the inserted needle is defined as a neural acupuncture unit (NAU). The traditionally defined acupoints represent an anatomical landmark system that indicates local sites where NAUs may contain relatively dense and concentrated neural and neuroactive components, upon which acupuncture stimulation would elicit a more efficient therapeutic response. The NAU-based local mechanisms of biochemical and biophysical reactions play an important role in acupuncture-induced analgesia. Different properties of NAUs are associated with different components of needling sensation. There exist several central pathways to convey NAU-induced acupuncture signals, Electroacupuncture (EA) frequency-specific neurochemical effects are related to different peripheral and central pathways transmitting afferent signals from different frequency of NAU stimulation. More widespread and intense neuroimaging responses of brain regions to acupuncture may be a consequence of more efficient NAU stimulation modes. The introduction of the conception of NAU provides a new theoretical approach to interpreting effects and mechanisms of acupuncture in modern biomedical knowledge framework. PMID:22474503

  11. Using Neural Networks in Decision Making for a Reconfigurable Electro Mechanical Actuator (EMA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latino, Carl D.

    2001-01-01

    The objectives of this project were to demonstrate applicability and advantages of a neural network approach for evaluating the performance of an electro-mechanical actuator (EMA). The EMA in question was intended for the X-37 Advanced Technology Vehicle. It will have redundant components for safety and reliability. The neural networks for this application are to monitor the operation of the redundant electronics that control the actuator in real time and decide on the operating configuration. The system we proposed consists of the actuator, sensors, control circuitry and dedicated (embedded) processors. The main purpose of the study was to develop suitable hardware and neural network capable of allowing real time reconfiguration decisions to be made. This approach was to be compared to other methods such as fuzzy logic and knowledge based systems considered for the same application. Over the course of the project a more general objective was the identification of the other neural network applications and the education of interested NASA personnel on the topic of Neural Networks.

  12. Coupling between mechanical and neural behaviour in the human first dorsal interosseous muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Anna L; Taylor, Janet L; Gandevia, Simon C; Butler, Jane E

    2009-02-15

    The neural drive to a muscle and its biomechanical properties determine the force at a joint. These factors may be centrally linked. We studied the relationship between the ability of first dorsal interosseous muscle (FDI) to generate index flexion force around the metacarpophalangeal joint and the neural drive it receives in a voluntary contraction. The role of FDI was assessed in two thumb postures, thumb 'down' (thumb abducted) and thumb 'up' (thumb extended), and at different thumb carpometacarpal angles. These postures were designed to change acutely the flexion moment arm for FDI. The flexion twitch force evoked by supramaximal stimulation of the ulnar nerve was measured in the two postures and the change in moment arm was assessed by ultrasonography. Subjects also made voluntary flexion contractions of the index finger of approximately 5 N in both postures during which neural drive to FDI and the long finger flexor muscles was measured using surface EMG. Recordings of FDI EMG were normalized to the maximal M wave. Five of the 15 subjects also had a radial nerve block to eliminate any co-contraction of the extensor muscles, and extensor muscle EMG was monitored in subjects without radial nerve block. Compared to thumb up, flexion twitch force was approximately 60% greater, and the flexion moment arm was approximately 50% greater with the thumb down. There was minimal effect of altered carpometacarpal angle on flexion twitch force for either thumb posture. During voluntary flexion contractions, normalized FDI EMG was approximately 28% greater with thumb down, compared to thumb up, with no consistent change in neural drive to the long flexors. Hence, the contribution of FDI to index finger flexion can be altered by changes in thumb position. This is linked to changes in neural drive to FDI such that neural drive increases when the mechanical contribution increases, and provides a central mechanism to produce efficient voluntary movements.

  13. Neural mechanisms influencing interlimb coordination during locomotion in humans: presynaptic modulation of forearm H-reflexes during leg cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Tsuyoshi; Mezzarane, Rinaldo A; Klarner, Taryn; Barss, Trevor S; Hundza, Sandra R; Komiyama, Tomoyoshi; Zehr, E Paul

    2013-01-01

    Presynaptic inhibition of transmission between Ia afferent terminals and alpha motoneurons (Ia PSI) is a major control mechanism associated with soleus H-reflex modulation during human locomotion. Rhythmic arm cycling suppresses soleus H-reflex amplitude by increasing segmental Ia PSI. There is a reciprocal organization in the human nervous system such that arm cycling modulates H-reflexes in leg muscles and leg cycling modulates H-reflexes in forearm muscles. However, comparatively little is known about mechanisms subserving the effects from leg to arm. Using a conditioning-test (C-T) stimulation paradigm, the purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that changes in Ia PSI underlie the modulation of H-reflexes in forearm flexor muscles during leg cycling. Subjects performed leg cycling and static activation while H-reflexes were evoked in forearm flexor muscles. H-reflexes were conditioned with either electrical stimuli to the radial nerve (to increase Ia PSI; C-T interval  = 20 ms) or to the superficial radial (SR) nerve (to reduce Ia PSI; C-T interval  = 37-47 ms). While stationary, H-reflex amplitudes were significantly suppressed by radial nerve conditioning and facilitated by SR nerve conditioning. Leg cycling suppressed H-reflex amplitudes and the amount of this suppression was increased with radial nerve conditioning. SR conditioning stimulation removed the suppression of H-reflex amplitude resulting from leg cycling. Interestingly, these effects and interactions on H-reflex amplitudes were observed with subthreshold conditioning stimulus intensities (radial n., ∼0.6×MT; SR n., ∼ perceptual threshold) that did not have clear post synaptic effects. That is, did not evoke reflexes in the surface EMG of forearm flexor muscles. We conclude that the interaction between leg cycling and somatosensory conditioning of forearm H-reflex amplitudes is mediated by modulation of Ia PSI pathways. Overall our results support a conservation of neural

  14. Neural mechanisms influencing interlimb coordination during locomotion in humans: presynaptic modulation of forearm H-reflexes during leg cycling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Nakajima

    Full Text Available Presynaptic inhibition of transmission between Ia afferent terminals and alpha motoneurons (Ia PSI is a major control mechanism associated with soleus H-reflex modulation during human locomotion. Rhythmic arm cycling suppresses soleus H-reflex amplitude by increasing segmental Ia PSI. There is a reciprocal organization in the human nervous system such that arm cycling modulates H-reflexes in leg muscles and leg cycling modulates H-reflexes in forearm muscles. However, comparatively little is known about mechanisms subserving the effects from leg to arm. Using a conditioning-test (C-T stimulation paradigm, the purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that changes in Ia PSI underlie the modulation of H-reflexes in forearm flexor muscles during leg cycling. Subjects performed leg cycling and static activation while H-reflexes were evoked in forearm flexor muscles. H-reflexes were conditioned with either electrical stimuli to the radial nerve (to increase Ia PSI; C-T interval  = 20 ms or to the superficial radial (SR nerve (to reduce Ia PSI; C-T interval  = 37-47 ms. While stationary, H-reflex amplitudes were significantly suppressed by radial nerve conditioning and facilitated by SR nerve conditioning. Leg cycling suppressed H-reflex amplitudes and the amount of this suppression was increased with radial nerve conditioning. SR conditioning stimulation removed the suppression of H-reflex amplitude resulting from leg cycling. Interestingly, these effects and interactions on H-reflex amplitudes were observed with subthreshold conditioning stimulus intensities (radial n., ∼0.6×MT; SR n., ∼ perceptual threshold that did not have clear post synaptic effects. That is, did not evoke reflexes in the surface EMG of forearm flexor muscles. We conclude that the interaction between leg cycling and somatosensory conditioning of forearm H-reflex amplitudes is mediated by modulation of Ia PSI pathways. Overall our results support a

  15. Dynamic changes in neural circuit topology following mild mechanical injury in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Tapan P; Ventre, Scott C; Meaney, David F

    2012-01-01

    Despite its enormous incidence, mild traumatic brain injury is not well understood. One aspect that needs more definition is how the mechanical energy during injury affects neural circuit function. Recent developments in cellular imaging probes provide an opportunity to assess the dynamic state of neural networks with single-cell resolution. In this article, we developed imaging methods to assess the state of dissociated cortical networks exposed to mild injury. We estimated the imaging conditions needed to achieve accurate measures of network properties, and applied these methodologies to evaluate if mild mechanical injury to cortical neurons produces graded changes to either spontaneous network activity or altered network topology. We found that modest injury produced a transient increase in calcium activity that dissipated within 1 h after injury. Alternatively, moderate mechanical injury produced immediate disruption in network synchrony, loss in excitatory tone, and increased modular topology. A calcium-activated neutral protease (calpain) was a key intermediary in these changes; blocking calpain activation restored the network nearly completely to its pre-injury state. Together, these findings show a more complex change in neural circuit behavior than previously reported for mild mechanical injury, and highlight at least one important early mechanism responsible for these changes.

  16. Nonlocal mechanism for cluster synchronization in neural circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, I.; Kopelowitz, E.; Vardi, R.; Zigzag, M.; Kinzel, W.; Abeles, M.; Cohen, D.

    2011-03-01

    The interplay between the topology of cortical circuits and synchronized activity modes in distinct cortical areas is a key enigma in neuroscience. We present a new nonlocal mechanism governing the periodic activity mode: the greatest common divisor (GCD) of network loops. For a stimulus to one node, the network splits into GCD-clusters in which cluster neurons are in zero-lag synchronization. For complex external stimuli, the number of clusters can be any common divisor. The synchronized mode and the transients to synchronization pinpoint the type of external stimuli. The findings, supported by an information mixing argument and simulations of Hodgkin-Huxley population dynamic networks with unidirectional connectivity and synaptic noise, call for reexamining sources of correlated activity in cortex and shorter information processing time scales.

  17. Neural mechanisms underlying nicotine addiction: acute positive reinforcement and withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, S S; Koob, G F; Markou, A

    2000-02-01

    The neurobiology of nicotine addiction is reviewed within the context of neurobiological and behavioral theories postulated for other drugs of abuse. The roles of various neurotransmitter systems, including acetylcholine, dopamine, serotonin, glutamate, gamma-aminobutyric acid, and opioid peptides in acute nicotine reinforcement and withdrawal from chronic administration are examined followed by a discussion of potential neuroadaptations within these neurochemical systems that may lead to the development of nicotine dependence. The link between nicotine administration, depression and schizophrenia are also discussed. Finally, a theoretical model of the neurobiological mechanisms underlying acute nicotine withdrawal and protracted abstinence involves alterations within dopaminergic, serotonergic, and stress systems that are hypothesized to contribute to the negative affective state associated with nicotine abstinence.

  18. Face-induced expectancies influence neural mechanisms of performance monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osinsky, Roman; Seeger, Jennifer; Mussel, Patrick; Hewig, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    In many daily situations, the consequences of our actions are predicted by cues that are often social in nature. For instance, seeing the face of an evaluator (e.g., a supervisor at work) may activate certain evaluative expectancies, depending on the history of prior encounters with that particular person. We investigated how such face-induced expectancies influence neurocognitive functions of performance monitoring. We recorded an electroencephalogram while participants completed a time-estimation task, during which they received performance feedback from a strict and a lenient evaluator. During each trial, participants first saw the evaluator's face before performing the task and, finally, receiving feedback. Therefore, faces could be used as predictive cues for the upcoming evaluation. We analyzed electrocortical signatures of performance monitoring at the stages of cue processing, task performance, and feedback reception. Our results indicate that, at the cue stage, seeing the strict evaluator's face results in an anticipatory preparation of fronto-medial monitoring mechanisms, as reflected by a sustained negative-going amplitude shift (i.e., the contingent negative variation). At the performance stage, face-induced expectancies of a strict evaluation rule led to increases of early performance monitoring signals (i.e., frontal-midline theta power). At the final stage of feedback reception, violations of outcome expectancies differentially affected the feedback-related negativity and frontal-midline theta power, pointing to a functional dissociation between these signatures. Altogether, our results indicate that evaluative expectancies induced by face-cues lead to adjustments of internal performance monitoring mechanisms at various stages of task processing.

  19. Two separate, but interacting, neural systems for familiarity and novelty detection: a dual-route mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafkas, Alexandros; Montaldi, Daniela

    2014-05-01

    It has long been assumed that familiarity- and novelty-related processes fall on a single continuum drawing on the same cognitive and neural mechanisms. The possibility that familiarity and novelty processing involve distinct neural networks was explored in a functional magnetic resonance imaging study (fMRI), in which familiarity and novelty judgments were made in contexts emphasizing either familiarity or novelty decisions. Parametrically modulated BOLD responses to familiarity and novelty strength were isolated in two separate, nonoverlapping brain networks. The novelty system involved brain regions along the ventral visual stream, the hippocampus, and the perirhinal and parahippocampal cortices. The familiarity system, on the other hand, involved the dorsomedial thalamic nucleus, and regions within the medial prefrontal cortex and the medial and lateral parietal cortex. Convergence of the two networks, treating familiarity and novelty as a single continuum was only found in a fronto-parietal network. Finally, the orbitomedial prefrontal cortex was found to be sensitive to reported strength/confidence, irrespective of stimulus' familiarity or novelty. This pattern of results suggests a dual-route mechanism supported by the existence of two distinct but interacting functional systems for familiarity and novelty. Overall, these findings challenge current assumptions regarding the neural systems that support the processing of novel and familiar information, and have important implications for research into the neural bases of recognition memory.

  20. Dissociable neural mechanisms underlying the modulation of pain and anxiety? An FMRI pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiech, Katja; Edwards, Robert; Moseley, Graham Lorimer; Berna, Chantal; Ploner, Markus; Tracey, Irene

    2014-01-01

    The down-regulation of pain through beliefs is commonly discussed as a form of emotion regulation. In line with this interpretation, the analgesic effect has been shown to co-occur with reduced anxiety and increased activity in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC), which is a key region of emotion regulation. This link between pain and anxiety modulation raises the question whether the two effects are rooted in the same neural mechanism. In this pilot fMRI study, we compared the neural basis of the analgesic and anxiolytic effect of two types of threat modulation: a "behavioral control" paradigm, which involves the ability to terminate a noxious stimulus, and a "safety signaling" paradigm, which involves visual cues that signal the threat (or absence of threat) that a subsequent noxious stimulus might be of unusually high intensity. Analgesia was paralleled by VLPFC activity during behavioral control. Safety signaling engaged elements of the descending pain control system, including the rostral anterior cingulate cortex that showed increased functional connectivity with the periaqueductal gray and VLPFC. Anxiety reduction, in contrast, scaled with dorsolateral prefrontal cortex activation during behavioral control but had no distinct neural signature during safety signaling. Our pilot data therefore suggest that analgesic and anxiolytic effects are instantiated in distinguishable neural mechanisms and differ between distinct stress- and pain-modulatory approaches, supporting the recent notion of multiple pathways subserving top-down modulation of the pain experience. Additional studies in larger cohorts are needed to follow up on these preliminary findings.

  1. Dissociable neural mechanisms underlying the modulation of pain and anxiety? An FMRI pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Wiech

    Full Text Available The down-regulation of pain through beliefs is commonly discussed as a form of emotion regulation. In line with this interpretation, the analgesic effect has been shown to co-occur with reduced anxiety and increased activity in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC, which is a key region of emotion regulation. This link between pain and anxiety modulation raises the question whether the two effects are rooted in the same neural mechanism. In this pilot fMRI study, we compared the neural basis of the analgesic and anxiolytic effect of two types of threat modulation: a "behavioral control" paradigm, which involves the ability to terminate a noxious stimulus, and a "safety signaling" paradigm, which involves visual cues that signal the threat (or absence of threat that a subsequent noxious stimulus might be of unusually high intensity. Analgesia was paralleled by VLPFC activity during behavioral control. Safety signaling engaged elements of the descending pain control system, including the rostral anterior cingulate cortex that showed increased functional connectivity with the periaqueductal gray and VLPFC. Anxiety reduction, in contrast, scaled with dorsolateral prefrontal cortex activation during behavioral control but had no distinct neural signature during safety signaling. Our pilot data therefore suggest that analgesic and anxiolytic effects are instantiated in distinguishable neural mechanisms and differ between distinct stress- and pain-modulatory approaches, supporting the recent notion of multiple pathways subserving top-down modulation of the pain experience. Additional studies in larger cohorts are needed to follow up on these preliminary findings.

  2. Theory of mind in schizophrenia: exploring neural mechanisms of belief attribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Junghee; Quintana, Javier; Nori, Poorang; Green, Michael F

    2011-01-01

    Although previous behavioral studies have shown that schizophrenia patients have impaired theory of mind (ToM), the neural mechanisms associated with this impairment are poorly understood. This study aimed to identify the neural mechanisms of ToM in schizophrenia, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with a belief attribution task. In the scanner, 12 schizophrenia patients and 13 healthy control subjects performed the belief attribution task with three conditions: a false belief condition, a false photograph condition, and a simple reading condition. For the false belief versus simple reading conditions, schizophrenia patients showed reduced neural activation in areas including the temporoparietal junction (TPJ) and medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) compared with controls. Further, during the false belief versus false photograph conditions, we observed increased activations in the TPJ and the MPFC in healthy controls, but not in schizophrenia patients. For the false photograph versus simple reading condition, both groups showed comparable neural activations. Schizophrenia patients showed reduced task-related activation in the TPJ and the MPFC during the false belief condition compared with controls, but not for the false photograph condition. This pattern suggests that reduced activation in these regions is associated with, and specific to, impaired ToM in schizophrenia.

  3. The influence of personality on neural mechanisms of observational fear and reward learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, Christine I; Verosky, Sara C; Miyakawa, Asako; Knight, Robert T; D'Esposito, Mark

    2008-09-01

    Fear and reward learning can occur through direct experience or observation. Both channels can enhance survival or create maladaptive behavior. We used fMRI to isolate neural mechanisms of observational fear and reward learning and investigate whether neural response varied according to individual differences in neuroticism and extraversion. Participants learned object-emotion associations by observing a woman respond with fearful (or neutral) and happy (or neutral) facial expressions to novel objects. The amygdala-hippocampal complex was active when learning the object-fear association, and the hippocampus was active when learning the object-happy association. After learning, objects were presented alone; amygdala activity was greater for the fear (vs. neutral) and happy (vs. neutral) associated object. Importantly, greater amygdala-hippocampal activity during fear (vs. neutral) learning predicted better recognition of learned objects on a subsequent memory test. Furthermore, personality modulated neural mechanisms of learning. Neuroticism positively correlated with neural activity in the amygdala and hippocampus during fear (vs. neutral) learning. Low extraversion/high introversion was related to faster behavioral predictions of the fearful and neutral expressions during fear learning. In addition, low extraversion/high introversion was related to greater amygdala activity during happy (vs. neutral) learning, happy (vs. neutral) object recognition, and faster reaction times for predicting happy and neutral expressions during reward learning. These findings suggest that neuroticism is associated with an increased sensitivity in the neural mechanism for fear learning which leads to enhanced encoding of fear associations, and that low extraversion/high introversion is related to enhanced conditionability for both fear and reward learning.

  4. Neural mechanisms of mismatch negativity dysfunction in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M; Sehatpour, P; Hoptman, M J; Lakatos, P; Dias, E C; Kantrowitz, J T; Martinez, A M; Javitt, D C

    2017-02-07

    Schizophrenia is associated with cognitive deficits that reflect impaired cortical information processing. Mismatch negativity (MMN) indexes pre-attentive information processing dysfunction at the level of primary auditory cortex. This study investigates mechanisms underlying MMN impairments in schizophrenia using event-related potential, event-related spectral decomposition (ERSP) and resting state functional connectivity (rsfcMRI) approaches. For this study, MMN data to frequency, intensity and duration-deviants were analyzed from 69 schizophrenia patients and 38 healthy controls. rsfcMRI was obtained from a subsample of 38 patients and 23 controls. As expected, schizophrenia patients showed highly significant, large effect size (P=0.0004, d=1.0) deficits in MMN generation across deviant types. In ERSP analyses, responses to deviants occurred primarily the theta (4-7 Hz) frequency range consistent with distributed corticocortical processing, whereas responses to standards occurred primarily in alpha (8-12 Hz) range consistent with known frequencies of thalamocortical activation. Independent deficits in schizophrenia were observed in both the theta response to deviants (P=0.021) and the alpha-response to standards (P=0.003). At the single-trial level, differential patterns of response were observed for frequency vs duration/intensity deviants, along with At the network level, MMN deficits engaged canonical somatomotor, ventral attention and default networks, with a differential pattern of engagement across deviant types (PMolecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 7 February 2017; doi:10.1038/mp.2017.3.

  5. The neural mechanisms of pain-related affect and memory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The pain experience includes a sensory-discriminative and an emotional-affective components. The affective dimension refers to the unpleasantness or aversion of sensation. The great progress at the genetic, molecular, cellular, and systemic levels on the study of the sensory dimension of pain has been made over past four decades. However, "to consider only the sensory features of pain, and ignore its motivational and affective properties, is to look at only part of the problem and not even the most important part of that". A line of clinic observations indicate that the patients with chronic pain suffer from much more affective disturbance than pain itself. Obviously,physiological arousal and hypervigilance to pain cause negative affect, such as anxiety, anger, worry, aversion, even tendency of suicide,these negative affective states in turn enhance pain sensation. Today, more and more attention has been paid to the study on mechanisms underlying affective dimension of pain. In order to deepen and expand our understanding of the nature of pain, this review summarizes the main progress and recent findings from our laboratory regarding affective component of pain in neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and cell biochemistry.

  6. Neural mechanisms underlying the exploration of small city maps using magnetoencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakellaridi, Sofia; Christova, Peka; Christopoulos, Vassilios; Leuthold, Arthur C; Peponis, John; Georgopoulos, Apostolos P

    2015-11-01

    The neural mechanisms underlying spatial cognition in the context of exploring realistic city maps are unknown. We conducted a novel brain imaging study to address the question of whether and how features of special importance for map exploration are encoded in the brain to make a spatial decision. Subjects explored by eyes small city maps exemplifying five different street network types in order to locate a hypothetical City Hall, while neural activity was recorded continuously by 248 magnetoencephalography (MEG) sensors at high temporal resolution. Monitoring subjects' eye positions, we locally characterized the maps by computing three spatial parameters of the areas that were explored. We computed the number of street intersections, the total street length, and the regularity index in the circular areas of 6 degrees of visual angle radius centered on instantaneous eye positions. We tested the hypothesis that neural activity during exploration is associated with the spatial parameters and modulated by street network type. All time series were rendered stationary and nonautocorrelated by applying an autoregressive integrated moving average model and taking the residuals. We then assessed the associations between the prewhitened time-varying MEG time series from 248 sensors and the prewhitened spatial parameters time series, for each street network type, using multiple linear regression analyses. In accord with our hypothesis, ongoing neural activity was strongly associated with the spatial parameters through localized and distributed networks, and neural processing of these parameters depended on the type of street network. Overall, processing of the spatial parameters seems to predominantly involve right frontal and prefrontal areas, but not for all street network layouts. These results are in line with findings from a series of previous studies showing that frontal and prefrontal areas are involved in the processing of spatial information and decision making

  7. Predictive Modeling of Mechanical Properties of Welded Joints Based on Dynamic Fuzzy RBF Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Yongzhi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A dynamic fuzzy RBF neural network model was built to predict the mechanical properties of welded joints, and the purpose of the model was to overcome the shortcomings of static neural networks including structural identification, dynamic sample training and learning algorithm. The structure and parameters of the model are no longer head of default, dynamic adaptive adjustment in the training, suitable for dynamic sample data for learning, learning algorithm introduces hierarchical learning and fuzzy rule pruning strategy, to accelerate the training speed of model and make the model more compact. Simulation of the model was carried out by using three kinds of thickness and different process TC4 titanium alloy TIG welding test data. The results show that the model has higher prediction accuracy, which is suitable for predicting the mechanical properties of welded joints, and has opened up a new way for the on-line control of the welding process.

  8. fMRI Study Revealing Neural Mechanisms of the Functions of SOA in Spatial Orienting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin Tian; Qian Zhang; De-Zhong Yao

    2009-01-01

    It is well documented that orienting attention plays an important role in visual search. However, it remains unclear how the executive brain regions will act when two different stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) are used in visual search. In this work, event-related fMRI was used to investigate neural mechanisms on the functions of SOA in endogenous and exogenous orienting. The results showed that in the endogenous orienting, long SOA versus short SOA resulted in widespread cortical activation mainly including right medial frontal gyrus and bilateral middle frontal gyri. Conversely, in exogenous orienting, long SOA compared to short SOA resulted in only activations in bilateral middle frontal gyri. These findings indicated that these two spatial orienting involved different brain areas and neural mechanisms.

  9. Habituation-based mechanism for encoding temporal information in artificial neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiles, Bryan W.; Ghosh, Joydeep

    1995-04-01

    A novel neural network is proposed for the dynamic classification of spatio-temporal signals. The network is designed to classify signals of different durations, taking into account correlations among different signal segments. Such a network is applicable to SONAR and speech signal classification problems, among others. Network parameters are adapted based on the biologically observed habituation mechanism. This allows the storage of contextual information, without a substantial increase in network complexity. Experiments on classification of high dimensional feature vectors obtained from Banzhaf sonograms, demonstrate that the proposed network performs better than time delay neural networks while using a less complex structure. A mathematical justification of the capabilities of the habituation based mechanism is also provided.

  10. FGF Signaling Transforms Non-neural Ectoderm into Neural Crest

    OpenAIRE

    Yardley, Nathan; García-Castro, Martín I.

    2012-01-01

    The neural crest arises at the border between the neural plate and the adjacent non-neural ectoderm. It has been suggested that both neural and non-neural ectoderm can contribute to the neural crest. Several studies have examined the molecular mechanisms that regulate neural crest induction in neuralized tissues or the neural plate border. Here, using the chick as a model system, we address the molecular mechanisms by which non-neural ectoderm generates neural crest. We report that in respons...

  11. The Neural Mechanisms of Meditative Practices: Novel Approaches for Healthy Aging

    OpenAIRE

    Acevedo, Bianca P.; Pospos, Sarah; Lavretsky, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Meditation has been shown to have physical, cognitive, and psychological health benefits that can be used to promote healthy aging. However, the common and specific mechanisms of response remain elusive due to the diverse nature of mind–body practices. Methods In this review, we aim to compare the neural circuits implicated in focused-attention meditative practices that focus on present-moment awareness to those involved in active-type meditative practices (e.g., yoga) that combine...

  12. Neural mechanisms underlying the integration of situational information into attribution outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Brosch, Tobias; Schiller, Daniela; Mojdehbakhsh, Rachel; Uleman, James S.; Phelps, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    When forming impressions and trying to figure out why other people behave the way they do, we should take into account not only dispositional factors (i.e. personality traits) but also situational constraints as potential causes for a behavior. However, in their attributions, people often ignore the importance of situational factors. To investigate the neural mechanisms underlying the integration of situational information into attributions, we decomposed the attribution process by separately...

  13. Neural mechanisms of peristalsis in the isolated rabbit distal colon: a neuromechanical loop hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phil eDinning

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Propulsive contractions of circular muscle are largely responsible for the movements of content along the digestive tract. Mechanical and electrophysiological recordings of isolated colonic circular muscle have demonstrated that localized distension activates ascending and descending interneuronal pathways, evoking contraction orally and relaxation anally. These polarised enteric reflex pathways can theoretically be sequentially activated by the mechanical stimulation of the advancing contents. Here, we test the hypothesis that initiation and propagation of peristaltic contractions involves a neuromechanical loop; that is an initial gut distension activates local and oral reflex contraction and anal reflex relaxation, the subsequent movement of content then acts as new mechanical stimulus triggering sequentially reflex contractions/relaxations at each point of the gut resulting in a propulsive peristaltic contraction. In fluid filled isolated rabbit distal colon, we combined spatiotemporal mapping of gut diameter and intraluminal pressure with a new analytical method, allowing us to identify when and where active (neurally-driven contraction or relaxation occurs. Our data indicate that gut dilation is associated with propagating peristaltic contractions, and that the associated level of dilation is greater than that preceding non-propagating contractions (2.7 ± 1.4mm v 1.6 ± 1.2mm; P < 0.0001. These propagating contractions lead to the formation of boluses that are propelled by oral active neurally driven contractions. The propelled boluses also activate neurally driven anal relaxations, in a diameter dependent manner. These data support the hypothesis that neural peristalsis is the consequence of the activation of a functional loop involving mechanical dilation which activates polarized enteric circuits. These produce propulsion of the bolus which activates further anally, polarized enteric circuits by distension, thus closing the

  14. An Integrative Model for the Neural Mechanism of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR)

    OpenAIRE

    Coubard, Olivier A.

    2016-01-01

    Since the seminal report by Shapiro that bilateral stimulation induces cognitive and emotional changes, 26 years of basic and clinical research have examined the effects of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) in anxiety disorders, particularly in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The present article aims at better understanding EMDR neural mechanism. I first review procedural aspects of EMDR protocol and theoretical hypothesis about EMDR effects, and develop the reasons ...

  15. An integrative model for the neural mechanism of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR)

    OpenAIRE

    Coubard, Olivier A.

    2016-01-01

    Since the seminal report by Shapiro that bilateral stimulation induces cognitive and emotional changes, twenty-six years of basic and clinical research have examined the effects of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) in anxiety disorders, particularly in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). The present article aims at better understanding EMDR neural mechanism. I first review procedural aspects of EMDR protocol and theoretical hypothesis about EMDR effects, and develop the ...

  16. Neural mechanisms underlying the integration of situational information into attribution outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Brosch, Tobias; Schiller, Daniela; Mojdehbakhsh, Rachel; Uleman, James S.; Phelps, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    When forming impressions and trying to figure out why other people behave the way they do, we should take into account not only dispositional factors (i.e. personality traits) but also situational constraints as potential causes for a behavior. However, in their attributions, people often ignore the importance of situational factors. To investigate the neural mechanisms underlying the integration of situational information into attributions, we decomposed the attribution process by separately...

  17. Neural mechanisms underlying transcranial direct current stimulation in aphasia: A feasibility study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena eUlm

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the neural mechanisms by which transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS impacts on language processing in post-stroke aphasia. This was addressed in a proof-of-principle study that explored the effects of tDCS application in aphasia during simultaneous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. We employed a single subject, cross-over, sham-tDCS controlled design and the stimulation was administered to an individualized perilesional stimulation site that was identified by a baseline fMRI scan and a picture naming task. Peak activity during the baseline scan was located in the spared left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG and this area was stimulated during a subsequent cross-over phase. tDCS was successfully administered to the target region and anodal- vs. sham-tDCS resulted in selectively increased activity at the stimulation site. Our results thus demonstrate that it is feasible to precisely target an individualized stimulation site in aphasia patients during simultaneous fMRI which allows assessing the neural mechanisms underlying tDCS application. The functional imaging results of this case report highlight one possible mechanism that may have contributed to beneficial behavioural stimulation effects in previous clinical tDCS trials in aphasia. In the future, this approach will allow identifying distinct patterns of stimulation effects on neural processing in larger cohorts of patients. This may ultimately yield information about the variability of tDCS-effects on brain functions in aphasia.

  18. Neural mechanisms underlying cognitive control of men with lifelong antisocial behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffer, Boris; Pawliczek, Christina; Mu Ller, Bernhard; Forsting, Michael; Gizewski, Elke; Leygraf, Norbert; Hodgins, Sheilagh

    2014-04-30

    Results of meta-analyses suggested subtle deficits in cognitive control among antisocial individuals. Because almost all studies focused on children with conduct problems or adult psychopaths, however, little is known about cognitive control mechanisms among the majority of persistent violent offenders who present an antisocial personality disorder (ASPD). The present study aimed to determine whether offenders with ASPD, relative to non-offenders, display dysfunction in the neural mechanisms underlying cognitive control and to assess the extent to which these dysfunctions are associated with psychopathic traits and trait impulsivity. Participants comprised 21 violent offenders and 23 non-offenders who underwent event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging while performing a non-verbal Stroop task. The offenders, relative to the non-offenders, exhibited reduced response time interference and a different pattern of conflict- and error-related activity in brain areas involved in cognitive control, attention, language, and emotion processing, that is, the anterior cingulate, dorsolateral prefrontal, superior temporal and postcentral cortices, putamen, thalamus, and amygdala. Moreover, between-group differences in behavioural and neural responses revealed associations with core features of psychopathy and attentional impulsivity. Thus, the results of the present study confirmed the hypothesis that offenders with ASPD display alterations in the neural mechanisms underlying cognitive control and that those alterations relate, at least in part, to personality characteristics. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  19. [Research Progress on the Interaction Effects and Its Neural Mechanisms between Physical Fatigue and Mental Fatigue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lixin; Zhang, Chuncui; He, Feng; Zhao, Xin; Qi, Hongzhi; Wan, Baikun; Ming, Dong

    2015-10-01

    Fatigue is an exhaustion state caused by prolonged physical work and mental work, which can reduce working efficiency and even cause industrial accidents. Fatigue is a complex concept involving both physiological and psychological factors. Fatigue can cause a decline of concentration and work performance and induce chronic diseases. Prolonged fatigue may endanger life safety. In most of the scenarios, physical and mental workloads co-lead operator into fatigue state. Thus, it is very important to study the interaction influence and its neural mechanisms between physical and mental fatigues. This paper introduces recent progresses on the interaction effects and discusses some research challenges and future development directions. It is believed that mutual influence between physical fatigue and mental fatigue may occur in the central nervous system. Revealing the basal ganglia function and dopamine release may be important to explore the neural mechanisms between physical fatigue and mental fatigue. Future effort is to optimize fatigue models, to evaluate parameters and to explore the neural mechanisms so as to provide scientific basis and theoretical guidance for complex task designs and fatigue monitoring.

  20. Neural Mechanisms Underlying Perilesional Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation in Aphasia: A Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulm, Lena; McMahon, Katie; Copland, David; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Meinzer, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the neural mechanisms by which transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) impacts on language processing in post-stroke aphasia. This was addressed in a proof-of-principle study that explored the effects of tDCS application in aphasia during simultaneous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We employed a single subject, cross-over, sham-tDCS controlled design, and the stimulation was administered to an individualized perilesional stimulation site that was identified by a baseline fMRI scan and a picture naming task. Peak activity during the baseline scan was located in the spared left inferior frontal gyrus and this area was stimulated during a subsequent cross-over phase. tDCS was successfully administered to the target region and anodal- vs. sham-tDCS resulted in selectively increased activity at the stimulation site. Our results thus demonstrate that it is feasible to precisely target an individualized stimulation site in aphasia patients during simultaneous fMRI, which allows assessing the neural mechanisms underlying tDCS application. The functional imaging results of this case report highlight one possible mechanism that may have contributed to beneficial behavioral stimulation effects in previous clinical tDCS trials in aphasia. In the future, this approach will allow identifying distinct patterns of stimulation effects on neural processing in larger cohorts of patients. This may ultimately yield information about the variability of tDCS effects on brain functions in aphasia. PMID:26500522

  1. Neural mechanisms of attention become more specialised during infancy: Insights from combined eye tracking and EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulke, Louisa; Atkinson, Janette; Braddick, Oliver

    2017-03-01

    The Fixation Shift Paradigm (FSP) measures infants' ability to shift gaze from a central fixation stimulus to a peripheral target (e.g. Hood & Atkinson, 1993: Infant Behavior and Development, 16(4), 405-422). Cortical maturation has been suggested as crucial for the developing ability to shift attention. This study investigated the development of neural mechanisms by combining EEG with simultaneous eye tracking during FSP testing, in typically developing infants aged between 1 and 8 months. The most prominent neural response was a frontal positivity which occurred only in the hemisphere contralateral to the target in the youngest infants but became more ipsilateral with age. This changing lateralisation was associated with improving ability to shift attention (decreasing saccade latencies and fewer 'sticky fixations'-failures to disengage attention from the central target). These findings suggest that the lateralisation of neural responses develops during infancy, possibly due to developing intracortical connections, allowing infants to shift attention more efficiently. Successful use of combined simultaneous remote eye tracking and EEG to measure infant attention shifts. Neural responses involved in attention shifts change in the first year of life. The lateralisation of EEG responses changes with age in the first year of life. Frontal cortex is involved in attention shifts from around 2 months of age. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The neural mechanisms of re-experiencing mental fatigue sensation: a magnetoencephalography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Akira; Karasuyama, Takuma; Kikuchi, Taiki; Tanaka, Masaaki; Yamano, Emi; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    There have been several studies which have tried to clarify the neural mechanisms of fatigue sensation; however fatigue sensation has multiple aspects. We hypothesized that past experience related to fatigue sensation is an important factor which contributes to future formation of fatigue sensation through the transfer to memories that are located within specific brain structures. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the neural mechanisms of fatigue sensation related to memory. In the present study, we investigated the neural activity caused by re-experiencing the fatigue sensation that had been experienced during a fatigue-inducing session. Thirteen healthy volunteers participated in fatigue and non-fatigue experiments in a crossover fashion. In the fatigue experiment, they performed a 2-back test session for 40 min to induce fatigue sensation, a rest session for 15 min to recover from fatigue, and a magnetoencephalography (MEG) session in which they were asked to re-experience the state of their body with fatigue that they had experienced in the 2-back test session. In the non-fatigue experiment, the participants performed a free session for 15 min, a rest session for 15 min, and an MEG session in which they were asked to re-experience the state of their body without fatigue that they had experienced in the free session. Spatial filtering analyses of oscillatory brain activity showed that the delta band power in the left Brodmann's area (BA) 39, alpha band power in the right pulvinar nucleus and the left BA 40, and beta band power in the left BA 40 were lower when they re-experienced the fatigue sensation than when they re-experienced the fatigue-free sensation, indicating that these brain regions are related to re-experiencing the fatigue sensation. Our findings may help clarify the neural mechanisms underlying fatigue sensation.

  3. Testing Multiple Psychological Processes for Common Neural Mechanisms Using EEG and Independent Component Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessel, Jan R

    2016-03-08

    Temporal independent component analysis (ICA) is applied to an electrophysiological signal mixture (such as an EEG recording) to disentangle the independent neural source signals-independent components-underlying said signal mixture. When applied to scalp EEG, ICA is most commonly used either as a pre-processing step (e.g., to isolate physiological processes from non-physiological artifacts), or as a data-reduction step (i.e., to focus on one specific neural process with increased signal-to-noise ratio). However, ICA can be used in an even more powerful way that fundamentally expands the inferential utility of scalp EEG. The core assumption of EEG-ICA-namely, that individual independent components represent separable neural processes-can be leveraged to derive the following inferential logic: If a specific independent component shows activity related to multiple psychological processes within the same dataset (e.g., elicited by different experimental events), it follows that those psychological processes involve a common, non-separable neural mechanism. As such, this logic allows testing a class of hypotheses that is beyond the reach of regular EEG analyses techniques, thereby crucially increasing the inferential utility of the EEG. In the current article, this logic will be referred to as the 'common independent process identification' (CIPI) approach. This article aims to provide a tutorial into the application of this powerful approach, targeted at researchers that have a basic understanding of standard EEG analysis. Furthermore, the article aims to exemplify the usage of CIPI by outlining recent studies that successfully applied this approach to test neural theories of mental functions.

  4. Distinct regulatory mechanisms act to establish and maintain Pax3 expression in the developing neural tube.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Moore

    Full Text Available Pattern formation in developing tissues is driven by the interaction of extrinsic signals with intrinsic transcriptional networks that together establish spatially and temporally restricted profiles of gene expression. How this process is orchestrated at the molecular level by genomic cis-regulatory modules is one of the central questions in developmental biology. Here we have addressed this by analysing the regulation of Pax3 expression in the context of the developing spinal cord. Pax3 is induced early during neural development in progenitors of the dorsal spinal cord and is maintained as pattern is subsequently elaborated, resulting in the segregation of the tissue into dorsal and ventral subdivisions. We used a combination of comparative genomics and transgenic assays to define and dissect several functional cis-regulatory modules associated with the Pax3 locus. We provide evidence that the coordinated activity of two modules establishes and refines Pax3 expression during neural tube development. Mutational analyses of the initiating element revealed that in addition to Wnt signaling, Nkx family homeodomain repressors restrict Pax3 transcription to the presumptive dorsal neural tube. Subsequently, a second module mediates direct positive autoregulation and feedback to maintain Pax3 expression. Together, these data indicate a mechanism by which transient external signals are converted into a sustained expression domain by the activities of distinct regulatory elements. This transcriptional logic differs from the cross-repression that is responsible for the spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression in the ventral neural tube, suggesting that a variety of circuits are deployed within the neural tube regulatory network to establish and elaborate pattern formation.

  5. The Poggendorff illusion driven by real and illusory contour: Behavioral and neural mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Lu; Zhang, Ming; Chen, Qi

    2016-05-01

    The Poggendorff illusion refers to the phenomenon that the human brain misperceives a diagonal line as being apparently misaligned once the diagonal line is interrupted by two parallel edges, and the size of illusion is negatively correlated with the angle of interception of the oblique, i.e. the sharper the oblique angle, the larger the illusion. This optical illusion can be produced by both real and illusory contour. In this fMRI study, by parametrically varying the oblique angle, we investigated the shared and specific neural mechanisms underlying the Poggendorff illusion induced by real and illusory contour. At the behavioral level, not only the real but also the illusory contours were capable of inducing significant Poggendorff illusion. The size of illusion induced by the real contour, however, was larger than that induced by the illusory contour. At the neural level, real and illusory contours commonly activated more dorsal visual areas, and the real contours specifically activated more ventral visual areas. More importantly, examinations on the parametric modulation effects of the size of illusion revealed the specific neural mechanisms underlying the Poggendorff illusion induced by the real and the illusory contours, respectively. Left precentral gyrus and right middle occipital cortex were specifically involved in the Poggendorff illusion induced by the real contour. On the other hand, bilateral intraparietal sulcus (IPS) and right lateral occipital complex (LOC) were specifically involved in the Poggendorff illusion induced by the illusory contour. Functional implications of the above findings were further discussed.

  6. Diagnosis of mechanical pumping system using neural networks and system parameters analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Tai Ming; Wang, Wei Hui [National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung (China)

    2009-01-15

    Normally, a mechanical pumping system is equipped to monitor some of the important input and output signals which are set to the prescribed values. This paper addressed dealing with these signals to establish the database of input- output relation by using a number of neural network models through learning algorithms. These signals encompass normal and abnormal running conditions. The abnormal running conditions were artificially generated. Meanwhile, for the purpose of setting up an on-line diagnosis network, the learning speed and accuracy of three kinds of networks, viz., the backpropagation (BPN), radial basis function (RBF) and adaptive linear (ADALINE) neural networks have been compared and assessed. The assessment criteria of the networks are compared with the correlation result matrix in terms of the neuron vectors. Both BPN and RBF are judged by the maximum vector based on the post-regression analysis, and the ADALINE is judged by the minimum vector based on the least mean square error analysis. By ignoring the neural network training time, it has been shown that if the mechanical diagnosis system is tackled off-line, the RBF method is suggested. However, for on-line diagnosis, the BPN method is recommended

  7. Exploring the mechanism of neural-function reconstruction by reinnervated nerves in targeted muscles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui ZHOU; Lin YANG; Feng-xia WU; Jian-ping HUANG; Liang-qing ZHANG; Ying-jian YANG; Guang-lin LI

    2014-01-01

    A lack of myoelectric sources after limb amputation is a critical challenge in the control of multifunctional motorized prostheses. To reconstruct myoelectric sources physiologically related to lost limbs, a newly proposed neural-function construc-tion method, targeted muscle reinnervation (TMR), appears promising. Recent advances in the TMR technique suggest that TMR could provide additional motor command information for the control of multifunctional myoelectric prostheses. However, little is known about the nature of the physiological functional recovery of the reinnervated muscles. More understanding of the under-lying mechanism of TMR could help us fine tune the technique to maximize its capability to achieve a much higher performance in the control of multifunctional prostheses. In this study, rats were used as an animal model for TMR surgery involving transferring a median nerve into the pectoralis major, which served as the target muscle. Intramuscular myoelectric signals reconstructed following TMR were recorded by implanted wire electrodes and analyzed to explore the nature of the neural-function recon-struction achieved by reinnervation of targeted muscles. Our results showed that the active myoelectric signal reconstructed in the targeted muscle was acquired one week after TMR surgery, and its amplitude gradually became stronger over time. These pre-liminary results from rats may serve as a basis for exploring the mechanism of neural-function reconstruction by the TMR tech-nique in human subjects.

  8. Underlying neural mechanisms of mirror therapy: Implications for motor rehabilitation in stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal Narayan Arya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mirror therapy (MT is a valuable method for enhancing motor recovery in poststroke hemiparesis. The technique utilizes the mirror-illusion created by the movement of sound limb that is perceived as the paretic limb. MT is a simple and economical technique than can stimulate the brain noninvasively. The intervention unquestionably has neural foundation. But the underlying neural mechanisms inducing motor recovery are still unclear. In this review, the neural-modulation due to MT has been explored. Multiple areas of the brain such as the occipital lobe, dorsal frontal area and corpus callosum are involved during the simple MT regime. Bilateral premotor cortex, primary motor cortex, primary somatosensory cortex, and cerebellum also get reorganized to enhance the function of the damaged brain. The motor areas of the lesioned hemisphere receive visuo-motor processing information through the parieto-occipital lobe. The damaged motor cortex responds variably to the MT and may augment true motor recovery. Mirror neurons may also play a possible role in the cortico-stimulatory mechanisms occurring due to the MT.

