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Sample records for netherlands cancer institute

  1. Oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma in young patients: the Netherlands Cancer Institute experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Monsjou, Hester S; Lopez-Yurda, Marta I; Hauptmann, Michael; van den Brekel, Michiel W M; Balm, Alfons J M; Wreesmann, Volkert B

    2013-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) mainly affects patients between the fifth and seventh decade of life but is increasingly seen in young patients (<40 years old). Controversy exists in the literature regarding outcomes for younger patients with HNSCC. A retrospective cohort analysis was performed comparing survival of 54 early-onset (<40 years) and 1708 older patients with oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) treated at The Netherlands Cancer Institute between 1977 and 2008. Survival analysis was performed using univariable and multivariable weighted Cox proportional hazards regression. The primary endpoint for the survival analysis was disease-specific survival (DSS). There was no difference in DSS between patients who were 40 years or younger and those older than 40 years (p = .878), although young patients had significantly better overall survival (OS). In this series, patients younger than 40 years with oral and oropharyngeal SCC showed no significant difference in DSS compared with patients older than 40 years, even when adjusted for tobacco and alcohol consumption. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. New developments in EPID-based 3D dosimetry in The Netherlands Cancer Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijnheer, B.; Rozendaal, R.; Olaciregui-Ruiz, I.; González, P.; van Oers, R.; Mans, A.

    2017-05-01

    EPID-based offline 3D in vivo dosimetry is performed routinely in The Netherlands Cancer Institute for almost all RT treatments. The 3D dose distribution is reconstructed using the EPID primary dose in combination with a back-projection algorithm and compared with the planned dose distribution. Recently the method was adapted for real-time dose verification, performing 3D dose verification in less than 300 ms, which is faster than the current portal frame acquisition rate. In this way a possibility is created for halting the linac in case of large delivery errors. Furthermore, a new method for pre-treatment QA was developed in which the EPID primary dose behind a phantom or patient is predicted using the CT data of that phantom or patient in combination with in-air EPID measurements. This virtual EPID primary transit dose is then used to reconstruct the 3D dose distribution within the phantom or patient geometry using the same dose engine as applied offline. In order to assess the relevance of our clinically applied alert criteria, we investigated the sensitivity of our EPID-based 3D dose verification system to detect delivery errors in VMAT treatments. This was done through simulation by modifying patient treatment plans, as well as experimentally by performing EPID measurements during the irradiation of an Alderson phantom, both after deliberately introducing errors during VMAT delivery. In this presentation these new developments will be elucidated.

  3. 2D AND 3D dose verification at The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital using EPIDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mijnheer, Ben; Mans, Anton; Olaciregui-Ruiz, Igor; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Tielenburg, Rene; Van Herk, Marcel; Vijlbrief, Ron; Stroom, Joep, E-mail: b.mijnheer@nki.n [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-11-01

    A review is given of the clinical use of EPID dosimetry in the Department of Radiation Oncology of The Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital. All curative plans (almost all IMRT or VMAT) are verified with EPID dosimetry, mostly in vivo. The 2D approach for IMRT verification and the 3D method for VMAT verification are elucidated and their clinical implementation described. It has been shown that EPID dosimetry plays an important role in the total chain of verification procedures that are implemented in our department. It provides a safety net for advanced treatments such as IMRT and VMAT, as well as a full account of the dose delivered.

  4. National Cancer Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and connect with NCI researchers via Twitter chats. Facebook Connect with NCI on its Facebook page to get updates on cancer information, including ... m. ET, the National Cancer Institute hosted a Facebook Live event about the NCI Contact Center. Astrid ...

  5. Identifying suicide risk in penal institutions in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaauw, E.; Kerkhof, A.J.F.M.; Winkel, F.W.; Sheridan, L.

    2001-01-01

    Suicide is the main cause of death among prison inmates, comprising almost half of all deaths in penal institutions in the Netherlands. Suicides in prisons have major consequences. They are a cause of distress to prison staff, other inmates, relatives and partners. They may cause unrest among other

  6. The Netherlands Institute for Social Research | SCP at a glance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2009-01-01

    The Netherlands Institute for Social Research supplies central government with information on the Dutch welfare state. For more than 30 years, the SCP has been charting developments in the daily lives of the Dutch population: work, income, health, education, social security, housing, culture, how

  7. T3-T4 laryngeal cancer in The Netherlands Cancer Institute: 10-year results of the consistent application of an organ preserving/-sacrificing protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermans, A.J.; de Gooijer, C.J.; Hamming-Vrieze, O.; Hilgers, F.J.M.; van den Brekel, M.W.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Both organ-preserving concurrent (chemo)radiotherapy ((C)RT) and organ-sacrificing surgery (total laryngectomy) are used for treatment of advanced laryngeal cancer. The purpose of this study was to present the assessment of our treatment protocol for T3 (C)RT and T4 disease (total

  8. T3-T4 laryngeal cancer in The Netherlands Cancer Institute; 10-year results of the consistent application of an organ-preserving/-sacrificing protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermans, Adriana J.; de Gooijer, Cornedine J.; Hamming-Vrieze, Olga; Hilgers, Frans J. M.; van den Brekel, Michiel W. M.

    2015-01-01

    Both organ-preserving concurrent (chemo)radiotherapy ((C)RT) and organ-sacrificing surgery (total laryngectomy) are used for treatment of advanced laryngeal cancer. The purpose of this study was to present the assessment of our treatment protocol for T3 (C)RT and T4 disease (total

  9. T3-T4 laryngeal cancer in The Netherlands Cancer Institute; 10-year results of the consistent application of an organ-preserving/-sacrificing protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, Adriana J; de Gooijer, Cornedine J; Hamming-Vrieze, Olga; Hilgers, Frans J M; van den Brekel, Michiel W M

    2015-10-01

    Both organ-preserving concurrent (chemo)radiotherapy ((C)RT) and organ-sacrificing surgery (total laryngectomy) are used for treatment of advanced laryngeal cancer. The purpose of this study was to present the assessment of our treatment protocol for T3 (C)RT and T4 disease (total laryngectomy + postoperative RT). We conducted a retrospective cohort study in 182 consecutive patients (1999-2008). The primary outcome was overall survival (OS) in relation to stage and treatment. One hundred two patients received RT (82.4% T3), 20 patients CRT (60.0% T3), and 60 patients total laryngectomy + RT (91.7% T4). Five-year OS: T3 52%, T4 48%, for RT 50%, for CRT 43%, and for total laryngectomy + RT 52%. Five-year laryngectomy-free interval was 72% after RT, and 83% after CRT. There were no differences in survival according to T classification or treatment modality. Because the majority of T3 laryngeal cancers were treated with (C)RT and the majority of T4 with total laryngectomy + RT, this gives food for thought on whether the present protocol for T3 laryngeal cancer is optimal. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Occupational lung cancer risk among men in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Preller, L.; Balder, H.F.; Tielemans, E.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Goldbohm, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: To assess male lung cancer risks for industrial sectors in the Netherlands and to estimate the proportion of lung cancer attributed to working in specific industrial sectors. Methods: Associations were studied among men aged 55-69 years (n = 58 279) from the prospective Netherlands

  11. Physical activity and risk of ovarian cancer: Results from the Netherlands Cohort Study (The Netherlands)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesma, R.G.; Schouten, L.J.; Dirx, M.J.M.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the association between nonoccupational physical activity and the risk of ovarian cancer among post-menopausal women. Methods: The Netherlands Cohort Study on Diet and Cancer consists of 62,573 women aged 55-69 years at baseline. Information regarding baseline

  12. Scientific contributions toward successful cancer immunotherapy in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melief, C.J.; Scheper, R.J.; Vries, I.J.M. de

    2014-01-01

    This historical overview shows that immunologists and clinicians from The Netherlands have contributed in a major way to better insights in the nature of cancer immunity. This work involved elucidation of the nature of cancer-associated antigens in autologous and allogeneic settings in addition to

  13. National Cancer Institute News

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and events from NCI-funded research and programs News & Events Featured News High-Fat Diet Linked to Prostate Cancer Metastasis ... Scientific Meetings and Lectures Conferences Social Media Events News Archive 2018 2017 2016 2015 2014 2013 National ...

  14. Evaluation of The Netherlands breast cancer screening programme.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, A.L.M.; Broeders, M.J.M.

    2003-01-01

    The Netherlands breast cancer screening programme for women aged 50-75 years was gradually implemented during 1989-1997. Short-term indicators for this mammography screening are 80% attendance (800 000 examinations yearly), and for the subsequent screening examinations 7.4 referrals for clinical

  15. Perceived causes of prostate cancer among prostate cancer survivors in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, D.E.G.; Cremers, R.G.H.M.; Aben, K.K.H.; Oort, van I.M.; Kampman, E.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to evaluate self-reported causes of prostate cancer among prostate cancer survivors in the Netherlands to obtain insight into the common beliefs and perceptions of risk factors for prostate cancer. Materials and methods A total of 956 prostate cancer survivors,

  16. Site of childhood cancer care in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reedijk, A M J; van der Heiden-van der Loo, M; Visser, O; Karim-Kos, H E; Lieverst, J A; de Ridder-Sluiter, J G; Coebergh, J W W; Kremer, L C; Pieters, R

    2017-12-01

    Due to the complexity of diagnosis and treatment, care for children and young adolescents with cancer preferably occurs in specialised paediatric oncology centres with potentially better cure rates and minimal late effects. This study assessed where children with cancer in the Netherlands were treated since 2004. All patients aged under 18 diagnosed with cancer between 2004 and 2013 were selected from the Netherlands Cancer Registry (NCR) and linked with the Dutch Childhood Oncology Group (DCOG) database. Associations between patient and tumour characteristics and site of care were tested statistically with logistic regression analyses. This population-based study of 6021 children diagnosed with cancer showed that 82% of them were treated in a paediatric oncology centre. Ninety-four percent of the patients under 10 years of age, 85% of the patients aged 10-14 and 48% of the patients aged 15-17 were treated in a paediatric oncology centre. All International Classification of Childhood Cancers (ICCC), 3rd edition, ICCC-3 categories, except embryonal tumours, were associated with a higher risk of treatment outside a paediatric oncology centre compared to leukaemia. Multivariable analyses by ICCC-3 category revealed that specific tumour types such as chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML), embryonal carcinomas, bone tumours other type than osteosarcoma, non-rhabdomyosarcomas, thyroid carcinomas, melanomas and skin carcinomas as well as lower-staged tumours were associated with treatment outside a paediatric oncology centre. The site of childhood cancer care in the Netherlands depends on the age of the cancer patient, type of tumour and stage at diagnosis. Collaboration between paediatric oncology centre(s), other academic units is needed to ensure most up-to-date paediatric cancer care for childhood cancer patients at the short and long term. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. [New developments in the treatment and rehabilitation of head and neck cancer in the Netherlands].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, A J Jacqueline; van den Brekel, Michiel W M; van der Molen, Lisette; Navran, Arash; Nijssen, Theo F; Hilgers, Frans J M

    2012-01-01

    Head and neck cancer is relatively rare: in the Netherlands, some 2600 newly diagnosed cases are registered annually. Its treatment is centralised and is actually performed only in Dutch Head and Neck Society (DHNS) accredited medical centres. Although survival rates have improved only marginally, treatment regimens have changed over the past few years. Treatment has become increasingly focused on the preservation of organs and their functionalities. The effects of both a tumour and its treatment can have a serious impact on the functioning and quality of life of a patient. Therefore, sufficient attention to post-treatment rehabilitation is necessary. The Netherlands Cancer Institute has recently collaborated with the Amsterdam Rehabilitation Research Center Reade in developing a structured multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme. This programme has also been made available to other DHNS centres.

  18. Scrotal cancer: Incidence, survival and second primary tumours in the Netherlands since 1989

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.H.A. Verhoeven (Rob); W.J. Louwman; E.L. Koldewijn (Evert); T.B.J. Demeyere (Thomas); J.W.W. Coebergh (Jan Willem)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Since the 1970s there have been few epidemiological studies of scrotal cancer. We report on the descriptive epidemiology of scrotal cancer in the Netherlands. Methods: Data on all scrotal cancer patients were obtained from the Netherlands Cancer Registry (NCR) in the period

  19. Strikes in France and the Netherlands; A Comparison of Labour Market Institutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Butter, den F.A.G.; Koppes, S.Y.

    2003-01-01

    Strikes as a consequence of labour conflicts occur about 28 times as much in France as in the Netherlands. This paper examines the institutional differences underlying these differences in strike activity. Our empirical analysis shows that strike activity is high in France if workers were successful

  20. Supporting Open Education Policymaking by Higher Education Institutions in The Netherlands: Lessons Learned

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hester Jelgerhuis; Ben Janssen; Robert Schuwer

    2014-01-01

    A survey conducted in 2012 among publicly financed higher education institutions in the Netherlands revealed a growing awareness of the strategic relevance of Open Educational Resources (OER) and Open Education. However, hardly any policy or strategy related to OER and Open Education had been

  1. Occupational lung cancer risk among men in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preller, L; Balder, H F; Tielemans, E; van den Brandt, P A; Goldbohm, R A

    2008-04-01

    To assess male lung cancer risks for industrial sectors in the Netherlands and to estimate the proportion of lung cancer attributed to working in specific industrial sectors. Associations were studied among men aged 55-69 years (n = 58 279) from the prospective Netherlands Cohort Study. 1920 incident lung cancer cases were available after 11.3 years of follow-up. Based on a case-cohort design, and using Cox proportional hazards models, risks were estimated for blue collar workers in 26 industrial sectors. Adjustment for individual smoking habits affected risk estimates for some sectors, but adjustment for fruit/vegetables and alcohol intake did not. Adjusted for confounders, an increased risk of lung cancer was observed for employment for >/=15 years in blue collar jobs in the "electronics and optical instruments" industry (rate ratio (RR) 1.99; 95% CI 1.18 to 3.35), "construction and homebuilding business" (RR 1.64; 95% CI 1.21 to 2.22) and "railway company" (RR 2.40; 95% CI 1.00 to 5.73). The attributable fraction for working for >/=15 years in these three industries was 5%. In three other sectors there was a statistically non-significant elevated RR of >1.5. Male lung cancer risk is increased in several industrial sectors. Approximately 2000 lung cancer cases between 1986 and 1997 in the 55-69-year-old age group in the Netherlands may be attributable to working for >/=15 years in the three sectors with increased risk. In addition, estimates for occupational lung cancer risks for sectors may be biased if no individual information is available on smoking habits.

  2. Dairy consumption and ovarian cancer risk in the Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mommers, M.; Schouten, L.J.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2006-01-01

    Ovary cancer risk in relation to consumption of dairy products was investigated using a self-administered questionnaire on dietary habits and other risk factors for cancer, which was completed in 1986 by 62 573 postmenopausal women participating in the Netherlands Cohort Study. Follow-up for cancer

  3. The impact of organisational external peer review on colorectal cancer treatment and survival in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kilsdonk, M. J.; van Dijk, B. A. C.; Otter, R.; Siesling, S.; van Harten, W. H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Organisational external peer review was introduced in 1994 in the Netherlands to improve multidisciplinary cancer care. We examined the clinical impact of this programme on colorectal cancer care. Methods: Patients with primary colorectal cancer were included from 23 participating

  4. Firm performance, financial institutions and corporate governance in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chirinko, Bob

    1999-01-01

    This paper analyses the impact of share ownership, creditorship and net-working by financial institutions on the performance of 94 Dutch non-financial firms in the period 1992-1996. We find a nonlinear relationship between firm performance and ownership by banks. Because of various defense

  5. Plant sterol intakes and colorectal cancer risk in the Netherlands : cohort study on diet and cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Normén, A.L.; Brants, H.A.M.; Voorrips, L.E.; Andersson, H.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2001-01-01

    Background: Plant sterols in vegetable foods might prevent colorectal cancer. Objective: The objective was to study plant sterol intakes in relation to colorectal cancer risk in an epidemiologic study. Design: The study was performed within the framework of the Netherlands Cohort Study on Diet and

  6. Incidence and treatment of tracheal cancer: a nationwide study in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honings, J.; Dijck, J.A.A.M. van; Verhagen, A.F.T.M.; Heijden, H.F.M. van der; Marres, H.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to assess the incidence, characteristics, treatment, and survival of patients with tracheal malignancies in the Netherlands. METHODS: All cases of tracheal cancer entered into the database of the Netherlands Cancer Registry in the period 1989-2002 were selected.

  7. Risk of prostate cancer among cancer survivors in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, D.E.G.; Schans, van de S.A.; Liu, L.; Kampman, E.; Coebergh, J.W.; Kiemeney, L.A.; Soerjomataram, I.; Aben, K.K.

    2013-01-01

    In parallel with increasing numbers of cancer patients and improving cancer survival, the occurrence of second primary cancers becomes a relevant issue. The aim of our study was to evaluate risk of prostate cancer as second primary cancer in a population-based setting. Methods Data from the

  8. Risk of prostate cancer among cancer survivors in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, D.E.; Schans, S.A. van de; Liu, L.; Kampman, E.; Coebergh, J.W.W.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Soerjomataram, I.; Aben, K.K.H.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In parallel with increasing numbers of cancer patients and improving cancer survival, the occurrence of second primary cancers becomes a relevant issue. The aim of our study was to evaluate risk of prostate cancer as second primary cancer in a population-based setting. METHODS: Data from

  9. Breast and stomach cancer incidence and survival in migrants in the Netherlands, 1996-2006

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnold, Melina; Aarts, Mieke Josepha; Siesling, Sabine; van der Aa, Maaike; Visser, Otto; Coebergh, Jan Willem

    2011-01-01

    Migrant populations experience a health transition that influences their cancer risk, determined by environmental changes and acculturation processes. In this retrospective cohort study, we investigated differences in breast and stomach cancer risk and survival in migrants to the Netherlands.

  10. Time-space trends in cancer incidence in The Netherlands in 1989–2003

    OpenAIRE

    Siesling, Sabine; van der Aa, Maaike A.; Coebergh, Jan W.W.; Pukkala, Eero

    2008-01-01

    Incidence of cancer may vary within a country and over time because of previous differences in exposure to risk factors or interventions for early detection (screening). This study describes time-space trends of incidence of common cancer sites across the Netherlands during the period 1989–2003 and speculates on the reasons for the observations. From the Netherlands Cancer Registry, World standardized incidence rates per municipality were smoothed calculating weighted averages for each 2 km b...

  11. Horticultural auctions in The Netherlands: A transition from 'price discovery' institution to 'marketing' institution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulenberg, M.T.G.

    1989-01-01

    This paper depicts the evolution of Dutch auctions during the past hundred years from a "price discovery" institution to a "marketing" institution, focusing on price discovery. A conceptual framework is proposed to assess the suitablility of marketing management by agricultural marketing

  12. [The rise and fall of Zander-Institutes in The Netherlands around 1900].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terlouw, Thomas J A

    2007-01-01

    The Swedish physician, Dr Jonas Gustav W. Zander (1835-1920), set himself the task of devising different contraptions around 1860. He believed that people who needed medical gymnastics could be treated better and more efficiently with the help of machines. His mechanistic approach can be understood in the context of the emerging industrialisation that rapidly took hold in Europe in this period. After very successful presentations at the World Exhibitions in Philadelphia (1876) and in Paris (1878), the Zander-method soon caught on in the medical world and many so-called Zander-Institutes (very similar to fitness-centres today) emerged in the larger cities of a number of European countries. Zander-therapy became very popular in The Netherlands during the 1890s. The first Zander-Institute opened its doors in Groningen in 1894 to be followed, within four years, by another eight Zander-Institutes in the major cities of The Netherlands. Physical education teachers, engaging in medical gymnastics, and physicians worked closely together in these institutes. This was considered to be a positive development as medical gymnastics was a heavily contested area in the field of labour in the last quarter of the nineteenth century. After a short period of success almost all of the Zander-Institutes had great difficulty in maintaining their existence in the first decade of the twentieth century. Both the rise and fall of the Zander-Institutes can be ascribed to a combination of factors of a scientific (concerning the method), social (legislation concerning the care of the crippled) and professional (concerning the different strategies of the involved professions) nature. These factors and the relationships between them are analysed in this article.

  13. Breast Cancer: Surgery at the South Egypt Cancer Institute

    OpenAIRE

    Salem, Ahmed A.S.; Salem, Mohamed Abou Elmagd; Abbass, Hamza

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent malignant tumor in women worldwide. In Egypt, it is the most common cancer among women, representing 18.9% of total cancer cases (35.1% in women and 2.2% in men) among the Egypt National Cancer Institute?s (NCI) series of 10,556 patients during the year 2001, with an age-adjusted rate of 49.6 per 100,000 people. In this study, the data of all breast cancer patients presented to the surgical department of the South Egypt cancer Institute (SECI) hospital durin...

  14. Clinical auditing as an instrument for quality improvement in breast cancer care in the Netherlands: The national NABON Breast Cancer Audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bommel, Annelotte C M; Spronk, Pauline E R; Vrancken Peeters, Marie-Jeanne T F D; Jager, Agnes; Lobbes, Marc; Maduro, John H; Mureau, Marc A M; Schreuder, Kay; Smorenburg, Carolien H; Verloop, Janneke; Westenend, Pieter J; Wouters, Michel W J M; Siesling, Sabine; Tjan-Heijnen, Vivianne C G; van Dalen, Thijs

    2017-03-01

    In 2011, the NABON Breast Cancer Audit (NBCA) was instituted as a nation-wide audit to address quality of breast cancer care and guideline adherence in the Netherlands. The development of the NBCA and the results of 4 years of auditing are described. Clinical and pathological characteristics of patients diagnosed with invasive breast cancer or in situ carcinoma (DCIS) and information regarding diagnosis and treatment are collected in all hospitals (n = 92) in the Netherlands. Thirty-two quality indicators measuring care structure, processes and outcomes were evaluated over time and compared between hospitals. The NBCA contains data of 56,927 patients (7,649 DCIS and 49,073 invasive cancers). Patients being discussed in pre- and post-operative multidisciplinary team meetings improved (2011: 83% and 91%; 2014: 98% and 99%, respectively) over the years. Tumour margin positivity rates after breast-conserving surgery for invasive cancer requiring re-operation were consistently low (∼5%). Other indicators, for example, the use of an MRI-scan prior to surgery or immediate breast reconstruction following mastectomy showed considerable hospital variation. Results shown an overall high quality of breast cancer care in all hospitals in the Netherlands. For most quality indicators improvement was seen over time, while some indicators showed yet unexplained variation. J. Surg. Oncol. 2017;115:243-249. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Alcohol and ovarian cancer risk: Results from the Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, L.J.; Zeegers, M.P.A.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study alcohol consumption in relation to ovarian cancer risk in a prospective cohort study. Methods: The Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer was initiated in 1986. A self-administered questionnaire on dietary habits and other risk factors for cancer was completed by 62,573

  16. Progress against laryngeal cancer in The Netherlands between 1989 and 2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Boukje A. C.; Karim-Kos, Henrike E.; Coebergh, Jan Willem; Marres, Henri A. M.; de Vries, Esther

    2014-01-01

    Cancer of the larynx is a frequently occurring head and neck cancer in The Netherlands. The main risk factors are smoking and excessive alcohol consumption. The aim of our study was to evaluate the progress against laryngeal cancer by studying trends in incidence, mortality and survival in The

  17. Breast cancer diagnosis and death in the Netherlands: a changing burden

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waal, D. van der; Verbeek, A.L.M.; Heeten, GJ. den; Ripping, T.M.; Tjan-Heijnen, V.C.; Broeders, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lifetime risks are often used in communications on cancer to the general public. The most-cited estimate for breast cancer risk (1 in 8 women), however, appears to be outdated. Here we describe the breast cancer burden in the Netherlands over time by means of lifetime and age-conditional

  18. 78 FR 26055 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-03

    ... Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Early-Stage Development of Informatics... of Extramural Activities, National Cancer Institute, NIH, 9609 Medical Center Drive, Room 7W-236...

  19. 76 FR 16431 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-23

    ... Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; SPORE in Lymphoma, Breast, Ovarian..., Cancer Centers Support; 93.398, Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399, Cancer Control, National Institutes of... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting...

  20. Netherlands Institute for Higher Education Early Childhood Development (ECD Diploma Course: Impressions and Suggestions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dide Karaşahin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Quality of the personnel employed at libraries for children in pre-school or early childhood years has gained in significance nowadays. For the personnel to be employed at pre-school and children’s departments, Netherlands Institute for Higher Education based in Ankara implemented the project called “Early Childhood Development (ECD Diploma Course” to give training in the fields of pre-school education, child psychology and children’s literature. The first program was completed at the end of 2010 while the second started in January 2011 and ended with the graduation ceremony in November 2011. Throughout the year 2011, 3-day trainings were given for 5 times in different time spans and a one-week training trip to the Netherlands was organized. It was understood that habits of reading and library usage are gained more easily in early childhood years and that public and children’s libraries assume a special role in the process of learning how to read and meeting libraries for the first time.

  1. 75 FR 20370 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-19

    [email protected] . Name of Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel, Breast Cancer....395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings...

  2. American Institute for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Flaxseed Alkaline diets Supplements Asparagus Claims Vegetarian and vegan Sugar and other topics in the news Resources ... Coconut Topping Holiday Portion Quiz How the new nutrition facts label can help you lower cancer risk. ...

  3. Changing institutional landscapes for implementing wind power : A geographical comparison of institutional capacity building: The Netherlands, England and North Rhine-Westphalia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breukers, Sylvia

    2006-01-01

    This international comparative study provides insight in the political-institutional conditions that have impeded and encouraged onshore wind power implementation in the Netherlands, England and the German state of North Rhine-Westphalia. The extent to which wind power, as a new energy technology,

  4. Knowledge Transfer between SMEs and Higher Education Institutions: Differences between Universities and Colleges of Higher Education in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delfmann, Heike; Koster, Sierdjan

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge transfer (KT) between higher education institutions (HEIs) and businesses is seen as a key element of innovation in knowledge-driven economies: HEIs generate knowledge that can be adopted in the regional economy. This process of valorization has been studied extensively, mainly with a focus on universities. In the Netherlands, there is a…

  5. Digitising the Past: The Beginning of a New Future at the Royal Tropical Institute of The Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe a project to digitise maps at the Royal Tropical Institute, or Koninklijk Instituut voor de Tropen (KIT), of The Netherlands. KIT has an extensive collection of maps and nautical charts of (sub-) tropical regions, including general maps and topographical map series, city maps, thematic maps and…

  6. Internationalization of Curricula in Higher Education Institutions in Comparative Perspectives: Case Studies of China, Japan and The Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Futao

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses the major issues and character of internationalization of curricula in higher education institutions in recent years in three non-English-speaking countries--China, Japan and The Netherlands. By making a comparative analysis of curricula provided for international students and curricula with international subjects,…

  7. Why does education matter to employers in different institutional contexts? A vignette study in England and the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Stasio, V.; van de Werfhorst, H.G.

    We study the process by which employers evaluate and interpret information related to the educational background of job applicants in simulated hiring contexts. We focus on England and the Netherlands, countries with very different education systems and labor-market institutions. Using a vignette

  8. The institutional space of community initiatives for renewable energy: a comparative case study of the Netherlands, Germany and Denmark

    OpenAIRE

    Oteman, M.I.; Wiering, M.A.; Helderman, J.K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Community initiatives for renewable energy are emerging across Europe but with varying numbers, success rates and strategies. A literature overview identifies structural, strategic and biophysical conditions for community success. Our analysis focuses on institutional structure, as we describe the variety between the Netherlands, Germany and Denmark, and place this within the institutional context of the policies, power structures and energy discourses of each country. Methods We c...

  9. 77 FR 49450 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-16

    ... Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; NCI REVIEW of P50 and R01 applications in Lung, Skin, Ovarian... Nos. 93.392, Cancer Construction; 93.393, Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings...

  10. 75 FR 79010 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings... Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel. Development of Devices for Point of Care Analysis of Circulating... Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398, Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399, Cancer Control...

  11. 77 FR 24969 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-26

    ... . Name of Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; SPORE in Breast, Prostate and....395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings...

  12. Height, weight weight change, and postmenopausal breast cancer risk: The Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Brandt, P. A.; Dirx, M. J.; Ronckers, C. M.; van den Hoogen, P.; Goldbohm, R. A.

    1997-01-01

    The association between several anthropometric indices and breast cancer risk was evaluated within the Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer, which began in 1986 and is conducted among 62,573 women aged 55 to 69 years at baseline. After 4.3 years of follow-up, data on 626 women with incident

  13. Time-space trends in cancer incidence in The Netherlands in 1989–2003

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siesling, Sabine; van der Aa, Maaike A.; Coebergh, Jan W.W.; Pukkala, Eero

    2008-01-01

    Incidence of cancer may vary within a country and over time because of previous differences in exposure to risk factors or interventions for early detection (screening). This study describes time-space trends of incidence of common cancer sites across the Netherlands during the period 1989–2003 and

  14. Determinants of regional differences in lung cancer mortality in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunst, A. E.; Looman, C. W.; Mackenbach, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    Although regional differences in lung cancer mortality are likely to be attributable to regional differences in tobacco smoking, studies in various countries found only weak relationships. This paper aimed at explaining regional differences in lung cancer mortality in the Netherlands. In a first

  15. Active and passive smoking and the risk of pancreatic cancer in the Netherlands cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinen, M.M.; Verhage, B.A.J.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2010-01-01

    Background: To date, cigarette smoking is the most consistent risk factor for pancreatic cancer. We prospectively examined the role of active cigarette smoking, smoking cessation, and passive smoking as determinants for pancreatic cancer. Methods: The Netherlands Cohort Study consisted of 120,852

  16. Dietary folate and folate vitamers and the risk of prostate cancer in the Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhage, B.A.J.; Cremers, P.; Schouten, L.J.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was to examine the association between intake of folate, and specific folate vitamers, and the risk of advanced and total prostate cancer. Methods: The association between dietary folate and prostate cancer risk was evaluated in The Netherlands Cohort Study

  17. Fat and K-ras mutations in sporadic colorectal cancer in The Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, M.; Weijenberg, M.P.; Goeij, A.F.P.M. de; Schouten, L.J.; Koedijk, F.D.H.; Roemen, G.M.J.M.; Lentjes, M.H.F.M.; Bruïne, A.P. de; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2004-01-01

    Associations between dietary intake of various fats and specific K-ras mutations in colorectal cancer (CRC) were investigated within the framework of The Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer (NLCS). After 7.3 years of follow-up and with exclusion of the first 2.3 years, 448 colon and 160

  18. Anthropometry, physical activity, and endometrial cancer risk: Results from the Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, L.J.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2004-01-01

    Although obesity is an established risk factor for endometrial cancer, evidence linking risk to height, weight change since age 20, and physical activity is limited. In this case-cohort study, 62 573 women from The Netherlands Cohort Study on Diet and Cancer were followed up from 1986 to 1995, and

  19. Magnesium intake and colorectal cancer risk in the Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandt, P.A. van den; Smits, K.M.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Weijenberg, M.P.

    2007-01-01

    Energy-adjusted magnesium intake was nonsignificantly inversely related to risk of colorectal cancer (n=2328) in the Netherlands Cohort Study on Diet and Cancer that started in 1986 (n=58 279 men and 62 573 women). Statistically significant inverse trends in risk were observed in overweight subjects

  20. Modest improvement in 20 years of kidney cancer care in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schans, S.A. van de; Aben, K.K.H.; Mulders, P.F.A.; Haanen, J.B.; Herpen, C.M. van; Verhoeven, R.H.A.; Karim-Kos, H.E.; Oosterwijk, E.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.

    2012-01-01

    AIM: For an evaluation of the progress achieved in the field of kidney cancer care in the Netherlands in the last decades, we described trends in incidence, treatment, mortality and relative survival. METHODS: All adult patients newly diagnosed with kidney cancer between 1989 and 2009 (N=32,545)

  1. Dietary patterns associated with male lung cancer risk in the Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balder, H.F.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this article was to study the association between dietary patterns and lung cancer incidence in the Netherlands Cohort Study on Diet and Cancer. The baseline measurement of this prospective case cohort study that was completed by 58,279 men in 1986 included a self-administered

  2. Trends in oral cavity cancer incidence, mortality, survival and treatment in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Boukje A. C.; Brands, Marieke T.; Geurts, Sandra M. E.; Merkx, Matthias A. W.; Roodenburg, Jan L. N.

    2016-01-01

    Information on epidemiology is essential to evaluate care for the growing group of oral cancer patients. We investigated trends in incidence, mortality and relative survival rates for oral cavity cancer (OCC) and its subsites in the Netherlands from 1991 to 2010, and relate these to changes in stage

  3. Gastric Cancer Trends and Treatment: Strategies in the Netherlands: Challenges Ahead

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.E. Dassen (A. E.)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ In this thesis trends and treatment of gastric cancer in the Netherlands are discussed. Gastric cancer is a challenging disease, because outcome with respect to postoperative mortality and long-term survival remains dismal; improvement of diagnostics and treatment

  4. Alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking, and endometrial cancer risk: Results from the Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loerbroks, A.; Schouten, L.J.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To examine the association between alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking, and endometrial cancer. Methods: In 1986, the Netherlands Cohort Study was initiated. A self-administered questionnaire on dietary habits and other cancer risk factors was completed by 62,573 women. Follow-up for

  5. Specialized care and survival of ovarian cancer patients in The Netherlands: Nationwide cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Vernooij (Flora); A.P.M. Heintz (Peter); P.O. Witteveen (Petronella); M. van der Heiden-Van der Loo (Margriet); J.W.W. Coebergh (Jan Willem); Y. van der Graaf (Yolanda)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground: There is much debate on the necessity of regionalization of ovarian cancer care. We investigated the association between hospital type and survival of patients with ovarian cancer in The Netherlands. Methods: A retrospective, population-based cohort study was performed on all

  6. 78 FR 27408 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    ... Methods for the Detection of Cancer Recurrence in Post-Therapy Breast Cancer Patients. Date: June 4, 2013....396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398, Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings...

  7. Effect of implementation of the mass breast cancer screening programme in older women in the Netherlands : population based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Glas, Nienke A; de Craen, Anton J M; Bastiaannet, Esther; Op 't Land, Ester G; Kiderlen, Mandy; van de Water, Willemien; Siesling, Sabine; Portielje, Johanneke E A; Schuttevaer, Herman M; de Bock, Geertruida Truuske H; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Liefers, Gerrit-Jan

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the incidence of early stage and advanced stage breast cancer before and after the implementation of mass screening in women aged 70-75 years in the Netherlands in 1998. DESIGN: Prospective nationwide population based study. SETTING: National cancer registry, the Netherlands.

  8. Marked improvements in survival of patients with rectal cancer in the Netherlands following changes in therapy, 1989-2006.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elferink, M.A.; Steenbergen, L.N. van; Krijnen, P.; Lemmens, V.E.; Rutten, H.J.; Marijnen, C.A.; Nagtegaal, I.D.; Karim-Kos, H.E.; Vries, E. de; Siesling, S.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Since the 1990s, treatment of patients with rectal cancer has changed in the Netherlands. Aim of this study was to describe these changes in treatment over time and to evaluate their effects on survival. METHODS: All patients in the Netherlands Cancer Registry with invasive primary

  9. Marked improvements in survival of patients with stage II-IV rectal cancer in the Netherlands 1989-2006

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elferink, M.A.G.; van Steenbergen, L.N.; Krijnen, P.; Lemmens, V.E.P.P.; Rutten, H.J.; Marijnen, C.A.M.; Nagtegaal, I.D.; Karim-Kos, H.E.; de Vries, E.; Siesling, Sabine

    2010-01-01

    Background: Since the 1990s, treatment of patients with rectal cancer has changed in the Netherlands. Aim of this study was to describe these changes in treatment over time and to evaluate their effects on survival. Methods: All patients in the Netherlands Cancer Registry with invasive primary

  10. Variation in incidence and outcome of cervical cancer in the Netherlands: Studies based on cancer registry data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Aa (Maaike Anne)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractIn the Netherlands, approximately 2% of all newly diagnosed malignant tumours in women are cancers of the uterine cervix, corresponding to about 700 new cases of invasive carcinoma per year. A general practitioner sees a patient with newly diagnosed cervical cancer only once in 15

  11. Height, weight, weight change, and ovarian cancer risk in the Netherlands Cohort Study on Diet and Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, L.J.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2003-01-01

    Although many studies have been conducted to investigate the relation between anthropometry and the risk of ovarian cancer, their results have been inconsistent. The Netherlands Cohort Study on Diet and Cancer was initiated in 1986. A self-administered questionnaire on dietary habits and other risk

  12. Spatial variation in stage distribution in colorectal cancer in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elferink, M A G; Pukkala, E; Klaase, J M; Siesling, S

    2012-05-01

    In the Netherlands the incidence of colorectal cancer has increased, mainly in the eastern part of the country. Patient delay due to unawareness or ignorance of symptoms and differences in use of diagnostic tools could have influence on the stage distribution. The aim of this study was to evaluate geographical differences in stage-specific incidence rates of colon and rectal cancer in the Netherlands. Age-adjusted incidence rates for cancers of the colon and rectum diagnosed in 2001-2005 and registered in the Netherlands Cancer Registry were calculated for each municipality and stage. The incidence for each 500m by 500m grid was estimated as a weighted average of the incidence rates of the neighbouring municipalities. The incidence rates and the stage distribution are both presented as maps. Geographic variation in stage-specific incidence was evaluated using spatial scan statistic. In both colon and rectal cancer, significant spatial variation in stage-specific incidences was found, except for colon cancer of stages III and IV. The regions with a higher stage-specific incidence were almost all in the south eastern part of the Netherlands, however, these differences were not seen in the stage distribution. There were no differences in stage distribution between large cities and the rest of the country. These maps give insight into differences in stage-specific incidences of colon and rectal cancer in the Netherlands. Educational interventions to increase the awareness of symptoms of colorectal cancer may be especially useful for the population in regions with high incidence of advanced stages. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. 76 FR 50487 - National Cancer Institute Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-15

    ... Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; NCI SPORE in Childhood ALL, Skin, Brain, Lung... Construction; 93.393, Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute Notice of Closed Meetings...

  14. 76 FR 9353 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings... Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Development of Image Processing and Analysis Software for Oncology. Date... Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers...

  15. 78 FR 55750 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings... Innovative Molecular Analysis Technology Development for Cancer Research (R21). Date: October 24, 2013. Time...: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Integrative Cancer Biology. Date: October 29, 2013. Time...

  16. 78 FR 78982 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ... National Laboratory for Cancer Research. Place: National Institutes of Health, 45 Center Drive, Natcher...., Executive Secretary, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, 9609 Medical Center Drive... Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397...

  17. Time to diagnosis and treatment for cancer patients in the Netherlands: Room for improvement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helsper, Charles C W; van Erp, Nicole N F; Peeters, Petra P H M; de Wit, Niek N J

    2017-12-01

    Reducing the duration of the diagnostic cancer care pathway is intensively pursued. The aim of this study was to chart the diagnostic pathway for the five most common cancers in the Netherlands. A retrospective cohort study using cancer patients' anonymised primary care data (free text and coded) linked to the Netherlands Cancer Registry. We determined the median duration of the following: 1. Primary care intervals (IPCs): the first cancer-related general practitioner consultation to referral, 2. Referral intervals (IRs): referral to diagnosis, 3. Treatment intervals (ITs): diagnosis to treatment and the overarching intervals, 4. Diagnostic intervals (IDs): IPC and IR combined and 5. Health care intervals (IHCs): IPC, IR and IT combined. For 465, 309, 197, 237 and 149 patients diagnosed with breast-, colorectal-, lung-, prostate cancer and melanoma, respectively; median IPC, IR and ID durations were shortest for breast cancer and melanoma (ID duration 7 and 21 days, respectively), intermediate for lung- and colon cancer (ID duration 49 and 54 days) and the longest for prostate cancer (ID duration 137 days). For all cancers, the duration of intervals increased steeply for the 10-25% with longest durations. For colorectal cancer, increasing ID durations showed increasing proportions of time attributable to primary care (IPC). Approximately 10-25% of cancer patients show substantially long duration of diagnostic intervals. Reducing primary care delay seems particularly relevant for colorectal cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. 75 FR 54161 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-03

    ...: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; SPORE in Sarcoma, Brain, Liver, Lung, and Prostate... Program Nos. 93.392, Cancer Construction; 93.393, Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer... Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee...

  19. 75 FR 14172 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings... Emphasis Panel, Nucleic Acid Analysis for the Molecular Characterization of Cancer. Date: April 6, 2010... Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398, Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399, Cancer Control...

  20. 77 FR 19674 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings... Emphasis Panel; Innovative Molecular Analysis Technologies for Cancer (R21). Date: June 26-27, 2012. Time..., Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398...

  1. 75 FR 3239 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-20

    ... Special Emphasis Panel, Basal-like Breast Cancer Assay. Date: March 10, 2010. Time: 8 a.m. to 7 p.m... Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398, Cancer Research... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings...

  2. 75 FR 21002 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-22

    ... Panel, SPORE in Lymphoma and Breast Cancer. Date: June 15-16, 2010. Time: 5 p.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda: To... Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398, Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399, Cancer Control... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings...

  3. Time-space trends in cancer incidence in the Netherlands in 1989-2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siesling, Sabine; van der Aa, Maaike A; Coebergh, Jan W W; Pukkala, Eero

    2008-05-01

    Incidence of cancer may vary within a country and over time because of previous differences in exposure to risk factors or interventions for early detection (screening). This study describes time-space trends of incidence of common cancer sites across the Netherlands during the period 1989-2003 and speculates on the reasons for the observations. From the Netherlands Cancer Registry, World standardized incidence rates per municipality were smoothed calculating weighted averages for each 2 km by 2 km grid of the population mid-points of neighbouring municipalities and presented as map animations. Spatial relative changes in incidence were estimated by comparing the periods 1989-1994 and 1998-2003. Complete time-space trends can be found as map animations on http://maps.ikcnet.nl. The incidence of cervical and stomach cancer (for both sexes) decreased, being higher in the cities than in the rural areas during all periods and contrasting the trends in colorectal and breast cancer. The relative increase in incidence of lung cancer among females was highest in the rural north, but the incidence remained higher in the cities of the mid-west Netherlands. For males, there was a marked decrease in lung cancer incidence across the country since 1991. Incidence of melanoma increased, rates being twice as high in the coastal area than in the cities. Prostate cancer maps largely replicated the known history of PSA-testing in the Netherlands. Time-space cancer incidence patterns gave insight into effects of changes in exposure to risk determinants and early detection. The maps illustrate marked potential for cancer prevention at the national and regional level. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Institutional shared resources and translational cancer research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Paoli Paolo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The development and maintenance of adequate shared infrastructures is considered a major goal for academic centers promoting translational research programs. Among infrastructures favoring translational research, centralized facilities characterized by shared, multidisciplinary use of expensive laboratory instrumentation, or by complex computer hardware and software and/or by high professional skills are necessary to maintain or improve institutional scientific competitiveness. The success or failure of a shared resource program also depends on the choice of appropriate institutional policies and requires an effective institutional governance regarding decisions on staffing, existence and composition of advisory committees, policies and of defined mechanisms of reporting, budgeting and financial support of each resource. Shared Resources represent a widely diffused model to sustain cancer research; in fact, web sites from an impressive number of research Institutes and Universities in the U.S. contain pages dedicated to the SR that have been established in each Center, making a complete view of the situation impossible. However, a nation-wide overview of how Cancer Centers develop SR programs is available on the web site for NCI-designated Cancer Centers in the U.S., while in Europe, information is available for individual Cancer centers. This article will briefly summarize the institutional policies, the organizational needs, the characteristics, scientific aims, and future developments of SRs necessary to develop effective translational research programs in oncology. In fact, the physical build-up of SRs per se is not sufficient for the successful translation of biomedical research. Appropriate policies to improve the academic culture in collaboration, the availability of educational programs for translational investigators, the existence of administrative facilitations for translational research and an efficient organization

  5. Institutional shared resources and translational cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paoli, Paolo

    2009-06-29

    The development and maintenance of adequate shared infrastructures is considered a major goal for academic centers promoting translational research programs. Among infrastructures favoring translational research, centralized facilities characterized by shared, multidisciplinary use of expensive laboratory instrumentation, or by complex computer hardware and software and/or by high professional skills are necessary to maintain or improve institutional scientific competitiveness. The success or failure of a shared resource program also depends on the choice of appropriate institutional policies and requires an effective institutional governance regarding decisions on staffing, existence and composition of advisory committees, policies and of defined mechanisms of reporting, budgeting and financial support of each resource. Shared Resources represent a widely diffused model to sustain cancer research; in fact, web sites from an impressive number of research Institutes and Universities in the U.S. contain pages dedicated to the SR that have been established in each Center, making a complete view of the situation impossible. However, a nation-wide overview of how Cancer Centers develop SR programs is available on the web site for NCI-designated Cancer Centers in the U.S., while in Europe, information is available for individual Cancer centers. This article will briefly summarize the institutional policies, the organizational needs, the characteristics, scientific aims, and future developments of SRs necessary to develop effective translational research programs in oncology.In fact, the physical build-up of SRs per se is not sufficient for the successful translation of biomedical research. Appropriate policies to improve the academic culture in collaboration, the availability of educational programs for translational investigators, the existence of administrative facilitations for translational research and an efficient organization supporting clinical trial recruitment

  6. Socioeconomic status and breast cancer survival in the southeastern Netherlands, 1980-1989

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.Th.M. Schrijvers (Carola); J.W.W. Coebergh (Jan Willem); L.H. van der Heijden (L.); J.P. Mackenbach (Johan)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractSocioeconomic differences in breast cancer survival in the southeastern Netherlands between 1980 and 1989 were studied (n = 3928), as was the impact of prognostic factors (stage at diagnosis, morphology, and treatment) on such differences. An area-based measure of Socioeconomic status

  7. Conditional survival for long-term colorectal cancer survivors in the Netherlands: who do best?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erning, F.N. van; Steenbergen, L.N. van; Lemmens, V.E.; Rutten, H.J.; Martijn, H.; Spronsen, D.J. van; Janssen-Heijnen, M.L.

    2014-01-01

    AIM: With the increase in the number of long-term colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors, there is a growing need for subgroup-specific analysis of conditional survival. METHODS: All 137,030 stage I-III CRC patients diagnosed in the Netherlands between 1989 and 2008 aged 15-89years were selected from the

  8. Uptake of prenatal diagnostic testing for retinoblastoma compared to other hereditary cancer syndromes in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dommering, Charlotte J.; Henneman, Lidewij; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Jonker, Marianne A.; Tops, Carli M. J.; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Mensenkamp, Arjen R.; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Redeker, Egbert J. W.; de Die-Smulders, Christine E. M.; Moll, Annette C.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne

    Since the 1980s the genetic cause of many hereditary tumor syndromes has been elucidated. As a consequence, carriers of a deleterious mutation in these genes may opt for prenatal diagnoses (PND). We studied the uptake of prenatal diagnosis for five hereditary cancer syndromes in the Netherlands.

  9. Uptake of prenatal diagnostic testing for retinoblastoma compared to other hereditary cancer syndromes in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dommering, C.J.; Henneman, L.; Hout, A.H. van der; Jonker, M.A.; Tops, C.M.; Ouweland, A.M. van den; Luijt, R.B. van der; Mensenkamp, A.R.; Hogervorst, F.B.; Redeker, E.J.; Die-Smulders, C.E.M. de; Moll, A.C.; Meijers-Heijboer, H.

    2017-01-01

    Since the 1980s the genetic cause of many hereditary tumor syndromes has been elucidated. As a consequence, carriers of a deleterious mutation in these genes may opt for prenatal diagnoses (PND). We studied the uptake of prenatal diagnosis for five hereditary cancer syndromes in the Netherlands.

