WorldWideScience

Sample records for net nitrification rates

  1. Effects of a clearcut on the net rates of nitrification and N mineralization in a northern hardwood forest, Catskill Mountains, New York, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Douglas A.; Murdoch, Peter S.

    2005-01-01

    The Catskill Mountains of southeastern New York receive among the highest rates of atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition in eastern North America, and ecosystems in the region may be sensitive to human disturbances that affect the N cycle. We studied the effects of a clearcut in a northern hardwood forest within a 24-ha Catskill watershed on the net rates of N mineralization and nitrification in soil plots during 6 years (1994-1999) that encompassed 3-year pre- and post-harvesting periods. Despite stream NO3- concentrations that increased by more than 1400 ??mol l-1 within 5 months after the clearcut, and three measures of NO3- availability in soil that increased 6- to 8-fold during the 1st year after harvest, the net rates of N mineralization and nitrification as measured by in situ incubation in the soil remained unchanged. The net N-mineralization rate in O-horizon soil was 1- 2 mg N kg-1 day-1 and the net nitrification rate was about 1 mg N kg-1 day-1, and rates in B-horizon soil were only one-fifth to one-tenth those of the O-horizon. These rates were obtained in single 625 m2 plots in the clearcut watershed and reference area, and were confirmed by rate measurements at 6 plots in 1999 that showed little difference in N-mineralization and nitrification rates between the treatment and reference areas. Soil temperature increased 1 ?? 0.8??C in a clearcut study plot relative to a reference plot during the post-harvest period, and soil moisture in the clearcut plot was indistinguishable from that in the reference plot. These results are contrary to the initial hypothesis that the clearcut would cause net rates of these N-cycling processes to increase sharply. The in situ incubation method used in this study isolated the samples from ambient roots and thereby prevented plant N uptake; therefore, the increases in stream NO3- concentrations and export following harvest largely reflect diminished uptake. Changes in temperature and moisture after the clearcut were

  2. In situ net N mineralisation and nitrification under organic and conventionally managed olive oil orchards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gomez Muñoz, Beatriz; Hinojosa, M. B.; García-Ruiz, R.

    2015-01-01

    Olive oil orchard occupies a great percentage of the cropland in southern Spain. Thus, changes in nitrogen (N) fertilization might have a great effect on N dynamics at least at regional scale, which should be investigated for a sustainable N fertilization program. In situ net N mineralization (NM......) and nitrification (NN) were investigated during a year in comparable organic (OR) and conventional (CV) olive oil orchards of two locations differing their N input. Soil samples were collected in two soil positions (under and between trees canopy) and both buried-bags and soil core techniques were used to quantify...... soil TN. Soil TN and PMN explained together a 50 % of the variability in soil N availability, which suggests that these two variables are good predictors of the potential of a soil to provide available N. The highest rates of soil N availability were found in spring, when olive tree demand for N...

  3. Sediment nitrification and denitrification rates in a Lake ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbially-mediated nitrogen (N) cycling in aquatic sediments has been recognized as an ecosystem service due to mitigation of N-transport to receiving waters. In 2011 and 2012, we compared nitrification (NIT), unamended (DeNIT) and amended (DEA) denitrification rates among spatial and depths zones and in relation to site physicochemical characteristics in the St. Louis River Estuary (SLRE) of western Lake Superior. Among vegetated habitats in 2011, NIT rates were highest in deep (>2 m) waters (249 mgN m-2 d-1) and in the upper estuary (>126). DeNIT rates were highest in deep waters and the harbor (2,111 and 274, respectively). DEA rates were similar among habitats. In 2012, we observed highest NIT (223 and 287) and DeNIT (77 and 64) rates in the harbor and from deep waters, respectively. Highest rates for NIT, DeNIT, and DEA were in July, May, and June, respectively. Individual site characteristics were weakly related to N-cycling rates, but water and sediment N-concentrations were identified as significant predictors in multiple linear regression models. NO3- was most limiting to sediment denitrification rates. The SLRE acted as a net source of NO3- to the water column, but had the potential to act as a sink. Average N2O production in 2011 was half that of 2012, with production during DEA (23-54%) being higher than DeNIT (0-41%). SLRE N-cycling rates were spatially and temporally variable, but our results give an indication of how alterations of water depth a

  4. Is ammonification the rate limiting step for nitrification kinetics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katipoglu-Yazan, Tugce; Ubay Cokgor, Emine; Insel, Güçlü; Orhon, Derin

    2012-06-01

    This study investigated relative magnitude of hydrolysis and ammonification by separate analysis of ammonia release and nitrification mechanisms. A peptone mixture was used as substrate in two parallel experiments seeded with nitrifying biomass conducted with and without nitrification inhibitor. Results were evaluated by means of model analysis of the ammonia and the oxygen uptake rate (OUR) profiles. A dual hydrolysis mechanism with maximum rate coefficients of 6.3 and 0.5/day characterized the peptone mixture and a kinetic balance was established for the ammonia release mechanism with a corresponding ammonification rate of 0.08 m(3)/g COD day. The experiments also showed a low soluble ammonia nitrogen generation that was rapidly depleted, confirming the existence of ammonification. These rate coefficients were verified using model calibration of the OUR profile related to simultaneous carbon removal and nitrification. Results indicated that ammonification would not be rate limiting for wastewaters such as domestic sewage, with lower hydrolysis kinetics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. [Effects of nitrification inhibitors DCD and DMPP on cinnamon soil' s gross nitrogen mineralization and nitrification rates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Xu, Hui; Xia, Zong-Wei; Guo, Yan-Ling

    2012-01-01

    By using 15N pool dilution technique in combining with in situ soil cultivation, this paper studied the effects of nitrification inhibitors dicyandiamide (DCD) and 3,4-dimethylpyrazole phosphate (DMPP) on the gross nitrogen (N) mineralization and nitrification rates in a saline-alkali cinnamon soil in North China. The experiment was carried out in a maize-wheat rotation field in Yuncheng City of Shanxi Province, and three treatments were installed, i.e., urea, urea + DCD, and urea + DMPP. In the first two weeks after fertilization, DCD and DMPP made the gross N mineralization rate and gross N nitrification rate decreased by 25.5% and 7.3%, and by 60.3% and 59.1%, respectively, with a significant difference in the gross N mineralization rate but less difference in the gross N nitrification rate between the effects of DCD and DMPP. However, significant difference was observed in the gross N nitrification rate between the effects of DCD and DMPP after seven weeks of fertilization. The gross N mineralization and nitrification rates and the NH4+ and NO3-consumption rates after two weeks of fertilization were 7.2-10.0, 5.5-21.5, 9.1-12.2, and 5.1-8.4 times of those before fertilization, respectively, possibly due to the stimulating effect of N fertilization. DCD and DMPP made the fertilizer urea N more maintained in NH(4+)-N form and less accumulated in NO(3-)-N form in soil. The decreases of the gross N mineralization and nitrifications rate in the test soil due to the effects of the inhibitors would benefit the reduction of N2O emission from the soil.

  6. Apparent and Measured Rates of Nitrification in the Hypolimnion of a Mesotrophic Lake

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, Grahame H.

    1982-01-01

    Three distinct phases were observed in the change of dissolved inorganic nitrogen concentrations in the hypolimnion of Grasmere. The second phase of decreasing ammonia and increasing nitrate concentrations was typical of the nitrification process. Observations on nitrate concentration gradients between surface sediments and the water column and experiments using the nitrification inhibitor N-Serve indicated the in situ activity of chemolithotrophic nitrifying organisms. Nitrification rates we...

  7. Coupling Hyporheic Nitrification-Denitrification: Evaluating Net Nitrate Source-Sink Dynamics as a Function of Transport and Reaction Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarnetske, J. P.; Haggerty, R.; Wondzell, S. M.; Bokil, V. A.; Gonzalez Pinzon, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    The fate of biologically-available nitrogen (N) and carbon (C) in stream ecosystems is controlled by the coupling of physical transport and biogeochemical reaction kinetics. However, determining the relative role of physical and biogeochemical controls at different temporal and spatial scales is difficult. Hyporheic and riparian zones, where ground waters and stream waters mix, can be important locations controlling N and C transformations because they create strong gradients in both the physical and biogeochemical conditions that control redox biogeochemistry. We evaluated the coupling of physical transport and biogeochemical redox reactions by linking an advection, dispersion, and residence time model with a multiple Monod kinetics model simulating the concentrations of oxygen (O2), ammonium (NH4), nitrate (NO3), and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The model successfully simulated the O2, NH4, NO3 and DOC concentration profiles observed in the hyporheic zone at our study site. We then used global Monte Carlo sensitivity analyses with a nondimensional form of the model to examine coupled nitrification-denitrification dynamics across many scales of transport and reaction conditions. Results demonstrated that the residence time of water in hyporheic systems and the uptake rate of O2 from either respiration and/or nitrification determined whether a hyporheic system was a source or a sink of NO3 to the stream. We further show that the net NO3 source or sink function of a hyporheic system is determined by the ratio of characteristic transport time to the characteristic reaction time of O2 (i.e., the Damköhler number, DaO2), where hyporheic systems with DaO2 > 1 will be net denitrification environments. Our coupling of the hydrologic and biogeochemical limitations of N transformations across different temporal and spatial scales within hyporheic zones allows us to explain the widely contrasting results of previous investigations of hyporheic N dynamics which variously

  8. Quantification of nitrification and denitrification rates in algae and duckweed based wastewater treatment systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmo, O R; van der Steen, N P; Gijzen, H J

    2004-03-01

    Nitrification and denitrification rates at three different depths (0.1, 0.45 and 0.9m from the water surface) in two series of four algae and duckweed based waste stabilisation ponds (ABPs and DBPs) were measured using nitrate reduction techniques in laboratory batch incubations. The effects of temperature and BOD5 loading were investigated. In situ measurements over the ponds' depths were also done for confirmation of laboratory results. Higher dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations in ABPs, especially during the warm season, favoured higher nitrification in ABPs over DBPs. Organic surface loading also affected the rate of nitrification in the ponds. Nitrification rates did not increase along the treatment line despite the decrease in organic matter content. Adsorption of nitrifiers to available suspended particles and subsequent sedimentation was assumed to be the main reason for the similar nitrification rates in most ponds. In both systems, the presence of DO in the water column resulted in very low denitrification rates (5-45 mg-N m(-2)d(-1)). Higher denitrification rates (160-560 mg-N m(-2)d(-1)) were measured in the sediments when anoxic conditions prevailed in the overlaying water. The absence of nitrite or nitrate accumulation suggested sufficient nitrite and nitrate diffusion within the water column to allow full denitrification. The nitrification and denitrification rates in both systems were higher at high temperature. The range of nitrogen loss via denitrification in ABPs and DBPs corresponded to 15-25% of total influent nitrogen.

  9. Impact of water boundary layer diffusion on the nitrification rate of submerged biofilter elements from a recirculating aquaculture system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prehn, Jonas; Waul, Christopher Kevin; Pedersen, Lars-Flemming

    2012-01-01

    Total ammonia nitrogen (TAN) removal by microbial nitrification is an essential process in recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS). In order to protect the aquatic environment and fish health, it is important to be able to predict the nitrification rates in RAS’s. The aim of this study...... was to determine the impact of hydraulic film diffusion on the nitrification rate in a submerged biofilter. Using an experimental batch reactor setup with recirculation, active nitrifying biofilter units from a RAS were exposed to a range of hydraulic flow velocities. Corresponding nitrification rates were...... measured following ammonium chloride, NH4Cl, spikes and the impact of hydraulic film diffusion was quantified. The nitrification performance of the tested biofilter could be significantly increased by increasing the hydraulic flow velocity in the filter. Area based first order nitrification rate constants...

  10. Soil properties associated with net nitrification following watershed conversion with Appalachian hardwoods to Norway spruce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlene N. Kelly; Stephen H. Schoenholtz; Mary Beth. Adams

    2011-01-01

    Nitrate (NO3-N) in soil solution and streamwater can be an important vector of nitrogen (N) loss from forested watersheds, and nitrification is associated with negative consequences of soil acidification and eutrophication of aquatic ecosystems. The purpose of this study was to identify vegetation-mediated soil properties that may control...

  11. Nitrification in Kochi backwaters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Miranda, J.; Balachandran, K.K.; Ramesh, R.; Wafar, M.

    concentrations. As shown by the relation between ammonification and nitrification rates, it is also likely that nitrification is more regulated by renewal rates, rather than by in situ concentrations, of substrate. Among other environmental parameters...

  12. Nitrification rates, nitrite and nitrate distribution in the Almeria-Oran frontal systems (eastern Alboran Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, M.; Morin, P.; Le Corre, P.

    1994-08-01

    In the western Mediterranean Sea, the Almeria-Oran frontal zone constitutes the eastern boundary of the Alboran Sea. During the "Almofront-1" cruise (April-May 1991) physical, chemical and biological features of the front and surrounding Atlantic and Mediterranean Waters were investigated. In the present study, the nitrite and nitrate concentrations and nitrification rates were measured. The nitracline was close to the surface in the north, close to the Spanish coast and in the south on the left side of the jet. The highest concentration of nitrite (0.25 μM) was located in the incoming Atlantic Waters. The ammonium oxidation rates were from 0 to 16 nmol 1 -1 d -1, except in Atlantic Waters in which the rates reached 28-42 nmol 1 -1 d -1. For all types of superficial water, i.e. Atlantic, jet core, Mediterranean, the nitrite produced by nitrification could account for the in situ concentrations in less time than the ages of the water masses. In contrast, to reach the ambient concentration, the production of nitrate would need more time than the lifetime of the water masses, except for the Atlantic Waters. In these Atlantic Waters, showing an increased rate of nitrate production, the in situ concentration of nitrate would be reached within its lifetime. The contribution of the nitrate produced by nitrification to the nitrate uptake by primary producers was estimated to range from 7% (Mediterranean Waters) to 40% (Atlantic Waters).

  13. Global declines in oceanic nitrification rates as a consequence of ocean acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beman, J. Michael; Chow, Cheryl-Emiliane; King, Andrew L.; Feng, Yuanyuan; Fuhrman, Jed A.; Andersson, Andreas; Bates, Nicholas R.; Popp, Brian N.; Hutchins, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Ocean acidification produced by dissolution of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions in seawater has profound consequences for marine ecology and biogeochemistry. The oceans have absorbed one-third of CO2 emissions over the past two centuries, altering ocean chemistry, reducing seawater pH, and affecting marine animals and phytoplankton in multiple ways. Microbially mediated ocean biogeochemical processes will be pivotal in determining how the earth system responds to global environmental change; however, how they may be altered by ocean acidification is largely unknown. We show here that microbial nitrification rates decreased in every instance when pH was experimentally reduced (by 0.05–0.14) at multiple locations in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Nitrification is a central process in the nitrogen cycle that produces both the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide and oxidized forms of nitrogen used by phytoplankton and other microorganisms in the sea; at the Bermuda Atlantic Time Series and Hawaii Ocean Time-series sites, experimental acidification decreased ammonia oxidation rates by 38% and 36%. Ammonia oxidation rates were also strongly and inversely correlated with pH along a gradient produced in the oligotrophic Sargasso Sea (r2 = 0.87, P ocean acidification could reduce nitrification rates by 3–44% within the next few decades, affecting oceanic nitrous oxide production, reducing supplies of oxidized nitrogen in the upper layers of the ocean, and fundamentally altering nitrogen cycling in the sea. PMID:21173255

  14. Nitrification rates in Arctic soils are associated with functionally distinct populations of ammonia-oxidizing archaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Ricardo J Eloy; Wanek, Wolfgang; Zappe, Anna; Richter, Andreas; Svenning, Mette M; Schleper, Christa; Urich, Tim

    2013-01-01

    The functioning of Arctic soil ecosystems is crucially important for global climate, and basic knowledge regarding their biogeochemical processes is lacking. Nitrogen (N) is the major limiting nutrient in these environments, and its availability is strongly dependent on nitrification. However, microbial communities driving this process remain largely uncharacterized in Arctic soils, namely those catalyzing the rate-limiting step of ammonia (NH3) oxidation. Eleven Arctic soils were analyzed through a polyphasic approach, integrating determination of gross nitrification rates, qualitative and quantitative marker gene analyses of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB) and enrichment of AOA in laboratory cultures. AOA were the only NH3 oxidizers detected in five out of 11 soils and outnumbered AOB in four of the remaining six soils. The AOA identified showed great phylogenetic diversity and a multifactorial association with the soil properties, reflecting an overall distribution associated with tundra type and with several physico-chemical parameters combined. Remarkably, the different gross nitrification rates between soils were associated with five distinct AOA clades, representing the great majority of known AOA diversity in soils, which suggests differences in their nitrifying potential. This was supported by selective enrichment of two of these clades in cultures with different NH3 oxidation rates. In addition, the enrichments provided the first direct evidence for NH3 oxidation by an AOA from an uncharacterized Thaumarchaeota–AOA lineage. Our results indicate that AOA are functionally heterogeneous and that the selection of distinct AOA populations by the environment can be a determinant for nitrification activity and N availability in soils. PMID:23466705

  15. A cross-site comparison of factors influencing soil nitrification rates in northeastern USA forested watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, D.S.; Wemple, B.C.; Jamison, A.E.; Fredriksen, G.; Shanley, J.B.; Lawrence, G.B.; Bailey, S.W.; Campbell, J.L.

    2009-01-01

    Elevated N deposition is continuing on many forested landscapes around the world and our understanding of ecosystem response is incomplete. Soil processes, especially nitrification, are critical. Many studies of soil N transformations have focused on identifying relationships within a single watershed but these results are often not transferable. We studied 10 small forested research watersheds in the northeastern USA to determine if there were common factors related to soil ammonification and nitrification. Vegetation varied between mixed northern hardwoods and mixed conifers. Watershed surface soils (Oa or A horizons) were sampled at grid or transect points and analyzed for a suite of chemical characteristics. At each sampling point, vegetation and topographic metrics (field and GIS-based) were also obtained. Results were examined by watershed averages (n = 10), seasonal/watershed averages (n = 28), and individual sampling points (n = 608). Using both linear and tree regression techniques, the proportion of conifer species was the single best predictor of nitrification rates, with lower rates at higher conifer dominance. Similar to other studies, the soil C/N ratio was also a good predictor and was well correlated with conifer dominance. Unlike other studies, the presence of Acer saccharum was not by itself a strong predictor, but was when combined with the presence of Betula alleghaniensis. Topographic metrics (slope, aspect, relative elevation, and the topographic index) were not related to N transformation rates across the watersheds. Although found to be significant in other studies, neither soil pH, Ca nor Al was related to nitrification. Results showed a strong relationship between dominant vegetation, soil C, and soil C/N. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  16. Organic carbon and iron modulate nitrification rates in mangrove swamps of Goa, south west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Krishnan, K.P.; LokaBharathi, P.A.

    ) and the other relatively undisturbed (control). We hypothesize that besides organic carbon, iron could also influence the rate of nitrification. The study also contrasts the distributive pattern of autotrophic and heterotrophic nitrifiers in the two regions...

  17. The Effect of Stocking Density on Nitrification Rate in a Closed Recirculating Culture System

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    A.S. Sidik

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTNitrification rate in a closed recirculating water system with different stocking density of common carp (Cyprinus carpio L. had been observed in the Laboratory of Aquaculture, Faculty of Fisheries and Marine Science, Mulawarman University.   Fish were cultivated  in rounded tanks with four level of stocking densities i.e. 10, 20, 30 and 40 fish/100 l in a closed recirculting water system, and fed on a commercial pellet given thrice a day at a quantity of 5% from the total body weight of fish per day.  The experiment was designed completely randomized with three replications. Nitrification rate was calculated stoichiometrically through the determination of  ammonia and nitrite oxidation rate. Results showed that in this experiment the ammonia and nitrite oxidation rate, and nitrification rate in a closed recirculating water system was increased with the increasing stocking density of fish.   On the contrary, the growth of fish was decreased with the increasing of stocking density.Key words :  Nitrification rate, stocking density, recirculation system, common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.. ABSTRAKLaju nitrifikasi dalam budidaya sistem resirkulasi air tertutup dengan padat penebaran ikan mas (Cyprinus carpio L. yang berbeda telah diamati di Laboratorium Budidaya Perairan, Fakultas Perikanan dan Ilmu Kelautan Universitas Mulawarman.  Ikan dipelihara dalam tong plastik dengan empat tingkat padat penebaran, yaitu 10, 20, 30 dan 40 ekor/100 l, dan diberi makan pelet komersial tiga kali sehari dengan jumlah 5 % dari berat badan ikan per hari.  Penelitian ini dirancang secara acak lengkap dengan tiga ulangan.  Laju nitrifikasi dihitung secara stoikiometrik melalui penentuan laju oksidasi amoniak dan nitrit. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa laju oksidasi amoniak dan nitrit serta laju nitrifikasi dalam sistem resirkulasi air tertutup meningkat dengan meningkatnya padat penebaran.  Sebaliknya pertumbuhan ikan menurun dengan meningkatnya

  18. Evaluating the effects of nitrogen loading rate and substrate inhibitions on partial nitrification with FISH analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Zhang, Shujun; Han, Xiaoyu; Gan, Yiping; Wu, Chengcheng; Peng, Yongzhen

    2012-01-01

    The effects of free ammonia (FA) or free nitrous acid (FNA) on partial nitrification (PN) has been well investigated. Nevertheless, little information was known about the combined effects of nitrogen loading rate (NLR) and substrate inhibition, as well as the impact on the community structure of nitrifiers. In this work, real reject water was treated in a pre-denitrification reactor. PN was achieved by gradually increasing NLR, and it was successfully maintained when average FA and FNA were within 0.8-3.2 mg NH₃-N/L and 0.003-0.067 mg HNO₂-N/L, respectively. When NLR was reduced, PN was slightly affected due to the FA declination. As FNA inhibition was also eliminated by adding alkalinity into the influent, PN was completely destroyed quickly. FISH results indicated the deterioration of the PN was mainly attributed to the recovery of NOB when inhibition effects were limited. It concluded the increase of NLR benefited the partial nitrification. However, the stability of the nitrite path way was more dependent on selective substrate inhibition effects, especially the FNA inhibition. These findings would be important for further treatment of actual reject water.

  19. Spatial variability in nitrification rates and ammonia-oxidizing microbial communities in the agriculturally impacted Elkhorn Slough estuary, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wankel, Scott D; Mosier, Annika C; Hansel, Colleen M; Paytan, Adina; Francis, Christopher A

    2011-01-01

    Ammonia oxidation-the microbial oxidation of ammonia to nitrite and the first step in nitrification-plays a central role in nitrogen cycling in coastal and estuarine systems. Nevertheless, questions remain regarding the connection between this biogeochemical process and the diversity and abundance of the mediating microbial community. In this study, we measured nutrient fluxes and rates of sediment nitrification in conjunction with the diversity and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing betaproteobacteria (β-AOB). Sediments were examined from four sites in Elkhorn Slough, a small agriculturally impacted coastal California estuary that opens into Monterey Bay. Using an intact sediment core flowthrough incubation system, we observed significant correlations among NO(3)(-), NO(2)(-), NH(4)(+), and PO(4)(3+) fluxes, indicating a tight coupling of sediment biogeochemical processes. (15)N-based measurements of nitrification rates revealed higher rates at the less impacted, lower-nutrient sites than at the more heavily impacted, nutrient-rich sites. Quantitative PCR analyses revealed that β-AOB amoA (encoding ammonia monooxygenase subunit A) gene copies outnumbered AOA amoA gene copies by factors ranging from 2- to 236-fold across the four sites. Sites with high nitrification rates primarily contained marine/estuarine Nitrosospira-like bacterial amoA sequences and phylogenetically diverse archaeal amoA sequences. Sites with low nitrification rates were dominated by estuarine Nitrosomonas-like amoA sequences and archaeal amoA sequences similar to those previously described in soils. This is the first report measuring AOA and β-AOB amoA abundance in conjunction with (15)N-based nitrification rates in estuary sediments.

  20. Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Nitrification Rates in Forested Floodplain Wetland Soils of Upper Mississippi River Pool 8, Journal Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overbank flooding is thought to be a critical process controlling nitrogen retention and cycling. In this study we investigated the effects of season and flood frequency on soil nitrification rates at ten sites in forested floodplains of Upper Mississippi River, Pool 8...A rough ...

  1. Prolonged exposure of mixed aerobic cultures to low temperature and benzalkonium chloride affect the rate and extent of nitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jeongwoo; Tezel, Ulas; Li, Kexun; Pavlostathis, Spyros G

    2015-03-01

    The combined effect of benzalkonium chloride (BAC) and prolonged exposure to low temperature on nitrification was investigated. Ammonia oxidation at 22-24°C by an enriched nitrifying culture was inhibited at increasing BAC concentrations and ceased at 15 mg BAC/L. The non-competitive inhibition coefficient was 1.5±0.9 mg BAC/L. Nitrification tests were conducted without and with BAC at 5mg/L using an aerobic, mixed heterotrophic/nitrifying culture maintained at a temperature range of 24-10°C. Maintaining this culture at 10°C for over one month in the absence of BAC, resulted in slower nitrification kinetics compared to those measured when the culture was first exposed to 10°C. BAC was degraded by the heterotrophic population, but its degradation rate decreased significantly as the culture temperature decreased to 10°C. These results confirm the negative impact of quaternary ammonium compounds on the nitrification process, which is further exacerbated by prolonged, low temperature conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Using paired in situ high frequency nitrate measurements to better understand controls on nitrate concentrations and estimate nitrification rates in a wastewater-impacted river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Tamara; O'Donnell, Katy; Downing, Bryan D.; Burau, Jon R.; Bergamaschi, Brian

    2017-01-01

    We used paired continuous nitrate ( ) measurements along a tidally affected river receiving wastewater discharge rich in ammonium ( ) to quantify rates of change in  concentration ( ) and estimate nitrification rates.  sensors were deployed 30 km apart in the Sacramento River, California (USA), with the upstream station located immediately above the regional wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). We used a travel time model to track water transit between the stations and estimated  every 15 min (October 2013 to September 2014). Changes in concentration were strongly related to water temperature. In the presence of wastewater, was generally positive, ranging from about 7 µM d−1 in the summer to near zero in the winter. Numerous periods when the WWTP halted discharge allowed the  to be estimated under no-effluent conditions and revealed that in the absence of effluent, net gains in  were substantially lower but still positive in the summer and negative (net sink) in the winter. Nitrification rates of effluent-derived NH4 ( ) were estimated from the difference between  measured in the presence versus absence of effluent and ranged from 1.5 to 3.4 µM d−1, which is within literature values but tenfold greater than recently reported for this region.  was generally lower in winter (∼2 µM d−1) than summer (∼3 µM d−1). This in situ, high frequency approach provides advantages over traditional discrete sampling, incubation, and tracer methods and allows measurements to be made over broad areas for extended periods of time. Incorporating this approach into environmental monitoring programs can facilitate our ability to protect and manage aquatic systems.

