WorldWideScience

Sample records for networks develop partnerships

  1. The development and achievement of a healthy cities network in Taiwan: sharing leadership and partnership building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Susan C; Kuo, Hsien-Wen

    2016-03-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) Healthy Cities (HC) projects are the best known of the settings-based approaches to health promotion. They engage local governments in health development through a process of political commitment, institutional change, capacity-building, partnership-based planning and innovative projects. Many cities have promoted HC projects in Taiwan since 2002. In 2008, the Taiwan Alliance for Healthy Cities (TAHC) was launched to assist local governments in effectively establishing, operating and promoting HC projects. In this article, we share our experiences of establishing a platform and network to promote the HC program in Taiwan. Based on individual city profiles and governance in Taiwan, the TAHC developed a well-organized framework and model to encourage strong leadership in local governments and to promote participation and engagement in their communities. In the last 6 years, leaders from Taiwan's local governments in HC networks have integrated the HC concepts into their governance models, actively engaging and combining various resources with practical expertise and private sectors. The network of health in Taiwan allows each city to develop its unique perspective on the HC projects. Using this method, not only local government meets its needs, but also increases governance efficiency and effectiveness, resulting in the promotion of its citizens' overall sustainable urban health development. This HC network in Taiwan has partnerships with government and non-governmental organizations (NGOs), with academic support and citizen involvement, a dynamic data collection system and demonstrated leadership in the sharing of information in the Asian region. © The Author(s) 2016.

  2. Partnerships for Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, David; Drysdale, David; Hansen, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) management systems of many developing countries are commonly constrained by factors such as limited financial resources and poor governance, making it a difficult proposition to break with complex, entrenched and unsustainable technologies and systems. This paper...... technologies. However, opportunities in the MSW management system can exist within other areas, and synergies can be sought with interlinking systems such as those represented with sanitation....... some lessons in such partnership building: In Uganda and Denmark respectively, the World Wildlife Fund and the network organization access2innovation have mobilised stakeholders around improving the MSW management system in Kasese District. Through a MSW management system characterisation and mapping...

  3. World Network of Friends: Africa-Asia regional partnerships and South-South development cooperation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Annette Skovsted

    exchange invitations to training courses and partnerships for the development of human resources. The structure of and focus on human resource development is inspired by experiences of ODA financed courses in Japan and, thereby, fits Shimomura and Wang’s argument that ‘the notable difference between...... traditional and emerging donors is their experience of receiving aid.” Much literature on the ‘emerging donors’ focuses on the challenge they pose to the ‘DAC regime’ of conditionalities. However, this chapter will explore how the Africa-Asia regional partnerships and South-South development cooperation...

  4. Networking the Global Maritime Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-13

    interest.” SOA lever- ages a “publish and subscribe” messaging pattern in which information services, 24 NAVA L WA R C O L L E G E R E V I E W...General Accounting Office (now the Government Accountability Office) summed up the results of these conflicts: Network-centric operating concepts...regions to build new partnerships. One example of this is a Sixth Fleet–sponsored project to provide the government of Ghana with the 18 NAVA L

  5. Utilization of an interorganizational network analysis to evaluate the development of community capacity among a community-academic partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Heather R; Ramirez, Albert; Drake, Kelly N; Beaudoin, Christopher E; Garney, Whitney R; Wendel, Monica L; Outley, Corliss; Burdine, James N; Player, Harold D

    2014-01-01

    Following a community health assessment the Brazos Valley Health Partnership (BVHP) organized to address fragmentation of services and local health needs. This regional partnership employs the fundamental principles of community-based participatory research, fostering an equitable partnership with the aim of building community capacity to address local health issues. This article describes changes in relationships as a result of capacity building efforts in a community-academic partnership. Growth in network structure among organizations is hypothesized to be indicative of less fragmentation of services for residents and increased capacity of the BVHP to collectively address local health issues. Each of the participant organizations responded to a series of questions regarding its relationships with other organizations. Each organization was asked about information sharing, joint planning, resource sharing, and formal agreements with other organizations. The network survey has been administered 3 times between 2004 and 2009. Network density increased for sharing information and jointly planning events. Growth in the complexity of relationships was reported for sharing tangible resources and formal agreements. The average number of ties between organizations as well as the strength of relationships increased. This study provides evidence that the community capacity building efforts within these communities have contributed to beneficial changes in interorganizational relationships. Results from this analysis are useful for understanding how a community partnership's efforts to address access to care can strengthen a community's capacity for future action. Increased collaboration also leads to new assets, resources, and the transfer of knowledge and skills.

  6. Strategic Partnerships in International Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treat, Tod; Hartenstine, Mary Beth

    2013-01-01

    This chapter provides a framework and recommendations for development of strategic partnerships in a variety of cultural contexts. Additionally, this study elucidates barriers and possibilities in interagency collaborations. Without careful consideration regarding strategic partnerships' approaches, functions, and goals, the ability to…

  7. Social network analysis of public health programs to measure partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoen, Martin W; Moreland-Russell, Sarah; Prewitt, Kim; Carothers, Bobbi J

    2014-12-01

    In order to prevent chronic diseases, community-based programs are encouraged to take an ecological approach to public health promotion and involve many diverse partners. Little is known about measuring partnership in implementing public health strategies. We collected data from 23 Missouri communities in early 2012 that received funding from three separate programs to prevent obesity and/or reduce tobacco use. While all of these funding programs encourage partnership, only the Social Innovation for Missouri (SIM) program included a focus on building community capacity and enhancing collaboration. Social network analysis techniques were used to understand contact and collaboration networks in community organizations. Measurements of average degree, density, degree centralization, and betweenness centralization were calculated for each network. Because of the various sizes of the networks, we conducted comparative analyses with and without adjustment for network size. SIM programs had increased measurements of average degree for partner collaboration and larger networks. When controlling for network size, SIM groups had higher measures of network density and lower measures of degree centralization and betweenness centralization. SIM collaboration networks were more dense and less centralized, indicating increased partnership. The methods described in this paper can be used to compare partnership in community networks of various sizes. Further research is necessary to define causal mechanisms of partnership development and their relationship to public health outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Networking the Global Maritime Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    OEF TASKING FS AIGLE (MHC) FS DAGUE (LCT) FS D’ENTRECASTEAUX (AGS) FS FLOREAL (FFG) FS ISARD (AG) FS JULES VERNE (AD) FS LA LAVALLEE (FFG) FS LOIRE...from Galdorisi notes transcription). 25 Rodger, presentation to King-Hall. 26 Former CNO, Admiral Vern Clark described FORCEnet as an...weapons into a networked, distributed combat force.” Admiral Vern Clark, “Sea Power 21: Projecting Decisive Joint Capabilities,” United States

  9. A Partnership Training Program in Breast Cancer Diagnosis: Concept Development of the Next Generation Diagnostic Breast Imaging Using Digital Image Library and Networking Techniques

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chouikha, Mohamed F

    2004-01-01

    ...); and Georgetown University (Image Science and Information Systems, ISIS). In this partnership training program, we will train faculty and students in breast cancer imaging, digital image database library techniques and network communication strategy...

  10. The Global Universities Partnership on Environment and Sustainability (GUPES): Networking of Higher Educational Institutions in Facilitating Implementation of the UN Decade of Education for Sustainable Development 2005-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Mahesh; Mariam, Ayombi

    2014-01-01

    This article will focus on involvement of Higher Education Institutions in promoting Education for Sustainable Development through UNEPs flagship programme Global Universities Partnership on Environment and Sustainability. To achieve this, the activities of the network are centered on three pillars: Education, Training and Networking.

  11. Project and Partnership Officer | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Provide support to the Centre on issues related to partnership development and resource mobilization connected with his/her specialized knowledge;; Manage a portfolio of partnerships within the policies of the Centre;; Assist the Centre in a range of tasks associated with partnerships and resource expansion (including, ...

  12. ENVIRONMENTAL AND ECONOMIC MANAGEMENT OF THE PARTNERSHIP NETWORKS IN THE CONCEPT OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT OF THE NATIONAL ECONOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Butenko

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This article summarizes the theoretical background and develops practical recommendations on green activities of partner networks. Particular attention is focused on the ability of domestic enterprises to implement eco-efficient business strategy and find the appropriate balance between making a profit, environmental conservation and social justice.

  13. Celebrating partnerships for International Development Week 2018 ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2018-01-31

    Jan 31, 2018 ... Goal 17 of the UN's Sustainable Development Goals calls for revitalized global partnerships to achieve sustainable development. Here in Canada, the Feminist International Assistance Policy promotes new partnerships to leverage additional resources for sustainable development. IDRC believes in the ...

  14. Building Capacity for Telecentre Partnerships, Networking and ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... within the telecentre.org community. Specifically, CSI will develop a post-2010 vision for telecentre.org; identify new partners who can contribute to this vision; encourage collaboration and innovation on the part of telecentre.org partners; conduct research on network development; and provide coaching to network leaders ...

  15. Networked curricula: fostering transnational partnership in open and distance learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Luz Cacheiro-González

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Transnational Networked Curricula (TNC provides many benefits to the institutions that offer them as well as to the different stakeholders involved, not only the students but also the academics, the institutions as a whole, and the wider society. Supporting Higher Education Institutions in enhancing and implementing international networked practices in virtual campus building is the main aim of the NetCU project, which has been developed by the EADTU, in partnership with 14 member organizations, from 2009 to 2012. The project outcomes intend to facilitate the future set-up of networked curricula in Higher Education institutions and potentially lead to more transnational partnerships in Open and Distance Education (ODE and blended learning, showing challenges, obstacles and ways to overcome them. This paper presents the main products developed in the project, assesses its completeness and usage, and discusses on the challenges of curricula networking starting from the ideas and opinions shared in different stakeholders workshops organized under the NetCU project.

  16. Government-Business Relationships through Partnerships for Sustainable Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehmann, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Moving from largely command and control measures in the 1970s and 1980s, through cleaner production initiatives and self-regulatory initiatives in the 1990s, the emphasis is increasingly on using networks and partnerships between private firms, NGOs, government and civil society as levers...... companies and public bodies have increased. Hence, the tools and means employed—outside as well as inside the network—have developed accordingly. In this paper, a distinct partnership mode of government–business relationships - a collaborative network with respect, trust and mutual legitimacy - is discussed...... and related to the Green Network way of doing things. The conclusion is that through dialogue, reflexivity and the establishment of an enabling environment, public–private partnerships can become useful vehicles in societies’ move towards sustainability....

  17. Developing public private partnerships in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buser, Martine; Koch, Christian

    2005-01-01

    The establishment of private public partnerships in Denmark in relation to construction has been a long and reluctant process. In the spring of 2004 however the government launched an action plan and PPP arrangements are now emerging. A first wave of PPP arrangements started flourishing however...... these various sectors in producing present public services. The paper analyse the emergent network and the metagovernance frame. Examples of Danish PPP are given highlighting the role of the construction firms. The experiences illustrate the importance of recognizing public private partnerships as emergent...... of networking, learning and establishing of institutions. Drawing on new public management perspectives it is argued that the future model of public services is the network of a mixed set of players (private, voluntary and public). Such networks might be strong in combining forces and strength from...

  18. How transformational learning promotes caring, consultation and creativity, and ultimately contributes to sustainable development: Lessons from the Partnership for Education and Research about Responsible Living (PERL) network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoresen, Victoria Wyszynski

    2017-12-01

    Oases of learning which are transformative and lead to significant behavioural change can be found around the globe. Transformational learning has helped learners not only to understand what they have been taught but also to re-conceptualise and re-apply this understanding to their daily lives. Unfortunately, as many global reports indicate, inspirational transformational learning approaches for sustainable development are rare and have yet to become the norm - despite calls for such approaches by several outstanding educators and organisations. This article examines three learning approaches developed by the network of the Partnership for Education and Research about Responsible Living (PERL). These approaches are structured around core elements of transformative learning for sustainable development, yet focus particularly on the ability to care, consult with others and be creative. They seem to depend on the learners' ability to articulate their perceptions of sustainable development in relation to their own values and to identify how these are actualised in their daily life. Together with other core elements of transformative learning, an almost magical (not precisely measurable) synergy then emerges. The intensity of this synergy appears to be directly related to the individual learner's understanding of the contradictions, interlinkages and interdependencies of modern society. The impact of this synergy seems to be concurrent with the extent to which the learner engages in a continual learning process with those with whom he/she has contact. The findings of this study suggest that mainstreaming transformational learning for sustainable development in ways that release the "magic synergy of creative caring" can result in the emergence of individuals who are willing and able to move from "business as usual" towards more socially just, economically equitable, and environmentally sensitive behaviour.

  19. How transformational learning promotes caring, consultation and creativity, and ultimately contributes to sustainable development: Lessons from the Partnership for Education and Research about Responsible Living (PERL) network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoresen, Victoria Wyszynski

    2017-11-01

    Oases of learning which are transformative and lead to significant behavioural change can be found around the globe. Transformational learning has helped learners not only to understand what they have been taught but also to re-conceptualise and re-apply this understanding to their daily lives. Unfortunately, as many global reports indicate, inspirational transformational learning approaches for sustainable development are rare and have yet to become the norm - despite calls for such approaches by several outstanding educators and organisations. This article examines three learning approaches developed by the network of the Partnership for Education and Research about Responsible Living (PERL). These approaches are structured around core elements of transformative learning for sustainable development, yet focus particularly on the ability to care, consult with others and be creative. They seem to depend on the learners' ability to articulate their perceptions of sustainable development in relation to their own values and to identify how these are actualised in their daily life. Together with other core elements of transformative learning, an almost magical (not precisely measurable) synergy then emerges. The intensity of this synergy appears to be directly related to the individual learner's understanding of the contradictions, interlinkages and interdependencies of modern society. The impact of this synergy seems to be concurrent with the extent to which the learner engages in a continual learning process with those with whom he/she has contact. The findings of this study suggest that mainstreaming transformational learning for sustainable development in ways that release the "magic synergy of creative caring" can result in the emergence of individuals who are willing and able to move from "business as usual" towards more socially just, economically equitable, and environmentally sensitive behaviour.

  20. George Washington Community High School: analysis of a partnership network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bringle, Robert G; Officer, Starla D H; Grim, Jim; Hatcher, Julie A

    2009-01-01

    After five years with no public schools in their community, residents and neighborhood organizations of the Near Westside of Indianapolis advocated for the opening of George Washington Community High School (GWCHS). As a neighborhood in close proximity to the campus of Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, the Near Westside and campus worked together to address this issue and improve the educational success of youth. In fall 2000, GWCHS opened as a community school and now thrives as a national model, due in part to its network of community relationships. This account analyzes the development of the school by focusing on the relationships among the university, the high school, community organizations, and the residents of the Near Westside and highlights the unique partnership between the campus and school by defining the relational qualities and describing the network created to make sustainable changes with the high school.

  1. Partnership Officer | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Donor Funding Support to Program Areas, Program Initiatives, Regional Offices and Beneficiaries. Supports the development and update of donor landscapes and donor funding strategies, including relevant communication materials, for the clients and IDRC staff; and; Support the development of partnership strategies and ...

  2. Delineating Partnerships from other Forms of Collaboration in Regional Development Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Peter Wilgaard

    2017-01-01

    The idea of an all-encompassing partnership has vindicated all sorts of collaboration models to be articulated as partnerships although not occurring as ones, leaving practitioners and politicians of regional development planning with suboptimal ways of collaborating. Reviewing the partnership...... of regional planning and development, this paper defines a partnership to be a promise of a promise denoting other collaborative models such as network, cluster and governance-partnership as a promise only. Based on qualitative interviews, discursive analyses and strategic documents, the comparative case...... analysis of two Danish regional development agencies shows how one remained as a governance-partnership while the other turned into a partnership by continuously creating possibilities for the groups of actors involved. This transformation from a promise only into a promise of a promise displays how...

  3. Developer Network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-08-21

    NREL's Developer Network, developer.nrel.gov, provides data that users can access to provide data to their own analyses, mobile and web applications. Developers can retrieve the data through a Web services API (application programming interface). The Developer Network handles overhead of serving up web services such as key management, authentication, analytics, reporting, documentation standards, and throttling in a common architecture, while allowing web services and APIs to be maintained and managed independently.

  4. Partnership for practice change and knowledge development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Stina Meyer; Stokholm, Gitte; Madsen, Anette Judithe

    2014-01-01

    Objective. This article presents and evaluates the results of an educational initiative at the occupational therapy programme at University College Lillebaelt in Denmark. The objectives of the initiative were (A) to establish institutional partnerships between the educational institution and vari......, student – practitioner – teacher collaboration, practice research, institutional partnership, bachelor ’ s thesis...... ’ bachelor ’ s projects had a theoretical and methodological foundation in critical psychology. Method. Four bachelor ’ s cohorts with a total of 29 students participated in the educational initiatives from 2008 to 2011. Nine groups conducted practice research projects, wherein they collaborated both...... and the students ’ bachelor ’ s theses. Results of the evaluations showed that (A) the developed institutional partnerships promoted the goals of the initiative, including research-based proposals for change in the practice fi eld and that (B) the students acquired competences in practice research and collaboration...

  5. European and Developing Countries Clinical Trials Partnership (EDCTP: the path towards a true partnership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ofori-Adjei David

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background European and Developing Countries Clinical Trials Partnership (EDCTP was founded in 2003 by the European Parliament and Council. It is a partnership of 14 European Union (EU member states, Norway, Switzerland, and Developing Countries, formed to fund acceleration of new clinical trial interventions to fight the human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis (TB in the sub-Saharan African region. EDCTP seeks to be synergistic with other funding bodies supporting research on these diseases. Methods EDCTP promotes collaborative research supported by multiple funding agencies and harnesses networking expertise across different African and European countries. EDCTP is different from other similar initiatives. The organisation of EDCTP blends important aspects of partnership that includes ownership, sustainability and responds to demand-driven research. The Developing Countries Coordinating Committee (DCCC; a team of independent scientists and representatives of regional health bodies from sub-Saharan Africa provides advice to the partnership. Thus EDCTP reflects a true partnership and the active involvement and contribution of these African scientists ensures joint ownership of the EDCTP programme with European counterparts. Results The following have been the major achievements of the EDCTP initiative since its formation in 2003; i increase in the number of participating African countries from two to 26 in 2008 ii the cumulative amount of funds spent on EDCTP projects has reached € 150 m, iii the cumulative number of clinical trials approved has reached 40 and iv there has been a significant increase number and diversity in capacity building activities. Conclusion While we recognise that EDCTP faced enormous challenges in its first few years of existence, the strong involvement of African scientists and its new initiatives such as unconditional funding to regional

  6. European and Developing Countries Clinical Trials Partnership (EDCTP): the path towards a true partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matee, Mecky I; Manyando, Christine; Ndumbe, Peter M; Corrah, Tumani; Jaoko, Walter G; Kitua, Andrew Y; Ambene, Herman Pa; Ndounga, Mathieu; Zijenah, Lynn; Ofori-Adjei, David; Agwale, Simon; Shongwe, Steven; Nyirenda, Thomas; Makanga, Michael

    2009-07-20

    European and Developing Countries Clinical Trials Partnership (EDCTP) was founded in 2003 by the European Parliament and Council. It is a partnership of 14 European Union (EU) member states, Norway, Switzerland, and Developing Countries, formed to fund acceleration of new clinical trial interventions to fight the human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS), malaria and tuberculosis (TB) in the sub-Saharan African region. EDCTP seeks to be synergistic with other funding bodies supporting research on these diseases. EDCTP promotes collaborative research supported by multiple funding agencies and harnesses networking expertise across different African and European countries. EDCTP is different from other similar initiatives. The organisation of EDCTP blends important aspects of partnership that includes ownership, sustainability and responds to demand-driven research. The Developing Countries Coordinating Committee (DCCC); a team of independent scientists and representatives of regional health bodies from sub-Saharan Africa provides advice to the partnership. Thus EDCTP reflects a true partnership and the active involvement and contribution of these African scientists ensures joint ownership of the EDCTP programme with European counterparts. The following have been the major achievements of the EDCTP initiative since its formation in 2003; i) increase in the number of participating African countries from two to 26 in 2008 ii) the cumulative amount of funds spent on EDCTP projects has reached 150 m euros, iii) the cumulative number of clinical trials approved has reached 40 and iv) there has been a significant increase number and diversity in capacity building activities. While we recognise that EDCTP faced enormous challenges in its first few years of existence, the strong involvement of African scientists and its new initiatives such as unconditional funding to regional networks of excellence in sub-Saharan Africa is envisaged to

  7. The national improvement partnership network: state-based partnerships that improve primary care quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Judith S; Norlin, Chuck; Gillespie, R J; Weissman, Mark; McGrath, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Improvement partnerships (IPs) are a model for collaboration among public and private organizations that share interests in improving child health and the quality of health care delivered to children. Their partners typically include state public health and Medicaid agencies, the local chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics, and an academic health care organization or children's hospital. Most IPs also engage other partners, including a variety of public, private, and professional organizations and individuals. IPs lead and support measurement-based, systems-focused quality improvement (QI) efforts that primarily target primary care practices that care for children. Their projects are most often conducted as learning collaboratives that involve a team from each of 8 to 15 participating practices over 9 to 12 months. The improvement teams typically include a clinician, office manager, clinical staff (nurses or medical assistants), and, for some projects, a parent; the IPs provide the staff and local infrastructure. The projects target clinical topics, chosen because of their importance to public health, local clinicians, and funding agencies, including asthma, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, autism, developmental screening, obesity, mental health, medical home implementation, and several others. Over the past 13 years, 19 states have developed (and 5 are exploring developing) IPs. These organizations share similar aims and methods but differ substantially in leadership, structure, funding, and longevity. Their projects generally engage pediatric and family medicine practices ranging from solo private practices to community health centers to large corporate practices. The practices learn about the project topic and about QI, develop specific improvement strategies and aims that align with the project aims, perform iterative measures to evaluate and guide their improvements, and implement systems and processes to support and sustain those improvements

  8. Developing effective Public Private Partnerships

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Contd..): Securing E-Governance services. Protection and resilience of Critical Information Infrastructure. Promotion of Research & Development in cyber security. Reducing supply chain risks. Human Resource Development. Creating Cyber ...

  9. Partnership capacity for community health improvement plan implementation: findings from a social network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, J Mac; Eisen-Cohen, Eileen; Salas, S Bianca

    2016-07-13

    degree centralization-meaning key organizations link organizations otherwise not tightly partnering. Coalition members rated each other highly on trust, a positive sign for future partnership development efforts. Examination of network maps reveal key organizations that can be targeted for future partnership facilitation and expansion. Future network data collection will enable exploration of longitudinal trends and exploration of network characteristics versus health behavior, status, and outcome changes.

  10. Business and partnerships for development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolk, A.; van Tulder, R.; Kostwinder, E.

    2008-01-01

    The potential contribution of companies as partners in furthering development objectives is frequently mentioned, but has received limited research attention. What has also remained unclear is to what extent companies can play such a role via the various individual and collaborative means available

  11. New partnerships encourage sustainable development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    In two Indian states, life for approx. 100,000 poor people has been made a bit easier. Via the Indian Solar Loan Programme, which is supported by UNEP Risø Centre, they have been given access to loans which can fi nance the purchase of solar cellsystems. This means access to a reliable and renewa...... and renewable form of energy, with a positive impact on social and economic development....

  12. Partnerships for development: municipal solid waste management in Kasese, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, David; Drysdale, David; Hansen, Kenneth; Vanhille, Josefine; Wolf, Andreas

    2014-11-01

    Municipal solid waste management systems of many developing countries are commonly constrained by factors such as limited financial resources and poor governance, making it a difficult proposition to break with complex, entrenched and unsustainable technologies and systems. This article highlights strategic partnerships as a way to affect a distributed agency among several sets of stakeholders to break so-called path dependencies, which occur when such unsustainable pathways arise, stabilize and become self-reinforcing over time. Experiences from a North-South collaborative effort provide some lessons in such partnership building: In Uganda and Denmark, respectively, the World Wildlife Fund and the network organization access2innovation have mobilized stakeholders around improving the municipal solid waste management system in Kasese District. Through a municipal solid waste management system characterization and mapping exercise, some emergent lessons and guiding principles in partnership building point to both pitfalls and opportunities for designing sustainable pathways. First, socio-technical lock-in effects in the municipal solid waste management system can stand in the way of partnerships based on introducing biogas or incineration technologies. However, opportunities in the municipal solid waste management system can exist within other areas, and synergies can be sought with interlinking systems, such as those represented with sanitation. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. University/City Partnerships: Creating Policy Networks for Urban Transformation in Nairobi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopp, Jacqueline; Ngau, Peter; Sclar, Elliot

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes an innovative collaboration between the Center for Sustainable Urban Development at Columbia University and the Department of Urban and Regional Planning at the University of Nairobi. By bringing universities into urban policy networks, this partnership aims to re-shape pedagogy, policy and research action for sustainable…

  14. Strategic Partnership: Potential for Ensuring the University Sustainable Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Salimova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the article is to research the theoretical approaches to strategic partnerships of universities, analyse the current trends of partnership development of universities in the context of sustainable development, discuss the experience of the National Research Ogarev Mordovia State University in terms of strategic partnerships creation and define the new opportunities of developing the strategic partnerships. The methodology of the paper is based on comprehensive literature review in the sphere of university partnerships. The authors use a comparative method, analysis and summarizing aimed on defining the current trends and issues related to strategic partnership. There has been developed the partnership commitment chart of key stakeholders of universities to show current points and target points. The research findings are generalization of the strategic partnership theory with the focus on university activities in reference to sustainable development, clarification of current trends and issues of university strategic partnership, definition of further opportunities and methods in the area under consideration. Under modern conditions it is extremely important to develop a strategic partnership in the sphere of higher education. Universities are open institutions and they need to be involved into different processes of economy and society development. Article’s significance is in a new view on strategic partnership in the context of sustainable development of universities.

  15. Professional Learning through P-16 Partnership Design: Emergent Lessons Learned toward Improving and Sustaining Partnership Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easley, Jacob, II; Ankrum, Julie; McConnell, Bethany; Girard, Nina

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the processes and features of one P-16 partnership developed to improve the clinical experience of teacher preparation. The development of partnerships reflects a commitment among institutions to collaborate in a purposeful manner with a keen awareness that each partner must seek to better understand and…

  16. Building Service Delivery Networks: Partnership Evolution Among Children's Behavioral Health Agencies in Response to New Funding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunger, Alicia C; Doogan, Nathan J; Cao, Yiwen

    2014-12-01

    Meeting the complex needs of youth with behavioral health problems requires a coordinated network of community-based agencies. Although fiscal scarcity or retrenchment can limit coordinated services, munificence can stimulate service delivery partnerships as agencies expand programs, hire staff, and spend more time coordinating services. This study examines the 2-year evolution of referral and staff expertise sharing networks in response to substantial new funding for services within a regional network of children's mental health organizations. Quantitative network survey data were collected from directors of 22 nonprofit organizations that receive funding from a county government-based behavioral health service fund. Both referral and staff expertise sharing networks changed over time, but results of a stochastic actor-oriented model of network dynamics suggest the nature of this change varies for these networks. Agencies with higher numbers of referral and staff expertise sharing partners tend to maintain these ties and/or develop new relationships over the 2 years. Agencies tend to refer to agencies they trust, but trust was not associated with staff expertise sharing ties. However, agencies maintain or form staff expertise sharing ties with referral partners, or with organizations that provide similar services. In addition, agencies tend to reciprocate staff expertise sharing, but not referrals. Findings suggest that during periods of resource munificence and service expansion, behavioral health organizations build service delivery partnerships in complex ways that build upon prior collaborative history and coordinate services among similar types of providers. Referral partnerships can pave the way for future information sharing relationships.

  17. A Public-Private Partnership Improves Clinical Performance In A Hospital Network In Lesotho.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Nathalie; Grabowski, Aria; Jack, Brian; Nkabane-Nkholongo, Elizabeth Limakatso; Vian, Taryn

    2015-06-01

    Health care public-private partnerships (PPPs) between a government and the private sector are based on a business model that aims to leverage private-sector expertise to improve clinical performance in hospitals and other health facilities. Although the financial implications of such partnerships have been analyzed, few studies have examined the partnerships' impact on clinical performance outcomes. Using quantitative measures that reflected capacity, utilization, clinical quality, and patient outcomes, we compared a government-managed hospital network in Lesotho, Africa, and the new PPP-managed hospital network that replaced it. In addition, we used key informant interviews to help explain differences in performance. We found that the PPP-managed network delivered more and higher-quality services and achieved significant gains in clinical outcomes, compared to the government-managed network. We conclude that health care public-private partnerships may improve hospital performance in developing countries and that changes in management and leadership practices might account for differences in clinical outcomes. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  18. Developed-developing country partnerships: Benefits to developed countries?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Shamsuzzoha B

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Developing countries can generate effective solutions for today’s global health challenges. This paper reviews relevant literature to construct the case for international cooperation, and in particular, developed-developing country partnerships. Standard database and web-based searches were conducted for publications in English between 1990 and 2010. Studies containing full or partial data relating to international cooperation between developed and developing countries were retained for further analysis. Of 227 articles retained through initial screening, 65 were included in the final analysis. The results were two-fold: some articles pointed to intangible benefits accrued by developed country partners, but the majority of information pointed to developing country innovations that can potentially inform health systems in developed countries. This information spanned all six WHO health system components. Ten key health areas where developed countries have the most to learn from the developing world were identified and include, rural health service delivery; skills substitution; decentralisation of management; creative problem-solving; education in communicable disease control; innovation in mobile phone use; low technology simulation training; local product manufacture; health financing; and social entrepreneurship. While there are no guarantees that innovations from developing country experiences can effectively transfer to developed countries, combined developed-developing country learning processes can potentially generate effective solutions for global health systems. However, the global pool of knowledge in this area is virgin and further work needs to be undertaken to advance understanding of health innovation diffusion. Even more urgently, a standardized method for reporting partnership benefits is needed—this is perhaps the single most immediate need in planning for, and realizing, the full potential of international

  19. Developed-developing country partnerships: benefits to developed countries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Shamsuzzoha B; Dadwal, Viva; Rutter, Paul; Storr, Julie; Hightower, Joyce D; Gooden, Rachel; Carlet, Jean; Bagheri Nejad, Sepideh; Kelley, Edward T; Donaldson, Liam; Pittet, Didier

    2012-06-18

    Developing countries can generate effective solutions for today's global health challenges. This paper reviews relevant literature to construct the case for international cooperation, and in particular, developed-developing country partnerships. Standard database and web-based searches were conducted for publications in English between 1990 and 2010. Studies containing full or partial data relating to international cooperation between developed and developing countries were retained for further analysis. Of 227 articles retained through initial screening, 65 were included in the final analysis. The results were two-fold: some articles pointed to intangible benefits accrued by developed country partners, but the majority of information pointed to developing country innovations that can potentially inform health systems in developed countries. This information spanned all six WHO health system components. Ten key health areas where developed countries have the most to learn from the developing world were identified and include, rural health service delivery; skills substitution; decentralisation of management; creative problem-solving; education in communicable disease control; innovation in mobile phone use; low technology simulation training; local product manufacture; health financing; and social entrepreneurship. While there are no guarantees that innovations from developing country experiences can effectively transfer to developed countries, combined developed-developing country learning processes can potentially generate effective solutions for global health systems. However, the global pool of knowledge in this area is virgin and further work needs to be undertaken to advance understanding of health innovation diffusion. Even more urgently, a standardized method for reporting partnership benefits is needed--this is perhaps the single most immediate need in planning for, and realizing, the full potential of international cooperation between developed and

  20. Acceptability of participatory social network analysis for problem-solving in Australian Aboriginal health service partnerships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuller Jeffrey

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While participatory social network analysis can help health service partnerships to solve problems, little is known about its acceptability in cross-cultural settings. We conducted two case studies of chronic illness service partnerships in 2007 and 2008 to determine whether participatory research incorporating social network analysis is acceptable for problem-solving in Australian Aboriginal health service delivery. Methods Local research groups comprising 13–19 partnership staff, policy officers and community members were established at each of two sites to guide the research and to reflect and act on the findings. Network and work practice surveys were conducted with 42 staff, and the results were fed back to the research groups. At the end of the project, 19 informants at the two sites were interviewed, and the researchers conducted critical reflection. The effectiveness and acceptability of the participatory social network method were determined quantitatively and qualitatively. Results Participants in both local research groups considered that the network survey had accurately described the links between workers related to the exchange of clinical and cultural information, team care relationships, involvement in service management and planning and involvement in policy development. This revealed the function of the teams and the roles of workers in each partnership. Aboriginal workers had a high number of direct links in the exchange of cultural information, illustrating their role as the cultural resource, whereas they had fewer direct links with other network members on clinical information exchange and team care. The problem of their current and future roles was discussed inside and outside the local research groups. According to the interview informants the participatory network analysis had opened the way for problem-solving by “putting issues on the table”. While there were confronting and ethically

  1. European and Developing Countries Clinical Trials Partnership (EDCTP): the path towards a true partnership

    OpenAIRE

    Ofori-Adjei David; Zijenah Lynn; Ndounga Mathieu; Ambene Herman PA; Kitua Andrew Y; Jaoko Walter G; Corrah Tumani; Ndumbe Peter M; Manyando Christine; Matee Mecky I; Agwale Simon; Shongwe Steven; Nyirenda Thomas; Makanga Michael

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background European and Developing Countries Clinical Trials Partnership (EDCTP) was founded in 2003 by the European Parliament and Council. It is a partnership of 14 European Union (EU) member states, Norway, Switzerland, and Developing Countries, formed to fund acceleration of new clinical trial interventions to fight the human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS), malaria and tuberculosis (TB) in the sub-Saharan African region. EDCTP seeks to b...

  2. When Places Speak: Developing an Exhibit in Partnership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasoulla Hadjiyanni

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This essay outlines the partnership that developed among a faculty member, students, two photographers, University of Minnesota units, and a multitude of community collaborators to develop the When Places Speak exhibit. Featuring places enmeshed in sex trafficking in Minnesota, the exhibit sheds light on the instrumental role partnerships can play in overcoming domination.

  3. Public-private partnerships (PPPs) in development policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brogaard, Lena; Petersen, Ole Helby

    2017-01-01

    Public-private partnerships (PPPs) have proliferated in development studies over the past decades. However, oftentimes the partnership notion remains loosely defined, thus making it difficult to grasp the concept and evaluate practice. This article aims to contribute to conceptual and empirical...

  4. STRATEGY OF PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS DEVELOPMENT IN CRISIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliya BYKOVA

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The role of strategy of public-private partnerships development through information is examined. The informational nature measures, the implementation of which help to promote Ukrainian innovative products on foreign markets, are identified. The urgency of implementing the strategy of public-private partnerships to intensify foreign trade with innovative products in crisis period is substantiated.

  5. Public-Private Partnership for Regional Development of Renewable Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea ZAMFIR

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the public-private partnership as a possible solution for regional development of renewable energy. Firstly, the study reveals the strong connection between renewable energy and sustainable regional development, and secondly, the study discloses some reasons for developing renewable energy through public-private partnerships in Romania’s regions. The findings of this study reveal that there is a strong need for a renewable energy partnership between public authorities, business community and civil society in order to achieve the regional development of renewable energy. The results of this study may be used for upcoming research in the area of implementing renewable energy projects through public-private partnerships in order to achieve sustainable regional development.

  6. Partnerships for Knowledge Translation and Exchange in the Context of Continuing Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legare, France; Borduas, Francine; MacLeod, Tanya; Sketris, Ingrid; Campbell, Barbara; Jacques, Andre

    2011-01-01

    Continuing professional development (CPD) is an important vehicle for knowledge translation (KT); however, selecting CPD strategies that will impact health professionals' behavior and improve patient outcomes is complex. In response, we, KT researchers and CPD knowledge users, have recently formed a partnership known as the National Network for…

  7. Spanning Boundaries in an Arizona Watershed Partnership: Information Networks as Tools for Entrenchment or Ties for Collaboration?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tischa A. Muñoz-Erickson

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The need to develop successful collaborative strategies is an enduring problem in sustainable resource management. Our goal is to evaluate the relationship between information networks and conflict in the context of collaborative groundwater management in the rapidly growing central highland region of Arizona. In this region, water-management conflicts have emerged because of stakeholders' differing geographic perspectives and competing scientific claims. Using social network analyses, we explored the extent to which the Verde River Basin Partnership (VRBP, which was charged with developing and sharing scientific information, has contributed to collaboration in the region. To accomplish this, we examined the role that this stakeholder partnership plays in reinforcing or overcoming the geographic, ideological, expert, and power conflicts among its members. Focusing on information sharing, we tested the extent to which several theoretically important elements of successful collaboration were evidenced by data from the VRBP. The structure of information sharing provides insight into ways in which barriers between diverse perspectives might be retained and elucidates weaknesses in the partnership. To characterize information sharing, we examined interaction ties among individuals with different geographic concerns, hierarchical scales of interest, belief systems (about science, the environment, and the role of the partnership, and self-identified expertise types. Results showed that the partnership's information-sharing network spans most of these boundaries. Based on current theories of collaboration, we would expect the partnership network to be conducive to collaboration. We found that information exchanges are limited by differences in connection patterns across actor expertise and environmental-belief systems. Actors who view scientists as advocates are significantly more likely to occupy boundary-spanning positions, that appear to impede the

  8. Building National Capacity for Climate Change Interpretation: The Role of Leaders, Partnerships, and Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, W.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2007, the New England Aquarium has led a national effort to increase the capacity of informal science venues to effectively communicate about climate change. We are now leading the NSF-funded National Network for Ocean and Climate Change Interpretation (NNOCCI), partnering with the Association of Zoos and Aquariums, FrameWorks Institute, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Monterey Bay Aquarium, and National Aquarium, with evaluation conducted by the New Knowledge Organization, Pennsylvania State University, and Ohio State University. NNOCCI enables teams of informal science interpreters across the country to serve as "communication strategists" - beyond merely conveying information they can influence public perceptions, given their high level of commitment, knowledge, public trust, social networks, and visitor contact. We provide in-depth training as well as an alumni network for ongoing learning, implementation support, leadership development, and coalition building. Our goals are to achieve a systemic national impact, embed our work within multiple ongoing regional and national climate change education networks, and leave an enduring legacy. Our project represents a cross-disciplinary partnership among climate scientists, social and cognitive scientists, and informal education practitioners. We have built a growing national network of more than 250 alumni, including approximately 15-20 peer leaders who co-lead both in-depth training programs and introductory workshops. We have found that this alumni network has been assuming increasing importance in providing for ongoing learning, support for implementation, leadership development, and coalition building. As we look toward the future, we are exploring potential partnerships with other existing networks, both to sustain our impact and to expand our reach. This presentation will address what we have learned in terms of network impacts, best practices, factors for success, and future directions.

  9. Developing partnerships at the community level to promote equity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Developing partnerships at the community level to promote equity: Community based research in poor urban Lilongwe. F Phiri, B N Simwaka, P Nkhonjera, B Nhlane, M Nolo, C Masiye, C Chipatala, C Chiumia, H Nanikwa, S Theobald ...

  10. Building partnership in oral cancer research in a developing country: processes and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zain, Rosnah Binti; Ghani, Wan Maria Nabillah; Razak, Ishak Abdul; Latifah, Raja Jallaludin Raja; Samsuddin, Abdul Rani; Cheong, Sok Ching; Abdullah, Norlida; Ismail, Abdul Rashid; Hussaini, Haizal Bin; Talib, Norain Abu; Jallaludin, Amin

    2009-01-01

    The rising burden of cancer in the developing world calls for a re-evaluation of the treatment strategies employed to improve patient management, early detection and understanding of the disease. There is thus an increasing demand for interdisciplinary research that integrates two or more disciplines of what may seemed to be highly unrelated and yet very much needed as strategies for success in research. This paper presents the processes and barriers faced in building partnerships in oral cancer research in a developing country. A case study was undertaken in a developing country (Malaysia) to assess the strengths and weaknesses of the situation leading to the formation of a multidisciplinary research partnership in oral cancer. Following the formalization of the partnership, further evaluation was undertaken to identify measures that can assist in sustaining the partnership. The group identifies its strength as the existence of academia, research-intensive NGOs and good networking of clinicians via the existence of the government's network of healthcare provider system who are the policy makers. The major weaknesses identified are the competing interest between academia and NGOs to justify their existence due to the lack of funding sources and well trained human resources. With the growing partnership, the collaborative group recognizes the need to develop standard operating procedures (SOPs) and guidelines for the sharing and usage of resources in order to safeguard the interest of the original partners while also attending to the needs of the new partners.

  11. A Social Network Analysis of 140 Community-Academic Partnerships for Health: Examining the Healthier Wisconsin Partnership Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Zeno E; Ahmed, Syed M; Maurana, Cheryl A; DeFino, Mia C; Brewer, Devon D

    2015-08-01

    Social Network Analysis (SNA) provides an important, underutilized approach to evaluating Community Academic Partnerships for Health (CAPHs). This study examines administrative data from 140 CAPHs funded by the Healthier Wisconsin Partnership Program (HWPP). Funder data was normalized to maximize number of interconnections between funded projects and 318 non-redundant community partner organizations in a dual mode analysis, examining the period from 2003-2013.Two strategic planning periods, 2003-2008 vs. 2009-2014, allowed temporal comparison. Connectivity of the network was largely unchanged over time, with most projects and partner organizations connected to a single large component in both time periods. Inter-partner ties formed in HWPP projects were transient. Most community partners were only involved in projects during one strategic time period. Community organizations participating in both time periods were involved in significantly more projects during the first time period than partners participating in the first time period only (Cohen's d = 0.93). This approach represents a significant step toward using objective (non-survey) data for large clusters of health partnerships and has implications for translational science in community settings. Considerations for government, funders, and communities are offered. Examining partnerships within health priority areas, orphaned projects, and faculty ties to these networks are areas for future research. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Partnership for practice change and knowledge development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Stina Meyer; Stokholm, Gitte; Madsen, Anette Judithe

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This article presents and evaluates the results of an educational initiative at the occupational therapy programme at University College Lillebaelt in Denmark. The objectives of the initiative were (A) to establish institutional partnerships between the educational institution and vari....... CONCLUSIONS: On top of what students learned through the initiative, all of this was to the benefit of the university college, the occupational therapy program, and the practice fields and citizens. The results point toward a continuation of the educational initiative....

  13. Foreign experience of state-private partnership mechanisms development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulnara Talgatovna Gafurova

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective to study the experience of developed European countries in the organization of publicprivate partnership. Methods the theoretical research methods were used analysis synthesis and historical method. Results basing on the study of experience of the UK France and Germany the strengths and weaknesses of different models of publicprivate partnerships were revealed as well as the features of their organization under specific economic and historical conditions. Scientific novelty for the first time the sectoral and financial features of the publicprivate partnerships organization in different economic systems were systematized. Practical value the main provisions and conclusions of the article can be used in the development of Russia39s state policy in the field of creation and financing of publicprivate partnership projects. nbsp

  14. Implementing partnership-driven clinical federated electronic health record data sharing networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Kari A; Anderson, Nicholas; Lin, Ching-Ping; Estiri, Hossein

    2016-09-01

    Building federated data sharing architectures requires supporting a range of data owners, effective and validated semantic alignment between data resources, and consistent focus on end-users. Establishing these resources requires development methodologies that support internal validation of data extraction and translation processes, sustaining meaningful partnerships, and delivering clear and measurable system utility. We describe findings from two federated data sharing case examples that detail critical factors, shared outcomes, and production environment results. Two federated data sharing pilot architectures developed to support network-based research associated with the University of Washington's Institute of Translational Health Sciences provided the basis for the findings. A spiral model for implementation and evaluation was used to structure iterations of development and support knowledge share between the two network development teams, which cross collaborated to support and manage common stages. We found that using a spiral model of software development and multiple cycles of iteration was effective in achieving early network design goals. Both networks required time and resource intensive efforts to establish a trusted environment to create the data sharing architectures. Both networks were challenged by the need for adaptive use cases to define and test utility. An iterative cyclical model of development provided a process for developing trust with data partners and refining the design, and supported measureable success in the development of new federated data sharing architectures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Facilitating the Development of Successful Student-Teacher-Scientist Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledley, T. S.; Haddad, N.; Lockwood, J.

    2002-05-01

    The National Science Education Standards (NSES) emphasize that students should learn science through inquiry and should understand the concepts and processes that shape our natural world. One method of accomplishing these goals is to provide students and teachers with opportunities to participate in scientists' ongoing research. Under the supervision of the cooperating scientist, students select a research question that will support the scientist's work. Students then review relevant background material, collect or otherwise acquire and analyze the data, draw conclusions, and write a research report. The Earth System Scientist Network (ESSN) project is working to develop scientists' research projects for the participation of 8th-12th grade students. This development goes well beyond identifying the participating scientist and asking the teachers and students to participate. It also requires: addressing logistical issues related to the partnership; identifying and testing the tools (both hardware and software) that the teachers and students will use; developing the background information and training they will need; and identifying spatial and time requirements unique to each project as well as incentives for the students and teachers. Each project is unique and thus needs to be developed independently of the others; however, each research project needs to address all of these issues. In this talk we will discuss the importance of each of these issues and describe how they are being addressed in the projects we are currently developing for the participation of students and teachers.

  16. Assessing Partnership Alternatives in an IT Network Employing Analytical Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Reza Salamat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the main critical success factors for the companies is their ability to build and maintain an effective collaborative network. This is more critical in the IT industry where the development of sustainable competitive advantage requires an integration of various resources, platforms, and capabilities provided by various actors. Employing such a collaborative network will dramatically change the operations management and promote flexibility and agility. Despite its importance, there is a lack of an analytical tool on collaborative network building process. In this paper, we propose an optimization model employing AHP and multiobjective programming for collaborative network building process based on two interorganizational relationships’ theories, namely, (i transaction cost theory and (ii resource-based view, which are representative of short-term and long-term considerations. The five different methods were employed to solve the formulation and their performances were compared. The model is implemented in an IT company who was in process of developing a large-scale enterprise resource planning (ERP system. The results show that the collaborative network formed through this selection process was more efficient in terms of cost, time, and development speed. The framework offers novel theoretical underpinning and analytical solutions and can be used as an effective tool in selecting network alternatives.

  17. Cape Town's central city development: A strategy of partnership and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    approach to urban planning through its. Development Guidelines for Land Use. Management (DGLUM) policy. In the final phase of development, this new way of analysing urban planning was developed in partnership with the City of Cape Town to promote a stronger dialogue between. City officials and the private sector.

  18. Developing Leadership Literacy: A University-School District Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufeld, Patricia J.; Purvey, Diane; Churchley, John; Handford, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    This project analyzes a long-standing school district-based leadership development program in British Columbia, Canada, and its transition to a partnership with the local university in which the students receive credit toward a graduate degree. The intent of this study was to explore the change process in leadership development from a school…

  19. Developing a Community through Its Marketplace. Partnership Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Manuel Alcazar

    1999-01-01

    A partnership of nongovernmental organizations developed a model of integrated community development centers (CDICs) to address the lack of services and affordable basic necessities in poor barrios surrounding many Latin American cities. A CDIC in a Guayaquil (Ecuador) barrio provides wholesale goods and credit to barrio shopkeepers and…

  20. Cape Town's central city development: A strategy of partnership and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to address this urban challenge, the Cape Town Partnership developed the Central City Development Strategy (CCDS), a ten-year plan that calls for the densification of the central city to re-plan Cape Town into a more liveable, inclusive, democratic, and sustainable urban space. By critically examining the role that ...

  1. Economic Public Private Partnerships for Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Thomas C.; Kistler, Walter P.; Citron, Bob

    2008-01-01

    Space transportation has evolved to entrepreneurs offering affordable transportation services to LEO. Society expects space tourism to produce low costs quickly, but entrepreneurs need the larger commercial transportation markets to raise the private money to build the orbital vehicles. Early heavy cargo is the logistics model of remote bases on Earth and is likely to be similar for off planet remote bases. Public Private Partnerships (PPP), (Norment, 2006) and other alliances with governments offer new transportation markets and combines private funding with government markets to accelerate the movement of mankind into space, (Kistler, 2004a). Entrepreneurs bring change like a multitude of innovation, changes to the traditional aerospace industry status quo, commercial market forces and the lowering of the cost of transportation to orbit. Within PPPs, government stretches space budgets, increases vehicle innovation without cost and gains cost advantages of larger markets. Examples of PPPs show some opportunity for change in space commerce is possible, (Stainback, 2000 and Spekman, 2000). Some of the items entrepreneurs bring include innovation in hardware, a maturing of the normal market forces such as the pressures from buyers and sellers rather than those from government planners or from regulation. Launch costs are high, society wants orbital hotels and current/future markets are not emerging because of high transportation costs. The paper proposes a new approach with examples, because mankind has taken a long time to transition from expendable launch vehicles to newer more affordable launch innovation and may require the introduction of new innovative approaches.

  2. Developing a framework for successful research partnerships in global health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkan, Fiona; Uduma, Ogenna; Lawal, Saheed Akinmayọwa; van Bavel, Bianca

    2016-05-06

    The Centre for Global Health, Trinity College Dublin has as one of its goals, strengthening health systems in developing countries. In realising this goal we work across more than 40 countries with third-level, civil society, government, private sector and UN partners. Each of these requires that different relationships be established. Good principles must guide all global health research partnerships. An exploratory research project was undertaken with research partners of, and staff within, the Centre for Global Health. The aim was to build an evidence-based framework. An inductive exploratory research process was undertaken using a grounded theory approach in three consecutive phases: Phase I: An open-ended questionnaire was sent via email to all identified partners. Phase II: A series of consultative meetings were held with the staff of the Centre for Global Health. Phase III: Data sets from Phases I and II were applied to the development of a unifying framework. Data was analysed using grounded theory three stage thematic analysis - open, axial and selective coding. Relational and operational aspects of partnership were highlighted as being relevant across every partnership. Seven equally important core concepts emerged (focus, values, equity, benefit, leadership, communication and resolution), and are described and discussed here. Of these, two (leadership and resolution) are less often considered in existing literature on partnerships. Large complex partnerships can work well if all parties are agreed in advance to a common minimum programme, have been involved from the design stage, and have adequate resources specifically allocated. Based on this research, a framework for partnerships has been developed and is shared.

  3. Partnerships

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

    Go Sport Free prize draw    Win Go Sport vouchers by participating in a prize draw of the Staff Association! Thanks to our partnership, 30 vouchers of 50 euros each have been offered to us. To reward you for your loyalty, the Staff Association, organizes a free prize draw for its members. The 30 people who will specify a number that comes closest to the total number of participants to this draw will win a voucher. Deadline for participation: Monday 14th July 2014 – 2 p.m. To participate: https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/content/concours-de-lassociation-du-personnel-2014-competition-staff-association Upon presentation of the Staff Association membership card Go Sport Val Thoiry offers a 15 % discount on all purchases in the shop (excluding promotions, sale items and bargain corner, and excluding purchases using Go Sport and Kadéos gift cards. Only one discount can be applied to each purchase). The manager of Go Sport Val Thoiry hands the discount vouchers to the presid...

  4. Innovation Partnerships to Enhance Student Learning and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Dennis C.; Komives, Susan R.

    2016-01-01

    Following chapters that have offered examples and tools relevant to higher education institutions that wish to enhance student learning and development, this chapter summarizes and extends the conversation of how true partnerships in international higher education can be cultivated to achieve the deepest impact.

