WorldWideScience

Sample records for netherlands antilles caribbean

  1. 76 FR 68039 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Successor Entities to the Netherlands Antilles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-02

    ... Regulation; Successor Entities to the Netherlands Antilles AGENCIES: Department of Defense (DoD), General... status of the islands that comprised the Netherlands Antilles. DATES: Effective Date: November 2, 2011.... Background The Netherlands Antilles was designated as a beneficiary country under the Caribbean Basin...

  2. Coastal stratigraphies of eastern Bonaire (Netherlands Antilles): New insights into the palaeo-tsunami history of the southern Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Max; Brückner, Helmut; Wennrich, Volker; Scheffers, Anja; Kelletat, Dieter; Vött, Andreas; Schäbitz, Frank; Daut, Gerhard; Willershäuser, Timo; May, Simon Matthias

    2010-11-01

    A sediment record of three alluvial sites along the east- and northeast-oriented shore of Bonaire (Netherlands Antilles) provides evidence for the recurrence of several extraordinary wave impacts during the Holocene. The interpretation of onshore high-energy wave deposits is controversially discussed in recent sedimentary research. However, it represents a powerful tool to evaluate the hazard of tsunami and severe storms where historical documentation is short and/or fragmentary. A facies model was established based on sedimentary and geochemical characteristics as well as the assemblage and state of preservation of shells and shell fragments. Radiocarbon data and the comparison of the facies model with both recent local hurricane deposits and global "tsunami signature types" point to the occurrence of three major wave events around 3300, 2000-1700 and shortly before 500 BP. Since (i) the stratigraphically correlated sand layers fulfill several sedimentary characteristics commonly associated with tsunamis and (ii) modern strong hurricanes left only little or even no sediment in the study areas, they were interpreted as tsunamigenic. However, surges largely exceeding the energy of those accompanying modern hurricanes in the southern Caribbean cannot entirely be ruled out. The results are partially consistent with existing chronologies for Holocene extreme wave events deduced from supralittoral coarse-clast deposits on Aruba, Bonaire and Curaçao as well as overwash sediments from Cayo Sal, Venezuela.

  3. The incidence of anorexia nervosa in Netherlands Antilles immigrants in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoeken, Daphne; Veling, Wim; Smink, Frederique R. E.; Hoek, Hans W.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Previously we found that the incidence of anorexia nervosa (AN) in the general population was much lower in the Netherlands Antilles than in the Netherlands. As a follow-up we compared the incidence of AN in the Netherlands in persons from the Netherlands Antilles to native Dutch. Method:

  4. Preliminary assessment of sponge biodiversity on Saba Bank, Netherlands Antilles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W Thacker

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Saba Bank Atoll, Netherlands Antilles, is one of the three largest atolls on Earth and provides habitat for an extensive coral reef community. To improve our knowledge of this vast marine resource, a survey of biodiversity at Saba Bank included a multi-disciplinary team that sampled fishes, mollusks, crustaceans, macroalgae, and sponges. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A single member of the dive team conducted surveys of sponge biodiversity during eight dives at six locations, at depths ranging from 15 to 30 m. This preliminary assessment documented the presence of 45 species pooled across multiple locations. Rarefaction analysis estimated that only 48 to 84% of species diversity was sampled by this limited effort, clearly indicating a need for additional surveys. An analysis of historical collections from Saba and Saba Bank revealed an additional 36 species, yielding a total of 81 sponge species recorded from this area. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This observed species composition is similar to that found on widespread Caribbean reefs, indicating that the sponge fauna of Saba Bank is broadly representative of the Caribbean as a whole. A robust population of the giant barrel sponge, Xestospongia muta, appeared healthy with none of the signs of disease or bleaching reported from other Caribbean reefs; however, more recent reports of anchor chain damage to these sponges suggests that human activities can have dramatic impacts on these communities. Opportunities to protect this extremely large habitat should be pursued, as Saba Bank may serve as a significant reservoir of sponge species diversity.

  5. Oceanographic data collected during the Bonaire 2008: Exploring Coral Reef Sustainability with New Technologies (bonaire2008) on Fetch1 AUV and Gavia AUV's in Netherlands, Antilles from January 6, 2008 - January 29, 2008 (NODC Accession 0072312)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles, is arguably the most pristine coral reef environment in the Caribbean. The percent coral cover is the highest and percent algal cover...

  6. The Shallow-Water Stony Corals of the Netherlands Antilles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, P.J.

    1971-01-01

    Although the corals and reefs of Curaçao are fairly well known (VAN DER HORST 1927, Roos 1964, 1967), information about coral growth around the other islands of the Netherlands Antilles is still lacking. This paper offers the first comprehensive study of the reef corals of this area: Aruba, Curaçao

  7. Situation Reports--Bahamas, Brasil, Guatemala, Netherlands Antilles (Curacao), Uruguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Planned Parenthood Federation, London (England).

    Data relating to population and family planning in four foreign countries are presented in these situation reports. Countries included are Bahamas, Guatemala, Netherlands Antilles (Curacao), and Uruguay. Information is provided under two topics, general background and family planning situation, where appropriate and if it is available. General…

  8. Preliminary Assessment of Sponge Biodiversity on Saba Bank, Netherlands Antilles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thacker, R.W.; Díaz, M.C.; de Voogd, N.J.; van Soest, R.W.M.; Freeman, C.J.; Mobley, A.S.; LaPietra, J.; Cope, K.; McKenna, S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Saba Bank Atoll, Netherlands Antilles, is one of the three largest atolls on Earth and provides habitat for an extensive coral reef community. To improve our knowledge of this vast marine resource, a survey of biodiversity at Saba Bank included a multi-disciplinary team that sampled

  9. Scale insects from the Netherlands Antilles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reyne, A.

    1964-01-01

    The following species have been reported from the Netherlands’ Antilles: Margarodes formicarum Guilding, collected in 1884 or 1885 by Prof. W. F. R. Suringar in Curaçao; specimens in the State Museum of Natural History at Leiden. Protortonia cacti (Linn.), collected in 1756 by Daniel Rolander in St.

  10. HIV Transmission Patterns Among The Netherlands, Suriname, and The Netherlands Antilles: A Molecular Epidemiological Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, Merlijn A.; Cornelissen, Marion; Paraskevis, Dimitrios; Prins, Maria; Coutinho, Roel A.; van Sighem, Ard I.; Sabajo, Lesley; Duits, Ashley J.; Winkel, Cai N.; Prins, Jan M.; van der Ende, Marchina E.; Kauffmann, Robert H.; Op de Coul, Eline L.

    2011-01-01

    We aimed to study patterns of HIV transmission among Suriname, The Netherlands Antilles, and The Netherlands. Fragments of env, gag, and pol genes of 55 HIV-infected Surinamese, Antillean, and Dutch heterosexuals living in The Netherlands and 72 HIV-infected heterosexuals living in Suriname and the

  11. 76 FR 38053 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Successor Entities to the Netherlands Antilles...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-29

    ... Regulation Supplement; Successor Entities to the Netherlands Antilles (DFARS Case 2011-D029) AGENCY: Defense... the change in the political status of the islands that comprised the Netherlands Antilles. DATES... became autonomous territories of the Kingdom of the Netherlands. Bonaire, Saba, and Sint Eustatius now...

  12. Biodiversity Assessment of the Fishes of Saba Bank Atoll, Netherlands Antilles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jeffrey T.; Carpenter, Kent E.; Van Tassell, James L.; Hoetjes, Paul; Toller, Wes; Etnoyer, Peter; Smith, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Biodiversity surveys were conducted on Saba Bank, Netherlands Antilles, to assess ichthyofaunal richness and to compare with published surveys of other Caribbean localities. The primary objective was to estimate the total species richness of the Saba Bank ichthyofauna. A variety of sampling techniques was utilized to survey the fish species of both the visually accessible megafauna and the camouflaged and small-sized species comprising the cryptic ichthyofauna. Based on results presented herein, the number of species known on Saba Bank is increased from 42 previously known species to 270 species. Expected species-accumulation curves demonstrate that the current estimate of species richness of fishes for Saba Bank under represents the actual richness, and our knowledge of the ichthyofauna has not plateaued. The total expected fish-species richness may be somewhere between 320 and 411 species. The Saba Bank ichthyofaunal assemblage is compared to fish assemblages found elsewhere in the Caribbean. Despite the absence of shallow or emergent shore habitats like mangroves, Saba Bank ranks as having the eighth highest ichthyofaunal richness of surveyed localities in the Greater Caribbean. Some degree of habitat heterogeneity was evident. Fore-reef, patch-reef, and lagoonal habitats were sampled. Fish assemblages were significantly different between habitats. Species richness was highest on the fore reef, but 11 species were found only at lagoonal sites. A comprehensive, annotated list of the fishes currently known to occur on Saba Bank, Netherland Antilles, is provided and color photographs of freshly collected specimens are presented for 165 of the listed species of Saba Bank fishes to facilitate identification and taxonomic comparison with similar taxa at other localities. Coloration of some species is shown for the first time. Preliminary analysis indicates that at least six undescribed new species were collected during the survey and these are indicated in the

  13. Biodiversity assessment of the fishes of Saba Bank atoll, Netherlands Antilles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jeffrey T; Carpenter, Kent E; Van Tassell, James L; Hoetjes, Paul; Toller, Wes; Etnoyer, Peter; Smith, Michael

    2010-05-21

    Biodiversity surveys were conducted on Saba Bank, Netherlands Antilles, to assess ichthyofaunal richness and to compare with published surveys of other Caribbean localities. The primary objective was to estimate the total species richness of the Saba Bank ichthyofauna. A variety of sampling techniques was utilized to survey the fish species of both the visually accessible megafauna and the camouflaged and small-sized species comprising the cryptic ichthyofauna.Based on results presented herein, the number of species known on Saba Bank is increased from 42 previously known species to 270 species. Expected species-accumulation curves demonstrate that the current estimate of species richness of fishes for Saba Bank under represents the actual richness, and our knowledge of the ichthyofauna has not plateaued. The total expected fish-species richness may be somewhere between 320 and 411 species.The Saba Bank ichthyofaunal assemblage is compared to fish assemblages found elsewhere in the Caribbean. Despite the absence of shallow or emergent shore habitats like mangroves, Saba Bank ranks as having the eighth highest ichthyofaunal richness of surveyed localities in the Greater Caribbean. Some degree of habitat heterogeneity was evident. Fore-reef, patch-reef, and lagoonal habitats were sampled. Fish assemblages were significantly different between habitats. Species richness was highest on the fore reef, but 11 species were found only at lagoonal sites.A comprehensive, annotated list of the fishes currently known to occur on Saba Bank, Netherland Antilles, is provided and color photographs of freshly collected specimens are presented for 165 of the listed species of Saba Bank fishes to facilitate identification and taxonomic comparison with similar taxa at other localities. Coloration of some species is shown for the first time. Preliminary analysis indicates that at least six undescribed new species were collected during the survey and these are indicated in the annotated

  14. Biodiversity assessment of the fishes of Saba Bank atoll, Netherlands Antilles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey T Williams

    Full Text Available Biodiversity surveys were conducted on Saba Bank, Netherlands Antilles, to assess ichthyofaunal richness and to compare with published surveys of other Caribbean localities. The primary objective was to estimate the total species richness of the Saba Bank ichthyofauna. A variety of sampling techniques was utilized to survey the fish species of both the visually accessible megafauna and the camouflaged and small-sized species comprising the cryptic ichthyofauna.Based on results presented herein, the number of species known on Saba Bank is increased from 42 previously known species to 270 species. Expected species-accumulation curves demonstrate that the current estimate of species richness of fishes for Saba Bank under represents the actual richness, and our knowledge of the ichthyofauna has not plateaued. The total expected fish-species richness may be somewhere between 320 and 411 species.The Saba Bank ichthyofaunal assemblage is compared to fish assemblages found elsewhere in the Caribbean. Despite the absence of shallow or emergent shore habitats like mangroves, Saba Bank ranks as having the eighth highest ichthyofaunal richness of surveyed localities in the Greater Caribbean. Some degree of habitat heterogeneity was evident. Fore-reef, patch-reef, and lagoonal habitats were sampled. Fish assemblages were significantly different between habitats. Species richness was highest on the fore reef, but 11 species were found only at lagoonal sites.A comprehensive, annotated list of the fishes currently known to occur on Saba Bank, Netherland Antilles, is provided and color photographs of freshly collected specimens are presented for 165 of the listed species of Saba Bank fishes to facilitate identification and taxonomic comparison with similar taxa at other localities. Coloration of some species is shown for the first time. Preliminary analysis indicates that at least six undescribed new species were collected during the survey and these are

  15. Late Cretaceous-Early Tertiary paleomagnetism of Aruba and Bonaire (Netherlands Leeward Antilles)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, Carola; Mauk, Frederick J.; van der Voo, Rob

    1982-02-01

    For a paleomagnetic study of the Upper Cretaceous of the Netherlands Leeward Antilles, we have analyzed 187 oriented samples from the complex norite-tonalite batholith and the diabase-schist-tuff formation on Aruba and 44 oriented samples from various igneous units of the Washikemba Formation on Bonaire. Both alternating field and thermal demagnetization procedures were used to demagnetize the samples. Most of the cores yielded univectorial Zijderveld diagrams above 10-20 mT or 400° C. Virtual geomagnetic poles calculated from site means were then compared with equivalently aged poles for cratonic South America and other Caribbean sites. The Washikemba Formation of Bonaire and the diabase-schist-tuff formation of Aruba yield poles that are similar to those of Guajira (Colombia) and the Caribbean Mountains of northern Venezuela, whereas they are rotated approximately 90° with respect to the pole for stable South America. The batholith on Aruba yields a pole which is rotated clockwise over approximately 20° with respect to the South American pole. Thus, our data strongly support the hypothesis that Aruba and Bonaire have been rotated clockwise by as much as 90° since the Late Cretaceous. In addition, paleolatitudes calculated from the inclinations of the paleomagnetic vectors suggest that there was a northward drift with respect to South America of perhaps as much as 10° of the islands during the rotation, although this can hardly be called a statistically significant amount.

  16. [Pre-trial psychiatric reports on Antillean suspected offenders in the Netherlands and on the Dutch Antilles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinkers, D J; Heytel, F G M; Matroos, G M; Hermans, K M; Hoek, H W

    2010-01-01

    The registered criminality among Antilleans living in the Netherlands is much higher than among Antilleans living on the Dutch Antilles (113 offences and 11 offences respectively, per year per 1000 persons, ppre-trail assessments there seems to be little difference in the prevalence of mental disorders in Antillean suspects in the Netherlands and on the Dutch Antilles.

  17. Beyond the Mayan Lowlands: impacts of the Terminal Classic Drought in the Caribbean Antilles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Chad S.; Horn, Sally P.; Kerr, Matthew T.

    2014-02-01

    High-resolution paleoclimate records from the Mayan Lowlands and the Cariaco Basin have shown that the collapse of the Mayan socio-political structure at the end of the Classic period ˜1000 C.E. was linked to a series of severe, multi-decadal drought events, collectively termed the 'Terminal Classic Drought' (TCD), between ˜750 and 1100 C.E. Here we present proxy evidence indicating that increased aridity leading up to and during the TCD also strongly affected the Caribbean Antilles. Additionally, the timing of the TCD corresponds with cultural and demographic shifts in the Greater Antilles, including the appearance of Ostionoid cultural traditions, the colonization of new islands, and the intensification of agriculture. We propose that these multi-decadal droughts affected not only the very large and complex socio-political structures governing large populations like that of the Late Classic Maya, but also smaller and less politically complex societies across the Caribbean. However, instead of resulting in societal collapses as suspected in the Mayan Lowlands, these climatic events may have spurred a cultural transition across the Caribbean Antilles that ultimately led to the development of Taíno cultural traditions encountered by Christopher Columbus upon his arrival in 1492 C.E.

  18. Molecular Evidence for Dissemination of Unique Campylobacter jejuni Clones in Curaçao, Netherlands Antilles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duim, B.; Godschalk, P.C.R.; Braak, N. van den; Dingle, K.E.; Dijkstra, J.R.; Leyde, E.; Plas, J. van der; Colles, F.M.; Endtz, H.P.; Wagenaar, J.A.; Maiden, M.C.J.; Belkum, A. van

    2003-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni isolates (n = 234) associated with gastroenteritis and the Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) in the island of Curaçao, Netherlands Antilles, and collected from March 1999 to March 2000 were investigated by a range of molecular typing techniques. Data obtained by pulsed-field gel

  19. Rapid assessment of octocoral diversity and habitat on Saba Bank, Netherlands Antilles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J Etnoyer

    Full Text Available Saba Bank is a large submerged platform (approximately 2200 km(2, average depth 30 m, located 4 km southwest of Saba Island in Netherlands Antilles, Caribbean Sea. Ships traveling to and from oil terminals on nearby St. Eustatius routinely anchor on the Bank, damaging benthic megafauna. Gorgonian octocorals are vulnerable to anchor damage, and they are common and conspicuous in shallow water (15-50 m around the banks. This prompted a rapid assessment of octocoral habitat and diversity. The primary objectives were to estimate total species richness and to characterize habitats vis a vis gorgonians. Landsat imagery and multibeam bathymetry were employed to identify random sites for quantitative transects. A Seabotix LBV200L remotely operated vehicle (ROV and SCUBA were used to collect and survey to 130 m. A total of 14 scuba dives and 3 ROV dives were completed in 10 days. During that time, 48 octocoral species were collected, including two likely undescribed species in the genera Pterogorgia and Lytreia. Gorgonian richness was exceptional, but not all species were collected, because the species accumulation curve remained steeply inclined after all surveys. Two shallow-water gorgonian habitat types were identified using multidimensional scaling and hierarchical cluster analyses: 1 a high diversity, high density fore-reef environment characterized by Eunicea spp., Gorgonia spp., and Pseudopterogorgia spp. and 2 a low diversity, low density plateau environment characterized by Pseudopterogorgia acerosa, Pterogorgia guadalupensis, and Gorgonia mariae. The analyses support hypotheses of broad (approximately 15 km habitat homogeneity (ANOSIM, P>0.05, but a significant difference between fore-reef and plateau environments (ANOSIM, P<0.05. However, there was some indication of habitat heterogeneity along the 15 km study section of the 50 km platform edge along the southeast rim. Our results highlight the complexity and biodiversity of the Saba Bank, and

  20. Reef fishes of Saba Bank, Netherlands Antilles: assemblage structure across a gradient of habitat types.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wes Toller

    Full Text Available Saba Bank is a 2,200 km(2 submerged carbonate platform in the northeastern Caribbean Sea off Saba Island, Netherlands Antilles. The presence of reef-like geomorphic features and significant shelf edge coral development on Saba Bank have led to the conclusion that it is an actively growing, though wholly submerged, coral reef atoll. However, little information exists on the composition of benthic communities or associated reef fish assemblages of Saba Bank. We selected a 40 km(2 area of the bank for an exploratory study. Habitat and reef fish assemblages were investigated in five shallow-water benthic habitat types that form a gradient from Saba Bank shelf edge to lagoon. Significant coral cover was restricted to fore reef habitat (average cover 11.5% and outer reef flat habitat (2.4% and declined to near zero in habitats of the central lagoon zone. Macroalgae dominated benthic cover in all habitats (average cover: 32.5--48.1% but dominant algal genera differed among habitats. A total of 97 fish species were recorded. The composition of Saba Bank fish assemblages differed among habitat types. Highest fish density and diversity occurred in the outer reef flat, fore reef and inner reef flat habitats. Biomass estimates for commercially valued species in the reef zone (fore reef and reef flat habitats ranged between 52 and 83 g/m(2. The composition of Saba Bank fish assemblages reflects the absence of important nursery habitats, as well as the effects of past fishing. The relatively high abundance of large predatory fish (i.e. groupers and sharks, which is generally considered an indicator of good ecosystem health for tropical reef systems, shows that an intact trophic network is still present on Saba Bank.

  1. Shoreline changes and high-energy wave impacts at the leeward coast of Bonaire (Netherlands Antilles)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Max; Brückner, Helmut; Messenzehl, Karoline; Frenzel, Peter; May, Simon Matthias; Scheffers, Anja; Scheffers, Sander; Wennrich, Volker; Kelletat, Dieter

    2012-10-01

    Supralittoral coarse-clast deposits along the shores of Bonaire (Netherlands Antilles) as well as increased hurricane frequency during the past decade testify to the major hazard of high-energy wave impacts in the southern Caribbean. Since deducing certain events from the subaerial coarse-clast record involves major uncertainties and historical reports are restricted to the past 500 years, we use a new set of vibracore and push core data (i) to contribute to a more reliable Holocene history of regional extreme-wave events and (ii) to evaluate their impact on shoreline evolution. Multi-proxy palaeoenvironmental analyses (XRF, XRD, grain size distribution, carbonate, LOI, microfossils) were carried out using nearshore sedimentary archives from the sheltered western (leeward) side of Bonaire and its small neighbour Klein Bonaire. In combination with 14C-AMS age estimates the stratigraphy reflects a long-term coastal evolution controlled by relative sea level rise, longshore sediment transport, and short-term morphodynamic impulses by extreme wave action, all three of which may have significantly influenced the development of polyhaline lagoons and the demise of mangrove populations. Extreme wave events may be categorized into major episodic incidents (c. 3.6 ka [?] BP; 3.2-3.0 ka BP; 2.0-1.8 ka BP; post-1.3 ka [?] BP), which may correspond to tsunamis and periodic events recurring on the order of decades to centuries, which we interpret as severe tropical cyclones. Extreme wave events seem to control to a certain extent the formation of coastal ridges on Bonaire and, thus, to cause abrupt shifts in the long-term morphodynamic and ecological boundary conditions of the circumlittoral inland bays.

  2. Genetic Diversity in the Lesser Antilles and Its Implications for the Settlement of the Caribbean Basin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jada Benn Torres

    Full Text Available Historical discourses about the Caribbean often chronicle West African and European influence to the general neglect of indigenous people's contributions to the contemporary region. Consequently, demographic histories of Caribbean people prior to and after European contact are not well understood. Although archeological evidence suggests that the Lesser Antilles were populated in a series of northward and eastern migratory waves, many questions remain regarding the relationship of the Caribbean migrants to other indigenous people of South and Central America and changes to the demography of indigenous communities post-European contact. To explore these issues, we analyzed mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosome diversity in 12 unrelated individuals from the First Peoples Community in Arima, Trinidad, and 43 unrelated Garifuna individuals residing in St. Vincent. In this community-sanctioned research, we detected maternal indigenous ancestry in 42% of the participants, with the remainder having haplotypes indicative of African and South Asian maternal ancestry. Analysis of Y-chromosome variation revealed paternal indigenous American ancestry indicated by the presence of haplogroup Q-M3 in 28% of the male participants from both communities, with the remainder possessing either African or European haplogroups. This finding is the first report of indigenous American paternal ancestry among indigenous populations in this region of the Caribbean. Overall, this study illustrates the role of the region's first peoples in shaping the genetic diversity seen in contemporary Caribbean populations.

  3. GPS Constraints on Lesser Antilles Forearc Motion and Rigid Caribbean Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, A. M.; Stein, S.; Sella, G.; Dixon, T. H.; Calais, E.; Jansma, P. E.

    2005-05-01

    We are using a decade of Global Positioning System data to address two tectonic problems of the Caribbean (CA) plate; 1) Whether a forearc sliver exists along the Lesser Antilles forearc and if so what is its dynamics and location, and 2) Whether the Caribbean plate is deforming internally. We approach this problem by developing GPS-derived velocity vectors at sites within the CA plate and its boundaries and comparing them to four decades of earthquake data. In a number of subduction zones, misfits between slip vectors and predicted convergence azimuths from Euler vectors suggest the presence of a forearc sliver, where trench-parallel motion is accommodated along a strike-slip fault system. Such a situation may be occurring at the eastern boundary of the CA plate along the Lesser Antilles (LA) forearc, where the North America (NA) plate subducts obliquely. Comparing slip vectors of shallow (0-60 km) thrust events to the predicted motions of GPS-based Euler vectors show a systematic northerly misfit, suggesting a trench-parallel component of motion taken up by the forearc sliver. This possibility can be tested with GPS data from the forearc. In addition, we use new GPS data to constrain the internal rigidity of the plate. Previous GPS work yielded a possible upper bound on internal deformation of 4-6 mm/yr. With an expansion in the data set on critically located stations in the CA plate (SANA, ROJO, CRO1 and AVES), we have computed new sets of Euler vector pairs for the CA-NA and CA-South America plate pairs.

  4. Asteroids from the Netherlands Antilles and other Caribbean localities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ummels, F.

    1963-01-01

    The material brought back by Dr. P. WAGENAAR HUMMELINCK from his various trips to the West Indies includes a number of starfish, which — with exception of the specimens belonging to Astropectinidae, Echinasteridae and Goniasteridae — were given to the present author as a subject for taxonomic

  5. Culicinae from the Netherlands Antilles and some other Caribbean localities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuyp, van der Edwin

    1953-01-01

    Dr P. Wagenaar Hummelinck entrusted me with the identification of the mosquitoes he collected during his trips to the West Indies in 1936—1937 and 1948—1949. Although dr Hummelinck told me that it was not his intention to catch representative material, the present collection is of particular

  6. Structure and financing of nature management costs in Caribbean Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beek, van I.J.M.; Debrot, A.O.; Rockmann, C.; Jak, R.G.

    2015-01-01

    The Nature Policy Plan Caribbean Netherlands identifies the need to “Evaluate the financial instruments available for nature conservation in the Caribbean Netherlands and make recommendations aimed at guaranteeing a sustainable financial future” as one of its strategic actions. Three preceding

  7. High-energy wave deposits at the eastern shore of Bonaire (Netherlands Antilles)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, M.; Willershäuser, T.; Bolten, A.; Brückner, H.; Daut, G.; Wennrich, V.; Kelletat, D.; Scheffers, A.; Scheffers, S. R.; Schäbitz, F.

    2009-04-01

    The island of Bonaire is part of the Leeward Netherlands Antilles and lies 90 km off the Venezuelan coast. It mainly consists of two upper cretaceous cores of basalt, andesite, and dacite, fringed by a sequence of Quaternary marine limestone terraces. These well-defined platforms formed by in-situ growth of coral reefs and deposition of coral debris during high stands of sea level and subsequent exposure due to slow tectonic uplift. Bonaire has a semi-arid climate with an average annual precipitation of less than 500 mm, though large year-to-year variation occurs. Due to its peripheral position within the Caribbean hurricane belt the island rarely experiences severe storm events. Nevertheless, along the eastern windward coast several high-energy wave impacts of mid- to late Holocene age have created a well-diversified sedimentary record. Broad ramparts of imbricated coral rubble north of Lac Bai are 4 m high, proceed up to 400 m inland, and follow the shore over a distance of 12 km. Reef communities of the island's eastern sublittoral obviously never regenerated after their destruction during extreme wave events. Furthermore, massive boulders of up to 260 tons are distributed over the broad elevated Pleistocene reef platform deriving from the foreshore zone (Scheffers et al., 2008). The windward nearshore morphological depressions provide excellent conditions for preserving sedimentary inputs of exceptionally large wave impacts. We carried out numerous vibracorings and gravity corings inside shallow sinkholes on the Pleistocene terrace north of Lac Bai and the landward floodplain of the Lagun embayment at Washikemba. Several vibracorings of up to 5 m below surface at Lagun show multiple interruptions of continuous sedimentation patterns by poorly-sorted shell hash within a carbonate-rich matrix of marine origin. The lowermost bioclastic unit dates back before 6000 BP. Within a superimposed layer of pure mangrove peat another cluster of shells, partly broken, is

  8. 76 FR 54928 - Export Administration Regulations: Netherlands Antilles, Curaçao, Sint Maarten and Timor-Leste

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-06

    ... Regulations: Netherlands Antilles, Cura ao, Sint Maarten and Timor-Leste AGENCY: Bureau of Industry and... Commerce Country Chart. This rule also revises the name ``East Timor'' to read ``Timor- Leste'' throughout... Commerce Country Chart as ``East Timor'' should instead be referred to by its proper name, which is ``Timor...

  9. Notes on marine fishes from the Netherlands Antilles, with the description of a new species, Eutyx tumidifrons (Brotulidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeseman, M.

    1960-01-01

    A small number of fishes from the Netherlands Antilles has been collected and recently presented to the Leiden Museum by Dr. J. S. Zaneveld, Head of the Biology Department, College of William and Mary, Norfolk, Va., formerly Director of the Caraibisch Marien Biologisch Instituut, Curaçao; and Dr. L.

  10. On the water relation in limestone and diabase vegetation in the Leeward Islands of the Netherlands Antilles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoffers, A.L.; Mansour Elassaiss, C.J.A.

    1967-01-01

    In a same macroclimate on the islands of the Leeward Group of the Netherlands Antilles two types of vegetation are chiefly found. A vegetation pertaining to the dry evergreen formation series on limestone and a vegetation on diabase belonging to the seasonal formation series. Study was made of the

  11. Description of extreme-wave deposits on the northern coast of Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Steven G.; Jaffe, Bruce E.; Morton, Robert A.; Richmond, Bruce M.; Gelfencaum, Guy

    2010-01-01

    To develop a better understanding of the origins of extreme-wave deposits and to help assess the potential risk of future overwash events, a field mapping survey was conducted in November 2006 on the northern coast of Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles. Deposits were mapped and analyzed to help develop a systematic sedimentological approach to distinguish the type of extreme-wave event (tsunamis or storms) or combination of events that formed and modified the deposits over time. Extreme-wave deposits on the northern coast of Bonaire between Boka Onima and Boka Olivia have formed sand sheets, poly-modal ridge complexes, and boulder fields on a Pleistocene limestone platform 3?8 meters above sea level. The deposits exhibit characteristics that are consistent with both large storm and tsunami processes that often overlap one another. Sand sheets occur as low-relief features underlying and incorporated with boulder field deposits. The seaward edge of ridge complexes are deposited up to 70 m from the shoreline and can extend over 200 m inland. Over 600 clasts were measured in fields and range in size from coarse gravel to fine block, weigh up to 165 metric tons, and are placed over 280 m from the shoreline. Our analyses indicate that the deposits may have been produced by a combination of hurricane and tsunami events spanning 10s to 1000s of years. Comparing the different deposit morphologies between study sites highlights the importance of shoreline orientation to the distribution of extreme-wave deposits onshore. However, further investigation is required to fully understand the processes that have produced and modified these deposits over time.

  12. Description of extreme-wave deposits on the northern coast of Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, S. G.; Jaffe, B. E.; Morton, R. A.; Richmond, B. M.; Gelfenbaum, G. R.; Coastal; Marine Geology Program

    2010-12-01

    To develop a better understanding of the origins of extreme-wave deposits and to help assess the potential risk of future overwash events, a field mapping survey was conducted in November 2006 on the northern coast of Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles. Deposits were mapped and analyzed to help develop a systematic sedimentological approach to distinguish the type of extreme-wave event (tsunamis or storms) or combination of events that formed and modified the deposits over time. Extreme-wave deposits on the northern coast of Bonaire between Boka Onima and Boka Olivia have formed sand sheets, ridge complexes composed of polymodal clasts, and boulder fields on a Pleistocene limestone platform that is roughly 3-6 meters above sea level. The deposits exhibit characteristics that are consistent with both large storm and tsunami processes that often overlap one another. Sand sheets occur as low-relief features underlying and incorporated with boulder field deposits. The seaward edge of ridge complexes are deposited up to 70 m from the shoreline and can extend over 200 m inland. Over 600 clasts were measured in fields and range in size from coarse gravel to fine block, weigh up to 165 metric tons, and are placed over 280 m from the shoreline. Our analyses indicate that the deposits may have been produced by a combination of hurricane and tsunami events spanning 10s’ to 1000s’ of years. Comparing the different deposit morphologies between study sites highlights the importance of shoreline orientation to the distribution of extreme-wave deposits onshore. However, further investigation is required to fully understand the processes that have produced and modified these deposits over time.

  13. Polyplacophora of the Caribbean Region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaas, P.

    1972-01-01

    The present monograph has been drawn up chiefly from material collected by Dr. P. WAGENAAR HUMMELINCK, secretary of the Foundation for Scientific Research in Surinam and the Netherlands Antilles, during his trips to the Caribbean in 1936/37, 1948/49, 1955, 1963, and 1967. This collection comprises

  14. Additions to the marine algal flora of Curaçao, Netherlands Antilles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegenga, H.; Vroman, M.

    1988-01-01

    Nine species of benthic marine algae are reported from the Caribbean island of Curaçao for the first time: Chlorophyta: Derbesia marina and Trichosolen longipedicellata; Phaeophyta: Ectocarpus rhodochortonoides, Feldmannia elachistaeformis, Hecatonema floridanum, Herponema tortugense and Sphacelaria

  15. Rapid assessment of stony coral richness and condition on Saba Bank, Netherlands Antilles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila A McKenna

    Full Text Available The benthic habitats of Saba Bank (17 degrees 25'N, 63 degrees 30'W are at risk from maritime traffic, especially oil tankers (e.g., anchoring. To mitigate this risk, information is needed on the biodiversity and location of habitats to develop a zone use plan. A rapid survey to document the biodiversity of macro-algae, sponges, corals and fishes was conducted. Here we report on the richness and condition of stony coral species at 18 select sites, and we test for the effects of bottom type, depth, and distance from platform edge. Species richness was visually assessed by roving scuba diver with voucher specimens of each species collected. Coral tissue was examined for bleaching and diseases. Thirty-three coral species were documented. There were no significant differences in coral composition among bottom types or depth classes (ANOSIM, P>0.05. There was a significant difference between sites (ANOSIM, P<0.05 near and far from the platform edge. The number of coral species observed ranged from zero and one in algal dominated habitats to 23 at a reef habitat on the southern edge of the Bank. Five reef sites had stands of Acropora cervicornis, a critically endangered species on the IUCN redlist. Bleaching was evident at 82% of the sites assessed with 43 colonies bleached. Only three coral colonies were observed to have disease. Combining our findings with that of other studies, a total of 43 species have been documented from Saba Bank. The coral assemblage on the bank is representative and typical of those found elsewhere in the Caribbean. Although our findings will help develop effective protection, more information is needed on Saba Bank to create a comprehensive zone use plan. Nevertheless, immediate action is warranted to protect the diverse coral reef habitats documented here, especially those containing A. cervicornis.

  16. How a collaborative integrated taxonomic effort has trained new spongiologists and improved knowledge of Martinique Island (French Antilles, eastern Caribbean Sea) marine biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Thierry; Díaz, Maria-Cristina; Ruiz, César; Cóndor-Luján, Baslavi; Klautau, Michelle; Hajdu, Eduardo; Lobo-Hajdu, Gisele; Zea, Sven; Pomponi, Shirley A; Thacker, Robert W; Carteron, Sophie; Tollu, Guillaume; Pouget-Cuvelier, Adeline; Thélamon, Philippe; Marechal, Jean-Philippe; Thomas, Olivier P; Ereskovsky, Alexander V; Vacelet, Jean; Boury-Esnault, Nicole

    2017-01-01

    Although sponges are important components of benthic ecosystems of the Caribbean Sea, their diversity remained poorly investigated in the Lesser Antilles. By organizing a training course in Martinique, we wanted both to promote taxonomy and to provide a first inventory of the sponge diversity on this island. The course was like a naturalist expedition, with a field laboratory and a classroom nearby. Early-career scientists and environmental managers were trained in sponge taxonomy. We gathered unpublished data and conducted an inventory at 13 coastal sites. We explored only shallow water habitats (0-30 m), such as mangroves, reefs or rocky bottoms and underwater caves. According to this study, the sponge fauna of Martinique is currently represented by a minimum of 191 species, 134 of which we could assign species names. One third of the remaining non-identified sponge species we consider to be new to science. Martinique appears very remarkable because of its littoral marine fauna harboring sponge aggregations with high biomass and species diversity dominating over coral species. In mangroves, sponges cover about 10% of the surface of subtidal roots. Several submarine caves are true reservoirs of hidden and insufficiently described sponge diversity. Thanks to this new collaborative effort, the Eastern Caribbean has gained a significant increase of knowledge, with sponge diversity of this area potentially representing 40% of the total in the Caribbean Sea. We thus demonstrated the importance of developing exploratory and educational research in areas historically devoid of biodiversity inventories and systematics studies. Finally, we believe in the necessity to consider not only the number of species but their distribution in space to evaluate their putative contribution to ecosystem services and our willingness to preserve them.

  17. How a collaborative integrated taxonomic effort has trained new spongiologists and improved knowledge of Martinique Island (French Antilles, eastern Caribbean Sea) marine biodiversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Although sponges are important components of benthic ecosystems of the Caribbean Sea, their diversity remained poorly investigated in the Lesser Antilles. By organizing a training course in Martinique, we wanted both to promote taxonomy and to provide a first inventory of the sponge diversity on this island. The course was like a naturalist expedition, with a field laboratory and a classroom nearby. Early-career scientists and environmental managers were trained in sponge taxonomy. We gathered unpublished data and conducted an inventory at 13 coastal sites. We explored only shallow water habitats (0–30 m), such as mangroves, reefs or rocky bottoms and underwater caves. According to this study, the sponge fauna of Martinique is currently represented by a minimum of 191 species, 134 of which we could assign species names. One third of the remaining non-identified sponge species we consider to be new to science. Martinique appears very remarkable because of its littoral marine fauna harboring sponge aggregations with high biomass and species diversity dominating over coral species. In mangroves, sponges cover about 10% of the surface of subtidal roots. Several submarine caves are true reservoirs of hidden and insufficiently described sponge diversity. Thanks to this new collaborative effort, the Eastern Caribbean has gained a significant increase of knowledge, with sponge diversity of this area potentially representing 40% of the total in the Caribbean Sea. We thus demonstrated the importance of developing exploratory and educational research in areas historically devoid of biodiversity inventories and systematics studies. Finally, we believe in the necessity to consider not only the number of species but their distribution in space to evaluate their putative contribution to ecosystem services and our willingness to preserve them. PMID:28329020

  18. How a collaborative integrated taxonomic effort has trained new spongiologists and improved knowledge of Martinique Island (French Antilles, eastern Caribbean Sea marine biodiversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry Pérez

    Full Text Available Although sponges are important components of benthic ecosystems of the Caribbean Sea, their diversity remained poorly investigated in the Lesser Antilles. By organizing a training course in Martinique, we wanted both to promote taxonomy and to provide a first inventory of the sponge diversity on this island. The course was like a naturalist expedition, with a field laboratory and a classroom nearby. Early-career scientists and environmental managers were trained in sponge taxonomy. We gathered unpublished data and conducted an inventory at 13 coastal sites. We explored only shallow water habitats (0-30 m, such as mangroves, reefs or rocky bottoms and underwater caves. According to this study, the sponge fauna of Martinique is currently represented by a minimum of 191 species, 134 of which we could assign species names. One third of the remaining non-identified sponge species we consider to be new to science. Martinique appears very remarkable because of its littoral marine fauna harboring sponge aggregations with high biomass and species diversity dominating over coral species. In mangroves, sponges cover about 10% of the surface of subtidal roots. Several submarine caves are true reservoirs of hidden and insufficiently described sponge diversity. Thanks to this new collaborative effort, the Eastern Caribbean has gained a significant increase of knowledge, with sponge diversity of this area potentially representing 40% of the total in the Caribbean Sea. We thus demonstrated the importance of developing exploratory and educational research in areas historically devoid of biodiversity inventories and systematics studies. Finally, we believe in the necessity to consider not only the number of species but their distribution in space to evaluate their putative contribution to ecosystem services and our willingness to preserve them.

  19. Thermochronology and Tectonics of the Leeward Antilles: evolution of the Southern Caribbean Plate Boundary Zone and accretion of the Bonaire Block

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Lelij, Roelant; Spikings, Richard; Kerr, Andrew; Kounov, Alexandre; Cosca, Michael; Chew, David; Villagomez, Diego

    2010-05-01

    Tectonic reconstructions of the Caribbean Plate are severely hampered by a paucity of geochronologic and exhumation constraints from anastomosed basement blocks along its southern margin. New zircon U/Pb, 40Ar/39Ar, apatite fission track and apatite (U-Th)/He data constrain quantitative thermal and exhumation histories, which have been used to propose a model for the tectonic evolution of the emergent parts of the Bonaire Block, and the Southern Caribbean Plate Boundary Zone. An east-facing arc system intruded through an oceanic plateau during ~90 to ~87 Ma, and crops out on Aruba. Subsequent structural displacements resulted in >80°C of cooling on Aruba during 70-60 Ma. In contrast, exhumation of the island arc sequence exposed on Bonaire occurred at 85-80 Ma and 55-45 Ma. Santonian exhumation on Bonaire occurred immediately subsequent to burial metamorphism and may have been driven by the collision of a west-facing island arc with the Caribbean Plate. Island-arc rocks intruded oceanic plateau rocks on Gran Roque at ~65 Ma and exhumed rapidly at 55-45 Ma. We attribute Maastrichtian - Danian exhumation on Aruba and early Eocene exhumation on Bonaire and Gran Roque to sequential diachronous accretion of their basement units to the South American Plate. Widespread unconformities indicate late Eocene subaerial exposure. Late Oligocene - early Miocene dextral transtension within the Bonaire block drove subsidence and burial of crystalline basement rocks of the Leeward Antilles to ≤1 km. Late Miocene - recent transpression caused inversion and ≤1 km of exhumation, possibly as a result of the northwards escape of the Maracaibo Block.

  20. Exploration of Caribbean Seamounts within the Greater and Lesser Antilles Transition Zone: Characterization of the Benthic Ecology and Geology

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Within the Caribbean region, numerous unexplored seamounts punctuate the seafloor holding records of geologic, biologic and oceanographic processes over different...

  1. Waist circumference as a measurement of obesity in the Netherlands Antilles; associations with hypertension and diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grievink, L.; Alberts, J.F.; O'Neil, J.; Gerstenbluth, I.

    Objectives: To evaluate waist circumference ( WC) as a screening tool for obesity in a Caribbean population. To identify risk groups with a high prevalence of ( central) obesity in a Caribbean population, and to evaluate associations between ( central) obesity and self-reported hypertension and

  2. Post-breeding migration routes of marine turtles from Bonaire and Klein Bonaire, Caribbean Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Becking, L.E.; Christianen, M.J.A.; Nava, M.I.; Miller, N; Willis, S.; Dam, van, M.F.N.

    2016-01-01

    The management of small rookeries is key to conserving the regional genetic diversity of marine turtle populations and requires knowledge on population connectivity between breeding and foraging areas. To elucidate the geographic scope of the populations of marine turtles breeding at Bonaire and Klein Bonaire (Caribbean Netherlands) we examined the post-breeding migratory behavior of 5 female loggerheads Caretta caretta, 4 female green turtles Chelonia mydas, and 2 male and 13 female hawksbil...

  3. Electron spin resonance and radiocarbon dating of coral deposited by Holocene tsunami events on Curaçao, Bonaire and Aruba (Netherlands Antilles)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Ulrich; Schellmann, Gerhard; Scheffers, Anja; Kelletat, Dieter; Kromer, Bernd; Uwe Kasper, Haino

    2003-05-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) dating of coral has become an efficient geochronological tool for studying the last 500,000 years. This study presents results of ESR dating of Holocene coral from Curaçao, Bonaire and Aruba, Leeward Netherlands Antilles. The coral accumulated in rubble ridges and ramparts onshore and the depositional process is attributed to a series of tsunami events. In addition to the calculation of equivalent dose ( DE) values, it is crucial for ESR dating to obtain the correct D0 value for each sample. The annual dose rate ( D0) estimation of the samples in this study is uncertain as the timing of the tsunami event and the residence time of a component of the dated sediment in different environments (marine versus terrestrial) is difficult to quantify. Assuming that the tsunami event deposited coral shortly after death, the ESR and 14C ages of 22 samples reaching from 3650 to 128 years correspond well with each other. This confirms the idea that the living coral reef was partly destroyed by tsunami events. The ESR dating uncertainties coincide with the variability of 14C ages caused by the marine reservoir effect. The local marine reservoir effect was estimated using four recent samples from 1920 and provided values between 375 and 595 yr BP.

  4. The relevance of cultural factors in predicting condom-use intentions among immigrants from the Netherlands Antilles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kocken, P.L.; Dorst, A.G. van; Schaalma, H.

    2006-01-01

    A study into the relevance of cultural factors in predicting condom-use intentions among Antillean migrants in the Netherlands is described in this article. The association between the intention to use condoms with a new sexual partner and a perceived taboo on discussing sex, beliefs about sex

  5. HIV-related stigma in African and Afro-Caribbean communities in the Netherlands: manifestations, consequences and coping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stutterheim, S.E.; Bos, A.E.R.; Shiripinda, I.; de Bruin, M.; Pryor, J.B.; Schaalma, H.P.

    2012-01-01

    HIV-related stigma in African and Afro-Caribbean diaspora communities in the Netherlands was investigated. Interviews with HIV-positive and HIV-negative community members demonstrated that HIV-related stigma manifests as social distance, physical distance, words and silence. The psychological

  6. HIV-related stigma in African and Afro-Caribbean communities in the Netherlands: Manifestations, consequences and coping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stutterheim, S.E.; Bos, A.E.R.; Shiripinda, I.; Bruin, M. de; Pryor, J.B.; Schaalma, H.P.

    2012-01-01

    HIV-related stigma in African and Afro-Caribbean diaspora communities in the Netherlands was investigated. Interviews with HIV-positive and HIV-negative community members demonstrated that HIV-related stigma manifests as social distance, physical distance, words and silence. The psychological

  7. Relationship between anthropogenic impacts and bleaching-associated tissue mortality of corals in Curaçao (Netherlands Antilles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Nagelkerken

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic anthropogenic impacts can have a negative effect on coral health and on coral energy budgets needed for regeneration of lesions. I therefore hypothesise that during massive bleaching events, the degree of corals showing bleaching-related tissue mortality is higher in areas subject to chronic anthropogenic impacts than in relatively pristine areas. In the present study, the degree of bleaching and bleaching-related tissue mortality was estimated for eight abundant coral species in Curaçao, at the onset of a massive Caribbean bleaching event in 1995, and three months afterwards. To study the possible effects of anthropogenic disturbances, the study was done at four unpolluted control sites, two polluted sites (sedimentation, sewage, and four sites at the mouth of lagoons with outflow of nutrient-rich, warm and turbid seawater. No pattern of an overall difference in bleaching between impacted and control sites was found for the degree of bleaching. However, the percentage of corals showing bleaching-related tissue mortality was higher at the impacted sites than at the control sites for the total number of corals and for corals with Los impactos antropogénicos crónicos pueden tener efectos negativos en la salud y en las cantidades de energía necesarias para la regeneración de lesiones en los corales. Mi hipótesis fue que durante los casos de blanqueamiento masivo, el grado en que los corales muestren mortalidades de tejido relacionadas con el blanqueamiento, será mayor en áreas sujetas a impactos antropogénicos crónicos que en áreas relativamente prístinas. Estimé los grados de blanqueamiento y mortalidad tisular en ocho especies de coral abundantes en Curaçao, durante el comienzo de un de blanqueamiento masivo en el Caribe en 1995 y tres meses después. El estudio se realizó en cuatro sitios control no contaminados, dos sitios contaminados (sedimentación, aguas residuales, y cuatro sitios en la boca de lagunas con aguas

  8. HIV status disclosure among HIV-positive African and Afro-Caribbean people in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutterheim, Sarah E; Shiripinda, Iris; Bos, Arjan E R; Pryor, John B; de Bruin, Marijn; Nellen, Jeannine F J B; Kok, Gerjo; Prins, Jan M; Schaalma, Herman P

    2011-02-01

    HIV status disclosure is often characterized as a dilemma. On the one hand, disclosure can promote health, social support, and psychological well-being. On the other, disclosure can lead to stigmatization, rejection, and other negative social interactions. Previous research has shown that HIV status disclosure is a reasoned process whereby the costs and benefits to oneself and to others are weighed. As such, understanding disclosure requires understanding the reasons for and against disclosure employed by people living with HIV (PLWH). In this study, disclosure among a population disproportionately affected by HIV in the Netherlands, namely African and Afro-Caribbean diaspora, was investigated. Reasons for nondisclosure were fear of stigmatization, previous negative experiences with disclosure, having observed the stigmatization of other PLWH, shame, the desire to protect others - particularly one's children and family - from stigmatization by association and/or worrying, and the belief that one's HIV status is a private matter. Participants reported disclosing because they were in a close and supportive relationship, disclosure led to emotional release, disclosure could lead to emotional or financial support, they felt a perceived duty to inform, and they had a desire to educate others about sexual risk-taking. The findings suggest that stigma plays an important role in disclosure decisions among these populations. They further point to a need for HIV-related stigma reduction interventions in African and Afro-Caribbean communities and culturally sensitive counseling for PLWH whereby caregivers do not automatically assume that disclosure is best but rather provide a safe environment in which the costs and benefits of disclosure can be weighed and strategies for disclosure can be developed, if perceived as beneficial by PLWH.

  9. Diversity of trophic niches among herbivorous fishes on a Caribbean reef (Guadeloupe, Lesser Antilles), evidenced by stable isotope and gut content analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dromard, Charlotte R.; Bouchon-Navaro, Yolande; Harmelin-Vivien, Mireille; Bouchon, Claude

    2015-01-01

    While herbivorous fishes have been widely studied due to the major ecological role they play on coral reefs, the description of their trophic niche remains challenging. In this study, we asked how 10 species of parrotfishes and surgeonfishes partition trophic resources on a Caribbean reef. The determination of trophic niches was conducted using gut and stomach content and stable isotope analyses (15N:14N and 13C:12C ratios). The contributions of food source to fish diet were calculated with concentration-dependent mixing models. Stomach content analyses distinguished two species of Acanthuridae from other fish species: Acanthurus coeruleus due to its high ingestion of fleshy macroalgae and Acanthurus chirurgus due to its high ingestion of calcified macroalgae. Acanthuridae and Sparisoma aurofrenatum presented similar diets in terms of assimilation of food resources with a high contribution of detritus and invertebrates to their diets. The diets of Sparisoma rubripinne and Sparisoma chrysopterum were more heterogeneous by comparison to the previous species. Scarus iseri, Scarus vetula, Scarus taeniopterus and Sparisoma viride appeared to share a similar trophic niche characterized by the contribution of live coral and fleshy macroalgae to their diet. The resource use among herbivorous fishes was partially related to the nutritional quality of food sources, but also to their physical structure and the capacity of fish to process them efficiently. These results showed that the ten species occupy distinct trophic niches, indicating a high functional diversity among the Caribbean herbivorous fishes.

  10. Elemental, Hf-Nd isotopic and geochronological constraints on an island arc sequence associated with the Cretaceous Caribbean plateau: Bonaire, Dutch Antilles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, P. M. E.; Kempton, P. D.; White, R. V.; Saunders, A. D.; Kerr, A. C.; Tarney, J.; Pringle, M. S.

    2004-05-01

    On the Caribbean margins, Upper Cretaceous oceanic plateaux fragments are juxtaposed with island arc fragments of a similar age; until this study, the relationship between them was unknown. This work represents the first detailed study of one such island arc sequence, the Bonaire Washikemba Formation (BWF). These rocks display typical arc-like trace element and Hf-Nd isotopic characteristics (negative Nb and Ta anomalies, ɛHf of +12 to +14, ɛNd of +6.5 to +8). They show no indication for the involvement of oceanic plateau material in their source. This is confirmed by binary mixing hyperbolae, which indicate that the Hf-Nd isotopic composition can be modelled by mixing of the whole rock, signifying that whole-rock Sr isotope ratios have been affected by alteration processes. New 40Ar- 39Ar ages indicate that the Formation is at least 96±4 Ma, which is older than the main phase of the Caribbean plateau (88-91 Ma). Together, the data presented in this study suggest that the Bonaire Washikemba Formation is part of an intra-oceanic arc unrelated to the Carribean plateau, but the Carribean plateau is probably indirectly responsible for the transport and ultimate preservation of this arc sequence.