  3. Nitrogen mineralization and nitrification in a mixed-conifer forest in southern California : controlling factors, fluxes, and nitrogen fertilization response at a high and low nitrogen deposition site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenn, M.E.; Poth, M.A.; Terry, J.D.; Blubaugh, T.J. [United States Dept. of Agriculture, Riverside, CA (United States). Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station

    2005-06-01

    Human activities and anthropogenic emissions have disturbed the global nitrogen (N) cycle to the point that atmospheric deposition of inorganic nitrogen has increased nearly threefold above preindustrial levels. These increased levels have the potential to cause excessive nitrogen enrichment of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Increased nitrogen levels stimulate nitrogen mineralization and nitrification, thereby contributing to mobilization of nitrogen and nitrogen saturation conditions. In this study, net fluxes of nitrogen mineralization and nitrification were measured in situ on a monthly basis for 3 years in the San Bernardino Mountains in California. The objective was to quantify the rates of net nitrogen mineralization and nitrification in the humus layer and mineral soil under field conditions in fertilized and unfertilized plots at a nitrogen deposition forest site that is highly N saturated as well as a low nitrogen deposition site to determine whether relative nitrification patterns in field assays are similar to laboratory study results. The main factors affecting nitrogen cycling rates in the mineral soil and the forest floor were determined. The study also tested the hypothesis that slow release nitrogen fertilization over 3 years at a low nitrogen site results in net nitrification rates that approach those of high nitrogen sites. The study revealed the relative nitrification rates under different tree canopies. The key factor for predicting the rate of net nitrification is the rate of net nitrogen mineralization. A high nitrogen fertilization had no substantial impact on net nitrification. It was concluded that at low-deposition sites, increased nitrification occurs in the short term due to added nitrogen. However, the accumulation of nitrogen enriched litter and soil organic matter along with chronic throughfall nitrogen deposition causes sustained elevated net nitrification. 67 refs., 7 tabs., 7 figs.

  4. In situ measurements of microbially-catalyzed nitrification and nitrate reduction rates in an ephemeral drainage channel receiving water from coalbed natural gas discharge, Powder River Basin, Wyoming, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, S.H.; Smith, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    Nitrification and nitrate reduction were examined in an ephemeral drainage channel receiving discharge from coalbed natural gas (CBNG) production wells in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming. CBNG co-produced water typically contains dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), primarily as ammonium. In this study, a substantial portion of discharged ammonium was oxidized within 50??m of downstream transport, but speciation was markedly influenced by diel fluctuations in dissolved oxygen (> 300????M). After 300??m of transport, 60% of the initial DIN load had been removed. The effect of benthic nitrogen-cycling processes on stream water chemistry was assessed at 2 locations within the stream channel using acrylic chambers to conduct short-term (2-6??h), in-stream incubations. The highest ambient DIN removal rates (2103????mol N m- 2 h- 1) were found at a location where ammonium concentrations > 350????M. This occurred during light incubations when oxygen concentrations were highest. Nitrification was occurring at the site, however, net accumulation of nitrate and nitrite accounted for nitrification was not a factor and changes in DIN removal rates were controlled by nitrate reduction, diel fluctuations in oxygen concentration, and availability of electron donor. This study indicates that short-term adaptation of stream channel processes can be effective for removing CBNG DIN loads given sufficient travel distances, but the long-term potential for nitrogen remobilization and nitrogen saturation remain to be determined.

  5. Effects of dissolved oxygen and pH on nitrous oxide production rates in autotrophic partial nitrification granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathnayake, Rathnayake M L D; Oshiki, Mamoru; Ishii, Satoshi; Segawa, Takahiro; Satoh, Hisashi; Okabe, Satoshi

    2015-12-01

    The effects of dissolved oxygen (DO) and pH on nitrous oxide (N2O) production rates and pathways in autotrophic partial nitrification (PN) granules were investigated at the granular level. N2O was primarily produced by betaproteobacterial ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, mainly Nitrosomonas europaea, in the oxic surface layer (<200μm) of the autotrophic PN granules. N2O production increased with increasing bulk DO concentration owing to activation of the ammonia (i.e., hydroxylamine) oxidation in this layer. The highest N2O emissions were observed at pH 7.5, although the ammonia oxidation rate was unchanged between pH 6.5 and 8.5. Overall, the results of this study suggest that in situ analyses of PN granules are essential to gaining insight into N2O emission mechanisms in a granule. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Spatial Variability in Nitrification Rates and Ammonia-Oxidizing Microbial Communities in the Agriculturally Impacted Elkhorn Slough Estuary, California ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wankel, Scott D.; Mosier, Annika C.; Hansel, Colleen M.; Paytan, Adina; Francis, Christopher A.

    2011-01-01

    Ammonia oxidation—the microbial oxidation of ammonia to nitrite and the first step in nitrification—plays a central role in nitrogen cycling in coastal and estuarine systems. Nevertheless, questions remain regarding the connection between this biogeochemical process and the diversity and abundance of the mediating microbial community. In this study, we measured nutrient fluxes and rates of sediment nitrification in conjunction with the diversity and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing betaproteobacteria (β-AOB). Sediments were examined from four sites in Elkhorn Slough, a small agriculturally impacted coastal California estuary that opens into Monterey Bay. Using an intact sediment core flowthrough incubation system, we observed significant correlations among NO3−, NO2−, NH4+, and PO43+ fluxes, indicating a tight coupling of sediment biogeochemical processes. 15N-based measurements of nitrification rates revealed higher rates at the less impacted, lower-nutrient sites than at the more heavily impacted, nutrient-rich sites. Quantitative PCR analyses revealed that β-AOB amoA (encoding ammonia monooxygenase subunit A) gene copies outnumbered AOA amoA gene copies by factors ranging from 2- to 236-fold across the four sites. Sites with high nitrification rates primarily contained marine/estuarine Nitrosospira-like bacterial amoA sequences and phylogenetically diverse archaeal amoA sequences. Sites with low nitrification rates were dominated by estuarine Nitrosomonas-like amoA sequences and archaeal amoA sequences similar to those previously described in soils. This is the first report measuring AOA and β-AOB amoA abundance in conjunction with 15N-based nitrification rates in estuary sediments. PMID:21057023

  7. Glyphosate applications,glyphosate resistant corn, and tillage on nitrification rates and distribution of nitrifying microbial communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conservation tillage practices have combined genetically modified glyphosate resistant corn crops along with applications of the herbicide glyphosate. We tested the null hypothesis that the soil process of nitrification and the distribution of archaeal and bacterial nitrifying communities would not ...

  8. Earthworm Effects on Nitrification Rate and Arginine Amonification in a Calcareous Soil Amended with Urban Sewage Sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanye Jafari Vafa

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Earthworms are among the most important organisms in soil and their activities can be an indicator of soil quality. These organisms may be influenced by organic wastes application such as sewage sludge and subsequently affect soil quality. One of the quick and easy methods for soil quality monitoring is the use of biological indicators such as microbial activity. It is due to their quick response to changes in the environment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of earthworms on nitrification rate and arginine ammonification as microbial activity in a calcareous soil amended with urban sewage sludge. Materials and Methods: The studied soil was sampled from Shahrekord University land and sewage sludge belonged to the refinery sludge ponds of shahrekord. Based on dry weight, this organic waste had carbon and nitrogen, approximately 67 and 110 times more than tested soil, respectively. The organic waste in terms of quality and heavy metal concentrations was in class A. Experimental treatments were sewage sludge (without and with 1.5% sewage sludge and earthworm (no earthworm, Eiseniafoetida from epigeic group, Allolobophracaliginosa from endogeic group and a mixture of the two species as 2×4 full factorial experiment arranged in a completely randomized design with three replications. After applying sewage sludge, the pots were irrigated three months to achieve a balance in the soil. An adult earthworm per kg of soil was added and in the mixed treatments comparison species were 1:1. To prevent the exit of earthworms, the pots was closed with a thin lace. At the end of the experiment, soil was completely mixed. Part of it was stored in the refrigerator to measure the microbiological parameters. Chemical properties were measured by the air-dried soil. The effectiveness of a factor in the observed changes is shown by partial effect size (Tabachnick and Fidell 2012. So, partial effect size (Eta2p for each source of

  9. Sterilization-CO2-Injection (SCI) BaPS: Establishment of a new method to measure rates of soil respiration and gross nitrification in calcareous agricultural soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrads, Hannah; Ingwersen, Joachim; Streck, Thilo

    2013-04-01

    Soil respiration and nitrification are key processes in carbon and nitrogen cycling in soil. An exact measurement of these two processes is a prerequisite for understanding the release of trace gases from soils. During the last decades the Barometric Process Separation (BaPS) method has become a widely used method to measure the turnover rates of these two processes. Its application, however, is currently limited to acidic to slightly acidic soils. In calcareous soils huge amounts of CO2 from soil respiration are dissolved in the soil solution, and the application of the BaPS method is hampered by the exact quantification of this flux. Small errors in this flux may result in huge errors in the calculation of the nitrification and respiration rates. In order to overcome this shortcoming and to extend the applicability of the method to a wider range of soils (especially agricultural soils) we developed a new adaptive method, the Sterilization-CO2-Injection (SCI) method, which aims to determine the CO2 dissolution flux (CO2,aq) experimentally. Therefore, an additional measuring step is introduced in which a sterilized soil subsample is incubated in the BaPS apparatus and known amounts of a pure CO2 gas are injected into the system while CO2 partial pressure is monitored. After each injection peak CO2 partial pressure decreases until a new stable equilibrium concentration is reached. This behavior is used to compute the amount of CO2 transferred to the soil solution applying simple mass balance calculation. The paired information about CO2 and CO2,aq is used to derive a regression equation, which gives CO2,aq as a function of the CO2 partial pressure. This relation is further used within the standard BaPS method. Results of the SCI-BaPS method for gross nitrification rates will be presented and compared to data measured by the 15N pool dilution method (Kirkham and Bartholomew, 1954). Results were obtained with calcareous and acidic agricultural soil samples. It turned

  10. Spatial patterns of soil nitrification and nitrate export from forested headwaters in the northeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, D.S.; Shanley, J.B.; Campbell, J.L.; Lawrence, G.B.; Bailey, S.W.; Likens, G.E.; Wemple, B.C.; Fredriksen, G.; Jamison, A.E.

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen export from small forested watersheds is known to be affected by N deposition but with high regional variability. We studied 10 headwater catchments in the northeastern United States across a gradient of N deposition (5.4 - 9.4 kg ha -1 yr -1) to determine if soil nitrification rates could explain differences in stream water NO 3 - export. Average annual export of two years (October 2002 through September 2004) varied from 0.1 kg NO 3 --N ha -1 yr -1 at Cone Pond watershed in New Hampshire to 5.1 kg ha -1 yr -1 at Buck Creek South in the western Adirondack Mountains of New York. Potential net nitrification rates and relative nitrification (fraction of inorganic N as NO 3 -) were measured in Oa or A soil horizons at 21-130 sampling points throughout each watershed. Stream NO 3 - export was positively related to nitrification rates (r 2 = 0.34, p = 0.04) and the relative nitrification (r 2 = 0.37, p = 0.04). These relationships were much improved by restricting consideration to the 6 watersheds with a higher number of rate measurements (59-130) taken in transects parallel to the streams (r 2 of 0.84 and 0.70 for the nitrification rate and relative nitrification, respectively). Potential nitrification rates were also a better predictor of NO 3 - export when data were limited to either the 6 sampling points closest to the watershed outlet (r 2 = 0.75) or sampling points influence of near-stream and near-watershed-outlet soils on measured stream NO 3 - export. Copyright 2012 by the American Geophysical Union.

  11. Annual variation in the net longshore sediment transport rate

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schoonees, JS

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available from wave data spanning a number of years, or by measuring continuously the longshore transport over a number of years. In both cases, it must be known over how many consecutive years either the computations or the measurements should be done. Ž... the annual variation in the net longshore transport rates over a period of 7 years. In a study Ž . Žby Shi-Leng and Teh-Fu 1987 , a longshore sediment transport formula the Bijker, .1967 method was calibrated against short-term measurements at Nouakchott...

  12. Long-term dynamic and pseudo-state modeling of complete partial nitrification process at high nitrogen loading rates in a sequential batch reactor (SBR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Moomen; Eldyasti, Ahmed

    2017-06-01

    Recently, partial nitrification has been adopted widely either for the nitrite shunt process or intermediate nitrite generation step for the Anammox process. However, partial nitrification has been hindered by the complexity of maintaining stable nitrite accumulation at high nitrogen loading rates (NLR) which affect the feasibility of the process for high nitrogen content wastewater. Thus, the operational data of a lab scale SBR performing complete partial nitrification as a first step of nitrite shunt process at NLRs of 0.3-1.2kg/(m3d) have been used to calibrate and validate a process model developed using BioWin® in order to describe the long-term dynamic behavior of the SBR. Moreover, an identifiability analysis step has been introduced to the calibration protocol to eliminate the needs of the respirometric analysis for SBR models. The calibrated model was able to predict accurately the daily effluent ammonia, nitrate, nitrite, alkalinity concentrations and pH during all different operational conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Use of aliphatic n-alkynes to discriminate soil nitrification activities of ammonia-oxidizing thaumarchaea and bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Anne E; Vajrala, Neeraja; Giguere, Andrew T; Gitelman, Alix I; Arp, Daniel J; Myrold, David D; Sayavedra-Soto, Luis; Bottomley, Peter J

    2013-11-01

    Ammonia (NH3)-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and thaumarchaea (AOA) co-occupy most soils, yet no short-term growth-independent method exists to determine their relative contributions to nitrification in situ. Microbial monooxygenases differ in their vulnerability to inactivation by aliphatic n-alkynes, and we found that NH3 oxidation by the marine thaumarchaeon Nitrosopumilus maritimus was unaffected during a 24-h exposure to ≤ 20 μM concentrations of 1-alkynes C8 and C9. In contrast, NH3 oxidation by two AOB (Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrosospira multiformis) was quickly and irreversibly inactivated by 1 μM C8 (octyne). Evidence that nitrification carried out by soilborne AOA was also insensitive to octyne was obtained. In incubations (21 or 28 days) of two different whole soils, both acetylene and octyne effectively prevented NH4(+)-stimulated increases in AOB population densities, but octyne did not prevent increases in AOA population densities that were prevented by acetylene. Furthermore, octyne-resistant, NH4(+)-stimulated net nitrification rates of 2 and 7 μg N/g soil/day persisted throughout the incubation of the two soils. Other evidence that octyne-resistant nitrification was due to AOA included (i) a positive correlation of octyne-resistant nitrification in soil slurries of cropped and noncropped soils with allylthiourea-resistant activity (100 μM) and (ii) the finding that the fraction of octyne-resistant nitrification in soil slurries correlated with the fraction of nitrification that recovered from irreversible acetylene inactivation in the presence of bacterial protein synthesis inhibitors and with the octyne-resistant fraction of NH4(+)-saturated net nitrification measured in whole soils. Octyne can be useful in short-term assays to discriminate AOA and AOB contributions to soil nitrification.

  14. The effect of net foreign assets on saving rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben David Nissim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Observing empirical data we find that many countries try to delay the decision of increasing saving rate in order to avoid a decrease of the living standards. However the delay leads a deterioration of countries financial stability. We present a simple theoretical model that connects between countries' saving rate and their net foreign assets. Using cross section data set of 135 countries in 2010 we estimated the econometric relation between saving rate in 2010 as dependent variable and two explanatory variables: the current account in 2010 and the aggregated current account during 1980-2010. Our findings show that industrial countries in a bad financial state tend to decrease their saving rate as external debt is larger causing to deterioration in external debt while countries with good financial state tend to increase their saving rate and the tendency increase as financial state becomes better. Only in countries with a very large external debt saving rate tends to grow. The results point that gross foreign debt will keep increasing and will worsen world financial state causing increased risk of getting into a world crisis.

  15. Assessment of nitrification potential in ground water using short term, single-well injection experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R.L.; Baumgartner, L.K.; Miller, D.N.; Repert, D.A.; Böhlke, J.K.

    2006-01-01

    Nitrification was measured within a sand and gravel aquifer on Cape Cod, MA, using a series of single-well injection tests. The aquifer contained a wastewater-derived contaminant plume, the core of which was anoxic and contained ammonium. The study was conducted near the downgradient end of the ammonium zone, which was characterized by inversely trending vertical gradients of oxygen (270 to 0 μM) and ammonium (19 to 625 μM) and appeared to be a potentially active zone for nitrification. The tests were conducted by injecting a tracer solution (ambient ground water + added constituents) into selected locations within the gradients using multilevel samplers. After injection, the tracers moved by natural ground water flow and were sampled with time from the injection port. Rates of nitrification were determined from changes in nitrate and nitrite concentration relative to bromide. Initial tests were conducted with 15N-enriched ammonium; subsequent tests examined the effect of adding ammonium, nitrite, or oxygen above background concentrations and of adding difluoromethane, a nitrification inhibitor. In situ net nitrate production exceeded net nitrite production by 3- to 6- fold and production rates of both decreased in the presence of difluoromethane. Nitrification rates were 0.02–0.28 μmol (L aquifer)−1 h−1 with in situ oxygen concentrations and up to 0.81 μmol (L aquifer)−1 h−1 with non-limiting substrate concentrations. Geochemical considerations indicate that the rates derived from single-well injection tests yielded overestimates of in situ rates, possibly because the injections promoted small-scale mixing within a transport-limited reaction zone. Nonetheless, these tests were useful for characterizing ground water nitrification in situ and for comparing potential rates of activity when the tracer cloud included non-limiting ammonium and oxygen concentrations.

  16. Brachiaria species affecting soil nitrification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adalton Mazetti Fernandes

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Nitrification can lead to substantial losses of the applied N through nitrate leaching and N2O emission. The regulation of nitrification may be a strategy to improve fertilizer N recovery and increase its agronomic efficiency. The objective of this study was to evaluate the inhibiting capacity of nitrification in soil by Brachiaria species. The greenhouse experiment was conducted using pots with 10 dm³ of a Red Latosol sample. The treatments consisted of the cultivation of three forage species (Brachiaria brizantha, B. ruziziensis and B. decumbens and four n rates (0, 100, 200, and 300 mg/pot, and the control (without plants. In the absence of the forage plants, all N fertilization levels raised the N-NO3- soil levels, as a result of nitrification. The mineralization of organic matter supplied much of the N requirement of the forage plants and nitrification was influenced in the rhizosphere of B. brizantha; however, this effect was not high enough to alter the N-NH4+ level in the total soil volume of the pot.

  17. Responses of nitrification and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria to reciprocal transfers of soil between adjacent coniferous forest and meadow vegetation in the Cascade Mountains of Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottomley, P J; Taylor, A E; Boyle, S A; McMahon, S K; Rich, J J; Cromack, K; Myrold, D D

    2004-11-01

    Despite the critical position of nitrification in N cycling in coniferous forest soils of western North America, little information exists on the composition of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in these soils, or their response to treatments that promote or reduce nitrification. To this end, an experiment was conducted in which a set of soil cores was reciprocally transplanted between adjacent forest (low nitrification potential) and meadow (high nitrification potential) environments, at two high-elevation (approximately 1500 m) sites in the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest located in the Cascade Mountains of Oregon. Half of the cores were placed in screened PVC pipe (closed) to prevent new root colonization, large litter debris inputs, and animal disturbance; the other cores were placed in open mesh bags. A duplicate set of open and closed soil cores was not transferred between sites and was incubated in place. Over the 2-year experiment, net nitrification increased in both open and closed cores transferred from forest to meadow, and to a lesser extent in cores remaining in the forest. In three of four forest soil treatments, net nitrification increases were accompanied by increases in nitrification potential rates (NPR) and 10- to 100-fold increases in AOB populations. In open cores remaining in the forests, however, increases in net nitrification were not accompanied by significant increases in either NPR or AOB populations. Although some meadow soil treatments reduced both net nitrification and nitrification potential rates, significant changes were not detected in most probable number (MPN)-based estimates of AOB population densities. Terminal restriction fragment profiles (T-RFs) of a PCR-amplified 491-bp fragment of the ammonia monooxygenase subunit A gene (amoA) changed significantly in response to some soil treatments, and treatment effects differed among locations and between years. A T-RF previously shown to be a specific biomarker of Nitrosospira

  18. Effects of nitrogen application rate and a nitrification inhibitor dicyandiamide on methanotroph abundance and methane uptake in a grazed pasture soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yu; Di, Hong J; Cameron, Keith C; He, Ji-Zheng

    2013-12-01

    Methane-oxidizing bacteria (methanotrophs) in the soil are a unique group of methylotrophic bacteria that utilize methane (CH4) as their sole source of carbon and energy which limit the flux of methane to the atmosphere from soils and consume atmospheric methane. A field experiment was conducted to determine the effect of nitrogen application rates and the nitrification inhibitor dicyandiamide (DCD) on the abundance of methanotrophs and on methane flux in a grazed pasture soil. Nitrogen (N) was applied at four different rates, with urea applied at 50 and 100 kg N ha(-1) and animal urine at 300 and 600 kg N ha(-1). DCD was applied at 10 kg ha(-1). The results showed that both the DNA and selected mRNA copy numbers of the methanotroph pmoA gene were not affected by the application of urea, urine or DCD. The methanotroph DNA and mRNA pmoA gene copy numbers were low in this soil, below 7.13 × 10(3) g(-1) soil and 3.75 × 10(3) μg(-1) RNA, respectively. Daily CH4 flux varied slightly among different treatments during the experimental period, ranging from -12.89 g CH4 ha(-1) day(-1) to -0.83 g CH4 ha(-1) day(-1), but no significant treatment effect was found. This study suggests that the application of urea fertilizer, animal urine returns and the use of the nitrification inhibitor DCD do not significantly affect soil methanotroph abundance or daily CH4 fluxes in grazed grassland soils.

  19. Nitrification in inland waters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laanbroek, H.J.; Bollmann, A.; B. Ward, B.; J. Arp, D.; G. Klotz, M.

    2011-01-01

    Over the past 15 years, the use of modern molecular biological approaches has radically advanced our understanding of nitrification processes. With chapters contributed by leading experts in the field, Nitrification fully reviews all the latest research findings on microbes involved in conventional

  20. The limiting role of oxygen penetration in sediment nitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Zhai, Wanying; Yin, Wei; Shan, Baoqing

    2015-07-01

    Oxygen penetration is a key determinant of sediment nitrification rates. In this study, we analyzed the effect of oxygen penetration on the sediment nitrification rate based on sediment oxygen profiles. Six sediments were designed to produce different oxygen profiles by adding different amounts of silica gel to the collected river mud. The oxygen profiles in the sediment were detected using a voltammetric microelectrode. With increased mud content, the sediment oxygen penetration depth decreased from 8.3 to 2.6 mm, and the oxygen concentration in the overlying water and at the sediment-water interface also showed a decreasing trend. The measured nitrification rate displayed a quadratic pattern that changed with the increase in mud content. Based on the detected oxygen profiles, the nitrification rate at each depth was calculated and summed to obtain the bulk sediment nitrification rate. The bulk sediment nitrification rate showed a consistently changing pattern with the measured rate. Oxygen profiles used to calculate nitrification rates could be approximated by the penetration depth (δ). The resulting nitrification model based on δ could explain the limiting role of oxygen penetration in sediment nitrification.

  1. Nitrification limitation in animal slurries at high temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willers, H.C.; Derikx, P.J.L.; Have, ten P.J.W.; Vijn, T.K.

    1998-01-01

    Nitrification rates in two types of animal slurry were measured at temperatures between 20 and 60°C. The rates were assessed in rapid laboratory assays using samples from aeration tanks of large scale treatment plants for pig or veal-calf slurry. Maximum nitrification rates for the two slurries were

  2. [Nitrification of biological soil crusts and soil system during drought process and its response to temperature and moisture: A case study in the Shapotou region, Northwest China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bing-xin; Chen, Yong-le; Hu, Yi-gang; Zhang, Zhi-shan; Li, Gang; Li, Meng-ru; Chen, Dong

    2015-04-01

    Two types of soil covered by biological soil crusts (BSCs) , i.e. moss and algae, and moving sand in the natural vegetation area at the southeast fringe of the Tengger Desert were collected intactly. They were incubated continuously for 20 days under two different temperatures (15 degrees C and 25 degrees C) and moistures (10% and 25%) condition in the laboratory, and soil NO3(-)-N contents were measured after 1, 2, 5, 8, 12, 20 days of incubation and net nitrification rate was evaluated during dehydration. The results showed that NO3(-)-N content of the moss-covered soil (2.29 mg x kg(-1)) was higher than that of the algae-covered soil (1.84 mg x kg(-1)) and sand (1.59 mg x kg(-1)). Net nitrification rate of the three soil types ranged from -3.47 to 2.97 mg x kg(-1) x d(-1). For the moss-covered soil and algae-covered soil at 10% and 25% moisture levels, the net nitrification rates at 15 degrees C were 75.1%, 0.7% and 99.1%, 21.3% higher than those at 25 degrees C, respectively. Also, the net nitrification rates at 15 degrees C and 10% moisture levels were 193.4% and 107.3% higher than those at 25 degrees C and 25% moisture levels, respectively. The results suggested that regardless of soil moisture increasing or decreasing under the global warming senior, the net nitrification rate of BSCs-soil system in the desert would probably be limited to some extent during drought process.

  3. Plant influence on nitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skiba, Marcin W; George, Timothy S; Baggs, Elizabeth M; Daniell, Tim J

    2011-01-01

    Modern agriculture has promoted the development of high-nitrification systems that are susceptible to major losses of nitrogen through leaching of nitrate and gaseous emissions of nitrogen oxide (NO and N2O), contributing to global warming and depletion of the ozone layer. Leakage of nitrogen from agricultural systems forces increased use of nitrogen fertilizers and causes water pollution and elevated costs of food production. Possible strategies for prevention of these processes involve various agricultural management approaches and use of synthetic inhibitors. Growing plants capable of producing nitrification suppressors could become a potentially superior method of controlling nitrification in the soil. There is a need to investigate the phenomenon of biological nitrification inhibition in arable crop species.