  5. A Guide to Developing Collaborative School-Community-Business Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luecking, Richard; Deschamps, Ann; Allison, Ruth; Hyatt, Jacque; Stuart, Christy

    2015-01-01

    The "gold standard" of youth outcomes is when they are achieving employment and pursuing a clear career path. The activities transition and employment initiatives, and the partnerships that support them, are most appropriately judged against this standard. This Guide presents approaches and considerations for the development and…

  6. Project and Partnership Officer | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Support to Program Areas, Program Initiatives, Regional Offices and Beneficiaries. Develops and updates donor information and landscapes;; Supports the development of resource mobilisation strategies, including relevant communication materials; and; Supports the development of resource mobilisation strategies and ...

  7. Community-Academic Partnerships: Developing a Service-Learning Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Heather C; Mathews, Launa Rae; Fossen, Traci; Scott, Ginger; Schaefer, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Academic partnerships with hospitals and health care agencies for authentic clinical learning have become a major focus of schools of nursing and professional nursing organizations. Formal academic partnerships in community settings are less common despite evolving models of care delivery outside of inpatient settings. Community-Academic partnerships are commonly developed as a means to engage nursing students in service-learning experiences with an emphasis on student outcomes. The benefit of service-learning projects on community partners and populations receiving the service is largely unknown primarily due to the lack of structure for identifying and measuring outcomes specific to service-learning. Nursing students and their faculty engaged in service-learning have a unique opportunity to collaborate with community partners to evaluate benefits of service-learning projects on those receiving the service. This article describes the development of a service-learning framework as a first step toward successful measurement of the benefits of undergraduate nursing students' service-learning projects on community agencies and the people they serve through a collaborative community-academic partnership. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of partnership working in cities in phase IV of the WHO Healthy Cities Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipp, Alistair; Winters, Tim; de Leeuw, Evelyne

    2013-10-01

    An intersectoral partnership for health improvement is a requirement of the WHO European Healthy Cities Network of municipalities. A review was undertaken in 59 cities based on responses to a structured questionnaire covering phase IV of the network (2003-2008). Cities usually combined formal and informal working partnerships in a pattern seen in previous phases. However, these encompassed more sectors than previously and achieved greater degrees of collaborative planning and implementation. Additional WHO technical support and networking in phase IV significantly enhanced collaboration with the urban planning sector. Critical success factors were high-level political commitment and a well-organized Healthy City office. Partnerships remain a successful component of Healthy City working. The core principles, purpose and intellectual rationale for intersectoral partnerships remain valid and fit for purpose. This applied to long-established phase III cities as well as newcomers to phase IV. The network, and in particular the WHO brand, is well regarded and encourages political and organizational engagement and is a source of support and technical expertise. A key challenge is to apply a more rigorous analytical framework and theory-informed approach to reviewing partnership and collaboration parameters.

  9. Network Computing Infrastructure to Share Tools and Data in Global Nuclear Energy Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Guehee; Suzuki, Yoshio; Teshima, Naoya

    CCSE/JAEA (Center for Computational Science and e-Systems/Japan Atomic Energy Agency) integrated a prototype system of a network computing infrastructure for sharing tools and data to support the U.S. and Japan collaboration in GNEP (Global Nuclear Energy Partnership). We focused on three technical issues to apply our information process infrastructure, which are accessibility, security, and usability. In designing the prototype system, we integrated and improved both network and Web technologies. For the accessibility issue, we adopted SSL-VPN (Security Socket Layer-Virtual Private Network) technology for the access beyond firewalls. For the security issue, we developed an authentication gateway based on the PKI (Public Key Infrastructure) authentication mechanism to strengthen the security. Also, we set fine access control policy to shared tools and data and used shared key based encryption method to protect tools and data against leakage to third parties. For the usability issue, we chose Web browsers as user interface and developed Web application to provide functions to support sharing tools and data. By using WebDAV (Web-based Distributed Authoring and Versioning) function, users can manipulate shared tools and data through the Windows-like folder environment. We implemented the prototype system in Grid infrastructure for atomic energy research: AEGIS (Atomic Energy Grid Infrastructure) developed by CCSE/JAEA. The prototype system was applied for the trial use in the first period of GNEP.

  10. Slavic Village: incorporating active living into community development through partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Emily K; Scofield, Jennifer L

    2009-12-01

    The Slavic Village neighborhood in Cleveland, Ohio, is a diverse community of 30,524 residents that is struggling economically yet strong in tradition. The neighborhood is located just south of downtown and adjacent to the city's industrial valley. Slavic Village Development (SVD) works with local and state partners to improve the quality of life for its residents, including low-income and market-rate housing developments, economic development, community organizing, and greenspace planning. Using the Active Living by Design framework (ALbD), SVD developed strong partnerships to address preparation, promotions, programs, policy, and physical projects. Efforts were focused on Safe Routes to School, neighborhood activities, asset mapping, worksite wellness, and social marketing. The ALbD project changed both the physical environment of Slavic Village and its marketed image. The initiative built cross-disciplinary partnerships that leveraged individual strengths to implement strategies to make Slavic Village a vibrant, healthy, family-friendly neighborhood that promotes active living. There is a strong connection between health and community development. When partners from multiple disciplines work together on a common goal, it is easier to leverage resources and create change. Resource development will always be a challenge. Through the leadership of SVD and its strong ties in the community, the ALbD initiative has re-engaged residents and businesses in efforts to restore the vitality of the community. The partnership in Cleveland has successfully incorporated health into community development, a model of collaboration that can be replicated in other communities.

  11. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Technology Development Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David J. Hill

    2007-07-01

    This plan describes the GNEP Technology Demonstration Program (GNEP-TDP). It has been prepared to guide the development of integrated plans and budgets for realizing the domestic portion of the GNEP vision as well as providing the basis for developing international cooperation. Beginning with the GNEP overall goals, it describes the basic technical objectives for each element of the program, summarizes the technology status and identifies the areas of greatest technical risk. On this basis a proposed technology demonstration program is described that can deliver the required information for a Secretarial decision in the summer of 2008 and support construction of facilities.

  12. Leadership for Developing Citizen-Professional Partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Sharon S.

    1995-01-01

    The Alabama Rural Elderly Enhancement Project was originally intended to help maintain the health and independence of the elderly in Alabama; it developed into an intergenerational program. The project director's leadership built a strong organization that promoted linkages among community agencies and with citizens. (JOW)

  13. Knowledge Networking for Rural Development in Asia/Pacific ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Knowledge Networking for Rural Development in Asia/Pacific Region (ENRAP) - Phase III. This project builds on previous (IDRC) partnership with the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) for establishing a knowledge-sharing network of IFAD rural poverty alleviation projects and partners in the Asia-Pacific ...

  14. Environmental technology development through industry partnership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebastion, R.L.

    1995-12-31

    The Coherent Laser Vision System (CLVS) is being developed to provide precision real-time 3D world views to support site characterization and robotic operations and during facilities Decontamination and Decommissioning. Autonomous or semiautonomous robotic operations requires an accurate, up-to-date 3D world view. Existing technologies for real-time 3D imaging, such as AM laser radar, have limited accuracy at significant ranges and have variability in range estimates caused by lighting or surface shading. Recent advances in fiber optic component technology and digital processing components have enabled the development of a new 3D vision system based upon a fiber optic FMCW coherent laser radar. The approach includes a compact scanner with no-moving parts capable of randomly addressing all pixels. The system maintains the immunity to lighting and surface shading conditions which is characteristic to coherent laser radar. The random pixel addressability allows concentration of scanning and processing on the active areas of a scene, as is done by the human eye-brain system. The precision measurement capability of the coherent laser radar (CLR) technology has already been demonstrated in the form of the CLR 3D Mapper, of which several copies have been delivered or are under order. The CLVS system, in contrast to the CLR 3D Mapper, will have substantially greater imaging speed with a compact no-moving parts scanner, more suitable for real-time robotic operations.

  15. The influence of network characteristics on costs in pharmaceutical new product development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buonansegna, Erika; Schultz, Carsten; Stargardt, Tom

    2015-01-01

    This paper develops a model relating prior experiences, network stability, exclusive partnership, geographical distance, and intermediation in inter-firm R&D networks to new product development (NPD) costs. The developed hypotheses are tested with unique multilevel R&D partnership data from 33...... becomes relevant for non-exclusive partnerships and dispersed networks. NPD costs also increase in more stable networks, reflecting the relevance of structural holes for control and information advantages. This study contributes to the network management literature by understanding the relation between...

  16. Continuing Professional Development Build on Industry-Academia Partnerships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Flemming K.

    2007-01-01

    A challenge for university - industry partnerships is to combine productive engineering and academic learning, to combine industrial engineering tasks with their tasks in Continuing Professional Development (CPD). The rather new methodology Facilitated Work Based Learning (FWBL) can be defined as...... of engineers as an integrated part of their problem oriented team organised engineering work. This presentation will describe the definition of the FWBL methodology, the FWBL Learning Contract, the FWBL process and discuss some results....

  17. Building Service Delivery Networks: Partnership Evolution Among Children’s Behavioral Health Agencies in Response to New Funding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunger, Alicia C.; Doogan, Nathan J.; Cao, Yiwen

    2014-01-01

    Meeting the complex needs of youth with behavioral health problems requires a coordinated network of community-based agencies. Although fiscal scarcity or retrenchment can limit coordinated services, munificence can stimulate service delivery partnerships as agencies expand programs, hire staff, and spend more time coordinating services. This study examines the 2-year evolution of referral and staff expertise sharing networks in response to substantial new funding for services within a regional network of children’s mental health organizations. Quantitative network survey data were collected from directors of 22 nonprofit organizations that receive funding from a county government-based behavioral health service fund. Both referral and staff expertise sharing networks changed over time, but results of a stochastic actor-oriented model of network dynamics suggest the nature of this change varies for these networks. Agencies with higher numbers of referral and staff expertise sharing partners tend to maintain these ties and/or develop new relationships over the 2 years. Agencies tend to refer to agencies they trust, but trust was not associated with staff expertise sharing ties. However, agencies maintain or form staff expertise sharing ties with referral partners, or with organizations that provide similar services. In addition, agencies tend to reciprocate staff expertise sharing, but not referrals. Findings suggest that during periods of resource munificence and service expansion, behavioral health organizations build service delivery partnerships in complex ways that build upon prior collaborative history and coordinate services among similar types of providers. Referral partnerships can pave the way for future information sharing relationships. PMID:25574359

  18. Sustainable Engagement? Reflections on the development of a creative community-university partnership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Shea

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Recognising the untapped potential of multiple discrete community-university partnerships (CUPs in San Francisco, San Francisco’s Neighborhood Empowerment Network (NEN and the Institute for Civic and Community Engagement at San Francisco State University are in the midst of creating a collaborative community-university partnership called NEN University (NENu,which includes other Bay Area institutions of higher education as well as city agencies, non-profit organisations, businesses and neighbourhood resident leaders. This article reflects on the author’s experiences and observations in the ‘doing’ of engaged scholarship as it relates to NENu over the past two years. It contributes to the discussion of how best to build sustainable (in that they have staying power beyond the commitment of a few key individuals and effective (in terms of building or strengthening communities CUPs. In so doing it offers a framework for understanding possible threats to the sustainability of CUPs and applies that framework to an account of NENu’s partnership development process. The article concludes with implications for research and practice. Keywords community-university partnership; engaged scholarship; leadership; sustainability

  19. Evolving partnerships in the collection of urban solid waste in the developing world

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, J.; Baud, I.S.A.; Furedy, C.; Post, J.

    2004-01-01

    -Post, Johan. (2004) Evolving Partnerships in the Collection of Urban Solid Waste in the Developing World, in: Baud, Isa., Johan. Post and Christine Furedy (2004) Solid Waste Management and Recycling; Actors, Partnerships and Policies in Hyderabad, India

  20. The partnership of patient advocacy groups and clinical investigators in the rare diseases clinical research network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkel, Peter A; Manion, Michele; Gopal-Srivastava, Rashmi; Groft, Stephen; Jinnah, H A; Robertson, David; Krischer, Jeffrey P

    2016-05-18

    Among the unique features of the Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network (RDCRN) Program is the requirement for each Consortium to include patient advocacy groups (PAGs) as research partners. This development has transformed the work of the RDCRN and is a model for collaborative research. This article outlines the roles patients and PAGs play in the RDCRN and reports on the PAGs' impact on the Network's success. Principal Investigators from the 17 RDCRN Consortia and 28 representatives from 76 PAGs affiliated with these Consortia were contacted by email to provide feedback via an online RDCRN survey. Impact was measured in the key areas of 1) Research logistics; 2) Outreach and communication; and 3) Funding and in-kind support. Rating choices were: 1-very negative, 2-somewhat negative, 3-no impact, 4-somewhat positive, and 5-very positive. Twenty-seven of the PAGs (96 %) disseminate information about the RDCRN within the patient community. The Consortium Principal Investigators also reported high levels of PAG involvement. Sixteen (94 %) Consortium Principal Investigators and 25 PAGs (89 %) reported PAGs participation in protocol review, study design, Consortium conference calls, attending Consortium meetings, or helping with patient recruitment. PAGs are actively involved in shaping Consortia's research agendas, help ensure the feasibility and success of research protocols by assisting with study design and patient recruitment, and support training programs. This extensive PAG-Investigator partnership in the RDCRN has had a strongly positive impact on the success of the Network.

  1. Community partnerships in healthy eating and lifestyle promotion: A network analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruopeng An

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Promoting healthy eating and lifestyles among populations with limited resources is a complex undertaking that often requires strong partnerships between various agencies. In local communities, these agencies are typically located in different areas, serve diverse subgroups, and operate distinct programs, limiting their communication and interactions with each other. This study assessed the network of agencies in local communities that promote healthy eating and lifestyles among populations with limited resources. Network surveys were administered in 2016 among 89 agencies located in 4 rural counties in Michigan that served limited-resource audiences. The agencies were categorized into 8 types: K-12 schools, early childhood centers, emergency food providers, health-related agencies, social resource centers, low-income/subsidized housing complexes, continuing education organizations, and others. Network analysis was conducted to examine 4 network structures—communication, funding, cooperation, and collaboration networks between agencies within each county. Agencies had a moderate level of cooperation, but were only loosely connected in the other 3 networks, indicated by low network density. Agencies in a network were decentralized rather than centralized around a few influential agencies, indicated by low centralization. There was evidence regarding homophily in a network, indicated by some significant correlations within agencies of the same type. Agencies connected in any one network were considerably more likely to be connected in all the other networks as well. In conclusion, promoting healthy eating and lifestyles among populations with limited resources warrants strong partnership between agencies in communities. Network analysis serves as a useful tool to evaluate community partnerships and facilitate coalition building.

  2. Healthcare technology management competency and its impacts on IT-healthcare partnerships development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jen-Her; Chen, Yi-Cheng; Greenes, Robert A

    2009-02-01

    This study presents a conceptual model to investigate the healthcare technology management (HTM) competency required by healthcare IS professionals and the impact of such competency in gaining strategic advantages through information technology (IT) by development of partnerships with people from different divisions of healthcare organizations. First, a scale to measure HTM competency was developed and validated, then it was used to collect the large-scale survey data. Second, the partial least squares (PLS) method was used to empirically test the conceptual model and hypotheses through the large-scale survey data collected. The empirical results support the proposed structure for HTM competency encompassing the four skills/knowledge domains: healthcare organization overview, external knowledge networking, healthcare technology integration, and management and interpersonal. The findings indicate that HTM competency positively influences the attitudes of information system (IS) professionals towards their willingness to develop partnerships with healthcare professionals. The findings improve our understanding of the concept of HTM competency and its influence on IT-healthcare partnerships. The conceptual model of HTM is of particular value to those concerned with skills/knowledge training and competency development for IS professionals in healthcare organizations. Healthcare organizations can develop HTM profiles for individual IS professionals in accordance with their own organization contexts. Executive management can take advantage of such HTM profiles to assist in making succession-planning decisions by evaluating the competency levels and development needs of their employees.

  3. The development of partnership after hypertensive diseases in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeners, Brigitte; Rath, Werner; Kuse, Sabine; Tschudin, Sibil

    2015-04-01

    Hypertensive diseases in pregnancy (HDP) occur in 5-8% of all pregnancies and represent one of the most important causes of maternal and fetal morbidity. Even after a normal pregnancy/delivery adaptation to parenthood is a major challenge. However, a successful adjustment is important for future family health. As pregnancy complications may put additional strain on early parenthood, the current study investigated satisfaction with partnership including factors which determine (dis)satisfaction as well as separation rates after pregnancies complicated by HDP. A total of 737 women after HDP and 624 matched-control women completed a self-administered questionnaire on psycho-social factors in the development of HDP. Free-text answers on satisfaction with partnership were analyzed by conceptual analysis. Women with HDP were significantly less often satisfied with their partnership than control women (76%/81.1%; p < 0.05). Women with preeclampsia were at higher risk for an unsatisfactory relationship than those with other manifestations of HDP. Common interests and aims could be identified as the most important reasons for a satisfying marital relationship in women with and without a diagnosis of HDP. HDP represent an additional challenge in family adjustment. Adapted perinatal psycho-social support may help to facilitate the start into family life.

  4. International Development Partnerships and Diffusion of Renewable Energy Technologies in Developing Countries: Cases in Latin America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platonova, Inna

    Access to energy is vital for sustainable development and poverty alleviation, yet billions of people in developing countries continue to suffer from constant exposure to open fires and dangerous fuels, such as kerosene. Renewable energy technologies are being acknowledged as suitable solutions for remote rural communities in much of the developing world and international development non-governmental organizations (NGOs) increasingly play important roles in the diffusion of these technologies via development partnerships. While these partnerships are widely promoted, many questions related to their functioning and effectiveness remain open. To advance the theory and practice, this interdisciplinary exploratory research provides in-depth insights into the nature of international NGO-driven development partnerships in rural renewable energy and their effectiveness based on the case studies in Talamanca, Costa Rica and Cajamarca, Peru. The analysis of the nature of development partnerships shows that partnerships in the case studies differ in structure, size and diversity of actors due to differentiation in the implementation strategies, technological complexities, institutional and contextual factors. A multi-theoretical approach is presented to explain the multiple drivers of the studied development partnerships. The research highlights partnership constraints related to the provision of rural renewable energy, the organizational type and institutional environments. Based on the case studies this research puts forward theoretical propositions regarding the factors that affect the effectiveness of the partnerships. In terms of the partnership dynamics dimension, several key factors of success are confirmed from the existing literature, namely shared values and goals, complementary expertise and capacities, confidence and trust, clear roles and responsibilities, effective communication. Additional factors identified are personality match and continuity of staff. In

  5. The Development of Public-private Partnerships in the Region in Terms of Global Economic Slowdown

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pakulin Serhij

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to develop scientifically grounded methodological tools of public-private partnerships in the region in terms of slowing economic globalization. According to this goal, organizes interaction of the government and businesses in the implementation of public-private partnerships; the mechanism for implementation of public-private partnerships in the Kharkiv region; the model of economic management in the region using a public-private partnership.

  6. A Community-based Partnership for a Sustainable GNSS Geodetic Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokka, R. K.

    2009-12-01

    Geodetic networks offer unparalleled opportunities to monitor and understand many of the rhythms of the Earth most vital to the sustainability of modern and future societies, i.e., crustal motions, sea-level, and the weather. For crustal deformation studies, the advantage is clear. Modern measurements allow us to document not only the permanent strains incurred over a seismic cycle, for example, but also the ephemeral strains that are critical for understanding the underlying physical mechanism. To be effective for science, however, geodetic networks must be properly designed, capitalized, and maintained over sufficient time intervals to fully capture the processes in action. Unfortunately, most networks lack interoperability and lack a business plan to ensure long term sustainability. The USA, for example, lacks a unified nation-wide GNSS network that can sustain its self over the coming years, decades, and century. Current federal priorities do not yet envision such a singular network. Publicly and privately funded regional networks exist, but tend to be parochial in scope, and optimized for a special user community, e.g., surveying, crustal motions, etc. Data sharing is common, but the lack of input at the beginning limits the functionality of the system for non-primary users. Funding for private networks depend heavily on the user demand, business cycle, and regulatory requirements. Agencies funding science networks offer no guarantee of sustained support. An alternative model (GULFNet) developed in Louisiana is meeting user needs, is sustainable, and is helping engineers, surveyors, and geologists become more spatially enabled. The common denominator among all participants is the view that accurate, precise, and timely geodetic data have tangible value for all segments of society. Although operated by a university (LSU), GULFNet is a community-based partnership between public and private sectors. GULFNet simultaneously achieves scientific goals by providing

  7. Global Partnership on Open Data for Development | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This project will build developing-country skills and knowledge to -formulate and implement open data policies -develop open data ... Open Data Leaders Network : bringing together government leaders of open data initiatives from around the world (video). Download PDF. Reports. Open Data Leaders Network : bringing ...

  8. The photovoltaic services network: A renewable energy partnership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plate, Peggy [Western Area Power Administration, (United states); Stokes, Kirk [NEOS Corporation, (United states)

    1995-12-31

    The Photovoltaic Services Network (PSN) is an independent organization of electric utilities established to support utility members in the use of photovoltaic (PV) power for off-grid applications. The PSN is focused on ensuring that cost-competitive, utility-grade, packaged PV products are available for various off-grid applications, such as livestock water pumping, remote residences, lighting, and cathodic protection among others. The primary objectives of the PSN are: 1) To provide education, training, and installation support as required by member utilities. 2) To establish a forum for member utilities to exchange ideas on PV program implementation and marketing strategies. 3) To create standardized system specifications for a variety of PV applications. 4) To coordinate PV product purchases for appropriate applications. 5) To identify and acquire additional funding (both publics and private) for product development and testing. 6) To pursue alliances with other organizations interested in PV. [Espanol] La Red de Servicios Fotovoltaicos (PSN) es una organizacion independiente de empresas electricas establecida para apoyar a las empresas miembro en el uso de la energia fotovoltaica en aplicaciones fuera de la red. La PSN se enfoca en garantizar que la competitividad en costo, calidad de empresa electrica de los paquetes de productos fotovoltaicos esten disponibles para varias aplicaciones fuera de la red, tales como el bombeo de agua para el ganado, residencias remotas, iluminacion y proteccion catodica entre otras. Los principales objetivos del PSN son: 1. Proporcionar educacion, entrenamiento, y apoyo en la instalacion requerida por las empresas miembro. 2. Establecer un forum de empresas miembro para intercambiar ideas sobre la puesta en practica del programa fotovoltaico y sobre la estrategias de comercializacion. 3. Crear un sistema de especificaciones estandarizadas para una variedad de aplicaciones de la energia fotovoltaica. 4. Coordinar la compra de

  9. Using the balanced scorecard in the development of community partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsasis, Peter; Owen, Susan M

    2009-02-01

    The benefits of community partnerships have been well established in the health service literature. However, measuring these benefits and associated outcomes is relatively new. This paper presents an innovative initiative in the application of a balanced scorecard framework for measuring and monitoring partnership activity at the community level, while adopting principles of evidence-based practice to the partnership process. In addition, it serves as an excellent example of how organizations can apply scorecard methodology to move away from relationship-based partnerships and into new collaborations of which they can select - using a formal skill and competency assessment for partnership success.

  10. A Danish-Vietnamese Partnership for Business and Technology Development in Solid Waste Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, David; Bach, Leu Tho

    2015-01-01

    of these partnerships. The partnership's business concept deals with the proposed introduction of improved, Danish solid waste separation and treatment technology at a plant in a suburb of Hanoi. The technology enables the production of derived products, such as organic fertilizer, and is suitable for biogas......In business and socio-technical literature, partnerships are highlighted as an important tool for developing sustainable solutions to environmental challenges, such as the waste management systems of developing countries. In order to investigate the formation of North–South partnerships...... in this respect, the business development process of a Danish–Vietnamese partnership in the waste sector is analyzed in this paper. From a participant's perspective, a business development process is narrated, showing how innovation management in partnerships evolves: through socially and culturally influenced...

  11. Midwifery participatory curriculum development: Transformation through active partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidebotham, Mary; Walters, Caroline; Chipperfield, Janine; Gamble, Jenny

    2017-07-01

    Evolving knowledge and professional practice combined with advances in pedagogy and learning technology create challenges for accredited professional programs. Internationally a sparsity of literature exists around curriculum development for professional programs responsive to regulatory and societal drivers. This paper evaluates a participatory curriculum development framework, adapted from the community development sector, to determine its applicability to promote engagement and ownership during the development of a Bachelor of Midwifery curriculum at an Australian University. The structures, processes and resulting curriculum development framework are described. A representative sample of key curriculum development team members were interviewed in relation to their participation. Qualitative analysis of transcribed interviews occurred through inductive, essentialist thematic analysis. Two main themes emerged: (1) 'it is a transformative journey' and (2) focused 'partnership in action'. Results confirmed the participatory curriculum development process provides symbiotic benefits to participants leading to individual and organisational growth and the perception of a shared curriculum. A final operational model using a participatory curriculum development process to guide the development of accredited health programs emerged. The model provides an appropriate structure to create meaningful collaboration with multiple stakeholders to produce a curriculum that is contemporary, underpinned by evidence and reflective of 'real world' practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. How do governments support the development of Public Private Partnerships?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verhoest, Koen; Petersen, Ole Helby; Scherrer, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Taking an institutional perspective, in this article we develop an index of the governmental support for public private partnership (PPP) — a ‘PPP Governmental Support Index’ (GSI) — which aims to measure the extent to which national governments provide an institutional framework that is either...... conducive or preventive for the introduction and diffusion of PPPs within transport infrastructure and other sectors. First, based on a substantive review of the literature, we define the elements of the PPP GSI, including the policy and political commitment regarding PPPs, the legal and regulatory...... institutional index scores and infrastructure PPP activity in the 20 countries. Lastly, we discuss the potential and usefulness of the presented PPP GSI, as well as methodological limitations, and elaborate on how this index might be utilised to strengthen future comparative research on PPP in transport...

  13. Evaluation of partnerships in a transnational family violence prevention network using an integrated knowledge translation and exchange model: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, Anita; Sibbald, Shannon L; Wathen, C Nadine

    2014-05-23

    Family violence is a significant and complex public health problem that demands collaboration between researchers, practitioners, and policymakers for systemic, sustainable solutions. An integrated knowledge translation network was developed to support joint research production and application in the area. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which the international Preventing Violence Across the Lifespan (PreVAiL) Research Network built effective partnerships among its members, with a focus on the knowledge user partner perspective. This mixed-methods study employed a combination of questionnaire and semi-structured interviews to understand partnerships two years after PreVAiL's inception. The questionnaire examined communication, collaborative research, dissemination of research, research findings, negotiation, partnership enhancement, information needs, rapport, and commitment. The interviews elicited feedback about partners' experiences with being part of the network. Five main findings were highlighted: i) knowledge user partner involvement varied across activities, ranging from 11% to 79% participation rates; ii) partners and researchers generally converged on their assessment of communication indicators; iii) partners valued the network at both an individual level and to fulfill their organizations' mandates; iv) being part of PreVAiL allowed partners to readily contact researchers, and partners felt comfortable acting as an intermediary between PreVAiL and the rest of their own organization; v) application of research was just emerging; partners needed more actionable insights to determine ways to move forward given the research at that point in time. Our results demonstrate the importance of developing and nurturing strong partnerships for integrated knowledge translation. Our findings are applicable to other network-oriented partnerships where a diversity of stakeholders work to address complex, multi-faceted public health problems.

  14. Visualizing Access: Knowledge Development in University-Community Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strier, Roni; Shechter, Dorit

    2016-01-01

    This article tackles the need to democratize processes of knowledge production in the context of university-community partnerships. These partnerships, which are a rich source of academic research, allow universities to create more reciprocal relationships with communities, especially those affected by social inequalities. Through their social…

  15. Public-Private Partnerships and Sustainable Agricultural Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Castle

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Agriculture in Africa is not sustainable because average yields have been stagnating for decades due to underinvestment, especially in the development of agricultural markets, crop improvement and the sustainable management of agricultural systems. Low public sector funding for agricultural research and lack of incentives for the private sector to operate in areas where there is no market largely explain the yield gap in many food-importing developing countries. Yet, there are effective ways in which the public and the private sector could work together and jointly improve agricultural sustainability in poor countries. The public sector provides a favorable institutional environment for the development of agricultural markets and investment in rural infrastructure, facilitates local business development and funds research with local relevance. The private sector, in return, brings its considerable expertise in product development and deployment. This article illustrates how new forms of public-private partnerships (PPPs for agricultural development can work in challenging environments. It discusses three promising examples of PPPs in which the Syngenta Foundation for Sustainable Agriculture (SFSA is actively involved, and shows that an experimental approach can sometimes be more effective than social planning in efforts to achieve sustainable agriculture.

  16. Financing Development Through Public Private Partnerships (PPPs in Botswana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. K. Botlhale

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Largely due to chronic fiscal stress since the recent global economic crisis, there are calls for alternative ways of financing economic development. Public Private Partnerships (PPPs have been identified as such alternatives. There is an increasing awareness that the private sector is not a competitor but a strategic partner in the drive for economic development. Therefore, governments are leveraging on the benefits of PPPs. Using the case study of Botswana, which is experiencing revenue challenges as diamonds have not been selling well since 2008, this theoretical paper explores the possibility of using more PPPs to finance economic development. Grounded in interpretivist research methodology, using the survey research strategy and using secondary data sources in the form of a desk survey, it concluded that there is a case for the increased use PPPs to finance economic development. It further concluded that while there is demonstrated appetite for PPPs, to date, only a few projects have been procured through PPPs. Hence, moving forward, and given the deteriorating revenue situation, there is a need to use more PPPs to deliver economic development. Finally, the paper argues that there is a need to reform the current PPP legal-institutional architecture and bench-mark and peer-learn from best PPP practices in Africa such as South Africa and Nigeria and beyond.

  17. Emerging metagovernance as an institutional framework for public private partnership networks in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Christian; Buser, Martine

    2006-01-01

    Implementing private public partnerships in Denmark has been a long and reluctant process. PPP developed among municipalities from the late nineties, but was halted because of a scandal in 2002. In 2004 the government launched an action plan, and PPP are emerging again. Drawing on new public mana...

  18. Emerging Metagovernance as an Institutional Framework for Public Private Partnership Network in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buser, Martine; Koch, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Implementing private public partnerships in Denmark has been a long and reluctant process. PPP developed among municipalities from the late nineties, but was halted because of a scandal in 2002. In 2004 the government launched an action plan, and PPP are emerging again. Drawing on new public mana...

  19. Development of university-industry partnerships in railroad engineering education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautala, Pasi T.

    , such as willingness of partners to understand each others needs and motivations for the relationship should be alleviated by developing performance goals and measures of success. While it is impossible to evaluate all aspects of university level railroad engineering education in one study, this research suggests that there are opportunities for a partnership between the rail industry and universities. The purpose of this research was to identify those opportunities and increase the understanding of the forces that shape the demand for railroad engineers and engineering education. The findings can be used both by the rail industry and the universities as they initiate change in the current processes and thrive to develop railroad engineers to meet the demands of the 21 st century.

  20. Concerning Collaboration: Teachers' Perspectives on Working in Partnerships to Develop Teaching Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofthouse, Rachel; Thomas, Ulrike

    2017-01-01

    Teachers are often encouraged to work in partnerships to support their professional development. In this article we focus on three forms of working partnerships based in English secondary schools. Each has an intended function of developing teaching practices. The cases of mentoring, coaching and an adapted lesson study come from both initial…

  1. Mapping the Possibilities: Using Network Analysis to Identify Opportunities for Building Nutrition Partnerships Within Diverse Low-Income Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchthal, Opal Vanessa; Maddock, Jason E

    2015-01-01

    To identify communication and collaboration patterns among organizations involved in nutrition education within an ethnically diverse low-income community. A snowball sample methodology was used to identify 27 organizations involved in nutrition activities in the community. The researchers conducted an online survey and network analysis to identify communication and collaboration patterns among these organizations. An urban neighborhood in Honolulu, HI. Individuals responsible for nutrition activities at state, county, and nonprofit organizations. Network structure, betweenness, and centralization. Communication was uncentralized and collaboration was limited. Collaboration was affected by differences in mission, location, and population served. Child care/youth development organizations and community health centers provided links across the community. Agencies serving different ethnic populations were poorly linked and located on the periphery of the network. Ethnic-specific churches expressed strong interest in nutrition partnership but were not identified as potential partners by other agencies in the network. Limited communication between agencies serving different populations in the same community may result in missed opportunities for collaboration. Network analysis is an effective tool for identifying these gaps and helps build community capacity for improving nutrition outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Addressing cancer disparities via community network mobilization and intersectoral partnerships: a social network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanadhan, Shoba; Salhi, Carmel; Achille, Erline; Baril, Nashira; D'Entremont, Kerrie; Grullon, Milagro; Judge, Christine; Oppenheimer, Sarah; Reeves, Chrasandra; Savage, Clara; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula

    2012-01-01

    Community mobilization and collaboration among diverse partners are vital components of the effort to reduce and eliminate cancer disparities in the United States. We studied the development and impact of intersectoral connections among the members of the Massachusetts Community Network for Cancer Education, Research, and Training (MassCONECT). As one of the Community Network Program sites funded by the National Cancer Institute, this infrastructure-building initiative utilized principles of Community-based Participatory Research (CBPR) to unite community coalitions, researchers, policymakers, and other important stakeholders to address cancer disparities in three Massachusetts communities: Boston, Lawrence, and Worcester. We conducted a cross-sectional, sociometric network analysis four years after the network was formed. A total of 38 of 55 members participated in the study (69% response rate). Over four years of collaboration, the number of intersectoral connections reported by members (intersectoral out-degree) increased, as did the extent to which such connections were reported reciprocally (intersectoral reciprocity). We assessed relationships between these markers of intersectoral collaboration and three intermediate outcomes in the effort to reduce and eliminate cancer disparities: delivery of community activities, policy engagement, and grants/publications. We found a positive and statistically significant relationship between intersectoral out-degree and community activities and policy engagement (the relationship was borderline significant for grants/publications). We found a positive and statistically significant relationship between intersectoral reciprocity and community activities and grants/publications (the relationship was borderline significant for policy engagement). The study suggests that intersectoral connections may be important drivers of diverse intermediate outcomes in the effort to reduce and eliminate cancer disparities. The findings

  3. Value chains, partnerships and development : Using case studies to refine programme theories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vellema, S.; Ton, G.; Roo, de N.; Wijk, van J.

    2013-01-01

    Partnerships between companies and non-governmental organizations that aim to incorporate smallholder farmers into value chains are increasingly being promoted as a way of pursuing development goals. This article investigates two case studies of such partnerships and the outcomes they achieved in

  4. The Metaphysics of Collaboration: Identity, Unity and Difference in Cross-Sector Partnerships for Sustainable Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, V.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we critically discuss the ideal of alignment, unity and harmony in cross-sector partnerships (CSP) for wicked problems like sustainable development. We explore four characteristics of the concepts of identity, unity and difference which are presupposed in the partnership and

  5. Developing a Unidimensional Instrument To Measure the Effectiveness of School-based Partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bainer, Deborah L.; Smith, Richard M.

    1999-01-01

    Developed and refined an instrument designed to measure the effectiveness of school-based partnerships using four theoretical models of partnering efforts. Results based on survey responses of 297 educators and volunteers from partnerships show how Rasch analysis, bias analysis, and principal-components analysis can be used to evaluate the…

  6. Collaborative Working and Contested Practices: Forming, Developing and Sustaining Social Partnerships in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billett, Stephen; Ovens, Carolyn; Clemans, Allie; Seddon, Terri

    2007-01-01

    Despite a lack of applied research, social partnerships are increasingly being adopted by both government and non-government agencies to meet localized needs in education and other fields. This article discusses the findings of an investigation of how social partnerships can best be formed, developed and sustained over time. Earlier work…

  7. Teacher Professional Development through a School-University Partnership. What Role Does Teacher Identity Play?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, John

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the continuing professional development of one group of secondary school English language teachers who participated in a school-university partnership in Hong Kong. Grounded in a framework of teacher identity and using in-depth interviews conducted over the entire 12 month period of the partnership, the study explores the…

  8. Local Sustainable Development and Conservation? : Research into Three Types of Tourism Partnerships in Tanzania.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.P. de Boer (Diederik)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstractBusiness community partnerships are vested in private sector development and are the study topic of this research. This study will elaborate on the role of local partnerships to understand to what extent they contribute to a sustainable environment for local socio-economic and

  9. Developing a Rubric to Support the Evaluation of Professional Development School Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polly, Drew; Smaldino, Sharon; Brynteson, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the synthesis of the NCATE PDS Standards, the NAPDS Nine Essentials and the CAEP Standards to create a rubric that can be used to help PDS stakeholders develop, refine, and evaluate their partnerships. Implications and future directions on how to use the rubric are also shared.

  10. The importance of the partnership and cooperation in the regional development exampled on Znojmo region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Foret

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is based on the theoretical presumption that the successful and balanced spatial development at all hierarchical levels (local, regional, national, international depends on close and effective partnership, cooperation and communication of many groups of the different actors. It brings own definition of partnership for local and regional development and there is included basic categorisation of different kind of partnerships as well. The importance of partnership and cooperation for territorial development is demonstrated on analyses of the concrete project from Znojmo region (project Moravian Wine Trails. The following part of the article pays attention to the selected problematic issues in Znojmo region which might be solved in future by means of partnership among the different groups of the stakeholders. The conclusion brings some recommendations which could be useful not only for municipal and regional authorities but for other groups of stakeholders as well.

  11. Product Development Partnerships: Case studies of a new mechanism for health technology innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Richard T

    2011-08-26

    There is a continuing need for new health technologies to address the disease burdens of developing countries. In the last decade Product Development Partnerships (PDP) have emerged that are making important contributions to the development of these technologies. PDPs are a form of public private partnerships that focus on health technology development. PDPs reflect the current phase in the history of health technology development: the Era of Partnerships, in which the public and private sectors have found productive ways to collaborate. Successful innovation depends on addressing six determinants of innovation. We examine four case studies of PDPs and show how they have addressed the six determinants to achieve success.

  12. A Tale of Two Community Networks Program Centers: Operationalizing and Assessing CBPR Principles and Evaluating Partnership Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo-Johnson, Cassandra; Allen, Michele L.; Colditz, Graham A.; Hurtado, G. Ali; Davey, Cynthia S.; Sanders Thompson, Vetta L.; Drake, Bettina F.; Svetaz, Maria Veronica; Rosas-Lee, Maira; Goodman, Melody S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Community Networks Program (CNP) centers are required to use a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach within their specific priority communities. Not all communities are the same and unique contextual factors and collaborators’ priorities shape each CBPR partnership. There are also established CBPR and community engagement (CE) principles shown to lead to quality CBPR in any community. However, operationalizing and assessing CBPR principles and partnership outcomes to understand the conditions and processes in CBPR that lead to achieving program and project level goals is relatively new in the science of CBPR. Objectives We sought to describe the development of surveys on adherence to and implementation of CBPR/CE principles at two CNP centers and examine commonalities and differences in program- versus project-level CBPR evaluation. Methods A case study about the development and application of CBPR/CE principles for the Missouri CNP, Program for the Elimination of Cancer Disparities, and Minnesota CNP, Padres Informados/Jovenes Preparados, surveys was conducted to compare project versus program operationalization of principles. Survey participant demographics were provided by CNP. Specific domains found in CBPR/CE principles were identified and organized under an existing framework to establish a common ground. Operational definitions and the number of survey items were provided for each domain by CNP. Conclusion There are distinct differences in operational definitions of CBPR/CE principles at the program and project levels of evaluation. However, commonalities support further research to develop standards for CBPR evaluation across partnerships and at the program and project levels. PMID:26213405

  13. Parcerias para o desenvolvimento produtivo: a constituição de redes sociotécnicas no Complexo Econômico-Industrial da Saúde | Partnerships for productive development: the establishment of socio-technical networks in the Economic-Industrial Complex of Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela de Oliveira Silva

    2017-02-01

    -technical networks formed from the drug PDP were built graphically by Gephi software. It was found that the efficient management of PDP partnerships depends primarily on the effective articulation of several actors from different ministries, Anvisa, development agencies and public and private entities, being important that each actor also recognizes itself as a fundamental part of the process to improve the results obtained.

  14. Building Pipelines for Information: Developing Partnerships Between Scientists, Educators, and Community Groups to Learn More About Hydraulic Fracturing in Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafich, K. A.; Hannigan, M.; Martens, W.; McDonald, J. E.; Knight, D.; Gardiner, L. S.; Collier, A. M.; Fletcher, H.; Polmear, M.

    2015-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is a highly contentious issue, and trusted sources of information about the impacts and benefits are difficult to find. Scientific research is making strides to catch up with rapidly expanding unconventional oil and gas development, in part, to meet the need for information for policy, regulation, and public interest. A leader in hydraulic fracturing research, the AirWaterGas Sustainability Research Network is a multi-institution, multi-disciplinary team of researchers working to understand the environmental, economic, and social tradeoffs of oil and gas development. AirWaterGas recently restructured and implemented our education and outreach program around a partnership with the CU-Boulder Office for Outreach and Engagement that leverages existing campus infrastructure, networks, and expertise to disseminate research results and engage the public. The education and outreach team is working with formal and informal K-12 educators through several programs: a yearlong teacher professional development program, a rural classroom air quality monitoring program, and a community partnership grant program. Each program brings together scientists and educators in different environments such as the classroom, online learning, in-person workshops, and community lectures. We will present best practices for developing and implementing a viable outreach and education program through building and fostering mutually beneficial partnerships that bridge the gap between scientists and the public.

  15. USE OF PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP FOR DEVELOPMENT OF INFRASTRUCTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Viktorovich Linev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Need of research and introduction of innovative mechanisms of growth of economy of Russia in the conditions of the accruing crisis tendencies and external restrictions causes relevance of consideration of close interaction and mutually providing production and social infrastructures of the economic development forming additional eff ects in all variety of branches of industrial complex. Formation becomes the initiating factor of such interaction in modern conditions and eff ective use of domestic enterprise potential a necessary condition of which is state – private partnership (PPP. In this regard it is necessary to consider problems and problems of formation of conditions, forms and methods of use of PPP, for development of infrastructure as necessary complex of BasicElements of formation of advanced socially oriented market economy. As an object of research in article the organizational and economic relations assuming eff ective partnership of the government and private institutions for formation of complete and highly eff ective system of the production and social infrastructure causing an intensifi cation of synergetic and multiplicative eff ects of development of a civilized society are considered. Purposes/tasks. The main objective of a statement of materials in this article consists in theoretical justifi cation of basic provisions of realization of PPP in system of production and social infrastructure. The task to prove need of application of PPP for strengthening of multiplicative eff ect at development of this system is set. Methodology. In the methodological plan this work represents the state-of-the-art review of the social and economic processes happening in system of social and production infrastructure. When writing article the complex of general scientifi c methods of research including generalization, economical and statistical, system and analytical cluster and others was applied Results. As a result of performance of this

  16. University wins highly competitive planning grant to develop partnership with universities in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Rich, Miriam Sommers

    2009-01-01

    The Office of International Research, Education, and Development at Virginia Tech has won a highly competitive federal planning grant to develop a strategic capacity-building partnership with universities in Sub-Saharan Africa.

  17. Challenges in a product development partnership: a malaria treatment case study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vera Lucia Luiza; Gabriela Costa Chaves; Tayna Marques Torres Barboza; Luciana dePaula Barros Goncalves; Eric G Stobbaerts

    2017-01-01

    .... This product development took place in the ambit of a public-private partnership. Semi-structured interviews were held with key actors involved in the different phases of the development, and documents were analyzed...

  18. Building Community Partnerships: Using Social Network Analysis to Strengthen Service Networks Supporting a South Carolina Program for Pregnant and Parenting Teens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radcliff, Elizabeth; Hale, Nathan; Browder, Jennifer; Cartledge, Claudia

    2017-09-01

    In 2013, South Carolina implemented a multi-year program providing support services for pregnant and parenting teens. Local lead sites were responsible for coordinating service delivery in partnership with other multidisciplinary community-based organizations. We used social network theory and analyses (SNA) to examine changes in partnerships over time. Using two-stage purposeful sampling, we identified three lead sites and their self-reported community partners. We administered two web-based surveys grounded in social network theory that included questions about partnership relationships and organizational characteristics. We calculated selected whole-network measures (size, cohesion, equity, diversity). Following the Year 1 surveys, we reviewed our findings with the lead sites and suggested opportunities to strengthen their respective partnerships. Following the Year 3 surveys, we observed changes across the networks. Survey response rates were 91.5% (43/47) in Year 1 and 68.2% (45/66) in Year 3. By Year 3, the average network size increased from 15.6 to 20.3 organizations. By Year 3, one lead site doubled its measure of network cohesion (connectedness); another lead site doubled in size (capacity). A third lead site, highly dense in Year 1, increased in size but decreased in cohesion by Year 3. Innovative use of SNA findings can help community partnerships identify gaps in capacity or services and organizations needed to fulfill program aims. SNA findings can also improve partnership function by identifying opportunities to improve connectedness or reduce redundancies in program work. The ability of lead sites to strategically reconfigure partnerships can be important to program success and sustainability.

  19. Perceived Effectiveness of Youth-Adult Partnerships on Enhancing Life Skill Development through 4-H

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff Sallee

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine if youth and adult participants in the 4-H Environmental Impact program perceive youth?adult partnerships as an effective means to enhance the youths’ development of life skills. The study further sought to discover the perceived obstacles that may keep youth and adults from participating in equal partnerships. The life skills of: Leadership, Cooperation, Service Learning, and Planning and organizing were enhanced through the youths’ participation in the youth-adult partnership. Through this research there was evidence that many of the youth participants did perceive themselves as equal team members when participating in this youth-adult partnership. The research indicated the greatest perceived obstacle that kept youth from engaging was not much time after homework and other activities. It is recommended that all participants in newly formed youth-adult partnerships receive training on how to implement this type of program, and how to participate equally.

  20. Strategies for Developing Literacy-Focused Family-School Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Julia; Terlitsky, Amy B.

    2016-01-01

    Student achievement increases when parents are involved in their child's education. This article describes the benefits of building partnerships with parents around child literacy activities. Tips for teachers provide ideas for sustaining communication with parents, involving parents in the school community, and conducting home visits along with…

  1. Towards a Development-Oriented Economic Partnership Agreement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Economic Partnership Agreements are far apart from the original developmentfocused agreements aimed at strengthening regional integration as envisaged by the ACP countries and the EU in the context of the Cotonou Agreement. This paper aims to articulate strategies that should guide West Africa's ...

  2. Sharing the Responsibility for Children's Literacy Development in First Grade: Child - Parent - Teacher Partnerships

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffrey, Sally Sherwin Jr.

    1997-01-01

    SHARING THE RESPONSIBILITY FOR CHILDREN'S LITERACY DEVELOPMENT IN FIRST GRADE: CHILD - PARENT - TEACHER PARTNERSHIPS by Sally Sherwin Jeffrey Jerome A. Niles, Chairperson College of Human Resources and Education (ABSTRACT) The purpose of this study was to describe what happens when parents and children are invited to participate in a child-parent-teacher partnership which mutually supports the child's literacy development during transition into first grade. Q...

  3. PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP IN SOCIOECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT OF THE MUSEUMS: UNUSED MODERNIZATION RESOURCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Polyanskova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Public-private partnership practically in all developed and developing countries of the world is recognized as the effective mechanism of social and economic tasks realization of society and state. The most popular use of the economic cooperation tools between business and government in areas such as the creation and modernization of infrastructure, transport infrastructure, road construction, municipal services (housing and communal services, the military-industrial complex, less social infrastructure. A large number of scientific, educational, recommendatory, reference and other books of domestic and foreign authors is developed for each of the called directions, various models of projects implementation of public-private partnership are developed and perfected. Unfortunately, to the sphere of culture it isn't paid due attention. State-private and municipal and private partnership in practice are quite successfully used for increase of efficiency of activity of establishments and objects of culture, but this positive experience isn't systematized and not fixed anywhere, the conceptual model of public-private partnership projects in culture is also not developed. Thus, a research objective is to design initiatives development and offers on modernization of the culture sphere on the basis of instruments of public-private partnership. The subject of the study is a set of administrative, economic and legal relations arising in the implementation of projects in the sphere of the Samara region culture on the basis of public-private partnerships. This article presents the results of a public-private partnerships study as uninvolved resource of the culture sphere modernization and the public-private partnership model developed by authors for projects in this sphere.

  4. Empowering High School Students in Scientific Careers: Developing Statewide Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, C.; Swartz, D.

    2008-05-01

    Center for Multiscale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes (CMMAP) is a National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center focused on improving the representation of cloud processes in climate models. The Center is divided into three sections including Knowledge Transfer, Research, and Education and Diversity. The Science Education and Diversity mission is to educate and train people with diverse backgrounds in Climate and Earth System Science by enhancing teaching and learning and disseminating science results through multiple media. CMMAP is partnering with two local school districts to host an annual global climate conferences for high school students. The 2008 Colorado Global Climate Conference seeks "To educate students on global and local climate issues and empower them to se their knowledge." The conference is sponsored by CMMAP, The Governor's Energy Office, Poudre School District, Thompson School District, Clif Bar, and Ben and Jerry's Scoop Shop of Fort Collins. The conference seeks to inspire students to pursue future education and careers in science fields. Following an opening welcome from the Governor's Energy Office, Keynote Piers Sellers will discuss his experiences as an atmospheric scientist and NASA astronaut. Students will then attend 3 out of 16 breakout sessions including such sessions as "Hot poems, Cool Paintings, and the treasures of Antiquity of Climate Change", "Mitigation vs Adaptation", "Bigfoot Walks(What Size is our carbon footprint?)" "The Wedges: Reduc ing Carbon Emissions", and "We the People: Climate and Culture of Climate Change" to name a few. Using The Governor's High School Conference on the Environment sponsored by the Wisconsin Center for Environmental Education as a model we are developing statewide partnerships to bring high school students together to look at global climate issues that will impact their future and of which they can be part of the solution through their education and career paths. In addition to

  5. Partnership and measurement: the promise, practice and theory of a successful health social networking strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montague, Terrence; Nemis-White, Joanna; Cochrane, Bonnie; Meisner, Janice; Trasler, Tessa

    2013-01-01

    Patient health management (PHM) was launched as a promising paradigm to close care gaps, the inequities between usual and best care, for whole patient populations. PHM's core premise was that interventions of multidisciplinary, community-oriented partnerships that used repeated measurement and feedback of provider practices, clinical and economic outcomes and general communication of relevant health knowledge to all stakeholders would continuously make things better. This article reviews the evolution of PHM from its genesis in a series of casual hospital-based networks to its maturation in a province-wide, community-focused, clustered-lattice social network that facilitated the improved clinical and cost-efficient care and outcomes of whole patient populations. The factors underlying PHM's clinical and cost efficacy, specifically its patient-centric social networking structures and integral measurement and knowledge translation processes, offer continuing promise to optimally manage the care of our increasingly aged patient populations, with their high burden of chronic diseases and disproportionately large care gaps. In an era when patients are demanding and leading change, and governments are struggling fiscally, PHM's clinical efficacy and cost-efficiency are especially resonant. Things can be better.

  6. A watershed-based adaptive knowledge system for developing ecosystem stakeholder partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hebin; Thornton, Jeffrey A.; Shadrin, Nickolai

    2015-11-01

    -and-Stakeholder structure corresponding to the social subsystem. This study seeks to share a vision of social adaptation for a global sustainable future through developing a network to adopt contributions from and forming partnerships among all ecosystem stakeholders.

