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Sample records for neural cell culture

  1. Culture of Mouse Neural Stem Cell Precursors

    OpenAIRE

    Currle, D. Spencer; Hu, Jia Sheng; Kolski-Andreaco, Aaron; Monuki, Edwin S.

    2007-01-01

    Primary neural stem cell cultures are useful for studying the mechanisms underlying central nervous system development. Stem cell research will increase our understanding of the nervous system and may allow us to develop treatments for currently incurable brain diseases and injuries. In addition, stem cells should be used for stem cell research aimed at the detailed study of mechanisms of neural differentiation and transdifferentiation and the genetic and environmental signals that direct the...

  2. Recombinant spider silk matrices for neural stem cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewicka, Michalina; Hermanson, Ola; Rising, Anna U

    2012-11-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) have the capacity to differentiate into neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. Accordingly, NSCs hold great promise in drug screening and treatment of several common diseases. However, a major obstacle in applied stem cell research is the limitation of synthetic matrices for culturing stem cells. The objective of this study was to evaluate the suitability of recombinant spider silk (4RepCT) matrices for growth of NSCs. NSCs isolated from the cerebral cortices of mid-gestation rat embryos were cultured on either 4RepCT matrices or conventional poly-L-ornithine and fibronectin (P + F) coated polystyrene plates. From 48 h of culture, no significant differences in cell proliferation or viability were detected in NSC cultures on 4RepCT compared to control matrices (polystyrene plates coated with P + F). The NSCs retained an undifferentiated state, displaying low or no staining for markers of differentiated cells. Upon stimulation NSCs grown on 4RepCT differentiated efficiently into neuronal and astrocytic cells to virtually the same degree as control cultures, but a slightly less efficient oligodendrocyte differentiation was noted. We suggest that recombinant spider silk matrices provide a functional microenvironment and represent a useful tool for the development of new strategies in neural stem cell research. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Topological defects control collective dynamics in neural progenitor cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Kyogo; Kageyama, Ryoichiro; Sano, Masaki

    2017-04-01

    Cultured stem cells have become a standard platform not only for regenerative medicine and developmental biology but also for biophysical studies. Yet, the characterization of cultured stem cells at the level of morphology and of the macroscopic patterns resulting from cell-to-cell interactions remains largely qualitative. Here we report on the collective dynamics of cultured murine neural progenitor cells (NPCs), which are multipotent stem cells that give rise to cells in the central nervous system. At low densities, NPCs moved randomly in an amoeba-like fashion. However, NPCs at high density elongated and aligned their shapes with one another, gliding at relatively high velocities. Although the direction of motion of individual cells reversed stochastically along the axes of alignment, the cells were capable of forming an aligned pattern up to length scales similar to that of the migratory stream observed in the adult brain. The two-dimensional order of alignment within the culture showed a liquid-crystalline pattern containing interspersed topological defects with winding numbers of +1/2 and -1/2 (half-integer due to the nematic feature that arises from the head-tail symmetry of cell-to-cell interaction). We identified rapid cell accumulation at +1/2 defects and the formation of three-dimensional mounds. Imaging at the single-cell level around the defects allowed us to quantify the velocity field and the evolving cell density; cells not only concentrate at +1/2 defects, but also escape from -1/2 defects. We propose a generic mechanism for the instability in cell density around the defects that arises from the interplay between the anisotropic friction and the active force field.

  4. Enteric neurospheres are not specific to neural crest cultures : Implications for neural stem cell therapies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binder, E. (Ellen); D. Natarajan (Dipa); J.E. Cooper (Julie E.); Kronfli, R. (Rania); Cananzi, M. (Mara); J.-M. Delalande (Jean-Marie); C. Mccann; A.J. Burns (Alan); N. Thapar (Nikhil)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjectives Enteric neural stem cells provide hope of curative treatment for enteric neuropathies. Current protocols for their harvesting from humans focus on the generation of 'neurospheres' from cultures of dissociated gut tissue. The study aims to better understand the derivation,

  5. Enrichment of skin-derived neural precursor cells from dermal cell populations by altering culture conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayati, Vahid; Gazor, Rohoullah; Nejatbakhsh, Reza; Negad Dehbashi, Fereshteh

    2016-01-01

    As stem cells play a critical role in tissue repair, their manipulation for being applied in regenerative medicine is of great importance. Skin-derived precursors (SKPs) may be good candidates for use in cell-based therapy as the only neural stem cells which can be isolated from an accessible tissue, skin. Herein, we presented a simple protocol to enrich neural SKPs by monolayer adherent cultivation to prove the efficacy of this method. To enrich neural SKPs from dermal cell populations, we have found that a monolayer adherent cultivation helps to increase the numbers of neural precursor cells. Indeed, we have cultured dermal cells as monolayer under serum-supplemented (control) and serum-supplemented culture, followed by serum free cultivation (test) and compared. Finally, protein markers of SKPs were assessed and compared in both experimental groups and differentiation potential was evaluated in enriched culture. The cells of enriched culture concurrently expressed fibronectin, vimentin and nestin, an intermediate filament protein expressed in neural and skeletal muscle precursors as compared to control culture. In addition, they possessed a multipotential capacity to differentiate into neurogenic, glial, adipogenic, osteogenic and skeletal myogenic cell lineages. It was concluded that serum-free adherent culture reinforced by growth factors have been shown to be effective on proliferation of skin-derived neural precursor cells (skin-NPCs) and drive their selective and rapid expansion.

  6. Maintenance of neural stem cell regional identity in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Ryan N; Lu, Changqing; Lim, Daniel A

    2016-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are distributed throughout the ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ) in the adult mouse brain. NSCs located in spatially distinct regions of the V-SVZ generate different types of olfactory bulb (OB) neurons, and the regional expression of specific transcription factors correlates with these differences in NSC developmental potential. In a recent article, we show that Nkx2.1-expressing embryonic precursors give rise to NKX2.1+ NSCs located in the ventral V-SVZ of adult mice. Here we characterize a V-SVZ monolayer culture system that retains regional gene expression and neurogenic potential of NSCs from the dorsal and ventral V-SVZ. In particular, we find that Nkx2.1-lineage V-SVZ NSCs maintain Nkx2.1 expression through serial passage and can generate new neurons in vitro. Thus, V-SVZ NSCs retain key aspects of their in vivo regional identity in culture, providing new experimental opportunities for understanding how such developmental patterns are established and maintained during development.

  7. Isolation and culture of porcine neural progenitor cells from embryos and pluripotent stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Mikkel Aabech; Hall, Vanessa Jane; Hyttel, Poul

    2013-01-01

    The isolation and culture of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) from pluripotent stem cells has facilitated in vitro mechanistic studies of diseases related to the nervous system, as well as discovery of new medicine. In addition, NPCs are envisioned to play a crucial role in future cell replacement...... therapy. The pig has become recognized as an important large animal model and establishment of in vitro-derived porcine NPCs would allow for preclinical safety testing by transplantation in a porcine biomedical model. In this chapter, a detailed method for isolation and in vitro culture of porcine NPCs...... from porcine embryos or induced pluripotent stem cells is presented. The neural induction is performed in coculture and the isolation of rosette structures is carried out manually to ensure a homogenous population of NPCs. Using this method, multipotent NPCs can be obtained in approximately 1 month...

  8. Dopaminergic differentiation of human neural stem cells mediated by co-cultured rat striatal brain slices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anwar, Mohammad Raffaqat; Andreasen, Christian Maaløv; Lippert, Solvej Kølvraa

    2008-01-01

    differentiation, we co-cultured cells from a human neural forebrain-derived stem cell line (hNS1) with rat striatal brain slices. In brief, coronal slices of neonatal rat striatum were cultured on semiporous membrane inserts placed in six-well trays overlying monolayers of hNS1 cells. After 12 days of co......Properly committed neural stem cells constitute a promising source of cells for transplantation in Parkinson's disease, but a protocol for controlled dopaminergic differentiation is not yet available. To establish a setting for identification of secreted neural compounds promoting dopaminergic......-culture, large numbers of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-immunoreactive, catecholaminergic cells could be found underneath individual striatal slices. Cell counting revealed that up to 25.3% (average 16.1%) of the total number of cells in these areas were TH-positive, contrasting a few TH-positive cells (

  9. Scaffolds for 3D in vitro culture of neural lineage cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Ashley R; Laslett, Andrew; O'Brien, Carmel M; Cameron, Neil R

    2017-05-01

    Understanding how neurodegenerative disorders develop is not only a key challenge for researchers but also for the wider society, given the rapidly aging populations in developed countries. Advances in this field require new tools with which to recreate neural tissue in vitro and produce realistic disease models. This in turn requires robust and reliable systems for performing 3D in vitro culture of neural lineage cells. This review provides a state of the art update on three-dimensional culture systems for in vitro development of neural tissue, employing a wide range of scaffold types including hydrogels, solid porous polymers, fibrous materials and decellularised tissues as well as microfluidic devices and lab-on-a-chip systems. To provide some context with in vivo development of the central nervous system (CNS), we also provide a brief overview of the neural stem cell niche, neural development and neural differentiation in vitro. We conclude with a discussion of future directions for this exciting and important field of biomaterials research. Neurodegenerative diseases, including dementia, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases and motor neuron diseases, are a major societal challenge for aging populations. Understanding these conditions and developing therapies against them will require the development of new physical models of healthy and diseased neural tissue. Cellular models resembling neural tissue can be cultured in the laboratory with the help of 3D scaffolds - materials that allow the organization of neural cells into tissue-like structures. This review presents recent work on the development of different types of scaffolds for the 3D culture of neural lineage cells and the generation of functioning neural-like tissue. These in vitro culture systems are enabling the development of new approaches for modelling and tackling diseases of the brain and CNS. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Transplantation of Neural Stem Cells Cultured in Alginate Scaffold for Spinal Cord Injury in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Seyed Mojtaba; Sharafkhah, Ali; Koohi-Hosseinabadi, Omid; Semsar-Kazerooni, Maryam

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated the effects of transplantation of alginate encapsulated neural stem cells (NSCs) on spinal cord injury in Sprague-Dawley male rats. The neurological functions were assessed for 6 weeks after transplantation along with a histological study and measurement of caspase-3 levels. The aim of this study was to discover whether NSCs cultured in alginate transplantation improve recovery from spinal cord injury. Spinal cord injury is one of the leading causes of disability and it has no effective treatment. Spinal cord injury can also cause sensory impairment. With an impetus on using stem cells therapy in various central nervous system settings, there is an interest in using stem cells for addressing spinal cord injury. Neural stem cell is one type of stem cells that is able to differentiate to all three neural lineages and it shows promise in spinal injury treatment. Furthermore, a number of studies have shown that culturing NSCs in three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds like alginate could enhance neural differentiation. The NSCs were isolated from 14-day-old rat embryos. The isolated NSCs were cultured in growth media containing basic fibroblast growth factor and endothelial growth factor. The cells were characterized by differentiating to three neural lineages and they were cultured in an alginate scaffold. After 7 days the cells were encapsulated and transplanted in a rat model of spinal cord injury. Our data showed that culturing in an alginate 3D scaffold and transplantation of the NSCs could improve neurological outcome in a rat model of spinal cord injury. The inflammation scores and lesion sizes and also the activity of caspase-3 (for apoptosis evaluation) were less in encapsulated neural stem cell transplantation cases. Transplantation of NSCs that were cultured in an alginate scaffold led to a better clinical and histological outcome for recovery from spinal cord injury in a rat model.

  11. Functional Stem Cell Integration into Neural Networks Assessed by Organotypic Slice Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, David; Thonabulsombat, Charoensri; Jäderstad, Johan; Jäderstad, Linda Maria; Olivius, Petri; Herlenius, Eric

    2017-08-14

    Re-formation or preservation of functional, electrically active neural networks has been proffered as one of the goals of stem cell-mediated neural therapeutics. A primary issue for a cell therapy approach is the formation of functional contacts between the implanted cells and the host tissue. Therefore, it is of fundamental interest to establish protocols that allow us to delineate a detailed time course of grafted stem cell survival, migration, differentiation, integration, and functional interaction with the host. One option for in vitro studies is to examine the integration of exogenous stem cells into an existing active neural network in ex vivo organotypic cultures. Organotypic cultures leave the structural integrity essentially intact while still allowing the microenvironment to be carefully controlled. This allows detailed studies over time of cellular responses and cell-cell interactions, which are not readily performed in vivo. This unit describes procedures for using organotypic slice cultures as ex vivo model systems for studying neural stem cell and embryonic stem cell engraftment and communication with CNS host tissue. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  12. Timescale of silver nanoparticle transformation in neural cell cultures impacts measured cell response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, Stephanie L.; Chiaramonti, Ann N.; Rice, Katherine P.; Schwindt, Rani K.; MacCuspie, Robert I.; Jeerage, Kavita M.

    2015-07-01

    Both serum protein concentration and ionic strength are important factors in nanoparticle transformation within cell culture environments. However, silver nanoparticles are not routinely tracked at their working concentration in the specific medium used for in vitro toxicology studies. Here we evaluated the transformation of electrostatically stabilized citrate nanoparticles (C-AgNPs) and sterically stabilized polyvinylpyrrolidone nanoparticles (PVP-AgNPs) in a low-serum ( 0.2 mg/mL bovine serum albumin) culture medium, while measuring the response of rat cortex neural progenitor cells, which differentiate in this culture environment. After 24 h, silver nanoparticles at concentrations up to 10 µg/mL did not affect adenosine triphosphate levels, whereas silver ions decreased adenosine triphosphate levels at concentrations of 1.1 µg/mL or higher. After 240 h, both silver nanoparticles, as well as silver ion, unambiguously decreased adenosine triphosphate levels at concentrations of 1 and 1.1 µg/mL, respectively, suggesting particle dissolution. Particle transformation was investigated in 1:10 diluted, 1:2 diluted, or undiluted differentiation medium, all having an identical protein concentration, to separate the effect of serum protein stabilization from ionic strength destabilization. Transmission electron microscopy images indicated that particles in 1:10 medium were not surrounded by proteins, whereas particles became clustered within a non-crystalline protein matrix after 24 h in 1:2 medium and at 0 h in undiluted medium. Despite evidence for a protein corona, particles were rapidly destabilized by high ionic strength media. Polyvinylpyrrolidone increased the stability of singly dispersed particles compared to citrate ligands; however, differences were negligible after 4 h in 1:2 medium or after 1 h in undiluted medium. Thus low-serum culture environments do not provide sufficient colloidal stability for long-term toxicology studies with citrate- or

  13. Timescale of silver nanoparticle transformation in neural cell cultures impacts measured cell response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hume, Stephanie L.; Chiaramonti, Ann N.; Rice, Katherine P.; Schwindt, Rani K. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Applied Chemicals and Materials Division (United States); MacCuspie, Robert I. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Materials Measurement Science Division (United States); Jeerage, Kavita M., E-mail: jeerage@boulder.nist.gov [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Applied Chemicals and Materials Division (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Both serum protein concentration and ionic strength are important factors in nanoparticle transformation within cell culture environments. However, silver nanoparticles are not routinely tracked at their working concentration in the specific medium used for in vitro toxicology studies. Here we evaluated the transformation of electrostatically stabilized citrate nanoparticles (C-AgNPs) and sterically stabilized polyvinylpyrrolidone nanoparticles (PVP-AgNPs) in a low-serum (∼ 0.2 mg/mL bovine serum albumin) culture medium, while measuring the response of rat cortex neural progenitor cells, which differentiate in this culture environment. After 24 h, silver nanoparticles at concentrations up to 10 µg/mL did not affect adenosine triphosphate levels, whereas silver ions decreased adenosine triphosphate levels at concentrations of 1.1 µg/mL or higher. After 240 h, both silver nanoparticles, as well as silver ion, unambiguously decreased adenosine triphosphate levels at concentrations of 1 and 1.1 µg/mL, respectively, suggesting particle dissolution. Particle transformation was investigated in 1:10 diluted, 1:2 diluted, or undiluted differentiation medium, all having an identical protein concentration, to separate the effect of serum protein stabilization from ionic strength destabilization. Transmission electron microscopy images indicated that particles in 1:10 medium were not surrounded by proteins, whereas particles became clustered within a non-crystalline protein matrix after 24 h in 1:2 medium and at 0 h in undiluted medium. Despite evidence for a protein corona, particles were rapidly destabilized by high ionic strength media. Polyvinylpyrrolidone increased the stability of singly dispersed particles compared to citrate ligands; however, differences were negligible after 4 h in 1:2 medium or after 1 h in undiluted medium. Thus low-serum culture environments do not provide sufficient colloidal stability for long-term toxicology studies with citrate

  14. Neural stem cell isolation and culture from C57BL/6 mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Koirala

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION A widely used in vitro culture, the neurosphere assay (NSA has provided a means to retrospectively identify neural progenitor cells as well as to determine both their selfrenewal capacity. Objective of study was to isolate and compare growth of the embryonic neuronal stem cell and adult neuronal stem cells in presence of Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF and Fibroblastic Growth Factor (FGF2. MATERIALS AND METHODS Embryonic neuronal stem cell were collected from cortical plate of dorsal telencephalon of fifteen C57BL/6 transgenic mice using stereoscopic microscope on 11th gestational day (GD. Adult mammalian neuronal stem cells taken from subventricular zone (SVZ of the lateral ventricles and subgranular layer of the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus were cultured. The growth for the neurosphere was then observed in interval of 24 and 72 hours. RESULT The adult stem cell culture showed few intact cells with high amount of debris and 9% heterogeneous sphere after 24 hours while only 20 % was observed at the end of 72 hours. Higher proliferation rate was observed in embryonic neurospheres than the adult stem cell culture. CONCLUSION Presence of EGF and basic FGF2 is essential for culture of neurospheres.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v10i2.12946 Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal, 2014, Vol.10(2; 1-3

  15. Isolation and Culture of Adult Neural Stem Cells from the Mouse Subcallosal Zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joo Yeon; Lee, Ju-Hyun; Sun, Woong

    2016-12-15

    Adult neural stem cells (aNSCs) can be used for the regeneration of damaged brain tissue. NSCs have the potential for differentiation and proliferation into three types of cells: neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. Identifying aNSC-derived regions and characterizing the aNSC properties are critical for the potential use of aNSCs and for the elucidation of their role in neural regeneration. The subcallosal zone (SCZ), located between white matter and the hippocampus, has recently been reported to contain aNSCs and continuously give rise to neuroblasts. A low percentage of aNSCs from the SCZ is differentiated into neurons; most cells are differentiated into glial cells, such as oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. These cells are suggested to have a therapeutic potential for traumatic cortical injury. This protocol describes in detail the process to generate SCZ-aNSCs from an adult mouse brain. A brain matrix with intervals of 1 mm is used to obtain the SCZ-containing coronal slices and to precisely dissect the SCZ from the whole brain. The SCZ sections are initially subjected to a neurosphere culture. A well-developed culture system allows for the verification of their characteristics and can increase research on NSCs. A neurosphere culture system provides a useful tool for determining proliferation and collecting the genuine NSCs. A monolayer culture is also an in vitro system to assay proliferation and differentiation. Significantly, this culture system provides a more homogenous environment for NSCs than the neurosphere culture system. Thus, using a discrete brain region, these culture systems will be helpful for expanding our knowledge about aNSCs and their applications for therapeutic uses.

  16. Huperzine A protects neural stem cells against Aβ-induced apoptosis in a neural stem cells and microglia co-culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ning; Lin, Jizong; Wang, Kewan; Wei, Meidan; Chen, Qingzhuang; Wang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to explore whether Huperzine A (HupA) could protect neural stem cells against amyloid beta-peptide Aβ induced apoptosis in a neural stem cells (NSCs) and microglia co-culture system. Rat NSCs and microglial cells were isolated, cultured and identified with immunofluorescence Assays (IFA). Co-culture systems of NSCs and microglial cells were employed using Transwell Permeable Supports. The effects of Aβ1-42 on NSCs were studied in 4 groups using co-culture systems: NSCs, Aβ+NSCs, co-culture and Aβ+co-culture groups. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and flow cytometry were utilized to assess the differences of proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis of NSCs between the groups. LQ test was performed to assess the amounts of IL-6, TNF-α and MIP-α secreted, and flow cytometry and Western blotting were used to assess apoptosis of NSCs and the expressions of Bcl-2 and Bax in each group. IFA results showed that isolated rat NSCs were nestin-positive and microglial cells were CD11b/c-positive. Among all the groups, the Aβ+co-culture group has the lowest BrdU expression level, the lowest MAP2-positive, ChAT-positive cell counts and the highest NSC apoptosis rate. Smaller amounts of IL-6, TNF-α and MIP-α were being secreted by microglial cells in the HupA+Aβ+co-culture group compared with those in the Aβ+ co-culture group. Also the Bcl-2: Bax ratio was much higher in the HupA+Aβ+co-culture group than in the Aβ+co-culture group. HupA inhibits cell apoptosis through restraining microglia's inflammatory response induced by Aβ1-42.

  17. A 3D human neural cell culture system for modeling Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Hye; Choi, Se Hoon; D’Avanzo, Carla; Hebisch, Matthias; Sliwinski, Christopher; Bylykbashi, Enjana; Washicosky, Kevin J.; Klee, Justin B.; Brüstle, Oliver; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Kim, Doo Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell technologies have facilitated the development of human cellular disease models that can be used to study pathogenesis and test therapeutic candidates. These models hold promise for complex neurological diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) because existing animal models have been unable to fully recapitulate all aspects of pathology. We recently reported the characterization of a novel three-dimensional (3D) culture system that exhibits key events in AD pathogenesis, including extracellular aggregation of β-amyloid and accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau. Here we provide instructions for the generation and analysis of 3D human neural cell cultures, including the production of genetically modified human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) with familial AD mutations, the differentiation of the hNPCs in a 3D matrix, and the analysis of AD pathogenesis. The 3D culture generation takes 1–2 days. The aggregation of β-amyloid is observed after 6-weeks of differentiation followed by robust tau pathology after 10–14 weeks. PMID:26068894

  18. Zika virus tropism and interactions in myelinating neural cell cultures: CNS cells and myelin are preferentially affected.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumberworth, Stephanie L; Barrie, Jennifer A; Cunningham, Madeleine E; de Figueiredo, Daniely Paulino Gomes; Schultz, Verena; Wilder-Smith, Adrian J; Brennan, Benjamin; Pena, Lindomar J; Freitas de Oliveira França, Rafael; Linington, Christopher; Barnett, Susan C; Willison, Hugh J; Kohl, Alain; Edgar, Julia M

    2017-06-23

    The recent global outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV) infection has been linked to severe neurological disorders affecting the peripheral and central nervous systems (PNS and CNS, respectively). The pathobiology underlying these diverse clinical phenotypes are the subject of intense research; however, even the principal neural cell types vulnerable to productive Zika infection remain poorly characterised. Here we used CNS and PNS myelinating cultures from wild type and Ifnar1 knockout mice to examine neuronal and glial tropism and short-term consequences of direct infection with a Brazilian variant of ZIKV. Cell cultures were infected pre- or post-myelination for various intervals, then stained with cell-type and ZIKV-specific antibodies. In bypassing systemic immunity using ex vivo culture, and the type I interferon response in Ifnar1 deficient cells, we were able to evaluate the intrinsic infectivity of neural cells. Through systematic quantification of ZIKV infected cells in myelinating cultures, we found that ZIKV infection is enhanced in the absence of the type I interferon responses and that CNS cells are considerably more susceptible to infection than PNS cells. In particular, we demonstrate that CNS axons and myelinating oligodendrocytes are especially vulnerable to injury. These results have implications for understanding the pathobiology of neurological symptoms associated with ZIKV infection. Furthermore, we provide a quantifiable ex vivo infection model that can be used for fundamental and therapeutic studies on viral neuroinvasion and its consequences.

  19. A device to facilitate preparation of high-density neural cell cultures in MEAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, S Y; Lim, Y M; Goh, S Y

    2009-05-15

    A device to facilitate high-density seeding of dissociated neural cells on planar multi-electrode arrays (MEAs) is presented in this paper. The device comprises a metal cover with two concentric cylinders-the outer cylinder fits tightly on to the external diameter of a MEA to hold it in place and an inner cylinder holds a central glass tube for introducing a cell suspension over the electrode area of the MEA. An O-ring is placed at the bottom of the inner cylinder and the glass tube to provide a fluid-tight seal between the glass tube and the MEA electrode surface. The volume of cell suspension in the glass tube is varied according to the desired plating density. After plating, the device can be lifted from the MEA without leaving any residue on the contact surface. The device has enabled us to increase and control the plating density of neural cell suspension with low viability, and to prepare successful primary cultures from cryopreserved neurons and glia. The cultures of cryopreserved dissociated cortical neurons that we have grown in this manner remained spontaneously active over months, exhibited stable development and similar network characteristics as reported by other researchers.

  20. Scaling up a chemically-defined aggregate-based suspension culture system for neural commitment of human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Cláudia C; Fernandes, Tiago G; Diogo, M Margarida; Cabral, Joaquim M S

    2016-12-01

    The demand of high cell numbers for applications in cellular therapies and drug screening requires the development of scalable platforms capable to generating highly pure populations of tissue-specific cells from human pluripotent stem cells. In this work, we describe the scaling-up of an aggregate-based culture system for neural induction of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) under chemically-defined conditions. A combination of non-enzymatic dissociation and rotary agitation was successfully used to produce homogeneous populations of hiPSC aggregates with an optimal (140 μm) and narrow distribution of diameters (coefficient of variation of 21.6%). Scalable neural commitment of hiPSCs as 3D aggregates was performed in 50 mL spinner flasks, and the process was optimized using a factorial design approach, involving parameters such as agitation rate and seeding density. We were able to produce neural progenitor cell cultures, that at the end of a 6-day neural induction process contained less than 3% of Oct4-positive cells and that, after replating, retained more than 60% of Pax6-positive neural cells. The results here presented should set the stage for the future generation of a clinically relevant number of human neural progenitors for transplantation and other biomedical applications using controlled, automated and reproducible large-scale bioreactor culture systems. Copyright © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Rotary orbital suspension culture of embryonic stem cell-derived neural stem/progenitor cells: impact of hydrodynamic culture on aggregate yield, morphology and cell phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laundos, Tiago L; Silva, Joana; Assunção, Marisa; Quelhas, Pedro; Monteiro, Cátia; Oliveira, Carla; Oliveira, Maria J; Pêgo, Ana P; Amaral, Isabel F

    2017-08-01

    Embryonic stem (ES)-derived neural stem/progenitor cells (ES-NSPCs) constitute a promising cell source for application in cell therapies for the treatment of central nervous system disorders. In this study, a rotary orbital hydrodynamic culture system was applied to single-cell suspensions of ES-NSPCs, to obtain homogeneously-sized ES-NSPC cellular aggregates (neurospheres). Hydrodynamic culture allowed the formation of ES-NSPC neurospheres with a narrower size distribution than statically cultured neurospheres, increasing orbital speeds leading to smaller-sized neurospheres and higher neurosphere yield. Neurospheres formed under hydrodynamic conditions (72 h at 55 rpm) showed higher cell compaction and comparable percentages of viable, dead, apoptotic and proliferative cells. Further characterization of cellular aggregates provided new insights into the effect of hydrodynamic shear on ES-NSPC behaviour. Rotary neurospheres exhibited reduced protein levels of N-cadherin and β-catenin, and higher deposition of laminin (without impacting fibronectin deposition), matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) activity and percentage of neuronal cells. In line with the increased MMP-2 activity levels found, hydrodynamically-cultured neurospheres showed higher outward migration on laminin. Moreover, when cultured in a 3D fibrin hydrogel, rotary neurospheres generated an increased percentage of neuronal cells. In conclusion, the application of a constant orbital speed to single-cell suspensions of ES-NSPCs, besides allowing the formation of homogeneously-sized neurospheres, promoted ES-NSPC differentiation and outward migration, possibly by influencing the expression of cell-cell adhesion molecules and the secretion of proteases/extracellular matrix proteins. These findings are important when establishing the culture conditions needed to obtain uniformly-sized ES-NSPC aggregates, either for use in regenerative therapies or in in vitro platforms for biomaterial development or

  2. Effects of Substrate and Co-Culture on Neural Progenitor Cell Differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Erin Boote [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2008-01-01

    In recent years the study of stem and progenitor cells has moved to the forefront of research. Since the isolation of human hematopoietic stem cells in 1988 and the subsequent discovery of a self renewing population of multipotent cells in many tissues, many researchers have envisioned a better understanding of development and potential clinical usage in intractable diseases. Both these goals, however, depend on a solid understanding of the intracellular and extracellular forces that cause stem cells to differentiate to a specific cell fate. Many diseases of large scale cell loss have been suggested as candidates for stem cell based treatments. It is proposed that replacing the function of the damaged or defective cells by specific differentiation of stem or progenitor cells could treat the disease. Before cells can be directed to specific lineages, the mechanisms of differentiation must be better understood. Differentiation in vivo is an intensively complex system that is difficult to study. The goal of this research is to develop further understanding of the effects of soluble and extracellular matrix (ECM) cues on the differentiation of neural progenitor cells with the use of a simplified in vitro culture system. Specific research objectives are to study the differentiation of neural progenitor cells in response to astrocyte conditioned medium and protein substrate composition and concentration. In an effort to reveal the mechanism of the conditioned medium interaction, a test for the presence of a feedback loop between progenitor cells and astrocytes is presented along with an examination of conditioned medium storage temperature, which can reveal enzymatic dependencies. An examination of protein substrate composition and concentration will help to reveal the role of any ECM interactions on differentiation. This thesis is organized into a literature review covering recent advances in use of external modulators of differentiation such as surface coatings, co-culture

  3. 3D culture of murine neural stem cells on decellularized mouse brain sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Waele, Jorrit; Reekmans, Kristien; Daans, Jasmijn; Goossens, Herman; Berneman, Zwi; Ponsaerts, Peter

    2015-02-01

    Transplantation of neural stem cells (NSC) in diseased or injured brain tissue is widely studied as a potential treatment for various neurological pathologies. However, effective cell replacement therapy relies on the intrinsic capacity of cellular grafts to overcome hypoxic and/or immunological barriers after transplantation. In this context, it is hypothesized that structural support for grafted NSC will be of utmost importance. With this study, we present a novel decellularization protocol for 1.5 mm thick mouse brain sections, resulting in the generation of acellular three-dimensional (3D) brain sections. Next, the obtained 3D brain sections were seeded with murine NSC expressing both the eGFP and luciferase reporter proteins (NSC-eGFP/Luc). Using real-time bioluminescence imaging, the survival and growth of seeded NSC-eGFP/Luc cells was longitudinally monitored for 1-7 weeks in culture, indicating the ability of the acellular brain sections to support sustained ex vivo growth of NSC. Next, the organization of a 3D maze-like cellular structure was examined using confocal microscopy. Moreover, under mitogenic stimuli (EGF and hFGF-2), most cells in this 3D culture retained their NSC phenotype. Concluding, we here present a novel protocol for decellularization of mouse brain sections, which subsequently support long-term 3D culture of undifferentiated NSC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Feline Neural Progenitor Cells I: Long-Term Expansion under Defined Culture Conditions

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    Jing Yang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Neural progenitor cells (NPCs of feline origin (cNPCs have demonstrated utility in transplantation experiments, yet are difficult to grow in culture beyond the 1 month time frame. Here we use an enriched, serum-free base medium (Ultraculture and report the successful long-term propagation of these cells. Primary cultures were derived from fetal brain tissue and passaged in DMEM/F12-based or Ultraculture-based proliferation media, both in the presence of EGF + bFGF. Cells in standard DMEM/F12-based medium ceased to proliferate by 1-month, whereas the cells in the Ultraculture-based medium continued to grow for at least 5 months (end of study with no evidence of senescence. The Ultraculture-based cultures expressed lower levels of progenitor and lineage-associated markers under proliferation conditions but retained multipotency as evidenced by the ability to differentiate into neurons and glia following growth factor removal in the presence of FBS. Importantly, later passage cNPCs did not develop chromosomal aberrations.

  5. Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Enhance Neuronal Differentiation in Cultured Rat Neural Stem Cells

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    Masanori Katakura

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs can induce neurogenesis and recovery from brain diseases. However, the exact mechanisms of the beneficial effects of PUFAs have not been conclusively described. We recently reported that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA induced neuronal differentiation by decreasing Hes1 expression and increasing p27kip1 expression, which causes cell cycle arrest in neural stem cells (NSCs. In the present study, we examined the effect of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and arachidonic acid (AA on differentiation, expression of basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors (Hes1, Hes6, and NeuroD, and the cell cycle of cultured NSCs. EPA also increased mRNA levels of Hes1, an inhibitor of neuronal differentiation, Hes6, an inhibitor of Hes1, NeuroD, and Map2 mRNA and Tuj-1-positive cells (a neuronal marker, indicating that EPA induced neuronal differentiation. EPA increased the mRNA levels of p21cip1 and p27kip1, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, which indicated that EPA induced cell cycle arrest. Treatment with AA decreased Hes1 mRNA but did not affect NeuroD and Map2 mRNA levels. Furthermore, AA did not affect the number of Tuj-1-positive cells or cell cycle progression. These results indicated that EPA could be involved in neuronal differentiation by mechanisms alternative to those of DHA, whereas AA did not affect neuronal differentiation in NSCs.

  6. Localizing Protein in 3D Neural Stem Cell Culture: a Hybrid Visualization Methodology

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    Fai, Stephen; Bennett, Steffany A.L.

    2010-01-01

    The importance of 3-dimensional (3D) topography in influencing neural stem and progenitor cell (NPC) phenotype is widely acknowledged yet challenging to study. When dissociated from embryonic or post-natal brain, single NPCs will proliferate in suspension to form neurospheres. Daughter cells within these cultures spontaneously adopt distinct developmental lineages (neurons, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes) over the course of expansion despite being exposed to the same extracellular milieu. This progression recapitulates many of the stages observed over the course of neurogenesis and gliogenesis in post-natal brain and is often used to study basic NPC biology within a controlled environment. Assessing the full impact of 3D topography and cellular positioning within these cultures on NPC fate is, however, difficult. To localize target proteins and identify NPC lineages by immunocytochemistry, free-floating neurospheres must be plated on a substrate or serially sectioned. This processing is required to ensure equivalent cell permeabilization and antibody access throughout the sphere. As a result, 2D epifluorescent images of cryosections or confocal reconstructions of 3D Z-stacks can only provide spatial information about cell position within discrete physical or digital 3D slices and do not visualize cellular position in the intact sphere. Here, to reiterate the topography of the neurosphere culture and permit spatial analysis of protein expression throughout the entire culture, we present a protocol for isolation, expansion, and serial sectioning of post-natal hippocampal neurospheres suitable for epifluorescent or confocal immunodetection of target proteins. Connexin29 (Cx29) is analyzed as an example. Next, using a hybrid of graphic editing and 3D modelling softwares rigorously applied to maintain biological detail, we describe how to re-assemble the 3D structural positioning of these images and digitally map labelled cells within the complete neurosphere. This

  7. Development of an in situ evaluation system for neural cells using extracellular matrix-modeled gel culture.

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    Nagai, Takayuki; Ikegami, Yasuhiro; Mizumachi, Hideyuki; Shirakigawa, Nana; Ijima, Hiroyuki

    2017-10-01

    Two-dimensional monolayer culture is the most popular cell culture method. However, the cells may not respond as they do in vivo because the culture conditions are different from in vivo conditions. However, hydrogel-embedding culture, which cultures cells in a biocompatible culture substrate, can produce in vivo-like cell responses, but in situ evaluation of cells in a gel is difficult. In this study, we realized an in vivo-like environment in vitro to produce cell responses similar to those in vivo and established an in situ evaluation system for hydrogel-embedded cell responses. The extracellular matrix (ECM)-modeled gel consisted of collagen and heparin (Hep-col) to mimic an in vivo-like environment. The Hep-col gel could immobilize growth factors, which is important for ECM functions. Neural stem/progenitor cells cultured in the Hep-col gel grew and differentiated more actively than in collagen, indicating an in vivo-like environment in the Hep-col gel. Second, a thin-layered gel culture system was developed to realize in situ evaluation of the gel-embedded cells. Cells in a 200-μm-thick gel could be evaluated clearly by a phase-contrast microscope and immunofluorescence staining through reduced optical and diffusional effects. Finally, we found that the neural cells cultured in this system had synaptic connections and neuronal action potentials by immunofluorescence staining and Ca2+ imaging. In conclusion, this culture method may be a valuable evaluation system for neurotoxicity testing. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Chromosome 7 and 19 trisomy in cultured human neural progenitor cells.

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    Dhruv Sareen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Stem cell expansion and differentiation is the foundation of emerging cell therapy technologies. The potential applications of human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs are wide ranging, but a normal cytogenetic profile is important to avoid the risk of tumor formation in clinical trials. FDA approved clinical trials are being planned and conducted for hNPC transplantation into the brain or spinal cord for various neurodegenerative disorders. Although human embryonic stem cells (hESCs are known to show recurrent chromosomal abnormalities involving 12 and 17, no studies have revealed chromosomal abnormalities in cultured hNPCs. Therefore, we investigated frequently occurring chromosomal abnormalities in 21 independent fetal-derived hNPC lines and the possible mechanisms triggering such aberrations. METHODS AND FINDINGS: While most hNPC lines were karyotypically normal, G-band karyotyping and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH analyses revealed the emergence of trisomy 7 (hNPC(+7 and trisomy 19 (hNPC(+19, in 24% and 5% of the lines, respectively. Once detected, subsequent passaging revealed emerging dominance of trisomy hNPCs. DNA microarray and immunoblotting analyses demonstrate epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR overexpression in hNPC(+7 and hNPC(+19 cells. We observed greater levels of telomerase (hTERT, increased proliferation (Ki67, survival (TUNEL, and neurogenesis (beta(III-tubulin in hNPC(+7 and hNPC(+19, using respective immunocytochemical markers. However, the trisomy lines underwent replicative senescence after 50-60 population doublings and never showed neoplastic changes. Although hNPC(+7 and hNPC(+19 survived better after xenotransplantation into the rat striatum, they did not form malignant tumors. Finally, EGF deprivation triggered a selection of trisomy 7 cells in a diploid hNPC line. CONCLUSIONS: We report that hNPCs are susceptible to accumulation of chromosome 7 and 19 trisomy in long-term cell culture. These

  9. Neural patterning of human induced pluripotent stem cells in 3-D cultures for studying biomolecule-directed differential cellular responses.

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    Yan, Yuanwei; Bejoy, Julie; Xia, Junfei; Guan, Jingjiao; Zhou, Yi; Li, Yan

    2016-09-15

    Appropriate neural patterning of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) is critical to generate specific neural cells/tissues and even mini-brains that are physiologically relevant to model neurological diseases. However, the capacity of signaling factors that regulate 3-D neural tissue patterning in vitro and differential responses of the resulting neural populations to various biomolecules have not yet been fully understood. By tuning neural patterning of hiPSCs with small molecules targeting sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling, this study generated different 3-D neuronal cultures that were mainly comprised of either cortical glutamatergic neurons or motor neurons. Abundant glutamatergic neurons were observed following the treatment with an antagonist of SHH signaling, cyclopamine, while Islet-1 and HB9-expressing motor neurons were enriched by an SHH agonist, purmorphamine. In neurons derived with different neural patterning factors, whole-cell patch clamp recordings showed similar voltage-gated Na(+)/K(+) currents, depolarization-evoked action potentials and spontaneous excitatory post-synaptic currents. Moreover, these different neuronal populations exhibited differential responses to three classes of biomolecules, including (1) matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors that affect extracellular matrix remodeling; (2) N-methyl-d-aspartate that induces general neurotoxicity; and (3) amyloid β (1-42) oligomers that cause neuronal subtype-specific neurotoxicity. This study should advance our understanding of hiPSC self-organization and neural tissue development and provide a transformative approach to establish 3-D models for neurological disease modeling and drug discovery. Appropriate neural patterning of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) is critical to generate specific neural cells, tissues and even mini-brains that are physiologically relevant to model neurological diseases. However, the capability of sonic hedgehog-related small molecules to tune

  10. Designing Neural Networks in Culture: Experiments are described for controlled growth, of nerve cells taken from rats, in predesigned geometrical patterns on laboratory culture dishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Bruce C; Brewer, Gregory J

    2010-03-01

    Technology has advanced to where it is possible to design and grow-with predefined geometry and surprisingly good fidelity-living networks of neurons in culture dishes. Here we overview the elements of design, emphasizing the lithographic techniques that alter the cell culture surface which in turn influences the attachment and growth of the neural networks. Advanced capability in this area makes it possible to design networks of desired complexity. Other issues addressed include the influence of glial cells and media on activity and the potential for extending the designs into three dimensions. Investigators are advancing the art and science of analyzing and controlling through stimulation the function of the neural networks, including the ability to take advantage of their geometric form in order to influence functional properties.

  11. Activity Patterns of Cultured Neural Networks on Micro Electrode Arrays

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rutten, Wim

    2001-01-01

    A hybrid neuro-electronic interface is a cell-cultured micro electrode array, acting as a neural information transducer for stimulation and/or recording of neural activity in the brain or the spinal cord...

  12. Human neural stem cell-derived cultures in three-dimensional substrates form spontaneously functional neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Imogen; Silveirinha, Vasco; Stein, Jason L; de la Torre-Ubieta, Luis; Farrimond, Jonathan A; Williamson, Elizabeth M; Whalley, Benjamin J

    2017-04-01

    Differentiated human neural stem cells were cultured in an inert three-dimensional (3D) scaffold and, unlike two-dimensional (2D) but otherwise comparable monolayer cultures, formed spontaneously active, functional neuronal networks that responded reproducibly and predictably to conventional pharmacological treatments to reveal functional, glutamatergic synapses. Immunocytochemical and electron microscopy analysis revealed a neuronal and glial population, where markers of neuronal maturity were observed in the former. Oligonucleotide microarray analysis revealed substantial differences in gene expression conferred by culturing in a 3D vs a 2D environment. Notable and numerous differences were seen in genes coding for neuronal function, the extracellular matrix and cytoskeleton. In addition to producing functional networks, differentiated human neural stem cells grown in inert scaffolds offer several significant advantages over conventional 2D monolayers. These advantages include cost savings and improved physiological relevance, which make them better suited for use in the pharmacological and toxicological assays required for development of stem cell-based treatments and the reduction of animal use in medical research. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Optimizing culture medium composition to improve oligodendrocyte progenitor cell yields in vitro from subventricular zone-derived neural progenitor cell neurospheres.

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    Franco, Paula G; Pasquini, Juana M; Silvestroff, Lucas

    2015-01-01

    Neural Stem and Progenitor Cells (NSC/NPC) are gathering tangible recognition for their uses in cell therapy and cell replacement therapies for human disease, as well as a model system to continue research on overall neural developmental processes in vitro. The Subventricular Zone is one of the largest NSC/NPC niches in the developing mammalian Central Nervous System, and persists through to adulthood. Oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (OPC) enriched cultures are usefull tools for in vitro studies as well as for cell replacement therapies for treating demyelination diseases. We used Subventricular Zone-derived NSC/NPC primary cultures from newborn mice and compared the effects of different growth factor combinations on cell proliferation and OPC yield. The Platelet Derived Growth Factor-AA and BB homodimers had a positive and significant impact on OPC generation. Furthermore, heparin addition to the culture media contributed to further increase overall culture yields. The OPC generated by this protocol were able to mature into Myelin Basic Protein-expressing cells and to interact with neurons in an in vitro co-culture system. As a whole, we describe an optimized in vitro method for increasing OPC.

  14. A novel culture method reveals unique neural stem/progenitors in mature porcine iris tissues that differentiate into neuronal and rod photoreceptor-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royall, Lars N; Lea, Daniel; Matsushita, Tamami; Takeda, Taka-Aki; Taketani, Shigeru; Araki, Masasuke

    2017-11-15

    Iris neural stem/progenitor cells from mature porcine eyes were investigated using a new protocol for tissue culture, which consists of dispase treatment and Matrigel embedding. We used a number of culture conditions and found an intense differentiation of neuronal cells from both the iris pigmented epithelial (IPE) cells and the stroma tissue cells. Rod photoreceptor-like cells were also observed but mostly in a later stage of culture. Neuronal differentiation does not require any additives such as fetal bovine serum or FGF2, although FGF2 and IGF2 appeared to promote neural differentiation in the IPE cultures. Furthermore, the stroma-derived cells were able to be maintained in vitro indefinitely. The evolutionary similarity between humans and domestic pigs highlight the potential for this methodology in the modeling of human diseases and characterizing human ocular stem cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Human neural progenitor cells decrease photoreceptor degeneration, normalize opsin distribution and support synapse structure in cultured porcine retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollick, Tanzina; Mohlin, Camilla; Johansson, Kjell

    2016-09-01

    Retinal neurodegenerative disorders like retinitis pigmentosa, age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and retinal detachment decrease retinal functionality leading to visual impairment. The pathological events are characterized by photoreceptor degeneration, synaptic disassembly, remodeling of postsynaptic neurons and activation of glial cells. Despite intense research, no effective treatment has been found for these disorders. The current study explores the potential of human neural progenitor cell (hNPC) derived factors to slow the degenerative processes in adult porcine retinal explants. Retinas were cultured for 3 days with or without hNPCs as a feeder layer and investigated by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL), immunohistochemical, western blot and quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) techniques. TUNEL showed that hNPCs had the capacity to limit photoreceptor cell death. Among cone photoreceptors, hNPC coculture resulted in better maintenance of cone outer segments and reduced opsin mislocalization. Additionally, maintained synaptic structural integrity and preservation of second order calbindin positive horizontal cells was also observed. However, Müller cell gliosis only seemed to be alleviated in terms of reduced Müller cell density. Our observations indicate that at 3 days of coculture, hNPC derived factors had the capacity to protect photoreceptors, maintain synaptic integrity and support horizontal cell survival. Human neural progenitor cell applied treatment modalities may be an effective strategy to help maintain retinal functionality in neurodegenerative pathologies. Whether hNPCs can independently hinder Müller cell gliosis by utilizing higher concentrations or by combination with other pharmacological agents still needs to be determined. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Vesicular glutamate transporters play a role in neuronal differentiation of cultured SVZ-derived neural precursor cells.

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    Eduardo H Sánchez-Mendoza

    Full Text Available The role of glutamate in the regulation of neurogenesis is well-established, but the role of vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs and excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs in controlling adult neurogenesis is unknown. Here we investigated the implication of VGLUTs in the differentiation of subventricular zone (SVZ-derived neural precursor cells (NPCs. Our results show that NPCs express VGLUT1-3 and EAAT1-3 both at the mRNA and protein level. Their expression increases during differentiation closely associated with the expression of marker genes. In expression analyses we show that VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 are preferentially expressed by cultured SVZ-derived doublecortin+ neuroblasts, while VGLUT3 is found on GFAP+ glial cells. In cultured NPCs, inhibition of VGLUT by Evans Blue increased the mRNA level of neuronal markers doublecortin, B3T and MAP2, elevated the number of NPCs expressing doublecortin protein and promoted the number of cells with morphological appearance of branched neurons, suggesting that VGLUT function prevents neuronal differentiation of NPCs. This survival- and differentiation-promoting effect of Evans blue was corroborated by increased AKT phosphorylation and reduced MAPK phosphorylation. Thus, under physiological conditions, VGLUT1-3 inhibition, and thus decreased glutamate exocytosis, may promote neuronal differentiation of NPCs.

  17. Conversion of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs and incorporation of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA in cultured neural cells

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    Alessandri Jean-Marc

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3 in membrane phospholipids originates from dietary intake of preformed DHA and from conversion of its essential precursor α-linolenic acid (ALA, 18:3n-3. Cultured cells, especially nervous cells, are increasingly used to explore the uptake, metabolism and gene transcription effects of n-3 fatty acids, raising the question of the specific metabolic fate of different fatty acids and of the physiological relevance of their concentrations in the culture medium. This paper reports experimental data that 1 compare the dose-dependent incorporation of preformed DHA into the ethanolamine phosphoglycerolipids (EPG of neural and cerebral endothelial cells in culture with that of the developing rat brain, 2 evaluate the pathway of DHA synthesis from ALA, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3 or n-3 docosapentaenoic acid (DPA, 22:5n-3 in a model of neuronal cells, the SH-5YSY human neuroblastoma cells, and 3 characterize in these cells the mRNA expression profile of genes involved in the fatty acid metabolism. The incorporation of preformed DHA in EPG followed, both in vivo and in vitro, a dose-response curve from which two parameters were drawn: the DHAmax, i.e. the plateau-value of the linearized dose-response curve (expressed in weight % of total fatty acids, and the DHA50, the concentration of DHA in the diet or in the culture medium corresponding to an incorporation of DHA in EPG equal to one-half the DHAmax. The ratio of DHAmax to DHA50 reflects the propensity (so-called the ‘avidity’ for DHA of cells or tissues to incorporate the exogenous DHA. The DHAmax and the DHAmax/DHA50 ratio values of SH-SY5Y cells and of rat brain endothelial cells in culture were compared to those of the frontal cortex and hippocampus of rats chronically deficient in n-3 fatty acids and supplemented with preformed DHA. The same DHAmax/DHA50 ratio values were found in SH-SY5Y (5.2 cells and in rat brain areas (5.1-5.7 when the DHA doses

  18. Effects of high-LET radiation on neural cells in culture: apoptosis induction, cell toxicity and gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, M.; Otto, S.; Estevez, L.; Rios, D.; Pena, L.; Anderson, C.

    Despite the fact that some in vivo studies suggest that chronic low-dose exposure to HZE particles might produce effects similar to aging and neurodegeneration, the basic mechanisms of HZE particle neurotoxicity remain to be elucidated. The goal of these experiments is to establish neural cellular models to evaluate the capacity of low- and high-LET radiation, to induce cell damage and apoptosis. In the present study we measured apoptosis, cell toxicity and gene expression induced by low fluences-doses of heavy ions, protons and photons using neuronal precursor cells (NT2, STRATAGENE) and post-mitotic neurons as models for adult neural cell system. Using heavy ions accelerated at AGS (BNL) and HIMAC (Chiba, Japan), and protons (Loma Linda) we study the neurotoxic effects of a variety of heavy particles (1 and 0.6 GeV/n Fe, 580 MeV/n Si, 290 MeV/n C, 550 MeV/n Ar; LET ranging from 13 to148 keV/μm), and 255 MeV/n protons. Apoptosis Induction: We measured the induction of apoptosis by flow cytometry using a FACSCalibur to detect the expression of Annexin V, as an early marker in the apoptotic pathway, in NT-2 cells. The ApoAlert Annexin V assay is based on the observation that soon after initiating apoptosis, most cell types translocate phosphatidylserine (PS) from the inner face of the plasma membrane to the cell surface. Once on the cell surface, PS can be easily detected by staining with a FITC conjugate of Annexin V, a protein that has a strong natural affinity for PS. Externalization of PS occurs earlier than the nuclear changes associated with apoptosis, so the ApoAlert Assay detects apoptotic cells significantly earlier than do DNA-based assays. Exposing NT-2 cells to Fe ions and protons induced a strong dose- and time-dependent induction of apoptosis with the peak of apoptosis appearing at 72 hours post-irradiation. It was determined that Fe ion exposure were more effective to induce apoptosis in comparison to protons and gamma rays, suggesting an high RBE

  19. In Vitro Neurotoxicity Resulting from Exposure of Cultured Neural Cells to Several Types of Nanoparticles

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    Stephen F Larner

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory and industrial production of various nanoparticles, single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs, fullerene (C60, cadmium selenide (CdSe quantum dots, carbon black (CB, and dye-doped silica nanospheres (NSs, has greatly increased in the past 15 years. However, little research has been done to analyze the toxicity of these materials. With recent studies showing that nano-substances can cross the blood–brain barrier, we examined the neurotoxicity of these manufactured nanoparticles. By employing the rat PC-12 neuronal-like cell line as the basis for our studies, we were able to evaluate the toxicity caused by these five nanoparticles. The level of toxicity was measured by testing for cell viability using the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH cell viability assay, morphological analysis of changes in cellular structures, and Western blot analyses of αII-spectrin breakdown products (SBDP as cell death indicators. Our results showed cytotoxicity in nondifferentiated PC-12 cells exposed to CB (10–100 µg/mL, SWNTs (10–100 µg/mL, C60 (100 µg/mL, CdSe (10 µg/mL, CB (500 µg/mL, and dye-doped silicon NSs (10 µg/mL. Exposure to higher concentrations (100 µg/mL of SWNTs, CB, and C60 increased the formation of SBDP150/145, as well as cell membrane contraction and the formation of cytosolic vacuoles. The incorporations of the nanoparticles into cell cytoplasm were observed using the fluorescent dye-doped NSs in both nondifferentiated and nerve growth factor (NGF-differentiated PC-12 cells. When PC-12 cells are differentiated, they appeared to be even more sensitive to cytotoxicity of nanoparticles such as CB 10 nm (10–100 µg/mL, CB 100 nm (10–100 µg/mL, and CdSe (1–10 µg/mL.