  11. HIV-related stigma in African and Afro-Caribbean communities in the Netherlands: manifestations, consequences and coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutterheim, Sarah E; Bos, Arjan E R; Shiripinda, Iris; de Bruin, Marijn; Pryor, John B; Schaalma, Herman P

    2012-01-01

    HIV-related stigma in African and Afro-Caribbean diaspora communities in the Netherlands was investigated. Interviews with HIV-positive and HIV-negative community members demonstrated that HIV-related stigma manifests as social distance, physical distance, words and silence. The psychological consequences of HIV-related stigma among those diagnosed with HIV reported were emotional pain, sadness, loneliness, anger, frustration and internalised stigma. The social consequences included decreased social network size, limited social support and social isolation, and resulted from not only enacted stigma but also self-imposed social withdrawal. Also, poor treatment adherence was a health-related consequence. People living with HIV employed both problem-focused and emotion-focused coping strategies to mitigate the negative consequences of stigma. Problem-focused coping strategies included selective disclosure, disengagement, affiliating with similar others, seeking social support and, to a lesser extent, activism. Emotion-focused strategies included distraction, positive reappraisal, religious coping, external attributions, disidentification and acceptance. HIV-related stigma clearly permeates African and Afro-Caribbean communities in the Netherlands, and should be targeted for intervention.

  12. Acculturation and education level in relation to quality of the diet: a study of Surinamese South Asian and Afro-Caribbean residents of the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolaou, M.; van Dam, R. M.; Stronks, K.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To consider the changes in overall diet quality following migration we examined the associations of acculturation variables and education level with diet in Surinamese South Asian and Surinamese Afro-Caribbean origin on the one hand, and ethnic Dutch residents of the Netherlands on the

  13. New geographic records of Hamlets, Hypoplectrus spp. (Serranidae), in the Caribbean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, E.H.; Bunkley-Williams, L.; Rogers, C.S.; Fenner, R.

    2006-01-01

    The exact number of species of hamlets, Hypoplectrus spp., in the Caribbean is controversial and the geographic distributions of these species/forms are poorly documented. We report Curac??ao, Netherlands Antilles, as a new locality for the Barred Hamlet, H. puella (Cuvier), and Shy Hamlet, H. guttavarius (Poey); and St. John and St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands, for the Tan Hamlet, Hypoplectrus sp. The Black Hamlet, H. nigricans (Poey), has previously been reported from Curac??ao, but we did not see it there.

  14. Benthic Macrofaunal Communities at Newly Explored Caribbean Seamounts in the Greater/Lesser Antilles Transition Zone and a Comparison to Nearby Habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demopoulos, A. W.; Bourque, J. R.; Cordes, E. E.; Chaytor, J. D.; Quattrini, A.

    2016-02-01

    Seamounts are topographically and oceanographically complex features with environmental characteristics, including substrate types, carbon flux, and current patterns, that vary greatly within and among seamounts. While seamounts are reputed to be oases and biodiversity hotspots, comparisons across multiple spatial scales of a seamount chain have yet to be explored. Along the margins of the Caribbean Sea basin, numerous seamounts punctuate the seafloor. In 2013 and 2014, we investigated the deep-sea benthic community ecology at Noroît, Dog, and Conrad Seamounts and nearby ridge, bank, and rift environments at depths ranging from 630 to 2930 m. Sediment push cores were collected to quantify macrofaunal (> 300 μm) density, diversity, community composition, grain size, and organic content. In addition, environmental data collected from CTDs and extracted from high resolution multibeam mapping efforts (e.g. slope, rugosity, roughness, slope orientation), allowed us to evaluate the role of microhabitats in structuring these communities. Preliminary results indicate that macrofaunal density across all sites decreased with depth in both seamount and non-seamount sediments, with the highest densities occurring in non-seamount environments. However, macrofaunal density patterns varied on individual seamounts. Macrofaunal densities on shallow seamounts (Conrad and Dog) increased with depth, whereas densities decreased with depth on the deeper Noroît seamount. The relationship between environmental parameters and macrofaunal community structure and biodiversity varied among seamounts and non-seamount environments. This study represents the first investigation of seamount infauna in the region and places this baseline information on seamount faunal biodiversity, spatial distribution of taxa, and overall ecology into a broader biogeographic context.

  15. Is there a northern Lesser Antilles forearc block?

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, A. M.; Stein, S.; Dixon, T.; Sella, G.; Calais, E.; Jansma, P.; Weber, J.; LaFemina, P.

    2006-04-01

    A systematic discrepancy exists between slip vectors of thrust fault earthquakes at the Lesser Antilles trench (LAT) and the predicted direction of North American-Caribbean convergence. A possibility has been that the discrepancy resulted because neither was well constrained. Estimating Caribbean motion has been challenging owing to the limited data along the plate's complex boundaries. Similarly, earlier studies had few slip vectors because interplate thrust events are infrequent. To address these difficulties, we estimate a new Caribbean-North America Euler vector using recently available GPS data from sites in the presumably stable interior of the Caribbean, and compare the predicted velocities to a larger set of slip vectors. The discrepancy persists, suggesting the northern Lesser Antilles forearc (NLAF) moves as a distinct entity from both the Caribbean and North America. For simplicity, we treat its motion as a coherent block, but because GPS sites are not within the NLAF, distributed deformation is also possible. Although there is no geologic evidence for the boundaries of the presumed NLAF block, GPS data show that the motions of Martinique, Barbados, and Trinidad are similar to that of the Caribbean, suggesting that none are on the NLAF block, and the southern LAT is weakly coupled.

  16. Evaluation of tsunami risk in the Lesser Antilles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Zahibo

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this study is to give the preliminary estimates of the tsunami risks for the Lesser Antilles. We investigated the available data of the tsunamis in the French West Indies using the historical data and catalogue of the tsunamis in the Lesser Antilles. In total, twenty-four (24 tsunamis were recorded in this area for last 400 years; sixteen (16 events of the seismic origin, five (5 events of volcanic origin and three (3 events of unknown source. Most of the tsunamigenic earthquakes (13 occurred in the Caribbean, and three tsunamis were generated during far away earthquakes (near the coasts of Portugal and Costa Rica. The estimates of tsunami risk are based on a preliminary analysis of the seismicity of the Caribbean area and the historical data of tsunamis. In particular, we investigate the occurrence of historical extreme runup tsunami data on Guadeloupe, and these data are revised after a survey in Guadeloupe.

  17. Rodents of the Caribbean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabre, Pierre-Henri; Mouatt, Julia Thidamarth Vilstrup; Raghavan, Maanasa

    2014-01-01

    The Capromyidae (hutias) are endemic rodents of the Caribbean and represent a model of dispersal for non-flying mammals in the Greater Antilles. This family has experienced severe extinctions during the Holocene and its phylogenetic affinities with respect to other caviomorph relatives are still ...... (Bahamas, Cuba, Jamaica) hutias. Recent divergences among these western hutias suggest Plio-Pleistocene dispersal waves associated with glacial cycles....

  18. Shallow-water Pycnogonida from Barbados, Lesser Antilles with description of Anoplodactylus justi n. sp.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, Hans-Georg

    1992-01-01

    MÜLLER, HANS-GEORG. Shallow-water Pycnogonida from Barbados, Lesser Antilles with description of Anoplodactylus Justi N. Sp., Studies Nat. Hist. Caribbean Region 71, Amsterdam 1992: 42-52. Eleven species of shallow-water Pycnogonida, one of which ( Anoplodactylus justi n. sp.) new to science, are

  19. Teredolites longissimus Kelly & Bromley from the Miocene Grand Bay Formation of Carriacou, the Grenadines, Lesser Antilles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pickerill, R.K.; Donovan, S.K.; Portell, R.W.

    2003-01-01

    The ichnotaxon Teredolites Leymerie, 1842, represented by T. longissimus Kelly & Bromley, 1984, is documented for the first time from the Lesser Antilles. Its occurrence also represents the first record of the ichnotaxon from the Miocene of the Caribbean. Five specimens, each occurring in isolation

  20. Ophiuroidea of the Lesser Antilles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parslow, Rosemary E.; Clark, Ailsa M.

    1963-01-01

    This paper deals mainly with a collection of ophiuroids from the Lesser Antilles sent to the British Museum (Natural History) by Dr. P. WAGENAAR HUMMELINCK in 1959. The identifications were made by ROSEMARY PARSLOW, but the discussion and figures of Amphiodia and Ophiocomella are by AILSA CLARK. The

  1. Acculturation and education level in relation to quality of the diet: a study of Surinamese South Asian and Afro-Caribbean residents of the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaou, M; van Dam, R M; Stronks, K

    2006-10-01

    To consider the changes in overall diet quality following migration we examined the associations of acculturation variables and education level with diet in Surinamese South Asian and Surinamese Afro-Caribbean origin on the one hand, and ethnic Dutch residents of the Netherlands on the other. Surinam is a former Dutch colony in South America. We randomly selected men and women aged 35-60 years: ethnic Dutch, n = 552; South Asian, n = 306; Afro-Caribbean, n = 660. Intakes of fruit, vegetables, red meat, fish, vegetable oils, breakfast and salt were measured using a short questionnaire that formed the basis for a 'diet quality indicator' score. Highest education was measured and acculturation of the Surinamese groups was assessed by age at migration, number of resident years and a scale measure of social contacts with ethnic Dutch. Compared with ethnic Dutch, both Surinamese groups scored higher on overall diet quality (P Education was positively associated with diet quality in ethnic Dutch (P quality aspects of the diet. Residence duration (mean = 22 years) and age at migration (mean = 21 years) were not associated with diet. A greater degree of acculturation does not necessarily lead to a less healthful diet in migrants. In addition, the association of education level with diet may differ for migrant groups. The diet of migrants differ from host populations, suggesting that migrant groups should be considered in the development of nutrition health promotion activities.

  2. A multiscale analysis of the stability of Caribbean coastal ecosystems through the biogeomorphic modelling of its complex bays and inlets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Candy, A.S.; Pietrzak, J.D.; Zijlema, M.

    2017-01-01

    The Dutch Caribbean consists of two island groups, the Leeward Antilles off the Venezuelan coast separated from the Windward Islands east of Puerto Rico over distances of the scale of the Caribbean Sea itself. Climate change in the Caribbean Sea is predicted to lead to rising sea levels, warming

  3. Beliefs Contributing to HIV-related Stigma in African and Afro-Caribbean Communities in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stutterheim, S.E.; Bos, A.E.R.; Kesteren, N.M.C. van; Shiripinda, I.; Pryor, J.B.; Bruin, M. de; Schaalma, H.P.

    2012-01-01

    Thirty years after the first diagnosis, people living with HIV (PLWH) around the world continue to report stigmatizing experiences. In this study, beliefs contributing to HIV-related stigma in African and Afro-Caribbean diaspora communities and their cultural context were explored through

  4. Resource and habitat sharing by the stoplight parrotfish, Sparisoma viride, a Caribbean reef herbivore

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rooij, J.M.; deJong, E; Vaandrager, F; Videler, J.J.

    We compare the vertical distribution, substrate preferences, grazing behaviour and social interactions of the stoplight parrotfish, Sparisoma viride, with that of other scarids at a fringing reef off Bonaire (Netherlands Antilles). Earlier reports that S. viride only displays territorial behaviour

  5. An analysis of community perceptions of mosquito-borne disease control and prevention in Sint Eustatius, Caribbean Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, Teresa E; Carson, Marianne; Coeverden, Els van; De Klein, Kirsten; Braks, Marieta; Krumeich, Anja

    2017-01-01

    In the Caribbean, mosquito-borne diseases are a public health threat. In Sint Eustatius, dengue, Chikungunya and Zika are now endemic. To control and prevent mosquito-borne diseases, the Sint Eustatius Public Health Department relies on the community to assist with the control of Aedes aegypti mosquito. Unfortunately, community based interventions are not always simple, as community perceptions and responses shape actions and influence behavioural responses Objective: The aim of this study was to determine how the Sint Eustatius population perceives the Aedes aegypti mosquito, mosquito-borne diseases and prevention and control measures and hypothesized that increased knowledge of the virus, vector, control and prevention should result in a lower AQ1 prevalence and incidence of mosquito-borne diseases. This study was conducted in Sint Eustatius island in the Eastern Caribbean. We combined qualitative and quantitative designs. We conducted interviews and focus groups discussions among community member and health professional in 2013 and 2015. We also conducted cross-sectional survey to assess local knowledge on the vector, virus, and control and prevention. The population is knowledgeable; ©however, mosquito-borne diseases are not the highest health priority. While local knowledge is sometimes put into action, it happens on the 20 household/individual level as opposed to the community level. After the 2014 CHIK outbreak, there was an increase in knowledge about mosquito control and mosquito-borne diseases. In the context of Sint Eustatius, when controlling the Aedes population it may be a strategic option to focus on the household level rather than the community and build collaborations with households by supporting them when they actively practice mosquito 25 control. To further increase the level of knowledge on the significance of mosquito-borne diseases, it may also be an option to contextualize the issue of the virus, vector, prevention and control into a

  6. Effect of Aseismic Ridge Subduction on Volcanism in the NE Lesser Antilles Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinton, A. J.; Hatfield, R. G.; McCanta, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    The interaction of aseismic ridges or buoyant crust in subduction zones can affect the volcanism occurring on the overriding plate. Here we describe the affect of the subduction of an aseismic ridge on volcanism in the NE Lesser Antilles. The Lesser Antilles island arc is a result of westward subduction of the North American plate beneath the Caribbean plate and stretches 800 km from Saba in the north to Grenada in the south. From Guadeloupe northwards, the arc bifurcates into an eastern, inactive arc (known as the Limestone Caribees) and a western, active arc (Volcanic Caribees). It has been suggested that this bifurcation is the result of the subduction of buoyant crust in the form of at least two aseismic ridges, in the North American plate. In 2012, IODP Expedition 340 recovered 130 m of core from site U1396, located 55 km SW of Montserrat, Lesser Antilles. The core contains a detailed record of volcanism, in the form of more than 180 tephra layers, that stretches back nearly 4.5 Ma. This is the longest and most complete record of volcanism for the NE Lesser Antilles and provides insight into the evolution and development of the island arc in this region. A variety of techniques are being applied to the tephra layers from U1396 to determine their age, chemistry, components and origin. Here we present preliminary results from paeleomagnetic age determinations for each tephra layer to show how the subduction of aseismic ridges on the North American plate has affected the rate of volcanism and development of the island arc in the NE Lesser Antilles over the last 4.5 Ma.

  7. Crustal structure of Guadeloupe Islands and the Lesser Antilles Arc from a new gravity and magnetic synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Gailler, Lydie; Bouchot, Vincent; Martelet, Guillaume; Thinon, Isabelle; Lebrun, Jean-Frédéric; Münch, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Guadeloupe Island (West French Indies) is one of the twenty islands that compose the Lesser Antilles Arc, which results from the subduction of the Atlantic Ocean plate beneath the Caribbean one. The island lies in a complex volcano-tectonic system and the need to understand its geological context has led to numerous on- and offshore geophysical investigations. This work presents the compilation and processing of available, on-land, airborne and marine, gravity and magnetic data acquired durin...

  8. Home-making of older Antillean migrants in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijering, Louise; Lager, Debbie

    A group of 141,345 immigrants from the Netherlands Antilles, a former colony, live in the Netherlands. An increasing number of these migrants are at or above retirement age, and for them, the question of where they want to grow old becomes relevant. It is important for people to age in a place where

  9. A hierarchical tectonic model of the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Malcolm I.; Scotese, Christopher R.

    1988-12-01

    A quantitative computer graphic methodology (hierarchical tectonic analysis) has been used to model the tectonic evolution of the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean region. This method employs a highly structured, hierarchical description of the relative motions of pairs of tectonic elements in order to quantify the timing and style of plate interactions. The main features described in this model are: (1) a revised fit of Pangea (2) the opening of the Gulf of Mexico in the Middle-Late Jurassic (3) the formation of a Proto-Caribbean Ocean due to the separation of North and South America during the Early Cretaceous (4) the formation of the Greater Antilles Arc along the western margin of the Proto-Caribbean Ocean (5) the insertion of the Farallon plate between North and South America during the Middle Cretaceous resulting in the northeastward advance of the Greater Antilles Arc and the subduction of Proto-Caribbean oceanic crust (6) the complete subduction of the Proto-Caribbean Ocean and the collision of the Greater Antilles arc with the Bahamas Platform in the Late Cretaceous (7) the truncation of the Caribbean section of the Farallon plate from its Pacific counterpart and the formation of the Panama Arc (latest Cretaceous), and (8) the westward movement of North and South America with respect to the Caribbean plate resulting in the opening of the Yucatan Basin (Paleocene) and subsequently in the evolution of the Cayman Trough and E-W zone of strike-slip.

  10. Tectonomagmatic setting and provenance of the Santa Marta Schists, northern Colombia: Insights on the growth and approach of Cretaceous Caribbean oceanic terranes to the South American continent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, A.; Valencia, V.; Bustamante, C.; García-Casco, A.; Ojeda, G.; Ruiz, J.; Saldarriaga, M.; Weber, M.

    2010-10-01

    Metamorphosed volcano-sedimentary rocks accreted to the northern South American continental margin are major vestiges of the Caribbean oceanic plate evolution and its interactions with the continent. Selected whole rock geochemistry, Nd-Sr isotopes and detrital zircon geochronology were obtained in metabasic and metasedimentary rocks from the Santa Marta and San Lorenzo Schists in northernmost Colombia. Trace element patterns are characterized by primitive island arc and MORB signatures. Similarly initial 87Sr/ 86Sr-ɛ Nd isotopic relations correlate with oceanic arcs and MORB reservoirs, suggesting that the protoliths were formed within a back-arc setting or at the transition between the inta-oceanic arc and the Caribbean oceanic crust. Trace element trends from associated metasedimentary rocks show that the provenance was controlled by a volcanic arc and a sialic continental domain, whereas detrital U/Pb zircons from the Santa Marta Schists and adjacent southeastern metamorphic units show Late Cretaceous and older Mesozoic, Late Paleozoic and Mesoproterozoic sources. Comparison with continental inland basins suggests that this arc-basin is allocthonous to its current position, and was still active by ca. 82 Ma. The geological features are comparable to other arc remnants found in northeastern Colombia and the Netherland Antilles. The geochemical and U/Pb detrital signatures from the metasedimentary rocks suggest that this tectonic domain was already in proximity to the continental margin, in a configuration similar to the modern Antilles or the Kermadec arc in the Pacific. The older continental detritus were derived from the ongoing Andean uplift feeding the intra-oceanic tectonic environment. Cross-cutting relations with granitoids and metamorphic ages suggest that metamorphism was completed by ca. 65 Ma.

  11. Marine macroalgal diversity assessment of Saba Bank, Netherlands Antilles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark M Littler

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Located in the Dutch Windward Islands, Saba Bank is a flat-topped seamount (20-45 m deep in the shallower regions. The primary goals of the survey were to improve knowledge of biodiversity for one of the world's most significant, but little-known, seamounts and to increase basic data and analyses to promote the development of an improved management plan. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our team of three divers used scuba to collect algal samples to depths of 50 m at 17 dive sites. Over 360 macrophyte specimens (12 putative new species were collected, more than 1,000 photographs were taken in truly exceptional habitats, and three astonishing new seaweed community types were discovered. These included: (1 "Field of Greens" (N 17 degrees 30.620', W 63 degrees 27.707' dominated by green seaweeds as well as some filamentous reds, (2 "Brown Town" (N 17 degrees 28.027', W 63 degrees 14.944' dominated by large brown algae, and (3 "Seaweed City" (N 17 degrees 26.485', W 63 degrees 16.850' with a diversity of spectacular fleshy red algae. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Dives to 30 m in the more two-dimensional interior habitats revealed particularly robust specimens of algae typical of shallower seagrass beds, but here in the total absence of any seagrasses (seagrasses generally do not grow below 20 m. Our preliminary estimate of the number of total seaweed species on Saba Bank ranges from a minimum of 150 to 200. Few filamentous and thin sheet forms indicative of stressed or physically disturbed environments were observed. A more precise number still awaits further microscopic and molecular examinations in the laboratory. The expedition, while intensive, has only scratched the surface of this unique submerged seamount/atoll.

  12. Anthicid Beetles from Venezuela, Colombia, Cuba, and the Netherlands Antilles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buck, F.D.

    1960-01-01

    The material of Anthicidae covered in this paper was taken by Prof. H. J. MAC GILLAVRY in 1930 and 1933, when being a studentmember of two geological excursions under the leadership of the late Prof. L. M. R. RUTTEN. It comprises ten species, three of which are new to science, viz. Formicillia

  13. Forearc kinematics in obliquely convergent margins: Examples from Nicaragua and the northern Lesser Antilles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Henry L., III

    In this study, I use surface velocities derived from GPS geodesy, elastic half-space dislocation models, and modeled Coulomb stress changes to investigate deformation in the over-riding plate at obliquely convergent margins at the leading and trailing edges of the Caribbean plate. The two principal study areas are western Nicaragua, where the Cocos plate subducts beneath the Caribbean plate, and the northern Lesser Antilles, where the North American plate subducts beneath the Caribbean plate. In Nicaragua, plate convergence is rapid at 84 mm yr1 with a small angle of obliquity of 10° along a slightly concave portion of the Middle America Trench. GPS velocities for the period from 2000 to 2004 from sites located in the Nicaraguan forearc confirmed forearc sliver motion on the order of ˜14 mm yr1 in close agreement with the value predicted by DeMets (2001). These results are presented here in Chapter 3 and were reported in Geophysical Research Letters (Turner et al., 2007). GPS observations made on sites located in the interior and on the eastern coast of Nicaragua during the same time period were combined with new data from eastern Honduras to help better constrain estimates of rigid Caribbean plate motion (DeMets et al., 2007). Slip approaching the plate convergence rate along the Nicaraguan and El Salvadoran sections of the Middle America Trench was quantitatively demonstrated by finite element modeling of this section of the plate interface using GPS velocities from our Nicaraguan network together with velocities from El Salvador and Honduras as model constraints (Correa-Mora, 2009). The MW 6.9 earthquake that ruptured the seismogenic zone offshore Nicaragua on October 9, 2004 resulted in coseismic displacements and post-seismic motion at GPS sites in the central part of the Nicaraguan forearc that currently prevent extension of interseismic time-series in this region. An elastic half-space dislocation model was used to estimate coseismic displacements at these

  14. Population Genetic Structure, Abundance, and Health Status of Two Dominant BenthicSpecies in the Saba Bank National Park, Caribbean Netherlands:

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bakker, D.M.; Meesters, E.H.W.G.; van Bleijswijk, J.D.L.; Luttikhuizen, P.C.; Breeuwer, H.J.A.J.; Becking, L.E.

    2016-01-01

    Saba Bank, a submerged atoll in the Caribbean Sea with an area of 2,200 km2, has attainedinternational conservation status due to the rich diversity of species that reside on the bank.In order to assess the role of Saba Bank as a potential reservoir of diversity for the surroundingreefs, we examined

  15. Crustal structure variations along the Lesser Antilles Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlaphorst, D.; Kendall, J. M.; Melekhova, E.; Blundy, J.; Baptie, B.; Latchman, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    Continental crust is predominantly formed along subduction zones. Therefore, an investigation of the crustal and mantle structure variation of these areas is crucial for understanding the growth of continental crust. This work deals with the seismological characteristics along the Lesser Antilles Arc, an island arc system built by the relatively slow subduction (~2cm/yr) of the North and South American plates beneath the Caribbean plate. The amount of subducted sediments changes significantly from sediment-rich subduction in the South to sediment-poor subduction in the North. The abundance of broadband seismic stations on the Lesser Antilles islands enables a range of seismic methods to be used to study arc processes. Furthermore, the abundance of cumulate samples allows for a detailed petrological analysis, which can be related to the seismological patterns. We use data from three component broadband stations located on the individual islands along the arc. From the island of Grenada in the South to the Virgin Islands in the North significant variations in sediment load, petrology and volcanism are observed along the arc. In this work, we investigate crustal structure using receiver functions to determine Moho depth and Vp/Vs ratio. The ratio gives an idea about the material of the subsurface as well as its water and its melt contents. The receiver functions are computed using the extended-time multitaper frequency domain cross-correlation receiver-function (ETMTRF) by Helffrich (2006). This method has the advantage of resistance to noise, which is helpful since most of the data around the arc will have been collected by stations close to the ocean, thus containing a large amount of noise. Our results show clear variations in these measurements. There are also regions where the Moho is not very sharp due to a low velocity contrast. The real data results were then compared to synthetic receiver functions from subsurface models. We compute a range of synthetic

  16. New geographic records of Hamlets, Hypoplectrus spp. (Serranidae, in the Caribbean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest H Williams, Jr

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The exact number of species of hamlets, Hypoplectrus spp., in the Caribbean is controversial and the geographic distributions of these species/forms are poorly documented. We report Curaçao, Netherlands Antilles, as a new locality for the Barred Hamlet, H. puella (Cuvier, and Shy Hamlet, H. guttavarius (Poey; and St. John and St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands, for the Tan Hamlet, Hypoplectrus sp. The Black Hamlet, H. nigricans (Poey, has previously been reported from Curaçao, but we did not see it there. Rev. Biol. Trop. 54 (Suppl. 3: 171-173. Epub 2007 Jan. 15.En el Caribe, el número exacto de especies de pez vaca, Hypoplectrus spp., es controversial y la distribución geográfica de estas especies/variedades está pobremente documentada. Presentamos Curaçao, Antillas Holandesas, como nueva localidad para el pez vaca de barras, H. puella (Cuvier y el vaca bicolor, H. guttavarius (Poey. Agregamos St. John y St. Thomas, Islas Vírgenes de los EUA, al ámbito del "Tan Hamlet", Hypoplectrus sp. Anteriormente se dijo que en Curaçao se halla el pez vaca negra, H. nigricans (Poey, pero no lo vimos en nuestros muestreos.

  17. Population Genetic Structure, Abundance, and Health Status of Two Dominant Benthic Species in the Saba Bank National Park, Caribbean Netherlands: Montastraea cavernosa and Xestospongia muta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didier M de Bakker

    Full Text Available Saba Bank, a submerged atoll in the Caribbean Sea with an area of 2,200 km2, has attained international conservation status due to the rich diversity of species that reside on the bank. In order to assess the role of Saba Bank as a potential reservoir of diversity for the surrounding reefs, we examined the population genetic structure, abundance and health status of two prominent benthic species, the coral Montastraea cavernosa and the sponge Xestospongia muta. Sequence data were collected from 34 colonies of M. cavernosa (nDNA ITS1-5.8S-ITS2; 892 bp and 68 X. muta sponges (mtDNA I3-M11 partition of COI; 544 bp on Saba Bank and around Saba Island, and compared with published data across the wider Caribbean. Our data indicate that there is genetic connectivity between populations on Saba Bank and the nearby Saba Island as well as multiple locations in the wider Caribbean, ranging in distance from 100s-1000s km. The genetic diversity of Saba Bank populations of M. cavernosa (π = 0.055 and X. muta (π = 0.0010 was comparable to those in other regions in the western Atlantic. Densities and health status were determined along 11 transects of 50 m2 along the south-eastern rim of Saba Bank. The densities of M. cavernosa (0.27 ind. m-2, 95% CI: 0.12-0.52 were average, while the densities of X. muta (0.09 ind. m-2, 95% CI: 0.02-0.32 were generally higher with respect to other Caribbean locations. No disease or bleaching was present in any of the specimens of the coral M. cavernosa, however, we did observe partial tissue loss (77.9% of samples as well as overgrowth (48.1%, predominantly by cyanobacteria. In contrast, the majority of observed X. muta (83.5% showed signs of presumed bleaching. The combined results of apparent gene flow among populations on Saba Bank and surrounding reefs, the high abundance and unique genetic diversity, indicate that Saba Bank could function as an important buffer for the region. Either as a natural source of larvae to

  18. Management plan for the natural resources of the EEZ of the Dutch Caribbean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meesters, H.W.G.; Slijkerman, D.M.E.; Graaf, de M.; Debrot, A.O.

    2010-01-01

    On the 10th of October 2010 the governmental entity known as the Netherlands Antilles is scheduled to cease to exist. Each island will aquire a new status within the kingdom. Following the declaration of an Exclusive Fishery Zone (EFZ) in 1993, an Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) has been declared in

  19. Environmental Influences on Caribbean Fish Catch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R. Jury

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A Caribbean fishery index is used to identify contrasting environmental conditions in atmosphere and ocean reanalysis fields associated with high- and low-catch years over the period 1971–2004. A number of composite features are noted: cooler surface temperatures and warmer, drier weather across the southern half of the Caribbean favors higher catch rates. There is a ridge of elevated sea level on 16°N. South of the ridge the Caribbean Current is strengthened while north of the ridge anomalous eastward currents flow past the Antilles Islands. The atmospheric Hadley circulation weakens in years of high catch and tropical cyclones are rare. This paper uncovers basin-scale forcing of aggregate fish catch, reflecting a north-south gradient in land-atmosphere hydrology, and composite oceanographic differences based on reanalysis data. In addition, seasonal and interannual cycles of ocean productivity are investigated using satellite ocean color. Summertime upwelling along the coast of Venezuela joins fresher waters from the North Brazil Current to infuse the Caribbean ecosystem with higher nutrients.

  20. Structural features and oil-and-gas bearing of the Caribbean region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabanbark, A.; Lobkovsky, L. I.

    2017-09-01

    The structure of the Caribbean region testifies to the extremely unstable condition of the terrestrial crust of this intercontinental and simultaneously interoceanic area. In the recent geological epoch, the Caribbean region is represented by a series of structural elements, the main of which are the Venezuelan and Colombian deep-sea suboceanic depressions, the Nicaraguan Rise, and the Greater and Lesser Antilles bordering the Caribbean Sea in the north and east. There are 63 sedimentary basins in the entire Caribbean region. However, only the Venezuelan and Colombian basins, the Miskito Basin in Nicaragua, and the northern and eastern shelves of the Antilles, Paria Bay, Barbodos-Tobago, and Grenada basins are promising in terms of oil-and-gas bearig. In the Colombian Basin, the southwestern part, located in the rift zone of the Gulf of Uraba, is the most promising. In the Venezuelan Basin, possible oil-and-gas-bearing basins showing little promise are assumed to be in the northern and eastern margins. The main potential of the eastern Caribbean region is attributed to the southern margin, at the shelf zone of which are the Tokuyo-Bonaire, Tuy-Cariaco, Margarita, Paria Bay, Barbados-Tobago, and Grenada oil-and-gas-bearing basins. The rest of the deepwater depressions of the Caribbean Sea show little promise for hydrocarbon research due to the small thickness of the deposits, their flat bedding, and probably a lack of fluid seals.

  1. High biomass and production but low energy transfer efficiency of Caribbean parrotfish : implications for trophic models of coral reefs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rooij, J.M.; Bruggemann, J.H; Videler, J.J

    1998-01-01

    Quantitative data are presented to assess the trophic role of scarids on the fringing coral reef of Bonaire (Netherlands Antilles): with particular emphasis on the stoplight parrotfish Sparisoma viride. Average herbivore biomass on the reef was 690 kg ha(-1), 22% of which was accounted for by S.

  2. High biomass and production but low energy transfer efficiency of Caribbean parrotfish: implications for trophic models of coral reefs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Rooij, J.M.; Videler, J.J.; Bruggemann, J.

    1998-01-01

    Quantitative data are presented to assess the trophic role of scarids on the fringing coral reef of Bonaire (Netherlands Antilles): with particular emphasis on the stoplight parrotfish Sparisoma viride. Average herbivore biomass on the reef was 690 kg ha(-1), 22% of which was accounted for by S.

  3. The 1843 earthquake: a maximising scenario for tsunami hazard assessment in the Northern Lesser Antilles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, Jean; Zahibo, Narcisse; Dudon, Bernard; Krien, Yann

    2013-04-01

    The French Caribbean Islands are located over the Lesser Antilles active subduction zone where a handful of earthquakes historically reached magnitude Mw=6.0 and more. According to available catalogs these earthquakes have been sometimes able to trigger devastating local or regional tsunamis, either directly by the shake or indirectly by induced landslides. For example, these islands have severely suffered during the Mw~7.5 Virgin Islands earthquake (1867) triggering several meters high waves in the whole Lesser Antilles Arc and, more recently, during the Mw=6.3 Les Saintes earthquake (2004) followed by a local 1 m high tsunami. However, in 1839 a Mw~7.5 subduction earthquake occured offshore Martinica followed a few years after by the more famous 1843 Mw~8.5 megathrust event, with an epicenter located approximately between Guadeloupe and Antigua, but both without any catastrophic tsunami being reported. In this study we discuss the potential impact of a maximum credible scenario of tsunami generation with such a Mw=8.5 rupture at the subduction interface using available geological information, numerical modeling of tsunami generation and propagation and high resolution bathymetric data within the framework of tsunami hazard assessment for the French West Indies. Despite the fact that the mystery remains unresolved concerning the lack of historical tsunami data especially for the 1843 event, modeling results show that the tsunami impact is not uniformly distributed in the whole archipelago and could show important heterogeneities in terms of maximum wave heights for specific places. This is easily explained by the bathymetry and the presence of several islands around the mainland leading to resonance phenomena, and because of the existence of a fringing coral reef surrounding partially those islands.

  4. Plate Coupling and Strain Partitioning in the Northeastern Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manaker, D.; Calais, E.; Jansma, P.; Mattioli, G.

    2006-12-01

    Major strike-slip faults commonly found on the margin of overriding plates in oblique subduction zone settings facilitate the partitioning of strain into trench-parallel and trench-normal tectonics. Their development has been proposed to be controlled by factors such as convergence obliquity, basal tractions, magnitude of slab-pull force, or strength of interplate coupling. In the northeastern Caribbean, the direction of GPS velocities and earthquake slip vectors suggests low coupling along the Puerto Rico and Lesser Antilles trenches, but strong coupling to the west along the Hispaniola margin, while the convergence obliquity remains constant. Coincidentally, large strike-slip faults in the overriding plate only develop in Hispaniola, which is also the locus of the largest historical subduction earthquakes in the Caribbean (M8.0, 1946-53 sequence). We investigate interplate coupling at the Caribbean-North American plate boundary using a model that allows for block rotations and elastic strain accumulation on partially coupled faults. Model parameters (block rotations and coupling on interplate faults) are derived from an inversion of earthquake slip vectors and new GPS data covering Haiti, the Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and the Lesser Antilles. We find that intraplate coupling is high in the western half of the domain, coincident with the development of large and fast-slipping strike-slip faults in the upper plate that partition the Carribean/North America plate motion, but low in its eastern half, along the Puerto Rico and Lesser Antilles subductions, that show little to no strain partitioning. This suggests that strain partitioning occur only if interplate coupling is large enough to effectively transfer shear stresses to the overriding plate.

  5. Remote sensing observations of the coherent and non-coherent ring structures in the vicinity of Lesser Antilles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Cruz Gómez

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The North Brazil Current Rings (NBCR penetration into the Caribbean Sea is being investigated by employing a merged altimeter-derived sea height anomaly (TOPEX/Poseidon, Jason-1 and ERS-1, 2, the ocean surface color data (SeaWiFS and Global Drifter Program information. Four strategies are being applied to process the data: (1 calculations of the Okubo-Weiss parameter for NBCR identification, (2 longitude-time plots (also known as Hovmöller diagrams, (3 two-dimensional Radon transforms and (4 two-dimensional Fourier transforms.

    A twofold NBCR structure has been detected in the region under investigation. The results have shown that NBC rings mainly propagate into the Caribbean Sea along two principal pathways (near 12° N and 17° N in the ring translation corridor. Thus, rings following the southern pathway in the fall-winter period can enter through very shallow southern straits as non-coherent structures. A different behavior is observed near the northern pathway (~17° N, where NBC rings are thought to have a coherent structure during their squeezing into the eastern Caribbean, i.e. conserving the principal characteristics of the incident rings. We attribute this difference in the rings' behavior to the vertical scales of the rings and to the bottom topography features in the vicinity of the Lesser Antilles.

  6. Caribbean Tourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosser, Robert

    1983-01-01

    Describes a teaching unit which explores the concept of development in a study of the Caribbean tourist industry. Intended for use by high school students, its purpose is to make students aware that development must not be equated with economic growth alone and that tourism brings both costs and benefits. (CS)

  7. Fall armyworm migration across the Lesser Antilles and the potential for genetic exchanges between North and South American populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodney N Nagoshi

    Full Text Available The fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith(Lepidoptera: Noctuidae, is an important agricultural pest of the Western Hemisphere noted for its broad host range, long distance flight capabilities, and a propensity to develop resistance to pesticides that includes a subset of those used in genetically modified corn varieties. These characteristics exacerbate the threat fall armyworm poses to agriculture, with the potential that a resistance trait arising in one geographical location could rapidly disseminate throughout the hemisphere. A region of particular concern is the Caribbean, where a line of islands that extends from Florida to Venezuela provides a potential migratory pathway between populations from North and South America that could allow for consistent and substantial genetic interactions. In this study, surveys of populations from Peru, Bolivia, Paraguay, and Trinidad & Tobago expand on previous work in South America that indicates a generally homogeneous population with respect to haplotype markers. This population differs from that found in most of the Lesser Antilles where a combination of genetic and meteorological observations is described that indicate fall armyworm migration from Puerto Rico to as far south as Barbados, but does not support significant incursion into Trinidad & Tobago and South America. Air transport projections demonstrate that the wind patterns in the Caribbean region are not conducive to consistent flight along the north-south orientation of the Lesser Antilles, supporting the conclusion that such migration is minor and sporadic, providing few opportunities for genetic exchanges. The implications of these findings on the dissemination of deleterious traits between the two Western Hemisphere continents are discussed.

  8. Fall armyworm migration across the Lesser Antilles and the potential for genetic exchanges between North and South American populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagoshi, Rodney N; Fleischer, Shelby; Meagher, Robert L; Hay-Roe, Mirian; Khan, Ayub; Murúa, M Gabriela; Silvie, Pierre; Vergara, Clorinda; Westbrook, John

    2017-01-01

    The fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith)(Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), is an important agricultural pest of the Western Hemisphere noted for its broad host range, long distance flight capabilities, and a propensity to develop resistance to pesticides that includes a subset of those used in genetically modified corn varieties. These characteristics exacerbate the threat fall armyworm poses to agriculture, with the potential that a resistance trait arising in one geographical location could rapidly disseminate throughout the hemisphere. A region of particular concern is the Caribbean, where a line of islands that extends from Florida to Venezuela provides a potential migratory pathway between populations from North and South America that could allow for consistent and substantial genetic interactions. In this study, surveys of populations from Peru, Bolivia, Paraguay, and Trinidad & Tobago expand on previous work in South America that indicates a generally homogeneous population with respect to haplotype markers. This population differs from that found in most of the Lesser Antilles where a combination of genetic and meteorological observations is described that indicate fall armyworm migration from Puerto Rico to as far south as Barbados, but does not support significant incursion into Trinidad & Tobago and South America. Air transport projections demonstrate that the wind patterns in the Caribbean region are not conducive to consistent flight along the north-south orientation of the Lesser Antilles, supporting the conclusion that such migration is minor and sporadic, providing few opportunities for genetic exchanges. The implications of these findings on the dissemination of deleterious traits between the two Western Hemisphere continents are discussed.

  9. Revisiting boulder fields on Bonaire (Leeward Antilles)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, M.; May, S. M.; Brückner, H.

    2012-04-01

    Blocks and boulders are typical sedimentary features of rocky shorelines worldwide. In many cases, their deposition is related to tsunamis or severe storms, though inferences of certain extreme wave events from the boulder record, and in particular the differentiation between storms and tsunamis, remain difficult. At the eastern coast of Bonaire (Leeward Antilles), numerous limestone boulders and blocks (up to approx. 130 t) are distributed on top of a 3 to 6 m a.s.l. (above mean sea level) palaeo-reef terrace. Disagreement exists among a number of scholars concerning the transport processes involved in the formation of these boulder fields. In this paper, numerical approaches of coastal boulder entrainment and transport were applied in order to provide new and more reliable data on their origin. To improve the reliability of the boulder transport model, more realistic input parameters were provided by DGPS measurements of the boulder dimensions (3D models by triangulation of point clouds using a GIS) and the calculation of bulk densities by taking into account the different coralline lithofacies of the reef-rock clasts. Boulder transport equations from literature were modified and now consider the irregular shape and real dimensions of the boulders and blocks. The results indicate that boulder weight and dimension, and thus calculated wave energy and wave heights were overestimated in most of the previous studies, where calculations of boulder volume were based on multiplication of the main axes. The results of this study and wave heights observed during recent high-magnitude hurricanes seem to rule out storm-generated waves for the dislocation of the largest boulders and blocks, and point to the occurrence of palaeo-tsunamis on Bonaire. However, the majority of coarse-clast deposits may have been generated by hurricane swells. The results underline the significance of more realistic field data in modelling boulder transport by waves.

  10. Provenance of the Eocene Soebi Blanco formation, Bonaire, Leeward Antilles: Correlations with post-Eocene tectonic evolution of northern South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, S.; Cardona, A.; Montes, C.; Valencia, V.; Vervoort, J.; Reiners, P.

    2014-07-01

    Middle to upper Eocene fluvial strata in the island of Bonaire contain detrital components that were tracked to Precambrian to Triassic massifs in northern Colombia and Venezuela. These detrital components confirm previous hypothesis suggesting that Bonaire and the Leeward Antilles were attached to South American basement massifs (SABM). These are composed of different fragmented South American blocks (Paraguana, Falcon, Maracaibo, Guajira, Perija, and Santa Marta) representing an Eocene, right-laterally displaced tectonic piercing point along the southern Caribbean plate margin. U-Pb LA-ICP-MS from the metamorphic boulders of the Soebi Blanco Formation in Bonaire yield Grenvillian peaks ages (1000-1200 Ma), while detrital zircons recovered from the sandy matrix of the conglomerates contain populations with peaks of 1000 Ma-1200 Ma, 750-950 Ma, and 200-300 Ma. These populations match with geochronological data reported for the northern South American massifs. Thermochronological results from the metamorphic clasts yield Paleocene-middle Eocene ages (65-50 Ma) that confirm a regional-scale cooling event in this time. These data imply a land connection between the SABM and the Leeward Antilles in late Eocene times, followed by a significant strike slip right-lateral displacement and transtensional basin opening starting in latest Eocene times. The succession of Eocene tectonic events recorded by the Soebi Blanco Formation and adjacent basins is a major tracer of the oblique convergence of the Caribbean plate against the South American margin.

  11. Records of Syrphidae (Diptera) from the Lesser Antilles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doesburg, van P.H.

    1970-01-01

    Having terminated his term of office as a Director of the Suriname Museum at Paramaribo, Dr. D. C. GEIJSKES returned to Holland. Accompanied by Mrs. GEIJSKES he availed himself of the opportunity to make a collecting-trip to several islands of the Windward Group of the Lesser Antilles, situated in a

  12. Hygrophoraceae of the Greater Antilles : Hygrocybe subgenus Hygrocybe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon A. Cantrell; D. Jean Lodge

    2000-01-01

    A key to six taxa of Hygrocybe, subgenus Hygrocybe, sections Chlorophanae and Hygrocybe is provided. One species is new and four species are reported for the first time from the Greater Antilles. The new species is H. chimaeroderma (section Chlarophanae). Hygrocybe acutoconica, H. calyptriformis and H. incolor (section Hygrocybe) are reported for the first time, and...

  13. Stone artefact production and exchange among the northern Lesser Antilles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knippenberg, Sebastiaan

    2006-01-01

    This work discusses the exchange of stone materials and artefacts among the northern Lesser Antilles during the Ceramic Age (500 BC - AD 1492). Through the systematic analysis of source materials and a comparison of these with lithic artefacts, the provenance of a significant portion of stone

  14. Frogs of the genus Eleutherodactylus in the Lesser Antilles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwartz, Albert

    1967-01-01

    The Lesser Antilles consist of those West Indian islands which extend from the Anegada Passage in the north to Grenada in the south.¹) These islands are nomenclatorially divided into two major groups: 1) The Leeward Islands, including Sombrero, Anguilla, St. Martin, St.-Barthélemy [= St. Barts],

  15. Non-stationary background intensity and Caribbean seismic events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valmy, Larissa; Vaillant, Jean

    2014-05-01

    We consider seismic risk calculation based on models with non-stationary background intensity. The aim is to improve predictive strategies in the framework of seismic risk assessment from models describing at best the seismic activity in the Caribbean arc. Appropriate statistical methods are required for analyzing the volumes of data collected. The focus is on calculating earthquakes occurrences probability and analyzing spatiotemporal evolution of these probabilities. The main modeling tool is the point process theory in order to take into account past history prior to a given date. Thus, the seismic event conditional intensity is expressed by means of the background intensity and the self exciting component. This intensity can be interpreted as the expected event rate per time and / or surface unit. The most popular intensity model in seismology is the ETAS (Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequence) model introduced and then generalized by Ogata [2, 3]. We extended this model and performed a comparison of different probability density functions for the triggered event times [4]. We illustrate our model by considering the CDSA (Centre de Données Sismiques des Antilles) catalog [1] which contains more than 7000 seismic events occurred in the Lesser Antilles arc. Statistical tools for testing the background intensity stationarity and for dynamical segmentation are presented. [1] Bengoubou-Valérius M., Bazin S., Bertil D., Beauducel F. and Bosson A. (2008). CDSA: a new seismological data center for the French Lesser Antilles, Seismol. Res. Lett., 79 (1), 90-102. [2] Ogata Y. (1998). Space-time point-process models for earthquake occurrences, Annals of the Institute of Statistical Mathematics, 50 (2), 379-402. [3] Ogata, Y. (2011). Significant improvements of the space-time ETAS model for forecasting of accurate baseline seismicity, Earth, Planets and Space, 63 (3), 217-229. [4] Valmy L. and Vaillant J. (2013). Statistical models in seismology: Lesser Antilles arc case

  16. COMPARATIVE-ANALYSIS OF FORAGING AND HABITAT USE BY THE SYMPATRIC CARIBBEAN PARROTFISH SCARUS-VETULA AND SPARISOMA-VIRIDE (SCARIDAE)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BRUGGEMANN, JH; KUYPER, MWM; BREEMAN, AM

    On the fringing reef of Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles, a comparative study was made of habitat use, diet selection, foraging behaviour and food acquisition of the parrotfish species Scarus vetula and Sparisoma viride. The species are sympatric and live in the same reef habitats (depth zones). Both

  17. Postglacial expansion pathways of red mangrove, Rhizophora mangle, in the Caribbean Basin and Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, John Paul; Pil, Maria W; Proffitt, C Edward; Boeger, Walter A; Stanford, Alice M; Devlin, Donna J

    2016-02-01

    The Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) was a period of massive range contraction. Post-LGM, water-dispersed coastal species, including the red mangrove (Rhizophora mangle), expanded poleward as propagules were transported by ocean currents. We assessed postglacial marine expansion pathways for R. mangle within the Caribbean Basin and Florida. Six microsatellite loci were used to genotype 237 individuals from nine R. mangle populations in the Caribbean, Florida, and Northwest Africa. We evaluated genetic variation, population structure, gene flow along alternative post-LGM expansion pathways to Florida, and potential long-distance dispersal (LDD) from West Africa to Caribbean islands. These R. mangle populations had substantial genetic structure (FST = 0.37, P < 0.0001) with three discrete population clusters (Caribbean mainland, Caribbean islands, and Florida). Genetic connectivity along the mainland pathway (Caribbean mainland to Florida) vs. limited gene dispersal along the Antilles Island pathway (Caribbean islands to Florida) supported Florida recolonization from Caribbean mainland sources. Genetic similarity of Northwest Africa and two Caribbean islands provided evidence for trans-Atlantic LDD. We did not find a pattern of decreasing genetic diversity with latitude. We outline a complex expansion history for R. mangle, with discrete pathways of recolonization for Florida and Caribbean islands. Contrary to expectation, connectivity to putative Caribbean mainland refugial populations via ocean currents, and not latitude, appears to dictate genetic diversity within Caribbean island and Florida R. mangle. These findings provide a framework for further investigation of additional water-dispersed neotropical species, and insights for management initiatives. © 2016 Botanical Society of America.

  18. Long term (since the late palaeogene) tectono-sedimentary evolution of the Lesser Antilles fore-arc at Marie-Galante Basin: a clue for geodynamical behavior at the subduction interfac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean-Frederic, L.; DeMin, L.; Garrigou, J.; Münch, P.; Léticée, J. L.; Cornée, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    Oblique subduction of late cretaceous lithosphere of the Atlantic ocean beneath the thick (25km) crust of the Caribbean plate results in widespread deformation and vertical motions in the Lesser Antilles fore-arc. The present-day deformation includes a major transtensive left lateral fault system along the arc and several forearc transverse basins accommodating lengthening of the fore-arc northward. These deformations result from plate motion partitioning under increasing subduction obliquity from the Marie-Galante Basin (MGB) latitude (central Lesser Antilles) northward. Vertical motions in the fore-arc at a regional scale were interpreted as resulting from the effect of subducting ridges and reliefs. The present day uplift of the fore-arc islands acting since the late(?) Pleistocene is believed to attest for long wavelength bending of the plate under strongly coupled plate interface. Recent GPS data suggests a mostly uncoupled plate interface. To decipher between the models and to understand the long-term evolution of the Lesser Antilles forearc since the Late Palaeogene, we interpret high-resolution bathymetric and seismic data from the MGB, together with the onland geology of shallow water carbonate platforms. The tectonic pattern reveals both inherited and late Neogene structures (re)activated under multidirectional extensive tectonic. The sismo-stratigraphic interpretation of sedimentary deposit displays long-term drowning and flexing of the upper plate similar to that occurring under intensive tectonic erosion at the subduction interface. Several short term period of second order uplift can correlate with sweeping of subducting ridges or transient events at the plate interface. The evolution of the Lesser Antilles fore-arc since the Late Palaeogene is interpreted within the regional geodynamical evolution of the plate boundary following its last major reorganization: collision of the Bahamas Bank and inception of the Greater Antilles strike-slip fault zone.

  19. Artists in and out of the Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally Price

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available [First paragraph] Caribbean Art. VEERLE POUPEYE. London: Thames and Hudson, 1998. 224 pp. (Paper US$ 14.95 Transforming the Crown: African, Asian and Caribbean Artists in Britain, 1966-1996. MORA J. BEAUCHAMP-BYRD & M. FRANKLIN SIRMANS (eds.. New York: Caribbean Cultural Center, 1998. 177 pp. (Paper US$ 39.95, £31.95 "Caribbean" (like "Black British" culture is (as a Dutch colleague once said of postmodernism a bit of a slippery fish. One of the books under review here presents the eclectic artistic productions of professional artists with Caribbean identities of varying sorts - some of them lifelong residents of the region (defined broadly to stretch from Belize and the Bahamas to Curacao and Cayenne, some born in the Caribbean but living elsewhere, and others from far-away parts of the world who have lingered or settled in the Caribbean. The other focuses on artists who trace their cultural heritage variously to Lebanon, France, Malaysia, Spain, China, England, Guyana, India, the Caribbean, the Netherlands, the Philippines, and the whole range of societies in West, East, and Central Africa, all of whom meet under a single ethnic label in galleries in New York and London. Clearly, the principles that vertebrate Caribbean Art and Transforming the Crown are built on the backs of ambiguities, misperceptions, ironies, and ethnocentric logics (not to mention their stronger variants, such as racism. Yet far from invalidating the enterprise, they offer an enlightening inroad to the social, cultural, economic, and political workings of artworlds that reflect globally orchestrated pasts of enormous complexity.

