WorldWideScience

Sample records for network research myths

  1. Network frontier as a metaphor and myth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N V Plotichkina

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This article considers spatial metaphors of the Internet and the possibility to extrapolate the frontier thesis of F. Turner on the electronic space. The authors believe that information and communication technologies and the digital world have become new spaces for the expansion of states or individuals. That is why there are ongoing scientific debates on the limits and potential of western and electronic frontiers’ metaphors for analytical description of the digital space. The metaphor of the Internet as a western frontier is quite controversial; many authors prefer the electronic frontier analogy as more heuristic and valid for constructing metaphors of the digital reality. The network frontier is defined as a dynamic, elastic and permeable border of social and cultural practices of the network society. The authors estimate the heuristic potential of the concept ‘network frontier’ developed on the basis of integration of the frontier theory and the concept ‘network society’, taking into account the effects of globalization for the study of elastic, permeable and movable border of the network landscape. In the digital world, the spatiality transforms, the geography of the Internet network determines the metamorphosis of the frontier as a contact zone between online and offline spaces, which is dynamic, innovative, encourages mobility, and its permeability depends on the digital competence of citizens. The authors explain the mythology of western and electronic frontier; name the main network frontier myths related to the rhetoric of western frontier myth; describe the main components of the western frontier myth associated with the idea of American exceptionalism; and conclude with the identification of nowadays myths about frontier-men and the online space they master.

  2. Kerlinger's Research Myths: An Overview with Implications for Professors of Educational Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Larry G.

    A generation ago, Fred N. Kerlinger proposed that there were a number of myths that pervaded educational research. An overview of three specific myths is presented, followed by a discussion of the degree to which these myths have been overcome or still exist in educational research. The first of these myths, the "methods" myth, is…

  3. Kerlinger's Research Myths: An Overview with Implications for Educational Researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Larry G.

    1997-01-01

    Gives an overview of three of the myths that F. N. Kerlinger (1959, 1960) identified as pervading educational research. Explores the myths of methods, practicality, and statistics, and analyzes the degree to which they have been overcome or still exist. (SLD)

  4. Kerlinger's Research Myths. ERIC/AE Digest Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Larry G.

    Fred N. Kerlinger has been hailed as having contributed to the transformation of the way that behavioral scientists and educators read research reports, design and execute research, and draw conclusions about research. In 1960 he introduced the notion that educational research is fraught with mythology. Three of the research myths that he…

  5. A Narrative Review of Greek Myths as Interpretative Metaphors in Educational Research and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Cano, Antonio; Torralbo, Manuel; Vallejo, Monica; Fernandez-Guerrero, Ines M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews a series of Greek myths put forward as cultural narratives that could be used as metaphors or interpretative similes for explanatory and evaluative purposes in educational research and evaluation. These myths have been used in educational research literature, and most of them were found by carrying out an exhaustive search of…

  6. Family Caregiver Participation in Palliative Care Research: Challenging the Myth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoun, Samar; Slatyer, Susan; Deas, Kathleen; Nekolaichuk, Cheryl

    2017-05-01

    Despite international guidelines emphasizing consumer-directed care and autonomous decisions in research participation, there is a common myth that research can be an additional and unwanted burden on patients and their family members. To examine the experiences and impact of research involvement on family caregivers (FCs) of terminally ill people, focusing within home-based palliative care. Three hundred sixteen of 322 participants (98.1%), who completed an FC support intervention through a stepped-wedge cluster trial (Australia, 2012-2015), participated in a postintervention telephone interview on their study experiences, which included quantitative and qualitative questions. Ninety-seven percent of both the control (n = 89) and intervention (n = 227) groups perceived positive aspects, whereas almost all did not report any negative aspects of being involved in this research; the majority rated their involvement as very/extremely beneficial (control 77%; intervention 83%). The qualitative analysis generated three major themes: "intrapersonal-inward directed"; "connection with others-outward directed"; and "interpersonal-participant-researcher relationship." This study provided quantitative and qualitative evidence challenging the myth. In contrast to health professional concerns, FCs appreciated the opportunity to participate and benefited from their involvement in research. Research protocols need to be specifically tailored to the needs of family caregivers and include debriefing opportunities for all participants at the end of intervention studies, regardless of which group they have been assigned. Strategies that facilitate health professionals' understanding of the research and risk benefits may help reduce gatekeeping and improve the validity of research findings. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The network researchers' network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henneberg, Stephan C.; Jiang, Zhizhong; Naudé, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The Industrial Marketing and Purchasing (IMP) Group is a network of academic researchers working in the area of business-to-business marketing. The group meets every year to discuss and exchange ideas, with a conference having been held every year since 1984 (there was no meeting in 1987). In thi......The Industrial Marketing and Purchasing (IMP) Group is a network of academic researchers working in the area of business-to-business marketing. The group meets every year to discuss and exchange ideas, with a conference having been held every year since 1984 (there was no meeting in 1987......). In this paper, based upon the papers presented at the 22 conferences held to date, we undertake a Social Network Analysis in order to examine the degree of co-publishing that has taken place between this group of researchers. We identify the different components in this database, and examine the large main...

  8. Maths Meets Myths: Network Investigations of Ancient Narratives

    CERN Document Server

    Kenna, R

    2015-01-01

    Three years ago, we initiated a programme of research in which ideas and tools from statistical physics and network theory were applied to the field of comparative mythology. The eclecticism of the work, together with the perspectives it delivered, led to widespread media coverage and academic discussion. Here we review some aspects of the project, contextualised with a brief history of the long relationship between science and the humanities. We focus in particular on an Irish epic, summarising some of the outcomes of our quantitative investigation. We also describe the emergence of a new sub-discipline and our hopes for its future.

  9. Kerlinger's Practicality Myth and the Quality of Research Instruction: An Overview of the Content of Educational Research Textbooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowell, R. Kevin

    1997-01-01

    The myth that research should have practicality as its principal aim was attacked by F. N. Kerlinger in many of his publications. However, a review of current educational research textbooks suggests that the field of education is still focused more on applied than on basic research. (SLD)

  10. The Myth of Meeting Needs Revisited: The Case of Educational Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawy, Robert; Armstrong, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Our primary objective in this paper is revisit a debate that was articulated 25 years ago in this journal in which it was argued that the idea of meeting needs in adult and continuing education is a myth. We extend the original analysis of need and apply it to the case of educational research. We look at the policy context, which has, in the…

  11. Family Myths, Beliefs, and Customs as a Research/Educational Tool to Explore Identity Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, William E.

    2008-01-01

    This paper outlines a qualitative research tool designed to explore personal identity formation as described by Erik Erikson and offers self-reflective and anonymous evaluative comments made by college students after completing this task. Subjects compiled a list of 200 myths, customs, fables, rituals, and beliefs from their family of origin and…

  12. Islamic Myths and Memories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islamic myths and collective memory are very much alive in today’s localized struggles for identity, and are deployed in the ongoing construction of worldwide cultural networks. This book brings the theoretical perspectives of myth-making and collective memory to the study of Islam and globalizat......Islamic myths and collective memory are very much alive in today’s localized struggles for identity, and are deployed in the ongoing construction of worldwide cultural networks. This book brings the theoretical perspectives of myth-making and collective memory to the study of Islam...

  13. Lymphatic Education & Research Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lymphatic Education & Research Network Donate Now Become a Supporting Member X Living with LYMPHEDEMA AND Lymphatic Disease FAQs About ... December 8, 2017 11.08.2017 The Lymphatic Education & Research Network… Read More > ASRM LE&RN Combined ...

  14. Open Innovation in Research Libraries-Myth or Reality?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scupola, Ada; W. Nicolajsen, Hanne

    2009-01-01

      In this article we investigate open innovation in a non commercial setting: research libraries. The research questions are: Do academic libraries engage in open innovation processes? If so, what are the most important actors in e-services innovation and development and what is their role? By dr...

  15. Open Innovation in Research Libraries-Myth or Reality?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scupola, Ada; Nicolajsen, Hanne Westh

    2010-01-01

    In this article we investigate open innovation in a non commercial setting: research libraries. The research questions are: Do academic libraries engage in open innovation processes? If so, what are the most important actors in e-services innovation and development and what is their role....... In particular collaboration with other Danish research libraries and governmental agencies are important in setting the visions and strategies for e-services innovations; users have a more limited role.......? By drawing on earlier research on open innovation, new product development and new service development a case study at Roskilde University Library is conducted. We found that research libraries are indeed engaging in open innovation, especially involving competitors, government agencies and users...

  16. Open Innovation in Research Libraries-Myth or Reality?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scupola, Ada; Nicolajsen, Hanne Westh

    2010-01-01

    In this article we investigate open innovation in a non commercial setting: research libraries. The research questions are: Do academic libraries engage in open innovation processes? If so, what are the most important actors in e-services innovation and development and what is their role......? By drawing on earlier research on open innovation, new product development and new service development a case study at Roskilde University Library is conducted. We found that research libraries are indeed engaging in open innovation, especially involving competitors, government agencies and users....... In particular collaboration with other Danish research libraries and governmental agencies are important in setting the visions and strategies for e-services innovations; users have a more limited role....

  17. The Alzheimer myth and biomarker research in dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Edo; Schmand, Ben; Eikelenboom, Piet; Westendorp, Rudi G; Van Gool, Willem A

    2012-01-01

    The focus of most of the research on Alzheimer's disease in the last decades has been on senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. The vast majority of patients with Alzheimer's disease are over 75 years of age, whereas most of the research focuses on younger subjects. To consider old-age dementia as a homogenous well-defined condition ignores the complexity of this condition and limits the development of new diagnostic methods, preventive strategies, or treatment strategies that could be widely applicable in daily practice in the majority of the older patients. The current research on biomarkers focuses on correlates of plaques and tangles, which are poor markers in older dementia subjects. Acknowledging that dementia in old age is an essentially different condition from dementia at relatively younger age is needed and should lead to new approaches in dementia research.

  18. The myth of induction in qualitative nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergdahl, Elisabeth; Berterö, Carina M

    2015-04-01

    In nursing today, it remains unclear what constitutes a good foundation for qualitative scientific inquiry. There is a tendency to define qualitative research as a form of inductive inquiry; deductive practice is seldom discussed, and when it is, this usually occurs in the context of data analysis. We will look at how the terms 'induction' and 'deduction' are used in qualitative nursing science and by qualitative research theorists, and relate these uses to the traditional definitions of these terms by Popper and other philosophers of science. We will also question the assertion that qualitative research is or should be inductive. The position we defend here is that qualitative research should use deductive methods. We also see a need to understand the difference between the creative process needed to create theory and the justification of a theory. Our position is that misunderstandings regarding the philosophy of science and the role of inductive and deductive logic and science are still harming the development of nursing theory and science. The purpose of this article is to discuss and reflect upon inductive and deductive views of science as well as inductive and deductive analyses in qualitative research. We start by describing inductive and deductive methods and logic from a philosophy of science perspective, and we examine how the concepts of induction and deduction are often described and used in qualitative methods and nursing research. Finally, we attempt to provide a theoretical perspective that reconciles the misunderstandings regarding induction and deduction. Our conclusion is that openness towards deductive thinking and testing hypotheses is needed in qualitative nursing research. We must also realize that strict induction will not create theory; to generate theory, a creative leap is needed. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Collaborative Research on Sustainability: Myths and Conundrums of Interdisciplinary Departments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Sherren

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Establishing interdisciplinary academic departments has been a common response to the challenge of addressing complex problems. However, the assumptions that guide the formation of such departments are rarely questioned. Additionally, the designers and managers of interdisciplinary academic departments in any field of endeavour struggle to set an organisational climate appropriate to the diversity of their members. This article presents a preliminary analysis of collaborative dynamics within two interdisciplinary university departments in Australia focused on sustainability. Social network diagrams and metrics of coauthorship and cosupervision are analysed qualitatively. A “vicarious interdisciplinarity” was identified among key academics working narrowly in order to earn the resources that allow them to support others working interdisciplinarily. Those supported in this way appear to benefit from the esteem and nonredundant collaborative connections their mentors provide via this strategy, but they experience uncertainty about their own career opportunities in similar settings. This article thus unearths a conundrum of succession for interdisciplinary academic environments, and suggests that simple colocation of diverse academic stars is an inadequate strategy to achieve effective intradepartmental collaboration.

  20. Methodological Approaches in MOOC Research: Retracing the Myth of Proteus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffaghelli, Juliana Elisa; Cucchiara, Stefania; Persico, Donatella

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the methodological approaches most commonly adopted in the scholarly literature on Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), published during the period January 2008-May 2014. In order to identify trends, gaps and criticalities related to the methodological approaches of this emerging field of research, we analysed 60 papers…

  1. Alzheimer's Myths

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... home. Myth 3: Only older people can get Alzheimer's Reality: Alzheimer's can strike people in their 30s, ... Myth 7: Silver dental fillings increase risk of Alzheimer's disease Reality: According to the best available scientific ...

  2. Busting Myths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chick, Helen

    2013-01-01

    Arecent episode of "MythBusters" (Williams, 2013) involved a series of "battles of the sexes" to examine myths and urban legends about things that men are supposedly better (or worse) at doing than women. Some of the processes that were used on the show to investigate these myths, along with the data they generated, can be used…

  3. International research networks in pharmaceuticals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cantner, Uwe; Rake, Bastian

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge production and scientific research have become increasingly more collaborative and international, particularly in pharmaceuticals. We analyze this tendency in general and tie formation in international research networks on the country level in particular. Based on a unique dataset...... of scientific publications related to pharmaceutical research and applying social network analysis, we find that both the number of countries and their connectivity increase in almost all disease group specific networks. The cores of the networks consist of high income OECD countries and remain rather stable...

  4. Urban Myths about Learning and Education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Bruyckere, Pedro; Kirschner, Paul A.; Hulshof, Casper

    2016-01-01

    In this book, the most common popular myths relating to learning and education are discussed with respect to whether there is any truth in the myth and what good educational and psychological research has to say about them. Examples of such myths range from: learning styles to neuromyths such as

  5. Membrane Yeast Two-Hybrid (MYTH) Mapping of Full-Length Membrane Protein Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, Jamie; Stagljar, Igor

    2016-01-04

    Mapping of protein interaction networks is a major strategy for obtaining a global understanding of protein function in cells and represents one of the primary goals of proteomics research. Membrane proteins, which play key roles in human disease and as drug targets, are of considerable interest; however, because of their hydrophobic nature, mapping their interactions presents significant technical challenges and requires the use of special methodological approaches. One powerful approach is the membrane yeast two-hybrid (MYTH) assay, a split-ubiquitin-based system specifically suited to the study of full-length membrane protein interactions in vivo using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a host. The system can be used in both low- and high-throughput formats to study proteins from a wide range of different organisms. There are two primary variants of MYTH: integrated (iMYTH), which involves endogenous expression and tagging of baits and is suitable for studying native yeast membrane proteins, and traditional (tMYTH), which involves ectopic plasmid-based expression of tagged baits and is suitable for studying membrane proteins from other organisms. Here we provide an introduction to the MYTH assay, including both the iMYTH and tMYTH variants. MYTH can be set up in almost any laboratory environment, with results typically obtainable within 4 to 6 wk. © 2016 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  6. Myths and Distance Education: What the Research Says (And Does Not Say).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonson, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Addresses three myths relating to distance education: (1) for video-based distance education, the higher the frames per second the better; (2) the more interaction, the better; and (3) instructor training is required for anyone planning to teach at a distance. (LRW)

  7. Grammar Myths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Roger

    2015-01-01

    This paper looks at the continued survival of "myths" about English grammar, for example, the statement that in negative and interrogative sentences "any" should be used instead of "some". It is based on a survey of 195 Hong Kong students majoring in English, in five different cohorts, which found that such myths are…

  8. Action Research as a Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boulus-Rødje, Nina

    2012-01-01

    and the different roles I occupied. To better understand the complex nature of collaboration found within action research projects, I propose conceptualizing action research as a network. The network framework directs our attention to the collective production and the conditions through which roles......This paper explores roles and interventions in IS action research. I draw upon a four-year research project about electronic medical records, conducted in close collaboration with a community partner. Following a self-reflexive stance, I trace the trajectory of the research engagement...... and interventions come to exist. Thus, interventions and roles can be seen as network effects—they are enacted and supported by the network. Accordingly, roles and interventions are neither simply static and fixed nor fluid and flexible; rather, these are products of past and present attachments. I demonstrate how...

  9. Research Award: Informaon and Networks

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Corey Piccioni

    2013-08-07

    Aug 7, 2013 ... IDRC's Informaon and Networks (I&N) program is seeking a Research Awardee for 2014. The growth of networked technologies has created new opportunies for advancing human development in developing countries. Greater access to the Internet and mobile phones has led to a series of unique and ...

  10. Action Research as a Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boulus-Rødje, Nina

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores roles and interventions in IS action research. I draw upon a four-year research project about electronic medical records, conducted in close collaboration with a community partner. Following a self-reflexive stance, I trace the trajectory of the research engagement...... and the different roles I occupied. To better understand the complex nature of collaboration found within action research projects, I propose conceptualizing action research as a network. The network framework directs our attention to the collective production and the conditions through which roles...... this influences the researcher’s agency....

  11. At the foot of Mount Olympus: A theory on myth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flip Schutte

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available A cult normally develops around myths and rituals. In this article myth as phenomenon will be investigated. Different types and categories of myths will be listed, while research done in the past on myths will also be dealt with. Furthermore, the issue of ritual accompanying the myth will be briefly discussed. This article wants to promote the notion that one does not need any particular worldview, be it mythological, orthodox, fundamentalistic, or biblisistic, to use, understand, and appreciate myths. Even in a postmodern world the value of myths can be appreciated.

  12. Diabetes Myths

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Diabetes Myths On behalf of the millions of Americans ... or obese, you will eventually develop type 2 diabetes. Fact: Being overweight is a risk factor for ...

  13. Gigabit Network Communications Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-12-31

    DARTnet of multi-part music synchronized using the protocol. ISI served as an endpoint for a distributed music demonstration; we performed one of the...34Portable DUAs", USC/ISI, October 1992. RFC 1374: Renwick, J., and A. Nicholson, "IP and ARP on HIPPI ", Cray Research Inc., October 1992. RFC 1375

  14. Research nodes and networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiessen, Christian Wichmann; Schwarz, Annette Winkel; Find, Søren

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of the spatial distribution and connectivity of scientific research, using linkages between academic units (institutions and business)to assess the relative weight of the worlds metropolitan regions. The findings support Richard Floridas assertion that the world is "spiky" rather than flat...

  15. Open Research Networking Gadgets (ORNG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeks, Eric; Turner, Brian; Chatterjee, Anirvan; Yuan, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    In 2009, UCSF embarked on a journey to utilize industry-backed application standards to extend our research networking tool of choice, Profiles, into a software platform. The goal of this work was to bring extended data and functionality to our researchers' online environment and make it easier to share independently-developed software innovations with others. We used the OpenSocial standard to achieve these ends. In 2012 we extended the OpenSocial standard to support RDF and the VIVO Ontology in an effort titled "Open Research Network Gadgets" or ORNG. Our work has been adopted by two major academic open source research networking tools - Harvard Catalyst Profiles and VIVO, and the ORNG standard is now available for use by the 50+ institutions that use recent versions of the two software products.

  16. Research, Boundaries, and Policy in Networked Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book presents cutting-edge, peer reviewed research on networked learning organized by three themes: policy in networked learning, researching networked learning, and boundaries in networked learning. The "policy in networked learning" section explores networked learning in relation to policy...

  17. Research nodes and networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiessen, Christian Wichmann; Schwarz, Annette Winkel; Find, Søren

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of the spatial distribution and connectivity of scientific research, using linkages between academic units (institutions and business)to assess the relative weight of the worlds metropolitan regions. The findings support Richard Floridas assertion that the world is "spiky" rather than flat......, and that the scientific world is even spikier that other spatial configurations. It is shown that there is a great deal of path dependence in the spatial structure of science, with northwestern Europe and north America hosting most of the leading creative metropolitan regions. But there is also a disimination tendency...

  18. Between myth and reality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldegård, Jette

    2010-01-01

    in an educational practice. The research on young people’s information behaviour by Rowlands et al. was carried out in 2007. To determine whether the picture of the Google generation is consistent with reality a number of the myths investigated in 2007 were explored among 43 Danish secondary school pupils in 2009...

  19. Research into Queueing Network Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-09-01

    recomposition , and stretching) that have been considered in queueing networks map arrival processes that are Markov renewal processes into other...research under this contract are marked by a double asterik(**). Other references are to work cited in the body of the report and are not ideas

  20. Network Penetration Testing and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Brandon F.

    2013-01-01

    This paper will focus the on research and testing done on penetrating a network for security purposes. This research will provide the IT security office new methods of attacks across and against a company's network as well as introduce them to new platforms and software that can be used to better assist with protecting against such attacks. Throughout this paper testing and research has been done on two different Linux based operating systems, for attacking and compromising a Windows based host computer. Backtrack 5 and BlackBuntu (Linux based penetration testing operating systems) are two different "attacker'' computers that will attempt to plant viruses and or NASA USRP - Internship Final Report exploits on a host Windows 7 operating system, as well as try to retrieve information from the host. On each Linux OS (Backtrack 5 and BlackBuntu) there is penetration testing software which provides the necessary tools to create exploits that can compromise a windows system as well as other operating systems. This paper will focus on two main methods of deploying exploits 1 onto a host computer in order to retrieve information from a compromised system. One method of deployment for an exploit that was tested is known as a "social engineering" exploit. This type of method requires interaction from unsuspecting user. With this user interaction, a deployed exploit may allow a malicious user to gain access to the unsuspecting user's computer as well as the network that such computer is connected to. Due to more advance security setting and antivirus protection and detection, this method is easily identified and defended against. The second method of exploit deployment is the method mainly focused upon within this paper. This method required extensive research on the best way to compromise a security enabled protected network. Once a network has been compromised, then any and all devices connected to such network has the potential to be compromised as well. With a compromised

  1. Authorship: Few Myths and Misconceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Ritesh G; Kharoshah, Magdy A; Madadin, Mohammed; Marakala, Vijaya; Lasrado, Savita; Al Tamimi, Dalal M

    2016-12-01

    This article seeks to address and dispel some of the popular myths and misconceptions surrounding authorship of a scientific publication as this is often misconstrued by beginners in academia especially those in the developing world. While ethical issues in publishing related to authorship have been increasingly discussed, not much has been written about the myths and misconceptions of who might be an author. Dispelling these myths and misconceptions would go a long way in shaping the thoughts and plans of students, junior faculty and researchers in academia especially in the developing world.

  2. The Myth of Spatial Reuse with Directional Antennas in Indoor Wireless Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmanan, Sriram; Sundaresan, Karthikeyan; Rangarajan, Sampath; Sivakumar, Raghupathy

    Interference among co-channel users is a fundamental problem in wireless networks, which prevents nearby links from operating concurrently. Directional antennas allow the radiation patterns of wireless transmitters to be shaped to form directed beams. Conventionally, such beams are assumed to improve the spatial reuse (i.e. concurrency) in indoor wireless networks. In this paper, we use experiments in an indoor office setting of Wifi Access points equipped with directional antennas, to study their potential for interference mitigation and spatial reuse. In contrast to conventional wisdom, we observe that the interference mitigation benefits of directional antennas are minimal. On analyzing our experimental traces we observe that directional links do not reduce interference to nearby links due to the lack of signal confinement due to indoor multipath fading. We then use the insights derived from our study to develop an alternative approach that provides better interference reduction in indoor networks compared to directional links.

  3. Myth Dispelled

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-03-20

    Dr. Adam Possner, an assistant professor of general internal medicine at George Washington University, reads and discusses his poem, "Myth Dispelled.".  Created: 3/20/2013 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 3/21/2013.

  4. Beyond the Myth of Nationality: Analyzing Networks within the European Commission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Suvarierol (Semin)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe current literature on the European Commission refers to the influence of nationality in the functioning of the Commission and in particular to the reliance on networks based on nationality, failing to give much evidence apart from anecdotes. This empirical study takes a systematic

  5. Myth & Bones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marchetti, Emanuela

    2011-01-01

    Recently museums are re-discussing traditional practices, as they became concerned with visitors' experience and learning. In this study communication is found to be mono-directional, especially towards captive audiences, like primary school children. The diachronic perspective seems neglected, a...... design of a new interactive installation, conducted with 8-10 years old children. Field study and initial evaluation show that introduction of notions related to human life-cycle and myth may further enrich learning from children's perspective....

  6. Tatar Myths

    OpenAIRE

    Kamalov, İlyas

    2005-01-01

    The Turks of Tataristan have a long tradition of sedentary life and written culture in the region where they currently live. In this environment, rich mythological elements of the Turkic world have got more chance to survive the long historical times. Their mythology grew richer, in the course of time, with various inner and outer influences, and have got more mythological materials. This article summarizes personalities in the Tatar myths and legends.

  7. National research and education network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villasenor, Tony

    1991-01-01

    Some goals of this network are as follows: Extend U.S. technological leadership in high performance computing and computer communications; Provide wide dissemination and application of the technologies both to the speed and the pace of innovation and to serve the national economy, national security, education, and the global environment; and Spur gains in the U.S. productivity and industrial competitiveness by making high performance computing and networking technologies an integral part of the design and production process. Strategies for achieving these goals are as follows: Support solutions to important scientific and technical challenges through a vigorous R and D effort; Reduce the uncertainties to industry for R and D and use of this technology through increased cooperation between government, industry, and universities and by the continued use of government and government funded facilities as a prototype user for early commercial HPCC products; and Support underlying research, network, and computational infrastructures on which U.S. high performance computing technology is based.

  8. Southern African Development Research Network | CRDI - Centre ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This project will build on lessons learned from an earlier IDRC-supported effort, the Southern African Trade Research Network (SATRN), funded under project 100816. The grant will support a broad-based research network, the Southern Africa Development Research Network (SADRN) with a view to filling some of the gaps ...

  9. Deconstructing myths, building alliances: a networking model to enhance tobacco control in hospital mental health settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montse Ballbè

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Life expectancy for people with severe mental disorders is up to 25 years less in comparison to the general population, mainly due to diseases caused or worsened by smoking. However, smoking is usually a neglected issue in mental healthcare settings. The aim of this article is to describe a strategy to improve tobacco control in the hospital mental healthcare services of Catalonia (Spain. To bridge this gap, the Catalan Network of Smoke-free Hospitals launched a nationwide bottom-up strategy in Catalonia in 2007. The strategy relied on the creation of a working group of key professionals from various hospitals —the early adopters— based on Rogers’ theory of the Diffusion of Innovations. In 2016, the working group is composed of professionals from 17 hospitals (70.8% of all hospitals in the region with mental health inpatient units. Since 2007, tobacco control has improved in different areas such as increasing mental health professionals’ awareness of smoking, training professionals on smoking cessation interventions and achieving good compliance with the national smoking ban. The working group has produced and disseminated various materials, including clinical practice and best practice guidelines, implemented smoking cessation programmes and organised seminars and training sessions on smoking cessation measures in patients with mental illnesses. The next challenge is to ensure effective follow-up for smoking cessation after discharge. While some areas of tobacco control within these services still require significant improvement, the aforementioned initiative promotes successful tobacco control in these settings.

  10. Greek and Roman Myths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Fredella; Faggionato, Michael

    Designed for use with the text "Greek and Roman Myths," this junior high school learning activity packet introduces students to mythology and examines the influence of myths on contemporary culture. Over 20 exercises, tagged to specific readings in the text, cover identification of the major gods, the Prometheus myth, the Atlas myth,…

  11. Deconstructing myths, building alliances: a networking model to enhance tobacco control in hospital mental health settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballbè, Montse; Gual, Antoni; Nieva, Gemma; Saltó, Esteve; Fernández, Esteve

    2016-01-01

    Life expectancy for people with severe mental disorders is up to 25 years less in comparison to the general population, mainly due to diseases caused or worsened by smoking. However, smoking is usually a neglected issue in mental healthcare settings. The aim of this article is to describe a strategy to improve tobacco control in the hospital mental healthcare services of Catalonia (Spain). To bridge this gap, the Catalan Network of Smoke-free Hospitals launched a nationwide bottom-up strategy in Catalonia in 2007. The strategy relied on the creation of a working group of key professionals from various hospitals -the early adopters- based on Rogers' theory of the Diffusion of Innovations. In 2016, the working group is composed of professionals from 17 hospitals (70.8% of all hospitals in the region with mental health inpatient units). Since 2007, tobacco control has improved in different areas such as increasing mental health professionals' awareness of smoking, training professionals on smoking cessation interventions and achieving good compliance with the national smoking ban. The working group has produced and disseminated various materials, including clinical practice and best practice guidelines, implemented smoking cessation programmes and organised seminars and training sessions on smoking cessation measures in patients with mental illnesses. The next challenge is to ensure effective follow-up for smoking cessation after discharge. While some areas of tobacco control within these services still require significant improvement, the aforementioned initiative promotes successful tobacco control in these settings. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Using Social Network Research in HRM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaše, Robert; King, Zella; Minbaeva, Dana

    2013-01-01

    ; the impact of social networking sites on perceptions of relationships; and ethical issues in organizational network analysis, we propose specific suggestions to bring social network perspectives closer to HRM researchers and practitioners and rebalance our attention to people and to their relationships.......The article features a conversation between Rob Cross and Martin Kilduff about organizational network analysis in research and practice. It demonstrates the value of using social network perspectives in HRM. Drawing on the discussion about managing personal networks; managing the networks of others...

  13. Chain and network science: A research framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Omta, S.W.F.; Trienekens, J.H.; Beers, G.

    2001-01-01

    In this first article of the Journal on Chain and Network Science the base-line is set for a discussion on contents and scope of chain and network theory. Chain and network research is clustered into four main ‘streams’: Network theory, social capital theory, supply chain management and business

  14. Modeling management of research and education networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galagan, D.V.

    2004-01-01

    Computer networks and their services have become an essential part of research and education. Nowadays every modern R&E institution must have a computer network and provide network services to its students and staff. In addition to its internal computer network, every R&E institution must have a

  15. Rescuing policy in tourism network research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dredge, Dianne

    2017-01-01

    Networks provide a powerful lens to understand complex relational entanglements that are transforming social, economic and political life. Through a discussion of the various streams of network research in tourism, this paper argues that policy matters run across and throughout these strands....... Rather than arguing for increased interest in tourism policy network research as a separate subfield, the paper argues for deeper theoretical engagement with the policy dimension in tourism network research. Researchers adopting a network ontology could gain considerable insights and open up new lines...... of inquiry into what is really going on if they engage with, unpack and critique policy and political science theories, tools, frameworks and concepts....

  16. The smart grid research network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troi, Anders; Jørgensen, Bo Nørregaard; Larsen, Emil Mahler

    2013-01-01

    This road map is a result of part-recommendation no. 25 in ‘MAIN REPORT – The Smart Grid Network’s recommendations’, written by the Smart Grid Network for the Danish Ministry of Climate, Energy and Building in October 2011. This part-recommendation states: “Part-recommendation 25 – A road map...... for Smart Grid research, development and demonstration It is recommended that the electricity sector invite the Ministry to participate in the creation of a road map to ensure that solutions are implemented and coordinated with related policy areas. The sector should also establish a fast-acting working...... group with representatives from universities, distribution companies and the electric industry, in order to produce a mutual, binding schedule for the RDD of the Smart Grid in Denmark. Time prioritisation of part-recommendation: 2011-2012 Responsibility for implementation of part...

  17. MYTH Screening: iMYTH and tMYTH Variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, Jamie; Stagljar, Igor

    2016-01-04

    Once a bait has been generated and validated for the membrane yeast two-hybrid (MYTH) assay, it can be used for either high-throughput screening to generate a detailed interaction map (interactome) or in low-throughput experiments to examine interactions with specific targets. Here we describe how to carry out high-throughput MYTH library screening of a validated bait generated using integrated or traditional MYTH. The principles herein can be easily adapted for use in a smaller-scale format if required. A typical MYTH library screen can be completed in ∼3-4 wk. © 2016 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  18. Five feminist myths about women's employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, C

    1995-09-01

    Feminist sociology has contributed substantial revisions to theory, especially in the sociology of work and employment. But it is also creating new feminist myths to replace the old patriarchal myths about women's attitudes and behaviour. Five feminist myths about women's employment are discussed whose acceptance as fact is not damaged by being demonstrably untrue. Arguably the most pervasive is the myth of rising female employment. The myth that women's work commitment is the same as that of men is often adduced to resist labour market discrimination. The myth of childcare problems as the main barrier to women's employment is commonplace in advocacy research reports. The myth of poor quality part-time jobs is used to blame employers for the characteristic behaviour of part-time workers, including high labour turnover. The issue of the sex differential in labour turnover and employment stability illustrates clearly how feminist orthodoxy has replaced dispassionate sociological research in certain topics. The concluding section considers the implications of such feminist myths for an academic community that claims to be in the truth business and for theories on the sexual division of labour.

  19. Academic social networking and research impact

    OpenAIRE

    Ebrahim, Nader Ale

    2015-01-01

    Academic social networking allows you to connect with other researchers in your field, share your publications and datasets, get feedback on your non-peer-reviewed work, and to stay current with news and events in your field of interest. It gives you another place to establish your name and research and perhaps even collaborate with others. The academic social networking, making your work more widely discoverable and easily available. The two best known academic social networking are Research...

  20. Myths on Bi-direction Communication of Web 2.0 Based Social Networks: Is Social Network Truly Interactive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-10

    Lyme Disease as an Example. Geospatial Health. 4(2), pp. 135-137 (2010). [18] Ginsberg, J., M.H. Mohebbi, R.S. Patel, L. Brammer, M.S. Smolinski, and...34 for epidemiological research: Lyme disease as an example. Geospatial Health, 2010. 4(2): p. 135-137. 5. Ginsberg, J., et al., Detecting influenza...people mutually oriented towards each other, that is, any behaviour that tries to affect or take account of each other’s subjective experiences or

  1. Using Network Science to Support Design Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parraguez Ruiz, Pedro; Maier, Anja

    2016-01-01

    A network-based perspective on designing permits research on the complexity of product, process, and people interactions. Strengthened by the latest advances in information technologies and accessibility of data, a network-based perspective and use of appropriate network analysis metrics, theories......, and tools allow us to explore new data-driven research approaches in design. These approaches allow us to move from counting to connecting, meaning to explicitly link disconnected pieces of data, information, and knowledge, and thus to answer far-reaching research questions with strong industrial...... and societal impact. This chapter contributes to the use of network science in empirical studies of design organisations. It focuses on introducing a network-based perspective on the design process and in particular on making use of network science to support design research and practice. The main contribution...

  2. Research of ad hoc network based on SINCGARS network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Hao; Cai, Xiaoxia; Chen, Hong; Chen, Jian; Weng, Pengfei

    2016-03-01

    In today's world, science and technology make a spurt of progress, so society has entered the era of information technology, network. Only the comprehensive use of electronic warfare and network warfare means can we maximize their access to information and maintain the information superiority. Combined with the specific combat mission and operational requirements, the research design and construction in accordance with the actual military which are Suitable for the future of information technology needs of the tactical Adhoc network, tactical internet, will greatly improve the operational efficiency of the command of the army. Through the study of the network of the U.S. military SINCGARS network, it can explore the routing protocol and mobile model, to provide a reference for the research of our army network.

  3. Myths about drinking alcohol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000856.htm Myths about drinking alcohol To use the sharing features on this page, ... We know much more about the effects of alcohol today than in the past. Yet, myths remain ...

  4. Meningitis Myths and Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... May 2014) 14 Adult Vaccine-Preventable Diseases Infographic Meningitis Myths and Facts Myth: Meningococcal disease is easy ... infected person, such as shaking hands. Fact: Meningococcal meningitis is spread through air droplets and direct contact ...

  5. Myths, Facts and Research on ‘Digital Natives’: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiola Cabra-Torres

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This review analyzed the context of discussion about ' digital natives’ subjectand the use of this notion in indexed literature. A critical review of essays,commentaries, point of view articles, and research results, are presented.Some problematic issues aroused in this field are discussed. It is evidentthe scarce empirical facts and drawbacks related with paradigmatic andmethodological approaches. Relevant aspects are proposed in order tofollow up the research with the purpose to deep in a comprehensive andinterdisciplinary way in this research arena.

  6. Biology Myth-Killers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampert, Evan

    2014-01-01

    "Biology Myth-Killers" is an activity designed to identify and correct common misconceptions for high school and college introductory biology courses. Students identify common myths, which double as biology misconceptions, and use appropriate sources to share the "truth" about the myths. This learner-centered activity is a fun…

  7. The Myth of the Working Mother: Evidence from Longitudinal Data. Research Briefing No. 70

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Heather

    2013-01-01

    It has been commonly held that "children suffer if their mother goes out to work". This research uses several studies--large scale longitudinal data--to look at the development of children whose mothers were employed when those children were very young.

  8. Network science and oral health research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maupome, Gerardo; McCranie, Ann

    2015-01-01

    The present overview of research methods describes a scientific enquiry paradigm that is well established in other disciplines, including health research, but that is fairly new to oral health research. Social networks analysis (SNA) or network science research is a set of relational methods purporting to identify and characterize the connections between members of a system or network, as well as the structure of the network. Persons and communities making up the members of networks have commonly been the focus of SNA studies but corporations or living organisms might just as well be organized in networks. SNA is grounded in both graphic imagery and computational models. SNA is based on the assumptions that features and structure of networks are amenable to characterization, that such information sheds light on the ways members of the network relate to each other (sharing information, diseases, norms, and so on), and that through these connections between members the overall network structure and characteristics are shaped. The overview resorts to examples specific to oral health themes and proposes a few general avenues for population-based research. © 2015 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  9. Weight-Loss and Nutrition Myths

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... D—cereals or soy-based beverages Myth: “Going vegetarian” will help you lose weight and be healthier. Some research shows that a healthy vegetarian eating plan may be linked to lower obesity ...

  10. Myths, Artifacts, and Fatal Flaws: Identifying Limitations and Opportunities in Vitamin C Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J. Michels

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Research progress to understand the role of vitamin C (ascorbic acid in human health has been slow in coming. This is predominantly the result of several flawed approaches to study design, often lacking a full appreciation of the redox chemistry and biology of ascorbic acid. In this review, we summarize our knowledge surrounding the limitations of common approaches used in vitamin C research. In human cell culture, the primary issues are the high oxygen environment, presence of redox-active transition metal ions in culture media, and the use of immortalized cell lines grown in the absence of supplemental ascorbic acid. Studies in animal models are also limited due to the presence of endogenous ascorbic acid synthesis. Despite the use of genetically altered rodent strains lacking synthesis capacity, there are additional concerns that these models do not adequately recapitulate the effects of vitamin C deprivation and supplementation observed in humans. Lastly, several flaws in study design endemic to randomized controlled trials and other human studies greatly limit their conclusions and impact. There also is anecdotal evidence of positive and negative health effects of vitamin C that are widely accepted but have not been substantiated. Only with careful attention to study design and experimental detail can we further our understanding of the possible roles of vitamin C in promoting human health and preventing or treating disease.

  11. Heroin assisted treatment and research networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houborg, Esben; Munksgaard, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    . In total, 11 research communities were constructed with different scientific content. HAT research communities are closely connected to medical, psychiatric, and epidemiological research and very loosely connected to social research. Originality/value – The first mapping of the collaborative network HAT...

  12. Targeting molecular networks for drug research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Pedro Pinto

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of molecular networks has recently moved into the limelight of biomedical research. While it has certainly provided us with plenty of new insights into cellular mechanisms, the challenge now is how to modify or even restructure these networks. This is especially true for human diseases, which can be regarded as manifestations of distorted states of molecular networks. Of the possible interventions for altering networks, the use of drugs is presently the most feasible. In this mini-review, we present and discuss some exemplary approaches of how analysis of molecular interaction networks can contribute to pharmacology (e.g., by identifying new drug targets or prediction of drug side effects, as well as listing pointers to relevant resources and software to guide future research. We also outline recent progress in the use of drugs for in vitro reprogramming of cells, which constitutes an example par excellence for altering molecular interaction networks with drugs.

  13. Research and Development Trends of Car Networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Li, Zhixiong; Xie, Guotao

    With the rapid development of the world economy, road transport has become increasingly busy. An unexpected incident would cause serious traffic disaster due to traffic accidents. To solve this problem, the intelligent transportation system (ITS), which is important for the health developments of the city transportation, has become a hot topic. The car networking provides a new way for intelligent transportation system. It can ensure intelligent control and monitoring of urban road with high performance. This paper described the concept of car networking and related technology both in oversea and domestic. The importance of car networking to achieve vehicle and details of the car networking related technologies were illustrated firstly. Then, attentions focus on the research nodus of the car networking. Lastly, the development trend of car networking research was discussed.

  14. Research Challenges for Wireless Multimedia Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melodia, Tommaso; Akyildiz, Ian F.

    This chapter discusses the state of the art and the major research challenges in architectures, algorithms, and protocols, for wireless multimedia sensor networks (WMSNs). These are networks of wirelessly interconnected smart devices designed and deployed to retrieve video and audio streams, still images, and scalar sensor data. First, applications and key factors influencing the design of WMSNs are discussed. Then, the existing solutions at the application, transport, network, link, and physical layers of the communication protocol stack are investigated. Finally, fundamental open research issues are discussed and future research trends in this area are outlined.

  15. Between myth and reality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldegård, Jette

    Many myths exist about the Google Generation which tend to overestimate the positive impact of ICT’s on young people. This paper presents and discusses the results of an exploratory case study of 43 Danish secondary school pupils’ information behaviour. Four research questions guided the study: 1......, this ‘optimal’ behaviour was found to be in conflict with a rational approach to information practice across secondary school pupils.......Many myths exist about the Google Generation which tend to overestimate the positive impact of ICT’s on young people. This paper presents and discusses the results of an exploratory case study of 43 Danish secondary school pupils’ information behaviour. Four research questions guided the study: 1......) What characterises the information behaviour of Danish secondary school pupils? 2) Does the information behaviour differ across year of study? If so, in which way does it differ? 3) How is information seeking conceptualized and experienced? 4) How is the study centre and library conceptualized...

  16. NC truck network model development research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    This research develops a validated prototype truck traffic network model for North Carolina. The model : includes all counties and metropolitan areas of North Carolina and major economic areas throughout the : U.S. Geographic boundaries, population a...

  17. Global Development Network: Supporting Global Research Capacity

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Global Development Network (GDN) is an international organization focused on building research capacity in development. Founded in 1999, GDN is ... The Centre for Research and Technology Development (RESTECH) is a two-year-old science and technology research centre at Maseno University in western Kenya.

  18. African Transitional Justice Research Network | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... the creation and sustainable expansion of an electronically-based research network on options and lessons learned pertaining to transitional justice. A second objective is to build the capacity of 75 African human rights researchers to produce locally based research and carry out evidence-based human rights advocacy.

  19. Research Award: Information and Networks

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC CRDI

    IDRC is one of the world's leaders in generating new knowledge to meet global challenges. We offer a number of research awards providing a unique opportunity to enhance research skills and gain a fresh perspective on crucial development issues. These one‐year, paid, in‐house programs of training and mentorship ...

  20. Using ethnicity as a classification variable in health research: perpetuating the myth of biological determinism, serving socio-political agendas, or making valuable contributions to medical sciences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, S S

    1999-11-01

    There is a need for a valid way to classify the human species consistently and reliably, be it to highlight similarities between human populations such as intelligence or physical capacity, to dispel myths about group differences, or to discover 'novel' risk factors for diseases. In contrast to racial divisions, which are usually based on differences in skin colour and physical features, ethnicity is a complex concept which has both socio-cultural and biological components. However, because of the relative vagueness of the term, the interpretation of the 'Ethnicity' construct is not simple, and its definition is often unique to the research project at hand. Therefore conducting ethnicity-research necessitates being aware of the differences between the concept of ethnicity and race, acknowledgement of the complexity of the ethnicity construct, and requires that a clear definition of the use of this term be made explicit by the researcher.

  1. Interventionist Research as a Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boulus, Nina

    2010-01-01

    , fostering such close collaboration comes at the cost of greater dependency on the community partner and it brings about various methodological complexities related to the research practice. This includes, for instance, dealing with conflicting agendas and interest, juggling multiple roles, managing high......In the past three decades, we have been witnessing a development in social studies which has been described by STS scholars as the ‘participatory turn.’ This refers to a move toward various types of interventionist and action-oriented research. This turn to participation and action emerged...... as a response to growing concerns with making STS ‘useful’ and politically relevant. The fundamental characteristic of interventionist and action-oriented research, is that the researcher is deliberately and explicitly engaged in a process of change through collaboration with a community partner. However...

  2. A proposed international watershed research network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterkamp, W.R.; Gray, J.R.

    2003-01-01

    An “International Watershed Research Network” is to be an initial project of the Sino-U. S. Centers for Soil and Water Conservation and Environmental Protection. The Network will provide a fundamental database for research personnel of the Centers, as well as of the global research community, and is viewed as an important resource for their successful operation. Efforts are under way to (a) identify and select candidate watersheds, (b) develop standards and protocols for data collection and dissemination, and (c) specify other data sources on erosion, sediment transport, hydrology, and ancillary information of probable interest and use to participants of the Centers. The initial focus of the Network will be on water-deficient areas. Candidate watersheds for the Network are yet to be determined although likely selections include the Ansai Research Station, northern China, and the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed, Arizona, USA. The Network is to be patterned after the Vigil Network, an open-ended group of global sites and small drainage basins for which Internet-accessible geomorphic, hydrologic, and biological data are periodically collected or updated. Some types of data, using similar instruments and observation methods, will be collected at all watersheds selected for the Network. Other data from the watersheds that may reflect individual watershed characteristics and research objectives will be collected as well.