  20. Polypyrrole/Alginate Hybrid Hydrogels: Electrically Conductive and Soft Biomaterials for Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Culture and Potential Neural Tissue Engineering Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sumi; Jang, LindyK; Kim, Semin; Yang, Jongcheol; Yang, Kisuk; Cho, Seung-Woo; Lee, Jae Young

    2016-11-01

    Electrically conductive biomaterials that can efficiently deliver electrical signals to cells or improve electrical communication among cells have received considerable attention for potential tissue engineering applications. Conductive hydrogels are desirable particularly for neural applications, as they can provide electrical signals and soft microenvironments that can mimic native nerve tissues. In this study, conductive and soft polypyrrole/alginate (PPy/Alg) hydrogels are developed by chemically polymerizing PPy within ionically cross-linked alginate hydrogel networks. The synthesized hydrogels exhibit a Young's modulus of 20-200 kPa. Electrical conductance of the PPy/Alg hydrogels could be enhanced by more than one order of magnitude compared to that of pristine alginate hydrogels. In vitro studies with human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) reveal that cell adhesion and growth are promoted on the PPy/Alg hydrogels. Additionally, the PPy/Alg hydrogels support and greatly enhance the expression of neural differentiation markers (i.e., Tuj1 and MAP2) of hMSCs compared to tissue culture plate controls. Subcutaneous implantation of the hydrogels for eight weeks induces mild inflammatory reactions. These soft and conductive hydrogels will serve as a useful platform to study the effects of electrical and mechanical signals on stem cells and/or neural cells and to develop multifunctional neural tissue engineering scaffolds. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Decreased proliferative, migrative and neuro-differentiative potential of postnatal rat enteric neural crest-derived cells during culture in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Hui [Department of Pediatric Surgery, the Second Affiliated Hospital, Xi’an Jiaotong University, No 157, Xi Wu Road, Xi’an 710004, Shaanxi (China); Institute of Neurobiology, Environment and Genes Related to Diseases Key Laboratory of Chinese Ministry of Education, Xi’an Jiaotong University, No 96, Yan Ta Xi Road, Xi’an 710061, Shaanxi (China); Pan, Wei-Kang; Zheng, Bai-Jun; Wang, Huai-Jie [Department of Pediatric Surgery, the Second Affiliated Hospital, Xi’an Jiaotong University, No 157, Xi Wu Road, Xi’an 710004, Shaanxi (China); Chen, Xin-Lin; Liu, Yong [Institute of Neurobiology, Environment and Genes Related to Diseases Key Laboratory of Chinese Ministry of Education, Xi’an Jiaotong University, No 96, Yan Ta Xi Road, Xi’an 710061, Shaanxi (China); Gao, Ya, E-mail: ygao@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Department of Pediatric Surgery, the Second Affiliated Hospital, Xi’an Jiaotong University, No 157, Xi Wu Road, Xi’an 710004, Shaanxi (China)

    2016-05-01

    A growing body of evidence supports the potential use of enteric neural crest-derived cells (ENCCs) as a cell replacement therapy for Hirschsprung's disease. Based on previous observations of robust propagation of primary ENCCs, as opposed to their progeny, it is suggested that their therapeutic potential after in vitro expansion may be restricted. We therefore examined the growth and differentiation activities and phenotypic characteristics of continuous ENCC cultures. ENCCs were isolated from the intestines of postnatal rats and were identified using an immunocytochemical approach. During continuous ENCC culture expansion, proliferation, migration, apoptosis, and differentiation potentials were monitored. The Cell Counting Kit-8 was used for assessment of ENCC vitality, Transwell inserts for cell migration, immunocytochemistry for cell counts and identification, and flow cytometry for apoptosis. Over six continuous generations, ENCC proliferation potency was reduced and with prolonged culture, the ratio of migratory ENCCs was decreased. The percentage of apoptosis showed an upward trend with prolonged intragenerational culture, but showed a downward trend with prolonged culture of combined generations. Furthermore, the percentage of peripherin{sup +} cells decreased whilst the percentage of GFAP{sup +} cells increased with age. The results demonstrated that alterations in ENCC growth characteristics occur with increased culture time, which may partially account for the poor results of proposed cell therapies. - Highlights: • Differences were identified between primary and daughter ENCCs. • Daughter ENCCs had reduced proliferation, migration and differentiation. • Daughter ENCCs also had increased apoptosis. • These altered characteristics warrant further investigation.

  2. Cholera toxin regulates a signaling pathway critical for the expansion of neural stem cell cultures from the fetal and adult rodent brains.

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    Andreas Androutsellis-Theotokis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: New mechanisms that regulate neural stem cell (NSC expansion will contribute to improved assay systems and the emerging regenerative approach that targets endogenous stem cells. Expanding knowledge on the control of stem cell self renewal will also lead to new approaches for targeting the stem cell population of cancers. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show that Cholera toxin regulates two recently characterized NSC markers, the Tie2 receptor and the transcription factor Hes3, and promotes the expansion of NSCs in culture. Cholera toxin increases immunoreactivity for the Tie2 receptor and rapidly induces the nuclear localization of Hes3. This is followed by powerful cultured NSC expansion and induction of proliferation both in the presence and absence of mitogen. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data suggest a new cell biological mechanism that regulates the self renewal and differentiation properties of stem cells, providing a new logic to manipulate NSCs in the context of regenerative disease and cancer.

  3. The effects of microRNAs on human neural stem cell differentiation in two- and three-dimensional cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevanato, Lara; Sinden, John D

    2014-04-11

    Stem cells have the ability to self-renew or to differentiate into numerous cell types; however, our understanding of how to control and exploit this potential is currently limited. An emerging hypothesis is that microRNAs (miRNAs) play a central role in controlling stem cell-fate determination. Herein, we have characterized the effects of miRNAs in differentiated human neural stem cells (hNSCs) by using a cell line currently being tested in clinical trials for stroke disability (NCT01151124, Clinicaltrials.gov). HNSCs were differentiated on 2- (2D) and 3-dimensional (3D) cultures for 1 and 3 weeks. Quantification of hNSC differentiation was measured with real-time PCR and axon outgrowth. The miRNA PCR arrays were implemented to investigate differential expression profiles in differentiated hNSCs. Evaluation of miRNA effects on hNSCs was performed by using transfection of miRNA mimics, real-time PCR, Western blot, and immunocytochemistry. The 3D substrate promoted enhanced hNSC differentiation coupled with a loss of cell proliferation. Differentiated hNSCs exhibited a similar miRNA profiling. However, in 3D samples, the degree and timing of regulation were significantly different in miRNA members of cluster mi-R17 and miR-96-182, and hsa-miR-302a. Overall, hNSC 3D cultures demonstrated differential regulation of miRNAs involved in hNSC stemness, cell proliferation, and differentiation. The miRNA mimic analysis of hsa-miR-146b-5p and hsa-miR-99a confirmed induction of lineage-committed progenitors. Downregulated miRNAs were more abundant; those most significantly downregulated were selected, and their putative target mRNAs analyzed with the aim of unraveling their functionality. In differentiated hNSCs, downregulated hsa-miR-96 correlated with SOX5 upregulation of gene and protein expression; similar results were obtained for hsa-miR-302a, hsa-miR-182, hsa-miR-7, hsa-miR-20a/b, and hsa-miR-17 and their target NR4A3. Moreover, SOX5 was identified as a direct target

  4. Lead decreases cell survival, proliferation, and neuronal differentiation of primary cultured adult neural precursor cells through activation of the JNK and p38 MAP kinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engstrom, Anna; Wang, Hao; Xia, Zhengui

    2015-01-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is the process whereby adult neural precursor cells (aNPCs) in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus (DG) generate adult-born, functional neurons in the hippocampus. This process is modulated by various extracellular and intracellular stimuli, and the adult-born neurons have been implicated in hippocampus-dependent learning and memory. However, studies on how neurotoxic agents affect this process and the underlying mechanisms are limited. The goal of this study was to determine whether lead, a heavy metal, directly impairs critical processes in adult neurogenesis and to characterize the underlying signaling pathways using primary cultured SGZ-aNPCs isolated from adult mice. We report here that lead significantly increases apoptosis and inhibits proliferation in SGZ-aNPCs. In addition, lead significantly impairs spontaneous neuronal differentiation and maturation. Furthermore, we found that activation of the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling pathways are important for lead cytotoxicity. Our data suggest that lead can directly act on adult neural stem cells and impair critical processes in adult hippocampal neurogenesis, which may contribute to its neurotoxicity and adverse effects on cognition in adults. PMID:25967738

  5. [Salidroside protects cultured rat subventricular zone neural stem cells against hypoxia injury by inhibiting Bax, Bcl-2 and caspase-3 expressions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Cunfang; Zhang, Junfeng; Chen, Xinlin; Zhang, JiansHui; Yang, Pengbo; Jiao, Qian; Zhang, Pengbo; Lu, Hai-Xia; Liu, Yong

    2013-07-01

    To explore the effects of salidroside (sal) on the expressions of Bcl-2, Bax and caspases-3 proteins in cultured rat subventricular zone (SVZ) neural stem cells (NSCs) exposed to hypoxia injury. Primarily cultured SVZ NSCs from adult SD rats were incubated with salidroside (120 and 240 µmol/L) for 24 h prior to exposure to hypoxia. The cell viability was assessed with MTT assay, and the cell apoptosis was analyzed using TUNEL staining and flow cytometry. Western blotting was performed to detect the expressions of Bcl-2, Bax and caspase-3 in the cells. Salidroside pretreatment of the cells for 24 h resulted in an obvious resistance to hypoxia-induced cell apoptosis and decrement of cell viability (PSalidroside also antagonized the effect of hypoxia exposure in lowering Bcl-2/Bax ratio apoptosis of rat neural stem cells and decreased the expression of caspases-3 protein (PSalidroside can significantly resist hypoxia-induced. The neuroprotective effect of salidroside may be related to the modulation of expressions of apoptosis-related proteins.

  6. Quantitative Analyses of Synergistic Responses between Cannabidiol and DNA-Damaging Agents on the Proliferation and Viability of Glioblastoma and Neural Progenitor Cells in Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Liting; Ng, Lindsay; Ozawa, Tatsuya; Stella, Nephi

    2017-01-01

    Evidence suggests that the nonpsychotropic cannabis-derived compound, cannabidiol (CBD), has antineoplastic activity in multiple types of cancers, including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). DNA-damaging agents remain the main standard of care treatment available for patients diagnosed with GBM. Here we studied the antiproliferative and cell-killing activity of CBD alone and in combination with DNA-damaging agents (temozolomide, carmustine, or cisplatin) in several human GBM cell lines and in mouse primary GBM cells in cultures. This activity was also studied in mouse neural progenitor cells (NPCs) in culture to assess for potential central nervous system toxicity. We found that CBD induced a dose-dependent reduction of both proliferation and viability of all cells with similar potencies, suggesting no preferential activity for cancer cells. Hill plot analysis indicates an allosteric mechanism of action triggered by CBD in all cells. Cotreatment regimens combining CBD and DNA-damaging agents produced synergistic antiproliferating and cell-killing responses over a limited range of concentrations in all human GBM cell lines and mouse GBM cells as well as in mouse NPCs. Remarkably, antagonistic responses occurred at low concentrations in select human GBM cell lines and in mouse GBM cells. Our study suggests limited synergistic activity when combining CBD and DNA-damaging agents in treating GBM cells, along with little to no therapeutic window when considering NPCs. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  7. Live-cell time-lapse imaging and single-cell tracking of in vitro cultured neural stem cells - Tools for analyzing dynamics of cell cycle, migration, and lineage selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piltti, Katja M; Cummings, Brian J; Carta, Krystal; Manughian-Peter, Ayla; Worne, Colleen L; Singh, Kulbir; Ong, Danier; Maksymyuk, Yuriy; Khine, Michelle; Anderson, Aileen J

    2018-01-15

    Neural stem cell (NSC) cultures have been considered technically challenging for time-lapse analysis due to high motility, photosensitivity, and growth at confluent densities. We have tested feasibility of long-term live-cell time-lapse analysis for NSC migration and differentiation studies. Here, we describe a method to study the dynamics of cell cycle, migration, and lineage selection in cultured multipotent mouse or human NSCs using single-cell tracking during a long-term, 7-14 day live-cell time-lapse analysis. We used in-house made PDMS inserts with five microwells on a glass coverslip petri-dish to constrain NSC into the area of acquisition during long-term live-cell imaging. In parallel, we have defined image acquisition settings for single-cell tracking of cell cycle dynamics using Fucci-reporter mouse NSC for 7 days as well as lineage selection and migration using human NSC for 14 days. Overall, we show that adjustments of live-cell analysis settings can extend the time period of single-cell tracking in mouse or human NSC from 24-72 h up to 7-14 days and potentially longer. However, we emphasize that experimental use of repeated fluorescence imaging will require careful consideration of controls during acquisition and analysis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Survival, proliferation and differentiation enhancement of neural stem cells cultured in three-dimensional polyethylene glycol-RGD hydrogel with tenascin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghdi, Pejman; Tiraihi, Taki; Ganji, Fariba; Darabi, Shehram; Taheri, Taher; Kazemi, Hadi

    2016-03-01

    Polyethylene glycol hydrogel (PEG) conjugated with arginyl glycyl aspartic acid (RGD) (PEG-RGD) has been considered to be a scaffold in three-dimensional (3D) culture that improves neurite outgrowth; on the other hand, tenascin C controls neural growth and differentiation. In this study, the effect of a combined RGD and tenascin C mixture in 3D culture (3D-PEG-RGD-TnC) on the survival, growth and differentiation of neural stem cells. The viability of the culture has been evaluated by live/dead assay and the results show that the viability of NSCs in 3D-PEG-RGD-TnC is significantly higher than its value in 3D-PEG-RGD. The proliferation was evaluated by MTS test and was found to be slightly improved but statistically not significant. Accordingly, the differentiation was evaluated by immunoreactivity to nestin, neurofilament 68, neurofilament 160, neurofilament 200 and GFAP; and the expression of nestin, neuro D, musashi1, β-tubulin III, GFAP, MBP and Oct4 was studied using RT-PCR. The results showed enhancement of the differentiation of NSCs into the neuronal phenotype in 3D-PEG-RGD-TnC. The morphology of NSCs cultured in 3D-PEG-RGD-TnC showed neurite outgrowths and increase in the contact between the differentiated cells' extensions. The conclusion of this study was that NSC survival, proliferation and differentiation are enhanced when the cells are cultured in 3D-PEG-RGD-TnC. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Co-culture of neural crest stem cells (NCSC and insulin producing beta-TC6 cells results in cadherin junctions and protection against cytokine-induced beta-cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anongnad Ngamjariyawat

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Transplantation of pancreatic islets to Type 1 diabetes patients is hampered by inflammatory reactions at the transplantation site leading to dysfunction and death of insulin producing beta-cells. Recently we have shown that co-transplantation of neural crest stem cells (NCSCs together with the islet cells improves transplantation outcome. The aim of the present investigation was to describe in vitro interactions between NCSCs and insulin producing beta-TC6 cells that may mediate protection against cytokine-induced beta-cell death. PROCEDURES: Beta-TC6 and NCSC cells were cultured either alone or together, and either with or without cell culture inserts. The cultures were then exposed to the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IFN-γ for 48 hours followed by analysis of cell death rates (flow cytometry, nitrite production (Griess reagent, protein localization (immunofluorescence and protein phosphorylation (flow cytometry. RESULTS: We observed that beta-TC6 cells co-cultured with NCSCs were protected against cytokine-induced cell death, but not when separated by cell culture inserts. This occurred in parallel with (i augmented production of nitrite from beta-TC6 cells, indicating that increased cell survival allows a sustained production of nitric oxide; (ii NCSC-derived laminin production; (iii decreased phospho-FAK staining in beta-TC6 cell focal adhesions, and (iv decreased beta-TC6 cell phosphorylation of ERK(T202/Y204, FAK(Y397 and FAK(Y576. Furthermore, co-culture also resulted in cadherin and beta-catenin accumulations at the NCSC/beta-TC6 cell junctions. Finally, the gap junction inhibitor carbenoxolone did not affect cytokine-induced beta-cell death during co-culture with NCSCs. CONCLUSION: In summary, direct contacts, but not soluble factors, promote improved beta-TC6 viability when co-cultured with NCSCs. We hypothesize that cadherin junctions between NCSC and beta-TC6 cells promote powerful signals that maintain beta-cell

  10. Seeding neural progenitor cells on silicon-based neural probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azemi, Erdrin; Gobbel, Glenn T; Cui, Xinyan Tracy

    2010-09-01

    Chronically implanted neural electrode arrays have the potential to be used as neural prostheses in patients with various neurological disorders. While these electrodes perform well in acute recordings, they often fail to function reliably in clinically relevant chronic settings because of glial encapsulation and the loss of neurons. Surface modification of these implants may provide a means of improving their biocompatibility and integration within host brain tissue. The authors proposed a method of improving the brain-implant interface by seeding the implant's surface with a layer of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) derived from adult murine subependyma. Neural progenitor cells may reduce the foreign body reaction by presenting a tissue-friendly surface and repair implant-induced injury and inflammation by releasing neurotrophic factors. In this study, the authors evaluated the growth and differentiation of NPCs on laminin-immobilized probe surfaces and explored the potential impact on transplant survival of these cells. Laminin protein was successfully immobilized on the silicon surface via covalent binding using silane chemistry. The growth, adhesion, and differentiation of NPCs expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) on laminin-modified silicon surfaces were characterized in vitro by using immunocytochemical techniques. Shear forces were applied to NPC cultures in growth medium to evaluate their shearing properties. In addition, neural probes seeded with GFP-labeled NPCs cultured in growth medium for 14 days were implanted in murine cortex. The authors assessed the adhesion properties of these cells during implantation conditions. Moreover, the tissue response around NPC-seeded implants was observed after 1 and 7 days postimplantation. Significantly improved NPC attachment and growth was found on the laminin-immobilized surface compared with an unmodified control before and after shear force application. The NPCs grown on the laminin-immobilized surface

  11. CD133-enriched Xeno-Free human embryonic-derived neural stem cells expand rapidly in culture and do not form teratomas in immunodeficient mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L. Haus

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Common methods for the generation of human embryonic-derived neural stem cells (hNSCs result in cells with potentially compromised safety profiles due to maintenance of cells in conditions containing non-human proteins (e.g. in bovine serum or on mouse fibroblast feeders. Additionally, sufficient expansion of resulting hNSCs for scaling out or up in a clinically relevant time frame has proven to be difficult. Here, we report a strategy that produces hNSCs in completely “Xeno-Free” culture conditions. Furthermore, we have enriched the hNSCs for the cell surface marker CD133 via magnetic sorting, which has led to an increase in the expansion rate and neuronal fate specification of the hNSCs in vitro. Critically, we have also confirmed neural lineage specificity upon sorted hNSC transplantation into the immunodeficient NOD-scid mouse brain. The future use or adaptation of these protocols has the potential to better facilitate the advancement of pre-clinical strategies from the bench to the bedside.

  12. Flexibility of neural stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eumorphia eRemboutsika

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic cortical neural stem cells are self-renewing progenitors that can differentiate into neurons and glia. We generated neurospheres from the developing cerebral cortex using a mouse genetic model that allows for lineage selection and found that the self-renewing neural stem cells are restricted to Sox2 expressing cells. Under normal conditions, embryonic cortical neurospheres are heterogeneous with regard to Sox2 expression and contain astrocytes, neural stem cells and neural progenitor cells sufficiently plastic to give rise to neural crest cells when transplanted into the hindbrain of E1.5 chick and E8 mouse embryos. However, when neurospheres are maintained under lineage selection, such that all cells express Sox2, neural stem cells maintain their Pax6+ cortical radial glia identity and exhibit a more restricted fate in vitro and after transplantation. These data demonstrate that Sox2 preserves the cortical identity and regulates the plasticity of self-renewing Pax6+ radial glia cells.

  13. The neural cell adhesion molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berezin, V; Bock, E; Poulsen, F M

    2000-01-01

    During the past year, the understanding of the structure and function of neural cell adhesion has advanced considerably. The three-dimensional structures of several of the individual modules of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) have been determined, as well as the structure of the complex...... between two identical fragments of the NCAM. Also during the past year, a link between homophilic cell adhesion and several signal transduction pathways has been proposed, connecting the event of cell surface adhesion to cellular responses such as neurite outgrowth. Finally, the stimulation of neurite...

  14. Insect Cell Culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oers, van M.M.; Lynn, D.E.

    2010-01-01

    Insect cell cultures are widely used in studies on insect cell physiology, developmental biology and microbial pathology. In particular, insect cell culture is an indispensable tool for the study of insect viruses. The first continuously growing insect cell cultures were established from

  15. Comparison of 2D and 3D neural induction methods for the generation of neural progenitor cells from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chandrasekaran, Abinaya; Avci, Hasan; Ochalek, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Neural progenitor cells (NPCs) from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are frequently induced using 3D culture methodologies however, it is unknown whether spheroid-based (3D) neural induction is actually superior to monolayer (2D) neural induction. Our aim was to compare the efficiency...

  16. Fish Stem Cell Cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Ni; Li, Zhendong; Hong, Yunhan

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells have the potential for self-renewal and differentiation. First stem cell cultures were derived 30 years ago from early developing mouse embryos. These are pluripotent embryonic stem (ES) cells. Efforts towards ES cell derivation have been attempted in other mammalian and non-mammalian species. Work with stem cell culture in fish started 20 years ago. Laboratory fish species, in particular zebrafish and medaka, have been the focus of research towards stem cell cultures. Medaka is th...

  17. Cultured Neural Networks: Optimization of Patterned Network Adhesiveness and Characterization of their Neural Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. L. C. Rutten

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available One type of future, improved neural interface is the “cultured probe”. It is a hybrid type of neural information transducer or prosthesis, for stimulation and/or recording of neural activity. It would consist of a microelectrode array (MEA on a planar substrate, each electrode being covered and surrounded by a local circularly confined network (“island” of cultured neurons. The main purpose of the local networks is that they act as biofriendly intermediates for collateral sprouts from the in vivo system, thus allowing for an effective and selective neuron–electrode interface. As a secondary purpose, one may envisage future information processing applications of these intermediary networks. In this paper, first, progress is shown on how substrates can be chemically modified to confine developing networks, cultured from dissociated rat cortex cells, to “islands” surrounding an electrode site. Additional coating of neurophobic, polyimide-coated substrate by triblock-copolymer coating enhances neurophilic-neurophobic adhesion contrast. Secondly, results are given on neuronal activity in patterned, unconnected and connected, circular “island” networks. For connected islands, the larger the island diameter (50, 100 or 150 μm, the more spontaneous activity is seen. Also, activity may show a very high degree of synchronization between two islands. For unconnected islands, activity may start at 22 days in vitro (DIV, which is two weeks later than in unpatterned networks.

  18. Cultured neural networks: Optimisation of patterned network adhesiveness and characterisation of their neural activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, Wim; Ruardij, T.G.; Marani, Enrico; Roelofsen, B.H.

    2006-01-01

    One type of future, improved neural interface is the "cultured probe"?. It is a hybrid type of neural information transducer or prosthesis, for stimulation and/or recording of neural activity. It would consist of a microelectrode array (MEA) on a planar substrate, each electrode being covered and

  19. Structural Analysis of Three-dimensional Human Neural Tissue derived from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terrence Brooks, Patrick; Rasmussen, Mikkel Aabech; Hyttel, Poul

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The present study aimed at establishing a method for production of a three-dimensional (3D) human neural tissue derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and analyzing the outcome by a combination of tissue ultrastructure and expression of neural markers. Methods: A two......-step cell culture procedure was implemented by subjecting human iPSCs to a 3D scaffoldbased neural differentiation protocol. First, neural fate-inducing small molecules were used to create a neuroepithelial monolayer. Second, the monolayer was trypsinized into single cells and seeded into a porous...... polystyrene scaffold and further cultured to produce a 3D neural tissue. The neural tissue was characterized by a combination of immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results: iPSCs developed into a 3D neural tissue expressing markers for neural progenitor cells, early neural...

  20. Cell Culture Made Easy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Frank J.

    1985-01-01

    Outlines steps to generate cell samples for observation and experimentation. The procedures (which use ordinary laboratory equipment) will establish a short-term primary culture of normal mammalian cells. Information on culture vessels and cell division and a list of questions to generate student interest and involvement in the topics are…

  1. Enhanced expression of FNDC5 in human embryonic stem cell-derived neural cells along with relevant embryonic neural tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghahrizjani, Fatemeh Ahmadi; Ghaedi, Kamran; Salamian, Ahmad; Tanhaei, Somayeh; Nejati, Alireza Shoaraye; Salehi, Hossein; Nabiuni, Mohammad; Baharvand, Hossein; Nasr-Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-02-25

    Availability of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) has enhanced the capability of basic and clinical research in the context of human neural differentiation. Derivation of neural progenitor (NP) cells from hESCs facilitates the process of human embryonic development through the generation of neuronal subtypes. We have recently indicated that fibronectin type III domain containing 5 protein (FNDC5) expression is required for appropriate neural differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). Bioinformatics analyses have shown the presence of three isoforms for human FNDC5 mRNA. To differentiate which isoform of FNDC5 is involved in the process of human neural differentiation, we have used hESCs as an in vitro model for neural differentiation by retinoic acid (RA) induction. The hESC line, Royan H5, was differentiated into a neural lineage in defined adherent culture treated by RA and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). We collected all cell types that included hESCs, rosette structures, and neural cells in an attempt to assess the expression of FNDC5 isoforms. There was a contiguous increase in all three FNDC5 isoforms during the neural differentiation process. Furthermore, the highest level of expression of the isoforms was significantly observed in neural cells compared to hESCs and the rosette structures known as neural precursor cells (NPCs). High expression levels of FNDC5 in human fetal brain and spinal cord tissues have suggested the involvement of this gene in neural tube development. Additional research is necessary to determine the major function of FDNC5 in this process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Pig Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neural Rosettes Developmentally Mimic Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Neural Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos-Cárdenas, Amalia; Webb, Robin; Jordan, Erin; West, Rachel; West, Franklin D; Yang, Jeong-Yeh; Wang, Kai; Stice, Steven L

    2015-08-15

    For diseases of the brain, the pig (Sus scrofa) is increasingly being used as a model organism that shares many anatomical and biological similarities with humans. We report that pig induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) can recapitulate events in early mammalian neural development. Pig iPSC line (POU5F1(high)/SSEA4(low)) had a higher potential to form neural rosettes (NR) containing neuroepithelial cells than either POU5F1(low)/SSEA4(low) or POU5F1(low)/SSEA4(high) lines. Thus, POU5F1 and SSEA4 pluripotency marker profiles in starting porcine iPSC populations can predict their propensity to form more robust NR populations in culture. The NR were isolated and expanded in vitro, retaining their NR morphology and neuroepithelial molecular properties. These cells expressed anterior central nervous system fate markers OTX2 and GBX2 through at least seven passages, and responded to retinoic acid, promoting a more posterior fate (HOXB4+, OTX2-, and GBX2-). These findings offer insight into pig iPSC development, which parallels the human iPSC in both anterior and posterior neural cell fates. These in vitro similarities in early neural differentiation processes support the use of pig iPSC and differentiated neural cells as a cell therapy in allogeneic porcine neural injury and degeneration models, providing relevant translational data for eventual human neural cell therapies.

  3. Brain stem slice conditioned medium contains endogenous BDNF and GDNF that affect neural crest boundary cap cells in co-culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Andreas; Kale, Ajay; Novozhilova, Ekaterina; Siratirakun, Piyaporn; Aquino, Jorge B; Thonabulsombat, Charoensri; Ernfors, Patrik; Olivius, Petri

    2014-05-30

    Conditioned medium (CM), made by collecting medium after a few days in cell culture and then re-using it to further stimulate other cells, is a known experimental concept since the 1950s. Our group has explored this technique to stimulate the performance of cells in culture in general, and to evaluate stem- and progenitor cell aptitude for auditory nerve repair enhancement in particular. As compared to other mediums, all primary endpoints in our published experimental settings have weighed in favor of conditioned culture medium, where we have shown that conditioned culture medium has a stimulatory effect on cell survival. In order to explore the reasons for this improved survival we set out to analyze the conditioned culture medium. We utilized ELISA kits to investigate whether brain stem (BS) slice CM contains any significant amounts of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and glial cell derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). We further looked for a donor cell with progenitor characteristics that would be receptive to BDNF and GDNF. We chose the well-documented boundary cap (BC) progenitor cells to be tested in our in vitro co-culture setting together with cochlear nucleus (CN) of the BS. The results show that BS CM contains BDNF and GDNF and that survival of BC cells, as well as BC cell differentiation into neurons, were enhanced when BS CM were used. Altogether, we conclude that BC cells transplanted into a BDNF and GDNF rich environment could be suitable for treatment of a traumatized or degenerated auditory nerve. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Uniform neural tissue models produced on synthetic hydrogels using standard culture techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Christopher; Schmitz, Matthew T; Propson, Nicholas E; Hou, Zhonggang; Zhang, Jue; Nguyen, Bao K; Bolin, Jennifer M; Jiang, Peng; McIntosh, Brian E; Probasco, Mitchell D; Swanson, Scott; Stewart, Ron; Thomson, James A; Schwartz, Michael P; Murphy, William L

    2017-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to test sample reproducibility for model neural tissues formed on synthetic hydrogels. Human embryonic stem (ES) cell-derived precursor cells were cultured on synthetic poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels to promote differentiation and self-organization into model neural tissue constructs. Neural progenitor, vascular, and microglial precursor cells were combined on PEG hydrogels to mimic developmental timing, which produced multicomponent neural constructs with 3D neuronal and glial organization, organized vascular networks, and microglia with ramified morphologies. Spearman's rank correlation analysis of global gene expression profiles and a comparison of coefficient of variation for expressed genes demonstrated that replicate neural constructs were highly uniform to at least day 21 for samples from independent experiments. We also demonstrate that model neural tissues formed on PEG hydrogels using a simplified neural differentiation protocol correlated more strongly to in vivo brain development than samples cultured on tissue culture polystyrene surfaces alone. These results provide a proof-of-concept demonstration that 3D cellular models that mimic aspects of human brain development can be produced from human pluripotent stem cells with high sample uniformity between experiments by using standard culture techniques, cryopreserved cell stocks, and a synthetic extracellular matrix. Impact statement Pluripotent stem (PS) cells have been characterized by an inherent ability to self-organize into 3D "organoids" resembling stomach, intestine, liver, kidney, and brain tissues, offering a potentially powerful tool for modeling human development and disease. However, organoid formation must be quantitatively reproducible for applications such as drug and toxicity screening. Here, we report a strategy to produce uniform neural tissue constructs with reproducible global gene expression profiles for replicate samples from multiple

  5. Fish Stem Cell Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ni; Li, Zhendong; Hong, Yunhan

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells have the potential for self-renewal and differentiation. First stem cell cultures were derived 30 years ago from early developing mouse embryos. These are pluripotent embryonic stem (ES) cells. Efforts towards ES cell derivation have been attempted in other mammalian and non-mammalian species. Work with stem cell culture in fish started 20 years ago. Laboratory fish species, in particular zebrafish and medaka, have been the focus of research towards stem cell cultures. Medaka is the second organism that generated ES cells and the first that gave rise to a spermatogonial stem cell line capable of test-tube sperm production. Most recently, the first haploid stem cells capable of producing whole animals have also been generated from medaka. ES-like cells have been reported also in zebrafish and several marine species. Attempts for germline transmission of ES cell cultures and gene targeting have been reported in zebrafish. Recent years have witnessed the progress in markers and procedures for ES cell characterization. These include the identification of fish homologs/paralogs of mammalian pluripotency genes and parameters for optimal chimera formation. In addition, fish germ cell cultures and transplantation have attracted considerable interest for germline transmission and surrogate production. Haploid ES cell nuclear transfer has proven in medaka the feasibility of semi-cloning as a novel assisted reproductive technology. In this special issue on “Fish Stem Cells and Nuclear Transfer”, we will focus our review on medaka to illustrate the current status and perspective of fish stem cells in research and application. We will also mention semi-cloning as a new development to conventional nuclear transfer. PMID:21547056

  6. Fish stem cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ni; Li, Zhendong; Hong, Yunhan

    2011-04-13

    Stem cells have the potential for self-renewal and differentiation. First stem cell cultures were derived 30 years ago from early developing mouse embryos. These are pluripotent embryonic stem (ES) cells. Efforts towards ES cell derivation have been attempted in other mammalian and non-mammalian species. Work with stem cell culture in fish started 20 years ago. Laboratory fish species, in particular zebrafish and medaka, have been the focus of research towards stem cell cultures. Medaka is the second organism that generated ES cells and the first that gave rise to a spermatogonial stem cell line capable of test-tube sperm production. Most recently, the first haploid stem cells capable of producing whole animals have also been generated from medaka. ES-like cells have been reported also in zebrafish and several marine species. Attempts for germline transmission of ES cell cultures and gene targeting have been reported in zebrafish. Recent years have witnessed the progress in markers and procedures for ES cell characterization. These include the identification of fish homologs/paralogs of mammalian pluripotency genes and parameters for optimal chimera formation. In addition, fish germ cell cultures and transplantation have attracted considerable interest for germline transmission and surrogate production. Haploid ES cell nuclear transfer has proven in medaka the feasibility of semi-cloning as a novel assisted reproductive technology. In this special issue on "Fish Stem Cells and Nuclear Transfer", we will focus our review on medaka to illustrate the current status and perspective of fish stem cells in research and application. We will also mention semi-cloning as a new development to conventional nuclear transfer.

  7. Umbilical cord blood cells CD133+/CD133- cultivation in neural proliferation media differentiates towards neural cell lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slovinska, Lucia; Novotna, Ivana; Kubes, Miroslav; Radonak, Jozef; Jergova, Stanislava; Cigankova, Viera; Rosocha, Jan; Cizkova, Dasa

    2011-10-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) has been identified as a good source of hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic stem cells that can be easily isolated. In the present study we investigated the possibility of whether stem cells in mononuclear UCB grown under defined conditions can produce progeny with neural phenotype. A combination of antigen-driven magnetic cell sorting (MACs) method and defined culture conditions specific for cells of neural lineages were used for isolation, expansion and differentiation of CD133+/- cells from UCB. Both UCB-derived fractions were expanded by exposure to growth factors (EGF, bFGF). Differentiation was induced by replacing them with fetal bovine serum. Using immunocytochemistry, the cell markers for neural (MAP2, GFAP, RIP) and non-neural lineages (S-100, von Willebrand factor) were detected. The analysis revealed occurrence of fully mature neural and non-neural lineages, which showed qualitative and quantitative differences between population of CD133+ and CD133- cells. The expression levels of MAP2 and RIP in CD133+ were significantly higher than in CD133-, more GFAP positive cells were found in the CD133-. At the same time, S-100 was expressed by 32.47 ± 6.24% of CD133- cells and 29.42 ± 1.32% of CD133- cell expressed a von Willebrand factor antigen. Our results indicate that stem cells derived from umbilical cord blood are easy to obtain, proliferate and are able to differentiate towards the cells of neural lineages, which represents a promising way for their utilization in cell-based therapies for CNS injuries and diseases. Copyright © 2011 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Digital Microfluidic Cell Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Alphonsus H C; Li, Bingyu Betty; Chamberlain, M Dean; Wheeler, Aaron R

    2015-01-01

    Digital microfluidics (DMF) is a droplet-based liquid-handling technology that has recently become popular for cell culture and analysis. In DMF, picoliter- to microliter-sized droplets are manipulated on a planar surface using electric fields, thus enabling software-reconfigurable operations on individual droplets, such as move, merge, split, and dispense from reservoirs. Using this technique, multistep cell-based processes can be carried out using simple and compact instrumentation, making DMF an attractive platform for eventual integration into routine biology workflows. In this review, we summarize the state-of-the-art in DMF cell culture, and describe design considerations, types of DMF cell culture, and cell-based applications of DMF.

  9. Liver Cell Culture Devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andria, B.; Bracco, A.; Cirino, G.; Chamuleau, R. A. F. M.

    2010-01-01

    In the last 15 years many different liver cell culture devices, consisting of functional liver cells and artificial materials, have been developed. They have been devised for numerous different applications, such as temporary organ replacement (a bridge to liver transplantation or native liver

  10. Control of neural stem cell survival by electroactive polymer substrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Lundin

    Full Text Available Stem cell function is regulated by intrinsic as well as microenvironmental factors, including chemical and mechanical signals. Conducting polymer-based cell culture substrates provide a powerful tool to control both chemical and physical stimuli sensed by stem cells. Here we show that polypyrrole (PPy, a commonly used conducting polymer, can be tailored to modulate survival and maintenance of rat fetal neural stem cells (NSCs. NSCs cultured on PPy substrates containing different counter ions, dodecylbenzenesulfonate (DBS, tosylate (TsO, perchlorate (ClO(4 and chloride (Cl, showed a distinct correlation between PPy counter ion and cell viability. Specifically, NSC viability was high on PPy(DBS but low on PPy containing TsO, ClO(4 and Cl. On PPy(DBS, NSC proliferation and differentiation was comparable to standard NSC culture on tissue culture polystyrene. Electrical reduction of PPy(DBS created a switch for neural stem cell viability, with widespread cell death upon polymer reduction. Coating the PPy(DBS films with a gel layer composed of a basement membrane matrix efficiently prevented loss of cell viability upon polymer reduction. Here we have defined conditions for the biocompatibility of PPy substrates with NSC culture, critical for the development of devices based on conducting polymers interfacing with NSCs.

  11. Cell Culturing of Cytoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Biomedical research offers hope for a variety of medical problems, from diabetes to the replacement of damaged bone and tissues. Bioreactors, which are used to grow cells and tissue cultures, play a major role in such research and production efforts. Cell culturing, such as this bone cell culture, is an important part of biomedical research. The BioDyn payload includes a tissue engineering investigation. The commercial affiliate, Millenium Biologix, Inc., has been conducting bone implant experiments to better understand how synthetic bone can be used to treat bone-related illnesses and bone damaged in accidents. On STS-95, the BioDyn payload will include a bone cell culture aimed to help develop this commercial synthetic bone product. Millenium Biologix, Inc., is exploring the potential for making human bone implantable materials by seeding its proprietary artificial scaffold material with human bone cells. The product of this tissue engineering experiment using the Bioprocessing Modules (BPMs) on STS-95 is space-grown bone implants, which could have potential for dental implants, long bone grafts, and coating for orthopedic implants such as hip replacements.

  12. Oscillating Cell Culture Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Lisa E.; Cheng, Mingyu; Moretti, Matteo G.

    2010-01-01

    To better exploit the principles of gas transport and mass transport during the processes of cell seeding of 3D scaffolds and in vitro culture of 3D tissue engineered constructs, the oscillatory cell culture bioreactor provides a flow of cell suspensions and culture media directly through a porous 3D scaffold (during cell seeding) and a 3D construct (during subsequent cultivation) within a highly gas-permeable closed-loop tube. This design is simple, modular, and flexible, and its component parts are easy to assemble and operate, and are inexpensive. Chamber volume can be very low, but can be easily scaled up. This innovation is well suited to work with different biological specimens, particularly with cells having high oxygen requirements and/or shear sensitivity, and different scaffold structures and dimensions. The closed-loop changer is highly gas permeable to allow efficient gas exchange during the cell seeding/culturing process. A porous scaffold, which may be seeded with cells, is fixed by means of a scaffold holder to the chamber wall with scaffold/construct orientation with respect to the chamber determined by the geometry of the scaffold holder. A fluid, with/without biological specimens, is added to the chamber such that all, or most, of the air is displaced (i.e., with or without an enclosed air bubble). Motion is applied to the chamber within a controlled environment (e.g., oscillatory motion within a humidified 37 C incubator). Movement of the chamber induces relative motion of the scaffold/construct with respect to the fluid. In case the fluid is a cell suspension, cells will come into contact with the scaffold and eventually adhere to it. Alternatively, cells can be seeded on scaffolds by gel entrapment prior to bioreactor cultivation. Subsequently, the oscillatory cell culture bioreactor will provide efficient gas exchange (i.e., of oxygen and carbon dioxide, as required for viability of metabolically active cells) and controlled levels of fluid

  13. Comparison of 2D and 3D neural induction methods for the generation of neural progenitor cells from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chandrasekaran, Abinaya; Avci, Hasan; Ochalek, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Neural progenitor cells (NPCs) from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are frequently induced using 3D culture methodologies however, it is unknown whether spheroid-based (3D) neural induction is actually superior to monolayer (2D) neural induction. Our aim was to compare the efficiency......), cortical layer (TBR1, CUX1) and glial markers (SOX9, GFAP, AQP4). Electron microscopy demonstrated that both methods resulted in morphologically similar neural rosettes. However, quantification of NPCs derived from 3D neural induction exhibited an increase in the number of PAX6/NESTIN double positive cells...... and the derived neurons exhibited longer neurites. In contrast, 2D neural induction resulted in more SOX1 positive cells. While 2D monolayer induction resulted in slightly less mature neurons, at an early stage of differentiation, the patch clamp analysis failed to reveal any significant differences between...

  14. Human Neural Cell-Based Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-28

    Orlando R, Stice SL. Membrane proteomic signatures of karyotypically normal and abnormal human embryonic stem cell lines and derivatives. Proteomics. 2011...format (96-,384-well) assays, 2) grow as adherent monolayers, and 3) possess a stable karyotype for multiple (>10) passages with a doubling time of ~36...derived neural progenitor cell line working stock has been amplified, characterized for karyotype and evaluated for the expression of neural progenitor

  15. Plant cell culture initiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hall, R.D.

    2000-01-01

    The use of cultured plant cells in either organized or unorganized form has increased vey considerably in the last 10-15 yr. Many new technologies have been developed and applications in both fundamental and applied research have led to the development of some powerful tools for improving our

  16. Gap Junction–mediated Cell–Cell Communication Modulates Mouse Neural Crest Migration

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, G.Y.; Cooper, E.S.; Waldo, K.; Kirby, M L; Gilula, N B; Lo, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Previous studies showed that conotruncal heart malformations can arise with the increase or decrease in α1 connexin function in neural crest cells. To elucidate the possible basis for the quantitative requirement for α1 connexin gap junctions in cardiac development, a neural crest outgrowth culture system was used to examine migration of neural crest cells derived from CMV43 transgenic embryos overexpressing α1 connexins, and from α1 connexin knockout (KO) mice and FC transgenic mice expressi...

  17. Passaging protocols for mammalian neural stem cells in suspension bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Arindom; Kallos, Michael S; Behie, Leo A

    2002-01-01

    Mammalian neural stem cells (NSC) offer great promise as therapeutic agents for the treatment of central nervous system disorders. As a consequence of the large numbers of cells that will be needed for drug testing and transplantation studies, it is necessary to develop protocols for the large-scale expansion of mammalian NSC. Neural stem cells and early progenitor cells can be expanded in vitro as aggregates in controlled bioreactors using carefully designed media. The first objective of this study was to determine if it is possible to maintain a population of murine neural stem and progenitor cells as aggregates in suspension culture bioreactors over extended periods of time. We discovered that serial passaging of a mixture of aggregates sizes resulted in high viabilities, high viable cell densities, and good control of aggregate diameter. When the NSC aggregates were serially subcultured three times without mechanical dissociation, a total multiplication ratio of 2.9 x 10(3) was achieved over a period of 12 days, whereas the aggregate size was controlled (mean diameter less than 150 microm) below levels at which necrosis would occur. Moreover, cell densities of 1.0 x 10(6) cells/mL were repeatedly achieved in batch culture with viabilities exceeding 80%. The second objective was to examine the proliferative potential of single cells shed from the surface of these aggregates. We found that the single cells, when subcultured, retained the capacity to generate new aggregates, gave rise to cultures with high viable cell densities and were able to differentiate into all of the primary cell phenotypes in the central nervous system.

  18. Culture and social support: neural bases and biological impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, David K; Kim, Heejung S; Taylor, Shelley E

    2009-01-01

    Social support is an effective means by which people cope with stressful events, and consequently, it beneficially affects health and well-being. Yet there are profound cultural differences in the effectiveness of different types of support and how people use their support networks. In this paper, we examine research on the impact of culture on social support, the neural underpinnings of social support, and how cultural differences in social support seeking are manifested biologically. We focus on cultural factors that may affect individuals' decisions to seek or not to seek social support and how culture moderates the impact of support seeking on biological and psychological health outcomes. We also examine recent research on the interaction between genes and culture in social support use. Discussion centers on the importance of developing an overarching framework of social support that integrates health psychology, cultural psychology, social neuroscience, and genetics.

  19. Cultural effects on the neural basis of theory of mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi Frank, Chiyoko; Temple, Elise

    2009-01-01

    "Theory of mind" has been described as the ability to attribute and understand other people's desires and intentions as distinct from one's own. It has been found to develop as early as between 3 and 4 years old, with precursor abilities possibly developing much earlier. There has been debate about the extent to which the developmental trajectory of theory of mind may differ across cultures or language systems. Although very few neuroimaging studies have directly compared different groups from different culture and language systems, across studies of a number of cultural/language groups have been used to explore the neural correlates of theory of mind. A summary of these findings suggests that there may be both universal and culture or language-specific neural correlates related to theory of mind. These studies, while still preliminary in many ways, illustrate the importance of taking into account the cultural background of participants. Furthermore these results suggest that there may be important cultural influence on theory of mind and the neural correlates associated with this ability.

  20. Nano-topography Enhances Communication in Neural Cells Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Onesto, V.

    2017-08-23

    Neural cells are the smallest building blocks of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Information in neural networks and cell-substrate interactions have been heretofore studied separately. Understanding whether surface nano-topography can direct nerve cells assembly into computational efficient networks may provide new tools and criteria for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. In this work, we used information theory approaches and functional multi calcium imaging (fMCI) techniques to examine how information flows in neural networks cultured on surfaces with controlled topography. We found that substrate roughness Sa affects networks topology. In the low nano-meter range, S-a = 0-30 nm, information increases with Sa. Moreover, we found that energy density of a network of cells correlates to the topology of that network. This reinforces the view that information, energy and surface nano-topography are tightly inter-connected and should not be neglected when studying cell-cell interaction in neural tissue repair and regeneration.

  1. Perfusion based cell culture chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiskanen, Arto; Emnéus, Jenny; Dufva, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Performing cell culture in miniaturized perfusion chambers gives possibilities to experiment with cells under near in vivo like conditions. In contrast to traditional batch cultures, miniaturized perfusion systems provide precise control of medium composition, long term unattended cultures...... and tissue like structuring of the cultures. However, as this chapter illustrates, many issues remain to be identified regarding perfusion cell culture such as design, material choice and how to use these systems before they will be widespread amongst biomedical researchers....

  2. Microfluidic Cell Culture Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Shuichi (Inventor); Cabrera, Lourdes Marcella (Inventor); Heo, Yun Seok (Inventor); Smith, Gary Daniel (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic devices for cell culturing and methods for using the same are disclosed. One device includes a substrate and membrane. The substrate includes a reservoir in fluid communication with a passage. A bio-compatible fluid may be added to the reservoir and passage. The reservoir is configured to receive and retain at least a portion of a cell mass. The membrane acts as a barrier to evaporation of the bio-compatible fluid from the passage. A cover fluid may be added to cover the bio-compatible fluid to prevent evaporation of the bio-compatible fluid.

  3. Biosynthesis of the neural cell adhesion molecule: characterization of polypeptide C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybroe, O; Albrechtsen, M; Dahlin, J

    1985-01-01

    The biosynthesis of the neural cell adhesion molecule (N-CAM) was studied in primary cultures of rat cerebral glial cells, cerebellar granule neurons, and skeletal muscle cells. The three cell types produced different N-CAM polypeptide patterns. Glial cells synthesized a 135,000 Mr polypeptide B...

  4. Stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous tooth exhibit stromal-derived inducing activity and lead to generation of neural crest cells from human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbalaie, Khadijeh; Tanhaei, Somayyeh; Rabiei, Farzaneh; Kiani-Esfahani, Abbas; Masoudi, Najmeh Sadat; Nasr-Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein; Baharvand, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    The neural crest is a transient structure of early vertebrate embryos that generates neural crest cells (NCCs). These cells can migrate throughout the body and produce a diverse array of mature tissue types. Due to the ethical and technical problems surrounding the isolation of these early human embryo cells, researchers have focused on in vitro studies to produce NCCs and increase their knowledge of neural crest development. In this experimental study, we cultured human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) on stromal stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) for a two-week period. We used different approaches to characterize these differentiated cells as neural precursor cells (NPCs) and NCCs. In the first co-culture week, hESCs appeared as crater-like structures with marginal rosettes. NPCs derived from these structures expressed the early neural crest marker p75 in addition to numerous other genes associated with neural crest induction such as SNAIL, SLUG, PTX3 and SOX9. Flow cytometry analysis showed 70% of the cells were AP2/P75 positive. Moreover, the cells were able to self-renew, sustain multipotent differentiation potential, and readily form neurospheres in suspension culture. SHED, as an adult stem cell with a neural crest origin, has stromal-derived inducing activity (SDIA) and can be used as an NCC inducer from hESCs. These cells provide an invaluable resource to study neural crest differentiation in both normal and disordered human neural crest development.

  5. A protocol for isolation and enriched monolayer cultivation of neural precursor cells from mouse dentate gyrus

    OpenAIRE

    Harish eBabu; Jan-Hendrik eClaasen; Jan-Hendrik eClaasen; Jan-Hendrik eClaasen; Suresh eKannan; Annette E. Rünker; Theo ePalmer; Gerd eKempermann; Gerd eKempermann

    2011-01-01

    In vitro assays are valuable tools to study the characteristics of adult neural precursor cells under controlled conditions with a defined set of parameters. We here present a detailed protocol based on our previous original publication (Babu et al., Enriched monolayer precursor cell cultures from micro-dissected adult mouse dentate gyrus yield functional granule cell-like neurons, PLoS One 2007, 2:e388) to isolate neural precursor cells from the hippocampus of adult mice and maintain and pro...

  6. Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived models to investigate human cytomegalovirus infection in neural cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo D'Aiuto

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV infection is one of the leading prenatal causes of congenital mental retardation and deformities world-wide. Access to cultured human neuronal lineages, necessary to understand the species specific pathogenic effects of HCMV, has been limited by difficulties in sustaining primary human neuronal cultures. Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells now provide an opportunity for such research. We derived iPS cells from human adult fibroblasts and induced neural lineages to investigate their susceptibility to infection with HCMV strain Ad169. Analysis of iPS cells, iPS-derived neural stem cells (NSCs, neural progenitor cells (NPCs and neurons suggests that (i iPS cells are not permissive to HCMV infection, i.e., they do not permit a full viral replication cycle; (ii Neural stem cells have impaired differentiation when infected by HCMV; (iii NPCs are fully permissive for HCMV infection; altered expression of genes related to neural metabolism or neuronal differentiation is also observed; (iv most iPS-derived neurons are not permissive to HCMV infection; and (v infected neurons have impaired calcium influx in response to glutamate.

  7. Isolation and characterization of adult neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebzehnrubl, Florian A; Vedam-Mai, Vinata; Azari, Hassan; Reynolds, Brent A; Deleyrolle, Loic P

    2011-01-01

    It has been thought for a long time that the adult brain is incapable of generating new neurons, or that neurons cannot be added to its complex circuitry. However, recent technology has resulted in an explosion of research demonstrating that neurogenesis, or the birth of new neurons from adult stem cells constitutively occurs in two specific regions of the mammalian brain; namely the subventricular zone and hippocampal dentate gyrus. Adult CNS stem cells exhibit three main characteristics: (1) they are "self-renewing," i.e., they possess a theoretically unlimited ability to produce progeny indistinguishable from themselves, (2) they are proliferative (undergoing mitosis) and (3) they are multipotent for the different neuroectodermal lineages of the CNS, including the different neuronal, and glial subtypes. CNS stem cells and all progenitor cell types are broadly termed "precursors." In this chapter, we describe methods to identify, isolate and experimentally manipulate stem cells of the adult brain. We outline how to prepare a precursor cell culture from naive brain tissue and how to test the "stemness" potential of different cell types present in that culture, which is achieved in a three-step paradigm. Following their isolation, stem/progenitor cells are expanded in neurosphere culture. Single cells obtained from these neurospheres are sorted for the expression of surface markers by flow cytometry. Finally, putative stem cells from cell sorting will be subjected to the so-called neural colony-forming cell assay, which allows discrimination between stem and progenitor cells. At the end of this chapter we will also describe how to identify neural stem cells in vivo.

  8. Human pluripotent stem cell-derived neural constructs for predicting neural toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Michael P; Hou, Zhonggang; Propson, Nicholas E; Zhang, Jue; Engstrom, Collin J; Santos Costa, Vitor; Jiang, Peng; Nguyen, Bao Kim; Bolin, Jennifer M; Daly, William; Wang, Yu; Stewart, Ron; Page, C David; Murphy, William L; Thomson, James A

    2015-10-06

    Human pluripotent stem cell-based in vitro models that reflect human physiology have the potential to reduce the number of drug failures in clinical trials and offer a cost-effective approach for assessing chemical safety. Here, human embryonic stem (ES) cell-derived neural progenitor cells, endothelial cells, mesenchymal stem cells, and microglia/macrophage precursors were combined on chemically defined polyethylene glycol hydrogels and cultured in serum-free medium to model cellular interactions within the developing brain. The precursors self-assembled into 3D neural constructs with diverse neuronal and glial populations, interconnected vascular networks, and ramified microglia. Replicate constructs were reproducible by RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) and expressed neurogenesis, vasculature development, and microglia genes. Linear support vector machines were used to construct a predictive model from RNA-Seq data for 240 neural constructs treated with 34 toxic and 26 nontoxic chemicals. The predictive model was evaluated using two standard hold-out testing methods: a nearly unbiased leave-one-out cross-validation for the 60 training compounds and an unbiased blinded trial using a single hold-out set of 10 additional chemicals. The linear support vector produced an estimate for future data of 0.91 in the cross-validation experiment and correctly classified 9 of 10 chemicals in the blinded trial.

  9. A cultured human neural network operates a robotic actuator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzi, R M R; Rossetti, D; Cino, G; Marino, D; A L Vescovi; Baer, W

    2009-02-01

    The development of bio-electronic prostheses, hybrid human-electronics devices and bionic robots has been the aim of many researchers. Although neurophysiologic processes have been widely investigated and bio-electronics has developed rapidly, the dynamics of a biological neuronal network that receive sensory inputs, store and control information is not yet understood. Toward this end, we have taken an interdisciplinary approach to study the learning and response of biological neural networks to complex stimulation patterns. This paper describes the design, execution, and results of several experiments performed in order to investigate the behavior of complex interconnected structures found in biological neural networks. The experimental design consisted of biological human neurons stimulated by parallel signal patterns intended to simulate complex perceptions. The response patterns were analyzed with an innovative artificial neural network (ANN), called ITSOM (Inductive Tracing Self Organizing Map). This system allowed us to decode the complex neural responses from a mixture of different stimulations and learned memory patterns inherent in the cell colonies. In the experiment described in this work, neurons derived from human neural stem cells were connected to a robotic actuator through the ANN analyzer to demonstrate our ability to produce useful control from simulated perceptions stimulating the cells. Preliminary results showed that in vitro human neuron colonies can learn to reply selectively to different stimulation patterns and that response signals can effectively be decoded to operate a minirobot. Lastly the fascinating performance of the hybrid system is evaluated quantitatively and potential future work is discussed.

