WorldWideScience

Sample records for net-flux radiometer measurements

  1. GALILEO PROBE NET FLUX RADIOMETER DATA V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Galileo Probe Net Flux Radiometer (NFR) measured net and upward radiation fluxes in Jupiter's atmosphere between about 0.44 bars and 14 bars, using five spectral...

  2. A Compact, Multi-view Net Flux Radiometer for Future Uranus and Neptune Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, S.; Amato, M.; Atkinson, D. H.; Hewagama, T.; Jennings, D. E.; Nixon, C. A.; Mousis, O.

    2017-01-01

    A Net Flux Radiometer (NFR) is presented that can be included in an atmospheric structure instrument suite for future probe missions to the icy giants Uranus and Neptune. The baseline design has two spectral channels i.e., a solar channel (0.4-to-3.5 m) and a thermal channel (4-to-300 m). The NFR is capable of viewing five distinct viewing angles during the descent. Non-imaging Winston cones with band-pass filters are used for each spectral channel and to define a 5 angular acceptance. Uncooled thermopile detectors are used in each spectral channel and are read out using a custom radiation hard application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The baseline design can easily be changed to increase the number of detector channels from two to seven.

  3. Development of a Net Flux Radiometer for the Hera Saturn Probe Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Shahid; Amato, Michael; Atkinson, David; Mousis, Olivier; Nixon, Conor; Simon, Amy A.; Hera Probe Mission Team

    2016-10-01

    In situ exploration of all the giant planets in the outer solar system is an imperative and a Saturn probe is the next compelling step beyond Galileo's in situ exploration of Jupiter, the remote investigation of its interior, gravity, and magnetic fields by the Juno mission, and the Cassini spacecraft's similar orbital reconnaissance of Saturn. One such proposed future mission is "HERA: an international atmospheric probe to unveil the depths of Saturn" a nominal configuration is a combined ESA/Class-M probe mission accompanied by a launch vehicle and carrier relay spacecraft provided by NASA. One of the instruments being considered for inclusion on the probe is a Net Flux Radiometer (NFR) to unravel the vertical structure and properties of Saturn's cloud and haze layers. A NFR concept is presented that can be included in an atmospheric structure instrument suite for the Hera mission. The current design has two spectral channels i.e., a solar channel (0.4-to-5 µm) and a thermal channel (4-to-50 µm). The NFR is capable of viewing five distinct viewing angles during the descent. Non-imaging Winston cones with window and filter combinations define the spectral channels with a 5° Field-Of View (FOV). Uncooled thermopile detectors are used in each spectral channel and are read out using a custom designed radiation-hard Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC).

  4. Microwave Radiometer Linearity Measured by Simple Means

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels

    2002-01-01

    Modern spaceborne radiometer systems feature an almost perfect on-board calibration, hence the primary calibration task to be carried out before launch is a check of radiometer linearity. This paper describes two ways of measuring linearity of microwave radiometers only requiring relatively simple...

  5. Measuring the instrument function of radiometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winston, R. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Littlejohn, R.G. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The instrument function is a function of position and angle, the knowledge of which allows one to compute the response of a radiometer to an incident wave field in any state of coherence. The instrument function of a given radiometer need not be calculated; instead, it may be measured by calibration with incident plane waves.

  6. Measurement errors with low-cost citizen science radiometers

    OpenAIRE

    Bardají, R.; Piera Fernández, Jaume

    2016-01-01

    The KdUINO is a Do-It-Yourself buoy with low-cost radiometers that measure a parameter related to water transparency, the diffuse attenuation coefficient integrated into all the photosynthetically active radiation. In this contribution, we analyze the measurement errors of a novel low-cost multispectral radiometer that is used with the KdUINO. Peer Reviewed

  7. Etched track radiometers in radon measurements: a review

    CERN Document Server

    Nikolaev, V A

    1999-01-01

    Passive radon radiometers, based on alpha particle etched track detectors, are very attractive for the assessment of radon exposure. The present review considers various devices used for measurement of the volume activity of radon isotopes and their daughters and determination of equilibrium coefficients. Such devices can be classified into 8 groups: (i) open or 'bare' detectors, (ii) open chambers, (iii) sup 2 sup 2 sup 2 Rn chambers with an inlet filter, (iv) advanced sup 2 sup 2 sup 2 Rn radiometers, (v) multipurpose radiometers, (vi) radiometers based on a combination of etched track detectors and an electrostatic field, (vii) radiometers based on etched track detectors and activated charcoal and (viii) devices for the measurement of radon isotopes and/or radon daughters by means of track parameter measurements. Some of them such as the open detector and the chamber with an inlet filter have a variety of modifications and are applied widely both in geophysical research and radon dosimetric surveys. At the...

  8. Temperature measurements of natural surfaces using infrared radiometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, D

    1968-09-01

    The radiometric method for surface temperature measurements in meteorology and its airborne use are discussed, with emphasis on possible errors of this method. These are caused by the air layer between radiometer and target, by the nonblackbody characteristic, and by the nonuniformity of natural surfaces. Methods for correcting and reducing these errors are described. Examples of airborne surface temperature measurements are presented.

  9. Measurement of small antenna reflector losses for radiometer calibration budget

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels

    1997-01-01

    Antenna reflector losses play an important role in the calibration budget for a microwave radiometer. If the losses are small, they are difficult to measure by traditional means. However, they can be assessed directly by radiometric means using the sky brightness temperature as incident radiation...

  10. Determination of maritime snowfall from radar and microwave radiometer measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinman, James A.; Hakkarinen, Ida M.

    1990-01-01

    This study examines the effect of snowfall on high frequency microwave radiances measured from above the atmosphere by airborne radiometers. Attention is given to the analysis of a maritime snow storm so that snow accumulation on the surface would not introduce ambiguities into the analysis of the upwelling radiances.

  11. The Use of Filtered Radiometers for Radiance Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parr, Albert C; Johnson, B Carol

    2011-01-01

    A methodology for using a calibrated filter radiometer to measure and monitor the spectral radiance of calibration sources is described. An example is presented using the NIST calibration sphere source that is used to support the NASA Earth Observing remote-sensing program.

  12. Accurate antenna reflector loss measurements for radiometer calibration budget

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels

    1996-01-01

    Antenna reflector losses may play an important role in the calibration budget for a microwave radiometer. If the losses are small they are difficult to measure by traditional means. However, they can be assessed directly by radiometric means using the sky brightness temperature as incident radiat...... radiation. The paper describes how such measurements are carried out as well as a suitable experimental set-up. The main reflector of the European Space Agency's MIMR system is used to demonstrate the principle...

  13. Experimental measurements and noise analysis of a cryogenic radiometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, S. M.; Woods, S. I.; Jung, T. M.; Carter, A. C.; Datla, R. U. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), 100 Bureau Drive, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States)

    2014-07-15

    A cryogenic radiometer device, intended for use as part of an electrical-substitution radiometer, was measured at low temperature. The device consists of a receiver cavity mechanically and thermally connected to a temperature-controlled stage through a thin-walled polyimide tube which serves as a weak thermal link. With the temperature difference between the receiver and the stage measured in millikelvin and the electrical power measured in picowatts, the measured responsivity was 4700 K/mW and the measured thermal time constant was 14 s at a stage temperature of 1.885 K. Noise analysis in terms of Noise Equivalent Power (NEP) was used to quantify the various fundamental and technical noise contributions, including phonon noise and Johnson-Nyquist noise. The noise analysis clarifies the path toward a cryogenic radiometer with a noise floor limited by fundamental phonon noise, where the magnitude of the phonon NEP is 6.5 fW/√(Hz) for the measured experimental parameters.

  14. Underlying Surface Remote Sensing by the Microwave Radiometer with High Measurement Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ubaichin Anton

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a new approach to microwave radiometer design. The approach implies simultaneous using both modified zero measurement method and multi-receiver technique. Simultaneous using increases the operating characteristics of airborne microwave radiometers for aircrafts with self-contained power supply. The block diagram of the onboard Earth remote sensing microwave radiometric system is presented. The block diagram and operating timing diagrams of the designed radiometer are shown. An original technique to design a fiducial noise source for transfer characteristics is discussed. The advantages of the designed radiometer in comparison with the state of the art zero-type microwave radiometer are described.

  15. Intercomparison of 51 radiometers for determining global horizontal irradiance and direct normal irradiance measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habte, Aron; Sengupta, Manajit; Andreas, Afshin; Wilcox, Stephen; Stoffel, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Accurate solar radiation measurements require properly installed and maintained radiometers with calibrations traceable to the World Radiometric Reference. This study analyzes the performance of 51 commercially available and prototype radiometers used for measuring global horizontal irradiances or direct normal irradiances. These include pyranometers, pyrheliometers, rotating shadowband radiometers, and a pyranometer with an internal shading mask deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Solar Radiation Research Laboratory. The radiometers in this study were deployed for one year (from April 1, 2011, through March 31, 2012), and their measurements were compared under clear-sky, partly cloudy, and mostly cloudy conditions to reference values of low estimated measurement uncertainties. The intent of this paper is to present a general overview of each radiometer's performance based on the instrumentation and environmental conditions available at NREL.

  16. Ability of four dental radiometers to measure the light output from nine curing lights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimokawa, Carlos Alberto Kenji; Harlow, Jessie Eudora; Turbino, Míriam Lacalle; Price, Richard Bengt

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of four dental radiometers when measuring the output from nine light curing units (LCUs). The light output from nine light-emitting diode LCUs was measured with a laboratory-grade power meter (PowerMax-Pro 150 HD) and four dental radiometers (Bluephase Meter II, SDI LED Radiometer, Kerr LED Radiometer, and LEDEX CM4000). Ten measurements were made of each LCU with each radiometer. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Tukey tests (α=0.05) were used to determine if there was a difference between the calculated irradiance values from the power meter and those from the radiometers. Where applicable, the LCUs were ranked according to their power and irradiance values. The emission spectra from the LCUs was measured using an integrating sphere attached to a fiber-optic spectrometer (N=10). The beam profile of the LCUs was measured with a beam profiler camera. Of the dental radiometers, only the Bluephase Meter II could measure power. ANOVA showed no significant difference between power values measured with the laboratory-grade meter and the Bluephase Meter II (p=0.527). The difference between the mean irradiance reported by the various radiometers for the same LCU was up to 479mW/cm 2 . The ranking of the power values obtained using the laboratory-grade meter was the same for the Bluephase Meter II. When compared to the calculated irradiance values from the laboratory-grade power meter, the Bluephase Meter II provided the most accurate data. Considering the great variation between the irradiance values provided by radiometers and their overall inaccuracy when compared to a laboratory-grade meter, dentists should not place too much faith in the absolute irradiance value. However, hand-held radiometers can be used to monitor changes in the light output of LCUs over time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of site of starch digestion on portal nutrient net fluxes in steers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozière, Pierre; Rémond, Didier; Lemosquet, Sophie; Chauveau, Béatrice; Durand, Denys; Poncet, Claude

    2005-08-01

    Processing of maize grain is known to modulate the site of starch digestion, thus the nature and amount of nutrients delivered for absorption. We assessed the effect of site of starch digestion on nutrient net fluxes across portal-drained viscera (PDV). Three steers, fitted with permanent digestive cannulas and blood catheters, successively received two diets containing 35 % starch as dent maize grain. Diets differed according to maize presentation: dry and cracked (by-pass, BP) v. wet and ground (control, C). Ruminal physicochemical parameters were not significantly affected. Between C and BP, the decrease in ruminal starch digestion was compensated by an increase in starch digestion in the small intestine. The amount of glucose and soluble alpha-glucoside reaching the ileum was not affected. The amount of glucose disappearing in the small intestine increased from 238 to 531 g/d between C and BP, but portal net flux of glucose remained unchanged (-97 g/d). The portal O2 consumption and net energy release were not significantly affected, averaging 16 % and 57 % of metabolizable energy intake, respectively. The whole-body glucose appearance rate, measured by jugular infusion of [6,6-2H2]glucose, averaged 916 g/d. The present study shows that the increase in the amount of glucose disappearing in the small intestine of conventionally fed cattle at a moderate intake level induces no change in portal net flux of glucose, reflecting an increase in glucose utilization by PDV. That could contribute to the low response of whole-body glucose appearance rate observed at this moderate level of intestinal glucose supply.

  18. A study of the directional response of ultraviolet radiometers: I. Practical evaluation and implications for ultraviolet measurement standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pye, S D; Martin, C J

    2000-09-01

    The directional responses of a range of ultraviolet radiometers commonly used for irradiance measurements of UVB and UVC have been studied. Radiometers with 24 diffuser/filter combinations were assessed using a deuterium source, and three different diffuser/filter designs were assessed using a monochromatic source. The directional responses of the radiometers have been calculated and expressed in terms of figures of merit similar to those described for (photopic) illuminance meters in BS 667 and CIE 69. Those radiometers that performed best for the measurement of both small and extended sources of UVB and UVC had raised PTFE diffusers. We conclude that UV radiometers with a directional response error f2 radiometer.

  19. Measurements on Active Cold Loads for Radiometer Calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels; Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl; Balling, Jan E.

    2008-01-01

    Two semi-conductor Active Cold Loads (ACLs) to be used as cold references in spaceborne microwave radiometers have been developed. An X-band frequency was chosen, and the target noise temperature value was in the 50 to 100 K range. The ACLs are characterized in the operating temperature range 0 50...... degrees C, and long term stability is assessed. To this end a Test Bed has been developed. This Test Bed is actually a stable radiometer, and its design is briefly reviewed. The test setup is described, and preliminary test campaign results indicate output temperatures of 77 K and 55 K for the two ACLs...

  20. Measurements on Active Cold Loads for Radiometer Calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl; Skou, Niels; Balling, Jan E.

    2009-01-01

    Two semiconductor active cold loads (ACLs) to be used as cold references in spaceborne microwave radiometers have been developed. An X-band frequency was chosen, and the target noise temperature value was in the 50-100-K range. The ACLs are characterized in the operating temperature range of 0deg......C-50degC, and long-term stability is assessed. To this end, a test bed has been developed. This test bed is actually a stable radiometer, and its design and performance are discussed. The test setup is described, and test campaign results indicate output temperatures of 77 and 56 K for the two ACLs...

  1. Performance Measurements on Active Cold Loads for Radiometer Calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels; Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl; Balling, Jan E.

    2007-01-01

    Two semi-conductor Active Cold Loads (ACLs) to be used as cold references in spaceborne microwave radiometers have been developed. An X-band frequency has been chosen, and the target noise temperature value is in the 50 to 100 K range. The ACLs are to be characterized in the operating temperature...... range 0-50 degrees C, and long term stability must be assessed. To this end a Test Bed has been developed. This Test Bed is actually a stable radiometer, and its design and development is discussed. The test setup is described, and preliminary test campaign results indicate output temperatures of 73 K...

  2. The Impact of Indoor and Outdoor Radiometer Calibration on Solar Measurements: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habte, Aron; Sengupta, Manajit; Andreas, Afshin; Reda, Ibrahim; Robinson, Justin

    2016-07-01

    Accurate solar radiation data sets are critical to reducing the expenses associated with mitigating performance risk for solar energy conversion systems, and they help utility planners and grid system operators understand the impacts of solar resource variability. The accuracy of solar radiation measured by radiometers depends on the instrument performance specification, installation method, calibration procedure, measurement conditions, maintenance practices, location, and environmental conditions. This study addresses the effect of calibration methodologies and the resulting calibration responsivities provided by radiometric calibration service providers such as the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and manufacturers of radiometers. Some of these radiometers are calibrated indoors, and some are calibrated outdoors. To establish or understand the differences in calibration methodology, we processed and analyzed field-measured data from these radiometers. This study investigates calibration responsivities provided by NREL's broadband outdoor radiometer calibration (BORCAL) and a few prominent manufacturers. The reference radiometer calibrations are traceable to the World Radiometric Reference. These different methods of calibration demonstrated 1% to 2% differences in solar irradiance measurement. Analyzing these values will ultimately assist in determining the uncertainties of the radiometer data and will assist in developing consensus on a standard for calibration.

  3. Measurement of Ocean Wind Vector by an Airborne, Imaging Polarimetric Radiometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels; Laursen, Brian

    1998-01-01

    Airborne measurements of the sea surface have been carried out with an imaging polarimetric 16-GHz radiometer system, aimed at determining the wind direction. The radiometer system features a high-speed digital correlator, and it measures all four parameters of the brightness temperature Stokes...... vector simultaneously. Preliminary experiments have confirmed the directional signatures of the sea brightness temperature as reported by other researchers and have led to development of improved instrumentation with the intention of determining the wind vector pixel by pixel in the radiometer imagery....

  4. Deconvolution of wide field-of-view radiometer measurements of earth-emitted radiation. I - Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G. L.; Green, R. N.

    1981-01-01

    The theory of deconvolution of wide field-of-view (WFOV) radiometer measurements of earth-emitted radiation provides a technique by which the resolution of such measurements can be enhanced to provide radiant exitance at the top of the atmosphere with a finer resolution than the field of view. An analytical solution for the earth-emitted radiant exitance in terms of WFOV radiometer measurements is derived for the nonaxisymmetric (or regional) case, in which the measurements and radiant exitance are considered to be functions of both latitude and longitude. This solution makes it possible to deconvolve a set of WFOV radiometer measurements of earth-emitted radiation and obtain information with a finer resolution than the instantaneous field of view of the instrument. It is shown that there are tradeoffs involved in the selection between WFOV and scanning radiometers.

  5. Thermal net flux measurements on the Pioneer Venus entry probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revercomb, H. E.; Sromovsky, L. A.; Suomi, V. E.; Boese, R. W.

    1985-01-01

    Corrected thermal net (upward minus downward flux) radiation data from four Pioneer Venus probes at latitudes of 4 deg and 60 deg N, and 27 deg and 31 deg S, are presented. Comparisons of these fluxes with radiative transfer calculations were interpreted in terms of cloud properties and the global distribution of water vapor in the lower atmosphere of Venus. The presence of an as yet undetected source of IR opacity is implied by the fluxes in the upper cloud range. It was also shown that beneath the clouds the fluxes at a given altitude increase with latitude, suggesting greater IR cooling below the clouds at high latitudes and a decrease of the water vapor mixing ratios toward the equator.

  6. Shortwave Radiometer Calibration Methods Comparison and Resulting Solar Irradiance Measurement Differences: A User Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habte, Aron; Sengupta, Manajit; Andreas, Afshin; Reda, Ibrahim; Robinson, Justin

    2016-11-21

    Banks financing solar energy projects require assurance that these systems will produce the energy predicted. Furthermore, utility planners and grid system operators need to understand the impact of the variable solar resource on solar energy conversion system performance. Accurate solar radiation data sets reduce the expense associated with mitigating performance risk and assist in understanding the impacts of solar resource variability. The accuracy of solar radiation measured by radiometers depends on the instrument performance specification, installation method, calibration procedure, measurement conditions, maintenance practices, location, and environmental conditions. This study addresses the effect of different calibration methods provided by radiometric calibration service providers, such as NREL and manufacturers of radiometers, on the resulting calibration responsivity. Some of these radiometers are calibrated indoors and some outdoors. To establish or understand the differences in calibration methodology, we processed and analyzed field-measured data from these radiometers. This study investigates calibration responsivities provided by NREL's broadband outdoor radiometer calibration (BORCAL) and a few prominent manufacturers. The BORCAL method provides the outdoor calibration responsivity of pyranometers and pyrheliometers at 45 degree solar zenith angle, and as a function of solar zenith angle determined by clear-sky comparisons with reference irradiance. The BORCAL method also employs a thermal offset correction to the calibration responsivity of single-black thermopile detectors used in pyranometers. Indoor calibrations of radiometers by their manufacturers are performed using a stable artificial light source in a side-by-side comparison between the test radiometer under calibration and a reference radiometer of the same type. In both methods, the reference radiometer calibrations are traceable to the World Radiometric Reference (WRR). These

  7. Results from the 4th WMO Filter Radiometer Comparison for aerosol optical depth measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Kazadzis, Stelios; Kouremeti, Natalia; Diémoz, Henri; Gröbner, Julian; Forgan, Bruce W.; Campanelli, Monica; Estellés, Victor; Lantz, Kathleen; Michalsky, Joseph; Carlund, Thomas; Cuevas, Emilio; Toledano, Carlos; Becker, Ralf; Nyeki, Stephan; Kosmopoulos, Panagiotis G.

    2017-01-01

    This study presents the results of the 4th Filter Radiometer Comparison that was held in Davos, Switzerland, between September 28 and October 16, 2015. Thirty filter radiometers and spectroradiometers from 12 countries participated including reference instruments from global aerosol networks. The absolute differences of all instruments compared to the reference have been based on the WMO criterion defined as 95 % of the measured data has to be within 0.005 ± 0.001/...

  8. Considerations About Antenna Pattern Measurements of 2-D Aperture Synthesis Radiometers

    OpenAIRE

    Camps Carmona, Adriano José; Skou, Neils; Torres Torres, Francisco; Corbella Sanahuja, Ignasi; Duffo Ubeda, Núria

    2006-01-01

    Accurate measurement of the antenna voltage patterns of large-aperture synthesis radiometers is critical in order to achieve good radiometric accuracy, and a very time consuming and expensive task. Measurement requirements and a tradeoff study relating radiometric accuracy degradation and number of elements to be measured are presented. Peer Reviewed

  9. Optical depth measurements by shadow-band radiometers and their uncertainties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, Mikhail D; Kiedron, Peter; Michalsky, Joseph J; Hodges, Gary; Flynn, Connor J; Lacis, Andrew A

    2007-11-20

    Shadow-band radiometers in general, and especially the Multi-Filter Rotating Shadow-band Radiometer (MFRSR), are widely used for atmospheric optical depth measurements. The major programs running MFRSR networks in the United States include the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, U.S. Department of Agriculture UV-B Monitoring and Research Program, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Surface Radiation (SURFRAD) Network, and NASA Solar Irradiance Research Network (SIRN). We discuss a number of technical issues specific to shadow-band radiometers and their impact on the optical depth measurements. These problems include instrument tilt and misalignment, as well as some data processing artifacts. Techniques for data evaluation and automatic detection of some of these problems are described.

  10. Using High-Resolution Hand-Held Radiometers To Measure In-Situ Thermal Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Douglas M.; Krintz, Donald F.

    1984-03-01

    A field study was carried out to investigate the accuracy of using high-resolution radiometers to determine the in situ thermal resistance of building components having conventional residential construction. Two different types of radiometers were used to determine the thermal resistances of the walls of six test buildings located at the National Bureau of Standards. These radiometer thermal resistance measurements were compared to reference thermal resistance values determined from steady-state series resistance predictions, time-averaged heat-flow-sensor measurements, and guarded-hot-box measurements. When measurements were carried out 5 hours after sunset when the outdoor temperature was relatively steady and the heating plant was operated in a typical cyclic fashion, the following results were obtained: for lightweight wood-frame cavity walls, the radiometer procedures were found to distinguish wall thermal resistance 4.4 h.ft2- °F/Btu (0.77 m2•K/W) systematically higher than corresponding reference values. Such a discrimination will per-mit insulated and uninsulated walls to be distinguished. However, in the case of walls having large heat capacity (e.g., masonry and log), thermal storage effects produced large time lags between the outdoor diurnal temperature variation and the heat-flow response at the inside surface. This phenomenon caused radiometer thermal resistances to deviate substantially from corresponding reference values. This study recommends that the ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 101-1981 be modified requiring the heating plant to be operated in a typical cyclic fashion instead of being turned off prior to and during radiometer measurements.

  11. L-Band Radiometers Measuring Salinity From Space: Atmospheric Propagation Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels; Hofman-Bang, Dorthe

    2005-01-01

    Microwave radiometers can measure sea surface salinity from space using L-band frequencies around 1.4 GHz. However, requirements to the accuracy of the measurements, in order to be satisfactory for the user, are so stringent that the influence of the intervening atmosphere cannot be neglected...

  12. Considerations About Antenna Pattern Measurements of 2-D Aperture Synthesis Radiometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Camps, Adreano; Skou, Niels; Torres, Francesc

    2006-01-01

    Accurate measurement of the antenna voltage patterns of large-aperture synthesis radiometers is critical in order to achieve good radiometric accuracy, and a very time consuming and expensive task. Measurement requirements and a tradeoff study relating radiometric accuracy degradation and number...

  13. The Compact Lightweight Absolute Radiometer (CLARA) for Total Solar Irradiance Measurements on the NORSAT-1 Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Benjamin; Finsterle, Wolfgang; Koller, Silvio; Levesque, Pierre-Luc; Pfiffner, Daniel; Schmutz, Werner

    2017-04-01

    Continuous and precise Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) measurements are indispensable to evaluate the influence of short- and long-term solar variability on the Earth's energy budget. The existence of a potential long-term trend in the suns activity and whether or not such a trend could be climate effective is still a matter of debate. The Compact Lightweight Absolute Radiometer (CLARA) is one of PMOD/WRC's future contributions to the almost seamless series of space borne TSI measurements since 1978. CLARA was designed and built by PMOD/WRC and characterized and calibrated by PMOD/WRC as part of the "European Metrology Research Program" (EMRP) project "European Metrology for Earth Observation and Climate" (MetEOC-2) funded by the European Commission. The main goals of the CLARA experiment are to continue the TSI data record with high accuracy and precision and to facilitate monitoring with its compact and adaptable design. CLARA will be one of three payloads of the Norwegian micro satellite NORSAT-1, along with Langmuir probes for space plasma research and an Automatic Identification System (AIS) receiver to monitor maritime traffic in Norwegian waters. The launch of NORSAT-1 is planned for March 2017. We present the design and calibration of CLARA, a new generation of Electrical Substitution Radiometers (ESR) comprising the latest radiometer developments of PMOD/WRC: i) A three-detector design for degradation tracking and redundancy, ii) a digital control system, iii) a new reference block and detector design to minimize size and weight of the instrument. The characterization of the CLARA instrument components provides an overview on the improvements that were achieved with the latest radiometer developments. An end-to-end calibration of CLARA against the SI-traceable cryogenic radiometer of the TSI Radiometer Facility (TRF) at the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) in Boulder (Colorado) results in a combined measurement uncertainty of 0.05% (k = 1

  14. Polarimetric Signatures from a Crop Covered Land Surface Measured by an L-band Polarimetric Radiometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl; Skou, Niels

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes preliminary results from field measurements of polarimetric azimuth signatures with the EMIRAD L-band polarimetric radiometer, performed over a land test site at the Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique in Avignon, France. Scans of 180 degrees in azimuth were carried...

  15. Intercomparison of the LBIR Absolute Cryogenic Radiometers to the NIST Optical Power Measurement Standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedchak, James A; Carter, Adriaan C; Datla, Raju

    2006-01-01

    The Low Background Infrared calibration (LBIR) facility at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) presently maintains four absolute cryogenic radiometers (ACRs) which serve as standard reference detectors for infrared calibrations performed by the facility. The primary standard for optical power measurements at NIST-Gaithersburg has been the High Accuracy Cryogenic Radiometer (HACR). Recently, an improved radiometer, the Primary Optical Watt Radiometer (POWR), has replaced the HACR as the primary standard. In this paper, we present the results of comparisons between the radiometric powers measured by the four ACRs presently maintained by the LBIR facility to that measured by the HACR and POWR. This was done by using a Si photodiode light-trapping detector as a secondary transfer standard to compare the primary national standards to the ACRs maintained by the LBIR facility. The technique used to compare an ACR to the trap detector is described in detail. The absolute optical power measurements are found to be within 0.1 % of the primary standard for all the ACRs examined in this study.

  16. Page 1 um- SST measurements with IR radiometer 207 neglect of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SST measurements with IR radiometer 207 neglect of reflectiºn by assuming unity emissivity would cause an error A.T. --. (T, T, pr where T, is the radiation temperature of the atmosphere, T, is the bulk temperature ºf the scº, * is the reflectivity and p is the atmospheric trans- missivity. ("lºnges in surface temperature ; T range ...

  17. The Impact of Indoor and Outdoor Radiometer Calibration on Solar Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habte, Aron; Sengupta, Manajit; Andreas, Afshin; Reda, Ibrahim; Robinson, Justin

    2016-06-02

    This study addresses the effect of calibration methodologies on calibration responsivities and the resulting impact on radiometric measurements. The calibration responsivities used in this study are provided by NREL's broadband outdoor radiometer calibration (BORCAL) and a few prominent manufacturers. The BORCAL method provides outdoor calibration responsivity of pyranometers and pyrheliometers at a 45 degree solar zenith angle and responsivity as a function of solar zenith angle determined by clear-sky comparisons to reference irradiance. The BORCAL method also employs a thermal offset correction to the calibration responsivity of single-black thermopile detectors used in pyranometers. Indoor calibrations of radiometers by their manufacturers are performed using a stable artificial light source in a side-by-side comparison of the test radiometer under calibration to a reference radiometer of the same type. These different methods of calibration demonstrated 1percent to 2 percent differences in solar irradiance measurement. Analyzing these values will ultimately enable a reduction in radiometric measurement uncertainties and assist in developing consensus on a standard for calibration.

  18. The Atmospheric radiation measurement (ARM program network of microwave radiometers: instrumentation, data, and retrievals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Cadeddu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The Climate Research Facility of the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM Program operates a network of ground-based microwave radiometers. Data and retrievals from these instruments have been available to the scientific community for almost 20 yr. In the past five years the network has expanded to include a total of 22 microwave radiometers deployed in various locations around the world. The new instruments cover a frequency range between 22 and 197 GHz and are consistently and automatically calibrated. The latest addition to the network is a new generation of three-channel radiometers, currently in the early stage of deployment at all ARM sites. The network has been specifically designed to achieve increased accuracy in the retrieval of precipitable water vapor (PWV and cloud liquid water path (LWP with the long-term goal of providing the scientific community with reliable, calibrated radiometric data and retrievals of important geophysical quantities with well-characterized uncertainties. The radiometers provide high-quality, continuous datasets that can be utilized in a wealth of applications and scientific studies. This paper presents an overview of the microwave instrumentation, calibration procedures, data, and retrievals that are available for download from the ARM data archive.

  19. Using a Cold Radiometer to Measure Heat Loads and Survey Heat Leaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dipirro, M.; Tuttle, J.; Hait, T.; Shirron, P.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed an inexpensive cold radiometer for use in thermal/vacuum chambers to measure heat loads, characterize emissivity and specularity of surfaces and to survey areas to evaluate stray heat loads. We report here the results of two such tests for the James Webb Space Telescope to measure heat loads and effective emissivities of 2 major pieces of optical ground support equipment that will be used in upcoming thermal vacuum testing of the Telescope.

  20. The use of clinical broadband UV radiometers for optical radiation hazard measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foy, Trevelyan

    2011-12-01

    The implementation of the UK Control of Artificial Optical Radiation at Work Regulations 2010 requires the employer to perform a risk assessment of workers' exposure to UV radiation from phototherapy equipment in the hospital environment. The objective of this study was to demonstrate that, where the source spectrum is known, an assessment of exposure to UV sources commonly used in hospitals, including assessment of reflections and transmission through personal protective equipment, may be performed with sufficient reliability by radiometer measurement rather than by complex spectroradiometric measurements. An intercomparison of radiometer and spectroradiometer measurements of exposure to UV sources was carried out. Direct exposure was considered, as well as exposure to reflected or scattered beams and that transmitted through eyewear. Assessment by radiometer of direct exposure and exposure to reflections demonstrated an acceptable measurement error in the context of the inherent uncertainty in the assumptions of the exposure scenario. Assessment of transmitted beams may result in a greater measurement error due to spectral mismatch; however, for typical exposure scenarios the error remained acceptable in comparison with the exposure limit value. The methodology presented reduces the complexity of the measurement of UV hazard levels for common phototherapy equipment.

  1. Design and first plasma measurements of the ITER-ECE prototype radiometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Austin, M. E.; Brookman, M. W.; Rowan, W. L. [Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Danani, S. [ITER-India/Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Bryerton, E. W.; Dougherty, P. [Virginia Diodes, Inc., Charlottesville, Virginia 22902 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    On ITER, second harmonic optically thick electron cyclotron emission (ECE) in the range of 220-340 GHz will supply the electron temperature (T{sub e}). To investigate the requirements and capabilities prescribed for the ITER system, a prototype radiometer covering this frequency range has been developed by Virginia Diodes, Inc. The first plasma measurements with this instrument have been carried out on the DIII-D tokamak, with lab bench tests and measurements of third through fifth harmonic ECE from high T{sub e} plasmas. At DIII-D the instrument shares the transmission line of the Michelson interferometer and can simultaneously acquire data. Comparison of the ECE radiation temperature from the absolutely calibrated Michelson and the prototype receiver shows that the ITER radiometer provides accurate measurements of the millimeter radiation across the instrument band.

  2. Precipitation Estimation Using Combined Radar/Radiometer Measurements Within the GPM Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Arthur

    2012-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission is an international satellite mission specifically designed to unify and advance precipitation measurements from a constellation of research and operational microwave sensors. The GPM mission centers upon the deployment of a Core Observatory in a 65o non-Sun-synchronous orbit to serve as a physics observatory and a transfer standard for intersatellite calibration of constellation radiometers. The GPM Core Observatory will carry a Ku/Ka-band Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) and a conical-scanning multi-channel (10-183 GHz) GPM Microwave Radiometer (GMI). The DPR will be the first dual-frequency radar in space to provide not only measurements of 3-D precipitation structures but also quantitative information on microphysical properties of precipitating particles needed for improving precipitation retrievals from microwave sensors. The DPR and GMI measurements will together provide a database that relates vertical hydrometeor profiles to multi-frequency microwave radiances over a variety of environmental conditions across the globe. This combined database will be used as a common transfer standard for improving the accuracy and consistency of precipitation retrievals from all constellation radiometers. For global coverage, GPM relies on existing satellite programs and new mission opportunities from a consortium of partners through bilateral agreements with either NASA or JAXA. Each constellation member may have its unique scientific or operational objectives but contributes microwave observations to GPM for the generation and dissemination of unified global precipitation data products. In addition to the DPR and GMI on the Core Observatory, the baseline GPM constellation consists of the following sensors: (1) Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS) instruments on the U.S. Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites, (2) the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-2 (AMSR-2) on the GCOM-W1

  3. Airborne radar and radiometer experiment for quantitative remote measurements of rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozu, Toshiaki; Meneghini, Robert; Boncyk, Wayne; Wilheit, Thomas T.; Nakamura, Kenji

    1989-01-01

    An aircraft experiment has been conducted with a dual-frequency (10 GHz and 35 GHz) radar/radiometer system and an 18-GHz radiometer to test various rain-rate retrieval algorithms from space. In the experiment, which took place in the fall of 1988 at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, VA, both stratiform and convective storms were observed. A ground-based radar and rain gauges were also used to obtain truth data. An external radar calibration is made with rain gauge data, thereby enabling quantitative reflectivity measurements. Comparisons between path attenuations derived from the surface return and from the radar reflectivity profile are made to test the feasibility of a technique to estimate the raindrop size distribution from simultaneous radar and path-attenuation measurements.

  4. Tropical Cyclones Wind Measurements with the SMAP L-Band Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardulli, L.; Meissner, T.; Wentz, F. J.

    2016-12-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive Mission SMAP was launched in January 2015 and has been providing science data since April 2015. Though designed to measure soil moisture, the SMAP radiometer has an excellent capability to measure ocean winds in tropical cyclones at a resolution of 40 km, with a swath width of 1000 km. The L-band radiometer V-pol and H-pol channels keep very good sensitivity to ocean surface wind speed even at very high wind speeds and they are only little impacted by rain. We briefly discuss the major features of the SMAP sensor, the geophysical model function that is used in the ocean vector wind retrieval and the basic steps of the retrieval algorithm. We will then illustrate the capability of this instrument to observe very high surface winds by comparing them to other validation datasets. The most important validation source is NOAA's airborne Step Frequency Microwave Radiometer SFMR, whose wind speeds were collocated with SMAP in space and time and resampled to the SMAP resolution. A comparison between SMAP and SFMR winds in hurricanes of the 2015 season, including Patricia, shows excellent correlation over a wide wind speed range (15 - 70 m/s) and no degradation in rain. This agreement is unique and gives SMAP a distinct advantage over many other space-borne sensors such as C-band or Ku-band scatterometers or radiometers, which either lose sensitivity at very high winds or degrade in rainy conditions. We will analyze the SMAP surface winds during the full evolution of the storms in recent intense tropical cyclones (Patricia, Winston, Fantala, and Nepartak) and compare them with wind measurements from ASCAT, RapidScat, and WindSat, with the NCEP wind fields, and with the best track data from the Joint Typhoon Warning Center.The SMAP wind data are available as twice-daily 0.25 deg gridded maps at www.remss.com.

  5. GROMOS-C, a novel ground-based microwave radiometer for ozone measurement campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, S.; Murk, A.; Kämpfer, N.

    2015-07-01

    Stratospheric ozone is of major interest as it absorbs most harmful UV radiation from the sun, allowing life on Earth. Ground-based microwave remote sensing is the only method that allows for the measurement of ozone profiles up to the mesopause, over 24 hours and under different weather conditions with high time resolution. In this paper a novel ground-based microwave radiometer is presented. It is called GROMOS-C (GRound based Ozone MOnitoring System for Campaigns), and it has been designed to measure the vertical profile of ozone distribution in the middle atmosphere by observing ozone emission spectra at a frequency of 110.836 GHz. The instrument is designed in a compact way which makes it transportable and suitable for outdoor use in campaigns, an advantageous feature that is lacking in present day ozone radiometers. It is operated through remote control. GROMOS-C is a total power radiometer which uses a pre-amplified heterodyne receiver, and a digital fast Fourier transform spectrometer for the spectral analysis. Among its main new features, the incorporation of different calibration loads stands out; this includes a noise diode and a new type of blackbody target specifically designed for this instrument, based on Peltier elements. The calibration scheme does not depend on the use of liquid nitrogen; therefore GROMOS-C can be operated at remote places with no maintenance requirements. In addition, the instrument can be switched in frequency to observe the CO line at 115 GHz. A description of the main characteristics of GROMOS-C is included in this paper, as well as the results of a first campaign at the High Altitude Research Station at Jungfraujoch (HFSJ), Switzerland. The validation is performed by comparison of the retrieved profiles against equivalent profiles from MLS (Microwave Limb Sounding) satellite data, ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast) model data, as well as our nearby NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric

  6. Vitamin D synthesis measured with a multiband filter radiometer in Río Gallegos, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orte, Facundo; Wolfram, Elian; Salvador, Jacobo; D'Elia, Raúl; Bulnes, Daniela; Leme, N. Paes; Quel, Eduardo

    2013-05-01

    Vitamin D plays an important role in human health. Vitamin D production from the sun is affected by UVB solar radiation. This paper presents a simple method for retrieving vitamin D-weighted UV by using a multiband filter radiometer GUV-541 installed at the Atmospheric Observatory of Southern Patagonia (OAPA) (51 ° 33' S, 69° 19' W), Río Gallegos. The methodology used combines irradiance measurements from a multiband filter radiometer with spectral irradiance modeled by the SOS radiative transfer code (developed by Lille University of Science and Technology (USTL)). The spectrum modeled is weighted with vitamin D action spectra published by the International Commission on Illumination (CIE), which describes the relative effectiveness of different wavelengths in the generation of this particular biological response. This method is validated using the vitamin D-weighted UV derived from a Brewer MKIII spectrophotometer (SN 124) belonging to the National Institute for Spatial Research (INPE), Brazil, which is able to measure solar spectra between 290 and 325nm. The method presents a good correlation between the two independent instruments. This procedure increases the instrumental capabilities of the multiband filter radiometer. Moreover, it evaluates the annual variation of vitamin D-weighted UV doses from exposure to ultraviolet radiation. These values are likely to be lower than suitable levels of vitamin D during winter and part of spring and autumn at these latitudes.

  7. PHOCUS radiometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Nyström

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available PHOCUS – Particles, Hydrogen and Oxygen Chemistry in the Upper Summer Mesosphere is a Swedish sounding rocket experiment, launched in July 2011, with the main goal of investigating the upper atmosphere in the altitude range 50–110 km. This paper describes the SondRad instrument in the PHOCUS payload, a radiometer comprising two frequency channels (183 GHz and 557 GHz aimed at exploring the water vapour concentration distribution in connection with the appearance of noctilucent (night shining clouds. The design of the radiometer system has been done in a collaboration between Omnisys Instruments AB and the Group for Advanced Receiver Development (GARD at Chalmers University of Technology where Omnisys was responsible for the overall design, implementation, and verification of the radiometers and backend, whereas GARD was responsible for the radiometer optics and calibration systems.

    The SondRad instrument covers the water absorption lines at 183 GHz and 557 GHz. The 183 GHz channel is a side-looking radiometer, while the 557 GHz radiometer is placed along the rocket axis looking in the forward direction. Both channels employ sub-harmonically pumped Schottky mixers and Fast Fourier Transform Spectrometers (FFTS backends with 67 kHz resolution.

    The radiometers include novel calibration systems specifically adjusted for use with each frequency channel. The 183 GHz channel employs a continuous wave CW pilot signal calibrating the entire receiving chain, while the intermediate frequency chain (the IF-chain of the 557 GHz channel is calibrated by injecting a signal from a reference noise source through a directional coupler.

    The instrument collected complete spectra for both the 183 GHz and the 557 GHz with 300 Hz data rate for the 183 GHz channel and 10 Hz data rate for the 557 GHz channel for about 60 s reaching the apogee of the flight trajectory and 100 s after that. With lossless data compression using variable

  8. Reflectance properties of West African savanna trees from ground radiometer measurements. II - Classification of components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanan, N. P.; Prince, S. D.; Franklin, J.

    1993-01-01

    A pole-mounted radiometer was used to measure the reflectance properties in the red and near-IR of three Sahelian tree species. These properties are classified depending on their location over the canopy. A geometrical description of the patterns of shadow and sunlight on and beneath a model tree when viewed from above is given, and six components are defined. Tree canopies are found to be dark in the red waveband with respect to the soil, but have little or no effect on the near-IR.

  9. Broadband radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, T.W.

    1994-07-26

    A broadband radiometer is disclosed including (a) an optical integrating sphere having generally spherical integrating chamber and an entry port for receiving light (e.g., having visible and ultraviolet fractions), (b) a first optical radiation detector for receiving light from the sphere and producing an electrical output signal corresponding to broadband radiation, (c) a second optical radiation detector for receiving light from the sphere and producing an electrical output signal corresponding to a predetermined wavelength fraction of the broadband radiation, and (d) an output for producing an electrical signal which is proportional to the difference between the two electrical output signals. The radiometer is very useful, for example, in measuring the absolute amount of ultraviolet light present in a given light sample. 8 figs.

  10. Modelling of the L-band brightness temperatures measured with ELBARA III radiometer on Bubnow wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluba, Lukasz; Sagan, Joanna; Lukowski, Mateusz; Szlazak, Radoslaw; Usowicz, Boguslaw

    2017-04-01

    Microwave radiometry has become the main tool for investigating soil moisture (SM) with remote sensing methods. ESA - SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) satellite operating at L-band provides global distribution of soil moisture. An integral part of SMOS mission are calibration and validation activities involving measurements with ELBARA III which is an L-band microwave passive radiometer. It is done in order to improve soil moisture retrievals - make them more time-effective and accurate. The instrument is located at Bubnow test-site, on the border of cultivated field, fallow, meadow and natural wetland being a part of Polesie National Park (Poland). We obtain both temporal and spatial dependences of brightness temperatures for varied types of land covers with the ELBARA III directed at different azimuths. Soil moisture is retrieved from brightness temperature using L-band Microwave Emission of the Biosphere (L-MEB) model, the same as currently used radiative transfer model for SMOS. Parametrization of L-MEB, as well as input values are still under debate. We discuss the results of SM retrievals basing on data obtained during first year of the radiometer's operation. We analyze temporal dependences of retrieved SM for one-parameter (SM), two-parameter (SM, τ - optical depth) and three-parameter (SM, τ, Hr - roughness parameter) retrievals, as well as spatial dependences for specific dates. Special case of Simplified Roughness Parametrization, combining the roughness parameter and optical depth, is considered. L-MEB processing is supported by the continuous measurements of soil moisture and temperature obtained from nearby agrometeorological station, as well as studies on the soil granulometric composition of the Bubnow test-site area. Furthermore, for better estimation of optical depth, the satellite-derived Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) was employed, supported by measured in situ vegetation parameters (such as Leaf Area Index and Vegetation

  11. Effects of cosine error in irradiance measurements from field ocean color radiometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zibordi, Giuseppe; Bulgarelli, Barbara

    2007-08-01

    The cosine error of in situ seven-channel radiometers designed to measure the in-air downward irradiance for ocean color applications was investigated in the 412-683 nm spectral range with a sample of three instruments. The interchannel variability of cosine errors showed values generally lower than +/-3% below 50 degrees incidence angle with extreme values of approximately 4-20% (absolute) at 50-80 degrees for the channels at 412 and 443 nm. The intrachannel variability, estimated from the standard deviation of the cosine errors of different sensors for each center wavelength, displayed values generally lower than 2% for incidence angles up to 50 degrees and occasionally increasing up to 6% at 80 degrees. Simulations of total downward irradiance measurements, accounting for average angular responses of the investigated radiometers, were made with an accurate radiative transfer code. The estimated errors showed a significant dependence on wavelength, sun zenith, and aerosol optical thickness. For a clear sky maritime atmosphere, these errors displayed values spectrally varying and generally within +/-3%, with extreme values of approximately 4-10% (absolute) at 40-80 degrees sun zenith for the channels at 412 and 443 nm. Schemes for minimizing the cosine errors have also been proposed and discussed.

  12. Solar Irradiances Measured using SPN1 Radiometers: Uncertainties and Clues for Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badosa, Jordi; Wood, John; Blanc, Philippe; Long, Charles N.; Vuilleumier, Laurent; Demengel, Dominique; Haeffelin, Martial

    2014-12-08

    The fast development of solar radiation and energy applications, such as photovoltaic and solar thermodynamic systems, has increased the need for solar radiation measurement and monitoring, not only for the global component but also the diffuse and direct. End users look for the best compromise between getting close to state-of-the-art measurements and keeping capital, maintenance and operating costs to a minimum. Among the existing commercial options, SPN1 is a relatively low cost solar radiometer that estimates global and diffuse solar irradiances from seven thermopile sensors under a shading mask and without moving parts. This work presents a comprehensive study of SPN1 accuracy and sources of uncertainty, which results from laboratory experiments, numerical modeling and comparison studies between measurements from this sensor and state-of-the art instruments for six diverse sites. Several clues are provided for improving the SPN1 accuracy and agreement with state-of-the-art measurements.

  13. A Miniaturized Laser Heterodyne Radiometer for Greenhouse Gas Measurements in the Atmospheric Column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Emily Wilson

    2015-01-01

    Laser Heterodyne Radiometry is a technique adapted from radio receiver technology has been used to measure trace gases in the atmosphere since the 1960s.By leveraging advances in the telecommunications industry, it has been possible to miniaturize this technology.The mini-LHR (Miniaturized Laser Heterodyne Radiometer) has been under development at NASA Goddard Space flight Center since 2009. This sun-viewing instrument measures carbon dioxide and methane in the atmospheric column and operates in tandem with an AERONET sun photometer producing a simultaneous measure of aerosols. The mini-LHR has been extensively field tested in a range of locations ranging in the continental US as well as Alaska and Hawaii and now operates autonomously with sensitivities of approximately 0.2 ppmv and approximately10 ppbv, for carbon dioxide and methane respectively, for 10 averaged scans under clear sky conditions.

  14. Island based radar and microwave radiometer measurements of stratus cloud parameters during the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frisch, A.S. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Fairall, C.W.; Snider, J.B. [NOAA Environmental Technology Lab., Boulder, CO (United States); Lenshow, D.H.; Mayer, S.D. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1996-04-01

    During the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) in June 1992, simultaneous measurements were made with a vertically pointing cloud sensing radar and a microwave radiometer. The radar measurements are used to estimate stratus cloud drizzle and turbulence parameters. In addition, with the microwave radiometer measurements of reflectivity, we estimated the profiles of cloud liquid water and effective radius. We used radar data for computation of vertical profiles of various drizzle parameters such as droplet concentration, modal radius, and spread. A sample of these results is shown in Figure 1. In addition, in non-drizzle clouds, with the radar and radiometer we can estimate the verticle profiles of stratus cloud parameters such as liquid water concentration and effective radius. This is accomplished by assuming a droplet distribution with droplet number concentration and width constant with height.

  15. A Tissue Propagation Model for Validating Close-Proximity Biomedical Radiometer Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonds, Q.; Herzig, P.; Weller, T.

    2016-01-01

    The propagation of thermally-generated electromagnetic emissions through stratified human tissue is studied herein using a non-coherent mathematical model. The model is developed to complement subsurface body temperature measurements performed using a close proximity microwave radiometer. The model takes into account losses and reflections as thermal emissions propagate through the body, before being emitted at the skin surface. The derivation is presented in four stages and applied to the human core phantom, a physical representation of a stomach volume of skin, muscle, and blood-fatty tissue. A drop in core body temperature is simulated via the human core phantom and the response of the propagation model is correlated to the radiometric measurement. The results are comparable, with differences on the order of 1.5 - 3%. Hence the plausibility of core body temperature extraction via close proximity radiometry is demonstrated, given that the electromagnetic characteristics of the stratified tissue layers are known.

  16. Channelling can affect concentrations of metabolic intermediates at constant net flux: artefact or reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornish-Bowden, A; Cárdenas, M L

    1993-04-01

    We show that if a metabolic intermediate is directly transferred ('channelled') from an enzyme that catalyses its production to another that uses it as substrate, there is no change in its free concentration compared with a system with the same net flux in which there is no direct transfer. Thus the widespread idea that channelling provides a mechanism for decreasing metabolite concentrations at constant flux is false. Results from computer simulation that suggest otherwise [Mendes, P., Kell, D. B. & Westerhoff, H. V. (1992) Eur. J. Biochem. 204, 257-266] are artefacts either of variations in flux or of alterations in opposite directions of the activities of the relevant enzymes.

  17. MIAWARA-C, a new ground based water vapor radiometer for measurement campaigns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Straub

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a new 22 GHz water vapor spectro-radiometer which has been specifically designed for profile measurement campaigns of the middle atmosphere is presented. The instrument is of a compact design and has a simple set up procedure. It can be operated as a standalone instrument as it maintains its own weather station and a calibration scheme that does not rely on other instruments or the use of liquid nitrogen. The optical system of MIAWARA-C combines a choked gaussian horn antenna with a parabolic mirror which reduces the size of the instrument in comparison with currently existing radiometers. For the data acquisition a correlation receiver is used together with a digital cross correlating spectrometer. The complete backend section, including the computer, is located in the same housing as the instrument. The receiver section is temperature stabilized to minimize gain fluctuations. Calibration of the instrument is achieved through a balancing scheme with the sky used as the cold load and the tropospheric properties are determined by performing regular tipping curves. Since MIAWARA-C is used in measurement campaigns it is important to be able to determine the elevation pointing in a simple manner as this is a crucial parameter in the calibration process. Here we present two different methods; scanning the sky and the Sun. Finally, we report on the first spectra and retrieved water vapor profiles acquired during the Lapbiat campaign at the Finnish Meteorological Institute Arctic Research Centre in Sodankylä, Finland. The performance of MIAWARA-C is validated here by comparison of the presented profiles against the equivalent profiles from the Microwave Limb Sounder on the EOS/Aura satellite.

  18. Informal Preliminary Report on Comparisons of Prototype SPN-1 Radiometer to PARSL Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Charles N.

    2014-06-17

    The prototype SPN-1 has been taking measurements for several months collocated with our PNNL Atmospheric Remote Sensing Laboratory (PARSL) solar tracker mounted instruments at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) located in Richland, Washington, USA. The PARSL radiometers used in the following comparisons consist of an Eppley Normal Incident Pyrheliometer (NIP) and a shaded Eppley model 8-48 “Black and White” pyrgeometer (B&W) to measure the direct and diffuse shortwave irradiance (SW), respectively. These instruments were calibrated in mid-September by comparison to an absolute cavity radiometer directly traceable to the world standard group in Davos, Switzerland. The NIP calibration was determined by direct comparison, while the B&W was calibrated using the shade/unshade technique. All PARSL data prior to mid-September have been reprocessed using the new calibration factors. The PARSL data are logged as 1-minute averages from 1-second samples. Data used in this report span the time period from June 22 through December 1, 2006. All data have been processed through the QCRad code (Long and Shi, 2006), which itself is a more elaborately developed methodology along the lines of that applied by the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) Archive (Long and Dutton, 2004), for quality control. The SPN-1 data are the standard total and diffuse SW values obtained from the analog data port of the instrument. The comparisons use only times when both the PARSL and SPN-1 data passed all QC testing. The data were further processed and analyzed by application of the SW Flux Analysis methodology (Long and Ackerman, 2000; Long and Gaustad, 2004, Long et al., 2006) to detect periods of clear skies, calculate continuous estimates of clear-sky SW irradiance and the effect of clouds on the downwelling SW, and estimate fractional sky cover.

  19. Method to Calculate Uncertainty Estimate of Measuring Shortwave Solar Irradiance using Thermopile and Semiconductor Solar Radiometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reda, I.

    2011-07-01

    The uncertainty of measuring solar irradiance is fundamentally important for solar energy and atmospheric science applications. Without an uncertainty statement, the quality of a result, model, or testing method cannot be quantified, the chain of traceability is broken, and confidence cannot be maintained in the measurement. Measurement results are incomplete and meaningless without a statement of the estimated uncertainty with traceability to the International System of Units (SI) or to another internationally recognized standard. This report explains how to use International Guidelines of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM) to calculate such uncertainty. The report also shows that without appropriate corrections to solar measuring instruments (solar radiometers), the uncertainty of measuring shortwave solar irradiance can exceed 4% using present state-of-the-art pyranometers and 2.7% using present state-of-the-art pyrheliometers. Finally, the report demonstrates that by applying the appropriate corrections, uncertainties may be reduced by at least 50%. The uncertainties, with or without the appropriate corrections might not be compatible with the needs of solar energy and atmospheric science applications; yet, this report may shed some light on the sources of uncertainties and the means to reduce overall uncertainty in measuring solar irradiance.

  20. Characterization and calibration of ultraviolet broadband radiometers measuring erythemally weighted irradiance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hülsen, Gregor; Gröbner, Julian

    2007-08-10

    An ultraviolet calibration center has been established in Davos, Switzerland. It provides a laboratory for characterizing the spectral and angular response of broadband radiometers. The absolute calibration of these instruments is performed through the comparison to the reference spectroradiometer QASUME. We present what we believe to be a novel calibration methodology that explicitly includes the information of the angular and spectral response functions. From the results of the latest broadband intercomparison campaign, the typical uncertainties of these instruments could be obtained. Most radiometers have an expanded uncertainty of approximately 7%. The angular response introduces an uncertainty of 0.9%-7.2%, depending on the cosine error of the radiometer.

  1. Solar-Collector Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, J. M., Jr

    1984-01-01

    Water-cooled Kendall radiometer measures output of solar energy concentrators. Unit measures irradiance up to 30,000 solar constants with 1 percent accuracy and responds to wavelengths from ultraviolet to far infrared.

  2. Broadband Outdoor Radiometer Calibration Process for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooraghi, Michael [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program (ARM) maintains a fleet of monitoring stations to aid in the improved scientific understanding of the basic physics related to radiative feedback processes in the atmosphere, particularly the interactions among clouds and aerosols. ARM obtains continuous measurements and conducts field campaigns to provide data products that aid in the improvement and further development of climate models. All of the measurement campaigns include a suite of solar measurements. The Solar Radiation Research Laboratory at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory supports ARM's full suite of stations in a number of ways, including troubleshooting issues that arise as part of the data-quality reviews; managing engineering changes to the standard setup; and providing calibration services and assistance to the full fleet of solar-related instruments, including pyranometers, pyrgeometers, pyrheliometers, as well as the temperature/relative humidity probes, multimeters, and data acquisition systems that are used in the calibrations performed at the Southern Great Plains Radiometer Calibration Facility. This paper discusses all aspects related to the support provided to the calibration of the instruments in the solar monitoring fleet.

  3. Narrowband filter radiometer for ground-based measurements of global ultraviolet solar irradiance and total ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkov, Boyan; Vitale, Vito; Tomasi, Claudio; Bonafé, Ubaldo; Scaglione, Salvatore; Flori, Daniele; Santaguida, Riccardo; Gausa, Michael; Hansen, Georg; Colombo, Tiziano

    2006-06-20

    The ultraviolet narrowband filter radiometer (UV-RAD) designed by the authors to take ground-based measurements of UV solar irradiance, total ozone, and biological dose rate is described, together with the main characteristics of the seven blocked filters mounted on it, all of which have full widths at half maxima that range 0.67 to 0.98 nm. We have analyzed the causes of cosine response and calibration errors carefully to define the corresponding correction terms, paying particular attention to those that are due to the spectral displacements of the filter transmittance peaks from the integer wavelength values. The influence of the ozone profile on the retrieved ozone at large solar zenith angles has also been examined by means of field measurements. The opportunity of carrying out nearly monochromatic irradiance measurements offered by the UV-RAD allowed us to improve the procedure usually followed to reconstruct the solar spectrum at the surface by fitting the computed results, using radiative transfer models with field measurements of irradiance. Two long-term comparison campaigns took place, showing that a mean discrepancy of +0.3% exists between the UV-RAD total ozone values and those given by the Brewer #63 spectroradiometer and that mean differences of +0.3% and -0.9% exist between the erythemal dose rates determined with the UV-RAD and those obtained with the Brewer #63 and the Brewer #104 spectroradiometers, respectively.

  4. Comparison of Historical Satellite-Based Estimates of Solar Radiation Resources with Recent Rotating Shadowband Radiometer Measurements: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, D. R.

    2009-03-01

    The availability of rotating shadow band radiometer measurement data at several new stations provides an opportunity to compare historical satellite-based estimates of solar resources with measurements. We compare mean monthly daily total (MMDT) solar radiation data from eight years of NSRDB and 22 years of NASA hourly global horizontal and direct beam solar estimates with measured data from three stations, collected after the end of the available resource estimates.