  20. The complexity of national identity Construction in Curaçao, Dutch Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Mary Allen

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Curaçao, one of the five islands of the Dutch Caribbean federation called the Netherlands Antilles, currently stands at a crossroad of constitutional reform. In the context of these changes at the political level, it is logical that national identities are being redefined and repositioned. The developments in the fashioning of national identities in Curaçao deserve attention locally but also regionally. How do people in Curaçao construct national identities in daily life? How is a national collective constructed on the one hand, and how are differences with other collectivities constructed on the other hand? The historical context of constitutional changes that have occurred over the years is considered as well as an examination of the present discourse on constitutional reform. These identity issues are then placed within a wider Caribbean context.  Resumen: La complejidad de la construcción de la identidad nacional en Curaçao,en el Caribe holandés Curaçao, una de las cinco islas de la federación caribeña neerlandesa llamada Antillas Holandesas, se encuentra hoy en día en una encrucijada de reformas constitucionales. En el contexto de estos cambios a nivel político, es lógico que las identidades nacionales sean redefinidas y reposicionadas. Los desarrollos en la formulación de identidades nacionales en Curaçao merecen atención local, y también regional. ¿Cómo construye la gente en Curaçao identidades nacionales en la vida cotidiana? ¿Cómo, por un lado, se construye el colectivo nacional y, por otro, cómo se construyen las diferencias con otras colectividades? En este análisis se estudia el contexto histórico de los cambios constitucionales que han ocurrido en el curso del tiempo y se realiza igualmente una revisión del actual discurso sobre la reforma constitucional. Estos problemas de identidad son analizados entonces en un contexto caribeño más amplio.

  1. Historical Biogeography of endemic seed plant genera in the Caribbean: Did GAARlandia play a role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto-Blázquez, María Esther; Antonelli, Alexandre; Roncal, Julissa

    2017-12-01

    The Caribbean archipelago is a region with an extremely complex geological history and an outstanding plant diversity with high levels of endemism. The aim of this study was to better understand the historical assembly and evolution of endemic seed plant genera in the Caribbean, by first determining divergence times of endemic genera to test whether the hypothesized Greater Antilles and Aves Ridge (GAARlandia) land bridge played a role in the archipelago colonization and second by testing South America as the main colonization source as expected by the position of landmasses and recent evidence of an asymmetrical biotic interchange. We reconstructed a dated molecular phylogenetic tree for 625 seed plants including 32 Caribbean endemic genera using Bayesian inference and ten calibrations. To estimate the geographic range of the ancestors of endemic genera, we performed a model selection between a null and two complex biogeographic models that included timeframes based on geological information, dispersal probabilities, and directionality among regions. Crown ages for endemic genera ranged from Early Eocene (53.1 Ma) to Late Pliocene (3.4 Ma). Confidence intervals for divergence times (crown and/or stem ages) of 22 endemic genera occurred within the GAARlandia time frame. Contrary to expectations, the Antilles appears as the main ancestral area for endemic seed plant genera and only five genera had a South American origin. In contrast to patterns shown for vertebrates and other organisms and based on our sampling, we conclude that GAARlandia did not act as a colonization route for plants between South America and the Antilles. Further studies on Caribbean plant dispersal at the species and population levels will be required to reveal finer-scale biogeographic patterns and mechanisms.

  2. Dislocation Modeling and Comparison With GPS Data to Assess Possible Elastic Strain Accumulation in the Central Lesser Antilles: New Constraints From the NSF REU Site in Dominica Between 2001 and 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staisch, L.; Styron, R. H.; James, S.; Turner, H. L.; Ashlock, A.; Cavness, C. L.; Collier, X.; Fauria, K.; Feinstein, R.; Murphy, R.; Williams, B.; Mattioli, G. S.; Jansma, P. E.; Cothren, J.

    2007-12-01

    The Caribbean, North and South American plates are converging at a rate of 2 cm/yr in the central region of the Lesser Antilles arc. Here we report high-precision GPS data in concert with forward modeling of a simplified subduction zone geometry to assess strain accumulation for the Lesser Antilles trench. We are able to constrain both vertical and horizontal surface deformation from campaign and continuous GPS observations from 28 geodetic benchmarks located in Guadeloupe, Dominica and Aves Island. Precise station positions were estimated with GIPSY-OASIS II using an absolute point positioning strategy and final, precise orbits, clocks, earth orientation parameters, and x-files. All position estimates were updated to ITRF05 and a revised Caribbean Euler pole was used to place our observations in a CAR-fixed frame. Surface displacements for each site were estimated over 2-7 years. CAR-fixed velocities are projected onto a 500 kilometer transect from the LA trench to Aves Island and compared to calculated displacements for 88 different subduction models. Finite dislocations within an elastic half-space with variable parameters such as angle of the subducting slab, the downdip extent of the locked zone, and percentage of plate interface locking were investigated. Other parameters, such as trench length and slip remained constant. Using a chi-squared, best-fit statistical criterion, the GPS data constrain the subduction interface to a 75 kilometer downdip extent, a 10° dip angle, and near 50% locking. This implies that the subduction zone offshore Dominica is in an interseismic state, thus accumulating strain and causing small westward and upward displacement of the Lesser Antilles relative to the stable Caribbean interior.

  3. Caribbean Land Molluscs: Vertiginidae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haas, Fritz

    1960-01-01

    The area dealt with in this publication requires definition. In order to avoid misunderstanding, its individual components are listed as follows (see Table 1): Bahamas — Bimini’s, Cat Key, New Providence Lesser Antilles, with the following groups: Virgin Islands — St. Thomas, St. John, St. Croix

  4. Shallow-water Mysidacea from the Lesser Antilles and other Caribbean regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brattegard, Torleiv

    1975-01-01

    This report is the seventh in a series of papers dealing with Mysidacea (Crustacea) from shallow water in the tropical and warm-temperate areas of the western Atlantic (BRATTEGARD 1969, 1970a, 1970b, 1973, 1974a, 1974b). Five of these are dealing with material collected by the author in southern

  5. Wind biodiesel for Bonaire island; Wind-Biodiesel fuer Bonaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2007-07-01

    Bonaire, an island of the Netherlands Antilles, will be the first Caribbean island to be supplied exclusively with power from renewable energy sources. A combined wind-biodiesel system will generate just about 14 MW from 2009. (orig.)

  6. Regional diversity of amphipoda in the Caribbean Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Alberto; Díaz, Yusbelly; Miloslavich, Patricia; Escobar-Briones, Elva; Guerra-García, José Manuel; Ortiz, Manuel; Valencia, Bellineth; Giraldo, Alan; Klein, Eduardo

    2013-12-01

    The order Amphipoda is one of the most diverse within Peracarids, and comprises 6950 described marine species. Amphipod research in the Caribbean Sea began in the late 1800s, but has increased significantly since 1980. In this study, we analized the amphipod biodiversity (Caprellidea, Gammaridea, Hyperiidea, and Ingolfiellidea) of the Caribbean Sea. For this, we compiled available data on species diversity of marine amphipods (data bases: WoRMS and OBIS and published species lists) into a comprehensive taxonomic list by country for the ecoregions of the Caribbean. Additionally, we analized the relative contribution of each country to regional diversity and the rate of discovery of new species. The Caribbean amphipod fauna is composed of 535 species within 236 genera and 73 families for the higher taxon. The Western Caribbean ecoregion holds the largest diversity (282 species), while the Eastern Caribbean recorded the lowest one (73). Mexico and Venezuela recorded the largest number of species with 266 and 206, respectively. Twelve countries had less than 50 species. The richest suborder is the Gammaridea with 381 species followed by the suborder Hyperiidea with 116. From the total of 535 amphipod species reported for the Caribbean region, 218 have the Caribbean as the holotype locality, and 132 are endemic (about 25% of the total). Areas of higher diversity seem to be concentrated along the Mexican Caribbean, Cuba and the Northern coast of South America (Venezuela-Colombia); however, such pattern is most likely reflecting local collection efforts and taxonomic expertise rather than actual distribution. Knowledge of amphipod species is mostly limited to shallow, near-shore waters, with little infonnation available on the deep sea fauna. Regional research priorities for this group should be focused on completing shallow water coastal inventories of species in Central America and the Greater and Lesser Antilles. In addition, sampling the deep sea ecosystems should

  7. Regional diversity of Amphipoda in the Caribbean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Martín

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The order Amphipoda is one of the most diverse within Peracarids, and comprises 6 950 described marine species. Amphipod research in the Caribbean Sea began in the late 1 800s, but has increased significantly since 1 980. In this study, we analized the amphipod biodiversity (Caprellidea, Gammaridea, Hyperiidea, and Ingolfiellidea of the Caribbean Sea. For this, we compiled available data on species diversity of marine amphipods (data bases: WoRMS and OBIS and published species lists into a comprehensive taxonomic list by country for the ecoregions of the Caribbean. Additionally, we analized the relative contribution of each country to regional diversity and the rate of discovery of new species. The Caribbean amphipod fauna is composed of 535 species within 236 genera and 73 families for the higher taxon. The Western Caribbean ecoregion holds the largest diversity (282 species, while the Eastern Caribbean recorded the lowest one (73. Mexico and Venezuela recorded the largest number of species with 266 and 206, respectively. Twelve countries had less than 50 species. The richest suborder is the Gammaridea with 381 species followed by the suborder Hyperiidea with 116. From the total of 535 amphipod species reported for the Caribbean region, 218 have the Caribbean as the holotype locality, and 132 are endemic (about 25% of the total. Areas of higher diversity seem to be concentrated along the Mexican Caribbean, Cuba and the Northern coast of South America (Venezuela-Colombia; however, such pattern is most likely reflecting local collection efforts and taxonomic expertise rather than actual distribution. Knowledge of amphipod species is mostly limited to shallow, near-shore waters, with little information available on the deep sea fauna. Regional research priorities for this group should be focused on completing shallow water coastal inventories of species in Central America and the Greater and Lesser Antilles. In addition, sampling the deep sea

  8. The Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vries, Anthon K.

    1975-01-01

    Examines early childhood education in the Netherlands: its history, general conceptions of child upbringing and developmental psychology, organizational patterns, main research projects, and goals. (JH)

  9. VOLCANIC TSUNAMI GENERATING SOURCE MECHANISMS IN THE EASTERN CARIBBEAN REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Pararas-Carayannis

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, volcanic island flank failures and underwater slides have generated numerous destructive tsunamis in the Caribbean region. Convergent, compressional and collisional tectonic activity caused primarily from the eastward movement of the Caribbean Plate in relation to the North American, Atlantic and South American Plates, is responsible for zones of subduction in the region, the formation of island arcs and the evolution of particular volcanic centers on the overlying plate. The inter-plate tectonic interaction and deformation along these marginal boundaries result in moderate seismic and volcanic events that can generate tsunamis by a number of different mechanisms. The active geo-dynamic processes have created the Lesser Antilles, an arc of small islands with volcanoes characterized by both effusive and explosive activity. Eruption mechanisms of these Caribbean volcanoes are complex and often anomalous. Collapses of lava domes often precede major eruptions, which may vary in intensity from Strombolian to Plinian. Locally catastrophic, short-period tsunami-like waves can be generated directly by lateral, direct or channelized volcanic blast episodes, or in combination with collateral air pressure perturbations, nuéss ardentes, pyroclastic flows, lahars, or cascading debris avalanches. Submarine volcanic caldera collapses can also generate locally destructive tsunami waves. Volcanoes in the Eastern Caribbean Region have unstable flanks. Destructive local tsunamis may be generated from aerial and submarine volcanic edifice mass edifice flank failures, which may be triggered by volcanic episodes, lava dome collapses, or simply by gravitational instabilities. The present report evaluates volcanic mechanisms, resulting flank failure processes and their potential for tsunami generation. More specifically, the report evaluates recent volcanic eruption mechanisms of the Soufriere Hills volcano on Montserrat, of Mt. Pel

  10. Marine biodiversity in the Caribbean: regional estimates and distribution patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Miloslavich

    Full Text Available This paper provides an analysis of the distribution patterns of marine biodiversity and summarizes the major activities of the Census of Marine Life program in the Caribbean region. The coastal Caribbean region is a large marine ecosystem (LME characterized by coral reefs, mangroves, and seagrasses, but including other environments, such as sandy beaches and rocky shores. These tropical ecosystems incorporate a high diversity of associated flora and fauna, and the nations that border the Caribbean collectively encompass a major global marine biodiversity hot spot. We analyze the state of knowledge of marine biodiversity based on the geographic distribution of georeferenced species records and regional taxonomic lists. A total of 12,046 marine species are reported in this paper for the Caribbean region. These include representatives from 31 animal phyla, two plant phyla, one group of Chromista, and three groups of Protoctista. Sampling effort has been greatest in shallow, nearshore waters, where there is relatively good coverage of species records; offshore and deep environments have been less studied. Additionally, we found that the currently accepted classification of marine ecoregions of the Caribbean did not apply for the benthic distributions of five relatively well known taxonomic groups. Coastal species richness tends to concentrate along the Antillean arc (Cuba to the southernmost Antilles and the northern coast of South America (Venezuela-Colombia, while no pattern can be observed in the deep sea with the available data. Several factors make it impossible to determine the extent to which these distribution patterns accurately reflect the true situation for marine biodiversity in general: (1 highly localized concentrations of collecting effort and a lack of collecting in many areas and ecosystems, (2 high variability among collecting methods, (3 limited taxonomic expertise for many groups, and (4 differing levels of activity in the study

  11. Marine Biodiversity in the Caribbean: Regional Estimates and Distribution Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloslavich, Patricia; Díaz, Juan Manuel; Klein, Eduardo; Alvarado, Juan José; Díaz, Cristina; Gobin, Judith; Escobar-Briones, Elva; Cruz-Motta, Juan José; Weil, Ernesto; Cortés, Jorge; Bastidas, Ana Carolina; Robertson, Ross; Zapata, Fernando; Martín, Alberto; Castillo, Julio; Kazandjian, Aniuska; Ortiz, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides an analysis of the distribution patterns of marine biodiversity and summarizes the major activities of the Census of Marine Life program in the Caribbean region. The coastal Caribbean region is a large marine ecosystem (LME) characterized by coral reefs, mangroves, and seagrasses, but including other environments, such as sandy beaches and rocky shores. These tropical ecosystems incorporate a high diversity of associated flora and fauna, and the nations that border the Caribbean collectively encompass a major global marine biodiversity hot spot. We analyze the state of knowledge of marine biodiversity based on the geographic distribution of georeferenced species records and regional taxonomic lists. A total of 12,046 marine species are reported in this paper for the Caribbean region. These include representatives from 31 animal phyla, two plant phyla, one group of Chromista, and three groups of Protoctista. Sampling effort has been greatest in shallow, nearshore waters, where there is relatively good coverage of species records; offshore and deep environments have been less studied. Additionally, we found that the currently accepted classification of marine ecoregions of the Caribbean did not apply for the benthic distributions of five relatively well known taxonomic groups. Coastal species richness tends to concentrate along the Antillean arc (Cuba to the southernmost Antilles) and the northern coast of South America (Venezuela – Colombia), while no pattern can be observed in the deep sea with the available data. Several factors make it impossible to determine the extent to which these distribution patterns accurately reflect the true situation for marine biodiversity in general: (1) highly localized concentrations of collecting effort and a lack of collecting in many areas and ecosystems, (2) high variability among collecting methods, (3) limited taxonomic expertise for many groups, and (4) differing levels of activity in the study of

  12. Marine biodiversity in the Caribbean: regional estimates and distribution patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloslavich, Patricia; Díaz, Juan Manuel; Klein, Eduardo; Alvarado, Juan José; Díaz, Cristina; Gobin, Judith; Escobar-Briones, Elva; Cruz-Motta, Juan José; Weil, Ernesto; Cortés, Jorge; Bastidas, Ana Carolina; Robertson, Ross; Zapata, Fernando; Martín, Alberto; Castillo, Julio; Kazandjian, Aniuska; Ortiz, Manuel

    2010-08-02

    This paper provides an analysis of the distribution patterns of marine biodiversity and summarizes the major activities of the Census of Marine Life program in the Caribbean region. The coastal Caribbean region is a large marine ecosystem (LME) characterized by coral reefs, mangroves, and seagrasses, but including other environments, such as sandy beaches and rocky shores. These tropical ecosystems incorporate a high diversity of associated flora and fauna, and the nations that border the Caribbean collectively encompass a major global marine biodiversity hot spot. We analyze the state of knowledge of marine biodiversity based on the geographic distribution of georeferenced species records and regional taxonomic lists. A total of 12,046 marine species are reported in this paper for the Caribbean region. These include representatives from 31 animal phyla, two plant phyla, one group of Chromista, and three groups of Protoctista. Sampling effort has been greatest in shallow, nearshore waters, where there is relatively good coverage of species records; offshore and deep environments have been less studied. Additionally, we found that the currently accepted classification of marine ecoregions of the Caribbean did not apply for the benthic distributions of five relatively well known taxonomic groups. Coastal species richness tends to concentrate along the Antillean arc (Cuba to the southernmost Antilles) and the northern coast of South America (Venezuela-Colombia), while no pattern can be observed in the deep sea with the available data. Several factors make it impossible to determine the extent to which these distribution patterns accurately reflect the true situation for marine biodiversity in general: (1) highly localized concentrations of collecting effort and a lack of collecting in many areas and ecosystems, (2) high variability among collecting methods, (3) limited taxonomic expertise for many groups, and (4) differing levels of activity in the study of different

  13. Tardigrada of the Caribbean island of Dominica (West Indies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana G. Hinton

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In June 2009 we surveyed the terrestrial Tardigrada of Dominica, the most northerly of the Windward islands of the Lesser Antilles in the Caribbean sea. Out of 112 moss, lichen, liverwort and leaf litter samples, 35 had tardigrades, representing 10 genera and 25 species or species groups. This survey increases the number of species reported from Dominica from 3 to 25, more than the total recorded from any other West Indian island. Twelve species found in Dominica are cosmopolitan or belong to cosmopolitan species groups. Eight species are new to the fauna of the West Indies, one is new to the fauna of the Americas, and at least one is endemic to Dominica.

  14. Preparedness actions towards seismic risk mitigation for the general public in Martinique, French Lesser Antilles: a mid-term appraisal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audru, J. C.; Vernier, J. L.; Capdeville, B.; Salindre, J. J.; Mouly, É.

    2013-08-01

    Martinique is a French island in the Lesser Antilles, with a high seismic hazard. In 2006, Martinican stakeholders involved in seismic safety formed the "Réplik" working group ("Aftershock" in French), the first of its kind in this region. This paper addresses a mid-term appraisal of the first seismic awareness campaign organised by Réplik from 2006 to 2011, and how it has modified, or not, local earthquake and tsunami preparedness. Despite efforts from Réplik to assess its efficiency through surveys, a growing gap is noted between the observed awareness and the actual preparedness of the public. As usual, gender, age, educational level, then boredom and saturation contribute to this discrepancy; strong cultural items may also influence the perception of actions. To remain efficient and respond to the public's expectations, Réplik must redirect its actions towards a cultural congruence of information: consideration of religion and local beliefs, comprehensive messages on TV and radio, use of the Creole language, participatory experiences and drills, and a little science. With this, the Réplik stakeholders can hope to increase Martinicans' involvement into the preparedness process, to cope quickly with a strong earthquake and this know-how can be shared with other seismically active islands in the Caribbean.

  15. Preparedness actions towards seismic risk mitigation for the general public in Martinique, French Lesser Antilles: a mid-term appraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Audru

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Martinique is a French island in the Lesser Antilles, with a high seismic hazard. In 2006, Martinican stakeholders involved in seismic safety formed the "Réplik" working group ("Aftershock" in French, the first of its kind in this region. This paper addresses a mid-term appraisal of the first seismic awareness campaign organised by Réplik from 2006 to 2011, and how it has modified, or not, local earthquake and tsunami preparedness. Despite efforts from Réplik to assess its efficiency through surveys, a growing gap is noted between the observed awareness and the actual preparedness of the public. As usual, gender, age, educational level, then boredom and saturation contribute to this discrepancy; strong cultural items may also influence the perception of actions. To remain efficient and respond to the public's expectations, Réplik must redirect its actions towards a cultural congruence of information: consideration of religion and local beliefs, comprehensive messages on TV and radio, use of the Creole language, participatory experiences and drills, and a little science. With this, the Réplik stakeholders can hope to increase Martinicans' involvement into the preparedness process, to cope quickly with a strong earthquake and this know-how can be shared with other seismically active islands in the Caribbean.

  16. Gravity modeling of the Muertos Trough and tectonic implications (north-eastern Caribbean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granja, Bruna J. L.; Munoz-Martin, A.; ten Brink, Uri S.; Carbó-Gorosabel, Andrés; Llanes, Estrada P.; Martin-Davila, J.; Cordoba-Barba, D.; Catalan, Morollon M.

    2010-01-01

    The Muertos Trough in the northeast Caribbean has been interpreted as a subduction zone from seismicity, leading to infer a possible reversal subduction polarity. However, the distribution of the seismicity is very diffuse and makes definition of the plate geometry difficult. In addition, the compressive deformational features observed in the upper crust and sandbox kinematic modeling do not necessarily suggest a subduction process. We tested the hypothesized subduction of the Caribbean plate's interior beneath the eastern Greater Antilles island arc using gravity modeling. Gravity models simulating a subduction process yield a regional mass deficit beneath the island arc independently of the geometry and depth of the subducted slab used in the models. This mass deficit results from sinking of the less dense Caribbean slab beneath the lithospheric mantle replacing denser mantle materials and suggests that there is not a subducted Caribbean plateau beneath the island arc. The geologically more realistic gravity model which would explain the N-S shortening observed in the upper crust requires an overthrusted Caribbean slab extending at least 60 km northward from the deformation front, a progressive increase in the thrusting angle from 8?? to 30?? reaching a maximum depth of 22 km beneath the insular slope. This new tectonic model for the Muertos Margin, defined as a retroarc thrusting, will help to assess the seismic and tsunami hazard in the region. The use of gravity modeling has provided targets for future wide-angle seismic surveys in the Muertos Margin. ?? 2010 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  17. Impact of Caribbean cyclones on the detachment of Loop Current anticyclones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athié, Gabriela; Candela, Julio; Ochoa, José; Sheinbaum, Julio

    2012-03-01

    The western boundary current in the North Atlantic is characterized by an intense flow (reaching 2.5 ms-1, at the surface) that enters the Caribbean Sea through the Lesser Antilles passages, crosses the entire Caribbean and enters the Gulf of Mexico through the Yucatan Channel, where it is known as the Loop Current. A characteristic feature of the Loop Current is eddy-shedding events (i.e., the detachment of large anticyclonic eddies) at irregular intervals. Moored current measurements between January 2005 and July 2009 in the Loop Current, the Yucatan Channel, and the Caribbean coastal waters of Mexico (i.e., the Western Cayman Sea), along with AVISO altimetry, are used to evidence the northward propagation of cyclonic anomalies along the Caribbean coast of Mexico and the marked eastward displacement of the Loop Current at 23°N latitude, just before several anticyclonic eddy shedding events. After entering the Gulf of Mexico, these cyclonic anomalies might initiate or enhance existing Campeche Bank cyclonic eddies, which are related to many of the Loop Current detachment events. Sixteen of the twenty-one detachments that occurred during the study period (76%) are related to the cyclonic eddies in the Western Caribbean Sea; six of them were not reattached again to the Loop Current. Observations, thus, clearly indicate that cyclonic eddies in the Western Cayman Sea contribute significantly to the Loop Current eddy-shedding process, which is complex and in principle not unique.

  18. A new genus and species of Serpulidae (Annelida, Polychaeta, Sabellida) from the Caribbean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    PRENTISS, NANCY K.; VASILEIADOU, KATERINA; FAULWETTER, SARAH; ARVANITIDIS, CHRISTOS; TEN HOVE, HARRY A.

    2015-01-01

    A new genus and species of Serpulidae (Annelida, Polychaeta) from the Caribbean Sea. Turbocavus secretus (gen. nov. and sp. nov.) is described from shallow hard substrates (0.5–3 m) in wind-sheltered bays of St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands and Curaçao, as well as from diving depths (46–49 m) around Bonaire (Leeward Antilles), Caribbean Sea. The new taxon, which has from 7 to 19 thoracic chaetigers and up to 335 abdominal chaetigers, bears a unique type of thoracic chaeta which is multifolded at the base and continues with a groove tapering to the capillary tip. The new serpulid has unique 18S rRNA sequences and genetic analysis of the 18S rRNA gene situates the new genus at the basis of the serpulid cla-dogram, well separated from other genera, and close to Filograna/Salmacina and Protula. PMID:25543733

  19. Risk factors associated with Campylobacter jejuni infections in Curacao, Netherlands Antilles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.P. Endtz (Hubert); L. de Haan (Lidewij); R. van Koningsveld (Rinske); Y. Halabi; N.P.W.C.J. van den Braak (Nicole); B.I. Kesztyus; C.W. Ang (Wim); I. Gerstenbluth; E. Leyde; A. Ott (Alewijn); F.G. Rodgers; R.P.A.J. Verkooyen (Roel); D.L. Woodward; A.F. van Belkum (Alex); L.J. Price; H. West; P.C.R. Godschalk (Peggy)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractA steady increase in the incidence of Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) with a seasonal preponderance, almost exclusively related to Campylobacter jejuni, and a rise in the incidence of laboratory-confirmed Campylobacter enteritis have been reported from Curacao,

  20. Surveillance and Spatial Characterization of Aedes aegypti in Sint Eustatius, Netherlands Antilles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-08

    Member rv:etca!f, Ph C., t\\ssociate Dean II www.usuhs.mil/graded II gr<lduateprogram@usuhs.edu 800 772-1747 I! Comrnercial: 301-295-3913 / 94711 II...local scientific research. Rev Panam Salud Publica. 20(5): 350–360 44. Twiddy S, Holmes E, Rambaut A. 2003. Inferring the Rate and Time-Scale of

  1. Foraminifera from the tidal zone in the Netherlands Antilles and other West Indian Islands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofker, J.

    1964-01-01

    Through the kindness of Dr. P. WAGENAAR HUMMELINCK the author was enabled to study a number of samples from localities in the tidal zone of several West Indian islands. Previously, by courtesy of Dr. T. MORTENSEN, abundant material from some deepwater samples collected off Santa Cruz, Virgin

  2. The marine Algal Vegetation of St. Martin, St. Eustatius and Saba (Netherlands Antilles)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vroman, M.

    1968-01-01

    Along the coast of St. Martin, St. Eustatius and Saba the rocks above sea-level often show a number of differently coloured zones. This is clearly visible when the coast over a larger distance is formed by one type of rock, as for instance on Saba. In many places a light-coloured belt is seen above

  3. Ecological aspects of the distribution of reef corals in the Netherlands Antilles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bak, Rolf P.M.

    1975-01-01

    The vertical and horizontal patterns of the distribution of corals and coral reefs (to a depth of 90 m) are discussed in relation to the environmental factors: geomorphology of the bottom, available substrate, light, turbidity, sedimentation, water movement and temperature. There is a general

  4. Calcium carbonate precipitation in the Cueva di Watapana on Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer Mohr, van der C.G.

    1978-01-01

    Calcium carbonate precipitates as low Mg-calcite and aragonite in slightly brackish water in a cave in the Pleistocene Middle Terrace of southern Bonaire. The calcium carbonate precipitates at the atmosphere-water interface forming floating calcite scales (calcite ice). Aragonite crystals frequently

  5. The Heteroptera of the Netherlands Antilles – V Tingidae (Lace Bugs)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drake, Carl J.; Cobben, R.H.

    1960-01-01

    The present paper is based upon the lace bugs, Family Tingidae, collected by the junior author in the West Indies, on the islands of Aruba, Curaçao, Bonaire, St. Martin, Saba, and St. Eustatius. This collection of several tingids comprises 17 species, including the five new forms described below.

  6. Reconstructing the population genetic history of the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Estrada, Andrés; Gravel, Simon; Zakharia, Fouad; McCauley, Jacob L; Byrnes, Jake K; Gignoux, Christopher R; Ortiz-Tello, Patricia A; Martínez, Ricardo J; Hedges, Dale J; Morris, Richard W; Eng, Celeste; Sandoval, Karla; Acevedo-Acevedo, Suehelay; Norman, Paul J; Layrisse, Zulay; Parham, Peter; Martínez-Cruzado, Juan Carlos; Burchard, Esteban González; Cuccaro, Michael L; Martin, Eden R; Bustamante, Carlos D

    2013-11-01

    The Caribbean basin is home to some of the most complex interactions in recent history among previously diverged human populations. Here, we investigate the population genetic history of this region by characterizing patterns of genome-wide variation among 330 individuals from three of the Greater Antilles (Cuba, Puerto Rico, Hispaniola), two mainland (Honduras, Colombia), and three Native South American (Yukpa, Bari, and Warao) populations. We combine these data with a unique database of genomic variation in over 3,000 individuals from diverse European, African, and Native American populations. We use local ancestry inference and tract length distributions to test different demographic scenarios for the pre- and post-colonial history of the region. We develop a novel ancestry-specific PCA (ASPCA) method to reconstruct the sub-continental origin of Native American, European, and African haplotypes from admixed genomes. We find that the most likely source of the indigenous ancestry in Caribbean islanders is a Native South American component shared among inland Amazonian tribes, Central America, and the Yucatan peninsula, suggesting extensive gene flow across the Caribbean in pre-Columbian times. We find evidence of two pulses of African migration. The first pulse--which today is reflected by shorter, older ancestry tracts--consists of a genetic component more similar to coastal West African regions involved in early stages of the trans-Atlantic slave trade. The second pulse--reflected by longer, younger tracts--is more similar to present-day West-Central African populations, supporting historical records of later transatlantic deportation. Surprisingly, we also identify a Latino-specific European component that has significantly diverged from its parental Iberian source populations, presumably as a result of small European founder population size. We demonstrate that the ancestral components in admixed genomes can be traced back to distinct sub-continental source

  7. Rigidity and definition of Caribbean plate motion from COCONet and campaign GPS observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattioli, Glen; Miller, Jamie; DeMets, Charles; Jansma, Pamela

    2014-05-01

    The currently accepted kinematic model of the Caribbean plate presented by DeMets et al. (2007) is based on velocities from 6 continuous and 14 campaign GPS sites. COCONet is a multi-hazard GPS-Met observatory, which extends the existing infrastructure of the Plate Boundary Observatory in North America into the Caribbean basin. In 2010, UNAVCO in collaboration with UCAR, was funded by NSF to design, build, and initially maintain a network of 50 new cGPS/Met sites and include data from another 50 existing sites in the Caribbean region. The current COCONet siting plan calls for 46 new stations, 21 refurbished stations, and 77 existing stations across 26 nations in the Caribbean region. Data from all COCONet sites flow into the UNAVCO archive and are processed by the PBO analysis centers and are also processed independently by the UTA Geodesy Lab using GIPSY-OASISII (v.6.2) using an absolute point positioning strategy and final, precise orbits, clocks, and Earth orientation parameters from JPL in the IGS08 frame. We present here our refined estimate of Caribbean plate motion by evaluating data from an expanded number of stations with an improved spatial distribution. In order to better constrain the eastern margin of the plate near the Lesser Antilles subduction interface, campaign GPS observations have been collected on the island of Dominica over the last decade. These are combined with additional campaign observations from the western Caribbean, specifically from Honduras and Nicaragua. We have analyzed a total of 117 sites from the Caribbean region, including campaign data and the data from the cGPS stations that comprise COCONet. An updated velocity field for the Caribbean plate is presented and an inversion of the velocities for 24 sites yields a plate angular velocity that differs from previously published models. Our best fitting inversion to GPS velocities from these 24 sites suggests that 2-plate model for the Caribbean is required to fit the GPS

  8. Sub-seasonally resolved coral records of Caribbean sea surface conditions during the demise of the Maya civilization (~AD 800-1050)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, H.; Felis, T.; Kölling, M.; Giry, C.; Scholz, D.; Scheffers, S.

    2012-04-01

    We present a unique collection of annually banded fossil Montastraea coral colonies from Bonaire (Netherlands Antilles) in the southern Caribbean Sea that reveals growth between ~AD 800-1050. Coincidentally, this time interval was known for the demise of the classic Maya civilization in the lowlands of the Yucatán Peninsula termed the Terminal Classic Period (roughly AD 750-1050). Explanations for the downfall ranged from foreign invasion to social turmoil, but paleoclimatic evidence suggests severe climate change such as prolonged dry cycles as the primary influence. The Bonaire corals provide the first sub-seasonally resolved proxy records of surface ocean conditions in the Caribbean region during the Terminal Classic Period, and are completely different than the terrestrial-driven and summer-influenced precipitation proxy records from locations in the Yucatán and the Cariaco Basin. The corals display uninterrupted growth patterns ranging ~30-60 years and overlap each other at various time periods during the Terminal Classic Period. Our preliminary coral radiocarbon ages will be refined by precise U-series dating. The aragonitic skeletons of modern and fossil Montastraea colonies have been analyzed for Sr/Ca and δ18O at sub-seasonal resolution as proxies of sea surface temperature (SST), sea surface salinity (SSS), and hydrological changes. Evaluation of the modern coral record provides a modern baseline condition as basis of comparison to track the changing SST and SSS in the southern Caribbean during the Terminal Classic Period. The modern record indicates that seasonal to interannual variability in southern Caribbean Sea coral δ18O is predominantly driven by SST where Sr/Ca and δ18O records are tightly coupled and in-phase reflecting a similar source of influence. However, the fossil coral records display distinct interannual variability and longer-term decadal variability (8-15 years) in both Sr/Ca and δ18O that are decoupled from each other indicating

  9. Accident caused by Centruroides testaceus (DeGeer, 1778 (Scorpiones, Buthidae, native to the Caribbean, in Brazilian airport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Antônio Lobo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Describes the case of a 6-year-old girl who was stung by a Centruroides testaceus, a scorpion native to the Lesser Antilles, in the Guarulhos International Airport, São Paulo, Brazil, as she disembarked from a flight coming from the Caribbean. The patient presented only local symptoms (a small area of erythema and pain at the sting site, which were resolved after a few hours with analgesics, without the need for antivenom. Physicians who treat patients stung by scorpions should be alert to the possibility of such accidents being caused by non native species, especially those cases that occur near airports or ports.

  10. Bonaire's boulder fields revisited: evidence for Holocene tsunami impact on the Leeward Antilles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Max; May, Simon Matthias

    2012-10-01

    Supralittoral boulders and blocks are prominent sedimentary features along rocky shorelines worldwide. In most cases, their deposition is attributed to high-energy wave events (tsunamis, severe storms). Even though tsunami waves are expected to have higher transport capacities compared to storm waves, megaclasts of up to 100 t were observed to have been moved laterally by the latter waveform. The deduction of certain extreme wave events (tsunamis, severe storms) from the boulder record thus remains a major challenge in palaeo-event research; the debate on their differentiation is ongoing. At the eastern coast of Bonaire (Leeward Antilles) in the southern Caribbean, numerous limestone blocks and boulders (up to c. 130 t) are distributed on top of a 3-6 m a.s.l. (above mean sea level) palaeo-reef platform. Disagreement exists among a number of authors concerning the transport processes involved in the formation of the boulder fields. In this paper, state-of-the-art modelling approaches of coastal boulder entrainment and transport were applied in order to provide new and more reliable data to support/challenge the working hypothesis of tsunami deposition. To improve the reliability of the boulder transport model, more realistic input parameters were provided by new DGPS measurements of the boulder dimensions and the calculation of bulk densities by taking into account the heterogeneity of the reef-rock boulders. Existing hydrodynamic equations were modified to allow for the irregular shape and real dimensions of the boulders. The results indicate that (i) boulder weight and dimension, and thus (ii) calculated wave energy and wave heights were overestimated in most of the previous studies, where calculations of boulder volume were based on multiplication of the main axes. The results of this study and wave heights observed during recent severe tropical cyclones seem to rule out storm-generated waves for the dislocation of the largest blocks. However, the majority of

  11. Caribbean landscapes and their biodiversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. E. Lugo; E. H. Helmer; E. Santiago Valentín

    2012-01-01

    Both the biodiversity and the landscapes of the Caribbean have been greatly modified as a consequence of human activity. In this essay we provide an overview of the natural landscapes and biodiversity of the Caribbean and discuss how human activity has affected both. Our Caribbean geographic focus is on the insular Caribbean and the biodiversity focus is on the flora,...

  12. Patterns of paleomobility in the ancient Antilles : an isotopic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laffoon, Jason Eric

    2012-01-01

    Patterns of paleomobility in the Caribbean were studied through an inter-disciplinary approach using a combination of archaeological, osteological, mortuary, and isotopic data. Samples of human enamel from 360 individuals from multiple sites spanning a broad range of geographic and temporal contexts

  13. Incorporation of crust at the Lesser Antilles arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, J. P.; Bezard, R. C.

    2012-12-01

    Most convergent margin magmas exhibit geochemical characteristics of continental crust, incorporated via subduction of continental sediment into the arc source (mantle wedge) or via assimilation of continental crust by arc magmas en route to surface. Resolving which of these processes dominate at a given arc is important in avoiding the circularity of the question of the origin of the continental crust. The Lesser Antilles is built on oceanic lithosphere so in principle any crustal signature has been introduced via sediment subduction. Geochemical variations in magmas along the arc have been matched with the variations displayed in sediments outboard of the trench 1 . At about the same time, similarly comprehensive data sets were produced from along the Lesser Antilles, arguing that much of the geochemical diversity reflected crustal contamination rather than source contamination 2. These claims were based on; 1) correlations between isotopic ratios and indices of differentiation, 2) high delta18O, which argues for extensive interaction with material that has interacted with water at low T and finally the observation that the highest Pb isotope ratios in the lavas actually exceed the highest seen in the sediments. The latter problem has now been solved since a wider range of sediments have now been examined, with a section of black shales exhibiting remarkably radiogenic Pb isotopes 3 . We have re-examined the origin of geochemical variations by comparing two specific volcanoes, Mt Pelee in the centre of the arc and The Quill in the north 4. The idea is to explore differentiation trends at a given volcano, and back project them to reasonable primitive magma compositions. In that way we can account for geochemical effects resulting from differentiation, and focus on source variations (contributions from slab to wedge along the Antilles). From this we conclude that 1) both suites differentiate largely by amphibole-plag fractionation, along with contamination by the

  14. The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schelhaas, M.; Clerkx, A.P.P.M.

    2017-01-01

    Forest coverage in the Netherlands has expanded from 2% at the beginning of the nineteenth century to 11% nowadays (370,000 ha). Wood production is only one function among many others including recreation and nature protection. Consequently, the harvest level is low relative to the increment (~55%),

  15. Caribbean development: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Sutton

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Reviews development in the Caribbean, especially since 1990 to the present, and highlights future development prospects. Author discusses 2 reports from 2005 on present developments problems in the Caribbean region: the economics-focussed 'A time to choose: Caribbean development in the 21st century' by the World Bank, and the UN ECLAC report 'The Millennium Development Goals: a Latin American and Caribbean perspective', with a broader, also social and political, development agenda. He relates what both reports recommend for the Caribbean on the basis of their evaluations of past development. The World Bank report advocates a move toward the services sector, including tourism, offshore education, ICT services, and health services as most viable. The ECLAC report notes some social and political advances in comparison to other developing countries, but also remaining problems and inequalities. The author finds that the World Bank report's neoliberal, one-size-fits-all approach is not mindful of specific Caribbean realities, while the ECLAC study is more sensitive to local realities, and espouses a mixed economy. He thus considers the ECLAC approach preferable, but argues that it needs to go further, as it excludes Cuba and Haiti as atypical states.

  16. Mesophotic and Deep-sea Demersal Fish Assemblages on Rugged Hardbottoms of the Greater-Lesser Antilles Transition Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrini, A.; Chaytor, J. D.; Demopoulos, A. W.

    2016-02-01

    Caribbean fish communities in shallow waters have been well studied along the Greater and Lesser Antilles for decades; however, the mesophotic (>50 m) and deep (>200 m) assemblages remain poorly known due to the technical challenges associated with surveying greater depths. Numerous seafloor features (e.g., seamounts, island ridges, banks) punctuate the insular margins and increase habitat heterogeneity, which may lead to enhanced diversity of the deeper demersal fish community in the region. Recent (2013-2015) expeditions in the area using the E/Vs Nautilus and Okeanos Explorer and ROVs Hercules and Deep Discoverer surveyed fish communities during 18 dives across different seafloor features at depths ranging from 64 to 2944 m. These surveys enabled us to investigate whether demersal fish assemblages differed among these seafloor features and/or in response to other (e.g., dissolved oxygen, microhabitat) abiotic factors. A totla of 3,532 fishes representing at least 140 species in 53 families were documented. Assemblage differences were primarily influenced by depth, but differences in microhabitat (i.e., soft substrate, profile, slope) further influenced assemblage structure. Several range and depth extensions were documented. The morid Lepidion sp., previously known only from the eastern and the western North Atlantic, was documented on Norôit Seamount. A new species of labrid, Polylepion sp. A, known only from Curacao, was documented on Conrad Seamount. Many mesophotic reef species were observed deeper than previously known, including the butterflyfishes Chaetodon sedentarius and Prognathodes aculeatus. This study further supports the importance of environmental conditions, particularly depth and microhabitat, influencing local-scale distribution of demersal fishes, while demonstrating how little is still known about the biogeography of numerous deep-sea and mesophotic species.

  17. Sub-seasonally resolved coral records of Caribbean sea surface conditions during the demise of the Maya civilization (~AD 800-1000)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, H. C.; Felis, T.; Scholz, D.; Kölling, M.; Giry, C.; Scheffers, S.

    2012-12-01

    We present a unique collection of annually banded fossil Montastraea coral colonies from Bonaire (Netherlands Antilles) in the southern Caribbean Sea that reveals growth between ~AD 800-1000. Coincidentally, this time interval was known for the demise of the classic Maya civilization in the lowlands of the Yucatán Peninsula termed the Terminal Classic Period (TCP; ~AD 750-1050). Explanations for the downfall ranged from foreign invasion to social turmoil, but recent paleoclimatic evidence suggests climate change such as prolonged dry cycles and decrease in precipitation as the primary influence. The Bonaire corals provide the first sub-seasonally resolved proxy records of surface ocean conditions in the Caribbean region during the TCP, and are completely different than the terrestrial-driven and summer-influenced precipitation proxy records from locations in the Yucatán and the Cariaco Basin. One modern and six fossil Montastraea colonies were analyzed for Sr/Ca and δ18O at sub-seasonal resolution as proxies of sea surface temperature (SST), sea surface salinity (SSS), and hydrological changes. The corals display uninterrupted growth patterns ranging ~30-70 years and overlap each other at various time periods during the TCP with age verification by precision 230Th/U dating. Evaluation of the modern coral record provides a modern baseline condition as basis of comparison to track the changing SST and SSS in the southern Caribbean during the TCP. The modern colony recorded in-phase and tightly coupled variability between the two proxies indicating a similar source of influence that is predominantly driven by SST over seasonal to interannual timescales. However, the fossil coral records display distinct interannual variability and longer-term decadal variability (~11-14 years) in both Sr/Ca and δ18O that are decoupled from each other indicating deviations in SSS and differences in primary drivers of proxy variability between past and modern conditions. In addition

  18. Caribbean brackish and freshwater Cyanophyceae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, Joséphine Th.

    1960-01-01

    Among the extensive collections of algae made by Dr P. Wagenaar Hummelinck (Utrecht) in the Antilles and adjacent regions during the years 1930, 1936, 1937, 1948—1949, 1955, a number of chiefly brackish, but also freshwater, Cyanophyceae were incorporated. This collection was kindly committed for

  19. Home-making of older Antillean migrants in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijering, Louise; Lager, Debbie

    2014-05-01

    A group of 141,345 immigrants from the Netherlands Antilles, a former colony, live in the Netherlands. An increasing number of these migrants are at or above retirement age, and for them, the question of where they want to grow old becomes relevant. It is important for people to age in a place where they feel at home, as attachment to place increases wellbeing in old age. In this article we discuss how older Antillean migrants in the Netherlands make their house and immediate living environment into a home. We focus on home-making practices in a broader cultural context, and in relation to wellbeing. These topics are addressed by drawing on qualitative life-history interviews with Antillean older people, who live in a co-housing community for older adults. It turns out that objects which remind the participants of their home country play an important role in making a home. Also, the community, with people from similar backgrounds, contributes to a sense of home. Finally, the presence of children and other family members is a key motivation for the participants' decision to age in the Netherlands.

  20. Identifying Eruption Dynamics in the Northern Lesser Antilles Using Cryptotephra

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCanta, M. C.; Hatfield, R. G.

    2016-12-01

    We have developed a method to analyze deep sea sediment cores in a non-destructive manner using a combination of visible shortwave infrared (VSWIR) spectroscopy, magnetic susceptibility, and core scanning XRF (McCanta et al., 2016). We have successfully applied this method to the upper 10 m of IODP core U1396C, collected off the coast of Montserrat, Lesser Antilles, identifying 29 cryptotephra layers within the analyzed material. From these 29 layers, physical samples from eight identified layers were collected, dissolved, and disaggregated, with the remaining material subjected to traditional point counting. Volcaniclastic material was classified into six categories: (1) volcanic glass shards and white mineral fragments; (2) black mineral fragments; (3) vesicular or pumiceous material; (4) non-vesicular lava clasts; (5) altered lava clasts (red in color); (6) mafic scoria clasts. We have identified two spectral regions at 0.9 and 2.2 µm that can be used to distinguish volcaniclastic from hemipelagic sediment. The source of the volcanic signal in the VSWIR region (i.e., what components contribute to the spectral features used to identify volcanic material) does not appear to be a single volcaniclastic component, but varies throughout the analyzed layers. There is a negative correlation observed between non-vescicular and vescicular components (see figure). This suggests that the changing volcaniclastic input may be related to eruption type: explosive (pumiceous) vs. effusive (non-vescicular). This non-destructive, multi-proxy approach to cryptotephra identification allows for greatly reduced physical sampling of precious drill core material and potential identification of multiple small events within intervals traditionally averaged over during point counting. In addition to identification, physical observation of volcaniclastic material can be used to place constraints on the dynamic nature of the eruption thereby expanding our understanding of the temporal

  1. Spinoza and the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. van Bunge (Wiep)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractMoving to my topic of Spinoza and the Netherlands, two separate questions present themselves: what did the Netherlands mean to Spinoza, and reversely, what did Spinoza mean to the Netherlands?

  2. Indicators on the status and trends of ecosystems in the Dutch Caribbean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, P.J.F.M.; Meesters, H.W.G.; Debrot, A.O.

    2015-01-01

    The Caribbean islands of Bonaire, Saba, St.Eustatius, Aruba, Curacao and St. Maarten are part of the Kingdom of the Netherlands. The islands have a rich biological diversity and a variety of globally threatened ecosystems. These ecosystems are important for their services such as the production of

  3. Deep-water sponges (Porifera) from Bonaire and Klein Curacao, Southern Caribbean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soest, R.W.M.; Meesters, H.W.G.; Becking, L.E.

    2014-01-01

    Four submersible dives off the coast of Bonaire (Caribbean Netherlands) and Klein Curaçao (Curaçao) to depths of 99.5–242 m, covering lower mesophotic and upper dysphotic zones, yielded 52 sponge specimens belonging to 31 species. Among these we identified 13 species as new to science. These are

  4. TOURISM MULTIPLIERS FOR A SMALL CARIBBEAN ISLAND STATE; THE CASE OF ARUBA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenge, Albert E.; Van De Steeg, Annemieke M.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we study the importance of tourism for Aruba, a small Caribbean island state within the Kingdom of The Netherlands. We present an input-output table based on the National Accounts and the Tourism Satellite Account for Aruba, with inbound tourism explicitly included, for the year 1999.

  5. Hygrophoraceae (Agaricales) of the Greater Antilles : Hygrocybe subgenus Pseudohygrocybe sections Coccineae and Neohygrocybe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon A. Cantrell; D. Jean Lodge

    2004-01-01

    A key to 17 species in the genus Hygrocybe, subgenus Pseudohygrocybe, sections Coccineae and Neohygrocybe sensu Boertmann is provided for the Greater Antilles. Five new species and five taxa that are new reports for the region are described. The new species in section Coccineae are H. pseudoadonis, H. viridiphylla, and H. zonata. The new species in section Neohygrocybe...

  6. Petrogenesis of meta-volcanic rocks from the Maimón Formation (Dominican Republic): Geochemical record of the nascent Greater Antilles paleo-arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torró, Lisard; Proenza, Joaquín A.; Marchesi, Claudio; Garcia-Casco, Antonio; Lewis, John F.

    2017-05-01

    stages transitional between FAB and first-island arc magmatism, whereas Group 2 boninitic lavas resulted from focused flux melting and higher degrees of melt extraction in a more mature stage of subduction. Group 3 basalts probably represent magmatism taking place immediately before the establishment of a steady-state subduction regime. The relatively high extents of flux melting and slab input recorded in the Maimón lavas support a scenario of hot subduction beneath the nascent Greater Antilles paleo-arc. Paleotectonic reconstructions and the markedly depleted, though heterogeneous character of the mantle source, indicate the rise of shallow asthenosphere which had sourced mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB) and/or back-arc basin basalts (BABB) in the proto-Caribbean domain prior to the inception of SW-dipping subduction. Relative to the neighbouring Aptian-Albian Los Ranchos Formation, we suggest that Maimón volcanic rocks extruded more proximal to the vertical projection of the subducting proto-Caribbean spreading ridge.

  7. A quantitative assessment of the vegetation types on the island of St. Eustatius, Dutch Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinde van Andel

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Caribbean dry forests are among the most endangered tropical ecosystems on earth. Several studies exist on their floristic composition and their recovery after natural or man-made disturbances, but little is known on the small Dutch Caribbean islands. In this study, we present quantitative data on plant species richness and abundance on St. Eustatius, one of the smallest islands of the Lesser Antilles. We collected and identified trees, shrubs, lianas and herbs in 11 plots of 25 x 25 m in different vegetation types. We compared their floristic composition and structure to vegetation surveys from roughly the same locations in the 1990s and 1950s. We found substantial differences among our 11 plots: vegetation types varied from evergreen forests to deciduous shrubland and open woodland. The number of tree species ≥10 cm DBH ranged between one and 17, and their density between three and 82 per plot. In spite that all plots were subject to grazing by free roaming cattle, canopy height and floristic diversity have increased in the last decades. Invasive species are present in the open vegetation types, but not under (partly closed canopy. Comparison with the earlier surveys showed that the decline of agriculture and conservation efforts resulted in the regeneration of dry forests between the 1950s and 2015. This process has also been reported from nearby islands and offers good opportunities for the future conservation of Caribbean dry forests.

  8. Traditional healing practices originating in Aruba, Bonaire, and Curacao : A review of the literature on psychiatry and Brua

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, Jan Dirk; Poulina, Igmar T.; van Gellecum, Trevor L.; Hoek, Hans W.