  10. Prostate cancer: trends in incidence, survival and mortality in the Netherlands, 1989-2006.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, R.G.H.M.; Karim-Kos, H.E.; Houterman, S.; Verhoeven, R.H.A.; Schroder, F.H.; Kwast, T.H. van der; Kil, P.J.M.; Coebergh, J.W.W.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prostate cancer occurrence and stage distribution changed dramatically during the end of the 20th century. This study aimed to quantify and explain trends in incidence, stage distribution, survival and mortality in the Netherlands between 1989 and 2006. METHODS: Population-based data

  11. K-ras oncogene mutations in sporadic colorectal cancer in The Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, M.; Goeij, A.F.P.M. de; Weijenberg, M.P.; Roemen, G.M.J.M.; Lentjes, M.H.F.M.; Pachen, M.M.M.; Smits, K.M.; Bruïne, A.P. de; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2003-01-01

    Activation of K-ras oncogene has been implicated in colorectal carcinogenesis, being mutated in 30-60% of the adenocarcinomas. In this study, 737 incident colorectal cancer (CRC) patients, originating from 120 852 men and women (55-69 years at baseline) participating in the Netherlands Cohort Study

  12. Animal products, calcium and protein and prostate cancer risk in the Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurman, A.G.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Dorant, E.; Goldbohm, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    Prostate cancer risk in relation to consumption of animal products, and intake of calcium and protein was investigated in the Netherlands Cohort Study. At baseline in 1986, 58,279 men aged 55-69 years completed a self-administered 150-item food frequency questionnaire and a questionnaire on other

  13. Vegetable and fruit consumption and prostate cancer risk: A cohort study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurman, A.G.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Dorant, E.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    1998-01-01

    The association between 21 vegetables and eight fruits and prostate cancer risk was assessed in the Netherlands Cohort Study among 58,279 men of ages 55-69 years at baseline in 1986. After 6.3 years of follow-up, 610 cases with complete vegetable data and 642 cases with complete fruit data were

  14. Spatial variation in stage distribution in colorectal cancer in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elferink, M. A. G.; Pukkala, E.; Klaase, J. M.; Siesling, S.

    Background: In the Netherlands the incidence of colorectal cancer has increased, mainly in the eastern part of the country. Patient delay due to unawareness or ignorance of symptoms and differences in use of diagnostic tools could have influence on the stage distribution. The aim of this study was

  15. Surgery for Recurrent Epithelial Ovarian Cancer in the Netherlands: A Population-Based Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laar, R. van de; Kruitwagen, R.F.P.M.; Hout, J. in't; Zusterzeel, P.L.M.; Gorp, T. Van; Massuger, L.F.A.G.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The value of secondary cytoreductive surgery (SCS) in patients with recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer is controversial. The aim of this population-based study was to investigate the role of SCS in the Netherlands. METHODS: Data of 408 patients who underwent SCS between 2000 and 2013

  16. Salt intake, cured meat consumption, refrigerator use and stomach cancer incidence: A prospective cohort study (Netherlands)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandt, P.A. van den; Botterweck, A.A.M.; Goldbohm, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: Many case-control studies have reported that salt and cured meat intake are positively, and refrigerator use is inversely, associated with stomach cancer risk. In the current prospective study these associations were evaluated. Methods: The Netherlands Cohort Study consisted of 120,852

  17. Disparities in quality of care for colon cancer between hospitals in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elferink, M.A.G.; Wouters, M.W.J.M.; Krijnen, P.; Lemmens, V.E.P.P.; Jansen-Landheer, M.L.E.A.; van de Velde, C.J.H.; Siesling, Sabine; Tollenaar, R.A.E.M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Aim of this study was to describe treatment patterns and outcome according to region, and according to hospital types and volumes among patients with colon cancer in the Netherlands. Methods: All patients with invasive colon carcinoma diagnosed in the period 2001–2006 were selected from

  18. 77 FR 55848 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-11

    ... a meeting of the National Cancer Institute Clinical Trials and Translational Research Advisory... Committee: National Cancer Institute Clinical Trials and Translational Research Advisory Committee; Ad hoc... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  19. Ocean color and transparency data received from Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research collected in the years 1889-99, 2001, 2002 and 2013 (NODC Accession 0114317)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Ocean color and transparency data received from Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research collected in the years 1889-99, 2001, 2002 and 2013.

  20. Euthanasia requests and cancer types in the Netherlands: is there a relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abarshi, Ebun; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje D; van der Wal, Gerrit

    2009-02-01

    Cancer patients have generally requested for euthanasia and assisted suicide (EAS) more frequently than others. However, different terminal cancers are accompanied by different clinical courses. This study seeks to explore the relationship, if any, between EAS requesters and cancer types, as relates to the provision of end-of-life care in the Netherlands. Standardized questionnaires were retrospectively sent to all general practitioners (GPs) in 10 of 23 GP-districts in the Netherlands. Of the 3614 respondents (60%), 1442 could describe a most recent EAS request from a cancer patient. Compared to all home cancer deaths, lung, pancreas, stomach oesophagus, lip-mouth-throat cancers and melanomas occur more frequently in the group of cancer patients who requested for EAS; while prostate, haemo-lymphatic, urinary tract, bladder and uterus cancer occur relatively less frequently. Vomiting, shortness of breath and anxiousness were symptoms positively associated, and old age was negatively associated with cancers in which patients relatively frequently request for EAS. There are differences in the extent to which patients with different cancer types request for EAS. Although shortness of breath, vomiting and anxiousness are associated with cancer types in which patients relatively frequently request for EAS, most symptoms are not associated with this. Possibly a common pathway, including more existential concerns, is important in the last stages of life.

  1. 76 FR 69744 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting... Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel, Cancer Diagnostic and Therapeutic Agents Enabled by Nanotechnology. Date: November 29, 2011. Time: 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate...

  2. 77 FR 4052 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings... Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel, NCI SPORE in Breast, Endometrial, and Skin Cancers. Date...

  3. Geographical relationships between sociodemographic factors and incidence of cervical cancer in the Netherlands 1989-2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Aa, Maaike A; Siesling, Sabine; Louwman, Marieke W; Visser, Otto; Pukkala, Eero; Coebergh, Jan Willem W

    2008-10-01

    In many industrialized countries, with some degree of screening, cervical cancer nowadays is most frequent among women of lower socioeconomic status (SES), partly owing to their lower participation in screening. This study aims to provide support for specification of mass screening policy for cervical cancer by describing relationships between sociodemographic factors and the incidence of cervical cancer in the Netherlands based on geographical differences and by analysing the relationship between SES of neighbourhood and individual tumour characteristics. Municipality-specific, age-adjusted incidence rates for cervical cancer were calculated from the Netherlands Cancer Registry, and data on sociodemographic factors were obtained from Statistics Netherlands. Logistic regression analysis was performed to investigate determinants of variations in incidence at the ecological level. An additional analysis linked individual tumour characteristics to SES estimates at the postal code level by calculating relative risks (RR). The incidence was higher in municipalities with a high prevalence of immigrants [odds ratios 7.9, 1.4-47 95% confidence intervals (CI)] and with more individuals on welfare (odds ratios 8.6, 1.7-43 95% CI). Patients residing in neighbourhoods with lower SES had higher Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages (RR 1.4, 1.2-1.6 95% CI) and fewer adenocarcinomas (RR 0.7, 0.6-0.9 95% CI), and were younger at diagnosis (Pimportance of future cervical cancer prevention programmes targeted at women of lower SES who do not participate in opportunistic screening.

  4. Pregnancy associated breast cancer: an institutional experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogia, A; Deo, S V S; Shukla, N K; Mohanti, B K; Raina, V

    2014-01-01

    Pregnancy-associated breast cancer (PABC) has been defined as breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy or within 1 year of delivery. There is a paucity of data on PABC from India. The aim of our study was to assess the clinical-pathological parameters and outcome of PABC at Institute Rotary Cancer Hospital, All India Institute of Medical Sciences. We screened approximately 3,750 cases registered from January 2001 to December 2012 and found 26 cases of PABC. Patients' records were obtained from the computer database using International Classification of Diseases code (C-50). The median age was 26 years (range 20-35). The median duration of symptoms was 11.5 months. The American Joint Committee on Cancer stage distribution was Stage I - 1, Stage II - 3, Stage III - 14 and in Stage IV - 8 patients. Median clinical tumor size is 5.5 cm. Four patients were presented with the inflammatory breast cancer. Positive family history was elicited in three patients. Twenty-one patients were diagnosed after delivery, two patients in the first trimester, two patients in the second trimester and three patients in the third trimester. Estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) negativity and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2/neu) positivity was 56% and 38%, respectively. Nearly, 40% of patients had a high-grade tumor and 70% had pathological node positivity. With a median follow-up of 33 months, 3 years relapse free survival and overall survival was 40% and 50% respectively. Bone was the most common site for systemic relapse. PABC constituted 0.7% of all breast cancer patients. It is associated with advanced stage at presentation. Half of them were ER/PR negative and one-third was HER2/neu positive.

  5. Use of primary radiotherapy for rectal cancer in the Netherlands between 1997 and 2008: a population-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jobsen, J. J.; Aarts, M. J.; Siesling, S.; Klaase, J.; Louwman, W. J.; Poortmans, P. M. P.; Lybeert, M. L. M.; Koning, C. C. E.; Struikmans, H.; Coebergh, J. W. W.

    2012-01-01

    To describe variation in the utilisation rates of primary radiotherapy for patients with rectal cancer in the Netherlands, focusing on time trends and age effects. Data on primary non-metastatic rectal cancer were derived from the population-based cancer registries of four comprehensive cancer

  6. 76 FR 81952 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-29

    ... and Lung Cancers, and Sarcoma. Date: February 8-9, 2012. Time: 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Agenda: To review and... Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.392, Cancer Construction; 93.393, Cancer Cause and Prevention Research... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings...

  7. 78 FR 8156 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings... with Focus on Downstream Single Cell Molecular Analysis. Date: March 26-27, 2013. Time: 8:00 p.m. to 12....395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93...

  8. 76 FR 17930 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-31

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings... Special Emphasis Panel; Innovative Emerging Molecular Analysis Technologies. Date: June 2-3, 2011. Time: 8..., Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology...

  9. Vegetable and fruit consumption and lung cancer risk in the Netherlands : cohort study on diet and cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorrips, L.E.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Verhoeven, D.T.H.; Poppel, G.A.F.C. van; Sturmans, F.; Hermus, R.J.J.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2000-01-01

    Objective: The purpose was to study the association between vegetable and fruit consumption and lung cancer incidence using 1074 cases after 6.3 years of follow-up in the Netherlands Cohort Study. Methods: Dietary intake was assessed using a 150-item food-frequency questionnaire. Multivariate models

  10. Medication use among women with breast cancer in the Netherlands : Pharmacoepidemiological studies based on data from the Eindhoven Cancer Registry-PHARMO linkage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P.P. van Herk-Sukel (Myrthe)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractIn the Netherlands, breast cancer is the most frequent (30%) of all cancers in women. In 2008, around 13,000 women were newly diagnosed with the disease. Worldwide, breast cancer accounted for almost 1.4 million new cancer patients in 20082. Incidence rates of breast cancer have been

  11. Intake of butylated hydroxyanisole and butylated hydroxytoluene and stomach cancer risk : results from analyses in the Netherlands : cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botterweck, A.A.M.; Verhagen, H.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Kleinjans, J.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2000-01-01

    Both carcinogenic and anticarcinogenic properties have been reported for the synthetic antioxidants butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT). The association between dietary intake of BHA and BHT and stomach cancer risk was investigated in the Netherlands Cohort Study (NLCS)

  12. 'Who's afraid of High Def?'' Institutional factors influencing HDTV diffusion in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baaren, E.; Wijngaert, L.A.L. van de; Huizer, E.

    2008-01-01

    Since digital HDTV has made an entrance in the Netherlands, ‘HD ready’ TV sets are sold and HDTV cable subscription services are available. In contrast, no Dutch TV channel offers HD content and publicity is mostly negative. This paper analyses the economical, organizational, historical and cultural

  13. Strategies of citizens’ initiatives in the Netherlands: connecting people and institutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, van R.I.; Salverda, I.E.; During, R.

    2014-01-01

    Research on active citizenship tends to focus on the government perspective on initiatives from the public. In this paper we seek to redress the balance by focusing on the practice of citizens’ initiatives. Two citizens’ initiatives in the Netherlands are analyzed in terms of their evolution, their

  14. Implementation of Wind Energy in the Netherlands: The Importance of the Social-Institutional Setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agterbosch, S.; Vermeulen, W.; Glasbergen, P.

    2004-01-01

    This paper analyses the differences in performance of the different types of wind power entrepreneurs now active on the wind power supply market in the Netherlands. The development of the market is divided into three successive market periods: Monopoly powers (1989–1995), Interbellum (1996–1997)

  15. 78 FR 24224 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-24

    ... a meeting of the National Cancer Institute Clinical Trials and Translational Research Advisory... Committee: National Cancer Institute Clinical Trials and Translational Research Advisory Committee. Date... Research Programs. Place: National Institutes of Health, Building 31, C-Wing, 6th Floor, Conference Room 10...

  16. 76 FR 52960 - National Cancer Institute Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-24

    ... a meeting of the National Cancer Institute Clinical Trials and Translational Research Advisory... Committee: National Cancer Institute Clinical Trials and Translational Research Advisory Committee. Date... Research Programs. Place: National Institutes of Health, Building 31, C-wing, 6th Floor, 31 Center Drive...

  17. 76 FR 22407 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-21

    ... a meeting of the National Cancer Institute Clinical Trials and Translational Research Advisory... Committee: National Cancer Institute Clinical Trials and Translational Research Advisory Committee. Date... Research Programs. Place: National Institutes of Health, Building 31, C-Wing, 6th Floor, 31 Center Drive...

  18. 78 FR 53463 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-29

    ... Translational Research Programs. Place: National Institutes of Health, Building 31, C-Wing, 6th Floor, 31 Center... a meeting of the National Cancer Institute Clinical Trials and Translational Research Advisory... Committee: National Cancer Institute Clinical Trials and Translational Research Advisory Committee. Date...

  19. 75 FR 75690 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-06

    ... a meeting of the National Cancer Institute Clinical Trials ] and Translational Research Advisory... Committee: National Cancer Institute Clinical Trials and Translational Research Advisory Committee. Date... Research Programs. Place: National Institutes of Health, Building 31, 31 Center Drive, C-Wing, 6th Floor...

  20. 76 FR 574 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-05

    ... a meeting of the National Cancer Institute Clinical Trials and Translational Research Advisory... Committee: National Cancer Institute Clinical Trials and Translational Research Advisory Committee. Date... Research Programs. Place: National Institutes of Health, Building 31, 31 Center Drive, C-wing, 6th Floor...

  1. 77 FR 26303 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-03

    ... Translational Research Programs. Place: National Institutes of Health, Building 31, C-Wing, 6th Floor, 31 Center... a meeting of the National Cancer Institute Clinical Trials and Translational Research Advisory... Committee: National Cancer Institute Clinical Trials and Translational Research Advisory Committee. Date...

  2. 77 FR 64817 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-23

    ... Translational Research Programs. Place: National Institutes of Health, Building 31, C-Wing, 6th Floor, 31 Center... a meeting of the National Cancer Institute Clinical Trials and Translational Research Advisory... Committee: National Cancer Institute Clinical Trials and Translational Research Advisory Committee. Date...

  3. 77 FR 1703 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-11

    ... a meeting of the National Cancer Institute Clinical Trials and Translational Research Advisory... Committee: National Cancer Institute Clinical Trials and Translational Research Advisory Committee. Date... Research Programs. Place: National Institutes of Health, Building 31, C-Wing, 6th Floor, 31 Center Drive...

  4. 76 FR 51044 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to.... Agenda: 09/21 Welcome and review of how science is changing; 09/ 22 The role of regulatory science; 09/23.... Contact Person: Shannon K. Bell, MSW, Director, Office of Advocacy Relations, National Cancer Institute...

  5. Dietary folate intake and K-ras mutations in sporadic colon and rectal cancer in the Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, M.; Weijenberg, M.P.; Goeij, A.F.P.M. de; Roemen, G.M.J.M.; Lentjes, M.H.F.M.; Bruïne, A.P. de; Engeland, M. van; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2005-01-01

    We studied the association between dietary folate and specific K-ras mutations in colon and rectal cancer in The Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer. After 7.3 years of follow-up, 448 colon and 160 rectal cancer patients and 3,048 sub-cohort members (55-69 years at baseline) were available

  6. Use of Primary Radiotherapy for Rectal Cancer in the Netherlands between 1997 and 2008: A Population-based Study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jobsen, J.J.; Aarts, M.J.; Siesling, Sabine; Klaase, J.; Louwman, W.J.; Poortmans, P.M.P.; Lybeert, M.L.M.; Koning, C.C.E.; Struikmans, H.; Coebergh, J.W.W.

    2012-01-01

    Aims: To describe variation in the utilisation rates of primary radiotherapy for patients with rectal cancer in the Netherlands, focusing on time trends and age effects. Materials and methods: Data on primary non-metastatic rectal cancer were derived from the population-based cancer registries of

  7. [Lung cancer in the Netherlands in the period 1989-1997: the epidemic is not over yet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen-Heijnen, M.L.; Dijck, J.A.A.M. van; Siesling, S.; Schipper, R.M.; Damhuis, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe and interpret changes in incidence, mortality and survival of lung cancer in the Netherlands in the period 1989-1997. DESIGN: Secondary data analysis. METHODS: Data on the incidence of lung cancer were collected from the Dutch Cancer Registration (1989-1997), on mortality from

  8. Age-specific incidence and treatment patterns of head and neck cancer in the Netherlands : A cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halmos, G. B.; Bras, L.; Siesling, S.; van der Laan, B.F.A.M.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; van Dijk, Boukje A.C.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To explore the incidence and treatment pattern of head and neck cancer in different age groups. Design: Cohort study. Setting: Netherlands Cancer Registry. Participants: All new primary head and neck cancer cases diagnosed between 2010 and 2014 were included and categorised into

  9. Changes in admission to long-term care institutions in the Netherlands: comparing two cohorts over the period 1996–1999 and 2006–2009

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.G.W. Alders (Peter); H.C. Comijs (Hannie); D.J.H. Deeg (Dorly)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractUsing data from two cohorts, we examine to what extent a decline in institutional care in the Netherlands is associated with changes in the need for care and/or societal factors. We compared older adults, aged 65–89, who were admitted to a long-term care (LTC) institution in the period

  10. Determinants of treatment waiting times for head and neck cancer in the Netherlands and their relation to survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Harten, Michel C; Hoebers, Frank J P; Kross, Kenneth W; van Werkhoven, Erik D; van den Brekel, Michiel W M; van Dijk, Boukje A C

    2015-03-01

    Waiting to start treatment has been shown to be associated with tumor progression and upstaging in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs). This diminishes the chance of cure and might lead to unnecessary mortality. We investigated the association between waiting times and survival in the Netherlands and assessed which factors were associated to longer waiting times. Patient (age, sex, socioeconomic status (SES), tumor (site, stage) and treatment (type, of institute of diagnosis/treatment) characteristics for patients with HNSCC who underwent treatment were extracted from the Netherlands Cancer Registry (NCR) for 2005-2011. Waiting time was defined as the number of days between histopathological diagnosis and start of treatment. Univariable and multivariable Cox regression was used to evaluate survival. In total, 13,140 patients were included, who had a median waiting time of 37days. Patients who were more likely to wait longer were men, patients with a low SES, oropharynx tumors, stage IV tumors, patients to be treated with radiotherapy or chemoradiation, and patients referred for treatment to a Head and Neck Oncology Center (HNOC) from another hospital. The 5-year overall survival was 58% for all patients. Our multivariable Cox regression model showed that longer waiting time, was significantly related to a higher hazard of dying (p<0.0001). This is the first large population-based study showing that longer waiting time for surgery, radiotherapy or chemoradiation is a significant negative prognostic factor for HNSCC patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking and the risk of subtypes of head-neck cancer: Results from the Netherlands Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Maasland, D.H.E.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Kremer, S.H.A.; Goldbohm, R A; Schouten, L. J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Prospective data on alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking and risk of head-neck cancer (HNC) subtypes, i.e. oral cavity cancer (OCC), oro-/hypopharyngeal cancer (OHPC), and laryngeal cancer (LC), are limited. We investigated these associations within the second largest prospective study on this topic so far, the Netherlands Cohort Study. Methods: 120,852 participants completed a questionnaire on diet and other cancer risk factors in 1986. After 17.3 years of follow-up, 395 HNC (1...

  12. Treatment strategies and survival of older breast cancer patients - an international comparison between the Netherlands and Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiderlen, Mandy; Walsh, Paul M; Bastiaannet, Esther; Kelly, Maria B; Audisio, Riccardo A; Boelens, Petra G; Brown, Chris; Dekkers, Olaf M; de Craen, Anton J M; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Liefers, Gerrit-Jan

    2015-01-01

    Forty percent of breast cancers occur among older patients. Unfortunately, there is a lack of evidence for treatment guidelines for older breast cancer patients. The aim of this study is to compare treatment strategy and relative survival for operable breast cancer in the elderly between The Netherlands and Ireland. From the Dutch and Irish national cancer registries, women aged ≥65 years with non-metastatic breast cancer were included (2001-2009). Proportions of patients receiving guideline-adherent locoregional treatment, endocrine therapy, and chemotherapy were calculated and compared between the countries by stage. Secondly, 5-year relative survival was calculated by stage and compared between countries. Overall, 41,055 patients from The Netherlands and 5,826 patients from Ireland were included. Overall, more patients received guideline-adherent locoregional treatment in The Netherlands, overall (80% vs. 68%, adjusted pIreland, where endocrine therapy was prescribed to 92% of hormone receptor-positive patients, compared to 59% in The Netherlands. In The Netherlands, only 6% received chemotherapy, as compared 24% in Ireland. But relative survival was poorer in Ireland (5 years relative survival 89% vs. 83%), especially in stage II (87% vs. 85%) and stage III (61% vs. 58%) patients. Treatment for older breast cancer patients differed significantly on all treatment modalities between The Netherlands and Ireland. More locoregional treatment was provided in The Netherlands, and more systemic therapy was provided in Ireland. Relative survival for Irish patients was worse than for their Dutch counterparts. This finding should be a strong recommendation to study breast cancer treatment and survival internationally, with the ultimate goal to equalize the survival rates for breast cancer patients across Europe.

  13. Harms of cervical cancer screening in the United States and the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habbema, Dik; Weinmann, Sheila; Arbyn, Marc; Kamineni, Aruna; Williams, Andrew E; M C M de Kok, Inge; van Kemenade, Folkert; Field, Terry S; van Rosmalen, Joost; Brown, Martin L

    2017-03-01

    We studied harms related to cervical cancer screening and management of screen-positive women in the United States (US) and the Netherlands. We utilized data from four US integrated health care systems (SEARCH), the US National Health Interview Survey, New Mexico state, the Netherlands national histopathology registry, and included studies on adverse health effects of cervical screening. We compared the number of Papanicolaou (Pap) smear tests, abnormal test results, punch biopsies, treatments, health problems (anxiety, pain, bleeding and discharge) and preterm births associated with excisional treatments. Results were age-standardized to the 2007 US population. Based on SEARCH, an estimated 36 million Pap tests were performed in 2007 for 91 million US women aged 21-65 years, leading to 2.3 million abnormal Pap tests, 1.5 million punch biopsies, 0.3 million treatments for precancerous lesions, 5 thousand preterm births and over 8 million health problems. Under the Netherlands screening practice, fewer Pap tests (58%), abnormal test results (64%), punch biopsies (75%), treatment procedures (40%), preterm births (60%) and health problems (63%) would have occurred. The SEARCH data did not differ much from other US data for 2007 or from more recent data up to 2013. Thus compared to the less intensive screening practice in the Netherlands, US practice of cervical cancer screening may have resulted in two- to threefold higher harms, while the effects on cervical cancer incidence and mortality are similar. The results are also of high relevance in making recommendations for HPV screening. Systematic collection of harms data is needed for monitoring and for better incorporation of harms in making screening recommendations. © 2016 UICC.

  14. 77 FR 19024 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-29

    ... Emphasis Panel; Topic 279 Phase II: Facilitating the Transfer of Statistical Methodology into Practice... Logistics Branch, Division of Extramural Activities, National Cancer Institute, 6116 Executive Boulevard... Review Officer, Special Review and Logistics Branch, Division of Extramural Activities, National Cancer...

  15. 78 FR 50065 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ... Bridge Gaps in Cancer Etiology and Early Detection. Date: October 16, 2013. Time: 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m... of Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Core Infrastructure and...

  16. 78 FR 16274 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-14

    ..., Scientific Review Officer, Resources and Training Review Branch, Division of Extramural Activities, National..., Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399, Cancer Control, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: March 8...

  17. 78 FR 53154 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-28

    ... patentable material, and personal information concerning individuals associated with the grant applications....nih.gov . Name of Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel Informatics Technology...

  18. Trends in treatment and survival for advanced laryngeal cancer : A 20-year population-based study in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermans, Adriana J.; van Dijk, Boukje A. C.; Overbeek, Lucy I. H.; van Velthuysen, Marie-Louise F.; van Tinteren, Harm; Hilgers, Frans J. M.; van den Brekel, Michiel W. M.

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to determine time trends for primary treatment modalities in advanced laryngeal cancer, overall survival (OS), and laryngectomy-free interval (LFI) over the last 2 decades in The Netherlands. METHODS: We conducted an analysis of T3 to T4 laryngeal cancer

  19. Meat consumption and K-ras mutations in sporadic colon and rectal cancer in The Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, M.; Weijenberg, M.P.; Goeij, A.F.P.M. de; Roemen, G.M.J.M.; Lentjes, M.H.F.M.; Bruïne, A.P. de; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2005-01-01

    Case-cohort analyses were performed on meat and fish consumption in relation to K-ras mutations in 448 colon and 160 rectal cancers that occurred during 7.3 years of follow-up, excluding the first 2.3 years, and 2948 subcohort members of The Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer. Adjusted

  20. Red and processed meat consumption and the risk of esophageal and gastric cancer subtypes in the netherlands cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keszei, A.P.; Schouten, L.J.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2012-01-01

    Background: Prospective data on red and processed meat in relation to risk of subtypes of esophageal and gastric cancer are scarce. We present analyses of association between red and processed meat and the risk of esophageal and gastric cancer subtypes within The Netherlands Cohort Study on Diet and

  1. Trends in oral cavity cancer incidence, mortality, survival and treatment in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Boukje A C; Brands, Marieke T; Geurts, Sandra M E; Merkx, Matthias A W; Roodenburg, Jan L N

    2016-08-01

    Information on epidemiology is essential to evaluate care for the growing group of oral cancer patients. We investigated trends in incidence, mortality and relative survival rates for oral cavity cancer (OCC) and its subsites in the Netherlands from 1991 to 2010, and relate these to changes in stage and treatment. Patient (age, sex), tumour (subsite, stage) and treatment characteristics of patients diagnosed with OCC (ICD-O-3: C02-C06) in 1991-2010 were extracted from the Netherlands Cancer Registry. Incidence, mortality and 5-year relative survival rates over time are presented, as well as trends in type of treatment. The incidence of OCC increased with +1.2% (95%CI: +0.9%;+1.6%) per year: more strongly in women, stage I and IV disease, and in cancers of the tongue and gum. The mortality rate slightly rose (+0.8%, 95%CI: +0.3%;+1.3% per year), but differed by subsite. The 5-year relative survival improved from 57% in 1991-1995 to 62% in 2006-2010. The 5-year relative survival was better for women compared with men (64% and 55%, respectively), decreased with increasing stage, was the best for tongue cancer (63%) and the worst for cancer of the gum (56%) and floor of mouth cancer (55%). The relative excess risk of dying was higher for non-surgery-based treatments. Surgery was the main treatment option and the proportion of "surgery only" rose in stage I and III disease. The incidence and, to a lesser extent, mortality of OCC are increasing and therefore, even with slightly improving survival rates, OCC is an increasingly important health problem. © 2016 UICC.

  2. SWOV – Institute for Road Safety Research in the Netherlands : introducing the organization of transport studies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, J.

    2015-01-01

    SWOV Institute for Road Safety Research was founded in 1962. SWOV's main objective is to contribute to road safety by means of scientific research and dissemination of results and knowledge to professionals and policy makers. SWOV is the national institute for road safety research in the

  3. 78 FR 30933 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-23

    .... Time: 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate contract proposals. Place: National Cancer... Conference Call). Contact Person: Clifford W Schweinfest, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, Special Review... Committee: National Cancer Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Nanotech-Biosensor Platforms for Cancer. Date...

  4. R&D Internationalization, R&D Collaboration and Public Knowledge Institutions in Small Economies : Evidence from Finland and the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Beers, C.; Berghäll, E.; Poot, T.

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates domestic and foreign innovating firms’ determinants of R&D collaboration with domestic universities and public knowledge institutes in Finland and the Netherlands. We put particular emphasis on the impact of incoming academic spillovers on the probability to co-operate with

  5. An outbreak of colistin-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae in the Netherlands (July to December 2013), with inter-institutional spread

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weterings, V; Zhou, K; Rossen, J W; van Stenis, D; Thewessen, E; Kluytmans, J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/323262139; Veenemans, J

    We describe an outbreak of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (KPC-KP) ST258 that occurred in two institutions (a hospital and a nursing home) in the Netherlands between July and December 2013. In total, six patients were found to be positive for KPC-KP. All

  6. An outbreak of colistin-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae in the Netherlands (July to December 2013), with inter-institutional spread

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weterings, V.; Zhou, K.; Rossen, J. W.; van Stenis, D.; Thewessen, E.; Kluytmans, J.; Veenemans, J.

    We describe an outbreak of Klebsiella pneurnonine carbapenemase (KPC)-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (KPC-KP) ST258 that occurred in two institutions (a hospital and a nursing home) in the Netherlands between July and December 2013. In total, six patients were found to be positive for KPC-KP. All

  7. Improved survival of colon cancer due to improved treatment and detection: a nationwide population-based study in The Netherlands 1989-2006

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Steenbergen, L. N.; Elferink, M. A. G.; Krijnen, P.; Lemmens, V. E. P. P.; Siesling, S.; Rutten, H. J. T.; Richel, D. J.; Karim-Kos, H. E.; Coebergh, J. W. W.

    2010-01-01

    Background: We described changes in treatment of colon cancer over time and the impact on survival in The Netherlands in the period 1989-2006. Patients and methods: All 103 744 patients with invasive colon cancer during 1989-2006 in The Netherlands were included. Data were extracted from The

  8. Improved survival of colon cancer due to improved treatment and detection: A nationwide population-based study in The Netherlands 1989-2006

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.N. van Steenbergen (Liza); M.A.G. Elferink; P. Krijnen (Pieta); V.E.P.P. Lemmens (Valery); S. Siesling (Sabine); H.J.T. Rutten (Harm); D.J. Richel (Dirk); H.E. Karim-Kos (Henrike); J.W.W. Coebergh (Jan Willem)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground: We described changes in treatment of colon cancer over time and the impact on survival in The Netherlands in the period 1989-2006. Patients and methods: All 103 744 patients with invasive colon cancer during 1989-2006 in The Netherlands were included. Data were extracted from

  9. Improved survival of colon cancer due to improved treatment and detection: a nationwide population-based study in The Netherlands 1989-2006.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Steenbergen, L.N.; Elferink, M.A.G.; Krijnen, P.; Lemmens, V.E.P.P.; Siesling, S.; Siesling, Sabine; Rutten, H.J.T.; Richel, D.J; Karim-Kos, H.E.; Coebergh, J.W.W.

    2010-01-01

    Background: We described changes in treatment of colon cancer over time and the impact on survival in The Netherlands in the period 1989–2006. Patients and methods: All 103 744 patients with invasive colon cancer during 1989–2006 in The Netherlands were included. Data were extracted from The

  10. How sustainable entrepreneurs engage in institutional change : insights from biomass torrefaction in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thompson, N.A.; Herrmann, A.M.; Hekkert, M.P.

    2015-01-01

    Sustainable entrepreneurship often requires a purposeful change to the existing business environment, market regulations, and societal norms and values (institutions) to ensure sustainable products and services become legitimate and competitive. Yet, how sustainable entrepreneurs alter or create

  11. Alcohol consumption and risk of pancreatic cancer in the Netherlands cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinen, Mirjam M; Verhage, Bas A J; Ambergen, Ton A W; Goldbohm, R Alexandra; van den Brandt, Piet A

    2009-05-15

    To examine prospectively the relation between alcohol consumption and pancreatic cancer risk, the authors analyzed data from the Netherlands Cohort Study. Participants were 120,852 persons who completed a baseline questionnaire in 1986. After 13.3 years of follow-up, 350 cases of pancreatic cancer (67% microscopically confirmed) were available for analysis. Compared with abstention, the highest category of alcohol consumption (> or =30 g/day of ethanol) was positively associated with pancreatic cancer risk (for all cases, rate ratio = 1.57, 95% confidence interval: 1.03, 2.39; P(trend) = 0.12; for microscopically confirmed cases, rate ratio = 1.54, 95% confidence interval: 0.94, 2.54; P(trend) = 0.22). In a subgroup of stable alcohol users (no change during the 5 years before baseline), a similarly increased risk of pancreatic cancer was found. This increased risk was limited to the first 7 years of follow-up. No associations were observed between consumption of specific alcoholic beverages and risk of pancreatic cancer. The associations were not modified by folate intake or smoking. Overall, these findings suggest an increased pancreatic cancer risk for persons with a high ethanol intake (> or =30 g/day). However, this increased risk was observed only during the first 7 years of follow-up.

  12. End-of-life care and circumstances of death in patients dying as a result of cancer in Belgium and the Netherlands: a retrospective comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeussen, Koen; Van den Block, Lieve; Echteld, Michael A; Boffin, Nicole; Bilsen, Johan; Van Casteren, Viviane; Abarshi, Ebun; Donker, Gé; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje; Deliens, Luc

    2011-11-10

    To examine and compare end-of-life care in patients with cancer dying in Belgium and the Netherlands. A mortality follow-back study was undertaken in 2008 via representative nationwide sentinel networks of general practitioners (GPs) in Belgium and the Netherlands. By using similar standardized procedures, GPs reported on aspects of end-of-life care and the circumstances of nonsudden death of patients with cancer in their practice. Of the 422 reported patients with cancer, most resided at home during the last year of life (Belgium, 91%; the Netherlands, 95%). Death occurred at home in 34% (Belgium) and 61% (the Netherlands) and in the hospital in 29% (Belgium) and 19% (the Netherlands). In the last month of life, end-of-life issues were more often discussed in the Netherlands (88%) than in Belgium (68%). In both countries, physical problems were discussed most often (Belgium, 49%; the Netherlands, 78%) and spiritual issues least often (Belgium, 20%; the Netherlands, 32%). Certain end-of-life treatment preferences were known for 43% (Belgium) and 67% (the Netherlands) of patients. In the last week of life, treatment was most often focused on palliation (Belgium, 94%; the Netherlands, 91%). Physical distress was reported in 84% (Belgium) and 76% (the Netherlands) of patients and psychological distress in 59% and 36%. Most distressing was lack of energy (Belgium, 73%; the Netherlands, 71%) and lack of appetite (Belgium, 61%; the Netherlands, 53%). Two thirds of patients were bedridden (Belgium, 67%; the Netherlands, 69%). Although place of death and communication about end-of-life issues differ substantially, a palliative treatment goal is adopted for the vast majority of patients in both countries. However, GPs reported that the majority of patients experienced symptom distress at the end of life, which suggests important challenges remain for improving end-of-life care.

  13. A Q fever outbreak in a psychiatric care institution in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koene, R.P.M.; Schimmer, B.; Rensen, H.; Biesheuvel, M.; Bruin, A. de; Lohuis, A.; Horrevorts, A.; Lunel, F.V.; Delsing, C.E.; Hautvast, J.L.A.

    2011-01-01

    In May 2008 the Nijmegen Municipal Health Service (MHS) was informed about an outbreak of atypical pneumonia in three in-patients of a long-term psychiatric institution. The patients had been hospitalized and had laboratory confirmation of acute Q fever infection. The MHS started active case finding

  14. Small but significant socioeconomic inequalities in axillary staging and treatment of breast cancer in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarts, M J; Hamelinck, V C; Bastiaannet, E; Coebergh, J W W; Liefers, G J; Voogd, A C; van der Sangen, M; Louwman, W J

    2012-01-01

    Background: The use of sentinel node biopsy (SNB), lymph node dissection, breast-conserving surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and hormonal treatment for breast cancer was evaluated in relation to socioeconomic status (SES) in the Netherlands, where access to care was assumed to be equal. Methods: Female breast cancer patients diagnosed between 1994 and 2008 were selected from the nationwide population-based Netherlands Cancer Registry (N=176 505). Socioeconomic status was assessed based on income, employment and education at postal code level. Multivariable models included age, year of diagnosis and stage. Results: Sentinal node biopsy was less often applied in high-SES patients (multivariable analyses, ⩽49 years: odds ratio (OR) 0.70 (95% CI: 0.56–0.89); 50–75 years: 0.85 (0.73–0.99)). Additionally, lymph node dissection was less common in low-SES patients aged ⩾76 years (OR 1.34 (0.95–1.89)). Socioeconomic status-related differences in treatment were only significant in the age group 50–75 years. High-SES women with stage T1–2 were more likely to undergo breast-conserving surgery (+radiotherapy) (OR 1.15 (1.09–1.22) and OR 1.16 (1.09–1.22), respectively). Chemotherapy use among node-positive patients was higher in the high-SES group, but was not significant in multivariable analysis. Hormonal therapy was not related to SES. Conclusion: Small but significant differences were observed in the use of SNB, lymph node dissection and breast-conserving surgery according to SES in Dutch breast cancer patients despite assumed equal access to health care. PMID:22596236

  15. Dana-Farber Cancer Institute: Identification of Therapeutic Targets Across Cancer Types | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Dana Farber Cancer Institute CTD2 Center focuses on the use of high-throughput genetic and bioinformatic approaches to identify and credential oncogenes and co-dependencies in cancers. This Center aims to provide the cancer research community with information that will facilitate the prioritization of targets based on both genomic and functional evidence, inform the most appropriate genetic context for downstream mechanistic and validation studies, and enable the translation of this information into therapeutics and diagnostics.

  16. Roswell Park Cancer Institute/Howard University Prostate Cancer Scholars Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0531 TITLE: Roswell Park Cancer Institute/Howard University Prostate Cancer Scholars Program PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Roswell Park Cancer Institute/Howard University Prostate Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0531 Cancer Scholars Program 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c... PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Adam Kisailus, PHD; Wendy Huss, PHD ; Richard Hershberger, MBA, PHD; Anna Allen PHD 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK

  17. 76 FR 14675 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-17

    ..., MD 20852. Contact Person: David G. Ransom, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, Research Programs Review..., Bethesda, MD 20892-8328, 301-451-4757, david.ransom@nih.gov . Name of Committee: National Cancer Institute...

  18. 75 FR 71713 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-24

    .... Contact Person: David G. Ransom, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, Research Programs Review Branch, Division..., MD 20892-8328, 301-451-4757, david.ransom@nih.gov . Name of Committee: National Cancer Institute...

  19. 75 FR 44274 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-28

    ... Meeting Ctr. Bethesda, 8120 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20814. Contact Person: David G. Ransom, PhD... Cancer Institute, NIH, 6116 Executive Blvd, Rm 8133, Bethesda, MD 20892-8328, 301-451-4757, david.ransom...

  20. 76 FR 52960 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-24

    ... Regency Crystal City, 2799 Jefferson Davis Highway, Arlington, VA 22202. Contact Person: Lynn M Amende, Ph..., Special Review and Logistics Branch, Division of Extramural Activities, National Cancer Institute, NIH...

  1. Reproductive and Hormonal Factors in Association With Ovarian Cancer in the Netherlands Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braem, M. G. M.; Onland-Moret, N. C.; van den Brandt, P. A.; Goldbohm, R. A.; Peeters, P. H. M.; Kruitwagen, R. F. P. M.; Schouten, L. J.

    2010-01-01

    Parity, oral contraceptive use, and hysterectomy are known to protect against ovarian cancer, whereas the effect of other reproductive factors remains unclear. The authors investigated the association between several reproductive and hormonal factors and the risk of epithelial invasive ovarian cancer among postmenopausal women participating in the Netherlands Cohort Study on Diet and Cancer. Information on reproductive history and exogenous hormone use was obtained through a self-administered questionnaire at baseline in 1986. After 16.3 years of follow-up, 375 cases and 2,331 subcohort members were available for case-cohort analysis. Ovarian cancer risk was reduced for parous women, with increasing parity, and for hysterectomized women. Moreover, the authors found evidence that oral contraceptive use is protective against ovarian cancer, even when initiated at an older age. In addition, a reduced risk was observed for each year reduction in age at natural menopause and per year reduction in total menstrual life span. A small increased risk was observed with prolonged time to pregnancy, but no difference was found between ever-married nulliparous women and never-married nulliparous women. Moreover, no associations were observed for age at first birth, age at menarche, age at first and last use of oral contraceptives, and use of hormone replacement therapy. PMID:20861144

  2. Current practice in the management of superficial bladder cancer in the Netherlands and Belgian Flanders: a survey.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witjes, J.A.; Melissen, D.O.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Because there is no national guideline for the diagnosis, therapy and follow up of (superficial) bladder cancer in the Netherlands and Belgium, the actual patient management may differ between urologists. The purpose of this study is to get insight in the current way urologists diagnose,

  3. Large variation between hospitals in immediate breast reconstruction rates after mastectomy for breast cancer in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bommel, A.C.M.; Mureau, Marc A.M.; Schreuder, K.; van Dalen, T.; Vrancken Peeters, M.T.F.D.; Schrieks, M.; Maduro, J.H.; Siesling, Sabine

    Background The present study aimed to describe the use of immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) after mastectomy for invasive breast cancer and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in hospitals in the Netherlands and determine whether patient and tumor factors account for the variation. Methods Patients

  4. Implementation of trastuzumab in conjunction with adjuvant chemotherapy in the treatment of non-metastatic breast cancer in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Munck, L.; Schaapveld, M.; Siesling, Sabine; Wessling, J.; Voogd, A.C.; Tjan-Heijnen, V.C.G.; Otter, R.; Willemse, P.H.B.

    2011-01-01

    Trastuzumab in conjunction with adjuvant chemotherapy markedly improves outcome. In the Netherlands, a national guideline was released in September 2005 stating that trastuzumab should be given in conjunction with adjuvant chemotherapy in women with HER2-positive breast cancer. Aim of this study was

  5. Implementation of trastuzumab in conjunction with adjuvant chemotherapy in the treatment of non-metastatic breast cancer in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Munck, L.; Schaapveld, M.; Siesling, S.; Wesseling, J.; Voogd, A. C.; Tjan-Heijnen, V. C. G.; Otter, R.; Willemse, P. H. B.

    Trastuzumab in conjunction with adjuvant chemotherapy markedly improves outcome. In the Netherlands, a national guideline was released in September 2005 stating that trastuzumab should be given in conjunction with adjuvant chemotherapy in women with HER2-positive breast cancer. Aim of this study was

  6. Cabazitaxel in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: results of a compassionate use program in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wissing, M.D.; Oort, I.M. van; Gerritsen, W.R.; Eertwegh, A.J. van den; Coenen, J.L.; Bergman, A.M.; Gelderblom, H.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cabazitaxel has been reimbursed as a second-line therapy for patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) in the Netherlands since 2011. Before reimbursement was available, cabazitaxel was provided through a Compassionate Use Program (CUP). We report the results of

  7. Analysis of Maryland cancer patient participation in National Cancer Institute-supported cancer treatment clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baquet, Claudia R; Ellison, Gary L; Mishra, Shiraz I

    2009-05-01

    We examined the relationship of sociodemographic factors, urban/rural residence, and county-level socioeconomic factors on accrual of Maryland patients with cancer to National Cancer Institute (NCI)-sponsored cancer treatment clinical trials. Data were analyzed for the period 1999 to 2002 for 2240 Maryland patients with cancer accrued onto NCI-sponsored treatment trials. The extent to which Maryland patients with cancer and patients residing in lower socioeconomic and/or rural areas were accrued to cancer trials and were representative of all patients with cancer in Maryland was determined. Data were obtained from several sources, including NCI's Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program for Maryland patients with cancer in Cooperative Group therapeutic trials, Maryland Cancer Registry data on cancer incidence, and United States Census and the Department of Agriculture. For Maryland patients with cancer accrued onto NCI-sponsored treatment trials between 1999 and 2002, subgroups accrued at a higher rate included pediatric and adolescent age groups, white patients, female patients (for sex-specific tumors), patients with private health insurance, and patients residing in the Maryland National Capitol region. Moreover, between 1999 and 2002, there was an estimated annual decline (8.9% per year; P Maryland patients with cancer onto NCI-sponsored treatment trials based on patient age, race/ethnicity, geography of residence, and county-level socioeconomic factors. Findings provide the basis for development of innovative tailored and targeted educational efforts to improve trial accrual, particularly for the underserved.

  8. 77 FR 33476 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-06

    ... applications. Place: National Institutes of Health, 6116 Executive Boulevard, Room 611, Rockville, MD 20852... Review and Logistics Branch, Division of Extramural Activities, National Cancer Institute, NIH, 6116..., 2012. Time: 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place: National...

  9. 77 FR 28613 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-15

    ... review and evaluate contract proposals. Place: National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute...: Adriana Stoica, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, Special Review and Logistics Branch, Division of..., 2012. Time: 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place: Bethesda...

  10. 77 FR 12600 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    ... contract proposals. Place: National Institutes of Health, 6116 Executive Boulevard, Room 707, Rockville, MD..., Special Review & Logistics Branch, Division of Extramural Activities, National Cancer Institute, NIH, 6116... 8, 2012. Time: 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place...

  11. 78 FR 16274 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to...: 8:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Agenda: Challenges of Global HPV Vaccination. Place: Hilton Miami Downtown... when applicable, the business or professional affiliation of the interested person. Information is also...

  12. 76 FR 62079 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-06

    ... hereby given of a meeting of the Board of Scientific Counselors for Basic Sciences National Cancer... consideration of personnel qualifications and performance, and the competence of individual investigators, the...: Board of Scientific Counselors for Basic Sciences National Cancer Institute. Date: November 15, 2011...

  13. 77 FR 31628 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-29

    ... hereby given of a meeting of the Board of Scientific Counselors for Basic Sciences National Cancer... consideration of personnel qualifications and performance, and the competence of individual investigators, the...: Board of Scientific Counselors for Basic Sciences National Cancer Institute. Date: July 9, 2012. Time: 8...

  14. 75 FR 62547 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-12

    ... hereby given of a meeting of the Board of Scientific Counselors for Basic Sciences National Cancer... consideration of personnel qualifications and performance, and the competence of individual investigators, the...: Board of Scientific Counselors for Basic Sciences National Cancer Institute. Date: November 15-16, 2010...

  15. 76 FR 33321 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-08

    ... hereby given of a meeting of the Board of Scientific Counselors for Basic Sciences National Cancer... consideration of personnel qualifications and performance, and the competence of individual investigators, the...: Board of Scientific Counselors for Basic Sciences National Cancer Institute. Date: July 11, 2011. Time...

  16. 78 FR 10622 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-14

    ... hereby given of a meeting of the Board of Scientific Counselors for Basic Sciences National Cancer... consideration of personnel qualifications and performance, and the competence of individual investigators, the...: Board of Scientific Counselors for Basic Sciences National Cancer Institute, NCI Board of Scientific...

  17. 75 FR 6043 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-05

    ... hereby given of a meeting of the Board of Scientific Counselors for Basic Sciences National Cancer... consideration of personnel qualifications and performance, and the competence of individual investigators, the...: Board of Scientific Counselors for Basic Sciences National Cancer Institute. Date: March 15-16, 2010...

  18. Epithelial ovarian cancer and the occurrence of skin cancer in the Netherlands: histological type connotations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niekerk, G.C. van; Bulten, J.; Verbeek, A.L.M.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Patients with epithelial ovarian cancer have a high risk of (non-)melanoma skin cancer. The association between histological variants of primary ovarian cancer and skin cancer is poorly documented. Objectives. To further evaluate the risk of skin cancer based on the histology of the

  19. Dietary folate and folate vitamers and the risk of pancreatic cancer in the Netherlands cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keszei, András P; Verhage, Bas A J; Heinen, Mirjam M; Goldbohm, Royle A; van den Brandt, Piet A

    2009-06-01

    An association between high intake of folate and reduced risk of cancer has been suggested by previous research. However, epidemiologic data from cohort studies regarding the relationship between dietary folate and pancreatic cancer are sparse and inconsistent. We examined the association between dietary folate intake and risk of pancreatic cancer within the Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer. Men and women (120,852), ages 55 to 69 years, were recruited. Information on diet was collected at baseline by means of food frequency questionnaires, and the cohort was followed for 13.3 years. Total folate and vitamer intake were calculated using folate contents of food items derived from a validated liquid chromatography trienzyme method. Cases (n = 363) were identified by record linkage with regional cancer registries and the Dutch National Database of Pathology Reports. A case-cohort approach was used using the follow-up data of a random subcohort (n = 5,000) identified at the onset of the cohort. Multivariable hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals were estimated using Cox proportional hazards model. After adjusting for age, gender, smoking status, number of years smoked, number of cigarettes smoked per day, and intake of added sugar multivariate hazard ratio comparing the highest and lowest quintiles of folate intake for pancreatic cancer risk was 1.37 (confidence interval, 0.97-1.94; P(trend) = 0.07). When folate vitamers were analyzed separately, results did not show a difference in association. Our results do not support a protective association of total dietary folate or individual folate vitamers on the risk of pancreatic cancer.