  5. Path Profiles of Cn2 Derived from Radiometer Temperature Measurements and Geometrical Ray Tracing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyhnalek, Brian E.

    2017-01-01

    Atmospheric turbulence has significant impairments on the operation of Free-Space Optical (FSO) communication systems, in particular temporal and spatial intensity fluctuations at the receiving aperture resulting in power surges and fades, changes in angle of arrival, spatial coherence degradation, etc. The refractive index structure parameter Cn2 is a statistical measure of the strength of turbulence in the atmosphere and is highly dependent upon vertical height. Therefore to understand atmospheric turbulence effects on vertical FSO communication links such as space-to-ground links, it is necessary to specify Cn2 profiles along the atmospheric propagation path. To avoid the limitations on the applicability of classical approaches, propagation simulation through geometrical ray tracing is applied. This is achieved by considering the atmosphere along the optical propagation path as a spatial distribution of spherical bubbles with varying relative refractive index deviations representing turbulent eddies. The relative deviations of the refractive index are statistically determined from altitude-dependent and time-varying temperature fluctuations, as measured by a microwave profiling radiometer. For each representative atmosphere ray paths are analyzed using geometrical optics, which is particularly advantageous in situations of strong turbulence where there is severe wavefront distortion and discontinuity. The refractive index structure parameter is then determined as a function of height and time.

  6. Polarimetric Radiometer Configurations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels; Laursen, Brian; Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl

    1998-01-01

    Ocean wind speed and direction can be assessed with a polarimetric radiometer system measuring the full set of Stokes parameters. The first and second Stokes parameters are the sum and difference of the usual vertical and horizontal brightness temperatures. The third and forth Stokes parameters can...... be found either by cross correlating the received vertical and horizontal electrical fields, or they can be found by a combination of properly polarized brightness temperature measurements. These considerations directly point at two fundamentally different ways of implementing the polarimetric radiometer...... airborne, imaging, polarimetric radiometer system is presently in its development phase. The design of the system is discussed...

  7. Measurement of the single-shot pulse energy of a free electron laser using a cryogenic radiometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masahiro, Kato; Norio, Saito; Yuichiro, Morishita; Takahiro, Tanaka [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), NMIJ, Tsukuba (Japan); Masahiro, Kato; Norio, Saito; Kai, Tiedtke; Pavle N, Juranic; Sorokin, A.A.; Richter, M.; Takahiro, Tanaka; Mitsuru, Nagasono; Makina, Yabashi; Kensuke, Tono; Tadashi, Togashi; Tetsuya, Ishikawa [RIKEN, XFEL Project Head Office, Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo (Japan); Kai, Tiedtke; Pavle N, Juranic; Sorokin, A.A.; Jastrow, U. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Sorokin, A.A. [Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, Polytekhnicheskaya 26, St Petersburg (Russian Federation); Richter, M.; Kroth, U.; Schoppe, H. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, PTB, Berlin (Germany); Tadashi, Togashi; Hiroaki, Kimura; Haruhiko, Ohashi [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, Sayo, Hyogo (Japan)

    2010-10-15

    The absolute single-shot pulse energy of the SPring 8 extreme ultraviolet (EUV) free electron laser (FEL) was measured using a cryogenic radiometer with a relative standard uncertainty of 3%. The temperature change of the cavity in the cryogenic radiometer caused by an incident FEL pulse was determined using a lock-in amplifier and an ac Wheatstone bridge. The measured pulse energies were compared with a gas-monitor detector developed by Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt/Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron/Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute (Ioffe) at a wavelength of 51.3 nm at the SPring-8 EUV-FEL in a shot-to-shot mode. The pulse energies measured using the two detectors agree within 2.0%. (authors)

  8. Applying the Water Vapor Radiometer to Verify the Precipitable Water Vapor Measured by GPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ta-Kang Yeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Taiwan is located at the land-sea interface in a subtropical region. Because the climate is warm and moist year round, there is a large and highly variable amount of water vapor in the atmosphere. In this study, we calculated the Zenith Wet Delay (ZWD of the troposphere using the ground-based Global Positioning System (GPS. The ZWD measured by two Water Vapor Radiometers (WVRs was then used to verify the ZWD that had been calculated using GPS. We also analyzed the correlation between the ZWD and the precipitation data of these two types of station. Moreover, we used the observational data from 14 GPS and rainfall stations to evaluate three cases. The offset between the GPS-ZWD and the WVR-ZWD ranged from 1.31 to 2.57 cm. The correlation coefficient ranged from 0.89 to 0.93. The results calculated from GPS and those measured using the WVR were very similar. Moreover, when there was no rain, light rain, moderate rain, or heavy rain, the flatland station ZWD was 0.31, 0.36, 0.38, or 0.40 m, respectively. The mountain station ZWD exhibited the same trend. Therefore, these results have demonstrated that the potential and strength of precipitation in a region can be estimated according to its ZWD values. Now that the precision of GPS-ZWD has been confirmed, this method can eventually be expanded to the more than 400 GPS stations in Taiwan and its surrounding islands. The near real-time ZWD data with improved spatial and temporal resolution can be provided to the city and countryside weather-forecasting system that is currently under development. Such an exchange would fundamentally improve the resources used to generate weather forecasts.

  9. A New Algorithm to Determine the Spectral Aerosol Optical Depth from Satellite Radiometer Measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veefkind, J.P.; Leeuw, G. de

    1998-01-01

    A new aerosol retrieval algorithm is presented which computes the spectral optical depth over the ocean from spaceborne radiometers. It includes both multiple scattering and the bi-directional reflectance of the ocean surface. The previous termalgorithmnext term is applied to data from the Along

  10. Measurement of Wind Signatures on the Sea Surface using an L-band Polarimetric Radiometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl; Rotbøll, Jesper; Skou, Niels

    2002-01-01

    A series of circle flights have been carried out over the wind driven sea, using the EMIRAD L-band polarimetric radiometer, described in J. Rotboll et al. (2001). Data are calibrated and corrected for aircraft attitude, and 360 degrees azimuth profiles are generated. The results show some variation...

  11. Evaluation of cloud microphysics schemes in simulations of a winter storm using radar and radiometer measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Mei; Braun, Scott A.; Matsui, Toshihisa; Williams, Christopher R.

    2013-02-01

    observations from a space-borne radiometer and a ground-based precipitation profiling radar, the impact of cloud microphysics schemes in the WRF model on the simulation of microwave brightness temperature (Tb), radar reflectivity, and Doppler velocity (Vdop) is studied for a winter storm in California. The unique assumptions of particles size distributions, number concentrations, shapes, and fall speeds in different microphysics schemes are implemented into a satellite simulator and customized calculations for the radar are performed to ensure consistent representation of precipitation properties between the microphysics schemes and the radiative transfer models.Simulations with four different schemes in the WRF model, including the Goddard scheme (GSFC), the WRF single-moment 6-class scheme (WSM6), the Thompson scheme (THOM), and the Morrison double-moment scheme (MORR), are compared directly with measurements from the sensors. Results show large variations in the simulated radiative properties. General biases of 20 K or larger are found in (polarization-corrected) Tb, which is linked to an overestimate of the precipitating ice aloft. The simulated reflectivity with THOM appears to agree well with the observations, while high biases of 5-10 dBZ are found in GSFC, WSM6 and MORR. Peak reflectivity in MORR exceeds other schemes. These biases are attributable to the snow intercept parameters or the snow number concentrations. Simulated Vdop values based on GSFC agree with the observations well, while other schemes appear to have a 1 m s-1 high bias in the ice layer. In the rain layer, the model representations of Doppler velocity vary at different sites.

  12. Miniaturized Laser Heterodyne Radiometer (LHR) for Measurements of Greenhouse Gases in the Atmospheric Column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Emily; McLinden, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    This passive laser heterodyne radiometer (LHR) instrument simultaneously measures multiple trace gases in the atmospheric column including carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4), and resolves their concentrations at different altitudes. This instrument has been designed to operate in tandem with the passive aerosol sensor currently used in AERONET (an established network of more than 450 ground aerosol monitoring instruments worldwide). Because aerosols induce a radiative effect that influences terrestrial carbon exchange, simultaneous detection of aerosols with these key carbon cycle gases offers a uniquely comprehensive measurement approach. Laser heterodyne radiometry is a technique for detecting weak signals that was adapted from radio receiver technology. In a radio receiver, a weak input signal from a radio antenna is mixed with a stronger local oscillator signal. The mixed signal (beat note, or intermediate frequency) has a frequency equal to the difference between the input signal and the local oscillator. The intermediate frequency is amplified and sent to a detector that extracts the audio from the signal. In the LHR instrument described here, sunlight that has undergone absorption by the trace gas is mixed with laser light at a frequency matched to a trace gas absorption feature in the infrared (IR). Mixing results in a beat signal in the RF (radio frequency) region that can be related to the atmospheric concentration. For a one-second integration, the estimated column sensitivities are 0.1 ppmv for CO2, and Greenhouse gases Observational SATellite). The only network that currently measures CO2 and CH4 in the atmospheric column is TCCON (Total Carbon Column Observing Network), and only two of its 16 operational sites are in the United States. TCCON data is used for validation of GOSAT data, and will be used for OCO-2 validation. While these Fourier-transform spectrometers (FTS) can measure the largest range of trace gases, the network is severely limited

  13. Evaluation of Spaceborne L-band Radiometer Measurements for Terrestrial Freeze/Thaw Retrievals in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, A.; Royer, A.; Derksen, C.; Brucker, L.; Langlois, A.; Mailon, A.; Kerr, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The landscape freeze/thaw (FT) state has an important impact on the surface energy balance, carbon fluxes, and hydrologic processes; the timing of spring melt is linked to active layer dynamics in permafrost areas. L-band (1.4 GHz) microwave emission could allow the monitoring of surface state dynamics due to its sensitivity to the pronounced permittivity difference between frozen and thawed soil. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the performance of both Aquarius and Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) L-band passive microwave measurements using a polarization ratio-based algorithm for landscape FT monitoring. Weekly L-band satellite observations are compared with a large set of reference data at 48 sites across Canada spanning three environments: tundra, boreal forest, and prairies. The reference data include in situ measurements of soil temperature (Tsoil) and air temperature (Tair), and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) land surface temperature (LST) and snow cover area (SCA) products. Results show generally good agreement between Lband FT detection and the surface state estimated from four reference datasets. The best apparent accuracies for all seasons are obtained using Tair as the reference. Aquarius radiometer 2 (incidence angle of 39.6) data gives the best accuracies (90.8), while for SMOS the best results (87.8 of accuracy) are obtained at higher incidence angles (55- 60). The FT algorithm identifies both freeze onset and end with a delay of about one week in tundra and two weeks in forest and prairies, when compared to Tair. The analysis shows a stronger FT signal at tundra sites due to the typically clean transitions between consistently frozen and thawed conditions (and vice versa) and the absence of surface vegetation. Results in the prairies were poorer because of the influence of vegetation growth in summer (which decreases the polarization ratio) and the high frequency of ephemeral thaw events during winter. Freeze onset

  14. Evaluation of Deep Space Ka-Band Data Transfer using Radiometeorological Forecasts and Radiometer Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montopoli, Mario; Marzano, Frank S.; Biscarini, Marianna; Milani, Luca; Cimini, Domenico; De Sanctis, Klaide; Di Fabio, Saverio

    2016-04-01

    Deep space exploration is aimed at acquiring information about the solar system. In this scenario, telecommunications links between Earth ground receiving stations and extra-terrestrial satellite platforms have to be designed in order to ensure the optimal transfer of the acquired scientific data back to the Earth. A significant communication capacity has to be planned when very large distances, as those characterising deep space links, are involved thus fostering more ambitious scientific mission requirements. At the current state of the art, two microwave channel frequencies are used to perform the deep space data transfer: X band (~ 8.4 GHz) and Ka band (~ 32 GHz) channel. Ka-band transmission can offer an advantage over X-band in terms of antenna performance with the same antenna effective area and an available data transfer bandwidth (50 times higher at Ka band than X band). However, Earth troposphere-related impairments can affects the space-to-Earth carrier signals at frequencies higher than 10 GHz by degrading its integrity and thus reducing the deep space channel temporal availability. Such atmospheric impairments, especially in terms of path attenuation, their statistic and the possibility to forecast them in the next 24H at the Earth's receiving station would allow a more accurate design of the deep space link, promoting the mitigation of the detrimental effects on the link availability. To pursue this aim, meteorological forecast models and in situ measurements need to be considered in order to characterise the troposphere in terms of signal path attenuation at current and future time. In this work, we want to show how the synergistic use of meteorological forecasts, radiative transfer simulations and in situ measurements such as microwave radiometry observations, rain gauges and radiosoundings, can aid the optimisation of a deep space link at Ka band and improve its performance with respect to usual practices. The outcomes of the study are in the

  15. Measurement of Rapid Variations in Lower-Tropospheric Humidity Profiles Using Ground-Based Scanning Compact Microwave Radiometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, S.; Bosch-Lluis, X.; Reising, S. C.; Vivekanandan, J.

    2012-12-01

    Thermodynamic properties of the troposphere, particularly water vapor content and temperature, change in response to physical mechanisms, including frictional drag, evaporation, transpiration, heat transfer, pollutant emission and flow modification due to terrain. The planetary boundary layer (PBL) is characterized by a greater rate of change in the thermodynamic state of the atmosphere than at higher altitudes in the troposphere. Measurement of these changes, such as large horizontal gradients in water vapor and vertical profiles, provides very important data for improved weather prediction. Sensitivity studies for severe storm prediction indicate that a lack of accurate observations of water vapor densities throughout the lower troposphere limits the forecasting of severe storms. Therefore, measurements of water vapor density using microwave radiometers may help to improve accuracy of severe weather prediction. The HUMidity EXperiment 2011 (HUMEX11) was conducted to validate remote sensing of tropospheric humidity using ground-based scanning Compact Microwave Radiometers for Humidity profiling (CMR-H). Two microwave radiometers were scanned to sample an atmospheric volume at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility. Scientific objectives of HUMEX11 were to measure water vapor profiles in the lower troposphere with high vertical and temporal resolution and to track rapid variations in water vapor in the lowest 3 km of the troposphere. The principal reason for conducting the campaign at the SGP Climate Research Facility was the ability to compare the water vapor profile results with other measurements like ARM microwave radiometers and Raman lidar. The Raman lidar water vapor profiles were used as truth for comparison with the retrieved profiles. The study also focuses on optimizing the size of the background data set to minimize retrieval error as well as varying the

  16. Retrievals of chlorine chemistry kinetic parameters from Antarctic ClO microwave radiometer measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kremser

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Key kinetic parameters governing the partitioning of chlorine species in the Antarctic polar stratosphere were retrieved from 28 days of chlorine monoxide (ClO microwave radiometer measurements made during the late winter/early spring of 2005 at Scott Base (77.85° S, 166.75° E. During day-time the loss of the ClO dimer chlorine peroxide (ClOOCl occurs mainly by photolysis. Some time after sunrise, a photochemical equilibrium is established and the ClO/ClOOCl partitioning is determined by the ratio of the photolysis frequency, J, and the dimer formation rate, kf. The values of J and kf from laboratory studies remain uncertain to a considerable extent, and as a complement to these ongoing studies, the goal of this work is to provide a constraint on that uncertainty based on observations of ClO profiles in the Antarctic. First an optimal estimation technique was used to derive J/kf ratios for a range of Keq values. The optimal estimation forward model was a photochemical box model that takes J, kf, and Keq as inputs, together with a priori profiles of activated chlorine (ClOx = ClO+2×ClOOCl, profiles of ozone, temperature, and pressure. JPL06 kinetics are used as a priori in the optimal estimation and for all other chemistry in the forward model. Using the more recent JPL09 kinetics results in insignificant differences in the retrieved value of J/kf. A complementary approach was used to derive the optimal kinetic parameters; the full parameter space of J, kf, Keq and ClOx was sampled to find the minimum in differences between measured and modelled ClO profiles. Furthermore, values of Keq up to 2.0 times larger than recommended by JPL06 were explored to test the sensitivity of the

  17. The Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, David P.

    1970-01-01

    The often observed and misunderstood phenomenon of movement of black and white vanes in toy radiometers under illumination is discussed in a generalized non-mathematical manner. Effects of light pressure, low gas density, friction, heat, and motion are illustrated. (JM)

  18. Digital Array Gas Radiometer (DAGR) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation proposed here is a digital array gas radiometer (DAGR), a new design for a gas filter correlation radiometer (GFCR) to accurately measure and monitor...

  19. Aquarius Radiometer Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Vine, D. M.; Piepmeier, J. R.; Dinnat, E. P.; de Matthaeis, P.; Utku, C.; Abraham, S.; Lagerloef, G.S.E.; Meissner, T.; Wentz, F.

    2014-01-01

    Aquarius was launched on June 10, 2011 as part of the Aquarius/SAC-D observatory and the instrument has been operating continuously since being turned on in August of the same year. The initial map of sea surface salinity was released one month later (September) and the quality of the retrieval has continuously improved since then. The Aquarius radiometers include several special features such as measurement of the third Stokes parameter, fast sampling, and careful thermal control, and a combined passive/active instrument. Aquarius is working well and in addition to helping measure salinity, the radiometer special features are generating new results.

  20. Design and instrumentation of an airborne far infrared radiometer for in-situ measurements of ice clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proulx, Christian; Ngo Phong, Linh; Lamontagne, Frédéric; Wang, Min; Fisette, Bruno; Martin, Louis; Châteauneuf, François

    2016-09-01

    We report on the design and instrumentation of an aircraft-certified far infrared radiometer (FIRR) and the resulting instrument characteristics. FIRR was designed to perform unattended airborne measurements of ice clouds in the arctic in support of a microsatellite payload study. It provides radiometrically calibrated data in nine spectral channels in the range of 8-50 μm with the use of a rotating wheel of bandpass filters and reference blackbodies. Measurements in this spectral range are enabled with the use of a far infrared detector based on microbolometers of 104-μm pitch. The microbolometers have a new design because of the large structure and are coated with gold black to maintain uniform responsivity over the working spectral range. The vacuum sealed detector package is placed at the focal plane of a reflective telescope based on a Schwarschild configuration with two on-axis spherical mirrors. The telescope field-of-view is of 6° and illuminates an area of 2.1-mm diameter at the focal plane. In operation, FIRR was used as a nonimaging radiometer and exhibited a noise equivalent radiance in the range of 10-20 mW/m2-sr. The dynamic range and the detector vacuum integrity of FIRR were found to be suited for the conditions of the airborne experiments.

  1. Sunbeds' ultraviolet radiation measurements with different radiometers and criteria for compliance assessment set by the national competent authority in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petri, Aspasia; Karabetsos, Efthymios

    2016-09-01

    In order to ground the credibility of the sunbeds' ultraviolet radiation compliance assessment with the 0.3W/m(2) erythema effective irradiance limit, it is highly important to use reliable measuring equipment and to justify reasonably the measurement's result. Recently, the first surveillance action of the artificial tanning sector in Greece has been finalised. The action consisted of in situ erythema effective irradiance measurements from sunbeds at commercial premises offering artificial tanning services at various cities throughout Greece. Four different broadband erythemal weighted radiometers were used in order to compare them during in situ sunbeds' radiation measurements, at commercial premises, and to choose the most suitable one for compliance inspections. Furthermore a rationale has been introduced in order to compare the measurement's result with the limit, and decide about compliance or not, taking into account the measurement's expanded uncertainty. According to this approach, compliance, probable compliance or non-compliance is verified when the measurement's result taking into account the measurement's expanded uncertainty does not, probably or does exceed the 0.3W/m(2) limit, respectively. Ultraviolet radiation exceeded the 0.3W/m(2) erythema effective irradiance limit in 63.5% (33 out of 52) of the sunbeds and probably exceeded the limit in 11.5% (6 out of 52) of the sunbeds, according to the measurements performed with the radiometer which was chosen as the most suitable one and the proposed rationale for compliance justification. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. First middle-atmospheric zonal wind profile measurements with a new ground-based microwave Doppler-spectro-radiometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Rüfenacht

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We report on the wind radiometer WIRA, a new ground-based microwave Doppler-spectro-radiometer specifically designed for the measurement of middle-atmospheric horizontal wind by observing ozone emission spectra at 142.17504 GHz. Currently, wind speeds in five levels between 30 and 79 km can be retrieved which makes WIRA the first instrument able to continuously measure horizontal wind in this altitude range. For an integration time of one day the measurement error on each level lies at around 25 m s−1. With a planned upgrade this value is expected to be reduced by a factor of 2 in the near future. On the altitude levels where our measurement can be compared to wind data from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF very good agreement in the long-term statistics as well as in short time structures with a duration of a few days has been found.

    WIRA uses a passive double sideband heterodyne receiver together with a digital Fourier transform spectrometer for the data acquisition. A big advantage of the radiometric approach is that such instruments can also operate under adverse weather conditions and thus provide a continuous time series for the given location. The optics enables the instrument to scan a wide range of azimuth angles including the directions east, west, north, and south for zonal and meridional wind measurements. The design of the radiometer is fairly compact and its calibration does not rely on liquid nitrogen which makes it transportable and suitable for campaign use. WIRA is conceived in a way that it can be operated remotely and does hardly require any maintenance.

    In the present paper, a description of the instrument is given, and the techniques used for the wind retrieval based on the determination of the Doppler shift of the measured atmospheric ozone emission spectra are outlined. Their reliability was tested using Monte Carlo simulations. Finally, a time series of 11

  3. Transferring the calibration of direct solar irradiance to diffuse-sky radiance measurements for CIMEL Sun-sky radiometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhengqiang; Blarel, Luc; Podvin, Thierry; Goloub, Philippe; Buis, Jean-Pierre; Morel, Jean-Philippe

    2008-04-01

    Two types of sunphotometric measurement are considered in this study: direct-Sun irradiance and diffuse-sky radiance. Based on CIMEL CE318 Sun-sky radiometer characteristics, we introduce a gain-corrected solid angle that allows interconverting calibration coefficients of these two types of measurement, thus realizing a "vicarious" radiance calibration. The accuracy of the gain-corrected solid angle depends on the number of available historical calibration records. The method is easy to use, provided that at least one laboratory calibration has been made previously. Examples coming from three distinct CE318 versions belonging to the AERONET/PHOTONS network are presented to provide details on the vicarious calibration method and protocols. From the error propagation analysis and the comparison with laboratory results, the uncertainty of the vicarious radiance calibration is shown to be comparable with the laboratory one, e.g., 3%-5%.

  4. Reliability of three dental radiometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, E K; Asmussen, E

    1993-04-01

    The light intensity from 80 different curing units was recorded on three dental radiometers. Even though the correlation between the recordings obtained with the three testers was rather high, some units were categorized as good units by one radiometer and poor ones by another. It was also found that, in some case, there was a pronounced difference between the output within the same type of new units. Cavities were made in extracted third molars, filled with a microfilled resin, irradiated for 40 s with 20 of the curing units, and the depth of cure was measured. The radiometers were not able to rank the 20 units in accordance with their depth of cure. We conclude that the three radiometers are not fully reliable. However, they may become very useful tools for monitoring the output from a curing unit if the radiometer and the unit are calibrated.

  5. Total solar irradiance as measured by the SOVAP radiometer onboard PICARD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meftah Mustapha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available From the SOlar VAriability PICARD (SOVAP space-based radiometer, we obtained a new time series of the total solar irradiance (TSI during Solar Cycle 24. Based on SOVAP data, we obtained that the TSI input at the top of the Earth’s atmosphere at a distance of one astronomical unit from the Sun is 1361.8 ± 2.4 W m−2 (1σ representative of the 2008 solar minimum period. From 2010 to 2014, the amplitude of the changes has been of the order of ± 0.1%, corresponding to a range of about 2.7 W m−2. To determine the TSI from SOVAP, we present here an improved instrument equation. A parameter was integrated from a theoretical analysis that highlighted the thermo-electrical non-equivalence of the radiometric cavity. From this approach, we obtained values that are lower than those previously provided with the same type of instrument. The results in this paper supersede the previous SOVAP analysis and provide the best SOVAP-based TSI-value estimate and its temporal variation.

  6. Design and characterization of a 32-channel heterodyne radiometer for electron cyclotron emission measurements on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, X; Liu, X; Liu, Y; Domier, C W; Luhmann, N C; Li, E Z; Hu, L Q; Gao, X

    2014-07-01

    A 32-channel heterodyne radiometer has been developed for the measurement of electron cyclotron emission (ECE) on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST). This system collects X-mode ECE radiation spanning a frequency range of 104-168 GHz, where the frequency coverage corresponds to a full radial coverage for the case with a toroidal magnetic field of 2.3 T. The frequency range is equally spaced every 2 GHz from 105.1 to 167.1 GHz with an RF bandwidth of ~500 MHz and the video bandwidth can be switched among 50, 100, 200, and 400 kHz. Design objectives and characterization of the system are presented in this paper. Preliminary results for plasma operation are also presented.

  7. A Low-Cost Miniaturized Laser Heterodyne Radiometer (Mini-LHR) for Near-ir Measurements of CO2 and CH4 in the Atmospheric Column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Emily Wilson

    2016-01-01

    The miniaturized laser heterodyne radiometer (mini-LHR) is a ground-based passive variation of a laser heterodyne radiometer that uses sunlight to measure absorption of CO2 andCH4 in the infrared. Sunlight is collected using collimation optics mounted to an AERONET sun tracker, modulated with a fiber switch and mixed with infrared laser light in a fast photoreciever.The amplitude of the resultant RF (radio frequency) beat signal correlates with the concentration of the gas in the atmospheric column.

  8. Simulated and measured performance of a real-time processor for RFI detection and mitigation on-board spaceborne microwave radiometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels; Kristensen, Steen Savstrup; Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl

    2017-01-01

    An RFI processor breadboard has been designed and developed for future spaceborne microwave radiometer systems. RFI detection is based on the anomalous amplitude, kurtosis, and cross-frequency algorithms. These are implemented in VHDL code in an FPGA. Thus algorithm performance can be assessed...... by proper code simulation. The breadboard has been integrated with a Ku band radiometer subjected to RFI-like signals from a laboratory generator. Simulations show that the algorithms as implemented work according to theory when subjected to pulsed sinusoidal and QPSK signals. The laboratory measurements...

  9. Nocturnal aerosol optical thickness measured with a sun/moon photometer developed by improving the Prede Sky-radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiobara, Masataka; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Hishida, Kosuke; Uchiyama, Akihiro

    2017-04-01

    Sun photometry to obtain the aerosol optical thickness (AOT) needs the sun. Since the moon must be another source of light instead of the sun during night-time, a moon photometer was developed by improving the Prede POM-02 Sky-radiometer to measure the spectral lunar irradiance. The original POM-02 model has an electric dynamic range of 109 to measure both of direct- and circum-solar radiation. The electronics of POM-02 was upgraded to include a 1011 dynamic range for better performance to measure the direct lunar irradiance at the visible range as well as the sun and sky measurements with a single instrument. A CCD-based position sensor was newly developed to track the moon as well as the sun continuously. The position of the moon/sun is determined with accuracy of better than 0.01° by a real-time processing system using the CCD imager. Test measurements with the improved POM-02 instrument were performed for the half to full moon conditions, and showed a good performance for lunar photometry to obtain the nocturnal AOTs.

  10. Technical progress report: Completion of spectral rotating shadowband radiometers and analysis of atmospheric radiation measurement spectral shortwave data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalsky, J.; Harrison, L. [State Univ. of New York, Albany, NY (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Our goal in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is the improvement of radiation models used in general circulation models (GCMs), especially in the shortwave, (1) by providing improved shortwave radiometric measurements for the testing of models and (2) by developing methods for retrieving climatologically sensitive parameters that serve as input to shortwave and longwave models. At the Atmospheric Sciences Research Center (ASRC) in Albany, New York, we are acquiring downwelling direct and diffuse spectral irradiance, at six wavelengths, plus downwelling broadband longwave, and upwelling and downwelling broadband shortwave irradiances that we combine with National Weather Service surface and upper air data from the Albany airport as a test data set for ARM modelers. We have also developed algorithms to improve shortwave measurements made at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) ARM site by standard thermopile instruments and by the multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) based on these Albany data sets. Much time has been spent developing techniques to retrieve column aerosol, water vapor, and ozone from the direct beam spectral measurements of the MFRSR. Additionally, we have had success in calculating shortwave surface albedo and aerosol optical depth from the ratio of direct to diffuse spectral reflectance.

  11. Autonomous field measurements of CO2 in the atmospheric column with the miniaturized laser heterodyne radiometer (Mini-LHR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melroy, H. R.; Wilson, E. L.; Clarke, G. B.; Ott, L. E.; Mao, J.; Ramanathan, A. K.; McLinden, M. L.

    2015-09-01

    We present column CO2 measurements taken by the passive miniaturized laser heterodyne radiometer (Mini-LHR) at 1611.51 nm at the Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii. The Mini-LHR was operated autonomously, during the month of May 2013 at this site, working in tandem with an AERONET sun photometer that measures aerosol optical depth at 15-min intervals during daylight hours. Laser heterodyne radiometry has been used since the 1970s to measure atmospheric gases such as ozone, water vapor, methane, ammonia, chlorine monoxide, and nitrous oxide. This iteration of the technology utilizes distributed feedback lasers to produce a low-cost, small, portable sensor that has potential for global deployment. Applications of this instrument include supplementation of existing monitoring networks to provide denser global coverage, providing validation for larger satellite missions, and targeting regions of carbon flux uncertainty. Also presented here are preliminary retrieval analysis and the performance analysis that demonstrate that the Mini-LHR responds extremely well to changes in the atmospheric absorption.

  12. Estimation of atmospheric aerosol composition from ground-based remote sensing measurements of Sun-sky radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Y. S.; Li, Z. Q.; Zhang, Y. X.; Zhang, Y.; Li, D. H.; Li, K. T.; Xu, H.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, Y. Q.; Chen, X. F.; Schauer, J. J.; Bergin, M.

    2017-01-01

    Remote sensing provides aerosol loading information, but to address climate and air quality model validation, there are additional needs to acquire aerosol composition information. In this study, a comprehensive aerosol composition model is established to quantify black carbon (BC), brown carbon (BrC), mineral dust (DU), particulate organic matters, ammonium sulfate like (AS), sea salt, and aerosol water uptake. We develop forward modeling of aerosol components, including microphysical parameters (real and imaginary refractive indices, volume fraction ratio of fine to coarse mode, and sphericity) and hygroscopic growth models, and propose an optimization scheme to estimate the components. The uncertainties caused by input parameters are also assessed. Sun-sky radiometer measurements and meteorological data obtained during a campaign in Huairou, Beijing, are processed to estimate aerosol components, which are further compared with synchronous in situ chemical measurements. The results show generally good consistencies between remotely estimated and measured components (e.g., correlation coefficients for BC, BrC, AS, and PM2.5 lie in about 0.8-0.9). The comparisons between modeled and observed microphysical parameters also show good agreements, with the exception of sphericity, which is likely caused by high uncertainties of this parameter. Sensitivity studies show that BC and BrC are highly sensitive to imaginary refractive index, while DU is strongly correlated to both volume size and sphericity. The performance of composition retrieval is expected to be improved when the sphericity uncertainty is significantly reduced.

  13. Autonomous Field Measurements of CO2 in the Atmospheric Column with the Miniaturized Laser Heterodyne Radiometer (Mini-LHR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melroy, H. R.; Wilson, E. L.; Clarke, G. B.; Ott, L. E.; Mao, J.; Ramanathan, A. K.; McLinden, M. L.

    2015-01-01

    We present column CO2 measurements taken by the passive Miniaturized Laser Heterodyne Radiometer (Mini-LHR) at 1611.51 nm at the Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO) in Hawaii. The Mini-LHR was operated autonomously, during the month of May 2013 at this site, working in tandem with an AERONET sun photometer that measures aerosol optical depth at 15 minute intervals during daylight hours. Laser Heterodyne Radiometry has been used since the 1970s to measure atmospheric gases such as ozone, water vapor, methane, ammonia, chlorine monoxide, and nitrous oxide. This iteration of the technology utilizes distributed feedback lasers to produce a low-cost, small, portable sensor that has potential for global deployment. Applications of this instrument include supplementation of existing monitoring networks to provide denser global coverage, providing validation for larger satellite missions, and targeting regions of carbon flux uncertainty. Also presented here is a preliminary retrieval analysis and the performance analysis that demonstrates that the Mini-LHR responds extremely well to changes in the atmospheric absorption.

  14. Balloon-borne radiometer measurements of Northern Hemisphere mid-latitude stratospheric HNO3 profiles spanning 12 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Walker

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Low-resolution atmospheric thermal emission spectra collected by balloon-borne radiometers over the time span of 1990–2002 are used to retrieve vertical profiles of HNO3, CFC-11 and CFC-12 volume mixing ratios between approximately 10 and 35 km altitude. All of the data analyzed have been collected from launches from a Northern Hemisphere mid-latitude site, during late summer, when stratospheric dynamic variability is at a minimum. The retrieval technique incorporates detailed forward modeling of the instrument and the radiative properties of the atmosphere, and obtains a best fit between modeled and measured spectra through a combination of onion-peeling and optimization steps. The retrieved HNO3 profiles are consistent over the 12-year period, and are consistent with recent measurements by the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier transform spectrometer satellite instrument. We therefore find no evidence of long-term changes in the HNO3 summer mid-latitude profile, although the uncertainty of our measurements precludes a conclusive trend analysis.

  15. Fast and Accurate Collocation of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite Measurements with Cross-Track Infrared Sounder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Likun Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Given the fact that Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS and the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS are currently onboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (Suomi NPP satellite and will continue to be carried on the same platform as future Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS satellites for the next decade, it is desirable to develop a fast and accurate collocation scheme to collocate VIIRS products and measurements with CrIS for applications that rely on combining measurements from two sensors such as inter-calibration, geolocation assessment, and cloud detection. In this study, an accurate and fast collocation method to collocate VIIRS measurements within CrIS instantaneous field of view (IFOV directly based on line-of-sight (LOS pointing vectors is developed and discussed in detail. We demonstrate that this method is not only accurate and precise from a mathematical perspective, but also easy to implement computationally. More importantly, with optimization, this method is very fast and efficient and thus can meet operational requirements. Finally, this collocation method can be extended to a wide variety of sensors on different satellite platforms.

  16. Failure and Redemption of Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR)/Normal Incidence Multifilter Radiometer (NIMFR) Cloud Screening: Contrasting Algorithm Performance at Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) and Southern Great Plains (SGP) Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Flynn, Connor J.; Koontz, Annette S.; Sivaraman, Chitra; Barnard, James C.

    2013-09-11

    Well-known cloud-screening algorithms, which are designed to remove cloud-contaminated aerosol optical depths (AOD) from AOD measurements, have shown great performance at many middle-to-low latitude sites around the world. However, they may occasionally fail under challenging observational conditions, such as when the sun is low (near the horizon) or when optically thin clouds with small spatial inhomogeneity occur. Such conditions have been observed quite frequently at the high-latitude Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites. A slightly modified cloud-screening version of the standard algorithm is proposed here with a focus on the ARM-supported Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) and Normal Incidence Multifilter Radiometer (NIMFR) data. The modified version uses approximately the same techniques as the standard algorithm, but it additionally examines the magnitude of the slant-path line of sight transmittance and eliminates points when the observed magnitude is below a specified threshold. Substantial improvement of the multi-year (1999-2012) aerosol product (AOD and its Angstrom exponent) is shown for the NSA sites when the modified version is applied. Moreover, this version reproduces the AOD product at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site, which was originally generated by the standard cloud-screening algorithms. The proposed minor modification is easy to implement and its application to existing and future cloud-screening algorithms can be particularly beneficial for challenging observational conditions.

  17. Validation of the uncertainty budget for soft X-ray radiant power measurement using a cryogenic radiometer

    CERN Document Server

    Rabus, H; Scholze, F; Thornagel, R; Ulm, G

    2002-01-01

    The cryogenic radiometer SYRES, a thermal detector based on the electrical substitution principle, has been used as the primary detector standard for radiant power measurement in the ultraviolet, vacuum ultraviolet and soft X-ray spectral ranges. In order to investigate the possibility of radiant energy being deposited in its absorber cavity without being transformed into heat when detecting soft X-rays, SYRES has been directly compared with the electron storage ring BESSY 1, a primary radiometric source standard of calculable spectral radiant power. To this end, the integral radiant power emitted by the storage ring,into a solid angle defined by a high-precision aperture was measured with SYRES. The experiments were conducted at two nominal energies of the circulating electrons, 800 MeV and 340 MeV, to study the influence of the different spectral distributions of the synchrotron radiation. For the original graphite-coated cavity absorber, significant discrepancies were found which could be traced back to th...

  18. Validation of Spacecraft Active Cavity Radiometer Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) Long Term Measurement Trends Using Proxy TSI Least Squares Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Robert Benjamin, III; Wilson, Robert S.

    2003-01-01

    Long-term, incoming total solar irradiance (TSI) measurement trends were validated using proxy TSI values, derived from indices of solar magnetic activity. Spacecraft active cavity radiometers (ACR) are being used to measure longterm TSI variability, which may trigger global climate changes. The TSI, typically referred to as the solar constant, was normalized to the mean earth-sun distance. Studies of spacecraft TSI data sets confirmed the existence of a 0.1 %, long-term TSI variability component within a 10-year period. The 0.1% TSI variability component is clearly present in the spacecraft data sets from the 1984-2004 time frame. Typically, three overlapping spacecraft data sets were used to validate long-term TSI variability trends. However, during the years of 1978-1984, 1989-1991, and 1993-1996, three overlapping spacecraft data sets were not available in order to validate TSI trends. The TSI was found to vary with indices of solar magnetic activity associated with recent 10-year sunspot cycles. Proxy TSI values were derived from least squares analyses of the measured TSI variability with the solar indices of 10.7-cm solar fluxes, and with limb-darked sunspot fluxes. The resulting proxy TSI values were compared to the spacecraft ACR measurements of TSI variability to detect ACR instrument degradation, which may be interpreted as TSI variability. Analyses of ACR measurements and TSI proxies are presented primarily for the 1984-2004, Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) ACR solar monitor data set. Differences in proxy and spacecraft measurement data sets suggest the existence of another TSI variability component with an amplitude greater than or equal to 0.5 Wm-2 (0.04%), and with a cycle of 20 years or more.

  19. Wide Dynamic Range Multiband Infrared Radiometer for In-Fire Measurements of Wildland Fire Radiant Flux Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremens, R.; Dickinson, M. B.; Hardy, C.; Skowronski, N.; Ellicott, E. A.; Schroeder, W.

    2016-12-01

    We have developed a wide dynamic range (24-bit) data acquisition system for collection of radiant flux density (FRFD) data from wildland fires. The data collection subsystem was designed as an Arduino `shield' and incorporates a 24-bit analog-to-digital converter, precision voltage reference, real time clock, microSD card interface, audible annuciator and interface for various digital communication interfaces (RS232, I2C, SPI, etc.). The complete radiometer system consists of our custom-designed `shield', a commercially available Arduino MEGA computer circuit board and a thermopile sensor -amplifier daughter board. Software design and development is greatly assisted by the availability of a library of public-domain, user-implemented software. The daughter board houses a 5-band radiometer using thermopiles designed for this experiment (Dexter Research Corp., Dexter, MI) to allow determination of the total FRFD from the fire (using a wide band thermopile with a KRS-5 window, 0.1 - 30 um), the FRFD as would be received by an orbital asset like MODIS (3.95 um center wavelength (CWL) and 10.95 CWL, corresponding to MODIS bands 21/22 and 31, respectively) and wider bandpass (0.1-5.5 um and 8-14 um) corresponding to the FRFD recorded by `MWIR' and `LWIR' imaging systems. We required a very wide dynamic range system in order to be able to record the flux density from `cold' ground before the fire, through the `hot' flaming combustion stage, to the `cool' phase after passage of the fire front. The recording dynamic range required (with reasonable resolution at the lowest temperatures) is on the order of 106, which is not currently available in commercial instrumentation at a price point, size or feature set that is suitable for wildland fire investigations. The entire unit, along with rechargeable battery power supply is housed in a fireproof aluminum chassis box, which is then mounted on a mast at a height of 5 - 7 m above the fireground floor. We will report initial

  20. [The accuracy and consistency of dental radiometers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossouw, S

    2001-11-01

    Radiometers are used in dentistry to evaluate the intensity of light emitted by curing lights. This article discusses the accuracy and consistency of radiometers. The study was done as two experiments, dividing radiometers by age. In experiment 1, one Heliolux II curing light was tested nine times with each of four old radiometers. In experiment 2 the same curing light was tested with three very new radiometers, under identical circumstances. In experiment 1, the average intensities measured by the radiometers ranged between 262 and 348 mW/cm2, while the standard deviation varied between 7.59 and 42.03. In experiment 2, the average intensities measured by the radiometers ranged between 240 and 283.75 mW/cm2, while the standard deviation varied between 0.00 and 4.63. The seven radiometers differed significantly (P radiometers differs depending on the age of the unit, the state of repair of the unit, and how often it is standardised. In this study it was impossible to evaluate the accuracy of the radiometers.

  1. A Hollow-Waveguide Gas Correlation Radiometer for Ultra-Precise Column Measurements of Formaldehyde on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Emily L.; Neveu, Marc; Riris, Haris; Georgieva, Elena M.; Heaps, William S.

    2011-01-01

    We present preliminary results in the development of a miniaturized gas correlation radiometer that implements a hollow-core optical fiber (hollow waveguide) gas correlation cell. The substantial reduction in mass and volume of the gas correlation cell makes this technology appropriate for an orbital mission -- capable of pinpointing sources of trace gases in the Martian atmosphere. Here we demonstrate a formaldehyde (H2CO) sensor and report a detection limit equivalent to approximately 30 ppb in the Martian atmosphere. The relative simplicity of the technique allows it to be expanded to measure a range of atmospheric trace gases of interest on Mars such as methane (CH4), water vapour (H2O), deuterated water vapour (HDO), and methanol (CH3OH). Performance of a formaldehyde instrument in a Mars orbit has been simulated assuming a 3 meter long, 1000 micron inner diameter hollow-core fiber gas correlation cell, a 92.8 degree sun-synchronous orbit from 400 km with a horizontal sampling scale of 10 km x 10 km. Initial results indicate that for one second of averaging, a detection limit of 1 ppb is possible.

  2. Estimation of aerosol particle composition using ground-based sun-sky radiometer measurements at typical sites in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z.; Gu, X.; Wang, L.; Li, D.; Xing, X.; Gai, J.; Wang, Q.; Li, K.; Li, L.; Zhang, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol affects climate and environment through radiative and health effects determined by its physical and chemical properties. In this study, we modeled aerosol by an internal mixture of different components like water, sulfate and black carbon following Maxwell-Garnett effective medium approximation theory. In order to deal with complex aerosol mixing situation in China, we considered extra mineral dust component in case of large particles. Remote sensing data obtained from ground-based CE318 sun-sky radiometers in typical China sites are used to derive the aerosol mixture model. Measurements are firstly calibrated by using intercomparison and vicarious calibration methods and then retrieved by using AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) inversion algorithm to obtain refractive indices of the mixture, which are then used to yield aerosol component fraction. Results at typical China regions like megacity, industrial, arid, oceanic and background sites show considerable difference between their aerosol particle compositions and agree with a priori information like regional aerosol sources and formation processes.

  3. The LIULIN-3M Radiometer for Measuring Particle Doses in Space and on Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stassinopoulos, E. G.; Stauffer, C. A.; Dachev, T. P.; Tomov, B. T.; Dimitrov, P. G.; Brucker, G. J.; Obenschain, Art (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a compact radiation monitor/dosimeter, the LIULIN-3M, and on extended measurements conducted on the ground and on commercial aircraft on domestic and international flights.

  4. Hurricane Imaging Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecil, Daniel J.; Biswas, Sayak K.; James, Mark W.; Roberts, J. Brent; Jones, W. Linwood; Johnson, James; Farrar, Spencer; Sahawneh, Saleem; Ruf, Christopher S.; Morris, Mary; hide

    2014-01-01

    The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) is a synthetic thinned array passive microwave radiometer designed to allow retrieval of surface wind speed in hurricanes, up through category five intensity. The retrieval technology follows the Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR), which measures surface wind speed in hurricanes along a narrow strip beneath the aircraft. HIRAD maps wind speeds in a swath below the aircraft, about 50-60 km wide when flown in the lower stratosphere. HIRAD has flown in the NASA Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) experiment in 2010 on a WB-57 aircraft, and on a Global Hawk unmanned aircraft system (UAS) in 2012 and 2013 as part of NASA's Hurricane and Severe Storms Sentinel (HS3) program. The GRIP program included flights over Hurricanes Earl and Karl (2010). The 2012 HS3 deployment did not include any hurricane flights for the UAS carrying HIRAD. The 2013 HS3 flights included one flight over the predecessor to TS Gabrielle, and one flight over Hurricane Ingrid. This presentation will describe the HIRAD instrument, its results from the 2010 and 2013 flights, and potential future developments.

  5. Seasonal and monthly variations of columnar aerosol optical properties over east Asia determined from multi-year MODIS, LIDAR, and AERONET Sun/sky radiometer measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Woo; Yoon, Soon-Chang; Kim, Jiyoung; Kim, Seung-Yeon

    Multi-year records of MODIS, micro-pulse lidar (MPL), and aerosol robotic network (AERONET) Sun/sky radiometer measurements were analyzed to investigate the seasonal, monthly and geographical variations of columnar aerosol optical properties over east Asia. Similar features of monthly and seasonal variations were found among the measurements, though the observational methodology and periods are not coincident. Seasonal and monthly cycles of MODIS-derived aerosol optical depth (AOD) over east Asia showed a maximum in spring and a minimum in autumn and winter. Aerosol vertical extinction profiles measured by MPL also showed elevated aerosol loads in the middle troposphere during the spring season. Seasonal and spatial distributions were related to the dust and anthropogenic emissions in spring, but modified by precipitation in July-August and regional atmospheric dispersion in September-February. All of the AERONET Sun/sky radiometers utilized in this study showed the same seasonal and monthly variations of MODIS-derived AOD. Interestingly, we found a peak of monthly mean AOD over industrialized coastal regions of China and the Yellow Sea, the Korean Peninsula, and Japan, in June from both MODIS and AERONET Sun/sky radiometer measurements. Especially, the maximum monthly mean AOD in June is more evident at the AERONET urban sites (Beijing and Gwangju). This AOD June maximum is attributable to the relative contribution of various processes such as stagnant synoptic meteorological patterns, secondary aerosol formation, hygroscopic growth of hydrophilic aerosols due to enhanced relative humidity, and smoke aerosols by regional biomass burning.

  6. Measuring GNSS ionospheric total electron content at Concordia, and application to L-band radiometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Romano

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of the project BIS - Bipolar Ionospheric Scintillation and Total Electron Content Monitoring, the ISACCO-DMC0 and ISACCO-DMC1 permanent monitoring stations were installed in 2008. The principal scope of the stations is to measure the ionospheric total electron content (TEC and to monitor the ionospheric scintillations, using high-sampling-frequency global positioning system (GPS ionospheric scintillation and TEC monitor (GISTM receivers. The disturbances that the ionosphere can induce on the electromagnetic signals emitted by the Global Navigation Satellite System constellations are due to the presence of electron density anomalies in the ionosphere, which are particularly frequent at high latitudes, where the upper atmosphere is highly sensitive to perturbations coming from outer space. With the development of present and future low-frequency space-borne microwave missions (e.g., Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity [SMOS], Aquarius, and Soil Moisture Active Passive missions, there is an increasing need to estimate the effects of the ionosphere on the propagation of electromagnetic waves that affects satellite measurements. As an example, how the TEC data collected at Concordia station are useful for the calibration of the European Space Agency SMOS data within the framework of an experiment promoted by the European Space Agency (known as DOMEX will be discussed. The present report shows the ability of the GISTM station to monitor ionospheric scintillation and TEC, which indicates that only the use of continuous GPS measurements can provide accurate information on TEC variability, which is necessary for continuous calibration of satellite data.

  7. Sol-Rad Net Flux (L 1.0, 1.5, 2.0)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SolRad-Net (Solar Radiation Network) is an established network of ground-based sensors providing high-frequency solar flux measurements in quasi-realtime to the...

  8. Why and when channelling can decrease pool size at constant net flux in a simple dynamic channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, P; Kell, D B; Westerhoff, H V

    1996-03-15

    Cornish-Bowden and Cárdenas (Cornish-Bowden, A. and Cárdenas M.L. (1993) Eur. J. Biochem. 213, 87-92) have suggested that simulation results peviously published by us (Mendes, P., Kell, D.B. and Westerhoff, H.V. (1992) Eur. J. Biochem. 204, 255-266) which had demonstrated that large reductions of intermediate pool sizes could be accompanied by increasing channel flux in a model metabolic pathway, were an artefact of changes in the pathway's overall flux of the order of 0.0075%, or of inappropriate alterations of enzyme activities. They also asserted to prove that the "channelling of an intermediate cannot affect its free concentration at constant net flux". We consider the co-response of the intermediate metabolite concentration ('pool') and the channel flux to changes in kinetic (or thermodynamic) parameters. Both by analytical proofs and by numerical examples we show that this co-response can be positive, negative or null, depending on the parameter change. In particular, we prove that there is always a number of ways of changing parameters such that the intermediate metabolite concentration decreases with increasing channel flux, whether the total flux varies or is constant. We also show that increased stability of the (dynamic) enzyme-intermediate-enzyme complex, as well as a single parameter change that similarly displays no cross-over effects, can lead to decreased intermediate metabolite concentration and increased channel flux at constant total flux. In general, a non-zero co-response of the intermediate metabolite concentration ('pool') and the channel flux to changes in kinetic (or other) parameters is the rule rather than the exception. More specifically: (i) The algebraic analysis ('general proof') given in Cornish-Bowden and Cárdenas (1993) contains the constraint that the elasticities of various steps to the modulation parameters which were used to vary the channel flux at constant net flux were unity. This is an unfortunate and unnecessary

  9. Stratospheric BrO abundance measured by a balloon-borne submillimeterwave radiometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Stachnik

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of mixing ratio profiles of stratospheric bromine monoxide (BrO were made using observations of BrO rotational line emission at 650.179 GHz by a balloon-borne SIS (superconductor-insulator-superconductor submillimeterwave heterodyne limb sounder (SLS. The balloon was launched from Ft. Sumner, New Mexico (34° N on 22 September 2011. Peak mid-day BrO abundance varied from 16 ± 2 ppt at 34 km to 6 ± 4 ppt at 16 km. Corresponding estimates of total inorganic bromine (Bry, derived from BrO vmr (volume mixing ratio using a photochemical box model, were 21 ± 3 ppt and 11 ± 5 ppt, respectively. Inferred Bry abundance exceeds that attributable solely to decomposition of long-lived methyl bromide and other halons, and is consistent with a contribution from bromine-containing very short lived substances, BryVSLS, of 4 ppt to 8 ppt. These results for BrO and Bry were compared with, and found to be in good agreement with, those of other recent balloon-borne and satellite instruments.

  10. Retrieving soil moisture for non-forested areas using PALS radiometer measurements in SMAPVEX12 field campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this paper we investigate retrieval of soil moisture based on L-band brightness temperature under diverse conditions and land cover types. We apply the PALS (Passive Active L-band System) radiometer data collected in the SMAPVEX12 (Soil Moisture Active Passive Validation Experiment 2012) field ex...

  11. An Airborne Campaign Measuring Wind Signatures from the Sea Surface using an L-band Polarimetric Radiometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl; Skou, Niels

    2003-01-01

    A series of circle flights have been carried out over the sea surface, using the EMIRAD L-band polarimetric radiometer. Motion compensation is applied, and polarimetric azimuth signatures are generated. Single tracks show geophysical noise, typically about 2 K, but averaging decreases the noise...

  12. A compact ground-based laser heterodyne radiometer for global column measurements of CO2 and CH4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Emily; Clarke, Gregory; Ramanathan, Anand; Mao, Jianping; Ott, Lesley; Duncan, Bryan; Melroy, Hilary; McLinden, Matthew; Holben, Brent; Houston Miller, J.

    2015-04-01

    Implementing effective global strategies to understand climate change is hindered by a lack of understanding of both anthropogenic emissions and land and ocean carbon reservoirs. Though in situ surface measurements and satellites provide valuable information for estimating carbon fluxes, areas not well covered by current observing systems (e.g. high latitude regions, tropical forests and wetlands) remain poorly understood. Deficiencies in understanding the processes governing carbon flux introduce considerable uncertainty to predictions of climate change over the coming century. Our vision is to enhance worldwide carbon monitoring by developing a low-cost ground network of miniaturized laser heterodyne radiometer (Mini-LHR) instruments that measure CO2 and CH4 in the atmospheric column. Ground-based remote sensing has the potential to fill gaps in the satellite data record while providing a complementary long-term observational record. This uninterrupted data record, would both bridge gaps in data sets and offer validation for key flight missions such as OCO-2, OCO-3 and ASCENDS. Mini-LHR instruments will be deployed as an accompaniment to AERONET. In addition to the complementary aerosol optical depth measurement, tandem operation with AERONET provides a clear pathway for the Mini-LHR to be expanded into a global monitoring network. AERONET has more than 500 instruments worldwide offering coverage in key arctic regions (not covered by OCO-2) where accelerated warming due to the release of CO2 and CH4 from thawing tundra and permafrost is a concern. Mini-LHR instruments at AERONET locations could also greatly improve data coverage in regions with large flux uncertainties such as North America and Western Europe, and under-sampled areas such as South America and Asia. Currently, the only ground global network that routinely measures multiple greenhouse gases in the atmospheric column is TCCON with 18 operational sites worldwide and two in the US. Cost and size of

  13. Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) project. VI - Spacecraft, scientific instruments, and launching rocket. Part 3 - The electrically Scanning Microwave Radiometer and the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilheit, Thomas T.; Yamasaki, Hiromichi

    1990-01-01

    The two microwave radiometers for TRMM are designed to measure thermal microwave radiation upwelling from the earth. The Electrically Scanning Microwave Radiometer (ESMR) scans from 50 deg to the left through nadir to 50 deg to the right in 78 steps with no moving mechanical parts in a band centered at 19.35 GHz. The TRMM concept uses the radar to develop a climatology of rain-layer thickness which can be used for the interpretation of the radiometer data over a swath wider than the radar. The ESMR data are useful for estimating rain intensity only over an ocean background. The Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I), which scans conically with three dual polarized channels at 19, 37, and 85 GHz and a single polarized channel at 22 GHz, provides a wider range of rainfall intensities. The SSM/I spins about an axis parallel to the local spacecraft vector and 128 uniformly spaced samples of the 85 GHz data are taken on each scan over a 112-deg scan region simultaneously with 64 samples of the other frequencies.

  14. Radiometer Testbed Development for SWOT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangaslahti, Pekka; Brown, Shannon; Gaier, Todd; Dawson, Douglas; Harding, Dennis; Fu, Lee-Lueng; Esteban-Fernandez, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Conventional altimeters include nadir looking colocated 18-37 GHz microwave radiometer to measure wet tropospheric path delay. These have reduced accuracy in coastal zone (within 50 km from land) and do not provide wet path delay over land. The addition of high frequency channels to Jason-class radiometer will improve retrievals in coastal regions and enable retrievals over land. High-frequency window channels, 90, 130 and 166 GHz are optimum for improving performance in coastal region and channels on 183 GHz water vapor line are ideal for over-land retrievals.

  15. Cloud parameters from zenith transmittances measured by sky radiometer at surface: Method development and satellite product validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, Pradeep; Hayasaka, Tadahiro; Iwabuchi, Hironobu; Takamura, Tamio; Irie, Hitoshi; Nakajima, Takashi Y.; Letu, Husi; Kai, Qin

    2017-04-01

    Clouds are known to have profound impacts on atmospheric radiation and water budget, climate change, atmosphere-surface interaction, and so on. Cloud optical thickness (COT) and effective radius (Re) are two fundamental cloud parameters required to study clouds from climatological and hydrological point of view. Large spatial-temporal coverages of those cloud parameters from space observation have proved to be very useful for cloud research; however, validation of space-based products is still a challenging task due to lack of reliable data. Ground-based remote sensing instruments, such as sky radiometers distributed around the world through international observation networks of SKYNET (http://atmos2.cr.chiba-u.jp/skynet/) and AERONET (https://aeronet.gsfc.nasa.gov/) have a great potential to produce ground-truth cloud parameters at different parts of the globe to validate satellite products. Focusing to the sky radiometers of SKYNET and AERONET, a few cloud retrieval methods exists, but those methods have some difficulties to address the problem when cloud is optically thin. It is because the observed transmittances at two wavelengths can be originated from more than one set of COD and Re, and the choice of the most plausible set is difficult. At the same time, calibration issue, especially for the wavelength of near infrared (NIR) region, which is important to retrieve Re, is also a difficult task at present. As a result, instruments need to be calibrated at a high mountain or calibration terms need to be transferred from a standard instrument. Taking those points on account, we developed a new retrieval method emphasizing to overcome above-mentioned difficulties. We used observed transmittances of multiple wavelengths to overcome the first problem. We further proposed a method to obtain calibration constant of NIR wavelength channel using observation data. Our cloud retrieval method is found to produce relatively accurate COD and Re when validated them using

  16. UV irradiance radiometers calibration procedure

    OpenAIRE

    Doctorovich I. V.; Butenko V. K.; Hodovaniouk V. N.; Fodchuk I. M.; Yuriev V. G.

    2008-01-01

    The paper deals with the problems arising at calibration of narrow-band spectral-sensitive radiometers. The procedure of irradiance unit transfer to UV radiometers — UV radiometers calibration procedure — is presented.