  4. [Bioaugmentation for shortcut nitrification in SBR treating for sewage containing sea water by nitrification-aerobic denitrification bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yang; Zhang, Pei-Yu; Yu, De-Shuang; Guo, Sha-Sha; Yang, Rui-Xia

    2010-10-01

    The feasibility of heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification bacteria applied in shortcut nitrification system was studied. Four heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification strains mixed with halotolerant activated sludge was added into SBR in order to test their bioaugmentation ability for shortcut nitrification system, which was treating for sewage containing sea water, and the difference between bioaugmentation system and original system was compared. The results showed that the maximum accumulation of NO2(-) -N in bioaugmentation system was 34.92% lower than that in original system, and the time of maximum accumulation of NO2(-) -N was 2 hours earlier than that in original system. The TN and COD was continuously decreasing in the later phase of nitrification in bioaugmentation system, and finally the removal rate of TN and COD were 15.24% and 5.39% higher than that in original system respectively, as well as the removal rate of NH4(+) -N and the nitrosation rate were 6.85% and 14.47% higher than that in original system. And the pH was 0.46 higher than that in original system, whereas the ORP was 25.84 mV lower. It was considered that the function of heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification bacteria should strengthen the performance of bioaugmentation system. When the seawater content raised to 70%, the stability of bioaugmentation system was better than that in original system, and the current that transforming shortcut nitrification to complete nitrification was restrained by heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification bacteria effectively. The number of heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification bacteria was changed when bioaugmentation system and original system ran in different phase and the bacteria had a great loss with the discharge of activated sludge. These results may provide a theoretical reference about the feasibility that the heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification bacteria applied in

  5. amoA Gene abundances and nitrification potential rates suggest that benthic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and not Archaea dominate N cycling in the Colne Estuary, United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jialin; Nedwell, David B; Beddow, Jessica; Dumbrell, Alex J; McKew, Boyd A; Thorpe, Emma L; Whitby, Corinne

    2015-01-01

    Nitrification, mediated by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), is important in global nitrogen cycling. In estuaries where gradients of salinity and ammonia concentrations occur, there may be differential selections for ammonia-oxidizer populations. The aim of this study was to examine the activity, abundance, and diversity of AOA and AOB in surface oxic sediments of a highly nutrified estuary that exhibits gradients of salinity and ammonium. AOB and AOA communities were investigated by measuring ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) gene abundance and nitrification potentials both spatially and temporally. Nitrification potentials differed along the estuary and over time, with the greatest nitrification potentials occurring mid-estuary (8.2 μmol N grams dry weight [gdw](-1) day(-1) in June, increasing to 37.4 μmol N gdw(-1) day(-1) in January). At the estuary head, the nitrification potential was 4.3 μmol N gdw(-1) day(-1) in June, increasing to 11.7 μmol N gdw(-1) day(-1) in January. At the estuary head and mouth, nitrification potentials fluctuated throughout the year. AOB amoA gene abundances were significantly greater (by 100-fold) than those of AOA both spatially and temporally. Nitrosomonas spp. were detected along the estuary by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) band sequence analysis. In conclusion, AOB dominated over AOA in the estuarine sediments, with the ratio of AOB/AOA amoA gene abundance increasing from the upper (freshwater) to lower (marine) regions of the Colne estuary. These findings suggest that in this nutrified estuary, AOB (possibly Nitrosomonas spp.) were of major significance in nitrification. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Estimation of nitrification capacity of rock media trickling filters in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    predators ('grazers') and unreliable nitrification performance, respectively, to the detriment and potential loss of nitrification in the NTF. In contrast, a too high wetting rate may flood the void spaces in the media bed resulting in 'ponding' of the excess water on the surface of the NTF (a common occurrence with rock media TFs ...

  7. Sustainable nitrification in fluidised bed reactor with immobilised ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-02-01

    Feb 1, 2012 ... +-N concentration was increased from 40 mg·ℓ-1 to 320 mg·ℓ-1, as soon as NH4. +-N removal efficiency of Reactor A reached 80%, in order to increase the capability of ... Additionally, in order to evaluate the impact of organic load on nitrification ... (2) where: k is the reaction rate of the nitrification reaction.

  8. Independent Effects of Temperature, Salinity, Ammonium Concentration and pH on Nitrification Rate of the Ariake Seawater Above Mud Sediment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALIM ISNANSETYO

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Ariake Sea located in the west parts of Kyushu Island is a semi-closed and macro-tidal shallow sea, and has the largest tidal flat in Japan. A large mud tidal flat with a productive ecosystem found along the western shoreline of the sea makes this area ideal as a major production site of nori (Porphyra yezoensis in Japan. We determined the independent effect of temperature, salinity, ammonium concentration and pH on nitrification rates (NR in the Ariake seawater above the mud sediment. The NR was determined by measuring accumulation of NO2-N production after adding sodium chlorate, an inhibitor of NO2-N to NO3-N oxidation. NRs were relatively high at 20-35 °C (optimum at 29.5 °C, but the rates were very low at 5, 10, and 40 °C. NRs increased sharply when increasing the salinity from 13 to 20 ppt, but it decreased drastically at salinity levels more than 35 ppt (optimum at 19 ppt. The relationship between ammonium concentration and NR showed a typical kinetic curve of enzymatic reaction with the maximum NR (Vmax of 0.029 µM N.h−1 at 200 µM NH4-N (the half saturation constant (Ks = 35 µM NH4-N. High NRs were determined at pH 7.5-8.0 (optimum pH 7.8. This is the first report on the independent effects of temperature, pH, salinity and NH4-N concentration on the NR of seawater, specifically the Ariake seawater.

  9. Biological suppression of nitrification by selected cultivars ofHelianthus annum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsaadawi, I S

    1988-03-01

    The allelopathic potential of different cultivars ofHelianthus annuus against nitrification was studied using the soil incubation method. The results indicated that aqueous extracts and residues of roots and shoots of all test cultivars significantly reduced the nitrification rate in soil. However, cultivars Local and Citosol were found to be more inhibitory to nitrification than others.

  10. Inhibitory effect of cyanide on wastewater nitrification ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effect of CN- (CN-) on nitrification was examined with samples from nitrifying wastewater enrichments using two different approaches: by measuring substrate (ammonia) specific oxygen uptake rates (SOUR), and by using RT-qPCR to quantify the transcripts of functional genes involved in nitrification. The nitrifying bioreactor was operated as a continuous reactor with a 24 h hydraulic retention time. The samples were exposed in batch vessels to cyanide for a period of 12 h. The concentrations of CN- used in the batch assays were 0.03, 0.06, 0.1 and 1.0 mg/L. There was considerable decrease in SOUR with increasing dosages of CN-. A decrease of more than 50% in nitrification activity was observed at 0.1 mg/L CN-. Based on the RT-qPCR data, there was notable reduction in the transcript levels of amoA and hao for increasing CN- dosage, which corresponded well with the ammonia oxidation activity measured via SOUR. The inhibitory effect of cyanide may be attributed to the affinity of cyanide to bind ferric heme proteins, which disrupt protein structure and function. The correspondence between the relative expression of functional genes and SOUR shown in this study demonstrates the efficacy of RNA based function-specific assays for better understanding of the effect of toxic compounds on nitrification activity in wastewater. Nitrification is the first step of nitrogen removal is wastewater, and it is susceptible to inhibition by many industrial chemical. We looked at

  11. Nitrification in a zeoponic substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGilloway, R. L.; Weaver, R. W.; Ming, D. W.; Gruener, J. E.

    2003-01-01

    Clinoptilolite is a zeolite mineral with high cation exchange capacity used in zeoponic substrates that have been proposed as a solid medium for growing plants or as a fertilizer material. The kinetics of nitrification has not been measured for NH4+ saturated zeoponic substrate. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the production of NO2- and NO3-, and nitrifier populations in zeoponic substrates. Small columns were filled with zeoponic substrate inoculated with a commercial inoculum or soil enrichment culture of nitrifying bacteria. In addition to column studies, a growth chamber study was conducted to evaluate the kinetics of nitrification in zeoponic substrates used to grow radishes (Raphanus sativus L.). The zeoponic substrate provided a readily available source of NH4+, and nitrifying bacteria were active in the substrate. Ammonium oxidation rates in column studies ranged from 5 to 10 micrograms N g-1 substrate h-1, and NO2- oxidation rates were 2 to 9.5 micrograms N g-1 substrate h-1. Rates determined from the growth chamber study were approximately 1.2 micrograms N g-1 substrate h-1. Quantities of NH4+ oxidized to NO2- and NO3- in inoculated zeoponic substrate were in excess of plant up-take. Acidification as a result of NH4+ oxidation resulted in a pH decline, and the zeoponic substrate showed limited buffering capacity.

  12. Optimizing kick rate and amplitude for Paralympic swimmers via net force measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Sacha K; Pyne, David; Burkett, Brendan

    2011-02-01

    Kicking is a key component of freestyle swimming yet the optimum combination of kick rate and kick amplitude remains unknown. For Paralympic swimmers, with upper and lower limb disabilities, the influence of the kick plays an important role in net force production. To determine optimum kick characteristics, 12 Paralympic swimmers aged 19.8 ± 2.9 years (mean ± s) were towed at their individual peak freestyle speed. The experimental conditions were (i) a prone streamline glide for passive trials and (ii) maximal freestyle kicking in a prone streamline for active trials at different speeds and kick amplitudes. Kick rate was quantified using inertial sensor technology. Towing speed was assessed using a novel and validated dynamometer, and net force was assessed using a Kistler force-platform system. When peak speed was increased by 5%, the active force increased 24.2 ± 5.3% (90% confidence limits), while kick rate remained at approximately 150 kicks per minute. Larger amplitude kicking increased the net active force by 25.1 ± 10.6%, although kick rate decreased substantially by 13.6 ± 5.1%. Based on the current kick rate and amplitude profile adopted by Paralympic swimmers, these characteristics are appropriate for optimizing net force.

  13. Heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification bacterium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A special strain of Alcaligenes denitrificans, designated as WY200811, with heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification ability was novel isolated from an anaerobic/anoxic/oxic treatment system and characterized. The average ammonia nitrogen (NH4+-N) and TN (total nitrogen) removal rates of the strain were ...

  14. Single interval longwave radiation scheme based on the net exchanged rate decomposition with bracketing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Geleyn, J.- F.; Mašek, Jan; Brožková, Radmila; Kuma, P.; Degrauwe, D.; Hello, G.; Pristov, N.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 143, č. 704 (2017), s. 1313-1335 ISSN 0035-9009 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415 Keywords : numerical weather prediction * climate models * clouds * parameterization * atmospheres * formulation * absorption * scattering * accurate * database * longwave radiative transfer * broadband approach * idealized optical paths * net exchanged rate decomposition * bracketing * selective intermittency Impact factor: 3.444, year: 2016

  15. Spatial variation in tuber depletion by swans explained by differences in net intake rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nolet, BA; Langevoord, O; Bevan, RM; Engelaar, KR; Klaassen, M; Mulder, RJW

    We tested whether the spatial variation in resource depletion by Tundra Swans (Cygnus columbianus) foraging on belowground tubers of sage pondweed (Potnmogeton pectinatus) was caused by differences in net energy intake rates. The variation in giving up densities within the confines of one lake was

  16. Spatial variation in tuber depletion by swans explained by differences in net intake rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nolet, B.A.; Langevoord, O.; Bevan, R.M.; Engelaar, K.R.; Klaassen, M.R.J.; Mulder, R.J.W.; Van Dijk, S.

    2001-01-01

    We tested whether the spatial variation in resource depletion by Tundra Swans (Cygnus columbianus) foraging on belowground tubers of sage pondweed (Potnmogeton pectinatus) was caused by differences in net energy intake rates. The variation in giving up densities within the confines of one lake was

  17. Ammonia-oxidizing Crenarchaeota and nitrification inside the tissue of a colonial ascidian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-García, Manuel; Stief, Peter; Díaz-Valdés, Marta; Wanner, Gerhard; Ramos-Esplá, Alfonso; Dubilier, Nicole; Antón, Josefa

    2008-11-01

    Marine Crenarchaeota represent an abundant component of the oceanic microbiota that play an important role in the global nitrogen cycle. Here we report the association of the colonial ascidian Cystodytes dellechiajei with putative ammonia-oxidizing Crenarchaeota that could actively be involved in nitrification inside the animal tissue. As shown by 16S rRNA gene analysis, the ascidian-associated Crenarchaeota were phylogenetically related to Nitrosopumilus maritimus, the first marine archaeon isolated in pure culture that grows chemolithoautotrophically oxidizing ammonia to nitrite aerobically. Catalysed reporter deposition (CARD)-FISH revealed that the Crenarchaeota were specifically located inside the tunic tissue of the colony, where moreover the expression of amoA gene was detected. The amoA gene encodes the alpha-subunit of ammonia monooxygenase, which is involved in the first step of nitrification, the oxidation of ammonia to nitrite. Sequencing of amoA gene showed that they were phylogenetically related to amoA genes of N. maritimus and other putative ammonia-oxidizing marine Crenarchaeota. In order to track the suspected nitrification activity inside the ascidian colony under in vivo conditions, microsensor profiles were measured through the tunic tissue. Net NO(x) production was detected in the tunic layer 1200-1800 microm with rates of 58-90 nmol cm(-3) h(-1). Oxygen and pH microsensor profiles showed that the layer of net NO(x) production coincided with O(2) concentrations of 103-116 microM and pH value of 5.2. Together, molecular and microsensor data indicate that Crenarchaeota could oxidize ammonia to nitrite aerobically, and thus be involved in nitrification inside the ascidian tissue.

  18. Suppression of soil nitrification by plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbarao, Guntur Venkata; Yoshihashi, Tadashi; Worthington, Margaret; Nakahara, Kazuhiko; Ando, Yasuo; Sahrawat, Kanwar Lal; Rao, Idupulapati Madhusudhana; Lata, Jean-Christophe; Kishii, Masahiro; Braun, Hans-Joachim

    2015-04-01

    Nitrification, the biological oxidation of ammonium to nitrate, weakens the soil's ability to retain N and facilitates N-losses from production agriculture through nitrate-leaching and denitrification. This process has a profound influence on what form of mineral-N is absorbed, used by plants, and retained in the soil, or lost to the environment, which in turn affects N-cycling, N-use efficiency (NUE) and ecosystem health and services. As reactive-N is often the most limiting in natural ecosystems, plants have acquired a range of mechanisms that suppress soil-nitrifier activity to limit N-losses via N-leaching and denitrification. Plants' ability to produce and release nitrification inhibitors from roots and suppress soil-nitrifier activity is termed 'biological nitrification inhibition' (BNI). With recent developments in methodology for in-situ measurement of nitrification inhibition, it is now possible to characterize BNI function in plants. This review assesses the current status of our understanding of the production and release of biological nitrification inhibitors (BNIs) and their potential in improving NUE in agriculture. A suite of genetic, soil and environmental factors regulate BNI activity in plants. BNI-function can be genetically exploited to improve the BNI-capacity of major food- and feed-crops to develop next-generation production systems with reduced nitrification and N2O emission rates to benefit both agriculture and the environment. The feasibility of such an approach is discussed based on the progresses made. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Net capital flows to and the real exchange rate of Western Balkan countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrisch Hubert

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper uses Granger causality tests to assess the linkages between changes in the real exchange rate and net capital inflows using the example of Western Balkan countries, which have suffered from low competitiveness and external imbalances for many years. The real exchange rate is a measure of a country’s price competitiveness, and the paper uses two concepts: relative unit labour cost and relative inflation differential. The sample consists of six Western Balkan countries for the period 1996-2012, relative to the European Union (EU. The main finding is that changes in the net capital flows precede changes in relative unit labour costs and not vice versa. Also, there is evidence that net capital flows affect the inflation differential of countries, although to a less discernible extent. This suggests that the increasing divergence in the unit labour cost between the EU and Western Balkan countries up to the global financial crisis was at least partly the result of net capital inflows. The paper adds to the ongoing debate on improving cost competitiveness through wage restrictions as the main vehicle to avert the accumulation of current account imbalances. It shows the importance of changes in the exchange rate regime, reform of the interaction between the financial and the real sector, and financial supervision and structural change.

  20. [Regulation of soil nitrification with nitrification inhibitors and related mechanisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhi-Mei; Wu, Zhi-Jie; Chen, Li-Jun; Jia, Li-Bin

    2008-06-01

    To improve the use efficiency of fertilizer N while alleviate its pollution is one of the keys in ensuring the high yield and good quality of agricultural products and the sustainable development of agriculture and environment, for which, applying nitrification inhibitors to retard the course of soil nitrification is an efficient measure. In this review, the definition, screening criteria, major varieties being widely used, and action mechanisms of nitrification inhibitors were introduced, and the existing problems and prospects in related researches were discussed.

  1. Light environment alters ozone uptake per net photosynthetic rate in black cherry trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredericksen, T S; Kolb, T E; Skelly, J M; Steiner, K C; Joyce, B J; Savage, J E

    1996-05-01

    Foliar ozone uptake rates of different-sized black cherry (Prunus serotina Ehrh.) trees were compared within a deciduous forest and adjacent openings in north-central Pennsylvania during one growing season. Study trees included open-grown seedlings and saplings, forest understory seedlings and saplings, and sunlit and shaded portions of mature canopy tree crowns. Instantaneous ozone uptake rates were highest in high-light environments primarily because of higher stomatal conductances. Low ozone uptake rates of seedlings and saplings in the forest understory could be attributed partially to lower average ambient ozone concentrations compared to the canopy and open environments. Among the tree size and light combinations tested, ozone uptake rates were highest in open-grown seedlings and lowest in forest-grown seedlings. Despite lower ozone uptake rates of foliage in shaded environments, ozone uptake per net photosynthesis of foliage in shaded environments was significantly higher than that of foliage in sunlit environments because of weaker coupling between net photosynthesis and stomatal conductance in shaded environments. The potential for greater ozone injury in shaded environments as a result of greater ozone uptake per net photosynthesis is consistent with previous reports of greater ozone injury in shaded foliage than in sunlit foliage.

  2. Nitrification and denitrification in pond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuni Puji Pujihastuti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available More of waste than pond aquacultutre system produced, will increase sedimentation in the bottom.  Ammonium and nitrite compounds are other forms of inorganic nitrogen in the pond. Nitrogen anorganic consist of ammonia, ammonium, nitrit, nitrat and nitrogen. Degradation of process metabolic biota culture waste can biologically be nitrat compound one of the forms that are not toxic in the nitrification process.  Five process of nitrogen biogeochemical cycle in the container cultivation is the amonification, nitrification, nitrogen assimilation, denitrification and nitrogen fixation. Nitrogen is the one of the compound in the overlay/ top stratification sediment.  Improvement of speed degradation will be success if the pond bottom on aerobic condition. Survival rate of tiger shrimp in the laboratory scale can be increase by administration of nitrification and denitrification bacteria should not just in the water kolom of pond engineering but also at the bottom pond layer at the preparation step.  Depht of the sediment 15 cm in day zero, intensive pond have been produced of nitrit and ammonium with the producing bacteria.  Application of nitrification and denitrification bacteria in the sediment and water coloum can be performed as the measurenment and evaluation nitrit, nitrat and ammonium abudance. Key words:  ponds, nitrogen inorganic, nitrification, denitrification   ABSTRAK Semakin banyak limbah kegiatan yang dihasilkan dalam sistem budidaya tambak, akan meningkatkan sedimentasi dalam dasar tambak.  Senyawa amonium dan nitrit merupakan bentuk lain dari nitrogen anorganik dalam tambak. Nitrogen anorganik terdiri terdiri dari amonia (NH3-, amonium (NH4+, nitrit (NO2-, dan nitrogen (N2. Secara biologis, proses perombakan sisa metabolisme biota budidaya dapat menjadi nitrat (NO3, suatu bentuk yang tidak berbahaya dalam proses nitrifikasi.  Lima proses siklus biogeokimia nitrogen yang terjadi di wadah budidaya adalah amonifikasi

  3. Relationship Between Diurnal Changes of Net Photosynthetic Rate and Influencing Factors in Rice under Saline Sodic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Yang

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The net photosynthetic rate of flag leaves and influencing factors under saline sodic soil conditions were investigated at the full heading stage of rice. The net photosynthetic rate of rice leaves showed a double-peak curve in a day in both non-saline sodic and saline sodic soil treatments. The first peak of the net photosynthetic rate appeared at 9:00–10:00 and 9:00 in the saline sodic and non-saline sodic soil treatments, respectively, whereas the second peak both at 14:00. The midday depression of the net photosynthetic rate always appeared regardless of non-saline sodic or saline sodic soil conditions. In addition, the net photosynthetic rate significantly decreased in all day under saline sodic conditions compared with that under non-saline sodic conditions. Some differences were observed in correlation characters between the net photosynthetic rate and all influencing factors during 9:00–13:00. Under non-saline sodic conditions, the diurnal changes of the net photosynthetic rate in a day were mainly caused by stomatal conductance, and the limitation value and the stomatal factors served as determinants; whereas under saline sodic stress, the diurnal changes of the net photosynthetic rate in a day were mainly caused by non stomatal factors including light intensity and air temperature.

  4. Nitrification in hybrid bioreactors treating simulated domestic wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellucci, M; Ofiţeru, I D; Head, I M; Curtis, T P; Graham, D W

    2013-08-01

    To provide deeper insights into nitrification process within aerobic bioreactors containing supplemental physical support media (hybrid bioreactors). Three bench-scale hybrid bioreactors with different media size and one control bioreactor were operated to assess how biofilm integrity influences microbial community conditions and bioreactor performance. The systems were operated initially at a 5-day hydraulic retention time (HRT), and all reactors displayed efficient nitrification and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal (>95%). However, when HRT was reduced to 2.5 days, COD removal rates remained high, but nitrification efficiencies declined in all reactors after 19 days. To explain reduced performance, nitrifying bacterial communities (ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, AOB; nitrite-oxidizing bacteria, NOB) were examined in the liquid phase and also on the beads using qPCR, FISH and DGGE. Overall, the presence of the beads in a reactor promoted bacterial abundances and diversity, but as bead size was increased, biofilms with active coupled AOB-NOB activity were less apparent, resulting in incomplete nitrification. Hybrid bioreactors have potential to sustain effective nitrification at low HRTs, but support media size and configuration type must be optimized to ensure coupled AOB and NOB activity in nitrification. This study shows that AOB and NOB coupling must be accomplished to minimize nitrification failure. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. Analysis of the inhibitory effects of chloropicrin fumigation on nitrification in various soil types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Dongdong; Wang, Qiuxia; Li, Yuan; Ouyang, Canbin; Guo, Meixia; Cao, Aocheng

    2017-05-01

    Chloropicrin retards the conversion of ammonia to nitrite during the nitrification process in soil. In our study, the dynamic effect of chloropicrin fumigation on soil nitrification was evaluated in five different soil types to identify relationships between soil properties and the effect of fumigation on nitrification. Chloropicrin significantly inhibited nitrification in all soils; however, the recovery of nitrification varied greatly between the soils. Following chloropicrin fumigation, nitrification recovered to the control level in all soils, except in the acidic Guangxi soil. Nitrification recovered faster in fumigated sandy loam Beijing soil than in the other four fumigated soils. Soil texture and pH were two important factors that influenced chloropicrin's inhibitory effect on nitrification. An S-shaped function was fitted to soil NO3(-)-N content to assess the nitrification recovery tendency in different soils. The time taken to reach maximum nitrification (tmax) ranged from 2.4 to 3.0 weeks in all unfumigated soils. Results demonstrated that tmax was greater in all fumigated soils than in untreated soils. Correlation calculations showed that tmax was strongly correlated to soil texture. The correlation analysis results indicated that the recovery rate of nitrification after chloropicrin fumigation is much faster in sandy loam soil than silty loam soil. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Complete nitrification by Nitrospira bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daims, Holger; Lebedeva, Elena V.; Pjevac, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Nitrification, the oxidation of ammonia via nitrite to nitrate, has always been considered to be a two-step process catalysed by chemolithoautotrophic microorganisms oxidizing either ammonia or nitrite. No known nitrifier carries out both steps, although complete nitrification should be energetic...

  7. Ammonium uptake by phytoplankton regulates nitrification in the sunlit ocean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason M Smith

    Full Text Available Nitrification, the microbial oxidation of ammonium to nitrate, is a central part of the nitrogen cycle. In the ocean's surface layer, the process alters the distribution of inorganic nitrogen species available to phytoplankton and produces nitrous oxide. A widely held idea among oceanographers is that nitrification is inhibited by light in the ocean. However, recent evidence that the primary organisms involved in nitrification, the ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA, are present and active throughout the surface ocean has challenged this idea. Here we show, through field experiments coupling molecular genetic and biogeochemical approaches, that competition for ammonium with phytoplankton is the strongest regulator of nitrification in the photic zone. During multiday experiments at high irradiance a single ecotype of AOA remained active in the presence of rapidly growing phytoplankton. Over the course of this three day experiment, variability in the intensity of competition with phytoplankton caused nitrification rates to decline from those typical of the lower photic zone (60 nmol L-1 d-1 to those in well-lit layers (<1 nmol L-1 d-1. During another set of experiments, nitrification rates exhibited a diel periodicity throughout much of the photic zone, with the highest rates occurring at night when competition with phytoplankton is lowest. Together, the results of our experiments indicate that nitrification rates in the photic zone are more strongly regulated by competition with phytoplankton for ammonium than they are by light itself. This finding advances our ability to model the impact of nitrification on estimates of new primary production, and emphasizes the need to more strongly consider the effects of organismal interactions on nutrient standing stocks and biogeochemical cycling in the surface of the ocean.