  7. Perceived Effectiveness of Youth-Adult Partnerships on Enhancing Life Skill Development through 4-H

    OpenAIRE

    Jeff Sallee; Charles Cox

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if youth and adult participants in the 4-H Environmental Impact program perceive youth?adult partnerships as an effective means to enhance the youths’ development of life skills. The study further sought to discover the perceived obstacles that may keep youth and adults from participating in equal partnerships. The life skills of: Leadership, Cooperation, Service Learning, and Planning and organizing were enhanced through the youths’ participation in...

  8. Green Power Partnership Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Green Power Partnership develops videos on a regular basis that explore a variety of topics including, Green Power partnership, green power purchasing, Renewable energy certificates, among others.

  9. EXPLORING THE ROLE OF ALLIANCES, AGREEMENTS AND PARTNERSHIPS IN THE AIRLINE INDUSTRY; THE CASE OF APG NETWORK WITHIN THE ROMANIAN MARKET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CAMELIA MONICA GHEORGHE

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available During the last years, the airline industry had a dynamic evolution, due to significant changes such as: the liberalization of air traffic with two important consequences, the development of the hub and spoke model, as well as the emergence of low-cost companies; the commercialization and privatization of airports; the evolution of technology. In order to be competitive in this new context, taking part of an alliance or network, creating a partnership or an agreement became a key strategy for airlines and as well as other stakeholders involved. This article examines the different partnerships in the airline industry, starting from code-share agreements between airlines or the emergence of airline alliances as a consequence of the hub and spoke system up to the more recent airline-airports partnerships, code-share agreements involving low-cost companies or airline representation agreements for several (new markets. The case study of APG Network will be examined, in order to emphasize the role of GSAs (General Sales Agents in the development strategy of airlines. Moreover, a questionnaire was distributed among travel agencies and airlines operating in Romania, to identify their perception on APG and its impact on the Romanian market.

  10. U.S. Department of Energy's regional carbon sequestration partnership initiative: Update on validation and development phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodosta, T.; Litynski, J.; Plasynski, S.; Spangler, L.; Finley, R.; Steadman, E.; Ball, D.; Gerald, H.; McPherson, B.; Burton, E.; Vikara, D.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the lead federal agency for the development and deployment of carbon sequestration technologies. The Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) are the mechanism DOE utilizes to prove the technology and to develop human capital, stakeholder networks, information for regulatory policy, best practices documents and training to work toward the commercialization of carbon capture and storage (CCS). The RCSPs are tasked with determining the most suitable technologies, regulations, and infrastructure for carbon capture, transport, and storage in their respective geographic areas of responsibility. The seven partnerships include more than 400 state agencies, universities, national laboratories, private companies, and environmental organizations, spanning 43 states and four Canadian provinces. The Regional Partnerships Initiative is being implemented in three phases: Characterization, Validation, and Development. The initial Characterization Phase began in 2003 and was completed in 2005 and focused on characterization of CO2 storage potential within each region. It was followed by the Validation Phase, which began in 2005 and is nearing completion in 2011. The focus of the Validation Phase has been on small-scale field tests throughout the seven partnerships in various formation types such as saline, oil-bearing, and coal seams. The Validation Phase has characterized suitable CO2 storage reservoirs and identified the need for comprehensive legal and regulatory frameworks to enable commercial-scale CCS deployment. Finally, the Development Phase will consist of a series of large-scale, one-million-ton, injection tests throughout the United States and Canada. The objective of these large-scale tests is to identify the regulatory path or challenges in permitting CCS projects, to demonstrate the technology can inject CO2 safely, and to verify its permanence in geologic formations in preparation for the commercialization of geologic

  11. Developing a Public Health Training and Research Partnership between Japan and Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Aya; Vinh, Nguyen Quang; Van, Nguyen Thi Tu; Phuc, Trinh Huu; Minh, Pham Nghiem; Yasumura, Seiji; Khue, Nguyen Thi

    2007-01-01

    Development of academic partnerships between developing and developed countries is a sustainable approach to build research capacity in the developing world. International collaboration between the Department of Public Health of Fukushima Medical University School of Medicine in Japan and the University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Ho Chi Minh City…

  12. Africa-Asia regional partnerships and South-South development cooperation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Annette Skovsted

    2018-01-01

    , the current linkages between Africa and Asia such as those related to development cooperation form an alternative to development cooperation efforts initiated by European or North American countries. Furthermore, the African and Asian stakeholders have defined South-South Cooperation to encompass many other...... aspects of cooperation than development. In an attempt to answer the question how Africa-Asia regional partnerships and South-South development cooperation (SSDC) have influenced each other in shaping South-South cooperation (SSC) since the turn of the Millennium, this chapter identifies two shifts...... of the New Asia-Africa Strategic Partnership (NAASP) explicitly referred to the NEPAD framework. The second shift came ten years later at the second NAASP Summit in 2015, when a general climate of reconsidering the aid paradigm contributed to a move away from a development to a public-private partnership...

  13. Networking for Innovation in South Wales. Experiences in Developing Productive Links between University and Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Haydn; Jenkins, Sarah

    1999-01-01

    To develop productive links between industry and university, the style and ethos of networks focused on innovation are crucial. Cardiff University (Wales) has an innovation network that stimulates collaborative work and technology transfer through its informal open nature that encourages partnership. (SK)

  14. Information partnerships--shared data, shared scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konsynski, B R; McFarlan, F W

    1990-01-01

    How can one company gain access to another's resources or customers without merging ownership, management, or plotting a takeover? The answer is found in new information partnerships, enabling diverse companies to develop strategic coalitions through the sharing of data. The key to cooperation is a quantum improvement in the hardware and software supporting relational databases: new computer speeds, cheaper mass-storage devices, the proliferation of fiber-optic networks, and networking architectures. Information partnerships mean that companies can distribute the technological and financial exposure that comes with huge investments. For the customer's part, partnerships inevitably lead to greater simplification on the desktop and more common standards around which vendors have to compete. The most common types of partnership are: joint marketing partnerships, such as American Airline's award of frequent flyer miles to customers who use Citibank's credit card; intraindustry partnerships, such as the insurance value-added network service (which links insurance and casualty companies to independent agents); customer-supplier partnerships, such as Baxter Healthcare's electronic channel to hospitals for medical and other equipment; and IT vendor-driven partnerships, exemplified by ESAB (a European welding supplies and equipment company), whose expansion strategy was premised on a technology platform offered by an IT vendor. Partnerships that succeed have shared vision at the top, reciprocal skills in information technology, concrete plans for an early success, persistence in the development of usable information for all partners, coordination on business policy, and a new and imaginative business architecture.

  15. Sexual transmissibility of HIV among opiates users with concurrent sexual partnerships: An egocentric network study in Yunnan, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Liu, Hongjie; Li, Jianhua; Luo, Jian; Koram, Nana; Detels, Roger

    2011-01-01

    Aims To investigate the patterns of concurrent sexual partnerships among young opiate users and sexual transmissibility of HIV in concurrent sexual partnerships in drug-use and sexual networks. Design Cross-sectional design. Participants 426 young opiate users in Yunnan, China. Measurement Respondent-driven sampling (RDS) was used to recruit participants. Multiple logistic regressions were performed to analyze the relationships of concurrent sexual partnerships with egocentric social network components, risky sexual behavior for HIV, and drug-use practices. Findings The RDS-adjusted prevalence of concurrent sexual partners was 42.9% among opiate users. Opiate users with concurrent sexual partnerships were more likely to engage in risky HIV-related sexual behavior, compared to those without. Specifically, they were more likely to report having had four or more sexual partners (26.3% vs. 2.0%), having had a spouse or boy/girl friends who also had concurrent sexual partnerships (28.1% vs. 8.2%), having exchanged drug for sex (12.4% vs. 3.8%), having had sexual partners who were non-injection drug users (22.6% vs. 10.1%), having had sexual partners who were injection drug users (25.3% vs. 13.5%), and having used club drugs (26.3% vs. 13.5%). There were no significant differences in consistent condom use between opiate users with sexual concurrency and those without. The same proportion (25.8%) of opiate users in the two groups reported having consistently used condoms when having sex with regular partners, and 46.3% of opiate users with sexual concurrency and 36.4% of those without such concurrency consistently used condoms with non-regular partners. Conclusion The expansion of the HIV epidemic from high risk populations to the general population in China may be driven by concurrent sexual partnerships. Behavioral interventions targeting safer sex should be integrated into harm reduction programmes. PMID:21457169

  16. Space Exploration Technologies Developed through Existing and New Research Partnerships Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nall, Mark; Casas, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    The Space Partnership Development Program of NASA has been highly successful in leveraging commercial research investments to the strategic mission and applied research goals of the Agency through industry academic partnerships. This program is currently undergoing an outward-looking transformation towards Agency wide research and discovery goals that leverage partnership contributions to the strategic research needed to demonstrate enabling space exploration technologies encompassing both robotic spacecraft missions and human space flight. New Space Partnership Initiatives with incremental goals and milestones will allow a continuing series of accomplishments to be achieved throughout the duration of each initiative, permit the "lessons learned" and capabilities acquired from previous implementation steps to be incorporated into subsequent phases of the initiatives, and allow adjustments to be made to the implementation of the initiatives as new opportunities or challenges arise. An Agency technological risk reduction roadmap for any required technologies not currently available will identify the initiative focus areas for the development, demonstration and utilization of space resources supporting the production of power, air, and water, structures and shielding materials. This paper examines the successes to date, lessons learned, and programmatic outlook of enabling sustainable exploration and discovery through governmental, industrial, academic, and international partnerships. Previous government and industry technology development programs have demonstrated that a focused research program that appropriately shares the developmental risk can rapidly mature low Technology Readiness Level (TRL) technologies to the demonstration level. This cost effective and timely, reduced time to discovery, partnership approach to the development of needed technological capabilities addresses the dual use requirements by the investing partners. In addition, these partnerships

  17. Trailblazing Partnerships: Professional Development Schools in Partnership with Emporia State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jill; Schwerdtfeger, Sara; Roop, Teddy; Long, Jennie L.

    2016-01-01

    Emporia State University is committed to preparing future elementary education teachers through the collaborative efforts and ongoing reflective practice between the university and school districts. The Professional Development School is the vehicle behind the structured involvement in the process of immersing student-teacher in a clinical model…

  18. The role of tourism public-private partnerships in regional development: a conceptual model proposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Franco

    Full Text Available Tourism is characterized as being a sector that stands out as one of the business activities with the greatest potential for worldwide expansion, and as an engine for economic growth. If at the national level, the appeal of tourism is significant, on the local level this sector presents itself as an essential tool in regional development, as a means to avoid regional desertification and stagnation, stimulating the potential of more undeveloped regions. In such a competitive sector as tourism, companies should develop synergies and achieve competitive advantage. In this context, public-private partnerships play an important role in regional development. The aim of this paper is to present a theoretical context that combines different concepts and elements to explain and understand the public-private partnership phenomenon in tourism. A conceptual model of the role of public-private partnerships will be proposed in order to contribute to successful regional development.

  19. Measuring Community-Based Participatory Research Partnerships: The Initial Development of an Assessment Instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Prerna G; Krumholz, Lauren S; Guerra, Terry; Leff, Stephen S

    2015-01-01

    Although the partnership between academic researchers and community members is paramount to community-based research efforts, a limited number of measures exist to evaluate this construct. Of those in existence, no assessment measures include a comprehensive coverage of the many dimensions of partnerships. In addition, these measures were not designed through an extensive community-based participatory research (CBPR) model, in which the strengths of traditional assessment techniques were integrated with input from stakeholders. The purpose of this article was to describe the creation of a measure to evaluate key dimensions of partnerships forged between researchers and community members using a CBPR approach to measurement development. The iterative process of developing this measure consisted of integrating valuable feedback from community partners and researchers, via multiple rounds of item sorting and qualitative interviewing. The resultant measure, titled Partnership Assessment In community-based Research (PAIR), consists of 32 items, and comprises 5 dimensions: communication, collaboration, partnership values, benefits, and evaluation. The innovative process of using CBPR in the development of measures, the benefits of this approach, and the lessons learned are highlighted. PAIR was developed out of a need identified jointly by community members and researchers, and is intended to characterize the range of relationships between researchers and community members engaging in community-based research and programming.

  20. Mission: Partnerships - A Socially Responsible Approach for New Hydro-electric Developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojczynski, Ed; Cole, Victoria; Pachal, Shawna; Goulet, Richard

    2010-09-15

    Worldwide there is a desire for clean, secure and renewable energy developed in an environmentally and socially responsible manner. In the Canadian province of Manitoba, where water is an abundant resource, efforts are being undertaken by Manitoba Hydro to achieve this goal through the development of new hydro-electric generating stations in partnership with Aboriginal (indigenous) communities. This paper focuses on the lessons learned by Manitoba Hydro in developing and implementing partnership agreements with northern Aboriginal communities on two new generation projects - the Wuskwatim Generation Project and the Keeyask Generation Project.

  1. Networking systems design and development

    CERN Document Server

    Chao, Lee

    2009-01-01

    Effectively integrating theory and hands-on practice, Networking Systems Design and Development provides students and IT professionals with the knowledge and skills needed to design, implement, and manage fully functioning network systems using readily available Linux networking tools. Recognizing that most students are beginners in the field of networking, the text provides step-by-step instruction for setting up a virtual lab environment at home. Grounded in real-world applications, this book provides the ideal blend of conceptual instruction and lab work to give students and IT professional

  2. Network diversity and economic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagle, Nathan; Macy, Michael; Claxton, Rob

    2010-05-21

    Social networks form the backbone of social and economic life. Until recently, however, data have not been available to study the social impact of a national network structure. To that end, we combined the most complete record of a national communication network with national census data on the socioeconomic well-being of communities. These data make possible a population-level investigation of the relation between the structure of social networks and access to socioeconomic opportunity. We find that the diversity of individuals' relationships is strongly correlated with the economic development of communities.

  3. The growth of partnerships to support patient safety practice adoption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendel, Peter; Damberg, Cheryl L; Sorbero, Melony E S; Varda, Danielle M; Farley, Donna O

    2009-04-01

    To document the numbers and types of interorganizational partnerships within the national patient safety domain, changes over time in these networks, and their potential for disseminating patient safety knowledge and practices. Self-reported information gathered from representatives of national-level organizations active in promoting patient safety. Social network analysis was used to examine the structure and composition of partnership networks and changes between 2004 and 2006. Two rounds of structured telephone interviews (n=35 organizations in 2004 and 55 in 2006). Patient safety partnerships expanded between 2004 and 2006. The average number of partnerships per interviewed organization increased 40 percent and activities per reported partnership increased over 50 percent. Partnerships increased in all activity domains, particularly dissemination and tools development. Fragmentation of the overall partnership network decreased and potential for information flow increased. Yet network centralization increased, suggesting vulnerability to partnership failure if key participants disengage. Growth in partnerships signifies growing strength in the capacity to disseminate and implement patient safety advancements in the U.S. health care system. The centrality of AHRQ in these networks of partnerships bodes well for its leadership role in disseminating information, tools, and practices generated by patient safety research projects.

  4. The purification of aid : an ethnography of Dutch partnership policy and (broken) dreams of development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gastel, van J.N.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis explores the shift from ownership to partnership policy in Dutch development aid. It is an ethnography based on participant observation during several periods between 2001 and 2006 in the Ministry’s headquarters in The Hague and the Dutch embassy in developing country Z. The aim

  5. Development of the Community Impact Scale Measuring Community Organization Perceptions of Partnership Benefits and Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, Tejaswinhi; Meenan, Chelsea E.; Drogin, Elizabeth; DePrince, Anne P.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the development and psychometric properties of the Community Impact Scale (CIS), a measure of benefits and costs of community-university partnerships across a range of outcomes as perceived by community partners. Scale development was carried out in two phases: (a) item generation, through which the research team, in close…

  6. The Wheel Keeps Turning: A Critical Reflection on PIC Partnerships in Educational Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Current government discourses on partnerships tend to assume an uncritical belief in the existence of equal ownership and equal power relations between development partners and partner governments. The rhetoric of shared visions, common strategic directions or complementary approaches to development in the Pacific begs the question of how such…

  7. The New Community Policing: Developing a Partnership-Based Theoretical Foundation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam J McKee

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a Partnership Model of Community Policing based on Partnership concepts developed by Riane Eisler and undergirded by Cultural Transformation Theory as a guiding principle (1987, 2010, 2013. This model is more reflective of the daily lived experiences of community police officers. It is culturally relevant and based on the whole of the police officer’s relationship with the community within the context in which the interactions occur. This "New Community Policing" is an extension of Riane Eisler’s Cultural Transformation Theory and is an attempt to answer her call for a movement towards a partnership model of social organization. Ultimately, "8 Pillars of the New Community Policing" are developed to aid in defining and implementing community policing.

  8. Developing educational leaders: A partnership between two universities to bring about system-wide change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suraiya R Naicker

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated a system-wide change strategy in a South African school district, which sought to build the leadership capacity of principals and district officials to improve instruction. The three-year venture was called the Leadership for Learning Programme (LLP. A distinctive feature of the LLP was that it was based on a partnership between two universities, a local one with understanding of the local context of schools, and an international institution, which brought international expertise, experience and repute/branding. Both universities had a shared vision to contribute to the ailing South African school landscape by using leadership development to leverage change. The LLP was implemented in a single school district, where the overall learner performance was unsatisfactory. A qualitative approach was used to research this change intervention. One of the main findings was that collaboration between principals collectively and district officials, as well as among principals, was lacking. It is recommended that collaborative structures such as professional learning communities, networks and teams are established to reduce isolation and fragmented work practices in the school district. This may speed up system-wide change towards improved learner performance.

  9. Partnership: A Development Strategy for Children. Learning from Redd Barna's Experience in Asia. Asian Dialogue No. 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wazir, Rekha; van Oudenhoven, Nico; Ageros, Bengt, Ed.

    This report explores the partnerships between local development organizations and Redd Barna (RB), a Norwegian development organization engaged in child-centered development work in Cambodia, Nepal, Sri Lanka, and Thailand. Chapter 1 of the report introduces the concept of partnership as viewed from donor and recipient perspectives, describes the…

  10. Transcending jurisdictions: developing partnerships for health in Manitoba First Nation communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eni, Rachel; Phillips-Beck, Wanda

    2011-09-01

    The article describes national, regional and community-level activities that contributed to the Manitoba First Nation partnership in maternal and child health programming. The activities reveal a potential for health change that is possible through working together across jurisdictional boundaries. Although we are only in the early phases of program implementation, the Manitoba First Nation Strengthening Families Maternal Child Health Program already suggests considerable successes and measurable outcomes. The article encourages development of further partnerships in the promotion of First Nation health and wellness programming.

  11. Developing an urban community-campus partnership: lessons learned in infrastructure development and communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Dorothy F; Dietz, Noella A; Hooper, Monica Webb; Byrne, Margaret M; Fernandez, Cristina A; Baker, Elizabeth A; Stevens, Marsha S; Messiah, Antoine; Lee, David J; Kobetz, Erin N

    2012-01-01

    A low-income, African American neighborhood in Miami, Florida, experiences health disparities including an excess burden of cancer. Many residents are disenfranchised from the healthcare system, and may not participate in cancer prevention and screening services. We sought to describe the development of a partnership between a university and this community and lessons learned in using a community-based participatory research (CBPR) model. To better understand the community's health behaviors and status, a randomized door-to-door survey was conducted in collaboration with a community partner. This collaboration helped foster a mutual understanding of the benefits of CBPR. We also describe challenges of adhering to study protocols, quality control, and sharing fiscal responsibility with organizations that do not have an established infrastructure. Understanding the organizational dynamics of a community is necessary for developing a CBPR model that will be effective in that community. Once established, it can help to inform future collaborations.

  12. What is new in the New Partnership for Africa's Development (NEPAD)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This treatise highlights the recent dreams and dialogues of African Renaissance and the New Partnership for Africa's Development (NEPAD). These dreams and dialogues have been driven as much by Afro-optimism as by Afro-pessimism, by both the positive and the negative political and economic changes that have ...

  13. League Bilong Laif: Rugby, Education and Sport-for-Development Partnerships in Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherry, Emma; Schulenkorf, Nico

    2016-01-01

    League Bilong Laif (LBL) is a sport-for-development (SFD) programme that was established in 2013 as a three-way partnership between the Australian Government, the Papua New Guinea (PNG) Government (Department of Education) and the Australian Rugby League Commission (National Rugby League). As a contribution to addressing low rates of school…

  14. Theorising Partnerships for Site-Based Education Development in Vocational Education and Workplace Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Sarojni; Kemmis, Roslin Brennan; Green, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Site-based education development now constitutes a common approach to preparing learners for particular occupations, enabling them to secure employment and at the same time achieve broader social, economic and personal outcomes. New forms of partnerships, other than traditional vendor-client relations, are necessary to achieve such multi-faceted…

  15. Private Foundations, Philanthropy, and Partnership in Education and Development: Mapping the Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Prachi; Oh, Su-Ann

    2010-01-01

    There has been increasing interest on the role of private foundations in education finance and delivery. We argue that this is due to a macro-policy context of stagnating levels of official development assistance for education and an uncritical acceptance of a logic of neutrality and the efficiency and effectiveness of of partnerships and…

  16. Partnerships in Sustainable Tourism Development: The Case of Canmore, Alberta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dianne Draper

    1992-01-01

    A variety of formal and informal "partnerships" have evolved in the course of planning for the first two of several large-scale, multi-million dollar private sector tourism development projects proposed for the small town of Canmore, adjacent to Banff National Park, Canada. This paper briefly identifies the major impetuses for and the nature of these...

  17. United Nations Sustainable Development Goals: Promoting Health and Well-Being through Physical Education Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    This paper shares a health and wellbeing partnership, modelling implementation of physical education (PE) advocated by the United Nations (UN). The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) exemplifies global efforts towards equality, specifically Goal 3 and 4 address health and wellbeing. The purpose of this paper is to provide insights into cross…

  18. Introduction: exploring and explaining the Asia-Pacific Partnership on Clean Development and Climate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karlsson-Vinkhuyzen, S. I.; van Asselt, H.D.

    2009-01-01

    This introduction lays the groundwork for this Special Issue by providing an overview of the Asia-Pacific Partnership on Clean Development and Climate (APP), and by introducing three main analytical themes. The first theme concerns the emergence and continuation of the APP. The contributions show

  19. Sexual transmissibility of HIV among opiate users with concurrent sexual partnerships: an egocentric network study in Yunnan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Liu, Hongjie; Li, Jianhua; Luo, Jian; Koram, Nana; Detels, Roger

    2011-10-01

    To investigate the patterns of concurrent sexual partnerships among young opiate users and sexual transmissibility of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in concurrent sexual partnerships in drug-use and sexual networks. Cross-sectional design. A total of 426 young opiate users in Yunnan, China. Young opiate users recruited from their network ties. Respondent-driven sampling (RDS) was used to recruit participants. Multiple logistic regressions were performed to analyze the relationships of concurrent sexual partnerships with egocentric social network components, risky sexual behavior for HIV and drug-use practices. The RDS-adjusted prevalence of concurrent sexual partners was 42.9% among opiate users. Opiate users with concurrent sexual partnerships were more likely to engage in risky HIV-related sexual behavior, compared to those without. Specifically, they were more likely to report having had four or more sexual partners (26.3% versus 2.0%), having had a spouse or boy/girlfriends who also had concurrent sexual partnerships (28.1% versus 8.2%), having exchanged drug for sex (12.4% versus 3.8%), having had sexual partners who were non-injection drug users (22.6% versus 10.1%), having had sexual partners who were injection drug users (25.3% versus 13.5%) and having used club drugs (26.3% versus 13.5%). There were no significant differences in consistent condom use between opiate users with sexual concurrency and those without. The same proportion (25.8%) of opiate users in the two groups reported having consistently used condoms when having sex with regular partners, and 46.3% of opiate users with sexual concurrency and 36.4% of those without such concurrency consistently used condoms with non-regular partners. The expansion of the human immunodeficiency virus epidemic from high-risk populations to the general population in China may be driven by concurrent sexual partnerships. Behavioral interventions targeting safer sex should be integrated into harm reduction

  20. Public-private partnerships for tourism infrastructure development: Evidence from the Cradle of Humankind, South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Christian M. Rogerson

    2016-01-01

    Public-private partnerships (PPP) are important vehicles for infrastructure development in the global South and increasingly applied in tourism. South Africa has extensively adopted the PPP approach for infrastructure develop-ment across several different sectors from transport, water and sanitation services, social development, office accommodation, health care and correctional services; increasingly the PPP approach is being applied to the tourism sector. This paper analyses the utilisation...

  1. Model Youth Programs: A Key Strategy for Developing Community-University Partnerships Using a Community Youth Development Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Anyon

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Universities across the nation face the charge of enhancing their intellectual capital as a learning institution while also contributing to the greater social good. While there is great potential for university-community partnerships to generate lessons for youth workers and policy makers, create powerful new knowledge for the academic field, and provide transformative experiences for community members, partnerships often fail to produce such meaningful results. In the San Francisco Bay Area, community residents who have been involved in such unsuccessful initiatives frequently perceived that university partners spent insufficient time learning about the community context, prioritized research objectives over community needs and did not make long-term commitments. Despite these challenges, community-university partnerships can be useful strategies for advancing the field of youth development by strengthening research and practice in local contexts. This paper presents how the design and implementation of model youth programs served as an effective strategy in developing a partnership between a university-based center and two local communities over a 5-year period. It also describes essential lessons that other communities, research institutions or universities may use to launch, implement, expand and sustain their own successful partnerships to build local capacity to implement youth development practices, promote positive outcomes for young people, and generate knowledge about the impact of youth development approaches.

  2. Developing a financial framework for academic service partnerships: models of the United States and Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Geest, Sabina; Sullivan Marx, Eileen M; Rich, Victoria; Spichiger, Elisabeth; Schwendimann, Rene; Spirig, Rebecca; Van Malderen, Greet

    2010-09-01

    Academic service partnerships (ASPs) are structured linkages between academe and service which have demonstrated higher levels of innovation. In the absence of descriptions in the literature on financial frameworks to support ASPs, the purpose of this paper is to present the supporting financial frameworks of a Swiss and a U.S. ASP. This paper used a case study approach. Two frameworks are presented. The U.S. model presented consists of a variety of ASPs, all linked to the School of Nursing of the University of Pennsylvania. The structural integration and governance system is elucidated. Each ASP has its own source of revenue or grant support with the goal to be fiscally in the black. Joint appointments are used as an instrument to realize these ASPs. The Swiss ASP entails a detailed description of the financial framework of one ASP between the Institute of Nursing Science at the University of Basel and the Inselspital Bern University Hospital. Balance in the partnership, in terms of both benefit and cost between both partners, was a main principle that guided the development of the financial framework and the translation of the ASP in budgetary terms. The model builds on a number of assumptions and provides the partnership management within a simple framework for monitoring and evaluation of the progress of the partnership. In operationalizing an ASP, careful budgetary planning should be an integral part of the preparation and evaluation of the collaboration. The proposed Swiss and U.S. financial frameworks allow doing so. Outcomes of care can be improved with strong nursing service and academic partnerships. Sustaining such partnerships requires attention to financial and contractual arrangements.

  3. Internal medicine network: a new way of thinking hospital-territory integration and public-private partnership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filomena Pietrantonio

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This working proposal aims to establish an Internal Medicine Network (IMN model for the appropriate management of the poly-pathological complex patient in the different phases of his illness natural hystory. The IMN is based on an organization recalling the Hub and Spoke system already used for existing specialized networks. The Internal Medicine Unit (IMU is the natural destination of acutely ill patients suffering from systemic or multi-organ diseases. Three are the IMU specific tasks: i to stabilize acute, severe, poly-pathologic and complex patients; ii to develop difficult etiological diagnosis in these patients and in those who should necessarily be admitted to the hospital, not being possible, for different reasons, alternative routes; iii to select the acute poly-pathological complex patient’s priorities. The expected results of a new model of integration system inside the IMN are: i reduction and rationalization of expenditure in the medical area, increasing effectiveness, quality and safety guaranteeing patient centrality; ii patients stratification based on characteristics of gravity, acute illness, estimated duration of hospitalization; iii reduction of inappropriate hospital admissions ensuring connections between hospital and primary care units; iv definition of different care pathways for patients hospitalized due to non-communicable diseases; v implementation of new common medical records. The public-private partnership inside the IMN could be able to increase appropriateness reducing health costs. Patient-centered problems assessment, together with integration, cooperation, coordination and effective communication are some simple rules useful to achieve tangible results in a complex system and the IMN model represents its practical application.

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF REGIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY PROJECTS IN ROMANIA THROUGH PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS

    OpenAIRE

    ANDREEA ZAMFIR

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to reveal recent research focused on the public-private partnerships as a possible solution for the development of regional renewable energy projects in Romania. Firstly, some arguments for developing regional renewable energy projects are revealed, and secondly, the responsibilities of local authorities in renewable energy projects, as well as some local measures for developing renewable energy projects are disclosed. The findings of this study reveal that there is a...

  5. Framework for Human Capital Development in Nigeria: A Public-Private Partnership Approach.

    OpenAIRE

    Akande, Emmanuel

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the framework for human capital development in Nigeria through a public-private partnership (PPP) approach. No doubt, population of a country determines the subsisted human capital resources and this in turn determines the economic status of such country. Therefore, human capital development becomes a mantra for economic development. Unfortunately, government spending on education and health is so negligible as to make any meaningful impact on Nigerian economy. It is...

  6. Classroom Effects of an Early Childhood Educator Professional Development Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algozzine, Bob; Babb, Julie; Algozzine, Kate; Mraz, Maryann; Kissel, Brian; Spano, Sedra; Foxworth, Kimberly

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated an Early Childhood Educator Professional Development (ECEPD) project that provided high-quality, sustained, and intensive professional development designed to support developmentally appropriate instruction for preschool-age children based on the best available research on early childhood pedagogy, child development, and preschool…

  7. State-civil society partnerships and sustainable urban development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Development scholars have consistently focused on the role of non-state actors in the development process. In sub-Saharan Africa, this concern became increasingly important due to the inability of many African states to effectively guide the development process. Consequently, non-state actors have progressively ...

  8. The effect of professional partnership on the development of a mutual-help organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Deborah A; Reischl, Thomas M; Randall, Katie W

    2008-09-01

    The effects of partnership between Schizophrenics Anonymous (SA, a mutual-help organization) and the Mental Health Association in Michigan (MHAM, a professionally staffed advocacy organization) on SA's growth and development were explored. Following the initiation of a formal partnership, SA groups were more available throughout the state, more likely to be associated with formal mental health settings, and less likely to have leaders who had been participants in other SA groups. Groups with consumer leaders had significantly greater longevity than groups with professional leaders. Changes in the organizational structure and process of SA were also identified. SA leaders reported that SA moved from a collective to a more bureaucratic structure. As a result, there was greater consistency, administrative capacity, and response capacity. This enhanced capacity came with costs reported by SA leaders. The leadership role of SA members became less defined. SA members expressed concerns about the more hierarchical structure of SA's organization, decreased consumer control, increased professional involvement in SA, and an excessive focus on group development as opposed to group maintenance. Mental Health Association in Michigan staff reported that MHAM was also impacted by the partnership, both with regard to internal functioning and external perception. Implications for effective partnerships between mutual-help and professional organizations are discussed.

  9. Private–Public Partnership as a Tool to Promote Entrepreneurship for Sustainable Development: WWP Torrearte Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio De Los Ríos-Carmenado

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available There is growing interest in the ability of both private–public partnerships and entrepreneurship to promote sustainable rural development. This research outlines the historical chronology and the importance of the PPP (Private Public Partnership for rural entrepreneurship; the complexity of PPP management dimensions is also analyzed. In addition, this research is based on an empiric study of a PPP for entrepreneurship in sustainable development in the North Highland of Madrid’s community, with more than 20 years of experience. This PPP is managed according to the Working With People (WWP model, which is for the management of complex projects in the sustainable rural development field, and aims to promote the development of competences amongst the parties involved. The results show the positive effects in terms of entrepreneurship’s competences for sustainable rural development and the parties involved who create the PPP management model for entrepreneurship and the Torrearte Project.

  10. NEPAD and African Development: Towards a New Partnership ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    daouda.thiam

    2009-02-26

    Feb 26, 2009 ... The model required to drive socio-economic development in Africa, and the relationship between the state and the private sector based on that model, have sparked much controversy among African analysts. Some question the relevance of other successful models of development, such as in the liberal.

  11. Developing Curriculum for Democracy through International Partnerships. ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamot, Gregory E.

    The fall of communism in eastern and central Europe inspired the call for curriculum development in citizenship education throughout the growing democratic world. Many programs between U.S. institutions and newly developing democracies continue to produce curricula for democratic citizenship suited to local needs. This digest discusses: (1)…

  12. Evolving a Network of Networks: The Experience of Partnerships in the National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Anderson

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program (NDIIPP was initiated in December 2000 when the U.S. Congress authorized the Library of Congress to work with a broad range of institutions to develop a national strategy for the preservation of at-risk digital content. Guided by a strategy of collaboration and iteration, the Library of Congress began the formation of a national network of partners dedicated to collecting and preserving important born-digital information. Over the last six years, the Library and its partners have been engaged in learning through action that has resulted in an evolving understanding of the most appropriate roles and functions for a national network of diverse stakeholders. The emerging network is complex and inclusive of a variety of stakeholders; content producers, content stewards and service providers from the public and private sectors. Lessons learned indicate that interoperability is a challenge in all aspects of collaborative work.

  13. Investing in vaccines for developing countries: How public-private partnerships can confront neglected diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaïch, Mansour

    2009-06-01

    This commentary discusses the barrier of vaccine price on sustainable immunization programs in developing countries and offers examples of new mechanisms driven by public-private partnerships to overcome issues of affordability. These mechanisms include Advance Market Commitments with vaccine manufacturers, which take a demand-pull approach to ensure increased production of available vaccines or development of new vaccines for neglected diseases. A second approach applies a supply-push mechanism, such as technology transfer to developing-country manufacturers. A public-private partnership that set long-term, maximum public-sector pricing to increase access of a Japanese encephalitis vaccine for the developing world is highlighted. Lessons learned from this experience can be applied to address common obstacles to new vaccine introduction in resource-limited countries, including issues of affordability, manufacturing capacity, equity in access and quality assurance.

  14. Arts Education Partnerships: Informing Policy through the Development of Culture and Creativity within a Collaborative Project Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlisle, Katie

    2011-01-01

    Arts education partnerships have become an important means for developing and sustaining school arts programs that engage students, teachers, and communities. Tapping into additional perspectives, resources, and support from arts agencies and postsecondary institutions, arts education partnerships strengthen arts education infrastructure within…

  15. Can Funding for University Partnerships between Africa and the US Contribute to Social Development and Poverty Reduction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Christopher S.

    2014-01-01

    This study explores US funding for university partnerships between the US and Africa. The primary objective was to study how funds are facilitated through partnerships to promote social development and poverty reduction. Findings include the innovative and resilient nature of the 11 projects included in the study as well as pitfalls in the…

  16. Analysing Teacher Professional Development through Professional Dialogue: An Investigation into a University-School Partnership Project on Enquiry Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, May M. H.; So, Winnie W. M.

    2012-01-01

    Although extensive research has been carried out on university-school partnerships, there is a lack of evidence and discussion about how universities or external parties may promote professional development through professional dialogue in schools. Based on a two-year university-school partnership project on enquiry learning, this study aims at…

  17. Constitutional and administrative law comments on public-private partnerships in urban development : Experiences from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hobma, F.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Public-private partnership agreements can be seen as government making use of private law to achieve planning objectives. Public-private partnerships (PPP’s) have extensively been used in urban development projects during the past few decades in the Netherlands (and elsewhere around the globe). A

  18. Pathways, Pitfalls and Opportunities in Partnerships for Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, David; Vanhill, Josefine; Wolf, Andreas

    The municipal solid waste management systems of many developing countries are commonly constrained by factors such as limited financial resources and poor governance, making it a difficult proposition to break with complex, entrenched and unsustainable technologies and systems. This paper...

  19. NEPAD and African Development: Towards a New Partnership ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    daouda.thiam

    2009-02-26

    Feb 26, 2009 ... To what extent can the African Peer Review Mechanism, which aims at sharing the ... contribute to the development of these countries? 3.Tawfik.pmd ..... the addition of the OMEGA plan, were the main sources of NEPAD's.

  20. Bangladesh-ADB: 40 Years of Development Partnership

    OpenAIRE

    Asian Development Bank (ADB)

    2013-01-01

    Bangladesh has made impressive socioeconomic gains with a steady rise in its gross domestic product, a decrease in overall rates of poverty, boost in social development, and steady movement toward achievement of the Millennium Development Goals. ADB has been a key partner in Bangladesh’s struggle for a better future since 1973 by contributing to critical socioeconomic and governance reforms. As of 31 December 2012, ADB’s cumulative lending amounted to about $14.1 billion for 234 loans, and it...

  1. Open development networked innovations in international development

    CERN Document Server

    Reilly, Katherine M A

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of open networked models made possible by digital technology has the potential to transform international development. Open network structures allow people to come together to share information, organize, and collaborate. Open development harnesses this power, to create new organizational forms and improve people's lives; it is not only an agenda for research and practice but also a statement about how to approach international development. In this volume, experts explore a variety of applications of openness, addressing challenges as well as opportunities. Open development requires new theoretical tools that focus on real world problems, consider a variety of solutions, and recognize the complexity of local contexts. After exploring the new theoretical terrain, the book describes a range of cases in which open models address such specific development issues as biotechnology research, improving education, and access to scholarly publications. Contributors then examine tensions between open model...

  2. The Role of Public Private Partnership (PPP) in Development of Indian Railway (IR)

    OpenAIRE

    フヤル, モハン; Mohan, Phuyal

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyzes the current potential of Public Private Partnership procurement to develop the railway industry and economy of India. Previous studies were not enough to discuss the clear features, policies and opportunities of PPP in Indian railway. The motto of this paper is to clarify the role of PPP in development of Indian Railway. The research is based on secondary data, acquired from various related sources.

  3. Health in all policies in the partnership for sustainable development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo M. Buss

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This article analyzes the dynamic interaction between the Health in All Policies (HiAP agenda and the ongoing implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. At the World Conference on Social Determinants of Health, held in Rio de Janeiro in October 2011, the Rio Political Declaration pledged to use HiAP as a mechanism to address health inequities. In 2014, the Ministers of Health of the Region of the Americas approved a regional Plan of Action of the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO that sought to call attention to the health consequences and benefits of policies and actions developed by other sectors. The HiAP approach seeks to integrate activities across the pillars of the sustainable development governance framework (economic, social, and environmental development. Advocates of the process are challenged to consider, using guiding questions outlined at the close of this article, how to pursue action at the country level and in what ways the HiAP approach can contribute to timely and effective implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs. The authors propose that coordination between the 2030 Agenda and the regional Plan of Action on HiAP can make an important contribution to the implementation of both processes in the Region.

  4. Understanding partnerships in developing disabled entrepreneurs through participatory action research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Niekerk, L; Lorenzo, T; Mdlokolo, P

    2006-03-15

    The paper reports on a community disability entrepreneurship project in Khayelitsha and Nyanga, Cape Town, South Africa. Disabled people, Disabled People South Africa ( a national organization made up by disabled people's organizations), a non-governmental organisation and occupational therapists from the University of Cape Town collaborated with the focus to achieve economic empowerment of disabled people though the establishment of micro-enterprises. Participatory Action Research strategies, which informed and monitored the effective development of the community disability entrepreneurship project, were carefully integrated with the existing principles of community development. The participatory action research process provided an opportunity for shared learning and development. This article reports on the challenges and strategies faced by disabled people in the quest to establish themselves as entrepreneurs. The challenges that were identified through analysis from the experiences of participants were starting with nothing, lack of capacity and complexity of establishing working relationships. The strategies used were building group identity and developing capacity together. Indicators of positive outcome that emerged from an inductive content analysis are presented and discussed.

  5. Irrigation Development and Public-Private Partnerships in Morocco ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Agriculture is at the heart of Morocco's economic and social development, but in this water-stressed country, irrigation is critical to agricultural production. Irrigated agriculture plays an important role in meeting Morocco's food needs. It also generates more than three-quarters of the country's agricultural exports, providing ...

  6. Roll Back Malaria and the new partnership for Africa's development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nancy Kamau

    Robust and sustained growth may come to Africa through a mosquito net, Artemisinin-based Combination Therapies (ACTs) or a malaria vaccine, rather that a donor's cheque for economic development initiatives. [Afr J Health Sci. 2006; 13:22-27]. Introduction. There have been substantial changes in malaria globally over ...

  7. School-Based Management Developments and Partnership: Evidence from Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandur, Agustinus

    2012-01-01

    School-based management (SBM) with devolution of authority and responsibility to school level decision-makers has become the most prominent feature of public school management systems in most countries around the world. This article provides the global trends and current developments in SBM in Indonesia with an emphasis on how SBM has created…

  8. [Family planning and community development: an indissoluble partnership].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butera, G

    1988-12-01

    Local publications about population in Rwanda over the past 3 years have tended either to view population growth and high density as advantageous because they lead to more intensive use of resources and hence development, or to view Rwanda as regressing economically and socially because of its very rapid population growth. It is questionable whether Rwanda's development goals can be attained without bringing down the rate of population growth. Population pressure in some rural areas has become catastrophic, yet parents do not see their large families as a problem because they expect their children once grown to make their living elsewhere. Local authorities should help to communicate the concept that only demographic stability will allow achievement of communal development goals. The advantages of smaller families should be discussed. Rwanda's policy of increasing agricultural production has encountered numerous obstacles. Subdivision of plots through inheritance, sale, or sharecropping is a problem in itself and also tends to increase erosion. None of the methods of increasing plot size by collectivization or resettling the population is without serious drawbacks. The best solution appears to be encouragement of better cultivation techniques through extension agents and demonstration projects at the local level. Artisanal activities and manual labor should be promoted to provide employment at the communal level. Community development projects should be decentralized and carefully planned to meet local needs.

  9. Development of State and Small-Business Partnership in a Region’s Innovation Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guseva Mariya Sergeevna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The strategic goals of innovation development of the Russian Federation and problems of development of small and medium businesses require the study of the mechanisms of successful cooperation between the state and small businesses, including public-private partnership (PPP. The article considers promising mechanisms for innovative development of the Russian economy in the framework of PPP, with the participation of small businesses. The hypothesis is presented by the thesis that small business has a high innovation potential and exceptional opportunities for its implementation in PPP projects. This thesis is confirmed by the analysis and synthesis of a number of scientific theories. The purpose of the study is to clarify the nature and areas of partnership between the state and small business in innovation and development of proposals to improve their cooperation according to the PPP principles. The methodological basis of the study includes the systematic approach, methods of structural, concept, functional and statistical analysis, the method of expert evaluations. The paper discloses the essence of public-private partnership as a mechanism for attracting private capital to investment processes on mutually beneficial terms for solving socially important issues; identifies the tools and forms of PPP used for economic innovative development. The key mechanisms of economic innovative development based on the principles of public-private partnership, include: program government investments; creation and maintenance of development institutions; formation and development of innovative territorial clusters; building and development of an innovative high-tech business development infrastructure. Using the experience of the Samara Oblast and the aerospace cluster the authors review the mechanisms for the implementation of PPP in innovation sector and the model for involving small businesses in investment projects. They also define organizational and

  10. A social economy partnership for a sustainable co-development

    OpenAIRE

    Ville de Montréal,

    2009-01-01

    Social economy contributes to a metropolis' development in responding to the different needs of the citizens. It also fully participates in wealth creation, offering employment possibilities both to educated workers and to those who are excluded from the labour market. In Montreal, the social economy also contributes to the improvement of the quality of life through the creation of accessible local services in areas like leisure, culture, security, services for senior citizens, health, socia...

  11. Operation of the Pinellas Plant Child Development Center/Partnership School: Environmental assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-07-20

    The US Department of Energy Albuquerque Operations Office (DOE/AL), through the DOE Pinellas Area Office (PAO) and GE Neutron Devices (GEND), is proposing a joint venture to operate a Partnership School and Child Development Center at the Pinellas Plant. The Child Development Center/Partnership School proposal has been developed. The building has been constructed, teachers and staff selected, and the building made ready for immediate occupancy. The proposed action addressed by this environmental assessment is the operation and utilization of the school as a Partnership School, a preschool Child Development Center, and a before- and after-hours child care facility. In compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1970, the potential impacts from the operation of the proposed action are assessed. Additionally, since the proposed school is located next to an industrial facility, impacts on the school population from routine plant operations, as well as abnormal events, are analyzed, and changes in plant operation that may be prudent are considered. 25 refs., 8 figs., 9 tabs.

  12. Time and developments in pedagogical work - A plea for experimental time within participatory partnerships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tofteng, Ditte Maria Børglum; Husted, Mia

    pedagogical work by putting forward the knowledge, critique and dreams of the professionals (here teachers and pedagogues) through specially designed participatory processes and experiments. The projects was characterised by high degree of commitment and cooperation among leaders and employees...... all situated at the same school.The pre-school project hold shared knowledge production with about ten leaders, 130 pedagogical employees and 50 children divided between five daycare centers situated in three municipalities.Expected OutcomesThe cross inquiry into two long term action research projects...... partnerships to develop welfare institutions and to discuss how difficulties to claim and uphold time for experimental developments of welfare work affects outcome.Experiences and knowledge build up in two long-term action research project conducted as participatory partnerships forms our point of departure...

  13. Social Media in Adult Education: Insights Gained from Grundtvig Learning Partnership Project “Institutional Strategies Targeting the Uptake of Social Networking in Adult Education (ISTUS”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilhelmina Vaičiūnienė

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose—the focus of this article is the role of social media in adult education and their impact on adult students in regards to their educational needs and specific personal situations within the frame of the learning partnership project. The Grundtvig learning partnership project “Institutional Strategies Targeting the Uptake of Social Networking in Adult Education (ISTUS is an international partnership that includes partners from 7 EU countries. The aim of the research presented in this paper is to define cases of the uptake of technologies and applications by MRU students; thus, the objectives of the research are 1 to review literature pertaining to the field of social media in adult education context and 2 to analyse the respondents’ insights as regards learning/teaching practices, resources, and facilities that affect their learning in relation to social networking and media use (taking into consideration both personal and educational perspectives. Design/methodology/approach—the research paper adopts qualitative research approach. Findings—students perceive SM mainly as online communication means (usually informal communication is implied. SM is firstly associated by learners with pastime venue, not educational resource. Thus, methods of teaching/learning in SM and with the help of SM have to be developed and improved. They have to be considered in line with the necessity to develop critical and reflexive thinking skills and media and information literacy skills. The respondents have pointed out both positive and negative aspects of social media use for learning/teaching. Creation of an inner institutional SM type involving qualified people with expertise in SM use for education has been suggested. Research limitations/implications—this article is focused only on the attitudes of MRU students though 105 interviews in total have been conducted within the framework of the project and not only students, but also teachers and

  14. Public Private Partnership in Hydro-Power Development of India: Prospects and Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Ullah, Amir

    2015-01-01

    India has experienced a sharp increase in energy demand as a result of economic growth and rising per capita energy consumption. The Government of India is focusing on Hydro-power as one of the sources of renewable energy due to con-cern for climate change and fast depleting coal/oilfields. But, its development has not been commensurate due to shortage of financial resources, lack of power infrastructure, and modern technologies. The successful completion of Public Private Partnership (PPP) p...

  15. KML-based teaching lessons developed by Google in partnership with the University of Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, E. J.; Bailey, J.; Bishop, A.; Cain, J.; Goddard, M.; Hurowitz, K.; Kennedy, K.; Ornduff, T.; Sfraga, M.; Wernecke, J.

    2008-12-01

    The focus of Google's Geo Education outreach efforts (http://www.google.com/educators/geo.html) is on helping primary, secondary, and post-secondary educators incorporate Google Earth and Sky, Google Maps, and SketchUp into their classroom lessons. In this poster and demonstration, we will show our KML-based science lessons that were developed in partnership with the University of Alaska and used in classroom teachings by our team to Alaskan high-school students.

  16. Developing Nontraditional Partnerships to Disseminate the Space Science Story (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo, C.; Allen, J. S.; Garcia, J.; Martinez, D.

    2010-12-01

    NASA Space Science Days (NSSD) was established in 2004 to bring the story of the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) to a community far removed from areas NASA traditionally served. The original NSSD invited 400 5th and 8th graders from the Texas Rio Grande Valley area to the University of Texas Brownsville (UTB) campus to participate in a one day Saturday event filled with information about MER with related hands on activities. Currently the yearly NSSD at UTB has grown to over 700 5th and 8th grade participants who are mentored by NASA trained university students. The NSSD program has expanded to other universities and community colleges and will soon include universities from throughout the U.S. A collaboration between three major institutions: 1) NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science Directorate (ARES); 2) The Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers/Advancing Hispanic Excellence in Technology Engineering, Math, and Science, (SHPE/AHETEMS); and 3) The University of Texas at Brownsville (UTB) has been established to enable the dissemination of NASA Space Science related education materials throughout the U.S. Already in its 8th year, UTB developed and tested a NSSD model that has successfully engaged students throughout South Texas Rio Grande Valley in space science activities. With this newly formed collaboration of NASA JSC, SHPE/AHETEMS, and UTB the expansion of the NSSD model will allow trained SHPE students and professionals to conduct events throughout SHPE’s established nation-wide delivery systems. Each year a new NSSD site will be established through an application process solicited from SHPE student and professional chapters. Once a chapter is awarded to conduct a NSSD, upper-level high school and university students will travel to NASA-JSC for a two day workshop where students learn about the current year’s science theme and are trained to present hands-on activities related to the theme. In each NSSD

  17. SOCIO-ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AREA BASED ON PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS. PART 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Viktorovich Zakharov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Methodical approaches to the description of the tools of public-private partnership (PPP are disclosed. The contradictions and problems of effectiveness of institutional means of regulating the functioning of the different forms of PPP in the Russian economy are analyzed. Some shortcomings of the legislative framework as an important institutional tool for the development of PPP and regulation of economic relations are identificated. The expediency of the expanded application of the corporate form of partnership and correction institutions and mechanisms of legal regulation of mutually beneficial partnerships, including with the participation of joint-stock companies, is proved. It is proposed to extend the classification of PPP forms to search for ways to improve the functioning of the legal framework of PPP and on this theoretical and methodological basis to make a number of changes in the relevant legislation. Purpose: to expand the classification of PPP based on the analysis and extended interpretation of the nature and content of PPP and to offer new institutional means of regulating the processes of partnerships cooperation between government structures and companies for social and economic development of the territory. Methodology: methodology of institutional economics; classification methods, the analysis of economic relations and contradictions in the development of different forms of PPP, the synthesis solutions; design and systemic, comprehensive approaches. Results: classification of forms of PPP and interpretation of the nature and content of partnerships between government and business are expanded; matrix model of comparative characteristics of different forms of PPP is presented; the necessity of the development of the institutional means of regulating the social and economic development of territories based on the different forms of PPP is proved; recommendations for improving the legislative framework conducive to the

  18. Developing Nontraditional Partnerships to Disseminate the Space Science Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo, Charles; Allen, Jaclyn; Garcia, Javier; Martinez, Debra

    2010-01-01

    NASA Space Science Days (NSSD) was established in 2004 to bring the story of the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) to a community far removed from areas NASA traditionally serves. The original NSSD invited 400 5th and 8th graders from the Texas Rio Grande Valley area to the University of Texas Brownsville campus to participate in a one day Saturday event filled with information about MER with related hands on activities. Currently the program has grown to over 700 5th and 8th grade participants who are mentored by trained university students from several Texas universities and community colleges and growing to include universities from throughout the U.S. A collaboration between three major institutions: The NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science Directorate (ARES), the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers/Advancing Hispanic Excellence in Technology Engineering, Math, and Science, (SHPE/AHETEMS), and the University of Texas at Brownsville (UTB) has been established to enable the dissemination of Solar System related educational materials throughout the U.S. Already in its 8th year, UTB has developed and tested a NSSD model that has successfully disseminated space science materials to students throughout South Texas Rio Grande Valley. With this newly formed collaboration this model s expansion will allow trained SHPE students and professionals to conduct events throughout its established nation-wide delivery systems. Each year a new NSSD site will be established through an application process solicited from SHPE student and professional chapters. Once a chapter is awarded, upper-level high school and university students will travel to NASA- JSC for a two day workshop where students learn about the current year s theme and are trained to present hands-on activities related to the theme. Additional training by ARES and UTB occurs one month before the new event in their own communities. Both local middle school teachers and

  19. Recent developments in Lambda networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Laat, C.; Grosso, P.

    About 6 years ago the first baby-steps were made on opening up dark fiber and DWDM infrastructure for direct use by ISP's after the transformation of the old style Telecom sector into a market driven business. Since then Lambda workshops, community groups like GLIF and a number of experiments have led to many implementations of hybrid national research and education networks and lightpath-based circuit exchanges as pioneered by SURFnet in GigaPort and NetherLight in collaboration with StarLight in Chicago and Canarie in Canada. This article looks back on those developments, describes some current open issues and research developments and proposes a concept of terabit networking.