  17. First continuous time series of tropical, mid-latitudinal and polar middle-atmospheric wind profile measurements with a ground-based microwave Doppler-spectro-radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüfenacht, Rolf; Kämpfer, Niklaus; Murk, Axel; Eriksson, Patrick; Buehler, Stefan A.; Kivi, Rigel; Keckhut, Philippe; Hauchecorne, Alain; Duflot, Valentin

    2014-05-01

    Wind is one of the key parameters for the characterisation of the atmosphere and the understanding of its dynamics. Despite this, no continuously operating instrument for wind measurements in the upper stratosphere and lower mesosphere existed so far. Aiming to contribute to the closing of this data gap by exploiting the potential of microwave radiometry the Institute of Applied Physics of the University of Bern built a ground-based 142 GHz Doppler-spectro-radiometer with the acronym WIRA (WInd RAdiometer). WIRA is specifically designed for the measurement of middle-atmospheric horizontal wind and is sensitive to the altitude range between 35 and 70 km. The architecture of the radiometer is fairly compact what makes it transportable and suitable for campaign use. WIRA is conceived in a way that it can be operated remotely and does hardly require any maintenance. The operational use of WIRA started in September 2010. Since a technical upgrade in autumn 2012 which drastically increased the signal to noise ratio of the instrument, the meridional component is permanently measured along with the zonal wind to get a full picture of the horizontal wind field. During the last year the wind retrieval algorithm has been entirely rebuilt and tested. It is now based on the optimal estimation technique (OEM) and uses an upgraded version of the ARTS/QPACK radiative transfer and inversion model. Time series of middle-atmospheric wind from measurement campaigns of 7 to 11 months duration at mid and high latitude sites (Bern, 46°57' N, 7°26' E; Sodankylä, 67°22' N, 26°38' E; Observatoire de Haute-Provence, 43°56' N, 5°43' E) have been obtained. In September 2013 WIRA was moved to Observatoire du Maïdo (21°04' S, 55°23' E) to study the dynamics of the tropical middle atmosphere. The measurements have been compared to the data from the ECMWF model. Generally good agreement has been found in the stratosphere, however systematic discrepancies exist in the mesosphere. At the

  18. Radiometer on a Chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Gill, John J.; Mehdi, Imran; Lee, Choonsup; Schlecht, Erich T.; Skalare, Anders; Ward, John S.; Siegel, Peter H.; Thomas, Bertrand C.

    2009-01-01

    The radiometer on a chip (ROC) integrates whole wafers together to p rovide a robust, extremely powerful way of making submillimeter rece ivers that provide vertically integrated functionality. By integratin g at the wafer level, customizing the interconnects, and planarizing the transmission media, it is possible to create a lightweight asse mbly performing the function of several pieces in a more conventiona l radiometer.

  19. GRIP HURRICANE IMAGING RADIOMETER (HIRAD) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GRIP Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) V1 dataset contains measurements of brightness temperature taken at 4, 5, 6 and 6.6 GHz, as well as MERRA 2 m wind...

  20. GRIP HURRICANE IMAGING RADIOMETER (HIRAD) V0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — HIRAD is a hurricane imaging, single-pol passive C-band radiometer with both cross-track and along-track resolution that measures strong ocean surface winds through...

  1. Microwave Radiometry and Radiometers for Ocean Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels

    2008-01-01

    aperture radiometer technique, both yielding imaging capability without scanning. Typical applications of microwave radiometry concerning oceans are: sea salinity, sea surface temperature, wind speed and direction, sea ice detection and classification. However, in an attempt to measure properties...

  2. A 4 U Laser Heterodyne Radiometer for Methane (CH4) and Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Measurements from an Occultation-Viewing CubSat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Emily L.; DiGregorio, A. J.; Riot, Vincent J.; Ammons, Mark S.; Bruner, WIlliam W.; Carter, Darrell; Mao, Jianping; Ramanathan, Anand; Strahan, Susan E.; Oman, Luke D.; hide

    2017-01-01

    We present a design for a 4 U (20 cm 20 cm 10 cm) occultation-viewing laser heterodyne radiometer (LHR) that measures methane (CH4), carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor(H2O) in the limb that is designed for deployment on a 6 U CubeSat. The LHR design collects sunlight that has undergone absorption by the trace gas and mixes it with a distributive feedback (DFB) laser centered at 1640 nm that scans across CO2, CH4, and H2O absorption features. Upper troposphere lower stratosphere measurements of these gases provide key inputs to stratospheric circulation models: measuring stratospheric circulation and its variability is essential for projecting how climate change will affect stratospheric ozone.

  3. Ozone, spectral irradiance and aerosol measurements with the Brewer spectro radiometer; Misure di ozono, irradianza spettrale ultravioletta e aerosol con lo spettroradiometro Brewer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marenco, F.; Di Sarra, A. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy)

    2001-07-01

    In this technical report a detailed description of the Brewer spectro radiometer, a widespread instrument for ozone and ultraviolet radiation, is given. The methodologies used to measure these quantities and for instrument calibration are described in detail. Finally a new methodology, developed by ENEA to derive the aerosol optical depth from the Brewer routine total ozone measurements, is described. This methodology is based on Langley extrapolation, on the determination of the transmissivity of the Brewer neutral density filters, and on a statistically significant number of half days of measurements obtained in could-free conditions. Results of this method, obtained with the Brewer of the ENEA station for climate observations Roberto Sarao, located in the island of Lampedusa, are reported. These results confirm the validity of the method, thanks to independent measurements taken in 1999 with a Multi filter Rotating Shadow band Radiometer. This methodology allows researchers to obtain an aerosol climatology from ozone measurements obtained at several sites world-wide. [Italian] In questo rapporto tecnico viene fornita la descrizione dettagliata di uno strumento comunemente utilizzato per le misure di ozono e radiazione ultravioletta: lo spettroradiometro Brewer. Le metodologie usate per la misura di queste grandezze e per la calibrazione dello strumento vengono descritte in dettaglio. Infine, viene descritto una nuova metodologia, messa a punto dall'ENEA, per ricavare lo spessore ottico degli aerosol a partire dalle misure di ozono fatte normalmente dal Brewer. Questa metodologia si basa su di una calibrazione effettuata con il metodo dell' estrapolazione di Langley, sulla misura della trasmissivita' dei filtri a densita' neutra dello strumento, e su un numero statisticamente grande di mezze giornate di misure effettuate in assenza di nuvole. Sono riportati alcuni risultati della metodologia, ottenuti con il Brewer della Stazione per le

  4. Design of a Combined Beacon Receiver and Digital Radiometer for 40 GHz Propagation Measurements at the Madrid Deep Space Communications Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemba, Michael J.; Nessel, James A.; Morabito, David D.

    2017-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) have jointly developed an atmospheric propagation terminal to measure and characterize propagation phenomena at 40 GHz at the Madrid Deep Space Communications Complex (MDSCC) in Robledo de Chavela, Spain. The hybrid Q-band system combines a 40 GHz beacon receiver and digital radiometer into the same RF front-end and observes the 39.402 GHz beacon of the European Space Agencys Alphasat Aldo Paraboni TDP5 experiment. The goals of these measurements are to assist MDSCC mission operations as well as to contribute to the development and improvement of International Telecommunications Union (ITU) models for prediction of communications systems performance within the Q-band. Herein, we provide an overview of the system design, characterization, and plan of operations to commence at the MDSCC beginning in March 2017.

  5. GPM GROUND VALIDATION DUAL POLARIZATION RADIOMETER GCPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Dual Polarization Radiometer GCPEx dataset provides brightness temperature measurements at frequencies 90 GHz (not polarized) and 150 GHz...

  6. GPM GROUND VALIDATION DUAL POLARIZATION RADIOMETER GCPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Dual Polarization Radiometer GCPEx dataset includes brightness temperature measurements at frequencies 90 GHz (not polarized) and 150 GHz...

  7. Accuracy of LED and halogen radiometers using different light sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Howard W; Vandewalle, Kraig S; Berzins, David W; Charlton, David G

    2006-01-01

    To determine the accuracy of commercially available, handheld light-emitting diode (LED) and halogen-based radiometers using LED and quartz-tungsten-halogen (QTH) curing lights with light guides of various diameters. The irradiance of an LED curing light (L.E. Demetron 1, SDS/Kerr, Orange, CA, USA) and a QTH curing light (Optilux 501, SDS/Kerr) were measured using multiple units of an LED (Demetron L.E.D. Radiometer, SDS/Kerr) and a halogen radiometer (Demetron 100, SDS/Kerr) and compared with each other and to a laboratory-grade power meter (control). Measurements were made using five light guides with distal light guide diameters of 4, 7, 8, 10, and 12.5 mm. For each light guide, five readings were made with each of three radiometers of each radiometer type. Data were analyzed with two-way analysis of variance/Tukey; alpha = 0.05. In general, both handheld radiometer types exhibited significantly different irradiance readings compared with the control meter. Additionally, readings between radiometer types were found to differ slightly, but were correlated. In general, the LED radiometer provided slightly lower irradiance readings than the halogen radiometer, irrespective of light source. With both types of handheld radiometers, the use of the larger-diameter light guides tended to overestimate the irradiance values as seen in the control, while smaller-diameter light guides tended to underestimate. The evaluated LED or halogen handheld radiometers may be used interchangeably to determine the irradiance of both LED and QTH visible-light-curing units. Measured differences between the two radiometer types were small and probably not clinically significant. However, the diameter of light guides may affect the accuracy of the radiometers, with larger-diameter light guides overestimating and smaller-diameter guides underestimating the irradiance value measured by the control instrument.

  8. Diffusers in silicon-photodiode radiometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, L P

    1982-03-01

    The problems encountered when making radiometric measurements with silicon-photodiode radiometers not incorporating diffusers are discussed, with special attention given to the case where laser beams are involved. A diffuserless radiometer head design is presented which eliminates most of these problems. These problems can also be avoided by using a diffuser. A radiometer head incorporating a diffuser is described, and its properties are studied for three types of diffuser: flashed opal, type-2250 translucent Plexiglas, and a three-piece ground and etched quartz. Graphical data are given for the spatial uniformity, angular response variation, and spectral attenuation associated with radiometer heads incorporating these three types of diffuser. It is shown that, for a wide range of radiometric and photometric applications, the quartz diffuser is the most desirable, although its use results in a somewhat limited angular field of view.

  9. High-Precision Laboratory Measurements Supporting Retrieval of Water Vapor, Gaseous Ammonia, and Aqueous Ammonia Clouds with the Juno Microwave Radiometer (MWR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffes, Paul G.; Hanley, Thomas R.; Karpowicz, Bryan M.; Devaraj, Kiruthika; Noorizadeh, Sahand; Duong, Danny; Chinsomboon, Garrett; Bellotti, Amadeo; Janssen, Michael A.; Bolton, Scott J.

    2017-11-01

    The NASA Juno mission includes a six-channel microwave radiometer system (MWR) operating in the 1.3-50 cm wavelength range in order to retrieve abundances of ammonia and water vapor from the microwave signature of Jupiter (see Janssen et al. 2016). In order to plan observations and accurately interpret data from such observations, over 6000 laboratory measurements of the microwave absorption properties of gaseous ammonia, water vapor, and aqueous ammonia solution have been conducted under simulated Jovian conditions using new laboratory systems capable of high-precision measurement under the extreme conditions of the deep atmosphere of Jupiter (up to 100 bars pressure and 505 K temperature). This is one of the most extensive laboratory measurement campaigns ever conducted in support of a microwave remote sensing instrument. New, more precise models for the microwave absorption from these constituents have and are being developed from these measurements. Application of these absorption properties to radiative transfer models for the six wavelengths involved will provide a valuable planning tool for observations, and will also make possible accurate retrievals of the abundance of these constituents during and after observations are conducted.

  10. Retrieval techniques and information content analysis to improve remote sensing of atmospheric water vapor, liquid water and temperature from ground-based microwave radiometer measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Swaroop

    Observation of profiles of temperature, humidity and winds with sufficient accuracy and fine vertical and temporal resolution are needed to improve mesoscale weather prediction, track conditions in the lower to mid-troposphere, predict winds for renewable energy, inform the public of severe weather and improve transportation safety. In comparing these thermodynamic variables, the absolute atmospheric temperature varies only by 15%; in contrast, total water vapor may change by up to 50% over several hours. In addition, numerical weather prediction (NWP) models are initialized using water vapor profile information, so improvements in their accuracy and resolution tend to improve the accuracy of NWP. Current water vapor profile observation systems are expensive and have insufficient spatial coverage to observe humidity in the lower to mid-troposphere. To address this important scientific need, the principal objective of this dissertation is to improve the accuracy, vertical resolution and revisit time of tropospheric water vapor profiles retrieved from microwave and millimeter-wave brightness temperature measurements. This dissertation advances the state of knowledge of retrieval of atmospheric water vapor from microwave brightness temperature measurements. It focuses on optimizing two information sources of interest for water vapor profile retrieval, i.e. independent measurements and background data set size. From a theoretical perspective, it determines sets of frequencies in the ranges of 20-23, 85-90 and 165-200 GHz that are optimal for water vapor retrieval from each of ground-based and airborne radiometers. The maximum number of degrees of freedom for the selected frequencies for ground-based radiometers is 5-6, while the optimum vertical resolution is 0.5 to 1.5 km. On the other hand, the maximum number of degrees of freedom for airborne radiometers is 8-9, while the optimum vertical resolution is 0.2 to 0.5 km. From an experimental perspective, brightness

  11. A new radiometer for earth radiation budget studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, P.G.

    1992-01-01

    A critical need for the US Global Change Research Program is to provide continuous, well-calibrated radiometric data for radiation balance studies. This paper describes a new, compact, relatively light-weight, adaptable radiometer which will provide both spectrally integrated measurements and data in selected spectral bands. The radiometer design is suitable for use on (small) satellites, aircraft, or Unmanned Aerospace Vehicles (UAVs). Some considerations for the implementation of this radiometer on a small satellite are given. 17 refs.

  12. Two blackbody radiometers of high accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, J M; Berdahl, C M

    1970-05-01

    Two cavity-type radiometers have been developed, based on first principles, having the capability of measuring an irradiance with an indicated error 0.3%. The prerequisites for this accuracy are a measuredaperture area, a measurement of electric voltages, and an effective absorptance of its blackbody cavity from 0.998 to 0.999 throughout the uv, visible, and ir spectral ranges. The first cavity-type radiometer is designed to operate only in a vacuum of radiometer in an evacuated cold chamber, an experimental determination of the Stefan-Boltzmann constant is obtained at a value that differs from the theoretical value by 0.3%, which indicates the degree of confidence that can be expected in measurements made with blackbody cavity radiometers. The second type of radiometer is designed to operate in either air or vacuum. Although its aperture opening is windowless, it is unaffected by wind. The range of intensities accurately measurable is from about 10 mW cm(-2) to 800 mW cm(-2); the indicated accuracy is also 0.3%.

  13. Radiometer calibration methods and resulting irradiance differences: Radiometer calibration methods and resulting irradiance differences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habte, Aron [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden CO 80401 USA; Sengupta, Manajit [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden CO 80401 USA; Andreas, Afshin [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden CO 80401 USA; Reda, Ibrahim [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden CO 80401 USA; Robinson, Justin [GroundWork Renewables Inc., Logan UT 84321 USA

    2016-10-07

    Accurate solar radiation measured by radiometers depends on instrument performance specifications, installation method, calibration procedure, measurement conditions, maintenance practices, location, and environmental conditions. This study addresses the effect of different calibration methodologies and resulting differences provided by radiometric calibration service providers such as the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and manufacturers of radiometers. Some of these methods calibrate radiometers indoors and some outdoors. To establish or understand the differences in calibration methodologies, we processed and analyzed field-measured data from radiometers deployed for 10 months at NREL's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory. These different methods of calibration resulted in a difference of +/-1% to +/-2% in solar irradiance measurements. Analyzing these differences will ultimately assist in determining the uncertainties of the field radiometer data and will help develop a consensus on a standard for calibration. Further advancing procedures for precisely calibrating radiometers to world reference standards that reduce measurement uncertainties will help the accurate prediction of the output of planned solar conversion projects and improve the bankability of financing solar projects.

  14. Calibration plan for the sea and land surface temperature radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David L.; Nightingale, Tim J.; Mortimer, Hugh; Middleton, Kevin; Edeson, Ruben; Cox, Caroline V.; Mutlow, Chris T.; Maddison, Brian J.

    2013-10-01

    The Sea and Land Surface Temperature Radiometer (SLSTR) to be flown on ESA's Sentinel-3 mission is a multichannel scanning radiometer that will continue the 21-year datasets of the Along Track Scanning Radiometer (ATSR) series. As its name implies, measurements from SLSTR will be used to retrieve global sea surface temperatures to an uncertainty of planning for the on-orbit monitoring and calibration activities to ensure that calibration is maintained. These activities include vicarious calibration techniques that have been developed through previous missions, and the deployment of ship-borne radiometers.

  15. Preliminary development of digital signal processing in microwave radiometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, W. D.

    1980-01-01

    Topics covered involve a number of closely related tasks including: the development of several control loop and dynamic noise model computer programs for simulating microwave radiometer measurements; computer modeling of an existing stepped frequency radiometer in an effort to determine its optimum operational characteristics; investigation of the classical second order analog control loop to determine its ability to reduce the estimation error in a microwave radiometer; investigation of several digital signal processing unit designs; initiation of efforts to develop required hardware and software for implementation of the digital signal processing unit; and investigation of the general characteristics and peculiarities of digital processing noiselike microwave radiometer signals.

  16. Celestial body irradiance determination from an underfilled satellite radiometer: application to albedo and thermal emission measurements of the Moon using CERES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Grant

    2008-09-20

    The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) is a program that measures the Earth radiation budget (ERB) from two polar orbiting satellite platforms. CERES radiometers are designed to make stable broadband measurements of scattered solar and emitted thermal radiative flux leaving Earth with an accuracy of 1% or better. Using versatile and programmable scan modes, it is also possible for every CERES instrument to view the Moon on each orbit. However, until now, it has not been possible to derive absolute measurements of lunar irradiance using CERES because the Moon's disk fills only 10% of the telescope field of view. This work presents a method of integrating CERES raster-scan data in order to obtain a measurement of the average scattered solar and emitted thermal radiance from the entire lunar disk. The technique results in excellent agreement between CERES instruments on different satellites as to lunar albedo and emitted thermal flux. The average broadband Moon albedo is measured by CERES at a value of 0.1362 (+/-2-3%) when normalized to a static lunar phase angle of 7 degrees using the U.S. Geological Survey lunar irradiance Robotic Lunar Observatory model. The method for the first time also yields very accurate measurements of the thermal irradiance emitted from the Moon. These suggest an average long-wave flux of 977 Wm(-2) (+/-2-3% at 7 degrees phase), implying an approximate mean surface temperature of around 92 degrees C. Statistical analysis on available data suggests that a CERES instrument performing monthly lunar measurements could utilize the Moon as a stability target and reduce calibration drifts to 0.3% per decade or less within an instrument's lifetime. Given the success of the technique, a solar calibration system is proposed that will allow precise tracking of an ERB instrument's optical degradation using the Sun.

  17. Developments in Miniaturized Laser Heterodyne Radiometer (mini-LHR) construction for groundtruth measurements of CH4 and CO2 in harsh terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGregorio, A.; Wilson, E. L.; Hoffman, C.; Grunberg, C.; Mao, J.; Ramanathan, A. K.

    2016-12-01

    We present an updated, ruggedized design of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Miniaturized Laser Heterodyne Radiometer (mini-LHR), and the results of testing in the Bonanza Creek Research Forest. The mini-LHR is a passive variation of typical heterodyne radiometry instruments, designed to work in tandem with the AERONET sun photometer for collection of column methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) in harsh environments. Advancements in the development of the Cube-Sat version of the mini-LHR have allowed a more than 50% reduction in size, weight, and power usage of the mini-LHR. Now small enough to fit in a medium handbag, the mini-LHR can be run off of a small 35 Watt solar panel and backup battery for continuous measurement. Using a touch-screen control interface built off of a Raspberry Pi, the updated mini-LHR is capable of data collection and preliminary data processing, even without internet, cellular, or satellite connectivity. The improvements made to the mini-LHR were tested in a field campaign in May 2016 funded under NASA's IDS program to track CH4 and CO2 emissions above thawing permafrost. In addition to being a comprehensive study of methane release from thawing permafrost, this pilot study tested the ruggedization and functionality of the instrument in three different environments- a black spruce forest, collapsed scar bog, and fen.

  18. The Radiometer Atmospheric Cubesat Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, B.; Bryk, M.; Clark, J.; Donahue, K.; Ellyin, R.; Misra, S.; Romero-Wolf, A.; Statham, S.; Steinkraus, J.; Lightsey, E. G.; Fear, A.; Francis, P.; Kjellberg, H.; McDonald, K.

    2014-12-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has been developing the Radiometer Atmospheric CubeSat Experiment (RACE) since 2012, which consists of a water vapor radiometer integrated on a 3U CubeSat platform. RACE will measure 2 channels of the 183 GHz water vapor line, and will be used to validate new low noise amplifier (LNA) technology and a novel amplifier based internal calibration subsystem. The 3U spacecraft is provided by the University of Texas at Austin's Satellite Design Laboratory. RACE will advance the technology readiness level (TRL) of the 183 GHz receiver subsystem from TRL 4 to TRL 6 and a CubeSat 183 GHz radiometer system from TRL 4 to TRL 7. Measurements at 183 GHz are used to retrieve integrated products and vertical profiles of water vapor. Current full scale satellite missions that can utilize the technology include AMSU, ATMS, SSMIS and Megha-Tropiques. The LNAs are designed at JPL, based on a 35 nm indium phosphide (InP) high-electron-mobility transistors (HEMT) technology developed by Northrop Grumman. The resulting single chip LNAs require only 25 mW of power. Current pre-launch instrument performance specifications include an RF gain of over 30 dB and a room noise figure of noise figure is dominated by the insertion loss of the Dicke switch which at these frequencies are > 5dB. If a coupler based calibration system is shown to be sufficient, future receiver systems will have noise figures noise figure variation over temperature is approximately 0.55 dB/K. The NEDT of the system is power consumption by eliminating the need for a local oscillator. A 2012 NASA CubeSat Launch Initiative (CSLI) selection, RACE is manifested for launch on the Orbital 3 (Orb-3) mission scheduled for October 2014. RACE will be deployed from the International Space Station (ISS) by NanoRacks.

  19. Characterizing thawing permafrost with the Miniaturized Laser Heterodyne Radiometer (mini-LHR) through column measurements of methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, E. L.; DiGregorio, A.

    2015-12-01

    We present mini-LHR measurements of column CH4 from our preliminary field campaign outside of Fairbanks, AK in June 2015. The mini-LHR is fully automated and works in tandem with the AERONET sun photometer for collection of column CH4 every 15 minutes. As part of a comprehensive array of ground based instruments, measurements made by the mini-LHR will aid in monitoring of changes in atmospheric greenhouse gas emissions and help interpret data collected by space-born instruments. The mini-LHR is a passive variation of typical heterodyne radiometry instruments, using sunlight as the light source for measuring CH4 in the infrared. Collecting through collimation optics mounted on the AERONET tracker, the sunlight is chopped in an optical chopper and mixed with a local oscillator in a fast photoreciever (InGaAs detector). The amplitude of the resultant RF (radio frequency) beat signal directly correlates with the concentration of the column gas being measured. Working in conjunction with ground penetrating radar, covariance flux tower, and high-resolution surface CO2 and CH4 measurements, our column CH4 measurements contribute to a holistic view of the atmospheric evolution and response to permafrost thaw. With the intent to expand our observational network to other North American sites, our column CH4 measurements will be instrumental in showing the effects of permafrost thaw on global CH4 levels, as well as benefiting ongoing efforts in retrospective and predictive simulations of greenhouse gasses.

  20. Estimation of aerosol water and chemical composition from AERONET Sun-sky radiometer measurements at Cabauw, the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Beelen, A. J.; Roelofs, G. J H; Hasekamp, O. P.; Henzing, J. S.; Röckmann, T.

    2014-01-01

    Remote sensing of aerosols provides important information on atmospheric aerosol abundance. However, due to the hygroscopic nature of aerosol particles observed aerosol optical properties are influenced by atmospheric humidity, and the measurements do not unambiguously characterize the aerosol dry

  1. Intra- and inter-brand accuracy of four dental radiometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Richard Bengt; Labrie, Daniel; Kazmi, Sonya; Fahey, John; Felix, Christopher M

    2012-06-01

    This study measured the accuracy and precision of four commercial dental radiometers. The intra-brand accuracy was also determined. The light outputs from 14 different curing lights were measured three times using four brands of dental radiometers and the results were compared to two laboratory-grade power meters that were used as the "gold standard". To ensure proper representation, three examples of each brand of dental radiometer were used. Data collected was analyzed using ANOVA, with 95% confidence intervals, comparing the laboratory-grade meters to the dental radiometers. Bioequivalence was established where the confidence interval for the irradiance values was within ±20% of the "gold standard" reading. Forest plots were used to highlight bioequivalence values. The two laboratory-grade meters differed by less than 0.6%. Overall, all three examples of the Bluephase and SDI radiometers as well as two examples of the LEDRadiometer and one CureRite meter were bioequivalent to the gold standard. However, the type of curing light measured had a significant effect on the accuracy of the radiometer. There was significant variability of the irradiance readings between radiometer brands, and between irradiance values recorded by the three samples of each brand studied. This made it impossible to definitively rank the radiometer brands for accuracy. Within the ±20% bioequivalence limits of this study, there was a clinically significant difference in the irradiance readings between radiometer brands and the choice of curing light affected the results. There was also significant variation in irradiance readings reported by different examples of the same brand of radiometer. Whether in clinical practice or in research, dental radiometers should not be used when either the irradiance or energy delivered needs to be accurately known.

  2. Novel multi-beam radiometers for accurate ocean surveillance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cappellin, C.; Pontoppidan, K.; Nielsen, P. H.

    2014-01-01

    Novel antenna architectures for real aperture multi-beam radiometers providing high resolution and high sensitivity for accurate sea surface temperature (SST) and ocean vector wind (OVW) measurements are investigated. On the basis of the radiometer requirements set for future SST/OVW missions...

  3. Field Results from Three Campaigns to Validate the Performance of the Miniaturized Laser Heterodyne Radiometer (Mini-LHR) for Measuring Carbon Dioxide and Methane in the Atmospheric Column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J. Houston; Clarke, Greg B.; Melroy, Hilary; Ott, Lesley; Steel, Emily Wilson

    2014-01-01

    In a collaboration between NASA GSFC and GWU, a low-cost, surface instrument is being developed that can continuously monitor key carbon cycle gases in the atmospheric column: carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4). The instrument is based on a miniaturized, laser heterodyne radiometer (LHR) using near infrared (NIR) telecom lasers. Despite relatively weak absorption line strengths in this spectral region, spectrallyresolved atmospheric column absorptions for these two molecules fall in the range of 60-80% and thus sensitive and precise measurements of column concentrations are possible. In the last year, the instrument was deployed for field measurements at Park Falls, Wisconsin; Castle Airport near Atwater, California; and at the NOAA Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii. For each subsequent campaign, improvement in the figures of merit for the instrument has been observed. In the latest work the absorbance noise is approaching 0.002 optical density (OD) noise on a 1.8 OD signal. An overview of the measurement campaigns and the data retrieval algorithm for the calculation of column concentrations will be presented. For light transmission through the atmosphere, it is necessary to account for variation of pressure, temperature, composition, and refractive index through the atmosphere that are all functions of latitude, longitude, time of day, altitude, etc. For temperature, pressure, and humidity profiles with altitude we use the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) data. Spectral simulation is accomplished by integrating short-path segments along the trajectory using the SpecSyn spectral simulation suite developed at GW. Column concentrations are extracted by minimizing residuals between observed and modeled spectrum using the Nelder-Mead simplex algorithm. We will also present an assessment of uncertainty in the reported concentrations from assumptions made in the meteorological data, LHR instrument and tracker noise, and radio

  4. Column Measurements of CO2, O2, and H2O by Differential Fabry-Perot Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, E. L.; Georgieva, E. M.; Heaps, W. S.

    2008-12-01

    We report progress on the development of a Fabry-Perot (FP) interferometer instrument that has been developed to measure the total column absorption of a number of significant atmospheric species that are important in understanding many open areas in the field of climate change and global air quality. We have demonstrated high precision measurements of total column CO2, O2, and H2O vapor using the absorption of incident sunlight and present progress on a new channel for measuring column CH4. The principle features of the FP are robustness enabling deployment in harsh field environments, low cost (less than 1/5 that of Michelson based FTIRs) and fast response reducing susceptibility to solar motion or atmospheric fluctuations that can affect the FTIR during its approximately 2 minute scan. Our current goal is to develop an ultra precise, inexpensive, ground based device suitable for wide deployment as a validation instrument for the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) satellite. At the core of this instrument is a solid Fabry-Perot etalon which is used as a spectral filter to restrict the measurement to particular absorption bands of the gas of interest. By adjusting the thickness of the etalon, the separation (in frequency) of the transmitted fringes can be made equal to the almost constant separation of the gas absorption lines. By adjusting the temperature of the etalon, which changes the index of refraction of its material, the transmission fringes can be brought into nearly exact correspondence with absorption lines of the particular species. We contrast recent measurements to data obtained from other types of sensors and discuss some of the peculiarities that must be addressed in order to provide the very high quality column detection required for solving problems about global distribution of greenhouse gases and climatological models.

  5. A Multifrequency Radiometer System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels

    1977-01-01

    A radiometer system having four channels: 5 GHz, l7 GHz, 34 GHz, all vertical polarization, and a 34 GHz sky horn, will be described. The system which is designed for collecting glaciological and oceanographic data is intended for airborne use and imaging is achieved by means of a multifrequency...... elaborate processing later, using ground facilities. In conjunction with a side looking radar which is under development at present, the radiometers are intended as the remote sensing basis for an all-weather ice reconnaissance service in the Greenland seas....... conically scanning antenna. Implementation of the noise-injection technique ensures the high absolute accuracy needed for oceanographic purposes. The collected data can be preprocessed in a microcomputer system and displayed in real time. Simultaneously, the data are recorded digitally on tape for more...

  6. The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer: Present and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Timothy L.; James, M. W.; Roberts, J. B.; Biswas, S. K.; Cecil, D.; Jones, W. L.; Johnson, J.; Farrar, S.; Sahawneh, S.; Ruf, C. S.; hide

    2013-01-01

    The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) is an airborne passive microwave radiometer designed to provide high resolution, wide swath imagery of surface wind speed in tropical cyclones from a low profile planar antenna with no mechanical scanning. Wind speed and rain rate images from HIRAD's first field campaign (GRIP, 2010) are presented here followed, by a discussion on the performance of the newly installed thermal control system during the 2012 HS3 campaign. The paper ends with a discussion on the next generation dual polarization HIRAD antenna (already designed) for a future system capable of measuring wind direction as well as wind speed.

  7. Long Term Measurement of the Earth's Radiation Budget using a constellation of Broadband Radiometers hosted on Iridium NEXT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Om Prakash; Thoma, Donald; Chaloner, Chris; Russell, Jacqueline; Simpson, Bill; Spilling, David; Morris, Nigel; Caldwell, Martin; Oneill, Alan

    The WMO called for "bringing new missions to operational status" and that "ERB should be measured through a constellation of sensors". A unique opportu-nity exists to host a set of Earth Radiation Budget (ERB) sensors on the Iridium NEXT (NEXT) LEO constellation in a cost effective manner that can deliver these requirements. The NEXT constellation, with 66 interconnected satellites in 6 near polar orbiting planes, provides a unique platform for hosting a variety of Earth observation missions including ERB. Launches are planned to begin in 2014 through 2016. The ERB both drives and responds to global climate and monitoring it can provide much insight into the climate system and how it might be changing. A climate quality measurement of the ERB requires high absolute accuracy and excellent stability and a long-term (decades) data record in order to inform the debate about global warming. Measurement of the ERB in terms of the broadband reflected solar (0.3 to 4 µm) and emitted thermal (4 to 200 µm) components have been identified as high priority by the WMO for climate observations. High temporal resolution is the key advantage offered by the NEXT platform and can provide a great step forward in accurately monitoring the energy balance of the planet. The sensor we propose will consist of a broad band instrument and associated imager for scene identification and cloud classification. There is the chance to place two such sensors in each of six different orbital planes this will improve the product refresh time from currently 12 hours to 3 hours. The increased temporal resolution will allow direct measure-ment of the changes to the broadband radiances that result from rapidly varying components of the climate such as cloud and aerosol, and avoid the need of relying on narrow band sensors to infer such changes. Considering that the prediction of cloud response to climate change is still a major source of uncertainty; improved measurement of the cloud effect and

  8. Calibration of electron cyclotron emission radiometer for KSTAR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogi, Y; Jeong, S H; Lee, K D; Akaki, K; Mase, A; Kuwahara, D; Yoshinaga, T; Nagayama, Y; Kwon, M; Kawahata, K

    2010-10-01

    We developed and installed an electron cyclotron emission radiometer for taking measurements of Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) plasma. In order to precisely measure the absolute value of electron temperatures, a calibration measurement of the whole radiometer system was performed, which confirmed that the radiometer has an acceptably linear output signal for changes in input temperature. It was also found that the output power level predicted by a theoretical calculation agrees with that obtained by the calibration measurement. We also showed that the system displays acceptable noise-temperature performance around 0.23 eV.

  9. Time dependent accuracy of dental radiometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marović, Danijela; Matić, Sanja; Kelić, Katarina; Klarić, Eva; Rakić, Mario; Tarle, Zrinka

    2013-06-01

    Inadequate intensity of the polymerization light source can compromise the quality and longevity of dental composite restorations. In order to maintain optimal strength of polymerization devices, regular control of polymerization units is necessary. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of two radiometers in the measurement of light intensity of photopolymerization devices concerning the time point of measurement. Light intensity measurements of 16 halogen and 8 LED curing lights were performed using three different devices at the beginning as well as 10 and 40 seconds after the start of illumination. Two were handheld radiometers: Bluephase meter (BM) and Cure Rite (CR), while an integrating sphere (IS) represented the reference device. Data were statistically analyzed using Friedman's test and Wilcoxon signed-rank test (p radiometers tended to overestimate the light intensity of LED and halogen curing units when compared to the reference device. The time point of measurement influences the output value. The heating of radiometers was proposed as a possible explanation for the inaccuracy.

  10. Retrievals of aerosol optical depth and total column ozone from Ultraviolet Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer measurements based on an optimal estimation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chaoshun; Chen, Maosi; Shi, Runhe; Gao, Wei

    2014-12-01

    A Bayesian optimal estimation (OE) retrieval technique was used to retreive aerosol optical depth (AOD), aerosol single scattering albedo (SSA), and an asymmetry factor ( g) at seven ultraviolet wavelengths, along with total column ozone (TOC), from the measurements of the UltraViolet Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (UV-MFRSR) deployed at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site during March through November in 2009. The OE technique specifies appropriate error covariance matrices and optimizes a forward model (Tropospheric ultraviolet radiative transfer model, TUV), and thus provides a supplemental method for use across the network of the Department of Agriculture UV-B Monitoring and Research Program (USDA UVMRP) for the retrieval of aerosol properties and TOC with reasonable accuracy in the UV spectral range under various atmospheric conditions. In order to assess the accuracy of the OE technique, we compared the AOD retreivals from this method with those from Beer's Law and the AErosol RObotic Network (AERONET) AOD product. We also examine the OE retrieved TOC in comparison with the TOC from the U.S. Department of Agriculture UV-B Monitoring and Research Program (USDA UVMRP) and the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) satellite data. The scatterplots of the estimated AOD from the OE method agree well with those derived from Beer's law and the collocated AERONETAOD product, showing high values of correlation coefficients, generally 0.98 and 0.99, and large slopes, ranging from 0.95 to 1.0, as well as small offsets, less than 0.02 especially at 368 nm. The comparison of TOC retrievals also indicates the promising accuracy of the OE method in that the standard deviations of the difference between the OE derived TOC and other TOC products are about 5 to 6 Dobson Units (DU). Validation of the OE retrievals on these selected dates suggested that the OE technique has its merits and can serve as a supplemental tool in further analyzing UVMRP data.

  11. Wind direction over the ocean determined by an airborne, imaging, polarimetric radiometer system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Brian; Skou, Niels

    2001-01-01

    The speed and direction of winds over the ocean can be determined by polarimetric radiometers. This has been established by theoretical work and demonstrated experimentally using airborne radiometers carrying out circle flights and thus measuring the full 360° azimuthal response from the sea...... surface. An airborne experiment, with the aim of measuring wind direction over the ocean using an imaging polarimetric radiometer, is described. A polarimetric radiometer system of the correlation type, measuring all four Stokes brightness parameters, is used. Imaging is achieved using a 1-m aperture...... in the radiometer imagery....

  12. In situ calibration technique for UV spectral radiometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, S R; Forgan, B W

    1995-08-20

    A technique for calibrating spectral radiometers measuring global (2π sr) irradiance using solar irradiance at the top of the atmosphere as the absolute irradiance reference is reported. In addition to providing a calibration at all measured wavelengths, the technique provides a direct measure of the angular response of the radiometer. For instruments that can be used to measure the ultraviolet-B region, the calibration also provides an estimate of the ozone column amount.

  13. Dual Microwave Radiometer Experiment Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchand, Roger [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Passive microwave radiometers (MWRs) are the most commonly used and accurate instruments the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Research Facility has to retrieve cloud liquid water path (LWP). The MWR measurements (microwave radiances or brightness temperatures) are often used to derive LWP using climatological constraints, but are frequently also combined with measurements from radar and other instruments for cloud microphysical retrievals. Nominally this latter approach improves the retrieval of LWP and other cloud microphysical quantities (such as effective radius or number concentration), but this also means that when MWR data are poor, other cloud microphysical quantities are also negatively affected. Unfortunately, current MWR data is often contaminated by water on the MWR radome. This water makes a substantial contribution to the measured radiance and typically results in retrievals of cloud liquid water and column water vapor that are biased high. While it is obvious when the contamination by standing water is large (and retrieval biases are large), much of the time it is difficult to know with confidence that there is no contamination. At present there is no attempt to estimate or correct for this source of error, and identification of problems is largely left to users. Typically users are advised to simply throw out all data when the MWR “wet-window” resistance-based sensor indicates water is present, but this sensor is adjusted by hand and is known to be temperamental. In order to address this problem, a pair of ARM microwave radiometers was deployed to the University of Washington (UW) in Seattle, Washington, USA. The radiometers were operated such that one radiometer was scanned under a cover that (nominally) prevents this radiometer radome from gathering water and permits measurements away from zenith; while the other radiometer is operated normally – open or uncovered - with the radome exposed to the sky

  14. The science and technology case for a global network of compact, low cost ground-based laser heterodyne radiometers for column measurements of CO2 and CH4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, J.; Clarke, G.; Wilson, E. L.; Palmer, P. I.; Feng, L.; Ramanathan, A. K.; Ott, L. E.; Duncan, B. N.; Melroy, H.; McLinden, M.; DiGregorio, A.

    2015-12-01

    The importance of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) in determining Earth's climate is well established. Recent technological developments in space-borne instrumentation have enabled us to observe changes in these gases to a precision necessary to infer for the responsible geographical fluxes. The Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON), comprising a network of upward-looking Fourier transform spectrometers, was established to provide an accurate ground truth and minimize regional systematic bias. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has developed a compact, low-cost laser heterodyne radiometer (LHR) for global column measurements CO2 and CH4. This Mini-LHR is a passive instrument that uses sunlight as the primary light source to measure absorption of CO2 and CH4in the shortwave infrared near 1.6 microns. It uses compact telecommunications lasers to offer a low cost (sensitive (CO2 and instruments to accompany the NASA AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) which has more than 500 sites worldwide. In addition, the NASA Micro-Pulse Lidar Network (MPLNET) provides both column and vertically resolved aerosol and cloud data in active remote sensing at nearly 50 sites worldwide. Tandem operation with AERONET/MPLNET provides a clear pathway for the Mini-LHR to be expanded into a global monitoring network for carbon cycle science and satellite data validation, offering coverage in cloudy regions (e.g., Amazon basin) and key regions such as the Arctic where accelerated warming due to the release of CO2 and CH4from thawing tundra and permafrost is a concern. These vulnerable geographic regions are not well covered by current space-based CO2 and CH4 measurements. We will present an overview of our instrument development and the implementation of a network based on current and future resources. We will also present preliminary Observing System Simulation Experiments to demonstrate the effectiveness of a network Mini-LHR instruments in quantify regional CO2

  15. Quality assessment of ground-based microwave measurements of chlorine monoxide, ozone, and nitrogen dioxide from the NDSC radiometer at the Plateau de Bure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ricaud

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available A ground-based microwave radiometer dedicated to chlorine monoxide (ClO measurements around 278GHz has been in operation from December 1993-June 1996 at the Plateau de Bure, France (45° N, 5.9° E, 2500m altitude. It belongs to the international Network for the Detection of Stratospheric Change. A detailed study of both measurements and retrieval schemes has been undertaken. Although dedicated to the measurements of ClO, simultaneous profiles of O3, ClO and NO2, together with information about the instrumental baseline, have been retrieved using the optimal estimation method. The vertical profiles have been compared with other ground-based microwave data, satellite-borne data and model results. Data quality shows: 1 the weak sensitivity of the instrument that obliges to make time averages over several hours; 2 the site location where measurements of good opacities are possible for only a few days per year; 3 the baseline undulation affecting all the spectra, an issue common to all the microwave instruments; 4 the slow drift of some components affecting frequencies by 3-4MHz within a couple of months. Nevertheless, when temporally averaging data over a few days, ClO temporal variations (diurnal and over several weeks in winter 1995 from 35-50km are consistent with model results and satellite data, particularly at the peak altitude around 40km, although temporal coincidences are infrequent in winter 1995. In addition to ClO, it is possible to obtain O3 information from 30-60km whilst the instrument is not optimized at all for this molecule. Retrievals of O3 are reasonable when compared with model and another ground-based data set, although the lowermost layers are affected by the contamination of baseline remnants. Monthly-averaged diurnal variations of NO2 are detected at 40km and appear in agreement with photochemical model results and satellite zonally-averaged data, although the amplitude

  16. Quality assessment of ground-based microwave measurements of chlorine monoxide, ozone, and nitrogen dioxide from the NDSC radiometer at the Plateau de Bure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ricaud

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available A ground-based microwave radiometer dedicated to chlorine monoxide (ClO measurements around 278GHz has been in operation from December 1993-June 1996 at the Plateau de Bure, France (45° N, 5.9° E, 2500m altitude. It belongs to the international Network for the Detection of Stratospheric Change. A detailed study of both measurements and retrieval schemes has been undertaken. Although dedicated to the measurements of ClO, simultaneous profiles of O3, ClO and NO2, together with information about the instrumental baseline, have been retrieved using the optimal estimation method. The vertical profiles have been compared with other ground-based microwave data, satellite-borne data and model results. Data quality shows: 1 the weak sensitivity of the instrument that obliges to make time averages over several hours; 2 the site location where measurements of good opacities are possible for only a few days per year; 3 the baseline undulation affecting all the spectra, an issue common to all the microwave instruments; 4 the slow drift of some components affecting frequencies by 3-4MHz within a couple of months. Nevertheless, when temporally averaging data over a few days, ClO temporal variations (diurnal and over several weeks in winter 1995 from 35-50km are consistent with model results and satellite data, particularly at the peak altitude around 40km, although temporal coincidences are infrequent in winter 1995. In addition to ClO, it is possible to obtain O3 information from 30-60km whilst the instrument is not optimized at all for this molecule. Retrievals of O3 are reasonable when compared with model and another ground-based data set, although the lowermost layers are affected by the contamination of baseline remnants. Monthly-averaged diurnal variations of NO2 are detected at 40km and appear in agreement with photochemical model results and satellite zonally-averaged data, although the amplitude is weaker than the other data sets. This NO2 result

  17. Failure and Redemption of Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR/Normal Incidence Multifilter Radiometer (NIMFR Cloud Screening: Contrasting Algorithm Performance at Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM North Slope of Alaska (NSA and Southern Great Plains (SGP Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Barnard

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Well-known cloud-screening algorithms, which are designed to remove cloud-contaminated aerosol optical depths (AOD from Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR and Normal Incidence Multifilter Radiometer (NIMFR measurements, have exhibited excellent performance at many middle-to-low latitude sites around world. However, they may occasionally fail under challenging observational conditions, such as when the sun is low (near the horizon and when optically thin clouds with small spatial inhomogeneity occur. Such conditions have been observed quite frequently at the high-latitude Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM North Slope of Alaska (NSA sites. A slightly modified cloud-screening version of the standard algorithm is proposed here with a focus on the ARM-supported MFRSR and NIMFR data. The modified version uses approximately the same techniques as the standard algorithm, but it additionally examines the magnitude of the slant-path line of sight transmittance and eliminates points when the observed magnitude is below a specified threshold. Substantial improvement of the multi-year (1999–2012 aerosol product (AOD and its Angstrom exponent is shown for the NSA sites when the modified version is applied. Moreover, this version reproduces the AOD product at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP site, which was originally generated by the standard cloud-screening algorithms. The proposed minor modification is easy to implement and its application to existing and future cloud-screening algorithms can be particularly beneficial for challenging observational conditions.

  18. In-situ Microwave Brightness Temperature Variability from Ground-based Radiometer Measurements at Dome C in Antarctica Induced by Wind-formed Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, A.; Picard, G.; Arnaud, L.; Brucker, L.; Fily, M..

    2014-01-01

    Space-borne microwave radiometers are among the most useful tools to study snow and to collect information on the Antarctic climate. They have several advantages over other remote sensing techniques: high sensitivity to snow properties of interest (temperature, grain size, density), subdaily coverage in the polar regions, and their observations are independent of cloud conditions and solar illumination. Thus, microwave radiometers are widely used to retrieve information over snow-covered regions. For the Antarctic Plateau, many studies presenting retrieval algorithms or numerical simulations have assumed, explicitly or not, that the subpixel-scale heterogeneity is negligible and that the retrieved properties were representative of whole pixels. In this presentation, we investigate the spatial variations of brightness temperature over arange of a few kilometers in the Dome C area (Antarctic Plateau).

  19. Calibration of the TUD Ku-band Synthetic Aperture Radiometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Brian; Skou, Niels

    1995-01-01

    The TUD Synthetic Aperture Radiometer is a 2-channel demonstration model that can simulate a thinned aperture radiometer having an unfilled aperture consisting of several small antenna elements. Aperture synthesis obtained by interferometric measurements using the antenna elements in pairs......, followed by an image reconstruction based on an inverse Fourier transform, results in an imaging instrument without the need of mechanical scan. The thinned aperture and the non-scanning feature make the technique attractive for low frequency spaceborne radiometer systems, e.g. at L-band. Initial...

  20. X-rays, radiometers and skin unit dose. The development of measuring methods and measuring units for X radiation in medical physics from the beginning until the international standardization; X-Strahlen, Radiometer und Hauteinheitsdosis. Die Entwicklung der Messverfahren und Masseinheiten fuer Roentgenstrahlung in der medizinischen Physik von den Anfaengen bis zur internationalen Standardisierung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glessmer-Junike, Simone

    2015-01-22

    X-rays, a special form of ionizing radiation, have been utilized in medicine and technology ever since their discovery at the end of 1895. However, the usage of X-rays made the development of measuring techniques necessary. Newly-developed measuring devices were at first called radiometers', but later the term dosimeter' has gained universal acceptance. The development of numerous dosimeters used in radiotherapy was accompanied by new units of measurement, each corresponding to its individual newly constructed dosimeter or method of measurement. While at first conversions between old and new units were performed, it later became clear that both within Germany and Europe units with similar names were used with different meanings, which was both incompatible and confusing. The first serious attempts of a standardization of units in Germany were made after the First World War, when the when the ionizing properties of X-rays was focused on for both measurements and unit definitions. Efforts towards an international standardization of units became successful in the mid-1920s when the Roentgen was defined as the universal unit. From the development described above, four stages of the evolution of radiation measurement and units in radiotherapy could be identified by means of comprehensive systematic research in printed publications. The first stage was the period of diagnostic application of X-rays, when tools for the determination of X-ray quality were designed. This stage progressed into that of therapeutic administration of X-rays shortly after, when instruments and units for the measurement of X-ray quantities (dose') were implemented. Due to the variety and diversity of measurement apparatus and units a third stage emerged, closely interconnected with the second. During the third stage, a nation-wide standardization was attempted in Germany. With the conclusion of this stage - the resolution of a unit for dose measurement in Germany - the stage of

  1. Calibration of Correlation Radiometers Using Pseudo-Random Noise Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián Pantoja

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The calibration of correlation radiometers, and particularly aperture synthesis interferometric radiometers, is a critical issue to ensure their performance. Current calibration techniques are based on the measurement of the cross-correlation of receivers’ outputs when injecting noise from a common noise source requiring a very stable distribution network. For large interferometric radiometers this centralized noise injection approach is very complex from the point of view of mass, volume and phase/amplitude equalization. Distributed noise injection techniques have been proposed as a feasible alternative, but are unable to correct for the so-called “baseline errors” associated with the particular pair of receivers forming the baseline. In this work it is proposed the use of centralized Pseudo-Random Noise (PRN signals to calibrate correlation radiometers. PRNs are sequences of symbols with a long repetition period that have a flat spectrum over a bandwidth which is determined by the symbol rate. Since their spectrum resembles that of thermal noise, they can be used to calibrate correlation radiometers. At the same time, since these sequences are deterministic, new calibration schemes can be envisaged, such as the correlation of each receiver’s output with a baseband local replica of the PRN sequence, as well as new distribution schemes of calibration signals. This work analyzes the general requirements and performance of using PRN sequences for the calibration of microwave correlation radiometers, and particularizes the study to a potential implementation in a large aperture synthesis radiometer using an optical distribution network.

  2. Calibration of correlation radiometers using pseudo-random noise signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Isaac Ramos; Bosch-Lluis, Xavi; Camps, Adriano; Alvarez, Nereida Rodriguez; Hernandez, Juan Fernando Marchán; Domènech, Enric Valencia; Vernich, Carlos; de la Rosa, Sonia; Pantoja, Sebastián

    2009-01-01

    The calibration of correlation radiometers, and particularly aperture synthesis interferometric radiometers, is a critical issue to ensure their performance. Current calibration techniques are based on the measurement of the cross-correlation of receivers' outputs when injecting noise from a common noise source requiring a very stable distribution network. For large interferometric radiometers this centralized noise injection approach is very complex from the point of view of mass, volume and phase/amplitude equalization. Distributed noise injection techniques have been proposed as a feasible alternative, but are unable to correct for the so-called "baseline errors" associated with the particular pair of receivers forming the baseline. In this work it is proposed the use of centralized Pseudo-Random Noise (PRN) signals to calibrate correlation radiometers. PRNs are sequences of symbols with a long repetition period that have a flat spectrum over a bandwidth which is determined by the symbol rate. Since their spectrum resembles that of thermal noise, they can be used to calibrate correlation radiometers. At the same time, since these sequences are deterministic, new calibration schemes can be envisaged, such as the correlation of each receiver's output with a baseband local replica of the PRN sequence, as well as new distribution schemes of calibration signals. This work analyzes the general requirements and performance of using PRN sequences for the calibration of microwave correlation radiometers, and particularizes the study to a potential implementation in a large aperture synthesis radiometer using an optical distribution network.

  3. Digital signal processing in microwave radiometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, R. W.; Stanley, W. D.; Harrington, R. F.

    1980-01-01

    A microprocessor based digital signal processing unit has been proposed to replace analog sections of a microwave radiometer. A brief introduction to the radiometer system involved and a description of problems encountered in the use of digital techniques in radiometer design are discussed. An analysis of the digital signal processor as part of the radiometer is then presented.

  4. Evaluation of Radiometers Deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habte, Aron; Wilcox, Stephen; Stoffel, Thomas

    2015-12-23

    This study analyzes the performance of various commercially available radiometers used for measuring global horizontal irradiances and direct normal irradiances. These include pyranometers, pyrheliometers, rotating shadowband radiometers, and a pyranometer with fixed internal shading and are all deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory. Data from 32 global horizontal irradiance and 19 direct normal irradiance radiometers are presented. The radiometers in this study were deployed for one year (from April 1, 2011, through March 31, 2012) and compared to measurements from radiometers with the lowest values of estimated measurement uncertainties for producing reference global horizontal irradiances and direct normal irradiances.

  5. Effect of curing-tip diameter on the accuracy of dental radiometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, D L; Charlton, D G; Hilton, T J

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy of four commercially available radiometers when curing tips of different diameters were used. A visible-light curing unit (Optilux 500) with a new 80-watt quartz-halogen bulb (OptiBulb) was used as the light source for all measurements. The unit's irradiance value was measured using three hand-held radiometers (Demetron model #100, Cure-Rite model #644726, and Coltolux Light Meter) and a built-in visible-light curing unit radiometer (Optilux 500). Measurements were made with four curing tips of diameters 4 mm, 7.5 mm, 10.5 mm, and 12 mm. For each tip, trials were made with five radiometers of each model. Student's t-tests at the 0.05 level of significance were used to compare the mean irradiance measured by each model of radiometer, to the irradiance value measured by a laboratory-grade power meter. A one-way analysis of variance at the 0.05 level of significance was used to compare the irradiance values among the five samples of each commercially available radiometer model. Except for the Optilux 500 built-in radiometer with the 10.5-mm tip, all the commercially available radiometers exhibited irradiance values significantly different from those of the laboratory-grade power meter. There were no statistically significant differences among the five samples of each commercially available radiometer model.

  6. Light curing unit effectiveness assessed by dental radiometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortall, A C; Harrington, E; Wilson, H J

    1995-08-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to assess the effectiveness of five commercially available hand-held dental radiometers and a computer-based experimental radiometer. Light intensity of five visible light activation units was determined using the dental radiometers. The influence of curing light intensity on depth of cure of a hybrid composite material was determined using a digital penetrometer. The radiometers evaluated varied with respect to sensor aperture diameter, scale readings (analogue or digital) and the units of measurement (arbitrary or mW cm2). The experimental computer-based radiometer allowed continuous recording of intensity against time; thus the light output could be monitored over the entire irradiation period. When light intensity readings were normalized with regard to a standardized light sensing device aperture of 4 mm diameter, a linear relationship was found between depth of cure and the logarithm of the intensity of the light. The results of this investigation support the use of dental radiometers for periodically monitoring visible light activation units.

  7. Compact Radiometers Expand Climate Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    To gain a better understanding of Earth's water, energy, and carbon cycles, NASA plans to embark on the Soil Moisture Active and Passive mission in 2015. To prepare, Goddard Space Flight Center provided Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) funding to ProSensing Inc., of Amherst, Massachusetts, to develop a compact ultrastable radiometer for sea surface salinity and soil moisture mapping. ProSensing incorporated small, low-cost, high-performance elements into just a few circuit boards and now offers two lightweight radiometers commercially. Government research agencies, university research groups, and large corporations around the world are using the devices for mapping soil moisture, ocean salinity, and wind speed.

  8. A simple method to minimize orientation effects in a profiling radiometer

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Suresh, T.; Talaulikar, M.; Desa, E.; Matondkar, S.G.P.; SrinivasaKumar, T.; Lotlikar, A.

    -fall radiometer is found to be a better option for measuring underwater light parameters as it avoids the effects of ship shadow and is easy to operate, the measurements demand profiling the radiometer vertical in water with minimum tilt. Here we present...

  9. Radiometer Calibration and Characterization (RCC) User's Manual: Windows Version 4.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreas, Afshin M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Wilcox, Stephen M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-02-29

    The Radiometer Calibration and Characterization (RCC) software is a data acquisition and data archival system for performing Broadband Outdoor Radiometer Calibrations (BORCAL). RCC provides a unique method of calibrating broadband atmospheric longwave and solar shortwave radiometers using techniques that reduce measurement uncertainty and better characterize a radiometer's response profile. The RCC software automatically monitors and controls many of the components that contribute to uncertainty in an instrument's responsivity. This is a user's manual and guide to the RCC software.

  10. Calibration approach and plan for the sea and land surface temperature radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David L.; Nightingale, Tim J.; Mortimer, Hugh; Middleton, Kevin; Edeson, Ruben; Cox, Caroline V.; Mutlow, Chris T.; Maddison, Brian J.; Coppo, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The sea and land surface temperature radiometer (SLSTR) to be flown on the European Space Agency's (ESA) Sentinel-3 mission is a multichannel scanning radiometer that will continue the 21 year dataset of the along-track scanning radiometer (ATSR) series. As its name implies, measurements from SLSTR will be used to retrieve global sea surface temperatures to an uncertainty of planning for the on-orbit monitoring and calibration activities to ensure that the calibration is maintained. These activities include vicarious calibration techniques that have been developed through previous missions and the deployment of ship-borne radiometers.

  11. Superhigh-frequency radiometer with post-detector pulse-duration modulation

    CERN Document Server

    Filatov, A V

    2002-01-01

    Paper describes a superhigh-frequency radiometer with extra pulse-duration modulation of reference signal by low frequency. Pulse-duration modulation is realized due to various coefficients of reference signal sharing in resistive attenuators of a low-frequency unit. Design of radiometer makes use of modification of zero measurement method when automatic control is realized by variation of pulse-duration signal duration. Radiometer switching to zero balance in a low-frequency section enables to use high-frequency units of any modulating radiometer with symmetry modulation

  12. PV-MCT working standard radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppeldauer, George P.; Podobedov, V. B.

    2012-06-01

    Sensitive infrared working-standard detectors with large active area are needed to extend the signal dynamic range of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) pyroelectric transfer-standards used for infrared spectral power responsivity calibrations. Increased sensitivity is especially important for irradiance mode responsivity measurements. The noise equivalent power (NEP) of the NIST used pyroelectric transfer-standards is about 8 nW/Hz1/2, equal to a D*= 5.5 x 107 cm Hz1/2/W. A large-area photovoltaic HgCdTe (PV-MCT) detector was custom made for the 2.5 μm to 11 μm wavelength range using a 4-stage thermoelectric cooler. At least an order of magnitude lower NEP was expected than that of the pyroelectric transfer-standards to measure irradiance. The large detector area was produced with multiple p-n junctions. The periodical, multiple-junction structure produced a spatial non-uniformity in the detector response. The PV-MCT radiometer was characterized for spatial non-uniformity of response using different incident beam sizes to evaluate the uncertainty component caused by the spatial non-uniformity. The output voltage noise and also the current and voltage responsivities were evaluated at different signal gains and frequencies. The output voltage noise was decreased and the voltage responsivity was increased to lower the NEP of the radiometer. The uncertainty of the spectral power responsivity measurements was evaluated. It is recommended to use a bootstrap type trans-impedance amplifier along with a cold field-of-view limiter to improve the NEP of the PV-MCT radiometer.

