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Sample records for netarts bay oregon

  1. An application of LIDAR to analyses of El Nino erosion in the Netarts littoral cell, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revell, D.L.; Komar, P.D.; Sallenger, A.H.

    2002-01-01

    El Nin??o produces coastal and beach erosion along the West Coast of the USA by elevating mean water levels so that tides are significantly higher than predicted, and by altering the paths of storms that generate large waves. In the past it has been difficult to adequately document the erosion impacts since they are so widespread. This difficulty has been solved through the application of LIDAR, which uses a scanning laser mounted in a small aircraft to rapidly and accurately survey beach elevations. This study uses LIDAR to document the beach changes and shoreline erosion that occurred during the 1997-98 El Nin??o within the Netarts Littoral Cell on the Oregon coast, a 14-km long "pocket beach" between large rocky headlands. The LIDAR surveys demonstrate that sand generally migrated northward within the cell due to the southwest approach of the El Nin??o storm waves, but there was a complex pattern of beach-elevation change due to the superposition of eroded rip-current embayments. The greatest beach erosion occurred near the south end of the cell, where it impacted Cape Lookout State Park, and to the north of the inlet to Netarts Bay where it threatened The Capes, a development of condominiums located on a high bluff. In both cases the LIDAR data proved to be extremely useful in quantifying the erosion, and in providing a better understanding of the erosion processes that occur during an El Nin??o.

  2. Biological baseline data Youngs Bay, Oregon, 1974

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMechan, K.J. (ed.); Higley, D.L.; Holton, R.L.

    1975-04-01

    This report presents biological baseline information gathered during the research project, Physical, Chemical and Biological Studies on Youngs Bay.'' Youngs Bay is a shallow embayment located on the south shore of the Columbia River, near Astoria, Oregon. Research on Youngs Bay was motivated by the proposed construction by Alumax Pacific Aluminum Corporation of an aluminum reduction plant at Warrenton, Oregon. The research was designed to provide biological baseline information on Youngs Bay in anticipation of potential harmful effects from plant effluents. The information collected concerns the kinds of animals found in the Youngs Bay area, and their distribution and seasonal patterns of abundance. In addition, information was collected on the feeding habits of selected fish species, and on the life history and behavioral characteristics of the most abundant benthic amphipod, Corophium salmonis. Sampling was conducted at approximately three-week intervals, using commonly accepted methods of animal collection. Relatively few stations were sampled for fish, because of the need to standardize conditions of capture. Data on fish capture are reported in terms of catch-per-unit effort by a particular sampling gear at a specific station. Methods used in sampling invertebrates were generally more quantitative, and allowed sampling at a greater variety of places, as well as a valid basis for the computation of densities. Checklists of invertebrate species and fish species were developed from these samples, and are referred to throughout the report. The invertebrate checklist is more specific taxonomically than are tables reporting invertebrate densities. This is because the methods employed in identification were more precise than those used in counts. 9 refs., 27 figs., 25 tabs.

  3. Nekton-habitat associations in Yaquina Bay, Oregon - March 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    We conducted a 3-year field study to determine the relative nekton usage of 4 intertidal habitats (eelgrass [Zostera marina], mud shrimp [Upogebia pugettensis], ghost shrimp [Neotrypaea californiensis], and unvegetated sand) in Yaquina Bay, Oregon. Nekton samples were collected u...

  4. Monitoring Oregon Silverspot Butterfly Habitat Restoration Methods: Willapa Bay National Wildlife Refuge and Oregon Coast NWRs

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Oregon Silverspot Butterfly is thought to be extirpated from the northern portion oftheir historic range. Currently the entire population is only known to...

  5. No cuerpos, lugares del anonimato: El cuerpo en el net.art Non-bodies, locations of anonymity: the body in the net.art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Teresa AGUILAR

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Este texto se ocupa del papel que la representación del cuerpo humano adquiere en el net.art. Por un lado, considera que el cuerpo humano ha sido descorporeizado y proyectado en el no lugar del espacio telemático, enfrentado así a las tendencias de rematerialización del cuerpo, como el arte carnal y el body art, y, por otra, parte considera que incluso en esta esfera ciberespacial el cuerpo de Internet se ve como una prolongación del arte carnal, según los trabajos de Orlan y Tomic. La construcción del género y el trabajo artístico de las mujeres en la red es otro de los objetivos que este texto pone de manifiesto como vinculación de mujeres y nuevas tecnologías en el contexto artístico del net.art.This text deals with the role that the representation of the human body acquired in net.art. On the one hand, considers that the human body has been disembodied and projected in the nowhere of telematic space, thus faced to the rematerialization trends of the body, as the carnal art and body art, and by the other hand considers that even in this cyberspace area the Internet´s body is seen as an extension of carnal art, depending on the work of Orlan and Tomic. The construction of gender and women's artwork in the network is another objective that this text shows as linking between women and new technologies in the artistic context of net.art.

  6. No cuerpos, lugares del anonimato: El cuerpo en el net.art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Teresa AGUILAR

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Este texto se ocupa del papel que la representación del cuerpo humano adquiere en el net.art. Por un lado, considera que el cuerpo humano ha sido descorporeizado y proyectado en el no lugar del espacio telemático, enfrentado así a las tendencias de rematerialización del cuerpo, como el arte carnal y el body art, y, por otra, parte considera que incluso en esta esfera ciberespacial el cuerpo de Internet se ve como una prolongación del arte carnal, según los trabajos de Orlan y Tomic. La construcción del género y el trabajo artístico de las mujeres en la red es otro de los objetivos que este texto pone de manifiesto como vinculación de mujeres y nuevas tecnologías en el contexto artístico del net.art.

  7. Evaluation of 1991-1992 Brood Overwinter-Reared Coho Released from Net Pens in Youngs Bay, Oregon : Final Completion Report Youngs Bay Terminal Fishery Project.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirose, Paul S.

    1997-01-01

    Funding from Bonneville Power Administration was provided to the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and the Clatsop County Economic Development Council`s Fisheries Project to identify and develop terminal fishing opportunities. The 1991 and 1992 brood fingerling coho from Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife hatcheries were successfully reared during the winter period to smolt stage in Youngs Bay utilizing floating net pens. Based on coded-wire-tag recoveries during 1991--93 from 2-week net-pen acclimation releases, total accountability of coho adults averaged 40,540 fish, with the Youngs Bay commercial harvest accounting for 39%. With reduced ocean harvest impacts during 1994 and 1995, 92% of 51,640 coho in 1994 and 68% of 23,599 coho in 1995 (based on coded-wire-tag recoveries) were accounted for in the Youngs Bay commercial fishery for combined 2-week and overwinter acclimation net-pen releases. Overwinter net-pen acclimation coho accounted for 35,063 and 15,775 coho adults in 1994 and 1995 with 93% and 68% accountable in the Youngs Bay commercial harvest. Based on coded-wire-tag recoveries, less than 1% of the adults resulting from releases at Youngs Bay net pens strayed to hatcheries, while none were recovered on spawning ground surveys during 1991--95. The highest survival rates were observed for 1991 and 1992 brood overwinter coho released in early May. Time of release, not rearing strategy, appears to be the determining factor affecting survival in Youngs Bay.

  8. Acoustic tag detections of green sturgeon in the Columbia River and Coos Bay estuaries, Washington and Oregon, 2010–11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansel, Hal C.; Romine, Jason G.; Perry, Russell W.

    2017-11-08

    The Columbia River, in Washington and Oregon, and Coos Bay, in Oregon, are economically important shipping channels that are inhabited by several fishes protected under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Maintenance of shipping channels involves dredge operations to maintain sufficient in-channel depths to allow large ships to navigate the waterways safely. Fishes entrained by dredge equipment often die or experience delayed mortality. Other potential negative effects of dredging include increased turbidity, reductions in prey resources, and the release of harmful contaminants from the dredged sediments. One species of concern is the ESA-listed green sturgeon (Acipenser medirostris; Southern Distinct Population Segment). In this study, we used acoustic telemetry to identify habitat use, arrival and departure timing, and the extent of upstream migration of green sturgeon in the Columbia River and Coos Bay to help inform dredge operations to minimize potential take of green sturgeon. Autonomous acoustic receivers were deployed in Coos Bay from the mouth to river kilometer (rkm) 21.6 from October 2009 through October 2010. In the Columbia River Estuary, receivers were deployed between the mouth and rkm 37.8 from April to November in 2010 and 2011. A total of 29 subadult and adult green sturgeon were tagged with temperature and pressure sensor tags and released during the study, primarily in Willapa Bay and Grays Harbor, Washington, and the Klamath River, Oregon. Green sturgeon detected during the study but released by other researchers also were included in the study.The number of tagged green sturgeon detected in the two estuaries differed markedly. In Coos Bay, only one green sturgeon was detected for about 2 hours near the estuary mouth. In the Columbia River Estuary, 9 green sturgeon were detected in 2010 and 10 fish were detected in 2011. Green sturgeon entered the Columbia River from May through October during both years, with the greatest numbers of fish being

  9. Siletz Bay - Oregon Coast Invasive Species Mapping, Monitoring and Eradication Program 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Siletz Bay NWR contains a variety of coastal habitat types including salt marsh, brackish marsh, tidal sloughs, mudflats, and coniferous and deciduous forestland....

  10. Nestucca Bay - Coastal Prairie and Oregon Silverspot Butterfly Habitat Restoration 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Service is partnering with the Institute for Applied Ecology (IAE) and several dedicated volunteer groups to convert 30 acres at Nestucca Bay NWR from highly...

  11. Great-earthquake paleogeodesy and tsunamis of the past 2000 years at Alsea Bay, central Oregon coast, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, A.R.; Sawai, Y.; Jennings, A.E.; Bradley, L.-A.; Gerson, L.; Sherrod, B.L.; Sabean, J.; Horton, B.P.

    2008-01-01

    The width of plate-boundary fault rupture at the Cascadia subduction zone, a dimension related to earthquake magnitude, remains uncertain because of the lack of quantitative information about land-level movements during past great-earthquake deformation cycles. Beneath a marsh at Alsea Bay, on the central Oregon coast, four sheets of tsunami-deposited sand blanket contacts between tidal mud and peat. Radiocarbon ages for the sheets match ages for similar evidence of regional coseismic subsidence and tsunamis during four of Cascadia's great earthquakes. Barring rapid, unrecorded postseismic uplift, reconstruction of changes in land level from core samples using diatom and foraminiferal transfer functions includes modest coseismic subsidence (0.4??0.2 m) during the four earthquakes. Interpretation is complicated, however, by the 30-38% of potentially unreliable transfer function values from samples with poor analogs in modern diatom and foraminiferal assemblages. Reconstructions of coseismic subsidence using good-analog samples range from 0.46??0.12 to 0.09??0.20 m showing greater variability than implied by sample-specific errors. From apparent high rates of land uplift following subsidence and tsunamis, we infer that postseismic rebound caused by slip on deep parts of the plate boundary and (or) viscoelastic stress relaxation in the upper plate may be almost as large as coseismic subsidence. Modest coseismic subsidence 100 km landward of the deformation front implies that plate-boundary ruptures in central Oregon were largely offshore. Ruptures may have been long and narrow during earthquakes near magnitude 9, as suggested for the AD 1700 earthquake, or of smaller and more variable dimensions and magnitudes. ?? 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Inorganic carbon dynamics in the upwelling system off the Oregon coast and implications for commercial shellfish hatcheries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, J. M.; Hales, B. R.

    2010-12-01

    The increasing absorption of anthropogenic CO2 by the global ocean and concomitant decrease in pH will alter seawater carbonate chemistry in ways that may negatively impact calcifying organisms. In particular, the change in saturation state (Ω) of calcium carbonate minerals calcite and aragonite may be energetically unfavorable for shell formation while favoring shell dissolution. Eastern boundary upwelling systems may provide insights into how ecosystems respond to future conditions of ocean acidification when deep water with high dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), low pH and low Ω is forced toward the surface. Mortality in commercial seed stock and reduced wild set of the oyster Crassostrea gigas in the northeast Pacific during 2005-2009 reinforced the need for understanding biological responses to acidified ocean water. In response, a long-term strategy to understand local carbonate chemistry dynamics, seasonal perturbations and the effects on development of calcifying bivalves was developed. At present, a time-series of pCO2 measurements was implemented in April 2010 in Netarts Bay, Oregon at Whiskey Creek Shellfish Hatchery (WCH). The intake sits at a depth of 0.5-8ft and water is pumped in at 100gpm. A line taken off the intake is run continuously through a thermosalinograph at approximately 1.5gpm into a showerhead style equilibrator in which the headspace is recirculated by aerating the water for enhanced gas exchange. CO2 in equilibrated air is analyzed by NDIR. Additionally two discrete samples of intake seawater were taken across tidal cycles weekly and analyzed for total CO2 (TCO2) according to the methods of Hales et al. (2004) and pCO2 for quality control. The pCO2 in the bay exhibits a diurnal cycle representative of daytime photosynthesis and nighttime respiration. However, the phasing and profiles of these cycles are dominated by tidal mixing and are affected by the introduction of high pCO2 water during upwelling events. Diurnal pCO2 during

  13. Umpqua River Oregon Geologic Floodplain

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Umpqua River drains 12,103 square kilometers (4,673 square miles) in southwest Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean at Winchester Bay near the city of...

  14. Marsh-nekton connectivity - A estuarine food web study in Yaquina Bay, Oregon using dual isotope analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding temporal and spatial variability in community-level interactions of PNW estuaries has implications for ecosystem-based management principles. Here, we are analyzing the contribution of marsh derived food sources to non-commercial resident fish in Yaquina Bay, a tem...

  15. 78 FR 27989 - Bandon Marsh, Nestucca Bay, and Siletz Bay National Wildlife Refuges, Coos, Tillamook, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-13

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Bandon Marsh, Nestucca Bay, and Siletz Bay National Wildlife Refuges, Coos... Assessments (EAs) for three Oregon refuges--Bandon Marsh, Nestucca Bay, and Siletz Bay National Wildlife... ``Bandon Marsh, Nestucca Bay, and Siletz Bay final CCPs and FONSIs'' in the subject line of the message. U...

  16. South Oregon Coast Reinforcement.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1998-05-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to build a transmission line to reinforce electrical service to the southern coast of Oregon. This FYI outlines the proposal, tells how one can learn more, and how one can share ideas and opinions. The project will reinforce Oregon`s south coast area and provide the necessary transmission for Nucor Corporation to build a new steel mill in the Coos Bay/North Bend area. The proposed plant, which would use mostly recycled scrap metal, would produce rolled steel products. The plant would require a large amount of electrical power to run the furnace used in its steel-making process. In addition to the potential steel mill, electrical loads in the south Oregon coast area are expected to continue to grow.

  17. Umpqua River Oregon Active Channel 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Umpqua River drains 12,103 square kilometers (4,673 square miles) in southwest Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean at Winchester Bay near the city of...

  18. Umpqua River Oregon Active Channel 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Umpqua River drains 12,103 square kilometers (4,673 square miles) in southwest Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean at Winchester Bay near the city of...

  19. Umpqua River Oregon Active Channel 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Umpqua River drains 12,103 square kilometers (4,673 square miles) in southwest Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean at Winchester Bay near the city of...

  20. Umpqua River Oregon Active Channel 1994

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Umpqua River drains 12,103 square kilometers (4,673 square miles) in southwest Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean at Winchester Bay near the city of...

  1. Umpqua River Oregon Active Channel 1939

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Umpqua River drains 12,103 square kilometers (4,673 square miles) in southwest Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean at Winchester Bay near the city of...

  2. Relations between DNA- and RNA-based molecular methods for cyanobacteria and microcystin concentration at Maumee Bay State Park Lakeside Beach, Oregon, Ohio, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelzer, Erin A.; Loftin, Keith A.; Struffolino, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    Water samples were collected from Maumee Bay State Park Lakeside Beach, Oregon, Ohio, during the 2012 recreational season and analyzed for selected cyanobacteria gene sequences by DNA-based quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and RNA-based quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Results from the four DNA assays (for quantifying total cyanobacteria, total Microcystis, and Microcystis and Planktothrix strains that possess the microcystin synthetase E (mcyE) gene) and two RNA assays (for quantifying Microcystis and Planktothrix genera that are expressing the microcystin synthetase E (mcyE) gene) were compared to microcystin concentration results determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Concentrations of the target in replicate analyses were log10 transformed. The average value of differences in log10 concentrations for the replicates that had at least one detection were found to range from 0.05 to >0.37 copy per 100 milliliters (copy/100 mL) for DNA-based methods and from >0.04 to >0.17 copy/100 mL for RNA-based methods. RNA has a shorter half-life than DNA; consequently, a 24-hour holding-time study was done to determine the effects of holding time on RNA concentrations. Holding-time comparisons for the RNA-based Microcystis toxin mcyE assay showed reductions in the number of copies per 100 milliliters over 24 hours. The log difference between time 2 hours and time 24 hours was >0.37 copy/100 mL, which was higher than the analytical variability (log difference of >0.17 copy/100 mL). Spearman’s correlation analysis indicated that microcystin toxin concentrations were moderately to highly related to DNA-based assay results for total cyanobacteria (rho=0.69), total Microcystis (rho=0.74), and Microcystis strains that possess the mcyE gene (rho=0.81). Microcystin toxin concentrations were strongly related with RNA-based assay results for Microcystis mcyE gene expression (rho=0.95). Correlation analysis could

  3. 77 FR 57107 - Bandon Marsh, Nestucca Bay, and Siletz Bay National Wildlife Refuges, Coos, Tillamook, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-17

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Bandon Marsh, Nestucca Bay, and Siletz Bay National Wildlife Refuges, Coos... conservation plans and environmental assessments (Draft CCP/EAs) for three Oregon refuges-- Bandon Marsh... . Include ``Bandon Marsh, Nestucca Bay, and Siletz Bay draft CCP and EA'' in the subject line of the message...

  4. Preliminary assessment of channel stability and bed-material transport in the Tillamook Bay tributaries and Nehalem River basin, northwestern Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Krista L.; Keith, Mackenzie K.; O'Connor, Jim E.; Mangano, Joseph F.; Wallick, J. Rose

    2012-01-01

    This report summarizes a preliminary study of bed-material transport, vertical and lateral channel changes, and existing datasets for the Tillamook (drainage area 156 square kilometers [km2]), Trask (451 km2), Wilson (500 km2), Kilchis (169 km2), Miami (94 km2), and Nehalem (2,207 km2) Rivers along the northwestern Oregon coast. This study, conducted in coopera-tion with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and Oregon Department of State Lands to inform permitting decisions regarding instream gravel mining, revealed that: * Study areas along the six rivers can be divided into reaches based on tidal influence and topography. The fluvial (nontidal or dominated by riverine processes) reaches vary in length (2.4-9.3 kilometer [km]), gradient (0.0011-0.0075 meter of elevation change per meter of channel length [m/m]), and bed-material composition (a mixture of alluvium and intermittent bedrock outcrops to predominately alluvium). In fluvial reaches, unit bar area (square meter of bar area per meter of channel length [m2/m]) as mapped from 2009 photographs ranged from 7.1 m2/m on the Tillamook River to 27.9 m2/m on the Miami River. * In tidal reaches, all six rivers flow over alluvial deposits, but have varying gradients (0.0001-0.0013 m/m) and lengths affected by tide (1.3-24.6 km). The Miami River has the steepest and shortest tidal reach and the Nehalem River has the flattest and longest tidal reach. Bars in the tidal reaches are generally composed of sand and mud. Unit bar area was greatest in the Tidal Nehalem Reach, where extensive mud flats flank the lower channel. * Background factors such as valley and channel confinement, basin geology, channel slope, and tidal extent control the spatial variation in the accumulation and texture of bed material. Presently, the Upper Fluvial Wilson and Miami Reaches and Fluvial Nehalem Reach have the greatest abundance of gravel bars, likely owing to local bed-material sources in combination with decreasing channel gradient and

  5. Geochemical ecosystem engineering by the mud shrimp Upogebia pugettensis (Crustacea: Thalassinidae) in Yaquina Bay, Oregon: density-dependent effects on organic matter remineralization and nutrient cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    We investigated the effect of the thalassinid mud shrimp Upogebia pugettensis on organic matter and nutrient cycling on Idaho Flat, an intertidal flat in the Yaquina River estuary, Oregon. Field studies were conducted to measure carbon and nitrogen remineralization rates and bent...

  6. Aerial photo mosaic of the Nehalem River, Oregon in 1939

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Tillamook Bay subbasins and Nehalem River basins encompass 1,369 and 2,207 respective square kilometers of northwestern Oregon and drain to the Pacific Ocean....

  7. Channel centerline for the Nehalem River, Oregon in 1967

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Tillamook Bay subbasins and Nehalem River basins encompass 1,369 and 2,207 respective square kilometers of northwestern Oregon and drain to the Pacific Ocean....

  8. Umpqua River Oregon North Umpqua PhotoMosaic 1939

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Umpqua River drains 12,103 square kilometers (4,673 square miles) in southwest Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean at Winchester Bay near the city of...

  9. Aerial photo mosaic of the Tillamook basin, Oregon in 1967

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Tillamook Bay subbasins and Nehalem River basins encompass 1,369 and 2,207 respective square kilometers of northwestern Oregon and drain to the Pacific Ocean....

  10. Umpqua River Oregon Coast Range PhotoMosaic 1967

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Umpqua River drains 12,103 square kilometers (4,673 square miles) in southwest Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean at Winchester Bay near the city of...

  11. Channel centerline for the Nehalem River, Oregon in 1939

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Tillamook Bay subbasins and Nehalem River basins encompass 1,369 and 2,207 respective square kilometers of northwestern Oregon and drain to the Pacific Ocean....

  12. Umpqua River Oregon Garden Valley PhotoMosaic 1967

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Umpqua River drains 12,103 square kilometers (4,673 square miles) in southwest Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean at Winchester Bay near the city of...

  13. Umpqua River Oregon Garden Valley PhotoMosaic 1939

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Umpqua River drains 12,103 square kilometers (4,673 square miles) in southwest Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean at Winchester Bay near the city of...

  14. Umpqua River Oregon Aerial Photograph Data for 1967

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Umpqua River drains 12,103 square kilometers (4,673 square miles) in southwest Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean at Winchester Bay near the city of...

  15. Channel centerline for the Nehalem River, Oregon in 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Tillamook Bay subbasins and Nehalem River basins encompass 1,369 and 2,207 respective square kilometers of northwestern Oregon and drain to the Pacific Ocean....

  16. Aerial photo mosaic of the Nehalem River, Oregon in 1967

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Tillamook Bay subbasins and Nehalem River basins encompass 1,369 and 2,207 respective square kilometers of northwestern Oregon and drain to the Pacific Ocean....

  17. Channel centerline for the Tillamook, Trask, Wilson, Kilchis, and Miami Rivers, Oregon in 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Tillamook Bay subbasins and Nehalem River basins encompass 1,369 and 2,207 respective square kilometers of northwestern Oregon and drain to the Pacific Ocean....

  18. Wetted channel and bar features for the Nehalem River, Oregon in 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Tillamook Bay subbasins and Nehalem River basins encompass 1,369 and 2,207 respective square kilometers of northwestern Oregon and drain to the Pacific Ocean....

  19. Channel centerline for the Tillamook, Trask, Wilson, Kilchis, and Miami Rivers, Oregon in 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Tillamook Bay subbasins and Nehalem River basins encompass 1,369 and 2,207 respective square kilometers of northwestern Oregon and drain to the Pacific Ocean....

  20. Channel centerline for the Tillamook, Trask, Wilson, Kilchis, and Miami Rivers, Oregon in 1967

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Tillamook Bay subbasins and Nehalem River basins encompass 1,369 and 2,207 respective square kilometers of northwestern Oregon and drain to the Pacific Ocean....

  1. Aerial photo mosaic of the Wilson and Kilchis Rivers, Tillamook basin, Oregon in 1939

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Tillamook Bay subbasins and Nehalem River basins encompass 1,369 and 2,207 respective square kilometers of northwestern Oregon and drain to the Pacific Ocean....

  2. Aerial photo mosaic of the Tillamook and Trask Rivers, Tillamook basin, Oregon in 1939

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Tillamook Bay subbasins and Nehalem River basins encompass 1,369 and 2,207 respective square kilometers of northwestern Oregon and drain to the Pacific Ocean....

  3. Wetted channel and bar features for the Nehalem River, Oregon in 1939

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Tillamook Bay subbasins and Nehalem River basins encompass 1,369 and 2,207 respective square kilometers of northwestern Oregon and drain to the Pacific Ocean....

  4. Wetted channel and bar features for the Tillamook, Trask, Wilson, Kilchis, and Miami Rivers, Oregon in 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Tillamook Bay subbasins and Nehalem River basins encompass 1,369 and 2,207 respective square kilometers of northwestern Oregon and drain to the Pacific Ocean....

  5. Monitoring the Northern San Francisco Bay Water Quality with Landsat-8. Nicholas B. Tufillaroa , and Curtiss O. Davisa. aOregon State University, Corvallis, OR, 97331, USA, nbt@coas.oregonstate.edu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, C. O.; Tufillaro, N.

    2016-02-01

    Landsat-8's high spatial resolution ( 30 nm nominal), improved signal-to-noise (12bit digitizer) and expanded band set open up new applications for coastal and in-land waters. We use a recent ocean color processor for Landsat-8 created by Vanhellemont and Ruddick (RSE, 2015)to examine changes in the Northern San Francisco Bay, in particular looking for possiblechanges due to the on-going California drought. For instance, a temporary drought barrier to prevent salt water intrusion was placed during May of 2015 at West False River in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. Using the new Landsat-8 ocean color products, we illustrate how to monitor changes in macro algae and plants (Sago pondweed (native), Curly pondweed (non-native)) in regions directly effected,such as the Franks Track region. Product maps using panchromatic enhancement ( 15 m resolution) andscene based atmospheric correction allow a detailed synoptic look every 16 days during theSpring, Summer, and Fall of 2015. This work is part of a larger NASA funded project aimed atimproving the modeling and predictive capabilities of the biogeochemical state for the San Francisco Bay(Davis, PI: Impacts of Population Growth on the San Francisco Bay and Delta Ecosystem, 2014-2017).

  6. Oregon: Library Automation Developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandis, Rushton

    1996-01-01

    Discusses Oregon library automation projects, including Internet connectivity and a statewide multitype library network; a bibliographic information system with college and university libraries, including a union catalog; a Portland Area Library System that connects multitype libraries; and library staff training for the Internet. (LRW)

  7. Managing sudden oak death on federal lands in southwest Oregon: triumphs and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellen Michaels Goheen

    2017-01-01

    Since 2001, approximately 5,350 acres of tanoak forests in Curry County, Oregon have been treated to eradicate Phytophthora ramorum and slow the spread of sudden oak death. Over 1,300 of these acres are on lands administered by the USDI Bureau of Land Management (BLM CB), Coos Bay District and the USDA Forest Service, Rogue River-Siskiyou...

  8. OR State Profile. Oregon: Oregon State Assessment System (OSAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center on Education Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides information about Oregon State Assessment System. Its purpose is to assess proficiency in the Essential Skills for the purpose of earning a regular or modified high school diploma. Oregon Assessment of Knowledge and Skills is also used for federal accountability purposes under No Child Left Behind. [For the main report,…

  9. STRAWBERRY MOUNTAIN WILDERNESS, OREGON.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer, T.P.; Stotelmeyer, Ronald B.

    1984-01-01

    The Strawberry Mountain Wilderness extends 18 mi along the crest of the Strawberry Range and comprises about 53 sq mi in the Malheur National Forest, Grant County, Oregon. Systematic geologic mapping, geochemical sampling and detailed sampling of prospect workings was done. A demonstrated copper resource in small quartz veins averaging at most 0. 33 percent copper with traces of silver occurs in shear zones in gabbro. Two small areas with substantiated potential for chrome occur near the northern edge of the wilderness. There is little promise for the occurrence of additional mineral or energy resources in the Strawberry Mountain Wilderness.

  10. Humboldt Bay Wetlands Review and Baylands Analysis. Volume I. Summary and Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-08-01

    Michael Mix, Ph.D. - Oregon State University (P. Invertebrates) Larry Riggs, Ph.D. (M. Mammals, N. Birds, Q. Amphibians and Reptiles ) John Rogers, M.A...long and 0.5 to 4 miles wide; Humboldt Bay is the only deep water port between San Francisco and Coos Bay, Oregon . A more detailed description of the...Biological Profiles L. Habitat Types 118 M. Mammals 130 N. Birds 144 0. Fish 164 P. Invertebrates 187 Q. Reptiles and Amphibians 201 R. Productivity 206 S

  11. 2007 Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) Northwest Oregon Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This lidar dataset encompasses two areas in northwest Oregon. The northern area is located in Clatsop County, encompassing Clatsop State Forest ownership; the...

  12. Sprague River Oregon Bars 1968

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the U.S....

  13. Sprague River Oregon Centerline 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the U.S....

  14. Sprague River Oregon Floodplain 1968

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the U.S....

  15. Sprague River Oregon Floodplain 1940

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the U.S....

  16. Sprague River Oregon Centerline 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the U.S....

  17. Sprague River Oregon Centerline 1975

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the U.S....

  18. Sprague River Oregon Centerline 1968

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the U.S....

  19. NEKTON-HABITAT ASSOCIATIONS IN YAQUINA BAY, OREGON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habitat-based ecological risk assessments rely, in part, on estimates of the ecological value of the habitats at risk. To estimate estuarine habitat values with respect to the nekton (small fish, crabs and other invertebrates), we determined nekton-habitat associations in four i...

  20. OLALLIE ROADLESS AREA, OREGON.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, George W.; Neumann, Terry R.

    1984-01-01

    The Olallie Roadless Area, Oregon, is devoid of mines and mineral prospects, and a mineral-resource evaluation of the area did not identify any mineral-resource potential. There is no evidence that fossil fuels are present in the roadless area. Nearby areas in Clackamas, Marion, Jefferson, and Wasco Counties are characterized by higher-than-normal heat flow and by numerous thermal springs, some of which have been partly developed. this may indicate that the region has some, as yet undefined, potential for the development of geothermal energy. Lack of thermal springs or other evidence of localized geothermal anomalies within the roadless area may be the result of masking by young, nonconductive rock units and by the flooding out and dilution of rising thermal waters by cool meteoric water.

  1. Oregon's mobility needs : social service provider survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-06-01

    In 1998, the Oregon Department of Transportation undertook the Social Services Provider Survey as part of an investigation of the transportation needs of mobility impaired individuals in Oregon. This survey was designed to gain information about the ...