  3. Biological and Environmental Research Network Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balaji, V. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Earth Science Grid Federation (ESGF); Boden, Tom [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Cowley, Dave [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dart, Eli [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). ESNet; Dattoria, Vince [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). ESNet; Desai, Narayan [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Egan, Rob [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Foster, Ian [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Goldstone, Robin [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gregurick, Susan [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Biological Systems Science Division; Houghton, John [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Program; Izaurralde, Cesar [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Johnston, Bill [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). ESNet; Joseph, Renu [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Climate and Environmental Sciences Division; Kleese-van Dam, Kerstin [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lipton, Mary [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Monga, Inder [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). ESNet; Pritchard, Matt [British Atmospheric Data Centre (BADC), Oxon (United Kingdom); Rotman, Lauren [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). ESNet; Strand, Gary [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, CO (United States); Stuart, Cory [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Tatusova, Tatiana [National Inst. of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD (United States); Tierney, Brian [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). ESNet; Thomas, Brian [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zurawski, Jason [Internet2, Washington, DC (United States)

    2013-09-01

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science (SC), the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of SC programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 25 years. In November 2012, ESnet and the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) of the DOE SC organized a review to characterize the networking requirements of the programs funded by the BER program office. Several key findings resulted from the review. Among them: 1) The scale of data sets available to science collaborations continues to increase exponentially. This has broad impact, both on the network and on the computational and storage systems connected to the network. 2) Many science collaborations require assistance to cope with the systems and network engineering challenges inherent in managing the rapid growth in data scale. 3) Several science domains operate distributed facilities that rely on high-performance networking for success. Key examples illustrated in this report include the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) and the Systems Biology Knowledgebase (KBase). This report expands on these points, and addresses others as well. The report contains a findings section as well as the text of the case studies discussed at the review.

  4. Creatiing a Collaborative Research Network for Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, W.

    2012-12-01

    This abstract proposes a discussion of how professional science communication and scientific cooperation can become more efficient through the use of modern social network technology, using the example of Mendeley. Mendeley is a research workflow and collaboration tool which crowdsources real-time research trend information and semantic annotations of research papers in a central data store, thereby creating a "social research network" that is emergent from the research data added to the platform. We describe how Mendeley's model can overcome barriers for collaboration by turning research papers into social objects, making academic data publicly available via an open API, and promoting more efficient collaboration. Central to the success of Mendeley has been the creation of a tool that works for the researcher without the requirement of being part of an explicit social network. Mendeley automatically extracts metadata from research papers, and allows a researcher to annotate, tag and organize their research collection. The tool integrates with the paper writing workflow and provides advanced collaboration options, thus significantly improving researchers' productivity. By anonymously aggregating usage data, Mendeley enables the emergence of social metrics and real-time usage stats on top of the articles' abstract metadata. In this way a social network of collaborators, and people genuinely interested in content, emerges. By building this research network around the article as the social object, a social layer of direct relevance to academia emerges. As science, particularly Earth sciences with their large shared resources, become more and more global, the management and coordination of research is more and more dependent on technology to support these distributed collaborations.

  5. Myth from a Psychological Point of View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mozhgan Yahyazade

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the most mysterious phenomena in the world that engage the human's curious mind for long time is to discover the unknown world of myth. Believes and costumes of every nation is like a very strong and big tree. That has rooted in myth and their result has appeared in art and literature; and now we can understand the importance of myth. In this study we have tried to consider myth and theory's about collective subcontinent and dream and to make clear relationship be literature's notion with psychology and its branches and whatever that analysis in this interfiled research is cases that show the importance of relation between different fields that with more and penalized investigation we can find new information that maybe with more consideration and more attention to relation of these sciences; we can discover the hidden and unknown aspect of human's life and his behaviors.

  6. Do physicists need myths?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Harold I.

    2006-05-01

    In textbooks and popular writings physicists repeat familiar stories about the history of physics that historians have long identified as myths. Examples of remarks about Galileo and Aristotle are used to illustrate this practice. These examples lead to a discussion of several reasons why these myths might play a positive role for physicists and whether physicists can dispense with myths about the history of their field.

  7. The myth about the origin of the Karo House

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juara R. Ginting

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The Karo people in North Sumatra (Indonesia consider areas in the Karo regency and those in other regencies as part of Taneh Karo (the Karolands, despite the fact that these areas comprise different administrative territories. This paper focuses on how the idea of Taneh Karo is articulated in a special Karo myth. Scholarly research has discovered that the notion of Taneh Karo originated in pre-colonial times, but an analysis of a local myth which established the concept of Taneh Karo remains an interesting anthropological study. This study is significant as it endeavours to comprehend the traditional ways of life of the Karo people, and it is a crucial attempt to map out the inter-group relations in the Karo area, where the Acehnese, the Batak, and the Malay people take part. It is interesting to note that the myth of Karo has positioned the Karo community and land in a distinctive site within the network of inter-related groups. This is precisely the position which would determine the formation of the Karolands.

  8. Action research in inter-organisational networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goduscheit, René Chester; Rasmussen, Erik Stavnsager; Jørgensen, Jacob Høj

    2007-01-01

    Traditionally, the literature on action research has been aimed at intra-organisational issues. These studies have distinguished between two researcher roles: The problem-solver and the observer. This article addresses the distinct challenges of action research in inter-organisational projects....... In addition to the problem-solver and observer roles, the researcher in an inter-organisational setting can serve as a legitimiser of the project and manage to involve partners that in an ordinary business-to-business setting would not have participated. Based on an action research project in a Danish inter......-organisational network, this article discusses potential pitfalls in the legitimiser role. Lack of clarity in defining the researcher role and project ownership in relation to the funding organisation and the rest of the network can jeopardise the project and potentially the credibility of the researchers. The article...

  9. The future of network governance research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lewis, Jenny

    2011-01-01

    The popularity and scope of network governance research and practice continues to expand from its divergent foundations, assumptions and ethodological positions. This paper introduces a symposium of papers on this substantial sub-field by first summarizing the sprawling research endeavour...

  10. Tobacco Control Research, Dissemination and Networking in ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Tobacco Control Research, Dissemination and Networking in Lebanon. The Tobacco Control Research Group (TCRG), University of Beirut (AUB), is a multidisciplinary team of professionals from the health sciences, medicine, chemistry and engineering departments. The Group was established in 1999 with IDRC support ...

  11. Sustaining Research Networks: the Twenty-Year Experience of the HMO Research Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, John F; Paolino, Andrea R; Thompson, Ella E; Larson, Eric B

    2014-01-01

    As multi-institutional research networks assume a central role in clinical research, they must address the challenge of sustainability. Despite its importance, the concept of network sustainability has received little attention in the literature, and the sustainability strategies of durable scientific networks have not been described. The Health Maintenance Organization Research Network (HMORN) is a consortium of 18 research departments in integrated health care delivery systems with over 15 million members in the United States and Israel. The HMORN has coordinated federally funded scientific networks and studies since 1994. This case study describes the HMORN approach to sustainability, proposes an operational definition of network sustainability, and identifies 10 essential elements that can enhance sustainability. The sustainability framework proposed here is drawn from prior publications on organizational issues by HMORN investigators and from the experience of recent HMORN leaders and senior staff. Network sustainability can be defined as (1) the development and enhancement of shared research assets to facilitate a sequence of research studies in a specific content area or multiple areas, and (2) a community of researchers and other stakeholders who reuse and develop those assets. Essential elements needed to develop the shared assets of a network include: network governance; trustworthy data and processes for sharing data; shared knowledge about research tools; administrative efficiency; physical infrastructure; and infrastructure funding. The community of researchers within a network is enhanced by: a clearly defined mission, vision and values; protection of human subjects; a culture of collaboration; and strong relationships with host organizations. While the importance of these elements varies based on the membership and goals of a network, this framework for sustainability can enhance strategic planning within the network and can guide relationships with

  12. Novel Network Services for Supporting Big Data Science Research

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Joaquin; Donovan, Sean; Bezerra, Jeronimo; Morgan, Heidi; Ibarra, Julio; Clark, Russ; Owen, Henry

    2017-01-01

    To interconnect research facilities across wide geographic areas, network operators deploy science networks, also referred to as Research and Education (R&E) networks. These networks allow experimenters to establish dedicated network connections between research facilities for transferring large amounts of data. Recently, R&E networks have started using Software-Defined Networking (SDN) and Software-Defined Exchanges (SDX) for deploying these connections. AtlanticWave/SDX is a response to the...

  13. BADUY PLURALISM: FROM MYTH TO REALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdurrahman Misno Bambang Prawiro

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia is a land of many tribes, with each tribe having different customs. However they have a bond in the form of the state motto, Bhineka Tunggal Ika. This motto is based on a philosophy embraced by every tribe in the form of the teachings passed down from the ancestors such as pantun (Malay poetic form, rhyme, guguritan (Sundanese literary works, history and myths. Myths here are stories about things that happened in the past in the form of the history of the origins of man and nature, or the origin of a nation. Myths as a local wisdom are believed to be the truth by every member of the tribe applied in everyday life. This includes the myth that tells about human cultural diversity (plurality, and the community will implement its content. What about the Baduy community in Banten, do they have myths and apply the myths that deal with pluralism in their life? The Baduy are one of the ethnic groups in Indonesia who have myths about the creation of the universe, human origins, and even myths about the events that will occur. The myth about the origin of humans in the Baduy community begins with the creation of Adam as the first human, and then he had children that gave birth to the whole nation in the world. Because every human in the world is the great-grandsons of Adam, the Baduy believe that all humanity is dulur (brother despite differences in customs and religion. The reality of social life of the Baduy community, either Baduy Dalam (inner baduy or Baduy Luar (outer baduy is that they greatly respect all mankind despite the different cultures and religions. Prohibition to enter the Baduy traditional village for foreigners is because of historical factors, namely the agreement made by their ancestors with the Dutch. This research concluded that the Baduy society is a society that understands the plurality of cultures; it is based on a myth that they believe and apply in their life about tolerance of other religions. Key Word: Pluralism

  14. Creating a national home visiting research network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan, Anne; Minkovitz, Cynthia S; Chaffin, Mark; Korfmacher, Jon; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne; Crowne, Sarah; Filene, Jill; Gonsalves, Kay; Landsverk, John; Harwood, Robin

    2013-11-01

    Home visiting can play a key role in the early childhood system of services. For home visiting to achieve its potential, decision-makers must make informed choices regarding adoption, adaptation, coordination, scale-up, and sustainment. We need a coordinated, focused, and theory-based home visiting research infrastructure to inform such decisions. The transdisciplinary Home Visiting Research Network (HVRN) was established in July 2012 with funding from the Health Resources and Services Administration. Its goal is to promote the translation of research findings into policy and practice. Its objectives are to (1) develop a national home visiting research agenda, (2) advance the use of innovative research methods; and (3) provide a research environment that is supportive of the professional development of emerging researchers interested in home visiting. A Management Team designs and directs activities to achieve these objectives through Work Teams. A Steering Committee of national leaders representing stakeholder groups oversees progress. HVRN's Coordinating Center supports the Work Teams and HVRN's Home visiting Applied Research Collaborative, a practice-based research network of home visiting programs. This article describes HVRN's rationale, approach, and anticipated products. We use home visiting-primary care coordination as an illustration, noting potential roles for pediatric practices and pediatric researchers and research educators in HVRN activities. HVRN creates the infrastructure for a rigorous program of research to inform policy and practice on home visiting as part of the system of services to improve family functioning, parenting, and child outcomes.

  15. Myths of Library Automation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegarty, Kevin

    1985-01-01

    This analysis of nine myths of library automation highlights cost effectiveness, circulation control and delinquency rates, budget allocation, staff needs, technical services productivity, the online catalog, need for consultants, the MARC format, and turnkey systems. Views of the reality regarding each myth are offered. (EJS)

  16. Stars and Star Myths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eason, Oliver

    Myths and tales from around the world about constellations and facts about stars in the constellations are presented. Most of the stories are from Greek and Roman mythology; however, a few Chinese, Japanese, Polynesian, Arabian, Jewish, and American Indian tales are also included. Following an introduction, myths are presented for the following 32…

  17. Debunking the Cinderella Myth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mildred K.

    1984-01-01

    Focuses on debunking the Cinderella Myth--that relates the tale of Cinderella who is abused and exploited until she finds Prince Charming and lives happily ever after--and indicates that the same strategies are applicable to the debunking of other sex-biased myths. (JOW)

  18. Networks (2005) | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-04-25

    Apr 25, 2016 ... From its launch in 1970, IDRC adopted a new approach to providing international development assistance. IDRC's philosophy was to work with the people who hoped to benefit from the aid, and to set research agendas in collaboration with local partners. Networks have been at the core of this cooperative ...

  19. [Cooperative Cardiovascular Disease Research Network (RECAVA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Dorado, David; Castro-Beiras, Alfonso; Díez, Javier; Gabriel, Rafael; Gimeno-Blanes, Juan R; Ortiz de Landázuri, Manuel; Sánchez, Pedro L; Fernández-Avilés, Francisco

    2008-01-01

    Today, cardiovascular disease is the principal cause of death and hospitalization in Spain, and accounts for an annual healthcare budget of more than 4000 million euros. Consequently, early diagnosis, effective prevention, and the optimum treatment of cardiovascular disease present a significant social and healthcare challenge for the country. In this context, combining all available resources to increase the efficacy and healthcare benefits of scientific research is a priority. This rationale prompted the establishment of the Spanish Cooperative Cardiovascular Disease Research Network, or RECAVA (Red Temática de Investigación Cooperativa en Enfermedades Cardiovasculares), 5 years ago. Since its foundation, RECAVA's activities have focused on achieving four objectives: a) to facilitate contacts between basic, clinical and epidemiological researchers; b) to promote the shared use of advanced technological facilities; c) to apply research results to clinical practice, and d) to train a new generation of translational cardiovascular researchers in Spain. At present, RECAVA consists of 41 research groups and seven shared technological facilities. RECAVA's research strategy is based on a scientific design matrix centered on the most important cardiovascular processes. The level of RECAVA's research activity is reflected in the fact that 28 co-authored articles were published in international journals during the first six months of 2007, with each involving contributions from at least two groups in the network. Finally, RECAVA also participates in the work of the Spanish National Center for Cardiovascular Research, or CNIC (Centro Nacional de Investigación Cardiovascular), and some established Biomedical Research Network Centers, or CIBER (Centros de Investigación Biomédica en RED), with the aim of consolidating the development of a dynamic multidisciplinary research framework that is capable of meeting the growing challenge that cardiovascular disease will present

  20. Craving for Quality Education in Tanzania: Dispelling the Myths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalolo, John Fungulupembe

    2016-01-01

    There has been widespread concern about the provision of quality education (QE) for all learners in all contexts, but research evidence to inform this debate is quite divergent and in most of cases the question about achieving this desire seems to be full of myths. This paper examines a selection of embedded myths about QE in Tanzanian education…

  1. Dinosaur Discourses: Taking Stock of Gendered Learning Myths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paule, Michele

    2015-01-01

    The persistence of gendered learning myths in educational contexts and the wider imaginary continues to trouble feminist educational researchers and practitioners. The tracing of such myths and the categories they create through authoritative and elite discourses of the past suggests how they have functioned across different fields to preserve a…

  2. Mental Game Myths and Tips for Coaches and Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vealey, Robin S.

    2015-01-01

    What often seems intuitive and well-meaning as a mental game strategy may be ineffective or detrimental to athletes, based on the evolution of knowledge in sport psychology. This article describes three popular ideas about the mental game and identifies them as myths, based on experience and research. These myths are (1) mental training should…

  3. Generation and Validation of MYTH Baits: iMYTH and tMYTH Variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, Jamie; Stagljar, Igor

    2016-01-04

    Generation of baits for membrane yeast two-hybrid (MYTH) screening differs depending on the nature of the protein(s) being studied. When using native yeast proteins with cytoplasmic carboxyl termini, the integrated form of MYTH (iMYTH) is the method of choice. iMYTH involves endogenous carboxy-terminal tagging of the gene of interest within the yeast chromosome, leaving the gene under the control of its natural promoter. When studying proteins not native to yeast, or native yeast proteins with only cytoplasmic amino termini, traditional MYTH (tMYTH) must be used. In the tMYTH approach, amino- or carboxy-terminally tagged proteins are expressed ectopically from a plasmid. In this protocol, we describe the generation and validation of iMYTH and tMYTH baits. MYTH bait generation can typically be completed in ∼1-2 wk. © 2016 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  4. Poland-AOD aerosol research network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Jacek W.; Struzewska, Joanna; Markowicz, Krzysztof

    2017-04-01

    Poland-AOD research network (www.polandaod.pl) was formed in 2011. It is a consortium of Polish institutions that are involved in studies of the atmospheric aerosol impact on the climate system. In 2016 the Poland-AOD network comprised of five stations: Radiative Transfer Laboratory, University of Warsaw (urban station), the research station of the Institute of Oceanology, in Sopot (coastal station), Radiative Transfer Station SolarAOT in Strzyzow (background station in the Carpathian mountains), Meteorology and Climatology Observatory at the Nicolaus Copernicus University in Torun (urban station), and the Research station in Rzecin at Poznan University of Life Sciences (rural station). The primary goal of the network is to carry out measurements of aerosol single scattering properties, radiation budget, simulate radiative transfer and aerosol transport, validate aerosol transport and transformation models such as NAAPS and GEM-AQ, as well as carry out instrument calibration and intercomparison. We will present observations of aerosol properties collected by the network as well as results from the GEM-AQ model simulations for selected episodes of biomass burning and urban aerosol.

  5. Conceptualizing and Advancing Research Networking Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleyer, Titus; Butler, Brian S; Song, Mei; Spallek, Heiko

    2012-03-01

    Science in general, and biomedical research in particular, is becoming more collaborative. As a result, collaboration with the right individuals, teams, and institutions is increasingly crucial for scientific progress. We propose Research Networking Systems (RNS) as a new type of system designed to help scientists identify and choose collaborators, and suggest a corresponding research agenda. The research agenda covers four areas: foundations, presentation, architecture, and evaluation. Foundations includes project-, institution- and discipline-specific motivational factors; the role of social networks; and impression formation based on information beyond expertise and interests. Presentation addresses representing expertise in a comprehensive and up-to-date manner; the role of controlled vocabularies and folksonomies; the tension between seekers' need for comprehensive information and potential collaborators' desire to control how they are seen by others; and the need to support serendipitous discovery of collaborative opportunities. Architecture considers aggregation and synthesis of information from multiple sources, social system interoperability, and integration with the user's primary work context. Lastly, evaluation focuses on assessment of collaboration decisions, measurement of user-specific costs and benefits, and how the large-scale impact of RNS could be evaluated with longitudinal and naturalistic methods. We hope that this article stimulates the human-computer interaction, computer-supported cooperative work, and related communities to pursue a broad and comprehensive agenda for developing research networking systems.

  6. Conceptualizing and Advancing Research Networking Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    SCHLEYER, TITUS; BUTLER, BRIAN S.; SONG, MEI; SPALLEK, HEIKO

    2013-01-01

    Science in general, and biomedical research in particular, is becoming more collaborative. As a result, collaboration with the right individuals, teams, and institutions is increasingly crucial for scientific progress. We propose Research Networking Systems (RNS) as a new type of system designed to help scientists identify and choose collaborators, and suggest a corresponding research agenda. The research agenda covers four areas: foundations, presentation, architecture, and evaluation. Foundations includes project-, institution- and discipline-specific motivational factors; the role of social networks; and impression formation based on information beyond expertise and interests. Presentation addresses representing expertise in a comprehensive and up-to-date manner; the role of controlled vocabularies and folksonomies; the tension between seekers’ need for comprehensive information and potential collaborators’ desire to control how they are seen by others; and the need to support serendipitous discovery of collaborative opportunities. Architecture considers aggregation and synthesis of information from multiple sources, social system interoperability, and integration with the user’s primary work context. Lastly, evaluation focuses on assessment of collaboration decisions, measurement of user-specific costs and benefits, and how the large-scale impact of RNS could be evaluated with longitudinal and naturalistic methods. We hope that this article stimulates the human-computer interaction, computer-supported cooperative work, and related communities to pursue a broad and comprehensive agenda for developing research networking systems. PMID:24376309

  7. Dissertation Quality and Kerlinger's "Methods Myth."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponticell, Judith A.; Olivarez, Arturo

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the context in which F. N. Kerlinger (1960) developed his perspectives on educational research, his ideas about mythology in educational research, and the importance of his "methods" myth for education dissertations. Makes some recommendations for research methods in dissertation writing. (SLD)

  8. ResearchGate & Academia: Networks for Researchers to Improve Research Impact

    OpenAIRE

    Ebrahim, Nader Ale

    2017-01-01

    Researchers needs to remove many traditional obstacles to reach the general public. Academic social networking allows you to connect with other researchers in your field, share your publications, and get feedback on your non-peer-reviewed work. It gives you another place to establish your name and research and perhaps even collaborate with others. The academic social networking, making your work more widely discoverable and easily available. The two best known academic social networking are R...

  9. Networking to Improve Nutrition Policy Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanck, Heidi M.; Cradock, Angie; Gortmaker, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Effective nutrition and obesity policies that improve the food environments in which Americans live, work, and play can have positive effects on the quality of human diets. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) Nutrition and Obesity Policy Research and Evaluation Network (NOPREN) conducts transdisciplinary practice-based policy research and evaluation to foster understanding of the effectiveness of nutrition policies. The articles in this special collection bring to light a set of policies that are being used across the United States. They add to the larger picture of policies that can work together over time to improve diet and health. PMID:26355829

  10. Global Warming: A Myth?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 7. Global Warming: A Myth? - Credibility of Climate Scenarios Predicted by Systems Simulations. Deepanjan Majumdar. General Article Volume 6 Issue 7 July 2001 pp 13-21 ...

  11. Liberating Interdisciplinarity from Myth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Dorte

    2016-01-01

    Schools and what is assumed to be a major institutional redrawing of boundaries, there is a pressing need to conceptualize interdisciplinary practices and boundary work. This paper explores the “weak” discipline through a discourse analytical lens and identifies a myth. Perceiving the discipline as weak is part...... of a myth, fueled by the ideal of a unitary discipline; the ideal discipline has strong boundaries, and as long as the discourse continues to focus on a need for boundaries, the only available discourse is one that articulates the discipline as weak. Thus, the myth is a vicious circle that can be broken...... if weakness is no longer ascribed to the discipline by tradition. The paper offers an explanation of the workings of the myth so that its particular way of interpreting the world does not mislead us when theorizing interdisciplinarity. This is a conceptual paper, and the examples serve as an empirical...

  12. Morphine: Myths and Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... section All Articles & Stories News Morphine: Myths and Reality Feb 2, 2013 Share The mere mention of “ ... due to misinformation and lack of training. The reality is that Morphine (and other opiates that work ...

  13. Global Warming: A Myth?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 6. Global Warming: A Myth? - Anomalous Temperature Trends Recorded from Satellites and Radiosondes. Deepanjan Majumdar. General Article Volume 6 Issue 6 June 2001 pp 43-52 ...

  14. AIDS Myths and Misunderstandings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... HIV is being spread by needles left in theater seats or vending machine coin returns. Reality: There ... cells (see fact sheet 124 ) could drop, a sign of immune damage. Myth: AIDS drugs are poison ...

  15. A research on the application of software defined networking in satellite network architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Huan; Chen, Jinqiang; Cao, Suzhi; Cui, Dandan; Li, Tong; Su, Yuxing

    2017-10-01

    Software defined network is a new type of network architecture, which decouples control plane and data plane of traditional network, has the feature of flexible configurations and is a direction of the next generation terrestrial Internet development. Satellite network is an important part of the space-ground integrated information network, while the traditional satellite network has the disadvantages of difficult network topology maintenance and slow configuration. The application of SDN technology in satellite network can solve these problems that traditional satellite network faces. At present, the research on the application of SDN technology in satellite network is still in the stage of preliminary study. In this paper, we start with introducing the SDN technology and satellite network architecture. Then we mainly introduce software defined satellite network architecture, as well as the comparison of different software defined satellite network architecture and satellite network virtualization. Finally, the present research status and development trend of SDN technology in satellite network are analyzed.

  16. The Evolution of the Personal Networks of Novice Librarian Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Marie R.; Kennedy, David P.; Brancolini, Kristine R.

    2017-01-01

    This article describes for the first time the composition and structure of the personal networks of novice librarian researchers. We used social network analysis to observe if participating in the Institute for Research Design in Librarianship (IRDL) affected the development of the librarians' personal networks and how the networks changed over…

  17. ESnet and Internet2 to launch next gen research network

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "The Department of Energy's (DOE) Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) and Internet2 will deploy a high capacity nationwide network that will greatly enhance the capabilities of researchers across the country who participate in the DOE's scientific research efforts." (1 page)

  18. Research on Evolutionary Mechanism of Agile Supply Chain Network via Complex Network Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nai-Ru Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper establishes the evolutionary mechanism model of agile supply chain network by means of complex network theory which can be used to describe the growth process of the agile supply chain network and analyze the complexity of the agile supply chain network. After introducing the process and the suitability of taking complex network theory into supply chain network research, the paper applies complex network theory into the agile supply chain network research, analyzes the complexity of agile supply chain network, presents the evolutionary mechanism of agile supply chain network based on complex network theory, and uses Matlab to simulate degree distribution, average path length, clustering coefficient, and node betweenness. Simulation results show that the evolution result displays the scale-free property. It lays the foundations of further research on agile supply chain network based on complex network theory.

  19. Research on 6R Military Logistics Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie, Wan; Wen, Wang

    The building of military logistics network is an important issue for the construction of new forces. This paper has thrown out a concept model of 6R military logistics network model based on JIT. Then we conceive of axis spoke y logistics centers network, flexible 6R organizational network, lean 6R military information network based grid. And then the strategy and proposal for the construction of the three sub networks of 6Rmilitary logistics network are given.

  20. Brave Firefighters, Endangered National Icons and Bumbling Land Managers: Network TV Myths about the 1988 Yellowstone Wildfires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Conrad

    Research shows that reporters often seek out the most available news sources rather than those who have the most expertise, that journalists tend to focus on specific events rather than the context in which they occur, and that news stories are presented as stylized social constructs rather than as factual accounts of what happened. A study…

  1. The Electra myth in Euripides and Cacoyannis

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    M.A. The goal of this research is to list, explore and explain the similarities and differences between the Electra of Euripides and the film of Michael Cacoyannis. Some critics regard the film as completely unfaithful to the original; others view it as a faithful cinematic rendition of the original; while others still regard it as a reworking of, and an improvement on, Euripides’ version of the Electra myth. The myth as treated by Euripides is about the revenge of the two children of Agam...

  2. Network Science Research Laboratory (NSRL) Telemetry Warehouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Collection, Storage, and Retrieval 3 3.2 Comparative Analysis 4 3.3 Data Processing 4 4. Architecture 4 4.1 NTW Database 6 4.2 NTW Server 6 4.4...efforts between ARL and the US Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). The primary emulation tools used by ARL are the Extendable Mobile Ad -Hoc Network...procedure call (gRPC) system. The gRPC system uses the Google protocol buffers compiler to generate the code for the server . gRPC handles many of the basic

  3. National Comparisons of Rape Myth Acceptance Predictors Between Nonathletes and Athletes From Multi-Institutional Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, John C; Tewksbury, Richard

    2017-09-01

    Athletes are cited as common perpetrators of sexual victimization and are at greater risk of becoming offenders compared with nonathletes. Demographic, lifestyle, and social characteristics of 624 nonathletes and 101 athletes from 21 U.S. Division I postsecondary educational institutions were assessed, with the updated Illinois Rape Myth Acceptance scale gauging endorsement of rape myths. Results indicate that athletes and nonathletes were similar in the degree of rape myth acceptance, with athletes reporting stronger agreement with rape myths than nonathletes did. Predictors of rape myth acceptance among nonathletes are multidimensional. In contrast, nondemographic characteristics like Greek membership, the number of alcoholic beverages consumed, and knowing a sexual assault victim predict rape myth acceptance for athletes, with gender not predicting rape myth acceptance nor different between genders of athletes. Policy implications and future research are discussed.

  4. The Myth in the Discourse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Myles; Corcoran, Farrel

    Reflecting the ideas of Roland Barthes, this paper examines the nature and importance of myth as a type of speech. The investigation proceeds by discussing myth from the perspectives of both traditional and contemporary disciplines, then considers the universality of myth, its religious impulse, and its functions. Using examples from television…

  5. Teachers' Strikes: Maxims or Myths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shreeve, William; And Others

    Seven commonly held myths concerning the effects of teachers' strikes on school districts are explored. Administrators from 124 school districts that experienced teacher strikes during the three-year period 1981-1984 responded to a questionnaire about the seven myths. The myths discussed include: (1) superintendents leave districts as a result of…

  6. The solar flare myth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosling, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    Many years of research have demonstrated that large, nonrecurrent geomagnetic storms, shock wave disturbances in the solar wind, and energetic particle events in interplanetary space often occur in close association with large solar flares. This result has led to a pradigm of cause and effect - that large solar flares are the fundamental cause of these events in the near-Earth space environmemt. This paradigm, which I call 'the solar flare myth,' dominates the popular perception of the relationship between solar activity and interplanetary and geomagnetic events and has provided much of the pragmatic rationale for the study of the solar flare phenomenon. Yet there is good evidence that this paradigm is wrong and that flares do not generally play a central role in producing major transient disturbances in the near-Earth space environment. In this paper I outline a different paradigm of cause and effect that removes solar flares from their central position in the chain of events leading from the Sun to near-Earth space. Instead, this central role is given to events known as coronal mass ejections.

  7. Empirically Based Myths: Astrology, Biorhythms, and ATIs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragsdale, Ronald G.

    1980-01-01

    A myth may have an empirical basis through chance occurrence; perhaps Aptitude Treatment Interactions (ATIs) are in this category. While ATIs have great utility in describing, planning, and implementing instruction, few disordinal interactions have been found. Article suggests narrowing of ATI research with replications and estimates of effect…

  8. Is Watching TV Passive, Uncreative, or Addictive? Debunking Some Myths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezdek, Kathy

    1985-01-01

    Three myths about the cognitive processing of television and its effects on children and adults--television is a passive medium, viewing decreases creativity, and viewing is an addictive behavior--are discussed and compared with relevant research findings. (MBR)

  9. The history of matrix metalloproteinases: milestones, myths, and misperceptions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Iyer, Rugmani Padmanabhan; Patterson, Nicolle L; Fields, Gregg B; Lindsey, Merry L

    2012-01-01

    .... Over the years, a few myths and misunderstandings have interwoven into the truths. In this review, we will discuss the major milestones of MMP research, as well as review the misinterpretations and misperceptions that have evolved...

  10. Hair Loss Myths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMarco, Gabriella; McMichael, Amy

    2017-07-01

    INTRODUCTION: Hair loss is a common complaint seen in dermatology clinics. From frustration and attempts at self-help, patients with hair loss may present to the dermatologist with false beliefs, or myths, about the causes of their condition and what treatments are effective. METHODS: We identified 12 common myths about hair loss, categorized as myths about minoxidil treatment, vitamin and mineral supplements, natural topical treatments, and hair care practices. We performed a PubMed search to find evidence to support or refute each myth. RESULTS: We found that there is little evidence to support many of these common hair loss myths. In some cases, randomized controlled trials have investigated the effects of particular therapies and point to the effectiveness of certain hair loss treatments. DISCUSSION: In many cases, there have not been sufficient randomized controlled trials to evaluate the effect of different therapies and hair care practices on hair loss. It is best to guide patients toward treatments with a long track record of efficacy and away from those where little is known scientifically. J Drugs Dermatol. 2017;16(7):690-694..

  11. Social networks of old people in India: research and policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Willigen, John; Chadha, N K

    2003-01-01

    This article presents a comparative analysis of the available research on the social networks of older persons in India. Most of this research has been done in North Indian cities. The research foci of the available studies include network size, core networks and beyond, life course changes in networks, impacts of residency in old-age homes, gender differences, and joint and nuclear family residence. This research is discussed in terms of its policy implications. Because the research demonstrates that social networks are important for the welfare of older Indians, one can conclude that social policy that encourages the maintenance of robust networks throughout the life course may be worth pursuing. One aspect of policy is discussed. The analysis of the relationship between social network and gender suggests that current policies that can be seen as supporting gender inequality in terms of property may have a negative impact on the networks of older women.

  12. Modern International Research Groups: Networks and Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katehi, Linda

    2009-05-01

    In a globalized economy, education and research are becoming increasing international in content and context. Academic and research institutions worldwide try to internationalize their programs by setting formal or informal collaborations. An education that is enhanced by international experiences leads to mobility of the science and technology workforce. Existing academic cultures and research structures are at odds with efforts to internationalize education. For the past 20-30 years, the US has recognized the need to improve the abroad experience of our scientists and technologists: however progress has been slow. Despite a number of both federally and privately supported programs, efforts to scale up the numbers of participants have not been satisfactory. The exchange is imbalanced as more foreign scientists and researchers move to the US than the other way around. There are a number of issues that contribute to this imbalance but we could consider the US academic career system, as defined by its policies and practices, as a barrier to internationalizing the early career faculty experience. Strict curricula, pre-tenure policies and financial commitments discourage students, post doctoral fellows and pre-tenure faculty from taking international leaves to participate in research abroad experiences. Specifically, achieving an international experience requires funding that is not provided by the universities. Furthermore, intellectual property requirements and constraints in pre-tenure probationary periods may discourage students and faculty from collaborations with peers across the Atlantic or Pacific or across the American continent. Environments that support early career networking are not available. This presentation will discuss the increasing need for international collaborations and will explore the need for additional programs, more integration, better conditions and improved infrastructures that can encourage and support mobility of scientists. In addition

  13. Evolution of the research collaboration network in a productive department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katerndahl, David

    2012-02-01

    Understanding collaboration networks can facilitate the research growth of new or developing departments. The purpose of this study was to use social network analysis to understand how the research collaboration network evolved within a productive department. Over a 13-year period, a departmental faculty completed an annual survey describing their research collaborations. Data were analyzed using social network analysis. Network measures focused on connectedness, distance, groupings and heterogeneity of distribution, while measures for the research director and external collaboration focused on centrality and roles within the network. Longitudinal patterns of network collaboration were assessed using Simulation Investigation for Empirical Network Analysis software (University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands). Based upon the number of active research projects, research development can be divided into three phases. The initial development phase was characterized by increasing centralization and collaboration focused within a single subject area. During the maintenance phase, measures went through cycles, possibly because of changes in faculty composition. While the research director was not a 'key player' within the network during the first several years, external collaboration played a central role during all phases. Longitudinal analysis found that forming ties was more likely when the opportunity for network closure existed and when those around you are principal investigators (PIs). Initial development of research relied heavily upon a centralized network involving external collaboration; a central position of the research director during research development was not important. Changes in collaboration depended upon faculty gender and tenure track as well as transitivity and the 'popularity of PIs'. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Seven Myths about Beginners' Language

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Karen; Kirkebæk, Mads Jakob

    2015-01-01

    ) the myth about ‘the only thing’ (the method), (4) the myth about “we tried that before”, (5) the myth about “one people and one teaching method, (6) the myth about easy and difficult languages, and (7) the myth about students with no competences and a worthless past. The article suggests language teachers...... to use a ‘myth-detector’ to detect, reflect on and possibly reject myths they may meet in their profession. The ‘myth-detector’ consists of four simple questions, namely (1) Where do we know it from? (2) What is it built on? (3) What views on learning, language and culture lie behind? and (4) Who (gets......In the article the authors have selected seven myths about beginners’ language for discussion, reflection and possible rejection. These are (1) the myth about the necessity of mastering the system before being able to speak the language, (2) the myth about limited capacity on the ‘hard disc’, (3...

  15. Recent Themes in Social Networking Service Research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John S Liu

    Full Text Available The body of literature addressing the phenomenon related to social networking services (SNSs has grown rather fast recently. Through a systematic and quantitative approach, this study identifies the recent SNS research themes, which are the issues discussed by a coherent and growing subset of this literature. A set of academic articles retrieved from the Web of Science database is used as the basis for uncovering the recent themes. We begin the analysis by constructing a citation network which is further separated into groups after applying a widely used clustering method. The resulting clusters all consist of articles coherent in citation relationships. This study suggests eight fast growing recent themes. They span widely encompassing politics, romantic relationships, public relations, journalism, and health. Among them, four focus their issues largely on Twitter, three on Facebook, and one generally on both. While discussions on traditional issues in SNSs such as personality, motivations, self-disclosure, narcissism, etc. continue to lead the pack, the proliferation of the highlighted recent themes in the near future is very likely to happen.

  16. Privacy Issues of a National Research and Education Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, James E.; Graveman, Richard F.

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of the right to privacy of communications focuses on privacy expectations within a National Research and Education Network (NREN). Highlights include privacy needs in scientific and education communications; academic and research networks; network security and privacy concerns; protection strategies; and consequences of privacy…

  17. The Myth of White Skin: A Postcolonial Review of Cosmetics Ads in Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Wulan Roro Retno

    2017-01-01

    Cosmetics industry created the beauty myth for women through advertising. A cosmetic ad in Indonesia has spread a new concept of white skin: East Asia beauty myth. The white concept of Asia white skin basically derived from colonial legacy. The purpose of the research was analyzing the beauty myth in Indonesia ads using postcolonial perspective. The principal result brought the discourse analysis and postcolonial perspective a new insight in communication research. Particularly on media and c...

  18. Networking: a catalyst in science and technological research ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research focuses on the network of networks access, usage, and productivity by the research scientists of Federal Institute of Industrial Research, Oshodi Lagos. Data was gathered through the use of questionnaire randomly administered to 100 research scientists in two phases. The phases were before and after the ...

  19. Asia-Pacific Research and Training Network on Trade (ARTNET ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Asia-Pacific Research and Training Network on Trade (ARTNET) was established in 2004 to enhance the capacity of researchers and research institutions to deliver timely, demand-driven, trade-related research to policymakers in the region. During the first phase of support (102568), the Network produced a number of ...

  20. Research of Innovation Diffusion on Industrial Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongtai Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The real value of innovation consists in its diffusion on industrial network. The factors which affect the diffusion of innovation on industrial network are the topology of industrial network and rules of diffusion. Industrial network is a complex network which has scale-free and small-world characters; its structure has some affection on threshold, length of path, enterprise’s status, and information share of innovation diffusion. Based on the cost and attitude to risk of technical innovation, we present the “avalanche” diffusing model of technical innovation on industrial network.

  1. Improving Research Visibility Part 6: Academic Social Networking

    OpenAIRE

    Ebrahim, Nader Ale

    2017-01-01

    Researchers needs to remove many traditional obstacles to disseminate and outreach their research outputs. Academic social networking allows you to connect with other researchers in your field, share your publications, and get feedback on your non-peer-reviewed work. The academic social networking, making your work more widely discoverable and easily available. The two best known academic social networking are ResearchGate and Academia.edu. These sites offer an instant technique to monitor wh...

  2. Academic Social Networking Sites: Improves Research Visibility and Impact

    OpenAIRE

    Ebrahim, Nader Ale

    2017-01-01

    Researchers needs to remove many traditional obstacles to disseminate and outreach their research outputs. Academic social networking allows you to connect with other researchers in your field, share your publications, and get feedback on your non-peer-reviewed work. The academic social networking, making your work more widely discoverable and easily available. The two best known academic social networking are ResearchGate and Academia.edu. These sites offer an instant technique to monitor wh...

  3. Community-centred Networks and Networking among Companies, Educational and Cultural Institutions and Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konnerup, Ulla; Dirckinck-Holmfeld, Lone

    2010-01-01

    This article presents visions for community-centred networks and networking among companies, educational and cultural institutions and research based on blended on- and off-line collaboration and communication. Our point of departure is the general vision of networking between government, industry...... and research as formulated in the Triple Helix Model (Etzkowitz 2008). The article draws on a case study of NoEL, a network on e-learning among business, educational and cultural institutions and research, all in all 21 partners from all around Denmark. Focus is how networks and networking change character......’ in Networked Learning, Wenger et al. 2009; The analysis concerns the participation structure and how the network activities connect local work practices and research, and how technology and online communication contribute to a change from participation in offline and physical network activities into online...

  4. The Portuguese Cinema, Trans-temporality and the Myth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Castelo Branco

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Eduardo Lourenço has focused some of his research on the historical-mythical relationship of the Portuguese with their country, claiming that they have been living in a kind of hyper-identity, incorporating an obsession with the past, which co-exists with a waiting utopian by future, as is demonstrates the Sebastianism myth. Focused on the representations of trans-temporality, identity, collective memory and myth, The Portuguese Cinema, Trans-temporality and the Myth, concentrated especially in Eduardo Lourenço's work to propose a research on how the identity myths – created and disseminated by Portuguese literature over the centuries – earned imagistic representations in the twentieth and twenty-first century’s, through a cinema that built or deconstructed these historical and patriotic mythological, inscribing image capacities to continually rebuild one mythologized common heritage.

  5. Collaboration networks and research productivity at IPEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteiro, Carlos Anisio; Barroso, Antonio Carlos de Oliveira, E-mail: monteiro@ipen.br, E-mail: barroso@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    In this article, we investigate the IPEN's scientific collaboration network. Based on publications registered in IPEN's technical and scientific database was extracted a set of authors that developed technical and scientific work on the 2001 to 2010 period, using coauthorship to define the relationship between authors. From the data collected, we used degree centrality indicator in conjunction with two approaches to assess the relationship between collaboration and productivity: normal count, where for each publication that the author appears is added one for the author’s productivity indicator, and fractional count which is added a fractional value according to the total number of publication's authors. We concluded that collaboration for the development of a technical and scientific work has a positive correlation with the researchers productivity, that is, the greater the collaboration greater the productivity. We presented, also, a statistical summary to reveal the total number of publications and the number of IPEN's authors by publication, the average number of IPEN's authors per publication and the average number of publications by IPEN's author, the number of IPEN's authors that not published with no other author of the IPEN and, finally, the number of active and inactive (ex. retirees) researchers of the IPEN, as well as, the number of authors who do not have employment contract with the IPEN. (author)

  6. Myths in test automation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jazmine Francis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Myths in automation of software testing is an issue of discussion that echoes about the areas of service in validation of software industry. Probably, the first though that appears in knowledgeable reader would be Why this old topic again? What's New to discuss the matter? But, for the first time everyone agrees that undoubtedly automation testing today is not today what it used to be ten or fifteen years ago, because it has evolved in scope and magnitude. What began as a simple linear scripts for web applications today has a complex architecture and a hybrid framework to facilitate the implementation of testing applications developed with various platforms and technologies. Undoubtedly automation has advanced, but so did the myths associated with it. The change in perspective and knowledge of people on automation has altered the terrain. This article reflects the points of views and experience of the author in what has to do with the transformation of the original myths in new versions, and how they are derived; also provides his thoughts on the new generation of myths.

  7. More Myths of Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basch, Linda; Lerner, Gail

    1986-01-01

    Challenges "myths" about women and migration, including (1) the causes of migration are economic, not racism; (2) migrant women receive support from feminist groups and trade unions; (3) transnational corporations are positive forces in developing nations; (4) migration today has little impact on family life; and (5) most migrants cluster in…

  8. The Myth about Einstien

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 11; Issue 1. The Myth about Einstien. Sushanta Dattagupta. General Article Volume 11 Issue 1 January 2006 pp 63-78. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/011/01/0063-0078. Keywords.

  9. Diet myths and facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... yourself to healthy snacks such as low-fat yogurt or baby carrots. MYTH? You cannot be overweight and healthy. FACT: There are some people who are overweight with healthy blood pressure, cholesterol, and blood sugar levels. For most people, excess ...

  10. Federal Plan for Advanced Networking Research and Development

    Data.gov (United States)

    Networking and Information Technology Research and Development, Executive Office of the President — In the four decades since Federal research first enabled computers to send and receive data over networks, U.S. government research and development R and D in...

  11. Local Governance and ICT Research Network for Africa | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Local Governance and ICT Research Network for Africa (LOG-IN Africa) is an emergent pan-African network of researchers and research institutions from nine countries. LOG-IN Africa will assess the current state and outcome of electronic local governance initiatives in Africa, focusing on how information and ...

  12. The Security Research of Digital Library Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Song, Ding-Li; Yan, Shu

    Digital library is a self-development needs for the modern library to meet the development requirements of the times, changing the way services and so on. digital library from the hardware, technology, management and other aspects to objective analysis of the factors of threats to digital library network security. We should face up the problems of digital library network security: digital library network hardware are "not hard", the technology of digital library is relatively lag, digital library management system is imperfect and other problems; the government should take active measures to ensure that the library funding, to enhance the level of network hardware, to upgrade LAN and prevention technology, to improve network control technology, network monitoring technology; to strengthen safety management concepts, to prefect the safety management system; and to improve the level of security management modernization for digital library.

  13. Research of The Deeper Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao You Rong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neural networks (NNs have powerful computational abilities and could be used in a variety of applications; however, training these networks is still a difficult problem. With different network structures, many neural models have been constructed. In this report, a deeper neural networks (DNNs architecture is proposed. The training algorithm of deeper neural network insides searching the global optimal point in the actual error surface. Before the training algorithm is designed, the error surface of the deeper neural network is analyzed from simple to complicated, and the features of the error surface is obtained. Based on these characters, the initialization method and training algorithm of DNNs is designed. For the initialization, a block-uniform design method is proposed which separates the error surface into some blocks and finds the optimal block using the uniform design method. For the training algorithm, the improved gradient-descent method is proposed which adds a penalty term into the cost function of the old gradient descent method. This algorithm makes the network have a great approximating ability and keeps the network state stable. All of these improve the practicality of the neural network.