  20. Comment Topic Evolution on a Cancer Institution's Facebook Page.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Chunlei; Zhou, Li; Plasek, Joseph; Rozenblum, Ronen; Bates, David

    2017-08-23

    Our goal was to identify and track the evolution of the topics discussed in free-text comments on a cancer institution's social media page. We utilized the Latent Dirichlet Allocation model to extract ten topics from free-text comments on a cancer research institution's Facebook™ page between January 1, 2009, and June 30, 2014. We calculated Pearson correlation coefficients between the comment categories to demonstrate topic intensity evolution. A total of 4,335 comments were included in this study, from which ten topics were identified: greetings (17.3%), comments about the cancer institution (16.7%), blessings (10.9%), time (10.7%), treatment (9.3%), expressions of optimism (7.9%), tumor (7.5%), father figure (6.3%), and other family members & friends (8.2%), leaving 5.1% of comments unclassified. The comment distributions reveal an overall increasing trend during the study period. We discovered a strong positive correlation between greetings and other family members & friends (r=0.88; p<0.001), a positive correlation between blessings and the cancer institution (r=0.65; p<0.05), and a negative correlation between blessings and greetings (r=-0.70; p<0.05). A cancer institution's social media platform can provide emotional support to patients and family members. Topic analysis may help institutions better identify and support the needs (emotional, instrumental, and social) of their community and influence their social media strategy.

  1. The role of government and financial institutions during a housing market crisis : a case study of the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelhouwer, P.J.

    2017-01-01

    The generous mortgage tax relief enjoyed in the Netherlands and the possible existence of a house price bubble cannot explain the sharp decrease of house prices in the Netherlands in the period from 2011–2013. This sharp decline can, however, be explained by the rigorous adjustments to mortgage

  2. Effect of implementation of the mass breast cancer screening programme in older women in the Netherlands: population based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Glas, Nienke A; de Craen, Anton J M; Bastiaannet, Esther; Op 't Land, Ester G; Kiderlen, Mandy; van de Water, Willemien; Siesling, Sabine; Portielje, Johanneke E A; Schuttevaer, Herman M; de Bock, Geertruida Truuske H; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Liefers, Gerrit-Jan

    2014-09-14

    To assess the incidence of early stage and advanced stage breast cancer before and after the implementation of mass screening in women aged 70-75 years in the Netherlands in 1998. Prospective nationwide population based study. National cancer registry, the Netherlands. Patients aged 70-75 years with a diagnosis of invasive or ductal carcinoma in situ breast cancer between 1995 and 2011 (n=25,414). Incidence rates were calculated using population data from Statistics Netherlands. Incidence rates of early stage (I, II, or ductal carcinoma in situ) and advanced stage (III and IV) breast cancer before and after implementation of screening. Hypotheses were formulated before data collection. The incidence of early stage tumours significantly increased after the extension for implementation of screening (248.7 cases per 100,000 women before screening up to 362.9 cases per 100,000 women after implementation of screening, incidence rate ratio 1.46, 95% confidence interval 1.40 to 1.52, Pbreast cancers decreased to a far lesser extent (58.6 cases per 100,000 women before screening to 51.8 cases per 100,000 women after implementation of screening, incidence rate ratio 0.88, 0.81 to 0.97, Pbreast cancer, while that of early stage tumours has strongly increased. © de Glas et al 2014.

  3. Dana-Farber Cancer Institute | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Functional Annotation of Cancer Genomes Principal Investigator: William C. Hahn, M.D., Ph.D. The comprehensive characterization of cancer genomes has and will continue to provide an increasingly complete catalog of genetic alterations in specific cancers. However, most epithelial cancers harbor hundreds of genetic alterations as a consequence of genomic instability. Therefore, the functional consequences of the majority of mutations remain unclear.

  4. Epithelial ovarian cancer and the occurrence of skin cancer in the Netherlands: histological type connotations

    OpenAIRE

    André L. M. Verbeek; Johan Bulten; van Niekerk, Catharina C.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Patients with epithelial ovarian cancer have a high risk of (non-)melanoma skin cancer. The association between histological variants of primary ovarian cancer and skin cancer is poorly documented. Objectives. To further evaluate the risk of skin cancer based on the histology of the epithelial ovarian cancer. Methods. A cross-sectional study within a large population-based dataset. Results. Skin cancer was found in 2.7% (95% CI: 2.3–3.1) of the 5366 individuals forming our dataset...

  5. End-of-Life Care and Circumstances of Death in Patients Dying As a Result of Cancer in Belgium and the Netherlands: A Retrospective Comparative Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeussen, K.; van den Block, L.; Echteld, M.A.; Boffin, N.; Bilsen, J.; van Casteren, V.; Abarshi-Fatiregun, E.A.B.; Donker, G.; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B.D.; Deliens, L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To examine and compare end-of-life care in patients with cancer dying in Belgium and the Netherlands. Patients and Methods: A mortality follow-back study was undertaken in 2008 via representative nationwide sentinel networks of general practitioners (GPs) in Belgium and the Netherlands. By

  6. End-of-life care and circumstances of death in patients dying as a result of cancer in Belgium and the Netherlands: a retrospective comparative study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeussen, K.; Block, L. van den; Echteld, M.A.; Boffin, N.; Bilsen, J.; Casteren, V. van; Abarshi, E.; Donker, G.; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B.; Deliens, L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To examine and compare end-of-life care in patients with cancer dying in Belgium and the Netherlands. Patients and methods: A mortality follow-back study was undertaken in 2008 via representative nationwide sentinel networks of general practitioners (GPs) in Belgium and the Netherlands. By

  7. Uptake of prenatal diagnostic testing for retinoblastoma compared to other hereditary cancer syndromes in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dommering, Charlotte J; Henneman, Lidewij; van der Hout, Annemarie H; Jonker, Marianne A; Tops, Carli M J; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; van der Luijt, Rob B; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Redeker, Egbert J W; de Die-Smulders, Christine E M; Moll, Annette C; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne

    2017-04-01

    Since the 1980s the genetic cause of many hereditary tumor syndromes has been elucidated. As a consequence, carriers of a deleterious mutation in these genes may opt for prenatal diagnoses (PND). We studied the uptake of prenatal diagnosis for five hereditary cancer syndromes in the Netherlands. Uptake for retinoblastoma (Rb) was compared with uptake for Von Hippel-Lindau disease (VHL), Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS), familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), and hereditary breast ovarian cancer (HBOC). A questionnaire was completed by all nine DNA-diagnostic laboratories assessing the number of independent mutation-positive families identified from the start of diagnostic testing until May 2013, and the number of PNDs performed for these syndromes within these families. Of 187 families with a known Rb-gene mutation, 22 had performed PND (11.8%), this was significantly higher than uptake for FAP (1.6%) and HBOC (cancer syndromes PND started 10-15 years after the introduction and uptake for PND showed an increase after 2009. We conclude that uptake of PND for Rb was significantly higher than for FAP and HBOC, but not different from VHL and LFS. Early onset, high penetrance, lack of preventive surgery and perceived burden of disease may explain these differences.

  8. Toenail selenium status and risk of subtypes of head-neck cancer: The Netherlands Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maasland, Denise H E; Schouten, Leo J; Kremer, Bernd; van den Brandt, Piet A

    2016-06-01

    There is limited prospective data on the relationship between selenium status and the risk of head-neck cancer (HNC) and HNC subtypes (i.e., oral cavity cancer [OCC], oro-/hypopharyngeal cancer [OHPC] and laryngeal cancer [LC]). Therefore, we investigated the association between toenail selenium, reflecting long-term selenium exposure, and HNC risk within the Netherlands Cohort Study. At baseline, 120,852 participants completed a self-administered questionnaire about diet and other cancer risk factors and were asked to provide toenail clippings. After 20.3 years of follow-up, 294 cases of HNC (95 OCC, 62 OHPC, two oral cavity/pharynx unspecified or overlapping and 135 LC) and 2,164 subcohort members were available for case-cohort analysis using Cox proportional hazards models. Toenail selenium status was statistically significantly associated with a decreased risk of HNC overall (multivariate RR for quartile four versus one: 0.55, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.37-0.82, P trend = 0.001). The association between toenail selenium and risk of HNC overall was stronger among men than women, but no statistically significant interaction with sex was found. Toenail selenium level was also associated with a decreased risk of all HNC subtypes, with statistically significant associations in OHPC and LC. No statistically significant interaction was found between toenail selenium level and cigarette smoking or alcohol consumption for HNC overall. In this large cohort study, we found an inverse association between toenail selenium level and HNC risk. Among HNC subtypes, this association was strongest for OHPC and LC. Furthermore, the association of toenail selenium status with HNC risk was stronger among men than women. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The Institutional Embedding of Interactive Policy Making Insights From a Comparative Research Based on Eight Interactive Projects in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edelenbos, Jurian; Klok, Pieter J.; van Tatenhove, Jan

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the authors address citizen involvement at the central government level in the Netherlands. Through comparative research in which they systematically analyze eight interactive projects in three governmental departments, the authors especially pay attention to the relation between

  10. Meat consumption and K-ras mutations in sporadic colon and rectal cancer in The Netherlands Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Brink, M.; Weijenberg, M.P.; de Goeij, A.F.; Roemen, G M J M; Lentjes, M.H.F.M.; de Bruine, A.P.; Goldbohm, R. A.; van den Brandt, P. A.

    2005-01-01

    Case-cohort analyses were performed on meat and fish consumption in relation to K-ras mutations in 448 colon and 160 rectal cancers that occurred during 7.3 years of follow-up, excluding the first 2.3 years, and 2948 subcohort members of The Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer. Adjusted incidence rate ratios and 95% confidence intervals were computed for colon and rectal cancer and for K-ras mutation status subgroups. Total fresh meat, most types of fresh meat and fish were not associ...

  11. The impact of adjuvant therapy on contralateral breast cancer risk and the prognostic significance of contralateral breast cancer : a population based study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaapveld, Michael; Visser, Otto; Louwman, W. J.; Willemse, Pax H. B.; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; van der Graaf, Winette T. A.; Otter, Renee; Coebergh, Jan Willem W.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.

    Background The impact of age and adjuvant therapy on contralateral breast cancer (CBC) risk and prognostic significance of CBC were evaluated. Patients and Methods In 45,229 surgically treated stage I-IIIA patients diagnosed in the Netherlands between 1989 and 2002 CBC risk was quantified using

  12. The impact of adjuvant therapy on contralateral breast cancer risk and the prognostic significance of contralateral breast cancer: a population based study in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaapveld, M.; Visser, O.; Louwman, W.J.; Willemse, P.H.; Vries, EG de; Graaf, W.T.A. van der; Otter, R.; Coebergh, J.W.; Leeuwen, F.E. van

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The impact of age and adjuvant therapy on contralateral breast cancer (CBC) risk and prognostic significance of CBC were evaluated. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In 45,229 surgically treated stage I-IIIA patients diagnosed in the Netherlands between 1989 and 2002 CBC risk was quantified using

  13. The impact of adjuvant therapy on contralateral breast cancer risk and the prognostic significance of contralateral breast cancer: A population based study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Schaapveld (Michael); O.J. Visser (Otto); W.J. Louwman; P.H.B. Willemse (Pax); E.G.E. de Vries (Elisabeth); W.T.A. van der Graaf (Winette); R. Otter (Renée); J.W.W. Coebergh (Jan Willem); F.E. van Leeuwen (Flora)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The impact of age and adjuvant therapy on contralateral breast cancer (CBC) risk and prognostic significance of CBC were evaluated. Patients and Methods: In 45,229 surgically treated stage I-IIIA patients diagnosed in the Netherlands between 1989 and 2002 CBC risk was

  14. Body Mass Index and von Hippel-Lindau Gene Mutations in Clear-cell Renal Cancer: Results of the Netherlands Cohort Study on Diet and Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, K.M.; Schouten, L.J.; Hudak, E.; Verhage, B.; Dijk, B.A.C. van; Hulsbergen - Kaa, C.A. van de; Goldbohm, R.A.; Oosterwijk, E.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Body mass index (BMI) is an important risk factor for clear-cell renal cancer (cc-RCC). A common molecular alteration in cc-RCC is loss-of-function of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene. We evaluated the association between BMI and VHL mutations in cc-RCC by using data from the Netherlands

  15. Long-term dietary sodium, potassium and fluid intake; Exploring potential novel risk factors for renal cell cancer in the Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deckers, I.A.G.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Engeland, M. van; Soetekouw, P.M.M.B.; Baldewijns, M.M.L.L.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Schouten, L.J.

    2014-01-01

    Background:As sodium, potassium and fluid intake are related to hypertension, an established risk factor for renal cell cancer (RCC), they may be independent risk factors for RCC.Methods:The Netherlands Cohort Study (NLCS) with case-cohort design included 120 852 participants aged 55-69 years. At

  16. Oral cancer trends in a single head-and-neck cancer center in the Netherlands; decline in T-stage at the time of admission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijers, M.; Leemans, C.R.; Aartman, I.H.; Karagozoglu, K.H.; van der Waal, I.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In this study we evaluated the possible epidemiologic changes of oral cancer patients in the Netherlands between the years 1980-1984 and 2000-2004. We specifically studied the differences in male-female ratio, age, TNM-stage, site distribution, and alcohol and tobacco use. MATERIALS AND

  17. Large variation between hospitals in immediate breast reconstruction rates after mastectomy for breast cancer in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bommel, A C M; Mureau, M A M; Schreuder, K; van Dalen, T; Vrancken Peeters, M T F D; Schrieks, M; Maduro, J H; Siesling, S

    2017-02-01

    The present study aimed to describe the use of immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) after mastectomy for invasive breast cancer and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in hospitals in the Netherlands and determine whether patient and tumor factors account for the variation. Patients undergoing mastectomy for primary invasive breast cancer or DCIS diagnosed between January 1, 2011 and December 31, 2013 were selected from the NABON Breast Cancer Audit. All the 92 hospitals in the Netherlands were included. The use of IBR in all hospitals was compared using unadjusted and adjusted analyses. Patient and tumor factors were evaluated by univariate and multivariate analyses. In total, 16,953 patients underwent mastectomy: 15,072 for invasive breast cancer and 1881 for DCIS. Unadjusted analyses revealed considerable variation between hospitals in postmastectomy IBR rates for invasive breast cancer (mean 17%; range 0-64%) and DCIS (mean 42%; range 0-83%). For DCIS, younger age and multifocal disease were factors that significantly increased IBR rates. For patients diagnosed with invasive breast cancer, IBR was more often used in younger patients, multifocal tumors, smaller tumors, tumors with a lower grade, absence of lymph node involvement, ductal carcinomas, or hormone-receptor positive/HER2-positive tumors. After case-mix adjustments for these factors, the variation in the use of IBR between hospitals remained large (0-43% for invasive breast cancer and 0-74% for DCIS). A large variation between hospitals was found in postmastectomy IBR rates in the Netherlands for both invasive breast cancer and DCIS even after adjustment for patient and tumor factors. Copyright © 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Inferior survival for young patients with contralateral compared to unilateral breast cancer : A nationwide population-based study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Font-Gonzalez, A.; Liu, L.; Voogd, A.C.; Schmidt, M.; Roukema, J.A.; Coebergh, J.W.; de Vries, E.; Soerjomataram, I.

    To compare overall survival between women with unilateral breast cancer (UBC) and contralateral breast cancer (CBC). Women with UBC (N = 182,562; 95 %) and CBC (N = 8,912; 5 %) recorded in the Netherlands Cancer Registry between 1989 and 2008 were included and followed until 2010. We incorporated

  19. The Regina Elena National Cancer Institute process of accreditation according to the standards of the Organisation of European Cancer Institutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canitano, Stefano; Di Turi, Annunziata; Caolo, Giuseppina; Pignatelli, Adriana C; Papa, Elena; Branca, Marta; Cerimele, Marina; De Maria, Ruggero

    2015-01-01

    The accreditation process is, on the one hand, a tool used to homogenize procedures, rendering comparable and standardized processes of care, and on the other, a methodology employed to develop a culture of quality improvement. Although not yet proven by evidence-based studies that health outcomes improve as a result of an accreditation to excellence, it is undeniable that better control of healthcare processes results in better quality and safety of diagnostic and therapeutic pathways. The Regina Elena National Cancer Institute underwent the accreditation process in accordance with the standards criteria set by the Organisation of European Cancer Institutes (OECI), and it has recently completed the process, acquiring its designation as a Comprehensive Cancer Center (CCC). This was an invaluable opportunity for the Regina Elena Institute to create a more cohesive environment, to widely establish a culture of quality, to implement an institutional information system, and to accelerate the process of patient involvement in strategic decisions. The steps of the process allowed us to evaluate the performance and the organization of the institute and put amendments in place designed to be adopted through 26 improvement actions. These actions regarded several aspects of the institute, including quality culture, information communication technology system, care, clinical trials unit, disease management team, nursing, and patient empowerment and involvement. Each area has a timeline. We chose to present the following 3 improvement actions: clinical trial center, computerized ambulatory medical record, and centrality of patient and humanization of clinical pathway.

  20. Netherlands in the spotlight at the ENLIGHT meeting on particle therapy

    CERN Multimedia

    Virginia Greco (CERN) and Manjit Dosanjh (ENLIGHT co-coordinator)

    2016-01-01

    The annual meeting of ENLIGHT, which focuses on particle therapy for cancer treatment, was held in the Netherlands.   Participants of the annual meeting of ENLIGHT, held in the Netherlands from 15-17 September 2016. The annual meeting of ENLIGHT (European Network for Light Hadron Therapy), which gathers experts working worldwide in centres and research institutions for particle therapy for cancer treatment, was hosted this year by the Dutch National Institute for Subatomic Physics (Nikhef) and the University of Utrecht, in the Netherlands, from 15-17 September. Chaired by the co-coordinator of ENLIGHT, Manjit Dosanjh, and the local organisers, Els Koffeman and Jan Visser from Nikhef, the meeting was attended by almost 100 participants from 15 countries. The Netherlands took centre stage at the ENLIGHT meeting: four brand new centres for proton therapy in the Netherlands are currently at various phases of completion as a consequence of the recent approval by the Dutch government of a plan for mak...

  1. New Hires at the National Cancer Institute at Frederick | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forty-nine people joined the facility in September and October 2013. The National Cancer Institute welcomes… Aamir Akram Clarissa Alexander Robert Buckheit Brian Chan Kelly Dempsey Christopher Descalzi Ahmed Fahim Devikala Gurusamy Jaewoo Hong Rhushikesh Kulkarni James Shaum Dionysios Watson Yuheng Xi Yi Xiang Thomas Zengeya

  2. 78 FR 31569 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-24

    ...:00 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications Place: National Cancer Institute Shady... Call) Contact Person: Donald L Coppock, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, Special Review and Logistics... Time: 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications Place: Hilton, Rockville...

  3. 75 FR 7489 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    .... Time: 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place: Bethesda North... Officer, Special Review and Logistics Branch, Division of Extramural Activities, National Cancer Institute..., 2010. Time: 12:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate contract proposals. Place: National...

  4. 75 FR 5092 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    .... Time: 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place: Hyatt Regency Bethesda... Review Officer, Special Review and Logistics Branch, Division of Extramural Activities, National Cancer.... Place: National Institutes of Health, 6116 Executive Boulevard, Room 8041, Rockville, MD 20852...

  5. 76 FR 11800 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-03

    ... Emphasis Panel; Biosensors for Early Cancer Detection and Risk Assessment. Date: March 29, 2011. Time: 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate contract proposals. Place: National Institutes of Health...: Lalita D. Palekar, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, Special Review and Logistics Branch, Division of...

  6. Validity of the stage of lung cancer in records of the Maastricht Cancer Registry, the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, Leo J.; Langendijk, JA; Jager, JJ; vandenBrandt, PA

    Information collected in a clinical study on a random sample of 99 patients with inoperable lung cancer, treated with radiotherapy, was compared to the staging information in the Maastricht cancer registry. Validity of sex (0% disagreements), date of birth (0%), histology (1% major disagreements)

  7. 78 FR 27974 - Proposed Collection; 60-Day Comment Request: National Cancer Institute (NCI) Alliance for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-13

    ... Cancer Institute (NCI) Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer Platform Partnership Scientific Progress..., including the validity of the methodology and assumptions used; (3) Ways to enhance the quality, utility... for Strategic Scientific Initiatives, Office of Cancer Nanotechnology Research, National Cancer...

  8. Gastrointestinal Tumor Board: An Evolving Experience in Tehran Cancer Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiman Haddad

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal (GI cancers are a significant source of morbidity and mortality in Iran, with stomach adenocarcinoma as the most common cancer in men and the second common cancer in women. Also, some parts of Northern Iran have one of the highest incidences of esophageal cancer in the world. Multi-disciplinary organ-based joint clinics and tumor boards are a well-recognized necessity for modern treatment of cancer and are routinely utilized in developed countries, especially in major academic centres. But this concept is relatively new in developing countries, where cancer treatment centres are burdened by huge loads of patients and have to cope with a suboptimum availability of resources and facilities. Cancer Institute of Tehran University of Medical Sciences is the oldest and the only comprehensive cancer treatment centre in Iran, with a long tradition of a general tumor board for all cancers. But with the requirements of modern oncology, there has been a very welcome attention to sub-specialized organ-based tumor boards and joint clinics here in the past few years. Considering this, we started a multi-disciplinary tumor board for GI cancers in our institute in early 2010 as the first such endeavor here. We hereby review this 2-year evolving experience. The process of establishment of a GI tumor board, participations from different oncology disciplines and related specialties, the cancers presented and discussed in the 2 years of this tumor board, the general intents of treatment for the decisions made and the development of interest in this tumor board among the Tehran oncology community will be reviewed. The GI tumor board of Tehran Cancer Institute started its work in January 2010, with routine weekly sessions. A core group of 2 physicians from each surgical, radiation and medical oncology departments plus one gastroenterologist, GI pathologist and radiologist was formed, but participation from all interested physicians was encouraged. An

  9. 78 FR 44136 - Submission for OMB review; 30-day Comment Request: National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-23

    ...). The CNPPs are part of the Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer, a network of awards funded by NCI to... the awards, along with their institutional business officials. The awards are administered by and the...

  10. Cabazitaxel in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: results of a compassionate use program in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissing, Michel D; van Oort, Inge M; Gerritsen, Winald R; van den Eertwegh, Alfons J M; Coenen, Jules L L M; Bergman, Andries M; Gelderblom, Hans

    2013-09-01

    Cabazitaxel has been reimbursed as a second-line therapy for patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) in the Netherlands since 2011. Before reimbursement was available, cabazitaxel was provided through a Compassionate Use Program (CUP). We report the results of the Dutch CUP, detailing the safety and efficacy of cabazitaxel in a routine clinical practice setting. Safety and efficacy data of all 5 Dutch centers participating in the cabazitaxel CUP were collected. Safety data were collected prospectively using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS), time to PSA progression (TTPP), and best clinical response were evaluated retrospectively. Fifty-one patients were registered in the CUP; 49 received cabazitaxel. Forty-two of 49 patients [85.7%], 42 patients had ≥ 2 metastatic sites. Patients received on average 6 cabazitaxel cycles (range, 1-21). A dose reduction or dose delay occurred in 13 and 20 patients [26.5% and 40.9%] respectively. Prophylactic granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) was used in 8 patients [16.3%]. Grade ≥ 3 adverse events were observed in 25 patients [51.0%]; 16 patients [32.7%] discontinued treatment because of treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs). Serious adverse events (SAEs) occurred in 16 (32.7%) patients; the most frequent SAEs were hematuria (4 patients [8.3%]) and urosepsis (3 patients [6.3%]). Febrile neutropenia occurred twice; no patient had grade ≥ 3 neuropathy. No toxicity-related mortality occurred. Median follow-up was 24.1 months. Median OS was 8.7 months (interquartile range [IQR], 6.0-15.9 months); median TTPP was 2.8 months (IQR, 1.7-5.9 months). In the Dutch CUP, patients with advanced mCRPC had delayed tumor progression with acceptable toxicities using cabazitaxel treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. No Decreased Risk of Gastrointestinal Cancers in Users of Metformin in The Netherlands; A Time-Varying Analysis of Metformin Exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Roy G; Burden, Andrea M; de Kort, Sander; van Herk-Sukel, Myrthe P; Vissers, Pauline A; Janssen, Paddy K; Haak, Harm R; Masclee, Ad A; de Vries, Frank; Janssen-Heijnen, Maryska L

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies on metformin use and gastrointestinal (GI) cancer risk have yielded inconclusive results on metformin's chemoprotective effects. We aimed to evaluate GI cancer risk in users of metformin in The Netherlands using a time-varying approach in a large population-based database. A cohort

  12. Meat and fish consumption, APC gene mutations and hMLH1 expression in colon and rectal cancer: a prospective cohort study (the Netherlands)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luchtenborg, M.; Weijenberg, M.P.; Goeij, de A.F.P.M.; Wark, P.A.; Brink, M.; Roemen, G.M.J.M.; Lentjes, M.H.F.M.; Bruine, de A.P.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Veer, van 't P.; Brandt, van den P.A.

    2005-01-01

    Objective:The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between meat and fish consumption and APC mutation status and hMLH1 expression in colon and rectal cancer. Methods:The associations were investigated in the Netherlands Cohort Study, and included 434 colon and 154 rectal cancer

  13. Cost-effectiveness of the prophylactic HPV vaccine : An application to the Netherlands taking non-cervical cancers and cross-protection into account

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luttjeboer, J.; Westra, T.A.; Wilschut, J.C.; Nijman, H.W.; Daemen, T.; Postma, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite an effective screening programme, 600-700 women are still diagnosed with cervical cancer in the Netherlands each year. In 2009 a prophylactic vaccine against HPV-type 16 and 18 was implemented in the national immunisation programme to decrease the incidence of cervical cancer. There is

  14. Regional variation in breast cancer treatment in the Netherlands and the role of external peer review : a cohort study comprising 63,516 women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kilsdonk, Melvin J.; van Dijk, Boukje A. C.; Otter, Renee; van Harten, Wim H.; Siesling, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Background: Treatment variation is an important issue in health care provision. An external peer review programme for multidisciplinary cancer care was introduced in 1994 in the Netherlands to improve the multidisciplinary organisation of cancer care in hospitals. So far the clinical impact of

  15. Meat and fish consumption, APC gene mutations and hMLH1 expression in colon and rectal cancer: A prospective cohort study (The Netherlands)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lüchtenborg, M.; Weijenberg, M.P.; Goeij, A.F.P.M. de; Wark, P.A.; Brink, M.; Roemen, G.M.J.M.; Lentjes, M.H.F.M.; Bruïne, A.P. de; Goldbohm, R.A.; Veer, P. van 't; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between meat and fish consumption and APC mutation status and hMLH1 expression in colon and rectal cancer. Methods: The associations were investigated in the Netherlands Cohort Study, and included 434 colon and 154 rectal cancer

  16. Trends in treatment, incidence and survival of hypopharynx cancer: a 20-year population-based study in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Japke F; Timmermans, Adriana J; van Dijk, Boukje A C; Overbeek, Lucy I H; Smit, Laura A; Hilgers, Frans J M; Stuiver, Martijn M; van den Brekel, Michiel W M

    2017-10-28

    Hypopharynx cancer has the worst prognosis of all head and neck squamous cell cancers. Since the 1990s, a treatment shift has appeared from a total laryngectomy towards organ preservation therapies. Large randomized trials evaluating treatment strategies for hypopharynx cancer, however, remain scarce, and frequently this malignancy is evaluated together with larynx cancer. Therefore, our aim was to determine trends in incidence, treatment and survival of hypopharynx cancer. We performed a population-based cohort study including all patients diagnosed with T1-T4 hypopharynx cancer between 1991 and 2010 in the Netherlands. Patients were recorded by the national cancer registry database and verified by a national pathology database. 2999 patients were identified. The incidence increased significantly with 4.1% per year until 1997 and decreased non-significantly afterwards. For women, the incidence increased with 1.7% per year during the entire study period. Total laryngectomy as primary treatment significantly decreased, whereas radiotherapy and chemoradiation increased. The 5-year overall survival significantly increased from 28% in 1991-2000 to 34% in 2001-2010. Overall survival for T3 was equal for total laryngectomy and (chemo)radiotherapy, but for T4-patients the survival was significantly better after primary total laryngectomy (± adjuvant radiotherapy). This large population-based study demonstrates a shift in treatment preference towards organ preservation therapies. The 5-year overall survival increased significantly in the second decade. The assumed equivalence of organ preservation and laryngectomy may require reconsideration for T4 disease.

  17. Northeast Regional Cancer Institute's Cancer Surveillance and Risk Factor Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesko, Samuel M.

    2007-07-31

    OBJECTIVES The Northeast Regional Cancer Institute is conducting a program of ongoing epidemiologic research to address cancer disparities in northeast Pennsylvania. Of particular concern are disparities in the incidence of, stage at diagnosis, and mortality from colorectal cancer. In northeast Pennsylvania, age-adjusted incidence and mortality rates for colorectal cancer are higher, and a significantly smaller proportion of new colorectal cancer cases are diagnosed with local stage disease than is observed in comparable national data. Further, estimates of the prevalence of colorectal cancer screening in northeast Pennsylvania are lower than the US average. The Northeast Regional Cancer Institute’s research program supports surveillance of common cancers, investigations of cancer risk factors and screening behaviors, and the development of resources to further cancer research in this community. This project has the following specific objectives: I. To conduct cancer surveillance in northeast Pennsylvania. a. To monitor incidence and mortality for all common cancers, and colorectal cancer, in particular, and b. To document changes in the stage at diagnosis of colorectal cancer in this high-risk, underserved community. II. To conduct a population-based study of cancer risk factors and screening behavior in a six county region of northeast Pennsylvania. a. To monitor and document changes in colorectal cancer screening rates, and b. To document the prevalence of cancer risk factors (especially factors that increase the risk of colorectal cancer) and to identify those risk factors that are unusually common in this community. APPROACH Cancer surveillance was conducted using data from the Northeast Regional Cancer Institute’s population-based Regional Cancer Registry, the Pennsylvania Cancer Registry, and NCI’s SEER program. For common cancers, incidence and mortality were examined by county within the region and compared to data for similar populations in the US

  18. Variation in mutation spectrum partly explains regional differences in the breast cancer risk of female BRCA mutation carriers in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Janet R; Teixeira, Natalia; van der Kolk, Dorina M; Mourits, Marian J E; Rookus, Matti A; van Leeuwen, Flora E; Collée, Margriet; van Asperen, Christi J; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Ausems, Margreet G E M; van Os, Theo A M; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; Gómez-Garcia, Encarna B; Vasen, Hans F; Brohet, Richard M; van der Hout, Annemarie H; Jansen, Liesbeth; Oosterwijk, Jan C; de Bock, Geertruida H

    2014-11-01

    We aimed to quantify previously observed relatively high cancer risks in BRCA2 mutation carriers (BRCA2 carriers) older than 60 in the Northern Netherlands, and to analyze whether these could be explained by mutation spectrum or population background risk. This consecutive cohort study included all known pathogenic BRCA1/2 carriers in the Northern Netherlands (N = 1,050). Carrier and general reference populations were: BRCA1/2 carriers in the rest of the Netherlands (N = 2,013) and the general population in both regions. Regional differences were assessed with HRs and ORs. HRs were adjusted for birth year and mutation spectrum. All BRCA1 carriers and BRCA2 carriers younger than 60 had a significantly lower breast cancer risk in the Northern Netherlands; HRs were 0.66 and 0.64, respectively. Above age 60, the breast cancer risk in BRCA2 carriers in the Northern Netherlands was higher than in the rest of the Netherlands [HR, 3.99; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.11-14.35]. Adjustment for mutational spectrum changed the HRs for BRCA1, BRCA2 <60, and BRCA2 ≥60 years by -3%, +32%, and +11% to 0.75, 0.50, and 2.61, respectively. There was no difference in background breast cancer incidence between the two regions (OR, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.97-1.09). Differences in mutation spectrum only partly explain the regional differences in breast cancer risk in BRCA2 carriers, and for an even smaller part in BRCA1 carriers. The increased risk in BRCA2 carriers older than 60 may warrant extension of intensive breast screening beyond age 60. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Cancer complementary and alternative medicine research at the US National Cancer Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Libin

    2012-05-01

    The United States National Cancer Institute (NCI) supports complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) research which includes different methods and practices (such as nutrition therapies) and other medical systems (such as Chinese medicine). In recent years, NCI has spent around $120 million each year on various CAM-related research projects on cancer prevention, treatment, symptom/side effect management and epidemiology. The categories of CAM research involved include nutritional therapeutics, pharmacological and biological treatments, mind-body interventions, manipulative and body based methods, alternative medical systems, exercise therapies, spiritual therapies and energy therapies on a range of types of cancer. The NCI Office of Cancer Complementary and Alternative Medicine (OCCAM) supports various intramural and extramural cancer CAM research projects. Examples of these cancer CAM projects are presented and discussed. In addition, OCCAM also supports international research projects.

  20. [Forensic assessments from the Netherlands Institute of Forensic Psychiatry and Psychology in retrospect; applications of genetics and neuroscience, in 2000 and 2009].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ter Harmsel, J F; Molendijk, T; van El, C G; M'charek, A; Kempes, M; Rinne, T; Pieters, T

    2016-01-01

    Developments in neurosciences and genetics are relevant for forensic psychiatry. To find out whether and how genetic and neuroscientific applications are being used in forensic psychiatric assessments, and, if they are, to estimate to what extent new applications will fit in with these uses. We analysed 60 forensic psychiatric assessments from the Netherlands Institute of Forensic Psychiatry and Psychology, Pieter Baan Center, and 30 non-clinical assessments from 2000 and 2009. We found that (behavioral) genetic, neurological and neuropsychological applications played only a modest role in forensic psychiatric assessment and they represent different phases of the implementation process. Neuropsychological assessment already occupied a position of some importance, but needed to be better integrated. Applications from neurology were still being developed. Clinical genetic assessment was being used occasionally in order to diagnose a genetic syndrome with behavioral consequences. If further validated information becomes available in the future, it should be possible to integrate new research methods more fully into current clinical practice.

  1. Dana-Farber Cancer Institute: Discovery of Novel Oncogenes | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widespread recurrent copy number alterations are observed across the majority of human cancers, yet the specific targets of such amplified or deleted regions remain undefined. Here, the CTD2 Center at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute took a systematic approach using cDNA overexpression screening to identify and validate oncogenes residing in such amplified regions. In representative examples, these experiments have identified the adaptor proteins CRKL, GAB2, FRS2 and the TLOC and SKIL proteins as novel amplified oncogenes.

  2. Dana-Farber Cancer Institute: Identification of Therapeutic Targets in KRAS Driven Lung Cancer | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The CTD2 Center at Dana Farber Cancer Institute focuses on the use of high-throughput genetic and bioinformatic approaches to identify and credential oncogenes and co-dependencies in cancers. This Center aims to provide the cancer research community with information that will facilitate the prioritization of targets based on both genomic and functional evidence, inform the most appropriate genetic context for downstream mechanistic and validation studies, and enable the translation of this information into therapeutics and diagnostics.

  3. Astronomy in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Wilfried; Habing, Harm

    2013-01-01

    We describe the state of astronomical research in the Netherlands per early 2012. We add some notes on its history of this research and on the strategic choices for the future. Compared to the size of the country (16 million people) the Netherlands is maintaining a high profile in astronomical research over a period of more than one century. The professional research community consists of about 650 people. This includes research staff, postdocs, PhD students, technical staff working on instrumentation projects and people involved in the operations of ground-based telescopes and astronomical space missions. We do not take into account staff working for international organizations based in the Netherlands. Astronomical research in the Netherlands is carried out at four university institutes and two national research institutes that fall under the umbrella of the national funding agency NWO. The Netherlands is the host of two international organizations: ESTEC, the technology division of the European Space Agency (ESA), and the Joint Institute for VLBI in Europe (JIVE). The Netherlands are one of the founding members of the European Southern Observatory (ESO) and of ESA. This paper will address a number of significant multilateral collaborations.

  4. Diabetes mellitus type 2 and subsite-specific colorectal cancer risk in men and women: results from the Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kort, Sander; Simons, C C J M; van den Brandt, Piet A; Goldbohm, R Alexandra Sandra; Arts, Ilja C W; de Bruine, Adriaan P; Janssen-Heijnen, Maryska L G; Sanduleanu, Silvia; Masclee, Ad A M; Weijenberg, Matty P

    2016-08-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC); however, studies differentiating between subsites of CRC are limited. We investigated how diabetes mellitus (DM) was associated with subsite-specific CRC risk in men and women. The Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer is a prospective study among 120 852 men and women aged 55-69 years old at baseline in 1986. Information on DM, anthropometric, dietary and lifestyle factors was self-reported at baseline. T2DM was defined as the diagnosis of DM after 30 years of age. Incident CRC cases were identified by record linkage with the Netherlands cancer registry and the Dutch pathology registry. After 17.3 years of follow-up, 1735 incident male CRC cases and 1321 female CRC cases were available for analyses. Subsite-specific hazard ratios (HRs) for CRC were estimated in case-cohort analyses using Cox regression. At baseline, 3.1% of subcohort members reported T2DM, of whom 80% were diagnosed after 50 years of age. Multivariable-adjusted models showed that the risk of proximal colon cancer was significantly increased in women with T2DM versus women without T2DM (HR=1.80, 95% confidence interval: 1.10-2.94). There was no association between T2DM and the risk of overall CRC, distal colon cancer and rectal cancer in women. In men, T2DM was not associated with overall CRC (HR=0.98, 95% confidence interval: 0.64-1.50), or with risk at any subsite. This prospective study showed an increased risk of proximal colon cancer in women with T2DM compared with non-T2DM women.

  5. Real world cost of human epidermal receptor 2-positive metastatic breast cancer patients: a longitudinal incidence-based observational costing study in the Netherlands and Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederix, G W J; Severens, J L; Hövels, A M; van Hasselt, J G C; Hooiveld, M J J; Neven, P; Raaijmakers, J A M; Schellens, J H M

    2015-05-01

    Currently, no country-specific metastatic breast cancer (MBC) observational costing data are available for the Netherlands and Belgium. Our aim is to describe country-specific resource use and costs of human epidermal receptor 2 (HER-2)-positive MBC in the Netherlands and Belgium, making use of real-world data. The eligibility period for patient selection was from April 2004 to April 2010. Inclusion and retrospective data collection begins at the time of first diagnosis of HER-2-positive MBC during the eligibility period and ends 24 months post-index diagnosis of MBC or at patient death. We identified 88 eligible patients in the Netherlands and 44 patients in Belgium. The total costs of medical treatment and other resource use utilisation per patient was €48,301 in the Netherlands and €37,431 in Belgium. Majority of costs was related to the use of trastuzumab in both countries, which was 50% of the total costs in the Netherlands and 56% in Belgium respectively. Our study provides estimates of resource use and costs for HER-2-positive MBC in the Netherlands and Belgium. We noticed various differences in resource use patterns between both countries demonstrating caution is needed when transferring cost estimates between countries. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. The institutional space of community initiatives for renewable energy: a comparative case study of the Netherlands, Germany and Denmark

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oteman, M.I.; Wiering, M.A.; Helderman, J.K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Community initiatives for renewable energy are emerging across Europe but with varying numbers, success rates and strategies. A literature overview identifies structural, strategic and biophysical conditions for community success. Our analysis focuses on institutional structure, as we

  7. Are retinol, vitamin C, vitamin E, folate and carotenoids intake associated with bladder cancer risk? : results from the Netherlands cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeegers, M.P.A.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2001-01-01

    In the Netherlands Cohort Study among 120 852 subjects aged 55-69 years at baseline (1986), the association between vitamins and carotenoids intake, vitamin supplement use, and bladder cancer incidence was examined. Exposure status was measured with a food-frequency questionnaire. After 6.3 years of

  8. Developing a Comprehensive Cardio-Oncology Program at a Cancer Institute: The Moffitt Cancer Center Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fradley, Michael G.; Brown, Allen C.; Shields, Bernadette; Viganego, Federico; Damrongwatanasuk, Rongras; Patel, Aarti A.; Hartlage, Gregory; Roper, Natalee; Jaunese, Julie; Roy, Larry; Ismail-Khan, Roohi

    2017-01-01

    Cardio-oncology is a multidisciplinary field focusing on the management and prevention of cardiovascular complications in cancer patients and survivors. While the initial focus of this specialty was on heart failure associated with anthracycline use, novel anticancer agents are increasingly utilized and are associated with many other cardiotoxicities including hypertension, arrhythmias and vascular disease. Since its inception, the field has developed at a rapid pace with the establishment of programs at many major academic institutions and community practices. Given the complexities of this patient population, it is important for providers to possess knowledge of not only cardiovascular disease but also cancer subtypes and their specific therapeutics. Developing a cardio-oncology program at a stand-alone cancer center can present unique opportunities and challenges when compared to those affiliated with other institutions including resource allocation, cardiovascular testing availability and provider education. In this review, we present our experiences establishing the cardio-oncology program at Moffitt Cancer Center and provide guidance to those individuals interested in developing a program at a similar independent cancer institution. PMID:28781723

  9. Developing a Comprehensive Cardio-Oncology Program at a Cancer Institute: The Moffitt Cancer Center Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fradley, Michael G; Brown, Allen C; Shields, Bernadette; Viganego, Federico; Damrongwatanasuk, Rongras; Patel, Aarti A; Hartlage, Gregory; Roper, Natalee; Jaunese, Julie; Roy, Larry; Ismail-Khan, Roohi

    2017-06-14

    Cardio-oncology is a multidisciplinary field focusing on the management and prevention of cardiovascular complications in cancer patients and survivors. While the initial focus of this specialty was on heart failure associated with anthracycline use, novel anticancer agents are increasingly utilized and are associated with many other cardiotoxicities including hypertension, arrhythmias and vascular disease. Since its inception, the field has developed at a rapid pace with the establishment of programs at many major academic institutions and community practices. Given the complexities of this patient population, it is important for providers to possess knowledge of not only cardiovascular disease but also cancer subtypes and their specific therapeutics. Developing a cardio-oncology program at a stand-alone cancer center can present unique opportunities and challenges when compared to those affiliated with other institutions including resource allocation, cardiovascular testing availability and provider education. In this review, we present our experiences establishing the cardio-oncology program at Moffitt Cancer Center and provide guidance to those individuals interested in developing a program at a similar independent cancer institution.

  10. Trends and variations in breast and colorectal cancer incidence from 1995 to 2011: A comparative study between Texas Cancer Registry and National Cancer Institute?s Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results data

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Zheyu; Zhang, Yefei; FRANZIN, LUISA; Cormier, Janice N.; Chan, Wenyaw; Xu, Hua; Du, Xianglin L.

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have examined the cancer incidence trends in the state of Texas, and no study has ever been conducted to compare the temporal trends of breast and colorectal cancer incidence in Texas with those of the National Cancer Institute?s Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) in the United States. This study aimed to conduct a parallel comparison between the Texas Cancer Registry and the National Cancer Institute?s SEER on cancer incidence from 1995 to 2011. A total of 951,899 ...

  11. Oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma in young patients: the Netherlands Cancer Institute experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Monsjou, Hester S.; Lopez-Yurda, Marta I.; Hauptmann, Michael; van den Brekel, Michiel W. M.; Balm, Alfons J. M.; Wreesmann, Volkert B.

    2013-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) mainly affects patients between the fifth and seventh decade of life but is increasingly seen in young patients ( <40 years old). Controversy exists in the literature regarding outcomes for younger patients with HNSCC. A retrospective cohort analysis was

  12. Accuracy of fine-needle aspiration cytology of salivary gland lesions in The Netherlands Cancer Institute

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postema, Rolf J.; van Velthuysen, Mari-Louise F.; van den Brekel, Michiel W. M.; Balm, Alfons J. M.; Peterse, Johannes L.

    2004-01-01

    Background. To evaluate the accuracy of fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) in salivary gland lesions in a tertiary referral center. Methods. A cytolhistologic correlation study was performed using an automated pathology database of 1023 patients diagnosed with a salivary gland lesion. Results.

  13. Trends in treatment and survival for advanced laryngeal cancer: A 20-year population-based study in The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, Adriana J; van Dijk, Boukje A C; Overbeek, Lucy I H; van Velthuysen, Marie-Louise F; van Tinteren, Harm; Hilgers, Frans J M; van den Brekel, Michiel W M

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine time trends for primary treatment modalities in advanced laryngeal cancer, overall survival (OS), and laryngectomy-free interval (LFI) over the last 2 decades in The Netherlands. We conducted an analysis of T3 to T4 laryngeal cancer data from 2 combined national (population-based and pathology-based) cancer registries. A total of 2072 T3 cases (14.7%) and 1722 T4 cases (12.2%) were identified. Total laryngectomy as primary treatment modality decreased, whereas radiotherapy (RT) increased. For T3 disease, 5-year OS after primary total laryngectomy (+/- adjuvant RT), RT, and chemoradiotherapy (CRT) was 49%, 47%, and 45%, respectively. For T4 disease, this was 48%, 34%, and 42% (overall p < .0001), respectively. Five-year LFI for T3 disease was 81% (RT) and 77% (CRT), and for T4 disease it was 81% and 87%, respectively. From 1991 to 2010 total laryngectomy as primary treatment modality for advanced laryngeal cancer decreased and RT increased. T3 disease showed similar survival rates for all primary treatment modalities. For T4 disease, total laryngectomy (+ adjuvant RT) showed the best survival. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: E1247-E1255, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Comparing Health-Care Providers' Perspectives on Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Childhood Cancer Between Netherlands and Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawan, Stefanus; Arnoldussen, Marijn; Gordijn, Maartje S; Sitaresmi, Mei N; van de Ven, Peter M; Ten Broeke, Chloé A M; Veerman, Anjo J P; Mantik, Max; Kaspers, Gertjan J L; Mostert, Saskia

    2016-01-01

    Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is common among patients with childhood cancer. Health-care providers (HCP) should address this need properly. Geographical and cultural differences seem likely. This study explores perspectives on CAM of HCP involved in the care of children with cancer in Netherlands and Indonesia. Health beliefs, components of CAM, encouraging or discouraging CAM, and knowledge about CAM were assessed. We conducted a cross-sectional study using semi-structured questionnaires at a Dutch and Indonesian academic hospital. A total of 342 HCP participated: 119 Dutch (response rate 80%) and 223 Indonesian (response rate 87%). Chemotherapy can cure cancer according to more Dutch than Indonesian HCP (87% vs. 53% respectively, P cancer according to more Indonesian than Dutch HCP (45% vs. 25%, P < 0.001). Dutch and Indonesian HCP recommend and discourage CAM use differently. Most Dutch (77%) and Indonesian HCP (84%) consider their knowledge about CAM to be inadequate (P = ns). Fewer Dutch doctors than other HCP want to learn more about CAM (51% vs. 76%, P = 0.007), whereas there is no significant difference in eagerness to learn about CAM between Indonesian doctors (64%) and other HCP (72%). Indonesian HCP have more positive views about CAM than their Dutch colleagues. Both Dutch and Indonesian HCP consider their knowledge about CAM to be inadequate. Therefore, education programs about CAM tailored to the needs of HCP are recommended, knowing that CAM is used frequently. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Consumption of vegetables and fruits and risk of subtypes of head-neck cancer in the Netherlands Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maasland, Denise H E; van den Brandt, Piet A; Kremer, Bernd; Goldbohm, R Alexandra; Schouten, Leo J

    2015-03-01

    There is limited prospective data on the relationship between consumption of vegetables and fruits and the risk of head-neck cancer (HNC) subtypes [i.e., oral cavity cancer (OCC), oro-/hypopharyngeal cancer (OHPC) and laryngeal cancer (LC)]. Therefore, we investigated these associations within the Netherlands Cohort Study, in which 120,852 participants completed a 150-item food frequency questionnaire at baseline in 1986. After 20.3 years of follow-up, 415 cases of HNC (131 OCC, 88 OHPC, three oral cavity/pharynx unspecified or overlapping and 193 LC) and 3,898 subcohort members were available for case-cohort analysis using Cox proportional hazards models. Total vegetable and fruit consumption was inversely associated with risk of HNC overall [multivariable-adjusted rate ratios for highest vs. lowest quartile: 0.61, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.44-0.85, p trend 0.002] and all HNC subtypes, with the strongest associations for OCC. Total vegetable intake and total fruit intake were also associated with a decreased risk of HNC overall and HNC subtypes. No significant interaction was found between vegetable and fruit intake and alcohol consumption or cigarette smoking. In conclusion, in this large-scale cohort study, consumption of vegetables and fruits was associated with a decreased risk of HNC overall and all subtypes. Consumption of vegetables and fruits (or of specific groups of them) may protect against HNC and its subtypes. © 2014 UICC.