  2. Libraries in Oregon: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/oregon.html Libraries in Oregon To use the sharing features on ... Albany Samaritan Albany General Hospital Stanley K. Davis Library 1046 6th Ave. SW Albany, OR 97321 541- ...

  3. Creating a Geo-Referenced Bibliography with Google Earth and Geocommons: The Coos Bay Bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Jenni; Butler, Barb

    2012-01-01

    We compiled a geo-referenced bibliography of research including theses, peer-reviewed articles, agency literature, and books having sample collection sites in and around Coos Bay, Oregon. Using Google Earth and GeoCommons we created a map that allows users such as visiting researchers, faculty, students, and local agencies to identify previous…

  4. Teenage Suicide in Oregon 1983-1985.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oregon State Dept. of Human Resources, Portland.

    During the 3-year period from 1983 through 1985, 80 Oregon teenagers intentionally took their own lives, making suicide second only to accidents as the leading cause of death among Oregon teenagers. Data on suicides committed by individuals between the ages of 10 and 19 were retrieved from death certificates on file with the Oregon Health Division…

  5. The Oregon Geothermal Planning Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-10-02

    Oregon's geothermal resources represent a large portion of the nation's total geothermal potential. The State's resources are substantial in size, widespread in location, and presently in various stages of discovery and utilization. The exploration for, and development of, geothermal is presently dependent upon a mixture of engineering, economic, environmental, and legal factors. In response to the State's significant geothermal energy potential, and the emerging impediments and incentives for its development, the State of Oregon has begun a planning program intended to accelerate the environmentally prudent utilization of geothermal, while conserving the resource's long-term productivity. The program, which is based upon preliminary work performed by the Oregon Institute of Technology's Geo-Heat Center, will be managed by the Oregon Department of Energy, with the assistance of the Departments of Economic Development, Geology and Mineral Industries, and Water Resources. Funding support for the program is being provided by the US Department of Energy. The first six-month phase of the program, beginning in July 1980, will include the following five primary tasks: (1) coordination of state and local agency projects and information, in order to keep geothermal personnel abreast of the rapidly expanding resource literature, resource discoveries, technological advances, and each agency's projects. (2) Analysis of resource commercialization impediments and recommendations of incentives for accelerating resource utilization. (3) Compilation and dissemination of Oregon geothermal information, in order to create public and potential user awareness, and to publicize technical assistance programs and financial incentives. (4) Resource planning assistance for local governments in order to create local expertise and action; including a statewide workshop for local officials, and the formulation of two specific community resource development

  6. Residential Energy Efficiency Potential: Oregon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Eric J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-11-02

    Energy used by Oregon single-family homes that can be saved through cost-effective improvements. Prepared by Eric Wilson and Noel Merket, NREL, and Erin Boyd, U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis.

  7. Western juniper in eastern Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald R. Gedney; David L. Azuma; Charles L. Bolsinger; Neil. McKay

    1999-01-01

    This report analyzes and summarizes a 1988 inventory of western juniper (Juniperus occidentalis Hook.) in eastern Oregon. This inventory, conducted by the Pacific Northwest Research Station of the USDA Forest Service, was intensified to meet increased need for more information about the juniper resource than was available in previous inventories. A...

  8. Timber resources of southwest Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricia M. Bassett

    1979-01-01

    This report presents statistics from a 1973 inventory of timber resources of Douglas County and from a 1974 inventory of timber resources of Coos, Curry, Jackson, and Josephine Counties, Oregon. Tables presented are of forest area and of timber volume, growth, and mortality.

  9. Lakeview, Oregon, Disposal Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linard, Joshua [USDOE Office of Legacy Management (LM), Washington, DC (United States); Hall, Steve [Navarro Research and Engineering, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-03-01

    9.1 Compliance Summary The Lakeview, Oregon, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Title I Disposal Site was inspected September 16 and 17, 2015. Other than some ongoing concern with erosion-control rock riprap degradation, the disposal cell was in good condition. Some minor fence repairs and vegetation removal, and minor erosion repair work along the west site fence is planned. Inspectors identified no other maintenance needs or cause for a follow-up or contingency inspection. Disposal cell riprap is evaluated annually to ensure continued long-term protection of the cell from erosion during a severe precipitation event. Degradation of the rock riprap was first observed at the site in the mid-1990s. Rock gradation monitoring of the riprap on the west side slope has been performed as part of the annual inspection since 1997 to determine the mean diameter (D50) value. As prescribed by the monitoring procedure, the rock monitoring is routinely conducted at random locations. However, at the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (NRC’s) request, the 2015 rock monitoring approach deviated from the normal procedure by using a pre-established monitoring grid in a subset area of the west side slope. This changed the monitoring approach from random sampling to biased sampling. The D50 value measured during the 2015 gradation monitoring is 2.39 inches, which falls below the original D50 design size range of 2.7–3.9 inches for the Type B size side slope riprap. At NRC’s request, rock durability monitoring was added to the gradation monitoring in 2009 to monitor durability by rock type. Results of the 2015 durability monitoring showed that74 percent of the total rock sampled is durability class code A rock with an assigned durability class of “highly durable” or durability class code B “durable” rock, and that over 90 percent of the 3-inch or larger rock is durability class code A or B. The rock durability

  10. Forward Stagewise Naive Bayes

    OpenAIRE

    Vidaurre Henche, Diego; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga Múgica, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    The naïve Bayes approach is a simple but often satisfactory method for supervised classification. In this paper, we focus on the naïve Bayes model and propose the application of regularization techniques to learn a naïve Bayes classifier. The main contribution of the paper is a stagewise version of the selective naïve Bayes, which can be considered a regularized version of the naïve Bayes model. We call it forward stagewise naïve Bayes. For comparison’s sake, we also introduce an explicitly r...

  11. 2015 Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) Oregon Lidar: Green Peter

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — WSI collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data of the Green Peter study area for the Oregon LiDAR Consortium (OLC) in Linn County, Oregon. The collection of...

  12. 2012 Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) Oregon Lidar: Green Peter

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — WSI collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data of the Green Peter study area for the Oregon LiDAR Consortium (OLC) in Linn County, Oregon. The collection of...

  13. Tsunami Preparedness in Oregon (video)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filmed and edited by: Loeffler, Kurt; Gesell, Justine

    2010-01-01

    Tsunamis are a constant threat to the coasts of our world. Although tsunamis are infrequent along the West coast of the United States, it is possible and necessary to prepare for potential tsunami hazards to minimize loss of life and property. Community awareness programs are important, as they strive to create an informed society by providing education and training. This video about tsunami preparedness in Oregon distinguishes between a local tsunami and a distant event and focus on the specific needs of this region. It offers guidelines for correct tsunami response and community preparedness from local emergency managers, first-responders, and leading experts on tsunami hazards and warnings, who have been working on ways of making the tsunami affected regions safer for the people and communities on a long-term basis. This video was produced by the US Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI).

  14. PINE CREEK ROADLESS AREA, OREGON.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, George W.; Denton, David K.

    1984-01-01

    Examination of the Pine Creek Roadless Area, Oregon indicates that there is little likelihood for the occurrence of energy or metallic mineral resources in the area. No mines or mineral prospects were identified during the investigation. Although nearby parts of Harney Basin are characterized by higher than normal heat flow, indicating that the region as a whole may have some as yet undefined potential for the occurrence of the geothermal energy resources, no potential for this resource was identified in the roadless area.

  15. Trout Creek Mountain project, Oregon

    OpenAIRE

    Hatfield, Doc; Hatfield, Connie

    1995-01-01

    The Trout Creek Mountain experience is an example of how the land and the people can win by building bridges of understanding and common interest between concerned constituencies. Love of the land, its natural resources, and realization of a need for changing grazing practices to reverse the degradation of riparian areas were the common interests that caused environmentalists, ranchers, the BLM, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to work togethe...

  16. Natural History of Oregon Coast Mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chris Maser; Bruce R. Mate; Jerry F. Franklin; C.T. Dyrness

    1981-01-01

    The book presents detailed information on the biology, habitats, and life histories of the 96 species of mammals of the Oregon coast. Soils, geology, and vegetation are described and related to wildlife habitats for the 65 terrestrial and 31 marine species. The book is not simply an identification guide to the Oregon coast mammals but is a dynamic portrayal of their...

  17. New Lepidoptera records for the Blue Mountains of eastern Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David G. Grimble; Roy C. Beckwith; Paul C. Hammond

    1993-01-01

    Black-light trap collections in mixed-coniferous forests in eastern Oregon resulted in the identification of one Arctiidae, six Noctuidae, and one Geometridae species not previously known to occur in Oregon. The ranges of 18 other species of Noctuidae, known previously in Oregon from only the Cascade and Coast Ranges, were extended to northeastern Oregon.

  18. Locally Weighted Naive Bayes

    OpenAIRE

    Frank, Eibe; Hall, Mark; Pfahringer, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    Despite its simplicity, the naive Bayes classifier has surprised machine learning researchers by exhibiting good performance on a variety of learning problems. Encouraged by these results, researchers have looked to overcome naive Bayes primary weakness - attribute independence - and improve the performance of the algorithm. This paper presents a locally weighted version of naive Bayes that relaxes the independence assumption by learning local models at prediction time. Experimental results s...

  19. Landslide assessment of Newell Creek Canyon, Oregon City, Oregon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Growney, L.; Burris, L.; Garletts, D.; Walsh, K. (Portland State Univ., OR (United States). Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    A study has been conducted in Newell Creek Canyon near Oregon City, Oregon, T3S, T2S, R2E. A landslide inventory has located 53 landslides in the 2.8 km[sup 2] area. The landslides range in area from approximately 15,000m[sup 2] to 10m[sup 2]. Past slides cover an approximate 7% of the canyon area. Landslide processes include: slump, slump-translational, slump-earthflow and earthflow. Hard, impermeable clay-rich layers in the Troutdale Formation form the failure planes for most of the slides. Slopes composed of Troutdale material may seem to be stable, but when cuts and fills are produced, slope failure is common because of the perched water tables and impermeable failure planes. Good examples of cut and fill failures are present on Highway 213 which passes through Newell Creek Canyon. Almost every cut and fill has failed since the road construction began. The latest failure is in the fill located at mile-post 2.1. From data gathered, a slope stability risk map was generated. Stability risk ratings are divided into three groups: high, moderate and low. High risk of slope instability is designated to all landslides mapped in the slide inventory. Moderate risk is designated to slopes in the Troutdale Formation greater than 8[degree]. Low risk is designated to slopes in the Troutdale Formation less than 8[degree].

  20. DESCHUTES CANYON ROADLESS AREA, OREGON.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, George W.; Winters, Richard A.

    1984-01-01

    An examination of the Deschutes Canyon Roadless Area, Oregon indicated that the area is devoid of mines and active mineral prospects or claims and that there is little likelihood for the occurrence of metallic or nonmetallic mineral resources. There is no evidence to indicate that mineral fuels are present in the roadless area. Nearby parts of central Jefferson County on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation are characterized by higher-than-normal heat flow and by numerous thermal springs, some of which have been partly developed. This may indicate that the region has some as yet undefined potential for the development of geothermal energy.

  1. Cascade Mountain Range in Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrod, David R.

    2016-01-01

    The Cascade mountain system extends from northern California to central British Columbia. In Oregon, it comprises the Cascade Range, which is 260 miles long and, at greatest breadth, 90 miles wide (fig. 1). Oregon’s Cascade Range covers roughly 17,000 square miles, or about 17 percent of the state, an area larger than each of the smallest nine of the fifty United States. The range is bounded on the east by U.S. Highways 97 and 197. On the west it reaches nearly to Interstate 5, forming the eastern margin of the Willamette Valley and, farther south, abutting the Coast Ranges. 

  2. An Annual Report to the Legislature on Oregon Public Schools. Oregon Statewide Report Card. 2014-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oregon Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The Oregon Statewide Report Card is an annual publication required by law (ORS 329.115), which reports on the state of public schools and their progress towards the goals of the Oregon Educational Act for the 21st Century. The purpose of the Oregon Report Card is to monitor trends among school districts and Oregon's progress toward achieving the…

  3. Wakasa Bay Weather Forecast Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The AMSR-E Wakasa Bay Field Campaign was conducted over Wakasa Bay, Japan, in January and February, 2003. The Wakasa Bay Field Campaign includes joint research...

  4. Annual changes in the song of the bowhead whale Balaena mysticetus in Disko Bay, Western Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Lee

    each season. However, it is more likely that sexual selection drives the changes in the song of the bowhead whales like it has been suggested for humpback whales (Tyack 1981). Disko Bay is an aggregation area for adult animals and new visual observations of sexual behaviour together with the presence......presented by Outi at: Acoustic Communication by Animals, 2nd International Conference, August 12-15, 2008, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon, USAAnnual changes in the song of the bowhead whale Balaena mysticetusin Disko Bay, Western GreenlandOuti Tervo and Mads F. Christoffersen, Arctic...... of Biology, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, DenmarkBowhead whale Balaena mysticetus acoustic behaviour has been a target of several investigations, primarily from recordings of the Bering Sea population near Alaska (Ljungblad et al 1980, Clark and Johnson 1984, Cummings and Holliday 1987) with a few...

  5. eBay.com

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engholm, Ida

    2014-01-01

    Celebrated as one of the leading and most valuable brands in the world, eBay has acquired iconic status on par with century-old brands such as Coca-Cola and Disney. The eBay logo is now synonymous with the world’s leading online auction website, and its design is associated with the company...

  6. Sprague River Oregon Centerline Sycan 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the U.S....

  7. Sprague River Oregon Centerline North Fork 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the U.S....

  8. Opportunities for silvicultural treatment in western Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin D. MacLean

    1980-01-01

    A recent Forest Survey inventory of western Oregon has been analyzed to determine the extent of physical opportunities to increase wood production through silvicultural treatment. Results are presented by owner group and by geographic unit.

  9. Sprague River Oregon Built Features 1968

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the U.S....

  10. Sprague River Oregon Centerline North Fork 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the U.S....

  11. Sprague River Oregon Centerline North Fork 1968

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the U.S....

  12. Sprague River Oregon Centerline Sycan 1940

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the U.S....

  13. Sprague River Oregon Centerline Sycan 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the U.S....

  14. DCS Hydrology Submission for Lincoln County, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The hydrology dataset for Lincoln County, Oregon includes proposed 10-, 50-, 100-, and 500-year discharges for Salmon River, Schooner Creek, Drift Creek, Siletz...

  15. 2015 Oregon Department Forestry Lidar: Northwest OR

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — GeoTerra, Inc. was selected by Oregon Department of Forestry to provide Lidar remote sensing data including LAZ files of the classified Lidar points and surface...

  16. Sprague River Oregon Centerline North Fork 1975

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the U.S....

  17. Sprague River Oregon Centerline Sycan circa 1870

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the U.S....

  18. Sprague River Oregon Centerline Sycan 1968

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the U.S....

  19. Sprague River Oregon Built Features 1940

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the U.S....

  20. Sprague River Oregon Centerline South Fork 1975

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the U.S....

  1. Sprague River Oregon Centerline Sycan 1975

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the U.S....

  2. Why the Oregon CCO experiment could founder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecker, Eric C

    2014-08-01

    The most recent Oregon Medicaid experiment is the boldest attempt yet to limit health care spending. Oregon's approach using a Medicaid waiver from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services utilizes global payments with two-sided risk at two levels - coordinated care organizations (CCOs) and the state. Equally important, the Oregon experiment mandates coverage of medical, behavioral, and dental health care using flexible coverage, with the locus of delivery innovation focused at the individual CCO level and with financial consequences for quality-of-care metrics. But insightful design alone is insufficient to overcome the vexing challenge of cost containment on a two- to five-year time horizon; well-tuned execution is also necessary. There are a number of reasons that the Oregon CCO model faces an uphill struggle in implementing the envisioned design. Copyright © 2014 by Duke University Press.

  3. Northern Oregon 6 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 6-second North Coast Oregon Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 6-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is...

  4. Central Oregon 6 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 6-second Central Coastal Oregon Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 6-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is...

  5. Floodplain Mapping Submission for Oregon County, MO

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for Oregon County, MO. The City of Thayer and the Missouri State Emergency Management...

  6. Oregon High Desert Discovery : An Overview

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a plan to link five BLM and FWS areas in southeast Oregon in order to provide better services for visitors. In order to most effectively and efficiently...

  7. Sprague River Oregon Centerline South Fork 1940

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Sprague River drains 4090 square kilometers in south-central Oregon before flowing into the Williamson River and upper Klamath Lake. In cooperation with the U.S....

  8. Coastal subsidence in Oregon, USA during the giant Cascadia earthquake of AD 1700

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkes, A.D.; Horton, B.P.; Nelson, A.R.; Vane, C.H.; Sawai, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative estimates of land-level change during the giant AD 1700 Cascadia earthquake along the Oregon coast are inferred from relative sea-level changes reconstructed from fossil foraminiferal assemblages preserved within the stratigraphic record. A transfer function, based upon a regional training set of modern sediment samples from Oregon estuaries, is calibrated to fossil assemblages in sequences of samples across buried peat-mud and peat-sand contacts marking the AD 1700 earthquake. Reconstructions of sample elevations with sample-specific errors estimate the amount of coastal subsidence during the earthquake at six sites along 400 km of coast. The elevation estimates are supported by lithological, carbon isotope, and faunal tidal zonation data. Coseismic subsidence at Nehalem River, Nestucca River, Salmon River, Alsea Bay, Siuslaw River and South Slough varies between 0.18 m and 0.85 m with errors between 0.18 m and 0.32 m. These subsidence estimates are more precise, consistent, and generally lower than previous semi-quantitative estimates. Following earlier comparisons of semi-quantitative subsidence estimates with elastic dislocation models of megathrust rupture during great earthquakes, our lower estimates for central and northern Oregon are consistent with modeled rates of strain accumulation and amounts of slip on the subduction megathrust, and thus, with a magnitude of 9 for the AD 1700 earthquake.

  9. Integrating naive Bayes and FOIL

    OpenAIRE

    Landwehr, Niels; Kersting, Kristian; De Raedt, Luc

    2007-01-01

    A novel relational learning approach that tightly integrates the naive Bayes learning scheme with the inductive logic programming rule-learner FOIL is presented. In contrast to previous combinations that have employed naive Bayes only for post-processing the rule sets, the presented approach employs the naive Bayes criterion to guide its search directly. The proposed technique is implemented in the NFOIL and TFOIL systems, which employ standard naive Bayes and tree augmented naive Bayes model...

  10. Hammond Bay Biological Station

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Hammond Bay Biological Station (HBBS), located near Millersburg, Michigan, is a field station of the USGS Great Lakes Science Center (GLSC). HBBS was established by...

  11. Humboldt Bay Orthoimages

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set consists of 0.5-meter pixel resolution, four band orthoimages covering the Humboldt Bay area. An orthoimage is remotely sensed image data in which...

  12. Biscayne Bay Alongshore Epifauna

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Field studies to characterize the alongshore epifauna (shrimp, crabs, echinoderms, and small fishes) along the western shore of southern Biscayne Bay were started in...

  13. Channel centerline for the Rogue River, Oregon in 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Rogue River drains 13,390 square kilometers of southwestern Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean near the town of Gold Beach, Oregon. The Rogue River...

  14. 2012 Oregon Lidar Consortium (OLC) Lidar: Keno (OR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Watershed Sciences, Inc. (WSI) collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data of the Oregon Keno Study Area for the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral...

  15. Research notes : study recommends changes to Oregon's driver improvement program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of the Oregon Department of Transportation-Driver and Motor Vehicle Services (DMV) Driver Improvement Program (DIP) is to improve traffic safety by temporarily restricting unsafe drivers or removing them from Oregons highways through t...

  16. Mammal Observations-Oregon OCS Floating Wind Farm Site

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of the Oregon OCS Data Release presents marine mammal observations from U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) field activity 2014-607-FA in the Oregon Outer...

  17. Channel centerline for the Rogue River, Oregon in 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Rogue River drains 13,390 square kilometers of southwestern Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean near the town of Gold Beach, Oregon. The Rogue River...

  18. 2007 Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DoGAMI) LiDAR: Northwest Oregon and Portland Metro Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Watershed Sciences, Inc. collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data for the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DoGAMI) and the Oregon...

  19. Klamath Falls geothermal field, Oregon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lienau, P.J.; Culver, G.; Lund, J.W.

    1989-09-01

    Klamath Falls, Oregon, is located in a Known Geothermal Resource Area which has been used by residents, principally to obtain geothermal fluids for space heating, at least since the turn of the century. Over 500 shallow-depth wells ranging from 90 to 2,000 ft (27 to 610 m) in depth are used to heat (35 MWt) over 600 structures. This utilization includes the heating of homes, apartments, schools, commercial buildings, hospital, county jail, YMCA, and swimming pools by individual wells and three district heating systems. Geothermal well temperatures range from 100 to 230{degree}F (38 to 110{degree}C) and the most common practice is to use downhole heat exchangers with city water as the circulating fluid. Larger facilities and district heating systems use lineshaft vertical turbine pumps and plate heat exchangers. Well water chemistry indicates approximately 800 ppM dissolved solids, with sodium sulfate having the highest concentration. Some scaling and corrosion does occur on the downhole heat exchangers (black iron pipe) and on heating systems where the geo-fluid is used directly. 73 refs., 49 figs., 6 tabs.

  20. Trichinella surveillance in black bears (Ursus americanus) from Oregon, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortenson, J A; Kent, M L; Fowler, D R; Chomel, B B; Immell, D A

    2014-01-01

    We used serology and muscle digestion to test black bears (Ursus americanus) from western Oregon, USA, for Trichinella. Results indicate black bears in Oregon are not part of a sylvatic cycle for Trichinella, and risk of human exposure to Trichinella larvae from eating black bear meat from Oregon appears low.

  1. Oregon geology - parent of the soil, foundation for the vine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Ray

    2006-01-01

    This presentation describes USGS geologic mapping in western Oregon, geologic map products, a thumbnail sketch of geologic history, a discussion of new mapping in progress in northwest Oregon, a tour of northwest Oregon geologic units, their relation to new American Viticultural Areas, and online sources of information.

  2. Oregon spotted frog (Rana pretiosa) monitoring in the Oregon Cascades 2012-2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Michael J.; Pearl, Christopher A.; Mccreary, Brome; Galvan, Stephanie; Rowe, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    This dataset contains information from visual encounter surveys conducted between 2012 and 2016 by USGS as part of an ongoing Oregon spotted frog (Rana pretiosa) monitoring effort in the Oregon Cascade Mountain Range. We surveyed 91 sites using a rotating frame design in the Klamath and Deschutes Basins, Oregon, which encompass most of the species' core extant range. Data consist of spotted frog counts aggregated by date, location, and life stage, as well as data on environmental conditions at the time of each survey.

  3. Creating Open Textbooks: A Unique Partnership between Oregon State University Libraries and Press and Open Oregon State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwell, Faye A.; Fisher, Dianna M.

    2016-01-01

    This article presents Oregon State University's experience launching an innovative Open Textbook initiative in spring 2014. The partners, Open Oregon State and the Oregon State University Libraries and Press, aimed to reduce the cost of course materials for students while ensuring the content created was peer-reviewed and employed multimedia…

  4. Bayes and the Law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, Norman; Neil, Martin; Berger, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Although the last forty years has seen considerable growth in the use of statistics in legal proceedings, it is primarily classical statistical methods rather than Bayesian methods that have been used. Yet the Bayesian approach avoids many of the problems of classical statistics and is also well suited to a broader range of problems. This paper reviews the potential and actual use of Bayes in the law and explains the main reasons for its lack of impact on legal practice. These include misconceptions by the legal community about Bayes' theorem, over-reliance on the use of the likelihood ratio and the lack of adoption of modern computational methods. We argue that Bayesian Networks (BNs), which automatically produce the necessary Bayesian calculations, provide an opportunity to address most concerns about using Bayes in the law.

  5. Evolving extended naive Bayes classifiers

    OpenAIRE

    Klawonn, Frank; Angelov, Plamen

    2006-01-01

    Naive Bayes classifiers are a very simple, but often effective tool for classification problems, although they are based on independence assumptions that do not hold in most cases. Extended naive Bayes classifiers also rely on independence assumptions, but break them down to artificial subclasses, in this way becoming more powerful than ordinary naive Bayes classifiers. Since the involved computations for Bayes classifiers are basically generalised mean value calculations, they easily render ...

  6. Oregon Spotted Frog (Rana pretiosa) Monitoring in the Oregon Cascades 2012-2016

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset contains information from visual encounter surveys conducted between 2012 and 2016 by USGS as part of an ongoing Oregon spotted frog (Rana pretiosa)...

  7. 2009 Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) Oregon Lidar: Willamette Valley

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Oregon Department of Geology & Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) contracted with Watershed Sciences, Inc. to collect high resolution topographic LiDAR data for...

  8. 2015 Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) Oregon Lidar DEM: Upper Rogue 3DEP

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Quantum Spatial collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data for the Oregon LiDAR Consortium (OLC) Upper Rogue 2015 study area. The collection of high...

  9. 2016 Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) Oregon Lidar: McKenzie River

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Quantum Spatial collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data for the Oregon LiDAR Consortium (OLC) McKenzie River study area. This study area is located near...

  10. 2016 Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) Oregon Lidar DEM: McKenzie River

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Quantum Spatial collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data for the Oregon LiDAR Consortium (OLC) McKenzie River study area. This study area is located near...

  11. 2013 Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) Oregon Lidar: Big Windy

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In July of 2013, lightning strikes ignited three wildfires in southwest Oregon that became known as the Big Windy Complex. The fires were fully contained by the end...

  12. 2012 Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) Lidar: Rogue River Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — WSI has collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data of the Rogue River Study Area for the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI),...

  13. 2015 Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) Oregon Lidar DEM: Upper Umpqua

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The dataset encompasses 2209.5 square miles in southwestern Oregon. The highest hit digital surface models (DSM) represent the earth's surface with all vegetation...

  14. 2014 Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) Oregon Lidar: Metro Portland, OR

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The dataset encompasses 1221.6 square miles in portions of the greater Portland Metro area in the state of Oregon. The highest hit digital surface models (DSM)...

  15. 2014 Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) Oregon Lidar DEM: Metro Portland, OR

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The dataset encompasses 1221.6 square miles in portions of the greater Portland Metro area in the state of Oregon. The highest hit digital surface models (DSM)...

  16. 2009 Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) Oregon Lidar: North Coast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) contracted with Watershed Sciences, Inc. to collect high resolution topographic LiDAR data for...

  17. 2008 Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) Lidar: Lake Billy Chinook, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Oregon Department of Geology & Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) contracted with Watershed Sciences, Inc. to collect high resolution topographic LiDAR data for...

  18. Oregon Spotted Frog (Rana pretiosa) Monitoring in the Oregon Cascades 2012-2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset contains information from visual encounter surveys conducted between 2012 and 2015 by USGS as part of an ongoing Oregon spotted frog (Rana pretiosa)...

  19. Oregon Spotted Frog Monitoring in the Oregon Cascades 2012-2016

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset contains information from visual encounter surveys conducted between 2012 and 2016 by USGS as part of an ongoing Oregon spotted frog (Rana pretiosa)...

  20. 2009 Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) Oregon Lidar: North Coast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Oregon Department of Geology & Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) contracted with Watershed Sciences, Inc. to collect high resolution topographic LiDAR data for...

  1. Neurocysticercosis in Oregon, 1995–2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Christopher J.; Kohn, Melvin A.

    2004-01-01

    The unexpected death of a teenager from neurocysticercosis prompted an investigation of this disease in Oregon. We found 89 hospitalizations, 43 newly diagnosed cases, and 6 deaths from 1995 to 2000. At least five cases occurred in persons who had not traveled or lived outside the United States. Enhanced surveillance for neurocysticercosis is warranted. PMID:15109424

  2. Indicators of cull in western Oregon conifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul E. Aho

    1982-01-01

    Descriptions and color photographs of important fungal sporophores (conks), other indicators of cull (wounds), and associated decays in western Oregon conifers are provided to aid timber markers, cruisers, and scalers in identifying them. Cull factors are given for the indicators by tree species.

  3. Timber resources of Douglas County, Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin D. MacLean

    1976-01-01

    This report summarizes a 1973 timber resource inventory of Douglas County, Oregon. Detailed tables of forest area, timber volume, growth, mortality, and cut are presented. A discussion of the present resource situation highlights the condition of cutover lands and the opportunities for silvicultural treatment.

  4. Juniper for Streambank Stabilization in Eastern Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy R. Sheeter; Errol W. Claire

    1989-01-01

    Cut juniper trees (Juniperous osteosperma Hook.) anchored along eroded streambanks proved beneficial in stabilizing 96 percent of the erosion on eight streams evaluated in eastern Oregon over a 14-year-period. Juniper revetment was a successful substitute for costly rock structures on straight or slightly curved banks, but failed when placed on outside curves or when...

  5. Distribution of Pacific Marten in Coastal Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katie M Moriarty; John D Bailey; Sharon E Smythe; Jake Verschuyl

    2016-01-01

    Information on the distribution of rare and little known species is critical for managers and biologists challenged with species conservation in an uncertain future. Pacific Martens (Martes caurina) historically resided throughout Oregon and northern California’s coastal forests, but were considered extinct until 1996 when a population in northern...

  6. Riparian Protection Rules for Oregon Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    George G. Ice; Robert L. Beschta; Raymond S. Craig; James R. Sedell

    1989-01-01

    Forest Practice Rules under the Oregon Forest Practices Act were modified in 1987 to increase protection of riparian areas adjacent to timber harvest operations. These modifications addressed concerns about water quality protection and retaining trees as sources of large woody debris for future stream channel structure. The rule changes triggered debate about the...

  7. Myxomatosis in domestic rabbits in Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, N M; Holmes, H T

    1977-09-15

    An epizootic of myxomatosis involved 26 rabbitries in western Oregon. Major clinical signs were inflammation and edema of the eyelids, conjunctiva, and anogenital area. Mortality ranged from 20 to 50%. On histologic examination, intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies were readily apparent in the epithelial cells of the conjunctiva. Lymphoid depletion of the spleen was also a common finding.