  8. Ammonium uptake by phytoplankton regulates nitrification in the sunlit ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jason M; Chavez, Francisco P; Francis, Christopher A

    2014-01-01

    Nitrification, the microbial oxidation of ammonium to nitrate, is a central part of the nitrogen cycle. In the ocean's surface layer, the process alters the distribution of inorganic nitrogen species available to phytoplankton and produces nitrous oxide. A widely held idea among oceanographers is that nitrification is inhibited by light in the ocean. However, recent evidence that the primary organisms involved in nitrification, the ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), are present and active throughout the surface ocean has challenged this idea. Here we show, through field experiments coupling molecular genetic and biogeochemical approaches, that competition for ammonium with phytoplankton is the strongest regulator of nitrification in the photic zone. During multiday experiments at high irradiance a single ecotype of AOA remained active in the presence of rapidly growing phytoplankton. Over the course of this three day experiment, variability in the intensity of competition with phytoplankton caused nitrification rates to decline from those typical of the lower photic zone (60 nmol L-1 d-1) to those in well-lit layers (nitrification rates exhibited a diel periodicity throughout much of the photic zone, with the highest rates occurring at night when competition with phytoplankton is lowest. Together, the results of our experiments indicate that nitrification rates in the photic zone are more strongly regulated by competition with phytoplankton for ammonium than they are by light itself. This finding advances our ability to model the impact of nitrification on estimates of new primary production, and emphasizes the need to more strongly consider the effects of organismal interactions on nutrient standing stocks and biogeochemical cycling in the surface of the ocean.

  9. Baseline Assessment of Net Calcium Carbonate Accretion Rates on U.S. Pacific Reefs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Vargas-Ángel

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comprehensive quantitative baseline assessment of in situ net calcium carbonate accretion rates (g CaCO3 cm(-2 yr(-1 of early successional recruitment communities on Calcification Accretion Unit (CAU plates deployed on coral reefs at 78 discrete sites, across 11 islands in the central and south Pacific Oceans. Accretion rates varied substantially within and between islands, reef zones, levels of wave exposure, and island geomorphology. For forereef sites, mean accretion rates were the highest at Rose Atoll, Jarvis, and Swains Islands, and the lowest at Johnston Atoll and Tutuila. A comparison between reef zones showed higher accretion rates on forereefs compared to lagoon sites; mean accretion rates were also higher on windward than leeward sites but only for a subset of islands. High levels of spatial variability in net carbonate accretion rates reported herein draw attention to the heterogeneity of the community assemblages. Percent cover of key early successional taxa on CAU plates did not reflect that of the mature communities present on surrounding benthos, possibly due to the short deployment period (2 years of the experimental units. Yet, net CaCO3 accretion rates were positively correlated with crustose coralline algae (CCA percent cover on the surrounding benthos and on the CAU plates, which on average represented >70% of the accreted material. For foreeefs and lagoon sites combined CaCO3 accretion rates were statistically correlated with total alkalinity and Chlorophyll-a; a GAM analysis indicated that SiOH and Halimeda were the best predictor variables of accretion rates on lagoon sites, and total alkalinity and Chlorophyll-a for forereef sites, demonstrating the utility of CAUs as a tool to monitor changes in reef accretion rates as they relate to ocean acidification. This study underscores the pivotal role CCA play as a key benthic component and supporting actively calcifying reefs; high Mg-calcite exoskeletons

  10. Baseline Assessment of Net Calcium Carbonate Accretion Rates on U.S. Pacific Reefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Ángel, Bernardo; Richards, Cristi L; Vroom, Peter S; Price, Nichole N; Schils, Tom; Young, Charles W; Smith, Jennifer; Johnson, Maggie D; Brainard, Russell E

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive quantitative baseline assessment of in situ net calcium carbonate accretion rates (g CaCO3 cm(-2) yr(-1)) of early successional recruitment communities on Calcification Accretion Unit (CAU) plates deployed on coral reefs at 78 discrete sites, across 11 islands in the central and south Pacific Oceans. Accretion rates varied substantially within and between islands, reef zones, levels of wave exposure, and island geomorphology. For forereef sites, mean accretion rates were the highest at Rose Atoll, Jarvis, and Swains Islands, and the lowest at Johnston Atoll and Tutuila. A comparison between reef zones showed higher accretion rates on forereefs compared to lagoon sites; mean accretion rates were also higher on windward than leeward sites but only for a subset of islands. High levels of spatial variability in net carbonate accretion rates reported herein draw attention to the heterogeneity of the community assemblages. Percent cover of key early successional taxa on CAU plates did not reflect that of the mature communities present on surrounding benthos, possibly due to the short deployment period (2 years) of the experimental units. Yet, net CaCO3 accretion rates were positively correlated with crustose coralline algae (CCA) percent cover on the surrounding benthos and on the CAU plates, which on average represented >70% of the accreted material. For foreeefs and lagoon sites combined CaCO3 accretion rates were statistically correlated with total alkalinity and Chlorophyll-a; a GAM analysis indicated that SiOH and Halimeda were the best predictor variables of accretion rates on lagoon sites, and total alkalinity and Chlorophyll-a for forereef sites, demonstrating the utility of CAUs as a tool to monitor changes in reef accretion rates as they relate to ocean acidification. This study underscores the pivotal role CCA play as a key benthic component and supporting actively calcifying reefs; high Mg-calcite exoskeletons makes CCA

  11. Generation time, net reproductive rate, and growth in stage-age-structured populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steiner, Uli; Tuljapurkar, Shripad; Coulson, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Major insights into the relationship between life-history features and fitness have come from Lotka's proof that population growth rate is determined by the level (expected amount) of reproduction and the average timing of reproduction of an individual. But this classical result is limited...... to age-structured populations. Here we generalize this result to populations structured by stage and age by providing a new, unique measure of reproductive timing (Tc) that, along with net reproductive rate (R0), has a direct mathematical relationship to and approximates growth rate (r). We use simple...... features of the life history determine population growth rate r and reveal a complex interplay of trait dynamics, timing, and level of reproduction. Our results contribute to a new framework of population and evolutionary dynamics in stage-and-age-structured populations....

  12. Relationship Between Diurnal Changes of Net Photosynthetic Rate and Influencing Factors in Rice under Saline Sodic Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Fu Yang; Zheng-wei Liang; Zhi-chun Wang; Yuan Chen

    2008-01-01

    The net photosynthetic rate of flag leaves and influencing factors under saline sodic soil conditions were investigated at the full heading stage of rice. The net photosynthetic rate of rice leaves showed a double-peak curve in a day in both non-saline sodic and saline sodic soil treatments. The first peak of the net photosynthetic rate appeared at 9:00–10:00 and 9:00 in the saline sodic and non-saline sodic soil treatments, respectively, whereas the second peak both at 14:00. The midday depr...

  13. Some plant extracts retarde nitrification in soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul–Mehdi S. AL-ANSARI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available An incubation experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of aqueous extracts of 17 plant materials on nitrification inhibition of urea- N in soil as compared with chemical inhibitor Dicyandiamide (DCD. Plant materials used in study were collected from different areas of Basrah province, south of Iraq. Aqueous extracts were prepared at ratio of 1:10 (plant material: water and added at conc. of 0.05, 0.10 and 0.20 ml g– 1 soil to loamy sand soil. DCD was added to soil at rate of 50 µg g-1 soil . Soil received urea at rate of 1000 µg N g-1 soil. Treated soils were incubated at 30 OC for 40 days. Results showed that application of all plant extracts, except those of casuarina, date palm and eucalyptus to soil retarded nitrification in soil. Caper, Sowthistle ,bladygrass and pomegranate extracts showed highest inhibition percentage (51, 42, 40 and 40 %, respectively and were found to be more effective than DCD (33 %. Highest inhibition was achieved by using those extracts at conc. of 0.1 ml g-1 soil after 10 days of incubation . Data also revealed that treated soil with these plant extracts significantly increased amount of NH4+–N and decreased amount of NO3-–N accumulation in soil compared with DCD and control treatments. Results of the study suggested a possibility of using aqueous extracts of some studied plants as potent nitrification inhibitor in soil.

  14. Archaeal Nitrification in the Ocean

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cornelia Wuchter; Ben Abbas; Marco J. L. Coolen; Lydie Herfort; Judith van Bleijswijk; Peer Timmers; Marc Strous; Eva Teira; Gerhard J. Herndl; Jack J. Middelburg; Stefan Schouten; Jaap S. Sinninghe Damsté

    2006-01-01

    .... Recently, a member of this clade was isolated from a sea aquarium and shown to be capable of nitrification, tentatively suggesting that Crenarchaeota may play a role in the oceanic nitrogen cycle...

  15. Optimizing nitrification in biological rapid sand filters for drinking water production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Smets, Barth F.; Lee, Carson Odell

    Addition of phosphate or trace metals or better management e.g. in terms of anmonium load can improve the nitrification rate and efficiency in biological rapid sand filters.......Addition of phosphate or trace metals or better management e.g. in terms of anmonium load can improve the nitrification rate and efficiency in biological rapid sand filters....

  16. Low rate loading-induced convection enhances net transport into the intervertebral disc in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullbrand, Sarah E; Peterson, Joshua; Mastropolo, Rosemarie; Roberts, Timothy T; Lawrence, James P; Glennon, Joseph C; DiRisio, Darryl J; Ledet, Eric H

    2015-05-01

    The intervertebral disc primarily relies on trans-endplate diffusion for the uptake of nutrients and the clearance of byproducts. In degenerative discs, diffusion is often diminished by endplate sclerosis and reduced proteoglycan content. Mechanical loading-induced convection has the potential to augment diffusion and enhance net transport into the disc. The ability of convection to augment disc transport is controversial and has not been demonstrated in vivo. To determine if loading-induced convection can enhance small molecule transport into the intervertebral disc in vivo. Net transport was quantified via postcontrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) into the discs of the New Zealand white rabbit lumbar spine subjected to in vivo cyclic low rate loading. Animals were administered the MRI contrast agent gadodiamide intravenously and subjected to in vivo low rate loading (0.5 Hz, 200 N) via a custom external loading apparatus for either 2.5, 5, 10, 15, or 20 minutes. Animals were then euthanized and the lumbar spines imaged using postcontrast enhanced MRI. The T1 constants in the nucleus, annulus, and cartilage endplates were quantified as a measure of gadodiamide transport into the loaded discs compared with the adjacent unloaded discs. Microcomputed tomography was used to quantify subchondral bone density. Low rate loading caused the rapid uptake and clearance of gadodiamide in the nucleus compared with unloaded discs, which exhibited a slower rate of uptake. Relative to unloaded discs, low rate loading caused a maximum increase in transport into the nucleus of 16.8% after 5 minutes of loading. Low rate loading increased the concentration of gadodiamide in the cartilage endplates at each time point compared with unloaded levels. Results from this study indicate that forced convection accelerated small molecule uptake and clearance in the disc induced by low rate mechanical loading. Low rate loading may, therefore, be therapeutic to the disc as it

  17. A New Approach for Mobile Advertising Click-Through Rate Estimation Based on Deep Belief Nets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie-Hao Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, with the rapid development of mobile Internet and its business applications, mobile advertising Click-Through Rate (CTR estimation has become a hot research direction in the field of computational advertising, which is used to achieve accurate advertisement delivery for the best benefits in the three-side game between media, advertisers, and audiences. Current research on the estimation of CTR mainly uses the methods and models of machine learning, such as linear model or recommendation algorithms. However, most of these methods are insufficient to extract the data features and cannot reflect the nonlinear relationship between different features. In order to solve these problems, we propose a new model based on Deep Belief Nets to predict the CTR of mobile advertising, which combines together the powerful data representation and feature extraction capability of Deep Belief Nets, with the advantage of simplicity of traditional Logistic Regression models. Based on the training dataset with the information of over 40 million mobile advertisements during a period of 10 days, our experiments show that our new model has better estimation accuracy than the classic Logistic Regression (LR model by 5.57% and Support Vector Regression (SVR model by 5.80%.

  18. Biomass rather than growth rate determines variation in net primary production by giant kelp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Daniel C; Rassweiler, Andrew; Arkema, Katie K

    2008-09-01

    Net primary production (NPP) is influenced by disturbance-driven fluctuations in foliar standing crop (FSC) and resource-driven fluctuations in rates of recruitment and growth, yet most studies of NPP have focused primarily on factors influencing growth. We quantified NPP, FSC, recruitment, and growth rate for the giant kelp, Macrocystis pyrifera, at three kelp forests in southern California, U.S.A., over a 54-month period and determined the relative roles of FSC, recruitment, and growth rate in contributing to variation in annual NPP. Net primary production averaged between 0.42 and 2.38 kg dry mass x m(-2) x yr(-1) at the three sites. The initial FSC present at the beginning of the growth year and the recruitment of new plants during the year explained 63% and 21% of the interannual variation observed in NPP, respectively. The previous year's NPP and disturbance from waves collectively accounted for 80% of the interannual variation in initial FSC. No correlation was found between annual growth rate (i.e., the amount of new kelp mass produced per unit of existing kelp mass) and annual NPP (i.e., the amount of new kelp mass produced per unit area of ocean bottom), largely because annual growth rate was consistent compared to initial FSC and recruitment, which fluctuated greatly among years and sites. Although growth rate was a poor predictor of variation in annual NPP, it was principally responsible for the high mean values observed for NPP by Macrocystis. These high mean values reflected rapid growth (average of approximately 2% per day) of a relatively small standing crop (maximum annual mean = 444 g dry mass/m2) that replaced itself approximately seven times per year. Disturbance-driven variability in FSC may be generally important in explaining variation in NPP, yet it is rarely examined because cycles of disturbance and recovery occur over timescales of decades or more in many systems. Considerable insight into how variation in FSC drives variation in NPP may

  19. Successive chlorothalonil applications inhibit soil nitrification and discrepantly affect abundances of functional genes in soil nitrogen cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Ying; Zhang, Manyun; Yang, Guangmei; Wang, Jun; Christie, Peter; Luo, Yongming

    2017-02-01

    Broad-spectrum fungicide chlorothalonil (CTN) is successively applied into intensive agriculture soil. However, the impacts of successive CTN applications on soil nitrification and related microorganisms remain poorly understood. A microcosm study was conducted to reveal the effects of successive CTN applications on soil nitrification and functional genes involved in soil nitrogen (N) cycling. The CTN at the dosages of 5 mg kg-1 dry soil (RD) and 25 mg kg-1 dry soil (5RD) was successively applied into the test soil at 7-day intervals which resulted in the accumulations of CTN residues. After 28 days of incubation, CTN residues in the RD and 5RD treatments were 3.14 and 69.7 mg kg-1 dry soil respectively. Net nitrification rates in the RD and 5RD treatments were lower than that obtained from the blank control (CK). Real-time PCR analysis revealed that AOA and AOB amoA gene abundances were significantly decreased by CTN applications. Moreover, CTN applications also discrepantly decreased the abundances of functional genes involved in soil denitrification, with the exception of nosZ gene. Principal component analysis further supported the observation that successive CTN applications could result in enhanced ecological toxicity.

  20. Nitrification and growth of autotrophic nitrifying bacteria and Thaumarchaeota in the coastal North Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veuger, B.; Pitcher, A.; Schouten, S.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2013-01-01

    Nitrification and the associated growth of autotrophic nitrifiers, as well as the contributions of bacteria and Thaumarchaeota to total autotrophic C-fixation by nitrifiers were investigated in the Dutch coastal North Sea from October 2007 to March 2008. Rates of nitrification were determined by

  1. Complete nitrification by Nitrospira bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daims, Holger; Lebedeva, Elena V.; Pjevac, Petra; Han, Ping; Herbold, Craig; Albertsen, Mads; Jehmlich, Nico; Palatinszky, Marton; Vierheilig, Julia; Bulaev, Alexandr; Kirkegaard, Rasmus H.; von Bergen, Martin; Rattei, Thomas; Bendinger, Bernd; Nielsen, Per H.; Wagner, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Nitrification, the oxidation of ammonia via nitrite to nitrate, has always been considered as a two-step process catalyzed by chemolithoautotrophic microorganisms oxidizing either ammonia or nitrite. No known nitrifier carries out both steps, although complete nitrification should be energetically advantageous. This functional separation has puzzled microbiologists for a century. Here we report on the discovery and cultivation of a completely nitrifying bacterium from the genus Nitrospira, a globally distributed group of nitrite oxidizers. The genome of this chemolithoautotrophic organism encodes both the pathways for ammonia and nitrite oxidation, which are concomitantly expressed during growth by ammonia oxidation to nitrate. Genes affiliated with the phylogenetically distinct ammonia monooxygenase and hydroxylamine dehydrogenase genes of Nitrospira are present in many environments and were retrieved on Nitrospira-contigs in new metagenomes from engineered systems. These findings fundamentally change our picture of nitrification and point to completely nitrifying Nitrospira as key components of nitrogen-cycling microbial communities. PMID:26610024

  2. A kinetic model for estimating net photosynthetic rates of cos lettuce leaves under pulsed light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jishi, Tomohiro; Matsuda, Ryo; Fujiwara, Kazuhiro

    2015-04-01

    Time-averaged net photosynthetic rate (P n) under pulsed light (PL) is known to be affected by the PL frequency and duty ratio, even though the time-averaged photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) is unchanged. This phenomenon can be explained by considering that photosynthetic intermediates (PIs) are pooled during light periods and then consumed by partial photosynthetic reactions during dark periods. In this study, we developed a kinetic model to estimate P n of cos lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. var. longifolia) leaves under PL based on the dynamics of the amount of pooled PIs. The model inputs are average PPFD, duty ratio, and frequency; the output is P n. The rates of both PI accumulation and consumption at a given moment are assumed to be dependent on the amount of pooled PIs at that point. Required model parameters and three explanatory variables (average PPFD, frequency, and duty ratio) were determined for the simulation using P n values under PL based on several combinations of the three variables. The model simulation for various PL levels with a wide range of time-averaged PPFDs, frequencies, and duty ratios further demonstrated that P n under PL with high frequencies and duty ratios was comparable to, but did not exceed, P n under continuous light, and also showed that P n under PL decreased as either frequency or duty ratio was decreased. The developed model can be used to estimate P n under various light environments where PPFD changes cyclically.

  3. The Influence of Mineral Fertilizer Combined With a Nitrification Inhibitor on Microbial Populations and Activities in Calcareous Uzbekistanian Soil Under Cotton Cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilfuza Egamberdiyeva

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Application of fertilizers combined with nitrification inhibitors affects soil microbial biomass and activity. The objective of this research was to determine the effects of fertilizer application combined with the nitrification inhibitor potassium oxalate (PO on soil microbial population and activities in nitrogen-poor soil under cotton cultivation in Uzbekistan. Fertilizer treatments were N as urea, P as ammophos, and K as potassium chloride. The nitrification inhibitor PO was added to urea and ammophos at the rate of 2%. Three treatments—N200P140K60 (T1, N200 P140 POK60 (T2, and N200 P140 POK60 (T3 mg kg-1 soil—were applied for this study. The control (C was without fertilizer and PO. The populations of oligotrophic bacteria, ammonifying bacteria, nitrifying bacteria, denitrifying bacteria, mineral assimilating bacteria, oligonitrophilic bacteria, and bacteria group Azotobacter were determined by the most probable number method. The treatments T2 and T3 increased the number of oligonitrophilic bacteria and utilization mineral forms of nitrogen on the background of reducing number of ammonifying bacteria. T2 and T3 also decreased the number of nitrifying bacteria, denitrifying bacteria, and net nitrification. In conclusion, our experiments showed that PO combined with mineral fertilizer is one of the most promising compounds for inhibiting nitrification rate, which was reflected in the increased availability and efficiency of fertilizer nitrogen to the cotton plants. PO combined with mineral fertilizer has no negative effects on nitrogen-fixing bacteria Azotobacter and oligo-nitrophilic bacteria.

  4. The Impact of Rate Design and Net Metering on the Bill Savings from Distributed PV for Residential Customers in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darghouth, Naim; Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan

    2010-03-30

    Net metering has become a widespread policy in the U.S. for supporting distributed photovoltaics (PV) adoption. Though specific design details vary, net metering allows customers with PV to reduce their electric bills by offsetting their consumption with PV generation, independent of the timing of the generation relative to consumption - in effect, compensating the PV generation at retail electricity rates (Rose et al. 2009). While net metering has played an important role in jump-starting the residential PV market in the U.S., challenges to net metering policies have emerged in a number of states and contexts, and alternative compensation methods are under consideration. Moreover, one inherent feature of net metering is that the value of the utility bill savings it provides to customers with PV depends heavily on the structure of the underlying retail electricity rate, as well as on the characteristics of the customer and PV system. Consequently, the value of net metering - and the impact of moving to alternative compensation mechanisms - can vary substantially from one customer to the next. For these reasons, it is important for policymakers and others that seek to support the development of distributed PV to understand both how the bill savings varies under net metering, and how the bill savings under net metering compares to other possible compensation mechanisms. To advance this understanding, we analyze the bill savings from PV for residential customers of California's two largest electric utilities, Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) and Southern California Edison (SCE). The analysis is based on hourly load data from a sample of 215 residential customers located in the service territories of the two utilities, matched with simulated hourly PV production for the same time period based on data from the nearest of 73 weather stations in the state.

  5. Net herbage accumulation rate and crude protein content of Urochloa brizantha cultivars under shade intensities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto de Lima Meirelles

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of silvopastoral systems is a sustainable alternative for animal production in various regions of the Brazil. However to obtain satisfactory results in these systems, the selection of forage species that grows well in the shade should be done. The tolerance of plants to light restriction and the correctly choice of species, considering good nutritional values for these conditions has great importance. The study of artificial shading for forage production helps the clarification of issues related to the behavior of plants under reduced light prior to use in integrations with forests. The aim of the study was to evaluate the net herbage accumulation rate of forage (HAR and crude protein (CP of Urochloa brizantha cultivars (Marandu and Piatã under natural light and shading of 30 and 60%. The experiment was conducted at FMVZ - UNESP, Botucatu. The experimental design was a randomized block in factorial arrangement 3 x 2 (three shading levels: 0, 30 and 60%, two cultivars: Marandu and Piatã with three replications and repeated measures (3 cuts. Sample collection occurred when the cultivars reached 35 cm in height. The treatments with shading showed lower cutting intervals as compared to those subjected to full sunlight, because they have reached in a shorter time to time as determined cut-off criterion (mean of 37, 45 and 61 days for reduction of 60%, reduction of 30% and full sun. Significant effects (P<0.05 interaction cultivar x shade x cut on the net herbage accumulation rate (HAR. Most HAR (P<0.05 was observed for cv. Marandu 60% reduction in lightness (127 kg/ha/day due to increased production of stem during the first growing cycle. The lower HAR also occurred to Marandu, but under natural light in the third cut (34 kg/ha/day due to adverse weather conditions during the growth interval. The shadow effect and the cutting (P<0.05 affected CP. The percentage of CP on cultivars showed the highest values (average value of 9.27% in 60

  6. Effects of the application of digestates from wet and dry anaerobic fermentation to Japanese paddy and upland soils on short-term nitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Kozue; Toyota, Koki

    2015-01-01

    Wet and dry anaerobic fermentation processes are operated for biogas production from organic matter, resulting in wet and dry digestates as by-products, respectively. The application of these digestates to soil as fertilizer has increased in recent years. Therefore, we herein compared the effects of applying wet digestates (pH 8.2, C/N ratio 4.5), dry digestates (pH 8.8, C/N ratio 23.4), and a chemical fertilizer to Japanese paddy and upland soils on short-term nitrification under laboratory aerobic conditions. Chloroform-labile C, an indicator of microbial biomass, was only minimally affected by these applications, indicating that a small amount of labile N was immobilized by microbes. All applications led to rapid increases in NO3 -N contents in both soils, and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, but not archaea may play a critical role in net nitrification in the amended soils. The net nitrification rates for both soils were the highest after the application of dry digestates, followed by wet digestates and then the chemical fertilizer in order of decreasing soil pH. These results suggest that the immediate effects of applying digestates, especially dry digestates with the highest pH, on nitrate leaching need to be considered when digestates are used as alternative fertilizers.

  7. Effects of the Application of Digestates from Wet and Dry Anaerobic Fermentation to Japanese Paddy and Upland Soils on Short-Term Nitrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Kozue; Toyota, Koki

    2015-01-01

    Wet and dry anaerobic fermentation processes are operated for biogas production from organic matter, resulting in wet and dry digestates as by-products, respectively. The application of these digestates to soil as fertilizer has increased in recent years. Therefore, we herein compared the effects of applying wet digestates (pH 8.2, C/N ratio 4.5), dry digestates (pH 8.8, C/N ratio 23.4), and a chemical fertilizer to Japanese paddy and upland soils on short-term nitrification under laboratory aerobic conditions. Chloroform-labile C, an indicator of microbial biomass, was only minimally affected by these applications, indicating that a small amount of labile N was immobilized by microbes. All applications led to rapid increases in NO3 -N contents in both soils, and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, but not archaea may play a critical role in net nitrification in the amended soils. The net nitrification rates for both soils were the highest after the application of dry digestates, followed by wet digestates and then the chemical fertilizer in order of decreasing soil pH. These results suggest that the immediate effects of applying digestates, especially dry digestates with the highest pH, on nitrate leaching need to be considered when digestates are used as alternative fertilizers. PMID:25740173

  8. [Effects of reduced solar radiation on winter wheat flag leaf net photosynthetic rate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, You-Fei; Ni, Yan-Li; Mai, Bo-Ru; Wu, Rong-Jun; Feng, Yan; Sun, Jian; Li, Jian; Xu, Jing-Xin

    2011-06-01

    Taking winter wheat Triticum aestivum L. (cv. Yangmai 13) as test material, a field experiment was conducted in Nanjing City to study the effects of simulated reduced solar radiation on the diurnal variation of winter wheat flag leaf photosynthetic rate and the main affecting factors. Five treatments were installed, i. e., 15% (T15), 20% (T20) , 40% (T40), 60% (T60), and 100% (CK) of total incident solar radiation. Reduced solar irradiance increased the chlorophyll and lutein contents significantly, but decreased the net photosynthetic rate (Pn). Under different solar irradiance, the diurnal variation of Pn had greater difference, and the daily maximum Pn was in the order of CK > T60 > T40 > T 20 > T15. In CK, the Pn exhibited a double peak diurnal curve; while in the other four treatments, the Pn showed a single peak curve, and the peak was lagged behind that of CK. Correlation analysis showed that reduced solar irradiance was the main factor affecting the diurnal variation of Pn, but the physiological parameters also played important roles in determining the diurnal variation of Pn. In treatments T60 and T40, the photosynthesis active radiation (PAR), leaf temperature (T1) , stomatal conductance (Gs) , and transpiration rate (Tr) were significantly positively correlated with Pn, suggesting their positive effects on Pn. The intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci) and stomatal limitation (Ls) had significant negative correlations with Pn in treatments T60 and T40 but significant positive correlations with Pn in treatments T20 and T15, implying that the Ci and Ls had negative (or positive) effects on Pn when the solar irradiance was higher (or lower) than 40% of incident solar irradiance.