    2015-01-01

    Brua is an Afro-Caribbean religion and healing tradition from the southern part of the former Netherlands Antilles. Like other Caribbean healing traditions, it plays a significant role in shaping how individuals experience and express disorders which Western health professionals consider to require

  9. A prehistoric tsunami induced long-lasting ecosystem changes on a semi-arid tropical island--the case of Boka Bartol (Bonaire, Leeward Antilles).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Max; Brückner, Helmut; Fürstenberg, Sascha; Frenzel, Peter; Konopczak, Anna Maria; Scheffers, Anja; Kelletat, Dieter; May, Simon Matthias; Schäbitz, Frank; Daut, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    The Caribbean is highly vulnerable to coastal hazards. Based on their short recurrence intervals over the intra-American seas, high-category tropical cyclones and their associated effects of elevated storm surge, heavy wave impacts, mudslides and floods represent the most serious threat. Given the abundance of historical accounts and trigger mechanisms (strike-slip motion and oblique collision at the northern and southern Caribbean plate boundaries, submarine and coastal landslides, volcanism), tsunamis must be considered as well. This paper presents interdisciplinary multi-proxy investigations of sediment cores (grain size distribution, carbonate content, loss-on-ignition, magnetic susceptibility, microfauna, macrofauna) from Washington-Slagbaai National Park, NW Bonaire (Leeward Antilles). No historical tsunami is recorded for this island. However, an allochthonous marine layer found in all cores at Boka Bartol reveals several sedimentary criteria typically linked with tsunami deposits. Calibrated (14)C data from these cores point to a palaeotsunami with a maximum age of 3,300 years. Alternative explanations for the creation of this layer, such as inland flooding during tropical cyclones, cannot entirely be ruled out, though in recent times even the strongest of these events on Bonaire did not deposit significant amounts of sediment onshore. The setting of Boka Bartol changed from an open mangrove-fringed embayment into a poly- to hyperhaline lagoon due to the establishment or closure of a barrier of coral rubble during or subsequent to the inferred event. The timing of the event is supported by further sedimentary evidence from other lagoonal and alluvial archives on Bonaire.

  10. A prehistoric tsunami induced long-lasting ecosystem changes on a semi-arid tropical island—the case of Boka Bartol (Bonaire, Leeward Antilles)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Max; Brückner, Helmut; Fürstenberg, Sascha; Frenzel, Peter; Konopczak, Anna Maria; Scheffers, Anja; Kelletat, Dieter; May, Simon Matthias; Schäbitz, Frank; Daut, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    The Caribbean is highly vulnerable to coastal hazards. Based on their short recurrence intervals over the intra-American seas, high-category tropical cyclones and their associated effects of elevated storm surge, heavy wave impacts, mudslides and floods represent the most serious threat. Given the abundance of historical accounts and trigger mechanisms (strike-slip motion and oblique collision at the northern and southern Caribbean plate boundaries, submarine and coastal landslides, volcanism), tsunamis must be considered as well. This paper presents interdisciplinary multi-proxy investigations of sediment cores (grain size distribution, carbonate content, loss-on-ignition, magnetic susceptibility, microfauna, macrofauna) from Washington-Slagbaai National Park, NW Bonaire (Leeward Antilles). No historical tsunami is recorded for this island. However, an allochthonous marine layer found in all cores at Boka Bartol reveals several sedimentary criteria typically linked with tsunami deposits. Calibrated 14C data from these cores point to a palaeotsunami with a maximum age of 3,300 years. Alternative explanations for the creation of this layer, such as inland flooding during tropical cyclones, cannot entirely be ruled out, though in recent times even the strongest of these events on Bonaire did not deposit significant amounts of sediment onshore. The setting of Boka Bartol changed from an open mangrove-fringed embayment into a poly- to hyperhaline lagoon due to the establishment or closure of a barrier of coral rubble during or subsequent to the inferred event. The timing of the event is supported by further sedimentary evidence from other lagoonal and alluvial archives on Bonaire.

  11. The Filistatidae in the Caribbean region, with a description of the new genus Antilloides, revision of the genus Filistatoides F. O. P.-Cambridge and notes on Kukulcania Lehtinen (Arachnida, Araneae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brescovit, Antonio D; Ruiz, Alexander Sánchez; Garcia, Giraldo Alayón

    2016-07-07

    A synopsis of Caribbean filistatid diversity is recorded herein. A new genus, Antilloides, is proposed for five new species exclusively found in the Antilles: A. abeli n. sp., A. cubitas n. sp., and A. mesoliticus n. sp. from Cuba; A. haitises n. sp. from the Dominican Republic; and A. zozo n. sp. from the U. S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico. The genus Filistatoides is revised and includes four species: the type species F. insignis F.O.P. Cambridge, which occurs only in Guatemala; the female is described here for the first time; F. polita Franganillo sp. reval., comb. nov., which occurs only in Cuba; F. xichu n. sp. described from Mexico; and F. milloti (Zapfe) which does not appear to belong to the genus based on morphological structures. Additionally, Kukulcania isolinae Alayón is synonymized with Kukulcania hibernalis (Hentz), and new records of its distribution are included for the Greater and Lesser Antilles.

  12. The European Union and the Caribbean Region: Situating the Caribbean Overseas Countries and Territories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Sutton

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:This paper examines one important dimension of the European Union's (EU 'regional' engagement with the Caribbean: its relations with the Overseas Countries and Territories (OCT, with a particular focus on the possibility of furthering the policy goals of greater regional integration and cooperation. It does so in three parts. The first sets out the basis for current EU policy to the OCT which has been under discussion between the EU, the OCT and the four EU member states most involved (Denmark, France, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom since 2008. It reports EU proposals for change and the responses to them by the Caribbean OCTs. The second part examines EU policy toward promoting greater regional cooperation among the Caribbean OCTs and between them and some of the other Caribbean regional organizations. Three distinct frameworks for cooperation and integration are discussed: with independent states as established in the Caribbean Community, the Caribbean Forum and the Economic Partnership Agreement; with the French departments and collectivities; and with the Caribbean OCT. In each the position of the Caribbean OCT is situated. The final part briefly discusses the creation of a 'new' framework for regional cooperation specific for the Caribbean OCT which will most closely match their interests in the Caribbean.Resumen: La Unión Europea y la Región del Caribe: Situando a los Países y Territorios de Ultramar del CaribeEste ensayo analiza una dimensión importante de la Unión Europea (UE 'regional' y su compromiso con el Caribe: de igual manera sus relaciones con los Países y Territorios de Ultramar (PTU, con un enfoque particular sobre la posibilidad de promover los objetivos de la política con una mayor integración regional y cooperación. Este proceso se desglosa en tres partes. La primera establece la base para la actual política de la UE hacia los PTU, ya que esta ha sido objeto de debate entre los mismos y los cuatro

  13. IDRC in the Caribbean

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Since the early 1970s, IDRC has supported the efforts of researchers in the English-speaking Caribbean to reduce poverty and inequality, restore degraded coastal ecosystems, and protect communities against disease and natural disasters. Research has helped to improve farming and fishing practices and tackle.

  14. [Imported Zika virus infection in the Netherlands].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Eije, Karin J; Schinkel, Janke; van den Kerkhof, J H C T Hans; Schreuder, Imke; de Jong, Menno D; Grobusch, Martin P; Goorhuis, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    Since mid-2015, a rapidly expanding outbreak of Zika virus infection is spreading across Latin America and the Caribbean. Although Zika virus infection usually causes only mild disease, the World Health Organization has declared the epidemiological association with the occurrence of congenital microcephaly and neurological complications a 'Public Health Emergency of International Concern' and urged the international community to mount a coordinated international response aimed to protect people at risk, especially pregnant women. In December 2015, the first case of imported Zika virus infection in the Netherlands was diagnosed in a returned traveler from Surinam. To date, more than 20 cases have been reported in The Netherlands, all imported from Surinam. We describe the epidemiology, clinical aspects, diagnostic challenges and the existing evidence to date that link Zika virus infection to complications.

  15. Caribbean AIDS explosion examined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-03-13

    Homophobia, sex tourism, infidelity, and poverty are major factors causing a rapid explosion of AIDS and increasingly infecting women in the Caribbean. The region has the second largest incidence of AIDS in the world after Africa. The number of people with the HIV virus is likely greater than 500,000 and could be as high as 700,000, about twice the previously reported figures. Societal norms encourage homosexuals to have heterosexual relationships, and married men to have extramarital affairs, while poverty forces men and women to prostitution, often with tourists. In addition, a survey of 8100 school children in 4 English-speaking Caribbean islands revealed that 42% of the children had experienced sex before the age of 10 years; 62% had experienced it by age 12. This finding may reflect a high rate of child molestation in the region.

  16. The polyphased tectonic evolution of the Anegada Passage in the northern Lesser Antilles subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurencin, M.; Marcaillou, B.; Graindorge, D.; Klingelhoefer, F.; Lallemand, S.; Laigle, M.; Lebrun, J.-F.

    2017-05-01

    The influence of the highly oblique plate convergence at the northern Lesser Antilles onto the margin strain partitioning and deformation pattern, although frequently invoked, has never been clearly imaged. The Anegada Passage is a set of basins and deep valleys, regularly related to the southern boundary of the Puerto Rico-Virgin Islands (PRVI) microplate. Despite the publications of various tectonic models mostly based on bathymetric data, the tectonic origin and deformation of this Passage remains unconstrained in the absence of deep structure imaging. During cruises Antithesis 1 and 3 (2013-2016), we recorded the first deep multichannel seismic images and new multibeam data in the northern Lesser Antilles margin segment in order to shed a new light on the structure and tectonic pattern of the Anegada Passage. We image the northeastern extent of the Anegada Passage, from the Sombrero Basin to the Lesser Antilles margin front. Our results reveal that this northeastern segment is an EW trending left-stepping en échelon strike-slip system that consists of the Sombrero and Malliwana pull-apart basins, the Malliwana and Anguilla left-lateral faults, and the NE-SW compressional restraining bend at the Malliwana Hill. Reviewing the structure of the Anegada Passage, from the south of Puerto Rico to the Lesser Antilles margin front, reveals a polyphased tectonic history. The Anegada Passage is formed by a NW-SE extension, possibly related to the rotation or escape of PRVI block due to collision of the Bahamas Bank. Currently, it is deformed by an active WNW-ESE strike-slip deformation associated to the shear component of the strain partitioning resulting from the subduction obliquity.

  17. TSUNAMI CATALOG AND VULNERABILITY OF MARTINIQUE (LESSER ANTILLES, FRANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger, J.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In addition to meteorological hazards (hurricanes, heavy rainfalls, long-period swells, etc., the Caribbean Islands are vulnerable to geological hazards such as earthquakes, landslides and volcanic eruptions caused by the complex tectonic activity and interactions in the region. Such events have generated frequently local or regional tsunamis, which often have affected the island of Martinique in the French West Indies. Over the past centuries, the island has been struck by destructive waves associated with local or regional events - such as those associated with the eruption of the Saint-Vincent volcano in 1902 and by tsunamis of distant origin as that generated by the 1755 Lisbon earthquake.The present study includes a classification of tsunamis that have affected Martinique since its discovery in 1502. It is based on international tsunami catalogs, historical accounts, and previous scientific studies and identifies tsunamigenic areas that could potentially generate destructive waves that could impact specific coastal areas of Martinique Island. The potential threat from tsunamis has been greatly increasing because of rapid urban expansion of coastal areas and development of tourism on the island.

  18. A review of the Cercyon Leach (Coleoptera, Hydrophilidae, Sphaeridiinae of the Greater Antilles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Arriaga-Varela

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The representatives of the genus Cercyon Leach occurring in the Greater Antilles are reviewed. Ten species are recorded, of which five are described here as new: C. gimmeli sp. n. (Dominican Republic, C. armatipenis sp. n. (Dominican Republic, C. taino sp. n. (Dominican Republic, C. sklodowskae sp. n. (Jamaica and C. spiniventris sp. n. (Dominican Republic. Diagnoses and detailed distributional data are also provided for C. floridanus Horn, 1890 (distributed in southeastern United States of America and Cayman Islands, C. insularis Chevrolat, 1863 (endemic to the Antilles C. praetextatus (Say, 1825 (widely distributed in the New World incl. Greater Antilles, C. quisquilius (Linnaeus, 1761 (an adventive species of Paleartic origin and C. nigriceps (Marshall, 1802 (an adventive species probably of Oriental origin. Cercyon armatipenis, C. gimmeli, C. taino form a group of closely related species only distinguishable by male genitalia and DNA sequences. A key to the Great Antillean Cercyon is provided and important diagnostic characters are illustrated. The larvae of C. insularis and C. taino were associated with adults using COI barcode sequences, illustrated and diagnosed. Full occurrence data, additional images and COI barcode sequences were submitted to open access on-line depositories in an effort to provide access to complete data.

  19. A low-cost and reliable technique to monitor the spread of an invasive seagrass in the Caribbean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobsis, D.; Wyllie-Echeverria, S.

    2016-02-01

    In 2002 the seagrass Halophila stipulacea was observed in Grenada in the Eastern Caribbean Sea. Since then this invasive species has spread northward through the Lesser Antilles and Leeward Islands into the US Virgin Islands. There are native Halophila species as well as other seagrass species in Eastern Caribbean therefore it is essential to accurately identify H. stipulacea before an invasion event is reported. Moreover, because the consequences of H. stipulaceapresence and spread are not known in many locations, after accurate identification is made it is also important to map patch expansion as a first step in process studies designed to determine impact. We now report a low-cost (filming (Norris et al. 1997). After sampling images and their associated GPS coordinates are imported to a spreadsheet and coded such that H. stipulaceais related to a known position on the bottom. With this system we produce accurate maps that specifically identify H. stipulacea patches, regardless of water depth, on the seafloor. During our poster presentation we will show a series of images from 2015 sampling and display mapping results. Since the 2002 sighting in Grenada, H. stipulaceae has spread northward to nineteen Eastern Caribbean Islands (Williette et al 2014). Our technique will allow those charged with protecting natural resources to track the spread of this invasion and potentially provide an early warning system for islands nations not yet invaded.

  20. Not of African Descent: Dental Modification among Indigenous Caribbean People from Canímar Abajo, Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roksandic, Mirjana; Alarie, Kaitlynn; Rodríguez Suárez, Roberto; Huebner, Erwin; Roksandic, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Dental modifications in the Caribbean are considered to be an African practice introduced to the Caribbean archipelago by the influx of enslaved Africans during colonial times. Skeletal remains which exhibited dental modifications are by default considered to be Africans, African descendants, or post-contact indigenous people influenced by an African practice. Individual E-105 from the site of Canímar Abajo (Cuba), with a direct 14C AMS date of 990-800 cal BC, provides the first unequivocal evidence of dental modifications in the Antilles prior to contact with Europeans in AD 1492. Central incisors showing evidence of significant crown reduction (loss of crown volume regardless of its etiology) were examined macroscopically and with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to determine if the observed alterations were due to deliberate modification or other (unintentional) factors considered: postmortem breakage, violent accidental breakage, non-dietary use of teeth, and wear caused by habitual or repeated actions. The pattern of crown reduction is consistent with deliberate dental modification of the type commonly encountered among African and African descendent communities in post-contact Caribbean archaeological assemblages. Six additional individuals show similar pattern of crown reduction of maxillary incisors with no analogous wear in corresponding mandibular dentition.

  1. Relationship between anthropogenic impacts and bleaching-associated tissue mortality of corals in Curaçao (Netherlands Antilles)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagelkerken, I.

    2007-01-01

    Chronic anthropogenic impacts can have a negative effect on coral health and on coral energy budgets needed for regeneration of lesions. I therefore hypothesise that during massive bleaching events, the degree of corals showing bleaching-related tissue mortality is higher in areas subject to chronic

  2. Bivergent thrust wedges surrounding oceanic island arcs: Insight from observations and sandbox models of the northeastern caribbean plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Brink, Uri S.; Marshak, S.; Granja, Bruna J. L.

    2009-01-01

    At several localities around the world, thrust belts have developed on both sides of oceanic island arcs (e.g., Java-Timor, Panama, Vanuatu, and the northeastern Caribbean). In these localities, the overall vergence of the backarc thrust belt is opposite to that of the forearc thrust belt. For example, in the northeastern Caribbean, a north-verging accretionary prism lies to the north of the Eastern Greater Antilles arc (Hispaniola and Puerto Rico), whereas a south-verging thrust belt called the Muertos thrust belt lies to the south. Researchers have attributed such bivergent geometry to several processes, including: reversal of subduction polarity; subduction-driven mantle flow; stress transmission across the arc; gravitational spreading of the arc; and magmatic inflation within the arc. New observations of deformational features in the Muertos thrust belt and of fault geometries produced in sandbox kinematic models, along with examination of published studies of island arcs, lead to the conclusion that the bivergence of thrusting in island arcs can develop without reversal of subduction polarity, without subarc mantle flow, and without magmatic inflation. We suggest that the Eastern Greater Antilles arc and comparable arcs are simply crustalscale bivergent (or "doubly vergent") thrust wedges formed during unidirectional subduction. Sandbox kinematic modeling suggests, in addition, that a broad retrowedge containing an imbricate fan of thrusts develops only where the arc behaves relatively rigidly. In such cases, the arc acts as a backstop that transmits compressive stress into the backarc region. Further, modeling shows that when arcs behave as rigid blocks, the strike-slip component of oblique convergence is accommodated entirely within the prowedge and the arc-the retrowedge hosts only dip-slip faulting ("frontal thrusting"). The existence of large retrowedges and the distribution of faulting in an island arc may, therefore, be evidence that the arc is

  3. CARIBE WAVE/LANTEX Caribbean and Western Atlantic Tsunami Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hillebrandt-Andrade, C.; Whitmore, P.; Aliaga, B.; Huerfano Moreno, V.

    2013-12-01

    Over 75 tsunamis have been documented in the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions over the past 500 years. While most have been generated by local earthquakes, distant generated tsunamis can also affect the region. For example, waves from the 1755 Lisbon earthquake and tsunami were observed in Cuba, Dominican Republic, British Virgin Islands, as well as Antigua, Martinique, Guadalupe and Barbados in the Lesser Antilles. Since 1500, at least 4484 people are reported to have perished in these killer waves. Although the tsunami generated by the 2010 Haiti earthquake claimed only a few lives, in the 1530 El Pilar, Venezuela; 1602 Port Royale, Jamaica; 1918 Puerto Rico; and 1946 Samaná, Dominican Republic tsunamis the death tolls ranged to over a thousand. Since then, there has been an explosive increase in residents, visitors, infrastructure, and economic activity along the coastlines, increasing the potential for human and economic loss. It has been estimated that on any day, upwards of more than 500,000 people could be in harm's way just along the beaches, with hundreds of thousands more working and living in the tsunamis hazard zones. Given the relative infrequency of tsunamis, exercises are a valuable tool to test communications, evaluate preparedness and raise awareness. Exercises in the Caribbean are conducted under the framework of the UNESCO IOC Intergovernmental Coordination Group for the Tsunami and other Coastal Hazards Warning System for the Caribbean and Adjacent Regions (CARIBE EWS) and the US National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program. On March 23, 2011, 34 countries and territories participated in the first CARIBE WAVE/LANTEX regional tsunami exercise, while in the second exercise on March 20, 2013 a total of 45 countries and territories participated. 481 organizations (almost 200 more than in 2011) also registered to receive the bulletins issued by the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center (PTWC), West Coast and Alaska Tsunami Warning Center and/or the Puerto Rico

  4. Petrogenesis of fertile mantle peridotites from the Monte del Estado massif (southwest Puerto Rico): a preserved section of Proto-Caribbean oceanic lithospheric mantle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesi, Claudio; Jolly, Wayne T.; Lewis, John F.; Garrido, Carlos J.; Proenza, Joaquín. A.; Lidiak, Edward G.

    2010-05-01

    The Monte del Estado massif is the largest and northernmost serpentinized peridotite belt in southwest Puerto Rico. It is mainly composed of spinel lherzolite and minor harzburgite with variable clinopyroxene modal abundances. Mineral and whole rock major and trace element compositions of peridotites coincide with those of fertile abyssal peridotites from mid ocean ridges. Peridotites lost 2-14 wt% of relative MgO and variable amounts of CaO by serpentinization and seafloor weathering. HREE contents in whole rock indicate that the Monte del Estado peridotites are residues after low to moderate degrees (2-15%) of fractional partial melting in the spinel stability field. However, very low LREE/HREE and MREE/HREE in clinopyroxene cannot be explained by melting models of a spinel lherzolite source and support that the Monte del Estado peridotites experienced initial low fractional melting degrees (~ 4%) in the garnet stability field. The relative enrichment of LREE in whole rock is not due to secondary processes but probably reflects the capture of percolating melt fractions along grain boundaries or as microinclusions in minerals, or the presence of exotic micro-phases in the mineral assemblage. We propose that the Monte del Estado peridotite belt represents a section of ancient Proto-Caribbean (Atlantic) lithospheric mantle originated by seafloor spreading between North and South America in the Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous. This portion of oceanic lithospheric mantle was subsequently trapped in the forearc region of the Greater Antilles paleo-island arc generated by the northward subduction of the Caribbean plate beneath the Proto-Caribbean ocean. Finally, the Monte del Estado peridotites belt was emplaced in the Early Cretaceous probably as result of the change in subduction polarity of the Greater Antilles paleo-island arc without having been significantly modified by subduction processes.

  5. The Caribbean after-shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canak, W L; Levy, D

    1988-03-01

    The population of the Caribbean islands, is expected to double by the mid-21st century, placing new pressures on local labor markets and economic resources and increasing the need for social expenditures. Most of this growth will take place in urban areas. Emigration to the US is an increasingly important trend, especially in the Dominican Republic, Haiti, and Jamaica, and local Caribbean economies are linked with labor markets in the US through a system of family remittances. Oil price hikes, escalating debt burdens, and falling export prices have created an economic crisis in the Caribbean since the late 1970s. There has been double-digit inflation, rising unemployment, and only sporadic growth in the gross national product. The Caribbean Basin Initiative, established by the Reagan Administration, provides the Caribbean nations with duty-free export entry to the US market for 12 years and targets manufacturing, tourism, agriculture, and foreign investment for growth. Overall, however, the results of this initiative have been an effective subsidy to US investors and little stimulus for growth in locally owned businesses. Haiti and the Dominican Republic are the islands with the most poverty, while Trinidad and Tobago are the most prosperous. Puerto Rico plays an important role in the Caribbean region, serving as a link between North and South America and between cultural differences.

  6. Caribbean corals in crisis: record thermal stress, bleaching, and mortality in 2005.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Mark Eakin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The rising temperature of the world's oceans has become a major threat to coral reefs globally as the severity and frequency of mass coral bleaching and mortality events increase. In 2005, high ocean temperatures in the tropical Atlantic and Caribbean resulted in the most severe bleaching event ever recorded in the basin. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Satellite-based tools provided warnings for coral reef managers and scientists, guiding both the timing and location of researchers' field observations as anomalously warm conditions developed and spread across the greater Caribbean region from June to October 2005. Field surveys of bleaching and mortality exceeded prior efforts in detail and extent, and provided a new standard for documenting the effects of bleaching and for testing nowcast and forecast products. Collaborators from 22 countries undertook the most comprehensive documentation of basin-scale bleaching to date and found that over 80% of corals bleached and over 40% died at many sites. The most severe bleaching coincided with waters nearest a western Atlantic warm pool that was centered off the northern end of the Lesser Antilles. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Thermal stress during the 2005 event exceeded any observed from the Caribbean in the prior 20 years, and regionally-averaged temperatures were the warmest in over 150 years. Comparison of satellite data against field surveys demonstrated a significant predictive relationship between accumulated heat stress (measured using NOAA Coral Reef Watch's Degree Heating Weeks and bleaching intensity. This severe, widespread bleaching and mortality will undoubtedly have long-term consequences for reef ecosystems and suggests a troubled future for tropical marine ecosystems under a warming climate.

  7. Caribbean Corals in Crisis: Record Thermal Stress, Bleaching, and Mortality in 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eakin, C. Mark; Morgan, Jessica A.; Heron, Scott F.; Smith, Tyler B.; Liu, Gang; Alvarez-Filip, Lorenzo; Baca, Bart; Bartels, Erich; Bastidas, Carolina; Bouchon, Claude; Brandt, Marilyn; Bruckner, Andrew W.; Bunkley-Williams, Lucy; Cameron, Andrew; Causey, Billy D.; Chiappone, Mark; Christensen, Tyler R. L.; Crabbe, M. James C; Day, Owen; de la Guardia, Elena; Díaz-Pulido, Guillermo; DiResta, Daniel; Gil-Agudelo, Diego L.; Gilliam, David S.; Ginsburg, Robert N.; Gore, Shannon; Guzmán, Héctor M.; Hendee, James C.; Hernández-Delgado, Edwin A.; Husain, Ellen; Jeffrey, Christopher F. G.; Jones, Ross J.; Jordán-Dahlgren, Eric; Kaufman, Les S.; Kline, David I.; Kramer, Philip A.; Lang, Judith C.; Lirman, Diego; Mallela, Jennie; Manfrino, Carrie; Maréchal, Jean-Philippe; Marks, Ken; Mihaly, Jennifer; Miller, W. Jeff; Mueller, Erich M.; Muller, Erinn M.; Orozco Toro, Carlos A.; Oxenford, Hazel A.; Ponce-Taylor, Daniel; Quinn, Norman; Ritchie, Kim B.; Rodríguez, Sebastián; Ramírez, Alberto Rodríguez; Romano, Sandra; Samhouri, Jameal F.; Sánchez, Juan A.; Schmahl, George P.; Shank, Burton V.; Skirving, William J.; Steiner, Sascha C. C.; Villamizar, Estrella; Walsh, Sheila M.; Walter, Cory; Weil, Ernesto; Williams, Ernest H.; Roberson, Kimberly Woody; Yusuf, Yusri

    2010-01-01

    Background The rising temperature of the world's oceans has become a major threat to coral reefs globally as the severity and frequency of mass coral bleaching and mortality events increase. In 2005, high ocean temperatures in the tropical Atlantic and Caribbean resulted in the most severe bleaching event ever recorded in the basin. Methodology/Principal Findings Satellite-based tools provided warnings for coral reef managers and scientists, guiding both the timing and location of researchers' field observations as anomalously warm conditions developed and spread across the greater Caribbean region from June to October 2005. Field surveys of bleaching and mortality exceeded prior efforts in detail and extent, and provided a new standard for documenting the effects of bleaching and for testing nowcast and forecast products. Collaborators from 22 countries undertook the most comprehensive documentation of basin-scale bleaching to date and found that over 80% of corals bleached and over 40% died at many sites. The most severe bleaching coincided with waters nearest a western Atlantic warm pool that was centered off the northern end of the Lesser Antilles. Conclusions/Significance Thermal stress during the 2005 event exceeded any observed from the Caribbean in the prior 20 years, and regionally-averaged temperatures were the warmest in over 150 years. Comparison of satellite data against field surveys demonstrated a significant predictive relationship between accumulated heat stress (measured using NOAA Coral Reef Watch's Degree Heating Weeks) and bleaching intensity. This severe, widespread bleaching and mortality will undoubtedly have long-term consequences for reef ecosystems and suggests a troubled future for tropical marine ecosystems under a warming climate. PMID:21125021

  8. Caribbean fresh and brackish water Chlorophyta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, van den C.

    1959-01-01

    During his zoological collecting trips to the Antilles Dr. P. Wagenaar Hummelinck also gathered several samples of fresh and brackish water algae, which have been presented to the Rijksherbarium, Leiden. The present paper deals with the Chlorophyta of that collection, with the exception of

  9. The Caribbean and the Wild Coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Goslinga

    1992-07-01

    Full Text Available [First paragraph] Suriname: a bibliography, 1980-1989. Jo DERKX & IRENE ROLFES. Leiden, the Netherlands: Department of Caribbean Studies, KITLV/Royal Institute of Linguistics and Anthropology, 1990. x + 297 pp. (Paper NLG 25.00 La Caraïbe politique et internationale: bibliographie politologique avec références économiques et socio-culturelles. MICHEL L. MARTIN. Paris: L'Harmattan, 1990. xvii + 287 pp. Suriname. ROSEMARIJN HOEFTE. Oxford and Santa Barbara CA: Clio Press, 1990. xxx + 229 pp. (Cloth US$ 45.00 Although in North American academie circles interest in Suriname (or the Wild Coast, as the area was originally called has always been marginal, the same cannot be said for the Dutch, for whom the former colony continues to hold an enduring fascination. Not only have the Dutch studied the country's historical beginnings assiduously, but Suriname's controversial relationship with the former mother country assures it a definite place in contemporary social and political thought.

  10. On the role of rising global temperatures on 2015-2016 Caribbean drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, D. A.; Ault, T.

    2016-12-01

    In 2015 the Caribbean faced one of the worst droughts ever recorded. On some islands, like Cuba, the event represents the worst in over 100 years. Although this exceptional drought has been linked primarily to the recent El Niño, it is unclear whether its severity could have been enhanced by anthropogenic climate change. In this work, an analysis of the role played by anthropogenic warming on the 2015-2016 drought in the Caribbean is presented, using high-resolution drought datasets based on the self-calibrated Palmer Drought Severity Index (scPDSI), with the Penman-Monteith approximation of evapotranspiration. This effort further uses statistically-downscaled reanalysis products that span 1950 to the near present to establish an historical baseline for characterizing and monitoring drought in real time. The relative contribution of global warming is estimated by comparing the scPDSI calculated using detrended temperatures, against the scPDSI computed with the observed trend while holding all other terms at their historical or climatological values. Results indicate that during 2015, 70% of the Caribbean was affected by mild drought (-2 to -3 scPDSI units), 43% by moderate drought (-4 to -3) and 14% by severe drought (<-4). Consequently, this event was the most regionally-widespread since at least 1950. In contrast, during the 1997 drought, 47% of the region was under mild drought, 25% moderate drought and 8% severe drought. The approximate relative contribution of warmth on the 2015-2016 event varies substantially along the Caribbean, ranging from 8-12% in Puerto Rico and Lesser Antilles, to 14-29 % in Cuba and the Hispaniola Island. The inherent insular nature of the Caribbean island make them especially vulnerable to drought because water cannot be collected, moved, and stored on large spatial scales, like it can in the US Southwest. These results underscore the likely role climate change is playing in exacerbating regional drought impacts by favoring higher

  11. Cultural diversity in center-based childcare: Childrearing beliefs of professional caregivers from different cultural communities in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijbregts, S.K.; Leseman, P.P.M.; Tavecchio, L.W.C.

    2008-01-01

    The present study investigated the cultural childrearing beliefs of 116 caregivers from different cultural communities in the Netherlands (Dutch, Caribbean-Dutch, and Mediterranean-Dutch), working with 2-4-year-olds in daycare centers. Cultural childrearing beliefs were assessed with standard

  12. Survey report: Eastern Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yinger, N

    1991-01-01

    Over 1 million people live on 8 small islands in the Eastern Caribbean: St. Kitts-Nevis, Montserrat, Grenada, St. Vincent, Antigua, Barbados, St. Lucia, and Dominica. Starting in 1985 the International Planned Parenthood Federation, Western Hemisphere Region has carried out a series of contraceptive prevalence surveys in these countries. Current information is provided by these surveys in the areas of fertility levels and preferences, contraceptive knowledge and use. Also, socioeconomic, historical and demographic background and analysis such as fertility patterns, desire for additional children, and breastfeeding data; contraceptive awareness including family planning methods and sources; contraceptive use by method, source, and timing, satisfaction, and male attitudes are provided in the surveys, but not in the report abstracted here. The total fertility rate (TFR) and the contraceptive prevalence rate (CPR) for the 8 islands are as follows: St. Kitts-Nevis (1984) 2.9 TFR, 40.6 CPR; St. Vincent (1988) 2.9 TFR, 58.3 CPR; Antigua (1988) 1.8 TFR, 52.6 CPR; Barbados (1988) not given, 55.0 CPR; St. Lucia (1988) 3.2 TFR, 47.3 CPR; Dominica (1987) 3.2 TFR, 49.8 CPR. The islands have unusual demographic patterns related to extensive out-migration.

  13. Artists in and out of the Caribbean

    OpenAIRE

    Sally Price; Sally Price

    1999-01-01

    [First paragraph] Caribbean Art. VEERLE POUPEYE. London: Thames and Hudson, 1998. 224 pp. (Paper US$ 14.95) Transforming the Crown: African, Asian and Caribbean Artists in Britain, 1966-1996. MORA J. BEAUCHAMP-BYRD & M. FRANKLIN SIRMANS (eds.). New York: Caribbean Cultural Center, 1998. 177 pp. (Paper US$ 39.95, £31.95) "Caribbean" (like "Black British") culture is (as a Dutch colleague once said of postmodernism) a bit of a slippery fish. One of the books under ...

  14. Geotectonic Elements, Stuctural Constraints and Current Problems for a Kinematic Reconstruction of the Caribbean Plate Margins during the Cretaceous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giunta, G.

    2001-12-01

    In the Caribbean Plate deformed margins are found relics of the Mid to Late Cretaceous eo-Caribbean tectonic phases, indicating the occurrence of sub-continental subduction zones with melange formation, and HP/LT metamorphism of ophiolitic rocks, and two main stages of intraoceanic subductions involving the unthickened proto-Caribbean oceanic lithosphere and/or supra-subduction complexes. These two stages are marked by the occurrence of (a) HP/LT metamorphic ophiolites and volcano-plutonic sequences with island-arc tholeiitic (IAT) or calc-alkaline (CA) affinities; (b) unmetamorphosed tonalitic intrusions of CA affinity below the proto-Caribbean thickened oceanic plateau. Since the Late Cretaceous the kinematics of the Caribbean Plate is closely related to the eastward drifting of the proto-Caribbean oceanic plateau (Colombia and Venezuela Basins) that produced both a diachronous tonalitic magmatism from 85-82 Ma, associated with a westward dipping oblique subduction of the proto-Caribbean-Atlantic ocean floor below the plateau, and an opposite dismembering of subduction complexes, of different ages along an E-W trend (North and South Caribbean Margins). This seems to be the consequence of the eastward shifting of both the northern and southern triple junctions, while allowing further bending of the Aves- Lesser Antilles arc. Moreover, the Caribbean oceanic plateau was trapped by different rotation rates of the Chortis, Chorotega and Choco blocks, during the construction of the western plate margin (Central American Isthmus). The previous Mid-Late Cretaceous eo-Caribbean evolution, correspondent to the beginning of the compressional conditions in Central America area, is characterized by sub-continental and/or intraoceanic subduction systems with associated IAT and CA arc magmatism. This simplified kinematic approach falls short in explaining (1) the Early Cretaceous paleogeography and morphology of the margins of the North, South American continents and minor

  15. Multiple dating approach (14C, U/Th and 36Cl) of tsunami-transported reef-top megaclasts on Bonaire (Leeward Antilles) - potential and current limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rixhon, Gilles; May, Simon Matthias; Engel, Max; Mechernich, Silke; Keulertz, Rebecca; Schroeder-Ritzrau, Andrea; Fohlmeister, Jens; Frank, Norbert; Dunai, Tibor; Brueckner, Helmut

    2016-04-01

    Coastal hazard assessment depends on reliable information on the magnitude and frequency of past high-energy wave events (EWE: tsunamis, storms). For this purpose onshore sedimentary records represent promising geo-archives for the mid- and late-Holocene EWE history. In comparison to fine-grained sediments which have been extensively studied in the recent past, supralittoral megaclasts are less investigated, essentially due to the difficulties related to the dating of corresponding depositional events, and thus their limited value for inferring the timing of major events. On Bonaire (Leeward Antilles, Caribbean), supratidal coarse-clast deposits form prominent landforms all around the island. Fields of large boulders (up to 150 t) are among the best-studied reef-top megaclasts worldwide. Transport by Holocene tsunamis is assumed at least for the largest boulders (Engel and May, 2012). Although a large dataset of 14C and electron spin resonance (ESR) ages is available for major coral rubble ridges and ramparts, showing some age clusters during the Late Holocene, it is still debated whether these data reflect the timing of major depositional/transport event(s), and how these data sets are biased by reworking of coral fragments. In addition, different processes may be responsible for the deposition of the coral rubble ridges and ramparts (storm) and the solitary megaclasts (tsunami). As an attempt to overcome the current challenges for dating the dislocation of the megaclasts, three distinct dating methods were implemented: (i) 14C dating of boring bivalves (Lithophaga) attached to the boulders; (ii) uranium-series (U/Th) dating of post-depositional, secondary calcitic flowstone at the underside of the boulders; and (iii) surface exposure dating of overturned boulders via 36Cl concentration measurements in corals. The three 14C datings yield age estimates >37 ka, i.e. most probably beyond the applicability of the method, which sheds doubt on the usefulness of this

  16. Deflection of mantle flow controlled by slab-cratonic keel interactions: insights from shear-wave splitting in the southeastern Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M. S.; Becker, T. W.

    2012-12-01

    Subduction and recycling of oceanic lithosphere is a major control on the thermal evolution of the Earth. Cratonic continental lithosphere, conversely, can resist mechanical erosion for billions of years, moves coherently with plates, and deflects flow in the asthenosphere. We investigate the mechanical interactions between these two components of mantle convection in the Caribbean-South American plate margin which hosts a complex subduction system and continental transform fault adjacent to the Guyana Shield. Along the northern margin of the South American continent, shear-wave splitting measurements display anomalously large (1.5-2.5 s) delay times and fast polarization directions are oriented orthogonal to the Antilles trench and parallel to the transform plate boundary. Analysis of various seismological data, including seismicity, tomography, and SK(K)S splitting, and 176 global geodynamical models with lateral viscosity and density variations adapted to this unique region allow for quantitative testing of how mantle flow, as induced by the oceanic slab of the Antilles volcanic arc and mediated by a weak asthenosphere, is influenced by the stiff South American cratonic keel. We explore for the first time how slab-craton interactions affect tectonic force transmission to produce this narrow region of abnormally strong seismic anisotropy parallel to the coastline, change regional plate velocities, and localize intra-plate deformation.

  17. Sea Turtle Conservation on Bonaire. Sea Turtle Club Bonaire 1996 Project Report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norde, D.J.; Rossum, van J.P.

    1997-01-01

    Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles (12°12’N, 68°77’W) is an island in the Caribbean sea, situated about 50 km east of Curacao and 80 km north of the South American continent (Venezuela). Its 288 2 km of land hold about 14,000 inhabitants. Bonaire has a strongly growing population, which is mostly due to

  18. FORAGING BY THE STOPLIGHT-PARROTFISH SPARISOMA-VIRIDE .1. FOOD SELECTION IN DIFFERENT SOCIALLY DETERMINED HABITATS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BRUGGEMANN, JH; VANOPPEN, MJH; BREEMAN, AM

    Food selection by the Caribbean stoplight parrotfish Sparisoma viride was investigated on a fringing coral reef of Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles. For different reef zones, the diet composition for each life phase was determined by description of randomly selected bites, and compared to the

  19. Host specificity and phylogenetic relationships among Atlantic Ovulidae (Mollusca: Gastropoda)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijnen, B.T.; Hoeksema, B.W.; Gittenberger, E.

    2010-01-01

    Ovulid gastropods and their octocoral hosts were collected along the leeward coast of Curaçao, Netherlands Antilles. New molecular data of Caribbean and a single Atlantic species were combined with comparable data of Indo-Pacific Ovulidae and a single East-Pacific species from GenBank. Based on two

  20. Status and conservation of parrots and parakeets in the Greater Antilles, Bahama Islands, and Cayman Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    In the 1490s a minimum of 28 species of psittacines occurred in the West Indies. Today, only 43% (12) of the species survive. All macaws and most parakeet species have been lost. Although the surviving parrot fauna of the Greater Antilles, Cayman Islands, and Bahama Islands has fared somewhat better than that of the Lesser Antilles, every species has undergone extensive reductions of populations and all but two have undergone extensive reductions in range, mostly as a result of habitat loss, but also from persecution as agricultural pests, conflicts with exotic species, harvesting for pets, and natural disasters. The Cayman Brac Parrot Amazona leucocephala hesterna with its tiny population (less than 150 individuals in the wild) and range, and the Puerto Rican Parrot A. vittata, with about 22-23 birds in the wild and 56 individuals in captivity, must be considered on the verge of extinction and in need of (in the latter's case, continuing) aggressive programmes of research and management. Other populations declining in numbers and range include the Yellow-billed Amazona collaria, and Black-billed A. agilis Parrots of Jamaica, Hispaniolan Parakeet Aratinga chloroptera, Hispaniolan Parrot Amazona ventralis, Cuban Parrot A. leucocephala leucocephala and, most seriously, Cuban Parakeet Aratinga euops. The population of the Grand Cayman Parrot (Amazona leucocephala caymanensis), although numbering only about 1,000 birds, appears stable and the current conservation programme gives hope for the survival of the race. An active conservation and public education programme has begun for the Bahama Parrot A. l. bahamensis, which still occurs in good numbers on Great Inagua Island, but is threatened on Abaco Island. Recommendations for conservation of parrots and parakeets in the region include (1) instituting long-term programmes of research to determine distribution, status, and ecology of each species; (2) developing conservation programmes through education and management

  1. Schoolsystem in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ing., M.Sc F.C. Holtkamp

    2004-01-01

    This paper explains the history of the graduate course in prosthetics and orthotics in the Netherlands. It also explains the schoolstystem in relationship towards vocational education and postgraduate education.

  2. Astronomy in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Wilfried; Habing, Harm

    2013-01-01

    We describe the state of astronomical research in the Netherlands per early 2012. We add some notes on its history of this research and on the strategic choices for the future. Compared to the size of the country (16 million people) the Netherlands is maintaining a high profile in astronomical research over a period of more than one century. The professional research community consists of about 650 people. This includes research staff, postdocs, PhD students, technical staff working on instrumentation projects and people involved in the operations of ground-based telescopes and astronomical space missions. We do not take into account staff working for international organizations based in the Netherlands. Astronomical research in the Netherlands is carried out at four university institutes and two national research institutes that fall under the umbrella of the national funding agency NWO. The Netherlands is the host of two international organizations: ESTEC, the technology division of the European Space Agency (ESA), and the Joint Institute for VLBI in Europe (JIVE). The Netherlands are one of the founding members of the European Southern Observatory (ESO) and of ESA. This paper will address a number of significant multilateral collaborations.

  3. Prehistoric settlements in the Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter L. Drewett

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available Mesoamerican archaeology has focused mainly on the ancient civilizations of the mainland, but knowledge of early settlement, society and economy in the Caribbean islands is essential for our understanding of the prehistory of the region as a whole. Institute staff and students are currently working in three islands: Puerto Rico, Tortola and Barbados.

  4. Sidney Mintz and Caribbean Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiel Baud

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Review of: Empirical Futures: Anthropologists and Historians Engage the Work of Sidney W. Mintz. George Baca, A isha Khan & Stephan Palmié (eds.. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2009. v + 232 pp. (Paper US$ 24.95 Three Ancient Colonies: Caribbean Themes and Variations. Sidney W. Mintz. Cambridge MA: Harvard University Press, 2010. xiv + 257 pp. (Cloth US$ 27.95 [First paragraph] There can be no doubt about the importance of U.S. anthropologist Sidney Mintz in the development of Caribbean Studies. His work has influenced both the historiography and anthropology of Caribbean slavery and the emergence of Caribbean peasant societies. Now two books have been published that interrogate the significance of his work. The first is an anthology that tries to build on Mintz’s ideas – as I will argue below, in a circumspect and not fully convincing way. In the second Mintz describes and compares the societies of Jamaica, Haiti, and Puerto Rico, and looks back on his work that started in the 1940s.

  5. Sidney Mintz and Caribbean Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baud, M.

    2011-01-01

    Review of:Empirical Futures: Anthropologists and Historians Engage the Work of Sidney W. Mintz. George Baca, A isha Khan & Stephan Palmié (eds.). Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2009. v + 232 pp. (Paper US$ 24.95)Three Ancient Colonies: Caribbean Themes and Variations. Sidney W.

  6. Rotaria of the Caribbean region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridder, de Marg.

    1977-01-01

    1. In this paper, a study of Rotifers has been made of extensive material, collected in the Caribbean province by Dr. P. WAGENAAR HUMMELINCK, between 1930 and 1973. 2. 64 species of Rotifers have been found. For 19 of these, particulars are given on their morphology, ecology and biogeographical

  7. Assessing storm surge hazard and impact of sea level rise in the Lesser Antilles case study of Martinique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Krien

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In the Lesser Antilles, coastal inundations from hurricane-induced storm surges pose a great threat to lives, properties and ecosystems. Assessing current and future storm surge hazards with sufficient spatial resolution is of primary interest to help coastal planners and decision makers develop mitigation and adaptation measures. Here, we use wave–current numerical models and statistical methods to investigate worst case scenarios and 100-year surge levels for the case study of Martinique under present climate or considering a potential sea level rise. Results confirm that the wave setup plays a major role in the Lesser Antilles, where the narrow island shelf impedes the piling-up of large amounts of wind-driven water on the shoreline during extreme events. The radiation stress gradients thus contribute significantly to the total surge – up to 100 % in some cases. The nonlinear interactions of sea level rise (SLR with bathymetry and topography are generally found to be relatively small in Martinique but can reach several tens of centimeters in low-lying areas where the inundation extent is strongly enhanced compared to present conditions. These findings further emphasize the importance of waves for developing operational storm surge warning systems in the Lesser Antilles and encourage caution when using static methods to assess the impact of sea level rise on storm surge hazard.

  8. The Two Subduction Zones of the Southern Caribbean: Lithosphere Tearing and Continental Margin Recycling in the East, Flat Slab Subduction and Laramide-Style Uplifts in the West

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levander, A.; Bezada, M. J.; Niu, F.; Schmitz, M.

    2015-12-01

    The southern Caribbean plate boundary is a complex strike-slip fault system bounded by oppositely vergent subduction zones, the Antilles subduction zone in the east, and a currently locked Caribbean-South American subduction zone in the west (Bilham and Mencin, 2013). Finite-frequency teleseismic P-wave tomography images both the Atlanic (ATL) and the Caribbean (CAR) plates subducting steeply in opposite directions to transition zone depths under northern South America. Ps receiver functions show a depressed 660 discontinuity and thickened transition zone associated with each subducting plate. In the east the oceanic (ATL) part of the South American (SA) plate subducts westward beneath the CAR, initiating the El Pilar-San Sebastian strike slip system, a subduction-transform edge propagator (STEP) fault (Govers and Wortel, 2005). The point at which the ATL tears away from SA as it descends into the mantle is evidenced by the Paria cluster seismicity at depths of 60-110 km (Russo et al, 1993). Body wave tomography and lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) thickness determined from Sp and Ps receiver functions and Rayleigh waves suggest that the descending ATL also viscously removes the bottom third to half of the SA continental margin lithospheric mantle as it descends. This has left thinned continental lithosphere under northern SA in the wake of the eastward migrating Antilles subduction zone. The thinned lithosphere occupies ~70% of the length of the El Pilar-San Sebastian fault system, from ~64oW to ~69oW, and extends inland several hundred kilometers. In northwestern SA the CAR subducts east-southeast at low angle under northern Colombia and western Venezuela. The subducting CAR is at least 200 km wide, extending from northernmost Colombia as far south as the Bucaramanga nest seismicity. The CAR descends steeply under Lake Maracaibo and the Merida Andes. This flat slab is associated with three Neogene basement cored, Laramide-style uplifts: the Santa Marta

  9. A new species of Thecadactylus from Sint Maarten, Lesser Antilles (Reptilia, Squamata, Gekkonidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunther Koehler

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We describe a new species of Thecadactylus from the Caribbean island of Sint Maarten. The new species differs from all other species in the genus bya distinct dorsal pattern of numerous irregular but sharply deliminated black spots and blotches on an otherwise almost patternless background.

  10. Geothermal resources in Martinique (Lesser Antilles): new insight of geochemical isotopic tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadalia, A.; Rad, S.; Braibant, G.; Brach, M.; Millot, R.; Traineau, H.

    2012-12-01

    Geothermal exploration of Martinique Island started in 1967 but was interrupted successively at 3 times. Additional geothermal exploration program was conducted by BRGM, in 2001-2003 and recently in areas known for their geothermal interest: Mount Pelée volcano and Diamant. A complementary exploration is now proceed with new sites of interest such as "Pitons du Carbet" massif after recent dating (Germa et al., 2011). A conceptual model of reservoir was established for Mount Pelée volcano and on the Piton du Carbet massif, but the extension of these greenfield remains unknown. We propose new approach through geochemistry by the integration to the prospection of chemical compositions of river waters adding to hot springs and well waters. Rivers catchment in Lesser Antilles and their hydrothermal impact have been studied in order to quantify and identify the magmatic contribution into the river (Rad et al., 2011). Chemical analyses and new isotopic tools such as Lithium isotopes 7Li/6Li (expressed as δ7Li) are measured in river waters. Among these multi chemical parameters, isotopic in particular (H, Li, C, O, Sr…) the Li isotopic signature appear to be conservative and allows to identify new target with high temperature water-rock interactions or in case of high fractionation, reflecting low temperature water-rock interactions, to avoid an extended zone. These new technique was applied to the Mount Pelée and confirm the pre-existent model established in previous exploration campaign. For Pitons du Carbet massif all the river catchment of the massif have been sampled, first results show a potential western extension of the reservoir, confirm by an important gas leak of hydrothermal origin. For tropical volcanic environment with sharp relief, dense vegetation, and high precipitation, chemical and isotopic analyses, particularly lithium isotopes, in river waters, allow to identify zone of interest. To conclude, river catchment studies dedicate to geothermal

  11. Estimating hypothetical present-day insured losses for past intense hurricanes in the French Antilles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, James; Desarthe, Jérémy; Naulin, Jean-Philippe; Garnier, Emmanuel; Liu, Ye; Moncoulon, David

    2015-04-01

    On the islands of the French Antilles, the period for which systematic meteorological measurements and historic event loss data are available is short relative to the recurrence intervals of very intense, damaging hurricanes. Additionally, the value of property at risk changes through time. As such, the recent past can only provide limited insight into potential losses from extreme storms in coming years. Here we present some research that seeks to overcome, as far as is possible, the limitations of record length in assessing the possible impacts of near-future hurricanes on insured properties. First, using the archives of the French overseas departments (which included administrative and weather reports, inventories of damage to houses, crops and trees, as well as some meteorological observations after 1950) we reconstructed the spatial patterns of hazard intensity associated with three historical events. They are: i) the 1928 Hurricane (Guadeloupe), ii) Hurricane Betsy (1956, Guadeloupe) and iii) Hurricane David (1979, Martinique). These events were selected because all were damaging, and the information available on each is rich. Then, using a recently developed catastrophe model for hurricanes affecting Guadeloupe, Martinique, Saint-Barthélemy and Saint-Martin, we simulated the hypothetical losses to insured properties that the reconstructed events might cause if they were to reoccur today. The model simulated damage due to wind, rainfall-induced flooding and storm surge flooding. These 'what if' scenarios provided an initial indication of the potential present-day exposure of the insurance industry to intense hurricanes. However, we acknowledge that historical events are unlikely to repeat exactly. We therefore extended the study by producing a stochastic event catalogue containing a large number of synthetic but plausible hurricane events. Instrumental data were used as a basis for event generation, but importantly the statistical methods we applied permit

  12. Symbiodinium photosynthesis in Caribbean octocorals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blake D Ramsby

    Full Text Available Symbioses with the dinoflagellate Symbiodinium form the foundation of tropical coral reef communities. Symbiodinium photosynthesis fuels the growth of an array of marine invertebrates, including cnidarians such as scleractinian corals and octocorals (e.g., gorgonian and soft corals. Studies examining the symbioses between Caribbean gorgonian corals and Symbiodinium are sparse, even though gorgonian corals blanket the landscape of Caribbean coral reefs. The objective of this study was to compare photosynthetic characteristics of Symbiodinium in four common Caribbean gorgonian species: Pterogorgia anceps, Eunicea tourneforti, Pseudoplexaura porosa, and Pseudoplexaura wagenaari. Symbiodinium associated with these four species exhibited differences in Symbiodinium density, chlorophyll a per cell, light absorption by chlorophyll a, and rates of photosynthetic oxygen production. The two Pseudoplexaura species had higher Symbiodinium densities and chlorophyll a per Symbiodinium cell but lower chlorophyll a specific absorption compared to P. anceps and E. tourneforti. Consequently, P. porosa and P. wagenaari had the highest average photosynthetic rates per cm2 but the lowest average photosynthetic rates per Symbiodinium cell or chlorophyll a. With the exception of Symbiodinium from E. tourneforti, isolated Symbiodinium did not photosynthesize at the same rate as Symbiodinium in hospite. Differences in Symbiodinium photosynthetic performance could not be attributed to Symbiodinium type. All P. anceps (n = 9 and P. wagenaari (n = 6 colonies, in addition to one E. tourneforti and three P. porosa colonies, associated with Symbiodinium type B1. The B1 Symbiodinium from these four gorgonian species did not cluster with lineages of B1 Symbiodinium from scleractinian corals. The remaining eight E. tourneforti colonies harbored Symbiodinium type B1L, while six P. porosa colonies harbored type B1i. Understanding the symbioses between gorgonian corals and

  13. The European Union – Caribbean Relation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broberg, Morten

    2016-01-01

    EU diplomats consider the Caribbean countries to be allies and therefore expect these countries to support the EU in international affairs – but they find that this support has been waning in recent years. Caribbean diplomats and politicians do not share the European viewpoint. Rather, they take ...... the view that the EU has forgotten its Caribbean allies and instead channels its attention and funding towards Sub-Saharan Africa. This article examines to what extent this asserted ‘rift’ really signals a profound change in the EU-Caribbean relations....