  8. Teaching Biochemistry Online at Oregon State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahern, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    A strategy for growing online biochemistry courses is presented based on successes in ecampus at Oregon State University. Four free drawing cards were key to the effort--YouTube videos, iTunes U online free course content, an Open Educational Resource textbook--Biochemistry Free and Easy, and a fun set of educational songs known as the Metabolic…

  9. Down by the Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Elizabeth; Tunks, Karyn; Hardman, Kacie

    2017-01-01

    The Pelican's Nest, located near Mobile Bay in the Gulf of Mexico, is a science center supported by a local educational foundation. Programs are geared toward marine wildlife and the coastal habitat with an emphasis on hands-on learning for students in grades K-6. The director of the science center conducts daily classroom labs and discovery trips…

  10. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey, Medford Quadrangle Oregon. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-04-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over ten (10) areas over northern California and southwestern Oregon. These include the 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles of Roseburg, Medford, Weed, Alturas, Redding, Susanville, Ukiah, and Chico along with the 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ areas of the Coos Bay quadrangle and the Crescent City/Eureka areas combined. This report discusses the results obtained over the Medford, Oregon, map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of three miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately twelve miles apart. A total of 16,880.5 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 2925 line miles are in this quadrangle. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

  11. Richards Bay effluent pipeline

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lord, DA

    1986-07-01

    Full Text Available 3815 9 D A Lord Department of Oceanography University of Port Elizabeth P 0 Box 1600 PORT ELIZABETH 6000 N D Geldenhuys Department of Environment Affairs Private Bag X9005 CAPE TOWN 8000 Cover: Richards Bay from the air showing city... of major concern identified in the effluent are the large volume of byproduct calcium sulphate (phosphogypsum) which would smother marine life, high concentrations of fluoride highly toxic to marine life, heavy metals, chlorinated organic material...

  12. 75 FR 73121 - Bandon Marsh, Nestucca Bay, and Siletz Bay National Wildlife Refuges, Coos, Tillamook, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-29

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Bandon Marsh, Nestucca Bay, and Siletz Bay National Wildlife Refuges, Coos... prepare a comprehensive conservation plan (CCP) for the Bandon Marsh, Nestucca Bay, and Siletz Bay... ``Bandon Marsh, Nestucca Bay, and Siletz Bay CCP'' in the subject line of the message. Fax: Attn: Project...

  13. Rhabdochlamydia spp. in an Oregon raptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouffroy, Sophie J; Schlueter, Andrew H; Bildfell, Robert J; Rockey, Daniel D

    2016-07-01

    PCR-based approach was used to examine the rate of Chlamydia positivity in raptors from wild bird rehabilitation centers in Oregon. Three of 82 birds were identified as positive for Chlamydia with this PCR. Sequence analysis of 16S ribosomal DNA from 2 of these birds confirmed the presence of DNA from phylum Chlamydiae. One bird was positive for Chlamydia psittaci in both choanal and cloacal swabs. The second bird, a louse-infested red-tailed hawk, had evidence of choanal colonization by "Candidatus Rhabdochlamydia" spp. Our study describes evidence of this Chlamydia-like organism in the United States. This survey also suggests that the carriage rate of C. psittaci is low in raptors in Oregon wild bird rehabilitation centers, and that care must be taken in the design of PCR primers for phylum Chlamydiae such that colonization by insect endosymbionts is not mistaken for an infection by known chlamydial pathogens. © 2016 The Author(s).

  14. TEMPERATURE RELATIONS OF CENTRAL OREGON MARINE INTERTIDAL INVERTEBRATES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MARINE BIOLOGY, OREGON), (* INVERTEBRATES , ECOLOGY), SEA WATER, TIDES, SURFACE TEMPERATURE, DIURNAL VARIATIONS, TEMPERATURE, ECHINODERMATA, GASTROPODA, PELECYPODA, BARNACLES, SALINITY, REPRODUCTION(PHYSIOLOGY)

  15. Geothermal research, Oregon Cascades: Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priest, G.R.; Black, G.L.

    1988-10-27

    Previous USDOE-funded geothermal studies have produced an extensive temperature gradient and heat flow data base for the State of Oregon. One of the important features identified as a result of these studies is a rapid transition from heat flow values on the order of 40 mW/m/sup 2/ in the Willamette Valley and Western Cascades to values of greater than or equal to100 mW/m/sup 2/ in the High Cascades and the eastern portion of the Western Cascades. These data indicate that the Cascade Range in Oregon has potential as a major geothermal province and stimulated much of the later work completed by government agencies and private industry. Additional data generated as a result of this grant and published in DOGAMI Open-File Report 0-86-2 further define the location and magnitude of this transition zone. In addition, abundant data collected from the vicinity of Breitenbush and Austin Hot Springs have permitted the formulation of relatively detailed models of these hydrothermal systems. These models are published in DOGAMI Open-File Report 0-88-5. Task 1.2 of the Deliverables section of Amendment M001 is fulfilled by DOGAMI publication GMS-48, Geologic map of the McKenzie Bridge quadrangle, Lane County, Oregon. This map was printed in October, 1988, and is part of the final submission to USDOE. 8 refs.

  16. BCDC Bay Trail Alignment 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The Bay Trail provides easily accessible recreational opportunities for outdoor enthusiasts, including hikers, joggers, bicyclists and skaters. It also offers a...

  17. Genetic characteristics of red foxes In northeastern Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory A Green; Benjamin N Sacks; Leonard J Erickson; Keith B Aubry

    2017-01-01

    The Rocky Mountain Red Fox (Vulpes vulpes macroura), once common in the Blue Mountains ecoregion of northeastern Oregon, was considered rare in eastern Oregon by the 1930s and thought to be extirpated by the 1960s, when putatively new Red Fox populations began to appear. Although the new foxes were long presumed to be nonnative (originating from...

  18. Seasonal species composition of invertebrates in several Oregon streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamela E. Porter; William R. Meehan

    1987-01-01

    The invertebrate communities ofeight Oregon streams were sampled seasonally from 1974 to 1976. Benthic, drift, and two types of aerial-trap samples were collected. Occurrence and percentage composition are summarized by sample type, season, and geographic area (coastal, Cascade, central, and eastern Oregon). Within 276 families, 426 taxa were identified; the 20...

  19. Potential effects of climate change on Oregon crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    This talk will discuss: 1) potential changes in the Pacific Northwest climate with global climate change, 2) how climate change can affect crops, 3) the diversity of Oregon agriculture, 4) examples of potential response of Oregon crops – especially dryland winter wheat, and 5) br...

  20. Oregon's High School Dropouts: Examining the Economic and Social Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Emily Anne

    2010-01-01

    This analysis presents the public costs of high school dropouts in Oregon. It examines how dropouts in the state dramatically impact state finances through reduced tax revenues, increased Medicaid costs, and high incarceration rates. This study describes how much high school dropouts cost Oregon's tax-payers each year, and how much could be saved…

  1. Aspen restoration in the Blue Mountains of northeast Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diane M. Shirley; Vicky Erickson

    2001-01-01

    In the Blue Mountains of northeast Oregon, quaking aspen is on the western fringe of its range. It exists as small, scattered, remnant stands of rapidly declining trees. Although little is known about the historic distribution of aspen in Oregon, it is believed that stands were once larger and more widely distributed. Decline of the species is attributed to fire...

  2. A method for examining the impacts of Oregon land use laws on forest lands and farmlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    David L. Azuma; Gary Lettman; Erica Hanson

    2009-01-01

    Over the past 8 years, the Pacific Northwest Research Station Forest Inventory and Analysis unit, in conjunction with the Oregon Department of Forestry, Oregon Department of Agriculture, and Oregon Department of Land Conservation and Development, has researched the effect of Oregon's land use laws on the conversion and development of land. The studies have used...

  3. Annual Coded Wire Tag Program; Oregon Missing Production Groups, 1997 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Mark A.; Mallette, Christine; Murray, William M.

    1998-03-01

    This annual report is in fulfillment of contract obligations with Bonneville Power Administration which is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's Annual Coded Wire Tag Program - Oregon Missing Production Groups Project. Tule stock fall chinook were caught primarily in British Columbia and Washington ocean, and Oregon freshwater fisheries. Up-river bright stock fall chinook contributed primarily to Alaska and British Columbia ocean commercial, and Columbia River gillnet and other freshwater fisheries. Contribution of Rogue stock fall chinook released in the lower Columbia River occurred primarily in Oregon ocean commercial and Columbia river gillnet fisheries. Willamette stock spring chinook contributed primarily to Alaska and British Columbia ocean commercial, Oregon freshwater sport and Columbia River gillnet fisheries. Willamette stock spring chinook released by CEDC contributed to similar ocean fisheries, but had much higher catch in gillnet fisheries than the same stocks released in the Willamette system. Up-river stocks of spring chinook contributed almost exclusively to Columbia River sport fisheries and other freshwater recovery areas. The up-river stocks of Columbia River summer steelhead contributed primarily to the Columbia River gillnet and other freshwater fisheries. Coho ocean fisheries from Washington to California were closed or very limited from 1994 through 1997 (1991 through 1994 broods). This has resulted in a greater average percent of catch for other fishery areas. Coho stocks released by ODFW below Bonneville Dam contributed mainly to Oregon and Washington ocean, Columbia Gillnet and other freshwater fisheries. Coho stocks released in the Klaskanine River and Youngs Bay area had similar ocean catch, but much higher contribution to gillnet fisheries than the other coho releases. Coho stocks released above Bonneville Dam had similar contribution to ocean fisheries as other coho releases. However, they

  4. WINDIGO-THIELSEN ROADLESS AREA, OREGON.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrod, David R.; Benham, John R.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a mineral survey indicate that the Windigo-Thielsen Roadless Area, in Oregon has little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral or fossil fuel resources. Abundant cinder deposits occur in the area, but numerous other large volume deposits are available in the region, closer to markets. The geothermal potential of the High Cascades province cannot be realistically evaluated without data on the subsurface thermal and hydrologic regime that can only be provided by deep drill holes. Several deep holes could be drilled outside the roadless areas of the High Cascades from which extrapolations of the geothermal potential of the province could be made.

  5. District-heating system, La Grande, Oregon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-01-01

    The area suggested for district heating feasibility study encompassed slightly over 400 acres extending north and south from the geographic center of the city. This district was subdivided into 8 areas, which include the Grande Ronde Hospital, Eastern Oregon State College, La Grande school district, one institutional area, one commercial area and three residential areas. Basic space heating loads developed for the various areas after a survey by county personnel and computation using a computer program form the basis for this economic feasibility study.

  6. H11605: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Approach to Coss Bay to Empire, Oregon, 2007-03-20

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  7. Bayes multiple decision functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wensong; Peña, Edsel A

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with the problem of simultaneously making many (M) binary decisions based on one realization of a random data matrix X. M is typically large and X will usually have M rows associated with each of the M decisions to make, but for each row the data may be low dimensional. Such problems arise in many practical areas such as the biological and medical sciences, where the available dataset is from microarrays or other high-throughput technology and with the goal being to decide which among of many genes are relevant with respect to some phenotype of interest; in the engineering and reliability sciences; in astronomy; in education; and in business. A Bayesian decision-theoretic approach to this problem is implemented with the overall loss function being a cost-weighted linear combination of Type I and Type II loss functions. The class of loss functions considered allows for use of the false discovery rate (FDR), false nondiscovery rate (FNR), and missed discovery rate (MDR) in assessing the quality of decision. Through this Bayesian paradigm, the Bayes multiple decision function (BMDF) is derived and an efficient algorithm to obtain the optimal Bayes action is described. In contrast to many works in the literature where the rows of the matrix X are assumed to be stochastically independent, we allow a dependent data structure with the associations obtained through a class of frailty-induced Archimedean copulas. In particular, non-Gaussian dependent data structure, which is typical with failure-time data, can be entertained. The numerical implementation of the determination of the Bayes optimal action is facilitated through sequential Monte Carlo techniques. The theory developed could also be extended to the problem of multiple hypotheses testing, multiple classification and prediction, and high-dimensional variable selection. The proposed procedure is illustrated for the simple versus simple hypotheses setting and for the composite hypotheses setting

  8. USGS Tampa Bay Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, K.K.; Cronin, T. M.; Crane, M.; Hansen, M.; Nayeghandi, A.; Swarzenski, P.; Edgar, T.; Brooks, G.R.; Suthard, B.; Hine, A.; Locker, S.; Willard, D.A.; Hastings, D.; Flower, B.; Hollander, D.; Larson, R.A.; Smith, K.

    2007-01-01

    Many of the nation's estuaries have been environmentally stressed since the turn of the 20th century and will continue to be impacted in the future. Tampa Bay, one the Gulf of Mexico's largest estuaries, exemplifies the threats that our estuaries face (EPA Report 2001, Tampa Bay Estuary Program-Comprehensive Conservation and Management Plan (TBEP-CCMP)). More than 2 million people live in the Tampa Bay watershed, and the population constitutes to grow. Demand for freshwater resources, conversion of undeveloped areas to resident and industrial uses, increases in storm-water runoff, and increased air pollution from urban and industrial sources are some of the known human activities that impact Tampa Bay. Beginning on 2001, additional anthropogenic modifications began in Tampa Bat including construction of an underwater gas pipeline and a desalinization plant, expansion of existing ports, and increased freshwater withdrawal from three major tributaries to the bay. In January of 2001, the Tampa Bay Estuary Program (TBEP) and its partners identifies a critical need for participation from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in providing multidisciplinary expertise and a regional-scale, integrated science approach to address complex scientific research issue and critical scientific information gaps that are necessary for continued restoration and preservation of Tampa Bay. Tampa Bay stakeholders identified several critical science gaps for which USGS expertise was needed (Yates et al. 2001). These critical science gaps fall under four topical categories (or system components): 1) water and sediment quality, 2) hydrodynamics, 3) geology and geomorphology, and 4) ecosystem structure and function. Scientists and resource managers participating in Tampa Bay studies recognize that it is no longer sufficient to simply examine each of these estuarine system components individually, Rather, the interrelation among system components must be understood to develop conceptual and

  9. Northeast Oregon Hatchery Project, Final Siting Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, Montgomery

    1995-03-01

    This report presents the results of site analysis for the Bonneville Power Administration Northeast Oregon Hatchery Project. The purpose of this project is to provide engineering services for the siting and conceptual design of hatchery facilities for the Bonneville Power Administration. The hatchery project consists of artificial production facilities for salmon and steelhead to enhance production in three adjacent tributaries to the Columbia River in northeast Oregon: the Grande Ronde, Walla Walla, and Imnaha River drainage basins. Facilities identified in the master plan include adult capture and holding facilities; spawning incubation, and early rearing facilities; full-term rearing facilities; and direct release or acclimation facilities. The evaluation includes consideration of a main production facility for one or more of the basins or several smaller satellite production facilities to be located within major subbasins. The historic and current distribution of spring and fall chinook salmon and steelhead was summarized for the Columbia River tributaries. Current and future production and release objectives were reviewed. Among the three tributaries, forty seven sites were evaluated and compared to facility requirements for water and space. Site screening was conducted to identify the sites with the most potential for facility development. Alternative sites were selected for conceptual design of each facility type. A proposed program for adult holding facilities, final rearing/acclimation, and direct release facilities was developed.

  10. Evaluation of Beginner Driver Education in Oregon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Mayhew

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Although driver education (DE is widely accepted as an effective teen driver safety measure and widely available in the United States, Canada and elsewhere, evaluations have generally failed to show that such formal programs actually produce safer drivers. To address the issue of safety effects as part of a larger investigation, two studies were conducted to examine whether the Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT-approved DE program was associated with reductions in collisions and convictions. In the first study, DE status among a relatively small sample of teens who completed an online survey was not found to have a significant effect on collisions and convictions. In the second study, of a much larger population of teen drivers, DE status was associated with a lower incidence of collisions and convictions. On balance, this suggests that the safety effects of DE are either neutral, based on the results of the first Oregon study, or cautiously optimistic based on the results of the second study. The implications of these findings are discussed in terms of making improvements in DE that are evidence-based, and the need for further evaluation to establish that improved and new programs meet their safety objectives.

  11. 33 CFR 165.1195 - Regulated Navigation Area; Humboldt Bay Bar Channel and Humboldt Bay Entrance Channel, Humboldt...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...; Humboldt Bay Bar Channel and Humboldt Bay Entrance Channel, Humboldt Bay, California. 165.1195 Section 165... Channel and Humboldt Bay Entrance Channel, Humboldt Bay, California. (a) Location. The Regulated Navigation Area (RNA) includes all navigable waters of the Humboldt Bay Bar Channel and the Humboldt Bay...

  12. Eutrophication in the Chesapeake Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulanowicz, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    The advantages and limitations of using remote sensing to acquire fast reliable data on the nutrient problem in the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem are discussed. Pollution effects to phytoplankton blooms during late summer and early fall months are also considered.

  13. FL BAY SPECTROUT-DIET

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Juvenile spotted seatrout and other sportfish are being monitored annually over a 6-mo period in Florida Bay to assess their abundance over time relative to...

  14. Missisquoi Bay Phosphorus Model Addendum

    Science.gov (United States)

    This technical memorandum provides results of an extended load reduction simulation. The memorandum serves as an addendum to the main Missisquoi Bay Phosphorus Mass Balance Model report prepared for the Lake Champlain Basin Program by LimnoTech in 2012

  15. Lavaca Bay 1985-1987

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Samples were collected from October 15, 1985 through June 12, 1987 in emergent marsh and non-vegetated habitats throughout the Lavaca Bay system to characterize...

  16. Constructing Puale Bay field camp

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Puale bay is located on the Pacific side of the Alaskan Peninsula across Shelikof Strait from the southern end of Kodiak Island. The weather, although often mild, is...

  17. Oregon Trail Mushrooms geothermal loan guaranty application, Malheur County, Oregon: Environmental assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-05-01

    The action assessed is the guaranty of a loan by the Geothermal Loan Guaranty Office of the US Department of Energy (DOE) to finance the construction and operation of a mushroom-growing facility that will use geothermal (hot) water for process and space heat. The project consists of two separate facilities: a growing facility located just outside of the eastern limit of the city of Vale, Oregon (Malheur County, Oregon) and a composting facility located about 6.4 km (4 miles) southwest of the city limits (also in Malheur County, Oregon). Five test wells have been drilled into the geothermal resource at the growing site. Either well No. 4 or well No. 5 will serve as a production well. All geothermal fluids will be reinjected into the geothermal aquifer, so either well No. 3 will be used for this purpose, wells Nos. 1 and 2 will be deepened, or a new well will be drilled on the site. A cold-water well will be drilled at the growing site, and another will be drilled at the composting site. The environmental effects of the proposed project are not expected to be significant.

  18. A Geographically Variable Water Quality Index Used in Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunnette, D. A.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the procedure developed in Oregon to formulate a valid water quality index which accounts for the specific conditions in the water body of interest. Parameters selected include oxygen depletion, BOD, eutrophication, dissolved substances, health hazards, and physical characteristics. (CS)

  19. Landslide Inventory for the Little North Santiam River Basin, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This geodatabase is an inventory of existing landslides in the Little North Santiam River Basin, Oregon (2009). Each landslide feature shown has been classified...

  20. 2009 Oregon Parks and Recreation Department Lidar: Columbia River

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data set represents the lidar elevations along the Columbia River corridor in Oregon, including portions of the following counties: Gilliam, Hood River,...

  1. Taxi Regulatory Revision in Portland, Oregon : A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-01

    Interest in taxi regulatory revision stems from the taxicab's potential to complement or to be an alternative to conventional fixed-route transit. Taxi regulatory revision in Portland, Oregon, and other cities reflects the current awareness to reduce...

  2. Port Orford, Oregon Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Port Orford, Oregon Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model....

  3. Garibaldi, Oregon Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Garibaldi, Oregon Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model. MOST...

  4. Baskett Slough - Oregon White Oak Restoration- North Butte

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Willamette Valley National Wildlife Refuge Complex (WVNWRC) holds some of the largest and best examples of Oregon white oak habitat remaining in the Valley....

  5. Newport, Oregon Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Newport, Oregon Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model. MOST...

  6. Florence, Oregon Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Florence, Oregon Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model. MOST...

  7. Aerial photo mosaic of Hunter Creek, Oregon in 1940

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Hunter Creek is an unregulated system that drains 115 square kilometers of southwestern Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean south of the town of Gold Beach,...

  8. 2010 Oregon Parks and Recreation Department Lidar: Cottonwood Canyon

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set represents the lidar elevations in portions of Gilliam and Sherman Counties, Oregon. This data set covers 35,902 acres and was collected between May 13...

  9. Oregon: a guide to geothermal energy development. [Includes glossary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Justus, D.; Basescu, N.; Bloomquist, R.G.; Higbee, C.; Simpson, S.

    1980-06-01

    The following subjects are covered: Oregons' geothermal potential, exploration methods and costs, drilling, utilization methods, economic factors of direct use projects, and legal and institutional setting. (MHR)

  10. Erosion and deposition for Fanno Creek, Oregon 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 2010, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began investigating the sources and sinks of organic matter in Fanno Creek, a tributary of the Tualatin River, Oregon....

  11. GSFLOW model of the upper Deschutes Basin, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A three-dimensional integrated groundwater/surface-water model was developed for the upper Deschutes Basin in central Oregon to better understand groundwater and...

  12. Seaside, Oregon 1/3 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 1/3-second Seaside Oregon Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 1/3-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is...

  13. Aerial photo mosaic of Hunter Creek, Oregon in 1965

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Hunter Creek is an unregulated system that drains 115 square kilometers of southwestern Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean south of the town of Gold Beach,...

  14. Final Critical Habitat for Oregon Spotted Frog (Rana pretiosa)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — These data identify, in general, the areas of FINAL critical habitat for Rana pretiosa (Oregon Spotted Frog). Maps published in the Federal Register 2016.

  15. 2015 Oregon Department Forestry Lidar DEM: Northwest OR

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — GeoTerra, Inc. was selected by Oregon Department of Forestry to provide Lidar remote sensing data including LAZ files of the classified Lidar points and surface...

  16. Channel centerline for the Coquille River, Oregon in 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Coquille River system is an unregulated system that encompasses 2,745 square kilometers of southwestern Oregon and flows into the Pacific Ocean near the town of...

  17. Channel centerline for Hunter Creek, Oregon in 1965

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Hunter Creek is an unregulated system that drains 115 square kilometers of southwestern Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean south of the town of Gold Beach,...

  18. Silviculture of mixed conifer forests in eastern Oregon and Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    K.W. Seidel; P.H. Cochran

    1981-01-01

    The silviculture of mixed conifer forests in eastern Oregon and Washington is described. Topics discussed include ecological setting, damaging agents, silviculture, and management. The relevant literature is presented, along with unpublished research, experience, and observations. Research needs are also proposed.

  19. Oregon High Desert Interpretive Center : Economic feasibility and impact analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a proposal to construct a High Desert Interpretive Center to inform visitors to Harney County, Oregon of the opportunities for education, recreation and...

  20. Oregon Tidal Wetland vegetation and edaphic data 2010 - 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Data includes edaphic and vegetation field data from four Oregon tidal wetlands. National Wetlands Inventory (NWI) classification: low marsh, high marsh, and...

  1. Backscatter-Oregon OCS Floating Wind Farm Site

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This Data Release contains data from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) survey of the Oregon outer Continental shelf (OCS) Floating Wind Farm Site in 2014. The...

  2. Bathymetry Hillshade-Oregon OCS Floating Wind Farm Site

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This Data Release contains data from the USGS survey of the Oregon OCS Floating Wind Farm Site in 2014. The shaded-relief raster was generated from bathymetry data...

  3. Contours-Oregon OCS Floating Wind Farm Site

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data release contains data from the USGS field activity 2014-607-FA, a survey of the Oregon Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Floating Wind Farm Site in 2014. The...

  4. Investigation of persistent seabird mortalities along the Oregon Coast

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — From 1978 until 1997, Oregon experienced large annual die-offs of common murres (Uria aalge) from July to October. The mortality was predominantly among juveniles,...

  5. Oregon Crest-to-Coast Environmental Monitoring Transect Dataset

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The US Environmental Protection Agency - Western Ecology Division (EPA) has been monitoring above- and belowground climate data from 23 locations along an Oregon...

  6. Oregon Spotted Frog (Rana pretiosa) Monitoring at Jack Creek 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset contains information from mark-recapture surveys conducted in 2015 by USGS as part of an ongoing Oregon spotted frog (Rana pretiosa) monitoring effort...

  7. Newport, Oregon 1/3 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 1/3-second Newport, Oregon Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 1/3-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is...

  8. Status of Oregon's Bull Trout.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchanan, David V.; Hanson, Mary L.; Hooton, Robert M.

    1997-10-01

    Limited historical references indicate that bull trout Salvelinus confluentus in Oregon were once widely spread throughout at least 12 basins in the Klamath River and Columbia River systems. No bull trout have been observed in Oregon's coastal systems. A total of 69 bull trout populations in 12 basins are currently identified in Oregon. A comparison of the 1991 bull trout status (Ratliff and Howell 1992) to the revised 1996 status found that 7 populations were newly discovered and 1 population showed a positive or upgraded status while 22 populations showed a negative or downgraded status. The general downgrading of 32% of Oregon's bull trout populations appears largely due to increased survey efforts and increased survey accuracy rather than reduced numbers or distribution. However, three populations in the upper Klamath Basin, two in the Walla Walla Basin, and one in the Willamette Basin showed decreases in estimated population abundance or distribution.

  9. Geologic Observations-Oregon OCS Floating Wind Farm Site

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of the Oregon Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Floating Windfarm Suite Data Release presents geological observations from video collected on U.S. Geological...

  10. Hydrographic Data from Oregon Waters, 1970 - 1971 (NODC Accession 7400004)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data were collected by Oregon State University personnel aboard the R/V YAQUINA and the R/V CAYUSE. Most of the cruises were concerned with surveying hydrographic...

  11. NOAA Ship Oregon II Underway Meteorological Data, Near Real Time

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Ship Oregon II Underway Meteorological Data (Near Real Time, updated daily) are from the Shipboard Automated Meteorological and Oceanographic System (SAMOS)...

  12. NOAA Ship Oregon II Underway Meteorological Data, Quality Controlled

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Ship Oregon II Underway Meteorological Data (delayed ~10 days for quality control) are from the Shipboard Automated Meteorological and Oceanographic System...

  13. Clean Energy Works Oregon Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob, Andria [City of Portland; Cyr, Shirley [Clean Energy Works

    2013-12-31

    In April 2010, the City of Portland received a $20 million award from the U.S. Department of Energy, as part of the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant program. This award was appropriated under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), passed by President Obama in 2009. DOE’s program became known as the Better Buildings Neighborhood Program (BBNP). The BBNP grant objectives directed the City of Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability (BPS) as the primary grantee to expand the BPS-led pilot program, Clean Energy Works Portland, into Clean Energy Works Oregon (CEWO), with the mission to deliver thousands of home energy retrofits, create jobs, save energy and reduce carbon dioxide emissions.The Final Technical Report explores the successes and lessons learned from the first 3 years of program implementation.

  14. MOUNT HOOD WILDERNESS AND ADJACENT AREAS, OREGON.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, T.E.C.; Causey, J.D.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Mount Hood Wilderness, Oregon, was conducted. Geochemical data indicate two areas of substantiated mineral-resource potential containing weak epithermal mineralization: an area of the north side of Zigzag Mountain where vein-type lead-zinc-silver deposits occur and an area of the south side of Zigzag Mountain, where the upper part of a quartz diorite pluton has propylitic alteration associated with mineralization of copper, gold, silver, lead, and zinc in discontinuous veins. Geothermal-resource potential for low- to intermediate-temperature (less than 248 degree F) hot-water systems in the wilderness is probable in these areas. Part of the wilderness is classified as a Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA), which is considered to have probable geothermal-resource potential, and two parts of the wilderness have been included in geothermal lease areas.

  15. A field guide to Newberry Volcano, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenson, Robert A.; Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; McKay, Daniele

    2009-01-01

    Newberry Volcano is located in central Oregon at the intersection of the Cascade Range and the High Lava Plains. Its lavas range in age from ca. 0.5 Ma to late Holocene. Erupted products range in composition from basalt through rhyolite and cover ~3000 km2. The most recent caldera-forming eruption occurred ~80,000 years ago. This trip will highlight a revised understanding of the volcano's history based on new detailed geologic work. Stops will also focus on evidence for ice and flooding on the volcano, as well as new studies of Holocene mafic eruptions. Newberry is one of the most accessible U.S. volcanoes, and this trip will visit a range of lava types and compositions including tholeiitic and calc-alkaline basalt flows, cinder cones, and rhyolitic domes and tuffs. Stops will include early distal basalts as well as the youngest intracaldera obsidian flow.

  16. Newberry Volcano—Central Oregon's Sleeping Giant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; Stovall, Wendy K.; Ramsey, David W.; Ewert, John W.; Jensen, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    Hidden in plain sight, Oregon's massive Newberry Volcano is the largest volcano in the Cascades volcanic arc and covers an area the size of Rhode Island. Unlike familiar cone-shaped Cascades volcanoes, Newberry was built into the shape of a broad shield by repeated eruptions over 400,000 years. About 75,000 years ago a major explosion and collapse event created a large volcanic depression (caldera) at its summit. Newberry last erupted about 1,300 years ago, and present-day hot springs and geologically young lava flows indicate that it could reawaken at any time. Because of its proximity to nearby communities, frequency and size of past eruptions, and geologic youthfulness, U.S. Geological Survey scientists are working to better understand volcanic activity at Newberry and closely monitor the volcano for signs of unrest.

  17. Floating Offshore Wind in Oregon: Potential for Jobs and Economic Impacts in Oregon Coastal Counties from Two Future Scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, Tony [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Keyser, David [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tegen, Suzanne [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-07-01

    This analysis examines the employment and potential economic impacts of large-scale deployment of offshore wind technology off the coast of Oregon. This analysis examines impacts within the seven Oregon coastal counties: Clatsop, Tillamook, Lincoln, Lane, Douglas, Coos, and Curry. The impacts highlighted here can be used in county, state, and regional planning discussions and can be scaled to get a general sense of the economic development opportunities associated with other deployment scenarios.

  18. BOBMEX: The Bay of Bengal Monsoon Experiment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhat, G.S.; Gadgil, S.; Kumar, P.V.H.; Kalsi, S.R.; Madhusoodanan, P.; Murty, V.S.N.; Rao, C.V.K.P.; RameshBabu, V.; Rao, L.V.G.; Rao, R.R.; Ravichandran, M.; Reddy, K.G.; Rao, P.Sanjeeva; Sengupta, D.; Sikka, D.R.; Swain, J.; Vinayachandran, P.N.

    , ocean, and their interface to gain deeper insight into some of the processes that govern the variability of organized convection over the bay. Simultaneous time series observations were carried out in the northern and southern Bay of Bengal from ships...

  19. Humboldt Bay Benthic Habitats 2009 Aquatic Setting

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Humboldt Bay is the largest estuary in California north of San Francisco Bay and represents a significant resource for the north coast region. Beginning in 2007 the...

  20. Humboldt Bay, California Benthic Habitats 2009 Geoform

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Humboldt Bay is the largest estuary in California north of San Francisco Bay and represents a significant resource for the north coast region. Beginning in 2007 the...