  13. Spaceborne L-band Radiometers: Push-broom or Synthetic Aperture?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels

    2004-01-01

    L-band radiometers can measure ocean salinity and soil moisture from space. A synthetic aperture radiometer system, SMOS, is under development by ESA for launch in 2007. A real aperture push-broom system, Aquarius, has been approved by NASA for launch in 2008. Pros et cons of the two fundamentally...

  14. APHID: A Wideband, Multichannel Radiometer for Phase Delay Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staguhn, J.; Harris, A. I.; Munday, L. G.; Woody, D. P.

    Atmospheric phase fluctuations of mm and sub-mm signals are predominantly caused by line of sight fluctuations in the amount of water vapor. Measurements of the line emission from tropospheric water vapor can be used to track and correct these fluctuations. We present model calculations which led to the design of a multichannel water vapor radiometer for phase correction of millimeter arrays. Our particular emphasis is on designing a phase correction scheme for mid-latitude sites (BIMA, OVRO), and for high-altitude sites. The instrument being implemented at OVRO and BIMA is a cooled double-sideband heterodyne receiver centered on the 22.2GHz water vapor line with a 0.5 - 4.0GHz IF. The back end is a 16 channel analog lag correlator similar to the WASP spectrometer (Harris et al 1998). We present two applications for the multichannel radiometer. A line fit to the observed spectra is expected to provide sufficient accuracy for mm phase correction with the 22 GHZ line. The radiometer can also be used for the determination of the vertical water vapor distribution from the observed line shape. We discuss how this information can be used to improve the accuracy of water vapor radiometers which have too few channels to observe the line shape, and for phase correction schemes which are based on a 183 GHz water line radiometer.

  15. Recalibration and Validation of the SMAP L-Band Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jinzheng; Piepmeier, Jeffrey; Le Vine, David M.; Dinnat, Emmanuel; Bindlish, Rajat; De amici, Giovanni; Mohammed, Priscilla; Misra, Sidharth; Yueh, Simon; Meissner, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    SMAP mission was launched on 31st January 2015 in a 6 AM 6 PM sun-synchronous orbit at 685 km altitude to measure soil moisture and freethaw globally. The passive instrument of SMAP is a fully polarimetric L-band radiometer (1.4GHz) operating with a bandwidth of 24MHz. The radiometer L1B data product version 3 has been released for public science activities. Post-launch calibration and validation activities are described in [4,5]. Validation results show that SMAP antenna temperature (TA) is 2.6 K warmer over galactic Cold Sky (CS), and land TB is 2.6 K colder comparing to SMOS land TB (compared at the top of the atmosphere) after the update of the reflectors thermal model. Due to the biases, the SMAP radiometer is under re-calibration for next data release in 2018.We present the updated calibration approaches for the SMAP radiometer product. We will discuss the various radiometer calibration parameters and part of the validation process and result.

  16. Planck-LFI radiometers' spectral response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zonca, A [INAF-IASF Milano, Via E. Bassini 15, 20133 Milano (Italy); Franceschet, C; Mennella, A; Bersanelli, M [Universita di Milano, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via G. Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Battaglia, P; Silvestri, R [Thales Alenia Space Italia S.p.A., S.S. Padana Superiore 290, 20090 Vimodrone, Milano (Italy); Villa, F; Butler, R C; Cuttaia, F; Mandolesi, N [INAF-IASF Bologna, Via P. Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy); D' Arcangelo, O [IFP-CNR, via Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Artal, E [Departamento de IngenierIa de Comunicaciones, Universidad de Cantabria, Avenida de los Castros s/n. 39005 Santander (Spain); Davis, R J [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, The University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Galeotta, S; Maris, M [INAF-OATs, Via G.B. Tiepolo 11, I-34131, Trieste (Italy); Hughes, N; Jukkala, P; Kilpiae, V-H [DA-Design Oy, Keskuskatu 29, FI-31600, Jokioinen (Finland); Laaninen, M [Ylinen Electronics Oy, Teollisuustie 9A, FIN-02700, Kauniainen (Finland); Mendes, L, E-mail: andrea.zonca@fisica.unimi.i [ESA - ESAC, Camino bajo del Castillo, s/n, Villanueva de la Canada 28692 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-12-15

    The Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) is an array of pseudo-correlation radiometers on board the Planck satellite, the ESA mission dedicated to precision measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background. The LFI covers three bands centred at 30, 44 and 70 GHz, with a goal bandwidth of 20% of the central frequency. The characterization of the broadband frequency response of each radiometer is necessary to understand and correct for systematic effects, particularly those related to foreground residuals and polarization measurements. In this paper we present the measured band shape of all the LFI channels and discuss the methods adopted for their estimation. The spectral characterization of each radiometer was obtained by combining the measured spectral response of individual units through a dedicated RF model of the LFI receiver scheme. As a consistency check, we also attempted end-to-end spectral measurements of the integrated radiometer chain in a cryogenic chamber. However, due to systematic effects in the measurement setup, only qualitative results were obtained from these tests. The measured LFI bandpasses exhibit a moderate level of ripple, compatible with the instrument scientific requirements.

  17. RF Reference Switch for Spaceflight Radiometer Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuble, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this technology is to provide improved calibration and measurement sensitivity to the Soil Moisture Active Passive Mission (SMAP) radiometer. While RF switches have been used in the past to calibrate microwave radiometers, the switch used on SMAP employs several techniques uniquely tailored to the instrument requirements and passive remote-sensing in general to improve radiometer performance. Measurement error and sensitivity are improved by employing techniques to reduce thermal gradients within the device, reduce insertion loss during antenna observations, increase insertion loss temporal stability, and increase rejection of radar and RFI (radio-frequency interference) signals during calibration. The two legs of the single-pole double-throw reference switch employ three PIN diodes per leg in a parallel-shunt configuration to minimize insertion loss and increase stability while exceeding rejection requirements at 1,413 MHz. The high-speed packaged diodes are selected to minimize junction capacitance and resistance while ensuring the parallel devices have very similar I-V curves. Switch rejection is improved by adding high-impedance quarter-wave tapers before and after the diodes, along with replacing the ground via of one diode per leg with an open circuit stub. Errors due to thermal gradients in the switch are reduced by embedding the 50-ohm reference load within the switch, along with using a 0.25-in. (approximately equal to 0.6-cm) aluminum prebacked substrate. Previous spaceflight microwave radiometers did not embed the reference load and thermocouple directly within the calibration switch. In doing so, the SMAP switch reduces error caused by thermal gradients between the load and switch. Thermal issues are further reduced by moving the custom, highspeed regulated driver circuit to a physically separate PWB (printed wiring board). Regarding RF performance, previous spaceflight reference switches have not employed high-impedance tapers to improve

  18. High resolution soil moisture radiometer. [large space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilheit, T. T.

    1978-01-01

    An electrically scanned pushbroom phased antenna array is described for a microwave radiometer which can provide agriculturally meaningful measurements of soil moisture. The antenna size of 100 meters at 1400 MHz or 230 meters at 611 MHz requires several shuttle launches and orbital assembly. Problems inherent to the size of the structure and specific instrument problems are discussed as well as the preliminary design.

  19. Improved cavity-type absolute total-radiation radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, J. M., Sr.; Plamondon, J. A., Jr.

    1967-01-01

    Conical cavity-type absolute radiometer measures the intensity of radiant energy to an accuracy of one to two percent in a vacuum of ten to the minus fifth torr or lower. There is a uniform response over the ultraviolet, visible, and infrared range, and it requires no calibration or comparison with a radiation standard.

  20. Microwave Radiometer – 3 Channel (MWR3C) Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadeddu, MP

    2012-05-04

    The microwave radiometer 3-channel (MWR3C) provides time-series measurements of brightness temperatures from three channels centered at 23.834, 30, and 89 GHz. These three channels are sensitive to the presence of liquid water and precipitable water vapor.

  1. Effect of emitted wavelength and light guide type on irradiance discrepancies in hand-held dental curing radiometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameyama, Atsushi; Haruyama, Akiko; Asami, Masako; Takahashi, Toshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine any discrepancies in the outputs of five commercial dental radiometers and also to evaluate the accuracy of these devices using a laboratory-grade spectroradiometer. The power densities of 12 different curing light sources were repeatedly measured for a total of five times using each radiometer in a random order. The emission spectra of all of the curing light sources were also measured using the spectroradiometer, and the integral value of each spectrum was calculated to determine the genuine power densities, which were then compared to the displayed power densities measured by the dental radiometers. The displayed values of power density were various and were dependent on the brand of radiometer, and this may be because each radiometer has a different wavelength sensitivity. These results cast doubt upon the accuracy of commercially available dental radiometers.

  2. Analysis of Radiometer Data from the Volga SA-2 Static Firing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Emery, Jonathan

    2000-01-01

    ...) Test Area 5 on September 15, 1999. Signatures were measured using a non-imaging radiometer and a suite of imaging instruments ranging from the ultraviolet through long wave infrared, as well as laser backscatter and transmission measurements...

  3. Microwave Radiometer Systems, Design and Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels; Vine, David Le

    Two important microwave remote sensors are the radar and the radiometer. There have been a number of books written on various aspects of radar, but there have been only a few written on microwave radiometers, especially on subjects of how to design and build radiometer systems. This book, which...... is the second edition of a book originally published in 1989, attempts to fill this void. The background for this book is many years of work with radiometer systems including design and manufacture of airborne imaging radiometer systems, laboratory as well as airborne field experiments with the systems......, and design of future spaceborne imagers. This book would not have been possible without the support and encouragement of several colleagues. Søren Nørvang Madsen, who is working with synthetic aperture radar systems, and, before him, Finn søndergaard have both contributed much to the work with radiometer...

  4. Method for characterization of filter radiometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toivanen, P; Manoochehri, F; Kärhä, P; Ikonen, E; Lassila, A

    1999-03-20

    We have developed a new method for characterizing the irradiance responsivity of filter radiometers. The method is based on a spatially uniform, known irradiance, generated by combining several identical laser beams. The measurement setup and the experimental demonstration at one wavelength are presented. The diffraction correction related to the generated irradiance is studied experimentally. The uncertainty analysis of the method indicates a relative standard uncertainty of 1 x 10(-3). The results with the new method are compared with the characterization measurements based on our present spectral-irradiance scale. The results have a relative deviation of 1 x 10(-3), which is well within the combined standard uncertainty of the comparison.

  5. Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) Handbook With subsections for derivative instruments: Multifilter Radiometer (MFR) Normal Incidence Multifilter Radiometer (NIMFR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodges, Gary B. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Boulder, CO (United States). Earth System Research Lab.; Michalsky, Joseph J. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Boulder, CO (United States). Earth System Research Lab.

    2016-03-01

    The visible Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) is a passive instrument that measures global and diffuse components of solar irradiance at six narrowband channels and one open, or broadband, channel (Harrison et al. 1994). Direct irradiance is not a primary measurement, but is calculated using diffuse and global measurements. To collect one data record, the MFRSR takes measurements at four different shadowband positions. The first measurement is taken with the shadowband in the nadir (home) position. The next three measurements are, in order, the first side-band, sun-blocked, and second side-band. The side-band measurements are used to correct for the portion of the sky obscured by the shadowband. The nominal wavelengths of the narrowband channels are 415, 500, 615, 673, 870, and 940 nm. From such measurements, one may infer the atmosphere’s aerosol optical depth at each wavelength. In turn, these optical depths may be used to derive information about the column abundances of ozone and water vapor (Michalsky et al. 1995), as well as aerosol (Harrison and Michalsky 1994) and other atmospheric constituents.

  6. Precision of hand-held dental radiometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueggeberg, F A

    1993-06-01

    The intensity of light within the wavelengths of 400 to 500 nm on a dental photocurable resin restorative material is a vital factor affecting many of the physical and chemical properties of the resulting restoration. This paper compares the precision of two recently introduced hand-held radiometers. The results indicate that the response of both hand-held meters was linear. For a given amount of decrease in light source intensity, both hand-held units responded with a corresponding decrement in measured intensity value. Both hand-held meters were found to limit their pass band of intensity readings between 400 and 515 nm, making them very useful clinical instruments. However, the absolute intensity readings between the two units were significantly different.

  7. DESIGN OF MEDICAL RADIOMETER FRONT-END FOR IMPROVED PERFORMANCE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemetsen, O; Birkelund, Y; Jacobsen, S K; Maccarini, P F; Stauffer, P R

    2011-01-01

    We have investigated the possibility of building a singleband Dicke radiometer that is inexpensive, small-sized, stable, highly sensitive, and which consists of readily available microwave components. The selected frequency band is at 3.25-3.75 GHz which provides a reasonable compromise between spatial resolution (antenna size) and sensing depth for radiometry applications in lossy tissue. Foreseen applications of the instrument are non-invasive temperature monitoring for breast cancer detection and temperature monitoring during heating. We have found off-the-shelf microwave components that are sufficiently small (water baths. Experiments showed superior sensitivity (36% higher) when implementing the low noise amplifier before the Dicke switch (close to the antenna) compared to the other design with the Dicke switch in front. Radiometer performance was also tested in a multilayered phantom during alternating heating and radiometric reading. Empirical tests showed that for the configuration with Dicke switch first, the switch had to be locked in the reference position during application of microwave heating to avoid damage to the active components (amplifiers and power meter). For the configuration with a low noise amplifier up front, damage would occur to the active components of the radiometer if used in presence of the microwave heating antenna. Nevertheless, this design showed significantly improved sensitivity of measured temperatures and merits further investigation to determine methods of protecting the radiometer for amplifier first front ends.

  8. Design and Development of the SMAP Microwave Radiometer Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Medeiros, James J.; Horgan, Kevin A.; Brambora, Clifford K.; Estep, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    The SMAP microwave radiometer will measure land surface brightness temperature at L-band (1413 MHz) in the presence of radio frequency interference (RFI) for soil moisture remote sensing. The radiometer design was driven by the requirements to incorporate internal calibration, to operate synchronously with the SMAP radar, and to mitigate the deleterious effects of RFI. The system design includes a highly linear super-heterodyne microwave receiver with internal reference loads and noise sources for calibration and an innovative digital signal processor and detection system. The front-end comprises a coaxial cable-based feed network, with a pair of diplexers and a coupled noise source, and radiometer front-end (RFE) box. Internal calibration is provided by reference switches and a common noise source inside the RFE. The RF back-end (RBE) downconverts the 1413 MHz channel to an intermediate frequency (IF) of 120 MHz. The IF signals are then sampled and quantized by high-speed analog-to-digital converters in the radiometer digital electronics (RDE) box. The RBE local oscillator and RDE sampling clocks are phase-locked to a common reference to ensure coherency between the signals. The RDE performs additional filtering, sub-band channelization, cross-correlation for measuring third and fourth Stokes parameters, and detection and integration of the first four raw moments of the signals. These data are packetized and sent to the ground for calibration and further processing. Here we discuss the novel features of the radiometer hardware particularly those influenced by the need to mitigate RFI.

  9. SMAP L2 Radiometer Half-Orbit 36 km EASE-Grid Soil Moisture V004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Passive soil moisture estimates onto a 36-km global Earth-fixed grid, based on radiometer measurements acquired when the SMAP spacecraft is travelling from North to...

  10. Nimbus-2 Level 2 Medium Resolution Infrared Radiometer (MRIR) V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Nimbus II Medium Resolution Infrared Radiometer (MRIR) was designed to measure electromagnetic radiation emitted and reflected from the earth and its atmosphere...

  11. Realization of photometric base unit of candela traceable to cryogenic radiometer at UME

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samedov, F.; Bazkır, Ö.

    2005-06-01

    At National Metrology Institute of Turkey (UME, Ulusal Metroloji Enstitüsü), luminous intensity unit of candela was realized using detector-based approach and photometric scale was re-established depending on this new realization. Candela was measured on photometric bench using interferometric distance measurement system and filter-radiometer traceable to UME primary level electrical-substitution cryogenic radiometer. Thermally stabilized filter radiometer, which has been designed for spectral irradiance measurements, is consists of trap detector, filter housing and precision aperture. Different measurement techniques were used to fully characterize each parameter of filter-radiometer; like effective aperture area, spectral transmittance of V(λ) filter and responsivity of trap detector.

  12. Evaluating Solar Resource Data Obtained from Multiple Radiometers Deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habte, A.; Sengupta, M.; Andreas, A.; Wilcox, S.; Stoffel, T.

    2014-09-01

    Solar radiation resource measurements from radiometers are used to predict and evaluate the performance of photovoltaic and concentrating solar power systems, validate satellite-based models for estimating solar resources, and advance research in solar forecasting and climate change. This study analyzes the performance of various commercially available radiometers used for measuring global horizontal irradiances (GHI) and direct normal irradiances (DNI). These include pyranometers, pyrheliometers, rotating shadowband irradiometers, and a pyranometer with a shading ring deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL). The radiometers in this study were deployed for one year (from April 1, 2011, through March 31, 2012) and compared to measurements from radiometers with the lowest values of estimated measurement uncertainties for producing reference GHI and DNI.

  13. A New Remote Sensing Filter Radiometer Employing a Fabry-Perot Etalon and a CCD Camera for Column Measurements of Methane in the Earth Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgieva, E. M.; Huang, W.; Heaps, W. S.

    2012-01-01

    A portable remote sensing system for precision column measurements of methane has been developed, built and tested at NASA GSFC. The sensor covers the spectral range from 1.636 micrometers to 1.646 micrometers, employs an air-gapped Fabry-Perot filter and a CCD camera and has a potential to operate from a variety of platforms. The detector is an XS-1.7-320 camera unit from Xenics Infrared solutions which combines an uncooled InGaAs detector array working up to 1.7 micrometers. Custom software was developed in addition to the graphical user basic interface X-Control provided by the company to help save and process the data. The technique and setup can be used to measure other trace gases in the atmosphere with minimal changes of the etalon and the prefilter. In this paper we describe the calibration of the system using several different approaches.

  14. Rotating shadowband radiometer development and analysis of spectral shortwave data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalsky, J.; Harrison, L.; Min, Q. [State Univ. of New York, Albany, NY (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    Our goals in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program are improved measurements of spectral shortwave radiation and improved techniques for the retrieval of climatologically sensitive parameters. The multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) that was developed during the first years of the ARM program has become a workhorse at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site, and it is widely deployed in other climate programs. We have spent most of our effort this year developing techniques to retrieve column aerosol, water vapor, and ozone from direct beam spectral measurements of the MFRSR. Additionally, we have had some success in calculating shortwave surface diffuse spectral irradiance. Using the surface albedo and the global irradiance, we have calculated cloud optical depths. From cloud optical depth and liquid water measured with the microwave radiometer, we have calculated effective liquid cloud particle radii. The rest of the text will provide some detail regarding each of these efforts.

  15. New differential Fabry-Perot radiometer for remote sensing measurements of column CO2, O2, H2O and other atmospheric trace gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaps, W. S.; Georgieva, E.; Wilson, E.

    2008-08-01

    A new type of remote sensing instrument based upon the Fabry-Perot interferometric technique has been developed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. Fabry-Perot interferometry (FPI) is a well known, powerful spectroscopic technique and one of its many applications is to be used to measure greenhouse gases and also some harmful species in the atmosphere. With this technique, absorption of particular species is measured and related to its concentration. A solid Fabry-Perot etalon is used as a frequency filter to restrict the measurement to particular absorption bands of the gas of interest. With adjusting the thickness of the etalon that separation (in frequency) of the transmitted fringes can be made equal to the almost constant separation of the gas absorption lines. By adjusting the temperature of the etalon, which changes the index of refraction of its material, the transmission fringes can be brought into nearly exact correspondence with absorption lines of the particular species. With this alignment between absorption lines and fringes, changes in the amount of a species in the atmosphere strongly affect the amount of light transmitted by the etalon and can be related to gas concentration. The instrument that we have developed detects the absorption of various atmospheric trace gases in direct or reflected sunlight. It can be used as ground based, airborne and satellite sensor for gases such as carbon dioxide (1570 nm), oxygen (762 nm and 768 nm lines sensitive to changes in oxygen pressure and oxygen temperature) and water vapor (940 nm). Our current goal is to develop an ultra precise, inexpensive, ground based device suitable for wide deployment as a validation instrument for the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) satellite. We show measurements for CO2 and, O2, , compare our measurements to those obtained using other types of sensors and discuss some of the peculiarities that must be addressed in order to provide the very high quality column detection

  16. SMEX03 Aircraft Polarimetric Scanning Radiometer (PSR) Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Polarimetric Scanning Radiometer (PSR) is an airborne microwave imaging radiometer developed and operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration...

  17. SMEX02 Aircraft Polarimetric Scanning Radiometer (PSR) Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Polarimetric Scanning Radiometer (PSR) is an airborne microwave imaging radiometer developed and operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration...

  18. SAFARI 2000 Cloud Absorption Radiometer BRDF, Dry Season 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: The Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) is an airborne multi-wavelength scanning radiometer that can perform several functions including determining the...

  19. Ocean Color Inferred from Radiometers on Low-Flying Aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churnside, James H; Wilson, James J

    2008-02-08

    The color of sunlight reflected from the ocean to orbiting visible radiometers hasprovided a great deal of information about the global ocean, after suitable corrections aremade for atmospheric effects. Similar ocean-color measurements can be made from a lowflyingaircraft to get higher spatial resolution and to obtain measurements under clouds.A different set of corrections is required in this case, and we describe algorithms to correctfor clouds and sea-surface effects. An example is presented and errors in the correctionsdiscussed.

  20. SMOS calibration and validation activities with airborne interferometric radiometer HUT-2D during spring 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kainulainen, J.; Rautiainen, K.; Sievinen, P.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present calibration and validation activities of European Space Agency’s SMOS mission, which utilize airborne interferomentric L-band radiometer system HUT-2D of the Aalto University. During spring 2010 the instrument was used to measure three SMOS validation target areas, one...... in Denmark and two in Germany. We present these areas shortly, and describe the airborne activities. We show some exemplary measurements of the radiometer system and demonstrate the studies using the data....

  1. Radio Frequency Interference Mitigation for the Planned SMAP Radar and Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Michael; Chan, Samuel; Belz, Eric; Piepmeier, Jeffrey; Mohammed, Priscilla; Kim, Edward; Johnson, Joel T.

    2011-01-01

    NASA's planned SMAP mission will utilize a radar operating in a band centered on 1.26 GHz and a co-observing radiometer operating at 1.41 GHz to measure surface soil moisture. Both the radar and radiometer sub-systems are susceptible to radio frequency interference (RFI). Any significant impact of such interference requires mitigation in order to avoid degradation in the SMAP science products. Studies of RFT detection and mitigation methods for both the radar and radiometer are continuing in order to assess the risk to mission products and to refine the performance achieved.

  2. Filter-radiometer-based realization of candela and establishment of photometric scale at UME

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samedov, Farhad; Durak, Murat; Bazkır, Özcan

    2005-11-01

    The luminous intensity unit of candela was realized based on filter-radiometer, which is traceable to detector-based primary standard electrical substitution cryogenic radiometer (ESCR). In that realization the traditional Osram Wi41/G-type incandescent lamp and filter-radiometer consisting of an aperture, a V(λ) filter and a silicon photodiode based trap detector were used as light source and detection element, respectively. Measurement techniques of effective aperture area, spectral transmittance of V(λ) filter and absolute responsivity of trap detector are also presented.

  3. Spectral Power and Irradiance Responsivity Calibration of InSb Working-Standard Radiometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppeldauer, G; Rácz, M

    2000-11-01

    New, improved-performance InSb power-irradiance meters have been developed and characterized to maintain the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) spectral responsivity scale between 2 and 5.1 mum. The InSb radiometers were calibrated against the transfer-standard cryogenic bolometer that is tied to the primary-standard cryogenic radiometer of the NIST. The InSb radiometers serve as easy-to-use working standards for routine spectral power and irradiance responsivity calibrations. The spectral irradiance responsivities were derived from the spectral power responsivities by use of the measured area of the apertures in front of the InSb detectors.

  4. A multipoint correction method for environmental temperature changes in airborne double-antenna microwave radiometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jian; Zhao, Kai; Jiang, Tao

    2014-04-29

    This manuscript describes a new type Ka-band airborne double-antenna microwave radiometer (ADAMR) designed for detecting atmospheric supercooled water content (SCWC). The source of the measurement error is investigated by analyzing the model of the system gain factor and the principle of the auto-gain compensative technique utilized in the radiometer. Then, a multipoint temperature correction method based on the two-point calibration method for this radiometer is proposed. The multipoint temperature correction method can eliminate the effect of changes in environmental temperature by establishing the relationship between the measurement error and the physical temperatures of the temperature-sensitive units. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of the correction method, the long-term outdoor temperature experiment is carried out. The multipoint temperature correction equations are obtained by using the least square regression method. The comparison results show that the measuring accuracy of the radiometer can be increased more effectively by using the multipoint temperature correction method.

  5. Ozone profiles above Kiruna from two ground-based radiometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Niall J.; Walker, Kaley A.; Raffalski, Uwe; Kivi, Rigel; Gross, Jochen; Manney, Gloria L.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents new atmospheric ozone concentration profiles retrieved from measurements made with two ground-based millimetre-wave radiometers in Kiruna, Sweden. The instruments are the Kiruna Microwave Radiometer (KIMRA) and the Millimeter wave Radiometer 2 (MIRA 2). The ozone concentration profiles are retrieved using an optimal estimation inversion technique, and they cover an altitude range of ˜ 16-54 km, with an altitude resolution of, at best, 8 km. The KIMRA and MIRA 2 measurements are compared to each other, to measurements from balloon-borne ozonesonde measurements at Sodankylä, Finland, and to measurements made by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) aboard the Aura satellite. KIMRA has a correlation of 0.82, but shows a low bias, with respect to the ozonesonde data, and MIRA 2 shows a smaller magnitude low bias and a 0.98 correlation coefficient. Both radiometers are in general agreement with each other and with MLS data, showing high correlation coefficients, but there are differences between measurements that are not explained by random errors. An oscillatory bias with a peak of approximately ±1 ppmv is identified in the KIMRA ozone profiles over an altitude range of ˜ 18-35 km, and is believed to be due to baseline wave features that are present in the spectra. A time series analysis of KIMRA ozone for winters 2008-2013 shows the existence of a local wintertime minimum in the ozone profile above Kiruna. The measurements have been ongoing at Kiruna since 2002 and late 2012 for KIMRA and MIRA 2, respectively.

  6. The multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) - precision infrared radiometer (PIR) platform in Fairbanks: Scientific objectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stamnes, K.; Leontieva, E. [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks (United States)

    1996-04-01

    The multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) and precision infrared radiometer (PIR) have been employed at the Geophysical Institute in Fairbanks to check their performance under arctic conditions. Drawing on the experience of the previous measurements in the Arctic, the PIR was equipped with a ventilator to prevent frost and moisture build-up. We adopted the Solar Infrared Observing Sytem (SIROS) concept from the Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) to allow implementation of the same data processing software for a set of radiation and meteorological instruments. To validate the level of performance of the whole SIROS prior to its incorporation into the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) Cloud and Radiation Testbed Site instrumental suite for flux radiatin measurements, the comparison between measurements and model predictions will be undertaken to assess the MFRSR-PIR Arctic data quality.

  7. A Scanning Microwave Radar and Radiometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels

    1995-01-01

    The Scanning Microwave Radar and Radiometer (SMRR) is a line scanner featuring a combined radar and radiometer system operating around 35 and 94 GHz. The layout of the SMRR is shown. The 2 offset antenna parabolas scan in synchronism, the receiver antenna has the highest gain in order to ensure...... that footprints are identical for the radar and the radiometer. The instrument will be flown in a pod under a Gulfstream G3 normally cruising with 240 m/sec at 12500 m, and will thus be able to sense clouds and precipitation from above...

  8. Faraday Rotation Measurement with the SMAP Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Vine, D. M.; Abraham, S.

    2016-01-01

    Faraday rotation is an issue that needs to be taken into account in remote sensing of parameters such as soil moisture and ocean salinity at L-band. This is especially important for SMAP because Faraday rotation varies with azimuth around the conical scan. SMAP retrieves Faraday rotation in situ using the ratio of the third and second Stokes parameters, a procedure that was demonstrated successfully by Aquarius. This manuscript reports the performance of this algorithm on SMAP. Over ocean the process works reasonably well and results compare favorably with expected values. But over land, the inhomogeneous nature of the scene results in much noisier, and in some cases unreliable estimates of Faraday rotation.

  9. Analysis of Anechoic Chamber Testing of the Hurricane Imaging Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenigstein, David; Ruf, Chris; James, Mark; Simmons, David; Miller, Timothy; Buckley, Courtney

    2010-01-01

    The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer System (HIRAD) is a new airborne passive microwave remote sensor developed to observe hurricanes. HIRAD incorporates synthetic thinned array radiometry technology, which use Fourier synthesis to reconstruct images from an array of correlated antenna elements. The HIRAD system response to a point emitter has been measured in an anechoic chamber. With this data, a Fourier inversion image reconstruction algorithm has been developed. Performance analysis of the apparatus is presented, along with an overview of the image reconstruction algorithm

  10. A filter-wheel solar radiometer for atmospheric transmission studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, G. E.; Peck, R. L.; Allen, G. R.

    1973-01-01

    A filter-wheel solar radiometer has been developed for monitoring the atmospheric optical depth at multiple narrow-wavelength intervals in the visible and near IR regions of the spectrum. Measurements of the direct solar radiations are converted to a digital format and stored in punched tape for eventual analysis by a computer. During stable clear weather condition, the instrument is capable of providing monochromatic optical depths to an estimated rms accuracy of 0.005.

  11. Application of pylon radon daughter standard for calibration of radiometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chruścielewski, Wojciech; Olszewski, Jerzy; Bogusz, Malgorzata

    2002-01-01

    Radiometers for measurements of radon daughter potential energy used in the surveillance of the work environment need a systematic calibration. This paper presents how a commercially available device produced by the Pylon Company can be applied. This device allows to produce, simply and directly, standard sources of radon daughters, corresponding with the energy, geometry and properties of radiation originated from an air sample. The calibration yielded the results that proved to be in agreement with those obtained previously by means of radon chamber.

  12. Solar occultation sounding of pressure and temperature using narrowband radiometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J H; Russell Iii, J M; Smith, M A

    1980-07-01

    A technique for simultaneously retrieving pressure and temperature profiles using satellite-based narrow-band radiometer measurements of absorption in the CO(2) 4.3-microm band is described. Pressure and temperature profiles for earth's upper atmosphere on a global scale can be obtained with errors <3% and 3 K, respectively. The p - T information can be used not only for improving the accuracy of inverted gas concentrations in the same absorption experiment but also for investigating the upper atmosphere circulation.

  13. GRIP HURRICANE IMAGING RADIOMETER (HIRAD) V0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GRIP Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) dataset was collected by the HIRAD instrument, which is a hurricane imaging, single-polarization passive C-band...

  14. Development and application of an automated precision solar radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Gang-gang; Li, Xin; Zhang, Quan; Zheng, Xiao-bing; Yan, Jing

    2016-10-01

    Automated filed vicarious calibration is becoming a growing trend for satellite remote sensor, which require a solar radiometer have to automatic measure reliable data for a long time whatever the weather conditions and transfer measurement data to the user office. An automated precision solar radiometer has been developed. It is used in measuring the solar spectral irradiance received at the Earth surface. The instrument consists of 8 parallel separate silicon-photodiode-based channels with narrow band-pass filters from the visible to near-IR regions. Each channel has a 2.0° full-angle Filed of View (FOV). The detectors and filters are temperature stabilized using a Thermal Energy Converter at 30+/-0.2°. The instrument is pointed toward the sun via an auto-tracking system that actively tracks the sun within a +/-0.1°. It collects data automatically and communicates with user terminal through BDS (China's BeiDou Navigation Satellite System) while records data as a redundant in internal memory, including working state and error. The solar radiometer is automated in the sense that it requires no supervision throughout the whole process of working. It calculates start-time and stop-time every day matched with the time of sunrise and sunset, and stop working once the precipitation. Calibrated via Langley curves and simultaneous observed with CE318, the different of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) is within 5%. The solar radiometer had run in all kinds of harsh weather condition in Gobi in Dunhuang and obtain the AODs nearly eight months continuously. This paper presents instrument design analysis, atmospheric optical depth retrievals as well as the experiment result.

  15. Compact Front-end Prototype for Next Generation RFI-rejecting Polarimetric L-band Radiometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Brian Sveistrup; Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl; Skou, Niels

    2009-01-01

    Realizing the need for lower noise figure and smaller physical size in todays higly sensitive radiometers, this paper presents a new compact analog front-end (AFE) for use with the existing L-band (1400-1427 MHz) radiometer designed and operated by the Technical University of Denmark. Using...... subharmonic sampling to sample directly at the RF-frequency, this radiometer obtains a fully polarimetric response and enables detection and removal of radio frequency interference (RFI). A more compact AFE will enable various desired features, as for example the ability to use the front-end with antenna...... arrays needing one receiver per antenna (Synthetic Aperture Radiometer, SARad), reduced weight for airborne missions and an easy temperature stabilization, i.e. improved instrument stability. The new front-end possesses an improved system noise temperature of only 76 K (roughly 40 K improvement) measured...

  16. The TSI Radiometer Facility: absolute calibrations for total solar irradiance instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Greg; Heuerman, Karl; Harber, Dave; Drake, Ginger

    2007-09-01

    The total solar irradiance (TSI) climate data record includes overlapping measurements from 10 spaceborne radiometers. The continuity of this climate data record is essential for detecting potential long-term solar fluctuations, as offsets between different instruments generally exceed the stated instrument uncertainties. The risk of loss of continuity in this nearly 30-year record drives the need for future instruments with solar power levels to these needed accuracy levels. The new TSI Radiometer Facility (TRF) is intended to provide such calibrations. Based on a cryogenic radiometer with a uniform input light source of solar irradiance power levels, the TRF allows direct comparisons between a TSI instrument and a reference cryogenic radiometer viewing the same light beam in a common vacuum system. We describe here the details of this facility designed to achieve 0.01% absolute accuracy.

  17. An improved outdoor calibration procedure for broadband ultraviolet radiometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancillo, M L; Serrano, A; Antón, M; García, J A; Vilaplana, J M; de la Morena, B

    2005-01-01

    This article aims at improving the broadband ultraviolet radiometer's calibration methodology. For this goal, three broadband radiometers are calibrated against a spectrophotometer of reference. Three different one-step calibration models are tested: ratio, first order and second order. The latter is proposed in order to adequately reproduce the high dependence on the solar zenith angle shown by the other two models and, therefore, to improve the calibration performance at high solar elevations. The proposed new second-order model requires no additional information and, thus, keeps the operational character of the one-step methodology. The models are compared in terms of their root mean square error and the most qualified is subsequently validated by comparing its predictions with the spectrophotometer measurements within an independent validation data subset. Results show that the best calibration is achieved by the second-order model, with a mean bias error and mean absolute bias error lower than 2.2 and 6.7%, respectively.

  18. DESIGN OF MEDICAL RADIOMETER FRONT-END FOR IMPROVED PERFORMANCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemetsen, Ø.; Birkelund, Y.; Jacobsen, S. K.; Maccarini, P. F.; Stauffer, P. R.

    2011-01-01

    , damage would occur to the active components of the radiometer if used in presence of the microwave heating antenna. Nevertheless, this design showed significantly improved sensitivity of measured temperatures and merits further investigation to determine methods of protecting the radiometer for amplifier first front ends. PMID:21779411

  19. Advanced modelling of the Planck-LFI radiometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battaglia, P [Thales Alenia Space Italia S.p.A., S.S. Padana Superiore 290, 20090 Vimodrone (Italy); Franceschet, C; Bersanelli, M; Maino, D; Mennella, A [Universita di Milano, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via G. Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Zonca, A [INAF-IASF Milano, Via E. Bassini 15, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Butler, R C; Mandolesi, N [INAF-IASF Bologna, Via P. Gobetti, 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); D' Arcangelo, O; Platania, P [IFP-CNR, via Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Davis, R J [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, The University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Galeotta, S [INAF-OATs, Via G.B. Tiepolo 11, I-34131, Trieste (Italy); Guzzi, P [Numonyx, R and D Technology Center, Via C. Olivetti 2, 20041 Agrate Brianza (Italy); Hoyland, R [Instituto de AstrofIsica de Canarias, C/ Via Lactea S/N, E-38200, La Laguna (Tenerife) (Spain); Hughes, N; Jukkala, P [DA-Design Oy Jokioinen (Finland); Kettle, D [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Manchester, Manchester, M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Laaninen, M [Ylinen Electronics Oy Kauniainen (Finland); Leonardi, R; Meinhold, P, E-mail: paola.battaglia@thalesaleniaspace.co [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9530 (United States)

    2009-12-15

    The Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) is a radiometer array covering the 30-70 GHz spectral range on-board the ESA Planck satellite, launched on May 14th, 2009 to observe the cosmic microwave background (CMB) with unprecedented precision. In this paper we describe the development and validation of a software model of the LFI pseudo-correlation receivers which enables to reproduce and predict all the main system parameters of interest as measured at each of the 44 LFI detectors. These include system total gain, noise temperature, band-pass response, non-linear response. The LFI Advanced RF Model (LARFM) has been constructed by using commercial software tools and data of each radiometer component as measured at single unit level. The LARFM has been successfully used to reproduce the LFI behavior observed during the LFI ground-test campaign. The model is an essential element in the database of LFI data processing center and will be available for any detailed study of radiometer behaviour during the survey.

  20. Neonatal phototherapy radiometers: current performance characteristics and future requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkson, Douglas McG; Nicol, Ruth; Chapman, Phillip

    2014-04-01

    Hand held radiometers provide a convenient means of monitoring the output of neonatal phototherapy treatment devices as part of planned programs of device maintenance and output monitoring. It was considered appropriate to determine the wavelength and angular response of a selection of such meters and compare their indicated values with that derived from spectral analysis of phototherapy light sources. This was undertaken using a Bentham DMc150 double grating spectroradiometer and a series of 10nm band pass optical filters in the range 400-640 nm used in conjunction with a fiber optic light source. Specific meters investigated included a GE Biliblanket Light Meter II, a NeoBLUE radiometer and a Bio-TEK radiometer 74345 device. Comparisons were made of measurements made using the hand held meters and the Bentham DMc 150 system for a range of neonatal phototherapy treatment devices. The use of such meters is discussed in relation to applicable equipment standards and recommendations of intensive phototherapy from clinical groups such as the American Academy of Pediatrics and a specification for a spectroradiometer based measurement system is proposed. Copyright © 2013 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Jason Microwave Radiometer On Orbit Calibration, Validation and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruf, C. S.; Brown, S. T.; Keihm, S. J.; Kitiyakara, A.

    2002-12-01

    The Jason Microwave Radiometer (JMR) on the Jason-1 altimeter satellite measures radiometric brightness temperature (TB) at 18.7, 23.8, and 34.0 GHz in the nadir direction, from which is estimated the excess path delay (PD) through the atmosphere experienced by the Jason radar altimeter signal due to water vapor and suspended cloud liquid water. JMR is an improved follow-on to the TOPEX Microwave Radiometer (TMR) on the earlier TOPEX/Poseidon altimeter satellite. Early work calibrating JMR and validating its performance during the first six months of the mission will be presented. Placement of Jason-1 into a virtually identical orbit with TOPEX/Poseidon, with approximately 70 s time displacement, has afforded unprecedented accuracy in the intercalibration of two satellite radiometers. The virtual elimination of spatial and temporal decorrelation errors between JMR and TMR TBs and PDs allows intercomparison fine tuning at a much more precise level, and with greatly reduced data averaging requirements, relative to the earlier TMR comparisons with other satellite instruments (SSM/I, ERS-1,2), island radiosondes, GPS, and ground-based water vapor radiometers. Calibration of the JMR TBs has been evaluated at the low end of its on-orbit range by comparing the differences between vicarious cold reference TBs of it and adjacent TMR channels with those predicted by theory. At the high end of the TB range, comparisons are made with TMR TBs over suitable regions of the Sahara desert and Amazon rain forest. Characterization of JMR performance at intermediate TB levels is possible using a variety of statistical intercomparison techniques.

  2. Galileo probe measurements of thermal and solar radiation fluxes in the Jovian atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sromovsky, L. A.; Collard, A. D.; Fry, P. M.; Orton, G. S.; Lemmon, M. T.; Tomasko, M. G.; Freedman, R. S.

    1998-09-01

    The Galileo probe net flux radiometer (NFR) measured radiation fluxes in Jupiter's atmosphere from about 0.44 to 14 bars, using five spectral channels to separate solar and thermal components. Onboard calibration results confirm that the NFR responded to radiation approximately as expected. NFR channels also responded to a superimposed thermal perturbation, which can be approximately removed using blind channel measurements and physical constraints. Evidence for the expected NH3 cloud was seen in the spectral character of spin-induced modulations of the direct solar beam signals. These results are consistent with an overlying cloud of small NH3 ice particles (0.5-0.75 μm in radius) of optical depth 1.5-2 at 0.5 μm. Such a cloud would have so little effect on thermal fluxes that NFR thermal channels provide no additional constraints on its properties. However, evidence for heating near 0.45 bar in the NFR thermal channels would seem to require either an additional opacity source beyond this small-particle cloud, implying a heterogeneous cloud structure to avoid conflicts with solar modulation results, or a change in temperature lapse rate just above the probe measurements. The large thermal flux levels imply water vapor mixing ratios that are only 6% of solar at 10 bars, but possibly increasing with depth, and significantly subsaturated ammonia at pressures less than 3 bars. If deep NH3 mixing ratios at the probe entry site are 3-4 times ground-based inferences, as suggested by probe radio signal attenuation, then only half as much water is needed to match NFR observations. No evidence of a water cloud was seen near the 5-bar level. The 5-μm thermal channel detected the presumed NH4SH cloud base near 1.35 bars. Effects of this cloud were also seen in the solar channel upflux measurements but not in the solar net fluxes, implying that the cloud is a conservative scatterer of sunlight. The minor thermal signature of this cloud is compatible with particle radii near

  3. Intercomparison of monochromatic source facilities for the determination of the relative spectral response of erythemal broadband filter radiometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreder, Josef; Gröbner, Julian; Los, Alexander; Blumthaler, Mario

    2004-07-01

    The relative spectral responses of erythemally weighted broadband radiometers determined at three different laboratories are compared, and the systems are described. The results of measurements of four different broadband radiometers are discussed. Although the common dynamic range of the measured relative spectral responses is approximately 10(4), the differences in the relative spectral response functions are lower than 20%. These differences are related mostly to measurement uncertainties and differences in the spectral response facilities.

  4. COBE DMR results and implications. [Differential Microwave Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoot, George F.

    1992-01-01

    This lecture presents early results obtained from the first six months of measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) by Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) aboard COBE and discusses significant cosmological implications. The DMR maps show the dipole anisotropy and some galactic emission but otherwise a spatially smooth early universe. The measurements are sufficiently precise that we must pay careful attention to potential systematic errors. Maps of galactic and local emission such as those produced by the FIRAS and DIRBE instruments will be needed to identify foregrounds from extragalactic emission and thus to interpret the results in terms of events in the early universe. The current DMR results are significant for Cosmology.

  5. Ocean Color Inferred from Radiometers on Low-Flying Aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J. Wilson

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The color of sunlight reflected from the ocean to orbiting visible radiometers hasprovided a great deal of information about the global ocean, after suitable corrections aremade for atmospheric effects. Similar ocean-color measurements can be made from a lowflyingaircraft to get higher spatial resolution and to obtain measurements under clouds.A different set of corrections is required in this case, and we describe algorithms to correctfor clouds and sea-surface effects. An example is presented and errors in the correctionsdiscussed.

  6. GRIP HIGH-ALTITUDE MMIC SOUNDING RADIOMETER (HAMSR) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GRIP High-Altitude MMIC Sounding Radiometer (HAMSR) dataset was collectd by the High Altitude monolithic microwave integrated Circuit (MMIC) Sounding Radiometer...

  7. GPM Ground Validation Duke Microwave Radiometer (MWR) IPHEx V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Duke Microwave Radiometer (MWR) IPHEx dataset consists of data collected by the MWR, which is a sensitive microwave radiometer that detects...

  8. HURRICANE AND SEVERE STORM SENTINEL (HS3) GLOBAL HAWK HIGH ALTITUDE MMIC SOUNDING RADIOMETER (HAMSR) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) Global Hawk High Altitude MMIC Sounding Radiometer (HAMSR) dataset includes measurements gathered by the HAMSR...

  9. Modeling the frequency response of microwave radiometers with QUCS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zonca, A.; Roucaries, B.; Williams, B.; Rubin, I.; D'Arcangelo, O.; Meinhold, P.; Lubin, P.; Franceschet, C.; Jahn, S.; Mennella, A.; Bersanelli, M.

    2010-12-01

    Characterization of the frequency response of coherent radiometric receivers is a key element in estimating the flux of astrophysical emissions, since the measured signal depends on the convolution of the source spectral emission with the instrument band shape. Laboratory Radio Frequency (RF) measurements of the instrument bandpass often require complex test setups and are subject to a number of systematic effects driven by thermal issues and impedance matching, particularly if cryogenic operation is involved. In this paper we present an approach to modeling radiometers bandpasses by integrating simulations and RF measurements of individual components. This method is based on QUCS (Quasi Universal Circuit Simulator), an open-source circuit simulator, which gives the flexibility of choosing among the available devices, implementing new analytical software models or using measured S-parameters. Therefore an independent estimate of the instrument bandpass is achieved using standard individual component measurements and validated analytical simulations. In order to automate the process of preparing input data, running simulations and exporting results we developed the Python package python-qucs and released it under GNU Public License. We discuss, as working cases, bandpass response modeling of the COFE and Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) radiometers and compare results obtained with QUCS and with a commercial circuit simulator software. The main purpose of bandpass modeling in COFE is to optimize component matching, while in LFI they represent the best estimation of frequency response, since end-to-end measurements were strongly affected by systematic effects.

  10. Modeling the frequency response of microwave radiometers with QUCS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zonca, A; Williams, B; Rubin, I; Meinhold, P; Lubin, P [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Roucaries, B [Universite Paris-Est, Laboratoire Central des Ponts et Chaussees, 75732 Paris (France); D' Arcangelo, O [IFP-CNR, via Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Franceschet, C; Mennella, A; Bersanelli, M [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Jahn, S, E-mail: zonca@deepspace.ucsb.edu [Infineon Technologies AG, Am Campeon 1-12, 85579 Neubiberg, Munich (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    Characterization of the frequency response of coherent radiometric receivers is a key element in estimating the flux of astrophysical emissions, since the measured signal depends on the convolution of the source spectral emission with the instrument band shape. Laboratory Radio Frequency (RF) measurements of the instrument bandpass often require complex test setups and are subject to a number of systematic effects driven by thermal issues and impedance matching, particularly if cryogenic operation is involved. In this paper we present an approach to modeling radiometers bandpasses by integrating simulations and RF measurements of individual components. This method is based on QUCS (Quasi Universal Circuit Simulator), an open-source circuit simulator, which gives the flexibility of choosing among the available devices, implementing new analytical software models or using measured S-parameters. Therefore an independent estimate of the instrument bandpass is achieved using standard individual component measurements and validated analytical simulations. In order to automate the process of preparing input data, running simulations and exporting results we developed the Python package python-qucs and released it under GNU Public License. We discuss, as working cases, bandpass response modeling of the COFE and Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) radiometers and compare results obtained with QUCS and with a commercial circuit simulator software. The main purpose of bandpass modeling in COFE is to optimize component matching, while in LFI they represent the best estimation of frequency response, since end-to-end measurements were strongly affected by systematic effects.

  11. Dynamic response of the thermometric net radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. D. Wilson; W. J. Massman; G. E. Swaters

    2009-01-01

    We computed the dynamic response of an idealized thermometric net radiometer, when driven by an oscillating net longwave radiation intended roughly to simulate rapid fluctuations of the radiative environment such as might be expected during field use of such devices. The study was motivated by curiosity as to whether non-linearity of the surface boundary conditions...

  12. Compositional Ground Truth of Diviner Lunar Radiometer Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhagen, B. T.; Thomas, I. R.; Bowles, N. E.; Allen, C. C.; Donaldson Hanna, K. L.; Foote, E. J.; Paige, D. A.

    2012-01-01

    The Moon affords us a unique opportunity to "ground truth" thermal infrared (i.e. 3 to 25 micron) observations of an airless body. The Moon is the most accessable member of the most abundant class of solar system bodies, which includes Mercury, astroids, and icy satellites. The Apollo samples returned from the Moon are the only extraterrestrial samples with known spatial context. And the Diviner Lunar Radiometer (Diviner) is the first instrument to globally map the spectral thermal emission of an airless body. Here we compare Diviner observations of Apollo sites to compositional and spectral measurements of Apollo lunar soil samples in simulated lunar environment (SLE).

  13. The Diviner Lunar Radiometer Compositional Data Products: Description and Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhagen, B. T.; Lucey, P. G.; Bandfield, J. L.; Hayne, P. O.; William, J. P.; Paige, D. A.

    2011-01-01

    The Diviner lunar radiometer has made the first direct global measurements of silicate mineralogy of the lunar surface using multispectral thermal emission mapping. By mid-March, 2011, the first derived compositional data products (level 3) will be released into the Planetary Data System (PDS) Geosciences Node. These products describe the Diviner Science Team's best efforts to determine the position of the Christiansen feature (CF), which is directly related to silicate mineralogy of lunar soils. The initial release of these products include data from the mission's primary mapping phase between 9/17/09 and 9/16/10. This work describes at a high level the creation of Diviner's compositional data products.

  14. Methods of determining the spatial response nonlinearities of radiometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, F A

    1970-09-01

    In many instances, a radiometer's responses are found to be nonuniform with respect to target positions within its field of view. This paper examines the effects of spatial nonuniformity for the case of a symmetrical uniform source boresighted in the radiometer's field of view and shows how these effects can be dealt with by relating the radiometer's output with its field of view unfilled to its output when its field of view is totally filled by a uniform source. By analysis of a Huggins Mark IX radiometer, it is shown that errors in excess of 18% can result through ignorance of the radiometer's nonlinearity caused by spatial response nonuniformity.

  15. First Results from the Microwave Radiometer (MWR) on Aquarius/SAC-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, L.; Gallo, J.; Rocca, D.; Rabolli, M.; Madero, F.; Kuba, J.; Masuelli, S.; Heredia, S. D.; Biswas, S. K.; Hejazin, Y.

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents first results from the Microwave Radiometer (MWR) instrument on the Aquarius/SAC-D satellite launched in June 2011. The MWR is a three channel pushbroom microwave radiometer with 8 antenna beams/channel that provides a measurement swath of approximately 380 Km. These channels provide 36.5 GHz dual horizontal and vertical polarized and 23.8 GHz horizontal polarized radiance measurements in an overlapping swath with the L-band Aquarius radiometer/scatterometer. From these microwave brightness temperatures, MWR provides ancillary geophysical measurements of columnar water vapor, ocean surface wind speed, oceanic rain rate and sea ice cover, which support the Aquarius mission objective of global sea surface salinity measurements. Results are presented showing MWR measurements compared to similar measurements made by the WindSat polarimetric radiometer on the US Navy's Coriolis satellite. The orbits of Aquarius and Windsat are very similar and provide about 60% overlap within a ± 45 minute window. First, inter-satellite radiometric comparisons of MWR brightness temperature with the WindSat are discussed. Also comparisons are made of MWR geophysical parameter retrievals with collocated WindSat environmental data records and the NOAA Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS) atmospheric and ocean surface parameters.

  16. Design and evaluation of net radiometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritschen, Leo J.; Fritschen, Charles L.

    Net radiometer designs were evaluated with respect to long and short wave sensitivities and to the effect of ambient wind on the signal. The design features of the instrument with the best overall performance include: equal sensitivity to long and short wave radiation, a thermal pile which is thermally isolated from the frame, a white guard ring, pathways for internal circulation between the top and bottom hemispheres, and self-supporting windshields. The windshields have O-ring seals, a ball joint is provided for ease of leveling, and ample desiccant is enclosed in the mounting pipe. Under a high radiant load, the net radiometer signal decreased by 2.5, 3.7, and 4.3 percent at wind speeds of 12.5, 4.6, and 7.5 m/s.

  17. Description and Performance of an L-Band Radiometer with Digital Beamforming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan F. Marchan-Hernandez

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the description and performance tests of an L-band microwave radiometer with Digital Beamforming (DBF, developed for the Passive Advanced Unit (PAU for ocean monitoring project. PAU is an instrument that combines, in a single receiver and without time multiplexing, a microwave radiometer at L-band (PAU-RAD and a GPS-reflectometer (PAU-GNSS-R. This paper focuses on the PAU‑RAD beamformer’s first results, analyzing the hardware and software required for the developed prototype. Finally, it discusses the first results measured in the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC anechoic chamber.

  18. Design studies of large aperture, high-resolution Earth science microwave radiometers compatible with small launch vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Lyle C.; Bailey, M. C.; Harrington, Richard F.; Kendall, Bruce M.; Campbell, Thomas G.

    1994-01-01

    High-spatial-resolution microwave radiometer sensing from space with reasonable swath widths and revisit times favors large aperture systems. However, with traditional precision antenna design, the size and weight requirements for such systems are in conflict with the need to emphasize small launch vehicles. This paper describes tradeoffs between the science requirements, basic operational parameters, and expected sensor performance for selected satellite radiometer concepts utilizing novel lightweight compactly packaged real apertures. Antenna, feed, and radiometer subsystem design and calibration are presented. Preliminary results show that novel lightweight real aperture coupled with state-of-the-art radiometer designs are compatible with small launch systems, and hold promise for high-resolution earth science measurements of sea ice, precipitation, soil moisture, sea surface temperature, and ocean wind speeds.

  19. Retrieval of physical properties of interference filters integrated in radiometer instruments by using reverse engineering process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Ríos, F. Javier; Jiménez, Juan José; Gonzalez-Guerrero, Miguel; Martin, Israel

    2017-11-01

    The Solar Irradiance flux experiment a spectral filtering process as the irradiance flux propagates from the source to the sensor. When using radiometer sensors for optical measurement both the atmospheric transmittance, sensor's filter and the responsivity of the detector produces a spectral filtering.

  20. An RFI Detection Algorithm for Microwave Radiometers Using Sparse Component Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed-Tano, Priscilla N.; Korde-Patel, Asmita; Gholian, Armen; Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Schoenwald, Adam; Bradley, Damon

    2017-01-01

    Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) is a threat to passive microwave measurements and if undetected, can corrupt science retrievals. The sparse component analysis (SCA) for blind source separation has been investigated to detect RFI in microwave radiometer data. Various techniques using SCA have been simulated to determine detection performance with continuous wave (CW) RFI.

  1. Stray light effects in above-water remote-sensing reflectance from hyperspectral radiometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talone, Marco; Zibordi, Giuseppe; Ansko, Ilmar; Banks, Andrew Clive; Kuusk, Joel

    2016-05-20

    Stray light perturbations are unwanted distortions of the measured spectrum due to the nonideal performance of optical radiometers. Because of this, stray light characterization and correction is essential when accurate radiometric measurements are a necessity. In agreement with such a need, this study focused on stray light correction of hyperspectral radiometers widely applied for above-water measurements to determine the remote-sensing reflectance (RRS). Stray light of sample radiometers was experimentally characterized and a correction algorithm was developed and applied to field measurements performed in the Mediterranean Sea. Results indicate that mean stray light corrections are appreciable, with values generally varying from -1% to +1% in the 400-700 nm spectral region for downward irradiance and sky radiance, and from -1% to +4% for total radiance from the sea. Mean corrections for data products such as RRS exhibit values that depend on water type varying between -0.5% and +1% in the blue-green spectral region, with peaks up to 9% in the red in eutrophic waters. The possibility of using one common stray light correction matrix for the analyzed class of radiometers was also investigated. Results centered on RRS support such a feasibility at the expense of an increment of the uncertainty typically well below 0.5% in the blue-green and up to 1% in the red, assuming sensors are based on spectrographs from the same production batch.

  2. Aquarius Radiometer RFI Detection, Mitigation, and Impact Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruf, Christopher; Chen, David; Le Vine, David; de Matthaeis, Paolo; Piepmeier, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    The Aquarius/SAC-D satellite was launched on 10 June 2011 into a sun-synchronous polar orbit and the Aquarius microwave radiometers [1] became operational on 25 August 2011. Since that time, it has been measuring brightness temperatures at 1.4 GHz with vertical, horizontal and 3rd Stokes polarizations . Beginning well before the launch, there has been the concern that Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) could have an appreciable presence. This concern was initiated by, among other things, its prevalence in both early [2] and more recent [3,4] aircraft field experiments using 1.4 GHz radiometers, as well as by the strong RFI environment encountered during the recent ESA SMOS mission, also at 1.4 GHz [5]. As a result, a number of methods for RFI detection and mitigation have been developed and tested. One in particular, "glitch detection" and "pulse blanking" mitigation has been adapted for use by Aquarius [6, 7]. The early on-orbit performance of the Aquarius RFI detection and mitigation algorithm is presented here, together with an assessment of the global RFI environment at 1.4 GHz which can be derived from the Aquarius results.

  3. First national intercomparison of solar ultraviolet radiometers in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Diémoz

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A blind intercomparison of ground-based ultraviolet (UV instruments has been organized for the first time in Italy. The campaign was coordinated by the Environmental Protection Agency of Aosta Valley (ARPA Valle d'Aosta and took place in Saint-Christophe (45.8° N, 7.4° E, 570 m a.s.l., in the Alpine region, from 8 to 23 June 2010. It involved 8 institutions, 10 broadband radiometers, 2 filter radiometers and 2 spectroradiometers. Synchronized measurements of downward global solar UV irradiance at the ground were collected and the raw series were then individually processed by the respective operators on the base of their own procedures and calibration data. A radiative transfer model was successfully applied as an interpretative tool. The input parameters and output results are described in detail. The comparison was performed in terms of global solar UV Index and integrated UV-A irradiance against a well-calibrated double monochromator spectroradiometer as reference. An improved algorithm for comparing broadband data and spectra has been developed and is discussed in detail. For some instruments, we found average deviations ranging from −16 % up to 20 % relative to the reference and diurnal variations as large as 15 % even in clear days. Remarkable deviations were found for the instruments calibrated in the manufacturers' facilities and never involved in field intercomparison. Finally, some recommendations to the UV operators based on the campaign results are proposed.