  9. The Impact of Rate Design and Net Metering on the Bill Savings from Distributed PV for Residential Customers in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Energy and Resources Group, University of California, Berkeley; Darghouth, Naim R.; Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan

    2011-06-01

    Net metering has become a widespread mechanism in the U.S. for supporting customer adoption of distributed photovoltaics (PV), but has faced challenges as PV installations grow to a larger share of generation in a number of states. This paper examines the value of the bill savings that customers receive under net metering, and the associated role of retail rate design, based on a sample of approximately two hundred residential customers of California's two largest electric utilities. We find that the bill savings per kWh of PV electricity generated varies by more than a factor of four across the customers in the sample, which is largely attributable to the inclining block structure of the utilities' residential retail rates. We also compare the bill savings under net metering to that received under three potential alternative compensation mechanisms, based on California's Market Price Referent (MPR). We find that net metering provides significantly greater bill savings than a full MPR-based feed-in tariff, but only modestly greater savings than alternative mechanisms under which hourly or monthly net excess generation is compensated at the MPR rate.

  10. Data filtering and expected muon and neutrino event rates in the KM3NeT neutrino telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanidze, Rezo [ECAP, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erwin-Rommel-Str.1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Collaboration: ANTARES-KM3NeT-Erlangen-Collaboration

    2011-07-01

    KM3NeT is a future Mediterranean deep sea neutrino telescope with an instrumented volume of several cubic kilometres. The neutrino and muon events in KM3NeT will be reconstructed from the signals collected from the telescope's photo detectors. However, in the deep sea the dominant source of photon signals are the decays of K40 nuclei and bioluminescence. The selection of neutrino and muon events requires the implementation of fast and efficient data filtering algorithms for the reduction of accidental background event rates. Possible data filtering and triggering schemes for the KM3NeT neutrino telescope and expected muon and neutrino event rates are discussed.

  11. Reforestation in southern China: revisiting soil N mineralization and nitrification after 8 years restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Qifeng; Li, Zhi’an; Zhu, Weixing; Zou, Bi; Li, Yingwen; Yu, Shiqin; Ding, Yongzhen; Chen, Yao; Li, Xiaobo; Wang, Faming

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen availability and tree species selection play important roles in reforestation. However, long-term field studies on the effects and mechanisms of tree species composition on N transformation are very limited. Eight years after tree seedlings were planted in a field experiment, we revisited the site and tested how tree species composition affects the dynamics of N mineralization and nitrification. Both tree species composition and season significantly influenced the soil dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen (DON). N-fixing Acacia crassicarpa monoculture had the highest DON, and 10-mixed species plantation had the highest DOC. The lowest DOC and DON concentrations were both observed in Eucalyptus urophylla monoculture. The tree species composition also significantly affected net N mineralization rates. The highest rate of net N mineralization was found in A. crassicarpa monoculture, which was over twice than that in Castanopsis hystrix monoculture. The annual net N mineralization rates of 10-mixed and 30-mixed plantations were similar as that of N-fixing monoculture. Since mixed plantations have good performance in increasing soil DOC, DON, N mineralization and plant biodiversity, we recommend that mixed species plantations should be used as a sustainable approach for the restoration of degraded land in southern China. PMID:26794649

  12. Nitrification in Dutch heathland soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, de W.

    1989-01-01

    This thesis is the result of a study on the production of nitrate in Dutch heathland soils. Most of the heathlands are located on acid, sandy soils. Therefore , it has dealt mainly with the occurrence, nature and mechanisms of nitrification in acid soils. In the Netherlands, the production

  13. Archaeal nitrification in the ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wuchter, C.; Abbas, B.; Coolen, M.J.L.; Herfort, L.; Bleijswijk, J. van; Timmers, P.; Strous, M.; Teira, E.; Herndl, G.J.; Middelburg, J.J.; Schouten, S.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.

    2006-01-01

    Marine Crenarchaeota are the most abundant single group of prokaryotes in the ocean, but their physiology and role in marine biogeochemical cycles are unknown. Recently, a member of this clade was isolated from a sea aquarium and shown to be capable of nitrification, tentatively suggesting that

  14. Low inflation, a high net savings surplus and institutional restrictions keep the Japanese long-term interest rate low

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Pieter W.

    2006-01-01

    This paper explains that the interest rate on long-term Japanese government bonds is low in comparison with other industrialised countries for four main reasons: lower inflation, net savings surplus, institutional restrictions and home bias. Monetary policy and institutionalised purchases of

  15. Kinetic evaluation of nitrification performance in an immobilized cell membrane bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güven, D; Ubay Çokgör, E; Sözen, S; Orhon, D

    2016-01-01

    High rate membrane bioreactor (MBR) systems operated at extremely low sludge ages (superfast membrane bioreactors (SFMBRs)) are inefficient to achieve nitrogen removal, due to insufficient retention time for nitrifiers. Moreover, frequent chemical cleaning is required due to high biomass flux. This study aims to satisfy the nitrification in SFMBRs by using sponge as carriers, leading to the extension of the residence time of microorganisms. In order to test the limits of nitrification, bioreactor was run under 52, 5 and 2 days of carrier residence time (CRT), with a hydraulic retention time of 6 h. Different degrees of nitrification were obtained for different CRTs. Sponge immobilized SFMBR operation with short CRT resulted in partial nitrification indicating selective dominancy of ammonia oxidizers. At higher CRT, simultaneous nitrification-denitrification was achieved when accompanying with oxygen limitation. Process kinetics was determined through evaluation of the results by a modeling study. Nitrifier partition in the reactor was also identified by model calibration.

  16. Net Metering and Market Feedback Loops: Exploring the Impact of Retail Rate Design on Distributed PV Deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darghouth, Naïm R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Wiser, Ryan [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Barbose, Galen [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Mills, Andrew [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-01-13

    The substantial increase in deployment of customer-sited solar photovoltaics (PV) in the United States has been driven by a combination of steeply declining costs, financing innovations, and supportive policies. Among those supportive policies is net metering, which in most states effectively allows customers to receive compensation for distributed PV generation at the full retail electricity price. The current design of retail electricity rates and the presence of net metering have elicited concerns that the possible under-recovery of fixed utility costs from PV system owners may lead to a feedback loop of increasing retail prices that accelerate PV adoption and further rate increases. However, a separate and opposing feedback loop could offset this effect: increased PV deployment may lead to a shift in the timing of peak-period electricity prices that could reduce the bill savings received under net metering where time-varying retail electricity rates are used, thereby dampening further PV adoption. In this paper, we examine the impacts of these two competing feedback dynamics on U.S. distributed PV deployment through 2050 for both residential and commercial customers, across states. Our results indicate that, at the aggregate national level, the two feedback effects nearly offset one another and therefore produce a modest net effect, although their magnitude and direction vary by customer segment and by state. We also model aggregate PV deployment trends under various rate designs and net-metering rules, accounting for feedback dynamics. Our results demonstrate that future adoption of distributed PV is highly sensitive to retail rate structures. Whereas flat, time-invariant rates with net metering lead to higher aggregate national deployment levels than the current mix of rate structures (+5% in 2050), rate structures with higher monthly fixed customer charges or PV compensation at levels lower than the full retail rate can dramatically erode aggregate customer

  17. The oxygen isotope composition of nitrate generated by nitrification in acid forest floors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Bernhard; Bollwerk, Sandra M.; Mansfeldt, Tim; Hütter, Birgit; Veizer, Jan

    2001-08-01

    The oxygen isotope composition of nitrate is used increasingly for identifying the origin of nitrate in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. This novel isotope tracer technique is based on the fact that nitrate in atmospheric deposition, in fertilizers, and nitrate generated by nitrification in soils appear to have distinct oxygen isotope ratios. While the typical ranges of δ18O values of nitrate in atmospheric deposition and fertilizers are comparatively well known, few experimental data exist for the oxygen isotope composition of nitrate generated by nitrification in soils. The objective of this study was to determine δ18O values of nitrate formed by microbial nitrification in acid forest floors. Evidence from laboratory incubation experiments and field studies suggests that during microbial nitrification in acid forest floor horizons, up to two of the three oxygen atoms in newly formed nitrate are derived from water, particularly if ammonium is abundant and nitrification rates are high. It was, however, also observed that in ammonium-limited systems with low nitrification rates, significantly less than two thirds of the oxygen in newly formed nitrate can be derived from water oxygen, presumably as a result of heterotrophic nitrification. It can be concluded from the presented data that the δ18O values of nitrate formed by microbial nitrification in acid forest floors typically range between +2 and +14‰, assuming that soil water δ18O values vary between -15 and -5‰. Hence, oxygen isotope ratios of nitrate formed by nitrification in forest floors are usually distinct from those of other nitrate sources such as atmospheric deposition and synthetic fertilizers and, therefore, constitute a valuable qualitative tracer for distinguishing among these sources of nitrate. A quantitative source apportionment appears, however, difficult because of the wide range of δ18O values, particularly for atmospheric nitrate deposition and for nitrate from microbial

  18. Nitrification cessation and recovery in an aerated saturated vertical subsurface flow treatment wetland: Field studies and microscale biofilm modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Clodagh; Rajabzadeh, Amin R; Weber, Kela P; Nivala, Jaime; Wallace, Scott D; Cooper, David J

    2016-06-01

    In aerated treatment wetlands, oxygen availability is not a limiting factor in sustaining a high level of nitrification in wastewater treatment. In the case of an air blower failure, nitrification would cease, potentially causing adverse effects to the nitrifying bacteria. A field trial was completed investigating nitrification loss when aeration is switched off, and the system recovery rate after the aeration is switched back on. Loss of dissolved oxygen was observed to be more rapid than loss of nitrification. Nitrate was observed in the effluent long after the aeration was switched off (48h+). A complementary modeling study predicted nitrate diffusion out of biofilm over a 48h period. After two weeks of no aeration in the established system, nitrification recovered within two days, whereas nitrification establishment in a new system was previously observed to require 20-45days. These results suggest that once established resident nitrifying microbial communities are quite robust. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Gill net selectivity and catch rates of pelagic fish in tropical coastal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The fish species and size selectivity of gillnets design with monofilament nylon polyethylene netting materials were investigated in Lagos Lagoon, Nigeria between September and December 2005. The gillnets floats and sinkers were improvised from rubber slippers and lead metallic objects which were attached at intervals ...

  20. Nitrification performance in a membrane bioreactor treating industrial wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvořák, Lukáš; Svojitka, Jan; Wanner, Jiří; Wintgens, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    The influence of industrial (pharmaceutical and chemical) wastewater composition on membrane bioreactor (MBR) performance was investigated in a pilot-scale installation. The study focussed on nitrification performance, which was evaluated based on influent and effluent parameters as well as batch nitrification rate tests. The industrial wastewater was pumped into the MBR in a mixture with municipal wastewater at constant flow rate. The loading of the MBR with industrial wastewater was increased stepwise from 0 to 75% share in the mixed influent to study the adaptation of nitrifying bacteria. Stable nitrification performance was observed until the content of industrial wastewater in the influent reached 40%, with effluent values of around 0.56 mg L(-1) NH4-N and 98.3% ammonia removal. Breakdown of nitratation was observed at a 40% industrial wastewater dose and breakdown of nitritation at a 50% dose, respectively. However, after several months of adaptation, both processes recovered. No nitrification was observed when the industrial wastewater share exceeded 50%. Adaptation of nitrifying bacteria in the MBR was also confirmed by results of kinetic tests. The inhibition effect of the concentrated industrial wastewater to the MBR sludge decreased substantially after several months of exposure, while the inhibition of referential activated sludge remained constant. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. An investigation of moving bed biofilm reactor nitrification during long-term exposure to cold temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Valerie; Delatolla, Robert; Laflamme, Edith; Gadbois, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Biological treatment is the most common and economical means of ammonia removal in wastewater; however, nitrification rates can become completely impeded at cold temperatures. Attached growth processes and, specifically, moving bed biofilm reactors (MBBRs) have shown promise with respect to low-temperature nitrification. In this study, two laboratory MBBRs were used to investigate MBBR nitrification rates at 20, 5, and 1 degree C. Furthermore, the solids detached by the MBBR reactors were investigated and Arrhenius temperature correction models used to predict nitrification rates after long-term low-temperature exposure was evaluated. The nitrification rate at 5 degrees C was 66 +/- 3.9% and 64 +/- 3.7% compared to the rate measured at 20 degrees C for reactors 1 and 2, respectively. The nitrification rates at 1 degree C over a 4-month exposure period compared to the rate at 20 degrees C were 18.7 +/- 5.5% and 15.7 +/- 4.7% for the two reactors. The quantity of solids detached from the MBBR biocarriers was low and the mass of biofilm per carrier did not vary significantly at 20 degrees C compared to that after long-term exposure at 1 degree C. Lastly, a temperature correction model based on exposure time to cold temperatures showed a strong correlation to the calculated ammonia removal rates relative to 20 degrees C following a gradual acclimatization period to cold temperatures.

  2. Nitrification at full-scale municipal wastewater treatment plants: Evaluation of inhibition and bioaugmentation of nitrifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hao L; Chen, Hongping

    2015-08-01

    Batch nitrification tests were conducted with sludge and wastewater streams obtained from field implementations to evaluate nitrification inhibition and efficiency of a nitrifiers bioaugmentation technology at full-scale municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). The results showed that the substrate organic carbon and pH of wastewater streams were inhibitory factors to nitrification and the low pH was the cause of the WWTP experiencing poor nitrification. An ammonia-nitrogen removal rate of 0.21mg-N/gMLVSS-h was observed at pH 6.5, while the rate increased to 0.54mg-N/gMLVSS-h with an introduction of 6% bioaugmented nitrifiers, indicating that the integrated side-stream nitrifiers bioaugmentation process was beneficial in improving nitrification efficiency, even under low pH conditions not conducive to nitrification. The study provides new insights into effective upgrading of municipal WWTPs exposed to poor nitrification. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. How inhibiting nitrification affects nitrogen cycle and reduces ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    We conducted a meta-analysis of 103 nitrification inhibitor (NI) studies, and evaluated how NI application affects crop productivity and other ecosystem services in agricultural systems. Our results showed that, compared to conventional fertilizer practice, applications of NI along with nitrogen (N) fertilizer increased crop nitrogen use efficiency, crop yield, and altered the pathways and the amount of N loss to environment. NI application increased ammonia emission, but reduced nitrate leaching and nitrous oxide emission, which led to a reduction of 12.9% of the total N loss. The cost and benefit analysis showed that the economic benefit of reducing N’s environmental impacts offset the cost of NI. NI application could bring additional revenue of $163.72 ha-1 for a maize farm. Taken together, our findings show that NI application may create a win-win scenario that increases agricultural output, while reducing the negative impact on the environment. Policies that encourage NI application would reduce N’s environmental impacts. A group from Chinese Academy of Sciences, US EPA-ORD and North Carolina examined the net environmental and economic effects of nitrification inhibitors to reduce nitrate leaching associated with farm fertilizers. They conducted a meta-analysis of studies examining nitrification inhibitors, and found that NI application increased ammonia emission, but reduced nitrate leaching and nitrous oxide emission, which led to a reduction of 12.9

  4. [Effects of lead stress on net photosynthetic rate, SPAD value and ginsenoside production in Ginseng (Panax ginseng)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yao; Jiang, Xiao-Li; Yang, Fen-Tuan; Cao, Qing-Jun; Li, Gang

    2014-08-01

    The paper aimed to evaluate the effects of lead stress on photosynthetic performance and ginsenoside content in ginseng (Panax ginseng). To accomplish this, three years old ginseng were cultivated in pot and in phytotron with different concentrations of lead, ranging from 0 to 1000 mg x kg(-1) soil for a whole growth period (about 150 days). The photosynthetic parameters in leaves and ginsenoside content in roots of ginseng were determined in green fruit stage and before withering stage, respectively. In comparison with the control, net photosynthetic rate and SPAD value in ginseng leaves cultivated with 100 and 250 mg x kg(-1) of lead changed insignificantly, however, ginseng supplied with 500 and 1 000 mg x kg(-1) of lead showed a noticeably decline in the net rate of photosynthesis and SPAD value (P lead, with decline of 57.8%,11.0%, respectively. Total content of ginsenoside in ginseng roots cultivated with 100 mg x kg(-1) of lead showed insignificantly change compared to the control, but the content increased remarkably in treatments supplied with 250, 500, 1 000 mg x kg(-1) of lead (P lead. The net photosynthetic rate and SPAD value in leaves of ginseng both showed significantly negative linear correlations with lead stress level (P lead concentration was also observed (P lead negatively affects photosynthetic performance in ginseng leaves, but benefits for accumulation of secondary metabolism (total content of ginsenoside) in ginseng root.

  5. Nitrification in reef corals

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Wafar, M.V.M.; Wafar, S.; David, J.J.

    (Taube 1970; Linck 1976). This stability of the hy- dration ion sphere imposes limitations on the mechanism of electron transfer reac- tions. The solubility of Cr(OH), (s) is about 400 nM at pH 8.5 and is controlled by the Cr(OH),+ and Cr... pho- tosynthesis (Olson cited by Kaplan 1983). Because our experiments were run in the 725 726 Notes Table 1. Production rates of NH,’ and N03- [nmol (mg coral tissue N)-’ h-l] with and without N-Serve addition (mean i 1 SD). Treatment Control...

  6. Recovery of soil nitrification after long-term zinc exposure and its co-tolerance to Cu in different soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Aiju; Fang, Dianmei; Wang, Chao; Li, Menghong; Young, Robert B

    2015-01-01

    Soils sampled from different locations of China were used to manipulate soil microbial diversity and to assess the effect of the diversity of the soil nitrifying community on the recovery of the soil nitrification to metal stress (zinc). Ten treatments were either or not amended with ZnCl2. Subsequently, a spike-on-spike assay was set up to test for the tolerance of soil nitrification to zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu). Initially, Zn amendment completely inhibited nitrification. After a year of Zn exposure, recovery of the potential nitrification rate in Zn-amended soils ranged from 28 to 126% of the potential nitrification rate in the corresponding Zn-nonamended soils. This recovery was strongly related to the potential nitrification rate before Zn amendment and soil pH. Increased Zn tolerance of the soil nitrification was consistently observed in response to corresponding soil contamination. Co-tolerance to Cu was obtained in all 1,000-mg kg(-1) Zn-amended soils. This tolerance was also strongly related to the potential nitrification rate before Zn amendment and soil pH. Our data indicate that inherently microbial activity can be a significant factor for the recovery of soil functioning derived from metal contamination.

  7. Moisture and temperature controls on nitrification differ among ammonia oxidizer communities from three alpine soil habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Brooke B; Baron, Jill S.; Wallenstein, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    Climate change is altering the timing and magnitude of biogeochemical fluxes in many high elevation ecosystems. The consequent changes in alpine nitrification rates have the potential to influence ecosystem scale responses. In order to better understand how changing temperature and moisture conditions may influence ammonia oxidizers and nitrification activity, we conducted laboratory incubations on soils collected in a Colorado watershed from three alpine habitats (glacial outwash, talus, and meadow). We found that bacteria, not archaea, dominated all ammonia oxidizer communities. Nitrification increased with moisture in all soils and under all temperature treatments. However, temperature was not correlated with nitrification rates in all soils. Site-specific temperature trends suggest the development of generalist ammonia oxidizer communities in soils with greater in situ temperature fluctuations and specialists in soils with more steady temperature regimes. Rapidly increasing temperatures and changing soil moisture conditions could explain recent observations of increased nitrate production in some alpine soils.

  8. Heterogeneous Nitrification in a Full Scale Rapid Sand Filter Treating Groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopato, Laure; Röttgers, Nina; Binning, Philip John

    2013-01-01

    between 1.7 m/h and 5.1 m/h. Ammonium profiles and salt breakthrough curves were obtained in four different locations of the filter six times during two filter runs. The experiments show that the nitrification in the rapid sand filter was heterogeneous. The ammonium profiles exhibited variation in time...... and in space, vertically and laterally within the filter. The nitrification rate constants were calculated using the ammonium profiles and the local pore velocity data obtained from the breakthrough curves. The local pore velocities were estimated to vary from 0.02 to 20.5 m/h. The nitrification rate constants...... varied randomly in time and it was not possible to determine a clear order of the nitrification reaction. The average zero order nitrification rate constant was 7 mg N/l/h and the average first order nitrification rate constant was 28 h−1 with an average 1.5 g/h/m2 ammonium load. The first order...

  9. Archaeal nitrification in the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuchter, Cornelia; Abbas, Ben; Coolen, Marco J. L.; Herfort, Lydie; van Bleijswijk, Judith; Timmers, Peer; Strous, Marc; Teira, Eva; Herndl, Gerhard J.; Middelburg, Jack J.; Schouten, Stefan; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2006-01-01

    Marine Crenarchaeota are the most abundant single group of prokaryotes in the ocean, but their physiology and role in marine biogeochemical cycles are unknown. Recently, a member of this clade was isolated from a sea aquarium and shown to be capable of nitrification, tentatively suggesting that Crenarchaeota may play a role in the oceanic nitrogen cycle. We enriched a crenarchaeote from North Sea water and showed that its abundance, and not that of bacteria, correlates with ammonium oxidation to nitrite. A time series study in the North Sea revealed that the abundance of the gene encoding for the archaeal ammonia monooxygenase alfa subunit (amoA) is correlated with a decline in ammonium concentrations and with the abundance of Crenarchaeota. Remarkably, the archaeal amoA abundance was 1–2 orders of magnitude higher than those of bacterial nitrifiers, which are commonly thought to mediate the oxidation of ammonium to nitrite in marine environments. Analysis of Atlantic waters of the upper 1,000 m, where most of the ammonium regeneration and oxidation takes place, showed that crenarchaeotal amoA copy numbers are also 1–3 orders of magnitude higher than those of bacterial amoA. Our data thus suggest a major role for Archaea in oceanic nitrification. PMID:16894176

  10. On the significance of nitrification within the euphotic zone of the subpolar North Atlantic (Iceland basin) during summer 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Stuart C.

    2011-11-01

    The oxidation of ammonium to nitrite was investigated within surface waters (< 125 m) of the sub-polar North Atlantic (~ 60°N, 20°W) during late summer 2007. Sampling occurred within a mesoscale eddy dipole system and a definite bias towards waters beneath the euphotic zone as the focus for nitrification was evident. The patchy occurrence of significant nitrification rates within the euphotic zone is interpreted as providing minimal indication for widespread nitrification within surface waters of the sub-polar gyre. However, isolated occurrences of significant nitrification rates within the euphotic zone above the cyclonic eddy were sufficient to account for observed in-situ NO 3-concentrations. It is proposed that the deeper mixed layer associated with the cyclonic eddy enhanced the likelihood of nitrification within the euphotic zone through the vertical displacement of sub-euphotic zone bacterial communities.

  11. Operating a pilot-scale nitrification/distillation plant for complete nutrient recovery from urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumasoli, Alexandra; Etter, Bastian; Sterkele, Bettina; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Udert, Kai M

    2016-01-01

    Source-separated urine contains most of the excreted nutrients, which can be recovered by using nitrification to stabilize the urine before concentrating the nutrient solution with distillation. The aim of this study was to test this process combination at pilot scale. The nitrification process was efficient in a moving bed biofilm reactor with maximal rates of 930 mg N L(-1) d(-1). Rates decreased to 120 mg N L(-1) d(-1) after switching to more concentrated urine. At high nitrification rates (640 mg N L(-1) d(-1)) and low total ammonia concentrations (1,790 mg NH4-N L(-1) in influent) distillation caused the main primary energy demand of 71 W cap(-1) (nitrification: 13 W cap(-1)) assuming a nitrogen production of 8.8 g N cap(-1) d(-1). Possible process failures include the accumulation of the nitrification intermediate nitrite and the selection of acid-tolerant ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. Especially during reactor start-up, the process must therefore be carefully supervised. The concentrate produced by the nitrification/distillation process is low in heavy metals, but high in nutrients, suggesting a good suitability as an integral fertilizer.

  12. Ammonia-oxidising bacteria not archaea dominate nitrification activity in semi-arid agricultural soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banning, Natasha C; Maccarone, Linda D; Fisk, Louise M; Murphy, Daniel V

    2015-06-08

    Ammonia-oxidising archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB) are responsible for the rate limiting step in nitrification; a key nitrogen (N) loss pathway in agricultural systems. Dominance of AOA relative to AOB in the amoA gene pool has been reported in many ecosystems, although their relative contributions to nitrification activity are less clear. Here we examined the distribution of AOA and AOB with depth in semi-arid agricultural soils in which soil organic matter content or pH had been altered, and related their distribution to gross nitrification rates. Soil depth had a significant effect on gene abundances, irrespective of management history. Contrary to reports of AOA dominance in soils elsewhere, AOA gene copy numbers were four-fold lower than AOB in the surface (0-10 cm). AOA gene abundance increased with depth while AOB decreased, and sub-soil abundances were approximately equal (10-90 cm). The depth profile of total archaea did not mirror that of AOA, indicating the likely presence of archaea without nitrification capacity in the surface. Gross nitrification rates declined significantly with depth and were positively correlated to AOB but negatively correlated to AOA gene abundances. We conclude that AOB are most likely responsible for regulating nitrification in these semi-arid soils.

  13. Importance of copper for nitrification in biological rapid sand filters for drinking water production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Florian Benedikt

    , the reaction rate is sometimes not high enough. This results in incomplete nitrification, with residual ammonium and nitrite concentrations in the finished water, which are problematic for the biological stability of the drinking water. In Denmark, 11 % of the larger water works (>350,000 m3/year) fail......When anoxic groundwater is treated to produce drinking water, ammonium is commonly removed through nitrification in rapid sand filters. Nitrification is a biological process, and is mediated by chemoautotrophic microorganisms. Ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA) oxidize ammonium...... were the main active ammonium oxidizers during the dosing. This PhD project revealed that copper is of vital importance for efficient nitrification in biological rapid sand filters for drinking water production. The results of this study have important practical implications for biofilters currently...