  20. Achieving STOP TB Partnership goals: perspectives on development of new diagnostics, drugs and vaccines for tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwaba, Peter; McNerney, Ruth; Grobusch, Martin Peter; O'Grady, Justin; Bates, Matthew; Kapata, Nathan; Maeurer, Markus; Zumla, Alimuddin

    2011-07-01

    Global eradication of tuberculosis (TB) depends on identification and treatment of all active TB cases and of the two billion people who are estimated to be latently infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The past decade has seen a renaissance of scientific activities and funder investment into development of new TB drugs, diagnostics, biomarkers and vaccines. This viewpoint critically summarises the promising portfolio of more accurate TB diagnostics, new TB drugs and vaccines that have been endorsed by the STOP TB Partnership. Increasing numbers of Phase 2 and 3 drug, vaccine and diagnostic clinical trials in high-TB endemic areas reflect substantial progress towards attaining Global STOP-TB Partnership targets. Achievement of STOP-TB Partnership goals will crucially depend on political will and serious investment by funders and developing country governments into improving delivery of better health services and living conditions for their people. Long-term sustainability of any newer tools implemented at point of care is essential. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. A network for development communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessette, G

    1996-01-01

    With the goal to promote a type of development that requires its beneficiaries to assume responsibility for it, the International Development Research Center (IDRC) set up a program in West Africa focusing on communication as a development tool within communities. The program is specifically designed for nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) in nine countries in the region. The NGOs defined five basic elements for improving communication to promote better development in their area which include training, basic education, conditions favoring success, traditional communication, and increasing recognition of the African woman. The program, which will be implemented in early 1996, is aimed at creating a network in participatory development communication. This program enables NGOs to undertake numerous research activities related to the program, bring their activities to the attention of communities, and learn better ways of helping the communities to take part in their own development.

  2. Training community health students to develop community-requested social marketing campaigns: an innovative partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Billie J; Hawk, Carol Wetherill

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a sustained partnership between a university community health program and local and regional community health agencies. As a key component of the Health Communication and Social Marketing course, the partnership involves undergraduate community health students working for and with community agencies and community members to design social marketing campaigns based on community-identified health needs. The goals of the course are to (1) provide students with the opportunity to work within the community to apply their skills in program planning, evaluation, and communication and (2) provide community agencies with a tailored campaign that can be implemented in their communities. Throughout the 10-week quarter, teams of students follow the principles of community participation in planning a social marketing campaign. These include (1) audience segmentation and formative assessment with the intended audience to determine campaign content and strategies and (2) pretesting and revisions of campaign messages and materials based on community feedback. This partnership contributes to the promotion of health in the local community and it builds the skills and competencies of future health educators. It demonstrates a successful and sustainable combination of community-based participatory research and experiential learning. From 2005 to 2011, 35 campaigns have been developed, many which have been implemented.

  3. International Civic Engagement: From Development Studies and Service-Learning, to Miami University-Dominica Partnerships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Klak

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available During the past four years, faculty, students, and staff from Miami University have been cultivating civic engagement relationships with citizens of the Commonwealth of Dominica, in the Eastern Caribbean. For members of the Miami University community, this has been an effort to create opportunities for learning and scholarship through partnerships with people in the Global South who are working for community empowerment, progressive change, and sustainable development. For our Dominican counterparts, benefits include financial inputs, manual labor, relevant research projects, and an outside interest in contributing positively to ameliorating their community challenges. We work to base the Miami University-Dominica relationships on trust, long-term commitment, and mutuality, so that the benefits go back and forth in myriad ways. The result has been a set of relationships across international borders and cultural differences that is more fulfilling for both sides than typical study abroad, research, or ecotourism encounters in the Global South. This paper describes the conceptual underpinnings of this international civic engagement, and recounts three examples of the kinds of community groups and activities that the partnerships involve. We also note where the project has encountered constraints and limitations, and our next steps in the effort. We hope this example can serve as a template and motivation for other university groups to commit to cultivating civic engagement relationships with people and communities in the Global South. KEYWORDScivic engagement; community engagement; community partnerships; sustainability

  4. Sexual networks, partnership mixing, and the female-to-male ratio of HIV infections in generalized epidemics: An agent-based simulation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges Reniers

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Empirical estimates of the female-to-male ratio of infections in generalized HIV epidemics in sub-Saharan Africa range from 1.31 in Zambia to 2.21 in Ivory Coast. Inequalities in the gender ratio of infections can arise because of differences in exposure (to HIV-positive partners, susceptibility (given exposure, and survival (once infected. Differences in susceptibility have to date received most attention, but neither the relatively high gender ratio of infections nor the heterogeneity in empirical estimates is fully understood. Objective: Demonstrate the relevance of partnership network attributes and sexual mixing patterns to gender differences in the exposure to HIV-positive partners and the gender ratio of infections. Methods: Agent-based simulation model built in NetLogo. Results: The female-to-male ratio of infections predicted by our model ranges from 1.13 to 1.75. Gender-asymmetric partnership concurrency, rapid partnership turnover, elevated partnership dissolution in female-positive serodiscordant couples, and lower partnership re-entry rates among HIV-positive women can produce (substantial differences in the gender ratio of infections. Coital dilution and serosorting have modest moderating effects. Conclusions: Partnership network attributes and sexual mixing patterns can have a considerable effect on the gender ratio of HIV infections. We need to look beyond individual behavior and gender differences in biological susceptibility if we are to fully understand, and remedy, gender inequalities in HIV infection in generalized epidemics.

  5. Scientist-Teacher Partnerships as Professional Development: An Action Research Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willcuts, Meredith H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2009-04-01

    The overall purpose of this action research study was to explore the experiences of ten middle school science teachers involved in a three-year partnership program between scientists and teachers at a Department of Energy national laboratory, including the impact of the program on their professional development, and to improve the partnership program by developing a set of recommendations based on the study’s findings. This action research study relied on qualitative data including field notes recorded at the summer academies and data from two focus groups with teachers and scientists. Additionally, the participating teachers submitted written reflections in science notebooks, participated in open-ended telephone interviews that were transcribed verbatim, and wrote journal summaries to the Department of Energy at the end of the summer academy. The analysis of the data, collaboratively examined by the teachers, the scientists, and the science education specialist acting as co-researchers on the project, revealed five elements critical to the success of the professional development of science teachers. First, scientist-teacher partnerships are a unique contribution to the professional development of teachers of science that is not replicated in other forms of teacher training. Second, the role of the science education specialist as a bridge between the scientists and teachers is a unique and vital one, impacting all aspects of the professional development. Third, there is a paradox for classroom teachers as they view the professional development experience from two different lenses – that of learner and that of teacher. Fourth, learning for science teachers must be designed to be constructivist in nature. Fifth, the principles of the nature of science must be explicitly showcased to be seen and understood by the classroom teacher.

  6. Designing for the Future: Curriculum Planning for a National Network of Arts Education Partnerships

    OpenAIRE

    Beck, Jill; Appel, Morgan P

    2003-01-01

    Sound, research-based educational reform principles suggest that public schools need arts education as a regular component of a comprehensive curriculum that will lead to student success, and that Universities can and should apply t heir vast stores of expertise and personnel on behalf of K-12 improvements in teacher support and child learning. This objective can be accomplished by university-school partnerships using a multifaceted, user-friendly curriculum design based on research and effec...

  7. PROBLEMS OF THE DEVELOPMENT OF PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP IN THE RUSSIAN FEDERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir B. Zotov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Public-private partnership (PPP is a complex mechanism, which includes a variety of industry legislation, which together form a system of legislative regulation of relations at the interaction of private and public parties in the realization of long-term capital-intensive investment projects for the development of public infrastructure. The article describes the current state of PPP in the Russian Federation, the analysis of the main problems and needs integrated action (regulatory, institutional and investment to improve and develop this project.

  8. Developing a community-academic partnership to improve recognition and treatment of depression in underserved African American and white elders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobransky-Fasiska, Deborah; Brown, Charlotte; Pincus, Harold A; Nowalk, Mary P; Wieland, Melissa; Parker, Lisa S; Cruz, Mario; McMurray, Michelle L; Mulsant, Benoit; Reynolds, Charles F

    2009-11-01

    Reducing mental health disparities among underserved populations, particularly African American elders, is an important public health priority. The authors describe the process and challenges of developing a community/academic research partnership to address these disparities. The authors are using a Community-Based Participatory Research approach to gain access to underserved populations in need of depression treatment. The authors identify six stages: 1) Collaborating to Secure Funding; 2) Building a Communications Platform and Research Infrastructure; 3) Fostering Enduring Relationships; 4) Assessing Needs/Educating about Research Process; 5) Initiating Specific Collaborative Projects (meeting mutual needs/interests); and 6) Maintaining a Sustainable and Productive Partnership. Data from a needs assessment developed collaboratively by researchers and community agencies facilitated agreement on mutual research goals, while strengthening the partnership. A community/academic-based partnership with a solid research infrastructure has been established and maintained for 3 years. Using the results of a needs assessment, the working partnership prioritized and launched several projects. Through interviews and questionnaires, community partners identified best practices for researchers working in the community. Future research and interventional projects have been developed, including plans for sustainability that will eventually shift more responsibility from the academic institution to the community agencies. To reach underserved populations by developing and implementing models of more effective mental health treatment, it is vital to engage community agencies offering services to this population. A successful partnership requires "cultural humility," collaborative efforts, and the development of flexible protocols to accommodate diverse communities.

  9. Establishing And Managing Development Networks In Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Establishing And Managing Development Networks In Africa: Perspectives On The African Virtual Library And Information Network (Avlin) ... In times like this when libraries are facing problems with access and acquisition of materials, networking becomes very important. This paper discusses issues relating to networking in ...

  10. Urban partnerships in low-carbon development: Opportunities and challenges of an emerging trend in global climate politics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Beermann

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the linkages between two recent trends in global climate governance. The first trend is the growing focus on cities in the multi-level governance of climate change. Whereas international climate change negotiations often end in deadlock, many urban centers across the world are taking the lead. Industrialized cities from the Global North and increasingly cities from the emerging Southern economies are experimenting with innovative and ambitious programs to reduce their local carbon footprints. A second trend is the expan¬ding urban North-South cooperation in the area of low-carbon development. This cooperation takes various forms, such as city twinning, transnational municipal networks and trans-local development cooperation. A key target of these initiatives is to develop joint projects and exchange knowledge to foster low-carbon development pathways. This study analyzes the conditions of success and failure in selected Indo-German urban low-carbon partnerships with a particular focus on institutional arrangements. The paper presents evidence from three initiatives and argues that successful trans-local cooperation depends largely on the interplay between institutional forms and the development of social capital. Building on these findings, the paper discusses what lessons may be drawn from the emergence of urban North-South cooperation for the future development of global climate governance.

  11. Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative—A case study in partnership development

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Erchia, Frank

    2016-10-21

    The Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI) is a successful example of collaboration between science and natural resource management at the landscape scale. In southwestern Wyoming, expanding energy and mineral development, urban growth, and other changes in land use over recent decades, combined with landscape-scale drivers such as climate change and invasive species, have presented compelling challenges to resource managers and a diverse group of Federal, State, industry, and non-governmental organizations, as well as citizen stakeholders. To address these challenges, the WLCI was established as a collaborative forum and interagency partnership to develop and implement science-based conservation actions. About a decade after being established, this report documents the establishment and history of the WLCI, focusing on the path to success of the initiative and providing insights and details that may be useful in developing similar partnerships in other locations. Not merely retrospective, the elements of the WLCI that are presented herein are still in play, still evolving, and still contributing to the resolution of compelling conservation challenges in the Western United States.The U.S. Geological Survey has developed many successful longstanding partnerships, of which the WLCI is one example.“As the Nation’s largest water, earth, and biological science and civilian mapping agency, the U.S. Geological Survey collects, monitors, analyzes, and provides scientific understanding about natural resource conditions, issues, and problems. The diversity of our scientific expertise enables us to carry out large-scale, multi-disciplinary investigations and provide impartial scientific information to resource managers, planners, and other customers” (U.S. Geological Survey, 2016).

  12. MUNICIPAL-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP – A MECHANISM FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF MUNICIPAL OUTPATIENT UROLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Gevorkyan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of the study is determined by the need to attract private investment in the field of municipal health care with the aim of improving the system of outpatient urological care.Purpose. To determine the vectors of development, planning, the basic conditions for the implementation of municipalprivate partnership (IMPP in the system of municipal outpatient urological care.Materials and methods. To achieve this goal, general scientific methods of analysis, synthesis, generalization, interpretation of scientific data, as well as systemic and structural-functional approaches were applied in the work.Results. The article provides the scientific substantiation of the role of municipal-private partnership in the development of municipal outpatient urology. Methodical approaches to the formation of the outpatient center of urology with the mechanisms of the mixed economy, developing business processes involving private investor resources in the reproduction processes and increasing the efficiency of the municipal system of outpatient urological care are outlined.Conclusions. The article defines the vectors of development, planning, the main conditions for the implementation of municipal-private partnershipsin the system of municipal outpatient urological carein order to attract privateinvestments and develop an outpatient urology system. 

  13. Partnerships for Clean Development and Climate: Business andTechnology Cooperation Benefits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathaye, Jayant A.; Price, Lynn; Kumar, Satish; de la Rue du Can,Stephane; Warfield, Corina; Padmanabhan, S.

    2006-08-22

    Development and poverty eradication are urgent andoverriding goals internationally. The World Summit on SustainableDevelopment made clear the need for increased access to affordable,reliable and cleaner energy and the international community agreed in theDelhi Declaration on Climate Change and Sustainable Development on theimportance of the development agenda in considering any climate changeapproach. To this end, six countries (Australia, China, India, Japan,Republic of Korea and the United States) have come together to form theAsia Pacific Partnership in accordance with their respective nationalcircumstances, to develop, deploy and transfer cleaner, more efficienttechnologies and to meet national pollution reduction, energy securityand climate change concerns consistent with the principles of the U.N.Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). The APP builds on thefoundation of existing bilateral and multilateral initiativescomplements.APP has established eight public-private sector Task Forcescovering: (1) cleaner fossil energy; (2) renewable energy and distributedgeneration; (3) power generation and transmission; (4) steel; (5)aluminium; (6) cement; (7) coal mining; and (8) buildings and appliances.As a priority, each Task Force will formulate detailed action plansoutlining both immediate and medium-term specific actions, includingpossible "flagship" projects and relevant indicators of progress by 31August 2006. The partnership will help the partners build human andinstitutional capacity to strengthen cooperative efforts, and will seekopportunities to engage the private sector. The APP organized An OutreachWorkshop: Business&Technology Cooperation Opportunities forIndustry on August 26, 2006, New Delhi. This paper was prepared toprovide background information for participants of the Conference. Ithighlights energy efficiency, renewable energy, and climate technologies,barriers, and partnerships that are being implemented in the US, Indiaand other selected

  14. Night Sky Network: A partnership with NASA, the ASP and Astronomical League

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chippindale, S.; Berendsen, M.

    2003-12-01

    In 2002, the Astronomical Society of the Pacific (ASP) surveyed amateur astronomers to determine their views and experiences with public outreach. The ultimate goal was to discover methods to support amateur astronomers in their outreach efforts. The survey discovered that they are looking for ready-made, themed materials, training in astronomy content and presentation skills, mentoring, and networking to enhance their astronomy events and support their ability to do educational outreach. Acting on these results and with funding from NASA, the ASP is forming a nationwide coalition of amateur astronomy clubs whose members bring the science, technology and inspiration of NASA's missions to the general public. The program consists of three primary components: outreach materials, training, and community building. Member-based astronomy clubs will receive kits of materials on various astronomy topics to supplement and enhance their events as well as a "professional development" component that includes training on how to use the materials and tips to strengthen their individual presentation skills. The Night Sky Network web site includes public pages and a user area where success stories and challenges can be exchanged, new information downloaded, and a support area for amateur astronomers doing outreach. We are currently testing our first kit, "PlanetQuest: The Search for Another Earth", in over two dozen clubs across the country. The second kit, "Big Bang to Black Holes" is under development for NASA's Structure and Evolution of the Universe Forum through the SAO and will be beta tested over the spring and summer of 2004. Sponsored and supported by NASA-Navigator Program, NASA-SAO Education Forum, the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, and the Astronomical League.

  15. An innovative approach to participatory health policy development in Bulgaria: The conception and first achievements of the Partnership for Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimova, Antoniya; Rohova, Maria; Hasardzhiev, Stanimir; Spranger, Anne

    2017-11-11

    The Bulgarian Partnership for Health was established in 2015 as a new forum for health policy formulation and discussion. The Partnership presents a new approach of structured and sustained stakeholder involvement to overcome the lack of public participation in health policy development and implementation. Constituted as a permanent consultative body to the Council of Ministers, the Partnership engages a wide variety of stakeholders and professionals to shape and improve health policies. The shared governance of the Partnership between the Minister of Health and a patient organisation supports the elaboration of legislative acts based on the stakeholders' collaboration in priority areas. The governance and organisational structure of the Partnership assures capacity building, fast mobilisation of experts, continuity of stakeholder involvement, and increased responsibility in health policy development and implementation. This type of participatory approach may help reconcile initially opposing positions and foster reforms often impeded by political antagonism. Persisting challenges are a rather slow process of policy development and different perceptions of key concepts among the stakeholders. As policy-making in many countries in Eastern Europe suffers from political distrust, the Partnership's approach of involving experts - and not only politicians - could provide inspiration also to other countries, which have struggled with inconsistency of health policies pursued by different governments. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Volunteer Service and Service Learning: Opportunities, Partnerships, and United Nations Millennium Development Goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmida, Safiya George; Amerson, Roxanne; Foster, Jennifer; McWhinney-Dehaney, Leila; Magowe, Mabel; Nicholas, Patrice K; Pehrson, Karen; Leffers, Jeanne

    2016-09-01

    This article explores approaches to service involvement and provides direction to nurse leaders and others who wish to begin or further develop global (local and international) service or service learning projects. We review types of service involvement, analyze service-related data from a recent survey of nearly 500 chapters of the Honor Society of Nursing, Sigma Theta Tau International (STTI), make recommendations to guide collaborative partnerships and to model engagement in global and local service and service learning. This article offers a literature review and describes results of a survey conducted by the STTI International Service Learning Task Force. Results describe the types of service currently conducted by STTI nursing members and chapters, including disaster response, service learning, and service-related responses relative to the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). The needs of chapter members for information about international service are explored and recommendations for promoting global service and sustainability goals for STTI chapters are examined. Before engaging in service, volunteers should consider the types of service engagement, as well as the design of projects to include collaboration, bidirectionality, sustainability, equitable partnerships, and inclusion of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. STTI supports the learning, knowledge, and professional development of nurses worldwide. International service and collaboration are key to the advancement of the nursing profession. Culturally relevant approaches to international service and service learning are essential to our global organization, as it aims to impact the health status of people globally. © 2016 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  17. Teacher/Scientist Partnership Develops a Simulated Natural Disaster Scenario to Enhance Student Learning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurstner, Signe K.; Herr, Cheryl; Andrews, Gregg L.; Feaster-Alley, Kathy

    2005-11-01

    National science education standards emphasize actively engaging students in developing the abilities of and understandings about scientific inquiry as a way to learn important concepts in the earth sciences and other disciplines. Too few high quality instructional tools, based on the national standards, currently exist that model this type of activity for sixth-grade students. To promote this approach, we created a national laboratory/middle school partnership to develop a hands-on, inquiry-based research project related to flash floods in southeastern Washington State. The project, conducted during the 2003-2004 school year, was built on the middle-school Catastrophic Events module developed by the National Science Resource Center. Seventeen student research teams deepened their understanding of geology, hydrology, and meteorology and applied this understanding as they analyzed and evaluated data they collected. The student teams wrote technical reports and created posters that synthesized the data and presented conclusions and recommendations based on their findings. The project models a successful approach for developing an inquiry-based earth science project and creating a meaningful partnership between schools and scientists.

  18. Product development public-private partnerships for public health: a systematic review using qualitative data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pinho Campos, Katia; Norman, Cameron D; Jadad, Alejandro R

    2011-10-01

    Almost a decade ago, public health initiated a number of innovative ventures to attract investments from multinational drug companies for the development of new drugs and vaccines to tackle neglected diseases (NDs). These ventures - known as product development public-private partnerships (PD PPPs) - represent the participation of the public and private actors toward the discovery and development of essential medicines to reduce the suffering of over one billion people worldwide living with NDs. This systematic review aimed to identify empirical-based descriptive articles to understand critical elements in the partnership process, and propose a framework to shed light on future guidelines to support better planning, design and management of existing and new forms of PPPs for public health. Ten articles met the inclusion criteria and were analyzed and synthesized using qualitative content analysis. The findings show that the development stage of PD PPPs requires a careful initiation and planning process including discussion on values and shared goals, agreement on mutual interests & equality of power relation, exchange of expertise & resources, stakeholder engagement, and assessment of the local health capacity. The management stage of PD PPPs entails transparency, extensive communication and participatory decision-making among partner organizations. This review illustrates the difficulties, challenges and effective responses during the partnering process. This model of collaboration may offer a way to advance population health at present, while creating streams of innovation that can yield future social and financial dividends in enhancing the public's health more widely. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Iterative and Event-Based Frameworks for University and School District Technology Professional Development Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winslow, Joseph; Dickerson, Jeremy; Weaver, Carmen; Josey, Fair

    2016-01-01

    Forming technology partnerships between universities and public schools in an era of competition and economic difficulty is a challenge. However, when these partnerships are formed and sustained, the benefits for both are extremely valuable. For a university instructional technology graduate program and school partnership to be successful, the…

  20. Revisiting Public School/University Partnerships for Formal Leadership Development: A Brief 30-Year Retrospective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, David C.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the Kansas State University Chair of the Department of Educational Leadership reviews the strong history of his department's university and public school partnerships and the impact these partnerships have had on leadership preparation programs. Almost 30 years ago, Kansas State University foresaw the power of partnerships with…

  1. Mechanisms Fostering Social Entrepreneurship as Potential Instruments for Economic Development: The Eastern Partnership Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plotnieks Dāvis

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available With its plan to assign 600 million euros through the European Neighbourhood Instrument for Eastern Partnership countries, the European Union intended to increase the efficiency of institutions, attenuate social problems, and create an environment that fosters economic growth and human well-being in Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Moldova, and Ukraine. A few scholars have criticized the amount of funding and planned initiatives of the European Neighbourhood Instrument as insufficient and suggested that in order to foster cooperation and support reforms in its Eastern Partnership countries, more action should be taken. In times when European Commission budget is under constraints of consolidation and increase of aid for supporting European Neighbourhood countries is hardly possible, alternative solutions for tempering social problems need to be assessed. Various scientists, philanthropists and entrepreneurs see social entrepreneurship as a tool for solving social problems in a sustainable way where business thinking is being combined with non-profit philosophy. Contrary to government support and intervention for solving social problems, social entrepreneurship is already being used as tool that initially addresses joint needs--solve social problems and create revenue that provides much needed income for sustainable business initiatives. This paper analyzes the concept of social entrepreneurship, examples where social entrepreneurship is solving social problems, and mechanisms that can foster these phenomena. The aim of this paper is to examine different mechanisms of how governments can foster the creation and development of social entrepreneurship. Unique survey data derived from a project examining social entrepreneurship in Europe is used. It is concluded that by adopting mechanisms proven in various developed countries, the Eastern Partnership countries can stimulate social entrepreneurship, thus attenuating social problems and

  2. An evaluation of inter-organisational information systems development on business partnership relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williamson, E.A.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Inter-organisational information systems (IOS are being used within SCM to improve businesses processes and to facilitate closer working relations with business partners. However, the technologies themselves impact on this relationship as they allow various levels of information flows, communications, function integration and partner integration.The aim of this paper is to evaluate IOS development influencing partnership integration within Supply Chain Management (SCM by investigating thirteen businesses that use a variety of IOS. IOS are classified into Elementary IOS, Intermediate IOS and Advanced IOS. Organisational variables such as information flows, partner co-ordination and integration, partner trust and confidence are measured against the level of IOS development. Variables such as management commitment, financial costs, system standards and partner resistance are investigated as forces or barriers, and related to different levels of IOS development.This research concludes that IOS development results in increased information flows and coordination which supports the development of trust and confidence in business partners. However, the customer position in the supply chain, whether it be retailer, distributor or manufacturer can influence the use of IOS of its business partners. Also, although IOS allows businesses to source and contact a larger range of business partners, the tendency is for businesses to use a smaller number of partners. This work also shows that IOS development changes a business’s relationship with its partners and moves it towards partnership integration.However, a number of organisational factors impact on this integration. These factors vary with the level of IOS development. Management commitment and showing the requirement for IOS development can act as a positive force in developing IOS or as a barrier against IOS development. Other barriers include resistance from business partners, financial costs, lack of

  3. Conceptual Developments & Capacity Building in Environmental Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehmann, Martin

    2008-01-01

    for governments in the South to make up for lack of sufficient environmental legislation and enforcement, the majority of these examples, however, stem from countries in the North. In terms of public–private partnerships, one of the foremost Danish initiatives is the Green Network in the former county of Vejle......, it aims at providing new forms of co-operation between public authorities and private companies. The vehicle for this was initially a voluntary environmental statement by companies, who wished to be members. With the passing of time, however, the demands and pressures on both companies and public bodies...... funding have in many cases led to disappointing outcomes. It is necessary to discuss and be aware of key factors in the institutional set-up and the importance of institutional carriers for the potential success of Green Networks in the South. With reference to at that time ongoing initiatives in Thailand...

  4. Developing injury prevention policy through a multi-agency partnership approach: a case study of a state-wide sports safety policy in New South Wales, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulos, Roslyn G; Donaldson, Alex; McLeod, Brent

    2012-01-01

    Sports injuries are an important public health issue. A multi-agency key stakeholder partnership was formed to develop a state-wide response to sports injury prevention in New South Wales, Australia. This study evaluated the partnership approach to injury prevention policy development. The partnership approach to policy development was evaluated pre- and post-partnership using semi-structured telephone interviews and questionnaire data gathered from participants. Participants were satisfied with the partnership operation and outcomes. Challenges included: maintaining focus and efficiency; time constraints; sector diversity limiting the likelihood of addressing needs and reaching consensus; and ensuring commitment from all relevant organisations. Potential benefits included: a sense of policy ownership; a broad-based approach across the sector and savings from resource sharing. Policy resulted from a shared understanding of the injury problem, and of an appropriate response. A credible industry leader, investment in partnership management and a consultative approach facilitated the success of the partnership.

  5. MODERN FORMS OF PARTNERSHIP IN BUSINESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markova V. D.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article examines tendencies of the development of new organizational forms of partnership and marks several problems of their usage in Russian conditions by the example of the Novosibirsk region. Modern forms of networking and partnership of commercial companies and universities, research institutes and other organizations, such as clusters, strategic alliances, technology platforms, business ecosystems and other, are focused on the development of new market opportunities and gaining competitive advantage through the sharing of assets and expertise. Two groups of strategic partnership initiatives in the business were emphasized: some initiatives are shown by the state, while some come from the companies. It has been shown that the development of digital technologies, which allows to establish connection between geographically separated participants, promotes the formation of new partnership tools, such as the technology platforms and business ecosystems built on their basis.

  6. Protocols and participatory democracy in a 'North-South' product development partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Catherine M

    2012-09-01

    Global product development partnerships (PDPs) for new health technologies have become an increasingly important part of the science and development landscape over the past two decades. Polarised positions are adopted by those scrutinising the power and governance of these public-private formations; on the one hand, they are seen as successful social technology innovations, on the other as regressive and imperialistic regimes of neo-colonialism. Answering recent calls for research to examine the actors, governance, context and dynamics of PDPs, this article presents a sociological case study of one particular partnership, the Microbicides Development Programme (MDP). Interviews were conducted with a cross-section of programme staff in the UK and Zambia, and discourses analysed through a Foucauldian lens of governmentality. This article suggests that two tools of government were central to MDP's cohesiveness: institutional discourses of participatory democracy and capacity building and scientific protocols. Through these material-semiotic tools, the scientific community, junior operational researchers and the funder were successfully enrolled into the programme and governed by a central body based in the UK. This article draws on Nikolas Rose's work to discuss these socio-scientific discourses as technologies of government, and provides a non-dualistic account of power and governance in a North-South PDP. © 2012 The Author. Sociology of Health & Illness © 2012 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Networks as Tools for Sustainable Urban Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Ole; Tollin, Nicola

    Due to the increasing number of networks related to sustainable development (SUD) the paper focuses on understanding in which way networks can be considered useful tools for sustainable urban development, taking particularly into consideration the networks potential of spreading innovative policies......, strategies and actions. There has been little theoretically development on the subject. In practice networks for sustainable development can be seen as combining different theoretical approaches to networks, including governance, urban competition and innovation. To give a picture of the variety...... of sustainable networks, we present different examples of networks, operating at different geographical scales, from global to local, with different missions (organizational, political, technical), fields (lobbying, learning, branding) and its size. The potentials and challenges related to sustainable networks...

  8. Technological Developments in Networking, Education and Automation

    CERN Document Server

    Elleithy, Khaled; Iskander, Magued; Kapila, Vikram; Karim, Mohammad A; Mahmood, Ausif

    2010-01-01

    "Technological Developments in Networking, Education and Automation" includes a set of rigorously reviewed world-class manuscripts addressing and detailing state-of-the-art research projects in the following areas: Computer Networks: Access Technologies, Medium Access Control, Network architectures and Equipment, Optical Networks and Switching, Telecommunication Technology, and Ultra Wideband Communications. Engineering Education and Online Learning: including development of courses and systems for engineering, technical and liberal studies programs; online laboratories; intelligent

  9. SOCIO-ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AREA BASED ON PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS. PART 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Viktorovich Zakharov

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Logic of expectations about the effects and benefits of management of development of different forms of PPP with the levels of institutional management tools developed by the state is proved based on the analysis of the theory and practice of public-private partnerships (PPP. It is shown that the implementation of programs and projects the main effects should be expected at the microeconomic and project levels, i.e. where goods and services are produced and sold. However, budgetary and other savings for socio-economic development of regions and municipalities could be achieved at management levels. The prospects, contradictions and problems of development and efficiency of PPP with using of software and project management are analyzed and measures are outlined to accelerate overcoming the negative effects of the economic crisis. A multi-level classification of institutional means of regulating the functioning of the different forms of PPP in the Russian economy are proposed. Disadvantages of institutional regulation of PPP are identified. It proposed to make extensive use of the tools of development and improve the effectiveness of partnerships that are created on the technological basis of electronic and open government. Purpose: to develop and implement new institutional means of PPP regulation for accelerating socio-economic development of the territory. Methodology: methodology of institutional economics; classification, analysis of economic relations and contradictions in the development of different forms of PPP and synthesis of solutions methods; methods of software management; design and systemic, comprehensive approaches. Results: contradictions of PPP development, reducing the importance of partnerships in the Russian economy are identificated; criteria are proposed which allows to identify the facts and PPP projects from the totality of the analyzed material; enlarged model is constructed which allows logically to connect expectations

  10. Governing by Network in Europe: Associations, Educational Research and Social Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawn, Martin

    2007-01-01

    The coincident arrival of a European policy space in education and a European Educational Research Association [EERA], and their subsequent relation, will be the subject of this paper. EERA is a hybrid organization--it supports scientific networking, it is a social partner in EU policy, it is a first level social space for networking, and…

  11. Reducing Concurrent Sexual Partnerships Among Blacks in the Rural Southeastern United States: Development of Narrative Messages for a Radio Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    CATES, JOAN R.; FRANCIS, DIANE B.; RAMIREZ, CATALINA; BROWN, JANE D.; SCHOENBACH, VICTOR J.; FORTUNE, THIERRY; HAMMOND, WIZDOM POWELL; ADIMORA, ADAORA A.

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, heterosexual transmission of HIV infection is dramatically higher among Blacks than among Whites. Overlapping (concurrent) sexual partnerships promote HIV transmission. The authors describe their process for developing a radio campaign (Escape the Web) to raise awareness among 18–34-year-old Black adults of the effect of concurrency on HIV transmission in the rural South. Radio is a powerful channel for the delivery of narrative-style health messages. Through six focus groups (n = 51) and 42 intercept interviews, the authors explored attitudes toward concurrency and solicited feedback on sample messages. Men were advised to (a) end concurrent partnerships and not to begin new ones; (b) use condoms consistently with all partners; and (c) tell others about the risks of concurrency and benefits of ending concurrent partnerships. The narrative portrayed risky behaviors that trigger initiation of casual partnerships. Women were advised to (a) end partnerships in which they are not their partner’s only partner; (b) use condoms consistently with all partners; and (c) tell others about the risks of concurrency and benefits of ending concurrent partnerships. Messages for all advised better modeling for children. PMID:26134387

  12. Open Development : Networked Innovations in International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Open Development : Networked Innovations in International Development. Couverture du livre Open Development: Networked Innovations in International Development. Directeur(s) : Matthew L. Smith et Katherine M. A. Reilly. Maison(s) d'édition : The MIT Press, CRDI. 12 décembre 2013. ISBN : 9780262525411.

  13. Women's right to health and the Millennium Development Goals: promoting partnerships to improve access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, D

    2006-09-01

    The Millennium Development Goals (MGD) represent a commitment of 189 member states that adopted them during the Millennium Summit in September 2000. This UN General Assembly recognized that gender equality and women's empowerment are both central to achieving sustainable development by means of combating poverty, hunger and disease. Neither reproductive nor sexual health was explicitly articulated in the original MDGs and indicators-a critical omission, as globally women are more disadvantaged than men. However, a clear link exists between all of the MDGs and the reproductive and sexual health of women, who cannot contribute to sustainable development, unless their right to health is met through improved access. The FIGO 2006 World Report on Women's Health addresses many issues critical to the success of the MDGs, with a focus on how partnerships have become a crucial vehicle to improve access to health for women.

  14. Sensor networks for sustainable development

    CERN Document Server

    Ilyas, Mohammad; Alwakeel, Mohammed M; Aggoune, el-Hadi M

    2014-01-01

    ContentsPreface AcknowledgmentsEditorsContributorsAgricultureA Review of Applications of Sensor Networks in Smart AgricultureAhsan AbdullahWireless Sensor Networks with Dynamic Nodes for Water and Crop Health Managementel-Hadi M. Aggoune, Sami S. Alwakeel, Mohammed M. Alwakeel, and Mohammad Ammad-UddinEnvironmentScaling Smart EnvironmentsDiane J. CookLocalization of a Wireless Sensor Network for Environment Monitoring using Maximum Likelihood Estimation with Negative

  15. INSTITUTE OF THE STATE-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP IN THE SPHERE OF THE STATE PURCHASES: PROBLEMS AND PROSPECTS OF DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sh. Subkhonberdiev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Close cooperation between public and private property within the boundaries of a single firm (mixed company or within various forms of public-private partnerships is a characteristic tendency of modern innovative economy. The term covers a wide range of partnerships from simple contracts with private entrepreneurs in the production of goods, works, the provision of services to large projects needed in the areas where privatization is not possible, but there is a need in private investment. State, attracting private capital to financing of capital-intensive, long payback, but important for innovative economic development projects, does not lose control over them, and the private business gets access to previously closed sectors of the economy, such as transport infr astructure, housing and communal services, bringing with it new efficient technology management. Now there is no single approach to defining the nature and content of the concepts in the economic and legal literature presented different points of view, institutional problems of public-private partnership actively discussed by scientists and practitioners. Analysis of international experience projects shows that the specific features of and peculiarities of the institute of public-private partnership determined by the historical, social and economic characteristics development of each country. In turn, the institutional system public procurement is formed depending on the current in them budgetary and legislative system. Because of the historical development United States, perhaps on other developed countries advanced in the organization system of partnership between the state and private business, based solely on market principles.

  16. Southern African Development Research Network | CRDI - Centre ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This project will build on lessons learned from an earlier IDRC-supported effort, the Southern African Trade Research Network (SATRN), funded under project 100816. The grant will support a broad-based research network, the Southern Africa Development Research Network (SADRN) with a view to filling some of the gaps ...

  17. Designing effective partnerships for waste-to-resource initiatives: Lessons learned from developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storey, Donovan; Santucci, Lorenzo; Fraser, Rowan; Aleluia, Joao; Chomchuen, Laksiri

    2015-12-01

    Cities in developing countries across Asia-Pacific are struggling to effectively manage municipal solid waste (MSW). This is especially the case in secondary cities and small towns, which often face a lack of resources and know-how. Because the waste stream in these cities is usually high in organic content (50-80%) and recyclable materials (10-20%), waste-to-resource initiatives are viable options for sustainable MSW management. Waste-to-resource initiatives that are low-cost, low-tech, decentralised and community-based offer municipalities useful solutions for managing their MSW. However, the sustainability of such solutions depends on a number of key factors, such as the separation of waste at source, the effective engagement of communities and steady and predictable sources of revenue. Using quantitative data and qualitative information derived from field experience, this paper concludes that effective partnerships between a diverse range of stakeholders must be designed and fostered in order to achieve sustainability. The paper provides an analysis of stakeholder roles for the establishment of effective partnerships in four case study cities of Matale and Ratnapura (Sri Lanka) and Kon Tum and Quy Nhon (Viet Nam), where waste-to-resource facilities have been established, and explores the resources of stakeholders and how these can be mobilised to support waste-to-resource initiatives for revenue generation and long-term sustainability. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Examining the potential contribution of social theory to developing and supporting Australian Indigenous-mainstream health service partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Emma; Taylor, Kate P; Durey, Angela; Bessarab, Dawn; Thompson, Sandra C

    2014-09-20

    The substantial gap in life expectancy between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians has been slow to improve, despite increased dedicated funding. Partnerships between Australian Indigenous and mainstream Western biomedical organisations are recognised as crucial to improved Indigenous health outcomes. However, these partnerships often experience challenges, particularly in the context of Australia's race and political relations. We examined the relevant literature in order to identify the potential role for social theory and theoretical models in developing and maintaining intercultural partnerships. Having identified relevant theoretical models, terms and possible key words, a range of databases were searched and relevant articles selected for inclusion. An integrative approach brought together theoretical models and practical considerations about working in partnership, to inform our analysis of the literature. Considering partnerships between Australian Indigenous and mainstream health organisations as 'bi-cultural' is simplistic: rather they are culturally diverse across social and professional levels. As such, partnerships between Australian Indigenous and mainstream health organisations may be better conceptualised as 'intercultural', operating across diverse and shifting cultural frames of reference. Theories identified by this review as useful to guide partnerships include power relations, reflexivity and dialogue, borders and strangeness and the intercultural or third space. This paper examines how these theoretical approaches can develop understanding and improve intercultural engagement between mainstream and Australian Indigenous partners in healthcare. Rather than viewing partnerships merely as arrangements between disembodied entities, sometimes contractual in nature, they are better seen as activities between people and organisations and essentially dependent on relationships, occurring in an intercultural space that is complex, dynamic and

  19. Developing nurse medication safety training in a health partnership in Mozambique using behavioural science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Eleanor Rose; Mason, Corina; Junior, Fonseca Domingos; Santos, Luana Vendramel; Scott, Abigail; Ademokun, Debo; Simião, Zeferina; Oliver, Wingi Manzungu; Joaquim, Fernando Francisco; Cavanagh, Sarah M

    2017-07-04

    Globally, safe and effective medication administration relies on nurses being able to apply strong drug calculation skills in their real-life practice, in the face of stressors and distractions. These may be especially prevalent for nurses in low-income countries such as Mozambique and Continuing Professional Development post-registration may be important. This study aimed to 1) explore the initial impact of an international health partnership's work to develop a drug calculation workshop for nurses in Beira, Mozambique and 2) reflect upon the role of health psychologists in helping educators apply behavioural science to the training content and evaluation. In phase one, partners developed a training package, which was delivered to 87 Portuguese-speaking nurses. The partnership's health psychologists coded the training's behaviour change content and recommended enhancements to content and delivery. In phase two, the refined training, including an educational game, was delivered to 36 nurses in Mozambique and recoded by the health psychologists. Measures of participant confidence and intentions to make changes to healthcare practice were collected, as well as qualitative data through post-training questions and 12 short follow-up participant interviews. In phase one six BCTs were used during the didactic presentation. Most techniques targeted participants' capability to calculate drug doses accurately; recommendations aimed to increase participants' motivation and perceived opportunity, two other drivers of practice change. Phase two training included an extra seven BCTs, such as action planning and further skills practice. Participants reported high confidence before and after the training (p = 0.25); intentions to use calculators to check drug calculations significantly increased (p = 0.031). Qualitative data suggested the training was acceptable, enjoyable and led to practice changes, through improved capability, opportunity and motivation. Opportunity

  20. Opportunities and challenges for drug development: public-private partnerships, adaptive designs and big data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oktay Yildirim

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Drug development faces the double challenge of increasing costs and increasing pressure on pricing. To avoid that lack of perceived commercial perspective will leave existing medical needs unmet, pharmaceutical companies and many other stakeholders are discussing ways to improve the efficiency of drug Research & Development. Based on an international symposium organized by the Medical School of the University of Duisburg-Essen (Germany and held in January 2016, we discuss the opportunities and challenges of three specific areas, i.e. public-private partnerships, adaptive designs and big data. Public-private partnerships come in many different forms with regard to scope, duration and type and number of participants. They range from project-specific collaborations to strategic alliances to large multi-party consortia. Each of them offers specific opportunities and faces distinct challenges. Among types of collaboration, investigator-initiated studies are becoming increasingly popular but have legal, ethical and financial implications. Adaptive trial designs are also increasingly discussed. However, adaptive should not be used as euphemism for the repurposing of a failed trial; rather it requires carefully planning and specification before a trial starts. Adaptive licensing can be a counter-part of adaptive trial design. The use of Big Data is another opportunity to leverage existing information into knowledge useable for drug discovery and development. Respecting limitations of informed consent and privacy is a key challenge in the use of Big Data. Speakers and participants at the symposium were convinced that appropriate use of the above new options may indeed help to increase the efficiency of future drug development.

  1. Developing health systems research capacities through north-south partnership: An evaluation of collaboration with South Africa and Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pitayarangsarit Siriwan

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the past ten years, calls to strengthen health systems research capacities in low and middle income countries have increased. One mechanism for capacity development is the partnering of northern and southern institutions. However, detailed case-studies of north-south partnerships, at least in the domain of health systems research, remain limited. This study aims to evaluate the partnerships developed between the Health Economics and Financing Programme of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and three research partners in South Africa and Thailand to strengthen health economics-related research capacity. Methods Data from programme documents were collected over five years to measure quantitative indicators of capacity development. Qualitative data were obtained from 25 in-depth interviews with programme staff from South Africa, Thailand and London. Results and Discussion Five years of formal partnership resulted in substantial strengthening of individual research skills and moderate instituonalised strengthening in southern partner institutions. Activities included joint proposals, research and articles, staff exchange and post-graduate training. In Thailand, individual capacities were built through post-graduate training and the partner institution developed this as part of a package aimed at retaining young researchers at the institution. In South Africa, local post-graduate teaching programs were strengthened, regular staff visits/exchanges initiated and maintained and funding secured for several large-scale, multi-partner projects. These activities could not have been achieved without good personal relationships between members of the partner institutions, built on trust developed over twenty years. In South Africa, a critical factor was the joint appointment of a London staff member on long-term secondment to one of the partner institutions. Conclusion As partnerships mature the needs of partners

  2. Activating the Zone of Proximal Development of Japanese Language Learners: Language-Exchange Partnerships (LEPs at an Australian University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromi Nishioka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines how social interactions in language-exchange partnership sessions can create opportunities for Japanese language learners to use and learn Japanese. The participants in this study were two pairs, consisting of a Japanese native speaker and an Australian studying Japanese at an Australian university. This study, employing Vygotsky’s Zone of Proximal Development and assistance to novices by experts, examined what factors enable participants in language-exchange partnerships to provide or receive language assistance within Japanese language learners’ zones of proximal development. As a result of the analysis, this study identified two important factors that had this effect: using shared learning experience in language-exchange partnerships, and actively negotiating the level of assistance. Language-exchange partnerships are a new type of learning experience for many participants. It can be anticipated that some participants may struggle to interact and learn from the interaction in the sessions. Therefore, this paper will provide pedagogical suggestions to improve interactions and learning outcomes from language-exchange partnerships. Moreover, suggestions for future research directions are presented in the conclusion of this paper.

  3. Crossing Borders: A Qualitative Study of How Occupational Therapy Educators and Scholars Develop and Sustain Global Partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witchger Hansen, Anne Marie

    2015-09-01

    The World Federation of Occupational Therapists (WFOT) and the American Occupational Therapy Association promote a globally connected profession that responds to the needs of our diverse societies. Global partnerships are grounded on the principle that cross-cultural experiences are enriching and provide mutual benefits. The purpose of this study was to uncover how occupational therapy educators and scholars perceive and experience (1) developing and sustaining global partnerships and (2) lessons learned. In this qualitative study, 30 occupational therapy educators and researchers completed an online survey. Eight participated in an interview. Results found major themes that help develop and sustain partnerships: building relationship of trust and respect, communicating effectively, cultivating cultural competence, sharing power and resources with collaborators and creating a context for reciprocal learning. Lessons learned include a call to walking humbly, building relationships of trust and respect, establishing open and honest communication, supporting local solutions to local problems, ensuring equality of resources and learning from their global partners. The findings suggest that global partnerships have the potential to transform both partners if the partners engage with mutual understanding and respect. Limitations of this study include a small sample size and participant's pool limited to occupational therapists from United States. Recommendations for future research include qualitative studies to identify model occupational therapy programmes that sustain global partnerships using a diverse sample of international occupational therapy educators and researchers. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. The Ingredients of a Public-Private Partnership in Education: The Global Development Alliance Model School Expansion Project in Nicaragua

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galisson, Kirsten; Brady, Kristin

    2006-01-01

    In May 2001, U.S. Secretary of State Colin Powell announced the establishment of the Global Development Alliance (GDA) as a key part of a new business model for the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). The GDA initiative aims to launch best practices in public-private partnerships around the world. The model is designed to…

  5. National Clean Fleets Partnership (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-01-01

    Provides an overview of Clean Cities National Clean Fleets Partnership (NCFP). The NCFP is open to large private-sector companies that have fleet operations in multiple states. Companies that join the partnership receive customized assistance to reduce petroleum use through increased efficiency and use of alternative fuels. This initiative provides fleets with specialized resources, expertise, and support to successfully incorporate alternative fuels and fuel-saving measures into their operations. The National Clean Fleets Partnership builds on the established success of DOE's Clean Cities program, which reduces petroleum consumption at the community level through a nationwide network of coalitions that work with local stakeholders. Developed with input from fleet managers, industry representatives, and Clean Cities coordinators, the National Clean Fleets Partnership goes one step further by working with large private-sector fleets.

  6. Africa and The Philosophy of the New Partnership For Africa’s Development (NEPAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shittu Raji

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This work examined the task of developing Africa within the framework of the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD with a view to evaluating the philosophical implications of the Programme for sustainable development in the continent. Findings from the research through exploratory technique showed that the NEPAD philosophy is primarily anchored on the African ownership and management of its development process owing to the continent’s conviction that no development paradigm can succeed optimally unless it is built on what its people genuinely require, understand and overwhelmingly control. The paper therefore concluded that there is no country that can escape from the process because the contemporary global imperative to development is premised on sufficient funding, adequate knowledge of scientific and technological know-how, all of which are the drivers and hallmark of neo-liberalism and globalization process. Africa thus needs to align its development philosophy with the global best practices in order to achieve the best for its citizens. There is also the need for the continent to re-negotiate the neo-liberal contents in the NEPAD document to make the programme more relevant and more responsive to the development aspirations of Africans.

  7. Gascoyne Growers Market: a sustainable health promotion activity developed in partnership with the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payet, Jennifer; Gilles, Marisa; Howat, Peter

    2005-10-01

    To explore the social, health and economic impact of a farmers' market on a small rural community in the north of Western Australia. Qualitative and quantitative research using a random structured intercept survey, and focus group interviews around four domains of social capital: economic impact, governance and capacity building, healthy public places and social and civic participation. The Gascoyne Growers Markets in Carnarvon. One hundred consumers and 28 market stallholders. Consumers demonstrated community pride and an increase in fruit and vegetable consumption since they commenced shopping at the markets. The stallholders appear to have gained economically, professionally and socially from the market experience. The Gascoyne Growers Markets demonstrate a sustainable health promotion activity developed in partnership with the community. It has contributed to the local economy, providing local quality fruit and vegetables directly to the community while also increasing social capital and creating a healthy public space.

  8. Research and Development Trends of Car Networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Li, Zhixiong; Xie, Guotao

    With the rapid development of the world economy, road transport has become increasingly busy. An unexpected incident would cause serious traffic disaster due to traffic accidents. To solve this problem, the intelligent transportation system (ITS), which is important for the health developments of the city transportation, has become a hot topic. The car networking provides a new way for intelligent transportation system. It can ensure intelligent control and monitoring of urban road with high performance. This paper described the concept of car networking and related technology both in oversea and domestic. The importance of car networking to achieve vehicle and details of the car networking related technologies were illustrated firstly. Then, attentions focus on the research nodus of the car networking. Lastly, the development trend of car networking research was discussed.