  14. Brian Meeks, Envisioning Caribbean Futures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay R. Mandle

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In this feature we highlight a recently launched book. We invite specialists in the field to comment on the book, and we invite the author to respond to their comments. In this issue we focus on Brian Meeks's, Envisioning Caribbean Futures. Those invited to comment on the book are Jay Mandle and Rivke Jaffe. [First paragraph] In Envisioning Caribbean Futures: Jamaican Perspectives (2007, Brian Meeks writes “in sympathy with the new social movements that have evolved in the past decade which assert boldly that ‘another world is possible’” (p. 2. His effort is “to explore the horizons for different approaches to social living in Jamaica and the Caribbean in the twenty-first century” (p. 2. In this, he “seeks to move beyond a statement of general principles to propose specific alternatives” in order to “stimulate a conversation that looks beyond the horizon of policy confines, yet is not so far removed as to appear hopelessly utopian” (p. 3. My hope with this essay is to advance that conversation, in the first place by reviewing and assessing Meeks’s contribution and then by extending the discussion to the role that Jamaica’s diaspora (and by extension that of the region’s generally might play in moving the country, as Meeks puts it, from its current “state of crime and murder, and the broad undermining of the rule of law that pervades the society” (p. 71.

  15. Space and time evolution of volcanism within Basse-Terre Island (Guadeloupe, Lesser Antilles) based on new geochronology, geochemistry and geomorphology data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, J.; Quidelleur, X.; Lahitte, P.; Pallares, C.

    2013-12-01

    Basse-Terre Island, located on the Lesser Antilles volcanic arc, is a volcanic complex resulting from the intra-oceanic subduction of the North and South American plates beneath the Caribbean plate. Composed by five main volcanic massifs (Basal complex, Septentrional Chain, Axial Chain, Caribbean Mount, and Grande-Decouverte volcanic complex), its activity has started at 2.79 × 0.04 Ma in the northern part of the island, then, has migrated southward to the current active volcanic dome of La Soufriere volcano. Thirty six new analyses for major and trace elements obtained here increase the previous dataset to more than one hundred samples covering the entire Basse-Terre Island. Major elements show a SiO2 content ranging from 47 to 65 wt.%, with most samples being andesite and basaltic-andesite. K2O vs. SiO2 diagram shows that these lavas belong to the low-K (or tholeitic affinity) and normal calc-alkaline series, with K contents ranging from 0.39 to 1.4 wt.%. Multi-elements diagrams display slight enrichment in most incompatible elements and LREE, with positives anomalies in Sr, Pb, La and Ba, characteristic of subduction derived rocks. Finally, diagrams of incompatible elements ratios, such as Th/Nb vs. Th/Yb, highlight a slight decrease of partial melting rate through time suggesting that younger rocks of Basse-Terre Island are more contaminated by slab-related subduction fluids than older rocks. Focusing on the southern Basse-Terre Island, geochemical data coupled with forty-seven new accurate K-Ar ages added to previous dataset, together with DEM geomorphological studies, allow us to provide the four main steps of the general evolution model for southern Basse-Terre Island for the last 1 Ma. First, our new ages constrain the volcanic activity of the Piton de Bouillante volcano (northernmost part of the Axial Chain), between 880 × 14 and 712 × 12 ka. Taking into account that all volcanoes from the southern part of the Axial Chain, as well as Icaque and

  16. Characterization of geothermal paleosystem in the Lesser Antilles volcanic arc: structural, petrographic, thermodynamic and petrophysics analysis of Terre-de-Haut (Les Saintes archipelago, Lesser Antilles)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favier, Alexiane; Navelot, Vivien; Verati, Chrystèle; Lardeaux, Jean-Marc; Corsini, Michel; Diraison, Marc; Géraud, Yves; Mercier de Lépinay, Jeanne; Munschy, Marc

    2017-04-01

    This survey takes part in the GEOTREF project (high enthalpy geothermal energy in fractured reservoirs), supported by the French government program "Investments for the future". The program focuses on the exploration of geothermal resource in the Lesser Antilles volcanic arc. An exclusive license has been issued in the Vieux-Habitants area (Basse-Terre, Guadeloupe) to carry on the development of high-temperature geothermal energy in this active volcanic region. The deep geothermal reservoir on the Basse-Terre island could be characterized in exhumed paleosystems. The reference paleosystem in the Guadeloupe archipelago is located in Terre-de-Haut. Four major fault directions have been highlighted N000-N020, N050-N070, N090-N110 and N130-N140. Field observations emphasize three major cleavage directions overlaying the fault systems: N035-N060, N080-N110, N145-N165. Volcanic rocks affected by cleavage display several metamorphic transformation grades. The more transformed calc-alkaline rocks are located at the intersection of several cleavage directions. Mineralogical transformations due to metamorphism and surimposed fractures are also responsible for strong changes of petrophysical properties. In comparison with the reference protolith of andesitic lava flows outcropping in Vieux-Habitants, which have porosity and permeability lower than 5 % and 10-15 m2, andesites of Terre-de-Haut have better reservoir properties with connected porosity and permeability higher than 15 % and 10-14-10-15 m2 respectively. Thermodynamic modelling based on petrography and chemical composition of the most transformed rocks highlights a steady state mineral assemblage between 0.25 - 1.5 kbar and 350 - 450 ˚ C. It corresponds to a geothermal gradient higher than 120 to 150˚ C/km. This is consistent with temperatures measured in Bouillante wells. However, this geothermal gradient is notably higher to a usual volcanic arc conductive gradient estimated to 70-100˚ C/km. It can be explained

  17. Worker participation - the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwantes, J.H.

    2014-01-01

    Worker participation relates to the involvement of workers in the management decision-making processes. In this article attention is focused on worker participation related to occupational safety and health in the Netherlands. Worker participation can refer either to direct or indirect participation

  18. Mechatronics in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Amerongen, J.; Jongkind, Wim

    1996-01-01

    This article assesses the present situation of mechatronics in the Netherlands. After a short historical survey, it describes the postgraduate ¿mechatronic designer course¿, introduced in 1991. It deals with the principles of this course and how these principles have been implemented. Also, the

  19. Sport in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Annet Tiessen-Raaphorst; Koen Breedveld

    2007-01-01

    Sport is a popular pastime in the Netherlands; 10 million people take part in at least one sport. To do this, they can choose from more than 27,000 non-profit sports clubs, or more than 5,000 commercial providers such as fitness centres or riding stables. These clubs and commercial providers

  20. Telework in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van het Kaar, R.

    2008-01-01

    Statistics show that the incidence of telework in the Netherlands has been rising since 2000, regardless of the precise definition used. The government has encouraged the use of telework by introducing tax benefits for employers who facilitate such work. This article looks at the extent of telework

  1. Morocco and the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fritschy, W.; Bos, P. (eds.)

    2006-01-01

    This book on aspects of society, economy and culture in Morocco and the Netherlands contains contributions of 28 Moroccan and Dutch authors on religion, family and marriage law, local government and PJD, Abdelkrim, Morocco and the EU, drug trafficking, migration, youth, Dutch-Moroccan writers, and

  2. Country Report - The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schermers, G.; Wegman, F.; Vliet, P. van; Horst, A.R.A. van der; Boender, J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the most significant developments in the area of road (geometric) design practices and standards and related research in the Netherlands in recent years. The paper describes the importance of the Sustainable Road Safety policy in this context. Furthermore, it

  3. Out in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saskia Keuzenkamp; David Bos

    2007-01-01

    The Netherlands is generally regarded as a gay-friendly country. It was the first country in the world where partners of the same sex were allowed to marry. Any number of famous Dutch figures openly profess their homosexuality, including one of the ministers in the present  Dutch cabinet.

  4. ASSESSMENT OF THE TSUNAMIGENIC POTENTIAL ALONG THE NORTHERN CARIBBEAN MARGIN Case Study: Earthquake and Tsunamis of 12 January 2010 in Haiti.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Pararas-Carayannis

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The potential tsunami risk for Hispaniola, as well as for the other Greater Antilles Islands is assessed by reviewing the complex geotectonic processes and regimes along the Northern Caribbean margin, including the convergent, compressional and collisional tectonic activity of subduction, transition, shearing, lateral movements, accretion and crustal deformation caused by the eastward movement of the Caribbean plate in relation to the North American plate. These complex tectonic interactions have created a broad, diffuse tectonic boundary that has resulted in an extensive, internal deformational sliver slab - the Gonâve microplate – as well as further segmentation into two other microplates with similarly diffused boundary characteristics where tsunamigenic earthquakes have and will again occur. The Gonâve microplate is the most prominent along the Northern Caribbean margin and extends from the Cayman Spreading Center to Mona Pass, between Puerto Rico and the island of Hispaniola, where the 1918 destructive tsunami was generated. The northern boundary of this sliver microplate is defined by the Oriente strike-slip fault south of Cuba, which appears to be an extension of the fault system traversing the northern part of Hispaniola, while the southern boundary is defined by another major strike-slip fault zone where the Haiti earthquake of 12 January 2010 occurred. Potentially tsunamigenic regions along the Northern Caribbean margin are located not only along the boundaries of the Gonâve microplate’s dominant western transform zone but particularly within the eastern tectonic regimes of the margin where subduction is dominant - particularly along the Puerto Rico trench. The Haiti earthquake of 12 January 2010 and its focal mechanism are examined, as they provide additional clues of potential tsunami generation that can occur along transform zones and, more specifically, from interplate and intraplate seismic events and subsequently induced

  5. Documentary-derived chronologies of rainfall variability in Antigua, Lesser Antilles, 1770-1890

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berland, A. J.; Metcalfe, S. E.; Endfield, G. H.

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents the first extensive reconstruction of precipitation variability in the Lesser Antilles using historical documentary sources. Over 13 250 items of documentation pertaining to Antigua from the period 1769-1890 were consulted, including missionary, plantation and governmental papers as well as contemporary scholarly publications. Based on the predominant meteorological conditions observed throughout the island, each "rain-year" (December-November) was assigned one of five classifications (very wet, wet, "normal", dry and very dry). Local weather references relating to seven plantations in central-eastern Antigua were grouped according to dry (December-April) and wet seasons (May-November), each of which were also categorised in the aforementioned manner. Results comprise individual island-wide and central-eastern Antiguan chronologies of relative precipitation levels, spanning the rain-years 1769-70 to 1889-90 and 1769-70 to 1853-54 respectively. The former is compared with available instrumental data for the years 1870-1890. Significant dry phases are identified in the rain-years 1775-80, 1788-91, 1820-22, 1834-37, 1844-45, 1859-60, 1862-64, 1870-74 and 1881-82, while wet episodes were 1771-74, 1833-34, 1837-38, 1841-44, 1845-46 and 1878-81. Evidence for major wet and dry spells is presented and findings are evaluated within wider historical and palaeoclimatic contexts.

  6. Languages in Contemporary Anglophone Caribbean Societies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davids, Melva P.

    2013-01-01

    The paper Languages in Contemporary Anglophone Caribbean Societies examines how language is treated in Jamaica and other Anglophone Caribbean societies and the effects of a haphazard approach to language planning on the social dynamics of the society as well as the individual. It briefly explores how Language is handled in Francophone or…

  7. ICT Enabled Disaster Communications for Vulnerable Caribbean ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Canada-Latin America and Caribbean Zika Virus Research Program. A new funding opportunity on Zika virus is responding to the virus outbreak and the health threat it represents for the affected populations in the hardest hit countries in Latin America and the... View moreCanada-Latin America and Caribbean Zika Virus ...

  8. Electronic Government : Caribbean Pilot Project | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Canada-Latin America and Caribbean Zika Virus Research Program. A new funding opportunity on Zika virus is responding to the virus outbreak and the health threat it represents for the affected populations in the hardest hit countries in Latin America and the... View moreCanada-Latin America and Caribbean Zika Virus ...

  9. Cimate change impacts within the Dutch Caribbean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debrot, A.O.

    2016-01-01

    The most recent climate change predictions for the Caribbean region (2013/2014) by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) are alarming and suggest that the islands of the Dutch Caribbean will go through profound environmental changes within the next century.

  10. Resources for Teaching about the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkwood, Toni Fuss

    2000-01-01

    Provides a list of resources to aid educators in teaching about the Caribbean. Includes outreach centers for Latin American and Caribbean studies, publishers and distributors, curriculum resource guides and monographs for teachers, citations of children's literature, and a website providing links to embassies. (CMK)

  11. British African Caribbean Women and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkison-Bradley, Carla; Maynard, Donna; Johnson, Phillip; Carter, Stephaney

    2009-01-01

    Depression is a common condition among women in the United Kingdom. However, little is known about the context of depression among British African Caribbean women. This article offers a preliminary discussion regarding issues and information pertaining to depression among British African Caribbean women. Characteristics and symptoms of depression…

  12. Caribbean tectonics and relative plate motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, K.; Dewey, J. F.; Cooper, C.; Mann, P.; Pindell, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    During the last century, three different ways of interpreting the tectonic evolution of the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean have been proposed, taking into account the Bailey Willis School of a permanent pre-Jurassic deep sea basin, the Edward Suess School of a subsided continental terrain, and the Alfred Wegener School of continental separation. The present investigation is concerned with an outline of an interpretation which follows that of Pindell and Dewey (1982). An attempt is made to point out ways in which the advanced hypotheses can be tested. The fit of Africa, North America, and South America is considered along with aspects of relative motion between North and South America since the early Jurasic. Attention is given to a framework for reconstructing Caribbean plate evolution, the evolution of the Caribbean, the plate boundary zones of the northern and southern Caribbean, and the active deformation of the Caribbean plate.

  13. Euthanasia in The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wal, G.; Dillmann, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    The practice of euthanasia in the Netherlands is often used as an argument in debates outside the Netherlands--hence a clear description of the Dutch situation is important. This article summarises recent data and discusses conceptual issues and relevant characteristics of the system of health care. Special emphasis is put on regulation, including relevant data on notification and prosecution. Besides the practice of euthanasia the Dutch are confronted with the gaps in reporting of cases to the public prosecutor and the existence of cases of ending a life without an explicit request. Nevertheless, the "Dutch experiment" need not inevitably lead down the slippery slope because of the visibility and openness of this part of medical practice. This will lead to increased awareness, more safeguards, and improvement of medical decisions concerning the end of life. PMID:8019226

  14. Out in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Saskia Keuzenkamp; David Bos

    2007-01-01

    The Netherlands is generally regarded as a gay-friendly country. It was the first country in the world where partners of the same sex were allowed to marry. Any number of famous Dutch figures openly profess their homosexuality, including one of the ministers in the present  Dutch cabinet. And according to international comparative research, homosexuality is widely accepted in Dutch public opinion. However, hostility towards homosexuality also occurs, for example in schools. And gays and ...

  15. First Multi-GAS based characterisation of the Boiling Lake volcanic gas (Dominica, Lesser Antilles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossella Di Napoli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We used a Multi-component Gas Analyser System (Multi-GAS to measure, for the very first time, the composition (H2O, CO2, H2S, SO2 of the volcanic gas plume issuing from the Boiling Lake, a vigorously degassing, hot (T ~ 80-90°C volcanic lake in Dominica, West Indies. The Multi-GAS captured in-plume concentrations of H2O, CO2 and H2S were well above those typical of ambient atmosphere, while no volcanic SO2 was detected (<0.05 ppm. These were used to derive the Boiling Lake plume characteristic ratios of CO2/H2S (5.2±0.4 and H2O/CO2 (31.4±6. Assuming that other volcanic gas species (e.g., HCl, CO, H2, N2, etc. are absent in the plume, we recalculated a (air-free composition for the sourcing volcanic gases of ~ 96.3% H2O, 3.1% CO2 and 0.6% H2S. This hydrous gas composition is within the range of published gas compositions in the Lesser Antilles region, and slightly more H2O-rich than obtained for the fumaroles of the nearby Valley of Desolation (~94.4% H2O, 4.7% CO2 and 0.8% H2S; CO2/H2S of ~5.7. We use our results, in tandem with the output of numerical simulations of gas scrubbing in the lake-water (performed via the EQ3/6 software, to derive new constraints on the degassing mechanisms at this poorly studied (but potentially hazardous volcanic lake.

  16. Perceived discrimination in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Iris Andriessen; Henk Fernee; Karin Wittebrood

    2014-01-01

    Only available in electronic version There is no systematic structure in the Netherlands for mapping out the discrimination experiences of different groups in different areas of society. As in many other countries, discrimination studies in the Netherlands mostly focus on the experiences of specific groups, on specific domains or on specific types of discrimination. This study aims to chart the extent to which residents of the Netherlands perceive that they are subject to discrimination, from...

  17. Gender differences in health and health care utilisation in various ethnic groups in the Netherlands: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devillé Walter L

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To determine gender differences in health and health care utilisation within and between various ethnic groups in the Netherlands. Methods Data from the second Dutch National Survey of General Practice (2000–2002 were used. A total of 7,789 persons from the indigenous population and 1,512 persons from the four largest migrant groups in the Netherlands – Morocco, Netherlands Antilles, Turkey and Surinam – aged 18 years and older were interviewed. Self-reported health outcomes studied were general health status and the presence of acute (past 14 days and chronic conditions (past 12 months. And self-reported utilisation of the following health care services was analysed: having contacted a general practitioner (past 2 months, a medical specialist, physiotherapist or ambulatory mental health service (past 12 months, hospitalisation (past 12 months and use of medication (past 14 days. Gender differences in these outcomes were examined within and between the ethnic groups, using logistic regression analyses. Results In general, women showed poorer health than men; the largest differences were found for the Turkish respondents, followed by Moroccans, and Surinamese. Furthermore, women from Morocco and the Netherlands Antilles more often contacted a general practitioner than men from these countries. Women from Turkey were more hospitalised than Turkish men. Women from Morocco more often contacted ambulatory mental health care than men from this country, and women with an indigenous background more often used over the counter medication than men with an indigenous background. Conclusion In general the self-reported health of women is worse compared to that of men, although the size of the gender differences may vary according to the particular health outcome and among the ethnic groups. This information might be helpful to develop policy to improve the health status of specific groups according to gender and ethnicity. In

  18. Parthenogenetic reproduction demonstrated in the diploid Spasalus puncticollis (Le Peletier & Serville 1825), n. stat., from the Antilles (Coleoptera, Scarabaeoidea, Passalidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Stéphane; Dutrillaux, Anne-Marie; Dutrillaux, Bernard

    2015-11-01

    Only females were observed in Spasalus crenatus (Mac Leay 1819) in the Antilles, from Puerto Rico to Saint-Vincent, whereas both sexes are in Trinidad and on the continent. No difference in endo- and ectodermic female genitalia could be noticed between the two populations. Chromosomes of specimens from Guadeloupe reveal a 26,XX karyotype, as in females of various sexual species of Passalini, which demonstrates its diploidy. Breedings were developed with isolated immature stages. After nine years, descendants from a single female are demonstrating their parthenogenetic reproduction. This is the first recorded parthenogenesis in Passalidae and a rare telytoky in diploid insects. Relationships between parthenogenesis, diploidy and insularity are discussed in the scheme of geographical parthenogenesis. No discriminant morphological character on adults could be found between the two populations, except the total length. The modes of reproduction distinguishing the two geographically separated populations suggest the presence of two taxa: S. crenatus on the continent and Trinidad; the parthenote S. puncticollis (Le Peletier & Serville 1825), n. stat., on the Arc of the Antilles. Copyright © 2015 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Caribbean | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    speaking Caribbean. Our work has helped reduce poverty and inequality, restore degraded coastal systems, and protect communities against disease and natural disasters. Our research has also helped improve farming and fishing practices, and ...

  20. 75 FR 9574 - Caribbean Trade Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-03

    ..., the Caribbean Region is the 3rd largest export market for U.S. manufactured goods in Latin America..., tied closely together by geography, history, and culture. The region as a whole represents a market of...

  1. Caribbean Marine Mammal Assessment Vessel Surveys

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data sets are a compilation of large vessel surveys for marine mammal stock assessments in Caribbean waters conducted during 2000-2001. These surveys were...

  2. The Chinese in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mérove Gijsberts; Willem Huijnk; Ria Vogels

    2011-01-01

    Original title: Chinese Nederlanders This report presents the first national picture of the position of the Chinese community in the Netherlands. A large-scale survey was conducted among persons of Chinese origin living in the Netherlands, with the aim of answering questions on a wide range of

  3. Biomass gasification in the Netherlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Drift, A. [ECN Biomass and Energy Efficiency, Petten (Netherlands)

    2013-07-15

    This reports summarizes the activities, industries, and plants on biomass gasification in the Netherlands. Most of the initiatives somehow relate to waste streams, rather than clean biomass, which may seem logic for a densely populated country as the Netherlands. Furthermore, there is an increasing interest for the production of SNG (Substitute Natural Gas) from biomass, both from governments and industry.

  4. Marriage migration in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leen Sterckx; Jaco Dagevos; Willem Huijnk; Jantine van Lisdonk

    2014-01-01

    Original title: Huwelijksmigratie in Nederland When a man or woman living in the Netherlands embarks on a relationship with a partner from another country and the couple decide to build a married life together in the Netherlands, we call this marriage migration. The foreign partner who moves to

  5. Perceived discrimination in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iris Andriessen; Henk Fernee; Karin Wittebrood

    2014-01-01

    Only available in electronic version There is no systematic structure in the Netherlands for mapping out the discrimination experiences of different groups in different areas of society. As in many other countries, discrimination studies in the Netherlands mostly focus on the experiences

  6. QANU - Quality Assurance Netherlands Universities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik Toft; Maria E., Weber; Vyt, André

    The Quality Assurance Netherlands Universities (QANU) underwent an ENQA-coordinated external review in 2016. The review was chaired by Henrik Toft Jensen, Research fellow at Roskilde University (RUC), Denmark.......The Quality Assurance Netherlands Universities (QANU) underwent an ENQA-coordinated external review in 2016. The review was chaired by Henrik Toft Jensen, Research fellow at Roskilde University (RUC), Denmark....

  7. Potato breeding in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haan, de H.

    1953-01-01

    A remarkable feature of potato breeding in the Netherlands is the great number of private breeders who have concentrated their efforts on the improvement of the potato. The author calls attention to some circumstances and measures that have made potato breeding attractive in the Netherlands

  8. Forest fires in the insular Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, A Marcus J; Eckelmann, Claus-Martin; Quiñones, Maya

    2008-12-01

    This paper presents a summary of the forest fire reports in the insular Caribbean derived from both management reports and an analysis of publicly available Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrodiometer (MODIS) satellite active fire products from the region. A vast difference between the amount of fires reported by land managers and fire points in the MODIS Fire Information for Resource Management System data can be observed. Future research is recommended to better understand the nature of these differences. While there is a general lack of available statistical data on forest fires in the Caribbean, a few general observations can be made: Forest fires occur mainly in dry forest types (500 to 1000 mm of mean annual rainfall). These are also the areas where most human settlements are located. Lowland high forests and montane forests with higher rainfall (1000 and more mm y(-1)) are less susceptible to forest fire, but they can burn in exceptionally dry years. Most of the dry forest ecosystems in the Caribbean can be considered to be fire-sensitive ecosystems, while the pine forests in the Caribbean (Cuba, Dominican Republic, and the Bahamas) are maintained by wildfires. In fire-sensitive ecosystems, uncontrolled burning often encourages the spread of alien invasive species. A Caribbean Fire Management Cooperation Strategy was developed between 2005 and 2006 under auspices of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. This regional strategy aims to strengthen Caribbean fire management networking by encouraging closer collaboration among countries with similar ecological conditions. The strategy for the Caribbean identifies a number of research, training, and management activities to improve wildfire management capacity in the Caribbean.

  9. Maritime security report. January 1997 [increased drug smuggling via Lesser Antilles ; business and government cooperation increasing to stem maritime cargo crimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This report consists of three parts. The first part deals the growing cocaine traffic through the eastern Caribbean using legitimate commercial maritime freight containers, implication for nations in the area and the Caribbean Community and Common Ma...

  10. Magnetic mapping for structural geology and geothermal exploration in Guadeloupe, Lesser Antilles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier de Lépinay, jeanne; munschy, marc; geraud, yves; diraison, marc; navelot, vivien; verati, christelle; corsini, michel; lardeaux, jean marc; favier, alexiane

    2017-04-01

    This work is implemented through the GEOTREF program which benefits from the support of both the ADEME and the French public funds "Investments for the future". The program focuses on the exploration for geothermal resources in Guadeloupe, Lesser Antilles, where a geothermal power plant is in production since 1986 (Bouillante, Basse Terre). In Les Saintes archipelago, in the south of Guadeloupe, the outcrop analysis of Terre-de-Haut Island allows to point out an exhumed geothermal paleo-system that is thought to be an analogue of the Bouillante active geothermal system. We show that a detailed marine magnetic survey with a quantitative interpretation can bring information about the offshore structures around Les Saintes archipelago in order to extend the geological limits and structural elements. A similar survey and workflow is also conducted offshore Basse-Terre where more geophysical data is already available. In order to correctly link the offshore and onshore structures, the magnetic survey must be close enough to the shoreline and sufficiently detailed to correctly outline the tectonic structures. An appropriate solution for such a survey is to use a three component magnetometer aboard a speedboat. Such a boat allows more navigation flexibility than a classic oceanic vessel towing a magnetometer; it can sail at higher speed on calm seas and closer to the shoreline. This kind of magnetic acquisition is only viable because the magnetic effect of the ship can be compensated using the same algorithms than those used for airborne magnetometry. The use of potential field transforms allows a large variety of structures to be highlighted, providing insights to build a general understanding of the nature and distribution of the magnetic sources. In particular, we use the tilt angle operator to better identify the magnetic lineaments offshore in order to compare them to the faults identified onshore during the outcrop analysis. All the major faults and fractures

  11. Mercury concentration, speciation and budget in volcanic aquifers: Italy and Guadeloupe (Lesser Antilles)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnato, E.; Aiuppa, A.; Parello, F.; D'Alessandro, W.; Allard, P.; Calabrese, S.

    2009-01-01

    Quantifying the contribution of volcanism to global mercury (Hg) emissions is important to understand the pathways and the mechanisms of Hg cycling through the Earth's geochemical reservoirs and to assess its environmental impacts. While previous studies have suggested that degassing volcanoes might contribute importantly to the atmospheric budget of mercury, little is known about the amount and behaviour of Hg in volcanic aquifers. Here we report on detailed investigations of both the content and the speciation of mercury in aquifers of active volcanoes in Italy and Guadeloupe Island (Lesser Antilles). In the studied groundwaters, total Hg (THg) concentrations range from 10 to 500 ng/l and are lower than the 1000 ng/l threshold value for human health protection fixed by the World Health Organization [WHO (1993): WHO Guidelines for Drinking Water Quality- http://www.who.int/water_sanitation_health/GDWQ/index.htlm]. Positive co-variations of (THg) with sulphate indicate that Hg-SO 4-rich acid groundwaters receive a direct input of magmatic/hydrothermal gases carrying mercury as Hg 0(gas). Increasing THg in a volcanic aquifer could thus be a sensitive tracer of magmatic gas input prior to an eruption. Since the complex behaviour and toxicity of mercury in waters depend on its chemical speciation, we carefully determined the different aqueous forms of this element in our samples. We find that dissolved elemental Hg 0(aq) and particulate-bound Hg (Hg P) widely prevail in volcanic aquifers, in proportions that highlight the efficiency of Hg adsorption onto colloidal particles. Moreover, we observe that dissolved Hg 0aq and Hg(II) forms coexist in comparable amount in most of the waters, in stark contrast to the results of thermodynamic equilibrium modelling. Therefore, chemical equilibrium between dissolved mercury species in volcanic waters is either prevented by natural kinetic effects or not preserved in collected waters due to sampling/storage artefacts. Finally, we

  12. Petrological and experimental evidence for differentiation of water-rich magmas beneath St. Kitts, Lesser Antilles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melekhova, Elena; Blundy, Jon; Martin, Rita; Arculus, Richard; Pichavant, Michel

    2017-12-01

    St. Kitts lies in the northern Lesser Antilles, a subduction-related intraoceanic volcanic arc known for its magmatic diversity and unusually abundant cognate xenoliths. We combine the geochemistry of xenoliths, melt inclusions and lavas with high pressure-temperature experiments to explore magma differentiation processes beneath St. Kitts. Lavas range from basalt to rhyolite, with predominant andesites and basaltic andesites. Xenoliths, dominated by calcic plagioclase and amphibole, typically in reaction relationship with pyroxenes and olivine, can be divided into plutonic and cumulate varieties based on mineral textures and compositions. Cumulate varieties, formed primarily by the accumulation of liquidus phases, comprise ensembles that represent instantaneous solid compositions from one or more magma batches; plutonic varieties have mineralogy and textures consistent with protracted solidification of magmatic mush. Mineral chemistry in lavas and xenoliths is subtly different. For example, plagioclase with unusually high anorthite content (An≤100) occurs in some plutonic xenoliths, whereas the most calcic plagioclase in cumulate xenoliths and lavas are An97 and An95, respectively. Fluid-saturated, equilibrium crystallisation experiments were performed on a St. Kitts basaltic andesite, with three different fluid compositions ( XH2O = 1.0, 0.66 and 0.33) at 2.4 kbar, 950-1025 °C, and fO2 = NNO - 0.6 to NNO + 1.2 log units. Experiments reproduce lava liquid lines of descent and many xenolith assemblages, but fail to match xenolith and lava phenocryst mineral compositions, notably the very An-rich plagioclase. The strong positive correlation between experimentally determined plagioclase-melt KdCa-Na and dissolved H2O in the melt, together with the occurrence of Al-rich mafic lavas, suggests that parental magmas were water-rich (> 9 wt% H2O) basaltic andesites that crystallised over a wide pressure range (1.5-6 kbar). Comparison of experimental and natural (lava

  13. Ethnomedicine and ethnobotany of fright, a Caribbean culture-bound psychiatric syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quinlan Marsha B

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background "Fright" is an English-speaking Caribbean idiom for an illness, or ethnomedical syndrome, of persistent distress. A parallel ethnopsychiatric idiom exists in the French Antilles as sésisma. Fright is distinct from susto among Hispanics, though both develop in the wake of traumatic events. West Indian ethnophysiology (ethnoanatomy theorizes that an overload of stressful emotions (fear, panic, anguish or worry causes a cold humoral state in which blood coagulates causing prolonged distress and increased risks of other humorally cold illnesses. Methods Qualitative data on local explanatory models and treatment of fright were collected using participant-observation, informal key informant interviews and a village health survey. Ethnobotanical and epidemiological data come from freelist (or "free-list" tasks, analyzed for salience, with nearly all adults (N = 112 of an eastern village in Dominica, and a village survey on medicinal plant recognition and use (N = 106. Results Along with prayer and exercise, three herbs are salient fright treatments: Gossypium barbadense L., Lippia micromera Schauer, and, Plectranthus [Coleus] amboinicus [Loureiro] Sprengel. The survey indicated that 27% of village adults had medicated themselves for fright. Logistic regression of fright suffering onto demographic variables of age, education, gender, parental status and wealth measured in consumer goods found age to be the only significant predictor of having had fright. The probability of having (and medicating for fright thus increases with every year. Conclusions While sufferers are often uncomfortable recalling personal fright experiences, reporting use of medicinal plants is less problematic. Inquiry on fright medical ethnobotany (or phytotherapies serves as a proxy measurement for fright occurrence. Cross-cultural and ethnopharmacology literature on the medicinal plants suggests probable efficacy in accord with Dominican ethnomedical notions

  14. Historical perspective on seismic hazard to Hispaniola and the northeast Caribbean region

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Brink, Uri S.; Bakun, W.H.; Flores, C.H.

    2011-01-01

    We evaluate the long-term seismic activity of the North-American/Caribbean plate boundary from 500 years of historical earthquake damage reports. The 2010 Haiti earthquakes and other earthquakes were used to derive regional attenuation relationships between earthquake intensity, magnitude, and distance from the reported damage to the epicenter, for Hispaniola and for Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. The attenuation relationship for Hispaniola earthquakes and northern Lesser Antilles earthquakes is similar to that for California earthquakes, indicating a relatively rapid attenuation of damage intensity with distance. Intensities in Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands decrease less rapidly with distance. We use the intensity-magnitude relationships to systematically search for the location and intensity magnitude MI which best fit all the reported damage for historical earthquakes. Many events occurred in the 20th-century along the plate-boundary segment from central Hispaniola to the NW tip of Puerto Rico, but earlier events from this segment were not identified. The remaining plate boundary to the east to Guadeloupe is probably not associated with M > 8 historical subduction-zone earthquakes. The May 2, 1787 earthquake, previously assigned an M 8–8.25, is probably only MI 6.9 and could be located north, west or SW of Puerto Rico. An MI 6.9 earthquake on July 11, 1785 was probably located north or east of the Virgin Islands. We located MI I 7.7) and May 7, 1842 (MI 7.6) earthquakes ruptured the Septentrional Fault in northern Hispaniola. If so, the recurrence interval on the central Septentrional Fault is ~300 years, and only 170 years has elapsed since the last event. The recurrence interval of large earthquakes along the Hispaniola subduction segment is likely longer than the historical record. Intra-arc M ≥ 7.0 earthquakes may occur every 75–100 years in the 410-km-long segment between the Virgin Islands and Guadeloupe.

  15. Ethnomedicine and ethnobotany of fright, a Caribbean culture-bound psychiatric syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background "Fright" is an English-speaking Caribbean idiom for an illness, or ethnomedical syndrome, of persistent distress. A parallel ethnopsychiatric idiom exists in the French Antilles as sésisma. Fright is distinct from susto among Hispanics, though both develop in the wake of traumatic events. West Indian ethnophysiology (ethnoanatomy) theorizes that an overload of stressful emotions (fear, panic, anguish or worry) causes a cold humoral state in which blood coagulates causing prolonged distress and increased risks of other humorally cold illnesses. Methods Qualitative data on local explanatory models and treatment of fright were collected using participant-observation, informal key informant interviews and a village health survey. Ethnobotanical and epidemiological data come from freelist (or "free-list") tasks, analyzed for salience, with nearly all adults (N = 112) of an eastern village in Dominica, and a village survey on medicinal plant recognition and use (N = 106). Results Along with prayer and exercise, three herbs are salient fright treatments: Gossypium barbadense L., Lippia micromera Schauer, and, Plectranthus [Coleus] amboinicus [Loureiro] Sprengel. The survey indicated that 27% of village adults had medicated themselves for fright. Logistic regression of fright suffering onto demographic variables of age, education, gender, parental status and wealth measured in consumer goods found age to be the only significant predictor of having had fright. The probability of having (and medicating for) fright thus increases with every year. Conclusions While sufferers are often uncomfortable recalling personal fright experiences, reporting use of medicinal plants is less problematic. Inquiry on fright medical ethnobotany (or phytotherapies) serves as a proxy measurement for fright occurrence. Cross-cultural and ethnopharmacology literature on the medicinal plants suggests probable efficacy in accord with Dominican ethnomedical notions of fright. Further, the

  16. Ethnomedicine and ethnobotany of fright, a Caribbean culture-bound psychiatric syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlan, Marsha B

    2010-02-17

    "Fright" is an English-speaking Caribbean idiom for an illness, or ethnomedical syndrome, of persistent distress. A parallel ethnopsychiatric idiom exists in the French Antilles as sésisma. Fright is distinct from susto among Hispanics, though both develop in the wake of traumatic events. West Indian ethnophysiology (ethnoanatomy) theorizes that an overload of stressful emotions (fear, panic, anguish or worry) causes a cold humoral state in which blood coagulates causing prolonged distress and increased risks of other humorally cold illnesses. Qualitative data on local explanatory models and treatment of fright were collected using participant-observation, informal key informant interviews and a village health survey. Ethnobotanical and epidemiological data come from freelist (or "free-list") tasks, analyzed for salience, with nearly all adults (N = 112) of an eastern village in Dominica, and a village survey on medicinal plant recognition and use (N = 106). Along with prayer and exercise, three herbs are salient fright treatments: Gossypium barbadense L., Lippia micromera Schauer, and, Plectranthus [Coleus] amboinicus [Loureiro] Sprengel. The survey indicated that 27% of village adults had medicated themselves for fright. Logistic regression of fright suffering onto demographic variables of age, education, gender, parental status and wealth measured in consumer goods found age to be the only significant predictor of having had fright. The probability of having (and medicating for) fright thus increases with every year. While sufferers are often uncomfortable recalling personal fright experiences, reporting use of medicinal plants is less problematic. Inquiry on fright medical ethnobotany (or phytotherapies) serves as a proxy measurement for fright occurrence. Cross-cultural and ethnopharmacology literature on the medicinal plants suggests probable efficacy in accord with Dominican ethnomedical notions of fright. Further, the cultural salience and beliefs about

  17. netherland hydrological modeling instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogewoud, J. C.; de Lange, W. J.; Veldhuizen, A.; Prinsen, G.

    2012-04-01

    Netherlands Hydrological Modeling Instrument A decision support system for water basin management. J.C. Hoogewoud , W.J. de Lange ,A. Veldhuizen , G. Prinsen , The Netherlands Hydrological modeling Instrument (NHI) is the center point of a framework of models, to coherently model the hydrological system and the multitude of functions it supports. Dutch hydrological institutes Deltares, Alterra, Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency, RWS Waterdienst, STOWA and Vewin are cooperating in enhancing the NHI for adequate decision support. The instrument is used by three different ministries involved in national water policy matters, for instance the WFD, drought management, manure policy and climate change issues. The basis of the modeling instrument is a state-of-the-art on-line coupling of the groundwater system (MODFLOW), the unsaturated zone (metaSWAP) and the surface water system (MOZART-DM). It brings together hydro(geo)logical processes from the column to the basin scale, ranging from 250x250m plots to the river Rhine and includes salt water flow. The NHI is validated with an eight year run (1998-2006) with dry and wet periods. For this run different parts of the hydrology have been compared with measurements. For instance, water demands in dry periods (e.g. for irrigation), discharges at outlets, groundwater levels and evaporation. A validation alone is not enough to get support from stakeholders. Involvement from stakeholders in the modeling process is needed. There fore to gain sufficient support and trust in the instrument on different (policy) levels a couple of actions have been taken: 1. a transparent evaluation of modeling-results has been set up 2. an extensive program is running to cooperate with regional waterboards and suppliers of drinking water in improving the NHI 3. sharing (hydrological) data via newly setup Modeling Database for local and national models 4. Enhancing the NHI with "local" information. The NHI is and has been used for many

  18. Holocene relative sea levels of Bonaire (Leeward Antilles) - Evidence from circumlittoral sediment traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Max; May, Simon Matthias; Brückner, Helmut

    2014-05-01

    Relative sea-level (RSL) rise in the near future represents one of the most serious coastal hazards worldwide, in particular in the Caribbean region where it may enhance negative effects from hurricane-induced flooding. RSL is a function of global (glacioeustasy, steric effect), regional (e.g. glacio-isostatic adjustment [GIA], gravitational effects inducing deformation of the earth, upper/lower mantle viscosity, etc.) and local (sediment compaction, tectonic uplift/subsidence) factors. Information on past RSL supports inferences on upper limits of ice shield ablation, estimates of anthropogenic contribution to historical and future RSL rise and calibration of rheological Earth models. We present the first Holocene RSL curve for the island of Bonaire in the southern Caribbean based on 42 14C datings from 20 sediment cores taken from nine different sedimentary archives along the coast. The sedimentary environment of each index point was linked to a palaeo-water depth based on literature and field observations. The index points trace a local RSL history of decelerating rise since 7000-6000 years ago and subsequent asymptotical approximation, similar to RSL curves from adjacent coasts of Curaςao and Venezuela. The results were compared to an existing reference model which considers global effects and regional GIA (including implications for geopotential). Even though the central and northwestern parts of Bonaire experienced slow tectonic uplift of up to 50 cm since the mid-Holocene and correction for compaction was applied, the new RSL curve for Bonaire runs slightly below the reference model which is probably due to sediment compaction in the investigated archives, collapse of cavities in the underlying limestone, or, at Boka Bartol, local-scale normal faulting (c. 1.5 mm/yr).

  19. East Indians in the Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen M. Schnepel

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available [First paragraph] Transients to Settlers: The Experience of Indians in Jamaica 1845-J950. VERENE SHEPHERD. Leeds, U.K.: Peepal Tree Books, 1993. 281 pp. (Paper £12.95 Survivors of Another Crossing: A History of East Indians in Trinidad, 1880-1946. MARIANNE D. SOARES RAMESAR. St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago: U.W.I. School of Continuing Education, 1994. xiii + 190 pp. (Paper n.p. Les Indes Antillaises: Presence et situation des communautes indiennes en milieu caribeen. ROGER TOUMSON (ed.. Paris: L'Harmattan, 1994. 264 pp. (Paper 140.00 FF Nation and Migration: The Politics of Space in the South Asian Diaspora. PETER VAN DER VEER (ed.. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1995. vi + 256 pp. (Cloth US$ 39.95, Paper US$ 17.95 In the decade since 1988, Caribbean nations with Indian communities have commemorated the 150th anniversary of the arrival of East Indians to the West Indies. These celebrations are part of local revitalization movements of Indian culture and identity stretching from the French departement of Guadeloupe in the Windward Islands to Trinidad and Guyana in the south. Political changes have mirrored the cultural revival in the region. While the debate so often in the past centered on the legitimacy of East Indian claims to local nationality in these societies where African or Creole cultures dominate, in the 1990s leaders of Indian descent were elected heads of government in the two Caribbean nations with the most populous East Indian communities: Cheddi Jagan as President of Guyana in October 1992 (after a 28-year hiatus and Basdeo Panday as Prime Minister of Trinidad in November 1995. Both men have long been associated with their respective countries' struggles for economic, political, and social equality. Outside the region during the summer of 1997, fiftieth-anniversary celebrations marking the independence of India and Pakistan from Britain confirmed that Indo chic — or "Indofrenzy" as anthropologist

  20. Poverty, drug abuse fuel Caribbean AIDS outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovaleski, S F

    1998-01-01

    Hatred and fear of homosexuals, together with a fear of losing tourism revenue, drove many high-level policymakers in the Caribbean to ignore the HIV/AIDS in its infancy. With an annual incidence rate of at least 146.6 people per 100,000, the Bahamas now has one of the highest AIDS rates in the world and the highest such rate in the English-speaking Caribbean. AIDS has become the major cause of death for men and women aged 20-44 in the Bahamas. Indeed, throughout the Caribbean, countries like the Bahamas must now cope with a growing AIDS epidemic. UN AIDS Program figures indicate that at least 310,000 people in the Caribbean have either HIV infection or AIDS, and that the prevalence rate among adults is almost 2%. This compares with an estimated 7.4% of the adult population of sub-Saharan Africa which is infected and 0.6% of adults in North America. 65% of reported AIDS cases in the region result from heterosexual intercourse. While the annual number of AIDS cases has been falling in North America over the last several years and rates in Latin America have leveled off, rates in the Caribbean are increasing sharply. Poverty, the population's lack of awareness, low levels of education, internal and international migration, crack cocaine use, promiscuity, high levels of STDs, prostitution, and tourism are also facilitating the spread of HIV in the Caribbean. Social conservatism, mainly in the English-Caribbean, about discussing sex impedes the implementation and success of HIV/AIDS prevention interventions.

  1. SEAMAP Caribbean Reef Fish Survey (PC1202, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Objectives of the 2012 SEAMAP Caribbean Reef Fish Survey were to assess relative abundance of reef fish species around the US Caribbean Islands, estimate...

  2. 77 FR 70419 - Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-26

    .... Miguel A. Rol n, Executive Director, Caribbean Fishery Management Council, 268 Mu oz Rivera Avenue, Suite... contact Mr. Miguel A. Rol n, Executive Director, Caribbean Fishery Management Council, 268 Mu oz Rivera...

  3. SEAMAP Caribbean Reef Fish Survey (PC1202, ME70)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Objectives of the 2012 SEAMAP Caribbean Reef Fish Survey were to assess relative abundance of reef fish species around the US Caribbean Islands, estimate...

  4. Quantifying Coseismic Normal Fault Rupture at the Seafloor: The 2004 Les Saintes Earthquake Along the Roseau Fault (French Antilles)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olive, J. A. L.; Escartin, J.; Leclerc, F.; Garcia, R.; Gracias, N.; Odemar Science Party, T.

    2016-12-01

    While >70% of Earth's seismicity is submarine, almost all observations of earthquake-related ruptures and surface deformation are restricted to subaerial environments. Such observations are critical for understanding fault behavior and associated hazards (including tsunamis), but are not routinely conducted at the seafloor due to obvious constraints. During the 2013 ODEMAR cruise we used autonomous and remotely operated vehicles to map the Roseau normal Fault (Lesser Antilles), source of the 2004 Mw6.3 earthquake and associated tsunami (1 km) to outcrop (models and the texture-mapped imagery, which have better resolution than any available acoustic systems (behavior of this submarine fault. Our work demonstrates the feasibility of extensive, high-resolution underwater surveys using underwater vehicles and novel imaging techniques, thereby opening new possibilities to study recent seafloor changes associated with tectonic, volcanic, or hydrothermal activity.

  5. Freshwater Ascomycetes: Jahnula purpurea (Jahnulales, Dothideomycetes, a new species on submerged wood from Martinique Island, Lesser Antilles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Fournier

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Jahnula purpurea J.Fourn., Raja & Shearer, a new species in the Jahnulales (Dothideomycetes collected from submerged wood in a freshwater river in Martinique Island, Lesser Antilles, is described and illustrated. The characteristic features of the new species are: globose to subglobose, brownish black ascomata with broad, golden brown, subtending hyphae which stain the underlying wood purple; a peridial wall composed of large pseudoparenchymatic cells, which are textura angularis to prismatica in surface view; sparsely septate pseudoparaphyses embedded in a gel matrix; clavate to obclavate asci with a short pedicel; brown, one-septate, ellipsoidal, rough-walled ascospores without a gelatinous sheath or appendages. Unfortunately, because limited material was available from the type collection, we were unable to obtain molecular data. Jahnula purpurea is distinct from all previously described species of Jahnula in its ability to stain the wood purple and in a combination of ascomal, ascus, and ascospore size and morphology.

  6. Perinatal care in six eastern Caribbean countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boersma, E R

    1985-01-01

    In December, 1981, the Government of the Netherlands conducted evaluation studies of perinatal health care in the 6 Caribbean countries of Antigua, the Bahamas, Barbados, Dominica, Saint Lucia, and St. Vincnet. In recent years, the governments of the 6 countries expressed their concerns about the need to improve perinatal health care and about the limited funds, health facilities, and health manpower available for meeting this need. Data for the studies were collected during visits to the 6 countries and consisted of availble vital statistics and hospital records collected by local physicians and chief nurses. Since 70%-95% of the deliveries in these countries occurred in hospitals, hospital data were used to assess the level of perinatal mortality. Perinatal death rates for the 6 countries ranged from 29/1000 live births to 38/1000 live births. When stillbirths and neonatal death rates were examined separately, there was considerable variation between countries. Stillbirth rates ranged from 23.4-13.6/1000 live births and neonatal death rates ranged from 9.9-22.5/1000 live births. These differences probably reflected classification problems rather than actual differences. Although there was considerable variation in per capita income levels in the 6 countries (US$380-US$2620) these differences did not appear to be associated with differences in perinatal death rates. Average birth weights for the 6 countries ranged from 3000 gm to 3150 gm, and the average for all 6 countries combined was 3100 gm. The incidence of low birth weights (2500 gm or less) ranged from 5.9% in Dominica to 11% in Barbados. The major causes of perinatal death were complications resulting from anoxia or hypoxia, prematurity complications, and neonatal infections. Infants who survive these conditions frequently develop handicaps. Average breastfeeding duration ranged from 1 month in the Bahamas to 7 months in St. Vincent. Bottle feeding is common and generally begins early. Mistaken beliefs

  7. Medical tourism in the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez de Arellano, Annette B

    2011-01-01

    Although travel for medical reasons has a long history, it has more recently evolved from a cottage industry to a worldwide enterprise. A number of countries are positioning themselves to attract visitors who are willing to travel to obtain health services that are more accessible, less expensive, or more available than in their countries of origin. This has in turn given rise to medical packages that combine tourism with health. Several Caribbean nations - including Cuba, Barbados, Jamaica, and Puerto Rico - hope to expand their revenues in this new market. Each country has selected specific service niches and promotes its services accordingly. While Cuba has been promoting its services to other countries for several decades, medical tourism is just beginning in the other islands. Ultimately, these nations' economic success will hinge on their comparative advantage vis-à-vis other options, while their success in terms of improving their own health care depends on the extent to which the services for tourists are also available to the islands' populations.

  8. Can cosmogenic nuclides (36Cl) unravel the timing of dislocation of tsunami blocks on Bonaire (Leeward Antilles)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Max; Rixhon, Gilles; Brückner, Helmut; May, S. Matthias; Binnie, Steve; Dunai, Tibor J.

    2013-04-01

    On Bonaire (Leeward Antilles) and rocky coasts worldwide, high-energy wave events (tsunamis, storms) dislocate coarse-clast deposits (Engel and May, 2012). Using these onshore blocks and boulders to derive ages for the most powerful events on millennial scales is still a major challenge. We apply terrestrial cosmogenic nuclides (TCN), in particular 36Cl, in case of the largest blocks in order to directly date the transport event(s), i.e. the inferred tsunami(s). This dating method has hitherto been disregarded in the coastal environment, particularly in the context of block transport. The following characteristics of the blocks are fundamental for the success of the presented dating approach: (1) due to the lithology (aragonite, calcite), concentration measurements of 36Cl are performed; (2) only large and thick boulders and blocks (>50 t, >2 m thickness) for which tsunami transport was inferred (Engel and May, 2012) were sampled; (3) since the boulders stem from the edge of the coral reef platform, they had been exposed to cosmic radiation prior to the transport event(s) and had already accumulated a certain amount of TCN. To avoid this problem of inheritance, we only sampled the thickest clasts, and those having experienced a 180° overturn during transport; thus, having exposed a "blank" side to cosmic rays only since the event. The complete overturn is attested by the presence of inactive rock pools in upside-down position and bioerosive notches. Engel, M., and May, S. M.: Bonaire's boulder fields revisited: Evidence for Holocene tsunami impact on the Leeward Antilles, Quat. Sci. Rev., 54, 126-141, 2012.

  9. Bonaire 2008: Exploring Coral Reef Sustainability with New Technologies on Fetch1 AUV and Gavia AUV's in Netherlands, Antilles between 20080107 and 20080130

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The goal of the Bonaire 2008 expedition is to survey this unique environment over a greater depth range than can be reached with compressed air scuba, using three...

  10. Recovery of the long-spined sea urchin Diadema Antillarum in Curacao (Netherlands Antilles) linked to lagoonal and wave sheltered shallow rocky habitats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debrot, A.O.; Nagelkerken, I.