  9. Persistent neural activity in the prefrontal cortex: a mechanism by which BDNF regulates working memory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Evan M; Woo, Newton H; Lu, Bai

    2008-01-01

    Working memory is the ability to maintain representations of task-relevant information for short periods of time to guide subsequent actions or make decisions. Neurons of the prefrontal cortex exhibit persistent firing during the delay period of working memory tasks. Despite extensive studies, the mechanisms underlying this persistent neural activity remain largely obscure. The neurotransmitter systems of dopamine, NMDA, and GABA have been implicated, but further investigations are necessary to establish their precise roles and relationships. Recent research has suggested a new component: brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its high-affinity receptor, TrkB. We review the research on persistent activity and suggest that BDNF/TrkB signaling in a distinct class of interneurons plays an important role in organizing persistent neural activity at the single-neuron and network levels.

  10. Pinning cluster synchronization in an array of coupled neural networks under event-based mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lulu; Ho, Daniel W C; Cao, Jinde; Lu, Jianquan

    2016-04-01

    Cluster synchronization is a typical collective behavior in coupled dynamical systems, where the synchronization occurs within one group, while there is no synchronization among different groups. In this paper, under event-based mechanism, pinning cluster synchronization in an array of coupled neural networks is studied. A new event-triggered sampled-data transmission strategy, where only local and event-triggering states are utilized to update the broadcasting state of each agent, is proposed to realize cluster synchronization of the coupled neural networks. Furthermore, a self-triggered pinning cluster synchronization algorithm is proposed, and a set of iterative procedures is given to compute the event-triggered time instants. Hence, this will reduce the computational load significantly. Finally, an example is given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results.

  11. Fuzzy Optimization of an Elevator Mechanism Applying the Genetic Algorithm and Neural Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Considering the indefinite character of the value of design parameters and being satisfied with load-bearing capacity and stiffness, the fuzzy optimization mathematical model is set up to minimize the volume of tooth corona of a worm gear in an elevator mechanism. The method of second-class comprehensive evaluation was used based on the optimal level cut set, thus the optimal level value of every fuzzy constraint can be attained; the fuzzy optimization is transformed into the usual optimization.The Fast Back Propagation of the neural networks algorithm are adopted to train feed-forward networks so as to fit a relative coefficient. Then the fitness function with penalty terms is built by a penalty strategy, a neural networks program is recalled, and solver functions of the Genetic Algorithm Toolbox of Matlab software are adopted to solve the optimization model.

  12. Adaptive Neural Network Output Feedback Tracking Control for a Class of Complicated Agricultural Mechanical Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Hu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The study presents an adaptive neural network output feedback tracking control scheme for a class of complicated agricultural mechanical systems. The scheme includes a dynamic gain observer to estimate the un-measurable states of the system. The main advantages of the authors scheme are that by introducing non-separation principle design neural network controller and the observer gain are simultaneously tuned according to output tracking error, the semi-globally ultimately bounded of output tracking error and all the states in the closed-loop system can be achieved by Lyapunov approach. With the universal approximation property of NN and the simultaneous parametrisation, no Lipschitz assumption and SPR condition are employed which makes the system construct simple. Finally the simulation results are presented to demonstrate the efficiency of the control scheme.

  13. Mechanisms determining cholinergic neural responses in airways of young and mature rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Gary L; Loader, Joan; Nguyen, Dee Dee; Fratelli, Cori; Dakhama, Azzeddine; Colasurdo, Giuseppe N

    2004-08-01

    Neural pathways help control airway caliber and responsiveness. Yet little is known of how neural control changes as a function of development. In rabbits, we found electrical field stimulation (EFS) of airway nerves led to more marked contractile responses in 2- vs. 13-week-old animals. This enhanced response to EFS may be due to prejunctional, junctional, and/or postjunctional neural mechanisms. We assessed these mechanisms in airways of 2- and 13-week-old rabbits. The contractile responses to methacholine did not differ in the groups, suggesting postjunctional neural events are not primarily responsible for differing responses to EFS. To address junctional events, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) was measured (spectrophotometry). AChE was elevated in 2-week-olds. However, this should lead to less and not greater responses. Prejunctionally, EFS-induced acetylcholine (ACh) release was assessed by HPLC. Airways of 2-week-old rabbits released significantly more ACh than airways from mature rabbits. Choline acetyltransferase, a marker of cholinergic nerves, was not different between groups, suggesting that more ACh release in young rabbits was not due to increased nerve density. ACh release in the presence of polyarginine increased significantly in both groups, supporting the presence of functional muscarinic autoreceptors (M2) at both ages. Because substance P (SP) increases release of ACh, SP was measured by ELISA. This neuropeptide was significantly elevated in airways of younger rabbits. Nerve growth factor (NGF) increased SP and was also significantly increased in airways from younger rabbits. This work suggests that increases in EFS-induced responsiveness in young rabbits are likely due to prejunctional events with enhanced release of ACh. Increases in NGF and SP early in life may contribute to this increased responsiveness.

  14. Neural Mechanism of Altruistic Punishment%利他惩罚的神经机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    原胜; 郭丰波

    2015-01-01

    Altruistic punishment,which occurs when an individual incurs a cost to punish unfairness or norm violation, may play a role in perpetuating cooperation.The neural mechanism underlying costly punishment has only recently begun to be explored.Here we review current studies on the neural basis of altruism from the perspectives of costly punishment,emphasi-zing the importance of elementary neural processes underlying a decision to punish.Particularly,there are four cognitive proces-ses that contribute to the decision to altruistically punish in most situations:inequity aversion,cost-benefit calculation,social reference frame to distinguish self from others and cognitive control.Overall,understanding the neural mechanism of altruistic punishment with respect to the core computations necessary to achieve a decision to punish is useful for us to learn the altruistic behavior of human being.%利他性惩罚指一个人选择付出代价去惩罚不公平行为和规则违背行为,以维持长期而稳定的合作行为。代价惩罚的视角回顾近期研究中利他性惩罚的神经基础,主要强调做出惩罚决策背后的神经加工过程。存在四种认知加工过程可能会促使人们在大多数场景中做出利他性决策:不公平厌恶,代价-利益评估,区分自己与他人的社会参照框架以及认知控制。总之,理解利他惩罚决策背后的核心神经加工机制有助于了解人类的利他行为。

  15. Neural Mechanisms Underlying Learning following Semantic Mediation Treatment in a case of Phonologic Alexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurland, Jacquie; Cortes, Carlos R; Wilke, Marko; Sperling, Anne J; Lott, Susan N; Tagamets, Malle A; VanMeter, John; Friedman, Rhonda B

    2009-01-01

    Patients with phonologic alexia can be trained to read semantically impoverished words (e.g., functors) by pairing them with phonologically-related semantically rich words (e.g, nouns). What mechanisms underlie success in this cognitive re-training approach? Does the mechanism change if the skill is “overlearned”, i.e., practiced beyond criterion? We utilized fMRI pre- and post-treatment, and after overlearning, to assess treatment-related functional reorganization in a patient with phonologic alexia, two years post left temporoparietal stroke. Pre-treatment, there were no statistically significant differences in activation profiles across the sets of words. Post-treatment, accuracy on the two trained sets improved. Compared with untrained words, reading trained words recruited larger and more significant clusters of activation in the right hemisphere, including right inferior frontal and inferior parietal cortex. Post-overlearning, with near normal performance on overlearned words, predominant activation shifted to left hemisphere regions, including perilesional activation in superior parietal lobe, when reading overlearned vs. untrained words. PMID:20119495

  16. A mechanism for the inhibition of neural progenitor cell proliferation by cocaine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Ting Lee

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prenatal exposure of the developing brain to cocaine causes morphological and behavioral abnormalities. Recent studies indicate that cocaine-induced proliferation inhibition and/or apoptosis in neural progenitor cells may play a pivotal role in causing these abnormalities. To understand the molecular mechanism through which cocaine inhibits cell proliferation in neural progenitors, we sought to identify the molecules that are responsible for mediating the effect of cocaine on cell cycle regulation. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Microarray analysis followed by quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR was used to screen cocaine-responsive and cell cycle-related genes in a neural progenitor cell line where cocaine exposure caused a robust anti-proliferative effect by interfering with the G1-to-S transition. Cyclin A2, among genes related to the G1-to-S cell cycle transition, was most strongly down-regulated by cocaine. Down-regulation of cyclin A was also found in cocaine-treated human primary neural and A2B5+ progenitor cells, as well as in rat fetal brains exposed to cocaine in utero. Reversing cyclin A down-regulation by gene transfer counteracted the proliferation inhibition caused by cocaine. Further, we found that cocaine-induced accumulation of reactive oxygen species, which involves N-oxidation of cocaine via cytochrome P450, promotes cyclin A down-regulation by causing an endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress response, as indicated by increased phosphorylation of eIF2alpha and expression of ATF4. In the developing rat brain, the P450 inhibitor cimetidine counteracted cocaine-induced inhibition of neural progenitor cell proliferation as well as down-regulation of cyclin A. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate that down-regulation of cyclin A underlies cocaine-induced proliferation inhibition in neural progenitors. The down-regulation of cyclin A is initiated by N-oxidative metabolism of cocaine and consequent ER stress. Inhibition of

  17. Neural mechanisms linking social status and inflammatory responses to social stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscatell, Keely A; Dedovic, Katarina; Slavich, George M; Jarcho, Michael R; Breen, Elizabeth C; Bower, Julienne E; Irwin, Michael R; Eisenberger, Naomi I

    2016-06-01

    Social stratification has important implications for health and well-being, with individuals lower in standing in a hierarchy experiencing worse outcomes than those higher up the social ladder. Separate lines of past research suggest that alterations in inflammatory processes and neural responses to threat may link lower social status with poorer outcomes. This study was designed to bridge these literatures to investigate the neurocognitive mechanisms linking subjective social status and inflammation. Thirty-one participants reported their subjective social status, and underwent a functional magnetic resonance imaging scan while they were socially evaluated. Participants also provided blood samples before and after the stressor, which were analysed for changes in inflammation. Results showed that lower subjective social status was associated with greater increases in inflammation. Neuroimaging data revealed lower subjective social status was associated with greater neural activity in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (DMPFC) in response to negative feedback. Finally, results indicated that activation in the DMPFC in response to negative feedback mediated the relation between social status and increases in inflammatory activity. This study provides the first evidence of a neurocognitive pathway linking subjective social status and inflammation, thus furthering our understanding of how social hierarchies shape neural and physiological responses to social interactions.

  18. Neural mechanisms of human perceptual learning: electrophysiological evidence for a two-stage process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamé, Carlos M; Cosmelli, Diego; Henriquez, Rodrigo; Aboitiz, Francisco

    2011-04-26

    Humans and other animals change the way they perceive the world due to experience. This process has been labeled as perceptual learning, and implies that adult nervous systems can adaptively modify the way in which they process sensory stimulation. However, the mechanisms by which the brain modifies this capacity have not been sufficiently analyzed. We studied the neural mechanisms of human perceptual learning by combining electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings of brain activity and the assessment of psychophysical performance during training in a visual search task. All participants improved their perceptual performance as reflected by an increase in sensitivity (d') and a decrease in reaction time. The EEG signal was acquired throughout the entire experiment revealing amplitude increments, specific and unspecific to the trained stimulus, in event-related potential (ERP) components N2pc and P3 respectively. P3 unspecific modification can be related to context or task-based learning, while N2pc may be reflecting a more specific attentional-related boosting of target detection. Moreover, bell and U-shaped profiles of oscillatory brain activity in gamma (30-60 Hz) and alpha (8-14 Hz) frequency bands may suggest the existence of two phases for learning acquisition, which can be understood as distinctive optimization mechanisms in stimulus processing. We conclude that there are reorganizations in several neural processes that contribute differently to perceptual learning in a visual search task. We propose an integrative model of neural activity reorganization, whereby perceptual learning takes place as a two-stage phenomenon including perceptual, attentional and contextual processes.

  19. Neural mechanisms of phonemic restoration for speech comprehension revealed by magnetoencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunami, Kishiko; Ishii, Akira; Takano, Sakurako; Yamamoto, Hidefumi; Sakashita, Tetsushi; Tanaka, Masaaki; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Yamane, Hideo

    2013-11-01

    In daily communication, we can usually still hear the spoken words as if they had not been masked and can comprehend the speech when spoken words are masked by background noise. This phenomenon is known as phonemic restoration. Since little is known about the neural mechanisms underlying phonemic restoration for speech comprehension, we aimed to identify the neural mechanisms using magnetoencephalography (MEG). Twelve healthy male volunteers with normal hearing participated in the study. Participants were requested to carefully listen to and understand recorded spoken Japanese stories, which were either played forward (forward condition) or in reverse (reverse condition), with their eyes closed. Several syllables of spoken words were replaced by 300-ms white-noise stimuli with an inter-stimulus interval of 1.6-20.3s. We compared MEG responses to white-noise stimuli during the forward condition with those during the reverse condition using time-frequency analyses. Increased 3-5 Hz band power in the forward condition compared with the reverse condition was continuously observed in the left inferior frontal gyrus [Brodmann's areas (BAs) 45, 46, and 47] and decreased 18-22 Hz band powers caused by white-noise stimuli were seen in the left transverse temporal gyrus (BA 42) and superior temporal gyrus (BA 22). These results suggest that the left inferior frontal gyrus and left transverse and superior temporal gyri are involved in phonemic restoration for speech comprehension. Our findings may help clarify the neural mechanisms of phonemic restoration as well as develop innovative treatment methods for individuals suffering from impaired speech comprehension, particularly in noisy environments.

  20. Neural mechanisms of human perceptual learning: electrophysiological evidence for a two-stage process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos M Hamamé

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Humans and other animals change the way they perceive the world due to experience. This process has been labeled as perceptual learning, and implies that adult nervous systems can adaptively modify the way in which they process sensory stimulation. However, the mechanisms by which the brain modifies this capacity have not been sufficiently analyzed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied the neural mechanisms of human perceptual learning by combining electroencephalographic (EEG recordings of brain activity and the assessment of psychophysical performance during training in a visual search task. All participants improved their perceptual performance as reflected by an increase in sensitivity (d' and a decrease in reaction time. The EEG signal was acquired throughout the entire experiment revealing amplitude increments, specific and unspecific to the trained stimulus, in event-related potential (ERP components N2pc and P3 respectively. P3 unspecific modification can be related to context or task-based learning, while N2pc may be reflecting a more specific attentional-related boosting of target detection. Moreover, bell and U-shaped profiles of oscillatory brain activity in gamma (30-60 Hz and alpha (8-14 Hz frequency bands may suggest the existence of two phases for learning acquisition, which can be understood as distinctive optimization mechanisms in stimulus processing. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that there are reorganizations in several neural processes that contribute differently to perceptual learning in a visual search task. We propose an integrative model of neural activity reorganization, whereby perceptual learning takes place as a two-stage phenomenon including perceptual, attentional and contextual processes.

  1. Neural mechanisms underlying the cost of task switching: an ERP study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: When switching from one task to a new one, reaction times are prolonged. This phenomenon is called switch cost (SC. Researchers have recently used several kinds of task-switching paradigms to uncover neural mechanisms underlying the SC. Task-set reconfiguration and passive dissipation of a previously relevant task-set have been reported to contribute to the cost of task switching. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: An unpredictable cued task-switching paradigm was used, during which subjects were instructed to switch between a color and an orientation discrimination task. Electroencephalography (EEG and behavioral measures were recorded in 14 subjects. Response-stimulus interval (RSI and cue-stimulus interval (CSI were manipulated with short and long intervals, respectively. Switch trials delayed reaction times (RTs and increased error rates compared with repeat trials. The SC of RTs was smaller in the long CSI condition. For cue-locked waveforms, switch trials generated a larger parietal positive event-related potential (ERP, and a larger slow parietal positivity compared with repeat trials in the short and long CSI condition. Neural SC of cue-related ERP positivity was smaller in the long RSI condition. For stimulus-locked waveforms, a larger switch-related central negative ERP component was observed, and the neural SC of the ERP negativity was smaller in the long CSI. Results of standardized low resolution electromagnetic tomography (sLORETA for both ERP positivity and negativity showed that switch trials evoked larger activation than repeat trials in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC and posterior parietal cortex (PPC. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results provide evidence that both RSI and CSI modulate the neural activities in the process of task-switching, but that these have a differential role during task-set reconfiguration and passive dissipation of a previously relevant task-set.

  2. An integrative model for the neural mechanism of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier A. Coubard

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Since the seminal report by Shapiro that bilateral stimulation induces cognitive and emotional changes, twenty-six years of basic and clinical research have examined the effects of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR in anxiety disorders, particularly in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD. The present article aims at better understanding EMDR neural mechanism. I first review procedural aspects of EMDR protocol and theoretical hypothesis about EMDR effects, and develop the reasons why the scientific community is still divided about EMDR. I then slide from psychology to physiology describing eye movements/emotion interaction from the physiological viewpoint, and introduce theoretical and technical tools used in movement research to re-examine EMDR neural mechanism. Using a recent physiological model for the neuropsychological architecture of motor and cognitive control, the Threshold Interval Modulation with Early Release-Rate of rIse Deviation with Early Release – TIMER-RIDER – model, I explore how attentional control and bilateral stimulation may participate to EMDR effects. These effects may be obtained by two processes acting in parallel: (i activity level enhancement of attentional control component; and (ii bilateral stimulation in any sensorimotor modality, both resulting in lower inhibition enabling dysfunctional information to be processed and anxiety to be reduced. The TIMER-RIDER model offers quantitative predictions about EMDR effects for future research about its underlying physiological mechanisms.

  3. An Integrative Model for the Neural Mechanism of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coubard, Olivier A

    2016-01-01

    Since the seminal report by Shapiro that bilateral stimulation induces cognitive and emotional changes, 26 years of basic and clinical research have examined the effects of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) in anxiety disorders, particularly in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The present article aims at better understanding EMDR neural mechanism. I first review procedural aspects of EMDR protocol and theoretical hypothesis about EMDR effects, and develop the reasons why the scientific community is still divided about EMDR. I then slide from psychology to physiology describing eye movements/emotion interaction from the physiological viewpoint, and introduce theoretical and technical tools used in movement research to re-examine EMDR neural mechanism. Using a recent physiological model for the neuropsychological architecture of motor and cognitive control, the Threshold Interval Modulation with Early Release-Rate of rIse Deviation with Early Release (TIMER-RIDER)-model, I explore how attentional control and bilateral stimulation may participate to EMDR effects. These effects may be obtained by two processes acting in parallel: (i) activity level enhancement of attentional control component; and (ii) bilateral stimulation in any sensorimotor modality, both resulting in lower inhibition enabling dysfunctional information to be processed and anxiety to be reduced. The TIMER-RIDER model offers quantitative predictions about EMDR effects for future research about its underlying physiological mechanisms.

  4. Challenges for identifying the neural mechanisms that support spatial navigation: the impact of spatial scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eWolbers

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Spatial navigation is a fascinating behavior that is essential for our everyday lives. It involves nearly all sensory systems, it requires numerous parallel computations, and it engages multiple memory systems. One of the key problems in this field pertains to the question of reference frames: spatial information such as direction or distance can be coded egocentrically - relative to an observer - or allocentrically - in a reference frame independent of the observer. While many studies have associated striatal and parietal circuits with egocentric coding and entorhinal/hippocampal circuits with allocentric coding, this strict dissociation is not in line with a growing body of experimental data. In this review, we discuss some of the problems that can arise when studying the neural mechanisms that are presumed to support different spatial reference frames. We argue that the scale of space in which a navigation task takes place plays a crucial role in determining the processes that are being recruited. This has important implications, particularly for the inferences that can be made from animal studies in small scale space about the neural mechanisms supporting human spatial navigation in large (environmental spaces. Furthermore, we argue that many of the commonly used tasks to study spatial navigation and the underlying neuronal mechanisms involve different types of reference frames, which can complicate the interpretation of neurophysiological data.

  5. An adaptive neural mechanism for acoustic motion perception with varying sparsity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaikh, Danish; Manoonpong, Poramate

    2017-01-01

    .e. extracting information about its direction and velocity. Here we focus on auditory motion perception of sound stimuli, which is poorly understood as compared to its visual counterpart. In earlier work we have developed a bio-inspired neural learning mechanism for acoustic motion perception. The mechanism...... extracts directional information via a model of the peripheral auditory system of lizards. The mechanism uses only this directional information obtained via specific motor behaviour to learn the angular velocity of unoccluded sound stimuli in motion. In nature however the stimulus being tracked may...... be occluded by artefacts in the environment, such as an escaping prey momentarily disappearing behind a cover of trees. This article extends the earlier work by presenting a comparative investigation of auditory motion perception for unoccluded and occluded tonal sound stimuli with a frequency of 2.2 k...

  6. The influence of negative emotions on pain: behavioral effects and neural mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiech, Katja; Tracey, Irene

    2009-09-01

    The idea that pain can lead to feelings of frustration, worry, anxiety and depression seems obvious, particularly if it is of a chronic nature. However, there is also evidence for the reverse causal relationship in which negative mood and emotion can lead to pain or exacerbate it. Here, we review findings from studies on the modulation of pain by experimentally induced mood changes and clinical mood disorders. We discuss possible neural mechanisms underlying this modulatory influence focusing on the periaqueductal grey (PAG), amygdala, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and anterior insula as key players in both, pain and affective processing.

  7. The changing brain--insights into the mechanisms of neural and behavioral adaptation to the environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergersen, L H; Bramham, C R; Hugdahl, K

    2013-01-01

    of the Symposium presentations was the mechanisms by which animals adapt to their environment. The symposium speakers--Michael Greenberg, Erin Schuman, Chiara Cirelli, Michael Meaney, Catherine Dulac, Hopi Hoekstra, and Stanislas Dehaene--covered topics ranging from the molecular and cellular levels to the systems...... level and behavior. Thus a single amino acid change in a transcriptional repressor can disrupt gene regulation through neural activity (Greenberg). Deep sequencing analysis of the neuropil transcriptome indicates that a large fraction of the synaptic proteome is synthesized in situ in axons...

  8. Compensatory recruitment of neural resources in chronic alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanraud, Sandra; Sullivan, Edith V

    2014-01-01

    Functional recovery occurs with sustained sobriety, but the neural mechanisms enabling recovery are only now emerging. Theories about promising mechanisms involve concepts of neuroadaptation, where excessive alcohol consumption results in untoward structural and functional brain changes which are subsequently candidates for reversal with sobriety. Views on functional adaptation in chronic alcoholism have expanded with results from neuroimaging studies. Here, we first describe and define the concept of neuroadaptation according to emerging theories based on the growing literature in aging-related cognitive functioning. Then we describe findings as they apply to chronic alcoholism and factors that could influence compensation, such as functional brain reserve and the integrity of brain structure. Finally, we review brain plasticity based on physiologic mechanisms that could underlie mechanisms of neural compensation. Where possible, we provide operational criteria to define functional and neural compensation.

  9. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD Associated Neural Defects: Complex Mechanisms and Potential Therapeutic Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Marrs

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD, caused by prenatal alcohol exposure, can result in craniofacial dysmorphism, cognitive impairment, sensory and motor disabilities among other defects. FASD incidences are as high as 2% to 5 % children born in the US, and prevalence is higher in low socioeconomic populations. Despite various mechanisms being proposed to explain the etiology of FASD, the molecular targets of ethanol toxicity during development are unknown. Proposed mechanisms include cell death, cell signaling defects and gene expression changes. More recently, the involvement of several other molecular pathways was explored, including non-coding RNA, epigenetic changes and specific vitamin deficiencies. These various pathways may interact, producing a wide spectrum of consequences. Detailed understanding of these various pathways and their interactions will facilitate the therapeutic target identification, leading to new clinical intervention, which may reduce the incidence and severity of these highly prevalent preventable birth defects. This review discusses manifestations of alcohol exposure on the developing central nervous system, including the neural crest cells and sensory neural placodes, focusing on molecular neurodevelopmental pathways as possible therapeutic targets for prevention or protection.

  10. Handedness is related to neural mechanisms underlying hemispheric lateralization of face processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frässle, Stefan; Krach, Sören; Paulus, Frieder Michel; Jansen, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    While the right-hemispheric lateralization of the face perception network is well established, recent evidence suggests that handedness affects the cerebral lateralization of face processing at the hierarchical level of the fusiform face area (FFA). However, the neural mechanisms underlying differential hemispheric lateralization of face perception in right- and left-handers are largely unknown. Using dynamic causal modeling (DCM) for fMRI, we aimed to unravel the putative processes that mediate handedness-related differences by investigating the effective connectivity in the bilateral core face perception network. Our results reveal an enhanced recruitment of the left FFA in left-handers compared to right-handers, as evidenced by more pronounced face-specific modulatory influences on both intra- and interhemispheric connections. As structural and physiological correlates of handedness-related differences in face processing, right- and left-handers varied with regard to their gray matter volume in the left fusiform gyrus and their pupil responses to face stimuli. Overall, these results describe how handedness is related to the lateralization of the core face perception network, and point to different neural mechanisms underlying face processing in right- and left-handers. In a wider context, this demonstrates the entanglement of structurally and functionally remote brain networks, suggesting a broader underlying process regulating brain lateralization.

  11. Neural networks mechanism of Parkinson's disease dementia and the clinical pharmacotherapy%帕金森病痴呆的神经网络机制和药物治疗进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周丽丽; 王文昭

    2016-01-01

    帕金森病(PD)随着病程的延长最终可进展为帕金森病痴呆(PDD),并将严重影响到患者的生活质量,显著增加致残率和病死率,近年逐渐受到关注.认知相关的多巴胺及非多巴胺神经网络可能有助于揭示PDD的发病机制及针对性的新型药物的研发.本文主要综述PDD的神经网络机制及药物治疗研究进展,以期为PDD的预防、诊断以及治疗提供新思路.%With the illness progression,Parkinson's disease could deteriorate into Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD),which would seriously affect the patients' quality to life,as well as significantly increase the mortality.Recently,the research progress,that the distinct neural networks underlie the cognitive deficits and their modulation through both dopaminergic and non-dopaminergic transmitter systems in brain,would provide a prospect to reveal the mechanism and new drugs for PDD.This review summarizes the progress of neural network mechanism and provides the new ideas for PDD prevention,diagnosis and treatment.

  12. Mechanisms of brain evolution: regulation of neural progenitor cell diversity and cell cycle length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrell, Victor; Calegari, Federico

    2014-09-01

    In the last few years, several studies have revisited long-held assumptions in the field of brain development and evolution providing us with a fundamentally new vision on the mechanisms controlling its size and shape, hence function. Among these studies, some described hitherto unforeseeable subtypes of neural progenitors while others reinterpreted long-known observations about their cell cycle in alternative new ways. Most remarkably, this knowledge combined has allowed the generation of mammalian model organisms in which brain size and folding has been selectively increased giving us the means to understand the mechanisms underlying the evolution of the most complex and sophisticated organ. Here we review the key findings made in this area and make a few conjectures about their evolutionary meaning including the likelihood of Martians conquering our planet.

  13. Neural correlates of mental state decoding in human adults: an event-related potential study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbagh, Mark A; Moulson, Margaret C; Harkness, Kate L

    2004-04-01

    Successful negotiation of human social interactions rests on having a theory of mind - an understanding of how others' behaviors can be understood in terms of internal mental states, such as beliefs, desires, intentions, and emotions. A core theory-of-mind skill is the ability to decode others' mental states on the basis of observable information, such as facial expressions. Although several recent studies have focused on the neural correlates of reasoning about mental states, no research has addressed the question of what neural systems underlie mental state decoding. We used dense-array event-related potentials (ERP) to show that decoding mental states from pictures of eyes is associated with an N270-400 component over inferior frontal and anterior temporal regions of the right hemisphere. Source estimation procedures suggest that orbitofrontal and medial temporal regions may underlie this ERP effect. These findings suggest that different components of everyday theory-of-mind skills may rely on dissociable neural mechanisms.

  14. Error awareness and salience processing in the oddball task: Shared neural mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helga A Harsay

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A body of work suggests that there are similarities in the way we become aware of an error and process motivationally salient events. Yet, evidence for a shared neural mechanism has not been provided. A within-subject investigation of the brain regions involved in error awareness and salience processing has not been reported. While the neural response to motivationally salient events is classically studied during target detection after longer target-to-target intervals in an oddball task and engages a widespread insula-thalamo-cortical brain network, error awareness has recently been linked to, most prominently, anterior insula cortex. Here we explore whether the anterior insula activation for error awareness is related to salience processing, by testing for activation overlap in subjects undergoing two different task settings. Using a within-subjects design, we show activation overlap in six major brain areas during aware errors in an antisaccade task and during target detection (which were associated with longer target-to-target interval conditions in an oddball task: anterior insula, anterior cingulate, supplementary motor area, thalamus, brainstem and parietal lobe. Within subject analyses shows that the insula is engaged in both error awareness and the processing of salience, and that the anterior insula is more involved in both processes than the posterior insula. The results of a fine-grained spatial pattern overlap analysis between active clusters in the same subjects indicated that even if the anterior insula is activated for both error awareness and salience processing, the two types of processes might tend to activate non-identical neural ensembles on a finer-grained spatial level. Together, these outcomes suggest a similar functional phenomenon in the two different task settings. Error awareness and salience processing share a functional anatomy, with a tendency towards subregional dorsal and ventral specialization within the

  15. Mindfulness training applied to addiction therapy: insights into the neural mechanisms of positive behavioral change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garl

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Eric L Garland,1,2 Matthew O Howard,3 Sarah E Priddy,1 Patrick A McConnell,4 Michael R Riquino,1 Brett Froeliger4 1College of Social Work, 2Hunstsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA; 3School of Social Work, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA; 4Department of Neuroscience, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA Abstract: Dual-process models from neuroscience suggest that addiction is driven by dysregulated interactions between bottom-up neural processes underpinning reward learning and top-down neural functions subserving executive function. Over time, drug use causes atrophy in prefrontally mediated cognitive control networks and hijacks striatal circuits devoted to processing natural rewards in service of compulsive seeking of drug-related reward. In essence, mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs can be conceptualized as mental training programs for exercising, strengthening, and remediating these functional brain networks. This review describes how MBIs may remediate addiction by regulating frontostriatal circuits, thereby restoring an adaptive balance between these top-down and bottom-up processes. Empirical evidence is presented suggesting that MBIs facilitate cognitive control over drug-related automaticity, attentional bias, and drug cue reactivity, while enhancing responsiveness to natural rewards. Findings from the literature are incorporated into an integrative account of the neural mechanisms of mindfulness-based therapies for effecting positive behavior change in the context of addiction recovery. Implications of our theoretical framework are presented with respect to how these insights can inform the addiction therapy process. Keywords: mindfulness, frontostriatal, savoring, cue reactivity, hedonic dysregulation, reward, addiction

  16. Neural Sources and Underlying Mechanisms of Neural Responses to Heartbeats, and their Role in Bodily Self-consciousness: An Intracranial EEG Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyeong-Dong; Bernasconi, Fosco; Salomon, Roy; Tallon-Baudry, Catherine; Spinelli, Laurent; Seeck, Margitta; Schaller, Karl; Blanke, Olaf

    2017-06-07

    Recent research has shown that heartbeat-evoked potentials (HEPs), brain activity in response to heartbeats, are a useful neural measure for investigating the functional role of brain-body interactions in cognitive processes including self-consciousness. In 2 experiments, using intracranial electroencephalography (EEG), we investigated (1) the neural sources of HEPs, (2) the underlying mechanisms for HEP generation, and (3) the functional role of HEPs in bodily self-consciousness. In Experiment-1, we found that shortly after the heartbeat onset, phase distributions across single trials were significantly concentrated in 10% of the recording sites, mainly in the insula and the operculum, but also in other regions including the amygdala and fronto-temporal cortex. Such phase concentration was not accompanied by increased spectral power, and did not correlate with spectral power changes, suggesting that a phase resetting, rather than an additive "evoked potential" mechanism, underlies HEP generation. In Experiment-2, we further aimed to anatomically refine previous scalp EEG data that linked HEPs with bodily self-consciousness. We found that HEP modulations in the insula reflected an experimentally induced altered sense of self-identification. Collectively, these results provide novel and solid electrophysiological evidence on the neural sources and underlying mechanisms of HEPs, and their functional role in self-consciousness. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. The Neural Web of War

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kennis, M.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to gain more insight in the neural network alterations that may underlie PTSD and trauma-focused therapy outcome. To investigate TheNeural Web of War brain scans of healthy civilians (n=26), and veterans with (n=58) and without (n=29) PTSD were assessed. Structural and fun

  18. A Neural Mechanism for Nonconscious Activation of Conditioned Placebo and Nocebo Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Karin B.; Kaptchuk, Ted J.; Chen, Xiaoyan; Kirsch, Irving; Ingvar, Martin; Gollub, Randy L.; Kong, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Fundamental aspects of human behavior operate outside of conscious awareness. Yet, theories of conditioned responses in humans, such as placebo and nocebo effects on pain, have a strong emphasis on conscious recognition of contextual cues that trigger the response. Here, we investigated the neural pathways involved in nonconscious activation of conditioned pain responses, using functional magnetic resonance imaging in healthy participants. Nonconscious compared with conscious activation of conditioned placebo analgesia was associated with increased activation of the orbitofrontal cortex, a structure with direct connections to affective brain regions and basic reward processing. During nonconscious nocebo, there was increased activation of the thalamus, amygdala, and hippocampus. In contrast to previous assumptions about conditioning in humans, our results show that conditioned pain responses can be elicited independently of conscious awareness and our results suggest a hierarchical activation of neural pathways for nonconscious and conscious conditioned responses. Demonstrating that the human brain has a nonconscious mechanism for responding to conditioned cues has major implications for the role of associative learning in behavioral medicine and psychiatry. Our results may also open up for novel approaches to translational animal-to-human research since human consciousness and animal cognition is an inherent paradox in all behavioral science. PMID:25452576

  19. Neural mechanisms involved in the oral representation of percussion music: an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chen-Gia; Chen, Chien-Chung; Chou, Tai-Li; Chen, Jyh-Horng

    2010-11-01

    Numerous music cultures use nonsense syllables to represent percussive sounds. Covert reciting of these syllable sequences along with percussion music aids active listeners in keeping track of music. Owing to the acoustic dissimilarity between the representative syllables and the referent percussive sounds, associative learning is necessary for the oral representation of percussion music. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to explore the neural processes underlying oral rehearsals of music. There were four music conditions in the experiment: (1) passive listening to unlearned percussion music, (2) active listening to learned percussion music, (3) active listening to the syllable representation of (2), and (4) active listening to learned melodic music. Our results specified two neural substrates of the association mechanisms involved in the oral representation of percussion music. First, information integration of heard sounds and the auditory consequences of subvocal rehearsals may engage the right planum temporale during active listening to percussion music. Second, mapping heard sounds to articulatory and laryngeal gestures may engage the left middle premotor cortex.

  20. Lexical organization and competition in first and second languages: computational and neural mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping

    2009-06-01

    How does a child rapidly acquire and develop a structured mental organization for the vast number of words in the first years of life? How does a bilingual individual deal with the even more complicated task of learning and organizing two lexicons? It is only until recently have we started to examine the lexicon as a dynamical system with regard to its acquisition, representation, and organization. In this article, I outline a proposal based on our research that takes the dynamical approach to the lexicon, and I discuss how this proposal can be applied to account for lexical organization, structural representation, and competition within and between languages. In particular, I provide computational evidence based on the DevLex model, a self-organizing neural network model, and neuroimaging evidence based on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies, to illustrate how children and adults learn and represent the lexicon in their first and second languages. In the computational research, our goal has been to identify, through linguistically and developmentally realistic models, detailed cognitive mechanisms underlying the dynamic self-organizing processes in monolingual and bilingual lexical development; in the neuroimaging research, our goal has been to identify the neural substrates that subserve lexical organization and competition in the monolingual and the bilingual brain. In both cases, our findings lead to a better understanding of the interactive dynamics involved in the acquisition and representation of one or multiple languages. Copyright © 2009 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  1. The Neural Mechanisms of Social Learning from Fleeting Experience with Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yang-Teng; Chen, Chenyi; Cheng, Yawei

    2016-01-01

    Social learning is critical for humans to adapt and cope with rapidly changing surroundings. Although, neuroscience has focused on associative learning and pain empathy, the neural mechanisms of social learning through fleeting pain remains to be determined. This functional MRI study included three participant groups, to investigate how the neuro-hemodynamic response and subjective evaluation in response to the observation of hand actions were modulated by first-hand experience (FH), as well as indirect experience through social-observational (SO), and verbal-informed (VI) learning from fleeting pain. The results indicated, that these three learning groups share the common neuro-hemodynamic activations in the brain regions implicated in emotional awareness, memory, mentalizing, perspective taking, and emotional regulation. The anterior insular cortex (AIC) was commonly activated during these learning procedures. The amygdala was only activated by the FH. Dynamic causal modeling further indicated, that the SO and VI learning exhibited weaker connectivity strength from the AIC to superior frontal gyrus than did the FH. These findings demonstrate, that social learning elicits distinct neural responses from associative learning. The ontogeny of human empathy could be better understood with social learning from fleeting experience with pain.

  2. Transdiagnostic dimensions of anxiety: Neural mechanisms, executive functions, and new directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Paul B; Miller, Gregory A; Heller, Wendy

    2015-11-01

    Converging neuroscientific and psychological evidence points to several transdiagnostic factors that cut across DSM-defined disorders, which both affect and are affected by executive dysfunction. Two of these factors, anxious apprehension and anxious arousal, have helped bridge the gap between psychological and neurobiological models of anxiety. The present integration of diverse findings advances an understanding of the relationships between these transdiagnostic anxiety dimensions, their interactions with each other and executive function, and their neural mechanisms. Additionally, a discussion is provided concerning how these constructs fit within the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) matrix developed by the National Institutes of Mental Health and how they relate to other anxiety constructs studied with different methods and at other units of analysis. Suggestions for future research are offered, including how to (1) improve measurement and delineation of these constructs, (2) use new neuroimaging methods and theoretical approaches of how the brain functions to build neural mechanistic models of these constructs, and (3) advance understanding of the relationships of these constructs to diverse emotional phenomena and executive functions.

  3. Neural adaptations to resistive exercise: mechanisms and recommendations for training practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, David A; Kamen, Gary; Frost, Gail

    2006-01-01

    It is generally accepted that neural factors play an important role in muscle strength gains. This article reviews the neural adaptations in strength, with the goal of laying the foundations for practical applications in sports medicine and rehabilitation. An increase in muscular strength without noticeable hypertrophy is the first line of evidence for neural involvement in acquisition of muscular strength. The use of surface electromyographic (SEMG) techniques reveal that strength gains in the early phase of a training regimen are associated with an increase in the amplitude of SEMG activity. This has been interpreted as an increase in neural drive, which denotes the magnitude of efferent neural output from the CNS to active muscle fibres. However, SEMG activity is a global measure of muscle activity. Underlying alterations in SEMG activity are changes in motor unit firing patterns as measured by indwelling (wire or needle) electrodes. Some studies have reported a transient increase in motor unit firing rate. Training-related increases in the rate of tension development have also been linked with an increased probability of doublet firing in individual motor units. A doublet is a very short interspike interval in a motor unit train, and usually occurs at the onset of a muscular contraction. Motor unit synchronisation is another possible mechanism for increases in muscle strength, but has yet to be definitely demonstrated. There are several lines of evidence for central control of training-related adaptation to resistive exercise. Mental practice using imagined contractions has been shown to increase the excitability of the cortical areas involved in movement and motion planning. However, training using imagined contractions is unlikely to be as effective as physical training, and it may be more applicable to rehabilitation. Retention of strength gains after dissipation of physiological effects demonstrates a strong practice effect. Bilateral contractions are

  4. Social neuroscience in psychiatry: unravelling the neural mechanisms of social dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fett, A K J; Shergill, S S; Krabbendam, L

    2015-04-01

    Social neuroscience is a flourishing, interdisciplinary field that investigates the underlying biological processes of social cognition and behaviour. The recent application of social neuroscience to psychiatric research advances our understanding of various psychiatric illnesses that are characterized by impairments in social cognition and social functioning. In addition, the upcoming line of social neuroscience research provides new techniques to design and evaluate treatment interventions that are aimed at improving patients' social lives. This review provides a contemporary overview of social neuroscience in psychiatry. We draw together the major findings about the neural mechanisms of social cognitive processes directed at understanding others and social interactions in psychiatric illnesses and discuss their implications for future research and clinical practice.

  5. Neural Network Based Multi-level Fuzzy Evaluation Model for Mechanical Kinematic Scheme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BO Ruifeng; LI Ruiqin

    2006-01-01

    To implement a quantificational evaluation for mechanical kinematic scheme more effectively, a multi-level and multi-objective evaluation model is presented using neural network and fuzzy theory. Firstly, the structure of evaluation model is constructed according to evaluation indicator system. Then evaluation samples are generated and provided to train this model. Thus it can reflect the relation between attributive value and evaluation result, as well as the weight of evaluation indicator. Once evaluation indicators of each candidate are fuzzily quantified and fed into the trained network model, the corresponding evaluation result is outputted and the best alternative can be selected. Under this model, expert knowledge can be effectively acquired and expressed, and the quantificational evaluation can be implemented for kinematic scheme with multi-level evaluation indicator system. Several key problems on this model are discussed and an illustration has demonstrated that this model is feasible and can be regarded as a new idea for solving kinematic scheme evaluation.

  6. Outsourcing neural active control to passive composite mechanics: a tissue engineered cyborg ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzola, Mattia; Park, Sung Jin; Park, Kyung Soo; Park, Shirley; di Santo, Valentina; Deisseroth, Karl; Lauder, George V.; Mahadevan, L.; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2016-11-01

    Translating the blueprint that stingrays and skates provide, we create a cyborg swimming ray capable of orchestrating adaptive maneuvering and phototactic navigation. The impossibility of replicating the neural system of batoids fish is bypassed by outsourcing algorithmic functionalities to the body composite mechanics, hence casting the active control problem into a design, passive one. We present a first step in engineering multilevel "brain-body-flow" systems that couple sensory information to motor coordination and movement, leading to behavior. This work paves the way for the development of autonomous and adaptive artificial creatures able to process multiple sensory inputs and produce complex behaviors in distributed systems and may represent a path toward soft-robotic "embodied cognition".

  7. Two distinct neural mechanisms in early visual cortex determine subsequent visual processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Christianne; de Graaf, Tom A; Sack, Alexander T

    2014-10-01

    Neuroscience research has conventionally focused on how the brain processes sensory information, after the information has been received. Recently, increased interest focuses on how the state of the brain upon receiving inputs determines and biases their subsequent processing and interpretation. Here, we investigated such 'pre-stimulus' brain mechanisms and their relevance for objective and subjective visual processing. Using non-invasive focal brain stimulation [transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)] we disrupted spontaneous brain state activity within early visual cortex (EVC) before onset of visual stimulation, at two different pre-stimulus-onset-asynchronies (pSOAs). We found that TMS pulses applied to EVC at either 20 msec or 50 msec before onset of a simple orientation stimulus both prevented this stimulus from reaching visual awareness. Interestingly, only the TMS-induced visual suppression following TMS at a pSOA of ?20 msec was retinotopically specific, while TMS at a pSOA of ?50 msec was not. In a second experiment, we used more complex symbolic arrow stimuli, and found TMS-induced suppression only when disrupting EVC at a pSOA of ? ?60 msec, which, in line with Experiment 1, was not retinotopically specific. Despite this topographic unspecificity of the ?50 msec effect, the additional control measurements as well as tracking and removal of eye blinks, suggested that also this effect was not the result of an unspecific artifact, and thus neural in origin. We therefore obtained evidence of two distinct neural mechanisms taking place in EVC, both determining whether or not subsequent visual inputs are successfully processed by the human visual system.