  9. Development of the Critical Care Pharmacotherapy Trials Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Seth R; Abraham, Prasad E; Barletta, Jeffrey F; Brophy, Gretchen M; Erstad, Brian L; Gonzales, Jeffrey P; Haas, Curtis E; MacLaren, Robert; Mueller, Eric W; Olsen, Keith M; Lat, Ishaq

    2017-03-01

    The development of the Critical Care Pharmacotherapy Trials Network (CCPTN) as a model for practice-based pharmacotherapy research is described. The CCPTN was formed in 2010 as a collaborative research network dedicated to scientific investigation in the field of critical care pharmacotherapy. The CCPTN organizational structure is consistent with many professional pharmacy and interdisciplinary organizations and organized into 3 primary domains: executive committee, working committees, and network membership. The network membership consists of critical care investigators dedicated to the mission and vision of the CCPTN and is open to anyone expressing an interest in contributing to high-level research. Network member sites represent the breadth of U.S. critical care practice environments. In addition, network members include individuals with demonstrated expertise in patient safety, administration, research design, grantsmanship, database management, peer review, and scientific writing. In 2015, there were more than 100 site investigators from around the United States and Canada. Projects to date have yielded numerous abstracts, platform presentations, and peer-reviewed publications in high-impact journals. The CCPTN has expanded to form collaborations with researchers in the United Kingdom, Australia, and New Zealand. The CCPTN has identified new potential partnerships and field-based areas for inquiry. Numerous opportunities for continued growth and scientific inquiry in the field of critical care pharmacotherapy research exist for the CCPTN to foster in the coming years. The CCPTN has been a successful model for practice-based pharmacotherapy research and assists its members in expanding critical care pharmacotherapy knowledge. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Open Development: Networked Innovations in International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2013-12-12

    Dec 12, 2013 ... The emergence of open networked models made possible by digital technology has the potential to transform international development. Open network structures allow people to come together to share information, organize, and collaborate. Open development harnesses this power to create new ...

  11. Working in Boundary Practices: Identity Development and Learning in Partnerships for Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waitoller, Federico R.; Kozleski, Elizabeth B.

    2013-01-01

    There has been an increasing trend to promote partnerships for inclusive education that share responsibility for teachers' and students' learning. Yet, the complexities of collaborating across institutions and professions as well as the identity work that goes with it has been under theorized in inclusive education partnerships. Drawing from…

  12. School District and University Leadership Development Collaborations: How Do Three Partnerships Line up with Best Practices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Zollie, Jr.; Shetley, Pamela R.

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the application of Whitaker, King, and Vogel's (2004) best practices for the implementation of partnerships regarding school leadership preparation programs in 3 school district-university collaboratives located in urban settings with large minority student populations. The 3 partnerships studied include the Nashville…

  13. A Needs Assessment to Develop Community Partnerships: Initial Steps Working with a Major Agricultural Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Ashley; Bezyak, Jill; Gilbert, Elizabeth; Trice, April

    2011-01-01

    Background: "Healthy People 2010" identified community partnership as one of the most effective strategies in eliminating health disparities and considered it a critical element in improving an individual's quality of life. To be effective at engaging communities in partnerships, an initial community based needs assessment is…

  14. Defining Health Research for Development: The perspective of stakeholders from an international health research partnership in Ghana and Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Claire Leonie; Shaw, David; Anane-Sarpong, Evelyn; Sankoh, Osman; Tanner, Marcel; Elger, Bernice

    2017-05-03

    The study uses a qualitative empirical method to define Health Research for Development. This project explores the perspectives of stakeholders in an international health research partnership operating in Ghana and Tanzania. We conducted 52 key informant interviews with major stakeholders in an international multicenter partnership between GlaxoSmithKline (GSK, Vaccine Developer) and the global health nonprofit organisation PATH and its Malaria Vaccine Initiative program (PATH/MVI, Funder-Development Partner), (RTS, S) (NCT00866619). The respondents included teams from four clinical research centres (two centres in Ghana and two in Tanzania) and various collaborating partners. This paper analyses responses to the question: What is Health Research for Development? Based on the stakeholders' experience the respondents offered many ways of defining Health Research for Development. The responses fell into four broad themes: i) Equitable Partnerships; ii) System Sustainability; iii) Addressing Local Health Targets, and iv) Regional Commitment to Benefit Sharing. Through defining Health Research for Development six key learning points were generated from the four result themes: 1) Ensure there is local research leadership working with the collaborative partnership, and local healthcare system, to align the project agenda and activities with local research and health priorities; 2) Know the country-specific context - map the social, health, legislative and political setting; 3) Define an explicit development component and plan of action in a research project; 4) Address the barriers and opportunities to sustain system capacity. 5) Support decentralised health system decision-making to facilitate the translation pathway; 6) Govern, monitor and evaluate the development components of health research partnerships. Overall, equity and unity between partners are required to deliver health research for development. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Public-Private Partnerships and the Role of Universities in "Sustainable Development"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehmann, Martin; Christensen, Per; Hansen, Jens Aage

    2006-01-01

    The notion of Public-Private Partnerships has on several occasions been heralded as one of the pivotal mechanisms for a move towards more sustainable societies. Through such partnerships it is suggested that major stakeholders (governments, NGOs, international organisations, and the private sector......) can address common societal aims while utilising each others' specific strengths and compensating own weaknesses. In this context, what is or could be the role of universities? This paper addresses the concept of public-private partnerships and discusses the role of universities if and when actively...... participating in ‘life outside the ivory tower’. Three cases are presented to underline the importance of what is signified as Public-Private-Academic Partnerships (PPAP). It is argued that mediation is a major function of universities in such partnerships, including both provision of new knowledge...

  16. Developing Personal Network Business Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saugstrup, Dan; Henten, Anders

    2006-01-01

    on the 'state of the art' in the field of business modeling. Furthermore, the paper suggests three generic business models for PNs: a service oriented model, a self-organized model, and a combination model. Finally, examples of relevant services and applications in relation to three different cases......The aim of the paper is to examine the issue of business modeling in relation to personal networks, PNs. The paper builds on research performed on business models in the EU 1ST MAGNET1 project (My personal Adaptive Global NET). The paper presents the Personal Network concept and briefly reports...... are presented and analyzed in light of business modeling of PN....

  17. Developing a best practice model for partnership practice between specialist palliative care and intellectual disability services: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Dorry; Barr, Owen; McIlfatrick, Sonja; McConkey, Roy

    2014-12-01

    The lack of access to good quality palliative care for people with intellectual disabilities is highlighted in the international literature. In response, more partnership practice in end-of-life care is proposed. This study aimed to develop a best practice model to guide and promote partnership practice between specialist palliative care and intellectual disability services. A mixed methods research design involving two phases was used, underpinned by a conceptual model for partnership practice. Phase 1 involved scoping end-of-life care to people with intellectual disability, based on self-completed questionnaires. In all, 47 of 66 (71.2%) services responded. In Phase 2, semi-structured interviews were undertaken with a purposive sample recruited of 30 health and social care professionals working in intellectual disability and palliative care services, who had provided palliative care to someone with intellectual disability. For both phases, data were collected from primary and secondary care in one region of the United Kingdom. In Phase 1, examples of good practice were apparent. However, partnership practice was infrequent and unmet educational needs were identified. Four themes emerged from the interviews in Phase 2: challenges and issues in end-of-life care, sharing and learning, supporting and empowering and partnership in practice. Joint working and learning between intellectual disability and specialist palliative care were seen as key and fundamental. A framework for partnership practice between both services has been developed which could have international applicability and should be explored with other services in end-of-life care. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Intersectoral partnerships constitution, framework for Serbian tourism competitiveness growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jegdić Vaso

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Intersectoral partnership is a means of strategic management that incorporates economical, social and environmental developmental aims. The Serbian tourist industry is characterized by numerous small and average-sized enterprises with limited resources for research, development, marketing and other investments. That requires addressing other subjects (stakeholders. By establishing partnership networks and clusters, stakeholders acquire necessary means and get opportunities for the development and improvement of competition of tourist products and destinations.

  19. Lessons Learned from the Evolution of an Academic Community Partnership: Creating "Patient Voices".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Meghan K; Ireland, Anna; D'Aniello, Rona; Lipnicki, Stephanie; Glick, Myron; Tumiel-Berhalter, Laurene

    2015-01-01

    Long-term partners received federal funding to develop the Patient Voices Network, a partnership of safety-net family practices and their patients to develop health improvement strategies. The scope and structure of the newly funded grant presented unexpected challenges that threatened the future of the partnership.Purpose of Article: To present a case study of the evolution of an existing partnership and offer lessons learned along with recommendations for future partnerships. Federal funding formalized the partnership in a way that required looking at it through a new lens. Leadership, programmatic, personnel, and financial challenges emerged. Short-term and long-term strategies were applied to address evolving needs. This case study demonstrates how federal funding raises the bar for academic-community partnerships and how challenges can be worked through, particularly if the partnership embraces the key principles of community-based participatory research (CBPR). Recommendations have been applied successfully to future initiatives.

  20. A Social Partnership Model to Promote Educators' Development in Mauritius through Formal and Informal Capacity-Building Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santally, Mohammad Issack; Cooshna-Naik, Dorothy; Conruyt, Noel; Wing, Caroline Koa

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a social partnership model based on the living lab concept to promote the professional development of educators through formal and informal capacity-building initiatives. The aim is to have a broader impact on society through community outreach educational initiatives. A Living Lab is an environment for user-centered…

  1. Partnerships: An Alternative Development Strategy. Inter-American Foundation 2000 in Review, October 1, 1999 to September 30, 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Duncan, Ed.

    The Inter-American Foundation (IAF), an independent agency of the U.S. government, works in Latin America and the Caribbean to promote equitable, participatory, and sustainable self-help development by awarding grants directly to local organizations. Its principal strategy is to support public-private partnerships that mobilize local, national,…

  2. iPads and Teacher Education: Exploring a 1:1 Initiative in a Professional Development School Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourlam, Daniel J.; Montgomery, Sarah E.

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the experiences of elementary education teacher candidates in a Professional Development School Partnership that included a 1:1 iPad initiative. The teacher candidates in the year-long cohort were each given their own iPad to use in their coursework and field experience. Observation, survey, and interview data were collected to…

  3. Contemporary Developments in Wireless Sensor Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Sangeeta Mittal; Alok Aggarwal; S.L. Maskara

    2012-01-01

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) since their inception, a decade ago, have grown well in research and implementation. In this work the developments in WSNs are reported in three sub areas of wireless sensor networks that is, wireless sensor node (hardware and software), Communication & Networking issues in WSNs and application areas. WSNs are characterized by huge data hence research work in aggregation & mining is also discussed. Contemporary issues of integration of WSNs with other prevalent ...

  4. The role of the transport sector in the new partnership for Africa’s development (nepad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. N. Mouchili

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available For many years Africa has presented a gloomy socio-economic picture. The problems Africa faces are so complex and interlinked that a holistic approach is needed to address the issues. Africa is increasingly being marginalised from world development. It accounts for only about 2% of the world total economic exchanges (UNECA, 2000. The New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD is an initiative by African leaders to inspire political stability and address shortages in infrastructure, education and health in an attempt to end misery across Africa and launch its sustainable development. Inadequate infrastructure is a critical obstacle to intra-African trade and to the competitiveness of African products in international markets. Transport can facilitate the flow of people, ideas and technology. Bridging the transport infrastructure gap is therefore an important factor in unlocking the human and economic potential of the continent. NEPAD aims to coordinate and channel regionally fragmented efforts into one core long-term vision for the continent. NEPAD cannot work if there is too much high level strategic regional focus with little involvement of civil society, specific requirements and needs of African countries, and the private sector. It should develop some general high-level objectives and strategies related to transport operations and infrastructure, such as simplifying and harmonising transport regulations, deregulating the air industry and implementing the Yamoussoukro decisions, and focusing investments on transport corridors (road or rail.

  5. Skill Development: Partnerships in Education. Guidelines, an Inventory of Business-Education Partnerships in Alberta and Some Innovative Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberta Teachers Association, Edmonton.

    Canada's ability to take advantage of the opportunities and mitigate the difficulties presented by today's economic, cultural, and social changes and global competition depends on the education and skill development of its youth. Meeting these challenges requires a common purpose involving students, parents, businesses, educators and others. To…

  6. Lopsided business partnerships: An ex-post study of Danida's Private Sector Development Programme in India

    OpenAIRE

    Folke, Steen

    2009-01-01

    The study examines the implementation and outcome of the second phase of the Private Sector programme in India 1996-2003. The programme funded partnerships between Danish and Indian firms with a total grant of 74 million DKK (in phase II). The study investigates the results of PS support to 23 partnerships between Danish and Indian firms, constituting 65 pct. of all supported partnerships. Nine of the Danish firms were small or medium-sized, while 14 were large, often among the largest firms ...

  7. Partnership for development: A peer mentorship model for PhD students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewinski, Allison A; Mann, Tara; Flores, Dalmacio; Vance, Ashlee; Bettger, Janet Prvu; Hirschey, Rachel

    Formal mentoring relationships socialize Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) students to their current and future roles as nursing scholars. Despite formal mentoring, some students may desire or benefit from additional mentoring in an informal setting. Informal mentoring complements the one-to-one relationship students develop with a primary faculty mentor or dissertation chair. This manuscript describes the development, implementation, and evaluation of a student-driven, peer mentorship model, titled Partnership for Development. This small group, peer mentorship model was implemented in a PhD program at a School of Nursing during an academic year. Five student peer facilitators organized a total of 32 PhD students, 2 post-doctoral associates, and invited 5 faculty to participate. Data includes pre- and post-implementation surveys completed by the students and peer facilitator field notes. Student reported post-participation benefits included: getting to know faculty in an informal setting (n=6), socializing with students from other cohorts (n=6), and obtaining a sense of camaraderie with other PhD students (n=5). We recommend peer mentorship for other PhD programs as a way to socialize PhD students into the role of nurse scientist and assist students during their tenure as a PhD student. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Gates Malaria Partnership: a consortium approach to malaria research and capacity development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Brian; Bhasin, Amit; Targett, Geoffrey

    2012-05-01

    Recently, there has been a major increase in financial support for malaria control. Most of these funds have, appropriately, been spent on the tools needed for effective prevention and treatment of malaria such as insecticide-treated bed nets, indoor residual spraying and artemisinin combination therapy. There has been less investment in the training of the scientists from malaria-endemic countries needed to support these large and increasingly complex malaria control programmes, especially in Africa. In 2000, with support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Gates Malaria Partnership was established to support postgraduate training of African scientists wishing to pursue a career in malaria research. The programme had three research capacity development components: a PhD fellowship programme, a postdoctoral fellowship programme and a laboratory infrastructure programme. During an 8-year period, 36 African PhD students and six postdoctoral fellows were supported, and two research laboratories were built in Tanzania. Some of the lessons learnt during this project--such as the need to improve PhD supervision in African universities and to provide better support for postdoctoral fellows--are now being applied to a successor malaria research capacity development programme, the Malaria Capacity Development Consortium, and may be of interest to other groups involved in improving postgraduate training in health sciences in African universities. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Developing a stochastic traffic volume prediction model for public-private partnership projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phong, Nguyen Thanh; Likhitruangsilp, Veerasak; Onishi, Masamitsu

    2017-11-01

    Transportation projects require an enormous amount of capital investment resulting from their tremendous size, complexity, and risk. Due to the limitation of public finances, the private sector is invited to participate in transportation project development. The private sector can entirely or partially invest in transportation projects in the form of Public-Private Partnership (PPP) scheme, which has been an attractive option for several developing countries, including Vietnam. There are many factors affecting the success of PPP projects. The accurate prediction of traffic volume is considered one of the key success factors of PPP transportation projects. However, only few research works investigated how to predict traffic volume over a long period of time. Moreover, conventional traffic volume forecasting methods are usually based on deterministic models which predict a single value of traffic volume but do not consider risk and uncertainty. This knowledge gap makes it difficult for concessionaires to estimate PPP transportation project revenues accurately. The objective of this paper is to develop a probabilistic traffic volume prediction model. First, traffic volumes were estimated following the Geometric Brownian Motion (GBM) process. Monte Carlo technique is then applied to simulate different scenarios. The results show that this stochastic approach can systematically analyze variations in the traffic volume and yield more reliable estimates for PPP projects.

  10. Developing aircraft photonic networks for airplane systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    White, Henry J.; Brownjohn, Nick; Baptista, João

    2013-01-01

    Achieving affordable high speed fiber optic communication networks for airplane systems has proved to be challenging. In this paper we describe a summary of the EU Framework 7 project DAPHNE (Developing Aircraft Photonic Networks). DAPHNE aimed to exploit photonic technology from terrestrial comm...

  11. Development and validation of a short version of the Partnership Self-Assessment Tool (PSAT among professionals in Dutch disease-management partnerships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nieboer Anna P

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The extent to which partnership synergy is created within quality improvement programmes in the Netherlands is unknown. In this article, we describe the psychometric testing of the Partnership Self-Assessment Tool (PSAT among professionals in twenty-two disease-management partnerships participating in quality improvement projects focused on chronic care in the Netherlands. Our objectives are to validate the PSAT in the Netherlands and to reduce the number of items of the original PSAT while maintaining validity and reliability. Methods The Dutch version of the PSAT was tested in twenty-two disease-management partnerships with 218 professionals. We tested the instrument by means of structural equation modelling, and examined its validity and reliability. Results After eliminating 14 items, the confirmatory factor analyses revealed good indices of fit with the resulting 15-item PSAT-Short version (PSAT-S. Internal consistency as represented by Cronbach's alpha ranged from acceptable (0.75 for the 'efficiency' subscale to excellent for the 'leadership' subscale (0.87. Convergent validity was provided with high correlations of the partnership dimensions and partnership synergy (ranged from 0.512 to 0.609 and high correlations with chronic illness care (ranged from 0.447 to 0.329. Conclusion The psychometric properties and convergent validity of the PSAT-S were satisfactory rendering it a valid and reliable instrument for assessing partnership synergy and its dimensions of partnership functioning.

  12. Development and validation of a short version of the Partnership Self-Assessment Tool (PSAT) among professionals in Dutch disease-management partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramm, Jane M; Strating, Mathilde Mh; Nieboer, Anna P

    2011-06-30

    The extent to which partnership synergy is created within quality improvement programmes in the Netherlands is unknown. In this article, we describe the psychometric testing of the Partnership Self-Assessment Tool (PSAT) among professionals in twenty-two disease-management partnerships participating in quality improvement projects focused on chronic care in the Netherlands. Our objectives are to validate the PSAT in the Netherlands and to reduce the number of items of the original PSAT while maintaining validity and reliability. The Dutch version of the PSAT was tested in twenty-two disease-management partnerships with 218 professionals. We tested the instrument by means of structural equation modelling, and examined its validity and reliability. After eliminating 14 items, the confirmatory factor analyses revealed good indices of fit with the resulting 15-item PSAT-Short version (PSAT-S). Internal consistency as represented by Cronbach's alpha ranged from acceptable (0.75) for the 'efficiency' subscale to excellent for the 'leadership' subscale (0.87). Convergent validity was provided with high correlations of the partnership dimensions and partnership synergy (ranged from 0.512 to 0.609) and high correlations with chronic illness care (ranged from 0.447 to 0.329). The psychometric properties and convergent validity of the PSAT-S were satisfactory rendering it a valid and reliable instrument for assessing partnership synergy and its dimensions of partnership functioning.

  13. Development and validation of a short version of the Partnership Self-Assessment Tool (PSAT) among professionals in Dutch disease-management partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The extent to which partnership synergy is created within quality improvement programmes in the Netherlands is unknown. In this article, we describe the psychometric testing of the Partnership Self-Assessment Tool (PSAT) among professionals in twenty-two disease-management partnerships participating in quality improvement projects focused on chronic care in the Netherlands. Our objectives are to validate the PSAT in the Netherlands and to reduce the number of items of the original PSAT while maintaining validity and reliability. Methods The Dutch version of the PSAT was tested in twenty-two disease-management partnerships with 218 professionals. We tested the instrument by means of structural equation modelling, and examined its validity and reliability. Results After eliminating 14 items, the confirmatory factor analyses revealed good indices of fit with the resulting 15-item PSAT-Short version (PSAT-S). Internal consistency as represented by Cronbach's alpha ranged from acceptable (0.75) for the 'efficiency' subscale to excellent for the 'leadership' subscale (0.87). Convergent validity was provided with high correlations of the partnership dimensions and partnership synergy (ranged from 0.512 to 0.609) and high correlations with chronic illness care (ranged from 0.447 to 0.329). Conclusion The psychometric properties and convergent validity of the PSAT-S were satisfactory rendering it a valid and reliable instrument for assessing partnership synergy and its dimensions of partnership functioning. PMID:21714931

  14. LEDS Global Partnership in Action: Advancing Climate-Resilient Low Emission Development Around the World (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-11-01

    Many countries around the globe are designing and implementing low emission development strategies (LEDS). These LEDS seek to achieve social, economic, and environmental development goals while reducing long-term greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and increasing resiliency to climate change impacts. The LEDS Global Partnership (LEDS GP) harnesses the collective knowledge and resources of more than 120 countries and international donor and technical organizations to strengthen climate-resilient low emission development efforts around the world.

  15. THE EUROPEAN UNION AND PARTNERSHIPS WITH DEVELOPING COUNTRIES – THE CASE OF ACP REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viera Dobošová

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The EU has developed a wide cooperation network with developing countries based on trade, cooperation, aid and other aspects. These bilateral and regional agreements serve various and specific interests of the EU and the concerned countries and cover not only trade, but also other broad issues. However, above those remain the main goals of the EU in the area of the common commercial policy, development policy and external relations policy. The trend of regional integration and regional trade agreements proliferation has influenced these relations as well. The article will examine this trend in the network of EU trade agreements with developing countries, specifically with the African, Caribbean and Pacific region. Some critical issues of the EU – ACP cooperation will be identified.

  16. PUBLIC POLICY, CHILD DEVELOPMENT RESEARCH AND BOYS AT RISK: CHALLENGING, ENDURING AND NECESSARY PARTNERSHIP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckinney, Marvin; Fitzgerald, Hiram E; Winn, Donna-Marie; Babcock, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Research findings documenting the issues and challenges of boys prebirth through age 5 years have barely penetrated the arena of public policy making nor has it permeated the public agenda of politicians, government, or other funding stakeholders. The purpose of this article is to articulate pathways for researchers to enter into the policy-making process. We review critical issues related to implementing the process of public policy. We argue that the policy process needs to be informed by more dynamic theoretical models of human development, and that researchers and clinicians need to be exposed more deeply to the processes required to inform and subsequently change public policy. We contend that most quantitative research on boys at risk occurs at the micro- and the mesosystem level rather than at the exo- and the macrosystem levels where structural societal policies embedded in economic and racial inequities contribute to risk. Researchers, clinicians, and policy makers need to create collaborative partnerships designed to develop, advocate, and implement more evidence-based policies designed to enhance the quality of life for boys at risk. © 2017 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  17. Developing networks to support science teachers work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillasen, Martin Krabbe; Valero, Paola

    2012-01-01

    In educational research literature constructing networks among practitioners has been suggested as a strategy to support teachers’ professional development (Huberman, 1995; Jackson & Temperley, 2007; Van Driel, Beijaard, & Verloop, 2001). The purpose of this paper is to report on a study about how...... networks provide opportunities for teachers from different schools to collaborate on improving the quality of their own science teaching practices. These networks exist at the meso-level of the educational system between the micro-realities of teachers’ individual practice and the macro-level, where...... to develop collaborative activities in primary science teacher communities in schools to improve individual teachers practice and in networks between teachers from different schools in each municipality. Each network was organized and moderated by a municipal science coordinator....

  18. Product Platform Development in Industrial Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Christer; Skold, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The article examines the strategic issues involved in the deployment of product platform development in an industrial network. The move entails identifying the types and characteristics of generically different product platform strategies and clarifying strategic motives and differences. Number...

  19. Learning Networks for Professional Development & Lifelong Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloep, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Sloep, P. B. (2009). Learning Networks for Professional Development & Lifelong Learning. Presentation at a NeLLL seminar with Etienne Wenger held at the Open Universiteit Nederland. September, 10, 2009, Heerlen, The Netherlands.

  20. South Asian Network for Development and Environmental ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    SANDEE) is a regional network that seeks to strengthen research capacity in the area of poverty, economic development and environmental change in seven countries (Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Nepal, Pakistan, Maldives and Sri Lanka). It does so ...

  1. Gene Regulation Networks for Modeling Drosophila Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mjolsness, E.

    1999-01-01

    This chapter will very briefly introduce and review some computational experiments in using trainable gene regulation network models to simulate and understand selected episodes in the development of the fruit fly, Drosophila Melanogaster.

  2. Development of the Global Measles Laboratory Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Featherstone, David; Brown, David; Sanders, Ray

    2003-05-15

    The routine reporting of suspected measles cases and laboratory testing of samples from these cases is the backbone of measles surveillance. The Global Measles Laboratory Network (GMLN) has developed standards for laboratory confirmation of measles and provides training resources for staff of network laboratories, reference materials and expertise for the development and quality control of testing procedures, and accurate information for the Measles Mortality Reduction and Regional Elimination Initiative. The GMLN was developed along the lines of the successful Global Polio Laboratory Network, and much of the polio laboratory infrastructure was utilized for measles. The GMLN has developed as countries focus on measles control activities following successful eradication of polio. Currently more than 100 laboratories are part of the global network and follow standardized testing and reporting procedures. A comprehensive laboratory accreditation process will be introduced in 2002 with six quality assurance and performance indicators.

  3. NC truck network model development research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    This research develops a validated prototype truck traffic network model for North Carolina. The model : includes all counties and metropolitan areas of North Carolina and major economic areas throughout the : U.S. Geographic boundaries, population a...

  4. Ideologies, Strategies and Higher Education Development: A Comparison of China's University Partnerships with the Soviet Union and Africa over Space and Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun

    2017-01-01

    University partnerships have been a key dimension of higher education development. Based on documentary analysis and empirical data, this study compares two distinctive models of university partnership experienced by China, first as a "recipient" with the Soviet Union in the 1950s and later as a "provider" with African…

  5. Partnership with informal education learning centers to develop hands-on activities for research outreach efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courville, Z.; Haynes, R.; DeFrancis, G.; Koh, S.; Ringelberg, D.

    2012-12-01

    Outreach informed by scientific research plays an important role in fostering interest in science by making science and scientists accessible, fun, and interesting. Developing an interest in science in young, elementary-aged students through outreach is a rewarding endeavor for researchers, in that audiences are usually receptive, requirements for broader impacts are met, and bonds are formed between researchers and members of their local and surrounding communities. Promoting such interest among young students is imperative not only for an individual researcher's own self interest, but also for the strength of American science and innovation moving forward, and is the responsibility of the current generation of scientists. Developing genuine and successful inquiry-based, hands-on activities for elementary-aged students is outside the expertise of many researchers. Partnering with an informal education learning center (i.e. science museum or after-school program) provides researchers with the expertise they might be lacking in such endeavors. Here, we present a series of polar-, engineering- and microbiology-themed hands-on activities that have been developed by researchers at a government lab in partnership with a local science museum. Through a series of workshops, the science education staff at the museum provided researchers with background and instruction on inquiry and hands-on activities, and then collaborated with the researchers to develop activities which were later demonstrated at the museum to museum-goers. Education staff provided feedback about the presentation of the activities for further refinement. The program provided an opportunity for researchers to develop fun, on-target and age-appropriate science activities for elementary-aged students, an audience for outreach, and enabled general public audiences the chance to interact with researchers and scientists in an informal setting.

  6. Public-Private Partnerships: an International Development vis a vis Indonesia Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizal Yaya

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available For more than two decades, Public Private Partnerships (PPP had developed worldwide as an instrument to procure public infrastructure where government funds are limited. This practice supports the covergent theory of the public and private sector. Indonesia experience with PPP follows most of what had been done by countries overseas with some deviations. The main reasons for going for PPP for Indonesia government is to fill the gap in finance and capability in procuring the infrastructure. Unofficial reason such as for off-balance sheet and ideological is not relevant. Up to now, the Government only allow investment in hard economic infrastructure. Instead of using pure private finance, Indonesia Government facilitates public funds either from Central Government or Local Governments to finance PPP projects. In most cases, this involvement is because of marginality of the project. This results in the condition where the Government still has dominant role in the existing PPP projects. Compared to the PPP framework in other countries like in the UK, Indonesia PPP lacks of attention on output specification and risk transfer. This may be because of lacking of experiences as well as due to high degree of Government involvement. Rigorous policy is needed in this area to ensure Government to achieve better value for money.

  7. Fostering SMART partnerships to develop an effective continuum of behavioral health services and supports in schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruns, Eric J; Duong, Mylien T; Lyon, Aaron R; Pullmann, Michael D; Cook, Clayton R; Cheney, Douglas; McCauley, Elizabeth

    2016-03-01

    The education sector offers compelling opportunities to address the shortcomings of traditional mental health delivery systems and to prevent and treat youth mental, emotional, and behavioral (MEB) problems. Recognizing that social and emotional wellness is intrinsically related to academic success, schools are moving to adopt multi-tier frameworks based on the public health model that provide a continuum of services to all children, including services to address both academic and MEB problems. In this article, we review the potential value of multi-tier frameworks in facilitating access to, and increasing the effectiveness of, mental health services in schools, and review the empirical support for school-based mental health interventions by tier. We go on to describe a community-academic partnership between the Seattle Public Schools and the University of Washington School Mental Health Assessment, Research, and Training (SMART) Center that exemplifies how multi-tier educational frameworks, research and evidence, and purposeful collaboration can combine to improve development and implementation of a range of school-based strategies focused on MEB needs of students. Finally, we present a set of 10 recommendations that may help guide other research and practice improvement efforts to address MEB problems in youth through effective school mental health programming. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Global Development Network: Supporting Global Research Capacity

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Global Development Network (GDN) is an international organization focused on building research capacity in development. Founded in 1999, GDN is ... The Centre for Research and Technology Development (RESTECH) is a two-year-old science and technology research centre at Maseno University in western Kenya.

  9. Networked Resources, Assessment and Collection Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Sue; Derry, Sebastian; Eggleston, Holly

    2004-01-01

    This project provides a critical evaluation of networked resources as they relate to the library's collection development policy, identifies areas of the curriculum not well represented, establishes a reliable method of assessing usage across all resources, and develops a framework of quantitative data for collection development decision making.

  10. The creation of regional partnerships for regional emergency planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Laura; Myers, Larry; Grant, Lorna

    2010-11-01

    Regional partnerships for regional emergency planning are relationships developed between disparate emergency planning stakeholders from multiple jurisdictions and with different missions. Regional partnerships are essential for the management of limited resources and for responding to large-scale disasters that can overwhelm local resources. Emergency response planners develop these partnerships as needs develop within their own jurisdictions or in response to lessons learned from previous disaster responses. This paper discusses a model process for developing or enhancing an all-hazards regional emergency planning network to create regional collaboration and resource allocation. This model process can be adapted and customised in any community to develop partnerships between communities, public agencies, non-governmental organisations, faith-based organisations and the private sector within a region. The model process and how to use it in communities will be discussed, including a qualitative analysis of its application.

  11. Interregional Partnership of Russia as a Tool of Realization of National Priorities of its Economic Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E L Andreeva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of interregional economic partnership existing simultaneously with the concept of traditional regionalism is proposed in the article. The cases of Trans-Pacific strategic economic partnership agreement (TPSEPA which is created already for some decades; Transpacific agreement on strategic and economic partnership plan (2012, under which the US and the EU are going to form a Transatlantic FTA (TAFTA; initiative of Asia and Pacific countries (presented at the summit of these countries in 2012 to form a Regional comprehensive economic partnership (RCEP are described. The case of BRICS is analyzed in details. The economic factors joining the countries - participants of the group are analyzed. The prospects of broadening of its partnership - with participation of economies of South America are highlighted. Russian external trade is touched by machinery production and accompanying services with the countries-partners mentioned. It’s shown that these economic relations can be used by Russia for solving of the tasks of substitution of import, neo-industrialization and export stimulating.

  12. Innovation Networks: the Contribution of Partnerships to Innovative Performance of Firms in the Brazilian Electrical-Electronics Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvye Ane Massaini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Innovation networks have been identified in the literature as a way to complement firms’ innovative capabilities through collaboration with other partners. To provide empirical evidence for this assertion, this paper investigates the contribution of partners established in innovation networks for innovative performance of firms in the Brazilian electricalelectronics industry. For this purpose, we carried out an exploratory and descriptive survey among 185 companies. The data were analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM. As the main findings, we observed that the establishment of collaborative relationships with customers, competitors and universities/research institutions can contribute to organizational and process innovation. However, despite obtaining some significant results concerning the contribution of different partners in the network, electrical-electronics industry companies also attach great importance to internal activities to develop their innovations.

  13. Developing and sustaining community-academic partnerships: lessons from Downstate New York Healthy Start.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merzel, Cheryl; Burrus, Gail; Davis, Jean; Moses, Ngozi; Rumley, Sharon; Walters, Dionna

    2007-10-01

    Partnering with communities is a critical aspect of contemporary health promotion. Linkages between universities and communities are particularly significant, given the prominence of academic institutions in channeling grants. This article describes the collaboration between a school of public health and several community-based organizations on a maternal and infant health grant project. The partnership serves as a model for ways in which a university and community organizations can interrelate and interact. Central lessons include the significance of sharing values and goals, the benefit of drawing on the different strengths of each partner, the gap created by the university's institutional focus on research rather than service and advocacy, and the strains created by power inequities and distribution of funds. A key element of the partnership's success is the emphasis on capacity building and colearning. The project demonstrates the potential of employing community-academic partnerships as a valuable mechanism for implementing community-based health promotion programs.

  14. Innovation and network development of logistics firms

    OpenAIRE

    Cui, Lianguang

    2011-01-01

    This compilation thesis consists of a cover and five appended articles. The research purpose of this thesis is to investigate the third party logistics phenomena from the logistics firm’s perspective with a focus on logistics innovation and network development. The thesis applies a qualitative research method and employs multiple case studies. Resource-based view, industrial network approach and strategy-as-practice perspective have been applied and combined to analyze the empirical findings....

  15. Public-Private Partnerships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehmann, Martin; Jeppesen, S.

    2006-01-01

    Public-private partnerships in the environmental field have emerged as one option in the pursuit of sustainable development. So-called ‘Green Networks’, ‘Cleaner Production Centres’, ‘Waste Minimisation Clubs’ are among others highlighted as alternatives to governmental regulation. While being...... promoted as an option for governments in the South to make up for lack of sufficient environmental legislation and enforcement, the majority of these examples, however, stem from countries in the North. Uncritical transfer of such concepts to contexts in the South along with substantial, external donor...... funding have in many cases led to disappointing outcomes. The authors discuss key factors in the institutional set-up and the importance of institutional carriers for the potential success of Green Networks in the South. With reference to ongoing initiatives in Thailand, the authors assess...

  16. Development of Network Synchronization Predicts Language Abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doesburg, Sam M; Tingling, Keriann; MacDonald, Matt J; Pang, Elizabeth W

    2016-01-01

    Synchronization of oscillations among brain areas is understood to mediate network communication supporting cognition, perception, and language. How task-dependent synchronization during word production develops throughout childhood and adolescence, as well as how such network coherence is related to the development of language abilities, remains poorly understood. To address this, we recorded magnetoencephalography while 73 participants aged 4-18 years performed a verb generation task. Atlas-guided source reconstruction was performed, and phase synchronization among regions was calculated. Task-dependent increases in synchronization were observed in the theta, alpha, and beta frequency ranges, and network synchronization differences were observed between age groups. Task-dependent synchronization was strongest in the theta band, as were differences between age groups. Network topologies were calculated for brain regions associated with verb generation and were significantly associated with both age and language abilities. These findings establish the maturational trajectory of network synchronization underlying expressive language abilities throughout childhood and adolescence and provide the first evidence for an association between large-scale neurophysiological network synchronization and individual differences in the development of language abilities.

  17. Networked Economies | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Digital innovations are transforming the global South. Sustainable and inclusive economic growth requires developing countries to capitalize on these innovations and address new and pressing governance challenges. While expanding access to the Internet around the world is sparking entrepreneurship, other ...

  18. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2005-01-31

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies and assessment frameworks; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. The groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. Efforts are underway to showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is

  19. The development of brain network architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wierenga, Lara M.; van den Heuvel, Martijn P.; van Dijk, Sarai; Rijks, Yvonne; de Reus, Marcel A.; Durston, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Brain connectivity shows protracted development throughout childhood and adolescence, and, as such, the topology of brain networks changes during this period. The complexity of these changes with development is reflected by regional differences in maturation. This study explored age-related changes

  20. Industry-University Partnerships in the Curriculum: Trends and Developments in OECD Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skilbeck, Malcolm; Connell, Helen

    1996-01-01

    The classic model of universities is changing due to new knowledge needs of industry, technological innovation, convergence of education and the economy, and funding pressures. The growth of industry-higher education partnerships is giving rise to policy issues about the roles and responsibilities of the partners and the government. (SK)

  1. STEAM-y Partnerships: A Case of Interdisciplinary Professional Development and Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelton, Molly L.; Saraniero, Patti

    2018-01-01

    Museum partnerships can involve significant tensions, especially when these collaborations reach across institutions to blend disciplines such as art and mathematics. Rather than simply being obstacles to overcome, we suggest that tensions arising in multi-institutional, cross-disciplinary collaborations can be highly generative for collaborators,…

  2. We Said … We Did!: A Partnership Approach to Developing Library and Student Support Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleton, Leo; Abernethy, Paul

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the UK higher education environment and how increasing student expectations have led to students engaging with their academic institutions as partners. The differences between consumerist and partnership models of engagement are discussed and the article includes a UK-based case study which illustrates how effective student…

  3. Developing University and Community Partnerships: A Critical Piece of Successful Service Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, James; Dominguez, Lynn A.

    2015-01-01

    The partnership between science and the environment in service-learning projects helps students to make greater connections to the world around them. Service learning provides many benefits to students, faculty, and communities within the context of a college course. However, to prevent frustration, it is important for faculty members to make a…

  4. Behind the Rhetoric: Applying a Cultural Theory Lens to Community-Campus Partnership Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kecskes, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    The nature of engagement between American campuses and communities is contested. This article is an invitation to reconsider why community-campus partnerships often look so different and have diverse and sometimes negative outcomes. Using a cultural theory approach (Thompson, Ellis, & Wildavsky, 1990) to elucidate the four main cultural frames…

  5. Developing Collaborative Partnerships with Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Families during the IEP Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Zachary; Sauer, Janet Story; Bui, Oanh; Ou, Susan

    2017-01-01

    Although there has been a consistent vision for multicultural education and family collaboration in teacher preparation programs for decades, collaborative partnerships between culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) families and their children's educators remain elusive (Harry, 2008; Trent, Kea, & Oh, 2008). Family engagement in special…

  6. The Development and Implementation of Successful School-Community Partnerships in Public Elementary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Record, Vincent N.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The study aimed to define common characteristics of successful school-community partnerships supporting the improvement of academic achievement in public elementary schools. Based on the perceptions of elementary school administrators, this study identified important factors of, barriers to, and benefits of successful school-community…

  7. Community-School Partnerships to Support Youth Development. REACH Issue Brief Series. Number Two

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabionar, James; Campbell, David

    2010-01-01

    The influence on youth of schools and communities--working independently or in partnership--raises important questions. How can schools and community groups work strategically to promote changes that meet youth needs? What form do existing interactions take? What benefits and challenges does the interaction pose for schools and their potential…

  8. Student-Faculty Partnership in Explorations of Pedagogical Practice: A Threshold Concept in Academic Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook-Sather, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Student-faculty partnerships position students as informants, participants, and change agents in collaboration with faculty members. Enacting one form of such collaboration, Bryn Mawr College's SaLT program pairs faculty members and undergraduate students in explorations of pedagogical practice. The program provides both context and case study for…

  9. Jumping into the Deep End: Developing Culturally Responsive Urban Teachers through Community-Immersive Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustian, April L.; Lee, Robert E.; Nelson, Carlos; Gamboa-Turner, Valentina; Roule, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    Preparing special educators for the highest-need schools remains an ongoing challenge in urban districts across the United States. One university's collaborative community-based immersive partnership model, with emphasis on service learning, has demonstrated promising levels of impact on candidates' preparation as preservice teachers learning how…

  10. Cross-platform wireless sensor network development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten Tranberg; Kusy, Branislav

    Design and development of wireless sensor network applications adds an additional layer of complexity to traditional computer systems. The developer needs to be an expert in resource constrained embedded devices as well as traditional desktop computers. We propose Tinylnventor, an open......-source development environment that takes a holistic approach to implementing sensor network applications. Users build applications using a drag-and-drop visual programming language Open Blocks, a language that Google selected for its App Inventor for Android. Tinylnventor uses cross-platform programming concepts......, such as threads and common network operations, to provide a unified environment from which it generates application binaries for the respective platforms. We demonstrate through an application example that Tinylnventor is both simple to use and powerful in expressing complex applications....

  11. Business Development of Solid Waste Treatment Technology and Bio-Fertilizer Production through a Danish-Vietnamese Partnership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, David

    , legislative and market context. The findings are useful for researchers and practitioners within the waste sector in Southeast Asian countries. The partnership’s business concept deals with the proposed introduction of improved Danish solid waste separation and treatment technology at a plant in one...... of the outlying suburbs of the Vietnamese capital city of Hanoi, which is dimensioned to be able to treat 30,000 tons municipal solid waste per year. The technology in question involves the highly refined separation of the organic waste fraction into so-called bio-pulp, which only has a 0,01% content of plastic......This paper narrates the process and outcome of the business development maturation phase of a partnership between Danish and Vietnamese businesses in the waste management sector that began in early 2011 and is ongoing. The partnership has been initially facilitated by a university-based support...

  12. Safe school task force: University-community partnership to promote student development and a safer school environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Corey; Chung-Do, Jane; Ongalibang, Ophelia

    2008-01-01

    The Asian/Pacific Islander Youth Violence Prevention Center (APIYVPC) focuses its youth violence prevention efforts on community mobilization by partnering with Kailua High School and other local community groups. This paper describes the development and activities of the Safe School Task Force (SSTF) and the lessons learned. In response to concerns of school, community members, and students, the SSTF was organized to promote student leadership in raising awareness about problems related to violence. Collaboration among the school, community, and the university places students in leadership roles to reduce school violence and enhances their self-efficacy to improve their school environment. To increase SSTF effectiveness, more attention must be paid to student recruitment, consistent community partnerships, and gaining teacher buy-in. This partnership may be useful in multicultural communities to provide students the opportunities to learn about violence prevention strategies, community mobilization, and leadership skills.

  13. 78 FR 17418 - Rural Health Information Technology Network Development Grant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-21

    ... award under the Rural Health Information Technology Network Development Grant (RHITND) to Grace... relinquishing its fiduciary responsibilities for the Rural Health Information Technology Network Development... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Rural Health Information Technology Network...

  14. From Vision to Reality: managing tensions in the development and implementation of an international collaborative partnership programme for institutional change and sustainable development in inclusive education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    David Rose; dr Jan Siska; dr Sulochini Pather; dr Jacqueline van Swet

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this article is to consider the practical implications of international collaborative partnerships between and within Higher Education (HE) institutions in terms of the development of an international programme in Special Needs Education as well as its implementation. We look first at the

  15. Developing Partnerships between Higher Education Faculty, K-12 Science Teachers, and School Administrators via MSP initiatives: The RITES Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulkins, J. L.; Kortz, K. M.; Murray, D. P.

    2011-12-01

    The Rhode Island Technology Enhanced Science Project (RITES) is a NSF-funded Math and Science Partnership (MSP) project that seeks to improve science education. RITES is, at its core, a unique partnership that fosters relationships between middle and high school science teachers, district and school administrators, higher education (HE) faculty members, and science education researchers. Their common goal is to enhance scientific inquiry, increase classroom technology usage, and improve state level science test scores. In one of the more visible examples of this partnership, middle and high school science teachers work closely with HE science faculty partners to design and teach professional development (PD) workshops. The PD sessions focus on technology-enhanced scientific investigations (e.g. use of probes, online simulations, etc.), exemplify inquiry-based instruction, and relate expert content knowledge. Teachers from these sessions express substantial satisfaction in the program, report increased comfort levels in teaching the presented materials (both via post-workshop surveys), and show significant gains in content knowledge (via pre-post assessments). Other benefits to this kind of partnership, in which K-12 and HE teachers are considered equals, include: 1) K-12 teachers are empowered through interactions with HE faculty and other science teachers in the state; 2) HE instructors become more informed not only about good pedagogical practices, but also practical aspects of teaching science such as engaging students; and 3) the PD sessions tend to be much stronger than ones designed and presented solely by HE scientists, for while HE instructors provide content expertise, K-12 teachers provide expertise in K-12 classroom practice and implementation. Lastly, the partnership is mutually beneficial for the partners involved because both sides learn practical ways to teach science and inquiry at different levels. In addition to HE faculty and K-12 science teacher

  16. Discrete fracture network code development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dershowitz, W.; Doe, T.; Shuttle, D.; Eiben, T.; Fox, A.; Emsley, S.; Ahlstrom, E. [Golder Associates Inc., Redmond, Washington (United States)

    1999-02-01

    This report presents the results of fracture flow model development and application performed by Golder Associates Inc. during the fiscal year 1998. The primary objective of the Golder Associates work scope was to provide theoretical and modelling support to the JNC performance assessment effort in fiscal year 2000. In addition, Golder Associates provided technical support to JNC for the Aespoe project. Major efforts for performance assessment support included extensive flow and transport simulations, analysis of pathway simplification, research on excavation damage zone effects, software verification and cross-verification, and analysis of confidence bounds on Monte Carlo simulations. In addition, a Fickian diffusion algorithm was implemented for Laplace Transform Galerkin solute transport. Support for the Aespoe project included predictive modelling of sorbing tracer transport in the TRUE-1 rock block, analysis of 1 km geochemical transport pathways for Task 5', and data analysis and experimental design for the TRUE Block Scale experiment. Technical information about Golder Associates support to JNC is provided in the appendices to this report. (author)

  17. Developing Partnerships to Expand Interprofessional Practice-Focused Educational Experiences in High-Risk Obstetric Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie L Pott

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare practice is continuing to shift toward interprofessional team-based care to improve the patient experience and the health of populations as well as to reduce the per capita cost of healthcare (National Center for Interprofessional Practice & Education, 2013. In particular, high-risk pregnancy is a uniquely complex healthcare challenge, which makes team- and partnership-based care in this specialty essential (American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists’ Task Force on Collaborative Practice, 2016. Despite healthcare leaders in the United States recognizing the need for collaborative care models and team-based care, the training of healthcare professions students in the skills needed to collaborate effectively as part of an interprofessional team have lagged dramatically behind the changes in current healthcare practices (Interprofessional Education Collaborative [IPEC] Expert Panel, 2011; National Center for Interprofessional Practice & Education, 2015b. A Doctorate of Nursing Practice (DNP Student and a Women’s Health DNP Program faculty identified that there was an opportunity to implement interprofessional practice-focused immersion experiences for advanced practice registered nursing (APRN students at an academic Maternal-Fetal Medicine Center. The faculty and student partnership allowed for the project interventions to be integrated directly into an existing APRN practicum course. This project’s implementation provided an opportunity for the Maternal-Fetal Medicine Center to integrate APRN students into their clinical team, and demonstrated that interprofessional practice-focused immersion experiences are beneficial for students’ learning of how to collaborate effectively as part of an interprofessional team, which is congruent with the research. The Maternal-Fetal Medicine Center embodied many of the components of the domains of interprofessional practice and qualities of a partnership-based system, making it an

  18. Networks (2005) | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-04-25

    Apr 25, 2016 ... From its launch in 1970, IDRC adopted a new approach to providing international development assistance. IDRC's philosophy was to work with the people who hoped to benefit from the aid, and to set research agendas in collaboration with local partners. Networks have been at the core of this cooperative ...

  19. Developer Network : Open Source Personal Digital Assistant ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This grant will allow a network of health application users to review and appraise existing commercial and free software applications. They will convene a technical workshop of users, developers and open source proponents to come up with a prototype application - electronic forms for use on a handheld computer and ...

  20. Comprehensive information system development and networking in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background/Aim: Hospital Information System(HIS) and Networking development is now the most important technology that must be embraced by all hospitals and clinics these days. Patients sometimes used to face problems in order to have quick and good services in the hospitals, often due to delay in searching for the ...

  1. Learning in Networks for Sustainable Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lansu, Angelique; Boon, Jo; Sloep, Peter; Van Dam-Mieras, Rietje

    2010-01-01

    The didactic model of remote internships described in this study provides the flexibility needed to support networked learners, i.e. to facilitate the development and subsequent assessment of their competences. The heterogeneity of the participants (students, employers, tutors) in the learning

  2. Development of a photonics outreach and education program through partnerships at Universidad Metropolitana for Puerto Rico and the IYL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, A.; Friedman, J. S.; Saltares, R.; Gordillo, R.; Trujillo, E.

    2016-09-01

    As the only photonics center in Puerto Rico and the Caribbean we have developed since 2014 and for the International Year of Light 2015 a comprehensive education and outreach program. We show how we have successfully reached an audience of more than 9,500 including K-12 students and teachers, general public, and specialized audiences, by partnering with other institutions and private companies to maximize resources. We present our experience, challenges, rewards and results or our activities and the types of partnerships we developed with institutions and private companies that were fundamental to achieve our goals.

  3. ACADEMIC PARTNERSHIP AND GENERATION OF SCIENTIFIC KNOWLEDGE: THE CASE OF THE INTERNATIONAL NETWORK OF RESEARCHERS ON COMPETITIVENESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Guadalupe Vargas Hernández

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper has the objective to demonstrate the contributions achieved by the International Network of Researchers in Competitiveness (INRCO in academic collaboration and scientific knowledge generation. Part of the assumption sustaining that economic globalization processes, information and communication technologies revolution lead to the increasing environmental complexity and uncertainty of a knowledge society. One answer is the study and analysis of competitiveness considered as the strategy to achieve higher levels of economic growth and socio-cultural development in all micro, meso and macro levels. The method used is the analytic-deductive based on the evidence of related data with the activity and results in publications of the International Network of Researchers in Competitiveness. Consequently, it has been adapted certain speculative notions in a theoretical analysis exploring the social dynamics of the scientific activities. It is concluded that the management of the researchers’ dynamic network is capable to generate, apply and recycle the critical knowledge and the assets of academic and scientific talent through a dynamic combination of resources that have a position inside the formal e informal borders and between these borders of participant academics and institutions.

  4. NETWORKING - THE URBAN AND REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIA NOWICKA-SKOWRON

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of innovations embraces everything that is connected with creation and application of new knowledge in order to win competitive advantage. A traditional approach applied by organizational and management sciences are not enough to explain and manage the development of enterprises as well as that of cities, regions and countries. According to a new approach to innovativeness, creation of innovations depends on a complex/system approach. A phenomenon of particular importance is the approach to network pro-innovation structures from the urban and regional point of view. What makes a network work is a mutual relation between actors who have same rights to access and participate in the network. The whole system must be perceived by every actor. Simultaneously, every actor is partially responsible for the whole. The nature of networking can be understood as a differentiated system of relations (particularly personal ones inside the network. Tolerance and trust are other foundations of information flow and information return.