  1. Humboldt Bay, California Benthic Habitats 2009 Biotic

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Humboldt Bay is the largest estuary in California north of San Francisco Bay and represents a significant resource for the north coast region. Beginning in 2007 the...

  2. Humboldt Bay, California Benthic Habitats 2009 Geodatabase

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Humboldt Bay is the largest estuary in California north of San Francisco Bay and represents a significant resource for the north coast region. Beginning in 2007 the...

  3. 33 CFR 100.112 - Swim the Bay, Narragansett Bay, Narragansett, RI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Swim the Bay, Narragansett Bay, Narragansett, RI. 100.112 Section 100.112 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND..., Narragansett Bay, Narragansett, RI. (a) Regulated area. All waters of the East Passage of Narragansett Bay...

  4. 77 FR 70891 - Safety Zone; Bay Bridge Construction, San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-28

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Bay Bridge Construction, San Francisco Bay..., CA in support of the Bay Bridge Construction Safety Zone from November 1, 2012 through July 31, 2013.... 1221 et seq.). CALTRANS will sponsor the Bay Bridge Construction Safety Zone on November 1, 2012...

  5. Bayes linear statistics, theory & methods

    CERN Document Server

    Goldstein, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Bayesian methods combine information available from data with any prior information available from expert knowledge. The Bayes linear approach follows this path, offering a quantitative structure for expressing beliefs, and systematic methods for adjusting these beliefs, given observational data. The methodology differs from the full Bayesian methodology in that it establishes simpler approaches to belief specification and analysis based around expectation judgements. Bayes Linear Statistics presents an authoritative account of this approach, explaining the foundations, theory, methodology, and practicalities of this important field. The text provides a thorough coverage of Bayes linear analysis, from the development of the basic language to the collection of algebraic results needed for efficient implementation, with detailed practical examples. The book covers:The importance of partial prior specifications for complex problems where it is difficult to supply a meaningful full prior probability specification...

  6. Contaminant transport in Massachusetts Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butman, Bradford

    Construction of a new treatment plant and outfall to clean up Boston Harbor is currently one of the world's largest public works projects, costing about $4 billion. There is concern about the long-term impact of contaminants on Massachusetts Bay and adjacent Gulf of Maine because these areas are used extensively for transportation, recreation, fishing, and tourism, as well as waste disposal. Public concern also focuses on Stellwagen Bank, located on the eastern side of Massachusetts Bay, which is an important habitat for endangered whales. Contaminants reach Massachusetts Bay not only from Boston Harbor, but from other coastal communities on the Gulf of Maine, as well as from the atmosphere. Knowledge of the pathways, mechanisms, and rates at which pollutants are transported throughout these coastal environments is needed to address a wide range of management questions.

  7. Hierarchical mixtures of naive Bayes classifiers

    OpenAIRE

    Wiering, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    Naive Bayes classifiers tend to perform very well on a large number of problem domains, although their representation power is quite limited compared to more sophisticated machine learning algorithms. In this pa- per we study combining multiple naive Bayes classifiers by using the hierar- chical mixtures of experts system. This system, which we call hierarchical mixtures of naive Bayes classifiers, is compared to a simple naive Bayes classifier and to using bagging and boosting for combining ...

  8. The Zoo, Benchmarks & You: How To Reach the Oregon State Benchmarks with Zoo Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002

    This document aligns Oregon state educational benchmarks and standards with Oregon Zoo resources. Benchmark areas examined include English, mathematics, science, social studies, and career and life roles. Brief descriptions of the programs offered by the zoo are presented. (SOE)

  9. Analysis of the Connect Oregon program through two project selection cycles : final report, August 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    The Oregon Legislature passed a law establishing the Multimodal Transportation Fund in 2005. The fund was part of what : became known as the ConnectOregon program, with the purpose of making public and private investments in aviation, : marine, rail,...

  10. Wetted channel and bar features for the Rogue River, Oregon in 1967 and 1969

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Rogue River drains 13,390 square kilometers of southwestern Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean near the town of Gold Beach, Oregon. The Rogue River...

  11. Report on Oregon Spotted Frog Egg Mass Surveys 2013-2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Oregon spotted frogs (Rana pretiosa) were once common across wetlands throughout western Washington and Oregon and were found in northern California and southern...

  12. 76 FR 7853 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Delisting From Oregon Patient Safety Commission

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Delisting From Oregon Patient Safety Commission AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), HHS. ACTION: Notice of delisting. SUMMARY: Oregon Patient Safety Commission: AHRQ has accepted a...

  13. Seismic vulnerability of Oregon state highway bridges : mitigation strategies to reduce major mobility risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    The Oregon Department of Transportation and Portland State University evaluated the seismic : vulnerability of state highway bridges in western Oregon. The study used a computer program : called REDARS2 that simulated the damage to bridges within a t...

  14. Wetted channel and bar features for the Rogue River, Oregon in 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Rogue River drains 13,390 square kilometers of southwestern Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean near the town of Gold Beach, Oregon. The Rogue River...

  15. Channel centerline for the Rogue River, Oregon in 1967 and 1969

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Rogue River drains 13,390 square kilometers of southwestern Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean near the town of Gold Beach, Oregon. The Rogue River...

  16. Wetted channel and bar features for the Rogue River, Oregon in 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Rogue River drains 13,390 square kilometers of southwestern Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean near the town of Gold Beach, Oregon. The Rogue River...

  17. A new subspecies of Chamaea fasciata (Wrentit) from Oregon (Aves: Timaliinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, M. Ralph

    1992-01-01

    Geographic variation in plumage color of Chamaea fasciata (Wrentit) from northern California and southern Oregon is related to climate. A new subspecies, Chamaea fasciata margra, is described from a disjunct population of southern interior Oregon. Colonization of C. fasciata in interior Oregon was perhaps from birds crossing coniferous forests via isolated balds of Ceonothus. Recent increases of Wrentits in interior Oregon may be in response to habitat alterations (deforestation, fires) and concurrent global warming.

  18. Pygmy rabbit surveys on state lands in Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagar, Joan; Lienkaemper, George

    2007-01-01

    The pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis) is classified by the federal government as a species of concern (i.e., under review by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for consideration as a candidate for listing as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act) because of its specialized habitat requirements and evidence of declining populations. The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) lists pygmy rabbits as “sensitive-vulnerable,” meaning that protective measures are needed if sustainable populations are to be maintained over time (Oregon Natural Heritage Program, 2001). The Oregon Natural Heritage Program considers this species to be threatened with extirpation from Oregon. Pygmy rabbits also are a species of concern in all the other states where they occur (NatureServe, 2004). The Washington population, known as the Columbia Basin pygmy rabbit, was listed as endangered by the federal government in 2003. Historically, pygmy rabbits have been collected from Deschutes, Klamath, Crook, Lake, Grant, Harney, Baker, and Malheur Counties in Oregon. However, the geographic range of pygmy rabbit in Oregon may have decreased in historic times (Verts and Carraway, 1998), and boundaries of the current distribution are not known. Not all potentially suitable sites appear to be occupied, and populations are susceptible to rapid declines and local extirpation (Weiss and Verts, 1984). In order to protect and manage remaining populations on State of Oregon lands, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife needs to identify areas currently occupied by pygmy rabbits, as well as suitable habitats. The main objective of this survey was document to presence or absence of pygmy rabbits on state lands in Malheur, Harney, Lake, and Deschutes counties. Knowledge of the location and extent of pygmy rabbit populations can provide a foundation for the conservation and management of this species in Oregon. The pygmy rabbit is just one of a suite of species of concern

  19. Oregon Low-Temperature-Resource Assessment Program. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priest, G.R.; Black, G.L.; Woller, N.M.

    1981-01-01

    Numerous low-temperature hydrothermal systems are available for exploitation throughout the Cascades and eastern Oregon. All of these areas have heat flow significantly higher than crustal averages and many thermal aquifers. In northeastern Oregon, low temperature geothermal resources are controlled by regional stratigraphic aquifers of the Columbia River Basalt Group at shallow depths and possibly by faults at greater depths. In southeastern Oregon most hydrothermal systems are of higher temperature than those of northeastern Oregon and are controlled by high-angle fault zones and layered volcanic aquifers. The Cascades have very high heat flow but few large population centers. Direct use potential in the Cascades is therefore limited, except possibly in the cities of Oakridge and Ashland, where load may be great enough to stimulate development. Absence of large population centers also inhibits initial low temperature geothermal development in eastern Oregon. It may be that uses for the abundant low temperature geothermal resources of the state will have to be found which do not require large nearby population centers. One promising use is generation of electricity from freon-based biphase electrical generators. These generators will be installed on wells at Vale and Lakeview in the summer of 1982 to evaluate their potential use on geothermal waters with temperatures as low as 80/sup 0/C (176/sup 0/F).

  20. Medical Marijuana Legalization and Marijuana Use Among Youth in Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschall, Mallie J; Grube, Joel W; Biglan, Anthony

    2017-06-01

    While the legalization of marijuana for medical and recreational use has raised concerns about potential influences on marijuana use and beliefs among youth, few empirical studies have addressed this issue. We examined the association between medical marijuana patients and licensed growers per 1000 population in 32 Oregon counties from 2006 to 2015, and marijuana use among youth over the same period. We obtained data on registered medical marijuana patients and licensed growers from the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program and we obtained data on youth marijuana use, perceived parental disapproval, and demographic characteristics from the Oregon Healthy Teens Survey. Across 32 Oregon counties, the mean rate of marijuana patients per 1000 population increased from 2.9 in 2006 to 18.3 in 2015, whereas the grower rate increased from 3.8 to 11.9. Results of multi-level analyses indicated significant positive associations between rates of marijuana patients and growers per 1000 population and the prevalence of past 30-day marijuana use, controlling for youth demographic characteristics. The marijuana patient and grower rates were also inversely associated with parental disapproval of marijuana use, which decreased from 2006 to 2015 and acted as a mediator. These findings suggest that a greater number of registered marijuana patients and growers per 1000 population in Oregon counties was associated with a higher prevalence of marijuana use among youth from 2006 to 2015, and that this relationship was partially attributable to perceived norms favorable towards marijuana use.

  1. Practice-based research: the Oregon experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyiendo, J; Lloyd, C; Haas, M

    2001-01-01

    Practice-based research links community-based physicians and their patients with investigators at academic institutions. In 1992, Western States Chiropractic College developed an infrastructure, the Center for Outcomes Studies, to support practice-based research. The Low Back Pain Study, undertaken in collaboration with Oregon Health Sciences University, 111 medical physicians, and 60 chiropractors, relied on the Center for Outcomes Studies infrastructure for support in project implementation and maintenance. Challenges, many of them critical, were a regular occurrence: dealing with unforeseen obstacles, establishing and maintaining physician buy-in, establishing and maintaining staff buy-in, implementing the protocol as directed and with minimal intrusiveness, maintaining enthusiasm for the project over time, and knowing where (and where not) to allocate the Study's time, energy, and money. Strategies were developed to overcome or minimize the impact of problems on a case-by-case basis. Successful practice-based research requires an awareness of study design issues and an appreciation of clinical practice logistics and priorities. Every effort must be made to include doctors and office staff in the implementation of the study in a manner that minimizes the study's intrusiveness and its economic impact on office organization, routine, and personnel. Investigators must understand and accept that there will be areas of the research environment over which they have no direct control. The challenges will be many, but they will be diminished by the rewards.

  2. Geothermal Exploration of Newberry Volcano, Oregon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waibel, Albert F. [Columbia Geoscience, Pasco, WA (United States); Frone, Zachary S. [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States); Blackwell, David D. [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Davenport Newberry (Davenport) has completed 8 years of exploration for geothermal energy on Newberry Volcano in central Oregon. Two deep exploration test wells were drilled by Davenport on the west flank of the volcano, one intersected a hydrothermal system; the other intersected isolated fractures with no hydrothermal interconnection. Both holes have bottom-hole temperatures near or above 315°C (600°F). Subsequent to deep test drilling an expanded exploration and evaluation program was initiated. These efforts have included reprocessing existing data, executing multiple geological, geophysical, geochemical programs, deep exploration test well drilling and shallow well drilling. The efforts over the last three years have been made possible through a DOE Innovative Exploration Technology (IET) Grant 109, designed to facilitate innovative geothermal exploration techniques. The combined results of the last 8 years have led to a better understanding of the history and complexity of Newberry Volcano and improved the design and interpretation of geophysical exploration techniques with regard to blind geothermal resources in volcanic terrain.

  3. Electrical structure of Newberry Volcano, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitterman, D.V.; Stanley, W.D.; Bisdorf, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    From the interpretation of magnetotelluric, transient electromagnetic, and Schlumberger resistivity soundings, the electrical structure of Newberry Volcano in central Oregon is found to consist of four units. From the surface downward, the geoelectrical units are 1) very resistive, young, unaltered volcanic rock, (2) a conductive layer of older volcanic material composed of altered tuffs, 3) a thick resistive layer thought to be in part intrusive rocks, and 4) a lower-crustal conductor. This model is similar to the regional geoelectrical structure found throughout the Cascade Range. Inside the caldera, the conductive second layer corresponds to the steep temperature gradient and alteration minerals observed in the USGS Newberry 2 test-hole. Drill hole information on the south and north flanks of the volcano (test holes GEO N-1 and GEO N-3, respectively) indicates that outside the caldera the conductor is due to alteration minerals (primarily smectite) and not high-temperature pore fluids. On the flanks of Newberry the conductor is generally deeper than inside the caldera, and it deepens with distance from the summit. A notable exception to this pattern is seen just west of the caldera rim, where the conductive zone is shallower than at other flank locations. The volcano sits atop a rise in the resistive layer, interpreted to be due to intrusive rocks. -from Authors

  4. 78 FR 42972 - Notice of Intent To Collect Fees on the John Day River, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-18

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Intent To Collect Fees on the John Day River, Oregon AGENCY: Bureau... (River Mile 157) to Tumwater Falls (River Mile 10) stretch of the John Day River, between Service Creek, Oregon, and the confluence of the John Day River and the Columbia River, Oregon. The John Day River...

  5. Forest fire weather in western Oregon and western Washington in 1957.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen P. Cramer

    1957-01-01

    Severity of 1957 fire weather west of the Cascade Range summit in Oregon and Washington was near the average of the previous 10 years. The season (April 1 through October 31) was slightly more severe than 1956 in western Oregon and about the same as 1956 in western Washington. Spring fire weather was near average severity in both western Washington and western Oregon....

  6. 78 FR 20073 - Adequacy of Oregon's Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Permit Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-03

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 239 and 258 Adequacy of Oregon's Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Permit Program AGENCY... modification to the State of Oregon's approved Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Program. On March 22, 2004, EPA... certain municipal solid waste landfills by approved states. On June 14, 2012, Oregon submitted an...

  7. 75 FR 14461 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-25

    ... Museum of Natural and Cultural History/Oregon State Museum of Anthropology professional staff in... Natural and Cultural History/Oregon State Museum of Anthropology, it is likely that these are from the... Cultural History/Oregon State Museum of Anthropology have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 3001 (9-10...

  8. Backscatter imagery in Jobos Bay

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 1x1 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of Jobos Bay, Puerto Rico (in NAD83 UTM 19 North). The backscatter values are in relative 8-bit (0 –...

  9. Hemoflagellates of Oregon marine fishes with the description of new species of Trypanosoma and Trypanoplasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burreson, Eugene M

    2007-12-01

    Of 2,122 marine fishes representing 36 species collected in the northeastern Pacific Ocean in the vicinity of Newport, Oregon from 1971 to 1973, 541 individuals (25.5%) representing 8 species (22.2%) were infected with hemoflagellates. Four morphologically distinct trypanosomes and 3 distinct trypanoplasms were found in fishes collected offshore, but no hemoflagellates were observed in fishes from Yaquina Bay estuary. Trypanosoma pacifica was found in English sole Parophrys vetulus, Pacific sanddab Citharichthys sordidus, and slender sole Lyopsetta exilis, and survived in 5 other species after intraperitoneal injection. Trypanosoma gargantua was found in big skate Raja binoculata, and the leech Orientobdella confluens was able to transmit the trypanosome in experimental conditions. Trypanosoma khani n. sp. occurred in P. vetulus, petrale sole Eopsetta jordani, and Dover sole Microstomus pacificus. Trypanosoma murmanense was found in L. exilis collected from 200 m, but not in L. exilis collected from 80 m. Trypanoplasma beckeri parasitized the cabezon Scorpaenichthys marmoratus. Trypanoplasma bobolsoni n. sp. was found in E. jordani, L. exilis, and P. vetulus, and survived in 2 other species after intraperitoneal injection. A distinct, but unnamed trypanoplasm, was found in P. vetulus.

  10. Classification using Hierarchical Naive Bayes models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langseth, Helge; Dyhre Nielsen, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Classification problems have a long history in the machine learning literature. One of the simplest, and yet most consistently well-performing set of classifiers is the Naïve Bayes models. However, an inherent problem with these classifiers is the assumption that all attributes used to describe......, termed Hierarchical Naïve Bayes models. Hierarchical Naïve Bayes models extend the modeling flexibility of Naïve Bayes models by introducing latent variables to relax some of the independence statements in these models. We propose a simple algorithm for learning Hierarchical Naïve Bayes models...

  11. Testing the Oregon delinquency model with 9-year follow-up of the Oregon Divorce Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forgatch, Marion S; Patterson, Gerald R; Degarmo, David S; Beldavs, Zintars G

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents experimental tests of the Oregon delinquency model applied within a randomized design of an at-risk sample of single mothers and their elementary school-aged sons. In the theoretical model, ineffective parenting practices and deviant peer association serve as the primary mechanisms for growth in adolescent delinquent behavior and early arrests. Multiple-method assessments of 238 mothers and sons include delinquency as measured by teacher reports and official arrest records, parenting skills measured by observations of parent-child interactions, and deviant peer association as reported by focal boys. Analyses of the 9-year follow-up data indicate that the Oregon model of parent management training significantly reduced teacher-reported delinquency and police arrests for focal boys. As hypothesized, the experiments demonstrated that improving parenting practices and reducing contacts with deviant peers served as mediating mechanisms for reducing rates of adolescent delinquency. As predicted, there was also a significant delay in the timing of police arrests for youth in the experimental as compared to the control group.

  12. M9.1 Cascadia Subduction Zone Earthquake Tsunami Inundation Modeling of Sequim Bay and Lopez Island, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C. J.; Cakir, R.; Walsh, T. J.; LeVeque, R. J.; Adams, L. M.; Gonzalez, F. I.

    2016-12-01

    The Strait of Juan de Fuca and adjacent coastal zone are prone to tsunami hazard triggered by a M9+ Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ) earthquake. In addition to the numerous tsunami deposits observed on the outer coast, there is geological evidence for nine sandy or muddy tsunami layers deposited in last 2500-year period in a tidal marsh area of Discovery Bay, Northeastern Olympic Peninsula, Washington (Williams et al., 2005, The Holocene, v. 15, no. 1). Thus, it is important to assess the potential tsunami hazard due to a future M9+ CSZ earthquake event that may impact local communities in and near Discovery Bay area . In this study, we conducted tsunami simulations using Clawpack-GeoClaw and the earthquake source scenario M9.1 CSZ, designated as "L1" (Witter et al., 2011, Oregon DOGAMI Special Paper 43). A fine-resolution (1/3 arc-second) NOAA digital elevation model (DEM) was used to provide a high resolution tsunami inundation simulation in Sequim Bay (about 5 miles west of Discovery Bay), Clallam county and Lopez Island, San Juan County. The test gauges, set around major infrastructures and properties, provided estimates of wave height, wave velocity, and wave arrival time. The results will contribute to further improving mitigation planning and emergency response efforts of the counties.

  13. Notes from the Field: Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis Death - Oregon, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liko, Juventila; Guzman-Cottrill, Judith A; Cieslak, Paul R

    2016-01-15

    In 2015, the Oregon Health Authority was notified of the death of a boy with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE), a rare and fatal complication of measles. The patient, aged 14 years, had reportedly been vaccinated against measles in the Philippines at age 8 months. However, the patient contracted measles at age 1 year while still in the Philippines. He had been well until 2012, when his neurodegenerative symptoms began. After the diagnosis of SSPE was made, the patient remained in home hospice care until his death. Investigators from the Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Health and Science University reviewed the patient's medical records and interviewed the parents. Vaccination against measles can prevent not only acute measles and its complications, but also SSPE.

  14. Kinematics of the Sierra Nevada and Oregon Crustal Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollick, J. J.; McCaffrey, R.; Sella, G.

    2004-12-01

    Northern California contains the intersection of the NW moving Sierra Nevada block and the clockwise rotating Oregon block. Adding to the tectonic complexity of the region are the interactions of the Pacific plate, Basin and Range, California Coast Ranges, Mendocino fracture zone, San Andreas fault and the Juan de Fuca plate. Our research focuses on how the interactions of these features influence the motions of the Oregon and Sierra Nevada blocks. We processed Global Positioning System (GPS) data collected during the 1998 and 1999 National Geodetic Survey High Accuracy Reference Network (HARN) surveys and by us in 2003. Our preliminary analysis of the velocity field indicates that the Oregon crustal block is rotating clockwise relative to the Sierra Nevada block around a pole approximately west of the Mendocino Triple Junction. Our future work involves finding a more exact location of the relative pole rotation between the blocks, the degree of rotation, and how this motion is being taken up.

  15. The 3D Elevation Program: summary for Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carswell, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Elevation data are essential to a broad range of business uses, including forest resources management, wildlife and habitat management, national security, recreation, and many others. In the State of Oregon, elevation data are critical for river and stream resource management; forest resources management; water supply and quality; infrastructure and construction management; wildfire management, planning and response; natural resources conservation; and other business uses. Today, high-density light detection and ranging (lidar) data are the primary source for deriving elevation models and other datasets. The Oregon Lidar Consortium (OLC), led by the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI), has developed partnerships with Federal, State, Tribal, and local agencies to acquire quality level 1 data in areas of shared interest. The goal of OLC partners is to acquire consistent, high-resolution and high-quality statewide coverage to support existing and emerging applications enabled by lidar data.

  16. The Holy Dose: Spiritual adventures with Southern Oregon's psychedelic crusaders

    OpenAIRE

    Weber, Alex L

    2011-01-01

    Ashland, Oregon is a smart little community nestled in the foothills of the Siskiyou Mountains about 20 minutes north of the California border. Home to Southern Oregon University and host to the yearly Shakespeare Festival, Ashland is one of those places both progressive and picturesque that often occupies a top spot on waiting-room magazines' “Best Small Towns” or “Best Places to Retire” lists. It's got a walkable business district with cozy fine-dining bistros, new-age book shops and old-sc...

  17. Creating Open Textbooks: A Unique Partnership Between Oregon State University Libraries and Press and Open Oregon State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faye A. Chadwell

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This article presents Oregon State University’s experience launching an innovative Open Textbook initiative in spring 2014. The partners, Open Oregon State and the Oregon State University Libraries and Press, aimed to reduce the cost of course materials for students while ensuring the content created was peer-reviewed and employed multimedia capabilities. This initiative sought to showcase existing and emerging disciplinary strengths of the University thus creating unique course content that could be shared globally. This article briefly describes the U.S. landscape for open textbook creation and adoption. It demonstrates how this unique partnership has developed, covering barriers and benefits, and what the future could hold for new projects.

  18. The Chesapeake Bay impact structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powars, David S.; Edwards, Lucy E.; Gohn, Gregory S.; Horton, J. Wright

    2015-10-28

    About 35 million years ago, during late Eocene time, a 2-mile-wide asteroid or comet smashed into Earth in what is now the lower Chesapeake Bay in Virginia. The oceanic impact vaporized, melted, fractured, and (or) displaced the target rocks and sediments and sent billions of tons of water, sediments, and rocks into the air. Glassy particles of solidified melt rock rained down as far away as Texas and the Caribbean. Models suggest that even up to 50 miles away the velocity of the intensely hot air blast was greater than 1,500 miles per hour, and ground shaking was equivalent to an earthquake greater than magnitude 8.0 on the Richter scale. Large tsunamis affected most of the North Atlantic basin. The Chesapeake Bay impact structure is among the 20 largest known impact structures on Earth.

  19. Bayes reconstruction of missing teeth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sporring, Jon; Jensen, Katrine Hommelhoff

    2008-01-01

     We propose a method for restoring the surface of tooth crowns in a 3D model of a human denture, so that the pose and anatomical features of the tooth will work well for chewing. This is achieved by including information about the position and anatomy of the other teeth in the mouth. Our system...... contains two major parts: A statistical model of a selection of tooth shapes and a reconstruction of missing data. We use a training set consisting of 3D scans of dental cast models obtained with a laser scanner, and we have build a model of the shape variability of the teeth, their neighbors...... regularization of the log-likelihood estimate based on differential geometrical properties of teeth surfaces, and we show general conditions under which this may be considered a Bayes prior.Finally we use Bayes method to propose the reconstruction of missing data, for e.g. finding the most probable shape...

  20. Influenza in Bristol Bay, 1919

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Gilson deValpine

    2015-01-01

    The 1918 influenza pandemic has been blamed for as many as 50 million deaths worldwide. Like all major disasters, the full story of the pandemic includes smaller, less noted episodes that have not attracted historical attention. The story of the 1919 wave of the influenza pandemic in Bristol Bay Alaska is one such lost episode. It is an important story because the most accessible accounts—the Congressional Record and t...

  1. Zooplankton Biomass Data from Prince William Sound, Icy Bay and Yakutat Bay, Alaska 2010-2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset includes zooplankton biomass from Prince William Sound, Icy Bay and Yakutat Bay, Alaska. Zooplankton were sampled with a ring net (0.6 m diameter with...

  2. [Characteristics of Pahs pollution in sediments from Leizhou coastal marine area, Liusha Bay and Shenzhen Bay].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li-Rong; Sun, Sheng-Li; Ke, Sheng

    2012-04-01

    Leizhou coastal marine area, Liusha Bay and Shenzhen Bay represented open coastal area and half-closed bay, respectively. This study discussed the differences of PAHs concentration levels, spatial distribution and sources in sediments from these three marine areas. The results showed that detected ratios of 15 PAHs were 100%, and major compounds were 3-ring and 4-ring PAHs, especialy Phe, Fla, Pry and Bbf; Sigma PAHs concentration was Leizhou the outside, and the aquaculture > the non-aquaculture in Liusha Bay and Shenzhen Bay. It suggested that large-scale mariculture inside bay played an important role in PAHs pollution and might make it serious. Oil, fossil fuels and biomass burning were the dominant sources of PAHs in sediments from Leizhou coastal area, Liusha Bay and Shenzhen Bay.

  3. Timber resource statistics for Oregon, January 1, 1973.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricia M. Bassett; Grover A. Choate

    1974-01-01

    Timber resource statistics as of January 1, 1973, for the State of Oregon show total land area, commercial timberland area, and growing stock and sawtimber inventory volumes by county and owner group. Growth and removals are shown by Forest Survey inventory unit for 1972. Each National Forest is updated to January 1, 1973, as well as each Bureau of Land Management...

  4. Seasonal variation of infiltration capacities of soils in western Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael G. Johnson; Robert L. Beschta

    1981-01-01

    Infiltration capacities were 50 percent greater during fall than during summer for forest soils of western Oregon. These results contrast with those measured in other studies. In forested areas, investigators should be aware of potentially large seasonal changes in infiltration capacities. Such seasonal changes may exceed effects due to applied treatments (logging,...

  5. Emissions from prescribed burning of timber slash piles in Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emissions from burning piles of post-harvest timber slash (Douglas fir) in Grande Ronde, Oregon were sampled using an instrument platform lofted into the plume using a tether-controlled aerostat or balloon. Emissions of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane, particulate matte...

  6. 75 FR 62690 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Grants Pass, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-13

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Grants Pass, Oregon AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Audio Division, at the request of Three Rivers Broadcasting LLC...(a)(1)(A). List of Subjects in 47 CFR Part 73 Radio, Radio broadcasting. 0 For the reasons discussed...

  7. Slash smoke dispersal over western Oregon...a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    John D. Dell; Franklin R. Ward; Robert E. Lynott

    1970-01-01

    Smoke from slash burns in the Cascade Mountains during a 3-day period ofstable air conditions at lower elevations in October 1969 added little to existing air pollution in the Willamette Valley, in western Oregon. Aerial observations and weather data analysis determined that slash smoke dispersed eastward — away from the Valley. Studies of this type can help improve...

  8. Fire severity in intermittent stream drainages, Western Cascade Range, Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennifer E. Tollefson; Frederick J. Swanson; John H. Cissel

    2004-01-01

    We quantified fire severity patterns within intermittent stream drainages in a recently burned area of the central western Cascades, Oregon. Aerial photographs were used to estimate post fire live canopy cover within streamside and upland zones on the southeast and southwest-facing slopes of 33 watersheds. Live canopy cover did not differ significantly between...

  9. Geology and geomorphology of the Lower Deschutes River Canyon, Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin A. Beebee; Jim E. O' Connor; Gordon E. Grant

    2002-01-01

    This field guide is designed for geologists floating the approximately 80 kilometers (50 miles) of the Deschutes River from the Pelton-Round Butte Dam Complex west of Madras to Maupin, Oregon. The first section of the guide is a geologic timeline tracing the formation of the units that compose the canyon walls and the incision of the present canyon. The second section...

  10. 78 FR 8016 - Establishment of the Elkton Oregon Viticultural Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-05

    ... viticultural area name would cause consumer confusion. Therefore, the part 9 regulatory text set forth in the... a brand name, including a trademark, or in another label reference as to the origin of the wine... or in a brand name for wines made from grapes grown within the Elkton Oregon viticultural area will...

  11. The Oregon experiment--effects of Medicaid on clinical outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baicker, K.; Taubman, S.L.; Allen, H.L.; Bernstein, M.; Gruber, J.H.; Newhouse, J.P.; Schneider, E.C.; Wright, B.J.; Zaslavsky, A.M.; Finkelstein, A.N.; Carlson, M.; Edlund, T.; Gallia, C.; Smith, J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite the imminent expansion of Medicaid coverage for low-income adults, the effects of expanding coverage are unclear. The 2008 Medicaid expansion in Oregon based on lottery drawings from a waiting list provided an opportunity to evaluate these effects. METHODS: Approximately 2 years

  12. Landslide inventory for the Little North Santiam River Basin, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobieszczyk, Steven

    2010-01-01

    This geodatabase is an inventory of existing landslides in the Little North Santiam River Basin, Oregon (2009). Each landslide feature shown has been classified according to a number of specific characteristics identified at the time recorded in the GIS database. The classification scheme was developed by the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (Burns and Madin, 2009). Several significant landslide characteristics recorded in the database are portrayed with symbology on this map. The specific characteristics shown for each landslide are the activity of landsliding, landslide features, deep or shallow failure, type of landslide movement, and confidence of landslide interpretation. These landslide characteristics are determined primarily on the basis of geomorphic features, or landforms, observed for each landslide. This work was completed as part of the Master's thesis "Turbidity Monitoring and LiDAR Imagery Indicate Landslides are Primary Source of Suspended-Sediment Load in the Little North Santiam River Basin, Oregon, Winter 2009-2010" by Steven Sobieszczyk, Portland State University and U.S. Geological Survey. Data layers in this geodatabase include: landslide deposit boundaries (Deposits); field-verfied location imagery (Photos); head scarp or scarp flanks (Scarp_Flanks); and secondary scarp features (Scarps).The geodatabase template was developed by the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (Burns and Madin, 2009).