  14. Research of multimedia streaming transmission in multiservice networks

    OpenAIRE

    Romanchuk, Vasyl; Chervenets, Vladymyr; Polishuk, Artur

    2012-01-01

    In order to forecast the quality of media streaming in multiservice networks under conditions of high load of network resources the research of the influence of network circulating traffic on streaming video and the efficiency analysis of existing protocols for transmission of multimedia data is held.

  15. [Modernity in dreams and myths].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scopelliti, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    The very presence of myths in psychoanalysis raises questions about their scientific status: that leads to reconsider the whole issue of Freudian mythology in a non-medical manner, by envisaging it in the more general context of modern myths, both political and artistic. Special attention is then paid to Surrealism, as the only avant-garde movement at the same time focused on psychoanalysis and politics: the role played by dreams in foundering myths is examined in both Surrealism and psychoanalysis. Surrealistic myths, such as Dalí's Grand Paranoïaque Comestible, finally prove to be so non-oedipian as the Nazi Ubermensch myth; nevertheless, their comparison with Freudian mythology points out their common origin, as they all fulfilled the need of the mass society for a modern myth, able to express his deeply renewed self-awareness.

  16. Research collaboration in groups and networks: differences across academic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyvik, Svein; Reymert, Ingvild

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to give a macro-picture of collaboration in research groups and networks across all academic fields in Norwegian research universities, and to examine the relative importance of membership in groups and networks for individual publication output. To our knowledge, this is a new approach, which may provide valuable information on collaborative patterns in a particular national system, but of clear relevance to other national university systems. At the system level, conducting research in groups and networks are equally important, but there are large differences between academic fields. The research group is clearly most important in the field of medicine and health, while undertaking research in an international network is most important in the natural sciences. Membership in a research group and active participation in international networks are likely to enhance publication productivity and the quality of research.

  17. The Relationships Between Policy, Boundaries and Research in Networked Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryberg, Thomas; Sinclair, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The biennial Networked Learning Conference is an established locus for work on practice, research and epistemology in the field of networked learning. That work continues between the conferences through the researchers’ own networks, ‘hot seat’ debates, and through publications, especially...... conferences, such as the inclusion of sociomaterial perspectives and recognition of informal networked learning. The chapters here each bring a particular perspective to the themes of Policy, Boundaries and Research in Networked Learning which we have chosen as the focus of the book. The selection...

  18. Building capability through networking with investors and researchers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Daojuan; Schøtt, Thomas

    -creation is embedded in the network around the starting entrepreneur, we expect. Co-creation benefits from networking with potential investors and with researchers and inventors, we hypothesize, and especially by networking with both investors and researchers concurrently. Co-creation is analyzed in a sample...... of startups at inception, by 9,161 entrepreneurs, surveyed in Global Entrepreneurship Monitor in 49 countries. Co-creation is found to be reduced by the entrepreneur’s networking in the private sphere of family and friends, but to be benefiting from networking in the public sphere, especially by networking...... with investors and researchers simultaneously. The findings contribute to understanding capability building as embedded in networks around the startup....

  19. Environmental sensor networks in ecological research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rundel, Philip W; Graham, Eric A; Allen, Michael F; Fisher, Jason C; Harmon, Thomas C

    2009-01-01

    Environmental sensor networks offer a powerful combination of distributed sensing capacity, real-time data visualization and analysis, and integration with adjacent networks and remote sensing data streams. These advances have become a reality as a combined result of the continuing miniaturization of electronics, the availability of large data storage and computational capacity, and the pervasive connectivity of the Internet. Environmental sensor networks have been established and large new networks are planned for monitoring multiple habitats at many different scales. Projects range in spatial scale from continental systems designed to measure global change and environmental stability to those involved with the monitoring of only a few meters of forest edge in fragmented landscapes. Temporal measurements have ranged from the evaluation of sunfleck dynamics at scales of seconds, to daily CO2 fluxes, to decadal shifts in temperatures. Above-ground sensor systems are partnered with subsurface soil measurement networks for physical and biological activity, together with aquatic and riparian sensor networks to measure groundwater fluxes and nutrient dynamics. More recently, complex sensors, such as networked digital cameras and microphones, as well as newly emerging sensors, are being integrated into sensor networks for hierarchical methods of sensing that promise a further understanding of our ecological systems by revealing previously unobservable phenomena.

  20. Virtual Network Computing Testbed for Cybersecurity Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-17

    Standard Form 298 (Rev 8/98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 212-346-1012 W911NF-12-1-0393 61504-CS-RIP.2 Final Report a. REPORT 14. ABSTRACT 16...Technology, 2007. [8] Pullen, J. M., 2000. The network workbench : network simulation software for academic investigation of Internet concepts. Comput

  1. Graduate students navigating social-ecological research: insights from the Long-Term Ecological Research Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sydne Record

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Interdisciplinary, collaborative research capable of capturing the feedbacks between biophysical and social systems can improve the capacity for sustainable environmental decision making. Networks of researchers provide unique opportunities to foster social-ecological inquiry. Although insights into interdisciplinary research have been discussed elsewhere, they rarely address the role of networks and often come from the perspectives of more senior scientists. We have provided graduate student perspectives on interdisciplinary degree paths from within the Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER Network. Focusing on data from a survey of graduate students in the LTER Network and four self-identified successful graduate student research experiences, we examined the importance of funding, pedagogy, research design and development, communication, networking, and culture and attitude to students pursuing social-ecological research. Through sharing insights from successful graduate student approaches to social-ecological research within the LTER Network, we hope to facilitate dialogue between students, faculty, and networks to improve training for interdisciplinary scientists.

  2. The Myth of Data Rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Defense AT&L: November–December 2015 46 The Myth of Data Rights Peter A. Czech Czech is a Professor of Program Management in the School of Program...following: What are data rights? How can we remove some of the myths surrounding them? What can we do if we don’t own the data rights? Before we answer...hand we want the best outcome or product for the pub- lic sector. Where does the myth of data rights originate? Myths The Merriam-Webster Diction

  3. Six dangerous myths about pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeffer, J

    1998-01-01

    Every day, executives make decisions about pay, and they do so in a landscape that's shifting. As more and more companies base less of their compensation on straight salary and look to other financial options, managers are bombarded with advice about the best approaches to take. Unfortunately, much of that advice is wrong. Indeed, much of the conventional wisdom and public discussion about pay today is misleading, incorrect, or both. The result is that business people are adopting wrongheaded notions about how to pay people and why. In particular, they are subscribing to six dangerous myths about pay. Myth #1: labor rates are the same as labor costs. Myth #2: cutting labor rates will lower labor costs. Myth #3: labor costs represent a large portion of a company's total costs. Myth #4: keeping labor costs low creates a potent and sustainable competitive edge. Myth #5: individual incentive pay improves performance. Myth #6: people work primarily for the money. The author explains why these myths are so pervasive, shows where they go wrong, and suggests how leaders might think more productively about compensation. With increasing frequency, the author says, he sees managers harming their organizations by buying into--and acting on--these myths. Those that do, he warns, are probably doomed to endless tinkering with pay that at the end of the day will accomplish little but cost a lot.

  4. Europe agrees to boost Internet networks used by researchers

    CERN Multimedia

    Butler, D

    2000-01-01

    The member states of the EU have approved an 80 million Euro upgrade of Europe's research Internet networks. The move will ensure the necessary infrastructure for work to begin on the concept of an advanced research computing 'grid' (1 page).

  5. Contrast research of CDMA and GSM network optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yanwen; Liu, Zehong; Zhou, Guangyue

    2004-03-01

    With the development of mobile telecommunication network, users of CDMA advanced their request of network service quality. While the operators also change their network management object from signal coverage to performance improvement. In that case, reasonably layout & optimization of mobile telecommunication network, reasonably configuration of network resource, improvement of the service quality, and increase the enterprise's core competition ability, all those have been concerned by the operator companies. This paper firstly looked into the flow of CDMA network optimization. Then it dissertated to some keystones in the CDMA network optimization, like PN code assignment, calculation of soft handover, etc. As GSM is also the similar cellular mobile telecommunication system like CDMA, so this paper also made a contrast research of CDMA and GSM network optimization in details, including the similarity and the different. In conclusion, network optimization is a long time job; it will run through the whole process of network construct. By the adjustment of network hardware (like BTS equipments, RF systems, etc.) and network software (like parameter optimized, configuration optimized, capacity optimized, etc.), network optimization work can improve the performance and service quality of the network.

  6. The Homogeneity Research of Urban Rail Transit Network Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Fu-jian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Urban Rail Transit is an important part of the public transit, it is necessary to carry out the corresponding network function analysis. Previous studies mainly about network performance analysis of a single city rail transit, lacking of horizontal comparison between the multi-city, it is difficult to find inner unity of different Urban Rail Transit network functions. Taking into account the Urban Rail Transit network is a typical complex networks, so this paper proposes the application of complex network theory to research the homogeneity of Urban Rail Transit network performance. This paper selects rail networks of Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou as calculation case, gave them a complex network mapping through the L, P Space method and had a static topological analysis using complex network theory, Network characteristics in three cities were calculated and analyzed form node degree distribution and node connection preference. Finally, this paper studied the network efficiency changes of Urban Rail Transit system under different attack mode. The results showed that, although rail transport network size, model construction and construction planning of the three cities are different, but their network performance in many aspects showed high homogeneity.

  7. New Visions for Large Scale Networks: Research and Applications

    Data.gov (United States)

    Networking and Information Technology Research and Development, Executive Office of the President — This paper documents the findings of the March 12-14, 2001 Workshop on New Visions for Large-Scale Networks: Research and Applications. The workshops objectives were...

  8. A Research and Management Agenda for Chain and Network Science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Omta, S.W.F.; Trienekens, J.H.; Beers, G.

    2002-01-01

    In the present editorial we address key issues and research questions in the field of chain and network science. Theoretical approaches discussed in this editorial include Network Theory, Supply Chain Management and Industrial Organisation Theory. Major research themes derived from these approaches

  9. How Might Better Network Theories Support School Leadership Research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadfield, Mark; Jopling, Michael

    2012-01-01

    This article explores how recent research in education has applied different aspects of "network" theory to the study of school leadership. Constructs from different network theories are often used because of their perceived potential to clarify two perennial issues in leadership research. The first is the relative importance of formal and…

  10. Von frühzeitlichen Mythen bis zur aktuellen Forschungsdiskussion From Early Myths to Contemporary Discussion of Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Neiseke

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available In dem als Lehrbuch konzipierten Werk bietet Mogge-Grotjahn einen ersten Einblick in die Frauen- und Geschlechterforschung. Ferner trägt sie zur Vermittlung von Gender-Kompetenzen für die soziale Arbeit bei. Die Lektüre erleichtert eine erste Orientierung bei der Auswahl weiterführender Literatur, zahlreiche Quellen ermuntern zur intensiveren Beschäftigung mit gender-spezifischen Fragestellungen.In this work, which is conceived as a textbook, Mogge-Grotjahn offers an introductory glance into women and gender research. Moreover, she contributes to the intermediation of gender competence for work in the social arena. The material makes a preliminary orientation easier through a selection of literature for further reading and numerous sources encourage a more intensive engagement with gender specific questions.

  11. Computer Network Equipment for Intrusion Detection Research

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ye, Nong

    2000-01-01

    .... To test the process model, the system-level intrusion detection techniques and the working prototype of the intrusion detection system, a set of computer and network equipment has been purchased...

  12. Rape Myths and the Cross-Cultural Adaptation of the Illinois Rape Myth Acceptance Scale in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Jia; Fang, Gang; Huang, Hui; Cui, Naixue; Rhodes, Karin V; Gelles, Richard

    2016-06-05

    The study examines the similarities and differences between China and the United States with regard to rape myths. We assessed the individual level of rape myth acceptance among Chinese university students by adapting and translating a widely used measure of rape myth endorsement in the United States, the Illinois Rape Myth Acceptance (IRMA) scale. We assessed whether the IRMA scale would be an appropriate assessment of attitudes toward rape among young adults in China. The sample consisted of 975 Chinese university students enrolled in seven Chinese universities. We used explorative factor analysis to examine the factor structure of the Chinese translation of the IRMA scale. Results suggest that the IRMA scale requires some modification to be employed with young adults in China. Our analyses indicate that 20 items should be deleted, and a five-factor model is generated. We discuss relevant similarities and differences in the factor structure and item loadings between the Chinese Rape Myth Acceptance (CRMA) and the IRMA scales. A revised version of the IRMA, the CRMA, can be used as a resource in rape prevention services and rape victim support services. Future research in China that employs CRMA will allow researchers to examine whether individual's response to rape myth acceptance can predict rape potential and judgments of victim blaming and community members' acceptance of marital rape. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. Drinking water microbial myths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Martin J; Edberg, Stephen C; Clancy, Jennifer L; Hrudey, Steve E

    2015-01-01

    Accounts of drinking water-borne disease outbreaks have always captured the interest of the public, elected and health officials, and the media. During the twentieth century, the drinking water community and public health organizations have endeavored to craft regulations and guidelines on treatment and management practices that reduce risks from drinking water, specifically human pathogens. During this period there also evolved misunderstandings as to potential health risk associated with microorganisms that may be present in drinking waters. These misunderstanding or "myths" have led to confusion among the many stakeholders. The purpose of this article is to provide a scientific- and clinically-based discussion of these "myths" and recommendations for better ensuring the microbial safety of drinking water and valid public health decisions.

  14. More myths of migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basch, L; Lerner, G

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses some of the myths of migration. The 5 myths presented are: 1) racism has little to do with the causes of migration and does not necessarily impede the adjustment or success of migrants; 2) in areas where there is a strong feminist movement and trade unions, migrant women receive their support and can count on the solidarity of these organizations; 3) transnational corporations are positive forces in the developing countries where they operate--not only do they provide these states with new sources of capital, but they also impart new industrial skills to the labor force; 4) migration today is essentially short-term in nature--it therefore does not have a strong impact on family life; and 5) most migrants cluster together in ethnic enclaves which provide a strong source of support and diminish dislocation inherent in the migrant process.

  15. Supporting Scientific Research with the Energy Sciences Network

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Monga, Inder

    2016-01-01

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is a high-performance, unclassified national network built to support scientific research. Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science (SC) and managed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, ESnet provides services to more than 40 DOE research sites, including the entire National Laboratory system, its supercomputing facilities, and its major scientific instruments. ESnet also connects to 140 research and commercial networks, permitting DOE-funded scientists to productively collaborate with partners around the world. ESnet Division Director (Interim) Inder Monga and ESnet Networking Engineer David Mitchell will present current ESnet projects and research activities which help support the HEP community. ESnet  helps support the CERN community by providing 100Gbps trans-Atlantic network transport for the LHCONE and LHCOPN services. ESnet is also actively engaged in researching connectivity to cloud computing resources for HEP workflows a...

  16. Cognitive radio wireless sensor networks: applications, challenges and research trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Gyanendra Prasad; Nam, Seung Yeob; Kim, Sung Won

    2013-08-22

    A cognitive radio wireless sensor network is one of the candidate areas where cognitive techniques can be used for opportunistic spectrum access. Research in this area is still in its infancy, but it is progressing rapidly. The aim of this study is to classify the existing literature of this fast emerging application area of cognitive radio wireless sensor networks, highlight the key research that has already been undertaken, and indicate open problems. This paper describes the advantages of cognitive radio wireless sensor networks, the difference between ad hoc cognitive radio networks, wireless sensor networks, and cognitive radio wireless sensor networks, potential application areas of cognitive radio wireless sensor networks, challenges and research trend in cognitive radio wireless sensor networks. The sensing schemes suited for cognitive radio wireless sensor networks scenarios are discussed with an emphasis on cooperation and spectrum access methods that ensure the availability of the required QoS. Finally, this paper lists several open research challenges aimed at drawing the attention of the readers toward the important issues that need to be addressed before the vision of completely autonomous cognitive radio wireless sensor networks can be realized.

  17. Cognitive Radio Wireless Sensor Networks: Applications, Challenges and Research Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Gyanendra Prasad; Nam, Seung Yeob; Kim, Sung Won

    2013-01-01

    A cognitive radio wireless sensor network is one of the candidate areas where cognitive techniques can be used for opportunistic spectrum access. Research in this area is still in its infancy, but it is progressing rapidly. The aim of this study is to classify the existing literature of this fast emerging application area of cognitive radio wireless sensor networks, highlight the key research that has already been undertaken, and indicate open problems. This paper describes the advantages of cognitive radio wireless sensor networks, the difference between ad hoc cognitive radio networks, wireless sensor networks, and cognitive radio wireless sensor networks, potential application areas of cognitive radio wireless sensor networks, challenges and research trend in cognitive radio wireless sensor networks. The sensing schemes suited for cognitive radio wireless sensor networks scenarios are discussed with an emphasis on cooperation and spectrum access methods that ensure the availability of the required QoS. Finally, this paper lists several open research challenges aimed at drawing the attention of the readers toward the important issues that need to be addressed before the vision of completely autonomous cognitive radio wireless sensor networks can be realized. PMID:23974152

  18. ALEPH: Israel's Research Library Network: Background, Evolution, and Implications for Networking in a Small Country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazinger, Susan S.

    1991-01-01

    Describes ALEPH, the research library network in Israel, and analyzes the strengths and weaknesses of its decentralized structure. Highlights include comparisons between RLIN and ALEPH; centralized versus decentralized networks; the format of ALEPH; authority control in ALEPH; and non-Roman scripts in both networks. (16 references) (LRW)

  19. Space, myth and cinematography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambardzumov, Arsen

    2016-12-01

    There exist both ancient and modern myths. The competition of good and evil, sanctity, mythic hero character, etc. make up those myths. Connection between the myth and literature, art and mainly cinematography is highly essential. Hollywood is a striking example of that connection, in other words "A Dream Factory". The mythic component in American films is obvious. It refers to the product structure which is frequently created by mythic rules. One of its striking examples is D. Lucas's film "Star wars. Episode IV - New Hope" (1977): The film plot is built on the struggle between the good and the evil. On one hand those are the representatives of the Empire with Darth Vader and princess Leia with her devotees on the other. The space has played a unique role for Greek philosophers as well. It was the symbol of perfection and grace. The attempt to approach this perfection, the desire to see the internal similarity besides the external one has been reflected in S. Kubrick's film "2001: Space Odyssey" (1968). Showing the space distance director looks for perfection in us which lies in the harmony of truth, human and nature.

  20. Ocean Research - Perspectives from an international Ocean Research Coordination Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearlman, Jay; Williams, Albert, III

    2013-04-01

    The need for improved coordination in ocean observations is more urgent now given the issues of climate change, sustainable food sources and increased need for energy. Ocean researchers must work across disciplines to provide policy makers with clear and understandable assessments of the state of the ocean. With advances in technology, not only in observation, but also communication and computer science, we are in a new era where we can answer questions asked over the last 100 years at the time and space scales that are relevant. Programs like GLOBEC moved us forward but we are still challenged by the disciplinary divide. Interdisciplinary problem solving must be addressed not only by the exchange of data between the many sides, but through levels where questions require day-to-day collaboration. A National Science Foundation-funded Research Coordination Network (RCN) is addressing approaches for improving interdisciplinary research capabilities in the ocean sciences. During the last year, the RCN had a working group for Open Data led by John Orcutt, Peter Pissierssens and Albert Williams III. The teams has focused on three areas: 1. Data and Information formats and standards; 2. Data access models (including IPR, business models for open data, data policies,...); 3. Data publishing, data citation. There has been a significant trend toward free and open access to data in the last few years. In 2007, the US announced that Landsat data would be available at no charge. Float data from the US (NDBC), JCOMM and OceanSites offer web-based access. The IODE is developing its Ocean Data Portal giving immediate and free access to ocean data. However, from the aspect of long-term collaborations across communities, this global trend is less robust than might appear at the surface. While there are many standard data formats for data exchange, there is not yet widespread uniformity in their adoption. Use of standard data formats can be encouraged in several ways: sponsors of

  1. Religiousness and Rape Myth Acceptance: Risk and Protective Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensz, Samantha; Jankowski, Peter J

    2017-03-01

    This study addressed the lack of research simultaneously examining multiple dimensions of religiousness when predicting rape myth acceptance, and extended prior findings of a mediating role for right-wing authoritarianism (i.e., uncritical submission to authority and aggressive attitude toward those who do not conform to social norms) in the association between religiousness and prejudice. The sample consisted of 99 undergraduate and graduate students ( M age = 31.87 years, 66.7% female, 80.82% White, and 93% Christian affiliated) from a religiously affiliated university in the Midwest United States. As hypothesized, dimensions of religiousness exhibited differential associations with rape myth acceptance. Religious motivation characterized by openness and exploration (i.e., quest religiousness) was a significant negative predictor of rape myth acceptance, directly, and indirectly through right-wing authoritarianism. In contrast, rigid adherence to religious beliefs, assumed to be "right" and absolutely true (i.e., religious fundamentalism), and extrinsically motivated religiousness each exhibited a positive association with rape myth acceptance through right-wing authoritarianism. In addition, internally motivated religiousness and religious fundamentalism each moderated the nonlinear effect for quest predicting rape myth acceptance. Findings suggest that uncritical religious and secular submission to external authorities or uncommitted and nonexploring religiousness may have increased the extent to which persons adhered to rape myths, whereas religious exploration was protective. Practical implications center on the need for socioculturally relevant prevention and intervention efforts with religious identifying college students.

  2. Myths and Truths from Exercise Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieffer, H. Scott

    2008-01-01

    This article addresses some of the common myths in the field of exercise physiology. Some of the myths are misconstrued facts that have developed over time, such as the myth of localized fat reduction. Other myths are unproved or collective beliefs used to justify a social institution; we see this occur in the form of "fitness fads." Society is…

  3. Researching Design, Experience and Practice of Networked Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hodgson, Vivien; de Laat, Maarten; McConnell, David

    2014-01-01

    and final section draws attention to a growing topic of interest within networked learning: that of networked learning in informal practices. In addition, we provide a reflection on the theories, methods and settings featured in the networked learning research of the chapters. We conclude the introduction......In the introductory chapter, we explore how networked learning has developed in recent years by summarising and discussing the research presented in the chapters of the book. The chapters are structured in three sections, each highlighting a particular aspect of practice. The first section focuses...

  4. Ricoeur on myth and demythologising

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-07-08

    Jul 8, 2016 ... using the Religionsgeschichtliche definition of myth and applying. Hans Jonas's .... Beyond the self-understanding of a society there is an opaque ... just like languages. Just as languages are translatable, so are myths, giving them a horizon of universality that allows them to be understood by other cultures.

  5. Myth, Method and International News.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lule, Jack

    Defining myth as a cultural narrative in symbolic form that articulates a world view and offers consensus with that view, this paper uses a brief "New York Times" report on the Soviet shooting down of South Korean airline flight 007 as the basis for comparison of international news and myth. Following a review of the literature on myth…

  6. Myths about Energy in Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

    This publication from the EnergySmart Schools initiative, a program that focuses on improving communities nationwide through energy-saving solutions, examines some myths and misconceptions about energy in schools and provides facts that can help school districts make smarter energy choices. The myths discussed are: (1) energy isn't a major budget…

  7. Myths about English Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Jerez, William; Campbell, Todd

    2015-01-01

    As the ethnic and racial diversity in U.S. classrooms continues to grow, myths about the education of English Language Learners (ELLs) persist, while many teachers feel ill-prepared to meet these students' academic needs. This article focuses on myths shared by in-service science teachers enrolled in a master's program at the University of Texas…

  8. Increasing Scalability of Researcher Network Extraction from the Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asada, Yohei; Matsuo, Yutaka; Ishizuka, Mitsuru

    Social networks, which describe relations among people or organizations as a network, have recently attracted attention. With the help of a social network, we can analyze the structure of a community and thereby promote efficient communications within it. We investigate the problem of extracting a network of researchers from the Web, to assist efficient cooperation among researchers. Our method uses a search engine to get the cooccurences of names of two researchers and calculates the streangth of the relation between them. Then we label the relation by analyzing the Web pages in which these two names cooccur. Research on social network extraction using search engines as ours, is attracting attention in Japan as well as abroad. However, the former approaches issue too many queries to search engines to extract a large-scale network. In this paper, we propose a method to filter superfluous queries and facilitates the extraction of large-scale networks. By this method we are able to extract a network of around 3000-nodes. Our experimental results show that the proposed method reduces the number of queries significantly while preserving the quality of the network as compared to former methods.

  9. The network researchers' network: A social network analysis of the IMP Group 1985-2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henneberg, Stephan C. M.; Ziang, Zhizhong; Naudé, Peter

    ). In this paper, based upon the papers presented at the 22 conferences held to date, we undertake a Social Network Analysis in order to examine the degree of co-publishing that has taken place between this group of researchers. We identify the different components in this database, and examine the large main...... components in some detail. The egonets of three of the original 'founding fathers' are examined in detail, and we draw comparisons as to how their publishing strategies vary. Finally, the paper draws some more general conclusions as to the insights that SNA can bring to those working within business...

  10. Interest in a national research network in surgery in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Businger, Adrian; Kaderli, Reto; Sommer, Christoph; Furrer, Markus; Villiger, Peter

    2011-11-08

    Networks are known to improve performance and create synergies. A research network can provide a significant advantage for all parties involved in research in surgery by systematically tracking the outcome of a huge number of patients over a long period of time. The aim of the present study was to investigate the experiences of surgeons with respect to research activities, to evaluate the opinions of surgeons with regard to the development of a national network for research in the field of surgery in Switzerland and to obtain data on how such a network should be designed. An anonymous postal survey of board-certified surgeons practising in Switzerland was conducted during summer 2007. The questionnaire included questions related to research activities, the desire to develop a national research network and the design and potential advantages of such a network. Qualitative analyses were performed using Mayring's content analysis. A total of 337 out of 749 (45%) questionnaires were returned. In all, 156/337 (46.3%) surgeons were engaged in research activities. During the past five years, 212/337 (62.9%) of the participants had participated at least in one multi-centre study. Out of 337, 88 (26.1%) surgeons were members of an established research association in Switzerland. Interest in a national surgical research network was reported by 266 (78.9%) participants. The reported advantages were "power" (53.1%), "teamwork effects" (23.7%), "efficiency" (12.2%) and "quality aspects" (8.0%). The most frequently named design proposal was based on a clinic for coordinating research, while the younger participants also suggested a web-based platform. Due to the significant interest of participants, the establishment of a national research network should be considered. An established clinic for coordinating research alongside an additional web-based platform to target young surgeons could function as an umbrella organisation.

  11. Challenges and research issues from the Italian Hearing Voices Network.

    OpenAIRE

    Cardano, Mario; Fornace, Gino; Macario, Marcello; Pezzano, Roberto; Piona, Glenda; Poobello, Raffaella; Santoni, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    The Association "Rete Italiana Noi e le Voci" (Italian Hearing Voices Network, IHVN) is characterized by the active collaboration between voice hearers, mental health professionals and researchers. Goal of this presentation is to share two network challenges and research issues: (1) Psychiatric drugs: Based on the insights gained from Robert Whitaker's meta-analysis on the development of psychiatric drugs use and its effects, the study on this issue has become a priority in our research agend...

  12. Consolidating African Research and Education Networking ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Free and Open Source Software in North African Universities. The project, Free and Open Source Software in North African Universities (POLLES), aims to establish a network of experts in open source software to develop information tools for use in North... View moreFree and Open Source Software in North African ...

  13. Research Award: Networked Economies | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-09-07

    Sep 7, 2016 ... For example, open data has great potential for driving innovation. Similarly, big data analytics can offer solutions to a number of health and social problems. Networked Economies also works to build leaders and institutions in developing countries that are capable of advancing policy discussions in the ...

  14. Advanced Medical Technology and Network Systems Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    acceptance and operations of comprehensive radiology networks. Is the PACS cup half full or half empty? SPIE Proc. 1093:194-201 23. Deleted in proof...repeat examination in one to two menstrual cysts approximately 1-2 weeks after menstrual period." Similar recommendations are given for women over

  15. Enabling Research Network Connectivity to Clouds with Virtual Router Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seuster, R.; Casteels, K.; Leavett-Brown, CR; Paterson, M.; Sobie, RJ

    2017-10-01

    The use of opportunistic cloud resources by HEP experiments has significantly increased over the past few years. Clouds that are owned or managed by the HEP community are connected to the LHCONE network or the research network with global access to HEP computing resources. Private clouds, such as those supported by non-HEP research funds are generally connected to the international research network; however, commercial clouds are either not connected to the research network or only connect to research sites within their national boundaries. Since research network connectivity is a requirement for HEP applications, we need to find a solution that provides a high-speed connection. We are studying a solution with a virtual router that will address the use case when a commercial cloud has research network connectivity in a limited region. In this situation, we host a virtual router in our HEP site and require that all traffic from the commercial site transit through the virtual router. Although this may increase the network path and also the load on the HEP site, it is a workable solution that would enable the use of the remote cloud for low I/O applications. We are exploring some simple open-source solutions. In this paper, we present the results of our studies and how it will benefit our use of private and public clouds for HEP computing.

  16. Network analysis of unstructured EHR data for clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer-Mehren, Anna; Lependu, Paea; Iyer, Srinivasan V; Harpaz, Rave; Leeper, Nicholas J; Shah, Nigam H

    2013-01-01

    In biomedical research, network analysis provides a conceptual framework for interpreting data from high-throughput experiments. For example, protein-protein interaction networks have been successfully used to identify candidate disease genes. Recently, advances in clinical text processing and the increasing availability of clinical data have enabled analogous analyses on data from electronic medical records. We constructed networks of diseases, drugs, medical devices and procedures using concepts recognized in clinical notes from the Stanford clinical data warehouse. We demonstrate the use of the resulting networks for clinical research informatics in two ways-cohort construction and outcomes analysis-by examining the safety of cilostazol in peripheral artery disease patients as a use case. We show that the network-based approaches can be used for constructing patient cohorts as well as for analyzing differences in outcomes by comparing with standard methods, and discuss the advantages offered by network-based approaches.

  17. The Healthy Aging Research Network: Modeling Collaboration for Community Impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belza, Basia; Altpeter, Mary; Smith, Matthew Lee; Ory, Marcia G

    2017-03-01

    As the first Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Prevention Research Centers Program thematic network, the Healthy Aging Research Network was established to better understand the determinants of healthy aging within older adult populations, identify interventions that promote healthy aging, and assist in translating research into sustainable community-based programs throughout the nation. To achieve these goals requires concerted efforts of a collaborative network of academic, community, and public health organizational partnerships. For the 2001-2014 Prevention Research Center funding cycles, the Healthy Aging Research Network conducted prevention research and promoted the wide use of practices known to foster optimal health. Organized around components necessary for successful collaborations (i.e., governance and infrastructure, shaping focus, community involvement, and evaluation and improvement), this commentary highlights exemplars that demonstrate the Healthy Aging Research Network's unique contributions to the field. The Healthy Aging Research Network's collaboration provided a means to collectively build capacity for practice and policy, reduce fragmentation and duplication in health promotion and aging research efforts, maximize the efficient use of existing resources and generate additional resources, and ultimately, create synergies for advancing the healthy aging agenda. This collaborative model was built upon a backbone organization (coordinating center); setting of common agendas and mutually reinforcing activities; and continuous communications. Given its successes, the Healthy Aging Research Network model could be used to create new and evaluate existing thematic networks to guide the translation of research into policy and practice. Copyright © 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Book Review - No-Party Democracy in Uganda, Myths and Realities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Book Review - No-Party Democracy in Uganda, Myths and Realities by Senzo Ngubane No-Party Democracy in Uganda, Myths and Realities - Mugaju, Justus and Oloka-Onyango (eds.)2000. Uganda: Fountain Publishers, 158 pp. Reviewed by Senzo Ngubane, Research Officer, ACCORD ...

  19. Evaluating emergency care research networks: what are the right metrics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baren, Jill M; Middleton, Melissa K; Kaji, Amy H; O'Connor, Robert E; O'Conner, Robert E; Lindsell, Christopher; Weik, Tasmeen Singh; Lewis, Roger J

    2009-10-01

    Research networks can enable the inclusion of large, diverse patient populations in different settings. However, the optimal measures of a research network's failure or success are not well defined or standardized. To define a framework for metrics used to measure the performance and effectiveness of emergency care research networks (ECRN), a conference for emergency care investigators, funding agencies, patient advocacy groups, and other stakeholders was held and yielded the following major recommendations: 1) ECRN metrics should be measurable, explicitly defined, and customizable for the multiple stakeholders involved and 2) continuing to develop and institute metrics to evaluate ECRNs will be critical for their accountability and sustainability.

  20. Multipath Routing in Wireless Sensor Networks: Survey and Research Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radi, Marjan; Dezfouli, Behnam; Bakar, Kamalrulnizam Abu; Lee, Malrey

    2012-01-01

    A wireless sensor network is a large collection of sensor nodes with limited power supply and constrained computational capability. Due to the restricted communication range and high density of sensor nodes, packet forwarding in sensor networks is usually performed through multi-hop data transmission. Therefore, routing in wireless sensor networks has been considered an important field of research over the past decade. Nowadays, multipath routing approach is widely used in wireless sensor networks to improve network performance through efficient utilization of available network resources. Accordingly, the main aim of this survey is to present the concept of the multipath routing approach and its fundamental challenges, as well as the basic motivations for utilizing this technique in wireless sensor networks. In addition, we present a comprehensive taxonomy on the existing multipath routing protocols, which are especially designed for wireless sensor networks. We highlight the primary motivation behind the development of each protocol category and explain the operation of different protocols in detail, with emphasis on their advantages and disadvantages. Furthermore, this paper compares and summarizes the state-of-the-art multipath routing techniques from the network application point of view. Finally, we identify open issues for further research in the development of multipath routing protocols for wireless sensor networks. PMID:22368490

  1. Multipath routing in wireless sensor networks: survey and research challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radi, Marjan; Dezfouli, Behnam; Abu Bakar, Kamalrulnizam; Lee, Malrey

    2012-01-01

    A wireless sensor network is a large collection of sensor nodes with limited power supply and constrained computational capability. Due to the restricted communication range and high density of sensor nodes, packet forwarding in sensor networks is usually performed through multi-hop data transmission. Therefore, routing in wireless sensor networks has been considered an important field of research over the past decade. Nowadays, multipath routing approach is widely used in wireless sensor networks to improve network performance through efficient utilization of available network resources. Accordingly, the main aim of this survey is to present the concept of the multipath routing approach and its fundamental challenges, as well as the basic motivations for utilizing this technique in wireless sensor networks. In addition, we present a comprehensive taxonomy on the existing multipath routing protocols, which are especially designed for wireless sensor networks. We highlight the primary motivation behind the development of each protocol category and explain the operation of different protocols in detail, with emphasis on their advantages and disadvantages. Furthermore, this paper compares and summarizes the state-of-the-art multipath routing techniques from the network application point of view. Finally, we identify open issues for further research in the development of multipath routing protocols for wireless sensor networks.

  2. How does investment in research training affect the development of research networks and collaborations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paina, Ligia; Ssengooba, Freddie; Waswa, Douglas; M'imunya, James M; Bennett, Sara

    2013-05-20

    Whether and how research training programs contribute to research network development is underexplored. The Fogarty International Center (FIC) has supported overseas research training programs for over two decades. FIC programs could provide an entry point in the development of research networks and collaborations. We examine whether FIC's investment in research training contributed to the development of networks and collaborations in two countries with longstanding FIC investments - Uganda and Kenya - and the factors which facilitated this process. As part of two case studies at Uganda's Makerere University and Kenya's University of Nairobi, we conducted 53 semi-structured in-depth interviews and nine focus group discussions. To expand on our case study findings, we conducted a focused bibliometric analysis on two purposively selected topic areas to examine scientific productivity and used online network illustration tools to examine the resulting network structures. FIC support made important contributions to network development. Respondents from both Uganda and Kenya confirmed that FIC programs consistently provided trainees with networking skills and exposure to research collaborations, primarily within the institutions implementing FIC programs. In both countries, networks struggled with inclusiveness, particularly in HIV/AIDS research. Ugandan respondents perceived their networks to be more cohesive than Kenyan respondents did. Network cohesiveness was positively correlated with the magnitude and longevity of FIC's programs. Support from FIC grants to local and regional research network development and networking opportunities, such as conferences, was rare. Synergies between FIC programs and research grants helped to solidify and maintain research collaborations. Networks developed where FIC's programs focused on a particular institution, there was a critical mass of trainees with similar interests, and investments for network development were available from

  3. Amateur mythographies: Fan fiction and the myth of myth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ika Willis

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper draws on classical scholarship on myth in order to critically examine three ways in which scholars and fans have articulated a relationship between fan fiction and myth. These are (1 the notion of fan fiction as a form of folk culture, reclaiming popular story from corporate ownership; (2 the notion of myth as counterhegemonic, often feminist, discourse; (3 the notion of myth as a commons of story and a universal story world. I argue that the first notion depends on an implicit primitivizing of fan fiction and myth, which draws ultimately on the work of Gottfried von Herder in the 18th century and limits our ability to produce historically and politically nuanced understandings of fan fiction. The second notion, which is visible in the work of Henry Jenkins and Constance Penley, is more helpful because of its attention to the politics of narration. However, it is the third model of myth, as a universal story world, where we find the richest crossover between fan fiction's creative power and contemporary classical scholarship on myth, especially in relation to Sarah Iles Johnston's analysis of hyperserial narrative. I demonstrate this through some close readings of fan fiction from the Greek and Roman Mythology fandom on Archive of Our Own. I conclude the paper by extending Johnston's arguments to show that fan-fictional hyperseriality, specifically, can be seen as mythic because it intervenes not only in the narrative worlds of its source materials but also in the social world of its telling.

  4. Antioxidant therapy: myth or reality?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunez-Selles, Alberto J. [Center of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Havana (Cuba)]. E-mail: alberto@cqf.co.cu

    2005-07-15

    New terms such as oxidative stress, antioxidant products or pro-oxidant risks are becoming familiar and an increasing number of international scientific conferences and the publication of thousands of scientific articles is an indication of the growing interest that the subject awakens. The most publicized example is perhaps the French paradox, based on the apparent compatibility of a high fat diet with a low incidence of coronary atherosclerosis attributed to the regular consumption, by the French, of red wine and/or grape juice. Flavonoids, and other phenolic substances contained in red wine, are assigned with antioxidant properties, which lower the oxidation of low density lipoproteins and consequently, the risk of atherogenic diseases. Other examples are the aging process and its correlation with an increase of free radicals, and the correlation between the initiation and promotion of cancer and tissue injury by free radicals, which has induced the intake of antioxidant products as chemical factors that prevent the onset of the disease. Currently, the incidence of oxidative stress on the onset and evolution of more than 100 diseases is claimed by several researchers. All these are 'realities', which on the other hand, are lacking of more clinical evidence, are considered by both physicians and health regulatory bodies, either as 'myths' or of 'secondary' importance. In the attempts to destroy those myths, results of chemical, pre-clinical, and clinical works with a crude extract of mango (Mangifera indica L.) stem bark, which has been developed in Cuba, are reviewed, with a strong experimental evidence of its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties. (author)

  5. PCs and networking for oceanographic research vessels

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Desai, R.G.P.; Desa, E.; Vithayathil, G.

    This paper, first describes briefly the evolution of data acquisition techniques and different system implementation, on board research vessels. A data acquisition system being developed for a coastal research vessel is then described which is based...

  6. Online communities: Challenges and opportunities for social network research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenewegen, P.; Moser, C.; Brass, D.; Labianca, G.; Mehra, A.; Halgin, D; Borgatti, S

    2014-01-01

    Online communities form a challenging and still-evolving field for social network research. We highlight two themes that are at the core of social network literature: formative processes and structures, and discuss how these might be relevant in the context of online communities. Processes of tie

  7. Viet Nam Economic Research Network (VERN) - Phase II | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    VERN I (101273) constituted the first network for young economic researchers in Viet Nam, where previously there had been no modality for cooperation or peer review. Guided by the philosophy of "understanding and managing globalization" that underpinned the earlier project, VERN II proposes to expand the network, ...

  8. Educational Research Network for West and Central Africa ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This grant will assist the Educational Research Network for West and Central Africa (ERNWACA) by providing funding for succession planning, recruiting a regional coordinator (to be based in Mali) and strengthening the Network's ... IDRC partner the World Economic Forum is building a hub for inclusive growth solutions.

  9. Viet Nam Economic Research Network (VERN) - Phase II | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    VERN I (101273) constituted the first network for young economic researchers in Viet Nam, where previously there had been no modality for cooperation or peer review. Guided by the philosophy of "understanding and managing globalization" that underpinned the earlier project, VERN II proposes to expand the network, ...

  10. Learning Networks--Enabling Change through Community Action Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleach, Josephine

    2016-01-01

    Learning networks are a critical element of ethos of the community action research approach taken by the Early Learning Initiative at the National College of Ireland, a community-based educational initiative in the Dublin Docklands. Key criteria for networking, whether at local, national or international level, are the individual's and…

  11. Academic social networking (ResearchGate & Academia) and the research impact

    OpenAIRE

    Ebrahim, Nader Ale

    2016-01-01

    Academic social networking allows you to connect with other researchers in your field, share your publications and datasets, get feedback on your non-peer-reviewed work, and to stay current with news and events in your field of interest. It gives you another place to establish your name and research and perhaps even collaborate with others. The academic social networking, making your work more widely discoverable and easily available. The two best known academic social networking are Research...

  12. Roger Caillois’ Biology of Myth and the Myth of Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Eidelpes, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    The article focuses on the “mythical” epistemology of Roger Caillois (1913-1987). For the French sociologist, writer and literary critic myth can no longer be confined to the specialist area of a cultural analysis of mythology, but is part of a « diagonal science ». In his work Le mythe et l’homme (1938), he aims to develop a “biological” basis for the theory of myths. He argues that human imagination is dominated by instincts and that natural processes control cultural production. Thus, Le m...

  13. Innovative research of AD HOC network mobility model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin

    2017-08-01

    It is difficult for researchers of AD HOC network to conduct actual deployment during experimental stage as the network topology is changeable and location of nodes is unfixed. Thus simulation still remains the main research method of the network. Mobility model is an important component of AD HOC network simulation. It is used to describe the movement pattern of nodes in AD HOC network (including location and velocity, etc.) and decides the movement trail of nodes, playing as the abstraction of the movement modes of nodes. Therefore, mobility model which simulates node movement is an important foundation for simulation research. In AD HOC network research, mobility model shall reflect the movement law of nodes as truly as possible. In this paper, node generally refers to the wireless equipment people carry. The main research contents include how nodes avoid obstacles during movement process and the impacts of obstacles on the mutual relation among nodes, based on which a Node Self Avoiding Obstacle, i.e. NASO model is established in AD HOC network.

  14. Baikal: Myth and Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Lidin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Baikal is not only one of the greatest lakes of the world. Baikal is a system of myths and images which has been formed for many centuries. The analysis of old maps shows that only 200-300 years ago the existence of Baikal was the subject of wild speculations. Today the image of Baikal is a world brand. However citizens of Irkutsk and other towns located around Baikal can hardly make any profit on it. The reason is the absence of specialists who would be able to work with such a complex and strong image as Baikal.

  15. Scientific myth-conceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allchin, Douglas

    2003-05-01

    Using several familiar examples - Gregor Mendel, H. B. D. Kettlewell, Alexander Fleming, Ignaz Semmelweis, and William Harvey - I analyze how educators currently frame historical stories to portray the process of science. They share a rhetorical architecture of myth, which misleads students about how science derives its authority. Narratives of error and recovery from error, alternatively, may importantly illustrate the nature of science, especially its limits. Contrary to recent claims for reform, we do not need more history in science education. Rather, we need different types of history that convey the nature of science more effectively.

  16. Scottish Stroke Research Network: the first three years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, K; Langhorne, P; Graham, F E J; McFarlane, C

    2010-08-01

    Research networks were introduced in the UK to facilitate and improve clinical research and stroke was seen as a priority topic for local research network development. The Scottish Stroke Research Network (SSRN) is one of 11 stroke research networks in the UK. In this article we review the progress of the Scottish Stroke Research Network in the three years since inception. Between 2006-2009 the number of active hospital research sites has increased from 10 to 22 expanding to involve 20 stroke research nurses. There was a corresponding 58% increase in recruitment of participants into stroke studies, from 376 in 2006/07 to 594 in 2008/09. The majority (17/20) of our current studies are interventional. Data from one of these, the CLOTs trial (Clots in Legs Or sTocking after Stroke), demonstrates that the annual recruitment in Scotland increased from a median of 94 (range 6-122) patients per year in the six years before the SSRN, to 140 (135-158) patients per year after SSRN involvement. We currently screen about 50% of Scottish stroke patients and approximately 5% of Scottish stroke patients are participating in research studies that we support. The SSRN has made good progress in the first three years. Increasing the recruitment of screened patients remains a challenge.

  17. West and Central African Research and Education Networking ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    West and Central African Research and Education Networking (WACREN). For universities and research centres around the world, the Internet has become an important resource for teaching, learning and research. But, African universities have always faced important challenges to accessing cheap and reliable bandwidth ...

  18. African Transitional Justice Research Network - Phase II | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The African Transitional Justice Research Network (ATJRN) aims to strengthen the capacity of African researchers and civil society institutions to conduct effective human rights advocacy through the production of high-quality, locally based and targeted empirical research. Phase I of the project (102862) focused on creating ...

  19. West Indian Ocean Deltas Exchange and Research Network | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The West Indian Ocean Deltas Exchange and Research Network (WIoDER) aims to support research, training, and pilot interventions in up to four Western Indian Ocean river deltas under pressure from human activity. Research will examine in particular the links between population mobility, agriculture, climate change, ...

  20. African Transitional Justice Research Network - Phase II | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The African Transitional Justice Research Network (ATJRN) aims to strengthen the capacity of African researchers and civil society institutions to conduct effective human rights advocacy through the production of high-quality, locally based and targeted empirical research. Phase I of the project (102862) focused on creating ...