  10. Mechanisms Of Cell Aging in Cell Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Feit, Julia; Gorzelańczyk, Edward Jacek

    2013-01-01

    A key element in the life of cells in culture is the number of cell divisions, not their life time in culture. Serially in vivo transplanted cells also exhibit a finite lifetime, which means that the cell aging is not unique only to a cell culture. There are theories suggesting that the aging of cells in culture may be associated with the aging of the organism from which they were obtained. Cells may stop dividing because of replicative aging, which is the result of telomere shortening. The a...

  11. Functional evaluation of neural stem cell differentiation by single cell calcium imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiriz, Maria Francisca; Grade, Sofia; Rosa, Alexandra; Xapelli, Sara; Bernardino, Liliana; Agasse, Fabienne; Malva, João O

    2011-09-01

    Neurogenesis in the adult mammalian brain occurs in two specific brain areas, the subventricular zone (SVZ) bordering the lateral ventricles and the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampus. Although these regions are prone to produce new neurons, cultured cells from these neurogenic niches tend to be mixed cultures, containing both neurons and glial cells. Several reports highlight the potential of the self-healing capacity of the brain following injury. Even though much knowledge has been produced on the neurogenesis itself, brain repairing strategies are still far away from patients cure. Here we review general concepts in the neurogenesis field, also addressing the methods available to study neural stem cell differentiation. A major problem faced by research groups and companies dedicated to brain regenerative medicine resides on the lack of good methods to functionally identify neural stem cell differentiation and novel drug targets. To address this issue, we developed a unique single cell calcium imaging-based method to functionally discriminate different cell types derived from SVZ neural stem cell cultures. The unique functional profile of each SVZ cell type was correlated at the single cell level with the immunodetection of specific phenotypic markers. This platform was raised on the basis of the functional response of neurons, oligodendrocytes and immature cells to depolarising agents, to thrombin and to histamine, respectively. We also outline key studies in which our new platform was extremely relevant in the context of drug discovery and development in the area of brain regenerative medicine.

  12. Culturing the epiblast cells of the pig blastocyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, N C; Rexroad, C E; Pursel, V G; Powell, A M; Nel, N D

    1993-07-01

    Pig epiblast cells that had been separated from other early embryonic cells were cultured in vitro. A three-step dissection protocol was used to isolate the epiblast from trophectoderm and primitive endoderm before culturing. Blastocysts collected at 7 to 8 days postestrus were immunodissected to obtain the inner cell mass (ICM) and destroy trophectodermal cells. The ICM was cultured for 2 to 3 days on STO feeder cells. The epiblast was then physically dissected free of associated primitive endoderm. Epiblast-derived cells, grown on STO feeders, produced colonies of small cells resembling mouse embryonic stem cells. This primary cell morphology changed as the colonies grew and evolved into three distinct colony types (endodermlike, neural rosette, or complex). Cell cultures derived from these three colony types spontaneously differentiated into numerous specialized cell types in STO co-culture. These included fibroblasts, endodermlike cells, neuronlike cells, pigmented cells, adipogenic cells, contracting muscle cells, dome-forming epithelium, ciliated epithelium, tubule-forming epithelium, and a round amoeboid cell type resembling a plasmacyte after Wright staining. The neuronlike cells, contracting muscle cells, and tubule-forming epithelium had normal karyotypes and displayed finite or undefined life spans upon long-term STO co-culture. The dome-forming epithelium had an indefinite life span in STO co-culture and also retained a normal karyotype. These results demonstrate the in vitro pluripotency of pig epiblast cells and indicate the epiblast can be a source for deriving various specialized cell cultures or cell lines.

  13. Neural crest cells: from developmental biology to clinical interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noisa, Parinya; Raivio, Taneli

    2014-09-01

    Neural crest cells are multipotent cells, which are specified in embryonic ectoderm in the border of neural plate and epiderm during early development by interconnection of extrinsic stimuli and intrinsic factors. Neural crest cells are capable of differentiating into various somatic cell types, including melanocytes, craniofacial cartilage and bone, smooth muscle, and peripheral nervous cells, which supports their promise for cell therapy. In this work, we provide a comprehensive review of wide aspects of neural crest cells from their developmental biology to applicability in medical research. We provide a simplified model of neural crest cell development and highlight the key external stimuli and intrinsic regulators that determine the neural crest cell fate. Defects of neural crest cell development leading to several human disorders are also mentioned, with the emphasis of using human induced pluripotent stem cells to model neurocristopathic syndromes. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. A Protocol for Isolation and Enriched Monolayer Cultivation of Neural Precursor Cells from Mouse Dentate Gyrus

    OpenAIRE

    Babu, Harish; Claasen, Jan-Hendrik; Kannan, Suresh; Rünker, Annette E.; Palmer, Theo; Kempermann, Gerd

    2011-01-01

    In vitro assays are valuable tools to study the characteristics of adult neural precursor cells under controlled conditions with a defined set of parameters. We here present a detailed protocol based on our previous original publication (Babu et al., 2007) to isolate neural precursor cells from the hippocampus of adult mice and maintain and propagate them as adherent monolayer cultures. The strategy is based on the use of Percoll density gradient centrifugation to enrich precursor cells from ...

  15. Differentiation of Equine Mesenchymal Stromal Cells into Cells of Neural Lineage: Potential for Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Cruz Villagrán

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are able to differentiate into extramesodermal lineages, including neurons. Positive outcomes were obtained after transplantation of neurally induced MSCs in laboratory animals after nerve injury, but this is unknown in horses. Our objectives were to test the ability of equine MSCs to differentiate into cells of neural lineage in vitro, to assess differences in morphology and lineage-specific protein expression, and to investigate if horse age and cell passage number affected the ability to achieve differentiation. Bone marrow-derived MSCs were obtained from young and adult horses. Following demonstration of stemness, MSCs were neurally induced and microscopically assessed at different time points. Results showed that commercially available nitrogen-coated tissue culture plates supported proliferation and differentiation. Morphological changes were immediate and all the cells displayed a neural crest-like cell phenotype. Expression of neural progenitor proteins, was assessed via western blot or immunofluorescence. In our study, MSCs generated from young and middle-aged horses did not show differences in their ability to undergo differentiation. The effect of cell passage number, however, is inconsistent and further experiments are needed. Ongoing work is aimed at transdifferentiating these cells into Schwann cells for transplantation into a peripheral nerve injury model in horses.

  16. Differentiation state determines neural effects on microvascular endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muffley, Lara A., E-mail: muffley@u.washington.edu [University of Washington, Campus Box 359796, 300 9th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104 (United States); Pan, Shin-Chen, E-mail: pansc@mail.ncku.edu.tw [University of Washington, Campus Box 359796, 300 9th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104 (United States); Smith, Andria N., E-mail: gnaunderwater@gmail.com [University of Washington, Campus Box 359796, 300 9th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104 (United States); Ga, Maricar, E-mail: marga16@uw.edu [University of Washington, Campus Box 359796, 300 9th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104 (United States); Hocking, Anne M., E-mail: ahocking@u.washington.edu [University of Washington, Campus Box 359796, 300 9th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104 (United States); Gibran, Nicole S., E-mail: nicoleg@u.washington.edu [University of Washington, Campus Box 359796, 300 9th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104 (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Growing evidence indicates that nerves and capillaries interact paracrinely in uninjured skin and cutaneous wounds. Although mature neurons are the predominant neural cell in the skin, neural progenitor cells have also been detected in uninjured adult skin. The aim of this study was to characterize differential paracrine effects of neural progenitor cells and mature sensory neurons on dermal microvascular endothelial cells. Our results suggest that neural progenitor cells and mature sensory neurons have unique secretory profiles and distinct effects on dermal microvascular endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and nitric oxide production. Neural progenitor cells and dorsal root ganglion neurons secrete different proteins related to angiogenesis. Specific to neural progenitor cells were dipeptidyl peptidase-4, IGFBP-2, pentraxin-3, serpin f1, TIMP-1, TIMP-4 and VEGF. In contrast, endostatin, FGF-1, MCP-1 and thrombospondin-2 were specific to dorsal root ganglion neurons. Microvascular endothelial cell proliferation was inhibited by dorsal root ganglion neurons but unaffected by neural progenitor cells. In contrast, microvascular endothelial cell migration in a scratch wound assay was inhibited by neural progenitor cells and unaffected by dorsal root ganglion neurons. In addition, nitric oxide production by microvascular endothelial cells was increased by dorsal root ganglion neurons but unaffected by neural progenitor cells. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dorsal root ganglion neurons, not neural progenitor cells, regulate microvascular endothelial cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neural progenitor cells, not dorsal root ganglion neurons, regulate microvascular endothelial cell migration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neural progenitor cells and dorsal root ganglion neurons do not effect microvascular endothelial tube formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dorsal root ganglion neurons, not neural progenitor cells, regulate

  17. Neuroprotective effects of ginsenoside Rg1-induced neural stem cell transplantation on hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying-Bo; Wang, Yan; Tang, Ji-Ping; Chen, Di; Wang, Sha-Li

    2015-05-01

    Ginsenoside Rg1 is the major pharmacologically active component of ginseng, and is reported to have various therapeutic actions. To determine whether it induces the differentiation of neural stem cells, and whether neural stem cell transplantation after induction has therapeutic effects on hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, we cultured neural stem cells in 10-80 μM ginsenoside Rg1. Immunohistochemistry revealed that of the concentrations tested, 20 mM ginsenoside Rg1 had the greatest differentiation-inducing effect and was the concentration used for subsequent experiments. Whole-cell patch clamp showed that neural stem cells induced by 20 μM ginsenoside Rg1 were more mature than non-induced cells. We then established neonatal rat models of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy using the suture method, and ginsenoside Rg1-induced neural stem cells were transplanted via intracerebroventricular injection. These tests confirmed that neural stem cells induced by ginsenoside had fewer pathological lesions and had a significantly better behavioral capacity than model rats that received saline. Transplanted neural stem cells expressed neuron-specific enolase, and were mainly distributed in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex. The present data suggest that ginsenoside Rg1-induced neural stem cells can promote the partial recovery of complicated brain functions in models of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

  18. Neuroprotective effects of ginsenoside Rg1-induced neural stem cell transplantation on hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-bo Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ginsenoside Rg1 is the major pharmacologically active component of ginseng, and is reported to have various therapeutic actions. To determine whether it induces the differentiation of neural stem cells, and whether neural stem cell transplantation after induction has therapeutic effects on hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, we cultured neural stem cells in 10-80 µM ginsenoside Rg1. Immunohistochemistry revealed that of the concentrations tested, 20 mM ginsenoside Rg1 had the greatest differentiation-inducing effect and was the concentration used for subsequent experiments. Whole-cell patch clamp showed that neural stem cells induced by 20 µM ginsenoside Rg1 were more mature than non-induced cells. We then established neonatal rat models of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy using the suture method, and ginsenoside Rg1-induced neural stem cells were transplanted via intracerebroventricular injection. These tests confirmed that neural stem cells induced by ginsenoside had fewer pathological lesions and had a significantly better behavioral capacity than model rats that received saline. Transplanted neural stem cells expressed neuron-specific enolase, and were mainly distributed in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex. The present data suggest that ginsenoside Rg1-induced neural stem cells can promote the partial recovery of complicated brain functions in models of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

  19. Transplantation of erythropoietin gene-modified neural stem cells improves the repair of injured spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-fei Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The protective effects of erythropoietin on spinal cord injury have not been well described. Here, the eukaryotic expression plasmid pcDNA3.1 human erythropoietin was transfected into rat neural stem cells cultured in vitro. A rat model of spinal cord injury was established using a free falling object. In the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group, transfected neural stem cells were injected into the rat subarachnoid cavity, while the neural stem cells group was injected with non-transfected neural stem cells. Dulbecco′s modified Eagle′s medium/F12 medium was injected into the rats in the spinal cord injury group as a control. At 1-4 weeks post injury, the motor function in the rat lower limbs was best in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group, followed by the neural stem cells group, and lastly the spinal cord injury group. At 72 hours, compared with the spinal cord injury group, the apoptotic index and Caspase-3 gene and protein expressions were apparently decreased, and the bcl-2 gene and protein expressions were noticeably increased, in the tissues surrounding the injured region in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group. At 4 weeks, the cavities were clearly smaller and the motor and somatosensory evoked potential latencies were remarkably shorter in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group and neural stem cells group than those in the spinal cord injury group. These differences were particularly obvious in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group. More CM-Dil-positive cells and horseradish peroxidase-positive nerve fibers and larger amplitude motor and somatosensory evoked potentials were found in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group and neural stem cells group than in the spinal cord injury group. Again, these differences were particularly obvious in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group. These data indicate that transplantation of erythropoietin gene-modified neural stem

  20. Transplantation of erythropoietin gene-modified neural stem cells improves the repair of injured spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Min-Fei; Zhang, Shu-Quan; Gu, Rui; Liu, Jia-Bei; Li, Ye; Zhu, Qing-San

    2015-09-01

    The protective effects of erythropoietin on spinal cord injury have not been well described. Here, the eukaryotic expression plasmid pcDNA3.1 human erythropoietin was transfected into rat neural stem cells cultured in vitro. A rat model of spinal cord injury was established using a free falling object. In the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group, transfected neural stem cells were injected into the rat subarachnoid cavity, while the neural stem cells group was injected with non-transfected neural stem cells. Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium/F12 medium was injected into the rats in the spinal cord injury group as a control. At 1-4 weeks post injury, the motor function in the rat lower limbs was best in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group, followed by the neural stem cells group, and lastly the spinal cord injury group. At 72 hours, compared with the spinal cord injury group, the apoptotic index and Caspase-3 gene and protein expressions were apparently decreased, and the bcl-2 gene and protein expressions were noticeably increased, in the tissues surrounding the injured region in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group. At 4 weeks, the cavities were clearly smaller and the motor and somatosensory evoked potential latencies were remarkably shorter in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group and neural stem cells group than those in the spinal cord injury group. These differences were particularly obvious in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group. More CM-Dil-positive cells and horseradish peroxidase-positive nerve fibers and larger amplitude motor and somatosensory evoked potentials were found in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group and neural stem cells group than in the spinal cord injury group. Again, these differences were particularly obvious in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group. These data indicate that transplantation of erythropoietin gene-modified neural stem cells into the

  1. Mammalian Cell Tissue Culture Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, Katy; May, Kristin M

    2016-06-01

    Cultured tissues and cells are used extensively in physiological and pharmacological studies. In vitro cultures provide a means of examining cells and tissues without the complex interactions that would be present if the whole organism were studied. A number of special skills are required in order to preserve the structure, function, behavior, and biology of cells in culture. This unit describes the basic skills required to maintain and preserve cell cultures: maintaining aseptic technique, preparing media with the appropriate characteristics, passaging, freezing and storage, recovering frozen stocks, and counting viable cells. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  2. Cell culture's spider silk road.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkel, Jeffrey

    2014-06-01

    A number of synthetic and natural materials have been tried in cell culture and tissue engineering applications in recent years. Now Jeffrey Perkel takes a look at one new culture component that might surprise you-spider silk.

  3. Mechanotransduction of Neural Cells Through Cell-Substrate Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stukel, Jessica M; Willits, Rebecca Kuntz

    2016-06-01

    Neurons and neural stem cells are sensitive to their mechanical and topographical environment, and cell-substrate binding contributes to this sensitivity to activate signaling pathways for basic cell functions. Many transmembrane proteins transmit signals into and out of the cell, including integrins, growth factor receptors, G-protein-coupled receptors, cadherins, cell adhesion molecules, and ion channels. Specifically, integrins are one of the main transmembrane proteins that transmit force across the cell membrane between a cell and its extracellular matrix, making them critical in the study of cell-material interactions. This review focuses on mechanotransduction, defined as the conversion of force a cell generates through cell-substrate bonds to a chemical signal, of neural cells. The chemical signals relay information via pathways through the cellular cytoplasm to the nucleus, where signaling events can affect gene expression. Pathways and the cellular response initiated by substrate binding are explored to better understand their effect on neural cells mechanotransduction. As the results of mechanotransduction affect cell adhesion, cell shape, and differentiation, knowledge regarding neural mechanotransduction is critical for most regenerative strategies in tissue engineering, where novel environments are developed to improve conduit design for central and peripheral nervous system repair in vivo.

  4. Sphere-Derived Multipotent Progenitor Cells Obtained From Human Oral Mucosa Are Enriched in Neural Crest Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Shigehiro; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Sato, Yutaka; Harada, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    : Although isolation of oral mucosal stromal stem cells has been previously reported, complex isolation methods are not suitable for clinical application. The neurosphere culture technique is a convenient method for the isolation of neural stem cells and neural crest stem cells (NCSCs); neurosphere generation is a phenotype of NCSCs. However, the molecular details underlying the isolation and characterization of human oral mucosa stromal cells (OMSCs) by neurosphere culture are not understood. The purpose of the present study was to isolate NCSCs from oral mucosa using the neurosphere technique and to establish effective in vivo bone tissue regeneration methods. Human OMSCs were isolated from excised human oral mucosa; these cells formed spheres in neurosphere culture conditions. Oral mucosa sphere-forming cells (OMSFCs) were characterized by biological analyses of stem cells. Additionally, composites of OMSFCs and multiporous polylactic acid scaffolds were implanted subcutaneously into immunocompromised mice. OMSFCs had the capacity for self-renewal and expressed neural crest-related markers (e.g., nestin, CD44, slug, snail, and MSX1). Furthermore, upregulated expression of neural crest-related genes (EDNRA, Hes1, and Sox9) was observed in OMSFCs, which are thought to contain an enriched population of neural crest-derived cells. The expression pattern of α2-integrin (CD49b) in OMSFCs also differed from that in OMSCs. Finally, OMSFCs were capable of differentiating into neural crest lineages in vitro and generating ectopic bone tissues even in the subcutaneous region. The results of the present study suggest that OMSFCs are an ideal source of cells for the neural crest lineage and hard tissue regeneration. The sphere culture technique is a convenient method for isolating stem cells. However, the isolation and characterization of human oral mucosa stromal cells (OMSCs) using the sphere culture system are not fully understood. The present study describes the

  5. The neural crest and neural crest cells: discovery and significance ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper I provide a brief overview of the major phases of investigation into the neural crest and the major players involved, discuss how the origin of the neural crest relates to the origin of the nervous system in vertebrate embryos, discuss the impact on the germ-layer theory of the discovery of the neural crest and of ...

  6. Methylprednisolone inhibits the proliferation and affects the differentiation of rat spinal cord-derived neural progenitor cells cultured in low oxygen conditions by inhibiting HIF-1α and Hes1 in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenhao; Wang, Peng; Li, Shiyuan; Yang, Jiewen; Liang, Xinjun; Tang, Yong; Li, Yuxi; Yang, Rui; Wu, Yanfeng; Shen, Huiyong

    2014-09-01

    Although there is much controversy over the use of methylprednisolone (MP), it is one of the main drugs used in the treatment of acute spinal cord injury (SCI). The induction of the proliferation and differentiation of endogenous neural progenitor cells (NPCs) is considered a promising mode of treatment for SCI. However, the effects of MP on spinal cord-derived endogenous NPCs in a low oxygen enviroment remain to be delineated. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the potential effects of MP on NPCs cultured under low oxygen conditions in vitro and to elucidate the molecular mechanisms involved. Fetal rat spinal cord-derived NPCs were harvested and divided into 4 groups: 2 groups of cells cultured under normal oxygen conditions and treated with or without MP, and 2 groups incubated in 3% O2 (low oxygen) treated in a similar manner. We found that MP induced suppressive effects on NPC proliferation even under low oxygen conditions (3% O2). The proportion of nestin-positive NPCs decreased from 51.8±2.46% to 36.17±3.55% following the addition of MP and decreased more significantly to 27.20±2.68% in the cells cultured in 3% O2. In addition, a smaller number of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive cells and a greater number of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2)-positive cells was observed following the addition of MP under both normal (normoxic) and low oxygen (hypoxic) conditions. In response to MP treatment, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and the Notch signaling pathway downstream protein, Hes1, but not the upstream Notch-1 intracelluar domain (NICD), were inhibited. After blocking NICD with a γ-secretase inhibitor (DAPT) MP still inhibited the expression of Hes1. Our results provide insight into the molecular mechanisms responsible for the MP-induced inhibition of proliferation and its effects on differentiation and suggest that HIF-1α and Hes1 play an important role in this effect.

  7. The effects of cultural learning in populations of neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Dara; O'Riordan, Colm

    2007-01-01

    Population learning can be described as the iterative Darwinian process of fitness-based selection and genetic transfer of information leading to populations of higher fitness and is often simulated using genetic algorithms. Cultural learning describes the process of information transfer between individuals in a population through non-genetic means. Cultural learning has been simulated by combining genetic algorithms and neural networks using a teacher-pupil scenario where highly fit individuals are selected as teachers and instruct the next generation. By examining the innate fitness of a population (i.e., the fitness of the population measured before any cultural learning takes place), it is possible to examine the effects of cultural learning on the population's genetic makeup. Our model explores the effect of cultural learning on a population and employs three benchmark sequential decision tasks as the evolutionary task for the population: connect-four, tic-tac-toe, and blackjack. Experiments are conducted with populations employing population learning alone and populations combining population and cultural learning. The article presents results showing the gradual transfer of knowledge from genes to the cultural process, illustrated by the simultaneous decrease in the population's innate fitness and the increase of its acquired fitness measured after learning takes place.

  8. Nestin-GFP Transgene Reveals Neural Precursor Cells in Adult Skeletal Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birbrair, Alexander; Wang, Zhong-Min; Messi, Maria Laura; Enikolopov, Grigori N.; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2011-01-01

    Background Therapy for neural lesions or degenerative diseases relies mainly on finding transplantable active precursor cells. Identifying them in peripheral tissues accessible for biopsy, outside the central nervous system, would circumvent the serious immunological and ethical concerns impeding cell therapy. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we isolated neural progenitor cells in cultured adult skeletal muscle from transgenic mice in which nestin regulatory elements control GFP expression. These cells also expressed the early neural marker Tuj1 and light and heavy neurofilament but not S100β, indicating that they express typical neural but not Schwann cell markers. GFP+/Tuj1+ cells were also negative for the endothelial and pericyte markers CD31 and α-smooth muscle actin, respectively. We established their a) functional response to glutamate in patch-clamp recordings; b) interstitial mesenchymal origin; c) replicative capacity; and d) the environment necessary for their survival after fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Conclusions/Significance We propose that the decline in nestin-GFP expression in muscle progenitor cells and its persistence in neural precursor cells in muscle cultures provide an invaluable tool for isolating a population of predifferentiated neural cells with therapeutic potential. PMID:21304812

  9. Simultaneous Measurement of Neural Spike Recordings and Multi-Photon Calcium Imaging in Neuroblastoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeehyun Kim

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes the design and implementation of a micro-electrode array (MEA for neuroblastoma cell culturing. It also explains the implementation of a multi-photon microscope (MPM customized for neuroblastoma cell excitation and imaging under ambient light. Electrical signal and fluorescence images were simultaneously acquired from the neuroblastoma cells on the MEA. MPM calcium images of the cultured neuroblastoma cell on the MEA are presented and also the neural activity was acquired through the MEA recording. A calcium green-1 (CG-1 dextran conjugate of 10,000 D molecular weight was used in this experiment for calcium imaging. This study also evaluated the calcium oscillations and neural spike recording of neuroblastoma cells in an epileptic condition. Based on our observation of neural spikes in neuroblastoma cells with our proposed imaging modality, we report that neuroblastoma cells can be an important model for epileptic activity studies.

  10. Fabrication of micropatterned hydrogels for neural culture systems using dynamic mask projection photolithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curley, J Lowry; Jennings, Scott R; Moore, Michael J

    2011-02-11

    Increasingly, patterned cell culture environments are becoming a relevant technique to study cellular characteristics, and many researchers believe in the need for 3D environments to represent in vitro experiments which better mimic in vivo qualities. Studies in fields such as cancer research, neural engineering, cardiac physiology, and cell-matrix interaction have shown cell behavior differs substantially between traditional monolayer cultures and 3D constructs. Hydrogels are used as 3D environments because of their variety, versatility and ability to tailor molecular composition through functionalization. Numerous techniques exist for creation of constructs as cell-supportive matrices, including electrospinning, elastomer stamps, inkjet printing, additive photopatterning, static photomask projection-lithography, and dynamic mask microstereolithography. Unfortunately, these methods involve multiple production steps and/or equipment not readily adaptable to conventional cell and tissue culture methods. The technique employed in this protocol adapts the latter two methods, using a digital micromirror device (DMD) to create dynamic photomasks for crosslinking geometrically specific poly-(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels, induced through UV initiated free radical polymerization. The resulting "2.5D" structures provide a constrained 3D environment for neural growth. We employ a dual-hydrogel approach, where PEG serves as a cell-restrictive region supplying structure to an otherwise shapeless but cell-permissive self-assembling gel made from either Puramatrix or agarose. The process is a quick simple one step fabrication which is highly reproducible and easily adapted for use with conventional cell culture methods and substrates. Whole tissue explants, such as embryonic dorsal root ganglia (DRG), can be incorporated into the dual hydrogel constructs for experimental assays such as neurite outgrowth. Additionally, dissociated cells can be encapsulated in the

  11. Angiogenic factors stimulate growth of adult neural stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Androutsellis-Theotokis

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The ability to grow a uniform cell type from the adult central nervous system (CNS is valuable for developing cell therapies and new strategies for drug discovery. The adult mammalian brain is a source of neural stem cells (NSC found in both neurogenic and non-neurogenic zones but difficulties in culturing these hinders their use as research tools.Here we show that NSCs can be efficiently grown in adherent cell cultures when angiogenic signals are included in the medium. These signals include both anti-angiogenic factors (the soluble form of the Notch receptor ligand, Dll4 and pro-angiogenic factors (the Tie-2 receptor ligand, Angiopoietin 2. These treatments support the self renewal state of cultured NSCs and expression of the transcription factor Hes3, which also identifies the cancer stem cell population in human tumors. In an organotypic slice model, angiogenic factors maintain vascular structure and increase the density of dopamine neuron processes.We demonstrate new properties of adult NSCs and a method to generate efficient adult NSC cultures from various central nervous system areas. These findings will help establish cellular models relevant to cancer and regeneration.

  12. How do culture media influence in vitro perivascular cell behavior?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Birgit; Volz, Ann-Cathrin; Kluger, Petra Juliane

    2015-12-01

    Perivascular cells are multilineage cells located around the vessel wall and important for wall stabilization. In this study, we evaluated a stem cell media and a perivascular cell-specific media for the culture of primary perivascular cells regarding their cell morphology, doubling time, stem cell properties, and expression of cell type-specific markers. When the two cell culture media were compared to each other, perivascular cells cultured in the stem cell medium had a more elongated morphology and a faster doubling rate and cells cultured in the pericyte medium had a more typical morphology, with several filopodia, and a slower doubling rate. To evaluate stem cell properties, perivascular cells, CD146(-) cells, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were differentiated into the adipogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic lineages. It was seen that perivascular cells, as well as CD146(-) cells and MSCs, cultured in stem cell medium showed greater differentiation than cells cultured in pericyte-specific medium. The expression of pericyte-specific markers CD146, neural/glial antigen 2 (NG2), platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β (PDGFR-β), myosin, and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) could be found in both pericyte cultures, as well as to varying amounts in CD146(-) cells, MSCs, and endothelial cells. The here presented work shows that perivascular cells can adapt to their in vitro environment and cell culture conditions influence cell functionality, such as doubling rate or differentiation behavior. Pericyte-specific markers were shown to be expressed also from cells other than perivascular cells. We can further conclude that CD146(+) perivascular cells are inhomogeneous cell population probably containing stem cell subpopulations, which are located perivascular around capillaries. © 2015 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  13. Integrating Biomaterials and Stem Cells for Neural Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclean, Francesca L; Rodriguez, Alexandra L; Parish, Clare L; Williams, Richard J; Nisbet, David R

    2016-02-01

    The central nervous system has a limited capacity to regenerate, and thus, traumatic injuries or diseases often have devastating consequences. Therefore, there is a distinct need to develop alternative treatments that can achieve functional recovery without side effects currently observed with some pharmacological treatments. Combining biomaterials with pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), either embryonic or induced, has the potential to revolutionize the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases and traumatic injuries. Biomaterials can mimic the extracellular matrix and present a myriad of relevant biochemical cues through rational design or further functionalization. Biomaterials such as nanofibers and hydrogels, including self-assembling peptide (SAP) hydrogels can provide a superior cell culture environment. When these materials are then combined with PSCs, more accurate drug screening and disease modeling could be developed, and the generation of large number of cells with the appropriate phenotype can be achieved, for subsequent use in vitro. Biomaterials have also been shown to support endogenous cell growth after implantation, and, in particular, hydrogels and SAPs have effectively acted as cell delivery vehicles, increasing cell survival after transplantation. Few studies are yet to fully exploit the combination of PSCs and innovative biomaterials; however, initial studies with neural stem cells, for example, are promising, and, hence, such a combination for use in vitro and in vivo is an exciting new direction for the field of neural regeneration.

  14. Mir-29b Mediates the Neural Tube versus Neural Crest Fate Decision during Embryonic Stem Cell Neural Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Jiajie; Wu, Yukang; Li, Guoping; Ma, Li; Feng, Ke; Guo, Xudong; Jia, Wenwen; Wang, Guiying; Yang, Guang; Li, Ping; Kang, Jiuhong

    2017-08-08

    During gastrulation, the neuroectoderm cells form the neural tube and neural crest. The nervous system contains significantly more microRNAs than other tissues, but the role of microRNAs in controlling the differentiation of neuroectodermal cells into neural tube epithelial (NTE) cells and neural crest cells (NCCs) remains unknown. Using embryonic stem cell (ESC) neural differentiation systems, we found that miR-29b was upregulated in NTE cells and downregulated in NCCs. MiR-29b promoted the differentiation of ESCs into NTE cells and inhibited their differentiation into NCCs. Accordingly, the inhibition of miR-29b significantly inhibited the differentiation of NTE cells. A mechanistic study revealed that miR-29b targets DNA methyltransferase 3a (Dnmt3a) to regulate neural differentiation. Moreover, miR-29b mediated the function of Pou3f1, a critical neural transcription factor. Therefore, our study showed that the Pou3f1-miR-29b-Dnmt3a regulatory axis was active at the initial stage of neural differentiation and regulated the determination of cell fate. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Applications of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Neural Crest Cells in Craniofacial Skeletal Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Morikawa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Craniofacial skeletal tissues are composed of tooth and bone, together with nerves and blood vessels. This composite material is mainly derived from neural crest cells (NCCs. The neural crest is transient embryonic tissue present during neural tube formation whose cells have high potential for migration and differentiation. Thus, NCCs are promising candidates for craniofacial tissue regeneration; however, the clinical application of NCCs is hindered by their limited accessibility. In contrast, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are easily accessible in adults, have similar potential for self-renewal, and can differentiate into skeletal tissues, including bones and cartilage. Therefore, MSCs may represent good sources of stem cells for clinical use. MSCs are classically identified under adherent culture conditions, leading to contamination with other cell lineages. Previous studies have identified mouse- and human-specific MSC subsets using cell surface markers. Additionally, some studies have shown that a subset of MSCs is closely related to neural crest derivatives and endothelial cells. These MSCs may be promising candidates for regeneration of craniofacial tissues from the perspective of developmental fate. Here, we review the fundamental biology of MSCs in craniofacial research.

  16. Enhanced Neural Cell Adhesion and Neurite Outgrowth on Graphene-Based Biomimetic Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Ho; Kang, Seok Hee; Hwang, Eun Young; Hwang, Yu-Shik; Lee, Mi Hee; Park, Jong-Chul

    2014-01-01

    Neural cell adhesion and neurite outgrowth were examined on graphene-based biomimetic substrates. The biocompatibility of carbon nanomaterials such as graphene and carbon nanotubes (CNTs), that is, single-walled and multiwalled CNTs, against pheochromocytoma-derived PC-12 neural cells was also evaluated by quantifying metabolic activity (with WST-8 assay), intracellular oxidative stress (with ROS assay), and membrane integrity (with LDH assay). Graphene films were grown by using chemical vapor deposition and were then coated onto glass coverslips by using the scooping method. Graphene sheets were patterned on SiO2/Si substrates by using photolithography and were then covered with serum for a neural cell culture. Both types of CNTs induced significant dose-dependent decreases in the viability of PC-12 cells, whereas graphene exerted adverse effects on the neural cells just at over 62.5 ppm. This result implies that graphene and CNTs, even though they were the same carbon-based nanomaterials, show differential influences on neural cells. Furthermore, graphene-coated or graphene-patterned substrates were shown to substantially enhance the adhesion and neurite outgrowth of PC-12 cells. These results suggest that graphene-based substrates as biomimetic cues have good biocompatibility as well as a unique surface property that can enhance the neural cells, which would open up enormous opportunities in neural regeneration and nanomedicine. PMID:24592382

  17. Culture-sensitive neural substrates of human cognition: a transcultural neuroimaging approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shihui; Northoff, Georg

    2008-08-01

    Our brains and minds are shaped by our experiences, which mainly occur in the context of the culture in which we develop and live. Although psychologists have provided abundant evidence for diversity of human cognition and behaviour across cultures, the question of whether the neural correlates of human cognition are also culture-dependent is often not considered by neuroscientists. However, recent transcultural neuroimaging studies have demonstrated that one's cultural background can influence the neural activity that underlies both high- and low-level cognitive functions. The findings provide a novel approach by which to distinguish culture-sensitive from culture-invariant neural mechanisms of human cognition.

  18. Hydrogel scaffolds promote neural gene expression and structural reorganization in human astrocyte cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Bleu Knight

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomaterial scaffolds have the potential to enhance neuronal development and regeneration. Understanding the genetic responses of astrocytes and neurons to biomaterials could facilitate the development of synthetic environments that enable the specification of neural tissue organization with engineered scaffolds. In this study, we used high throughput transcriptomic and imaging methods to determine the impact of a hydrogel, PuraMatrix™, on human glial cells in vitro. Parallel studies were undertaken with cells grown in a monolayer environment on tissue culture polystyrene. When the Normal Human Astrocyte (NHA cell line is grown in a hydrogel matrix environment, the glial cells adopt a structural organization that resembles that of neuronal-glial cocultures, where neurons form clusters that are distinct from the surrounding glia. Statistical analysis of next generation RNA sequencing data uncovered a set of genes that are differentially expressed in the monolayer and matrix hydrogel environments. Functional analysis demonstrated that hydrogel-upregulated genes can be grouped into three broad categories: neuronal differentiation and/or neural plasticity, response to neural insult, and sensory perception. Our results demonstrate that hydrogel biomaterials have the potential to transform human glial cell identity, and may have applications in the repair of damaged brain tissue.

  19. Niche-dependent development of functional neuronal networks from embryonic stem cell-derived neural populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siebler Mario

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present work was performed to investigate the ability of two different embryonic stem (ES cell-derived neural precursor populations to generate functional neuronal networks in vitro. The first ES cell-derived neural precursor population was cultivated as free-floating neural aggregates which are known to form a developmental niche comprising different types of neural cells, including neural precursor cells (NPCs, progenitor cells and even further matured cells. This niche provides by itself a variety of different growth factors and extracellular matrix proteins that influence the proliferation and differentiation of neural precursor and progenitor cells. The second population was cultivated adherently in monolayer cultures to control most stringently the extracellular environment. This population comprises highly homogeneous NPCs which are supposed to represent an attractive way to provide well-defined neuronal progeny. However, the ability of these different ES cell-derived immature neural cell populations to generate functional neuronal networks has not been assessed so far. Results While both precursor populations were shown to differentiate into sufficient quantities of mature NeuN+ neurons that also express GABA or vesicular-glutamate-transporter-2 (vGlut2, only aggregate-derived neuronal populations exhibited a synchronously oscillating network activity 2–4 weeks after initiating the differentiation as detected by the microelectrode array technology. Neurons derived from homogeneous NPCs within monolayer cultures did merely show uncorrelated spiking activity even when differentiated for up to 12 weeks. We demonstrated that these neurons exhibited sparsely ramified neurites and an embryonic vGlut2 distribution suggesting an inhibited terminal neuronal maturation. In comparison, neurons derived from heterogeneous populations within neural aggregates appeared as fully mature with a dense neurite network and punctuated

  20. Highly Efficient Neural Conversion of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells in Adherent and Animal-Free Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukovic, Dunja; Diez Lloret, Andrea; Stojkovic, Petra; Rodríguez-Martínez, Daniel; Perez Arago, Maria Amparo; Rodriguez-Jimenez, Francisco Javier; González-Rodríguez, Patricia; López-Barneo, José; Sykova, Eva; Jendelova, Pavla; Kostic, Jelena; Moreno-Manzano, Victoria; Stojkovic, Miodrag; Bhattacharya, Shomi S; Erceg, Slaven

    2017-04-01

    Neural differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) can produce a valuable and robust source of human neural cell subtypes, holding great promise for the study of neurogenesis and development, and for treating neurological diseases. However, current hESCs and hiPSCs neural differentiation protocols require either animal factors or embryoid body formation, which decreases efficiency and yield, and strongly limits medical applications. Here we develop a simple, animal-free protocol for neural conversion of both hESCs and hiPSCs in adherent culture conditions. A simple medium formula including insulin induces the direct conversion of >98% of hESCs and hiPSCs into expandable, transplantable, and functional neural progenitors with neural rosette characteristics. Further differentiation of neural progenitors into dopaminergic and spinal motoneurons as well as astrocytes and oligodendrocytes indicates that these neural progenitors retain responsiveness to instructive cues revealing the robust applicability of the protocol in the treatment of different neurodegenerative diseases. The fact that this protocol includes animal-free medium and human extracellular matrix components avoiding embryoid bodies makes this protocol suitable for the use in clinic. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:1217-1226. © 2017 The Authors Stem Cells Translational Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  1. Gelatin methacrylamide hydrogel with graphene nanoplatelets for neural cell-laden 3D bioprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei Zhu; Harris, Brent T; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-08-01

    Nervous system is extremely complex which leads to rare regrowth of nerves once injury or disease occurs. Advanced 3D bioprinting strategy, which could simultaneously deposit biocompatible materials, cells and supporting components in a layer-by-layer manner, may be a promising solution to address neural damages. Here we presented a printable nano-bioink composed of gelatin methacrylamide (GelMA), neural stem cells, and bioactive graphene nanoplatelets to target nerve tissue regeneration in the assist of stereolithography based 3D bioprinting technique. We found the resultant GelMA hydrogel has a higher compressive modulus with an increase of GelMA concentration. The porous GelMA hydrogel can provide a biocompatible microenvironment for the survival and growth of neural stem cells. The cells encapsulated in the hydrogel presented good cell viability at the low GelMA concentration. Printed neural construct exhibited well-defined architecture and homogenous cell distribution. In addition, neural stem cells showed neuron differentiation and neurites elongation within the printed construct after two weeks of culture. These findings indicate the 3D bioprinted neural construct has great potential for neural tissue regeneration.

  2. Comparison of 2D and 3D neural induction methods for the generation of neural progenitor cells from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Abinaya; Avci, Hasan X; Ochalek, Anna; Rösingh, Lone N; Molnár, Kinga; László, Lajos; Bellák, Tamás; Téglási, Annamária; Pesti, Krisztina; Mike, Arpad; Phanthong, Phetcharat; Bíró, Orsolya; Hall, Vanessa; Kitiyanant, Narisorn; Krause, Karl-Heinz; Kobolák, Julianna; Dinnyés, András

    2017-12-01

    Neural progenitor cells (NPCs) from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are frequently induced using 3D culture methodologies however, it is unknown whether spheroid-based (3D) neural induction is actually superior to monolayer (2D) neural induction. Our aim was to compare the efficiency of 2D induction with 3D induction method in their ability to generate NPCs, and subsequently neurons and astrocytes. Neural differentiation was analysed at the protein level qualitatively by immunocytochemistry and quantitatively by flow cytometry for NPC (SOX1, PAX6, NESTIN), neuronal (MAP2, TUBB3), cortical layer (TBR1, CUX1) and glial markers (SOX9, GFAP, AQP4). Electron microscopy demonstrated that both methods resulted in morphologically similar neural rosettes. However, quantification of NPCs derived from 3D neural induction exhibited an increase in the number of PAX6/NESTIN double positive cells and the derived neurons exhibited longer neurites. In contrast, 2D neural induction resulted in more SOX1 positive cells. While 2D monolayer induction resulted in slightly less mature neurons, at an early stage of differentiation, the patch clamp analysis failed to reveal any significant differences between the electrophysiological properties between the two induction methods. In conclusion, 3D neural induction increases the yield of PAX6+/NESTIN+ cells and gives rise to neurons with longer neurites, which might be an advantage for the production of forebrain cortical neurons, highlighting the potential of 3D neural induction, independent of iPSCs' genetic background. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Cell culture purity issues and DFAT cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Shengjuan [College of Animal Science and Technology, Northwest A and F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100 (China); Department of Animal Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164 (United States); Bergen, Werner G. [Program in Cellular and Molecular Biosciences/Department of Animal Sciences, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States); Hausman, Gary J. [Animal Science Department, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-2771 (United States); Zan, Linsen, E-mail: zanls@yahoo.com.cn [College of Animal Science and Technology, Northwest A and F University, Yangling, Shaanxi Province 712100 (China); Dodson, Michael V., E-mail: dodson@wsu.edu [Department of Animal Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164 (United States)

    2013-04-12

    Highlights: •DFAT cells are progeny cells derived from dedifferentiated mature adipocytes. •Common problems in this research is potential cell contamination of initial cultures. •The initial cell culture purity is crucial in DFAT cell research field. -- Abstract: Dedifferentiation of mature adipocytes, in vitro, has been pursued/documented for over forty years. The subsequent progeny cells are named dedifferentiated adipocyte-derived progeny cells (DFAT cells). DFAT cells are proliferative and likely to possess mutilineage potential. As a consequence, DFAT cells and their progeny/daughter cells may be useful as a potential tool for various aspects of tissue engineering and as potential vectors for the alleviation of several disease states. Publications in this area have been increasing annually, but the purity of the initial culture of mature adipocytes has seldom been documented. Consequently, it is not always clear whether DFAT cells are derived from dedifferentiated mature (lipid filled) adipocytes or from contaminating cells that reside in an impure culture.

  4. MANF Promotes Differentiation and Migration of Neural Progenitor Cells with Potential Neural Regenerative Effects in Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tseng, Kuan-Yin; Anttila, Jenni E; Khodosevich, Konstantin

    2018-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia activates endogenous reparative processes, such as increased proliferation of neural stem cells (NSCs) in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and migration of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) toward the ischemic area. However, this reparative process is limited because most of the NPCs...

  5. Knockdown of tissue nonspecific alkaline phosphatase impairs neural stem cell proliferation and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kermer, Vanessa; Ritter, Mathias; Albuquerque, Boris; Leib, Christoph; Stanke, Matthias; Zimmermann, Herbert

    2010-11-26

    In the adult mammalian brain the subependymal layer of the lateral ventricles houses neural stem cells giving rise to young neurons migrating towards the olfactory bulb. The molecular cues controlling essential functions within the neurogenesis pathway such as proliferation, short and long distance migration, differentiation and functional integration are poorly understood. Neural progenitors in situ express the tissue nonspecific form of alkaline phosphatase (TNAP), a cell surface-located nonspecific phosphomonoesterase capable of hydrolyzing extracellular nucleotides. To gain insight into the functional role of TNAP in cultured multipotent neural stem cells we applied a knockdown protocol using RNA interference with shRNA and retroviral infection. We show that TNAP knockdown reduces cell proliferation and differentiation into neurons or oligodendrocytes. This effect is abrogated by addition of alkaline phosphatase to the culture medium. Our results suggest that TNAP is essential for NSC proliferation and differentiation in vitro and possibly also in vivo. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Dynamic transcriptional signature and cell fate analysis reveals plasticity of individual neural plate border cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roellig, Daniela; Tan-Cabugao, Johanna; Esaian, Sevan; Bronner, Marianne E

    2017-03-29

    The 'neural plate border' of vertebrate embryos contains precursors of neural crest and placode cells, both defining vertebrate characteristics. How these lineages segregate from neural and epidermal fates has been a matter of debate. We address this by performing a fine-scale quantitative temporal analysis of transcription factor expression in the neural plate border of chick embryos. The results reveal significant overlap of transcription factors characteristic of multiple lineages in individual border cells from gastrula through neurula stages. Cell fate analysis using a Sox2 (neural) enhancer reveals that cells that are initially Sox2+ cells can contribute not only to neural tube but also to neural crest and epidermis. Moreover, modulating levels of Sox2 or Pax7 alters the apportionment of neural tube versus neural crest fates. Our results resolve a long-standing question and suggest that many individual border cells maintain ability to contribute to multiple ectodermal lineages until or beyond neural tube closure.

  7. Inhibition of storage pathology in prenatal CLN5-deficient sheep neural cultures by lentiviral gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Stephanie M; Hope, Katie M; Xu, Janet Boyu; Mitchell, Nadia L; Palmer, David N

    2014-02-01

    The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs, Batten disease) are inherited neurodegenerative lysosomal storage diseases caused by mutations in several different genes. Mutations in CLN5 cause a variant late-infantile human disease and some cases of juvenile and adult clinical disease. NCLs also occur in animals, and a flock of New Zealand Borderdale sheep with a CLN5 splice-site mutation has been developed for model studies. Dissociated mixed neural cells from CLN5-deficient foetal sheep brains contained no obvious storage bodies at plating but these accumulated rapidly in culture, mainly in microglial cells and also in neurons and astrocytes. Accumulation was very obvious after a week, as monitored by fluorescent microscopy and immunostaining for subunit c of mitochondrial ATP synthase. Photography at intervals revealed the dynamic nature of the cultures and a flow of storage bodies between cells, specifically the phagocytosis of storage-body containing cells by microglia and incorporation of the storage bodies into the host cells. No storage was observed in cultured control cells. Transduction of cell cultures with a lentiviral vector expressing a C-terminal Myc tagged CLN5 resulted in secretion of post-translationally glycosylated and processed CLN5. Transduction of CLN5-deficient cultures with this construct rapidly reversed storage body accumulation, to less than half in only six days. These results show that storage body accumulation is reversible with enzyme correction and support the use of these cultures for testing of therapeutics prior to whole animal studies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Neural correlates of behavioral preference for culturally familiar drinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Samuel M; Li, Jian; Tomlin, Damon; Cypert, Kim S; Montague, Latané M; Montague, P Read

    2004-10-14

    Coca-Cola (Coke) and Pepsi are nearly identical in chemical composition, yet humans routinely display strong subjective preferences for one or the other. This simple observation raises the important question of how cultural messages combine with content to shape our perceptions; even to the point of modifying behavioral preferences for a primary reward like a sugared drink. We delivered Coke and Pepsi to human subjects in behavioral taste tests and also in passive experiments carried out during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Two conditions were examined: (1) anonymous delivery of Coke and Pepsi and (2) brand-cued delivery of Coke and Pepsi. For the anonymous task, we report a consistent neural response in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex that correlated with subjects' behavioral preferences for these beverages. In the brand-cued experiment, brand knowledge for one of the drinks had a dramatic influence on expressed behavioral preferences and on the measured brain responses.

  9. Culture, characterization and differentiation of neural precursors from the central nervous system of guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus Linnaeus, 1758

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Toledo da Fonseca

    Full Text Available Abstract: Potentially neurogenic areas were initially identified by incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU in cells underlying the subventricular zone (SVZ of the lateral ventricles wall, hippocampus and olfactory bulbs of newborn guinea pigs. Neural precursors from the SVZ were cultured in suspension, generating neurospheres (NSFs, which, upon dissociation were able to generate new NSFs. Upon culture in the absence of growth factors, cells dissociated from NSFs displayed evidence for neural differentiation, giving rise to cells from neural lineage. Flow cytometry analysis for of NSFs-derived cells after differentiation revealed approximately 13.3% nestin positive, 5.5% Beta-III-tubulin positive, 9% GFAP positive and 7.8% mGalC positive. Functional assays by measurement of calcium influx upon gamma butiric amino acid (GABA and glutamate stimuli, revealed stimulation in differentiated cells, an indicator of neuronal differentiation. The ability of guinea pig SVZ cells to originate functional neurons in vitro is promising for research and towards a future use of neural stem cells in the therapy of neurological disorders.

  10. Towards the fabrication of artificial 3D microdevices for neural cell networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Andrew A; Ortega, Ílida; Kelly, Stephen; Claeyssens, Frederik

    2015-04-01

    This work reports first steps towards the development of artificial neural stem cell microenvironments for the control and assessment of neural stem cell behaviour. Stem cells have been shown to be found in specific, supportive microenvironments (niches) and are believed to play an important role in tissue regeneration mechanisms. These environments are intricate spaces with chemical and biological features. Here we present work towards the development of physically defined microdevices in which neural and neural stem cells can be studied in 3-dimensions. We have approached this challenge by creating bespoke, microstructured polymer environments using both 2-photon polymerisation and soft lithography techniques. Specifically, we have designed and fabricated biodegradable microwell-shaped devices using an in house synthetized polymer (4-arm photocurable poly-lactid acid) on a bespoke 2-photon polymerisation (2PP) set-up. We have studied swelling and degradation of the constructs as well as biocompatibility. Moreover, we have explored the potential of these constructs as artificial neural cell substrates by culturing NG108-15 cells (mouse neuroblastoma; rat glioma hybrid) and human neural progenitor cells on the microstructures. Finally, we have studied the effects of our artificial microenvironments upon neurite length and cell density.

  11. Folate receptor 1 is necessary for neural plate cell apical constriction during Xenopus neural tube formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balashova, Olga A; Visina, Olesya; Borodinsky, Laura N

    2017-04-15

    Folate supplementation prevents up to 70% of neural tube defects (NTDs), which result from a failure of neural tube closure during embryogenesis. The elucidation of the mechanisms underlying folate action has been challenging. This study introduces Xenopus laevis as a model to determine the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in folate action during neural tube formation. We show that knockdown of folate receptor 1 (Folr1; also known as FRα) impairs neural tube formation and leads to NTDs. Folr1 knockdown in neural plate cells only is necessary and sufficient to induce NTDs. Folr1-deficient neural plate cells fail to constrict, resulting in widening of the neural plate midline and defective neural tube closure. Pharmacological inhibition of folate action by methotrexate during neurulation induces NTDs by inhibiting folate interaction with its uptake systems. Our findings support a model in which the folate receptor interacts with cell adhesion molecules, thus regulating the apical cell membrane remodeling and cytoskeletal dynamics necessary for neural plate folding. Further studies in this organism could unveil novel cellular and molecular events mediated by folate and lead to new ways of preventing NTDs. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Plasma as a scaffold for regeneration of neural precursor cells after transplantation into rats with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaga, Mitsuko; Ohta, Yuki; Tokura, Yukie; Hamaguchi, Akemi; Suzuki, Noboru; Nakamura, Masaya; Okano, Hideyuki; Igarashi, Rie

    2007-01-01

    The present study investigated whether plasma could be useful as a scaffold for cell transplantation in rats with spinal cord injury (SCI). Transplantation of cells with plasma promoted the recovery of SCI-induced motor dysfunction. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the grafted cells had differentiated into the neural lineage. When dissociated neural precursor cells were cultured with plasma, extensive neurite outgrowth was observed along with increased expression of p35 and NF68. Neural markers were also expressed by the cultured cells. Culture with plasma reduced thymidine incorporation, but promoted cell growth and increased the RNA contents. These findings suggest that the cells underwent differentiation into neurons in the presence of plasma. In conclusion, plasma could be a promising scaffold for cell transplantation therapy.

  13. The neural crest and neural crest cells: discovery and significance ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    such as sea urchins, flies, fish and humans. (ii) Embryos (and so larvae and adults) form by differentiation from these germ layers. (iii) Homologous structures in different animals arise from the same germ layers. The germ-layer theory exerted a profound influence on those claiming a neural crest — that is, an ectodermal.

  14. SOX10-Nano-Lantern Reporter Human iPS Cells; A Versatile Tool for Neural Crest Research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Horikiri

    Full Text Available The neural crest is a source to produce multipotent neural crest stem cells that have a potential to differentiate into diverse cell types. The transcription factor SOX10 is expressed through early neural crest progenitors and stem cells in vertebrates. Here we report the generation of SOX10-Nano-lantern (NL reporter human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPS by using CRISPR/Cas9 systems, that are beneficial to investigate the generation and maintenance of neural crest progenitor cells. SOX10-NL positive cells are produced transiently from hiPS cells by treatment with TGFβ inhibitor SB431542 and GSK3 inhibitor CHIR99021. We found that all SOX10-NL-positive cells expressed an early neural crest marker NGFR, however SOX10-NL-positive cells purified from differentiated hiPS cells progressively attenuate their NL-expression under proliferation. We therefore attempted to maintain SOX10-NL-positive cells with additional signaling on the plane and sphere culture conditions. These SOX10-NL cells provide us to investigate mass culture with neural crest cells for stem cell research.

  15. Adult Mammalian Neural Stem Cells and Neurogenesis: Five Decades Later

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Allison M.; Ming, Guo-li; Song, Hongjun

    2015-01-01

    Summary Adult somatic stem cells in various organs maintain homeostatic tissue regeneration and enhance plasticity. Since its initial discovery five decades ago, investigations of adult neurogenesis and neural stem cells have led to an established and expanding field that has significantly influenced many facets of neuroscience, developmental biology and regenerative medicine. Here we review recent progress and focus on questions related to adult mammalian neural stem cells that also apply to other somatic stem cells. We further discuss emerging topics that are guiding the field toward better understanding adult neural stem cells and ultimately applying these principles to improve human health. PMID:26431181

  16. Cell culture compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yiao, Jian

    2014-03-18

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl6 (SEQ ID NO:1 encodes the full length endoglucanase; SEQ ID NO:4 encodes the mature form), and the corresponding endoglucanase VI amino acid sequence ("EGVI"; SEQ ID NO:3 is the signal sequence; SEQ ID NO:2 is the mature sequence). The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVI, recombinant EGVI proteins and methods for producing the same.