  16. Glandularity and mean glandular dose determined for individual women at four regional breast cancer screening units in The Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoetelief, J.; Veldkamp, W. J. H.; Thijssen, M. A. O.; Jansen, J. T. M.

    2006-04-01

    The nationwide breast cancer screening programme using mammography has been in full operation in The Netherlands since 1997. There is concern that the mean glandular doses due to mammography might be differing between different regions of the country due to differences in glandularity and compressed breast thickness. To investigate regional differences, glandularity, compressed breast thickness and mean glandular dose were determined for individual breasts during screening at mammography units at four locations in The Netherlands. Differences in glandularity were observed, which could be related qualitatively to differences in age of the participants at the different locations. Mean glandular dose depends on compressed breast thickness, glandularity and technical conditions of screening. The lowest average value of the mean glandular dose was found for the unit in Amsterdam. This is most likely due to the use of the Mo/Rh anode/filter combination at this unit, in addition to the Mo/Mo combination. At the other three units, almost exclusively the Mo/Mo anode/filter combination was used. Differences in mean glandular dose averaged per unit could be related mainly to differences in tube-current exposure-time product values. Consequently, it is concluded that differences in mean glandular dose at different units are marginal.

  17. The Roswell Park Cancer Institute experience with extramammary Paget's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zollo, J D; Zeitouni, N C

    2000-01-01

    Extramammary Paget's disease (EMPD) is a rare intraepithelial neoplasm. Common sites of occurrence include the vulva, perianal region, perineum and scrotum. Despite frequent recurrences, surgery is the standard treatment. This study examines the recurrence rate for EMPD treated by conventional surgical management. Alternative and multimodal therapeutic approaches are reviewed. This retrospective analysis included all 30 patients treated for EMPD at Roswell Park Cancer Institute (RPCI) between 1970 and 1998. Following conventional surgical treatment, 44% of our patients developed recurrence. Vulvectomy provided the lowest recurrence rate, but involved extensive tissue loss and functional debility. Multimodal treatment using Mohs' micrographic surgery and photodynamic therapy has been used at RPCI to manage EMPD with minimal tissue loss and no functional impairment. Surgical treatment offers a moderate chance of EMPD cure. Long-term multimodal approaches require close follow-up, but may conserve both tissue and function.

  18. Target volume delineation variation in radiotherapy for early stage rectal cancer in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijkamp, Jasper; de Haas-Kock, Danielle F M; Beukema, Jannet C; Neelis, Karen J; Woutersen, Dankert; Ceha, Heleen; Rozema, Tom; Slot, Annerie; Vos-Westerman, Hanneke; Intven, Martijn; Spruit, Patty H; van der Linden, Yvette; Geijsen, Debby; Verschueren, Karijn; van Herk, Marcel B; Marijnen, Corrie A M

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure and improve the quality of target volume delineation by means of national consensus on target volume definition in early-stage rectal cancer. The CTV's for eight patients were delineated by 11 radiation oncologists in 10 institutes according to local guidelines (phase 1). After observer variation analysis a workshop was organized to establish delineation guidelines and a digital atlas, with which the same observers re-delineated the dataset (phase 2). Variation in volume, most caudal and cranial slice and local surface distance variation were analyzed. The average delineated CTV volume decreased from 620 to 460 cc (p<0.001) in phase 2. Variation in the caudal CTV border was reduced significantly from 1.8 to 1.2 cm SD (p=0.01), while it remained 0.7 cm SD for the cranial border. The local surface distance variation (cm SD) reduced from 1.02 to 0.74 for anterior, 0.63 to 0.54 for lateral, 0.33 to 0.25 for posterior and 1.22 to 0.46 for the sphincter region, respectively. The large variation in target volume delineation could significantly be reduced by use of consensus guidelines and a digital delineation atlas. Despite the significant reduction there is still a need for further improvement. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. 76 FR 576 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-05

    ... Emphasis Panel; SPORE in Mesothelioma, Lung, Breast and Ovarian Cancers. Date: February 2-3, 2011. Time: 8....395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93...

  20. Experiences of home and institution in a secured nursing home ward in the Netherlands : A participatory intervention study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassens, Mirjam; Meijering, Louise

    Nursing homes have been criticised for not providing a home for their residents. This article aims to provide insight into (I) the features of home and institution as experienced by residents and caregivers of a secured ward in a nursing home, and (2) how interventions implemented on the ward can

  1. Population-based geographic access to parent and satellite National Cancer Institute Cancer Center Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onega, Tracy; Alford-Teaster, Jennifer; Wang, Fahui

    2017-09-01

    Satellite facilities of National Cancer Institute (NCI) cancer centers have expanded their regional footprints. This study characterized geographic access to parent and satellite NCI cancer center facilities nationally overall and by sociodemographics. Parent and satellite NCI cancer center facilities, which were geocoded in ArcGIS, were ascertained. Travel times from every census tract in the continental United States and Hawaii to the nearest parent and satellite facilities were calculated. Census-based population attributes were used to characterize measures of geographic access for sociodemographic groups. From the 62 NCI cancer centers providing clinical care in 2014, 76 unique parent locations and 211 satellite locations were mapped. The overall proportion of the population within 60 minutes of a facility was 22% for parent facilities and 32.7% for satellite facilities. When satellites were included for potential access, the proportion of some racial groups for which a satellite was the closest NCI cancer center facility increased notably (Native Americans, 22.6% with parent facilities and 39.7% with satellite facilities; whites, 34.8% with parent facilities and 50.3% with satellite facilities; and Asians, 40.0% with parent facilities and 54.0% with satellite facilities), with less marked increases for Hispanic and black populations. Rural populations of all categories had dramatically low proportions living within 60 minutes of an NCI cancer center facility of any type (1.0%-6.6%). Approximately 14% of the population (n = 43,033,310) lived more than 180 minutes from a parent or satellite facility, and most of these individuals were Native Americans and/or rural residents (37% of Native Americans and 41.7% of isolated rural residents). Racial/ethnic and rural populations showed markedly improved geographic access to NCI cancer center care when satellite facilities were included. Cancer 2017;123:3305-11. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American

  2. Intake of vegetables, fruits, carotenoids and vitamins C and E and pancreatic cancer risk in The Netherlands Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinen, Mirjam M; Verhage, Bas A J; Goldbohm, R Alexandra; van den Brandt, Piet A

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiological data investigating the relation between fruit and vegetable consumption and pancreatic cancer risk have shown inconsistent results so far. Most case-control studies observed an inverse association with total fruit and vegetable consumption, whereas results from most cohort studies have largely been null. We examined prospectively the relation between pancreatic cancer risk and intake of vegetables, fruits, carotenoids and vitamins C and E. The Netherlands Cohort Study consisted of 120,852 men and women who completed a questionnaire at baseline in 1986, including a validated 150-item food-frequency questionnaire. After 16.3 years of follow-up, 423 cases were available for analysis. Total vegetable and total fruit consumption were not associated with pancreatic cancer risk (highest vs. lowest quintile, multivariable-adjusted hazard rate ratio = 1.23, 95% confidence interval: 0.86-1.75 and multivariable-adjusted hazard rate ratio = 0.90, 95% confidence interval: 0.66-1.24, respectively). Also, for cooked vegetables, raw vegetables and vegetables and fruits classified into subgroups, no associations were observed. Dietary carotenoids, vitamin C and E intake and supplements containing vitamin C or E were not associated with pancreatic cancer risk. The results were not modified by sex, smoking status and body mass index. In conclusion, we observed no association between a high consumption of vegetables and fruits and pancreatic cancer risk in this large cohort study, which is in agreement with previous prospective studies. Furthermore, we observed no association between the intake of carotenoids, vitamins and vitamin supplements and pancreatic cancer risk. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  3. Adherence to the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research recommendations and head and neck cancers risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravi, Francesca; Polesel, Jerry; Garavello, Werner; Serraino, Diego; Negri, Eva; Franchin, Gianni; La Vecchia, Carlo; Bosetti, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    The World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) and the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) have proposed eight recommendations for cancer prevention, related to body fatness, diet, and physical activity. Our aim is to evaluate the role of adherence to these recommendations on head and neck cancers risk. We obtained an overall score including seven of the WCRF/AICR recommendations, and examined its relationship with head and neck cancers risk in two Italian case-control studies including 946 patients with oral cavity and pharyngeal (OCP) cancer and 2492 controls, and 689 patients with laryngeal cancer and 1605 controls. Higher adherence to WCRF/AICR recommendations was associated to a reduced risk of OCP cancer (odds ratio, OR=0.45, 95% confidence interval, CI: 0.33-0.62 for a score of 4-laryngeal cancer were 0.68 (95% CI: 0.50-0.92) for a score of 3-cancer prevention is associated with a substantially decreased risk of head and neck cancers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Commentary on: "Ipilimumab versus placebo after radiotherapy in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer that had progressed after docetaxel chemotherapy (CA184-043): A multicentre, randomised, double-blind, phase 3 trial." Kwon ED, Drake CG, Scher HI, Fizazi K, Bossi A, van den Eertwegh AJ, Krainer M, Houede N, Santos R, Mahammedi H, Ng S, Maio M, Franke FA, Sundar S, Agarwal N, Bergman AM, Ciuleanu TE, Korbenfeld E, Sengeløv L, Hansen S, Logothetis C, Beer TM, McHenry MB, Gagnier P, Liu D, Gerritsen WR, CA184-043 Investigators. Departments of Urology and Immunology and Mayo Clinic Comprehensive Cancer Center, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA, Electronic address: kwon.eugene@mayo.edu; Johns Hopkins Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center and Brady Urological Institute, Baltimore, MD, USA; Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA; Institut Gustave Roussy, University of Paris-Sud, Villejuif, France; Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France; VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, Netherlands; Vienna General Hospital, Medical University Vienna, Vienna, Austria; Institut Bergonié, Bordeaux, France; CHU Caremeau, Nimes, France; Centro Médico Austral, Buenos Aires, Argentina; Centre Jean Perrin, Clermont-Ferrand, France; St John of God Hospital, Subiaco, WA, Australia; University Hospital of Siena, Istituto Toscano Tumori, Siena, Italy; Hospital de Caridade de Ijuí, Ijuí, Brazil; Nottingham University Hospital, Nottingham, UK; Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA; Netherlands Cancer Institute and Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam, Netherlands; Institute of Oncology Ion Chiricuta and University of Medicine and Pharmacy Iuliu Hatieganu, Cluj-Napoca, Romania; Hospital Británico de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina; Herlev Hospital, Herlev, Denmark; Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark; University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston,

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trump, Donald

    2016-05-01

    Ipilimumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody that binds cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 to enhance antitumour immunity. Our aim was to assess the use of ipilimumab after radiotherapy in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer that progressed after docetaxel chemotherapy. We did a multicentre, randomised, double-blind, phase 3 trial in which men with at least one bone metastasis from castration-resistant prostate cancer that had progressed after docetaxel treatment were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive bone-directed radiotherapy (8Gy in one fraction) followed by either ipilimumab 10mg/kg or placebo every 3 weeks for up to four doses. Non-progressing patients could continue to receive ipilimumab at 10mg/kg or placebo as maintenance therapy every 3 months until disease progression, unacceptable toxic effect, or death. Patients were randomly assigned to either treatment group via a minimisation algorithm, and stratified by Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, alkaline phosphatase concentration, haemoglobin concentration, and investigator site. Patients and investigators were masked to treatment allocation. The primary endpoint was overall survival, assessed in the intention-to-treat population. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00861614. From May 26, 2009, to Feb 15, 2012, 799 patients were randomly assigned (399 to ipilimumab and 400 to placebo), all of whom were included in the intention-to-treat analysis. Median overall survival was 11.2 months (95% CI: 9.5-12.7) with ipilimumab and 10.0 months (8.3-11.0) with placebo (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.85, 0.72-1.00; P = 0.053). However, the assessment of the proportional hazards assumption showed that it was violated (P = 0.0031). A piecewise hazard model showed that the HR changed over time: the HR for 0-5 months was 1.46 (95% CI: 1.10-1.95), for 5-12 months was 0.65 (0.50-0.85), and beyond 12 months was 0.60 (0.43-0.86). The most common grade 3

  5. Dying from cancer or other chronic diseases in the Netherlands: ten-year trends derived from death certificate data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hingstman Lammert

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For the further development of palliative care, it is relevant to gain insight into trends in non-acute mortality. The aim of this article is twofold: (a to provide insight into ten-year trends in the characteristics of patients who died from cancer or other chronic diseases in the Netherlands; (b to show how national death statistics, derived from physicians' death certificates, can be used in this type of investigations. Methods Secondary analysis of data from 1996 to 2006 on the "primary" or "underlying" cause of death from official death certificates filled out by physicians and additional data from 2003 to 2006 on the place of death from these certificates. Results Of the 135,000 people who died in the Netherlands in 2006, 77,000 (or 57% died from a chronic disease. Cancer was the most frequent cause of death (40,000. Stroke accounted for 10,000 deaths, dementia for 8,000 deaths and COPD and heart failure each accounted for 6,000 deaths. Compared to 1996, the number of people who died from chronic diseases has risen by 6%. Of all non-acute deaths, almost three quarters were at least 70 years old when they died. Almost one third of the people died at home (31%, 28% in a hospital, 25% in a nursing home and 16% somewhere else. Conclusion Further investments to facilitate dying at home are desirable. Death certificate data proved to be useful to describe and monitor trends in non-acute deaths. Advantages of the use of death certificate data concern the reliability of the data, the opportunities for selection on the basis of the ICD-10, and the availability and low cost price of the data.

  6. Dana-Farber Cancer Institute: Discovery of Resistance Mechanisms | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resistance to targeted therapy is emerging as a bottleneck to achieving durable drug responses in cancer. The goal of the CTD2 Center at Dana Farber Cancer Institute is to identify mechanisms of resistance for both existing therapeutics as well as for emerging targets even prior to the identification of lead compounds. They aim to use this information to inform combinatorial treatments. In representative examples they have found that YAP1 leads to resistance after KRAS targeting and that PRKACA mediates resistance to HER2 therapy.

  7. Occupational asbestos exposure and risk of pleural mesothelioma, lung cancer, and laryngeal cancer in the prospective Netherlands cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Offermans, Nadine S M; Vermeulen, Roel|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/216532620; Burdorf, Alex; Goldbohm, R Alexandra; Kauppinen, Timo; Kromhout, Hans|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074385224; van den Brandt, Piet a

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the association between occupational asbestos exposure and pleural mesothelioma, lung cancer, and laryngeal cancer, specifically addressing risk associated with the lower end of the exposure distribution, risk of cancer subtypes, and the interaction between asbestos and

  8. Occupational asbestos exposure and risk of pleural mesothelioma, lung cancer, and laryngeal cancer in the prospective netherlands cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Offermans, N.S.M.; Vermeulen, R.; Burdorf, A.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Kauppinen, T.; Kromhout, H.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:: To study the association between occupational asbestos exposure and pleural mesothelioma, lung cancer, and laryngeal cancer, specifically addressing risk associated with the lower end of the exposure distribution, risk of cancer subtypes, and the interaction between asbestos and smoking.

  9. Physical activity, energy restriction, and the risk of pancreatic cancer: Prospective study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinen, M.M.; Verhage, B.A.J.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Lumey, L.H.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2011-01-01

    Background: Because of their influence on insulin concentrations, we hypothesized that both physical activity and energy restriction may reduce the risk of pancreatic cancer. Objective: We examined the associations between physical activity, proxies for energy restriction, and pancreatic cancer

  10. Diverging breast and stomach cancer incidence and survival in migrants in The Netherlands, 1996–2009

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnold, M.; Aarts, M.J.; Siesling, Sabine; van der Aa, M.A.; Visser, O.; Coebergh, J.W.W.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Migrant populations usually experience a health transition with respect to their cancer risk as a result from environmental changes and acculturation processes. We investigated potentially contrasting experiences with breast and stomach cancer risk and survival in migrants to the

  11. 76 FR 5597 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    ... Emphasis Panel; Vaccine for Prevention of HIV Infection. Date: February 24, 2011. Time: 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m... Nos. 93.392, Cancer Construction; 93.393, Cancer Cause and Prevention Research; 93.394, Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397...

  12. Vitamin and carotenoid intake and risk of head-neck cancer subtypes in the Netherlands Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Munter, Leonie; Maasland, Denise H E; van den Brandt, Piet A; Kremer, Bernd; Schouten, Leo J

    2015-08-01

    Head and neck cancer (HNC) is the seventh most-common type of cancer worldwide. Evidence regarding the potential protective effect of vitamins and carotenoids on HNC is limited and mostly based on case-control studies. We evaluated the association of intake of dietary vitamins C and E (including supplementation) and the most-common carotenoids (α-carotene, β-carotene, lutein plus zeaxanthin, lycopene, and β-cryptoxanthin) and risk of HNC and HNC subtypes in a large prospective study. The Netherlands Cohort Study included 120,852 participants. For efficiency reasons, a case-cohort design was used. At baseline in 1986, participants completed a food-frequency questionnaire. A subcohort was randomly selected from the total cohort. After 20.3 y of follow-up, 3898 subcohort members and 415 HNC cases [131 oral cavity cancer (OCCs), 88 oro-/hypopharyngeal cancer (OHPs), and 193 laryngeal cancer cases] were available for analysis. Rate ratios and 95% CIs for highest (quartile 4) compared with lowest (quartile 1) quartiles of vitamin and carotenoid intake were estimated by using the Cox proportional hazards model. A strong inverse association was shown between vitamin C and HNC overall (multivariable-adjusted rate ratio for quartile 4 compared with quartile 1: 0.39; 95% CI: 0.23, 0.66; P-trend vitamin E, α-carotene, β-carotene, lycopene, and lutein plus zeaxanthin. The association of vitamin E and HNC was modified by alcohol status (P-interaction = 0.003) with lower risks in alcohol abstainers. With this study, we show an inverse association between intake of vitamin C and the incidence of HNC and HNC-subtypes. Future research is recommended to investigate the underlying mechanisms and to confirm our results, which may be promising for the prevention of HNC. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  13. Alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking and the risk of subtypes of head-neck cancer: results from the Netherlands Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maasland, Denise H E; van den Brandt, Piet A; Kremer, Bernd; Goldbohm, R Alexandra Sandra; Schouten, Leo J

    2014-03-14

    Prospective data on alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking and risk of head-neck cancer (HNC) subtypes, i.e. oral cavity cancer (OCC), oro-/hypopharyngeal cancer (OHPC), and laryngeal cancer (LC), are limited. We investigated these associations within the second largest prospective study on this topic so far, the Netherlands Cohort Study. 120,852 participants completed a questionnaire on diet and other cancer risk factors in 1986. After 17.3 years of follow-up, 395 HNC (110 OCC, 83 OHPC, and 199 LC) cases and 4288 subcohort members were available for case-cohort analysis using Cox proportional hazards models. For total HNC, the multivariable adjusted incidence rate ratio (RR) was 2.74 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.85-4.06) for those drinking ≥30 g ethanol/day compared with abstainers; in subtypes, RRs were 6.39 for OCC, 3.52 for OHPC, and 1.54 for LC. Compared with never cigarette smokers, current cigarette smokers had a RR of 4.49 (95%CI 3.11-6.48) for HNC overall, and 2.11 for OCC, 8.53 for OHPC, and 8.07 for LC. A significant, positive, multiplicative interaction between categories of alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking was found for HNC overall (P interaction 0.03). Alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking were independently associated with risk of HNC overall, with a positive, multiplicative interaction. The strength of these associations differed among HNC-subtypes: OCC was most strongly associated with alcohol consumption but most weakly with cigarette smoking, whereas LC was not statistically significantly associated with alcohol consumption.

  14. The National Cancer Institute's Cancer Information Service: a premiere cancer information and education resource for the nation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Mary Anne

    2007-01-01

    Through the National Cancer Act and its amendments (National Cancer Act, 1971; National Cancer Act Amendments, 1974), the U.S. Congress mandated that the National Cancer Institute (NCI) - the nation's lead agency for cancer information and research - provides accurate, up-to-date information about cancer to all segments of the U.S. population. In 1975, the NCI established the Cancer Information Service (CIS), a premieer resource for providing cancer information and education to the nation. The CIS is designed to maximize reach to the public by responding to the cancer needs of clients through several communication technologies, including a telephone service, e-mail, and real-time instant messaging. By offering cancer information to the public through one-on-one interactions with CIS information specialists, the CIS is in a unique position to fill the gap that lies between the preferred, interpersonal source of the health care provider and the actual, impersonal Internet. Cancer Information Service can play an important role in providing health care practitioners, health departments, caregivers, and researchers with up-to-date and accurate information about cancer and clinical trials. Currently, 10% of CIS callers are health professionals. Referring patients to the CIS can augment health practitioners' ability to convey important health information to patients. The CIS program uses NCI resources to educate clients on cancer prevention, early detection, treatment, and rehabilitation and smoking cessation in simple terms that they can understand. Additionally, the CIS works with organizations to develop educational programs and interventions to reach underserved populations. A unique component of this information and education program is its ability to contribute to the field of health communications research by collaborating in research studies throughout the U.S. Finally, since its inception in 1975, the CIS has assisted international organizations with starting a

  15. Does lowering the screening age for cervical cancer in The Netherlands make sense?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Aa, Maaike A.; de Kok, Inge M.C.M.; Siesling, Sabine; van Ballegooijen, Marjolein; Coebergh, Jan Willem W.

    2008-01-01

    Recommendations for the age to initiate cervical cancer screening should be directed towards maximum detection of early cervical cancer. However, the screening programme should do more good than harm. The aim of this analysis was to determine whether the target age for cervical cancer screening

  16. Decreased rates of advanced breast cancer due to mammography screening in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Fracheboud (Jacques); S.J. Otto (Suzie); J.A.A.M. van Dijck; M.J.M. Broeders (Mireille); A.L.M. Verbeek (Andre); H.J. de Koning (Harry)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThe effect of the implementation of the Dutch breast cancer screening programme during 1990-1997 on the incidence rates of breast cancer, particularly advanced breast cancer, was analysed according to stage at diagnosis in seven regions, where no screening took place before 1990. The

  17. Overdiagnosis by mammographic screening for breast cancer studied in birth cohorts in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ripping, T.M.; Verbeek, A.L.; Fracheboud, J.; Koning, H.J. de; Ravesteyn, N.T. van; Broeders, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    A drawback of early detection of breast cancer through mammographic screening is the diagnosis of breast cancers that would never have become clinically detected. This phenomenon, called overdiagnosis, is ideally quantified from the breast cancer incidence of screened and unscreened cohorts of women

  18. 75 FR 42449 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-21

    ... Research Programs and Updates of the Implementation of the Clinical Trials and Translational Research....395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93...

  19. 77 FR 31030 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-24

    ... 20892, 301- 496-9723. Any interested person may file written comments with the committee by forwarding....396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398, Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399...

  20. 78 FR 50064 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ..., [email protected] . Any interested person may file written comments with the committee by forwarding... Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398, Cancer Research...

  1. 77 FR 5029 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    ..., Room 10A30, Bethesda, MD 20892, 301- 496-9723. Any interested person may file written comments with the... Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398, Cancer Research...

  2. 77 FR 58851 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-24

    ... interested person may file written comments with the committee by forwarding ] the statement to the Contact..., Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology...

  3. 77 FR 46765 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-06

    ...-9582. Any interested person may file written comments with the committee by forwarding the statement to... Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398, Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399, Cancer Control...

  4. 78 FR 48455 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-08

    ...- 6340. Any interested person may file written comments with the committee by forwarding the statement to....396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398, Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399...

  5. 78 FR 9402 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-08

    ..., Room 10A28, Bethesda, MD 20892, 301- 594-3194. Any interested person may file written comments with the... Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer CentersSupport; 93.398, Cancer Research...

  6. 78 FR 2682 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-14

    ..., (301) 496-5147. Any interested person may file written comments with the committee by forwarding the... Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398, Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399, Cancer Control...

  7. 75 FR 26267 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-11

    ..., (301) 496-5147. Any interested person may file written comments with the committee by forwarding the....396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398, Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399...

  8. 78 FR 44577 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-24

    ..., [email protected] . Any interested person may file written comments with the committee by forwarding....396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398, Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399...

  9. 75 FR 42453 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-21

    ....gov . Any interested person may file written comments with the committee by forwarding the statement....396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398, Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399...

  10. 78 FR 50068 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ... Center Drive, Room 7W-102, Bethesda, MD 20892, (240) 276-6341. Any interested person may file written..., Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398...

  11. 76 FR 53687 - National Cancer Institute Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-29

    ..., Rm. 11A48, Bethesda, MD 20892, 301-435-2455, [email protected] . Any interested person may file..., Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology...

  12. 77 FR 26772 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-07

    ... may file written comments with the committee by forwarding the statement to the Contact Person listed..., Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology...

  13. 75 FR 70013 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-16

    ...-9399, [email protected] . Any interested person may file written comments with the committee by....396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93.398, Cancer Research Manpower; 93.399...

  14. 75 FR 29769 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-27

    ... Emphasis Panel; Integrating Patient-Reported Outcomes in Hospice and Palliative Care Practices. Date: June....395, Cancer ] Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397, Cancer Centers Support; 93...

  15. Robust breast cancer prediction system based on rough set theory at National Cancer Institute of Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamouda, Saeed Khodary M; Wahed, Mohammed E; Abo Alez, Reda H; Riad, Khaled

    2018-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the major death causing diseases of the women in the world. Every year more than million women are diagnosed with breast cancer more than half of them will die because of inaccuracies and delays in diagnosis of the disease. High accuracy in cancer prediction is important to improve the treatment quality and the survivability rate of patients. In this paper, we are going to propose a new and robust breast cancer prediction and diagnosis system based on the Rough Set (RS). Also, introducing the robust classification process based on some new and most effective attributes. Comparing and evaluating the performance of our proposed approach with the clinical, Radial Basis Function, and Artificial Neural Networks classification schemes. The dataset used in our experiments consists of 60 samples obtained from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) of Egypt. We have used the RS theory to robustly find dependence relationships among data, and evaluate the importance of attributes through: Results: Conclusion: We have introduced the robustness of the RS theory in early predicting and diagnosing the breast cancer. This lay more importance to the contribution and efficiency of RS theory in the field of computational biology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Adherence to the Dutch Guidelines for a Healthy Diet and cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Netherlands (EPIC-NL) cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struijk, Ellen A; May, Anne M; Beulens, Joline W J; Fransen, Heidi P; de Wit, G Ardine; Boer, Jolanda M A; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Hoekstra, Jeljer; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Peeters, Petra H M

    2014-11-01

    To examine the association between adherence to the Dutch Guidelines for a Healthy Diet created by the Dutch Health Council in 2006 and overall and smoking-related cancer incidence. Prospective cohort study. Adherence to the guidelines, which includes one recommendation on physical activity and nine on diet, was measured using an adapted version of the Dutch Healthy Diet (DHD) index. The score ranged from 0 to 90 with a higher score indicating greater adherence to the guidelines. We estimated the hazard ratios (HR) and 95 % confidence intervals for the association between the DHD index (in tertiles and per 20-point increment) at baseline and cancer incidence at follow-up. We studied 35 608 men and women aged 20-70 years recruited into the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Netherlands (EPIC-NL) study during 1993-1997. After an average follow-up of 12·7 years, 3027 cancer cases were documented. We found no significant association between the DHD index (tertile 3 v. tertile 1) and overall (HR = 0·97; 95 % CI 0·88, 1·07) and smoking-related cancer incidence (HR = 0·89; 95 % CI 0·76, 1·06) after adjustment for relevant confounders. Excluding the components physical activity or alcohol from the score did not change the results. None of the individual components of the DHD index was significantly associated with cancer incidence. In the present study, participants with a high adherence to the Dutch Guidelines for a Healthy Diet were not at lower risk of overall or smoking-related cancer. This does not exclude that other components not included in the DHD index may be associated with overall cancer risk.

  17. "A Somali girl is Muslim and does not have premarital sex. Is vaccination really necessary?" A qualitative study into the perceptions of Somali women in the Netherlands about the prevention of cervical cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Salad, Jihan; Verdonk, Petra; de Boer, Fijgje; Abma, Tineke A

    2015-01-01

    .... This qualitative study, based on the Health Belief Model (HBM) and an intersectionality-based framework, explores the perceptions of Somali women living in the Netherlands regarding measures to prevent cervical cancer...

  18. Multi-institutional tumor banking: lessons learned from a pancreatic cancer biospecimen repository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demeure, Michael J; Sielaff, Timothy; Koep, Larry; Prinz, Richard; Moser, A James; Zeh, Herb; Hostetter, Galen; Black, Jodi; Decker, Ardis; Rosewell, Sandra; Bussey, Kimberly J; Von Hoff, Daniel

    2010-10-01

    Clinically annotated pancreatic cancer samples are needed for progress to be made toward developing more effective treatments for this deadly cancer. As part of a National Cancer Institute-funded program project, we established a biospecimen core to support the research efforts. This article summarizes the key hurdles encountered and solutions we found in the process of developing a successful multi-institution biospecimen repository.

  19. Recruiting end-of-life cancer patients in the Netherlands for a study on suffering and euthanasia requests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruijs, C D M; Goedhart, J; Kerkhof, A J F M; van der Wal, G; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B D

    2011-12-01

    In the Netherlands, GPs performed euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide (EAS) in ∼1 of 10 end-of-life cancer patients in their care. Of all explicit requests for EAS directed at GPs, ∼44% resulted in EAS. However, the suffering of patients who do and do not request EAS has never been studied. An important barrier for such research is the low prevalence of end-of-life cancer patients per practice (on average two/year). We studied whether it is possible to recruit end-of-life cancer patients, following-up for requests for EAS (if any), in an interview study in general practice, whether selection occurred and which were the threats and opportunities to recruitment. Our target was to recruit at least 50 patients. Characteristics of all eligible patients were monitored. One in every three eligible patients were recruited by 44 GPs in a 3-year inclusion period, resulting in 64 patients in the interview study with follow-up until death. The prevalence of explicit requests for EAS was higher (27%; P = 0.026) in the interview sample, and the presence of a depressed mood according to the GP was lower (5%; P = 0.013) than in the sample with eligible but not participating patients. Recruitment of slightly more than the minimal target number of end-of-life cancer patients in this study in general practice was realized. Monitoring of all eligible patients permitted to evaluate the selection which occurred. Recruitment through GPs who were direct professional colleagues of one of the researchers was a positive recruitment factor.

  20. Intake of meat and fish and risk of head-neck cancer subtypes in the Netherlands Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perloy, Andy; Maasland, Denise H E; van den Brandt, Piet A; Kremer, Bernd; Schouten, Leo J

    2017-06-01

    To date, the role of meat and fish intake in head-neck cancer (HNC) etiology is not well understood and prospective evidence is limited. This prompted us to study the association between meat, fish, and HNC subtypes, i.e., oral cavity cancer (OCC), oro- and hypopharyngeal cancer (OHPC), and laryngeal cancer (LC), within the Netherlands Cohort Study (NLCS). In 1986, 120,852 participants (aged 55-69 years) completed a baseline 150-item food frequency questionnaire (FFQ), from which daily meat and fish intake were calculated. After 20.3 years of follow-up, 430 HNC overall (134 OCC, 90 OHPC and 203 LC) cases and 4,111 subcohort members were found to be eligible for case-cohort analysis. Multivariate hazard ratios were calculated using Cox's proportional hazards model within quartiles of energy-adjusted meat and fish intake. Processed meat intake, but not red meat intake, was positively associated with HNC overall [HR(Q4 vs. Q1) = 1.46, 95% CI 1.06-2.00; ptrend = 0.03]. Among HNC subtypes, processed meat was positively associated with OCC, while no associations were found with OHPC and LC. Fish intake was not associated with HNC risk. Tests for interaction did not reveal statistically significant interaction between meat, fish, and alcohol or smoking on HNC overall risk. In this large cohort study, processed meat intake was positively associated with HNC overall and HNC subtype OCC, but not with OHPC and LC.

  1. The Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vries, Anthon K.

    1975-01-01

    Examines early childhood education in the Netherlands: its history, general conceptions of child upbringing and developmental psychology, organizational patterns, main research projects, and goals. (JH)

  2. 76 FR 66932 - The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Announces the Initiation of a Public Private Industry...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-28

    ... Initiation of a Public Private Industry Partnership on Translation of Nanotechnology in Cancer (TONIC) To... Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) is initiating a public private... biotechnology companies. This consortium will evaluate promising nanotechnology platforms and facilitate their...

  3. Body mass index and risk of subtypes of head-neck cancer: the Netherlands Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Maasland, Denise H. E.; van den Brandt, Piet A.; Bernd Kremer; Schouten, Leo J.

    2015-01-01

    Low body mass index (BMI) has been associated with risk of head-neck cancer (HNC), but prospective data are scarce. We investigated the association between BMI, BMI at age 20 years and change in BMI during adulthood with risk of HNC and HNC subtypes. 120,852 participants completed a questionnaire on diet and other cancer risk factors, including anthropometric measurements, at baseline in 1986. After 20.3 years of follow-up, 411 HNC (127 oral cavity cancer (OCC), 84 oro-/hypopharyngeal cancer ...

  4. Explaining the Decline in Coronary Heart Disease Mortality in the Netherlands between 1997 and 2007

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Koopman, Carla; Vaartjes, Ilonca; van Dis, Ineke; Verschuren, W. M. Monique; Engelfriet, Peter; Heintjes, Edith M; Blokstra, Anneke; Deeg, Dorly J. H; Visser, Marjolein; Bots, Michiel L; O’Flaherty, Martin; Capewell, Simon

    2016-01-01

    ... for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, the Netherlands Edith M. Heintjes Affiliation: PHARMO Institute for drug research, Utrecht, the Netherlands Anneke Blokstra Affiliation: National...

  5. Disparities in Geographic Accessibility of National Cancer Institute Cancer Centers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yanqing; Fu, Cong; Onega, Tracy; Shi, Xun; Wang, Fahui

    2017-11-11

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Centers form the backbone of the cancer care system in the United States since their inception in the early 1970s. Most studies on their geographic accessibility used primitive measures, and did not examine the disparities across urbanicity or demographic groups. This research uses an advanced accessibility method, termed "2-step floating catchment area (2SFCA)" and implemented in Geographic Information Systems (GIS), to capture the degree of geographic access to NCI Cancer Centers by accounting for competition intensity for the services and travel time between residents and the facilities. The results indicate that urban advantage is pronounced as the average accessibility is highest in large central metro areas, declines to large fringe metro, medium metro, small metro, micropolitan and noncore rural areas. Population under the poverty line are disproportionally concentrated in lower accessibility areas. However, on average Non-Hispanic White have the lowest geographic accessibility, followed by Hispanic, Non-Hispanic Black and Asian, and the differences are statistically significant. The "reversed racial disadvantage" in NCI Cancer Center accessibility seems counterintuitive but is consistent with an influential prior study; and it is in contrast to the common observation of co-location of concentration of minority groups and people under the poverty line.

  6. Dietary folate and folate vitamers and the risk of pancreatic cancer in the Netherlands cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keszei, A.P.; Verhage, B.A.J.; Heinen, M.M.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2009-01-01

    An association between high intake of folate and reduced risk of cancer has been suggested by previous research. However, epidemiologic data from cohort studies regarding the relationship between dietary folate and pancreatic cancer are sparse and inconsistent. We examined the association between

  7. Progress against cancer in the Netherlands since the late 1980s: an epidemiological evaluation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karim-Kos, H.E.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Louwman, M.W.; Coebergh, J.W.W.; Vries, E. de

    2012-01-01

    Progress against cancer through prevention and treatment is often measured by survival statistics only instead of analyzing trends in incidence, survival and mortality simultaneously because of interactive influences. This study combines these parameters of major cancers to provide an overview of

  8. Determinants of regional differences in lung cancer mortality in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.E. Kunst (Anton); C.W.N. Looman (Caspar); J.P. Mackenbach (Johan)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractAlthough regional differences in lung cancer mortality are likely to be attributable to regional differences in tobacco smoking, studies in various countries found only weak relationships. This paper aimed at explaining regional differences in lung cancer mortality in the

  9. Alcohol consumption and bladder cancer risk : results from the Netherlands cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeegers, M.P.A.; Volovics, A.; Dorant, E.; Goldbohm, A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2001-01-01

    Although several epidemiologic studies have been conducted on alcohol consumption and bladder cancer risk, the risk according to quantity and type of alcohol consumed is not clear. The authors investigated these associations in a large prospective cohort study on diet and cancer among 120,852

  10. A prospective study on active and environmental tobacco smoking and bladder cancer risk (The Netherlands)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeegers, M.P.A.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2002-01-01

    Objective: In a prospective cohort study among 120,852 adult subjects the authors investigated the associations between cigarette, cigar, pipe, environmental tobacco smoking (ETS), and bladder cancer. Methods: In 1986 all subjects completed a questionnaire on cancer risk factors. Follow-up for

  11. Socioeconomic status and stomach cancer incidence in men: Results from the Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, A.J.M. van; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    1998-01-01

    Study objective - To study the association between socioeconomic status (SES) and stomach cancer incidence (cardia and non-cardia) and the role of lifestyle factors in explaining this association. Design - Prospective cohort study on diet and cancer that started in 1986. Data were collected by means

  12. Survival of non-Western first generations immigrants with stomach cancer in North East Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siemerink, E.J.M.; van der Aa, M.A.; Siesling, Sabine; Hospers, G.A.P.; Mulder, N.H.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Isolated groups, such as first generation non-Western immigrants, are at risk for suboptimal utilisation of the health care system resulting in a worse outcome. Methods: From 1989 to 2007, all patients with stomach cancer were selected from the Comprehensive Cancer Centre North-East

  13. Trend breaks in incidence of non-cardia gastric cancer in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holster, I.L.; Aarts, M.J.; Tjwa, E.T.; Lemmens, V.E.; Kuipers, E.J.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The incidence of gastric cancer declined over the past decades. Recently, unfavorable trend breaks (i.e. rise in incidence) were seen for non-cardia cancer in younger age groups in the US. It is unclear whether these also occur in other Western countries. We aimed to analyze the

  14. Dietary glycemic load, glycemic index and colorectal cancer risk: Results from the Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijenberg, M.P.; Mullie, P.F.F.; Brants, H.A.M.; Heinen, M.M.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2008-01-01

    Since hyperinsulinemia is implicated in the development of colorectal cancer, determinants of serum insulin levels, like the glycemic load and the glycemic index of the diet, could influence cancer risk. Our objective was to evaluate whether a diet with a high glycemic load or glycemic index is

  15. Consumption of dietary fat and meat and risk of ovarian cancer in the Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilsing, A.M.J.; Weijenberg, M.P.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Schouten, L.J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Evidence that links dietary factors to ovarian cancer is conflicting, but several epidemiologic studies suggested that consumption of dietary fat and meat may increase risk of ovarian cancer. Objective: We studied associations of intakes of total fat and sources and subtypes of fat,

  16. Supportive nursing care around breast cancer surgery : An evaluation of the 1997 status in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijs-Boer, FM; de Kruif, ATC; van de Wiel, HBM

    This study aimed to assess nurses' involvement in the supportive care of patients with recently diagnosed breast cancer in Dutch hospitals. A questionnaire used to evaluate various aspects of nursing care for breast cancer patients was sent to the surgical nursing teams in all 120 Dutch hospitals

  17. The impact of HPV vaccination on HPV and cervical cancer in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M. Matthijsse (Suzette)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractHuman papillomavirus (HPV) is a highly prevalent sexually transmitted virus, of which 150 types have been completely sequenced. Currently, about 14 HPV-types are considered ‘high risk’ for their potential to cause cervical cancer, the fourth most common cancer among women worldwide. In

  18. Occupational exposure to silica and lung cancer risk in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Preller, L.; Bosch, L.M.C. van den; Brandt, P.A. van den; Kauppinen, T.; Goldbohm, R.A.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The lung cancer carcinogenicity of crystalline silica dust remains the subject of discussion. Epidemiological evidence is based on occupational cohort studies and population-based case-control studies. The aim of this study was to assess associations between male lung cancer risk and

  19. Travel Burden and Clinical Profile of Cancer Patients Admitted to the Cancer Institute of Iran in 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Fatemeh; Ardestani, Atefeh; Hadji, Maryam; Mohagheghi, Mohammad Ali; Kazemian, Ali; Mirzania, Mehrzad; Mahmoodzadeh, Habibollah; Aghili, Mahdi; Zendehdel, Kazem

    2017-03-01

    Burden of cancer is increasing in developing countries, where healthcare infrastructures and resources are limited. Evaluating the pattern of care would provide evidence for planning and improvement of the situation. We studied the pattern of residential place and clinical information of cancer patients who were admitted to the Cancer Institute of Iran from January 1, to May 31, 2012. We studied 1,705 consecutive cancer patients admitted to the Cancer Institute in the study period. The most common cancers were breast (29.2%), colorectal (9.0%), stomach (8.3%), head & neck (8.0%) and esophageal (3.8%) cancers. Radiotherapy was the main treatment (52.1%) followed by chemotherapy (43.8%) and surgery (29.1%). We found that 60% of the patients presented in the loco-regional or advanced stages. About 35% of patients travelled from other provinces mainly from Mazandaran (13.4%), Lorestan (10.6%), Zanjan (7.8%) and Ghazvin (6.6%). On average, the cancer patients travelled about 455 kilometers to receive care in the cancer institute. We found more than 38% patients who were referred from other provinces had an early stage tumor. Establishment of comprehensive cancer centers in different geographical regions and implementation of a proper referral system for advanced cancer patients is needed to improve the patient outcomes and mitigate the burden of travel of patients for cancer care.

  20. Treatment Variation of Sequential versus Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients in the Netherlands and Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walraven, I; Damhuis, R A; Ten Berge, M G; Rosskamp, M; van Eycken, L; de Ruysscher, D; Belderbos, J S A

    2017-11-01

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) is considered the standard treatment regimen in non-surgical locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients and sequential chemoradiotherapy (SCRT) is recommended in patients who are unfit to receive CCRT or when the treatment volume is considered too large. In this study, we investigated the proportion of CCRT/SCRT in the Netherlands and Belgium. Furthermore, patient and disease characteristics associated with SCRT were assessed. An observational study was carried out with data from three independent national registries: the Belgian Cancer Registry (BCR), the Netherlands Cancer Registry (NCR) and the Dutch Lung Cancer Audit-Radiotherapy (DLCA-R). Differences in patient and disease characteristics between CCRT and SCRT were tested with unpaired t-tests (for continuous variables) and with chi-square tests (for categorical variables). A prognostic model was constructed to determine patient and disease parameters predictive for the choice of SCRT. This study included 350 patients from the BCR, 780 patients from the NCR and 428 patients from the DLCA-R. More than half of the stage III NSCLC patients in the Netherlands (55%) and in Belgium more than a third (35%) were treated with CCRT. In both the Dutch and Belgian population, higher age and more advanced N-stage were significantly associated with SCRT. Performance score, pulmonary function, comorbidities and tumour volume were not associated with SCRT. In this observational population-based study, a large treatment variation in non-surgical stage III NSCLC patients was observed between and within the Netherlands and Belgium. Higher age and N-stage were significantly associated with the choice for SCRT. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Night work and breast cancer risk in a general population prospective cohort study in The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppes, Lando L J; Geuskens, Goedele A; Pronk, Anjoeka; Vermeulen, Roel C H; de Vroome, Ernest M M

    2014-08-01

    Experimental studies in animals indicate that disruption of the circadian rhythm is carcinogenic, and night work has been suggested to be a probable breast cancer cause in humans. Findings among humans, however are inconsistent, often gathered with retrospective study designs, and only based on specific populations, such as nurses. We used data on night work collected in the Dutch Labor Force Surveys of 1996 until 2009, and individually linked these with National registers on hospital admission. Among 285,723 women without breast cancer at baseline, 2,531 had a hospital admission for breast cancer during an average of 7 years of follow up in the registers. Occasional and regular night work were not associated with the risk of hospital admission for breast cancer (adjusted hazard ratios 1.04; 95 % confidence interval 0.85-1.27, and 0.87; 0.72-1.05, respectively). Working more hours per week, or more years in a job entailing night work did not show increased breast cancer risks. Hazard ratios neither differed between nurses and women with other occupations. Our results show no association of night work with incident breast cancer, and suggest that night work generally does not increase the risk of breast cancer among women in the Dutch working population.

  2. Vegetables and fruits consumption and risk of esophageal and gastric cancer subtypes in the Netherlands Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steevens, Jessie; Schouten, Leo J; Goldbohm, R Alexandra; van den Brandt, Piet A

    2011-12-01

    Prospective epidemiologic data on vegetables and fruits consumption and risk of subtypes of esophageal and gastric cancer are sparse. We studied the association between vegetables and fruits consumption and risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), gastric cardia adenocarcinoma (GCA) and gastric noncardia adenocarcinoma (GNCA) in the Netherlands Cohort Study. In 1986, 120,852 Dutch men and women aged 55-69 filled out a questionnaire on diet and other cancer risk factors. After 16.3 years of follow-up, 101 ESCC, 144 EAC, 156 GCA, 460 GNCA cases and 4,035 subcohort members were available for case-cohort analysis using Cox proportional hazards models. Multivariable adjusted incidence rate ratios (RRs) were generally below unity. Total vegetable consumption was nonsignificantly inversely associated with EAC and ESCC risk, but not with GCA and GNCA risk. Significant inverse associations were observed for raw vegetables and EAC risk [RR per 25 g/day: 0.81, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.68-0.98], and Brassica vegetables and GCA risk (RR per 25 g/day: 0.72, 95% CI 0.54-0.95). Total fruit consumption was associated with a nonsignificantly decreased EAC risk. Citrus fruits were inversely associated with EAC and GCA risk (RRs for highest vs. lowest intake: 0.55, 95% CI 0.31-0.98 and 0.38, 95% CI 0.21-0.69, respectively). Specifically for current smokers, vegetables and possibly also fruits intake was inversely associated with ESCC and EAC risk. Consumption of (specific groups of) vegetables and fruits may protect against subtypes of esophageal and gastric cancer. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  3. Chemotherapy for ovarian cancer in the Netherlands: a population-based study on treatment patterns and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houben, E; van Haalen, H G M; Sparreboom, W; Overbeek, J A; Ezendam, N P M; Pijnenborg, J M A; Severens, J L; van Herk-Sukel, M P P

    2017-04-01

    Information on treatment patterns for ovarian cancer (OC) is limited. The aim of this study was to describe current patterns of chemotherapy and other systemic treatments for OC in the Netherlands and evaluate survival outcomes following subsequent lines of treatment. Data from the Eindhoven Cancer Registry, including on newly diagnosed cancer patients, were linked to the PHARMO Database Network, including information on in- and out-patient drug use. Patients diagnosed with OC between January 2000 and December 2010 were selected. An algorithm was used to identify separate lines of treatment. Data were studied descriptively. Detailed data on systemic drug use were available for 261 patients (17%) with OC. In first-line treatment, 87% of the patients (227/261) received platinum-based chemotherapy. Of the 161 patients receiving second-line treatment, 101 patients (63%) received platinum-based chemotherapy. In third line, this was 51% (53/103). The median number of treatment lines received by patients was two (interquartile range 1-3), and eight or more lines of chemotherapy were identified for 12 patients. Median survival from diagnosis onwards was 47 months from the end of first-line treatment, median survival was 32 months, and from the end of second-line treatment, it was 14 months. Predominantly beyond second-line treatment, there is much variety in treatment patterns with chemotherapy for OC. Although uncertainty remains regarding the desirability of this observed treatment variation, there seems a need for detailed clinical guidance, assuring that physicians can properly choose the most suitable treatment for each patient.

  4. Readability of patient information regarding breast cancer prevention from the Web site of the National Cancer Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, Ian C

    2010-12-01

    The increasing use of the Internet for gathering information regarding preventative health measures creates a unique dilemma. Access to the Internet is almost universal in the USA. Web sites presenting health information regarding breast cancer must create information that is understandable to the general public, meaning a reading level of around seventh grade. Text was obtained from the National Cancer Institute's Web site, and an examination of the text's grade level was performed. The text was written at between a 10th and 12th grade level. This indicates that information regarding breast cancer prevention obtained from the National Cancer Institute's web site is written at far too high of a level.