    2006-01-01

    Mangroves are an important fish habitat, but little is known of their nursery function and connectivity to other habitats such as coral reefs. Here, the present status of knowledge on connectivity between non-estuarine mangroves and coral reefs by post-larval coral reef fishes is reviewed. Only

  11. Refugee groups in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edith Dourleijn; Jaco Dagevos

    2011-01-01

    Original title: Vluchtelingengroepen in Nederland This report describes for the first time the socioeconomic and sociocultural position of the four largest refugee groups in the Netherlands, originating from Afghanistan, Iraq, Iran and Somalia. Virtually nothing is known about these migrants,

  12. Organic agriculture in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sukkel, W.; Hommes, M.

    2009-01-01

    Dutch organic agriculture has unique characteristics and peculiarities. It is still a relatively small sector compared to conventional agriculture in the Netherlands. However, its market share is growing and organic agriculture leads the way in terms of sustainability and innovations

  13. From the past to the globalized future for Caribbean birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph Wunderle Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Extinctions of Caribbean animals were well underway during the period of Amerindian occupation and have continued since the arrival of Columbus. Despite high extinction rates, the Caribbean still retains high levels of terrestrial biodiversity and, for some taxa, exceptionally high levels of endemism relative to other parts of the world. The fate of the Caribbean’s...

  14. The Caribbean, the U.S. and World Politics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singham, A.W.

    1981-01-01

    Attempts by major powers to redefine the Caribbean area in their own geopolitical terms are aimed at isolating the Caribbean and at stunting the development of its potentially important role in world politics. In defense of national sovereignty, Caribbean nations must retain links with other Third World and nonaligned countries. (Author/GC)

  15. Regulating private security companies in the Caribbean | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Diversity in local food production combats obesity in the Caribbean. In the Caribbean region, the combination of increased imports of processed foods and limited consumption of healthy foods, such as fresh fruit and. View moreDiversity in local food production combats obesity in the Caribbean ...

  16. 78 FR 69048 - Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-18

    ... --Other Business December 12, 2013, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Overview of the Caribbean Large Marine Ecosystem Program... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC980 Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public... (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The Caribbean Fishery Management Council...

  17. [Echinoderms (Echinodermata) of the Mexican Caribbean].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laguarda-Figueras, Alfredo; Solis-Marín, Francisco A; Durán-González, Alicia; Ahearn, Cynthia Gust; Buitrón Sánchez, Blanca Estela; Torres-Vega, Juan

    2005-12-01

    A systematic list of the echinoderms of the Mexican Caribbean based on museum specimens of the Colección Nacional de Equinodermos, Instituto de Ciencias del Mar y Limnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México and the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. is presented. This list reveals an important echinoderm biodiversity in the Mexican Caribbean, where five of the six echinoderm classes are represented. A total of 178 echinoderm species is recorded, distributed in 113 genera, 51 families and 22 orders. 30 new records for the Mexican Caribbean are presents: Crínoidea (three), Asteroidea (two), Ophiuroidea (eleven), Echinoidea (one), Holothuroidea (thirteen).

  18. Towards indigenous feminist theorizing in the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, P

    1998-01-01

    This theoretical study of feminism in the Caribbean opens by presenting the contemporary image of the Caribbean and then pointing to the continuing influence of the colonial past in the creation of contemporary community and the establishment of identity. The paper continues with a focus on three aspects of identity, or difference, that have influenced the daily articulation of feminism and academic debates. The first concerns the positions taken by women in the region's political struggles. The second is an exploration of the linguistic meanings of the gender discourse within the region. Finally, the essay examines the idea of linguistic difference in light of contemporary Western feminist views of "sexual difference" versus equality. The discussion of each of these issues is grounded in historical analysis and illustrated with specific examples. The study concludes that, in this region, feminism offers a new way to investigate the past while creating challenges and opportunities in the struggle to establish a Caribbean identity.

  19. Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Secretariat, Sustainable Development Secretariat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fevrier, C.

    1999-11-01

    In spite of low petroleum prices, energy remains a significant issue in the development thrust of the Caribbean. With the exception of Trinidad and Tobago and to a lesser extent Barbados the region relies on imported petroleum for its commercial energy needs. The Secretariat will continue to pursue collaboration with agencies in the hemisphere so that the potential of the renewable energy resource of the Caribbean region can be fully utilized. This commitment is being demonstrated with collaboration with the Caribbean Energy Information System (CEIS), The University of the West Indies Centre for Environment and Development (UWICED) and the Latin American Energy Organization and the Climate Institute in formulating projects and programmes in the Energy Sector. (EHS)

  20. Caribbean literary theory: modernist and postmodern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. James Arnold

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available [First paragraph] The Repeating Mand: The Caribbean and the Postmodern Perspective. ANTONIO BENITEZ-ROJO. Durham NC: Duke University Press, 1992. xi + 303 pp. (Cloth US$ 49.95, Paper US$ 15.95 Myth and History in Caribbean Fiction: Alejo Carpentier, Wilson Harris, and Edouard Glissant. BARBARA J. WEBB. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1992. x + 185 pp. (Cloth US$ 25.00 Caribbean literature has been overtaken of late by the quarrels that have pitted postmodernists against modernists in Europe and North America for the past twenty years. The modernists, faced with the fragmentation of the region that hard-nosed pragmatists and empiricists could only see as hostile to the emergence of any common culture, had sought in myth and its literary derivatives the collective impulse to transcend the divisions wrought by colonial history. Fifteen years ago I wrote a book that combined in its lead title the terms Modernism and Negritude in an effort to account for the efforts by mid-century Caribbean writers to come to grips with this problem. A decade later I demonstrated that one of the principal Caribbean modernists, Aimé Césaire, late in his career adopted stylistic characteristics that we associate with the postmodern (Arnold 1990. The example of Césaire should not be taken to suggest that we are dealing with some sort of natural evolution of modernism toward the postmodern. In fact the two terms represent competing paradigms that organize concepts and data so differently as to offer quite divergent maps of the literary Caribbean.

  1. Cancer incidence and mortality in the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Adrienne A; Jacobson, Judith S; Magai, Carol; Consedine, Nathan; Horowicz-Mehler, Nathalie C; Neugut, Alfred I

    2007-09-01

    Nearly 10% of immigrants to the United States come from the Caribbean region. In this paper, we analyzed incidence and mortality rates of the major cancers in the Bahamas, Barbados, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Jamaica, Puerto Rico, and Trinidad and Tobago, and compared them with US patterns. We obtained age-standardized, sex-specific cancer incidence and mortality rates for cancers of the bladder, breast, cervix, esophagus, large bowel, liver, lung, pancreas, prostate, and stomach for 8 Caribbean countries and the United States from the GLOBOCAN program of the International Agency for Research in Cancer (IARC) and for the U.S. population from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program of the NCI. GLOBOCAN incidence and mortality rates for the overall United States were lower than but correlated with overall SEER rates. Based on GLOBOCAN data, the incidence and mortality rates of cancers of the breast, prostate, large bowel, and lung, and, among males, bladder cancer were lower in the Caribbean countries than the United States. Caribbean countries had higher rates of cancers of the cervix, esophagus, liver, and stomach. Haiti had the highest incidence and mortality rates of cervix and liver cancers. Jamaica and Haiti had the highest rates of stomach cancer. Cancer incidence and mortality in the Caribbean generally follow known patterns of association with economic development, infectious agents, and racial/ethnic origin. Studying these patterns and how immigration changes them may yield clues to cancer etiology. A better understanding of cancer incidence and mortality rates may help health policymakers to implement state-of-the-art treatment and preventive services for people of Caribbean descent both in their native countries and in immigrant communities in the United States.

  2. Ethnic background and differences in health care use: a national cross-sectional study of native Dutch and immigrant elderly in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foets Marleen

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immigrant elderly are a rapidly growing group in Dutch society; little is known about their health care use. This study assesses whether ethnic disparities in health care use exist and how they can be explained. Applying an established health care access model as explanatory factors, we tested health and socio-economic status, and in view of our research population we added an acculturation variable, elaborated into several sub-domains. Methods Cross-sectional study using data from the "Social Position, Health and Well-being of Elderly Immigrants" survey, conducted in 2003 in the Netherlands. The study population consisted of first generation immigrants aged 55 years and older from the four major immigrant populations in the Netherlands and a native Dutch reference group. The average response rate to the survey was 46% (1503/3284; country of origin: Turkey n = 307, Morocco n = 284, Surinam n = 308, the Netherlands Antilles n = 300, the Netherlands n = 304. Results High ethnic disparities exist in health and health care utilisation. Immigrant elderly show a higher use of GP services and lower use of physical therapy and home care. Both self-reported health status (need factor and language competence (part of acculturation have high explanatory power for all types of health services utilisation; the additional impact of socio-economic status and education is low. Conclusion For all health services, health disparities among all four major immigrant groups in the Netherlands translate into utilisation disparities, aggravated by lack of language competence. The resulting pattern of systematic lower health services utilisation of elderly immigrants is a challenge for health care providers and policy makers.

  3. Ectomycorrhizal fungal communities of Coccoloba uvifera (L.) L. mature trees and seedlings in the neotropical coastal forests of Guadeloupe (Lesser Antilles)

    OpenAIRE

    Séne, S.; Avril, R.; Chaintreuil, Clémence; Geoffroy, A.; Ndiaye, C.; Diedhiou, A. G.; SADIO, O.; Courtecuisse, R.; Sylla, S.; Selosse, M.A.; Bâ, Amadou

    2015-01-01

    We studied belowground and aboveground diversity and distribution of ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungal species colonizing Coccoloba uvifera (L.) L. (seagrape) mature trees and seedlings naturally regenerating in four littoral forests of the Guadeloupe island (Lesser Antilles). We collected 546 sporocarps, 49 sclerotia, and morphotyped 26,722 root tips from mature trees and seedlings. Seven EM fungal species only were recovered among sporocarps (Cantharellus cinnabarinus, Amanita arenicola, Russula ...

  4. Fostering Entrepreneurship in the Caribbean | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This project seeks to answer the following questions: Can entrepreneurs play a significant role in promoting economic advancement in the Caribbean? ... Women in the developing world continue to face obstacles that limit their ability to establish careers and become leaders in the fields of science, technology, engineering, ...

  5. Networks for Development : Caribbean Information and ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The second component, Rethinking ICT Policy and Regulation, will examine policymaking and regulation formulation and their implementation across four jurisdictions: Barbados, Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago, and the Organization of Eastern Caribbean States. All these jurisdictions have implemented ICT reforms with ...

  6. Caribbean Knowledge Economy : Coordinating Network | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    A special effort will be made to involve representatives from Haiti in order to provide insights into the reconstruction process. The project will include training in the use of Outcome Mapping for impact evaluation, and support to the University of the West Indies (UWI) to establish a virtual institute for the Caribbean knowledge ...

  7. Latin America and the Caribbean | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Our projects that capitalize on local and global knowledge bring strength to our quest for lasting solutions. Our aim? Long-term sustainability of development in Latin America and the Caribbean through economic growth, equitable access to health and social services, sustainable natural resources, and civil security. And we ...

  8. Canada: psychosis in the immigrant Caribbean population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeman, Mary V

    2011-09-01

    Many reports from European countries suggest that acute episodes of psychosis are more frequent among immigrants from the Caribbean than among their non-immigrant peers. The aim of this selective review is to examine how the social correlates of migration to Canada interact with biological mechanisms to contribute to psychosis in the Caribbean population. PubMed and JSTOR social science databases (between 1966 and 2010) were searched using the following search terms: psychiatric genetics; dopamine pathways; Caribbean family structure and child rearing; cannabis and psychosis; obstetric complications and schizophrenia; social defeat; social capital; racial discrimination; urbanicity; immigration; assimilation; and immigration. This was followed by the cross-checking of references pertinent to Canada. There was no information about the prevalence of psychosis in Afro-Caribbean immigrant groups to Canada. There was a suggestion that the form the acute episode takes may differ, depending perhaps on the island of origin. Ethnicity and migration influence susceptibility and response to psychotic illness in a number of distinct and interacting ways depending both on the host country and the country of origin. Understanding the pathways can help to protect the health of immigrants.

  9. Decolonization and life expectancy in the Caribbean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstraeten, S.P.A.; Van Oers, J.A.M.; Mackenbach, J.P.

    2016-01-01

    Decolonization has brought political independence to half the Caribbean states in the last half of the 20th century, while the other states remain affiliated. Previous studies suggested a beneficial impact of affiliated status on population health, which may be mediated by more favorable economic

  10. Latin American and Caribbean Environmental Economics Program ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Latin American and Caribbean Environmental Economics Program Phase III. A grant to improve a new generation of Latin American leaders' understanding of how to better manage natural resources will contribute to the region's economic and social development. Earlier IDRC grants helped the Latin American and ...

  11. The Caribbean Bildungsroman: Notes on a Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, Jacqueline Brice

    The universality of the childhood experience is a perspective that is useful in the classroom where the student body reflects the multiethnic, multicultural roots of American culture. The novels from the Caribbean can add new material to the body of world literature and should be included in a crosscultural study of the "bildungsroman"…

  12. Migration and rural development in the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momsen, J D

    1986-01-01

    The relationship between migration and agricultural development in the Caribbean is examined. The data, collected by survey, concern the islands of Nevis, Montserrat, and Saint Lucia. The results show that migration is not associated with agricultural innovation or the use of specific technical inputs and that it frequently has a negative impact on agricultural productivity and attitudes toward farming.

  13. Toward a cladistic model for the Caribbean subregion: Delimitation of areas of endemism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morrone Juan J.

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available A new biogeographic scherne for the Caribbean subregion is proposed herein, where the following 29 provinces are recognized: Sierra Madre Occidental (western Mexico: states of Chihuahua, Durango, Zacatecas, Sonora, Sinaloa, Nayarit, and Jalisco, above 1,000 m altitude, Sierra Madre Oriental (eastern Mexico: states of San Luis Potosí, Coahuila, Hidalgo, Nuevo León, and Querétaro, above 1,500 m altitud e, Transmexican Volcanic Belt (central Mexico: states ofGuanajuato, Mexico, Distrito Federal, Jalisco, Michoacán, Puebla, Oaxaca, Tlaxcala, and Veracruz, Balsas Basin (central Mexico: states ofGuerrero, Mexico, Jalisco, Michoacán, Morelos, Oaxaca, and Puebla, below 2,000 m altitude, Sierra Madre del Sur (south central Mexico, from southern Michoacán to Guerrero and Oaxaca, and part of Pucbla, abo ve 1,000 m altitude, Mexican Gulf (coast ofthe Mexican Gulf, in eastern Mexico, Belize, and northern Guatemala, Yucatán peninsula (Yucatán península, in the Mexican states of Carnpeche, Yucatán, and Quintana Roo, below 200 m altitude, Mexican Pacific Coast (western Mexico, in the Pacific coast ofthe states ofSinaloa, Nayarit, Colima, Jalisco, Michoacán, Guerrero, Oaxaca, and Chiapas, Chiapas (Mexico, Guatemala, and Nicaragua, basically corresponding to the Sierra Madre de Chiapas, from 500 to 2,000 m altitude, Eastern Central Arnerica (eastern Central America, frorn Guatemala to Panarna, Western Panamanian Isthrnus (western Central America, from Costa Rica to western Panama, Bahama (Bahama archipelago, comprising the islands of Abaco-Grand Bahama, Andros-Birnini, Cat, Crooked-Mayaguana, Exurnas, Inaguas, Long-Ragged Island Range, Mona, New Providence-Eleutheras, San Salvador-Rum Cay, St. Eustatius, St. Kitts, St. Lucia, St. Martin, St. Vincent, and Turks and Caicos, Cuba (island ofCuba, Cayman islands (archipelago including Grand Cayman, Little Cayrnan, and Cayrnan Brac, Jamaica (island of Jamaica, Hispaniola (Dominican Republic and Haiti, Puerto

  14. Enchytraeidae of the Netherlands (Annelida; Oligochaeta)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gunst, de J.H.

    1965-01-01

    This paper presents a preliminary check list of 46 species of Enchytraeidae hitherto found in the Netherlands. With the exception of Enchytraeus albidus and Hemifridericia parva, these species are recorded from the Netherlands for the first time.

  15. Diabetes MILES--The Netherlands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nefs, Giesje; Bot, Mariska; Browne, Jessica L

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As the number of people with diabetes is increasing rapidly worldwide, a more thorough understanding of the psychosocial aspects of living with this condition has become an important health care priority. While our knowledge has grown substantially over the past two decades with respect...... to the physical, emotional and social difficulties that people with diabetes may encounter, many important issues remain to be elucidated. Under the umbrella of the Diabetes MILES (Management and Impact for Long-term Empowerment and Success) Study International Collaborative, Diabetes MILES--The Netherlands aims...... to examine how Dutch adults with diabetes manage their condition and how it affects their lives. Topics of special interest in Diabetes MILES--The Netherlands include subtypes of depression, Type D personality, mindfulness, sleep and sexual functioning. METHODS/DESIGN: Diabetes MILES--The Netherlands...

  16. Transactional sex among men who have sex with men in the French Antilles and French Guiana: frequency and associated factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingelschmidt, Justine; Parriault, Marie-Claire; Van Melle, Astrid; Basurko, Célia; Gontier, Barbara; Cabié, André; Hoen, Bruno; Sow, Marie-Thérèse; Nacher, Mathieu

    2017-06-01

    The French Antilles (Martinique, Saint Martin and Guadeloupe) and French Guiana are the French territories most affected by the HIV epidemic. Some population groups such as men who have sex with men (MSM), especially those involved in transactional sex, are thought to be particularly vulnerable to HIV but few data exist to help characterize their health-related needs and thus implement relevant prevention interventions. To fill this knowledge gap, we used data collected from an HIV/AIDS Knowledge, Attitudes, Behaviours and Practices survey conducted in 2012 among MSM living in the French Antilles and French Guiana and recruited through snowball sampling. Our objectives were to compare social and demographic characteristics and sexual behaviours between MSM engaging in transactional sex and MSM not engaging in transactional sex and to identify factors associated with transactional sex involvement using a logistic regression model. A total of 733 MSM were interviewed, 21% of whom reported to undergo transactional sex. Their behaviour and social and demographic characteristics were different from other MSMs' and they were more exposed to factors that are recognized to potentiate HIV vulnerability, at the individual, community, network and structural levels. The variables positively associated with sex trade involvement were having ever consumed drug (OR = 2.84 [1.23-6.52]; p = .002), having a greater number of sex partners than the median (OR = 8.31 [4.84-14.30]; p < .001), having experienced intimate partner violence (OR = 1.72 [0.99-3.00]; p = .053) and having undergone physical aggression because of sexual orientation (OR = 2.84 [1.23-6.52]; p = .014). Variables negatively associated with sex trade involvement were being older (OR = 0.93 [0.90-0.97] per year; p = .001), having a stable administrative situation (OR = 0.10 [0.06-0.19]; p < .001), having a stable housing (OR = 0.29 [0.15-0.55]; p < .001) and

  17. Post-breeding migration routes of marine turtles from Bonaire and Klein Bonaire, Caribbean Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becking, L. E.; Christianen, M. J. A.; Nava, M. I.; Miller, N.; Willis, S.; van Dam, R. P.

    2016-01-01

    The management of small rookeries is key to conserving the regional genetic diversity of marine turtle populations and requires knowledge on population connectivity between breeding and foraging areas. To elucidate the geographic scope of the populations of marine turtles breeding at Bonaire and

  18. Divergence of cryptic species of Doryteuthis plei Blainville, 1823 (Loliginidae, Cephalopoda) in the Western Atlantic Ocean is associated with the formation of the Caribbean Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, João Bráullio de L; Rodrigues-Filho, Luis F da S; Ferreira, Yrlene do S; Carneiro, Jeferson; Asp, Nils E; Shaw, Paul W; Haimovici, Manuel; Markaida, Unai; Ready, Jonathan; Schneider, Horacio; Sampaio, Iracilda

    2017-01-01

    Although recent years have seen an increase in genetic analyses that identify new species of cephalopods and phylogeographic patterns, the loliginid squid of South America remain one of the least studied groups. The suggestion that Doryteuthis plei may represent distinct lineages within its extensive distribution along the western Atlantic coasts from Cape Hatteras, USA (36°N) to northern Argentina (35°S) is consistent with significant variation in a number of environmental variables along this range including in both temperature and salinity. In the present study D. plei samples were obtained from a large number of localities along the western Atlantic coasts to investigate the distribution of these possible species in a phylogeographic context. Phylogeographic analyses were performed using the mitochondrial Cytochrome Oxidase I gene and nuclear Rhodopsin gene. Divergence times were estimated using Bayesian strict clock dating with calibrations based on fossil records for divergence from the lineage containing Vampyroteuthis infernalis (162mya), the probable origins of the North American loliginids (45mya), and the European loliginids (20mya) and fossil statolith from Doryteuthis opalescens (3mya). Our results suggest a deep genetic divergence within Doryteuthis plei. The currently described specie consists of two genetically distinct clades (pair-wise genetic divergence of between 7.7 and 9.1%). One clade composed of individuals collected in northwestern Atlantic and Central Caribbean Atlantic waters and the other from southwestern Atlantic waters. The divergence time and sampling locations suggest the speciation process at approximately 16Mya, which is in full agreement with the middle Miocene orogeny of the Caribbean plate, ending up with the formation of the Lesser Antilles and the adjacent subduction zone, coinciding with a particularly low global sea level, resulting in the practical absence of continental shelves at the area, and therefore an effective

  19. Invertebrate distribution patterns and river typology for the implementation of the water framework directive in Martinique, French Lesser Antilles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernadet C.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, Europe’s Water Framework Directive provided compelling reasons for developing tools for the biological assessment of freshwater ecosystem health in member States. Yet, the lack of published study for Europe’s overseas regions reflects minimal knowledge of the distribution patterns of aquatic species in Community’s outermost areas. Benthic invertebrates (84 taxa and land-cover, physical habitat and water chemistry descriptors (26 variables were recorded at fifty-one stations in Martinique, French Lesser Antilles. Canonical Correspondence Analysis and Ward’s algorithm were used to bring out patterns in community structure in relation to environmental conditions, and variation partitioning was used to specify the influence of geomorphology and anthropogenic disturbance on invertebrate communities. Species richness decreased from headwater to lowland streams, and species composition changed from northern to southern areas. The proportion of variation explained by geomorphological variables was globally higher than that explained by anthropogenic variables. Geomorphology and land cover played key roles in delineating ecological sub-regions for the freshwater biota. Despite this and the small surface area of Martinique (1080 km2, invertebrate communities showed a clear spatial turnover in composition and biological traits (e.g., insects, crustaceans and molluscs in relation to natural conditions.

  20. Heartwater in Guadeloupe and in the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camus, E; Martinez, D; Beauperthuy, L; Benderdouche, A; Coisne, S; Corbette, C; Denormandie, N; Garris, G; Harris, E; King, T

    1993-01-01

    A sero-epidemiological survey for heartwater was organized in 1992 in the Lesser Antilles, from Grenada to Saint Martin. Blood from about one percent of the ruminant livestock of the islands was randomly sampled and the sera were tested with an indirect ELISA. The percentage of positive sera was found to be 30% in Guadeloupe, 25% in Antigua, 2.2% in St.Martin, 1.3% in St. Kitts & Nevis, 3.8% in Montserrat, 1.7% in Dominica, 1.5% in St.Lucia, 1.5% in St.Vincent, 3.5% in Barbados, 2.9% in Grenada and 7% in Martinique. Ruminants from Guadeloupe and Antigua are known to be infected with heartwater. The low percentage of positive sera and the absence of clinical cases in the other islands strongly suggest that positive sera in these islands are probably due to non-specific cross reactions between Cowdria and other micro-organisms (possibly Ehrlichia) which remain to be isolated. In particular, the high percentages of positive sheep sera in Martinique (15%) and Montserrat (11%) should be further investigated.

  1. European Bat Lyssaviruses, the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poel, van der W.H.M.; Heide, van der R.; Verstraten, E.R.A.M.; Kramps, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    To study European bat lyssavirus (EBLV) in bat reservoirs in the Netherlands, native bats have been tested for rabies since 1984. For all collected bats, data including species, age, sex, and date and location found were recorded. A total of 1,219 serotine bats, Eptesicus serotinus, were tested, and

  2. Robotics Activities in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kranenburg- de Lange, D.J.B.A.

    2010-01-01

    Since April 2010, in The Netherlands robotics activities are coordinated by RoboNED. This Dutch Robotics Platform, chaired by Prof. Stefano Stramigioli, aims to stimulate the synergy between the robotics fields and to formulate a focus. The goal of RoboNED is three fold: 1) RoboNED aims to bring the

  3. Work life in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bossche, S. van den; Dhondt, S.; Genabeek, J. van; Goudswaard, A.; Hooftman, W.; Houtman, I.; Klein Hesselink, J.; Korte, E. de; Kraan, K.; Oeij, P.; Pot, F.; Smulders, P.G.W.; Vaas, F.; Wevers, C.; Willems, D.

    2012-01-01

    The nature of work is changing, not only in the Netherlands but throughout Europe. There is a growing demand for different types of products and services. These demands are influenced by technological developments and innovations, but also by globalization, which indicates the integration of

  4. Netherlands: archives, libraries and museums

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketelaar, E.; Huysmans, F.; van Mensch, P.; Bates, M.J.; Maack, M.N.

    2010-01-01

    This entry provides an overview of the development and current state of archives, libraries, and museums as institutions, and the related professions and disciplines within the Netherlands. The entry describes social and political issues affecting information institutions from the early nineteenth

  5. Central Planning in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Tinbergen (Jan)

    1947-01-01

    textabstractImmediately after the Liberation the Netherlands were faced with a severe shortage of all essential goods, particularly in the Western part of the country, where the period of famine had led to a complete exhaustion of all stocks, and where the Germans had deliberately destroyed the

  6. Coeliac disease in The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schweizer, JJ; Blomberg - van der Flier, von B.M.E.; Mesquita, HB Bueno-de; Mearin, ML

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prevalence of adult coeliac disease in The Netherlands was studied in the Dutch Coeliac Disease Society and in blood donors but not in the general population. We therefore studied the prevalence of recognized and unrecognized coeliac disease in a large cohort, representative of the

  7. Emergency departments in The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijssen, W.A.M.H.; Giesen, P.H.J.; Wensing, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Emergency medicine in The Netherlands is faced with an increasing interest by politicians and stakeholders in health care. This is due to crowding, increasing costs, criticism of the quality of emergency care, restructuring of out-of-hours services in primary care and the introduction of a training

  8. Environmental chronology of the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Windt, Henny J. van der; Harle, Nigel

    1997-01-01

    This report encompasses all major events in nature management and environmental policy in the Netherlands from 1814-1995. All relevant bills, policy documents and government departments as well as important events and incidents have been included. For instant mass demonstrations against nuclear

  9. Rural areas in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haartsen, T.; Huigen, P.P.P.; Groote, P.

    2003-01-01

    According to the OECD standard, there are no rural areas in the Netherlands. Nonetheless, debate continues about the future of the Dutch countryside. In order to explore how Dutch inhabitants think about rural areas a survey was conducted by the authors, focusing on two topics: the kind of

  10. Adaptation strategies in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gupta, J.; Klostermann, J.E.M.; Bergsma, E.; Jong, P.; Albrecht, E.; Schmidt, M.; Mißler-Behr, M.; Spyra, S.P.N.

    2014-01-01

    Although climate change has been prominently featured on the global scientific and political agendas since the World Climate Conference in 1979 (WCC 1979), the specific importance of adaptation to climate change has only been underlined about 20 years later. The Netherlands, because it lies largely

  11. Sport in the Netherlands 2009

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Annet Tiessen-Raaphorst; Koen Breedveld

    2009-01-01

    Sport is a popular pastime in the Netherlands; More than 10 million people take part in at least one sport. To do this, they can choose from more than 27,000 non-profit sports clubs, or more than 7,200 commercial providers such as fitness centres or riding stables. Among the most popular sports

  12. The Netherlands : A tax haven?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemmeren, Eric; Kuijer, Martin; Werner, Wouter

    2017-01-01

    The taxation of multinational enterprises is currently subject to intensive international and national debates. In these debates the Netherlands has sometimes been labelled as a ‘tax haven’. This term has a strong negative connotation. In any case, a country’s reputation is at stake if it is

  13. Patient education in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bensing, J.; Visser, Adriaan; Saan, Hans

    2001-01-01

    This article presents the development of patient education (PE) in The Netherlands from a historical perspective. A description is given of the first pioneering years from the 70s till the late 80s, in which early topics like the organization of PE, the orchestration of PE between different

  14. Chinese Companies in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hong, T.M.; Pieke, F.N.; Stam, T.

    2017-01-01

    The rapid growth of Chinese investment in the Netherlands has been cause for both excitement and anxiety. Many of the companies and other investors are still unknown and the background and objectives of their investment often remain unclear. This research takes a close look at fourteen Chinese

  15. Infrared activities in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, A.N. de

    1987-01-01

    This presentation summarizes the infrared activities in the Netherlands during the past 30 years and indicates the directions for future work. The capabilities of infrared technology, being passive and useful for night vision applications were envisaged for a long time in our country. The dependence

  16. Net Neutrality in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijk, N.

    2014-01-01

    The Netherlands is among the first countries that have put specific net neutrality standards in place. The decision to implement specific regulation was influenced by at least three factors. The first was the prevailing social and academic debate, partly due to developments in the United States. The

  17. Sport clubs in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werff, H. van der; Hoekman, R.H.A.; Kalmthout, J. van; Breuer, C.; Hoekman, R.; Nagel, S.; Werff, H. van der

    2015-01-01

    The Netherlands are a prosperous country. Compared to other countries wage differences and social inequality are low, and the standards for education, health, safety and security are high. Furthermore, with approximately 500 inhabitants per square kilometre it is dense populated. The culture of the

  18. Elder abuse in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Inger Plaisier; Mirjam de Klerk

    2015-01-01

    Original title: Ouderenmishandeling in Nederland It is twenty years since the last study was carried out on the number of older persons in the Netherlands who are deliberate or accidental victims of abuse in the form of verbal, physical or sexual violence, financial abuse and/or neglect by

  19. The dynamic evolutionary history of the bananaquit (Coereba flaveola) in the Caribbean revealed by a multigene analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Background The bananaquit (Coereba flaveola) is a small nectivorous and frugivorous emberizine bird (order Passeriformes) that is an abundant resident throughout the Caribbean region. We used multi-gene analyses to investigate the evolutionary history of this species throughout its distribution in the West Indies and in South and Middle America. We sequenced six mitochondrial genes (3744 base pairs) and three nuclear genes (2049 base pairs) for forty-four bananaquits and three outgroup species. We infer the ancestral area of the present-day bananaquit populations, report on the species' phylogenetic, biogeographic and evolutionary history, and propose scenarios for its diversification and range expansion. Results Phylogenetic concordance between mitochondrial and nuclear genes at the base of the bananaquit phylogeny supported a West Indian origin for continental populations. Multi-gene analysis showing genetic remnants of successive colonization events in the Lesser Antilles reinforced earlier research demonstrating that bananaquits alternate periods of invasiveness and colonization with biogeographic quiescence. Although nuclear genes provided insufficient information at the tips of the tree to further evaluate relationships of closely allied but strongly supported mitochondrial DNA clades, the discrepancy between mitochondrial and nuclear data in the population of Dominican Republic suggested that the mitochondrial genome was recently acquired by introgression from Jamaica. Conclusion This study represents one of the most complete phylogeographic analyses of its kind and reveals three patterns that are not commonly appreciated in birds: (1) island to mainland colonization, (2) multiple expansion phases, and (3) mitochondrial genome replacement. The detail revealed by this analysis will guide evolutionary analyses of populations in archipelagos such as the West Indies, which include islands varying in size, age, and geological history. Our results suggest that

  20. The dynamic evolutionary history of the bananaquit (Coereba flaveola in the Caribbean revealed by a multigene analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricklefs Robert E

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bananaquit (Coereba flaveola is a small nectivorous and frugivorous emberizine bird (order Passeriformes that is an abundant resident throughout the Caribbean region. We used multi-gene analyses to investigate the evolutionary history of this species throughout its distribution in the West Indies and in South and Middle America. We sequenced six mitochondrial genes (3744 base pairs and three nuclear genes (2049 base pairs for forty-four bananaquits and three outgroup species. We infer the ancestral area of the present-day bananaquit populations, report on the species' phylogenetic, biogeographic and evolutionary history, and propose scenarios for its diversification and range expansion. Results Phylogenetic concordance between mitochondrial and nuclear genes at the base of the bananaquit phylogeny supported a West Indian origin for continental populations. Multi-gene analysis showing genetic remnants of successive colonization events in the Lesser Antilles reinforced earlier research demonstrating that bananaquits alternate periods of invasiveness and colonization with biogeographic quiescence. Although nuclear genes provided insufficient information at the tips of the tree to further evaluate relationships of closely allied but strongly supported mitochondrial DNA clades, the discrepancy between mitochondrial and nuclear data in the population of Dominican Republic suggested that the mitochondrial genome was recently acquired by introgression from Jamaica. Conclusion This study represents one of the most complete phylogeographic analyses of its kind and reveals three patterns that are not commonly appreciated in birds: (1 island to mainland colonization, (2 multiple expansion phases, and (3 mitochondrial genome replacement. The detail revealed by this analysis will guide evolutionary analyses of populations in archipelagos such as the West Indies, which include islands varying in size, age, and geological history. Our

  1. New strategic directions for Caribbean CSM project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    Recent changes in the strategy of the Caribbean Contraceptive Social Marketing Project emphasize the condom, under the brand name, Panther. Since 1984, CCSMP began marketing their Perle rand of oral contraceptive, since dropped, in Barbados, St. Vincent and St. Lucia. Now wider commercial connections are envisioned, with support by CCSMP to promote generic brands. The Panther condom campaign will include an array of mass media, point-of-purchase and sporting event advertising. Pharmacies report that Panther is selling as well as the leading commercial brand. CCSMP is looking to introduce an ultra-thin condom and a vaginal foaming tablet. Market research, involving physicians and users as well as retail audits, indicates that although population in numbers alone is not a serious problem in the Caribbean, early pregnancy is a concern in the area.

  2. Provenance And Tectonomagmatic Setting Of The Santa Marta Schists, Northern Colombia Caribbean Region: Insights On The Styles Of Growth And Approach Of Caribbean Intra- Oceanic Domains To The Continental Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, A.; Jaramillo, C.; Ojeda, G.; Ruiz, J.; Valencia, V.; Weber, M.

    2007-12-01

    The life cycle of an intra-oceanic terranemincludes different phases and styles of magmatic growth, accretion with other terranes and translation before reaching a continental margin. In order to unveil the nature of these phases in crystalline rocks from northern Colombia, U/Pb LA-MC-ICP-MS detrital geochronology and whole rock geochemical data were obtained from stacks of intercalated metavolcanic-sedimentary rocks of the Santa Marta Schists in the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta. Immobile elements whole rock geochemistry from greenschist to amphibolite facies units are characterized by low to moderate LREE/HREE, variable Th enrichment and weakly negative Nb and Ti anomalies, which are similar to island arc and MORB signatures. The intercalated metasedimentary rocks show a REE pattern similar to the PAAS and high Zr/Sc vs Th/Sc ratios, which suggest a felsic and highly diferentiated upper crust sources for the protoliths. Detrital zircons from three different units were obtained, The maximum depositional age for the northwestern unit is limited to the late Cretaceous, with a major peak of 83 Ma. Variable input of older crustal sources with Jurassic (153 Ma), Permo-Triassic (250-290 Ma), Cambrian to Late Neoproterozoic (520-560 Ma) and Middle Mesoproterozic (1000-1500 Ma) ages which are clearly recognized in older units of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta massif and the northern South American basement are also recorded. This type of volcano-sedimentary record within an intra-oceanic arc bears strong similarities with the modern Lesser-Antilles and the Tonga-Kermadec arcs, where continentally derived sediments can be transported houndred of kilometers to the fore-arc, back-arc or the accretionary prism of the active intra-oceanic arc. This record also suggests that this arc has an intra-Americas position, near to its final accretionary stop. Although the metamorphic overprint has obliterated the stratigraphic relations, apparent variations of the LREE/HREE in the

  3. Regional Disease Vector Ecology Profile: Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-07-01

    malathion treatment on Aedes aegypti during a dengue outbreak in Kingston, Jamaica. Rev. Panam. Salud Publica 5: 100-105. Chadee, D.D. 1988. Landing...Baboolal. 2000. Lymphatic filariasis in the Caribbean region: the opportunity for its elimination and certification. Rev. Panam. Salud Publica 7: 319...Rev. Panam. Salud Publica 6: 16-25. Van Der Kuip, E.J. 1969. Trypanosomiasis cruzi in Aruba and Curaçao. Trop. Geogr. Med. 21: 462-469

  4. Art Music by Caribbean Composers: The Bahamas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gangelhoff, Christine

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The cultural identity of the Bahamas owes much to its West African and British colonial heritages and to its physical proximity to the United States. A combination of African and European elements - rhyming spirituals, anthems, rushin' music at watch-night services, wake and setting-up songs; ringplays, fire dance, jump-in-dance, quadrille music (rake-‘n’-scrape music, goombay, and junkanoo - can be seen in musical traditions throughout the Caribbean, including art music.

  5. Assistance Focus: Latin America/Caribbean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-03-29

    The Clean Energy Solutions Center, an initiative of the Clean Energy Ministerial, helps countries throughout the world create policies and programs that advance the deployment of clean energy technologies. Through the Solutions Center's no-cost 'Ask an Expert' service, a team of international experts has delivered assistance to countries in all regions of the world. High-impact examples from the Latin American/Caribbean region are featured here.

  6. Art Music by Caribbean Composers: Haiti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LeGrand, Cathleen

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Haïti has by far the longest history of independence of any of its Caribbean neighbors, having gained independence from France in 1804. Haïti's tradition of classical music takes root in its colonial heritage. Haïtian classical music, "mizik savant ayisyen," is derived from that "desire to retain European standards while including local features" of indigenous musical traditions (Grenier & Averill, 2007-2011.

  7. Marine biodiversity in the Caribbean: regional estimates and distribution patterns

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Miloslavich, Patricia; Díaz, Juan Manuel; Klein, Eduardo; Alvarado, Juan José; Díaz, Cristina; Gobin, Judith; Escobar-Briones, Elva; Cruz-Motta, Juan José; Weil, Ernesto; Cortés, Jorge; Bastidas, Ana Carolina; Robertson, Ross; Zapata, Fernando; Martín, Alberto; Castillo, Julio; Kazandjian, Aniuska; Ortiz, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    .... The coastal Caribbean region is a large marine ecosystem (LME) characterized by coral reefs, mangroves, and seagrasses, but including other environments, such as sandy beaches and rocky shores...

  8. Impact of the slab dip change onto the deformation partitioning in the northern Lesser Antilles oblique subduction zone (Antigua-Virgin Islands)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurencin, Muriel; Marcaillou, Boris; Klingelhoefer, Frauke; Graindorge, David; Lebrun, Jean-Frédéric; Laigle, Mireille; Lallemand, Serge

    2017-04-01

    Marine geophysical cruises Antithesis (2013-2016) investigate the impact of the variations in interplate geometry onto margin tectonic deformation along the strongly oblique Lesser Antilles subduction zone. A striking features of this margin is the drastic increase in earthquake number from the quiet Barbuda-St Martin segment to the Virgin Islands platform. Wide-angle seismic data highlight a northward shallowing of the downgoing plate: in a 150 km distance from the deformation front, the slab dipping angle in the convergence direction decreases from 12° offshore of Antigua Island to 7° offshore of Virgin Islands. North-South wide-angle seismic line substantiates a drastic slab-dip change that likely causes this northward shallowing. This dip change is located beneath the southern tip of the Virgin Islands platform where the Anegada Passage entails the upper plate. Based on deep seismic lines and bathymetric data, the Anegada Passage is a 450 km long W-E trending set of pull-apart basins and strike-slip faults that extends from the Lesser Antilles accretionary prism to Puerto Rico. The newly observed sedimentary architecture within pull-apart Sombrero and Malliwana basins indicates a polyphased tectonic history. A past prominent NW-SE extensive to transtensive phase, possibly related to the Bahamas Bank collision, opened the Anegada Passage as previously published. Transpressive tectonic evidences indicate that these structures have been recently reactivated in an en-echelon sinistral strike-slip system. The interpreted strain ellipsoid is consistent with deformation partitioning. We propose that the slab northward shallowing increases the interplate coupling and the seismic activity beneath the Virgin Islands platform comparatively to the quiet Barbuda-St Martin segment. It is noteworthy that the major tectonic partitioning structure in the Lesser Antilles forearc is located above the slab dip change where the interplate seismic coupling increases.

  9. CARICOF - The Caribbean Regional Climate Outlook Forum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Meerbeeck, Cedric

    2013-04-01

    Regional Climate Outlook Forums (RCOFs) are viewed as a critical building block in the Global Framework for Climate Services (GFCS) of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). The GFCS seeks to extend RCOFs to all vulnerable regions of the world such as the Caribbean, of which the entire population is exposed to water- and heat-related natural hazards. An RCOF is initially intended to identify gaps in information and technical capability; facilitate research cooperation and data exchange within and between regions, and improve coordination within the climate forecasting community. A focus is given on variations in climate conditions on a seasonal timescale. In this view, the relevance of a Caribbean RCOF (CARICOF) is the following: while the seasonality of the climate in the Caribbean has been well documented, major gaps in knowledge exist in terms of the drivers in the shifts of amplitude and phase of seasons (as evidenced from the worst region-wide drought period in recent history during 2009-2010). To address those gaps, CARICOF has brought together National Weather Services (NWSs) from 18 territories under the coordination of the Caribbean Institute for Meteorology and Hydrology (CIMH), to produce region-wide, consensus, seasonal climate outlooks since March 2012. These outlooks include tercile rainfall forecasts, sea and air surface temperature forecasts as well as the likely evolution of the drivers of seasonal climate variability in the region, being amongst others the El Niño Southern Oscillation or tropical Atlantic and Caribbean Sea temperatures. Forecasts for both the national-scale forecasts made by the NWSs and CIMH's regional-scale forecast amalgamate output from several forecasting tools. These currently include: (1) statistical models such as Canonical Correlation Analysis run with the Climate Predictability Tool, providing tercile rainfall forecasts at weather station scale; (2) a global outlooks published by the WMO appointed Global Producing

  10. Recherche de la signature biologique de la dégradation du chlordécone dans le sol des Antilles françaises

    OpenAIRE

    Merlin, Chloé

    2015-01-01

    L’utilisation du chlordécone (CLD) pour éradiquer les populations de charançon noir dans les bananeraies des Antilles françaises (Guadeloupe et Martinique) entre 1972 et 1993 a conduit à la contamination des sols et de l’environnement. Cet insecticide organochloré très hydrophobe persiste dans les sols d’où il transfère lentement vers les ressources en eau et vers les biotes terrestre et aquatique (plantes, animaux, poissons, crustacées). Réputé « indégradable », le CLD résiste à la photolyse...

  11. Local Taxation in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    van der Hoek, M. Peter

    1991-01-01

    Provincial governments in the Netherlands have only one general tax at their disposal. However, it has become an insufficient source of revenue for this level of government in the Dutch system. To increase the revenue raising capacity of the provincial governments, thirteen broad-based general tax proposals not used at the local level were examined. The objective was to find a fair and equitable tax that could easily be collected and would result in fl. 200 million in additional revenue for t...

  12. Safety regions in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Jazić, Aleksandar

    2016-01-01

    Political, economic, social and environmental changes that accompany the development of the modern world, encourage states to implement changes in the security field. One of these countries is the Netherlands, which reformed its system of public security by introducing safety regions. The safety regions represent a new form of organization in the field of emergency and disaster. They are not a new level of local government but rather a new form of public policy that involves all levels of the...

  13. An integrated approach to the seismic activity and structure of the central Lesser Antilles subduction megathrust seismogenic zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirn, Alfred; Laigle, Mireille; Charvis, Philippe; Flueh, Ernst; Gallart, Josep; Kissling, Edi; Lebrun, Jean-Frederic; Nicolich, Rinaldo; Sachpazi, Maria

    2010-05-01

    In order to increase the understanding of plate boundaries that show currently low seismic activity, as was the Sumatra-Andaman subduction before the major earthquake in 2004, a cluster of surveys and cruises has been carried out in 2007 and coordinated under the European Union THALES WAS RIGHT project on the Lesser Antilles subduction zone of the Carribean-America plate boundary. A segment of the corresponding transform boundary just tragically ruptured in the 2010 January 12, Haïti earthquake. This cluster is composed by the German cruise TRAIL with the vessel F/S M. A. MERIAN, the French cruise SISMANTILLES II with the IFREMER vessel N/O ATALANTE), and French cruise OBSANTILLES with the IRD vessel N/O ANTEA. During these cruises and surveys, 80 OBS, Ocean Bottom Seismometers, 64 of which with 3-components seismometers and hydrophones, and 20 OBH with hydrophones have been brought together from several pools (Geoazur Nice, INSU/IPGP Paris, IfM-GEOMAR Kiel, AWI Bremerhaven), with up to 30 land stations (CSIC Barcelona, IPG Paris, INSU-RLBM and -Lithoscope, ETH Zurich). The deployment of all these instruments has been supported principally in addition by ANR Catastrophes Telluriques et Tsunamis (SUBSISMANTI), by the EU SALVADOR Programme of IFM-GEOMAR, as well as by the EU project THALES WAS RIGHT. The main goal of this large seismic investigation effort is the understanding of the behaviour of the seismogenic zone and location of potential source regions of mega-thrust earthquakes. Specific goals are the mapping of the subduction interplate in the range where it may be seismogenic along the Lesser Antilles Arc from Antigua to Martinique Islands, as a contribution to identification and localisation in advance of main rupture zones of possible future major earthquakes, and to the search for transient signals of the activity. The forearc region, commonly considered as a proxy to the seismogenic portion of the subduction mega-thrust fault plane, and which is here the

  14. Application of the probabilistic model BET_UNREST during a volcanic unrest simulation exercise in Dominica, Lesser Antilles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinescu, Robert; Robertson, Richard; Lindsay, Jan M.; Tonini, Roberto; Sandri, Laura; Rouwet, Dmitri; Smith, Patrick; Stewart, Roderick

    2016-11-01

    We report on the first "real-time" application of the BET_UNREST (Bayesian Event Tree for Volcanic Unrest) probabilistic model, during a VUELCO Simulation Exercise carried out on the island of Dominica, Lesser Antilles, in May 2015. Dominica has a concentration of nine potentially active volcanic centers and frequent volcanic earthquake swarms at shallow depths, intense geothermal activity, and recent phreatic explosions (1997) indicate the region is still active. The exercise scenario was developed in secret by a team of scientists from The University of the West Indies (Trinidad and Tobago) and University of Auckland (New Zealand). The simulated unrest activity was provided to the exercise's Scientific Team in three "phases" through exercise injects comprising processed monitoring data. We applied the newly created BET_UNREST model through its software implementation PyBetUnrest, to estimate the probabilities of having (i) unrest of (ii) magmatic, hydrothermal or tectonic origin, which may or may not lead to (iii) an eruption. The probabilities obtained for each simulated phase raised controversy and intense deliberations among the members of the Scientific Team. The results were often considered to be "too high" and were not included in any of the reports presented to ODM (Office for Disaster Management) revealing interesting crisis communication challenges. We concluded that the PyBetUnrest application itself was successful and brought the tool one step closer to a full implementation. However, as with any newly proposed method, it needs more testing, and in order to be able to use it in the future, we make a series of recommendations for future applications.

  15. Forearc structure in the Lesser Antilles inferred from depth to the Curie temperature and thermo-mechanical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gailler, Lydie; Arcay, Diane; Münch, Philippe; Martelet, Guillaume; Thinon, Isabelle; Lebrun, Jean-Frédéric

    2017-06-01

    Imaging deep active volcanic areas remains a challenge in our understanding of their activity and evolution, especially in subduction zones. Study of magnetic anomalies is appropriate to access such dynamics in depth. The magnetic anomaly pattern of the Lesser Antilles Arc (LAA) subduction is studied through Curie Point Depth (CPD), interpreted as the depth of the 580 °C isotherm, and developed to better assess the deep thermal structure of the arc. The depth of the estimated CPD exhibits a complex topography. Keeping in mind the overall uncertainty associated with this method, a main doming is evidenced below the Guadeloupe archipelago. Its apex is shifted towards the ancient arc, suggesting a very hot state of the fore-arc/arc domain. To better understand the LAA thermal state, we perform 2D thermo-mechanical simulations of the subduction zone. Recalling that magnetite is a serpentinization by-product, we simulate water transfer triggered by slab dehydration to test the assumption of fore-arc serpentinization suggested by the positive magnetic anomaly in the vicinity of the Guadeloupe archipelago. In this area, the subduction-induced arc lithosphere hydration and related weakening trigger a fast heating of the upper plate by basal convective removal. This process of fast arc lithosphere thinning may apply where simultaneously the volcanic arc is split in two and normal convergence is high enough. As serpentinization strongly decreases P-wave velocity, we propose a new interpretation of a published seismic profile below Guadeloupe. The seismic layer previously interpreted as the arc lower crust may rather be a layer of serpentinized mantle, as supported by spatial correlations between gravimetric and magnetic anomalies. Consequently, at the scale of Guadeloupe Island, the fore-arc Moho would be shallower than initially assumed, with a dome shape more consistent with both the extensive deformation active since the Oligocene in the inner fore-arc and the CPD doming.

  16. The Molybdenum Isotope System as a Tracer of Slab Input in Subduction Zones: An Example From Martinique, Lesser Antilles Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaschnig, Richard M.; Reinhard, Christopher T.; Planavsky, Noah J.; Wang, Xiangli; Asael, Dan; Chauvel, Catherine

    2017-12-01

    Molybdenum isotopes are fractionated by Earth-surface processes and may provide a tracer for the recycling of crustal material into the mantle. Here, we examined the Mo isotope composition of arc lavas from Martinique in the Lesser Antilles arc, along with Cretaceous and Cenozoic Deep Sea Drilling Project sediments representing potential sedimentary inputs into the subduction zone. Mo stable isotope composition (defined as δ98Mo in ‰ deviation from the NIST 3134 standard) in lavas older than ˜7 million years (Ma) exhibits a narrow range similar to and slightly higher than MORB, whereas those younger than ˜7 Ma show a much greater range and extend to unusually low δ98Mo values. Sediments from DSDP Leg 78A, Site 543 have uniformly low δ98Mo values whereas Leg 14, Site 144 contains both sediments with isotopically light Mo and Mo-enriched black shales with isotopically heavy Mo. When coupled with published radiogenic isotope data, Mo isotope systematics of the lavas can be explained through binary mixing between a MORB-like end-member and different sedimentary compositions identified in the DSDP cores. The lavas older than ˜7 Ma were influenced by incorporation of isotopically heavy black shales into the mantle wedge. The younger lavas are the product of mixing isotopically light sedimentary material into the mantle wedge. The change in Mo isotope composition of the lavas at ˜7 Ma is interpreted to reflect the removal of the Cretaceous black shale component due to the arrival of younger ocean crust where the age-equivalent Cretaceous sediments were deposited in shallower oxic waters. Isotopic fractionation of Mo during its removal from the slab is not required to explain the observed systematics in this system.