  17. Measurements with fluorescent probes in primary neural cultures; improved multiwell techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, Avi; Tanso, Rita

    2007-01-01

    Fluorescence imaging techniques are valuable tools for the pharmacological characterization of CNS drugs. Dissected cerebellar granule neurons (CGN) are an important model system in the study of mechanisms of excitotoxicity, glutamate receptors and transporters. Widely applied techniques use fluorescent probes loaded in neural cells cultured on glass supports. CGN, however, require at least 7 days for differentiation and over time cells tend to cluster and loose adherence to the glass substrate. This problem is accentuated in small wells (e.g. 96-well plates). CGN were grown on large coverslips (60 x 24 mm) and measurements made with a designed mountable multiwell in 48 regions on 4 coverslips at a time. The UV ratiometric probe fura-2 was used to measure glutamatergic calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) responses induced by NMDA. The IC(50) of NMDA receptor antagonists was determined from inhibition curves with 6 doses and 8 parallels per experiment. The method was validated by comparing with published data for the dose response to NMDA and glycine and IC(50) values for ion-channel block by Mg(2+) and MK-801. Resolution is enhanced with the new technique since it allows measurement of multiple doses on cells from the same batch. It has advantages to cuvette techniques because cells have intact dendritic tree and synaptic function and it is a convenient method to obtain reliable dose-response curves for NMDA channel modulators on differentiated neural cells.

  18. Rescue of Brain Function Using Tunneling Nanotubes Between Neural Stem Cells and Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoqing; Yu, Xiaowen; Xie, Chong; Tan, Zijian; Tian, Qi; Zhu, Desheng; Liu, Mingyuan; Guan, Yangtai

    2016-05-01

    Evidence indicates that neural stem cells (NSCs) can ameliorate cerebral ischemia in animal models. In this study, we investigated the mechanism underlying one of the neuroprotective effects of NSCs: tunneling nanotube (TNT) formation. We addressed whether the control of cell-to-cell communication processes between NSCs and brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) and, particularly, the control of TNT formation could influence the rescue function of stem cells. In an attempt to mimic the cellular microenvironment in vitro, a co-culture system consisting of terminally differentiated BMECs from mice in a distressed state and NSCs was constructed. Additionally, engraftment experiments with infarcted mouse brains revealed that control of TNT formation influenced the effects of stem cell transplantation in vivo. In conclusion, our findings provide the first evidence that TNTs exist between NSCs and BMECs and that regulation of TNT formation alters cell function.

  19. Culturing of PC12 Cells, Neuronal Cells, Astrocytes Cultures and Brain Slices in an Open Microfluidic System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al Atraktchi, Fatima Al-Zahraa; Bakmand, Tanya; Rømer Sørensen, Ane

    The brain is the center of the nervous system, where serious neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s and Huntington’s are products of functional loss in the neural cells (1). Typical techniques used to investigate these diseases lack precise control of the cellular surroundings...... cells, neuronal cells, astrocytes cultures and brain slices. The microfluidic system provides efficient nutrient delivery, waste removal, access to oxygen, fine control over the neurochemical environment and access to modern microscopy. Additionally, the setup consists of an in vitro culturing...... and electrochemical sensor system that enables real time detection of metabolites, e.g. dopamine from cell cultures and brain slices. In summary we present results on culturing of brain slices and cells in the microfluidic system as well as on the incorporation of an electrochemical sensor system for characterization...

  20. Effect of monocular deprivation on rabbit neural retinal cell densities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Maseghe Mwachaka

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: In this rabbit model, monocular deprivation resulted in activity-dependent changes in cell densities of the neural retina in favour of the non-deprived eye along with reduced cell densities in the deprived eye.

  1. Multiple phenotypes in Huntington disease mouse neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritch, James J; Valencia, Antonio; Alexander, Jonathan; Sapp, Ellen; Gatune, Leah; Sangrey, Gavin R; Sinha, Saurabh; Scherber, Cally M; Zeitlin, Scott; Sadri-Vakili, Ghazaleh; Irimia, Daniel; Difiglia, Marian; Kegel, Kimberly B

    2012-05-01

    Neural stem (NS) cells are a limitless resource, and thus superior to primary neurons for drug discovery provided they exhibit appropriate disease phenotypes. Here we established NS cells for cellular studies of Huntington's disease (HD). HD is a heritable neurodegenerative disease caused by a mutation resulting in an increased number of glutamines (Q) within a polyglutamine tract in Huntingtin (Htt). NS cells were isolated from embryonic wild-type (Htt(7Q/7Q)) and "knock-in" HD (Htt(140Q/140Q)) mice expressing full-length endogenous normal or mutant Htt. NS cells were also developed from mouse embryonic stem cells that were devoid of Htt (Htt(-/-)), or knock-in cells containing human exon1 with an N-terminal FLAG epitope tag and with 7Q or 140Q inserted into one of the mouse alleles (Htt(F7Q/7Q) and Htt(F140Q/7Q)). Compared to Htt(7Q/7Q) NS cells, HD Htt(140Q/140Q) NS cells showed significantly reduced levels of cholesterol, increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and impaired motility. The heterozygous Htt(F140Q/7Q) NS cells had increased ROS and decreased motility compared to Htt(F7Q/7Q). These phenotypes of HD NS cells replicate those seen in HD patients or in primary cell or in vivo models of HD. Huntingtin "knock-out" NS cells (Htt(-/-)) also had impaired motility, but in contrast to HD cells had increased cholesterol. In addition, Htt(140Q/140Q) NS cells had higher phospho-AKT/AKT ratios than Htt(7Q/7Q) NS cells in resting conditions and after BDNF stimulation, suggesting mutant htt affects AKT dependent growth factor signaling. Upon differentiation, the Htt(7Q/7Q) and Htt(140Q/140Q) generated numerous Beta(III)-Tubulin- and GABA-positive neurons; however, after 15 days the cellular architecture of the differentiated Htt(140Q/140Q) cultures changed compared to Htt(7Q/7Q) cultures and included a marked increase of GFAP-positive cells. Our findings suggest that NS cells expressing endogenous mutant Htt will be useful for study of mechanisms of HD

  2. An Overview of Protocols for the Neural Induction of Dental and Oral Stem Cells In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Boon Chin; Lim, Lee Wei; Wu, Wutian; Zhang, Chengfei

    2016-06-01

    To date, various adult stem cells have been identified within the oral cavity, including dental pulp stem cells, dental follicle stem cells, stem cells from apical papilla, stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth, periodontal ligament stem cells, and mesenchymal stem cells from the gingiva. All of these possess neurogenic potential due to their common developmental origin from the embryonic neural crest. Besides the relative ease of isolation of these adult stem cells from readily available biological waste routinely produced during dental treatment, these cells also possess the advantage of immune compatibility in autologous transplantation. In recent years, much interest has been focused on the derivation of neural lineages from these adult stem cells for therapeutic applications in the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral nerve regeneration. In addition, there are also promising nontherapeutic applications of stem cell-derived neurons in pharmacological and toxicological screening of neuroactive drugs, and for in vitro modeling of neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases. Hence, this review will critically examine the diverse array of in vitro neural induction protocols that have been devised for dental and oral-derived stem cells. These protocols are defined not only by the culture milieu comprising the basal medium plus growth factors, small molecules, and other culture supplements but also by the substrata/surface coatings utilized, the presence of multiple culture stages, the total culture duration, the initial seeding density, and whether the spheroid/neurosphere formation is being utilized to recapitulate the three-dimensional neural differentiation microenvironment that is naturally present physiologically in vivo.

  3. Identification and characterization of secondary neural tube-derived embryonic neural stem cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaker, Mohammed R; Kim, Joo Yeon; Kim, Hyun; Sun, Woong

    2015-05-15

    Secondary neurulation is an embryonic progress that gives rise to the secondary neural tube, the precursor of the lower spinal cord region. The secondary neural tube is derived from aggregated Sox2-expressing neural cells at the dorsal region of the tail bud, which eventually forms rosette or tube-like structures to give rise to neural tissues in the tail bud. We addressed whether the embryonic tail contains neural stem cells (NSCs), namely secondary NSCs (sNSCs), with the potential for self-renewal in vitro. Using in vitro neurosphere assays, neurospheres readily formed at the rosette and neural-tube levels, but less frequently at the tail bud tip level. Furthermore, we identified that sNSC-generated neurospheres were significantly smaller in size compared with cortical neurospheres. Interestingly, various cell cycle analyses revealed that this difference was not due to a reduction in the proliferation rate of NSCs, but rather the neuronal commitment of sNSCs, as sNSC-derived neurospheres contain more committed neuronal progenitor cells, even in the presence of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). These results suggest that the higher tendency for sNSCs to spontaneously differentiate into progenitor cells may explain the limited expansion of the secondary neural tube during embryonic development.

  4. Cell density-dependent differential proliferation of neural stem cells on omnidirectional nanopore-arrayed surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Kyoung Je; Kong, Sun-Young; Lee, Ji Soo; Kim, Hyung Woo; Shin, Jae-Yeon; La, Moonwoo; Han, Byung Woo; Kim, Dong Sung; Kim, Hyun-Jung

    2017-10-12

    Recently, the importance of surface nanotopography in the determination of stem cell fate and behavior has been revealed. In the current study, we generated polystyrene cell-culture dishes with an omnidirectional nanopore arrayed surface (ONAS) (diameter: 200 nm, depth: 500 nm, center-to-center distance: 500 nm) and investigated the effects of nanotopography on rat neural stem cells (NSCs). NSCs cultured on ONAS proliferated better than those on the flat surface when cell density was low and showed less spontaneous differentiation during proliferation in the presence of mitogens. Interestingly, NSCs cultured on ONAS at clonal density demonstrated a propensity to generate neurospheres, whereas those on the flat surface migrated out, proliferated as individuals, and spread out to attach to the surface. However, the differential patterns of proliferation were cell density-dependent since the distinct phenomena were lost when cell density was increased. ONAS modulated cytoskeletal reorganization and inhibited formation of focal adhesion, which is generally observed in NSCs grown on flat surfaces. ONAS appeared to reinforce NSC-NSC interaction, restricted individual cell migration and prohibited NSC attachment to the nanopore surface. These data demonstrate that ONAS maintains NSCs as undifferentiated while retaining multipotency and is a better topography for culturing low density NSCs.

  5. Adipose stromal cells contain phenotypically distinct adipogenic progenitors derived from neural crest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Sowa

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that adipose-derived stromal/stem cells (ASCs contain phenotypically and functionally heterogeneous subpopulations of cells, but their developmental origin and their relative differentiation potential remain elusive. In the present study, we aimed at investigating how and to what extent the neural crest contributes to ASCs using Cre-loxP-mediated fate mapping. ASCs harvested from subcutaneous fat depots of either adult P0-Cre/or Wnt1-Cre/Floxed-reporter mice contained a few neural crest-derived ASCs (NCDASCs. This subpopulation of cells was successfully expanded in vitro under standard culture conditions and their growth rate was comparable to non-neural crest derivatives. Although NCDASCs were positive for several mesenchymal stem cell markers as non-neural crest derivatives, they exhibited a unique bipolar or multipolar morphology with higher expression of markers for both neural crest progenitors (p75NTR, Nestin, and Sox2 and preadipocytes (CD24, CD34, S100, Pref-1, GATA2, and C/EBP-delta. NCDASCs were able to differentiate into adipocytes with high efficiency but their osteogenic and chondrogenic potential was markedly attenuated, indicating their commitment to adipogenesis. In vivo, a very small proportion of adipocytes were originated from the neural crest. In addition, p75NTR-positive neural crest-derived cells were identified along the vessels within the subcutaneous adipose tissue, but they were negative for mural and endothelial markers. These results demonstrate that ASCs contain neural crest-derived adipocyte-restricted progenitors whose phenotype is distinct from that of non-neural crest derivatives.

  6. Three dimensional cellular microarray platform for human neural stem cell differentiation and toxicology

    OpenAIRE

    Luciana Meli; Hélder S.C. Barbosa; Anne Marie Hickey; Leyla Gasimli; Gregory Nierode; Maria Margarida Diogo; Linhardt, Robert J.; Joaquim M S Cabral; Dordick, Jonathan S.

    2014-01-01

    We developed a three-dimensional (3D) cellular microarray platform for the high-throughput (HT) analysis of human neural stem cell (hNSC) growth and differentiation. The growth of an immortalized hNSC line, ReNcell VM, was evaluated on a miniaturized cell culture chip consisting of 60 nl spots of cells encapsulated in alginate, and compared to standard 2D well plate culture conditions. Using a live/dead cell viability assay, we demonstrated that the hNSCs are able to expand on-chip, albeit wi...

  7. Three Dimensional Cellular Microarray Platform for Human Neural Stem Cell Differentiation and Toxicology

    OpenAIRE

    Meli, Luciana; Hélder S.C. Barbosa; Hickey, Anne Marie; Gasimli, Leyla; Nierode, Gregory; Diogo, Maria Margarida; Linhardt, Robert J.; Joaquim M S Cabral; Dordick, Jonathan S.

    2014-01-01

    We developed a three-dimensional (3D) cellular microarray platform for the high-throughput (HT) analysis of human neural stem cell (hNSC) growth and differentiation. The growth of an immortalized hNSC line, ReNcell VM, was evaluated on a miniaturized cell culture chip consisting of 60 nl spots of cells encapsulated in alginate, and compared to standard 2D well plate culture conditions. Using a live/dead cell viability assay, we demonstrated that the hNSCs are able to expand on-chip, albeit wi...

  8. 9 CFR 101.6 - Cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cell cultures. 101.6 Section 101.6..., SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS DEFINITIONS § 101.6 Cell cultures. When used in conjunction with or in reference to cell cultures, which may be referred to as tissue cultures...

  9. Protection of neurons derived from human neural progenitor cells by veratridine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Peter J; Ortinau, Stefanie; Frahm, Jana; Krüger, Norman; Rolfs, Arndt; Frech, Moritz J

    2009-08-26

    The survival of developing dopaminergic neurons has been shown to be modulated by voltage-dependent mechanisms. Manipulation of these mechanisms in human neural progenitor cell cultures could improve the survival of immature dopaminergic neurons, and therefore aid research into pharmacological and cell replacement therapies for Parkinson's disease. Here, we examined the effect of the Na+ channel agonist veratridine on the human fetal neural progenitor ReNcell VM cell line. Neuronal differentiation was determined by immunocytochemistry, whereas patch clamp recordings showed the expression of functional voltage-gated sodium channels. Our results show that veratridine is neuroprotective in human fetal neural progenitor cells, which may benefit studies investigating neuronal development by reducing premature death amongst developing neurons.

  10. Neural Crest Cells Isolated from the Bone Marrow of Transgenic Mice Express JCV T-Antigen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Gordon

    Full Text Available JC virus (JCV, a common human polyomavirus, is the etiological agent of the demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML. In addition to its role in PML, studies have demonstrated the transforming ability of the JCV early protein, T-antigen, and its association with some human cancers. JCV infection occurs in childhood and latent virus is thought to be maintained within the bone marrow, which harbors cells of hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic lineages. Here we show that non-hematopoietic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs isolated from the bone marrow of JCV T-antigen transgenic mice give rise to JCV T-antigen positive cells when cultured under neural conditions. JCV T-antigen positive cells exhibited neural crest characteristics and demonstrated p75, SOX-10 and nestin positivity. When cultured in conditions typical for mesenchymal cells, a population of T-antigen negative cells, which did not express neural crest markers arose from the MSCs. JCV T-antigen positive cells could be cultured long-term while maintaining their neural crest characteristics. When these cells were induced to differentiate into neural crest derivatives, JCV T-antigen was downregulated in cells differentiating into bone and maintained in glial cells expressing GFAP and S100. We conclude that JCV T-antigen can be stably expressed within a fraction of bone marrow cells differentiating along the neural crest/glial lineage when cultured in vitro. These findings identify a cell population within the bone marrow permissible for JCV early gene expression suggesting the possibility that these cells could support persistent viral infection and thus provide clues toward understanding the role of the bone marrow in JCV latency and reactivation. Further, our data provides an excellent experimental model system for studying the cell-type specificity of JCV T-antigen expression, the role of bone marrow-derived stem cells in the pathogenesis of JCV-related diseases

  11. Enrichment and Schwann Cell Differentiation of Neural Crest-derived Dental Pulp Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zer, Heba; Apel, Christian; Heiland, Max; Friedrich, Reinhard E; Jung, Ole; Kroeger, Nadja; Eichhorn, Wolfgang; Smeets, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    As already described in previous studies, neural crest stem cells (NCSCs) can be found in adult human dental pulp. The present study investigated the methodology for enrichment and differentiation-induction of the above mentioned cells. Dental pulp was extracted from human wisdom teeth of four patients and subsequently cultured as explants on fibronectin-coated plates in neurobasal medium supplemented with B27, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), insulin, l-glutamine and neuregulin-β1. The cells were then characterized by immunofluorescence, while their differentiation-potential was tested by the attempt to induce cells into different lineages, i.e. osteogenic, melanocytic and glial. The enriched cell population expressed nestin, CD271 and SOX10, which are well-known markers for NCSCs. Consequently, the cells were successfully induced to differentiate into osteoblasts, melanocytes and Schwann cells, expressing the corresponding differentiation markers. Human adult dental pulp contains a population of stem cells with neural crest ontogeny, which can thus be recruited for multiple regenerative therapies. Copyright © 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  12. Xenotransplantation of human neural progenitor cells to the subretinal space of nonimmunosuppressed pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warfvinge, Karin; Schwartz, Philip H; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility of transplanting human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) to the retina of nonimmunosuppressed pigs, cultured hNPCs were injected into the subretinal space of 5 adult pigs after laser burns were applied to promote donor cell integration. Postoperatively, the retinal......-specific antibodies revealed donor cells in the subretinal space at 10-13 days and smaller numbers within the retina on days 12 and 13, with evidence suggesting a limited degree of morphological integration; however, no cells remained at 4 weeks. The strong mononuclear cell reaction and loss of donor cells indicate...

  13. Neural cell 3D microtissue formation is marked by cytokines' up-regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinzhi Lai

    Full Text Available Cells cultured in three dimensional (3D scaffolds as opposed to traditional two-dimensional (2D substrates have been considered more physiologically relevant based on their superior ability to emulate the in vivo environment. Combined with stem cell technology, 3D cell cultures can provide a promising alternative for use in cell-based assays or biosensors in non-clinical drug discovery studies. To advance 3D culture technology, a case has been made for identifying and validating three-dimensionality biomarkers. With this goal in mind, we conducted a transcriptomic expression comparison among neural progenitor cells cultured on 2D substrates, 3D porous polystyrene scaffolds, and as 3D neurospheres (in vivo surrogate. Up-regulation of cytokines as a group in 3D and neurospheres was observed. A group of 13 cytokines were commonly up-regulated in cells cultured in polystyrene scaffolds and neurospheres, suggesting potential for any or a combination from this list to serve as three-dimensionality biomarkers. These results are supportive of further cytokine identification and validation studies with cells from non-neural tissue.

  14. Differential development of neuronal physiological responsiveness in two human neural stem cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Patel Sara; Pollock Kenneth; Aouabdi Sihem; Hines Susan J; Miljan Erik A; Donato Roberta; Edwards Frances A; Sinden John D

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Neural stem cells (NSCs) are powerful research tools for the design and discovery of new approaches to neurodegenerative disease. Overexpression of the myc family transcription factors in human primary cells from developing cortex and mesencephalon has produced two stable multipotential NSC lines (ReNcell VM and CX) that can be continuously expanded in monolayer culture. Results In the undifferentiated state, both ReNcell VM and CX are nestin positive and have resting memb...

  15. Coseeded Schwann cells myelinate neurites from differentiated neural stem cells in neurotrophin-3-loaded PLGA carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yi; Zhu, Ji-Xiang; Fang, Zheng-Yu; Zeng, Cheng-Guang; Zhang, Chao; Qi, Guo-Long; Li, Man-Hui; Zhang, Wei; Quan, Da-Ping; Wan, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Biomaterials and neurotrophic factors represent promising guidance for neural repair. In this study, we combined poly-(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) conduits and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) to generate NT-3-loaded PLGA carriers in vitro. Bioactive NT-3 was released stably and constantly from PLGA conduits for up to 4 weeks. Neural stem cells (NSCs) and Schwann cells (SCs) were coseeded into an NT-releasing scaffold system and cultured for 14 days. Immunoreactivity against Map2 showed that most of the grafted cells (>80%) were differentiated toward neurons. Double-immunostaining for synaptogenesis and myelination revealed the formation of synaptic structures and myelin sheaths in the coculture, which was also observed under electron microscope. Furthermore, under depolarizing conditions, these synapses were excitable and capable of releasing synaptic vesicles labeled with FM1-43 or FM4-64. Taken together, coseeding NSCs and SCs into NT-3-loaded PLGA carriers increased the differentiation of NSCs into neurons, developed synaptic connections, exhibited synaptic activities, and myelination of neurites by the accompanying SCs. These results provide an experimental basis that supports transplantation of functional neural construction in spinal cord injury. PMID:22619535

  16. Neutralization of LINGO-1 during in vitro differentiation of neural stem cells results in proliferation of immature neurons.

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    Camilla Lööv

    Full Text Available Identifying external factors that can be used to control neural stem cells division and their differentiation to neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes is of high scientific and clinical interest. Here we show that the Nogo-66 receptor interacting protein LINGO-1 is a potent regulator of neural stem cell maturation to neurons. LINGO-1 is expressed by cortical neural stem cells from E14 mouse embryos and inhibition of LINGO-1 during the first days of neural stem cell differentiation results in decreased neuronal maturation. Compared to neurons in control cultures, which after 6 days of differentiation have long extending neurites, neurons in cultures treated with anti-LINGO-1 antibodies retain an immature, round phenotype with only very short processes. Furthermore, neutralization of LINGO-1 results in a threefold increase in βIII tubulin-positive cells compared to untreated control cultures. By using BrdU incorporation assays we show that the immature neurons in LINGO-1 neutralized cultures are dividing neuroblasts. In contrast to control cultures, in which no cells were double positive for βIII tubulin and BrdU, 36% of the neurons in cultures treated with anti-LINGO-1 antibodies were proliferating after three days of differentiation. TUNEL assays revealed that the amount of cells going through apoptosis during the early phase of differentiation was significantly decreased in cultures treated with anti-LINGO-1 antibodies compared to untreated control cultures. Taken together, our results demonstrate a novel role for LINGO-1 in neural stem cell differentiation to neurons and suggest a possibility to use LINGO-1 inhibitors to compensate for neuronal cell loss in the injured brain.

  17. Neutralization of LINGO-1 during in vitro differentiation of neural stem cells results in proliferation of immature neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lööv, Camilla; Fernqvist, Maria; Walmsley, Adrian; Marklund, Niklas; Erlandsson, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Identifying external factors that can be used to control neural stem cells division and their differentiation to neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes is of high scientific and clinical interest. Here we show that the Nogo-66 receptor interacting protein LINGO-1 is a potent regulator of neural stem cell maturation to neurons. LINGO-1 is expressed by cortical neural stem cells from E14 mouse embryos and inhibition of LINGO-1 during the first days of neural stem cell differentiation results in decreased neuronal maturation. Compared to neurons in control cultures, which after 6 days of differentiation have long extending neurites, neurons in cultures treated with anti-LINGO-1 antibodies retain an immature, round phenotype with only very short processes. Furthermore, neutralization of LINGO-1 results in a threefold increase in βIII tubulin-positive cells compared to untreated control cultures. By using BrdU incorporation assays we show that the immature neurons in LINGO-1 neutralized cultures are dividing neuroblasts. In contrast to control cultures, in which no cells were double positive for βIII tubulin and BrdU, 36% of the neurons in cultures treated with anti-LINGO-1 antibodies were proliferating after three days of differentiation. TUNEL assays revealed that the amount of cells going through apoptosis during the early phase of differentiation was significantly decreased in cultures treated with anti-LINGO-1 antibodies compared to untreated control cultures. Taken together, our results demonstrate a novel role for LINGO-1 in neural stem cell differentiation to neurons and suggest a possibility to use LINGO-1 inhibitors to compensate for neuronal cell loss in the injured brain.

  18. Neural stem cells differentiated from iPS cells spontaneously regain pluripotency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyun Woo; Kim, Jong Soo; Choi, Sol; Hong, Yean Ju; Kim, Min Jung; Seo, Han Geuk; Do, Jeong Tae

    2014-10-01

    Differentiated somatic cells can be reprogrammed into pluripotent stem cells by transduction of exogenous reprogramming factors. After induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are established, exogenous genes are silenced. In the pluripotent state, retroviral genes integrated in the host genome are kept inactive through epigenetic transcriptional regulation. In this study, we tried to determine whether exogenous genes remain silenced or are reactivated upon loss of pluripotency or on differentiation using an in vitro system. We induced differentiation of iPS cells into neural stem cells (NSCs) in vitro; the NSCs appeared morphologically indistinguishable from brain-derived NSCs and stained positive for the NSC markers Nestin and Sox2. These iPS cell-derived NSCs (iPS-NSCs) were also capable of differentiating into all three neural subtypes. Interestingly, iPS-NSCs spontaneously formed aggregates on long-term culture and showed reactivation of the Oct4-GFP marker, which was followed by the formation of embryonic stem cell-like colonies. The spontaneously reverted green fluorescent protein (GFP)-positive (iPS-NSC-GFP(+) ) cells expressed high levels of pluripotency markers (Oct4 and Nanog) and formed germline chimeras, indicating that iPS-NSC-GFP(+) cells had the same pluripotency as the original iPS cells. The reactivation of silenced exogenous genes was tightly correlated with the downregulation of DNA methyltransferases (Dnmts) during differentiation of iPS cells. This phenomenon was not observed in doxycycline-inducible iPS cells, where the reactivation of exogenous genes could be induced only by doxycycline treatment. These results indicate that pluripotency can be regained through reactivation of exogenous genes, which is associated with dynamic change of Dnmt levels during differentiation of iPS cells. © 2014 AlphaMed Press.

  19. Mechanical roles of apical constriction, cell elongation, and cell migration during neural tube formation in Xenopus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Makoto; Watanabe, Tadashi; Yasue, Naoko; Tateo, Itsuki; Adachi, Taiji; Ueno, Naoto

    2016-12-01

    Neural tube closure is an important and necessary process during the development of the central nervous system. The formation of the neural tube structure from a flat sheet of neural epithelium requires several cell morphogenetic events and tissue dynamics to account for the mechanics of tissue deformation. Cell elongation changes cuboidal cells into columnar cells, and apical constriction then causes them to adopt apically narrow, wedge-like shapes. In addition, the neural plate in Xenopus is stratified, and the non-neural cells in the deep layer (deep cells) pull the overlying superficial cells, eventually bringing the two layers of cells to the midline. Thus, neural tube closure appears to be a complex event in which these three physical events are considered to play key mechanical roles. To test whether these three physical events are mechanically sufficient to drive neural tube formation, we employed a three-dimensional vertex model and used it to simulate the process of neural tube closure. The results suggest that apical constriction cued the bending of the neural plate by pursing the circumference of the apical surface of the neural cells. Neural cell elongation in concert with apical constriction further narrowed the apical surface of the cells and drove the rapid folding of the neural plate, but was insufficient for complete neural tube closure. Migration of the deep cells provided the additional tissue deformation necessary for closure. To validate the model, apical constriction and cell elongation were inhibited in Xenopus laevis embryos. The resulting cell and tissue shapes resembled the corresponding simulation results.

  20. All-trans retinoic acid promotes neural lineage entry by pluripotent embryonic stem cells via multiple pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Bo

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background All-trans retinoic acid (RA is one of the most important morphogens with pleiotropic actions. Its embryonic distribution correlates with neural differentiation in the developing central nervous system. To explore the precise effects of RA on neural differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs, we detected expression of RA nuclear receptors and RA-metabolizing enzymes in mouse ESCs and investigated the roles of RA in adherent monolayer culture. Results Upon addition of RA, cell differentiation was directed rapidly and exclusively into the neural lineage. Conversely, pharmacological interference with RA signaling suppressed this neural differentiation. Inhibition of fibroblast growth factor (FGF signaling did not suppress significantly neural differentiation in RA-treated cultures. Pharmacological interference with extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK pathway or activation of Wnt pathway effectively blocked the RA-promoted neural specification. ERK phosphorylation was enhanced in RA-treated cultures at the early stage of differentiation. Conclusion RA can promote neural lineage entry by ESCs in adherent monolayer culture systems. This effect depends on RA signaling and its crosstalk with the ERK and Wnt pathways.

  1. 3D Cell Culture: An Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koledova, Zuzana

    2017-01-01

    3D cell culture is an invaluable tool in developmental, cell, and cancer biology. By mimicking crucial features of in vivo environment, including cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions, 3D cell culture enables proper structural architecture and differentiated function of normal tissues or tumors in vitro. Thereby 3D cell culture realistically models in vivo tissue conditions and processes, and provides in vivo like responses. Since its early days in the 1970s, 3D cell culture has revealed important insights into mechanisms of tissue homeostasis and cancer, and accelerated translational research in cancer biology and tissue engineering.

  2. [Phenotypic plasticity of neural crest-derived melanocytes and Schwann cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupin, Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    Melanocytes, the pigmented cells of the skin, and the glial Schwann cells lining peripheral nerves are developmentally derived from an early and transient ectodermal structure of the vertebrate embryo, the neural crest, which is also at the origin of multiple neural and non-neural cell types. Besides melanocytes and neural cells of the peripheral nervous system, the neural crest cells give rise to mesenchymal cell types in the head, which form most of the craniofacial skeleton, dermis, fat tissue and vascular musculo-connective components. How such a wide diversity of differentiation fates is established during embryogenesis and is later maintained in adult tissues are among key questions in developmental and stem cell biology. The analysis of the developmental potentials of single neural crest cells cultured in vitro led to characterizing multipotent stem/progenitor cells as well as more restricted precursors in the early neural crest of avian and mammalian embryos. Data support a hierarchical model of the diversification of neural crest lineages through progressive restrictions of multipotent stem cell potentials driven by local environmental factors. In particular, melanocytes and glial Schwann cells were shown to arise from a common bipotent progenitor, which depends upon the peptide endothelin-3 for proliferation and self-renewal ability. In vivo, signaling by endothelin-3 and its receptor is also required for the early development of melanocytes and proper pigmentation of the vertebrate body. It is generally assumed that, after lineage specification and terminal differentiation, specialized cell types, like the melanocytes and Schwann cells, do not change their identity. However, this classic notion that somatic cell differentiation is a stable and irreversible process has been challenged by emerging evidence that dedifferentiation can occur in different biological systems through nuclear transfer, cell fusion, epigenetic modifications and ectopic gene

  3. Spirulina Promotes Stem Cell Genesis and Protects against LPS Induced Declines in Neural Stem Cell Proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachstetter, Adam D.; Jernberg, Jennifer; Schlunk, Andrea; Vila, Jennifer L.; Hudson, Charles; Cole, Michael J.; Shytle, R. Douglas; Tan, Jun; Sanberg, Paul R.; Sanberg, Cyndy D.; Borlongan, Cesario; Kaneko, Yuji; Tajiri, Naoki; Gemma, Carmelina; Bickford, Paula C.

    2010-01-01

    Adult stem cells are present in many tissues including, skin, muscle, adipose, bone marrow, and in the brain. Neuroinflammation has been shown to be a potent negative regulator of stem cell and progenitor cell proliferation in the neurogenic regions of the brain. Recently we demonstrated that decreasing a key neuroinflammatory cytokine IL-1β in the hippocampus of aged rats reversed the age-related cognitive decline and increased neurogenesis in the age rats. We also have found that nutraceuticals have the potential to reduce neuroinflammation, and decrease oxidative stress. The objectives of this study were to determine if spirulina could protect the proliferative potential of hippocampal neural progenitor cells from an acute systemic inflammatory insult of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). To this end, young rats were fed for 30 days a control diet or a diet supplemented with 0.1% spirulina. On day 28 the rats were given a single i.p. injection of LPS (1 mg/kg). The following day the rats were injected with BrdU (50 mg/kg b.i.d. i.p.) and were sacrificed 24 hours after the first injection of BrdU. Quantification of the BrdU positive cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus demonstrated a decrease in proliferation of the stem/progenitor cells in the hippocampus as a result of the LPS insult. Furthermore, the diet supplemented with spirulina was able to negate the LPS induced decrease in stem/progenitor cell proliferation. In a second set of studies we examined the effects of spirulina either alone or in combination with a proprietary formulation (NT-020) of blueberry, green tea, vitamin D3 and carnosine on the function of bone marrow and CD34+ cells in vitro. Spirulina had small effects on its own and more than additive effects in combination with NT-020 to promote mitochondrial respiration and/or proliferation of these cells in culture. When examined on neural stem cells in culture spirulina increased proliferation at baseline and protected against the negative

  4. Spirulina promotes stem cell genesis and protects against LPS induced declines in neural stem cell proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam D Bachstetter

    Full Text Available Adult stem cells are present in many tissues including, skin, muscle, adipose, bone marrow, and in the brain. Neuroinflammation has been shown to be a potent negative regulator of stem cell and progenitor cell proliferation in the neurogenic regions of the brain. Recently we demonstrated that decreasing a key neuroinflammatory cytokine IL-1beta in the hippocampus of aged rats reversed the age-related cognitive decline and increased neurogenesis in the age rats. We also have found that nutraceuticals have the potential to reduce neuroinflammation, and decrease oxidative stress. The objectives of this study were to determine if spirulina could protect the proliferative potential of hippocampal neural progenitor cells from an acute systemic inflammatory insult of lipopolysaccharide (LPS. To this end, young rats were fed for 30 days a control diet or a diet supplemented with 0.1% spirulina. On day 28 the rats were given a single i.p. injection of LPS (1 mg/kg. The following day the rats were injected with BrdU (50 mg/kg b.i.d. i.p. and were sacrificed 24 hours after the first injection of BrdU. Quantification of the BrdU positive cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus demonstrated a decrease in proliferation of the stem/progenitor cells in the hippocampus as a result of the LPS insult. Furthermore, the diet supplemented with spirulina was able to negate the LPS induced decrease in stem/progenitor cell proliferation. In a second set of studies we examined the effects of spirulina either alone or in combination with a proprietary formulation (NT-020 of blueberry, green tea, vitamin D3 and carnosine on the function of bone marrow and CD34+ cells in vitro. Spirulina had small effects on its own and more than additive effects in combination with NT-020 to promote mitochondrial respiration and/or proliferation of these cells in culture. When examined on neural stem cells in culture spirulina increased proliferation at baseline and protected

  5. Fluorescent probes as a tool for cell population tracking in spontaneously active neural networks derived from human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkinen, M; Joki, T; Ylä-Outinen, L; Skottman, H; Narkilahti, S; Aänismaa, R

    2013-04-30

    Applications such as 3D cultures and tissue modelling require cell tracking with non-invasive methods. In this work, the suitability of two fluorescent probes, CellTracker, CT, and long chain carbocyanine dye, DiD, was investigated for long-term culturing of labeled human pluripotent stem cell-derived neural cells. We found that these dyes did not affect the cell viability. However, proliferation was decreased in DiD labeled cell population. With both dyes the labeling was stable up to 4 weeks. CT and DiD labeled cells could be co-cultured and, importantly, these mixed populations had their normal ability to form spontaneous electrical network activity. In conclusion, human neural cells can be successfully labeled with these two fluorescent probes without significantly affecting the cell characteristics. These labeled cells could be utilized further in e.g. building controlled neuronal networks for neurotoxicity screening platforms, combining cells with biomaterials for 3D studies, and graft development. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Neural Cell Chip Based Electrochemical Detection of Nanotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Abdul Kafi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Development of a rapid, sensitive and cost-effective method for toxicity assessment of commonly used nanoparticles is urgently needed for the sustainable development of nanotechnology. A neural cell with high sensitivity and conductivity has become a potential candidate for a cell chip to investigate toxicity of environmental influences. A neural cell immobilized on a conductive surface has become a potential tool for the assessment of nanotoxicity based on electrochemical methods. The effective electrochemical monitoring largely depends on the adequate attachment of a neural cell on the chip surfaces. Recently, establishment of integrin receptor specific ligand molecules arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD or its several modifications RGD-Multi Armed Peptide terminated with cysteine (RGD-MAP-C, C(RGD4 ensure farm attachment of neural cell on the electrode surfaces either in their two dimensional (dot or three dimensional (rod or pillar like nano-scale arrangement. A three dimensional RGD modified electrode surface has been proven to be more suitable for cell adhesion, proliferation, differentiation as well as electrochemical measurement. This review discusses fabrication as well as electrochemical measurements of neural cell chip with particular emphasis on their use for nanotoxicity assessments sequentially since inception to date. Successful monitoring of quantum dot (QD, graphene oxide (GO and cosmetic compound toxicity using the newly developed neural cell chip were discussed here as a case study. This review recommended that a neural cell chip established on a nanostructured ligand modified conductive surface can be a potential tool for the toxicity assessments of newly developed nanomaterials prior to their use on biology or biomedical technologies.

  7. Three dimensional cellular microarray platform for human neural stem cell differentiation and toxicology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Meli

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We developed a three-dimensional (3D cellular microarray platform for the high-throughput (HT analysis of human neural stem cell (hNSC growth and differentiation. The growth of an immortalized hNSC line, ReNcell VM, was evaluated on a miniaturized cell culture chip consisting of 60 nl spots of cells encapsulated in alginate, and compared to standard 2D well plate culture conditions. Using a live/dead cell viability assay, we demonstrated that the hNSCs are able to expand on-chip, albeit with lower proliferation rates and viabilities than in conventional 2D culture platforms. Using an in-cell, on-chip immunofluorescence assay, which provides quantitative information on cellular levels of proteins involved in neural fate, we demonstrated that ReNcell VM can preserve its multipotent state during on-chip expansion. Moreover, differentiation of the hNSCs into glial progeny was achieved both off- and on-chip six days after growth factor removal, accompanied by a decrease in the neural progenitor markers. The versatility of the platform was further demonstrated by complementing the cell culture chip with a chamber system that allowed us to screen for differential toxicity of small molecules to hNSCs. Using this approach, we showed differential toxicity when evaluating three neurotoxic compounds and one antiproliferative compound, and the null effect of a non-toxic compound at relevant concentrations. Thus, our 3D high-throughput microarray platform may help predict, in vitro, which compounds pose an increased threat to neural development and should therefore be prioritized for further screening and evaluation.

  8. Three dimensional cellular microarray platform for human neural stem cell differentiation and toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meli, Luciana; Barbosa, Hélder S C; Hickey, Anne Marie; Gasimli, Leyla; Nierode, Gregory; Diogo, Maria Margarida; Linhardt, Robert J; Cabral, Joaquim M S; Dordick, Jonathan S

    2014-07-01

    We developed a three-dimensional (3D) cellular microarray platform for the high-throughput (HT) analysis of human neural stem cell (hNSC) growth and differentiation. The growth of an immortalized hNSC line, ReNcell VM, was evaluated on a miniaturized cell culture chip consisting of 60nl spots of cells encapsulated in alginate, and compared to standard 2D well plate culture conditions. Using a live/dead cell viability assay, we demonstrated that the hNSCs are able to expand on-chip, albeit with lower proliferation rates and viabilities than in conventional 2D culture platforms. Using an in-cell, on-chip immunofluorescence assay, which provides quantitative information on cellular levels of proteins involved in neural fate, we demonstrated that ReNcell VM can preserve its multipotent state during on-chip expansion. Moreover, differentiation of the hNSCs into glial progeny was achieved both off- and on-chip six days after growth factor removal, accompanied by a decrease in the neural progenitor markers. The versatility of the platform was further demonstrated by complementing the cell culture chip with a chamber system that allowed us to screen for differential toxicity of small molecules to hNSCs. Using this approach, we showed differential toxicity when evaluating three neurotoxic compounds and one antiproliferative compound, and the null effect of a non-toxic compound at relevant concentrations. Thus, our 3D high-throughput microarray platform may help predict, in vitro, which compounds pose an increased threat to neural development and should therefore be prioritized for further screening and evaluation. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Dynamized Preparations in Cell Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellanzhiyil Surendran Sunila

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Although reports on the efficacy of homeopathic medicines in animal models are limited, there are even fewer reports on the in vitro action of these dynamized preparations. We have evaluated the cytotoxic activity of 30C and 200C potencies of ten dynamized medicines against Dalton's Lymphoma Ascites, Ehrlich's Ascites Carcinoma, lung fibroblast (L929 and Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO cell lines and compared activity with their mother tinctures during short-term and long-term cell culture. The effect of dynamized medicines to induce apoptosis was also evaluated and we studied how dynamized medicines affected genes expressed during apoptosis. Mother tinctures as well as some dynamized medicines showed significant cytotoxicity to cells during short and long-term incubation. Potentiated alcohol control did not produce any cytotoxicity at concentrations studied. The dynamized medicines were found to inhibit CHO cell colony formation and thymidine uptake in L929 cells and those of Thuja, Hydrastis and Carcinosinum were found to induce apoptosis in DLA cells. Moreover, dynamized Carcinosinum was found to induce the expression of p53 while dynamized Thuja produced characteristic laddering pattern in agarose gel electrophoresis of DNA. These results indicate that dynamized medicines possess cytotoxic as well as apoptosis-inducing properties.

  10. A protocol for isolation and enriched monolayer cultivation of neural precursor cells from mouse dentate gyrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harish eBabu

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In vitro assays are valuable tools to study the characteristics of adult neural precursor cells under controlled conditions with a defined set of parameters. We here present a detailed protocol based on our previous original publication (Babu et al., Enriched monolayer precursor cell cultures from micro-dissected adult mouse dentate gyrus yield functional granule cell-like neurons, PLoS One 2007, 2:e388 to isolate neural precursor cells from the hippocampus of adult mice and maintain and propagate them as adherent monolayer cultures. The strategy is based on the use of Percoll density gradient centrifugation to enrich precursor cells from the micro-dissected dentate gyrus. Based on the expression of Nestin and Sox2, a culture-purity of more than 98% can be achieved. The cultures are expanded under serum-free conditions in Neurobasal A medium with addition of the mitogens EGF and FGF2 as well as the supplements Glutamax-1 and B27. Under differentiation conditions, the precursor cells reliably generate approximately 30% neurons with appropriate morphological, molecular and electrophysiological characteristics that might reflect granule cell properties as their in vivo counterpart. We also highlight potential modifications to the protocol.

  11. Neural Crest Stem Cells from Dental Tissues: A New Hope for Dental and Neural Regeneration

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    Gaskon Ibarretxe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Several stem cell sources persist in the adult human body, which opens the doors to both allogeneic and autologous cell therapies. Tooth tissues have proven to be a surprisingly rich and accessible source of neural crest-derived ectomesenchymal stem cells (EMSCs, which may be employed to repair disease-affected oral tissues in advanced regenerative dentistry. Additionally, one area of medicine that demands intensive research on new sources of stem cells is nervous system regeneration, since this constitutes a therapeutic hope for patients affected by highly invalidating conditions such as spinal cord injury, stroke, or neurodegenerative diseases. However, endogenous adult sources of neural stem cells present major drawbacks, such as their scarcity and complicated obtention. In this context, EMSCs from dental tissues emerge as good alternative candidates, since they are preserved in adult human individuals, and retain both high proliferation ability and a neural-like phenotype in vitro. In this paper, we discuss some important aspects of tissue regeneration by cell therapy and point out some advantages that EMSCs provide for dental and neural regeneration. We will finally review some of the latest research featuring experimental approaches and benefits of dental stem cell therapy.

  12. Responsiveness of fetal rat brain cells to glia maturation factor during neoplastic transformation in cell culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugen, A; Laerum, O D; Bock, E

    1981-01-01

    of gestation. The brains of the treated fetuses were transferred to cell culture and underwent neoplastic transformation with a characteristic sequence of phenotypic alterations which could be divided into five different stages. During the first 40 days after explantation (stage I & II) BE induced...... morphological differentiation of epitheloid neural cells into astrocytes. This occurred in carcinogen treated cells as well as in untreated control cultures. At the same time cells with astrocyte morphology showed accumulation of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFA) as tested by indirect immunofluorescence...... with monospecific antibodies against GFA. Thereafter, in the EtNU pre-treated cultures an increased number of cells with astrocyte morphology was seen, and BE further increased the number of cells with long cytoplasmic processes. Control cells were GFA negative, while some few strongly, as well as many weakly...

  13. Mechanotransduction of Neural Cells Through Cell–Substrate Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stukel, Jessica M.

    2016-01-01

    Neurons and neural stem cells are sensitive to their mechanical and topographical environment, and cell–substrate binding contributes to this sensitivity to activate signaling pathways for basic cell functions. Many transmembrane proteins transmit signals into and out of the cell, including integrins, growth factor receptors, G-protein-coupled receptors, cadherins, cell adhesion molecules, and ion channels. Specifically, integrins are one of the main transmembrane proteins that transmit force across the cell membrane between a cell and its extracellular matrix, making them critical in the study of cell–material interactions. This review focuses on mechanotransduction, defined as the conversion of force a cell generates through cell–substrate bonds to a chemical signal, of neural cells. The chemical signals relay information via pathways through the cellular cytoplasm to the nucleus, where signaling events can affect gene expression. Pathways and the cellular response initiated by substrate binding are explored to better understand their effect on neural cells mechanotransduction. As the results of mechanotransduction affect cell adhesion, cell shape, and differentiation, knowledge regarding neural mechanotransduction is critical for most regenerative strategies in tissue engineering, where novel environments are developed to improve conduit design for central and peripheral nervous system repair in vivo. PMID:26669274

  14. The neural code in developing cultured networks: experiments and advanced simulation models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, Wim; Gritsun, T.; Stoyanova, Irina; le Feber, Jakob

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the neural code of cultured neuronal networks may help to forward our understanding of human brain processes.The most striking property of spontaneously firing cultures is their regular bursting activity, a burst being defined as synchronized firing of groups of neurons spread

  15. Plasmid-based generation of induced neural stem cells from adult human fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Capetian

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Direct reprogramming from somatic to neural cell types has become an alternative to induced pluripotent stem cells. Most protocols employ viral expression systems, posing the risk of random genomic integration. Recent developments led to plasmid-based protocols, lowering this risk. However, these protocols either relied on continuous presence of a variety of small molecules or were only able to reprogram murine cells. We therefore established a reprogramming protocol based on vectors containing the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-derived oriP/EBNA1 as well as the defined expression factors Oct3/4, Sox2, Klf4, L-myc, Lin28, and a small hairpin directed against p53. We employed a defined neural medium in combination with the neurotrophins bFGF, EGF and FGF4 for cultivation without the addition of small molecules. After reprogramming, cells demonstrated a temporary increase in the expression of endogenous Oct3/4. We obtained induced neural stem cells (iNSC 30 days after transfection. In contrast to previous results, plasmid vectors as well as a residual expression of reprogramming factors remained detectable in all cell lines. Cells showed a robust differentiation into neuronal (72% and glial cells (9% astrocytes, 6% oligodendrocytes. Despite the temporary increase of pluripotency-associated Oct3/4 expression during reprogramming, we did not detect pluripotent stem cells or non-neural cells in culture (except occasional residual fibroblasts. Neurons showed electrical activity and functional glutamatergic synapses. Our results demonstrate that reprogramming adult human fibroblasts to iNSC by plasmid vectors and basic neural medium without small molecules is possible and feasible. However, a full set of pluripotency-associated transcription factors may indeed result in the acquisition of a transient (at least partial pluripotent intermediate during reprogramming. In contrast to previous reports, the EBV-based plasmid system remained present and active inside

  16. File list: His.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. File list: His.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  3. File list: His.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  6. Expanding intestinal stem cells in culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heo, Inha; Clevers, Hans

    Culturing intestinal stem cells into 3D organoids results in heterogeneous cell populations, reflecting the in vivo cell type diversity. In a recent paper published in Nature, Wang et al. established a culture condition for a highly homogeneous population of intestinal stem cells.

  7. Herpes simplex virus induces neural oxidative damage via microglial cell Toll-like receptor-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Little Morgan R

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Using a murine model of herpes simplex virus (HSV-1 encephalitis, our laboratory has determined that induction of proinflammatory mediators in response to viral infection is largely mediated through a Toll-like receptor-2 (TLR2-dependent mechanism. Published studies have shown that, like other inflammatory mediators, reactive oxygen species (ROS are generated during viral brain infection. It is increasingly clear that ROS are responsible for facilitating secondary tissue damage during central nervous system infection and may contribute to neurotoxicity associated with herpes encephalitis. Methods Purified microglial cell and mixed neural cell cultures were prepared from C57B/6 and TLR2-/- mice. Intracellular ROS production in cultured murine microglia was measured via 2', 7'-Dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH-DA oxidation. An assay for 8-isoprostane, a marker of lipid peroxidation, was utilized to measure free radical-associated cellular damage. Mixed neural cultures obtained from β-actin promoter-luciferase transgenic mice were used to detect neurotoxicity induced by HSV-infected microglia. Results Stimulation with HSV-1 elevated intracellular ROS in wild-type microglial cell cultures, while TLR2-/- microglia displayed delayed and attenuated ROS production following viral infection. HSV-infected TLR2-/- microglia produced less neuronal oxidative damage to mixed neural cell cultures in comparison to HSV-infected wild-type microglia. Further, HSV-infected TLR2-/- microglia were found to be less cytotoxic to cultured neurons compared to HSV-infected wild-type microglia. These effects were associated with decreased activation of p38 MAPK and p42/p44 ERK in TLR2-/- mice. Conclusions These studies demonstrate the importance of microglial cell TLR2 in inducing oxidative stress and neuronal damage in response to viral infection.

  8. Best practices in cell culture: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baust, John M; Buehring, Gertrude Case; Campbell, Lia; Elmore, Eugene; Harbell, John W; Nims, Raymond W; Price, Paul; Reid, Yvonne A; Simione, Frank

    2017-09-01

    This overview describes a series of articles to provide an unmet need for information on best practices in animal cell culture. The target audience primarily consists of entry-level scientists with minimal experience in cell culture. It also include scientists, journalists, and educators with some experience in cell culture, but in need of a refresher in best practices. The articles will be published in this journal over a six-month period and will emphasize best practices in: (1) media selection; (2) use and evaluation of animal serum as a component of cell culture medium; (3) receipt of new cells into the laboratory; (4) naming cell lines; (5) authenticating cell line identity; (6) detecting and mitigating risk of cell culture contamination; (7) cryopreservation and thawing of cells; and (8) storing and shipping viable cells.

  9. Neural Progenitor Cells Derived from Human Embryonic Stem Cells as an Origin of Dopaminergic Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parinya Noisa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs are able to proliferate in vitro indefinitely without losing their ability to differentiate into multiple cell types upon exposure to appropriate signals. Particularly, the ability of hESCs to differentiate into neuronal subtypes is fundamental to develop cell-based therapies for several neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s disease, Huntington’s disease, and Parkinson’s disease. In this study, we differentiated hESCs to dopaminergic neurons via an intermediate stage, neural progenitor cells (NPCs. hESCs were induced to neural progenitor cells by Dorsomorphin, a small molecule that inhibits BMP signalling. The resulting neural progenitor cells exhibited neural bipolarity with high expression of neural progenitor genes and possessed multipotential differentiation ability. CBF1 and bFGF responsiveness of these hES-NP cells suggested their similarity to embryonic neural progenitor cells. A substantial number of dopaminergic neurons were derived from hES-NP cells upon supplementation of FGF8 and SHH, key dopaminergic neuron inducers. Importantly, multiple markers of midbrain neurons were detected, including NURR1, PITX3, and EN1, suggesting that hESC-derived dopaminergic neurons attained the midbrain identity. Altogether, this work underscored the generation of neural progenitor cells that retain the properties of embryonic neural progenitor cells. These cells will serve as an unlimited source for the derivation of dopaminergic neurons, which might be applicable for treating patients with Parkinson’s disease.

  10. A cell junction pathology of neural stem cells leads to abnormal neurogenesis and hydrocephalus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodríguez, Esteban M; Guerra, María M; Vío, Karin; González, César; Ortloff, Alexander; Bátiz, Luis F; Rodríguez, Sara; Jara, María C; Muñoz, Rosa I; Ortega, Eduardo; Jaque, Jaime; Guerra, Francisco; Sival, Deborah A; den Dunnen, Wilfred F A; Jiménez, Antonio J; Domínguez-Pinos, María D; Pérez-Fígares, José M; McAllister, James P; Johanson, Conrad

    2012-01-01

    Most cells of the developing mammalian brain derive from the ventricular (VZ) and the subventricular (SVZ) zones. The VZ is formed by the multipotent radial glia/neural stem cells (NSCs) while the SVZ harbors the rapidly proliferative neural precursor cells (NPCs). Evidence from human and animal

  11. Applicability of tooth derived stem cells in neural regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludovica Parisi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Within the nervous system, regeneration is limited, and this is due to the small amount of neural stem cells, the inhibitory origin of the stem cell niche and often to the development of a scar which constitutes a mechanical barrier for the regeneration. Regarding these aspects, many efforts have been done in the research of a cell component that combined with scaffolds and growth factors could be suitable for nervous regeneration in regenerative medicine approaches. Autologous mesenchymal stem cells represent nowadays the ideal candidate for this aim, thank to their multipotency and to their amount inside adult tissues. However, issues in their harvesting, through the use of invasive techniques, and problems involved in their ageing, require the research of new autologous sources. To this purpose, the recent discovery of a stem cells component in teeth, and which derive from neural crest cells, has came to the light the possibility of using dental stem cells in nervous system regeneration. In this work, in order to give guidelines on the use of dental stem cells for neural regeneration, we briefly introduce the concepts of regeneration and regenerative medicine, we then focus the attention on odontogenesis, which involves the formation and the presence of a stem component in different parts of teeth, and finally we describe some experimental approaches which are exploiting dental stem cells for neural studies.

  12. Applicability of tooth derived stem cells in neural regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, Ludovica; Manfredi, Edoardo

    2016-11-01

    Within the nervous system, regeneration is limited, and this is due to the small amount of neural stem cells, the inhibitory origin of the stem cell niche and often to the development of a scar which constitutes a mechanical barrier for the regeneration. Regarding these aspects, many efforts have been done in the research of a cell component that combined with scaffolds and growth factors could be suitable for nervous regeneration in regenerative medicine approaches. Autologous mesenchymal stem cells represent nowadays the ideal candidate for this aim, thank to their multipotency and to their amount inside adult tissues. However, issues in their harvesting, through the use of invasive techniques, and problems involved in their ageing, require the research of new autologous sources. To this purpose, the recent discovery of a stem cells component in teeth, and which derive from neural crest cells, has came to the light the possibility of using dental stem cells in nervous system regeneration. In this work, in order to give guidelines on the use of dental stem cells for neural regeneration, we briefly introduce the concepts of regeneration and regenerative medicine, we then focus the attention on odontogenesis, which involves the formation and the presence of a stem component in different parts of teeth, and finally we describe some experimental approaches which are exploiting dental stem cells for neural studies.