  5. Neuroendocrine Carcinoma: Immunohistochemistry Department Of Cancer Institute 1996 - 2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazdani F

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Dispersed neuroendocrine system (D.N.S consists of a wide variety of cells that are present in the central and peripheral nervous system and in many classic endocrine organs and different tissues such as respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts, skin, prostate, breast and also their neoplasm show neuroendocrine differentiation by electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry or biochemical techniques:"nMaterials and Methods: The present study has been carried out by case-series method in order to evaluating the characteristics of all types of neuroendocrine carcinoma: different anatomical locations during 5 years period in immunohistochemistry department of cancer institute."nResults: The diagnosis of 109 cases of neuroendocrine carcinoma consisting of neuroendocrine carcinoma, small cell carcinoma, medullary carcinoma of thyroid, carcinoid tumor and merkel cell carcinoma are confirmed that among them the most common diagnosis was related to neuroendocrine carcinoma (50.5 percent. The most prevalent age group was 40-49 years and male to female distribution were 56 percent and 44 percent respectively. Anatomical distribution of tumor show that about 30 percent of cases were metastatic carcinoma, 30 percent in thyroid, respiratory tract and head and neck region and remainder in a variety of tissues. In over 50 percent of cases one of endocrinoid patterns as trabecular, organoid or mixed of them were seen."nConclusion: Immunohistochemically N.S.E (Neuron Specific Enolase show high sensitivity with 96 percent positive reaction and more specific endocrine markers as chromogranin A in 80 percent and synaptophysin only in 24 percent because of lesser application of the latter. Also epithelial markers such as cytokeratin and E.M.A."n(Epithelial Membrane Antigen were positive in 69 percent and 74 percent respectively. Mean survival rate of all neuroendocrine carcinoma reached to 4.8 years with lowest survival of 4.3 years among small cell carcinoma and

  6. 76 FR 66733 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-27

    .... Any interested person may file written comments with the committee by forwarding the statement to the... Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397...

  7. 77 FR 2557 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-18

    .... Any interested person may file written comments with the committee by forwarding the statement to the... Detection and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397...

  8. 78 FR 29758 - National Cancer Institute Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-21

    ... 20892, (240) 276- 6340.> Any interested person may file written comments with the committee by... and Diagnosis Research; 93.395, Cancer Treatment Research; 93.396, Cancer Biology Research; 93.397...

  9. Glycemic load, glycemic index, and pancreatic cancer risk in the Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinen, M.M.; Verhage, B.A.J.; Lumey, L.H.; Brants, H.A.M.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2008-01-01

    Background: Recent studies of pancreatic cancer suggest a role for hyperinsulinemia in carcinogenesis. Because insulin is secreted in response to elevated blood glucose concentrations, dietary factors that increase these concentrations may be important in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Objective: The

  10. Reproductive and hormonal factors in association with ovarian cancer in the Netherlands cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braem, M.G.M.; Onland-Moret, N.C.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Goldbohm, R.A.; Peeters, P.H.M.; Kruitwagen, R.F.P.M.; Schouten, L.J.

    2010-01-01

    Parity, oral contraceptive use, and hysterectomy are known to protect against ovarian cancer, whereas the effect of other reproductive factors remains unclear. The authors investigated the association between several reproductive and hormonal factors and the risk of epithelial invasive ovarian

  11. Calculation of lung cancer incidence in the Netherlands by smoking and radon exposure. Implications for the effect of radon; Berekening van de longkankerincidentie in Nederland door roken en blootstelling aan radon. Implicaties voor het effect van radon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leenhouts, H.P.; Brugmans, J.P. [Laboratorium voor Stralingsonderzoek, Rijksinstituut voor Volksgezondheid en Milieu RIVM, Bilthoven (Netherlands)

    2001-09-01

    Although the main cause of lung cancer is smoking cigarettes, part of the cases are subscribed to radon exposure, in particular {alpha}-radiation from daughter products. However, the relation between lung cancer and radon exposure is rather insecure. Based on international reports (e.g. BEIR VI) and extrapolation of lung cancer incidence in uranium mine workers to the population of the USA and subsequently to the Netherlands, the number of lung cancer cases in the Netherlands is estimated to be circa 800 per year, varying between 200-2000. Results of the analysis are summarized in this article. 10 refs.

  12. Cardiotoxicity and Cardiac Monitoring During Adjuvant Trastuzumab in Daily Dutch Practice: A Study of the Southeast Netherlands Breast Cancer Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seferina, Shanly C; de Boer, Maaike; Derksen, M Wouter; van den Berkmortel, Franchette; van Kampen, Roel J W; van de Wouw, Agnès J; Joore, Manuela; Peer, Petronella G M; Voogd, Adri C; Tjan-Heijnen, Vivianne C G

    2016-05-01

    We assessed the incidence and timing of first cardiac events, impact on trastuzumab prescription, and role of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) monitoring in daily practice of trastuzumab-treated patients with human epidermal growth receptor 2 (HER2)-positive early breast cancer. We included all patients with stage I-III breast cancer diagnosed in the early years (2005-2007) after the introduction of adjuvant trastuzumab in five hospitals in Southeast Netherlands. We studied the incidence and timing of cardiotoxicity in patients treated with adjuvant trastuzumab, using similar cardiac endpoints as in the Herceptin Adjuvant (HERA) trial. Of 2,684 included patients, 476 (17.7%) had a HER2-positive tumor. Of these, 269 (56.9%) were treated with adjuvant chemotherapy, and of these, 230 (85.5%) also received trastuzumab. Cardiotoxicity was observed in 29 of 230 patients (12.6%). Twenty of the 230 patients (8.7%) had symptomatic cardiotoxicity, defined as a drop in LVEF of at least 10 percentage points and to below 50%, accompanied by symptoms of congestive heart failure. Trastuzumab was definitely discontinued because of supposed cardiotoxicity in 36 patients (15.6%), of whom only 15 (6.5%) had a significant LVEF drop. Of the 36 patients who prematurely discontinued trastuzumab (including the 29 in whom cardiotoxicity was observed), 84.8% stopped in the first 6 months. No cardiac deaths were seen. In the first years after implementation of trastuzumab for treatment of early breast cancer, physicians frequently based their decision to discontinue treatment on patient symptoms apart from LVEF outcome. We suggest that focusing LVEF monitoring on the first 6 months might be more cost-effective without compromising patient safety. Nonetheless, further research is needed. Knowledge of when cardiotoxicity occurs in daily practice will help shape the best follow-up method for cardiac monitoring in trastuzumab-treated patients with human epidermal growth receptor 2

  13. Body mass index and risk of subtypes of head-neck cancer: the Netherlands Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maasland, Denise H E; van den Brandt, Piet A; Kremer, Bernd; Schouten, Leo J

    2015-12-04

    Low body mass index (BMI) has been associated with risk of head-neck cancer (HNC), but prospective data are scarce. We investigated the association between BMI, BMI at age 20 years and change in BMI during adulthood with risk of HNC and HNC subtypes. 120,852 participants completed a questionnaire on diet and other cancer risk factors, including anthropometric measurements, at baseline in 1986. After 20.3 years of follow-up, 411 HNC (127 oral cavity cancer (OCC), 84 oro-/hypopharyngeal cancer (OHPC), and 197 laryngeal cancer (LC)) cases and 3,980 subcohort members were available for case-cohort analysis using Cox proportional hazards models. BMI at baseline was inversely associated with risk of HNC overall, with a multivariate rate ratio of 3.31 (95% CI 1.40-7.82) for subjects with a BMI < 18.5 kg/m(2), compared to participants with a BMI of 18.5 to 25 kg/m(2). Among HNC subtypes, this association was strongest for OCC and OHPC. The association between BMI at age 20 and HNC risk appeared to be positive. In this large prospective cohort study, we found an inverse association between BMI at baseline and HNC risk. For BMI at age 20, however, a positive rather than inverse association was found.

  14. Return to work of cancer patients after a multidisciplinary intervention including occupational counselling and physical exercise in cancer patients: a prospective study in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leensen, Monique C J; Groeneveld, Iris F; Heide, Iris van der; Rejda, Tomas; van Veldhoven, Peter L J; Berkel, Sietske van; Snoek, Aernout; Harten, Wim van; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W; de Boer, Angela G E M

    2017-06-15

    To support return to work (RTW) among cancer patients, a multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme was developed which combined occupational counselling with a supervised physical exercise programme during chemotherapy. The aim was to investigate RTW rates of cancer patients and to evaluate changes in work-related quality of life and physical outcomes. Longitudinal prospective intervention study using a one-group design. Two hospitals in the Netherlands. Of the eligible patients, 56% participated; 93 patients with a primary diagnosis of cancer receiving chemotherapy and on sick leave were included. Patients completed questionnaires on RTW, the importance of work, work ability (WAI), RTW self-efficacy, fatigue (MFI), and quality of life (EORTC QLQ C-30) at baseline and 6, 12 and 18 months follow-up. Before and after the exercise programme 1-repetition maximum (1RM) muscle strength and cardiorespiratory fitness (VO 2 peak) were assessed. Six months after the start of a multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme that combined occupational counselling with a supervised physical exercise programme, 59% of the cancer patients returned to work, 86% at 12 months and 83% at 18 months. In addition, significant improvements (pfatigue levels were significantly reduced. After completing the exercise programme, 1RM muscle strength was significantly increased but there was no improvement in VO 2 peak level. RTW rates of cancer patients were high after completion of the multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme. A multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme which combines occupational counselling with a supervised physical exercise programme is likely to result in RTW, reduced fatigue and increased importance of work, work ability, and quality of life. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  15. Patterns of use of medical cannabis among Israeli cancer patients: a single institution experience

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Waissengrin, Barliz; Urban, Damien; Leshem, Yasmin; Garty, Meital; Wolf, Ido

    2015-01-01

    .... Efficacy and patterns of use of cannabis were evaluated using physician-completed application forms, medical files, and a detailed questionnaire in adult cancer patients treated at a single institution...

  16. Dietary Acrylamide Intake and the Risk of Lymphatic Malignancies: The Netherlands Cohort Study on Diet and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongers, Mathilda L.; Hogervorst, Janneke G. F.; Schouten, Leo J.; Goldbohm, R. Alexandra; Schouten, Harry C.; van den Brandt, Piet A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Acrylamide, a probable human carcinogen, is present in many everyday foods. Since the finding of its presence in foods in 2002, epidemiological studies have found some suggestive associations between dietary acrylamide exposure and the risk of various cancers. The aim of this prospective study is to investigate for the first time the association between dietary acrylamide intake and the risk of several histological subtypes of lymphatic malignancies. Methods The Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer includes 120,852 men and women followed-up since September 1986. The number of person years at risk was estimated by using a random sample of participants from the total cohort that was chosen at baseline (n  = 5,000). Acrylamide intake was estimated from a food frequency questionnaire combined with acrylamide data for Dutch foods. Hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated for acrylamide intake as a continuous variable as well as in categories (quintiles and tertiles), for men and women separately and for never-smokers, using multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazards models. Results After 16.3 years of follow-up, 1,233 microscopically confirmed cases of lymphatic malignancies were available for multivariable-adjusted analysis. For multiple myeloma and follicular lymphoma, HRs for men were 1.14 (95% CI: 1.01, 1.27) and 1.28 (95% CI: 1.03, 1.61) per 10 µg acrylamide/day increment, respectively. For never-smoking men, the HR for multiple myeloma was 1.98 (95% CI: 1.38, 2.85). No associations were observed for women. Conclusion We found indications that acrylamide may increase the risk of multiple myeloma and follicular lymphoma in men. This is the first epidemiological study to investigate the association between dietary acrylamide intake and the risk of lymphatic malignancies, and more research into these observed associations is warranted. PMID:22723843

  17. Dietary acrylamide intake and the risk of lymphatic malignancies: the Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathilda L Bongers

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acrylamide, a probable human carcinogen, is present in many everyday foods. Since the finding of its presence in foods in 2002, epidemiological studies have found some suggestive associations between dietary acrylamide exposure and the risk of various cancers. The aim of this prospective study is to investigate for the first time the association between dietary acrylamide intake and the risk of several histological subtypes of lymphatic malignancies. METHODS: The Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer includes 120,852 men and women followed-up since September 1986. The number of person years at risk was estimated by using a random sample of participants from the total cohort that was chosen at baseline (n =5,000. Acrylamide intake was estimated from a food frequency questionnaire combined with acrylamide data for Dutch foods. Hazard ratios (HRs were calculated for acrylamide intake as a continuous variable as well as in categories (quintiles and tertiles, for men and women separately and for never-smokers, using multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazards models. RESULTS: After 16.3 years of follow-up, 1,233 microscopically confirmed cases of lymphatic malignancies were available for multivariable-adjusted analysis. For multiple myeloma and follicular lymphoma, HRs for men were 1.14 (95% CI: 1.01, 1.27 and 1.28 (95% CI: 1.03, 1.61 per 10 µg acrylamide/day increment, respectively. For never-smoking men, the HR for multiple myeloma was 1.98 (95% CI: 1.38, 2.85. No associations were observed for women. CONCLUSION: We found indications that acrylamide may increase the risk of multiple myeloma and follicular lymphoma in men. This is the first epidemiological study to investigate the association between dietary acrylamide intake and the risk of lymphatic malignancies, and more research into these observed associations is warranted.

  18. Assessing the Development of Multidisciplinary Care: Experience of the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Eliot L; Chawla, Neetu; Morris, Paul T; Castro, Kathleen M; Carrigan, Angela C; Das, Irene Prabhu; Clauser, Steven B

    2015-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program (NCCCP) began in 2007 with a goal of expanding cancer research and delivering quality care in communities. The NCCCP Quality of Care (QoC) Subcommittee was charged with developing and improving the quality of multidisciplinary care. An assessment tool with nine key elements relevant to MDC structure and operations was developed. Fourteen NCCCP sites reported multidisciplinary care assessments for lung, breast, and colorectal cancer in June 2010, June 2011, and June 2012 using an online reporting tool. Each site evaluated their level of maturity (level 1 = no multidisciplinary care, level 5 = highly integrated multidisciplinary care) in nine elements integral to multidisciplinary care. Thematic analysis of open-ended qualitative responses was also conducted. The proportion of sites that reported level 3 or greater on the assessment tool was tabulated at each time point. For all tumor types, sites that reached this level increased in six elements: case planning, clinical trials, integration of care coordination, physician engagement, quality improvement, and treatment team integration. Factors that enabled improvement included increasing organizational support, ensuring appropriate physician participation, increasing patient navigation, increasing participation in national quality initiatives, targeting genetics referrals, engaging primary care providers, and integrating clinical trial staff. Maturation of multidisciplinary care reflected focused work of the NCCCP QoC Subcommittee. Working group efforts in patient navigation, genetics, and physician conditions of participation were evident in improved multidisciplinary care performance for three common malignancies. This work provides a blueprint for health systems that wish to incorporate prospective multidisciplinary care into their cancer programs. Copyright © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  19. National Cancer Institute and American Association for Clinical Chemistry Partner to Bridge the Gap | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute, through its Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer (CPTC) initiative has entered into a memorandum of understanding with the American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC) to join forces to promote and educate the clinical chemistry community in the area of proteomic standards and technology advances.

  20. Geographical relationships between sociodemographic factors and incidence of cervical cancer in the Netherlands 1989–2003

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Aa, Maaike A.; Siesling, Sabine; Louwman, Marieke W.; Visser, Otto; Pukkala, Eero; Coebergh, Jan Willem W.

    2008-01-01

    In many industrialized countries, with some degree of screening, cervical cancer nowadays is most frequent among women of lower socioeconomic status (SES), partly owing to their lower participation in screening. This study aims to provide support for specification of mass screening policy for

  1. Nitrate intake does not influence bladder cancer risk: The Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeegers, M.P.; Selen, R.F.M.; Kleinjans, J.C.S.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: N-nitroso compounds, endogenously formed from nitrate-derived nitrite, are suspected to be important bladder carcinogens. However, the association between nitrate exposure from food or drinking water and bladder cancer has not been substantially investigated in epidemiologic studies.

  2. Night work and breast cancer risk in a general population prospective cohort study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppes, Lando L J; Geuskens, Goedele A.; Pronk, Anjoeka; Vermeulen, Roel C H; De Vroome, Ernest M M

    2014-01-01

    Experimental studies in animals indicate that disruption of the circadian rhythm is carcinogenic, and night work has been suggested to be a probable breast cancer cause in humans. Findings among humans, however are inconsistent, often gathered with retrospective study designs, and only based on

  3. Night work and breast cancer risk in a general population prospective cohort study in The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppes, L.L.J.; Geuskens, G.A.; Pronk, A.; Vermeulen, R.C.H.; Vroome, E.M.M. de

    2014-01-01

    Experimental studies in animals indicate that disruption of the circadian rhythm is carcinogenic, and night work has been suggested to be a probable breast cancer cause in humans. Findings among humans, however are inconsistent, often gathered with retrospective study designs, and only based on

  4. Uptake of prenatal diagnostic testing for retinoblastoma compared to other hereditary cancer syndromes in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J. Dommering (Charlotte); L. Henneman (Lidewij); A.H. van der Hout (Annemarie); M.A. Jonker (Marianne); C. Tops (Carli); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); Mensenkamp, A.R. (Arjen R.); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); E.J.W. Redeker (Egbert); C. de Die-Smulders (Christine); A.C. Moll (Annette); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractSince the 1980s the genetic cause of many hereditary tumor syndromes has been elucidated. As a consequence, carriers of a deleterious mutation in these genes may opt for prenatal diagnoses (PND). We studied the uptake of prenatal diagnosis for five hereditary cancer syndromes in the

  5. Epidemiological studies on postpartum thyroid dysfunction and thyroid cancer in Southeastern Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.L.P. Kuijpens (Hans)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractThe studies described in this thesis concentrate OIl epidemiological and pathogenetic aspects of postpartum thyroid dysfunction (PPTD) and related topics, and on epidemiological and treatment aspects of thyroid cancer. The studies were petfonned in the southeastern part of the

  6. Heme and chlorophyll intake and risk of colorectal cancer in the Netherlands cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balder, H.F.; Vogel, J. de; Jansen, M.C.J.F.; Weijenberg, M.P.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Westenbrink, S.; Meer, R.D. van der; Goldbohm, R.A.

    2006-01-01

    Background: The evidence for red meat as a determinant of colorectal cancer remains equivocal, which might be explained by differences in heme content. Heme is the prooxidant, iron-containing porphyrin pigment of meat and its content depends on the type of meat. Chlorophyll from green vegetables

  7. Cost utility analysis of everolimus in the treatment of metastatic renal cell cancer in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mihajlović, J.; Minović, I.; Bruinsma, A.; Postma, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC) is becoming an important part of Dutch health care expenditure due to expensive pharmaceutical options for disease control and lack of adequate prevention methods. New targeted therapeutics, such as sunitinib, sorafenib and everolimus, have recently

  8. Population-based Results of Chemoradiotherapy for Limited Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damhuis, R.; Widder, J.; Senan, S.

    Aims: Treatment guidelines for limited stage small cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC) favour early concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Little is known about contemporary, real-world treatment patterns and outcome. We evaluated population-based practice patterns of CRT and corresponding survival in the

  9. Meat and fat intake and pancreatic cancer risk in the Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinen, M.M.; Verhage, B.A.J.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2009-01-01

    Meat contains numerous carcinogens, such as heterocyclic amines, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and N-nitroso compounds, which can be derived either from natural food or during the process of food preparation. These carcinogens may increase pancreatic cancer risk. Furthermore, studies in animals

  10. 77 FR 31628 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-29

    ....m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place: National Institutes of Health, 6116..., MD, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, Special Review and Logistics Branch, Division of Extramural...: To review and evaluate contract proposals. Place: National Institutes of Health, 6116 Executive...

  11. Between prevention and therapy: Gio Batta Gori and the National Cancer Institute's Diet, Nutrition and Cancer Programme, 1974-1978.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantor, David

    2012-10-01

    This paper explores the origins of the Diet, Nutrition and Cancer Programme (DNCP) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and its fate under its first director, Gio Batta Gori. The DNCP is used to explore the emergence of federal support for research on diet, nutrition and cancer following the 1971 Cancer Act, the complex relations between cancer prevention and therapeutics in the NCI during the 1970s, the broader politics around diet, nutrition and cancer during that decade, and their relations to Senator George McGovern's select committee on Nutrition and Human Needs. It also provides a window onto the debates and struggles over whether NCI research should be funded by contracts or grants, the nature of the patronage system within the federal cancer research agency, how a director, Gio Gori, lost patronage within that system and how a tightening of the budget for cancer research in the mid-to-late 1970s affected the DNCP.

  12. Cancer in human immunodeficiency virus-infected children : A case series from the Children's Cancer Group and the National Cancer Institute

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Granovsky, MO; Mueller, BU; Nicholson, HS; Rosenberg, PS; Rabkin, CS

    Purpose: To describe the spectrum of malignancies in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children and the clinical outcome of patients with these tumors. Methods: We retrospectively surveyed the Children's Cancer Group (CCG) and the National Cancer institute (NCI) for cases of cancer that

  13. 78 FR 312 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-03

    ... Facility, 5701 Marinelli Road, North Bethesda, MD 20852. Contact Person: David G. Ransom, Ph.D., Scientific... Institute, NIH, 6116 Executive Blvd., Room 8133, Bethesda, MD 20892-8328, 301-451-4757, david.ransom@nih.gov...

  14. Netherlands: archives, libraries and museums

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketelaar, E.; Huysmans, F.; van Mensch, P.; Bates, M.J.; Maack, M.N.

    2010-01-01

    This entry provides an overview of the development and current state of archives, libraries, and museums as institutions, and the related professions and disciplines within the Netherlands. The entry describes social and political issues affecting information institutions from the early nineteenth

  15. Analysis of esophagogastric cancer patients enrolled in the National Cancer Institute Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program sponsored phase 1 trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bando, Hideaki; Rubinstein, Larry; Harris, Pamela; Yoshino, Takayuki; Doi, Toshihiko; Ohtsu, Atsushi; Welch, John; Takebe, Naoko

    2017-05-01

    In phase 1 trials, an important entry criterion is life expectancy predicted to be more than 90 days, which is generally difficult to predict. The Royal Marsden Hospital (RMH) prognostic score that is determined by lactate dehydrogenase level, albumin level, and number of metastatic sites of disease was developed to help project patient outcomes. There have been no systematic analyses to evaluate the utility of the RMH prognostic score for esophagogastric cancer patients. All nonpediatric phase 1 oncology trials sponsored by the National Cancer Institute Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program that began between 2001 and 2013 were considered in this review. Of 4722 patients with solid tumors, 115 patients were eligible for our analysis; 54 (47 %) with cancer of the esophagus, 14 (12 %) with cancer of the esopagogastric junction, and 47 (41 %) with stomach cancer. Eighty-six patients (75 %) had a good RMH prognostic score (0 or 1) and 29 patients (25 %) had a poor RMH prognostic score (2 or 3). Disease control rates were significantly different between patients with good and poor RMH prognostic scores (49 % vs 17 %; two-sided Fisher's exact test P = 0.004). The median treatment duration and overall survival for good and poor RMH prognostic score patients were significantly different (median treatment duration 2.1 months vs 1.2 months respectively, P = 0.016; median overall survival 10.9 months vs 2.1 months respectively, P cancer patients who might participate in a phase 1 trial.

  16. 75 FR 30407 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    ...: David G. Ransom, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, Research Programs Review Branch, Division of Extramural...-4757. david.ransom@nih.gov . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.392, Cancer...

  17. 78 FR 26379 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-06

    .... Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place: Hilton Garden Inn and Homewood Suites, 14975... the Evaluation of Responses to Cancer Therapies. Date: June 20, 2013. Time: 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m...

  18. Costs of complications after colorectal cancer surgery in the Netherlands: Building the business case for hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govaert, J A; Fiocco, M; van Dijk, W A; Scheffer, A C; de Graaf, E J R; Tollenaar, R A E M; Wouters, M W J M

    2015-08-01

    Healthcare providers worldwide are struggling with rising costs while hospitals budgets are under stress. Colorectal cancer surgery is commonly performed, however it is associated with a disproportionate share of adverse events in general surgery. Since adverse events are associated with extra hospital costs it seems important to explicitly discuss the costs of complications and the risk factors for high-costs after colorectal surgery. Retrospective analysis of clinical and financial outcomes after colorectal cancer surgery in 29 Dutch hospitals (6768 patients). Detailed clinical data was derived from the 2011-2012 population-based Dutch Surgical Colorectal Audit database. Costs were measured uniform in all participating hospitals and based on Time-Driven Activity-Based Costing. Of total hospital costs in this study, 31% was spent on complications and the top 5% most expensive patients were accountable for 23% of hospitals budgets. Minor and severe complications were respectively associated with a 26% and 196% increase in costs as compared to patients without complications. Independent from other risk factors, ASA IV, double tumor, ASA III, short course preoperative radiotherapy and TNM-4 stadium disease were the top-5 attributors to high costs. This article shows that complications after colorectal cancer surgery are associated with a substantial increase in costs. Although not all surgical complications can be prevented, reducing complications will result in considerable cost savings. By providing a business case we show that investments made to develop targeted quality improvement programs will pay off eventually. Results based on this study should encourage healthcare providers to endorse quality improvement efforts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The National Cancer Institute's Physical Sciences - Oncology Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espey, Michael Graham

    In 2009, the NCI launched the Physical Sciences - Oncology Centers (PS-OC) initiative with 12 Centers (U54) funded through 2014. The current phase of the Program includes U54 funded Centers with the added feature of soliciting new Physical Science - Oncology Projects (PS-OP) U01 grant applications through 2017; see NCI PAR-15-021. The PS-OPs, individually and along with other PS-OPs and the Physical Sciences-Oncology Centers (PS-OCs), comprise the Physical Sciences-Oncology Network (PS-ON). The foundation of the Physical Sciences-Oncology initiative is a high-risk, high-reward program that promotes a `physical sciences perspective' of cancer and fosters the convergence of physical science and cancer research by forming transdisciplinary teams of physical scientists (e.g., physicists, mathematicians, chemists, engineers, computer scientists) and cancer researchers (e.g., cancer biologists, oncologists, pathologists) who work closely together to advance our understanding of cancer. The collaborative PS-ON structure catalyzes transformative science through increased exchange of people, ideas, and approaches. PS-ON resources are leveraged to fund Trans-Network pilot projects to enable synergy and cross-testing of experimental and/or theoretical concepts. This session will include a brief PS-ON overview followed by a strategic discussion with the APS community to exchange perspectives on the progression of trans-disciplinary physical sciences in cancer research.

  20. Adherence to the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research recommendations and colorectal cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turati, Federica; Bravi, Francesca; Di Maso, Matteo; Bosetti, Cristina; Polesel, Jerry; Serraino, Diego; Dalmartello, Michela; Giacosa, Attilio; Montella, Maurizio; Tavani, Alessandra; Negri, Eva; La Vecchia, Carlo

    2017-11-01

    The World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) and the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) released in 2007 eight recommendations for cancer prevention on body fatness, diet and physical activity. Our aim is to evaluate the relation between adherence to these recommendations and colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. We pooled data from two Italian case-control studies including overall 2419 patients with CRC and 4723 controls. Adherence to the WCRF/AICR guidelines was summarised through a score incorporating seven of the WCRF/AICR recommendations, with higher scores indicating higher adherence to the guidelines. Odds ratios (ORs) of colorectal cancer were estimated using multiple logistic regression models. Higher adherence to the WCRF/AICR recommendations was associated with a significantly reduced CRC risk (OR 0.67, 95% confidence interval, CI, 0.56-0.80 for a score ≥5 versus cancer (OR 0.67). Inverse associations were observed with the diet-specific WCRF/AICR score (OR 0.71, 95% CI, 0.61-0.84 for ≥3.5 versus <2.5 points) and with specific recommendations on body fatness (OR 0.82, 95% CI, 0.70-0.97), physical activity (OR 0.86, 95% CI, 0.75-1.00), foods and drinks that promote weight gain (OR 0.70, 95% CI, 0.56-0.89), foods of plant origin (OR 0.56, 95% CI, 0.42-0.76), limiting alcohol (OR 0.87, 95% CI, 0.77-0.99) and salt intake (OR 0.63, 95% CI, 0.48-0.84). Our study indicated that adherence to the WCRF/AICR recommendations is inversely related to CRC risk. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Empowering wind power; On social and institutional conditions affecting the performance of entrepreneurs in the wind power supply market in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agterbosch, S.

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on wind energy for electricity generation, analysing the evolution of the wind power supply market in the Netherlands. We analysed different kind of wind power entrepreneurs (energy distributors, small private investors, wind cooperatives and new independent wind power

  2. 77 FR 6130 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-07

    ... hereby given of a meeting of the Board of Scientific Counselors for Clinical Sciences and Epidemiology... INSTITUTE, including consideration of personnel qualifications and performance, and the competence of... privacy. Name of Committee: Board of Scientific Counselors for Clinical Sciences and Epidemiology...

  3. 75 FR 62552 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-12

    ... hereby given of a meeting of the Board of Scientific Counselors for Clinical Sciences and Epidemiology... Institute, including consideration of personnel qualifications and performance, and the competence of... privacy. Name of Committee: Board of Scientific Counselors for Clinical Sciences and Epidemiology...

  4. 75 FR 6041 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-05

    ... hereby given of a meeting of the Board of Scientific Counselors for Clinical Sciences and Epidemiology... Institute, including consideration of personnel qualifications and performance, and the competence of... privacy. Name of Committee: Board of Scientific Counselors for Clinical Sciences and Epidemiology National...

  5. 77 FR 31627 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-29

    ... hereby given of a meeting of the Board of Scientific Counselors for Clinical Sciences and Epidemiology... Institute, including consideration of personnel qualifications and performance, and the competence of... privacy. Name of Committee: Board of Scientific Counselors for Clinical Sciences and Epidemiology...

  6. 78 FR 312 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-03

    ... Translational Research Advisory Committee. Date: March 13, 2013. Time: 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Agenda: Strategic Discussion of NCI's Clinical and Translational Research Programs. Place: National Institutes of Health... and Translational Research Advisory Committee. The meeting will be open to the public, with attendance...

  7. 75 FR 65364 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-22

    ...: November 2, 2010. Time: 8 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place...). Contact Person: Sherwood Githens, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, Special Review and Logistics Branch.... Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place: National Institutes of Health, 6116 Executive...

  8. 77 FR 14026 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-08

    ... 5 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate contract proposals. Place: Hilton Washington DC/Rockville..., MD, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, Special Review and Logistics Branch, Division of Extramural... proposals. Place: National Institutes of Health, 6116 Executive Boulevard, Rockville, MD 20852 (Telephone...

  9. 77 FR 56215 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-12

    .... Place: Bethesda North Marriott Hotel & Conference Center, 5701 Marinelli Road, Bethesda, MD 20852. Contact Person: Adriana Stoica, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, Special Review & Logistics Branch.... ] Place: National Institutes of Health, 6120 Executive Boulevard, Room 511, Rockville, MD 20852. Contact...

  10. 77 FR 55849 - National Cancer Institute ;Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-11

    ...: October 1-2, 2012. Time: 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. ] Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place... and evaluate grant applications. Place: National Institutes of Health, 6116 Executive Boulevard, Room..., Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, Special Review and Logistics Branch, Division of Extramural...

  11. 75 FR 7489 - National Cancer Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ... Validation Centers. Date: March 17, 2010. Time: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant... Panel; NCI Cancer Nanotechnology Training (R25) and Career Development Award (K99/R00) Applications. Date: March 23-24, 2010. Time: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications...

  12. Cost-effectiveness of the prophylactic HPV vaccine: an application to the Netherlands taking non-cervical cancers and cross-protection into account.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luttjeboer, J; Westra, T A; Wilschut, J C; Nijman, H W; Daemen, T; Postma, M J

    2013-08-20

    Despite an effective screening programme, 600-700 women are still diagnosed with cervical cancer in the Netherlands each year. In 2009 a prophylactic vaccine against HPV-type 16 and 18 was implemented in the national immunisation programme to decrease the incidence of cervical cancer. There is evidence that infections with several oncogenic HPV types other than the vaccine types 16 and 18 are also prevented by vaccination, also known as cross-protection. Besides cervical cancer, HPV can also cause cancers at other sites such as the oropharynx, vulva, vagina and the anus/anal area. In this study we estimated the maximum health and economic benefits of vaccinating 12-year old girls against infection with HPV, taking cross-protection and non-cervical cancers into account. In the base-case, we found an incremental cost ratio (ICER) of €5815 per quality adjusted life year (QALY). Robustness of this result was examined in sensitivity analysis. The ICER proved to be most sensitive to vaccine price, discounting rates, costs of cervical cancer and to variation in the disutility of cervical cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. FCCC Institutional Breast Cancer Training Program (FCCC-IBCTP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Y, Ke Y (2004) Carcinogenesis 25:2201- 6. 15. Granja F, Morari J, Morari EC, Correa LA, Assumpcao LV, Ward LS. (2004) Cancer Lett 210:151-7. 16...LeukLymphoma 45:957-64. 4. Xi YG, Ding KY, Su XL, Chen DF, You WC, Shen Y, Ke Y (2004) Carcinogenesis 25:2201-6. 5. Granja F, Morari J, Morari EC, Correa LA

  14. Real-Life Use and Effectiveness of Adjuvant Trastuzumab in Early Breast Cancer Patients: A Study of the Southeast Netherlands Breast Cancer Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seferina, Shanly C.; Lobbezoo, Dorien J.A.; de Boer, Maaike; Dercksen, M. Wouter; van den Berkmortel, Franchette; van Kampen, Roel J.W.; van de Wouw, Agnès J.; de Vries, Bart; Joore, Manuela A.; Peer, Petronella G.M.; Voogd, Adri C.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The impact of drug prescriptions in real life as opposed to strict clinical trial prescription is only rarely assessed, although it is well recognized that incorrect use may harm patients and may have a significant impact on health care resources. We investigated the use and effectiveness of adjuvant trastuzumab in daily practice compared with the effectiveness in clinical trials. Methods. We included all patients with stage I–III invasive breast cancer, irrespective of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status, diagnosed in five hospitals in the southeast of The Netherlands in 2005–2007. We aimed to assess the actual use of adjuvant trastuzumab in early HER2-positive breast and its efficacy in daily practice. Results. Of 2,684 patients included, 476 (17.7%) had a HER2-positive tumor. Of these, 251 (52.7%) patients had an indication for trastuzumab treatment of which 196 (78.1%) patients actually received it. Of the 225 patients without an indication, 34 (15.1%) received trastuzumab. Five-year disease-free survival was 80.7% for (n = 230) patients treated with versus 68.2% for (n = 246) patients not treated with trastuzumab (p = .0023), and 5-year overall survival rates were 90.7% and 77.4%, respectively (p = .0002). The hazard ratio for disease recurrence was 0.63 (95% confidence interval, 0.37–1.06) for trastuzumab when adjusting for potential confounders. Conclusion. This study shows that in real life, patients treated with trastuzumab in early-stage HER2-positive breast cancer had a 5-year disease-free and overall survival comparable to prior randomized trials. For informative decision making, real-life data are of additional value, providing insight on outcome of patients considered ineligible for treatment. PMID:26099745

  15. Real-Life Use and Effectiveness of Adjuvant Trastuzumab in Early Breast Cancer Patients: A Study of the Southeast Netherlands Breast Cancer Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seferina, Shanly C; Lobbezoo, Dorien J A; de Boer, Maaike; Dercksen, M Wouter; van den Berkmortel, Franchette; van Kampen, Roel J W; van de Wouw, Agnès J; de Vries, Bart; Joore, Manuela A; Peer, Petronella G M; Voogd, Adri C; Tjan-Heijnen, Vivianne C G

    2015-08-01

    The impact of drug prescriptions in real life as opposed to strict clinical trial prescription is only rarely assessed, although it is well recognized that incorrect use may harm patients and may have a significant impact on health care resources. We investigated the use and effectiveness of adjuvant trastuzumab in daily practice compared with the effectiveness in clinical trials. We included all patients with stage I-III invasive breast cancer, irrespective of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status, diagnosed in five hospitals in the southeast of The Netherlands in 2005-2007. We aimed to assess the actual use of adjuvant trastuzumab in early HER2-positive breast and its efficacy in daily practice. Of 2,684 patients included, 476 (17.7%) had a HER2-positive tumor. Of these, 251 (52.7%) patients had an indication for trastuzumab treatment of which 196 (78.1%) patients actually received it. Of the 225 patients without an indication, 34 (15.1%) received trastuzumab. Five-year disease-free survival was 80.7% for (n = 230) patients treated with versus 68.2% for (n = 246) patients not treated with trastuzumab (p = .0023), and 5-year overall survival rates were 90.7% and 77.4%, respectively (p = .0002). The hazard ratio for disease recurrence was 0.63 (95% confidence interval, 0.37-1.06) for trastuzumab when adjusting for potential confounders. This study shows that in real life, patients treated with trastuzumab in early-stage HER2-positive breast cancer had a 5-year disease-free and overall survival comparable to prior randomized trials. For informative decision making, real-life data are of additional value, providing insight on outcome of patients considered ineligible for treatment. ©AlphaMed Press.

  16. Selected National Cancer Institute Breast Cancer Research Topics | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 8615; (301) 496-5583 www.cancer.gov/ American Cancer Society Phone Number(s): (800) 227-2345; (404) 329-7520 www.cancer.org/docroot/home/ National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program Phone number(s): (888) 232-6348 www.cdc.gov/cancer/ ...

  17. The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schelhaas, M.; Clerkx, A.P.P.M.

    2017-01-01

    Forest coverage in the Netherlands has expanded from 2% at the beginning of the nineteenth century to 11% nowadays (370,000 ha). Wood production is only one function among many others including recreation and nature protection. Consequently, the harvest level is low relative to the increment (~55%),

  18. Clinicopathologic characteristics of double primary endometrial and colorectal cancers in a single institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun J; Choi, Min C; Jang, Ja-Hyun; Jung, Sang G; Park, Hyun; Joo, Won D; Kim, Tae H; Lee, Chan; Lee, Je H

    2018-02-14

    To investigate the clinicopathologic and genetic correlations between double primary endometrial and colorectal cancer related to Lynch syndrome and to analyze germline mutations in mismatch repair genes in endometrial cancer patients in Korea. Thirteen patients diagnosed with pathologically endometrial and colorectal cancer between January 2005 and November 2016 in a single institution were enrolled in the study. The medical records were retrospectively analyzed. The genetic mutational information of endometrial cancer in Korea was retrieved from the literature review. Endometrial cancer was diagnosed first in eight (62%) patients, and one patient was diagnosed with colorectal cancer first. Endometrioid adenocarcinoma was reported in 10 of 13 (77%) endometrial cancer patients. Endometrial cancer was found at the low uterine segment in three patients. Three of four patients had high microsatellite instability. The loss of mismatch repair proteins was confirmed in 7 of 11 cases using immunohistochemistry. Four patients fulfilled clinical criteria based on a family history of cancer. Overall, the incidence of suspected Lynch syndrome was 77% (10/13). Four of them underwent genetic testing and three were found to have a pathogenic germline mutation. A possible founder mutation, c.1757_1758insC in MLH1, was observed in 21 germline mutation information from literature review. The present study describes the clinicopathologic data of double primary endometrial and colorectal cancer patients and supports that these patients should undergo closed approach for Lynch syndrome. Moreover, a possible founder mutation in Korean endometrial cancer patients was identified. © 2018 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  19. Biomarkers for Early Detection of Clinically Relevant Prostate Cancer: A Multi-Institutional Validation Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0595 TITLE: Biomarkers for Early Detection of Clinically Relevant Prostate Cancer. A Multi- Institutional Validation... Institutional Validation Trial 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0595 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Daniel Lin, MD 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK...to report. Other Products As part of this project we continue to maintain a large biospecimen repository with associated clinical and demographic

  20. Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Parotid Cancer: A Single-Institution Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeidan, Youssef H., E-mail: youssefzaidan@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Shiue, Kevin; Weed, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Johnstone, Peter A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Terry, Colin [Methodist Research Institute, Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Freeman, Stephen; Krowiak, Edward; Borrowdale, Robert; Huntley, Tod [CENTA Otolaryngology, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Yeh, Alex [Department of Radiation Oncology, Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Our practice policy has been to provide intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) at resection to patients with head-and-neck malignancies considered to be at high risk of recurrence. The purpose of the present study was to review our experience with the use of IORT for primary or recurrent cancer of the parotid gland. Methods and Materials: Between 1982 and 2007, 96 patients were treated with gross total resection and IORT for primary or recurrent cancer of the parotid gland. The median age was 62.9 years (range, 14.3-88.1). Of the 96 patients, 33 had previously undergone external beam radiotherapy as a component of definitive therapy. Also, 34 patients had positive margins after surgery, and 40 had perineural invasion. IORT was administered as a single fraction of 15 or 20 Gy with 4-6-MeV electrons. The median follow-up period was 5.6 years. Results: Only 1 patient experienced local recurrence, 19 developed regional recurrence, and 12 distant recurrence. The recurrence-free survival rate at 1, 3, and 5 years was 82.0%, 68.5%, and 65.2%, respectively. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rate after surgery and IORT was 88.4%, 66.1%, and 56.2%, respectively. No perioperative fatalities occurred. Complications developed in 26 patients and included vascular complications in 7, trismus in 6, fistulas in 4, radiation osteonecrosis in 4, flap necrosis in 2, wound dehiscence in 2, and neuropathy in 1. Of these 26 patients, 12 had recurrent disease, and 8 had undergone external beam radiotherapy before IORT. Conclusions: IORT results in effective local disease control at acceptable levels of toxicity and should be considered for patients with primary or recurrent cancer of the parotid gland.

  1. Rational use and effectiveness of morphine in the palliative care of cancer patients at the Ocean Road Cancer Institute in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kamuhabwa, A; Ezekiel, D

    2009-01-01

    .... The aim of this study was to assess the rational use and effectiveness of morphine for management of pain in the palliative care of cancer patients at Ocean Road Cancer Institute (ORCI) in Tanzania...

  2. Rational use and effectiveness of morphine in the palliative care of cancer patients at the Ocean Road Cancer Institute in Dar es salaam, Tanzania

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kamuhabwa, A; Ezekiel, D

    2010-01-01

    .... The aim of this study was to assess the rational use and effectiveness of morphine for management of pain in the palliative care of cancer patients at Ocean Road Cancer Institute (ORCI) in Tanzania...

  3. A prospective study of the screening for breast cancer by using DMR; Collaboration with four institutes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endo, Tokiko; Kido, Choichiro; Horita, Katsuhei (Aichi Cancer Center, Nagoya (Japan). Hospital) (and others)

    1991-05-01

    Digital mammoradiography (DMR) is a new apparatus for mammography. Three thousands and six hundred seventy four breasts, including 192 cancer lesions, were evaluated by DMR and palpation in each institute. Screening ability for breast cancer was discussed by ROC analysis in the each group. Results were as follows: (1) DMR group showed inferior results compared with palpation group; (2) But, true positive rate was not enough for screening; (3) By a good education, higher true positive rate could be acquired in DMR group. In conclusion, DMR is an useful apparatus for mass screening for breast cancer in combination with palpation. (author).

  4. A prospective cohort study on intake of retinol, vitamins C and E and carotenoids and prostate cancer risk (Netherlands)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurman, A.G.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brants, H.A.M.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: The roles of retinol, vitamins C and E, and carotenoids as risk factors for prostate carcinoma are still questionable. We evaluated these in the Netherlands Cohort Study. Methods: The cohort study consisted of 58,279 men ages 55-69 years at baseline in 1986. After 6.3 years of follow-up,

  5. Dietary acrylamide intake and the risk of head-neck and thyroid cancers : results from the netherlands cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, L.J.; Hogervorst, J.G.F.; Konings, E.J.M.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2009-01-01

    Acrylamide exposure has been related to an increased incidence of oral and thyroid tumors in animal studies. In 1986, 120,852 persons (aged 55-69 years) were included in the Netherlands Cohort Study. Dietary acrylamide intake was assessed with a food frequency questionnaire and was based on chemical

  6. Evaluation of the cost of cervical cancer at the National Institute of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The Cervical Cancer (CC) is one of the heavy and costly diseases for the population and the health system. We want to know through this study, the first in Morocco, the annual cost of the treatment of this disease at the National Institute of Oncology (NIO) in Rabat, we also want to explore the possibility of ...

  7. The treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia, data from Gujarat Cancer and Research Institute, Ahmedabad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sandip A

    2013-07-01

    Gujarat Cancer and Research Institute, Ahmedabad presented data of total 840 patients, out of which 775 (90%) were in chronic phase. Complete hematological response (CHR) was seen in 96% of patients and median time to achieve (CHR) was 2 months. Complete cytogenetic response was seen in 36%.

  8. Oral cancer trends in a single head-and-neck cancer center in the Netherlands; decline in T-stage at the time of admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weijers, Manon; Leemans, C René; Aartman, Irene H; Karagozoglu, K Hakki; van der Waal, Isaäc

    2011-11-01

    In this study we evaluated the possible epidemiologic changes of oral cancer patients in the Netherlands between the years 1980-1984 and 2000-2004. We specifically studied the differences in male-female ratio, age, TNM-stage, site distribution, and alcohol and tobacco use. Patients from the VU University Medical Center with an oral squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity registered in 1980-1984 (n=200), group 1, were compared to patients registered in 2000-2004 (n=184), group 2. Trends in prevalence, site distribution, TNM-stage, alcohol and tobacco use, age and gender were studied. The male-female ratio has decreased from 1.8 to 1.2. There were no differences in age between the two groups of patients. The site distribution was similar in both groups. The most commonly involved sites were the tongue and the floor of mouth. In group 2 more patients were diagnosed with a T1 tumour. There were no differences in tobacco use between the two different groups. There were much more light drinkers (0-2 drinks per day) in group 2 than in group 1, whereas there were more heavy drinkers (>4 per day) in group 1 than in group 2 (p<0.001). This was observed in both male and female patients. In our study there were no significant differences between the patients registered in the years 1980-1984 and 2000-2004 regarding the mean age of the patients, site distribution and smoking habits. The male-female ratio has decreased. In the recent group more patients were staged T1N0 and there was a strong decrease of the patients who were heavy drinkers.

  9. Risk of Advanced Neoplasia Using the National Cancer Institute's Colorectal Cancer Risk Assessment Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imperiale, Thomas F; Yu, Menggang; Monahan, Patrick O; Stump, Timothy E; Tabbey, Rebeka; Glowinski, Elizabeth; Ransohoff, David F

    2017-01-01

    There is no validated, discriminating, and easy-to-apply tool for estimating risk of colorectal neoplasia. We studied whether the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) Colorectal Cancer (CRC) Risk Assessment Tool, which estimates future CRC risk, could estimate current risk for advanced colorectal neoplasia among average-risk persons. This cross-sectional study involved individuals age 50 to 80 years undergoing first-time screening colonoscopy. We measured medical and family history, lifestyle information, and physical measures and calculated each person's future CRC risk using the NCI tool's logistic regression equation. We related quintiles of future CRC risk to the current risk of advanced neoplasia (sessile serrated polyp or tubular adenoma ≥ 1 cm, a polyp with villous histology or high-grade dysplasia, or CRC). All statistical tests were two-sided. For 4457 (98.5%) with complete data (mean age = 57.2 years, SD = 6.6 years, 51.7% women), advanced neoplasia prevalence was 8.26%. Based on quintiles of five-year estimated absolute CRC risk, current risks of advanced neoplasia were 2.1% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.3% to 3.3%), 4.8% (95% CI = 3.5% to 6.4%), 6.4% (95% CI = 4.9% to 8.2%), 10.0% (95% CI = 8.1% to 12.1%), and 17.6% (95% CI = 15.5% to 20.6%; P neoplasia were 2.2% (95% CI = 1.4% to 3.5%), 4.8% (95% CI = 3.5% to 6.4%), 6.5% (95% CI = 5.0% to 8.3%), 9.3% (95% CI = 7.5% to 11.4%), and 18.4% (95% CI = 15.9% to 21.1%; P neoplasia was 12.8%, compared with 3.7% among those below the median (relative risk = 3.4, 95 CI = 2.7 to 4.4). The NCI's Risk Assessment Tool, which estimates future CRC risk, may be used to estimate current risk for advanced neoplasia, making it potentially useful for tailoring and improving CRC screening efficiency among average-risk persons. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Cost of the Cervical Cancer Screening Program at the Mexican Social Security Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Granados-García

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To estimate the annual cost of the National Cervical Cancer Screening Program (CCSP of the Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS. Materials and methods. This cost analysis examined regional coverage rates reported by IMSS. We estimated the number of cytology, colposcopy, biopsy and pathology evaluations, as well as the diagnostic test and treatment costs for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade II and III (CIN 2/3 and cervical cancer. Diagnostic test costs were estimated using a micro-costing technique. Sensitivity analyses were performed. Results. The cost to perform 2.7 million cytology tests was nearly 38 million dollars, which represents 26.1% of the total program cost (145.4 million. False negatives account for nearly 43% of the program costs. Conclusion. The low sensitivity of the cytology test generates high rates of false negatives, which results in high institutional costs from the treatment of undetected cervical cancer cases.