  13. Temporal epidemiology of sudden oak death in Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebba K. Peterson; Everett M. Hansen; Alan Kanaskie

    2015-01-01

    An effort to eradicate Phytophthora ramorum, causal agent of sudden oak death, has been underway since its discovery in Oregon forests. Using an information-theoretical approach, we sought to model yearly variation in the size of newly infested areas and dispersal distance. Maximum dispersal distances were best modeled by spring and winter...

  14. Managing interior Northwest rangelands: the Oregon Range Evaluation Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas M. Quigley; H. Reed Sanderson; Arthur R. Tiedemann

    1989-01-01

    This report is a synthesis of results from an 11-year study of the effects of increasing intensities of range management strategies on herbage production, water resources, economics, and associated resources-such as wood fiber and recreation-in Grant County, Oregon. Four intensities of management were studied on Federal land (19 grazing allotments) ranging from no...

  15. Plethodontid salamander distributions in managed forest headwaters in western Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deanna H. Olson; Matthew R. Kluber

    2014-01-01

    We examined terrestrial amphibians in managed headwater forest stands in western Oregon from 1998 to 2009. We assessed: (1) temporal and spatial patterns of species capture rates, and movement patterns with distance from streams and forest management treatments of alternative riparian buffer widths and upland thinning; (2) species survival and recapture probabilities;...

  16. Seed production and establishment of western Oregon native grasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale C. Darris

    2005-01-01

    It is well understood that native grasses are ecologically important and provide numerous benefits. However, unfavorable economics, low seed yields for some species, genetic issues, and a lack of experience behind the production and establishment of most western Oregon native grasses remain significant impediments for their expanded use. By necessity, adaptation of...

  17. Guide to the Geology of the Owyhee Region of Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittleman, Laurence R.

    In this bulletin a detailed description of a geologic region in Oregon is presented with numerous illustrations, both plates and schematic diagrams. Maps of the region as well as maps of various excursions are included in the booklet. A geologic-time unit table is presented covering the Cenozoic Era. Three excursions with included side-trips are…

  18. 1954 forest fire weather in western Oregon and Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen P. Cramer

    1954-01-01

    For the second successive fire season forest fire weather in western Oregon and Washington was far below normal severity. The low danger is reflected in record low numbers of fires reported by forestry offices of both States and by the U. S. Forest Service for their respective protection areas. Although spring and fall fire weather was near normal, a rain-producing...

  19. 75 FR 41093 - FM Table of Allotments, Maupin, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-15

    ... of Maupin Broadcasting Company, requesting the deletion of Channel 244C2 at Maupin, Oregon. We are... Order, MB Docket No. 09-130, adopted June 25, 2010, and released June 28, 2010. The full text of this... Street, SW, Room CY-B402, Washington, DC 20554, 800-378-3160 or via the company's website, http://www...

  20. Financial analysis of early stand treatments in southwest Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helge Eng; K. Norman Johnson; Roger D. Fight

    1990-01-01

    Management guidelines for economically efficient early stand treatments were developed by identifying treatments that would maximize financial returns over the rotation for coast Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco var. menziesii) in southwest Oregon. Short rotations and low stand densities (trees per acre) gave...

  1. Emergency watershed treatments on burned lands in southwestern Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ed Gross; Ivars Steinblums; Curt Ralston; Howard Jubas

    1989-01-01

    Following extensive, natural wildfires on the Siskiyou National Forest in southwest Oregon during fall 1987, numerous rehabilitation measures were applied to severely burned public and private forest watersheds. Treatments were designed to prevent offsite degradation of water quality and fisheries, to minimize soil erosion and productivity losses, and to prevent...

  2. 1955 forest fire weather in western Oregon and Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen P. Cramer

    1955-01-01

    While fire-weather severity remained low for the third successive year in western Washington, 1955 brought near normal fire weather to western Oregon for the first time since 1952. Temperatures were cooler than normal throughout the season in both half States, with record or near record lows for April, May, and July. April, July, and October were unusually rainy while...

  3. ...Toward complete use of eastern Oregon's forest resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald R. Gedney

    1963-01-01

    Eastern Oregon's economy is definitely timber oriented. Few other segments of its economy have contributed as much to its development or promise more for future growth. The greatest opportunity for expansion through use of its forest resources lies in the direction of greater product diversification and product refinement.

  4. On the Cusp: Corey Harper--University of Oregon, Eugene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Library Journal, 2004

    2004-01-01

    A recent library school graduate, Corey Harper was nominated by his colleagues at the University of Oregon (UO) because of the key role he played in implementing digital collections. Along with technical expertise, says Watson, he brought with him "[an ability to] balance idealism with expediency, the striving for perfection with the need to…

  5. Geology as destiny: cold waters run deep in western Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sally. Duncan

    2002-01-01

    The summer of 2001 brought the second-worst drought on record in Oregon, resulting in historically low streamflows and reservoir levels, stressed aquatic ecosystems, and even dramatic confrontations between irrigators and federal resource agencies in the Klamath basin. These events underscore the critical and growing importance of water availability and allocation in...

  6. Aerial sampling of emissions from biomass pile burns in Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emissions from burning piles of post-harvest timber slash in Grande Ronde, Oregon were sampled using an instrument platform lofted into the plume using a tether-controlled aerostat or balloon. Emissions of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane, particulate matter (PM2.5 µm), ...

  7. Lodgepole pine in the Blue Mountains of northeastern Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James M. Trappe; Robert W. Harris

    1958-01-01

    Lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) is a major species in northeastern Oregon. The lodgepole type covers nearly 400,000 acres in the Blue and Wallowa Mountains, and individual trees are scattered over many of the remaining six million forested acres in this area (2). The type blankets large areas in watersheds in a region where spring floods and summer...

  8. The timber resources of the Blue Mountain area, Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles L. Bolsinger; John M. Berger

    1975-01-01

    The latest inventory of the timber resources of the Blue Mountain Area of Oregon indicates that there are about 47 billion board feet of sawtimber on 4.6 million acres of commercial forest land. Public agencies administer about 76 percent of the area and hold 89 percent of the sawtimber volume; farmer and miscellaneous private ownerships account for 16 percent of the...

  9. Acorn storage alternatives tested on Oregon white oak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren D. Devine; Constance A. Harrington; Joseph M. Kraft

    2010-01-01

    We assessed various combinations of storage factors: bag type, temperature, duration, and antifungal pre-storage treatments for white oak acorn storage, using Oregon white oak (Quercus garryana Douglas ex Hook. [Fagaceae]) acorns from 7 seed sources. Acorn viability remained high (84%), even after 2 y of refrigerated storage, but the majority of...

  10. Linear dimension reduction and Bayes classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decell, H. P., Jr.; Odell, P. L.; Coberly, W. A.

    1978-01-01

    An explicit expression for a compression matrix T of smallest possible left dimension K consistent with preserving the n variate normal Bayes assignment of X to a given one of a finite number of populations and the K variate Bayes assignment of TX to that population was developed. The Bayes population assignment of X and TX were shown to be equivalent for a compression matrix T explicitly calculated as a function of the means and covariances of the given populations.

  11. Investigation of Tidal Power, Cobscook Bay, Maine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-08-01

    include Perry, Pembrook, Edmunds, Dennyville, Whiting and Trescott (See Figure 1). Located entirely in the United States at the mouth of the Bay of Fundy ...Quoddy Region because of the softer sediments in that area. Some are harvested within the bay itself, although to a much lesser extent. Lobsters are...earthquake of an intensity VIII occurring in the Bay of Fundy approximately 35 miles west of the site. Closer to the site an earthquake of intensity VII

  12. Eruptive history of South Sister, Oregon Cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierstein, J.; Hildreth, W.; Calvert, A.T.

    2011-01-01

    South Sister is southernmost and highest of the Three Sisters, three geologically dissimilar stratovolcanoes that together form a spectacular 20km reach along the Cascade crest in Oregon. North Sister is a monotonously mafic edifice as old as middle Pleistocene, Middle Sister a basalt-andesite-dacite cone built between 48 and 14ka, and South Sister is a basalt-free edifice that alternated rhyolitic and intermediate modes from 50ka to 2ka (largely contemporaneous with Middle Sister). Detailed mapping, 330 chemical analyses, and 42 radioisotopic ages show that the oldest exposed South Sister lavas were initially rhyolitic ~50ka. By ~37ka, rhyolitic lava flows and domes (72-74% SiO2) began alternating with radially emplaced dacite (63-68% SiO2) and andesite (59-63% SiO2) lava flows. Construction of a broad cone of silicic andesite-dacite (61-64% SiO2) culminated ~30ka in a dominantly explosive sequence that began with crater-forming andesitic eruptions that left fragmental deposits at least 200m thick. This was followed at ~27ka by growth of a steeply dipping summit cone of agglutinate-dominated andesite (56-60.5% SiO2) and formation of a summit crater ~800m wide. This crater was soon filled and overtopped by a thick dacite lava flow and then by >150m of dacitic pyroclastic ejecta. Small-volume dacite lavas (63-67% SiO2) locally cap the pyroclastic pile. A final sheet of mafic agglutinate (54-56% SiO2) - the most mafic product of South Sister - erupted from and drapes the small (300-m-wide) present-day summit crater, ending a summit-building sequence that lasted until ~22ka. A 20kyr-long-hiatus was broken by rhyolite eruptions that produced (1) the Rock Mesa coulee, tephra, and satellite domelets (73.5% SiO2) and (2) the Devils Chain of ~20 domes and short coulees (72.3-72.8% SiO2) from N-S vent alignments on South Sister's flanks. The compositional reversal from mafic summit agglutinate to recent rhyolites epitomizes the frequently changing compositional modes of the

  13. 78 FR 45061 - Safety Zone; Sister Bay Marina Fest Fireworks and Ski Show, Sister Bay, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-26

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Sister Bay Marina Fest Fireworks and Ski... intended to restrict vessels from a portion of Sister Bay due to a fireworks display and ski show. This... with the fireworks display and ski show in Sister Bay on August 31, 2013. DATES: This rule is effective...

  14. 78 FR 46813 - Safety Zone; Evening on the Bay Fireworks; Sturgeon Bay, WI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-02

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Evening on the Bay Fireworks; Sturgeon Bay... of Sturgeon Bay due to a fireworks display. This temporary safety zone is necessary to protect the surrounding public and vessels from the hazards associated with the fireworks display. DATES: This rule is...

  15. Increasing Diversity in the Earth Sciences (IDES) - An Oregon Effort

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Silva, S. L.; Duncan, R. A.; Wright, D. J.; de Silva, L.; Guerrero, E. F.

    2011-12-01

    The IDES (Increasing Diversity in Earth Sciences) Program is the first partnership of its kind in the state of Oregon targeted at broadening participation in the Earth Science enterprise. Funded by the National Science Foundation Opportunities to Enhance Diversity in the Geosciences program (NSF-OEDG), this partnership involves community colleges, a research university with major strengths in Earth Science research and education and an institutionalized commitment to enhancing diversity, state and federal agencies, centers of informal education, and the Oregon Space Grant Consortium, IDES has two integrated goals: 1) to increase the number of students from under-represented groups who pursue careers in Earth Science research and education, and 2) to strengthen the understanding of Earth Sciences and their relevance to society among broad and diverse segments of the population. Built around the best practices of tiered mentoring, interactive student cohort, research and education internships, and financial support, this 4-year program recruits 10 to 12 students (mainly rising juniors) each year from science majors at Oregon State University and five Oregon community colleges. The program is reaching its goals by: a) training participants in the application of geospatial to Earth Science problems of personal relevance b) immersing participants in a two-year mentored research project that involves summer internships with academic units, state and federal agencies, and centers for informal education in Oregon. c) exposing, educating, and involving participants in the breadth of Earth Science careers through contact with Earth Science professionals through mentors, a professional internship, and a learning community that includes a speaker series. d) instilling an understanding of context and relevance of the Earth Science Enterprise to the participants, their families, their communities, and the general public. We report on the first two years of this program during

  16. Investigation of Tidal Power, Cobscook Bay, Maine. Environmental Appendix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-08-01

    Nevertheless, some worms are harvested in Cobscook Bay . Lobsters are also found in Cobscook Bay , although not in sufficient numbers to support a...ring-billed gull, sanderling, black-bellied plover, semipalmated plover, least sandpiper and dowitcher. Cobscook Bay (and Bay of Fundy in general...tidal power development in the upper Bay of Fundy . Circulation between Cobscook Bay and the Gulf of Maine will be reduced resulting in decreased

  17. Hydrology of the Johnson Creek Basin, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Karl K.; Snyder, Daniel T.

    2009-01-01

    The Johnson Creek basin is an important resource in the Portland, Oregon, metropolitan area. Johnson Creek forms a wildlife and recreational corridor through densely populated areas of the cities of Milwaukie, Portland, and Gresham, and rural and agricultural areas of Multnomah and Clackamas Counties. The basin has changed as a result of agricultural and urban development, stream channelization, and construction of roads, drains, and other features characteristic of human occupation. Flooding of Johnson Creek is a concern for the public and for water management officials. The interaction of the groundwater and surface-water systems in the Johnson Creek basin also is important. The occurrence of flooding from high groundwater discharge and from a rising water table prompted this study. As the Portland metropolitan area continues to grow, human-induced effects on streams in the Johnson Creek basin will continue. This report provides information on the groundwater and surface-water systems over a range of hydrologic conditions, as well as the interaction these of systems, and will aid in management of water resources in the area. High and low flows of Crystal Springs Creek, a tributary to Johnson Creek, were explained by streamflow and groundwater levels collected for this study, and results from previous studies. High flows of Crystal Springs Creek began in summer 1996, and did not diminish until 2000. Low streamflow of Crystal Springs Creek occurred in 2005. Flow of Crystal Springs Creek related to water-level fluctuations in a nearby well, enabling prediction of streamflow based on groundwater level. Holgate Lake is an ephemeral lake in Southeast Portland that has inundated residential areas several times since the 1940s. The water-surface elevation of the lake closely tracked the elevation of the water table in a nearby well, indicating that the occurrence of the lake is an expression of the water table. Antecedent conditions of the groundwater level and autumn

  18. Galveston Bay Area : Land Barrier preliminary design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Berchum, E.C.; de Vries, P.A.L.; de Kort, R.P.J.

    2016-01-01

    The Galveston Bay Area is under significant risk from hurricane induced flooding. Ever since Hurricane Ike caused billions of damage back in 2008, the option of closing off the Galveston Bay from the Gulf of Mexico was investigated. This report, commissioned by Texas A&M University in Galveston,

  19. Unique thermal record in False Bay

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Grundlingh, ML

    1993-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade False Bay has assumed a prime position in terms of research in to large South African bays. This is manifested by investigations that cover flow conditions modelling, thermal structure, management, biology and nutrients, geology...

  20. Hierarchical mixtures of naive Bayes classifiers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiering, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    Naive Bayes classifiers tend to perform very well on a large number of problem domains, although their representation power is quite limited compared to more sophisticated machine learning algorithms. In this pa- per we study combining multiple naive Bayes classifiers by using the hierar- chical

  1. Traditional Fisheries of Antongil Bay, Madagascar | Doukakis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Madagascar's marine fisheries provide revenue and sustenance for the island nation. Antongil Bay, the largest shallow-water bay along Madagascar's eastern coast, harbors significant marine resources and is heavily utilized by traditional, artisanal (shark-fin) and industrial fisheries. Mean hourly catch rates are just under 1 ...

  2. Forest and farmland conservation effects of Oregon's (USA) land-use planning program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Jeffrey D

    2005-04-01

    Oregon's land-use planning program is often cited as an exemplary approach to forest and farmland conservation, but analyses of its effectiveness are limited. This article examines Oregon's land-use planning program using detailed spatial data describing building densities in western Oregon. An empirical model describes changes in building densities on forest and agricultural lands from 1974 to 1994, as a function of a gravity index of land's commuting distance to cities of various sizes, topographic characteristics, and zoning adopted under Oregon's land-use planning program. The effectiveness of Oregon's land-use planning program is evaluated based on the statistical significance of zoning variables and by computing estimated areas of forest and agricultural lands falling into undeveloped, low-density developed, and developed building density categories, with and without land-use zoning in effect. Results suggest that Oregon's land-use planning program has provided a measurable degree of protection to forest and agricultural lands since its implementation.

  3. Recent Results from Daya Bay

    CERN Document Server

    Zhan, Liang

    2015-01-01

    The Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment observed electron antineutrino disappearance associated with $\\theta_{13}$ with a significance better than $5\\sigma$ in 2012. The final two of eight antineutrino detectors were installed in the summer of 2012. Including the 404 days of data collected with the full detector configuration resulted in a 3.6 times increase of statistics over the previous result with the 6-AD configuration. With improvements of the systematic uncertainties and better estimation of backgrounds, Daya Bay has measured $\\sin^22\\theta_{13} = 0.084\\pm0.005$ and $|\\Delta m^2_{ee}|=2.42^{+0.10}_{-0.11}\\times 10^{-3}$~eV$^2$. This is the most precise measurement of $\\sin^22\\theta_{13}$ to date and the most precise measurement of of $|\\Delta m^2_{ee}|$ via electron antineutrino disappearance. Several other analysis results are presented, including an independent measurement of $\\theta_{13}$ using inverse-beta decays associated with neutron capture on hydrogen, a measurement of reactor antineutrino fl...

  4. Oregon OCS seafloor mapping: Selected lease blocks relevant to renewable energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Guy R.; Hemery, Lenaïg G.; Henkel, Sarah K.

    2017-05-23

    In 2014 the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) entered into Intra-agency agreement M13PG00037 to map an area of the Oregon Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) off of Coos Bay, Oregon, under consideration for development of a floating wind energy farm. The BOEM requires seafloor mapping and site characterization studies in order to evaluate the impact of seafloor and sub-seafloor conditions on the installation, operation, and structural integrity of proposed renewable energy projects, as well as to assess the potential effects of construction and operations on archaeological resources. The mission of the USGS is to provide geologic, topographic, and hydrologic information that contributes to the wise management of the Nation's natural resources and that promotes the health, safety, and well being of the people. This information consists of maps, databases, and descriptions and analyses of the water, energy, and mineral resources, land surface, underlying geologic structure, and dynamic processes of the earth.For the Oregon OCS study, the USGS acquired multibeam echo sounder and seafloor video data surrounding the proposed development site, which is 95 km2 in area and 15 miles offshore from Coos Bay. The development site had been surveyed by Solmar Hydro Inc. in 2013 under a contract with WindFloat Pacific. The USGS subsequently produced a bathymetry digital elevation model and a backscatter intensity grid that were merged with existing data collected by the contractor. The merged grids were published along with visual observations of benthic geo-habitat from the video data in an associated USGS data release (Cochrane and others, 2015).This report includes the results of analysis of the video data conducted by Oregon State University and the geo-habitat interpretation of the multibeam echo sounder (MBES) data conducted by the USGS. MBES data was published in Cochrane and others (2015). Interpretive data associated with this

  5. CO{sub 2} degassing in the Oregon Cascades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, E.R.; Manga, M. [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences; Rose, T.P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Isotope Sciences Div.

    1999-09-01

    The carbon isotope content of dissolved inorganic carbon was measured for large cold springs in the central Oregon Cascades. Low {sup 14}C activities in some of the springs are interpreted to result from the dissolution of diffuse emissions of magmatic CO{sub 2}, even though volcanic activity has not occurred in this area for more than 1300 yr. On the basis of dissolved magmatic carbon concentrations in the springs, the authors infer a diffuse magmatic CO{sub 2} degassing rate of 3.4 {times} 10{sup 5} kg/yr per kilometer of arc for the central Oregon Cascades. The CO{sub 2} flux calculated from estimates of the mean magmatic intrusion rate and experimentally determined values of CO{sub 2} content in melts is consistent with that determined from their measurements of the dissolved CO{sub 2} flux at springs.

  6. CO[sub 2] degassing in the Oregon Cascades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, E.R.; Manga, M. (Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences); Rose, T.P. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Isotope Sciences Div.)

    1999-09-01

    The carbon isotope content of dissolved inorganic carbon was measured for large cold springs in the central Oregon Cascades. Low [sup 14]C activities in some of the springs are interpreted to result from the dissolution of diffuse emissions of magmatic CO[sub 2], even though volcanic activity has not occurred in this area for more than 1300 yr. On the basis of dissolved magmatic carbon concentrations in the springs, the authors infer a diffuse magmatic CO[sub 2] degassing rate of 3.4 [times] 10[sup 5] kg/yr per kilometer of arc for the central Oregon Cascades. The CO[sub 2] flux calculated from estimates of the mean magmatic intrusion rate and experimentally determined values of CO[sub 2] content in melts is consistent with that determined from their measurements of the dissolved CO[sub 2] flux at springs.

  7. Marine nekton off Oregon and the 1997 98 El Nino

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearcy, W. G.

    2002-09-01

    Several species of migratory, warm-water, oceanic fishes invaded Oregon waters during the summer of 1997. Also, the jumbo squid ( Dosidicus gigas), common in the eastern tropical Pacific, was reported for the first time in 1997 and was caught in large numbers. The occurrence of these oceanic nekton was associated with inshore advection of anomalously warm water. During 1998, after arrival of the main El Niño signal, some warm-water coastal fishes appeared off Oregon. However, unlike observations off California, fewer species of warm-water coastal fishes were noted during the 1997-98 El Niño than during the 1982-83 El Niño.

  8. Oregon's Senate Bill 560: practical policy lessons for nurse advocates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilson Sistrom, Maria

    2010-02-01

    In response to striking rates of childhood obesity in Oregon, advocates led by a nurse lobbyist proposed legislation in 2005 to regulate junk foods in public schools. Several theories propose to explain the policy-making process, yet Senate Bill 560 (SB 560) followed a twisted course through rule making, legislative and political processes that are not well articulated in policy theory. Three overlapping mechanisms were identified in content analysis of documents and interviews with participants in the SB 560 policy process. Strategically placed legislative "banana peels," proponents' amateur advocacy, and legislative outflanking by professional lobbyists more fully characterize this policy process and better account for the failure of SB 560. Subsequent passage of the Oregon Healthy School Foods bill in the more politically conducive 2007 legislature suggest that advocacy and incremental change frameworks are less predictive of successful passage than is the ability to take advantage of political opportunities to change public health policy.

  9. Trees in the city: valuing street trees in Portland, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    G.H. Donovan; D.T. Butry

    2010-01-01

    We use a hedonic price model to simultaneously estimate the effects of street trees on the sales price and the time-on-market (TOM) of houses in Portland. Oregon. On average, street trees add $8,870 to sales price and reduce TOM by 1.7 days. In addition, we found that the benefits of street trees spill over to neighboring houses. Because the provision and maintenance...

  10. Receipt of Preventive Services After Oregon's Randomized Medicaid Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Miguel; Bailey, Steffani R; Gold, Rachel; Hoopes, Megan J; O'Malley, Jean P; Huguet, Nathalie; Heintzman, John; Gallia, Charles; McConnell, K John; DeVoe, Jennifer E

    2016-02-01

    It is predicted that gaining health insurance via the Affordable Care Act will result in increased rates of preventive health services receipt in the U.S., primarily based on self-reported findings from previous health insurance expansion studies. This study examined the long-term (36-month) impact of Oregon's 2008 randomized Medicaid expansion ("Oregon Experiment") on receipt of 12 preventive care services in community health centers using electronic health record data. Demographic data from adult (aged 19-64 years) Oregon Experiment participants were probabilistically matched to electronic health record data from 49 Oregon community health centers within the OCHIN community health information network (N=10,643). Intent-to-treat analyses compared receipt of preventive services over a 36-month (2008-2011) period among those randomly assigned to apply for Medicaid versus not assigned, and instrumental variable analyses estimated the effect of actually gaining Medicaid coverage on preventive services receipt (data collected in 2012-2014; analysis performed in 2014-2015). Intent-to-treat analyses revealed statistically significant differences between patients randomly assigned to apply for Medicaid (versus not assigned) for 8 of 12 assessed preventive services. In intent-to-treat analyses, Medicaid coverage significantly increased the odds of receipt of most preventive services (ORs ranging from 1.04 [95% CI=1.02, 1.06] for smoking assessment to 1.27 [95% CI=1.02, 1.57] for mammography). Rates of preventive services receipt will likely increase as community health center patients gain insurance through Affordable Care Act expansions. Continued effort is needed to increase health insurance coverage in an effort to decrease health disparities in vulnerable populations. Copyright © 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Idaho–Eastern Oregon Onion Industry Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Bolotova, Yuliya; Jemmett, Brian

    2010-01-01

    The Idaho–Eastern Oregon onion industry operates in a market environment characterized by a high level of onion price and supply volatility. Years of relatively high onion prices are often followed by years of very low prices which do not allow onion growers to recover their onion production costs. This feature of the industry adversely affects the profi tability of onion growers and the economic performance of their industry. This study conducts an analysis of alternative market scenarios ...

  12. The passage and initial implementation of Oregon's Measure 44

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, L.; Glantz, S.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To prepare a history of the passage and early implementation of Ballot Measure 44, "An Act to Support the Oregon Health Plan", and tobacco control policymaking in Oregon. Measure 44 raised cigarette taxes in Oregon by US$0.30 per pack, and dedicated 10% of the revenues to tobacco control.
METHODS—Data were gathered from interviews with members of the Committee to Support the Oregon Health Plan, Measure 44's campaign committee, as well as with state and local officials, and tobacco control advocates. Additional information was obtained from public documents, internal memoranda, and news reports.
RESULTS—Although the tobacco industry outspent Measure 44's supporters 7 to 1, the initiative passed with 56% of the vote. Even before the election, tobacco control advocates were working to develop an implementation plan for the tobacco control programme. They mounted a successful lobbying campaign to see that the legislature did not divert tobacco control funds to other uses. They also stopped industry efforts to limit the scope of the programme. The one shortcoming of the tobacco control forces was not getting involved in planning the initiative early enough to influence the amount of money that was devoted to tobacco control. Although public health groups provided 37% of the money it cost to pass Measure 44, only 10% of revenues were devoted to tobacco control.
CONCLUSIONS—Proactive planning and aggressive implementation can secure passage of tobacco control initiatives and see that the associated implementing legislation follows good public health practice.


Keywords: advocacy; legislation; implementation; tobacco tax PMID:10599577

  13. Blood parasites in sage-grouse from Nevada and Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Mike R; Tornquist, Susan; Giordano, Mark R

    2003-01-01

    Peripheral blood smears from 196 adult and yearling female greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) were examined for blood parasites (167 from the breeding and 29 from the brood-rearing season) to determine prevalence of blood parasites, to attempt to correlate infection with chick survival, and to establish base-line values of prevalence in sage-grouse from Nevada and Oregon (USA). Birds were captured and released on two study areas during 1999-2001; Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge (SNWR) in northwestern Nevada, and Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge (HMNAR) in southeastern Oregon. Birds from a third study area, Beaty's Butte grazing allotment (BB) in southeastern Oregon, were sampled in 2000 and 2001. Overall, 19 birds (10%) were positive for Leucocytozoon lovati (= L. bonasae), 1 (0.5%) for Plasmodium pedioecetii, and 2 (1%) for microfilariae. Although prevalence of L. lovati on HMNAR was 39% during the breeding season in 1999 and 100% during the brood-rearing season in 2000, statistically, prevalence of L. lovati among study areas and years was not different. However, there were statistical differences between capture periods. Overall, 31% of the hens were positive for L. lovati during the brood-rearing season compared to 6% during the breeding season. There was no difference in packed cell volume between infected and non-infected birds and no difference between age-classes. However, mean sage-grouse productivity on HMNAR was higher (1.6 chicks/hen) for non-infected (n = 10) compared to infected hens (0.7 chicks/hen; n = 7), during 1999. Based on these limited observations on HMNAR in 1999, the possible effects that L. lovati may have on young sage-grouse could be detrimental to sage-grouse populations in Nevada and Oregon.

  14. Characterization of leptospirosis among dogs in Oregon, 2007-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayzel, Sharon E; DeBess, Emilio E

    2016-04-15

    To characterize the demographics, exposure risks, and outcomes for dogs with leptospirosis in Oregon between 2007 and 2011 and to identify geographic and temporal distributions of known cases of canine leptospirosis within the state during this period. Retrospective descriptive epidemiological study. 72 dogs. Reports of laboratory tests for leptospirosis and zoonosis reporting forms voluntarily submitted by veterinarians to the Oregon Health Authority were evaluated to identify dogs with leptospirosis during the study period; data were also collected by examination of medical records or by telephone surveys with veterinarians from reporting facilities. 72 confirmed cases of leptospirosis were identified; surveys were completed for 65 cases. Seasonal and spatial distributions coincided with rainfall patterns for the state, with most cases diagnosed in the spring and in the western part of the state. Common exposure risks included contact with water in the environment (14/65) and contact with wildlife (14); 33 dogs had no history of known exposure risks. Among dogs with other conditions at the time of diagnosis (26/64), dermatitis, otitis, or both were the most commonly reported findings (9/26). Of 65 dogs, 44 recovered, 12 died or were euthanized because of leptospirosis, and 9 were lost to follow-up. Distribution of canine leptospirosis cases in Oregon fit the rainfall theory pattern. Dermatologic conditions were present in 9 of 64 (14%) dogs that had a diagnosis of leptospirosis; however, further investigation is needed to determine whether such conditions predispose dogs to the disease.

  15. 19 CFR 7.11 - Guantanamo Bay Naval Station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Guantanamo Bay Naval Station. 7.11 Section 7.11... TREASURY CUSTOMS RELATIONS WITH INSULAR POSSESSIONS AND GUANTANAMO BAY NAVAL STATION § 7.11 Guantanamo Bay Naval Station. Articles of foreign origin may enter the area (both land and water) of the Guantanamo Bay...