  1. Research on key technology of space laser communication network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chengwu; Huang, Huiming; Liu, Hongyang; Gao, Shenghua; Cheng, Liyu

    2016-10-01

    Since the 21st century, Spatial laser communication has made a breakthrough development. Europe, the United States, Japan and other space powers have carried out the test of spatial laser communication technology on-orbit, and put forward a series of plans. In 2011, China made the first technology demonstration of satellite-ground laser communication carried by HY-2 satellite. Nowadays, in order to improve the transmission rate of spatial network, the topic of spatial laser communication network is becoming a research hotspot at home and abroad. This thesis, from the basic problem of spatial laser communication network to solve, analyzes the main difference between spatial network and ground network, which draws forth the key technology of spatial laser communication backbone network, and systematically introduces our research on aggregation, addressing, architecture of spatial network. From the perspective of technology development status and trends, the thesis proposes the development route of spatial laser communication network in stages. So as to provide reference about the development of spatial laser communication network in China.

  2. Networks as integrated in research methodologies in PER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    In recent years a number of researchers within the PER community have started using network analysis as a new methodology to extend our understanding of teaching and learning physics by viewing these as complex systems. In this paper, I give examples of social, cognitive, and action mapping...... networks and how they can be analyzed. In so doing I show how a network can be methodologically described as a set of relations between a set of entities, and how a network can be characterized and analyzed as a mathematical object. Then, as an illustrative example, I discuss a relatively new example...... of using networks to create insightful maps of learning discussions. To conclude, I argue that conceptual blending is a powerful framework for constructing "mixed methods" methodologies that may integrate diverse theories and other methodologies with network methodologies....

  3. Content-centric networks an overview, applications and research challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, Syed Hassan; Kim, Dongkyun

    2016-01-01

    This book introduces Content-Centric Networking (CCN), a networking paradigm that provides a simple and effective solution to the challenging demands of future wired and wireless communications. It provides an overview of the recent developments in the area of future internet technologies, bringing together the advancements that have been made in Information-Centric Networking (ICN) in general, with a focus on CCN. It begins with an introduction to the basics of CCN is followed by an overview of the current internet paradigm and its challenges. Next, an application perspective has been included, where the authors encompass the selected applications for CCN with recent refereed research and developments. These applications include Internet of Things (IoT), Smart Grid, Vehicular Ad hoc Networks (VANETs), and Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs). The book is a useful reference source for practising researchers, and can be used as supporting material for undergraduate and graduate level courses in computer science and...

  4. Data Transfer Throughput Research Over Mobile Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolis Žvinys

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This work analyses communication channel settings of UMTS technology, which are related with a data transfer throughput. The paper describes the measurement equipment that is suitable for measuring parameters of a mobile network channel. Besides, it analyses the suitability of this equipment and issue of parameter values that are associated with data throughput. Further, the study includes the selection of the most specific parameters, which are crucial for data speed. Using these parameters, models were developed for prediction of data transfer throughput. To build the model, the linear and nonlinear forecasting methods were used. The linear prediction was made by using linear regression, nonlinear — neural networks. Using the linear prediction model, 77.83% forecast accuracy was achieved, while the accuracy of forecasted nonlinear transmission rate amounted to 76.19%. The accuracy of prediction models was obtained using eight parameters of the communication channel. Finally, the paper presents the data throughput prediction models that allow predicting data speed with the help of channel parameters presented by a standard terminal. The list of these channel parameters is derived from five UE‘s of different manufacturers. The expected most accurate data transfer rate can be predicted using a set of parameters issued by Nokia device.Article in Lithuanian

  5. Tools and Methods to Create Scenarios for Experimental Research in the Network Science Research Laboratory (NSRL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    among the nodes, you can choose to create more wireless networks by adding more clouds, or you can create a wired connection between 2 nodes. To make...traditional wireless networking challenges as well as more general network science research issues. NSRL is capable of doing this by providing a...the .eel file through EMANE. Click on the square blue Ethernet hub on the left panel. Select the cloud (which is a wireless local area network [LAN

  6. Research award: Networked Economies | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-09-06

    Sep 6, 2017 ... Deadline: September 6, 2017 Please note that all applications must be submitted online. IDRC is one of the world's leaders in generating new knowledge to meet global challenges. We offer a number of research awards providing a unique opportunity to enhance research skills and gain a fresh ...

  7. SOCIAL KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT, RESEARCH AND INNOVATION NETWORKS FOR INCLUSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Ace vedo Zapata

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective is to describe the social management of knowledge through research and innovation networks to promote social inclusion. The reflection of the exploratory stage is presented within the doctoral thesis analyzing the challenges of the universities in the achievement of social inclusion with networks of research and innovation. A descriptive work was done, with documentary tracking, systematization and analysis. The findings show that it is necessary to articulate efforts in interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary networks with different actors: state, company, education, scientists, technologists and vulnerable, excluded populations, to build policies and strategies for social inclusion.

  8. Time and myth: the Argonauts in Ljubljana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María Sánchez Tarrío

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This papers gives a breif overview of research in its initial phases, which examines, from the perspective of the construction of national identity, the traditional theme of the enduring and timeless nature of Classical myths and in particular the ancient myth, which is the subject of Borges’s sharp irony in his short-story “The immortal”. The reception of the Argonauts myth in Slovenian culture, initiated by the work of Janez Vajkard or Johann Weichard Freiherr von Valvasor (1641–1693, offers a significant case-study, which also highlights the relevance of Humanist and Baroque culture in the critical history of European nationalism. Writing before the emergence in Europe of the Hegelian conception of “Volkgeist”, the polymath writer applied a humanistic approach to patriotic themes, revealing Slovene culture, hybrid from its origins, to the wider world. A characteristic feature of his approach was the fusion of earlier textual tradition with contemporary oral material. Both in Slovenia and in the rest of Europe the comparison of the nineteenth century treatment of material dealing with national identity with its earlier treatment and transmission by humanist writers highlights the importance of the 16th and 17th centuries in the configuration of the different national faces of Europe as well as the significant role of common Greek and Latin roots. As a result, the myth of the Argonauts in Ljubljana, against the backdrop of idealistic or essentialist nationalist faiths, has the not inconsiderable virtue of underscoring the contaminatio that is characteristic of the construction of national identity.

  9. Myth busting in carbon monoxide poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, Neil B

    2016-02-01

    The evidence supporting many beliefs in medicine is based upon opinion, personal experience, hearsay, or "common knowledge." When one searches for the data supporting oft-quoted facts in medicine, they are sometimes found to be old, incorrect, or nonexistent. Such unsupported facts or beliefs can be termed myths. This minireview will summarize 4 examples of "myth busting" by the author when he has discovered widely held beliefs regarding carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning to be untrue during a 25-year career of research in the field. These include the mistaken beliefs that (1) symptoms correlate with presenting blood carboxyhemoglobin levels, (2) residents are safe from CO poisoning if their home does not contain fuel-burning appliances, (3) carboxyhemoglobin levels must be measured rapidly and on arterial blood, and (4) CO poisoning predisposes to premature long-term death from cardiac disease. In addition to providing the evidence disproving these myths, the importance of going back to the original reference when citing prior work is emphasized. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Myths, presumptions, and facts about obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casazza, Krista; Fontaine, Kevin R; Astrup, Arne; Birch, Leann L; Brown, Andrew W; Bohan Brown, Michelle M; Durant, Nefertiti; Dutton, Gareth; Foster, E Michael; Heymsfield, Steven B; McIver, Kerry; Mehta, Tapan; Menachemi, Nir; Newby, P K; Pate, Russell; Rolls, Barbara J; Sen, Bisakha; Smith, Daniel L; Thomas, Diana M; Allison, David B

    2013-01-31

    Many beliefs about obesity persist in the absence of supporting scientific evidence (presumptions); some persist despite contradicting evidence (myths). The promulgation of unsupported beliefs may yield poorly informed policy decisions, inaccurate clinical and public health recommendations, and an unproductive allocation of research resources and may divert attention away from useful, evidence-based information. Using Internet searches of popular media and scientific literature, we identified, reviewed, and classified obesity-related myths and presumptions. We also examined facts that are well supported by evidence, with an emphasis on those that have practical implications for public health, policy, or clinical recommendations. We identified seven obesity-related myths concerning the effects of small sustained increases in energy intake or expenditure, establishment of realistic goals for weight loss, rapid weight loss, weight-loss readiness, physical-education classes, breast-feeding, and energy expended during sexual activity. We also identified six presumptions about the purported effects of regularly eating breakfast, early childhood experiences, eating fruits and vegetables, weight cycling, snacking, and the built (i.e., human-made) environment. Finally, we identified nine evidence-supported facts that are relevant for the formulation of sound public health, policy, or clinical recommendations. False and scientifically unsupported beliefs about obesity are pervasive in both scientific literature and the popular press. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health.).

  11. Modern myths of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Gilbert V.

    2006-08-01

    July 30, 2006 was the 30 th anniversary of the Viking Mission's first Labeled Release (LR) life detection experiment on Mars. The strong response, together with supporting results from eight additional LR tests of Martian soil, established the presence of an active agent that was inhibited by heating. The data satisfied the pre-mission criteria for the detection of living microorganisms. However, the scientific community reacted cautiously, generally concluding that the activity in the soil was caused by chemistry or physics. Over the last three decades, investigation of Mars has greatly increased. Soil, rock and atmospheric analyses have been made. Multi-spectral observations have been made from Mars and Earth orbits and from Earth-based telescopes. Knowledge of extreme habitats and bizarre life forms that populate them on Earth has increased dramatically. However, this vast amount of new astrobiological information has yet to be integrated into an objective scientific evaluation of the LR results and the possibilities for life on Mars. Indeed, in part upon misinterpretations of the new findings, myths have been embedded into the scientific literature of Mars. Based on these myths as key ingredients, a false "standard model" of Martian life potential has been developed. It has been accepted by much of the astrobiological community, and, through its endorsement, the world at large. This paper attempts to bring the supportable facts together in calling for a revision of the current consensus regarding life on Mars. It recommends actions to facilitate the paradigm change.

  12. Mesopotamia: myth and reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Haldar

    1972-06-01

    Full Text Available Was there a myth relating to the state in ancient Mesopotamia? There were several complexes of such myth. An example of this is Hammurabi, the king of Babylonian dynasty who extended Babylon’s control throughout Mesopotamia. His most important reform was Marduk's rise to a position as the chief deity of the whole kingdom. Whether or not the Epic of Creation obtained its final literary form in the reign of Hammurabi is a question, which is not easily answered. There is sufficient evidence of the main features of Marduk's character before Hammurabi's reign, but quite another question is that of the literary process. In any case, Marduk's position as the chief deity of the realm coincided with Hammurabi's adopting the feudal system of administration. In the Ur III period, as we have seen, the early system still prevailed, and the earlier city states continued their existence, although as provinces of the unity. This system was continued in the period of the Isin and Larsa dynasties. In the reign of Shamshi-Adad of Asshur, at any rate, we meet with a typical feudal system, as is evident, for instance, from his correspondence with his son Yasmah-Adad, viceroy of Mari. This system implies that the king considered himself the possessor of the ground, particularly such as belonged to the temples, and its products as well.

  13. MYTH. OTHERNESS DISCOURSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana G. VOȘ

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to explain the concept of otherness as a mythical dimension of the man as a creator in the context of contemporary drama. The approach is a hermeneutics one, but the intention is to extend the analysis towards an interdisciplinary approach due to the multiple ways that otherness reveals on the background of the insular space of the theater as interface of cultural and social. We wish to draw attention to the mythical-symbolic elements that catalyzes the relation between drama and its putting on stage . In our point of view the importance of the drama is the revealing the way that a prototype lives in everyone and the myth is a generating center of identities and otherness in a World of correlations. Mythical models are bringing the imaginary and objectivity into a manageable collaboration that resonate a sense of reality in order to make seen the unseen by ritual as a link between myth and culture.

  14. No longer simply a Practice-based Research Network (PBRN) health improvement networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Robert L; Rhyne, Robert L

    2011-01-01

    While primary care Practice-based Research Networks are best known for their original, research purpose, evidence accumulating over the last several years is demonstrating broader values of these collaborations. Studies have demonstrated their role in quality improvement and practice change, in continuing professional education, in clinician retention in medically underserved areas, and in facilitating transition of primary care organization. A role in informing and facilitating health policy development is also suggested. Taking into account this more robust potential, we propose a new title, the Health Improvement Network, and a new vision for Practice-based Research Networks.

  15. Pan-Gaean Flood myths: Gondwana myths -- and beyond

    OpenAIRE

    Witzel, Michael E.J.

    2010-01-01

    Mythological compendia and indexes such as that by Stith Thompson create the impression that flood myths are rare in Africa and Australia. Erroneously, I too thought so in my short summary of Laurasian mythology (2001). A closer look at the worldwide distribution of flood myths tells differently. While they are fairly widespread in the Laurasian Area (Eurasia, Polynesia, the Americas), they are by no means absent from what I like to call the Gondwana belt (sub-Saharan Africa, New Guinea / M...

  16. Direct2Experts: a pilot national network to demonstrate interoperability among research-networking platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, William; Conlon, Mike; Eichmann, David; Kibbe, Warren; Falk-Krzesinski, Holly; Halaas, Michael; Johnson, Layne; Meeks, Eric; Mitchell, Donald; Schleyer, Titus; Stallings, Sarah; Warden, Michael; Kahlon, Maninder

    2011-01-01

    Research-networking tools use data-mining and social networking to enable expertise discovery, matchmaking and collaboration, which are important facets of team science and translational research. Several commercial and academic platforms have been built, and many institutions have deployed these products to help their investigators find local collaborators. Recent studies, though, have shown the growing importance of multiuniversity teams in science. Unfortunately, the lack of a standard data-exchange model and resistance of universities to share information about their faculty have presented barriers to forming an institutionally supported national network. This case report describes an initiative, which, in only 6 months, achieved interoperability among seven major research-networking products at 28 universities by taking an approach that focused on addressing institutional concerns and encouraging their participation. With this necessary groundwork in place, the second phase of this effort can begin, which will expand the network's functionality and focus on the end users. PMID:22037890

  17. Detecting and analyzing research communities in longitudinal scientific networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone Sciabolazza, Valerio; Vacca, Raffaele; Kennelly Okraku, Therese; McCarty, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    A growing body of evidence shows that collaborative teams and communities tend to produce the highest-impact scientific work. This paper proposes a new method to (1) Identify collaborative communities in longitudinal scientific networks, and (2) Evaluate the impact of specific research institutes, services or policies on the interdisciplinary collaboration between these communities. First, we apply community-detection algorithms to cross-sectional scientific collaboration networks and analyze different types of co-membership in the resulting subgroups over time. This analysis summarizes large amounts of longitudinal network data to extract sets of research communities whose members have consistently collaborated or shared collaborators over time. Second, we construct networks of cross-community interactions and estimate Exponential Random Graph Models to predict the formation of interdisciplinary collaborations between different communities. The method is applied to longitudinal data on publication and grant collaborations at the University of Florida. Results show that similar institutional affiliation, spatial proximity, transitivity effects, and use of the same research services predict higher degree of interdisciplinary collaboration between research communities. Our application also illustrates how the identification of research communities in longitudinal data and the analysis of cross-community network formation can be used to measure the growth of interdisciplinary team science at a research university, and to evaluate its association with research policies, services or institutes.

  18. Detecting and analyzing research communities in longitudinal scientific networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerio Leone Sciabolazza

    Full Text Available A growing body of evidence shows that collaborative teams and communities tend to produce the highest-impact scientific work. This paper proposes a new method to (1 Identify collaborative communities in longitudinal scientific networks, and (2 Evaluate the impact of specific research institutes, services or policies on the interdisciplinary collaboration between these communities. First, we apply community-detection algorithms to cross-sectional scientific collaboration networks and analyze different types of co-membership in the resulting subgroups over time. This analysis summarizes large amounts of longitudinal network data to extract sets of research communities whose members have consistently collaborated or shared collaborators over time. Second, we construct networks of cross-community interactions and estimate Exponential Random Graph Models to predict the formation of interdisciplinary collaborations between different communities. The method is applied to longitudinal data on publication and grant collaborations at the University of Florida. Results show that similar institutional affiliation, spatial proximity, transitivity effects, and use of the same research services predict higher degree of interdisciplinary collaboration between research communities. Our application also illustrates how the identification of research communities in longitudinal data and the analysis of cross-community network formation can be used to measure the growth of interdisciplinary team science at a research university, and to evaluate its association with research policies, services or institutes.

  19. 75 FR 80853 - Designing a Digital Future: Federally Funded Research and Development in Networking and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-23

    ... Designing a Digital Future: Federally Funded Research and Development in Networking and Information... ``Designing a Digital Future: Federally Funded Research and Development in Networking and Information... report entitled ``Designing a Digital Future: Federally Funded Research and Development in Networking and...

  20. Measuring Networking as an Outcome Variable in Undergraduate Research Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanauer, David I.; Hatfull, Graham

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose, present, and validate a simple survey instrument to measure student conversational networking. The tool consists of five items that cover personal and professional social networks, and its basic principle is the self-reporting of degrees of conversation, with a range of specific discussion partners. The networking instrument was validated in three studies. The basic psychometric characteristics of the scales were established by conducting a factor analysis and evaluating internal consistency using Cronbach’s alpha. The second study used a known-groups comparison and involved comparing outcomes for networking scales between two different undergraduate laboratory courses (one involving a specific effort to enhance networking). The final study looked at potential relationships between specific networking items and the established psychosocial variable of project ownership through a series of binary logistic regressions. Overall, the data from the three studies indicate that the networking scales have high internal consistency (α = 0.88), consist of a unitary dimension, can significantly differentiate between research experiences with low and high networking designs, and are related to project ownership scales. The ramifications of the networking instrument for student retention, the enhancement of public scientific literacy, and the differentiation of laboratory courses are discussed. PMID:26538387

  1. [Training of institutional research networks as a strategy of improvement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galván-Plata, María Eugenia; Almeida-Gutiérrez, Eduardo; Salamanca-Gómez, Fabio Abdel

    2017-01-01

    The Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS) through the Coordinación de Investigación en Salud (Health Research Council) has promoted a strong link between the generation of scientific knowledge and the clinical care through the program Redes Institucionales de Investigación (Institutional Research Network Program), whose main aim is to promote and generate collaborative research between clinical, basic, epidemiologic, educational, economic and health services researchers, seeking direct benefits for patients, as well as to generate a positive impact on institutional processes. All of these research lines have focused on high-priority health issues in Mexico. The IMSS internal structure, as well as the sufficient health services coverage, allows the integration of researchers at the three levels of health care into these networks. A few years after their creation, these networks have already generated significant results, and these are currently applied in the institutional regulations in diseases that represent a high burden to health care. Two examples are the National Health Care Program for Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction "Código Infarto", and the Early Detection Program on Chronic Kidney Disease; another result is the generation of multiple scientific publications, and the promotion of training of human resources in research from the same members of our Research Networks. There is no doubt that the Coordinación de Investigación en Salud advances steadily implementing the translational research, which will keep being fruitful to the benefit of our patients, and of our own institution.

  2. Exposing the Bathtub Coriolis Myth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzsieder, John C.

    1994-01-01

    Presents a demonstration that employs angular momentum to disprove the myth that water spirals down a bathtub drain clockwise in one hemisphere and counterclockwise in the other because of the Coriolis force on water. (ZWH)

  3. Newton's Principia: Myth and Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, George

    2016-03-01

    Myths about Newton's Principia abound. Some of them, such as the myth that the whole book was initially developed using the calculus and then transformed into a geometric mathematics, stem from remarks he made during the priority controversy with Leibniz over the calculus. Some of the most persistent, and misleading, arose from failures to read the book with care. Among the latter are the myth that he devised his theory of gravity in order to explain the already established ``laws'' of Kepler, and that in doing so he took himself to be establishing that Keplerian motion is ``absolute,'' if not with respect to ``absolute space,'' then at least with respect to the fixed stars taken as what came later to be known as an inertial frame. The talk will replace these two myths with the reality of what Newton took himself to have established.

  4. Filtering Dialysis Myths from Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Menu Menu Search Home Prevention Kidney Disease Patients Organ Donation & Transplantation Professionals Events Advocacy Donate A to Z ... the area if needed. Myth: Dialysis is a death sentence. Fact: Dialysis is a treatment that helps ...

  5. Contraception. Myths, facts and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlman, S E; Richmond, D M; Sabatini, M M; Krueger, H; Rudy, S J

    2001-02-01

    After reading this article, the reader should be able to: 1. Recognize the mechanism of action, side effects, contraindications, precautions and instructions for use of a variety of contraceptive methods. 2. Understand the advantages and disadvantages of the various contraceptive methods. 3. List the common myths and misconceptions about conception and contraception, and recognize how they can influence contraceptive decisions. Unintended pregnancy is a serious problem in the United States. Counseling a patient about conception and contraception involves more than simply imparting information and answering questions. Clinicians should actively detect and correct any myths and misapprehensions on the patient's part. These myths are quite common and can interfere with treatment if not attended to. This article summarizes common myths about pregnancy and contraception and reviews the key facts about both.

  6. Mapping the network | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... of the 12 scholars who joined in subsequent years are affiliated with universities in cities other than Beijing and Shanghai. In fact, the researchers' roots extend more widely than that. Few of them actually come from Beijing or Shanghai. Most were born in smaller cities and moved to the major centres for graduate school.

  7. The network evolves | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2011-07-08

    Jul 8, 2011 ... Canada, China collaborate to encourage “brain flow” between the two countries. The "brain flow" between Canada and China involves the movement of Chinese students, researchers, and faculty to Canadian educational institutions,. View moreCanada, China collaborate to encourage “brain flow” between ...

  8. Tobacco Control Research, Dissemination and Networking in ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Canada-Latin America and Caribbean Zika Virus Research Program. A new funding opportunity on Zika virus is responding to the virus outbreak and the health threat it represents for the affected populations in the hardest hit countries in Latin America and the... View moreCanada-Latin America and Caribbean Zika Virus ...

  9. Building a fisheries research network | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2011-02-01

    Feb 1, 2011 ... At the same time, much of the scientific research being carried out on these issues was primarily biological in nature, even while people were starting to recognize that the real solutions were social, economic, political, and institutional in nature. Too much of the focus went toward studying the fish, and not ...

  10. Southern African Development Research Network | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Members of the Southern Africa Development Community (SADC) are struggling to craft policies for fruitful integration into the global economy and inclusive growth. While some donor initiatives have been successful in meeting short-term policy needs, they are not sustainable solutions to a weak research and policy ...

  11. Expanding delivery system research in public health settings: lessons from practice-based research networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mays, Glen P; Hogg, Rachel A

    2012-11-01

    Delivery system research to identify how best to organize, finance, and implement health improvement strategies has focused heavily on clinical practice settings, with relatively little attention paid to public health settings-where research is made more difficult by wide heterogeneity in settings and limited sources of existing data and measures. This study examines the approaches used by public health practice-based research networks (PBRNs) to expand delivery system research and evidence-based practice in public health settings. Practice-based research networks employ quasi-experimental research designs, natural experiments, and mixed-method analytic techniques to evaluate how community partnerships, economic shocks, and policy changes impact delivery processes in public health settings. In addition, network analysis methods are used to assess patterns of interaction between practitioners and researchers within PBRNs to produce and apply research findings. Findings from individual PBRN studies elucidate the roles of information exchange, community resources, and leadership and decision-making structures in shaping implementation outcomes in public health delivery. Network analysis of PBRNs reveals broad engagement of both practitioners and researchers in scientific inquiry, with practitioners in the periphery of these networks reporting particularly large benefits from research participation. Public health PBRNs provide effective mechanisms for implementing delivery system research and engaging practitioners in the process. These networks also hold promise for accelerating the translation and application of research findings into public health settings.

  12. Primary care research conducted in networks: getting down to business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mold, James W

    2012-01-01

    This seventh annual practice-based research theme issue of the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine highlights primary care research conducted in practice-based research networks (PBRNs). The issue includes discussion of (1) theoretical and methodological research, (2) health care research (studies addressing primary care processes), (3) clinical research (studies addressing the impact of primary care on patients), and (4) health systems research (studies of health system issues impacting primary care including the quality improvement process). We had a noticeable increase in submissions from PBRN collaborations, that is, studies that involved multiple networks. As PBRNs cooperate to recruit larger and more diverse patient samples, greater generalizability and applicability of findings lead to improved primary care processes.

  13. The Mind Research Network - Mental Illness Neuroscience Discovery Grant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, J. [The Mind Research Network, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Calhoun, V. [The Mind Research Network, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2013-12-17

    The scientific and technological programs of the Mind Research Network (MRN), reflect DOE missions in basic science and associated instrumentation, computational modeling, and experimental techniques. MRN's technical goals over the course of this project have been to develop and apply integrated, multi-modality functional imaging techniques derived from a decade of DOE-support research and technology development.

  14. Networks of Practice in Science Education Research: A Global Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sonya N.; Siry, Christina

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we employ cultural sociology and Braj Kachru's model of World Englishes as theoretical and analytical tools for considering English as a form of capital necessary for widely disseminating research findings from local networks of practice to the greater science education research community. We present a brief analysis of recent…

  15. Asia-Pacific Research and Training Network on Trade (ARTNET ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Small and Medium Enterprises (SME) Adjustments to Information Technology (IT) in Trade Facilitation: The South Korean Experience. Documents. Asia - Pacific Research and Training Network on Trade (ARTNeT) newsletter, volume 6, issue 1 / October 2009 - January 2010. Documents. Asia - Pacific Research and ...

  16. Investigating communication networks contextually: Qualitative network analysis as cross-media research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Hepp

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article introduces the approach of contextualised communication network analysis as a qualitative procedure for researching communicative relationships realised through the media. It combines qualitative interviews on media appropriation, egocentric network maps, and media diaries. Through the triangulation of these methods of data collection, it is possible to gain a differentiated insight into the specific meanings, structures and processes of communication networks across a variety of media. The approach is illustrated using a recent study dealing with the mediatisation of community building among young people. In this context, the qualitative communication network analysis has been applied to distinguish “localists” from “centrists”, “multilocalists”, and “pluralists”. These different “horizons of mediatised communitisation” are connected to distinct communication networks. Since this involves today a variety of different media, the contextual analysis of communication networks necessarily has to imply a cross-media perspective.

  17. EEG-based research on brain functional networks in cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Niannian; Zhang, Li; Liu, Guozhong

    2015-01-01

    Recently, exploring the cognitive functions of the brain by establishing a network model to understand the working mechanism of the brain has become a popular research topic in the field of neuroscience. In this study, electroencephalography (EEG) was used to collect data from subjects given four different mathematical cognitive tasks: recite numbers clockwise and counter-clockwise, and letters clockwise and counter-clockwise to build a complex brain function network (BFN). By studying the connectivity features and parameters of those brain functional networks, it was found that the average clustering coefficient is much larger than its corresponding random network and the average shortest path length is similar to the corresponding random networks, which clearly shows the characteristics of the small-world network. The brain regions stimulated during the experiment are consistent with traditional cognitive science regarding learning, memory, comprehension, and other rational judgment results. The new method of complex networking involves studying the mathematical cognitive process of reciting, providing an effective research foundation for exploring the relationship between brain cognition and human learning skills and memory. This could help detect memory deficits early in young and mentally handicapped children, and help scientists understand the causes of cognitive brain disorders.

  18. Roles of Clinical Research Networks in Pediatric Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Mark A; Attar, Sabah; de Wildt, Saskia N; Vassal, Gilles; Mangiarini, Laura; Giaquinto, Carlo

    2017-10-01

    The evaluation of drugs that are used in children has been neglected historically but is now well established as an essential part of clinical drug development. The increase in pediatric activity among industry, and other sectors, has highlighted the importance of joint working. All participants in pediatric drug development need to be aware of the "big picture." An increasingly important part of this big picture in pediatrics, as in other populations, is the design and conduct of clinical trials in networks. This narrative review provides an overview of the roles of clinical research networks in pediatric drug development. Networks take many forms as specialty networks and geographic networks but work toward common principles, including sharing resources between trials, and using experience with trial conduct to improve trial design. Networks develop standardized processes for trial conduct (including performance management) that increase the speed and predictability of trial conduct while reducing burdens on sites, sponsors, and intermediaries. Networks can provide validated, real-world information about natural history, participant distribution, and standards of care to inform planning of development programs, including extrapolation and clinical trial simulation. Networks can work across geographic and jurisdictional barriers to promote global interoperability of drug development. Networks support participant centrality. Networks offer an opportunity to develop relationships with investigators, sites, and methodological experts that span pre-competitive foundations for drug development and specific products. Sustainable networks benefit all stakeholders by providing a multifunctional platform that promotes the quality and timeliness of clinical drug development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Defining and measuring successful emergency care networks: a research agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glickman, Seth W; Kit Delgado, M; Hirshon, Jon Mark; Hollander, Judd E; Iwashyna, Theodore J; Jacobs, Alice K; Kilaru, Austin S; Lorch, Scott A; Mutter, Ryan L; Myers, Sage R; Owens, Pamela L; Phelan, Michael P; Pines, Jesse M; Seymour, Christopher W; Ewen Wang, N; Branas, Charles C

    2010-12-01

    The demands on emergency services have grown relentlessly, and the Institute of Medicine (IOM) has asserted the need for "regionalized, coordinated, and accountable emergency care systems throughout the country." There are large gaps in the evidence base needed to fix the problem of how emergency care is organized and delivered, and science is urgently needed to define and measure success in the emerging network of emergency care. In 2010, Academic Emergency Medicine convened a consensus conference entitled "Beyond Regionalization: Integrated Networks of Emergency Care." This article is a product of the conference breakout session on "Defining and Measuring Successful Networks"; it explores the concept of integrated emergency care delivery and prioritizes a research agenda for how to best define and measure successful networks of emergency care. The authors discuss five key areas: 1) the fundamental metrics that are needed to measure networks across time-sensitive and non-time-sensitive conditions; 2) how networks can be scalable and nimble and can be creative in terms of best practices; 3) the potential unintended consequences of networks of emergency care; 4) the development of large-scale, yet feasible, network data systems; and 5) the linkage of data systems across the disease course. These knowledge gaps must be filled to improve the quality and efficiency of emergency care and to fulfill the IOM's vision of regionalized, coordinated, and accountable emergency care systems. 2010 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  20. Myths About Press Freedom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaarle Nordenstreng

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This article intends to rectify three popular beliefs related to press freedom: (1 that the idea of a free marketplace of ideas with a self-righting truth belongs to original liberalism, (2 that UNESCO’s primary mission is to promote freedom of information, and (3 that the Universal Declaration of Human Rights provides legal safeguards for the media. These beliefs are shown, on the basis of the legacy of liberalism and documents of the international community, to be misleading myths. Instead of accurate readings of the idea of freedom, they serve as ideological positions which are harmful to democracy. The Millennium Declaration provides further proof that the international community has a much more balanced view of freedom of information than that typically held by media professionals. Therefore it is important to liberate the concept of press freedom from its ideological baggage.

  1. Dispelling Seven Myths about Grid Resource Management

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Natrajan, Anand; Grimshaw, Andrew S; Humphrey, Marty A; Nguyen-Tuong, Anh

    2004-01-01

    ... policies, respecting permissions for use, and so on. In this article we will present seven "myths" or common beliefs about grid resource management and dispel each myth by presenting counter-examples or "observations...

  2. Effects of Actor-Network Theory in Accounting Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Lise Nederland; Mouritsen, Jan

    2011-01-01

    of a critical literature review and discussion. Findings – Since the early 1990s, actor-network theory, particularly the work of Bruno Latour, has inspired accounting researchers and led to a number of innovative studies of accounting phenomena. In particular, Latour's book, Science in Action, has been...... number of accounting papers that apply actor-network theory. A different sample might have given a somewhat different picture. Furthermore, it focuses on the influence of Latour's work and refrains from discussing how the writings of Michel Callon, John Law or other thinkers within the actor......Purpose – This paper aims to discuss how Bruno Latour's version of actor-network theory has influenced accounting research. It also seeks to show that Latour's writings contain unexplored potential that may inspire future accounting research. Design/methodology/approach – The paper takes the form...

  3. AmeriFlux Measurement Network: Science Team Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, B E

    2012-12-12

    Research involves analysis and field direction of AmeriFlux operations, and the PI provides scientific leadership of the AmeriFlux network. Activities include the coordination and quality assurance of measurements across AmeriFlux network sites, synthesis of results across the network, organizing and supporting the annual Science Team Meeting, and communicating AmeriFlux results to the scientific community and other users. Objectives of measurement research include (i) coordination of flux and biometric measurement protocols (ii) timely data delivery to the Carbon Dioxide Information and Analysis Center (CDIAC); and (iii) assurance of data quality of flux and ecosystem measurements contributed by AmeriFlux sites. Objectives of integration and synthesis activities include (i) integration of site data into network-wide synthesis products; and (ii) participation in the analysis, modeling and interpretation of network data products. Communications objectives include (i) organizing an annual meeting of AmeriFlux investigators for reporting annual flux measurements and exchanging scientific information on ecosystem carbon budgets; (ii) developing focused topics for analysis and publication; and (iii) developing data reporting protocols in support of AmeriFlux network goals.

  4. Research on complex networks' repairing characteristics due to cascading failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaoqi, Fu; Ying, Wang; Xiaoyang, Wang

    2017-09-01

    In reality, most of the topological structures of complex networks are not ideal. Considering the restrictions from all aspects, we cannot timely adjust and improve network defects. Once complex networks collapse under cascading failure, an appropriate repair strategy must be implemented. This repair process is divided into 3 kinds of situations. Based on different types of opening times, we presented 2 repair modes, and researched 4 kinds of repair strategies. Results showed that network efficiency recovered faster when the repair strategies were arranged in descending order by parameters under the immediate opening condition. However, the risk of secondary failure and additional expansion capacity were large. On the contrary, when repair strategies were in ascending order, the demand for additional capacity caused by secondary failure was greatly saved, but the recovery of network efficiency was relatively slow. Compared to immediate opening, delayed opening alleviated the contradiction between network efficiency and additional expansion capacity, particularly to reduce the risk of secondary failure. Therefore, different repair methods have different repair characteristics. This paper investigates the impact of cascading effects on the network repair process, and by presenting a detailed description of the status of each repaired node, helps us understand the advantages and disadvantages of different repair strategies.

  5. Network pharmacology: a new approach for chinese herbal medicine research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gui-Biao; Li, Qing-Ya; Chen, Qi-Long; Su, Shi-Bing

    2013-01-01

    The dominant paradigm of "one gene, one target, one disease" has influenced many aspects of drug discovery strategy. However, in recent years, it has been appreciated that many effective drugs act on multiple targets rather than a single one. As an integrated multidisciplinary concept, network pharmacology, which is based on system biology and polypharmacology, affords a novel network mode of "multiple targets, multiple effects, complex diseases" and replaces the "magic bullets" by "magic shotguns." Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) has been recognized as one of the most important strategies in complementary and alternative medicine. Though CHM has been practiced for a very long time, its effectiveness and beneficial contribution to public health has not been fully recognized. Also, the knowledge on the mechanisms of CHM formulas is scarce. In the present review, the concept and significance of network pharmacology is briefly introduced. The application and potential role of network pharmacology in the CHM fields is also discussed, such as data collection, target prediction, network visualization, multicomponent interaction, and network toxicology. Furthermore, the developing tendency of network pharmacology is also summarized, and its role in CHM research is discussed.

  6. Network Pharmacology: A New Approach for Chinese Herbal Medicine Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gui-biao Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The dominant paradigm of “one gene, one target, one disease” has influenced many aspects of drug discovery strategy. However, in recent years, it has been appreciated that many effective drugs act on multiple targets rather than a single one. As an integrated multidisciplinary concept, network pharmacology, which is based on system biology and polypharmacology, affords a novel network mode of “multiple targets, multiple effects, complex diseases” and replaces the “magic bullets” by “magic shotguns.” Chinese herbal medicine (CHM has been recognized as one of the most important strategies in complementary and alternative medicine. Though CHM has been practiced for a very long time, its effectiveness and beneficial contribution to public health has not been fully recognized. Also, the knowledge on the mechanisms of CHM formulas is scarce. In the present review, the concept and significance of network pharmacology is briefly introduced. The application and potential role of network pharmacology in the CHM fields is also discussed, such as data collection, target prediction, network visualization, multicomponent interaction, and network toxicology. Furthermore, the developing tendency of network pharmacology is also summarized, and its role in CHM research is discussed.

  7. The concept of myth in the Russian religious philosophy of the 20-ies of XX century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. CHAGINSKY

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The problem of the myth is not something new to Russian thought of 20 century — the main approaches to its solution were developed in the 40s of the 19 century — so the research in the field of myth was based not only on the works of European thinkers, but also on the national tradition formed by that time. In particular, the article is centered on the approaches to understanding the myth developed in the Moscow intellectual milieu in the 20-ies of 20 century. The starting point of the study is the Vyacheslav Ivanov’s concept of myth, who developed the ideas of late Schelling’s works. The works of philosophers, who collaborated and communicated with V. Ivanov in Moscow until 1922 — Frank, Shestov, Florensky, Vysheslavtsev, Bulgakov, Losev, Berdyaev — are also studied. In the course of consideration of these theories the article focuses on the specifi c characteristics of the myth, as well as relations «myth — mythologeme — meaning» and «myth — symbol» uncovered by each thinker. In particular, an original A. F. Losev’s theory of the myth — miracle is studied, as it not only includes the elements of an earlier concepts, but also elevate the problem of the myth to a new level. The spectrum of actual at the time solutions to the problem of myth, thus obtained, allows to take a fresh look not only at the role of works by A. F. Losev in the Russian thought, but on the Russian religious philosophy of the beginning of the 20 century as a whole.

  8. Myths and realities of electronics maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Douglas H

    2008-06-01

    The author presents and discusses discoveries and developments contributing to enhanced electronics maintenance performance. This body of research is viewed from the vantage point of Nick Bond's 1970 Ely Award-winning article in Human Factors, "Some Persistent Myths About Military Electronics Maintenance." Bond identified a set of myths and summarized research that not only produced information and techniques leading to demonstrably improved maintenance performance but also exploded many unfounded beliefs that were commonly held before the research had been conducted and the findings disseminated. The period from 1964 through 1986, as reflected by publications in the journal, was a productive period of research that led to greater understanding of human factors in electronics maintenance and to numerous advances that contributed, ultimately, to more effective maintenance performance. Technological advances, combined with what we learned about maintenance performance, have substantially reduced the maintenance burden and enhanced the maintenance of electronic systems. Some of the principal lessons learned from this research on electronics maintenance apply to understanding the effects of equipment complexity, providing an optimal role for automation, designing more appropriate on-the-job training, and enhancing troubleshooting skills.

  9. NIHR Clinical Research Networks: what they do and how they help paediatric research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lythgoe, Hanna; Price, Victoria; Poustie, Vanessa; Attar, Sabah; Hawcutt, Daniel; Preston, Jennifer; Beresford, Michael W

    2017-08-01

    This review provides paediatricians with an update on the new structure of the National Institute for Health Research's (NIHR) Clinical Research Network (CRN): Children and its role within the wider NIHR infrastructure. The network supports delivery of high-quality research within the NHS in England and supports researchers, through provision of staff and resources, with feasibility, site set-up, patient recruitment and study management. Since 2013, over 80% of commercial contract studies running within the UK sat within the UKCRN Portfolio. Of the diverse, increasing portfolio of studies supported by the network, many studies are interventional, with 33% being randomised controlled studies. Recruitment to studies supported by the network through the Children's Portfolio has consistently improved. Over 200 000 participants have been recruited to the Children's Portfolio studies to date, and there are currently approximately 500 studies open to recruitment. The CRN: Children has successfully involved patients and the public in all aspects of study design and delivery, including through the work of Generation R. Challenges remain in conducting paediatric research and the network is committed to supporting Children's research and further building on its achievements to date. Education and engagement of paediatricians within the network and research is important to further improving quality and delivery of paediatric research. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  10. 75 FR 57521 - Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD) Program: Draft NITRD 2010...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    ... FOUNDATION Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD) Program: Draft NITRD 2010 Strategic Plan--URL Correction AGENCY: The National Coordination Office (NCO) for Networking and Information... Coordination Office for Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD) requests...

  11. Research on the complex network of the UNSPSC ontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yingying; Zou, Shengrong; Gu, Aihua; Wei, Li; Zhou, Ta

    The UNSPSC ontology mainly applies to the classification system of the e-business and governments buying the worldwide products and services, and supports the logic structure of classification of the products and services. In this paper, the related technologies of the complex network were applied to analyzing the structure of the ontology. The concept of the ontology was corresponding to the node of the complex network, and the relationship of the ontology concept was corresponding to the edge of the complex network. With existing methods of analysis and performance indicators in the complex network, analyzing the degree distribution and community of the ontology, and the research will help evaluate the concept of the ontology, classify the concept of the ontology and improve the efficiency of semantic matching.

  12. Building capability through networking with investors and researchers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Daojuan; Schøtt, Thomas

    A startup requires financing, typically, and the startup is based on innovation, often. Capabilities for innovation and financing may be built simultaneously and created jointly at inception. Co-creation of capabilities for financing and innovation is accounted for in this study. Co...... of startups at inception, by 9,161 entrepreneurs, surveyed in Global Entrepreneurship Monitor in 49 countries. Co-creation is found to be reduced by the entrepreneur’s networking in the private sphere of family and friends, but to be benefiting from networking in the public sphere, especially by networking...... with investors and researchers simultaneously. The findings contribute to understanding capability building as embedded in networks around the startup....

  13. The use and significance of a research networking system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlon, Maninder; Yuan, Leslie; Daigre, John; Meeks, Eric; Nelson, Katie; Piontkowski, Cynthia; Reuter, Katja; Sak, Rachael; Turner, Brian; Weber, Griffin M; Chatterjee, Anirvan

    2014-02-07

    Universities have begun deploying public Internet systems that allow for easy search of their experts, expertise, and intellectual networks. Deployed first in biomedical schools but now being implemented more broadly, the initial motivator of these research networking systems was to enable easier identification of collaborators and enable the development of teams for research. The intent of the study was to provide the first description of the usage of an institutional research "social networking" system or research networking system (RNS). Number of visits, visitor location and type, referral source, depth of visit, search terms, and click paths were derived from 2.5 years of Web analytics data. Feedback from a pop-up survey presented to users over 15 months was summarized. RNSs automatically generate and display profiles and networks of researchers. Within 2.5 years, the RNS at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) achieved one-seventh of the monthly visit rate of the main longstanding university website, with an increasing trend. Visitors came from diverse locations beyond the institution. Close to 75% (74.78%, 208,304/278,570) came via a public search engine and 84.0% (210 out of a sample of 250) of these queried an individual's name that took them directly to the relevant profile page. In addition, 20.90% (214 of 1024) visits went beyond the page related to a person of interest to explore related researchers and topics through the novel and networked information provided by the tool. At the end of the period analyzed, more than 2000 visits per month traversed 5 or more links into related people and topics. One-third of visits came from returning visitors who were significantly more likely to continue to explore networked people and topics (P<.001). Responses to an online survey suggest a broad range of benefits of using the RNS in supporting the research and clinical mission. Returning visitors in an ever-increasing pool of visitors to an RNS are

  14. Advanced Scientific Computing Research Network Requirements: ASCR Network Requirements Review Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacon, Charles [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bell, Greg [ESnet, Berkeley, CA (United States); Canon, Shane [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Dart, Eli [ESnet, Berkeley, CA (United States); Dattoria, Vince [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science. Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR); Goodwin, Dave [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science. Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR); Lee, Jason [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hicks, Susan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Holohan, Ed [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Klasky, Scott [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lauzon, Carolyn [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science. Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR); Rogers, Jim [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Shipman, Galen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Skinner, David [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Tierney, Brian [ESnet, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-03-08

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science (SC), the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of SC programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 25 years. In October 2012, ESnet and the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) of the DOE SC organized a review to characterize the networking requirements of the programs funded by the ASCR program office. The requirements identified at the review are summarized in the Findings section, and are described in more detail in the body of the report.

  15. Linking behavior in the physics education research coauthorship network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine A. Anderson

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available There is considerable long-term interest in understanding the dynamics of collaboration networks, and how these networks form and evolve over time. Most of the work done on the dynamics of social networks focuses on well-established communities. Work examining emerging social networks is rarer, simply because data are difficult to obtain in real time. In this paper, we use thirty years of data from an emerging scientific community to look at that crucial early stage in the development of a social network. We show that when the field was very young, islands of individual researchers labored in relative isolation, and the coauthorship network was disconnected. Thirty years later, rather than a cluster of individuals, we find a true collaborative community, bound together by a robust collaboration network. However, this change did not take place gradually—the network remained a loose assortment of isolated individuals until the mid 2000s, when those smaller parts suddenly knit themselves together into a single whole. In the rest of this paper, we consider the role of three factors in these observed structural changes: growth, changes in social norms, and the introduction of institutions such as field-specific conferences and journals. We have data from the very earliest years of the field, a period which includes the introduction of two different institutions: the first field-specific conference, and the first field-specific journals. We also identify two relevant behavioral shifts: a discrete increase in coauthorship coincident with the first conference, and a shift among established authors away from collaborating with outsiders, towards collaborating with each other. The interaction of these factors gives us insight into the formation of collaboration networks more broadly.

  16. Linking behavior in the physics education research coauthorship network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Katharine A.; Crespi, Matthew; Sayre, Eleanor C.