  17. Sexual behaviour and sexually transmitted infections in sexually transmitted infection clinic attendees in the Netherlands, 2007-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Coul, E L M Op; Warning, T D; Koedijk, F D H

    2014-01-01

    High annual figures of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are diagnosed in the Netherlands despite significant efforts to control them. Herein, we analyse trends and determinants of STI diagnoses, co-infections, and sexual risks among visitors of 26 STI clinics between 2007 and 2011. We recorded increased positivity rates of STIs (chlamydia, syphilis, gonorrhoea, and/or HIV) in women and heterosexual men up to 12.6% and 13.4%, respectively, in 2011, while rates in men having sex with men (MSM) were stable but high (18.8%) through the documented years. Younger age, origin from Surinam/Antilles, history of previous STI, multiple partners, or a previous notification are the identified risk factors for an STI in this population. Known HIV-infected men (MSM and heterosexuals) were at highest risk for co-infections (relative rate heterosexual men: 15.6; MSM: 11.6). STI positivity rates remained high (MSM) or increased over time (women and heterosexual men), a fact that highlights the importance of continuing STI prevention. Most importantly, the very high STI co-infection rates among HIV-positive men requires intensified STI reduction strategies to put an end to the vicious circle of re-infection and spread of HIV and other STIs.

  18. Child Support, Poverty and Gender Equality in the Caribbean ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Child Support, Poverty and Gender Equality in the Caribbean - Phase II. This project aims to inform policy on both the content and administration of family law in the Caribbean, and to facilitate integration of legal and social protection systems. Based on the research findings from the previous phase (102617), researchers ...

  19. A school fight against AIDS in the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBean, G

    1996-06-01

    The English-speaking Caribbean consists of some fifteen countries, with a population of just over 6 million. The countries including Suriname are united under CARICOM, (the Caribbean Economic Community) and share a common education system. The area is characterised by low infant mortality rates (averaging less than 20/1000 live births) and high literacy rates (above 85% for many years).

  20. Highlight: IDRC sponsors Caribbean symposium on impact of ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-04-15

    Apr 15, 2016 ... The Mona ICT Policy Centre, the Caribbean Institute of Media and Communication and the University of the West Indies hosted the meeting, in partnership with the World Bank and IDRC. The symposium provided an opportunity for experts from the Caribbean and elsewhere to examine the impact of ...

  1. Analytical Support to African and Caribbean Trade Negotiations ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Analytical Support to African and Caribbean Trade Negotiations - Phase III. International Lawyers and Economists against Poverty (ILEAP) is an initiative that aims to help African and Caribbean countries derive full benefit from integration into the global economy. Its work is premised on the recognition that while significant ...

  2. Electronic Waste Toolkit for Latin America and the Caribbean | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Canada-Latin America and Caribbean Zika Virus Research Program. A new funding opportunity on Zika virus is responding to the virus outbreak and the health threat it represents for the affected populations in the hardest hit countries in Latin America and the... View moreCanada-Latin America and Caribbean Zika Virus ...

  3. CarlSnet II : Strengthening the Caribbean ICT Virtual Stakeholders ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Canada-Latin America and Caribbean Zika Virus Research Program. A new funding opportunity on Zika virus is responding to the virus outbreak and the health threat it represents for the affected populations in the hardest hit countries in Latin America and the... View moreCanada-Latin America and Caribbean Zika Virus ...

  4. Canada-Latin America and the Caribbean Research Exchange ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Canada-Latin America and Caribbean Zika Virus Research Program. A new funding opportunity on Zika virus is responding to the virus outbreak and the health threat it represents for the affected populations in the hardest hit countries in Latin America and the... View moreCanada-Latin America and Caribbean Zika Virus ...

  5. School Leadership in the Caribbean: Perceptions, Practices, Paradigms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Paul, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    Successful school leadership is an issue currently being debated up and down Caribbean territories. Key issues in the ongoing debate include: students' outcomes and participation in the regional Caribbean Secondary Examinations (CSEC); teacher recruitment and retention; teacher training and continuing professional development (upgrading); and…

  6. Caribbean health: Healthy children, healthy nation — tackling the ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The health problem in Caribbean children has recently shifted to one of overweight instead of underweight and stunting. • Approximately 25% of school aged children in St. Kitts-Nevis and Trinidad and Tobago are overweight or obese. • The cost to the Caribbean economy of diseases linked to obesity, such as diabetes and ...

  7. 78 FR 33959 - National Caribbean-American Heritage Month, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-06

    ... for independence, our countries won the right to chart their own destinies after generations of... arts, spurring our movements and answering the call to serve. Caribbean traditions have enriched our own, and woven new threads into our cultural fabric. Again and again, Caribbean immigrants and their...

  8. 50 CFR 622.50 - Caribbean spiny lobster import prohibitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Caribbean spiny lobster import... ATLANTIC Management Measures § 622.50 Caribbean spiny lobster import prohibitions. (a) Minimum size limits for imported spiny lobster. There are two minimum size limits that apply to importation of spiny...

  9. Coastal Resource Management in the Wider Caribbean : Resilience ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    1 janv. 2010 ... Coastal Resource Management in the Wider Caribbean : Resilience, Adaptation, and Community Diversity. Couverture du livre Coastal Resource Management in the Wider Caribbean : Resilience, Adaptation, and. Directeur(s) : Yvan Breton, David Brown, Brian Davy, Milton Haughton et Luis Ovares.

  10. Theorising African Caribbean Absences in Multicultural Art Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Paul

    2010-01-01

    This article looks at the learning of African Caribbean pupils in art and design classrooms in the United Kingdom. It proceeds from the proposition that African Caribbean pupils, as the descendants of enslaved peoples whose cultural lineage has been blurred by the skewed relationship with the white majority group, are uniquely disadvantaged in the…

  11. 76 FR 2672 - Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-14

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 068-XA145 Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public... (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Caribbean Fishery Management Council (Council) in partnership with the Fisheries Leadership and Sustainability Forum ] (FLSF) will conduct an...

  12. Another style of Christianity in the Capitalist Ridden Caribbean

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two characteristics mark the Caribbean: capitalism and the hegemony of North Atlantic versions of Christianity. The colonization and exploitation of the Caribbean was justified in the name of profit and the dominant North Atlantic renderings of Christ's message. Having been conceived by the joint forces of these worldly and ...

  13. Marine Gastropods from Curaçao, Aruba and Bonaire

    OpenAIRE

    Jong, de, Anne; Coomans, H.E.

    1988-01-01

    The present study is based on the well-known publication “Caribbean Seashells” by Warmke & Abbott (1961); its data are not repeated here, but a large number of mainly small species were added. Most data from “Gegevens over Mariene Gastropoden van Curaçao” by De Jong & Kristensen (1965) have been included. Furthermore most of the photos of species in “A survey of the littoral Gastropoda of the Netherlands Antilles and other Caribbean Islands” by Coomans (1958) are reproduced. The figures of sp...

  14. African dust and the demise of Caribbean Coral Reefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinn, Eugene A.; Smith, Garriet W.; Prospero, Joseph M.; Betzer, Peter; Hayes, Marshall L.; Garrison, Virginia; Barber, Richard T.

    2000-10-01

    The vitality of Caribbean coral reefs has undergone a continual state of decline since the late 1970s, a period of time coincidental with large increases in transatlantic dust transport. It is proposed that the hundreds of millions of tons/year of soil dust that have been crossing the Atlantic during the last 25 years could be a significant contributor to coral reef decline and may be affecting other ecosystems. Benchmark events, such as near synchronous Caribbean-wide mortalities of acroporid corals and the urchin Diadema in 1983, and coral bleaching beginning in 1987, correlate with the years of maximum dust flux into the Caribbean. Besides crustal elements, in particular Fe, Si, and aluminosilicate clays, the dust can serve as a substrate for numerous species of viable spores, especially the soil fungus Aspergillus. Aspergillus sydowii, the cause of an ongoing Caribbean-wide seafan disease, has been cultured from Caribbean air samples and used to inoculate sea fans.

  15. Diabetes in the English-speaking Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennis, Anselm; Fraser, Henry S

    2004-02-01

    Rates of diabetes mellitus in the English-speaking Caribbean have been rising in recent years, and they are projected to continue climbing in the new millennium. Prevalence rates across countries of the African diaspora mirror levels of Western acculturation, and available data emphasize the importance of obesity as a modifiable risk factor. The population-based Barbados Eye Studies have provided new information about the burden of ocular complications of diabetes such as retinopathy and lens opacities. Diabetes was shown to increase the risk of lens opacities, and 14% of prevalent cataract was attributed to diabetes. Persons with type 1 diabetes were particularly at increased risk of retinopathy, as a result of longer durations of illness and poor glycemic control. Other Caribbean studies have suggested that glycemic control in patients evaluated in various clinical settings is suboptimal, which raises important concerns about quality of care. Diabetics are at increased risk of mortality compared with nondiabetics, and that mortality risk increases with higher baseline levels of glycosylated hemoglobin, even among nondiabetics. These data highlight the need for urgent attention to public health and clinical strategies to prevent diabetes in unaffected persons as well as to prevent or reduce the burden of complications among those who are affected. Among the measures that should be adopted to stem the flood of diabetes in the Caribbean region are lifestyle interventions to promote better nutrition and to increase exercise; patient education, particularly about the central role of diabetes self-management; and the multidisciplinary team approach in the provision of care.

  16. Decolonization and life expectancy in the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraeten, Soraya P A; van Oers, Hans A M; Mackenbach, Johan P

    2016-12-01

    Decolonization has brought political independence to half the Caribbean states in the last half of the 20th century, while the other states remain affiliated. Previous studies suggested a beneficial impact of affiliated status on population health, which may be mediated by more favorable economic development. We assessed how disparities in life expectancy between currently sovereign and affiliated states developed over time, whether decolonization coincided with changes in life expectancy, and whether decolonization coincided with similar changes in GDP per capita. Time-series data on life expectancy and related variables, GDP per capita and political status were collected from harmonized databases. We quantified variations in life expectancy by current political status during the 1950-2010 period. We assessed whether decolonization coincided with life expectancy trend changes by: 1. calculating the annual changes before and after independence, and 2. evaluating trend breaks in a predefined period during decolonization using joinpoint analyses. Similar analyses were undertaken for GDP per capita. Life expectancy in currently sovereign Caribbean states was already lower than in affiliated states before political independence. Overall, decolonization coincided with reductions in life expectancy growth, but not with reductions in economic growth, and changes in life expectancy growth in the decade after independence did not correspond with changes in economic performance. The widening of the life expectancy gap between currently sovereign and affiliated states accelerated in the 1990's and continues to increase. Despite considerable life expectancy gains in all Caribbean states, life expectancy in currently sovereign states increasingly lags behind that of states which remained affiliated. Our results indicate that changing economic conditions were not the main determinant of the unfavorable trends in life expectancy during and after decolonization. Circumstantial

  17. Road deaths in the Netherlands. [Previously known as: Road fatalities in The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2011-01-01

    This fact sheet outlines the development of the number of road deaths in the Netherlands since 1950. After a rise in the 1950s and 1960s, the number of road deaths in the Netherlands has shown a gradual decline since 1973. In 2016, there were 629 road deaths in the Netherlands. After the years of

  18. Art Music by Caribbean Composers: Jamaica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gangelhoff, Christine

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Jamaica is among the Caribbean islands that Columbus claimed for Spain. In response to its rich diversity of peoples: Europeans, Asians, Chinese, Indians and Africans, the motto of Jamaica is: Out of Many, One People."Jamaican music is as varied as the people who inhabit the island... [M]uch folk music retains features and functions of black African music, blended with elements of European (primarily British music" (Lewin & Gordon, 2007-2011. Jamaican musical genres, such as ska, rocksteady, reggae, and dancehall, are popular and influential internationally.The classical music tradition in Jamaica dates back to the 18th century.

  19. WELFARE REGIMES IN LATIN AMERICA AND CARIBBEAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melisa Campana-Alabarce

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a characterization of Latin American and Caribbean Welfare regimes in historiographical perspective. Firstly, it makes a review of the emergence conditions of Welfare States in Western Europe and its core features, with particular emphasis on its role as a method to regulate inequalities in industrial capitalism. Dialoguing with it, then stops in the specific configurations that welfare regimes have taken in Latin America during the course of the twentieth century. Finally, it provides a map of its contemporary features and the major challenges that the States of the region face in his capacity as right guarantors for the future.

  20. 75 FR 30431 - Carboxymethylcellulose from Finland, Mexico, Netherlands, and Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    ... COMMISSION Carboxymethylcellulose from Finland, Mexico, Netherlands, and Sweden AGENCY: United States... on carboxymethylcellulose from Finland, Mexico, Netherlands, and Sweden. SUMMARY: The Commission... carboxymethylcellulose from Finland, Mexico, Netherlands, and Sweden would be likely to lead to continuation or...

  1. Gospel Film/Video in the Caribbean - Reading The Grace Thrillers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article makes the case for the short-video form as constituting “film” in the Caribbean and in Caribbean discourse. It suggests that Caribbean gospel culture has been significantly influenced by western popular culture, which has given two main types of music videos to Caribbean gospel performers. The main body of ...

  2. Coeliac disease in The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, J J; von Blomberg, B M E; Bueno-de Mesquita, H B; Mearin, M L

    2004-04-01

    The prevalence of adult coeliac disease in The Netherlands was studied in the Dutch Coeliac Disease Society and in blood donors but not in the general population. We therefore studied the prevalence of recognized and unrecognized coeliac disease in a large cohort, representative of the adult Dutch general population. Blood samples were available for anonymous research, as well as data on dietary habits, self-reported physical characteristics, health problems, quality of life and socio-economic circumstances. Subjects included 50,760 individuals who had previously participated in two large population-based studies on health status in relation to lifestyle factors. Recognized coeliac disease was studied in all subjects by identification of self-reported adherence to a gluten-free diet and subsequent confirmation of the diagnosis of coeliac disease. Unrecognized coeliac disease was studied in a random sample of 1440 out of the 50,760 subjects through serologic screening and human lymphocyte antigen (HLA) typing. The prevalence of recognized coeliac disease was 0.016% (95% confidence interval 0.008-0.031) and of unrecognized coeliac disease 0.35% (95% confidence interval 0.15-0.81). Menarcheal age was higher in women with recognized coeliac disease than in women without coeliac disease. The prevalence of adult recognized coeliac disease in The Netherlands is one of the lowest in Europe, while the prevalence of unrecognized coeliac disease is comparable with that in other European countries. Adult coeliac disease is strongly under diagnosed in The Netherlands. The higher menarcheal age in women with recognized coeliac disease may be explained by diagnostic delay.

  3. Education and health care in the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaroop, V

    1997-06-01

    Primary and secondary education and preventive health care are essential to the well-being of the poor in developing countries. Average expenditures on education and health care as a percentage of the gross domestic product in Caribbean countries exceed those in other developing countries. Such investment has resulted in high literacy rates and steady declines in infant mortality. Barbados, which has provided free and universal primary and secondary education since 1985, ranks first among developing countries in human development indicators (e.g., life expectancy and income). There are concerns, however, that the poor are not benefiting from this public sector investment. Government subsidies for tertiary-level services (e.g., university education and hospital-based curative care) disproportionately benefit higher-income urban families who could afford to pay a substantial portion of the cost of such services. Although primary and secondary school attendance rates are impressive in Caribbean countries, schools in rural areas tend to provide poor instruction and lack appropriate educational materials. Public sector funding should focus on basic services to maximize the returns to society. If the public sector is the primary provider of tertiary services, charges should be introduced to facilitate cost recovery from high-income users.

  4. Water Security and Services in the Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Cashman

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The efficient management of water resources and services continues to be a concern in many of the small island states of the Caribbean. There are growing concerns over the ability of governments in the region to ensure the good management and provision of water without jeopardizing economic growth and the maintenance of social well-being. This paper provides an overview of the major factors influencing the water security facing the Caribbean Region and how the emerging concerns are being addressed. The key challenges and vulnerabilities may be summarized as lack of data and barriers to making available what information there is. Forward planning has been largely neglected and is symptomatic of a lack of appreciation of the need for having national water policies. In this respect Jamaica’s development of a national master water plan serves as a good example of what is needed. Water service providers have to be efficient, well managed and allowed to do their job. This means that they have to be on a sound financial footing. The challenge is to find the balance between appropriate political and regulatory oversight and the autonomy of water managers and service providers.

  5. Neogene Proto-Caribbean porcupinefishes (Diodontidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera, Orangel; Silva, Guilherme Oliveira Andrade; Lopes, Ricardo Tadeu; Machado, Alessandra Silveira; Dos Santos, Thaís Maria; Marques, Gabriela; Bertucci, Thayse; Aguiar, Thayanne; Carrillo-Briceño, Jorge; Rodriguez, Felix; Jaramillo, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Fossil Diodontidae in Tropical America consist mostly of isolated and fused beak-like jawbones, and tooth plate batteries. These durophagous fishes are powerful shell-crushing predators on shallow water invertebrate faunas from Neogene tropical carbonate bottom, rocky reefs and surrounding flats. We use an ontogenetic series of high-resolution micro CT of fossil and extant species to recognize external and internal morphologic characters of jaws and tooth plate batteries. We compare similar sizes of jaws and/or tooth-plates from both extant and extinct species. Here, we describe three new fossil species including †Chilomycterus exspectatus n. sp. and †Chilomycterus tyleri n. sp. from the late Miocene Gatun Formation in Panama, and †Diodon serratus n. sp. from the middle Miocene Socorro Formation in Venezuela. Fossil Diodontidae review included specimens from the Neogene Basins of the Proto-Caribbean (Brazil: Pirabas Formation; Colombia: Jimol Formation, Panama: Gatun and Tuira formations; Venezuela: Socorro and Cantaure formations). Diodon is present in both the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, whereas the distribution of Chilomycterus is highly asymmetrical with only one species in the Pacific. It seems that Diodon was as abundant in the Caribbean/Western Atlantic during the Miocene as it is there today. We analyze the paleogeographic distribution of the porcupinefishes group in Tropical America, after the complete exhumation of the Panamanian isthmus during the Pliocene.

  6. Women in Physics: A Caribbean Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Kandice

    2009-03-01

    This paper is concerned with aspects of post-secondary education of women in physics in the Caribbean, focusing more specifically on the main university campuses in Trinidad and Tobago, Jamaica, and Barbados. Within this framework, there are three institutions of tertiary education that provide for undergraduate and post-graduate studies in physics. On average, the bachelor-level graduating class is roughly 40% female. A great majority of these students go on to seek master's degrees in engineering. Among those enrolled in graduate programs featuring research in astronomy, materials science, environmental physics, medical physics, and quantum physics, 58% are female. Significant numbers of women from the selected countries and from the Caribbean region are engaged in bachelor and doctoral programs in physics abroad, but no formal survey is available to provide the relevant quantitative information. However, an attempt will be made to quantify this component. Based in part on personal experience, a comparison will be made between domestic and foreign educational pathways, in terms of access to resources, level of research training, and occupational opportunities following graduation.

  7. The Upper Permian in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, W.A.

    1955-01-01

    The Upper Permian in the Netherlands, as known from borehole data, is deposited in a mainly evaporitic facies north of the Brabant and Rhenish Massifs. In the extreme south (Belgian Campine, de Peel) a near-shore facies of reef dolomites and elastics occurs. In the western and central Netherlands

  8. A soil sampling program for the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visschers, R.; Finke, P.A.; Gruijter, de J.J.

    2007-01-01

    Soil data users in The Netherlands were inventoried for current and future data needs. Prioritized data needs were used to design the Netherlands Soil Sampling Program (NSSP) as a framework containing 3 groups of related projects: map upgrading, map updating and upgrading of pedotransfer functions.

  9. Serious road injuries in The Netherlands dissected.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijermars, W.A.M. Bos, N.M. & Stipdonk, H.L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the characteristics and injury patterns of serious road injuries (MAIS2+ inpatients) in the Netherlands. Methods: In the Netherlands, the actual number of serious injuries is estimated by linking police data to hospital data. The distribution of serious road injuries over 1)

  10. The Poor Side of the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cok Vrooman; Stella Hoff

    2004-01-01

    Poverty is a theme that has attracted a great deal of attention in the Netherlands over the last decade, both in government policy and in academic research and statistics. Since 1997 the Social and Cultural Planning Office (SCP) and Statistics Netherlands (CBS) have published a regular Poverty

  11. Agricultural marketing in Belgium and The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulenberg, M.T.G.; Viaene, J.

    1993-01-01

    Agriculture in Belgium and the Netherlands has a strong export tradition and has been market oriented for a long time. In this article agricultural markeling in Belgium and the Netherlands is analyzed on the basis of the concepts structure, conduct and performance. In our review of market structure

  12. Personal identity in Belgium and The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klimstra, T.A.; Luyckx, K.; Meeus, W.H.J.

    2012-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of research on personal identity formation in the Low Countries (Belgium and The Netherlands). First we describe the broader societal context and specificities of Belgium and The Netherlands, then we move to a historical overview of the identity models that have

  13. The Netherlands: A Case of Fading Leadership

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liefferink, J.D.; Boezeman, D.F.; Coninck, H.C. de; Wurzel, R.K.W.; Connelly, J.; Liefferink, D.

    2017-01-01

    This chapter analyses the relationship between the development of domestic climate policy in the Netherlands and the Dutch efforts in this field in the EU and international arena since the 1980s. Traditionally, the Netherlands has enjoyed a reputation as an environmental and climate leader, based on

  14. Deep-water sponges (Porifera) from Bonaire and Klein Curaçao, Southern Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Soest, Rob W M; Meesters, Erik H W G; Becking, Leontine E

    2014-10-29

    Four submersible dives off the coast of Bonaire (Caribbean Netherlands) and Klein Curaçao (Curaçao) to depths of 99.5-242 m, covering lower mesophotic and upper dysphotic zones, yielded 52 sponge specimens belonging to 31 species. Among these we identified 13 species as new to science. These are Plakinastrella stinapa n. sp., Pachastrella pacoi n. sp., Characella pachastrelloides n. sp., Geodia curacaoensis n. sp., Caminus carmabi n. sp., Discodermia adhaerens n. sp., Clathria (Microciona) acarnoides n. sp., Antho (Acarnia) pellita n. sp., Parahigginsia strongylifera n. sp., Calyx magnoculata n. sp., Neopetrosia dutchi n. sp., Neopetrosia ovata n. sp. and Neopetrosia eurystomata n. sp. We also report an euretid hexactinellid, which belongs to the rare genus Verrucocoeloidea, recently described (2014) as V. liberatorii Reiswig & Dohrmann. The remaining 18 already known species are all illustrated by photos of the habit, either in situ or 'on deck', but only briefly characterized in an annotated table to confirm their occurrence in the Southern Caribbean. The habitat investigated-steep limestone rocks, likely representing Pleistocene fossil reefs--is similar to deep-water fossil reefs at Barbados of which the sponges were sampled and studied by Van Soest and Stentoft (1988). A comparison is made between the two localities, showing a high degree of similarity in sponge composition: 53% of the present Bonaire-Klein Curaçao species were also retrieved at Barbados. At the level of higher taxa (genera, families) Bonaire-Klein Curaçao shared approximately 80% of its lower mesophotic and upper dysphotic sponge fauna with Barbados, despite a distance between them of 1000 km, indicating high faunal homogeneity. We also preliminarily compared the shallow-water (euphotic) sponge fauna of Curaçao with the combined data available for the Barbados, Bonaire and Klein Curaçao mesophotic and upper dysphotic sponges, which resulted in the conclusion that the two faunas show only

  15. Current achievements and challenges of a multiple dating approach (14C, 230Th/U and 36Cl) to infer tsunami transport age(s) of reef-top boulders on Bonaire (Leeward Antilles)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rixhon, Gilles; May, Simon Matthias; Engel, Max; Mechernich, Silke; Schroeder-Ritzrau, Andrea; Frank, Norbert; Fohlmeister, Jens; Boulvain, Frédéric; Dunai, Tibor; Brückner, Helmut

    2017-04-01

    The deposition of supratidal coarse-clast deposits is difficult to date, limiting their value for inferring frequency-magnitude patterns of high-energy wave events. On Bonaire (Leeward Antilles, Caribbean), these deposits form prominent landforms, and transport by one or several Holocene tsunamis is assumed at least for the largest clasts. Although a large dataset of 14C and electron spin resonance (ESR) ages is available for major coral rubble ridges and ramparts, it is still debated whether these data reflect the timing of major events, and how these datasets are biased by the reworking of coral fragments. As an attempt to overcome the current challenges for dating the dislocation of singular boulders, three distinct dating methods are implemented and compared: (i) 14C dating of boring bivalves attached to the boulders; (ii) 230Th/U dating of post-depositional, secondary calcite flowstone and subaerial microbialites at the underside of the boulders; and (iii) surface exposure dating of overturned boulders via 36Cl concentration measurements in corals. Approaches (ii) and (iii) have never been applied to coastal boulder deposits so far. The three 14C age estimates are older than 37 ka, i.e. most probably beyond the applicability of the method, which is attributed to post-depositional diagenetic processes, shedding doubt on the usefulness of this method in the local context. The remarkably convergent 230Th/U ages, all pointing to the Late Holocene period (1.0-1.6 ka), are minimum ages for the transport event(s). The microbialite sample yields an age of 1.23±0.23 ka and both flowstone samples are in stratigraphic order: the older (onset of carbonate precipitation) and younger flowstone layers yield ages of 1.59±0.03 and 1.23±0.03 ka, respectively. Four coral samples collected from the topside of overturned boulders yielded similar 36Cl concentration measurements. However, the computed ages are affected by large uncertainties, mostly due to the high natural

  16. Migration and development in the Caribbean: relating policies and people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, R

    1985-01-01

    Throughout the 20th century, the US has feared that political instability in the Caribbean area could be exploited by adversaries; therefore, the US and the nations of the Caribbean share a compelling interest in the region's development. The dramatic increase in legal and illegal immigration to the US from the Caribbean in the last 2 decades has offered an additional human reason for US interest in the region. This migration has also created a new source of dependence and vulnerability for the region. Curtailment of migration would undoubtedly affect the region, and if the effect were social and political instability, then the US would also share those consequences. The 1984 Conference on Migration and Development in the Caribbean held discussions to 1) enhance the benefits of migration to Caribbean development, 2) identify development strategies, policies, and projects that would reduce pressures that have accelerated the rate of international migration, making it less manageable and more costly, and 3) identify ways to reduce dependence on migration by expanding employment and assisting economies in the region to become more self-reliant. The attitudes of both US and Caribbean participants seemed to reflect a considerable degree of ambivalence on the migration issue. The US views itself as "a nation of immigrants" and yet is troubled by the recent large influx of immigrants, particularly illegal migrants and refugees. While Americans recognize that the "brain" reduces the development capacity of developing countries, the US still needs and benefits from young immigrants trained in the sciences, engineering, and computers. Caribbean participants were also ambivalent about immigration. They consider immigration "a way of life" and a "right," but they also recognize that there are significant developmental costs to some types of migration. While many want the US to keep a wide open door to Caribbean immigrants, they are aware that most Caribbean Community (CARICOM

  17. The CARICOM/FAO/IICA Caribbean Amblyomma Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegram, R G; De Castro, J J; Wilson, D D

    1998-06-29

    The objective of the Caribbean Amblyomma Program is to eradicate the tropical bont tick (TBT), Amblyomma variegatum, from the Caribbean. Field activities directed to eradication of the TBT were initiated in May 1995 commencing in northern Caribbean islands. Plans have been finalized for the remaining islands to the south to start eradication activities in early 1997. The components of the program include tick control and surveillance, adaptive research, training, communications, and extension. Despite uncertain financial support, substantial progress has been made so far with strong participation by farmers and livestock owners who have been made responsible for the compulsory treatment of all ruminant livestock.

  18. Underutilization of prescribed drugs use among first generation elderly immigrants in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birnie Erwin

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In developed countries, health care utilization among immigrant groups differs where the dominant interpretation is unjustified overutilization due to lack of acculturation. We investigated utilization of prescribed drugs in native Dutch and various groups of immigrant elderly. Methods Cross-sectional study using data from the survey "Social Position, Health and Well-being of Elderly Immigrants" (the Netherlands, 2003. Ethnicity-matched interviewers conducted the survey among first generation immigrants aged 55 years and older. Outcome measure is self-reported use of prescribed drugs. Utilization is explained by need, and by enabling and predisposing factors, in particular acculturation; analysis is conducted by multiple logistic regression. Results The study population consisted of immigrants from Turkey (n = 307, Morocco (n = 284, Surinam (n = 308 and the Netherlands Antilles (n = 300, and a native Dutch reference group (n = 304. Prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM, COPD and musculoskeletal disorders was relatively high among immigrant elderly. Drug utilization in especially Turkish and Moroccan elderly with DM and COPD was relatively low. Drugs use for non-mental chronic diseases was explained by more chronic conditions (OR 2.64, higher age (OR 1.03, and modern attitudes on male-female roles (OR 0.74 and religiosity (OR 0.89. Ethnicity specific effects remained only among Turkish elderly (OR 0.42. Drugs use for mental health problems was explained by more chronic conditions (OR 1.43, better mental health (OR 0.95 and modern attitudes on family values (OR 0.59. Ethnicity specific effects remained only among Moroccan (OR 0.19 and Antillean elderly (OR 0.31. Explanation of underutilization of drugs among diseased with diabetes and musculoskeletal disorders are found in number of chronic diseases (OR 0.74 and OR 0.78 and regarding diabetes also in language proficiency (OR 0.66 and modern attitudes on male-female roles (OR 1

  19. Underutilization of prescribed drugs use among first generation elderly immigrants in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denktaş, Semiha; Koopmans, Gerrit; Birnie, Erwin; Foets, Marleen; Bonsel, Gouke

    2010-06-22

    In developed countries, health care utilization among immigrant groups differs where the dominant interpretation is unjustified overutilization due to lack of acculturation. We investigated utilization of prescribed drugs in native Dutch and various groups of immigrant elderly. Cross-sectional study using data from the survey "Social Position, Health and Well-being of Elderly Immigrants" (the Netherlands, 2003). Ethnicity-matched interviewers conducted the survey among first generation immigrants aged 55 years and older. Outcome measure is self-reported use of prescribed drugs. Utilization is explained by need, and by enabling and predisposing factors, in particular acculturation; analysis is conducted by multiple logistic regression. The study population consisted of immigrants from Turkey (n = 307), Morocco (n = 284), Surinam (n = 308) and the Netherlands Antilles (n = 300), and a native Dutch reference group (n = 304). Prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM), COPD and musculoskeletal disorders was relatively high among immigrant elderly. Drug utilization in especially Turkish and Moroccan elderly with DM and COPD was relatively low. Drugs use for non-mental chronic diseases was explained by more chronic conditions (OR 2.64), higher age (OR 1.03), and modern attitudes on male-female roles (OR 0.74) and religiosity (OR 0.89). Ethnicity specific effects remained only among Turkish elderly (OR 0.42). Drugs use for mental health problems was explained by more chronic conditions (OR 1.43), better mental health (OR 0.95) and modern attitudes on family values (OR 0.59). Ethnicity specific effects remained only among Moroccan (OR 0.19) and Antillean elderly (OR 0.31). Explanation of underutilization of drugs among diseased with diabetes and musculoskeletal disorders are found in number of chronic diseases (OR 0.74 and OR 0.78) and regarding diabetes also in language proficiency (OR 0.66) and modern attitudes on male-female roles (OR 1.69). Need and predisposing factors

  20. Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guibault, L.; van 't Klooster, K.; Hilty, R.M.; Nérisson, S.

    2012-01-01

    Generally speaking, Dutch copyright law does not differentiate in terms of the effects of copyright law according to various work categories. The Dutch Copyright Act protects "works of literature, science or art", as exemplified in the non-exhaustive list of work categories of Article 10(1) which is

  1. Distribución de cangrejos ermitaños (Anomura: Paguroidea en el mar Caribe colombiano Hermit crabs (Anomura: Paguroidea distribution patterns in the Colombian Caribbean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bibian Martínez Campos

    2012-03-01

    the Colombian Caribbean Sea, through classification and spatial ordination multivariate analyses, using historical records from years 1916 to 2006. Besides, the world distribution of Colombian species and their geographic affinity in the Caribbean and Western Atlantic were identified. The results show deep differences between coastal and continental slope faunas, and latitudinal differences in the assemblages, with the identification of three groups: Northeast, Center and Southwest. The differences in faunal composition that support these three groups were determined. Based on maps of the Colombian marine ecosystems, it was found that the main factors affecting the distribution of hermit crabs were the Caribaná slope (depth, water-mass temperature, Guajira sea-grass beds, and particular conditions of “Coralline Archipelagos” and “Darién” eco-regions. Colombian hermit crab fauna is more related to the North Atlantic and the Antilles, than to the South Atlantic and the Gulf of Mexico. Additionally, geographical sub-provinces in which Colombia is included, these were found as transition zones among Northern and Austral subprovinces of the Greater Caribbean.

  2. Scientific travel in the Atlantic world: the French expedition to Gorée and the Antilles, 1681-1683.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dew, Nicholas

    2010-03-01

    Although historians have long recognized the importance of long-range scientific expeditions in both the practice and culture of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century science, it is less well understood how this form of scientific organization emerged and became established in the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. In the late seventeenth century new European scientific institutions tried to make use of globalized trade networks for their own ends, but to do so proved difficult. This paper offers a case history of one such expedition, the voyage sponsored by the French Académie royale des sciences to Gorée (in modern Senegal) and the Caribbean islands of Guadeloupe and Martinique in 1681-3. The voyage of Varin, Deshayes and de Glos reveals how the process of travel itself caused problems for instruments and observers alike.

  3. 77 FR 46409 - Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-03

    ..., 2012, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. ADDRESSES: The meetings will be held at the El Conquistador Hotel, 1000 El Conquistador Avenue, Fajardo, Puerto Rico. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Caribbean Fishery Management...

  4. 77 FR 47603 - Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-09

    ..., from 9 a.m. until noon. ADDRESSES: The meetings will be held at the El Conquistador Hotel, 1000 El Conquistador Avenue, Fajardo, Puerto Rico. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Caribbean Fishery Management...

  5. Caribbean Seasonal and/or Area Closures GIS data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data represents the geographic area described in Title 50 CFR Part 622, Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic, Subpart S - Reef Fish...

  6. Surface Geology of the Caribbean Region (geo6bg)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset includes polygons that describe the geologic age of surface outcrops of bedrock of the Caribbean region (Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, Aruba, Bahamas,...

  7. Faults of the Caribbean Region (flt6bg)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset describes faults and structural features of the Caribbean region (Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, Aruba, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, British Virgin...

  8. Caribbean women: changes in the works

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Isabel Quiñones-Arocho

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available [First paragraph] The women of Azua: work and family in the rural Dominican Republic, by BARBARA FINLAY. New York: Praeger, 1989. xi + 190 pp. (Cloth US$ 35.00 The psychosocial development of Puerto Rican women, edited by CYNTHIA T. GARCIA COLL & MARIA DE LOURDES MATTEI. New York: Praeger, 1989. xiii + 272 pp. (Cloth US$ 45.00 Women and the sexual division oflabour in the Caribbean, edited by KEITH HART. Mona, Jamaica: Consortium Graduate School of Social Sciences, UWI, 1989. 141 pp. (Paper n.p. The three books under review work have a common theme: the impact of changing gender expectations on Caribbean women. The authors are mainly concerned with recent political and economie changes that might have contributed to either the improvement or deterioration of women's status in these societies. The questions raised by the contributors are strikingly similar: What has been the impact of dependent economie development on women's lives and has this resulted in increased labor participation (a problem explored for rural Dominican women as well as for Jamaican and Barbadian women or in the migration to metropolitan centers, with its psychosocial consequences (an issue raised for Puerto Rican women living in the United States? If patriarchal values (often referred to as traditional values prevail in these societies, then what impact might wage work, migration, or improved education have on those values? Could it be the disintegration of the nuclear family with an increased proportion of female-headed households (Hart, higher rates of mental illness as a result of dysfunctional aceulturation (Garcia Coll and Mattei, or even an improvement of women's status within their families and communities (Finlay?

  9. Virginia Tech creates Caribbean center for education and research

    OpenAIRE

    Felker, Susan B.

    2006-01-01

    Virginia Tech has established a research, education, and outreach center in the Caribbean that will serve as part of a broad strategy to create international centers of scholarship around the world. The Caribbean Center for Education and Research (CCER) in Punta Cana, on the eastern tip of the Dominican Republic, will allow Virginia Tech faculty to conduct research as well as instruct students on biodiversity, environmental and social sustainability, global issues in natural resources, and ho...

  10. Common wood decay fungi found in the Caribbean Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. Jean. Lodge

    2016-01-01

    There are hundreds of wood-decay fungi in the Caribbean Basin, but relatively few of these are likely to grow on manmade structures built of wood or wood-composites. The wood-decay fungi of greatest concern are those that cause brown-rot, and especially brown-rot fungi that are resistant to copper-based wood preservatives. Some fungi that grow in the Caribbean and...

  11. 3-D Magnetotelluric Investigations for geothermal exploration in Martinique (Lesser Antilles). Characteristic Deep Resistivity Structures, and Shallow Resistivity Distribution Matching Heliborne TEM Results

    CERN Document Server

    Coppo, Nicolas; Girard, Jean-François; Wawrzyniak, Pierre; Hautot, Sophie; Tarits, Pascal; Jacob, Thomas; Martelet, Guillaume; Mathieu, Francis; Gadalia, Alain; Bouchot, Vincent; Traineau, Hervé

    2015-01-01

    Within the framework of a global French program oriented towards the development of renewable energies, Martinique Island (Lesser Antilles, France) has been extensively investigated (from 2012 to 2013) through an integrated multi-methods approach, with the aim to define precisely the potential geothermal ressources, previously highlighted (Sanjuan et al., 2003). Amongst the common investigation methods deployed, we carried out three magnetotelluric (MT) surveys located above three of the most promising geothermal fields of Martinique, namely the Anses d'Arlet, the Montagne Pel{\\'e}e and the Pitons du Carbet prospects. A total of about 100 MT stations were acquired showing single or multi-dimensional behaviors and static shift effects. After processing data with remote reference, 3-D MT inversions of the four complex elements of MT impedance tensor without pre-static-shift correction, have been performed for each sector, providing three 3-D resistivity models down to about 12 to 30 km depth. The sea coast effe...

  12. Clinical immunology--autoimmunity in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tervaert, Jan Willem Cohen; Kallenberg, Cees G M

    2014-12-01

    Clinical immunology is in the Netherlands a separate clinical specialty within internal medicine and pediatrics. Clinical immunologists work closely together with nephrologists, rheumatologists and many other medical specialists. Apart from research and teaching, clinical immunologists are taking care of patients with immune-deficiencies, vasculitides and systemic auto-immune diseases. Clinical immunology in the Netherlands has always been an important contributor to basic and clinical science in the Netherlands. Major scientific contributions were made in the field of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and ANCA associated vasculitis. These Dutch contributions will be reviewed in this article. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Identification of deep subaqueous co-seismic scarps through specific coeval sedimentation in Lesser Antilles: implication for seismic hazard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Beck

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available During the GWADASEIS cruise (Lesser Antilles volcanic arc, February–March 2009 a very high resolution (VHR seismic-reflection survey was performed in order to constrain Late Quaternary to Present faulting. The profiles we obtained evidence frequent "ponding" of reworked sediments in the deepest areas, similar to the deposition of Mediterranean "homogenites". These bodies are acoustically transparent (few ms t.w.t. thick and are often deposited on the hanging walls of dominantly normal faults, at the base of scarps. Their thickness appears sufficient to compensate (i.e. bury co-seismic scarps between successive earthquakes, resulting in a flat and horizontal sea floor through time. In a selected area (offshore Montserrat and Nevis islands, piston coring (4 to 7 m long was dedicated to a sedimentological analysis of the most recent of these particular layers. It corresponds to non-stratified homogenous calcareous silty sand (reworked calcareous plankton and minor volcanoclastics. This layer can be up to 2 m thick, and overlies fine-grained hemipelagites. The upper centimeters of the latter represent the normal RedOx water/sediment interface. 210Pb and 137Cs activities lack in the massive sands, while a normal profile of unsupported 210Pb decrease is observed in the hemipelagite below, together with a 137Cs peak corresponding to the Atmospheric Nuclear Experiments (1962. The RedOx level was thus capped by a recent instantaneous major sedimentary event considered as post-1970 AD; candidate seismic events to explain this sedimentary deposits are either the 16 March 1985 earthquake or the 8 October 1974 one (Mw = 6.3 and Mw = 7.4, respectively. This leads to consider that the syntectonic sedimentation in this area is not continuous but results from accumulation of thick homogenites deposited after the earthquakes (as observed in the following weeks after Haiti January

  14. How television went digital in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijk, N.; van der Sloot, B.

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarizes the development of digital television in the Netherlands, analyzing such key policy issues as: technical decisions on access for public television, license conditions, and other issues.

  15. Gambling and problem gambling in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goudriaan, Anna E.

    2014-01-01

    To provide an overview of gambling in the Netherlands, focusing on historical background, policy, legislation, prevalence of problem gambling, availability of treatment options and research base. Literature review. Contradictions between gambling policy and practice have been present in the past

  16. Clinical immunology - Autoimmunity in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tervaert, Jan Willem Cohen; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical immunology is in the Netherlands a separate clinical specialty within internal medicine and pediatrics. Clinical immunologists work closely together with nephrologists, rheumatologists and many other medical specialists. Apart from research and teaching, clinical immunologists are taking

  17. Urban Scaling of Cities in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    van Raan, Anthony F. J.; Gerwin van der Meulen; Willem Goedhart

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the socioeconomic scaling behavior of all cities with more than 50,000 inhabitants in the Netherlands and found significant superlinear scaling of the gross urban product with population size. Of these cities, 22 major cities have urban agglomerations and urban areas defined by the Netherlands Central Bureau of Statistics. For these major cities we investigated the superlinear scaling for three separate modalities: the cities defined as municipalities, their urban agglomeratio...

  18. INLAND DUNE VEGETATION OF THE NETHERLANDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. HAVEMAN

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Drifting sands in the Netherlands are the result of human over-exploitation (sod-cutting, over-grazing of woodlands and heathlands. The most important association of inland sand dune areas is the Spergulo-Corynephoretum (Corynephorion canescentis, which is poor in vascular plants, but in it older stager rich in mosses and especially lichens. In the Netherlands, the area of drifting sand is reduced dramatically in the last 70 years. mainly by afforestation and spontaneous succession.

  19. Acceptance of homosexuality in the Netherlands 2011

    OpenAIRE

    Saskia Keuzenkamp

    2011-01-01

    The Dutch government wishes to promote the social acceptance of homosexuality. To gain an impression of the current status and the progress in achieving this objective, the government asked the Netherlands Institute for Social Research/SCP to carry out a study of the current statistics and trends in this regard. This report shows that the Netherlands is still the most gay-tolerant country in Europe. Nonetheless, there are limits to that tolerance and there are some groups in Dutch society whi...

  20. Acceptance of homosexuality in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Lisette Kuyper; Floor Bakker

    2006-01-01

    Original title: De houding ten opzichte van homoseksualiteit. To date, relatively little systematic research has been carried out on public attitudes to homosexual men and women in the Netherlands - far less than in the United States, for example. SCP has recently carried out a large-scale survey of the attitudes of the Dutch public to homosexuality; this was published earlier this year under the title Just doing what comes naturally. Acceptance of homosexuality in the Netherlands (Gewoon doe...

  1. Latin American and Caribbean Urban Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christien Klaufus

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The new development agendas confirmed in the year 2015 evidence an increased global interest in cities and urban challenges. In Latin America and the Caribbean, cities have long been an established topic of study and debate. This exploration gives a brief overview of current research on urban development in the region and suggests fruitful avenues for future research. Following different ideological trends in twentieth-century urban studies, we currently see more pragmatic frameworks and a belief in technocratic solutions. Some scholars consider Latin American and Caribbean cities to be the world’s new signposts in urban development, given their role as sites of innovations in politics, architecture and urban design; we see potential here for urban scholars of the region to move beyond technocratic language. In addition, we argue for an area studies approach to these cities that uses the framework of the region as a heuristic device to unsettle global urbanist epistemologies that privilege North-to-South mobilities in both policy and theory. Resumen: El desarrollo urbano latinoamericano y caribeñoLas nuevas agendas de desarrollo confirmadas en el año 2015 reflejan un mayor interés mundial en las ciudades y en los retos urbanos. En Latinoamérica y en el Caribe, las ciudades llevan mucho tiempo siendo un tema habitual de estudio y debate. Esta exploración ofrece un resumen breve de las investigaciones actuales sobre desarrollo urbano en la región y sugiere caminos fructíferos para futuras investigaciones. Siguiendo las distintas tendencias ideológicas en los estudios urbanos del siglo XX, actualmente observamos marcos más pragmáticos y una creencia en soluciones tecnocráticas. Algunos investigadores consideran las ciudades latinoamericanas y caribeñas como los nuevos referentes mundiales en desarrollo urbano, dado su papel como centros de innovación en política, arquitectura y diseño urbano; vemos potencial para que los

  2. Caribbean immigrants in Britain and Canada: socio-economic adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, A H

    1988-12-01

    This paper compares the socioeconomic experiences of Caribbean immigration in Britain and Canada and shows how differing immigration trends together with changing economic circumstances influenced the process of integration. Caribbean immigrants in Canada are more recent arrivals than those in Britain and, in 1981, were still experiencing initial adjustment problems aggravated by an economy in which unemployment is still high. Unlike Britain, which has a large population born in that country of West Indian parentage, the "2nd generation" in Canada is small and mostly still in school. Despite higher levels of education and qualifications than their counterparts in Britain, Caribbean immigrants in Canada faced similar problems. Males were relatively more concentrated in manufacturing industries in Canada and in transportation in Britain, sectors which were undergoing significant structural change and experiencing high levels of unemployment. Earned income was below average in both countries but there were interesting gender differences. Caribbean women experienced the same "earnings gap", relative to men, that characterized most women in the labor force. However, Caribbean women were relatively more successful than men, as measured by unemployment rates and earned incomes. This appears to be due to their qualifications in nursing and other service occupations that continued to expand, and to be in demand in the 1970s and 1980s, when other occupations were declining in response to technological change and "post-industrial" developments. In both countries there were residual disadvantages, faced by Caribbean men and women, which cannot be statistically explained by factors such as age, education, period of immigration, or structural changes in the economy. These can be attributed, at least in part, to the institutionalized prejudice and discrimination against racial minorities which is prevalent in both societies. In absolute terms Caribbean immigrants in Canada are

  3. A Proposal Towards a Dutch Caribbean Marine Mammal Sanctuary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debrot, A.O.; Witte, R.H.; Scheidat, M.; Lucke, K.

    2011-01-01

    Based on the goals set forth in the Dutch Biodiversity Policy Programme, The Netherlands has a traditionally strong commitment to protect biodiversity and marine mammals both internationally and in its own national and Kingdom waters. Last year the responsible ministry, namely the Netherlands

  4. Caribbean Coral Reef, Seagrass and Mangrove Sites (CARICOMP), (NODC Accession 0000501)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Caribbean Coastal Marine Productivity (CARICOMP) Program is a Caribbean-wide research and monitoring network of 27 marine laboratories, parks, and reserves in 17...

  5. Baseball and society in the Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Zimbalist

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available [First paragraph] The Tropic of Baseball: Baseball in the Dominican Republic. Rob Ruck. Westport CT: Meckler, 1991. x + 205 pp. (Cloth n.p. Trading with the Enemy: A Yankee Travels Through Castro's Cuba. Tom Miller. New York: Atheneum, 1992. x + 338 pp. (Cloth US$ 24.00 Read Bart Giamatti's Take Time for Paradise (1989 or any of the other grand old game sentimentalists and you'11 discover that baseball somehow perfectly reflects the temperament of U.S. culture. This match, in turn, accounts for basebali's enduring and penetrating popularity in the United States. Read Ruck and Miller and you'11 learn that baseball is more popular and culturally dominant in the Dominican Republic and Cuba than it is to the north. The suppressed syllogism affirms that U.S. and Caribbean cultures hold intimate similarities. If that is true, this Caribbeanist has been out to lunch; then again, no one ever accused economists of having acute cultural sensibilities.

  6. [Occupational leptospirosis in a Colombian Caribbean area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nájera, Saholeth; Alvis, Nelson; Babilonia, David; Alvarez, Ligia; Máttar, Salim

    2005-01-01

    To establish the seroprevalence of infection by Leptospira in an occupational setting in Cordoba. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 334 farmworkers, butchers, and garbage collectors, to identify the presence of anti-leptospira IgM antibodies, in the Department of Cordoba, Colombia. Stratified sampling proportional to the number of inhabitants and occupation was used to select the sample population (confidence level 99.9%, error 0.5%, prevalence 72%). The SPSS software 11.0 version was used to perform non parametric tests with p < 0.05, as well as odds ratios with confidence intervals. The prevalence of previous infection by Leptospira was high (13.1%). No differences among areas were found, however, higher infection was associated with living in Cienaga de Oro municipality (OR = 3.52 Cl 1.70-7.26) (p = 0,00283). Being a farmer was also a risk factor for infection (OR = 2.04 Cl 1.080-3.85) (p = 0.025), as well as drinking water from a dam (OR = 2.4 CI 1.24-4.70) (p = 0.00787). The rate of infection is important and a significant public health problem in this area of the Colombian Caribbean coast.

  7. Precautionary assessment and management of dolphinfish in the Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Mahon

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Dolphinfish in the Caribbean are fast growing and short-lived, living for about 12 to 18 months in the southern Caribbean and a maximum of 2-3 years in the north of the region. They are believed to be highly migratory, are seasonally abundant, and likely to have a more complex stock structure than the larger oceanic epipelagic species. Most of the information on dolphinfish in the western central Atlantic comes from studies in the waters of the USA and the eastern Caribbean, and there is a general paucity of information particularly for stock-based management of this species. No Caribbean country undertakes regular assessment of dolphinfish, or has put in place any species-specific management program. Yield-per-recruit analyses for this species in the eastern Caribbean suggest that maximization of Y/R is likely to lead to very low levels of mature stock biomass. A stock recruitment analysis does not show any dependency of recruitment on stock size within the observed stock size range. This suggests that recruitment failure could be sudden at some threshold below the minimum observed stock size, probably at about one third of the average observed stock size. Given the trends observed in landings of dolphinfish, a precautionary approach to management is needed for this species in the western central Atlantic. Given the migratory, shared nature of the dolphinfish resource, a regional approach to assessment and management is required. However, the institutional basis for this approach does not currently exist within the region in a form that is functional. The membership of the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT does not include any of the small island states where dolphinfish is of primary importance. ICCAT would need to establish a regional presence in order to serve the needs of Caribbean states. The FAO Western Central Atlantic Fishery Commission (WECAFC does not operate in a mode which would allow it to

  8. u371cb.m77t - MGD77 data file for geophysical data from field activity UGEOLEG_3 (U-3-71-CB) in Eastern Greater Antilles, Caribbean from 07/17/1971 to 08/04/1971

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry, gravity, and magnetic data along with transit satellite navigation data was collected as part of field activity UGEOLEG_3 (U-3-71-CB) in...

  9. An Historical and Contemporary Overview of Gendered Caribbean Relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Sharla Blank

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a broad overview of historical and contemporary gender and social class relations in the British, French, and Spanish Caribbean islands focusing primarily on Afro-Caribbean people. It begins with a discussion of gendered relations during slavery and then investigates gender roles post emancipation. Next, multiple aspects of contemporary West Indian family life are addressed including the prevalence of matrifocal households and child shifting. The important roles played by Caribbean female household heads are discussed in the context of patriarchy. Highlights include the significance of the maternal role over the marital, socializing youth, particular negative expectations each sex holds of the other, customary sexual behavior, as well as common relationship types. Varying aspects of women’s behavior according to social class is touched upon followed by a brief synopsis of the status of Caribbean women on measures of educational and work force participation rates; finally, a summary of the dearth of active women’s movements in the region is addressed. The paper provides an introduction to the intimate and working lives of Caribbean women and men.