  4. Marine ARM GPCI Investigation of Clouds Infrared Sea Surface Temperature Autonomous Radiometer (ISAR) Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, R. Michael [Remote Measurements & Research Company, Seattle, WA (United States); Long, Charles N. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Boulder, CO (United States). Earth System Research Lab.

    2016-01-10

    Sea surface temperature (SST) is one of the most appropriate and important climate parameters: a widespread increase is an indicator of global warming and modifications of the geographical distribution of SST are an extremely sensitive indicator of climate change. There is high demand for accurate, reliable, high-spatial-and-temporal-resolution SST measurements for the parameterization of ocean-atmosphere heat, momentum, and gas (SST is therefore critical to understanding the processes controlling the global carbon dioxide budget) fluxes, for detailed diagnostic and process-orientated studies to better understand the behavior of the climate system, as model boundary conditions, for assimilation into climate models, and for the rigorous validation of climate model output. In order to achieve an overall net flux uncertainty < 10 W/m2 (Bradley and Fairall, 2006), the sea surface (skin) temperature (SSST) must be measured to an error < 0.1 C and a precision of 0.05 C. Anyone experienced in shipboard meteorological measurements will recognize this is a tough specification. These demands require complete confidence in the content, interpretation, accuracy, reliability, and continuity of observational SST data—criteria that can only be fulfilled by the successful implementation of an ongoing data product validation strategy.

  5. The 1997 North American Interagency Intercomparison of Ultraviolet Spectroradiometers Including Narrowband Filter Radiometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz, Kathleen; Disterhoft, Patrick; Early, Edward; Thompson, Ambler; DeLuisi, John; Berndt, Jerry; Harrison, Lee; Kiedron, Peter; Ehramjian, James; Bernhard, Germar; Cabasug, Lauriana; Robertson, James; Mou, Wanfeng; Taylor, Thomas; Slusser, James; Bigelow, David; Durham, Bill; Janson, George; Hayes, Douglass; Beaubien, Mark; Beaubien, Arthur

    2002-01-01

    The fourth North American Intercomparison of Ultraviolet Monitoring Spectroradiometers was held September 15 to 25, 1997 at Table Mountain outside of Boulder, Colorado, USA. Concern over stratospheric ozone depletion has prompted several government agencies in North America to establish networks of spectroradiometers for monitoring solar ultraviolet irradiance at the surface of the Earth. The main purpose of the Intercomparison was to assess the ability of spectroradiometers to accurately measure solar ultraviolet irradiance, and to compare the results between instruments of different monitoring networks. This Intercomparison was coordinated by NIST and NOAA, and included participants from the ASRC, EPA, NIST, NSF, SERC, USDA, and YES. The UV measuring instruments included scanning spectroradiometers, spectrographs, narrow band multi-filter radiometers, and broadband radiometers. Instruments were characterized for wavelength accuracy, bandwidth, stray-light rejection, and spectral irradiance responsivity. The spectral irradiance responsivity was determined two to three times outdoors to assess temporal stability. Synchronized spectral scans of the solar irradiance were performed over several days. Using the spectral irradiance responsivities determined with the NIST traceable standard lamp, and a simple convolution technique with a Gaussian slit-scattering function to account for the different bandwidths of the instruments, the measured solar irradiance from the spectroradiometers excluding the filter radiometers at 16.5 h UTC had a relative standard deviation of ±4 % for wavelengths greater than 305 nm. The relative standard deviation for the solar irradiance at 16.5 h UTC including the filter radiometer was ±4 % for filter functions above 300 nm.

  6. A study of the directional response of ultraviolet radiometers: II. Implications for ultraviolet phototherapy derived from computer simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, C J; Pye, S D

    2000-09-01

    A theoretical model has been used to simulate irradiances for ultraviolet (UV) phototherapy cabinets and other sources. The accuracy of the simulation results has been checked by comparison with experimental measurements. The simulations have been used to study the influence of different factors on UV phototherapy exposure and to develop recommendations for the operation and calibration of phototherapy cabinets. Many radiometers used in the evaluation of skin doses have input optics with directional responses that are not proportional to the cosine of the angle of incidence for the UV radiation. Data on radiometer directional responses have been incorporated into the simulations, which show that the poor directional responses for some radiometers currently in use will give errors of 20-50% in the assessment of irradiance. The influence of lamp source geometries employed for radiometer calibration has been investigated. UV phototherapy dosimetry commonly uses a spectroradiometer and a radiometer in the transfer of irradiance calibrations from a small standard UV lamp to a large-area source with a different UV spectrum. Recommendations are given on the range of acceptability for radiometer directional responses and a method is described for determining whether these are fulfilled. Recommendations are made on the techniques that should be used for calibration.

  7. Carbon monoxide mixing ratio inference from gas filter radiometer data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallio, H. A.; Reichle, H. G., Jr.; Casas, J. C.; Saylor, M. S.; Gormsen, B. B.

    1983-01-01

    A new algorithm has been developed which permits, for the first time, real time data reduction of nadir measurements taken with a gas filter correlation radiometer to determine tropospheric carbon monoxide concentrations. The algorithm significantly reduces the complexity of the equations to be solved while providing accuracy comparable to line-by-line calculations. The method is based on a regression analysis technique using a truncated power series representation of the primary instrument output signals to infer directly a weighted average of trace gas concentration. The results produced by a microcomputer-based implementation of this technique are compared with those produced by the more rigorous line-by-line methods. This algorithm has been used in the reduction of Measurement of Air Pollution from Satellites, Shuttle, and aircraft data.

  8. GRIP HIGH-ALTITUDE MMIC SOUNDING RADIOMETER (HAMSR) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The High Altitude monolithic microwave integrated Circuit (MMIC) Sounding Radiometer (HAMSR) is a microwave atmospheric sounder developed by JPL under the NASA...

  9. GPM GROUND VALIDATION ENVIRONMENT CANADA (EC) RADIOMETER GCPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Environment Canada (EC) Radiometer GCPEx dataset contains retrievals of temperature, water vapor, relative humidity, liquid water profiles...

  10. On the importance of spectral responsivity of Robertson-Berger-type ultraviolet radiometers for long-term observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Sarra, Alcide; Disterhoft, Patrick; DeLuisi, John J

    2002-07-01

    A system to determine the spectral responsivity of ultraviolet (UV) radiometers has been developed and is routinely operated at the Central Ultraviolet Calibration Facility, at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The instrument and the measurement methodologies are described. Results of measurements from thermally controlled broadband UV radiometers of the Robertson-Berger (R-B)-type are described. Systematic differences in the spectral response curves for these instruments have been detected. The effect of these differences on the field operation of UV-B radiometers has been studied by calculating the instrumental response from modeled UV spectra. The differences of the weighted spectral UV irradiances, measured by two radiometers with different spectral response functions, caused by the daily variation in the position of the sun were estimated for fixed values of total ozone, altitude and albedo, and for cloud-free conditions. These differences increase with the solar zenith angle and are as large as 8%. Larger differences in the instrumental response may be produced by ozone variations. Thus, care must be taken when analyzing data from R-B radiometers and comparing results from different instruments. Routine cycling of UV-B radiometers in operative networks without a careful determination of the spectral responsivity, or small drifts of the spectral responsivity, may strongly affect the accuracy of UV radiation measurements and produce an erroneous trend. Because of the possible differences among radiometers, it would not be practical to derive the long-term behavior of UV radiation without routine and thorough characterization of the spectral responsivities of the instruments.

  11. Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Radiometer Subband Calibration and Calibration Drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jinzheng; Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; De Amici, Giovanni; Mohammed, Priscilla N.

    2016-01-01

    The SMAP is one of four first-tier missions recommended by the US National Research Council's Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space (Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond, Space Studies Board, National Academies Press, 2007). The observatory was launched on Jan 31, 2015. The goal of the SMAP is to measure the global soil moisture and freeze/thaw from space. The L-band radiometer is the passive portion of the spaceborne instrument. It measures all four Stokes antenna temperatures and outputs counts. The Level 1B Brightness Temperature (L1B_TB) science algorithm converts radiometer counts to the Earths surface brightness temperature. The results are reported in the radiometer level 1B data product together with the calibrated antenna temperature (TA) and all of the corrections to the unwanted sources contribution. The calibrated L1B data product are required to satisfy the overall radiometer error budget of 1.3 K needed to meet the soil moisture requirement of 0.04 volumetric fraction uncertainty and the calibration drift requirement of no larger than 0.4 K per month.

  12. Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) Radiometer Subband Calibration and Calibration Drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jinzheng; Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; De Amici, Giovanni; Mohammed, Priscilla

    2016-01-01

    The SMAP is one of four first-tier missions recommended by the US National Research Council's Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space (Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond, Space Studies Board, National Academies Press, 2007)]. The observatory was launched on Jan 31, 2015. The goal of the SMAP is to measure the global soil moisture and freeze/thaw from space. The L-band radiometer is the passive portion of the spaceborne instrument. It measures all four Stokes antenna temperatures and outputs counts. The Level 1B Brightness Temperature (L1B_TB) science algorithm converts radiometer counts to the Earths surface brightness temperature. The results are reported in the radiometer level 1B data product together with the calibrated antenna temperature (TA) and all of the corrections to the unwanted sources contribution. The calibrated L1B data product are required to satisfy the overall radiometer error budget of 1.3 K needed to meet the soil moisture requirement of 0.04 volumetric fraction uncertainty and the calibration drift requirement of no larger than 0.4 K per month.

  13. Calibrating ground-based microwave radiometers: Uncertainty and drifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küchler, N.; Turner, D. D.; Löhnert, U.; Crewell, S.

    2016-04-01

    The quality of microwave radiometer (MWR) calibrations, including both the absolute radiometric accuracy and the spectral consistency, determines the accuracy of geophysical retrievals. The Microwave Radiometer Calibration Experiment (MiRaCalE) was conducted to evaluate the performance of MWR calibration techniques, especially of the so-called Tipping Curve Calibrations (TCC) and Liquid Nitrogen Calibrations (LN2cal), by repeatedly calibrating a fourth-generation Humidity and Temperature Profiler (HATPRO-G4) that measures downwelling radiance between 20 GHz and 60 GHz. MiRaCalE revealed two major points to improve MWR calibrations: (i) the necessary repetition frequency for MWR calibration techniques to correct drifts, which ensures stable long-term measurements; and (ii) the spectral consistency of control measurements of a well known reference is useful to estimate calibration accuracy. Besides, we determined the accuracy of the HATPRO's liquid nitrogen-cooled blackbody's temperature. TCCs and LN2cals were found to agree within 0.5 K when observing the liquid nitrogen-cooled blackbody with a physical temperature of 77 K. This agreement of two different calibration techniques suggests that the brightness temperature of the LN2 cooled blackbody is accurate within at least 0.5 K, which is a significant reduction of the uncertainties that have been assumed to vary between 0.6 K and 1.5 K when calibrating the HATPRO-G4. The error propagation of both techniques was found to behave almost linearly, leading to maximum uncertainties of 0.7 K when observing a scene that is associated with a brightness temperature of 15 K.

  14. Improved characterization of scenes with a combination of MMW radar and radiometer information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dill, Stephan; Peichl, Markus; Schreiber, Eric; Anglberger, Harald

    2017-05-01

    For security related applications MMW radar and radiometer systems in remote sensing or stand-off configurations are well established techniques. The range of development stages extends from experimental to commercial systems on the civil and military market. Typical examples are systems for personnel screening at airports for concealed object detection under clothing, enhanced vision or landing aid for helicopter and vehicle based systems for suspicious object or IED detection along roads. Due to the physical principle of active (radar) and passive (radiometer) MMW measurement techniques the appearance of single objects and thus the complete scenario is rather different for radar and radiometer images. A reasonable combination of both measurement techniques could lead to enhanced object information. However, some technical requirements should be taken into account. The imaging geometry for both sensors should be nearly identical, the geometrical resolution and the wavelength should be similar and at best the imaging process should be carried out simultaneously. Therefore theoretical and experimental investigations on a suitable combination of MMW radar and radiometer information have been conducted. First experiments in 2016 have been done with an imaging linescanner based on a cylindrical imaging geometry [1]. It combines a horizontal line scan in azimuth with a linear motion in vertical direction for the second image dimension. The main drawback of the system is the limited number of pixel in vertical dimension at a certain distance. Nevertheless the near range imaging results where promising. Therefore the combination of radar and radiometer sensor was assembled on the DLR wide-field-of-view linescanner ABOSCA which is based on a spherical imaging geometry [2]. A comparison of both imaging systems is discussed. The investigations concentrate on rather basic scenarios with canonical targets like flat plates, spheres, corner reflectors and cylinders. First

  15. Preliminary Evaluation of the SMAP Radiometer Soil Moisture Product over China Using In Situ Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yayong Sun

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP satellite makes coincident global measurements of soil moisture using an L-band radar instrument and an L-band radiometer. It is crucial to evaluate the errors in the newest L-band SMAP satellite-derived soil moisture products, before they are routinely used in scientific research and applications. This study represents the first evaluation of the SMAP radiometer soil moisture product over China. In this paper, a preliminary evaluation was performed using sparse in situ measurements from 655 China Meteorological Administration (CMA monitoring stations between 1 April 2015 and 31 August 2016. The SMAP radiometer-derived soil moisture product was evaluated against two schemes of original soil moisture and the soil moisture anomaly in different geographical zones and land cover types. Four performance metrics, i.e., bias, root mean square error (RMSE, unbiased root mean square error (ubRMSE, and the correlation coefficient (R, were used in the accuracy evaluation. The results indicated that the SMAP radiometer-derived soil moisture product agreed relatively well with the in situ measurements, with ubRMSE values of 0.058 cm3·cm−3 and 0.039 cm3·cm−3 based on original data and anomaly data, respectively. The values of the SMAP radiometer-based soil moisture product were overestimated in wet areas, especially in the Southwest China, South China, Southeast China, East China, and Central China zones. The accuracies over croplands and in Northeast China were the worst. Soil moisture, surface roughness, and vegetation are crucial factors contributing to the error in the soil moisture product. Moreover, radio frequency interference contributes to the overestimation over the northern portion of the East China zone. This study provides guidelines for the application of the SMAP-derived soil moisture product in China and acts as a reference for improving the retrieval algorithm.

  16. Millimeter wave radiometer installation in Río Gallegos, southern Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orte, P. F.; Salvador, J.; Wolfram, E.; D'Elia, R.; Nagahama, T.; Kojima, Y.; Tanada, R.; Kuwahara, T.; Morihira, A.; Quel, E.; Mizuno, A.

    2011-05-01

    With the aim of contribution to the study of atmospheric ozone layer, a new sensitive radiometer for atmospheric minor constituents has been installed in the Observatorio Atmosférico de la Patagonia Austral, División LIDAR, CEILAP (CITEDEF-CONICET), in October 2010. This observatory is established in the city of Rio Gallegos (51° 36' S, 69° 19' W), Argentina, close to the spring ozone hole. The millimeter wave radiometer was developed in STEL (Solar Terrestrial Environment Laboratory), Nagoya University, Japan. This passive remote sensing instrument is able to measure the ozone (O3) amount in the high stratosphere and mesosphere continuously and automatically with a high time resolution. The millimeter wave radiometer ozone profiles will be supplemented with the ozone profiles obtained from the DIAL system existent in the observatory. The millimeter wave radiometer is based on the spectral signal detection from the atmosphere due to the molecular rotational transition of molecules under study. The operation is based on a superheterodyne system which uses a Superconductor-Insulator-Superconductor (SIS) mixer receiver operating at 203.6GHz. The SIS mixer junction consists of a sandwich structure of Nb/AlOx/Nb, and is cooled to 4.2K with a closed cycle He-gas refrigerator. Two additional heterodyne-mixed stages are realized with the aim to shift the measured spectral line until a frequency around of 500 MHz. A FFT (Fast Fourier Transform) spectrometer system is used as a back end. The aims of this work are to show the potential of the millimeter wave radiometer installed in the subpolar latitudes close to the polar ozone hole and to present the preliminary result of the first measurements.

  17. Comparing the Accuracy of AMSRE, AMSR2, SSMI and SSMIS Satellite Radiometer Ice Concentration Products with One-Meter Resolution Visible Imagery in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, E. R.; Stanton, T. P.

    2016-12-01

    Determining ice concentration in the Arctic is necessary to track significant changes in sea ice edge extent. Sea ice concentrations are also needed to interpret data collected by in-situ instruments like buoys, as the amount of ice versus water in a given area determines local solar heating. Ice concentration products are now routinely derived from satellite radiometers including the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for the Earth Observing System (AMSR-E), the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2), the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSMI), and the Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS). While these radiometers are viewed as reliable to monitor long-term changes in sea ice extent, their accuracy should be analyzed, and compared to determine which radiometer performs best over smaller features such as melt ponds, and how seasonal conditions affect accuracy. Knowledge of the accuracy of radiometers at high resolution can help future researchers determine which radiometer to use, and be aware of radiometer shortcomings in different ice conditions. This will be especially useful when interpreting data from in-situ instruments which deal with small scale measurements. In order to compare these passive microwave radiometers, selected high spatial resolution one-meter resolution Medea images, archived at the Unites States Geological Survey, are used for ground truth comparison. Sea ice concentrations are derived from these images in an interactive process, although estimates are not perfect ground truth due to exposure of images, shadowing and cloud cover. 68 images are retrieved from the USGS website and compared with 9 useable, collocated SSMI, 33 SSMIS, 36 AMSRE, and 14 AMSR2 ice concentrations in the Arctic Ocean. We analyze and compare the accuracy of radiometer instrumentation in differing ice conditions.

  18. Conceptual radiometer design studies for Earth observations from low Earth orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Richard F.

    1994-01-01

    A conceptual radiometer design study was performed to determine the optimum design approach for spaceborne radiometers in low Earth orbit. Radiometric system configurations which included total power radiometers, unbalanced Dicke radiometers, and balanced Dicke, or as known as noise injection, radiometers were studied. Radiometer receiver configurations which were analyzed included the direct detection radiometer receiver, the double sideband homodyne radiometer receiver, and the single sideband heterodyne radiometer receiver. Radiometer system performance was also studied. This included radiometric sensitivity analysis of the three different radiometer system configurations studied. Both external and internal calibration techniques were analyzed. An accuracy analysis with and without mismatch losses was performed. It was determined that the balanced Dicke radiometer system configuration with direct detection receivers and external calibrations was optimum where frequent calibration such as once per minute were not feasible.

  19. Microfluidic Radiometal Labeling Systems for Biomolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichert, D E; Kenis, P J. A.

    2011-12-29

    In a typical labeling procedure with radiometals, such as Cu-64 and Ga-68; a very large (~ 100-fold) excess of the non-radioactive reactant (precursor) is used to promote rapid and efficient incorporation of the radioisotope into the PET imaging agent. In order to achieve high specific activities, careful control of reaction conditions and extensive chromatographic purifications are required in order to separate the labeled compounds from the cold precursors. Here we propose a microfluidic approach to overcome these problems, and achieve high specific activities in a more convenient, semi-automated fashion and faster time frame. Microfluidic reactors, consisting of a network of micron-sized channels (typical dimensions in the range 10 - 300¼m), filters, separation columns, electrodes and reaction loops/chambers etched onto a solid substrate, are now emerging as an extremely useful technology for the intensification and miniaturization of chemical processes. The ability to manipulate, process and analyze reagent concentrations and reaction interfaces in both space and time within the channel network of a microreactor provides the fine level of reaction control that is desirable in PET radiochemistry practice. These factors can bring radiometal labeling, specifically the preparation of radio-labeled biomolecules such as antibodies, much closer to their theoretical maximum specific activities.

  20. A novel L-band polarimetric radiometer featuring subharmonic sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rotbøll, J.; Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl; Skou, Niels

    2003-01-01

    A novel L-band radiometer trading analog components for digital circuits has been designed, built and operated. It is a fully polarimetric radiometer of the correlation type, and it is based on the subharmonic sampling principle in which the L-band signal is directly sampled by a fast A to D...

  1. L-Band Polarimetric Correlation Radiometer with Subharmonic Sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rotbøll, Jesper; Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl; Skou, Niels

    2001-01-01

    A novel L-band radiometer trading analog complexity for digital ditto has been designed and built. It is a fully polarimetric radiometer of the correlation type and it is based on the sub-harmonic sampling principle in which the L-band signal is directly sampled by a fast A to D converter...

  2. GHRSST Level 3U Global Subskin Sea Surface Temperature from the WindSat Polarimetric Radiometer on the Coriolis satellite (GDS version 2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The WindSat Polarimetric Radiometer, launched on January 6, 2003 aboard the Department of Defense Coriolis satellite, was designed to measure the ocean surface wind...

  3. SMEX03 Aircraft Polarimetric Scanning Radiometer (PSR) Data, Alabama, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Polarimetric Scanning Radiometer (PSR) is an airborne microwave imaging radiometer developed and operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration...

  4. SHADOWS: spectrogonio radiometer for bidirectional reflectance studies of dark meteorites and terrestrial analogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potin, S.; Beck, P.; Schmitt, B.; Brissaud, O.

    2017-09-01

    A new spectrogonio radiometer SHADOWS is designed for the spectral bidirectional reflectance study of dark surfaces. Its official delivery as an European simulation facility within the Europlanet 2020 RI program is set late August 2017. This abstract presents a general description of the instrument, and some of its measurements modes. Test spectra measured with the instrument's prototype on challenging dark surfaces (Spectral Black, Metal Velvet and Vantablack) are then presented.

  5. Four absolute cavity radiometer (pyrheliometer) intercomparisons at New River, Arizona: radiometer standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estey, R.S.; Seaman, C.H.

    1981-07-01

    Four detailed intercomparisons were made for a number of models of cavity-type self-calibrating radiometers (pyrheliometers). Each intercomparison consisted of simultaneous readings of pyrheliometers at 30-second intervals in runs of 10 minutes, with at least 15 runs per intercomparison. Twenty-seven instruments were in at least one intercomparison, and five were in all four. Summarized results and all raw data are provided from the intercomparisons.

  6. Bias characteristics of temperature and relative humidity retrieved by microwave radiometer in Naqu region over the Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, W.

    2016-12-01

    Radiosonde is the most basic method to measure the atmospheric temperature and humidity profiles with very coarse temporal resolution (2-4 times per day for conventional observation). But multiple simultaneous profiles of temperature, humidity, and so on can be obtained in 2-3 minutes temporal resolution with the microwave radiometer. In the third Tibetan Plateau experiment of Atmospheric Scientific organized by the Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences, synergic observations by ground-based multi-band radars and other detection equipments were used to study the microphysical processes of cloud and precipitation in Naqu area on the Tibetan Plateau. In this paper, profiles of temperature and relative humidity retrieved by microwave radiometer in different observation modes (zenith observation and off-zenith observation modes) are compared with collocated radiosondes during the summer period from 2014 to 2015 in Naqu region for different weather conditions defined by the data of millimeter wave cloud radar and raindrop spectrum. Three methods to compare the observation between microwave radiometer and radiosonde are temporal-spatial precision matching method, nearest temporal matching method and average profile method. The results show that: 1. Average profile method has the minimum difference between microwave radiometer retrievals and collocated sounding observation. 2. Profiles of temperature and relative humidity retrieved by microwave radiometer under zenith observation model and collocated sounding observation are more consistent under the condition of non-precipitation cloud than other weather conditions (clear sky and precipitation cloud). 3. Compared to zenith observation mode, the retrievals from the off-zenith observation mode of the microwave radiometer has a reasonable accuracy against the sounding observation. 4. In contract with cloudy sky, the retrievals by microwave radiometer and the sounding observation has the highest bias under the weather

  7. Stable Targets for Spaceborne Microwave Radiometer Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njoku, Eni G.; Chan, S. K.; Armstrong, R. L.; Brodzik, M. J.; Savoie, M. H.; Knowles, K.

    2006-01-01

    Beginning in the 1970s, continuous observations of the Earth have been made by spaceborne microwave radiometers. Since these instruments have different observational characteristics, care must be taken in combining their data to form consistent long term records of brightness temperatures and derived geophysical quantities. To be useful for climate studies, data from different instruments must be calibrated relative to each other and to reference targets on the ground whose characteristics are stable and can be monitored continuously. Identifying such targets over land is not straightforward due to the heterogeneity and complexity of the land surface and cover. In this work, we provide an analysis of multi-sensor brightness temperature statistics over ocean, tropical forest, and ice sheet locations, spanning the period from 1978 to the present, and indicate the potential of these sites as continuous calibration monitoring targets.

  8. Ozone height profiles using laser heterodyne radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, S. L.

    1994-01-01

    The monitoring of vertical profiles of ozone and related minor constituents in the atmosphere are of great significance to understanding the complex interaction between atmospheric dynamics, chemistry and radiation budget. An ultra high spectral resolution tunable CO2 laser heterodyne radiometer has been designed, developed and set up at the National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi to obtain vertical profiles of various minor constituents the characteristic absorption lines in 9 to 11 micron spectral range. Due to its high spectral resolution the lines can be resolved completely and data obtained are inverted to get vertical profiles using an inversion technique developed by the author. In the present communication the salient features of the laser heterodyne system and the results obtained are discussed in detail.

  9. Development of the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) radiometer derived landscape freeze/thaw product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colliander, A.; Xu, X.; Dunbar, R. S.; Derksen, C.; Kim, Y.; Kimball, J. S.

    2016-12-01

    A baseline SMAP mission objective was to determine the land surface binary freeze/thaw (FT) state for northern (>45°N) regions with 80% spatial classification accuracy at 3 km resolution and 2-day average intervals. These requirements were initially achieved from the SMAP radar until the sensor failed in July 2015. The FT algorithm is now transitioning to using SMAP radiometer inputs. The main compromises of this change are a coarse (36 km) radiometer footprint, enhanced noise and potential FT signal degradation from seasonal vegetation biomass, soil moisture and surface inundation changes. The new daily passive FT product (L3_FT_P) is based on the same seasonal threshold algorithm as the radar derived product (L3_FT_A): instantaneous SMAP measurements are compared to reference signatures acquired during seasonal frozen and thawed states. Instead of radar inputs, the normalized polarization ratio (NPR) is calculated from SMAP radiometer measurements. The L3_FT_P algorithm is applied using NPR inputs, whereby NPR decreases and increases are associated with respective landscape freezing and thawing. A lower NPR under frozen conditions is due to smaller V-pol brightness temperature increases and larger H-pol increases. Using in situ measurements from core validation sites, the temporal behavior of backscatter and NPR measurements were evaluated during the spring 2015 radar and radiometer overlap period. The transition from frozen to thawed states produced a NPR response similar in timing and magnitude to the radar response, resulting in similar freeze to thaw seasonal transition dates. While the post-thaw radar backscatter consistently remained at elevated values relative to the frozen state, the NPR drifted downwards following the main thaw transition (due to de-polarization of the scene), which may introduce false freeze classification errors. Both radar and radiometer results tended to lead observed soil thawing due to strong sensitivity of the microwave

  10. Assessment of Radiometer Calibration with GPS Radio Occultation for the MiRaTA CubeSat Mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinan, Anne D; Cahoy, Kerri L; Bishop, Rebecca L; Lui, Susan S; Bardeen, James R; Mulligan, Tamitha; Blackwell, William J; Leslie, R Vincent; Osaretin, Idahosa; Shields, Michael

    2016-12-01

    The Microwave Radiometer Technology Acceleration (MiRaTA) is a 3U CubeSat mission sponsored by the NASA Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO). The science payload on MiRaTA consists of a tri-band microwave radiometer and Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (GPSRO) sensor. The microwave radiometer takes measurements of all-weather temperature (V-band, 50-57 GHz), water vapor (G-band, 175-191 GHz), and cloud ice (G-band, 205 GHz) to provide observations used to improve weather forecasting. The Aerospace Corporation's GPSRO experiment, called the Compact TEC (Total Electron Content) and Atmospheric GPS Sensor (CTAGS), measures profiles of temperature and pressure in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (∼20 km) and electron density in the ionosphere (over 100 km). The MiRaTA mission will validate new technologies in both passive microwave radiometry and GPS radio occultation: (1) new ultra-compact and low-power technology for multi-channel and multi-band passive microwave radiometers, (2) the application of a commercial off the shelf (COTS) GPS receiver and custom patch antenna array technology to obtain neutral atmospheric GPSRO retrieval from a nanosatellite, and (3) a new approach to spaceborne microwave radiometer calibration using adjacent GPSRO measurements. In this paper, we focus on objective (3), developing operational models to meet a mission goal of 100 concurrent radiometer and GPSRO measurements, and estimating the temperature measurement precision for the CTAGS instrument based on thermal noise. Based on an analysis of thermal noise of the CTAGS instrument, the expected temperature retrieval precision is between 0.17 K and 1.4 K, which supports the improvement of radiometric calibration to 0.25 K.

  11. Calibration of incandescent lamps for spectral irradiance by means of absolute radiometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, L P

    1980-08-15

    A method for calibrating incandescent lamps for spectral irradiance by means of absolute radiometers is described in which a secondary radiometer is calibrated spectrally against absolute radiometers and then used in conjunction with a series of filters to calibrate the lamps. Considering both narrowband and wideband filters, an extensive mathematical error analysis is performed. The use of narrowband filters (20-25-nm halfwidth) is found to be advantageous because very little information is required on the spectral distribution of the lamp being measured. The most serious source of error is a wavelength shift in the measured spectral transmittances of the filters, especially at shorter avelengths; for example, at 400 nm, a wavelength shift error of 1 nm can cause an error approaching 3%. It is estimated that the accuracy of spectral irradiance measurements made using the method described here will vary between +/-1 and +/-0.5% from ~350 to 800 nm. Measurements on 500-W quartz-bromine spectral irradiance standards are described. With such lamps, only four or five narrowband filters are required to cover the spectral range from the near UV to the near IR. The measured and calibration values agreed to ~ +/-0.5% on average with a maximum difference of ~1%.

  12. A linear model to predict with a multi-spectral radiometer the amount of nitrogen in winter wheat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reyniers, M.; Walvoort, D.J.J.; Baardemaaker, De J.

    2006-01-01

    The objective was to develop an optimal vegetation index (VIopt) to predict with a multi-spectral radiometer nitrogen in wheat crop (kg[N] ha-1). Optimality means that nitrogen in the crop can be measured accurately in the field during the growing season. It also means that the measurements are

  13. Aquarius L-Band Radiometers Calibration Using Cold Sky Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinnat, Emmanuel P.; Le Vine, David M.; Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Brown, Shannon T.; Hong, Liang

    2015-01-01

    An important element in the calibration plan for the Aquarius radiometers is to look at the cold sky. This involves rotating the satellite 180 degrees from its nominal Earth viewing configuration to point the main beams at the celestial sky. At L-band, the cold sky provides a stable, well-characterized scene to be used as a calibration reference. This paper describes the cold sky calibration for Aquarius and how it is used as part of the absolute calibration. Cold sky observations helped establish the radiometer bias, by correcting for an error in the spillover lobe of the antenna pattern, and monitor the long-term radiometer drift.

  14. Analysis of RFI Identification and Mitigation in CAROLS Radiometer Data Using a Hardware Spectrum Analyser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Caudoux

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A method to identify and mitigate radio frequency interference (RFI in microwave radiometry based on the use of a spectrum analyzer has been developed. This method has been tested with CAROLS L-band airborne radiometer data that are strongly corrupted by RFI. RFI is a major limiting factor in passive microwave remote sensing interpretation. Although the 1.400–1.427 GHz bandwidth is protected, RFI sources close to these frequencies are still capable of corrupting radiometric measurements. In order to reduce the detrimental effects of RFI on brightness temperature measurements, a new spectrum analyzer has been added to the CAROLS radiometer system. A post processing algorithm is proposed, based on selective filters within the useful bandwidth divided into sub-bands. Two discriminant analyses based on the computation of kurtosis and Euclidian distances have been compared evaluated and validated in order to accurately separate the RF interference from natural signals.

  15. Intercomparison of stratospheric temperature profiles from a ground-based microwave radiometer with other techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas-Guzmán, Francisco; Kämpfer, Niklaus; Schranz, Franziska; Steinbrecht, Wolfgang; Haefele, Alexander

    2017-11-01

    In this work the stratospheric performance of a relatively new microwave temperature radiometer (TEMPERA) has been evaluated. With this goal in mind, almost 3 years of temperature measurements (January 2014-September 2016) from the TEMPERA radiometer were intercompared with simultaneous measurements from other techniques: radiosondes, MLS satellite and Rayleigh lidar. This intercomparison campaign was carried out at the aerological station of MeteoSwiss at Payerne (Switzerland). In addition, the temperature profiles from TEMPERA were used to validate the temperature outputs from the SD-WACCM model. The results showed in general a very good agreement between TEMPERA and the different instruments and the model, with a high correlation (higher than 0.9) in the temperature evolution at different altitudes between TEMPERA and the different data sets. An annual pattern was observed in the stratospheric temperature with generally higher temperatures in summer than in winter and with a higher variability during winter. A clear change in the tendency of the temperature deviations was detected in summer 2015, which was due to the repair of an attenuator in the TEMPERA spectrometer. The mean and the standard deviations of the temperature differences between TEMPERA and the different measurements were calculated for two periods (before and after the repair) in order to quantify the accuracy and precision of this radiometer over the campaign period. The results showed absolute biases and standard deviations lower than 2 K for most of the altitudes. In addition, comparisons proved the good performance of TEMPERA in measuring the temperature in the stratosphere.

  16. Hurricane Satellite (HURSAT) from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Huricane Satellite (HURSAT)-Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) is used to extend the HURSAT data set such that appling the Objective Dvorak technique...

  17. Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) was successfully launched into sun-synchronous polar orbit aboard Terra, NASA's first Earth Observing System (EOS)...

  18. NAMMA HIGH ALTITUDE MMIC SOUNDING RADIOMETER (HAMSR) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NAMMA High Altitude MMIC Sounding Radiometer (HAMSR) dataset consists of data collected by HAMSR, which is a 25-channel microwave atmospheric sounder operating...

  19. Effect of Chamber Wall Proximity on Radiometer Force Production (Preprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Selden, N. P; Gimelshein, N. E; Gimelshein, S. F; Ketsdever, A. D

    2008-01-01

    ... on a given radiometer configuration in both the free molecule and transitional regimes. The contribution of the chamber walls to both the flowfield structure and radiometric force production were examined for helium, argon, and nitrogen test gases...

  20. Characterization of a Compact Water Vapor Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Ajay; Selina, Rob

    2018-01-01

    We report on laboratory test results of the Compact Water Vapor Radiometer (CWVR) prototype for the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA), a five-channel design centered around the 22 GHz water vapor line. Fluctuations in perceptible water vapor cause fluctuations in atmospheric brightness emission, which are assumed to be proportional to phase fluctuations of the astronomical signal seen by an antenna. The design is intended to support empirical radiometric phase corrections for each baseline in the array.The dynamic range, channel isolation, and gain stability of the device were characterized. The device has a useful dynamic range of order 18 dB after calibration, and the CWVR channel isolation requirement of 102.6 sec. With temperature corrections, the single channel and channel difference gain stability per channel is < 2 x 10-4 over τ = 2.5 - 103 sec, which meets the < 2 x 10-4 requirement. The observable gain stability is < 2.5 x 10-4 over τ = 2.5 - 103 sec, which meets the < 2.5 x 10-4 requirement.Overall, the test results indicate that the CWVR meets required specifications for dynamic range, channel isolation, and gain stability in order to proceed with testing on a pair of VLA antennas.

  1. Bolometric detectors: optimization for differential radiometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glezer, E N; Lange, A E; Wilbanks, T M

    1992-12-01

    A differential radiometer can be constructed by placing two matched bolometric detectors in an ac bridge, thus producing a signal that is proportional to the difference in power incident on the two detectors. In conditions of large and time-varying common-mode radiative load, the common-mode response resulting from imperfectly matched detectors can limit the stability of the difference signal. For semiconductor thermistor bolometers we find that the bridge can always be trimmed to null the common-mode response for a given instantaneous value of the radiative load. However, subsequent changes in the commonmode radiative load change the operating point of the detectors, giving rise to a second-order common-mode response. This response can be minimized by increasing the electrical-power dissipation in the detectors at the cost of sensitivity. For the case that we are analyzing, and for mismatches in detector parameters that are typical of randomly paired detectors, common-mode rejection ratios in excess of 10(3) can be achieved under 20% changes in radiative load.

  2. Large area mapping of southwestern forest crown cover, canopy height, and biomass using the NASA Multiangle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark Chopping; Gretchen G. Moisen; Lihong Su; Andrea Laliberte; Albert Rango; John V. Martonchik; Debra P. C. Peters

    2008-01-01

    A rapid canopy reflectance model inversion experiment was performed using multi-angle reflectance data from the NASA Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR) on the Earth Observing System Terra satellite, with the goal of obtaining measures of forest fractional crown cover, mean canopy height, and aboveground woody biomass for large parts of south-eastern Arizona...

  3. Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Microwave Radiometer Radio-Frequency Interference (RFI) Mitigation: Initial On-Orbit Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Priscilla N.; Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Johnson, Joel T.; Aksoy, Mustafa; Bringer, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, launched in January 2015, provides global measurements of soil moisture using a microwave radiometer. SMAPs radiometer passband lies within the passive frequency allocation. However, both unauthorized in-band transmitters as well as out-of-band emissions from transmitters operating at frequencies adjacent to this allocated spectrum have been documented as sources of radio frequency interference (RFI) to the L-band radiometers on SMOS and Aquarius. The spectral environment consists of high RFI levels as well as significant occurrences of low level RFI equivalent to 0.1 to 10 K. The SMAP ground processor reports the antenna temperature both before and after RFI mitigation is applied. The difference between these quantities represents the detected RFI level. The presentation will review the SMAP RFI detection and mitigation procedure and discuss early on-orbit RFI measurements from the SMAP radiometer. Assessments of global RFI properties and source types will be provided, as well as the implications of these results for SMAP soil moisture measurements.

  4. The Cubesat Radiometer Radio Frequency Interference Technology Validation (CubeRRT) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, S.; Johnson, J. T.; Ball, C.; Chen, C. C.; Smith, G.; McKelvey, C.; Andrews, M.; O'Brien, A.; Kocz, J.; Jarnot, R.; Brown, S. T.; Piepmeier, J. R.; Lucey, J.; Miles, L. R.; Bradley, D.; Mohammed, P.

    2016-12-01

    Passive microwave measurements made below 40GHz have experienced increased amounts of man-made radio frequency interference (RFI) over the past couple of decades. Such RFI has had a degenerative impact on various important geophysical retrievals such as soil-moisture, sea-surface salinity, atmospheric water vapor, precipitation etc. The commercial demand for spectrum allocation has increased over the past couple of years - infringing on frequencies traditionally reserved for scientific uses such as Earth observation at passive microwave frequencies. With the current trend in shared spectrum allocations, future microwave radiometers will have to co-exist with terrestrial RFI sources. The CubeSat Radiometer Radio Frequency Interference Technology Validation (CubeRRT) mission is developing a 6U Cubesat system to demonstrate RFI detection and filtering technologies for future microwave radiometer remote sensing missions. CubeRRT will operate between 6-40GHz, and demonstrate on-board real-time RFI detection on Earth brightness temperatures tuned over 1GHz steps. The expected launch date for CubeRRT is early 2018. Digital subsystems for higher frequency microwave radiometry require a larger bandwidth, as well as more processing power and on-board operation capabilities for RFI filtering. Real-time and on-board RFI filtering technology development is critical for future missions to allow manageable downlink data volumes. The enabling CubeRRT technology is a digital FPGA-based spectrometer with a bandwidth of 1 GHz that is capable of implementing advanced RFI filtering algorithms that use the kurtosis and cross-frequency RFI detection methods in real-time on board the spacecraft. The CubeRRT payload consists of 3 subsystems: a wideband helical antenna, a tunable analog radiometer subsystem, and a digital backend. The following presentation will present an overview of the system and results from the latest integration and test.

  5. Time series inversion of spectra from ground-based radiometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Christensen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Retrieving time series of atmospheric constituents from ground-based spectrometers often requires different temporal averaging depending on the altitude region in focus. This can lead to several datasets existing for one instrument, which complicates validation and comparisons between instruments. This paper puts forth a possible solution by incorporating the temporal domain into the maximum a posteriori (MAP retrieval algorithm. The state vector is increased to include measurements spanning a time period, and the temporal correlations between the true atmospheric states are explicitly specified in the a priori uncertainty matrix. This allows the MAP method to effectively select the best temporal smoothing for each altitude, removing the need for several datasets to cover different altitudes. The method is compared to traditional averaging of spectra using a simulated retrieval of water vapour in the mesosphere. The simulations show that the method offers a significant advantage compared to the traditional method, extending the sensitivity an additional 10 km upwards without reducing the temporal resolution at lower altitudes. The method is also tested on the Onsala Space Observatory (OSO water vapour microwave radiometer confirming the advantages found in the simulation. Additionally, it is shown how the method can interpolate data in time and provide diagnostic values to evaluate the interpolated data.

  6. Jupiter's global ammonia distribution inferred from Juno Microwave Radiometer Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng; Ingersoll, Andrew; Ewald, Shawn; Oyafuso, Fabiano; Janssen, Michael

    2017-04-01

    The Juno microwave radiometer (Juno/MWR) has made several observations of Jupiter's atmosphere by measuring the thermal emission from pressure levels down to a few hundred bars. The main objective of Juno/MWR is to determine Jupiter's deep water abundance because water is the key to understand Jovian meteorology that we observe at the cloud level, and because the deep water abundance hints at a giant planet's volatile and heavy element history. Since ammonia is the major opacity source in the Juno/MWR channels, it is especially important to figure out the ammonia distribution before we can conclude anything on the water abundance. At this stage of our analysis, we have inverted a global map (vertical and latitudinal) of ammonia distribution from the observed brightness temperatures at six wavelengths using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique. This method fully calibrates error and explores a wide range of the parameter space to avoid falling into a local minimum. The robustness of the retrieval is explained by matching the features in the ammonia distribution with the features in the microwave spectra. We will also announce the initial result of the retrieval of water abundance using the same technique.

  7. Polarimetric characteristics of a class of hyperspectral radiometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talone, Marco; Zibordi, Giuseppe

    2016-12-10

    The polarimetric characteristics of a class of hyperspectral radiometers commonly applied for above-water radiometry have been investigated by analyzing a sample of sensors. Results indicate polarization sensitivity increasing with wavelength and exhibiting values varying from sensor to sensor. In the case of radiance sensors, the maximum differences increase from approximately 0.4% at 400 nm to 1.3% at 750 nm. In the case of irradiance sensors, due to depolarizing effects of the diffusing collector, the maximum differences between horizontal and vertical polarization sensitivities vary from approximately 0.3% at 400 nm to 0.6% at 750 nm. Application of the previous results to above-water radiometry measurements performed in sediment dominated waters indicates that neglecting polarization effects may lead to uncertainties not exceeding a few tenths of a percent in remote sensing reflectance RRS determined in the 400-570 nm spectral interval. Conversely, uncertainties spectrally increase toward the near infrared, reaching several percent at 750 nm in the case of oligotrophic waters.

  8. Assessing the accuracy of microwave radiometers and radio acoustic sounding systems for wind energy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Laura; Friedrich, Katja; Wilczak, James M.; Hazen, Duane; Wolfe, Daniel; Delgado, Ruben; Oncley, Steven P.; Lundquist, Julie K.

    2017-05-01

    To assess current remote-sensing capabilities for wind energy applications, a remote-sensing system evaluation study, called XPIA (eXperimental Planetary boundary layer Instrument Assessment), was held in the spring of 2015 at NOAA's Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) facility. Several remote-sensing platforms were evaluated to determine their suitability for the verification and validation processes used to test the accuracy of numerical weather prediction models.The evaluation of these platforms was performed with respect to well-defined reference systems: the BAO's 300 m tower equipped at six levels (50, 100, 150, 200, 250, and 300 m) with 12 sonic anemometers and six temperature (T) and relative humidity (RH) sensors; and approximately 60 radiosonde launches.In this study we first employ these reference measurements to validate temperature profiles retrieved by two co-located microwave radiometers (MWRs) as well as virtual temperature (Tv) measured by co-located wind profiling radars equipped with radio acoustic sounding systems (RASSs). Results indicate a mean absolute error (MAE) in the temperature retrieved by the microwave radiometers below 1.5 K in the lowest 5 km of the atmosphere and a mean absolute error in the virtual temperature measured by the radio acoustic sounding systems below 0.8 K in the layer of the atmosphere covered by these measurements (up to approximately 1.6-2 km). We also investigated the benefit of the vertical velocity correction applied to the speed of sound before computing the virtual temperature by the radio acoustic sounding systems. We find that using this correction frequently increases the RASS error, and that it should not be routinely applied to all data.Water vapor density (WVD) profiles measured by the MWRs were also compared with similar measurements from the soundings, showing the capability of MWRs to follow the vertical profile measured by the sounding and finding a mean absolute error below 0.5 g m-3 in the lowest

  9. Spatiotemporal Variability of Earth's Radiation Balance Components from Russian Radiometer IKOR-M

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherviakov, M.

    2016-12-01

    The radiometer IKOR-M was created in National Research Saratov State University for satellite monitoring of the outgoing reflected short-wave radiation, which is one of the components of Earth's radiation budget. Such information can be used in different models of long-term weather forecasts, in researches of climate change trends and in calculation of absorbed solar radiation values and albedo of the Earth-atmosphere system. The IKOR-M product archive is available online at all times. A searchable catalogue of data products is continually updated and users may search and download data products via the Earth radiation balance components research laboratory website as soon as they become available. Two series of measurements from two different IKOR-M are available. The first radiometer had worked from October 2009 to August 2014 and second - from August 2014 to the present. Therefore, there is a period when both radiometers work at the same time. Top-of-atmosphere fluxes deduced from the "Meteor-M" No 1 measurement in August, 2014 show very good agreement with the fluxes determined from "Meteor-M" No 2. The scale relationship of the IKOR-M radiometers on "Meteor - M" No 1 and No 2 satellites found by comparing of the global distribution maps for monthly averaged albedo values. The seasonal and interannual variations of OSR, albedo and ASR were discussed. The variations between SW radiation budget components seem to be within observational uncertainty and natural variability governed by cloudiness, water vapor and aerosol variations. It was assessed spatial and temporal variations of albedo and the absorbed solar radiation over different regions. Latitudinal distributions of albedo and ASR were estimated in more detail. Meridional cross sections over oceans and land were used separately for this estimation. It was shown that the albedo and ASR data received from the radiometer IKOR-M can be used to detect El Nino in the Pacific Ocean. The reported study was funded by

  10. Validation of stratospheric temperature profiles from a ground-based microwave radiometer with other techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas, Francisco; Kämpfer, Niklaus; Haefele, Alexander; Keckhut, Philippe; Hauchecorne, Alain

    2016-04-01

    Vertical profiles of atmospheric temperature trends has become recognized as an important indicator of climate change, because different climate forcing mechanisms exhibit distinct vertical warming and cooling patterns. For example, the cooling of the stratosphere is an indicator for climate change as it provides evidence of natural and anthropogenic climate forcing just like surface warming. Despite its importance, our understanding of the observed stratospheric temperature trend and our ability to test simulations of the stratospheric response to emissions of greenhouse gases and ozone depleting substances remains limited. One of the main reason is because stratospheric long-term datasets are sparse and obtained trends differ from one another. Different techniques allow to measure stratospheric temperature profiles as radiosonde, lidar or satellite. The main advantage of microwave radiometers against these other instruments is a high temporal resolution with a reasonable good spatial resolution. Moreover, the measurement at a fixed location allows to observe local atmospheric dynamics over a long time period, which is crucial for climate research. This study presents an evaluation of the stratospheric temperature profiles from a newly ground-based microwave temperature radiometer (TEMPERA) which has been built and designed at the University of Bern. The measurements from TEMPERA are compared with the ones from other different techniques such as in-situ (radiosondes), active remote sensing (lidar) and passive remote sensing on board of Aura satellite (MLS) measurements. In addition a statistical analysis of the stratospheric temperature obtained from TEMPERA measurements during four years of data has been performed. This analysis evidenced the capability of TEMPERA radiometer to monitor the temperature in the stratosphere for a long-term. The detection of some singular sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) during the analyzed period shows the necessity of these

  11. Self-shading correction for oceanographic upwelling radiometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leathers, Robert; Downes, Trijntje; Mobley, Cutris

    2004-10-04

    We present the derivation of an analytical model for the self-shading error of an oceanographic upwelling radiometer. The radiometer is assumed to be cylindrical and can either be a profiling instrument or include a wider cylindrical buoy for floating at the sea surface. The model treats both optically shallow and optically deep water conditions and can be applied any distance off the seafloor. We evaluate the model by comparing its results to those from Monte Carlo simulations. The analytical model performs well over a large range of environmental conditions and provides a significant improvement to previous analytical models. The model is intended for investigators who need to apply self-shading corrections to radiometer data but who do not have the ability to compute shading corrections with Monte Carlo simulations. The model also can provide guidance for instrument design and cruise planning.

  12. Design and calibration of field deployable ground-viewing radiometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Nikolaus; Czapla-Myers, Jeffrey; Leisso, Nathan; Biggar, Stuart; Burkhart, Charles; Kingston, Rob; Thome, Kurtis

    2013-01-10

    Three improved ground-viewing radiometers were built to support the Radiometric Calibration Test Site (RadCaTS) developed by the Remote Sensing Group (RSG) at the University of Arizona. Improved over previous light-emitting diode based versions, these filter-based radiometers employ seven silicon detectors and one InGaAs detector covering a wavelength range of 400-1550 nm. They are temperature controlled and designed for greater stability and lower noise. The radiometer systems show signal-to-noise ratios of greater than 1000 for all eight channels at typical field calibration signal levels. Predeployment laboratory radiance calibrations using a 1 m spherical integrating source compare well with in situ field calibrations using the solar radiation based calibration method; all bands are within ±2.7% for the case tested.

  13. Preliminary Design of the Brazilian's National Institute for Space Research Broadband Radiometer for Solar Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berni, L. A.; Vieira, L. E. A.; Savonov, G. S.; Dal Lago, A.; Mendes, O.; Silva, M. R.; Guarnieri, F.; Sampaio, M.; Barbosa, M. J.; Vilas Boas, J. V.; Branco, R. H. F.; Nishimori, M.; Silva, L. A.; Carlesso, F.; Rodríguez Gómez, J. M.; Alves, L. R.; Vaz Castilho, B.; Santos, J.; Silva Paula, A.; Cardoso, F.

    2017-10-01

    The Total Solar Irradiance (TSI), which is the total radiation arriving at Earth's atmosphere from the Sun, is one of the most important forcing of the Earths climate. Measurements of the TSI have been made employing instruments on board several space-based platforms during the last four solar cycles. However, combining these measurements is still challenging due to the degradation of the sensor elements and the long-term stability of the electronics. Here we describe the preliminary efforts to design an absolute radiometer based on the principle of electrical substitution that is under development at Brazilian's National Institute for Space Research (INPE).

  14. Sources of errors in the measurements of underwater profiling radiometer

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Silveira, N.; Suresh, T.; Talaulikar, M.; Desa, E.; Matondkar, S.G.P.; Lotlikar, A.

    at the surface layers, sea state conditions which may affect the tilt of the instrument, atmospheric conditions such as cloud cover, solar elevation, wind and rain. Radiometric optical data in water could also get affected due to Raman scattering and fluorescence...

  15. GPM GROUND VALIDATION CONICAL SCANNING MILLIMETER-WAVE IMAGING RADIOMETER (COSMIR) GCPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Conical Scanning Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer (COSMIR) GCPEx dataset used the Conical Scanning Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer...

  16. Novel Low-Impact Integration of a Microwave Radiometer into Cloud Radar System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The radiometer channel will have significant filtering to reduce the contamination of the radar signal into the radiometer channels.The successful isolation between...

  17. HURRICANE AND SEVERE STORM SENTINEL (HS3) HURRICANE IMAGING RADIOMETER (HIRAD) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) was collected by the Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD), which was a multi-band...

  18. Cloud Absorption Radiometer Autonomous Navigation System - CANS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahle, Duncan; Gatebe, Charles; McCune, Bill; Hellwig, Dustan

    2013-01-01

    CAR (cloud absorption radiometer) acquires spatial reference data from host aircraft navigation systems. This poses various problems during CAR data reduction, including navigation data format, accuracy of position data, accuracy of airframe inertial data, and navigation data rate. Incorporating its own navigation system, which included GPS (Global Positioning System), roll axis inertia and rates, and three axis acceleration, CANS expedites data reduction and increases the accuracy of the CAR end data product. CANS provides a self-contained navigation system for the CAR, using inertial reference and GPS positional information. The intent of the software application was to correct the sensor with respect to aircraft roll in real time based upon inputs from a precision navigation sensor. In addition, the navigation information (including GPS position), attitude data, and sensor position details are all streamed to a remote system for recording and later analysis. CANS comprises a commercially available inertial navigation system with integral GPS capability (Attitude Heading Reference System AHRS) integrated into the CAR support structure and data system. The unit is attached to the bottom of the tripod support structure. The related GPS antenna is located on the P-3 radome immediately above the CAR. The AHRS unit provides a RS-232 data stream containing global position and inertial attitude and velocity data to the CAR, which is recorded concurrently with the CAR data. This independence from aircraft navigation input provides for position and inertial state data that accounts for very small changes in aircraft attitude and position, sensed at the CAR location as opposed to aircraft state sensors typically installed close to the aircraft center of gravity. More accurate positional data enables quicker CAR data reduction with better resolution. The CANS software operates in two modes: initialization/calibration and operational. In the initialization/calibration mode

  19. Long-term temporal stability of the National Institute of Standards and Technology spectral irradiance scale determined with absolute filter radiometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Howard W; Gibson, Charles E

    2002-10-01

    The temporal stability of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) spectral irradiance scale as measured with broadband filter radiometers calibrated for absolute spectral irradiance responsivity is described. The working standard free-electron laser (FEL) lamps and the check standard FEL lamps have been monitored with radiometers in the ultraviolet and the visible wavelength regions. The measurements made with these two radiometers reveal that the NIST spectral irradiance scale as compared with an absolute thermodynamic scale has not changed by more than 1.5% in the visible from 1993 to 1999. Similar measurements in the ultraviolet reveal that the corresponding change is less than 1.5% from 1995 to 1999. Furthermore, a check of the spectral irradiance scale by six different filter radiometers calibrated for absolute spectral irradiance responsivity based on the high-accuracy cryogenic radiometer shows that the agreement between the present scale and the detector-based scale is better than 1.3% throughout the visible to the near-infrared wavelength region. These results validate the assigned spectral irradiance of the widely disseminated NIST or NIST-traceable standard sources.

  20. Development and qualification of the conveyable thermal infrared field radiometer CLIMAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietras, Christophe M.; Haeffelin, Martial P.; Legrand, Michel; Brogniez, Gerard; Abuhassan, Nader K.; Buis, Jean P.

    1995-12-01

    The radiometer CLIMAT is a highly sensitive field instrument designed for multispectral thermal infrared measurements. Ground-based measurements can be performed. but the instrument has capabilities for operating from aircraft or balloon. The optics consist of an objective lens and a condenser mounted according to the Koehler principle to provide uniform irradiation over the detector surface. The radiometric signal is treated by a fast thermopile detector characterized by a low noise and a very weak temperature dependence of its responsivity. The managing system allows either manual or automated measurements. The energy consumption of the instrument is optimized for a maximum autonomy. The optical and electrical units of the instrument are described. Different experimental studies for measuring the sensitivity accuracy, spectral characteristics, thermal behavior and, field of view of the instrument are described. The instrument is dedicated to ground and vegetation on the one hand. and on the other hand, clouds and atmospheric soundings. The radiometer is also designed for calibrations or analyses of satellite radiometry data. Some atmospheric measurements obtained with a prototype are presented. Prospects are the development and the qualification of a narrow field-of-view instrument adapted to inhomogeneous targets such as cirrus clouds. A 3.7-tim channel and an internal blackbody are under study.

  1. A New Way to Demonstrate the Radiometer as a Heat Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hladkouski, V. I.; Pinchuk, A. I.

    2015-01-01

    While the radiometer is readily available as a toy, A. E. Woodruff notes that it is also a very useful tool to help us understand how to resolve certain scientific problems. Many physicists think they know how the radiometer works, but only a few actually understand it. Here we present a demonstration that shows that a radiometer can be thought of…

  2. Processor breadboard for on-board RFI detection and mitigation in MetOp-SG radiometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels; Kristensen, Steen S.; Kovanen, Arhippa

    2015-01-01

    Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) is an increasing threat to proper operation of space-borne Earth viewing microwave radiometer systems. There is a steady growth in active services, and tougher requirements to sensitivity and fidelity of future radiometer systems. Thus it has been decided...... to ground at the modest data rate usually associated with radiometer systems....

  3. Design of a Push-Broom Multi-Beam Radiometer for Future Ocean Observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cappellin, C.; Pontoppidan, K.; Nielsen, P. H.

    2015-01-01

    The design of a push-broom multi-beam radiometer for future ocean observations is described. The radiometer provides a sensitivity one order of magnitude higher than a traditional conical scanning radiometer, and has the big advantage of being fully stationary relative to the satellite platform...