    2017-06-01

    There is considerable long-term interest in understanding the dynamics of collaboration networks, and how these networks form and evolve over time. Most of the work done on the dynamics of social networks focuses on well-established communities. Work examining emerging social networks is rarer, simply because data are difficult to obtain in real time. In this paper, we use thirty years of data from an emerging scientific community to look at that crucial early stage in the development of a social network. We show that when the field was very young, islands of individual researchers labored in relative isolation, and the coauthorship network was disconnected. Thirty years later, rather than a cluster of individuals, we find a true collaborative community, bound together by a robust collaboration network. However, this change did not take place gradually—the network remained a loose assortment of isolated individuals until the mid 2000s, when those smaller parts suddenly knit themselves together into a single whole. In the rest of this paper, we consider the role of three factors in these observed structural changes: growth, changes in social norms, and the introduction of institutions such as field-specific conferences and journals. We have data from the very earliest years of the field, a period which includes the introduction of two different institutions: the first field-specific conference, and the first field-specific journals. We also identify two relevant behavioral shifts: a discrete increase in coauthorship coincident with the first conference, and a shift among established authors away from collaborating with outsiders, towards collaborating with each other. The interaction of these factors gives us insight into the formation of collaboration networks more broadly.

  17. Measuring Networking as an Outcome Variable in Undergraduate Research Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanauer, David I; Hatfull, Graham

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose, present, and validate a simple survey instrument to measure student conversational networking. The tool consists of five items that cover personal and professional social networks, and its basic principle is the self-reporting of degrees of conversation, with a range of specific discussion partners. The networking instrument was validated in three studies. The basic psychometric characteristics of the scales were established by conducting a factor analysis and evaluating internal consistency using Cronbach's alpha. The second study used a known-groups comparison and involved comparing outcomes for networking scales between two different undergraduate laboratory courses (one involving a specific effort to enhance networking). The final study looked at potential relationships between specific networking items and the established psychosocial variable of project ownership through a series of binary logistic regressions. Overall, the data from the three studies indicate that the networking scales have high internal consistency (α = 0.88), consist of a unitary dimension, can significantly differentiate between research experiences with low and high networking designs, and are related to project ownership scales. The ramifications of the networking instrument for student retention, the enhancement of public scientific literacy, and the differentiation of laboratory courses are discussed. © 2015 D. I. Hanauer and G. Hatfull. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2015 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  18. The European Union’s Institutionalisation of Symbols and Myths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manners, Ian James

    2014-01-01

    to smart growth with more effective investments in education, research and innovation. But at the same time the strategy also mobilises around the myth of green Europe with an emphasis on sustainable growth with targets for a resource efficient, greener and more competitive economy. Thirdly the strategy...

  19. Rape Myth Beliefs and Bystander Attitudes among Incoming College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The bystander approach to rape prevention is gaining popularity on college campuses, although research is limited. This study explored bystander attitudes and their relationship with rape myths in a sample of college students. Participants: Surveys from 2,338 incoming undergraduate students at a large, northeastern university were…

  20. Two Birds with One Myth-Debunking Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaCaille, Rick A.

    2015-01-01

    Misconceptions of psychological phenomena are widespread and often not easily eliminated--even among students completing college-level psychology courses. As part of a research methods psychology course, students developed public-service-announcement-style posters as part of a psychology myth-debunking campaign and presented these to students…

  1. Myth and reality of gender inequality in education admission in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study is embedded within the context of the prevailing scholarly debate on gender and education in Africa's sustainable development. The researcher situates the discourse on the myth and reality of gender inequality in admission at state Universities in Nigeria. It examines the implication of this situation to educational ...

  2. Market Myths and Facts - the Ontario Context

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorey, S.

    2007-07-01

    The world has learned much about electricity markets and what they can and can't do over the past few years, but some myths persist. Why they persist is a subject for those who study politics, interests and influence. This paper provides a perspective on myths which have affected the reliable and economic delivery of electricity to customers, particularly with respect to transmission. Hydro One effectively provides the transmission network for the Province of Ontario, Canada. As Hydro One is a wires company, the paper is not intended to address the issues which affect the generation or conservation sectors of the industry, except where they directly relate to the wires. The proposition of this paper is that electricity transmission is best treated as an essential public good. Transmission as a market participant and a traded commodity has generally not worked with respect to assuring that the system continues to be developed to meet the basic need of customers for reliable and affordable electricity. (auth)

  3. Networking of theories as a research practice in mathematics education

    CERN Document Server

    Bikner-Ahsbahs, Angelika

    2014-01-01

    How can we deal with the diversity of theories in mathematics education This was the main question that led the authors of this book to found the Networking Theories Group. Starting from the shared assumption that the existence of different theories is a resource for mathematics education research, the authors have explored the possibilities of interactions between theories, such as contrasting, coordinating, and locally integrating them. The book explains and illustrates what it means to network theories; it presents networking as a challenging but fruitful research practice and shows how the Group dealt with this challenge considering five theoretical approaches, namely the approach of Action, Production, and Communication (APC), the Theory of Didactical Situations (TDS), the Anthropological Theory of the Didactic (ATD), the approach of Abstraction in Context (AiC), and the Theory of Interest-Dense Situations (IDS). A synthetic presentation of each theory and their connections shows how the activity of netw...

  4. Myths Dispelled: A Historical Account of Diversity and Inclusion at HBCUs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasman, Marybeth; Nguyen, Thai-Huy

    2015-01-01

    This chapter provides a historical and contemporary overview of diversity at HBCUs, challenges five myths related to diversity at HBCUs, and concludes with opportunities for future research consideration on diversity at HBCUs.

  5. Stories in Networks and Networks in Stories: A Tri-Modal Model for Mixed-Methods Social Network Research on Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker-Doyle, Kira J.

    2015-01-01

    Social network research on teachers and schools has risen exponentially in recent years as an innovative method to reveal the role of social networks in education. However, scholars are still exploring ways to incorporate traditional quantitative methods of Social Network Analysis (SNA) with qualitative approaches to social network research. This…

  6. Digital networks to aid research and education in Africa

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Around 120 participants were assembled over two days at CERN to discuss ways to bridge the digital divide with Africa. As part of efforts to implement the outcome of the first World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS), held in Geneva in 2003, CERN held the international workshop on Research and Education Networks in Africa, from 25 to 27 September. Organized by the United Nations University (UNU) in collaboration with the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) and CERN, this meeting was designed to promote scientific cooperation with and within Africa, through the development of networking infrastructure. Faster, reliable and more affordable Internet access is widely recognized as one of the key factors for enhancing research and education efforts in African academic and research institutions. For the first time, this workshop brought together representatives of all the key stakeholders: African academic and research institutions, international coordinators, funding agencies, grass-roots imple...

  7. Graduate students navigating social-ecological research: insights from the Long-Term Ecological Research Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydne Record; Paige F. B. Ferguson; Elise Benveniste; Rose A. Graves; Vera W. Pfeiffer; Michele Romolini; Christie E. Yorke; Ben Beardmore

    2016-01-01

    Interdisciplinary, collaborative research capable of capturing the feedbacks between biophysical and social systems can improve the capacity for sustainable environmental decision making. Networks of researchers provide unique opportunities to foster social-ecological inquiry. Although insights into interdisciplinary research have been discussed elsewhere,...

  8. Higher Education Change and Social Networks: A Review of Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kezar, Adrianna

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews literature on the potential for understanding higher education change processes through social network analysis (SNA). In this article, the main tenets of SNA are reviewed and, in conjunction with organizational theory, are applied to higher education change to develop a set of hypotheses that can be tested in future research.

  9. Artificial Neural Networks in Policy Research: A Current Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woelfel, Joseph

    1993-01-01

    Suggests that artificial neural networks (ANNs) exhibit properties that promise usefulness for policy researchers. Notes that ANNs have found extensive use in areas once reserved for multivariate statistical programs such as regression and multiple classification analysis and are developing an extensive community of advocates for processing text…

  10. Understanding the meaning of awareness in Research Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinhardt, Wolfgang; Mletzko, Christian; Sloep, Peter; Drachsler, Hendrik

    2013-01-01

    Reinhardt, W., Mletzko, C., Sloep, P. B., & Drachsler, H. (2012). Understanding the meaning of awareness in Research Networks. In A. Moore, V. Pammer, L. Pannese, M. Prilla, K. Rajagopal, W. Reinhardt, Th. D. Ullman, & Ch. Voigt (Eds.), Proceedings of the 2nd Workshop on Awareness and Reflection in

  11. Exploration of Heterogeneity in Distributed Research Network Drug Safety Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Richard A.; Zeng, Peng; Ryan, Patrick; Gao, Juan; Sonawane, Kalyani; Teeter, Benjamin; Westrich, Kimberly; Dubois, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Distributed data networks representing large diverse populations are an expanding focus of drug safety research. However, interpreting results is difficult when treatment effect estimates vary across datasets (i.e., heterogeneity). In a previous study, risk estimates were generated for selected drugs and potential adverse outcomes. Analyses were…

  12. Research Note: Networking Among Small and Medium-sized Enterprises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Limborg, Hans Jørgen; Grøn, Sisse; Flensborg Jensen, Maya

    2014-01-01

    Researchers and regulatory bodies lack an in-depth understanding of how small and mediumsized enterprises (SMEs) make decisions about workplace health and safety improvements and the role played by business networks in these decisions. To improve regulation and support there is a need to understa...

  13. Faculty Use of Author Identifiers and Researcher Networking Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Clara Y.; Lyon, Jennifer A.

    2017-01-01

    This cross-sectional survey focused on faculty use and knowledge of author identifiers and researcher networking systems, and professional use of social media, at a large state university. Results from 296 completed faculty surveys representing all disciplines (9.3% response rate) show low levels of awareness and variable resource preferences. The…

  14. Mekong Economic Research Network (MERN) | CRDI - Centre de ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Mekong Economic Research Network (MERN). The Greater Mekong countries of Cambodia, Laos and Viet Nam are among the lowest income countries in Asia. Although recent market-oriented reforms have greatly accelerated economic development in all three countries, they face numerous challenges to achieving ...

  15. Leadership in Network Learning: Business Action Research at Monash University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslett, Tim; Barton, John; Stephens, John; Schell, Liz; Olsen, Jane

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explain the emergent nature of leadership in a university-based learning network of mature-aged practitioner-scholars. Design/methodology/approach: The paper draws on previously published work, interviews, and current research. Findings: The paper finds that once initial structures have been established,…

  16. A community of practice: librarians in a biomedical research network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jager-Loftus, Danielle P; Midyette, J David; Harvey, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Providing library and reference services within a biomedical research community presents special challenges for librarians, especially those in historically lower-funded states. These challenges can include understanding needs, defining and communicating the library's role, building relationships, and developing and maintaining general and subject specific knowledge. This article describes a biomedical research network and the work of health sciences librarians at the lead intensive research institution with librarians from primarily undergraduate institutions and tribal colleges. Applying the concept of a community of practice to a collaborative effort suggests how librarians can work together to provide effective reference services to researchers in biomedicine.

  17. OAFP starts practice-based resource/research network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mold, J W; Barton, E D

    1996-12-01

    The Oklahoma Academy of Family Physicians, in collaboration with the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, has established a primary care practice-based research network with thirteen family practice offices currently participating. The practices are connected to each other and to the Health Sciences Center campuses in Oklahoma City and Tulsa by electronic mail and have begun their first research project involving the diagnosis and treatment of brown recluse spider bites in the primary care setting.

  18. Interdependent networks - Topological percolation research and application in finance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Di

    This dissertation covers the two major parts of my Ph.D. research: i) developing a theoretical framework of complex networks and applying simulation and numerical methods to study the robustness of the network system, and ii) applying statistical physics concepts and methods to quantitatively analyze complex systems and applying the theoretical framework to study real-world systems. In part I, we focus on developing theories of interdependent networks as well as building computer simulation models, which includes three parts: 1) We report on the effects of topology on failure propagation for a model system consisting of two interdependent networks. We find that the internal node correlations in each of the networks significantly changes the critical density of failures, which can trigger the total disruption of the two-network system. Specifically, we find that the assortativity within a single network decreases the robustness of the entire system. 2) We study the percolation behavior of two interdependent scale-free (SF) networks under random failure of 1-p fraction of nodes. We find that as the coupling strength q between the two networks reduces from 1 (fully coupled) to 0 (no coupling), there exist two critical coupling strengths q1 and q2 , which separate the behaviors of the giant component as a function of p into three different regions, and for q2 numerically. We study a starlike network of n Erdos-Renyi (ER), SF networks and a looplike network of n ER networks, and we find for starlike networks, their phase transition regions change with n, but for looplike networks the phase regions change with average degree k . In part II, we apply concepts and methods developed in statistical physics to study economic systems. We analyze stock market indices and foreign exchange daily returns for 60 countries over the period of 1999-2012. We build a multi-layer network model based on different correlation measures, and introduce a dynamic network model to simulate and

  19. The Use and Significance of a Research Networking System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Leslie; Daigre, John; Meeks, Eric; Nelson, Katie; Piontkowski, Cynthia; Reuter, Katja; Sak, Rachael; Turner, Brian; Weber, Griffin M; Chatterjee, Anirvan

    2014-01-01

    Background Universities have begun deploying public Internet systems that allow for easy search of their experts, expertise, and intellectual networks. Deployed first in biomedical schools but now being implemented more broadly, the initial motivator of these research networking systems was to enable easier identification of collaborators and enable the development of teams for research. Objective The intent of the study was to provide the first description of the usage of an institutional research “social networking” system or research networking system (RNS). Methods Number of visits, visitor location and type, referral source, depth of visit, search terms, and click paths were derived from 2.5 years of Web analytics data. Feedback from a pop-up survey presented to users over 15 months was summarized. Results RNSs automatically generate and display profiles and networks of researchers. Within 2.5 years, the RNS at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) achieved one-seventh of the monthly visit rate of the main longstanding university website, with an increasing trend. Visitors came from diverse locations beyond the institution. Close to 75% (74.78%, 208,304/278,570) came via a public search engine and 84.0% (210 out of a sample of 250) of these queried an individual’s name that took them directly to the relevant profile page. In addition, 20.90% (214 of 1024) visits went beyond the page related to a person of interest to explore related researchers and topics through the novel and networked information provided by the tool. At the end of the period analyzed, more than 2000 visits per month traversed 5 or more links into related people and topics. One-third of visits came from returning visitors who were significantly more likely to continue to explore networked people and topics (P<.001). Responses to an online survey suggest a broad range of benefits of using the RNS in supporting the research and clinical mission. Conclusions Returning

  20. Revealing myths about people, energy and buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, R.; Moezzi, M.

    2000-05-01

    In this essay we take a closer look at some energy myths, focusing on the ways energy professionals and the public alike, talk, write and teach about how energy affects the way in which we design, operate, retrofit and inhabit buildings. What myths about people, energy and buildings are current today? Who tells these myths and why do we believe them? How do myths affect our behavior? Myths are a way of understanding the world we live in. They may represent incomplete understanding, or be based on premises that are scientifically not valid, but they help us understand and explain how the world works, and we shape our behavior accordingly.

  1. The Genesis of Myth in V. Solovyov’s Early Writings. Myth as Theogon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaganova Natal'ia

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In Vladimir Solovyov’s works myth is presented in two ways: as the authorial myth, which is a part of the future “universal religion”, and as an object of theoretical refl ection in the process of philosophical and religious research. In both cases myth is understood as an actual process of theogony, and so Solovyov’s “religious studies” turn out to be a part of his religious metaphysics. The philosopher marks three periods in mythological process: uranic – solar – phallic, and maintains such development to be a law. Solovyov’s theory of the origin of religion is based upon the idea of the essential analogy between cosmic and theogonic processes. These two processes are different ways in which the same conscious principle of the world manifests itself; in Solovyov’s religious doctrine this principle is described as the “universal soul” which strives for the divine unity. The theory of mythological process by Solovyov is compared with a similar conception of bishop Chrysanthus (Retivtsev, who also appeals to primeval monotheism as the basic form of religion. In contrast to Solovyov’s theory, Chrysanthus understands the genesis of the ancient religion as a development of tribal psychology, which is localized entirely in the consciousness of a collective religious subject.

  2. Research trends in wireless visual sensor networks when exploiting prioritization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Daniel G; Guedes, Luiz Affonso; Vasques, Francisco; Portugal, Paulo

    2015-01-15

    The development of wireless sensor networks for control and monitoring functions has created a vibrant investigation scenario, where many critical topics, such as communication efficiency and energy consumption, have been investigated in the past few years. However, when sensors are endowed with low-power cameras for visual monitoring, a new scope of challenges is raised, demanding new research efforts. In this context, the resource-constrained nature of sensor nodes has demanded the use of prioritization approaches as a practical mechanism to lower the transmission burden of visual data over wireless sensor networks. Many works in recent years have considered local-level prioritization parameters to enhance the overall performance of those networks, but global-level policies can potentially achieve better results in terms of visual monitoring efficiency. In this paper, we make a broad review of some recent works on priority-based optimizations in wireless visual sensor networks. Moreover, we envisage some research trends when exploiting prioritization, potentially fostering the development of promising optimizations for wireless sensor networks composed of visual sensors.

  3. Research Trends in Wireless Visual Sensor Networks When Exploiting Prioritization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel G. Costa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of wireless sensor networks for control and monitoring functions has created a vibrant investigation scenario, where many critical topics, such as communication efficiency and energy consumption, have been investigated in the past few years. However, when sensors are endowed with low-power cameras for visual monitoring, a new scope of challenges is raised, demanding new research efforts. In this context, the resource-constrained nature of sensor nodes has demanded the use of prioritization approaches as a practical mechanism to lower the transmission burden of visual data over wireless sensor networks. Many works in recent years have considered local-level prioritization parameters to enhance the overall performance of those networks, but global-level policies can potentially achieve better results in terms of visual monitoring efficiency. In this paper, we make a broad review of some recent works on priority-based optimizations in wireless visual sensor networks. Moreover, we envisage some research trends when exploiting prioritization, potentially fostering the development of promising optimizations for wireless sensor networks composed of visual sensors.

  4. Assessing citation networks for dissemination and implementation research frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolarus, Ted A; Lehmann, Todd; Tabak, Rachel G; Harris, Jenine; Lecy, Jesse; Sales, Anne E

    2017-07-28

    A recent review of frameworks used in dissemination and implementation (D&I) science described 61 judged to be related either to dissemination, implementation, or both. The current use of these frameworks and their contributions to D&I science more broadly has yet to be reviewed. For these reasons, our objective was to determine the role of these frameworks in the development of D&I science. We used the Web of Science™ Core Collection and Google Scholar™ to conduct a citation network analysis for the key frameworks described in a recent systematic review of D&I frameworks (Am J Prev Med 43(3):337-350, 2012). From January to August 2016, we collected framework data including title, reference, publication year, and citations per year and conducted descriptive and main path network analyses to identify those most important in holding the current citation network for D&I frameworks together. The source article contained 119 cited references, with 50 published articles and 11 documents identified as a primary framework reference. The average citations per year for the 61 frameworks reviewed ranged from 0.7 to 103.3 among articles published from 1985 to 2012. Citation rates from all frameworks are reported with citation network analyses for the framework review article and ten highly cited framework seed articles. The main path for the D&I framework citation network is presented. We examined citation rates and the main paths through the citation network to delineate the current landscape of D&I framework research, and opportunities for advancing framework development and use. Dissemination and implementation researchers and practitioners may consider frequency of framework citation and our network findings when planning implementation efforts to build upon this foundation and promote systematic advances in D&I science.

  5. Leadership in complex networks: the importance of network position and strategic action in a translational cancer research network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Janet C; Cunningham, Frances C; Wiley, Janice; Carswell, Peter; Braithwaite, Jeffrey

    2013-10-11

    Leadership behaviour in complex networks is under-researched, and little has been written concerning leadership of translational research networks (TRNs) that take discoveries made 'at the bench' and translate them into practices used 'at the bedside.' Understanding leaders' opportunities and behaviours within TRNs working to solve this key problem in implementing evidence into clinical practice is therefore important. This study explored the network position of governing body members and perceptions of their role in a new TRN in Sydney, Australia. The paper asks three questions: Firstly, do the formal, mandated leaders of this TRN hold key positions of centrality or brokerage in the informal social network of collaborative ties? Secondly, if so, do they recognise the leadership opportunities that their network positions afford them? Thirdly, what activities associated with these key roles do they believe will maximise the TRN's success? Semi-structured interviews of all 14 governing body members conducted in early 2012 explored perceptions of their roles and sought comments on a list of activities drawn from review of successful transdisciplinary collaboratives combined with central and brokerage roles. An on-line, whole network survey of all 68 TRN members sought to understand and map existing collaborative connections. Leaders' positions in the network were assessed using UCInet, and graphs were generated in NetDraw. Social network analysis identified that governing body members had high centrality and high brokerage potential in the informal network of work-related ties. Interviews showed perceived challenges including 'silos' and the mismatch between academic and clinical goals of research. Governing body members recognised their central positions, which would facilitate the leadership roles of leading, making decisions, and providing expert advice necessary for the co-ordination of effort and relevant input across domains. Brokerage potential was recognised

  6. Myth and One-Dimensionality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Hansen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A striking difference between the folk-narrative genres of legend and folktale is how the human characters respond to supernatural, otherworldly, or uncanny beings such as ghosts, gods, dwarves, giants, trolls, talking animals, witches, and fairies. In legend the human actors respond with fear and awe, whereas in folktale they treat such beings as if they were ordinary and unremarkable. Since folktale humans treat all characters as belonging to a single realm, folklorists have described the world of the folktale as one-dimensional, in contrast to the two-dimensionality of the legend. The present investigation examines dimensionality in the third major genre of folk narrative: myth. Using the Greek and Hebrew myths of primordial paradise as sample narratives, the present essay finds—surprisingly—that the humans in these stories respond to the otherworldly one-dimensionally, as folktale characters do, and suggests an explanation for their behavior that is peculiar to the world of myth.

  7. Rethinking Interventionist Research: Navigating Oppositional Networks in a Danish Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Christian Nickelsen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on a researcher's experience of being invited to improve upon an organisational situation in a hospital in Denmark. Being engaged with different networks of participants in the organisational situation, the researcher found himself wrapped up in various agendas, with different sections of the staff trying to persuade him to support their own respective interests. The article theorises these persuasions as "seductions." Consequently, the task of the researcher involves selecting, prioritising, and working upon his connections with various networks, while each continues to represent a different set of values, expectations, interests, and experiences. Based on this conceptualisation, the article interrogates the notion of interventionist research. Intervention is not limited only to a simple one-way causation where the interventionist does something useful in a studied field; it also involves engagement with multiple networks present in the field, each of which tries to seduce the researcher in order to befriend this potentially powerful collaborator. Using the term "interference," rather than intervention, to represent the researcher's action, the article suggests that the researcher is often not able to control the effect of his or her interference unilaterally. Neither is the researcher able to establish an overarching perspective which can be used to evaluate the final outcome. The article calls for fresh thinking on how a researcher may be engaged usefully in an organisational situation, working within the boundaries defined by the institutional logic, confronting the seductions from multiple sources, and still seeking to maintain a ground that justifies one's identity as a researcher.

  8. New Zealand needs a Practice Based Research Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitch, Sharon

    2016-03-01

    Practice Based Research Networks (PBRNs) are groups of general practices collaborating to produce research. Contemporary New Zealand health information technology systems are ideal for electronic data extraction for PBRN research. Stakeholders have a valuable, but typically underutilised, part to play in research. Development of an e-participation platform will facilitate stakeholder engagement. New Zealand is in a unique position to create an innovative, low cost, stakeholder-engaged PBRN. This type of PBRN would offer unparalleled research opportunities, and would strengthen New Zealand's general practice research capacity. The more research information we have based on our New Zealand population, the more appropriate care we can provide. Establishing a stakeholder-engaged PBRN in New Zealand will promote and support transformational change within our health system.

  9. Wireless networks and security issues, challenges and research trends

    CERN Document Server

    Pathan, Al-Sakib

    2013-01-01

     “Wireless Networks and Security” provides a broad coverage of wireless security issues including cryptographic coprocessors, encryption, authentication, key management, attacks and countermeasures, secure routing, secure medium access control, intrusion detection, epidemics, security performance analysis, security issues in applications. The contributions identify various vulnerabilities in the physical layer, MAC layer, network layer, transport layer, and application layer, and focus on ways of strengthening security mechanisms and services throughout the layers. This carefully edited monograph is targeting  for researchers, post-graduate students in universities, academics, and industry practitioners or professionals.  

  10. Energy Efficiency in Underwater Sensor Networks: a Research Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Kanakaris

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In an energy-constrained underwater system environment it is very important to find ways to improve the life expectancy ofthe sensors. Compared to the sensors of a terrestrial Ad Hoc Wireless Sensor Network (WSN, underwater sensors cannotuse solar energy to recharge the batteries, and it is difficult to replace the batteries in the sensors. This paper reviews theresearch progress made to date in the area of energy consumption in underwater sensor networks (UWSN and suggestsfurther research that needs to be carried out in order to increase the energy efficiency of the UWSN system.

  11. Debunking Health IT Usability Myths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staggers, N.; Xiao, Y.; Chapman, L.

    2013-01-01

    Poor usability is a threat to patient safety and linked to productivity loss, workflow disruption, user frustration, sub-optimal product use and system de-installations. Although usability is receiving more attention nationally and internationally, myths about usability persist. This editorial debunks five common myths about usability (1) usability only concerns the look and feel of a product and is, therefore, only a minor concern, (2) usability is not measurable, (3) usability stifles innovation, (4) vendors are solely responsible for product usability, and (5) usability methods are not practical for use in healthcare. PMID:23874361

  12. Network of Research Infrastructures for European Seismology (NERIES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eck, T.; Giardini, D.; Bossu, R.; Wiemer, S.

    2008-12-01

    NERIES (Network of Research Infrastructures for European Seismology) is an Integrated Infrastructure Initiative (I3) project within the Sixth Framework Programme of the European Commission (EC). The project consortium consists of 25 participants from 13 different European countries. It is currently the largest earth science project ever funded by the EC. The goal of NERIES is to integrate European seismological observatories and research institutes into one integrated cyber-infrastructure for seismological data serving the research community, civil protection authorities and the general public. The EC provides funds for the networking and research. The participants provide the necessary hardware investments, mostly through national resources. NERIES consists of 13 subprojects (networking and research activities) and 5 facilities providing access through grants (Transnational Access). The project is coordinated by ORFEUS in close cooperation with the EMSC. The individual subprojects address different issues such as: extension of the Virtual European Broadband Seismic Network (VEBSN) from 140 to about 500 stations, implementing the core European Integrated Waveform Data Archive (EIDA) consisting of ODC-KNMI, GFZ, INGV and IPGP and a distributed archive of historical Data. Providing access to data gathered by acceleration networks within Europe and its surroundings and deploys Ocean Bottom Seismometers in coordination with relevant Ocean bottom projects like ESONET. Tot facilitate access to this diverse and distributed data NERIES invests a significant portion of its resources to implementing a portal for which a beta release is planned to be release in the autumn of 2008. The research project main goal is to produce products and tools facilitating data interpretation and analysis. These tools include a European reference (velocity) model, real-time hazard tools, shakemaps and lossmaps, site response determination software and tools, and automatic tools to manage and

  13. European network for research in global change (ENRICH)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghazi, A. [European Commission, Bruxelles (Belgium). DG XII/JRC

    1995-12-31

    While approaching the beginning of the twenty first century, the scientific community is faced with the formidable tasks of monitoring and detecting, understanding and predicting changes in the Earth System and its interactions with human beings. A crucial challenge is to make scientific research results accessible and usable for those involved in the decision making process related to the concept of Sustainable Development. Major international scientific programmes under the umbrella of ICSU, such as the IGBP and WCRP, are dealing with these issues. Although there exist many well developed global change research programmes in several European countries and effective collaboration networks between research institutes, there is an urgent need for overall communication with a view to promoting wider international links ensuring complementarity, synergy and coherence. Recognizing the importance of promoting coherence in research and utilising research results for various European Union (EU) policies, the European Commissioner responsible for Science, Research and Development wrote in March 1992 to all the EU Research Ministers to propose an initiative in this domain. In a rapid response, a group of Senior Experts from the EU Member States was set up in April 1992. This Group established a Task Force to develop the concept of the European Network for Research In Global CHange (ENRICH) which was approved in July 1993

  14. Challenges, limits and possibilities of the telejournalism researchers network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Antônio Camargo Porcello

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes a theoretical reflection on the challenges, limits and possibilities of network research, with emphasis on the case of the Telejournalism Researchers Network of the Brazilian Association of Journalism Researchers (SBPJor. In addition to a brief historical account of the network´s years of existence, we will deal here with the publications already accomplished, the evolution of the empirical research works, the courses adopted and also the future plans for the amplification, in quantity and quality, of the commitments undertaken. The interaction between theory and practice has always been a basic milestone in the advancement of the group, composed of professors who have had professional activity in television broadcasting stations. TV enters into people´s lives and cannot be seen as a mere support for electronic communication. Telejournalism is an interdisciplinary field which should be studied in its discursive and enunciative aspects. This article will offer some theoretical contributions from authors such as Castells, Bauman, Chauraudeau, Thompson, Gomes and Mattos, among others, to help in shedding light on this path and stimulate the amplification of the theoretical debate proposed.

  15. Mapping collaboration networks in the world of Autism Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Neal D; Tager-Flusberg, Helen; Lee, Brian K

    2015-02-01

    In the era of globalization and with the emergence of autism spectrum disorder as a global concern, the landscape of autism research has expanded to encompass much of the world. Here, we seek to provide an overview of the world of autism research, by documenting collaboration underlying the International Meeting for Autism Research (IMFAR), the pre-eminent annual scientific meeting devoted to the presentation of the latest autism research. We analyzed published abstracts presented at IMFAR meetings, between 2008 and 2013, to determine patterns of collaboration. We described collaboration networks on the individual, institutional, and international levels, and visually depicted these results on spatial network maps. Consistent with findings from other scientific disciplines, we found that collaboration is correlated with research productivity. Collaborative hotspots of autism research throughout the years were clustered on the East and West coasts of the U.S., Canada, and northern Europe. In years when conferences were held outside of North America, the proportion of abstracts from Europe and Asia increased. While IMFAR has traditionally been dominated by a large North American presence, greater global representation may be attained by shifting meeting locations to other regions of the world. © 2014 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Consumer involvement in cancer research: example from a Cancer Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arain, Mubashir; Pyne, Sarah; Thornton, Nigel; Palmer, Susan; Sharma, Ricky A

    2015-10-01

    The involvement of consumers and the general public in improving cancer services is an important component of health services. However, consumer involvement in cancer research is relatively unexplored. The objective of this study was to explore different ways of involving consumers in cancer research in one regional network. Thames Valley Cancer Network Consumer Research Partnership (CRP) group was formed in 2009. The group consists of consumers and professionals to help in promoting consumer involvement in Cancer Research in the Thames Valley. This study evaluated the project of consumer involvement in cancer research in the Thames Valley from March 2010 to March 2011. We used different indices to judge the level of consumer involvement: number of projects involving consumers through the group, types of projects, level of involvement (ranged from consultation on research documents to collaborating in preparing grant applications) and the methods of involving consumers in cancer research. Fifteen projects were submitted to the CRP group during the 12-month period studied. Of these, eight projects were clinical trials, three were qualitative research projects, two were patients' surveys and two were non-randomized interventional studies. Seven projects requested consumer involvement on patient information sheets for clinical trials. Of these seven applications, three also requested consumers' help in designing research questionnaires and another three requested that consumers should be involved in their project management group. In addition, four projects involved consumers in the proposal development phase and another four projects asked for advice on how to increase trial recruitment, conduct patient interviews or help with grant applications. The creation of the CRP and this audit of its activity have documented consumer involvement in cancer research in the Thames Valley. We have clearly shown that consumers can be involved in designing and managing cancer

  17. Confronting myths with science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, B

    1994-12-01

    Family Health International (FHI) staff arranged for a workshop on contraceptive facts and fallacies within 48 hours for the 10-day meeting of the Nongovernmental Organization (NGO) Forum in Cairo, Egypt. Since policy and advocacy groups affect family planning service delivery and are often misinformed, the quality of client services is impaired. This workshop would allow NGO Forum participants to receive basic information on contraception and to correct any misinformation. FHI hoped that the workshop would stimulate dialogue among scientists, women's groups, and policymakers. Panel speakers were a deputy assistant secretary for population affairs with the US Department of Health and Human Services, an obstetrics-gynecology (OB-GYN) professor at Emory University in Atlanta, who was also a member of FHI's Board of Directors, and a native Indian, now practicing OB-GYN in the US, who was a former medical director at FHI. FHI senior vice president for reproductive health programs moderated the panel. The panel addressed the following myths: male condoms fail often and condom use increases the spread of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), natural family planning (NFP) does not prevent pregnancy, oral contraceptives (OCs) cause cancer, spermicides increase the risk of acquiring AIDS and STDs. The panel provided the following facts: Condom breakage and slippage occurs in 0-12% of acts of intercourse. Education on proper use of condoms can reduce the likelihood of condom failure. If used correctly, NFP is 98% effective. OCs protect against ovarian and endometrial cancers. We still do not know whether or not they contribute to cervical cancer development. A study has found an association between OCs and a form of liver cancer common in developing countries (due to a high prevalence of hepatitis B infection). Spermicide use reduces the risk of bacterial STDs (e.g., gonorrhea and chlamydia), but it is not yet clear whether it affects the risk of viral STDs (e.g., HIV).

  18. Myths and Facts about SIDS and Safe Infant Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Myths and Facts About SIDS and Safe Infant Sleep Page Content Myth: Babies can “catch” SIDS. Fact: ... sleep environment for your baby. Myth: Babies who sleep on their backs will choke if they spit ...

  19. Social network analysis of international scientific collaboration on psychiatry research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ying; Duan, Zhiguang

    2015-01-01

    Mental disorder is harmful to human health, effects social life seriously and still brings a heavy burden for countries all over the world. Scientific collaboration has become the indispensable choice for progress in the field of biomedicine. However, there have been few scientific publications on scientific collaboration in psychiatry research so far. The aim of this study was to measure the activities of scientific collaboration in psychiatry research at the level of authors, institutions and countries. We retrieved 36557 papers about psychiatry from Science Ciation Index Expanded (SCI-Expanded) in web of science. Additionally, some methods such as social network analysis (SNA), K-plex analysis and Core-Periphery were used in this study. Collaboration has been increasing at the level of authors, institutions and countries in psychiatry in the last ten years. We selected the top 100 prolific authors, institutions and 30 countries to construct collaborative map respectively. Freedman, R and Seidman, LJ were the central authors, Harvard university was the central institution and the USA was the central country of the whole network. Notably, the rate of economic development of countries affected collaborative behavior. The results show that we should encourage multiple collaboration types in psychiatry research as they not only help researchers to master the current research hotspots but also provide scientific basis for clinical research on psychiatry and suggest policies to promote the development of this area.

  20. Romanian Post‑Revolution Electoral Myths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Bulai

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes some of the political and electoral myths of the post-communist transition, myths that have occupied the political agenda and the public debate throughout this period. Myths are seen as simple or complex narratives that have an explanatory and justificatory function in relation to social life, focused on Romanian society’s problems. They define and legitimizes a certain way to solve them and guides the development of society on the basis of some axiomatic principles. The article analyzes such myths, older or more recent, such as the myth of changing the electoral system, the myth of renewing the political class, the myth of the fundamental power of the referendum, the myth of the reform of the state, or of the constitutional amendments. The proposed analysis highlights the negative effects of using myths as instruments of the political and social changing on public policies and more generally on governance, and also the long-term harmful effects of the use of myths in defining political vision and Romania’s governmental development strategies.

  1. Understanding the meaning of awareness in Research Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Reinhardt, Wolfgang; Mletzko, Christian; Sloep, Peter; Drachsler, Hendrik

    2013-01-01

    Reinhardt, W., Mletzko, C., Sloep, P. B., & Drachsler, H. (2012). Understanding the meaning of awareness in Research Networks. In A. Moore, V. Pammer, L. Pannese, M. Prilla, K. Rajagopal, W. Reinhardt, Th. D. Ullman, & Ch. Voigt (Eds.), Proceedings of the 2nd Workshop on Awareness and Reflection in Technology Enhanced Learning. In conjunction with the 7th European Conference on Technology Enhanced Learning: 21st Century Learning for 21st Century Skills (ARTEL/EC-TEL 2012) (pp. 13-30). Septemb...

  2. ESnet and Internet2 partner to deploy next generation network for scientific research and discovery

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "The Department of Energy's (DOE) Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) and Internet 2 - two of the nation's leading networking organizations for research - today announced a partnership to deploy a highly reliable, high capacity nationwide network.." (1,5 page)

  3. Belief in Family Planning Myths at the Individual and Community Levels and Modern Contraceptive Use in Urban Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueye, Abdou; Speizer, Ilene S; Corroon, Meghan; Okigbo, Chinelo C

    2015-12-01

    Negative myths and misconceptions about family planning are a barrier to modern contraceptive use. Most research on the subject has focused on individual beliefs about contraception; however, given that myths spread easily within communities, it is also important to examine how the prevalence of negative myths in a community affects the aggregate level of method use. Baseline data collected in 2010-2011 by the Measurement, Learning & Evaluation project on women aged 15-49 living in selected cities in Kenya, Nigeria and Senegal were used. Multivariate analyses examined associations between modern contraceptive use and belief in negative myths for individuals and communities. In each country, the family planning myths most prevalent at the individual and community levels were that "people who use contraceptives end up with health problems," "contraceptives are dangerous to women's health" and "contraceptives can harm your womb." On average, women in Nigeria and Kenya believed 2.7 and 4.6 out of eight selected myths, respectively, and women in Senegal believed 2.6 out of seven. Women's individual-level belief in myths was negatively associated with their modern contraceptive use in all three countries (odds ratios, 0.2-0.7). In Nigeria, the women's community-level myth variable was positively associated with modern contraceptive use (1.6), whereas the men's community-level myth variable was negatively associated with use (0.6); neither community-level variable was associated with modern contraceptive use in Kenya or Senegal. Education programs are needed to dispel common myths and misconceptions about modern contraceptives. In Nigeria, programs that encourage community-level discussions may be effective at reducing myths and increasing modern contraceptive use.

  4. Common High Blood Pressure Myths

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Common High Blood Pressure Myths Updated:Dec 8,2017 Knowing the facts ... health. This content was last reviewed October 2016. High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP Introduction What ...

  5. The Myth of Peer Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungar, Michael T.

    2000-01-01

    The construct of peer pressure was examined as part of a qualitative study of the determinants of mental health for 41 high-risk adolescents. While the concept of peer pressure enables adults to explain youths' troubling behaviors, content analysis of the participants' accounts of their lives reveals peer pressure to be a myth. (Author/MKA)

  6. Debunking the Myths about Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirichello, Michael

    2008-01-01

    When principals travel down the road of change, they often find potholes of resistance, many resulting from misconceptions about the process. In this article, the author debunks five myths about change: (1) Change is always the answer; (2) The destination is more important than the journey; (3) Change depends on the principal's leadership; (4)…

  7. The myths of the Bear

    CERN Document Server

    Antonello, E

    2013-01-01

    Following previous works on ancient myths in Greek and Latin literature regarding Ursa Major, and the possible relation with the ancient shape of the constellation, we discuss further this case in the light of the evolution of Homo sapiens and the ethnographic records of populations of Eurasia and North America.

  8. Validation of the internalization of the Model Minority Myth Measure (IM-4) and its link to academic performance and psychological adjustment among Asian American adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Hyung Chol; Miller, Matthew J; Yip, Pansy

    2015-04-01

    There is limited research examining psychological correlates of a uniquely racialized experience of the model minority stereotype faced by Asian Americans. The present study examined the factor structure and fit of the only published measure of the internalization of the model minority myth, the Internalization of the Model Minority Myth Measure (IM-4; Yoo et al., 2010), with a sample of 155 Asian American high school adolescents. We also examined the link between internalization of the model minority myth types (i.e., myth associated with achievement and myth associated with unrestricted mobility) and psychological adjustment (i.e., affective distress, somatic distress, performance difficulty, academic expectations stress), and the potential moderating effect of academic performance (cumulative grade point average). Results suggested the 2-factor model of the IM-4 had an acceptable fit to the data and supported the factor structure using confirmatory factor analyses. Internalizing the model minority myth of achievement related positively to academic expectations stress; however, internalizing the model minority myth of unrestricted mobility related negatively to academic expectations stress, both controlling for gender and academic performance. Finally, academic performance moderated the model minority myth associated with unrestricted mobility and affective distress link and the model minority myth associated with achievement and performance difficulty link. These findings highlight the complex ways in which the model minority myth relates to psychological outcomes. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Zero Net Energy Myths and Modes of Thought

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajkovich, Nicholas B.; Diamond, Rick; Burke, Bill

    2010-09-20

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC), and a number of professional organizations have established a target of zero net energy (ZNE) in buildings by 2030. One definition of ZNE is a building with greatly reduced needs for energy through efficiency gains with the balance of energy needs supplied by renewable technologies. The push to ZNE is a response to research indicating that atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases have increased sharply since the eighteenth century, resulting in a gradual warming of the Earth?s climate. A review of ZNE policies reveals that the organizations involved frame the ZNE issue in diverse ways, resulting in a wide variety of myths and a divergent set of epistemologies. With federal and state money poised to promote ZNE, it is timely to investigate how epistemologies, meaning a belief system by which we take facts and convert them into knowledge upon which to take action, and the propagation of myths might affect the outcome of a ZNE program. This paper outlines myths commonly discussed in the energy efficiency and renewable energy communities related to ZNE and describes how each myth is a different way of expressing"the truth." The paper continues by reviewing a number of epistemologies common to energy planning, and concludes that the organizations involved in ZNE should work together to create a"collaborative rationality" for ZNE. Through this collaborative framework it is argued that we may be able to achieve the ZNE and greenhouse gas mitigation targets.

  10. Evolutionary Events in a Mathematical Sciences Research Collaboration Network

    CERN Document Server

    Brunson, Jason Cory; McInnes, Antonio; Narayan, Monisha; Richardson, Brianna; Franck, Christopher; Ion, Patrick; Laubenbacher, Reinhard

    2012-01-01

    Collaboration is key to scientific research, and increasingly to mathematics. This paper contains a longitudinal investigation of mathematics collaboration and publishing using the proprietary database Mathematical Reviews, maintained by the American Mathematical Society. The database contains publications by several hundred thousand researchers over 25 years. Mathematical scientists became more interconnected, collaborative, and interdisciplinary over this interval, and twice the network experienced dramatic structural shifts. These events are examined and possible external factors are discussed. Smaller subject-specific subnetworks exhibit behavior that provides insight into the aggregate dynamics. The data are available upon request to the Executive Director of the AMS.

  11. Design and Research on Automotive Controller Area Network Bus Analyzer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwei CUI

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The detection method of automotive controller area network bus is researched in this paper. Failure identifying of CAN bus under different working conditions has been realized. In order to realizing intelligent failure diagnosis, data fusion means has been put forward in this paper. The composition of analysis and detection system is introduced. By analyzing and processing the data of CAN bus and sensors, work condition of automotive is achieved. Multi-pattern data fusion model and algorithm for failure diagnosis are researched. The analyzer and detection system designed in this paper can be applied to automotive fault analysis, troubleshooting and maintenance.

  12. Six myths about mathematical modeling in geomorphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bras, Rafael L.; Tucker, Gregory E.; Teles, Vanessa

    Geomorphologists, geologists and hydrologists have always used models. Unfortunately an artificial schism between modelers and experimentalists (or "observationalists") commonly exists in our fields. This schism is founded on bias, misinterpretation, and myth. The schism is perpetuated by misuse and misrepresentation of data and models. In this paper we have tried to address six of those myths and illustrate, mostly with our experiences, why we think mathematical models are useful and necessary tools of the trade. First we argue for a broad definition of "physical" models. Mechanistic rigor is not always possible or the best approach to problems. Second, verification is impossible given that reality is imperfectly known. We can strive for some level of confirmation of model behavior and this confirmation must generally be of statistical, distributional, nature. Third we give examples of how even unconfirmed models can be useful tools. Fourth, examples are given of rejected models, in a sense "failures," that have advanced our knowledge and led us to discoveries. Fifth, models should become progressively more complex, but this complexity commonly results in simple outcomes. Finally, the best models are those with outputs that challenge preconceived ideas. Modeling, including mathematical modeling, is a necessary tool of field researchers and theorists alike.

  13. Testosterone therapy in women: myths and misconceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Rebecca; Dimitrakakis, Constantine

    2013-03-01

    Although testosterone therapy is being increasingly prescribed for men, there remain many questions and concerns about testosterone (T) and in particular, T therapy in women. A literature search was performed to elucidate the origin of, and scientific basis behind many of the concerns and assumptions about T and T therapy in women. This paper refutes 10 common myths and misconceptions, and provides evidence to support what is physiologically plausible and scientifically evident: T is the most abundant biologically active female hormone, T is essential for physical and mental health in women, T is not masculinizing, T does not cause hoarseness, T increases scalp hair growth, T is cardiac protective, parenteral T does not adversely affect the liver or increase clotting factors, T is mood stabilizing and does not increase aggression, T is breast protective, and the safety of T therapy in women is under research and being established. Abandoning myths, misconceptions and unfounded concerns about T and T therapy in women will enable physicians to provide evidenced based recommendations and appropriate therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. WORKING TOGETHER: EDUCATION, RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT FOR 5G NETWORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. P. Ivanova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the new world of globalization of ideas and mobility difficulties in knowledge diffusion still remains. The effectiveexchange of experiences and skills in new generation networks is not guaranteed by the enormous potentialsofinternetworking systems and devices. Conceptual model for performance modeling and evaluation of multiservicenetworks has been major interest for mobile networks providers. It is essential to assess the performance ofmobile system architectures in order to identify where potential bottlenecks and data packet blocking probabilityare possible to occur. Educational platforms, new simulations opportunities represent a good opportunity to reducethe digital divide and to ensure faster and higher communication trends. Several universities and companies arecurrently involved in using educational platforms to provide better results. Conceptual model for teletrafficengineering in educational platform and applications focuses on some important aspects: tutorials, exercise,simulations, and expectation values of parameters, testing and estimation of students work. In the same time thesame model is very appropriate for simulation of network management for the new generation networks. Thiseducational platform for academics, students and researchers, puts together some of the critical aspects ofdistributed systems and their characteristics, parameters and probability of blocking.