  14. Net Reaction Rate and Neutrino Cooling Rate for the Urca Process in Departure from Chemical Equilibrium in the Crust of Fast-accreting Neutron Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Hua; Huang, Xi; Zheng, Xiao-Ping

    We discuss the effect of compression on Urca shells in the ocean and crust of accreting neutron stars, especially in superbursting sources. We find that Urca shells may be deviated from chemical equilibrium in neutron stars which accrete at several tenths of the local Eddington accretion rate. The deviation depends on the energy threshold of the parent and daughter nuclei, the transition strength, the temperature, and the local accretion rate. In a typical crust model of accreting neutron stars, the chemical departures range from a few tenths of kBT to tens of kBT for various Urca pairs. If the Urca shell can exist in crusts of accreting neutron stars, compression may enhance the net neutrino cooling rate by a factor of about 1-2 relative to the neutrino emissivity in chemical equilibrium. For some cases, such as Urca pairs with small energy thresholds and/or weak transition strength, the large chemical departure may result in net heating rather than cooling, although the released heat can be small. Strong Urca pairs in the deep crust are hard to be deviated even in neutron stars accreting at the local Eddington accretion rate.

  15. Dicyandiamide as nitrification inhibitor of pig slurry ammonium nitrogen in soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Gonzatto

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Inhibition of nitrification of ammoniacal nitrogen pig slurry after its application to the soil can mitigate nitrogen (N losses by nitrate (NO3 - denitrification and leaching, with economical and environmental benefits. However, the use of this strategy is incipient in Brazil and, therefore, requires further assessment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of dicyandiamide (DCD nitrification inhibitor in slowing the nitrification of ammoniacal N applied to the soil with pig slurry (PS. For this, incubation was performed in laboratory, where nitrification was assessed by NO3 - accumulation in the soil. Rates of 2.8, 5.7 and 11.3kg DCD ha-1 were compared, being applied to the soil during PS addition. Nitrification was inhibited by DCD, and inhibition magnitude and duration depended on DCD applied rate. At a dose of 11.3kg ha-1 DCD, nitrification was completely inhibited in the first 12 days. During the first month after PS application, each 2.8kg of DCD increase applied per hectare promoted NO3 --N reduction in the soil of 13.3kg ha-1, allowing longer ammoniacal N maintenance in the soil.

  16. Net accumulation rates derived from ice core stable isotope records of Pío XI glacier, Southern Patagonia Icefield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schwikowski

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Pío XI, the largest glacier of the Southern Patagonia Icefield, reached its neoglacial maximum extent in 1994 and is one of the few glaciers in that area which is not retreating. In view of the recent warming it is important to understand glacier responses to climate changes. Due to its remoteness and the harsh conditions in Patagonia, no systematic mass balance studies have been performed. In this study we derived net accumulation rates for the period 2000–2006 from a 50 m (33.2 4 m weq ice core collected in the accumulation area of Pío XI (2600 m a.s.l., 49°16'40"S, 73°21'14"W. Borehole temperatures indicate near temperate ice, but the average melt percent is only 16 ± 14%. Records of stable isotopes are well preserved and were used for identification of annual layers. Net accumulation rates range from 3.4–7.1 water equivalent (m weq with an average of 5.8 m weq, comparable to precipitation amounts at the Chilean coast, but not as high as expected for the Icefield. Ice core stable isotope data correlate well with upper air temperatures and may be used as temperature proxy.

  17. Effect of stroke rate on the distribution of net mechanical power in rowing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofmijster, M.J.; Landman, E.H.; Smith, R.M.; van Soest, A.J.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of manipulating stroke rate on the distribution of mechanical power in rowing. Two causes of inefficient mechanical energy expenditure were identified in rowing. The ratio between power not lost at the blades and generated mechanical power (P̄

  18. Significance of archaeal nitrification in hypoxic waters of the Baltic Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Carlo; Vandieken, Verona; Thamdrup, Bo; Jürgens, Klaus

    2015-06-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) of the phylum Thaumarchaeota are widespread, and their abundance in many terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems suggests a prominent role in nitrification. AOA also occur in high numbers in oxygen-deficient marine environments, such as the pelagic redox gradients of the central Baltic Sea; however, data on archaeal nitrification rates are scarce and little is known about the factors, for example sulfide, that regulate nitrification in this system. In the present work, we assessed the contribution of AOA to ammonia oxidation rates in Baltic deep basins and elucidated the impact of sulfide on this process. Rate measurements with (15)N-labeled ammonium, CO(2) dark fixation measurements and quantification of AOA by catalyzed reporter deposition-fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed that among the three investigated sites the highest potential nitrification rates (122-884 nmol l(-1)per day) were measured within gradients of decreasing oxygen, where thaumarchaeotal abundance was maximal (2.5-6.9 × 10(5) cells per ml) and CO(2) fixation elevated. In the presence of the archaeal-specific inhibitor GC(7), nitrification was reduced by 86-100%, confirming the assumed dominance of AOA in this process. In samples spiked with sulfide at concentrations similar to those of in situ conditions, nitrification activity was inhibited but persisted at reduced rates. This result together with the substantial nitrification potential detected in sulfidic waters suggests the tolerance of AOA to periodic mixing of anoxic and sulfidic waters. It begs the question of whether the globally distributed Thaumarchaeota respond similarly in other stratified water columns or whether the observed robustness against sulfide is a specific feature of the thaumarchaeotal subcluster present in the Baltic Deeps.

  19. Some plant extracts retarde nitrification in soil

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    AL-ANSARI, Abdul –Mehdi S; ABDULKAREEM, Mohammed A

    An incubation experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of aqueous extracts of 17 plant materials on nitrification inhibition of urea- N in soil as compared with chemical inhibitor Dicyandiamide (DCD...

  20. Differential contributions of archaeal ammonia oxidizer ecotypes to nitrification in coastal surface waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jason M; Casciotti, Karen L; Chavez, Francisco P; Francis, Christopher A

    2014-08-01

    The occurrence of nitrification in the oceanic water column has implications extending from local effects on the structure and activity of phytoplankton communities to broader impacts on the speciation of nitrogenous nutrients and production of nitrous oxide. The ammonia-oxidizing archaea, responsible for carrying out the majority of nitrification in the sea, are present in the marine water column as two taxonomically distinct groups. Water column group A (WCA) organisms are detected at all depths, whereas Water column group B (WCB) are present primarily below the photic zone. An open question in marine biogeochemistry is whether the taxonomic definition of WCA and WCB organisms and their observed distributions correspond to distinct ecological and biogeochemical niches. We used the natural gradients in physicochemical and biological properties that upwelling establishes in surface waters to study their roles in nitrification, and how their activity--ascertained from quantification of ecotype-specific ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) genes and transcripts--varies in response to environmental fluctuations. Our results indicate a role for both ecotypes in nitrification in Monterey Bay surface waters. However, their respective contributions vary, due to their different sensitivities to surface water conditions. WCA organisms exhibited a remarkably consistent level of activity and their contribution to nitrification appears to be related to community size. WCB activity was less consistent and primarily constrained to colder, high nutrient and low chlorophyll waters. Overall, the results of our characterization yielded a strong, potentially predictive, relationship between archaeal amoA gene abundance and the rate of nitrification.

  1. Fundamentals and control of nitrification in chloraminated drinking water distribution systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    American Water Works Association

    2006-01-01

    ... Introduction, 25 Nitrification in Drinking Water Distribution System, 25 Nitrification in Pipelines and Effects of Biofilms, 31 Nitrification in Water Storage Facilities, 34 Conclusions, 39 Refere...

  2. Net Ecosystem Carbon Flux

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Net Ecosystem Carbon Flux is defined as the year-over-year change in Total Ecosystem Carbon Stock, or the net rate of carbon exchange between an ecosystem and the...

  3. Soil pH management by calcareous and siliceous minerals: effect on N2O yield in nitrification and denitrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeem, Shahid; Bakken, Lars; Dörsch, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Amelioration of soil pH by liming is necessary and common practice in vast areas of crop production. It is well known that pH is one of the most pervasive factors controlling rates and product stoichiometries in microbially mediated N transformations, including N2O emissions. While liming of acid soils appears to increase N2O reductase activity in denitrification (resulting in less N2O relative to N2), sudden pH raise may boost nitrification and hence N2O emission from ammonia oxidation. Thus, the net effect of liming on N2O emissions is not straightforward, which probably explains why soil pH management has not been embraced as a strategy for mitigating N2O emissions so far. Here we report laboratory incubations in which we determined potential rates and N2O yields in soils from an ongoing field experiment, comparing traditional calcareous limes (calcite, dolomite) with mafic minerals (olivine, different types of plagioclase). The experiment is in its second year, and shows strong pH increase (0.7-1.5, units) in plots with calcareous limes, a weak pH increase (~ 0.2 unit) in the olivine treatment and no measurable pH increase with the plagioclases. Potential nitrification rates correlated positively with effective soil pH as did the N2O yield, measured as N2O accumulation rate over NO2- + NO3- accumulation rate. The N2O yield increased in the order, control robot (using fast box technique) in the same liming experiment.

  4. Empirical evidence reveals seasonally dependent reduction in nitrification in coastal sediments subjected to near future ocean acidification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braeckman, U.; Van Colen, C.; Guilini, K.; Van Gansbeke, D.; Soetaert, K.; Vincx, M.; Vanaverbeke, J.

    2014-01-01

    Research so far has provided little evidence that benthic biogeochemical cycling is affected by ocean acidification under realistic climate change scenarios. We measured nutrient exchange and sediment community oxygen consumption (SCOC) rates to estimate nitrification in natural coastal permeable

  5. Increased Ratio of Electron Transport to Net Assimilation Rate Supports Elevated Isoprenoid Emission Rate in Eucalypts under Drought1[W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dani, Kaidala Ganesha Srikanta; Jamie, Ian McLeod; Prentice, Iain Colin; Atwell, Brian James

    2014-01-01

    Plants undergoing heat and low-CO2 stresses emit large amounts of volatile isoprenoids compared with those in stress-free conditions. One hypothesis posits that the balance between reducing power availability and its use in carbon assimilation determines constitutive isoprenoid emission rates in plants and potentially even their maximum emission capacity under brief periods of stress. To test this, we used abiotic stresses to manipulate the availability of reducing power. Specifically, we examined the effects of mild to severe drought on photosynthetic electron transport rate (ETR) and net carbon assimilation rate (NAR) and the relationship between estimated energy pools and constitutive volatile isoprenoid emission rates in two species of eucalypts: Eucalyptus occidentalis (drought tolerant) and Eucalyptus camaldulensis (drought sensitive). Isoprenoid emission rates were insensitive to mild drought, and the rates increased when the decline in NAR reached a certain species-specific threshold. ETR was sustained under drought and the ETR-NAR ratio increased, driving constitutive isoprenoid emission until severe drought caused carbon limitation of the methylerythritol phosphate pathway. The estimated residual reducing power unused for carbon assimilation, based on the energetic status model, significantly correlated with constitutive isoprenoid emission rates across gradients of drought (r2 > 0.8) and photorespiratory stress (r2 > 0.9). Carbon availability could critically limit emission rates under severe drought and photorespiratory stresses. Under most instances of moderate abiotic stress levels, increased isoprenoid emission rates compete with photorespiration for the residual reducing power not invested in carbon assimilation. A similar mechanism also explains the individual positive effects of low-CO2, heat, and drought stresses on isoprenoid emission. PMID:25139160

  6. N mineralization, nitrification, and N uptake across a 100-year chronosequence upland hardwood forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis W. Idol; Phillip E. Pope; Felix, Jr. Ponder

    2003-01-01

    Net N mineralization, nitrification, and N uptake were monitored in the A (0-8 cm) and B (8-30 cm) soil horizons from 1997 to 1999 across a chronosequence of upland hardwood forest stands in southern Indiana, USA. Stand ages were 1, 6, 12, 31, and 80-100 years at the beginning of the study. Contrary to previous studies, there was no apparent stimulation of N...

  7. Nonnative Pacific salmon alter hot spots of sediment nitrification in Great Lakes tributaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Peter S.; Tank, Jennifer L.

    2013-06-01

    Biogeochemical transformations may represent an important pathway influencing the fate of nutrient subsidies in stream ecosystems. Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) provide an ammonium (NH4+) subsidy to streams during their annual spawning runs, which may be transformed to nitrate (NO3-) via sediment nitrification. Increases in either forms of dissolved inorganic nitrogen may have ecosystem effects both at the reach and watershed scales, including the fertilization of algal biofilms and elevated export of nutrients to downstream ecosystems. In the nonnative range of salmon, where spawning runs are a relatively new phenomenon, few studies have explored the effect of introduced salmon on ecosystem processes. To assess the effect of nonnative salmon on dissolved inorganic nitrogen dynamics in Great Lakes tributaries, we quantified sediment nitrification in five streams before, during, and after the spawning run in 2009. Overall, sediment nitrification rates were higher in the channel thalweg (mean ± SE = 1.9 ± 0.1 mg N/gAFDM/d) compared to channel margins (mean ± SE = 0.9 ± 0.1 mg N/gAFDM/d). In the two streams with the largest salmon runs, nitrification was highest in the channel thalweg prior to salmon, but margin sediments had higher nitrification during the run. Among all streams, variation in nitrification rates was habitat specific, predicted by exchangeable NH4+ in sediments from the thalweg and predicted by salmon biomass for sediments in the channel margin. Nonnative salmon provide a pulsed source of inorganic nitrogen to Great Lakes tributaries, yet dissimilatory biogeochemical transformations such as nitrification may alter the form of the NH4+ subsidy and potentially influence downstream lakes via export of both NH4+ and NO3-.

  8. Uncertainties in the Value of Bill Savings from Behind-the-Meter, Residential Photovoltaic Systems: The Roles of Electricity Market Conditions, Retail Rate Design, and Net Metering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darghouth, Naim Richard

    Net metering has become a widespread policy mechanism in the U.S. for supporting customer adoption of distributed photovoltaics (PV), allowing customers with PV systems to reduce their electric bills by offsetting their consumption with PV generation, independent of the timing of the generation relative to consumption. Although net metering is one of the principal drivers for the residential PV market in the U.S., the academic literature on this policy has been sparse and this dissertation contributes to this emerging body of literature. This dissertation explores the linkages between the availability of net metering, wholesale electricity market conditions, retail rates, and the residential bill savings from behind-the-meter PV systems. First, I examine the value of the bill savings that customers receive under net metering and alternatives to net metering, and the associated role of retail rate design, based on current rates and a sample of approximately two hundred residential customers of California's two largest electric utilities. I find that the bill savings per kWh of PV electricity generated varies greatly, largely attributable to the increasing block structure of the California utilities' residential retail rates. I also find that net metering provides significantly greater bill savings than alternative compensation mechanisms based on avoided costs. However, retail electricity rates may shift as wholesale electricity market conditions change. I then investigate a potential change in market conditions -- increased solar PV penetrations -- on wholesale prices in the short-term based on the merit-order effect. This demonstrates the potential price effects of changes in market conditions, but also points to a number of methodological shortcomings of this method, motivating my usage of a long-term capacity investment and economic dispatch model to examine wholesale price effects of various wholesale market scenarios in the subsequent analysis. By developing

  9. [Heterotrophic Nitrification and Aerobic Denitrification of the Hypothermia Aerobic Denitrification Bacterium: Arthrobacter arilaitensis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Teng-xia; Ni, Jiu-pai; Li, Zhen-lun; Sun, Quan; Ye Qing; Xu, Yi

    2016-03-15

    High concentrations of ammonium, nitrate and nitrite nitrogen were employed to clarify the abilities of heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification of Arthrobacter arilaitensis strain Y-10. Meanwhile, by means of inoculating the strain suspension into the mixed ammonium and nitrate, ammonium and nitrite nitrogen simulated wastewater, we studied the simultaneous nitrification and denitrification ability of Arthrobacter arilaitensis strain Y-10. In addition, cell optical density was assayed in each nitrogen removal process to analyze the relationship of cell growth and nitrogen removal efficiency. The results showed that the hypothermia denitrification strain Arthrobacter arilaitensis Y-10 exhibited high nitrogen removal efficiency during heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification. The ammonium, nitrate and nitrite removal rates were 65.0%, 100% and 61.2% respectively when strain Y-10 was cultivated for 4 d at 15°C with initial ammonium, nitrate and nitrite nitrogen concentrations of 208.43 mg · L⁻¹, 201.16 mg · L⁻¹ and 194.33 mg · L⁻¹ and initial pH of 7.2. Nitrite nitrogen could only be accumulated in the medium containing nitrate nitrogen during heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification process. Additionally, the ammonium nitrogen was mainly removed in the inorganic nitrogen mixed synthetic wastewater. In short, Arthrobacter arilaitensis Y-10 could conduct nitrification and denitrification effectively under aerobic condition and the ammonium nitrogen removal rate was more than 80.0% in the inorganic nitrogen mixed synthetic wastewater.

  10. Efficient nitrogen removal via simultaneous nitrification and denitrification in a penicillin wastewater biological treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Weiwei; Jin, Xibiao; Yu, Yonglian; Zhou, Sichen; Lu, Shuguang

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen-removal performance was investigated in a penicillin wastewater biological treatment plant (P-WWTP) reconstructed from a cyclic activated sludge system (CASS) tank designed for simultaneous nitrification and denitrification (SND). Good performance was obtained during a 900-day operation period, as indicated by effluent chemical oxygen demand (COD), total nitrogen (TN) and ammonia nitrogen (NH₃‒N) values of 318 ± 34, 28.7 ± 2.4 andNitrification and denitrification occurred at different spaces, that is, 71.4% of TN removal occurred in the first 40% of the aeration tank, while 68.8% of the TKN removal occurred in 40-100% of the aeration tank. Sufficient easily biodegradable organics (EBO) in wastewater were key to the occurrence of SND. The denitrification rate under aeration conditions was 10.7 mg N g VSS⁻¹ h⁻¹ when EBO were sufficient, but 0.98 mg N g VSS⁻¹ h⁻¹ when EBO were completely degraded. Nitrification primarily occurred in the rear of the aeration tank owing to the competition for oxygen between carbonaceous oxidation and nitrification. The nitrification rate was only 7.13 mg NOD g VSS⁻¹ h⁻¹ at the beginning of the reaction, but 14.7 mg NOD g VSS⁻¹ h⁻¹ when EBO were completely degraded. These results will facilitate the improvement of nitrogen removal by existing WWTPs.

  11. Effects of temperature and particles on nitrification in a eutrophic coastal bay in southern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhen-Zhen; Wan, Xianhui; Xu, Min Nina; Hsiao, Silver Sung-Yun; Zhang, Yao; Zheng, Li-Wei; Wu, Yanhua; Zou, Wenbin; Kao, Shuh-Ji

    2017-09-01

    Despite being the only link between reduced and oxidized nitrogen, the impact of environmental factors on nitrification, temperature and particles, in particular, remains unclear for coastal zones. By using the 15NH4+-labeling technique, we determined nitrification rates in bulk (NTRB) and free-living (NTRF, after removing particles >3 μm) for water samples with varying particle concentrations (as sampled at different tidal stages) during autumn, winter, and summer in a eutrophic coastal bay in southern China. The highest NTRB occurred in autumn, when particle concentrations were highest. In general, particle-associated nitrification rates (NTRP, >3 μm) were higher than NTRF and increased with particle abundance. Regardless of seasonally distinctive temperature and particle concentrations, nitrification exhibited consistent temperature dependence in all cases (including bulk, particle-associated, and free-living) with a Q10 value of 2.2. Meanwhile, the optimum temperature for NTRP was 29°C, 5°C higher than that for NTRF although the causes for such a difference remained unclear. Strong temperature dependence and particle association suggest that nitrification is sensitive to temperature change (seasonality and global warming) and to ocean dynamics (wave and tide). Our results can potentially be applied to biogeochemical models of the nitrogen cycle for future predictions.

  12. Evidence for biological nitrification inhibition in Brachiaria pastures

    OpenAIRE

    Subbarao, G.V.; Nakahara, K; Hurtado, M.P.; Ono, H.; Moreta, D. E.; Salcedo, A. F.; Yoshihashi, A. T.; Ishikawa, T.; Ishitani, M.; Ohnishi-Kameyama, M.; Yoshida, M; Rondon, M; Rao, I. M.; Lascano, C. E.; Berry, W. L.

    2009-01-01

    Nitrification, a key process in the global nitrogen cycle that generates nitrate through microbial activity, may enhance losses of fertilizer nitrogen by leaching and denitrification. Certain plants can suppress soil-nitrification by releasing inhibitors from roots, a phenomenon termed biological nitrification inhibition (BNI). Here, we report the discovery of an effective nitrification inhibitor in the root-exudates of the tropical forage grass Brachiaria humidicola (Rendle) Schweick. Named ...

  13. Autotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria contribute minimally to nitrification in a nitrogen-impacted forested ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiona L. Jordan; J. Jason L. Cantera; Mark E. Fenn; Lisa Y. Stein

    2005-01-01

    Deposition rates of atmospheric nitrogenous pollutants to forests in the San Bernardino Mountains range east of Los Angeles, California, are the highest reported in North America. Acidic soils from the west end of the range are N-saturated and have elevated rates of N-mineralization, nitrification, and nitrate leaching. We assessed the impact of this heavy nitrogen...

  14. In Situ Nitrogen Mineralization, Nitrification, and Ammonia Volatilization in Maize Field Fertilized with Urea in Huanghuaihai Region of Northern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuelin; Wang, Qun; Xu, Jun; Gilliam, Frank S.; Tremblay, Nicolas; Li, Chaohai

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) fertilization potentially affects soil N mineralization and leaching, and can enhance NH3 volatilization, thus impacting crop production. A fertilizer experiment with five levels of N addition (0, 79, 147, 215 and 375 kg N ha-1) was performed in 2009 and 2010 in a maize field in Huanghuaihai region, China, where > 300 kg N ha-1 has been routinely applied to soil during maize growth period of 120 days. Responses of net N mineralization, inorganic N flux (0–10cm), NH3 volatilization, and maize yield to N fertilization were measured. During the growth period, net N mineralization and nitrification varied seasonally, with higher rates occurring in August and coinciding with the R1 stage of maize growth. Soil NO3−-N contributed to more than 60% of inorganic N flux during maize growth. Cumulative NH3 volatilization increased with N additions, with total NH3 volatilization during maize growth accounting for about 4% of added N. Relative to the control, mean maize yield in the fertilizer treatments increased by 17% and 20% in 2009 and 2010, respectively. However, grain yield, aboveground biomass, and plant N accumulation did not increase with added N at levels > 215 kg N ha-1. These results suggest that the current N rate of 300 kg N ha-1 is not only excessive, but also reduces fertilizer efficacy and may contribute to environmental problems such as global warming and eutrophication of ground water and streams. PMID:25635864

  15. Mechanisms of inorganic nitrous oxide production in soils during nitrification and their dependence on soil properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heil, Jannis; Liu, Shurong; Vereecken, Harry; Brüggemann, Nicolas

    2014-05-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important anthropogenic greenhouse gas and today's single most ozone depleting substance. Soils have been identified as the major source of N2O. Microbial nitrification and denitrification are considered the major N2O emission sources. However, N2O production in soils, especially during nitrification, is far from being completely understood. Several abiotic reactions involving the nitrification intermediate hydroxylamine (NH2OH) have been identified leading to N2O emissions, but are being neglected in most current studies. However, it is known that NH2OH can be oxidized by several soil constituents to form N2O. For better mitigation strategies it is mandatory to understand the underlying processes of N2O production during nitrification and their controlling factors. We studied N2O emissions from different soils in laboratory incubation experiments. Soils covered a wide range of land use types from arable to grassland and forest. Soil incubations were conducted with and without the addition of NH2OH at conditions favorable for nitrification with non-sterile as well as with sterile samples. N2O and, additionally, CO2 evolution were analyzed using gas chromatography. To get insight into the dynamics of N2O formation, N2O production from NH2OH was quantified online using quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy. Furthermore, isotope ratio mass spectrometry was used to analyze the isotopic signature of the produced N2O (i.e. δ15N, δ18O, and 15N site preference). We observed large differences in N2O emissions between different soils upon the addition of NH2OH. While a forest soil sample with pH caused by NH2OH addition. Although it was shown in the past that NH2OH can react with Fe(III) to form N2O, we could not find any correlation between Fe concentration in soils and N2O emission rates. Our results suggest a coupled biotic-abiotic production of N2O during nitrification. We hypothesize that N2O production is the result of a leakage of

  16. Research of the relationship between delayed fluorescence and net photosynthesis rate in spinach under NaCl stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lingrui; Xing, Da

    2006-09-01

    Under NaCl stress conditions, the relationship between delayed fluorescence (DF) and net photosynthesis rate (Pn) in detached leaves of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) was surveyed. Results showed that the changes in DF intensity of the spinach leaves directly exposed to different NaCl concentrations demonstrated considerably high consistency with that in Pn. Incubation of the leaves in 200mmol/L NaCl induced a gradual increase and subsequent decline of the DF intensity and Pu, whereas incubation of the leaves in 300mmol/L NaCl induced a continuous decline of the DF intensity and Pn, suggesting that DF bad the same response to duration of treatment of different NaC1 concentrations with Pn. Both DF and Pn showed maximal Ca 2+ antagonism effects on stress of high concentration NaC1 when the concentration of CaC1 II reached l5mmolfL. All the results demonstrated that DF has an excellent correlation with Pn and can be used as a sensitive test for the state of photosynthetic apparatus under salt stress physiology.

  17. Modeled dosage-response relationship on the net photosynthetic rate for the sensitivity to acid rain of 21 plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Shihuai; Gou, Shuzhen; Sun, Baiye; Lv, Wenlin; Li, Yuanwei; Peng, Hong; Xiao, Hong; Yang, Gang; Wang, Yingjun

    2012-08-01

    This study investigated the sensitivity of plant species to acid rain based on the modeled dosage-response relationship on the net photosynthetic rate (P (N)) of 21 types of plant species, subjected to the exposure of simulated acid rain (SAR) for 5 times during a period of 50 days. Variable responses of P (N) to SAR occurred depending on the type of plant. A majority (13 species) of the dosage-response relationship could be described by an S-shaped curve and be fitted with the Boltzmann model. Model fitting allowed quantitative evaluation of the dosage-response relationship and an accurate estimation of the EC(10), termed as the pH of the acid rain resulting in a P (N) 10 % lower than the reference value. The top 9 species (Camellia sasanqua, Cinnamomum camphora, etc. EC(10) ≤ 3.0) are highly endurable to very acid rain. The rare, relict plant Metasequoia glyptostroboides was the most sensitive species (EC(10) = 5.1) recommended for protection.