  16. THz identification and Bayes modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolnikov, Andre

    2017-05-01

    THz Identification is a developing technology. Sensing in the THz range potentially gives opportunity for short range radar sensing because THz waves can better penetrate through obscured atmosphere, such as fog, than visible light. The lower scattering of THz as opposed to the visible light results also in significantly better imaging than in IR spectrum. A much higher contrast can be achieved in medical trans-illumination applications than with X-rays or visible light. The same THz radiation qualities produce better tomographical images from hard surfaces, e.g. ceramics. This effect comes from the delay in time of reflected THz pulses detection. For special or commercial applications alike, the industrial quality control of defects is facilitated with a lower cost. The effectiveness of THz wave measurements is increased with computational methods. One of them is Bayes modeling. Examples of this kind of mathematical modeling are considered.

  17. A pollution history of Chesapeake Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, E.D.; Hodge, V.; Koide, M.; Griffin, J.; Gamble, E.; Bricker, O.P.; Matisoff, G.; Holdren, G.R.; Braun, R.

    1978-01-01

    Present day anthropogenic fluxes of some heavy metals to central Chesapeake Bay appear to be intermediate to those of the southern California coastal region and those of Narragansett Bay. The natural fluxes, however, are in general higher. On the bases of Pb-210 and Pu-239 + 240 geochronologies and of the time changes in interstitial water compositions, there is a mixing of the upper 30 or so centimeters of the sediments in the mid-Chesapeake Bay area through bioturbation by burrowing mollusks and polychaetes. Coal, coke and charcoal levels reach one percent or more by dry weight in the deposits, primarily as a consequence of coal mining operations. ?? 1978.

  18. 78 FR 14185 - Safety Zone; MODU KULLUK; Kiliuda Bay, Kodiak Island, AK to Captains Bay, Unalaska Island, AK

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-05

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; MODU KULLUK; Kiliuda Bay, Kodiak Island, AK to Captains Bay, Unalaska Island, AK AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY... in Kiliuda Bay, Kodiak Island, Alaska with planned towed transit into Captains Bay, Unalaska Island...

  19. 46 CFR 7.20 - Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block Island Sound and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block Island Sound and easterly entrance to Long Island Sound, NY. 7.20 Section 7.20... Atlantic Coast § 7.20 Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound, Buzzards Bay, Narragansett Bay, MA, Block Island...

  20. Description of gravity cores from San Pablo Bay and Carquinez Strait, San Francisco Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodrow, Donald L.; John L. Chin,; Wong, Florence L.; Fregoso, Theresa; Jaffe, Bruce E.

    2017-06-27

    Seventy-two gravity cores were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in 1990, 1991, and 2000 from San Pablo Bay and Carquinez Strait, California. The gravity cores collected within San Pablo Bay contain bioturbated laminated silts and sandy clays, whole and broken bivalve shells (mostly mussels), fossil tube structures, and fine-grained plant or wood fragments. Gravity cores from the channel wall of Carquinez Strait east of San Pablo Bay consist of sand and clay layers, whole and broken bivalve shells (less than in San Pablo Bay), trace fossil tubes, and minute fragments of plant material.

  1. Stratigraphic and microfossil evidence for a 4500-year history of Cascadia subduction zone earthquakes and tsunamis at Yaquina River estuary, Oregon, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graehl, Nicholas A; Kelsey, Harvey M.; Witter, Robert C.; Hemphill-Haley, Eileen; Engelhart, Simon E.

    2015-01-01

    intervals.The comparison of the Yaquina Bay earthquake record to similar records at other Cascadia coastal sites helps to define potential patterns of rupture for different earthquakes, although inherent uncertainty in dating precludes definitive statements about rupture length during earthquakes. We infer that in the first half of the last millennia, the northern Oregon part of the subduction zone had a different rupture history than the southern Oregon part of the subduction zone, and we also infer that at ca. 1.6 ka, two earthquakes closely spaced in time together ruptured a length of the megathrust that extends at least from southwestern Washington to southern Oregon.

  2. 77 FR 55144 - Ocean Dumping; Designation of Ocean Dredged Material Disposal Sites Offshore of Yaquina Bay, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-07

    ... site. Benthic grabs and trawl data show the ecology of the area to be that associated with sandy... Department of Land Conservation and Development (DLCD) for review on February 17, 2012. The DCLD concurred on...

  3. FL BAY SPECTROUT-POPULATION STATUS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Juvenile spotted seatrout and other sportfish are being monitored annually over a 6-mo period in Florida Bay to assess their abundance over time relative to...

  4. Watermass structure in the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sastry, J.S.; Rao, D.P.; Murty, V.S.N.; Sarma, Y.V.B.; Suryanarayana, A.; Babu, M.T.

    The distributions of temperature, salinity thermosteric anomaly, density flux function and stability along 88 degrees E in the Bay of Bengal are presented. The surface salinities showed strong gradients both horizontally and vertically in northern...

  5. Delaware River and Upper Bay Sediment Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The area of coverage consists of 192 square miles of benthic habitat mapped from 2005 to 2007 in the Delaware River and Upper Delaware Bay. The bottom sediment map...

  6. Underwater Video Sites in Jobos Bay

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Shallow-water (<30m) benthic habitat maps of the nearshore marine environment of Jobos Bay, Puerto Rico were mapped and characterized using visual interpretation...

  7. San Antonio Bay 1986-1989

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The effect of salinity on utilization of shallow-water nursery habitats by aquatic fauna was assessed in San Antonio Bay, Texas. Overall, 272 samples were collected...

  8. BENTHIC MACROFAUNAL ALIENS IN WILLAPA BAY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benthic macrofaunal samples were collected at random stations in Willapa Bay, WA, in four habitats [eelgrass (Zostera marina), Atlantic cordgrass (Spartina alterniflora), mud shrimp (Upogebia pugettensis), ghost shrimp (Neotrypaea californiensis)] in 1996 and in seven habitats (Z...

  9. Bay Scallop Spawning, Survival, Growth Records

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bay Scallops are selected and cultured according to criteria of growth and survival. Morphological attributes have also been selected to assess heretibility....

  10. Mesozoic anomalies in the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramana, M.V.; Nair, R.R.; Sarma, K.V.L.N.S.; Ramprasad, T.; Krishna, K.S.; Subrahmanyam, V.; D'Cruz, M.; Subrahmanyam, C.; Paul, J.; Subrahmanyam, A.S.; Sekhar, D.V.C.

    The analysis of 8200 line km of total magnetic intensity data in the Bay of Bengal, northeastern Indian Ocean, revealed the presence of approximately N30~'E-trending seafloor spreading type magnetic anomalies. These anomalies resemble the Mesozoic...

  11. Hydrogeomorphic Regions in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Generalized lithology (rock type) and physiography based on geologic formations were used to characterize hydrgeomorphic regions (HGMR) within the Chesapeake Bay...

  12. 2002 Willapa Bay LiDAR Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA contracted with Spencer B. Gross, Inc. (SBG) to obtain airborne LiDAR of Willapa Bay, Washington during low tide conditions. The LiDAR data was processed to...

  13. Corpus ChristiEast Matagorda Bay 1986

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Patterns of habitat utilization were compared among transplanted and natural Spartina alterniflora marshes in the Halls Lake area of Chocolate Bay in the Galveston...

  14. 2004 Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron, Michigan Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This metadata document describes the collection and processing of Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) data over an area along the coast of Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron,...

  15. Willapa Bay, Washington Benthic Habitats 1995 Biotic

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In June 1995, the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce (CREST) acquired 295 true color aerial photographs (1:12,000) of Willapa Bay, Washington, from the State of...

  16. Willapa Bay, Washington Benthic Habitats 1995 Geoform

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In June 1995, the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce (CREST) acquired 295 true color aerial photographs (1:12,000) of Willapa Bay, Washington, from the State of...

  17. Willapa Bay, Washington Benthic Habitats 1995 Substrate

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In June 1995, the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce (CREST) acquired 295 true color aerial photographs (1:12,000) of Willapa Bay, Washington, from the State of...

  18. Wastewater Out Front in Bay Restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clean Water Act programs administered by EPA and the delegated states have played a central role in the success of the wastewater sector in effectively meeting nutrient limits in the Chesapeake Bay “pollution diet” a decade early.

  19. Biscayne Bay Florida Bottlenose Dolphin Studies

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data sets include a compilation of small vessel based studies of bottlenose dolphins that reside within Biscayne Bay, Florida, adjacent estuaries and nearshore...

  20. South Bay Salt Ponds : Initial stewardship plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The California Department of Fish and Game and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will operate and maintain the South Bay Salt Ponds under this Initial Stewardship...

  1. Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge: Master Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge, located in the city of Virginia Beach, Virginia, comprises 4,608 acres of barrier beach, fresh and brackish marsh, small...

  2. Historical methyl mercury in San Francisco Bay

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — San Francisco Bay, California is considered a mercury-impaired watershed. Elevated concentrations of mercury are found in water and sediment as well as fish and...

  3. Naive Bayes Image Classification: beyond Nearest Neighbors

    OpenAIRE

    Timofte, Radu; Tuytelaars, Tinne; Van Gool, Luc

    2012-01-01

    Timofte R., Tuytelaars T., Van Gool L., ''Naive bayes image classification: beyond nearest neighbors'', 11th Asian conference on computer vision - ACCV 2012, 13 pp., November 5-9, 2012, Daejeon, Korea.

  4. Saginaw Bay Restoration Assessment Degree Flowlines

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This represents the flowline network in Sagina Bay Restoration Assessment (SBRA). It is attributed with the number of disconnections between the reach and the...

  5. Willapa Bay, Washington Benthic Habitats 1995 Geodatabase

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In June 1995, the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce (CREST) acquired 295 true color aerial photographs (1:12,000) of Willapa Bay, Washington, from the State of...

  6. The surface heat budget of Hudson Bay

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Danielson, E.W

    1969-01-01

    ... which information the heat budget calculations are based. These data include surface air and sea temperatures, ice concentration, cloudiness, wind, atmospheric moisture, ice and water movement, and heat storage amounts within Hudson Bay waters...

  7. Differential productivity of Bristol Bay spawning grounds

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Bristol Bay escapement surveys covering a period of several years show that, irrespective of fluctuations in total numbers on a system, certain grounds display a...

  8. 78 FR 73186 - Wallowa-Whitman National Forests, Oregon; Lower Imnaha Rangeland Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-05

    ... within the Lightning Creek, Tulley Creek, Cow Creek, and a portion of the Snake River watersheds of the... Wallowa-Whitman National Forest. Wallowa-Whitman National Forest, Baker City, Oregon. \\2\\ USDA Forest... National Forest. Baker City, Oregon. The needs associated with this project are (1) to comply with with the...

  9. Tourism and Place Studies: An Example of Older Retail Districts in Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew, Alan A.

    1988-01-01

    Demonstrates, through the example of older retail districts in Oregon, how tourism promotional literature can be used for the study of places. Presents survey results on the thematic orientation of tourism promotion (historic, authentic, etc.) and includes three case studies of tourism development in Oregon. (GEA)

  10. Post-planting treatments increase growth of Oregon white oak (Quercus garryana Dougl. ex Hook.) seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    W.D. Devine; C.A. Harrington; L.P. Leonard

    2007-01-01

    The extent of Oregon white oak woodland and savanna ecosystems in the Pacific Northwest has diminished significantly during the past century, and planting of Oregon white oak seedlings is often necessary for restoring these plant communities. Our objective was to evaluate the effects of tree shelters, control of competing vegetation, fertilization, irrigation, and...

  11. 75 FR 17954 - Noncompetitive Lease of Public Land; Josephine County, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management Noncompetitive Lease of Public Land; Josephine County, Oregon AGENCY: Bureau of..., Page 449 in Josephine County, Oregon, Deed Records, more particularly described as that portion lying...

  12. Rural Health Clinics and Diabetes-Related Primary Care for Medicaid Beneficiaries in Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkbride, Kelly; Wallace, Neal

    2009-01-01

    Background: This study assessed whether Rural Health Clinics (RHCs) were associated with higher rates of recommended primary care services for adult beneficiaries diagnosed with diabetes in Oregon's Medicaid program, the Oregon Health Plan (OHP). Methods: OHP claims data from 2002 to 2003 were used to assess quality of diabetic care for…

  13. 33 CFR 100.1302 - Special Local Regulation, Annual Dragon Boat Races, Portland, Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Special Local Regulation, Annual Dragon Boat Races, Portland, Oregon. 100.1302 Section 100.1302 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... § 100.1302 Special Local Regulation, Annual Dragon Boat Races, Portland, Oregon. (a) Regulated area. All...

  14. 76 FR 12651 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; State of Oregon; Regional Haze State...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-08

    ..., meteorology and atmospheric chemistry for aerosol formation to predict pollutant concentrations in the Class I... contribute to haze at specific Class I areas. WEP does not account for atmospheric chemistry (secondary... sources in Washington, Oregon, and marine shipping in the Pacific offshore region (see Oregon Regional...

  15. 75 FR 76633 - Oregon; Correction of Federal Authorization of the State's Hazardous Waste Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-09

    ... authorization for changes the State of Oregon made to its federally authorized RCRA Hazardous Waste Management... Conditionally Exempt Small Quality Generators (CESQG) waste is subject to RCRA used oil management standards... later date. With this correction to Oregon's federally authorized RCRA Hazardous Waste Management...

  16. Summer temperature patterns in the headwater streams of the Oregon coast range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liz Dent; Danielle Vick; Kyle Abraham; Stephen Schoenholtz; Sherri Johnson

    2008-01-01

    Cool summertime stream temperature is an important component of high-quality aquatic habitat in Oregon coastal streams. Within the Oregon Coast Range, small headwater streams make up a majority of the stream network, yet little information is available on temperature patterns and the longitudinal variability for these streams. In this paper we describe preharvest...

  17. Analysis of populations of the sudden oak death pathogen in Oregon forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhian N. Kamvar; Everett M. Hansen; Alan M. Kanaskie; Meredith M. Larsen; Niklaus J. Grünwald

    2017-01-01

    Sudden oak death, caused by the oomycete Phytophthora ramorum, was first discovered in California toward the end of the 20th century and subsequently emerged on tanoak forests in Oregon before its first detection in 2001 by aerial surveys. The Oregon Department of Forestry has since monitored the epidemic and sampled symptomatic tanoak trees from...

  18. Forest health monitoring in California, Oregon, and Washington: results and interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard T. Busing

    2000-01-01

    From 1992 to 1997, standardized plots were established at about 500 sites in California, Oregon, and Washington as part of the national Forest Health Monitoring program. In California, 197 plots were established from 1992 to 1995; in Oregon and Washington, a total of 304 plots were established in 1997. Summarization of baseline data by state reveals similarities and...

  19. Forest fire weather in eastern Oregon and central Washington in 1960.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen P. Cramer; Howard E. Graham

    1961-01-01

    In 1960, the first analysis of fire season weather was made for forests east of the Cascade Range. Highlights were: The 1960 season was among the most severe since 1939 in eastern Oregon, was more severe than normal in central Washington, and will long be remembered for the rainless lightning storm that hit northeast Oregon with devastating effect the evening of July...

  20. Investing in Educator Data Literacy Improves Student Achievement. Evidence of Impact: The Oregon Data Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Data Quality Campaign, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Since 2007 the Oregon DATA Project has been investing resources to provide educators on-the-job training around effective data use to improve student achievement. New evidence shows that their efforts are paying off. A 2011 Oregon DATA Project report detailed the impact of their investment in the state's educators, finding the following: (1)…

  1. Area of old-growth forests in California, Oregon, and Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles L. Bolsinger; Karen L. Waddell

    1993-01-01

    Area of old-growth forests in California, Oregon, and Washington has declined significantly in the second half of the 20th century. This report summarizes available information on old-growth forest area by ownership in California, Oregon, and Washington. Old-growth definitions used by the various owners and agencies are provided.

  2. Area of old-growth forests in California, Oregon, and Washington. Forest Service research bulletin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolsinger, C.L.; Waddell, K.L.

    1993-12-01

    An area of old-growth forests in California, Oregon, and Washington has declined significantly in the second half of the 20th century. The report summarizes available information on old-growth forest area by ownership in California, Oregon, and Washington. Old-growth definitions used by the various owners and agencies are provided.

  3. Visitor use patterns and satisfaction along the Rogue-Umpqua Scenic Byway, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh K. Shrestha; Robert C. Burns; Alan R. Graefe; Kevin R. Gaydos

    2009-01-01

    Face-to-face interviews were conducted with 232 visitors/groups along Oregon's Rogue-Umpqua Scenic Byway (RUSB) to identify recreation use patterns and assess visitor satisfaction with various attributes of the Byway. Study participants were most likely to be over 50 years old, to be visiting overnight, and to be repeat visitors from Oregon who were there with...

  4. Transformational Leadership and the Leadership Performance of Oregon Secondary School Principals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breaker, Jason Lee

    2009-01-01

    A study of 118 secondary school principals in Oregon was conducted to examine the relationship of transformational leadership to secondary school principals' leadership performance. This study measured the transformational leadership of secondary school principals in Oregon using the "Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (5X-Short)"…

  5. 75 FR 11010 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Designation of Critical Habitat for Oregon Chub...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-10

    ... specific habitat conditions. Sampling is conducted over a percentage of the surface area at each site and...; Designation of Critical Habitat for Oregon Chub (Oregonichthys crameri) AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service... habitat for the Oregon chub (Oregonichthys crameri) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended...

  6. Potential biomass and logs from fire-hazard-reduction treatments in Southwest Oregon and Northern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. James Barbour; Jeremy Fried; Peter J. Daugherty; Glenn Christensen; Roger. Fight

    2008-01-01

    The FIA BioSum model was used to simulate three fire-hazard-reduction policies in an area comprising northern California, southwestern Oregon, and the east slopes of the Cascade Mountains in Oregon. The policy scenarios, all subject to a stand-scale fire-hazard-reduction effectiveness constraint, included maximize torching index improvement (Max TI), maximize net...

  7. Slowing spread of sudden oak death in Oregon forests, 2001–2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan Kanaskie; Randy Wiese; Danny Norlander; Jon Laine; Sarah Navarro; Ellen Michaels Goheen; Ron Rhatigan; Everett Hansen; Wendy Sutton; Paul Reeser; Nik Grunwald; Zhian Kamvar; Nancy Osterbauer

    2017-01-01

    Sudden oak death, caused by Phytophthora ramorum, is lethal to tanoak (Notholithocarpus densiflorus) and threatens this species throughout its range in Oregon. The disease was first discovered in coastal southwest Oregon forests in July 2001. An interagency team attempted to eradicate the pathogen through a program of...

  8. Suspension, Expulsion, and Achievement of English Learner Students in Six Oregon Districts. REL 2015-094

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the rates of exclusionary discipline (i.e., suspensions and expulsions) among English learners and non-English learners in six diverse Oregon districts that serve a third of the state's English learner students. Using 2011/12 databases from the Oregon Department of Education, the study found that differences in suspension and…

  9. Stunted patches in onion bulb crops in Oregon and Washington: Etiology and yield loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onion stunting caused by Rhizoctonia spp. is an important soilborne disease in the Columbia Basin of Oregon and Washington. From 2010 to 2013, 251 isolates of Rhizoctonia or Rhizoctonia-like spp. were obtained from soil and onion plant samples collected from Oregon and Washington. Sequence analysis ...

  10. The Politics of Marginality in Wallowa County, Oregon: Contesting the Production of Landscapes of Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Jesse B.; Gosnell, Hannah

    2012-01-01

    The state of Oregon's (USA) land use planning framework has long been characterized by tensions between state and local authority, between traditionally-defined "urban" and "rural" concerns, and between the competing interests of various landowners. An examination of Wallowa County, Oregon's implementation of House Bill 3326, a…

  11. 75 FR 43138 - Ochoco National Forest, Lookout Mountain Ranger District; Oregon; Howard Elliot Johnson Fuels and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-23

    ... Forest Service Ochoco National Forest, Lookout Mountain Ranger District; Oregon; Howard Elliot Johnson...-acre Howard Elliot Johnson project area, which is approximately 23 miles east of Prineville, Oregon... Maurice Evans, Acting District Ranger, Lookout Mountain District, Ochoco National Forest, 3160 NE. Third...

  12. 78 FR 42945 - Public Water Supply Supervision Program; Program Revision for the State of Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-18

    ... AGENCY Public Water Supply Supervision Program; Program Revision for the State of Oregon AGENCY... that the State of Oregon has revised its approved State Public Water Supply Supervision Primacy Program...; Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule; Ground Water Rule; and Lead and Copper Short-Term...

  13. 75 FR 51099 - Final Supplementary Rules for Public Land in Oregon and Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-18

    ... over land, water, sand, snow, ice, marsh, swamp land, or other natural terrain. Authorized Employee... Bureau of Land Management Final Supplementary Rules for Public Land in Oregon and Washington AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Final Supplementary Rules on the BLM lands in Oregon and...

  14. AFSC/NMML/CCEP: Diet of Pacific harbor seals at Umpqua River, Oregon and Columbia River, Oregon/Washington during 1994 through 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — From 1994 to 2005, The National Marine Mammal Laboratories' California Current Ecosystem Program (AFSC/NOAA) collected fecal samples at the Umpqua River, Oregon and...

  15. Gradient Analysis and Classification of Carolina Bay Vegetation: A Framework for Bay Wetlands Conservation and Restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diane De Steven,Ph.D.; Maureen Tone,PhD.

    1997-10-01

    This report address four project objectives: (1) Gradient model of Carolina bay vegetation on the SRS--The authors use ordination analyses to identify environmental and landscape factors that are correlated with vegetation composition. Significant factors can provide a framework for site-based conservation of existing diversity, and they may also be useful site predictors for potential vegetation in bay restorations. (2) Regional analysis of Carolina bay vegetation diversity--They expand the ordination analyses to assess the degree to which SRS bays encompass the range of vegetation diversity found in the regional landscape of South Carolina's western Upper Coastal Plain. Such comparisons can indicate floristic status relative to regional potentials and identify missing species or community elements that might be re-introduced or restored. (3) Classification of vegetation communities in Upper Coastal Plain bays--They use cluster analysis to identify plant community-types at the regional scale, and explore how this classification may be functional with respect to significant environmental and landscape factors. An environmentally-based classification at the whole-bay level can provide a system of templates for managing bays as individual units and for restoring bays to desired plant communities. (4) Qualitative model for bay vegetation dynamics--They analyze present-day vegetation in relation to historic land uses and disturbances. The distinctive history of SRS bays provides the possibility of assessing pathways of post-disturbance succession. They attempt to develop a coarse-scale model of vegetation shifts in response to changing site factors; such qualitative models can provide a basis for suggesting management interventions that may be needed to maintain desired vegetation in protected or restored bays.

  16. New Approaches to Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Demonstrated in Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, G. R.; Rizzo, A.; Madin, I.; Lyles Smith, R.; Stimely, L.

    2012-12-01

    Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries and Oregon Emergency Management collaborated over the last four years to increase tsunami preparedness for residents and visitors to the Oregon coast. Utilizing support from the National Tsunami Hazards Mitigation Program (NTHMP), new approaches to outreach and tsunami hazard assessment were developed and then applied. Hazard assessment was approached by first doing two pilot studies aimed at calibrating theoretical models to direct observations of tsunami inundation gleaned from the historical and prehistoric (paleoseismic/paleotsunami) data. The results of these studies were then submitted to peer-reviewed journals and translated into 1:10,000-12,000-scale inundation maps. The inundation maps utilize a powerful new tsunami model, SELFE, developed by Joseph Zhang at the Oregon Health & Science University. SELFE uses unstructured computational grids and parallel processing technique to achieve fast accurate simulation of tsunami interactions with fine-scale coastal morphology. The inundation maps were simplified into tsunami evacuation zones accessed as map brochures and an interactive mapping portal at http://www.oregongeology.org/tsuclearinghouse/. Unique in the world are new evacuation maps that show separate evacuation zones for distant versus locally generated tsunamis. The brochure maps explain that evacuation time is four hours or more for distant tsunamis but 15-20 minutes for local tsunamis that are invariably accompanied by strong ground shaking. Since distant tsunamis occur much more frequently than local tsunamis, the two-zone maps avoid needless over evacuation (and expense) caused by one-zone maps. Inundation mapping for the entire Oregon coast will be complete by ~2014. Educational outreach was accomplished first by doing a pilot study to measure effectiveness of various approaches using before and after polling and then applying the most effective methods. In descending order, the most effective

  17. A Guide for School Councils and Minority Communities. The Oregon Educational Act for the 21st Century: Implications for Ethnic Minority Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laguardia, Armando; Nave, Gary

    The Oregon Professional Development Center (OPDC) was created by the Oregon Department of Education to support school councils in the state as they make local changes to meet the requirements of the Oregon Educational Act for the 21st Century. School councils will be established at every school in Oregon, charged with three main areas of work:…

  18. Overview of the Oregon Transect Ecosystem Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, David L.; Waring, Richard H.

    1994-01-01

    The Oregon Transect Ecosystem Research (OTTER) project is a study of ecosystem functions in coniferous forests using the methods of computer modeling, experimental and theoretical remote sensing, and ecological field and laboratory techniques. The study is focused on predicting the major fluxes of carbon, nitrogen, and water, and the factors that dynamically regulate them. The OTTER project was conceived to test two major questions: (1) Can a generalized ecosystem simulation model, designed to use mainly parameters available from remote sensing, predict the functioning of forests across an environmentally variable region? and (2) To what extent can the variables required by this model be derived from remotely sensed data? The scientific objectives and scope of the project demanded that a coordinated effort be made to link ground measurements with remote sensing and modeling requirements. OTTER was selected as a focus for a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)-sponsored Multi-sensor Aircraft Campaign (MAC; combining NASA aircraft and sensors with those of others) on the basis of experience gained in past ecosystem studies and remote-sensing projects, and the importance of the OTTER objectives to NASA's long-range science goals and plans. Having several independent approaches available, both on the ground and from various remote-sensing platforms, proved valuable in estimating and validating many of the critical variables. This experience and cross comparison should help simplify future studies of a similar nature. Edited data sets from the OTTER project are now available to the scientific community on optical disks or via on-line data banks at NASA (Washington, D.C., USA) and Oregon State University (Corvallis, Oregon, USA).

  19. 77 FR 2972 - Thunder Bay Power Company, Thunder Bay Power, LLC, et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Thunder Bay Power Company, Thunder Bay Power, LLC, et al.; Notice of..., 2347-049, 2373-010 Midwest Hydro, LLC Midwest Hydraulic Company, Inc Project No. 10805-054 Midwest...

  20. Map showing thickness of young bay mud, southern San Francisco Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Sandra D.; Nichols, Donald R.; Wright, Nancy A.; Atwater, Brian

    1978-01-01

    Soft water-saturated estuarine deposits less than 10,000 years old underlie the southern part of San Francisco bay and the present and former marshlands that border the bay. Known locally as bay mud or as young bay mud, these deposits, and the estuarine environment that produces them, are of major importance in making decision on land use and development in the San Francisco Bay area. Knowledge of the distribution, thickness, and physical properties of young bay mud is critical to the feasibility, design, and maintenance of structures built on it. Fore this reason, numerous attempts have been made in the past to map or describe these characteristics (Mitchell, 1963; Goldman, 1969; McDonald and Nichols, 1974). The accompanying map of bay-mud thickness significantly revises part of an earlier compilation by Kahle and Goldman (1969) and includes new data from approximately 2400 boreholes, most of which have been drilled during the past 15 years. It also incorporates information on historic margins of San Francisco Bay and its tidal marshes (Nichols and Wright, 1971). Although this map was compelled mostly from data gathered during foundation investigations and construction projects, it is mostly from data gathered during foundation investigations and construction projects, it is not a substitute for such studies. Rather, the map provides regional information for land-use planning, seismic zonation, and design of foundation investigations.

  1. BOOK REVIEW OF "CHESAPEAKE BAY BLUES: SCIENCE, POLITICS, AND THE STRUGGLE TO SAVE THE BAY"

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is a book review of "Chesapeake Bay Blues: Science, Politics, and the Struggle to Save the Bay". This book is very well written and provides an easily understandable description of the political challenges faced by those proposing new or more stringent environmental regulat...

  2. Influenza in Bristol Bay, 1919

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Gilson deValpine

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The 1918 influenza pandemic has been blamed for as many as 50 million deaths worldwide. Like all major disasters, the full story of the pandemic includes smaller, less noted episodes that have not attracted historical attention. The story of the 1919 wave of the influenza pandemic in Bristol Bay Alaska is one such lost episode. It is an important story because the most accessible accounts—the Congressional Record and the Coast Guard Report—are inconsistent with reports made by employees, health care workers, and volunteers at the site of the disaster. Salmon fishing industry supervisors and medical officers recorded their efforts to save the region’s Native Alaskans in private company reports. The federal Bureau of Education physician retained wireless transmission, reports, and letters of events. The Coast Guard summarized its work in its Annual Report of 1920. The independent Bureau of Fisheries report to the Department of Commerce reveals the Coast Guard report at striking odds with others and reconciles only one account. This article explores the historical oversight, and attempts to tell the story of the 1919 wave of the pandemic which devastated the Native Alaskan population in this very remote place.

  3. Bayes Syndrome and Imaging Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancor, Ivan Hernandez; Izquierdo-Gomez, Maria Manuela; Niebla, Javier Garcia; Laynez-Cerdeña, Ignacio; Garcia-Gonzalez, Martin Jesus; Barragan-Acea, Antonio; Iribarren-Sarriá, Jose Luis; Jimenez-Rivera, Juan Jose; Lacalzada-Almeida, Juan

    2017-07-13

    Interatrial block (IAB) is due to disruption in the Bachmann region (BR). According to whether interatrial electrical conduction is delayed or completely blocked through the BR, it can be classified as IAB of first, second or third degree. On the surface electrocardiogram, a P wave ≥ 120 ms (partial IAB) is observed or associated to the prolongation of the P wave with a biphasic (positive / negative) morphology in the inferior leads (advanced IAB). Bayes syndrome is defined as an advanced IAB associated with atrial arrhythmia, more specifically atrial fibrillation. The purpose of this review is to describe the latest evidence about an entity considered an anatomical and electrical substrate with its own name, which may be a predictor of supraventricular arrhythmia and cardioembolic cerebrovascular accidents, as well as the role of new imaging techniques, such as echocardiographic strain and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, in characterizing atrial alterations associated with this syndrome and generally in the study of anatomy and atrial function. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. Gulf of Mexico Integrated Science - Tampa Bay Study - Historical and Prehistorical Record of Tampa Bay Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, Terry

    2005-01-01

    To study how Tampa Bay, Florida, has changed over time, the prehistorical conditions and natural variations in the bay environment are being evaluated. These variations can be tracked by examining the sediments that have accumulated in and around the bay. The prehistorical record, which pre-dates settlers' arrival in the Tampa Bay area around 1850, provides a baseline with which to compare and evaluate the magnitude and effects of sea-level, climate, biological, geochemical, and man-made changes. These data also are valuable for planning and conducting projects aimed at restoring wetlands and other estuarine habitats to their original state. In addition, the data provide a basis for judging efforts to improve the health of the bay.