  15. METHODOLOGY OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT OF REGIONAL NETWORK ECONOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.I. Botkin

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Information practically of all the Russian regions economy branches and development by managing subjects is information − communicative the Internet technologies render huge influence on economic attitudes development in the environment of regional business: there are new forms of interaction of managing subjects and change is information − organizational structures of regional business management. Integrated image of the set forth above innovations is the regional network economy representing the interactive environment in which on high speed and with minimal transaction (R.H.Coase’s costs are performed social economic and commodity monetary attitudes between managing subjects of region with use of Internet global network interactive opportunities. The urgency of the regional network economy phenomenon research, first of all, is caused by necessity of a substantiation of regional network economy methodology development and management mechanisms development by its infrastructure with the purpose of regional business efficiency increase. In our opinion, the decision of these problems will be the defining factor of effective economic development maintenance and russian regions economy growth in the near future.

  16. How Researchers Use Social Media to Promote their Research and Network with Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Päivi Jaring

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Social media is now an essential information and interaction channel. Companies advertise and sell their products and services through social media, but this channel has not been so commonly applied to the task of selling knowledge and research work. This article studies the use of social media by researchers to promote their research and network with product developers in industry, and it presents a model of the use of social media by researchers. The data for this research was obtained by interviewing individual researchers of a research organization and surveying product developers from industry. The findings show that social media is seen as a good source of new information and contacts, and it is suitable for promoting awareness of research services and results. The results show that the speed and intensity of social media present challenges for researchers, but by being active in posting content and participating in discussions, researchers can derive benefits and enhance their personal reputations.

  17. Patient-Centered Network of Learning Health Systems: Developing a resource for clinical translational research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finney Rutten, L J; Alexander, A; Embi, P J; Flores, G; Friedman, C; Haller, I V; Haug, P; Jensen, D; Khosla, S; Runger, G; Shah, N D; Winden, T; Roger, V L

    2017-02-01

    The Learning Health System Network clinical data research network includes academic medical centers, health-care systems, public health departments, and health plans, and is designed to facilitate outcomes research, pragmatic trials, comparative effectiveness research, and evaluation of population health interventions. The Learning Health System Network is 1 of 13 clinical data research networks assembled to create, in partnership with 20 patient-powered research networks, a National Patient-Centered Clinical Research Network. Herein, we describe the Learning Health System Network as an emerging resource for translational research, providing details on the governance and organizational structure of the network, the key milestones of the current funding period, and challenges and opportunities for collaborative science leveraging the network.

  18. Practice-based research networks: building the infrastructure of primary care research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutting, P A

    1996-02-01

    Family practice and primary care are rapidly achieving prominence as the foundation of a rapidly changing health care system, driven not by systematic reform but by the rapid advance of managed care. The knowledge base to support primary care practice, however, lags far behind after decades of neglect in the headlong rush toward overspecialization. The success of biomedical research in the United States in the last 50 years is due in large part to the network of tertiary care hospitals, where the specialized care of highly selected patients supports broad programs of teaching and research. There are no comparable laboratories, however, for research on the important content areas of primary care. The emergence and success of practice-based research networks over the past decade provide an important infrastructure for careful study of the health and health care phenomena that comprise primary care. Practice-based research networks have made a great deal of progress in methods development and have begun to contribute important information to the primary care knowledge base. They continue, however, to be underfunded and underdeveloped, existing on large infusions of volunteerism by the participating physicians. The study recently completed by the Institute of Medicine's Committee on the Future of Primary Care will play a critical role in promoting widespread appreciation of the gap in the scientific base necessary to support primary care practice, the need for research in primary care, and the complementary relationship of this body of research and the more traditional biomedical research that has been so well funded.

  19. Recruitment of Underrepresented Minority Researchers into HIV Prevention Research: The HIV Prevention Trials Network Scholars Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Erica L.; Griffith, Sam B.; Jennings, Larissa; Dyer, Typhanye V.; Mayer, Kenneth; Wheeler, Darrell

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Most U.S. investigators in the HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN) have been of majority race/ethnicity and sexual orientation. Research participants, in contrast, have been disproportionately from racial/ethnic minorities and men who have sex with men (MSM), reflecting the U.S. epidemic. We initiated and subsequently evaluated the HPTN Scholars Program that mentors early career investigators from underrepresented minority groups. Scholars were affiliated with the HPTN for 12–18 months, mentored by a senior researcher to analyze HPTN study data. Participation in scientific committees, trainings, protocol teams, and advisory groups was facilitated, followed by evaluative exit surveys. Twenty-six trainees have produced 17 peer-reviewed articles to date. Research topics typically explored health disparities and HIV prevention among black and Hispanic MSM and at-risk black women. Most scholars (81% in the first five cohorts) continued HIV research after program completion. Alumni reported program-related career benefits and subsequent funding successes. Their feedback also suggested that we must improve the scholars' abilities to engage new research protocols that are developed within the network. Mentored engagement can nurture the professional development of young researchers from racial/ethnic and sexual minority communities. Minority scientists can benefit from training and mentoring within research consortia, whereas the network research benefits from perspectives of underrepresented minority scientists. PMID:29145745

  20. European network infrastructures of observatories for terrestrial Global Change research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereecken, H.; Bogena, H.; Lehning, M.

    2009-04-01

    The earth's climate is significantly changing (e.g. IPCC, 2007) and thus directly affecting the terrestrial systems. The number and intensity hydrological extremes, such as floods and droughts, are continually increasing, resulting in major economical and social impacts. Furthermore, the land cover in Europe has been modified fundamentally by conversions for agriculture, forest and for other purposes such as industrialisation and urbanisation. Additionally, water resources are more than ever used for human development, especially as a key resource for agricultural and industrial activities. As a special case, the mountains of the world are of significant importance in terms of water resources supply, biodiversity, economy, agriculture, traffic and recreation but particularly vulnerable to environmental change. The Alps are unique because of the pronounced small scale variability they contain, the high population density they support and their central position in Europe. The Alps build a single coherent physical and natural environment, artificially cut by national borders. The scientific community and governmental bodies have responded to these environmental changes by performing dedicated experiments and by establishing environmental research networks to monitor, analyse and predict the impact of Global Change on different terrestrial systems of the Earths' environment. Several European network infrastructures for terrestrial Global Change research are presently immerging or upgrading, such as ICOS, ANAEE, LifeWatch or LTER-Europe. However, the strongest existing networks are still operating on a regional or national level and the historical growth of such networks resulted in a very heterogeneous landscape of observation networks. We propose therefore the establishment of two complementary networks: The NetwOrk of Hydrological observAtories, NOHA. NOHA aims to promote the sustainable management of water resources in Europe, to support the prediction of

  1. THE NEED OF DASHBOARD IN SOCIAL RESEARCH NETWORK SITES FOR RESEARCHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Hawa Apandi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, dashboard has been widely used by organizations to display information based on their objectives such as monitoring business performance or checking the current trend in the niche market. There is a need to investigate whether the researchers also need the dashboard in assisting their research works. There are some issues facing by researchers while using Social Research Network Sites (SRNS since they could not noticed with information related to research field that they might be interested in because they are huge amounts of information in the SRNS. The inclusion of dashboard in the SRNS has to be explored to understand its relevancy in supporting the researchers work. We review previous works regarding dashboard usage to find the purposes of having dashboard and find researcher needs by reviewing researchers use scenario in the social networking sites. Then, we analyze whether the dashboard purposes can satisfy the researcher needs. From the analysis, we found out that the dashboard is a significant tool in assisting the researchers on: measuring their own research performance, monitoring research trends and alerting them with upcoming events.

  2. Passive and Active Monitoring on a High Performance Research Network.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, Warren

    2001-05-01

    The bold network challenges described in ''Internet End-to-end Performance Monitoring for the High Energy and Nuclear Physics Community'' presented at PAM 2000 have been tackled by the intrepid administrators and engineers providing the network services. After less than a year, the BaBar collaboration has collected almost 100 million particle collision events in a database approaching 165TB (Tera=10{sup 12}). Around 20TB has been exported via the Internet to the BaBar regional center at IN2P3 in Lyon, France, for processing and around 40 TB of simulated events have been imported to SLAC from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). An unforseen challenge has arisen due to recent events and highlighted security concerns at DoE funded labs. New rules and regulations suggest it is only a matter of time before many active performance measurements may not be possible between many sites. Yet, at the same time, the importance of understanding every aspect of the network and eradicating packet loss for high throughput data transfers has become apparent. Work at SLAC to employ passive monitoring using netflow and OC3MON is underway and techniques to supplement and possibly replace the active measurements are being considered. This paper will detail the special needs and traffic characterization of a remarkable research project, and how the networking hurdles have been resolved (or not!) to achieve the required high data throughput. Results from active and passive measurements will be compared, and methods for achieving high throughput and the effect on the network will be assessed along with tools that directly measure throughput and applications used to actually transfer data.

  3. Debunking the Myth of the Strategic Corporal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-13

    To) 13-04-2015 Master’ s Thesis 21-07-2014 to 12-06-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER Debunking the Myth of the Strategic Corporal...anyone but themselves . A thorough analysis of a series of contemporary historical case studies debunks the myth of the strategic corporal and...demonstrates errors in policy or strategic level decisions ultimately affect the outcome of an operation and because the strategic corporal is a myth

  4. National High Frequency Radar Network (hfrnet) and Pacific Research Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazard, L.; Terrill, E. J.; Cook, T.; de Paolo, T.; Otero, M. P.; Rogowski, P.; Schramek, T. A.

    2016-12-01

    The U.S. High Frequency Radar Network (HFRNet) has been in operation for over ten years with representation from 31 organizations spanning academic institutions, state and local government agencies, and private organizations. HFRNet currently holds a collection from over 130 radar installations totaling over 10 million records of surface ocean velocity measurements. HFRNet is a primary example of inter-agency and inter-institutional partnerships for improving oceanographic research and operations. HF radar derived surface currents have been used in several societal applications including coastal search and rescue, oil spill response, water quality monitoring and marine navigation. Central to the operational success of the large scale network is an efficient data management, storage, access, and delivery system. The networking of surface current mapping systems is characterized by a tiered structure that extends from the individual field installations to local regional operations maintaining multiple sites and on to centralized locations aggregating data from all regions. The data system development effort focuses on building robust data communications from remote field locations (sites) for ingestion into the data system via data on-ramps (Portals or Site Aggregators) to centralized data repositories (Nodes). Centralized surface current data enables the aggregation of national surface current grids and allows for ingestion into displays, management tools, and models. The Coastal Observing Research and Development Center has been involved in international relationships and research in the Philippines, Palau, and Vietnam. CORDC extends this IT architecture of surface current mapping data systems leveraging existing developments and furthering standardization of data services for seamless integration of higher level applications. Collaborations include the Philippine Atmospheric Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA), The Coral Reef Research

  5. Construction Management--Exploding Some Myths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluenker, Charles

    1986-01-01

    Construction management on educational facility projects provides boards of education with documentation showing the project is on track. Eight "myths" surrounding construction management are explained. (MLF)

  6. Le soleil devient un mythe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ildikó Lőrinszky

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Partant d’une phrase énigmatique datant de 1858 et puisée dans la Correspondance de Flaubert, cet article s’interroge sur la relation entre soleil et mythe, qui constituera l’un des éléments clefs de la dimension mythologique de Salammbô. Il se propose d’examiner la façon dont cette question apparaît dans deux ouvrages représentatifs des études mythographiques : d’une part, L’Origine de tous les cultes de Charles-François Dupuis, d’autre part, Les Religions de l’Antiquité..., publié sous les noms de Frédéric Creuzer et de son adaptateur français, Joseph-Daniel Guigniault. La version française de la grande synthèse de Creuzer, assortie d’une série importante de planches, a été richement exploitée par Flaubert au cours de la genèse du roman carthaginois. Dans Salammbô, le mythe apparaît sous de multiples formes. L’analyse de ce texte peut nous amener à réfléchir sur le « bon usage » du mythe auquel chaque créateur (et chaque lecteur se trouve nécessairement confronté.Starting from an enigmatic phrase in Flaubert’s correspondence, dating from 1858, this article examines the relation between the Sun and myth, which constitutes one of the key elements of the mythological dimension of Salammbô. It especially focuses on the treatment of this question in two representative works of mythographic studies, The Origin of All Religious Worship by Charles-François Dupuis, and Les Religions de l’Antiquité..., the French adaptation of Frédéric Creuzer’s Symbolik und Mythologie der alten Völker by Joseph-Daniel Guigniault. The French version of Creuzer’s great synthesis, supplied with a remarkable set of prints, was abundantly consulted by Flaubert when writing his Carthaginian novel. In Salammbô, myth takes on various forms. Analyzing this text might lead one to reconsider “the right way” to use myths — a problem all writers (and readers find themselves confronted with.

  7. Proliferation: myth or reality?; La proliferation: mythe ou realite?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    This article analyzes the proliferation approach, its technical condition and political motivation, and the share between the myth (political deception, assumptions and extrapolations) and the reality of proliferation. Its appreciation is complicated by the irrational behaviour of some political actors and by the significant loss of the non-use taboo. The control of technologies is an important element for proliferation slowing down but an efficient and autonomous intelligence system remains indispensable. (J.S.)

  8. European Network of Bipolar Research Expert Centre (ENBREC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henry, Chantal; Andreassen, Ole A; Barbato, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    clinical decision-making as well as being applicable to research. Reliable, established measures have been prioritised, and instruments have been translated and validated when necessary. An electronic healthcare record and monitoring system (e-ENBREC©) has been developed to collate the data. Protocols...... of a critical mass of expertise and multicentre collaborative projects. Within the framework of the European FP7 programme, we developed a European Network of Bipolar Research Expert Centres (ENBREC) designed specifically to facilitate EU-wide studies. ENBREC provides an integrated support structure...... facilitating research on disease mechanisms and clinical outcomes across six European countries (France, Germany, Italy, Norway, Spain and the UK). The centres are adopting a standardised clinical assessment that explores multiple aspects of bipolar disorder through a structured evaluation designed to inform...

  9. Differential Regulatory Analysis Based on Coexpression Network in Cancer Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junyi Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With rapid development of high-throughput techniques and accumulation of big transcriptomic data, plenty of computational methods and algorithms such as differential analysis and network analysis have been proposed to explore genome-wide gene expression characteristics. These efforts are aiming to transform underlying genomic information into valuable knowledges in biological and medical research fields. Recently, tremendous integrative research methods are dedicated to interpret the development and progress of neoplastic diseases, whereas differential regulatory analysis (DRA based on gene coexpression network (GCN increasingly plays a robust complement to regular differential expression analysis in revealing regulatory functions of cancer related genes such as evading growth suppressors and resisting cell death. Differential regulatory analysis based on GCN is prospective and shows its essential role in discovering the system properties of carcinogenesis features. Here we briefly review the paradigm of differential regulatory analysis based on GCN. We also focus on the applications of differential regulatory analysis based on GCN in cancer research and point out that DRA is necessary and extraordinary to reveal underlying molecular mechanism in large-scale carcinogenesis studies.

  10. Ultimate doctor liability: a myth of ignorance or myth of control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashin, Andrew; Carey, Michael; Watson, Ngaire; Clark, Greg; Newman, Claire; Waters, Cheryl D

    2009-01-01

    Ultimate medical doctor responsibility for the care delivered to patients by all professionals is a myth. Legally Lord Denning dismissed the myth in the mid-20th century in England. The assumption that a medical doctor is responsible for the care delivered by nurses has not existed in English and Australian law since that time, and it has been actively refuted. Yet it is a myth that continues to circulate influencing health service, state and federal health policy. For some it is a myth of ignorance and for others it is a means of control. This paper outlines the relevant case law to debunk the myth of ultimate medical doctor control.

  11. Study of co-authorship network of papers in the Journal of Research in Medical Sciences using social network analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firoozeh Zare-Farashbandi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Co-authorship is one of the most tangible forms of research collaboration. A co-authorship network is a social network in which the authors through participation in one or more publication through an indirect path have linked to each other. The present research using the social network analysis studied co-authorship network of 681 articles published in Journal of Research in Medical Sciences (JRMS during 2008-2012. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out with the scientometrics approach and using co-authorship network analysis of authors. The topology of the co-authorship network of 681 published articles in JRMS between 2008 and 2012 was analyzed using macro-level metrics indicators of network analysis such as density, clustering coefficient, components and mean distance. In addition, in order to evaluate the performance of each authors and countries in the network, the micro-level indicators such as degree centrality, closeness centrality and betweenness centrality as well as productivity index were used. The UCINET and NetDraw softwares were used to draw and analyze the co-authorship network of the papers. Results: The assessment of the authors productivity in this journal showed that the first ranks were belonged to only five authors, respectively. Furthermore, analysis of the co-authorship of the authors in the network demonstrated that in the betweenness centrality index, three authors of them had the good position in the network. They can be considered as the network leaders able to control the flow of information in the network compared with the other members based on the shortest paths. On the other hand, the key role of the network according to the productivity and centrality indexes was belonged to Iran, Malaysia and United States of America. Conclusion: Co-authorship network of JRMS has the characteristics of a small world network. In addition, the theory of 6° separation is valid in this network was also true.

  12. Caries treatment in a dental practice-based research network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, Gregg H; Gordan, Valeria V; Funkhouser, Ellen M

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Practice-based research networks (PBRNs) provide a venue to foster evidence-based care. We tested the hypothesis that a higher level of participation in a dental PBRN is associated with greater stated change toward evidence-based practice. METHODS: A total of 565 dental PBRN...... practitioner-investigators completed a baseline questionnaire entitled 'Assessment of Caries Diagnosis and Treatment'; 405 of these also completed a follow-up questionnaire about treatment of caries and existing restorations. Certain questions (six treatment scenarios) were repeated at follow-up a mean (SD...

  13. Impact of the Cancer Prevention and Control Research Network: Accelerating the Translation of Research Into Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribisl, Kurt M; Fernandez, Maria E; Friedman, Daniela B; Hannon, Peggy A; Leeman, Jennifer; Moore, Alexis; Olson, Lindsay; Ory, Marcia; Risendal, Betsy; Sheble, Laura; Taylor, Vicky M; Williams, Rebecca S; Weiner, Bryan J

    2017-03-01

    The Cancer Prevention and Control Research Network (CPCRN) is a thematic network dedicated to accelerating the adoption of evidence-based cancer prevention and control practices in communities by advancing dissemination and implementation science. Funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and National Cancer Institute, CPCRN has operated at two levels: Each participating network center conducts research projects with primarily local partners as well as multicenter collaborative research projects with state and national partners. Through multicenter collaboration, thematic networks leverage the expertise, resources, and partnerships of participating centers to conduct research projects collectively that might not be feasible individually. Although multicenter collaboration is often advocated, it is challenging to promote and assess. Using bibliometric network analysis and other graphical methods, this paper describes CPCRN's multicenter publication progression from 2004 to 2014. Searching PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science in 2014 identified 249 peer-reviewed CPCRN publications involving two or more centers out of 6,534 total. The research and public health impact of these multicenter collaborative projects initiated by CPCRN during that 10-year period were then examined. CPCRN established numerous workgroups around topics such as: 2-1-1, training and technical assistance, colorectal cancer control, federally qualified health centers, cancer survivorship, and human papillomavirus. This paper discusses the challenges that arise in promoting multicenter collaboration and the strategies that CPCRN uses to address those challenges. The lessons learned should broadly interest those seeking to promote multisite collaboration to address public health problems, such as cancer prevention and control. Copyright © 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Transforming networking within the ESIP Federation using ResearchBit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, E.

    2015-12-01

    Geoscientists increasingly need interdisciplinary teams to solve their research problems. Currently, geoscientists use Research Networking (RN) systems to connect with each other and find people of similar and dissimilar interests. As we shift to digitally mediated scholarship, we need innovative methods for scholarly communication. Formal methods for scholarly communication are undergoing vast transformation owing to the open-access movement and reproducible research. However, informal scholarly communication that takes place at professional society meetings and conferences, like AGU, has received limited research attention relying primarily on serendipitous interaction. The ResearchBit project aims to fundamentally improve informal methods of scholarly communication by leveraging the serendipitous interactions of researchers and making them more aware of co-located potential collaborators with mutual interests. This presentation will describe our preliminary hardware testing done at the Federation for Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP) Summer meeting this past July and the initial recommendation system design. The presentation will also cover the cultural shifts and hurdles to introducing new technology, the privacy concerns of tracking technology and how we are addressing those new issues.

  15. The role of social networking sites in medical genetics research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reaves, Allison Cook; Bianchi, Diana W

    2013-05-01

    Social networking sites (SNS) have potential value in the field of medical genetics as a means of research subject recruitment and source of data. This article examines the current role of SNS in medical genetics research and potential applications for these sites in future studies. Facebook is the primary SNS considered, given the prevalence of its use in the United States and role in a small but growing number of studies. To date, utilization of SNS in medical genetics research has been primarily limited to three studies that recruited subjects from populations of Facebook users [McGuire et al. (2009); Am J Bioeth 9: 3-10; Janvier et al. (2012); Pediatrics 130: 293-298; Leighton et al. (2012); Public Health Genomics 15: 11-21]. These studies and a number of other medical and public health studies that have used Facebook as a context for recruiting research subjects are discussed. Approaches for Facebook-based subject recruitment are identified, including paid Facebook advertising, snowball sampling, targeted searching and posting. The use of these methods in medical genetics research has the potential to facilitate cost-effective research on both large, heterogeneous populations and small, hard-to-access sub-populations. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Researcher networking drives change: an autoenthnographic narrative analysis from medical graduate to primary health researcher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott-Rudder, Megan

    2010-01-01

    This narrative study aims to provide an illustrative example of the role of networking in a career path into doctoral candidature and research. Currently there is a push to build capacity for primary health care research. Mentoring and networking are increasingly relevant for recruitment, retention and research output, as can be seen in the case of this novice rural female researcher. The narrative ofmy career path from a rural general practice trainee, general practice obstetrician and educator through to postgraduate researcher is mapped and analysed. In this light this paper witnesses the development of the cluster-randomised controlled trial that is the basis of my doctoral research. My research topic is the use of a motivational interviewing intervention to increase breastfeeding rates through increased support for mothers. Analysis of connections among researchers who have influenced my career transitions reveals my gradual awareness of parallels with the theoretical framework of motivational interviewing. Themes that arise are related to the spirit of motivational interviewing: linkage and collaboration, exchange and evocation, career direction and autonomy. There are potential public health benefits from promoting such connections that may help to sustain motivation and increase output in both breastfeeding and primary health care research.

  17. Food intolerance- facts and myths

    OpenAIRE

    Ptáčková, Zuzana

    2017-01-01

    This bachelor's thesis focuses on the facts and myths about two kinds of food intolerance: celiac disease and lactose intolerance. The thesis consists of a practical and a theoretical part. The theoretical part is further divided into three sections. The first one focuses on celiac disease and describes gluten, epidemiology, etiology, pathogenesis, symptoms of the disease, diagnostics, dietary solutions, celiac disease screening, other similar diseases and also a comparison of allergy to glut...

  18. Confronting Myths about Teacher Leadership

    OpenAIRE

    Sinha, Somnath; Hanuscin, Deborah; Rebello, Carina; Muslu, Nilay; Cheng, Ya-Wen

    2012-01-01

      Leadership in Freshman Physics is an NSF-funded professional development program designed to support 9th grade teacher leaders in the successful implementation of a ‘Physics First’ or curriculum sequence that places physics prior to biology and chemistry. Leadership is viewed as an essential component in the initial success and long-term sustainability of such reforms. This article is an account of myths about teacher leadership held by participants and the ways...

  19. Faith healers, myths and deaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasti, Harihar; Kanchan, Tanuj; Acharya, Jenash

    2015-09-01

    Science and myth have been closely linked and argued upon by philosophers, educationalists, scientists, enthusiasts and the general public. Faith healing, when added as an adjuvant or alternative aid to medical science, will not necessarily be confined to mere arguments and debates but may also give rise to series of complications, medical emergencies and even result in death. We present an unusual case where reliance on faith healing led to the death of a young man. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. State-Mandated (Mis)Information and Women's Endorsement of Common Abortion Myths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglas, Nancy F; Gould, Heather; Turok, David K; Sanders, Jessica N; Perrucci, Alissa C; Roberts, Sarah C M

    The extent that state-mandated informed consent scripts affect women's knowledge about abortion is unknown. We examine women's endorsement of common abortion myths before and after receiving state-mandated information that included accurate and inaccurate statements about abortion. In Utah, women presenting for an abortion information visit completed baseline surveys (n = 494) and follow-up interviews 3 weeks later (n = 309). Women answered five items about abortion risks, indicating which of two statements was closer to the truth (as established by prior research) or responding "don't know." We developed a continuous myth endorsement scale (range, 0-1) and, using multivariable regression models, examined predictors of myth endorsement at baseline and change in myth endorsement from baseline to follow-up. At baseline, many women reported not knowing about abortion risks (range, 36%-70% across myths). Women who were younger, non-White, and had previously given birth but not had a prior abortion reported higher myth endorsement at baseline. Overall, myth endorsement decreased after the information visit (0.37-0.31; p endorsement of the myth that was included in the state script-describing inaccurate risks of depression and anxiety-increased at follow-up (0.47-0.52; p < .05). Lack of knowledge about the effects of abortion is common. Knowledge of information that was accurately presented or not referenced in state-mandated scripts increased. In contrast, inaccurate information was associated with decreases in women's knowledge about abortion, violating accepted principles of informed consent. State policies that require or result in the provision of inaccurate information should be reconsidered. Copyright © 2016 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Trends in Research Librarianship Literature: A Social Network Analysis of Articles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Al, Umut; Soydal, İrem; Alir, Gülten

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to identify the bibliometric characteristics of research librarianship literature and to visualize relationships in research librarianship by means of social network analysis...

  2. The Utrecht Pharmacy Practice network for Education and Research: a network of community and hospital pharmacies in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, Ellen S; Blom, Lyda; Philbert, Daphne; Rump, Willem; Bouvy, Marcel L

    2014-08-01

    Practice-based networks can serve as effective mechanisms for the development of the profession of pharmacists, on the one hand by supporting student internships and on the other hand by collection of research data and implementation of research outcomes among public health practice settings. This paper presents the characteristics and benefits of the Utrecht Pharmacy Practice network for Education and Research, a practice based research network affiliated with the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Utrecht University. Yearly, this network is used to realize approximately 600 student internships (in hospital and community pharmacies) and 20 research projects. To date, most research has been performed in community pharmacy and research questions frequently concerned prescribing behavior or adherence and subjects related to uptake of regulations in the pharmacy setting. Researchers gain access to different types of data from daily practice, pharmacists receive feedback on the functioning of their own pharmacy and students get in depth insight into pharmacy practice.

  3. The research of computer network security and protection strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jian

    2017-05-01

    With the widespread popularity of computer network applications, its security is also received a high degree of attention. Factors affecting the safety of network is complex, for to do a good job of network security is a systematic work, has the high challenge. For safety and reliability problems of computer network system, this paper combined with practical work experience, from the threat of network security, security technology, network some Suggestions and measures for the system design principle, in order to make the masses of users in computer networks to enhance safety awareness and master certain network security technology.

  4. Changing the research landscape: the New York City Clinical Data Research Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushal, Rainu; Hripcsak, George; Ascheim, Deborah D; Bloom, Toby; Campion, Thomas R; Caplan, Arthur L; Currie, Brian P; Check, Thomas; Deland, Emme Levin; Gourevitch, Marc N; Hart, Raffaella; Horowitz, Carol R; Kastenbaum, Isaac; Levin, Arthur Aaron; Low, Alexander F H; Meissner, Paul; Mirhaji, Parsa; Pincus, Harold A; Scaglione, Charles; Shelley, Donna; Tobin, Jonathan N

    2014-01-01

    The New York City Clinical Data Research Network (NYC-CDRN), funded by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI), brings together 22 organizations including seven independent health systems to enable patient-centered clinical research, support a national network, and facilitate learning healthcare systems. The NYC-CDRN includes a robust, collaborative governance and organizational infrastructure, which takes advantage of its participants’ experience, expertise, and history of collaboration. The technical design will employ an information model to document and manage the collection and transformation of clinical data, local institutional staging areas to transform and validate data, a centralized data processing facility to aggregate and share data, and use of common standards and tools. We strive to ensure that our project is patient-centered; nurtures collaboration among all stakeholders; develops scalable solutions facilitating growth and connections; chooses simple, elegant solutions wherever possible; and explores ways to streamline the administrative and regulatory approval process across sites. PMID:24821739

  5. Research and Collaboration Overview of Institut Pasteur International Network: A Bibliometric Approach toward Research Funding Decisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Mostafavi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Institut Pasteur International Network (IPIN, which includes 32 research institutes around the world, is a network of research and expertise to fight against infectious diseases. A scientometric approach was applied to describe research and collaboration activities of IPIN. Methods Publications were identified using a manual search of IPIN member addresses in Science Citation Index Expanded (SCIE between 2006 and 2011. Total publications were then subcategorized by geographic regions. Several scientometric indicators and the H-index were employed to estimate the scientific production of each IPIN member. Subject and geographical overlay maps were also applied to visualize the network activities of the IPIN members. Results A total number of 12667 publications originated from IPIN members. Each author produced an average number of 2.18 papers and each publication received an average of 13.40 citations. European Pasteur Institutes had the largest amount of publications, authored papers, and H-index values. Biochemistry and molecular biology, microbiology, immunology and infectious diseases were the most important research topics, respectively. Geographic mapping of IPIN publications showed wide international collaboration among IPIN members around the world. Conclusion IPIN has strong ties with national and international authorities and organizations to investigate the current and future health issues. It is recommended to use scientometric and collaboration indicators as measures of research performance in IPIN future policies and investment decisions.

  6. Evaluating the impact of interdisciplinary research: a multilayer network approach

    CERN Document Server

    Omodei, Elisa; Arenas, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, scientific challenges usually require approaches that cross traditional boundaries between academic disciplines, driving many researchers towards interdisciplinarity. Despite its obvious importance, there is a lack of studies on how to quantify the influence of interdisciplinarity on the research impact, posing uncertainty in a proper evaluation for hiring and funding purposes. Here we propose a method based on the analysis of bipartite interconnected multilayer networks of citations and disciplines, to assess scholars, institutions and countries interdisciplinary importance. Using data about physics publications and US patents, we show that our method allows to reveal, using a quantitative approach, that being more interdisciplinary causes -- in the Granger sense -- benefits in scientific productivity and impact. The proposed method could be used by funding agencies, universities and scientific policy decision makers for hiring and funding purposes, and to complement existing methods to rank univer...

  7. On a popular myth: “Scientific research cannot be subject to quality management”. Think again! Who says it cannot be?

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Theron, B

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available projects with the expectation of achievement of scientifically valid results, efficiently obtained; and the credibility of researchers, research groups and their managers depend on the scientific validity of their results. Furthermore, product design...

  8. Friending Adolescents on Social Networking Websites: A Feasible Research Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockman, Libby N; Christakis, Dimitri A; Moreno, Megan A

    2014-01-01

    Social networking sites (SNSs) are increasingly used for research. This paper reports on two studies examining the feasibility of friending adolescents on SNSs for research purposes. Study 1 took place on www.MySpace.com where public profiles belonging to 18-year-old adolescents received a friend request from an unknown physician. Study 2 took place on www.Facebook.com where college freshmen from two US universities, enrolled in an ongoing research study, received a friend request from a known researcher's profile. Acceptance and retention rates of friend requests were calculated for both studies. Study 1: 127 participants received a friend request; participants were 18 years-old, 62.2% male and 51.8% Caucasian. 49.6% accepted the friend request. After 9 months, 76% maintained the online friendship, 12.7% defriended the study profile and 11% deactivated their profile. Study 2: 338 participants received a friend request; participants were 18 years-old, 56.5% female and 75.1% Caucasian. 99.7% accepted the friend request. Over 12 months, 3.3% defriended the study profile and 4.1% deactivated their profile. These actions were often temporary; the overall 12-month friendship retention rate was 96.1%. Friending adolescents on SNSs is feasible and friending adolescents from a familiar profile may be more effective for maintaining online friendship with research participants over time.

  9. Research Network of Tehran Defined Population: Methodology and Establishment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali-Asghar Kolahi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: We need a defined population for determining prevalence and incidence of diseases, as well as conducting interventional, cohort and longitudinal studies, calculating correct and timely public health indicators, assessing actual health needs of community, performing educational programs and interventions to promote healthy lifestyle, and enhancing quality of primary health services.The objective of this project was to determine a defined population which is representative of Tehran, the Capital of Iran. This article reports the methodology and establishment of the research network of Tehran defined population.Methods: This project started by selecting two urban health centers from each of the five district health centers affiliated to Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences in 2012. Inside each selected urban health center, one defined population research station was established. Two new centers have been added during 2013 and 2014. For the time being, the number of the covered population of the network has reached 40000 individuals. The most important criterion for the defined population has been to be representative of the population of Tehran. For this, we selected two urban health centers from 12 of 22 municipality districts and from each of the five different socioeconomic of Greater Tehran. Merely 80000 individuals in neighborhoods of each defined population research station were considered as control group of the project.Findings: Totally we selected 12 defined population research stations and their under-covered population developed a defined population which is representative of Tehran population.Conclusion: a population lab is ready now in metropolitan of Tehran.

  10. Guidance for researchers developing and conducting clinical trials in practice-based research networks (PBRNs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolor, Rowena J; Schmit, Kristine M; Graham, Deborah G; Fox, Chester H; Baldwin, Laura Mae

    2014-01-01

    There is increased interest nationally in multicenter clinical trials to answer questions about clinical effectiveness, comparative effectiveness, and safety in real-world community settings. Primary care practice-based research networks (PBRNs), comprising community- and/or academically affiliated practices committed to improving medical care for a range of health problems, offer ideal settings for these trials, especially pragmatic clinical trials. However, many researchers are not familiar with working with PBRNs. Experts in practice-based research identified solutions to challenges that researchers and PBRN personnel experience when collaborating on clinical trials in PBRNs. These were organized as frequently asked questions in a draft document presented at a 2013 Agency for Health care Research and Quality PBRN conference workshop, revised based on participant feedback, then shared with additional experts from the DARTNet Institute, Clinical Translational Science Award PBRN, and North American Primary Care Research Group PBRN workgroups for further input and modification. The "Toolkit for Developing and Conducting Multi-site Clinical Trials in Practice-Based Research Networks" offers guidance in the areas of recruiting and engaging practices, budgeting, project management, and communication, as well as templates and examples of tools important in developing and conducting clinical trials. Ensuring the successful development and conduct of clinical trials in PBRNs requires a highly collaborative approach between academic research and PBRN teams. © Copyright 2014 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  11. Research on Network Scanning Strategy Based on Information Granularity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Futong; Shi, Pengfei; Du, Jing; Cheng, Ruosi; Zhou, Yunyan

    2017-10-01

    As the basic mean to obtain the information of the targets network, network scanning is often used to discover the security risks and vulnerabilities existing on the network. However, with the development of network technology, the scale of network is more and more large, and the network scanning efficiency put forward higher requirements. In this paper, the concept of network scanning information granularity is proposed, and the design method of network scanning strategy based on information granularity is proposed. Based on single information granularity and hybrid information granularity, four network scanning strategies were designed and verified experimentally. Experiments show that the network scanning strategies based on hybrid information granularity can improve the efficiency of network scanning.

  12. Heterogeneous research networks as interfaces: Commit and survival of organizations around university research. The case of biotechnology in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rossum, Wouter

    2002-01-01

    In this paper social network terms are applied to conceptualize the intermediary sector of heterogeneous research networks between the institutional contexts of university research and industrial research. White’s notion of ‘commit interface’, and Burt’s elaboration of this notion to account for

  13. The Creation of Inequality: Myths of Potential and Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorling, Danny; Tomlinson, Sally

    2016-01-01

    The old myth about the ability and variability of potential in children is a comforting myth, for those who are uneasy with the degree of inequality they see and would rather seek to justify it than confront it. The myth of inherent potential helps some explain to themselves why they are privileged. Extend the myth to believe in inherited ability…

  14. Revisiting the Common Myths about Homeschooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanowski, Michael H.

    2006-01-01

    The author examines four common myths that still influence individuals regarding their perspective and understanding of the role homeschooling plays in the education of American children. Myth 1 is that homeschooling produces social misfits, stemming from the belief that homeschooled students lack the socialization skills necessary for normal…

  15. Myth and Other Norms in World Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Hanne

    2017-01-01

    This article uses the Thule Case at the Danish Supreme Court as an example of normativity in world society. Here norms, which may turn out to be important in world society could be myths of several kinds such as 'narrative normativity'. One myth may be that of (exclusive) sovereignty...

  16. MYTHS--LITERATURE CURRICULUM I, STUDENT VERSION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    KITZHABER, ALBERT

    PRESENTED HERE WAS A STUDY GUIDE FOR STUDENT USE IN A SEVENTH-GRADE LITERATURE CURRICULUM. INTRODUCTORY MATERIAL WAS PRESENTED ON GREEK MYTHS, NORSE MYTHOLOGY, AND AMERICAN INDIAN MYTHOLOGY. STUDY QUESTIONS, SUGGESTED ACTIVITIES, AND A REFERENCE BOOK OF MYTHS WERE PRESENTED. AN ACCOMPANYING GUIDE WAS PREPARED FOR TEACHERS (ED 010 140). (WN)

  17. Dangerous Myths about "Gifted" Mathematics Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffield, Linda Jensen

    2017-01-01

    A number of myths about mathematically gifted students, mathematics itself, and programs designed to serve these students tend to inhibit educators, parents and students themselves from developing students' mathematical creativity, expertise and enjoyment. This paper discusses some of the myths that can discourage students' mathematical…

  18. The Meaning Behind Popular Myths About Suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuringer, Charles

    1988-01-01

    Examines several common human-serving fallacies about suicide as to their validity and discusses these myths in terms of how they operate to reduce anxiety about quality of life and death. Asserts need to dispel myths and seek truths in order to understand and prevent suicide. (Author/NB)

  19. Fifteen Prevalent Myths Concerning Adolescent Suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Keith A.

    1999-01-01

    Examines 15 common myths about adolescent suicide, presenting the actual facts corresponding to each. The myths relate to such issues as prevalence, warning signs, education about suicide, differences between males and females, common methods of adolescent suicide, mental illness and suicide, suicide prevention, genetic factors, poverty and…

  20. Pre-Columbian Mayan Myths. Project Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callanan, Margaret

    This document outlines a course unit on Pre-Columbian Mayan Myths intended to be part of a semester-long survey course on world mythology. The intended unit length of three weeks for three hours per week allows time for consideration of a brief geographical, historical, and cosmological background against which to place Mayan myths, study of the…

  1. Deconstruction of founder myths and succession in family businesses/Desconstrucao do mito e sucessao do fundador em empresas familiares

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pereira, Antonio Carlos Soares; Vieira, Adriane; Garcia, Fernando Coutinho; Roscoe, Maria Teresa de Azeredo

    2013-01-01

    .... This research's objective was to identify the factors that contribute to the deconstruction of a myth in a family business that goes through the process of succession from the founder, and analyze...

  2. Practice-based Research Network Research Good Practices (PRGPs): Summary of Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolor, Rowena J; Campbell-Voytal, Kimberly; Daly, Jeanette; Nagykaldi, Zsolt J; O'Beirne, Maeve; Sterling, Pamela; Fagnan, Lyle J; Levy, Barcey; Michaels, LeAnn; Louks, Hannah A; Smith, Paul; Aspy, Cheryl B; Patterson, V Beth; Kano, Miria; Sussman, Andrew L; Williams, Robert; Neale, Anne Victoria

    2015-12-01

    Practice-based research networks (PBRNs) conduct research in community settings, which poses quality control challenges to the integrity of research, such as study implementation and data collection. A foundation for improving research processes within PBRNs is needed to ensure research integrity. Network directors and coordinators from seven U.S.-based PBRNs worked with a professional team facilitator during semiannual in-person meetings and monthly conference calls to produce content for a compendium of recommended research practices specific to the context of PBRNs. Participants were assigned to contribute content congruent with their expertise. Feedback on the draft document was obtained from attendees at the preconference workshop at the annual PBRN meeting in 2013. A revised document was circulated to additional PBRN peers prior to finalization. The PBRN Research Good Practices (PRGPs) document is organized into four chapters: (1) Building PBRN Infrastructure; (2) Study Development and Implementation; (3) Data Management, and (4) Dissemination Policies. Each chapter contains an introduction, detailed procedures for each section, and example resources with information links. The PRGPs is a PBRN-specific resource to facilitate PBRN management and staff training, to promote adherence to study protocols, and to increase validity and generalizability of study findings. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Research on optical access network remote management technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wayne; Zou, Chen; Luo, Wenyi

    2008-11-01

    This paper goal is to provide a framework for the remote configuration and management of services for PON (Passive Optical Network) access and fiber access. Also it defines how Auto-Configuration Servers (ACS) in the network can remotely configure, troubleshoot and manage a Passive Optical Network (PON) optical network termination (ONT) with layer 3 capabilities using the CPE WAN management protocol, TR-069.

  4. Linking Behavior in the Physics Education Research Coauthorship Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Katharine A.; Crespi, Matthew; Sayre, Eleanor C.

    2017-01-01

    There is considerable long-term interest in understanding the dynamics of collaboration networks, and how these networks form and evolve over time. Most of the work done on the dynamics of social networks focuses on well-established communities. Work examining emerging social networks is rarer, simply because data are difficult to obtain in real…

  5. The Myth, the Truth, the NASA IRB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covington, M. D.; Flores, M. P.; Neutzler, V. P.; Schlegel, T. T.; Platts, S. H.; Lioyd, C. W.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the NASA Institutional Review Board (IRB) is to review research activities involving human subjects to ensure that ethical standards for the care and protection of human subjects have been met and research activities are in compliance with all pertinent federal, state and local regulations as well as NASA policies. NASA IRB's primary role is the protection of human subjects in research studies. Protection of human subjects is the shared responsibility of NASA, the IRB, and the scientific investigators. Science investigators who plan to conduct NASA-funded human research involving NASA investigators, facilities, or funds must submit and coordinate their research studies for review and approval by the NASA IRB prior to initiation. The IRB has the authority to approve, require changes in, or disapprove research involving human subjects. Better knowledge of the NASA IRB policies, procedures and guidelines should help facilitate research protocol applications and approvals. In this presentation, the myths and truths of NASA IRB policies and procedures will be discussed. We will focus on the policies that guide a protocol through the NASA IRB and the procedures that principal investigators must take to obtain required IRB approvals for their research studies. In addition, tips to help ensure a more efficient IRB review will be provided. By understanding the requirements and processes, investigators will be able to more efficiently prepare their protocols and obtain the required NASA IRB approval in a timely manner.

  6. Networking among young global health researchers through an intensive training approach: a mixed methods exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenters, Lindsey M; Cole, Donald C; Godoy-Ruiz, Paula

    2014-01-25

    Networks are increasingly regarded as essential in health research aimed at influencing practice and policies. Less research has focused on the role networking can play in researchers' careers and its broader impacts on capacity strengthening in health research. We used the Canadian Coalition for Global Health Research (CCGHR) annual Summer Institute for New Global Health Researchers (SIs) as an opportunity to explore networking among new global health researchers. A mixed-methods exploratory study was conducted among SI alumni and facilitators who had participated in at least one SI between 2004 and 2010. Alumni and facilitators completed an online short questionnaire, and a subset participated in an in-depth interview. Thematic analysis of the qualitative data was triangulated with quantitative results and CCGHR reports on SIs. Synthesis occurred through the development of a process model relevant to networking through the SIs. Through networking at the SIs, participants experienced decreased isolation and strengthened working relationships. Participants accessed new knowledge, opportunities, and resources through networking during the SI. Post-SI, participants reported ongoing contact and collaboration, although most participants desired more opportunities for interaction. They made suggestions for structural supports to networking among new global health researchers. Networking at the SI contributed positively to opportunities for individuals, and contributed to the formation of a network of global health researchers. Intentional inclusion of networking in health research capacity strengthening initiatives, with supportive resources and infrastructure could create dynamic, sustainable networks accessible to global health researchers around the world.

  7. The Health and Occupation Research Network: An Evolving Surveillance System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Carder

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Vital to the prevention of work-related ill-health (WRIH is the availability of good quality data regarding WRIH burden and risks. Physician-based surveillance systems such as The Health and Occupation Research (THOR network in the UK are often established in response to limitations of statutory, compensation-based systems for addressing certain epidemiological aspects of disease surveillance. However, to fulfil their purpose, THOR and others need to have methodologic rigor in capturing and ascertaining cases. This article describes how data collected by THOR and analogous systems can inform WRIH incidence, trends, and other determinants. An overview of the different strands of THOR research is provided, including methodologic advancements facilitated by increased data quantity/quality over time and the value of the research outputs for informing Government and other policy makers. In doing so, the utility of data collected by systems such as THOR to address a wide range of research questions, both in relation to WRIH and to wider issues of public and social health, is demonstrated.