  5. JOINT-INDUSTRY PARTNERSHIP TO DEVELOP A HOLLOW SPHERE DUAL-GRADIENT DRILLING SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William C. Maurer; Colin Ruan; Greg Deskins

    2003-05-01

    Maurer Technology Inc. (MTI) formed a joint-industry partnership to fund the development of a hollow sphere dual-gradient drilling (DGD) system. Phase I consisted of collecting, compiling, analyzing, and distributing information and data regarding a new DGD system for use by the oil and gas industry. Near the end of Phase I, DOE provided funding to the project that was used to conduct a series of critical follow-on tests investigating sphere separation in weighted waterbase and oilbase muds. Drilling costs in deep water are high because seawater pressure on the ocean floor creates a situation where many strings of casing are required due to the relatively close spacing between fracture and pore pressure curves. Approximately $100 million have been spent during the past five years on DGD systems that place pumps on the seafloor to reduce these drilling problems by reducing the annulus fluid pressure at the bottom of the riser. BP estimates that a DGD system can save $9 million per well in the Thunderhorse Field and Conoco estimates it can save $5 to $15 million per well in its deepwater operations. Unfortunately, previous DGD development projects have been unsuccessful due to the high costs ($20 to $50 million) and reliability problems with seafloor pump systems. MTI has been developing a simple DGD system concept that would pump hollow glass spheres into the bottom of the riser to reduce density of the mud in the riser. This eliminates the requirement for seafloor pumps and replaces them with low cost mud pumps, shale shakers, and other oilfield equipment that can be operated on the rig by conventional crews. A $1.8 million Phase I joint-industry project funded by five service companies and three operators showed that hollow spheres could be pumped well, but difficulties were encountered in separating the spheres from a polymer mud supplied by Halliburton due to the high viscosity of this mud at the low shear rates encountered on oilfield shale shaker screens. As a

  6. 77 FR 62243 - Rural Health Network Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-12

    ... Administration Rural Health Network Development Program AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration...-competitive replacement award under the Rural Health Network Development Program to the Siloam Springs... through the Rural Health Network Development Grant Program are to improve the capacity of network members...

  7. Partnership Among Peers: Lessons Learned From the Development of a Community Organization-Academic Research Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewett-Tennant, Jeri; Collins, Cyleste; Matloub, Jacqueline; Patrick, Alison; Chupp, Mark; Werner, James J; Borawski, Elaine A

    2016-01-01

    Community engagement and rigorous science are necessary to address health issues. Increasingly, community health organizations are asked to partner in research. To strengthen such community organization-academic partnerships, increase research capacity in community organizations, and facilitate equitable partnered research, the Partners in Education Evaluation and Research (PEER) program was developed. The program implements an 18-month structured research curriculum for one mid-level employee of a health-focused community-based organization with an organizational mentor and a Case Western Reserve University faculty member as partners. The PEER program was developed and guided by a community-academic advisory committee and was designed to impact the research capacity of organizations through didactic modules and partnered research in the experiential phase. Active participation of community organizations and faculty during all phases of the program provided for bidirectional learning and understanding of the challenges of community-engaged health research. The pilot program evaluation used qualitative and quantitative data collection techniques, including experiences of the participants assessed through surveys, formal group and individual interviews, phone calls, and discussions. Statistical analysis of the change in fellows' pre-test and post-test survey scores were conducted using paired sample t tests. The small sample size is recognized by the authors as a limitation of the evaluation methods and would potentially be resolved by including more cohort data as the program progresses. Qualitative data were reviewed by two program staff using content and narrative analysis to identify themes, describe and assess group phenomena and determine program improvements. The objective of PEER is to create equitable partnerships between community organizations and academic partners to further research capacity in said organizations and develop mutually beneficial research

  8. Partnership Among Peers: Lessons Learned From the Development of a Community Organization–Academic Research Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewett-Tennant, Jeri; Collins, Cyleste; Matloub, Jacqueline; Patrick, Alison; Chupp, Mark; Werner, James J.; Borawski, Elaine A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Community engagement and rigorous science are necessary to address health issues. Increasingly, community health organizations are asked to partner in research. To strengthen such community organization–academic partnerships, increase research capacity in community organizations, and facilitate equitable partnered research, the Partners in Education Evaluation and Research (PEER) program was developed. The program implements an 18-month structured research curriculum for one mid-level employee of a health-focused community-based organization with an organizational mentor and a Case Western Reserve University faculty member as partners. Methods The PEER program was developed and guided by a community–academic advisory committee and was designed to impact the research capacity of organizations through didactic modules and partnered research in the experiential phase. Active participation of community organizations and faculty during all phases of the program provided for bidirectional learning and understanding of the challenges of community-engaged health research. The pilot program evaluation used qualitative and quantitative data collection techniques, including experiences of the participants assessed through surveys, formal group and individual interviews, phone calls, and discussions. Statistical analysis of the change in fellows’ pre-test and post-test survey scores were conducted using paired sample t tests. The small sample size is recognized by the authors as a limitation of the evaluation methods and would potentially be resolved by including more cohort data as the program progresses. Qualitative data were reviewed by two program staff using content and narrative analysis to identify themes, describe and assess group phenomena and determine program improvements. Objectives The objective of PEER is to create equitable partnerships between community organizations and academic partners to further research capacity in said organizations and

  9. Participatory development and implementation of a community research workshop: experiences from a community-based participatory research partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, M Kathryn; Colley, Dianne; Huff, Anna; Felix, Holly; Shelby, Beatrice; Strickland, Earline; Redmond, Patricia; Evans, Margaret; Baker, Bessie; Stephens, Glenda; Nuss, Henry; McCabe-Sellers, Beverly

    2009-01-01

    Although community-based participatory research (CBPR) principles stress the importance of "equitable partnerships" and an "empowering and power-sharing process that attends to social inequalities," descriptions of actual projects often focus on the challenges confronted in academic-community partnerships. These challenges occur in the context of economic and power inequities and the frequently limited diversity of researchers. Less often does this discourse attend to the link between the principles of CBPR and their empowering potential for community members who internalize and use these principles to hold outside partners accountable to these ideals. This article documents the participatory development and implementation of a community research workshop, the community and organizational contexts, the content of the workshop, and lessons learned. Workshop objectives included increasing community knowledge of the research process, positively impacting community members' perceptions and attitudes about research, and improving researchers' understanding of community knowledge, perceptions, and experiences with research. This project was conducted as a part of the larger United States Department of Agriculture, Agriculture Research Service (USDA ARS) Delta Nutrition Intervention Research Initiative (Delta NIRI). The workshop was developed by a joint academic-community team in partnership with a community-based workshop advisory committee (WAC) and implemented in three rural communities of the lower Mississippi Delta. Development included a dry run with the WAC, a pilot workshop, and a focus group to refine the final content and format. Applying participatory principles to the development of the community research workshop resulted in the creation of a mutually acceptable workshop and co-learning experience that empowered community members in their involvement in other community research projects.

  10. Design and Delivery of Professional Development Through Partnerships: Long-Term, Short-Term, and Everything In-Between

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquhart, M. L.; Curry, B.; Hairston, M. R.

    2009-12-01

    Professional development for teachers can take a variety of forms, each with unique challenges and needs. At the University of Texas at Dallas (UTD), we have leveraged partnerships between multiple groups including the Masters of Arts in Teaching program in Science Education, the joint US Air Force/NASA CINDI mission, an ionospheric explorer built at UTD, and the UTD Regional Collaborative for Excellence in Science Teaching. Each effort models, and in the case of the later two has created, inquiry-based lessons around Earth-systems science. A space science mission, currently in low Earth orbit aboard the Air Force satellite C/NOFS, provides real world connections to classroom science, scientific data and visualizations, and funding to support delivery of professional development in short courses and workshops at teacher conferences. Workshops and short course in turn often serve to recruit teachers into our longer-term programs. Long-term professional development programs such as the Collaborative provide opportunities to test curriculum and teacher learning, an interface to high-quality sustained efforts within talented communities of teachers, and much more. From the birth of our CINDI Educational Outreach program to the Collaborative project that produced geoscience kit-based modules and associated professional development adopted throughout the state of Texas, we will share highlights of our major professional development initiatives and how our partnerships have enabled us to better serve the needs of K-12 teachers expected to deliver geoscience and space science content in their classrooms.

  11. Developing hydrological monitoring networks with Arduino

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buytaert, Wouter; Vega, Andres; Villacis, Marcos; Moulds, Simon

    2015-04-01

    The open source hardware platform Arduino is very cost-effective and versatile for the development of sensor networks. Here we report on experiments on the use of Arduino-related technologies to develop and implement hydrological monitoring networks. Arduino Uno boards were coupled to a variety of commercially available hydrological sensors and programmed for automatic data collection. Tested sensors include water level, temperature, humidity, radiation, and precipitation. Our experiments show that most of the tested analogue sensors are quite straightforward to couple to Arduino based data loggers, especially if the electronic characteristics of the sensor are available. However, some sensors have internal digital interfaces, which are more challenging to connect. Lastly, tipping bucket rain gauges prove the most challenging because of the very specific methodology, i.e. registration of bucket tips instead of measurements at regular intervals. The typically low data generation rate of hydrological instruments is very compatible with available technologies for wireless data transmission. Mesh networks such as Xbee prove very convenient and robust for dispersed networks, while wifi is also an option for shorter distances and particular topographies. Lastly, the GSM shield of the Arduino can be used to transfer data to centralized databases. In regions where no mobile internet (i.e. 3G) connection is available, data transmission via text messages may be an option, depending on the bandwidth requirements.

  12. Successful strategies and lessons learned from development of large-scale partnerships of national non-governmental organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potts-Datema, William; Smith, Becky J; Taras, Howard; Lewallen, Theresa C; Bogden, James F; Murray, Sharon

    2005-01-01

    National governments worldwide work to improve education and health outcomes for children and youth and influence their behaviours. Also heavily engaged are national non-governmental organisations (NGOs) in the voluntary and non-profit sector. While individual agencies and non-profit organisations are often concerned with specific issues of interest related to their charge, constituency or membership, they often develop allegiances with like-minded groups to accomplish broader goals. Two such collaborations in the United States are the focus of this discussion, the National Co-ordinating Committee on School Health and Safety (NCCSHS) and the Friends of School Health (hereafter, "the Friends"). This article reviews these two significant partnerships of public health and education NGOs and outlines successful strategies and lessons learned from the development of these large-scale partnerships. NCCSHS is a collaboration of 64 NGOs and six U.S. government departments representing both the fields of public health and education. Nearly all major NGOs working in fields related to school health are represented, and the six primary governmental agencies all have at least some responsibility for students' health and safety. The group is the primary intersection of NGOs and the Federal government related to school health at the national level. The Friends of School Health ("the Friends") is the primary school health advocacy coalition at the national level in the United States. Sixty-one education and public health NGOs participate. The coalition serves as a communication mechanism and venue for collaborative action on issues before the U.S. Congress and state legislatures that relate to school health. Since the coalition advocates to legislators and other decision makers, no government agencies participate. The paper describes the strategies relating to the initial development of the collaboratives and their ongoing operation. A common theme in development of both of these

  13. Participatory development and implementation of a community research workshop: Experiences from a community based participatory research (CBPR) partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    While community based participatory research (CBPR) principles stress the importance of "equitable partnerships" and an "empowering and power-sharing process that attends to social inequalities", descriptions of actual projects often cite the challenges confronted in academic–-community partnerships...

  14. Development and validation of a novel scale for measuring interpersonal factors underlying injection drug using behaviours among injecting partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Meghan D; Neilands, Torsten B; Andrew, Erin; Maher, Lisa; Page, Kimberly A; Hahn, Judith A

    2017-10-01

    People who inject drugs with sexual partners or close friends have high rates of syringe/ancillary equipment sharing and HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Although evidence suggests that interpersonal factors underlie these higher risk profiles, there is no quantitative measure of how interpersonal factors operate within injecting relationships. We aimed to develop and validate a quantitative scale to assess levels of injecting drug-related interpersonal factors associated with risky injecting behaviours within injecting partnerships. We conducted qualitative interviews with 45 people who inject drugs (PWID) who reported having injecting partners to inform item development, and tested these items in a quantitative study of 140 PWID from San Francisco, USA, to assess internal reliability (Cronbach's alpha) and validity (convergent, and discriminant validity). With results from the qualitative interview data, we developed the Interpersonal Dynamics in Injecting Partnerships (IDIP) scale with 54 final items for 5 subscales of injecting-related interpersonal factors. Exploratory factor analysis revealed 5 factors ("trust", "power", "risk perception", "intimacy", and "cooperation") with eigenvalues of 14.32, 6.18, 3.55, 2.46, and 2.14, explaining 57% of the variance, and indicating good internal reliability (alpha: 0.92-0.68). Strong convergent validity was observed in bivariate logistic regression models where higher levels of trust, intimacy, and cooperation within partnerships were positively associated with partners sharing needles and injecting equipment, whereas higher levels of power and risk perception were negatively associated with partners sharing needles and injecting equipment. These findings offer strong evidence that the IDIP scale provides a psychometrically sound measure of injecting drug-related interpersonal dynamics. This measurement tool has the potential to facilitate additional investigations into the individual and collective impact of

  15. Simulation of developing human neuronal cell networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenk, Kerstin; Priwitzer, Barbara; Ylä-Outinen, Laura; Tietz, Lukas H B; Narkilahti, Susanna; Hyttinen, Jari A K

    2016-08-30

    Microelectrode array (MEA) is a widely used technique to study for example the functional properties of neuronal networks derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESC-NN). With hESC-NN, we can investigate the earliest developmental stages of neuronal network formation in the human brain. In this paper, we propose an in silico model of maturating hESC-NNs based on a phenomenological model called INEX. We focus on simulations of the development of bursts in hESC-NNs, which are the main feature of neuronal activation patterns. The model was developed with data from developing hESC-NN recordings on MEAs which showed increase in the neuronal activity during the investigated six measurement time points in the experimental and simulated data. Our simulations suggest that the maturation process of hESC-NN, resulting in the formation of bursts, can be explained by the development of synapses. Moreover, spike and burst rate both decreased at the last measurement time point suggesting a pruning of synapses as the weak ones are removed. To conclude, our model reflects the assumption that the interaction between excitatory and inhibitory neurons during the maturation of a neuronal network and the spontaneous emergence of bursts are due to increased connectivity caused by the forming of new synapses.

  16. The Austrian Approach in Promoting Partnership in Balkan Areas: Research Cooperation and Networking between Austria, Kosovo and South Eastern Europe

    OpenAIRE

    SALIH S.

    2009-01-01

    Creating and improving the partnerships in order to strengthen the cooperation between institutions andcontribute towards a sustainable regional scientific collaboration is of major preoccupation for the Austrian Science andBalkan areas. Permanent work in maintaining a diversity of wheat plants and cultivars is a key to survival of plants,which are undergone to the new abiotic and biotic stress (climatic condition, pests and disease) demonstrates to be asuitable issue to ve approached in this...

  17. PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP IN COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT. THE CASE OF ROMANIA. CONCEPT AND MANAGEMENT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisetchi Mihai

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The public administration has a major role in partnerships establishing and operating with different community actors aiming at solving specific community problems. In the process of identifying and solving the community problems the actions of the non-governmental organisations are considered as "alternatives" to the solutions of the public administration. The advantages of an on-going collaboration between non-governmental organisations, as relevant agents in the social economy, and the public authorities aiming at solving the community problems were identified and aknowledged by both sides representatives. The access to complementary resources, and implicitly, an increase in the range of actions of the partners beyond mathematical calculus, an increase in the credibility and public image of the partners, as well as the social benefit corollary to positive models established within the community, are only a few of the arguments. The question raised is why this type of a more consistent approach is not used in the current practices of solving the community issues in Romania. The following causes should be considered in response to this question: the lack of an associative culture at the level of all potential partners, the access to resources is by far too limited on behalf of any of the two parts involved, a neutral, thus, unrestrictive legislative environment, but at the same time, unstimulating towards an associative action, i.e. limited management capacities on both sides. From this perspectives, this paper aims at clarifying the partnership concept (definition, typology, the public-private partnership role in solving community problems and the management issues related: partners identification, negociation of the cooperation protocol, decision making process and resource management, assesment, etc.

  18. Western Hemisphere Knowledge Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, T. F.

    2001-05-01

    , and application of knowledge concerning the nature of -- and interaction among -- matter, living organisms, energy, information, and human behavior. This strategy calls for innovative partnerships among the physical, biological, health, and social sciences, engineering, and the humanities. New kinds of partnership must also be forged among academia, business and industry, governments, and nongovernmental organizations. Geophysicists can play an important role in these partnerships. A focus for these partnerships is to manage the individual economic productivity that drives both human development and global change. As world population approaches stability during the twenty-first century, individual economic productivity will be the critical link between the human and the natural systems on planet Earth. AGU is among a core group of individuals and institutions proposing Western Hemisphere Knowledge Partnerships (WHKP) to test the hypothesis that knowledge, broadly construed, is an important organizing principle in choosing a path into the future. The WHKP agenda includes: (1) life-long learning, (2) the health and resilience of natural ecosystems, (3) eco-efficiency in economic production and consumption, (4) extension of national income accounts, (5) environmentally benign sources of energy, (6) delivery of health care, (7) intellectual property rights, and (8) networks for action by local communities.Collaboratories and distance education technologies will be major tools. A panel of experts will explore this proposal.

  19. Spread of endemic disease and global change in an educational project: proposition of relationships developed in a twin partnership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Viale

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The sudden event of the spread of dengue fever (or break-bone fever that appeared for the first time in Cape Verde in 2009 revealed that inappropriate management of waste can be considered a major cause of the spread of this disease. Dengue fever is a tropical infectious disease that is caused by the dengue virus. Its vector, the mosquito Aedes aegypti, found an optimal environment for its life cycle in the context of Cape Verde, with the persistence of water in abandoned waste objects. The connection between the topics of Earth sciences and the spread of this disease is not obvious, but it was explored and illustrated in a school partnership. Activities with pupils and students provided an opportunity to investigate how some global phenomena, like climate change (with an increase in local rainfall and higher temperatures, are related to local events, such as the spread of dengue fever. Preventive strategies are conditioned by the geomorphology of the territory and by the complex relationships that connect the geosphere and the biosphere. For this reason, it is important to be aware of the risk of breaking these delicate balances, and hence activating unexpected consequences. The roles played by both partners linked knowledge about the natural dynamics of our planet with the development of appropriate behavior, thus contributing to the formation of responsible citizenship, to preserve and protect the environment. The partnership encouraged students to develop sustainable management strategies against dengue fever, and consequently against waste, actively involving them at school, at home, and in their community. In this study, we present a case study of the role of a school partnership in a complex problem, such as the spread of dengue fever and environmental pollution.

  20. The Bridging Advanced Developments for Exceptional Rehabilitation (BADER) Consortium: Reaching in Partnership for Optimal Orthopaedic Rehabilitation Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanhope, Steven J; Wilken, Jason M; Pruziner, Alison L; Dearth, Christopher L; Wyatt, Marilynn; Ziemke, Gregg W; Strickland, Rachel; Milbourne, Suzanne A; Kaufman, Kenton R

    2016-11-01

    The Bridging Advanced Developments for Exceptional Rehabilitation (BADER) Consortium began in September 2011 as a cooperative agreement with the Department of Defense (DoD) Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs Peer Reviewed Orthopaedic Research Program. A partnership was formed with DoD Military Treatment Facilities (MTFs), U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Centers, the National Institutes of Health (NIH), academia, and industry to rapidly conduct innovative, high-impact, and sustainable clinically relevant research. The BADER Consortium has a unique research capacity-building focus that creates infrastructures and strategically connects and supports research teams to conduct multiteam research initiatives primarily led by MTF and VA investigators.BADER relies on strong partnerships with these agencies to strengthen and support orthopaedic rehabilitation research. Its focus is on the rapid forming and execution of projects focused on obtaining optimal functional outcomes for patients with limb loss and limb injuries. The Consortium is based on an NIH research capacity-building model that comprises essential research support components that are anchored by a set of BADER-funded and initiative-launching studies. Through a partnership with the DoD/VA Extremity Trauma and Amputation Center of Excellence, the BADER Consortium's research initiative-launching program has directly supported the identification and establishment of eight BADER-funded clinical studies. BADER's Clinical Research Core (CRC) staff, who are embedded within each of the MTFs, have supported an additional 37 non-BADER Consortium-funded projects. Additional key research support infrastructures that expedite the process for conducting multisite clinical trials include an omnibus Cooperative Research and Development Agreement and the NIH Clinical Trials Database. A 2015 Defense Health Board report highlighted the Consortium's vital role, stating the research capabilities of the Do

  1. Developing a Bidirectional Academic–Community Partnership with an Appalachian-American Community for Environmental Health Research and Risk Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beidler, Caroline; Wittberg, Richard; Meloncon, Lisa; Parin, Megan; Kopras, Elizabeth J.; Succop, Paul; Dietrich, Kim N.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Marietta, Ohio, is an Appalachian-American community whose residents have long struggled with understanding their exposure to airborne manganese (Mn). Although community engagement in research is strongly endorsed by the National Institutes of Health and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences in particular, little has been documented demonstrating how an academic–community partnership that implements the community-based participatory research (CBPR) principles can be created and mobilized for research. Objectives: We created a bidirectional, academic–community partnership with an Appalachian-American community to a) identify the community’s thoughts and perceptions about local air quality, its effect on health, and the perception of risk communication sources and b) jointly develop and conduct environmental health research. Methods: We formed a community advisory board (CAB), jointly conducted pilot research studies, and used the results to develop a community-driven research agenda. Results: Persons in the community were “very concerned” to “concerned” about local air quality (91%) and perceived the air quality to have a direct impact on their health and on their children’s health (93% and 94%, respectively). The CAB identified the primary research question: “Does Mn affect the cognition and behavior of children?” Although the community members perceived research scientists as the most trusted and knowledgeable regarding risks from industrial emissions, they received very little risk information from research scientists. Conclusions: Engaging a community in environmental health research from its onset enhanced the quality and relevance of the research investigation. The CBPR principles were a useful framework in building a strong academic–community partnership. Because of the current disconnect between communities and research scientists, academic researchers should consider working collaboratively with community

  2. Developing a bidirectional academic-community partnership with an Appalachian-American community for environmental health research and risk communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Erin N; Beidler, Caroline; Wittberg, Richard; Meloncon, Lisa; Parin, Megan; Kopras, Elizabeth J; Succop, Paul; Dietrich, Kim N

    2011-10-01

    Marietta, Ohio, is an Appalachian-American community whose residents have long struggled with understanding their exposure to airborne manganese (Mn). Although community engagement in research is strongly endorsed by the National Institutes of Health and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences in particular, little has been documented demonstrating how an academic-community partnership that implements the community-based participatory research (CBPR) principles can be created and mobilized for research. We created a bidirectional, academic-community partnership with an Appalachian-American community to a) identify the community's thoughts and perceptions about local air quality, its effect on health, and the perception of risk communication sources and b) jointly develop and conduct environmental health research. We formed a community advisory board (CAB), jointly conducted pilot research studies, and used the results to develop a community-driven research agenda. Persons in the community were "very concerned" to "concerned" about local air quality (91%) and perceived the air quality to have a direct impact on their health and on their children's health (93% and 94%, respectively). The CAB identified the primary research question: "Does Mn affect the cognition and behavior of children?" Although the community members perceived research scientists as the most trusted and knowledgeable regarding risks from industrial emissions, they received very little risk information from research scientists. Engaging a community in environmental health research from its onset enhanced the quality and relevance of the research investigation. The CBPR principles were a useful framework in building a strong academic-community partnership. Because of the current disconnect between communities and research scientists, academic researchers should consider working collaboratively with community-based risk communication sources.

  3. The Dynamic and Changing Development of EERA Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Maria P.; Grosvenor, Ian; Hoveid, Marit Honerod; Macnab, Natasha

    2014-01-01

    In this article the authors use two EERA networks as a case for a discussion on the development of research networks within the European Educational Research Association (EERA). They contend that EERA networks through their way of working create a European research space. As their case shows, the development of networks is diverse. The emergence…

  4. Manitoba Hydro's Aboriginal partnerships : a new business model for developing current and future hydro-electric projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pachal, S.; Goulet, R. [Manitoba Hydro, Winnipeg, MB (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    Socio-economic as well as environmental considerations have become as important as economic factors when developing hydroelectric power projects. Manitoba Hydro has developed a unique partnership approach to deal more effectively and equitably with the Aboriginal communities of Northern Manitoba who live in proximity to, and are affected by, projects such as the construction of the Wuskwatim3, the Keeyask4 and Conawapa5 generating stations. This paper outlined the genesis of Manitoba Hydro's approach along with the main elements and the expected benefits to both Manitoba Hydro and its partners. Their past approach in dealing with the communities who were in the vicinity of hydro-electric projects was also discussed. Manitoba Hydro's new approach includes the provision of training, employment and business opportunities as well as the possibility of ownership in the project. It is not without challenges, as it increases the costs, adds complexity and slows down the planning process. It also requires much consultation and patience to reconcile different goals and priorities regarding the development of these projects. It can also increase the risks involved by increasing construction or operating costs and even impair the viability of projects. Despite the challenges inherent in such partnerships, Manitoba Hydro sees immediate and long-lasting benefits for itself and the communities involved. 16 refs.

  5. Public-private partnerships as facilitators of environmental improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Søren; Lehmann, Martin

    2004-01-01

    Public-private partnerships in the environmental field have emerged as one option in the pursuit of sustainable development in different contexts. So-called ?Green Networks?, ?Cleaner Production Centres?, ?Waste Minimisation Clubs? are among others highlighted as alternatives to (governmental) re...

  6. Development and Implementation of an Academic-Community Partnership to Enhance Care among Homeless Persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon B.S. Gatewood

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An academic-community partnership between a Health Care for the Homeless (HCH clinic and a school of pharmacy was created in 2005 to provide medication education and identify medication related problems. The urban community based HCH clinic in the Richmond, VA area provides primary health care to the homeless, uninsured and underinsured. The center also offers eye care, dental care, mental health and psychiatric care, substance abuse services, case management, laundry and shower facilities, and mail services at no charge to those in need. Pharmacist services are provided in the mental health and medical clinics. A satisfaction survey showed that the providers and staff (n = 13 in the clinic were very satisfied with the integration of pharmacist services. The quality and safety of medication use has improved as a result of the academic-community collaborative. Education and research initiatives have also resulted from the collaborative. This manuscript describes the implementation, outcomes and benefits of the partnership for both the HCH clinic and the school of pharmacy. Type: Clinical Experience

  7. Rosebud syncoal partnership SynCoal{sup {reg_sign}} demonstration technology development update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheldon, R.W. [Rosebud SynCoal Company, Billings, MT (United States); Heintz, S.J. [Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    Rosebud SynCoal{reg_sign} Partnership`s Advanced Coal Conversion Process (ACCP) is an advanced thermal coal upgrading process coupled with physical cleaning techniques to upgrade high moisture, low-rank coals to produce a high-quality, low-sulfur fuel. The coal is processed through two vibrating fluidized bed reactors where oxygen functional groups are destroyed removing chemically bound water, carboxyl and carbonyl groups, and volatile sulfur compounds. After thermal upgrading, the SynCoal{reg_sign} is cleaned using a deep-bed stratifier process to effectively separate the pyrite rich ash. The SynCoal{reg_sign} process enhances low-rank western coals with moisture contents ranging from 2555%, sulfur contents between 0.5 and 1.5 %, and heating values between 5,500 and 9,000 Btu/lb. The upgraded stable coal product has moisture contents as low as 1 %, sulfur contents as low as 0.3%, and heating values up to 12,000 Btu/lb.

  8. Development of an Iberian IDD Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagas, G.; Orgaz, M. D.; Homar, V.; Guilabert, R.; Romero, R.; Weber, J.; Yoksas, T.

    2008-05-01

    In response to an academic need to improve regional mesoscale modeling efforts throughout Spain and Portugal, it was conceived in 2003 the Iberian MM5/WRF Network (Red Iberica MM5/WRF), coordinated by the Universidad de las Islas Baleares (UIB). Focusing at the development of thematic workgroups and trans-national research cooperation, this network counts with over 40 participant groups, and has led to a consistent improvement in mesoscale modeling research among its members. The constant need of near real-time forecasts and the general adoption of the Global Forecast System (GFS- NCEP) 0.5 degree model products has created a major challenge, as the standard data acquisition methods where proven to be inadequate to transfer the vast amount of data needed. Therefore, it was created a new data distribution scheme, based on the Unidata Local Data Manager (LDM), using the already established Internet Data Distribution (IDD) connectivity at University of Aveiro (UA) at its foundation. The IDD, developed by the Unidata Program of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), consists of a system for distributing near real-time hydro-meteorological data. One of the datasets included is the CONDUIT, containing NCEP Model Data of key interest to mesoscale modeling. This network provides greater interoperability and reliability, since it operates on a decentralized architecture and with the cooperation of over 150 institutions over the Americas. Consequently, the newly developed Iberian IDD Network strives to provide optimum conditions for the advancement of mesoscale modeling research, distributing initially the GFS model data among its peers. It is envisioned that many participants will also take advantage of the wide range of meteorological datasets provided and the data sharing capabilities of LDM to further enhance cooperation and research.

  9. Strategic Networks for Sustainable Tourism Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivelyna Krasteva Yoveva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an innovative approach towards introduction of an up-to-date sustainable development philosophy founded on the principles of combination and balance of common and individual interests on multilateral perspective, i.e. individuals vs. organizations, public groups vs. governmental authorities, industry vs. macroeconomic development, nation states vs. international regional development etc. The optimal implementation of such an approach is imminently dependent on an authentic self-awareness of own identity, values, purposes and motivation for positive contribution to the common well-being. The author’s arguments are based on the conviction that when more individuals and organizations harness deeper understanding of the mutual benefits within their operations area and undertake collaborative efforts to solve common problem their steadfast long-term development may be secured even in times of social-economic-political-eco-etc. crises and within a dynamically changing environment.Main purpose of current article is the concentration of the research on looking for and applying the principles of consistency, exchange of good collaborative practices and consequently strategic and operational utilization of the synergy effect, systems thinking and the holistic approach. Collaborative efforts would lead to greater effectiveness and optimization that satisfies individual and common interests in multiple environmental dimensions. The study aims to analyze the potential of a new network paradigm for provision of effectively applied strategies within the contemporary sustainable development context.Some good practices within the area of joint development of sustainable strategic networks in tourism industry in Bulgaria are presented. A case study of a culinary and hospitality cluster recently established in the Dobrudzha region is about to demonstrates the strategic network viability and sustainability in a contemporary agricultural

  10. Strategy development management of Multimodal Transport Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesterova Natalia S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article gives a brief overview of works on the development of transport infrastructure for multimodal transportation and integration of Russian transport system into the international transport corridors. The technology for control of the strategy, that changes shape and capacity of Multi-modal Transport Network (MTN, is considered as part of the methodology for designing and development of MTN. This technology allows to carry out strategic and operational management of the strategy implementation based on the use of the balanced scorecard.

  11. Using community/researcher partnerships to develop a culturally relevant intervention for children with communication disabilities in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Sally; Murira, Gladys; Mwangoma, Mary; Carter, Julie; Newton, Charles R J C

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a culturally relevant community-based intervention for children with communication disabilities in Kenya through a community/researcher partnership. The resulting intervention is for use in a randomized control trial which will be reported at a later stage. Using a qualitative approach, initial data was collected through focus group discussions with women, disabled people and traditional dancers. The groups examined the needs, problems and challenges faced by disabled children and their families. This generated the content and structure for a series of participatory workshops with a further two women's groups. These workshops strove to generate a culturally relevant community-based intervention programme for children with communication disabilities and their families. The content and balance of the resulting intervention was observed to be different from existing programmes described in the literature. Notably it included many culturally appropriate strategies for increasing social integration and raising community awareness. The process of generating a locally relevant community-based rehabilitation intervention is potentially transferable and has particular relevance to the estimated 80% of the world where there are no formal rehabilitation services for children with disabilities and where women's groups are a strong element of local culture. (i) Community/researcher partnerships can be used to develop interventions; (ii) such interventions are different from those imported from other cultures; and (iii) this process is transferable and can be part of the preparations for a Randomized Control Trial.

  12. The DataTools Professional Development Program: Sustainability via a University Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, N.; Ledley, T. S.; McAuliffe, C. A.; Reider, D.

    2009-12-01

    The DataTools professional development program (http://serc.carleton.edu/eet/msdatatools), offered by TERC, helps teachers integrate technology, scientific data, and inquiry into their middle and high school curricula. It leverages the resources and techniques of the Earth Exploration Toolbook (http://serc.carleton.edu/eet), an online collection of investigations that promotes the use of technology and scientific data in the context of studying the earth system. Over the course of the year-long program, teachers develop skills and a pedagogy of inquiry through a combination of on-line and face-to-face professional development and a significant amount of peer support. They learn to use information technologies that support the visualization and analysis of numerical, geospatial, and image data. DataTools was funded by NSF’s ITEST program to operate for three years. During year two we started to investigate the possibility of transforming the program into a graduate-level course at the University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth (UMD). The first step in that process was partnering with UMD to offer the third year of the NSF-funded program as a 3-credit graduate course on a 1-year trial basis. Our UMD partner participated in advertising the program to teachers in its network, provided classroom space at UMD for the face-to-face meetings and summer workshop, and offered three graduate credits to teachers who successfully completed the program. TERC staff continued to provide the professional development. The formation of the School for Education, Public Policy, and Civic Engagement at UMD, and the new STEM Department within that school appear to be favoring the transformation of this NSF-funded program into a sustainable graduate level course for in-service teachers. A key element to developing a sustainable course at a large university is to position it in a way that can service the largest number of students. In addition to the tremendous need of science professional

  13. A Component Approach to Collaborative Scientific Software Development: Tools and Techniques Utilized by the Quantum Chemistry Science Application Partnership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph P. Kenny

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutting-edge scientific computing software is complex, increasingly involving the coupling of multiple packages to combine advanced algorithms or simulations at multiple physical scales. Component-based software engineering (CBSE has been advanced as a technique for managing this complexity, and complex component applications have been created in the quantum chemistry domain, as well as several other simulation areas, using the component model advocated by the Common Component Architecture (CCA Forum. While programming models do indeed enable sound software engineering practices, the selection of programming model is just one building block in a comprehensive approach to large-scale collaborative development which must also address interface and data standardization, and language and package interoperability. We provide an overview of the development approach utilized within the Quantum Chemistry Science Application Partnership, identifying design challenges, describing the techniques which we have adopted to address these challenges and highlighting the advantages which the CCA approach offers for collaborative development.

  14. Developing Equity Culture and Partnerships in the Investment Market: a Study on Iran’s over the Counter Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi SALEHI

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The equity culture has an effective role in developing investment market and represents economic development. In the current study, polling and questionnaire method was used to determine the approach of organizational stockholders and exchange stockbrokers to over the counter market (OTC role in developing partnerships and equity culture in the investment market of Iran. The results demonstrate that the statistical population deems the transparency of Iran’s OTC market favorable and that the OTC market has acceptable trading expenses for investors and company’s involvement. Also, in addition to adequate supporting and educational facilities in Iran’s OTC market, there is the potential for innovation and diversity in trading opportunities for investors and individuals and reduces investor’s risks for investment and involvement in the investment market. Also there is no significant dereference between the approaches of organizational shareholders and exchange stockbrokers with regards to the discussed variables.

  15. Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2005-11-01

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies and assessment frameworks; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. The groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO2 utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other DOE regional partnerships. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the

  16. Successes and challenges of north–south partnerships – key lessons from the African/Asian Regional Capacity Development projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Färnman, Rosanna; Diwan, Vishal; Zwarenstein, Merrick; Atkins, Salla

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Increasing efforts are being made globally on capacity building. North–south research partnerships have contributed significantly to enhancing the research capacity in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) over the past few decades; however, a lack of skilled researchers to inform health policy development persists, particularly in LMICs. The EU FP7 funded African/Asian Regional Capacity Development (ARCADE) projects were multi-partner consortia aimed to develop a new generation of highly trained researchers from universities across the globe, focusing on global health-related subjects: health systems and services research and research on social determinants of health. This article aims to outline the successes, challenges and lessons learned from the life course of the projects, focusing on the key outputs and experiences of developing and implementing these two projects together with sub-Saharan African, Asian and European institution partners. Design Sixteen participants from 12 partner institutions were interviewed. The data were analysed using thematic content analysis, which resulted in four themes and three sub-categories. These data were complemented by a review of project reports. Results The results indicated that the ARCADE projects have been successful in developing and delivering courses, and have reached over 920 postgraduate students. Some partners thought the north–south and south–south partnerships that evolved during the project were the main achievement. However, others found there to be a ‘north–south divide’ in certain aspects. Challenges included technical constraints and quality assurance. Additionally, adapting new teaching and learning methods into current university systems was challenging, combined with not being able to award students with credits for their degrees. Conclusion The ARCADE projects were introduced as an innovative and ambitious project idea, although not designed appropriately for all partner

  17. Successes and challenges of north-south partnerships - key lessons from the African/Asian Regional Capacity Development projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Färnman, Rosanna; Diwan, Vishal; Zwarenstein, Merrick; Atkins, Salla

    2016-01-01

    Increasing efforts are being made globally on capacity building. North-south research partnerships have contributed significantly to enhancing the research capacity in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) over the past few decades; however, a lack of skilled researchers to inform health policy development persists, particularly in LMICs. The EU FP7 funded African/Asian Regional Capacity Development (ARCADE) projects were multi-partner consortia aimed to develop a new generation of highly trained researchers from universities across the globe, focusing on global health-related subjects: health systems and services research and research on social determinants of health. This article aims to outline the successes, challenges and lessons learned from the life course of the projects, focusing on the key outputs and experiences of developing and implementing these two projects together with sub-Saharan African, Asian and European institution partners. Sixteen participants from 12 partner institutions were interviewed. The data were analysed using thematic content analysis, which resulted in four themes and three sub-categories. These data were complemented by a review of project reports. The results indicated that the ARCADE projects have been successful in developing and delivering courses, and have reached over 920 postgraduate students. Some partners thought the north-south and south-south partnerships that evolved during the project were the main achievement. However, others found there to be a 'north-south divide' in certain aspects. Challenges included technical constraints and quality assurance. Additionally, adapting new teaching and learning methods into current university systems was challenging, combined with not being able to award students with credits for their degrees. The ARCADE projects were introduced as an innovative and ambitious project idea, although not designed appropriately for all partner institutions. Some challenges were underestimated

  18. Developing A Generic Optical Avionic Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jiang; An, Yi; Berger, Michael Stübert

    2011-01-01

    We propose a generic optical network design for future avionic systems in order to reduce the weight and power consumption of current networks on board. A three-layered network structure over a ring optical network topology is suggested, as it can provide full reconfiguration flexibility and supp...

  19. Partnership for Wave Power - Roadmaps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kim; Krogh, Jan; Brodersen, Hans Jørgen

    This Wave Energy Technology Roadmap is developed by the Partnership for Wave Power including nine Danish wave energy developers. It builds on to the strategy [1] published by the Partnership in 2012, a document that describes the long term vision of the Danish Wave Energy sector: “By 2030...

  20. Institutions, Partnerships and Institutional Change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C.A.C. van Wijk (Jeroen); S.R. Vellema (Sietze); J. van Wijk (Jakomijn)

    2011-01-01

    markdownabstractOne of the goals of the Partnership Resource Centre (PRC) is to execute evidence-based research and further develop a theoretical framework on the linkages between partnerships and value chain development (ECSAD 2009). Within the PRC Trajectory on Global Value Chains, this goal was

  1. Community Health Global Network and Sustainable Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebekah Young

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With the achievements, failures and passing of the Millennium Development Goals (MDG, the world has turned its eyes to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG, designed to foster sustainable social, economic and environmental development over the next 15 years.(1 Community-led initiatives are increasingly being recognised as playing a key role in realising sustainable community development and in the aspirations of universal healthcare.(2 In many parts of the world, faith-based organisations are some of the main players in community-led development and health care.(3 Community Health Global Network (CHGN creates links between organisations, with the purpose being to encourage communities to recognise their assets and abilities, identify shared concerns and discover solutions together, in order to define and lead their futures in sustainable ways.(4 CHGN has facilitated the development of collaborative groups of health and development initiatives called ‘Clusters’ in several countries including India, Bangladesh, Kenya, Tanzania, Zambia and Myanmar. In March 2016 these Clusters met together in an International Forum, to share learnings, experiences, challenges, achievements and to encourage one another. Discussions held throughout the forum suggest that the CHGN model is helping to promote effective, sustainable development and health care provision on both a local and a global scale.

  2. ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP IN THE CONTEXT OF REGIONAL ECONOMY (ON THE EXAMPLE OF REPUBLIC OF KALMYKIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kermen M. Maksimova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Public-private partnership is a significant factor of socio-economic development of the territory, the widespread use of which should enhance the investment attractiveness of the region, increase revenues for the regional budget, as well as the implementation of socially significant investment projects in the Republic of Kalmykia. The study found that today a public-private partnership is in the process of its formation in the Republic of Kalmykia. In the near future there is need to carry out substantial and systematic work on the development of partnership and improvement of regulatory legal base, regulating the issues of property rights, sharing risks and responsibility; the creation of a specialized structure, responsible for the development and coordination of the interaction between the state (municipal agencies and private businesses; the training of highly qualified specialists among the employees of the regional and municipal levels, as well as the issue of financial security of projects.

  3. Investment dimensions in a universal service perspective: Next generation networks, alternative funding mechanisms and public-private partnerships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falch, Morten; Henten, Anders

    2008-01-01

    This paper seeks to examine the investment dimensions of next generation networks from a universal service perspective in a European context. The question is how new network infrastructures for providing access for everyone to communication, information and entertainment services in the present...

  4. Há salvação para a África? Thabo Mbeki e seu New Partnership for African development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Döpcke

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available O NEPAD - New Partnership for African Development - tem seus primórdios em 1996, proposto pelo atual presidente da África do Sul, Thabo Mbeki e outros líderes africanos, para erradicar a marginalização e o subdesenvolvimento africanos e promover o crescimento econômico, através da integração continental. Seus objetivos, inseridos no contexto da globalização e do African Renaissance, incorpora valores da luta antiapartheid sul-africana, restauração da auto-estima e resgate de valores pré-coloniais. O que o difere de outros planos que não deram certo na África é o vínculo inseparável entre democracia, direitos humanos, paz, governabilidade e o desenvolvimento econômico, as responsabilidades assumidas pelos participantes e a propriedade africana do plano.NEPAD - New Partnership for African Development - was originated in 1996, proposed by the current South African president, Thabo Mbeki and other African leaders, to eradicate the African exclusion and underdevelopment and to promote the economical growth, through the continental integration. It's objectives, in the context of globalization and African Renaissance, incorporates values of the fight against apartheid in South Africa, restoration of the self-esteem and recovering pre-colonial values. What differs this from other plans that did not work is the inseparable entail among democracy, human rights, peace, governability and the economical development, the responsibilities assumed by the participants and the African property of the plan.

  5. Climate change communication through networks and partnerships: A successful model of engaging and educating non-specialist audience in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, S.; Nayak, R.; Gore, A.

    2013-12-01

    There is an overwhelming international scientific consensus on climate change; however, the global community still lacks the resolve to implement meaningful solutions. No meaningful solutions can be found without educating and engaging non-scientific community in addressing the climate change. With more than 41 percent of world's population falling under 10-34 years age group, the future citizens, inspiring them is a great challenge for the climate scientists. In order to educate the youth and students in India, a model program named 'Climeducate' was created with the help of scientists in Indian Polar Research Network (IPRN), trained climate leaders in ';The Climate Reality Project', and a local organization (Planature Consultancy Services). This model was developed keeping in mind the obstacles that may be faced in reaching out to non-specialist audiences in different parts of India. The identified obstacles were 1- making such a presentation that could reveal the truth about the climate crisis in a way that ignites the moral courage in non-specialist audience 2- lack of funding for travel and boarding expenses of a climate communicator, 3- language barrier in educating local audiences, 4- logistical arrangements at the venue. In this presentation we will share how all the four obstacles were overcome. Audiences were also given short questionnaires before and after the presentation. Remarkable changes in the pattern of answers, data would be shared in the presentation, were observed between the two questionnaires. More importantly, a significant difference in audience engagement was observed comparing a presentation that integrated scientific data with audiovisuals prepared by The Climate Reality Project Chairman, Al Gore (also Former US Vice President) and the other using simple PowerPoint slides. With the success of this program which was implemented among 500 audiences in the eastern India, we aim to replicate this program soon in other parts of India. This

  6. New forms of public-private partnership for sustainable development of the fuel and energy sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakhomova, E. O.; Goosen, E. V.; Nikitenko, S. M.

    2017-09-01

    Public-private partnership (PPP) as a form of interaction between the public and private sectors contributes to the improvement of social and economic situation in the country. PPP is viewed in a broad context and is presented as a system of financial and non-financial relations between government and business. A number of legislative initiatives contributed to the emergence of a new form of PPP that is a special investment contract (SPIC). In the Russian regions there are legislative initiatives that provide differences in terms of contracting. In a number of regions a federal-specific volume of mandatory investment has been reduced to attract investors, while there are regions where this volume is higher than at the federal level. Monitoring of regional legislation showed that the authorities of the constituent entities of the Russian Federation are striving to obtain guarantee obligations to create jobs and receive salaries above the average in the region. Measures to encourage investors have been determined, and the benefits to the government and business from the implementation of a SPIC have been shown.

  7. Developing Quality Improvement capacity and capability across the Children in Fife partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Craig; Alexander, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    A Project Manager from the Fife Early Years Collaborative facilitated a large-scale Quality Improvement (herein QI) project to build organisational capacity and capability across the Children in Fife partnership through three separate, eight month training cohorts. This 18 month QI project enabled 32 practitioners to increase their skills, knowledge, and experiences in a variety of QI tools including the Model for Improvement which then supported the delivery of high quality improvement projects and improved outcomes for children and families. Essentially growing the confidence and capability of practitioners to deliver sustainable QI. 27 respective improvement projects were delivered, some leading to service redesign, reduced waiting times, increased uptake of health entitlements, and improved accessibility to front-line health services. 13 improvement projects spread or scaled beyond the initial site and informal QI mentoring took place with peers in respective agencies. Multiple PDSA cycles were conducted testing the most efficient and effective support mechanisms during and post training, maintaining regular contact, and utilising social media to share progress and achievements.

  8. Two steps forward, one step back: Achievements and limitations of university-community partnerships in addressing neighbourhood socioeconomic disadvantage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Warr

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses a partnership initiative that involved a major Australian research university (University of Melbourne, a local government and a network of local community service organisations. The partnership projects aimed to promote public access to university infrastructure for poor and marginalised residents, enhance the local value of research and teaching activities, and create employment opportunities. The article draws on an evaluation of the partnership, which focused on four keynote projects. It found that the partnership appeared to achieve positive outcomes for residents but was limited by tensions associated with the university’s ambivalent commitment to the value of such partnerships. These tensions remained difficult to resolve because they signalled present contestation over the foundational values of contemporary public universities. Keywords: university-community partnerships, neoliberalism, neighbourhoods, community development

  9. European network for health technology assessment, EUnetHTA: planning, development, and implementation of a sustainable European network for health technology assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Finn Børlum; Mäkelä, Marjukka; Neikter, Susanna Allgurin

    2009-01-01

    in organization, financial transactions, and decision making was a key principle in the management of the Project as was the commitment to appropriately involve stakeholders. RESULTS: EUnetHTA activities resulted in a clear management and governance structure, efficient partnership, and transnational cooperation....... The Project developed a model for sustainable continuation of the EUnetHTA Collaboration. CONCLUSIONS: The EUnetHTA Project achieved its goals by producing a suite of practical tools, a strong network, and plans for continuing the work in a sustainable EUnetHTA Collaboration that facilitates and promotes...

  10. Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    The CHP Partnership seeks to reduce air pollution and water usage associated with electric power generation by promoting the use of CHP. The Partnership works to remove policy barriers and to facilitate the development of new projects.

  11. Wyoming Community Colleges Annual Partnership Report, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyoming Community College Commission, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The "Annual Partnership Report" catalogs partnerships that Wyoming community colleges established and maintained for each fiscal year. Each community college maintains numerous partnerships for the development and provision of academic, occupational-technical, workforce development, and enrichment educational programs. These partnerships…

  12. Military-civilian partnership in device innovation: development, commercialization and application of Resuscitative Endovascular Balloon Occlusion of the Aorta (REBOA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Todd E; Eliason, Jonathan L

    2017-07-19

    Noncompressible torso hemorrhage (NCTH) and shock is a leading cause of trauma-related mortality and evidence suggests that survival from this injury pattern has not improved in decades. As such, innovating new approaches and devices, including technologies which can be used by providers within a short of time after severe injury, is a priority for the military. Guided by wartime observations, and through partnerships with civilian academia and private investment, the military has led an effort to define resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta (REBOA) and assess its potential to address this problem. The result of this effort is development and commercialization of new REBOA-specific device referred to as the ER-REBOA™ catheter. This device has been approved by regulatory agencies in the US and abroad and is now being used in civilian trauma centers and by military teams in the deployed setting. Despite excellent device performance and an empiric benefit of its use, there remains skepticism over this disruptive change in practice and an expressed need for more robust data to prove its effectiveness. This commentary reviews of the origins of the REBOA effort and the ER-REBOA™ catheter and outlines key factors influencing its development, commercialization and implementation. This essay also outlines post-market surveillance mechanisms which are tracking use of the ER-REBOA™ catheter as well as plans for prospective, multi-center studies of REBOA in the U.S. and U.K. With this reset on the origins, rationale and progress of REBOA, it's hoped that military-civilian partnerships in this endeavor can be strengthened and that debate of this topic can be evidence-based, balanced and productive.

  13. [German ophthalmology in developing countries : Partnerships with eye clinics in developing countries - an initiative of the German Ophthalmological Society].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nentwich, M M; Klauß, V; Guthoff, R

    2017-08-28

    In 1999 the global initiative "Vision 2020 - The Right to Sight" was established by the World Health Organization (WHO), the International Agency for the Prevention of Blindness (IAPB) and several non-governmental organizations (NGOs) with the goal of reducing avoidable blindness. Based on this initiative, the working group "International Ophthalmology" of the German Ophthalmological Society (DOG), which was established in 1994, was converted into a DOG section with the same name in 2004 and represents one of the core components of the DOG; however, even before there were a number of established partnerships of German and African eye hospitals. The first cooperation of this kind was the partnership between the Department of Ophthalmology, Ludwig-Maximilians University Munich and the University of Nairobi, Kenya, which was founded in 1978. As a result of this cooperation, the Department of Ophthalmology in Nairobi has evolved into one of the major centers of ophthalmological training and ophthalmic care in East Africa. Since then a number of similar cooperation projects between several hospitals and numerous further projects (e. g. in Myanmar) have been implemented and some of these are presented in this manuscript.