  8. Elevated body mass index and maintenance of cognitive function in late life: exploring underlying neural mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chun Liang; Voss, Michelle W; Best, John R; Handy, Todd C; Madden, Kenneth; Bolandzadeh, Niousha; Liu-Ambrose, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is associated with vascular risk factors that in turn, may increase dementia risk. However, higher body mass index (BMI) in late life may be neuroprotective. The possible neural mechanisms underlying the benefit of higher BMI on cognition in older adults are largely unknown. Thus, we used functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI) to examine: (1) the relationship between BMI and functional brain connectivity; and (2) the mediating role of functional brain connectivity in the association between baseline BMI and change in cognitive function over a 12-month period. We conducted a 12-month, prospective study among 66 community-dwelling older adults, aged 70 to 80 years, who were categorized as: normal weight (BMI from 18.50 to 24.99); overweight (BMI from 25.00 to 29.99); and obese (BMI ≥ 30.00). At baseline, participants performed a finger-tapping task during fMRI scanning. Relevant neural networks were initially identified through independent component analysis (ICA) and subsequently examined through seed-based functional connectivity analysis. At baseline and 12-months, we measured three executive cognitive processes: (1) response inhibition; (2) set shifting; and (3) working memory. Obese individuals showed lower task-related functional connectivity during finger tapping in the default mode network (DMN) compared with their healthy weight counterparts (p BMI and working memory at 12-months (indirect effect: -0.155, 95% confidence interval [-0.313, -0.053]). These findings suggest that functional connectivity of the DMN may be an underlying mechanism by which higher BMI confers protective effects to cognition in late life.

  9. Neural mechanisms supporting the extraction of general knowledge across episodic memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweegers, Carly C G; Takashima, Atsuko; Fernández, Guillén; Talamini, Lucia M

    2014-02-15

    General knowledge acquisition entails the extraction of statistical regularities from the environment. At high levels of complexity, this may involve the extraction, and consolidation, of associative regularities across event memories. The underlying neural mechanisms would likely involve a hippocampo-neocortical dialog, as proposed previously for system-level consolidation. To test these hypotheses, we assessed possible differences in consolidation between associative memories containing cross-episodic regularities and unique associative memories. Subjects learned face-location associations, half of which responded to complex regularities regarding the combination of facial features and locations, whereas the other half did not. Importantly, regularities could only be extracted over hippocampus-encoded, associative aspects of the items. Memory was assessed both immediately after encoding and 48 h later, under fMRI acquisition. Our results suggest that processes related to system-level reorganization occur preferentially for regular associations across episodes. Moreover, the build-up of general knowledge regarding regular associations appears to involve the coordinated activity of the hippocampus and mediofrontal regions. The putative cross-talk between these two regions might support a mechanism for regularity extraction. These findings suggest that the consolidation of cross-episodic regularities may be a key mechanism underlying general knowledge acquisition.

  10. Bio-Inspired Controller for a Robot Cheetah with a Neural Mechanism Controlling Leg Muscles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Wang; Mantian Li; Pengfei Wang; Wei Guo; Lining Sun

    2012-01-01

    The realization of a high-speed running robot is one of the most challenging problems in developing legged robots.The excellent performance of cheetahs provides inspiration for the control and mechanical design of such robots.This paper presents a three-dimensional model of a cheetah that predicts the locomotory behaviors of a running cheetah.Applying biological knowledge of the neural mechanism,we control the muscle flexion and extension during the stance phase,and control the positions of the joints in the flight phase via a PD controller to minimize complexity.The proposed control strategy is shown to achieve similar locomotion of a real cheetah.The simulation realizes good biological properties,such as the leg retraction,ground reaction force,and spring-like leg behavior.The stable bounding results show the promise of the controller in high-speed locomotion.The model can reach 2.7 m·s- 1 as the highest speed,and can accelerate from 0 to 1.5 m·s -1 in one stride cycle.A mechanical structure based on this simulation is designed to demonstrate the control approach,and the most recently developed hindlimb controlled by the proposed controller is presented in swinging-leg experiments and jump-force experiments.

  11. Fuzzy clustering: critical analysis of the contextual mechanisms employed by three neural network models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraldi, Andrea; Parmiggiani, Flavio

    1996-06-01

    According to the following definition, taken from the literature, a fuzzy clustering mechanism allows the same input pattern to belong to multiple categories to different degrees. Many clustering neural network (NN) models claim to feature fuzzy properties, but several of them (like the Fuzzy ART model) do not satisfy this definition. Vice versa, we believe that Kohonen's Self-Organizing Map, SOM, satisfies the definition provided above, even though this NN model is well-known to (robustly) perform topologically ordered mapping rather than fuzzy clustering. This may sound as a paradox if we consider that several fuzzy NN models (such as the Fuzzy Learning Vector Quantization, FLVQ, which was first called Fuzzy Kohonen Clustering Network, FKCN) were originally developed to enhance Kohonen's models (such as SOM and the vector quantization model, VQ). The fuzziness of SOM indicates that a network of processing elements (PEs) can verify the fuzzy clustering definition when it exploits local rules which are biologically plausible (such as the Kohonen bubble strategy). This is equivalent to state that the exploitation of the fuzzy set theory in the development of complex systems (e.g., clustering NNs) may provide new mathematical tools (e.g., the definition of membership function) to simulate the behavior of those cooperative/competitive mechanisms already identified by neurophysiological studies. When a biologically plausible cooperative/competitive strategy is pursued effectively, neighboring PEs become mutually coupled to gain sensitivity to contextual effects. PEs which are mutually coupled are affected by vertical (inter-layer) as well as horizontal (intra-layer) connections. To summarize, we suggest to relate the study of fuzzy clustering mechanisms to the multi-disciplinary science of complex systems, with special regard to the investigation of the cooperative/competitive local rules employed by complex systems to gain sensitivity to contextual effects in

  12. Neural mechanism of central inhibition during physical fatigue: a magnetoencephalography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Masaaki; Ishii, Akira; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi

    2013-11-01

    Central inhibition plays an important role in physical performance during physical fatigue. We tried to clarify the neural mechanism of central inhibition during physical fatigue using the magnetoencephalography (MEG) and a classical conditioning technique. Twelve right-handed volunteers participated in this study. Participants underwent MEG recording during the imagery of maximum grips of the right hand guided by metronome sounds for 10 min. Thereafter, fatigue-inducing maximum handgrip trials were performed for 10 min; the metronome sounds were started 5 min after the beginning of the handgrip trials. We used metronome sounds as conditioned stimuli and maximum handgrip trials as unconditioned stimuli to cause central inhibition. The next day, MEG recording during the imagery of maximum grips of the right hand guided by metronome sounds were measured for 10 min. Levels of the fatigue sensation in the right hand and sympathetic nerve activity on the second day were significantly higher than those on the first day. In the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (Brodmann's area 46), the alpha-band event-related desynchronization (ERD) of the second MEG session relative to the first session with the time window of 200 to 300 ms after the onset of handgrip cue sounds was identified. The ERD level in this brain region was positively associated with the change in subjective level of right hand fatigue after the conditioning session and was negatively associated with that of the sympathetic nerve activity. We demonstrated that the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex is involved in the neural substrates of central inhibition during physical fatigue.

  13. Staying cool when things get hot: Emotion regulation modulates neural mechanisms of memory encoding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmeet P Hayes

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available During times of emotional stress, individuals often engage in emotion regulation to reduce the experiential and physiological impact of negative emotions. Interestingly, emotion regulation strategies also influence memory encoding of the event. Cognitive reappraisal is associated with enhanced memory while expressive suppression is associated with impaired explicit memory of the emotional event. However, the mechanism by which these emotion regulation strategies affect memory is unclear. We used event-related fMRI to investigate the neural mechanisms that give rise to memory formation during emotion regulation. Twenty-five participants viewed negative pictures while alternately engaging in cognitive reappraisal, expressive suppression, or passive viewing. As part of the subsequent memory design, participants returned to the laboratory two weeks later for a surprise memory test. Behavioral results showed a reduction in negative affect and a retention advantage for reappraised stimuli relative to the other conditions. Imaging results showed that successful encoding during reappraisal was uniquely associated with greater co-activation of the left inferior frontal gyrus, amygdala and hippocampus, suggesting a possible role for elaborative encoding of negative memories. This study provides neurobehavioral evidence that engaging in cognitive reappraisal is advantageous to both affective and mnemonic processes.

  14. Common mechanisms linking connexin43 to neural progenitor cell migration and glioma invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naus, Christian C; Aftab, Qurratulain; Sin, Wun Chey

    2016-02-01

    Cell migration is critical for cell differentiation, tissue formation and organ development. Several mechanisms come to play in the process of cell migration, orchestrating changes in cell polarity, adhesion, process extension and motility. Recent findings have shown that gap junctions, and specifically connexin43 (Cx43), can play a significant role in these processes, impacting adhesion and cytoskeletal rearrangements. Thus Cx43 within a cell regulates its motility and migration via intracellular signaling. Furthermore, Cx43 in the host cells can impact the degree of cellular migration through that tissue. Similarities in these connexin-based processes account for both neural progenitor migration in the developing brain, and for glioma cell invasion in the mature brain. In both cases, Cx43 in the tissue ("soil") in which cells ("seeds") exist facilitates their migration and, for glioma cells, tissue invasion. Cx43 mediates these effects through channel- and non-channel-dependent mechanisms which have similarities in both paradigms of cell migration. This provides insight into developmental processes and pathological situations, as well as possible therapeutic approaches regarding specific functional domains of gap junction proteins.

  15. Fracture Mechanics Method for Word Embedding Generation of Neural Probabilistic Linguistic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Size Bi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Word embedding, a lexical vector representation generated via the neural linguistic model (NLM, is empirically demonstrated to be appropriate for improvement of the performance of traditional language model. However, the supreme dimensionality that is inherent in NLM contributes to the problems of hyperparameters and long-time training in modeling. Here, we propose a force-directed method to improve such problems for simplifying the generation of word embedding. In this framework, each word is assumed as a point in the real world; thus it can approximately simulate the physical movement following certain mechanics. To simulate the variation of meaning in phrases, we use the fracture mechanics to do the formation and breakdown of meaning combined by a 2-gram word group. With the experiments on the natural linguistic tasks of part-of-speech tagging, named entity recognition and semantic role labeling, the result demonstrated that the 2-dimensional word embedding can rival the word embeddings generated by classic NLMs, in terms of accuracy, recall, and text visualization.

  16. Mechanisms for Interferon-α-Induced Depression and Neural Stem Cell Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lian-Shun Zheng

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available New neurons generated by the neural stem cells (NSCs in the adult hippocampus play an important role in emotional regulation and respond to the action of antidepressants. Depression is a common and serious side effect of interferon-α (IFN-α, which limits its use as an antiviral and antitumor drug. However, the mechanism(s underlying IFN-induced depression are largely unknown. Using a comprehensive battery of behavioral tests, we found that mice subjected to IFN-α treatment exhibited a depression-like phenotype. IFN-α directly suppressed NSC proliferation, resulting in the reduced generation of new neurons. Brain-specific mouse knockout of the IFN-α receptor prevented IFN-α-induced depressive behavioral phenotypes and the inhibition of neurogenesis, suggesting that IFN-α suppresses hippocampal neurogenesis and induces depression via its receptor in the brain. These findings provide insight for understanding the neuropathology underlying IFN-α-induced depression and for developing new strategies for the prevention and treatment of IFN-α-induced depressive effects.

  17. Study Under AC Stimulation on Excitement Properties of Weighted Small-World Biological Neural Networks with Side-Restrain Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Wu-Jie; LUO Xiao-Shu; JIANG Pin-Qun

    2007-01-01

    In this paper,we propose a new model of weighted small-world biological neural networks based on biophysical Hodgkin-Huxley neurons with side-restrain mechanism.Then we study excitement properties of the model under alternating current (AC) stimulation.The study shows that the excitement properties in the networks are preferably consistent with the behavior properties of a brain nervous system under different AC stimuli,such as refractory period and the brain neural excitement response induced by different intensities of nolse and coupling.The results of the study have reference worthiness for the brain nerve electrophysiology and epistemological science.

  18. 疼痛共情的神经机制%Neural Mechanisms Underlying Empathy for Pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程真波; 黄宇霞

    2012-01-01

    one's and others' pain in the ACC and AI and then used them as seed regions for two kinds of functional connectivity analyses. Their analyses identified clusters in the midbrain and periaqueductal gray with greater connectivity to the AI during one's own pain as opposed to other pain. The opposite pattern was found in the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex that showed greater connectivity to the ACC and AI during other pain than during self pain. This demonstrated that regions showing similar activity during one's and other's pain may nonetheless be part of distinct functional networks ; these networks could not have been detected in prior work that examined overlaps between one's and other's pain in terms of average activity, but not connectivity. Empathy, however, is a complex construct consisting not only of emotional but also of cognitive and somatomotor components. The sensory dimension of pain is mainly coded in parietal sensorimotor neural structures, including the somatosensory cortices. Thus, it is entirely possible that empathy may also rely on basic resonant mechanisms that allow mapping others' sensation onto one' s own sensorimotor system. Single-pulse TM5 may provide indirect information about the sensorimotor structures involved in this mapping. The primary somatosensory cortex (S1) is involved in pain and touch shared representations by recording somatosensory-evoked potentials during the direct observation of painful and nonpainful stimuli delivered to a human model' s hand. This paper reviews the research advance in the field of the neural bases of empathy for pain from the perspective of the affective aspect and the sensory aspect respectively. Future studies should pay more attention to the research technologies, analysis methods and experimental manipulation.%疼痛是一种多维度的体验。情感成分和感觉成分是疼痛体验的主要成分,二者有着不同的神经机制。疼痛共情是痛觉“共鸣”的

  19. Monitoring of total positive end-expiratory pressure during mechanical ventilation by artificial neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perchiazzi, Gaetano; Rylander, Christian; Pellegrini, Mariangela; Larsson, Anders; Hedenstierna, Göran

    2016-04-11

    Ventilation treatment of acute lung injury (ALI) requires the application of positive airway pressure at the end of expiration (PEEPapp) to avoid lung collapse. However, the total pressure exerted on the alveolar walls (PEEPtot) is the sum of PEEPapp and intrinsic PEEP (PEEPi), a hidden component. To measure PEEPtot, ventilation must be discontinued with an end-expiratory hold maneuver (EEHM). We hypothesized that artificial neural networks (ANN) could estimate the PEEPtot from flow and pressure tracings during ongoing mechanical ventilation. Ten pigs were mechanically ventilated, and the time constant of their respiratory system (τRS) was measured. We shortened their expiratory time (TE) according to multiples of τRS, obtaining different respiratory patterns (Rpat). Pressure (PAW) and flow (V'AW) at the airway opening during ongoing mechanical ventilation were simultaneously recorded, with and without the addition of external resistance. The last breath of each Rpat included an EEHM, which was used to compute the reference PEEPtot. The entire protocol was repeated after the induction of ALI with i.v. injection of oleic acid, and 382 tracings were obtained. The ANN had to extract the PEEPtot, from the tracings without an EEHM. ANN agreement with reference PEEPtot was assessed with the Bland-Altman method. Bland Altman analysis of estimation error by ANN showed -0.40 ± 2.84 (expressed as bias ± precision) and ±5.58 as limits of agreement (data expressed as cmH2O). The ANNs estimated the PEEPtot well at different levels of PEEPapp under dynamic conditions, opening up new possibilities in monitoring PEEPi in critically ill patients who require ventilator treatment.

  20. Realization of the conscience mechanism in CMOS implementation of winner-takes-all self-organizing neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlugosz, Rafa; Talaska, Tomasz; Pedrycz, Witold; Wojtyna, Ryszard

    2010-06-01

    This paper presents a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) implementation of a conscience mechanism used to improve the effectiveness of learning in the winner-takes-all (WTA) artificial neural networks (ANNs) realized at the transistor level. This mechanism makes it possible to eliminate the effect of the so-called ¿dead neurons,¿ which do not take part in the learning phase competition. These neurons usually have a detrimental effect on the network performance, increasing the quantization error. The proposed mechanism comes as part of the analog implementation of the WTA neural networks (NNs) designed for applications to ultralow power portable diagnostic devices for online analysis of ECG biomedical signals. The study presents Matlab simulations of the network's model, discusses postlayout circuit level simulations and includes results of measurement completed for the physical realization of the circuit.

  1. Artificial Neural Networks for Nonlinear Dynamic Response Simulation in Mechanical Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Niels Hørbye; Høgsberg, Jan Becker; Winther, Ole

    2011-01-01

    It is shown how artificial neural networks can be trained to predict dynamic response of a simple nonlinear structure. Data generated using a nonlinear finite element model of a simplified wind turbine is used to train a one layer artificial neural network. When trained properly the network is able...

  2. A molecular mechanism for the topographic alignment of convergent neural maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savier, Elise; Eglen, Stephen J; Bathélémy, Amélie; Perraut, Martine; Pfrieger, Frank W; Lemke, Greg; Reber, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Sensory processing requires proper alignment of neural maps throughout the brain. In the superficial layers of the superior colliculus of the midbrain, converging projections from retinal ganglion cells and neurons in visual cortex must be aligned to form a visuotopic map, but the basic mechanisms mediating this alignment remain elusive. In a new mouse model, ectopic expression of ephrin-A3 (Efna3) in a subset of retinal ganglion cells, quantitatively altering the retinal EFNAs gradient, disrupts cortico-collicular map alignment onto the retino-collicular map, creating a visuotopic mismatch. Genetic inactivation of ectopic EFNA3 restores a wild-type cortico-collicular map. Theoretical analyses using a new mapping algorithm model both map formation and alignment, and recapitulate our experimental observations. The algorithm is based on an initial sensory map, the retino-collicular map, which carries intrinsic topographic information, the retinal EFNAs, to the superior colliculus. These EFNAs subsequently topographically align ingrowing visual cortical axons to the retino-collicular map. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20470.001 PMID:28322188

  3. Estimating the mechanical competence parameter of the trabecular bone: a neural network approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érica Regina Filletti

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The mechanical competence parameter (MCP of the trabecular bone is a parameter that merges the volume fraction, connectivity, tortuosity and Young modulus of elasticity, to provide a single measure of the trabecular bone structural quality. Methods As the MCP is estimated for 3D images and the Young modulus simulations are quite consuming, in this paper, an alternative approach to estimate the MCP based on artificial neural network (ANN is discussed considering as the training set a group of 23 in vitro vertebrae and 12 distal radius samples obtained by microcomputed tomography (μCT, and 83 in vivo distal radius magnetic resonance image samples (MRI. Results It is shown that the ANN was able to predict with very high accuracy the MCP for 29 new samples, being 6 vertebrae and 3 distal radius bones by μCT and 20 distal radius bone by MRI. Conclusion There is a strong correlation (R2 = 0.97 between both techniques and, despite the small number of testing samples, the Bland-Altman analysis shows that ANN is within the limits of agreement to estimate the MCP.

  4. Neural mechanisms of reward processing associated with depression-related personality traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemoto, Akina; Holroyd, Clay B

    2017-07-01

    Although impaired reward processing in depression has been well-documented, the exact nature of that deficit remains poorly understood. To investigate the link between depression and the neural mechanisms of reward processing, we examined individual differences in personality. We recorded the electroencephalogram from healthy college students engaged in a probabilistic reinforcement learning task. Participants also completed several personality questionnaires that assessed traits related to reward sensitivity, motivation, and depression. We examined whether behavioral measures of reward learning and event-related potential components related to outcome processing and reward anticipation-namely, the cue and feedback-related reward positivity (RewP) and the stimulus preceding negativity (SPN)-would link these personality traits to depression. Participants who scored high in reward sensitivity produced a relatively larger feedback-RewP. By contrast, participants who scored high in depression learned the contingencies for infrequently rewarded cue-response combinations relatively poorly, exhibited a larger SPN, and produced a smaller feedback-RewP, especially to outcomes following cue-response combinations that were frequently rewarded. These results point to a primary deficit in reward valuation in individuals who score high in depression, with secondary consequences that impact reward learning and anticipation. Despite recent evidence arguing for an anticipatory deficit in depression, impaired reward valuation as a primary deficit should be further examined in clinical samples. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Dissociable neural mechanisms for goal-directed versus incidental memory reactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhl, Brice A; Johnson, Marcia K; Chun, Marvin M

    2013-10-09

    Remembering a past event involves reactivation of distributed patterns of neural activity that represent the features of that event-a process that depends on associative mechanisms supported by medial temporal lobe structures. Although efficient use of memory requires prioritizing those features of a memory that are relevant to current behavioral goals (target features) over features that may be goal-irrelevant (incidental features), there remains ambiguity concerning how this is achieved. We tested the hypothesis that although medial temporal lobe structures may support reactivation of both target and incidental event features, frontoparietal cortex preferentially reactivates those features that match current goals. Here, human participants were cued to remember either the category (face/scene) to which a picture belonged (category trials) or the location (left/right) in which a picture appeared (location trials). Multivoxel pattern analysis of fMRI data were used to measure reactivation of category information as a function of its behavioral relevance (target vs incidental reactivation). In ventral/medial temporal lobe (VMTL) structures, incidental reactivation was as robust as target reactivation. In contrast, frontoparietal cortex exhibited stronger target than incidental reactivation; that is, goal-modulated reactivation. Reactivation was also associated with later memory. Frontoparietal biases toward target reactivation predicted subsequent memory for target features, whereas incidental reactivation in VMTL predicted subsequent memory for nontested features. These findings reveal a striking dissociation between goal-modulated reactivation in frontoparietal cortex and incidental reactivation in VMTL.

  6. Action mechanisms for social cognition: behavioral and neural correlates of developing Theory of Mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Lindsay C; Thorpe, Samuel G; Cannon, Erin N; Fox, Nathan A

    2016-08-29

    Many psychological theories posit foundational links between two fundamental constructs: (1) our ability to produce, perceive, and represent action; and (2) our ability to understand the meaning and motivation behind the action (i.e. Theory of Mind; ToM). This position is contentious, however, and long-standing competing theories of social-cognitive development debate roles for basic action-processing in ToM. Developmental research is key to investigating these hypotheses, but whether individual differences in neural and behavioral measures of motor action relate to social-cognitive development is unknown. We examined 3- to 5-year-old children's (N = 26) EEG mu-desynchronization during production of object-directed action, and explored associations between mu-desynchronization and children's behavioral motor skills, behavioral action-representation abilities, and behavioral ToM. For children with high (but not low) mu-desynchronization, motor skill related to action-representation abilities, and action-representation mediated relations between motor skill and ToM. Results demonstrate novel foundational links between action-processing and ToM, suggesting that basic motor action may be a key mechanism for social-cognitive development, thus shedding light on the origins and emergence of higher social cognition.

  7. Moral foundations in an interacting neural networks society: A statistical mechanics analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, R.; Susemihl, A.; Jericó, J. P.; Caticha, N.

    2014-04-01

    The moral foundations theory supports that people, across cultures, tend to consider a small number of dimensions when classifying issues on a moral basis. The data also show that the statistics of weights attributed to each moral dimension is related to self-declared political affiliation, which in turn has been connected to cognitive learning styles by the recent literature in neuroscience and psychology. Inspired by these data, we propose a simple statistical mechanics model with interacting neural networks classifying vectors and learning from members of their social neighbourhood about their average opinion on a large set of issues. The purpose of learning is to reduce dissension among agents when disagreeing. We consider a family of learning algorithms parametrized by δ, that represents the importance given to corroborating (same sign) opinions. We define an order parameter that quantifies the diversity of opinions in a group with homogeneous learning style. Using Monte Carlo simulations and a mean field approximation we find the relation between the order parameter and the learning parameter δ at a temperature we associate with the importance of social influence in a given group. In concordance with data, groups that rely more strongly on corroborating evidence sustain less opinion diversity. We discuss predictions of the model and propose possible experimental tests.

  8. Disentangling cognitive processes from neural activation and psychic mechanisms: the example of empathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilé, Jean-Marc

    2010-12-01

    Empathy processes can be explored within a three-level model distinguishing neuronal, cognitive and intra-psychic operating levels. Cognitive and intra-psychic processes need not to be collapsed. Neural systems involved in empathy are described through neuroimaging and event-related potential (ERP) studies. On the cognitive level, empathy is threefold: procedural, semantic and biographical. Automatically activated since birth, procedural empathy processes are deeply enrooted in visuo-motor response capacities and responsible for automatic mimicry. These processes might rely on a prior sensori-motor contagion system. Semantic empathy parallels language development and expresses connexion between words, meaning and emotion. Biographical emerges later in life and corresponds to the interweaving of personal experience with feelings and words, together with a capacity to bridge with the others' experiences. On the intra-psychic level, defence mechanisms as well as identification processes, depicted from a subjective and interpersonal standpoint, are corresponding, without being similar, to empathetic processes described in cognitive neuroscience studies. Studies on semantic empathy need to control for the participants biographical information and concomitant memory activation. The interface between cognitive and intra-psychic processes needs to be further investigated.

  9. Neural mechanisms of dissonance: an fMRI investigation of choice justification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitayama, Shinobu; Chua, Hannah Faye; Tompson, Steven; Han, Shihui

    2013-04-01

    Cognitive dissonance theory proposes that difficult choice produces negatively arousing cognitive conflict (called dissonance), which motivates the chooser to justify her decision by increasing her preference for the chosen option while decreasing her preference for the rejected option. At present, however, neural mechanisms of dissonance are poorly understood. To address this gap of knowledge, we scanned 24 young Americans as they made 60 choices between pairs of popular music CDs. As predicted, choices between CDs that were close (vs. distant) in attractiveness (referred to as difficult vs. easy choices) resulted in activations of the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC), a brain region associated with cognitive conflict, and the left anterior insula (left aINS), a region often linked with aversive emotional arousal. Importantly, a separate analysis showed that choice-justifying attitude change was predicted by the in-choice signal intensity of the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), a region that is linked to self-processing. The three regions identified (dACC, left aINS, and PCC) were correlated, within-subjects, across choices. The results were interpreted to support the hypothesis that cognitive dissonance plays a key role in producing attitudes that justify the choice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Neural mechanisms of intermodal sustained selective attention with concurrently presented auditory and visual stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Saupe

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigated intermodal attention effects on the auditory steady-state response (ASSR and the steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP. For this purpose, 40 Hz amplitude modulated tones and a stream of flickering (7.5 Hz random letters were presented concurrently. By means of an auditory or visual target detection task, participants’ attention was directed to the respective modality for several seconds. Attention to the auditory stream led to a significant enhancement of the ASSR compared to when the visual stream was attended. This attentional modulation was located mainly in the right superior temporal gyrus. Vice versa, attention to the visual stream especially increased the second harmonic response of the SSVEP. This modulation was focused in the inferior occipital and lateral occipitotemporal gyrus of both hemispheres. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of amplitude modulation of the ASSR and the SSVEP by intermodal sustained attention. Our results open a new avenue of research to understand the basic neural mechanisms of intermodal attention in the human brain.

  11. Action mechanisms for social cognition: behavioral and neural correlates of developing Theory of Mind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Lindsay C.; Thorpe, Samuel G.; Cannon, Erin N.; Fox, Nathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Many psychological theories posit foundational links between two fundamental constructs: (1) our ability to produce, perceive, and represent action; and (2) our ability to understand the meaning and motivation behind the action (i.e. Theory of Mind; ToM). This position is contentious, however, and long-standing competing theories of social-cognitive development debate roles for basic action-processing in ToM. Developmental research is key to investigating these hypotheses, but whether individual differences in neural and behavioral measures of motor action relate to social-cognitive development is unknown. We examined 3- to 5-year-old children’s (N = 26) EEG mu-desynchronization during production of object-directed action, and explored associations between mu-desynchronization and children’s behavioral motor skills, behavioral action-representation abilities, and behavioral ToM. For children with high (but not low) mu-desynchronization, motor skill related to action-representation abilities, and action-representation mediated relations between motor skill and ToM. Results demonstrate novel foundational links between action-processing and ToM, suggesting that basic motor action may be a key mechanism for social-cognitive development, thus shedding light on the origins and emergence of higher social cognition. PMID:27573916

  12. Neural mechanisms underlying pain's ability to reorient attention: evidence for sensitization of somatic threat detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowman, Robert

    2014-06-01

    Pain typically signals damage to the body, and as such can be perceived as threatening and can elicit a strong emotional response. This ecological significance undoubtedly underlies pain's well-known ability to demand attention. However, the neural mechanisms underlying this ability are poorly understood. Previous work from the author's laboratory has reported behavioral evidence suggesting that participants disengage their attention from an incorrectly cued visual target stimulus and reorient it toward a somatic target more rapidly when the somatic target is painful than when it is nonpainful. Furthermore, electrophysiological data suggest that this effect is mediated by a stimulus-driven process, in which somatic threat detectors located in the dorsal posterior insula activate the medial and lateral prefrontal cortex areas involved in reorienting attention toward the painful target. In these previous studies, the painful and nonpainful somatic targets were given in separate experiments involving different participants. Here, the nonpainful and painful somatic targets were presented in random order within the same block of trials. Unlike in the previous studies, both the nonpainful and painful somatic targets activated the somatic threat detectors, and the times taken to disengage and reorient attention were the same for both. These electrophysiological and behavioral data suggest that somatic threat detectors can become sensitized to nonpainful somatic stimuli that are presented in a context that includes painful stimuli.

  13. Neural mechanisms underlying the integration of situational information into attribution outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosch, Tobias; Schiller, Daniela; Mojdehbakhsh, Rachel; Uleman, James S; Phelps, Elizabeth A

    2013-08-01

    When forming impressions and trying to figure out why other people behave the way they do, we should take into account not only dispositional factors (i.e., personality traits) but also situational constraints as potential causes for a behavior. However, in their attributions, people often ignore the importance of situational factors. To investigate the neural mechanisms underlying the integration of situational information into attributions, we decomposed the attribution process by separately presenting information about behaviors and about the situational circumstances in which they occur. After reading the information, participants judged whether dispositional or situational causes explained the behavior (attribution), and how much they liked the person described in the scenario (affective evaluation). The dorsolateral prefrontal cortex showed increased blood oxygenation-level-dependent activation during the encoding of situational information when the resulting attribution was situational, relative to when the attribution was dispositional, potentially reflecting a controlled process that integrates situational information into attributions. Interestingly, attributions were strongly linked to subsequent affective evaluations, with the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex emerging as potential substrate of the integration of attributions and affective evaluations. Our findings demonstrate how top-down control processes regulate impression formation when situational information is taken into account to understand others.

  14. Neural substrates of language acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhl, Patricia; Rivera-Gaxiola, Maritza

    2008-01-01

    Infants learn language(s) with apparent ease, and the tools of modern neuroscience are providing valuable information about the mechanisms that underlie this capacity. Noninvasive, safe brain technologies have now been proven feasible for use with children starting at birth. The past decade has produced an explosion in neuroscience research examining young children's processing of language at the phonetic, word, and sentence levels. At all levels of language, the neural signatures of learning can be documented at remarkably early points in development. Individual continuity in linguistic development from infants' earliest responses to phonemes is reflected in infants' language abilities in the second and third year of life, a finding with theoretical and clinical implications. Developmental neuroscience studies using language are beginning to answer questions about the origins of humans' language faculty.

  15. Neural mechanism of oculomotor horizontal velocity-to- position temporal integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksay, Emre R. F.

    Storage of briefly presented information in ``working'' memory correlates with persistent firing in the brain. Persistent activity in response to transient stimulation is a form of neural temporal integration. Here, the mechanism of temporal integration was explored in the oculomotor velocity-to-position neural integrator (VPNI), where persistent activity is used to maintain eye position and fixation. Extracellular and intracellular electrophysiology, single-cell dye- labeling, and pharmacological inactivation were performed in awake behaving goldfish while monitoring eye motion with the scleral search-coil method. Neurons identified within a compact subnucleus in the medulla designated as Area I are part of the VPNI for horizontal eye movements. Neurons fired tonically during fixations, with tonic rate higher for lateral eye positions and no discharge below a threshold position value. Dye-labeled somata were localized in a 350 micron extent of the inferior reticular formation. Axons either projected ipsilaterally to abducens motoneurons, or crossed the midline and projected toward the contralateral Area I and abducens. Bilateral inactivation of Area I induced inability to maintain eccentric gaze. During intracellular recording, step changes in eye position and firing rate were accompanied by steps in underlying membrane potential. Steps remained when neurons were hyperpolarized below action potential threshold. Perturbation with brief intracellular current pulses only induced transient changes in firing rate and potential. Membrane potential fluctuations were greater during more depolarized steps. These results suggest that steps are generated by synaptic input changes rather than intrinsic properties like membrane multistability. Spiking of unilateral pairs was positively correlated with 0-10 ms lag. Bilateral pairs were negatively correlated with 0-10 ms lag. These results are consistent with excitatory connections between unilateral pairs and inhibitory

  16. Modeling the Insertion Mechanics of Flexible Neural Probes Coated with Sacrificial Polymers for Optimizing Probe Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagar Singh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Single-unit recording neural probes have significant advantages towards improving signal-to-noise ratio and specificity for signal acquisition in brain-to-computer interface devices. Long-term effectiveness is unfortunately limited by the chronic injury response, which has been linked to the mechanical mismatch between rigid probes and compliant brain tissue. Small, flexible microelectrodes may overcome this limitation, but insertion of these probes without buckling requires supporting elements such as a stiff coating with a biodegradable polymer. For these coated probes, there is a design trade-off between the potential for successful insertion into brain tissue and the degree of trauma generated by the insertion. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a finite element model (FEM to simulate insertion of coated neural probes of varying dimensions and material properties into brain tissue. Simulations were performed to predict the buckling and insertion forces during insertion of coated probes into a tissue phantom with material properties of brain. The simulations were validated with parallel experimental studies where probes were inserted into agarose tissue phantom, ex vivo chick embryonic brain tissue, and ex vivo rat brain tissue. Experiments were performed with uncoated copper wire and both uncoated and coated SU-8 photoresist and Parylene C probes. Model predictions were found to strongly agree with experimental results (<10% error. The ratio of the predicted buckling force-to-predicted insertion force, where a value greater than one would ideally be expected to result in successful insertion, was plotted against the actual success rate from experiments. A sigmoidal relationship was observed, with a ratio of 1.35 corresponding to equal probability of insertion and failure, and a ratio of 3.5 corresponding to a 100% success rate. This ratio was dubbed the “safety factor”, as it indicated the degree to which the coating

  17. Modeling the Insertion Mechanics of Flexible Neural Probes Coated with Sacrificial Polymers for Optimizing Probe Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sagar; Lo, Meng-Chen; Damodaran, Vinod B; Kaplan, Hilton M; Kohn, Joachim; Zahn, Jeffrey D; Shreiber, David I

    2016-03-04

    Single-unit recording neural probes have significant advantages towards improving signal-to-noise ratio and specificity for signal acquisition in brain-to-computer interface devices. Long-term effectiveness is unfortunately limited by the chronic injury response, which has been linked to the mechanical mismatch between rigid probes and compliant brain tissue. Small, flexible microelectrodes may overcome this limitation, but insertion of these probes without buckling requires supporting elements such as a stiff coating with a biodegradable polymer. For these coated probes, there is a design trade-off between the potential for successful insertion into brain tissue and the degree of trauma generated by the insertion. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a finite element model (FEM) to simulate insertion of coated neural probes of varying dimensions and material properties into brain tissue. Simulations were performed to predict the buckling and insertion forces during insertion of coated probes into a tissue phantom with material properties of brain. The simulations were validated with parallel experimental studies where probes were inserted into agarose tissue phantom, ex vivo chick embryonic brain tissue, and ex vivo rat brain tissue. Experiments were performed with uncoated copper wire and both uncoated and coated SU-8 photoresist and Parylene C probes. Model predictions were found to strongly agree with experimental results (experiments. A sigmoidal relationship was observed, with a ratio of 1.35 corresponding to equal probability of insertion and failure, and a ratio of 3.5 corresponding to a 100% success rate. This ratio was dubbed the "safety factor", as it indicated the degree to which the coating should be over-designed to ensure successful insertion. Probability color maps were generated to visually compare the influence of design parameters. Statistical metrics derived from the color maps and multi-variable regression analysis confirmed

  18. Implicit and explicit second language training recruit common neural mechanisms for syntactic processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batterink, Laura; Neville, Helen

    2013-06-01

    In contrast to native language acquisition, adult second-language (L2) acquisition occurs under highly variable learning conditions. Although most adults acquire their L2 at least partially through explicit instruction, as in a classroom setting, many others acquire their L2 primarily through implicit exposure, as is typical of an immersion environment. Whether these differences in acquisition environment play a role in determining the neural mechanisms that are ultimately recruited to process L2 grammar has not been well characterized. This study investigated this issue by comparing the ERP response to novel L2 syntactic rules acquired under conditions of implicit exposure and explicit instruction, using a novel laboratory language-learning paradigm. Native speakers tested on these stimuli showed a biphasic response to syntactic violations, consisting of an earlier negativity followed by a later P600 effect. After merely an hour of training, both implicitly and explicitly trained learners who were capable of detecting grammatical violations also elicited P600 effects. In contrast, learners who were unable to discriminate between grammatically correct and incorrect sentences did not show significant P600 effects. The magnitude of the P600 effect was found to correlate with learners' behavioral proficiency. Behavioral measures revealed that successful learners from both the implicit and explicit groups gained explicit, verbalizable knowledge about the L2 grammar rules. Taken together, these results indicate that late, controlled mechanisms indexed by the P600 play a crucial role in processing a late-learned L2 grammar, regardless of training condition. These findings underscore the remarkable plasticity of later, attention-dependent processes and their importance in lifelong learning.

  19. Neural mechanisms of symptom improvements in generalized anxiety disorder following mindfulness training☆☆☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölzel, Britta K.; Hoge, Elizabeth A.; Greve, Douglas N.; Gard, Tim; Creswell, J. David; Brown, Kirk Warren; Barrett, Lisa Feldman; Schwartz, Carl; Vaitl, Dieter; Lazar, Sara W.

    2013-01-01

    Mindfulness training aims to impact emotion regulation. Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) symptoms can be successfully addressed through mindfulness-based interventions. This preliminary study is the first to investigate neural mechanisms of symptom improvements in GAD following mindfulness training. Furthermore, we compared brain activation between GAD patients and healthy participants at baseline. 26 patients with a current DSM-IV GAD diagnosis were randomized to an 8-week Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR, N = 15) or a stress management education (SME, N = 11) active control program. 26 healthy participants were included for baseline comparisons. BOLD response was assessed with fMRI during affect labeling of angry and neutral facial expressions. At baseline, GAD patients showed higher amygdala activation than healthy participants in response to neutral, but not angry faces, suggesting that ambiguous stimuli reveal stronger reactivity in GAD patients. In patients, amygdala activation in response to neutral faces decreased following both interventions. BOLD response in ventrolateral prefrontal regions (VLPFC) showed greater increase in MBSR than SME participants. Functional connectivity between amygdala and PFC regions increased significantly pre- to post-intervention within the MBSR, but not SME group. Both, change in VLPFC activation and amygdala–prefrontal connectivity were correlated with change in Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) scores, suggesting clinical relevance of these changes. Amygdala–prefrontal connectivity turned from negative coupling (typically seen in down-regulation of emotions), to positive coupling; potentially suggesting a unique mechanism of mindfulness. Findings suggest that in GAD, mindfulness training leads to changes in fronto-limbic areas crucial for the regulation of emotion; these changes correspond with reported symptom improvements. PMID:24179799

  20. Neural mechanisms of the influence of popularity on adolescent ratings of music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berns, Gregory S; Capra, C Monica; Moore, Sara; Noussair, Charles

    2010-02-01

    It is well-known that social influences affect consumption decisions. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to elucidate the neural mechanisms associated with social influence with regard to a common consumer good: music. Our study population was adolescents, age 12-17. Music is a common purchase in this age group, and it is widely believed that adolescent behavior is influenced by perceptions of popularity in their reference group. Using 15-s clips of songs from MySpace.com, we obtained behavioral measures of preferences and neurobiological responses to the songs. The data were gathered with, and without, the overall popularity of the song revealed. Song popularity had a significant effect on the participants' likability ratings of the songs. fMRI results showed a strong correlation between the participants' rating and activity in the caudate nucleus, a region previously implicated in reward-driven actions. The tendency to change one's evaluation of a song was positively correlated with activation in the anterior insula and anterior cingulate, two regions that are associated with physiological arousal and negative affective states. Sensitivity to popularity was linked to lower activation levels in the middle temporal gyrus, suggesting a lower depth of musical semantic processing. Our results suggest that a principal mechanism whereby popularity ratings affect consumer choice is through the anxiety generated by the mismatch between one's own preferences and others'. This mismatch anxiety motivates people to switch their choices in the direction of the consensus. Our data suggest that this is a major force behind the conformity observed in music tastes in some teenagers.

  1. The role of mechanical resonance in the neural control of swimming in fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tytell, Eric D; Hsu, Chia-Yu; Fauci, Lisa J

    2014-02-01

    The bodies of many fishes are flexible, elastic structures; if you bend them, they spring back. Therefore, they should have a resonant frequency: a bending frequency at which the output amplitude is maximized for a particular input. Previous groups have hypothesized that swimming at this resonant frequency could maximize efficiency, and that a neural circuit called the central pattern generator might be able to entrain to a mechanical resonance. However, fishes swim in water, which may potentially damp out many resonant effects. Additionally, their bodies are elongated, which means that bending can occur in complicated ways along the length of the body. We review previous studies of the mechanical properties of fish bodies, and then present new data that demonstrate complex bending properties of elongated fish bodies. Resonant peaks in amplitude exist, but there may be many of them depending on the body wavelength. Additionally, they may not correspond to the maximum swimming speed. Next, we describe experiments using a closed-loop preparation of the lamprey, in which a preparation of the spinal cord is linked to a real-time simulation of the muscle and body properties, allowing us to examine resonance entrainment as we vary the simulated resonant frequency. We find that resonance entrainment does occur, but is rare. Gain had a significant, though weak, effect, and a nonlinear muscle model produced resonance entrainment more often than a linear filter. We speculate that resonance may not be a critical effect for efficient swimming in elongate, anguilliform swimmers, though it may be more important for stiffer carangiform and thunniform fishes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. When a good taste turns bad: Neural mechanisms underlying the emergence of negative affect and associated natural reward devaluation by cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carelli, Regina M; West, Elizabeth A

    2014-01-01

    An important feature of cocaine addiction in humans is the emergence of negative affect (e.g., dysphoria, irritability, anhedonia), postulated to play a key role in craving and relapse. Indeed, the DSM-IV recognizes that social, occupational and/or recreational activities become reduced as a consequence of repeated drug use where previously rewarding experiences (e.g., food, job, family) become devalued as the addict continues to seek and use drug despite serious negative consequences. Here, research in the Carelli laboratory is reviewed that examined neurobiological mechanisms that may underlie these processes using a novel animal model. Oromotor responses (taste reactivity) were examined as rats learned that intraoral infusion of a sweet (e.g., saccharin) predicts impending but delayed access to cocaine self-administration. We showed that rats exhibit aversive taste reactivity (i.e., gapes/rejection responses) during infusion of the sweet paired with impending cocaine, similar to aversive responses observed during infusion of quinine, a bitter tastant. Critically, the expression of this pronounced aversion to the sweet predicted the subsequent motivation to self-administer cocaine. Electrophysiology studies show that this shift in palatability corresponds to an alteration in nucleus accumbens (NAc) cell firing; neurons that previously responded with inhibition during infusion of the palatable sweet shifted to excitatory activity during infusion of the cocaine-devalued tastant. This excitatory response profile is typically observed during infusion of quinine, indicating that the once palatable sweet becomes aversive following its association with impending but delayed cocaine, and NAc neurons encode this aversive state. We also review electrochemical studies showing a shift (from increase to decrease) in rapid NAc dopamine release during infusion of the cocaine-paired tastant as the aversive state developed, again, resulting in responses similar to quinine

  3. Neural Operant Conditioning as a Core Mechanism of Brain-Machine Interface Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshio Sakurai

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The process of changing the neuronal activity of the brain to acquire rewards in a broad sense is essential for utilizing brain-machine interfaces (BMIs, which is essentially operant conditioning of neuronal activity. Currently, this is also known as neural biofeedback, and it is often referred to as neurofeedback when human brain activity is targeted. In this review, we first illustrate biofeedback and operant conditioning, which are methodological background elements in neural operant conditioning. Then, we introduce research models of neural operant conditioning in animal experiments and demonstrate that it is possible to change the firing frequency and synchronous firing of local neuronal populations in a short time period. We also debate the possibility of the application of neural operant conditioning and its contribution to BMIs.

  4. An emerging molecular mechanism for the neural vs mesodermal cell fate decision

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Roman A Li; Kate G Storey

    2011-01-01

    @@ Understanding how primary cell fates are established and maintained in the vertebrate embryo provides important insights that inform directed in vitro differentiation of embryonic stem cells or adult cells that have undergone induced pluripotency.Neural differentiation is of particular interest as new neural cells may contribute to therapeutic approaches to nervous system injury and diseases and provide in vitro disease models for small molecule screening and for determining personalized drug treatments.

  5. Cranial and trunk neural crest cells use different mechanisms for attachment to extracellular matrices

    OpenAIRE

    Lallier, Thomas; Leblanc, Gabrielle; Artinger, Kristin B.; Bronner-Fraser, Marianne

    1992-01-01

    We have used a quantitative cell attachment assay to compare the interactions of cranial and trunk neural crest cells with the extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules fibronectin, laminin and collagen types I and IV. Antibodies to the β_1 subunit of integrin inhibited attachment under all conditions tested, suggesting that integrins mediate neural crest cell interactions with these ECM molecules. The HNK-1 antibody against a surface carbohydrate epitope under certain conditions inhibited both cr...