  11. "Should I Buy or Should I Grow?" How drug policy institutions and drug market transaction costs shape the decision to self-supply with cannabis in the Netherlands and the Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belackova, Vendula; Maalsté, Nicole; Zabransky, Tomas; Grund, Jean Paul

    2015-03-01

    This paper uses the framework of institutional economics to assess the impact of formal and informal institutions that influence the transaction costs on the cannabis market, and users' decisions to self-supply in the Czech Republic and the Netherlands, two countries with seemingly identical policies towards cannabis cultivation. A comparative analysis was conducted using secondary qualitative and quantitative data in four areas that were identified as relevant to the decision to cultivate cannabis: (i) the rules of the game - cannabis cultivation policy; (ii) "playing the game" - implementation of cannabis cultivation policy, (iii) informal institutions - cannabis cultivation culture, and (iv) the transaction costs of the cannabis market - availability, quality, and relative cannabis prices adjusted by purchasing power parity. Although the two policies are similar, their implementation differs substantially. In the Czech Republic, law enforcement has focused almost exclusively on large-scale cultivation. This has resulted in a competitive small-scale cultivation market, built upon a history of cannabis self-supply, which is pushing cannabis prices down. In the Netherlands, the costs of establishing one's own self-supply have historically outweighed the costs associated with buying in coffee shops. Additionally, law enforcement has recently pushed small-scale growers away from the market, and a large-scale cannabis supply, partly controlled by organised criminal groups, has been established that is driving prices up. The Czech cannabis prices have become relatively lower than the Dutch prices only recently, and the decision to buy on the market or to self-supply will be further shaped by the transactions costs on both markets, by policy implementation and by the local culture. The ability to learn from the impacts of cannabis cultivation policies conducted within the framework of UN drug treaties is particularly important at a time when increasing numbers of

  12. Differences in screening history, tumour characteristics and survival between women with screen-detected versus not screen-detected cervical cancer in the east of The Netherlands, 1992–2001

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Aa, Maaike A.; Schutter, Eltjo M.; Looijen-Salamon, Monika; Martens, Jolise E.; Siesling, Sabine

    2008-01-01

    Objective In The Netherlands, despite a national screening programme since 1996, invasive cervical cancers have been detected in screened and non-screened women. The aim of this study was to determine differences between Pap-smear history, tumour characteristics and survival of patients with a

  13. Differences in screening history, tumour characteristics and survival between women with screen-detected versus not screen-detected cervical cancer in the east of The Netherlands, 1992-2001.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aa, M.A. van der; Schutter, E.M.; Looijen-Salamon, M.; Martens, J.E.; Siesling, S.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In The Netherlands, despite a national screening programme since 1996, invasive cervical cancers have been detected in screened and non-screened women. The aim of this study was to determine differences between Pap-smear history, tumour characteristics and survival of patients with a

  14. Return-to-work intervention for cancer survivors: budget impact and allocation of costs and returns in the Netherlands and six major EU-countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewes, Janne C; Steuten, Lotte M G; Groeneveld, Iris F; de Boer, Angela G E M; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W; IJzerman, Maarten J; van Harten, Wim H

    2015-11-12

    Return-to-work (RTW)-interventions support cancer survivors in resuming work, but come at additional healthcare costs. The objective of this study was to assess the budget impact of a RTW-intervention, consisting of counselling sessions with an occupational physician and an exercise-programme. The secondary objective was to explore how the costs of RTW-interventions and its financial revenues are allocated among the involved stakeholders in several EU-countries. The budget impact (BI) of a RTW-intervention versus usual care was analysed yearly for 2015-2020 from a Dutch societal- and from the perspective of a large cancer centre. The allocation of the expected costs and financial benefits for each of the stakeholders involved was compared between the Netherlands, Belgium, England, France, Germany, Italy, and Sweden. The average intervention costs in this case were €1,519/patient. The BI for the Netherlands was €-14.7 m in 2015, rising to €-71.1 m in 2020, thus the intervention is cost-saving as the productivity benefits outweigh the intervention costs. For cancer centres the BI amounts to €293 k in 2015, increasing to €1.1 m in 2020. Across European countries, we observed differences regarding the extent to which stakeholders either invest or receive a share of the benefits from offering a RTW-intervention. The RTW-intervention is cost-saving from a societal perspective. Yet, the total intervention costs are considerable and, in many European countries, mainly covered by care providers that are not sufficiently reimbursed.

  15. Spinoza and the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. van Bunge (Wiep)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractMoving to my topic of Spinoza and the Netherlands, two separate questions present themselves: what did the Netherlands mean to Spinoza, and reversely, what did Spinoza mean to the Netherlands?

  16. The Organization of European Cancer Institute Pathobiology Working Group and its support of European biobanking infrastructures for translational cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riegman, Peter H J; de Jong, Bas W D; Llombart-Bosch, Antonio

    2010-04-01

    Today's translational cancer research increasingly depends on international multi-center studies. Biobanking infrastructure or comprehensive sample exchange platforms to enable networking of clinical cancer biobanks are instrumental to facilitate communication, uniform sample quality, and rules for exchange. The Organization of European Cancer Institutes (OECI) Pathobiology Working Group supports European biobanking infrastructure by maintaining the OECI-TuBaFrost exchange platform and organizing regular meetings. This platform originated from a European Commission project and is updated with knowledge from ongoing and new biobanking projects. This overview describes how European biobanking projects that have a large impact on clinical biobanking, including EuroBoNeT, SPIDIA, and BBMRI, contribute to the update of the OECI-TuBaFrost exchange platform. Combining the results of these European projects enabled the creation of an open (upon valid registration only) catalogue view of cancer biobanks and their available samples to initiate research projects. In addition, closed environments supporting active projects could be developed together with the latest views on quality, access rules, ethics, and law. With these contributions, the OECI Pathobiology Working Group contributes to and stimulates a professional attitude within biobanks at the European comprehensive cancer centers. Improving the fundamentals of cancer sample exchange in Europe stimulates the performance of large multi-center studies, resulting in experiments with the desired statistical significance outcome. With this approach, future innovation in cancer patient care can be realized faster and more reliably.

  17. Alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking and the risk of subtypes of head-neck cancer: Results from the Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maasland, D.H.E.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Kremer, S.H.A.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Schouten, L.J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Prospective data on alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking and risk of head-neck cancer (HNC) subtypes, i.e. oral cavity cancer (OCC), oro-/hypopharyngeal cancer (OHPC), and laryngeal cancer (LC), are limited. We investigated these associations within the second largest prospective study

  18. Consumption of vegetables and fruits and risk of subtypes of head-neck cancer in the Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maasland, D.H.E.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Kremer, B.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Schouten, L.J.

    2015-01-01

    There is limited prospective data on the relationship between consumption of vegetables and fruits and the risk of head-neck cancer (HNC) subtypes [i.e., oral cavity cancer (OCC), oro-/hypopharyngeal cancer (OHPC) and laryngeal cancer (LC)]. Therefore, we investigated these associations within the

  19. Genetic polymorphisms of the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes and risk of breast cancer in the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lund Eiliv

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GNRH1 triggers the release of follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone from the pituitary. Genetic variants in the gene encoding GNRH1 or its receptor may influence breast cancer risk by modulating production of ovarian steroid hormones. We studied the association between breast cancer risk and polymorphisms in genes that code for GNRH1 and its receptor (GNRHR in the large National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (NCI-BPC3. Methods We sequenced exons of GNRH1 and GNRHR in 95 invasive breast cancer cases. Resulting single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were genotyped and used to identify haplotype-tagging SNPs (htSNPS in a panel of 349 healthy women. The htSNPs were genotyped in 5,603 invasive breast cancer cases and 7,480 controls from the Cancer Prevention Study-II (CPS-II, European Prospective Investigation on Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC, Multiethnic Cohort (MEC, Nurses' Health Study (NHS, and Women's Health Study (WHS. Circulating levels of sex steroids (androstenedione, estradiol, estrone and testosterone were also measured in 4713 study subjects. Results Breast cancer risk was not associated with any polymorphism or haplotype in the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes, nor were there any statistically significant interactions with known breast cancer risk factors. Polymorphisms in these two genes were not strongly associated with circulating hormone levels. Conclusion Common variants of the GNRH1 and GNRHR genes are not associated with risk of invasive breast cancer in Caucasians.

  20. The evaluation of the risks and benefits of phase II cancer clinical trials by institutional review board (IRB) members: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Luijn, H E M; Aaronson, N K; Keus, R B; Musschenga, A W

    2006-03-01

    There are indications that institutional review board (IRB) members do not find it easy to assess the risks and benefits in medical experiments, although this is their principal duty. This study examined how IRB members assessed the risk/benefit ratio (RBR) of a specific phase II breast cancer clinical trial. The trial was evaluated by means of a questionnaire administered to 43 members of IRBs at six academic hospitals and specialised cancer centres in the Netherlands. The questionnaire addressed: identification and estimation of inconvenience, toxicity, psychosocial distress, and benefits of trial participation to patients; identification and estimation of benefits to future patients and medical science; assessment of the trial's RBR; and assessment of its ethical acceptability. Most IRB members expected trial participation to involve fairly or very serious inconvenience, fairly severe to sometimes life-threatening toxicity, and serious psychological and social consequences. Conversely, the perceived likelihood of benefits to patients was modest. Most regarded the study as important, and the balance between risks and benefits to be favourable, and believed that the protocol should be approved. The IRB members' final judgement on the trial's ethical acceptability was significantly correlated with their RBR assessment of the protocol. Because most patients who participate in clinical trials hope this will prolong their lives, it is suggested that patient information should better describe the anticipated benefits-for example, the likelihood of prolonging life. This would allow patients to make decisions regarding participation based on realistic expectations.

  1. Photodynamic Therapy in Gynecologic Malignancies: A Review of the Roswell Park Cancer Institute Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Mayor, Paul C.; Lele, Shashikant

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a treatment modality used in the management of solid tumor malignancies that employs the use of a photosensitizing agent, a light source and oxygen in order to illicit a direct cytotoxic effect. Its use in gynecologic malignancies is somewhat novel and has been used for palliative and curative intent. At the Roswell Park Cancer Institute, the use of PDT in the management of gynecologic cancers began in the mid 1980s and since that time 35 patients have received P...

  2. Treatment Patterns and Differences in Survival of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Between Academic and Non-Academic Hospitals in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linden, Naomi; Bongers, Mathilda L; Coupé, Veerle M H; Smit, Egbert F; Groen, Harry J M; Welling, Alle; Schramel, Franz M N H; Uyl-de Groot, Carin A

    2017-09-01

    The aims of this study are to analyze differences in survival between academic and non-academic hospitals and to provide insight into treatment patterns for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Results show the state of NSCLC survival and care in the Netherlands. The Netherlands Cancer Registry provided data on NSCLC survival for all Dutch hospitals. We used the Kaplan-Meier estimate to calculate median survival time by hospital type and a Cox proportional hazards model to estimate the relative risk of mortality (expressed as hazard ratios) for patients diagnosed in academic versus non-academic hospitals, with adjustment for age, gender, and tumor histology, and stratifying for disease stage. Data on treatment patterns in Dutch hospitals was obtained from 4 hospitals (2 academic, 2 non-academic). A random sample of patients diagnosed with NSCLC from January 2009 until January 2011 was identified through hospital databases. Data was obtained on patient characteristics, tumor characteristics, and treatments. The Cox proportional hazards model shows a significantly decreased hazard ratio of mortality for patients diagnosed in academic hospitals, as opposed to patients diagnosed in non-academic hospitals. This is specifically true for primary radiotherapy patients and patients who receive systemic treatment for non-metastasized NSCLC. Patients diagnosed in academic hospitals have better median overall survival than patients diagnosed in non-academic hospitals, especially for patients treated with radiotherapy, systemic treatment, or combinations. This difference may be caused by residual confounding since the estimates were not adjusted for performance status. A wide variety of surgical, radiotherapeutic, and systemic treatments is prescribed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Pioneering Quality Assessment in European Cancer Centers: A Data Analysis of the Organization for European Cancer Institutes Accreditation and Designation Program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saghatchian, Mahasti; Thonon, Frederique; Boomsma, Femke; Hummel, Henk; Koot, Bert; Harrison, Chris; Rajan, Abinaya; de Valeriola, Dominique; Otter, Renee; Pontes, Jose Laranja; Lombardo, Claudio; McGrath, Eoin; Ringborg, Ulrik; Tursz, Thomas; van Harten, Willem H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In order to improve the quality of care in Cancer Centers (CC) and designate Comprehensive Cancer Centers (CCCs), the Organization for European Cancer Institutes (OECI) launched an Accreditation and Designation (A&D) program. The program facilitates the collection of defined data and the

  4. Trends in research on energy balance supported by the National Cancer Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard-Barbash, Rachel; Siddiqi, Sameer M; Berrigan, David A; Ross, Sharon A; Nebeling, Linda C; Dowling, Emily C

    2013-04-01

    Over the past decade, the body of research linking energy balance to the incidence, development, progression, and treatment of cancer has grown substantially. No prior NIH portfolio analyses have focused on energy balance within one institute. This portfolio analysis describes the growth of National Cancer Institute (NCI) grant research on energy balance-related conditions and behaviors from 2004 to 2010 following the release of an NCI research priority statement in 2003 on energy balance and cancer-related research. Energy balance grants from fiscal years (FY) 2004 to 2010 were identified using multiple search terms and analyzed between calendar years 2008 and 2010. Study characteristics related to cancer site, design, population, and energy balance area (physical activity, diet, and weight) were abstracted. From FY2004 to FY2010, the NCI awarded 269 energy balance-relevant grants totaling $518 million. In FY2010, 4.2% of NCI's total research project grants budget was allocated to energy balance research, compared to 2.1% in FY2004. The NCI more than doubled support for investigator-initiated research project grants (R01) and increased support for cooperative agreement (U01, U54) and exploratory research (R21) grants. In the portfolio, research examining energy balance areas in combination accounted for 41.6%, and observational and interventional studies were equally represented (38.3% and 37.2%, respectively). Breast cancer was the most commonly studied cancer. Inclusion of minorities rose, and funding specific to cancer survivors more than doubled. From FY2004 to FY2010, NCI's investment in energy balance and related health behavior research showed growth in funding and diversity of mechanisms, topics, and disciplines-growth that reflects new directions in this field. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Improvement in survival for patients with synchronous metastatic esophageal cancer in the south of the Netherlands from 1994 to 2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernards, N.; Haj Mohammad, N.; Creemers, G. J.; Rozema, T.; Roukema, J. A.; Nieuwenhuijzen, G. A. P.; van Laarhoven, H. W. M.; van der Sangen, M.; Lemmens, V. E. P. P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: We assessed the use of external beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy chemoradiotherapy and chemotherapy in patients with metastatic esophageal cancer and evaluated the effect on overall survival.Methods: We included all patients diagnosed with synchronous metastatic esophageal cancer in the

  6. Improvement in survival for patients with synchronous metastatic esophageal cancer in the south of the Netherlands from 1994 to 2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernards, N.; Mohammed, N.H.; Creemers, G.J.; Rozema, T.; Roukema, J.A.; Nieuwenhuijzen, G.A.P.; van Laarhoven, M.; van der Sangen, M.J.C.; Lemmens, V.E.P.P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: We assessed the use of external beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy chemoradiotherapy and chemotherapy in patients with metastatic esophageal cancer and evaluated the effect on overall survival. Methods: We included all patients diagnosed with synchronous metastatic esophageal cancer in the

  7. Occupational asbestos exposure and risk of esophageal, gastric and colorectal cancer in the prospective Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Offermans, N.S.M.; Vermeulen, R.; Burdorf, A.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Keszei, A.P.; Peters, S.; Kauppinen, T.; Kromhout, H.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2014-01-01

    The evidence for an association between occupational asbestos exposure and esophageal, gastric and colorectal cancer is limited. We studied this association specifically addressing risk differences between relatively low and high exposure, risk associated with cancer subtypes, the influence of

  8. Depression and explicit requests for euthanasia in end-of-life cancer patients in primary care in the Netherlands: a longitudinal, prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruijs, Cees D M; Kerkhof, A J F M; van der Wal, G; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B D

    2011-08-01

    In the Netherlands, many (45%) cancer patients die at home, in the care of GPs. About 1 out of 10 end-of-life cancer deaths is hastened by GPs through euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide. However, the relationship between depression and requests for euthanasia has never been prospectively studied directly in primary care. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of depression in end-of-life cancer patients requesting euthanasia in primary care, as well as to assess the relationship between depression and requesting euthanasia. Primary care patients with incurable cancer and an estimated life expectancy of half a year or shorter were interviewed every 2 months, using standardized psychometric instruments. Also, non-recruited eligible patients were monitored. Out of 258 eligible patients, 76 patients were recruited, of whom 64 patients were followed up until death. Of these, 27% (n = 17) explicitly requested euthanasia. One patient suffered from major depression. According to the depression subscale of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, 47% of the patients who explicitly requested euthanasia versus 28% of those without an euthanasia request suffered from a depressed mood at inclusion; the difference was not significant (P = 0.2). Corresponding figures for the last interview before death were 40% and 41% (P = 0.6). Major depression was not a major factor in explicit requests for euthanasia in end-of-life cancer patients in primary care. Further depressed mood was not associated with explicitly requesting euthanasia in this patient group, although statistical underpower cannot be ruled out in this small sample.

  9. National Cancer Institute Patient Navigation Research Program: methods, protocol, and measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Karen M; Battaglia, Tracy A; Calhoun, Elizabeth; Dudley, Donald J; Fiscella, Kevin; Paskett, Electra; Raich, Peter C; Roetzheim, Richard G

    2008-12-15

    Patient, provider, and systems barriers contribute to delays in cancer care, a lower quality of care, and poorer outcomes in vulnerable populations, including low-income, underinsured, and racial/ethnic minority populations. Patient navigation is emerging as an intervention to address this problem, but navigation requires a clear definition and a rigorous testing of its effectiveness. Pilot programs have provided some evidence of benefit, but have been limited by evaluation of single-site interventions and varying definitions of navigation. To overcome these limitations, a 9-site National Cancer Institute Patient Navigation Research Program (PNRP) was initiated. The PNRP is charged with designing, implementing, and evaluating a generalizable patient navigation program targeting vulnerable populations. Through a formal committee structure, the PNRP has developed a definition of patient navigation and metrics to assess the process and outcomes of patient navigation in diverse settings, compared with concurrent continuous control groups. The PNRP defines patient navigation as support and guidance offered to vulnerable persons with abnormal cancer screening or a cancer diagnosis, with the goal of overcoming barriers to timely, quality care. Primary outcomes of the PNRP are 1) time to diagnostic resolution; 2) time to initiation of cancer treatment; 3) patient satisfaction with care; and 4) cost effectiveness, for breast, cervical, colon/rectum, and/or prostate cancer. The metrics to assess the processes and outcomes of patient navigation have been developed for the NCI-sponsored PNRP. If the metrics are found to be valid and reliable, they may prove useful to other investigators.

  10. A role model program to promote institutional changes for management of acute and cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, D E; Griffie, J; Gordon, D B; Dahl, J L

    1997-11-01

    This report describes an 18-month project to make acute and cancer pain management an institutional priority in Southeastern Wisconsin health-care facilities. Facility-based teams, each of which included a nurse in a leadership position, were recruited to participate in a project based on the Cancer Pain Role Model Program. The project was conducted in three stages: (a) a 1-day conference focusing on basic pain management issues and clinical standards, (b) a preceptorship at the Medical College of Wisconsin, and (c) a follow-up conference focusing on institutional change. Participants completed an Action Plan, outlining activities aimed at changing practice in their facility. Participants from 17 of the 32 participating facilities partially or completely met their Action Plan goals. Lack of ongoing facility commitment, staff turnover and facility closures were cited as reasons for failure to meet goals. Nurses in key positions, provided with strong institutional commitment and given suitable educational training and nurturing, are ideally suited to help facilitate changes in institutional pain practices.

  11. Investments in cancer research awarded to UK institutions and the global burden of cancer 2000-2013: a systematic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruthappu, Mahiben; Head, Michael G; Zhou, Charlie D; Gilbert, Barnabas J; El-Harasis, Majd A; Raine, Rosalind; Fitchett, Joseph R; Atun, Rifat

    2017-04-20

    To systematically categorise cancer research investment awarded to United Kingdom (UK) institutions in the period 2000-2013 and to estimate research investment relative to disease burden as measured by mortality, disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) and years lived with disability (YLDs). Systematic analysis of all open-access data. Public and philanthropic funding to all UK cancer research institutions, 2000-2013. Number and financial value of cancer research investments reported in 2013 UK pounds (UK£). Mortality, DALYs and YLDs data were acquired from the Global Burden of Disease Study. A compound metric was adapted to estimate research investment relative to disease burden as measured by mortality, DALYs and YLDs. We identified 4299 funded studies with a total research investment of £2.4 billion. The highest fundings by anatomical sites were haematological, breast, prostate, colorectal and ovarian cancers. Relative to disease burden as determined by a compound metric combining mortality, DALYs and YLDs, gender-specific cancers were found to be highest funded-the five sites that received the most funding were prostate, ovarian, breast, mesothelioma and testicular cancer; the least well-funded sites were liver, thyroid, lung, upper gastrointestinal (GI) and bladder. Preclinical science accounted for 66.2% of award numbers and 62.2% of all funding. The top five areas of primary research focus by funding were pathogenesis, drug therapy, diagnostic, screening and monitoring, women's health and immunology. The largest individual funder was the Medical Research Council. In combination, the five lowest funded site-specific cancers relative to disease burden account for 47.9%, 44.3% and 20.4% of worldwide cancer mortality, DALYs and YLDs. Research funding for cancer is not allocated according to relative disease burden. These findings are in line with earlier published studies. Funding agencies and industry should openly document their research investments to

  12. The Institute of Medicine report on high-quality cancer care: implications for oncology nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrell, Betty; McCabe, Mary S; Levit, Laura

    2013-11-01

    To present key recommendations from a recently released Institute of Medicine (IOM) report on high-quality cancer care. The recommendations were derived from the IOM report Delivering High-Quality Cancer Care: Charting a New Course for a System in Crisis. The authors reviewed each of the recommendations to identify implications for oncology nurses. Nurses will play a vital role in the future design and delivery of high-quality cancer care. Oncology nurses should use the IOM recommendations in their settings to prepare for the delivery of oncology care amidst health system challenges, including an aging society. The IOM recommendations identify key areas of concern to nurses. Key aspects of nursing practice, including involvement in advanced care planning, patient-centered care, and evidence-based practice, are essential for high-quality care. Oncology nurses will be centrally involved in healthcare innovations, such as rapid learning systems, and as key members of a well-trained workforce.

  13. Survey of Policies and Guidelines on Antioxidant Use for Cancer Prevention, Treatment, and Survivorship in North American Cancer Centers: What Do Institutions Perceive as Evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Gyeongyeon; White, Jennifer; Zhong, Lihong; Carlson, Linda E

    2015-07-01

    Health care policies and guidelines that are clear and consistent with research evidence are important for maximizing clinical outcomes. To determine whether cancer centers in Canada and the United States had policies and/or guidelines about antioxidant use, and whether policies were aligned with the evidence base, we reviewed current research evidence in the field, and we undertook a survey of the policies and guidelines on antioxidant use at cancer institutions across North America. A survey of policies and guidelines on antioxidant use and the development and communication of the policies and guidelines was conducted by contacting cancer institutions in North America. We also conducted a Website search for each institution to explore any online resources. Policies and guidelines on antioxidant use were collected from 78 cancer institutions. Few cancer institutions had policies (5%) but most provided guidelines (69%). Antioxidants from diet were generally encouraged at cancer institutions, consistent with the current research evidence. In contrast, specific antioxidant supplements were generally not recommended at cancer institutions. Policies and guidelines were developed using evidence-based methods (53%), by consulting another source (35%), or through discussions/conference (26%), and communicated mainly through online resources (65%) or written handouts (42%). For cancer institutions that had no policy or guideline on antioxidants, lack of information and lack of time were the most frequently cited reasons. Policies and guidelines on antioxidants from diet were largely consistent with the research evidence. Policies and guidelines on antioxidant supplements during treatment were generally more restrictive than the research evidence might suggest, perhaps due to the specificity of results and the inability to generalize findings across antioxidants, adding to the complexity of their optimal and safe use. Improved communication of comprehensive research

  14. [Retrospective NGS Study in High-risk Hereditary Cancer Patients at Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macháčková, E; Hazova, J; Sťahlová Hrabincová, E; Vašíčková, P; Navrátilová, M; Svoboda, M; Foretová, L

    2016-01-01

    Currently, more than 200 hereditary cancer syndromes have been described, yet, in most countries genetic testing is restricted to a narrow spectrum of genes within a limited group of people tested. For this retrospective study we used the TruSight cancer panel (Illumina)--NGS panel targeting 94 cancer predisposition genes in order to analyze 50 high-risk cancer patients with significant personal and family history of cancer who did not carry mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, TP53 or APC genes. All pathogenic and potentially pathogenic mutations detected by NGS technology have been confirmed by Sanger sequencing. There were several deleterious (frame-shift/nonsense) mutations detected in ATM, BAP1, FANCC, FANCI, PMS2, SBDS, ERCC2, RECQL4 genes. Various pathogenic or potentially pathogenic (missense, predicted splice site, in-frame insertion/deletion) mutations were detected in ATM, BRIP1, CDH1, CHEK2, ERCC2, ERCC3, ERCC4, FANCA, MC1R, MEN1, MRE11A, MUTYH, PALB2, RAD51C, RET, SDHB, STK11. These mutations affect highly conserved protein domains and affect their function as proved by the available functional assays. They were confirmed to be pathogenic as an "Parent No2 " in serious recessive diseases such as Ataxia telangiectasia or Fanconi anemia. The clinical significance of the majority of detected missense variants still remains to be identified. Moderate or low penetrance variants are of limited clinical importance. Panel genetic testing in high-risk individuals with cancer provides important information concerning the cause of the investigated cancer, and may assist in the risk assesment and optimal management of the cancer, as well as in further preventive care.

  15. Study protocol of KLIMOP: a cohort study on the wellbeing of older cancer patients in Belgium and the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verniest Thessa

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer is mainly a disease of older patients. In older cancer patients, additional endpoints such as quality of survival and daily functioning might be considered equally relevant as overall or disease free survival. However, these factors have been understudied using prospective designs focussing on older cancer patients. Therefore, this study will focus on the impact of cancer, ageing, and their interaction on the long-term wellbeing of older cancer patients. Methods/Design This study is an observational cohort study. We aim to recruit 720 cancer patients above 70 years with a new diagnosis of breast, prostate, lung or gastrointestinal cancer and two control groups: one control group of 720 patients above 70 years without a previous diagnosis of cancer and one control group of 720 cancer patients between 50 - 69 years newly diagnosed with breast, prostate, lung or gastrointestinal cancer. Data collection will take place at inclusion, after six months, after one year and every subsequent year until death or end of the study. Data will be collected through personal interviews (consisting of socio-demographic information, general health information, a comprehensive geriatric assessment, quality of life, health locus of control and a loneliness scale, a handgrip test, assessment of medical records, two buccal swabs and a blood sample from cancer patients (at baseline. As an annex study, caregivers of the participants will be recruited as well. Data collection for caregivers will consist of a self-administered questionnaire examining depression, coping, and burden. Discussion This extensive data collection will increase insight on how wellbeing of older cancer patients is affected by cancer (diagnosis and treatment, ageing, and their interaction. Results may provide new insights, which might contribute to the improvement of care for older cancer patients.

  16. Study protocol of KLIMOP: a cohort study on the wellbeing of older cancer patients in Belgium and the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckx, Laura; van Abbema, Doris; Nelissen, Katherine; Daniels, Liesbeth; Stinissen, Piet; Bulens, Paul; Linsen, Loes; Rummens, Jean-Luc; Robaeys, Geert; de Jonge, Eric T; Houben, Bert; Pat, Karin; Walgraeve, Daan; Spaas, Luc; Verheezen, Jolanda; Verniest, Thessa; Goegebuer, Alexander; Wildiers, Hans; van den Berkmortel, Franchette; Tjan-Heijnen, Vivianne C; Buntinx, Frank; van den Akker, Marjan

    2011-10-25

    Cancer is mainly a disease of older patients. In older cancer patients, additional endpoints such as quality of survival and daily functioning might be considered equally relevant as overall or disease free survival. However, these factors have been understudied using prospective designs focussing on older cancer patients. Therefore, this study will focus on the impact of cancer, ageing, and their interaction on the long-term wellbeing of older cancer patients. This study is an observational cohort study. We aim to recruit 720 cancer patients above 70 years with a new diagnosis of breast, prostate, lung or gastrointestinal cancer and two control groups: one control group of 720 patients above 70 years without a previous diagnosis of cancer and one control group of 720 cancer patients between 50 - 69 years newly diagnosed with breast, prostate, lung or gastrointestinal cancer. Data collection will take place at inclusion, after six months, after one year and every subsequent year until death or end of the study. Data will be collected through personal interviews (consisting of socio-demographic information, general health information, a comprehensive geriatric assessment, quality of life, health locus of control and a loneliness scale), a handgrip test, assessment of medical records, two buccal swabs and a blood sample from cancer patients (at baseline). As an annex study, caregivers of the participants will be recruited as well. Data collection for caregivers will consist of a self-administered questionnaire examining depression, coping, and burden. This extensive data collection will increase insight on how wellbeing of older cancer patients is affected by cancer (diagnosis and treatment), ageing, and their interaction. Results may provide new insights, which might contribute to the improvement of care for older cancer patients.

  17. Nanotechnology: Emerging Developments and Early Detection of Cancer. A Two-Day Workshop Sponsored by the National Cancer Institute and the National Institute of Standards and Technology, August 30–31 2001, on the National Institute of Standards and Technology Campus, Gaithersburg, MD, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zullo, Steven J.; Srivastava, Sudhir; Looney, J. Patrick; Barker, Peter E.

    2002-01-01

    A recent meeting jointly sponsored by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) brought together researchers active in nanotechnology and cancer molecular biology to discuss and evaluate the interface between disciplines. Emerging areas where nanotechnologies may impact cancer prevention and early cancer detection were elaborated by key researchers who catalyzed interdisciplinary dialogue aimed at fostering cross-discipline communications and future collaboration. PMID:12590168

  18. Nanotechnology: Emerging Developments and Early Detection of Cancer. A Two-Day Workshop Sponsored by the National Cancer Institute and the National Institute of Standards and Technology, August 30–31 2001, on the National Institute of Standards and Technology Campus, Gaithersburg, MD, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven J. Zullo

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A recent meeting jointly sponsored by the National Cancer Institute (NCI and National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST brought together researchers active in nanotechnology and cancer molecular biology to discuss and evaluate the interface between disciplines. Emerging areas where nanotechnologies may impact cancer prevention and early cancer detection were elaborated by key researchers who catalyzed interdisciplinary dialogue aimed at fostering cross-discipline communications and future collaboration.

  19. Pioneering the Transdisciplinary Team Science Approach: Lessons Learned from National Cancer Institute Grantees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Amanda L; Stipelman, Brooke A; Hall, Kara L; Nebeling, Linda; Stokols, Daniel; Spruijt-Metz, Donna

    2014-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute has been a leader in supporting transdisciplinary (TD) team science. From 2005-2010, the NCI supported Transdisciplinary Research on Energetic and Cancer I (TREC I), a center initiative fostering the TD integration of social, behavioral, and biological sciences to examine the relationships among obesity, nutrition, physical activity and cancer. In the final year of TREC I, we conducted qualitative in-depth-interviews with 31 participating investigators and trainees to learn more about their experiences with TD team science, including challenges, facilitating factors, strategies for success, and impacts. Five main challenges emerged: (1) limited published guidance for how to engage in TD team science, when TREC I was implemented; (2) conceptual and scientific challenges inherent to efforts to achieve TD integration; (3) discipline-based differences in values, terminology, methods, and work styles; (4) project management challenges involved in TD team science; and (5) traditional incentive and reward systems that do not recognize or reward TD team science. Four main facilitating factors and strategies for success emerged: (1) beneficial attitudes and beliefs about TD research and team science; (2) effective team processes; (3) brokering and bridge-building activities by individuals holding particular roles in a research center; and (4) funding initiative characteristics that support TD team science. Broad impacts of participating in TD team science in the context of TREC I included: (1) new positive attitudes about TD research and team science; (2) new boundary-crossing collaborations; (3) scientific advances related to research approaches, findings, and dissemination; (4) institutional culture change and resource creation in support of TD team science; and (5) career advancement. Funding agencies, academic institutions, and scholarly journals can help to foster TD team science through funding opportunities, institutional policies on

  20. The Utility of Routine Follow-Up Procedures in the Surveillance of Uterine Cancer: A 20-Year Institutional Review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rettenmaier, Chris R; Rettenmaier, Nicholas B; Wojciechowski, Tomasz; Abaid, Lisa N; Brown III, John V; Micha, John P; Goldstein, Bram H

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to assess the value of routine follow-up procedures during uterine cancer surveillance and the corresponding cost throughout a 20-year period at a single medical institution. Methods...

  1. A catalogue of the type-specimens of Recent fishes in the Institute of Taxonomic Zoology (Zoölogisch Museum), University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijssen, H.; Tuijl, van L.; Isbrücker, I.J.H.

    1982-01-01

    This catalogue resulted from our attempts (since 1963) to accommodate and modernize the labelling of type-material of Recent fishes in the collections of the Zoölogisch Museum Amsterdam (ZMA), now named Institute of Taxonomie Zoology, University of Amsterdam. We traced 6625 type-specimens of 714

  2. Dutch scholarship in the age of empire and beyond : KITLV - The Royal Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian and Caribbean Studies, 1851-2011

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuitenbrouwer, Maarten; Poeze, H.A.; Granger, Lorri

    2013-01-01

    How was it possible for the Koninklijk Instituut voor Taal-, Land- en Volkenkunde (KITLV) to grow from a learned society with fewer than a hundred members and only one partly salaried employee in 1851 into a modern professional institute with 1800 members and a staff of over fifty in 2001? This book

  3. Dutch scholarship in the age of empire and beyond: KITLV - The Royal Netherlands Institute of Southeast Asian and Caribbean Studies, 1851-2011

    OpenAIRE

    Kuitenbrouwer, Maarten; H.A. Poeze; Granger, Lorri

    2013-01-01

    How was it possible for the Koninklijk Instituut voor Taal-, Land- en Volkenkunde (KITLV) to grow from a learned society with fewer than a hundred members and only one partly salaried employee in 1851 into a modern professional institute with 1800 members and a staff of over fifty in 2001? This book provides the answer to this question.

  4. Improvement in survival for patients with synchronous metastatic esophageal cancer in the south of the Netherlands from 1994 to 2013

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bernards, N; Haj Mohammad, N; Creemers, G. J; Rozema, T; Roukema, J. A; Nieuwenhuijzen, G. A. P; van Laarhoven, H. W. M; van der Sangen, M; Lemmens, V. E. P. P

    2016-01-01

    Background: We assessed the use of external beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy chemoradiotherapy and chemotherapy in patients with metastatic esophageal cancer and evaluated the effect on overall survival.Methods...

  5. Improvement in survival for patients with synchronous metastatic esophageal cancer in the south of the Netherlands from 1994 to 2013

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bernards, N; Mohammed, N.H; Creemers, G.J; Rozema, T; Roukema, J.A; Nieuwenhuijzen, G.A.P; van Laarhoven, M; van der Sangen, M.J.C; Lemmens, V.E.P.P

    2016-01-01

    Background: We assessed the use of external beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy chemoradiotherapy and chemotherapy in patients with metastatic esophageal cancer and evaluated the effect on overall survival. Methods...

  6. Variation in Definitive Therapy for Localized Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Among National Comprehensive Cancer Network Institutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valle, Luca F. [Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth College, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire (United States); Jagsi, Reshma [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Bobiak, Sarah N.; Zornosa, Carrie [National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Fort Washington, Pennsylvania (United States); D' Amico, Thomas A. [Department of Surgery, Division of Thoracic Surgery, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Pisters, Katherine M. [Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Medical Oncology, Division of Cancer Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Dexter, Elisabeth U. [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York (United States); Niland, Joyce C. [Department of Information Sciences, City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California (United States); Hayman, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Kapadia, Nirav S., E-mail: Nirav.S.Kapadia@hitchcock.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States); Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Purpose: This study determined practice patterns in the staging and treatment of patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) among National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) member institutions. Secondary aims were to determine trends in the use of definitive therapy, predictors of treatment type, and acute adverse events associated with primary modalities of treatment. Methods and Materials: Data from the National Comprehensive Cancer Network Oncology Outcomes Database from 2007 to 2011 for US patients with stage I NSCLC were used. Main outcome measures included patterns of care, predictors of treatment, acute morbidity, and acute mortality. Results: Seventy-nine percent of patients received surgery, 16% received definitive radiation therapy (RT), and 3% were not treated. Seventy-four percent of the RT patients received stereotactic body RT (SBRT), and the remainder received nonstereotactic RT (NSRT). Among participating NCCN member institutions, the number of surgeries-to-RT course ratios varied between 1.6 and 34.7 (P<.01), and the SBRT-to-NSRT ratio varied between 0 and 13 (P=.01). Significant variations were also observed in staging practices, with brain imaging 0.33 (0.25-0.43) times as likely and mediastinoscopy 31.26 (21.84-44.76) times more likely for surgical patients than for RT patients. Toxicity rates for surgical and for SBRT patients were similar, although the rates were double for NSRT patients. Conclusions: The variations in treatment observed among NCCN institutions reflects the lack of level I evidence directing the use of surgery or SBRT for stage I NSCLC. In this setting, research of patient and physician preferences may help to guide future decision making.

  7. Acceptance of homosexuality in the Netherlands 2011

    OpenAIRE

    Saskia Keuzenkamp

    2011-01-01

    The Dutch government wishes to promote the social acceptance of homosexuality. To gain an impression of the current status and the progress in achieving this objective, the government asked the Netherlands Institute for Social Research/SCP to carry out a study of the current statistics and trends in this regard. This report shows that the Netherlands is still the most gay-tolerant country in Europe. Nonetheless, there are limits to that tolerance and there are some groups in Dutch society whi...

  8. Current academic clinical trials in ovarian cancer: Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup and US National Cancer Institute Clinical Trials Planning Meeting, May 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, Edward L; Birrer, Michael J; Hoskins, William J; Marth, Christian; Petryshyn, Ray; Quinn, Michael; Thomas, Gillian M; Kitchener, Henry C; Aghajanian, Carol; Alberts, David S; Armstrong, Deborah; Brown, Jubilee; Coleman, Robert L; Colombo, Nicoletta; Eisenhauer, Elizabeth; Friedlander, Michael; Fujiwara, Keiichi; Hunsberger, Sally; Kaye, Stan; Ledermann, Jonathan A; Lee, Susanna; Look, Katherine; Mannel, Robert; McNeish, Iain A; Minasian, Lori; Oza, Amit; Paul, Jim; Poveda, Andres; Pujade-Lauraine, Eric; Schoenfeldt, Mason; Swart, Ann Marie; von Gruenigen, Vivian; Wenzel, Lari

    2010-10-01

    To review the current status of large phase academic clinical trials for women with ovarian cancer, address cross-cutting issues, and identify promising areas for future collaboration. In May 2009, the Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup, which represents 19 Cooperative Groups conducting trials for women with gynecologic cancer, and the US National Cancer Institute convened a Clinical Trials Planning Meeting. The topics covered included the impact of new developments in cancer biology upon molecular targets and novel agents, pharmacogenomics, advances in imaging, the potential benefit of diet and exercise to reduce the risk of recurrence, academic partnership with industry, statistical considerations for phases 2 and 3 trials, trial end points, and symptom benefit and health-related quality-of-life issues. The clinical trials discussed spanned the spectrum of ovarian cancer from initial diagnosis, staging, and cytoreductive surgery to consolidation chemotherapy, and treatment of recurrent disease. Ongoing and effective collaboration with industry, government, and patients aims to ensure that the most important scientific questions can be answered rapidly. We encourage women with ovarian cancer and their oncologists to consider participation in the academic clinical trials conducted by the member groups of the Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup.

  9. Opportunities for Small Nutrition-Related Cancer Research Grants (R03) from the National Cancer Institute1

    OpenAIRE

    Nicastro, Holly L.; Harold E Seifried; John A. Milner

    2011-01-01

    Small research grants, or R03 grants, provide limited, short-term support for individual research projects. R03s may be an excellent means of support for projects by nutrition scientists at all stages in their careers. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) has awarded roughly one-half of all nutrition-related NIH R03 grants in the period from 2005 to 2010. A detailed review of the recent NCI grant portfolio identified potential strategies for successful applications. Projects that addressed imp...

  10. Oncologists' perspectives on concurrent palliative care in a National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakitas, Marie; Lyons, Kathleen Doyle; Hegel, Mark T; Ahles, Tim

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand oncology clinicians' perspectives about the care of advanced cancer patients following the completion of the ENABLE II (Educate, Nurture, Advise, Before Life Ends) randomized clinical trial (RCT) of a concurrent oncology palliative care model. This was a qualitative interview study of 35 oncology clinicians about their approach to patients with advanced cancer and the effect of the ENABLE II RCT. Oncologists believed that integrating palliative care at the time of an advanced cancer diagnosis enhanced patient care and complemented their practice. Self-assessment of their practice with advanced cancer patients comprised four themes: (1) treating the whole patient, (2) focusing on quality versus quantity of life, (3) “some patients just want to fight,” and (4) helping with transitions; timing is everything. Five themes comprised oncologists' views on the complementary role of palliative care: (1) “refer early and often,” (2) referral challenges: “Palliative” equals “hospice”; “Heme patients are different,” (3) palliative care as consultants or co-managers, (4) palliative care “shares the load,” and (5) ENABLE II facilitated palliative care integration. Oncologists described the RCT as holistic and complementary, and as a significant factor in adopting concurrent care as a standard of care.

  11. Are coffee, tea and total fluid consumption associated with bladder cancer risk? Results from the Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeegers, M.P.A.; Dorant, E.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2001-01-01

    Objectives: Coffee, tea, and fluid consumption have been thought to influence bladder cancer incidence. In a large prospective study, these associations were investigated. Methods: In 1986, cohort members (55-69 years) completed a questionnaire on cancer risk factors. Follow-up was established by

  12. The proportion of postmenopausal breast cancer cases in the Netherlands attributable to lifestyle-related risk factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gemert, W. A.; Lanting, C. I.; Goldbohm, R. A.; van den Brandt, P. A.; Grooters, H. G.; Kampman, E.; Kiemeney, L. A. L. M.; van Leeuwen, F. E.; Monninkhof, E. M.; de Vries, E.; Peeters, P. H.; Elias, S. G.

    We aimed to estimate the proportion of Dutch postmenopausal breast cancer cases in 2010 that is attributable to lifestyle-related risk factors. We calculated population attributable fractions (PAFs) of potentially modifiable risk factors for postmenopausal breast cancer in Dutch women aged > 50 in

  13. The proportion of postmenopausal breast cancer cases in the Netherlands attributable to lifestyle-related risk factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gemert, van W.A.; Lanting, C.I.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, van den P.A.; Grooters, H.G.; Kampman, E.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Leeuwen, van F.E.; Monninkhof, E.M.; Vries, de E.; Peeters, P.H.; Elias, S.G.

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to estimate the proportion of Dutch postmenopausal breast cancer cases in 2010 that is attributable to lifestyle-related risk factors. We calculated population attributable fractions (PAFs) of potentially modifiable risk factors for postmenopausal breast cancer in Dutch women aged >50

  14. The proportion of postmenopausal breast cancer cases in the Netherlands attributable to lifestyle-related risk factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.A. van Gemert; C.I. Lanting (Caren); R.A. Goldbohm; P.A. van den Brandt (Piet); H.G. Grooters (Hilda G.); E. Kampman (Ellen); L.A.L.M. Kiemeney (Bart); F.E. van Leeuwen (F.); E. Monninkhof (Evelyn); E. de Vries (Esther); P.H.M. Peeters; S.G. Elias (Sjoerd)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractWe aimed to estimate the proportion of Dutch postmenopausal breast cancer cases in 2010 that is attributable to lifestyle-related risk factors. We calculated population attributable fractions (PAFs) of potentially modifiable risk factors for postmenopausal breast cancer in Dutch women

  15. The proportion of postmenopausal breast cancer cases in the Netherlands attributable to lifestyle-related risk factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gemert, W.A. van; Lanting, C.I.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Grooters, H.G.; Kampman, E.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Leeuwen, F.E. van; Monninkhof, E.M.; Vries, E. de; Peeters, P.H.M.; Elias, S.G.

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to estimate the proportion of Dutch postmenopausal breast cancer cases in 2010 that is attributable to lifestyle-related risk factors. We calculated population attributable fractions (PAFs) of potentially modifiable risk factors for postmenopausal breast cancer in Dutch women aged >50 in

  16. New insights into the aetiology of scrotal cancer, a nationwide case-control study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, R.H.A.; Aben, K.K.H.; Rossum, M.M. van; Reedijk, A.M.; Botterweck, A.A.; Veerbeek, L.; Visser, O; Aa, M.A. van der; Ho, V.K.; Coebergh, J.W.; Kiemeney, B.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although scrotal cancer is traditionally regarded as an occupational disease, there is increasing evidence that factors which are involved in cutaneous and genital carcinogenesis might play a role in the carcinogenesis of scrotal cancer. OBJECTIVE: This exploratory study aimed to detect

  17. Personal hair dye use and the risk of bladder cancer: a case–control study from The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ros, M.; Gago-Dominguez, M.; Bueno de Mesquita, H.B.; Kampman, E.; Vermeulen, S.H.; Kiemeney, L.A.

    2012-01-01

    Background - Several studies have suggested an increased risk of bladder cancer among hairdressers, who are occupationally exposed to hair dyes. There has also been concern about a possible increased risk of bladder cancer among users of hair dyes. However, the association between personal hair dye

  18. Multi-Dimensional Impact of the Public–Private Center for Translational Molecular Medicine (CTMM) in the Netherlands: Understanding New 21st Century Institutional Designs to Support Innovation-in-Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Knowledge translation is at the epicenter of 21st century life sciences and integrative biology. Several innovative institutional designs have been formulated to cultivate knowledge translation. One of these organizational innovations has been the Center for Translational Molecular Medicine (CTMM), a multi-million public–private partnership in the Netherlands. The CTMM aims to accelerate molecular diagnostics and imaging technologies to forecast disease susceptibilities in healthy populations and early diagnosis and personalized treatment of patients. This research evaluated CTMM's impact on scientific, translational, clinical, and economic dimensions. A pragmatic, operationally-defined process indicators approach was used. Data were gathered from CTMM administrations, through a CTMM-wide survey (n = 167) and group interviews. We found that the CTMM focused on disease areas with high human, clinical, and economic burden to society (i.e., oncology, cardiovascular, neurologic, infection, and immunity diseases). CTMM displayed a robust scientific impact that rests 15%–80% above international reference values regarding publication volume and impact. Technology translation to the clinic was accelerated, with >50% of projects progressing from pre-clinical development to clinical testing within 5 years. Furthermore, CTMM has generated nearly 1500 Full Time Equivalent (FTE) of translational R&D capacity. Its positive impact on translational, (future) clinical, and economic aspects is recognized across all surveyed stakeholders. As organizational innovation is increasingly considered critical to forge linkages between life sciences discoveries and innovation-in-society, lessons learned from this study may inform other institutions with similar objectives such as the Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA) Program of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the United States. PMID:27195965

  19. Multi-Dimensional Impact of the Public-Private Center for Translational Molecular Medicine (CTMM) in the Netherlands: Understanding New 21(st) Century Institutional Designs to Support Innovation-in-Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steuten, Lotte M

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge translation is at the epicenter of 21st century life sciences and integrative biology. Several innovative institutional designs have been formulated to cultivate knowledge translation. One of these organizational innovations has been the Center for Translational Molecular Medicine (CTMM), a multi-million public-private partnership in the Netherlands. The CTMM aims to accelerate molecular diagnostics and imaging technologies to forecast disease susceptibilities in healthy populations and early diagnosis and personalized treatment of patients. This research evaluated CTMM's impact on scientific, translational, clinical, and economic dimensions. A pragmatic, operationally-defined process indicators approach was used. Data were gathered from CTMM administrations, through a CTMM-wide survey (n = 167) and group interviews. We found that the CTMM focused on disease areas with high human, clinical, and economic burden to society (i.e., oncology, cardiovascular, neurologic, infection, and immunity diseases). CTMM displayed a robust scientific impact that rests 15%-80% above international reference values regarding publication volume and impact. Technology translation to the clinic was accelerated, with >50% of projects progressing from pre-clinical development to clinical testing within 5 years. Furthermore, CTMM has generated nearly 1500 Full Time Equivalent (FTE) of translational R&D capacity. Its positive impact on translational, (future) clinical, and economic aspects is recognized across all surveyed stakeholders. As organizational innovation is increasingly considered critical to forge linkages between life sciences discoveries and innovation-in-society, lessons learned from this study may inform other institutions with similar objectives such as the Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA) Program of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the United States.