  14. Evaluating Multi-Institutional Partnership Sustainability: A Case Study of Collaborative Workforce Development in Renewable Energy Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, John M.; Stallings, Kevin D.; KC, Birendra; Seekamp, Erin

    2015-01-01

    Partnership evaluation typically occurs during the final stages either to assess why a collaborative effort did not work or to identify the indicators of success. Partnerships are rarely evaluated at their incipient stage, which is a critical time to assess their potential for long-term sustainability. In this paper, we present an early-stage…

  15. Impact Challenges in Community Science-with-Practice: Lessons from PROSPER on Transformative Practitioner-Scientist Partnerships and Prevention Infrastructure Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Mark

    2011-01-01

    At present, evidence-based programs (EBPs) to reduce youth violence are failing to translate into widespread community practice, despite their potential for impact on this pervasive public health problem. In this paper we address two types of challenges in the achievement of such impact, drawing upon lessons from the implementation of a partnership model called PROSPER. First, we address five key challenges in the achievement of community-level impact through effective community planning and action: readiness and mobilization of community teams; maintaining EBP implementation quality; sustaining community teams and EBPs; demonstrating community-level impact; and continuous, proactive technical assistance. Second, we consider grand challenges in the large-scale translation of EBPs: (1) building, linking and expanding existing infrastructures to support effective EBP delivery systems, and (2) organizing networks of practitioner-scientist partnerships—networks designed to integrate diffusion of EBPs with research that examines effective strategies to do so. The PROSPER partnership model is an evidence-based delivery system for community-based prevention and has evolved through two decades of NIH-funded research, assisted by land grant universities' Cooperative Extension Systems. Findings and lessons of relevance to each of the challenges are summarized. In this context, we outline how practitioner-scientist partnerships can serve to transform EBP delivery systems, particularly in conjunction with supportive federal policy. PMID:21222151

  16. Gene networks controlling Arabidopsis thaliana flower development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ó'Maoiléidigh, Diarmuid Seosamh; Graciet, Emmanuelle; Wellmer, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The formation of flowers is one of the main models for studying the regulatory mechanisms that underlie plant development and evolution. Over the past three decades, extensive genetic and molecular analyses have led to the identification of a large number of key floral regulators and to detailed insights into how they control flower morphogenesis. In recent years, genome-wide approaches have been applied to obtaining a global view of the gene regulatory networks underlying flower formation. Furthermore, mathematical models have been developed that can simulate certain aspects of this process and drive further experimentation. Here, we review some of the main findings made in the field of Arabidopsis thaliana flower development, with an emphasis on recent advances. In particular, we discuss the activities of the floral organ identity factors, which are pivotal for the specification of the different types of floral organs, and explore the experimental avenues that may elucidate the molecular mechanisms and gene expression programs through which these master regulators of flower development act. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  17. Price Determinants of Affordable Apartments in Vietnam: Toward the Public–Private Partnerships for Sustainable Housing Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ducksu Seo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the Doi Moi policy of economic reform in 1986, Vietnam has experienced economic development and housing market growth with increasing foreign direct investment. While high-end apartment development has dominated since the emergence of the privatized housing market, more recent focus is on the affordable apartment segment with the remarkable surge of middle-income households in Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC. While most previous studies have analyzed housing price determinants based on locational classification, this study is based on the affordability framework of the housing market in HCMC. It aims to investigate the price determinants of affordable and unaffordable apartment units using the hedonic regression model. The study identified common factors between the two types of apartments, such as vertical shared access and proximity to downtown, as well as unique factors for each, such as more high-rise towers, foreign development, proximity to main roads, and shopping malls only for the affordable segments. The findings have valuable implications, not only for future investors and developers in setting up successful housing development strategies, but also for the public sector in strongly encouraging public–private partnerships for sustainable housing development in Vietnam.

  18. A partnership approach to leadership development for Directors of Nursing in Older People's services in Ireland - articulating the impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Pauline; Wynne, Mary; Rice, Matthew; Grogan, Carol

    2008-03-01

    This paper outlines the approach undertaken by the Royal College of Nursing to design, deliver and evaluate a programme of leadership development for Directors of Nursing in Older People's services commissioned by the Nursing and Midwifery Planning Development Unit Dublin, Kildare and Wicklow. The programme was developed to support Nurse Directors of these services to enhance their leadership capabilities at a time of significant health service reform and investment. The programme was underpinned by the Office of Health Management's Nursing Competency Framework (Rush et al. 2000). The key influences for the programme were the significant contemporary policy and organizational developments directly experienced by Directors of Nursing. This paper will focus on the benefits for participants, commissioners and service users alike in adopting this kind of partnership approach to the design, delivery and evaluation of a bespoke RCN leadership development programme which combined the experience of RCN Gerontology alongside Leadership. Specifically, the paper focuses on the context of the commissioned work and the ways of working between the members of the delivery team and the commissioners, their roles and responsibilities and the importance of these interrelationships in the delivery of a development programme which would meet the specific needs of this key group of nurse leaders. The key learning and experiences of the Directors of Nursing are highlighted.

  19. Developing and articulating intersectorial networks for integral care of drug users in vulnerable contexts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Nazareth Rodrigues Malcher de Oliveira Silva

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This manuscript presents an experience report with some activities that the Reference Center on Drugs and Associated Vulnerabilities - CRR, ‘Faculdade Ceilândia’/University of Brasilia - UNB implemented and developed in 2013. This account allows us to reflect on the process of building partnerships based on social networks and the notion of territory for people with problems related to drugs and their associated vulnerability. The experience follows the current national framework, in which the social network has become a central paradigm of public practices and policies (e.g. Law 10.216/2001. These changes occur in the model of care for people with mental disorders, including the integral health policy for users and dependents of alcohol and other drugs. The CRR team mapped local social networks, i.e. several public institutions in different sectors, in four municipalities: one in the Federal District (Brazlândia and three in the state of Goiás (Valparaiso, Luziânia, Águas Lindas. After the mapping, the CRR team sought to articulate and establish an agenda to discuss alcohol and drug use and its associated vulnerabilities among these different institutions, sectors and professionals, e.g. nurses, physicians, occupational therapists, social workers, and police officers. This strategy enabled several actors to develop and qualify their local intersectorial network, which consequently qualifies the integral care actions, as recommended by several national policies.

  20. The Partnership and Coping Enhancement Programme for couples undergoing in vitro fertilization treatment: the development of a complex intervention in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Liying; Chen, Xiaomin; Wu, Lai Har; Shu, Jing; Wu, Xiangli; Loke, Alice Yuen

    2017-01-01

    Couples as dyads suffer from the diagnosis of infertility and related treatment. These couples commonly experience emotional and physical pain and tension in their marital lives. The purpose of this study is to report on the process of developing a potentially feasible and effective complex intervention for couples undergoing in vitro fertilization treatment in China. The Medical Research Council (MRC) framework for developing and evaluating the complex intervention was adopted to guide the development of the Partnership and Coping Enhancement Programme (PCEP). In developing the PCEP, three steps were taken, namely, (1) identifying evidence by conducting literature reviews, a concept analysis and a qualitative study; (2) identifying/developing a theory-in this case, a preliminary Endurance with Partnership Conceptual Framework (P-EPCF) was proposed; and (3) modelling the process and outcomes of the PCEP. The PCEP that was developed is targeted mainly at the domains of the partnership mediators of stress in the P-EPCF. It consists of two sections-partnership and coping-and will be delivered to infertile couples on the day of embryo transfer. The main focuses of the programme are to facilitate mutual sharing and support in infertile couples, and to improve their individual and dyadic coping strategies while undergoing IVF treatment, especially in the period when they are waiting for the results of a pregnancy test and after the disclosure of a negative treatment outcome. The programme is couple-based, consisting of experience sharing, psychoeducation, meditation exercise, skill practise and supplemental written materials. The Partnership and Coping Enhancement Programme (PCEP) for couples undergoing in vitro fertilization treatment was developed according to the guideline of the MRC framework. It is recommended that a pilot study be conducted to evaluate its feasibility and to model the process and outcomes of the programme.

  1. Benefits, Challenges, Characteristics and Instructional Approaches in an El Sistema Inspired After-School String Program Developed as a University-School Partnership in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Michael; Provenzano, Anthony M.; Spencer, Michael S.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the benefits, challenges, program characteristics and instructional approaches of an El Sistema inspired (ESI) after-school string program developed as a university-school partnership. Case study methodology was used to examine the program. Fifth-grade students received 75 minutes of after-school…

  2. Developing a Community-Based Participatory Research Curriculum to Support Environmental Health Research Partnerships: An Initiative of the GROWH Community Outreach and Dissemination Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, Caitlin; Angove, Rebekah; Boselovic, Joseph; Brown, Lisanne F.; Gauthe, Sharon; Bui, Tap; Gauthe, David; Bogen, Donald; Denham, Stacey; Nguyen, Tuan; Lichtveld, Maureen Y.

    2017-01-01

    Background The Transdisciplinary Research Consortium for Gulf Resilience on Women’s Health (GROWH) addresses reproductive health disparities in the Gulf Coast by linking communities and scientists through community-engaged research. Funded by the National Institutes of Environmental Health Sciences, GROWH’s Community Outreach and Dissemination Core (CODC) seeks to utilize community-based participatory research (CBPR) and other community-centered outreach strategies to strengthen resilience in vulnerable Gulf Coast populations. The CODC is an academic-community partnership comprised of Tulane University, Mary Queen of Vietnam Community Development Corporation, Bayou Interfaith Shared Community Organizing, and the Louisiana Public Health Institute (LPHI). Methods Alongside its CODC partners, LPHI collaboratively developed, piloted and evaluated an innovative CBPR curriculum. In addition to helping with curriculum design, the CODC’s community and academic partners participated in the pilot. The curriculum was designed to impart applied, practical knowledge to community-based organizations and academic researchers on the successful formulation, execution and sustaining of CBPR projects and partnerships within the context of environmental health research. Results The curriculum resulted in increased knowledge about CBPR methods among both community and academic partners as well as improved relationships within the GROWH CODC partnership. Conclusion The efforts of the GROWH partnership and curriculum were successful. This curriculum may serve as an anchor for future GROWH efforts including: competency development, translation of the curriculum into education and training products, community development of a CBPR curriculum for academic partners, community practice of CBPR, and future environmental health work. PMID:28890934

  3. Same but Different. Scaling through partnership replication : The case of the Sustainable Development Programme for Coffee Growing Families in Nariño

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M. Pfisterer (Stella); N. Payandeh (Nasim)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstractCross-sector development partnerships (CSDPs) often start as ‘pilots’– testing out the potential of partnering approach to deliver desired results within a pre-defined time. As projects, CSDPs have potential for replication because they test innovative approaches which can be scaled

  4. The initial pharmaceutical development of an artesunate/amodiaquine oral formulation for the treatment of malaria: a public-private partnership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaudin Karen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Artemisinin-based combination therapy is currently recommended worldwide for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria. Fixed-dose combinations are preferred as they favour compliance. This paper reports on the initial phases of the pharmaceutical development of an artesunate-amodiaquine (ASAQ bilayer co-formulation tablet, undertaken following pre-formulation studies by a network of scientists and industrials from institutions of both industrialized and low income countries. Methods Pharmaceutical development was performed by a research laboratory at the University Bordeaux Segalen, School of Pharmacy, for feasibility and early stability studies of various drug formulations, further transferred to a company specialized in pharmaceutical development, and then provided to another company for clinical batch manufacturing. The work was conducted by a regional public-private not-for-profit network (TropiVal within a larger Public Private partnership (the FACT project, set up by WHO/TDR, Médecins Sans Frontières and the Drugs for Neglected Disease initiative (DNDi. Results The main pharmaceutical goal was to combine in a solid oral form two incompatible active principles while preventing artesunate degradation under tropical conditions. Several options were attempted and failed to provide satisfactory stability results: incorporating artesunate in the external phase of the tablets, adding a pH regulator, alcoholic wet granulation, dry granulation, addition of an hydrophobic agent, tablet manufacturing in controlled conditions. However, long-term stability could be achieved, in experimental batches under GMP conditions, by physical separation of artesunate and amodiaquine in a bilayer co-formulation tablet in alu-alu blisters. Conduction of the workplan was monitored by DNDi. Conclusions Collaborations between research and industrial groups greatly accelerated the process of development of the bi-layered ASAQ tablet. Lack of public

  5. Successes and challenges of north–south partnerships – key lessons from the African/Asian Regional Capacity Development projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanna Färnman

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Increasing efforts are being made globally on capacity building. North–south research partnerships have contributed significantly to enhancing the research capacity in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs over the past few decades; however, a lack of skilled researchers to inform health policy development persists, particularly in LMICs. The EU FP7 funded African/Asian Regional Capacity Development (ARCADE projects were multi-partner consortia aimed to develop a new generation of highly trained researchers from universities across the globe, focusing on global health-related subjects: health systems and services research and research on social determinants of health. This article aims to outline the successes, challenges and lessons learned from the life course of the projects, focusing on the key outputs and experiences of developing and implementing these two projects together with sub-Saharan African, Asian and European institution partners. Design: Sixteen participants from 12 partner institutions were interviewed. The data were analysed using thematic content analysis, which resulted in four themes and three sub-categories. These data were complemented by a review of project reports. Results: The results indicated that the ARCADE projects have been successful in developing and delivering courses, and have reached over 920 postgraduate students. Some partners thought the north–south and south–south partnerships that evolved during the project were the main achievement. However, others found there to be a ‘north–south divide’ in certain aspects. Challenges included technical constraints and quality assurance. Additionally, adapting new teaching and learning methods into current university systems was challenging, combined with not being able to award students with credits for their degrees. Conclusion: The ARCADE projects were introduced as an innovative and ambitious project idea, although not designed

  6. Anti-Afrophobia policy shortfall and dilemma in the New Partnership for Africa’s Development and South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Mbecke

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Since 1994, South Africa witnessed various xenophobic attacks, the two recent ones leaving over 60 Africans dead in 2008 and 17 in 2015. Xenophobia is an embarrassment to the new South African Government, which is considered the leader of African unity, democracy, good governance and development by some governments in the world. South African and African political leaders have remained indifferent and they have not as yet developed and implemented policies and strategies to address the massacre of Africans in their own continent, hampering prospects of realising the promise of the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD. This article emphasises a public administration perspective on managing and preventing xenophobia through national and pan-African policies and strategies. It uses migration theory to review South Africa’s migration and anti-xenophobia policies and strategies. Through literature review and interviews with the NEPAD Agency, the silence of the continental initiative on xenophobia was confirmed, prompting the need to review the European Union (EU best practice. The article acknowledges the importance of existing anti-xenophobia strategies in South Africa and advocates for their revival. It also proposes the development of a pan-African framework and structure to deal with racism and xenophobia at the NEPAD continental level.

  7. Geology at Our Doorstep: Building a Partnership for Standards-Based Curriculum and Professional Development in Middle School Earth Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laursen, S.; Lester, A.; Cannon, E.; Forrest, A.; Bencivengo, B.; Hunter, K.

    2003-12-01

    Geology at Our Doorstep is a collaboration between a science outreach program (CIRES Outreach), students and faculty in a university geology department (U. Colorado at Boulder), and a local school district (St. Vrain Valley) to develop locally relevant geology classroom resources for use by the district's middle-school teachers. The project grew out of direct conversations with teachers about their ideas and needs and was explicitly based on district and state standards in Earth science and scientific thinking, drawing on close work with the district on standards implementation and assessment over the past two years. We intended to draw on existing curriculum resources and substitute local geologic examples to construct a "place-based" teaching resource. However, we found that generic, national-level curricula did not effectively match the rich geologic resources of our area, and instead developed a rather more substantial set of original materials, including classroom collections of regional rocks, reference materials on local geology, classroom activities, and media resources, all shared with teachers at a series of professional development workshops. While the original project was small in scale, a number of spin-off projects have evolved. This project models several important features in the development of university-K12 partnerships: consultation with districts, piloting of small projects, and the role of outreach programs in facilitating participation of university faculty and students.

  8. Advances in Artificial Neural Networks - Methodological Development and Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artificial neural networks as a major soft-computing technology have been extensively studied and applied during the last three decades. Research on backpropagation training algorithms for multilayer perceptron networks has spurred development of other neural network training algorithms for other ne...

  9. Social networks for innovation and new product development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenders, R.T.A.J.; Dolfsma, W.

    2016-01-01

    In this article we first provide a brief introduction into social network analysis, focusing on the measures and approaches that are used in the empirical contributions in this special issue. Second, we discuss the role of social networks in new product development. Social networks are inherently

  10. Outsourcing through Partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRose, Garry J.; McLaughlin, Janet

    1995-01-01

    Outsourcing, a major corporate trend formerly used primarily for information services, is now used for marketing, distribution, maintenance, human resource management, and training. Corning outsourced its training by developing a partnership with CCFL, a nonprofit education and training organization that is a consortium of colleges. (JOW)

  11. The Eastern Partnership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kristian L.; Vilson, Maili

    2014-01-01

    When the EU launched the Eastern Partnership (EaP) in 2009, it did so with much rhetoric about projecting its soft power into Eastern Europe. Yet today, the EU's soft power project seems to have stalled, with developments in the region being less than favourable. This article argues that the Ea...

  12. Public private partnerships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miranda Sarmento, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Public-private partnerships (PPPs) are increasing in number worldwide and are used to build and manage large public infrastructure projects. In PPPs, the private sector plays a role in developing and maintaining public infrastructure and services, which is usually a public sector responsibility.

  13. Development of evidence based practice in academic service partnerships: Experiences of working life representatives from social and health care sectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melender, Hanna-Leena

    2017-03-01

    Learning about how to develop and lead the implementation of evidence based practice (EBP) in services is an important part of the education of developers and managers for the social and health care sectors. In order to develop this teaching and to support the development of EBP in services, a Teaching Development Effort (TDE) was conducted by establishing academic service partnerships (ASPs) and connecting Master's students' assignments with them. The TDE was conducted as a part of a larger project whose main aims were to strengthen, develop and renew transfers of knowledge and competence between higher education institutions and workplaces, and to strive for a more multidisciplinary quality in workplace innovations. The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe the experiences of working life representatives regarding the development of EBP in ASPs within the social and health care sectors. The data were collected by email interviews. Eight working life representatives' participated in the study. The informants were asked to describe the usefulness of the plan that had been prepared by the students regarding the implementation of EBP, and to describe the significance of this ASP for the development of working life. A qualitative content analysis method was used when analyzing the data. Virtually all the informants stated that the plan prepared by the students, for the implementation of EBP, was entirely ready to be taken into use in the form they had finished it. The significance of the ASP was described in terms of the ASP assisting in improving the quality of the service. Furthermore, the workplace-based student assignment topics, external views to support the development of EBP, and the theoretical approach used by the students were valuable. The ASP provided opportunities for the practitioners to learn new things, inspiration to look to the future, and assistance in the implementation of time management practices. ASPs have potential to support EBP in

  14. 47 CFR 27.1305 - Shared wireless broadband network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Shared wireless broadband network. 27.1305... broadband network. The Shared Wireless Broadband Network developed by the 700 MHz Public/Private Partnership must be designed to meet requirements associated with a nationwide, public safety broadband network. At...

  15. 47 CFR 90.1405 - Shared wireless broadband network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Shared wireless broadband network. 90.1405... broadband network. The Shared Wireless Broadband Network developed by the 700 MHz Public/Private Partnership must be designed to meet requirements associated with a nationwide, public safety broadband network. At...

  16. Advances in Artificial Neural Networks – Methodological Development and Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanbo Huang

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Artificial neural networks as a major soft-computing technology have been extensively studied and applied during the last three decades. Research on backpropagation training algorithms for multilayer perceptron networks has spurred development of other neural network training algorithms for other networks such as radial basis function, recurrent network, feedback network, and unsupervised Kohonen self-organizing network. These networks, especially the multilayer perceptron network with a backpropagation training algorithm, have gained recognition in research and applications in various scientific and engineering areas. In order to accelerate the training process and overcome data over-fitting, research has been conducted to improve the backpropagation algorithm. Further, artificial neural networks have been integrated with other advanced methods such as fuzzy logic and wavelet analysis, to enhance the ability of data interpretation and modeling and to avoid subjectivity in the operation of the training algorithm. In recent years, support vector machines have emerged as a set of high-performance supervised generalized linear classifiers in parallel with artificial neural networks. A review on development history of artificial neural networks is presented and the standard architectures and algorithms of artificial neural networks are described. Furthermore, advanced artificial neural networks will be introduced with support vector machines, and limitations of ANNs will be identified. The future of artificial neural network development in tandem with support vector machines will be discussed in conjunction with further applications to food science and engineering, soil and water relationship for crop management, and decision support for precision agriculture. Along with the network structures and training algorithms, the applications of artificial neural networks will be reviewed as well, especially in the fields of agricultural and biological

  17. NOAA Big Data Partnership RFI

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Beaujardiere, J.

    2014-12-01

    In February 2014, the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) issued a Big Data Request for Information (RFI) from industry and other organizations (e.g., non-profits, research laboratories, and universities) to assess capability and interest in establishing partnerships to position a copy of NOAA's vast data holdings in the Cloud, co-located with easy and affordable access to analytical capabilities. This RFI was motivated by a number of concerns. First, NOAA's data facilities do not necessarily have sufficient network infrastructure to transmit all available observations and numerical model outputs to all potential users, or sufficient infrastructure to support simultaneous computation by many users. Second, the available data are distributed across multiple services and data facilities, making it difficult to find and integrate data for cross-domain analysis and decision-making. Third, large datasets require users to have substantial network, storage, and computing capabilities of their own in order to fully interact with and exploit the latent value of the data. Finally, there may be commercial opportunities for value-added products and services derived from our data. Putting a working copy of data in the Cloud outside of NOAA's internal networks and infrastructures should reduce demands and risks on our systems, and should enable users to interact with multiple datasets and create new lines of business (much like the industries built on government-furnished weather or GPS data). The NOAA Big Data RFI therefore solicited information on technical and business approaches regarding possible partnership(s) that -- at no net cost to the government and minimum impact on existing data facilities -- would unleash the commercial potential of its environmental observations and model outputs. NOAA would retain the master archival copy of its data. Commercial partners would not be permitted to charge fees for access to the NOAA data they receive, but

  18. Val-Eo and Algonquin Power : innovative partnership for win-win relationship between community and wind developer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cote, P. [Val-Eo, St. Bruno, PQ (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    This presentation outlined the basic success factors for a successful partnership between a community and a wind developer. Val-Eo has invested more than $400,000 in wind resource development. This community business owns the wind rights to more than 58 farms near St. Bruno, Quebec, representing thousands of hectares. Algonquin Power is an established energy company with a portfolio of 66 generating projects focused on renewable energy, including a 104 MW wind farm. This presentation described the general framework of agreement between Algonquin Power Income Fund and Vale-Eo. Val-Eo's strategy for high community involvement in a wind resource development plan was emphasized along with other issues such as investment; risk; economic benefit; required expertise; and social acceptability. Algonquin Power has experience with hydroelectric power, cogeneration, alternative fuels, and infrastructure. The company holds 3 values, notably that wind rights and the control of the wind resource belongs to the community on which the resource lies; since the community is the legitimate owner of the resource, it has the right to manage and exploit the resource; and, the participation of local investors in a wind project can be beneficial to all participants. figs.

  19. Professional development and human resources management in networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeniy Rudnev

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Social networks occupy more places in development of people and organizations. Confidence in institutions and social networking are different and based on referentiality in Internet. For communication in network persons choose a different strategies and behavior in LinkedIn, resources of whom may be in different degree are interesting in Human Resources Management for organizations. Members of different social groups and cultures demonstrate some differences in interaction with Russian identity native. There are gender differences behavior in networks. Participating in groups need ethical behavior and norms in social networking for professional development and communication in future.

  20. Adaptive Networks: the Governance for Sustainable Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.G. Nooteboom (Sibout)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractIn this book, I reconstruct how policy makers, working together in what I term adaptive networks, have enabled a breakthrough in thinking about sustainable mobility in certain policy circles. I define the conduct of leading actors in these adaptive networks as sustainable change

  1. Private Sector-led Urban Development Projects : Management, Partnerships & Effects in the Netherlands and the UK

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heurkens, E.W.T.M.

    2012-01-01

    Subject of study is Private Sector-led Urban Development Projects. Such projects involve property developers taking a leading role and local authorities adopting a facilitating role in the management of the development of an urban area, based on a framework of public requirements and a formal

  2. 75 FR 14170 - Medical Device Epidemiology Network: Developing Partnership Between the Center for Devices and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-24

    ... Between the Center for Devices and Radiological Health and Academia; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug... the Center for Devices and Radiological Health and Academia.'' The purpose of the public workshop is to facilitate discussion among FDA and academic researchers with expertise in epidemiology and health...

  3. Academic partnership in NLS resource design: a European case study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo Pye

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the library work package of the European Union’s Telematics for Teacher Training project, which links the Libraries and Education and Training sectors. Its two major deliverables, a user needs analysis report addressing networked learner support in European partner institutions and development of an online course for librarians, are discussed in terms of professional development opportunities for partnership between academic and information staff.

  4. Networks: Innovation, Growth and Sustainable Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Johnston

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of the Internet as a measureable manifestation of our social and economic relationships changed the domination of networks in our lives. From about 2000, the internet has allowed us to study and understand the type of networks in which we live, and to model their behaviour. The Internet has fundamentally changed the distribution of wealth. The rich became richer simply because of the larger scale of the trading network and stretched national wealth distributions. Network effects are therefore likely to be responsible for much of the perceived increases in inequalities in the last 20-30 years, and policies to tackle poverty must therefore address the extent to which the poor can engage with society's networks of wealth creation. The greatest challenge to continued growth and prosperity, and therefore to peace and justice, is climate change. The potential cost of inaction on climate change could be as high. Our self-organising social networks have structured our societies and economies, and are now reflected in our technology networks. We can now replicate their evolution in computer simulations and can therefore better assess how to deal with the greatest challenges facing us in the next few decades.

  5. A New Global Partnership for Development: Factoring in the Contribution of Migration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McGregor, Elaine; Siegel, Melissa; Ragab, Nora; Juzwiak, Teressa

    2014-01-01

    Part A of this report provides a systematic update of the evidence base regarding migration’s relevance to and impact on the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). In doing so, it considers the role of migration as an enabler of development through a number of different channels –

  6. Concepts and Practices for the Democratisation of Knowledge Generation in Research Partnerships for Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Cordula; Kiteme, Boniface

    2016-01-01

    In response to the development and climate crisis of the Anthropocene, world leaders at the 2015 UN Sustainable Development Summit in New York have reconfirmed the urgency of a sustainability transformation. This paper shows how a strong conceptualisation of sustainability can guide scientists in contributing to this transformation. The Eastern…

  7. University-Rural Community Partnership for People-Centred Development: Experiences from Makhado Municipality, Limpopo Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, J.; Dube, B.; Mokganyetji, T.; Chitapa, T.

    2010-01-01

    Children, youth, women, the elderly, men and their leaders are integral components of rural communities. It is important to ensure that their unique needs and perceptions shape development programming. However, despite having various policies and legal frameworks introduced to deepen democracy in South Africa, current rural development programming…

  8. Comparison of Industry-Academia Partnership Projects for the Purpose of Product Development

    OpenAIRE

    Konishi, Takashi; Akai, Kenju; Nishino, Nariaki; Kageyama, Kazuro

    2015-01-01

    Part 3: The Practitioner’s View on “Innovative Production Management Towards Sustainable Growth”; International audience; The Japanese manufacturing industry has sought to increase its international competitiveness by developing higher value-added products. Simultaneously, R&D that exploits external resources – as typified by open innovation – is also taking hold.Although collaborative product development research between public research institutions and private-sector companies is widely con...

  9. Gene network analysis: from heart development to cardiac therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrazzi, Fulvia; Bellazzi, Riccardo; Engel, Felix B

    2015-03-01

    Networks offer a flexible framework to represent and analyse the complex interactions between components of cellular systems. In particular gene networks inferred from expression data can support the identification of novel hypotheses on regulatory processes. In this review we focus on the use of gene network analysis in the study of heart development. Understanding heart development will promote the elucidation of the aetiology of congenital heart disease and thus possibly improve diagnostics. Moreover, it will help to establish cardiac therapies. For example, understanding cardiac differentiation during development will help to guide stem cell differentiation required for cardiac tissue engineering or to enhance endogenous repair mechanisms. We introduce different methodological frameworks to infer networks from expression data such as Boolean and Bayesian networks. Then we present currently available temporal expression data in heart development and discuss the use of network-based approaches in published studies. Collectively, our literature-based analysis indicates that gene network analysis constitutes a promising opportunity to infer therapy-relevant regulatory processes in heart development. However, the use of network-based approaches has so far been limited by the small amount of samples in available datasets. Thus, we propose to acquire high-resolution temporal expression data to improve the mathematical descriptions of regulatory processes obtained with gene network inference methodologies. Especially probabilistic methods that accommodate the intrinsic variability of biological systems have the potential to contribute to a deeper understanding of heart development.

  10. Academic-Community Partnership to Develop a Patient-Centered Breast Cancer Risk Reduction Program for Latina Primary Care Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda, Sheila F; Giacinto, Rebeca E; Medeiros, Elizabeth A; Brongiel, Ilana; Cardona, Olga; Perez, Patricia; Talavera, Gregory A

    2016-06-01

    This collaborative study sought to address Latina breast cancer (BC) disparities by increasing health literacy (HL) in a community health center situated on the US-Mexico border region of San Diego County. An academic-community partnership conducted formative research to develop a culturally tailored promotora-based intervention with 109 individuals. The Spanish language program, entitled Nuestra Cocina: Mesa Buena, Vida Sana (Our Kitchen: Good Table, Healthy Life), included six sessions targeting HL, women's health, BC risk reduction, and patient-provider communication; sessions include cooking demonstrations of recipes with cancer-risk-reducing ingredients. A pilot study with 47 community health center Latina patients was conducted to examine the program's acceptability, feasibility, and ability to impact knowledge and skills. Pre- and post-analyses demonstrated that participants improved their self-reported cancer screening, BC knowledge, daily fruit and vegetable intake, and ability to read a nutrition label (p < 0.05). Results of the pilot study demonstrate the importance of utilizing patient-centered culturally appropriate noninvasive means to educate and empower Latina patients.

  11. SLICEIT and TAHMO Partnerships: Students Local and International Collaboration for Climate and Environmental Monitoring, Technology Development, Education, Adaptation and Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aishlin, P. S.; Selker, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    Climate change understanding and impacts vary by community, yet the global nature of climate change requires international collaboration to address education, monitoring, adaptation and mitigation needs. We propose that effective climate change monitoring and education can be accomplished via student-led local and international community partnerships. By empowering students as community leaders in climate-environmental monitoring and education, as well as exploration of adaptation/mitigation needs, well-informed communities and young leadership are developed to support climate change science moving forward. Piloted 2013-2015, the SLICEIT1 program partnered with TAHMO2 to connect student leaders in North America, Europe and Africa. At the international level, schools in the U.S.A and Netherlands were partnered with schools in Ghana, Kenya, and Uganda for science and cultural exchange. Each school was equipped with a climate or other environmental sensing system, real-time data publication and curricula for both formal and informal science, technology, engineering and math education and skill development. African counterparts in TAHMO's School-2-School program collect critically important data for enhanced on-the-ground monitoring of weather conditions in data-scarce regions of Africa. In Idaho, student designed, constructed and installed weather stations provide real time data for classroom and community use. Student-designed formal educational activities are disseminated to project partners, increasing hands-on technology education and peer-based learning. At the local level, schools are partnered with a local agency, research institute, nonprofit organization, industry and/or community partner that supplies a climate science expert mentor to SLICEIT program leaders and teachers. Mentor engagement is facilitated and secured by program components that directly benefit the mentor's organization and local community via climate/environment monitoring, student workforce

  12. Socio-economic development of territories based on the principles of public-private partnership in the sphere of comprehensive mineral exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitenko, S. M.; Goosen, E. V.

    2017-09-01

    The article explores the possibility of using instruments of public-private partnership for a paradigm shift in subsoil use in the fuel and energy complex of Russia. The modern Russian fuel and energy complex (FEC) is characterized by high depreciation of production assets, technological inferiority compared to the developed countries, etc. The solution to all these problems seems to be closely connected with the transition from extensive use of natural resources to comprehensive mineral exploration (CME), with a stable socio-economic development of territories and mutually beneficial partnership between science, business and government based on the principles of public-private partnership (PPP). The article discussed the three main directions of PPP projects development in subsoil use. The first direction comprises the projects aimed at the establishment of core mineral resource businesses on the basis of concession agreements and production sharing contracts. The second direction concerns the projects focused on the development of territories and objects of industrial and social infrastructure in resource regions. The third direction is formed by the projects aimed at the development of new industries, focused on the creation of centers of innovative development, formation of markets for innovative products and innovative clusters in the energy industry.

  13. Roles of Clinical Research Networks in Pediatric Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Mark A; Attar, Sabah; de Wildt, Saskia N; Vassal, Gilles; Mangiarini, Laura; Giaquinto, Carlo

    2017-10-01

    The evaluation of drugs that are used in children has been neglected historically but is now well established as an essential part of clinical drug development. The increase in pediatric activity among industry, and other sectors, has highlighted the importance of joint working. All participants in pediatric drug development need to be aware of the "big picture." An increasingly important part of this big picture in pediatrics, as in other populations, is the design and conduct of clinical trials in networks. This narrative review provides an overview of the roles of clinical research networks in pediatric drug development. Networks take many forms as specialty networks and geographic networks but work toward common principles, including sharing resources between trials, and using experience with trial conduct to improve trial design. Networks develop standardized processes for trial conduct (including performance management) that increase the speed and predictability of trial conduct while reducing burdens on sites, sponsors, and intermediaries. Networks can provide validated, real-world information about natural history, participant distribution, and standards of care to inform planning of development programs, including extrapolation and clinical trial simulation. Networks can work across geographic and jurisdictional barriers to promote global interoperability of drug development. Networks support participant centrality. Networks offer an opportunity to develop relationships with investigators, sites, and methodological experts that span pre-competitive foundations for drug development and specific products. Sustainable networks benefit all stakeholders by providing a multifunctional platform that promotes the quality and timeliness of clinical drug development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Time Development in the Early History of Social Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Jesper; Bearden, Ian

    2014-01-01

    are beginning their studies at a university with no or few prior connections to each other offers a unique opportunity to investigate the formation and early development of link patterns and community structure in social networks. During a nine week introductory physics course, first year physics students were...... asked to identify those with whom they communicated about problem solving in physics during the preceding week. We use these students' self reports to produce time dependent student interaction networks. We investigate these networks to elucidate possible effects of different student attributes in early......Studies of the time development of empirical networks usually investigate late stages where lasting connections have already stabilized. Empirical data on early network history are rare but needed for a better understanding of how social network topology develops in real life. Studying students who...

  15. Federal Plan for Advanced Networking Research and Development

    Data.gov (United States)

    Networking and Information Technology Research and Development, Executive Office of the President — In the four decades since Federal research first enabled computers to send and receive data over networks, U.S. government research and development R and D in...

  16. Network 13 partnership to improve the influenza, pneumococcal pneumonia, and hepatitis B vaccination rates among dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Linda; George, Cheryl; Hedrick, Nellie; Woodruff, Sandra; Kleinpeter, Myra A

    2011-01-01

    Vaccinations are available for primary prevention of many infections in adults. Morbidity and mortality from invasive diseases such as influenza and Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) remain high and may be largely preventable by vaccination of high-risk adults, including dialysis patients. The current 23-valent vaccine-efficacious, with a low adverse event profile-is widely available. Revaccination is also recommended in patients with immunocompromising conditions, including chronic kidney disease. Despite having many opportunities to be vaccinated, adult hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis patients are often missed During the recent H1N1 influenza outbreak, we conducted a performance improvement project to increase the vaccination rates for pneumococcal pneumonia, hepatitis B, and influenza, with a special focus on prevention. The project included an education phase, baseline assessment of vaccination rates, intervention, and a follow-up assessment of vaccination rates. The geographic jurisdiction of ESRD Network 13 encompasses the states of Arkansas, Louisiana, and Oklahoma. At the beginning of the network-wide project, the documented state-specific rates for influenza immunization were below the average influenza immunization rates for adults reported by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and far below its target for adults. Our improvement project incorporated educational interventions to improve patient acceptance of vaccinations, educational interventions to improve staff participation in quality improvement activities, and improved techniques of quality improvement data collection and analysis by participants. During this project, the immunization rates for hepatitis B and pneumococcal pneumonia were also reviewed. At project's conclusion, improvement was demonstrated in all three focus areas, with statistically significant improvements noted in both influenza and pneumococcus vaccination rates. The use of educational interventions to improve

  17. Network-level structural covariance in the developing brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinski, Brandon A; Gennatas, Efstathios D; Zhou, Juan; Seeley, William W

    2010-10-19

    Intrinsic or resting state functional connectivity MRI and structural covariance MRI have begun to reveal the adult human brain's multiple network architectures. How and when these networks emerge during development remains unclear, but understanding ontogeny could shed light on network function and dysfunction. In this study, we applied structural covariance MRI techniques to 300 children in four age categories (early childhood, 5-8 y; late childhood, 8.5-11 y; early adolescence, 12-14 y; late adolescence, 16-18 y) to characterize gray matter structural relationships between cortical nodes that make up large-scale functional networks. Network nodes identified from eight widely replicated functional intrinsic connectivity networks served as seed regions to map whole-brain structural covariance patterns in each age group. In general, structural covariance in the youngest age group was limited to seed and contralateral homologous regions. Networks derived using primary sensory and motor cortex seeds were already well-developed in early childhood but expanded in early adolescence before pruning to a more restricted topology resembling adult intrinsic connectivity network patterns. In contrast, language, social-emotional, and other cognitive networks were relatively undeveloped in younger age groups and showed increasingly distributed topology in older children. The so-called default-mode network provided a notable exception, following a developmental trajectory more similar to the primary sensorimotor systems. Relationships between functional maturation and structural covariance networks topology warrant future exploration.

  18. John C. Stennis Space Center: Partnerships for ISHM Technology Development and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Jorge F.; Schmalzel, John; Turowski, Mark; Morris, John; Smith, Harvey

    2008-01-01

    This poster shows the partners that work with NASA's Stennis Space Center's NASA Test Operations Group in development of Integrated Systems Health Management (ISHM) applications for various programs. The partners are from universities, other US government agencies, private firms and other NASA Centers.

  19. Sustained Partnerships: The Establishment and Development of Meaningful Student-Faculty Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urso, David J.

    2012-01-01

    This phenomenological study was designed to explore the one-on-one connections between successful students and the faculty members with whom a meaningful relationship was fostered. The specific focus was on the establishment, development, and reciprocity within the context of the relationships. By comparing the students' experiences to their…

  20. The Art Association/Higher Education Partnership: Implementing Residential Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charland, William

    2006-01-01

    In-service professional development in education began informally in the early nineteenth-century as a means of disseminating classroom management techniques, specifically addressing ways in which corporal punishment could be delivered to a child without inflicting serious injury. This initial effort paralleled a concern regarding children's…

  1. Developing Reading Partnerships between Parents and Children: A Reflection on the Reading Together Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhram, Diana Patricia; Hsu, Amy

    2012-01-01

    Early reading exposure is important in setting a foundation for students to acquire the basic literacy skills that set them up for school and life success. More importantly, parent involvement at an early age is a critical component of reading skills development. This report presents an overview of the Reading Together Program that introduced…

  2. A Multilevel Study of Partnership Building to Support Early Childhood Development across Different Education Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianjun; Ortiz, Theresa; Maier, Roland; Navarro, Diana

    2015-01-01

    First five years are identified as a critical period of child growth in scientific literature. In 1998, California voters passed Proposition 10 that appropriated a 50 cent per pack tax on cigarettes and other tobacco products to support early childhood development. As a result, Kern County Children and Families Commission administered over $10…

  3. Minimum network constraint on reverse engineering to develop biological regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Bin; Wu, Jiayi; Tian, Binghui; Ouyang, Qi

    2015-09-07

    Reconstructing the topological structure of biological regulatory networks from microarray expression data or data of protein expression profiles is one of major tasks in systems biology. In recent years, various mathematical methods have been developed to meet this task. Here, based on our previously reported reverse engineering method, we propose a new constraint, i.e., the minimum network constraint, to facilitate the reconstruction of biological networks. Three well studied regulatory networks (the budding yeast cell cycle network, the fission yeast cell cycle network, and the SOS network of Escherichia coli) were used as the test sets to verify the performance of this method. Numerical results show that the biological networks prefer to use the minimal networks to fulfill their functional tasks, making it possible to apply minimal network criteria in the network reconstruction process. Two scenarios were considered in the reconstruction process: generating data using different initial conditions; and generating data from knock out and over-expression experiments. In both cases, network structures are revealed faithfully in a few steps using our approach. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Developing Social Media-Based Suicide Prevention Messages in Partnership With Young People: Exploratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Jo; Bailey, Eleanor; Hetrick, Sarah; Paix, Steve; O'Donnell, Matt; Cox, Georgina; Ftanou, Maria; Skehan, Jaelea

    2017-10-04

    Social media is increasingly being used by young people for health-related issues, including communicating about suicide. Due to the concerns about causing distress or inducing suicidal thoughts or behaviors, to date young people neither have been engaged in the development of social media-based suicide prevention interventions nor have interventions focused on educating young people about safe ways to communicate about suicide online. Given the potential that social media holds to deliver messages to vast numbers of people across space and time and the fact that young people often prefer to seek help from their friends and peers, safely educating and engaging young people to develop suicide prevention messages that can be delivered via social media is an obvious next step. The objectives of this study were to (1) provide education to a small number of secondary school students about safe ways to communicate about suicide via social media; (2) engage the same young people in the development of a suite of social media-based suicide prevention multimedia messages; (3) assess the impact of this on participants; and (4) assess the acceptability and safety of the messages developed. This study involved two phases. In phase 1, 20 participants recruited from two schools took part in an 8- to 10-week program during which they were provided with psychoeducation about mental health and suicide, including how to talk safely about suicide online, and they were then supported to design and develop their own media messages. These participants completed an evaluation questionnaire at the conclusion of the program. In phase 2, a larger group of participants (n=69), recruited via an opt-in process, viewed the media messages and completed a short questionnaire about each one. Participants in phase 1 enjoyed the program and reported that they learned new skills, such as how to talk safely about suicide online, and felt more able to provide emotional support to others (16/20, 80%). No

  5. Patient-Centered Network of Learning Health Systems: Developing a resource for clinical translational research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finney Rutten, L J; Alexander, A; Embi, P J; Flores, G; Friedman, C; Haller, I V; Haug, P; Jensen, D; Khosla, S; Runger, G; Shah, N D; Winden, T; Roger, V L

    2017-02-01

    The Learning Health System Network clinical data research network includes academic medical centers, health-care systems, public health departments, and health plans, and is designed to facilitate outcomes research, pragmatic trials, comparative effectiveness research, and evaluation of population health interventions. The Learning Health System Network is 1 of 13 clinical data research networks assembled to create, in partnership with 20 patient-powered research networks, a National Patient-Centered Clinical Research Network. Herein, we describe the Learning Health System Network as an emerging resource for translational research, providing details on the governance and organizational structure of the network, the key milestones of the current funding period, and challenges and opportunities for collaborative science leveraging the network.

  6. Teaching quality improvement in Tanzania: a model of inter-professional partnership for global health development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Kvasnicka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Education is a universal need in health care and a tool for quality improvement. We developed a two-day medical education conference in Iringa, Tanzania, that has now evolved to teach the basics of quality improvement to an inter-professional audience from the 28 hospitals in the southern zone of the Tanzania Christian Social Services Commission (CSSC. Methods: We describe the planning, budget, implementation, evolution and evaluation of this on-going medical education conference. Representatives from medicine, nursing, pharmacy and administration from all 28 hospitals were invited to attend. Attendees evaluated the conference and individual lectures on a 5 point scale. In addition, attendees were asked to rate the most important learning aspect of the conference. Results: Over 100 Tanzanian health professionals and administrators from the 28 hospitals in the southern zone of the CSSC attended. Evaluation forms were completed by 82 attendees. The 2016 conference received an overall rating of 4.0 on a 5 point scale. The individual lectures received an overall rating of 4.2 on a 5 point scale. Quality improvement techniques and co-leadership topics were rated as most useful by attendees. Conclusion: We provide a framework for developing a medical education conference that can be replicated in other settings. Teaching the basics of quality improvement by having hospital leadership teams develop individual quality improvement projects is a highly useful method of instruction.

  7. Research Partnerships for Sustainable Development: A Keystone of the Johannesburg Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bass, Stephen

    2003-07-01

    'Implementation' is rightly the strong emphasis of the WSSD Plan of Implementation. In today's dynamic and uncertain world, however, implementing sustainable development commitments will be very difficult without integral research. The certainties of the past now rarely apply. The uncertain effects of climatic and environmental change, market liberalisation, and increased migration and social mobility, will all radically affect the prospects for sustainable development (SD). This gives rise to many technical research challenges – such as how to get more value out of fewer resources and eliminate harmful side effects. But the fundamental knowledge gaps for 'implementation' tend to be institutional: How to create governance structures and incentives to encourage technological innovation in the first place? How to encourage investment in millions of new jobs each year? How to establish and protect rights to sustainable livelihoods? and How to develop empirical baselines for assessing SD? Too few people are attempting to answer such basic questions, or if they are, they rarely involve policymakers, investors, producers and consumers in their efforts. SD research cannot be a detached and long-term endeavour. Research institutions need to partner with other stakeholders so that everyone can learn, adapt and innovate.

  8. Developing Elementary Science PCK for Teacher Education: Lessons Learned from a Second Grade Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Leslie U.; Wilson, Rachel E.; Brookshire, Laura E.

    2017-06-01

    In this self-study, two science educators partnered with two elementary teachers to plan, implement, and reflect on a unit taught in second grade classrooms that integrated science and language arts. The researchers hoped to increase their pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) for elementary science teaching so that they might use their experiences working in an elementary context to modify their practices in their elementary science method instruction. The research question guiding the study was: What aspects of our PCK for elementary science teaching do we as science educators develop by co-planning, co-teaching, and reflecting with second grade teachers? Data include transcripts of planning meetings, oral reflections about the experience, and videos of the unit being enacted. Findings indicate that managing resources for science teaching, organizing students for science learning, and reflecting on science teaching were themes prevalent in the data. These themes were linked to the model of PCK developed by Park and Oliver (Research in Science Education, 38, 261-284, 2008) and demonstrate that we developed PCK for elementary science teaching in several areas. In our discussion, we include several proposed changes for our elementary science methods course based on the outcomes of the study.

  9. The National Biomedical Communications Network as a Developing Structure *

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Ruth M.

    1971-01-01

    The National Biomedical Communications Network has evolved both from a set of conceptual recommendations over the last twelve years and an accumulation of needs manifesting themselves in the requests of members of the medical community. With a short history of three years this network and its developing structure have exhibited most of the stresses of technology interfacing with customer groups, and of a structure attempting to build itself upon many existing fragmentary unconnected segments of a potentially viable resourcesharing capability. In addition to addressing these topics, the paper treats a design appropriate to any network devoted to information transfer in a special interest user community. It discusses fundamentals of network design, highlighting that network structure most appropriate to a national information network. Examples are given of cost analyses of information services and certain conjectures are offered concerning the roles of national networks. PMID:5542912

  10. Managing the critical zone to obtain and sustain multiple benefits from working landscapes: The value of partnerships between LTAR and NSF CZO networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohse, K. A.; Seyfried, M. S.; Pierson, F. B.

    2015-12-01

    The Critical Zone Observatories add value to earth system science and society by addressing research gaps to understand the critical zone, the surface skin of the earth that extends from the top of the tree canopy to the lower limits of the groundwater. The Critical Zone (CZ) sustains life on earth and provides food, shelter, forage, and fuel and other services to human well-being. This Zone is also where most of human activities take place and thus subject to change and degradation. Managing the critical zone to obtain and sustain these services will require initiatives, policies and incentives that maintain and enhance this zone. The Critical Zone Observatories are seeking to address major gaps in understanding how earth surface evolves over time and how it will respond to future changes. Many of these gaps in our understanding occur at the interface between disciplines, across space and deep time scales, and multiple dimensions. For example, the Reynolds Creek CZO seeks to understand the role of soil environmental variables such as soil moisture and depth that vary across complex terrain in governing soil carbon storage and turnover in a semi-arid environment. For this reason, soil samples are being collected to depth of bedrock. Other networks and agencies such as the new LTAR and NEON are quantifying soil carbon at more shallow depths that will likely capture the variability in near surface soil carbon that is more sensitive to management and climate changes but may underestimate the total stores of carbon on the landscape. The CZOs also provide a platform to conduct interdisciplinary to transdisciplinary science by integrating across geological, soil, hydrologic, ecological, and social sciences to understand the critical zone. The emergence of the CZO Network and the LTAR network brings the opportunity to standardize methods and test hypotheses and ask questions across broad environmental conditions and gradients that could not be achieved with single

  11. Library and school partnership on the move - a study of second language learners’ early literacy development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damber Ulla

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A study of eight multicultural suburban Swedish classes forms the backdrop of an analysis of the role of the library in students’ development towards becoming skilled readers. In-depth interviews with five teachers and one librarian involved in the classes provide empirical data, even though background information was collected with mixed research methods. The librarian’s narrative is the primary source of data in this article. The children′s educational trajectory from the preschool class to third grade is in focus. The present meta-analysis highlights the role of the library and the librarian, with respect to linkages made to the children’s overall literacy development. As a tool for analysis critical literacy theory was used, thus extending the influence of the librarian′s participation beyond the actual literacy practice, to the surrounding society. The results indicate that the library played a vital role in several ways, for teachers and students as well as for the parents. The collaboration between the librarian and the teachers started with the librarian having book talks with the children. However, she became a participant in the team’s planning and follow-up activities, linking the worlds in and out of school.

  12. Technologies development for environmental restoration and waste management: International university and research institution and industry partnerships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herndon, R.C.; Moerlins, J.E.; Kuperberg, J.M.

    1996-12-31

    The Institute for Central and Eastern European Cooperative Environmental Research (ICEECER) at Florida State University was formed in 1990 soon after the end of the Cold War. ICEECER consists of a number of joint centers which link FSU, and US as well as international funding agencies, to academic and research institutions in Hungary, Poland, the Czech Republic, Russia, and the other countries of Central and Eastern Europe and the Newly Independent States. Areas of interest include risk assessment, toxicology, contaminated site remediation/characterization, waste management, emergency response, environmental technology development/demonstration/transfer, and some specialized areas of research (e.g., advanced chemical separations). Through ICEECER, numerous international conferences, symposia, training courses, and workshops have also been conducted on a variety of environmental topics. This paper summarizes the mission, structure, and administration of ICEECER and provides information on the projects conducted through this program at FSU.

  13. Understanding collaborative partnerships between farmers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asai, Masayasu

    arrangements, either as family or neighbors, or through their local or professional networks. Social relationships are also shown to play an important role in shaping the functions of partnerships, expressed for example in the burden-sharing of manure transportation and spreading, frequency of communication......, duration of the partnership and transport distance. The most important aspects of farmers' perception of successful collaborative arrangements seem to be trust, continuity, flexibility and accessibility. These findings supplement the understanding of farmer collaboration based on spatial-economic models...

  14. Recent transport network development using ROADMs and 40G transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagimoto, Kazuo

    2008-11-01

    This paper overviews the recent transport network development using reconfigurable optical add drop multiplexers (ROADMs) and 40G transmission technologies. High-speed transmission technologies with the line-rate of 40G or 100G are reviewed first. Then, the advanced modulation format suitable for constructing the metro-core 40G ROADM network from the viewpoints of impairments is discussed. Finally the advanced functionalities that enhance ROADM network agility are described.

  15. Developing security tools of WSN and WBAN networks applications

    CERN Document Server

    A M El-Bendary, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    This book focuses on two of the most rapidly developing areas in wireless technology (WT) applications, namely, wireless sensors networks (WSNs) and wireless body area networks (WBANs). These networks can be considered smart applications of the recent WT revolutions. The book presents various security tools and scenarios for the proposed enhanced-security of WSNs, which are supplemented with numerous computer simulations. In the computer simulation section, WSN modeling is addressed using MATLAB programming language.