  18. Mosquito abundance, bed net coverage and other factors associated with variations in sporozoite infectivity rates in four villages of rural Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kweka, Eliningaya J; Nkya, Watoky M M; Mahande, Aneth M

    2008-01-01

    . Sporozoite infectivity rates, mosquito host blood meal source, bed net coverage and mosquito abundance were assessed in this study. METHODOLOGY: A longitudinal survey was conducted in four villages in two regions of Tanzania. Malaria vectors were sampled using the CDC light trap and pyrethrum spray catch......,628 (81.8%) Anopheles arabiensis, 1,100 (15.9%) Culex quinquefasciatus, 89 (1.4%) Anopheles funestus, and 66 (0.9%) Anopheles gambiae s.s. Of the total mosquitoes collected 3,861 were captured by CDC light trap and 3,022 by the pyrethrum spray catch method. The overall light trap: spray catch ratio was 1.......3:1. Mosquito densities per room were 96.5 and 75.5 for light trap and pyrethrum spray catch respectively. Mosquito infectivity rates between villages that have high proportion of bed net owners and those without bed nets was significant (P

  19. Development of a Biochar-Plant-Extract-Based Nitrification Inhibitor and Its Application in Field Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhónatan Reyes-Escobar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The global use of nitrogen (N fertilizer has increased 10-fold in the last fifty years, resulting in increased N losses via nitrate leaching to groundwater bodies or from gaseous emissions to the atmosphere. One of the biggest problems farmers face in agricultural production systems is the loss of N. In this context, novel biological nitrification inhibitors (BNI using biochar (BC as a renewable matrix to increase N use efficiency, by reducing nitrification rates, have been evaluated. The chemical and morphological characteristics of BC were analyzed and BC-BNI complexes were formulated using plant extracts from pine (Pinus radiata, eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globulus and peumo (Cryptocarya alba. In field experiments, fertilizer and treatments, based on crude plant extracts and BC-BNI complexes, were applied and the effect on nitrification was periodically monitored, and at the laboratory level, a phytotoxicity assay was performed. The biochar-peumo (BCPe complex showed the highest nitrification inhibition (66% on day 60 after application compared with the crude plant extract, suggesting that BCPe complex protects the BNI against biotic or abiotic factors, and therefore BC-BNI complexes could increase the persistence of biological nitrification inhibitors. None of the biochar complexes had toxic effect on radish plants.

  20. Alteration of Oceanic Nitrification Under Elevated Carbon Dioxide Concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beman, J.; Chow, C. E.; Popp, B. N.; Fuhrman, J. A.; Feng, Y.; Hutchins, D. A.

    2008-12-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations are increasing exponentially and expected to double by the year 2100. Dissolution of excess CO2 in the upper ocean reduces pH, alters carbonate chemistry, and also represents a potential resource for autotrophic organisms that convert inorganic carbon into biomass--including a broad spectrum of marine microbes. These bacteria and archaea drive global biogeochemical cycles of carbon and nitrogen and constitute the vast majority of biomass in the sea, yet their responses to reduced pH and increased pCO2 remain largely undocumented. Here we show that elevated pCO2 may sharply reduce nitrification rates and populations of nitrifying microorganisms in the ocean. Multiple experiments were performed in the Sargasso Sea and the Southern California Bight under glacial maximum (193 ppm), present day (390 ppm), and projected (750 ppm) pCO2 concentrations, over time scales from hours to multiple days, and at depths of 45 m to 240 m. Measurement of nitrification rates using isotopically-labeled nitrogen showed 2-5 fold reduction under elevated pCO2--as well as an increase under glacial maximum pCO2. Marine Crenarchaeota are likely involved in nitrification as ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and are among the most abundant microbial groups in the ocean, yet this group decreased by 40-80% under increased pCO2, based on quantification of both 16S rRNA and ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) gene copies. Crenarchaeota also steadily declined over the course of multiple days under elevated pCO2, whereas ammonia-oxidizing (AOB) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) were more variable in their responses or were not detected. These findings suggest that projected increases in pCO2 and subsequent decreases in pH may strongly influence marine biogeochemistry and microbial community structure in the sea.

  1. Experimental formulation of a kinetic model describing the nitrification process in biological aerated filters filled with plastic elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siciliano, Alessio; De Rosa, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    The present work reports the results of a series of experimental tests performed on cylindrically shaped biological aerated filters (BAFs) to define a new model for reactors design. The nitrification performance was analysed by monitoring a laboratory pilot plant over a six-month period; the dependence of the nitrification rate from the biomass surface density, from ammonia nitrogen concentration and dissolved oxygen concentration was determined using kinetic batch tests. The controls performed on the pilot plant exhibited a nitrification efficiency of approximately 98% at loadings up to [Formula: see text]. Over this value, the pilot plant performance decreased without a correlation with the applied loads. In response to the inlet ammonia loading increase, the bacterial surface density showed a logistic growing trend. The results of kinetic tests proved that the nitrification rate was not affected by the ammonia nitrogen concentration; instead, a first-order kinetic with respect to the dissolved oxygen concentration was detected. Moreover, it was observed that a minimum oxygen concentration, which was proportional to the bacterial surface density, was necessary to initiate the nitrification process. The reaction rate related to bacterial surface density exhibited an increasing trend that was followed by a subsequent decreasing behaviour. The results of kinetic tests and the identification of the relationship between bacterial surface density and ammonia loading permitted the formulation of a mathematical model to predict BAFs' nitrification efficiency.

  2. Measuring the impact of motivation on achievement and course completion rates in MarineNet distance education

    OpenAIRE

    Lindshield, Timothy D.

    2016-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited The Marine Corps Distance Learning Network (MarineNet) is the primary source for distance education (DE) and online training for the Marine Corps. This research applies the learning theory of human motivation to archival MarineNet data to determine if motivation factors impact academic performance and course completion. The literature on motivation divides this variable into multiple types of intrinsic and extrinsic motivations. Each t...

  3. Complete nitrification by a single microorganism

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kessel, Maartje A.H.J.; Speth, Daan R.; Albertsen, Mads; Nielsen, Per H.; Op den Camp, Huub J.M.; Kartal, Boran; Jetten, Mike S.M.; Lücker, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Summary Nitrification is a two-step process where ammonia is considered to first be oxidized to nitrite by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and/or archaea (AOA), and subsequently to nitrate by nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB). Described by Winogradsky already in 18901, this division of labour between the two functional groups is a generally accepted characteristic of the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle2. Complete oxidation of ammonia to nitrate in one organism (complete ammonia oxidation; comammox) is energetically feasible and it was postulated that this process could occur under conditions selecting for species with lower growth-rates but higher growth-yields than canonical ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms3. Still, organisms catalysing this process have not yet been discovered. Here, we report the enrichment and initial characterization of two Nitrospira species that encode all enzymes necessary for ammonia oxidation via nitrite to nitrate in their genomes, and indeed completely oxidize ammonium to nitrate to conserve energy. Their ammonia monooxygenase (AMO) enzymes are phylogenetically distinct from currently identified AMOs, rendering recent acquisition by horizontal gene transfer from known ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms unlikely. We also found highly similar amoA sequences (encoding the AMO subunit A) in public sequence databases, which were apparently misclassified as methane monooxygenases. This recognition of a novel amoA sequence group will lead to an improved understanding on the environmental abundance and distribution of ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms. Furthermore, the discovery of the long-sought-after comammox process will change our perception of the nitrogen cycle. PMID:26610025

  4. Importance of copper for nitrification in biological rapid sand filters for drinking water production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Florian Benedikt

    nitrification. Investigations were carried out in situ at full-scale drinking water treatment plants (DWTPs) in Denmark, thereby underlining the problem-solving approach, which focuses on process optimization of real systems. Initial investigations were carried out at Nærum DWTP. The plant has had a long...... of only 19 days. This confirmed a generic, broad applicability of copper dosing to remediate nitrification problems in copper deficient biofilters. After ammonium removal was complete, ammonium loading rates (ALRs) twice as high as the normal ALR were imposed on a filter at one plant. Nevertheless...... to remove ammonium to below the national drinking water quality standard of 0.05 mg NH4+/L. A better process understanding of nitrifying biofilters is needed to optimize treatment performance, remediate existing filters, and to prevent future nitrification problems. The frequent incidents of insufficient...

  5. Knowledge extraction from a nitrification denitrification wastewater treatment plant using SOM-NG algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machón-González, Iván; Rodríguez-Iglesias, Jesús; López-García, Hilario; Castrillón-Peláez, Leonor; Marañón-Maison, Elena

    2017-06-01

    SOM-NG is a hybrid algorithm that is able to carry out visualization of process data, nonlinear function approximation, classification and clustering. The supervised version of SOM-NG produces a new type of 2D lattices called gradient planes which are useful to determine the dynamics of a target variable according to the remaining training variables. In this way, it is an interesting tool for data mining in order to extract knowledge from databases for nonlinear systems. The main objective of this work is to analyze data from an industrial wastewater treatment plant using SOM-NG algorithm in order to investigate relationships between the process variables. The data used proceeds from a biological wastewater treatment plant. This plant is based on an activated sludge treatment including nitrification and denitrification processes. A direct relation between the nitrification efficiency and the operating temperature was found, and also between the ammonia loading rate and the nitrification denitrification efficiency.

  6. Neem seed oil: a potent nitrification inhibitor to control nitrate leaching after incorporation of crop residues

    OpenAIRE

    Opoku, A; Chaves, B; De Neve, Stefaan

    2014-01-01

    The effect of neem seed oil and neem leaf extract as organic nitrification inhibitors (NIs) on the accumulation of NH4+ and NO3-, and nitrification inhibition after incorporation of crop residue was investigated in an incubation experiment. Dicyandiamide (DCD) applications of 15 and 30 kg active ingredient ha(-1) were used as low and high doses of a synthetic NI. Soil samples were amended with 21 g kg(-1) cauliflower leaves and treated with NIs at a rate of 30 kg ha(-1) of neem seed oil, 60 k...

  7. Significance of archaeal nitrification in hypoxic waters of the Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, C.; Vandieken, V.; Thamdrup, B.; Jürgens, K.

    2012-04-01

    Marine oxygen deficient areas are sites of important microbially mediated transformations within the nitrogen cycle. In the Baltic Sea, suboxic waters (oxygen below 5 μmol L-1) are considered to be a major nitrification zone within the water column. Recent evidence indicates that Archaea and not Bacteria are here the major ammonium oxidizers. In a Baltic Sea pelagic redoxcline, the crenarchaeotal subcluster GD2 which is related to the first cultivated ammonia-oxidizing crenarchaeote Candidatus Nitrosopumilus maritimus occurs in high abundance. However, little is known about its function and importance for the nitrogen and carbon cycles in oxygen minimum zones of the Baltic Sea. To approach this question, we sampled pelagic redoxclines in the Baltic Sea and determined the rates of nitrification and light-independent, inorganic carbon fixation via 15N and 14C isotope incubations, and quantified the abundance of putative ammonia-oxidizing Crenarchaeota by catalyzed reporter deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARD-FISH). Nitrification was detectable throughout the suboxic zone with maxima of 122-131 nmol L-1 d-1 in layers with 1.8-7.1 μmol oxygen L-1 and ammonium below 0.2 μmol L-1. However, a nitrification potential was detected even in the upper anoxic, sulfidic zone. Crenarchaeotal abundance correlated strongly with nitrification rates and accounted for up to 24% of total prokaryotic cells. In contrast, the CO2 fixation in the suboxic zone was with 1.6-19.6 nmol L-1 d-1 rather low when compared to the subjacent anoxic, sulfidic waters. Our study indicates that ammonia oxidation in the suboxic zone of the Baltic Sea is mainly driven by Crenarchaeota. Their occurrence also in the anoxic, sulfidic water masses and the maintained nitrification potential point to special adaptations in this habitat with a potentially reduced sensitivity against hydrogen sulfide.

  8. In situ filtering rate variability in egg and larval surveys off the Pacific coast of Japan: Do plankton nets clog or over-filter in the sea?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takasuka, Akinori; Tadokoro, Kazuaki; Okazaki, Yuji; Ichikawa, Tadafumi; Sugisaki, Hiroya; Kuroda, Hiroshi; Oozeki, Yoshioki

    2017-02-01

    In situ filtering rate variability was examined for vertical tows of plankton nets in egg and larval surveys off the Pacific coast of Japan, based on a data set pooled over large spatial and temporal scales (76,444 sampling tows from 1978 to 2013). The filtering rate showed unimodal distributions and was highly variable for the four net types: Long NORPAC (LNP), NORPAC (NOR), Maru-toku B (MTB), and Maru-naka (MNK). Despite the high variability at the individual tow level, the median values of the filtering rate for the overall data approximated the theoretical value of 1.0, in particular, for LNP, although the median values differed among the net types. For LNP, the differences in the median values among the 26 years, the 12 months, and the 4 regions were small relative to the overall variability at the individual level. The present study quantified the extent of underestimation/overestimation when the theoretical value of 1.0 is used due to the lack of the actual filtering rate data. The filtering rate was almost on a balance of resistance effect of net and cod-end, clogging effect of collected organisms, and over-inflow effect of currents over large scales. The present analysis implies that the filtering rate is mainly influenced by small-scale transient variability of ocean conditions such as wind speed, current intensity, rolling, turbulence, and mixing rather than large-scale variability related to climate regime, seasonality, or water masses. The results will allow the utilization of historical data lacking flow-meter data for large-scale comparative analyses.

  9. Model predictive control of two-step nitrification and its validation via short-cut nitrification tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Jun; Luo, Fan; Li, Jie

    2016-10-01

    Short-cut nitrification (SCN) is shown to be an attractive technology due to its savings in aeration and external carbon source addition cost. However, the shortage of excluding nitrite nitrogen as a model state in an Activated Sludge Model limits the model predictive control of biological nitrogen removal via SCN. In this paper, a two-step kinetic model was developed based on the introduction of pH and temperature as process controller, and it was implemented in an SBR reactor. The simulation results for optimizing operating conditions showed that with increasing of dissolved oxygen (DO) the rate of ammonia oxidation and nitrite accumulation firstly increased in order to achieve a SCN process. By further increasing DO, the SCN process can be transformed into a complete nitrification process. In addition, within a certain range, increasing sludge retention time and aeration time are beneficial to the accumulation of nitrite. The implementation results in the SBR reactor showed that the data predicted by the kinetic model are in agreement with the data obtained, which indicate that the two-step kinetic model is appropriate to simulate the ammonia removal and nitrite production kinetics.

  10. [Temporal-spatial distribution of agricultural diffuse nitrogen pollution and relationship with soil respiration and nitrification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ouyang; Cai, Guan-Qing; Huang, Hao-Bo; Geng, Xiao-Jun

    2014-06-01

    The soil respiration, nitrification and denitrification processes play an important role on soil nitrogen transformation and diffuse nitrogen loading. These processes are also the chains for soil circle. In this study, the Zhegao watershed located north of Chaohu Lake was selected to explore the interactions of these processes with diffuse nitrogen pollution. The BaPS (Barometric Process Separation) was applied to analyze the soil respiration, nitrification and denitrification processes in farmland and forest. The SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool) simulated the temporal and spatial pattern of diffuse nitrogen loading. As the expanding of farmland and higher level of fertilization, the yearly mean loading of diffuse nitrogen increased sustainably from 1980-1995 to 1996-2012. The monthly loading in 1996-2012 was also higher than that in the period of 1980-1995, which closely related to the precipitation. The statistical analysis indicated that there was a significant difference between two periods. The yearly averaged loading of the whole watershed in 1996-2012 was 10.40 kg x hm(-2), which was 8.10 kg x hm(-2) in 1980-1995. The variance analysis demonstrated that there was also a big difference between the spatial distributions of two periods. The forest soil had much higher soil respiration than the farmland soil. But the farmland had higher nitrification and denitrification rates. The more intensive nitrogen transformation in the farmland contributed to the less diffuse nitrogen loading. As the nitrification rate of farmland was higher than denitrification rate, agricultural diffuse nitrate nitrogen loading would increase and organic nitrogen loading would reduce. The analysis of soil respiration, nitrification and denitrification is helpful for the study of soil nitrogen circle form the aspect of soil biology, which also benefits the control of agricultural diffuse nitrogen pollution.

  11. Copper deficiency can limit nitrification in biological rapid sand filters for drinking water production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Florian B; Nielsen, Peter Borch; Boe-Hansen, Rasmus; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2016-05-15

    Incomplete nitrification in biological filters during drinking water treatment is problematic, as it compromises drinking water quality. Nitrification problems can be caused by a lack of nutrients for the nitrifying microorganisms. Since copper is an important element in one of the essential enzymes in nitrification, we investigated the effect of copper dosing on nitrification in different biological rapid sand filters treating groundwater. A lab-scale column assay with filter material from a water works demonstrated that addition of a trace metal mixture, including copper, increased ammonium removal compared to a control without addition. Subsequently, another water works was investigated in full-scale, where copper influent concentrations were below 0.05 μg Cu L(-1) and nitrification was incomplete. Copper dosing of less than 5 μg Cu L(-1) to a full-scale filter stimulated ammonium removal within one day, and doubled the filter's removal from 0.22 to 0.46 g NH4-N m(-3) filter material h(-1) within 20 days. The location of ammonium and nitrite oxidation shifted upwards in the filter, with an almost 14-fold increase in ammonium removal rate in the filter's top 10 cm, within 57 days of dosing. To study the persistence of the stimulation, copper was dosed to another filter at the water works for 42 days. After dosing was stopped, nitrification remained complete for at least 238 days. Filter effluent concentrations of up to 1.3 μg Cu L(-1) confirmed that copper fully penetrated the filters, and determination of copper content on filter media revealed a buildup of copper during dosing. The amount of copper stored on filter material gradually decreased after dosing stopped; however at a slower rate than it accumulated. Continuous detection of copper in the filter effluent confirmed a release of copper to the bulk phase. Overall, copper dosing to poorly performing biological rapid sand filters increased ammonium removal rates significantly, achieving effluent

  12. Conditions and mechanisms affecting simultaneous nitrification and denitrification in a Pasveer oxidation ditch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hao, X.; Doddema, H.J.; Groenestijn, J.W. van

    1997-01-01

    Simultaneous nitrification and denitrification in a Pasveer oxidation ditch was studied. The purpose was to evaluate the performances of both nitrification and dentrification in oxidation ditches, and to pursue some possible approaches to enhance nitrogen removal. Almost complete nitrification was

  13. Isotope investigations of nitrification dynamics in the Elbe River and in pure cultures of nitrifying bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Juliane; Sanders, Tina; Dähnke, Kirstin

    2013-04-01

    Since the onset of industrialisation, the nutrient input to aquatic systems is significally enhanced. This leads to high nitrogen loads in rivers, which drain densely populated catchments, and an increased eutrophication pressure on coastal water bodies. Along the river - estuary - continuum, nitrogen processing in aquatic environments has the potential to alter river loads significantly. Especially nitrification, the stepwise oxidation of ammonium to nitrite and further to nitrate, is important, because it can create additional nitrate from freshly remineralized organic matter, but also represents the link to subsequent removal via denitrification. Stable isotopes are a valuable tool to track overlapping source and sink processes in natural environments: Changes in stable isotope ratios can be attributed to the corresponding turnover processes, if the corresponding isotope effects are carefully assessed. However, the data base on N and O isotope fractionation in natural environments and during specific turnover processes is scarce. Thus we aimed to better understand the isotope dynamics of nitrification, assigning specific fractionation factors to environmentally relevant bacterial species. Besides N and O isotope analyses of river nitrate over an annual cycle, we performed incubation experiments with pure cultures and river water. Biweekly water samples from the Elbe River (Northern Germany) were taken to analyse, among other parameters, the seasonal variations of δ15N and δ18O in nitrate, corresponding nitrification rates and isotope effects during nitrification. While changes in δ15N and δ18O suggest phytoplankton assimilation as the main turnover process, incubations of river water reveal the relevance of nutrient regeneration via nitrification, which increase 15-fold with the onset of spring. In these incubations, we analysed rates of ammonium and nitrite oxidation and the corresponding isotope fractionation factors. Additional experiments with newly

  14. Links between Ammonia Oxidizer Community Structure, Abundance, and Nitrification Potential in Acidic Soils ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Huaiying; Gao, Yangmei; Nicol, Graeme W.; Campbell, Colin D.; Prosser, James I.; Zhang, Limei; Han, Wenyan; Singh, Brajesh K.

    2011-01-01

    Ammonia oxidation is the first and rate-limiting step of nitrification and is performed by both ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB). However, the environmental drivers controlling the abundance, composition, and activity of AOA and AOB communities are not well characterized, and the relative importance of these two groups in soil nitrification is still debated. Chinese tea orchard soils provide an excellent system for investigating the long-term effects of low pH and nitrogen fertilization strategies. AOA and AOB abundance and community composition were therefore investigated in tea soils and adjacent pine forest soils, using quantitative PCR (qPCR), terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and sequence analysis of respective ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) genes. There was strong evidence that soil pH was an important factor controlling AOB but not AOA abundance, and the ratio of AOA to AOB amoA gene abundance increased with decreasing soil pH in the tea orchard soils. In contrast, T-RFLP analysis suggested that soil pH was a key explanatory variable for both AOA and AOB community structure, but a significant relationship between community abundance and nitrification potential was observed only for AOA. High potential nitrification rates indicated that nitrification was mainly driven by AOA in these acidic soils. Dominant AOA amoA sequences in the highly acidic tea soils were all placed within a specific clade, and one AOA genotype appears to be well adapted to growth in highly acidic soils. Specific AOA and AOB populations dominated in soils at particular pH values and N content, suggesting adaptation to specific niches. PMID:21571885

  15. Quantifying nitrogen process rates in a constructed wetland using natural abundance stable isotope signatures and stable isotope amendment experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erler, Dirk V; Eyre, Bradley D

    2010-01-01

    This study describes the spatial variability in nitrogen (N) transformation within a constructed wetland (CW) treating domestic effluent. Nitrogen cycling within the CW was driven by settlement and mineralization of particulate organic nitrogen and uptake of NO3-. The concentration of NO3- was found to decrease, as the delta15N-NO3- signature increased, as water flowed through the CW, allowing denitrification rates to be estimated on the basis of the degree of fractionation of delta15N-NO3-. Estimates of denitrification hinged on the determination of a net isotope effect (eta), which was influenced byprocesses that enrich or deplete 15NO3- (e.g., nitrification), as well as the rate constants associated with the different processes involved in denitrification (i.e., diffusion and enzyme activity). The influence of nitrification on eta was quantified; however, it remained unclear how eta varied due to variability in denitrification rate constants. A series of stable isotope amendment experiments was used to further constrain the value of eta and calculate rates of denitrification, and nitrification, within the wetland. The maximum calculated rate of denitrification was 956 +/- 187 micromol N m(-2) h(-1), and the maximum rate of nitrification was 182 +/- 28.9 micromol N m(-2) h(-1). Uptake of NO3- was quantitatively more important than denitrification throughoutthe wetland. Rates of N cycling varied spatially within thewetland, with denitrification dominating in the downstream deoxygenated region of the wetland. Studies that use fractionation of N to derive rate estimates must exercise caution when interpreting the net isotope effect. We suggest a sampling procedure for future natural abundance studies that may help improve the accuracy of N cycling rate estimates.

  16. Archaeal ammonia oxidizers dominate in numbers, but bacteria drive gross nitrification in N-amended grassland soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna E Sterngren

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Both ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB play an important role in nitrification in terrestrial environments. Most often AOA outnumber AOB, but the relative contribution of AOA and AOB to nitrification rates remains unclear. The aim of this experiment was to test the hypotheses that high nitrogen availability would favor AOB and result in high gross nitrification rates, while high carbon availability would result in low nitrogen concentrations that favor the activity of AOA. The hypotheses were tested in a microcosm experiment where sugars, ammonium or amino acids were added regularly to a grassland soil for a period of 33 days. The abundance of amoA genes from AOB increased markedly in treatments that received nitrogen, suggesting that AOB were the main ammonia oxidizers here. However, AOB could not account for the entire ammonia oxidation activity observed in treatments where the soil was deficient in available nitrogen. The findings suggest that AOA are important drivers of nitrification under nitrogen-poor conditions, but that input of easily available nitrogen results in increased abundance, activity, and relative importance of AOB for gross nitrification in grassland soil.