  4. Total column water vapor estimation over land using radiometer data from SAC-D/Aquarius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epeloa, Javier; Meza, Amalia

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study is retrieving atmospheric total column water vapor (CWV) over land surfaces using a microwave radiometer (MWR) onboard the Scientific Argentine Satellite (SAC-D/Aquarius). To research this goal, a statistical algorithm is used for the purpose of filtering the study region according to the climate type. A log-linear relationship between the brightness temperatures of the MWR and CWV obtained from Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) measurements was used. In this statistical algorithm, the retrieved CWV is derived from the Argentinian radiometer's brightness temperature which works at 23.8 GHz and 36.5 GHz, and taking into account CWVs observed from GNSS stations belonging to a region sharing the same climate type. We support this idea, having found a systematic effect when applying the algorithm; it was generated for one region using the previously mentioned criteria, however, it should be applied to additional regions, especially those with other climate types. The region we analyzed is in the Southeastern United States of America, where the climate type is Cfa (Köppen - Geiger classification); this climate type includes moist subtropical mid-latitude climates, with hot, muggy summers and frequent thunderstorms. However, MWR only contains measurements taken from over ocean surfaces; therefore the determination of water vapor over land is an important contribution to extend the use of the SAC-D/Aquarius radiometer measurements beyond the ocean surface. The CWVs computed by our algorithm are compared against radiosonde CWV observations and show a bias of about -0.6 mm, a root mean square (rms) of about 6 mm and a correlation of 0.89.

  5. Moisture Retrievals from the Windsat spaceborne polarimetric microwave radiometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parinussa, R.M.; Holmes, T.R.H.; de Jeu, R.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    An existing methodology to derive surface soil moisture from passive microwave satellite observations is applied to the WindSat multifrequency polarimetric microwave radiometer. The methodology is a radiative-transfer-based model that has successfully been applied to a series of (historical)

  6. Calibration of the solar UV radiometers in Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leszczynski, K.; Jokela, K.; Visuri, R.; Ylianttila, L. [Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, Helsinki (Finland). Non-Ionizing Radiation Lab.

    1996-12-31

    In this report, the main emphasis is given to (1) the problems associated with the basic calibration of the spectroradiometer and (2) the year-to-year variability of the calibrations of the solar UV network radiometers. Also, the results from intercomparisons of the Brewer and OL 742 spectroradiometers are included

  7. The design of an in-water optical radiometer

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Desa, E.S.; Desa, B.A.E.; DeSa, E.J.

    and downwelling spectral irradiance over an effective dynamic range greater than six decades and with a spectral resolution of 2nm. The emergence of a new generation of radiometers is now practically possible with the advent of scientific grade CCD (charged couple...

  8. A comparison of ultraviolet radiometers' long-term performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper we present a comparison of the performance characteristics of two types of broad-band ultraviolet radiometers. The first type of instrument is manufactured by Eppley Laboratories of the USA and the second type is manufactured by Kipp and Zonen of Holland. The results presented in this paper are for a ...

  9. Evolution and design characteristics of the microwave radiometer spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    The evolution of the design of the microwave radiometer spacecraft from conception to preliminary design is described. Alternatives and tradeoff rationale are described, and the configuration and structural design features that were developed and refined during the design processes are presented for the three structural configurations studied (two geodesic trusses and a flexible catenary).

  10. Topographic Signatures in Aquarius Radiometer/Scatterometer Response: Initial Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utku, C.; LeVine, D. M.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of topography on remote sensing at L-band is examined using the co-located Aquarius radiometer and scatterometer observations over land. A correlation with slope standard deviation is demonstrated for both the radiometer and scatterometer at topographic scales. Although the goal of Aquarius is remote sensing of sea surface salinity, the radiometer and scatterometer are on continuously and collect data for remote sensing research over land. Research is reported here using the data over land to determine if topography could have impact on the passive remote sensing at L-band. In this study, we report observations from two study regions: North Africa between 15 deg and 30 deg Northern latitudes and Australia less the Tasmania Island. Common to these two regions are the semi-arid climate and low population density; both favorable conditions to isolate the effect of topography from other sources of scatter and emission such as vegetation and urban areas. Over these study regions, topographic scale slopes within each Aquarius pixel are computed and their standard deviations are compared with Aquarius scatterometer and radiometer observations over a 36 day period between days 275 and 311 of 2011.

  11. Landmine detection with an imaging 94-GHz radiometer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, J.S.; Dekker, R.J.; Ewijk, L.J.

    1996-01-01

    We analyzed a time series of 94 GHz radiometer images of a sandbox with buried and unburied, metal and plastic AP and AT dummy mines. The images covered almost a complete 24 hour cycle, with both clear sky and rain conditions occurring. The AP nor the buried mines were visible at any time. The

  12. The Use of Cryogenic HEMT Amplifiers in Wide Band Radiometers

    OpenAIRE

    Jarosik, Norman

    2000-01-01

    Advances in device fabrication, modelling and design techniques have made wide band, low noise cryogenic amplifiers available at frequencies up to 106 GHz. Microwave radiometry applications as used in radio astronomy capitalize on the low noise and large bandwidths of these amplifiers. Radiometers must be carefully designed so as to preclude sensitivity degradations caused by small, low frequency gain fluctuations inherent in these amplifiers.

  13. The airborne EMIRAD L-band radiometer system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl; Kristensen, Steen Savstrup; Balling, Jan E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the EMIRAD L-band radiometer, developed in support of the ESA/SMOS mission. The instrument is a fully polarimetric, dual antenna system, built with special focus on antenna accuracy, receiver stability, and detection and mitigation of radio frequency interference (RFI...

  14. Calibration of Hurricane Imaging Radiometer C-Band Receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Sayak K.; Cecil, Daniel J.; James, Mark W.

    2017-01-01

    The laboratory calibration of airborne Hurricane Imaging Radiometer's C-Band multi-frequency receivers is described here. The method used to obtain the values of receiver frontend loss, internal cold load brightness temperature and injected noise diode temperature is presented along with the expected RMS uncertainty in the final calibration.

  15. Dense Focal Plane Arrays for Pushbroom Satellite Radiometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iupikov, O. A.; Ivashina, M. V.; Pontoppidan, K.

    2014-01-01

    Performance of a dense focal plane array feeding an offset toroidal reflector antenna system is studied and discussed in the context of a potential application in multi-beam radiometers for ocean surveillance. We present a preliminary design of the array feed for the 5-m diameter antenna at X-ban...

  16. The Odin satellite - II. Radiometer data processing and calibration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olberg, M; Frisk, U; Lecacheux, A; Olofsson, AOH; Baron, P; Bergman, P; Florin, G; Hjalmarson, A; Larsson, B; Murtagh, D; Olofsson, G; Pagani, L; Sandqvist, A; Teyssier, D; Torchinsky, SA; Volk, K

    The radiometer on-board the Odin satellite comprises four different sub-mm receivers covering the 486 - 581 GHz frequency range and one fixed frequency 119 GHz receiver. Two auto-correlators and one acousto-optical spectrometer serve as backends. This article gives an overview over the processing of

  17. Calibration OGSEs for multichannel radiometers for Mars atmosphere studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, J. J.; J Álvarez, F.; Gonzalez-Guerrero, M.; Apéstigue, V.; Martín, I.; Fernández, J. M.; Fernán, A. A.; Arruego, I.

    2018-02-01

    This work describes several Optical Ground Support Equipment (OGSEs) developed by INTA (Spanish Institute of Aerospace Technology—Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial) for the calibration and characterization of their self-manufactured multichannel radiometers (solar irradiance sensors—SIS) developed for working on the surface of Mars and studying the atmosphere of that planet. Nowadays, INTA is developing two SIS for the ESA ExoMars 2020 and for the JPL/NASA Mars 2020 missions. These calibration OGSEs have been improved since the first model in 2011 developed for Mars MetNet Precursor mission. This work describes the currently used OGSE. Calibration tests provide an objective evidence of the SIS performance, allowing the conversion of the electrical sensor output into accurate physical measurements (irradiance) with uncertainty bounds. Calibration results of the SIS on board of the Dust characterisation, Risk assessment, and Environment Analyzer on the Martian Surface (DREAMS) on board the ExoMars 2016 Schiaparelli module (EDM—entry and descent module) are also presented, as well as their error propagation. Theoretical precision and accuracy of the instrument are determined by these results. Two types of OGSE are used as a function of the pursued aim: calibration OGSEs and Optical Fast Verification (OFV) GSE. Calibration OGSEs consist of three setups which characterize with the highest possible accuracy, the responsivity, the angular response and the thermal behavior; OFV OGSE verify that the performance of the sensor is close to nominal after every environmental and qualification test. Results show that the accuracy of the calibrated sensors is a function of the accuracy of the optical detectors and of the light conditions. For normal direct incidence and diffuse light, the accuracy is in the same order of uncertainty as that of the reference cell used for fixing the irradiance, which is about 1%.

  18. LYRA, a solar UV radiometer on Proba2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochedez, J.-F.; Schmutz, W.; Stockman, Y.; Schühle, U.; Benmoussa, A.; Koller, S.; Haenen, K.; Berghmans, D.; Defise, J.-M.; Halain, J.-P.; Theissen, A.; Delouille, V.; Slemzin, V.; Gillotay, D.; Fussen, D.; Dominique, M.; Vanhellemont, F.; McMullin, D.; Kretzschmar, M.; Mitrofanov, A.; Nicula, B.; Wauters, L.; Roth, H.; Rozanov, E.; Rüedi, I.; Wehrli, C.; Soltani, A.; Amano, H.; van der Linden, R.; Zhukov, A.; Clette, F.; Koizumi, S.; Mortet, V.; Remes, Z.; Petersen, R.; Nesládek, M.; D'Olieslaeger, M.; Roggen, J.; Rochus, P.

    LYRA is the solar UV radiometer that will embark in 2006 onboard Proba2, a technologically oriented ESA micro-mission. LYRA is designed and manufactured by a Belgian Swiss German consortium (ROB, PMOD/WRC, IMOMEC, CSL, MPS and BISA) with additional international collaborations. It will monitor the solar irradiance in four UV passbands. They have been chosen for their relevance to Solar Physics, Aeronomy and Space Weather: (1) the 115 125 nm Lyman-α channel, (2) the 200 220 nm Herzberg continuum range, (3) the Aluminium filter channel (17 70 nm) including He II at 30.4 nm and (4) the Zirconium filter channel (1 20 nm). The radiometric calibration will be traceable to synchrotron source standards (PTB and NIST). The stability will be monitored by onboard calibration sources (LEDs), which allow to distinguish between potential degradations of the detectors and filters. Additionally, a redundancy strategy maximizes the accuracy and the stability of the measurements. LYRA will benefit from wide bandgap detectors based on diamond: it will be the first space assessment of a pioneering UV detectors program. Diamond sensors make the instruments radiation-hard and solar-blind: their high bandgap energy makes them insensitive to visible light and, therefore, make dispensable visible light blocking filters, which seriously attenuate the desired ultraviolet signal. Their elimination augments the effective area and hence the signal-to-noise, therefore increasing the precision and the cadence. The SWAP EUV imaging telescope will operate next to LYRA on Proba2. Together, they will establish a high performance solar monitor for operational space weather nowcasting and research. LYRA demonstrates technologies important for future missions such as the ESA Solar Orbiter.

  19. Global silicate mineralogy of the Moon from the Diviner lunar radiometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhagen, Benjamin T; Lucey, Paul G; Wyatt, Michael B; Glotch, Timothy D; Allen, Carlton C; Arnold, Jessica A; Bandfield, Joshua L; Bowles, Neil E; Donaldson Hanna, Kerri L; Hayne, Paul O; Song, Eugenie; Thomas, Ian R; Paige, David A

    2010-09-17

    We obtained direct global measurements of the lunar surface using multispectral thermal emission mapping with the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment. Most lunar terrains have spectral signatures that are consistent with known lunar anorthosite and basalt compositions. However, the data have also revealed the presence of highly evolved, silica-rich lunar soils in kilometer-scale and larger exposures, expanded the compositional range of the anorthosites that dominate the lunar crust, and shown that pristine lunar mantle is not exposed at the lunar surface at the kilometer scale. Together, these observations provide compelling evidence that the Moon is a complex body that has experienced a diverse set of igneous processes.

  20. Response time and noise power gain of electrical substitution radiometers with feedback control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clare, J F; White, D R

    1989-08-15

    We present criteria for choosing filter and control parameters for absolute radiometers and true RMS meters that employ feedback controlled electrical substitution. Expressions are obtained for the response of the electrical heating power to radiation and to detector noise. The gains and time constants that minimize the response time for a given variance in a single power measurement are obtained from analyses of second- and third-order systems. Near optimal behavior is obtained in the third-order system comprising a first-order filter and a proportional-plus-integral controller with an integration time equal to the detector time constant. A procedure for tuning the control system is presented.

  1. Sentinel-3 MWR Microwave Radiometer – Our contribution to the success of the Copernicus programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Palacios

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The MWR builds, together with the SRAL altimeter, the S3 topography mission. The MWR, developed by EADS CASA Espacio as prime contractor, provides information for tropospheric path correction of SRAL measurements. MWR data can also be used for determining surface emissivity and soil moisture over land, surface energy budget investigations and ice characterization. The MWR instrument is a Noise Injection Radiometer (NIR, working at two frequencies (23.8/36.5 GHz, embarking a dual frequency horn antenna pointing to the cold sky for embedded autonomous calibration.

  2. Imager-to-Radiometer In-flight Cross Calibration: RSP Radiometric Comparison with Airborne and Satellite Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCorkel, Joel; Cairns, Brian; Wasilewski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    This work develops a method to compare the radiometric calibration between a radiometer and imagers hosted on aircraft and satellites. The radiometer is the airborne Research Scanning Polarimeter (RSP), which takes multi-angle, photo-polarimetric measurements in several spectral channels. The RSP measurements used in this work were coincident with measurements made by the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS), which was on the same aircraft. These airborne measurements were also coincident with an overpass of the Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI). First we compare the RSP and OLI radiance measurements to AVIRIS since the spectral response of the multispectral instruments can be used to synthesize a spectrally equivalent signal from the imaging spectrometer data. We then explore a method that uses AVIRIS as a transfer between RSP and OLI to show that radiometric traceability of a satellite-based imager can be used to calibrate a radiometer despite differences in spectral channel sensitivities. This calibration transfer shows agreement within the uncertainty of both the various instruments for most spectral channels.

  3. Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) L-Band Microwave Radiometer Post-Launch Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jinzheng; Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Misra, Sidharth; Dinnat, Emmanuel P.; Hudson, Derek; Le Vine, David M.; De Amici, Giovanni; Mohammed, Priscilla N.; Yueh, Simon H.; Meissner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The SMAP microwave radiometer is a fully-polarimetric L-band radiometer flown on the SMAP satellite in a 6 AM/ 6 PM sun-synchronous orbit at 685 km altitude. Since April, 2015, the radiometer is under calibration and validation to assess the quality of the radiometer L1B data product. Calibration methods including the SMAP L1B TA2TB (from Antenna Temperature (TA) to the Earth's surface Brightness Temperature (TB)) algorithm and TA forward models are outlined, and validation approaches to calibration stability/quality are described in this paper including future work. Results show that the current radiometer L1B data satisfies its requirements.

  4. Thermal-infrared field radiometer for vicarious cross-calibration: characterization and comparisons with other field instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicard, Michael; Spyak, Paul R.; Brogniez, Gerard; Legrand, Michel; Abuhassan, Nader K.; Pietras, Christophe; Buis, Jean P.

    1999-02-01

    A four-band (8.2 to 9.2, 10.5 to 11.5, 11.5 to 12.5, and 8 to 14 micrometers ), prototype, thermal-IR radiometer, model CE 312 [CE 312 is the company model number. In previous papers, the CE 312 was called the CLIMAT (conveyable low-noise IR radiometer for measurements of atmosphere and ground-surface targets)], with a built-in radiance reference is been fabricated by CIMEL Electronique (Paris, France) for use as a field instrument. The instrument is briefly described, laboratory characterization is detailed, and its field measurements are compared with those from three other radiometers. The CE 312's main characteristics are linearity of better than 0.8%, field of view of 9.5 deg; noise- equivalent temperature difference of 0.06 to 0.2 K (depending on the band) for brightness temperatures of 0 to 75 degree(s)C; SNR greater than 1100 for the broadband and greater than 400 for the other bands for brightness temperatures between 10 and 80 degree(s)C; and repeatability of the measured radiance smaller than 0.35% after four field campaigns, corresponding to 0.2 K in terms of brightness temperature. Field measurements were conducted over different periods during 1996 at Jornada Experimental Range, New Mexico, Lunar Lake and Railroad Valley, Nevada, and Lake Tahoe, California. The CE 312 compares quite favorably with the other instruments; the brightness temperature at two different sites compared to within 0.3 K with two instruments. These measurements show that the CE 312 thermal-IR radiometer is very stable for ambient temperatures varying between 15 and 60 degree(s)C and that the availability of several filters in the thermal-IR region can help tremendously to improve the accuracy of the radiance determination.

  5. Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Project Algorithm Theoretical Basis Document SMAP L1B Radiometer Data Product: L1B_TB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piepmeier, Jeffrey; Mohammed, Priscilla; De Amici, Giovanni; Kim, Edward; Peng, Jinzheng; Ruf, Christopher; Hanna, Maher; Yueh, Simon; Entekhabi, Dara

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) radiometer calibration algorithm is to convert Level 0 (L0) radiometer digital counts data into calibrated estimates of brightness temperatures referenced to the Earth's surface within the main beam. The algorithm theory in most respects is similar to what has been developed and implemented for decades for other satellite radiometers; however, SMAP includes two key features heretofore absent from most satellite borne radiometers: radio frequency interference (RFI) detection and mitigation, and measurement of the third and fourth Stokes parameters using digital correlation. The purpose of this document is to describe the SMAP radiometer and forward model, explain the SMAP calibration algorithm, including approximations, errors, and biases, provide all necessary equations for implementing the calibration algorithm and detail the RFI detection and mitigation process. Section 2 provides a summary of algorithm objectives and driving requirements. Section 3 is a description of the instrument and Section 4 covers the forward models, upon which the algorithm is based. Section 5 gives the retrieval algorithm and theory. Section 6 describes the orbit simulator, which implements the forward model and is the key for deriving antenna pattern correction coefficients and testing the overall algorithm.

  6. Network operability of ground-based microwave radiometers: Calibration and standardization efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pospichal, Bernhard; Löhnert, Ulrich; Küchler, Nils; Czekala, Harald

    2017-04-01

    Ground-based microwave radiometers (MWR) are already widely used by national weather services and research institutions all around the world. Most of the instruments operate continuously and are beginning to be implemented into data assimilation for atmospheric models. Especially their potential for continuously observing boundary-layer temperature profiles as well as integrated water vapor and cloud liquid water path makes them valuable for improving short-term weather forecasts. However until now, most MWR have been operated as stand-alone instruments. In order to benefit from a network of these instruments, standardization of calibration, operation and data format is necessary. In the frame of TOPROF (COST Action ES1303) several efforts have been undertaken, such as uncertainty and bias assessment, or calibration intercomparison campaigns. The goal was to establish protocols for providing quality controlled (QC) MWR data and their uncertainties. To this end, standardized calibration procedures for MWR have been developed and recommendations for radiometer users compiled. Based on the results of the TOPROF campaigns, a new, high-accuracy liquid-nitrogen calibration load has been introduced for MWR manufactured by Radiometer Physics GmbH (RPG). The new load improves the accuracy of the measurements considerably and will lead to even more reliable atmospheric observations. Next to the recommendations for set-up, calibration and operation of ground-based MWR within a future network, we will present homogenized methods to determine the accuracy of a running calibration as well as means for automatic data quality control. This sets the stage for the planned microwave calibration center at JOYCE (Jülich Observatory for Cloud Evolution), which will be shortly introduced.

  7. Characterizing L-band Radio-Frequency Interference (RFI) Using SMAP Microwave Radiometer Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, P.; Piepmeier, J. R.; Bringer, A.; Johnson, J. T.; Soldo, Y.; de Matthaeis, P.

    2016-12-01

    The L-band microwave radiometer on NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite measures electromagnetic radiation upwelling from Earth within the 1400-1427 MHz band. This relatively low microwave frequency is used to achieve penetration through vegetation and first few centimeters of soil. This frequency band is specifically selected, however, because it is exclusively allocated, on a primary basis, to passive sensing in the Earth Exploration Satellite and Radio Astronomy Services by international treaty. Thus, local administrations prohibit intentional transmissions within the band, and any non-natural signal in this band is considered to be radio-frequency interference (RFI). The SMAP radiometer has an advanced radiometer receiver providing time, frequency, polarization, and statistical diversity information on observed signals for RFI detection and filtering. Here we use this signal information to characterize the RFI environmental on local, regional, and global bases. RFI environment assessment is of interest for several reasons: 1) Reporting instances of interference harmful to SMAP performance to the appropriate regulators; 2) Informing spectrum managers and regulators of the state of the spectrum; and 3) Alerting SMAP users and future developers of trouble spots. We find the RF environment is highly variable around the globe. Global maps of RFI rate-of-occurrence exhibit a contrast in detected RFI between Eastern and Western Hemispheres and between Northern and Southern Hemispheres. Peak-hold maps show both isolated and distributed regions of severe RFI, some of which correspond to populated areas and others to geographically isolated long-range radars. Maps of kurtosis-excess reveal much RFI likely due to terrestrial radar systems, although other analysis indicates proliferation of low-level non-radar sources. In one case of intense RFI there is no kurtosis-excess indicating noise-like behavior due to either the use advanced digital modulation

  8. Detection of Solar Rotational Variability in the Large Yield RAdiometer (LYRA) 190-222 nm Spectral Band

    OpenAIRE

    Shapiro A. V.; Shapiro A.I.; Dominique M.; Dammasch I. E.; Wehrli C.; Rozanov E.; Schmutz W.

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the variability of the spectral solar irradiance during the period from 7 January 2010 until 20 January 2010 as measured by the Herzberg channel (190?–?222 nm) of the Large Yield RAdiometer (LYRA) onboard PROBA2. In this period of time observations by the LYRA nominal unit experienced degradation and the signal produced by the Herzberg channel frequently jumped from one level to another. Both factors significantly complicate the analysis. We present the algorithm that allowed us to...

  9. Detection of Solar Rotational Variability in the Large Yield RAdiometer (LYRA) 190 – 222 nm Spectral Band

    OpenAIRE

    Shapiro A. V.; Shapiro A.I.; Dominique M.; Dammasch I.; Wehrli C.; Rozanov E.; Schmutz W.

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the variability of the spectral solar irradiance during the period from 7 January 2010 until 20 January 2010 as measured by the Herzberg channel (190 – 222 nm) of the Large Yield RAdiometer (LYRA) onboard PROBA2. In this period of time observations by the LYRA nominal unit experienced degradation and the signal produced by the Herzberg channel frequently jumped from one level to another. Both factors significantly complicate the analysis. We present the algorithm that allowed us to...

  10. ARM Shortwave and Longwave Radiometer Calibrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooraghi, Mike; Kutchenreiter, Mark; Reda, Ibrahim; Habte, Aron; Sengupta, Manajit; Andreas, Afshin; Newman, Martina; Webb, Craig

    2017-03-23

    This presentation provides a high-level overview of shortwave and longwave calibrations performed at the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program Southern Great Plains site.

  11. PHyTIR - A Prototype Thermal Infrared Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jau, Bruno M.; Hook, Simon J.; Johnson, William R.; Foote, Marc C.; Paine, Christopher G.; Pannell, Zack W.; Smythe, Robert F.; Kuan, Gary M.; Jakoboski, Julie K.; Eng, Bjorn T.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the PHyTIR (Prototype HyspIRI Thermal Infrared Radiometer) instrument, which is the engineering model for the proposed HyspIRI (Hyperspectral Infrared Imager) earth observing instrument. The HyspIRI mission would be comprised of the HyspIRI TIR (Thermal Infrared Imager), and a VSWIR (Visible Short-Wave Infra-Red Imaging Spectrometer). Both instruments would be used to address key science questions related to the earth's carbon cycle, ecosystems, climate, and solid earth properties. Data gathering of volcanic activities, earthquakes, wildfires, water use and availability, urbanization, and land surface compositions and changes, would aid the predictions and evaluations of such events and the impact they create. Even though the proposed technology for the HyspIRI imager is mature, the PHyTIR prototype is needed to advance the technology levels for several of the instrument's key components, and to reduce risks, in particular to validate 1) the higher sensitivity, spatial resolution, and higher throughput required for this focal plane array, 2) the pointing accuracy, 2) the characteristics of several spectral channels, and 4) the use of ambient temperature optics. The PHyTIR telescope consists of the focal plane assembly that is housed within a cold housing located inside a vacuum enclosure; all mounted to a bulkhead, and an optical train that consists of 3 powered mirrors; extending to both sides of the bulkhead. A yoke connects the telescope to a scan mirror. The rotating mirror enables to scan- a large track on the ground. This structure is supported by kinematic mounts, linking the telescope assembly to a base plate that would also become the spacecraft interface for HyspIRI. The focal plane's cooling units are also mounted to the base plate, as is an overall enclosure that has two viewing ports with large exterior baffles, shielding the focal plane from incoming stray light. PHyTIR's electronics is distributed inside and near the vacuum

  12. Design Study of a Synthetic Thinned Aperture Radiometer for Hurricane Impact Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruf, Christopher S.

    2003-01-01

    The principle accomplishments involve a conceptual design of an airborne Hurricane Imaging (microwave) Radiometer (HiRad) instrument for use in operational hurricane surveillance. The basis of the HiRad design is the Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR) that has successfully measured surface wind speed and rain rate in hurricanes from the NOAA Hurricane Research Division s P-3 aircraft. Unlike the SFMR that views only at nadir, the HiRad provides wide-swath measurements between +/- 45 deg. in incidence angle with a spot-beam spatial resolution of approximately 1-3 km. The system operates at four equally spaced frequency channels that cover a range between 4 GHz and 6 GHz. The final report consists of two parts. Part 1 is a reprint of a conference proceeding presented at the 2002 International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium and authored by the principle members of the HiRad design team. Part 2 is a summary of the MMIC receiver design developed to support the HiRad sensor.

  13. Transmission of radiometer data from the Synchronous Meteorological Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, R. S.

    1973-01-01

    The Synchronous Meteorological Satellite uses a spin scanner radiometer which generates eight visual signals and two infrared signals. These signals are multiplexed and converted into a 28-Mbps data stream. This signal is transmitted to ground by quadriphase modulation at 1686.1 MHz. On the ground, the digital signal is reconstructed to an analog signal. To conserve bandwidth, an analog-to-digital converter with a nonlinear transfer function was used for the visual signals. The size of the quantization step was made proportional to the noise output of the scanner photomultiplier tube which increases as the square root of incident light. The radiometer data transmission link was simulated on a digital computer to determine the transfer function. Some results of the simulation are shown.

  14. Quantitative Analysis of Spectral Impacts on Silicon Photodiode Radiometers: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, D. R.

    2011-04-01

    Inexpensive broadband pyranometers with silicon photodiode detectors have a non-uniform spectral response over the spectral range of 300-1100 nm. The response region includes only about 70% to 75% of the total energy in the terrestrial solar spectral distribution from 300 nm to 4000 nm. The solar spectrum constantly changes with solar position and atmospheric conditions. Relative spectral distributions of diffuse hemispherical irradiance sky radiation and total global hemispherical irradiance are drastically different. This analysis convolves a typical photodiode response with SMARTS 2.9.5 spectral model spectra for different sites and atmospheric conditions. Differences in solar component spectra lead to differences on the order of 2% in global hemispherical and 5% or more in diffuse hemispherical irradiances from silicon radiometers. The result is that errors of more than 7% can occur in the computation of direct normal irradiance from global hemispherical irradiance and diffuse hemispherical irradiance using these radiometers.

  15. Dual-Polarization, Multi-Frequency Antenna Array for use with Hurricane Imaging Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, John

    2013-01-01

    Advancements in common aperture antenna technology were employed to utilize its proprietary genetic algorithmbased modeling tools in an effort to develop, build, and test a dual-polarization array for Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) applications. Final program results demonstrate the ability to achieve a lightweight, thin, higher-gain aperture that covers the desired spectral band. NASA employs various passive microwave and millimeter-wave instruments, such as spectral radiometers, for a range of remote sensing applications, from measurements of the Earth's surface and atmosphere, to cosmic background emission. These instruments such as the HIRAD, SFMR (Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer), and LRR (Lightweight Rainfall Radiometer), provide unique data accumulation capabilities for observing sea surface wind, temperature, and rainfall, and significantly enhance the understanding and predictability of hurricane intensity. These microwave instruments require extremely efficient wideband or multiband antennas in order to conserve space on the airborne platform. In addition, the thickness and weight of the antenna arrays is of paramount importance in reducing platform drag, permitting greater time on station. Current sensors are often heavy, single- polarization, or limited in frequency coverage. The ideal wideband antenna will have reduced size, weight, and profile (a conformal construct) without sacrificing optimum performance. The technology applied to this new HIRAD array will allow NASA, NOAA, and other users to gather information related to hurricanes and other tropical storms more cost effectively without sacrificing sensor performance or the aircraft time on station. The results of the initial analysis and numerical design indicated strong potential for an antenna array that would satisfy all of the design requirements for a replacement HIRAD array. Multiple common aperture antenna methodologies were employed to achieve exceptional gain over the entire

  16. Water Quality Models with Different Functions of Exotech Radiometer Bands

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, K. R.; Krishnan, R.; Chakraborty, A. K.; Deekshatulu, B. L.

    1981-01-01

    Surveillance of water quality by remote sensing technique can be pursued with advantage. An attempt has been made in this paper to obtain regional models of water quality of inland tanks and lakes. Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis between water quality parameters and several functions of Exotech radiometer band reflectance values, namely, bands alone, bands and their ratios, and, bands and their products are evaluated with respect to performance of the regression parameters. It is...

  17. Fusion of synthetic aperture radiometer and noise waveform SAR images

    OpenAIRE

    Lukin, Konstantin A.; Kudriashov, V. V.

    2014-01-01

    Noise waveform SAR generates 2D SAR images of a scene. Advanced radiometric SAR imaging provides information on the objects thermal radiation, angular coordinates and even range. The brightness temperatures of rough and smooth surfaces are different. An active, noise waveform, operating mode of bistatic radiometer, based on antennae with beam synthesis, is considered with respect to the roughness criteria. The optimal and quasi-optimal algorithms for fusion of radiometric and SAR images are p...

  18. A horizontal vane radiometer: Experiment, theory, and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, David; Larraza, Andres, E-mail: larraza@nps.edu [Department of Physics, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, California 93940 (United States); Garcia, Alejandro [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San Jose State University, San Jose, California 95152 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    The existence of two motive forces on a Crookes radiometer has complicated the investigation of either force independently. The thermal creep shear force in particular has been subject to differing interpretations of the direction in which it acts and its order of magnitude. In this article, we provide a horizontal vane radiometer design which isolates the thermal creep shear force. The horizontal vane radiometer is explored through experiment, kinetic theory, and the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. The qualitative agreement between the three methods of investigation is good except for a dependence of the force on the width of the vane even when the temperature gradient is narrower than the vane which is present in the DSMC method results but not in the theory. The experimental results qualitatively resemble the theory in this regard. The quantitative agreement between the three methods of investigation is better than an order of magnitude in the cases examined. The theory is closer to the experimental values for narrow vanes and the simulations are closer to the experimental values for the wide vanes. We find that the thermal creep force acts from the hot side to the cold side of the vane. We also find the peak in the radiometer’s angular speed as a function of pressure is explained as much by the behavior of the drag force as by the behavior of the thermal creep force.

  19. MWR: Microwave Radiometer for the Juno Mission to Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, M. A.; Oswald, J. E.; Brown, S. T.; Gulkis, S.; Levin, S. M.; Bolton, S. J.; Allison, M. D.; Atreya, S. K.; Gautier, D.; Ingersoll, A. P.; Lunine, J. I.; Orton, G. S.; Owen, T. C.; Steffes, P. G.; Adumitroaie, V.; Bellotti, A.; Jewell, L. A.; Li, C.; Li, L.; Misra, S.; Oyafuso, F. A.; Santos-Costa, D.; Sarkissian, E.; Williamson, R.; Arballo, J. K.; Kitiyakara, A.; Ulloa-Severino, A.; Chen, J. C.; Maiwald, F. W.; Sahakian, A. S.; Pingree, P. J.; Lee, K. A.; Mazer, A. S.; Redick, R.; Hodges, R. E.; Hughes, R. C.; Bedrosian, G.; Dawson, D. E.; Hatch, W. A.; Russell, D. S.; Chamberlain, N. F.; Zawadski, M. S.; Khayatian, B.; Franklin, B. R.; Conley, H. A.; Kempenaar, J. G.; Loo, M. S.; Sunada, E. T.; Vorperion, V.; Wang, C. C.

    2017-03-01

    The Juno Microwave Radiometer (MWR) is a six-frequency scientific instrument designed and built to investigate the deep atmosphere of Jupiter. It is one of a suite of instruments on NASA's New Frontiers Mission Juno launched to Jupiter on August 5, 2011. The focus of this paper is the description of the scientific objectives of the MWR investigation along with the experimental design, observational approach, and calibration that will achieve these objectives, based on the Juno mission plan up to Jupiter orbit insertion on July 4, 2016. With frequencies distributed approximately by octave from 600 MHz to 22 GHz, the MWR will sample the atmospheric thermal radiation from depths extending from the ammonia cloud region at around 1 bar to pressure levels as deep as 1000 bars. The primary scientific objectives of the MWR investigation are to determine the presently unknown dynamical properties of Jupiter's subcloud atmosphere and to determine the global abundance of oxygen and nitrogen, present in the atmosphere as water and ammonia deep below their respective cloud decks. The MWR experiment is designed to measure both the thermal radiation from Jupiter and its emission-angle dependence at each frequency relative to the atmospheric local normal with high accuracy. The antennas at the four highest frequencies (21.9, 10.0, 5.2, and 2.6 GHz) have ˜12° beamwidths and will achieve a spatial resolution approaching 600 km near perijove. The antennas at the lowest frequencies (0.6 and 1.25 GHz) are constrained by physical size limitations and have 20° beamwidths, enabling a spatial resolution of as high as 1000 km to be obtained. The MWR will obtain Jupiter's brightness temperature and its emission-angle dependence at each point along the subspacecraft track, over angles up to 60° from the normal over most latitudes, during at least six perijove passes after orbit insertion. The emission-angle dependence will be obtained for all frequencies to an accuracy of better than one

  20. MWR: Microwave Radiometer for the Juno Mission to Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, M. A.; Oswald, J. E.; Brown, S. T.; Gulkis, S.; Levin, S. M.; Bolton, S. J.; Allison, M. D.; Atreya, S. K.; Gautier, D.; Ingersoll, A. P.; Lunine, J. I.; Orton, G. S.; Owen, T. C.; Steffes, P. G.; Adumitroaie, V.; Bellotti, A.; Jewell, L. A.; Li, C.; Li, L.; Misra, S.; Oyafuso, F. A.; Santos-Costa, D.; Sarkissian, E.; Williamson, R.; Arballo, J. K.; Kitiyakara, A.; Ulloa-Severino, A.; Chen, J. C.; Maiwald, F. W.; Sahakian, A. S.; Pingree, P. J.; Lee, K. A.; Mazer, A. S.; Redick, R.; Hodges, R. E.; Hughes, R. C.; Bedrosian, G.; Dawson, D. E.; Hatch, W. A.; Russell, D. S.; Chamberlain, N. F.; Zawadski, M. S.; Khayatian, B.; Franklin, B. R.; Conley, H. A.; Kempenaar, J. G.; Loo, M. S.; Sunada, E. T.; Vorperion, V.; Wang, C. C.

    2017-11-01

    The Juno Microwave Radiometer (MWR) is a six-frequency scientific instrument designed and built to investigate the deep atmosphere of Jupiter. It is one of a suite of instruments on NASA's New Frontiers Mission Juno launched to Jupiter on August 5, 2011. The focus of this paper is the description of the scientific objectives of the MWR investigation along with the experimental design, observational approach, and calibration that will achieve these objectives, based on the Juno mission plan up to Jupiter orbit insertion on July 4, 2016. With frequencies distributed approximately by octave from 600 MHz to 22 GHz, the MWR will sample the atmospheric thermal radiation from depths extending from the ammonia cloud region at around 1 bar to pressure levels as deep as 1000 bars. The primary scientific objectives of the MWR investigation are to determine the presently unknown dynamical properties of Jupiter's subcloud atmosphere and to determine the global abundance of oxygen and nitrogen, present in the atmosphere as water and ammonia deep below their respective cloud decks. The MWR experiment is designed to measure both the thermal radiation from Jupiter and its emission-angle dependence at each frequency relative to the atmospheric local normal with high accuracy. The antennas at the four highest frequencies (21.9, 10.0, 5.2, and 2.6 GHz) have ˜12° beamwidths and will achieve a spatial resolution approaching 600 km near perijove. The antennas at the lowest frequencies (0.6 and 1.25 GHz) are constrained by physical size limitations and have 20° beamwidths, enabling a spatial resolution of as high as 1000 km to be obtained. The MWR will obtain Jupiter's brightness temperature and its emission-angle dependence at each point along the subspacecraft track, over angles up to 60° from the normal over most latitudes, during at least six perijove passes after orbit insertion. The emission-angle dependence will be obtained for all frequencies to an accuracy of better than one

  1. Sua Pan surface bidirectional reflectance: a validation experiment of the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) during SAFARI 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdou, Wedad A.; Pilorz, Stuart H.; Helmlinger, Mark C.; Diner, David J.; Conel, James E.; Martonchik, John V.; Gatebe, Charles K.; King, Michael D.; Hobbs, Peter V.

    2004-01-01

    The Southern Africa Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI 2000) dray deason campaign was carried out during August and September 2000 at the peak of biomass burning. The intensive ground-based and airborne measurements in this campaign provided a unique opportunity to validate space sensors, such as the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), onboard NASA's EOS Terra platform.

  2. The CLARA/NORSAT-1 solar absolute radiometer: instrument design, characterization and calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Benjamin; Levesque, Pierre-Luc; Kopp, Greg; Andersen, Bo; Beck, Ivo; Finsterle, Wolfgang; Gyo, Manfred; Heuerman, Karl; Koller, Silvio; Mingard, Nathan; Remesal Oliva, Alberto; Pfiffner, Daniel; Soder, Ricco; Spescha, Marcel; Suter, Markus; Schmutz, Werner

    2017-10-01

    The compact lightweight absolute radiometer (CLARA) experiment aims at measuring the total solar irradiance (TSI) in space and is scheduled to fly on the Norwegian NORSAT-1 micro satellite. The CLARA experiment will contribute to the long term monitoring of the TSI variability to support the analysis of potential long term trends in the Sun’s variability. CLARA is traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology radiometric scale and will provide further evidence for the TSI value on an absolute scale. In this paper we present the design, characterization, and calibration details of the CLARA instrument. The combined measurement uncertainty for the calibrated SI-traceable CLARA flight instrument is 567-912 ppm (k  =  1) depending on the measuring channel.

  3. Millimeter-wave Radiometer for High Sensitivity Water Vapor Profiling in Arid Regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pazmany, Andrew

    2006-11-09

    Abstract - ProSensing Inc. has developed a G-band (183 GHz) water Vapor Radiometer (GVR) for long-term, unattended measurements of low concentrations of atmospheric water vapor and liquid water. Precipitable water vapor and liquid water path are estimated from zenith brightness temperatures measured from four double-sideband receiver channels, centered at 183.31 1, 3 and 7, and 14 GHz. A prototype ground-based version of the instrument was deployed at the DOE ARM program?s North Slope of Alaska site near Barrow AK in April 2005, where it collected data continuously for one year. A compact, airborne version of this instrument, packaged to operate from a standard 2-D PMS probe canister, has been tested on the ground and is scheduled for test flights in the summer of 2006. This paper presents design details, laboratory test results and examples of retrieved precipitable water vapor and liquid water path from measured brightness temperature data.

  4. Hurricane Imaging Radiometer Wind Speed and Rain Rate Retrievals during the 2010 GRIP Flight Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahawneh, Saleem; Farrar, Spencer; Johnson, James; Jones, W. Linwood; Roberts, Jason; Biswas, Sayak; Cecil, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Microwave remote sensing observations of hurricanes, from NOAA and USAF hurricane surveillance aircraft, provide vital data for hurricane research and operations, for forecasting the intensity and track of tropical storms. The current operational standard for hurricane wind speed and rain rate measurements is the Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR), which is a nadir viewing passive microwave airborne remote sensor. The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer, HIRAD, will extend the nadir viewing SFMR capability to provide wide swath images of wind speed and rain rate, while flying on a high altitude aircraft. HIRAD was first flown in the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes, GRIP, NASA hurricane field experiment in 2010. This paper reports on geophysical retrieval results and provides hurricane images from GRIP flights. An overview of the HIRAD instrument and the radiative transfer theory based, wind speed/rain rate retrieval algorithm is included. Results are presented for hurricane wind speed and rain rate for Earl and Karl, with comparison to collocated SFMR retrievals and WP3D Fuselage Radar images for validation purposes.

  5. Variability of Earth's radiation budget components during 2009 - 2015 from radiometer IKOR-M data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherviakov, Maksim

    2016-04-01

    This report describes a new «Meteor-M» satellite program which has been started in Russia. The first satellite of new generation "Meteor-M» № 1 was put into orbit in September, 2009. The radiometer IKOR-M - «The Measuring instrument of short-wave reflected radiation" was created in Saratov State University. It was installed on Russian hydrometeorological satellites «Meteor-M» № 1 and № 2. Radiometer IKOR-M designed for satellite monitoring of the outgoing reflected short-wave radiation, which is one of the components of Earth's radiation budget. Such information can be used in different models of long-term weather forecasts, in researches of climate change trends and also in calculation of absorbed solar radiation values and albedo of the Earth-atmosphere system. Satellite «Meteor-M» № 1 and № 2 are heliosynchronous that allows observing from North to South Poles. The basic products of data processing are given in the form of global maps of distribution outgoing short-wave radiation (OSR), albedo and absorbed solar radiation (ASR). Such maps were made for each month during observation period. The IKOR-M product archive is available online at all times. A searchable catalogue of data products is continually updated and users may search and download data products via the Earth radiation balance components research laboratory website (http://www.sgu.ru/structure/geographic/metclim/balans) as soon as they become available. Two series of measurements from two different IKOR-M are available. The first radiometer had worked from October, 2009 to August, 2014 and second - from August, 2014 to the present. Therefore, there is a period when both radiometers work at the same time. Top-of-atmosphere fluxes deduced from the «Meteor-M» № 1 measurements in August, 2014 show very good agreement with the fluxes determined from «Meteor-M» № 2. The seasonal and interannual variations of OSR, albedo and ASR were discussed. The variations between SW radiation

  6. Upgrades and Real Time Ntm Control Application of the Ece Radiometer on Asdex Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, N. K.; Suttrop, W.; Behler, K.; Giannone, L.; Manini, A.; Maraschek, M.; Raupp, G.; Reich, M.; Sips, A. C. C.; Stober, J.; Treutterer, W.; ASDEX Upgrade Team; Cirant, S.

    2009-04-01

    The 60-channel electron cyclotron emission (ECE) radiometer diagnostic on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak is presently being upgraded to include a 1 MHz sampling rate data acquisition system. This expanded capability allows electron temperature measurements up to 500 kHz (anti-aliasing filter cut-off) with spatial resolution ~1 cm, and will thus provide measurement of plasma phenomena on the MHD timescale, such as neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs). The upgraded and existing systems may be run in parallel for comparison, and some of the first plasma measurements using the two systems together are presented. A particular planned application of the upgraded radiometer is integration into a real-time NTM stabilization loop using targeted deposition of electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH). For this loop, it is necessary to determine the locations of the NTM and ECRH deposition using ECE measurements. As the magnetic island of the NTM repeatedly rotates through the ECE line of sight, electron temperature fluctuations at the NTM frequency are observed. The magnetic perturbation caused by the NTM is independently measured using Mirnov coils, and a correlation profile between these magnetic measurements and the ECE data is constructed. The phase difference between ECE oscillations on opposite sides of the island manifests as a zero-crossing of the correlation profile, which determines the NTM location in ECE channel space. To determine the location of ECRH power deposition, the power from a given gyrotron may be modulated at a particular frequency. Correlation analysis of this modulated signal and the ECE data identifies a particular ECE channel associated with the deposition of that gyrotron. Real time equilibrium reconstruction allows the ECE channels to be translated into flux surface and spatial coordinates for use in the feedback loop.

  7. Validation of Rain Rate Retrievals for the Airborne Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Maria Marta; Salemirad, Matin; Jones, W. Linwood; Biswas, Sayak; Cecil, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) mission is an aircraft field measurements program using NASA's unmanned Global Hawk aircraft system for remote sensing and in situ observations of Atlantic and Caribbean Sea hurricanes. One of the principal microwave instruments is the Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD), which measures surface wind speeds and rain rates. For validation of the HIRAD wind speed measurement in hurricanes, there exists a comprehensive set of comparisons with the Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR) with in situ GPS dropwindsondes [1]. However, for rain rate measurements, there are only indirect correlations with rain imagery from other HS3 remote sensors (e.g., the dual-frequency Ka- & Ku-band doppler radar, HIWRAP), which is only qualitative in nature. However, this paper presents results from an unplanned rain rate measurement validation opportunity that occurred in 2013, when HIRAD flew over an intense tropical squall line that was simultaneously observed by the Tampa NEXRAD meteorological radar (Fig. 1). During this experiment, Global Hawk flying at an altitude of 18 km made 3 passes over the rapidly propagating thunderstorm, while the TAMPA NEXRAD perform volume scans on a 5-minute interval. Using the well-documented NEXRAD Z-R relationship, 2D images of rain rate (mm/hr) were obtained at two altitudes (3 km & 6 km), which serve as surface truth for the HIRAD rain rate retrievals. A preliminary comparison of HIRAD rain rate retrievals (image) for the first pass and the corresponding closest NEXRAD rain image is presented in Fig. 2 & 3. This paper describes the HIRAD instrument, which 1D synthetic-aperture thinned array radiometer (STAR) developed by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center [2]. The rain rate retrieval algorithm, developed by Amarin et al. [3], is based on the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) technique, which compares the observed Tb's at the HIRAD operating frequencies of 4, 5, 6 and 6.6 GHz with

  8. Ground registration of data from an airborne Multifrequency Microwave Radiometer (MfMR). [Colby, Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, J. C. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    The agricultural soil moisture experiment was conducted near Colby, Kansas, in July and August 1978. A portion of the data collected was taken with a five band microwave radiometer. A method of locating the radiometer footprints with respect to a ground based coordinate system is documented. The procedure requires that the airplane's flight parameters along with aerial photography be acquired simultaneously with the radiometer data. The software which documented reads in data from the precision radiation thermometer (PRT Model 5) and attaches the scene temperature to the corresponding multifrequency microwave radiometer data. Listings of the programs used in the registration process are included.

  9. Nimbus-3 Medium-Resolution Infrared Radiometer (MRIR) Level 1 Meteorological Radiation Data V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Nimbus-3 Medium-Resolution Infrared Radiometer (MRIR) Level 1 Meteorological Radiance Data contain radiances expressed as equivalent blackbody temperatures along...

  10. A New Approach for Radiometric Cross Calibration of Satellite-borne Radiometers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Qu, John J; Hao, Xianjun; Hauss, Bruce; Wang, Chunming; Privette, Jeffrey

    2005-01-01

    Approaches for establishing the absolute calibration of a newly deployed, satellite-borne radiometer have varied from aircraft under flights with previously calibrated sensors to vicarious calibration...

  11. Boreal Inundation Mapping with SMAP Radiometer Data for Methane Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seungbum; Brisco, Brian; Poncos, Valentin

    2017-04-01

    Inundation and consequent anoxic condition induce methane release, which is one of the most potent greenhouse gases. Boreal regions contain large amounts of organic carbon, which is a potentially major methane emission source under climatic warming conditions. Boreal wetlands in particular are one of the largest sources of uncertainties in global methane budget. Wetland spatial extent together with the gas release rate remains highly unknown. Characterization of the existing inundation database is poor, because of the inundation under clouds and dense vegetation. In this work, the inundation extent is derived using brightness temperature data acquired by the L-band Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite, which offers the L-band capabilities to penetrate clouds and vegetation at 3-day revisit. The fidelity of the SMAP watermask is assessed as a first step in this investigation by comparing with the following data sets: 3-m resolution maps derived using Radarsat synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data in northern Canada and multi-sensor climatology over Siberia. Because Radarsat coverages are limited despite its high spatial resolution, at the time and location where Radarsats are not available, we also compare with 3-km resolution SMAP SAR data that are concurrent with the SMAP radiometer data globally until July 2015. Inundation extents were derived with Radarsat, SMAP SAR, and SMAP radiometer over the 60 km x 60km area at Peace Athabasca Delta (PAD), Canada on 6 days in spring and summer 2015. The SMAP SAR results match the locations of Radarsat waterbodies. However, the SMAP SAR underestimates the water extent, mainly over mixed pixels that have subpixel land presence. The threshold value (-3 dB) applied to the SMAP SAR was determined previously over the global domain. The threshold is dependent on the type of local landcover within a mixed pixel. Further analysis is needed to locally optimize the threshold. The SMAP radiometer water fraction over Peace

  12. Selection of suitable wavelengths for estimating total ozone column with multifilter UV radiometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piedehierro, A. A.; Cancillo, M. L.; Serrano, A.; Antón, M.; Vilaplana, J. M.

    2017-07-01

    The complete recovery of the ozone layer is expected by mid-century but projections depend on the greenhouse scenario and the possible interaction with other atmospheric constituents. Therefore, enlarging the ground-based measuring network is necessary in order to accurately monitor the foreseeable recovery of the ozone layer in the next decades. Multifilter instruments can be used to complement the networks of Dobson and Brewer spectroradiometers. Total ozone column (TOC) can be retrieved from spectral or narrowband global ultraviolet (UV) measurements by comparing the ratio of two close wavelengths with significantly different ozone cross-sections against ratios simulated using a radiative transfer code. This methodology has been widely applied to multifilter radiometers but some unsolved discrepancies between the analyses of different authors regarding which pair of channels to use still remain, even for studies involving the same instrument. The present work aims to analyze TOC estimations derived using different pairs of wavelengths in the UV range (spectral and weighted by the filter response) as it would be recorded by the two main families of multifilter instruments (NILU-UV and GUV). Their spectral responses have been used for determining the response-weighted quantities from Brewer spectra. Validation against TOC values retrieved from direct solar measurements by a reference Brewer spectroradiometer shows that 340:305 wavelengths/channels result in the most accurate TOC estimations. According to our results, TOC values retrieved using response-weighted irradiance are more robust than those obtained using spectral irradiances at certain nominal wavelengths. This finding suggests calibrating multifilter radiometers towards the accurate measurement of response-weighted irradiances, being necessary to characterize the spectral response of each channel.

  13. Aquarius Radiometer Performance: Early On-Orbit Calibration and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; LeVine, David M.; Yueh, Simon H.; Wentz, Frank; Ruf, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The Aquarius/SAC-D observatory was launched into a 657-km altitude, 6-PM ascending node, sun-synchronous polar orbit from Vandenberg, California, USA on June 10, 2011. The Aquarius instrument was commissioned two months after launch and began operating in mission mode August 25. The Aquarius radiometer meets all engineering requirements, exhibited initial calibration biases within expected error bars, and continues to operate well. A review of the instrument design, discussion of early on-orbit performance and calibration assessment, and investigation of an on-going calibration drift are summarized in this abstract.

  14. Optimal estimation of water vapour profiles using a combination of Raman lidar and microwave radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foth, Andreas; Pospichal, Bernhard

    2017-09-01

    In this work, a two-step algorithm to obtain water vapour profiles from a combination of Raman lidar and microwave radiometer is presented. Both instruments were applied during an intensive 2-month measurement campaign (HOPE) close to Jülich, western Germany, during spring 2013. To retrieve reliable water vapour information from inside or above the cloud a two-step algorithm is applied. The first step is a Kalman filter that extends the profiles, truncated at cloud base, to the full height range (up to 10 km) by combining previous information and current measurement. Then the complete water vapour profile serves as input to the one-dimensional variational (1D-VAR) method, also known as optimal estimation. A forward model simulates the brightness temperatures which would be observed by the microwave radiometer for the given atmospheric state. The profile is iteratively modified according to its error bars until the modelled and the actually measured brightness temperatures sufficiently agree. The functionality of the retrieval is presented in detail by means of case studies under different conditions. A statistical analysis shows that the availability of Raman lidar data (night) improves the accuracy of the profiles even under cloudy conditions. During the day, the absence of lidar data results in larger differences in comparison to reference radiosondes. The data availability of the full-height water vapour lidar profiles of 17 % during the 2-month campaign is significantly enhanced to 60 % by applying the retrieval. The bias with respect to radiosonde and the retrieved a posteriori uncertainty of the retrieved profiles clearly show that the application of the Kalman filter considerably improves the accuracy and quality of the retrieved mixing ratio profiles.

  15. Study of high frequency MHD modes from ECE radiometer in Tore Supra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubuit N.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Tore Supra ECE diagnostic has been recently upgraded to study MHD modes driven by energetic particles up to 400 kHz. To improve the measurement sensitivity, the ECE signals of the 32 channels radiometer were amplified just below the saturation limit and sources of noise were investigated in order to keep it as low as possible. With such an improvement, fast particle driven modes with frequencies up to 200 kHz were detected. A 4-channel correlation ECE system using YIG filters with tuneable frequency was also installed. It allows fine radial scans of MHD modes and correlation length measurements. For the two kinds of YIG filter in use, the minimum frequency separation between two ECE channels that could be achieved was established measuring the correlation coefficient between the respective radiation noises. Finally, by modelling the ECE radiometer taking into account the antenna radiation pattern and the vertical position of the ECE beam relative to the plasma centre we improved the data analysis tools, thus giving a better determination of the phase radial structure of ECE oscillations. The poloidal structure of MHD modes can then be identified from ECE data and, for off axis ECE lines of sight, the direction of the plasma rotation can also be determined. This method allows identifying the occurrence of an inverse cascade of electron fishbone modes ranging from m/n=4/4 to 1/1 (m and n are the poloidal and toroidal mode numbers, respectively which appears in lower hybrid current drive plasmas.

  16. Physical, biological, and chemical data from radiometer, profiling reflectance radiometer, and CTD casts in a world-wide distribution as part of the SeaWiFS/SIMBIOS project from 13 September 1981 to 16 December 1999 (NODC Accession 0000632)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical, biological, and chemical data were collected using radiometer, profiling reflectance radiometer, and CTD casts in a world-wide distribution from 13...

  17. Errors from Rayleigh-Jeans approximation in satellite microwave radiometer calibration systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Fuzhong; Zou, Xiaolei

    2013-01-20

    The advanced technology microwave sounder (ATMS) onboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite is a total power radiometer and scans across the track within a range of ±52.77° from nadir. It has 22 channels and measures the microwave radiation at either quasi-vertical or quasi-horizontal polarization from the Earth's atmosphere. The ATMS sensor data record algorithm employed a commonly used two-point calibration equation that derives the earth-view brightness temperature directly from the counts and temperatures of warm target and cold space, and the earth-scene count. This equation is only valid under Rayleigh-Jeans (RJ) approximation. Impacts of RJ approximation on ATMS calibration biases are evaluated in this study. It is shown that the RJ approximation used in ATMS radiometric calibration results in errors on the order of 1-2 K. The error is also scene count dependent and increases with frequency.

  18. Aquarius L-Band Microwave Radiometer: Three Years of Radiometric Performance and Systematic Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Hong, Liang; Pellerano, Fernando A.

    2015-01-01

    The Aquarius L-band microwave radiometer is a three-beam pushbroom instrument designed to measure sea surface salinity. Results are analyzed for performance and systematic effects over three years of operation. The thermal control system maintains tight temperature stability promoting good gain stability. The gain spectrum exhibits expected orbital variations with 1f noise appearing at longer time periods. The on-board detection and integration scheme coupled with the calibration algorithm produce antenna temperatures with NEDT 0.16 K for 1.44-s samples. Nonlinearity is characterized before launch and the derived correction is verified with cold-sky calibration data. Finally, long-term drift is discovered in all channels with 1-K amplitude and 100-day time constant. Nonetheless, it is adeptly corrected using an exponential model.

  19. Maturation and Hardening of the Stabilized Radiometer Platforms (STRAPS) Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucholtz, A. [U.S. Naval Research Lab. Washington, DC (United States); Bluth, R. [U.S. Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA (United States); Pfaff, B. [L-3 Communications, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of solar and infrared irradiance by instruments rigidly mounted to an aircraft have historically been plagued by the introduction of offsets and fluctuations into the data that are solely due to the pitch and roll movements of the aircraft. Two STabilized RAdiometer Platforms (STRAPs) were developed for the U.S. Navy in the early to mid-2000s to address this problem. The development was a collaborative effort between the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), the Naval Postgraduate School Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Sandia National Laboratories. The STRAPs were designed and built by L-3 Communications Sonoma EO (formerly the small business Sonoma Design Group).

  20. Calibration and uncertainty estimation of erythemal radiometers in the argentine ultraviolet monitoring network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cede, Alexander; Luccini, Eduardo; Nuñez, Liliana; Piacentini, Rubén D; Blumthaler, Mario

    2002-10-20

    The erythemal radiometers of the Ultraviolet Monitoring Network of the Argentine Servicio Meteorológico Nacional were calibrated in an extensive in situ campaign from October 1998 to April 1999 with Austrian reference instruments. Methods to correct the influence of the location's horizon and long-term detector changes are applied. The different terms that contribute to the measurement uncertainty are analyzed. The expanded uncertainty is estimated to be +/- 10% at 70 degrees solar zenith angle (SZA) and +/-6% for a SZA of <50 degrees. We observed significant changes for some detectors over hours and days, reaching a maximum diurnal drift of +/-5% at a SZA of 70 degrees and a maximum weekly variation of +/-4%.

  1. Cryogenic absolute radiometers as laboratory irradiance standards, remote sensing detectors, and pyroheliometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foukal, P V; Hoyt, C; Kochling, H; Miller, P

    1990-03-01

    The dramatic improvement in heat diffusivity of pure copper at liquid helium temperatures makes possible very important advances in the absolute accuracy, reproducibility, sensitivity, and time constant of cryogenic electrical substitution radiometers (ESRs), relative to conventional ESRs. The design and characterization of a table top cryogenic ESR now available for detector calibration work to the 0.01% level of absolute accuracy under laser illumination is discussed. A sensitive cryogenic ESR recently delivered to the NIST for radiometric calibrations of black bodies is also described, along with the design and testing of a very fast cryogenic ESR developed for NASA's remote sensing studies of the earth's radiation budget. Finally, the improvements that could be achieved in total and UV solar irradiance measurement using cryogenic ESRs are mentioned.