  6. Ionic mechanisms subserving mechanosensory transduction and neural integration in statocyst hair cells of Hermissenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Joseph

    1988-01-01

    The neural processing of gravitational-produced sensory stimulation of statocyst hair cells in the nudibranch mollusk Hermissenda was studied. The goal in these studies was to understand how: gravireceptor neurons sense or transduce gravitational forces, gravitational stimulation is integrated so as to produce a graded receptor potential, and ultimately the generation of an action potential, and various neural adaptation phenomena which hair cells exhibit arise. The approach to these problems was primarily electrophysical.

  7. A neural model for temporal order judgments and their active recalibration: a common mechanism for space and time?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingbo eCai

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available When observers experience a constant delay between their motor actions and sensory feedback, their perception of the temporal order between actions and sensations adapt (Stetson et al., 2006a. We present here a novel neural model that can explain temporal order judgments (TOJs and their recalibration. Our model employs three ubiquitous features of neural systems: 1 information pooling, 2 opponent processing, and 3 synaptic scaling. Specifically, the model proposes that different populations of neurons encode different delays between motor-sensory events, the outputs of these populations feed into rivaling neural populations (encoding before and after, and the activity difference between these populations determines the perceptual judgment. As a consequence of synaptic scaling of input weights, motor acts which are consistently followed by delayed sensory feedback will cause the network to recalibrate its point of subjective simultaneity. The structure of our model raises the possibility that recalibration of TOJs is a temporal analogue to the motion aftereffect. In other words, identical neural mechanisms may be used to make perceptual determinations about both space and time. Our model captures behavioral recalibration results for different numbers of adapting trials and different adapting delays. In line with predictions of the model, we additionally demonstrate that temporal recalibration can last through time, in analogy to storage of the motion aftereffect.

  8. Neural mechanisms underlying balance improvement with short term Tai Chi training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatts, Strawberry K; Woollacott, Marjorie Hines

    2006-02-01

    Though previous research has shown that Tai Chi reduces falls risk in older adults, no studies have examined underlying neural mechanisms responsible for balance improvement. We aimed to determine the efficacy of Tai Chi training in improving neuromuscular response characteristics underlying balance control in balance-impaired older adults. Twenty-two balance-impaired older adults were randomly divided into Tai Chi (TC) or control groups. Nineteen subjects (age 68-92, BERG 44 or less) completed the study. TC training included repetitive exercises using TC motor and biomechanical strategies, techniques, and postural elements. Control training included axial mobility exercises, balance/awareness education and stress reduction. Groups trained 1.5 hours/day, 5 days/week for 3 weeks. After post-testing the control group received TC training. Subjects walked across a force plate triggered to move forward 15 cm at 40 cm/sec at heel strike. Tibialis anterior (TA) and medial gastrocnemius (GA) responses during balance recovery were measured with electromyograms (EMGs). Four clinical measures of balance were also recorded. TC subjects, but not controls, significantly reduced both TA response time from 148.92 +/- 45.11 ms to 98.67 +/- 17.22 ms (p < or = 0.004) and occurrence of co-contraction of antagonist muscles (p < or = 0.003) of the perturbed leg. Clinical balance measures also significantly improved after TC. TC enhanced neuromuscular responses controlling the ankle joint of the perturbed leg. Fast, accurate neuromuscular activation is crucial for efficacious response to slips or trips.

  9. Cortical reorganization in patients with subcortical hemiparesis: neural mechanisms of functional recovery and prognostic implication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Yukihiko; Nakada, Tsutomu

    2003-01-01

    A systematic investigation on cortical reorganization in patients with hemiparesis of a subcortical origin, with special emphasis on functional correlates, was conducted using functional magnetic resonance (fMR) imaging performed on a 3-tesla system specifically optimized for fMR imaging investigation. The study group included 46 patients with hemiparesis (25 with right and 21 with left hemiparesis) and 30 age-matched healthy volunteers as controls. All study participants were originally right handed. The characteristics of the lesion were putaminal hemorrhage in 19 patients, thalamic hemorrhage in 10 patients, and striatocapsular bland infarction in 17 patients. Functional recovery in subcortical hemiparesis showed two distinct phases of the recovery process involving entirely different neural mechanisms. Phase I is characterized by the process of recovery and/or reorganization of the primary system. Successful recovery of this system is typically reached within 1 month after stroke onset. Its clinical correlate is a rapid recovery course and significant recovery of function within 1 month of stroke onset. Failure of recovery of the primary system shifts the recovery process to Phase II, during which reorganization involving the ipsilateral pathway takes place. The clinical correlate of Phase II is a slow recovery course with variable functional outcome. Effective functional organization of the ipsilateral pathway, as identified by linked activation of the ipsilateral primary sensorimotor cortex and contralateral anterior lobe of the cerebellum, is correlated with a good prognostic outcome for patients in the slow recovery group. A high degree of connectivity between supplementary motor areas, bilaterally, appears to influence functional recovery adversely.

  10. Building bridges between perceptual and economic decision-making: neural and computational mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher eSummerfield

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Investigation into the neural and computational bases of decision-making has proceeded in two parallel but distinct streams. Perceptual decision making (PDM is concerned with how observers detect, discriminate and categorise noisy sensory information. Economic decision making (EDM explores how options are selected on the basis of their reinforcement history. Traditionally, the subfields of PDM and EDM have employed different paradigms, proposed different mechanistic models, explored different brain regions, disagreed about whether decisions approach optimality. Nevertheless, we argue that there is a common framework for understanding decisions made in both domains, under which an agent has to combine sensory information (what is the stimulus with value information (what is it worth. We review computational models of the decision process typically used in PDM, based around the idea that decisions involve a serial integration of evidence, and assess their applicability to decisions between good and gambles. Subsequently, we consider the contribution of three key brain regions – the parietal cortex, the basal ganglia, and the orbitofrontal cortex – to perceptual and economic decision-making, with a focus on the mechanisms by which sensory and reward information are integrated during choice. We find that although the parietal cortex is often implicated in the integration of sensory evidence, there is evidence for its role in encoding the expected value of a decision. Similarly, although much research has emphasised the role of the striatum and orbitofrontal cortex in value-guided choices, they may play an important role in categorisation of perceptual information. In conclusion, we consider how findings from the two fields might be brought together, in order to move towards a general framework for understanding decision-making in humans and other primates.

  11. Neural Mechanisms of Context Effects on Face Recognition: Automatic Binding and Context Shift Decrements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Scott M.; Baena, Elsa; Truong, Trong-Kha; Cabeza, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Although people do not normally try to remember associations between faces and physical contexts, these associations are established automatically, as indicated by the difficulty of recognizing familiar faces in different contexts (“butcher-on-the-bus” phenomenon). The present functional MRI (fMRI) study investigated the automatic binding of faces and scenes. In the Face-Face (F-F) condition, faces were presented alone during both encoding and retrieval, whereas in the Face/Scene-Face (FS-F) condition, they were presented overlaid on scenes during encoding but alone during retrieval (context change). Although participants were instructed to focus only on the faces during both encoding and retrieval, recognition performance was worse in the FS-F than the F-F condition (“context shift decrement”—CSD), confirming automatic face-scene binding during encoding. This binding was mediated by the hippocampus as indicated by greater subsequent memory effects (remembered > forgotten) in this region for the FS-F than the F-F condition. Scene memory was mediated by the right parahippocampal cortex, which was reactivated during successful retrieval when the faces were associated with a scene during encoding (FS-F condition). Analyses using the CSD as a regressor yielded a clear hemispheric asymmetry in medial temporal lobe activity during encoding: left hippocampal and parahippocampal activity was associated with a smaller CSD, indicating more flexible memory representations immune to context changes, whereas right hippocampal/rhinal activity was associated with a larger CSD, indicating less flexible representations sensitive to context change. Taken together, the results clarify the neural mechanisms of context effects on face recognition. PMID:19925208

  12. Neural mechanisms underlying the computation of hierarchical tree structures in mathematics.

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    Tomoya Nakai

    Full Text Available Whether mathematical and linguistic processes share the same neural mechanisms has been a matter of controversy. By examining various sentence structures, we recently demonstrated that activations in the left inferior frontal gyrus (L. IFG and left supramarginal gyrus (L. SMG were modulated by the Degree of Merger (DoM, a measure for the complexity of tree structures. In the present study, we hypothesize that the DoM is also critical in mathematical calculations, and clarify whether the DoM in the hierarchical tree structures modulates activations in these regions. We tested an arithmetic task that involved linear and quadratic sequences with recursive computation. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we found significant activation in the L. IFG, L. SMG, bilateral intraparietal sulcus (IPS, and precuneus selectively among the tested conditions. We also confirmed that activations in the L. IFG and L. SMG were free from memory-related factors, and that activations in the bilateral IPS and precuneus were independent from other possible factors. Moreover, by fitting parametric models of eight factors, we found that the model of DoM in the hierarchical tree structures was the best to explain the modulation of activations in these five regions. Using dynamic causal modeling, we showed that the model with a modulatory effect for the connection from the L. IPS to the L. IFG, and with driving inputs into the L. IFG, was highly probable. The intrinsic, i.e., task-independent, connection from the L. IFG to the L. IPS, as well as that from the L. IPS to the R. IPS, would provide a feedforward signal, together with negative feedback connections. We indicate that mathematics and language share the network of the L. IFG and L. IPS/SMG for the computation of hierarchical tree structures, and that mathematics recruits the additional network of the L. IPS and R. IPS.

  13. Neural mechanisms underlying the computation of hierarchical tree structures in mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, Tomoya; Sakai, Kuniyoshi L

    2014-01-01

    Whether mathematical and linguistic processes share the same neural mechanisms has been a matter of controversy. By examining various sentence structures, we recently demonstrated that activations in the left inferior frontal gyrus (L. IFG) and left supramarginal gyrus (L. SMG) were modulated by the Degree of Merger (DoM), a measure for the complexity of tree structures. In the present study, we hypothesize that the DoM is also critical in mathematical calculations, and clarify whether the DoM in the hierarchical tree structures modulates activations in these regions. We tested an arithmetic task that involved linear and quadratic sequences with recursive computation. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we found significant activation in the L. IFG, L. SMG, bilateral intraparietal sulcus (IPS), and precuneus selectively among the tested conditions. We also confirmed that activations in the L. IFG and L. SMG were free from memory-related factors, and that activations in the bilateral IPS and precuneus were independent from other possible factors. Moreover, by fitting parametric models of eight factors, we found that the model of DoM in the hierarchical tree structures was the best to explain the modulation of activations in these five regions. Using dynamic causal modeling, we showed that the model with a modulatory effect for the connection from the L. IPS to the L. IFG, and with driving inputs into the L. IFG, was highly probable. The intrinsic, i.e., task-independent, connection from the L. IFG to the L. IPS, as well as that from the L. IPS to the R. IPS, would provide a feedforward signal, together with negative feedback connections. We indicate that mathematics and language share the network of the L. IFG and L. IPS/SMG for the computation of hierarchical tree structures, and that mathematics recruits the additional network of the L. IPS and R. IPS.

  14. Neural mechanisms of semantic interference and false recognition in short-term memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Alexandra S; Reuter-Lorenz, Patricia A

    2011-06-01

    Decades of research using the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) paradigm have demonstrated that episodic memory is vulnerable to semantic distortion, and neuroimaging investigations of this phenomenon have shown dissociations between the neural mechanisms subserving true and false retrieval from long-term memory. Recently, false short-term memories have also been demonstrated, with false recognition of items related in meaning to memoranda encoded less than 5s earlier. Semantic interference is also evident in short-term memory, such that correct rejection of related lures is slowed relative to correct rejection of unrelated lures. The present research constitutes the first fMRI investigation of false recognition and semantic interference in short-term memory using a short-term DRM paradigm in which participants retained 4 semantic associates over a short 4-s filled retention interval. Results showed increased activation in the left mid-ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (BA45) associated with semantic interference, and significant correlations between these increases and behavioral measures of interference across subjects. Furthermore, increases in dorsolateral PFC occurred when related lures were correctly rejected versus falsely remembered. Compared with false recognition, true recognition was associated with increases in left fusiform gyrus, a finding consistent with the notion that increased perceptual processing may distinguish true from false recognition over both short and long retention intervals. Findings are discussed in relation to current models of interference resolution in short-term memory, and suggest that false short-term recognition occurs as a consequence of the failure of frontally mediated cognitive control processes which adjudicate semantic familiarity in support of accurate mnemonic retrieval.

  15. Physical and perceptual factors shape the neural mechanisms that integrate audiovisual signals in speech comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, HweeLing; Noppeney, Uta

    2011-08-01

    Face-to-face communication challenges the human brain to integrate information from auditory and visual senses with linguistic representations. Yet the role of bottom-up physical (spectrotemporal structure) input and top-down linguistic constraints in shaping the neural mechanisms specialized for integrating audiovisual speech signals are currently unknown. Participants were presented with speech and sinewave speech analogs in visual, auditory, and audiovisual modalities. Before the fMRI study, they were trained to perceive physically identical sinewave speech analogs as speech (SWS-S) or nonspeech (SWS-N). Comparing audiovisual integration (interactions) of speech, SWS-S, and SWS-N revealed a posterior-anterior processing gradient within the left superior temporal sulcus/gyrus (STS/STG): Bilateral posterior STS/STG integrated audiovisual inputs regardless of spectrotemporal structure or speech percept; in left mid-STS, the integration profile was primarily determined by the spectrotemporal structure of the signals; more anterior STS regions discarded spectrotemporal structure and integrated audiovisual signals constrained by stimulus intelligibility and the availability of linguistic representations. In addition to this "ventral" processing stream, a "dorsal" circuitry encompassing posterior STS/STG and left inferior frontal gyrus differentially integrated audiovisual speech and SWS signals. Indeed, dynamic causal modeling and Bayesian model comparison provided strong evidence for a parallel processing structure encompassing a ventral and a dorsal stream with speech intelligibility training enhancing the connectivity between posterior and anterior STS/STG. In conclusion, audiovisual speech comprehension emerges in an interactive process with the integration of auditory and visual signals being progressively constrained by stimulus intelligibility along the STS and spectrotemporal structure in a dorsal fronto-temporal circuitry.

  16. Neural mechanisms of time-based prospective memory: evidence for transient monitoring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin M Oksanen

    Full Text Available In daily life, we often need to remember to perform an action after, or at, a specific period of time (e.g., take pizza out of oven in 15 minutes. Surprisingly, little is known about the neural mechanisms that support this form of memory, termed time-based prospective memory (PM. Here we pioneer an fMRI paradigm that enables examination of both sustained and transient processes engaged during time-based PM. Participants were scanned while performing a demanding on-going task (n-back working memory, with and without an additional time-based PM demand. During the PM condition participants could access a hidden clock with a specific button-press response, while in the control condition, pseudo-clocks randomly appeared and were removed via the same response. Analyses tested for sustained activation associated with the PM condition, and also transient activation associated with clock-checks and the PM target response. Contrary to prior findings with event-based PM (i.e., remembering to perform a future action when a specific event occurs, no sustained PM-related activity was observed in anterior prefrontal cortex (aPFC or elsewhere in the brain; instead, transient clock-related activity was observed in this region. Critically, the activation was anticipatory, increasing before clock-check responses. Anticipatory activity prior to the PM target response was weaker in aPFC, but strong in pre-Supplementary Motor Area (pre-SMA; relative to clock-check responses, suggesting a functional double dissociation related to volitional decision-making. Together, the results suggest that aPFC-activity dynamics during time-based PM reflect a distinct transient monitoring process, enabling integration of the PM intention with current temporal information to facilitate scheduling of upcoming PM-related actions.

  17. Neural Mechanisms Underlying the Computation of Hierarchical Tree Structures in Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, Tomoya; Sakai, Kuniyoshi L.

    2014-01-01

    Whether mathematical and linguistic processes share the same neural mechanisms has been a matter of controversy. By examining various sentence structures, we recently demonstrated that activations in the left inferior frontal gyrus (L. IFG) and left supramarginal gyrus (L. SMG) were modulated by the Degree of Merger (DoM), a measure for the complexity of tree structures. In the present study, we hypothesize that the DoM is also critical in mathematical calculations, and clarify whether the DoM in the hierarchical tree structures modulates activations in these regions. We tested an arithmetic task that involved linear and quadratic sequences with recursive computation. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we found significant activation in the L. IFG, L. SMG, bilateral intraparietal sulcus (IPS), and precuneus selectively among the tested conditions. We also confirmed that activations in the L. IFG and L. SMG were free from memory-related factors, and that activations in the bilateral IPS and precuneus were independent from other possible factors. Moreover, by fitting parametric models of eight factors, we found that the model of DoM in the hierarchical tree structures was the best to explain the modulation of activations in these five regions. Using dynamic causal modeling, we showed that the model with a modulatory effect for the connection from the L. IPS to the L. IFG, and with driving inputs into the L. IFG, was highly probable. The intrinsic, i.e., task-independent, connection from the L. IFG to the L. IPS, as well as that from the L. IPS to the R. IPS, would provide a feedforward signal, together with negative feedback connections. We indicate that mathematics and language share the network of the L. IFG and L. IPS/SMG for the computation of hierarchical tree structures, and that mathematics recruits the additional network of the L. IPS and R. IPS. PMID:25379713

  18. Dissociable Learning Processes Underlie Human Pain Conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Suyi; Mano, Hiroaki; Ganesh, Gowrishankar; Robbins, Trevor; Seymour, Ben

    2016-01-11

    Pavlovian conditioning underlies many aspects of pain behavior, including fear and threat detection [1], escape and avoidance learning [2], and endogenous analgesia [3]. Although a central role for the amygdala is well established [4], both human and animal studies implicate other brain regions in learning, notably ventral striatum and cerebellum [5]. It remains unclear whether these regions make different contributions to a single aversive learning process or represent independent learning mechanisms that interact to generate the expression of pain-related behavior. We designed a human parallel aversive conditioning paradigm in which different Pavlovian visual cues probabilistically predicted thermal pain primarily to either the left or right arm and studied the acquisition of conditioned Pavlovian responses using combined physiological recordings and fMRI. Using computational modeling based on reinforcement learning theory, we found that conditioning involves two distinct types of learning process. First, a non-specific "preparatory" system learns aversive facial expressions and autonomic responses such as skin conductance. The associated learning signals-the learned associability and prediction error-were correlated with fMRI brain responses in amygdala-striatal regions, corresponding to the classic aversive (fear) learning circuit. Second, a specific lateralized system learns "consummatory" limb-withdrawal responses, detectable with electromyography of the arm to which pain is predicted. Its related learned associability was correlated with responses in ipsilateral cerebellar cortex, suggesting a novel computational role for the cerebellum in pain. In conclusion, our results show that the overall phenotype of conditioned pain behavior depends on two dissociable reinforcement learning circuits.

  19. Anti-Inflammatory Mechanism of Neural Stem Cell Transplantation in Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijian Cheng

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Neural stem cell (NSC transplantation has been proposed to promote functional recovery after spinal cord injury. However, a detailed understanding of the mechanisms of how NSCs exert their therapeutic plasticity is lacking. We transplanted mouse NSCs into the injured spinal cord seven days after SCI, and the Basso Mouse Scale (BMS score was performed to assess locomotor function. The anti-inflammatory effects of NSC transplantation was analyzed by immunofluorescence staining of neutrophil and macrophages and the detection of mRNA levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interleukin-1β (IL-1β, interleukin-6 (IL-6 and interleukin-12 (IL-12. Furthermore, bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs were co-cultured with NSCs and followed by analyzing the mRNA levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-10 with quantitative real-time PCR. The production of TNF-α and IL-1β by BMDMs was examined using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Transplanted NSCs had significantly increased BMS scores (p < 0.05. Histological results showed that the grafted NSCs migrated from the injection site toward the injured area. NSCs transplantation significantly reduced the number of neutrophils and iNOS+/Mac-2+ cells at the epicenter of the injured area (p < 0.05. Meanwhile, mRNA levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-12 in the NSCs transplantation group were significantly decreased compared to the control group. Furthermore, NSCs inhibited the iNOS expression of BMDMs and the release of inflammatory factors by macrophages in vitro (p < 0.05. These results suggest that NSC transplantation could modulate SCI-induced inflammatory responses and enhance neurological function after SCI via reducing M1 macrophage activation and infiltrating neutrophils. Thus, this study provides a new insight into the mechanisms responsible for the anti-inflammatory effect of NSC transplantation after SCI.

  20. Neural mechanism of lmplicit and explicit memory retrieval: functional MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Heoung Keun; Jeong, Gwang Woo; Park, Tae Jin; Seo, Jeong Jin; Kim, Hyung Joong; Eun, Sung Jong; Chung, Tae Woong [Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-03-01

    To identify, using functional MR imaging, distinct cerebral centers and to evaluate the neural mechanism associated with implicit and explicit retrieval of words during conceptual processing. Seven healthy volunteers aged 21-25 (mean, 22) years underwent BOLD-based fMR imaging using a 1.5T signa horizon echospeed MR system. To activate the cerebral cortices, a series of tasks was performed as follows: the encoding of two-syllable words, and implicit and explicit retrieval of previously learned words during conceptual processing. The activation paradigm consisted of a cycle of alternating periods of 30 seconds of stimulation and 30 seconds of rest. Stimulation was accomplished by encoding eight two-syllable words and the retrieval of previously presented words, while the control condition was a white screen with a small fixed cross. During the tasks we acquired ten slices (6 mm slice thickness, 1 mm gap) parallel to the AC-PC line, and the resulting functional activation maps were reconstructed using a statistical parametric mapping program (SPM99). A comparison of activation ratios (percentages), based on the number of volunteers, showed that activation of Rhs-35, PoCiG-23 and ICiG-26{center_dot}30 was associated with explicit retrieval only; other brain areas were activated during the performance of both implicit and explicit retrieval tasks. Activation ratios were higher for explicit tasks than for implicit; in the cingulate gyrus and temporal lobe they were 30% and 10% greater, respectively. During explicit retrieval, a distinct brain activation index (percentage) was seen in the temporal, parietal, and occipital lobe and cingulate gyrus, and PrCeG-4, Pr/ PoCeG-43 in the frontal lobe. During implicit retrieval, on the other hand, activity was greater in the frontal lobe, including the areas of SCA-25, SFG/MFG-10, IFG-44{center_dot}45, OrbG-11{center_dot}47, SFG-6{center_dot}8 and MFG-9{center_dot}46. Overall, activation was lateralized mainly in the left

  1. Towards Pro-active Embodied Agents: On the Importance of Neural Mechanisms Suitable to Process Time Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Croon, G.; Nolfi, S.; Postma, E. O.

    In Embodied Cognitive Science, many studies have focused on reactive agents, i.e. agents that have no internal state and always respond in the same way to the same stimulus. However, this particular focus is not due to a rejection of the importance of internal states. Rather, it is due to the difficulty of developing pro-active embodied and situated agents, that is agents able to: (a) extract internal states by integrating sensorymotor information through time and, (b) later use these internal states to modulate their motor behaviour according to the current environmental circumstances. In this chapter we will focus on how pro-active agents can be developed and, more specifically, on which are the neural mechanisms that might favour the development of pro-active agents. By comparing the results of five sets of evolutionary experiments in which simulated robots are provided with different types of recurrent neural networks, we gain insight into the relation between the robots` capabilities and the characteristics of their neural controllers. We show how special mechanisms for processing information in time facilitate the exploitation of internal states.

  2. 5-HTTLPR polymorphism is linked to neural mechanisms of selective attention in preschoolers from lower socioeconomic status backgrounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Isbell

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available While a growing body of research has identified experiential factors associated with differences in selective attention, relatively little is known about the contribution of genetic factors to the skill of sustained selective attention, especially in early childhood. Here, we assessed the association between the serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR genotypes and the neural mechanisms of selective attention in young children from lower socioeconomic status (SES backgrounds. Event-related potentials (ERPs were recorded during a dichotic listening task from 121 children (76 females, aged 40–67 months, who were also genotyped for the short and long allele of 5-HTTLPR. The effect of selective attention was measured as the difference in ERP mean amplitudes elicited by identical probe stimuli embedded in stories when they were attended versus unattended. Compared to children homozygous for the long allele, children who carried at least one copy of the short allele showed larger effects of selective attention on neural processing. These findings link the short allele of the 5-HTTLPR to enhanced neural mechanisms of selective attention and lay the groundwork for future studies of gene-by-environment interactions in the context of key cognitive skills.

  3. 5-HTTLPR polymorphism is linked to neural mechanisms of selective attention in preschoolers from lower socioeconomic status backgrounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isbell, Elif; Stevens, Courtney; Hampton Wray, Amanda; Bell, Theodore; Neville, Helen J

    2016-12-01

    While a growing body of research has identified experiential factors associated with differences in selective attention, relatively little is known about the contribution of genetic factors to the skill of sustained selective attention, especially in early childhood. Here, we assessed the association between the serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) genotypes and the neural mechanisms of selective attention in young children from lower socioeconomic status (SES) backgrounds. Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded during a dichotic listening task from 121 children (76 females, aged 40-67 months), who were also genotyped for the short and long allele of 5-HTTLPR. The effect of selective attention was measured as the difference in ERP mean amplitudes elicited by identical probe stimuli embedded in stories when they were attended versus unattended. Compared to children homozygous for the long allele, children who carried at least one copy of the short allele showed larger effects of selective attention on neural processing. These findings link the short allele of the 5-HTTLPR to enhanced neural mechanisms of selective attention and lay the groundwork for future studies of gene-by-environment interactions in the context of key cognitive skills.

  4. [Plant lectins and embryonic tissue factors as probes for studying the mechanisms of neural induction in amphibians].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhaĭlov, A T; Gorgoliuk, N A

    1992-01-01

    Using various experimental techniques, we have demonstrated that animal pole ectoderm (APE) of Rana temporaria embryos at the stage of early gastrula is a good target tissue for testing the neuralizing (N) factors. In this respect R. temporaria APE is comparable with APE of some other amphibian species. We found that concanavalin A (con A), phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and embryonic brain-derived neuralizing factor (EBDNF; a factor extracted from the chick embryonic brain and partially purified) have a pronounced N-effect on the APE of R. temporaria. In order to analyse possible mechanisms of N-action of these factors, we have cultured APE explants for 3 or 18 h in the medium containing various concentrations of con A, PHA of EBDNF. All these factors could produce neuralization in 50% explants. However, the optimal concentration and time of exposure were different. This is an evidence for different mechanisms of reception and transmission of a N-signal in each particular case. It appears that the APE consists of several cell subpopulations which differ in their threshold sensitivity to the N-effect of studied agents.

  5. Vive les differences! Individual variation in neural mechanisms of executive control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braver, Todd S.; Cole, Michael W.; Yarkoni, Tal

    2010-01-01

    Summary Investigations of individual differences have become increasingly important in the cognitive neuroscience of executive control. For instance, individual variation in lateral prefrontal cortex function (and that of associated regions) has recently been used to identify contributions of executive control processes to a number of domains, including working memory capacity, anxiety, reward/motivation, and emotion regulation. However, the origins of such individual differences remain poorly understood. Recent progress toward identifying the genetic and environmental sources of variation in neural traits, in combination with progress identifying the causal relationships between neural and cognitive processes, will be essential for developing a mechanistic understanding of executive control. PMID:20381337

  6. Deriving Meaning: Distinct Neural Mechanisms for Metaphoric, Literal, and Non-Meaningful Sentences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringaris, Argyris K.; Medford, Nicholas C.; Giampietro, Vincent; Brammer, Michael J.; David, Anthony S.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we used a novel cognitive paradigm and event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (ER-fMRI) to investigate the neural substrates involved in processing three different types of sentences. Participants read either metaphoric ("Some surgeons are butchers"), literal ("Some surgeons are fathers"), or non-meaningful sentences…

  7. Comparable mechanisms for action and language: Neural systems behind intentions, goals and means

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schie, H.T. van; Toni, I.; Bekkering, H.

    2006-01-01

    In this position paper we explore correspondence between neural systems for language and action starting from recent electrophysiological findings on the roles of posterior and frontal areas in goal-directed grasping actions. The paper compares the perceptual and motor organization for action and

  8. Evaluating the negative or valuing the positive? Neural mechanisms supporting feedback-based learning across development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Duijvenvoorde, A.C.K.; Zanolie, K.; Rombouts, S.A.R.B.; Raijmakers, M.E.J.; Crone, E.A.

    2008-01-01

    Howchildren learn from positive and negative performance feedback lies at the foundation of successful learning and is therefore of great importance for educational practice. In this study, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine the neural developmental changes related to

  9. Mechanisms of Developmental Regression in Autism and the Broader Phenotype: A Neural Network Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Michael S. C.; Knowland, Victoria C. P.; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette

    2011-01-01

    Loss of previously established behaviors in early childhood constitutes a markedly atypical developmental trajectory. It is found almost uniquely in autism and its cause is currently unknown (Baird et al., 2008). We present an artificial neural network model of developmental regression, exploring the hypothesis that regression is caused by…

  10. Neural mechanisms of proactive and reactive inhibitory control : Studies in healthy volunteers and schizophrenia patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandbelt, B.B.

    2011-01-01

    The neural underpinnings of our ability to restrain actions in advance (i.e. proactive inhibition) and stop actions in reaction to some event (i.e. reactive inhibition) remain largely unknown. In this thesis we used neuroimaging (functional magnetic resonance imaging, fMRI) and brain stimulation (tr

  11. Neural Mechanisms of Improvements in Social Motivation after Pivotal Response Treatment: Two Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voos, Avery C.; Pelphrey, Kevin A.; Tirrell, Jonathan; Bolling, Danielle Z.; Vander Wyk, Brent; Kaiser, Martha D.; McPartland, James C.; Volkmar, Fred R.; Ventola, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    Pivotal response treatment (PRT) is an empirically validated behavioral treatment that has widespread positive effects on communication, behavior, and social skills in young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). For the first time, functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to identify the neural correlates of successful response to…

  12. Mechanisms of Developmental Regression in Autism and the Broader Phenotype: A Neural Network Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Michael S. C.; Knowland, Victoria C. P.; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette

    2011-01-01

    Loss of previously established behaviors in early childhood constitutes a markedly atypical developmental trajectory. It is found almost uniquely in autism and its cause is currently unknown (Baird et al., 2008). We present an artificial neural network model of developmental regression, exploring the hypothesis that regression is caused by…

  13. Expert music performance: cognitive, neural, and developmental bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Rachel M; Zatorre, Robert J; Penhune, Virginia B

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, we explore what happens in the brain of an expert musician during performance. Understanding expert music performance is interesting to cognitive neuroscientists not only because it tests the limits of human memory and movement, but also because studying expert musicianship can help us understand skilled human behavior in general. In this chapter, we outline important facets of our current understanding of the cognitive and neural basis for music performance, and developmental factors that may underlie musical ability. We address three main questions. (1) What is expert performance? (2) How do musicians achieve expert-level performance? (3) How does expert performance come about? We address the first question by describing musicians' ability to remember, plan, execute, and monitor their performances in order to perform music accurately and expressively. We address the second question by reviewing evidence for possible cognitive and neural mechanisms that may underlie or contribute to expert music performance, including the integration of sound and movement, feedforward and feedback motor control processes, expectancy, and imagery. We further discuss how neural circuits in auditory, motor, parietal, subcortical, and frontal cortex all contribute to different facets of musical expertise. Finally, we address the third question by reviewing evidence for the heritability of musical expertise and for how expertise develops through training and practice. We end by discussing outlooks for future work.

  14. LOGIC WITH EXCEPTION ON THE ALGEBRA OF FOURIER-DUAL OPERATIONS: NEURAL NET MECHANISM OF COGNITIVE DISSONANCE REDUCING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Pavlov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A mechanism of cognitive dissonance reducing is demonstrated with approach for non-monotonic fuzzy-valued logics by Fourier-holography technique implementation developing. Cognitive dissonance occurs under perceiving of new information that contradicts to the existing subjective pattern of the outside world, represented by double Fourier-transform cascade with a hologram – neural layers interconnections matrix of inner information representation and logical conclusion. The hologram implements monotonic logic according to “General Modus Ponens” rule. New information is represented by a hologram of exclusion that implements interconnections of logical conclusion and exclusion for neural layers. The latter are linked by Fourier transform that determines duality of the algebra forming operations of conjunction and disjunction. Hologram of exclusion forms conclusion that is dual to the “General Modus Ponens” conclusion. It is shown, that trained for the main rule and exclusion system can be represented by two-layered neural network with separate interconnection matrixes for direct and inverse iterations. The network energy function is involved determining the cyclic dynamics character; dissipative factor causing convergence type of the dynamics is analyzed. Both “General Modus Ponens” and exclusion holograms recording conditions on the dynamics and convergence of the system are demonstrated. The system converges to a stable status, in which logical conclusion doesn’t depend on the inner information. Such kind of dynamics, leading to tolerance forming, is typical for ordinary kind of thinking, aimed at inner pattern of outside world stability. For scientific kind of thinking, aimed at adequacy of the inner pattern of the world, a mechanism is needed to stop the net relaxation; the mechanism has to be external relative to the model of logic. Computer simulation results for the learning conditions adequate to real holograms recording are

  15. Effective electric fields along realistic DTI-based neural trajectories for modelling the stimulation mechanisms of TMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Geeter, N; Crevecoeur, G; Leemans, A; Dupré, L

    2015-01-21

    In transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), an applied alternating magnetic field induces an electric field in the brain that can interact with the neural system. It is generally assumed that this induced electric field is the crucial effect exciting a certain region of the brain. More specifically, it is the component of this field parallel to the neuron's local orientation, the so-called effective electric field, that can initiate neuronal stimulation. Deeper insights on the stimulation mechanisms can be acquired through extensive TMS modelling. Most models study simple representations of neurons with assumed geometries, whereas we embed realistic neural trajectories computed using tractography based on diffusion tensor images. This way of modelling ensures a more accurate spatial distribution of the effective electric field that is in addition patient and case specific. The case study of this paper focuses on the single pulse stimulation of the left primary motor cortex with a standard figure-of-eight coil. Including realistic neural geometry in the model demonstrates the strong and localized variations of the effective electric field between the tracts themselves and along them due to the interplay of factors such as the tract's position and orientation in relation to the TMS coil, the neural trajectory and its course along the white and grey matter interface. Furthermore, the influence of changes in the coil orientation is studied. Investigating the impact of tissue anisotropy confirms that its contribution is not negligible. Moreover, assuming isotropic tissues lead to errors of the same size as rotating or tilting the coil with 10 degrees. In contrast, the model proves to be less sensitive towards the not well-known tissue conductivity values.

  16. FGF signalling regulates chromatin organisation during neural differentiation via mechanisms that can be uncoupled from transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishal S Patel

    Full Text Available Changes in higher order chromatin organisation have been linked to transcriptional regulation; however, little is known about how such organisation alters during embryonic development or how it is regulated by extrinsic signals. Here we analyse changes in chromatin organisation as neural differentiation progresses, exploiting the clear spatial separation of the temporal events of differentiation along the elongating body axis of the mouse embryo. Combining fluorescence in situ hybridisation with super-resolution structured illumination microscopy, we show that chromatin around key differentiation gene loci Pax6 and Irx3 undergoes both decompaction and displacement towards the nuclear centre coincident with transcriptional onset. Conversely, down-regulation of Fgf8 as neural differentiation commences correlates with a more peripheral nuclear position of this locus. During normal neural differentiation, fibroblast growth factor (FGF signalling is repressed by retinoic acid, and this vitamin A derivative is further required for transcription of neural genes. We show here that exposure to retinoic acid or inhibition of FGF signalling promotes precocious decompaction and central nuclear positioning of differentiation gene loci. Using the Raldh2 mutant as a model for retinoid deficiency, we further find that such changes in higher order chromatin organisation are dependent on retinoid signalling. In this retinoid deficient condition, FGF signalling persists ectopically in the elongating body, and importantly, we find that inhibiting FGF receptor (FGFR signalling in Raldh2-/- embryos does not rescue differentiation gene transcription, but does elicit both chromatin decompaction and nuclear position change. These findings demonstrate that regulation of higher order chromatin organisation during differentiation in the embryo can be uncoupled from the machinery that promotes transcription and, for the first time, identify FGF as an extrinsic signal that

  17. Physiological and Neural Adaptations to Eccentric Exercise: Mechanisms and Considerations for Training

    OpenAIRE

    Nosratollah Hedayatpour; Deborah Falla

    2015-01-01

    Eccentric exercise is characterized by initial unfavorable effects such as subcellular muscle damage, pain, reduced fiber excitability, and initial muscle weakness. However, stretch combined with overload, as in eccentric contractions, is an effective stimulus for inducing physiological and neural adaptations to training. Eccentric exercise-induced adaptations include muscle hypertrophy, increased cortical activity, and changes in motor unit behavior, all of which contribute to improved muscl...

  18. Neural mechanisms of negative reinforcement in children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Damiano, Cara R.; Cockrell, Dillon C.; DUNLAP, KAITLYN; Hanna, Eleanor K; Miller, Stephanie; Bizzell, Joshua; Kovac, Megan; Turner-Brown, Lauren; Sideris, John; Kinard, Jessica; Dichter, Gabriel S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous research has found accumulating evidence for atypical reward processing in autism spectrum disorders (ASD), particularly in the context of social rewards. Yet, this line of research has focused largely on positive social reinforcement, while little is known about the processing of negative reinforcement in individuals with ASD. Methods The present study examined neural responses to social negative reinforcement (a face displaying negative affect) and non-social negative re...

  19. Effect of Heterogeneity on Decorrelation Mechanisms in Spiking Neural Networks: A Neuromorphic-Hardware Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeil, Thomas; Jordan, Jakob; Tetzlaff, Tom; Grübl, Andreas; Schemmel, Johannes; Diesmann, Markus; Meier, Karlheinz

    2016-04-01

    High-level brain function, such as memory, classification, or reasoning, can be realized by means of recurrent networks of simplified model neurons. Analog neuromorphic hardware constitutes a fast and energy-efficient substrate for the implementation of such neural computing architectures in technical applications and neuroscientific research. The functional performance of neural networks is often critically dependent on the level of correlations in the neural activity. In finite networks, correlations are typically inevitable due to shared presynaptic input. Recent theoretical studies have shown that inhibitory feedback, abundant in biological neural networks, can actively suppress these shared-input correlations and thereby enable neurons to fire nearly independently. For networks of spiking neurons, the decorrelating effect of inhibitory feedback has so far been explicitly demonstrated only for homogeneous networks of neurons with linear subthreshold dynamics. Theory, however, suggests that the effect is a general phenomenon, present in any system with sufficient inhibitory feedback, irrespective of the details of the network structure or the neuronal and synaptic properties. Here, we investigate the effect of network heterogeneity on correlations in sparse, random networks of inhibitory neurons with nonlinear, conductance-based synapses. Emulations of these networks on the analog neuromorphic-hardware system Spikey allow us to test the efficiency of decorrelation by inhibitory feedback in the presence of hardware-specific heterogeneities. The configurability of the hardware substrate enables us to modulate the extent of heterogeneity in a systematic manner. We selectively study the effects of shared input and recurrent connections on correlations in membrane potentials and spike trains. Our results confirm that shared-input correlations are actively suppressed by inhibitory feedback also in highly heterogeneous networks exhibiting broad, heavy-tailed firing

  20. Acute effects of neural mobilization and infrared on the mechanics of the median nerve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Monara Kedma; Fontenele dos Santos, Gabrielly; Martins e Silva, Diandra Caroline; Mota de Freitas, Ana Cláudia; Henriques, Isadora Ferreira; Andrade, Peterson Marco; Machado, Dionis de Castro; Teixeira, Silmar; Neves, Marco Orsini; Dias, Gildário; Silva-Júnior, Fernando; Bastos, Victor Hugo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study analyzed the acute effects of infrared and neural mobilization on the median nerve on the range of elbow extension of the dominant limb. [Subjects and Methods] Forty participants from university, neurologically asymptomatic, 12 males and 28 females (22.8 ± 1.9 years), were randomly divided into four groups: Group 1 (control) rested for 25 minutes in the supine position; Group 2 received the specific neural mobilization for the median nerve; Group 3 received an application of infrared for 15 minutes on the forearm; Group 4 received the same application of infrared followed by neural mobilization. The goniometric parameters of elbow extension were evaluated after the intervention. [Results] Significant differences of extension value were observed between Group 1 and Group 3 (15.75 degrees), and between Group 1 and Group 4 (14.60 degrees), and the average higher in Group 3 (26.35 degrees). [Conclusion] This research provides new experimental evidence that NM in relation to superficial heat produces an immediate effect on elbow range of motion versus NM isolated. PMID:27390402

  1. Neural mechanisms of subclinical depressive symptoms in women: a pilot functional brain imaging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felder Jennifer N

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies of individuals who do not meet criteria for major depressive disorder (MDD but with subclinical levels of depressive symptoms may aid in the identification of neurofunctional abnormalities that possibly precede and predict the development of MDD. The purpose of this study was to evaluate relations between subclinical levels of depressive symptoms and neural activation patterns during tasks previously shown to differentiate individuals with and without MDD. Methods Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI was used to assess neural activations during active emotion regulation, a resting state scan, and reward processing. Participants were twelve females with a range of depressive symptoms who did not meet criteria for MDD. Results Increased depressive symptom severity predicted (1 decreased left midfrontal gyrus activation during reappraisal of sad stimuli; (2 increased right midfrontal gyrus activation during distraction from sad stimuli; (3 increased functional connectivity between a precuneus seed region and left orbitofrontal cortex during a resting state scan; and (4 increased paracingulate activation during non-win outcomes during a reward-processing task. Conclusions These pilot data shed light on relations between subclinical levels of depressive symptoms in the absence of a formal MDD diagnosis and neural activation patterns. Future studies will be needed to test the utility of these activation patterns for predicting MDD onset in at-risk samples.

  2. Neural Androgen Receptor Deletion Impairs the Temporal Processing of Objects and Hippocampal CA1-Dependent Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picot, Marie; Billard, Jean-Marie; Dombret, Carlos; Albac, Christelle; Karameh, Nida; Daumas, Stéphanie; Hardin-Pouzet, Hélène; Mhaouty-Kodja, Sakina

    2016-01-01

    We studied the role of testosterone, mediated by the androgen receptor (AR), in modulating temporal order memory for visual objects. For this purpose, we used male mice lacking AR specifically in the nervous system. Control and mutant males were gonadectomized at adulthood and supplemented with equivalent amounts of testosterone in order to normalize their hormonal levels. We found that neural AR deletion selectively impaired the processing of temporal information for visual objects, without affecting classical object recognition or anxiety-like behavior and circulating corticosterone levels, which remained similar to those in control males. Thus, mutant males were unable to discriminate between the most recently seen object and previously seen objects, whereas their control littermates showed more interest in exploring previously seen objects. Because the hippocampal CA1 area has been associated with temporal memory for visual objects, we investigated whether neural AR deletion altered the functionality of this region. Electrophysiological analysis showed that neural AR deletion affected basal glutamate synaptic transmission and decreased the magnitude of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) activation and high-frequency stimulation-induced long-term potentiation. The impairment of NMDAR function was not due to changes in protein levels of receptor. These results provide the first evidence for the modulation of temporal processing of information for visual objects by androgens, via AR activation, possibly through regulation of NMDAR signaling in the CA1 area in male mice.

  3. Neural Androgen Receptor Deletion Impairs the Temporal Processing of Objects and Hippocampal CA1-Dependent Mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Picot

    Full Text Available We studied the role of testosterone, mediated by the androgen receptor (AR, in modulating temporal order memory for visual objects. For this purpose, we used male mice lacking AR specifically in the nervous system. Control and mutant males were gonadectomized at adulthood and supplemented with equivalent amounts of testosterone in order to normalize their hormonal levels. We found that neural AR deletion selectively impaired the processing of temporal information for visual objects, without affecting classical object recognition or anxiety-like behavior and circulating corticosterone levels, which remained similar to those in control males. Thus, mutant males were unable to discriminate between the most recently seen object and previously seen objects, whereas their control littermates showed more interest in exploring previously seen objects. Because the hippocampal CA1 area has been associated with temporal memory for visual objects, we investigated whether neural AR deletion altered the functionality of this region. Electrophysiological analysis showed that neural AR deletion affected basal glutamate synaptic transmission and decreased the magnitude of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR activation and high-frequency stimulation-induced long-term potentiation. The impairment of NMDAR function was not due to changes in protein levels of receptor. These results provide the first evidence for the modulation of temporal processing of information for visual objects by androgens, via AR activation, possibly through regulation of NMDAR signaling in the CA1 area in male mice.