  5. A Survey of Light Pollution in the Rogue Valley, Southwest Oregon, By St. Mary’s School, Medford, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensel, Holly; Arianna Ashby, Colin Cai, Thomas Cox, Genna Dorrell, Gabe FitzPatrick, Meaghan FitzPatrick, Jason Mars Liu, Mitchell Moczygemba, Kieran Rooney, Emry Timmons,; Ray You, students, (St. Mary's. School)

    2015-01-01

    Rural areas in Oregon, including the Rogue Valley, are renowned for beautiful dark skies. Electric light came to Medford, Oregon, the largest town in the Rogue Valley, in 1894. During the past 100 years the Rogue Valley grew from 2,500 individuals in 1895 to a population of 76,462 and a metropolitan area population of 208,545, in 2012. The increased population density resulted in increased light pollution. A light pollution chart using DMSP, Defense Meteorological Satellite Program, data was published in 2006, but did not show the spatial variation in detail. In the spring of 2014, the 9th grade physics students, astronomy students, and members of the Astronomy Club from St. Mary's School conducted the first detailed night sky survey. The purpose of the survey is to create a baseline of the variations in light pollution in the Rogue Valley.The project started with a talk by Steve Bosbach, former Texas IDA coordinator, on the topic of light pollution and how it affects our lives and the environment. Groups of students were given the tasks of measuring the night sky brightness in the Rogue Valley, doing a light audit in an area of their choice, and researching what light pollution is and its effects on the environment. From this they created a presentation for a final physics grade. The basis for this project, along with procedures can be found on the Globe at Night (www.globeatnight.org) website. The light audit and research portion were developed from the Dark Sky Rangers section (www.globeatnight.org/dsr/) of the website. In the fall of 2014, astronomy students and club members extended this study to the town of Ashland and the Sothern Oregon University campus, areas of the valley not surveyed in the Spring.This survey will increase awareness of light pollution in the Rogue Valley, as well as educate developers and city planners on the impact that light pollution has on the environment in Southern Oregon. It will help determine areas of concern and areas of dark

  6. 76 FR 23193 - Traffic Separation Schemes: In the Approaches to Portland, ME; Boston, MA; Narragansett Bay, RI...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-26

    ... Portland, ME; Boston, MA; Narragansett Bay, RI and Buzzards Bay, MA; Chesapeake Bay, VA, and Cape Fear... Portland, ME; in the approaches to Boston, MA; in the approaches to Narragansett Bay, RI and Buzzards Bay... Portland, ME; Boston, MA; Narragansett Bay, RI and Buzzards Bay, MA; Chesapeake Bay, VA; and Cape Fear...

  7. Modeling vertebrate diversity in Oregon using satellite imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cablk, Mary Elizabeth

    Vertebrate diversity was modeled for the state of Oregon using a parametric approach to regression tree analysis. This exploratory data analysis effectively modeled the non-linear relationships between vertebrate richness and phenology, terrain, and climate. Phenology was derived from time-series NOAA-AVHRR satellite imagery for the year 1992 using two methods: principal component analysis and derivation of EROS data center greenness metrics. These two measures of spatial and temporal vegetation condition incorporated the critical temporal element in this analysis. The first three principal components were shown to contain spatial and temporal information about the landscape and discriminated phenologically distinct regions in Oregon. Principal components 2 and 3, 6 greenness metrics, elevation, slope, aspect, annual precipitation, and annual seasonal temperature difference were investigated as correlates to amphibians, birds, all vertebrates, reptiles, and mammals. Variation explained for each regression tree by taxa were: amphibians (91%), birds (67%), all vertebrates (66%), reptiles (57%), and mammals (55%). Spatial statistics were used to quantify the pattern of each taxa and assess validity of resulting predictions from regression tree models. Regression tree analysis was relatively robust against spatial autocorrelation in the response data and graphical results indicated models were well fit to the data.

  8. Occurrence and concentration of caffeine in Oregon coastal waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez del Rey, Zoe; Granek, Elise F; Sylvester, Steve

    2012-07-01

    Caffeine, a biologically active drug, is recognized as a contaminant of freshwater and marine systems. We quantified caffeine concentrations in Oregon's coastal ocean to determine whether levels correlated with proximity to caffeine pollution sources. Caffeine was analyzed at 14 coastal locations, stratified between populated areas with sources of caffeine pollution and sparsely populated areas with no major caffeine pollution sources. Caffeine concentrations were measured in major water bodies discharging near sampling locations. Caffeine in seawater ranged from below the reporting limit (8.5 ng/L) to 44.7 ng/L. Caffeine occurrence and concentrations in seawater did not correspond with pollution threats from population density and point and non-point sources, but did correspond with storm event occurrence. Caffeine concentrations in rivers and estuaries draining to the coast ranged from below the reporting limit to 152.2 ng/L. This study establishes the occurrence of caffeine in Oregon's coastal waters, yet relative importance of sources, seasonal variability, and processes affecting caffeine transport into the coastal ocean require further research. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Northeast Oregon Hatchery Project, Conceptual Design Report, Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, Montgomery (Montgomery Watson, Bellevue, WA)

    1995-03-01

    This report presents the results of site analysis for the Bonneville Power Administration Northeast Oregon Hatchery Project. The purpose of this project is to provide engineering services for the siting and conceptual design of hatchery facilities for the Bonneville Power Administration. The hatchery project consists of artificial production facilities for salmon and steelhead to enhance production in three adjacent tributaries to the Columbia River in northeast Oregon: the Grande Ronde, Walla Walla, and Imnaha River drainage basins. Facilities identified in the master plan include adult capture and holding facilities; spawning incubation, and early rearing facilities; full-term rearing facilities; and direct release or acclimation facilities. The evaluation includes consideration of a main production facility for one or more of the basins or several smaller satellite production facilities to be located within major subbasins. The historic and current distribution of spring and fall chinook salmon and steelhead was summarized for the Columbia River tributaries. Current and future production and release objectives were reviewed. Among the three tributaries, forty seven sites were evaluated and compared to facility requirements for water and space. Site screening was conducted to identify the sites with the most potential for facility development. Alternative sites were selected for conceptual design of each facility type. A proposed program for adult holding facilities, final rearing/acclimation, and direct release facilities was developed.

  10. Deep long-period earthquakes beneath Washington and Oregon volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, M.L.; Malone, S.D.; Moran, S.C.; Thelen, W.A.; Vidale, J.E.

    2011-01-01

    Deep long-period (DLP) earthquakes are an enigmatic type of seismicity occurring near or beneath volcanoes. They are commonly associated with the presence of magma, and found in some cases to correlate with eruptive activity. To more thoroughly understand and characterize DLP occurrence near volcanoes in Washington and Oregon, we systematically searched the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network (PNSN) triggered earthquake catalog for DLPs occurring between 1980 (when PNSN began collecting digital data) and October 2009. Through our analysis we identified 60 DLPs beneath six Cascade volcanic centers. No DLPs were associated with volcanic activity, including the 1980-1986 and 2004-2008 eruptions at Mount St. Helens. More than half of the events occurred near Mount Baker, where the background flux of magmatic gases is greatest among Washington and Oregon volcanoes. The six volcanoes with DLPs (counts in parentheses) are Mount Baker (31), Glacier Peak (9), Mount Rainier (9), Mount St. Helens (9), Three Sisters (1), and Crater Lake (1). No DLPs were identified beneath Mount Adams, Mount Hood, Mount Jefferson, or Newberry Volcano, although (except at Hood) that may be due in part to poorer network coverage. In cases where the DLPs do not occur directly beneath the volcanic edifice, the locations coincide with large structural faults that extend into the deep crust. Our observations suggest the occurrence of DLPs in these areas could represent fluid and/or magma transport along pre-existing tectonic structures in the middle crust. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  11. Radium isotopes in the Ulsan Bay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Seong [Department of Oceanography, Chungnam National University, Gung-dong 220, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: leejs728@nfrda.re.kr; Kim, Kee Hyun [Department of Oceanography, Chungnam National University, Gung-dong 220, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Duck Soo [Department of Oceanography, Chungnam National University, Gung-dong 220, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    In order to estimate the fluxes of Ra isotopes, we measured {sup 224}Ra, {sup 226}Ra, and {sup 228}Ra activities in the Ulsan Bay mixing zone. The convex upwards curvature of the plot of Ra isotope activities versus salinity for the mixing zone suggests that Ra isotopes are supplied from particles entering the mixing zone from both the river and bottom sediments. This addition increases the estuarine flux of {sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra to the outer sea by factors of 15 and 95 over the flux attributable to Ra dissolved in the riverine water alone. In order to estimate the residence time of the water in Ulsan Bay, we applied a mass balance model to the distribution of {sup 224}Ra and {sup 226}Ra activities in the Ulsan Bay mixing zone with the inflow from the Taehwa River. The obtained residence times of the waters in the Ulsan Bay were estimated to be 6.8-11.4 d. The waters in the upper part of the estuary have long residence times whereas those in the lower part, in contact with the open sea, have shorter residence times. The mean residence time of the water in the Ulsan Bay was estimated to be 9.1 d.

  12. Fishery Management Program Progress Report: Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Memorandum containing summary of fishery biologist's visit to Back Bay to remove carp from impoundments at Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge.

  13. Parameter Identification by Bayes Decision and Neural Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulczycki, P.; Schiøler, Henrik

    1994-01-01

    The problem of parameter identification by Bayes point estimation using neural networks is investigated.......The problem of parameter identification by Bayes point estimation using neural networks is investigated....

  14. SF Bay Water Quality Improvement Fund: Projects and Accomplishments

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Francisco Bay Water Quality Improvement Fund (SFBWQIF) projects listed here are part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquatic resources.

  15. Benthic grab data from October 1999 in Apalachicola Bay, Florida

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Apalachicola Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve and the NOAA Office for Coastal Management worked together to map benthic habitats within Apalachicola Bay,...

  16. Sediment grab data from October 1999 in Apalachicola Bay, Florida

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Apalachicola Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve and the NOAA Office for Coastal Management worked together to map benthic habitats within Apalachicola Bay,...

  17. South Bay Salt Pond Restoration, Phase II at Ravenswood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about the South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project: Phase II Construction at Ravenswood, part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquatic resources.

  18. Phytoplankton and nutrients studies in Magu bay, Speke gulf, Lake ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    chemical parameters were studied in Magu Bay, Lake Victoria, in May 2001. Investigations on the influence of Simiyu River on the biological and physical characteristics of the Bay were carried out. Surface and bottom currents flowed in the ...

  19. Biology and subsistence hunting of geese at Chagvan Bay

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Chagvan Bay and Nanvak Bay are known to be important staging and/or stopover areas for large numbers of Pacific Brant (Branta bernicola) and Emperor Geese (Chen...

  20. 1999 RoxAnn Data Points from Apalachicola Bay, Florida

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Apalachicola Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve and the NOAA Office for Coastal Management worked together to map benthic habitats within Apalachicola Bay,...

  1. Technical Support Documents Used to Develop the Chesapeake Bay TMDL

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Chesapeake Bay TMDL development was supported by several technical documents for water quality standards and allocation methodologies specific to the Chesapeake Bay. This page provides the technical support documents.

  2. Beyond a Box of Documents: The Collaborative Partnership Behind the Oregon Chinese Disinterment Documents Collection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia M. Fernández

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This article is a case study of a collaboration between the Oregon Multicultural Archives of Oregon State University, Portland State University Library's Special Collections, the Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association (CCBA, and the Northwest News Network to preserve and make accessible a recovered box of Oregon Chinese disinterment documents. By examining what influenced and engaged each partner, this case study offers an opportunity to better understand the motivations of diverse stakeholders in a "post-custodial era" project that challenges traditional practices of custody, control, and access.

  3. Variability of intertidal foraminferal assemblages in a salt marsh, Oregon, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milker, Yvonne; Horton, Benjamin P.; Nelson, Alan R.; Engelhart, Simon E.; Witter, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    We studied 18 sampling stations along a transect to investigate the similarity between live (rose Bengal stained) foraminiferal populations and dead assemblages, their small-scale spatial variations and the distribution of infaunal foraminifera in a salt marsh (Toms Creek marsh) at the upper end of the South Slough arm of the Coos Bay estuary, Oregon, USA. We aimed to test to what extent taphonomic processes, small-scale variability and infaunal distribution influence the accuracy of sea-level reconstructions based on intertidal foraminifera. Cluster analyses have shown that dead assemblages occur in distinct zones with respect to elevation, a prerequisite for using foraminifera as sea-level indicators. Our nonparametric multivariate analysis of variance showed that small-scale spatial variability has only a small influence on live (rose Bengal stained) populations and dead assemblages. The dissimilarity was higher, however, between live (rose Bengal stained) populations in the middle marsh. We observed early diagenetic dissolution of calcareous tests in the dead assemblages. If comparable post-depositional processes and similar minor spatial variability also characterize fossil assemblages, then dead assemblage are the best modern analogs for paleoenvironmental reconstructions. The Toms Creek tidal flat and low marsh vascular plant zones are dominated by Miliammina fusca, the middle marsh is dominated by Balticammina pseudomacrescens and Trochammina inflata, and the high marsh and upland–marsh transition zone are dominated by Trochamminita irregularis. Analysis of infaunal foraminifera showed that most living specimens are found in the surface sediments and the majority of live (rose Bengal stained) infaunal specimens are restricted to the upper 10 cm, but living individuals are found to depths of 50 cm. The dominant infaunal specimens are similar to those in the corresponding surface samples and no species have been found living solely infaunally. The

  4. Algae Reefs in Shark Bay, Western Australia, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Numerous algae reefs are seen in Shark Bay, Western Australia, Australia (26.0S, 113.5E) especially in the southern portions of the bay. The south end is more saline because tidal flow in and out of the bay is restricted by sediment deposited at the north and central end of the bay opposite the mouth of the Wooramel River. This extremely arid region produces little sediment runoff so that the waters are very clear, saline and rich in algae.

  5. Mapping Oyster Reef Habitats in Mobile Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolte, Danielle

    2011-01-01

    Oyster reefs around the world are declining rapidly, and although they haven t received as much attention as coral reefs, they are just as important to their local ecosystems and economies. Oyster reefs provide habitats for many species of fish, invertebrates, and crustaceans, as well as the next generations of oysters. Oysters are also harvested from many of these reefs and are an important segment of many local economies, including that of Mobile Bay, where oysters rank in the top five commercial marine species both by landed weight and by dollar value. Although the remaining Mobile Bay oyster reefs are some of the least degraded in the world, projected climate change could have dramatic effects on the health of these important ecosystems. The viability of oyster reefs depends on water depth and temperature, appropriate pH and salinity levels, and the amount of dissolved oxygen in the water. Projected increases in sea level, changes in precipitation and runoff patterns, and changes in pH resulting from increases in the amount of carbon dioxide dissolved in the oceans could all affect the viability of oyster reefs in the future. Human activities such as dredging and unsustainable harvesting practices are also adversely impacting the oyster reefs. Fortunately, several projects are already under way to help rebuild or support existing or previously existing oyster reefs. The success of these projects will depend on the local effects of climate change on the current and potential habitats and man s ability to recognize and halt unsustainable harvesting practices. As the extent and health of the reefs changes, it will have impacts on the Mobile Bay ecosystem and economy, changing the resources available to the people who live there and to the rest of the country, since Mobile Bay is an important national source of seafood. This project identified potential climate change impacts on the oyster reefs of Mobile Bay, including the possible addition of newly viable

  6. Lost lake - restoration of a Carolina bay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanlin, H.G.; McLendon, J.P. [Univ. of South Carolina, Aiken, SC (United States). Dept. of Biology and Geology; Wike, L.D. [Univ. of South Carolina, Aiken, SC (United States). Dept. of Biology and Geology]|[Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Technology Center; Dietsch, B.M. [Univ. of South Carolina, Aiken, SC (United States). Dept. of Biology and Geology]|[Univ. of Georgia, Aiken, SC (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Carolina bays are shallow wetland depressions found only on the Atlantic Coastal Plain. Although these isolated interstream wetlands support many types of communities, they share the common features of having a sandy margin, a fluctuating water level, an elliptical shape, and a northwest to southeast orientation. Lost Lake, an 11.3 hectare Carolina bay, was ditched and drained for agricultural production before establishment of the Savannah River Site in 1950. Later it received overflow from a seepage basin containing a variety of chemicals, primarily solvents and some heavy metals. In 1990 a plan was developed for the restoration of Lost Lake, and restoration activities were complete by mid-1991. Lost Lake is the first known project designed for the restoration and recovery of a Carolina bay. The bay was divided into eight soil treatment zones, allowing four treatments in duplicate. Each of the eight zones was planted with eight species of native wetland plants. Recolonization of the bay by amphibians and reptiles is being evaluated by using drift fences with pitfall traps and coverboard arrays in each of the treatment zones. Additional drift fences in five upland habitats were also established. Hoop turtle traps, funnel minnow traps, and dip nets were utilized for aquatic sampling. The presence of 43 species common to the region has been documented at Lost Lake. More than one-third of these species show evidence of breeding populations being established. Three species found prior to the restoration activity and a number of species common to undisturbed Carolina bays were not encountered. Colonization by additional species is anticipated as the wetland undergoes further succession.

  7. 77 FR 14276 - Regulated Navigation Area; Little Bay Bridge Construction, Little Bay, Portsmouth, NH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-09

    ...The Coast Guard is establishing a regulated navigation area (RNA) on the navigable waters of Little Bay in the Piscataqua River under and surrounding the Little Bay and General Sullivan Bridges in order to facilitate construction of the Little Bay Bridge between Newington, NH and Dover, NH. This temporary interim rule is necessary to provide for the safety of life on the navigable waters during bridge construction operations that could pose an imminent hazard to vessels operating in the area. This rule implements certain safety measures, including speed restrictions and the temporary suspension of vessel traffic during construction operations.

  8. Holocene evolution of Apalachicola Bay, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterman, Lisa E.; Twichell, David C.

    2011-01-01

    A program of geophysical mapping and vibracoring was conducted in 2007 to better understand the geologic evolution of Apalachicola Bay and its response to sea-level rise. A detailed geologic history could help better understand how this bay may respond to both short-term (for example, storm surge) and long-term sea-level rise. The results of this study were published (Osterman and others, 2009) as part of a special issue of Geo-Marine Letters that documents early results from the Northern Gulf of Mexico (NGOM) Ecosystem Change and Hazard Susceptibility Project.

  9. An Empirical Bayes Approach to Spatial Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, C. N.; Kostal, H.

    1983-01-01

    Multi-channel LANDSAT data are collected in several passes over agricultural areas during the growing season. How empirical Bayes modeling can be used to develop crop identification and discrimination techniques that account for spatial correlation in such data is considered. The approach models the unobservable parameters and the data separately, hoping to take advantage of the fact that the bulk of spatial correlation lies in the parameter process. The problem is then framed in terms of estimating posterior probabilities of crop types for each spatial area. Some empirical Bayes spatial estimation methods are used to estimate the logits of these probabilities.

  10. Chondrichthyan occurrence and abundance trends in False Bay ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Commercial fishing in False Bay, South Africa, began in the 1600s. Today chondrichthyans are regularly taken in fisheries throughout the bay. Using a combination of catch, survey and life history data, the occurrence and long-term changes in populations of chondrichthyans in False Bay are described. Analyses of time ...

  11. 33 CFR 117.323 - Outer Clam Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Outer Clam Bay 117.323 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Florida § 117.323 Outer Clam Bay The drawspan of the Outer Clam Bay Boardwalk Drawbridge shall open on signal if at least 30 minutes advance notice is given. ...

  12. 33 CFR 162.150 - Maumee Bay and River, Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Maumee Bay and River, Ohio. 162... (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.150 Maumee Bay and River, Ohio. (a) In Maumee Bay (lakeward of Maumee River Lighted Buoy 49(L/L No. 770)), no vessel greater than...

  13. Naïve Bayes classification in R

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Zhongheng

    2016-01-01

    Naïve Bayes classification is a kind of simple probabilistic classification methods based on Bayes’ theorem with the assumption of independence between features. The model is trained on training dataset to make predictions by predict() function. This article introduces two functions naiveBayes() and train() for the performance of Naïve Bayes classification.

  14. Naive Bayes and Text Classification I - Introduction and Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Raschka, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Naive Bayes classifiers, a family of classifiers that are based on the popular Bayes' probability theorem, are known for creating simple yet well performing models, especially in the fields of document classification and disease prediction. In this article, we will look at the main concepts of naive Bayes classification in the context of document categorization.

  15. Technical evaluation of a total maximum daily load model for Upper Klamath and Agency Lakes, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Tamara M.; Wherry, Susan A.; Carter, James L.; Kuwabara, James S.; Simon, Nancy S.; Rounds, Stewart A.

    2013-01-01

    We reviewed a mass balance model developed in 2001 that guided establishment of the phosphorus total maximum daily load (TMDL) for Upper Klamath and Agency Lakes, Oregon. The purpose of the review was to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the model and to determine whether improvements could be made using information derived from studies since the model was first developed. The new data have contributed to the understanding of processes in the lakes, particularly internal loading of phosphorus from sediment, and include measurements of diffusive fluxes of phosphorus from the bottom sediments, groundwater advection, desorption from iron oxides at high pH in a laboratory setting, and estimates of fluxes of phosphorus bound to iron and aluminum oxides. None of these processes in isolation, however, is large enough to account for the episodically high values of whole-lake internal loading calculated from a mass balance, which can range from 10 to 20 milligrams per square meter per day for short periods. The possible role of benthic invertebrates in lake sediments in the internal loading of phosphorus in the lake has become apparent since the development of the TMDL model. Benthic invertebrates can increase diffusive fluxes several-fold through bioturbation and biodiffusion, and, if the invertebrates are bottom feeders, they can recycle phosphorus to the water column through metabolic excretion. These organisms have high densities (1,822–62,178 individuals per square meter) in Upper Klamath Lake. Conversion of the mean density of tubificid worms (Oligochaeta) and chironomid midges (Diptera), two of the dominant taxa, to an areal flux rate based on laboratory measurements of metabolic excretion of two abundant species suggested that excretion by benthic invertebrates is at least as important as any of the other identified processes for internal loading to the water column. Data from sediment cores collected around Upper Klamath Lake since the development of the

  16. An environmental streamflow assessment for the Santiam River basin, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risley, John C.; Wallick, J. Rose; Mangano, Joseph F.; Jones, Krista L.

    2012-01-01

    The Santiam River is a tributary of the Willamette River in northwestern Oregon and drains an area of 1,810 square miles. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) operates four dams in the basin, which are used primarily for flood control, hydropower production, recreation, and water-quality improvement. The Detroit and Big Cliff Dams were constructed in 1953 on the North Santiam River. The Green Peter and Foster Dams were completed in 1967 on the South Santiam River. The impacts of the structures have included a decrease in the frequency and magnitude of floods and an increase in low flows. For three North Santiam River reaches, the median of annual 1-day maximum streamflows decreased 42–50 percent because of regulated streamflow conditions. Likewise, for three reaches in the South Santiam River basin, the median of annual 1-day maximum streamflows decreased 39–52 percent because of regulation. In contrast to their effect on high flows, the dams increased low flows. The median of annual 7-day minimum flows in six of the seven study reaches increased under regulated streamflow conditions between 60 and 334 percent. On a seasonal basis, median monthly streamflows decreased from February to May and increased from September to January in all the reaches. However, the magnitude of these impacts usually decreased farther downstream from dams because of cumulative inflow from unregulated tributaries and groundwater entering the North, South, and main-stem Santiam Rivers below the dams. A Wilcox rank-sum test of monthly precipitation data from Salem, Oregon, and Waterloo, Oregon, found no significant difference between the pre-and post-dam periods, which suggests that the construction and operation of the dams since the 1950s and 1960s are a primary cause of alterations to the Santiam River basin streamflow regime. In addition to the streamflow analysis, this report provides a geomorphic characterization of the Santiam River basin and the associated conceptual

  17. Benthic processes affecting contaminant transport in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwabara, James S.; Topping, Brent R.; Carter, James L.; Carlson, Rick A; Parchaso, Francis; Fend, Steven V.; Stauffer-Olsen, Natalie; Manning, Andrew J.; Land, Jennie M.

    2016-09-30

    Executive SummaryMultiple sampling trips during calendar years 2013 through 2015 were coordinated to provide measurements of interdependent benthic processes that potentially affect contaminant transport in Upper Klamath Lake (UKL), Oregon. The measurements were motivated by recognition that such internal processes (for example, solute benthic flux, bioturbation and solute efflux by benthic invertebrates, and physical groundwater-surface water interactions) were not integrated into existing management models for UKL. Up until 2013, all of the benthic-flux studies generally had been limited spatially to a number of sites in the northern part of UKL and limited temporally to 2–3 samplings per year. All of the benthic invertebrate studies also had been limited to the northern part of the lake; however, intensive temporal (weekly) studies had previously been completed independent of benthic-flux studies. Therefore, knowledge of both the spatial and temporal variability in benthic flux and benthic invertebrate distributions for the entire lake was lacking. To address these limitations, we completed a lakewide spatial study during 2013 and a coordinated temporal study with weekly sampling of benthic flux and benthic invertebrates during 2014. Field design of the spatially focused study in 2013 involved 21 sites sampled three times as the summer cyanobacterial bloom developed (that is, May 23, June 13, and July 3, 2013). Results of the 27-week, temporally focused study of one site in 2014 were summarized and partitioned into three periods (referred to herein as pre-bloom, bloom and post-bloom periods), each period involving 9 weeks of profiler deployments, water column and benthic sampling. Partitioning of the pre-bloom, bloom, and post-bloom periods were based on water-column chlorophyll concentrations and involved the following date intervals, respectively: April 15 through June 10, June 17 through August 13, and August 20 through October 16, 2014. To examine

  18. 33 CFR 100.124 - Maggie Fischer Memorial Great South Bay Cross Bay Swim, Great South Bay, New York.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... (a) Regulated area. All navigable waters of Great South Bay, NY within a 100 yard radius of each... the Fire Island Lighthouse Dock in approximate position 40°38′01″ N 073°13′07″ W, northerly through.... (1) No person or vessel may enter, transit, or remain within 100 yards of any swimmer or safety craft...

  19. Susceptibilities of Human Cytomegalovirus Clinical Isolates to BAY38-4766, BAY43-9695, and Ganciclovir

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSharry, James J.; McDonough, Ann; Olson, Betty; Hallenberger, Sabine; Reefschlaeger, Juergen; Bender, Wolfgang; Drusano, George L.

    2001-01-01

    BAY38-4766 and BAY43-9695 are nonnucleosidic compounds with activities against human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). Two phenotypic assays were used to determine the drug susceptibilities of 36 HCMV clinical isolates to the BAY compounds and ganciclovir. Using either assay, both BAY compounds at a concentration of approximately 1 μM inhibited the replication of all 36 HCMV clinical isolates, including 11 ganciclovir-resistant clinical isolates, by 50%. PMID:11557492

  20. Biotopes of the Oregon outer continental shelf (OCS) proposed wind farm site

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This biotope raster is part of a data release of the Oregon outer continental shelf (OCS) proposed wind farm map site. The biotopes mapped in this area have been...

  1. Post-Emergence Behavior of Hatchling Western Pond Turtles (Actinemys marmorata) in Western Oregon

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Daniel K. Rosenberg; Roberta Swift

    2013-01-01

    .... We investigated post-emergence movements and habitat associations of western pond turtles (Actinemys marmorata) at two study sites in western Oregon using micro-transmitters and harmonic radar methods...

  2. Hughes: Diachronic Variability in Obsidian Procurement Patterns in Northeastern California and Southcentral Oregon

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, Thomas L.

    1987-01-01

    Diachronic Variability in Obsidian Procurement Patterns in Northeastern California and Southcentral Oregon Richard E. Hughes. Berkeley: University of California Publications in Anthropology, Vol. 17, 1986, 429 pp., figures, tables, appendices, references, $35.00 (paper).

  3. 2010 Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) Lidar: Crater Lake Study Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Oregon Department of Geology & Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) contracted with Watershed Sciences, Inc. to collect high resolution topographic LiDAR data for...

  4. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Lakeview, Oregon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-01

    This Baseline Risk Assessment of Ground Water Contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Lake view, Oregon evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site.

  5. Environmental Contaminants in River Otter (Lontra canadensis) Collected from the Willamette River, Oregon, 1996-99

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Willamette River originates in the Cascade Mountains southeast of Eugene, Oregon and makes a 300 mile northward journey through the Willamette Valley, joining...

  6. 78 FR 20613 - Ochoco National Forest, Paulina Ranger District; Oregon; Wolf Creek Vegetation and Fuels...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-05

    ... analyze the effects of managing vegetation and fuels within the 24,506 acre Wolf project area, which is... INFORMATION CONTACT: Jeffrey Marszal, Project Leader at 3160 NE Third Street, Prineville, Oregon 97754, or at...

  7. Region 1 Acoustic Bat Inventory: National Wildlife Refuges in Eastern Oregon, Eastern Washington, and Idaho

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Bat species were inventoried on National Wildlife Refuges in Eastern Oregon, Eastern Washington, and Idaho using acoustic methods. Samples were collected between...

  8. Oregon State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-12-01

    The Oregon State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Oregon. The profile is a result of a survey of NRC licensees in Oregon. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in Oregon.

  9. Acoustic backscatter from 2013 interferometric swath bathymetry systems survey of Columbia River Mouth, Oregon and Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of the USGS data release presents acoustic backscatter data for the Columbia River Mouth, Oregon and Washington. The acoustic backscatter data of the...

  10. 2015 Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) Lidar: Big Wood, ID

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Quantum Spatial has collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data for the Oregon LiDAR Consortium (OLC) Big Wood 2015 study area. This study area is located in...

  11. The Economic Impact of Ecotourism on the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge Area, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A study of the economic impact of ecotourism and the demographics of ecotourists was conducted at Malheur National Wildlife Refuge, Oregon, from June1993-May 1994....

  12. 2007 Oregon Parks and Recreation Department Silver Falls State Park Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The dataset represents the Lidar elevations for Silver Falls State Park in Marion County, Oregon. The LiDAR data was collected during March 2007. This was a leaf-off...