  13. Dynamic transcriptional signature and cell fate analysis reveals plasticity of individual neural plate border cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roellig, Daniela; Tan-Cabugao, Johanna; Esaian, Sevan; Bronner, Marianne E

    2017-01-01

    The ‘neural plate border’ of vertebrate embryos contains precursors of neural crest and placode cells, both defining vertebrate characteristics. How these lineages segregate from neural and epidermal fates has been a matter of debate. We address this by performing a fine-scale quantitative temporal analysis of transcription factor expression in the neural plate border of chick embryos. The results reveal significant overlap of transcription factors characteristic of multiple lineages in individual border cells from gastrula through neurula stages. Cell fate analysis using a Sox2 (neural) enhancer reveals that cells that are initially Sox2+ cells can contribute not only to neural tube but also to neural crest and epidermis. Moreover, modulating levels of Sox2 or Pax7 alters the apportionment of neural tube versus neural crest fates. Our results resolve a long-standing question and suggest that many individual border cells maintain ability to contribute to multiple ectodermal lineages until or beyond neural tube closure. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21620.001 PMID:28355135

  14. Role of SDF1/CXCR4 Interaction in Experimental Hemiplegic Models with Neural Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noboru Suzuki

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Much attention has been focused on neural cell transplantation because of its promising clinical applications. We have reported that embryonic stem (ES cell derived neural stem/progenitor cell transplantation significantly improved motor functions in a hemiplegic mouse model. It is important to understand the molecular mechanisms governing neural regeneration of the damaged motor cortex after the transplantation. Recent investigations disclosed that chemokines participated in the regulation of migration and maturation of neural cell grafts. In this review, we summarize the involvement of inflammatory chemokines including stromal cell derived factor 1 (SDF1 in neural regeneration after ES cell derived neural stem/progenitor cell transplantation in mouse stroke models.

  15. PEM Fuel Cell Modelling Using Artificial Neural Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Doumbia, Mamadou Lamine

    2016-01-01

    Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that convert the chemical energy of a reaction directly into dc electrical energy. Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell is a suitable alternative for both electrical transportation and stationary applications. In this article, an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) modelling approach of a PEM fuel cell is developed. This model describes the behaviour of PEM fuel cell voltage under both steady-state and transient conditions. Moreover, the prediction of th...

  16. Microinjection of membrane-impermeable molecules into single neural stem cells in brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Fong Kuan; Haffner, Christiane; Huttner, Wieland B; Taverna, Elena

    2014-05-01

    This microinjection protocol allows the manipulation and tracking of neural stem and progenitor cells in tissue at single-cell resolution. We demonstrate how to apply microinjection to organotypic brain slices obtained from mice and ferrets; however, our technique is not limited to mouse and ferret embryos, but provides a means of introducing a wide variety of membrane-impermeable molecules (e.g., nucleic acids, proteins, hydrophilic compounds) into neural stem and progenitor cells of any developing mammalian brain. Microinjection experiments are conducted by using a phase-contrast microscope equipped with epifluorescence, a transjector and a micromanipulator. The procedure normally takes ∼2 h for an experienced researcher, and the entire protocol, including tissue processing, can be performed within 1 week. Thus, microinjection is a unique and versatile method for changing and tracking the fate of a cell in organotypic slice culture.

  17. Cellular therapy after spinal cord injury using neural progenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vroemen, Maurice

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis, the possibilities and limitations of cell-based therapies after spinal cord injury are explored. Particularly, the potential of adult derived neural progenitor cell (NPC) grafts to function as a permissive substrate for axonal regeneration was investigated. It was found that syngenic

  18. Viability of dielectrophoretically trapped neuronal cortical cells in culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heida, Tjitske; Vulto, P; Rutten, Wim; Marani, Enrico

    2001-01-01

    Negative dielectrophoretic trapping of neural cells is an efficient way to position neural cells on the electrode sites of planar micro-electrode arrays. The preservation of viability of the neural cells is essential for this approach. This study investigates the viability of postnatal cortical rat

  19. Passaged neural stem cell-derived neuronal networks for a portable biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shaughnessy, Thomas J; Liu, Jinny L; Ma, Wu

    2009-04-15

    We have previously demonstrated a portable biosensor that utilizes networks of mammalian neurons on microelectrode arrays (MEAs) as the sensing element. These neuronal cultures on MEAs are derived from primary neuronal tissues and are short-lived. In order to extend the shelf life of neuronal networks for use in a fieldable sensor technology, a renewable source of networks is needed. Neural stem and progenitor cells are capable of self-renewal and differentiation into functional neuronal networks. The purpose of this study was to develop a strategy for growing passaged neural stem and progenitor cells on MEAs under controlled conditions to produce differentiated neurons and glia comprising functional neuronal networks. Primary and passaged neuroepithelial stem and progenitor cells dissociated from embryonic day 13 rat cortex were seeded on MEAs and maintained with serum-free medium containing basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) combined with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). These culture conditions lead to abundant neurons, with astrocytes as supportive cells, forming synaptically linked networks of neurons. Spontaneous action potentials were best recorded from networks derived from primary or passaged progenitor cells 4-5 weeks after initial culture. The passaged progenitor cell-derived networks on MEAs responded to the GABA(A) antagonist bicuculline, the NMDA glutamate inhibitor APV, and the non-NMDA glutamate antagonist CNQX indicating active synapses were present. Passaged neural stem and progenitor cell-derived networks on MEAs have properties similar to networks derived from primary neuronal cultures and can serve as a renewable supply of sensor elements for detection of environmental threats.

  20. Crosslinking of extracellular matrix scaffolds derived from pluripotent stem cell aggregates modulates neural differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sart, Sébastien; Yan, Yuanwei; Li, Yan; Lochner, Eric; Zeng, Changchun; Ma, Teng; Li, Yan

    2016-01-01

    At various developmental stages, pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) and their progeny secrete a large amount of extracellular matrices (ECMs) which could interact with regulatory growth factors to modulate stem cell lineage commitment. ECMs derived from PSC can be used as unique scaffolds that provide broad signaling capacities to mediate cellular differentiation. However, the rapid degradation of ECMs can impact their applications as the scaffolds for in vitro cell expansion and in vivo transplantation. To address this issue, this study investigated the effects of crosslinking on the ECMs derived from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and the regulatory capacity of the crosslinked ECMs on the proliferation and differentiation of reseeded ESC-derived neural progenitor cells (NPCs). To create different biological cues, undifferentiated aggregates, spontaneous embryoid bodies, and ESC-derived NPC aggregates were decellularized. The derived ECMs were crosslinked using genipin or glutaraldehyde to enhance the scaffold stability. ESC-derived NPC aggregates were reseeded on different ECM scaffolds and differential cellular compositions of neural progenitors, neurons, and glial cells were observed. The results indicate that ESC-derived ECM scaffolds affect neural differentiation through intrinsic biological cues and biophysical properties. These scaffolds have potential for in vitro cell culture and in vivo tissue regeneration study. Dynamic interactions of acellular extracellular matrices and stem cells are critical for lineage-specific commitment and tissue regeneration. Understanding the synergistic effects of biochemical, biological, and biophysical properties of acellular matrices would facilitate scaffold design and the functional regulation of stem cells. The present study assessed the influence of crosslinked embryonic stem cell-derived extracellular matrix on neural differentiation and revealed the synergistic interactions of various matrix properties. While embryonic stem

  1. Neural induction from ES cells portrays default commitment but instructive maturation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nibedita Lenka

    Full Text Available The neural induction has remained a debatable issue pertaining to whether it is a mere default process or it involves precise instructive cues. We have chosen the embryonic stem (ES cell model to address this issue. In a devised monoculture strategy, the cell-cell interaction availed through optimum cell plating density could define the niche for the attainment of efficient in vitro neurogenesis from the ES cells. The medium plating density was found ideal in generating optimum number of progenitors and also yielded about 80% mature neurons in a serum free culture set up barring any exogenous inducers. We could also demarcate and quantify the neural stem cells/progenitors among the heterogeneous cell population of differentiating ES cells using nestin intron II driven EGFP expression as a tool. The one week post-plating was determined to be the critical time window for optimum neural progenitor generation from ES cells that helped us further in purifying these cells and in demonstrating their proliferation and multipotent differentiation potential. Seeding cells at varying densities, we could decipher an interesting paradoxical scenario that interlinked both commitment and maturation with the initial plating density having a vital influence on neuronal maturation but not specification and the secretory factors were apparently playing a key role during this process. Thus it was comprehended that, the neural specification was a default process independent of exogenous factors and cellular interaction. Conversely, a defined number of cells at the specification stage itself seemed critical to provide an auto-/paracrine means of signaling threshold for the maturation process to materialize.

  2. Isolation, characterization, and differentiation of multipotent neural progenitor cells from human cerebrospinal fluid in fetal cystic myelomeningocele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marotta, Mario; Fernández-Martín, Alejandra; Oria, Marc; Fontecha, Cesar G; Giné, Carles; Martínez-Ibáñez, Vicente; Carreras, Elena; Belfort, Michael A; Pelizzo, Gloria; Peiró, Jose L

    2017-07-01

    Despite benefits of prenatal in utero repair of myelomeningocele, a severe type of spina bifida aperta, many of these patients will still suffer mild to severe impairment. One potential source of stem cells for new regenerative medicine-based therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury repair is neural progenitor cells (NPCs) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). To this aim, we extracted CSF from the cyst surrounding the exposed neural placode during the surgical repair of myelomeningocele in 6 fetuses (20 to 26weeks of gestation). In primary cultured CSF-derived cells, neurogenic properties were confirmed by in vitro differentiation into various neural lineage cell types, and NPC markers expression (TBR2, CD15, SOX2) were detected by immunofluorescence and RT-PCR analysis. Differentiation into three neural lineages was corroborated by arbitrary differentiation (depletion of growths factors) or explicit differentiation as neuronal, astrocyte, or oligodendrocyte cell types using specific induction mediums. Differentiated cells showed the specific expression of neural differentiation markers (βIII-tubulin, GFAP, CNPase, oligo-O1). In myelomeningocele patients, CSF-derived cells could become a potential source of NPCs with neurogenic capacity. Our findings support the development of innovative stem-cell-based therapeutics by autologous transplantation of CSF-derived NPCs in damaged spinal cords, such as myelomeningocele, thus promoting neural tissue regeneration in fetuses. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Isolation, characterization, and differentiation of multipotent neural progenitor cells from human cerebrospinal fluid in fetal cystic myelomeningocele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Marotta

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite benefits of prenatal in utero repair of myelomeningocele, a severe type of spina bifida aperta, many of these patients will still suffer mild to severe impairment. One potential source of stem cells for new regenerative medicine-based therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury repair is neural progenitor cells (NPCs in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. To this aim, we extracted CSF from the cyst surrounding the exposed neural placode during the surgical repair of myelomeningocele in 6 fetuses (20 to 26 weeks of gestation. In primary cultured CSF-derived cells, neurogenic properties were confirmed by in vitro differentiation into various neural lineage cell types, and NPC markers expression (TBR2, CD15, SOX2 were detected by immunofluorescence and RT-PCR analysis. Differentiation into three neural lineages was corroborated by arbitrary differentiation (depletion of growths factors or explicit differentiation as neuronal, astrocyte, or oligodendrocyte cell types using specific induction mediums. Differentiated cells showed the specific expression of neural differentiation markers (βIII-tubulin, GFAP, CNPase, oligo-O1. In myelomeningocele patients, CSF-derived cells could become a potential source of NPCs with neurogenic capacity. Our findings support the development of innovative stem-cell-based therapeutics by autologous transplantation of CSF-derived NPCs in damaged spinal cords, such as myelomeningocele, thus promoting neural tissue regeneration in fetuses.

  4. Cell Stratification, Spheroid Formation and Bioscaffolds Used to Grow Cells in Three Dimensional Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Hrebíková

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The cell culture became an invaluable tool for studying cell behaviour, development, function, gene expression, toxicity of compounds and efficacy of novel drugs. Although most results were obtained from cell cultivation in two-dimensional (2D systems, in which cells are grown in a monolayer, three-dimensional (3D cultures are more promising as they correspond closely to the native arrangement of cells in living tissues. In our study, we focused on three types of 3D in vitro systems used for cultivation of one cell type. Cell morphology, their spatial distribution inside of resulting multicellular structures and changes in time were analysed with histological examination of samples harvested at different time periods. In multilayered cultures of WRL 68 hepatocytes grown on semipermeable membranes and non-passaged neurospheres generated by proliferation of neural progenitor cells, the cells were tightly apposed, showed features of cell differentiation but also cell death that was observable in short-term cultures. Biogenic scaffolds composed of extracellular matrix of the murine tibial anterior muscle were colonized with C2C12 myoblasts in vitro. The recellularized scaffolds did not reach high cell densities comparable with the former systems but supported well cell anchorage and migration without any signs of cell regression.

  5. Cell Culture as an Alternative in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardone, Roland M.

    1990-01-01

    Programs that are intended to inform and provide "hands-on" experience for students and to facilitate the introduction of cell culture-based laboratory exercises into the high school and college laboratory are examined. The components of the CellServ Program and the Cell Culture Toxicology Training Programs are described. (KR)

  6. Possible promotion of neuronal differentiation in fetal rat brain neural progenitor cells after sustained exposure to static magnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamichi, Noritaka; Ishioka, Yukichi; Hirai, Takao; Ozawa, Shusuke; Tachibana, Masaki; Nakamura, Nobuhiro; Takarada, Takeshi; Yoneda, Yukio

    2009-08-15

    We have previously shown significant potentiation of Ca(2+) influx mediated by N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, along with decreased microtubules-associated protein-2 (MAP2) expression, in hippocampal neurons cultured under static magnetism without cell death. In this study, we investigated the effects of static magnetism on the functionality of neural progenitor cells endowed to proliferate for self-replication and differentiate into neuronal, astroglial, and oligodendroglial lineages. Neural progenitor cells were isolated from embryonic rat neocortex and hippocampus, followed by culture under static magnetism at 100 mT and subsequent determination of the number of cells immunoreactive for a marker protein of particular progeny lineages. Static magnetism not only significantly decreased proliferation of neural progenitor cells without affecting cell viability, but also promoted differentiation into cells immunoreactive for MAP2 with a concomitant decrease in that for an astroglial marker, irrespective of the presence of differentiation inducers. In neural progenitors cultured under static magnetism, a significant increase was seen in mRNA expression of several activator-type proneural genes, such as Mash1, Math1, and Math3, together with decreased mRNA expression of the repressor type Hes5. These results suggest that sustained static magnetism could suppress proliferation for self-renewal and facilitate differentiation into neurons through promoted expression of activator-type proneural genes by progenitor cells in fetal rat brain.

  7. File list: ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 All antigens Neural Neural progenitor ...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  8. File list: ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 All antigens Neural Neural progenitor ...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  9. File list: ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 All antigens Neural Neural progenitor ...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  10. Filovirus contamination of cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, C J; Jahrling, P B; Ksiazek, T G; Johnson, E D; Lupton, H W

    1992-01-01

    The filoviruses Marburg and Ebola comprise a newly recognized family of viruses. The first filovirus to be isolated was Marburg virus in 1967. This virus was imported in shipments of African green monkeys from Uganda and infected several cell-culture technicians, with serious illness resulting. The rarity of Marburg and Ebola virus transmission, decreasing use of imported African monkeys, and quarantine efforts have presumably been responsible for the lack of additional episodes until 1989, when a new filovirus related to Ebola was isolated from quarantined monkeys in Reston, Virginia. This virus was imported on multiple occasions from a Philippine supplier of cynomolgus macaques as a consequence of an epidemic of acute infections in the foreign holding facility. While quarantine procedures prevented the use of any of these animals in research and the three human infections that occurred were asymptomatic, this episode emphasizes that these little understood viruses have considerable potential for mischief. The finding of antibodies reacting with Ebola viruses in many biomedically important Old World primates, including colonized monkeys in the U.S., emphasizes the need for more research to understand the specificity of the antibodies, spectrum of filovirus strains in nature, potential hosts, and true distribution of the family. The filoviruses grow well in primary and established cell strains and cell lines, and cytopathogenic effects may be absent or require several days to be manifest, leading to the possibility of occult contamination. The known viruses are readily detected by polyclonal and monoclonal antibody staining of cells and by electron microscopy; nucleic acid probes exist to develop more sensitive techniques if warranted.

  11. Isolating dividing neural and brain tumour cells for gene expression profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endaya, Berwini; Cavanagh, Brenton; Alowaidi, Faisal; Walker, Tom; de Pennington, Nicholas; Ng, Jin-Ming A; Lam, Paula Y P; Mackay-Sim, Alan; Neuzil, Jiri; Meedeniya, Adrian C B

    2016-01-15

    The characterisation of dividing brain cells is fundamental for studies ranging from developmental and stem cell biology, to brain cancers. Whilst there is extensive anatomical data on these dividing cells, limited gene transcription data is available due to technical constraints. We focally isolated dividing cells whilst conserving RNA, from culture, primary neural tissue and xenografted glioma tumours, using a thymidine analogue that enables gene transcription analysis. 5-ethynyl-2-deoxyuridine labels the replicating DNA of dividing cells. Once labelled, cultured cells and tissues were dissociated, fluorescently tagged with a revised click chemistry technique and the dividing cells isolated using fluorescence-assisted cell sorting. RNA was extracted and analysed using real time PCR. Proliferation and maturation related gene expression in neurogenic tissues was demonstrated in acutely and 3 day old labelled cells, respectively. An elevated expression of marker and pathway genes was demonstrated in the dividing cells of xenografted brain tumours, with the non-dividing cells showing relatively low levels of expression. BrdU "immune-labelling", the most frequently used protocol for detecting cell proliferation, causes complete denaturation of RNA, precluding gene transcription analysis. This EdU labelling technique, maintained cell integrity during dissociation, minimized copper exposure during labelling and used a cell isolation protocol that avoided cell lysis, thus conserving RNA. The technique conserves RNA, enabling the definition of cell proliferation-related changes in gene transcription of neural and pathological brain cells in cells harvested immediately after division, or following a period of maturation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Xenotransplantation of human neural progenitor cells to the subretinal space of nonimmunosuppressed pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warfvinge, Karin; Schwartz, Philip H; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility of transplanting human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) to the retina of nonimmunosuppressed pigs, cultured hNPCs were injected into the subretinal space of 5 adult pigs after laser burns were applied to promote donor cell integration. Postoperatively, the retinal...... vessels appeared normal without signs of exudation, bleeding, or subretinal elevation. Eyes were harvested at 10-28 days. H&E consistently showed mild retinal vasculitis, depigmentation of the RPE, and marked mononuclear cell infiltrate in the choroid adjacent to the site of transplantation. Human...

  13. Human-Derived Neurons and Neural Progenitor Cells in High Content Imaging Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrill, Joshua A

    2018-01-01

    Due to advances in the fields of stem cell biology and cellular engineering, a variety of commercially available human-derived neurons and neural progenitor cells (NPCs) are now available for use in research applications, including small molecule efficacy or toxicity screening. The use of human-derived neural cells is anticipated to address some of the uncertainties associated with the use of nonhuman culture models or transformed cell lines derived from human tissues. Many of the human-derived neurons and NPCs currently available from commercial sources recapitulate critical process of nervous system development including NPC proliferation, neurite outgrowth, synaptogenesis, and calcium signaling, each of which can be evaluated using high content image analysis (HCA). Human-derived neurons and NPCs are also amenable to culture in multiwell plate formats and thus may be adapted for use in HCA-based screening applications. This article reviews various types of HCA-based assays that have been used in conjunction with human-derived neurons and NPC cultures. This article also highlights instances where lower throughput analysis of neurodevelopmental processes has been performed and which demonstrate a potential for adaptation to higher-throughout imaging methods. Finally, a generic protocol for evaluating neurite outgrowth in human-derived neurons using a combination of immunocytochemistry and HCA is presented. The information provided in this article is intended to serve as a resource for cell model and assay selection for those interested in evaluating neurodevelopmental processes in human-derived cells.

  14. Differentiation of reprogrammed human adipose mesenchymal stem cells toward neural cells with defined transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Xinjian; Liu, Tianqing; Song, Kedong; Li, Xiangqin; Ge, Dan

    2013-10-04

    Somatic cell reprogramming may become a powerful approach to generate specific human cell types for cell-fate determination studies and potential transplantation therapies of neurological diseases. Here we report a reprogramming methodology with which human adipose stem cells (hADSCs) can be differentiated into neural cells. After being reprogrammed with polycistronic plasmid carrying defined factor OCT3/4, SOX2, KLF4 and c-MYC, and further treated with neural induce medium, the hADSCs switched to differentiate toward neural cell lineages. The generated cells had normal karyotypes and exogenous vector sequences were not inserted in the genomes. Therefore, this cell lineage conversion methodology bypasses the risk of mutation and gene instability, and provides a novel strategy to obtain patient-specific neural cells for basic research and therapeutic application. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of mood stabilizers on adult dentate gyrus-derived neural precursor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boku, Shuken; Nakagawa, Shin; Masuda, Takahiro; Nishikawa, Hiroyuki; Kato, Akiko; Toda, Hiroyuki; Song, Ning; Kitaichi, Yuji; Inoue, Takeshi; Koyama, Tsukasa

    2011-01-15

    Neurogenesis in the adult dentate gyrus (DG) is considered to be partly involved in the action of mood stabilizers. However, it remains unclear how mood stabilizers affect neural precursor cells in adult DG. We have established a culture system of adult rat DG-derived neural precursor cells (ADP) and have shown that lithium, a mood stabilizer, and dexamethasone, an agonist of glucocorticoid receptor, reciprocally regulate ADP proliferation. Neurogenesis constitutes not only proliferation of neural precursor cells but also apoptosis and differentiation. To develop further understanding of mood stabilizer effects on neural precursor cells in adult DG, we investigated and compared the effects of four common mood stabilizers-lithium, valproate, carbamazepine, and lamotrigine-on ADP proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation. ADP proliferation, decreased by dexamethasone, was examined using Alamar Blue assay. Using TUNEL assay, ADP apoptosis induced by staurosporine was examined. The differentiated ADP induced by retinoic acid was characterized by immunostaining with anti-GFAP or anti-Tuj1 antibody. Lithium and valproate, but not carbamazepine and lamotrigine, recovered ADP proliferation decreased by dexamethasone. All four mood stabilizers decreased ADP apoptosis. Retinoic acid differentiated ADP into both neurons and astrocytes. Lithium and carbamazepine increased the ratio of neurons and decreased that of astrocytes. However, valproate and lamotrigine increased the ratio of astrocytes and decreased that of neurons. Therefore, these four stabilizers exhibited both common and differential effects on ADP proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A cGMP-applicable expansion method for aggregates of human neural stem and progenitor cells derived from pluripotent stem cells or fetal brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelley, Brandon C; Gowing, Geneviève; Svendsen, Clive N

    2014-06-15

    A cell expansion technique to amass large numbers of cells from a single specimen for research experiments and clinical trials would greatly benefit the stem cell community. Many current expansion methods are laborious and costly, and those involving complete dissociation may cause several stem and progenitor cell types to undergo differentiation or early senescence. To overcome these problems, we have developed an automated mechanical passaging method referred to as "chopping" that is simple and inexpensive. This technique avoids chemical or enzymatic dissociation into single cells and instead allows for the large-scale expansion of suspended, spheroid cultures that maintain constant cell/cell contact. The chopping method has primarily been used for fetal brain-derived neural progenitor cells or neurospheres, and has recently been published for use with neural stem cells derived from embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells. The procedure involves seeding neurospheres onto a tissue culture Petri dish and subsequently passing a sharp, sterile blade through the cells effectively automating the tedious process of manually mechanically dissociating each sphere. Suspending cells in culture provides a favorable surface area-to-volume ratio; as over 500,000 cells can be grown within a single neurosphere of less than 0.5 mm in diameter. In one T175 flask, over 50 million cells can grow in suspension cultures compared to only 15 million in adherent cultures. Importantly, the chopping procedure has been used under current good manufacturing practice (cGMP), permitting mass quantity production of clinical-grade cell products.

  17. Genome-wide copy number profiling of mouse neural stem cells during differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Fischer

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available There is growing evidence that gene amplifications were present in neural stem and progenitor cells during differentiation. We used array-CGH to discover copy number changes including gene amplifications and deletions during differentiation of mouse neural stem cells using TGF-ß and FCS for differentiation induction. Array data were deposited in GEO (Gene Expression Omnibus, NCBI under accession number GSE35523. Here, we describe in detail the cell culture features and our TaqMan qPCR-experiments to validate the array-CGH analysis. Interpretation of array-CGH experiments regarding gene amplifications in mouse and further detailed analysis of amplified chromosome regions associated with these experiments were published by Fischer and colleagues in Oncotarget (Fischer et al., 2015. We provide additional information on deleted chromosome regions during differentiation and give an impressive overview on copy number changes during differentiation induction at a time line.

  18. Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells to Regional Specific Neural Precursors in Chemically Defined Medium Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erceg, Slaven; Laínez, Sergio; Ronaghi, Mohammad; Stojkovic, Petra; Pérez-Aragó, Maria Amparo; Moreno-Manzano, Victoria; Moreno-Palanques, Rubén; Planells-Cases, Rosa; Stojkovic, Miodrag

    2008-01-01

    Background Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) provide a unique model to study early events in human development. The hESC-derived cells can potentially be used to replace or restore different tissues including neuronal that have been damaged by disease or injury. Methodology and Principal Findings The cells of two different hESC lines were converted to neural rosettes using adherent and chemically defined conditions. The progenitor cells were exposed to retinoic acid (RA) or to human recombinant basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) in the late phase of the rosette formation. Exposing the progenitor cells to RA suppressed differentiation to rostral forebrain dopamine neural lineage and promoted that of spinal neural tissue including motor neurons. The functional characteristics of these differentiated neuronal precursors under both, rostral (bFGF) and caudalizing (RA) signals were confirmed by patch clamp analysis. Conclusions/Significance These findings suggest that our differentiation protocol has the capacity to generate region-specific and electrophysiologically active neurons under in vitro conditions without embryoid body formation, co-culture with stromal cells and without presence of cells of mesodermal or endodermal lineages. PMID:18461168

  19. Differentiation of human embryonic stem cells to regional specific neural precursors in chemically defined medium conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slaven Erceg

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human embryonic stem cells (hESC provide a unique model to study early events in human development. The hESC-derived cells can potentially be used to replace or restore different tissues including neuronal that have been damaged by disease or injury. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The cells of two different hESC lines were converted to neural rosettes using adherent and chemically defined conditions. The progenitor cells were exposed to retinoic acid (RA or to human recombinant basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF in the late phase of the rosette formation. Exposing the progenitor cells to RA suppressed differentiation to rostral forebrain dopamine neural lineage and promoted that of spinal neural tissue including motor neurons. The functional characteristics of these differentiated neuronal precursors under both, rostral (bFGF and caudalizing (RA signals were confirmed by patch clamp analysis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that our differentiation protocol has the capacity to generate region-specific and electrophysiologically active neurons under in vitro conditions without embryoid body formation, co-culture with stromal cells and without presence of cells of mesodermal or endodermal lineages.

  20. Effects of Chronic Low-Dose Radiation on Human Neural Progenitor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsura, Mari; Cyou-Nakamine, Hiromasa; Zen, Qin; Zen, Yang; Nansai, Hiroko; Amagasa, Shota; Kanki, Yasuharu; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Kaneki, Kiyomi; Taguchi, Akashi; Kobayashi, Mika; Kaji, Toshiyuki; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Miyagawa, Kiyoshi; Wada, Youichiro; Akimitsu, Nobuyoshi; Sone, Hideko

    2016-01-01

    The effects of chronic low-dose radiation on human health have not been well established. Recent studies have revealed that neural progenitor cells are present not only in the fetal brain but also in the adult brain. Since immature cells are generally more radiosensitive, here we investigated the effects of chronic low-dose radiation on cultured human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) derived from embryonic stem cells. Radiation at low doses of 31, 124 and 496 mGy per 72 h was administered to hNPCs. The effects were estimated by gene expression profiling with microarray analysis as well as morphological analysis. Gene expression was dose-dependently changed by radiation. By thirty-one mGy of radiation, inflammatory pathways involving interferon signaling and cell junctions were altered. DNA repair and cell adhesion molecules were affected by 124 mGy of radiation while DNA synthesis, apoptosis, metabolism, and neural differentiation were all affected by 496 mGy of radiation. These in vitro results suggest that 496 mGy radiation affects the development of neuronal progenitor cells while altered gene expression was observed at a radiation dose lower than 100 mGy. This study would contribute to the elucidation of the clinical and subclinical phenotypes of impaired neuronal development induced by chronic low-dose radiation.

  1. Culture of Cells from Amphibian Embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanisstreet, Martin

    1983-01-01

    Describes a method for in vitro culturing of cells from amphibian early embryos. Such cells can be used to demonstrate such properties of eukaryote cells as cell motility, adhesion, differentiation, and cell sorting into tissues. The technique may be extended to investigate other factors. (Author/JN)

  2. Syndecan 4 interacts genetically with Vangl2 to regulate neural tube closure and planar cell polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobedo, Noelia; Contreras, Osvaldo; Muñoz, Rosana; Farías, Marjorie; Carrasco, Héctor; Hill, Charlotte; Tran, Uyen; Pryor, Sophie E; Wessely, Oliver; Copp, Andrew J; Larraín, Juan

    2013-07-01

    Syndecan 4 (Sdc4) is a cell-surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) that regulates gastrulation, neural tube closure and directed neural crest migration in Xenopus development. To determine whether Sdc4 participates in Wnt/PCP signaling during mouse development, we evaluated a possible interaction between a null mutation of Sdc4 and the loop-tail allele of Vangl2. Sdc4 is expressed in multiple tissues, but particularly in the non-neural ectoderm, hindgut and otic vesicles. Sdc4;Vangl2(Lp) compound mutant mice have defective spinal neural tube closure, disrupted orientation of the stereocilia bundles in the cochlea and delayed wound healing, demonstrating a strong genetic interaction. In Xenopus, co-injection of suboptimal amounts of Sdc4 and Vangl2 morpholinos resulted in a significantly greater proportion of embryos with defective neural tube closure than each individual morpholino alone. To probe the mechanism of this interaction, we overexpressed or knocked down Vangl2 function in HEK293 cells. The Sdc4 and Vangl2 proteins colocalize, and Vangl2, particularly the Vangl2(Lp) mutant form, diminishes Sdc4 protein levels. Conversely, Vangl2 knockdown enhances Sdc4 protein levels. Overall HSPG steady-state levels were regulated by Vangl2, suggesting a molecular mechanism for the genetic interaction in which Vangl2(Lp/+) enhances the Sdc4-null phenotype. This could be mediated via heparan sulfate residues, as Vangl2(Lp/+) embryos fail to initiate neural tube closure and develop craniorachischisis (usually seen only in Vangl2(Lp/Lp)) when cultured in the presence of chlorate, a sulfation inhibitor. These results demonstrate that Sdc4 can participate in the Wnt/PCP pathway, unveiling its importance during neural tube closure in mammalian embryos.

  3. Spheroid Culture of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cesarz, Zoe; Tamama, Kenichi

    2016-01-01

      Compared with traditional 2D adherent cell culture, 3D spheroidal cell aggregates, or spheroids, are regarded as more physiological, and this technique has been exploited in the field of oncology...

  4. A protocol for isolation and enriched monolayer cultivation of neural precursor cells from mouse dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Harish; Claasen, Jan-Hendrik; Kannan, Suresh; Rünker, Annette E; Palmer, Theo; Kempermann, Gerd

    2011-01-01

    In vitro assays are valuable tools to study the characteristics of adult neural precursor cells under controlled conditions with a defined set of parameters. We here present a detailed protocol based on our previous original publication (Babu et al., 2007) to isolate neural precursor cells from the hippocampus of adult mice and maintain and propagate them as adherent monolayer cultures. The strategy is based on the use of Percoll density gradient centrifugation to enrich precursor cells from the micro-dissected dentate gyrus. Based on the expression of Nestin and Sox2, a culture-purity of more than 98% can be achieved. The cultures are expanded under serum-free conditions in Neurobasal A medium with addition of the mitogens Epidermal growth factor and Fibroblast growth factor 2 as well as the supplements Glutamax-1 and B27. Under differentiation conditions, the precursor cells reliably generate approximately 30% neurons with appropriate morphological, molecular, and electrophysiological characteristics that might reflect granule cell properties as their in vivo counterpart. We also highlight potential modifications to the protocol.

  5. Responsiveness of fetal rat brain cells to glia maturation factor during neoplastic transformation in cell culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugen, A; Laerum, O D; Bock, E

    1981-01-01

    The effect of partially purified extracts from adult pig brains containing a glia maturation protein factor (BE) has been investigated on neural cells during carcinogenesis. Pregnant BD IX-rats were given a single transplacental dose of the carcinogen ethylnitrosourea (EtNU) on the 18th day...... of gestation. The brains of the treated fetuses were transferred to cell culture and underwent neoplastic transformation with a characteristic sequence of phenotypic alterations which could be divided into five different stages. During the first 40 days after explantation (stage I & II) BE induced...... on GFA-content was seen any longer, although some few weakly GFA positive cells could be observed in all permanent cell lines. Fetal rat brain cells therefore seem to become less responsive to this differentiation inducer during neoplastic transformation in cell culture....

  6. A neural network approach for the prediction of in vitro culture parameters for maximum biomass yields in hairy root cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Om; Mehrotra, Shakti; Krishna, Aneesh; Mishra, Bhartendu N

    2010-08-21

    The present study deals with ANN based prediction of culture parameters in terms of inoculum density, pH and volume of growth medium per culture vessel and sucrose content of the growth medium for Glycyrrhiza hairy root cultures. This kind of study could be a model system in exploitation of hairy root cultures for commercial production of pharmaceutical compounds using large bioreactors. The study is aimed to evaluate the efficiency of regression neural network and back propagation neural network for the prediction of optimal culture conditions for maximum hairy root biomass yield. The training data for regression and back propagation networks were primed on the basis of function approximation, where final biomass fresh weight (f(wt)) was considered as a function of culture parameters. On this basis the variables in culture conditions were described in the form of equations which are for inoculum density: y=0.02x+0.04, for pH of growth medium: y=x+2.8, for sucrose content in medium: y=9.9464x+(-9.7143) and for culture medium per culture vessel: y=10x. The fresh weight values obtained from training data were considered as target values and further compared with predicted fresh weight values. The empirical data were used as testing data and further compared with values predicted from trained networks. Standard MATLAB inbuilt generalized regression network with radial basis function radbas as transfer function in layer one and purelin in layer two and back propagation having purelin as transfer function in output layer and logsig in hidden layer were used. Although in comparative assessment both the networks were found efficient for prediction of optimal culture conditions for high biomass production, more accuracy in results was seen with regression network. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Network bursts in cortical neuronal cultures: 'noise - versus pacemaker'- driven neural network simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gritsun, T.; Stegenga, J.; le Feber, Jakob; Rutten, Wim

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we address the issue of spontaneous bursting activity in cortical neuronal cultures and explain what might cause this collective behavior using computer simulations of two different neural network models. While the common approach to acivate a passive network is done by introducing

  8. Enteric Neural Cells From Hirschsprung Disease Patients Form Ganglia in Autologous Aneuronal ColonSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin N. Rollo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Hirschsprung disease (HSCR is caused by failure of cells derived from the neural crest (NC to colonize the distal bowel in early embryogenesis, resulting in absence of the enteric nervous system (ENS and failure of intestinal transit postnatally. Treatment is by distal bowel resection, but neural cell replacement may be an alternative. We tested whether aneuronal (aganglionic colon tissue from patients may be colonized by autologous ENS-derived cells. Methods: Cells were obtained and cryopreserved from 31 HSCR patients from the proximal resection margin of colon, and ENS cells were isolated using flow cytometry for the NC marker p75 (nine patients. Aneuronal colon tissue was obtained from the distal resection margin (23 patients. ENS cells were assessed for NC markers immunohistologically and by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, and mitosis was detected by ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine labeling. The ability of human HSCR postnatal ENS-derived cells to colonize the embryonic intestine was demonstrated by organ coculture with avian embryo gut, and the ability of human postnatal HSCR aneuronal colon muscle to support ENS formation was tested by organ coculture with embryonic mouse ENS cells. Finally, the ability of HSCR patient ENS cells to colonize autologous aneuronal colon muscle tissue was assessed. Results: ENS-derived p75-sorted cells from patients expressed multiple NC progenitor and differentiation markers and proliferated in culture under conditions simulating Wnt signaling. In organ culture, patient ENS cells migrated appropriately in aneural quail embryo gut, and mouse embryo ENS cells rapidly spread, differentiated, and extended axons in patient aneuronal colon muscle tissue. Postnatal ENS cells derived from HSCR patients colonized autologous aneuronal colon tissue in cocultures, proliferating and differentiating as neurons and glia. Conclusions: NC-lineage cells can be obtained from HSCR

  9. Embryonic Stem Cells: Isolation, Characterization and Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amit, Michal; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph

    Embryonic stem cells are pluripotent cells isolated from the mammalian blastocyst. Traditionally, these cells have been derived and cultured with mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) supportive layers, which allow their continuous growth in an undifferentiated state. However, for any future industrial or clinical application hESCs should be cultured in reproducible, defined, and xeno-free culture system, where exposure to animal pathogens is prevented. From their derivation in 1998 the methods for culturing hESCs were significantly improved. This chapter wills discuss hESC characterization and the basic methods for their derivation and maintenance.

  10. Functional Comparison of Neuronal Cells Differentiated from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neural Stem Cells under Different Oxygen and Medium Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Kazuto; Fukushima, Kazuyuki; Sugawara, Michiko; Tabata, Yoshikuni; Imaizumi, Yoichi; Ishihara, Yasuharu; Ito, Masashi; Tsukahara, Kappei; Kohyama, Jun; Okano, Hideyuki

    2016-12-01

    Because neurons are difficult to obtain from humans, generating functional neurons from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) is important for establishing physiological or disease-relevant screening systems for drug discovery. To examine the culture conditions leading to efficient differentiation of functional neural cells, we investigated the effects of oxygen stress (2% or 20% O2) and differentiation medium (DMEM/F12:Neurobasal-based [DN] or commercial [PhoenixSongs Biologicals; PS]) on the expression of genes related to neural differentiation, glutamate receptor function, and the formation of networks of neurons differentiated from hiPSCs (201B7) via long-term self-renewing neuroepithelial-like stem (lt-NES) cells. Expression of genes related to neural differentiation occurred more quickly in PS and/or 2% O2 than in DN and/or 20% O2, resulting in high responsiveness of neural cells to glutamate, N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA), α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA), and ( S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (an agonist for mGluR1/5), as revealed by calcium imaging assays. NMDA receptors, AMPA receptors, mGluR1, and mGluR5 were functionally validated by using the specific antagonists MK-801, NBQX, JNJ16259685, and 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)-pyridine, respectively. Multielectrode array analysis showed that spontaneous firing occurred earlier in cells cultured in 2% O2 than in 20% O2. Optimization of O2 tension and culture medium for neural differentiation of hiPSCs can efficiently generate physiologically relevant cells for screening systems.

  11. Derivation of Neural Progenitors and Retinal Pigment Epithelium from Common Marmoset and Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laughing Bear Torrez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs derived from mammalian species are valuable tools for modeling human disease, including retinal degenerative eye diseases that result in visual loss. Restoration of vision has focused on transplantation of neural progenitor cells (NPCs and retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE to the retina. Here we used transgenic common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus and human pluripotent stem cells carrying the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP reporter as a model system for retinal differentiation. Using suspension and subsequent adherent differentiation cultures, we observed spontaneous in vitro differentiation that included NPCs and cells with pigment granules characteristic of differentiated RPE. Retinal cells derived from human and common marmoset pluripotent stem cells provide potentially unlimited cell sources for testing safety and immune compatibility following autologous or allogeneic transplantation using nonhuman primates in early translational applications.

  12. Studying cell-cell communication in co-culture

    OpenAIRE

    Bogdanowicz, Danielle R.; Lu, Helen H.

    2013-01-01

    Heterotypic and homotypic cellular interactions are essential for biological function, and co-culture models are versatile tools for investigating these cellular interactions in vitro. Physiologically relevant co-culture models have been used to elucidate the effects of cell-cell physical contact and/or secreted factors, as well as the influence of substrate geometry and interaction scale on cell response. Identifying the relative contribution of each cell population to co-culture is often ex...

  13. Methods for Derivation of Multipotent Neural Crest Cells Derived from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, John; Dalton, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Multipotent, neural crest cells (NCCs) produce a wide range of cell types during embryonic development. This includes melanocytes, peripheral neurons, smooth muscle cells, osteocytes, chondrocytes, and adipocytes. The protocol described here allows for highly efficient differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells to a neural crest fate within 15 days. This is accomplished under feeder-free conditions, using chemically defined medium supplemented with two small molecule inhibitors that block glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) and bone morphogenic protein (BMP) signaling. This technology is well suited as a platform to understand in greater detail the pathogenesis of human disease associated with impaired neural crest development/migration.

  14. Neural stem cell proliferation and differentiation in the conductive PEDOT-HA/Cs/Gel scaffold for neural tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuping; Guan, Shui; Xu, Jianqiang; Li, Wenfang; Ge, Dan; Sun, Changkai; Liu, Tianqing; Ma, Xuehu

    2017-09-26

    Engineering scaffolds with excellent electro-activity is increasingly important in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Herein, conductive poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) doped with hyaluronic acid (PEDOT-HA) nanoparticles were firstly synthesized via chemical oxidant polymerization. A three-dimensional (3D) PEDOT-HA/Cs/Gel scaffold was then developed by introducing PEDOT-HA nanoparticles into a chitosan/gelatin (Cs/Gel) matrix. HA, as a bridge, not only was used as a dopant, but also combined PEDOT into the Cs/Gel via chemical crosslinking. The PEDOT-HA/Cs/Gel scaffold was used as a conductive substrate for neural stem cell (NSC) culture in vitro. The results demonstrated that the PEDOT-HA/Cs/Gel scaffold had excellent biocompatibility for NSC proliferation and differentiation. 3D confocal fluorescence images showed cells attached on the channel surface of Cs/Gel and PEDOT-HA/Cs/Gel scaffolds with a normal neuronal morphology. Compared to the Cs/Gel scaffold, the PEDOT-HA/Cs/Gel scaffold not only promoted NSC proliferation with up-regulated expression of Ki67, but also enhanced NSC differentiation into neurons and astrocytes with up-regulated expression of β tubulin-III and GFAP, respectively. It is expected that this electro-active and bio-active PEDOT-HA/Cs/Gel scaffold will be used as a conductive platform to regulate NSC behavior for neural tissue engineering.

  15. Effect of Monocular Deprivation on Rabbit Neural Retinal Cell Densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwachaka, Philip Maseghe; Saidi, Hassan; Odula, Paul Ochieng; Mandela, Pamela Idenya

    2015-01-01

    To describe the effect of monocular deprivation on densities of neural retinal cells in rabbits. Thirty rabbits, comprised of 18 subject and 12 control animals, were included and monocular deprivation was achieved through unilateral lid suturing in all subject animals. The rabbits were observed for three weeks. At the end of each week, 6 experimental and 3 control animals were euthanized, their retinas was harvested and processed for light microscopy. Photomicrographs of the retina were taken and imported into FIJI software for analysis. Neural retinal cell densities of deprived eyes were reduced along with increasing period of deprivation. The percentage of reductions were 60.9% (P < 0.001), 41.6% (P = 0.003), and 18.9% (P = 0.326) for ganglion, inner nuclear, and outer nuclear cells, respectively. In non-deprived eyes, cell densities in contrast were increased by 116% (P < 0.001), 52% (P < 0.001) and 59.6% (P < 0.001) in ganglion, inner nuclear, and outer nuclear cells, respectively. In this rabbit model, monocular deprivation resulted in activity-dependent changes in cell densities of the neural retina in favour of the non-deprived eye along with reduced cell densities in the deprived eye.

  16. Development and function of human cerebral cortex neural networks from pluripotent stem cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirwan, Peter; Turner-Bridger, Benita; Peter, Manuel; Momoh, Ayiba; Arambepola, Devika; Robinson, Hugh P C; Livesey, Frederick J

    2015-09-15

    A key aspect of nervous system development, including that of the cerebral cortex, is the formation of higher-order neural networks. Developing neural networks undergo several phases with distinct activity patterns in vivo, which are thought to prune and fine-tune network connectivity. We report here that human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC)-derived cerebral cortex neurons form large-scale networks that reflect those found in the developing cerebral cortex in vivo. Synchronised oscillatory networks develop in a highly stereotyped pattern over several weeks in culture. An initial phase of increasing frequency of oscillations is followed by a phase of decreasing frequency, before giving rise to non-synchronous, ordered activity patterns. hPSC-derived cortical neural networks are excitatory, driven by activation of AMPA- and NMDA-type glutamate receptors, and can undergo NMDA-receptor-mediated plasticity. Investigating single neuron connectivity within PSC-derived cultures, using rabies-based trans-synaptic tracing, we found two broad classes of neuronal connectivity: most neurons have small numbers (40). These data demonstrate that the formation of hPSC-derived cortical networks mimics in vivo cortical network development and function, demonstrating the utility of in vitro systems for mechanistic studies of human forebrain neural network biology. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. Neural cell image segmentation method based on support vector machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Shiwei; Ren, Kan

    2015-10-01

    In the analysis of neural cell images gained by optical microscope, accurate and rapid segmentation is the foundation of nerve cell detection system. In this paper, a modified image segmentation method based on Support Vector Machine (SVM) is proposed to reduce the adverse impact caused by low contrast ratio between objects and background, adherent and clustered cells' interference etc. Firstly, Morphological Filtering and OTSU Method are applied to preprocess images for extracting the neural cells roughly. Secondly, the Stellate Vector, Circularity and Histogram of Oriented Gradient (HOG) features are computed to train SVM model. Finally, the incremental learning SVM classifier is used to classify the preprocessed images, and the initial recognition areas identified by the SVM classifier are added to the library as the positive samples for training SVM model. Experiment results show that the proposed algorithm can achieve much better segmented results than the classic segmentation algorithms.

  18. Differentiation of human neural progenitor cell-derived spiral ganglion-like neurons: a time-lapse video study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edin, Fredrik; Liu, Wei; Boström, Marja; Magnusson, Peetra U; Rask-Andersen, Helge

    2014-05-01

    Human neural progenitor cells can differentiate into spiral ganglion-like cells when exposed to inner ear-associated growth factors. The phenotype bears resemblance to human sphere-derived neurons. To establish an in vitro model for the human auditory nerve to replace and complement in vivo animal experiments and ultimately human in vivo transplantation. Human neural progenitors were differentiated under conditions developed for in vitro survival of human primary spiral ganglion culture with media containing growth factors associated with inner ear development. Differentiation was documented using time-lapse video microscopy. Time-dependent marker expression was evaluated using immunocytochemistry with fluorescence and laser confocal microscopy. Within 14 days of differentiation, neural progenitors adopted neural phenotype and expressed spiral ganglion-associated markers.

  19. New culture medium concepts for cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S; Kim, B Y; Yeo, J E; Nemeno, J G; Jo, Y H; Yang, W; Nam, B M; Namoto, S; Tanaka, S; Sato, M; Lee, K M; Hwang, H S; Lee, J I

    2013-10-01

    Before cell or tissue transplantation, cells or tissues have to be maintained for a certain period in vitro using culture medium and methods. Most culture media contain substances such as pH indicators and buffers. It is not known whether some of these substances are safe for subsequent application in the transplantation of cells or tissues into the human body. We investigated culture media and methods with respect to the safety of the components in future transplantation applications. A modified culture medium--medical fluid-based culture medium (FCM)--was designed by using various fluids and injectable drugs that are already currently permitted for use in clinical medicine. Medium components necessary for optimal cell growth were obtained from approved drugs. FCM was manufactured with adjusted final concentrations of the medium components similar to those in commercial Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM). In particular, 1029.40 mg/L amino acids, approximately 88.85 mg/L vitamins, 13,525.77 mg/L inorganic salts, and 4500 mg/L D-glucose comprise the high-glucose FCM. Next, human fat synovium-derived mesenchymal stem cells and rat H9c2 (2-1) cells were cultured under 2 conditions: (1) DMEM-high glucose (HG), an original commercial medium, and (2) optimized FCM-HG. We assessed the morphologies and proliferation rates of these cells. We observed that FCM-HG was able to induce the growth of FS-MSC and commercially available H9c2 cell. The morphologies and proliferation patterns of these cells cultured under FCM-HG showed no differences compared with cells grown in DMEM-HG. Our data suggest that FCM, which we developed for the first time according to the concept of drug repositioning, was a useful culture medium, especially in cultured cells intended for human cell transplantation. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Adult human brain neural progenitor cells (NPCs) and fibroblast-like cells have similar properties in vitro but only NPCs differentiate into neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Thomas In-Hyeup; Monzo, Hector; Mee, Edward W; Bergin, Peter S; Teoh, Hoon H; Montgomery, Johanna M; Faull, Richard L M; Curtis, Maurice A; Dragunow, Mike

    2012-01-01

    The ability to culture neural progenitor cells from the adult human brain has provided an exciting opportunity to develop and test potential therapies on adult human brain cells. To achieve a reliable and reproducible adult human neural progenitor cell (AhNPC) culture system for this purpose, this study fully characterized the cellular composition of the AhNPC cultures, as well as the possible changes to this in vitro system over prolonged culture periods. We isolated cells from the neurogenic subventricular zone/hippocampus (SVZ/HP) of the adult human brain and found a heterogeneous culture population comprised of several types of post-mitotic brain cells (neurons, astrocytes, and microglia), and more importantly, two distinct mitotic cell populations; the AhNPCs, and the fibroblast-like cells (FbCs). These two populations can easily be mistaken for a single population of AhNPCs, as they both proliferate under AhNPC culture conditions, form spheres and express neural progenitor cell and early neuronal markers, all of which are characteristics of AhNPCs in vitro. However, despite these similarities under proliferating conditions, under neuronal differentiation conditions, only the AhNPCs differentiated into functional neurons and glia. Furthermore, AhNPCs showed limited proliferative capacity that resulted in their depletion from culture by 5-6 passages, while the FbCs, which appear to be from a neurovascular origin, displayed a greater proliferative capacity and dominated the long-term cultures. This gradual change in cellular composition resulted in a progressive decline in neurogenic potential without the apparent loss of self-renewal in our cultures. These results demonstrate that while AhNPCs and FbCs behave similarly under proliferative conditions, they are two different cell populations. This information is vital for the interpretation and reproducibility of AhNPC experiments and suggests an ideal time frame for conducting AhNPC-based experiments.

  1. Adult Human Brain Neural Progenitor Cells (NPCs) and Fibroblast-Like Cells Have Similar Properties In Vitro but Only NPCs Differentiate into Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Thomas In-Hyeup; Monzo, Hector; Mee, Edward W.; Bergin, Peter S.; Teoh, Hoon H.; Montgomery, Johanna M.; Faull, Richard L. M.; Curtis, Maurice A.; Dragunow, Mike

    2012-01-01

    The ability to culture neural progenitor cells from the adult human brain has provided an exciting opportunity to develop and test potential therapies on adult human brain cells. To achieve a reliable and reproducible adult human neural progenitor cell (AhNPC) culture system for this purpose, this study fully characterized the cellular composition of the AhNPC cultures, as well as the possible changes to this in vitro system over prolonged culture periods. We isolated cells from the neurogenic subventricular zone/hippocampus (SVZ/HP) of the adult human brain and found a heterogeneous culture population comprised of several types of post-mitotic brain cells (neurons, astrocytes, and microglia), and more importantly, two distinct mitotic cell populations; the AhNPCs, and the fibroblast-like cells (FbCs). These two populations can easily be mistaken for a single population of AhNPCs, as they both proliferate under AhNPC culture conditions, form spheres and express neural progenitor cell and early neuronal markers, all of which are characteristics of AhNPCs in vitro. However, despite these similarities under proliferating conditions, under neuronal differentiation conditions, only the AhNPCs differentiated into functional neurons and glia. Furthermore, AhNPCs showed limited proliferative capacity that resulted in their depletion from culture by 5–6 passages, while the FbCs, which appear to be from a neurovascular origin, displayed a greater proliferative capacity and dominated the long-term cultures. This gradual change in cellular composition resulted in a progressive decline in neurogenic potential without the apparent loss of self-renewal in our cultures. These results demonstrate that while AhNPCs and FbCs behave similarly under proliferative conditions, they are two different cell populations. This information is vital for the interpretation and reproducibility of AhNPC experiments and suggests an ideal time frame for conducting AhNPC-based experiments. PMID

  2. Adult human brain neural progenitor cells (NPCs and fibroblast-like cells have similar properties in vitro but only NPCs differentiate into neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas In-Hyeup Park

    Full Text Available The ability to culture neural progenitor cells from the adult human brain has provided an exciting opportunity to develop and test potential therapies on adult human brain cells. To achieve a reliable and reproducible adult human neural progenitor cell (AhNPC culture system for this purpose, this study fully characterized the cellular composition of the AhNPC cultures, as well as the possible changes to this in vitro system over prolonged culture periods. We isolated cells from the neurogenic subventricular zone/hippocampus (SVZ/HP of the adult human brain and found a heterogeneous culture population comprised of several types of post-mitotic brain cells (neurons, astrocytes, and microglia, and more importantly, two distinct mitotic cell populations; the AhNPCs, and the fibroblast-like cells (FbCs. These two populations can easily be mistaken for a single population of AhNPCs, as they both proliferate under AhNPC culture conditions, form spheres and express neural progenitor cell and early neuronal markers, all of which are characteristics of AhNPCs in vitro. However, despite these similarities under proliferating conditions, under neuronal differentiation conditions, only the AhNPCs differentiated into functional neurons and glia. Furthermore, AhNPCs showed limited proliferative capacity that resulted in their depletion from culture by 5-6 passages, while the FbCs, which appear to be from a neurovascular origin, displayed a greater proliferative capacity and dominated the long-term cultures. This gradual change in cellular composition resulted in a progressive decline in neurogenic potential without the apparent loss of self-renewal in our cultures. These results demonstrate that while AhNPCs and FbCs behave similarly under proliferative conditions, they are two different cell populations. This information is vital for the interpretation and reproducibility of AhNPC experiments and suggests an ideal time frame for conducting Ah

  3. Insights in spatio-temporal characterization of human fetal neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Ibáñez, Raquel; Guardia, Inés; Pardo, Mónica; Herranz, Cristina; Zietlow, Rike; Vinh, Ngoc-Nga; Rosser, Anne; Canals, Josep M

    2017-05-01

    Primary human fetal cells have been used in clinical trials of cell replacement therapy for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease (HD). However, human fetal primary cells are scarce and difficult to work with and so a renewable source of cells is sought. Human fetal neural stem cells (hfNSCs) can be generated from human fetal tissue, but little is known about the differences between hfNSCs obtained from different developmental stages and brain areas. In the present work we characterized hfNSCs, grown as neurospheres, obtained from three developmental stages: 4-5, 6-7 and 8-9weeks post conception (wpc) and four brain areas: forebrain, cortex, whole ganglionic eminence (WGE) and cerebellum. We observed that, as fetal brain development proceeds, the number of neural precursors is diminished and post-mitotic cells are increased. In turn, primary cells obtained from older embryos are more sensitive to the dissociation process, their viability is diminished and they present lower proliferation ratios compared to younger embryos. However, independently of the developmental stage of derivation proliferation ratios were very low in all cases. Improvements in the expansion rates were achieved by mechanical, instead of enzymatic, dissociation of neurospheres but not by changes in the seeding densities. Regardless of the developmental stage, neurosphere cultures presented large variability in the viability and proliferation rates during the initial 3-4 passages, but stabilized achieving significant expansion rates at passage 5 to 6. This was true also for all brain regions except cerebellar derived cultures that did not expand. Interestingly, the brain region of hfNSC derivation influences the expansion potential, being forebrain, cortex and WGE derived cells the most expandable compared to cerebellar. Short term expansion partially compromised the regional identity of cortical but not WGE cultures. Nevertheless, both expanded cultures were

  4. Integrin-associated protein promotes neuronal differentiation of neural stem/progenitor cells.

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    Kazuhiko Fujimura

    Full Text Available Neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs proliferate and differentiate depending on their intrinsic properties and local environment. During the development of the mammalian nervous system, NSPCs generate neurons and glia sequentially. However, little is known about the mechanism that determines the timing of switch from neurogenesis to gliogenesis. In this study, we established a culture system in which the neurogenic potential of NSPCs is decreased in a time-dependent manner, so that short-term-cultured NSPCs differentiate into more neurons compared with long-term-cultured NSPCs. We found that short-term-cultured NSPCs express high levels of integrin-associated protein form 2 (IAP2; so-called CD47 mRNA using differential display analysis. Moreover, IAP2 overexpression in NSPCs induced neuronal differentiation of NSPCs. These findings reveal a novel mechanism by which IAP2 induces neuronal differentiation of NSPCs.