  4. Neural network methods for identification and optimization of quantum mechanical features needed for bioactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunheim, B B; Schwartz, S D

    2000-09-01

    This paper presents a new approach to the discovery and design of bioactive compounds. The focus of this application will be on the analysis of enzymatic inhibitors. At present the discovery of enzymatic inhibitors for therapeutic use is often accomplished through random searches. The first phase of discovery is a random search through a large pre-fabricated chemical library. Many molecules are tested with refined enzyme for signs of inhibition. Once a group of lead compounds have been discovered the chemical intuition of biochemists is used to find structurally related compounds that are more effective. This step requires new molecules to be conceived and synthesized, and it is the most time-consuming and expensive step. The development of computational and theoretical methods for prediction of the molecular structure that would bind most tightly prior to synthesis and testing, would facilitate the design of novel inhibitors. In the past, our work has focused on solving the problem of predicting the bioactivity of a molecule prior to synthesis. We used a neural network trained with the bioactivity of known compounds to predict the bioactivity of unknown compounds. In our current work, we use a separate neural network in conjunction with a trained neural network in an attempt to gain insight as to how to modify existing compounds and increase their bioactivity.

  5. Neural mechanisms of rhythm-based temporal prediction: Delta phase-locking reflects temporal predictability but not rhythmic entrainment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deouell, Leon Y.

    2017-01-01

    Predicting the timing of upcoming events enables efficient resource allocation and action preparation. Rhythmic streams, such as music, speech, and biological motion, constitute a pervasive source for temporal predictions. Widely accepted entrainment theories postulate that rhythm-based predictions are mediated by synchronizing low-frequency neural oscillations to the rhythm, as indicated by increased phase concentration (PC) of low-frequency neural activity for rhythmic compared to random streams. However, we show here that PC enhancement in scalp recordings is not specific to rhythms but is observed to the same extent in less periodic streams if they enable memory-based prediction. This is inconsistent with the predictions of a computational entrainment model of stronger PC for rhythmic streams. Anticipatory change in alpha activity and facilitation of electroencephalogram (EEG) manifestations of response selection are also comparable between rhythm- and memory-based predictions. However, rhythmic sequences uniquely result in obligatory depression of preparation-related premotor brain activity when an on-beat event is omitted, even when it is strategically beneficial to maintain preparation, leading to larger behavioral costs for violation of prediction. Thus, while our findings undermine the validity of PC as a sign of rhythmic entrainment, they constitute the first electrophysiological dissociation, to our knowledge, between mechanisms of rhythmic predictions and of memory-based predictions: the former obligatorily lead to resonance-like preparation patterns (that are in line with entrainment), while the latter allow flexible resource allocation in time regardless of periodicity in the input. Taken together, they delineate the neural mechanisms of three distinct modes of preparation: continuous vigilance, interval-timing-based prediction and rhythm-based prediction. PMID:28187128

  6. Untangling the neurobiology of coping styles in rodents: Towards neural mechanisms underlying individual differences in disease susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Sietse F; Buwalda, Bauke; Koolhaas, Jaap M

    2017-03-01

    Considerable individual differences exist in trait-like patterns of behavioral and physiological responses to salient environmental challenges. This individual variation in stress coping styles has an important functional role in terms of health and fitness. Hence, understanding the neural embedding of coping style variation is fundamental for biobehavioral neurosciences in probing individual disease susceptibility. This review outlines individual differences in trait-aggressiveness as an adaptive component of the natural sociobiology of rats and mice, and highlights that these reflect the general style of coping that varies from proactive (aggressive) to reactive (docile). We propose that this qualitative coping style can be disentangled into multiple quantitative behavioral domains, e.g., flexibility/impulse control, emotional reactivity and harm avoidance/reward processing, that each are encoded into selective neural circuitries. Since functioning of all these brain circuitries rely on fine-tuned serotonin signaling, autoinhibitory control mechanisms of serotonergic neuron (re)activity are crucial in orchestrating general coping style. Untangling the precise neuromolecular mechanisms of different coping styles will provide a roadmap for developing better therapeutic strategies of stress-related diseases.

  7. Mind your errors: evidence for a neural mechanism linking growth mind-set to adaptive posterror adjustments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Jason S; Schroder, Hans S; Heeter, Carrie; Moran, Tim P; Lee, Yu-Hao

    2011-12-01

    How well people bounce back from mistakes depends on their beliefs about learning and intelligence. For individuals with a growth mind-set, who believe intelligence develops through effort, mistakes are seen as opportunities to learn and improve. For individuals with a fixed mind-set, who believe intelligence is a stable characteristic, mistakes indicate lack of ability. We examined performance-monitoring event-related potentials (ERPs) to probe the neural mechanisms underlying these different reactions to mistakes. Findings revealed that a growth mind-set was associated with enhancement of the error positivity component (Pe), which reflects awareness of and allocation of attention to mistakes. More growth-minded individuals also showed superior accuracy after mistakes compared with individuals endorsing a more fixed mind-set. It is critical to note that Pe amplitude mediated the relationship between mind-set and posterror accuracy. These results suggest that neural mechanisms indexing on-line awareness of and attention to mistakes are intimately involved in growth-minded individuals' ability to rebound from mistakes.

  8. Language Learning Enhanced by Massive Multiple Online Role-Playing Games (MMORPGs) and the Underlying Behavioral and Neural Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongjun; Song, Hongwen; Liu, Xiaoming; Tang, Dinghong; Chen, Yue-E; Zhang, Xiaochu

    2017-01-01

    Massive Multiple Online Role-Playing Games (MMORPGs) have increased in popularity among children, juveniles, and adults since MMORPGs' appearance in this digital age. MMORPGs can be applied to enhancing language learning, which is drawing researchers' attention from different fields and many studies have validated MMORPGs' positive effect on language learning. However, there are few studies on the underlying behavioral or neural mechanism of such effect. This paper reviews the educational application of the MMORPGs based on relevant macroscopic and microscopic studies, showing that gamers' overall language proficiency or some specific language skills can be enhanced by real-time online interaction with peers and game narratives or instructions embedded in the MMORPGs. Mechanisms underlying the educational assistant role of MMORPGs in second language learning are discussed from both behavioral and neural perspectives. We suggest that attentional bias makes gamers/learners allocate more cognitive resources toward task-related stimuli in a controlled or an automatic way. Moreover, with a moderating role played by activation of reward circuit, playing the MMORPGs may strengthen or increase functional connectivity from seed regions such as left anterior insular/frontal operculum (AI/FO) and visual word form area to other language-related brain areas.

  9. Language Learning Enhanced by Massive Multiple Online Role-Playing Games (MMORPGs) and the Underlying Behavioral and Neural Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongjun; Song, Hongwen; Liu, Xiaoming; Tang, Dinghong; Chen, Yue-e; Zhang, Xiaochu

    2017-01-01

    Massive Multiple Online Role-Playing Games (MMORPGs) have increased in popularity among children, juveniles, and adults since MMORPGs’ appearance in this digital age. MMORPGs can be applied to enhancing language learning, which is drawing researchers’ attention from different fields and many studies have validated MMORPGs’ positive effect on language learning. However, there are few studies on the underlying behavioral or neural mechanism of such effect. This paper reviews the educational application of the MMORPGs based on relevant macroscopic and microscopic studies, showing that gamers’ overall language proficiency or some specific language skills can be enhanced by real-time online interaction with peers and game narratives or instructions embedded in the MMORPGs. Mechanisms underlying the educational assistant role of MMORPGs in second language learning are discussed from both behavioral and neural perspectives. We suggest that attentional bias makes gamers/learners allocate more cognitive resources toward task-related stimuli in a controlled or an automatic way. Moreover, with a moderating role played by activation of reward circuit, playing the MMORPGs may strengthen or increase functional connectivity from seed regions such as left anterior insular/frontal operculum (AI/FO) and visual word form area to other language-related brain areas. PMID:28303097

  10. Neural cell adhesion molecule induces intracellular signaling via multiple mechanisms of Ca2+ homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiryushko, Darya; Korshunova, Irina; Berezin, Vladimir;

    2006-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) plays a pivotal role in the development of the nervous system, promoting neuronal differentiation via homophilic (NCAM-NCAM) as well as heterophilic (NCAM-fibroblast growth factor receptor [FGFR]) interactions. NCAM-induced intracellular signaling has been....... The first pathway was associated with activation of FGFR, phospholipase Cgamma, and production of diacylglycerol, and the second pathway involved Src-family kinases. Moreover, NCAM-mediated Ca2+ entry required activation of nonselective cation and T-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. These channels, together...

  11. Physiological and Neural Adaptations to Eccentric Exercise: Mechanisms and Considerations for Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayatpour, Nosratollah; Falla, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Eccentric exercise is characterized by initial unfavorable effects such as subcellular muscle damage, pain, reduced fiber excitability, and initial muscle weakness. However, stretch combined with overload, as in eccentric contractions, is an effective stimulus for inducing physiological and neural adaptations to training. Eccentric exercise-induced adaptations include muscle hypertrophy, increased cortical activity, and changes in motor unit behavior, all of which contribute to improved muscle function. In this brief review, neuromuscular adaptations to different forms of exercise are reviewed, the positive training effects of eccentric exercise are presented, and the implications for training are considered.

  12. Physiological and Neural Adaptations to Eccentric Exercise: Mechanisms and Considerations for Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nosratollah Hedayatpour

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Eccentric exercise is characterized by initial unfavorable effects such as subcellular muscle damage, pain, reduced fiber excitability, and initial muscle weakness. However, stretch combined with overload, as in eccentric contractions, is an effective stimulus for inducing physiological and neural adaptations to training. Eccentric exercise-induced adaptations include muscle hypertrophy, increased cortical activity, and changes in motor unit behavior, all of which contribute to improved muscle function. In this brief review, neuromuscular adaptations to different forms of exercise are reviewed, the positive training effects of eccentric exercise are presented, and the implications for training are considered.

  13. Persistent activity in neural networks with dynamic synapses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omri Barak

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Persistent activity states (attractors, observed in several neocortical areas after the removal of a sensory stimulus, are believed to be the neuronal basis of working memory. One of the possible mechanisms that can underlie persistent activity is recurrent excitation mediated by intracortical synaptic connections. A recent experimental study revealed that connections between pyramidal cells in prefrontal cortex exhibit various degrees of synaptic depression and facilitation. Here we analyze the effect of synaptic dynamics on the emergence and persistence of attractor states in interconnected neural networks. We show that different combinations of synaptic depression and facilitation result in qualitatively different network dynamics with respect to the emergence of the attractor states. This analysis raises the possibility that the framework of attractor neural networks can be extended to represent time-dependent stimuli.

  14. Neural correlates of informational cascades: brain mechanisms of social influence on belief updating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klucharev, Vasily; Rieskamp, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Informational cascades can occur when rationally acting individuals decide independently of their private information and follow the decisions of preceding decision-makers. In the process of updating beliefs, differences in the weighting of private and publicly available social information may modulate the probability that a cascade starts in a decisive way. By using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we examined neural activity while participants updated their beliefs based on the decisions of two fictitious stock market traders and their own private information, which led to a final decision of buying one of two stocks. Computational modeling of the behavioral data showed that a majority of participants overweighted private information. Overweighting was negatively correlated with the probability of starting an informational cascade in trials especially prone to conformity. Belief updating by private information was related to activity in the inferior frontal gyrus/anterior insula, the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and the parietal cortex; the more a participant overweighted private information, the higher the activity in the inferior frontal gyrus/anterior insula and the lower in the parietal-temporal cortex. This study explores the neural correlates of overweighting of private information, which underlies the tendency to start an informational cascade. PMID:24974396

  15. Learning to Associate Auditory and Visual Stimuli: Behavioral and Neural Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altieri, Nicholas; Stevenson, Ryan; Wallace, Mark T.; Wenger, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to effectively combine sensory inputs across modalities is vital for acquiring a unified percept of events. For example, watching a hammer hit a nail while simultaneously identifying the sound as originating from the event requires the ability to identify spatio-temporal congruencies and statistical regularities. In this study, we applied a reaction time (RT) and hazard function measure known as capacity (e.g., Townsend and Ashby, 1978) to quantify the extent to which observers learn paired associations between simple auditory and visual patterns in a model theoretic manner. As expected, results showed that learning was associated with an increase in accuracy, but more significantly, an increase in capacity. The aim of this study was to associate capacity measures of multisensory learning, with neural based measures, namely mean Global Field Power (GFP). We observed a co-variation between an increase in capacity, and a decrease in GFP amplitude as learning occurred. This suggests that capacity constitutes a reliable behavioral index of efficient energy expenditure in the neural domain. PMID:24276220

  16. Neural mechanisms by which gravitational stimuli and stress affect the secretion of renin and other hormones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, William F.

    1987-01-01

    The present goal is to determine by the production of discrete lesions the parts of the hypothalamus and brainstem that are involved in serotonin-mediated increases in renin secretion. A variety of stimuli which act in different ways to increase renin stimuli were developed and standardized. The experiments with p-chloroamphetamine (PCA) demonstrated that there is a serotonergic pathway which projects from the dorsal raphe nuclei to the paraventricular nuclei and the vetromedial nuclei of the hypothalamus; that projection from paraventricular nuclei to the brainstem and spinal cord may be oxytocinergic; and that the pathway from the spinal cord to the renin secreting cells is sympathetic. The demonstration that paraventicular lesions lower circulating renin substrate is important because it raises the possibility that substrate secretion is under neural control, either via the pituitary or by direct neural pathways. The discovery that lesions of the ventromedial nuclei appear to abolish the increase in renin secretion produced by many different stimuli without affecting the concentration of renin substrate in the plasma makes the position of the hypothalamus in the regulation of fluid and electrolyte balance more prominent than previously suspected.

  17. Numerical simulation with finite element and artificial neural network of ball indentation for mechanical property estimation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kamal Sharma; Vivek Bhasin; K K Vaze; A K ghosh

    2011-04-01

    A combined mechanical property evaluation methodology with ABI (Automated Ball Indentation) simulation and Artificial Neural Network (ANN) analysis is evolved to evaluate the mechanical properties for Carbon Manganese Steel (SA-333 Grade-6) and Stainless Steel (SS-304LN). The experimental load deflection data is converted into meaningful mechanical properties for these materials and their evaluated property is verified with experimental tensile specimen results. An ANN database is generated with the help of contact type finite element analysis by numerically simulating the ABI process for various magnitudes of yield strength $(\\sigma_{yp})$ (200 MPa–400 MPa) with a range of strain hardening exponent (n) (0.05–0.5)$and strength coefficient (K) (600 MPa–1600 MPa). For the present problem, a ball indenter of 1.57 mm diameter having Young’s modulus higher than test piece is used to minimize the error due to indenter deformation. Test piece dimension is kept large enough in comparison to the indenter configuration in the simulation to minimize the deflection at the outer edge of the test piece. Further, this database after the neural network training; is used to analyse measured material properties of different test pieces. The ANN predictions are reconfirmed with contact type finite element analysis for an arbitrary selected test sample. The methodology evolved in this work can be extended to predict material properties for any irradiated nuclear material in the service. Extensions of the ABI tests and the associated database analysis could lead to evaluation of the indentation energy to fracture needed for the structural integrity assessment of aged components.

  18. Repetition suppression: a means to index neural representations using BOLD?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Timothy E. J.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how the human brain gives rise to complex cognitive processes remains one of the biggest challenges of contemporary neuroscience. While invasive recording in animal models can provide insight into neural processes that are conserved across species, our understanding of cognition more broadly relies upon investigation of the human brain itself. There is therefore an imperative to establish non-invasive tools that allow human brain activity to be measured at high spatial and temporal resolution. In recent years, various attempts have been made to refine the coarse signal available in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), providing a means to investigate neural activity at the meso-scale, i.e. at the level of neural populations. The most widely used techniques include repetition suppression and multivariate pattern analysis. Human neuroscience can now use these techniques to investigate how representations are encoded across neural populations and transformed by relevant computations. Here, we review the physiological basis, applications and limitations of fMRI repetition suppression with a brief comparison to multivariate techniques. By doing so, we show how fMRI repetition suppression holds promise as a tool to reveal complex neural mechanisms that underlie human cognitive function. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience’. PMID:27574308

  19. Neural mechanisms of interstimulus interval-dependent responses in the primary auditory cortex of awake cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Ling

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary auditory cortex (AI neurons show qualitatively distinct response features to successive acoustic signals depending on the inter-stimulus intervals (ISI. Such ISI-dependent AI responses are believed to underlie, at least partially, categorical perception of click trains (elemental vs. fused quality and stop consonant-vowel syllables (eg.,/da/-/ta/continuum. Methods Single unit recordings were conducted on 116 AI neurons in awake cats. Rectangular clicks were presented either alone (single click paradigm or in a train fashion with variable ISI (2–480 ms (click-train paradigm. Response features of AI neurons were quantified as a function of ISI: one measure was related to the degree of stimulus locking (temporal modulation transfer function [tMTF] and another measure was based on firing rate (rate modulation transfer function [rMTF]. An additional modeling study was performed to gain insight into neurophysiological bases of the observed responses. Results In the click-train paradigm, the majority of the AI neurons ("synchronization type"; n = 72 showed stimulus-locking responses at long ISIs. The shorter cutoff ISI for stimulus-locking responses was on average ~30 ms and was level tolerant in accordance with the perceptual boundary of click trains and of consonant-vowel syllables. The shape of tMTF of those neurons was either band-pass or low-pass. The single click paradigm revealed, at maximum, four response periods in the following order: 1st excitation, 1st suppression, 2nd excitation then 2nd suppression. The 1st excitation and 1st suppression was found exclusively in the synchronization type, implying that the temporal interplay between excitation and suppression underlies stimulus-locking responses. Among these neurons, those showing the 2nd suppression had band-pass tMTF whereas those with low-pass tMTF never showed the 2nd suppression, implying that tMTF shape is mediated through the 2nd suppression. The

  20. Neural mechanism of proposer's decision-making in the ultimatum and dictator games

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongming Zheng; Liqi Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that reactions to unfair offers in the ultimatum game are correlated with negative emotion. However, little is known about the difference in neural activity between a proposer's decision-making in the ultimatum game compared with the dictator game. The present functional magnetic resonance imaging study revealed that proposing fair offers in the dictator game elicited greater activation in the right supramarginal gyrus, right medial frontal gyrus and left anterior cingulate cortex compared with proposing fair offers in the ultimatum game in 23 Chinese undergraduate and graduate students from Beijing Normal University in China. However, greater activation was found in the right superior temporal gyrus and left cingulate gyrus for the reverse contrast. The results indicate that proposing fair offers in the dictator game is more strongly associated with cognitive control and conflicting information processing compared with proposing fair offers in the ultimatum game.

  1. Interactions of peptide amidation and copper: novel biomarkers and mechanisms of neural dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousquet-Moore, Danielle; Prohaska, Joseph R; Nillni, Eduardo A; Czyzyk, Traci; Wetsel, William C; Mains, Richard E; Eipper, Betty A

    2010-01-01

    Mammalian genomes encode only a small number of cuproenzymes. The many genes involved in coordinating copper uptake, distribution, storage and efflux make gene/nutrient interactions especially important for these cuproenzymes. Copper deficiency and copper excess both disrupt neural function. Using mice heterozygous for peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase (PAM), a cuproenzyme essential for the synthesis of many neuropeptides, we identified alterations in anxiety-like behavior, thermoregulation and seizure sensitivity. Dietary copper supplementation reversed a subset of these deficits. Wildtype mice maintained on a marginally copper-deficient diet exhibited some of the same deficits observed in PAM(+/-) mice and displayed alterations in PAM metabolism. Altered copper homeostasis in PAM(+/-) mice suggested a role for PAM in the cell type specific regulation of copper metabolism. Physiological functions sensitive to genetic limitations of PAM that are reversed by supplemental copper and mimicked by copper deficiency may serve as indicators of marginal copper deficiency.

  2. The watercolor illusion and neon color spreading: a unified analysis of new cases and neural mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinna, Baingio; Grossberg, Stephen

    2005-10-01

    Coloration and figural properties of neon color spreading and the watercolor illusion are studied using phenomenal and psychophysical observations. Coloration properties of both effects can be reduced to a common limiting condition, a nearby color transition called the two-dot limiting case, which clarifies their perceptual similarities and dissimilarities. The results are explained by the FACADE neural model of biological vision. The model proposes how local properties of color transitions activate spatial competition among nearby perceptual boundaries, with boundaries of lower-contrast edges weakened by competition more than boundaries of higher-contrast edges. This asymmetry induces spreading of more color across these boundaries than conversely. The model also predicts how depth and figure-ground effects are generated in these illusions.

  3. Neural Mechanisms Underlying Affective Theory of Mind in Violent Antisocial Personality Disorder and/or Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffer, Boris; Pawliczek, Christina; Müller, Bernhard W; Wiltfang, Jens; Brüne, Martin; Forsting, Michael; Gizewski, Elke R; Leygraf, Norbert; Hodgins, Sheilagh

    2017-02-11

    Among violent offenders with schizophrenia, there are 2 sub-groups, one with and one without, conduct disorder (CD) and antisocial personality disorder (ASPD), who differ as to treatment response and alterations of brain structure. The present study aimed to determine whether the 2 groups also differ in Theory of Mind and neural activations subsuming this task. Five groups of men were compared: 3 groups of violent offenders-schizophrenia plus CD/ASPD, schizophrenia with no history of antisocial behavior prior to illness onset, and CD/ASPD with no severe mental illness-and 2 groups of non-offenders, one with schizophrenia and one without (H). Participants completed diagnostic interviews, the Psychopathy Checklist Screening Version Interview, the Interpersonal Reactivity Index, authorized access to clinical and criminal files, and underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging while completing an adapted version of the Reading-the-Mind-in-the-Eyes Task (RMET). Relative to H, nonviolent and violent men with schizophrenia and not CD/ASPD performed more poorly on the RMET, while violent offenders with CD/ASPD, both those with and without schizophrenia, performed similarly. The 2 groups of violent offenders with CD/ASPD, both those with and without schizophrenia, relative to the other groups, displayed higher levels of activation in a network of prefrontal and temporal-parietal regions and reduced activation in the amygdala. Relative to men without CD/ASPD, both groups of violent offenders with CD/ASPD displayed a distinct pattern of neural responses during emotional/mental state attribution pointing to distinct and comparatively successful processing of social information. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Memory Consolidation and Neural Substrate of Reward

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    Redolar-Ripoll, Diego

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this report is to analyze the relationships between reward and learning and memory processes. Different studies have described how information about rewards influences behavior and how the brain uses this reward information to control learning and memory processes. Reward nature seems to be processed in different ways by neurons in different brain structures, ranging from the detection and perception of rewards to the use of information about predicted rewards for the control of goal-directed behavior. The neural substrate underling this processing of reward information is a reliable way of improving learning and memory processes. Evidence from several studies indicates that this neural system can facilitate memory consolidation in a wide variety of learning tasks. From a molecular perspective, certain cardinal features of reward have been described as forms of memory. Studies of human addicts and studies in animal models of addiction show that chronic drug exposure produces stable changes in the brain at the cellular and molecular levels that underlie the long-lasting behavioral plasticity associated with addiction. These molecular and cellular adaptations involved in addiction are also implicated in learning and memory processes. Dopamine seems to be a critical common signal to activate different genetic mechanisms that ultimately remodel synapses and circuits. Despite memory is an active and complex process mediated by different brain areas, the neural substrate of reward is able to improve memory consolidation in a several paradigms. We believe that there are many equivalent traits between reward and learning and memory processes.

  5. Determination of the mechanical and physical properties of cartilage by coupling poroelastic-based finite element models of indentation with artificial neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbabi, Vahid; Pouran, Behdad; Campoli, Gianni; Weinans, Harrie; Zadpoor, Amir A

    2016-03-21

    One of the most widely used techniques to determine the mechanical properties of cartilage is based on indentation tests and interpretation of the obtained force-time or displacement-time data. In the current computational approaches, one needs to simulate the indentation test with finite element models and use an optimization algorithm to estimate the mechanical properties of cartilage. The modeling procedure is cumbersome, and the simulations need to be repeated for every new experiment. For the first time, we propose a method for fast and accurate estimation of the mechanical and physical properties of cartilage as a poroelastic material with the aid of artificial neural networks. In our study, we used finite element models to simulate the indentation for poroelastic materials with wide combinations of mechanical and physical properties. The obtained force-time curves are then divided into three parts: the first two parts of the data is used for training and validation of an artificial neural network, while the third part is used for testing the trained network. The trained neural network receives the force-time curves as the input and provides the properties of cartilage as the output. We observed that the trained network could accurately predict the properties of cartilage within the range of properties for which it was trained. The mechanical and physical properties of cartilage could therefore be estimated very fast, since no additional finite element modeling is required once the neural network is trained. The robustness of the trained artificial neural network in determining the properties of cartilage based on noisy force-time data was assessed by introducing noise to the simulated force-time data. We found that the training procedure could be optimized so as to maximize the robustness of the neural network against noisy force-time data.

  6. Roles of chromatin remodelers in maintenance mechanisms of multipotency of mouse trunk neural crest cells in the formation of neural crest-derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Kyohei; Ogawa, Ryuhei; Kawawaki, Syunsaku; Ito, Kazuo

    2014-08-01

    We analyzed roles of two chromatin remodelers, Chromodomain Helicase DNA-binding protein 7 (CHD7) and SWItch/Sucrose NonFermentable-B (SWI/SNF-B), and Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP)/Wnt signaling in the maintenance of the multipotency of mouse trunk neural crest cells, leading to the formation of mouse neural crest-derived stem cells (mouse NCSCs). CHD7 was expressed in the undifferentiated neural crest cells and in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and sciatic nerve, typical tissues containing NCSCs. BMP/Wnt signaling stimulated the expression of CHD7 and participated in maintaining the multipotency of neural crest cells. Furthermore, the promotion of CHD7 expression maintained the multipotency of these cells. The inhibition of CHD7 and SWI/SNF-B expression significantly suppressed the maintenance of the multipotency of these cells. In addition, BMP/Wnt treatment promoted CHD7 expression and caused the increase of the percentage of multipotent cells in DRG. Thus, the present data suggest that the chromatin remodelers as well as BMP/Wnt signaling play essential roles in the maintenance of the multipotency of mouse trunk neural crest cells and in the formation of mouse NCSCs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. 认知老化的神经机制及假说%Neural mechanism and hypothesis of cognitive aging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李婷; 李春波

    2013-01-01

    在认知老化的过程中,大脑的结构和功能均会发生不同程度的变化.自20世纪70年代以来,脑成像技术已成为研究认知老化神经机制的重要手段.任务态功能影像学研究发现老年人局部脑区的两种过度“激活”现象:老年人大脑半球非对称性减弱模型(HAROLD)和老化中由后向前转移模型(PASA).文章回顾了与这两个模型相关的理论假说,包括代偿说(compensation theory)和去分化说(dedifferentiation theory),从不同方面来解释认知老化的神经机制.%During the course of cognitive aging,the structure and function of brain change at different levels.Brain imaging techniques have become important means for the neural mechanism research of cognitive aging since 1970s.Functional imaging studies have consistently found two "overactivation" models in regional brain area in the elderly:hemispheric asymmetry reduction in older adults (HAROLD) and posterior-anterior shift in aging (PASA).The theories and hypothesis relating to the two models,including compensation theory and dedifferentiation theory are reviewed,and the neural mechanism of cognitive aging is explained from different aspects in this paper.

  8. Neurofeedback of slow cortical potentials: neural mechanisms and feasibility of a placebo-controlled design in healthy adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger eGevensleben

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available To elucidate basic mechanisms underlying neurofeedback we investigated neural mechanisms of training of slow cortical potentials by considering EEG- and fMRI. Additionally, we analyzed the feasibility of a double-blind, placebo-controlled design in NF research based on regulation performance during treatment sessions and self-assessment of the participants. Twenty healthy adults participated in 16 sessions of SCP training: 9 participants received regular SCP training, 11 participants received sham feedback. At three time points (pre, intermediate, post fMRI and EEG/ERP-measurements were conducted during a continuous performance test (CPT. Performance-data during the sessions (regulation performance in the treatment group and the placebo group were analyzed. Analysis of EEG-activity revealed in the SCP group a strong enhancement of the CNV (electrode Cz at the intermediate assessment, followed by a decrease back to baseline at the post-treatment assessment. In contrast, in the placebo group a continuous but smaller increase of the CNV could be obtained from pre to post assessment. The increase of the CNV in the SCP group at intermediate testing was superior to the enhancement in the placebo group. The changes of the CNV were accompanied by a continuous improvement in the test performance of the CPT from pre to intermediate to post assessment comparable in both groups. The change of the CNV in the SCP group is interpreted as an indicator of neural plasticity and efficiency while an increase of the CNV in the placebo group might reflect learning and improved timing due to the frequent task repetition.In the fMRI analysis evidence was obtained for neuronal plasticity. After regular SCP neurofeedback activation in the posterior parietal cortex decreased from the pre- to the intermediate measurement and increased again in the post measurement, inversely following the U-shaped increase and decrease of the tCNV EEG amplitude in the SCP-trained group

  9. A Neural Mechanism for Surprise-related Interruptions of Visuospatial Working Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessel, Jan R

    2016-11-30

    Surprising perceptual events recruit a fronto-basal ganglia mechanism for inhibition, which suppresses motor activity following surprise. A recent study found that this inhibitory mechanism also disrupts the maintenance of verbal working memory (WM) after surprising tones. However, it is unclear whether this same mechanism also relates to surprise-related interruptions of non-verbal WM. We tested this hypothesis using a change-detection task, in which surprising tones impaired visuospatial WM. Participants also performed a stop-signal task (SST). We used independent component analysis and single-trial scalp-electroencephalogram to test whether the same inhibitory mechanism that reflects motor inhibition in the SST relates to surprise-related visuospatial WM decrements, as was the case for verbal WM. As expected, surprising tones elicited activity of the inhibitory mechanism, and this activity correlated strongly with the trial-by-trial level of surprise. However, unlike for verbal WM, the activity of this mechanism was unrelated to visuospatial WM accuracy. Instead, inhibition-independent activity that immediately succeeded the inhibitory mechanism was increased when visuospatial WM was disrupted. This shows that surprise-related interruptions of visuospatial WM are not effected by the same inhibitory mechanism that interrupts verbal WM, and instead provides evidence for a 2-stage model of distraction.

  10. Mindfulness Meditation-Based Pain Relief Employs Different Neural Mechanisms Than Placebo and Sham Mindfulness Meditation-Induced Analgesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, Nichole M.; Farris, Suzan R.; Ray, Jenna N.; Jung, Youngkyoo; McHaffie, John G.; Coghill, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Mindfulness meditation reduces pain in experimental and clinical settings. However, it remains unknown whether mindfulness meditation engages pain-relieving mechanisms other than those associated with the placebo effect (e.g., conditioning, psychosocial context, beliefs). To determine whether the analgesic mechanisms of mindfulness meditation are different from placebo, we randomly assigned 75 healthy, human volunteers to 4 d of the following: (1) mindfulness meditation, (2) placebo conditioning, (3) sham mindfulness meditation, or (4) book-listening control intervention. We assessed intervention efficacy using psychophysical evaluation of experimental pain and functional neuroimaging. Importantly, all cognitive manipulations (i.e., mindfulness meditation, placebo conditioning, sham mindfulness meditation) significantly attenuated pain intensity and unpleasantness ratings when compared to rest and the control condition (p meditation reduced pain intensity (p = 0.032) and pain unpleasantness (p meditation also reduced pain intensity (p = 0.030) and pain unpleasantness (p = 0.043) ratings more than sham mindfulness meditation. Mindfulness-meditation-related pain relief was associated with greater activation in brain regions associated with the cognitive modulation of pain, including the orbitofrontal, subgenual anterior cingulate, and anterior insular cortex. In contrast, placebo analgesia was associated with activation of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and deactivation of sensory processing regions (secondary somatosensory cortex). Sham mindfulness meditation-induced analgesia was not correlated with significant neural activity, but rather by greater reductions in respiration rate. This study is the first to demonstrate that mindfulness-related pain relief is mechanistically distinct from placebo analgesia. The elucidation of this distinction confirms the existence of multiple, cognitively driven, supraspinal mechanisms for pain modulation. SIGNIFICANCE

  11. Stability of Neural Firing in the Trigeminal Nuclei under Mechanical Whisker Stimulation

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    Valeri A. Makarov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sensory information handling is an essentially nonstationary process even under a periodic stimulation. We show how the time evolution of ridges in the wavelet spectrum of spike trains can be used for quantification of the dynamical stability of the neuronal responses to a stimulus. We employ this method to study neuronal responses in trigeminal nuclei of the rat provoked by tactile whisker stimulation. Neurons from principalis (Pr5 and interpolaris (Sp5i show the maximal stability at the intermediate (50 ms stimulus duration, whereas Sp5o cells “prefer” shorter (10 ms stimulation. We also show that neurons in all three nuclei can perform as stimulus frequency filters. The response stability of about 33% of cells exhibits low-pass frequency dynamics. About 57% of cells have band-pass dynamics with the optimal frequency at 5 Hz for Pr5 and Sp5i, and 4 Hz for Sp5o, and the remaining 10% show no prominent dependence on the stimulus frequency. This suggests that the neural coding scheme in trigeminal nuclei is not fixed, but instead it adapts to the stimulus characteristics.

  12. An fMRI study on the neural mechanisms of hyperalgesic nocebo effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Jian; Gollub, Randy L.; Polich, Ginger; Kirsch, Irving; LaViolette, Peter; Vangel, Mark; Rosen, Bruce; Kaptchuk, Ted J

    2008-01-01

    Summary Previous studies suggest that nocebo effects, sometimes termed “negative placebo effects,” can contribute appreciably to a variety of medical symptoms and adverse events in clinical trials and medical care. In this study, using a within-subject design, we combined fMRI and an expectation / conditioning manipulation model to investigate the neural substrates of nocebo hyperalgesia using heat pain on the right forearm. Thirteen subjects completed the study. Results showed that after administering inert treatment, subjective pain intensity ratings increased significantly more on nocebo regions as compared with the control regions where no expectancy / conditioning manipulation was performed. fMRI analysis of hyperalgesic nocebo responses to identical calibrated noxious stimuli showed signal increases in brain regions including bilateral dorsal ACC, insula, superior temporal gyrus; left frontal and parietal operculum, medial frontal gyrus, orbital prefrontal cortex, superior parietal lobule and hippocampus; right claustrum / putamen, lateral prefrontal gyrus and middle temporal gyrus. Functional connectivity analysis of spontaneous resting-state fMRI data from the same cohort of subjects showed a correlation between two seed regions (frontal operculum and left hippocampus) pain network including bilateral insula, operculum, ACC, and left S1 / M1. In conclusion, we found evidence that nocebo hyperalgesia may be predominantly produced through an affective-cognitive pain pathway (medial pain system) and the left hippocampus may play an important role in this process. PMID:19052227

  13. Music training relates to the development of neural mechanisms of selective auditory attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strait, Dana L; Slater, Jessica; O'Connell, Samantha; Kraus, Nina

    2015-04-01

    Selective attention decreases trial-to-trial variability in cortical auditory-evoked activity. This effect increases over the course of maturation, potentially reflecting the gradual development of selective attention and inhibitory control. Work in adults indicates that music training may alter the development of this neural response characteristic, especially over brain regions associated with executive control: in adult musicians, attention decreases variability in auditory-evoked responses recorded over prefrontal cortex to a greater extent than in nonmusicians. We aimed to determine whether this musician-associated effect emerges during childhood, when selective attention and inhibitory control are under development. We compared cortical auditory-evoked variability to attended and ignored speech streams in musicians and nonmusicians across three age groups: preschoolers, school-aged children and young adults. Results reveal that childhood music training is associated with reduced auditory-evoked response variability recorded over prefrontal cortex during selective auditory attention in school-aged child and adult musicians. Preschoolers, on the other hand, demonstrate no impact of selective attention on cortical response variability and no musician distinctions. This finding is consistent with the gradual emergence of attention during this period and may suggest no pre-existing differences in this attention-related cortical metric between children who undergo music training and those who do not.

  14. Neural mechanisms of genetic risk for impulsivity and violence in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Buckholtz, Joshua W; Kolachana, Bhaskar; R Hariri, Ahmad; Pezawas, Lukas; Blasi, Giuseppe; Wabnitz, Ashley; Honea, Robyn; Verchinski, Beth; Callicott, Joseph H; Egan, Michael; Mattay, Venkata; Weinberger, Daniel R

    2006-04-18

    Neurobiological factors contributing to violence in humans remain poorly understood. One approach to this question is examining allelic variation in the X-linked monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) gene, previously associated with impulsive aggression in animals and humans. Here, we have studied the impact of a common functional polymorphism in MAOA on brain structure and function assessed with MRI in a large sample of healthy human volunteers. We show that the low expression variant, associated with increased risk of violent behavior, predicted pronounced limbic volume reductions and hyperresponsive amygdala during emotional arousal, with diminished reactivity of regulatory prefrontal regions, compared with the high expression allele. In men, the low expression allele is also associated with changes in orbitofrontal volume, amygdala and hippocampus hyperreactivity during aversive recall, and impaired cingulate activation during cognitive inhibition. Our data identify differences in limbic circuitry for emotion regulation and cognitive control that may be involved in the association of MAOA with impulsive aggression, suggest neural systems-level effects of X-inactivation in human brain, and point toward potential targets for a biological approach toward violence.

  15. Sex differences in the neural mechanisms mediating addiction: a new synthesis and hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becker Jill B

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this review we propose that there are sex differences in how men and women enter onto the path that can lead to addiction. Males are more likely than females to engage in risky behaviors that include experimenting with drugs of abuse, and in susceptible individuals, they are drawn into the spiral that can eventually lead to addiction. Women and girls are more likely to begin taking drugs as self-medication to reduce stress or alleviate depression. For this reason women enter into the downward spiral further along the path to addiction, and so transition to addiction more rapidly. We propose that this sex difference is due, at least in part, to sex differences in the organization of the neural systems responsible for motivation and addiction. Additionally, we suggest that sex differences in these systems and their functioning are accentuated with addiction. In the current review we discuss historical, cultural, social and biological bases for sex differences in addiction with an emphasis on sex differences in the neurotransmitter systems that are implicated.

  16. Changes in neural mechanisms of cognitive control during the transition from late adolescence to young adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veroude, Kim; Jolles, Jelle; Croiset, Gerda; Krabbendam, Lydia

    2013-07-01

    The transition from late adolescence to young adulthood is marked by anatomical maturation of various brain regions. In parallel, defining life changes take place, such as entrance into college. Up till now research has not focused on functional brain differences during this particular developmental stage. The current cross-sectional fMRI study investigates age differences in cognitive control by comparing late adolescents, 18-19 years old, with young adults, 23-25 years old. Seventy-four male and female medical students carried out a combined cognitive and emotional Stroop task. Overall, lateral frontoparietal and medial parietal activation was observed during cognitive interference resolution. Young adults showed stronger activation in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, left inferior frontal gyrus, left middle temporal gyrus and middle cingulate, compared to late adolescents. During emotional interference resolution, the left precentral and postcentral gyrus were involved across age and sex. The dorsomedial prefrontal cortex and precuneus were activated more in young adults than in late adolescents. No sex-related differences were found in this homogeneous sample. The results suggest that the neural bases of cognitive control continue to change between late adolescence and young adulthood.

  17. Neural systems for sign language production: mechanisms supporting lexical selection, phonological encoding, and articulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San José-Robertson, Lucila; Corina, David P; Ackerman, Debra; Guillemin, Andre; Braun, Allen R

    2004-11-01

    Overt production of ASL signs was evaluated using H(2)(15)O PET to differentiate brain systems that support sign language production at the lexical-selection and phonological-articulatory levels. Subjects were 16 right-handed, congenitally deaf native ASL signers (10 women, six men; age 20 to 29 years). Scans were performed while subjects (1) passively viewed ASL nouns, (2) repeated nouns, (3) generated verbs in response to these nouns, (4) passively viewed videotaped segments depicting transitive actions, and (5) generated a verb to describe these actions. Conjunctions between the two verb-generation tasks revealed left-lateralized activation of perisylvian, frontal, and subcortical regions commonly observed in spoken language generation tasks and implicated in processes of semantic feature binding and lexical selection. Analysis of noun repetition minus viewing condition revealed activation of distinct systems supporting phonological encoding and articulation, including bilateral activation of sensorimotor areas and association cortices in the temporal, parietal, and occipital lobes. In addition, lexical-selection and articulatory processes were associated with activation of different corticostriatal-thalamocortical circuits: articulation with activation of the motor, and lexical-selection with activation of the prefrontal circuits, respectively. The results collectively provide insight into dissociable neural systems underlying these psycholinguistic functions. In addition, activation of regions that are typically associated with the auditory system during sign production suggests that these regions may support modality-independent linguistic processes, or may indicate cross-modal plasticity within the deaf brain.

  18. Neural mechanisms underlying valence inferences to sound: The role of the right angular gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Fernando; Cross, Ian; Hawkins, Sarah; Gonzalez, Nadia; Docampo, Jorge; Bruno, Claudio; Stamatakis, Emmanuel Andreas

    2017-07-28

    We frequently infer others' intentions based on non-verbal auditory cues. Although the brain underpinnings of social cognition have been extensively studied, no empirical work has yet examined the impact of musical structure manipulation on the neural processing of emotional valence during mental state inferences. We used a novel sound-based theory-of-mind paradigm in which participants categorized stimuli of different sensory dissonance level in terms of positive/negative valence. Whilst consistent with previous studies which propose facilitated encoding of consonances, our results demonstrated that distinct levels of consonance/dissonance elicited differential influences on the right angular gyrus, an area implicated in mental state attribution and attention reorienting processes. Functional and effective connectivity analyses further showed that consonances modulated a specific inhibitory interaction from associative memory to mental state attribution substrates. Following evidence suggesting that individuals with autism may process social affective cues differently, we assessed the relationship between participants' task performance and self-reported autistic traits in clinically typical adults. Higher scores on the social cognition scales of the AQ were associated with deficits in recognising positive valence in consonant sound cues. These findings are discussed with respect to Bayesian perspectives on autistic perception, which highlight a functional failure to optimize precision in relation to prior beliefs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Neural mechanisms of reading facial emotions in young and older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Christina Ebner

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The ability to read and appropriately respond to emotions in others is central for successful social interaction. Young and older adults are better at identifying positive than negative facial expressions and expressions of young than older faces. Little, however, is known about the neural processes associated with reading different emotions, particularly in faces of different ages, in samples of young and older adults. During fMRI, young and older participants identified expressions in happy, neutral, and angry young and older faces. The results suggest a functional dissociation of ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC and dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC in reading facial emotions that is largely comparable in young and older adults: Both age groups showed greater vmPFC activity to happy compared to angry or neutral faces, which was positively correlated with expression identification for happy compared to angry faces. In contrast, both age groups showed greater activity in dmPFC to neutral or angry than happy faces which was negatively correlated with expression identification for neutral compared to happy faces. A similar region of dmPFC showed greater activity for older than young faces, but no brain-behavior correlations. Greater vmPFC activity in the present study may reflect greater affective processing, involved in reading happy compared to neutral or angry faces. Greater dmPFC activity may reflect more cognitive control involved in decoding and/or regulating negative emotions associated with neutral or angry than happy, and older than young, faces.

  20. Neural mechanisms of cognitive control: an integrative model of stroop task performance and FMRI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herd, Seth A; Banich, Marie T; O'Reilly, Randall C

    2006-01-01

    We address the connection between conceptual knowledge and cognitive control using a neural network model. This model extends a widely held theory of cognitive control [Cohen, J. D., Dunbar, K., & McClelland, J. L. On the control of automatic processes: A parallel distributed processing model of the Stroop effect. Psychological Review, 97, 332-361, 1990] so that it can explain new empirical findings. Leveraging other computational modeling work, we hypothesize that representations used for task control are recruited from preexisting representations for categories, such as the concept of color relevant to the Stroop task we model here. This hypothesis allows the model to account for otherwise puzzling fMRI results, such as increased activity in brain regions processing to-be-ignored information. In addition, biologically motivated changes in the model's pattern of connectivity show how global competition can arise when inhibition is strictly local, as it seems to be in the cortex. We also discuss the potential for this theory to unify models of task control with other forms of attention.