  20. Review of outcomes of primary liver cancers in children: our institutional experience with resection and transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malek, Marcus M; Shah, Sohail R; Atri, Prashant; Paredes, Jose L; DiCicco, Leigh Anne; Sindhi, Rakesh; Soltys, Kyle A; Mazariegos, George V; Kane, Timothy D

    2010-10-01

    Operative intervention plays an important role in the management of primary liver cancers in children. Recent improvements in diagnostic modalities, pre- and postoperative chemotherapy, and operative technique have all led to improved survival in these patients. Both hepatic resection and orthotopic liver transplantation are effective operations for pediatric liver tumors; which intervention is pursued is based on preoperative extent of disease. This is a review of our institution's experience with operative management of pediatric liver cancer over an 18-year period. A retrospective chart review from 1990 to 2007 identified patients who were ≤18 years old who underwent operative intervention for primary liver cancer. Demographics, type of operation, intraoperative details, pre- and postoperative management, as well as outcomes were recorded for all patients. Fifty-four patients underwent 57 operations for primary liver cancer, 30 of whom underwent resection; the remaining 27 underwent orthotopic liver transplantation. The mean age at diagnosis was 41 months. Twenty patients had stage 1 or 2 disease and 34 patients had stage 3 or 4 disease. Forty-eight (89%) patients received preoperative chemotherapy. Postoperative chemotherapy was given to 92% of patients. Mean overall and intensive care unit duration of stay were 18 and 6 days, respectively. About 45% of patients had a postoperative complication, including hepatic artery thrombosis (n = 8), line sepsis (n = 6), mild acute rejection (n = 3), biliary stricture (n = 2), pneumothorax (n = 2), incarcerated omentum (n = 1), Horner's syndrome (n = 1), and urosepsis (n = 1). Only 6 patients had a recurrence of their cancer, 5 after liver resection, 3 of whom later received a transplant. There was only 1 recurrence after liver transplantation. There was 1 perioperative mortality from cardiac arrest. Overall survival was 93%. Operative intervention plays a critical role in the management of primary liver cancer in the

  1. Interinstitutional variation in management decisions for treatment of 4 common types of cancer: A multi-institutional cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Jane C; Uno, Hajime; Taback, Nathan; Ting, Gladys; Cronin, Angel; D'Amico, Thomas A; Friedberg, Jonathan W; Schrag, Deborah

    2014-07-01

    When clinical practice is governed by evidence-based guidelines and there is consensus about their validity, practice variation should be minimal. For areas in which evidence gaps exist, greater variation is expected. To systematically assess interinstitutional variation in management decisions for 4 common types of cancer. Multi-institutional, observational cohort study of patients with cancer diagnosed between July 2006 through May 2011 and observed through 31 December 2011. 18 cancer centers participating in the formulation of treatment guidelines and systematic outcomes assessment through the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. 25 589 patients with incident breast cancer, colorectal cancer, lung cancer, or non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Interinstitutional variation for 171 binary management decisions with varying levels of supporting evidence. For each decision, variation was characterized by the median absolute deviation of the center-specific proportions. Interinstitutional variation was high (median absolute deviation >10%) for 35 of 171 (20%) oncology management decisions, including 9 of 22 (41%) decisions for non-Hodgkin lymphoma, 16 of 76 (21%) for breast cancer, 7 of 47 (15%) for lung cancer, and 3 of 26 (12%) for colorectal cancer. Forty-six percent of high-variance decisions involved imaging or diagnostic procedures and 37% involved choice of chemotherapy regimen. The evidence grade underpinning the 35 high-variance decisions was category 1 for 0%, 2A for 49%, and 2B/other for 51%. Physician identifiers were unavailable, and results may not generalize outside of major cancer centers. The substantial variation in institutional practice manifest among cancer centers reveals a lack of consensus about optimal management for common clinical scenarios. For clinicians, awareness of management decisions with high variation should prompt attention to patient preferences. For health systems, high variation can be used to prioritize comparative effectiveness research

  2. Institute of Dramatic Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenmakers, H.

    1976-01-01

    There is a fundamental difference between the courses given at university drama institutes in the Netherlands and those of the drama departments in the American universities. This is one of the points to emerge from this article on the University of Amsterdam's Institute of Dramatic Art written by a senior staff member of that institute.…

  3. Preliminary Analysis of Difficulty of Importing Pattern-Based Concepts into the National Cancer Institute Thesaurus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhe; Geller, James

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of biomedical ontologies is difficult. We have developed a pattern-based method for dealing with the problem of identifying missing concepts in the National Cancer Institute thesaurus (NCIt). Specifically, we are mining patterns connecting NCIt concepts with concepts in other ontologies to identify candidate missing concepts. However, the final decision about a concept insertion is always up to a human ontology curator. In this paper, we are estimating the difficulty of this task for a domain expert by counting possible choices for a pattern-based insertion. We conclude that even with support of our mining algorithm, the insertion task is challenging.

  4. Advanced Cancer Genomics Institute: Genetic Signatures and Therapeutic Targets in Cancer Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    American and European American women . Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2013 Sep 24. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 24062209. 13. Yu X, Song H, Xia T, Han S...Higgins MJ. Genome-wide methylation patterns provide insight into differences in breast tumor biology between American women of African and European... ancestry . Oncotarget. 2013 Nov 29. PubMed PMID: 24368439. 21. Liu B, Morrison CD, Johnson CS, Trump DL, Qin M, Conroy JC, Wang J, Liu S

  5. Surgical Feeding Tubes in Pediatric and Adolescent Cancer Patients: A Single-institution Retrospective Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Emma C; Curtin, Thomas; Slack, Rebecca S; Ge, Christine; Slade, Austen D; Hayes-Jordan, Andrea; Lally, Kevin P; Austin, Mary T

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate surgical enteric access in pediatric cancer patients to determine factors associated with postoperative complications. We performed a single-institution retrospective review of all patients below 21 years old with a primary cancer diagnosis who underwent surgical procedures for enteral access between 2004 and 2014. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to determine independent predictors of postoperative complications. During the study period, 122 patients had surgically placed feeding tubes, of whom 58% developed ≥1 complication(s) and 16% experienced a major complication. No single factor was significantly associated with developing any complication or major complication. Several trends were noted including increased complications associated with jejunostomy tubes, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tubes, and abdominal radiation. Surgically placed enteric access in pediatric and adolescent cancer patients is associated with an extremely high complication rate emphasizing the importance of careful evaluation of these patients before embarking on surgical feeding access. Future work should evaluate mechanisms to decrease complications and/or explore alternative methods to provide supplemental nutrition in children and adolescents with cancer.

  6. Sexual outcomes after partial penectomy for penile cancer: results from a multi-institutional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Sansalone

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Penile cancer is an uncommon malignancy. Surgical treatment is inevitably mutilating. Considering the strong impact on patients′ sexual life we want to evaluate sexual function and satisfaction after partial penectomy. The patients in this study (n = 25 represented all those who attended our institutions and were diagnosed and treated for penile cancer from October 2011 to November 2013. All patients underwent partial penectomy and followed-up (mean: 14 months; range: 12-25. Sexual presurgical baseline was estimated using the International Index of Erectile Dysfunction 15 (IIEF-15. Sexual outcomes of each patient were estimated considering four standardized and validated questionnaires. We analyzed the means and ranges of IIEF-15 including erectile function (IIEF-1-5 and -15, orgasmic function (IIEF-9 and -10, sexual desire (IIEF-11 and -12, intercourse satisfaction (IIEF-6-8, and overall satisfaction (IIEF-13 and -14. Then, we also used Quality of Erection Questionnaire (QEQ, Erectile Dysfunction Inventory of Treatment Satisfaction (EDITS and Self-Esteem and Relationship (SEAR to evaluate the sexual function and satisfaction of our patients. The final results showed that penile cancer leads to several sexual and psychosexual dysfunctions. Nevertheless, patients who undergo partial penectomy for penile cancer can maintain the sexual outcomes at levels slightly lower to those that existed in the period before surgery.

  7. Transoral resection of pharyngeal cancer: summary of a National Cancer Institute Head and Neck Cancer Steering Committee Clinical Trials Planning Meeting, November 6-7, 2011, Arlington, Virginia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelstein, David J; Ridge, John A; Brizel, David M; Holsinger, F Christopher; Haughey, Bruce H; O'Sullivan, Brian; Genden, Eric M; Beitler, Jonathan J; Weinstein, Gregory S; Quon, Harry; Chepeha, Douglas B; Ferris, Robert L; Weber, Randal S; Movsas, Benjamin; Waldron, John; Lowe, Val; Ramsey, Scott; Manola, Judith; Yueh, Bevan; Carey, Thomas E; Bekelman, Justin E; Konski, Andre A; Moore, Eric; Forastiere, Arlene; Schuller, David E; Lynn, Jean; Ullmann, Claudio Dansky

    2012-12-01

    Recent advances now permit resection of many pharyngeal tumors through the open mouth, an approach that can greatly reduce the morbidity of surgical exposure. These transoral techniques are being rapidly adopted by the surgical community and hold considerable promise. On November 6-7, 2011, the National Cancer Institute sponsored a Clinical Trials Planning Meeting to address how to further investigate the use of transoral surgery, both in the good prognosis human papillomavirus (HPV)-initiated oropharyngeal cancers, and in those with HPV-unrelated disease. The proceedings of this meeting are summarized. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. General Practitioners and Breast Surgeons in France, Germany, Netherlands and the UK show variable breast cancer risk communication profiles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Julian-Reynier, Claire; Bouhnik, Anne-Deborah; Evans, D Gareth; Harris, Hilary; van Asperen, Christi J; Tibben, Aad; Schmidtke, Joerg; Nippert, Irmgard

    2015-01-01

    .... The aim of this study was to describe the Breast Cancer Risk Communication Behaviours (RCBs) reported by GPs and BSs in four European countries and to determine the relationships between their RCBs and their socio-occupational characteristics...

  9. Vegetables and fruits consumption and risk of esophageal and gastric cancer subtypes in the Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steevens, J.; Schouten, L.J.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2011-01-01

    Prospective epidemiologic data on vegetables and fruits consumption and risk of subtypes of esophageal and gastric cancer are sparse. We studied the association between vegetables and fruits consumption and risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), gastric

  10. Better survival in patients with metastasised kidney cancer after nephrectomy: a population-based study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aben, K.K.H.; Heskamp, S.; Janssen-Heijnen, M.L.; Koldewijn, E.L.; Herpen, C.M. van; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Oosterwijk, E.; Spronsen, D.J. van

    2011-01-01

    AIM: Cytoreductive nephrectomy is considered beneficial in patients with metastasised kidney cancer but only a minority of these patients undergo cytoreductive surgery. Factors associated with nephrectomy and the independent effect of nephrectomy on survival were evaluated in this study. METHODS:

  11. Survival of acral lentiginous melanoma in the National Cancer Institute of Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, C A; Flórez, J P; López, H G; Meneses, M X; de Vries, E

    2017-03-01

    To determine survival of a cohort of patients with acral lentiginous melanoma (ALM), treated at the National Cancer Institute of Colombia, the largest referral hospital of the country. All patients diagnosed with an invasive ALM between 2003 and 2009 at the Colombian National Cancer Institute were included for analyses and followed for vital status and date of death. Using Kaplan-Meier methods, overall survival at 1, 3 and 5 years post diagnosis was determined, and Cox proportional hazards models were constructed for the variables showing a significant effect on survival in univariate analyses. Overall survival of this cohort of 90 patients was 77% at 1 year, 59% at 3 years and 54% at 5 years after diagnosis. Females had a better prognosis in univariate analyses but this advantage disappeared in multivariate models. Clinical stage was a strong predictor of survival, in univariate and multivariate models, particularly among elderly patients. Prognosis of ALM in Colombia is relatively poor, particularly for patients with higher clinical stage. The large proportions of ALM diagnosed in stage III and IV explain the relatively poor survival, and illustrate the importance of improving prognosis by lowering stage at diagnosis through better education and early detection programmes. © 2016 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  12. Return to work of cancer patients after a multidisciplinary intervention including occupational counselling and physical exercise in cancer patients: a prospective study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leensen, Monique C. J.; Groeneveld, Iris F.; van der Heide, Iris; Rejda, Tomas; van Veldhoven, Peter L. J.; van Berkel, Sietske; Snoek, Aernout; van Harten, Wim; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.; de Boer, Angela G. E. M.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To support return to work (RTW) among cancer patients, a multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme was developed which combined occupational counselling with a supervised physical exercise programme during chemotherapy. The aim was to investigate RTW rates of cancer patients and to

  13. Endobronchial Ultrasound Changed the World of Lung Cancer Patients: A 11-Year Institutional Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chia-Hung; Liao, Wei-Chih; Wu, Biing-Ru; Chen, Chih-Yu; Chen, Wei-Chun; Hsia, Te-Chun; Cheng, Wen-Chien; Tu, Chih-Yen; Hsu, Wu-Huei

    2015-01-01

    The role of advanced bronchoscopic diagnostic techniques in the detection and staging of lung cancer has increased sharply in recent years. The development of endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) improved minimally invasive mediastinal staging and diagnosis of peripheral lung lesions (PLLs). We investigated the impact of using EBUS as a diagnostic method for tissue acquisition in lung cancer patients. In a single center observational retrospective study, 3712 subjects were diagnosed with lung cancer from 2003 to 2013 (EBUS was introduced in 2008). Thus, we divided the data into two periods: the conventional bronchoscopy period (2003 to 2007) and the EBUS period (2008 to 2013). A total of 3712 patients were included in the analysis. Comparing the conventional bronchoscopy period with the EBUS period data, there has been a significant reduction in the use of diagnostic modalities: CT-guided biopsy (P < 0.0001) and pleural effusion cytology (P < 0.0001). The proportion of subjects diagnosed using bronchoscopy significantly increased from 39.4% in the conventional period to 47.4% in the EBUS period (P < 0.0001). In the EBUS period, there has also been a significant increase in the proportion of patients proceeding directly to diagnostic surgery (P < 0.0001). Compared to bronchoscopy, the incidence of complications was higher in those who underwent CT guide biopsy. The incidence of iatrogenic pneumothorax significantly decreased in the EBUS period. Advanced bronchoscopic techniques are widely used in the diagnosis of lung cancer. At our institution, the increasing use of EBUS for providing lung cancer diagnosis has led to a significant reduction in other diagnostic modalities, namely CT-guided biopsy and pleural effusion cytology. These changes in practice also led to a reduction in the incidence of complications.

  14. Endobronchial Ultrasound Changed the World of Lung Cancer Patients: A 11-Year Institutional Experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Hung Chen

    Full Text Available The role of advanced bronchoscopic diagnostic techniques in the detection and staging of lung cancer has increased sharply in recent years. The development of endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS improved minimally invasive mediastinal staging and diagnosis of peripheral lung lesions (PLLs. We investigated the impact of using EBUS as a diagnostic method for tissue acquisition in lung cancer patients.In a single center observational retrospective study, 3712 subjects were diagnosed with lung cancer from 2003 to 2013 (EBUS was introduced in 2008. Thus, we divided the data into two periods: the conventional bronchoscopy period (2003 to 2007 and the EBUS period (2008 to 2013.A total of 3712 patients were included in the analysis. Comparing the conventional bronchoscopy period with the EBUS period data, there has been a significant reduction in the use of diagnostic modalities: CT-guided biopsy (P < 0.0001 and pleural effusion cytology (P < 0.0001. The proportion of subjects diagnosed using bronchoscopy significantly increased from 39.4% in the conventional period to 47.4% in the EBUS period (P < 0.0001. In the EBUS period, there has also been a significant increase in the proportion of patients proceeding directly to diagnostic surgery (P < 0.0001. Compared to bronchoscopy, the incidence of complications was higher in those who underwent CT guide biopsy. The incidence of iatrogenic pneumothorax significantly decreased in the EBUS period.Advanced bronchoscopic techniques are widely used in the diagnosis of lung cancer. At our institution, the increasing use of EBUS for providing lung cancer diagnosis has led to a significant reduction in other diagnostic modalities, namely CT-guided biopsy and pleural effusion cytology. These changes in practice also led to a reduction in the incidence of complications.

  15. The proportion of postmenopausal breast cancer cases in the Netherlands attributable to lifestyle-related risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gemert, W A; Lanting, C I; Goldbohm, R A; van den Brandt, P A; Grooters, H G; Kampman, E; Kiemeney, L A L M; van Leeuwen, F E; Monninkhof, E M; de Vries, E; Peeters, P H; Elias, S G

    2015-07-01

    We aimed to estimate the proportion of Dutch postmenopausal breast cancer cases in 2010 that is attributable to lifestyle-related risk factors. We calculated population attributable fractions (PAFs) of potentially modifiable risk factors for postmenopausal breast cancer in Dutch women aged >50 in 2010. First, age-specific PAFs were calculated for each risk factor, based on their relative risks for postmenopausal breast cancer (from meta-analyses) and age-specific prevalence in the population (from national surveys) around the year 2000, assuming a latency period of 10 years. To obtain the overall PAF, age-specific PAFs were summed in a weighted manner, using the age-specific breast cancer incidence rates (2010) as weights. 95 % confidence intervals for PAF estimates were derived by Monte Carlo simulations. Of Dutch women >40 years, in 2000, 51 % were overweight/obese, 55 % physically inactive (factors combined had a PAF of 25.7 % (95 % CI 24.2-27.2), corresponding to 2,665 Dutch postmenopausal breast cancer cases in 2010. PAFs were 8.8 % (95 % CI 6.3-11.3) for overweight/obesity, 6.6 % (95 % CI 5.2-8.0) for alcohol consumption, 5.5 % (95 % CI 4.0-7.0) for physical inactivity, 4.6 % (95 % CI 3.3-6.0) for smoking and 3.2 % (95 % CI 1.6-4.8) for low-fibre intake. Our findings imply that modifiable risk factors are jointly responsible for approximately one out of four Dutch postmenopausal breast cancer cases. This suggests that incidence rates can be lowered substantially by living a more healthy lifestyle.

  16. Lower Breast Cancer Risk among Women following the World Cancer Research Fund and American Institute for Cancer Research Lifestyle Recommendations: EpiGEICAM Case-Control Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adela Castelló

    Full Text Available According to the "World Cancer Research Fund" and the "American Institute of Cancer Research" (WCRF/AICR one in four cancer cases could be prevented through a healthy diet, weight control and physical activity.To explore the association between the WCRF/AICR recommendations and risk of breast cancer.During the period 2006 to 2011 we recruited 973 incident cases of breast cancer and 973 controls from 17 Spanish Regions. We constructed a score based on 9 of the WCRF/AICR recommendations for cancer prevention:: 1Maintain adequate body weight; 2Be physically active; 3Limit the intake of high density foods; 4Eat mostly plant foods; 5Limit the intake of animal foods; 6Limit alcohol intake; 7Limit salt and salt preserved food intake; 8Meet nutritional needs through diet; S1Breastfeed infants exclusively up to 6 months. We explored its association with BC by menopausal status and by intrinsic tumor subtypes (ER+/PR+ & HER2-; HER2+; ER&PR-&HER2- using conditional and multinomial logistic models respectively.Our results point to a linear association between the degree of noncompliance and breast cancer risk. Taking women who met 6 or more recommendations as reference, those meeting less than 3 showed a three-fold excess risk (OR=2.98(CI95%:1.59-5.59, especially for postmenopausal women (OR=3.60(CI95%:1.24;10.47 and ER+/PR+&HER2- (OR=3.60(CI95%:1.84;7.05 and HER2+ (OR=4.23(CI95%:1.66;10.78 tumors. Noncompliance of recommendations regarding the consumption of foods and drinks that promote weight gain in premenopausal women (OR=2.24(CI95%:1.18;4.28; p for interaction=0.014 and triple negative tumors (OR=2.93(CI95%:1.12-7.63; the intake of plant foods in postmenopausal women (OR=2.35(CI95%:1.24;4.44 and triple negative tumors (OR=3.48(CI95%:1.46-8.31; and the alcohol consumption in ER+/PR+&HER2- tumors (OR=1.52 (CI95%:1.06-2.19 showed the strongest associations.Breast cancer prevention might be possible by following the "World Cancer Research Fund" and the

  17. Colorectal cancer in patients under 50 years of age: A retrospective analysis of two institutions' experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Elizabeth A; Feingold, Daniel L; Forde, Kenneth A; Arnell, Tracey; Jang, Joon Ho; Whelan, Richard L

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the epidemiological characteristics of colorectal cancer (CRC) in patients under 50 years of age across two institutions. METHODS: Records of patients under age 50 years of age who had CRC surgery over a 16 year period were assessed at two institutions. The following documents where reviewed: admission notes, operative notes, and discharge summaries. The main study variables included: age, presenting symptoms, family history, tumor location, operation, stage/differentiation of disease, and post operative complications. Stage of disease was classified according to the American Joint Committee on Cancer TNM staging system: tumor depth; node status; and metastases. RESULTS: CRC was found in 180 patients under age 50 years (87 females, 93 males; mean age 41.4 ± 6.2 years). Young patients accounted for 11.2% of cases during a 6 year period for which the full data set was available. Eight percent had a 1st degree and 12% a 2nd degree family CRC history. Almost all patients (94%) were symptomatic at diagnosis; common symptoms included: bleeding (59%), obstruction (9%), and abdominal/rectal pain (35%). Evaluation was often delayed and bleeding frequently attributed to hemorrhoids. Advanced stage CRC (Stage 3 or 4) was noted in 53% of patients. Most tumors were distal to the splenic flexure (77%) and 39% involved the rectum. Most patients (95%) had segmental resections; 6 patients had subtotal/total colectomy. Poorly differentiated tumors were noted in 12% and mucinous lesions in 19% of patients of which most had Stage 3 or 4 disease. Twenty-two patients (13%) developed recurrence and/or progression of disease to date. Three patients (ages 42, 42 and 49 years) went on to develop metachronous primary colon cancers within 3 to 4 years of their initial resection. CONCLUSION: CRC was common in young patients with no family history. Young patients with symptoms merit a timely evaluation to avoid presentation with late stage CRC. PMID:24039357

  18. Altered plasma apolipoprotein modifications in patients with pancreatic cancer: protein characterization and multi-institutional validation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazufumi Honda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Among the more common human malignancies, invasive ductal carcinoma of the pancreas has the worst prognosis. The poor outcome seems to be attributable to difficulty in early detection. METHODS: We compared the plasma protein profiles of 112 pancreatic cancer patients with those of 103 sex- and age-matched healthy controls (Cohort 1 using a newly developed matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (oMALDI QqTOF (quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MS system. RESULTS: We found that hemi-truncated apolipoprotein AII dimer (ApoAII-2; 17252 m/z, unglycosylated apolipoprotein CIII (ApoCIII-0; 8766 m/z, and their summed value were significantly decreased in the pancreatic cancer patients [P = 1.36×10(-21, P = 4.35×10(-14, and P = 1.83×10(-24 (Mann-Whitney U-test; area-under-curve values of 0.877, 0.798, and 0.903, respectively]. The significance was further validated in a total of 1099 plasma/serum samples, consisting of 2 retrospective cohorts [Cohort 2 (n = 103 and Cohort 3 (n = 163] and a prospective cohort [Cohort 4 (n = 833] collected from 8 medical institutions in Japan and Germany. CONCLUSIONS: We have constructed a robust quantitative MS profiling system and used it to validate alterations of modified apolipoproteins in multiple cohorts of patients with pancreatic cancer.

  19. Immunotherapy of head and neck cancer: Emerging clinical trials from a National Cancer Institute Head and Neck Cancer Steering Committee Planning Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, Julie E; Cohen, Ezra; Ferris, Robert L; Adelstein, David J; Brizel, David M; Ridge, John A; O'Sullivan, Brian; Burtness, Barbara A; Butterfield, Lisa H; Carson, William E; Disis, Mary L; Fox, Bernard A; Gajewski, Thomas F; Gillison, Maura L; Hodge, James W; Le, Quynh-Thu; Raben, David; Strome, Scott E; Lynn, Jean; Malik, Shakun

    2017-04-01

    Recent advances have permitted successful therapeutic targeting of the immune system in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). These new immunotherapeutic targets and agents are being rapidly adopted by the oncologic community and hold considerable promise. The National Cancer Institute sponsored a Clinical Trials Planning Meeting to address the issue of how to further investigate the use of immunotherapy in patients with HNSCC. The goals of the meeting were to consider phase 2 or 3 trial designs primarily in 3 different patient populations: those with previously untreated, human papillomavirus-initiated oropharyngeal cancers; those with previously untreated, human papillomavirus-negative HNSCC; and those with recurrent/metastatic HNSCC. In addition, a separate committee was formed to develop integrative biomarkers for the clinical trials. The meeting started with an overview of key immune components and principles related to HNSCC, including immunosurveillance and immune escape. Four clinical trial concepts were developed at the meeting integrating different immunotherapies with existing standards of care. These designs were presented for implementation by the head and neck committees of the National Cancer Institute-funded National Clinical Trials Network. This article summarizes the proceedings of this Clinical Trials Planning Meeting, the purpose of which was to facilitate the rigorous development and design of randomized phase 2 and 3 immunotherapeutic trials in patients with HNSCC. Although reviews usually are published immediately after the meeting is held, this report is unique because there are now tangible clinical trial designs that have been funded and put into practice and the studies are being activated to accrual. Cancer 2017;123:1259-1271. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  20. Intake of vegetables, fruits, carotenoids and vitamins C and E and pancreatic cancer risk in The Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinen, M.M.; Verhage, B.A.J.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiological data investigating the relation between fruit and vegetable consumption and pancreatic cancer risk have shown inconsistent results so far. Most case-control studies observed an inverse association with total fruit and vegetable consumption, whereas results from most cohort studies

  1. Rapid N-acetyltransferase 2 imputed phenotype and smoking may increase risk of colorectal cancer in women (Netherlands)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Hel, OL; de Mesquita, HBB; Sandkuijl, L; van Noord, PAH; Pearson, PL; Grobbee, DE; Peeters, PHM

    Objective: The relationship between smoking and colorectal cancer risk and whether such effect is modified by variations in the NAT2 genotype is investigated. Methods: In the prospective DOM (Diagnostisch Onderzoek Mammacarcinoom; 27,722 women) cohort follow-up from 1976 until 1987 revealed 54

  2. Dying from cancer or other chronic diseases in the Netherlands: ten-year trends derived from death certificate data.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velden, L.F.J. van der; Francke, A.L.; Hingstman, L.; Willems, D.L.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For the further development of palliative care, it is relevant to gain insight into trends in non-acute mortality. The aim of this article is twofold: (a) to provide insight into ten-year trends in the characteristics of patients who died from cancer or other chronic diseases in the

  3. Dying from cancer or other chronic diseases in the Netherlands: ten-year trends derived from death certificate data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Velden, Lud Fj; Francke, Anneke L.; Hingstman, Lammert; Willems, Dick L.

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: For the further development of palliative care, it is relevant to gain insight into trends in non-acute mortality. The aim of this article is twofold: (a) to provide insight into ten-year trends in the characteristics of patients who died from cancer or other chronic diseases

  4. Comparison of treatment outcome in metastatic colorectal cancer patients included in a clinical trial versus daily practice in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, L.; Koopman, M.; Gils, C.W. van; Ottevanger, P.B.; Punt, C.J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The external validity of trial results is a matter of debate, and no strong evidence is available to support whether a trial may have a positive or a negative effect on the outcome of patients. Methods. We compared the results of stage IV colorectal cancer patients treated within a large

  5. Educational achievement, employment and living situation in long-term young adult survivors of childhood cancer in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langeveld, N. E.; Ubbink, M. C.; Last, B. F.; Grootenhuis, M. A.; Voûte, P. A.; de Haan, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper investigated educational achievement, employment status, living situation, marital status and offspring in 500 Dutch long-term young adults survivors of childhood cancer (age range, 16-49 years, 47% female). The results were compared with a reference group of 1092 persons with no history

  6. Improved outcomes due to changes in organization of care for patients with ovarian cancer in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eggink, F. A.; Mom, C. H.; Kruitwagen, R. F.; Reyners, A. K.; Van Driel, W. J.; Massuger, L. F.; Niemeijer, G. C.; Van der Zee, A. G.; van der Aa, M. A.; Nijman, H. W.

    Objectives. Objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of changes in patterns of care, for example centralization and treatment sequence, on surgical outcome and survival in patients with epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Methods. Patients diagnosed with FIGO stage IIB-IV EOC (2004-2013)

  7. "A Somali girl is Muslim and does not have premarital sex. Is vaccination really necessary?" A qualitative study into the perceptions of Somali women in the Netherlands about the prevention of cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salad, Jihan; Verdonk, Petra; de Boer, Fijgje; Abma, Tineke A

    2015-08-21

    Participation in Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination and Papanicolaou Screening (Pap smears) is low among ethnic minorities in the Netherlands and hardly any information is available about the cervical cancer prevention methods of Somali women living in the diaspora. This qualitative study, based on the Health Belief Model (HBM) and an intersectionality-based framework, explores the perceptions of Somali women living in the Netherlands regarding measures to prevent cervical cancer. Semi-structured interviews have been conducted with young Somali women aged 17-21 years (n = 14) and Somali mothers aged 30-46 years (n = 6). Two natural group discussions have been conducted with 12 and 14 Somali mothers aged 23-66 years. The collected data has been analyzed thematically for content. In this study, we have identified perceived barriers to the use of preventive measures across three major themes: (1) Somali women and preventive healthcare; (2) Language, knowledge, and negotiating decisions; and (3) Sexual standards, culture, and religion. Many issues have been identified across these themes, e.g., distrust of the Dutch health care system or being embarrassed to get Pap smears due to Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) and having a Dutch, male practitioner; or a perceived low susceptibility to HPV and cancer because of the religious norms that prohibit sex before marriage. Current measures in the Netherlands to prevent women from developing cervical cancer hardly reach Somali women because these women perceive these kinds of preventative measures as not personally relevant. Dutch education strategies about cervical cancer deviate from ways of exchanging information within the Somali community. Teachers can provide culturally sensitive information to young Somali women in schools. For Somali mothers, oral education (e.g., poetry or theater) about the Dutch health care system and men's roles in HPV transmission may be useful. An intersectional approach, grounded in

  8. Education and support needs in patients with head and neck cancer: A multi-institutional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbour, Joe; Milross, Chris; Sundaresan, Puma; Ebrahimi, Ardalan; Shepherd, Heather L; Dhillon, Haryana M; Morgan, Gary; Ashford, Bruce; Abdul-Razak, Muzib; Wong, Eva; Veness, Michael; Palme, Carsten E; Froggatt, Cate; Cohen, Ruben; Ekmejian, Rafael; Tay, Jessica; Roshan, David; Clark, Jonathan R

    2017-06-01

    Head and neck cancer (HNC) encompasses a diverse group of tumors, and thus providing appropriate and tailored information to patients before, during, and after treatment is a challenge. The objective of the current study was to characterize the experience and unmet needs of patients with HNC with regard to information and support provision. A 28-question, cross-sectional survey was completed by patients treated for HNC at 1 of 4 institutions in New South Wales, Australia (Chris O'Brien Lifehouse and Liverpool, Westmead, and Wollongong hospitals). It consisted of the adapted Kessler Psychological Distress Scale and questions assessing information quality, quantity, and format. A total of 597 patients responded. The mean age of the patients was 58 years (range, 21-94 years) with 284 men and 313 women (1:1.1). The majority of patients reported information concerning the disease process (76%), prognosis (67%), and treatment (77%) was sufficient, and approximately 50% reporting having received little or no information regarding coping with stress and anxiety. A substantial percentage of patients reported receiving minimal information concerning psychosexual health (56%) or the availability of patient support groups (56%). The majority of patients preferred access to multiple modes of information delivery (72%), with the preferred modality being one-on-one meetings with a health educator (37%) followed by internet-based written information (19%). Patients with HNC are a diverse group, with complex educational and support needs. Patients appear to be given information regarding survivorship topics such as psychological well-being, patient support groups, and psychosexual health less frequently than information concerning disease and treatment. Verbal communication needs to be reinforced by accessible, well-constructed, written and multimedia resources appropriate to the patient's educational level. Cancer 2017;123:1949-1957. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017

  9. Creating a “culture of research” in a community hospital: Strategies and tools from the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Germain, Diane; Nacpil, Lianne M; Zaren, Howard A; Swanson, Sandra M; Minnick, Christopher; Carrigan, Angela; Denicoff, Andrea M; Igo, Kathleen E; Acoba, Jared D; Gonzalez, Maria M; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta

    2015-01-01

    Background The value of community-based cancer research has long been recognized. In addition to the National Cancer Institute’s Community Clinical and Minority-Based Oncology Programs established in 1983, and 1991 respectively, the National Cancer Institute established the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program in 2007 with an aim of enhancing access to high-quality cancer care and clinical research in the community setting where most cancer patients receive their treatment. This article discusses strategies utilized by the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program to build research capacity and create a more entrenched culture of research at the community hospitals participating in the program over a 7-year period. Methods To facilitate development of a research culture at the community hospitals, the National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program required leadership or chief executive officer engagement; utilized a collaborative learning structure where best practices, successes, and challenges could be shared; promoted site-to-site mentoring to foster faster learning within and between sites; required research program assessments that spanned clinical trial portfolio, accrual barriers, and outreach; increased identification and use of metrics; and, finally, encouraged research team engagement across hospital departments (navigation, multidisciplinary care, pathology, and disparities) to replace the traditionally siloed approach to clinical trials. Limitations The health-care environment is rapidly changing while complexity in research increases. Successful research efforts are impacted by numerous factors (e.g. institutional review board reviews, physician interest, and trial availability). The National Cancer Institute Community Cancer Centers Program sites, as program participants, had access to the required resources and support to develop and implement the strategies described. Metrics are an important

  10. netherland hydrological modeling instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogewoud, J. C.; de Lange, W. J.; Veldhuizen, A.; Prinsen, G.

    2012-04-01

    Netherlands Hydrological Modeling Instrument A decision support system for water basin management. J.C. Hoogewoud , W.J. de Lange ,A. Veldhuizen , G. Prinsen , The Netherlands Hydrological modeling Instrument (NHI) is the center point of a framework of models, to coherently model the hydrological system and the multitude of functions it supports. Dutch hydrological institutes Deltares, Alterra, Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency, RWS Waterdienst, STOWA and Vewin are cooperating in enhancing the NHI for adequate decision support. The instrument is used by three different ministries involved in national water policy matters, for instance the WFD, drought management, manure policy and climate change issues. The basis of the modeling instrument is a state-of-the-art on-line coupling of the groundwater system (MODFLOW), the unsaturated zone (metaSWAP) and the surface water system (MOZART-DM). It brings together hydro(geo)logical processes from the column to the basin scale, ranging from 250x250m plots to the river Rhine and includes salt water flow. The NHI is validated with an eight year run (1998-2006) with dry and wet periods. For this run different parts of the hydrology have been compared with measurements. For instance, water demands in dry periods (e.g. for irrigation), discharges at outlets, groundwater levels and evaporation. A validation alone is not enough to get support from stakeholders. Involvement from stakeholders in the modeling process is needed. There fore to gain sufficient support and trust in the instrument on different (policy) levels a couple of actions have been taken: 1. a transparent evaluation of modeling-results has been set up 2. an extensive program is running to cooperate with regional waterboards and suppliers of drinking water in improving the NHI 3. sharing (hydrological) data via newly setup Modeling Database for local and national models 4. Enhancing the NHI with "local" information. The NHI is and has been used for many

  11. Science, institutional archives and open access: an overview and a pilot survey on the Italian cancer research institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poltronieri, Elisabetta; Truccolo, Ivana; Di Benedetto, Corrado; Castelli, Mauro; Mazzocut, Mauro; Cognetti, Gaetana

    2010-12-20

    The Open Archive Initiative (OAI) refers to a movement started around the '90 s to guarantee free access to scientific information by removing the barriers to research results, especially those related to the ever increasing journal subscription prices. This new paradigm has reshaped the scholarly communication system and is closely connected to the build up of institutional repositories (IRs) conceived to the benefit of scientists and research bodies as a means to keep possession of their own literary production. The IRs are high-value tools which permit authors to gain visibility by enabling rapid access to scientific material (not only publications) thus increasing impact (citation rate) and permitting a multidimensional assessment of research findings. A survey was conducted in March 2010 to mainly explore the managing system in use for archiving the research finding adopted by the Italian Scientific Institutes for Research, Hospitalization and Health Care (IRCCS) of the oncology area within the Italian National Health Service (Servizio Sanitario Nazionale, SSN). They were asked to respond to a questionnaire intended to collect data about institutional archives, metadata formats and posting of full-text documents. The enquiry concerned also the perceived role of the institutional repository DSpace ISS, built up by the Istituto Superiore di Sanità (ISS) and based on a XML scheme for encoding metadata. Such a repository aims at acting as a unique reference point for the biomedical information produced by the Italian research institutions. An in-depth analysis has also been performed on the collection of information material addressed to patients produced by the institutions surveyed. The survey respondents were 6 out of 9. The results reveal the use of different practices and standard among the institutions concerning: the type of documentation collected, the software adopted, the use and format of metadata and the conditions of accessibility to the IRs. The

  12. Adherence to the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research guidelines and risk of death in Europe: results from the European Prospective Investigation into Nutrition and Cancer cohort study1,4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vergnaud, A.C.; Romaguera, D.; Peeters, P.H.M.; Gils, C.H. van; Chan, D.S.; Romieu, I.; Freisling, H.; Ferrari, P.; Clavel-Chapelon, F.; Fagherazzi, G.; Dartois, L.; Li, K.; Tikk, K.; Bergmann, M.M.; Boeing, H.; Tjonneland, A.; Olsen, A.; Overvad, K.; Dahm, C.C.; Redondo, M.L.; Agudo, A.; Sanchez, M.J.; Amiano, P.; Chirlaque, M.D.; Ardanaz, E.; Khaw, K.T.; Wareham, N.J.; Crowe, F.; Trichopoulou, A.; Orfanos, P.; Trichopoulos, D.; Masala, G.; Sieri, S.; Tumino, R.; Vineis, P.; Panico, S.; Bueno-De-Mesquita, H.B.; Ros, M.M.; May, A.; Wirfalt, E.; Sonestedt, E.; Johansson, I.; Hallmans, G.; Lund, E.; Weiderpass, E.; Parr, C.L.; Riboli, E.; Norat, T.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 2007, the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) and the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) issued recommendations on diet, physical activity, and weight management for cancer prevention on the basis of the most comprehensive collection of available evidence. OBJECTIVE: We

  13. Topological-Pattern-Based Recommendation of UMLS Concepts for National Cancer Institute Thesaurus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhe; Chen, Yan; de Coronado, Sherri; Piskorski, Katrina; Geller, James

    2016-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute Thesaurus (NCIt) is a reference terminology used to support clinical, translational and basic research as well as administrative activities. As medical knowledge evolves, concepts that might be missing from a particular needed subdomain are regularly added to the NCIt. However, terminology development is known to be labor-intensive and error-prone. Therefore, cost-effective semi-automated methods for identifying potentially missing concepts would be useful to terminology curators. Previously, we have developed a structural method leveraging the native term mappings of the Unified Medical Language System to identify potential concepts in several of its source vocabularies to enrich the SNOMED CT. In this paper, we tested an analogous method for NCIt. Concepts from eight UMLS source terminologies were identified as possibilities to enrich NCIt's conceptual content.

  14. Qualification of National Cancer Institute-Designated Cancer Centers for Quantitative PET/CT Imaging in Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuermann, Joshua S; Reddin, Janet S; Opanowski, Adam; Kinahan, Paul E; Siegel, Barry A; Shankar, Lalitha K; Karp, Joel S

    2017-07-01

    The National Cancer Institute developed the Centers for Quantitative Imaging Excellence (CQIE) initiative in 2010 to prequalify imaging facilities at all of the National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive and clinical cancer centers for oncology trials using advanced imaging techniques, including PET. Here we review the CQIE PET/CT scanner qualification process and results in detail. Methods: Over a period of approximately 5 y, sites were requested to submit a variety of phantoms, including uniform and American College of Radiology-approved phantoms, PET/CT images, and examples of clinical images. Submissions were divided into 3 distinct time periods: initial submission (T0) and 2 requalification submissions (T1 and T2). Images were analyzed using standardized procedures, and scanners received a pass or fail designation. Sites had the opportunity to submit new data for scanners that failed. Quantitative results were compared across scanners within a given time period and across time periods for a given scanner. Results: Data from 65 unique PET/CT scanners across 56 sites were submitted for CQIE T0 qualification; 64 scanners passed the qualification. Data from 44 (68%) of those 65 scanners were submitted for T2. From T0 to T2, the percentage of scanners passing the CQIE qualification on the first attempt rose from 38% for T1 to 67% for T2. The most common reasons for failure were SUV outside specifications, incomplete submission, and uniformity issues. Uniform phantom and American College of Radiology-approved phantom results between scanner manufacturers were similar. Conclusion: The results of the CQIE process showed that periodic requalification may decrease the frequency of deficient data submissions. The CQIE project also highlighted the concern within imaging facilities about the burden of maintaining different qualifications and accreditations. Finally, for quantitative imaging-based trials, further evaluation of the relationships between the level of

  15. A survey of National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer centers' oral health supportive care practices and resources in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Joel B; Parker, Ira R; Epstein, Matthew S; Gupta, Anurag; Kutis, Susan; Witkowski, Daniela M

    2007-04-01

    The oral complications and morbidity resulting from overall cancer therapy utilizing radiation, chemotherapy, and/or stem cell transplantation can have significant impact on a patient's health, quality of life, cost of care, and cancer management. There has been minimal health services research focusing on the status of medically necessary, oral supportive services at US cancer centers. A pre-tested, survey questionnaire was distributed to the directors of National Cancer Institute (NCI)-designated comprehensive cancer centers to assess each institution's resource availability and clinical practices, as it relates to the prevention and management of oral complications during cancer treatment. Sixteen of the 39 comprehensive cancer centers responded to the survey. Of the respondents, 56% of the centers did not have a dental department. The sites of delivery of oral supportive care services range from the provision of in-house dental care to community-based, private practice sites. No standard protocols were in place for either oral preventive care or for supportive services for oral complications during or after cancer therapy. Fifty percent of the responding comprehensive cancer centers reported orally focused research and/or clinical trial activities. Comprehensive cancer care must include an oral care component, particularly for those cancer patients who are at high risk for oral complications. This requires a functional team of oral care providers collaborating closely within the oncology team. Considering the number of cancer patients receiving aggressive oncologic treatment that may result in oral toxicity, the impact of oral conditions on a compromised host, and the potential lack of appropriate resources and healthcare personnel to manage these complications, future research efforts are needed to identify the strengths and weaknesses of present oral supportive care delivery systems at both NCI-designated cancer centers and community-based oncology practices.

  16. Breast cancer and screening in persons with an intellectual disability living in institutions in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trétarre, B; Bourgarel, S; Stoebner-Delbarre, A; Jacot, W; Bessaoud, F; Satge, D

    2017-03-01

    We aimed to describe, among a population of women with intellectual disabilities (ID) living in institutions in France, the characteristics in whom breast cancer (BC) was diagnosed and of those who participated in BC screening. Study was performed in 2009 among a random, representative sample of women with ID living in institutions in France. Participants answered a questionnaire either directly by themselves, or with the help of an intermediary. In total, 978 women with ID aged over 18 years were included, and 14 were diagnosed with BC. The incidence observed in this sample of women with ID is similar to that of the general population (standardised incidence ratio, SIR 0.857, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.42-1.53). Average age at diagnosis was 47.8 years, and the risk of developing BC before the age of 50 was 2.03% (0.4-3.66). This risk was not significantly different from that of the general population (2.4%, 1.0-3.78). Obesity was almost twice as frequent in women who had BC as compared to those without BC (43% vs. 22.5%, P = 0.0196). Among the 310 women aged >50 years and eligible for the national BC screening programme, 238 (77%) had already had at least one mammogram, and 199 had had it within the previous 2 years. Adherence to the screening programme was 64.2% (199/310) in the participating institutions. This rate was slightly higher than the national average of 62% for the same period. The results of this study show that BC is equally as frequent among women with ID living in institutions as in the general population, and occurs at around the same age. Obesity was significantly more frequent among women in whom BC was diagnosed in our study. Participation in BC screening is slightly higher among women with ID living in institutions than among the general population. © 2016 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. [Nutritional status in patients first hospital admissions service hematology National Cancer Institute].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltazar Luna, E; Omaña Guzmán, L I; Ortiz Hernández, L; Ñamendis-Silva, S A; De Nicola Delfin, L

    2013-01-01

    To determine the nutritional status of patients admitted to hospital for the first time the hematology service and who have not received treatment for cancer, to know if the nutritional status assessed by the EGS-GP and serum albumin related mortality of patients A longitudinal, prospective, analytical. EGS-Through GP assessed the nutritional status of patients, we used SPSS 19.0 for data analysis. Evaluaron 119 patients, 52.1% female and 47.9% male. The most common diagnosis was non-Hodgkin lymphoma in 43.7%. According to the EGS-GP 50.4% of patients had some degree of malnutrition or was at risk of suffering of which: 31.1% had moderate and 19.3% had severe malnutrition. The 49.6% of patients had an adequate nutritional status. 30.3% of the patients who died, 37% had severe malnutrition and 50% severe decrease in albumin concentration. The prevalence of malnutrition in hematological patients treated at the National Cancer Institute of Mexico that have not received medical treatment was high. There is an association between nutritional status and mortality in this patient group. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  18. [The health care costs of breast cancer: the case of the Mexican Social Security Institute].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaul, Felicia Marie; Arreola-Ornelas, Héctor; Velázquez, Enrique; Dorantes, Javier; Méndez, Oscar; Avila-Burgos, Leticia

    2009-01-01

    We studied the cost of health care for women with breast cancer treated at the Mexican Social Security Institute (IMSS, per its abbreviation in Spanish). Using the Medical and Operative Information Systems of the IMSS, we constructed a cohort of patients diagnosed in 2002 and followed these patients to the end of 2006, identifying the use of resources and imputing the IMSS-specific cost structure. Only 14% of women were diagnosed in stage 1 and 48% were diagnosed in stages III-IV. The average cost of their medical care per patient-year was $MX110,459. Costs for stage 1 were $MX74,522 compared to $102,042 for stage II, and were $MX154,018 for stage III and $MX199,274 for stage IV. Breast cancer accounts for a significant part of the IMSS health budget. Later stage at diagnosis is associated with higher economic costs per patient-year of treatment and lower probability of five-year survival.

  19. Photodynamic Therapy in Gynecologic Malignancies: A Review of the Roswell Park Cancer Institute Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayor, Paul C; Lele, Shashikant

    2016-09-23

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a treatment modality used in the management of solid tumor malignancies that employs the use of a photosensitizing agent, a light source and oxygen in order to illicit a direct cytotoxic effect. Its use in gynecologic malignancies is somewhat novel and has been used for palliative and curative intent. At the Roswell Park Cancer Institute, the use of PDT in the management of gynecologic cancers began in the mid 1980s and since that time 35 patients have received PDT as a treatment for recurrent or metastatic cutaneous and vulvar, vaginal, anal, and cervical recurrences. In our experience, 85% patients with metastatic cutaneous lesions had a complete response. Twenty-seven percent of patients with metastatic vaginal, cervical or anal recurrences had a complete response to therapy with a median response time of 28 months. Side effects from the treatment included moderate to severe burning sensation, pain and edema at the treatment site requiring narcotic pain medication for symptom management in patients who underwent treatment to cutaneous lesions as well as lower genital tract recurrences. PDT should be considered an option in patients who are too frail to undergo the standard of care or decline the standard of care in lieu of a less invasive treatment modality.