  10. Aluminum across the Americas: Caribbean Mobilities and Transnational American Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mimi Sheller

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The emerging field of critical mobilities research posits the need to replace sedentary approaches to nation-states as containers for national societies and repositories of national histories with a far more relational understanding of transnational and cross-regional dynamics. It proposes “mobile methodologies” for research that cross national boundaries, including following people, commodities, and cultures as they circulate between various interlinked sites of production and consumption. Yet few have noted the debt of mobilities research to Caribbean Studies and to the theoretical trajectories that have arisen out of research on the colonial and postcolonial Atlantic world. This article aims to situate the “new mobilities paradigm” in relation to Caribbean and transnational American Studies, and to mobilize Caribbean Studies as an approach that transcends regional or national paradigms. After tracing some of the theoretical intersections of mobilities theory and Caribbean Studies, the article sketches the arc of the author’s own work, leading into a current research project on the mobilities of bauxite/aluminum as a material object. Following the mobilities of aluminum allows us to break open both US American history and particular Caribbean national histories into a dynamic pan-American framework that challenges the geographical fixity of American Studies and illustrates the importance of placing (immobilities at the center of transnational American Studies.

  11. Les algues sont-elles une ressource marine à exploiter pour développer durablement l’espace caribéen ? Can algae be a sea resource to be exploited to have a sustainable development of Caribbean?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Litzler

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available L’algue est une ressource marine peu étudiée par la géographie ; elle offre pourtant des potentialités de développement économique. Les macro-algues cultivées à des fins alimentaires sont une alternative à la pêche. Les micro-algues constituent une biomasse valorisable : molécule pharmaceutique, Oméga 3 et biocarburants. De ces différents usages naît la question suivante : les algues sont-elles une ressource marine à exploiter pour développer durablement les territoires de la zone intertropicale ? Nous présenterons tout d’abord l’algoculture à l’échelle mondiale en soulignant le faible poids de cette activité dans le bassin caribéen. Puis nous montrerons que l’algoculture s’inscrit dans un processus de développement durable en assurant un revenu à des communautés rurales (Petites Antilles. Enfin, dans une approche comparative (États-Unis, nous verrons que l’espace caribéen est une région de projets et d’aménagements durables qui a des atouts pour développer l’algoculture : exposition solaire, hautes températures, proximité de la recherche américaine.Algae as sea resource have not been largely explored in Geography, yet it offers the potential for economic development. Macro-algae are cultivated for food purposes and they can substitute for fishing. Micro-algae can be valued as biomass: “nutraceutics”, Omega 3, biofuel. These various utilizations raise a question: are algae a key to a sustainable development in intertropical islands? We shall present Algaculture on a global scale, while emphasizing its low importance in the Caribbean. Then we shall show how algaculture can be part of a process of sustainable development by providing revenue to rural communities (Lesser Antilles. Finally, in a comparative approach (with the US, we shall see that the Caribbean Region has a number of assets for algaculture that make it suitable for sustainable projects and infrastructures: solar exposure

  12. Gendered Perceptions of Schooling: Classroom Dynamics and Inequalities within Four Caribbean Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younger, Mike; Cobbett, Mary

    2014-01-01

    This paper sets out to interrogate the reality of secondary schooling in one part of the Caribbean, through a case study exploration of the "gender regimes" of four secondary schools in the small Eastern Caribbean nation state of Antigua and Barbuda. In Antigua, as in the Caribbean region more broadly, the focus of attention has been on…

  13. Communication from the Information Sharing Working Group: Agreement for Data Sharing Among Caribbean Foresters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamara Heartsill Scalley; Saara DeWalt; François Korysko; Guy Van Laere; Kasey Jacobs; Seth Panka; Joseph Torres

    2016-01-01

    We presented a new information-sharing platform at the 16th Caribbean Foresters Meeting in August 2013 to facilitate and promote collaboration among Caribbean foresters. The platform can be accessed through the Caribbean Foresters website where information and data on forest research sites can be shared. There is a special focus on identifying potential collaborations...

  14. 78 FR 57534 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-19

    ..., Caribbean reef fish, Caribbean spiny lobster, Caribbean queen conch, Gulf red drum, Gulf reef fish, Gulf... related to the IFQ program for Gulf red snapper as specified in Sec. 622.21, or the IFQ program for Gulf... regarding the IFQ program for Gulf red snapper as specified in Sec. 622.21, or the IFQ program for Gulf...

  15. Marital Satisfaction among African Americans and Black Caribbeans: Findings from the National Survey of American Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Chalandra M.; Taylor, Robert Joseph; Lincoln, Karen D.; Chatters, Linda M.; Jackson, James S.

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the correlates of marital satisfaction using data from a national probability sample of African Americans (N = 962) and Black Caribbeans (N = 560). Findings reveal differences between African Americans and Black Caribbeans, and men and women within those groups, in the predictors of marital satisfaction. Black Caribbean women…

  16. Competing Meanings of Childhood and the Social Construction of Child Sexual Abuse in the Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasura, Dominic; Jones, Adele D.; Hafner, James A. H.; Maharaj, Priya E.; Nathaniel-DeCaires, Karene; Johnson, Emmanuel Janagan

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the dynamic interplay between competing meanings of childhood and the social construction of sexual abuse in the Caribbean. Drawing on qualitative data from a study undertaken in six Caribbean countries, the article suggests that Caribbean childhoods are neither wholly global nor local but hybrid creations of the region's…

  17. Observations on the whale shark (Rhincodon typus) in the Dutch Caribbean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debrot, A.O.; Leon, R.; Esteban, N.; Meesters, H.W.G.

    2013-01-01

    Records of whale sharks in the Caribbean are relatively sparse. Here we document 24 records of whale sharks (Rhincodon typus Smith 1882) for the Dutch Caribbean, four for the windward islands of Saba, St. Eustatius and St. Maarten, and twenty for the southern Caribbean leeward islands of Aruba,

  18. Caribbean Oceans: Utilizing NASA Earth Observations to Detect, Monitor, and Respond to Unprecedented Levels of Sargassum in the Caribbean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ped, Jordan; Scaduto, Erica; Accorsi, Emma; Torres-Perez, Juan (Editor)

    2016-01-01

    In 2011 and 2015, the nations of the Caribbean Sea were overwhelmed by the unprecedented quantity of Sargassum that washed ashore. This issue prompted international discussion to better understand the origins, distribution, and movement of Sargassum, a free-floating brown macro alga with ecological, environmental, and commercial importance. In the open ocean, Sargassum mats serve a vital ecological function. However, when large quantities appear onshore without warning, Sargassum threatens local tourist industries and nearshore ecosystems within the Caribbean. As part of the international response, this project investigated the proliferation of this macro alga within the Caribbean Sea from 2003-2015, and used NASA Earth observations to detect and model Sargassum growth across the region. The Caribbean Oceans team calculated the Floating Algal Index (FAI) using Terra Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data, and compared the FAI to various oceanic variables to determine the ideal pelagic environment for Sargassum growth. The project also examined the annual spread of Sargassum throughout the region by using Earth Trends Modeler (ETM) in Clark Labs' TerrSet software. As part of the international effort to better understand the life cycle of Sargassum in the Caribbean, the results of this project will help local economies promote sustainable management practices in the region.

  19. African American and Black Caribbean Feelings of Closeness to Africans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Michael C; Taylor, Robert Joseph; Chatters, Linda M; Forsythe-Brown, Ivy

    2017-01-01

    African American and Black Caribbean relations dominate research on interactions across black ethnic divides. Using National Survey of American Life data, we explore a different aspect of black interethnic attitudes: how close these groups feel toward Africans. African Americans and Black Caribbeans were largely similar in their feelings of closeness to Africans. For Black Caribbeans, younger and male respondents, those reporting higher levels of financial strain, living in the northeast and persons who immigrated to the United States at least 11 years ago, report feeling especially close to Africans. Being male was the only significant correlate among African Americans. The findings are discussed in relation to how race, ethnicity and national origin shape personal identities within the U.S. and their significance for intergroup perceptions. These broader issues warrant further consideration in light of assertions that race as a defining feature of American life and intergroup relations is obsolete.

  20. Art at the crossroads: Francisco Oller and Caribbean art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Manthorne

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Review of Edward J. Sullivan, From San Juan to Paris and Back: Francisco Oller and Caribbean Art in the Era of Impressionism: Francisco Oller (1833-1917 was a Puerto Rican born artist who helped shape the visual production of the Caribbean in the second half of the nineteenth century. He enjoyed a reputation on both sides of the Atlantic, both at home and in Europe, where he spent twenty years. This book fills provides a much-needed analysis of the achievement of Oller, who has received little scholarly attention in the past thirty years. In six chapters that analyze major artworks and themes in Oller’s oeuvre, this book recasts the artist as a key figure in nineteenth century art and sheds new light on his contribution to a uniquely Caribbean aesthetic.

  1. Religious Involvement among Caribbean Blacks in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Robert Joseph; Chatters, Linda M.; Mattis, Jacqueline S.; Joe, Sean

    2011-01-01

    This study examined demographic and denominational differences in religious involvement (i.e., organizational, non-organizational, subjective) among Caribbean Blacks (Black Caribbeans) residing in the U.S. using data from the National Survey of American Life. Caribbean Blacks who were born in the U.S. had lower levels of religious involvement than those who immigrated and respondents originating from Haiti (as compared to Jamaica) had higher levels of religious involvement, while persons from Trinidad-Tobago reported lower service attendance than did Jamaicans. Older persons, women and married persons generally demonstrated greater religious involvement than their counterparts, while highly educated respondents expressed lower levels of self-rated religiosity. Denominational differences indicated that Baptists reported high levels of religious involvement; however, in several cases, Pentecostals and Seventh Day Adventists reported greater involvement. PMID:21927509

  2. Euthanasia in Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Each of the Benelux countries (Belgium, Luxembourg, Netherlands) has enacted legislation that partially decriminalises euthanasia, defined as an act that intentionally terminates someone's life at their request. In the Netherlands and Luxembourg, but not in Belgium, the legislation partially decriminalised assisted suicide at the same time. In all three countries, euthanasia can only be performed by a doctor, in response to the patient's voluntary and well-considered request, and for patients who have an incurable disease that causes unbearable suffering, without any prospect of relief. In the Netherlands, minors can request euthanasia as of the age of 12 years. In 2011, reported euthanasia accounted for about 1% of deaths in Belgium and 3% in the Netherlands. In 75% of cases, cancer was the disease leading to a request for euthanasia. In the Netherlands, the number of cases of euthanasia reported by doctors in surveys matches the number that is officially declared. In Belgium, it is thought that there are as many unreported as reported cases of euthanasia. Since the enactment of euthanasia legislation, fewer deaths involve the intentional administration of lethal drugs without an explicit request from the patient.

  3. Presence of Ruvettus pretiosus (Gempylidae in the Colombian continental Caribbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Camila Gómez-Cubillos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The first record of Ruvettus pretiosus Cocco, 1833 for the Colombian continental Caribbean is presented. The specimen was collected at Los Cocos, department of Magdalena (11°16’33, 84’’ N 73°53’33, 01’’ W, using a demersal longline gear placed at 100 m depth. Biometrics, diagnosis and comments regarding its distribution, ecology and biology are included in the description. This new record expands the distribution of the species in the Caribbean Sea and increases the reported number of gempylids for Colombia to five.

  4. The volcanic evolution of Martinique Island: Insights from K-Ar dating into the Lesser Antilles arc migration since the Oligocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germa, Aurélie; Quidelleur, Xavier; Labanieh, Shasa; Chauvel, Catherine; Lahitte, Pierre

    2011-12-01

    The Lesser Antilles island arc bifurcates into two lines in its northern part, with an old branch to the east and a recent active branch to the west. Martinique is located at the southern tip of the separation. The two arcs diverge northward, and at maximum divergence are separated by a 50 km wide depression. Despite this separation, which suggests a jump in volcanism, activity has been almost continuous in Martinique Island with a slow displacement of the eruptive centers to the west. Considering timing of emplacement, previous authors defined three cycles of activity, the old, intermediate and recent arcs, of Late Oligocene-Early Miocene, Mid Miocene and Late Miocene to present ages, respectively. The present study investigates the timing of emplacement of the volcanic units in Martinique Island in order to constrain the activity of the old and intermediate Lesser Antilles arcs, as recorded on this island. Unspiked K-Ar age determinations on groundmass and plagioclase separates (Cassignol-Gillot technique) were conducted on 20 samples from the old and intermediate volcanic chains. Martinique has evolved as eight distinct volcanic centers: (1) Basal Complex and Sainte Anne Series (24.8 ± 0.4-20.8 ± 0.4 Ma) for the old arc; (2) Vauclin-Pitault Chain (16.1 ± 0.2-8.44 ± 0.12 Ma) and (3) South-western Volcanism (9.18 ± 0.16-7.10 ± 0.10 Ma) for the intermediate arc; and (4) Morne Jacob volcano (5.14 ± 0.07-1.54 ± 0.03 Ma), (5) Trois Ilets Volcanism (2.358 ± 0.034 Ma and 346 ± 27 ka), (6) Carbet Complex (998 ± 14 to 322 ± 6 ka), (7) Mount Conil (543 ± 8 to 127 ± 2 ka) and (8) Mount Pelée (126 ± 2 ka to present) for the recent arc ( Germa et al., 2010, 2011a).We propose migration rates of 1.1-1.4 km/Myr westward, toward the back arc region throughout the whole volcanic history of Martinique Island. These rates, together with geochemical evidence for a more enriched signature in the youngest magmas, are consistent with a geodynamic evolution involving the

  5. The development of a new chemistry curriculum in the Netherlands ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The development of a new chemistry curriculum in the Netherlands: Introducing ... Journal Home > Vol 4, No 2 (2014) >. Log in or ... This paper describes the recent changes in chemistry education in secondary school in the Netherlands.

  6. Employment Assimilation of Immigrants in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    Zorlu, Aslan; Hartog, Joop

    2008-01-01

    This discussion Paper led to a publication in International Journal of Population Research , Vol. 2012, article ID 634276. Using two Dutch labour force surveys, employment assimilation of immigrants is examined. We observe marked differences between immigrants by source country. Non-western immigrants never reach parity with native Dutch. Even second generation immigrants never fully catch up. Caribbean immigrants, who share a colonial history with the Dutch, assimilate relatively quick compa...

  7. Agricultural Cooperatives in the Netherlands: key success factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijman, J.

    2016-01-01

    The paper argues that the ongoing success of agricultural cooperatives in the Netherlands can be explained by the combination of five factors. First, the Netherlands has an enabling cooperative legislation. Second, cooperatives in the Netherlands have been able to maintain effective member control

  8. Ectomycorrhizal fungal communities of Coccoloba uvifera (L.) L. mature trees and seedlings in the neotropical coastal forests of Guadeloupe (Lesser Antilles).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Séne, Seynabou; Avril, Raymond; Chaintreuil, Clémence; Geoffroy, Alexandre; Ndiaye, Cheikh; Diédhiou, Abdala Gamby; Sadio, Oumar; Courtecuisse, Régis; Sylla, Samba Ndao; Selosse, Marc-André; Bâ, Amadou

    2015-10-01

    We studied belowground and aboveground diversity and distribution of ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungal species colonizing Coccoloba uvifera (L.) L. (seagrape) mature trees and seedlings naturally regenerating in four littoral forests of the Guadeloupe island (Lesser Antilles). We collected 546 sporocarps, 49 sclerotia, and morphotyped 26,722 root tips from mature trees and seedlings. Seven EM fungal species only were recovered among sporocarps (Cantharellus cinnabarinus, Amanita arenicola, Russula cremeolilacina, Inocybe littoralis, Inocybe xerophytica, Melanogaster sp., and Scleroderma bermudense) and one EM fungal species from sclerotia (Cenococcum geophilum). After internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequencing, the EM root tips fell into 15 EM fungal taxa including 14 basidiomycetes and 1 ascomycete identified. Sporocarp survey only weakly reflected belowground assessment of the EM fungal community, although 5 fruiting species were found on roots. Seagrape seedlings and mature trees had very similar communities of EM fungi, dominated by S. bermudense, R. cremeolilacina, and two Thelephoraceae: shared species represented 93 % of the taxonomic EM fungal diversity and 74 % of the sampled EM root tips. Furthermore, some significant differences were observed between the frequencies of EM fungal taxa on mature trees and seedlings. The EM fungal community composition also varied between the four investigated sites. We discuss the reasons for such a species-poor community and the possible role of common mycorrhizal networks linking seagrape seedlings and mature trees in regeneration of coastal forests.

  9. The memory of volcanic waters: Shallow magma degassing revealed by halogen monitoring in thermal springs of La Soufrière volcano (Guadeloupe, Lesser Antilles)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villemant, Benoît; Hammouya, Gilbert; Michel, Agnès; Semet, Michel P.; Komorowski, Jean-Christophe; Boudon, Georges; Cheminée, Jean-Louis

    2005-09-01

    The halogen contents of thermal waters collected since 1979 at La Soufrière volcano (Guadeloupe, Lesser Antilles) are interpreted as a retarded record of magma degassing pulses dispersed into the hydrothermal system. The further the spring is located from the source, the larger the time delay and the older the event recorded in water chemistry. Using advection-dispersion transport models in porous media, we reconstruct the time-series of degassing pulses for the period 1971-1992 and show that it correlates with the seismic records. The 1975-1977 sismo-volcanic crisis at La Soufrière is thereby interpreted as the result of a magma intrusion at shallow depth (˜3 km) which likely began in approximately 1973 and degassed in a pulsatory regime during ˜15 yr. The recent recrudescence of fumarolic and seismic activity could represent the initial stage of new magma injection. Measurement of halogen contents in hydrothermal waters collected around active volcanoes may provide a powerful tool for detection of the initial stages of magma intrusions.

  10. Digital Poverty: Latin American and Caribbean Perspectives | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2007-01-01

    Jan 1, 2007 ... This book examines the problem of inadequate access to information and communication technology (ICT) and the need to develop appropriate pro-poor ICT policies within the Latin American and Caribbean context. The authors show how market reforms have failed to ensure that the benefits of the ...

  11. Rethinking Education for the Caribbean: A Radical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jules, Didacus

    2008-01-01

    The article reflects critically on the experience of the Caribbean Anglophone countries (CARICOM) in reforming their education systems to meet the challenges of the present era. It argues that education reform in the current conjuncture can no longer be incremental and that what is required is a fundamental rethinking of educational provision.…

  12. Coastal Resource Management in the Wider Caribbean: Resilience ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-01-01

    Jan 1, 2010 ... The Caribbean Sea is the second largest sea in the world, including more than 30 insular and continental countries with an approximate population of 35 million. In addition to its highly fractionalized territory, it is characterized by a great linguistic and cultural diversity, a phenomenon enhanced by ...

  13. Measurement Invariance of the UTAUT Constructs in the Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Troy D.; Singh, Lenandlar; Gaffar, Kemuel; Thakur, Dhanaraj; Jackman, Grace-Ann; Thomas, Michael; Gajraj, Roger; Allen, Claudine; Tooma, Keron

    2014-01-01

    This article employs confirmatory factor analysis to evaluate the factorial validity and the cross-national comparability of the UTAUT constructs with respect to mobile learning in higher education in four Caribbean countries. Except for the measurement of one factor, the UTAUT constructs exhibit adequate reliability and validity. Though full…

  14. 75 FR 65453 - Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-25

    .... Executive Director's Report. ACLs/AMs Report/Discussion. Trap Reduction Program Update--Anthony Iarocci/Tony... contact Mr. Miguel A. Rol n, Executive Director, Caribbean Fishery Management Council, 268 Mu oz Rivera.... Although non-emergency issues not contained in this agenda may come before this group for discussion, those...

  15. 78 FR 67127 - Caribbean Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-08

    ... auxiliary aids, please contact Mr. Miguel A. Rol n, Executive Director, Caribbean Fishery Management Council... agenda issues. Although non-emergency issues not contained in this agenda may come before this group for... days prior to the meeting date. Dated: November 5, 2013. Tracey L. Thompson, Acting Deputy Director...

  16. Productivity in services in Latin America and the Caribbean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arias Ortiz, E.; Crespi, G.A.; Rasteletti, A.; Vargas, F.

    2014-01-01

    This paper studies productivity in Latin America and the Caribbean, with an emphasis on the service sector. It shows that the low levels of productivity observed in the region are not only a consequence of low productivity at the firm level, but also of misallocation of workers across firms. These

  17. The Case of Latin America and the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacio, Jairo

    1993-01-01

    Reviews the history of population education programs in Latin America and the Caribbean from 1970 to 1992 and changes in fertility, mortality, and migration during that period. Considers issues such as government styles and motivations, staff shortages, cooperation among administrators, teacher training, distance education, and new management…

  18. Women in Development: The Issues for the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antrobus, Peggy

    1980-01-01

    In the Caribbean, women's programs have focused on women's reproductive roles, to the detriment of equal opportunities in education, training, access to jobs, land, and credit. This deprives developing nations of the full contribution of women to social and economic development. (SK)

  19. Caribbean dry forest networking: an opportunity for conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    K. Banda-Rodriguez; J. Weintritt; R.T. Pennington

    2016-01-01

    Seasonally dry tropical forest is the most threatened tropical forest in the world. Though its overall plant species diversity is lower than in neighboring biomes such as rain forest, species endemism can be high, and its conservation has often been neglected. Caribbean dry forests face diverse threats including tourism, agriculture, and climate change. The Latin...

  20. Caribbean piracy and youth restiveness in Niger delta: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Our aim in this paper is to make a comparative analysis of Caribbean piracy and youth restiveness in Niger Delta of Nigeria. It will not be out of place to carry out such an analysis having seen, heard or read of the ongoing chaos, insecurity in the. Niger Delta Zone in Nigeria. We have to look at the past to find out such similar

  1. The Educational Experience of Afro-Caribbean Student Immigrants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmore, Keiana; Vazquez-Montilla, Elia; Greene, Jackie

    2016-01-01

    The following article summarizes a research study which involved an investigation of the educational experiences of Afro-Caribbean student immigrants who were academically successful in the United States (U.S.). Although immigrants of African descent experience barriers such as immigrant status and racial minority status which leads to a double…

  2. Canada-Latin America and Caribbean Zika Virus Research Program ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-05-10

    May 10, 2016 ... A new funding opportunity on Zika virus is responding to the virus outbreak and the health threat it represents for the affected populations in the hardest hit countries in Latin America and the Caribbean. The Canadian Institutes for Health Research and the International Development Research Centre, ...

  3. Canada-Latin America and the Caribbean Research Exchange ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Like the three earlier phases (002624, 004097 and 101783), this project will allow the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada (AUCC) to offer academics (graduate students, professors, researchers) from Canada and Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) opportunities for face-to-face dialogue on ...

  4. Preliminary analysis of interannual Caribbean Current spatial variability

    OpenAIRE

    Bryce Corlett, W.; Ezer, Tal

    2014-01-01

    2012 Poster Presentation - Old Dominion University The preliminary results shown here are an initial attempt to connect spatial variations of the Caribbean Current to eddy activity at the Meso-American Barrier Reef, as is an important driver for currents around the reef during spawning.

  5. On Afro-American and Afro-Caribbean Cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Clement G. B.

    1980-01-01

    Cites negative stereotypes and cultural differences as barriers to unity among Black Americans and immigrants from the Caribbean islands. Calls for political unity of the two groups, based on the fact that they are perceived and discriminated against as one by the dominant White majority. (GC)

  6. Wave-swept coralliths of Saba Bank, Dutch Caribbean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksema, Bert W.; Hassell, Dahlia; Meesters, Erik H.W.G.; Duyl, van Fleur C.

    2017-01-01

    During a recent reef coral survey at the submarine Saba Bank (Eastern Caribbean), an uncommon and diverse assemblage of unattached scleractinian corals (coralliths) was encountered, which has not been reported from the Atlantic before. Four different types of these free-living (unattached) corals

  7. How to Avoid a Darkening Debt Storm in the Caribbean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallett, Andrew Hughes; Hougaard Jensen, Svend E.

    Using the euro area and the Eastern Caribbean Currency Union as case studies, this chapter argues that a comprehensive policy framework should comprise not only a rule for fiscal policy but also, and equally important, a broader set of strategies designed to improve competitiveness and economic...

  8. Familiar faces from abroad: Diaspora tourism in the Caribbean ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2012-03-02

    Mar 2, 2012 ... Altogether, millions of Caribbean natives, or their descendants, live in global cities abroad. ... Diaspora members, it turns out, return home not just for sun and relaxation, but also to invest and do business, to improve education, to establish a new residence, to attend festivals or family events such as ...

  9. Racial and Ego Identity Development in Black Caribbean College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Delida

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the relationships between racial identity attitudes and ego identity statuses among 255 Black Caribbean college students in the Northeast United States. Findings indicated that racial identity attitudes were predictive of ego identity statuses. Specifically, preencounter racial identity attitudes were predictive of lower scores…

  10. Boys' Educational "Underachievement" in the Caribbean: Interpreting the "Problem"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobbett, Mary; Younger, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Education ministries in the Caribbean countries have directed considerable attention over the last decade to "solving" the "problem" of boys' underachievement. Rather than considering such interventions, our central concern in this paper is to revisit debates about the interpretation of the issue, to explore whether boys'…

  11. Highlight: IDRC sponsors Caribbean symposium on impact of ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2015-05-12

    12 mai 2015 ... An IDRC-sponsored symposium exploring the impact of the Internet on economic growth and public service delivery in the Caribbean was held in Saint Andrew, Jamaica, on May 12, 2015. Discussions from the symposium will feed into the 2016 World Development Report: Internet for Development.

  12. Freshwater resources in the insular Caribbean: an environmental perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    T. Heartsill Scalley

    2012-01-01

    From islands with no permanent flowing streams to those with navigable inland waters, the insular Caribbean contains a great range of conditions regarding the access to freshwater resources. Because of the variation in topography and size, the ability of islands to retain freshwater also varies widely. The usage of freshwater in this region is being led by two major...

  13. Lessons from NAFTA for Latin America and the Caribbean

    OpenAIRE

    Lederman, Daniel; William F. Maloney; Servén, Luis

    2004-01-01

    Analyzing the experience of Mexico under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), "Lessons from NAFTA" aims to provide guidance to Latin American and Caribbean countries considering free trade agreements with the United States. The authors conclude that the treaty raised external trade and foreign investment inflows and had a modest effect on Mexico's average income per person. It ...

  14. Rewriting The Caribbean Experience In Homerian Style: A Study Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is realised that the poem is a reenactment of the total Caribbean experience in all its totality. However, the study goes further to underscore the peculiar Homerian style of the poem. The style is discussed with regards to the extant epics of Homer and Dante and some of the stylistic indicators discovered include the use of ...

  15. Strengthening Coastal Pollution Management in the Wider Caribbean Region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lavieren, van H.; Metcalfe, C.D.; Drouillard, K.; Sale, P.; Gold-Bouchot, G.; Reid, R.; Vermeulen, L.C.

    2011-01-01

    Control of aquatic pollution is critical for improving coastal zone management and for the conservation of fisheries resources. Countries in the Wider Caribbean Region (WCR) generally lack monitoring capacity and do not have reliable information on the levels and distribution of pollutants,

  16. Breastfeeding and food pattern in overweight children in the Caribbean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greaux, K.; Schwiebbe, L.; Renders, C.M.; Doak, C.M.; Visser, R.; Kist-van Holthe, J.E.; Hirasing, R.A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: As in most countries around the globe, overweight and obesity are a major threat to public health on the Caribbean island of Aruba. Increasing evidence confirms that breastfeeding protects against overweight and obesity. However, little is known about the mechanism underlying the

  17. Disaster-induced displacement in the Caribbean and the Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mo Hamza

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available People in Small Island Developing States are particularly vulnerable to displacement by disaster. Governments in the Caribbean and the Pacific need urgently to do more risk management and planning, rather than focusing almost exclusively on response and relocation.

  18. Nocturnal foraging by artificial light in three Caribbean bird species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debrot, A.O.

    2014-01-01

    I discuss observations of opportunistic use of artificial light for feeding in the dark by the native White-tailed Nightjar (Caprimulgus cayennensis), the long-established Cattle Egret (Bubulcus ibis), and the introduced Carib Grackle (Quiscalus lugubris) in Curaçao, Dutch Caribbean. The

  19. Migration as an Agent of Change in Caribbean Island Ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Dawn

    1982-01-01

    There is need to assess the impact of migration on the Caribbean ecosystems. As a 150-year-old institution, emigration is related to the carrying capacity of the islands and the need to export the surplus population when capacity is threatened. Emigration, however, is a deterrent to development and individual independence. (KC)

  20. Improving food security in Latin America and the Caribbean | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-04-21

    Apr 21, 2016 ... Fish farming is greatly improving food security, incomes, health, and quality of life for families in Bolivia. Women are empowered to become leaders in their communities, promoting gender equality. More fruits and vegetables in children's diets in Caribbean primary schools are helping with child obesity.

  1. The Care Chain, Children's Mobility and the Caribbean Migration Tradition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olwig, Karen Fog

    2012-01-01

    Children’s mobility is analysed in this article as an important foundation of the migration tradition that has been an integral aspect of most Caribbean societies. I show that, because of their position as dependents who are not yet fully socialised and who are subject to adult authority, childre...

  2. Early Efforts at Educating the Indians in the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchus, M. K.

    1988-01-01

    Examines history of three native Caribbean groups, the Ciboney, the Arawaks, and the Caribs, from beginning of European colonization in the fifteen th century. Details destruction of Indian society and culture by Spanish settlers, who subjugated Natives with education and religion. Includes section of "Some Positive Educational Contributions…

  3. Premiere of "Forward Home:" The economic power of Caribbean ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    26 avr. 2016 ... The documentary "Forward Home," produced as part of IDRC'sOpportunities in CARICOM Migration : Brain Circulation, Diasporic Tourism, and Investment project, reveals the economic power of the Caribbean's overseas communities. The 30-minute film showcases the experiences of peoples who ...

  4. Spanish? What Spanish? The Search for a 'Caribbean Standard.'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, C.

    1978-01-01

    Variations in lexicon, phonology, morphology, and syntax of Spanish as spoken in Venezuela, Cuba, Mexico, and Castile have led to a diversity in the types of Spanish taught in Caribbean schools. The Programa Interamericano de Linguistica y Ensenanza de Idiomas is conducting a survey which will provide authoritative standards for Spanish teachers.…

  5. Premiere of "Forward Home:" The economic power of Caribbean ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-04-26

    Apr 26, 2016 ... The documentary "Forward Home," produced as part of IDRC'sOpportunities in CARICOM Migration : Brain Circulation, Diasporic Tourism, and Investment project, reveals the economic power of the Caribbean's overseas communities. The 30-minute film showcases the experiences of peoples who ...

  6. book review the cambridge guide to african ano caribbean theatre.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    THE CAMBRIDGE GUIDE TO AFRICAN ANO CARIBBEAN. THEATRE. Edited by Martin Banham, Errol Hill and George Woodyard. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994, pp.24. 35 Pounds, $39.95. Six years after the Guide to World Theatre, which was "particularly designed to offer to scholars, students and general ...

  7. Knowledge and attitudes of students in a caribbean medical school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AIDS) is seen as one of the most devastating infection/disease known to have attacked the human population. This study is aimed at assessing the level of knowledge, attitudes and misconceptions of the medical students in a Caribbean Medical ...

  8. Rewriting the Caribbean experience in Homerian style: a study of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigates the themes that bother upon the Caribbean experience in Derek Walcott's Omeros. A brief introduction to the poetry of Derek Walcott is given before attempts are made at rendering some of the themes of the work such as identity, slavery/colonialism, rootlessness, reconciliation, and migration.

  9. Improving food security in Latin America and the Caribbean | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    21 avr. 2016 ... Fish farming is greatly improving food security, incomes, health, and quality of life for families in Bolivia. Women are empowered to become leaders in their communities, promoting gender equality. More fruits and vegetables in children's diets in Caribbean primary schools are helping with child obesity.

  10. Dust and Air Quality Forecasting in the Eastern Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sealy, A. M.; Reyes, A.; Farrell, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Significant amounts of dust travel across the northern tropical Atlantic to the Caribbean every year from the Sahara region. These dust concentrations in the Caribbean often exceed United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards for particulate matter of 2.5 microns or less (PM 2.5) which could have serious implications for human health in the region. Air pollution has become a major issue in the Caribbean because of urban development, increased vehicle emissions and growing industrialisation. However, the majority of territories in the Caribbean do not have routine air quality monitoring programmes and several do not have or enforce air quality standards for PM2.5 and PM10. As a result, the Caribbean Institute for Meteorology and Hydrology (CIMH) has taken the initiative to provide dust and air quality forecasts for the Eastern Caribbean using the advanced WRF-Chem modeling system. The applications of the WRF-Chem modelling system at CIMH that are currently being focused on are the coupled weather prediction/dispersion model to simulate the release and transport of constituents, especially Saharan dust transport and concentration; and as a coupled weather/dispersion/air quality model with full interaction of chemical species with prediction of particulate matter (PM2.5 and PM10). This will include future applications in the prediction of ozone (O3) and ultraviolet (UV) radiation as well as examining dust radiative forcing and effects on atmospheric precipitation and dynamics. The simulations are currently initialised at 00Z for a seven day forecast and run at 36 km resolution with a planned second domain (at 12 km) for air quality forecasts. Preliminary results from this study will be presented and compared to other dust forecast models currently used in other regions. This work also complements in situ measurements at Ragged Point, Barbados (oldest dust record since 1965), Martinique, Guadeloupe, French Guiana and Puerto Rico. The goal of this study

  11. The distribution of bats in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braaksma, S.

    1970-01-01

    The Research Institute for Nature Management (R.I.N.) has compiled all available information on the distribution of bats in the Netherlands up till 1968. The data were derived from literature and museum specimens, as well as from numerous unpublished observations. Around 1960 much was known already

  12. Green data centres in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Owen van der Lee; ir. A. Kasper; ir. Marco A. Dorenbos; Anda Counotte-Potman; dr. Th.J.G. Thiadens

    2010-01-01

    Green data centres are the talk of the day. But who in fact is involved in developing green data centres? What is their contribution? And what does this contribution constitute in practical terms? This article states which stakeholders are involved in green data centres in the Netherlands, what

  13. Shellfish reef restoration pilots: Voordelta The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sas, H.; Kamermans, P.; Have, van der T.M.; Lengkeek, W.; Smaal, A.C.

    2016-01-01

    Once, shellfish reefs - mainly flat oysters - covered about 20% of the North Sea floor, but diseases, pollution and overfishing have led to a significant decline. As part of the Haringvliet Dream Fund Project (www.haringvliet.nu), ARK
    Nature and World Wildlife Fund Netherlands are working on

  14. Restructuring Environmental Legislation in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuuren, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    In 2002, the newly elected Cabinet in the Netherlands decided to act upon a growing number of complaints from businesses that government legis-lation is the cause of heavy administrative burdens for companies. According to businesses, this has a negative impact on the economy. The Cabinet promised

  15. Administration by negotiation in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, O.J.D.M.L.

    2002-01-01

    The legal literature in the Netherlands has been paying a considerable amount of attention for some time now to horizontal administration or administration by negotiation., voluntary agreements, mediation, Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) and dispute settlement. The issue is still of continued

  16. Modelling Forest Water Consumption in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolman, A.J.; Nonhebel, S.

    1988-01-01

    The water consumption of oak, beech, spruce and pine forest is predicted from routinely measured meteorological data for five locations in the Netherlands. Differences in water consumption are found to be primarily a result of differences in interception loss. Predicted interception loss was found

  17. The Netherlands Yearbook on International Cooperation 2008

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoebink, P.R.J.

    2009-01-01

    'The Netherlands Yearbook on International Cooperation 2008' is a second of the series yearbooks. The Yearbook has as objectives: to stimulate and feed the scientific and political debate on the Dutch international cooperation; to offer opportunities for publication for researchers in the field of

  18. Chapter 5: Adaptation Strategies in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klostermann, J.E.M.; Gupta, J.; Bergsma, E.; Jong, P.

    2014-01-01

    Although climate change has been prominently featured on the global scientific and political agendas since the World Climate Conference in 1979 (WCC 1979), the specific importance of adaptation to climate change has only been underlined about 20 years later. The Netherlands, because it lies largely

  19. The Netherlands in a European Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2000-01-01

    How does the Netherlands compare with the other members of the European family? This issue of the Social and Cultural Report is devoted chiefly to answering that question. From how long we can expect to live to how much television we watch: from having the most part-time jobs to the least number

  20. Calcareous sponges of the Netherlands (Porifera, Calcarea)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koolwijk, van Th.

    1982-01-01

    The taxonomy of calcareous sponges occurring in the Netherlands is reviewed, using field observations of live individuals, microscopical examination of individual skeletons and study of the breeding cycle. This led to the conclusion that a new species had to be erected and other species

  1. Mapping groundwater quality in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pebesma, Edzer Jan

    1996-01-01

    Groundwater quality is the suitability of groundwater for a certain purpose (e.g. for human consumption), and is mostly determined by its chemical composition. Pollution from agricultural and industrial origin threatens the groundwater quality in the Netherlands. Locally, this pollution is

  2. Norms of filial obligation in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A. Dykstra (Pearl); T. Fokkema (Tineke)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractIn this article we examine to what extent norms of filial obligation in the Netherlands are shaped by group value patterns, family constellation, possibilities for helping others, and actual experiences of support exchange. The data are drawn from the first wave of the combined main and

  3. The Netherlands: wage flexibility and collective bargaining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van het Kaar, R.

    2009-01-01

    In the Netherlands, the incidence of variable payments systems (VPS) and performance-related pay (PRP) gradually increases. Most forms of VPS are covered by collective bargaining, with the exception of share and option schemes. Virtually all agreements only allow upward variability. Employers and

  4. Regional labour market dynamics in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broersma, Lourens; van Dijk, J.

    This article analyzes the response of regional labor markets in the Netherlands to region-specific labor demand shocks. Previous studies show remarkable differences in response between regions in European countries and regions in the United States. The analysis shows that, in Dutch regions, the

  5. Wildlife value orientations in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, M.H.

    2007-01-01

    Wildlife value orientations among inhabitants of the Netherlands were explored by conducting semi-structured interviews, and using predefined value orientations that were previously revealed in the United States. Special attention was paid to the existence of mutualism orientations, viewing wildlife

  6. Acceptance of homosexuality in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisette Kuyper; Floor Bakker

    2006-01-01

    Original title: De houding ten opzichte van homoseksualiteit. To date, relatively little systematic research has been carried out on public attitudes to homosexual men and women in the Netherlands - far less than in the United States, for example. SCP has recently carried out a large-scale

  7. Prevalence of Dupuytren Disease in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lanting, Rosanne; van den Heuvel, Edwin R; Westerink, Bram; Werker, Paul M N

    Background: Dupuytren disease is a fibroproliferative disease of palmar fascias of the hand. The prevalence of Dupuytren disease and the association with potential risk factors have been the subject of several studies, although there is a paucity of such data from The Netherlands. Methods: To study

  8. Issues and party competition in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, Kees; Macdonald, Stuart Elaine; Rabinowitz, George

    1999-01-01

    The Netherlands represents the prototypic case of a consociational democracy; in addition, the Dutch system has an extremely low threshold for obtaining representation in the legislature, making it open to challengers of any political persuasion. This article has two explicit goals: to compare two

  9. Jews in the Netherlands and their languages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Ruiter, A.C.J.

    2014-01-01

    Cultural contacts between majority and minority groups involve many different aspects, one of which is language. Jews have been living in the Netherlands since around the beginning of the sixteenth century. In the two centuries that followed, their language repertoire was very rich, consisting of at

  10. Euthanasia in the Netherlands: a slippery slope?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toebes, Brigit

    2017-01-01

    The Dutch euthanasia legislation has been lauded as well as criticized by legal scholars and physicians in the Netherlands and abroad. The legal framework so established is renowned for setting a number of valuable due-care criteria for the physician to follow when performing euthanasia on a

  11. The Umbelliferae of the Netherlands Indies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buwalda, P.

    1936-01-01

    Besides the Umbelliferae of the Netherlands Indies proper, also those of the Malay Peninsula and the non-Dutch parts of Borneo and New Guinea have been taken up in this revision. The materials examined belong to the following Herbaria: (B) = the Herbarium of the Botanic Garden, Buitenzorg. (BD) =

  12. Recognizablility of rural roads in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, L.T. & Davidse, R.J.

    2008-01-01

    In the Netherlands, the Sustainable Safety vision is an important guide in improving road safety. It is considered that the road environment shouldconform to the expectations of road users in order to prevent errors thatcould lead to road crashes. These expectations are based on the characteristics

  13. Engaging scientists : organising valorisation in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, Stefan de

    2015-01-01

    Globally, the call for impact of science on society is louder than ever. The Netherlands is no exception. In 2004, valorisation was introduced as a core element of Dutch science policy, aiming to increase the societal benefits of academic research. In scientific practice, the introduction

  14. Monitoring Acceptance of homosexuality in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saskia Keuzenkamp

    2010-01-01

    Promoting acceptance of homosexuality is the main objective of current Dutch policy on the emancipation of gays and lesbians. At the request of Ronald Plasterk, the former Dutch government minister with responsibility for this policy, the Netherlands Institute for Social Research/SCP is

  15. Rapid response systems in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ludikhuize, Jeroen; Hamming, Annette; de Jonge, Evert; Fikkers, Bernard G.

    2011-01-01

    Sixty-three (approximately 80%) of the 81 hospitals that responded to a survey sent to all hospitals in The Netherlands with nonpediatric intensive care units had a rapid response system (RRS) in place or were in the final process of starting one. Among many other findings regarding RRS

  16. Road safety of children in The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2006-01-01

    Compared to other ages groups, relatively few children in the Netherlands in the 0-14 age group are killed in traffic. What is more, the number of casualties in this age group has diminished considerably over the past twenty years, more than in other age groups. This is due to a combination of

  17. Rural youth culture : Keten in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haartsen, Tialda; Strijker, Dirk

    A remarkable present-day phenomenon in rural areas in the Netherlands is that young people, mostly males, often meet in small groups in self-built or at least self-fitted out sheds or caravans (keten). At first glance, these keten seem to be substitutes for more official entertainment sites in the

  18. Aerosol light-scattering in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, H.M. ten; Veefkind, J.P.; Waijers-IJpelaan, A.; Hage, J.C. van der

    1996-01-01

    The relation between the (midday) aerosol light-scattering and the concentrations of nitrate and sulfate has been assessed at a site near the coast of the North Sea in The Netherlands. Midday was selected for the measurements because this is the time at which the aerosol is most effective in the

  19. Review of Infrared Technology in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, A.N. de

    1993-01-01

    The use of infrared sensors in the Netherlands is substantial. Users can be found in a variety of disciplines, military as well as civil. This need for IR sensors implied a long history on IR technology and development. The result was a large technological-capability allowing the realization of IR

  20. The reception of relativity in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Besouw, J.; van Dongen, J.; Maas, A.; Schatz, H.

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews the early academic and public reception of Albert Einstein's theory of relativity in the Netherlands, particularly after Arthur Eddington's eclipse experiments of 1919. Initially, not much attention was given to relativity, as it did not seem an improvement over Hendrik A.

  1. Public Administration Programmes in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C.N. Raadschelders; F.K.M. van Nispen tot Pannerden (Frans)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractPublic administration in The Netherlands is generally approached as a multi-disciplinary field of inquiry, especially in the social sciences. Some schools attempt a more integrating approach preserving the integrity of Public Administration as an academic discipline. Its focus is on: 1.

  2. Social Housing in the Netherlands, Chapter 10

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsinga, M.; Wassenberg, F.

    2007-01-01

    Nowhere else in Europe does social housing dominate the housing market as it does in the Netherlands. Over one third of all households rent a social-sector dwelling. There are 2.4 million social rented dwellings, a number that has been stable during the last decade. Almost all social housing is

  3. The history of radiotherapy in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levendag, PC; Vermey, J; Senan, S

    1996-01-01

    Soon after the discovery of x-rays by W. C. Rontgen in 1895, a publication on fluoroscopy and x-ray pictures/films appeared in the Dutch medical literature in February 1896, The present article reviews the subsequent developments in the field of therapeutic radiology in The Netherlands and, in

  4. The development of marketing in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Wierenga (Berend)

    1981-01-01

    textabstractThe article discusses marketing developments in the Netherlands. The author describes the evolution of marketing in the country from the traditional institutions such as wholesaling, retailing, and auctions, etc. to the nonprofit sectors. Marketing in the country has been described in

  5. Severe Neonatal Hyperbilirubinemia in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gotink, Mark J.; Benders, Manon J.; Lavrijsen, Selma W.; Pereira, Rob Rodrigues; Hulzebos, Christian V.; Dijk, Peter H.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The occurrence of severe neonatal hyperbilirubinemia (SH) is partly attributed to nonhospitalized perinatal care. The Netherlands have a high frequency of home births and nonhospitalized perinatal care, and the incidence of SH is unknown. Objective: To assess the effects of home births

  6. Islamic Primary Schools in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dronkers, Jaap

    2016-01-01

    During the last 20 years of the 20th century, Islamic primary schools were founded in the Netherlands thanks to its constitutional "freedom of education" (which allows state-funded religious schools), its voucher system (each school receives the same amount of money per pupil), and school choice by parents. This essay gives some…

  7. Going Dutch: Higher Education in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, David

    2016-01-01

    This article outlines some of the policy issues currently faced by research-based universities in the Netherlands. The focus is on four leading universities (University of Amsterdam: UvA; Free University of Amsterdam: VU; Leiden University; and Delft University of Technology: TUD). The author visited these institutions as part of a Study Tour…

  8. Education in General Practice in the Netherlands*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the Netherlands medicine is taught at 7 universities, while in a few years an 8th faculty will be in operation in Maastricht. Each faculty has a department for general practice. We will show you the set-up of the institutes of. Groningen, Utrecht, Nijmegen and Leyden. We are dealing with the education of all medical students ...

  9. Childcare in the Netherlands: Lessons in Privatisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgunduz, Yusuf Emre; Plantenga, Janneke

    2014-01-01

    In 2005 the Child Care Act was introduced in the Netherlands. The explicit objective of the childcare reform has been to stimulate the operation of market forces so that childcare services are provided in an efficient way. The change towards a demand-driven financing system implies that there is no longer public provision of childcare services in…

  10. Gambling and problem gambling in The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudriaan, Anna E

    2014-07-01

    To provide an overview of gambling in the Netherlands, focusing on historical background, policy, legislation, prevalence of problem gambling, availability of treatment options and research base. Literature review. Contradictions between gambling policy and practice have been present in the past 15-20 years, and have led to an increasingly stricter gambling regulation to retain the government policy to restrict gambling within a national monopoly. Conversely, political efforts have been made to legalize internet gambling, but have not yet been approved. Compared to other European countries, slot machine gambling and casino gambling are relatively popular, whereas betting is relatively unpopular. Last-year problem gambling prevalence (South Oaks Gambling Screen score > 5) is estimated at 0.22-0.15% (2005, 2011). Treatment for problem gambling is covered by health insurance under the same conditions as substance dependence, but only a small proportion of Dutch problem gamblers seeks help at addiction treatment centres. Gambling policy in the Netherlands has become stricter during recent last years in order to maintain the Dutch gambling monopoly. Problem gambling in the Netherlands is relatively stable. Dutch research on problem gambling has a lack of longitudinal studies. Most of the epidemiological gambling studies are reported in non-peer-reviewed research reports, which diminishes control by independent peers on the methodology and interpretation of results. Recent efforts to enhance consistency in research methods between gambling studies over time could enhance knowledge on changes in (problem) gambling in the Netherlands. © 2013 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  11. Start-up incentives the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekker, S.; van den Eijnden, J.

    2014-01-01

    Generally, there are three different types of start-up incentive for unemployed and inactive people in the Netherlands. The first is a set of incentives for potential entrepreneurs receiving Unemployment Benefits (UB) (Werloosheidwet - WW). Such incentives have existed since 2006 and were adjusted

  12. Part time working in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wil Portegijs; Saskia Keuzenkamp

    2008-01-01

    Original title: Nederland deeltijdland. The Netherlands is at the top of the league when it comes to part-time working. Women in particular very frequently work part-time. This is blamed on the difficulty of combining paid employment with care tasks, thus limiting the scope for participation

  13. Climate Change Communication in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dewulf, A.; Boezeman, D.F.; Vink, M.J.; Vink, M.

    2017-01-01

    Climate change communication in the Netherlands started in the 1950s, but it was not until the late 1970s that the issue earned a place on the public agenda, as an aspect of the energy problem, and in the shadow of controversy about nuclear energy. Driven largely by scientific reports and political

  14. International bioenergy trade in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Junginger, H.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/202130703; de Wit, M.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/310873754; Sikkema, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/110609913; Faaij, A.P.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/10685903X

    2008-01-01

    The international biomass trade in the Netherlands has been growing strongly over the last few years, but information on the corresponding volumes, origins and prices is barely available. The objectives of this paper are to quantify imported and exported biomass volumes and origins, and identify

  15. Bibliography "Visual Signalling", The Netherlands, 1979.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, D.A.

    1983-01-01

    This bibliography pertains to publications produced in the netherlands and/or by dutch authors concerning the subject-matter of visual signalling between 1979 and 1982 inclusive. Some information regarding publications of 1983 is included. The bibliography includes books, journals and research

  16. Chronic Q fever in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampschreur, L.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/344824497

    2013-01-01

    From 2007-2010, during the recent Q fever epidemic in the Netherlands, over 4000 cases of acute Q fever were registered, which is an underestimation of the total amount of Coxiella burnetii infections due to a high amount of asymptomatic primary infections. In the literature it is stated that 1-5%

  17. Prioritizing emerging zoonoses in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.H. Havelaar (Arie); F. van Rosse (Floor); C. Bucura (Catalin); M.A. Toetenel (Milou); J.A. Haagsma (Juanita); D. Kurowicka (Dorota); A.J.P. Heesterbeek (Hans); N. Speybroeck (Niko); M.F.M. Langelaar (Merel); J.W.B. van der Giessen (Joke); R.M. Cooke (Roger); M.A.H. Braks (Marieta)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground: To support the development of early warning and surveillance systems of emerging zoonoses, we present a general method to prioritize pathogens using a quantitative, stochastic multi-criteria model, parameterized for the Netherlands. Methodology/Principal Findings: A risk

  18. Prioritizing Emerging Zoonoses in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havelaar, A.H.; Van Rosse, F.; Bucura, C.; Toetenel, M.A.; Haagsma, J.A.; Kurowicka, D.; Heesterbeek, J.A.P.; Speybroeck, N.; Langelaar, M.F.M.; Cooke, R.M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: To support the development of early warning and surveillance systems of emerging zoonoses, we present a general method to prioritize pathogens using a quantitative, stochastic multi-criteria model, parameterized for the Netherlands. Methodology/Principal Findings: A risk score was based

  19. Prioritizing emerging zoonoses in The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havelaar, A.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/072306122; van Rosse, F.; Bucura, C.; Toetenel, M.A.; Haagsma, J.A.; Kurowicka, D.; Heesterbeek, J.A.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073321427; Speybroeck, N.; Langelaar, M.F.M.; van der Giessen, J.W.; Cooke, R.M.; Braks, M.A.H.

    2010-01-01

    To support the development of early warning and surveillance systems of emerging zoonoses, we present a general method to prioritize pathogens using a quantitative, stochastic multi-criteria model, parameterized for the Netherlands. A risk score was based on seven criteria, reflecting assessments of

  20. Prioritizing Emerging Zoonoses in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havelaar, A.H.; Rosse, F.; Bubura, C.; Toetenel, M.A.; Haagsma, J.A.; Kurowicka, D.; Heesterbeek, J.A.P.; Giessen, van der J.W.B.

    2010-01-01

    Background To support the development of early warning and surveillance systems of emerging zoonoses, we present a general method to prioritize pathogens using a quantitative, stochastic multi-criteria model, parameterized for the Netherlands. Methodology/Principal Findings A risk score was based on