  1. Computations Underlying Social Hierarchy Learning: Distinct Neural Mechanisms for Updating and Representing Self-Relevant Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaran, Dharshan; Banino, Andrea; Blundell, Charles; Hassabis, Demis; Dayan, Peter

    2016-12-07

    Knowledge about social hierarchies organizes human behavior, yet we understand little about the underlying computations. Here we show that a Bayesian inference scheme, which tracks the power of individuals, better captures behavioral and neural data compared with a reinforcement learning model inspired by rating systems used in games such as chess. We provide evidence that the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) selectively mediates the updating of knowledge about one's own hierarchy, as opposed to that of another individual, a process that underpinned successful performance and involved functional interactions with the amygdala and hippocampus. In contrast, we observed domain-general coding of rank in the amygdala and hippocampus, even when the task did not require it. Our findings reveal the computations underlying a core aspect of social cognition and provide new evidence that self-relevant information may indeed be afforded a unique representational status in the brain. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Disentangling the neural mechanisms involved in Hinduism- and Buddhism-related meditations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasino, Barbara; Chiesa, Alberto; Fabbro, Franco

    2014-10-01

    The most diffuse forms of meditation derive from Hinduism and Buddhism spiritual traditions. Different cognitive processes are set in place to reach these meditation states. According to an historical-philological hypothesis (Wynne, 2009) the two forms of meditation could be disentangled. While mindfulness is the focus of Buddhist meditation reached by focusing sustained attention on the body, on breathing and on the content of the thoughts, reaching an ineffable state of nothigness accompanied by a loss of sense of self and duality (Samadhi) is the main focus of Hinduism-inspired meditation. It is possible that these different practices activate separate brain networks. We tested this hypothesis by conducting an activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies. The network related to Buddhism-inspired meditation (16 experiments, 263 subjects, and 96 activation foci) included activations in some frontal lobe structures associated with executive attention, possibly confirming the fundamental role of mindfulness shared by many Buddhist meditations. By contrast, the network related to Hinduism-inspired meditation (8 experiments, 54 activation foci and 66 subjects) triggered a left lateralized network of areas including the postcentral gyrus, the superior parietal lobe, the hippocampus and the right middle cingulate cortex. The dissociation between anterior and posterior networks support the notion that different meditation styles and traditions are characterized by different patterns of neural activation. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Different mechanisms must be considered to explain the increase in hippocampal neural precursor cell proliferation by physical activity

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    Rupert W Overall

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The number of proliferating neural precursor cells in the adult hippocampus is strongly increased by physical activity. The mechanisms through which this behavioral stimulus induces cell proliferation, however, are not yet understood. In fact, even the mode of proliferation of the stem and progenitor cells is not exactly known. Evidence exists for several mechanisms including cell cycle shortening, reduced cell death and stem cell recruitment, but as yet no model can account for all observations. An appreciation of how the cells proliferate, however, is crucial to our ability to model the neurogenic process and predict its behavior in response to pro-neurogenic stimuli. In a recent study, we addressed modulation of the cell cycle length as one possible mode of regulation of precursor cell proliferation in running mice. Our results indicated that the observed increase in number of proliferating cells could not be explained through a shortening of the cell cycle. We must therefore consider other mechanisms by which physical activity leads to enhanced precursor cell proliferation. Here we review the evidence for and against several different hypotheses and discuss the implications for future research in the field.

  4. Integrating resource defence theory with a neural nonapeptide pathway to explain territory-based mating systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldfield, Ronald G; Harris, Rayna M; Hofmann, Hans A

    2015-01-01

    The ultimate-level factors that drive the evolution of mating systems have been well studied, but an evolutionarily conserved neural mechanism involved in shaping behaviour and social organization across species has remained elusive. Here, we review studies that have investigated the role of neural arginine vasopressin (AVP), vasotocin (AVT), and their receptor V1a in mediating variation in territorial behaviour. First, we discuss how aggression and territoriality are a function of population density in an inverted-U relationship according to resource defence theory, and how territoriality influences some mating systems. Next, we find that neural AVP, AVT, and V1a expression, especially in one particular neural circuit involving the lateral septum of the forebrain, are associated with territorial behaviour in males of diverse species, most likely due to their role in enhancing social cognition. Then we review studies that examined multiple species and find that neural AVP, AVT, and V1a expression is associated with territory size in mammals and fishes. Because territoriality plays an important role in shaping mating systems in many species, we present the idea that neural AVP, AVT, and V1a expression that is selected to mediate territory size may also influence the evolution of different mating systems. Future research that interprets proximate-level neuro-molecular mechanisms in the context of ultimate-level ecological theory may provide deep insight into the brain-behaviour relationships that underlie the diversity of social organization and mating systems seen across the animal kingdom.

  5. Evidence of involvement of central neural mechanisms in generating fibromyalgia pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staud, Roland

    2002-08-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) is characterized by widespread pain, fatigue, sleep abnormalities, and distress. Because FMS lacks consistent evidence of tissue abnormalities, recent investigations have focused on central nervous system mechanisms of pain. Abnormal temporal summation of second pain (wind-up) and central sensitization have been described recently in patients with FMS. Wind-up and central sensitization, which rely on central pain mechanisms, occur after prolonged C-nociceptor input and depend on activation of nociceptor-specific neurons and wide dynamic range neurons in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Other abnormal central pain mechanisms recently detected in patients with FMS include diffuse noxious inhibitory controls. These pain inhibitory mechanisms rely on spinal cord and supraspinal systems involving pain facilitatory and pain inhibitory pathways. Brain-imaging techniques that can detect neuronal activation after nociceptive stimuli have provided additional evidence for abnormal central pain mechanisms in FMS. Brain images have corroborated the augmented reported pain experience of patients with fibromyalgia during experimental pain stimuli. In addition, thalamic activity, which contributes significantly to pain processing, was decreased in fibromyalgia. However, central pain mechanisms of fibromyalgia may not depend exclusively on neuronal activation. Neuroglial activation has been found to play an important role in the induction and maintenance of chronic pain. These findings may have important implications for future research and the treatment of fibromyalgia pain.

  6. A developmental perspective on neuroeconomic mechanisms of contingency management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanger, Catherine; Budney, Alan J; Bickel, Warren K

    2013-06-01

    This paper provides a developmental overview of relevant theory and research on delay discounting and neuroeconomics, and their implications for contingency management (CM) approaches to treatment. Recent advances in the neuroscience of decision making have the potential to inform treatment development for adolescent substance use in general, and CM treatments in particular. CM interventions may be informed by research on delay discounting, a type of decision making that reflects how individuals value immediate versus delayed rewards. Delay discounting reliably distinguishes substance abusers from nonabusers and is a significant predictor of individual differences in response to substance use treatments. Discounting may also be important in predicting response to CM, as CM attempts to directly influence this decision-making process, shifting the preference from the immediate rewards of use to delayed rewards for choosing not to use. Multiple neural processes underlie decision making, and those processes have implications for adolescent substance abuse. There are significant neurodevelopmental processes that differentiate adolescents from adults. These processes are implicated in delay discounting, suggesting that adolescence may reflect a period of plasticity in temporal decision making. Understanding the neural mechanisms of delay discounting has led to promising working memory interventions directly targeting the executive functions that underlie individual choices. These interventions may be particularly helpful in combination with CM interventions that offer immediate rewards for brief periods of abstinence, and may show particular benefit in adolescence due to the heightened neural plasticity of systems that underlie temporal discounting in adolescence.

  7. Neural mechanisms underlying catastrophic failure in human-machine interaction during aerial navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saproo, Sameer; Shih, Victor; Jangraw, David C.; Sajda, Paul

    2016-12-01

    Objective. We investigated the neural correlates of workload buildup in a fine visuomotor task called the boundary avoidance task (BAT). The BAT has been known to induce naturally occurring failures of human-machine coupling in high performance aircraft that can potentially lead to a crash—these failures are termed pilot induced oscillations (PIOs). Approach. We recorded EEG and pupillometry data from human subjects engaged in a flight BAT simulated within a virtual 3D environment. Main results. We find that workload buildup in a BAT can be successfully decoded from oscillatory features in the electroencephalogram (EEG). Information in delta, theta, alpha, beta, and gamma spectral bands of the EEG all contribute to successful decoding, however gamma band activity with a lateralized somatosensory topography has the highest contribution, while theta band activity with a fronto-central topography has the most robust contribution in terms of real-world usability. We show that the output of the spectral decoder can be used to predict PIO susceptibility. We also find that workload buildup in the task induces pupil dilation, the magnitude of which is significantly correlated with the magnitude of the decoded EEG signals. These results suggest that PIOs may result from the dysregulation of cortical networks such as the locus coeruleus (LC)—anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) circuit. Significance. Our findings may generalize to similar control failures in other cases of tight man-machine coupling where gains and latencies in the control system must be inferred and compensated for by the human operators. A closed-loop intervention using neurophysiological decoding of workload buildup that targets the LC-ACC circuit may positively impact operator performance in such situations.

  8. In search of neural mechanisms of mirror neuron dysfunction in schizophrenia: resting state functional connectivity approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaytseva, Yuliya; Bendova, Marie; Garakh, Zhanna; Tintera, Jaroslav; Rydlo, Jan; Spaniel, Filip; Horacek, Jiri

    2015-09-01

    It has been repeatedly shown that schizophrenia patients have immense alterations in goal-directed behaviour, social cognition, and social interactions, cognitive abilities that are presumably driven by the mirror neurons system (MNS). However, the neural bases of these deficits still remain unclear. Along with the task-related fMRI and EEG research tapping into the mirror neuron system, the characteristics of the resting state activity in the particular areas that encompass mirror neurons might be of interest as they obviously determine the baseline of the neuronal activity. Using resting state fMRI, we investigated resting state functional connectivity (FC) in four predefined brain structures, ROIs (inferior frontal gyrus, superior parietal lobule, premotor cortex and superior temporal gyrus), known for their mirror neurons activity, in 12 patients with first psychotic episode and 12 matched healthy individuals. As a specific hypothesis, based on the knowledge of the anatomical inputs of thalamus to all preselected ROIs, we have investigated the FC between thalamus and the ROIs. Of all ROIs included, seed-to-voxel connectivity analysis revealed significantly decreased FC only in left posterior superior temporal gyrus (STG) and the areas in visual cortex and cerebellum in patients as compared to controls. Using ROI-to-ROI analysis (thalamus and selected ROIs), we have found an increased FC of STG and bilateral thalamus whereas the FC of these areas was decreased in controls. Our results suggest that: (1) schizophrenia patients exhibit FC of STG which corresponds to the previously reported changes of superior temporal gyrus in schizophrenia and might contribute to the disturbances of specific functions, such as emotional processing or spatial awareness; (2) as the thalamus plays a pivotal role in the sensory gating, providing the filtering of the redundant stimulation, the observed hyperconnectivity between the thalami and the STGs in patients with schizophrenia

  9. Differences in the Neural Mechanisms of Selective Attention in Children from Different Socioeconomic Backgrounds: An Event-Related Brain Potential Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Courtney; Lauinger, Brittni; Neville, Helen

    2009-01-01

    Previous research indicates that children from lower socioeconomic backgrounds show deficits in aspects of attention, including a reduced ability to filter irrelevant information and to suppress prepotent responses. However, less is known about the neural mechanisms of group differences in attention, which could reveal the stages of processing at…

  10. Lifelong bilingualism and neural reserve against Alzheimer's disease: a review of findings and potential mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Brian T

    2015-03-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive brain disorder that initially affects medial temporal lobe circuitry and memory functions. Current drug treatments have only modest effects on the symptomatic course of the disease. In contrast, a growing body of evidence suggests that lifelong bilingualism may delay the onset of clinical AD symptoms by several years. The purpose of the present review is to summarize evidence for bilingualism as a reserve variable against AD and discuss potential underlying neurocognitive mechanisms. Evidence is reviewed suggesting that bilingualism may delay clinical AD symptoms by protecting frontostriatal and frontoparietal executive control circuitry rather than medial temporal lobe memory circuitry. Cellular and molecular mechanisms that may contribute to bilingual cognitive reserve effects are discussed, including those that may affect neuronal metabolic functions, dynamic neuronal-glial interactions, vascular factors, myelin structure and neurochemical signaling. Future studies that may test some of these potential mechanisms of bilingual CR effects are proposed.

  11. Neural Mechanisms of Temporomandibular Joint and Masticatory Muscle Pain: A Possible Role for Peripheral Glutamate Receptor Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David K Lam

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present review is to correlate recent knowledge of the role of peripheral ionotropic glutamate receptors in the temporomandibular joint and muscle pain from animal and human experimental pain models with findings in patients. Chronic pain is common, and many people suffer from chronic pain conditions involving deep craniofacial tissues such as temporomandibular disorders or fibromyalgia. Animal and human studies have indicated that the activation of peripheral ionotropic glutamate receptors in deep craniofacial tissues may contribute to muscle and temporomandibular joint pain and that sex differences in the activation of glutamate receptors may be involved in the female predominance in temporomandibular disorders and fibromyalgia. A peripheral mechanism involving autocrine and/or paracrine regulation of nociceptive neuronal excitability via injury or inflammation-induced release of glutamate into peripheral tissues that may contribute to the development of craniofacial pain is proposed.

  12. An Adaptive Neural Mechanism with a Lizard Ear Model for Binaural Acoustic Tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaikh, Danish; Manoonpong, Poramate

    2016-01-01

    mechanism uses to learn the target’s velocity via fast correlation-based unsupervised learning. Simulation results for tracking a pure tone acoustic target moving along a semi-circular trajectory validate our approach. Three different angular velocities in three separate trials were employed...

  13. Bilateral Strength Deficit Is Not Neural in Origin; Rather Due to Dynamometer Mechanical Configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoneau-Buessinger, Emilie; Leteneur, Sébastien; Toumi, Anis; Dessurne, Alexandra; Gabrielli, François; Barbier, Franck; Jakobi, Jennifer M

    2015-01-01

    During maximal contractions, the sum of forces exerted by homonymous muscles unilaterally is typically higher than the sum of forces exerted by the same muscles bilaterally. However, the underlying mechanism(s) of this phenomenon, which is known as the bilateral strength deficit, remain equivocal. One potential factor that has received minimal attention is the contribution of body adjustments to bilateral and unilateral force production. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the plantar-flexors in an innovative dynamometer that permitted the influence of torque from body adjustments to be adapted. Participants were identically positioned between two setup configurations where torques generated from body adjustments were included within the net ankle torque (locked-unit) or independent of the ankle (open-unit). Twenty healthy adult males performed unilateral and bilateral maximal voluntary isometric plantar-flexion contractions using the dynamometer in the open and locked-unit mechanical configurations. While there was a significant bilateral strength deficit in the locked-unit (p = 0.01), it was not evident in the open-unit (p = 0.07). In the locked-unit, unilateral torque was greater than in the open-unit (p0.05). This study revealed that the mechanical configuration of the dynamometer and then the body adjustments caused the observation of a bilateral strength deficit.

  14. Bilateral Strength Deficit Is Not Neural in Origin; Rather Due to Dynamometer Mechanical Configuration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Simoneau-Buessinger

    Full Text Available During maximal contractions, the sum of forces exerted by homonymous muscles unilaterally is typically higher than the sum of forces exerted by the same muscles bilaterally. However, the underlying mechanism(s of this phenomenon, which is known as the bilateral strength deficit, remain equivocal. One potential factor that has received minimal attention is the contribution of body adjustments to bilateral and unilateral force production. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the plantar-flexors in an innovative dynamometer that permitted the influence of torque from body adjustments to be adapted. Participants were identically positioned between two setup configurations where torques generated from body adjustments were included within the net ankle torque (locked-unit or independent of the ankle (open-unit. Twenty healthy adult males performed unilateral and bilateral maximal voluntary isometric plantar-flexion contractions using the dynamometer in the open and locked-unit mechanical configurations. While there was a significant bilateral strength deficit in the locked-unit (p = 0.01, it was not evident in the open-unit (p = 0.07. In the locked-unit, unilateral torque was greater than in the open-unit (p0.05. This study revealed that the mechanical configuration of the dynamometer and then the body adjustments caused the observation of a bilateral strength deficit.

  15. Mechanisms of peptide YY release induced by an intraduodenal meal in rats: neural regulation by proximal gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu-Cheng, X; Anini, Y; Chariot, J; Castex, N; Galmiche, J P; Rozé, C

    1997-03-01

    Peptide YY (PYY) release in anaesthetized rats was studied during the 2 h following the intraduodenal administration of a semi-liquid meal of 21 kJ. Surgical and pharmacological manipulations were performed in order to analyse the mechanisms of PYY release. Postprandial PYY release was suppressed or strongly decreased by caecocolonectomy, truncal vagotomy, tetrodotoxin, hexamethonium, sensory denervation by perivagal capsaicin, and by the NO-synthase inhibitor L-N-arginine methyl ester, while atropine, adrenergic blockers, antagonists of type-A or type-B cholecystokinin (CCK) receptors or bombesin receptors had no effect. Comparing the digestive transit of the semi-liquid meal with the amount of PYY contained in the small bowel wall showed that nutrients had not reached the area rich in cells containing PYY by 30 min, the time at which there was a large PYY release in plasma. By 120 min, the meal front had travelled 72% of the small intestine length, just beginning to reach the PYY-rich part of the ileum. We conclude that the main postprandial PYY release studied in this model comes from ileal and colonic L-cells indirectly stimulated through a neural mechanism originating in the proximal gut and involving sensory vagal fibres, nicotinic synapses and NO release, while CCK and bombesin do not seem to be physiologically involved.

  16. The effect of nutrition on the neural mechanisms potentially involved in melatonin-stimulated LH secretion in female Mediterranean goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarazaga, Luis A; Celi, Irma; Guzmán, José Luis; Malpaux, Benoît

    2011-12-01

    This research examines which neural mechanisms among the endogenous opioid, dopaminergic, serotonergic and excitatory amino acid systems are involved in the stimulation of LH secretion by melatonin implantation and their modulation by nutritional level. Female goats were distributed to two experimental groups that received either 1.1 (group H; n=24) or 0.7 (group L; n=24) times their nutritional maintenance requirements. Half of each group was implanted with melatonin after a long-day period. Plasma LH concentrations were measured twice per week. The effects of i.v. injections of naloxone, pimozide, cyproheptadine and N-methyl-d,l-aspartate (NMDA) on LH secretion were assessed the day before melatonin implantation and again on days 30 and 45. The functioning of all but the dopaminergic systems was clearly modified by the level of nutrition, melatonin implantation and time elapsed since implantation. Thirty days after implantation, naloxone increased LH concentrations irrespective of the level of nutrition (Pgoats (HM; Pnutritional level and melatonin implantation. Endogenous opioids seem to be most strongly involved in the inhibition of LH secretion on days 30 and 45 after melatonin implantation. However, the serotonergic mechanism appears to be most influenced by nutritional level.

  17. 人类外显记忆脑机制研究进展%The Neural Mechanisms of Human Explicit Memory Formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程灶火; 王力

    2002-01-01

    The fMRI and ERPs have played important role s in understanding neura l mechanisms of human memory. Recent studies have revealed that distinct regions in medial temporal and prefrontal areas exhibit more neural activity during suc cessful than unsuccessful memory formation. The results from different studies s uggest that relational and non-relational memories are mediated by distinct sub- regions in medial temporal and prefrontal cortex and there are extensive interac tions between them in a parallel and bi-directional fashions. Emotionally arousi ng events enhance neural activity in amygdala, which in turn may modulate proces sing in other brain regions responsible for declarative memory formation.

  18. Matching tutor to student: rules and mechanisms for efficient two-stage learning in neural circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Tesileanu, Tiberiu; Balasubramanian, Vijay

    2016-01-01

    Existing models of birdsong learning assume that brain area LMAN introduces variability into song for trial-and-error learning. Recent data suggest that LMAN also encodes a corrective bias driving short-term improvements in song. These later consolidate in area RA, a motor cortex analogue downstream of LMAN. We develop a new model of such two-stage learning. Using a stochastic gradient descent approach, we derive how 'tutor' circuits should match plasticity mechanisms in 'student' circuits for efficient learning. We further describe a reinforcement learning framework with which the tutor can build its teaching signal. We show that mismatching the tutor signal and plasticity mechanism can impair or abolish learning. Applied to birdsong, our results predict the temporal structure of the corrective bias from LMAN given a plasticity rule in RA. Our framework can be applied predictively to other paired brain areas showing two-stage learning.

  19. Neural mechanisms of transient neocortical beta rhythms: Converging evidence from humans, computational modeling, monkeys, and mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Maxwell A.; Lee, Shane; Law, Robert; Haegens, Saskia; Thorn, Catherine A.; Hämäläinen, Matti S.; Moore, Christopher I.; Jones, Stephanie R.

    2016-01-01

    Human neocortical 15–29-Hz beta oscillations are strong predictors of perceptual and motor performance. However, the mechanistic origin of beta in vivo is unknown, hindering understanding of its functional role. Combining human magnetoencephalography (MEG), computational modeling, and laminar recordings in animals, we present a new theory that accounts for the origin of spontaneous neocortical beta. In our MEG data, spontaneous beta activity from somatosensory and frontal cortex emerged as noncontinuous beta events typically lasting <150 ms with a stereotypical waveform. Computational modeling uniquely designed to infer the electrical currents underlying these signals showed that beta events could emerge from the integration of nearly synchronous bursts of excitatory synaptic drive targeting proximal and distal dendrites of pyramidal neurons, where the defining feature of a beta event was a strong distal drive that lasted one beta period (∼50 ms). This beta mechanism rigorously accounted for the beta event profiles; several other mechanisms did not. The spatial location of synaptic drive in the model to supragranular and infragranular layers was critical to the emergence of beta events and led to the prediction that beta events should be associated with a specific laminar current profile. Laminar recordings in somatosensory neocortex from anesthetized mice and awake monkeys supported these predictions, suggesting this beta mechanism is conserved across species and recording modalities. These findings make several predictions about optimal states for perceptual and motor performance and guide causal interventions to modulate beta for optimal function. PMID:27469163

  20. Tissue heterogeneity as a mechanism for localized neural stimulation by applied electric fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, P C [Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Sciences, University of Lisbon, 1749-016 Lisbon (Portugal); Correia, L [Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Sciences, University of Lisbon, 1749-016 Lisbon (Portugal); Salvador, R [Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Sciences, University of Lisbon, 1749-016 Lisbon (Portugal); Basser, P J [Section on Tissue Biophysics and Biomimetics, NICHD, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892-1428 (United States)

    2007-09-21

    We investigate the heterogeneity of electrical conductivity as a new mechanism to stimulate excitable tissues via applied electric fields. In particular, we show that stimulation of axons crossing internal boundaries can occur at boundaries where the electric conductivity of the volume conductor changes abruptly. The effectiveness of this and other stimulation mechanisms was compared by means of models and computer simulations in the context of transcranial magnetic stimulation. While, for a given stimulation intensity, the largest membrane depolarization occurred where an axon terminates or bends sharply in a high electric field region, a slightly smaller membrane depolarization, still sufficient to generate action potentials, also occurred at an internal boundary where the conductivity jumped from 0.143 S m{sup -1} to 0.333 S m{sup -1}, simulating a white-matter-grey-matter interface. Tissue heterogeneity can also give rise to local electric field gradients that are considerably stronger and more focal than those impressed by the stimulation coil and that can affect the membrane potential, albeit to a lesser extent than the two mechanisms mentioned above. Tissue heterogeneity may play an important role in electric and magnetic 'far-field' stimulation.

  1. Similar verbal memory impairments in schizophrenia and healthy aging. Implications for understanding of neural mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Henry; Bilker, Warren B

    2015-03-30

    Memory is impaired in schizophrenia patients but it is not clear whether this is specific to the illness and whether different types of memory (verbal and nonverbal) or memories in different cognitive domains (executive, object recognition) are similarly affected. To study relationships between memory impairments and schizophrenia we compared memory functions in 77 schizophrenia patients, 58 elderly healthy individuals and 41 young healthy individuals. Tests included verbal associative and logical memory and memory in executive and object recognition domains. We compared relationships of memory functions to each other and to other cognitive functions including psychomotor speed and verbal and spatial working memory. Compared to the young healthy group, schizophrenia patients and elderly healthy individuals showed similar severe impairment in logical memory and in the ability to learn new associations (NAL), and similar but less severe impairment in spatial working memory and executive and object memory. Verbal working memory was significantly more impaired in schizophrenia patients than in the healthy elderly. Verbal episodic memory impairment in schizophrenia may share common mechanisms with similar impairment in healthy aging. Impairment in verbal working memory in contrast may reflect mechanisms specific to schizophrenia. Study of verbal explicit memory impairment tapped by the NAL index may advance understanding of abnormal hippocampus dependent mechanisms common to schizophrenia and aging.

  2. A leg-local neural mechanism mediates the decision to search in stick insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Eva M; Hooper, Scott L; Schmidt, Joachim; Büschges, Ansgar

    2015-08-01

    In many animals, individual legs can either function independently, as in behaviors such as scratching or searching, or be used in coordinated patterns with other legs, as in walking or climbing. While the control of walking has been extensively investigated, the mechanisms mediating the behavioral choice to activate individual legs independently are poorly understood. We examined this issue in stick insects, in which each leg can independently produce a rhythmic searching motor pattern if it doesn't find a foothold [1-4]. We show here that one non-spiking interneuron, I4, controls searching behavior in individual legs. One I4 is present in each hemi-segment of the three thoracic ganglia [5, 6]. Search-inducing sensory input depolarizes I4. I4 activity was necessary and sufficient to initiate and maintain searching movements. When substrate contact was provided, I4 depolarization no longer induced searching. I4 therefore both integrates search-inducing sensory input and is gated out by other sensory input (substrate contact). Searching thus occurs only when it is behaviorally appropriate. I4 depolarization never elicited stepping. These data show that individual, locally activated neurons can mediate the behavioral choice to use individual legs independently. This mechanism may be particularly important in insects' front legs, which can function independently like vertebrate arms and hands [7]. Similar local command mechanisms that selectively activate the pattern generators controlling repeated functional units such as legs or body segments may be present in other systems.

  3. Sharpened cortical tuning and enhanced cortico-cortical communication contribute to the long-term neural mechanisms of visual motion perceptual learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nihong; Bi, Taiyong; Zhou, Tiangang; Li, Sheng; Liu, Zili; Fang, Fang

    2015-07-15

    Much has been debated about whether the neural plasticity mediating perceptual learning takes place at the sensory or decision-making stage in the brain. To investigate this, we trained human subjects in a visual motion direction discrimination task. Behavioral performance and BOLD signals were measured before, immediately after, and two weeks after training. Parallel to subjects' long-lasting behavioral improvement, the neural selectivity in V3A and the effective connectivity from V3A to IPS (intraparietal sulcus, a motion decision-making area) exhibited a persistent increase for the trained direction. Moreover, the improvement was well explained by a linear combination of the selectivity and connectivity increases. These findings suggest that the long-term neural mechanisms of motion perceptual learning are implemented by sharpening cortical tuning to trained stimuli at the sensory processing stage, as well as by optimizing the connections between sensory and decision-making areas in the brain.

  4. A model of interval timing by neural integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simen, Patrick; Balci, Fuat; de Souza, Laura; Cohen, Jonathan D; Holmes, Philip

    2011-06-22

    We show that simple assumptions about neural processing lead to a model of interval timing as a temporal integration process, in which a noisy firing-rate representation of time rises linearly on average toward a response threshold over the course of an interval. Our assumptions include: that neural spike trains are approximately independent Poisson processes, that correlations among them can be largely cancelled by balancing excitation and inhibition, that neural populations can act as integrators, and that the objective of timed behavior is maximal accuracy and minimal variance. The model accounts for a variety of physiological and behavioral findings in rodents, monkeys, and humans, including ramping firing rates between the onset of reward-predicting cues and the receipt of delayed rewards, and universally scale-invariant response time distributions in interval timing tasks. It furthermore makes specific, well-supported predictions about the skewness of these distributions, a feature of timing data that is usually ignored. The model also incorporates a rapid (potentially one-shot) duration-learning procedure. Human behavioral data support the learning rule's predictions regarding learning speed in sequences of timed responses. These results suggest that simple, integration-based models should play as prominent a role in interval timing theory as they do in theories of perceptual decision making, and that a common neural mechanism may underlie both types of behavior.

  5. Neural Mechanism of Restrained Eating%限制性饮食的神经机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周一舟; 陈红; 高笑

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduced the ERP and brain mechanism studies on the dimension of cognitive restraint and tendency toward disinhibitive eating respectively, and put forward the restrained model of "cool-hot" processing. Future stud-ies are also advanced.%本文分别从认知限制和去抑制进食倾向两个维度回顾了限制性饮食的ERP和脑成像研究,初步提出限制性饮食者对食物的“冷—热”加工模型,并对今后的研究提出了展望.

  6. Diagonal recursive neural network based wind power forecasting model with electromagnetism-like mechanism algorithm%基于EM-DRNN的风电功率预测模型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张智晟; 龚文杰; 于强; 常德政

    2012-01-01

    提出基于类电磁机制算法的对角递归神经网络的风电功率预测模型.对角递归神经网络属于动态递归神经网络,具有较好的动态性能;类电磁机制算法模拟电磁场中带电粒子间吸引与排斥机制,可进行全局优化,具有好的收敛性能.模型采用类电磁机制算法对对角递归神经网络进行优化,可避免使神经网络训练陷入局部最小点,提高模型的预测精度.仿真结果表明,模型可有效降低预测误差,获得满意的预测精度.%Diagonal recursive neural network based wind power forecasting model using electro-magnetism-like mechanism algorithm is constructed in this paper. The diagonal recursive neural network is contained in dynamic recursive neural network, which possesses good dynamic performance. Electromagnetism-like mechanism algorithm simulates attraction and repulsion mechanism for particles in the electromagnetic field. It possesses global optimization ability and good convergence performance. Diagonal recursive neural network is optimized by electromagnetism-like mechanism algorithm, which can avoid neural network to immerse in the local minimal points and improve the forecasting precision. The testing results show that the proposed forecasting mode can reduce forecasting error and obtain satisfactory forecasting precision.

  7. An artificial neural network model for the prediction of mechanical and barrier properties of biodegradable films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobrega, Marcelo Medre; Bona, Evandro; Yamashita, Fabio

    2013-10-01

    Nowadays, the production of biodegradable starch-based films is of great interest because of the growing environmental concerns regarding pollution and the need to reduce dependence on the plastics industry. A broad view of the role of different components, added to starch-based films to improve their properties, is required to guide the future development. The self-organizing maps (SOMs) provide comparisons that initially were complicated due to the large volume of the data. Furthermore, the construction of a model capable of predicting the mechanical and barrier properties of these films will accelerate the development of films with improved characteristics. The water vapor permeability (WVP) analysis using the SOM algorithm showed that the presence of glycerol is very important for films with low amounts of poly (butylene adipate co-terephthalate) and confirms the role of the equilibrium relative humidity in the determination of WVP. Considering the mechanical properties, the SOM analysis emphasizes the important role of poly (butylene adipate co-terephthalate) in thermoplastic starch based films. The properties of biodegradable films were predicted and optimized by using a multilayer perceptron coupled with a genetic algorithm, presenting a great correlation between the experimental and theoretical values with a maximum error of 24%. To improve the response of the model and to ensure the compatibility of the components more information will be necessary.

  8. Tinnitus Neural Mechanisms and Structural Changes in the Brain: The Contribution of Neuroimaging Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simonetti, Patricia

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Tinnitus is an abnormal perception of sound in the absence of an external stimulus. Chronic tinnitus usually has a high impact in many aspects of patients' lives, such as emotional stress, sleep disturbance, concentration difficulties, and so on. These strong reactions are usually attributed to central nervous system involvement. Neuroimaging has revealed the implication of brain structures in the auditory system. Objective This systematic review points out neuroimaging studies that contribute to identifying the structures involved in the pathophysiological mechanism of generation and persistence of various forms of tinnitus. Data Synthesis Functional imaging research reveals that tinnitus perception is associated with the involvement of the nonauditory brain areas, including the front parietal area; the limbic system, which consists of the anterior cingulate cortex, anterior insula, and amygdala; and the hippocampal and parahippocampal area. Conclusion The neuroimaging research confirms the involvement of the mechanisms of memory and cognition in the persistence of perception, anxiety, distress, and suffering associated with tinnitus.

  9. Rules and mechanisms for efficient two-stage learning in neural circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teşileanu, Tiberiu; Ölveczky, Bence; Balasubramanian, Vijay

    2017-01-01

    Trial-and-error learning requires evaluating variable actions and reinforcing successful variants. In songbirds, vocal exploration is induced by LMAN, the output of a basal ganglia-related circuit that also contributes a corrective bias to the vocal output. This bias is gradually consolidated in RA, a motor cortex analogue downstream of LMAN. We develop a new model of such two-stage learning. Using stochastic gradient descent, we derive how the activity in ‘tutor’ circuits (e.g., LMAN) should match plasticity mechanisms in ‘student’ circuits (e.g., RA) to achieve efficient learning. We further describe a reinforcement learning framework through which the tutor can build its teaching signal. We show that mismatches between the tutor signal and the plasticity mechanism can impair learning. Applied to birdsong, our results predict the temporal structure of the corrective bias from LMAN given a plasticity rule in RA. Our framework can be applied predictively to other paired brain areas showing two-stage learning. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20944.001 PMID:28374674

  10. Development of neural mechanisms of conflict and error processing during childhood: implications for self-regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checa, Purificación; Castellanos, M. C.; Abundis-Gutiérrez, Alicia; Rosario Rueda, M.

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of thoughts and behavior requires attention, particularly when there is conflict between alternative responses or when errors are to be prevented or corrected. Conflict monitoring and error processing are functions of the executive attention network, a neurocognitive system that greatly matures during childhood. In this study, we examined the development of brain mechanisms underlying conflict and error processing with event-related potentials (ERPs), and explored the relationship between brain function and individual differences in the ability to self-regulate behavior. Three groups of children aged 4–6, 7–9, and 10–13 years, and a group of adults performed a child-friendly version of the flanker task while ERPs were registered. Marked developmental changes were observed in both conflict processing and brain reactions to errors. After controlling by age, higher self-regulation skills are associated with smaller amplitude of the conflict effect but greater amplitude of the error-related negativity. Additionally, we found that electrophysiological measures of conflict and error monitoring predict individual differences in impulsivity and the capacity to delay gratification. These findings inform of brain mechanisms underlying the development of cognitive control and self-regulation. PMID:24795676

  11. A preconscious neural mechanism of hypnotically altered colors: a double case study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mika Koivisto

    Full Text Available Hypnotic suggestions may change the perceived color of objects. Given that chromatic stimulus information is processed rapidly and automatically by the visual system, how can hypnotic suggestions affect perceived colors in a seemingly immediate fashion? We studied the mechanisms of such color alterations by measuring electroencephalography in two highly suggestible participants as they perceived briefly presented visual shapes under posthypnotic color alternation suggestions such as "all the squares are blue". One participant consistently reported seeing the suggested colors. Her reports correlated with enhanced evoked upper beta-band activity (22 Hz 70-120 ms after stimulus in response to the shapes mentioned in the suggestion. This effect was not observed in a control condition where the participants merely tried to simulate the effects of the suggestion on behavior. The second participant neither reported color alterations nor showed the evoked beta activity, although her subjective experience and event-related potentials were changed by the suggestions. The results indicate a preconscious mechanism that first compares early visual input with a memory representation of the suggestion and consequently triggers the color alteration process in response to the objects specified by the suggestion. Conscious color experience is not purely the result of bottom-up processing but it can be modulated, at least in some individuals, by top-down factors such as hypnotic suggestions.

  12. A Neural Path Integration Mechanism for Adaptive Vector Navigation in Autonomous Agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldschmidt, Dennis; Dasgupta, Sakyasingha; Wörgötter, Florentin

    2015-01-01

    Animals show remarkable capabilities in navigating their habitat in a fully autonomous and energy-efficient way. In many species, these capabilities rely on a process called path integration, which enables them to estimate their current location and to find their way back home after long-distance......Animals show remarkable capabilities in navigating their habitat in a fully autonomous and energy-efficient way. In many species, these capabilities rely on a process called path integration, which enables them to estimate their current location and to find their way back home after long...... of autonomous agent navigation, but it also reproduces various aspects of animal navigation. Finally, we discuss how the proposed path integration mechanism may be used as a scaffold for spatial learning in terms of vector navigation....

  13. On Known Unknowns: Fluency and the Neural Mechanisms of Illusory Truth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Chun; Brashier, Nadia M; Wing, Erik A; Marsh, Elizabeth J; Cabeza, Roberto

    2016-05-01

    The "illusory truth" effect refers to the phenomenon whereby repetition of a statement increases its likelihood of being judged true. This phenomenon has important implications for how we come to believe oft-repeated information that may be misleading or unknown. Behavioral evidence indicates that fluency, the subjective ease experienced while processing information, underlies this effect. This suggests that illusory truth should be mediated by brain regions previously linked to fluency, such as the perirhinal cortex (PRC). To investigate this possibility, we scanned participants with fMRI while they rated the truth of unknown statements, half of which were presented earlier (i.e., repeated). The only brain region that showed an interaction between repetition and ratings of perceived truth was PRC, where activity increased with truth ratings for repeated, but not for new, statements. This finding supports the hypothesis that illusory truth is mediated by a fluency mechanism and further strengthens the link between PRC and fluency.

  14. Behavioral and neural Darwinism: selectionist function and mechanism in adaptive behavior dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, J J

    2010-05-01

    An evolutionary theory of behavior dynamics and a theory of neuronal group selection share a common selectionist framework. The theory of behavior dynamics instantiates abstractly the idea that behavior is selected by its consequences. It implements Darwinian principles of selection, reproduction, and mutation to generate adaptive behavior in virtual organisms. The behavior generated by the theory has been shown to be quantitatively indistinguishable from that of live organisms. The theory of neuronal group selection suggests a mechanism whereby the abstract principles of the evolutionary theory may be implemented in the nervous systems of biological organisms. According to this theory, groups of neurons subserving behavior may be selected by synaptic modifications that occur when the consequences of behavior activate value systems in the brain. Together, these theories constitute a framework for a comprehensive account of adaptive behavior that extends from brain function to the behavior of whole organisms in quantitative detail.

  15. Neural and hormonal mechanisms of reproductive-related arousal in fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forlano, Paul M; Bass, Andrew H

    2011-05-01

    The major classes of chemicals and brain pathways involved in sexual arousal in mammals are well studied and are thought to be of an ancient, evolutionarily conserved origin. Here we discuss what is known of these neurochemicals and brain circuits in fishes, the oldest and most species-rich group of vertebrates from which tetrapods arose over 350 million years ago. Highlighted are case studies in vocal species where well-delineated sensory and motor pathways underlying reproductive-related behaviors illustrate the diversity and evolution of brain mechanisms driving sexual motivation between (and within) sexes. Also discussed are evolutionary insights from the neurobiology and reproductive behavior of elasmobranch fishes, the most ancient lineage of jawed vertebrates, which are remarkably similar in their reproductive biology to terrestrial mammals.

  16. How social is error observation? The neural mechanisms underlying the observation of human and machine errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmet, Charlotte; Deschrijver, Eliane; Brass, Marcel

    2014-04-01

    Recently, it has been shown that the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) is involved in error execution as well as error observation. Based on this finding, it has been argued that recognizing each other's mistakes might rely on motor simulation. In the current functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we directly tested this hypothesis by investigating whether medial prefrontal activity in error observation is restricted to situations that enable simulation. To this aim, we compared brain activity related to the observation of errors that can be simulated (human errors) with brain activity related to errors that cannot be simulated (machine errors). We show that medial prefrontal activity is not only restricted to the observation of human errors but also occurs when observing errors of a machine. In addition, our data indicate that the MPFC reflects a domain general mechanism of monitoring violations of expectancies.

  17. Neurocognitive mechanisms underlying social learning in infancy: infants' neural processing of the effects of others' actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulus, Markus; Hunnius, Sabine; Bekkering, Harold

    2013-10-01

    Social transmission of knowledge is one of the reasons for human evolutionary success, and it has been suggested that already human infants possess eminent social learning abilities. However, nothing is known about the neurocognitive mechanisms that subserve infants' acquisition of novel action knowledge through the observation of other people's actions and their consequences in the physical world. In an electroencephalogram study on social learning in infancy, we demonstrate that 9-month-old infants represent the environmental effects of others' actions in their own motor system, although they never achieved these effects themselves before. The results provide first insights into the neurocognitive basis of human infants' unique ability for social learning of novel action knowledge.

  18. Application of hierarchical dissociated neural network in closed-loop hybrid system integrating biological and mechanical intelligence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongcheng Li

    Full Text Available Neural networks are considered the origin of intelligence in organisms. In this paper, a new design of an intelligent system merging biological intelligence with artificial intelligence was created. It was based on a neural controller bidirectionally connected to an actual mobile robot to implement a novel vehicle. Two types of experimental preparations were utilized as the neural controller including 'random' and '4Q' (cultured neurons artificially divided into four interconnected parts neural network. Compared to the random cultures, the '4Q' cultures presented absolutely different activities, and the robot controlled by the '4Q' network presented better capabilities in search tasks. Our results showed that neural cultures could be successfully employed to control an artificial agent; the robot performed better and better with the stimulus because of the short-term plasticity. A new framework is provided to investigate the bidirectional biological-artificial interface and develop new strategies for a future intelligent system using these simplified model systems.

  19. Application of hierarchical dissociated neural network in closed-loop hybrid system integrating biological and mechanical intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongcheng; Sun, Rong; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Yuechao; Li, Hongyi

    2015-01-01

    Neural networks are considered the origin of intelligence in organisms. In this paper, a new design of an intelligent system merging biological intelligence with artificial intelligence was created. It was based on a neural controller bidirectionally connected to an actual mobile robot to implement a novel vehicle. Two types of experimental preparations were utilized as the neural controller including 'random' and '4Q' (cultured neurons artificially divided into four interconnected parts) neural network. Compared to the random cultures, the '4Q' cultures presented absolutely different activities, and the robot controlled by the '4Q' network presented better capabilities in search tasks. Our results showed that neural cultures could be successfully employed to control an artificial agent; the robot performed better and better with the stimulus because of the short-term plasticity. A new framework is provided to investigate the bidirectional biological-artificial interface and develop new strategies for a future intelligent system using these simplified model systems.

  20. Shared Neural Mechanisms for the Prediction of Own and Partner Musical Sequences after Short-term Piano Duet Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappe, Claudia; Bodeck, Sabine; Lappe, Markus; Pantev, Christo

    2017-01-01

    Predictive mechanisms in the human brain can be investigated using markers for prediction violations like the mismatch negativity (MMN). Short-term piano training increases the MMN for melodic and rhythmic deviations in the training material. This increase occurs only when the material is actually played, not when it is only perceived through listening, suggesting that learning predictions about upcoming musical events are derived from motor involvement. However, music is often performed in concert with others. In this case, predictions about upcoming actions from a partner are a crucial part of the performance. In the present experiment, we use magnetoencephalography (MEG) to measure MMNs to deviations in one's own and a partner's musical material after both engaged in musical duet training. Event-related field (ERF) results revealed that the MMN increased significantly for own and partner material suggesting a neural representation of the partner's part in a duet situation. Source analysis using beamforming revealed common activations in auditory, inferior frontal, and parietal areas, similar to previous results for single players, but also a pronounced contribution from the cerebellum. In addition, activation of the precuneus and the medial frontal cortex was observed, presumably related to the need to distinguish between own and partner material.

  1. Neural mechanisms underlying the effects of face-based affective signals on memory for faces: a tentative model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukiura, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    In our daily lives, we form some impressions of other people. Although those impressions are affected by many factors, face-based affective signals such as facial expression, facial attractiveness, or trustworthiness are important. Previous psychological studies have demonstrated the impact of facial impressions on remembering other people, but little is known about the neural mechanisms underlying this psychological process. The purpose of this article is to review recent functional MRI (fMRI) studies to investigate the effects of face-based affective signals including facial expression, facial attractiveness, and trustworthiness on memory for faces, and to propose a tentative concept for understanding this affective-cognitive interaction. On the basis of the aforementioned research, three brain regions are potentially involved in the processing of face-based affective signals. The first candidate is the amygdala, where activity is generally modulated by both affectively positive and negative signals from faces. Activity in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), as the second candidate, increases as a function of perceived positive signals from faces; whereas activity in the insular cortex, as the third candidate, reflects a function of face-based negative signals. In addition, neuroscientific studies have reported that the three regions are functionally connected to the memory-related hippocampal regions. These findings suggest that the effects of face-based affective signals on memory for faces could be modulated by interactions between the regions associated with the processing of face-based affective signals and the hippocampus as a memory-related region. PMID:22837740

  2. Stochastic slowly adapting ionic currents may provide a decorrelation mechanism for neural oscillators by causing wander in the intrinsic period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Sharon E; Butera, Robert J; Canavier, Carmen C

    2016-09-01

    Oscillatory neurons integrate their synaptic inputs in fundamentally different ways than normally quiescent neurons. We show that the oscillation period of invertebrate endogenous pacemaker neurons wanders, producing random fluctuations in the interspike intervals (ISI) on a time scale of seconds to minutes, which decorrelates pairs of neurons in hybrid circuits constructed using the dynamic clamp. The autocorrelation of the ISI sequence remained high for many ISIs, but the autocorrelation of the ΔISI series had on average a single nonzero value, which was negative at a lag of one interval. We reproduced these results using a simple integrate and fire (IF) model with a stochastic population of channels carrying an adaptation current with a stochastic component that was integrated with a slow time scale, suggesting that a similar population of channels underlies the observed wander in the period. Using autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) models, we found that a single integrator and a single moving average with a negative coefficient could simulate both the experimental data and the IF model. Feeding white noise into an integrator with a slow time constant is sufficient to produce the autocorrelation structure of the ISI series. Moreover, the moving average clearly accounted for the autocorrelation structure of the ΔISI series and is biophysically implemented in the IF model using slow stochastic adaptation. The observed autocorrelation structure may be a neural signature of slow stochastic adaptation, and wander generated in this manner may be a general mechanism for limiting episodes of synchronized activity in the nervous system.