  20. Photodynamic Therapy in Gynecologic Malignancies: A Review of the Roswell Park Cancer Institute Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul C. Mayor

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a treatment modality used in the management of solid tumor malignancies that employs the use of a photosensitizing agent, a light source and oxygen in order to illicit a direct cytotoxic effect. Its use in gynecologic malignancies is somewhat novel and has been used for palliative and curative intent. At the Roswell Park Cancer Institute, the use of PDT in the management of gynecologic cancers began in the mid 1980s and since that time 35 patients have received PDT as a treatment for recurrent or metastatic cutaneous and vulvar, vaginal, anal, and cervical recurrences. In our experience, 85% patients with metastatic cutaneous lesions had a complete response. Twenty-seven percent of patients with metastatic vaginal, cervical or anal recurrences had a complete response to therapy with a median response time of 28 months. Side effects from the treatment included moderate to severe burning sensation, pain and edema at the treatment site requiring narcotic pain medication for symptom management in patients who underwent treatment to cutaneous lesions as well as lower genital tract recurrences. PDT should be considered an option in patients who are too frail to undergo the standard of care or decline the standard of care in lieu of a less invasive treatment modality.

  1. Metaplastic Breast Cancer: Molecular Typing and Identification of Potential Targeted Therapies at a Single Institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edenfield, Jessica; Schammel, Christine; Collins, Justin; Schammel, David; Edenfield, W Jeff

    2017-02-01

    Metaplastic breast carcinoma (MBC) is a rare and aggressive histologic subtype of breast cancer comprising approximately 0.5% to 5.0% of all invasive breast cancers with a poor prognosis and limited therapeutic options. We investigated MBC at our institution to evaluate outcomes and investigate the molecular profile of our cohort to determine the presence of mutations for which there are targeted therapies. We found our cohort to consist mainly of the matrix-producing variant (72%) with 48% having the stereotypical estrogen receptor-negative/progesterone receptor-negative/human epidermal growth factor receptor-2-negative phenotype. While the overall survival of our cohort was an average of 1679 days (4.6 years), we had a surprising number of patients with second primaries (40%) and distant metastases (40%), yet few recurrences (12%). Molecular analysis of the tumors indicated that one gene mutation, CSFIR, was significantly associated with outcome (P = .021); however, the cohort was defined by frequent mutations in ERBB4 (36%), PIK3CA (48%), and FLT3 (60%), for which there are now targeted therapies. While surgery is the appropriate first step in the management of this aggressive malignancy, the collection of data pertaining to the use of targeted agents, although anecdotal, may provide clues to better treatment for these patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Cancer incidence in a Cancer Care Unit of the Mexican Social Security Institute (IMSS) in Toluca, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Villanueva, Angel; Chacón Sánchez, Jesús; Santillán Arreygue, Leopoldo; Sánchez González, Yolanda; Romero-Figueroa, María del Socorro

    2014-01-01

    In 2000, malignant tumors were responsible for 12% of nearly 56 million deaths that occurred in the world from all causes. To determine the incidence of cancer in a Cancer Care Unit of IMSS in Toluca, Mexico. Prospective cross-sectional study; we identified the primary tumor, age, family history of cancer, comorbidities, risk factors, and ECOG in patients with newly diagnosed cancer. We identified 446 cases, 66.1% were women. The age group of age 50 to 59 had the highest number of cases (98). The most common cancers in women are breast, cervical, and ovarian cancer, and in men, testicular, prostate, and colorectal cancer. The most common cancers in both sexes were breast cancer, cervical cancer, colorectal cancer, ovarian cancer, and testicular cancer.

  3. Adherence to Guidelines for Adult (Non-GIST) Soft Tissue Sarcoma in the Netherlands : A Plea for Dedicated Sarcoma Centers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Harald J; Haas, Rick L M; Verhoef, Cornelis; Suurmeijer, Albert J H; van Rijswijk, Carla S P; Bongers, Ben G H; van der Graaf, Winette T; Ho, Vincent K Y

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Optimal management of soft tissue sarcoma (STS) remains a challenge. A nationwide survey assessed the quality of STS care in the Netherlands, thereby aiming to identify potentialities for improvement through more centralized disease management. METHODS: From the Netherlands Cancer

  4. The distribution of bats in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braaksma, S.

    1970-01-01

    The Research Institute for Nature Management (R.I.N.) has compiled all available information on the distribution of bats in the Netherlands up till 1968. The data were derived from literature and museum specimens, as well as from numerous unpublished observations. Around 1960 much was known already

  5. Monitoring Acceptance of homosexuality in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saskia Keuzenkamp

    2010-01-01

    Promoting acceptance of homosexuality is the main objective of current Dutch policy on the emancipation of gays and lesbians. At the request of Ronald Plasterk, the former Dutch government minister with responsibility for this policy, the Netherlands Institute for Social Research/SCP is

  6. The development of marketing in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Wierenga (Berend)

    1981-01-01

    textabstractThe article discusses marketing developments in the Netherlands. The author describes the evolution of marketing in the country from the traditional institutions such as wholesaling, retailing, and auctions, etc. to the nonprofit sectors. Marketing in the country has been described in

  7. Going Dutch: Higher Education in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, David

    2016-01-01

    This article outlines some of the policy issues currently faced by research-based universities in the Netherlands. The focus is on four leading universities (University of Amsterdam: UvA; Free University of Amsterdam: VU; Leiden University; and Delft University of Technology: TUD). The author visited these institutions as part of a Study Tour…

  8. Education in General Practice in the Netherlands*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the Netherlands medicine is taught at 7 universities, while in a few years an 8th faculty will be in operation in Maastricht. Each faculty has a department for general practice. We will show you the set-up of the institutes of. Groningen, Utrecht, Nijmegen and Leyden. We are dealing with the education of all medical students ...

  9. Acceptance of homosexuality in the Netherlands 2011

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saskia Keuzenkamp

    2011-01-01

    The Dutch government wishes to promote the social acceptance of homosexuality. To gain an impression of the current status and the progress in achieving this objective, the government asked the Netherlands Institute for Social Research/SCP to carry out a study of the current statistics and

  10. 10th International Symposium on Head And Neck Skin Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Brekel, Michiel W. M.; Balm, Alfons J. M.; Lohuis, Peter J. F. M.; van der Veen, J. P. Wietse

    2011-01-01

    Since 1993, ten multidisciplinary symposia were organized at The Netherlands Cancer Institute on the diagnosis and treatment of malignancies of the head and neck. The symposia are meant to provide up-to-date teaching for physicians by world-renowned speakers. The previous symposia dealt with

  11. Immunological Subtypes of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia- Beyond Morphology: Experience from Kidwai State Cancer Institute, Bengaluru, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, Namrata N; Vijay, Raghavendra H

    2017-07-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is disease of lymphoid precursors and is the most common cancer. Diagnosis of ALL is made by evaluating morphology and flowcytometric Immunophenotyping (FCI)and is an important adjunct in diagnosis and determining treatment in ALL, with availability of extensive monoclonal antibodies in the recent years there is tremendous progress in the field of FCI, and is a requirement by World Health Organisation for the classification of acute lymphoblastic Leukemia. Flow cytometric immunophenotyping of the leukemic blasts helps in categorization of acute lymphoblastic leukemia as B-ALL or T-ALL. Though ALL is the most common cancer, there is paucity of study in Indian scenario, and very few reports of immunologically subtyping of ALL is reported. To confirm the clinical/morphological diagnosis and to determine immunological subtype of acute lymphoblastic leukemia as per requirement by World Health Organization for the classification of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. At Kidwai State Cancer institute, Bangalore, we have performed of Immunophenotyping in 1425 untreated cases of acute leukemias during January 2012 - August 2015. Flow cytometry analysis of 1425 cases of acute Leukemias were performed, 918 (64.42%) were acute lymphoblastic Leukemia, 688 were B-ALL (74.94%), majority(480) of B-ALL were in children (69.76%), 230 were T-ALL (25.05 %), B-ALL was the most common subtype of acute leukemias. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the most common leukemia in adults and children. Immunophenotping helps in confirming the clinical/morphological diagnosis and in determining the immunological subtype of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, thus has an important role in deciding on the treatment regime. ALL is the disease of lymphoid precursors and is more common cancer in children than adults. B-ALL was the most common subtype of acute leukemias both in adults and in children. T-ALL is less common in pediatric population. Flowcytometric techniques are used

  12. Prevalence and Predictors of Neoadjuvant Therapy for Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer in the National Cancer Database: Importance of Socioeconomic Status and Treating Institution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sher, David J., E-mail: david_sher@rush.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Liptay, Michael J. [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Fidler, Mary Jo [Section of Medical Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The optimal locoregional therapy for stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is controversial, with definitive chemoradiation therapy (CRT) and neoadjuvant therapy followed by surgery (NT-S) serving as competing strategies. In this study, we used the National Cancer Database to determine the prevalence and predictors of NT in a large, modern cohort of patients. Methods and Materials: Patients with stage IIIA NSCLC treated with CRT or NT-S between 2003 and 2010 at programs accredited by the Commission on Cancer were included. Predictors were categorized as clinical, time/geographic, socioeconomic, and institutional. In accord with the National Cancer Database, institutions were classified as academic/research program and as comprehensive and noncomprehensive community cancer centers. Logistic regression and random effects multilevel logistic regression were performed for univariable and multivariable analyses, respectively. Results: The cohort consisted of 18,581 patients, 3,087 (16.6%) of whom underwent NT-S (10.6% induction CRT, 6% induction chemotherapy). The prevalence of NT-S was constant over time, but there were significant relative 31% and 30% decreases in pneumonectomy and right-sided pneumonectomy, respectively, over time (P trend <.02). In addition to younger age, lower T stage, and favorable comorbidity score, indicators of higher socioeconomic status were strong independent predictors of NT-S, including white race, higher income, and private/managed insurance. The type of institution (academic/research program vs comprehensive or noncomprehensive community cancer centers, odds ratio 1.54 and 2.08, respectively) strongly predicted NT-S, but treatment volume did not. Conclusions: Neoadjuvant therapy followed by surgery was an uncommon treatment approach in Commission on Cancer programs, and the prevalence of postinduction pneumonectomy decreased over time. Higher socioeconomic status and treatment at academic institutions were significant

  13. Evaluation of the cost of cervical cancer at the National Institute of Oncology, Rabat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheikh, Amine; El Majjaoui, Sanaa; Ismaili, Nabil; Cheikh, Zakia; Bouajaj, Jamal; Nejjari, Chakib; El Hassani, Amine; Cherrah, Yahya; Benjaafar, Noureddine

    2016-01-01

    The Cervical Cancer (CC) is one of the heavy and costly diseases for the population and the health system. We want to know through this study, the first in Morocco, the annual cost of the treatment of this disease at the National Institute of Oncology (NIO) in Rabat, we also want to explore the possibility of flat-rate management of this disease in order to standardize medical practices and improve reimbursement by health insurance funds. 550 patients were treated for their cervical cancer in the Rabat's NIO. Data of all of medical and surgical services offered to patients were collected from the NIO registry. The cost of care was assessed using the method of micro-costing. We will focus to the total direct cost of all the services lavished to patients in NIO. The global cost was about US$ 1,429,673 with an average estimated at US$ 2,599 ± US$ 839. Radiotherapy accounts for 55% of total costs, followed by brachytherapy (27%) and surgery (7%). This three services plus chemotherapy influence the overall cost of care (p <0.001). Other services (radiology, laboratory tests and consultations) represent only 10%. The overall cost is influenced by the stage of the disease, this cost decreased significantly evolving in the stage of CC (p <0.001). The standardization of medical practices is essential to the equity and efficiency in access to care. The flat-rate or lump sum by stage of disease is possible and interesting for standardizing medical practices and improving the services of the health insurance plan.

  14. Oncological management of pediatric cancer patients belonging to Jehovah's Witnesses: a two-institutional experience report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenenbaum, T; Hasan, C; Kramm, C M; Janssen, G; Laws, H-J; Wessalowski, R; Bode, U; Göbel, U

    2004-04-01

    Aim of this study was to analyze the feasibility of oncological treatment in pediatric patients belonging to Jehovah's Witnesses and to describe the changing policy in performing transfusions and supportive care measures at two German pediatric cancer institutions. Over a period of 16 years 21 treatments according to the current cooperative protocols were performed in 14 children of Jehovah's Witnesses. Various hematological supportive care measures such as supplementation with iron, human erythropoietin, interleukin 11, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and autologous or allogeneic stem cell rescue had been applied. For comparison matched pairs treated in our hospitals not belonging to Jehovah's Witnesses and 50 pediatric and adult oncological patients belonging to Jehovah's Witnesses reviewed from the international literature were analyzed with respect to transfusions and outcome. So far, 9 of 14 children are surviving 16-195 months (median 26 months). During the primary therapy they received markedly less transfusions than the control cohort (-39,1% red blood cell transfusions and -37,5% platelet transfusions). The review of 50 reported cases showed that oncological therapy can also be successfully performed with a restricted transfusion regimen in children and particularly in adults. Pediatric cancer patients belonging to Jehovah's Witnesses can be treated similarly to other patients. A restrictive transfusion policy and the broad application of hematopoietic supportive care measures may reduce transfusions. This treatment policy and a continuous collaboration with the Hospital Liaison Committee for Jehovah's Witnesses appears to create an oncological treatment situation with a high compliance of patients and parents where court orders may not be necessary. Copyright 2004 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg

  15. Tumor induction following intraoperative radiotherapy: Late results of the National Cancer Institute canine trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, M.; Duray, P.; DeLuca, A.; Anderson, W.; Sindelar, W.; Kinsella, T. (Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (USA))

    1990-09-01

    Intraoperative radiotherapy has been employed in human cancer research for over a decade. Since 1979, trials to assess the acute and late toxicity of IORT have been carried out at the National Cancer Institute in an adult dog model in an attempt to establish dose tolerance guidelines for a variety of organs. Of the 170 animals entered on 12 studies with a minimum follow-up of 2 years, 148 dogs received IORT; 22 control animals received only surgery. Animals were sacrificed at designated intervals following IORT, usually at 1, 6, 12, 24, and 60 month intervals. 102 of 148 irradiated dogs were sacrificed less than 24 months; 46 dogs were followed greater than or equal to 24 months after IORT. To date, 34 of the 46 animals have been sacrificed; the 12 remaining animals are to be followed to 5 years. These 12 animals have minimum follow-up of 30 months. In the irradiated group followed for greater than or equal to 24 months, 10 tumors have arisen in 9 animals. One animal developed an incidental spontaneous breast carcinoma outside the IORT port, discovered only at scheduled post-mortem exam. The remaining nine tumors arose within IORT ports. Two tumors were benign neural tumors--a neuroma and a neurofibroma. One animal had a collision tumor comprised of grade I chondrosarcoma adjacent to grade III osteosarcoma arising in lumbar vertebrae. Two other grade III osteosarcomas, one grade III fibrosarcoma, and one grade III malignant fibrous histiocytoma arose in retroperitoneal/paravertebral sites. An embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (sarcoma botryoides) arose within the irradiated urinary bladder of one animal. No sham irradiated controls nor IORT animals sacrificed less than 24 months have developed any spontaneous or radiation-induced tumors. The time range of diagnoses of tumors was 24-58 months. The IORT dose range associated with tumor development was 20-35 Gy.

  16. The premenopausal breast cancer collaboration : A pooling project of studies participating in the national cancer institute cohort consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nichols, Hazel B.; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Wright, Lauren B.; McGowan, Craig; Brook, Mark N.; Mcclain, Kathleen M.; Jones, Michael E; Adami, Hans-Olov; Agnoli, Claudia; Baglietto, Laura; Bernstein, Leslie; Bertrand, Kimberly A; Blot, William J.; Boutron-Ruault, Marie Christine; Butler, Lesley M; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Doody, Michele M.; Dossus, Laure; Eliassen, A. Heather; Giles, Graham G.; Gram, Inger T.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hoffman-Bolton, Judy; Kaaks, Rudolf; Key, Timothy J.; Kirsh, Victoria A.; Kitahara, Cari M; Koh, Woon-Puay; Larsson, Susanna C.; Lund, Eiliv; Ma, Huiyan; Merritt, Melissa A.; Milne, Roger L.; Navarro, Carmen; Overvad, Kim; Ozasa, Kotaro; Palmer, Julie R.; Peeters, Petra H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074099655; Riboli, Elio; Rohan, Thomas E.; Sadakane, Atsuko; Sund, Malin; Tamimi, Rulla M; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Vatten, Lars; Visvanathan, Kala; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Willett, Walter C.; Wolk, Alicja; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zheng, Wei; Sandler, Dale P; Swerdlow, Anthony J.

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is a leading cancer diagnosis among premenopausal women around the world. Unlike rates in postmenopausal women, incidence rates of advanced breast cancer have increased in recent decades for premenopausal women. Progress in identifying contributors to breast cancer risk among

  17. Diabetes mellitus type 2 and subsite-specific colorectal cancer risk in men and women: results from the Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kort, S. de; Simons, C.C.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Goldbohm, R.A.; Arts, I.C.; Bruine, A.P.; Janssen-Heijnen, M.L.; Sanduleanu, S.; Masclee, A.A.; Weijenberg, M.P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC); however, studies differentiating between subsites of CRC are limited. We investigated how diabetes mellitus (DM) was associated with subsite-specific CRC risk in men and women. Methods: The

  18. Intake of conjugated linoleic acid, fat and other fatty acids in relation to postmenopausal breast cancer : the Netherlands cohort study on diet and cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorrips, L.E.; Brants, H.A.M.; Kardinaal, A.F.M.; Hiddink, G.J.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2002-01-01

    Background: Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), which is present in milk products and meat from ruminants, appears to have anticarcinogenic activity against breast cancer in animal and in vitro experiments. To date, few epidemiologic data are available in humans. Objective: This study evaluated the

  19. Effects of dietary folate and alcohol intake on promoter methylation in sporadic colorectal cancer: The Netherlands cohort study on diet and cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engeland, M. van; Weijenberg, M.P.; Roemen, G.M.J.M.; Brink, M.; Bruïne, A.P. de; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Baylin, S.B.; Goeij, A.F.P.M. de; Herman, J.G.

    2003-01-01

    Sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC) is characterized by genetic and epigenetic changes such as regional DNA hypermethylation and global DNA hypomethylation. Epidemiological and animal studies suggest that aherrant DNA methylation is associated with low dietary folate intake, which is aggravated by high

  20. Laser oncology in Italy: experimental research and clinical applications at the National Cancer Institute, Milan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuelli, H; Bandieramonte, G; Marchesini, R; Fava, G; Rodari, A; Colombo, M P; Costa, A; Spinelli, P; Zunino, F; Chiesa, F; Cascinelli, N; Andreola, S; Pariente, R; Canti, G F

    1983-01-01

    CO2, Nd:YAG, and argon lasers have been used for 5 years for experimental and clinical procedures at the National Cancer Institute of Milan under the auspices of the National Research Council. Experimental data regarding tumor cell spread through lymphatic and hematic channels and cell viability in the fumes after CO2 laser irradiation are reported. New advantages in the combined treatment modalities have been demonstrated, since the synergism between the low power argon laser beam and chemotherapeutic agents (anthracyclines) was assessed on cell cultures and the least toxic and the most effective doses of the drugs were identified. Due to the optical properties of the laser beam, physical measurements of the delivered energy and mathematical calculation of the energy per tissue volume unit to be ablated increase the precision in microsurgery especially when conservative managements are indicated. Main applications in surgical oncology, and comparison versus conventional methods, both with vaporization and excisional techniques, according to specific therapeutic protocols, in general surgery, otolaryngology, gynecology, and endoscopy, even on an outpatient basis, are finally illustrated in a series of 600 cases.

  1. Possible misdiagnosis of HIV associated lymphoma as tuberculosis among patients attending Uganda Cancer Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyego, Paul; Nakiyingi, Lydia; Ddungu, Henry; Walimbwa, Stephen; Nalwanga, Damalie; Reynolds, Steven J; Parkes-Ratanshi, Rosalind

    2017-03-14

    Early diagnosis of HIV associated lymphoma is challenging because the definitive diagnostic procedure of biopsy, requires skills and equipment that are not readily available. As a consequence, diagnosis may be delayed increasing the risk of mortality. We set out to determine the frequency and risk factors associated with the misdiagnosis of HIV associated lymphoma as tuberculosis (TB) among patients attending the Uganda Cancer Institute (UCI). A retrospective cohort study design was used among HIV patients with associated lymphoma patients attending the UCI, Kampala, Uganda between February and March 2015. Eligible patient charts were reviewed for information on TB treatment, socio-demographics, laboratory parameters (Hemoglobin, CD4cells count and lactate dehydrogenase) and clinical presentation using a semi structured data extraction form. A total of 183 charts were reviewed; 106/183 were males (57.9%), the median age was 35 (IQR, 28-45). Fifty six (30.6%) patients had a possible misdiagnosis as TB and their median time on TB treatment was 3.5 (1-5.3) months. In multivariate analysis the presence of chest pain had an odd ratio (OR) of 4.4 (95% CI 1.89-10.58, p UCI are misdiagnosed and treated as TB. Chest pain and stage III and IV of lymphoma were associated with an increased risk of a possible misdiagnosis of lymphoma as TB.

  2. The National Cancer Institute diet history questionnaire: validation of pyramid food servings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millen, Amy E; Midthune, Douglas; Thompson, Frances E; Kipnis, Victor; Subar, Amy F

    2006-02-01

    The performance of the National Cancer Institute's food frequency questionnaire, the Diet History Questionnaire (DHQ), in estimating servings of 30 US Department of Agriculture Food Guide Pyramid food groups was evaluated in the Eating at America's Table Study (1997-1998), a nationally representative sample of men and women aged 20-79 years. Participants who completed four nonconsecutive, telephone-administered 24-hour dietary recalls (n = 1,301) were mailed a DHQ; 965 respondents completed both the 24-hour dietary recalls and the DHQ. The US Department of Agriculture's Pyramid Servings Database was used to estimate intakes of pyramid servings for both diet assessment tools. The correlation (rho) between DHQ-reported intake and true intake and the attenuation factor (lambda) were estimated using a measurement error model with repeat 24-hour dietary recalls as the reference instrument. Correlations for energy-adjusted pyramid servings of foods ranged from 0.43 (other starchy vegetables) to 0.84 (milk) among women and from 0.42 (eggs) to 0.80 (total dairy food) among men. The mean rho and lambda after energy adjustment were 0.62 and 0.60 for women and 0.63 and 0.66 for men, respectively. This food frequency questionnaire validation study of foods measured in pyramid servings allowed for a measure of food intake consistent with national dietary guidance.

  3. Melanoma of unknown primary: experience at Massachusetts General Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Kenneth A; Jonasch, Eric; Hodi, F Stephen; Soiffer, Robert; Kwitkiwski, Kimberly; Sober, Arthur J; Haluska, Frank G

    2005-02-01

    Melanoma may present metastatically without an identifiable primary lesion. To further characterize the epidemiology of melanoma of unknown primary (MUP), we report our experience with a cohort of MUP patients. We retrospectively reviewed patients seen at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI) between 1986 and 1996 with follow-up to 2002. Data were analysed using log-rank and proportional hazards analyses, with death from any cause as the main outcome measure. Of the 2485 melanoma patients seen, 65 (2.6%) had MUP; 41 patients were male [63.1%; 95% confidence interval (CI), 50.2%, 74.7%]. The median age at diagnosis was 54.1 years (interquartile range, 39.4-67.1 years). Thirty patients had lymph node metastases, 12 cutaneous or subcutaneous metastases and 23 visceral metastases. Of the 62 patients (95.4%) with at least some follow-up, there were 42 deaths from any cause. Patients with lymph node metastases survived significantly longer than patients with other metastases [5-year survival 38.7% (95% CI, 18.1%, 59.1%) vs. 13.9% (95% CI, 4.4%, 28.6%); Pdefinition of MUP, may shed light on the pathogenesis and prognosis of MUP.

  4. A Picture Really is Worth a Thousand Words: Public Engagement with the National Cancer Institute on Social Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strekalova, Yulia A; Krieger, Janice L

    2017-03-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) provides pertinent information about cancer prevention, treatment, and research advancements that is considered objective and accurate. NCI's presence on social media is an example of a growing effort in promoting and facilitating audience engagement with evidence-based information about health and cancer. However, it is unknown what strategies are most effective for engaging audiences via this communication platform. To evaluate this important question, we analyzed data on posts, associated comments, and meta-data from official NCI Facebook page between July 2010 and February 2015 (end of data collection). Results show that audience engagement is associated with the format of cancer-related social media posts. Specifically, posts with photos received significantly more likes, comments, and shares than videos, links, and status updates. The findings have important implications for how social media can be more effectively utilized to promote public engagement with important public health issues.

  5. Institutional (mis)trust in colorectal cancer screening: a qualitative study with Greek, Iranian, Anglo-Australian and Indigenous groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Paul R; Coffey, Cushla; Javanparast, Sara; Wilson, Carlene; Meyer, Samantha B

    2015-12-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) has the second highest cancer mortality rate in Australia. The Australian National Bowel Cancer Screening Program (NBCSP) aims to increase early detection of CRC by offering free Faecal Occult Blood Testing (FOBT), although uptake is low for culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) groups. To present data on trust and mistrust in the NBCSP by population groups with low uptake and thus to highlight areas in need of policy change. A qualitative study was undertaken in South Australia, involving interviews with 94 people from four CALD groups: Greek, Iranian, Anglo-Australian, and Indigenous peoples. Our study highlights the complexities of institutional trust, which involves considerations of trust at interpersonal, local and national levels. In addition, trust and mistrust was found in more abstract systems such as the medical knowledge of doctors to diagnose or treat cancer or the scientific procedures in laboratories to test the FOBTs. The object of institutional (mis)trust differed between cultural groups - Anglo-Australian and Iranian groups indicated a high level of trust in the government, whereas Indigenous participants were much less trusting. The level and nature of trust in the screening process varied between the CALD groups. Addressing program misconceptions, clarifying the FOBT capabilities and involving medical services in collecting and transporting the samples may increase trust in the NBCSP. However, broader and more enduring mistrust in services and institutions may need to be dealt with in order to increase trust and participation. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Assessing health-state utility values in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer: a utility study in the United Kingdom and the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Dara; Joulain, F; Naoshy, S; Iqbal, U; Muszbek, N; Payne, K A; Ferry, D; Goey, S H

    2014-10-01

    This study aimed to elicit EuroQol Quality of Life 5-Dimensions (EQ-5D) utility values from patients with second-line metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) pre- and post-progression. A cross-sectional study was conducted in five hospitals in the Netherlands and the UK. Patients with mCRC were eligible if prescribed a second or subsequent line of therapy or best supportive care (BSC), received prior oxaliplatin in first-line therapy, and had Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status scores of 0-2 at second-line initiation. Patients completed the EuroQol Quality of Life 5-Dimensions 3-levels (EQ-5D-3L) questionnaire and were categorized as pre- or post-progression. Chart data including patient demographics, clinical history, prior/current treatments and serious adverse events (SAEs) were collected. Mean utilities were estimated; uni- and multivariate analyses were conducted. Seventy-five patients were enrolled; 42 were pre-progression defined as second line or third line following an AE on second line and 33 were post-progression defined as third or subsequent therapy lines or BSC. Patient/disease characteristics and number of SAEs were similar between cohorts. Mean utility scores were 0.741 (SD = 0.230) and 0.731 (SD = 0.292) for pre- and post-progression cohorts, respectively. Compared to pre-progression, more patients reported increased anxiety/depression (36 vs. 12 %) and fewer problems with daily activities (64 vs. 38 %) post-progression. More patients pre-progression were on active treatment at enrolment (83 vs. 42 %) compared to post-progression. This is the first real-world study to collect utilities for patients with second-line mCRC pre- and post-disease progression. Utility values were similar pre- and post-progression. To further explore the effect of radiological progression on utilities, longitudinal research is required that includes patients in palliative care centres.

  7. Survival after definitive (chemo)radiotherapy in esophageal cancer patients: a population-based study in the north-East Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Justin K; Muijs, Christina T; Burgerhof, Johannes G M; Paardekooper, Gabriel; Timmer, Paul R; Muller, Karin; Woutersen, Dankert; Mul, Véronique E; Beukema, Jannet C; Hospers, Geke A P; van Dijk, Boukje A C; Langendijk, Johannes A; Plukker, John Th M

    2013-06-01

    Definitive (chemo)radiotherapy is employed in esophageal cancer patients as an alternative for patients considered medically unfit for surgery or having unresectable tumors. We evaluated a population-based cohort to improve the selection for intensified nonsurgical strategies and to identify prognostic factors. Patients who had squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) or adenocarcinoma (AC) were treated in four referral centers in the north-east Netherlands with definitive chemoradiotherapy (dCRT) or radiotherapy (dRT) between 1996 and 2008. Of the 287 included patients, 110 were treated with dCRT and 177 with dRT. Median overall survival (OS) was 11 months (95 % confidence interval: 10-12 months), with OS of 22 and 8 % and disease-free survival (DFS) of 16 and 5 % at 2 and 5 years, respectively. DFS at 2 and 5 years was 24 and 9 % for SCC versus 10 and 2 % for AC patients (P = 0.006). OS after 2 and 5 years was 29 and 14 % for SCC patients versus 17 and 3 % for AC patients (P = 0.044). On multivariate Cox regression, SCC was an independent prognostic factor for DFS [P = 0.020, hazard ratio (HR) = 0.71] and OS (P = 0.047, HR = 0.76). On matched cohort analysis, DFS was higher in the dCRT group compared with dRT patients (P = 0.016). The locoregional failure rate was lower in the dCRT group and in SCC patients (P = 0.001 and 0.046). Long-term results and the local control rate in SCC patients were better after definitive (chemo)radiotherapy compared with in AC patients. SCC was an independent prognostic factor for survival. Definitive chemoradiotherapy leads to improved local control rate and DFS.

  8. A clinical analysis of brain metastasis in gynecologic cancer: a retrospective multi-institute analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Zoon; Kwon, Jae Hyun; Lim, Soyi

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzes the clinical characteristics of the brain metastasis (BM) of gynecologic cancer based on the type of cancer. In addition, the study examines the factors influencing the survival. Total 61 BM patients of gynecologic cancer were analyzed retrospectively from January 2000 to December 2012 in terms of clinical and radiological characteristics by using medical and radiological records from three university hospitals. There were 19 (31.1%) uterine cancers, 32 (52.5%) ovarian cancers, and 10 (16.4%) cervical cancers. The mean interval to BM was 25.4 months (21.6 months in ovarian cancer, 27.8 months in uterine cancer, and 33.1 months in cervical cancer). The mean survival from BM was 16.7 months (14.1 months in ovarian cancer, 23.3 months in uterine cancer, and 8.8 months in cervical cancer). According to a multivariate analysis of factors influencing survival, type of primary cancer, Karnofsky performance score, status of primary cancer, recursive partitioning analysis class, and treatment modality, particularly combined therapies, were significantly related to the overall survival. These results suggest that, in addition to traditional prognostic factors in BM, multiple treatment methods such as neurosurgery and combined chemoradiotherapy may play an important role in prolonging the survival for BM patients of gynecologic cancer.

  9. Trends and variations in breast and colorectal cancer incidence from 1995 to 2011: a comparative study between Texas Cancer Registry and National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zheyu; Zhang, Yefei; Franzin, Luisa; Cormier, Janice N; Chan, Wenyaw; Xu, Hua; Du, Xianglin L

    2015-04-01

    Few studies have examined the cancer incidence trends in the state of Texas, and no study has ever been conducted to compare the temporal trends of breast and colorectal cancer incidence in Texas with those of the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) in the United States. This study aimed to conduct a parallel comparison between the Texas Cancer Registry and the National Cancer Institute's SEER on cancer incidence from 1995 to 2011. A total of 951,899 breast and colorectal cancer patients were included. Age-adjusted breast cancer incidence was 134.74 per 100,000 in Texas and 131.78 per 100,000 in SEER in 1995-2011, whereas age-adjusted colorectal cancer incidence was 50.52 per 100,000 in Texas and 49.44 per 100,000 in SEER. Breast cancer incidence increased from 1995 to 2001, decreased from 2002 to 2006, and then remained relatively stable from 2007 to 2011. For colorectal cancer, the incidence increased in 1995-1997, and then decreased continuously from 1998 to 2011 in Texas and SEER areas. Incidence rates and relative risks by age, gender and ethnicity were identical between Texas and SEER.

  10. Nutrient-wide association study of 57 foods/nutrients and epithelial ovarian cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study and the Netherlands Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Melissa A; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; van den Brandt, Piet A; Schouten, Leo J; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Patel, Chirag J; Tjønneland, Anne; Hansen, Louise; Overvad, Kim; His, Mathilde; Dartois, Laureen; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Fortner, Renée T; Kaaks, Rudolf; Aleksandrova, Krasimira; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lagiou, Pagona; Bamia, Christina; Palli, Domenico; Krogh, Vittorio; Tumino, Rosario; Ricceri, Fulvio; Mattiello, Amalia; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Peeters, Petra H; Skeie, Guri; Jareid, Mie; Quirós, J Ramón; Obón-Santacana, Mireia; Sánchez, María-José; Chamosa, Saioa; Huerta, José M; Barricarte, Aurelio; Dias, Joana A; Sonestedt, Emily; Idahl, Annika; Lundin, Eva; Wareham, Nicholas J; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Travis, Ruth C; Ferrari, Pietro; Riboli, Elio; Gunter, Marc J

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the role of dietary factors in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) development have been limited, and no specific dietary factors have been consistently associated with EOC risk. We used a nutrient-wide association study approach to systematically test the association between dietary factors and invasive EOC risk while accounting for multiple hypothesis testing by using the false discovery rate and evaluated the findings in an independent cohort. We assessed dietary intake amounts of 28 foods/food groups and 29 nutrients estimated by using dietary questionnaires in the EPIC (European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition) study (n = 1095 cases). We selected 4 foods/nutrients that were statistically significantly associated with EOC risk when comparing the extreme quartiles of intake in the EPIC study (false discovery rate = 0.43) and evaluated these factors in the NLCS (Netherlands Cohort Study; n = 383 cases). Cox regression models were used to estimate HRs and 95% CIs. None of the 4 dietary factors that were associated with EOC risk in the EPIC study (cholesterol, polyunsaturated and saturated fat, and bananas) were statistically significantly associated with EOC risk in the NLCS; however, in meta-analysis of the EPIC study and the NLCS, we observed a higher risk of EOC with a high than with a low intake of saturated fat (quartile 4 compared with quartile 1; overall HR: 1.21; 95% CI: 1.04, 1.41). In the meta-analysis of both studies, there was a higher risk of EOC with a high than with a low intake of saturated fat. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  11. Multi-Institutional Experience of Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy for Stage I Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Vivek [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Simone, Charles B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Allen, Pamela K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gajjar, Sameer R. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States); Shah, Chirag [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Zhen, Weining [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Harkenrider, Matthew M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Loyola University Stritch School of Medicine, Maywood, Illinois (United States); Hallemeier, Christopher L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Jabbour, Salma K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Matthiesen, Chance L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stephenson Cancer Center, University of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (United States); Braunstein, Steve E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, San Francisco, California (United States); Lee, Percy [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States); Dilling, Thomas J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States); Allen, Bryan G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Nichols, Elizabeth M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); and others

    2017-02-01

    Purpose: For inoperable stage I (T1-T2N0) small cell lung cancer (SCLC), national guidelines recommend chemotherapy with or without conventionally fractionated radiation therapy. The present multi-institutional cohort study investigated the role of stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) for this population. Methods and Materials: The clinical and treatment characteristics, toxicities, outcomes, and patterns of failure were assessed in patients with histologically confirmed stage T1-T2N0M0 SCLC. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to evaluate the survival outcomes. Univariate and multivariate analyses identified predictors of outcomes. Results: From 24 institutions, 76 lesions were treated in 74 patients (median follow-up 18 months). The median age and tumor size was 72 years and 2.5 cm, respectively. Chemotherapy and prophylactic cranial irradiation were delivered in 56% and 23% of cases, respectively. The median SABR dose and fractionation was 50 Gy and 5 fractions. The 1- and 3-year local control rate was 97.4% and 96.1%, respectively. The median disease-free survival (DFS) duration was 49.7 months. The DFS rate was 58.3% and 53.2% at 1 and 3 years, respectively. The median, 1-year, and 3-year disease-specific survival was 52.3 months, 84.5%, and 64.4%, respectively. The median, 1-year, and 3-year overall survival (OS) was 17.8 months, 69.9%, and 34.0% respectively. Patients receiving chemotherapy experienced an increased median DFS (61.3 vs 9.0 months; P=.02) and OS (31.4 vs 14.3 months; P=.02). The receipt of chemotherapy independently predicted better outcomes for DFS/OS on multivariate analysis (P=.01). Toxicities were uncommon; 5.2% experienced grade ≥2 pneumonitis. Post-treatment failure was most commonly distant (45.8% of recurrence), followed by nodal (25.0%) and “elsewhere lung” (20.8%). The median time to each was 5 to 7 months. Conclusions: From the findings of the largest report of SABR for stage T1-T2N0 SCLC to date, SABR (≥50

  12. Ultrasound surveillance for thyroid malignancies in survivors of childhood cancer following radiotherapy: a single institutional experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhe; Franklin, Jason; Zelcer, Shayna; Sexton, Tracy; Husein, Murad

    2014-12-01

    Survivors of childhood cancer (SCC) who have received radiotherapy to the head, neck, and upper thorax are at higher risk of developing subsequent thyroid malignancies. As part of the post treatment long-term follow-up protocol, the current Children's Oncology Group guideline recommends surveillance by annual palpation; however, thyroid nodules are difficult to detect by physical examinations alone, and potentially malignancy-harboring nodules may be undetected. Since thyroid ultrasound is a sensitive and noninvasive procedure, it was incorporated in our institutional follow-up protocol. The aim of this study was to examine the outcome of ultrasound screening in this high-risk population. The following describes our experience from 2007 to 2013. A retrospective chart review was conducted on survivors enrolled in our follow-up program. SCC who have received direct or scattered radiation to the thyroid gland, and who were ≥10 years from the diagnosis of primary childhood cancer were considered to be at-risk. Seventy-eight survivors met the inclusion criteria and were screened. Thyroid ultrasound detected thyroid nodule(s) in 46 patients (59%), 17 of which had nodule(s) between 5 and 10 mm (22%), and 15 patients had nodules ≥10 mm (19%). Fourteen patients (18%) underwent fine-needle aspiration biopsy. Six patients (8%) underwent surgery, and 5 (6%) had confirmed papillary carcinoma. At the time of the first ultrasound, thyroid nodules of various sizes were found. However, over time, these nodules demonstrated slow growth rates. Incorporation of thyroid ultrasound into routine follow-up of high-risk SCC may aid in the detection of thyroid malignancies that are not clinically apparent. The use of ultrasound allows detailed characterization of the thyroid nodule and reliable monitoring of nodule progression. In SCC without suspicious nodule(s), it may be reasonable to perform screening ultrasounds less frequently due to the slow growth rate of thyroid nodules

  13. Euthanasia in Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Each of the Benelux countries (Belgium, Luxembourg, Netherlands) has enacted legislation that partially decriminalises euthanasia, defined as an act that intentionally terminates someone's life at their request. In the Netherlands and Luxembourg, but not in Belgium, the legislation partially decriminalised assisted suicide at the same time. In all three countries, euthanasia can only be performed by a doctor, in response to the patient's voluntary and well-considered request, and for patients who have an incurable disease that causes unbearable suffering, without any prospect of relief. In the Netherlands, minors can request euthanasia as of the age of 12 years. In 2011, reported euthanasia accounted for about 1% of deaths in Belgium and 3% in the Netherlands. In 75% of cases, cancer was the disease leading to a request for euthanasia. In the Netherlands, the number of cases of euthanasia reported by doctors in surveys matches the number that is officially declared. In Belgium, it is thought that there are as many unreported as reported cases of euthanasia. Since the enactment of euthanasia legislation, fewer deaths involve the intentional administration of lethal drugs without an explicit request from the patient.

  14. Throat or larynx cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vocal cord cancer; Throat cancer; Laryngeal cancer; Cancer of the glottis; Cancer of oropharynx or hypopharynx ... Saunders; 2015:chap 106. National Cancer Institute. PDQ laryngeal cancer treatment. Bethesda, MD: National Cancer Institute. Date last ...

  15. Potential causes of stage migration and their prognostic implications in colon cancer: a nationwide survey of specialist institutions in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Hideki; Hase, Kazuo; Hashiguchi, Yojiro; Shinto, Eiji; Shimazaki, Hideyuki; Yamamoto, Junji; Nakamura, Takahiro; Sugihara, Kenichi

    2014-06-01

    The actual status of stage migration in colon cancer that occurs in the procedure of preparing pathological specimens of lymph nodes has not been fully investigated. A nationwide survey of specialist institutions for colon cancer treatment was conducted to clarify interinstitutional differences in processing surgical specimens. After categorizing 111 institutions on the basis of their practice of processing specimens, distribution of tumor stage and the recurrence status of 3294 colon cancer patients treated with the same level of lymphadenectomy were compared. Patients were diagnosed with lower tumor stages in non-teaching hospitals, in hospitals where lymph nodes were retrieved by less experienced clinicians and in hospitals in which lymph nodes were retrieved with procedures that preserved the planes of surgery around the primary tumor. However, the process of sectioning and embedding lymph nodes did not affect stage distribution. The average number of lymph nodes examined per case in each institute was 19.4. Institutional number of lymph nodes examined was not associated with node positivity but it did affect the substage in Stage III for number of lymph nodes examined ≥21. In contrast, none of the factors associated with stage migration caused interinstitutional differences in the recurrence status according to the tumor stage. Considerable variety in the processing of surgical specimens existed even within one country, which could be a cause of stage migration in colon cancer. Better awareness of the clinical impact of the lymph node retrieval process is needed; an international guideline to standardize the treatment of surgical specimens might increase the value of tumor staging. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. REVIEW: Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in the investigation of cancer at The Royal Marsden Hospital and The Institute of Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, M. O.

    2006-07-01

    Developments in magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) at The Royal Marsden Hospital and The Institute of Cancer Research are reviewed in the context of preceding developments in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and MRS, and some of the early developments in this field, particularly those leading to human measurements. The early development of technology, and associated techniques for human measurement and assessment will be discussed, with particular reference to experience at out institutions. Applications using particular nuclei will then be described and related to other experimental work where appropriate. Contributions to the development of MRS that have been published in Physics in Medicine and Biology will be discussed.

  17. Noninvasive extramammary Paget's disease treated with photodynamic therapy: case series from the Roswell Park Cancer Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Housel, Joseph P; Izikson, Leonid; Zeitouni, Nathalie C

    2010-11-01

    Extramammary Paget's disease (EMPD) is a rare low-grade cutaneous malignancy that affects apocrine gland-bearing areas and most commonly occurs on the perineal skin. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) may represent a useful treatment option for extensive, noninvasive EMPD, alone or as part of multimodal therapy. To analyze the clinical outcomes of PDT for noninvasive EMPD with topical aminolevulinic acid (ALA) or intravenous porfimer sodium as photosensitizing agents and argon laser as the photoactivator. Retrospective case series of patients with noninvasive EMPD treated at Roswell Park Cancer Institute with PDT from April 20, 1995, to December 4, 2008. Identified patients included five men and three women aged 50 to 80 (mean age 67) with a total of 24 distinct lesions of noninvasive EMPD without distant metastases. Four patients received topical ALA only as a photosensitizer, three received intravenous porfimer sodium only, and one received both. All patients were treated using a 632.8-nm argon-pumped dye laser, and some were also treated using a red lamp (590-729 nm). Seven of nine lesions (78%) treated with PDT using intravenous porfimer sodium showed a complete response (CR) and were disease free at 12 to 96 months. Eight of 16 lesions (50%) treated with PDT using topical ALA showed a CR, and 38% were disease free at 9 to 88 months. None of the treated patients developed any serious cosmetic or functional impairments, such as loss of sphincter control or dysesthesias. PDT with intravenous porfimer sodium or topical ALA and argon laser may represent a useful, surgery-sparing therapeutic option for management of noninvasive EMPD in selected patients. Prospective, randomized clinical trials are necessary to compare the effectiveness of PDT with that of surgery for noninvasive EMPD. © 2010 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc.

  18. Definitive Radiotherapy for T1-2 Hypopharyngeal Cancer: A Single-Institution Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Aya, E-mail: anakajima-kyt@umin.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Nishiyama, Kinji; Morimoto, Masahiro; Nakamura, Satoaki; Suzuki, Osamu; Kawaguchi, Yoshifumi; Miyagi, Ken [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan); Fujii, Takashi; Yoshino, Kunitoshi [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka (Japan)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To analyze the outcome in T1-2 hypopharyngeal cancer (HPC) patients treated with definitive radiotherapy (RT). Patients and Methods: A total of 103 patients with T1-2 hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma treated with radical RT between March 2000 and June 2008 at our institution were analyzed. Pre-RT neck dissection (ND) was performed in 26 patients with advanced neck disease. Chemotherapy was used concurrently with RT in 14 patients. Sixty patients were associated with synchronous or metachronous malignancies. The median follow-up for surviving patients was 41 months. Results: The 3-year overall and cause-specific survival rates were 70% and 79%, respectively. The 3-year local control rates were 87% for T1 and 83% for T2 disease. The ultimate local control rate was 89%, including 7 patients in whom salvage was successful. The ultimate local control rate with laryngeal preservation was 82%. Tumors of the medial wall of the pyriform sinus tended to have lower control rates compared with tumors of the lateral or posterior pharyngeal wall. Among patients with N2b-3 disease, the 3-year regional control rates were 74% for patients with pre-RT ND and 40% for patients without ND. The 3-year locoregional control rates were as follows: Stage I, 100%; Stage II, 84%; Stage III, 67%; Stage IVA, 43%; Stage IVB, 67%. Forty-two patients developed disease recurrence, with 29 (70%) patients developing recurrence within the first year. Of the 103 patients, 6 developed late complications higher than or equal to Grade 3. Conclusions: Definitive RT accomplished a satisfactory local control rate and contributed to organ preservation.

  19. Assessment of Statistical Methodologies and Pitfalls of Dissertations Carried Out at National Cancer Institute, Cairo University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allam, Rasha M; Noaman, Maissa K; Moneer, Manar M; Elattar, Inas A

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To identify statistical errors and pitfalls in dissertations performed as part of the requirements for the Medical Doctorate (MD) degree at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), Cairo University (CU) to improve the quality of medical research. Methods: A critical assessment of 62 MD dissertations conducted in 3 departments at NCI, CU, between 2009 and 2013 was carried out regarding statistical methodology and presentation of the results. To detect differences in study characteristics over time, grouping was into two periods; 2009-2010 and 2011-2013. Results: Statistical methods were appropriate in only 13 studies (24.5%). The most common statistical tests applied were chi-square, log-rank, and Mann-Whitney tests. Four studies estimated sample size and/or power. Only 37.1% and 38.7% of dissertation results supported aims and answered the research questions, respectively. Most of results were misinterpreted (82.3%) with misuse of statistical terminology (77.4%). Tabular and graphical data display was independently informative in only 36 dissertations (58.1%) with accurate titles and labels in only 17 (27.4%). Statistical tests fulfilled the assumptions only in 29 studies; with evident misuse in 33. Ten dissertations reported non-significance regarding their primary outcome measure; the median power of the test was 35.5% (range: 6-60%). There was no significant change in the characteristics between the time periods. Conclusion: MD dissertations at NCI have many epidemiological and statistical defects that may compromise the external validity of the results. It is recommended to involve a biostatistician from the very start to improve study design, sample size calculation, end points estimation and measures. Creative Commons Attribution License

  20. Family history record and hereditary cancer risk perception according to National Cancer Institute criteria in a Spanish medical oncology service: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez-Rodas, Iván; López-Trabada, Daniel; Rupérez Blanco, Ana Belén; Custodio Cabello, Sara; Peligros Gómez, María Isabel; Orera Clemente, María; Calvo, Felipe A; Martín, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Identification of patients at risk of hereditary cancer is an essential component of oncology practice, since it enables clinicians to offer early detection and prevention programs. However, the large number of hereditary syndromes makes it difficult to take them all into account in daily practice. Consequently, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has suggested a series of criteria to guide initial suspicion. It was the aim of this study to assess the perception of the risk of hereditary cancer according to the NCI criteria in our medical oncology service. We retrospectively analyzed the recordings of the family history in new cancer patients seen in our medical oncology service from January to November 2009, only 1 year before the implementation of our multidisciplinary hereditary cancer program. The family history was recorded in only 175/621 (28%) patients. A total of 119 (19%) patients met 1 or more NCI criteria (1 criterion, n = 91; 2 criteria, n = 23; 3 criteria, n = 4; and 4 criteria, n = 1), and only 14 (11.4%) patients were referred to genetic counseling. This study shows that few clinicians record the family history. The perception of the risk of hereditary cancer is low according to the NCI criteria in our medical oncology service. These findings can be explained by the lack of a multidisciplinary hereditary cancer program when the study was performed. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.