  8. The personal myth: a re-evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirois, François

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents a re-evaluation of Kris's personal myth. The notion has been used rather sparingly despite the Delphi Symposium in 1984 on the question of its clinical usefulness. After framing the notion of myth, some difficulties related to the question are identified. A clinical vignette exemplifies some of the ambiguities in its definition but stresses its clinical relevance. A discussion expands on these situations so as to propose three various aspects of personal myths to account for the two variants identified by Kris. The actualization of the underlying fantasy in the character organization is a third form and the technical aspect associated with it is reviewed from a new perspective. The family romance is revisited to reassess its role as the basis of the personal myth in the face of studies favouring an earlier development of the myth. Copyright © 2014 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  9. Tityus: a forgotten myth of liver regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiniakos, Dina G; Kandilis, Apostolos; Geller, Stephen A

    2010-08-01

    The ancient Greek myth of Tityus is related to liver regeneration in the same way as the well known myth of Prometheus is. Depictions of the punishment of Prometheus are frequently used by lecturers on liver regeneration; however, Tityus remains unknown despite the fact that he received the same punishment and his myth could also be used as a paradigm for the organ's extraordinary ability to regenerate. Nevertheless, there is no convincing evidence that ancient Greeks had any specific knowledge about liver regeneration, a concept introduced in the early 19th century. We describe and analyze the myth of Tityus and compare it to the myth of Prometheus. We also explore artistic and literary links and summarize recent scientific data on the mechanisms of liver regeneration. Finally, we highlight links of the legend of Tityus with other sciences. Copyright 2010 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Building a Community of Practice for Researchers: The International Network for Simulation-Based Pediatric Innovation, Research and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Adam; Auerbach, Marc; Calhoun, Aaron; Mackinnon, Ralph; Chang, Todd P; Nadkarni, Vinay; Hunt, Elizabeth A; Duval-Arnould, Jordan; Peiris, Nicola; Kessler, David

    2017-11-08

    The scope and breadth of simulation-based research is growing rapidly; however, few mechanisms exist for conducting multicenter, collaborative research. Failure to foster collaborative research efforts is a critical gap that lies in the path of advancing healthcare simulation. The 2017 Research Summit hosted by the Society for Simulation in Healthcare highlighted how simulation-based research networks can produce studies that positively impact the delivery of healthcare. In 2011, the International Network for Simulation-based Pediatric Innovation, Research and Education (INSPIRE) was formed to facilitate multicenter, collaborative simulation-based research with the aim of developing a community of practice for simulation researchers. Since its formation, the network has successfully completed and published numerous collaborative research projects. In this article, we describe INSPIRE's history, structure, and internal processes with the goal of highlighting the community of practice model for other groups seeking to form a simulation-based research network.

  11. The Global Research Collaboration of Network Meta-Analysis: A Social Network Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lun; Catalá-López, Ferrán; Alonso-Arroyo, Adolfo; Tian, Jinhui; Aleixandre-Benavent, Rafael; Pieper, Dawid; Ge, Long; Yao, Liang; Wang, Quan; Yang, Kehu

    Research collaborations in biomedical research have evolved over time. No studies have addressed research collaboration in network meta-analysis (NMA). In this study, we used social network analysis methods to characterize global collaboration patterns of published NMAs over the past decades. PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science and the Cochrane Library were searched (at 9th July, 2015) to include systematic reviews incorporating NMA. Two reviewers independently selected studies and cross-checked the standardized data. Data was analyzed using Ucinet 6.0 and SPSS 17.0. NetDraw software was used to draw social networks. 771 NMAs published in 336 journals from 3459 authors and 1258 institutions in 49 countries through the period 1997-2015 were included. More than three-quarters (n = 625; 81.06%) of the NMAs were published in the last 5-years. The BMJ (4.93%), Current Medical Research and Opinion (4.67%) and PLOS One (4.02%) were the journals that published the greatest number of NMAs. The UK and the USA (followed by Canada, China, the Netherlands, Italy and Germany) headed the absolute global productivity ranking in number of NMAs. The top 20 authors and institutions with the highest publication rates were identified. Overall, 43 clusters of authors (four major groups: one with 37 members, one with 12 members, one with 11 members and one with 10 members) and 21 clusters of institutions (two major groups: one with 62 members and one with 20 members) were identified. The most prolific authors were affiliated with academic institutions and private consulting firms. 181 consulting firms and pharmaceutical industries (14.39% of institutions) were involved in 199 NMAs (25.81% of total publications). Although there were increases in international and inter-institution collaborations, the research collaboration by authors, institutions and countries were still weak and most collaboration groups were small sizes. Scientific production on NMA is increasing worldwide with research

  12. An Overview of Computer Network security and Research Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Rathore, Vandana

    2016-01-01

    The rapid development in the field of computer networks and systems brings both convenience and security threats for users. Security threats include network security and data security. Network security refers to the reliability, confidentiality, integrity and availability of the information in the system. The main objective of network security is to maintain the authenticity, integrity, confidentiality, availability of the network. This paper introduces the details of the technologies used in...

  13. Towards migration research networking in Eastern-Southern African subregions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oucho, J O

    1993-01-01

    This article reports efforts made by a small group of Eastern-Southern African (ESA) subregion scholars to adopt a systematic approach to establishing a regional network Migration Network in Eastern and Southern Africa (MINESA). The approach involved: 1) holding a conference at which symptomatic types of internal and international migration would be discussed; 2) publication of the conference proceedings; and 3) establishment of MINESA as a network of policy-oriented research in the two subregions. The first stage has been accomplished, the second is nearly complete, and the third has yet to be undertaken. During the African Population Conference organized by the International Union for Scientific Study of Population in Dakar, Senegal, on 5-9 November 1988, a small group agreed on a timetable to establish MINESA. At the ESA conference, papers were presented on ESA issues; internal migration processes and mechanism; refugee movements and their implications for countries; the effects on the economies of Southern African states, of emigration to the Republic of South Africa (RSA). In a keynote address, Adepoju surveyed migration and development in Western-Central (Middle) Africa and Eastern-Southern Africa, which included colonial and post-colonial historical epochs, internal and international migration, and labor and refugee movements. A paper on Kenya by Oucho discussed the implications for rural-urban balance of internal migration based on 1969 and 1979 censuses. Rural-urban migration from the traditional economy to Nairobi and Mombasa in particular has created an unacceptable rural-urban imbalance, adversely affecting rural development. Eastern and Southern Africa has seen massive and wide spatial dispersal of refugees (victims of wars, drought, and famine). Two papers were presented on Tanzania and one on Uganda. The final set of papers addressed the effects of labor migration to the RSA on Swaziland and Lesotho.

  14. Unpacking the Male Superiority Myth and Masculinization of Mathematics at the Intersections: A Review of Research on Gender in Mathematics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyva, Luis A.

    2017-01-01

    Gender research in mathematics education has experienced methodological and theoretical shifts over the past 45 years. Although achievement studies have used assessment tools to explore and subsequently challenge the assumption of male superiority on mathematics assessments, research on participation has unpacked these studies' sex-based…

  15. Networking among young global health researchers through an intensive training approach: a mixed methods exploratory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Networks are increasingly regarded as essential in health research aimed at influencing practice and policies. Less research has focused on the role networking can play in researchers’ careers and its broader impacts on capacity strengthening in health research. We used the Canadian Coalition for Global Health Research (CCGHR) annual Summer Institute for New Global Health Researchers (SIs) as an opportunity to explore networking among new global health researchers. Methods A mixed-methods exploratory study was conducted among SI alumni and facilitators who had participated in at least one SI between 2004 and 2010. Alumni and facilitators completed an online short questionnaire, and a subset participated in an in-depth interview. Thematic analysis of the qualitative data was triangulated with quantitative results and CCGHR reports on SIs. Synthesis occurred through the development of a process model relevant to networking through the SIs. Results Through networking at the SIs, participants experienced decreased isolation and strengthened working relationships. Participants accessed new knowledge, opportunities, and resources through networking during the SI. Post-SI, participants reported ongoing contact and collaboration, although most participants desired more opportunities for interaction. They made suggestions for structural supports to networking among new global health researchers. Conclusions Networking at the SI contributed positively to opportunities for individuals, and contributed to the formation of a network of global health researchers. Intentional inclusion of networking in health research capacity strengthening initiatives, with supportive resources and infrastructure could create dynamic, sustainable networks accessible to global health researchers around the world. PMID:24460819

  16. Research Networking Systems: The State of Adoption at Institutions Aiming to Augment Translational Research Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeid, Jihad S; Johnson, Layne M; Stallings, Sarah; Eichmann, David

    2015-01-01

    Fostering collaborations across multiple disciplines within and across institutional boundaries is becoming increasingly important with the growing emphasis on translational research. As a result, Research Networking Systems that facilitate discovery of potential collaborators have received significant attention by institutions aiming to augment their research infrastructure. We have conducted a survey to assess the state of adoption of these new tools at the Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) funded institutions. Survey results demonstrate that most CTSA funded institutions have either already adopted or were planning to adopt one of several available research networking systems. Moreover a good number of these institutions have exposed or plan to expose the data on research expertise using linked open data, an established approach to semantic web services. Preliminary exploration of these publically-available data shows promising utility in assessing cross-institutional collaborations. Further adoption of these technologies and analysis of the data are needed, however, before their impact on cross-institutional collaboration in research can be appreciated and measured. PMID:26491707

  17. The Function Biomedical Informatics Research Network Data Repository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keator, David B; van Erp, Theo G M; Turner, Jessica A; Glover, Gary H; Mueller, Bryon A; Liu, Thomas T; Voyvodic, James T; Rasmussen, Jerod; Calhoun, Vince D; Lee, Hyo Jong; Toga, Arthur W; McEwen, Sarah; Ford, Judith M; Mathalon, Daniel H; Diaz, Michele; O'Leary, Daniel S; Jeremy Bockholt, H; Gadde, Syam; Preda, Adrian; Wible, Cynthia G; Stern, Hal S; Belger, Aysenil; McCarthy, Gregory; Ozyurt, Burak; Potkin, Steven G

    2016-01-01

    The Function Biomedical Informatics Research Network (FBIRN) developed methods and tools for conducting multi-scanner functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies. Method and tool development were based on two major goals: 1) to assess the major sources of variation in fMRI studies conducted across scanners, including instrumentation, acquisition protocols, challenge tasks, and analysis methods, and 2) to provide a distributed network infrastructure and an associated federated database to host and query large, multi-site, fMRI and clinical data sets. In the process of achieving these goals the FBIRN test bed generated several multi-scanner brain imaging data sets to be shared with the wider scientific community via the BIRN Data Repository (BDR). The FBIRN Phase 1 data set consists of a traveling subject study of 5 healthy subjects, each scanned on 10 different 1.5 to 4 T scanners. The FBIRN Phase 2 and Phase 3 data sets consist of subjects with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder along with healthy comparison subjects scanned at multiple sites. In this paper, we provide concise descriptions of FBIRN's multi-scanner brain imaging data sets and details about the BIRN Data Repository instance of the Human Imaging Database (HID) used to publicly share the data. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Research on optic antenna of space laser communication networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Li-Xin; Li, Long; Zhang, Li-zhong; Zhao, Shan-shan; Jiang, Hui-lin

    2013-08-01

    With the highlights of the high transmission rate, large capacity, strong anti-interference and anti-capture ability, good security and small light, space laser communication becomes an important hotspot. At present, the focus of research of the laser communication system is point to point communication structure. However, from the application point of view, both the realization of space laser communication among multiple points and the establishment of the information transmission network can really have the practical value. Aiming at the problem of space laser communication network, this article puts forward the general idea about optical antenna to achieve multiple tracking goals at the same time. Through the analysis of the optical antenna, and the comparing of the current commonly used mirror driving mechanism, a new mirror driving mechanism is designed. The azimuth motion, containing circular grating feedback, is driven by torque motor,voice coil motor of fan produces pitch motion that has fan-shaped grating feedback, so that compression of the structure size to improve the efficiency of the reflector assembly. Through the establishment of the driving mechanism and the kinematic model of 3D entity, the relationship between the single drive azimuth and pitch angle following the angle of incident light is explained. The biggest ideal view area affecting the optical antenna is obtained by the simulation analysis of the kinematics model using MATLAB. The several factors of field overlap area and blind area offers a theoretical basis for structure optimization and control system for the subsequent optical antenna design.

  19. From Network to Research – Ten Years of Music Informatics, Performance and Aesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frimodt-Møller, Søren; Grund, Cynthia M.; Jensen, Kristoffer

    2011-01-01

    This article briefly chronicles the history of the Nordic Network of Music Informatics, Performance and Aesthetics (NNIMIPA) and its roots in previous research networks and milieus. It explains how a cross-disciplinary network works and gives rise to research projects that bridge the gap between...

  20. 75 FR 55360 - Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD) Program: Draft NITRD 2010...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-10

    ... Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD) Program: Draft NITRD 2010 Strategic Plan AGENCY: The National Coordination Office (NCO) for Networking and Information Technology Research.... EDT on October 11, 2010. SUMMARY: With this notice, the National Coordination Office for Networking...

  1. COST network genderSTE: Networking Gender Equality in Research and Innovation in Europe and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inés Sánchez de Madariaga

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Gender is one of five priorities of the European Research Area, as stated in the Communication adopted in July 2012 entitled A Reinforced European Research Area Partnership for Excellence and Growth (EC 2012c. Following this Communication, the EC has fully integrated gender dimensions in its proposal for a regulation on the new research framework program Horizon 2020¸ which includes in article 15 a provision for gender mainstreaming (EC 2011b. One final upcoming policy instrument announced by the EC is the Recommendation on Gender, Science and Innovation that will address member states and be adopted in the next months. Against this European policy background , the international COST network genderSTE (Gender, Science, Technology and Environment aims at enhancing a better integration of gender dimensions in science and technology at three main levels: i promoting women’s careers in science and technology through structural change of institutions (as recommended by EC by disseminating existing research and practice; ii promoting a better integration of gender in the content of science, research and technology, by dissemination existing research on the topic, ie the UE-US Gendered Innovations Project; iii identifying gender dimensions relevant to environment-related Horizon2020 Grand Challenges and other urban EC initiatives.  

  2. Maths meets myths quantitative approaches to ancient narratives

    CERN Document Server

    MacCarron, Máirín; MacCarron, Pádraig

    2017-01-01

    With an emphasis on exploring measurable aspects of ancient narratives, Maths Meets Myths sets out to investigate age-old material with new techniques. This book collects, for the first time, novel quantitative approaches to studying sources from the past, such as chronicles, epics, folktales, and myths. It contributes significantly to recent efforts in bringing together natural scientists and humanities scholars in investigations aimed at achieving greater understanding of our cultural inheritance. Accordingly, each contribution reports on a modern quantitative approach applicable to narrative sources from the past, or describes those which would be amenable to such treatment and why they are important. This volume is a unique state-of-the-art compendium on an emerging research field which also addresses anyone with interests in quantitative approaches to humanities.

  3. Whither prometheus' liver? Greek myth and the science of regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Carl; Rasko, John E J

    2008-09-16

    Stem-cell biologists and those involved in regenerative medicine are fascinated by the story of Prometheus, the Greek god whose immortal liver was feasted on day after day by Zeus' eagle. This myth invariably provokes the question: Did the ancient Greeks know about the liver's amazing capacity for self-repair? The authors address this question by exploring the origins of Greek myth and medicine, adopting a 2-fold strategy. First, the authors consider what opportunities the ancient Greeks had to learn about the liver's structure and function. This involves a discussion of early battlefield surgery, the beginnings of anatomical research, and the ancient art of liver augury. In addition, the authors consider how the Greeks understood Prometheus' immortal liver. Not only do the authors examine the general theme of regeneration in Greek mythology, they survey several scholarly interpretations of Prometheus' torture.

  4. The Geropathology Research Network: An Interdisciplinary Approach for Integrating Pathology Into Research on Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladiges, Warren; Ikeno, Yuji; Niedernhofer, Laura; McIndoe, Richard A; Ciol, Marcia A; Ritchey, Jerry; Liggitt, Denny

    2016-04-01

    Geropathology is the study of aging and age-related lesions and diseases in the form of whole necropsies/autopsies, surgical biopsies, histology, and molecular biomarkers. It encompasses multiple subspecialties of geriatrics, anatomic pathology, molecular pathology, clinical pathology, and gerontology. In order to increase the consistency and scope of communication in the histologic and molecular pathology assessment of tissues from preclinical and clinical aging studies, a Geropathology Research Network has been established consisting of pathologists and scientists with expertise in the comparative pathology of aging, the design of aging research studies, biostatistical methods for analysis of aging data, and bioinformatics for compiling and annotating large sets of data generated from aging studies. The network provides an environment to promote learning and exchange of scientific information and ideas for the aging research community through a series of symposia, the development of uniform ways of integrating pathology into aging studies, and the statistical analysis of pathology data. The efforts of the network are ultimately expected to lead to a refined set of sentinel biomarkers of molecular and anatomic pathology that could be incorporated into preclinical and clinical aging intervention studies to increase the relevance and productivity of these types of investigations. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Role of Internet Images in the Biomedical Informatics Research Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini, Simone; Gupta, Amarnath

    2003-01-01

    The Biomedical Informatics Research Network is wide breadth project sponsored by the American National Institutes of Health (NIH) to promote the use of modern telecommunication for data exchange and collaboration in brain research. The project is attempting to buid a database and network infrastructure in which neuroscientists will post, query, and analyze raw data, processed data, and the results of the analysis. The project is divided into parts, which analyze mouse brain data and human brain data, respectively. In this phase of the project, the data are essentially anatomical, while in a future phase we foresee the introduction of functional data. One important source of raw data, both for the mouse and the human brains are magnetic resonance images (MRI), which provide dense volumetric information of the density of the brain or (in the case of functional MRI), of the brain activity. In the case of the brain mouse, these data are supplemented with images of slices of brains and other histological measure. One important technical problem that we are facing in BIRN is that of managing these volumetric data, processing them (possibly using tools available only remotely), storing the results of the analyses, and making them available to all the institutions participating in the project. This paper describes the problems posed by the BIRN project, the importance of image data in these activities, and the challenges they pose. We will describe the shared environment that we are creating, and the facilities for storing, querying, remotely processing, and sharing the image data that constitute the bulk of the brain data that scientists are producing.

  6. Myths, science and stories: working with peer educators to counter HIV/AIDS myths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, David

    2011-01-01

    The failure to bring about widespread or effective behavioural change in response to South Africa's HIV epidemic requires that new forms of health communication be explored. This article reports on an action research project in which a group of workplace HIV/AIDS peer educators at a South African mining company recorded HIV/AIDS myths that they encountered, around which they then developed stories as an alternative response to repeating factual, scientific messages, which seem to have little effect on target populations. A total of 16 stories were developed during the project. Some of the peer educators appeared to be much better at using stories within their activities than others. In part, this was a reflection of the enthusiasm and abilities of individual peer educators. It was also observed that the stories were used to respond to situations that were sometimes quite different from the original stimulus for the story. The complex range of skills that allows an individual to introduce and effectively use a story in day-to-day conversation should not be underestimated. The article suggests that rather than repeating the project's focus on developing stories tailored to specific HIV/AIDS myths, a more effective approach could be to develop stories that support core messages for facilitating HIV prevention, testing and treatment.

  7. Canadian Network Enabled Operations Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-06-01

    Canto One: Network Centric Warfare and the Myth of the New Economy, A Woven Web of Guesses, Canto Two: Network Centric Warfare and the Myth of...symposium 30 Nov – 2 Dec 04 CFEC-CEFC 5 CFEC CEFC CFEC Thrust Areas COMBAT ID FUTURE CFCS CF JOINT LOGISTICS INTEROPERABILITY WITH OGDS /NGOS/ CONTRACTORS...Surveillance, Fish Patrol, Protection of vital points • Forces: ROC, HFSWR, AIS, CP140, PAL, UAV, CBRN Team, ISTAR ASC, MEWT, Radarsat, OGDs • C4I

  8. The Networking and Information Technology Research and Development NITRD Program 2012 Strategic Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    Networking and Information Technology Research and Development, Executive Office of the President — Information technology IT computers, wired and wireless digital networks, electronic data and information, IT devices and systems, and software applications?today...

  9. Research of UMTS core network firewall base on IXP1200

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Kai; Deng, Tian Ping; Lu, YiMin

    2005-12-01

    The 3G network security was a problem in the practice. The particularity of the 3G core network determined that the new firewall technology must be adopt in order to protect the core network. The development of the network processor (NP) technology offered a high-performance realization platform for core network firewall. On the basis analyzing the shelter method of the attack to each interface in the 3G core network, a scheme of 3G core network firewall design was put forward. It was on the network processor hardware platform. How to use IPSEC protocol to protect the GPRS tunnel protocol (GTP) and implement on the NP was discussed in detail. The aggregated bit vector algorithm was applied on NP for packet classification. In the end result table of firewall performance test with SMART BIT instrument was provided.

  10. Research on University Network Teaching Platform (Blackboard in Teaching Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gou Zhao Xia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With rapid development of online education; teaching platform based on the network, as a new instructional mode has become a hot topic in online teaching. In this paper, the he teaching situation and existing problems on online was analyzed by comparing the difference between network teaching platform and traditional classroom teaching. Then the strategies of network teaching management and the case, which is focusing on the characteristics of Blackboard with the application of network teaching management was presents.

  11. Myths about nutrition in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guggino, Alice; Barbero, Sara; Ponzo, Valentina; Viora, Elsa; Durazzo, Marilena; Bo, Simona

    2016-10-01

    Many women have incorrect knowledge about nutrition in pregnancy owing to false beliefs derived from popular practices. More than 90% of our cohort of pregnant women during early pregnancy (myths about nutrition in pregnancy. Education was inversely associated with the percentage of incorrect answers, and the lowest percentage of any mistakes was found in the small number of women who received nutritional information by a dietician. In conclusion, the usual sources of information about nutrition in pregnancy are not adequate to overcome the false beliefs acquired by traditions.

  12. Networks and Water Policy: Conclusions and Implications for Research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bressers, Johannes T.A.; O'Toole, Laurence J.

    1994-01-01

    Network models for analysing public policy have become widely used in recent years. This symposium assesses the network idea by applying a common perspective on network analysis to the constellations involved in water policy formation and implementation in several countries and the European Union.

  13. Religious Affiliation, Religiosity, Gender, and Rape Myth Acceptance: Feminist Theory and Rape Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Michael D; Sligar, Kylie B; Wang, Chiachih D C

    2016-08-24

    Rape myths are false beliefs about rape, rape victims, and rapists, often prejudicial and stereotypical. Guided by feminist theory and available empirical research, this study aimed to examine the influences of gender, religious affiliation, and religiosity on rape myth acceptance of U.S. emerging adults. A sample of 653 university students aged 18 to 30 years were recruited from a large public university in the southern United States to complete the research questionnaires. Results indicated that individuals who identified as Roman Catholic or Protestant endorsed higher levels of rape myth acceptance than their atheist or agnostic counterparts. Men were found more likely to ascribe to rape myths than their female counterparts. Religiosity was positively associated with rape myth acceptance, even after controlling the effect of conservative political ideology. No significant interaction was found between gender and religious affiliation or gender and religiosity. Limitations, future research directions, and implications of the findings are discussed from the perspective of feminist theory. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. Computing and Network Systems Administration, Operations Research, and System Dynamics Modeling: A Proposed Research Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael W. Totaro

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Information and computing infrastructures (ICT involve levels of complexity that are highly dynamic in nature. This is due in no small measure to the proliferation of technologies, such as: cloud computing and distributed systems architectures, data mining and multidimensional analysis, and large scale enterprise systems, to name a few. Effective computing and network systems administration is integral to the stability and scalability of these complex software, hardware and communication systems. Systems administration involves the design, analysis, and continuous improvement of the performance or operation of information and computing systems. Additionally, social and administrative responsibilities have become nearly as integral for the systems administrator as are the technical demands that have been imposed for decades. The areas of operations research (OR and system dynamics (SD modeling offer system administrators a rich array of analytical and optimization tools that have been developed from diverse disciplines, which include: industrial, scientific, engineering, economic and financial, to name a few. This paper proposes a research framework by which OR and SD modeling techniques may prove useful to computing and network systems administration, which include: linear programming, network analysis, integer programming, nonlinear optimization, Markov processes, queueing modeling, simulation, decision analysis, heuristic techniques, and system dynamics modeling.

  15. GMES Initial Operations - Network for Earth Observation Research Training (GIONET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas-Perea, V.; Balzter, H.

    2012-12-01

    GMES Initial Operations - Network for Earth Observation Research Training (GIONET) is a Marie Curie funded project that aims to establish the first of a kind European Centre of Excellence for Earth Observation Research Training. GIONET is a partnership of leading Universities, research institutes and private companies from across Europe aiming to cultivate a community of early stage researchers in the areas of optical and radar remote sensing skilled for the emerging GMES land monitoring services during the GMES Initial Operations period (2011-2013) and beyond. GIONET is expected to satisfy the demand for highly skilled researchers and provide personnel for operational phase of the GMES and monitoring and emergency services. It will achieve this by: -Providing postgraduate training in Earth Observation Science that exposes students to different research disciplines and complementary skills, providing work experiences in the private and academic sectors, and leading to a recognized qualification (Doctorate). -Enabling access to first class training in both fundamental and applied research skills to early-stage researchers at world-class academic centers and market leaders in the private sector. -Building on the experience from previous GMES research and development projects in the land monitoring and emergency information services. The training program through supervised research focuses on 14 research topics (each carried out by an Early Stage Researchers based in one of the partner organization) divided in 5 main areas: Forest monitoring: Global biomass information systems Forest Monitoring of the Congo Basin using Synthetic Aperture radar (SAR) Multi-concept Earth Observation Capabilities for Biomass Mapping and Change Detection: Synergy of Multi-temporal and Multi-frequency Interferometric Radar and Optical Satellite Data Land cover and change: Multi-scale Remote Sensing Synergy for Land Process Studies: from field Spectrometry to Airborne Hyperspectral and

  16. Research on dynamic routing mechanisms in wireless sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, A Q; Weng, Y N; Lu, Y; Liu, C Y

    2014-01-01

    WirelessHART is the most widely applied standard in wireless sensor networks nowadays. However, it does not provide any dynamic routing mechanism, which is important for the reliability and robustness of the wireless network applications. In this paper, a collection tree protocol based, dynamic routing mechanism was proposed for WirelessHART network. The dynamic routing mechanism was evaluated through several simulation experiments in three aspects: time for generating the topology, link quality, and stability of network. Besides, the data transmission efficiency of this routing mechanism was analyzed. The simulation and evaluation results show that this mechanism can act as a dynamic routing mechanism for the TDMA-based wireless sensor network.

  17. Myth as metaphor

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-07-08

    Jul 8, 2016 ... HTS Teologiese Studies/Theological Studies. ISSN: (Online) 2072-8050, (Print) 0259-9422. Page 1 of 8. Original Research. Read online: Scan this QR code with your smart phone or mobile device to read online. Author: Gert Malan1. Affiliation: 1Department New Testament. Studies, Faculty of Theology,.

  18. GIONET (GMES Initial Operations Network for Earth Observation Research Training)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, V.; Balzter, H.

    2013-12-01

    GMES Initial Operations - Network for Earth Observation Research Training (GIONET) is a Marie Curie funded project that aims to establish the first of a kind European Centre of Excellence for Earth Observation Research Training. Copernicus (previously known as GMES (Global Monitoring for Environment and Security) is a joint undertaking of the European Space Agency and the European Commission. It develops fully operational Earth Observation monitoring services for a community of end users from the public and private sector. The first services that are considered fully operational are the land monitoring and emergency monitoring core services. In GIONET, 14 early stage researchers are being trained at PhD level in understanding the complex physical processes that determine how electromagnetic radiation interacts with the atmosphere and the land surface ultimately form the signal received by a satellite. In order to achieve this, the researchers are based in industry and universities across Europe, as well as receiving the best technical training and scientific education. The training programme through supervised research focuses on 14 research topics. Each topic is carried out by an Early Stage Researcher based in one of the partner organisations and is expected to lead to a PhD degree. The 14 topics are grouped in 5 research themes: Forest monitoring Land cover and change Coastal zone and freshwater monitoring Geohazards and emergency response Climate adaptation and emergency response The methods developed and used in GIONET are as diverse as its research topics. GIONET has already held two summer schools; one at Friedrich Schiller University in Jena (Germany), on 'New operational radar satellite applications: Introduction to SAR, Interferometry and Polarimetry for Land Surface Mapping'. The 2nd summer school took place last September at the University of Leicester (UK )on 'Remote sensing of land cover and forest in GMES'. The next Summer School in September 2013

  19. Design and Evaluation of a Widget-Based Dashboard for Awareness Support in Research Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, Wolfgang; Mletzko, Christian; Drachsler, Hendrik; Sloep, Peter B.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we describe the rationale, design and evaluation of a widget-based dashboard to support scholars' awareness of their Research Networks. We introduce the concept of a Research Network and discuss Personal Research Environments that are built of as a development parallel to Personal Learning Environments. Based on the results…

  20. [AFNET. A translational research network develops into an academic research organization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchhof, Paulus; Goette, Andreas; Näbauer, Michael; Schotten, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    "The whole is greater than the sum of its parts" (Aristotle).Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia and affects 1-2 % of the population in developed countries, especially the elderly. We expect that the prevalence of AF will double in the next few decades. The last decades have seen important improvements in the management of atrial fibrillation, but many questions remain regarding the optimal diagnosis and management of the condition. The German Atrial Fibrillation NETwork (AFNET) was one of three cardiovascular competence networks in medicine funded by the German Ministry of Education and Research between 2003-2014. AFNET has contributed to the understanding of atrial fibrillation, and AFNET-led studies have led to improved clinical practices and practice guidelines in Germany and in Europe. This work has been expanded and is continuing in the AFNET association (AFNET e. V.). The AFNET association, founded in 2010 and continuing to this day, has developed into a small but fully formed academic research organisation that conducts investigator-initiated clinical trials as the responsible sponsor in Germany, Europe, and beyond. The AFNET association currently cooperates with EHRA (The European Heart Rhythm Association), ESC (The European Society of Cardiology) and DZHK (The German Centre for Cardiovascular Research) and receives funding from the European Union to generate evidence that can in the future lead to better prevention and management of AF.

  1. Myths and misconceptions about intrauterine contraception among women seeking termination of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michie, Lucy; Cameron, Sharon T; Glasier, Anna; Wellings, Kaye; Loudon, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Immediate initiation of an intrauterine device (IUD) or intrauterine system (IUS) following termination of pregnancy (TOP) is associated with a significant reduction in the risk of another TOP. In spite of its high efficacy, uptake of intrauterine contraception in the UK is low. Myths and misconceptions about the method may contribute to the low uptake. Anonymous, self-administered questionnaire among women requesting a TOP in a hospital abortion service in Scotland, UK. Misconceptions about intrauterine contraception were extracted from an online social networking and micro-blogging service, and from existing research to develop a questionnaire containing 12 negative statements about intrauterine contraception. Respondents indicated their level of agreement with each statement. A total of 106/125 (85%) women requesting a TOP completed the questionnaire. The two commonest negative statements that respondents agreed with were that the IUD/IUS 'Is painful to have inserted' (n=36; 34%) and that 'It can move around inside your body' (n=25; 23.6%). The range of women who neither agreed nor disagreed with negative statements was 26.4-56.0%. Twenty-seven (25%) women indicated that the IUD/IUS was their planned method of post-TOP contraception. Although myths about intrauterine contraception persist among a small proportion of women requesting a TOP, lack of knowledge about the method is also evident. The consultation prior to TOP is an important opportunity to provide accurate and quality information to women about the IUD/IUS that may serve to increase uptake and prevent repeat abortions.

  2. The research on user behavior evaluation method for network state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chengyuan; Xu, Haishui

    2017-08-01

    Based on the correlation between user behavior and network running state, this paper proposes a method of user behavior evaluation based on network state. Based on the analysis and evaluation methods in other fields of study, we introduce the theory and tools of data mining. Based on the network status information provided by the trusted network view, the user behavior data and the network state data are analysed. Finally, we construct the user behavior evaluation index and weight, and on this basis, we can accurately quantify the influence degree of the specific behavior of different users on the change of network running state, so as to provide the basis for user behavior control decision.

  3. Research infrastructure, networks of science and regional development - the case of Oskarshamn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Folke Valfrid Snickars

    2017-10-01

    Our results indicate that research infrastructures as the ones in Oskarshamn are powerful creators of international research networks. It is possible although somewhat difficult in view of scattered systems for data provision to assess their academic and societal impacts. Engineering research has its own networks of university-industry and industry-university interaction where value is cogenerated dynamically. In the study we have come some way towards empirically analyzing the networks of research cooperation between industry and university using methods of infrastructure theory and network analysis.

  4. An Analysis for the Use of Research and Education Networks and Commercial Network Vendors in Support of Space Based Mission Critical and Non-Critical Networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Robert N.

    2002-01-01

    Currently, and in the past, dedicated communication circuits and "network services" with very stringent performance requirements are being used to support manned and unmanned mission critical ground operations at GSFC, JSC, MSFC, KSC and other NASA facilities. Because of the evolution of network technology, it is time to investigate using other approaches to providing mission services for space ground operations. The current NASA approach is not in keeping with the evolution of network technologies. In the past decade various research and education networks dedicated to scientific and educational endeavors have emerged, as well as commercial networking providers, that employ advanced networking technologies. These technologies have significantly changed networking in recent years. Significant advances in network routing techniques, various topologies and equipment have made commercial networks very stable and virtually error free. Advances in Dense Wave Division Multiplexing will provide tremendous amounts of bandwidth for the future. The question is: Do these networks, which are controlled and managed centrally, provide a level of service that equals the stringent NASA performance requirements. If they do, what are the implication(s) of using them for critical space based ground operations as they are, without adding high cost contractual performance requirements? A second question is the feasibility of applying the emerging grid technology in space operations. Is it feasible to develop a Space Operations Grid and/or a Space Science Grid? Since these network's connectivity is substantial, both nationally and internationally, development of these sorts of grids may be feasible. The concept of research and education networks has evolved to the international community as well. Currently there are international RENs connecting the US in Chicago to and from Europe, South America, Asia and the Pacific rim, Russia and Canada. And most countries in these areas have their

  5. Mapping the Field of Educational Administration Research: A Journal Citation Network Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yinying; Bowers, Alex J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to uncover how knowledge is exchanged and disseminated in the educational administration research literature through the journal citation network. Design/ Methodology/Approach: Drawing upon social network theory and citation network studies in other disciplines, the authors constructed an educational…

  6. Defining dimensions of research readiness: a conceptual model for primary care research networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Helen; de Lusignan, Simon; Liyanage, Harshana; Liaw, Siaw-Teng; Terry, Amanda; Rafi, Imran

    2014-11-26

    Recruitment to research studies in primary care is challenging despite widespread implementation of electronic patient record (EPR) systems which potentially make it easier to identify eligible cases. Literature review and applying the learning from a European research readiness assessment tool, the TRANSFoRm International Research Readiness instrument (TIRRE), to the context of the English NHS in order to develop a model to assess a practice's research readiness. Seven dimensions of research readiness were identified: (1) Data readiness: Is there good data quality in EPR systems; (2) Record readiness: Are EPR data able to identify eligible cases and other study data; (3) Organisational readiness: Are the health system and socio-cultural environment supportive; (4) Governance readiness: Does the study meet legal and local health system regulatory compliance; (5) Study-specific readiness; (6) Business process readiness: Are business processes tilted in favour of participation: including capacity and capability to take on extra work, financial incentives as well as intangibles such as social and intellectual capital; (7) Patient readiness: Are systems in place to recruit patients and obtain informed consent? The model might enable the development of interventions to increase participation in primary care-based research and become a tool to measure the progress of practice networks towards the most advanced state of readiness.

  7. The early detection research network: 10-year outlook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Sudhir

    2013-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute's Early Detection Research Network (EDRN) has made significant progress in developing an organized effort for discovering and validating biomarkers, building resources to support this effort, demonstrating the capabilities of several genomic and proteomic platforms, identifying candidate biomarkers, and undertaking multicenter validation studies. In its first 10 years, the EDRN went from a groundbreaking concept to an operational success. The EDRN has established clear milestones for reaching a decision of "go" or "no go" during the biomarker development process. Milestones are established on the basis of statistical criteria, performance characteristics of biomarkers, and anticipated clinical use. More than 300 biomarkers have been stopped from further development. To date, the EDRN has prioritized more than 300 biomarkers and has completed more than 10 validation studies. The US Food and Drug Administration has now cleared 5 biomarkers for various clinical endpoints. The EDRN today combines numerous collaborative and multidisciplinary investigator-initiated projects with a strong national administrative and data infrastructure. The EDRN has created a rigorous peer-review system that ensures that preliminary data--analytical, clinical, and quantitative--are of excellent quality. The process begins with an internal review with clinical, biostatistical, and analytical expertise. The project then receives external peer review and, finally, National Cancer Institute program staff review, resulting in an exceptionally robust and high-quality validation trial. © 2012 American Association for Clinical Chemistry

  8. Patient informed governance of distributed research networks: results and discussion from six patient focus groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamo, Laura A; Browe, Dennis K; Logan, Holly C; Kim, Katherine K

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how to govern emerging distributed research networks is essential to their success. Distributed research networks aggregate patient medical data from many institutions leaving data within the local provider security system. While much is known about patients' views on secondary medical research, little is known about their views on governance of research networks. We conducted six focus groups with patients from three medical centers across the U.S. to understand their perspectives on privacy, consent, and ethical concerns of sharing their data as part of research networks. Participants positively endorsed sharing their health data with these networks believing that doing so could advance healthcare knowledge. However, patients expressed several concerns regarding security and broader ethical issues such as commercialism, public benefit, and social responsibility. We suggest that network governance guidelines move beyond strict technical requirements and address wider socio-ethical concerns by fully including patients in governance processes.

  9. Isaac Newton: Man, Myth, and Mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickey, V. Frederick

    1987-01-01

    This article was written in part to celebrate the anniversaries of landmark mathematical works by Newton and Descartes. It's other purpose is to dispel some myths about Sir Isaac Newton and to encourage readers to read Newton's works. (PK)

  10. Competence in Management Development: Challenging the Myths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubb, Richard; Robotham, David

    1997-01-01

    Counters the following myths: competence has been defined; managerial effectiveness can be identified; management is generic; effectiveness can be measured; management is composed of skills, behaviors, or traits; and only maximum performance counts. (SK)

  11. The Myth of the Black Matriarchy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staples, Robert

    1981-01-01

    Reprint of a 1970 article that describes the oppression of Blacks and the distortion of Black family life throughout United States history. Holds that the myth of Black matriarchy sets back the struggle for Black liberation. (GC)

  12. Myths, presumptions, and facts about obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casazza, Krista; Fontaine, Kevin R; Astrup, Arne

    2013-01-01

    Many beliefs about obesity persist in the absence of supporting scientific evidence (presumptions); some persist despite contradicting evidence (myths). The promulgation of unsupported beliefs may yield poorly informed policy decisions, inaccurate clinical and public health recommendations...

  13. Of maps and myths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estes, J.E.; Mooneyhan, D.W. [Univ. Space Research Assoc, Washington, DC (United States)

    1994-05-01

    For many areas of both the developed and developing world, the spatially accurate data required to effectively support environmental planning, resources management, and public policy decision making do not exist. There are a variety of reasons for this lack of map data. Mapping is neither easy nor cheap. Issues of both national security and national sovereignty are involved. There is a need to reinvigorate and expand our mapping programs to make them national in focus but global in scope. It is also essential that a civil agency be given a load role in global mapping. There is a need to work to break down the barriers that inhibit the open flow of map information that does exist, garner the resources required to fill in where there are gaps, and support efforts to increase funding for research in mapping and spatial analysis. All this must be done if we are to improve our understanding of our rapidly changing world. 20 refs.

  14. Symbols and Myths in European Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynggaard, Kennet; Manners, Ian James; Søby, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The study of symbols and myths in European integration is crucial to our understanding of both how the European Union (EU) becomes constituted as a political reality and how the integration process itself occurs. By drawing on the study of symbols and myths from political science, humanities...... and cultural studies to the analysis of European integration, this paper will set out a project to provide a better understanding of how symbolic and substantial processes interact in European society....

  15. Research Award: Information and Networks (I&N) Deadline ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    arashid

    2011-09-12

    Sep 12, 2011 ... What are the limitations of openness models in reducing poverty or achieving networked societies? What role do collaborative technologies (e.g. social media) play in social innovation and change? Which policies and regulations are needed to sustain inclusive and innovative network societies?

  16. Advantages of Social Network Analysis in Educational Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushakov, K. M.; Kukso, K. N.

    2015-01-01

    Currently one of the main tools for the large scale studies of schools is statistical analysis. Although it is the most common method and it offers greatest opportunities for analysis, there are other quantitative methods for studying schools, such as network analysis. We discuss the potential advantages that network analysis has for educational…

  17. Perceptions About Sex Related Myths And Misconceptions: Difference In Male And Female

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupam Raizada

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available Research problem: Perceptions about sex-re- iated myths and misconceptions.Objectives: To identify the difference in percep­tions of mates and females over sex-reiated myths and misconceptions.Study Design - Community based cross sectional study.Setting - Self-administered questionnaire study was un­dertaken in an urban area of Jhansi.Participants - Married couples with reproductive age wife.Sample size - 417 couples of the area.Study Variables-Sex-related myths and misconceptionsOutcome Variables - Masturbation, Penis-size and sexual performance, STD transmission. Intercourse with virgin and cure of STDs, Initiation of sexual act, Bleeding on first night.Statistical analysis - By chi - square test.Results: Response rate 63.8%. Only 8.6% females and 33.7% males knew correctly about masturbation. Males also knew better about route of STD infection (73.5% and about the fact that intercouse with a virgin cannot cure STDs (47.4%. Females, however, outnumber males on the question of relation between man's penis size and his sexual performance (70%, initiation of sexual act (58.6% and bleeding in females on first night of marriage (70%.Conclusion: Males and females had significantly different perceptions on sex related myths and misconceptions.Recommendations: Sex education campaigns should be designed and implemented to eliminate these age old sex related myths and misconceptions.

  18. Exploring knowledge processes based on teacher research in a school-university research network of a master's program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    prof dr Theo Bergen; prof dr Douwe Beijaard; dr Frank Cornelissen; Dr. Jacqueline van Swet

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on a multiple-case study of five participants in a school-university research network in a Dutch master's program. Outcomes indicate that use of existing network structures in master's programs is complex, but could be a promising avenue for creating succesful school-university

  19. A survey of research and practices of network-on-chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Tobias; Mahadevan, Shankar

    2006-01-01

    The scaling of microchip technologies has enabled large scale systems-on-chip (SoC). Network-on-chip (NoC) research addresses global communication in SoC, involving (i) a move from computation-centric to communication-centric design and (ii) the implementation of scalable communication structures....... This survey presents a perspective on existing NoC research. We define the following abstractions: system, network adapter, network, and link to explain and structure the fundamental concepts. First, research relating to the actual network design is reviewed. Then system level design and modeling...

  20. Stillbirth Collaborative Research Network: design, methods and recruitment experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Corette B; Hogue, Carol J R; Koch, Matthew A; Willinger, Marian; Reddy, Uma M; Thorsten, Vanessa R; Dudley, Donald J; Silver, Robert M; Coustan, Donald; Saade, George R; Conway, Deborah; Varner, Michael W; Stoll, Barbara; Pinar, Halit; Bukowski, Radek; Carpenter, Marshall; Goldenberg, Robert

    2011-09-01

    The Stillbirth Collaborative Research Network (SCRN) has conducted a multisite, population-based, case-control study, with prospective enrollment of stillbirths and livebirths at the time of delivery. This paper describes the general design, methods and recruitment experience. The SCRN attempted to enroll all stillbirths and a representative sample of livebirths occurring to residents of pre-defined geographical catchment areas delivering at 59 hospitals associated with five clinical sites. Livebirths <32 weeks gestation and women of African descent were oversampled. The recruitment hospitals were chosen to ensure access to at least 90% of all stillbirths and livebirths to residents of the catchment areas. Participants underwent a standardised protocol including maternal interview, medical record abstraction, placental pathology, biospecimen testing and, in stillbirths, post-mortem examination. Recruitment began in March 2006 and was completed in September 2008 with 663 women with a stillbirth and 1932 women with a livebirth enrolled, representing 69% and 63%, respectively, of the women identified. Additional surveillance for stillbirths continued until June 2009 and a follow-up of the case-control study participants was completed in December 2009. Among consenting women, there were high consent rates for the various study components. For the women with stillbirths, 95% agreed to a maternal interview, chart abstraction and a placental pathological examination; 91% of the women with a livebirth agreed to all of these components. Additionally, 84% of the women with stillbirths agreed to a fetal post-mortem examination. This comprehensive study is poised to systematically study a wide range of potential causes of, and risk factors for, stillbirths and to better understand the scope and incidence of the problem. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Automatic generation of investigator bibliographies for institutional research networking systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Stephen B; Bales, Michael E; Dine, Daniel; Bakken, Suzanne; Albert, Paul J; Weng, Chunhua

    2014-10-01

    Publications are a key data source for investigator profiles and research networking systems. We developed ReCiter, an algorithm that automatically extracts bibliographies from PubMed using institutional information about the target investigators. ReCiter executes a broad query against PubMed, groups the results into clusters that appear to constitute distinct author identities and selects the cluster that best matches the target investigator. Using information about investigators from one of our institutions, we compared ReCiter results to queries based on author name and institution and to citations extracted manually from the Scopus database. Five judges created a gold standard using citations of a random sample of 200 investigators. About half of the 10,471 potential investigators had no matching citations in PubMed, and about 45% had fewer than 70 citations. Interrater agreement (Fleiss' kappa) for the gold standard was 0.81. Scopus achieved the best recall (sensitivity) of 0.81, while name-based queries had 0.78 and ReCiter had 0.69. ReCiter attained the best precision (positive predictive value) of 0.93 while Scopus had 0.85 and name-based queries had 0.31. ReCiter accesses the most current citation data, uses limited computational resources and minimizes manual entry by investigators. Generation of bibliographies using named-based queries will not yield high accuracy. Proprietary databases can perform well but requite manual effort. Automated generation with higher recall is possible but requires additional knowledge about investigators. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Community based research network: opportunities for coordination of care, public health surveillance, and farmworker research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Sharon P; Heyer, Nicholas; Shipp, Eva M; Ryder, E Roberta; Hendrikson, Edward; Socias, Christina M; Del Junco, Deborah J; Valerio, Melissa; Partida, Sylvia

    2014-01-01

    The lack of aggregated longitudinal health data on farmworkers has severely limited opportunities to conduct research to improve their health status. To correct this problem, we have created the infrastructure necessary to develop and maintain a national Research Data Repository of migrant and seasonal farmworker patients and other community members receiving medical care from Community and Migrant Health Centers (C/MHCs). Project specific research databases can be easily extracted from this repository. The Community Based Research Network (CBRN) has securely imported and merged electronic health records (EHRs) data from five geographically dispersed C/MHCs. To demonstrate the effectiveness of our data aggregation methodologies, we also conducted a small pilot study using clinical, laboratory and demographic data from the CBRN Data Repository from two initial C/MHCs to evaluate HbA1c management. Overall, there were 67,878 total patients (2,858 farmworkers) that were seen by two C/MHCs from January to August 2013. A total of 94,189 encounters were captured and all could be linked to a unique patient. HbA1c values decreased as the number of tests or intensity of testing increased. This project will inform the foundation for an expanding collection of C/MHC data for use by clinicians for medical care coordination, by clinics to assess quality of care, by public health agencies for surveillance, and by researchers under Institutional Review Board (IRB) oversight to advance understanding of the needs and capacity of the migrant and seasonal farmworker population and the health centers that serve them. Approved researchers can request data that constitute a Limited Data Set from the CBRN Data Repository to establish a specific research database for their project.