  5. LNGFR(+)THY-1(+) human pluripotent stem cell-derived neural crest-like cells have the potential to develop into mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouchi, Takehito; Morikawa, Satoru; Shibata, Shinsuke; Fukuda, Kimiko; Okuno, Hironobu; Fujimura, Takumi; Kuroda, Tatsuo; Ohyama, Manabu; Akamatsu, Wado; Nakagawa, Taneaki; Okano, Hideyuki

    2016-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are defined as non-hematopoietic, plastic-adherent, self-renewing cells that are capable of tri-lineage differentiation into bone, cartilage or fat in vitro. Thus, MSCs are promising candidates for cell-based medicine. However, classifications of MSCs have been defined retrospectively; moreover, this conventional criterion may be inaccurate due to contamination with other hematopoietic lineage cells. Human MSCs can be enriched by selection for LNGFR and THY-1, and this population may be analogous to murine PDGFRα(+)Sca-1(+) cells, which are developmentally derived from neural crest cells (NCCs). Murine NCCs were labeled by fluorescence, which provided definitive proof of neural crest lineage, however, technical considerations prevent the use of a similar approach to determine the origin of human LNGFR(+)THY-1(+) MSCs. To further clarify the origin of human MSCs, human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were used in this study. Under culture conditions required for the induction of neural crest cells, human ESCs and iPSCs-derived cells highly expressed LNGFR and THY-1. These LNGFR(+)THY-1(+) neural crest-like cells, designated as LT-NCLCs, showed a strong potential to differentiate into both mesenchymal and neural crest lineages. LT-NCLCs proliferated to form colonies and actively migrated in response to serum concentration. Furthermore, we transplanted LT-NCLCs into chick embryos, and traced their potential for survival, migration and differentiation in the host environment. These results suggest that LNGFR(+)THY-1(+) cells identified following NCLC induction from ESCs/iPSCs shared similar potentials with multipotent MSCs. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Differentiation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Impact of Lipid Nutrition on Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyuki Sakayori

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The neural system originates from neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs. Embryonic NSPCs first proliferate to increase their numbers and then produce neurons and glial cells that compose the complex neural circuits in the brain. New neurons are continually produced even after birth from adult NSPCs in the inner wall of the lateral ventricle and in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. These adult-born neurons are involved in various brain functions, including olfaction-related functions, learning and memory, pattern separation, and mood control. NSPCs are regulated by various intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Diet is one of such important extrinsic factors. Of dietary nutrients, lipids are important because they constitute the cell membrane, are a source of energy, and function as signaling molecules. Metabolites of some lipids can be strong lipid mediators that also regulate various biological activities. Recent findings have revealed that lipids are important regulators of both embryonic and adult NSPCs. We and other groups have shown that lipid signals including fat, fatty acids, their metabolites and intracellular carriers, cholesterol, and vitamins affect proliferation and differentiation of embryonic and adult NSPCs. A better understanding of the NSPCs regulation by lipids may provide important insight into the neural development and brain function.

  7. Aebp2 as an epigenetic regulator for neural crest cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Kim

    Full Text Available Aebp2 is a potential targeting protein for the mammalian Polycomb Repression Complex 2 (PRC2. We generated a mutant mouse line disrupting the transcription of Aebp2 to investigate its in vivo roles. Aebp2-mutant homozygotes were embryonic lethal while heterozygotes survived to adulthood with fertility. In developing mouse embryos, Aebp2 is expressed mainly within cells of neural crest origin. In addition, many heterozygotes display a set of phenotypes, enlarged colon and hypopigmentation, similar to those observed in human patients with Hirschsprung's disease and Waardenburg syndrome. These phenotypes are usually caused by the absence of the neural crest-derived ganglia in hindguts and melanocytes. ChIP analyses demonstrated that the majority of the genes involved in the migration and development process of neural crest cells are downstream target genes of AEBP2 and PRC2. Furthermore, expression analyses confirmed that some of these genes are indeed affected in the Aebp2 heterozygotes. Taken together, these results suggest that Aebp2 may regulate the migration and development of the neural crest cells through the PRC2-mediated epigenetic mechanism.

  8. Capacity of Human Dental Follicle Cells to Differentiate into Neural Cells In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shingo Kanao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The dental follicle is an ectomesenchymal tissue surrounding the developing tooth germ. Human dental follicle cells (hDFCs have the capacity to commit to differentiation into multiple cell types. Here we investigated the capacity of hDFCs to differentiate into neural cells and the efficiency of a two-step strategy involving floating neurosphere-like bodies for neural differentiation. Undifferentiated hDFCs showed a spindle-like morphology and were positive for neural markers such as nestin, β-III-tubulin, and S100β. The cellular morphology of several cells was neuronal-like including branched dendrite-like processes and neurites. Next, hDFCs were used for neurosphere formation in serum-free medium containing basic fibroblast growth factor, epidermal growth factor, and B27 supplement. The number of cells with neuronal-like morphology and that were strongly positive for neural markers increased with sphere formation. Gene expression of neural markers also increased in hDFCs with sphere formation. Next, gene expression of neural markers was examined in hDFCs during neuronal differentiation after sphere formation. Expression of Musashi-1 and Musashi-2, MAP2, GFAP, MBP, and SOX10 was upregulated in hDFCs undergoing neuronal differentiation via neurospheres, whereas expression of nestin and β-III-tubulin was downregulated. In conclusion, hDFCs may be another optimal source of neural/glial cells for cell-based therapies to treat neurological diseases.

  9. 3D Cell Culture in Alginate Hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Therese; Auk-Emblem, Pia; Dornish, Michael

    2015-03-24

    This review compiles information regarding the use of alginate, and in particular alginate hydrogels, in culturing cells in 3D. Knowledge of alginate chemical structure and functionality are shown to be important parameters in design of alginate-based matrices for cell culture. Gel elasticity as well as hydrogel stability can be impacted by the type of alginate used, its concentration, the choice of gelation technique (ionic or covalent), and divalent cation chosen as the gel inducing ion. The use of peptide-coupled alginate can control cell-matrix interactions. Gelation of alginate with concomitant immobilization of cells can take various forms. Droplets or beads have been utilized since the 1980s for immobilizing cells. Newer matrices such as macroporous scaffolds are now entering the 3D cell culture product market. Finally, delayed gelling, injectable, alginate systems show utility in the translation of in vitro cell culture to in vivo tissue engineering applications. Alginate has a history and a future in 3D cell culture. Historically, cells were encapsulated in alginate droplets cross-linked with calcium for the development of artificial organs. Now, several commercial products based on alginate are being used as 3D cell culture systems that also demonstrate the possibility of replacing or regenerating tissue.

  10. Repair of spinal cord injury with neuronal relays: From fetal grafts to neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, Joseph F; Steward, Oswald

    2015-09-04

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) disrupts the long axonal tracts of the spinal cord leading to devastating loss of function. Cell transplantation in the injured spinal cord has the potential to lead to recovery after SCI via a variety of mechanisms. One such strategy is the formation of neuronal relays between injured long tract axons and denervated neurons. The idea of creating a neuronal relay was first proposed over 25 years ago when fetal tissue was first successfully transplanted into the injured rodent spinal cord. Advances in labeling of grafted cells and the development of neural stem cell culturing techniques have improved the ability to create and refine such relays. Several recent studies have examined the ability to create a novel neuronal circuit between injured axons and denervated targets. This approach is an alternative to long-distance regeneration of damaged axons that may provide a meaningful degree of recovery without direct recreation of lost pathways. This brief review will examine the contribution of fetal grafting to current advances in neuronal grafting. Of particular interest will be the ability of transplanted neurons derived from fetal grafts, neural precursor cells and neural stem cells to reconnect long distance motor and sensory pathways of the injured spinal cord. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Spinal cord injury. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Circumventricular organs: a novel site of neural stem cells in the adult brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Lori; Yang, Ming; Enikolopov, Grigori; Iacovitti, Lorraine

    2009-07-01

    Neurogenesis in the adult mammalian nervous system is now well established in the subventricular zone of the anterolateral ventricle and subgranular zone of the hippocampus. In these regions, neurons are thought to arise from neural stem cells, identified by their expression of specific intermediate filament proteins (nestin, vimentin, GFAP) and transcription factors (Sox2). In the present study, we show that in adult rat and mouse, the circumventricular organs (CVOs) are rich in nestin+, GFAP+, vimentin+ cells which express Sox2 and the cell cycle-regulating protein Ki67. In culture, these cells proliferate as neurospheres and express neuronal (doublecortin+, beta-tubulin III+) and glial (S100beta+, GFAP+, RIP+) phenotypic traits. Further, our in vivo studies using bromodeoxyuridine show that CVO cells proliferate and undergo constitutive neurogenesis and gliogenesis. These findings suggest that CVOs may constitute a heretofore unknown source of stem/progenitor cells, capable of giving rise to new neurons and/or glia in the adult brain.

  12. Endoscopic delivery of enteric neural stem cells to treat Hirschsprung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, L S; Hotta, R; Graham, H K; Nagy, N; Goldstein, A M; Belkind-Gerson, J

    2015-10-01

    Transplantation of enteric neural stem cells (ENSC) holds promise as a potential therapy for enteric neuropathies, including Hirschsprung disease. Delivery of transplantable cells via laparotomy has been described, but we propose a novel, minimally invasive endoscopic method of cell delivery. Enteric neural stem cells for transplantation were cultured from dissociated gut of postnatal donor mice. Twelve recipient mice, including Ednrb(-/-) mice with distal colonic aganglionosis, underwent colonoscopic injection of ENSC under direct vision using a 30-gauge Hamilton needle passed through a rigid cystoureteroscope. Cell engraftment, survival, and neuroglial differentiation were studied 1-4 weeks after the procedure. All recipient mice tolerated the procedure without complications and survived to sacrifice. Transplanted cells were found within the colonic wall in 9 of 12 recipient mice with differentiation into enteric neurons and glia. Endoscopic injection of ENSC is a safe and reliable method for cell delivery, and can be used to deliver a large number of cells to a specific area of disease. This minimally invasive endoscopic approach may prove beneficial to future human applications of cell therapy for neurointestinal disease. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Use of a murine embryonic stem cell line that is sensitive to high glucose environment to model neural tube development in diabetic pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Kaitlyn; Jung, Jin Hyuk; Loeken, Mary R

    2014-08-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are significantly increased by maternal diabetes. Embryonic stem cells (ESC) that can differentiate into neuroepithelium and can sense supraphysiological glucose concentrations would be very valuable to simulate the effects of maternal diabetes on molecular and cellular processes during neural tube formation. LG-ESC, a recently established ESC line that expresses the glucose transporter, Scl2a2, and is sensitive to elevated glucose concentrations, were grown for up to 8 days in a three-dimensional culture to form neural cysts. We tested whether high glucose media inhibits expression of Pax3, a gene that is required for neural tube closure and whose expression is inhibited in embryos of diabetic mice, and inhibits formation of neural cysts. Pax3 expression was detected after 4 days of culture and increased with time. Pax3 expression was inhibited by high glucose media, but not if cells had been cultured in low glucose media for the first 4 days of culture. Pax7, which is also expressed in dorsal neural tube, was not detected. Pax6, which is expressed in the ventral neural tube, was detected only after 8 days of culture, but was not inhibited by high glucose. High glucose media did not inhibit formation of neural cysts. LG-ESC can be used as a model of embryonic exposure to a diabetic environment during neural tube development. While high glucose exposure inhibits expression of a gene required for neural tube closure, it may not inhibit all of the processes involved in formation of a neural tube-like structure. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Co-culture with Sertoli cells promotes proliferation and migration of umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Fenxi, E-mail: fxzhang0824@gmail.com [Department of Anatomy, Sanquan College, Xinxiang Medical University, Henan 453003, People' s Republic of China (China); Hong, Yan; Liang, Wenmei [Department of Histology and Embryology, Guiyang Medical University, Guizhou 550004, People' s Republic of China (China); Ren, Tongming [Department of Anatomy, Sanquan College, Xinxiang Medical University, Henan 453003, People' s Republic of China (China); Jing, Suhua [ICU Center, The Third Hospital of Xinxiang Medical University, Henan 453003, People' s Republic of China (China); Lin, Juntang [Stem Cell Center, Xinxiang Medical University, Henan 453003, People' s Republic of China (China)

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-culture of Sertoli cells (SCs) with human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UCMSCs). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presence of SCs dramatically increased proliferation and migration of UCMSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presence of SCs stimulated expression of Mdm2, Akt, CDC2, Cyclin D, CXCR4, MAPKs. -- Abstract: Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) have been recently used in transplant therapy. The proliferation and migration of MSCs are the determinants of the efficiency of MSC transplant therapy. Sertoli cells are a kind of 'nurse' cells that support the development of sperm cells. Recent studies show that Sertoli cells promote proliferation of endothelial cells and neural stem cells in co-culture. We hypothesized that co-culture of UCMSCs with Sertoli cells may also promote proliferation and migration of UCMSCs. To examine this hypothesis, we isolated UCMSCs from human cords and Sertoli cells from mouse testes, and co-cultured them using a Transwell system. We found that UCMSCs exhibited strong proliferation ability and potential to differentiate to other cell lineages such as osteocytes and adipocytes. The presence of Sertoli cells in co-culture significantly enhanced the proliferation and migration potential of UCMSCs (P < 0.01). Moreover, these phenotypic changes were accompanied with upregulation of multiple genes involved in cell proliferation and migration including phospho-Akt, Mdm2, phospho-CDC2, Cyclin D1, Cyclin D3 as well as CXCR4, phospho-p44 MAPK and phospho-p38 MAPK. These findings indicate that Sertoli cells boost UCMSC proliferation and migration potential.

  15. Proteome and Secretome Characterization of Glioblastoma-Derived Neural Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okawa, Satoshi; Gagrica, Sladjana; Blin, Carla; Ender, Christine; Pollard, Steven M; Krijgsveld, Jeroen

    2017-04-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) (grade IV astrocytoma) is the most common and aggressive primary brain tumor. GBM consists of heterogeneous cell types including a subset of stem cell-like cells thought to sustain tumor growth. These tumor-initiating glioblastoma multiforme-derived neural stem (GNS) cells as well as their genetically normal neural stem (NS) counterparts can be propagated in culture as relatively pure populations. Here, we perform quantitative proteomics to globally characterize and compare total proteome plus the secreted proteome (secretome) between GNS cells and NS cells. Proteins and pathways that distinguish malignant cancer (GNS) stem cells from their genetically normal counterparts (NS cells) might have value as new biomarkers or therapeutic targets. Our analysis identified and quantified ∼7,500 proteins in the proteome and ∼2,000 in the secretome, 447 and 138 of which were differentially expressed, respectively. Notable tumor-associated processes identified using gene set enrichment analysis included: extracellular matrix interactions, focal adhesion, cell motility, and cell signaling. We focused on differentially expressed surface proteins, and identified 26 that participate in ligand-receptor pairs that play a prominent role in tumorigenesis. Immunocytochemistry and immunoblotting confirmed that CD9, a recently identified marker of adult subventricular zone NS cells, was consistently enriched across a larger set of primary GNS cell lines. CD9 may, therefore, have value as a GNS-specific surface marker and a candidate therapeutic target. Altogether, these findings support the notion that increased cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesion molecules play a crucial role in promoting the tumor initiating and infiltrative properties of GNS cells. Stem Cells 2017;35:967-980. © 2016 AlphaMed Press.

  16. Conversion of adult human peripheral blood mononuclear cells into induced neural stem cell by using episomal vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xihe Tang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Human neural stem cells (NSCs hold great promise for research and therapy in neural diseases. Many studies have shown direct induction of NSCs from human fibroblasts, which require an invasive skin biopsy and a prolonged period of expansion in cell culture prior to use. Peripheral blood (PB is routinely used in medical diagnoses, and represents a noninvasive and easily accessible source of cells. Here we show direct derivation of NSCs from adult human PB mononuclear cells (PB-MNCs by employing episomal vectors for transgene delivery. These induced NSCs (iNSCs can expand more than 60 passages, can exhibit NSC morphology, gene expression, differentiation potential, and self-renewing capability and can give rise to multiple functional neural subtypes and glial cells in vitro. Furthermore, the iNSCs carry a specific regional identity and have electrophysiological activity upon differentiation. Our findings provide an easily accessible approach for generating human iNSCs which will facilitate disease modeling, drug screening, and possibly regenerative medicine.

  17. Llgl1 Connects Cell Polarity with Cell-Cell Adhesion in Embryonic Neural Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jossin, Yves; Lee, Minhui; Klezovitch, Olga; Kon, Elif; Cossard, Alexia; Lien, Wen-Hui; Fernandez, Tania E; Cooper, Jonathan A; Vasioukhin, Valera

    2017-06-05

    Malformations of the cerebral cortex (MCCs) are devastating developmental disorders. We report here that mice with embryonic neural stem-cell-specific deletion of Llgl1 (Nestin-Cre/Llgl1fl/fl), a mammalian ortholog of the Drosophila cell polarity gene lgl, exhibit MCCs resembling severe periventricular heterotopia (PH). Immunohistochemical analyses and live cortical imaging of PH formation revealed that disruption of apical junctional complexes (AJCs) was responsible for PH in Nestin-Cre/Llgl1fl/fl brains. While it is well known that cell polarity proteins govern the formation of AJCs, the exact mechanisms remain unclear. We show that LLGL1 directly binds to and promotes internalization of N-cadherin, and N-cadherin/LLGL1 interaction is inhibited by atypical protein kinase C-mediated phosphorylation of LLGL1, restricting the accumulation of AJCs to the basolateral-apical boundary. Disruption of the N-cadherin-LLGL1 interaction during cortical development in vivo is sufficient for PH. These findings reveal a mechanism responsible for the physical and functional connection between cell polarity and cell-cell adhesion machineries in mammalian cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Blood-neural barrier: its diversity and coordinated cell-to-cell communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon Kyung; Kim, Kyu-Won

    2008-05-31

    The cerebral microvessels possess barrier characteristics which are tightly sealed excluding many toxic substances and protecting neural tissues. The specialized blood-neural barriers as well as the cerebral microvascular barrier are recognized in the retina, inner ear, spinal cord, and cerebrospinal fluid. Microvascular endothelial cells in the brain closely interact with other components such as astrocytes, pericytes, perivascular microglia and neurons to form functional 'neurovascular unit'. Communication between endothelial cells and other surrounding cells enhances the barrier functions, consequently resulting in maintenance and elaboration of proper brain homeostasis. Furthermore, the disruption of the neurovascular unit is closely involved in cerebrovascular disorders. In this review, we focus on the location and function of these various blood-neural barriers, and the importance of the cell-to-cell communication for development and maintenance of the barrier integrity at the neurovascular unit. We also demonstrate the close relation between the alteration of the blood-neural barriers and cerebrovascular disorders.

  19. Viral-mediated gene transfer to mouse primary neural progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Stephanie M; Moussavi-Harami, Farid; Sauter, Sybille L; Davidson, Beverly L

    2002-01-01

    Neural progenitor cells may provide for cell replacement or gene delivery vehicles in neurodegen-erative disease therapies. The expression of therapeutic proteins by neural progenitors would be enhanced by viral-mediated gene transfer, but the effects of several common recombinant viruses on primary progenitor cell populations have not been tested. To address this issue, we cultured cells from embryonic day 16-18 mouse brain in serum-free medium containing epidermal growth factor or basic fibroblast growth factor, and investigated how transduction with recombinant viral vectors affected maintenance and differentiation properties of progenitor cells. Neurosphere cultures were incubated with feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), adeno-associated virus (AAV) or ade-noviral (Ad) constructs expressing either beta-galactosidase or enhanced green fluorescent protein at low multiplicity of infection. Nestin-positive neurospheres were regenerated after incubation of single progenitor cells with FIV, indicating that FIV-mediated gene transfer did not inhibit progenitor cell self-renewal. In contrast, adenovirus induced differentiation into glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive astrocytes. The AAV serotypes tested did not effectively transduce progenitor cells. FIV-transduced progenitors retained the potential for differentiation into neurons and glia in vitro, and when transplanted into the striatum of normal adult C57BL/6 mice differentiated into glia, or remained undifferentiated. In the presence of tumor cells, FIV-transduced progenitors migrated significantly from the injection site. Our results suggest that FIV-based vectors can transduce progenitor cell populations in vitro, with maintenance of their ability to differentiate into multiple cell types or to respond to injury within the central nervous system. These results hold promise for the use of genetically manipulated stem cells for CNS therapies.

  20. Hypoxia Epigenetically Confers Astrocytic Differentiation Potential on Human Pluripotent Cell-Derived Neural Precursor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuro Yasui

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Human neural precursor cells (hNPCs derived from pluripotent stem cells display a high propensity for neuronal differentiation, but they require long-term culturing to differentiate efficiently into astrocytes. The mechanisms underlying this biased fate specification of hNPCs remain elusive. Here, we show that hypoxia confers astrocytic differentiation potential on hNPCs through epigenetic gene regulation, and that this was achieved by cooperation between hypoxia-inducible factor 1α and Notch signaling, accompanied by a reduction of DNA methylation level in the promoter region of a typical astrocyte-specific gene, Glial fibrillary acidic protein. Furthermore, we found that this hypoxic culture condition could be applied to rapid generation of astrocytes from Rett syndrome patient-derived hNPCs, and that these astrocytes impaired neuronal development. Thus, our findings shed further light on the molecular mechanisms regulating hNPC differentiation and provide attractive tools for the development of therapeutic strategies for treating astrocyte-mediated neurological disorders.

  1. Culture in the mind's mirror: how anthropology and neuroscience can inform a model of the neural substrate for cultural imitative learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losin, Elizabeth A Reynolds; Dapretto, Mirella; Iacoboni, Marco

    2009-01-01

    Cultural neuroscience, the study of how cultural experience shapes the brain, is an emerging subdiscipline in the neurosciences. Yet, a foundational question to the study of culture and the brain remains neglected by neuroscientific inquiry: "How does cultural information get into the brain in the first place?" Fortunately, the tools needed to explore the neural architecture of cultural learning - anthropological theories and cognitive neuroscience methodologies - already exist; they are merely separated by disciplinary boundaries. Here we review anthropological theories of cultural learning derived from fieldwork and modeling; since cultural learning theory suggests that sophisticated imitation abilities are at the core of human cultural learning, we focus our review on cultural imitative learning. Accordingly we proceed to discuss the neural underpinnings of imitation and other mechanisms important for cultural learning: learning biases, mental state attribution, and reinforcement learning. Using cultural neuroscience theory and cognitive neuroscience research as our guides, we then propose a preliminary model of the neural architecture of cultural learning. Finally, we discuss future studies needed to test this model and fully explore and explain the neural underpinnings of cultural imitative learning.

  2. Adenosine signaling promotes neuronal, catecholaminergic differentiation of primary neural crest cells and CNS-derived CAD cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilodeau, Matthew L; Ji, Ming; Paris, Maryline; Andrisani, Ourania M

    2005-07-01

    In neural crest (NC) cultures cAMP signaling is an instructive signal in catecholaminergic, sympathoadrenal cell development. However, the extracellular signals activating the cAMP pathway during NC cell development have not been identified. We demonstrate that in avian NC cultures, evidenced by tyrosine hydroxylase expression and catecholamine biosynthesis, adenosine and not adrenergic signaling, together with BMP2, promotes sympathoadrenal cell development. In NC cultures, addition of the adenosine receptor agonist NECA in the presence of BMP2 promotes sympathoadrenal cell development, whereas the antagonist CGS 15943 or the adenosine degrading enzyme adenosine deaminase (ADA) suppresses TH expression. Importantly, NC cells express A2A and A2B receptors which couple with Gsalpha increasing intracellular cAMP. Employing the CNS-derived catecholaminergic CAD cell line, we also demonstrate that neuronal differentiation mediated by serum withdrawal is further enhanced by treatment with IBMX, a cAMP-elevating agent, or the adenosine receptor agonist NECA, acting via cAMP. By contrast, the adenosine receptor antagonist CGS 15943 or the adenosine degrading enzyme ADA inhibits CAD cell neuronal differentiation mediated by serum withdrawal. These results support that adenosine is a physiological signal in neuronal differentiation of the CNS-derived catecholaminergic CAD cell line and suggest that adenosine signaling is involved in NC cell development in vivo.

  3. Cell culture from sponges: pluripotency and immortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Caralt, Sònia; Uriz, María J; Wijffels, René H

    2007-10-01

    Sponges are a source of compounds with potential pharmaceutical applications. In this article, methods of sponge cell culture for production of these bioactive compounds are reviewed, and new approaches for overcoming the problem of metabolite supply are examined. The use of embryos is proposed as a new source of sponge material for cell culture. Stem cells are present in high amounts in embryos and are more versatile and resistant to infections than adult cells. Additionally, genetic engineering and cellular research on apoptotic mechanisms are promising new fields that might help to improve cell survival in sponge-cell lines. We propose that one topic for future research should be how to reduce apoptosis, which appears to be very high in sponge cell cultures.

  4. Porcine mitral valve interstitial cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, W; Rosenthal, A; Granton, B; Gotlieb, A I

    1988-11-01

    There are connective tissue cells present within the interstitium of the heart valves. This study was designed to isolate and characterize mitral valve interstitial cells from the anterior leaflet of the mitral valve. Explants obtained from the distal part of the leaflet, having been scraped free of surface endocardial cells, were incubated in medium 199 supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum. Cells grew out of the explant after 3 to 5 days and by 3 weeks these cells were harvested and passaged. Passages 1 to 22 were characterized in several explant sets. The cells showed a growth pattern reminiscent of fibroblasts. Growth was dependent on serum concentration. Cytoskeletal localization of actin and myosin showed prominent stress fibers. Ultrastructural studies showed many elongated cells with prominent stress fibers and some gap junctions and few adherens junctions. There were as well cells with fewer stress fibers containing prominent Golgi complex and dilated endoplasmic reticulum. In the multilayered superconfluent cultures, the former cells tended to be on the substratum of the dish or surface of the multilayered culture, whereas the latter was generally located within the layer of cells. Extracellular matrix was prominent in superconfluent cultures, often within the layers as well. Labeling of the cells with antibody HHF 35 (Tsukada T, Tippens D, Gordon D, Ross R, Gown AM: Am J Pathol 126:51, 1987), which recognizes smooth muscle cell actin, showed prominent staining of the elongated stress fiber-containing cells and much less in the secretory type cells. These studies show that interstitial mitral valve cells can be grown in culture and that either two different cell types or one cell type with two phenotypic expressions is present in culture.

  5. Methods for maintaining insect cell cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Dwight E. Lynn

    2002-01-01

    Insect cell cultures are now commonly used in insect physiology, developmental biology, pathology, and molecular biology. As the field has advanced from methods development to a standard procedure, so has the diversity of scientists using the technique. This paper describes methods that are effective for maintaining various insect cell lines. The procedures are differentiated between loosely or non-attached cell strains, attached cell strains, and strongly adherent cell strains.

  6. Distribution and localization of fibroblast growth factor-8 in rat brain and nerve cells during neural stem/progenitor cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jiang; Li, Dongsheng; Lu, Kehuan

    2012-07-05

    The present study explored the distribution and localization of fibroblast growth factor-8 and its potential receptor, fibroblast growth factor receptor-3, in adult rat brain in vivo and in nerve cells during differentiation of neural stem/progenitor cells in vitro. Immunohistochemistry was used to examine the distribution of fibroblast growth factor-8 in adult rat brain in vivo. Localization of fibroblast growth factor-8 and fibroblast growth factor receptor-3 in cells during neural stem/progenitor cell differentiation in vitro was detected by immunofluorescence. Flow cytometry and immunofluorescence were used to evaluate the effect of an anti-fibroblast growth factor-8 antibody on neural stem/progenitor cell differentiation and expansion in vitro. Results from this study confirmed that fibroblast growth factor-8 was mainly distributed in adult midbrain, namely the substantia nigra, compact part, dorsal tier, substantia nigra and reticular part, but was not detected in the forebrain comprising the caudate putamen and striatum. Unusual results were obtained in retrosplenial locations of adult rat brain. We found that fibroblast growth factor-8 and fibroblast growth factor receptor-3 were distributed on the cell membrane and in the cytoplasm of nerve cells using immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence analyses. We considered that the distribution of fibroblast growth factor-8 and fibroblast growth factor receptor-3 in neural cells corresponded to the characteristics of fibroblast growth factor-8, a secretory factor. Addition of an anti-fibroblast growth factor-8 antibody to cultures significantly affected the rate of expansion and differentiation of neural stem/progenitor cells. In contrast, addition of recombinant fibroblast growth factor-8 to differentiation medium promoted neural stem/progenitor cell differentiation and increased the final yields of dopaminergic neurons and total neurons. Our study may help delineate the important roles of fibroblast growth

  7. Differentiation and Cell-Cell Interactions of Neural Progenitor Cells Transplanted into Intact Adult Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhinich, K K; Kosykh, A V; Aleksandrova, M A

    2015-11-01

    We studied the behavior and cell-cell interactions of embryonic brain cell from GFP-reporter mice after their transplantation into the intact adult brain. Fragments or cell suspensions of fetal neocortical cells at different stages of development were transplanted into the neocortex and striatum of adult recipients. Even in intact brain, the processes of transplanted neurons formed extensive networks in the striatum and neocortical layers I and V-VI. Processes of transplanted cells at different stages of development attained the rostral areas of the frontal cortex and some of them reached the internal capsule. However, the cells transplanted in suspension had lower process growth potency than cells from tissue fragments. Tyrosine hydroxylase fibers penetrated from the recipient brain into grafts at both early and late stages of development. Our experiments demonstrated the formation of extensive reciprocal networks between the transplanted fetal neural cells and recipient brain neurons even in intact brain.

  8. Transfection of glioma cells with the neural-cell adhesion molecule NCAM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edvardsen, K; Pedersen, P H; Bjerkvig, R

    1994-01-01

    The tumor growth and the invasive capacity of a rat glioma cell line (BT4Cn) were studied after transfection with the human transmembrane 140-kDa isoform of the neural-cell adhesion molecule, NCAM. After s.c. injection, the NCAM-transfected cells showed a slower growth rate than the parent cell...

  9. Advances in cell culture: anchorage dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merten, Otto-Wilhelm

    2015-01-01

    Anchorage-dependent cells are of great interest for various biotechnological applications. (i) They represent a formidable production means of viruses for vaccination purposes at very large scales (in 1000–6000 l reactors) using microcarriers, and in the last decade many more novel viral vaccines have been developed using this production technology. (ii) With the advent of stem cells and their use/potential use in clinics for cell therapy and regenerative medicine purposes, the development of novel culture devices and technologies for adherent cells has accelerated greatly with a view to the large-scale expansion of these cells. Presently, the really scalable systems—microcarrier/microcarrier-clump cultures using stirred-tank reactors—for the expansion of stem cells are still in their infancy. Only laboratory scale reactors of maximally 2.5 l working volume have been evaluated because thorough knowledge and basic understanding of critical issues with respect to cell expansion while retaining pluripotency and differentiation potential, and the impact of the culture environment on stem cell fate, etc., are still lacking and require further studies. This article gives an overview on critical issues common to all cell culture systems for adherent cells as well as specifics for different types of stem cells in view of small- and large-scale cell expansion and production processes. PMID:25533097

  10. 5-Azacytidine and BDNF enhance the maturation of neurons derived from EGF-generated neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinstine, M; Iacovitti, L

    1997-04-01

    EGF-generated neural stem cells can form astrocytes, neurons, and oligodendrocytes upon differentiation; however, the proportion of cells that actually form neurons is very small. In the present study, we have studied the effect that 5-azacytidine (5AzaC), a demethylation agent, and brain-derived growth factor (BDNF) have on the differentiation and maturation of neurons originating from EGF-generated neural stem cells. Stem cells were maintained under a variety of culture conditions using combinations of 5AzaC and BDNF either alone or together. More neurons, as determined by the number of beta-tubulin III-immunoreactive somata, were present in cultures maintained in BDNF medium (a nearly fourfold increase compared to control cultures). 5AzaC did not significantly affect neuronal number, regardless of the presence of BDNF. In addition to neuronal number, the effect of 5AzaC and BDNF on the distribution of the microtubule proteins MAP2 and Tau was analyzed. In most cultures, MAP2 and Tau were colocalized throughout the neuron. In contrast, neurons cotreated with 5AzaC and BDNF contained neurons that began to exhibit cytoskeletal segregation of MAP2 into the somatodendritic compartments. Tau remained dispersed within the somata and the axon. This effect was not produced when 5AzaC or BDNF was used individually. These results demonstrate that 5AzaC and BDNF cooperate to produce more mature neurons from EGF-generated neural stem cells then either molecule can alone.

  11. Donor mesenchymal stem cell-derived neural-like cells transdifferentiate into myelin-forming cells and promote axon regeneration in rat spinal cord transection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xue-Cheng; Jin, Hui; Zhang, Rong-Yi; Ding, Ying; Zeng, Xiang; Lai, Bi-Qin; Ling, Eng-Ang; Wu, Jin-Lang; Zeng, Yuan-Shan

    2015-05-27

    Severe spinal cord injury often causes temporary or permanent damages in strength, sensation, or autonomic functions below the site of the injury. So far, there is still no effective treatment for spinal cord injury. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been used to repair injured spinal cord as an effective strategy. However, the low neural differentiation frequency of MSCs has limited its application. The present study attempted to explore whether the grafted MSC-derived neural-like cells in a gelatin sponge (GS) scaffold could maintain neural features or transdifferentiate into myelin-forming cells in the transected spinal cord. We constructed an engineered tissue by co-seeding of MSCs with genetically enhanced expression of neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) and its high-affinity receptor tropomyosin receptor kinase C (TrkC) separately into a three-dimensional GS scaffold to promote the MSCs differentiating into neural-like cells and transplanted it into the gap of a completely transected rat spinal cord. The rats received extensive post-operation care, including cyclosporin A administrated once daily for 2 months. MSCs modified genetically could differentiate into neural-like cells in the MN + MT (NT-3-MSCs + TrKC-MSCs) group 14 days after culture in the GS scaffold. However, after the MSC-derived neural-like cells were transplanted into the injury site of spinal cord, some of them appeared to lose the neural phenotypes and instead transdifferentiated into myelin-forming cells at 8 weeks. In the latter, the MSC-derived myelin-forming cells established myelin sheaths associated with the host regenerating axons. And the injured host neurons were rescued, and axon regeneration was induced by grafted MSCs modified genetically. In addition, the cortical motor evoked potential and hindlimb locomotion were significantly ameliorated in the rat spinal cord transected in the MN + MT group compared with the GS and MSC groups. Grafted MSC-derived neural-like cells in the

  12. Establishment of Human Neural Progenitor Cells from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells with Diverse Tissue Origins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayato Fukusumi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs have previously been generated from limited numbers of human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC clones. Here, 21 hiPSC clones derived from human dermal fibroblasts, cord blood cells, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were differentiated using two neural induction methods, an embryoid body (EB formation-based method and an EB formation method using dual SMAD inhibitors (dSMADi. Our results showed that expandable hNPCs could be generated from hiPSC clones with diverse somatic tissue origins. The established hNPCs exhibited a mid/hindbrain-type neural identity and uniform expression of neural progenitor genes.

  13. Spheroid Culture of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoe Cesarz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Compared with traditional 2D adherent cell culture, 3D spheroidal cell aggregates, or spheroids, are regarded as more physiological, and this technique has been exploited in the field of oncology, stem cell biology, and tissue engineering. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs cultured in spheroids have enhanced anti-inflammatory, angiogenic, and tissue reparative/regenerative effects with improved cell survival after transplantation. Cytoskeletal reorganization and drastic changes in cell morphology in MSC spheroids indicate a major difference in mechanophysical properties compared with 2D culture. Enhanced multidifferentiation potential, upregulated expression of pluripotency marker genes, and delayed replicative senescence indicate enhanced stemness in MSC spheroids. Furthermore, spheroid formation causes drastic changes in the gene expression profile of MSC in microarray analyses. In spite of these significant changes, underlying molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways triggering and sustaining these changes are largely unknown.

  14. Neurite extension and neuronal differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cell derived neural stem cells on polyethylene glycol hydrogels containing a continuous Young's Modulus gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosley, Matthew C; Lim, Hyun Ju; Chen, Jing; Yang, Yueh-Hsun; Li, Shenglan; Liu, Ying; Smith Callahan, Laura A

    2017-03-01

    Mechanotransduction in neural cells involves multiple signaling pathways that are not fully understood. Differences in lineage and maturation state are suggested causes for conflicting reports on neural cell mechanosensitivity. To optimize matrices for use in stem cell therapy treatments transplanting human induced pluripotent stem cell derived neural stem cells (hNSC) into lesions after spinal cord injury, the effects of Young's Modulus changes on hNSC behavior must be understood. The present study utilizes polyethylene glycol hydrogels containing a continuous gradient in Young's modulus to examine changes in the Young's Modulus of the culture substrate on hNSC neurite extension and neural differentiation. Changes in the Young's Modulus of the polyethylene glycol hydrogels was found to affect neurite extension and cellular organization on the matrices. hNSC cultured on 907 Pa hydrogels were found to extend longer neurites than hNSC cultured on other tested Young's Moduli hydrogels. The gene expression of β tubulin III and microtubule-associated protein 2 in hNSC was affected by changes in the Young's Modulus of the hydrogel. The combinatory method approach used in the present study demonstrates that hNSC are mechanosensitive and the matrix Young's Modulus should be a design consideration for hNSC transplant applications. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 824-833, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Proteome-wide analysis of neural stem cell differentiation to facilitate transition to cell replacement therapies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žižková, Martina; Suchá, Rita; Tylečková, Jiřina; Jarkovská, Karla; Mairychová, Kateřina; Kotrčová, Eva; Marsala, M.; Gadher, S. J.; Kovářová, Hana

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 1 (2015), s. 83-95 ISSN 1478-9450 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0124; GA TA ČR(CZ) TA01011466 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : cell therapy * immunomodulation * neural stem cell differentiation * neural subpopulation * neurodegenerative disease Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.465, year: 2015

  16. Effect of Monocular Deprivation on Rabbit Neural Retinal Cell Densities

    OpenAIRE

    Philip Maseghe Mwachaka; Hassan Saidi; Paul Ochieng Odula; Pamela Idenya Mandela

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the effect of monocular deprivation on densities of neural retinal cells in rabbits. Methods: Thirty rabbits, comprised of 18 subject and 12 control animals, were included and monocular deprivation was achieved through unilateral lid suturing in all subject animals. The rabbits were observed for three weeks. At the end of each week, 6 experimental and 3 control animals were euthanized, their retinas was harvested and processed for light microscopy. Photomicrographs of ...

  17. Neural network adapted to wound cell analysis in surgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viljanto, Jouko; Koski, Antti

    2011-01-01

    Assessment of the real state of wound healing of closed surgical wounds is uncertain both clinically and from conventional laboratory tests. Therefore, a novel approach based on early analysis of exactly timed wound cells, computerized further with an artificial neural network, was developed. At the end of routine surgery performed on 481 children under 18 years of age, a specific wound drain Cellstick™ was inserted subcutaneously between the wound edges to harvest wound cells. The Cellsticks™ were removed from 1 to 50 hours, mainly at hour 3 or 24 postsurgery. Immediately, the cellular contents were washed out using a pump constructed for the purpose. After cytocentrifugation, the cells were stained and counted differentially. Based on their relative proportions at selected time intervals, an artificial self-organizing neural map was developed. This was further transformed to a unidirectional linear graph where each node represents one set of relative cell quantities. As early as 3 hours, but more precisely 24 hours after surgery, the location of the nodes on this graph showed individually the patients' initial speed of wound inflammatory cell response. Similarly, timed Cellstick™ specimens from new surgical patients could be analyzed, computerized, and compared with these node values to assess their initial speed in wound inflammatory cell response. Location of the node on the graph does not express the time lapse after surgery but the speed of wound inflammatory cell response in relation to that of other patients. © 2011 by the Wound Healing Society.

  18. Monitoring neural stem cell differentiation using PEDOT-PSS based MEA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Yuriko; Shimada, Akiyoshi; Kato, Koichi; Iwata, Hiroo; Torimitsu, Keiichi

    2013-09-01

    Transplantation is one potential clinical application of neural stem cells (NSCs). However, it is very difficult to monitor/control NSCs after transplantation and so provide effective treatment. Electrical measurement using a poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT-PSS) modified microelectrode array (MEA) is a biocompatible, non-invasive, non-destructive approach to understanding cell conditions. This property makes continuous monitoring available for the evaluation/assessment of the development of cells such as NSCs. A PEDOT-PSS modified MEA was used to monitor electrical signals during NSC development in a culture derived from rat embryo striatum in order to understand the NSC differentiation conditions. Electrical data indicated that NSCs with nerve growth factor (NGF) generate a cultured cortical neuron-like burst pattern while a random noise pattern was measured with epidermal growth factor (EGF) at 4days in vitro (DIV) and a burst pattern was observed in both cases at 11 DIV indicating the successful monitoring of differentiation differences and developmental changes. The electrical analysis of cell activity using a PEDOT-PSS modified MEA could indicate neural network formation by differentiated neurons. Changes in NSC differentiation could be monitored. The method is based on non-invasive continuous measurement and so could prove a useful tool for the primary/preliminary evaluation of a pharmaceutical analysis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Organic Bioelectronics-Novel Applications in Biomedicine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Neural stem cells express melatonin receptors and neurotrophic factors: colocalization of the MT1 receptor with neuronal and glial markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McMillan Catherine R

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to optimize the potential benefits of neural stem cell (NSC transplantation for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders, it is necessary to understand their biological characteristics. Although neurotrophin transduction strategies are promising, alternative approaches such as the modulation of intrinsic neurotrophin expression by NSCs, could also be beneficial. Therefore, utilizing the C17.2 neural stem cell line, we have examined the expression of selected neurotrophic factors under different in vitro conditions. In view of recent evidence suggesting a role for the pineal hormone melatonin in vertebrate development, it was also of interest to determine whether its G protein-coupled MT1 and MT2 receptors are expressed in NSCs. Results RT-PCR analysis revealed robust expression of glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and nerve growth factor (NGF in undifferentiated cells maintained for two days in culture. After one week, differentiating cells continued to exhibit high expression of BDNF and NGF, but GDNF expression was lower or absent, depending on the culture conditions utilized. Melatonin MT1 receptor mRNA was detected in NSCs maintained for two days in culture, but the MT2 receptor was not seen. An immature MT1 receptor of about 30 kDa was detected by western blotting in NSCs cultured for two days, whereas a mature receptor of about 40 – 45 kDa was present in cells maintained for longer periods. Immunocytochemical studies demonstrated that the MT1 receptor is expressed in both neural (β-tubulin III positive and glial (GFAP positive progenitor cells. An examination of the effects of melatonin on neurotrophin expression revealed that low physiological concentrations of this hormone caused a significant induction of GDNF mRNA expression in NSCs following treatment for 24 hours. Conclusions The phenotypic characteristics of C17.2 cells suggest that they are

  20. Similarity on neural stem cells and brain tumor stem cells in transgenic brain tumor mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    Qiao, Guanqun; Li, Qingquan; Peng, Gang; Ma, Jun; Fan, Hongwei; Li, Yingbin

    2013-01-01

    Although it is believed that glioma is derived from brain tumor stem cells, the source and molecular signal pathways of these cells are still unclear. In this study, we used stable doxycycline-inducible transgenic mouse brain tumor models (c-myc+/SV40Tag+/Tet-on+) to explore the malignant trans-formation potential of neural stem cells by observing the differences of neural stem cells and brain tumor stem cells in the tumor models. Results showed that chromosome instability occurred in brain t...

  1. Single-Cell Transcriptomic Analysis Defines Heterogeneity and Transcriptional Dynamics in the Adult Neural Stem Cell Lineage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben W. Dulken

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neural stem cells (NSCs in the adult mammalian brain serve as a reservoir for the generation of new neurons, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes. Here, we use single-cell RNA sequencing to characterize adult NSC populations and examine the molecular identities and heterogeneity of in vivo NSC populations. We find that cells in the NSC lineage exist on a continuum through the processes of activation and differentiation. Interestingly, rare intermediate states with distinct molecular profiles can be identified and experimentally validated, and our analysis identifies putative surface markers and key intracellular regulators for these subpopulations of NSCs. Finally, using the power of single-cell profiling, we conduct a meta-analysis to compare in vivo NSCs and in vitro cultures, distinct fluorescence-activated cell sorting strategies, and different neurogenic niches. These data provide a resource for the field and contribute to an integrative understanding of the adult NSC lineage.

  2. Isolation and culture of biliary epithelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Joplin, R

    1994-01-01

    At one time it was thought that biliary epithelial cells simply formed the lining to the tubular conduits which constitute the biliary tract. Development of in vitro systems for culturing biliary epithelial cells has enabled functional studies which increasingly show that this is far from true, and that biliary epithelial cells do have important functional roles. Disruption of these functions may be involved in the generation of pathology. Most functional studies to date have utilised cells i...

  3. Stage-specific control of neural crest stem cell proliferation by the small rho GTPases Cdc42 and Rac1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuchs, Sebastian; Herzog, Dominik; Sumara, Grzegorz

    2009-01-01

    The neural crest (NC) generates a variety of neural and non-neural tissues during vertebrate development. Both migratory NC cells and their target structures contain cells with stem cell features. Here we show that these populations of neural crest-derived stem cells (NCSCs) are differentially re...

  4. Melanoma Spheroids Grown Under Neural Crest Cell Conditions Are Highly Plastic Migratory/Invasive Tumor Cells Endowed with Immunomodulator Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalou, Claude; Lauden, Laura; Michel, Laurence; de la Grange, Pierre; Khatib, Abdel-Majid; Aoudjit, Fawzi; Charron, Dominique; Alcaide-Loridan, Catherine; Al-Daccak, Reem

    2011-01-01

    Background The aggressiveness of melanoma tumors is likely to rely on their well-recognized heterogeneity and plasticity. Melanoma comprises multi-subpopulations of cancer cells some of which may possess stem cell-like properties. Although useful, the sphere-formation assay to identify stem cell-like or tumor initiating cell subpopulations in melanoma has been challenged, and it is unclear if this model can predict a functional phenotype associated with aggressive tumor cells. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed the molecular and functional phenotypes of melanoma spheroids formed in neural crest cell medium. Whether from metastatic or advanced primary tumors, spheroid cells expressed melanoma-associated markers. They displayed higher capacity to differentiate along mesenchymal lineages and enhanced expression of SOX2, NANOG, KLF4, and/or OCT4 transcription factors, but not enhanced self-renewal or tumorigenicity when compared to their adherent counterparts. Gene expression profiling attributed a neural crest cell signature to these spheroids and indicated that a migratory/invasive and immune-function modulating program could be associated with these cells. In vitro assays confirmed that spheroids display enhanced migratory/invasive capacities. In immune activation assays, spheroid cells elicited a poorer allogenic response from immune cells and inhibited mitogen-dependent T cells activation and proliferation more efficiently than their adherent counterparts. Our findings reveal a novel immune-modulator function of melanoma spheroids and suggest specific roles for spheroids in invasion and in evasion of antitumor immunity. Conclusion/Significance The association of a more plastic, invasive and evasive, thus a more aggressive tumor phenotype with melanoma spheroids reveals a previously unrecognized aspect of tumor cells expanded as spheroid cultures. While of limited efficiency for melanoma initiating cell identification, our melanoma spheroid model predicted

  5. Cell delamination in the mesencephalic neural fold and its implication for the origin of ectomesenchyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Raymond Teck Ho; Nagai, Hiroki; Nakaya, Yukiko; Sheng, Guojun; Trainor, Paul A.; Weston, James A.; Thiery, Jean Paul

    2013-01-01

    The neural crest is a transient structure unique to vertebrate embryos that gives rise to multiple lineages along the rostrocaudal axis. In cranial regions, neural crest cells are thought to differentiate into chondrocytes, osteocytes, pericytes and stromal cells, which are collectively termed ectomesenchyme derivatives, as well as pigment and neuronal derivatives. There is still no consensus as to whether the neural crest can be classified as a homogenous multipotent population of cells. This unresolved controversy has important implications for the formation of ectomesenchyme and for confirmation of whether the neural fold is compartmentalized into distinct domains, each with a different repertoire of derivatives. Here we report in mouse and chicken that cells in the neural fold delaminate over an extended period from different regions of the cranial neural fold to give rise to cells with distinct fates. Importantly, cells that give rise to ectomesenchyme undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition from a lateral neural fold domain that does not express definitive neural markers, such as Sox1 and N-cadherin. Additionally, the inference that cells originating from the cranial neural ectoderm have a common origin and cell fate with trunk neural crest cells prompted us to revisit the issue of what defines the neural crest and the origin of the ectomesenchyme. PMID:24198279

  6. Biphasic influence of Miz1 on neural crest development by regulating cell survival and apical adhesion complex formation in the developing neural tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerosuo, Laura; Bronner, Marianne E.

    2014-01-01

    Myc interacting zinc finger protein-1 (Miz1) is a transcription factor known to regulate cell cycle– and cell adhesion–related genes in cancer. Here we show that Miz1 also plays a critical role in neural crest development. In the chick, Miz1 is expressed throughout the neural plate and closing neural tube. Its morpholino-mediated knockdown affects neural crest precursor survival, leading to reduction of neural plate border and neural crest specifier genes Msx-1, Pax7, FoxD3, and Sox10. Of interest, Miz1 loss also causes marked reduction of adhesion molecules (N-cadherin, cadherin6B, and α1-catenin) with a concomitant increase of E-cadherin in the neural folds, likely leading to delayed and decreased neural crest emigration. Conversely, Miz1 overexpression results in up-regulation of cadherin6B and FoxD3 expression in the neural folds/neural tube, leading to premature neural crest emigration and increased number of migratory crest cells. Although Miz1 loss effects cell survival and proliferation throughout the neural plate, the neural progenitor marker Sox2 was unaffected, suggesting a neural crest–selective effect. The results suggest that Miz1 is important not only for survival of neural crest precursors, but also for maintenance of integrity of the neural folds and tube, via correct formation of the apical adhesion complex therein. PMID:24307680

  7. The impact of cultural differences in self-representation on the neural substrates of posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddell, Belinda J; Jobson, Laura

    2016-01-01

    A significant body of literature documents the neural mechanisms involved in the development and maintenance of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, there is very little empirical work considering the influence of culture on these underlying mechanisms. Accumulating cultural neuroscience research clearly indicates that cultural differences in self-representation modulate many of the same neural processes proposed to be aberrant in PTSD. The objective of this review paper is to consider how culture may impact on the neural mechanisms underlying PTSD. We first outline five key affective and cognitive functions and their underlying neural correlates that have been identified as being disrupted in PTSD: (1) fear dysregulation; (2) attentional biases to threat; (3) emotion and autobiographical memory; (4) self-referential processing; and (5) attachment and interpersonal processing. Second, we consider prominent cultural theories and review the empirical research that has demonstrated the influence of cultural variations in self-representation on the neural substrates of these same five affective and cognitive functions. Finally, we propose a conceptual model that suggests that these five processes have major relevance to considering how culture may influence the neural processes underpinning PTSD.