  16. Registered partnerships

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades, family patterns have changed significantly. National laws have taken these changes into account, recognizing new forms of unions, different to heterosexual marriage. Indeed, recently some countries have given the possibility to same-sex couples to enter into various forms of unions. Staff regulations of international organizations are not directly affected by national laws, but in the context of diversity policies, the lack of recognition of these new forms of unions, may appear to discriminate based on sexual orientation and to limit the freedom of choosing marital status. A study by the International Service for Remunerations and Pensions (iSRP) of the OECD in January 2015 (PROS Report (1015) 04) shows that in comparison with other international organizations, CERN offers the least favorable social conditions for its Staff with in a registered partnership. As part of the Five-year review in 2015, it is important that CERN aligns itself with the practice of these other organizations...

  17. The impact of social networks and partnership status on treatment choice in men with localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamie, Karim; Kwan, Lorna; Connor, Sarah E; Zavala, Mary; Labo, Jessica; Litwin, Mark S

    2012-04-01

    To determine whether martial status and social support impact treatment choice. The decision to pursue radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer is often influenced by factors outside the realm of tumour risk, such as a man's support system at home. We performed a retrospective cohort study of 418 low-income men who were diagnosed with non-metastatic prostate cancer and underwent definitive treatment with either radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy. We performed univariate and multivariate mixed-effects logistic regression analysis, with the dependent variable being treatment type. Confidence intervals (CIs) for the predicted probabilities and relative risks were derived using bias-corrected bootstrapping with 1000 repetitions. Men with two or more members in their support system were more likely to be older, Hispanic, have less than a high school education, earn more than US $1500 monthly, have high-risk disease and be in a significant relationship. In multivariate analysis, partnered men with fewer than two social support members (relative risk, RR, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.02-1.63) were more likely to undergo surgery, whereas men who were morbidly obese (RR, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.09-0.88), high school graduates (RR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.64-0.99) or had high-risk disease (RR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.44-0.85) were less likely to undergo surgery than their respective referent groups. Partnered men with two or more social support members were no more likely to undergo surgery than unpartnered men who lacked any social support. In the present study cohort, married men with fewer than two members in their social network were more likely to have undergone surgery. Although marital status is often used as a proxy for social support, we find that the quality of support and partner may impact treatment type more than the extent of the social matrix. © 2011 THE AUTHORS. BJU INTERNATIONAL © 2011 BJU INTERNATIONAL.

  18. University Students and Local Museums: Developing Effective Partnerships with Oral History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Eva Baxter

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This is a descriptive paper that details the collaboration between a group of twenty-one DePaul University students and the Exhibitions Committee of the Chinese American Museum of Chicago (CAMOC in the spring of 2010.  The students were all junior and senior Anthropology Majors participating in a course on applied-anthropology, or the applications of anthropological methods and perspectives outside of an academic setting.  CAMOC is a significant, volunteer-driven Chicago museum devoted to the collection, study, and exhibition of materials relating to the Chinese-Americans and Chinese-Canadians who settled in the regions between the coasts of these nations.  The museum first opened its doors in 2005, and in 2008 suffered a devastating fire resulting in the loss of most of the collections and exhibits.  DePaul students partnered with the Exhibitions Committee to collect, archive, and display oral histories of community members to assist in their rebuilding efforts.  The presentation of this particular project focusing on three significant ideas: (1 The importance of developing a project that can be brought to fruition in the course of a single collaborative episode, (2 The types of infrastructure that should be provided by the partners in such a collaboration, and (3 The necessity of creating a project that can simultaneously address the needs of a small museum and the educational goals for student participants.

  19. FAMILY–TEACHER PARTNERSHIP IN FOSTERING THE DEVELOPMENT OF CHILDREN`S SOCIAL SKILLS USING THE BULLYING PREVENTION PROGRAMME “FREE FROM BULLYING” IN ESTONIAN SCHOOLS

    OpenAIRE

    Leida Talts; Sirje Piht; Maia Muldma

    2017-01-01

    This research focused on the most important topics areas in parents` communication with the teachers and their assessments of the values prevailing in the classroom of second grade children using the programme “Free of Bullying”. The Free of Bullying methodology is fostering the development of children`s social skills, where family-teacher partnership plays essential role. The bullying prevention programme, initiated in the Kingdom of Denmark in 2007 and implemented in kindergartens in Estoni...

  20. European network for health technology assessment, EUnetHTA: planning, development, and implementation of a sustainable European network for health technology assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Finn Børlum; Mäkelä, Marjukka; Neikter, Susanna Allgurin; Rehnqvist, Nina; Håheim, Lise Lund; Mørland, Berit; Milne, Ruairidh; Nielsen, Camilla Palmhøj; Busse, Reinhard; Lee-Robin, Sun Hae; Wild, Claudia; Espallargues, Mireia; Chamova, Julia

    2009-12-01

    The European network on Health Technology Assessment (EUnetHTA) aimed to produce tangible and practical results to be used in the various phases of health technology assessment and to establish a framework and processes to support this. This article presents the background, objectives, and organization of EUnetHTA, which involved a total of sixty-four partner organizations. Establishing an effective and sustainable structure for a transnational network involved many managerial, policy, and methodological tools, according to the objective of each task or Work Package. Transparency in organization, financial transactions, and decision making was a key principle in the management of the Project as was the commitment to appropriately involve stakeholders. EUnetHTA activities resulted in a clear management and governance structure, efficient partnership, and transnational cooperation. The Project developed a model for sustainable continuation of the EUnetHTA Collaboration. The EUnetHTA Project achieved its goals by producing a suite of practical tools, a strong network, and plans for continuing the work in a sustainable EUnetHTA Collaboration that facilitates and promotes the use of HTA at national and regional levels. Responsiveness to political developments in Europe should be balanced with maintaining a high level of ambition to promote independent, evidence-based information and well-tested tools for best practice based on a strong network of HTA institutions.

  1. Private Sector-led Urban Development Projects. Management, Partnerships and Effects in the Netherlands and the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwin Heurkens

    2012-09-01

    adoption of Anglo-Saxon principles in Dutch society. Despite its Rhineland roots with a focus on welfare provision, in the Netherlands several neoliberal principles (privatization, decentralization, deregulation have been adopted by government and incorporated in the management of organizations (Bakker et al., 2005. Hence, market institutionalization on the one hand, and rising civic emancipation on the other, in current Western societies prevents a return towards hierarchical governance. Second, the result of such changes is the emergence of a market-oriented type of planning practice based on the concept of ‘development planning’. Public-Private Partnerships and the ‘forward integration’ of market parties (De Zeeuw, 2007 enforce the role of market actors. In historical perspective, Boelens et al. (2006 argue that Dutch spatial planning always has been characterized by public-private collaborations in which governments facilitated private and civic entrepreneurship. Therefore, post-war public-led spatial planning with necessary government intervention was a ‘temporary hiccup’, an exception to the rule. Third, the European Commission expresses concerns about the hybrid role of public actors in Dutch institutionalized PPP joint ventures. EU legislation opts for formal public-private role divisions in realizing urban projects based on Anglo-Saxon law that comply with the legislative tendering principles of competition, transparency, equality, and public legitimacy. Fourth, experiences with joint ventures in the Netherlands are less positive as often is advocated. Such institutionalized public-private entities have seldom generated the assumed added value, caused by misconceptions about the objectives of both partners grounded in incompatible value systems. This results in contra-productive levels of distrust, time-consuming partnership formations, lack of transparency, and compromising decision-making processes (Teisman & Klijn, 2002, providing a need for other

  2. The PRIDE (Partnership to Improve Diabetes Education) Toolkit: Development and Evaluation of Novel Literacy and Culturally Sensitive Diabetes Education Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Kathleen; Chambers, Laura; Bumol, Stefan; White, Richard O; Gregory, Becky Pratt; Davis, Dianne; Rothman, Russell L

    2016-02-01

    Patients with low literacy, low numeracy, and/or linguistic needs can experience challenges understanding diabetes information and applying concepts to their self-management. The authors designed a toolkit of education materials that are sensitive to patients' literacy and numeracy levels, language preferences, and cultural norms and that encourage shared goal setting to improve diabetes self-management and health outcomes. The Partnership to Improve Diabetes Education (PRIDE) toolkit was developed to facilitate diabetes self-management education and support. The PRIDE toolkit includes a comprehensive set of 30 interactive education modules in English and Spanish to support diabetes self-management activities. The toolkit builds upon the authors' previously validated Diabetes Literacy and Numeracy Education Toolkit (DLNET) by adding a focus on shared goal setting, addressing the needs of Spanish-speaking patients, and including a broader range of diabetes management topics. Each PRIDE module was evaluated using the Suitability Assessment of Materials (SAM) instrument to determine the material's cultural appropriateness and its sensitivity to the needs of patients with low literacy and low numeracy. Reading grade level was also assessed using the Automated Readability Index (ARI), Coleman-Liau, Flesch-Kincaid, Fry, and SMOG formulas. The average reading grade level of the materials was 5.3 (SD 1.0), with a mean SAM of 91.2 (SD 5.4). All of the 30 modules received a "superior" score (SAM >70%) when evaluated by 2 independent raters. The PRIDE toolkit modules can be used by all members of a multidisciplinary team to assist patients with low literacy and low numeracy in managing their diabetes. © 2015 The Author(s).

  3. A versatile framework for cooperative hub network development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cruijssen, F.C.A.M.; Borm, P.; Dullaert, W.; Hamers, H.

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces a framework for cooperative hub network development. Building a joint physical hub for the transshipment of goods is expensive and, therefore, involves considerable risks for cooperating companies. In a practical setting, it is unlikely that an entire network will be built at

  4. The National Biomedical Communications Network as a Developing Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Ruth M.

    The National Biomedical Communications Network has evolved both from a set of conceptual recommendations over the last twelve years and an accumulation of needs manifesting themselves in the requests of members of the medical community. With a short history of three years this Network and its developing structure have exhibited most of the…

  5. Partnership for Sustainable Communities - Grants Map -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Partnership for Sustainable Communities is comprised of the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), the US Department of Transportation (DOT), and the...

  6. Networking for Learning The role of Networking in a Lifelong Learner's Professional Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rajagopal, Kamakshi

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation discusses the role the social activity of networking plays in lifelong learners’ professional and personal continuous development. The main hypothesis of this thesis is that networking is a learning strategy for lifelong learners, in which conversations are key activities through

  7. Developing a succession plan: the North Bronx Healthcare Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Denise C

    2002-12-01

    After 3 years of reorganizing a nursing department, surviving 2 very successful Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) visits, developing an outcomes-based leadership program for head nurses, and assisting a large health care network navigate change, a nurse executive stops to think about succession planning. The challenge to develop a plan includes her own history, others' definitions, and finally developing her own definition and plan. Included are the complications of planning within a network that includes long-term and loyal employees. Finally, the steps to achieving that plan are outlined with the goal of having the nursing department continue to flourish and survive in a diverse network system.

  8. [Austrian Network for Psychosomatic Medicine: background, development and participation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazekas, Christian; Stelzig, Manfred; Moser, Gabriele; Matzer, Franziska; Schüssler, Gerhard; Harnoncourt, Karl; Pieringer, Walter

    2007-01-01

    Physicians as well as the general public need easy access to information on regional psychosomatic treatment options as can be provided by a network website. We therefore set out to explore the readiness of the Austrian psychosomatic community to participate in a network for Psychosomatic Medicine and actively contribute to its website. All Austrian psychosomatic societies and all psychosomatic in-patient facilities were addressed personally and/or by letter. Through articles published in medical journals, physicians in private practices specialized in psychosomatic-psychotherapeutic medicine were also invited to participate. All departments of medical psychology and psychotherapy, all psychosomatic societies and all psychosomatic in-patient facilities in Austria decided to participate in this network. In addition, 100 physicians in private practice applied for registration in the network. These results support the network concept and have led to its implementation, and clearly, the network should be further developed. The first precondition for its functioning seems to be met.

  9. Field Note-Developing Suicide Risk Assessment Training for Hospital Social Workers: An Academic-Community Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wharff, Elizabeth A.; Ross, Abigail M.; Lambert, Susan

    2014-01-01

    This article describes 1 large urban pediatric hospital's partnership with a university to provide suicide assessment and management training within its social work department. Social work administrators conducted a department-wide needs assessment and implemented a 2-session suicide assessment training program and evaluation. Respondents…

  10. Social network analysis and network connectedness analysis for industrial symbiotic systems: model development and case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Zheng, Hongmei; Chen, Bin; Yang, Naijin

    2013-06-01

    An important and practical pattern of industrial symbiosis is rapidly developing: eco-industrial parks. In this study, we used social network analysis to study the network connectedness (i.e., the proportion of the theoretical number of connections that had been achieved) and related attributes of these hybrid ecological and industrial symbiotic systems. This approach provided insights into details of the network's interior and analyzed the overall degree of connectedness and the relationships among the nodes within the network. We then characterized the structural attributes of the network and subnetwork nodes at two levels (core and periphery), thereby providing insights into the operational problems within each eco-industrial park. We chose ten typical ecoindustrial parks in China and around the world and compared the degree of network connectedness of these systems that resulted from exchanges of products, byproducts, and wastes. By analyzing the density and nodal degree, we determined the relative power and status of the nodes in these networks, as well as other structural attributes such as the core-periphery structure and the degree of sub-network connectedness. The results reveal the operational problems created by the structure of the industrial networks and provide a basis for improving the degree of completeness, thereby increasing their potential for sustainable development and enriching the methods available for the study of industrial symbiosis.

  11. Determinants of successful public-private partnerships in the context of overweight prevention in Dutch youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenaars, Karlijn; Jacobs-van der Bruggen, Monique; Renders, Carry

    2013-07-11

    A public-private partnership (PPP) is an essential component of the Dutch community-based approach toward overweight prevention, Youth on Healthy Weight (JOGG). Beginning in 2010, 25 Dutch municipalities have implemented JOGG, but little is known about determinants of successful partnerships. This study aims to identify these determinants to guide other municipalities or communities in creating successful partnerships. Semistructured interviews were held in Veghel, a town in the southeast of the Netherlands, with private (n=7) and public (n=5) partners from the PPP involved in JOGG. We developed a themes and topics list that fit the purpose of our study. The interviews focused on the formation, functioning, and output of the partnership. Recruitment of partners was facilitated by using preexisting networks. Corporate social responsibility, belief in the JOGG approach, importance of the health issue, and strengthened contacts with other partners were important motivations for partners to participate. In addition to partnership functioning and output, enthusiastic and decisive management, shared commitment, joint responsibility, and effective internal communication were important to the partners, as were clear goals and concrete actions to achieve these goals. To create successful partnerships, the program and its goals should appeal to the motivations of the partners. Involving partners in defining local program objectives can help to create shared commitment and joint responsibility. Further evaluation of partnerships' impact on achieving program goals is a subsequent step to be taken to identify long-term determinants of successful PPPs.

  12. Participatory evaluation of a community-academic partnership to inform capacity-building and sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Vani Nath; Klasko, Lynne B; Fleming, Khaliah; Koskan, Alexis M; Jackson, Nia T; Noel-Thomas, Shalewa; Luque, John S; Vadaparampil, Susan T; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Britt, Lounell; Waddell, Rhondda; Meade, Cathy D; Gwede, Clement K

    2015-10-01

    The Tampa Bay Community Cancer Network (TBCCN) was formed as a partnership comprised of committed community based organizations (grassroots, service, health care organizations) and a National Cancer Institute designated cancer center working together to reduce cancer health disparities. Adhering to principles of community-based participatory research, TBCCN's primary aims are to develop and sustain outreach, training, and research programs that aim to reach medically underserved, multicultural and multilingual populations within the Tampa Bay tri-county area. Using a participatory evaluation approach, we recently evaluated the partnerships' priorities for cancer education and outreach; perspectives on the partnerships' adherence to CBPR principles; and suggestions for sustaining TBCCN and its efforts. The purpose of this paper is to describe implementation and outcomes of this participatory evaluation of a community/academic partnership, and to illustrate the application of evaluation findings for partnership capacity-building and sustainability. Our evaluation provides evidence for partners' perceived benefits and realized expectations of the partnership and illustrates the value of ongoing and continued partnership assessment to directly inform program activities and build community capacity and sustainability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Strategic Partnerships that Strengthen Extension's Community-Based Entrepreneurship Programs: An Example from Maine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassano, Louis V.; McConnon, James C., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    This article explains how Extension can enhance and expand its nationwide community-based entrepreneurship programs by developing strategic partnerships with other organizations to create highly effective educational programs for rural entrepreneurs. The activities and impacts of the Down East Micro-Enterprise Network (DEMN), an alliance of three…

  14. Euro-Mediterranean Partnership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brach, Juliane

    2007-01-01

    The EU and 12 countries of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) engaged in 1995 in the Euro-Mediterranean Partnership (EMP) in political, economic and cultural matters with the aim to foster cooperation, stability and prosperity around the Mediterranean Basin. The Economic and Financial...... Partnership (EFP) plays a central role in the EMP design and implementation, which is centered on economic and trade integration as a starting point for and an anchor of socio-economic development in the MENA region. Against this background, this paper reviews the situation in the MENA partner countries...... and the past performance of the EFP. It analyses the association agreements, economic cooperation and financial assistance, discusses the major obstacles, and outlines the potential of the EFP to shape the European Neighborhood Policy....

  15. Developing Large-Scale Bayesian Networks by Composition

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this paper, we investigate the use of Bayesian networks to construct large-scale diagnostic systems. In particular, we consider the development of large-scale...

  16. THE DISTRIBUTION NETWORK DEVELOPEMENT IN PRINT MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana Iordache

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we identify the characteristics of the distribution networks in print media and the features ofmarketing in mass media, emphasising the attempts initiated by the press in the context of the financial crisis. Theresearch was conducted through a case study on regional newspaper,, Gazeta de Sud'' The main problems analyzedwere decreasing newspaper circulation and advertising. The research taken into account trends and developmentsworldwide print media as well as print media particularities of Romania, with a focus on identifying factors thatcontributed to the closure of a significant number of newspapers, or their transition from printed version online format.The paper is mainly focused on some practical issues related to the way of organizing the print media sales networks,the authors elaborating proposals for the implementation of certain measures to increase the circulation, on the onehand, and on the hand, to increase the sale of ad space in the newspaper. Compared with other products, thenewspaper has unique characteristics caused by daily changing content, and therefore the product itself. Having ahighly perishable, the content of media products should always seen in relation to time, which requires more rapiddistribution and continuous production.

  17. Opportunities for industrial ecology networks and partnerships in the Montreal area; Possibilites pour les reseaux et les partenariats en ecologie industrielle dans la region de Montreal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nisbet, M. [JAN Consultants, Montreal, PQ (Canada); Venta, G. [Venta, Glaser and Associates, Montreal, PQ (Canada)

    1997-12-15

    The concept of industrial ecology and its contribution to sustainable development was discussed. Industrial ecology looks at ways to link industries into networks so that resources can be conserved and the demands on the environment can be minimized. In a fully evolved industrial ecosystem, member industries would develop networks to optimize energy, water, and materials utilization. For energy, this would translate to sharing high energy waste streams, such as furnace waste gases, high pressure steam, and low energy sources, such as post-process water for space heating. This report analysed the successful cases at Kalundborg in Denmark, and the Bruce Energy Centre in Ontario. The drivers and key factors for their success were identified. There are several locations in Canada with concentrations of industries that would be a logical choice for developing industrial ecosystems. The industrial park in Montreal is one such area. It covers 40 sq. km. and includes 12 industries in the metal and chemical sectors. 6 tabs., 33 figs.

  18. Partnerships among community development, public health, and health care could improve the well-being of low-income people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, David; Andrews, Nancy

    2011-11-01

    Safe, vibrant neighborhoods are vital to health. The community development "industry"-a network of nonprofit service providers, real estate developers, financial institutions, foundations, and government-draws on public subsidies and other financing to transform impoverished neighborhoods into better-functioning communities. Although such activity positively affects the "upstream" causes of poor health, the community development industry rarely collaborates with the health sector or even considers health effects in its work. Examples of initiatives-such as the creation of affordable housing that avoids nursing home placement-suggest a strong potential for cross-sector collaborations to reduce health disparities and slow the growth of health care spending, while at the same time improving economic and social well-being in America's most disadvantaged communities. We propose a four-point plan to help ensure that these collaborations achieve positive outcomes and sustainable progress for residents and investors alike.

  19. Developing intelligent sensor networks —a technological convergence approach

    OpenAIRE

    Vassev, Emil; Hinchey, Mike; Nixon, Paddy

    2010-01-01

    peer-reviewed We present a technological convergence approach to developing sensor networks capable of self-management. We use ASSL (Autonomic System Specification Language) to formally develop autonomous intelligent sensor nodes and DMF (Demand Migration Framework) to connect these nodes in a sensor network. ASSL provides constructs for modeling special self-management policies that drive the sensor nodes’ behavior and control the communication mechanism provided by DMF.

  20. Developing an intelligence analysis process through social network analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waskiewicz, Todd; LaMonica, Peter

    2008-04-01

    Intelligence analysts are tasked with making sense of enormous amounts of data and gaining an awareness of a situation that can be acted upon. This process can be extremely difficult and time consuming. Trying to differentiate between important pieces of information and extraneous data only complicates the problem. When dealing with data containing entities and relationships, social network analysis (SNA) techniques can be employed to make this job easier. Applying network measures to social network graphs can identify the most significant nodes (entities) and edges (relationships) and help the analyst further focus on key areas of concern. Strange developed a model that identifies high value targets such as centers of gravity and critical vulnerabilities. SNA lends itself to the discovery of these high value targets and the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) has investigated several network measures such as centrality, betweenness, and grouping to identify centers of gravity and critical vulnerabilities. Using these network measures, a process for the intelligence analyst has been developed to aid analysts in identifying points of tactical emphasis. Organizational Risk Analyzer (ORA) and Terrorist Modus Operandi Discovery System (TMODS) are the two applications used to compute the network measures and identify the points to be acted upon. Therefore, the result of leveraging social network analysis techniques and applications will provide the analyst and the intelligence community with more focused and concentrated analysis results allowing them to more easily exploit key attributes of a network, thus saving time, money, and manpower.

  1. Developing IT Infrastructure for Rural Hospitals: A Case Study of Benefits and Challenges of Hospital-to-Hospital Partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Madhu C; Purao, Sandeep; Kelly, Mary

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a study identifying benefits and challenges of a novel hospital-to-hospital information technology (IT) outsourcing partnership (HHP). The partnership is an innovative response to the problem that many smaller, rural hospitals face: to modernize their IT infrastructure in spite of a severe shortage of resources. The investigators studied three rural hospitals that outsourced their IT infrastructure, through an HHP, to a larger, more technologically advanced hospital in the region. The study design was based on purposive sampling and interviews of senior managers from the four hospitals. The results highlight the HHP's benefits and challenges from both the rural hospitals' and vendor hospital's perspectives. The HHP was considered a success: a key outcome was that it has improved the rural hospitals' IT infrastructure at an affordable cost. The investigators discuss key elements for creating a successful HHP and offer preliminary answers to the question of what it takes for an HHP to be successful.

  2. How the Pacific Islands Climate Education Partnership (PCEP) Has Collaboratively Increased Regional Collective Impacts on Climate Literacy Via Networks of Diverse Stakeholders Engaging in Multiple Reinforcing Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, A.

    2016-12-01

    The Pacific Islands Climate Education Partnership (PCEP) serves the U.S. Affiliated Pacific Island (USAPI) Region. The international entities served by PCEP are the state of Hawai`i (USA); three Freely Associated States (the Federated States of Micronesia, the Republic of the Marshall Islands, and the Republic of Palau), and three Territories (Guam, Commonwealth of Northern Mariana Islands, and American Samoa). Funded by NSF, the PCEP aims to educate the region's students and citizens in ways that exemplify modern science and indigenous environmental knowledge, address the urgency of climate change impacts, and focus on adaptation strategies that can increase resiliency with respect to climate change impacts. PCEP partners include universities, education nonprofits, state or country offices/ministries of education, local ecological nonprofits, and a variety of community organizations. Partners contribute and share expertise in climate science, local ecological knowledge, K-12 education in the Pacific island region, science and environmental education, community college education, learning science, indigenous navigation, and oceanography. Over the past six years, PCEP has engaged with regional school systems and communities in a wide variety of ways that complement and reinforce each other. Highlighted activities include improving country and state climate science education standards; focusing on place-based local ecological knowledge and skills in working with schools and communities; developing and disseminating formal education resources such as books and web resources that focus on local contexts and skills rather than contextually inappropriate mainland the textbooks; developing and implementing professional development for teachers; and supporting local ways of knowing by gathering and sharing local stories of climate change; and promoting an emphasis on climate adaptation strategies that increase resilience of natural environments and community systems.

  3. Governance and Risk Management of Network and Information Security: The Role of Public Private Partnerships in Managing the Existing and Emerging Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navare, Jyoti; Gemikonakli, Orhan

    Globalisation and new technology has opened the gates to more security risks. As the strategic importance of communication networks and information increased, threats to the security and safety of communication infrastructures, as well as information stored in and/or transmitted increased significantly. The development of the self replicating programmes has become a nightmare for Internet users. Leading companies, strategic organisations were not immune to attacks; they were also "hacked" and overtaken by intruders. Incidents of recent years have also shown that national/regional crisis may also trigger cyber attacks at large scale. Experts forecast that cyber wars are likely to take the stage as tension mounts between developed societies. New risks such as cyber-attacks, network terrorism and disintegration of traditional infrastructures has somewhat blurred the boundaries of operation and control. This paper seeks to consider the risk management and governance and looking more specifically at implications for emerging economies.

  4. Developing a Bidirectional Academic?Community Partnership with an Appalachian-American Community for Environmental Health Research and Risk Communication

    OpenAIRE

    Haynes, Erin N.; Beidler, Caroline; Wittberg, Richard; Meloncon, Lisa; Parin, Megan; Kopras, Elizabeth J.; Succop, Paul; Dietrich, Kim N.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Marietta, Ohio, is an Appalachian-American community whose residents have long struggled with understanding their exposure to airborne manganese (Mn). Although community engagement in research is strongly endorsed by the National Institutes of Health and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences in particular, little has been documented demonstrating how an academic?community partnership that implements the community-based participatory research (CBPR) principles can...

  5. The role of the social-entrepreneurship corporations in Kazakhstan in the development of the public private partnership mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    A. Taubayev; DOSKALIYEVA B.; S. Akenov

    2016-01-01

    The article describes the features of the establishment and functioning of the specialized institutions of the public-private partnership – the social-entrepreneurship corporations in Kazakhstan. Based on the study of foreign experience of the creation of similar organizations, the advantages and problems of their functioning have been determined. The social-entrepreneurship corporations of Kazakhstan have a non-profit corporation model, but their mission is to meet the challenges of gaining ...

  6. Aging services or services to the aging?focus of a university-community curriculum development partnership to increase awareness of aging issues in social work practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwan, Sadhna; Wertheimer, Mindy R

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a partnership between social work faculty and community practitioners to develop gerontological curricula to increase awareness of aging issues among social work students. We describe steps taken to identify learning needs of students by examining gaps in the core curriculum and surveying community-based agencies that serve older persons who face a variety of problems. We also describe a unique field education assignment designed to increase awareness of how well community service agencies meet the needs of older clients and provide quantitative and qualitative data on students' overall learning experiences. The project highlights the role of community partners in developing relevant curricula for future social work practitioners.

  7. Networking the Global Maritime Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    means of communication, and semaphore and homing pigeons were also used during the early 1900s as a back up in the event of radio failures .51...together to fight aggression and totalitarianism. But this is not the case, as coalition warfare goes back well over two millennia. As early as 700...attack the Phoenician city of Tyre in 725 BC.7 Centuries later, the Peloponnesian War pitted a coalition built around Sparta against one built around

  8. 75 FR 80853 - Designing a Digital Future: Federally Funded Research and Development in Networking and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-23

    ... Designing a Digital Future: Federally Funded Research and Development in Networking and Information... ``Designing a Digital Future: Federally Funded Research and Development in Networking and Information... report entitled ``Designing a Digital Future: Federally Funded Research and Development in Networking and...

  9. The Tribal Lands Collaboratory: Building partnerships and developing tools to support local Tribal community response to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, K. D.; Wee, B.; Kuslikis, A.

    2015-12-01

    Response of Tribal nations and Tribal communities to current and emerging climate change challenges requires active participation of stakeholders who have effective access to relevant data, information and analytical tools. The Tribal Lands Collaboratory (TLC), currently under development, is a joint effort between the American Indian Higher Education Consortium (AIHEC), the Environmental Systems Research Institute (Esri), and the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON). The vision of the TLC is to create an integrative platform that enables coordination between multiple stakeholders (e.g. Tribal resource managers, Tribal College faculty and students, farmers, ranchers, and other local community members) to collaborate on locally relevant climate change issues. The TLC is intended to facilitate the transformation of data into actionable information that can inform local climate response planning. The TLC will provide the technical mechanisms to access, collect and analyze data from both internal and external sources (e.g. NASA's Giovanni climate data portal, Ameriflux or USA National Phenology Network) while also providing the social scaffolds to enable collaboration across Tribal communities and with members of the national climate change research community. The prototype project focuses on phenology, a branch of science focused on relationships between climate and the seasonal timing of biological phenomena. Monitoring changes in the timing and duration of phenological stages in plant and animal co­­­­mmunities on Tribal lands can provide insight to the direct impacts of climate change on culturally and economically significant Tribal resources . The project will leverage existing phenological observation protocols created by the USA-National Phenology Network and NEON to direct data collection efforts and will be tailored to the specific needs and concerns of the community. Phenology observations will be captured and managed within the Collaboratory

  10. Developer Network : Open Source Personal Digital Assistant ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    They will convene a technical workshop of users, developers and open source proponents to come up with a prototype application - electronic forms for use on a handheld computer and uploading data back to the computer - that can be used to satisfy immediate requirements and form the basis for further development.

  11. Technology Developments Integrating a Space Network Communications Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Winston; Jennings, Esther; Clare, Loren; Leang, Dee

    2006-01-01

    As future manned and robotic space explorations missions involve more complex systems, it is essential to verify, validate, and optimize such systems through simulation and emulation in a low cost testbed environment. The goal of such a testbed is to perform detailed testing of advanced space and ground communications networks, technologies, and client applications that are essential for future space exploration missions. We describe the development of new technologies enhancing our Multi-mission Advanced Communications Hybrid Environment for Test and Evaluation (MACHETE) that enable its integration in a distributed space communications testbed. MACHETE combines orbital modeling, link analysis, and protocol and service modeling to quantify system performance based on comprehensive considerations of different aspects of space missions. It can simulate entire networks and can interface with external (testbed) systems. The key technology developments enabling the integration of MACHETE into a distributed testbed are the Monitor and Control module and the QualNet IP Network Emulator module. Specifically, the Monitor and Control module establishes a standard interface mechanism to centralize the management of each testbed component. The QualNet IP Network Emulator module allows externally generated network traffic to be passed through MACHETE to experience simulated network behaviors such as propagation delay, data loss, orbital effects and other communications characteristics, including entire network behaviors. We report a successful integration of MACHETE with a space communication testbed modeling a lunar exploration scenario. This document is the viewgraph slides of the presentation.

  12. Concurrent sexual partnerships among married Zimbabweans – implications for HIV prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mugweni E

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Esther Mugweni,1 Stephen Pearson,2 Mayeh Omar2 1UCL Department of Infection and Population Health, University College London, London, 2The Nuffield Centre for International Health and Development, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK Background: Concurrent sexual partnerships play a key role in sustaining the HIV epidemic in Zimbabwe. Married couples are at an increased risk of contracting HIV from sexual networks produced by concurrent sexual partnerships. Addressing these partnerships is an international HIV prevention priority. Methods: Our qualitative study presents the socioeconomic factors that contribute to the occurrence of concurrent sexual partnerships among married people in Zimbabwe. We conducted 36 in-depth interviews and four focus group discussions with married men and women in Zimbabwe in 2008 to understand the organizations of concurrent sexual partnerships. Data were analyzed using framework analysis. Results: Our study indicates that relationship dissatisfaction played a key role in the engagement of concurrent sexual partnerships. Depending on the source of the dissatisfaction, there were four possible types of concurrent sexual relationships that were formed: sex worker, casual partner, regular girlfriend or informal polygyny which was referred to as “small house”. These relationships had different levels of intimacy, which had a bearing on practicing safer sex. Participants described three characteristics of hegemonic masculinity that contributed to the sources of dissatisfaction leading to concurrent sexual activity. Similarly, various aspects of emphasized femininity were described as creating opportunities for the occurrence of concurrent sexual relationships. Economic status was also listed as a factor that contributed to the occurrence of concurrent sexual partnerships. Conclusion: Marital dissatisfaction was indicated as a contributing factor to the occurrence of concurrent sexual relationships. There were several

  13. Networking of teachers as an individual professional development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Магомедхан Магомедович Ниматулаев

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Today the system of additional professional education (CVE do not fully manages the timely realization of the process of introduction of new information technologies, modern organizational forms of education. In this situation, experts have their own conditions of use of network technologies to seek a variety of opportunities for self-education, self-training. Network technology is Web-based and space allow, when it is necessary to carry out the process of self-training. In article methodical aspects of network interaction as professional development forms are stated.

  14. Developed hydraulic simulation model for water pipeline networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ayad

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A numerical method that uses linear graph theory is presented for both steady state, and extended period simulation in a pipe network including its hydraulic components (pumps, valves, junctions, etc.. The developed model is based on the Extended Linear Graph Theory (ELGT technique. This technique is modified to include new network components such as flow control valves and tanks. The technique also expanded for extended period simulation (EPS. A newly modified method for the calculation of updated flows improving the convergence rate is being introduced. Both benchmarks, ad Actual networks are analyzed to check the reliability of the proposed method. The results reveal the finer performance of the proposed method.

  15. Network Models for Cognitive Development and Intelligence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    van der Maas, H.L.J; Kan, K.J; Marsman, M; Stevenson, C.E

    2017-01-01

    ... (dimensionality of individual differences). The welcome integration of the two fields requires the construction of mechanistic models of cognition and cognitive development that explain key phenomena in individual differences research...

  16. South Asian Network for Development and Environmental ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    SANDEE) seeks to build research capacity in the area of poverty, economic development and environmental change in Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Nepal, Pakistan, the Maldives and Sri Lanka. It does so through research, training, policy dialogue, ...

  17. Lifelong learning networks for sustainable regional development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Kraker, Joop; Cörvers, Ron; Ruelle, Christine; Valkering, Pieter

    2010-01-01

    Sustainable regional development is a participatory, multi-actor process, involving a diversity of societal stakeholders, administrators, policy makers, practitioners and scientific experts. In this process, mutual and collective learning plays a major role as participants have to exchange and

  18. Development of Novel Random Network Theory-Based Approaches to Identify Network Interactions among Nitrifying Bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Cindy

    2015-07-17

    The interactions among different microbial populations in a community could play more important roles in determining ecosystem functioning than species numbers and their abundances, but very little is known about such network interactions at a community level. The goal of this project is to develop novel framework approaches and associated software tools to characterize the network interactions in microbial communities based on high throughput, large scale high-throughput metagenomics data and apply these approaches to understand the impacts of environmental changes (e.g., climate change, contamination) on network interactions among different nitrifying populations and associated microbial communities.

  19. Partnership : Information and Communication Technology for ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Partnership : Information and Communication Technology for Development in Africa and Asia ... has entered into a partnership with IDRC's Information and Communication Technology for Development (ICT4D) program area in support of research that improves livelihood opportunities, ... Strategic leverage on value chains.

  20. Space station common module network topology and hardware development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, P.; Braunagel, L.; Chwirka, S.; Fishman, M.; Freeman, K.; Eason, D.; Landis, D.; Lech, L.; Martin, J.; Mccorkle, J.

    1990-01-01

    Conceptual space station common module power management and distribution (SSM/PMAD) network layouts and detailed network evaluations were developed. Individual pieces of hardware to be developed for the SSM/PMAD test bed were identified. A technology assessment was developed to identify pieces of equipment requiring development effort. Equipment lists were developed from the previously selected network schematics. Additionally, functional requirements for the network equipment as well as other requirements which affected the suitability of specific items for use on the Space Station Program were identified. Assembly requirements were derived based on the SSM/PMAD developed requirements and on the selected SSM/PMAD network concepts. Basic requirements and simplified design block diagrams are included. DC remote power controllers were successfully integrated into the DC Marshall Space Flight Center breadboard. Two DC remote power controller (RPC) boards experienced mechanical failure of UES 706 stud-mounted diodes during mechanical installation of the boards into the system. These broken diodes caused input to output shorting of the RPC's. The UES 706 diodes were replaced on these RPC's which eliminated the problem. The DC RPC's as existing in the present breadboard configuration do not provide ground fault protection because the RPC was designed to only switch the hot side current. If ground fault protection were to be implemented, it would be necessary to design the system so the RPC switched both the hot and the return sides of power.

  1. Development of a nationwide network for technology transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Louis B. C.; Brockman, Paul R.

    1987-01-01

    The winter and spring of 1987 saw the cooperative nationwide network for technology transfer translated from concept to reality. The most obvious of the network relationships which were developed or which are anticipated are summarized. The objective was to help assure that every U.S. business which has the capacity to exploit, or the need to obtain new technology in any form, has access to the technology it needs or can use.

  2. Collaborative learning: a focused partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souers, Charlotte; Kauffman, Lisa; McManus, Charlotte; Parker, Vicky

    2007-11-01

    This paper describes a collaborative project that joins academic perspectives and clinical practice perspectives in a focused clinical experience. This activity involves 3rd quarter associate degree nursing students in a medical-surgical course. Instructors identified the need to provide an activity to develop intravenous therapy skills and provide increased opportunities, thus increasing technical skill and assessment skills. This led to the development of the focused clinical experience. During this clinical rotation, the students rotate through either a Same Day Surgery unit or an endoscopy unit for one of their clinical days. The primary objective of this clinical day is to provide intravenous therapy. The duration of this project was a 10-week quarter of the curriculum and involved 38 students in the 2002 class and 30 in the 2003 class. Results indicate a very positive learning experience for the student, as well as a collaborative and contributing effort by the students for the staff. The staff, on the other hand, assists in providing a mentoring role in shared expertise. Collaborative partnerships between academia and practice can help bridge the gap by providing opportunities to share perceptions, creating an environment for shared knowledge, and networking opportunities, leading to further enabling preparation for potentially future staff.

  3. Development and psychometric testing of the clinical networks engagement tool.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill M Norris

    Full Text Available Clinical networks are being used widely to facilitate large system transformation in healthcare, by engagement of stakeholders throughout the health system. However, there are no available instruments that measure engagement in these networks.The study purpose was to develop and assess the measurement properties of a multiprofessional tool to measure engagement in clinical network initiatives. Based on components of the International Association of Public Participation Spectrum and expert panel review, we developed 40 items for testing. The draft instrument was distributed to 1,668 network stakeholders across different governance levels (leaders, members, support, frontline stakeholders in 9 strategic clinical networks in Alberta (January to July 2014. With data from 424 completed surveys (25.4% response rate, descriptive statistics, exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, Pearson correlations, linear regression, multivariate analysis, and Cronbach alpha were conducted to assess reliability and validity of the scores.Sixteen items were retained in the instrument. Exploratory factor analysis indicated a four-factor solution and accounted for 85.7% of the total variance in engagement with clinical network initiatives: global engagement, inform (provided with information, involve (worked together to address concerns, and empower (given final decision-making authority. All subscales demonstrated acceptable reliability (Cronbach alpha 0.87 to 0.99. Both the confirmatory factor analysis and regression analysis confirmed that inform, involve, and empower were all significant predictors of global engagement, with involve as the strongest predictor. Leaders had higher mean scores than frontline stakeholders, while members and support staff did not differ in mean scores.This study provided foundational evidence for the use of this tool for assessing engagement in clinical networks. Further work is necessary to evaluate engagement in broader network

  4. Social networks and expertise development for Australian breast radiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taba, Seyedamir Tavakoli; Hossain, Liaquat; Willis, Karen; Lewis, Sarah

    2017-02-11

    In this study, we explore the nexus between social networks and expertise development of Australian breast radiologists. Background literature has shown that a lack of appropriate social networks and interaction among certain professional group(s) may be an obstacle for knowledge acquisition, information flow and expertise sharing. To date there have not been any systematic studies investigating how social networks and expertise development are interconnected and whether this leads to improved performance for breast radiologists. This study explores the value of social networks in building expertise alongside with other constructs of performance for the Australian radiology workforce using semi-structured in-depth interviews with 17 breast radiologists. The findings from this study emphasise the influences of knowledge transfer and learning through social networks and interactions as well as knowledge acquisition and development through experience and feedback. The results also show that accessibility to learning resources and a variety of timely feedback on performance through the information and communication technologies (ICT) is likely to facilitate improved performance and build social support. We argue that radiologists' and, in particular, breast radiologists' work performance, needs to be explored not only through individual numerical characteristics but also by analysing the social context and peer support networks in which they operate and we identify multidisciplinary care as a core entity of social learning.

  5. Networking Skills as a Career Development Practice: Lessons from the Earth Science Women's Network (ESWN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, M. G.; Kontak, R.; Holloway, T.; Marin-Spiotta, E.; Steiner, A. L.; Wiedinmyer, C.; Adams, A. S.; de Boer, A. M.; Staudt, A. C.; Fiore, A. M.

    2010-12-01

    Professional networking is often cited as an important component of scientific career development, yet there are few resources for early career scientists to develop and build networks. Personal networks can provide opportunities to learn about organizational culture and procedures, expectations, advancement opportunities, and best practices. They provide access to mentors and job placement opportunities, new scientific collaborations, speaker and conference invitations, increased scientific visibility, reduced isolation, and a stronger feeling of community. There is evidence in the literature that a sense of community positively affects the engagement and retention of underrepresented groups, including women, in science. Thus women scientists may particularly benefit from becoming part of a network. The Earth Science Women’s Network (ESWN) began in 2002 as an informal peer-to-peer mentoring initiative among a few recent Ph.D.s. The network has grown exponentially to include over 1000 women scientists across the globe. Surveys of our membership about ESWN report positive impacts on the careers of women in Earth sciences, particularly those in early career stages. Through ESWN, women share both professional and personal advice, establish research collaborations, communicate strategies on work/life balance, connect with women at various stages of their careers, and provide perspectives from cultures across the globe. We present lessons learned through the formal and informal activities promoted by ESWN in support of the career development of women Earth scientists.

  6. Open Development: Networked Innovations in International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Social intervention is distinctively shaped to approach a problem represented by market or state failure: it seeks to create a workaround that harnesses social production to fulfill the complete ...... Here we find the body of ICT4D literature that advocates appropriation of ICTs for the creation of alternative forms of development.

  7. Southern African Development Research Network | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Members of the Southern Africa Development Community (SADC) are struggling to craft policies for fruitful integration into the global economy and inclusive growth. While some donor initiatives have been successful in meeting short-term policy needs, they are not sustainable solutions to a weak research and policy ...

  8. Virtual learning networks for sustainable development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Kraker, Joop; Cörvers, Ron

    2010-01-01

    Sustainable development is a participatory, multi-actor process. In this process, learning plays a major role as participants have to exchange and integrate a diversity of perspectives and types of knowledge and expertise in order to arrive at innovative, jointly supported solutions. Virtual

  9. Evaluating global health partnerships: A case study of a Gavi HPV vaccine application process in Uganda

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Salisbury, Nicole; Carnahan, Emily; Kamya, Carol; Asiimwe, Gilbert; Shearer, Jessica; Brinkerhoff, Jennifer; Waiswa, Peter; Hozumi, Dai

    2017-01-01

    .... Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, is one such public-private partnership; in Gavi-eligible countries partnerships are dynamic networks of immunization actors who work together to support all stages and aspects of Gavi support...

  10. Developing Partnerships and Recruiting Dyads for a Prostate Cancer Informed Decision Making Program: Lessons Learned From a Community-Academic-Clinical Team

    OpenAIRE

    Friedman, Daniela B.; Johnson, Kim M.; Owens, Otis L.; Thomas, Tracey L.; Dawkins, DeLisa S.; Gansauer, Lucy; Bartelt, Sharon; Waddell, Nancy M.; Talley, Pastor Jacqueline; Bearden, James D.; Hebert, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PrCA) is the most commonly diagnosed non-skin cancer among men. PrCA mortality in African-American (AA) men in South Carolina is ~50% higher than for AAs in the U.S as a whole. AA men also have low rates of participation in cancer research. This paper describes partnership development and recruitment efforts of a Community-Academic-Clinical research team for a PrCA education intervention with AA men and women that was designed to address the discordance between high rates of ...

  11. INFORMATION SYSTEM OF AIRPORT NETWORK DEVELOPMENT MONITORING FORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Smirnov

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the approaches to the development of information system in public administration of this important branch of transport civil aviation. In particular, it is shown that the application of algorithmic elements allows to increase the objectivity and transparency when making decisions regarding the regulation of development of the airport network.

  12. Migrating a professional field of study in a multi-institutional partnership: facilitators’ experience in the competence-based curriculum development process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Proscovia Namubiru Ssentamu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available With the urge to Africanise the curriculum following colonisation, many African countries are still wary of the educational initiatives from the developed countries. However, with the clear curriculum design and development guidelines provided by various national Quality Assurance bodies, African countries need not fear migrating curricula from developed countries. Drawing from the workshop experiences, authors of this paper illustrate the steps involved in migrating, contextualising and adapting a professional field of study in a multi-institutional partnership, with particular focus on the competence-based curriculum design and development process. The process of migrating higher education (HE Administration, Leadership and Management curriculum taught at the University of Tampere (Finland to a Postgraduate Diploma in Higher Education Leadership and Management (PGDHELM curriculum at Uganda Management Institute (UMI in partnership with the Makerere University and the University of Helsinki involved undertaking a needs assessment, training of trainers and adapting the programme to the UMI context. The training of trainers provided opportunity for the trainees to reflect and generate information on the status of HE leadership and management in Uganda. The curriculum was institutionalised by aligning it to the vision, mission and profile of UMI in the context of the existing internal and external Quality Assurance frameworks. This paper underscores the importance of involving stakeholders, taking into account national and institutional requirements in all the steps when migrating an academic curriculum.

  13. Partnerships panel: natural, resource partnerships: literature synthesis and research agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steve Selin; Nancy Myers

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a summary of an annotated bibliography on natural resource partnerships. Resource areas and management functions addressed in the partnership literature are examined. Partnership research is summarized and broken into categories including: Partnership outcomes, assessing the potential for partnerships, characteristics of successful partnerships,...

  14. Datasets for radiation network algorithm development and testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Nageswara S [ORNL; Sen, Satyabrata [ORNL; Berry, M. L.. [New Jersey Institute of Technology; Wu, Qishi [University of Memphis; Grieme, M. [New Jersey Institute of Technology; Brooks, Richard R [ORNL; Cordone, G. [Clemson University

    2016-01-01

    Domestic Nuclear Detection Office s (DNDO) Intelligence Radiation Sensors Systems (IRSS) program supported the development of networks of commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) radiation counters for detecting, localizing, and identifying low-level radiation sources. Under this program, a series of indoor and outdoor tests were conducted with multiple source strengths and types, different background profiles, and various types of source and detector movements. Following the tests, network algorithms were replayed in various re-constructed scenarios using sub-networks. These measurements and algorithm traces together provide a rich collection of highly valuable datasets for testing the current and next generation radiation network algorithms, including the ones (to be) developed by broader R&D communities such as distributed detection, information fusion, and sensor networks. From this multiple TeraByte IRSS database, we distilled out and packaged the first batch of canonical datasets for public release. They include measurements from ten indoor and two outdoor tests which represent increasingly challenging baseline scenarios for robustly testing radiation network algorithms.

  15. Developing Network Location Model in Uncertainty Mode (Robust Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AMINI Mousa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research, facility location problem - network design under uncertainty robust mode has been discussed. In this regard a model will be developed, so that the uncertainty in parameters such as demand and problem’s various costs considered. Facility location- network design, unlike classical facility location models, which are assumed that network structure is pre-defined and specified- will also decide on the structure of the network. This has been in many actual applications such as road network, communication systems and etc and finding facility location and main network designing simultaneously has deemed important and the need for simultaneous design and optimization models to meet the mentioned items is felt. Different approaches have been developed in the uncertainty optimization literature. Amongst them, robust and stochastic optimizations are well- known. To deal with uncertainty and problem modeling, in this research robust optimization approach have been used. In addition, by using generated random samples, the proposed model has been tested and computational analysis is presented for various parameters.

  16. INTERCULTURAL ISSUES IN FORMAL PARTNERSHIPS - DIAGNOSIS AND SOLUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina MANOLESCU

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Today, collaboration, information and resource sharing with different (and sometimes even competing organizations have been viewed as key for success building. Encouraged by the European and national institutions, formal partnerships, whether temporary or permanent, such as grant writing agreements, clusters, regional working groups or networks have become more widespread in the socio-economic environment. This paper aims to investigate the most important intercultural issues in various types of formal partnerships built in Romanian public and private organizations and to identify solutions to these problems. In order to provide a solid, research-based approach to our study, we studied the evaluation reports of programs and projects involving partnerships and conducted interviews with people involved in the development and implementation of joint activities. The application of results is straightforward: the organizations will raise their awareness of the importance of an intercultural analysis when participating in a formal partnership and will take into account the implementation of appropriate methods in order to overcome intercultural challenges.

  17. E-Government Partnerships Across Levels of Government

    OpenAIRE

    Charbit, Claire; Michalun, Varinia

    2009-01-01

    E-government Partnerships across Levels of Government, is an overview of the challenges and approaches to creating a collaborative and cooperative partnership across levels of government for e-government development and implementation.

  18. 75 FR 57521 - Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD) Program: Draft NITRD 2010...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    ... FOUNDATION Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD) Program: Draft NITRD 2010 Strategic Plan--URL Correction AGENCY: The National Coordination Office (NCO) for Networking and Information... Coordination Office for Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD) requests...

  19. 24 CFR 92.501 - HOME Investment Partnership Agreement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false HOME Investment Partnership... Housing and Urban Development HOME INVESTMENT PARTNERSHIPS PROGRAM Program Administration § 92.501 HOME Investment Partnership Agreement. Allocated and reallocated funds will be made available pursuant to a HOME...

  20. Coalicion de Salud Comunitaria (COSACO): using a Healthy Community Partnership framework to integrate short-term global health experiences into broader community development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Lawrence C; Valdman, Olga; Dacso, Matthew M

    2016-05-02

    There is growing concern that short-term experiences in global health experiences (STEGH), undertaken by healthcare providers, trainees, and volunteers from high income countries in lower and middle income countries, risk harming the community by creating a parallel system of care separate from established community development efforts. At the same time, the inclusion of non-traditional actors in health planning has been the basis of the development of many Healthy Community Partnerships (HCP) being rolled out in Canada and the United States. These partnerships aim to bring all stakeholders with a role to play in health to the table to align efforts, goals and programs towards broad community health goals. This methodology paper reports on the process used in La Romana, Dominican Republic, in applying a modified HCP framework. This project succeeded at bringing visiting STEGH organizations into a coalition with key community partners and supported attempts to embed the work of STEGH within longer-term, established development plans. In presenting the work and process and lessons learned, the hope is that other communities that encounter significant investment from STEGH groups, and will gain the same benefits that were seen in La Romana with regards to improved information exchange, increased cross-communication between silos, and the integration of STEGH into the work of community partners.