  3. The Utrecht Pharmacy Practice network for education and research : A network of community and hospital pharmacies in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, E.S.; Blom, A.T.G.; Philbert, D.; Rump, H.H.; Bouvy, M.L.

    2014-01-01

    Practice-based networks can serve as effective mechanisms for the development of the profession of pharmacists, on the one hand by supporting student internships and on the other hand by collection of research data and implementation of research outcomes among public health practice settings. This

  4. Separating Fact from Fiction: An Empirical Examination of Six Myths About Dissociative Identity Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Bethany L; Sar, Vedat; Stavropoulos, Pam; Krüger, Christa; Korzekwa, Marilyn; Martínez-Taboas, Alfonso; Middleton, Warwick

    2016-01-01

    Dissociative identity disorder (DID) is a complex, posttraumatic, developmental disorder for which we now, after four decades of research, have an authoritative research base, but a number of misconceptualizations and myths about the disorder remain, compromising both patient care and research. This article examines the empirical literature pertaining to recurrently expressed beliefs regarding DID: (1) belief that DID is a fad, (2) belief that DID is primarily diagnosed in North America by DID experts who overdiagnose the disorder, (3) belief that DID is rare, (4) belief that DID is an iatrogenic, rather than trauma-based, disorder, (5) belief that DID is the same entity as borderline personality disorder, and (6) belief that DID treatment is harmful to patients. The absence of research to substantiate these beliefs, as well as the existence of a body of research that refutes them, confirms their mythical status. Clinicians who accept these myths as facts are unlikely to carefully assess for dissociation. Accurate diagnoses are critical for appropriate treatment planning. If DID is not targeted in treatment, it does not appear to resolve. The myths we have highlighted may also impede research about DID. The cost of ignorance about DID is high not only for individual patients but for the whole support system in which they reside. Empirically derived knowledge about DID has replaced outdated myths. Vigorous dissemination of the knowledge base about this complex disorder is warranted.

  5. Separating Fact from Fiction: An Empirical Examination of Six Myths About Dissociative Identity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Bethany L.; Sar, Vedat; Stavropoulos, Pam; Krüger, Christa; Korzekwa, Marilyn; Martínez-Taboas, Alfonso; Middleton, Warwick

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Dissociative identity disorder (DID) is a complex, posttraumatic, developmental disorder for which we now, after four decades of research, have an authoritative research base, but a number of misconceptualizations and myths about the disorder remain, compromising both patient care and research. This article examines the empirical literature pertaining to recurrently expressed beliefs regarding DID: (1) belief that DID is a fad, (2) belief that DID is primarily diagnosed in North America by DID experts who overdiagnose the disorder, (3) belief that DID is rare, (4) belief that DID is an iatrogenic, rather than trauma-based, disorder, (5) belief that DID is the same entity as borderline personality disorder, and (6) belief that DID treatment is harmful to patients. The absence of research to substantiate these beliefs, as well as the existence of a body of research that refutes them, confirms their mythical status. Clinicians who accept these myths as facts are unlikely to carefully assess for dissociation. Accurate diagnoses are critical for appropriate treatment planning. If DID is not targeted in treatment, it does not appear to resolve. The myths we have highlighted may also impede research about DID. The cost of ignorance about DID is high not only for individual patients but for the whole support system in which they reside. Empirically derived knowledge about DID has replaced outdated myths. Vigorous dissemination of the knowledge base about this complex disorder is warranted. PMID:27384396

  6. 76 FR 46359 - Announcing the Nineteenth Public Meeting of the Crash Injury Research and Engineering Network...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-02

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Announcing the Nineteenth Public Meeting of the Crash Injury Research and Engineering Network (CIREN) AGENCY: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA... members of the Crash Injury Research and Engineering Network. CIREN is a collaborative effort to conduct...

  7. A practice-based research network on the survival of ceramic inlay/onlay restorations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collares, K.; Correa, M.B.; Laske, M.; Kramer, E.; Reiss, B.; Moraes, R.R.; Huysmans, M.C.; Opdam, N.J.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate prospectively the longevity of ceramic inlay/onlay restorations placed in a web-based practice-based research network and to investigate risk factors associated with restoration failures. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data were collected by a practice-based research network called

  8. A data protection scheme for medical research networks. Review after five years of operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helbing, K; Demiroglu, S Y; Rakebrandt, F; Pommerening, K; Rienhoff, O; Sax, U

    2010-01-01

    The data protection requirements matured in parallel to new clinical tests generating more personal data since the 1960s. About ten years ago it was recognized that a generic data protection scheme for medical research networks is required, which reinforces patient rights but also allows economically feasible medical research compared to "hand-carved" individual solutions. To give recommendations for more efficient IT infrastructures for medical research networks in compliance with data protection requirements. The IT infrastructures of three medical research networks were reviewed with respect to the relevant data management modules. Recommendations are derived to increase cost efficiency in research networks assessing the consequences of a service provider approach without lowering the data protection level. The existing data protection schemes are very complex. Smaller research networks cannot afford the implementation of such schemes. Larger networks struggle to keep them sustainable. Due to a modular redesign in the medical research network community, a new approach offers opportunities for an efficient sustainable IT infrastructure involving a service provider concept. For standard components 70-80% of the costs could be cut down, for open source components about 37% over a three-year period. Future research networks should switch to a service-oriented approach to achieve a sustainable, cost-efficient IT infrastructure.

  9. Counseling Child Sexual Abuse Victims: Myths and Realities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, Lynn W.; Thompson, Charles L.

    1988-01-01

    Attempts to create awareness among counselors about nature and prevalence of child sexual abuse. Identifies six myths about sexual abuse and discusses both myths and realities about the topic. Presents recommendations for interviewing suspected victims of child sexual abuse. (Author)

  10. Building a Healthy Vegetarian Meal: Myths and Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthy Vegetarian Meal Print Email Building a Healthy Vegetarian Meal Myths and Facts By Alexandra Caspero, MA, ... it comes to plant-based diets. Myth #1: Vegetarians and Vegans Have a Hard Time Getting Enough ...

  11. Cancer Fact or Fiction: Separating Myths from Good Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer Fact or Fiction: Separating Myths from Good Information By the National Cancer Institute To many, cancer remains one of the most frightening ... cancer. It is important to separate fact from fiction. Some of the most common cancer myths not ...

  12. Qwest provides high-speed network for major research institutions in Illinois eight campuses interconnected to foster collaborative, virtual research

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Qwest Communications International Inc. today announced that Argonne National Laboratory has deployed Qwest's broadband fiber optic network for the Illinois Wired/Wireless Infrastructure for Research and Education (I-WIRE) project (1 page).

  13. Internalized model minority myth, Asian values, and help-seeking attitudes among Asian American students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Paul Youngbin; Lee, Donghun

    2014-01-01

    The present study examined cultural factors underlying help-seeking attitudes of Asian American college students (N = 106). Specifically, we explored internalized model minority myth as a predictor of help-seeking attitudes and tested an intrapersonal-interpersonal framework of Asian values as a mechanism by which the two are related. Results indicated that internalized model minority myth significantly predicted unfavorable help-seeking attitudes, and emotional self-control mediated this relationship. Interpersonal values and humility were nonsignificant mediators, contrary to our hypotheses. The findings suggest that the investigation of internalized model minority myth in help-seeking research is a worthwhile endeavor, and they also highlight emotional self-control as an important explanatory variable in help-seeking attitudes of Asian American college students.

  14. Confronting, Confirming, and Dispelling Myths Surrounding ERP-in-the-Cloud

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beaulieu, Tanya; C. Martin, Todd; Sarker, Saonee

    2015-01-01

    understanding about the true challenges related to ERP cloud computing, it is important to examine these myths in an effort to dispel or support them. In this paper, we attempt to achieve that. Specifically, we explore eight myths related to cloud-based ERP systems through a study involving in-depth interviews......Although cloud computing is still in its infancy, it is rapidly becoming one of the most used buzzwords in the IS/IT field and ERP-systems are one of the fastest growing SaaS cloud applications. However, given the relative newness of ERP cloud computing, and the lack of empirical research...... on the topic, there is substantial uncertainty surrounding the benefits and challenges of ERP cloud computing. Consequently, as often is the case with new technologies, popular myths surrounding the technology are used to make adoption and implementation decisions. As a first step toward providing an informed...

  15. FLUXNET Research Network Site Characteristics, Investigators, and Bibliography, 2016

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — FLUXNET is a global network of micrometeorological tower sites that use eddy covariance methods to measure the exchanges of carbon dioxide, water vapor, and energy...

  16. Positive train control interoperability and networking research : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    This document describes the initial development of an ITC PTC Shared Network (IPSN), a hosted : environment to support the distribution, configuration management, and IT governance of Interoperable : Train Control (ITC) Positive Train Control (PTC) s...

  17. Manifesto for a European Anxiety Disorders Research Network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baldwin, David S.; Allgulander, Christer; Altamura, Alfredo Carlo; Angst, Jules; Bandelow, Borwin; den Boer, Johan; Boyer, Patrice; Davies, Simon; dell'Osso, Bernardo; Eriksson, Elias; Fineberg, Naomi; Fredrikson, Mats; Herran, Andres; Maron, Eduard; Metspalu, Andres; Nutt, David; van der Wee, Nic; Luis Vazquez-Barquero, Jose; Zohar, Joseph

    Despite the size, burden and costs of anxiety disorders, many patients remain unrecognised, and the effectiveness of evidence-based interventions in routine clinical practice can be disappointing. The European College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ECNP) has established the ECNP Network Initiative

  18. [The network organization of medical research in the US Armed Forces].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golota, A S; Zubenko, A I; Ivchenko, E V; Krassiĭ, A B; Shalakhin, R A

    2014-03-01

    The current article is dedicated to the network mode of medical scientific research organization in the US Armed Forces exploring the Armed Forces Institute of Regenerative Medicine as an example. The following features of the institute are examined: the structure, definition of scientific research goals and tasks, financing, management, areas of research, the next generation of the institute. In conclusion some characteristic features of network scientific research establishment and required legal conditions are determined.

  19. Research network on capital markets and financial integration in Europe : results and experience after two years

    OpenAIRE

    European Central Bank ; Center for Financial Studies (CFS)

    2008-01-01

    In April 2002 the European Central Bank (ECB) and the Center for Financial Studies (CFS) launched the ECB-CFS Research Network to promote research on “Capital Markets and Financial Integration in Europe”. The ECB-CFS research network aims at stimulating top-level and policy-relevant research, significantly contributing to the understanding of the current and future structure and integration of the financial system in Europe and its international linkages with the United States and Japan. This...

  20. Speech Quality Monitoring in Czech National Research Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Voznak

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with techniques of measuring and assessment of the voice transmitted in IP networks and describes design of quality measurement, which can be used for Cisco Gateways. Cisco gateways send Calculated Planning Impairment Factor in every CDR (Call Detail Record. Our design is based on collection of CDR's, their storing into SQL database and their visualization through web page. This design was implemented and successfully tested in CESNET network.

  1. Network Pharmacology: A New Approach for Chinese Herbal Medicine Research

    OpenAIRE

    Gui-biao Zhang; Qing-ya Li; Qi-long Chen; Shi-bing Su

    2013-01-01

    The dominant paradigm of ?one gene, one target, one disease? has influenced many aspects of drug discovery strategy. However, in recent years, it has been appreciated that many effective drugs act on multiple targets rather than a single one. As an integrated multidisciplinary concept, network pharmacology, which is based on system biology and polypharmacology, affords a novel network mode of ?multiple targets, multiple effects, complex diseases? and replaces the ?magic bullets? by ?magic sho...

  2. Providing access to research data, publications and current research information at Data Archiving and Networked Services - DANS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, E.M.S.; Doorn, P.K.

    2014-01-01

    Data Archiving and Networked Services (DANS) promotes sustained access to digital research data in the Netherlands. Researchers can deposit their data through the online archiving system EASY. Via the portal NARCIS the research data are shown in context, namely in relation to publications, and other

  3. Rape Myth Consistency and Gender Differences in Perceiving Rape Victims: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockett, Jericho M; Smith, Sara J; Klausing, Cathleen D; Saucier, Donald A

    2016-02-01

    An overview discusses feminist analyses of oppression, attitudes toward rape victims, and previously studied predictors of individuals' attitudes toward rape victims. To better understand such attitudes, this meta-analysis examines the moderating influences of various rape victim, perpetrator, and crime characteristics' rape myth consistency on gender differences in individuals' perceptions of rape victims (i.e., victim responsibility and blame attributions and rape minimizing attitudes). Consistent with feminist theoretical predictions, results indicated that, overall, men perceived rape victims more negatively than women did. However, this sex difference was moderated by the rape myth consistency within the rape vignettes. Implications for research are discussed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. [ECRIN (European clinical research infrastructures network), a pan-European infrastructure for clinical research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demotes-Mainard, Jacques

    2010-12-01

    Clinical research plays a key role both in the development of innovative health products and in the optimisation of medical strategies, leading to evidence-based practice and healthcare cost containment. ECRIN is a distributed ESFRI-roadmap pan-European infrastructure designed to support multinational clinical research, making Europe a single area for clinical studies, taking advantage of its population size to access patients, and unlocking latent scientific providing services to multinational. Servicing of multinational trials started during the preparatory phase, and ECRIN has applied for ERIC status in 2011. In parallel, ECRIN has also proposed an FP7 integrating activity project to further develop, upgrade and expand the ECRIN infrastructure built up during the past FP6 and FP7 projects, facilitating an efficient organization of clinical research in Europe, with ECRIN developing generic tools and providing generic services for multinational studies, and supporting the construction of pan-European disease-oriented networks that will in turn act as ECRIN users. This organization will improve Europe's attractiveness for industry trials, boost its scientific competitiveness, and result in better healthcare for European citizens. The three medical areas supported in this project (rare diseases, medical devices, and nutrition) will serve as pilots for other biomedical research fields. By creating a single area for clinical research in Europe, this structure will contribute to the implementation of the Europe flagship initiative 2020 'Innovation Union', whose objectives include defragmentation of research and educational capacities, tackling the major societal challenges (starting with healthy aging), and removing barriers to bringing ideas to the market.

  5. Prioritising neonatal medicines research: UK Medicines for Children Research Network scoping survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hawcutt Daniel B

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dosing regimen and indications for many medicines in current use in neonatology are not well defined. There is a need to prioritise research in this area, but currently there is little information about which drugs are used in UK neonatal units and the research needs in this area as perceived by UK neonatologists. Methods The Neonatal Clinical Studies Group (CSG of the Medicines for Children Research Network (MCRN undertook a 2 week prospective scoping survey study to establish which medicines are used in UK neonatal units; how many babies are receiving them; and what clinicians (and other health professionals believe are important issues for future research. Results 49 out of 116 units responded to at least one element of the survey (42%. 37 units reported the number of neonates who received medicines over a 2 week period. A total of 3924 medicine-patient pairs were reported with 119 different medicines. 70% of medicine-patient pairs involved medicines that were missing either a license or dose for either term or preterm neonates. 4.3% of medicine-patient pairs involved medicines that were missing both license and dose for any neonate. The most common therapeutic gap in need of additional research identified by UK neonatologists was chronic lung disease (21 responding units, followed by patent ductus arteriosus and vitamin supplements (11 responding units for both Conclusion The research agenda for neonatal medicines can be informed by knowledge of current medicine use and the collective views of the neonatal community.

  6. NDEx - the Network Data Exchange, A Network Commons for Biologists | Informatics Technology for Cancer Research (ITCR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Network models of biology, whether curated or derived from large-scale data analysis, are critical tools in the understanding of cancer mechanisms and in the design and personalization of therapies. The NDEx Project (Network Data Exchange) will create, deploy, and maintain an open-source, web-based software platform and public website to enable scientists, organizations, and software applications to share, store, manipulate, and publish biological networks.

  7. A Federated Network for Translational Cancer Research Using Clinical Data and Biospecimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Rebecca S; Becich, Michael J; Bollag, Roni J; Chavan, Girish; Corrigan, Julia; Dhir, Rajiv; Feldman, Michael D; Gaudioso, Carmelo; Legowski, Elizabeth; Maihle, Nita J; Mitchell, Kevin; Murphy, Monica; Sakthivel, Mayurapriyan; Tseytlin, Eugene; Weaver, JoEllen

    2015-12-15

    Advances in cancer research and personalized medicine will require significant new bridging infrastructures, including more robust biorepositories that link human tissue to clinical phenotypes and outcomes. In order to meet that challenge, four cancer centers formed the Text Information Extraction System (TIES) Cancer Research Network, a federated network that facilitates data and biospecimen sharing among member institutions. Member sites can access pathology data that are de-identified and processed with the TIES natural language processing system, which creates a repository of rich phenotype data linked to clinical biospecimens. TIES incorporates multiple security and privacy best practices that, combined with legal agreements, network policies, and procedures, enable regulatory compliance. The TIES Cancer Research Network now provides integrated access to investigators at all member institutions, where multiple investigator-driven pilot projects are underway. Examples of federated search across the network illustrate the potential impact on translational research, particularly for studies involving rare cancers, rare phenotypes, and specific biologic behaviors. The network satisfies several key desiderata including local control of data and credentialing, inclusion of rich phenotype information, and applicability to diverse research objectives. The TIES Cancer Research Network presents a model for a national data and biospecimen network. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. Facilitative Components of Collaborative Learning: A Review of Nine Health Research Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, Lisa; Rittner, Jessica Levin; Johnson, Karin E; Gerteis, Jessie; Miller, Therese

    2017-02-01

    Collaborative research networks are increasingly used as an effective mechanism for accelerating knowledge transfer into policy and practice. This paper explored the characteristics and collaborative learning approaches of nine health research networks. Semi-structured interviews with representatives from eight diverse US health services research networks conducted between November 2012 and January 2013 and program evaluation data from a ninth. The qualitative analysis assessed each network's purpose, duration, funding sources, governance structure, methods used to foster collaboration, and barriers and facilitators to collaborative learning. The authors reviewed detailed notes from the interviews to distill salient themes. Face-to-face meetings, intentional facilitation and communication, shared vision, trust among members and willingness to work together were key facilitators of collaborative learning. Competing priorities for members, limited funding and lack of long-term support and geographic dispersion were the main barriers to coordination and collaboration across research network members. The findings illustrate the importance of collaborative learning in research networks and the challenges to evaluating the success of research network functionality. Conducting readiness assessments and developing process and outcome evaluation metrics will advance the design and show the impact of collaborative research networks. Copyright © 2017 Longwoods Publishing.

  9. Research for the Influence of Distribution Network Line Reclosing Current on Line Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Kansheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the distribution network line structure and reclosing control strategy, the system simulation model of distribution network lines has established based on the real-time digital simulation RTDS. Based on this, distribution network switching impulse current characteristic has researched with different capacity, different distribution and different load power factor under the different voltage switching angles. The results of the study provide a scientific basis for distribution network line protection setting, in order to further lay the foundation for improvement the validity and reliability of distribution network line protection action.

  10. Combining Ricoeur and Bultmann on myth and demythologising

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-07-08

    Jul 8, 2016 ... understanding of myth was influenced by literary criticism, Bultmann's definition of myth is .... as Bultmann used analogical (or metaphorical) language to ... opaque. In this regard, Ricoeur (1977:38) joined metaphysics to metaphor. Exactly this function of metaphor shows that myths and mythological ...

  11. Myth as metaphor | Malan | HTS Teologiese Studies / Theological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Modern Christianity has failed to update its myths and has even eliminated them, thus, excluding the metaphysical experience indispensable to religion (Jung). Myths should be interpreted, not eliminated. Answering the question about how to interpret myths without eliminating them or their intended effect is the object of this ...

  12. Exposure to Pornography and Acceptance of Rape Myths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Mike; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Summarizes the literature examining the association between acceptance of rape myths and exposure to pornography. States that nonexperimental methodology shows that exposure to pornography does not increase rape myth acceptance, while experimental studies show that exposure to pornography increases rape myth acceptance. Concludes that experimental…

  13. Child Sexual Abuse Myths: Attitudes, Beliefs, and Individual Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cromer, Lisa DeMarni; Goldsmith, Rachel E.

    2010-01-01

    Child sexual abuse myths comprise incorrect beliefs regarding sexual abuse, victims, and perpetrators. Relations among myth acceptance, responses to disclosure, legal decisions, and victims' subsequent psychological and health outcomes underscore the importance of understanding child sexual abuse myths. Despite accurate knowledge regarding child…

  14. Cyber Security Research Frameworks For Coevolutionary Network Defense

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rush, George D. [Missouri Univ. of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO (United States); Tauritz, Daniel Remy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-12-03

    Several architectures have been created for developing and testing systems used in network security, but most are meant to provide a platform for running cyber security experiments as opposed to automating experiment processes. In the first paper, we propose a framework termed Distributed Cyber Security Automation Framework for Experiments (DCAFE) that enables experiment automation and control in a distributed environment. Predictive analysis of adversaries is another thorny issue in cyber security. Game theory can be used to mathematically analyze adversary models, but its scalability limitations restrict its use. Computational game theory allows us to scale classical game theory to larger, more complex systems. In the second paper, we propose a framework termed Coevolutionary Agent-based Network Defense Lightweight Event System (CANDLES) that can coevolve attacker and defender agent strategies and capabilities and evaluate potential solutions with a custom network defense simulation. The third paper is a continuation of the CANDLES project in which we rewrote key parts of the framework. Attackers and defenders have been redesigned to evolve pure strategy, and a new network security simulation is devised which specifies network architecture and adds a temporal aspect. We also add a hill climber algorithm to evaluate the search space and justify the use of a coevolutionary algorithm.

  15. Research on Joint Handoff Algorithm in Vehicles Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuming Bi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With the communication services evolution from the fourth generation (4G to the fifth generation (5G, we are going to face diverse challenges from the new network systems. On the one hand, seamless handoff is expected to integrate universal access among various network mechanisms. On the other hand, a variety of 5G technologies will complement each other to provide ubiquitous high speed wireless connectivity. Because the current wireless network cannot support the handoff among Wireless Access for Vehicular Environment (WAVE, WiMAX, and LTE flexibly, the paper provides an advanced handoff algorithm to solve this problem. Firstly, the received signal strength is classified, and the vehicle speed and data rate under different channel conditions are optimized. Then, the optimal network is selected for handoff. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm can well adapt to high speed environment, guarantee flexible and reasonable vehicles access to a variety of networks, and prevent ping-pong handoff and link access failure effectively.

  16. AVAILABILITY RESEARCH OF REMOTE DEVICES FOR WIRELESS NETWORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Bazhayev

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We consider the wireless network under attack, aimed at "broadcast storm" initiation, in order to determine the availability of stand-alone units and the ability to carry out their functional tasks under information exposure. We determine a set of conditions for such type of attacks on the part of potential information interloper. The functional analysis of the systems based on wireless technology is made. We examine the remote device of a self-organizing wireless network as a queuing system M/M/1/n. Model dependencies are shown for normal system performance and at information exposure on the part of potential information interloper. Analytical simulation of wireless network functioning is carried out in the normal mode and under the attack aimed at "broadcast storm" initiation. An experiment is described which provides statistical information on operation of network remote devices. We present experiment results on carrying out attack at typical system transferring data by broabcast net scanning package at different noise intensities on the part of information interloper. The proposed model can be used to determine the technical characteristics of wireless ad-hoc network, develop recommendations for node configuration, aimed at countering "broadcast storm".

  17. China's Developing Arctic Policies: Myths and Misconceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Lanteigne

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Arctic and Far North regions of the world have grown in importance for China's international interests in recent years, and in 2013 China became an observer state in the Arctic Council. Beijing has sought to develop an Arctic policy based on scientific research and partnerships, including in the areas of environmental studies and climate change issues, as well as development and economic issues. As the Arctic gains more international attention due to the effects of ice melting and the possibility of the region becoming a new source of resources, concerns have been raised about a scramble for riches and economic advantages. China, as a rising political and economic power, has been subject to much scrutiny, especially from the West, about its emerging agenda in the Arctic region. Although China is not an Arctic state, the concerns are based on predictions that Beijing is seeking to play a stronger and perhaps even dominant role in the Arctic, and this has led to many misconceptions about China's Arctic policy. The result has been a "clash of identities" between Chinese and Western perceptions, and in order to understand why these diverging views have appeared, it is necessary to first examine the origins of "myths" about China's regional Arctic policies, and then examine their roles, using constructivist theory, before suggesting ways for both China and the international community to address this divergence.

  18. Architecture of the Multi-Modal Organizational Research and Production Heterogeneous Network (MORPHnet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aiken, R.J.; Carlson, R.A.; Foster, I.T. [and others

    1997-01-01

    The research and education (R&E) community requires persistent and scaleable network infrastructure to concurrently support production and research applications as well as network research. In the past, the R&E community has relied on supporting parallel network and end-node infrastructures, which can be very expensive and inefficient for network service managers and application programmers. The grand challenge in networking is to provide support for multiple, concurrent, multi-layer views of the network for the applications and the network researchers, and to satisfy the sometimes conflicting requirements of both while ensuring one type of traffic does not adversely affect the other. Internet and telecommunications service providers will also benefit from a multi-modal infrastructure, which can provide smoother transitions to new technologies and allow for testing of these technologies with real user traffic while they are still in the pre-production mode. The authors proposed approach requires the use of as much of the same network and end system infrastructure as possible to reduce the costs needed to support both classes of activities (i.e., production and research). Breaking the infrastructure into segments and objects (e.g., routers, switches, multiplexors, circuits, paths, etc.) gives the capability to dynamically construct and configure the virtual active networks to address these requirements. These capabilities must be supported at the campus, regional, and wide-area network levels to allow for collaboration by geographically dispersed groups. The Multi-Modal Organizational Research and Production Heterogeneous Network (MORPHnet) described in this report is an initial architecture and framework designed to identify and support the capabilities needed for the proposed combined infrastructure and to address related research issues.

  19. A new approach to mentoring for research careers: the National Research Mentoring Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorkness, Christine A; Pfund, Christine; Ofili, Elizabeth O; Okuyemi, Kolawole S; Vishwanatha, Jamboor K; Zavala, Maria Elena; Pesavento, Theresa; Fernandez, Mary; Tissera, Anthony; Deveci, Alp; Javier, Damaris; Short, Alexis; Cooper, Paige; Jones, Harlan; Manson, Spero; Buchwald, Dedra; Eide, Kristin; Gouldy, Andrea; Kelly, Erin; Langford, Nicole; McGee, Richard; Steer, Clifford; Unold, Thad; Weber-Main, Anne Marie; Báez, Adriana; Stiles, Jonathan; Pemu, Priscilla; Thompson, Winston; Gwathmey, Judith; Lawson, Kimberly; Johnson, Japera; Hall, Meldra; Paulsen, Douglas; Fouad, Mona; Smith, Ann; Luna, Rafael; Wilson, Donald; Adelsberger, Greg; Simenson, Drew; Cook, Abby; Feliu-Mojer, Monica; Harwood, Eileen; Jones, Amy; Branchaw, Janet; Thomas, Stephen; Butz, Amanda; Byars-Winston, Angela; House, Stephanie; McDaniels, Melissa; Quinn, Sandra; Rogers, Jenna; Spencer, Kim; Utzerath, Emily; Duplicate Of Weber-Main; Womack, Veronica

    2017-01-01

    Effective mentorship is critical to the success of early stage investigators, and has been linked to enhanced mentee productivity, self-efficacy, and career satisfaction. The mission of the National Research Mentoring Network (NRMN) is to provide all trainees across the biomedical, behavioral, clinical, and social sciences with evidence-based mentorship and professional development programming that emphasizes the benefits and challenges of diversity, inclusivity, and culture within mentoring relationships, and more broadly the research workforce. The purpose of this paper is to describe the structure and activities of NRMN. NRMN serves as a national training hub for mentors and mentees striving to improve their relationships by better aligning expectations, promoting professional development, maintaining effective communication, addressing equity and inclusion, assessing understanding, fostering independence, and cultivating ethical behavior. Training is offered in-person at institutions, regional training, or national meetings, as well as via synchronous and asynchronous platforms; the growing training demand is being met by a cadre of NRMN Master Facilitators. NRMN offers career stage-focused coaching models for grant writing, and other professional development programs. NRMN partners with diverse stakeholders from the NIH-sponsored Diversity Program Consortium (DPC), as well as organizations outside the DPC to work synergistically towards common diversity goals. NRMN offers a virtual portal to the Network and all NRMN program offerings for mentees and mentors across career development stages. NRMNet provides access to a wide array of mentoring experiences and resources including MyNRMN, Guided Virtual Mentorship Program, news, training calendar, videos, and workshops. National scale and sustainability are being addressed by NRMN "Coaches-in-Training" offerings for more senior researchers to implement coaching models across the nation. "Shark Tanks" provide

  20. NET.EXCEL thematic network: networking for research on radioactive waste geological disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svemar, Christer [Svensk Karnbranslemantering AB, SKB, Aspo Hard Rock Laboratory, PL 300, S-57295 Figeholm (Sweden); Vira, Juhani [Posiva Oy, FIN-27160 Olkiluoto (Finland); Astudillo, Julio [Empresa Nacional de Residuos Radioactivos SA, ENRESA, Emilio Vargas 7, E-Madrid (Spain)] [and others

    2004-07-01

    The NET.EXCEL project concerns the forming of a network of European end users for analysing the present status and future needs in Research, Technical development and Demonstration (RTD) for the disposal of highly radioactive waste in the three classical rock media: salt, clay/clay sediments and crystalline rock. The aim is to generate value additional to that gained by the individual participants: Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB (Sweden), Posiva Oy (Finland), Empresa Nacional de Residuos Radioactivos SA (Spain), Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit mbH (Germany), Agence nationale pour la gestion des dechets radioactifs (France), Nationale Genossenschaft fuer die Lagerung radioaktiver Abfaelle (Switzerland), Organisme National des Dechets Radioactifs et des Matieres Fissiles Enrichies (Belgium) and United Kingdom Nirex Limited (UK). The work performed in various research institutes as well as in large-scale underground rock laboratories in European countries to develop techniques for the safe handling and disposal of highly radioactive waste has led to a substantial build-up of experience. The experience covers both the practical areas of repository design and construction, waste encapsulation/conditioning (as over-packing) and disposal, as well as the theoretical evaluation of long term safety. In general, there are differences in the type of high level and long lived radioactive waste (for instance, either spent fuel or vitrified waste if the reprocessing option is considered by utilities) that the participating organisations have responsibilities for, and the time-schedules for their work. The national regulatory framework may also induce some differences. One of the initial issues in the project is to shed light on the rationale for these observed differences. In contrast, the practical way to carry out the needed RTD-activities and the principles behind the process to establish priorities for the necessary RTD-work is quite similar. Common ground

  1. Vehicular ad hoc networks standards, solutions, and research

    CERN Document Server

    Molinaro, Antonella; Scopigno, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    This book presents vehicular ad-hoc networks (VANETs) from the their onset, gradually going into technical details, providing a clear understanding of both theoretical foundations and more practical investigation. The editors gathered top-ranking authors to provide comprehensiveness and timely content; the invited authors were carefully selected from a list of who’s who in the respective field of interest: there are as many from Academia as from Standardization and Industry sectors from around the world. The covered topics are organized around five Parts starting from an historical overview of vehicular communications and standardization/harmonization activities (Part I), then progressing to the theoretical foundations of VANETs and a description of the day-one standard-compliant solutions (Part II), hence going into details of vehicular networking and security (Part III) and to the tools to study VANETs, from mobility and channel models, to network simulators and field trial methodologies (Part IV), and fi...

  2. Research on three-phase unbalanced distribution network reconfiguration strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shuang; Li, Ke-Jun; Xu, Yanshun; Liu, Zhijie; Guo, Jing; Wang, Zhuodi

    2017-01-01

    With the development of social economy, the loads installed in the distribution network become more and more complex which may cause the three-phase unbalance problems. This paper proposes an optimal reconfiguration approach based on mixed integer quadric programming (MIQP) method to address the three-phase unbalance problem. It aims to minimize the total network losses of the system. By using several square constraints to substitute the circular constraint, the original optimization problem is linearized and converted into a mixed-integer linear programming (MILP) model. Then this MILP problem is solved in general algebraic model system (GAMS) software using CPLEX solver. The additional losses caused by three-phase unbalanced are also considered. An IEEE 34 nodes test system is used to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method. The results show that the losses and the voltage violation mitigation in the network can be reduced significantly.

  3. Research on networked manufacturing system for reciprocating pump industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yangdong; Qi, Guoning; Xie, Qingsheng; Lu, Yujun

    2005-12-01

    Networked manufacturing is a trend of reciprocating pump industry. According to the enterprises' requirement, the architecture of networked manufacturing system for reciprocating pump industry was proposed, which composed of infrastructure layer, system management layer, application service layer and user layer. Its main functions included product data management, ASP service, business management, and customer relationship management, its physics framework was a multi-tier internet-based model; the concept of ASP service integration was put forward and its process model was also established. As a result, a networked manufacturing system aimed at the characteristics of reciprocating pump industry was built. By implementing this system, reciprocating pump industry can obtain a new way to fully utilize their own resources and enhance the capabilities to respond to the global market quickly.

  4. Transnational Research Networks in Chinese Scientific Production. An Investigation on Health-Industry Related Sectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauretta Rubini

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Transnational research networks (TRN are becoming increasingly complex. Such complexity may have both positive and negative effects on the quality of research. Our work studies the evolution over time of Chinese TRN and the role of complexity on the quality of Chinese research, given the leading role this country has recently acquired in international science. We focus on the fields of geriatrics and gerontology. We build an original dataset of all scientific publications of China in these areas in 2009, 2012 and 2015, starting from the ISI Web of Knowledge (ISI WoK database. Using Social Network Analysis (SNA, we analyze the change in scientific network structure across time. Second, we design indices to control for the different aspects of networks complexity (number of authors, country heterogeneity and institutional heterogeneity and we perform negative binomial regressions to identify the main determinants of research quality. Our analysis shows that research networks in the field of geriatrics and gerontology have gradually become wider in terms of countries and have become more balanced. Furthermore, our results identify that different forms of complexity have different impacts on quality, including a reciprocal moderating effect. In particular, according to our analysis, research quality benefits from complex research networks both in terms of countries and of types of institutions involved, but that such networks should be “compact” in terms of number of authors. Eventually, we suggest that complexity should be carefully taken into account when designing policies aimed at enhancing the quality of research.

  5. Transnational Research Networks in Chinese Scientific Production. An Investigation on Health-Industry Related Sectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubini, Lauretta; Pollio, Chiara; Di Tommaso, Marco R

    2017-08-29

    Transnational research networks (TRN) are becoming increasingly complex. Such complexity may have both positive and negative effects on the quality of research. Our work studies the evolution over time of Chinese TRN and the role of complexity on the quality of Chinese research, given the leading role this country has recently acquired in international science. We focus on the fields of geriatrics and gerontology. We build an original dataset of all scientific publications of China in these areas in 2009, 2012 and 2015, starting from the ISI Web of Knowledge (ISI WoK) database. Using Social Network Analysis (SNA), we analyze the change in scientific network structure across time. Second, we design indices to control for the different aspects of networks complexity (number of authors, country heterogeneity and institutional heterogeneity) and we perform negative binomial regressions to identify the main determinants of research quality. Our analysis shows that research networks in the field of geriatrics and gerontology have gradually become wider in terms of countries and have become more balanced. Furthermore, our results identify that different forms of complexity have different impacts on quality, including a reciprocal moderating effect. In particular, according to our analysis, research quality benefits from complex research networks both in terms of countries and of types of institutions involved, but that such networks should be "compact" in terms of number of authors. Eventually, we suggest that complexity should be carefully taken into account when designing policies aimed at enhancing the quality of research.

  6. The Swiss Education and Research Network - SWITCH - Upgrades Optical Network to Transport 10 Gbps Using Sorrento Networks DWDM Platform

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Sorrento Networks, a supplier of optical transport networking equipment for carriers and enterprises worldwide, today announced that SWITCH successfully completed 10 Gbps BER tests on the 220 km Zurich to Manno and 360 km Zurich to Geneva links in September and November 2003, using Sorrento's GigaMux DWDM system" (1/2 page).

  7. Pay less, take more: the myth of quality of life at the Brazil’s largest drugstore chain counter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luiz Maranhão de Souza Leão

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Considering the role of cultural transformer that the brandoccupies in the contemporary and seeking to delineate the role played bymyth in this construction, we look at Pague Menos, the largest pharmacyretail network in the country, through a qualitative study based on Barthesiansemiology. Our results showed six myths, whose relationships reveal ametanarrative: the quality of life.

  8. Visually Augmented Analysis of Socio-Technical Networks in Engineering Systems Design Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storga, M.; Stankovic, T.; Cash, Philip

    2013-01-01

    , but only fairly recently has the study of networks in general become a major topic of research in complex engineering systems. The research reported in this paper is discussing how the visually augmented analysis of complex socio-networks (networks of people and technology engaged in a product/service-system...... captured during experiments and observations that are more and more used as a main research method. Case studies that are presented illustrate also the significance of the network based research approach in providing insight into ways of improving the design process for complex engineering systems.......In characterizing systems behaviour, complex-systems scientists use tools from a variety of disciplines, including nonlinear dynamics, information theory, computation theory, evolutionary biology and social network analysis, among others. All of these topics have been studied for some time...

  9. Research and application of knowledge resources network for product innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuan; Li, Wen-qiang; Li, Yan; Na, Hui-zhen; Shi, Qian

    2015-01-01

    In order to enhance the capabilities of knowledge service in product innovation design service platform, a method of acquiring knowledge resources supporting for product innovation from the Internet and providing knowledge active push is proposed. Through knowledge modeling for product innovation based on ontology, the integrated architecture of knowledge resources network is put forward. The technology for the acquisition of network knowledge resources based on focused crawler and web services is studied. Knowledge active push is provided for users by user behavior analysis and knowledge evaluation in order to improve users' enthusiasm for participation in platform. Finally, an application example is illustrated to prove the effectiveness of the method.

  10. Research and Application of Knowledge Resources Network for Product Innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to enhance the capabilities of knowledge service in product innovation design service platform, a method of acquiring knowledge resources supporting for product innovation from the Internet and providing knowledge active push is proposed. Through knowledge modeling for product innovation based on ontology, the integrated architecture of knowledge resources network is put forward. The technology for the acquisition of network knowledge resources based on focused crawler and web services is studied. Knowledge active push is provided for users by user behavior analysis and knowledge evaluation in order to improve users’ enthusiasm for participation in platform. Finally, an application example is illustrated to prove the effectiveness of the method.

  11. Potential Paradoxical Effects of Myth-Busting as a Nutrition Education Strategy for Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansburg, Pamela I.; Heiss, Cynthia J.

    2012-01-01

    Medical myth-busting is a common health education strategy during which a health educator highlights common misconceptions about health and then presents evidence to refute those misconceptions. Whereas this strategy can be an effective way to correct faulty health beliefs held by young adults, research from the field of cognitive psychology…

  12. Examining the Relationship between Male Rape Myth Acceptance, Female Rape Myth Acceptance, Victim Blame, Homophobia, Gender Roles, and Ambivalent Sexism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Michelle; Gilston, Jennifer; Rogers, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between male rape myth acceptance, female rape myth acceptance, attitudes toward gay men, a series of gender role and sexism measures, victim blame and assault severity were investigated. It was predicted that men would display more negative, stereotypical attitudes than women and that male rape myth endorsement would be related…

  13. Research collaboration in the discovery, development, and delivery networks of a statewide cancer coalition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provan, Keith G; Leischow, Scott J; Keagy, Judith; Nodora, Jesse

    2010-11-01

    This study examines and evaluates collaborative network involvement among 18 organizations within the Arizona Cancer Coalition. All were involved in one or more of three types of research activity: discovery, development, and delivery, consistent with the 3D continuum developed by the National Cancer Institute. Data were collected in 2007 using surveys of key informants in each organization. Using network analysis methods, we examined the structure of each type of network as well as the relationship between network position and the importance of cancer research to each organization's mission. Findings indicated that while both the discovery and delivery networks were comparably densely connected, their centrality structures were quite different. In contrast, the structures of both these networks were similar to the development network. Centrality in the discovery and development networks was positively related to the importance of cancer research to the organization, but not in the delivery network. Implications of the findings for future research, policy, and planning are discussed. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Desconstrução do Mito e Sucessão do Fundador em Empresas Familiares/Deconstruction of Founder Myths and Succession in Family Businesses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Antonio Carlos Soares Pereira; Adriane Vieira; Fernando Coutinho Garcia; Maria Teresa de Azeredo Roscoe

    2013-01-01

    .... This research's objective was to identify the factors that contribute to the deconstruction of a myth in a family business that goes through the process of succession from the founder, and analyze...

  15. Imitating the Myth in the Gorgias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efren A. Alverio II

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The advent of logical positivism contributed to the sharp definitional demarcation between what we consider mythical (mythos and what we take to be a true account (logos. This essay attempts to go back to one of the sources of such a supposed distinction. By analyzing the Gorgias, I will show that even Plato did not make such a distinction. In fact, Plato even constructed a theory of justice that made use of myth as its medium. The Platonic Myth in the Gorgias was used as true logos in order to justify Socrates' use of the myth as the paradigm of a life that is philosophical in contrast to that of his accusers who espoused mere sophistry. By using the concept of historia in relation with the concept of mythos, Plato regarded the futuristic afterlife in the myth as a sufficient condition to live a just life. This sufficient condition exemplified by the Myth in the Gorgias is a measuring rod by which we can compare our present system of justice.

  16. State of the Art and Recent Research Advances in Software Defined Networking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taimur Bakhshi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Emerging network services and subsequent growth in the networking infrastructure have gained tremendous momentum in recent years. Application performance requiring rapid real-time network provisioning, optimized traffic management, and virtualization of shared resources has induced the conceptualization and adoption of new networking models. Software defined networking (SDN, one of the predominant and relatively new networking paradigms, seeks to simplify network management by decoupling network control logic from the underlying hardware and introduces real-time network programmability enabling innovation. The present work reviews the state of the art in software defined networking providing a historical perspective on complementary technologies in network programmability and the inherent shortcomings which paved the way for SDN. The SDN architecture is discussed along with popular protocols, platforms, and existing simulation and debugging solutions. Furthermore, a detailed analysis is presented around recent SDN development and deployment avenues ranging from mobile communications and data centers to campus networks and residential environments. The review concludes by highlighting implementation challenges and subsequent research directions being pursued in academia and industry to address issues related to application performance, control plane scalability and design, security, and interdomain connectivity in the context of SDN.

  17. Teacher Agency in Educational Reform: Lessons from Social Networks Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datnow, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    This article provides a context for understanding how social networks among teachers support or constrain school improvement in terms of instructional practice, professional development, and educational reform. It comments on the articles in this special issue, summarizing their contributions to the field. This analysis reveals several important…

  18. Low-stress bicycling and network connectivity : [research brief].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    In one sense, a citys or regions bicycling network includes all of its roads and paths on which bicycling is permitted. However, some streets provide such a poor level of safety and comfort for bicycling that the majority of the population cons...

  19. Young China Scholars Poverty Research Network: A bridge linking ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2011-07-08

    Jul 8, 2011 ... ... more about this successful Canada-China collaboration: "A strong competition" · Two-way learning · Declining poverty, rising inequality · Fresh insights · Mapping the network · One scholar's story · On the world stage · The CHIP surveys · "We chose the mentors carefully" · "The good work is collaborative" ...

  20. Research Award: Information and Networks (I&N) Deadline: 12 ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Jean-Claude Dumais

    2012-09-12

    Sep 12, 2012 ... IDRC's Research Awards provide a unique opportunity to enhance research skills and gain a fresh perspective on crucial development issues. This one-year, paid, in-house program of training and mentorship in research, research management, and grant administration allows awardees to pursue their ...