  2. Iapetus' near surface thermal emission modeled and constrained using Cassini RADAR Radiometer microwave observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gall, A.; Leyrat, C.; Janssen, M. A.; Keihm, S.; Wye, L. C.; West, R.; Lorenz, R. D.; Tosi, F.

    2014-10-01

    Since its arrival at Saturn, the Cassini spacecraft has had only a few opportunities to observe Iapetus, Saturn's most distant regular satellite. These observations were all made from long ranges (>100,000 km) except on September 10, 2007, during Cassini orbit 49, when the spacecraft encountered the two-toned moon during its closest flyby so far. In this pass it collected spatially resolved data on the object's leading side, mainly over the equatorial dark terrains of Cassini Regio (CR). In this paper, we examine the radiometry data acquired by the Cassini RADAR during both this close-targeted flyby (referred to as IA49-3) and the distant Iapetus observations. In the RADAR's passive mode, the receiver functions as a radiometer to record the thermal emission from planetary surfaces at a wavelength of 2.2-cm. On the cold icy surfaces of Saturn's moons, the measured brightness temperatures depend both on the microwave emissivity and the physical temperature profile below the surface down to a depth that is likely to be tens of centimeters or even a few meters. Combined with the concurrent active data, passive measurements can shed light on the composition, structure and thermal properties of planetary regoliths and thus on the processes from which they have formed and evolved. The model we propose for Iapetus' microwave thermal emission is fitted to the IA49-3 observations and reveals that the thermal inertias sensed by the Cassini Radiometer over both CR and the bright mid-to-high latitude terrains, namely Ronceveaux Terra (RT) in the North and Saragossa Terra (ST) in the South, significantly exceed those measured by Cassini's CIRS (Composite Infrared Spectrometer), which is sensitive to much smaller depths, generally the first few millimeters of the surface. This implies that the subsurface of Iapetus sensed at 2.2-cm wavelength is more consolidated than the uppermost layers of the surface. In the case of CR, a thermal inertia of at least 50 J m-2 K-1 s-1/2, and

  3. Comparison of stratospheric temperature profiles from a ground-based microwave radiometer with lidar, radiosonde and satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas-Guzmán, Francisco; Kämpfer, Niklaus; Haefele, Alexander; Keckhut, Philippe; Hauchecorne, Alain

    2015-04-01

    The importance of the knowledge of the temperature structure in the atmosphere has been widely recognized. Temperature is a key parameter for dynamical, chemical and radiative processes in the atmosphere. The cooling of the stratosphere is an indicator for climate change as it provides evidence of natural and anthropogenic climate forcing just like surface warming ( [1] and references therein). However, our understanding of the observed stratospheric temperature trend and our ability to test simulations of the stratospheric response to emissions of greenhouse gases and ozone depleting substances remains limited. Stratospheric long-term datasets are sparse and obtained trends differ from one another [1]. Therefore it is important that in the future such datasets are generated. Different techniques allow to measure stratospheric temperature profiles as radiosonde, lidar or satellite. The main advantage of microwave radiometers against these other instruments is a high temporal resolution with a reasonable good spatial resolution. Moreover, the measurement at a fixed location allows to observe local atmospheric dynamics over a long time period, which is crucial for climate research. TEMPERA (TEMPERature RAdiometer) is a newly developed ground-based microwave radiometer designed, built and operated at the University of Bern. The instrument and the retrieval of temperature profiles has been described in detail in [2]. TEMPERA is measuring a pressure broadened oxygen line at 53.1 GHz in order to determine stratospheric temperature profiles. The retrieved profiles of TEMPERA cover an altitude range of approximately 20 to 45 km with a vertical resolution in the order of 15 km. The lower limit is given by the instrumental baseline and the bandwidth of the measured spectrum. The upper limit is given by the fact that above 50 km the oxygen lines are splitted by the Zeeman effect in the terrestrial magnetic field. In this study we present a comparison of stratospheric

  4. Technique for Radiometer and Antenna Array Calibration with a Radiated Noise Diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Karthik; Limaye, Ashutosh; Laymon, Charles; Meyer, Paul

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a new technique to calibrate a microwave radiometer and antenna array system. This calibration technique uses a radiated noise source in addition to two calibration sources internal to the radiometer. The method accurately calibrates antenna arrays with embedded active devices (such as amplifiers) which are used extensively in active phased array antennas.

  5. Challenges in application of Active Cold Loads for microwave radiometer calibration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl; Balling, Jan E.; Skou, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Two Active Cold Loads (ACLs) for microwave radiometer calibration, operating at X-band, are evaluated with respect to important stability parameters. Using a stable radiometer system as test bed, absolute levels of 77 K and 55 K are found. This paper identifies and summarizes potential challenges...

  6. A spaceborne synthetic aperture radiometer simulated by the TUD demonstration model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Brian; Skou, Niels

    1994-01-01

    The TUD synthetic aperture radiometer demonstration model consists of a 2-channel X-band correlation radiometer with two horn antennas and an antenna mounting structure enabling the horns to be mounted in relevant positions within a certain aperture. The cross correlation of the signals from the 2...

  7. Observations of water vapor by ground-based micro-wave radiometers and Raman lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yong; Snider, J. B.; Westwater, E. R.; Melfi, S. H.; Ferrare, R. A.

    1994-09-01

    In November to December 1991, a substantial number of remote sensors and in situ instruments were operated together in Coffeyville, Kansas, during the climate experiment FIRE II. Included in the suite of instruments were (1) the NOAA Environmental Technology Laboratory (ETL) three-channel microwave radiometer, (2) the NASA GSFC Raman lidar, (3) ETL radio acoustic sounding system (RASS), and (4) frequent, research-quality radiosondes. The Raman lidar operated only at night and the focus of this portion of the experiment concentrated on clear conditions. The lidar data, together with frequent radiosondes and measurements of temperature profiles (every 15 min) by RASS allowed profiles of temperature and absolute humidity to be estimated every minute. We compared 2-min measurements of brightness temperature (Tb) with calculations of Tb that were based on the Liebe and Lay ton (1987) and Liebe et al. (1993) microwave propagation models, as well as the Waters (1976) model. The comparisons showed the best agreement at 20.6 GHz with the Waters model, with the Liebe et al. (1993) model being best at 31.65 GHz. The results at 90 GHz gave about equal success with the Liebe and Layton (1987) and Liebe et al. (1993) models. Comparisons of precipitable water vapor derived independently from the two instruments also showed excellent agreement, even for averages as short as 2 min. The rms difference between Raman and radiometric determinations of precipitable water vapor was 0.03 cm which is roughly 2%. The experiments clearly demonstrate the potential of simultaneous operation of radiometers and Raman lidars for fundamental physical studies of water vapor.

  8. Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Partnership Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite Polarization Sensitivity Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Junqiang; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Waluschka, Eugene; Wang, Menghua

    2016-01-01

    The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) is one of five instruments onboard the Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite that launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California, on October 28, 2011. It is a whiskbroom radiometer that provides +/-56.28deg scans of the Earth view. It has 22 bands, among which 14 are reflective solar bands (RSBs). The RSBs cover a wavelength range from 410 to 2250 nm. The RSBs of a remote sensor are usually sensitive to the polarization of incident light. For VIIRS, it is specified that the polarization factor should be smaller than 3% for 410 and 862 nm bands and 2.5% for other RSBs for the scan angle within +/-45deg. Several polarization sensitivity tests were performed prelaunch for SNPP VIIRS. The first few tests either had large uncertainty or were less reliable, while the last one was believed to provide the more accurate information about the polarization property of the instrument. In this paper, the measured data in the last polarization sensitivity test are analyzed, and the polarization factors and phase angles are derived from the measurements for all the RSBs. The derived polarization factors and phase angles are band, detector, and scan angle dependent. For near-infrared bands, they also depend on the half-angle mirror side. Nevertheless, the derived polarization factors are all within the specification, although the strong detector dependence of the polarization parameters was not expected. Compared to the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer on both Aqua and Terra satellites, the polarization effect on VIIRS RSB is much smaller.

  9. The Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-Earth Observing System Data Products from the Aqua Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, D.; Troisi, V.; Marquis, M.; Armstrong, R.; Stroeve, J.; Maslanik, J.; Axford, Y.; Wolfe, J.

    2001-12-01

    The Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) is scheduled to launch on NASA's Aqua Satellite in early 2002. The Aqua mission is an important part of the NASA Earth Science Enterprise (ESE). The Aqua mission provides a multi-disciplinary study of the Earth's atmospheric, oceanic, cryospheric, and land processes and their relationship to global change. With six instruments aboard, the Aqua Satellite will travel in a polar, sun-synchronous orbit. The AMSR-E will measure passive microwave radiation, allowing for derivation of many geophysical parameters, including cloud properties, radiative energy flux, precipitation, land surface wetness, sea surface temperatures, sea ice, snow cover, and sea surface wind fields. The AMSR-E has much greater spatial resolution than previous passive microwave radiometers: approximately double the spatial resolution of the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) and the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I). Further, the AMSR-E combines in one sensor all the channels that SMMR and SSM/I had individually. The AMSR-E has the following frequencies (in GHz): 6.9, 10.7, 18.7, 23.8, 36.5, and 89. The level 1A data product will contain chronological antenna temperature count data. The level 2A data product will contain spatially-resampled brightness temperatures (in global swath format) at resolutions of 56, 38, 21, 12 and 5.4 km. Level 2B data will include ocean, soil moisture, and rain products. Level 3 data will include gridded ocean, soil moisture, and rain products; gridded snow water equivalent products; gridded brightness temperatures; and gridded sea ice concentration and snow depth products. The National Space Agency of Japan (NASDA) will process level 0 data to level 1A data. The AMSR-E Science Investigator-led Processing System (SIPS) will process the level 1A data product to level 2 and 3 data products. The National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) will archive and distribute all AMSR

  10. Aerosol ultraviolet absorption experiment (2002 to 2004), part 1: ultraviolet multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer calibration and intercomparison with CIMEL sunphotometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krotkov, Nickolay A.; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Herman, Jay R.; Slusser, James R.; Labow, Gordon J.; Scott, Gwendolyn R.; Janson, George T.; Eck, Tom; Holben, Brent N.

    2005-04-01

    Radiative transfer calculations of UV irradiance from total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS) satellite data are frequently overestimated compared to ground-based measurements because of the presence of undetected absorbing aerosols in the planetary boundary layer. To reduce these uncertainties, an aerosol UV absorption closure experiment has been conducted at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Goddard Space Flight Center (NASA/GSFC) site in Greenbelt, Maryland, using 17 months of data from a shadowband radiometer [UV-multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (UV-MFRSR), U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) UV-B Monitoring and Research Network] colocated with a group of three sun-sky CIMEL radiometers [rotating reference instruments of the NASA Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET)]. We describe an improved UV-MFRSR on-site calibration method augmented by AERONET-CIMEL measurements of aerosol extinction optical thickness (τa) interpolated or extrapolated to the UV-MFRSR wavelengths and measurement intervals. The estimated τa is used as input to a UV-MFRSR spectral-band model, along with independent column ozone and surface pressure measurements, to estimate zero air mass voltages V0 in three longer wavelength UV-MFRSR channels (325, 332, 368 nm). Daily mean , estimates and standard deviations are obtained for cloud-free conditions and compared with the on-site UV-MFRSR Langley plot calibration method. By repeating the calibrations on clear days, relatively good stability (+/-2% in ) is found in summer, with larger relative changes in fall-winter seasons.

  11. CAROLS: A New Airborne L-Band Radiometer for Ocean Surface and Land Observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zribi, Mehrez; Parde, Mickael; Boutin, Jacquline

    2011-01-01

    on board a dedicated French ATR42 research aircraft, in conjunction with other airborne instruments (C-Band scatterometer-STORM, the GOLD-RTR GPS system, the infrared CIMEL radiometer and a visible wavelength camera). Following initial laboratory qualifications, three airborne campaigns involving 21......The "Cooperative Airborne Radiometer for Ocean and Land Studies" (CAROLS) L-Band radiometer was designed and built as a copy of the EMIRAD II radiometer constructed by the Technical University of Denmark team. It is a fully polarimetric and direct sampling correlation radiometer. It is installed...... flights were carried out over South West France, the Valencia site and the Bay of Biscay (Atlantic Ocean) in 2007, 2008 and 2009, in coordination with in situ field campaigns. In order to validate the CAROLS data, various aircraft flight patterns and maneuvers were implemented, including straight...

  12. Lidar-Radiometer Inversion Code (LIRIC) for the Retrieval of Vertical Aerosol Properties from Combined Lidar Radiometer Data: Development and Distribution in EARLINET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaikovsky, A.; Dubovik, O.; Holben, Brent N.; Bril, A.; Goloub, P.; Tanre, D.; Pappalardo, G.; Wandinger, U.; Chaikovskaya, L.; Denisov, S.; hide

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a detailed description of LIRIC (LIdar-Radiometer Inversion Code)algorithm for simultaneous processing of coincident lidar and radiometric (sun photometric) observations for the retrieval of the aerosol concentration vertical profiles. As the lidar radiometric input data we use measurements from European Aerosol Re-search Lidar Network (EARLINET) lidars and collocated sun-photometers of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). The LIRIC data processing provides sequential inversion of the combined lidar and radiometric data by the estimations of column-integrated aerosol parameters from radiometric measurements followed by the retrieval of height-dependent concentrations of fine and coarse aerosols from lidar signals using integrated column characteristics of aerosol layer as a priori constraints. The use of polarized lidar observations allows us to discriminate between spherical and non-spherical particles of the coarse aerosol mode. The LIRIC software package was implemented and tested at a number of EARLINET stations. Inter-comparison of the LIRIC-based aerosol retrievals was performed for the observations by seven EARLNET lidars in Leipzig, Germany on 25 May 2009. We found close agreement between the aerosol parameters derived from different lidars that supports high robustness of the LIRIC algorithm. The sensitivity of the retrieval results to the possible reduction of the available observation data is also discussed.

  13. Development of a L-band ocean emissivity electromagnetic model using observations from the Aquarius Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejazin, Y.; Jones, W.; El-Nimri, S.

    2012-12-01

    The Aquarius/SAC-D ocean salinity measurement mission was launched into polar orbit during the summer of 2011. The prime sensor is an L-band radiometer/scatterometer developed jointly by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. This paper deals with the development of an ocean emissivity model using AQ radiometer brightness temperature (Tb) observations. This model calculates the ocean surface emissivity as a function of ocean salinity, sea surface temperature, surface wind speed and direction. One unique aspect of this model is that it calculates ocean emissivity over wide ranges of Earth incidence angles (EIAs) from nadir to > 60°and ocean wind speeds from 0 m/s to > 70 m/s. This physical electromagnetic model with empirical coefficients follows the form of Stogryn [1967] that treats the ocean as a mixture of foam and clean rough water. The CFRSL ocean surface emissivity (ɛocean) is modeled as a linear sum of foam (ɛfoam) and foam-free seawater (ɛrough) emissivities, according to ɛocean = FF * ɛfoam + (1 - FF) * ɛrough (1) where FF is the fractional area coverage by foam. The foam emissivity is modeled as ɛfoam = Q(freq, U10, EIA) (2) where Q( ) is the empirical dependence of foam emissivity on radiometer frequency, the 10-m neutral stability wind speed and EIA according to El-Nimri [2010]. Following Stogryn, the foam-free seawater emissivity (ɛrough) is modeled ɛrough = ɛsmooth +Δɛexcess (3) where ɛsmooth = (1 - Γ) is the smooth surface emissivity, Γ is the Fresnel power reflection coefficient, and Δɛexcess is the wind-induced excess emissivity, given by Δɛexcess = G(freq, U10, WDir, EIA) (4) Where G( ) is the empirical signature of foam-free rough ocean, which depends upon the surface wind speed and wind direction. This function is determined empirically from measured AQ radiometer Tb's associated with surface wind vector from collocated NOAA GDAS numerical weather model. Ocean emissivity calculations are compared

  14. A Compact L-band Radiometer for High Resolution sUAS-based Imaging of Soil Moisture and Surface Salinity Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasiewski, A. J.; Stachura, M.; Dai, E.; Elston, J.; McIntyre, E.; Leuski, V.

    2014-12-01

    Due to the long electrical wavelengths required along with practical aperture size limitations the scaling of passive microwave remote sensing of soil moisture and salinity from spaceborne low-resolution (~10-100 km) applications to high resolution (~10-1000 m) applications requires use of low flying aerial vehicles. This presentation summarizes the status of a project to develop a commercial small Unmanned Aerial System (sUAS) hosting a microwave radiometer for mapping of soil moisture in precision agriculture and sea surface salinity studies. The project is based on the Tempest electric-powered UAS and a compact L-band (1400-1427 MHz) radiometer developed specifically for extremely small and lightweight aerial platforms or man-portable, tractor, or tower-based applications. Notable in this combination are a highly integrated sUAS/radiometer antenna design and use of both the upwelling emitted signal from the surface and downwelling cold space signal for precise calibration using a unique lobe-differencing correlating radiometer architecture. The system achieves a spatial resolution comparable to the altitude of the UAS above the surface while referencing upwelling measurements to the constant and well-known background temperature of cold space. The radiometer has been tested using analog correlation detection, although future builds will include infrared, near-infrared, and visible (red) sensors for surface temperature and vegetation biomass correction and digital sampling for radio frequency interference mitigation. This NASA-sponsored project is being developed for commercial application in cropland water management (for example, high-value shallow root-zone crops), landslide risk assessment, NASA SMAP satellite validation, and NASA Aquarius salinity stratification studies. The system will ultimately be capable of observing salinity events caused by coastal glacier and estuary fresh water outflow plumes and open ocean rainfall events.

  15. Retrieval of Aerosol Optical Depth and PM10 Concentration from ulti-Angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR) Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, J.; Bojinski [PSI and University of Zurich (Switzerland); Prevot, A.

    2004-03-01

    The aerosol extinction coefficient, optical depth and PM10 concentration (particulate matter with particle diameter d < 10 m) were estimated from radiance data of the Multi-Angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR). The outputs of the algorithm for low and high aerosol loads were compared to sun photometry and in-situ PM10 measurements. In the spatial aerosol patterns well known features like enhanced pollution in the Po basin were identified. Realistic values were found over water. Values over land were too low, because the non-lambertian reflectance of land surfaces was not yet taken fully into account. (author)

  16. Global ultraviolet spectra derived directly from observations with multichannel radiometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuenzalida, H A

    1998-11-20

    Some general features of multichannel filter radiometers operating in the UV region of the solar spectrum are reviewed with emphasis on calibration problems that are due to incomplete knowledge of responsivity in the UV-B region. An alternative calibration procedure that is able to generate a full UV spectrum obtained by a constrained inversion method is presented. Accuracy of such spectra is assessed with simulated and with real data. A comparison between customary calibration and an alternative procedure is made in terms of monochromatic UV-B irradiance and CIE dose rate (CIE is the Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage) and indicates that irradiances are estimated within 8% accuracy with solar zenith angles as great as 60 degrees and that dose rates are within 6% for any solar zenith angle. The advantage of having an additional channel in the UV-B region is considered.

  17. The infrared imaging radiometer for PICASSO-CENA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corlay, Gilles; Arnolfo, Marie-Christine; Bret-Dibat, Thierry; Lifferman, Anne; Pelon, Jacques

    2017-11-01

    Microbolometers are infrared detectors of an emerging technology mainly developed in US and few other countries for few years. The main targets of these developments are low performing and low cost military and civilian applications like survey cameras. Applications in space are now arising thanks to the design simplification and the associated cost reduction allowed by this new technology. Among the four instruments of the payload of PICASSO-CENA, the Imaging Infrared Radiometer (IIR) is based on the microbolometer technology. An infrared camera in development for the IASI instrument is the core of the IIR. The aim of the paper is to recall the PICASSO-CENA mission goal, to describe the IIR instrument architecture and highlight its main features and performances and to give the its development status.

  18. Data processing for the DMSP microwave radiometer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigone, J. L.; Stogryn, A. P.

    1977-01-01

    A software program was developed and tested to process microwave radiometry data to be acquired by the microwave sensor (SSM/T) on the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program spacecraft. The SSM/T 7-channel microwave radiometer and systems data will be data-linked to Air Force Global Weather Central (AFGWC) where they will be merged with ephemeris data prior to product processing for use in the AFGWC upper air data base (UADB). The overall system utilizes an integrated design to provide atmospheric temperature soundings for global applications. The fully automated processing at AFGWC was accomplished by four related computer processor programs to produce compatible UADB soundings, evaluate system performance, and update the a priori developed inversion matrices. Tests with simulated data produced results significantly better than climatology.

  19. Rapid assessment of water pollution by airborne measurement of chlorophyll content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvesen, J. C.; Weaver, E. C.; Millard, J. P.

    1971-01-01

    Present techniques of airborne chlorophyll measurement are discussed as an approach to water pollution assessment. The differential radiometer, the chlorophyll correlation radiometer, and an infrared radiometer for water temperature measurements are described as the key components of the equipment. Also covered are flight missions carried out to evaluate the capability of the chlorophyll correlation radiometer in measuring the chlorophyll content in water bodies with widely different levels of nutrients, such as fresh-water lakes of high and low eutrophic levels, marine waters of high and low productivity, and an estuary with a high sediment content. The feasibility and usefulness of these techniques are indicated.

  20. Assessment of Satellite-Derived Surface Reflectances by NASA's CAR Airborne Radiometer over Railroad Valley, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharbouche, Said; Muller, Jan-Peter; Gatebe, Charles K.; Scanlon, Tracy; Banks, Andrew C.

    2017-01-01

    CAR (Cloud Absorption Radiometer) is a multi-angular and multi-spectral airborne radiometer instrument, whose radiometric and geometric characteristics are well calibrated and adjusted before and after each flight campaign. CAR was built by NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) in 1984. On 16 May 2008, a CAR flight campaign took place over the well-known calibration and validation site of Railroad Valley in Nevada (38.504 deg N, 115.692 deg W).The campaign coincided with the overpasses of several key EO (Earth Observation) satellites such as Landsat-7, Envisat and Terra. Thus, there are nearly simultaneous measurements from these satellites and the CAR airborne sensor over the same calibration site. The CAR spectral bands are close to those of most EO satellites. CAR has the ability to cover the whole range of azimuth view angles and a variety of zenith angles depending on altitude and, as a consequence, the biases seen between satellite and CAR measurements due to both unmatched spectral bands and unmatched angles can be significantly reduced. A comparison is presented here between CARs land surface reflectance (BRF or Bidirectional Reflectance Factor) with those derived from Terra/MODIS (MOD09 and MAIAC), Terra/MISR, Envisat/MERIS and Landsat-7. In this study, we utilized CAR data from low altitude flights (approx. 180 m above the surface) in order to minimize the effects of the atmosphere on these measurements and then obtain a valuable ground-truth data set of surface reflectance. Furthermore, this study shows that differences between measurements caused by surface heterogeneity can be tolerated, thanks to the high homogeneity of the study site on the one hand, and on the other hand, to the spatial sampling and the large number of CAR samples. These results demonstrate that satellite BRF measurements over this site are in good agreement with CAR with variable biases across different spectral bands. This is most likely due to residual aerosol

  1. Digital processor breadboard for RFI detection and mitigation in spaceborne radiometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Steen Savstrup; Skou, Niels; Kovanen, Arhippa

    2014-01-01

    The increasing problem with Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) in protected radiometer frequency bands has inspired the development and implementation of methods for detecting RFI. With increasing demands for next generation spaceborne radiometers, it becomes necessary to include RFI detection...... in such systems. Since input to these methods require much more data than traditional radiometer data, and since the downlink capacity for spaceborne systems are limited, RFI detection and mitigation must be implemented on-board thereby maintaining the low downlink data rate. The development of such a system...

  2. Atmospheric absorption model for dry air and water vapor at microwave frequencies below 100 GHz derived from spaceborne radiometer observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentz, Frank J.; Meissner, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    The Liebe and Rosenkranz atmospheric absorption models for dry air and water vapor below 100 GHz are refined based on an analysis of antenna temperature (TA) measurements taken by the Global Precipitation Measurement Microwave Imager (GMI) in the frequency range 10.7 to 89.0 GHz. The GMI TA measurements are compared to the TA predicted by a radiative transfer model (RTM), which incorporates both the atmospheric absorption model and a model for the emission and reflection from a rough-ocean surface. The inputs for the RTM are the geophysical retrievals of wind speed, columnar water vapor, and columnar cloud liquid water obtained from the satellite radiometer WindSat. The Liebe and Rosenkranz absorption models are adjusted to achieve consistency with the RTM. The vapor continuum is decreased by 3% to 10%, depending on vapor. To accomplish this, the foreign-broadening part is increased by 10%, and the self-broadening part is decreased by about 40% at the higher frequencies. In addition, the strength of the water vapor line is increased by 1%, and the shape of the line at low frequencies is modified. The dry air absorption is increased, with the increase being a maximum of 20% at the 89 GHz, the highest frequency considered here. The nonresonant oxygen absorption is increased by about 6%. In addition to the RTM comparisons, our results are supported by a comparison between columnar water vapor retrievals from 12 satellite microwave radiometers and GPS-retrieved water vapor values.

  3. HP3-RAD: a compact radiometer design with on-site calibration for in-situ exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Emanuel; Mueller, Nils; Grott, Matthias; Walter, Ingo; Knollenberg, Jörg; Hanschke, Frank; Kessler, Ernst; Meyer, Hans-Georg

    2016-09-01

    Many processes on planetary bodies are driven by their respective surface energy balance, and while planetary climate is influenced by the dynamics of the atmospheric boundary layer, surface radiation drives the Yarkovksy and YORB effects on small airless bodies. In addition, insolation governs cometary activity and drives the dust cycle on Mars. The radiative flux received and emitted at the surface of solar system bodies is thus a fundamental quantity, which is driven by the reception of solar radiation in the visible wavelength band, while re-radiation primarily occurs in the thermal infrared. Knowledge of the relevant radiative fluxes enables studies of thermo-physical surface properties, and radiometers to measure surface brightness temperatures have been payloads on many missions. The HP3-RAD is part of the Heat Flow and Physical Properties Package (HP3) on the InSight mission to Mars. It is a light-weight thermal infrared radiometer with compact design. HP3-RAD measures radiative flux in 3 spectral bands using thermopile detectors. The 120 g device includes integrated front-end electronics as well as a deployable cover that protects the sensors from dust contamination during landing. In addition, the cover is simultaneously used as a calibration target. The instrument concept as well as its implementation will be described, and special emphasis will be put on technological challenges encountered during instrument development. Potential future improvements of the design will be discussed.

  4. Three-dimensional vector modeling and restoration of flat finite wave tank radiometric measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truman, W. M.; Balanis, C. A.

    1977-01-01

    The three-dimensional vector interaction between a microwave radiometer and a wave tank was modeled. Computer programs for predicting the response of the radiometer to the brightness temperature characteristics of the surroundings were developed along with a computer program that can invert (restore) the radiometer measurements. It is shown that the computer programs can be used to simulate the viewing of large bodies of water, and is applicable to radiometer measurements received from satellites monitoring the ocean. The water temperature, salinity, and wind speed can be determined.

  5. GPM GROUND VALIDATION ADVANCED MICROWAVE PRECIPITATION RADIOMETER (AMPR) MC3E V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR) instrument played a key role in the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E). The AMPR...

  6. A satellite-based multichannel infrared radiometer to sound the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esplin, Roy W.; Batty, J. Clair; Jensen, Mark; McLain, Dave; Jensen, Scott; Stauder, John; Stump, Charles W.; Roettker, William A.; Vanek, Michael D.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes a 12-channel infrared radiometer with the acronym SABER (Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission radiometry) that has been selected by NASA to fly on the TIMED (Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics) mission.

  7. GPM GROUND VALIDATION CONICAL SCANNING MILLIMETER-WAVE IMAGING RADIOMETER (COSMIR) GCPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Conical Scanning Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer (CoSMIR) dataset for the GPM Cold-season Precipitation Experiment (GCPEx) plays the role as an airborne...

  8. GPM GROUND VALIDATION CONICAL SCANNING MILLIMETER-WAVE IMAGING RADIOMETER (COSMIR) MC3E V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Conical Scanning Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer (CoSMIR) dataset for the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) plays the role as an...

  9. GPM GROUND VALIDATION CONICAL SCANNING MILLIMETER-WAVE IMAGING RADIOMETER (COSMIR) IPHEx V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Conical Scanning Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer (CoSMIR) IPHEx dataset includes data gathered during the Integrated Precipitation and...

  10. GPM GROUND VALIDATION ADVANCED MICROWAVE PRECIPITATION RADIOMETER (AMPR) IPHEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR) IPHEx dataset was acquired by the AMPR instrument during the IPHEx field campaign in...

  11. GPM GROUND VALIDATION ADVANCED MICROWAVE PRECIPITATION RADIOMETER (AMPR) IPHEX V2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR) IPHEx dataset was acquired by the AMPR instrument during the IPHEx field campaign in...

  12. AVHRR Orbital Segment = NOAA's Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer Files: 1992 - 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data set is comprised of data collected by the AVHRR sensor and held in the archives of the USGS Earth Resources...

  13. Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) Monthly Mean Integrated Water Vapor (IWV) By Prabhakara

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SMMR_IWV_PRABHAKARA data are Special Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) Monthly Mean Integrated Water Vapor (IWV) data by Prabhakara.The Scanning Multichannel...

  14. Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) Monthly Mean Atmospheric Liquid Water (ALW) By Prabhakara

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SMMR_ALW_PRABHAKARA data are Special Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) Monthly Mean Atmospheric Liquid Water (ALW) data by Prabhakara.The Prabhakara Scanning...

  15. AVHRR Composites = Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer U.S. Alaska: 1989 - Present

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) Composites are produced from multiple Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) daily observations that have...

  16. NPP Visible Infrared Imager-Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Quasi-Analytical Algorithm (GSM) Global Mapped Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Visible and Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) is a multi-disciplinary instrument that is being flown on the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) series of...

  17. NPP Visible Infrared Imager-Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Quasi-Analytical Algorithm (GSM) Global Binned Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Visible and Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) is a multi-disciplinary instrument that is being flown on the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) series of...

  18. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Cloud Mask Environmental Data Record (EDR) from NDE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains a high quality Environmental Data Record (EDR) of cloud masks from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument onboard...

  19. Optimizing Performance of a Microwave Salinity Mapper: STARRS L-Band Radiometer Enhancements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Burrage, Derek M; Wesson, Joel C; Goodberlet, Mark A; Miller, Jerry L

    2007-01-01

    Airborne microwave radiometers for salinity remote sensing have advanced to a point where operational surveys can be conducted over the inner continental shelf to observe the evolution of freshwater...

  20. NPP Visible Infrared Imager-Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Remote-Sensing Reflectance (RRS) Global Mapped Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Visible and Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) is a multi-disciplinary instrument that is being flown on the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) series of...

  1. Intersatellite Calibration of Polar-orbiting Radiometers using the SNO/SCO Method

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cao, Changyong; Weng, Fuzhong; Goldberg, Mitch; Wu, Xiangqian; Xu, Hui; Ciren, Pubu

    2005-01-01

    There is an increasing demand for intercalibrating the polar-orbiting radiometers on different satellites to achieve the consistency and traceability required for long-term climate studies with the 25...

  2. Experimental and Computational Study of Area and Perimeter Contributions to Radiometer Forces (Preprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Selden, N. P; Muntz, E. P; Gimelshein, S. F; Alexeenko, A; Ketsdever, A. D

    2008-01-01

    .... Gas pressure was varied from .006 to 6 Pa, which was a broad enough range to observe the characteristic peak force production of a radiometer in the transition regime, where the peak occurs at Kn approximately 0.1...

  3. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Aerosol Detection Environmental Data Record (EDR) from NDE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) of suspended matter from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS)...

  4. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Snow Cover Environmental Data Record (EDR) from NDE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) of snow cover from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument...

  5. An optical scanning subsystem for a UAS-enabled hyperspectral radiometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A hyperspectral visible radiometer instrument system has been developed for use on UAS platforms.  It has been successfully flown on three previous UAS field...

  6. NPP Visible Infrared Imager-Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Chlorophyll (CHL) Global Mapped Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Visible and Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) is a multi-disciplinary instrument that is being flown on the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) series of...

  7. CAMEX-4 CONICALLY-SCANNING TWO-LOOK AIRBORNE RADIOMETER (C-STAR) V1a

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Conically-Scanning Two-look Airborne Radiometer (C-STAR) was deployed during the Fourth Convection and Moisture Experiment (CAMEX-4). C-STAR data were collected...

  8. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Smoothed Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) from NDE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Smoothed Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) from NDE is a weekly product derived from the VIIRS...

  9. GPM Ground Validation Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR) OLYMPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR) OLYMPEX dataset was collected by the AMPR instrument flown on the high altitude ER-2...

  10. GPM Ground Validation Conical Scanning Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer (CoSMIR) OLYMPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Conical Scanning Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer (CoSMIR) OLYMPEX dataset consists of brightness temperatures from 9 channels as...

  11. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Sensor Data Record (SDR) from IDPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Sensor Data Records (SDRs), or Level 1b data, from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) are the calibrated and geolocated radiance and reflectance...

  12. Solar-Blind Diamond Detectors for Lyra, the Solar VUV Radiometer on Board Proba II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benmoussa, A.; Hochedez, J.-F.; Schmutz, W. K.; Schühle, U.; Nesládek, M.; Stockman, Y.; Kroth, U.; Richter, M.; Theissen, A.; Remes, Z.; Haenen, K.; Mortet, V.; Koller, S.; Halain, J. P.; Petersen, R.; Dominique, M.; D'Olieslaeger, M.

    2003-12-01

    Fabrication, packaging and experimental results on the calibration of metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) photodetectors made on diamond are reported. LYRA (Lyman-α RAdiometer onboard PROBA-2) will use diamond detectors for the first time in space for a solar physics instrument. A set of measurement campaigns was designed to obtain the XUV-to-VIS responsivity of the devices and other characterizations. The measurements of responsivity in EUV and VUV spectral ranges (40 240 nm) have been carried out by the Physkalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Germany at the electron storage ring BESSY II. The longer wavelength range from 210 to 1127 nm was measured with monochromatic light by using a Xe-lamp at IMO-IMOMEC. The diamond detectors exhibit a photoresponse which lie in the 35 65 mA/W range at 200 nm (corresponding to an external quantum efficiency of 20 40%) and indicate a visible rejection ratio (200 500 nm) higher than four orders of magnitude.

  13. Quantitative Characterisation of Sky Conditions on Paranal with the Microwave Radiometer LHATPRO - Five Years and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerber, Florian; Querel, R.; Neureiter, B.; Hanuschik, R.

    2017-09-01

    "A Low Humidity and Temperature Profiling (LHATPRO) microwave radiometer, optimized for measuring small amounts of atmospheric precipitable water vapour (PWV), has now been in use for more than five years to monitor sky conditions over ESO's Paranal observatory (median PWV 2.5 mm). We'll summarise the performance characteristics of the unit and the current applications of its data in scheduling observations in Service Mode to take advantage of favourable conditions for infrared observations. We'll elaborate on our improved understanding of PWV over Paranal, including an analysis of PWV homogeneity addressing an important calibration issue. In addition we'll describe how the capabilities of the LHATPRO can be used in the future to further strengthen science operations and calibration by also offering line-of-sight support for individual VLT observations. Using its IR data we developed a method for an automated classification of photometric observing conditions in a quantitative way, supporting high precision photometry. Its highly precise PWV measurements enable new low PWV science during episodes of extremely low water vapour that result in a strongly increased transmission also outside the standard atmospheric windows. A goal for the future is to combine various diagnostics measurements (altitude resolved profiles) by LHATPRO and other instruments and sophisticated atmospheric modeling to better characterize relevant properties of the atmosphere and to thus enable more precise, local short-term forecasting for optimised science operations."

  14. An alternative method for calibration of narrow band radiometer using a radiative transfer model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvador, J; Wolfram, E; D' Elia, R [Centro de Investigaciones en Laseres y Aplicaciones, CEILAP (CITEFA-CONICET), Juan B. de La Salle 4397 (B1603ALO), Villa Martelli, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Zamorano, F; Casiccia, C [Laboratorio de Ozono y Radiacion UV, Universidad de Magallanes, Punta Arenas (Chile) (Chile); Rosales, A [Universidad Nacional de la Patagonia San Juan Bosco, UNPSJB, Facultad de Ingenieria, Trelew (Argentina) (Argentina); Quel, E, E-mail: jsalvador@citefa.gov.ar [Universidad Nacional de la Patagonia Austral, Unidad Academica Rio Gallegos Avda. Lisandro de la Torre 1070 ciudad de Rio Gallegos-Sta Cruz (Argentina) (Argentina)

    2011-01-01

    The continual monitoring of solar UV radiation is one of the major objectives proposed by many atmosphere research groups. The purpose of this task is to determine the status and degree of progress over time of the anthropogenic composition perturbation of the atmosphere. Such changes affect the intensity of the UV solar radiation transmitted through the atmosphere that then interacts with living organisms and all materials, causing serious consequences in terms of human health and durability of materials that interact with this radiation. One of the many challenges that need to be faced to perform these measurements correctly is the maintenance of periodic calibrations of these instruments. Otherwise, damage caused by the UV radiation received will render any one calibration useless after the passage of some time. This requirement makes the usage of these instruments unattractive, and the lack of frequent calibration may lead to the loss of large amounts of acquired data. Motivated by this need to maintain calibration or, at least, know the degree of stability of instrumental behavior, we have developed a calibration methodology that uses the potential of radiative transfer models to model solar radiation with 5% accuracy or better relative to actual conditions. Voltage values in each radiometer channel involved in the calibration process are carefully selected from clear sky data. Thus, tables are constructed with voltage values corresponding to various atmospheric conditions for a given solar zenith angle. Then we model with a radiative transfer model using the same conditions as for the measurements to assemble sets of values for each zenith angle. The ratio of each group (measured and modeled) allows us to calculate the calibration coefficient value as a function of zenith angle as well as the cosine response presented by the radiometer. The calibration results obtained by this method were compared with those obtained with a Brewer MKIII SN 80 located in the

  15. Aerosol optical depth determination in the UV using a four-channel precision filter radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlund, Thomas; Kouremeti, Natalia; Kazadzis, Stelios; Gröbner, Julian

    2017-03-01

    The determination of aerosol properties, especially the aerosol optical depth (AOD) in the ultraviolet (UV) wavelength region, is of great importance for understanding the climatological variability of UV radiation. However, operational retrievals of AOD at the biologically most harmful wavelengths in the UVB are currently only made at very few places. This paper reports on the UVPFR (UV precision filter radiometer) sunphotometer, a stable and robust instrument that can be used for AOD retrievals at four UV wavelengths. Instrument characteristics and results of Langley calibrations at a high-altitude site were presented. It was shown that due to the relatively wide spectral response functions of the UVPFR, the calibration constants (V0) derived from Langley plot calibrations underestimate the true extraterrestrial signals. Accordingly, correction factors were introduced. In addition, the instrument's spectral response functions also result in an apparent air-mass-dependent decrease in ozone optical depth used in the AOD determinations. An adjusted formula for the calculation of AOD, with a correction term dependent on total column ozone amount and ozone air mass, was therefore introduced. Langley calibrations performed 13-14 months apart resulted in sensitivity changes of ≤ 1.1 %, indicating good instrument stability. Comparison with a high-accuracy standard precision filter radiometer, measuring AOD at 368-862 nm wavelengths, showed consistent results. Also, very good agreement was achieved by comparing the UVPFR with AOD at UVB wavelengths derived with a Brewer spectrophotometer, which was calibrated against the UVPFR at an earlier date. Mainly due to non-instrumental uncertainties connected with ozone optical depth, the total uncertainty of AOD in the UVB is higher than that reported from AOD instruments measuring in UVA and visible ranges. However, the precision can be high among instruments using harmonized algorithms for ozone and Rayleigh optical depth as

  16. Evaluation of the new ESR network software for the retrieval of direct sun products from CIMEL CE318 and PREDE POM01 sun-sky radiometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Estellés

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The European Skynet Radiometers network (EuroSkyRad or ESR has been recently established as a research network of European PREDE sun-sky radiometers. Moreover, ESR is federated with SKYNET, an international network of PREDE sun-sky radiometers mostly present in East Asia. In contrast to SKYNET, the European network also integrates users of the CIMEL CE318 sky–sun photometer. Keeping instrumental duality in mind, a set of open source algorithms has been developed consisting of two modules for (1 the retrieval of direct sun products (aerosol optical depth, wavelength exponent and water vapor from the sun extinction measurements; and (2 the inversion of the sky radiance to derive other aerosol optical properties such as size distribution, single scattering albedo or refractive index. In this study we evaluate the ESR direct sun products in comparison with the AERosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET products. Specifically, we have applied the ESR algorithm to a CIMEL CE318 and PREDE POM simultaneously for a 4-yr database measured at the Burjassot site (Valencia, Spain, and compared the resultant products with the AERONET direct sun measurements obtained with the same CIMEL CE318 sky–sun photometer. The comparison shows that aerosol optical depth differences are mostly within the nominal uncertainty of 0.003 for a standard calibration instrument, and fall within the nominal AERONET uncertainty of 0.01–0.02 for a field instrument in the spectral range 340 to 1020 nm. In the cases of the Ångström exponent and the columnar water vapor, the differences are lower than 0.02 and 0.15 cm, respectively. Therefore, we present an open source code program that can be used with both CIMEL and PREDE sky radiometers and whose results are equivalent to AERONET and SKYNET retrievals.

  17. Development of a Miniature L-band Radiometer for Education Outreach in Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Lyon B.

    2004-01-01

    Work performed under this grant developed a 1.4-Mhz radiometer for use in soil moisture remote sensing from space. The resulting instrument was integrated onto HuskySat. HuskySat is a 30-kg nanosatellite built under sponsorship from the Air Force Research Laboratory and NASA. This report consists of the interface document for the radiometer (the Science Payload of HuskySat) as detailed in the vehicle design report.

  18. Microwave Correlation Measurement Crossed-pair Antennas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    frequency radiometry for obtaining a measurement of the subcutaneous temperature gradient in living tissue. In its simplest form this technique consists of combining the outputs of two antennas feeding a microwave correlation radiometer.

  19. A concept for global crop forecasting. [using microwave radiometer satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelace, U. M.; Wright, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    The mission, instrumentation, and design concepts for microwave radiometer satellites for continuous crop condition forecasting and monitoring on a global basis are described. Soil moisture affects both crop growth and the dielectric properties of the soil, and can be quantified by analysis of reflected radiance passively received by orbiting spacecraft. A dedicated satellite reading a swath 200 km across, with 1 km and 1 K temperature resolution, could track the time-varying changes of solid moisture, sea ice, and water surface temperature. Launched by the Shuttle into an interim orbit, a boost would place the satellite in a 400 or 700 km orbit. Resolution requirements indicate a 45-725 m diam antenna, with 70 dB gain, operating at frequencies of 1.08, 2.03, and 4.95 GHz to ensure atmospheric transparency. Alternative structural concepts include either double-layer tetrahedral or single-layer geodesic trusses as the basic structural members. An analysis of the electrostatic positioning of the parabolic antenna membrane is outlined.

  20. Regolith Formation Rates and Evolution from the Diviner Lunar Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayne, P. O.; Ghent, R. R.; Bandfield, J. L.; Vasavada, A. R.; Williams, J. P.; Siegler, M. A.; Lucey, P. G.; Greenhagen, B. T.; Elder, C. M.; Paige, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Fragmentation and overturn of lunar surface materials produces a layer of regolith, which increases in thickness through time. Experiments on the lunar surface during the Apollo era, combined with remote sensing, found that the upper 10's of cm of regolith exhibit a rapid increase in density and thermal conductivity with depth. This is interpreted to be the signature of impact gardening, which operates most rapidly in the uppermost layers. Gravity data from the GRAIL mission showed that impacts have also extensively fractured the deeper crust. The breakdown and mixing of crustal materials is therefore a central process to lunar evolution and must be understood in order to interpret compositional information from remote sensing and sample analysis. Recently, thermal infrared data from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Diviner radiometer were used to provide the first remote observational constraints on the rate of ejecta breakdown around craters geologic units. We will also discuss several anomalous features that merit further investigation. Reference: Ghent, R. R., Hayne, P. O., Bandfield, J. L., Campbell, B. A., Allen, C. C., Carter, L. M., & Paige, D. A. (2014). Constraints on the recent rate of lunar ejecta breakdown and implications for crater ages. Geology, 42(12), 1059-1062.

  1. Simultaneous retrievals of temperature and volume mixing ratio constituents from nonoxygen odin submillimeter radiometer bands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, P; Merino, F; Murtagh, D

    2001-11-20

    We present the retrieval of temperature and O(3) volume mixing ratio profiles in the middle atmosphere from a single strong O(3) line. We performed the study using simulated limb-sounding measurements in the frame of the submillimeter radiometer (SMR) instrument that will be carried by the Odin satellite that is due to be launched in early 2001. This study is interesting for the Odin SMR data analysis because we first provide additional temperature measurements, and second reduce significantly the O(3) retrieval error that is due to the temperature and pressure uncertainties. Nonlinear retrievals are performed to retrieve the O(3), CO, H(2)O, and temperature profiles simultaneously from the spectral band 576.27-576.67 GHz. The pressure profile is deduced from the hydrostatic equilibrium equation after each iteration. Temperature and O(3) can be retrieved throughout the stratosphere from 15-50 and 20-50 km, respectively, with a vertical resolution of 3 km. The altitude domain corresponds to the parts of the atmosphere where the signal intensity saturates in some spectrometer channels. A total error of 4-6 K has been found in the temperature profile, mainly because of the instrumental thermal noise and to a lesser extent the calibration. The total error in the O(3) profile is 5-10% and is dominated by the O(3) line-broadening parameter. The total error on the retrieved pressure profile is 2-10% because of the errors in calibration and reference pressure.

  2. The distribution of ammonia on Jupiter from a preliminary inversion of Juno microwave radiometer data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng; Ingersoll, Andrew; Janssen, Michael; Levin, Steven; Bolton, Scott; Adumitroaie, Virgil; Allison, Michael; Arballo, John; Bellotti, Amadeo; Brown, Shannon; Ewald, Shawn; Jewell, Laura; Misra, Sidharth; Orton, Glenn; Oyafuso, Fabiano; Steffes, Paul; Williamson, Ross

    2017-06-01

    The Juno microwave radiometer measured the thermal emission from Jupiter's atmosphere from the cloud tops at about 1 bar to as deep as a hundred bars of pressure during its first flyby over Jupiter (PJ1). The nadir brightness temperatures show that the Equatorial Zone is likely to be an ideal adiabat, which allows a determination of the deep ammonia abundance in the range 362-33+33 ppm. The combination of Markov chain Monte Carlo method and Tikhonov regularization is studied to invert Jupiter's global ammonia distribution assuming a prescribed temperature profile. The result shows (1) that ammonia is depleted globally down to 50-60 bars except within a few degrees of the equator, (2) the North Equatorial Belt is more depleted in ammonia than elsewhere, and (3) the ammonia concentration shows a slight inversion starting from about 7 bars to 2 bars. These results are robust regardless of the choice of water abundance.Plain Language SummaryThe distribution of ammonia gas on Jupiter's atmosphere was derived by fitting the microwave spectra measured by the Juno spacecraft. The result showed that the concentration of ammonia gas in the extratropics was much less than expected and had a local minimum near 7 bars of pressure.

  3. Comparison of spectral irradiance standards used to calibrate shortwave radiometers and spectroradiometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiedron, P W; Michalsky, J J; Berndt, J L; Harrison, L C

    1999-04-20

    Absolute calibration of spectral shortwave radiometers is usually performed with National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) or NIST-traceable incandescent lamps. We compare 18 irradiance standards from NIST and three commercial vendors using the same spectrometer to assess their agreement with our working standard. The NIST procedure is followed for the 1000-W FEL lamps from NIST, Optronics, and EG&G. A modified calibration procedure developed by Li-Cor is followed for their 200-W tungsten-halogen lamps. Results are reproducible from one day to the next to approximately 0.1% using the same spectrometer. Measurements taken four months apart using two similar but different spectrometers were reproducible to 0.5%. The comparisons suggest that even NIST standards may disagree with each other beyond their stated accuracy. Some of the 1000-W commercial lamps agreed with the NIST lamps to within their stated accuracy, but not all. Surprisingly, the lowest-cost lamps from Li-Cor agreed much better with the NIST lamps than their stated accuracy of 4%, typically within 2%. An analysis of errors leads us to conclude that we can transfer the calibration from a standard lamp to a secondary standard lamp with approximately 1% added uncertainty. A field spectrometer was calibrated with a secondary standard, producing a responsivity for the spectrometer that was within 5% of the responsivity obtained by Langley calibration using routine field measurements.

  4. A 10-Year Cloud Fraction Climatology of Liquid Water Clouds over Bern Observed by a Ground-Based Microwave Radiometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Cossu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cloud fraction (CF is known as the dominant modulator of Earth’s radiative fluxes. Ground-based CF observations are useful to characterize the cloudiness of a specific site and are valuable for comparison with satellite observations and numerical models. We present for the first time CF statistics (relative to liquid clouds only for Bern, Switzerland, derived from the observations of a ground-based microwave radiometer. CF is derived with a new method involving the analysis of the integrated liquid water distribution measured by the radiometer. The 10-year analyzed period (2004–2013 allowed us to compute a CF climatology for Bern, showing a maximum CF of 60.9% in winter and a minimum CF of 42.0% in summer. The CF monthly anomalies are identified with respect to the climatological mean values, and they are confirmed through MeteoSwiss yearly climatological bulletins. The CF monthly mean variations are similar to the observations taken at another Swiss location, Payerne, suggesting a large-scale correlation between different sites on the Swiss Plateau. A CF diurnal cycle is also computed, and large intraseasonal variations are found. The overall mean CF diurnal cycle, however, shows a typical sinusoidal cycle, with higher values in the morning and lower values in the afternoon.

  5. The unusual phase curve of Titan's surface observed by Huygens’ Descent Imager/Spectral Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, S. E.; Keller, H. U.

    2009-12-01

    The Descent Imager/Spectral Radiometer onboard Huygens observed Titan's surface through the atmospheric methane windows [Tomasko, M.G., Doose, L., Engel, S., Dafoe, L.E., West, R., Lemmon, M., Karkoschka, E., See, C., 2008. A model of Titan's aerosols based on measurements made inside the atmosphere. Planet. Space Sci. 56, 669-707]. Infrared spectra obtained during the last stage of the descent, for which the atmospheric contribution is negligible, show that the reflectance of the surface around the sit increases with decreasing solar phase angle. Combining these with a spectrum reconstructed from reflected lamp light [Schröder, S.E., Keller, H.U., 2008. The reflectance spectrum of Titan's surface at the Huygens landing site determined by the Descent Imager/Spectral Radiometer. Planet. Space Sci. 56, 753-769] reveals a strong increase in reflectance towards zero phase angle: the opposition surge. Both shadow hiding and coherent backscatter are required to fit the phase curve with the Hapke [2002. Bidirectional Reflectance Spectroscopy 5. The Coherent Backscatter Opposition Effect and Anisotropic Scattering. Icarus 157, 523-534] model. We find the particle phase function below 60∘ phase angle to be close to isotropic, which is highly unusual for the surfaces of planetary bodies. A terrain with similar scattering properties has been identified on Triton [Lee, P., Helfenstein, P., Veverka, J., McCarthy, D., 1992. Anomalous-scattering region on Triton. Icarus 99, 82-97], and a connection with the tholins thought to be present on both worlds seems plausible. Indeed, tholin laboratory analogs are found to scatter in similar fashion [Lüthi, 2008. Remote sensing of the surface of Titan: Photometric properties, comparison with analogues, and future microscopic observations. Ph.D. Thesis, Philosophisch-naturwissenschaftlichen Fakultät, Universität Bern]. We conclude that Titan's unusual phase curve is consistent with the presence of tholins on the surface. Our result

  6. Assessment of water pollution by airborne measurement of chlorophyll

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvesen, J. C.; Weaver, E. C.; Millard, J. P.

    1972-01-01

    Remote measurement of chlorophyll concentrations to determine extent of water pollution is discussed. Construction and operation of radiometer to provide measurement capability are explained. Diagram of equipment is provided.

  7. ARIS-Campaign: intercomparison of three ground based 22 GHz radiometers for middle atmospheric water vapor at the Zugspitze in winter 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, C.; Murk, A.; Kämpfer, N.; Golchert, S. H. W.; Hochschild, G.; Hallgren, K.; Hartogh, P.

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents the Alpine Radiometer Intercomparison at the Schneefernerhaus (ARIS), which took place in winter 2009 at the high altitude station at the Zugspitze, Germany (47.42° N, 10.98° E, 2650 m). This campaign was the first direct intercomparison between three new ground based 22 GHz water vapor radiometers for middle atmospheric profiling with the following instruments participating: MIRA 5 (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology), cWASPAM3 (Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Katlenburg-Lindau) and MIAWARA-C (Institute of Applied Physics, University of Bern). Even though the three radiometers all measure middle atmospheric water vapor using the same rotational transition line and similar fundamental set-ups, there are major differences between the front ends, the back ends, the calibration concepts and the profile retrieval. The spectrum comparison shows that all three radiometers measure spectra without severe baseline artifacts and that the measurements are in good general agreement. The measurement noise shows good agreement to the values theoretically expected from the radiometer noise formula. At the same time the comparison of the noise levels shows that there is room for instrumental and calibration improvement, emphasizing the importance of low elevation angles for the observation, a low receiver noise temperature and an efficient calibration scheme. The comparisons of the retrieved profiles show that the agreement between the profiles of MIAWARA-C and cWASPAM3 with the ones of MLS is better than 0.3 ppmv (6%) at all altitudes. MIRA 5 has a dry bias of approximately 0.5 ppm (8%) below 0.1 hPa with respect to all other instruments. The profiles of cWASPAM3 and MIAWARA-C could not be directly compared because the vertical region of overlap was too small. The comparison of the time series at different altitude levels show a similar evolution of the H2O volume mixing ratio (VMR) for the ground based instruments as well as the space borne

  8. ARIS-Campaign: intercomparison of three ground based 22 GHz radiometers for middle atmospheric water vapor at the Zugspitze in winter 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Straub

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the Alpine Radiometer Intercomparison at the Schneefernerhaus (ARIS, which took place in winter 2009 at the high altitude station at the Zugspitze, Germany (47.42° N, 10.98° E, 2650 m. This campaign was the first direct intercomparison between three new ground based 22 GHz water vapor radiometers for middle atmospheric profiling with the following instruments participating: MIRA 5 (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, cWASPAM3 (Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Katlenburg-Lindau and MIAWARA-C (Institute of Applied Physics, University of Bern. Even though the three radiometers all measure middle atmospheric water vapor using the same rotational transition line and similar fundamental set-ups, there are major differences between the front ends, the back ends, the calibration concepts and the profile retrieval. The spectrum comparison shows that all three radiometers measure spectra without severe baseline artifacts and that the measurements are in good general agreement. The measurement noise shows good agreement to the values theoretically expected from the radiometer noise formula. At the same time the comparison of the noise levels shows that there is room for instrumental and calibration improvement, emphasizing the importance of low elevation angles for the observation, a low receiver noise temperature and an efficient calibration scheme.

    The comparisons of the retrieved profiles show that the agreement between the profiles of MIAWARA-C and cWASPAM3 with the ones of MLS is better than 0.3 ppmv (6% at all altitudes. MIRA 5 has a dry bias of approximately 0.5 ppm (8% below 0.1 hPa with respect to all other instruments. The profiles of cWASPAM3 and MIAWARA-C could not be directly compared because the vertical region of overlap was too small. The comparison of the time series at different altitude levels show a similar evolution of the H2O volume mixing ratio (VMR for the ground based

  9. Use of coincident radar and radiometer observations from GPM, ATMS, and CloudSat for global spaceborne snowfall observation assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panegrossi, Giulia; Casella, Daniele; Sanò, Paolo; Cinzia Marra, Anna; Dietrich, Stefano; Johnson, Benjamin T.; Kulie, Mark S.

    2017-04-01

    Snowfall is the main component of the global precipitation amount at mid and high latitudes, and improvement of global spaceborne snowfall quantitative estimation is one of the main goals of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission. Advancements in snowfall detection and retrieval accuracy at mid-high latitudes are expected from both instruments on board the GPM Core Observatory (GPM-CO): the GMI, the most advanced conical precipitation radiometer with respect to both channel assortment and spatial resolution; and the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) (Ka and Ku band). Moreover, snowfall monitoring is now possible by exploiting the high frequency channels (i.e. >100 GHz) available from most of the microwave radiometers in the GPM constellation providing good temporal coverage at mid-high latitudes (hourly or less). Among these, the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) onboard Suomi-NPP is the most advanced polar-orbiting cross track radiometer with 5 channels in the 183 GHz oxygen absorption band. Finally, CloudSat carries the W-band Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) that has collected data since its launch in 2006. While CPR was primarily designed as a cloud remote sensing mission, its high-latitude coverage (up to 82° latitude) and high radar sensitivity ( -28 dBZ) make it very suitable for snowfall-related research. In this work a number of global datasets made of coincident observations of snowfall producing clouds from the spaceborne radars DPR and CPR and from the most advanced radiometers available (GMI and ATMS) have been created and analyzed. We will show the results of a study where CPR is used to: 1) assess snowfall detection and estimate capabilities of DPR; 2) analyze snowfall signatures in the high frequency channels of the passive microwave radiometers in relation to fundamental environmental conditions. We have estimated that DPR misses a very large fraction of snowfall precipitation (more than 90% of the events and around 70% of

  10. Introduction to a real-time cloud detection based on the ground-based infrared thermometer and the microwave radiometer at ARM SGP site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Hye Young; Ahn, Myoung-Hwan

    2017-04-01

    A fast cloud detection for the utilization of ground based remote sensing instrument such as microwave radiometer is important for the real time application such as assimilation to the numerical prediction model. For this, an algorithm based on the spectral and temporal characteristics of clouds in the downwelling infrared radiance readily available with the infrared thermometer (IRT) equipped in the microwave radiometer has been developed for a specific IRT. Characteristics and applicability of the algorithm for a different types of instrumentation with an augumented validation data are demonstrated using the data obtained at ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) SGP (the Southern Great Plains) site. From the comparison, it is shown that the dynamic range of IRT (down to -100 oC) is important, while improvement in the spectral test could improve the detectablilty of high thin clouds. For a futher simplification of the algorithm, utilization of the retrieved precipitable water vapor from the microwave radiometer is under investigation and the detailed analysis is going to be presented during the conference.