  13. The Oregon Public Health Policy Institute: Building Competencies for Public Health Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luck, Jeff; Yoon, Jangho; Bernell, Stephanie; Tynan, Michael; Alvarado, Carla Sarai; Eversole, Tom; Mosbaek, Craig; Beathard, Candice

    2015-08-01

    The Oregon Public Health Policy Institute (PHPI) was designed to enhance public health policy competencies among state and local health department staff. The Oregon Health Authority funded the College of Public Health and Human Sciences at Oregon State University to develop the PHPI curriculum in 2012 and offer it to participants from 4 state public health programs and 5 local health departments in 2013. The curriculum interspersed short instructional sessions on policy development, implementation, and evaluation with longer hands-on team exercises in which participants applied these skills to policy topics their teams had selected. Panel discussions provided insights from legislators and senior Oregon health experts. Participants reported statistically significant increases in public health policy competencies and high satisfaction with PHPI overall.

  14. 2011 Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) Lidar: Ochoco Study Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Oregon Department of Geology & Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) contracted with Watershed Sciences, Inc. to collect high resolution topographic LiDAR data for...

  15. 2009 Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) Lidar: Southwest Washington Study Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) contracted with Watershed Sciences, Inc. to collect high resolution topographic LiDAR data for...

  16. Oregon: basic data for thermal springs and wells as recorded in GEOTHERM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bliss, J.D.

    1983-05-01

    This sample file contains 346 records for Oregon. The records contain data on location, sample description, analysis type, collection condition, flow rates, and chemical and physical properties of the fluid. Stable and radioactive isotope data are occasionally available. (ACR)

  17. Location of Photographs Showing Landslide Features in the Little North Santiam River Basin, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Data points represent locations of photographs taken of landslides in the Little North Santiam River Basin, Oregon. Photos were taken in spring of 2010 during field...

  18. Avian abundance and oak mistletoe survey data from the Willamette Valley, Oregon, 2013-2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset includes two spreadsheets: The "Avian_abundance_oak_mistletoe_bird_data" spreadsheet contains data regarding Oregon White Oak tree (Quercus garryana)...

  19. Bullet fragments in Belding's ground squirrels in Oregon and California in 2014-2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The dataset includes specifics on fragments of bullets recovered from shot Belding's ground squirrels from Oregon and California. Ground squirrels were radiographed...

  20. Food habits and dietary variability of pelagic nekton off Oregon and Washington, 1979-1984

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brodeur, R.D; Lorz, H.V; Pearcy, W.G

    1987-01-01

    This paper provides details on interannual variability in the taxonomic composition of the diet of 20 species of pelagic nekton sampled on the continental shelf off Oregon and Washington from 1979 to 1984...

  1. Wetted channel and bar features for Hunter Creek, Oregon in 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Hunter Creek is an unregulated system that drains 115 square kilometers of southwestern Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean south of the town of Gold Beach,...

  2. Wetted channel and bar features for Hunter Creek, Oregon in 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Hunter Creek is an unregulated system that drains 115 square kilometers of southwestern Oregon before flowing into the Pacific Ocean south of the town of Gold Beach,...

  3. 2010 Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) Lidar: Eagle Point Study Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) contracted with Watershed Sciences, Inc. to collect high resolution topographic LiDAR data for...

  4. Landslide Deposit Boundaries for the Little North Santiam River Basin, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This layer is an inventory of existing landslides deposits in the Little North Santiam River Basin, Oregon (2009). Each landslide deposit shown on this map has been...

  5. Euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide policy in The Netherlands and Oregon: a comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Kant

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a comparative analysis of euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide policy in The Netherlands and the state of Oregon in the United States. The topics of euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide are discussed in the context of the historical setting of The Netherlands and the United States with special emphasis placed on public opinion, role of the courts and the legislative bodies, and opinions of physicians. Major similarities and differences in the laws of The Netherlands and Oregon are discussed. The article examines whether the passage of the law has led to a slide down the slippery slope in The Netherlands and Oregon as had been suggested by the opponents of the law. The article concludes that the empirical evidence does not support the contention of the opponents. However, the author argues that the potential for this happening is much greater in The Netherlands than in Oregon.

  6. Final Critical Habitat for the Oregon Silverspot Butterfly (Speyeria zerene hippolyta)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — These data identify, in general, the areas where final critical habitat for the Oregon Silverspot Butterfly (Speyeria zerene hippolyta) occur.

  7. The Oregon Public Health Policy Institute: Building Competencies for Public Health Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jangho; Bernell, Stephanie; Tynan, Michael; Alvarado, Carla Sarai; Eversole, Tom; Mosbaek, Craig; Beathard, Candice

    2015-01-01

    The Oregon Public Health Policy Institute (PHPI) was designed to enhance public health policy competencies among state and local health department staff. The Oregon Health Authority funded the College of Public Health and Human Sciences at Oregon State University to develop the PHPI curriculum in 2012 and offer it to participants from 4 state public health programs and 5 local health departments in 2013. The curriculum interspersed short instructional sessions on policy development, implementation, and evaluation with longer hands-on team exercises in which participants applied these skills to policy topics their teams had selected. Panel discussions provided insights from legislators and senior Oregon health experts. Participants reported statistically significant increases in public health policy competencies and high satisfaction with PHPI overall. PMID:26066925

  8. 2010 Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) Lidar: Mt. Shasta Study Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Oregon Department of Geology & Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) contracted with Watershed Sciences, Inc. to collect high resolution topographic LiDAR data for...

  9. 2009 Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) Lidar: Medford

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Oregon Department of Geology & Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) contracted with Watershed Sciences, Inc. to collect high resolution topographic lidar data for...

  10. 2011 Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) Lidar: Umatilla Study Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Oregon Department of Geology & Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) contracted with Watershed Sciences, Inc. to collect high resolution topographic LiDAR data for...

  11. 2008 - 2009 Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) South Coast LiDAR Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) contracted with Watershed Sciences, Inc. to collect high resolution topographic LiDAR data for...

  12. 2008 Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) Lidar: Ontario

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Oregon Department of Geology & Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) contracted with Watershed Sciences, Inc. to collect high resolution topographic lidar data for...

  13. 2010 Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) Lidar: Yambo Study Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Oregon Department of Geology & Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) contracted with Watershed Sciences, Inc. to collect high resolution topographic LiDAR data for...

  14. 2011 Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) Lidar: Pine Creek Study Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Oregon Department of Geology & Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) contracted with Watershed Sciences, Inc. to collect high resolution topographic LiDAR data for...

  15. 2011 Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) Lidar: Burns Study Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Oregon Department of Geology & Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) contracted with Watershed Sciences, Inc. to collect high resolution topographic LiDAR data for...

  16. 2012 Oregon Department of Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Lidar: Panther Creek Study Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Oregon Department of Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) contracted with Watershed Sciences, Inc. to collect high resolution topographic LiDAR data for...

  17. 2008 Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) Lidar: Camp Creek

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Oregon Department of Geology & Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) contracted with Watershed Sciences, Inc. to collect high resolution topographic lidar data for...

  18. 2011 Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) Lidar: Umatilla Study Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) contracted with Watershed Sciences, Inc. to collect high resolution topographic LiDAR data for...

  19. 2010 Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) Lidar: Mt. Shasta Study Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) contracted with Watershed Sciences, Inc. to collect high resolution topographic LiDAR data for...

  20. Head Scarp Boundary for the Landslides in the Little North Santiam River Basin, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Polygons represent head scarps and flank scarps associated with landslide deposits in the Little North Santiam River Basin, Oregon. This work was completed as part...

  1. Hydrodynamic modeling of the mouth of the Columbia River, Oregon and Washington, 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A process-based numerical model of the mouth of the Columbia River (MCR) and estuary, Oregon and Washington, was applied to simulate hydrodynamic conditions for the...

  2. Seafloor character of the Oregon outer continental shelf (OCS) proposed wind farm site

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This seafloor-character raster is part of a data release of the Oregon outer continental shelf (OCS) proposed wind farm map site. The substrate classes mapped in...

  3. 2010 Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) Lidar: Newberry Study Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) contracted with Watershed Sciences, Inc. to collect high resolution topographic LiDAR data for...

  4. 2010 Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) Lidar: Newberry Study Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Oregon Department of Geology & Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) contracted with Watershed Sciences, Inc. to collect high resolution topographic LiDAR data for...

  5. Oregon Spotted Frog (Rana pretiosa) Monitoring at Jack Creek 2015-2016

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset contains information from mark-recapture and egg mass surveys conducted 2015-2016 by USGS as part of an ongoing Oregon spotted frog (Rana pretiosa)...

  6. 75 FR 68336 - Oregon Parks and Recreation Department; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-05

    ... 30, 2010. d. Applicant: Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. e. Name of Project: Thompson's Mills... reference to this application must be accompanied by proof of service on all persons listed in the service...

  7. 2011 Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) Lidar: Burns Study Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) contracted with Watershed Sciences, Inc. to collect high resolution topographic LiDAR data for...

  8. Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for Oregon based on 2000 Census Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data depicts the social vulnerability of Oregon census block groups to environmental hazards. Data were culled primarily from the 2000 Decennial Census.

  9. 2010 Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) Lidar: Klamath Study Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Oregon Department of Geology & Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) contracted with Watershed Sciences, Inc. to collect high resolution topographic LiDAR data for...

  10. Stream Temperature Data in the Willow-Whitehorse watershed of SE Oregon, 2011-15

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset includes stream temperatures from a network of 100 data loggers that was installed throughout the Willow-Whitehorse watershed of SE Oregon in September...

  11. Stream Temperature Data in the Little Blitzen watershed of SE Oregon, 2009-15

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset includes stream temperatures from two data loggers installed at one site in the Little Blitzen River of SE Oregon as part of a redband trout...

  12. Geology and geomorphology--Drakes Bay and Vicinity Bay Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Drakes Bay and Vicinity map area, California. The polygon shapefile is included in...

  13. Pärnu Bay Golf Club = Pärnu Bay Golf Club / Arhitekt11

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2016-01-01

    Pärnu Bay Golf Club, arhitektid Jürgen Lepper, Anto Savi, Margus Soonets, Janar Toomesso (Arhitekt11), sisearhitektid Liina Vaino, Kaari Metslang, Hannelore Kääramees (Arhitekt11). Kultuurkapitali Arhitektuuri sihtkapitali aastapreemia nominent 2016

  14. Gravity cores from San Pablo Bay and Carquinez Strait, San Francisco Bay, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data release contains information on gravity cores that were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in the area of San Pablo Bay and Carquinez Strait,...

  15. San Francisco Bay Water Quality Improvement Fund Points, SF Bay CA, 2015, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The San Francisco Bay Water Quality Improvement Fund is a competitive grant program that is helping implement TMDLs to improve water quality, protect wetlands, and...

  16. Contaminants in redhead ducks wintering in Baffin Bay and Redfish Bay, Texas

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A sample of 39 redhead ducks was collected from Redfish and Baffin Bays on the Texas Coast during the winter of 1988-1989 to obtain baseline information on...

  17. Compositional zoning of the Devine Canyon Tuff, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacaster, S.; Streck, M. J.; Belkin, H. E.; Bodnar, R. J.

    2011-12-01

    In eastern Oregon, many voluminous and minor rhyolites erupted from 40 Ma to 1.3 ka. As part of continued investigations into the petrogenesis of Oregon rhyolites, we focus here on the Devine Canyon Tuff (DCT). The 9.7 Ma DCT, with its proposed source in the Harney Basin, is among the most widespread ash flow tuffs in SE Oregon. It originally covered about 20,000 km2 with a minimum volume of 200 km3 as it flowed radially and eastward into the Oregon-Idaho graben. The DCT is crystal rich, pumiceous in places, and non- to densely welded with vitric, devitrified, and vapor phase zones. Pumices range in size from a few cm to about 30 cm and are rhyolitic with a very minor commingled dacite component. Phenocryst content ranges from 7% to 30%. Compositional zoning only becomes apparent by integrating data from several outcrops and therefore the tuff appears little zoned at the single outcrop scale. Published data and our work to date show that bulk tuff and pumices, excluding the commingled mafic component, are mildly peralkaline rhyolites (Na+K/Al = 1.0-1.2) with a limited range in major elements (SiO2, 74.6-77.6 wt%; and FeO*, 2.3-3.1 wt%), but vary greatly in the most incompatibe trace elements including Rb, Zr, Nb, Y. These elements indicate two-fold enrichments with the following concentrations in the least to most evolved samples: Rb from 80 ppm to 167 ppm, Zr from 599 ppm to 1,310 ppm, Nb from 48 ppm to 100 ppm, and Y from 81 ppm to 172 ppm. Other trace elements behave conservatively or decrease. LREE (e.g. Ce) concentrations decrease with differentiation pointing to the fractionation of LREE enriched phases causing rotation of REE patterns from the least (e.g. Ce/Y = 2.7) to most differentiated (Ce/Y = 1.1) samples. Compatible elements such as Ba and Sr range from 260 ppm to 10 ppm and 36 ppm to 3 ppm, respectively, but are more scattered suggesting that changes in alkali feldspar proportions influence concentration levels. Minerals include alkali feldspars

  18. Oregon state information handbook formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-12-31

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administater, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the State of Oregon. It contains: a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; and the full text of relevant statutes and regulations.

  19. Oregon state information handbook: formerly utilized sites remedial action program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-12-31

    This volume is one of a series produced under contract with the DOE, by Politech Corporation to develop a legislative and regulatory data base to assist the FUSRAP management in addressing the institutional and socioeconomic issues involved in carrying out the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. This Information Handbook series contains information about all relevant government agencies at the Federal and state levels, the pertinent programs they administer, each affected state legislature, and current Federal and state legislative and regulatory initiatives. This volume is a compilation of information about the State of Oregon. It contains a description of the state executive branch structure; a summary of relevant state statutes and regulations; a description of the structure of the state legislature, identification of the officers and committee chairmen, and a summary of recent relevant legislative action; and the full text of relevant statutes and regulations.

  20. THE OREGON HEALTH INSURANCE EXPERIMENT: EVIDENCE FROM THE FIRST YEAR*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Amy; Taubman, Sarah; Wright, Bill; Bernstein, Mira; Gruber, Jonathan; Newhouse, Joseph P.; Allen, Heidi; Baicker, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    In 2008, a group of uninsured low-income adults in Oregon was selected by lottery to be given the chance to apply for Medicaid. This lottery provides an opportunity to gauge the effects of expanding access to public health insurance on the health care use, financial strain, and health of low-income adults using a randomized controlled design. In the year after random assignment, the treatment group selected by the lottery was about 25 percentage points more likely to have insurance than the control group that was not selected. We find that in this first year, the treatment group had substantively and statistically significantly higher health care utilization (including primary and preventive care as well as hospitalizations), lower out-of-pocket medical expenditures and medical debt (including fewer bills sent to collection), and better self-reported physical and mental health than the control group. PMID:23293397

  1. Oregon's strategy to confront prescription opioid misuse: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Dennis; Bovett, Rob; Burns, Thomas; Cushing, Judy; Glynn, Mary Ellen; Kruse, Senator Jeff; Millet, Lisa M; Shames, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Governor John Kitzhaber appointed a Prescription Drug Taskforce to address Oregon's opioid epidemic. This case study reviews the Taskforce's participation in the National Governors Association State Policy Academy on Reducing Prescription Drug Abuse. To address the challenge of the misuse and abuse of prescription opioids, the Taskforce developed a strategy for practice change, community education and enhanced access to safe opioid disposal using stakeholder meetings, consensus development, and five action steps: (1) fewer pills in circulation, (2) educate prescribers and the public on the risks of opioid use, (3) foster safe disposal of unused medication, (4) provide treatment for opioid dependence, and (5) continued leadership from the Governor, health plans and health professionals. Although the story is ongoing, there are lessons for leadership in other states and for public health and medical practitioners throughout the country. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Block Interactions in Southern Oregon, Northern California, and Northwestern Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollick, J. J.; McCaffrey, R.; Sella, G.; Stevens, C.; Williams, T.; McCaffrey, C.; Walton, B.

    2003-12-01

    Southern Oregon, northern California, and northwestern Nevada is an area of plate tectonic interest due to the surrounding complex interactions between the Pacific plate, Sierra Nevada block, western Basin and Range, California Coast Range, Mendocino Transform, Juan de Fuca plate and the San Andreas fault. The overall net effects from these interactions on the tri-state area are unknown and constitute the focus of our research. Over a two week period in June and July of 2003, GPS data were collected at approximately 100 sites between 40 - 45 degrees N. and 235 - 245 degrees E. Most of the sites were first occupied as part of National Geodetic Survey HARN surveys in 1998 and 1999. These data are currently being processed and the resulting velocity vectors will be analyzed to ascertain block interactions in the region of interest.

  3. Waitress was not induced into quitting, Oregon court says.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-09-04

    An Oregon Supreme Court has ruled that an HIV-positive waitress failed to present sufficient evidence supporting her claims of wrongful discharge and unlawful discrimination in a suit she brought against her employer. The restaurant's supervisor informed the waitress that a regular customer threatened to boycott the restaurant because of the waitress's HIV status. He also stated that her continued employment could result in financial problems for the restaurant. The waitress, fearing abuse and humiliation, agreed to a resignation that would be treated as a layoff, so that she would not lose certain government benefits. The waitress then decided to sue, saying that the supervisor's comments were intended to convince her to quit.

  4. Geothermal gradient drilling, north-central Cascades of Oregon, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youngquist, W.

    1980-01-01

    A geothermal gradient drilling program was conducted on the western flank of the north-central Cascade Mountains in Oregon. Six wells were drilled during this program, although in effect seven were drilled, as two wells were drilled at site 3, the second well, however, actually going to a lesser depth than the first. Three of the wells (3, 4, and 5) were drilled in areas which topographically are subject to strong throughflows of ground water. None of these wells reached the regional water table, and all showed essentially isothermal geothermal gradients. The single well which was started essentially at the water table (well 6) shows a linear temperature rise with depth essentially from the top of the well bore. Well No. 2 shows an isothermal gradient down to the level of the regional water table and then shows a linear gradient of about 70/sup 0/C/km from the regional water table to total depth.

  5. Florida Bay Science Program: a Synthesis of Research on Florida Bay

    OpenAIRE

    Hunt, John; Nuttle, William

    2007-01-01

    This report documents the progress made toward the objectives established in the Strategic Plan revised in 1997 for the agencies cooperating in the program. These objectives are expressed as five questions that organized the research on the Florida Bay ecosystem: Ecosystem History What was the Florida Bay ecosystem like 50, 100, and 150 years ago? Question 1—Physical Processes How and at what rates do storms, changing freshwater flows, sea level rise, and local evaporatio...

  6. Oregon Sustainability Center: Weighing Approaches to Net Zero

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regnier, Cindy [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Robinson, Alastair [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Settlemyre, Kevin [Sustainable IQ, Inc., Arlington, MA (United States); Bosnic, Zorana [HOK, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2013-10-01

    The Oregon Sustainability Center (OSC) was to represent a unique public/private partnership between the city of Portland, Oregon, state government, higher education, non-profit organizations, and the business community. A unique group of stakeholders partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) technical expert team (TET) to collaboratively identify, analyze, and evaluate solutions to enable the OSC to become a high-performance sustainability landmark in downtown Portland. The goal was to build a new, low-energy mixed-use urban high-rise that consumes at least 50 percent less energy than requirements set by Energy Standard 90.1-2007 of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), and the Illuminating Engineering Society of America (IESNA) as part of DOE’s Commercial Building Partnerships (CBP) program.1 In addition, the building design was to incorporate renewable energy sources that would account for the remaining energy consumption, resulting in a net zero building. The challenge for the CBP DOE technical team was to evaluate factors of risk and components of resiliency in the current net zero energy design and analyze that design to see if the same high performance could be achieved by alternative measures at lower costs. In addition, the team was to use a “lens of scalability” to assess whether or not the strategies could be applied to more projects. However, a key component of the required project funding did not pass, and therefore this innovative building design was discontinued while it was in the design development stage.

  7. Probabilistic, Seismically-Induced Landslide Hazard Mapping of Western Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, M. J.; Sharifi Mood, M.; Gillins, D. T.; Mahalingam, R.

    2015-12-01

    Earthquake-induced landslides can generate significant damage within urban communities by damaging structures, obstructing lifeline connection routes and utilities, generating various environmental impacts, and possibly resulting in loss of life. Reliable hazard and risk maps are important to assist agencies in efficiently allocating and managing limited resources to prepare for such events. This research presents a new methodology in order to communicate site-specific landslide hazard assessments in a large-scale, regional map. Implementation of the proposed methodology results in seismic-induced landslide hazard maps that depict the probabilities of exceeding landslide displacement thresholds (e.g. 0.1, 0.3, 1.0 and 10 meters). These maps integrate a variety of data sources including: recent landslide inventories, LIDAR and photogrammetric topographic data, geology map, mapped NEHRP site classifications based on available shear wave velocity data in each geologic unit, and USGS probabilistic seismic hazard curves. Soil strength estimates were obtained by evaluating slopes present along landslide scarps and deposits for major geologic units. Code was then developed to integrate these layers to perform a rigid, sliding block analysis to determine the amount and associated probabilities of displacement based on each bin of peak ground acceleration in the seismic hazard curve at each pixel. The methodology was applied to western Oregon, which contains weak, weathered, and often wet soils at steep slopes. Such conditions have a high landslide hazard even without seismic events. A series of landslide hazard maps highlighting the probabilities of exceeding the aforementioned thresholds were generated for the study area. These output maps were then utilized in a performance based design framework enabling them to be analyzed in conjunction with other hazards for fully probabilistic-based hazard evaluation and risk assessment. a) School of Civil and Construction

  8. Diets and foraging behavior of northern Spotted Owls in Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsman, E.D.; Anthony, R.G.; Meslow, E.C.; Zabel, C.J.

    2004-01-01

    We describe local, regional, and annual variation in diets of northern Spotted Owls (Strix occidentalis caurina) in Oregon based on 24 497 prey collected at 1118 owl territories in 1970-2003. The sample included 91.5% mammals, 4.3% birds, 4.1% insects, and 0.1% other prey. The diet included ???131 species, including 49 mammals, 41 birds, 3 reptiles, 1 frog, 1 crayfish, 1 scorpion, 2 snails, and 33 species of insects. On average, 91.9 ?? 0.3% (SE) of prey in the diet were nocturnal animals, 3.3 ?? 0.2% were diurnal, and 4.8 ?? 0.2% were active both day and night. Of the prey captured, 50.5 ?? 0.8% were arboreal, 18.7 ?? 0.7% were scansorial, 4.8 ?? 0.2% were aerial, and 26.0 = 0.7% were terrestrial. Mean mass of prey was 116.6 ?? 6.5 g. Diets varied among owl territories, geographic regions, and years; but were generally dominated by four to six species of nocturnal mammals, including northern flying squirrels (Glaucomys sabrinus), woodrats (Neotoma fuscipes and N. cinerea), red tree voles (Arborimus longicaudus), western red-backed voles (Clethrionomys californicus), deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus), or gophers (Thomomys spp.). Estimates of dietary evenness were low, indicating diets dominated by a few species of mammals. Forest management practices that produce healthy populations of arboreal and scansorial mammals such as flying squirrels, woodrats, and red tree voles should benefit northern Spotted Owls in Oregon and Washington. ?? 2004 The Raptor Research Foundation, Inc.

  9. Sports-Related Emergency Preparedness in Oregon High Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Samuel T; Norcross, Marc F; Bovbjerg, Viktor E; Hoffman, Mark A; Chang, Eunwook; Koester, Michael C

    Best practice recommendations for sports-related emergency preparation include implementation of venue-specific emergency action plans (EAPs), access to early defibrillation, and first responders-specifically coaches-trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and automated external defibrillator (AED) use. The objective was to determine whether high schools had implemented these 3 recommendations and whether schools with a certified athletic trainer (AT) were more likely to have done so. Schools with an AT were more likely to have implemented the recommendations. Cross-sectional study. Level 4. All Oregon School Activities Association member school athletic directors were invited to complete a survey on sports-related emergency preparedness and AT availability at their school. Chi-square and Fisher exact tests were used to analyze the associations between emergency preparedness and AT availability. In total, 108 respondents (37% response rate) completed the survey. Exactly half reported having an AT available. Only 11% (95% CI, 6%-19%) of the schools had implemented all 3 recommendations, 29% (95% CI, 21%-39%) had implemented 2, 32% (95% CI, 24%-42%) had implemented 1, and 27% (95% CI, 19%-36%) had not implemented any of the recommendations. AT availability was associated with implementation of the recommendations (χ2 = 10.3, P = 0.02), and the proportion of schools with ATs increased with the number of recommendations implemented (χ2 = 9.3, P Schools with an AT were more likely to implement venue-specific EAPs (52% vs 24%, P schools were inadequately prepared for sports-related emergencies. Schools with an AT were more likely to implement some, but not all, of the recommendations. Policy changes may be needed to improve implementation. Most Oregon high schools need to do more to prepare for sports-related emergencies. The results provide evidence for sports medicine professionals and administrators to inform policy changes that ensure the safety of athletes.

  10. Carolina bays of the Savannah River Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schalles, J.F. (Creighton Univ., Omaha, NE (USA)); Sharitz, R.R.; Gibbons, J.W.; Leversee, G.J.; Knox, J.N. (Savannah River Ecology Lab., Aiken, SC (USA))

    1989-01-01

    Much of the research to date on the Carolina bays of the Savannah River Plant and elsewhere has focused on certain species or on environmental features. Different levels of detail exist for different groups of organisms and reflect the diverse interests of previous investigators. This report summarizes aspects of research to date and presents data from numerous studies. 70 refs., 14 figs., 12 tabs.

  11. Bathymetry (2011) for Coral Bay, St. John

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a LiDAR (Light Detection & Ranging) 0.3x0.3 meter resolution depth surface for Coral Bay, St. John in the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI). The...

  12. Madreporaria from the Bay of Batavia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Umbgrove, J.H.F.

    1939-01-01

    INTRODUCTION In the Bay of Batavia there are patch-reefs and cays in different stadia of development. Some are small reefs still rather deep below sea level, other reefs bear a small sand cay. On the larger coral sand islands vegetation has developed ; moreover shingle ramparts and a moat have come

  13. Bathymetry (2011) for Fish Bay, St. John

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a LiDAR (Light Detection & Ranging) 0.3x0.3 meter resolution depth surface for Fish Bay, St. John in the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI). The...

  14. PEMANFATAN TEOREMA BAYES DALAM PENENTUAN PENYAKIT THT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Winiarti

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Dalam konsep pelacakan dalam mencari solusi dengan pendekatan artificial inteligent, ada berbagai metode  yang dapat diterapkan untuk mengatasi masalah ketidakpastian saat proses pelacakan terjadi. Salah satunya adalah teorema bayes. Adanya ketidakpastian pada proses pelacakan dapat terjadi karena adanya perubahan pengetahuan yang ada di dalam sistem. Untuk itu diperlukan adanya suatu metode untuk mengatasi permasalahan tersebut. Dalam penelitian ini telah diterapkan suatu metode untuk mengatasi ketidakpastian dengan teorema Bayes pada kasus pelacakan untuk mendiagnosa penyakit pada THT (Telinga,Hidung dan Tenggorokan.  Subjek pada penelitian ini adalah proses pelacakan untuk menentukan penyakit THT dengan model penalaran forward chaining dan metode kepastiannya menggunakan teorema bayes dengan cara menghitung nilai probabilitas suatu penyakit dan membandingkan probabilitas setiap gejalanya. Model pengembangan perangkat lunak yang digunakan dalam penelitian ini adalah Waterfall. Metode Waterfall diawali dengan analisis data, perancangan sistem, pengkodean menggunakan Visual Basic 6.0, pengujian sistem dengan black box test dan alfa test. Dari penelitian yang dilakukan menghasilkan sebuah perangkat lunak yaitu  yang mampu menentukan penyakit pada THT dengan menerapkan metode bayes untuk mengatasi ketidakpastian. Hasil uji coba sistem menujukkan bahwa aplikasi ini layak dan dapat digunakan.

  15. Morphological features in the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarma, K.V.L.N.S.; Ramana, M.V.; Subrahmanyam, V.; Krishna, K.S.; Ramprasad, T.; Desa, M.

    the NW-SE trending long profiles spaced at 30 nautical miles aided to improve the bathymetry chart of the Bay of Bengal. The echograms show some important geo-morphological features of the seafloor. One such feature is the "Swatch of no ground" which...

  16. Chesapeake Bay Program Water Quality Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Chesapeake Information Management System (CIMS), designed in 1996, is an integrated, accessible information management system for the Chesapeake Bay Region. CIMS is an organized, distributed library of information and software tools designed to increase basin-wide public access to Chesapeake Bay information. The information delivered by CIMS includes technical and public information, educational material, environmental indicators, policy documents, and scientific data. Through the use of relational databases, web-based programming, and web-based GIS a large number of Internet resources have been established. These resources include multiple distributed on-line databases, on-demand graphing and mapping of environmental data, and geographic searching tools for environmental information. Baseline monitoring data, summarized data and environmental indicators that document ecosystem status and trends, confirm linkages between water quality, habitat quality and abundance, and the distribution and integrity of biological populations are also available. One of the major features of the CIMS network is the Chesapeake Bay Program's Data Hub, providing users access to a suite of long- term water quality and living resources databases. Chesapeake Bay mainstem and tidal tributary water quality, benthic macroinvertebrates, toxics, plankton, and fluorescence data can be obtained for a network of over 800 monitoring stations.

  17. Saginaw Bay, MI LiDAR

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TASK NAME:(NRCS) Saginaw Bay, MI LiDAR LiDAR Data Acquisition and Processing Production Task USGS Contract No. G10PC00057 Task Order No. G11PD01254 Woolpert Order...

  18. (IMPS) at Makoba Bay, Zanzibar, Tanzania

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Daisy Ouya

    sedimentation pond, in that order. Water from the reservoir flows through the pond system by gravity. In the late 18th Century a powerful cyclone hit. Unguja Island. As a result, the estuarine sediments in the Bay have remained blackish in colour, sticky,.

  19. Summary report on Bristol Bay murre mortality

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — At least 86,000 common murres died in Bristol Bay, Alaska during a brief period in late April of this year. Evidence suggests that it was a catastrophic event of...

  20. An empirical Bayes approach for the Poisson life distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canavos, G. C.

    1973-01-01

    A smooth empirical Bayes estimator is derived for the intensity parameter (hazard rate) in the Poisson distribution as used in life testing. The reliability function is also estimated either by using the empirical Bayes estimate of the parameter, or by obtaining the expectation of the reliability function. The behavior of the empirical Bayes procedure is studied through Monte Carlo simulation in which estimates of mean-squared errors of the empirical Bayes estimators are compared with those of conventional estimators such as minimum variance unbiased or maximum likelihood. Results indicate a significant reduction in mean-squared error of the empirical Bayes estimators over the conventional variety.