  3. Putting an object in context and acting on it: neural mechanisms of goal-directed response to contextual object.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Inah; Lee, Sang-Hun

    2013-01-01

    Animals including humans experience objects in a certain environment, that is, a context. Same objects may have to be treated differently, or different objects may need to be treated similarly depending on contexts. Flexible behavioral choice in such ambiguous situations involves dynamic interactions among brain regions, but underlying neural mechanisms are poorly understood. In this article, prior studies that have examined (mostly in rodents) some of the brain regions involved in contextual processing of object information using goal-directed tasks are selectively reviewed. The current review identifies the hippocampus, prefrontal cortex (PFC) and perirhinal cortex (PER) as key regions for associating the same objects with different reward values and responses depending on the background visual context. The hippocampus is particularly important for contextual choice behavior when the context must be used as a conditional cue that can disambiguate reward-related 'meanings' of objects. The PER appears to play significant roles in such tasks during initial learning (but not so much for retrieval) because perturbations in the PER produce severe deficits in the acquisition of the contextual object memory task. Perturbations in the PFC also affect performance when flexible contextual responses should be made toward otherwise ambiguous objects.

  4. Spike frequency adaptation is a possible mechanism for control of attractor preference in auto-associative neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, James; Sander, Leonard; Zochowski, Michal

    Auto-associative memory is the ability to retrieve a pattern from a small fraction of the pattern and is an important function of neural networks. Within this context, memories that are stored within the synaptic strengths of networks act as dynamical attractors for network firing patterns. In networks with many encoded memories, some attractors will be stronger than others. This presents the problem of how networks switch between attractors depending on the situation. We suggest that regulation of neuronal spike-frequency adaptation (SFA) provides a universal mechanism for network-wide attractor selectivity. Here we demonstrate in a Hopfield type attractor network that neurons minimal SFA will reliably activate in the pattern corresponding to a local attractor and that a moderate increase in SFA leads to the network to converge to the strongest attractor state. Furthermore, we show that on long time scales SFA allows for temporal sequences of activation to emerge. Finally, using a model of cholinergic modulation within the cortex we argue that dynamic regulation of attractor preference by SFA could be critical for the role of acetylcholine in attention or for arousal states in general. This work was supported by: NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program under Grant No. DGE 1256260 (JPR), NSF CMMI 1029388 (MRZ) and NSF PoLS 1058034 (MRZ & LMS).

  5. Risk-taking and social exclusion in adolescence: neural mechanisms underlying peer influences on decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peake, Shannon J; Dishion, Thomas J; Stormshak, Elizabeth A; Moore, William E; Pfeifer, Jennifer H

    2013-11-15

    Social exclusion and risk-taking are both common experiences of concern in adolescence, yet little is known about how the two may be related at behavioral or neural levels. In this fMRI study, adolescents (N=27, 14 male, 14-17years-old) completed a series of tasks in the scanner assessing risky decision-making before and after an episode of social exclusion. In this particular context, exclusion was associated with greater behavioral risk-taking among adolescents with low self-reported resistance to peer influence (RPI). When making risky decisions after social exclusion, adolescents who had lower RPI exhibited higher levels of activity in the right temporoparietal junction (rTPJ), and this response in rTPJ was a significant mediator of the relationship between RPI and greater risk-taking after social exclusion. Lower RPI was also associated with lower levels of activity in lPFC during crashes following social exclusion, but unlike rTPJ this response in lPFC was not a significant mediator of the relationship between RPI and greater risk-taking after social exclusion. The results suggest that mentalizing and/or attentional mechanisms have a unique direct effect on adolescents' vulnerability to peer influence on risk-taking.

  6. Neural mechanisms of selective exposure: an EEG study on the processing of decision-consistent and inconsistent information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Peter; Reinweber, Matthias; Vogrincic, Claudia; Schäfer, Axel; Schienle, Anne; Volberg, Gregor

    2013-01-01

    Decision makers tend to prefer decision-consistent information and/or neglect decision-inconsistent information (selective exposure). In the present EEG study the neural mechanisms of the classic selective exposure effect were examined by investigating oscillatory brain responses to consistent vs. inconsistent information. Twenty participants made an economic decision and subsequently were exposed to 45 consistent and 45 inconsistent images concerning their decision. EEG was recorded from 31 electrodes and differences between oscillatory brain responses towards consistent and inconsistent information were examined. The main result was an increase of induced theta power (5-8Hz, 0-0.7s) in the consistent compared to the inconsistent condition at right temporo-parietal electrodes, as well as a corresponding increase of evoked theta power at frontal electrodes. Since theta oscillations are often observed during memory formation, we conclude that decision-consistent information triggers memory formation, whereas decision-inconsistent information seems not to do so. This finding supports the classic motivational perspective of Leon Festinger on the selective exposure effect.

  7. Neural circuit mechanism for learning dependent on dopamine transmission: roles of striatal direct and indirect pathways in sensory discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kazuto; Fukabori, Ryoji; Nishizawa, Kayo

    2013-01-01

    The dorsal striatum in basal ganglia circuit mediates learning processes contributing to instrumental motor actions. The striatum receives excitatory inputs from many cortical areas and the thalamic nuclei and dopaminergic inputs from the ventral midbrain and projects to the output nuclei through direct and indirect pathways. The neural mechanism remains unclear as to how these striatofugal pathways control the learning processes of instrumental actions. Here, we addressed the behavioral roles of the two striatofugal pathways in the performance of sensory discrimination by using immunotoxin (IT)-mediated cell targeting. IT targeting of the striatal direct pathway in mutant mice lengthened the response time but did not affect the accuracy of the response selection in visual discrimination. Subregion-specific pathway targeting revealed a delay in motor responses generated by elimination of the direct pathway arising from the dorsomedial striatum (DMS) but not from the dorsolateral striatum (DLS). These findings indicate that the direct pathway, in particular that from the DMS, contributes to the regulation of the response time in visual discrimination. In addition, IT targeting of the striatal indirect pathway originating from the DLS in transgenic rats impaired the accuracy of response selection in auditory discrimination, whereas the response time remained normal. These data demonstrate that the DLS-derived indirect pathway plays an essential role in the control of the selection accuracy of learned motor responses. Our results suggest that striatal direct and indirect pathways act cooperatively to regulate the selection accuracy and response time of learned motor actions in the performance of discriminative learning.

  8. Multiobjective optimization design of spinal pedicle screws using neural networks and genetic algorithm: mathematical models and mechanical validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaritsakul, Yongyut; Chao, Ching-Kong; Lin, Jinn

    2013-01-01

    Short-segment instrumentation for spine fractures is threatened by relatively high failure rates. Failure of the spinal pedicle screws including breakage and loosening may jeopardize the fixation integrity and lead to treatment failure. Two important design objectives, bending strength and pullout strength, may conflict with each other and warrant a multiobjective optimization study. In the present study using the three-dimensional finite element (FE) analytical results based on an L25 orthogonal array, bending and pullout objective functions were developed by an artificial neural network (ANN) algorithm, and the trade-off solutions known as Pareto optima were explored by a genetic algorithm (GA). The results showed that the knee solutions of the Pareto fronts with both high bending and pullout strength ranged from 92% to 94% of their maxima, respectively. In mechanical validation, the results of mathematical analyses were closely related to those of experimental tests with a correlation coefficient of -0.91 for bending and 0.93 for pullout (P design had significantly higher fatigue life (P < 0.01) and comparable pullout strength as compared with commercial screws. Multiobjective optimization study of spinal pedicle screws using the hybrid of ANN and GA could achieve an ideal with high bending and pullout performances simultaneously.

  9. Do horizontal saccadic eye movements increase interhemispheric coherence? Investigation of a hypothesized neural mechanism underlying EMDR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoe eSamara

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Series of horizontal saccadic eye movements (EMs are known to improve episodic memory retrieval in healthy adults and to facilitate the processing of traumatic memories in eye-movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR therapy. Several authors have proposed that EMs achieve these effects by increasing the functional connectivity of the two brain hemispheres, but direct evidence for this proposal is lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate whether memory enhancement following bilateral EMs is associated with increased interhemispheric coherence in the electroencephalogram (EEG. Fourteen healthy young adults were asked to freely recall lists of studied neutral and emotional words after a series of bilateral EMs and a control procedure. Baseline EEG activity was recorded before and after the EM and control procedures. Phase and amplitude coherence between bilaterally homologous brain areas were calculated for six frequency bands and electrode pairs across the entire scalp. Behavioral analyses showed that participants recalled more emotional (but not neutral words following the EM procedure than following the control procedure. However, the EEG analyses indicated no evidence that the EMs altered participants’ interhemispheric coherence or that improvements in recall were correlated with such changes in coherence. These findings cast doubt on the interhemispheric interaction hypothesis, and therefore may have important implications for future research on the neurobiological mechanism underlying EMDR.

  10. Neural Mechanisms Behind Identification of Leptokurtic Noise and Adaptive Behavioral Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Acremont, Mathieu; Bossaerts, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Large-scale human interaction through, for example, financial markets causes ceaseless random changes in outcome variability, producing frequent and salient outliers that render the outcome distribution more peaked than the Gaussian distribution, and with longer tails. Here, we study how humans cope with this evolutionary novel leptokurtic noise, focusing on the neurobiological mechanisms that allow the brain, 1) to recognize the outliers as noise and 2) to regulate the control necessary for adaptive response. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging, while participants tracked a target whose movements were affected by leptokurtic noise. After initial overreaction and insufficient subsequent correction, participants improved performance significantly. Yet, persistently long reaction times pointed to continued need for vigilance and control. We ran a contrasting treatment where outliers reflected permanent moves of the target, as in traditional mean-shift paradigms. Importantly, outliers were equally frequent and salient. There, control was superior and reaction time was faster. We present a novel reinforcement learning model that fits observed choices better than the Bayes-optimal model. Only anterior insula discriminated between the 2 types of outliers. In both treatments, outliers initially activated an extensive bottom-up attention and belief network, followed by sustained engagement of the fronto-parietal control network.

  11. Stress, sex and neural adaptation to a changing environment: mechanisms of neuronal remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, Bruce S.

    2010-01-01

    The adult brain is much more resilient and adaptable than previously believed, and adaptive structural plasticity involves growth and shrinkage of dendritic trees, turnover of synapses and limited amounts of neurogenesis in the forebrain, especially the dentate gyrus of the hippocampal formation. Stress and sex hormones help to mediate adaptive structural plasticity, which has been extensively investigated in hippocampus and to a lesser extent in prefrontal cortex and amygdala, all brain regions that are involved in cognitive and emotional functions. Stress and sex hormones exert their effects on brain structural remodeling through both classical genomic as well as non-genomic mechanisms, and they do so in collaboration with neurotransmitters and other intra- and extracellular mediators. This review will illustrate the actions of estrogen on synapse formation in the hippocampus and the process of stress-induced remodelling of dendrites and synapses in the hippocampus, amygdala and prefrontal cortex. The influence of early developmental epigenetic events, such as early life stress and brain sexual differentiation, is noted along with the interactions between sex hormones and the effects of stress on the brain. Because hormones influence brain structure and function and because hormone secretion is governed by the brain, applied molecular neuroscience techniques can begin to reveal the role of hormones in brain-related disorders and the treatment of these diseases. A better understanding of hormone-brain interactions should promote more flexible approaches to the treatment of psychiatric disorders, as well as their prevention through both behavioral and pharmaceutical interventions. PMID:20840167

  12. Facing competition: Neural mechanisms underlying parallel programming of antisaccades and prosaccades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talanow, Tobias; Kasparbauer, Anna-Maria; Steffens, Maria; Meyhöfer, Inga; Weber, Bernd; Smyrnis, Nikolaos; Ettinger, Ulrich

    2016-08-01

    The antisaccade task is a prominent tool to investigate the response inhibition component of cognitive control. Recent theoretical accounts explain performance in terms of parallel programming of exogenous and endogenous saccades, linked to the horse race metaphor. Previous studies have tested the hypothesis of competing saccade signals at the behavioral level by selectively slowing the programming of endogenous or exogenous processes e.g. by manipulating the probability of antisaccades in an experimental block. To gain a better understanding of inhibitory control processes in parallel saccade programming, we analyzed task-related eye movements and blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) responses obtained using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) at 3T from 16 healthy participants in a mixed antisaccade and prosaccade task. The frequency of antisaccade trials was manipulated across blocks of high (75%) and low (25%) antisaccade frequency. In blocks with high antisaccade frequency, antisaccade latencies were shorter and error rates lower whilst prosaccade latencies were longer and error rates were higher. At the level of BOLD, activations in the task-related saccade network (left inferior parietal lobe, right inferior parietal sulcus, left precentral gyrus reaching into left middle frontal gyrus and inferior frontal junction) and deactivations in components of the default mode network (bilateral temporal cortex, ventromedial prefrontal cortex) compensated increased cognitive control demands. These findings illustrate context dependent mechanisms underlying the coordination of competing decision signals in volitional gaze control.

  13. Neural mechanisms underlying attribution of hostile intention in nonaggressive individuals: An ERP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Jean; Aubin, Mercédès; Emond, Fannie Carrier; Derguy, Sophie; Bessette, Monique; Jolicoeur, Pierre

    2016-12-01

    Although the perception of hostile intentions in other people can have a clear adaptive function, researchers have paid little attention to the capacity of nonaggressive individuals to infer hostile intentions in others. The goal of the present study was to study brain mechanisms associated with expectations of hostile/non-hostile intent and their on-line evaluation. Scenarios with a hostile versus non-hostile social context followed by a character's ambiguous aversive behavior were presented to readers, and we recorded and analyzed event-related brain potentials (ERPs) to critical words that disambiguated the hostile versus non-hostile intent behind the behavior. Fifty nonaggressive individuals participated in the study. Non-hostile critical words that violated hostile intention expectations elicited a larger negative-going ERP deflection with central and posterior maximums between 400 and 600ms after word onset compatible with an N400 effect. Finally, there were marginally significant correlations between N400 effect sizes and hostile as well as neutral attribution bias measured by a self-report questionnaire. The results suggest that nonaggressive individuals evaluate rapidly, on-line, their attributions of the hostile intent of others. The methodology we developed provides the field with a new paradigm with which to study social attributions of hostile intent likely to contribute to hostile or aggressive reactions.

  14. Identification of neural firing patterns, frequency and temporal coding mechanisms in individual aortic baroreceptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaguang eGu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In rabbit depressor nerve fibers, an on-off firing pattern, period-1 firing, and integer multiple firing with quiescent state were observed as the static pressure level was increased. A bursting pattern with bursts at the systolic phase of blood pressure, continuous firing, and bursting with burst at diastolic phase and quiescent state at systolic phase were observed as the mean level of the dynamic blood pressure was increased. For both static and dynamic pressures, the firing frequency of the first two firing patterns increased and of the last firing pattern decreased due to the quiescent state. If the quiescent state is disregarded, the spike frequency becomes an increasing trend. The instantaneous spike frequency of the systolic phase bursting, continuous firing, and diastolic phase bursting can reflect the temporal process of the systolic phase, whole procedure, and diastolic phase of the dynamic blood pressure signal, respectively. With increasing the static current corresponding to pressure level, the deterministic Hodgkin-Huxley (HH model manifests a process from a resting state first to period-1 firing via a subcritical Hopf bifurcation and then to a resting state via a supercritical Hopf bifurcation, and the firing frequency increases. The on-off firing and integer multiple firing were here identified as noise-induced firing patterns near the subcritical and supercritical Hopf bifurcation points, respectively, using the stochastic HH model. The systolic phase bursting and diastolic phase bursting were identified as pressure-induced firings near the subcritical and supercritical Hopf bifurcation points, respectively, using an HH model with a dynamic signal. The firing, spike frequency, and instantaneous spike frequency observed in the experiment were simulated and explained using HH models. The results illustrate the dynamics of different firing patterns and the frequency and temporal coding mechanisms of aortic baroreceptor.

  15. Neural Mechanisms of Cortical Motion Computation Based on a Neuromorphic Sensory System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luma Issa Abdul-Kreem

    Full Text Available The visual cortex analyzes motion information along hierarchically arranged visual areas that interact through bidirectional interconnections. This work suggests a bio-inspired visual model focusing on the interactions of the cortical areas in which a new mechanism of feedforward and feedback processing are introduced. The model uses a neuromorphic vision sensor (silicon retina that simulates the spike-generation functionality of the biological retina. Our model takes into account two main model visual areas, namely V1 and MT, with different feature selectivities. The initial motion is estimated in model area V1 using spatiotemporal filters to locally detect the direction of motion. Here, we adapt the filtering scheme originally suggested by Adelson and Bergen to make it consistent with the spike representation of the DVS. The responses of area V1 are weighted and pooled by area MT cells which are selective to different velocities, i.e. direction and speed. Such feature selectivity is here derived from compositions of activities in the spatio-temporal domain and integrating over larger space-time regions (receptive fields. In order to account for the bidirectional coupling of cortical areas we match properties of the feature selectivity in both areas for feedback processing. For such linkage we integrate the responses over different speeds along a particular preferred direction. Normalization of activities is carried out over the spatial as well as the feature domains to balance the activities of individual neurons in model areas V1 and MT. Our model was tested using different stimuli that moved in different directions. The results reveal that the error margin between the estimated motion and synthetic ground truth is decreased in area MT comparing with the initial estimation of area V1. In addition, the modulated V1 cell activations shows an enhancement of the initial motion estimation that is steered by feedback signals from MT cells.

  16. Diversity of neural signals mediated by multiple, burst-firing mechanisms in rat olfactory tubercle neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Elizabeth; Strowbridge, Ben W

    2007-11-01

    Olfactory information is processed by a diverse group of interconnected forebrain regions. Most efforts to define the cellular mechanisms involved in processing olfactory information have been focused on understanding the function of the olfactory bulb, the primary second-order olfactory region, and its principal target, the piriform cortex. However, the olfactory bulb also projects to other targets, including the rarely studied olfactory tubercle, a ventral brain region recently implicated in regulating cocaine-related reward behavior. We used whole cell patch-clamp recordings from rat tubercle slices to define the intrinsic properties of neurons in the dense and multiform cell layers. We find three common firing modes of tubercle neurons: regular-spiking, intermittent-discharging, and bursting. Regular-spiking neurons are typically spiny-dense-cell-layer cells with pyramidal-shaped, dendritic arborizations. Intermittently discharging and bursting neurons comprise the majority of the deeper multiform layer and share a common morphology: multipolar, sparsely spiny cells. Rather than generating all-or-none stereotyped discharges, as observed in many brain areas, bursting cells in the tubercle generate depolarizing plateau potentials that trigger graded but time-limited discharges. We find two distinct subclasses of bursting cells that respond similarly to step stimuli but differ in the role transmembrane Ca currents play in their intrinsic behavior. Calcium currents amplify depolarizing inputs and enhance excitability in regenerative bursting cells, whereas the primary action of Ca in nonregenerative bursting tubercle neurons appears to be to decrease excitability by triggering Ca-activated K currents. Nonregenerative bursting cells exhibit a prolonged refractory period after even short discharges suggesting that they may function to detect transient events.

  17. A Novel Robot System Integrating Biological and Mechanical Intelligence Based on Dissociated Neural Network-Controlled Closed-Loop Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuechao; Li, Hongyi; Zheng, Xiongfei

    2016-01-01

    We propose the architecture of a novel robot system merging biological and artificial intelligence based on a neural controller connected to an external agent. We initially built a framework that connected the dissociated neural network to a mobile robot system to implement a realistic vehicle. The mobile robot system characterized by a camera and two-wheeled robot was designed to execute the target-searching task. We modified a software architecture and developed a home-made stimulation generator to build a bi-directional connection between the biological and the artificial components via simple binomial coding/decoding schemes. In this paper, we utilized a specific hierarchical dissociated neural network for the first time as the neural controller. Based on our work, neural cultures were successfully employed to control an artificial agent resulting in high performance. Surprisingly, under the tetanus stimulus training, the robot performed better and better with the increasement of training cycle because of the short-term plasticity of neural network (a kind of reinforced learning). Comparing to the work previously reported, we adopted an effective experimental proposal (i.e. increasing the training cycle) to make sure of the occurrence of the short-term plasticity, and preliminarily demonstrated that the improvement of the robot’s performance could be caused independently by the plasticity development of dissociated neural network. This new framework may provide some possible solutions for the learning abilities of intelligent robots by the engineering application of the plasticity processing of neural networks, also for the development of theoretical inspiration for the next generation neuro-prostheses on the basis of the bi-directional exchange of information within the hierarchical neural networks. PMID:27806074

  18. Natural selection on genes that underlie human disease susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blekhman, Ran; Man, Orna; Herrmann, Leslie; Boyko, Adam R.; Indap, Amit; Kosiol, Carolin; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Teshima, Kosuke M.; Przeworski, Molly

    2008-01-01

    What evolutionary forces shape genes that contribute to the risk of human disease? Do similar selective pressures act on alleles that underlie simple vs. complex disorders? [1-3]. Answers to these questions will shed light on the origin of human disorders (e.g., [4]), and help to predict the population frequencies of alleles that contribute to disease risk, with important implications for the efficient design of mapping studies [5-7]. As a first step towards addressing them, we created a hand-curated version of the Mendelian Inheritance in Man database (OMIM). We then examined selective pressures on Mendelian disease genes, genes that contribute to complex disease risk and genes known to be essential in mouse, by analyzing patterns of human polymorphism and of divergence between human and rhesus macaque. We find that Mendelian disease genes appear to be under widespread purifying selection, especially when the disease mutations are dominant (rather than recessive). In contrast, the class of genes that influence complex disease risk shows little signs of evolutionary conservation, possibly because this category includes both targets of purifying and positive selection. PMID:18571414

  19. Neural activation toward erotic stimuli in homosexual and heterosexual males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagerer, Sabine; Klucken, Tim; Wehrum, Sina; Zimmermann, Mark; Schienle, Anne; Walter, Bertram; Vaitl, Dieter; Stark, Rudolf

    2011-11-01

    Studies investigating sexual arousal exist, yet there are diverging findings on the underlying neural mechanisms with regard to sexual orientation. Moreover, sexual arousal effects have often been confounded with general arousal effects. Hence, it is still unclear which structures underlie the sexual arousal response in homosexual and heterosexual men. Neural activity and subjective responses were investigated in order to disentangle sexual from general arousal. Considering sexual orientation, differential and conjoint neural activations were of interest. The functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study focused on the neural networks involved in the processing of sexual stimuli in 21 male participants (11 homosexual, 10 heterosexual). Both groups viewed pictures with erotic content as well as aversive and neutral stimuli. The erotic pictures were subdivided into three categories (most sexually arousing, least sexually arousing, and rest) based on the individual subjective ratings of each participant. Blood oxygen level-dependent responses measured by fMRI and subjective ratings. A conjunction analysis revealed conjoint neural activation related to sexual arousal in thalamus, hypothalamus, occipital cortex, and nucleus accumbens. Increased insula, amygdala, and anterior cingulate gyrus activation could be linked to general arousal. Group differences emerged neither when viewing the most sexually arousing pictures compared with highly arousing aversive pictures nor compared with neutral pictures. Results suggest that a widespread neural network is activated by highly sexually arousing visual stimuli. A partly distinct network of structures underlies sexual and general arousal effects. The processing of preferred, highly sexually arousing stimuli recruited similar structures in homosexual and heterosexual males. © 2011 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  20. Effects of PYY on the interdigestive migrating myoelectric complex in the small intestine in vivo and the neural and endocrinal mechanisms of the effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of peptide YY (PYY) on the interdigestive migrating myoelectric complex (MMC) in the small intestine in vivo and explore the neural and endocrinal mechanisms of the effects. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were supplied with a venous catheter and bipolar electrodes in the duodenum and jejunum for electromyography of stomach and small intestine in wake state. PYY,phentolamine,nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA,the inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase) and atropine were served with PYY res...

  1. Abdominal pain in Irritable Bowel Syndrome: a review of putative psychological, neural and neuro-immune mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsenbruch, Sigrid

    2011-03-01

    Chronic abdominal pain is a common symptom of great clinical significance in several areas of medicine. In many cases no organic cause can be established resulting in the classification as functional gastrointestinal disorder. Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is the most common of these conditions and is considered an important public health problem because it can be disabling and constitutes a major social and economic burden given the lack of effective treatments. IBS aetiology is most likely multi-factorial involving biological, psychological and social factors. Visceral hyperalgesia (or hypersensitivity) and visceral hypervigilance, which could be mediated by peripheral, spinal, and/or central pathways, constitute key concepts in current research on pathophysiological mechanisms of visceral hyperalgesia. The role of central nervous system mechanisms along the "brain-gut axis" is increasingly appreciated, owing to accumulating evidence from brain imaging studies that neural processing of visceral stimuli is altered in IBS together with long-standing knowledge regarding the contribution of stress and negative emotions to symptom frequency and severity. At the same time, there is also growing evidence suggesting that peripheral immune mechanisms and disturbed neuro-immune communication could play a role in the pathophysiology of visceral hyperalgesia. This review presents recent advances in research on the pathophysiology of visceral hyperalgesia in IBS, with a focus on the role of stress and anxiety in central and peripheral response to visceral pain stimuli. Together, these findings support that in addition to lower pain thresholds displayed by a significant proportion of patients, the evaluation of pain appears to be altered in IBS. This may be attributable to affective disturbances, negative emotions in anticipation of or during visceral stimulation, and altered pain-related expectations and learning processes. Disturbed "top-down" emotional and cognitive pain

  2. Genetic algorithm based on optimization of neural network structure for fault diagnosis of the clutch retainer mechanism of MF 285 tractor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. F Mousavi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The diagnosis of agricultural machinery faults must be performed at an opportune time, in order to fulfill the agricultural operations in a timely manner and to optimize the accuracy and the integrity of a system, proper monitoring and fault diagnosis of the rotating parts is required. With development of fault diagnosis methods of rotating equipment, especially bearing failure, the security, performance and availability of machines has been increasing. In general, fault detection is conducted through a specific procedure which starts with data acquisition and continues with features extraction, and subsequently failure of the machine would be detected. Several practical methods have been introduced for fault detection in rotating parts of machineries. The review of the literature shows that both Artificial Neural Networks (ANN and Support Vector Machines (SVM have been used for this purpose. However, the results show that SVM is more effective than Artificial Neural Networks in fault detection of such machineries. In some smart detection systems, incorporating an optimized method such as Genetic Algorithm in the Neural Network model, could improve the fault detection procedure. Consequently, the fault detection performance of neural networks may also be improved by combining with the Genetic Algorithm and hence will be comparable with the performance of the Support Vector Machine. In this study, the so called Genetic Algorithm (GA method was used to optimize the structure of the Artificial Neural Networks (ANN for fault detection of the clutch retainer mechanism of Massey Ferguson 285 tractor. Materials and Methods The test rig consists of some electro mechanical parts including the clutch retainer mechanism of Massey Ferguson 285 tractor, a supporting shaft, a single-phase electric motor, a loading mechanism to model the load of the tractor clutch and the corresponding power train gears. The data acquisition section consists of a

  3. Neural mechanisms underlying the effects of face-based affective signals on memory for faces: a tentative model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi eTsukiura

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available When we encounter someone in our daily lives, we form impressions of that person. Although those impressions are affected by many factors, face-based affective signals such as facial expression, facial attractiveness, or trustworthiness are important. Previous psychological studies have demonstrated the impact of facial impressions on remembering other people, but little is known about the neural mechanisms underlying this psychological process. The purpose of this article is to review recent functional MRI (fMRI studies to investigate the effects of face-based affective signals including facial expression, facial attractiveness, and trustworthiness on memory for faces, and to propose a concept for understanding this affective-cognitive interaction. On the basis of the aforementioned research, three brain regions are potentially involved in the processing of face-based affective signals. The first candidate is the amygdala, where activity is generally modulated by both affectively positive and negative signals from faces. Activity in the orbitofrontal cortex, as the second candidate, increases as a function of perceived positive signals from faces; whereas activity in the insular cortex, as the third candidate, reflects a function of face-based negative signals. In addition, neuroscientific studies have reported that the three regions are functionally connected to the memory-related hippocampal regions. These findings suggest that the effects of face-based affective signals on memory for faces could be modulated by interactions between the regions associated with the processing of face-based affective signals and the hippocampus as a memory-related region.

  4. Murine neural stem cells model Hunter disease in vitro: glial cell-mediated neurodegeneration as a possible mechanism involved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusar Poli, E; Zalfa, C; D'Avanzo, F; Tomanin, R; Carlessi, L; Bossi, M; Nodari, L Rota; Binda, E; Marmiroli, P; Scarpa, M; Delia, D; Vescovi, A L; De Filippis, L

    2013-11-07

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPSII or Hunter Syndrome) is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by the deficit of iduronate 2-sulfatase (IDS) activity and characterized by progressive systemic and neurological impairment. As the early mechanisms leading to neuronal degeneration remain elusive, we chose to examine the properties of neural stem cells (NSCs) isolated from an animal model of the disease in order to evaluate whether their neurogenic potential could be used to recapitulate the early phases of neurogenesis in the brain of Hunter disease patients. Experiments here reported show that NSCs derived from the subventricular zone (SVZ) of early symptomatic IDS-knockout (IDS-ko) mouse retained self-renewal capacity in vitro, but differentiated earlier than wild-type (wt) cells, displaying an evident lysosomal aggregation in oligodendroglial and astroglial cells. Consistently, the SVZ of IDS-ko mice appeared similar to the wt SVZ, whereas the cortex and striatum presented a disorganized neuronal pattern together with a significant increase of glial apoptotic cells, suggesting that glial degeneration likely precedes neuronal demise. Interestingly, a very similar pattern was observed in the brain cortex of a Hunter patient. These observations both in vitro, in our model, and in vivo suggest that IDS deficit seems to affect the late phases of neurogenesis and/or the survival of mature cells rather than NSC self-renewal. In particular, platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α-positive (PDGFR-α+) glial progenitors appeared reduced in both the IDS-ko NSCs and in the IDS-ko mouse and human Hunter brains, compared with the respective healthy controls. Treatment of mutant NSCs with IDS or PDGF throughout differentiation was able to increase the number of PDGFR-α+ cells and to reduce that of apoptotic cells to levels comparable to wt. This evidence supports IDS-ko NSCs as a reliable in vitro model of the disease, and suggests the rescue of PDGFR-α+ glial cells as a

  5. Effects of action observation therapy and mirror therapy after stroke on rehabilitation outcomes and neural mechanisms by MEG: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Tsai-Yu; Wu, Ching-Yi; Lin, Keh-Chung; Cheng, Chia-Hsiung; Hsieh, Yu-Wei; Chen, Chia-Ling; Lai, Chih-Jou; Chen, Chih-Chi

    2017-10-04

    Loss of upper-extremity motor function is one of the most debilitating deficits following stroke. Two promising treatment approaches, action observation therapy (AOT) and mirror therapy (MT), aim to enhance motor learning and promote neural reorganization in patients through different afferent inputs and patterns of visual feedback. Both approaches involve different patterns of motor observation, imitation, and execution but share some similar neural bases of the mirror neuron system. AOT and MT used in stroke rehabilitation may confer differential benefits and neural activities that remain to be determined. This clinical trial aims to investigate and compare treatment effects and neural activity changes of AOT and MT with those of the control intervention in patients with subacute stroke. An estimated total of 90 patients with subacute stroke will be recruited for this study. All participants will be randomly assigned to receive AOT, MT, or control intervention for a 3-week training period (15 sessions). Outcome measurements will be taken at baseline, immediately after treatment, and at the 3-month follow-up. For the magnetoencephalography (MEG) study, we anticipate that we will recruit 12 to 15 patients per group. The primary outcome will be the Fugl-Meyer Assessment score. Secondary outcomes will include the modified Rankin Scale, the Box and Block Test, the ABILHAND questionnaire, the Questionnaire Upon Mental Imagery, the Functional Independence Measure, activity monitors, the Stroke Impact Scale version 3.0, and MEG signals. This clinical trial will provide scientific evidence of treatment effects on motor, functional outcomes, and neural activity mechanisms after AOT and MT in patients with subacute stroke. Further application and use of AOT and MT may include telerehabilitation or home-based rehabilitation through web-based or video teaching. ClinicalTrials.gov, ID: NCT02871700 . Registered on 1 August 2016.

  6. Growth factor deprivation induces an alternative non-apoptotic death mechanism that is inhibited by Bcl2 in cells derived from neural precursor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas-Aguayo, María del Carmen; Santa-Olalla, Jesús; Baizabal, José-Manuel; Salgado, Luis-Miguel; Covarrubias, Luis

    2003-12-01

    Although apoptosis has been considered the typical mechanism for physiological cell death, presently alternative mechanisms need to be considered. We previously showed that fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2) could act as a survival factor for neural precursor cells. To study the death mechanism activated by the absence of this growth factor, we followed the changes in cell morphology and determined cell viability by staining with several dyes after FGF2 removal from mesencephalic neural-progenitor-cell cultures. The changes observed did not correspond to those associated with apoptosis. After 48 h in the absence of FGF2, cells began to develop vacuoles in their cytoplasm, a phenotype that became very obvious 3-5 days later. Double-membrane vacuoles containing cell debris were observed. Vacuolated cells did not stain with either ethidium bromide or trypan Blue, and did not show chromatin condensations. Nonetheless, during the course of culture, vacuolated cells formed aggregates with highly condensed chromatin and detached from the plate. Neural progenitor cells grown in the presence of FGF2 did not display any of those characteristics. The vacuolated phenotype could be reversed by the addition of FGF2. Typical autophagy inhibitors such as 3-MA and LY294002 inhibited vacuole development, whereas a broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor did not. Interestingly, Bcl-2 overexpression retarded vacuole development. In conclusion, we identified a death autophagy-like mechanism activated by the lack of a specific survival factor that can be inhibited by Bcl2. We propose that anti-apoptotic Bcl2 family members are key molecules controlling death activation independently of the cell degeneration mechanism used.

  7. Direct evidence for two different neural mechanisms for reading familiar and unfamiliar words: an intra-cerebral EEG study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra eJuphard

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available After intensive practice, unfamiliar letter strings become familiar words and reading speed increases strikingly from a slow processing to a fast and with more global recognition of words. While this effect has been well documented at the behavioral level, its neural underpinnings are still unclear. The question is how the brain modulates the activity of the reading network according to the novelty of the items. Several models have proposed that familiar and unfamiliar words are not processed by separate networks but rather by common regions operating differently according to familiarity. This hypothesis has proved difficult to test at the neural level because the effects of familiarity and length on reading occur (a on a millisecond scale, shorter than the resolution of fMRI and (b in regions which cannot be isolated with non-invasive EEG or MEG. We overcame these limitations by using invasive intra-cerebral EEG recording in epileptic patients. Neural activity (gamma-band responses, GBR, between 50 Hz and 150 Hz was measured in three major nodes of reading network – left inferior frontal, supramarginal and inferior temporo-occipital cortices - while patients silently read familiar (words and unfamiliar (pseudo-words items of two lengths (short composed of one-syllable vs. long composed of three syllables. While all items elicited strong neural responses in the three regions, we found that the duration of the neural response increases with length only for pseudo-words, in direct relation to grapheme-to-phoneme conversion. Our results validate at the neural level the hypothesis that all words are processed by a common network operating more or less efficiently depending on words’ novelty.

  8. Effective electric fields along realistic DTI-based neural trajectories for modelling the stimulation mechanisms of TMS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Geeter, N.; Crevecoeur, G.; Leemans, A.; Dupré, L.

    2015-01-01

    In transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), an applied alternating magnetic field induces an electric field in the brain that can interact with the neural system. It is generally assumed that this induced electric field is the crucial effect exciting a certain region of the brain. More specifically,

  9. Effective electric fields along realistic DTI-based neural trajectories for modelling the stimulation mechanisms of TMS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Geeter, N.; Crevecoeur, G.; Leemans, A.; Dupré, L.

    2015-01-01

    In transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), an applied alternating magnetic field induces an electric field in the brain that can interact with the neural system. It is generally assumed that this induced electric field is the crucial effect exciting a certain region of the brain. More specifically,

  10. Molecular shifts in limb identity underlie development of feathered feet in two domestic avian species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domyan, Eric T; Kronenberg, Zev; Infante, Carlos R; Vickrey, Anna I; Stringham, Sydney A; Bruders, Rebecca; Guernsey, Michael W; Park, Sungdae; Payne, Jason; Beckstead, Robert B; Kardon, Gabrielle; Menke, Douglas B; Yandell, Mark; Shapiro, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Birds display remarkable diversity in the distribution and morphology of scales and feathers on their feet, yet the genetic and developmental mechanisms governing this diversity remain unknown. Domestic pigeons have striking variation in foot feathering within a single species, providing a tractable model to investigate the molecular basis of skin appendage differences. We found that feathered feet in pigeons result from a partial transformation from hindlimb to forelimb identity mediated by cis-regulatory changes in the genes encoding the hindlimb-specific transcription factor Pitx1 and forelimb-specific transcription factor Tbx5. We also found that ectopic expression of Tbx5 is associated with foot feathers in chickens, suggesting similar molecular pathways underlie phenotypic convergence between these two species. These results show how changes in expression of regional patterning genes can generate localized changes in organ fate and morphology, and provide viable molecular mechanisms for diversity in hindlimb scale and feather distribution. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12115.001 PMID:26977633

  11. Valproic acid increases conservative homologous recombination frequency and reactive oxygen species formation: a potential mechanism for valproic acid-induced neural tube defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defoort, Ericka N; Kim, Perry M; Winn, Louise M

    2006-04-01

    Valproic acid, a commonly used antiepileptic agent, is associated with a 1 to 2% incidence of neural tube defects when taken during pregnancy; however, the molecular mechanism by which this occurs has not been elucidated. Previous research suggests that valproic acid exposure leads to an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). DNA damage due to ROS can result in DNA double-strand breaks, which can be repaired through homologous recombination (HR), a process that is not error-free and can result in detrimental genetic changes. Because the developing embryo requires tight regulation of gene expression to develop properly, we propose that the loss or dysfunction of genes involved in embryonic development through aberrant HR may ultimately cause neural tube defects. To determine whether valproic acid induces HR, Chinese hamster ovary 3-6 cells, containing a neomycin direct repeat recombination substrate, were exposed to valproic acid for 4 or 24 h. A significant increase in HR after exposure to valproic acid (5 and 10 mM) for 24 h was observed, which seems to occur through a conservative HR mechanism. We also demonstrated that exposure to valproic acid (5 and 10 mM) significantly increased intracellular ROS levels, which were attenuated by preincubation with polyethylene glycol-conjugated (PEG)-catalase. A significant change in the ratio of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine/2'-de-oxyguanosine, a measure of DNA oxidation, was not observed after valproic acid exposure; however, preincubation with PEG-catalase significantly blocked the increase in HR. These data demonstrate that valproic acid increases HR frequency and provides a possible mechanism for valproic acid-induced neural tube defects.

  12. Abnormal left-sided orbitomedial prefrontal cortical-amygdala connectivity during happy and fear face processing: a potential neural mechanism of female MDD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge eAlmeida

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pathophysiologic processes supporting abnormal emotion regulation in major depressive disorder (MDD are poorly understood. We previously found abnormal inverse left-sided ventromedial prefrontal cortical- amygdala effective connectivity to happy faces in females with MDD. We aimed to replicate and expand this previous finding in an independent participant sample, using a more inclusive neural model, and a novel emotion-processing paradigm.Methods: Nineteen individuals with MDD in depressed episode (12 females, and nineteen healthy individuals, age and gender matched, performed an implicit emotion processing and automatic attentional control paradigm to examine abnormalities in prefrontal cortical-amygdala neural circuitry during happy, angry, fearful and sad face processing measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging in a 3Tesla scanner. Effective connectivity was estimated with Dynamic Causal Modelling in a trinodal neural model including two anatomically defined prefrontal cortical regions, ventromedial prefrontal cortex and subgenual cingulate cortex(sgACC, and the amygdala. Results: We replicated our previous finding of abnormal inverse left-sided inverse top-down ventromedial prefrontal cortical-amygdala connectivity to happy faces in females with MDD (p=.04, and also showed a similar pattern of abnormal inverse left-sided sgACC-amygdala connectivity to these stimuli (p=0.03. These findings were paralleled by abnormally reduced positive left-sided ventromedial prefrontal cortical-sgACC connectivity to happy faces in females with MDD (p=0.008, and abnormally increased positive left-sided sgACC-amygdala connectivity to fearful faces in females, and all individuals, with MDD (p=0.008;p=0.003.Conclusions: Different patterns of abnormal prefrontal cortical-amygdala connectivity to happy and fearful stimuli might represent neural mechanisms for the excessive self-reproach and comorbid anxiety that characterize female MDD.

  13. Mechanism of functional recovery after repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in the subacute cerebral ischemic rat model: neural plasticity or anti-apoptosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Kyung Jae; Lee, Yong-Taek; Han, Tai Ryoon

    2011-10-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been studied increasingly in recent years to determine whether it has a therapeutic benefit on recovery after stroke. However, the underlying mechanisms of rTMS in stroke recovery remain unclear. Here, we evaluated the effect of rTMS on functional recovery and its underlying mechanism by assessing proteins associated with neural plasticity and anti-apoptosis in the peri-lesional area using a subacute cerebral ischemic rat model. Twenty cerebral ischemic rats were randomly assigned to the rTMS or the sham group at post-op day 4. A total of 3,500 impulses with 10 Hz frequency were applied to ipsilesional cortex over a 2-week period. Functional outcome was measured before (post-op day 4) and after rTMS (post-op day 18). The rTMS group showed more functional improvement on the beam balance test and had stronger Bcl-2 and weaker Bax expression on immunohistochemistry compared with the sham group. The expression of NMDA and MAP-2 showed no significant difference between the two groups. These results suggest that rTMS in subacute cerebral ischemia has a therapeutic effect on functional recovery and is associated with an anti-apoptotic mechanism in the peri-ischemic area rather than with neural plasticity.

  14. Common neural mechanisms for the evaluation of facial trustworthiness and emotional expressions as revealed by behavioral adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engell, Andrew D; Todorov, Alexander; Haxby, James V

    2010-01-01

    People rapidly and automatically evaluate faces along many social dimensions. Here, we focus on judgments of trustworthiness, which approximate basic valence evaluation of faces, and test whether these judgments are an overgeneralization of the perception of emotional expressions. We used a behavioral adaptation paradigm to investigate whether the previously noted perceptual similarities between trustworthiness and emotional expressions of anger and happiness extend to their underlying neural representations. We found that adapting to angry or happy facial expressions causes trustworthiness evaluations of subsequently rated neutral faces to increase or decrease, respectively. Further, we found no such modulation of trustworthiness evaluations after participants were adapted to fearful expressions, suggesting that this effect is specific to angry and happy expressions. We conclude that, in line with the overgeneralization hypothesis, a common neural system is engaged during the evaluation of facial trustworthiness and expressions of anger and happiness.

  15. Implementing the cellular mechanisms of synaptic transmission in a neural mass model of the thalamo-cortical circuitry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basabdatta Sen Bhattacharya

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A novel direction to existing neural mass modelling technique is proposed where the commonly used `alpha function' for representing synaptic transmission is replaced by a kinetic framework of neurotransmitter and receptor dynamics. The aim is to underpin neuro-transmission dynamics associated with abnormal brain rhythms commonly observed in neurological and psychiatric disorders. An existing thalamocortical neural mass model is modified by using the kinetic framework for modelling synaptic transmission mediated by glutamatergic and GABA (gamma-aminobutyric-acid-ergic receptors. The model output is compared qualitatively with existing literature on in-vitro experimental studies of ferret thalamic slices, as well as on single-neuron-level model based studies of neuro-receptor and transmitter dynamics in the thalamocortical tissue. The results are consistent with these studies: the activation of ligand-gated GABA receptors is essential for generation of spindle waves in the model, while blocking this pathway leads to low-frequency synchronised oscillations such as observed in slow-wave sleep; the frequency of spindle oscillations increase with increased levels of post-synaptic membrane conductance for AMPA (alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic-acid receptors, and blocking this pathway effects a quiescent model output. In terms of computational efficiency, the simulation time is improved by a factor of ten compared to a similar neural mass model based on alpha functions. This implies a dramatic improvement in computational resources for large-scale network simulation using this model. Thus, the model provides a platform for correlating high-level brain oscillatory activity with low-level synaptic attributes, and makes a significant contribution towards advancements in current neural mass modelling paradigm as a potential computational tool to better the understanding of brain oscillations in sickness and in health.