  11. LYRA, solar uv radiometer on the technology demonstration platform PROBA-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockman, Y.; Hochedez, J.-F.; Schmutz, W.; BenMoussa, A.; Defise, J.-M.; Denis, F.; D'Olieslaeger, M.; Dominique, M.; Haenen, K.; Halain, J.-P.; Koller, S.; Koizumi, S.; Mortet, V.; Rochus, P.; Schühle, U.; Soltani, A.; Theissen, A.

    2017-11-01

    LYRA is a solar radiometer part of the PROBA 2 micro satellite payload. LYRA will monitor the solar irradiance in four soft X-Ray - VUV passbands. They have been chosen for their relevance to Solar Physics, Aeronomy and SpaceWeather: 1/ Lyman Alpha channel, 2/ Herzberg continuum range, 3/ Aluminium filter channel (including He II at 30.4 nm) and 4/ Zirconium filter channel. The radiometric calibration is traceable to synchrotron source standards. The stability will be monitored by on-board calibration sources (LEDs), which allow us to distinguish between potential degradations of the detectors and filters. Additionally, a redundancy strategy maximizes the accuracy and the stability of the measurements. LYRA will benefit from wide bandgap detectors based on diamond: it will be the first space assessment of revolutionary UV detectors. Diamond sensors make the instruments radiation-hard and solar-blind (insensitive to visible light) and therefore, make dispensable visible light blocking filters. To correlate the data of this new detector technology, well known technology, such as Si detectors are also embarked. The SWAP EUV imaging telescope will operate next to LYRA on PROBA-2. Together, they will provide a high performance solar monitor for operational space weather nowcasting and research. LYRA demonstrates technologies important for future missions such as the ESA Solar Orbiter.

  12. Methods for Global Survey of Natural Gas Flaring from Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher D. Elvidge

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A set of methods are presented for the global survey of natural gas flaring using data collected by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration NASA/NOAA Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS. The accuracy of the flared gas volume estimates is rated at ±9.5%. VIIRS is particularly well suited for detecting and measuring the radiant emissions from gas flares through the collection of shortwave and near-infrared data at night, recording the peak radiant emissions from flares. In 2012, a total of 7467 individual flare sites were identified. The total flared gas volume is estimated at 143 (±13.6 billion cubic meters (BCM, corresponding to 3.5% of global production. While the USA has the largest number of flares, Russia leads in terms of flared gas volume. Ninety percent of the flared gas volume was found in upstream production areas, 8% at refineries and 2% at liquified natural gas (LNG terminals. The results confirm that the bulk of natural gas flaring occurs in upstream production areas. VIIRS data can provide site-specific tracking of natural gas flaring for use in evaluating efforts to reduce and eliminate routine flaring.

  13. Calibration Plans for the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruegge, C. J.; Duval, V. G.; Chrien, N. L.; Diner, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    The EOS Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) will study the ecology and climate of the Earth through acquisition of global multi-angle imagery. The MISR employs nine discrete cameras, each a push-broom imager. Of these, four point forward, four point aft and one views the nadir. Absolute radiometric calibration will be obtained pre-flight using high quantum efficiency (HQE) detectors and an integrating sphere source. After launch, instrument calibration will be provided using HQE detectors in conjunction with deployable diffuse calibration panels. The panels will be deployed at time intervals of one month and used to direct sunlight into the cameras, filling their fields-of-view and providing through-the-optics calibration. Additional techniques will be utilized to reduce systematic errors, and provide continuity as the methodology changes with time. For example, radiation-resistant photodiodes will also be used to monitor panel radiant exitance. These data will be acquired throughout the five-year mission, to maintain calibration in the latter years when it is expected that the HQE diodes will have degraded. During the mission, it is planned that the MISR will conduct semi-annual ground calibration campaigns, utilizing field measurements and higher resolution sensors (aboard aircraft or in-orbit platforms) to provide a check of the on-board hardware. These ground calibration campaigns are limited in number, but are believed to be the key to the long-term maintenance of MISR radiometric calibration.

  14. Recent improvements in Hurricane Imaging Radiometer’s brightness temperature image reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayak K. Biswas

    Full Text Available NASA MSFCs airborne Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD uses interferometric aperture synthesis to produce high resolution wide swath images of scene brightness temperature (Tb distribution at four discrete C-band microwave frequencies (4.0, 5.0, 6.0 and 6.6 GHz. Images of ocean surface wind speed under heavy precipitation such as in tropical cyclones, is inferred from these measurements. The baseline HIRAD Tb reconstruction algorithm had produced prominent along-track streaks in the Tb images. Particularly the 4.0 GHz channel had been so dominated by the streaks as to be unusable.The loss of a frequency channel had compromised the final wind speed retrievals. During 2016, the HIRAD team made substantial progress in developing a quality controlled signal processing technique for the HIRAD data collected in 2015’s Tropical Cyclone Intensity (TCI experiment and reduced the effect of streaks in all channels including 4.0 GHz. 2000 MSC: 41A05, 41A10, 65D05, 65D17, Keywords: Microwave radiometry, Aperture synthesis, Image reconstruction, Hurricane winds

  15. Characterization of errors in the use of integrating-sphere systems in the calibration of scanning radiometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatebe, Charles K; Butler, James J; Cooper, John W; Kowalewski, Matthew; King, Michael D

    2007-11-01

    Laboratory measurements were performed to characterize the geometrical effects in the calibration of the NASA's cloud absorption radiometer (CAR). The measurements involved three integrating sphere sources (ISSs) operated at different light levels and experimental setups to determine radiance variability. The radiance gradients across the three ISS apertures were 0.2%-2.6% for different visible, near-infrared, and shortwave infrared illumination levels but <15% in the UV. Change in radiance with distance was determined to be 2%-20%, being highest in the UV. Radiance variability due to the edge effects was found to be significant; as much as 70% due to the sphere aperture and <10% due to the CAR telescope's secondary mirror.

  16. Evaluation of Radiometers in Full-Time Use at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Solar Radiation Research Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilcox, S. M.; Myers, D. R.

    2008-12-01

    This report describes the evaluation of the relative performance of the complement of solar radiometers deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL).

  17. Nighttime Environmental Products from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite: Science Rationale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, M. O.; Wang, Z.; Kalb, V.; Cole, T.; Oda, T.; Stokes, E.; Molthan, A.

    2016-12-01

    A new generation of satellite instruments, represented by the Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Partnership (Suomi-NPP) Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS), offer global measurements of nocturnal visible and near-infrared light suitable for urban science research. While many promising urban-focused applications have been developed using nighttime satellite imagery in the past 25 years, most studies to-date have been limited by the quality of the captured imagery and the retrieval methods used in heritage (DMSP/OLS) products. Instead, science-quality products that are temporally consistent, global in extent, and local in resolution were needed to monitor human settlements worldwide —particularly for studies within dense urban areas. Since the first-light images from the VIIRS were received in January 2012, the NASA Land Science Investigator-led Processing System (Land SIPS) team has worked on maximizing the capabilities of these low-light measurements to generate a wealth of new information useful for understanding urbanization processes, urban functions, and the vulnerability of urban areas to climate hazards. In a recent case study, our team demonstrated that tracking daily dynamic VIIRS nighttime measurements can provide valuable information about the character of the human activities and behaviors that shape energy consumption and vulnerability (Roman and Stokes, 2015). Moving beyond mapping the physical qualities of urban areas (e.g. land cover and impervious area), VIIRS measurements provide insight into the social, economic, and cultural activities that shape energy and infrastructure use. Furthermore, as this time series expands and is merged with other sources of optical remote sensing data (e.g., Landsat-8 and Sentinel 2), VIIRS has the potential to increase our understanding of changes in urban form, structure, and infrastructure—factors that may also influence urban resilience—and how the increasing frequency and severity of climate

  18. A sea ice concentration estimation algorithm utilizing radiometer and SAR data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Karvonen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the possibility of combining the high-resolution synthetic aperture radar (SAR segmentation and ice concentration estimated by radiometer brightness temperatures. Here we present an algorithm for mapping a radiometer-based concentration value for each SAR segment. The concentrations are estimated by a multi-layer perceptron (MLP neural network which has the AMSR-2 (Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 polarization ratios and gradient ratios of four radiometer channels as its inputs. The results have been compared numerically to the gridded Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI ice chart concentrations and high-resolution AMSR-2 ASI (ARTIST Sea Ice algorithm concentrations provided by the University of Hamburg and also visually to the AMSR-2 bootstrap algorithm concentrations, which are given in much coarser resolution. The differences when compared to FMI daily ice charts were on average small. When compared to ASI ice concentrations, the differences were a bit larger, but still small on average. According to our comparisons, the largest differences typically occur near the ice edge and sea–land boundary. The main advantage of combining radiometer-based ice concentration estimation and SAR segmentation seems to be a more precise estimation of the boundaries of different ice concentration zones.

  19. The R/V Discoverer cruise to Manus Island. The BNL Portable Radiometer Package (PRP) evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, R.M.; Smith, S.

    1996-05-24

    Brookhaven National Laboratory installed and operated a Portable Radiation Package (PRP) on the NOAA ship R/V DISCOVERER as part of the Combined Sensor Program cruise in the Tropical Western Pacific Ocean. The DISCOVERER transported a collection of radiation and atmospheric instrumentation to positions offshore of manus Island to compare cloud and radiation fields to like instruments measured from a station on the island. The ship sailed NW from Pago Pago, American Samoa, on 14 March 1996 to a latitude of 1{degree}S then due West until it approached manus Island (2{degree}S and 148{degree}E) on approximately 7 April. The ship then turned SW and approached Manus Island in three steps. This route was reversed during the ship`s return to Hawaii. The PRP package is a compact low-power integration of simple sensors that measure long- and short-wave irradiance from moving platforms. A rapid rotating shadowband radiometer that is designed to provide good estimates of diffuse (sky) radiation even from moving buoys or ships was being evaluated. The PRP provided the only means of making diffuse (sky) radiation measurements from the ship. The CSP cruise provided an excellent opportunity to intercompare the PRP with other like instruments in the TWP locale. The unit was located on the starboard flying bridge which was fully exposed to direct sunlight during the ship`s westward transit. When the ship was at its closest approach to manus, the PRP was moved to the island where careful intercomparison with the Manus instrumentation was conducted.

  20. New improved algorithm for sky calibration of L-band radiometers JLBARA and ELBARA II

    KAUST Repository

    Dimitrov, Marin

    2012-03-01

    We propose a new algorithm for sky calibration of the L-band radiometers JLBARA and ELBARA II, introducing the effective transmissivities of the instruments. The suggested approach was tested using experimental data obtained at the Selhausen test site, Germany. It was shown that for JLBARA the effective transmissivities depend strongly on the air temperature and decrease with increasing air temperature, while for ELBARA II such strong dependence was not observed. It was also shown that the effective transmissivities account for the antenna and feed cable loss effects, and for the variations of the radiometer gain due to air temperature changes. The new calibration algorithm reduces significantly the bias of brightness temperature estimates for both radiometers, especially for JLBARA. © 2012 IEEE.

  1. ELBARA II, an L-band radiometer system for soil moisture research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwank, Mike; Wiesmann, Andreas; Werner, Charles; Mätzler, Christian; Weber, Daniel; Murk, Axel; Völksch, Ingo; Wegmüller, Urs

    2010-01-01

    L-band (1-2 GHz) microwave radiometry is a remote sensing technique that can be used to monitor soil moisture, and is deployed in the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) Mission of the European Space Agency (ESA). Performing ground-based radiometer campaigns before launch, during the commissioning phase and during the operative SMOS mission is important for validating the satellite data and for the further improvement of the radiative transfer models used in the soil-moisture retrieval algorithms. To address these needs, three identical L-band radiometer systems were ordered by ESA. They rely on the proven architecture of the ETH L-Band radiometer for soil moisture research (ELBARA) with major improvements in the microwave electronics, the internal calibration sources, the data acquisition, the user interface, and the mechanics. The purpose of this paper is to describe the design of the instruments and the main characteristics that are relevant for the user.

  2. Limb-darkening functions as derived from along-track operation of the ERBE scanning radiometer for January 1985

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G. Louis; Manalo, Natividad; Suttles, John T.; Walker, Ira

    1989-01-01

    During January 1985, the scanning radiometer aboard the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite was operated to scan along-track. These data have been analyzed to produce limb-darkening functions for Earth emitted radiation, which relate the radiance in any given direction to the radiant exitance. Limb-darkening functions are presented in tabular form and shown as figures for 10 day cases and 12 night cases, corresponding to various scene types and latitude zones. The scene types were computed using measurements within 10 deg of zenith. The limb-darkening functions have values of 1.03 to 1.09 at zenith, with 1.06 being typical. It is found that latitude causes a variation on the order of 1 percent, except for zenith angles greater than 70 deg. These limb-darkening models are about 2 percent higher at zenith than the models derived from Nimbus 7 data.

  3. An Optimal Beamforming Algorithm for Phased-Array Antennas Used in Multi-Beam Spaceborne Radiometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iupikov, O. A.; Ivashina, M. V.; Pontoppidan, K.

    2015-01-01

    Strict requirements for future spaceborne ocean missions using multi-beam radiometers call for new antenna technologies, such as digital beamforming phased arrays. In this paper, we present an optimal beamforming algorithm for phased-array antenna systems designed to operate as focal plane arrays...... (FPA) in push-broom radiometers. This algorithm is formulated as an optimization procedure that maximizes the beam efficiency, while minimizing the side-lobe and cross-polarization power in the area of Earth, subject to a constraint on the beamformer dynamic range. The proposed algorithm is applied...

  4. On-board digital RFI and polarimetry processor for future spaceborne radiometer systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels; Kristensen, Steen Savstrup; Ruokokoski, T.

    2012-01-01

    Man-made Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) is an increasingly threatening problem for passive microwave radiometry from space. The problem is presently very evident in L-band data from SMOS, but it is realized that it is already now a problem at other traditional radiometer bands at C, X, and Ku...... bands. Studies of data from existing radiometer systems have revealed this, and clearly indicates increasing RFI intensity over time. Thus, future missions have to take this into consideration, and dedicated hardware and algorithms to safely detect and mitigate RFI must be included. The design...

  5. Assessing the beginning to end-of-mission sensitivity change of the PREcision MOnitor Sensor total solar irradiance radiometer (PREMOS/PICARD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ball William T.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The switching of the total solar irradiance (TSI backup radiometer (PREMOS-B to a primary role for 2 weeks at the end of the PICARD mission provides a unique opportunity to test the fundamental hypothesis of radiometer experiments in space, which is that the sensitivity change of instruments due to the space environment is identical for the same instrument type as a function of solar-exposure time of the instruments. We verify this hypothesis for the PREMOS TSI radiometers within the PREMOS experiment on the PICARD mission. We confirm that the sensitivity change of the backup instrument, PREMOS-B, is similar to that of the identically-constructed primary radiometer, PREMOS-A. The extended exposure of the backup instrument at the end of the mission allows for the assessment, with an uncertainty estimate, of the sensitivity change of the primary radiometer from the beginning of the PICARD mission compared to the end, and of the degradation of the backup over the mission. We correct six sets of PREMOS-B observations connecting October 2011 with February 2014, using six ratios from simultaneous PREMOS-A and PREMOS-B exposures during the first days of PREMOS-A operation in 2010. These ratios are then used, without indirect estimates or assumptions, to evaluate the stability of SORCE/TIM and SOHO/VIRGO TSI measurements, which have both operated for more than a decade and now show different trends over the time span of the PICARD mission, namely from 2010 to 2014. We find that by February 2014 relative to October 2011 PREMOS-B supports the SORCE/TIM TSI time evolution, which in May 2014 relative to October 2011 is ~0.11 W m−2, or ~84 ppm, higher than SOHO/VIRGO. Such a divergence between SORCE/TIM and SOHO/VIRGO over this period is a significant fraction of the estimated decline of 0.2 W m−2 between the solar minima of 1996 and 2008, and questions the reliability of that estimated trend. Extrapolating the uncertainty indicated by the

  6. A Model for Estimation of Rain Rate on Tropical Land from TRMM Microwave Imager Radiometer Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakara, C.; Iacovazzi, R., Jr.; Yoo, J.-M.; Kim, Kyu-Myong

    2004-01-01

    Over the tropical land regions observations of the 85 GHz brightness temperature (T(sub 85v)) made by the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) radiometer when analyzed with the help of rain rate (R(sub pR)) deduced from the TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) indicate that there are two maxima in rain rate. One strong maximum occurs when T(sub 85) has a value of about 220 K and the other weaker one when T(sub 85v) is much colder approx. 150 K. Together with the help of earlier studies based on airborne Doppler Radar observations and radiative transfer theoretical simulations, we infer the maximum near 220 K is a result of relatively weak scattering due to super cooled rain drops and water coated ice hydrometeors associated with a developing thunderstorm (Cb) that has a strong updraft. The other maximum is associated with strong scattering due to ice particles that are formed when the updraft collapses and the rain from the Cb is transit2oning from convective type to stratiform type. Incorporating these ideas and with a view to improve the estimation of rain rate from existing operational method applicable to the tropical land areas, we have developed a rain retrieval model. This model utilizes two parameters, that have a horizontal scale of approx. 20km, deduced from the TMI measurements at 19, 21 and 37 GHz (T(sub 19v), T(sub 21v), T(sub 37v). The third parameter in the model, namely the horizontal gradient of brightness temperature within the 20 km scale, is deduced from TMI measurements at 85 GHz. Utilizing these parameters our retrieval model is formulated to yield instantaneous rain rate on a scale of 20 km and seasonal average on a mesoscale that agree well with that of the PR.

  7. Comparisons of UV synthetic spectra retrieved from the USDA UV multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer with collocated USDA reference UV spectroradiometer and NIWA UV spectroradiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei; Slusser, James R.; Harrison, Lee; Disterhoft, Patrick; Min, Qilong; Olson, Becky; Lantz, Kathleen O.; Davis, Bill

    2002-01-01

    The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) UVB Radiation Monitoring and Research Program began installing the UV Multi-Filter Rotating Shadow-band Radiometer for long-term measurements of UV radiation in 1995, and the program now has 28 sites across the U.S., as well as 2 sites in Canada. The UV-MFRSR uses 7 independent interference filter photodiode detector combinations to make total horizontal solar irradiance measurements at 300, 305.5, 311.4, 317.6, 325.4, 332.4 and 368 nm (nominal 2 nm FWHM bandwidth) through a single Lambertian detector. UV effects researchers want to apply their particular action spectrum to the measured spectra to estimate damage due to UV. The UV synthetic spectra retrieval model is used to estimate the continuous spectral distribution based on the seven UV radiometer channel measurements. In this study, we made comparisons of these synthetic spectra with the spectra measured from co-located USDA Reference UV and NIWA UV spectroradiometers at Table Mountain near Boulder, Colorado, U.S. A preliminary comparison of modeled erythemal-weighted dose with measurements performed by the two spectroradiometers is presented.

  8. InP HEMT Integrated Circuits for Submillimeter Wave Radiometers in Earth Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deal, William R.; Chattopadhyay, Goutam

    2012-01-01

    The operating frequency of InP integrated circuits has pushed well into the Submillimeter Wave frequency band, with amplification reported as high as 670 GHz. This paper provides an overview of current performance and potential application of InP HEMT to Submillimeter Wave radiometers for earth remote sensing.

  9. Estimation of optimal size of plots for experiments with radiometer in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aghomotsegin

    2015-07-29

    Jul 29, 2015 ... Estimation of optimal size of plots for experiments with radiometer in beans. Roger Nabeyama Michels1*, Marcelo Giovanetti Canteri2, Inês Cristina de Batista Fonseca2,. Marcelo ... with beans, the size of the portions differ according to the ... obtained through the minor form: 0.45 m × 1 m (Table 1). The.

  10. Airborne L-band radiometer mapping of the dome-C area in Antarctica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels; Kristensen, Steen Savstrup; Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl

    2015-01-01

    A 350 km × 350 km area near the Concordia station on the high plateau of Dome-C in Antarctica has been mapped by an airborne L-band radiometer system. The area was expected to display a rather uniform brightness temperature (TB) close to the yearly mean temperature-well suited for calibration...

  11. Mapping of the DOME-C area in Antarctica by an airborne L-band radiometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels; Kristensen, Steen Savstrup; Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl

    2014-01-01

    A 350 × 350 km area near the Concordia station on the high plateau of Dome C in Antarctica has been mapped by an airborne L-band radiometer system. The area was expected to display a rather uniform brightness temperature close to the yearly mean temperature — well suited for calibration checks...

  12. Estimation of optimal size of plots for experiments with radiometer in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aghomotsegin

    2015-07-29

    Jul 29, 2015 ... radiometer in beans. Roger Nabeyama Michels1*, Marcelo Giovanetti Canteri2, Inês Cristina de Batista Fonseca2,. Marcelo Augusto de Aguiar e Silva2 and José Alexandre de França2. 1Universidade Tecnológica Federal do Paraná, Avenida dos Pioneiros, 3131, CEP 86036-370, Londrina, PR, Brasil.

  13. Modification of the collective Thomson scattering radiometer in the search for parametric decay on TEXTOR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Stefan Kragh; Salewski, Mirko; Bongers, W.

    2012-01-01

    Strong scattering of high-power millimeter waves at 140 GHz has been shown to take place in heating and current-drive experiments at TEXTOR when a tearing mode is present in the plasma. The scattering signal is at present supposed to be generated by the parametric decay instability. Here we descr...... with independent backscattering radiometer data....

  14. Future spaceborne ocean missions using high sensitivity multiple-beam radiometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels; Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl; Kristensen, Steen Savstrup

    2014-01-01

    Design considerations concerning a scanning as well as a push-broom microwave radiometer system are presented. Strict requirements to spatial and radiometric resolution leads to a multiple-beam scanner achieving good sensitivity through integration over many beams, or to a push-broom system where...

  15. Hybrid PSO-ASVR-based method for data fitting in the calibration of infrared radiometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Sen; Li, Chengwei, E-mail: heikuanghit@163.com [School of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2016-06-15

    The present paper describes a hybrid particle swarm optimization-adaptive support vector regression (PSO-ASVR)-based method for data fitting in the calibration of infrared radiometer. The proposed hybrid PSO-ASVR-based method is based on PSO in combination with Adaptive Processing and Support Vector Regression (SVR). The optimization technique involves setting parameters in the ASVR fitting procedure, which significantly improves the fitting accuracy. However, its use in the calibration of infrared radiometer has not yet been widely explored. Bearing this in mind, the PSO-ASVR-based method, which is based on the statistical learning theory, is successfully used here to get the relationship between the radiation of a standard source and the response of an infrared radiometer. Main advantages of this method are the flexible adjustment mechanism in data processing and the optimization mechanism in a kernel parameter setting of SVR. Numerical examples and applications to the calibration of infrared radiometer are performed to verify the performance of PSO-ASVR-based method compared to conventional data fitting methods.

  16. Three-dimensional radar and radiometer simulations of mixed-phase clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, I. S.; Bobak, J.; Munchak, S. J.; Johnson, B. T.

    2016-12-01

    Supercooled liquid clouds are believed to have an appreciable climate feedback effect, and as the climate warms, the presence of supercooled liquid is expected to increase. Such changes will alter the albedo of clouds as liquid clouds are more reflective than ice clouds; however, the partitioning of liquid and ice in mixed-phase clouds is poorly represented in global climate models. Beyond climate applications, supercooled liquid presents a hazard to aviation through airframe icing. To address both of these areas, improvements in the ability to measure the microphysics of mixed-phase clouds are necessary, and simulation tools are required to interpret remote sensing observations of clouds. In particular, radiative transfer modeling can be used to determine the usefulness of millimeter wave sensors for detecting and quantifying supercooled liquid layers within mixed-phase clouds. To better understand the active and passive millimeter wave response to mixed-phase clouds, we implemented a structural cloud model to represent the spatial variability and inherent microphysics of a high-latitude mixed-phase cloud, and the cloud model allows for the inclusion of preferentially-aligned nonspherical cloud particles. This cloud is then ingested by a three-dimensional vector radiative transfer model that includes multiple-scattering effects. A variety of geometries are considered to encompass ground-based, airborne, and space-based sensors for the purpose of profiling meteorological conditions and cloud microphysics. Additionally, sensor geometries for observing aircraft flight paths are included to determine the feasibility of remote detection of icing conditions. For active simulations, polarimetric quantities, including cross-correlation, differential reflectivity, and linear depolarization ratio are computed, while the full Stokes vector is calculated for passive radiometer simulations. The results are analyzed to determine the sensitivity to liquid and ice phase

  17. Investigation of ground-based microwave radiometer calibration techniques at 530 hPa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Maschwitz

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Ground-based microwave radiometers (MWR are becoming more and more common for remotely sensing the atmospheric temperature and humidity profile as well as path-integrated cloud liquid water content. The calibration accuracy of the state-of-the-art MWR HATPRO-G2 (Humidity And Temperature Profiler – Generation 2 was investigated during the second phase of the Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaign (RHUBC-II in northern Chile (5320 m above mean sea level, 530 hPa conducted by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM program conducted between August and October 2009. This study assesses the quality of the two frequently used liquid nitrogen and tipping curve calibrations by performing a detailed error propagation study, which exploits the unique atmospheric conditions of RHUBC-II. Both methods are known to have open issues concerning systematic offsets and calibration repeatability. For the tipping curve calibration an uncertainty of ±0.1 to ±0.2 K (K-band and ±0.6 to ±0.7 K (V-band is found. The uncertainty in the tipping curve calibration is mainly due to atmospheric inhomogeneities and the assumed air mass correction for the Earth curvature. For the liquid nitrogen calibration the estimated uncertainty of ±0.3 to ±1.6 K is dominated by the uncertainty of the reflectivity of the liquid nitrogen target. A direct comparison between the two calibration techniques shows that for six of the nine channels that can be calibrated with both methods, they agree within the assessed uncertainties. For the other three channels the unexplained discrepancy is below 0.5 K. Systematic offsets, which may cause the disagreement of both methods within their estimated uncertainties, are discussed.

  18. An evaluation of water vapor radiometer data for calibration of the wet path delay in very long baseline interferometry experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehn, C. E.; Himwich, W. E.; Clark, T. A.; Ma, C.

    1991-01-01

    The internal consistency of the baseline-length measurements derived from analysis of several independent VLBI experiments is an estimate of the measurement precision. The paper investigates whether the inclusion of water vapor radiometer (WVR) data as an absolute calibration of the propagation delay due to water vapor improves the precision of VLBI baseline-length measurements. The paper analyzes 28 International Radio Interferometric Surveying runs between June 1988 and January 1989; WVR measurements were made during each session. The addition of WVR data decreased the scatter of the length measurements of the baselines by 5-10 percent. The observed reduction in the scatter of the baseline lengths is less than what is expected from the behavior of the formal errors, which suggest that the baseline-length measurement precision should improve 10-20 percent if WVR data are included in the analysis. The discrepancy between the formal errors and the baseline-length results can be explained as the consequence of systematic errors in the dry-mapping function parameters, instrumental biases in the WVR and the barometer, or both.

  19. Measuring and Modeling Component and Whole-System Carbon Exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Bolstad

    2006-11-01

    We measured ecosystem/atmospheric carbon exchange through a range of methods covering a range of scales. We measured carbon (C) pool and flux for a number of previously poorly quantified ecosystems, developed measurement and modeling methods, and applied these to substantially increase the accuracy and reduce uncertainty in ecosystem/atmospheric C exchange at a range of scales. It appears most upland forests are weak to strong carbon sinks, and status depends largely on disturbance history and age. Net flux from wetland ecosystems appears to be from weak sinks to moderate sources of C to the atmosphere. We found limited evidence for a positive feedback of warming/drying to increased ecosystem C emissions. We further developed multi-source integration and modeling methods, including multiple towers, to scale estimates to landscapes and larger regions.

  20. Calibration of ground-based microwave radiometers - Accuracy assessment and recommendations for network users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pospichal, Bernhard; Küchler, Nils; Löhnert, Ulrich; Crewell, Susanne; Czekala, Harald; Güldner, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Ground-based microwave radiometers (MWR) are becoming widely used in atmospheric remote sensing and start to be routinely operated by national weather services and other institutions. However, common standards for calibration of these radiometers and a detailed knowledge about the error characteristics is needed, in order to assimilate the data into models. Intercomparisons of calibrations by different MWRs have rarely been done. Therefore, two calibration experiments in Lindenberg (2014) and Meckenheim (2015) were performed in the frame of TOPROF (Cost action ES1303) in order to assess uncertainties and differences between various instruments. In addition, a series of experiments were taken in Oklahoma in autumn 2014. The focus lay on the performance of the two main instrument types, which are currently used operationally. These are the MP-Profiler series by Radiometrics Corporation as well as the HATPRO series by Radiometer Physics GmbH (RPG). Both instrument types are operating in two frequency bands, one along the 22 GHz water vapour line, the other one at the lower wing of the 60 GHz oxygen absorption complex. The goal was to establish protocols for providing quality controlled (QC) MWR data and their uncertainties. To this end, standardized calibration procedures for MWR were developed and recommendations for radiometer users were compiled. We focus here mainly on data types, integration times and optimal settings for calibration intervals, both for absolute (liquid nitrogen, tipping curve) as well as relative (hot load, noise diode) calibrations. Besides the recommendations for ground-based MWR operators, we will present methods to determine the accuracy of the calibration as well as means for automatic data quality control. In addition, some results from the intercomparison of different radiometers will be discussed.

  1. Potential soil moisture products from the aquarius radiometer and scatterometer using an observing system simulation experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Luo

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Using an observing system simulation experiment (OSSE, we investigate the potential soil moisture retrieval capability of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA Aquarius radiometer (L-band 1.413 GHz and scatterometer (L-band, 1.260 GHz. We estimate potential errors in soil moisture retrievals and identify the sources that could cause those errors. The OSSE system includes (i a land surface model in the NASA Land Information System, (ii a radiative transfer and backscatter model, (iii a realistic orbital sampling model, and (iv an inverse soil moisture retrieval model. We execute the OSSE over a 1000 × 2200 km2 region in the central United States, including the Red and Arkansas river basins. Spatial distributions of soil moisture retrieved from the radiometer and scatterometer are close to the synthetic truth. High root mean square errors (RMSEs of radiometer retrievals are found over the heavily vegetated regions, while large RMSEs of scatterometer retrievals are scattered over the entire domain. The temporal variations of soil moisture are realistically captured over a sparely vegetated region with correlations 0.98 and 0.63, and RMSEs 1.28% and 8.23% vol/vol for radiometer and scatterometer, respectively. Over the densely vegetated region, soil moisture exhibits larger temporal variation than the truth, leading to correlation 0.70 and 0.67, respectively, and RMSEs 9.49% and 6.09% vol/vol respectively. The domain-averaged correlations and RMSEs suggest that radiometer is more accurate than scatterometer in retrieving soil moisture. The analysis also demonstrates that the accuracy of the retrieved soil moisture is affected by vegetation coverage and spatial aggregation.

  2. Potential Soil Moisture Products from the Aquarius Radiometer and Scatterometer Using an Observing System Simulation Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Yan [I.M. Systems Group at NOAA/NCEP/EMC; Feng, Xia [George Mason University; Houser, Paul [George Mason University; Anantharaj, Valentine G [ORNL; Fan, Xingang [Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green; De Lannoy, Gabrielle [Ghent University, Belgium; Zhan, Xiwu [NOAA/NESDIS Center for Satellite Applications and Research; Dabbiru, Lalitha [Mississippi State University (MSU)

    2013-01-01

    Using an observing system simulation experiment (OSSE), we investigate the potential soil moisture retrieval capability of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Aquarius radiometer (L-band 1.413 GHz) and scatterometer (L-band, 1.260 GHz). We estimate potential errors in soil moisture retrievals and identify the sources that could cause those errors. The OSSE system includes (i) a land surface model in the NASA Land Information System, (ii) a radiative transfer and backscatter model, (iii) a realistic orbital sampling model, and (iv) an inverse soil moisture retrieval model. We execute the OSSE over a 1000 2200 km2 region in the central United States, including the Red and Arkansas river basins. Spatial distributions of soil moisture retrieved from the radiometer and scatterometer are close to the synthetic truth. High root mean square errors (RMSEs) of radiometer retrievals are found over the heavily vegetated regions, while large RMSEs of scatterometer retrievals are scattered over the entire domain. The temporal variations of soil moisture are realistically captured over a sparely vegetated region with correlations 0.98 and 0.63, and RMSEs 1.28% and 8.23% vol/vol for radiometer and scatterometer, respectively. Over the densely vegetated region, soil moisture exhibits larger temporal variation than the truth, leading to correlation 0.70 and 0.67, respectively, and RMSEs 9.49% and 6.09% vol/vol respectively. The domain-averaged correlations and RMSEs suggest that radiometer is more accurate than scatterometer in retrieving soil moisture. The analysis also demonstrates that the accuracy of the retrieved soil moisture is affected by vegetation coverage and spatial aggregation.

  3. PC-SEAPAK - ANALYSIS OF COASTAL ZONE COLOR SCANNER AND ADVANCED VERY HIGH RESOLUTION RADIOMETER DATA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcclain, C. R.

    1994-01-01

    PC-SEAPAK is a user-interactive satellite data analysis software package specifically developed for oceanographic research. The program is used to process and interpret data obtained from the Nimbus-7/Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS), and the NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR). PC-SEAPAK is a set of independent microcomputer-based image analysis programs that provide the user with a flexible, user-friendly, standardized interface, and facilitates relatively low-cost analysis of oceanographic satellite data. Version 4.0 includes 114 programs. PC-SEAPAK programs are organized into categories which include CZCS and AVHRR level-1 ingest, level-2 analyses, statistical analyses, data extraction, remapping to standard projections, graphics manipulation, image board memory manipulation, hardcopy output support and general utilities. Most programs allow user interaction through menu and command modes and also by the use of a mouse. Most programs also provide for ASCII file generation for further analysis in spreadsheets, graphics packages, etc. The CZCS scanning radiometer aboard the NIMBUS-7 satellite was designed to measure the concentration of photosynthetic pigments and their degradation products in the ocean. AVHRR data is used to compute sea surface temperatures and is supported for the NOAA 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12 satellites. The CZCS operated from November 1978 to June 1986. CZCS data may be obtained free of charge from the CZCS archive at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. AVHRR data may be purchased through NOAA's Satellite Data Service Division. Ordering information is included in the PC-SEAPAK documentation. Although PC-SEAPAK was developed on a COMPAQ Deskpro 386/20, it can be run on most 386-compatible computers with an AT bus, EGA controller, Intel 80387 coprocessor, and MS-DOS 3.3 or higher. A Matrox MVP-AT image board with appropriate monitor and cables is also required. Note that the authors have received some reports of

  4. Increasing vertical resolution of three-dimensional atmospheric water vapor retrievals using a network of scanning compact microwave radiometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Swaroop

    2011-12-01

    The thermodynamic properties of the troposphere, in particular water vapor content and temperature, change in response to physical mechanisms, including frictional drag, evaporation, transpiration, heat transfer and flow modification due to terrain. The planetary boundary layer (PBL) is characterized by a high rate of change in its thermodynamic state on time scales of typically less than one hour. Large horizontal gradients in vertical wind speed and steep vertical gradients in water vapor and temperature in the PBL are associated with high-impact weather. Observation of these gradients in the PBL with high vertical resolution and accuracy is important for improvement of weather prediction. Satellite remote sensing in the visible, infrared and microwave provide qualitative and quantitative measurements of many atmospheric properties, including cloud cover, precipitation, liquid water content and precipitable water vapor in the upper troposphere. However, the ability to characterize the thermodynamic properties of the PBL is limited by the confounding factors of ground emission in microwave channels and of cloud cover in visible and IR channels. Ground-based microwave radiometers are routinely used to measure thermodynamic profiles. The vertical resolution of such profiles retrieved from radiometric brightness temperatures depends on the number and choice of frequency channels, the scanning strategy and the accuracy of brightness temperature measurements. In the standard technique, which uses brightness temperatures from vertically pointing radiometers, the vertical resolution of the retrieved water vapor profile is similar to or larger than the altitude at which retrievals are performed. This study focuses on the improvement of the vertical resolution of water vapor retrievals by including scanning measurements at a variety of elevation angles. Elevation angle scanning increases the path length of the atmospheric emission, thus improving the signal-to-noise ratio

  5. Radiometric absolute noise-temperature measurement system features improved accuracy and calibration ease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, W.; Ewen, H.; Haroules, G.

    1970-01-01

    Radiometric receiver system, which measures noise temperatures in degrees Kelvin, does not require cryogenic noise sources for routine operation. It eliminates radiometer calibration errors associated with RF attenuation measurements. Calibrated noise source is required only for laboratory adjustment and calibration.

  6. [Radiometers performance attenuation and data correction in long-term observation of total radiation and photosynthetically active radiation in typical forest ecosystems in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhi-Lin; Sun, Xiao-Min; Yu, Gui-Rui; Wen, Xue-Fa; Zhang, Yi-Ping; Han, Shi-Jie; Yan, Jun-Hua; Wang, Hui-Min

    2011-11-01

    Based on the total radiation and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) observations with net radiometer (CNR1) and quantum sensor (Li-190SB) in 4 ChinaFLUX forest sites (Changbaishan, Qianyanzhou, Dinghushan, and Xishuangbanna) in 2003-2008, this paper analyzed the uncertainties and the radiometers performance changes in long-term and continuous field observation. The results showed that the 98% accuracy of the total radiation measured with CNR1 (Q(cNR1)) could satisfy the technical criterion for the sites except Xishuangbanna where the Q(CNR1) was averagely about 7% lower than Q(CM11), the radiation measured with high accuracy pyranometer CM11. For most sites, though the temperature had definite effects on the performance of CNR1, the effects were still within the allowable range of the accuracy of the instrument. Besides temperature, the seasonal fog often occurred in tropical rain forests in Xishuangbanna also had effects on the performance of CNR1. Based on the long-term variations of PAR, especially its ratio to total radiation in the 4 sites, it was found that quantum sensor (Li-190SB) had obvious performance attenuation, with the mean annual attenuation rate being about 4%. To correct the observation error caused by Li-190SB, an attempt was made to give a post-correction of the PAR observations, which could basically eliminate the quantum sensor's performance attenuation due to long-term field measurement.

  7. Miniaturized Gas Correlation Radiometer for the Detection of Trace Gases in the Martian Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melroy, H.; Wilson, E. L.; Georgieva, E.

    2012-12-01

    We present a miniaturized and simplified version of a gas correlation radiometer (GCR) capable of simultaneously mapping multiple trace gases and identifying active regions on the Mars surface. Gas correlation radiometry (GCR) has been shown to be a sensitive and versatile method for detecting trace gases in Earth's atmosphere. Reduction of the size and mass of the GCR was achieved by implementing compact, light-weight 1 mm inner diameter hollow-core optical fibers (hollow waveguides) as the gas correlation cells. In a comparison with an Earth orbiting CO2 GCR instrument, exchanging the 10 m multipass cells with hollow waveguide gas correlation cells of equivalent pathlength reduces the mass from ~150 kg to ~0.5 kg, and reduces the volume from 1.9 m x 1.3 m x 0.86 m to a small bundle of fiber coils approximately 1 meter in diameter by 0.05 m in height (mass and volume reductions of >99%). A unique feature of this instrument is its stackable module design, with a single module for each trace gas. Each of the modules is self-contained, and fundamentally identical; differing by the bandpass filter wavelength range and gas mixtures inside the hollow-waveguide absorption cells. The current configuration contains four stacked modules for simultaneous measurements of methane (CH4), formaldehyde (H2CO), water vapor (H2O), and deuterated water vapor (HDO) but could easily be expanded to include measurements of additional species of interest including nitrous oxide (N2O), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), methanol (CH3OH), and sulfur dioxide (SO2), as well as carbon dioxide (CO2) for a simultaneous measure of mass balance. Preliminary results indicate that a 1 ppb detection limit is possible for both formaldehyde and methane with one second of averaging. Using non-optimized components, we have demonstrated an instrument sensitivity equivalent to ~30 ppb for formaldehyde, and ~500 ppb for methane. We expect custom bandpass filters and 6 m long waveguides to significantly improve these

  8. High-Resolution Soil Moisture Retrieval using SMAP-L Band Radiometer and RISAT-C band Radar Data for the Indian Subcontinent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, G.; Das, N. N.; Panda, R. K.; Mohanty, B.; Entekhabi, D.; Bhattacharya, B. K.

    2016-12-01

    Soil moisture status at high resolution (1-10 km) is vital for hydrological, agricultural and hydro-metrological applications. The NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission had potential to provide reliable soil moisture estimate at finer spatial resolutions (3 km and 9 km) at the global extent, but suffered a malfunction of its radar, consequently making the SMAP mission observations only from radiometer that are of coarse spatial resolution. At present, the availability of high-resolution soil moisture product is limited, especially in developing countries like India, which greatly depends on agriculture for sustaining a huge population. Therefore, an attempt has been made in the reported study to combine the C-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data from Radar Imaging Satellite (RISAT) of the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) with the SMAP mission L-band radiometer data to obtain high-resolution (1 km and 3 km) soil moisture estimates. In this study, a downscaling approach (Active-Passive Algorithm) implemented for the SMAP mission was used to disaggregate the SMAP radiometer brightness temperature (Tb) using the fine resolution SAR backscatter (σ0) from RISAT. The downscaled high-resolution Tb was then subjected to tau-omega model in conjunction with high-resolution ancillary data to retrieve soil moisture at 1 and 3 km scale. The retrieved high-resolution soil moisture estimates were then validated with ground based soil moisture measurement under different hydro-climatic regions of India. Initial results show tremendous potential and reasonable accuracy for the retrieved soil moisture at 1 km and 3 km. It is expected that ISRO will implement this approach to produce high-resolution soil moisture estimates for the Indian subcontinent.

  9. Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD) Observations of Brightness Temperatures and Ocean Surface Wind Speed and Rain Rate During NASA's GRIP and HS3 Campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Timothy L.; James, M. W.; Roberts, J. B.; Jones, W. L.; Biswas, S.; Ruf, C. S.; Uhlhorn, E. W.; Atlas, R.; Black, P.; Albers, C.

    2012-01-01

    HIRAD flew on high-altitude aircraft over Earl and Karl during NASA s GRIP (Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes) campaign in August - September of 2010, and plans to fly over Atlantic tropical cyclones in September of 2012 as part of the Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) mission. HIRAD is a new C-band radiometer using a synthetic thinned array radiometer (STAR) technology to obtain spatial resolution of approximately 2 km, out to roughly 30 km each side of nadir. By obtaining measurements of emissions at 4, 5, 6, and 6.6 GHz, observations of ocean surface wind speed and rain rate can be retrieved. The physical retrieval technique has been used for many years by precursor instruments, including the Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR), which has been flying on the NOAA and USAF hurricane reconnaissance aircraft for several years to obtain observations within a single footprint at nadir angle. Results from the flights during the GRIP and HS3 campaigns will be shown, including images of brightness temperatures, wind speed, and rain rate. Comparisons will be made with observations from other instruments on the campaigns, for which HIRAD observations are either directly comparable or are complementary. Features such as storm eye and eye-wall, location of storm wind and rain maxima, and indications of dynamical features such as the merging of a weaker outer wind/rain maximum with the main vortex may be seen in the data. Potential impacts on operational ocean surface wind analyses and on numerical weather forecasts will also be discussed.

  10. Assessing the potential of passive microwave radiometers for continuous temperature profile retrieval using a three year data set from Payerne

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löhnert, U.; Maier, O.

    2011-12-01

    The motivation of this study is to verify theoretical expectations placed on ground-based radiometer techniques and to confirm whether they are suitable for supporting key missions of national weather services, such as timely and accurate weather advisories and warnings. We evaluate reliability and accuracy of atmospheric temperature profiles retrieved continuously by a HATPRO (Humidity And Temperature PROfiler) system operated at the aerological station of Payerne (MeteoSwiss) in the time period August 2006-December 2009. Assessment is performed by comparing temperatures from the radiometer against temperature measurements from a radiosonde accounting for a total of 2088 quality-controlled all-season cases. In the evaluated time period, HATPRO delivered reliable temperature profiles in 88% of all-weather conditions with a temporal resolution of 15 min. Random differences between HATPRO and radiosonde are down to 0.5 K in the lower boundary layer and rise up to 1.7 K at 4 km height. The differences observed between HATPRO and radiosonde in the lower boundary layer are similar to the differences observed between the radiosonde and another in-situ sensor located on a close-by 30 m tower. Temperature retrievals from above 4 km contain less than 5% of the total information content of the measurements, which makes clear that this technique is mainly suited for continuous observations in the boundary layer. Systematic temperature differences are also observed throughout the retrieved profile and can account for up to ±0.5 K. These errors are due to offsets in the measurements of the microwave radiances that have been corrected for in data post-processing and lead to nearly bias-free overall temperature retrievals. Different reasons for the radiance offsets are discussed, but cannot be unambiguously determined retrospectively. Monitoring and, if necessary, corrections for radiance offsets as well as a real-time rigorous automated data quality control are mandatory for

  11. Millimeter-wave Imaging Radiometer Brightness Temperatures, Wakasa Bay, Japan

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes calibrated brightness temperatures measured over Wakasa Bay in the Sea of Japan in January and February 2003. The MIR was carried on a...

  12. Autonomous marine hyperspectral radiometers for determining solar irradiances and aerosol optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, John; Smyth, Tim J.; Estellés, Victor

    2017-05-01

    We have developed two hyperspectral radiometer systems which require no moving parts, shade rings or motorised tracking, making them ideally suited for autonomous use in the inhospitable remote marine environment. Both systems are able to measure direct and diffuse hyperspectral irradiance in the wavelength range 350-1050 nm at 6 nm (Spectrometer 1) or 3.5 nm (Spectrometer 2) resolution. Marine field trials along a 100° transect (between 50° N and 50° S) of the Atlantic Ocean resulted in close agreement with existing commercially available instruments in measuring (1) photosynthetically available radiation (PAR), with both spectrometers giving regression slopes close to unity (Spectrometer 1: 0.960; Spectrometer 2: 1.006) and R2 ˜ 0.96; (2) irradiant energy, with R2 ˜ 0.98 and a regression slope of 0.75 which can be accounted for by the difference in wavelength integration range; and (3) hyperspectral irradiance where the agreement on average was between 2 and 5 %. Two long duration land-based field campaigns of up to 18 months allowed both spectrometers to be well calibrated. This was also invaluable for empirically correcting for the wider field of view (FOV) of the spectrometers in comparison with the current generation of sun photometers ( ˜ 7.5° compared with ˜ 1°). The need for this correction was also confirmed and independently quantified by atmospheric radiative transfer modelling and found to be a function of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and solar zenith angle. Once Spectrometer 2 was well calibrated and the FOV effect corrected for, the RMSE in retrievals of AOD when compared with a CIMEL sun photometer were reduced to ˜ 0.02-0.03 with R2 > 0.95 at wavelengths 440, 500, 670 and 870 nm. Corrections for the FOV as well as ship motion were applied to the data from the marine field trials. This resulted in AOD500 nm ranging between 0.05 in the clear background marine aerosol regions and ˜ 0.5 within the Saharan dust plume. The RMSE between the

  13. Chang'E Microwave Radiometer Data Calibration with LRO Diviner Data and Machine Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Ken; Hu, Guo-Ping; Zheng, Yong-Chun; This work is supported by BNU-HKBU United International College Research Grant R201626, Zhuhai Premier Discipline Enhancement Grant code: R1050, and Science and Technology Development Fund in Macao SAR 039/2013/A2

    2016-10-01

    Following usual practice in microwave remote sensing, raw data from multi-channel microwave radiometers (MR) onboard the Chinese Chang'E lunar obiters (CE1 & CE2) were acquired as observed antenna voltages, which were then calibrated and converted to brightness temperatures (TB) by a two-point calibration procedure. While the CE cold calibration antenna is supposed to point to the deep space and taking data for the cold reference point in the two-point calibration scheme, in reality, it picked up undesirable thermal microwave radiation from the lunar surface. Thus the "cold" reference point is not exactly the 2.7K cosmic background assumed and this affects the quality of the calibration.In this work, the small but puzzling differences between the two sets of Level 2C MR data released for CE1 & 2 are attributed to the difference in orbital altitudes between CE1 & 2. This leads to the different degrees of contamination to the cold antenna on CE1 & 2 by thermal radiations from the lunar surface, which showed up as persistent lower night-time TB values in the Level 2C CE2 dataset.We proposed a machine learning approach applied directly to pre-Level 2C data in the voltages to TB convertion process. Since all the antenna voltage data as well as the high temperature referencing point in the calibration procedure are directly measurable, optimized regression algorithms have been employed to determine the effective low temperature referencing points and obtain a single set of statistical consistent TB by combining raw data from CE1 & 2, due to the fact that seasonal variations are less than resolution of the CE MR data from low to medium latitudes.Finally, the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Diviner IR data are used as constraints on the boundary condition of the top layer regolith temperature to obtain a consistent sub-surface temperature profile, from which the measured CE MR data can be computed through multi-layer radiation transfer model. This step removes most of

  14. A Novel Sensor Based on a Single-Pixel Microwave Radiometer for Warm Object Counting: Concept Validation and IoT Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimenti, Federico; Bonafoni, Stefania; Roselli, Luca

    2017-06-14

    Controlled measurements by a low-cost single-pixel microwave radiometer operating at 12.65 GHz were carried out to assess the detection and counting capability for targets warmer than the surroundings. The adopted reference test targets were pre-warmed water and oil; and a hand, both naked and wearing a glove. The results showed the reliability of microwave radiometry for counting operations under controlled conditions, and its effectiveness at detecting even warm targets masked by unheated dielectric layers. An electromagnetic model describing the scenario sensed by the radiometer antenna is proposed, and comparison with the experimental observations shows a good agreement. The measurements prove that reliable counting is enabled by an antenna temperature increment, for each target sample added, of around 1 K. Starting from this value, an analysis of the antenna filling factor was performed to provide an instrument useful for evaluating real applicability in many practical situations. This study also allows the direct people counting problem to be addressed, providing preliminary operational indications, reference numbers and experimental validation.

  15. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Cloud Top Temperature (CTT) Environmental Data Record (EDR) from IDPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument onboard the...

  16. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Imagery (not Near Constant Contrast) Environmental Data Record (EDR) from IDPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument onboard the...

  17. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Near Constant Contrast (NCC) Imagery Environmental Data Record (EDR) from IDPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument onboard the...

  18. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Land Surface Temperature (LST) Environmental Data Record (EDR) from IDPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) of Land Surface Temperature (LST) from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite...

  19. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Ice Surface Temperature (IST) Environmental Data Record (EDR) from IDPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument onboard the...

  20. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Volcanic Ash Detection and Height Environmental Data Record (EDR) from NDE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) of volcanic ash from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer (VIIRS) instrument...

  1. Nimbus-2 High-Resolution Infrared Radiometer (HRIR) Imagery of Cloud Cover at Night on 70 mm Film V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The HRIRN2IM data product contains scanned negatives of photofacsimile 70mm film strips from the Nimbus-2 High-Resolution Infrared Radiometer. The images contain...

  2. Nimbus-1 High-Resolution Infrared Radiometer (HRIR) Imagery of Cloud Cover at Night on 70 mm Film V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The HRIRN1IM data product contains scanned negatives of photofacsimile 70mm film strips from the Nimbus-1 High-Resolution Infrared Radiometer. The images contain...

  3. Nimbus-6 High Resolution Infrared Radiometer (HIRS) Level 1 Calibrated Radiances for the Global Atmospheric Research Program (GARP) V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Nimbus-6 High Resolution Infrared Radiometer (HIRS) Level 1 Calibrated Radiances for the Global Atmospheric Research Program (GARP) data product contains daily...

  4. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Sea Ice Characterization (SIC) Environmental Data Record (EDR) from IDPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains an Environmental Data Record (EDR) of Sea Ice Characterization (SIC) from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument...

  5. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Cloud Base Height (CBH) Environmental Data Record (EDR) from IDPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) of Cloud Base Heights (CBH) from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite...

  6. GPM GROUND VALIDATION ENVIRONMENT CANADA (EC) PASSIVE MICROWAVE RADIOMETER AND SOIL MOISTURE-TEMPERATURE DATA GCPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Environment Canada (EC) Passive Microwave Radiometer and Soil Moisture-Temperature Data GCPEx dataset gathered data during the GPM...

  7. NPP Visible Infrared Imager-Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Diffuse Attenuation Coefficient for Downwelling Irradiance (KD) Global Mapped Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Visible and Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) is a multi-disciplinary instrument that is being flown on the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) series of...

  8. NPP Visible Infrared Imager-Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Diffuse Attenuation Coefficient for Downwelling Irradiance (KD) Global Binned Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Visible and Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) is a multi-disciplinary instrument that is being flown on the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) series of...

  9. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Ice Thickness and Age Environmental Data Records (EDRs) from NDE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) of Ice Thickness and Age from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS)...

  10. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Cloud Type and Phase Environmental Data Record (EDR) from NDE

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) of cloud type and phase from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS)...

  11. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Ocean Color/Chlorophyll (OCC) Environmental Data Record (EDR) from IDPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) of Ocean Color/Chlorophyll (OCC) from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite...

  12. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Cloud Top Height (CTH) Environmental Data Record (EDR) from IDPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality operational Environmental Data Record (EDR) from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument onboard the...

  13. NOAA JPSS Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Cloud Cover Layer (CCL) Environmental Data Record (EDR) from IDPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains a high quality Environmental Data Record (EDR) of Cloud Cover Layers (CCL) from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS)...

  14. Development of Breakthrough Technology for Spaceflight Microwave Radiometers? RFI Noise Detection and Mitigation Based on the HHT2 Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Microwave active/passive radiometer is the premier instrument for remote sensing of Earth. However, it carries the price of non-linear response by its horn-receiver...

  15. Microwave Radiometry for Oil Pollution Monitoring, Measurements, and Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Skou, Niels

    1986-01-01

    Work is presently carried out in Europe to change the Status of the microwave radiometer, namely, to develop it from a research instrument to an operational instrument-especially for measuring oil pollution on the sea surface. The Technical University of Denmark (TUD), with its long experience in airborne microwave radiometry, is heavily involved in this process. The TUD multichannel imaging radiometer system has been flown in several large-scale oil-pollution experiments, the collected data ...

  16. Characteristic of a Digital Correlation Radiometer Back End with Finite Wordlength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Sayak K.; Hyde, David W.; James, Mark W.; Cecil, Daniel J.

    2017-01-01

    The performance characteristic of a digital correlation radiometer signal processing back end (DBE) is analyzed using a simulator. The particular design studied here corresponds to the airborne Hurricane Imaging radiometer which was jointly developed by the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, University of Michigan, University of Central Florida and NOAA. Laboratory and flight test data is found to be in accord with the simulation results. Overall design seems to be optimum for the typical input signal dynamic range. It was found that the performance of the digital kurtosis could be improved by lowering the DBE input power level. An unusual scaling between digital correlation channels observed in the instrument data is confirmed to be a DBE characteristic.

  17. Balloon-borne disposable radiometer for cloud detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoll, K A; Harrison, R G

    2012-02-01

    A low cost, disposable instrument for measuring solar radiation during meteorological balloon flights through cloud layers is described. Using a photodiode detector and low thermal drift signal conditioning circuitry, the device showed less than 1% drift for temperatures varied from +20 °C to -35 °C. The angular response to radiation, which declined less rapidly than the cosine of the angle between the incident radiation and normal incidence, is used for cloud detection exploiting the motion of the platform. Oriented upwards, the natural motion imposed by the balloon allows cloud and clear air to be distinguished by the absence of radiation variability within cloud, where the diffuse radiation present is isotropic. The optical method employed by the solar radiation instrument has also been demonstrated to provide higher resolution measurements of cloud boundaries than relative humidity measurements alone.

  18. A General Analysis of the Impact of Digitization in Microwave Correlation Radiometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch-Lluis, Xavier; Ramos-Perez, Isaac; Camps, Adriano; Rodriguez-Alvarez, Nereida; Valencia, Enric; Park, Hyuk

    2011-01-01

    This study provides a general framework to analyze the effects on correlation radiometers of a generic quantization scheme and sampling process. It reviews, unifies and expands several previous works that focused on these effects separately. In addition, it provides a general theoretical background that allows analyzing any digitization scheme including any number of quantization levels, irregular quantization steps, gain compression, clipping, jitter and skew effects of the sampling period. PMID:22163943

  19. Development of microwave radiometer sensor technology for geostationary earth science platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, T. G.; Lawrence, R. W.; Schroeder, L. C.; Kendall, B. M.; Harrington, R. F.

    1991-01-01

    A new research and technology program has been initiated at the Langley Research Center of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for developing advanced, high resolution microwave radiometer (HI-RES) sensors suitable for Mission to Planet Earth (MPE) remote sensing applications. The objective of this program is to provide the technology needed to enable and enhance the long-term observations, documentation, and understanding of the earth as a system.

  20. A General Analysis of the Impact of Digitization in Microwave Correlation Radiometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyuk Park

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This study provides a general framework to analyze the effects on correlation radiometers of a generic quantization scheme and sampling process. It reviews, unifies and expands several previous works that focused on these effects separately. In addition, it provides a general theoretical background that allows analyzing any digitization scheme including any number of quantization levels, irregular quantization steps, gain compression, clipping, jitter and skew effects of the sampling period.