  8. The impact of cultural differences in self-representation on the neural substrates of posttraumatic stress disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda J. Liddell

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A significant body of literature documents the neural mechanisms involved in the development and maintenance of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD. However, there is very little empirical work considering the influence of culture on these underlying mechanisms. Accumulating cultural neuroscience research clearly indicates that cultural differences in self-representation modulate many of the same neural processes proposed to be aberrant in PTSD. The objective of this review paper is to consider how culture may impact on the neural mechanisms underlying PTSD. We first outline five key affective and cognitive functions and their underlying neural correlates that have been identified as being disrupted in PTSD: (1 fear dysregulation; (2 attentional biases to threat; (3 emotion and autobiographical memory; (4 self-referential processing; and (5 attachment and interpersonal processing. Second, we consider prominent cultural theories and review the empirical research that has demonstrated the influence of cultural variations in self-representation on the neural substrates of these same five affective and cognitive functions. Finally, we propose a conceptual model that suggests that these five processes have major relevance to considering how culture may influence the neural processes underpinning PTSD. Highlights of the article:

  9. Sponge cell culture? A molecular identification method for sponge cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sipkema, D.; Heilig, G.H.J.; Akkermans, A.D.L.; Osinga, R.; Tramper, J.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2003-01-01

    Dissociated sponge cells are easily confused with unicellular organisms. This has been an obstacle in the development of sponge-cell lines. We developed a molecular detection method to identify cells of the sponge Dysidea avara in dissociated cell cultures. The 18S ribosomal RNA gene from a Dysidea

  10. Arctigenin protects against neuronal hearing loss by promoting neural stem cell survival and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xinghua; Chen, Mo; Ding, Yan; Wang, Qin

    2017-03-01

    Neuronal hearing loss has become a prevalent health problem. This study focused on the function of arctigenin (ARC) in promoting survival and neuronal differentiation of mouse cochlear neural stem cells (NSCs), and its protection against gentamicin (GMC) induced neuronal hearing loss. Mouse cochlea was used to isolate NSCs, which were subsequently cultured in vitro. The effects of ARC on NSC survival, neurosphere formation, differentiation of NSCs, neurite outgrowth, and neural excitability in neuronal network in vitro were examined. Mechanotransduction ability demonstrated by intact cochlea, auditory brainstem response (ABR), and distortion product optoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) amplitude in mice were measured to evaluate effects of ARC on GMC-induced neuronal hearing loss. ARC increased survival, neurosphere formation, neuron differentiation of NSCs in mouse cochlear in vitro. ARC also promoted the outgrowth of neurites, as well as neural excitability of the NSC-differentiated neuron culture. Additionally, ARC rescued mechanotransduction capacity, restored the threshold shifts of ABR and DPOAE in our GMC ototoxicity murine model. This study supports the potential therapeutic role of ARC in promoting both NSCs proliferation and differentiation in vitro to functional neurons, thus supporting its protective function in the therapeutic treatment of neuropathic hearing loss in vivo. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Cultural modulation of the neural correlates of emotional pain perception: the role of other-focusedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheon, Bobby K; Im, Dong-Mi; Harada, Tokiko; Kim, Ji-Sook; Mathur, Vani A; Scimeca, Jason M; Parrish, Todd B; Park, Hyunwook; Chiao, Joan Y

    2013-06-01

    Cultures vary in the extent to which they emphasize group members to habitually attend to the needs, perspectives, and internal experiences of others compared to the self. Here we examined the influence that collectivistic and individualistic cultural environments may play on the engagement of the neurobiological processes that underlie the perception and processing of emotional pain. Using cross-cultural fMRI, Korean and Caucasian-American participants passively viewed scenes of others in situations of emotional pain and distress. Regression analyses revealed that the value of other-focusedness was associated with heightened neural response within the affective pain matrix (i.e. anterior cingulate cortex and insula) to a greater extent for Korean relative to Caucasian-American participants. These findings suggest that mindsets promoting attunement to the subjective experience of others may be especially critical for pain-related and potentially empathic processing within collectivistic relative to individualistic cultural environments. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Webs, cell assemblies, and chunking in neural nets: introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickelgren, W A

    1999-03-01

    This introduction to Wickelgren (1992), describes a theory of idea representation and learning in the cerebral cortex and seven properties of Hebb's (1949) formulation of cell assemblies that have played a major role in all such neural net models. Ideas are represented in the cerebral cortex by webs (innate cell assemblies), using sparse coding with sparse, all-or-none, innate linking. Recruiting a web to represent a new idea is called chunking. The innate links that bind the neurons of a web are basal dendritic synapses. Learning modifies the apical dendritic synapses that associate neurons in one web to neurons in another web.

  13. Which has more stem-cell characteristics: Müller cells or Müller cells derived from in vivo culture in neurospheres?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Hong-Pei; Xiong, Yu; Zhang, En-Dong; Song, Wei-Tao; Gao, Zhao-Lin; Yao, Fei; Sun, Hong; Zhou, Rong-Rong; Xia, Xiao-Bo

    2017-01-01

    Müller cells can be acquired from in vitro culture or a neurosphere culture system. Both culture methods yield cells with progenitor-cell characteristics that can differentiate into mature nervous cells. We compared the progenitor-cell traits of Müller cells acquired from each method. Primary murine Müller cells were isolated in serum culture media and used to generate Müller cells derived from neurospheres in serum-free culture conditions. Gene expression of neural progenitor cell markers was examined by Q-PCR in the two groups. Expression of rhodopsin and the cone-rod homeobox protein CRX were assessed after induction with 1 μM all-trans retinoic acid (RA) for 7 days. After more than four passages, many cells were large, flattened, and difficult to passage. A spontaneously immortalized Müller cell line was not established. Three-passage neurospheres yielded few new spheres. Genes coding for Nestin, Sox2, Chx10, and Vimentin were downregulated in cells derived from neurospheres compared to the cells from standard culture, while Pax6 was upregulated. Müller cells from both culture methods were induced into rod photoreceptors, but expression of rhodopsin and CRX was greater in the Müller cells from the standard culture. Both culture methods yielded cells with stem-cell characteristics that can be induced into rod photoreceptor neurons by RA. Serum had no influence on the "stemness" of the cells. Cells from standard culture had greater "stemness" than cells derived from neurospheres. The standard Müller cells would seem to be the best choice for transplantation in cell replacement therapy for photoreceptor degeneration.

  14. Bioprinting for Neural Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlton, Stephanie; Anand, Shivesh; Shah, Twisha; Tasoglu, Savas

    2018-01-01

    Bioprinting is a method by which a cell-encapsulating bioink is patterned to create complex tissue architectures. Given the potential impact of this technology on neural research, we review the current state-of-the-art approaches for bioprinting neural tissues. While 2D neural cultures are ubiquitous for studying neural cells, 3D cultures can more accurately replicate the microenvironment of neural tissues. By bioprinting neuronal constructs, one can precisely control the microenvironment by specifically formulating the bioink for neural tissues, and by spatially patterning cell types and scaffold properties in three dimensions. We review a range of bioprinted neural tissue models and discuss how they can be used to observe how neurons behave, understand disease processes, develop new therapies and, ultimately, design replacement tissues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Flux analysis of mammalian cell culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, D.E.; Tramper, J.

    2010-01-01

    Animal cells are used for the production of vaccines and pharmaceutical proteins. The increase in demand for these products requires an increase in volumetric productivity of animal cell culture processes, which can be attained through an increase in biomass concentration and/or specific

  16. Epigenetic landscaping during hESC differentiation to neural cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golebiewska, Anna; Atkinson, Stuart P; Lako, Majlinda; Armstrong, Lyle

    2009-06-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying pluripotency and lineage specification from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are still largely unclear. To address the role of chromatin structure in maintenance of pluripotency in human ESCs (hESCs) and establishment of lineage commitment, we analyzed a panel of histone modifications at promoter sequences of genes involved in maintenance of pluripotency, self-renewal, and in early stages of differentiation. To understand the changes occurring at lineage-specific gene regulatory sequences, we have established an efficient purification system that permits the examination of two distinct populations of lineage committed cells; fluorescence activated cell sorted CD133(+) CD45(-)CD34(-) neural stem cells and beta-III-tubulin(+) putative neurons. Here we report the importance of other permissive marks supporting trimethylation of Lysine 4 H3 at the active stem cell promoters as well as poised bivalent and nonbivalent lineage-specific gene promoters in hESCs. Methylation of lysine 9 H3 was found to play a role in repression of pluripotency-associated and lineage-specific genes on differentiation. Moreover, presence of newly formed bivalent domains was observed at the neural progenitor stage. However, they differ significantly from the bivalent domains observed in hESCs, with a possible role of dimethylation of lysine 9 H3 in repressing the poised genes.

  17. Axonal Control of the Adult Neural Stem Cell Niche

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Cheuk Ka; Chen, Jiadong; Cebrián-Silla, Arantxa; Mirzadeh, Zaman; Obernier, Kirsten; Guinto, Cristina D.; Tecott, Laurence H.; García-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Kriegstein, Arnold; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ) is an extensive germinal niche containing neural stem cells (NSC) in the walls of the lateral ventricles of the adult brain. How the adult brain’s neural activity influences the behavior of adult NSCs remains largely unknown. We show that serotonergic (5HT) axons originating from a small group of neurons in the raphe form an extensive plexus on most of the ventricular walls. Electron microscopy revealed intimate contacts between 5HT axons and NSCs (B1) or ependymal cells (E1) and these cells were labeled by a transsynaptic viral tracer injected into the raphe. B1 cells express the 5HT receptors 2C and 5A. Electrophysiology showed that activation of these receptors in B1 cells induced small inward currents. Intraventricular infusion of 5HT2C agonist or antagonist increased or decreased V-SVZ proliferation, respectively. These results indicate that supraependymal 5HT axons directly interact with NSCs to regulate neurogenesis via 5HT2C. PMID:24561083

  18. An Integrated Miniature Bioprocessing for Personalized Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Expansion and Differentiation into Neural Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Haishuang; Li, Qiang; Lei, Yuguo

    2017-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are ideal cell sources for personalized cell therapies since they can be expanded to generate large numbers of cells and differentiated into presumably all the cell types of the human body in vitro. In addition, patient specific iPSC-derived cells induce minimal or no immune response in vivo. However, with current cell culture technologies and bioprocessing, the cost for biomanufacturing clinical-grade patient specific iPSCs and their derivatives are very high and not affordable for majority of patients. In this paper, we explored the use of closed and miniature cell culture device for biomanufacturing patient specific neural stem cells (NSCs) from iPSCs. We demonstrated that, with the assist of a thermoreversible hydrogel scaffold, the bioprocessing including iPSC expansion, iPSC differentiation into NSCs, the subsequent depletion of undifferentiated iPSCs from the NSCs, and concentrating and transporting the purified NSCs to the surgery room, could be integrated and completed within two closed 15 ml conical tubes. PMID:28057917

  19. Technologies enabling autologous neural stem cell-based therapies for neurodegenerative disease and injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhru, Sasha H.

    The intrinsic abilities of mammalian neural stem cells (NSCs) to self-renew, migrate over large distances, and give rise to all primary neural cell types of the brain offer unprecedented opportunity for cell-based treatment of neurodegenerative diseases and injuries. This thesis discusses development of technologies in support of autologous NSC-based therapies, encompassing harvest of brain tissue biopsies from living human patients; isolation of NSCs from harvested tissue; efficient culture and expansion of NSCs in 3D polymeric microcapsule culture systems; optimization of microcapsules as carriers for efficient in vivo delivery of NSCs; genetic engineering of NSCs for drug-induced, enzymatic release of transplanted NSCs from microcapsules; genetic engineering for drug-induced differentiation of NSCs into specific therapeutic cell types; and synthesis of chitosan/iron-oxide nanoparticles for labeling of NSCs and in vivo tracking by cellular MRI. Sub-millimeter scale tissue samples were harvested endoscopically from subventricular zone regions of living patient brains, secondary to neurosurgical procedures including endoscopic third ventriculostomy and ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement. On average, 12,000 +/- 3,000 NSCs were isolated per mm 3 of subventricular zone tissue, successfully demonstrated in 26 of 28 patients, ranging in age from one month to 68 years. In order to achieve efficient expansion of isolated NSCs to clinically relevant numbers (e.g. hundreds of thousands of cells in Parkinson's disease and tens of millions of cells in multiple sclerosis), an extracellular matrix-inspired, microcapsule-based culture platform was developed. Initial culture experiments with murine NSCs yielded unprecedented expansion folds of 30x in 5 days, from initially minute NSC populations (154 +/- 15 NSCs per 450 mum diameter capsule). Within 7 days, NSCs expanded as almost perfectly homogenous populations, with 94.9% +/- 4.1% of cultured cells staining positive for

  20. Neural differentiation of choroid plexus epithelial cells: role of human traumatic cerebrospinal fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Hashemi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As the key producer of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, the choroid plexus (CP provides a unique protective system in the central nervous system. CSF components are not invariable and they can change based on the pathological conditions of the central nervous system. The purpose of the present study was to assess the effects of non-traumatic and traumatic CSF on the differentiation of multipotent stem-like cells of CP into the neural and/or glial cells. CP epithelial cells were isolated from adult male rats and treated with human non-traumatic and traumatic CSF. Alterations in mRNA expression of Nestin and microtubule-associated protein (MAP2, as the specific markers of neurogenesis, and astrocyte marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP in cultured CP epithelial cells were evaluated using quantitative real-time PCR. The data revealed that treatment with CSF (non-traumatic and traumatic led to increase in mRNA expression levels of MAP2 and GFAP. Moreover, the expression of Nestin decreased in CP epithelial cells treated with non-traumatic CSF, while treatment with traumatic CSF significantly increased its mRNA level compared to the cells cultured only in DMEM/F12 as control. It seems that CP epithelial cells contain multipotent stem-like cells which are inducible under pathological conditions including exposure to traumatic CSF because of its compositions.

  1. Transplantation of neurons derived from human iPS cells cultured on collagen matrix into guinea-pig cochleae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Masaaki; Ohnishi, Hiroe; Skerleva, Desislava; Sakamoto, Tatsunori; Yamamoto, Norio; Hotta, Akitsu; Ito, Juichi; Nakagawa, Takayuki

    2017-06-01

    The present study examined the efficacy of a neural induction method for human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells to eliminate undifferentiated cells and to determine the feasibility of transplanting neurally induced cells into guinea-pig cochleae for replacement of spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs). A stepwise method for differentiation of human iPS cells into neurons was used. First, a neural induction method was established on Matrigel-coated plates; characteristics of cell populations at each differentiation step were assessed. Second, neural stem cells were differentiated into neurons on a three-dimensional (3D) collagen matrix, using the same protocol of culture on Matrigel-coated plates; neuron subtypes in differentiated cells on a 3D collagen matrix were examined. Then, human iPS cell-derived neurons cultured on a 3D collagen matrix were transplanted into intact guinea-pig cochleae, followed by histological analysis. In vitro analyses revealed successful induction of neural stem cells from human iPS cells, with no retention of undifferentiated cells expressing OCT3/4. After the neural differentiation of neural stem cells, approximately 70% of cells expressed a neuronal marker, 90% of which were positive for vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGLUT1). The expression pattern of neuron subtypes in differentiated cells on a 3D collagen matrix was identical to that of the differentiated cells on Matrigel-coated plates. In addition, the survival of transplant-derived neurons was achieved when inflammatory responses were appropriately controlled. Our preparation method for human iPS cell-derived neurons efficiently eliminated undifferentiated cells and contributed to the settlement of transplant-derived neurons expressing VGLUT1 in guinea-pig cochleae. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Human dental follicle cells express embryonic, mesenchymal and neural stem cells markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Rodrigo Lopes; Holanda-Afonso, Rosenilde Carvalho; Moura-Neto, Vivaldo; Bolognese, Ana Maria; DosSantos, Marcos Fabio; Souza, Margareth Maria

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to identify and characterize dental follicle stem cells (DFSCs) by analyzing expression of embryonic, mesenchymal and neural stem cells surface markers. Design Dental follicle cells (DFCs) were evaluated by immunocytochemistry using embryonic stem cells markers (OCT4 and SOX2), mesenchmal stem cells (MSCs) markers (Notch1, active Notch1, STRO, CD44, HLA-ABC, CD90), neural stem cells markers (Nestin and β-III-tubulin), neural crest stem cells (NCSCs) markers (p75 and HNK1) and a glial cells marker (GFAP). RT-PCR was performed to identify the expression of OCT4 and NANOG in DFCs and dental follicle tissue. Immunocytochemistry and RT-PCR analysis revealed that a significant proportion of the DFCs evaluated expressed human embryonic stem cells marker OCT4 (75%) whereas NANOG was weakly expressed. A considerable amount of MSCs (90%) expressed Notch1, STRO, CD44 and HLA-ABC. However, they were weakly positive for CD90. Moreover, it was possible to demonstrate that dental follicle contains a significant proportion of neural stem/progenitors cells, expressing β-III-tubulin (90%) and nestin (70%). Interestingly, immunocytochemistry showed DFCs positive for p75 (50%), HNK1 (cells. This is the first study reporting the presence of NCSCs and glial-like cells in the dental follicle. The results of the present study suggest the occurrence of heterogeneous populations of stem cells, particularly neural stem/progenitor cells, in the dental follicle, Therefore, the human dental follicle might be a promising source of adult stem cells for regenerative purposes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. In vitro effects of Epidiferphane™ on adult human neural progenitor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neural stem cells have the capacity to respond to their environment, migrate to the injury site and generate functional cell types, and thus they hold great promise for cell therapies. In addition to representing a source for central nervous system (CNS) repair, neural stem and progenitor cells als...

  4. Up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinase-1 and interleukin-6 expression in cocultures of corneal fibroblasts and neural cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Ji-Ae; Chikama, Tai-ichiro; Sonoda, Koh-Hei; Kiuchi, Yoshiaki

    2012-03-16

    The cornea is the most sensitive tissue in the human body, with the dense nerve endings of the cornea being derived from the first division of the ophthalmic nerve. The existence of such organized nerve fibers reflects the role of neural regulation in corneal homeostasis, with the proper distribution and function of these nerve fibers thus being required for maintenance of a healthy cornea. We recently established an in vitro model, based on the coculture of human corneal epithelial cells and fibroblasts on opposite sides of a collagen vitrigel membrane. We have now examined the role of neural cells in corneal homeostasis with the use of a similar coculture system. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunoblot analyses showed that the presence of neural cells (differentiated PC12 cells) increased the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) in human corneal fibroblasts at both the mRNA and protein levels. The expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in corneal fibroblasts was not affected by PC12 cells. Furthermore, a multiplex assay showed that, among various cytokines assayed, only the release of interleukin-6 in cocultures of the two cell types was markedly greater than that in cultures of corneal fibroblasts alone. These results thus suggest that factors released from neural cells may play an important role in regulation of the function of corneal fibroblasts and thereby contribute to the maintenance of corneal structure and function. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Increasing cell culture population doublings for long-term growth of finite life span human cell cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stampfer, Martha R.; Garbe, James C.

    2016-06-28

    Cell culture media formulations for culturing human epithelial cells are herein described. Also described are methods of increasing population doublings in a cell culture of finite life span human epithelial cells and prolonging the life span of human cell cultures. Using the cell culture media disclosed alone and in combination with addition to the cell culture of a compound associated with anti-stress activity achieves extended growth of pre-stasis cells and increased population doublings and life span in human epithelial cell cultures.

  6. Increasing cell culture population doublings for long-term growth of finite life span human cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stampfer, Martha R; Garbe, James C

    2015-02-24

    Cell culture media formulations for culturing human epithelial cells are herein described. Also described are methods of increasing population doublings in a cell culture of finite life span human epithelial cells and prolonging the life span of human cell cultures. Using the cell culture media disclosed alone and in combination with addition to the cell culture of a compound associated with anti-stress activity achieves extended growth of pre-stasis cells and increased population doublings and life span in human epithelial cell cultures.

  7. Immunocytochemical characterisation of neural stem-progenitor cells from green terror cichlid Aequidens rivulatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, C M; Chen, M M; Nan, F H; Wang, C S

    2017-01-01

    In this study, cultures of neural stem-progenitor cells (NSPC) from the brain of green terror cichlid Aequidens rivulatus were established and various NSPCs were demonstrated using immunocytochemistry. All of the NSPCs expressed brain lipid-binding protein, dopamine- and cAMP-regulated neuronal phosphoprotein 32 (DARPP-32), oligodendrocyte transcription factor 2, paired box 6 and sex determining region Y-box 2. The intensity and localisation of these proteins, however, varied among the different NSPCs. Despite being intermediate cells, NSPCs can be divided into radial glial cells, oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPC) and neuroblasts by expressing the astrocyte marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), OPC marker A2B5 and neuronal markers, including acetyl-tubulin, βIII-tubulin, microtubule-associated protein 2 and neurofilament protein. Nevertheless, astrocytes were polymorphic and were the most dominant cells in the NSPC cultures. By using Matrigel, radial glia exhibiting a long GFAP(+) or DARPP-32(+) fibre and neurons exhibiting a significant acetyl-tubulin(+) process were obtained. The results confirmed that NSPCs obtained from A. rivulatus brains can proliferate and differentiate into neurons in vitro. Clonal culture can be useful for further studying the distinct NSPCs. © 2016 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  8. Low immunogenicity of mouse induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem/progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itakura, Go; Ozaki, Masahiro; Nagoshi, Narihito; Kawabata, Soya; Nishiyama, Yuichiro; Sugai, Keiko; Iida, Tsuyoshi; Kashiwagi, Rei; Ookubo, Toshiki; Yastake, Kaori; Matsubayashi, Kohei; Kohyama, Jun; Iwanami, Akio; Matsumoto, Morio; Nakamura, Masaya; Okano, Hideyuki

    2017-10-11

    Resolving the immunogenicity of cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) remains an important challenge for cell transplant strategies that use banked allogeneic cells. Thus, we evaluated the immunogenicity of mouse fetal neural stem/progenitor cells (fetus-NSPCs) and iPSC-derived neural stem/progenitor cells (iPSC-NSPCs) both in vitro and in vivo. Flow cytometry revealed the low expression of immunological surface antigens, and these cells survived in all mice when transplanted syngeneically into subcutaneous tissue and the spinal cord. In contrast, an allogeneic transplantation into subcutaneous tissue was rejected in all mice, and allogeneic cells transplanted into intact and injured spinal cords survived for 3 months in approximately 20% of mice. In addition, cell survival was increased after co-treatment with an immunosuppressive agent. Thus, the immunogenicity and post-transplantation immunological dynamics of iPSC-NSPCs resemble those of fetus-NSPCs.

  9. Effects of teicoplanin on cell number of cultured cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kashkolinejad-Koohi Tahere

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Teicoplanin is a glycopeptide antibiotic with a wide variation in human serum half-life. It is also a valuable alternative of vancomycin. There is however no study on its effect on cultured cells. The aim of the present study was to test the effect of teicoplanin on cultured cell lines CHO, Jurkat E6.1 and MCF-7. The cultured cells were exposed to teicoplanin at final concentrations of 0–11000 μg/ml for 24 hours. To determine cell viability, the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT test was performed. At low concentrations of teicoplanin the numbers of cultured cells (due to cell proliferation were increased in the three cell lines examined. The maximum cell proliferation rates were observed at concentrations of 1000, 400, and 200 μg/ml of teicoplanin for CHO, MCF-7 and Jurkat cell lines, respectively. Cell toxicity was observed at final concentrations over 2000, 6000, and 400 μg/ml of teicoplanin for CHO, MCF-7 and Jurkat cell lines, respectively. A dose-dependent manner of cell toxicity was observed. Our present findings indicated that teicoplanin at clinically used concentrations induced cell proliferation. It should therefore be used cautiously, particularly in children, pregnant women and patients with cancer.

  10. Cross-Cultural Differences in the Neural Correlates of Specific and General Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paige, Laura E.; Ksander, John C.; Johndro, Hunter A.; Gutchess, Angela H.

    2017-01-01

    Research suggests that culture influences how people perceive the world, which extends to memory specificity, or how much perceptual detail is remembered. The present study investigated cross-cultural differences (Americans vs. East Asians) at the time of encoding in the neural correlates of specific vs. general memory formation. Participants encoded photos of everyday items in the scanner and 48 hours later completed a surprise recognition test. The recognition test consisted of same (i.e., previously seen in scanner), similar (i.e., same name, different features), or new photos (i.e., items not previously seen in scanner). For Americans compared to East Asians, we predicted greater activation in the hippocampus and right fusiform for specific memory at recognition, as these regions were implicated previously in encoding perceptual details. Results revealed that East Asians activated the left fusiform and left hippocampus more than Americans for specific vs. general memory. Follow-up analyses ruled out alternative explanations of retrieval difficulty and familiarity for this pattern of cross-cultural differences at encoding. Results overall suggest that culture should be considered as another individual difference that affects memory specificity and modulates neural regions underlying these processes. PMID:28256199

  11. Copine1 regulates neural stem cell functions during brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Hwan; Sung, Soo-Eun; Cheal Yoo, Jae; Park, Jae-Yong; Yi, Gwan-Su; Heo, Jun Young; Lee, Jae-Ran; Kim, Nam-Soon; Lee, Da Yong

    2018-01-01

    Copine 1 (CPNE1) is a well-known phospholipid binding protein in plasma membrane of various cell types. In brain cells, CPNE1 is closely associated with AKT signaling pathway, which is important for neural stem cell (NSC) functions during brain development. Here, we investigated the role of CPNE1 in the regulation of brain NSC functions during brain development and determined its underlying mechanism. In this study, abundant expression of CPNE1 was observed in neural lineage cells including NSCs and immature neurons in human. With mouse brain tissues in various developmental stages, we found that CPNE1 expression was higher at early embryonic stages compared to postnatal and adult stages. To model developing brain in vitro, we used primary NSCs derived from mouse embryonic hippocampus. Our in vitro study shows decreased proliferation and multi-lineage differentiation potential in CPNE1 deficient NSCs. Finally, we found that the deficiency of CPNE1 downregulated mTOR signaling in embryonic NSCs. These data demonstrate that CPNE1 plays a key role in the regulation of NSC functions through the activation of AKT-mTOR signaling pathway during brain development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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  14. Marmoset induced pluripotent stem cells: Robust neural differentiation following pretreatment with dimethyl sulfoxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhifang Qiu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The marmoset is an important nonhuman primate model for regenerative medicine. For experimental autologous cell therapy based on induced pluripotent (iPS cells in the marmoset, cells must be able to undergo robust and reliable directed differentiation that will not require customization for each specific iPS cell clone. When marmoset iPS cells were aggregated in a hanging drop format for 3 days, followed by exposure to dual SMAD inhibitors and retinoic acid in monolayer culture for 3 days, we found substantial variability in the response of different iPS cell clones. However, when clones were pretreated with 0.05–2% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO for 24 hours, all clones showed a very similar maximal response to the directed differentiation scheme. Peak responses were observed at 0.5% DMSO in two clones and at 1% DMSO in a third clone. When patterns of gene expression were examined by microarray analysis, hierarchical clustering showed very similar responses in all 3 clones when they were pretreated with optimal DMSO concentrations. The change in phenotype following exposure to DMSO and the 6 day hanging drop/monolayer treatment was confirmed by immunocytochemistry. Analysis of DNA content in DMSO-exposed cells indicated that it is unlikely that DMSO acts by causing cells to exit from the cell cycle. This approach should be generally valuable in the directed neural differentiation of pluripotent cells for experimental cell therapy.

  15. Human ES cells: Starting Culture from Frozen Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Trish, Erin; Dimos, John; Eggan, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    Here we demonstrate how our lab begins a HuES human embryonic stem cell line culture from a frozen stock. First, a one to two day old ten cm plate of approximately one (to two) million irradiated mouse embryonic fibroblast feeder cells is rinsed with HuES media to remove residual serum and cell debris, and then HuES media added and left to equilibrate in the cell culture incubator. A frozen vial of cells from long term liquid nitrogen storage or a -80C freezer is sourced and quickly submer...

  16. miR-381 Regulates Neural Stem Cell Proliferation and Differentiation via Regulating Hes1 Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Shi

    Full Text Available Neural stem cells are self-renewing, multipotent and undifferentiated precursors that retain the capacity for differentiation into both glial (astrocytes and oligodendrocytes and neuronal lineages. Neural stem cells offer cell-based therapies for neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease and spinal cord injuries. However, their cellular behavior is poorly understood. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of small noncoding RNAs involved in cell development, proliferation and differentiation through regulating gene expression at post-transcriptional level. The role of miR-381 in the development of neural stem cells remains unknown. In this study, we showed that overexpression of miR-381 promoted neural stem cells proliferation. It induced the neural stem cells differentiation to neurons and inhibited their differentiation to astrocytes. Furthermore, we identified HES1 as a direct target of miR-381 in neural stem cells. Moreover, re-expression of HES1 impaired miR-381-induced promotion of neural stem cells proliferation and induce neural stem cells differentiation to neurons. In conclusion, miR-381 played important role in neural stem cells proliferation and differentiation.

  17. Culture conditions tailored to the cell of origin are critical for maintaining native properties and tumorigenicity of glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledur, Pítia F; Liu, Chong; He, Hua; Harris, Alexandra R; Minussi, Darlan C; Zhou, Hai-Yan; Shaffrey, Mark E; Asthagiri, Ashok; Lopes, Maria Beatriz S; Schiff, David; Lu, Yi-Cheng; Mandell, James W; Lenz, Guido; Zong, Hui

    2016-10-01

    Cell culture plays a pivotal role in cancer research. However, culture-induced changes in biological properties of tumor cells profoundly affect research reproducibility and translational potential. Establishing culture conditions tailored to the cancer cell of origin could resolve this problem. For glioma research, it has been previously shown that replacing serum with defined growth factors for neural stem cells (NSCs) greatly improved the retention of gene expression profile and tumorigenicity. However, among all molecular subtypes of glioma, our laboratory and others have previously shown that the oligodendrocyte precursor cell (OPC) rather than the NSC serves as the cell of origin for the proneural subtype, raising questions regarding the suitability of NSC-tailored media for culturing proneural glioma cells. OPC-originated mouse glioma cells were cultured in conditions for normal OPCs or NSCs, respectively, for multiple passages. Gene expression profiles, morphologies, tumorigenicity, and drug responsiveness of cultured cells were examined in comparison with freshly isolated tumor cells. OPC media-cultured glioma cells maintained tumorigenicity, gene expression profiles, and morphologies similar to freshly isolated tumor cells. In contrast, NSC-media cultured glioma cells gradually lost their OPC features and most tumor-initiating ability and acquired heightened sensitivity to temozolomide. To improve experimental reproducibility and translational potential of glioma research, it is important to identify the cell of origin, and subsequently apply this knowledge to establish culture conditions that allow the retention of native properties of tumor cells. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Leader Cells Define Directionality of Trunk, but Not Cranial, Neural Crest Cell Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo Richardson

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Collective cell migration is fundamental for life and a hallmark of cancer. Neural crest (NC cells migrate collectively, but the mechanisms governing this process remain controversial. Previous analyses in Xenopus indicate that cranial NC (CNC cells are a homogeneous population relying on cell-cell interactions for directional migration, while chick embryo analyses suggest a heterogeneous population with leader cells instructing directionality. Our data in chick and zebrafish embryos show that CNC cells do not require leader cells for migration and all cells present similar migratory capacities. In contrast, laser ablation of trunk NC (TNC cells shows that leader cells direct movement and cell-cell contacts are required for migration. Moreover, leader and follower identities are acquired before the initiation of migration and remain fixed thereafter. Thus, two distinct mechanisms establish the directionality of CNC cells and TNC cells. This implies the existence of multiple molecular mechanisms for collective cell migration.

  19. Pinoresinol from Ipomoea cairica cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Páska, Csilla; Innocenti, Gabbriella; Ferlin, Mariagrazia; Kunvári, Mónika; László, Miklós

    2002-10-01

    Ipomoea cairica cell cultures produced a tetrahydrofuran lignan, (+)-pinoresinol, identified by UV, IR, MS and NMR methods, not yet found in the intact plant, and new in the Convolvulaceae family. Pinoresinol was found to have antioxidant and Ca2+ antagonist properties. As it could be requested for its biological activity, we examined the possibility to raise the pinoresinol yield of I. cairica cultures, as well as we continued investigations on lignans' response to optimization.

  20. SSEA4-positive pig induced pluripotent stem cells are primed for differentiation into neural cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jeong-Yeh; Mumaw, Jennifer L; Liu, Yubing; Stice, Steve L; West, Franklin D

    2013-01-01

    Neural cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have the potential for autologous cell therapies in treating patients with severe neurological disorders or injury. However, further study of efficacy and safety are needed in large animal preclinical models that have similar neural anatomy and physiology to humans such as the pig. The pig model for pluripotent stem cell therapy has been made possible for the first time with the development of pig iPSCs (piPSCs) capable of in vitro and in vivo differentiation into tissues of all three germ layers. Still, the question remains if piPSCs are capable of undergoing robust neural differentiation using a system similar to those being used with human iPSCs. In this study, we generated a new line of piPSCs from fibroblast cells that expressed pluripotency markers and were capable of embryoid body differentiation into all three germ layers. piPSCs demonstrated robust neural differentiation forming βIII-TUB/MAP2+ neurons, GFAP+ astrocytes, and O4+ oligodendrocytes and demonstrated strong upregulation of neural cell genes representative of all three major neural lineages of the central nervous system. In the presence of motor neuron signaling factors, piPSC-derived neurons showed expression of transcription factors associated with motor neuron differentiation (HB9 and ISLET1). Our findings demonstrate that SSEA4 expression is required for piPSCs to differentiate into neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes and furthermore develop specific neuronal subtypes. This indicates that the pigs can fill the need for a powerful model to study autologous neural iPSC therapies in a system similar to humans.

  1. 21 CFR 864.2280 - Cultured animal and human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cultured animal and human cells. 864.2280 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products § 864.2280 Cultured animal and human cells. (a) Identification. Cultured animal and human cells are in vitro...

  2. GDNF facilitates differentiation of the adult dentate gyrus-derived neural precursor cells into astrocytes via STAT3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boku, Shuken, E-mail: shuboku@med.hokudai.ac.jp [Department of Psychiatry, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Nakagawa, Shin [Department of Psychiatry, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Takamura, Naoki [Pharmaceutical Laboratories, Dainippon Sumitomo Pharma Co. Ltd., Osaka (Japan); Kato, Akiko [Department of Psychiatry, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Takebayashi, Minoru [Department of Psychiatry, National Hospital Organization Kure Medical Center, Kure (Japan); Hisaoka-Nakashima, Kazue [Department of Pharmacology, Hiroshima University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima (Japan); Omiya, Yuki; Inoue, Takeshi; Kusumi, Ichiro [Department of Psychiatry, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)

    2013-05-17

    Highlights: •GDNF has no effect on ADP proliferation and apoptosis. •GDNF increases ADP differentiation into astrocyte. •A specific inhibitor of STAT3 decreases the astrogliogenic effect of GDNF. •STAT3 knockdown by lentiviral shRNA vector also decreases the astrogliogenic effect of GDNF. •GDNF increases the phosphorylation of STAT3. -- Abstract: While the pro-neurogenic actions of antidepressants in the adult hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) are thought to be one of the mechanisms through which antidepressants exert their therapeutic actions, antidepressants do not increase proliferation of neural precursor cells derived from the adult DG. Because previous studies showed that antidepressants increase the expression and secretion of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) in C6 glioma cells derived from rat astrocytes and GDNF increases neurogenesis in adult DG in vivo, we investigated the effects of GDNF on the proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis of cultured neural precursor cells derived from the adult DG. Data showed that GDNF facilitated the differentiation of neural precursor cells into astrocytes but had no effect on their proliferation or apoptosis. Moreover, GDNF increased the phosphorylation of STAT3, and both a specific inhibitor of STAT3 and lentiviral shRNA for STAT3 decreased their differentiation into astrocytes. Taken together, our findings suggest that GDNF facilitates astrogliogenesis from neural precursor cells in adult DG through activating STAT3 and that this action might indirectly affect neurogenesis.

  3. CRISPR/Cas9-induced disruption of gene expression in mouse embryonic brain and single neural stem cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalebic, Nereo; Taverna, Elena; Tavano, Stefania; Wong, Fong Kuan; Suchold, Dana; Winkler, Sylke; Huttner, Wieland B; Sarov, Mihail

    2016-03-01

    We have applied the CRISPR/Cas9 system in vivo to disrupt gene expression in neural stem cells in the developing mammalian brain. Two days after in utero electroporation of a single plasmid encoding Cas9 and an appropriate guide RNA (gRNA) into the embryonic neocortex of Tis21::GFP knock-in mice, expression of GFP, which occurs specifically in neural stem cells committed to neurogenesis, was found to be nearly completely (≈ 90%) abolished in the progeny of the targeted cells. Importantly, upon in utero electroporation directly of recombinant Cas9/gRNA complex, near-maximal efficiency of disruption of GFP expression was achieved already after 24 h. Furthermore, by using microinjection of the Cas9 protein/gRNA complex into neural stem cells in organotypic slice culture, we obtained disruption of GFP expression within a single cell cycle. Finally, we used either Cas9 plasmid in utero electroporation or Cas9 protein complex microinjection to disrupt the expression of Eomes/Tbr2, a gene fundamental for neocortical neurogenesis. This resulted in a reduction in basal progenitors and an increase in neuronal differentiation. Thus, the present in vivo application of the CRISPR/Cas9 system in neural stem cells provides a rapid, efficient and enduring disruption of expression of specific genes to dissect their role in mammalian brain development. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY NC ND 4.0 license.

  4. Cell Culture on MEMS Platforms: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Ming; Tong, Wen Hao; Choudhury, Deepak; Rahim, Nur Aida Abdul; Iliescu, Ciprian; Yu, Hanry

    2009-01-01

    Microfabricated systems provide an excellent platform for the culture of cells, and are an extremely useful tool for the investigation of cellular responses to various stimuli. Advantages offered over traditional methods include cost-effectiveness, controllability, low volume, high resolution, and sensitivity. Both biocompatible and bio-incompatible materials have been developed for use in these applications. Biocompatible materials such as PMMA or PLGA can be used directly for cell culture. However, for bio-incompatible materials such as silicon or PDMS, additional steps need to be taken to render these materials more suitable for cell adhesion and maintenance. This review describes multiple surface modification strategies to improve the biocompatibility of MEMS materials. Basic concepts of cell-biomaterial interactions, such as protein adsorption and cell adhesion are covered. Finally, the applications of these MEMS materials in Tissue Engineering are presented. PMID:20054478

  5. Genome-wide copy number profiling to detect gene amplifications in neural progenitor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Fischer

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available DNA sequence amplification occurs at defined stages during normal development in amphibians and flies and seems to be restricted in humans to drug-resistant and tumor cells only. We used array-CGH to discover copy number changes including gene amplifications and deletions during differentiation of human neural progenitor cells. Here, we describe cell culture features, DNA extraction, and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH analysis tailored towards the identification of genomic copy number changes. Further detailed analysis of amplified chromosome regions associated with this experiment, was published by Fischer and colleagues in PLOS One in 2012 (Fischer et al., 2012. We provide detailed information on deleted chromosome regions during differentiation and give an overview on copy number changes during differentiation induction for two representative chromosome regions.

  6. The Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule NCAM2/OCAM/RNCAM, a Close Relative to NCAM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulahin, Nikolaj; Walmod, Peter

    2008-01-01

    and plasticity of synapses. NCAM shares an overall sequence identity of approximately 44% with the neural cell adhesion molecule 2 (NCAM2), a protein also known as olfactory cell adhesion molecule (OCAM) and Rb-8 neural cell adhesion molecule (RNCAM), and the region-for-region sequence homology between the two......Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) constitute a large class of plasma membrane-anchored proteins that mediate attachment between neighboring cells and between cells and the surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM). However, CAMs are more than simple mediators of cell adhesion. The neural cell adhesion...

  7. A chemical screen in zebrafish embryonic cells establishes that Akt activation is required for neural crest development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ciarlo, Christie; Kaufman, Charles K.; Kinikoglu, Beste; Michael, Jonathan; Yang, Song; D’Amato, Christopher; Blokzijl-Franke, Sasja; den Hertog, Jeroen|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/096717696; Schlaeger, Thorsten M.; Zhou, Yi; Liao, Eric C; Zon, Leonard I.

    2017-01-01

    The neural crest is a dynamic progenitor cell population that arises at the border of neural and non-neural ectoderm. The inductive roles of FGF, Wnt, and BMP at the neural plate border are well established, but the signals required for subsequent neural crest development remain poorly

  8. Heterotopically transplanted CVO neural stem cells generate neurons and migrate with SVZ cells in the adult mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Lori B; Cai, Jingli; Enikolopov, Grigori; Iacovitti, Lorraine

    2010-05-07

    Production of new neurons throughout adulthood has been well characterized in two brain regions, the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the anterolateral ventricle and the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampus. The neurons produced from these regions arise from neural stem cells (NSCs) found in highly regulated stem cell niches. We recently showed that midline structures called circumventricular organs (CVOs) also contain NSCs capable of neurogenesis and/or astrogliogenesis in vitro and in situ (Bennett et al.). The present study demonstrates that NSCs derived from two astrogliogenic CVOs, the median eminence and organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis of the nestin-GFP mouse, possess the potential to integrate into the SVZ and differentiate into cells with a neuronal phenotype. These NSCs, following expansion and BrdU-labeling in culture and heterotopic transplantation into a region proximal to the SVZ in adult mice, migrate caudally to the SVZ and express early neuronal markers (TUC-4, PSA-NCAM) as they migrate along the rostral migratory stream. CVO-derived BrdU(+) cells ultimately reach the olfactory bulb where they express early (PSA-NCAM) and mature (NeuN) neuronal markers. Collectively, these data suggest that although NSCs derived from the ME and OVLT CVOs are astrogliogenic in situ, they produce cells phenotypic of neurons in vivo when placed in a neurogenic environment. These findings may have implications for neural repair in the adult brain. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Transient expression of Olig1 initiates the differentiation of neural stem cells into oligodendrocyte progenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balasubramaniyan, [No Value; Timmer, N; Kust, B; Boddeke, E; Copray, S

    2004-01-01

    In order to develop an efficient strategy to induce the in vitro differentiation of neural stem cells (NSCs) into oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs), NSCs were isolated from E14 mice and grown in medium containing epidermal growth factor and fibroblast growth factor (FGF). Besides supplementing

  10. SPECC1L deficiency results in increased adherens junction stability and reduced cranial neural crest cell delamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Nathan R; Olm-Shipman, Adam J; Acevedo, Diana S; Palaniyandi, Kanagaraj; Hall, Everett G; Kosa, Edina; Stumpff, Kelly M; Smith, Guerin J; Pitstick, Lenore; Liao, Eric C; Bjork, Bryan C; Czirok, Andras; Saadi, Irfan

    2016-01-20

    Cranial neural crest cells (CNCCs) delaminate from embryonic neural folds and migrate to pharyngeal arches, which give rise to most mid-facial structures. CNCC dysfunction plays a prominent role in the etiology of orofacial clefts, a frequent birth malformation. Heterozygous mutations in SPECC1L have been identified in patients with atypical and syndromic clefts. Here, we report that in SPECC1L-knockdown cultured cells, staining of canonical adherens junction (AJ) components, β-catenin and E-cadherin, was increased, and electron micrographs revealed an apico-basal diffusion of AJs. To understand the role of SPECC1L in craniofacial morphogenesis, we generated a mouse model of Specc1l deficiency. Homozygous mutants were embryonic lethal and showed impaired neural tube closure and CNCC delamination. Staining of AJ proteins was increased in the mutant neural folds. This AJ defect is consistent with impaired CNCC delamination, which requires AJ dissolution. Further, PI3K-AKT signaling was reduced and apoptosis was increased in Specc1l mutants. In vitro, moderate inhibition of PI3K-AKT signaling in wildtype cells was sufficient to cause AJ alterations. Importantly, AJ changes induced by SPECC1L-knockdown were rescued by activating the PI3K-AKT pathway. Together, these data indicate SPECC1L as a novel modulator of PI3K-AKT signaling and AJ biology, required for neural tube closure and CNCC delamination.

  11. How Tissue Mechanical Properties Affect Enteric Neural Crest Cell Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, N. R.; Gazguez, E.; Bidault, L.; Guilbert, T.; Vias, C.; Vian, E.; Watanabe, Y.; Muller, L.; Germain, S.; Bondurand, N.; Dufour, S.; Fleury, V.

    2016-02-01

    Neural crest cells (NCCs) are a population of multipotent cells that migrate extensively during vertebrate development. Alterations to neural crest ontogenesis cause several diseases, including cancers and congenital defects, such as Hirschprung disease, which results from incomplete colonization of the colon by enteric NCCs (ENCCs). We investigated the influence of the stiffness and structure of the environment on ENCC migration in vitro and during colonization of the gastrointestinal tract in chicken and mouse embryos. We showed using tensile stretching and atomic force microscopy (AFM) that the mesenchyme of the gut was initially soft but gradually stiffened during the period of ENCC colonization. Second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy revealed that this stiffening was associated with a gradual organization and enrichment of collagen fibers in the developing gut. Ex-vivo 2D cell migration assays showed that ENCCs migrated on substrates with very low levels of stiffness. In 3D collagen gels, the speed of the ENCC migratory front decreased with increasing gel stiffness, whereas no correlation was found between porosity and ENCC migration behavior. Metalloprotease inhibition experiments showed that ENCCs actively degraded collagen in order to progress. These results shed light on the role of the mechanical properties of tissues in ENCC migration during development.

  12. Ginsenoside Rb1 Protects Rat Neural Progenitor Cells against Oxidative Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Ni

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Ginseng, the root of Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer, has been used as a tonic to enhance bodily functions against various ailments for hundreds of years in Far Eastern countries without apparent adverse effects. Ginsenoside Rb1, one of the most active ingredients of ginseng, has been shown to possess various pharmacological activities. Here we report that Rb1 exhibits potent neuroprotective effects against oxidative injury induced by tert-butylhydroperoxide (t-BHP. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH assay demonstrated that incubation with 300 µm t-BHP for 2.5 h led to a significant cell loss of cultured rat embryonic cortex-derived neural progenitor cells (NPCs and the cell viability was pronouncedly increased by 24 h pretreatment of 10 µm Rb1. TUNEL staining further confirmed that pretreatment of Rb1 significantly reduced the cell apoptosis in t-BHP-induced oxidative injury. Real time PCR revealed that pretreatment with Rb1 activated Nrf2 pathway in cultured NPCs and led to an elevated expression of HO-1. The results of the present study demonstrate that Rb1 shows a potent anti-oxidative effect on cultured NPCs by activating Nrf2 pathway.

  13. A novel three-dimensional system to study interactions between endothelial cells and neural cells of the developing central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milner Richard

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During angiogenesis in the developing central nervous system (CNS, endothelial cells (EC detach from blood vessels growing on the brain surface, and migrate into the expanding brain parenchyma. Brain angiogenesis is regulated by growth factors and extracellular matrix (ECM proteins secreted by cells of the developing CNS. In addition, recent evidence suggests that EC play an important role in establishing the neural stem cell (NSC niche. Therefore, two-way communication between EC and neural cells is of fundamental importance in the developing CNS. To study the interactions between brain EC and neural cells of the developing CNS, a novel three-dimensional (3-D murine co-culture system was developed. Fluorescent-labelled brain EC were seeded onto neurospheres; floating cellular aggregates that contain NSC/neural precursor cells (NPC and smaller numbers of differentiated cells. Using this system, brain EC attachment, survival and migration into neurospheres was evaluated and the role of integrins in mediating the early adhesive events addressed. Results Brain EC attached, survived and migrated deep into neurospheres over a 5-day period. Neurospheres express the ECM proteins fibronectin and laminin, and brain EC adhesion to neurospheres was inhibited by RGD peptides and antibodies specific for the β1, but not the α6 integrin subunit. Conclusion A novel 3-D co-culture system for analysing the interactions between EC and neural cells of the developing CNS is presented. This system could be used to investigate the reciprocal influence of EC and NSC/NPC; to examine how NSC/NPC influence cerebral angiogenesis, and conversely, to examine how EC regulate the maintenance and differentiation of NSC/NPC. Using this system it is demonstrated that EC attachment to neurospheres is mediated by the fibronectin receptor, α5β1 integrin.

  14. Properties of Dental Pulp-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells and the Effects of Culture Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Nobuyuki; Noda, Sonoko; Yamamoto, Mioko; Okiji, Takashi

    2017-09-01

    Dental pulp mesenchymal stem cells (DPMSCs) highly express mesenchymal stem cell markers and possess the potential to differentiate into neural cells, osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. Thus, DPMSCs are considered suitable for tissue regeneration. The colony isolation method has commonly been used to collect relatively large amounts of heterogeneous DPMSCs. Homogenous DPMSCs can be isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting using antibodies against mesenchymal stem cell markers, although this method yields a limited number of cells. Both quality and quantity of DPMSCs are critical to regenerative therapy, and cell culture methods need to be improved. We thus investigated the properties of DPMSCs cultured with different methods. DPMSCs in a three-dimensional spheroid culture system, which is similar to the hanging drop culture for differentiation of embryonic stem cells, showed upregulation of odonto-/osteoblastic markers and mineralized nodule formation. This suggests that this three-dimensional spheroid culturing system for DPMSCs may be suitable for inducing hard tissues. We further examined the effect of cell culture density on the properties of DPMSCs because the properties of stem cells can be altered depending on the cell density. DPMSCs cultured under the confluent cell density condition showed slight downregulation of some mesenchymal stem cell markers compared with those under the sparse condition. The ability of DPMSCs to differentiate into hard tissue-forming cells was found to be enhanced in the confluent condition, suggesting that the confluent culture condition may not be suitable for maintaining the stemness of DPMSCs. When DPMSCs are to be used for hard tissue regeneration, dense followed by sparse cell culture conditions may be a better alternative strategy. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Cell Cycle Progression of Human Cells Cultured in Rotating Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Kelsey

    2009-01-01

    Space flight has been shown to alter the astronauts immune systems. Because immune performance is complex and reflects the influence of multiple organ systems within the host, scientists sought to understand the potential impact of microgravity alone on the cellular mechanisms critical to immunity. Lymphocytes and their differentiated immature form, lymphoblasts, play an important and integral role in the body's defense system. T cells, one of the three major types of lymphocytes, play a central role in cell-mediated immunity. They can be distinguished from other lymphocyte types, such as B cells and natural killer cells by the presence of a special receptor on their cell surface called T cell receptors. Reported studies have shown that spaceflight can affect the expression of cell surface markers. Cell surface markers play an important role in the ability of cells to interact and to pass signals between different cells of the same phenotype and cells of different phenotypes. Recent evidence suggests that cell-cycle regulators are essential for T-cell function. To trigger an effective immune response, lymphocytes must proliferate. The objective of this project is to investigate the changes in growth of human cells cultured in rotating bioreactors and to measure the growth rate and the cell cycle distribution for different human cell types. Human lymphocytes and lymphoblasts will be cultured in a bioreactor to simulate aspects of microgravity. The bioreactor is a cylindrical culture vessel that incorporates the aspects of clinostatic rotation of a solid fluid body around a horizontal axis at a constant speed, and compensates gravity by rotation and places cells within the fluid body into a sustained free-fall. Cell cycle progression and cell proliferation of the lymphocytes will be measured for a number of days. In addition, RNA from the cells will be isolated for expression of genes related in cell cycle regulations.

  16. Ezh2 Expression in Astrocytes Induces Their Dedifferentiation Toward Neural Stem Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sher, Falak; Boddeke, Erik; Copray, Sjef

    Recently, we have demonstrated the expression of the polycomb group protein Ezh2 in embryonic and adult neural stem cells. Although Ezh2 remained highly expressed when neural stem cells differentiate into oligodendrocyte precursor cells, it is downregulated during the differentiation into neurons or

  17. Retinol esterification in cultured rat liver cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drevon, C A; Blomhoff, R; Rasmussen, M; Kindberg, G M; Berg, T; Norum, K R

    1985-01-01

    Retinol esterification was examined in cultured hepatocytes and stellate cells from the rat. Esterification of [3H]retinol was linear for 2 h in both cell types. By increasing the concentration of retinol in the medium, there was a marked increase in retinol esterification in both cell types. The capacity for esterification of retinol was in the same order of magnitude in the two cell types at 3.5 microM-retinol in the medium. This represents a rate of retinol esterification which far exceeds that required to esterify the amount of retinol absorbed in the intestine. It was demonstrated in particulate homogenates from cultured hepatocytes that the esterification of retinol was dependent on acyl-CoA. Addition of 25-hydroxycholesterol or mevalonolactone promoted an increase in cholesterol esterification, whereas retinol esterification was unaffected, suggesting that cholesterol and retinol are esterified by two different enzymes. Some 80% of vitamin A in cultured hepatocytes is retinyl esters, mostly retinyl palmitate. By adding 87 microM-retinol in the medium the cells accumulated 100-fold free retinol and 2.5-3.0-fold retinyl esters within 1 h. When retinol-loaded cells were incubated without retinol, there was a marked decrease especially in free but also in esterified retinol. In the presence of 1 mM-oleic acid in the medium the amount of retinyl oleate was twice that in control cells. PMID:4062867

  18. Neural stem cell adhesion and proliferation on phospholipid bilayers functionalized with RGD peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananthanarayanan, Badriprasad; Little, Lauren; Schaffer, David V; Healy, Kevin E; Tirrell, Matthew

    2010-11-01

    Peptide-functionalized materials show promise in controlling stem cell behavior by mimicking cell-matrix interactions. Supported lipid bilayers are an excellent platform for displaying peptides due to their ease of fabrication and low non-specific interactions with cells. In this paper, we report on the behavior of adult hippocampal neural stem cells (NSCs) on phospholipid bilayers functionalized with different RGD-containing peptides: either GGGNGEPRGDTYRAY ('bsp-RGD(15)') or GRGDSP. Fluid supported bilayers were prepared on glass surfaces by adsorption and fusion of small lipid vesicles incorporating synthetic peptide amphiphiles. NSCs adhered to bilayers with either GRGDSP or bsp-RGD(15) peptide. After 5 days in culture, NSCs formed neurosphere-like aggregates on GRGDSP bilayers, whereas on bsp-RGD(15) bilayers a large fraction of single adhered cells were observed, comparable to monolayer growth seen on laminin controls. NSCs retained their ability to differentiate into neurons and astrocytes on both peptide surfaces. This work illustrates the utility of supported bilayers in displaying peptide ligands and demonstrates that RGD peptides may be useful in synthetic culture systems for stem cells. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Directed differentiation of porcine epiblast-derived neural progenitor cells into neurons and glia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, M A; Hall, V J; Carter, T F; Hyttel, P

    2011-09-01

    Neural progenitor cells (NPCs) are promising candidates for cell-based therapy of neurodegenerative diseases; however, safety concerns must be addressed through transplantation studies in large animal models, such as the pig. The aim of this study was to derive NPCs from porcine blastocysts and evaluate their in-vitro differentiation potential. Epiblasts were manually isolated from expanded hatched blastocysts and cultured on MEF feeder cells. Outgrowth colonies were passaged to MS5 cells and rosettes were further passaged to Matrigel-coated dishes containing bFGF and EGF. Three NPC lines were established which showed expression of SOX2, NESTIN and VIMENTIN. One line was characterised in more detail, retaining a normal karyotype and proliferating for more than three months in culture. Following differentiation, TUJI was significantly up-regulated in protocol 2 (RA and SHH; 58% positive cells) as were NF and TH. In contrast, MBP was significantly up-regulated in protocol 3 (FGF8 and SHH; 63% positive cells), whereas, GFAP was significantly up-regulated in protocols 1-4 (33%, 25%, 43% and 22%). The present study provides the first report of a porcine blastocyst-derived NPC line capable of differentiating into both neurons and glia, which may be of paramount importance for future transplantation studies in large animal models of neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Defined human pluripotent stem cell culture enables highly efficient neuroepithelium derivation without small molecule inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippmann, Ethan Scott; Estevez-Silva, Maria Carolina; Ashton, Randolph Scott

    2014-04-01

    The embryonic neuroepithelium gives rise to the entire central nervous system in vivo, making it an important tissue for developmental studies and a prospective cell source for regenerative applications. Current protocols for deriving homogenous neuroepithelial cultures from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) consist of either embryoid body-mediated neuralization followed by a manual isolation step or adherent differentiation using small molecule inhibitors. Here, we report that hPSCs maintained under chemically defined, feeder-independent, and xeno-free conditions can be directly differentiated into pure neuroepithelial cultures ([mt]90% Pax6(+)/N-cadherin(+) with widespread rosette formation) within 6 days under adherent conditions, without small molecule inhibitors, and using only minimalistic medium consisting of Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium/F-12, sodium bicarbonate, selenium, ascorbic acid, transferrin, and insulin (i.e., E6 medium). Furthermore, we provide evidence that the defined culture conditions enable this high level of neural conversion in contrast to hPSCs maintained on mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). In addition, hPSCs previously maintained on MEFs could be rapidly converted to a neural compliant state upon transfer to these defined conditions while still maintaining their ability to generate all three germ layers. Overall, this fully defined and scalable protocol should be broadly useful for generating therapeutic neural cells for regenerative applications. © 2013 AlphaMed Press.