  16. Implementing the cellular mechanisms of synaptic transmission in a neural mass model of the thalamo-cortical circuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Basabdatta S

    2013-01-01

    A novel direction to existing neural mass modeling technique is proposed where the commonly used "alpha function" for representing synaptic transmission is replaced by a kinetic framework of neurotransmitter and receptor dynamics. The aim is to underpin neuro-transmission dynamics associated with abnormal brain rhythms commonly observed in neurological and psychiatric disorders. An existing thalamocortical neural mass model is modified by using the kinetic framework for modeling synaptic transmission mediated by glutamatergic and GABA (gamma-aminobutyric-acid)-ergic receptors. The model output is compared qualitatively with existing literature on in vitro experimental studies of ferret thalamic slices, as well as on single-neuron-level model based studies of neuro-receptor and transmitter dynamics in the thalamocortical tissue. The results are consistent with these studies: the activation of ligand-gated GABA receptors is essential for generation of spindle waves in the model, while blocking this pathway leads to low-frequency synchronized oscillations such as observed in slow-wave sleep; the frequency of spindle oscillations increase with increased levels of post-synaptic membrane conductance for AMPA (alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic-acid) receptors, and blocking this pathway effects a quiescent model output. In terms of computational efficiency, the simulation time is improved by a factor of 10 compared to a similar neural mass model based on alpha functions. This implies a dramatic improvement in computational resources for large-scale network simulation using this model. Thus, the model provides a platform for correlating high-level brain oscillatory activity with low-level synaptic attributes, and makes a significant contribution toward advancements in current neural mass modeling paradigm as a potential computational tool to better the understanding of brain oscillations in sickness and in health.

  17. In the Red: Deficits in Immune Regulation Underlie Psoriasis Severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Andrew

    2016-11-01

    IL-17-driven pathways are active in the skin of patients with psoriasis. Kim et al. examined lesions from mild and moderate to severe psoriasis and found that differences in cutaneous disease severity may be the outcome of lapses in immunoregulatory mechanisms; because as much, if not more, T helper type 17-induced inflammation was seen in mild psoriasis, these patients may also benefit from anti-IL-17-targeted biologics.

  18. Abiotic stress tolerance and competition-related traits underlie phylogenetic clustering in soil bacterial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goberna, Marta; Navarro-Cano, Jose A; Valiente-Banuet, Alfonso; García, Carlos; Verdú, Miguel

    2014-10-01

    Soil bacteria typically coexist with close relatives generating widespread phylogenetic clustering. This has been ascribed to the abiotic filtering of organisms with shared ecological tolerances. Recent theoretical developments suggest that competition can also explain the phylogenetic similarity of coexisting organisms by excluding large low-competitive clades. We propose that combining the environmental patterns of traits associated with abiotic stress tolerances or competitive abilities with phylogeny and abundance data, can help discern between abiotic and biotic mechanisms underlying the coexistence of phylogenetically related bacteria. We applied this framework in a model system composed of interspersed habitats of highly contrasted productivity and comparatively dominated by biotic and abiotic processes, i.e. the plant patch-gap mosaic typical of drylands. We examined the distribution of 15 traits and 3290 bacterial taxa in 28 plots. Communities showed a marked functional response to the environment. Conserved traits related to environmental stress tolerance (e.g. desiccation, formation of resistant structures) were differentially selected in either habitat, while competition related traits (e.g. organic C consumption, formation of nutrient-scavenging structures) prevailed under high resource availability. Phylogenetic clustering was stronger in habitats dominated by biotic filtering, suggesting that competitive exclusion of large clades might underlie the ecological similarity of co-occurring soil bacteria. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  19. Don't forget the lyrics! Spatiotemporal dynamics of neural mechanisms spontaneously evoked by gaps of silence in familiar and newly learned songs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Damien; Wong, Thian Chiew; Nicolier, Magali; Giustiniani, Julie; Mignot, Coralie; Noiret, Nicolas; Monnin, Julie; Magnin, Eloi; Pazart, Lionel; Moulin, Thierry; Haffen, Emmanuel; Vandel, Pierre

    2016-07-01

    The vast majority of people experience musical imagery, the sensation of reliving a song in absence of any external stimulation. Internal perception of a song can be deliberate and effortful, but also may occur involuntarily and spontaneously. Moreover, musical imagery is also involuntarily used for automatically completing missing parts of music or lyrics from a familiar song. The aim of our study was to explore the onset of musical imagery dynamics that leads to the automatic completion of missing lyrics. High-density electroencephalography was used to record the cerebral activity of twenty healthy volunteers while they were passively listening to unfamiliar songs, very familiar songs, and songs previously listened to for two weeks. Silent gaps inserted into these songs elicited a series of neural activations encompassing perceptual, attentional and cognitive mechanisms (range 100-500ms). Familiarity and learning effects emerged as early as 100ms and lasted 400ms after silence occurred. Although participants reported more easily mentally imagining lyrics in familiar rather than passively learnt songs, the onset of neural mechanisms and the power spectrum underlying musical imagery were similar for both types of songs. This study offers new insights into the musical imagery dynamics evoked by gaps of silence and on the role of familiarity and learning processes in the generation of these dynamics. The automatic and effortless method presented here is a potentially useful tool to understand failure in the familiarity and learning processes of pathological populations.

  20. Protective Effects and Mechanisms of Salvianolic Acid B Against H₂O₂-Induced Injury in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neural Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Tao; Pang, Mao; Rong, Limin; Liu, Chang; Wang, Juan; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Xuan; Liu, Bin

    2015-06-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have the potential to differentiate into neural lineages. Salvianolic acid B (Sal B) is a commonly used, traditional Chinese medicine for enhancing neuroprotective effects, and has antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiapoptotic properties. Here, we explore the potential mechanism of Sal B in protecting iPSC-derived neural stem cells (NSCs) against H2O2-induced injury. iPSCs were induced into NSCs, iPSC-derived NSCs were treated with 50 μM Sal B for 24.5 h and 500 μM H2O2 for 24 h. The resulting effects were examined by flow cytometry analysis, quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, and western blotting. Upon H2O2 exposure, Sal B significantly promoted cell viability and stabilization of the mitochondrial membrane potential. Sal B also visibly decreased the cell apoptotic ratio. In addition, Sal B markedly reduced expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9, and phosphospecific signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (p-STAT3), and increased the level of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-2 in iPSC-derived NSCs induced by H2O2. These results suggest that Sal B protects iPSC-derived NSCs against H2O2-induced oxidative stress. The mechanisms of this stress tolerance may be attributed to modulation of the MMP/TIMP system and inhibition of the STAT3 signaling pathway.

  1. Goal-independent mechanisms for free response generation: creative and pseudo-random performance share neural substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Manzano, Örjan; Ullén, Fredrik

    2012-01-02

    To what extent free response generation in different tasks uses common and task-specific neurocognitive processes has remained unclear. Here, we investigated overlap and differences in neural activity during musical improvisation and pseudo-random response generation. Brain activity was measured using fMRI in a group of professional classical pianists, who performed musical improvisation of melodies, pseudo-random key-presses and a baseline condition (sight-reading), on either two, six or twelve keys on a piano keyboard. The results revealed an extensive overlap in neural activity between the two generative conditions. Active regions included the dorsolateral and dorsomedial prefrontal cortices, inferior frontal gyrus, anterior cingulate cortex and pre-SMA. No regions showed higher activity in improvisation than in pseudo-random generation. These findings suggest that the activated regions fulfill generic functions that are utilized in different types of free generation tasks, independent of overall goal. In contrast, pseudo-random generation was accompanied by higher activity than improvisation in several regions. This presumably reflects the participants' musical expertise as well as the pseudo-random generation task's high load on attention, working memory, and executive control. The results highlight the significance of using naturalistic tasks to study human behavior and cognition. No brain activity was related to the size of the response set. We discuss that this may reflect that the musicians were able to use specific strategies for improvisation, by which there was no simple relationship between response set size and neural activity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Network mechanisms of hippocampal laterality, place coding, and goal-directed navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitanishi, Takuma; Ito, Hiroshi T; Hayashi, Yuichiro; Shinohara, Yoshiaki; Mizuseki, Kenji; Hikida, Takatoshi

    2017-03-01

    The hippocampus and associated structures are responsible for episodic memory in humans. In rodents, the most prominent behavioral correlate of hippocampal neural activity is place coding, which is thought to underlie spatial navigation. While episodic memory is considered to be unique to humans in a restricted context, it has been proposed that the same neural circuitry and algorithms that enable spatial coding and navigation also support episodic memory. Here we review the recent progress in neural circuit mechanisms of hippocampal activity by introducing several topics: (1) cooperation and specialization of the bilateral hippocampi, (2) the role of synaptic plasticity in gamma phase-locking of spikes and place cell formation, (3) impaired goal-related activity and oscillations in a mouse model of mental disorders, and (4) a prefrontal-thalamo-hippocampal circuit for goal-directed spatial navigation.

  3. Neural correlates underlying musical semantic memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groussard, M; Viader, F; Landeau, B; Desgranges, B; Eustache, F; Platel, H

    2009-07-01

    Numerous functional imaging studies have examined the neural basis of semantic memory mainly using verbal and visuospatial materials. Musical material also allows an original way to explore semantic memory processes. We used PET imaging to determine the neural substrates that underlie musical semantic memory using different tasks and stimuli. The results of three PET studies revealed a greater involvement of the anterior part of the temporal lobe. Concerning clinical observations and our neuroimaging data, the musical lexicon (and most widely musical semantic memory) appears to be sustained by a temporo-prefrontal cerebral network involving right and left cerebral regions.

  4. Neural mechanism of deficits in Chinese developmental dyslexia%汉语发展性阅读障碍缺陷的神经机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵婧; 张逸玮; 毕鸿燕

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study on the neural mechanism of deficits in Chinese developmental dyslexia from the aspects of the phonological processing,orthographic skills,visual magnocellular function and cerebellum function.Methods Critical words in Chinese and English (e.g.dyslexia,reading development,Chinese,neural) and formula (e.g.Chinese and (reading development) and (neural or neuroimage or fMRI or ERP or brain area) related with the present topic were searched among the article abstracts in Chinese and foreign databases (e.g.CNKI,Pubmed,Sciencedirect) from July to December,2014.Results Fifty-two relevant articles were gained access to the database.Referring to the present topic,research on the neural mechanism of dyslexia with neuroimaging technique was reserved,while the studies in which the reading impairment of the participants was caused by acquired factors were eliminated.Finally,thirty-three valid articles were retained.Conclusion According to previous studies,although there might be similarities in cognitive deficits of dyslexia between alphabetic languages and Chinese,it was still found that the Chinese children with developmental dyslexia exhibited abnormal neural activities and impaired brain structures in areas associated with Chinese phonology (i.e.left middle frontal gyrus,which was different from the left inferior fiontal gyrus always related with phonological processing in alphabetic languages) and orthographic skills (right occipitotemporal areas which was responsible for the visuospatial processing),revealing language specificity of Chinese to some extent.However,some other studies reported the similarities in neural mechanisms of dyslexia across languages.Therefore,more studies were required to further examine the crosscultural mechanism of the neural activity regarding the developmental dyslexia.Meanwhile,researches on the aspects of general perception showed Chinese dyslexic individuals had deficits in visual magnocellular function,and cerebellum

  5. Molecular genetics and pathogenic mechanisms for the severe ciliopathies: insights into neurodevelopment and pathogenesis of neural tube defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Clare V; Abdel-Hamed, Zakia; Johnson, Colin A

    2011-02-01

    Meckel-Gruber syndrome (MKS) is a severe autosomal recessively inherited disorder characterized by developmental defects of the central nervous system that comprise neural tube defects that most commonly present as occipital encephalocele. MKS is considered to be the most common syndromic form of neural tube defect. MKS is genetically heterogeneous with six known disease genes: MKS1, MKS2/TMEM216, MKS3/TMEM67, RPGRIP1L, CEP290, and CC2D2A with the encoded proteins all implicated in the correct function of primary cilia. Primary cilia are microtubule-based organelles that project from the apical surface of most epithelial cell types. Recent progress has implicated the involvement of cilia in the Wnt and Shh signaling pathways and has led to an understanding of their role in normal mammalian neurodevelopment. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the molecular genetics of the human disorder, and to assess recent insights into the etiology and molecular cell biology of severe ciliopathies from mammalian animal models of MKS.

  6. Exploring the mechanical behavior of degrading swine neural tissue at low strain rates via the fractional Zener constitutive model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentil, Sarah A; Dupaix, Rebecca B

    2014-02-01

    The ability of the fractional Zener constitutive model to predict the behavior of postmortem swine brain tissue was examined in this work. Understanding tissue behavior attributed to degradation is invaluable in many fields such as the forensic sciences or cases where only cadaveric tissue is available. To understand how material properties change with postmortem age, the fractional Zener model was considered as it includes parameters to describe brain stiffness and also the parameter α, which quantifies the viscoelasticity of a material. The relationship between the viscoelasticity described by α and tissue degradation was examined by fitting the model to data collected in a previous study (Bentil, 2013). This previous study subjected swine neural tissue to in vitro unconfined compression tests using four postmortem age groups (week). All samples were compressed to a strain level of 10% using two compressive rates: 1mm/min and 5mm/min. Statistical analysis was used as a tool to study the influence of the fractional Zener constants on factors such as tissue degradation and compressive rate. Application of the fractional Zener constitutive model to the experimental data showed that swine neural tissue becomes less stiff with increased postmortem age. The fractional Zener model was also able to capture the nonlinear viscoelastic features of the brain tissue at low strain rates. The results showed that the parameter α was better correlated with compressive rate than with postmortem age. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Pyramidal cell-interneuron interactions underlie hippocampal ripple oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Eran; Roux, Lisa; Eichler, Ronny; Senzai, Yuta; Royer, Sebastien; Buzsáki, György

    2014-07-16

    High-frequency ripple oscillations, observed most prominently in the hippocampal CA1 pyramidal layer, are associated with memory consolidation. The cellular and network mechanisms underlying the generation, frequency control, and spatial coherence of the rhythm are poorly understood. Using multisite optogenetic manipulations in freely behaving rodents, we found that depolarization of a small group of nearby pyramidal cells was sufficient to induce high-frequency oscillations, whereas closed-loop silencing of pyramidal cells or activation of parvalbumin- (PV) or somatostatin-immunoreactive interneurons aborted spontaneously occurring ripples. Focal pharmacological blockade of GABAA receptors abolished ripples. Localized PV interneuron activation paced ensemble spiking, and simultaneous induction of high-frequency oscillations at multiple locations resulted in a temporally coherent pattern mediated by phase-locked interneuron spiking. These results constrain competing models of ripple generation and indicate that temporally precise local interactions between excitatory and inhibitory neurons support ripple generation in the intact hippocampus.

  8. Match mismatch processes underlie human hippocampal responses to associative novelty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaran, Dharshan; Maguire, Eleanor A

    2007-08-08

    The hippocampus has long been proposed to play a critical role in novelty detection through its ability to act as a comparator between past and present experience. A recent study provided evidence for this hypothesis by characterizing hippocampal responses to sequence novelty, a type of associative novelty where familiar items appear in a new temporal order. Here, we ask whether a hippocampal match-mismatch (i.e., comparator) mechanism operates selectively to identify the violation of predictions within the temporal domain or instead also underlies the processing of associative novelty in other domains (e.g., spatial). We used functional magnetic resonance imaging and a repetition paradigm in which subjects viewed sequences of objects presented in distinct locations on the screen and performed an incidental target detection task. The left hippocampus exhibited a pattern of activity consistent with that of an associative match-mismatch detector, with novelty signals generated only in conditions where one contextual component was novel and the other repeated. In contrast, right hippocampal activation signaled the presence of objects in familiar locations. Our results suggest that hippocampal match-mismatch computations constitute a general mechanism underpinning the processing of associative novelty. These findings support a model in which hippocampal mismatch signals rely critically on the recall of previous experience, a process that only occurs when novel sensory inputs overlap significantly with stored representations. More generally, the current study also offers insights into how the hippocampus automatically represents the spatiotemporal context of our experiences, a function that may relate to its role in episodic memory.

  9. Cholinergic Interneurons Underlie Spontaneous Dopamine Release in Nucleus Accumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorgason, Jordan T; Zeppenfeld, Douglas M; Williams, John T

    2017-02-22

    The release of dopamine from terminals in the NAc is regulated by a number of factors, including voltage-gated ion channels, D2-autoreceptors, and nAChRs. Cholinergic interneurons (CINs) drive dopamine release through activation of nAChRs on dopamine terminals. Using cyclic voltammetry in mouse brain slices, nAChR-dependent spontaneous dopamine transients and the mechanisms underlying the origin were examined in the NAc. Spontaneous events were infrequent (0.3 per minute), but the rate and amplitude were increased after blocking Kv channels with 4-aminopyridine. Although the firing frequency of CINs was increased by blocking glutamate reuptake with TBOA and the Sk blocker apamin, only 4-aminopyridine increased the frequency of dopamine transients. In contrast, inhibition of CIN firing with the μ/δ selective opioid [Met(5)]enkephalin (1 μm) decreased spontaneous dopamine transients. Cocaine increased the rate and amplitude of dopamine transients, suggesting that the activity of the dopamine transporter limits the detection of these events. In the presence of cocaine, the rate of spontaneous dopamine transients was further increased after blocking D2-autoreceptors. Blockade of muscarinic receptors had no effect on evoked dopamine release, suggesting that feedback inhibition of acetylcholine release was not involved. Thus, although spontaneous dopamine transients are reliant on nAChRs, the frequency was not strictly governed by the activity of CINs. The increase in frequency of spontaneous dopamine transients induced by cocaine was not due to an increase in cholinergic tone and is likely a product of an increase in detection resulting from decreased dopamine reuptake.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The actions of dopamine in the NAc are thought to be responsible for endogenous reward and the reinforcing properties of drugs of abuse, such as psychostimulants. The present work examines the mechanisms underlying nAChR-induced spontaneous dopamine release. This study

  10. Altered oncomodules underlie chromatin regulatory factors driver mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigola, Joan; Iturbide, Ane; Lopez-Bigas, Nuria; Peiro, Sandra; Gonzalez-Perez, Abel

    2016-05-24

    Chromatin regulatory factors (CRFs), are known to be involved in tumorigenesis in several cancer types. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanisms through which driver alterations of CRFs cause tumorigenesis remain unknown. Here, we developed a CRFs Oncomodules Discovery approach, which mines several sources of cancer genomics and perturbaomics data. The approach prioritizes sets of genes significantly miss-regulated in primary tumors (oncomodules) bearing mutations of driver CRFs. We applied the approach to eleven TCGA tumor cohorts and uncovered oncomodules potentially associated to mutations of five driver CRFs in three cancer types. Our results revealed, for example, the potential involvement of the mTOR pathway in the development of tumors with loss-of-function mutations of MLL2 in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. The experimental validation that MLL2 loss-of-function increases the sensitivity of cancer cell lines to mTOR inhibition lends further support to the validity of our approach. The potential oncogenic modules detected by our approach may guide experiments proposing ways to indirectly target driver mutations of CRFs.

  11. Neural cryptography with feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Shacham, Lanir; Kanter, Ido

    2004-04-01

    Neural cryptography is based on a competition between attractive and repulsive stochastic forces. A feedback mechanism is added to neural cryptography which increases the repulsive forces. Using numerical simulations and an analytic approach, the probability of a successful attack is calculated for different model parameters. Scaling laws are derived which show that feedback improves the security of the system. In addition, a network with feedback generates a pseudorandom bit sequence which can be used to encrypt and decrypt a secret message.

  12. Neural cryptography with feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Shacham, Lanir; Kanter, Ido

    2004-04-01

    Neural cryptography is based on a competition between attractive and repulsive stochastic forces. A feedback mechanism is added to neural cryptography which increases the repulsive forces. Using numerical simulations and an analytic approach, the probability of a successful attack is calculated for different model parameters. Scaling laws are derived which show that feedback improves the security of the system. In addition, a network with feedback generates a pseudorandom bit sequence which can be used to encrypt and decrypt a secret message.

  13. Meta Review of Systematic and Meta Analytic Reviews on Movement Differences, Effect of Movement Based Interventions, and the Underlying Neural Mechanisms in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motohide eMiyahara

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Purposes: The aims of this paper are three-folds: first, to identify and appraise evidence from published systematic and meta-analytic reviews on 1 movement characteristics of individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD; 2 the effects of movement based interventions for ASD; 3 hypothesized underlying neural mechanisms for the movement characteristics. Methods: A meta review of published systematic and meta-analytic reviews on movement characteristics, structural and functional brain anomalies in ASD and the effects of movement based interventions for individuals with ASD between 1806 and October 2012. The methodological quality of the identified systematic and meta-analytic reviews was independently assessed by two assessors with the assessment of multiple systematic reviews (AMSTAR.Results: The search yielded a total of twelve reviews on the movement differences or the movement based interventions. The methodological quality of the reviews varied, but the review conclusions were similar. Although individuals with ASD generally perform less well than age-matched controls in developmental movement tasks, there are few exceptions whose movement abilities are intact. Most movement based interventions report their efficacies. However, all existing studies employ the research design that is inherently incapable of providing strong evidence, and they often fail to report the extent of psychosocial interactions within the movement interventions. The hypothesized neural mechanisms are still under development and speculative in nature.Conclusions: It is premature to designate movement disturbance as a core symptom of ASD. The effects of movement based interventions on ASD core symptoms need to be further validated by stronger evidence based on verified theoretical mechanisms linking ASD with movement disorders.

  14. An Order Release Control Mechanism Based on self-Adaptive Neural Fuzzy Inference System and Theory of Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuandong Zhan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Order release is the key premise for the semiconductor wafer fabrication system to perform well, which is also one of the paramount significant components in the scheduling strategies. Most order release strategies merely have focused on the workloadbut failed in considering the remarkable influence oncycletime of common orders that is brought by unexpectedrushones.In this paper an on-linemechanismbased on Theory of Constraintsfor lot releaseusingself-Adaptive Neural Fuzzy Inference System modelswas presentedwhich is able to adjust the release rhythmdynamicallyaccording to dynamics of fabs.In our approach, an ANFIS model was established to predict the ratiobetweenhotand common lotsin wafer fabto perform adjustments on the order release schedule in advance.Simulated experimentsbased on the HP24 model were carefully performed and experimental results proved a better performance of common lotsthan original TOC on a large scale, especially when it comes to the situation of disturbance.  

  15. Adaptive neural control for dual-arm coordination of humanoid robot with unknown nonlinearities in output mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhi; Chen, Ci; Zhang, Yun; Chen, C L P

    2015-03-01

    To achieve an excellent dual-arm coordination of the humanoid robot, it is essential to deal with the nonlinearities existing in the system dynamics. The literatures so far on the humanoid robot control have a common assumption that the problem of output hysteresis could be ignored. However, in the practical applications, the output hysteresis is widely spread; and its existing limits the motion/force performances of the robotic system. In this paper, an adaptive neural control scheme, which takes the unknown output hysteresis and computational efficiency into account, is presented and investigated. In the controller design, the prior knowledge of system dynamics is assumed to be unknown. The motion error is guaranteed to converge to a small neighborhood of the origin by Lyapunov's stability theory. Simultaneously, the internal force is kept bounded and its error can be made arbitrarily small.

  16. Neural Mechanism of Cognitive Control Impairment in Patients with Hepatic Cirrhosis: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long Jiang Zhang; Guifen Yang; Jianzhong Yin; Yawu Liu; Ji Qi [Dept. of Radiology, Tianjin First Central Hospital of Tianjin Medical Univ, Tianjin (China)

    2007-07-15

    Background: Many studies have claimed the existence of attention alterations in cirrhotic patients without overt hepatic encephalopathy (HE). No functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study in this respect has been published. Purpose: To investigate the neural basis of cognitive control deficiency in cirrhotic patients using fMRI. Material and Methods: 14 patients with hepatic cirrhosis and 14 healthy volunteers were included in the study. A modified Stroop task with Chinese characters was used as the target stimulus, and block-design fMRI was used to acquire resource data, including four stimulus blocks and five control blocks, each presented alternatively. Image analysis was performed using statistical parametric mapping 99. After fMRI examinations were complete, behavior tests of Stroop interference were performed for all subjects. Overall reaction time and error numbers were recorded. Results: Both healthy volunteers and patients with hepatic cirrhosis had Stroop interference effects. Patients with hepatic cirrhosis had more errors and longer reaction time in performing an incongruous color-naming task than healthy volunteers (P<0.001); there was no significant difference in performing an incongruous word-reading task (P 0.066). Compared with controls, patients with hepatic cirrhosis had greater activation of the bilateral prefrontal cortex and parietal cortex when performing the incongruous word-reading task. With increased conflict, activation of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), bilateral prefrontal cortex (PFC), parietal lobe, and temporal fusiform gyrus (TFG) was decreased when patients with hepatic cirrhosis performed the incongruous color-naming task. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that patients with hepatic cirrhostic have cognitive control deficiency. The abnormal brain network of the ACC-PFC-parietal lobe-TFG is the neural basis of cognitive control impairment in cirrhotic patients.

  17. Artificial neural networks application for modeling of friction stir welding effects on mechanical properties of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, E.

    2015-12-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a relatively new solid-state joining technique that is widely adopted in manufacturing and industry fields to join different metallic alloys that are hard to weld by conventional fusion welding. Friction stir welding is a very complex process comprising several highly coupled physical phenomena. The complex geometry of some kinds of joints makes it difficult to develop an overall governing equations system for theoretical behavior analyse of the friction stir welded joints. Weld quality is predominantly affected by welding effective parameters, and the experiments are often time consuming and costly. On the other hand, employing artificial intelligence (AI) systems such as artificial neural networks (ANNs) as an efficient approach to solve the science and engineering problems is considerable. In present study modeling of FSW effective parameters by ANNs is investigated. To train the networks, experimental test results on thirty AA-7075-T6 specimens are considered, and the networks are developed based on back propagation (BP) algorithm. ANNs testing are carried out using different experimental data that they are not used during networks training. In this paper, rotational speed of tool, welding speed, axial force, shoulder diameter, pin diameter and tool hardness are regarded as inputs of the ANNs. Yield strength, tensile strength, notch-tensile strength and hardness of welding zone are gathered as outputs of neural networks. According to the obtained results, predicted values for the hardness of welding zone, yield strength, tensile strength and notch-tensile strength have the least mean relative error (MRE), respectively. Comparison of the predicted and the experimental results confirms that the networks are adjusted carefully, and the ANN can be used for modeling of FSW effective parameters.

  18. Neural Mechanism of Cognitive Control Impairment in Patients with Hepatic Cirrhosis: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long Jiang Zhang; Guifen Yang; Jianzhong Yin; Yawu Liu; Ji Qi [Dept. of Radiology, Tianjin First Central Hospital of Tianjin Medical Univ, Tianjin (China)

    2007-07-15

    Background: Many studies have claimed the existence of attention alterations in cirrhotic patients without overt hepatic encephalopathy (HE). No functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study in this respect has been published. Purpose: To investigate the neural basis of cognitive control deficiency in cirrhotic patients using fMRI. Material and Methods: 14 patients with hepatic cirrhosis and 14 healthy volunteers were included in the study. A modified Stroop task with Chinese characters was used as the target stimulus, and block-design fMRI was used to acquire resource data, including four stimulus blocks and five control blocks, each presented alternatively. Image analysis was performed using statistical parametric mapping 99. After fMRI examinations were complete, behavior tests of Stroop interference were performed for all subjects. Overall reaction time and error numbers were recorded. Results: Both healthy volunteers and patients with hepatic cirrhosis had Stroop interference effects. Patients with hepatic cirrhosis had more errors and longer reaction time in performing an incongruous color-naming task than healthy volunteers (P<0.001); there was no significant difference in performing an incongruous word-reading task (P 0.066). Compared with controls, patients with hepatic cirrhosis had greater activation of the bilateral prefrontal cortex and parietal cortex when performing the incongruous word-reading task. With increased conflict, activation of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), bilateral prefrontal cortex (PFC), parietal lobe, and temporal fusiform gyrus (TFG) was decreased when patients with hepatic cirrhosis performed the incongruous color-naming task. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that patients with hepatic cirrhostic have cognitive control deficiency. The abnormal brain network of the ACC-PFC-parietal lobe-TFG is the neural basis of cognitive control impairment in cirrhotic patients.

  19. Modeling and Analysis of Mechanical Properties of Aluminium Alloy (A413 Processed through Squeeze Casting Route Using Artificial Neural Network Model and Statistical Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Soundararajan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Artificial Neural Network (ANN approach was used for predicting and analyzing the mechanical properties of A413 aluminum alloy produced by squeeze casting route. The experiments are carried out with different controlled input variables such as squeeze pressure, die preheating temperature, and melt temperature as per Full Factorial Design (FFD. The accounted absolute process variables produce a casting with pore-free and ideal fine grain dendritic structure resulting in good mechanical properties such as hardness, ultimate tensile strength, and yield strength. As a primary objective, a feed forward back propagation ANN model has been developed with different architectures for ensuring the definiteness of the values. The developed model along with its predicted data was in good agreement with the experimental data, inferring the valuable performance of the optimal model. From the work it was ascertained that, for castings produced by squeeze casting route, the ANN is an alternative method for predicting the mechanical properties and appropriate results can be estimated rather than measured, thereby reducing the testing time and cost. As a secondary objective, quantitative and statistical analysis was performed in order to evaluate the effect of process parameters on the mechanical properties of the castings.

  20. Effects of Fast Simple Numerical Calculation Training on Neural Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Hikaru; Nagase, Tomomi; Taki, Yasuyuki; Sassa, Yuko; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Nouchi, Rui; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive training, including fast simple numerical calculation (FSNC), has been shown to improve performance on untrained processing speed and executive function tasks in the elderly. However, the effects of FSNC training on cognitive functions in the young and on neural mechanisms remain unknown. We investigated the effects of 1-week intensive FSNC training on cognitive function, regional gray matter volume (rGMV), and regional cerebral blood flow at rest (resting rCBF) in healthy young adults. FSNC training was associated with improvements in performance on simple processing speed, speeded executive functioning, and simple and complex arithmetic tasks. FSNC training was associated with a reduction in rGMV and an increase in resting rCBF in the frontopolar areas and a weak but widespread increase in resting rCBF in an anatomical cluster in the posterior region. These results provide direct evidence that FSNC training alone can improve performance on processing speed and executive function tasks as well as plasticity of brain structures and perfusion. Our results also indicate that changes in neural systems in the frontopolar areas may underlie these cognitive improvements.

  1. Differing mechanisms underlie sexual size-dimorphism in two populations of a sex-changing fish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark I McCormick

    Full Text Available Variability in the density of groups within a patchy environment lead to differences in interaction rates, growth dynamics and social organization. In protogynous hermaphrodites there are hypothesised trade-offs among sex-specific growth, reproductive output and mortality. When differences in density lead to changes to social organization the link between growth and the timing of sex-change is predicted to change. The present study explores this prediction by comparing the social organisation and sex-specific growth of two populations of a protogynous tropical wrasse, Halichoeres miniatus, which differ in density. At a low density population a strict harem structure was found, where males maintained a tight monopoly of access and spawning rights to females. In contrast, at a high density population a loosely organised system prevailed, where females could move throughout multiple male territories. Otolith microstructure revealed the species to be annual and deposit an otolith check associated with sex-change. Growth trajectories suggested that individuals that later became males in both populations underwent a growth acceleration at sex-change. Moreover, in the high density population, individuals that later became males were those individuals that had the largest otolith size at hatching and consistently deposited larger increments throughout early larval, juvenile and female life. This study demonstrates that previous growth history and growth rate changes associated with sex change can be responsible for the sexual dimorphism typically found in sex-changing species, and that the relative importance of these may be socially constrained.

  2. Different involuntary mechanisms underlie priming and LOP effects in stem completion tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhardt, Terrence M

    2004-09-01

    The role of intentional retrieval, involuntary conscious memory, and lexical processing in priming and levels-of-processing (LOP) effects in stem completion tests was investigated in three experiments. First, Experiment 1 provided strong evidence against the intentional retrieval hypothesis for the implicit LOP effects. LOP effects in the explicit test were dependent on intertrial interval at test, whereas LOP effects in the implicit test were not. Second, support was provided for the involuntary conscious memory hypothesis. Implicit memory (priming) was associated with awareness in all three experiments and the implicit LOP effect was associated with awareness in two of the three experiments. Third, it was concluded that lexical processing per se played a limited role in both priming and implicit LOP effects. Although priming was sensitive to normative rates of production in Experiment 1 and the number of solutions in all three experiments, it was insensitive to frequency manipulations. The LOP effect was insensitive to number of solutions, normative rates of production, and frequency manipulations. In addition, LOP and priming effects were uncorrelated in the implicit memory tests. It was concluded that production processes (e.g., Gabrieli et al., 1999), rather than lexical processes, played a crucial role in stem completion priming. In contrast, the LOP effect was attributed to the involuntary interaction of episodic and perceptual memory.

  3. Distinct Mechanisms Underlie Quiescence during Two Caenorhabditis elegans Sleep-Like States

    OpenAIRE

    Trojanowski, Nicholas F.; Nelson, Matthew D.; Flavell, Steven W.; Fang-Yen, Christopher; Raizen, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Electrophysiological recordings have enabled identification of physiologically distinct yet behaviorally similar states of mammalian sleep. In contrast, sleep in nonmammals has generally been identified behaviorally and therefore regarded as a physiologically uniform state characterized by quiescence of feeding and locomotion, reduced responsiveness, and rapid reversibility. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans displays sleep-like quiescent behavior under two conditions: developmentally timed ...

  4. A follow-up investigation into the mechanisms that underlie improved recognition of dysarthric speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrie, Stephanie A; McAuliffe, Megan J; Liss, Julie M; O'Beirne, Greg A; Anderson, Tim J

    2012-08-01

    Differences in perceptual strategies for lexical segmentation of moderate hypokinetic dysarthric speech, apparently related to the conditions of the familiarization procedure, have been previously reported [Borrie et al., Language and Cognitive Processes (2012)]. The current follow-up investigation examined whether this difference was also observed when familiarization stimuli highlighted syllabic strength contrast cues. Forty listeners completed an identical transcription task following familiarization with dysarthric phrases presented under either passive or explicit learning conditions. Lexical boundary error patterns revealed that syllabic strength cues were exploited in both familiarization conditions. Comparisons with data previously reported afford further insight into perceptual learning of dysarthric speech.

  5. Central Synaptic Mechanisms Underlie Short-Term Olfactory Habituation in "Drosophila" Larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Aoife; Karak, Somdatta; Priya, Rashi; Das, Abhijit; Ayyub, Champakali; Ito, Kei; Rodrigues, Veronica; Ramaswami, Mani

    2010-01-01

    Naive "Drosophila" larvae show vigorous chemotaxis toward many odorants including ethyl acetate (EA). Chemotaxis toward EA is substantially reduced after a 5-min pre-exposure to the odorant and recovers with a half-time of [image omitted]20 min. An analogous behavioral decrement can be induced without odorant-receptor activation through…

  6. Mechanisms that Underlie Co-variation of the Brain and Face

    OpenAIRE

    Marcucio, Ralph S.; Young, Nathan M.; Hu, Diane; Hallgrimsson, Benedikt

    2011-01-01

    The effect of the brain on the morphology of the face has long been recognized in both evolutionary biology and clinical medicine. In this paper we describe factors that are active between development of the brain and face and how these might impact craniofacial variation. First, there is the physical influence of the brain, which contributes to overall growth and morphology of the face through direct structural interactions. Second, there is the molecular influence of the brain, which signal...

  7. Mechanisms that underlie co-variation of the brain and face.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcucio, Ralph S; Young, Nathan M; Hu, Diane; Hallgrimsson, Benedikt

    2011-04-01

    The effect of the brain on the morphology of the face has long been recognized in both evolutionary biology and clinical medicine. In this work, we describe factors that are active between the development of the brain and face and how these might impact craniofacial variation. First, there is the physical influence of the brain, which contributes to overall growth and morphology of the face through direct structural interactions. Second, there is the molecular influence of the brain, which signals to facial tissues to establish signaling centers that regulate patterned growth. Importantly, subtle alterations to these physical or molecular interactions may contribute to both normal and abnormal variation. These interactions are therefore critical to our understanding of how a diversity of facial morphologies can be generated both within species and across evolutionary time.

  8. Analysis of the Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms Which Underlie Sensitivity to Bacterial Endotoxin and Early Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-06-24

    1990). It is the O-antigen that confers antigenic and serological specificity on the bacterium (Luderitz et a1., 1982; 1987; reviewed in Brade et a1...Munford, 1983; Munford and Hall, 1985; 1986). AOAH enzyme assays were kindly performed by David Ginkel, in the laboratory of Robert S. Munford...MPL for 1 hour at 370 C in 6% C02. Affinity-purified rabbit anti-5D3 antibody (RaSD3) was provided by David 41 Morrison (University of Kansas

  9. Recurring RNA structural motifs underlie the mechanics of L1 stalk movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Srividya; Noller, Harry F.

    2017-02-01

    The L1 stalk of the large ribosomal subunit undergoes large-scale movements coupled to the translocation of deacylated tRNA during protein synthesis. We use quantitative comparative structural analysis to localize the origins of L1 stalk movement and to understand its dynamic interactions with tRNA and other structural elements of the ribosome. Besides its stacking interactions with the tRNA elbow, stalk movement is directly linked to intersubunit rotation, rotation of the 30S head domain and contact of the acceptor arm of deacylated tRNA with helix 68 of 23S rRNA. Movement originates from pivoting at stacked non-canonical base pairs in a Family A three-way junction and bending in an internal G-U-rich zone. Use of these same motifs as hinge points to enable such dynamic events as rotation of the 30S subunit head domain and in flexing of the anticodon arm of tRNA suggests that they represent general strategies for movement of functional RNAs.

  10. EEG frequency tagging dissociates between neural processing of motion synchrony and human quality of multiple point-light dancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alp, Nihan; Nikolaev, Andrey R.; Wagemans, Johan; Kogo, Naoki

    2017-01-01

    Do we perceive a group of dancers moving in synchrony differently from a group of drones flying in-sync? The brain has dedicated networks for perception of coherent motion and interacting human bodies. However, it is unclear to what extent the underlying neural mechanisms overlap. Here we delineate these mechanisms by independently manipulating the degree of motion synchrony and the humanoid quality of multiple point-light displays (PLDs). Four PLDs moving within a group were changing contrast in cycles of fixed frequencies, which permits the identification of the neural processes that are tagged by these frequencies. In the frequency spectrum of the steady-state EEG we found two emergent frequency components, which signified distinct levels of interactions between PLDs. The first component was associated with motion synchrony, the second with the human quality of the moving items. These findings indicate that visual processing of synchronously moving dancers involves two distinct neural mechanisms: one for the perception of a group of items moving in synchrony and one for the perception of a group of moving items with human quality. We propose that these mechanisms underlie high-level perception of social interactions. PMID:28272421

  11. Prediction on Power Produced from Power Turbine as a Waste Heat Recovery Mechanism on Naturally Aspirated Spark Ignition Engine Using Artificial Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safarudin Gazali Herawan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The waste heat from exhaust gases represents a significant amount of thermal energy, which has conventionally been used for combined heating and power applications. This paper explores the performance of a naturally aspirated spark ignition engine equipped with waste heat recovery mechanism (WHRM in a sedan car. The amount of heat energy from exhaust is presented and the experimental test results suggest that the concept is thermodynamically feasible and could significantly enhance the system performance depending on the load applied to the engine. However, the existence of WHRM affects the performance of engine by slightly reducing the power. The simulation method is created using an artificial neural network (ANN which predicts the power produced from the WHRM.

  12. Intelligent direct analysis of physical and mechanical parameters of tunnel surrounding rock based on adaptive immunity algorithm and BP neural network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-rui Wang; Yuan-han Wang; Xiao-feng Jia

    2009-01-01

    Because of complexity and non-predictability of the tunnel surrounding rock, the problem with the determination of the physical and, mechanical parameters of the surrounding rock has become a main obstacle to theoretical research and numerical analysis in tunnel engineering. During design, it is a frequent practice, therefore, to give recommended values by analog based on experience. It is a key point in current research to make use of the displacement back analytic method to comparatively accurately determine the parameters of the surrounding rock whereas artificial intelligence possesses an exceptionally strong capability of identifying, expressing and coping with such complex non-linear relationships. The parameters can be verified by searching the optimal network structure, using back analysis on measured data to search optimal parameters and performing direct computation of the obtained results. In the current paper, the direct analysis is performed with the biological emulation system and the software of Fast Lagrangian Analysis of Continua (FLAC3D. The high non-linearity, network reasoning and coupling ability of the neural network are employed. The output vector required of the training of the neural network is obtained with the numerical analysis software. And the overall space search is conducted by employing the Adaptive Immunity Algorithm. As a result, we are able to avoid the shortcoming that multiple parameters and optimized parameters are easy to fall into a local extremum. At the same time, the computing speed and efficiency are increased as well. Further, in the paper satisfactory conclusions are arrived at through the intelligent direct-back analysis on the monitored and measured data at the Erdaoya tunneling project. The results show that the physical and mechanical parameters obtained by the intelligent direct-back analysis proposed in the current paper have effectively unproved the recommended values in the original prospecting data. This is of

  13. 心理疲劳发生的认知神经机制%Cognitive and Neural Mechanism of Mental Fatigue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    晏双平; 张进辅; 熊春金; 甘霖

    2011-01-01

    Mental fatigue is a complex psychological phenomenon involving changes in cognition, emotion and behavior resulting from people engaging in long-time mental activity.There are individual differences in the occurrence of mental fatigue.Its occurrence is relevant to the reward measure of gains and losses, impaired error monitoring, information processing disruption, and so on.Based on reviewing the research over the past decade, the authors found the neural mechanisms of mental fatigue mainly involved dopamine, sensorimotor gating, autonomic nervous system (vagus nerve and parasympathetic), the brain's cingulate gyrus and basal ganglia and other neural basis.The research methods and means of mental fatigue need to be improved; various theoretical perspectives of mental fatigue need to be integrated.Moreover, researches on the cognitive and neural mechanisms of mental fatigue are immature, and need to be deepened and improved.%心理疲劳是人们长时间从事脑力活动而形成的一种包括认知、情绪和行为改变的复杂心理现象.心理疲劳的发生有个体差异,它与奖赏得失的衡量、错误监控受损和信息加工扰乱等因素有关.回顾近十年相关研究,发现心理疲劳发生的神经生理机制主要涉及多巴胺、感觉运动门控、自主神经(迷走神经和副交感神经)、大脑的扣带回和基底神经节等神经系统,认为目前对心理疲劳的研究方法和手段有待改进,心理疲劳的各种理论观点有待整合,对心理疲劳发生的认知机制和神经机制需作进一步深入研究.

  14. Neural effects of positive and negative incentives during marijuana withdrawal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca M Filbey

    Full Text Available In spite of evidence suggesting two possible mechanisms related to drug-seeking behavior, namely reward-seeking and harm avoidance, much of the addiction literature has focused largely on positive incentivization mechanisms associated with addiction. In this study, we examined the contributing neural mechanisms of avoidance of an aversive state to drug-seeking behavior during marijuana withdrawal. To that end, marijuana users were scanned while performing the monetary incentive delay task in order to assess positive and negative incentive processes. The results showed a group x incentive interaction, such that marijuana users had greater response in areas that underlie reward processes during positive incentives while controls showed greater response in the same areas, but to negative incentives. Furthermore, a negative correlation between withdrawal symptoms and response in the amygdala during negative incentives was found in the marijuana users. These findings suggest that although marijuana users have greater reward sensitivity and less harm avoidance than controls, that attenuated amygdala response, an area that underlies fear and avoidance, was present in marijuana users with greater marijuana withdrawal symptoms. This is concordant with models of drug addiction that involve multiple sources of reinforcement in substance use disorders, and suggests the importance of strategies that focus on respective mechanisms.

  15. Optimization and Prediction of Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Graphene/LLDPE Nanocomposites by Using Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Noorunnisa Khanam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this work is to develop the knowledge of prediction of the physical and chemical properties of processed linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE/graphene nanoplatelets composites. Composites made from LLDPE reinforced with 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 wt% grade C graphene nanoplatelets (C-GNP were processed in a twin screw extruder with three different screw speeds and feeder speeds (50, 100, and 150 rpm. These applied conditions are used to optimize the following properties: thermal conductivity, crystallization temperature, degradation temperature, and tensile strength while prediction of these properties was done through artificial neural network (ANN. The three first properties increased with increase in both screw speed and C-GNP content. The tensile strength reached a maximum value at 4 wt% C-GNP and a speed of 150 rpm as this represented the optimum condition for the stress transfer through the amorphous chains of the matrix to the C-GNP. ANN can be confidently used as a tool to predict the above material properties before investing in development programs and actual manufacturing, thus significantly saving money, time, and effort.