  1. Differentiation of mammalian skeletal muscle cells cultured on microcarrier beads in a rotating cell culture system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torgan, C. E.; Burge, S. S.; Collinsworth, A. M.; Truskey, G. A.; Kraus, W. E.

    2000-01-01

    The growth and repair of adult skeletal muscle are due in part to activation of muscle precursor cells, commonly known as satellite cells or myoblasts. These cells are responsive to a variety of environmental cues, including mechanical stimuli. The overall goal of the research is to examine the role of mechanical signalling mechanisms in muscle growth and plasticity through utilisation of cell culture systems where other potential signalling pathways (i.e. chemical and electrical stimuli) are controlled. To explore the effects of decreased mechanical loading on muscle differentiation, mammalian myoblasts are cultured in a bioreactor (rotating cell culture system), a model that has been utilised to simulate microgravity. C2C12 murine myoblasts are cultured on microcarrier beads in a bioreactor and followed throughout differentiation as they form a network of multinucleated myotubes. In comparison with three-dimensional control cultures that consist of myoblasts cultured on microcarrier beads in teflon bags, myoblasts cultured in the bioreactor exhibit an attenuation in differentiation. This is demonstrated by reduced immunohistochemical staining for myogenin and alpha-actinin. Western analysis shows a decrease, in bioreactor cultures compared with control cultures, in levels of the contractile proteins myosin (47% decrease, p muscle growth and repair during spaceflight.

  2. A biocompatible micro cell culture chamber (microCCC) for the culturing and on-line monitoring of eukaryote cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangegaard, Michael; Petronis, Sarunas; Jørgensen, A M

    2006-01-01

    We have previously shown that a polymeric (PMMA) chip with medium perfusion and integrated heat regulation provides sufficiently precise heat regulation, pH-control and medium exchange to support cell growth for weeks. However, it was unclear how closely the cells cultured in the chip resembled...... cells cultured in the culture flask. In the current study, gene expression profiles of cells cultured in the chip were compared with gene expression profiles of cells cultured in culture flasks. The results showed that there were only two genes that were differently expressed in cells grown in the cell...... culture chip compared to cell culture flasks. The cell culture chip could without further modification support cell growth of two other cell lines. Light coming from the microscope lamp during optical recordings of the cells was the only external factor identified, that could have a negative effect...

  3. Generation and properties of a new human ventral mesencephalic neural stem cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Ana; Liste, Isabel; Courtois, Elise T

    2009-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are powerful research tools for the design and discovery of new approaches to cell therapy in neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's disease. Several epigenetic and genetic strategies have been tested for long-term maintenance and expansion of these cells in vitro....... Here we report the generation of a new stable cell line of human neural stem cells derived from ventral mesencephalon (hVM1) based on v-myc immortalization. The cells expressed neural stem cell and radial glia markers like nestin, vimentin and 3CB2 under proliferation conditions. After withdrawal...

  4. Comparative transcriptome analysis in induced neural stem cells reveals defined neural cell identities in vitro and after transplantation into the adult rodent brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna-Lena Hallmann

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Reprogramming technology enables the production of neural progenitor cells (NPCs from somatic cells by direct transdifferentiation. However, little is known on how neural programs in these induced neural stem cells (iNSCs differ from those of alternative stem cell populations in vitro and in vivo. Here, we performed transcriptome analyses on murine iNSCs in comparison to brain-derived neural stem cells (NSCs and pluripotent stem cell-derived NPCs, which revealed distinct global, neural, metabolic and cell cycle-associated marks in these populations. iNSCs carried a hindbrain/posterior cell identity, which could be shifted towards caudal, partially to rostral but not towards ventral fates in vitro. iNSCs survived after transplantation into the rodent brain and exhibited in vivo-characteristics, neural and metabolic programs similar to transplanted NSCs. However, iNSCs vastly retained caudal identities demonstrating cell-autonomy of regional programs in vivo. These data could have significant implications for a variety of in vitro- and in vivo-applications using iNSCs.

  5. Melanoblast development coincides with the late emerging cells from the dorsal neural tube in turtle Trachemys scripta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Ritva; Cebra-Thomas, Judith; Haugas, Maarja; Partanen, Juha; Rice, David P C; Gilbert, Scott F

    2017-09-21

    Ectothermal reptiles have internal pigmentation, which is not seen in endothermal birds and mammals. Here we show that the development of the dorsal neural tube-derived melanoblasts in turtle Trachemys scripta is regulated by similar mechanisms as in other amniotes, but significantly later in development, during the second phase of turtle trunk neural crest emigration. The development of melanoblasts coincided with a morphological change in the dorsal neural tube between stages mature G15 and G16. The melanoblasts delaminated and gathered in the carapacial staging area above the neural tube at G16, and differentiated into pigment-forming melanocytes during in vitro culture. The Mitf-positive melanoblasts were not restricted to the dorsolateral pathway as in birds and mammals but were also present medially through the somites similarly to ectothermal anamniotes. This matched a lack of environmental barrier dorsal and lateral to neural tube and the somites that is normally formed by PNA-binding proteins that block entry to medial pathways. PNA-binding proteins may also participate in the patterning of the carapacial pigmentation as both the migratory neural crest cells and pigment localized only to PNA-free areas.

  6. Preservation of neuronal functions by exosomes derived from different human neural cell types under ischemic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Mingyang; Xiao, Han; Peng, Hongling; Yuan, Huan; Xu, Yunxiao; Zhang, Guangsen; Tang, Jianguang; Hu, Zhiping

    2017-11-27

    Stem cell-based therapies have been reported in protecting cerebral infarction-induced neuronal dysfunction and death. However, most studies used rat/mouse neuron as model cell when treated with stem cell or exosomes. Whether these findings can be translated from rodent to humans has been in doubt. Here, we used human embryonic stem cell-derived neurons to detect the protective potential of exosomes against ischemia. Neurons were treated with in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) for 1 h. For treatment group, different exosomes were derived from neuron, embryonic stem cell, neural progenitor cell and astrocyte differentiated from H9 human embryonic stem cell and added to culture medium 30 min after OGD (100 μg/mL). Western blotting was performed 12 h after OGD, while cell counting and electrophysiological recording were performed 48 h after OGD. We found that these exosomes attenuated OGD-induced neuronal death, Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), pro-inflammatory and apoptotic signaling pathway changes, as well as basal spontaneous synaptic transmission inhibition in varying degrees. The results implicate the protective effect of exosomes on OGD-induced neuronal death and dysfunction in human embryonic stem cell-derived neurons, potentially through their modulation on mTOR, pro-inflammatory and apoptotic signaling pathways. © 2017 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Comparing three methods of co-culture of retinal pigment epithelium with progenitor cells derived human embryonic stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noushin Amirpour

    2013-01-01

    The adherent cells were morphologically examined using phase contrast microscopy and characterized by immunofluorescent staining and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR Results: Evaluation of immunostaining showed that hESC, highly (>80% can be directed to the RPs fate. Upon co-culture of RPCs with RPE sheet using insert for 2 weeks or by the cell-to-cell contact, these cells differentiated to neural retina and expressed photoreceptor-specific markers. However, in direct co-culture, some mature photoreceptor markers like arrestin expressed in compare with indirect co-culture. Conclusions: The expression of late photoreceptor marker could be improved when RPE cells seeded on RPCs in compare with the use of insert.

  8. Cell Culture Microfluidic Biochips: Experimental Throughput Maximization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minhass, Wajid Hassan; Pop, Paul; Madsen, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Microfluidic biochips offer a promising alternative to a conventional biochemical laboratory, integrating all necessary functionalities on-chip in order to perform biochemical applications. Researchers have started to propose computer-aided design tools for the synthesis of such biochips. Our foc...... metaheuristic for experimental design generation for the cell culture microfluidic biochips, and we have evaluated our approach using multiple experimental setups....

  9. 3D culture for cardiac cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuppinger, Christian

    2016-07-01

    This review discusses historical milestones, recent developments and challenges in the area of 3D culture models with cardiovascular cell types. Expectations in this area have been raised in recent years, but more relevant in vitro research, more accurate drug testing results, reliable disease models and insights leading to bioartificial organs are expected from the transition to 3D cell culture. However, the construction of organ-like cardiac 3D models currently remains a difficult challenge. The heart consists of highly differentiated cells in an intricate arrangement.Furthermore, electrical “wiring”, a vascular system and multiple cell types act in concert to respond to the rapidly changing demands of the body. Although cardiovascular 3D culture models have been predominantly developed for regenerative medicine in the past, their use in drug screening and for disease models has become more popular recently. Many sophisticated 3D culture models are currently being developed in this dynamic area of life science. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel.

  10. Plant Cell Culture Initiation: practical tips

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hall, R.D.

    2001-01-01

    The use of cultured plant cells in either organized or unorganized form has increased vey considerably in the last 10-15 yr. Many new technologies have been developed and applications in both fundamental and applied research have led to the development of some powerful tools for improving our

  11. One-Step Seeding of Neural Stem Cells with Vitronectin-Supplemented Medium for High-Throughput Screening Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Sheng; Li, Rong; Long, Yan; Titus, Steve; Zhao, Jinghua; Huang, Ruili; Xia, Menghang; Zheng, Wei

    2016-12-01

    Human neuronal cells differentiated from induced pluripotent cells have emerged as a new model system for the study of disease pathophysiology and evaluation of drug efficacy. Differentiated neuronal cells are more similar in genetics and biological content to human brain cells than other animal disease models. However, culture of neuronal cells in assay plates requires a labor-intensive procedure of plate precoating, hampering its applications in high-throughput screening (HTS). We developed a simplified method with one-step seeding of neural stem cells in assay plates by supplementing the medium with a recombinant human vitronectin (VTN), thus avoiding plate precoating. Robust results were obtained from cell viability, calcium response, and neurite outgrowth assays using this new method. Our data demonstrate that this approach greatly simplifies high-throughput assays using neuronal cells differentiated from human stem cells for translational research.

  12. In vivo neural stem cell imaging: current modalities and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gera, Atul; Steinberg, Gary K; Guzman, Raphael

    2010-01-01

    Neural stem cells have been proposed as a promising therapy for treating a wide variety of neuropathologies. While several studies have demonstrated the therapeutic benefits of neural stem cells, the exact mechanism remains elusive. In order to facilitate research efforts to understand these mechanisms, and before neural stem cell-based therapies can be utilized in a clinical context, we must develop means of monitoring these cells in vivo. However, because of tissue depth and the blood-brain barrier, in vivo imaging of neural stem cells in the brain has unique challenges that do not apply to stem cells for other purposes. In this paper, we review contemporary methods for in vivo neural stem cell imaging, including MRI, PET and optical imaging techniques.

  13. Nanotechnology, Cell Culture and Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazutoshi Haraguchi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We have fabricated new types of polymer hydrogels and polymer nanocomposites, i.e., nanocomposite gels (NC gels and soft, polymer nanocomposites (M-NCs: solid, with novel organic/inorganic network structures. Both NC gels and M-NCs were synthesized by in-situ free-radical polymerization in the presence of exfoliated clay platelets in aqueous systems and were obtained in various forms such as film, sheet, tube, coating, etc. and sizes with a wide range of clay contents. Here, disk-like inorganic clay nanoparticles act as multi-functional crosslinkers to form new types of network systems. Both NC gels and M-NCs have extraordinary optical and mechanical properties including ultra-high reversible extensibility, as well as a number of new characteristics relating to optical anisotropy, polymer/clay morphology, biocompatibility, stimuli-sensitive surfaces, micro-patterning, etc. For examples, the biological testing of medical devices, comprised of a sensitization test, an irritation test, an intracutaneous test and an in vitro cytotoxicity test,was carried out for NC gels and M-NCs. The safety of NC gels and M-NCs was confirmed in all tests. Also, the interaction of living tissue with NC gel was investigated in vivo by implantation in live goats; neither inflammation nor concrescence occurred around the NC gels. Furthermore, it was found that both N-NC gels consisting of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide(PNIPA/clay network and M-NCs consisting of poly(2-methoxyethyacrylate(PMEA/clay network show characteristic cell culture and subsequent cell detachment on their surfaces, although it was almost impossible to culture cells on conventional, chemically-crosslinked PNIPA hydrogels and chemically crossslinked PMEA, regardless of their crosslinker concentration. Various kinds of cells, such ashumanhepatoma cells (HepG2, normal human dermal fibroblast (NHDF, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC, could be cultured to be confluent on the surfaces of N

  14. Intermittent, low dose carbon monoxide exposure enhances survival and dopaminergic differentiation of human neural stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer-Andersen, Nanna; Almeida, Ana Sofia; Jensen, Pia; Kamand, Morad; Okarmus, Justyna; Rosenberg, Tine; Friis, Stig Düring; Martínez Serrano, Alberto; Blaabjerg, Morten; Kristensen, Bjarne Winther; Skrydstrup, Troels; Gramsbergen, Jan Bert; Vieira, Helena L. A.

    2018-01-01

    Exploratory studies using human fetal tissue have suggested that intrastriatal transplantation of dopaminergic neurons may become a future treatment for patients with Parkinson’s disease. However, the use of human fetal tissue is compromised by ethical, regulatory and practical concerns. Human stem cells constitute an alternative source of cells for transplantation in Parkinson’s disease, but efficient protocols for controlled dopaminergic differentiation need to be developed. Short-term, low-level carbon monoxide (CO) exposure has been shown to affect signaling in several tissues, resulting in both protection and generation of reactive oxygen species. The present study investigated the effect of CO produced by a novel CO-releasing molecule on dopaminergic differentiation of human neural stem cells. Short-term exposure to 25 ppm CO at days 0 and 4 significantly increased the relative content of β-tubulin III-immunoreactive immature neurons and tyrosine hydroxylase expressing catecholaminergic neurons, as assessed 6 days after differentiation. Also the number of microtubule associated protein 2-positive mature neurons had increased significantly. Moreover, the content of apoptotic cells (Caspase3) was reduced, whereas the expression of a cell proliferation marker (Ki67) was left unchanged. Increased expression of hypoxia inducible factor-1α and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cultures exposed to CO may suggest a mechanism involving mitochondrial alterations and generation of ROS. In conclusion, the present procedure using controlled, short-term CO exposure allows efficient dopaminergic differentiation of human neural stem cells at low cost and may as such be useful for derivation of cells for experimental studies and future development of donor cells for transplantation in Parkinson’s disease. PMID:29338033

  15. YAP/TAZ enhance mammalian embryonic neural stem cell characteristics in a Tead-dependent manner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Dasol; Byun, Sung-Hyun; Park, Soojeong; Kim, Juwan; Kim, Inhee; Ha, Soobong; Kwon, Mookwang; Yoon, Keejung, E-mail: keejung@skku.edu

    2015-02-27

    Mammalian brain development is regulated by multiple signaling pathways controlling cell proliferation, migration and differentiation. Here we show that YAP/TAZ enhance embryonic neural stem cell characteristics in a cell autonomous fashion using diverse experimental approaches. Introduction of retroviral vectors expressing YAP or TAZ into the mouse embryonic brain induced cell localization in the ventricular zone (VZ), which is the embryonic neural stem cell niche. This change in cell distribution in the cortical layer is due to the increased stemness of infected cells; YAP-expressing cells were colabeled with Sox2, a neural stem cell marker, and YAP/TAZ increased the frequency and size of neurospheres, indicating enhanced self-renewal- and proliferative ability of neural stem cells. These effects appear to be TEA domain family transcription factor (Tead)–dependent; a Tead binding-defective YAP mutant lost the ability to promote neural stem cell characteristics. Consistently, in utero gene transfer of a constitutively active form of Tead2 (Tead2-VP16) recapitulated all the features of YAP/TAZ overexpression, and dominant negative Tead2-EnR resulted in marked cell exit from the VZ toward outer cortical layers. Taken together, these results indicate that the Tead-dependent YAP/TAZ signaling pathway plays important roles in neural stem cell maintenance by enhancing stemness of neural stem cells during mammalian brain development. - Highlights: • Roles of YAP and Tead in vivo during mammalian brain development are clarified. • Expression of YAP promotes embryonic neural stem cell characteristics in vivo in a cell autonomous fashion. • Enhancement of neural stem cell characteristics by YAP depends on Tead. • Transcriptionally active form of Tead alone can recapitulate the effects of YAP. • Transcriptionally repressive form of Tead severely reduces stem cell characteristics.

  16. Lack of beta1 integrins in enteric neural crest cells leads to a Hirschsprung-like phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breau, Marie A; Pietri, Thomas; Eder, Olivier

    2006-01-01

    The enteric nervous system arises mainly from vagal and sacral neural crest cells that colonise the gut between 9.5 and 14 days of development in mice. Using the Cre-LoxP system, we removed beta1 integrins in the neural crest cells when they emerge from the neural tube. beta1-null enteric neural ...

  17. File list: NoD.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. File list: NoD.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. File list: NoD.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 No description Neural Neural progenito...SRX346817,SRX346814 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  20. Cell Culture Assay for Human Noroviruses [response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straub, Tim M.; Honer Zu Bentrup, Kerstin; Orosz Coghlan, Patricia; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mayer, Brooke K.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Gerba, Charles P.; Abbaszadegan, Morteza A.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2007-07-01

    We appreciate the comments provided by Leung et al., in response to our recently published article “In Vitro Cell Culture Infectivity Assay for Human Noroviruses” by Straub et al. (1). The specific aim of our project was to develop an in vitro cell culture infectivity assay for human noroviruses (hNoV) to enhance risk assessments when they are detected in water supplies. Reverse transcription (RT) qualitative or quantitative PCR are the primary assays for waterborne NoV monitoring. However, these assays cannot distinguish between infectious vs. non-infectious virions. When hNoV is detected in water supplies, information provided by our infectivity assay will significantly improve risk assessment models and protect human health, regardless of whether we are propagating NoV. Indeed, in vitro cell culture infectivity assays for the waterborne pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum that supplement approved fluorescent microscopy assays, do not result in amplification of the environmentally resistant hard-walled oocysts (2). However, identification of life cycle stages in cell culture provides evidence of infectious oocysts in a water supply. Nonetheless, Leung et al.’s assertion regarding the suitability of our method for the in vitro propagation of high titers of NoV is valid for the medical research community. In this case, well-characterized challenge pools of virus would be useful for developing and testing diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines. As further validation of our published findings, we have now optimized RT quantitative PCR to assess the level of viral production in cell culture, where we are indeed finding significant increases in viral titer. The magnitude and time course of these increases is dependent on both virus strain and multiplicity of infection. We are currently preparing a manuscript that will discuss these findings in greater detail, and the implications this may have for creating viral challenge pools

  1. Neural evidence for cultural differences in the valuation of positive facial expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, BoKyung; Tsai, Jeanne L; Chim, Louise; Blevins, Elizabeth; Knutson, Brian

    2016-02-01

    European Americans value excitement more and calm less than Chinese. Within cultures, European Americans value excited and calm states similarly, whereas Chinese value calm more than excited states. To examine how these cultural differences influence people's immediate responses to excited vs calm facial expressions, we combined a facial rating task with functional magnetic resonance imaging. During scanning, European American (n = 19) and Chinese (n = 19) females viewed and rated faces that varied by expression (excited, calm), ethnicity (White, Asian) and gender (male, female). As predicted, European Americans showed greater activity in circuits associated with affect and reward (bilateral ventral striatum, left caudate) while viewing excited vs calm expressions than did Chinese. Within cultures, European Americans responded to excited vs calm expressions similarly, whereas Chinese showed greater activity in these circuits in response to calm vs excited expressions regardless of targets' ethnicity or gender. Across cultural groups, greater ventral striatal activity while viewing excited vs. calm expressions predicted greater preference for excited vs calm expressions months later. These findings provide neural evidence that people find viewing the specific positive facial expressions valued by their cultures to be rewarding and relevant. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neural Cells Survive and Mature in the Nonhuman Primate Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina E. Emborg

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs opens up the possibility for personalized cell therapy. Here, we show that transplanted autologous rhesus monkey iPSC-derived neural progenitors survive for up to 6 months and differentiate into neurons, astrocytes, and myelinating oligodendrocytes in the brains of MPTP-induced hemiparkinsonian rhesus monkeys with a minimal presence of inflammatory cells and reactive glia. This finding represents a significant step toward personalized regenerative therapies.

  3. Artificial neural networks for classification in metabolomic studies of whole cells using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brougham, D F

    2011-01-01

    We report the successful classification, by artificial neural networks (ANNs), of (1)H NMR spectroscopic data recorded on whole-cell culture samples of four different lung carcinoma cell lines, which display different drug resistance patterns. The robustness of the approach was demonstrated by its ability to classify the cell line correctly in 100% of cases, despite the demonstrated presence of operator-induced sources of variation, and irrespective of which spectra are used for training and for validation. The study demonstrates the potential of ANN for lung carcinoma classification in realistic situations.

  4. The role of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase in neural cell adhesion molecule-mediated neuronal differentiation and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Dorte K; Køhler, Lene B; Pedersen, Martin V

    2003-01-01

    that phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) is required for NCAM-mediated neurite outgrowth from PC12-E2 cells and from cerebellar and dopaminergic neurones in primary culture, and that the thr/ser kinase Akt/protein kinase B (PKB) is phosphorylated downstream of PI3K after stimulation with C3. Moreover, we present data...... to be dependent on PI3K.......The neural cell adhesion molecule, NCAM, is known to stimulate neurite outgrowth from primary neurones and PC12 cells presumably through signalling pathways involving the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR), protein kinase A (PKA), protein kinase C (PKC), the Ras-mitogen activated protein...

  5. Biosynthetic incorporation of unnatural sialic acids into polysialic acid on neural cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charter, N W; Mahal, L K; Koshland, D E; Bertozzi, C R

    2000-10-01

    In this study we demonstrate that polysialyltransferases are capable of accepting unnatural substrates in terminally differentiated human neurons. Polysialyltransferases catalyze the glycosylation of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) with polysialic acid (PSA). The unnatural sialic acid analog, N-levulinoyl sialic acid (SiaLev), was incorporated into cell surface glycoconjugates including PSA by the incubation of cultured neurons with the metabolic precursor N-levulinoylmannosamine (ManLev). The ketone group within the levulinoyl side chain of SiaLev was then used as a chemical handle for detection using a biotin probe. The incorporation of SiaLev residues into PSA was demonstrated by protection from sialidases that can cleave natural sialic acids but not those bearing unnatural N-acyl groups. The presence of SiaLev groups on the neuronal cell surface did not impede neurite outgrowth or significantly affect the distribution of PSA on neuronal compartments. Since PSA is important in neural plasticity and development, this mechanism for modulating PSA structure might be useful for functional studies.

  6. 3D reconstitution of the patterned neural tube from embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinhardt, Andrea; Eberle, Dominic; Tazaki, Akira; Ranga, Adrian; Niesche, Marco; Wilsch-Bräuninger, Michaela; Stec, Agnieszka; Schackert, Gabriele; Lutolf, Matthias; Tanaka, Elly M

    2014-12-09

    Inducing organogenesis in 3D culture is an important aspect of stem cell research. Anterior neural structures have been produced from large embryonic stem cell (ESC) aggregates, but the steps involved in patterning such complex structures have been ill defined, as embryoid bodies typically contained many cell types. Here we show that single mouse ESCs directly embedded in Matrigel or defined synthetic matrices under neural induction conditions can clonally form neuroepithelial cysts containing a single lumen in 3D. Untreated cysts were uniformly dorsal and could be ventralized to floor plate (FP). Retinoic acid posteriorized cysts to cervical levels and induced localize FP formation yielding full patterning along the dorsal/ventral (DV) axis. Correct spatial organization of motor neurons, interneurons, and dorsal interneurons along the DV axis was observed. This system serves as a valuable tool for studying morphogen action in 3D and as a source of patterned spinal cord tissue. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Neural stem cell differentiation by electrical stimulation using a cross-linked PEDOT substrate: Expanding the use of biocompatible conjugated conductive polymers for neural tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Filipa; Ferreira, Quirina; Rodrigues, Carlos A V; Morgado, Jorge; Ferreira, Frederico Castelo

    2015-06-01

    The use of conjugated polymers allows versatile interactions between cells and flexible processable materials, while providing a platform for electrical stimulation, which is particularly relevant when targeting differentiation of neural stem cells and further application for therapy or drug screening. Materials were tested for cytotoxicity following the ISO10993-5. PSS was cross-linked. ReNcellVM neural stem cells (NSC) were seeded in laminin coated surfaces, cultured for 4 days in the presence of EGF (20 ng/mL), FGF-2 (20 ng/mL) and B27 (20 μg/mL) and differentiated over eight additional days in the absence of those factors under 100Hz pulsed DC electrical stimulation, 1V with 10 ms pulses. NSC and neuron elongation aspect ratio as well as neurite length were assessed using ImageJ. Cells were immune-stained for Tuj1 and GFAP. F8T2, MEH-PPV, P3HT and cross-linked PSS (x PSS) were assessed as non-cytotoxic. L929 fibroblast population was 1.3 higher for x PSS than for glass control, while F8T2 presents moderate proliferation. The population of neurons (Tuj1) was 1.6 times higher with longer neurites (73 vs 108 μm) for cells cultured under electrical stimulus, with cultured NSC. Such stimulus led also to longer neurons. x PSS was, for the first time, used to elongate human NSC through the application of pulsed current, impacting on their differentiation towards neurons and contributing to longer neurites. The range of conductive conjugated polymers known as non-cytotoxic was expanded. x PSS was introduced as a stable material, easily processed from solution, to interface with biological systems, in particular NSC, without the need of in-situ polymerization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Development of a miniaturized bioreactor for neural culture and axon stretch growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qi; Chen, Fang; Wang, Yuanyuan; Li, Xiao; He, Jiping

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a miniaturized bioreactor for accelerating nerve growth is developed to investigate potentially bi-directional peripheral neural interface based on tissue engineering. The bioreactor consisting of two parallel chambers that are extended to conduct controlled trials for optimized neuronal culture. The chamber is used to improve the micro-environment of in vitro nerve regeneration in a CO2 incubator, whereas the process of axon stretch growth is performed by a computer controlled micro-motion system comprised of a linear motion table and a micro-stepper motor. This apparatus produces axon stretch growth by taking l μm step every 1 minute over 1000 iterations for 1mm elongation growth per day. Results show that axons from neonatal DRG explants are grown with unidirectional polarity with a robust regeneration over 5 days in the culture chamber, whereas micro-displacement measurement indicates a satisfactory accuracy and repeatability for the implementation of computer-controlled ASG.

  9. LINE-1 Cultured Cell Retrotransposition Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopera, Huira C.; Larson, Peter A.; Moldovan, John B.; Richardson, Sandra R.; Liu, Ying; Moran, John V.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The Long INterspersed Element-1 (LINE-1 or L1) retrotransposition assay has facilitated the discovery and characterization of active (i.e., retrotransposition-competent) LINE-1 sequences from mammalian genomes. In this assay, an engineered LINE-1 containing a retrotransposition reporter cassette is transiently transfected into a cultured cell line. Expression of the reporter cassette, which occurs only after a successful round of retrotransposition, allows the detection and quantification of the LINE-1 retrotransposition efficiency. This assay has yielded insight into the mechanism of LINE-1 retrotransposition. It also has provided a greater understanding of how the cell regulates LINE-1 retrotransposition and how LINE-1 retrotransposition impacts the structure of mammalian genomes. Below, we provide a brief introduction to LINE-1 biology and then detail how the LINE-1 retrotransposition assay is performed in cultured mammalian cells. PMID:26895052

  10. Efficient derivation of multipotent neural stem/progenitor cells from non-human primate embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko Shimada

    Full Text Available The common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus is a small New World primate that has been used as a non-human primate model for various biomedical studies. We previously demonstrated that transplantation of neural stem/progenitor cells (NS/PCs derived from mouse and human embryonic stem cells (ESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs promote functional locomotor recovery of mouse spinal cord injury models. However, for the clinical application of such a therapeutic approach, we need to evaluate the efficacy and safety of pluripotent stem cell-derived NS/PCs not only by xenotransplantation, but also allotransplantation using non-human primate models to assess immunological rejection and tumorigenicity. In the present study, we established a culture method to efficiently derive NS/PCs as neurospheres from common marmoset ESCs. Marmoset ESC-derived neurospheres could be passaged repeatedly and showed sequential generation of neurons and astrocytes, similar to that of mouse ESC-derived NS/PCs, and gave rise to functional neurons as indicated by calcium imaging. Although marmoset ESC-derived NS/PCs could not differentiate into oligodendrocytes under default culture conditions, these cells could abundantly generate oligodendrocytes by incorporating additional signals that recapitulate in vivo neural development. Moreover, principal component analysis of microarray data demonstrated that marmoset ESC-derived NS/PCs acquired similar gene expression profiles to those of fetal brain-derived NS/PCs by repeated passaging. Therefore, marmoset ESC-derived NS/PCs may be useful not only for accurate evaluation by allotransplantation of NS/PCs into non-human primate models, but are also applicable to analysis of iPSCs established from transgenic disease model marmosets.

  11. Role of ciliary neurotrophic factor in the proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jun; He, Zhili; Ruan, Juan; Ma, Zilong; Liu, Ying; Gong, Chengxin; Iqbal, Khalid; Sun, Shenggang; Chen, Honghui

    2013-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that has been fully studied for its structure, receptor, and signaling pathways and its multiplex effects on neural system, skeletal muscle, and weight control. Recent research demonstrates that CNTF also plays an important role in neurogenesis and the differentiation of neural stem cells. In this article, we summarize the general characteristics of CNTF and its function on neural stem cells, which could be a valuable therapeutic strategy in treating neurological disorders.

  12. Nifurtimox Is Effective Against Neural Tumor Cells and Is Synergistic with Buthionine Sulfoximine

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Du; Linna Zhang; Scorsone, Kathleen A.; Woodfield, Sarah E.; Zage, Peter E.

    2016-01-01

    Children with aggressive neural tumors have poor survival rates and novel therapies are needed. Previous studies have identified nifurtimox and buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) as effective agents in children with neuroblastoma and medulloblastoma. We hypothesized that nifurtimox would be effective against other neural tumor cells and would be synergistic with BSO. We determined neural tumor cell viability before and after treatment with nifurtimox using MTT assays. Assays for DNA ladder formatio...

  13. Planar cell polarity-mediated induction of neural stem cell expansion during axolotl spinal cord regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rost, Fabian; Nowoshilow, Sergej; Chara, Osvaldo; Tanaka, Elly M

    2015-01-01

    Axolotls are uniquely able to mobilize neural stem cells to regenerate all missing regions of the spinal cord. How a neural stem cell under homeostasis converts after injury to a highly regenerative cell remains unknown. Here, we show that during regeneration, axolotl neural stem cells repress neurogenic genes and reactivate a transcriptional program similar to embryonic neuroepithelial cells. This dedifferentiation includes the acquisition of rapid cell cycles, the switch from neurogenic to proliferative divisions, and the re-expression of planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway components. We show that PCP induction is essential to reorient mitotic spindles along the anterior-posterior axis of elongation, and orthogonal to the cell apical-basal axis. Disruption of this property results in premature neurogenesis and halts regeneration. Our findings reveal a key role for PCP in coordinating the morphogenesis of spinal cord outgrowth with the switch from a homeostatic to a regenerative stem cell that restores missing tissue. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10230.001 PMID:26568310

  14. Role of Reactive Oxygen Species in the Neural and Hormonal Regulation of the PNMT Gene in PC12 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. G. Crispo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The stress hormone, epinephrine, is produced predominantly by adrenal chromaffin cells and its biosynthesis is regulated by the enzyme phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT. Studies have demonstrated that PNMT may be regulated hormonally via the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and neurally via the stimulation of the splanchnic nerve. Additionally, hypoxia has been shown to play a key role in the regulation of PNMT. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of reactive oxygen species (ROS produced by the hypoxia mimetic agent CoCl2, on the hormonal and neural stimulation of PNMT in an in vitro cell culture model, utilizing the rat pheochromocytoma (PC12 cell line. RT-PCR analyses show inductions of the PNMT intron-retaining and intronless mRNA splice variants by CoCl2 (3.0- and 1.76-fold, respectively. Transient transfection assays of cells treated simultaneously with CoCl2 and the synthetic glucocorticoid, dexamethasone, show increased promoter activity (18.5-fold, while mRNA levels of both splice variants do not demonstrate synergistic effects. Similar results were observed when investigating the effects of CoCl2-induced ROS on the neural stimulation of PNMT via forskolin. Our findings demonstrate that CoCl2-induced ROS have synergistic effects on hormonal and neural activation of the PNMT promoter.

  15. Roles of neural stem cells in the repair of peripheral nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, researchers are using neural stem cell transplantation to promote regeneration after peripheral nerve injury, as neural stem cells play an important role in peripheral nerve injury repair. This article reviews recent research progress of the role of neural stem cells in the repair of peripheral nerve injury. Neural stem cells can not only differentiate into neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes, but can also differentiate into Schwann-like cells, which promote neurite outgrowth around the injury. Transplanted neural stem cells can differentiate into motor neurons that innervate muscles and promote the recovery of neurological function. To promote the repair of peripheral nerve injury, neural stem cells secrete various neurotrophic factors, including brain-derived neurotrophic factor, fibroblast growth factor, nerve growth factor, insulin-like growth factor and hepatocyte growth factor. In addition, neural stem cells also promote regeneration of the axonal myelin sheath, angiogenesis, and immune regulation. It can be concluded that neural stem cells promote the repair of peripheral nerve injury through a variety of ways.

  16. Direct Laser Writing of Tubular Microtowers for 3D Culture of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neuronal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turunen, Sanna; Joki, Tiina; Hiltunen, Maiju L; Ihalainen, Teemu O; Narkilahti, Susanna; Kellomäki, Minna

    2017-08-09

    As the complex structure of nervous tissue cannot be mimicked in two-dimensional (2D) cultures, the development of three-dimensional (3D) neuronal cell culture platforms is a topical issue in the field of neuroscience and neural tissue engineering. Computer-assisted laser-based fabrication techniques such as direct laser writing by two-photon polymerization (2PP-DLW) offer a versatile tool to fabricate 3D cell culture platforms with highly ordered geometries in the size scale of natural 3D cell environments. In this study, we present the design and 2PP-DLW fabrication process of a novel 3D neuronal cell culture platform based on tubular microtowers. The platform facilitates efficient long-term 3D culturing of human neuronal cells and supports neurite orientation and 3D network formation. Microtower designs both with or without intraluminal guidance cues and/or openings in the tower wall are designed and successfully fabricated from Ormocomp. Three of the microtower designs are chosen for the final culture platform: a design with openings in the wall and intralumial guidance cues (webs and pillars), a design with openings but without intraluminal structures, and a plain cylinder design. The proposed culture platform offers a promising concept for future 3D cultures in the field of neuroscience.

  17. Dynamic cell culture system (7-IML-1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogoli, Augusto

    1992-01-01

    This experiment is one of the Biorack experiments being flown on the International Microgravity Laboratory 1 (MIL-1) mission as part of an investigation studying cell proliferation and performance in space. One of the objectives of this investigation is to assess the potential benefits of bioprocessing in space with the ultimate goal of developing a bioreactor for continuous cell cultures in space. This experiment will test the operation of an automated culture chamber that was designed for use in a Bioreactor in space. The device to be tested is called the Dynamic Cell Culture System (DCCS). It is a simple device in which media are renewed or chemicals are injected automatically, by means of osmotic pumps. This experiment uses four Type I/O experiment containers. One DCCS unit, which contains a culture chamber with renewal of medium and a second chamber without a medium supply fits in each container. Two DCCS units are maintained under zero gravity conditions during the on-orbit period. The other two units are maintained under 1 gh conditions in a 1 g centrifuge. The schedule for incubator transfer is given.

  18. Studying the glial cell response to biomaterials and surface topography for improving the neural electrode interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ereifej, Evon S.

    Neural electrode devices hold great promise to help people with the restoration of lost functions, however, research is lacking in the biomaterial design of a stable, long-term device. Current devices lack long term functionality, most have been found unable to record neural activity within weeks after implantation due to the development of glial scar tissue (Polikov et al., 2006; Zhong and Bellamkonda, 2008). The long-term effect of chronically implanted electrodes is the formation of a glial scar made up of reactive astrocytes and the matrix proteins they generate (Polikov et al., 2005; Seil and Webster, 2008). Scarring is initiated when a device is inserted into brain tissue and is associated with an inflammatory response. Activated astrocytes are hypertrophic, hyperplastic, have an upregulation of intermediate filaments GFAP and vimentin expression, and filament formation (Buffo et al., 2010; Gervasi et al., 2008). Current approaches towards inhibiting the initiation of glial scarring range from altering the geometry, roughness, size, shape and materials of the device (Grill et al., 2009; Kotov et al., 2009; Kotzar et al., 2002; Szarowski et al., 2003). Literature has shown that surface topography modifications can alter cell alignment, adhesion, proliferation, migration, and gene expression (Agnew et al., 1983; Cogan et al., 2005; Cogan et al., 2006; Merrill et al., 2005). Thus, the goals of the presented work are to study the cellular response to biomaterials used in neural electrode fabrication and assess surface topography effects on minimizing astrogliosis. Initially, to examine astrocyte response to various materials used in neural electrode fabrication, astrocytes were cultured on platinum, silicon, PMMA, and SU-8 surfaces, with polystyrene as the control surface. Cell proliferation, viability, morphology and gene expression was measured for seven days in vitro. Results determined the cellular characteristics, reactions and growth rates of astrocytes

  19. Dual small-molecule targeting of SMAD signaling stimulates human induced pluripotent stem cells toward neural lineages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Methichit Wattanapanitch

    Full Text Available Incurable neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD, Huntington's disease (HD, and Alzheimer's disease (AD are very common and can be life-threatening because of their progressive disease symptoms with limited treatment options. To provide an alternative renewable cell source for cell-based transplantation and as study models for neurological diseases, we generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs from human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs and then differentiated them into neural progenitor cells (NPCs and mature neurons by dual SMAD signaling inhibitors. Reprogramming efficiency was improved by supplementing the histone deacethylase inhibitor, valproic acid (VPA, and inhibitor of p160-Rho associated coiled-coil kinase (ROCK, Y-27632, after retroviral transduction. We obtained a number of iPS colonies that shared similar characteristics with human embryonic stem cells in terms of their morphology, cell surface antigens, pluripotency-associated gene and protein expressions as well as their in vitro and in vivo differentiation potentials. After treatment with Noggin and SB431542, inhibitors of the SMAD signaling pathway, HDF-iPSCs demonstrated rapid and efficient differentiation into neural lineages. Six days after neural induction, neuroepithelial cells (NEPCs were observed in the adherent monolayer culture, which had the ability to differentiate further into NPCs and neurons, as characterized by their morphology and the expression of neuron-specific transcripts and proteins. We propose that our study may be applied to generate neurological disease patient-specific iPSCs allowing better understanding of disease pathogenesis and drug sensitivity assays.

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. File list: DNS.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells mm9 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived... neural cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  5. File list: DNS.PSC.20.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.20.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells hg19 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell iPS derived... neural cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.PSC.20.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  6. File list: NoD.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells hg19 No description Pluripotent stem cell iPS derived neural... cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  7. File list: DNS.PSC.10.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.10.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells hg19 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell iPS derived neural... cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.PSC.10.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  8. File list: Pol.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived neural... cells SRX190259 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  9. File list: DNS.PSC.10.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.10.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells hg19 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived neural... cells SRX121241,SRX134721 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.PSC.10.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  10. File list: Unc.PSC.10.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.PSC.10.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells hg19 Unclassified Pluripotent stem cell iPS derived neural... cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.PSC.10.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  11. File list: DNS.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells mm9 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived neural... cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  12. File list: DNS.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells hg19 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell iPS derived neural... cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  13. File list: DNS.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells mm9 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived neural... cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  14. File list: NoD.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells mm9 No description Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived neural... cells SRX440731,SRX440736 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  15. File list: DNS.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells hg19 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived neural... cells SRX121241,SRX134721 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  16. File list: Unc.PSC.20.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.PSC.20.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells hg19 Unclassified Pluripotent stem cell iPS derived neural... cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.PSC.20.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  17. File list: NoD.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. File list: DNS.PSC.20.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.20.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells hg19 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived neural... cells SRX121241,SRX134721 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.PSC.20.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  19. File list: NoD.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells mm9 No description Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived neural... cells SRX440736,SRX440731 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  20. File list: Pol.PSC.20.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.20.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived neural... cells SRX190259 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.PSC.20.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  1. File list: DNS.PSC.50.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.50.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells hg19 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived neural... cells SRX121241,SRX134721 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.PSC.50.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  2. File list: Pol.PSC.50.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.50.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived neural... cells SRX190259 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.PSC.50.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  3. File list: NoD.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells mm9 No description Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived neural... cells SRX440731,SRX440736 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  4. File list: Unc.PSC.50.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.PSC.50.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells hg19 Unclassified Pluripotent stem cell iPS derived neural... cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.PSC.50.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  5. File list: InP.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells hg19 Input control Pluripotent stem cell iPS derived neural... cells SRX702550 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  6. File list: Pol.PSC.10.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.10.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived neural... cells SRX190259 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.PSC.10.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  7. File list: Pol.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Pluripotent stem cell iPS derived neural... cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  8. File list: Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells hg19 Unclassified Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived neural... cells SRX378284 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  9. File list: NoD.PSC.10.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.PSC.10.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells hg19 No description Pluripotent stem cell iPS derived neural... cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.PSC.10.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  10. File list: Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells hg19 Unclassified Pluripotent stem cell iPS derived neural... cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  11. File list: Pol.PSC.10.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.10.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Pluripotent stem cell iPS derived neural... cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.PSC.10.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  12. Prokaryotic expression, purification, and production of glutathione S-transferase-tagged neural stem cell specific peptides from phage display screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Lei; Zhao, Wenxiu; Ma, Lan

    2013-02-01

    Combining stem cell with phage display to discover novel biomarkers is a new field in stem cell studies. Novel peptides obtained through phage display panning have been functionally identified and involved into initial applications as cell culture support or cell label. In the present study, we designed a glutathione S-transferase (GST)-tagged peptide complex to construct an easy and efficient prokaryotic expression and purification platform for peptides obtained from phage display panning. The purified GST-peptide protein could specifically bind to neural stem (NS) cells and could be flexibly used for GST pull down assay or NS cell labeling in future studies. The results of the present study would be useful for cell labeling and future investigations of special receptors on stem cell surface.

  13. Effects of Nerve Growth Factor and Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor Promote Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells to Neural Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinlong; Lian, Min; Cao, Peipei; Bao, Guofeng; Xu, Guanhua; Sun, Yuyu; Wang, Lingling; Chen, Jiajia; Wang, Yi; Feng, Guijuan; Cui, Zhiming

    2017-04-01

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) were the most widely used seed cells in the field of neural regeneration and bone tissue engineering, due to their easily isolation, lack of ethical controversy, low immunogenicity and low rates of transplantation rejection. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) on neural differentiation of DPSCs in vitro. DPSCs were cultured in neural differentiation medium containing NGF and bFGF alone or combination for 7 days. Then neural genes and protein markers were analyzed using western blot and RT-PCR. Our study revealed that bFGF and NGF increased neural differentiation of DPSCs synergistically, compared with bFGF and NGF alone. The levels of Nestin, MAP-2, βIII-tubulin and GFAP were the most highest in the DPSCs + bFGF + NGF group. Our results suggested that bFGF and NGF signifiantly up-regulated the levels of Sirt1. After treatment with Sirt1 inhibitor, western blot, RT-PCR and immunofluorescence staining showed that neural genes and protein markers had markedly decreased. Additionally, the ERK and AKT signaling pathway played a key role in the neural differentiation of DPSCs stimulated with bFGF + NGF. These results suggested that manipulation of the ERK and AKT signaling pathway may be associated with the differentiation of bFGF and NGF treated DPSCs. Our date provided theoretical basis for DPSCs to treat neurological diseases and repair neuronal damage.

  14. Small molecule GSK-3 inhibitors increase neurogenesis of human neural progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Christian; Mix, Eilhard; Frahm, Jana; Glass, Anne; Müller, Jana; Schmitt, Oliver; Schmöle, Anne-Caroline; Klemm, Kristin; Ortinau, Stefanie; Hübner, Rayk; Frech, Moritz J; Wree, Andreas; Rolfs, Arndt

    2011-01-13

    Human neural progenitor cells provide a source for cell replacement therapy to treat neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, there is great interest in mechanisms and tools to direct the fate of multipotent progenitor cells during their differentiation to increase the yield of a desired cell type. We tested small molecule inhibitors of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) for their functionality and their influence on neurogenesis using the human neural progenitor cell line ReNcell VM. Here we report the enhancement of neurogenesis of human neural progenitor cells by treatment with GSK-3 inhibitors. We tested different small molecule inhibitors of GSK-3 i.e. LiCl, sodium-valproate, kenpaullone, indirubin-3-monoxime and SB-216763 for their ability to inhibit GSK-3 in human neural progenitor cells. The highest in situ GSK-3 inhibitory effect of the drugs was found for kenpaullone and SB-216763. Accordingly, kenpaullone and SB-216763 were the only drugs tested in this study to stimulate the Wnt/β-catenin pathway that is antagonized by GSK-3. Analysis of human neural progenitor differentiation revealed an augmentation of neurogenesis by SB-216763 and kenpaullone, without changing cell cycle exit or cell survival. Small molecule inhibitors of GSK-3 enhance neurogenesis of human neural progenitor cells and may be used to direct the differentiation of neural stem and progenitor cells in therapeutic applications. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Review: the role of neural crest cells in the endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Meghan Sara; Bronner-Fraser, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    The neural crest is a pluripotent population of cells that arises at the junction of the neural tube and the dorsal ectoderm. These highly migratory cells form diverse derivatives including neurons and glia of the sensory, sympathetic, and enteric nervous systems, melanocytes, and the bones, cartilage, and connective tissues of the face. The neural crest has long been associated with the endocrine system, although not always correctly. According to current understanding, neural crest cells give rise to the chromaffin cells of the adrenal medulla, chief cells of the extra-adrenal paraganglia, and thyroid C cells. The endocrine tumors that correspond to these cell types are pheochromocytomas, extra-adrenal paragangliomas, and medullary thyroid carcinomas. Although controversies concerning embryological origin appear to have mostly been resolved, questions persist concerning the pathobiology of each tumor type and its basis in neural crest embryology. Here we present a brief history of the work on neural crest development, both in general and in application to the endocrine system. In particular, we present findings related to the plasticity and pluripotency of neural crest cells as well as a discussion of several different neural crest tumors in the endocrine system.

  16. Reversible neural stem cell niche dysfunction in a model of multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Stine; Imitola, Jaime; Ayuso-Sacido, Angel

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The subventricular zone (SVZ) of the brain constitutes a niche for neural stem and progenitor cells that can initiate repair after central nervous system (CNS) injury. In a relapsing-remitting model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the neural stem cells (NSCs) become...

  17. The active principle region of Buyang Huanwu decoction induced differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells into neural-like cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jinghui; Wan, Yi; Chi, Jianhuai; Shen, Dekai; Wu, Tingting; Li, Weimin; Du, Pengcheng

    2012-01-01

    The present study induced in vitro-cultured passage 4 bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells to differentiate into neural-like cells with a mixture of alkaloid, polysaccharide, aglycone, glycoside, essential oils, and effective components of Buyang Huanwu decoction (active principle region of decoction for invigorating yang for recuperation). After 28 days, nestin and neuron-specific enolase were expressed in the cytoplasm. Reverse transcription-PCR and western blot analyses showed that nestin and neuron-specific enolase mRNA and protein expression was greater in the active principle region group compared with the original formula group. Results demonstrated that the active principle region of Buyang Huanwu decoction induced greater differentiation of rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells into neural-like cells in vitro than the original Buyang Huanwu decoction formula. PMID:25806066

  18. Human ES cells: starting culture from frozen cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trish, Erin; Dimos, John; Eggan, Kevin

    2006-11-09

    Here we demonstrate how our lab begins a HuES human embryonic stem cell line culture from a frozen stock. First, a one to two day old ten cm plate of approximately one (to two) million irradiated mouse embryonic fibroblast feeder cells is rinsed with HuES media to remove residual serum and cell debris, and then HuES media added and left to equilibrate in the cell culture incubator. A frozen vial of cells from long term liquid nitrogen storage or a -80 C freezer is sourced and quickly submerged in a 37 C water bath for quick thawing. Cells in freezing media are then removed from the vial and placed in a large volume of HuES media. The large volume of HuES media facilitates removal of excess serum and DMSO, which can cause HuES human embryonic stem cells to differentiate. Cells are gently spun out of suspension, and then re-suspended in a small volume of fresh HuES media that is then used to seed the MEF plate. It is considered important to seed the MEF plate by gently adding the HuES cells in a drop wise fashion to evenly disperse them throughout the plate. The newly established HuES culture plate is returned to the incubator for 48 hrs before media is replaced, then is fed every 24 hours thereafter.

  19. Healthy human CSF promotes glial differentiation of hESC-derived neural cells while retaining spontaneous activity in existing neuronal networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heikki Kiiski

    2013-05-01

    The possibilities of human pluripotent stem cell-derived neural cells from the basic research tool to a treatment option in regenerative medicine have been well recognized. These cells also offer an interesting tool for in vitro models of neuronal networks to be used for drug screening and neurotoxicological studies and for patient/disease specific in vitro models. Here, as aiming to develop a reductionistic in vitro human neuronal network model, we tested whether human embryonic stem cell (hESC-derived neural cells could be cultured in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF in order to better mimic the in vivo conditions. Our results showed that CSF altered the differentiation of hESC-derived neural cells towards glial cells at the expense of neuronal differentiation. The proliferation rate was reduced in CSF cultures. However, even though the use of CSF as the culture medium altered the glial vs. neuronal differentiation rate, the pre-existing spontaneous activity of the neuronal networks persisted throughout the study. These results suggest that it is possible to develop fully human cell and culture-based environments that can further be modified for various in vitro modeling purposes.

  20. Maintenance and neuronal cell differentiation of neural stem cells C17.2 correlated to medium availability sets design criteria in microfluidic systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bu Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neural stem cells (NSCs play an important role in developing potential cell-based therapeutics for neurodegenerative disease. Microfluidics has proven a powerful tool in mechanistic studies of NSC differentiation. However, NSCs are prone to differentiate when the nutrients are limited, which occurs unfavorable by fast medium consumption in miniaturized culture environment. For mechanistic studies of NSCs in microfluidics, it is vital that neuronal cell differentiation is triggered by controlled factors only. Thus, we studied the correlation between available cell medium and spontaneous neuronal cell differentiation of C17.2 NSCs in standard culture medium, and proposed the necessary microfluidic design criteria to prevent undesirable cell phenotype changes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A series of microchannels with specific geometric parameters were designed to provide different amount of medium to the cells over time. A medium factor (MF, defined as the volume of stem cell culture medium divided by total number of cells at seeding and number of hours between medium replacement successfully correlated the amount of medium available to each cell averaged over time to neuronal cell differentiation. MF smaller than 8.3×10(4 µm3/cell⋅hour produced significant neuronal cell differentiation marked by cell morphological change and significantly more cells with positive β-tubulin-III and MAP2 staining than the control. When MF was equal or greater than 8.3×10(4 µm3/cell⋅hour, minimal spontaneous neuronal cell differentiation happened relative to the control. MF had minimal relation with the average neurite length. SIGNIFICANCE: MFs can be controlled easily to maintain the stem cell status of C17.2 NSCs or to induce spontaneous neuronal cell differentiation in standard stem cell culture medium. This finding is useful in designing microfluidic culture platforms for controllable NSC maintenance and differentiation. This study also