  17. Empirical Evidence Reveals Seasonally Dependent Reduction in Nitrification in Coastal Sediments Subjected to Near Future Ocean Acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braeckman, Ulrike; Van Colen, Carl; Guilini, Katja; Van Gansbeke, Dirk; Soetaert, Karline; Vincx, Magda; Vanaverbeke, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Research so far has provided little evidence that benthic biogeochemical cycling is affected by ocean acidification under realistic climate change scenarios. We measured nutrient exchange and sediment community oxygen consumption (SCOC) rates to estimate nitrification in natural coastal permeable and fine sandy sediments under pre-phytoplankton bloom and bloom conditions. Ocean acidification, as mimicked in the laboratory by a realistic pH decrease of 0.3, significantly reduced SCOC on average by 60% and benthic nitrification rates on average by 94% in both sediment types in February (pre-bloom period), but not in April (bloom period). No changes in macrofauna functional community (density, structural and functional diversity) were observed between ambient and acidified conditions, suggesting that changes in benthic biogeochemical cycling were predominantly mediated by changes in the activity of the microbial community during the short-term incubations (14 days), rather than by changes in engineering effects of bioturbating and bio-irrigating macrofauna. As benthic nitrification makes up the gross of ocean nitrification, a slowdown of this nitrogen cycling pathway in both permeable and fine sediments in winter, could therefore have global impacts on coupled nitrification-denitrification and hence eventually on pelagic nutrient availability. PMID:25329898

  18. Archaeal Ammonia Oxidizers Dominate in Numbers, but Bacteria Drive Gross Nitrification in N-amended Grassland Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterngren, Anna E.; Hallin, Sara; Bengtson, Per

    2015-01-01

    Both ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) play an important role in nitrification in terrestrial environments. Most often AOA outnumber AOB, but the relative contribution of AOA and AOB to nitrification rates remains unclear. The aim of this experiment was to test the hypotheses that high nitrogen availability would favor AOB and result in high gross nitrification rates, while high carbon availability would result in low nitrogen concentrations that favor the activity of AOA. The hypotheses were tested in a microcosm experiment where sugars, ammonium, or amino acids were added regularly to a grassland soil for a period of 33 days. The abundance of amoA genes from AOB increased markedly in treatments that received nitrogen, suggesting that AOB were the main ammonia oxidizers here. However, AOB could not account for the entire ammonia oxidation activity observed in treatments where the soil was deficient in available nitrogen. The findings suggest that AOA are important drivers of nitrification under nitrogen-poor conditions, but that input of easily available nitrogen results in increased abundance, activity, and relative importance of AOB for gross nitrification in grassland soil. PMID:26648926

  19. Molecular indicators of Nitrobacter spp. population and growth activity during an induced inhibition event in a bench scale nitrification reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Shawn; Robinson, Kevin; Layton, Alice; Sayler, Gary

    2012-04-15

    The Nitrobacter spp. ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) and transcript (rRNAt) abundance were quantified in a bench scale nitrification reactor during baseline periods of high nitrification efficiency and an intervening staged inhibition event. The transcript to gene ratio (rRNAt/rDNA) was highly sensitive to changes in the reactor nitrite oxidation rate. During high nitrification efficiency, the rRNAt/rDNA metric displayed a range from 0.68 to 2.01 with one-sided (α=0.10) lower and upper prediction intervals of 0.70 and 1.78, respectively. When nitrification was inhibited by disabling the reactor pH control system, this activity metric declined an order of magnitude to ≈ 0.05, well below the lower prediction interval reflecting high nitrification efficiency. The decline was rapid (2h) and preceded a significant drop in reactor nitrification performance, which occurred as ammonia accumulated. The rRNAt/rDNA ratio remained low (≈ 0.05) for several days after the pH control system was re-enabled at a setpoint of 8.0, which otherwise induced rapid oxidation of accumulated ammonia and produced high free ammonia concentrations. The timing of a subsequent increase in the rRNAt/rDNA ratio, which transiently exceeded the upper prediction interval established during the baseline period of high nitrification efficiency, was not coincidental with resumption of pH control at 7.2 that lowered free ammonia concentrations to non-inhibitory levels. Rather, nitrite oxidation resumed and the rRNAt/rDNA ratio increased only after oxidation of accumulated ammonia was complete, which was coincidental with reduced reactor oxygen demand. In summary, the Nitrobacter rRNAt/rDNA activity metric reflected timely and easily recognizable changes in nitrite oxidation activity, illustrating that molecular data can be used to diagnose poor biological wastewater treatment performance. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Full-scale implementation of external nitrification biological nutrient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the external nitrification (EN) biological nutrient removal (BNR) activated sludge (AS) system, the nitrification process is removed from the main BNRAS system to a fixed media system external to the AS system (Hu et al., 2003). The ENBNRAS system provides considerable advantages over the conventional BNRAS ...

  1. Analysis of Nitrification Efficiency and Microbial Community in a Membrane Bioreactor Fed with Low COD/N-Ratio Wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jinxing; Wang, Zhiwei; Zhu, Chaowei; Liu, Shumeng; Wang, Qiaoying; Wu, Zhichao

    2013-01-01

    In this study, an approach using influent COD/N ratio reduction was employed to improve process performance and nitrification efficiency in a membrane bioreactor (MBR). Besides sludge reduction, membrane fouling alleviation was observed during 330 d operation, which was attributed to the decreased production of soluble microbial products (SMP) and efficient carbon metabolism in the autotrophic nitrifying community. 454 high-throughput 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing revealed that the diversity of microbial sequences was mainly determined by the feed characteristics, and that microbes could derive energy by switching to a more autotrophic metabolism to resist the environmental stress. The enrichment of nitrifiers in an MBR with a low COD/N-ratio demonstrated that this condition stimulated nitrification, and that the community distribution of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) resulted in faster nitrite uptake rates. Further, ammonia oxidation was the rate-limiting step during the full nitrification. PMID:23667573

  2. Analysis of nitrification efficiency and microbial community in a membrane bioreactor fed with low COD/N-ratio wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jinxing; Wang, Zhiwei; Zhu, Chaowei; Liu, Shumeng; Wang, Qiaoying; Wu, Zhichao

    2013-01-01

    In this study, an approach using influent COD/N ratio reduction was employed to improve process performance and nitrification efficiency in a membrane bioreactor (MBR). Besides sludge reduction, membrane fouling alleviation was observed during 330 d operation, which was attributed to the decreased production of soluble microbial products (SMP) and efficient carbon metabolism in the autotrophic nitrifying community. 454 high-throughput 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing revealed that the diversity of microbial sequences was mainly determined by the feed characteristics, and that microbes could derive energy by switching to a more autotrophic metabolism to resist the environmental stress. The enrichment of nitrifiers in an MBR with a low COD/N-ratio demonstrated that this condition stimulated nitrification, and that the community distribution of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) resulted in faster nitrite uptake rates. Further, ammonia oxidation was the rate-limiting step during the full nitrification.

  3. Fabrication of Bacteria Environment Cubes with Dry Lift-Off Fabrication Process for Enhanced Nitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarasinghe, S A P L; Shao, Yiru; Huang, Po-Jung; Pishko, Michael; Chu, Kung-Hui; Kameoka, Jun

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a 3D dry lift-off process to localize multiple types of nitrifying bacteria in polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) cubes for enhanced nitrification, a two-step biological process that converts ammonium to nitrite and then to nitrate. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) is responsible for converting ammonia into nitrite, and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) is responsible for converting nitrite to nitrate. Successful nitrification is often challenging to accomplish, in part because AOB and NOB are slow growers and highly susceptible to many organic and inorganic chemicals in wastewater. Most importantly, the transportation of chemicals among scattered bacteria is extremely inefficient and can be problematic. For example, nitrite, produced from ammonia oxidation, is toxic to AOB and can lead to the failure of nitrification. To address these challenges, we closely localize AOB and NOB in PEGDA cubes as microenvironment modules to promote synergetic interactions. The AOB is first localized in the vicinity of the surface of the PEGDA cubes that enable AOB to efficiently uptake ammonia from a liquid medium and convert it into nitrite. The produced nitrite is then efficiently transported to the NOB localized at the center of the PEGDA particle and converted into non-toxic nitrate. Additionally, the nanoscale PEGDA fibrous structures offer a protective environment for these strains, defending them from sudden toxic chemical shocks and immobilize in cubes. This engineered microenvironment cube significantly enhances nitrification and improves the overall ammonia removal rate per single AOB cell. This approach-encapsulation of multiple strains at close range in cube in order to control their interactions-not only offers a new strategy for enhancing nitrification, but also can be adapted to improve the production of fermentation products and biofuel, because microbial processes require synergetic reactions among multiple species.

  4. Effect of arsenic on nitrification of simulated mining water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papirio, S; Zou, G; Ylinen, A; Di Capua, F; Pirozzi, F; Puhakka, J A

    2014-07-01

    Mining and mineral processing of gold-bearing ores often release arsenic to the environment. Ammonium is released when N-based explosives or cyanide are used. Nitrification of simulated As-rich mining waters was investigated in batch bioassays using nitrifying cultures enriched in a fluidized-bed reactor (FBR). Nitrification was maintained at 100mg AsTOT/L. In batch assays, ammonium was totally oxidized by the FBR enrichment in 48 h. As(III) oxidation to As(V) occurred during the first 3h attenuating arsenic toxicity to nitrification. At 150 and 200mg AsTOT/L, nitrification was inhibited by 25%. Candidatus Nitrospira defluvii and other nitrifying species mainly colonized the FBR. In conclusion, the FBR enriched cultures of municipal activated sludge origins tolerated high As concentrations making nitrification a potent process for mining water treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Net Locality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Souza e Silva, Adriana Araujo; Gordon, Eric

    Provides an introduction to the new theory of Net Locality and the profound effect on individuals and societies when everything is located or locatable. Describes net locality as an emerging form of location awareness central to all aspects of digital media, from mobile phones, to Google Maps...... of emerging technologies, from GeoCities to GPS, Wi-Fi, Wiki Me, and Google Android....

  6. Net Neutrality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savin, Andrej

    2017-01-01

    Repealing “net neutrality” in the US will have no bearing on Internet freedom or security there or anywhere else.......Repealing “net neutrality” in the US will have no bearing on Internet freedom or security there or anywhere else....

  7. Oxygen Isotope Composition of Nitrate Produced by Freshwater Nitrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boshers, D.; Granger, J.; Bohlke, J. K.

    2016-12-01

    Measurements of the naturally occurring nitrogen and oxygen stable isotope ratios of nitrate (NO3-), δ15N and δ18O, can be used to determine the source, dispersal, and fate of natural and contaminant NO3- in aquatic environments. To this end, it is necessary to know the extent to which NO3- isotopologues are modified by biological reactions, as heavy and light isotopes have different reaction rates. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of the δ18O of ambient water on the isotope composition of NO3- produced during nitrification, the biological oxidation of ammonium (NH4+) to nitrite (NO2-) and then NO3-, which is poorly constrained in freshwater systems. To determine the δ18O of NO3- produced by nitrification in freshwater, we collected water from a stream in New England, which we amended with NH4+ and with increments of 18O-enriched water, to monitor the isotope composition of NO3- produced by a natural consortium of nitrifiers. Added NH4+ was completely oxidized to NO3- over 26 days. The final δ18O of nitrified NO3- revealed sensitivity to the δ18O of water mediated by (a) isotopic equilibration between water and NO2- and (b) kinetic isotope fractionation during O-atom incorporation from water into NO2- and NO3-. Our results concur with nitrifying culture experiments that have demonstrated analogous sensitivity of the δ18O of nitrified NO3- to equilibrium and kinetic O isotope effects (Buchwald et al. 2012), as well as show that these dynamics need to be considered to interpret NO3- isotope distribution in freshwater environments.

  8. Nitrogen balance and transformation in the nitrification process of coking wastewater and the influence on nitrification kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Mingjun; Zhang, Yan; Kou, Lihong

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the total nitrogen balance, and the direction and degree of nitrogen transformation during the nitrification process of coking wastewater. According to the actual nitrification process, the conventional nitrification kinetic equation was amended. After 48 h of nitrification, the total nitrogen content remained almost the same with error less than 0.6%. The total removal efficiency of NH4(+)-N was 91.1%, in which blow-off, producing cells and transforming to nitrate nitrogen accounted for 1.1, 17.8 and 72.2% respectively. Considering the influences of NH4(+)-N blow-off and conversion from cyanide, thiocyanide and organic nitrogen, the nitrification kinetic equation was amended as μ'=0.82·S/(0.48+S).

  9. Reduction of Net Sulfide Production Rate by Nitrate in Wastewater Bioreactors. Kinetics and Changes in the Microbial Community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villahermosa, Desiree; Corzo, Alfonso; Gonzalez, J M

    2013-01-01

    Nitrate addition stimulated sulfide oxidation by increasing the activity of nitrate-reducing sulfide-oxidizing bacteria (NR-SOB), decreasing the concentration of dissolved H2S in the water phase and, consequently, its release to the atmosphere of a pilot-scale anaerobic bioreactor. The effect...... of four different concentrations of nitrate (0.12, 0.24, 0.50, and 1.00 mM) was investigated for a period of 3 days in relation to sulfide concentration in two bioreactors set up at Guadalete wastewater treatment plant (Jerez de la Frontera, Spain). Physicochemical variables were measured in water and air......, and the activity of bacteria implicated in the sulfur and nitrogen cycles was analyzed in the biofilms and in the water phase of the bioreactors. Biofilms were a net source of sulfide for the water and gas phases (7.22 ± 5.3 μmol s−1) in the absence of nitrate dosing. Addition of nitrate resulted in a quick...

  10. Nitrification with submerged filters. Air supply and comsumption at the pilot-plant at the Bekkelaget treatment plant

    OpenAIRE

    Englund, G

    1990-01-01

    During the three months research period (October 1989 - January 1990) the average nitrification efficiencies for municipal sewage were 48% and 61 % for respectively one-step and two-step biological submerged filters placed after chemical precipitation. Correspondi- ng nitrification rates were 0.69 and 0.56 g NH4-N/m² d. The air/liquid ratio (m³/m³) varied from 18-35 for the diffused aeration, giving high 02-concentrations, but indicating an inefficient aeration system. No logging problems occ...

  11. Bioassays for the determination of nitrification inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunditz, Camilla

    1999-07-01

    Requirements for nitrogen reduction in wastewater treatment plants were introduced in Sweden in the early 1990's. This was a governmental move to reduce the nitrogen discharges to the Baltic and Kattegat in order to prevent eutrophication. The nitrification process in wastewater treatment plants is performed by nitrifying bacteria. These are susceptible to inhibition and it is of great importance that the influent water does not contain toxic compounds. Therefore, there is a need for assays for the determination of nitrification inhibition. This thesis describes the development and applications of such bioassays. Pure cultures of Nitrosomonas sp. and Nitrobacter sp. were isolated from activated sludge of a wastewater treatment plant. These cultures were used as test organisms in the development of bioassays for nitrification inhibition measurements. The assays are based on two different principles; cell suspensions of the bacteria, performed in test tubes, and mediated amperometric biosensors with the bacteria immobilised. Ammonia oxidation and nitrite oxidation are studied separately without interference from other organisms, which makes it easier to interpret the results. The cell suspension assays were applied to samples of industrial and municipal wastewater. The Nitrosomonas and Nitrobacter assays showed to have different inhibition patterns. A large percentage of the Swedish municipal wastewater treatment plants were found to receive inhibitory influent water, but the inhibition level was generally low. Compared to an assay based on activated sludge, the screening method, the pure culture assays found more samples of influent water strongly inhibitory or stimulating. The highest correlation was found between the screening method and the Nitrosomonas assay. The Nitrobacter assay was found to be the most sensitive method. Assessment of toxicity of a number of chemical substances was studied using the biosensors, together with the cell suspension assays

  12. Pressures on safety net access: the level of managed care penetration and uninsurance rate in a community

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cunningham, P J

    1999-01-01

    To examine the effects of managed care penetration and the uninsurance rate in an area on access to care of low-income uninsured persons and to compare differences in access between low-income insured...

  13. Evidence for biological nitrification inhibition in Brachiaria pastures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbarao, G V; Nakahara, K; Hurtado, M P; Ono, H; Moreta, D E; Salcedo, A F; Yoshihashi, A T; Ishikawa, T; Ishitani, M; Ohnishi-Kameyama, M; Yoshida, M; Rondon, M; Rao, I M; Lascano, C E; Berry, W L; Ito, O

    2009-10-13

    Nitrification, a key process in the global nitrogen cycle that generates nitrate through microbial activity, may enhance losses of fertilizer nitrogen by leaching and denitrification. Certain plants can suppress soil-nitrification by releasing inhibitors from roots, a phenomenon termed biological nitrification inhibition (BNI). Here, we report the discovery of an effective nitrification inhibitor in the root-exudates of the tropical forage grass Brachiaria humidicola (Rendle) Schweick. Named "brachialactone," this inhibitor is a recently discovered cyclic diterpene with a unique 5-8-5-membered ring system and a gamma-lactone ring. It contributed 60-90% of the inhibitory activity released from the roots of this tropical grass. Unlike nitrapyrin (a synthetic nitrification inhibitor), which affects only the ammonia monooxygenase (AMO) pathway, brachialactone appears to block both AMO and hydroxylamine oxidoreductase enzymatic pathways in Nitrosomonas. Release of this inhibitor is a regulated plant function, triggered and sustained by the availability of ammonium (NH(4)(+)) in the root environment. Brachialactone release is restricted to those roots that are directly exposed to NH(4)(+). Within 3 years of establishment, Brachiaria pastures have suppressed soil nitrifier populations (determined as amoA genes; ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and ammonia-oxidizing archaea), along with nitrification and nitrous oxide emissions. These findings provide direct evidence for the existence and active regulation of a nitrification inhibitor (or inhibitors) release from tropical pasture root systems. Exploiting the BNI function could become a powerful strategy toward the development of low-nitrifying agronomic systems, benefiting both agriculture and the environment.

  14. Effects of the Nitrification Inhibitor 3,4-Dimethylpyrazole Phosphate on Nitrification and Nitrifiers in Two Contrasting Agricultural Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiuzhen; Müller, Christoph; He, Ji-Zheng; Chen, Deli; Suter, Helen Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The nitrification inhibitor 3,4-dimethylpyrazole phosphate (DMPP) is a powerful tool that can be used to promote nitrogen (N) use efficiency and reduce N losses from agricultural systems by slowing nitrification. Mounting evidence has confirmed the functional importance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in nitrification and N2O production; however, their responses to DMPP amendment and the microbial mechanisms underlying the variable efficiencies of DMPP across different soils remain largely unknown. Here we compared the impacts of DMPP on nitrification and the dynamics of ammonia oxidizers between an acidic pasture soil and an alkaline vegetable soil using a 15N tracing and 13CO2-DNA–stable-isotope probing (SIP) technique. The results showed that DMPP significantly inhibited nitrification and N2O production in the vegetable soil only, and the transient inhibition was coupled with a significant decrease in AOB abundance. No significant effects on the community structure of ammonia oxidizers or the abundances of total bacteria and denitrifiers were observed in either soil. The 15N tracing experiment revealed that autotrophic nitrification was the predominant form of nitrification in both soils. The 13CO2-DNA–SIP results indicated the involvement of AOB in active nitrification in both soils, but DMPP inhibited the assimilation of 13CO2 into AOB only in the vegetable soil. Our findings provide evidence that DMPP could effectively inhibit nitrification through impeding the abundance and metabolic activity of AOB in the alkaline vegetable soil but not in the acidic pasture soil, possibly due to the low AOB abundance or the adsorption of DMPP by organic matter. IMPORTANCE The combination of the 15N tracing model and 13CO2-DNA–SIP technique provides important evidence that the nitrification inhibitor DMPP could effectively inhibit nitrification and nitrous oxide emission in an alkaline soil through influencing the

  15. Effects of the Nitrification Inhibitor 3,4-Dimethylpyrazole Phosphate on Nitrification and Nitrifiers in Two Contrasting Agricultural Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiuzhen; Hu, Hang-Wei; Müller, Christoph; He, Ji-Zheng; Chen, Deli; Suter, Helen Charlotte

    2016-09-01

    The nitrification inhibitor 3,4-dimethylpyrazole phosphate (DMPP) is a powerful tool that can be used to promote nitrogen (N) use efficiency and reduce N losses from agricultural systems by slowing nitrification. Mounting evidence has confirmed the functional importance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in nitrification and N2O production; however, their responses to DMPP amendment and the microbial mechanisms underlying the variable efficiencies of DMPP across different soils remain largely unknown. Here we compared the impacts of DMPP on nitrification and the dynamics of ammonia oxidizers between an acidic pasture soil and an alkaline vegetable soil using a (15)N tracing and (13)CO2-DNA-stable-isotope probing (SIP) technique. The results showed that DMPP significantly inhibited nitrification and N2O production in the vegetable soil only, and the transient inhibition was coupled with a significant decrease in AOB abundance. No significant effects on the community structure of ammonia oxidizers or the abundances of total bacteria and denitrifiers were observed in either soil. The (15)N tracing experiment revealed that autotrophic nitrification was the predominant form of nitrification in both soils. The (13)CO2-DNA-SIP results indicated the involvement of AOB in active nitrification in both soils, but DMPP inhibited the assimilation of (13)CO2 into AOB only in the vegetable soil. Our findings provide evidence that DMPP could effectively inhibit nitrification through impeding the abundance and metabolic activity of AOB in the alkaline vegetable soil but not in the acidic pasture soil, possibly due to the low AOB abundance or the adsorption of DMPP by organic matter. The combination of the (15)N tracing model and (13)CO2-DNA-SIP technique provides important evidence that the nitrification inhibitor DMPP could effectively inhibit nitrification and nitrous oxide emission in an alkaline soil through influencing the abundance and

  16. Effect of dosing regime on nitrification in a subsurface vertical flow treatment wetland system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantawanichkul, Suwasa; Boontakhum, Walaya

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the effect of dosing regime on nitrification in a subsurface vertical flow treatment wetland system was investigated. The experimental unit was composed of four circular concrete tanks (1 m diameter and 80 cm deep), filled with gravel (1-2 cm) and planted with Cyperus alternifolius L. Synthetic wastewater with average chemical oxygen demand (COD) and ammonia nitrogen of 1,151 and 339 mg/L was fed into each tank. Different feeding and resting periods were applied: continuous flow (tank 1), 4 hrs on and 4 hrs off (tank 2), 1 hr on and 3 hrs off (tank 3) and 15 minutes on and 3 hrs 45 minutes off (tank 4). All four tanks were under the same hydraulic loading rate of 5 cm/day. After 165 days the reduction of total Kjeldahl nitrogen and ammonia nitrogen and the increase of nitrate nitrogen were greatest in tank 4, which had the shortest feeding period, while the continuous flow produced the lowest results. Effluent tanks 2 and 3 experienced similar levels of nitrification, both higher than that of tank 1. Thus supporting the idea that rapid dosing periods provide better aerobic conditions resulting in enhanced nitrification within the bed. Tank 4 had the highest removal rates for COD, and the continuous flow had the lowest. Tank 2 also exhibited a higher COD removal rate than tank 3, demonstrating that short dosing periods provide better within-bed oxidation and therefore offer higher removal efficiency.

  17. The HLA-net GENE[RATE] pipeline for effective HLA data analysis and its application to 145 population samples from Europe and neighbouring areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, J M; Buhler, S; Roessli, D; Sanchez-Mazas, A

    2014-05-01

    In this review, we present for the first time an integrated version of the Gene[rate] computer tools which have been developed during the last 5 years to analyse human leukocyte antigen (HLA) data in human populations, as well as the results of their application to a large dataset of 145 HLA-typed population samples from Europe and its two neighbouring areas, North Africa and West Asia, now forming part of the Gene[va] database. All these computer tools and genetic data are, from now, publicly available through a newly designed bioinformatics platform, HLA-net, here presented as a main achievement of the HLA-NET scientific programme. The Gene[rate] pipeline offers user-friendly computer tools to estimate allele and haplotype frequencies, to test Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE), selective neutrality and linkage disequilibrium, to recode HLA data, to convert file formats, to display population frequencies of chosen alleles and haplotypes in selected geographic regions, and to perform genetic comparisons among chosen sets of population samples, including new data provided by the user. Both numerical and graphical outputs are generated, the latter being highly explicit and of publication quality. All these analyses can be performed on the pipeline after scrupulous validation of the population sample's characterisation and HLA typing reporting according to HLA-NET recommendations. The Gene[va] database offers direct access to the HLA-A, -B, -C, -DQA1, -DQB1, -DRB1 and -DPB1 frequencies and summary statistics of 145 population samples having successfully passed these HLA-NET 'filters', and representing three European subregions (South-East, North-East and Central-West Europe) and two neighbouring areas (North Africa, as far as Sudan, and West Asia, as far as South India). The analysis of these data, summarized in this review, shows a substantial genetic variation at the regional level in this continental area. These results have main implications for population genetics

  18. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of extracellular polymeric substances in partial nitrification and full nitrification reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Dong; Yan, Tao; Zhang, Keyi; Chen, Ya; Wu, Na; Du, Bin; Wei, Qin

    2017-09-01

    In present study, two column-type sequencing batch reactors with alternative anoxic/aerobic phases were operated and compared under partial nitrification and full nitrification modes by controlling different dissolved oxygen (DO) conditions. During steady state, the characterizations of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from two reactors were qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed through chemical and spectroscopic approaches. Data implied that partial nitrification reactor had relatively higher total nitrogen (TN) removal efficiency and loosely bound EPS (LB-EPS) and tightly bound EPS (TB-EPS) contents. According to excitation emission matrix (EEM) spectra, LB-EPS and TB-EPS from two kinds of reactors expressed similar fluorescence peak locations but different intensities. Fluorescence regional integration (FRI) further suggested that Region IV was the main fraction in both types of EPS fractions. Moreover, TB-EPS exhibited a greater number of molecular weight fractions than those of LB-EPS. Both EPS fractions had similar functional groups, which represented the complex nature of EPS compositions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Tingkat Insidensi Malaria di Wilayah Pemanasan Kelambu Berinsektisida Tahan Lama dan Wilayah Kontrol (MALARIA INCIDENCE RATE OF HEAT ASSISTED REGENERATION LONG LASTING INSECTICIDAL NETS AREA AND CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etih Sudarnika

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Long lasting insecticidal nets (LLIN is one effective way to prevent malaria. Permethrin treatedLLIN is one type of LLIN which is recommended by WHO. Several studies have shown that these types ofLLIN requiring heat assisted regeneration after washing to enhance the biological activity of insecticidethat contained in the LLIN fibers. This study aimed to compare the incidence rates of malaria in childrenunder five years old who live in the intervention area (where the heat assisted regeneration on LLIN afterwashing was applied and control area (where the heat assisted regeneration on LLIN after washing wasnot applied. Data of malaria cases was collected from laboratory log book at all health centers in BangkaDistrict, in the period of June June 2007 until July 2008. Data were analyzed with Poisson regressionmodels. The results showed that the incidence rate of malaria in children under five years old was notsignificantly different between the treatment and control areas.

  20. Nitrification and inorganic nitrogen distribution in a large perturbed river/estuarine system: the Pearl River Estuary, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dai

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the spatial distribution and seasonal variation of dissolved inorganic nitrogen in a large perturbed estuary, the Pearl River Estuary, based on three cruises conducted in winter (January 2005, summer (August 2005 and spring (March 2006. On-site incubation was also carried out for determining ammonium and nitrite oxidation rates (nitrification rates. We observed a year-round pattern of dramatic decrease in NH4+, increase in NO3, but insignificant change in NO2 in the upper estuary at salinity ~0–5. However, species and concentrations of inorganic nitrogen at upper estuary significantly changed with season. In winter, with low runoff, the most upper reach of the Pearl River Estuary showed relatively low rates of ammonia oxidation (0–5.4 μmol N L−1 d−1 and nitrite oxidation (0–5.2 μmol N L−1 d−1, accompanied by extremely high concentrations of ammonia (up to >800 μmol L−1 and nitrate (up to >300 μmol L−1. In summer, the upper estuary showed higher nitrification rates (ammonia oxidation rate ~1.5–33.1 μmol N L−1 d−1, nitrite oxidation rate ~0.6–32.0 μmol N L−1 d−1 with lower concentrations of ammonia (<350 μmol L−1 and nitrate (<120 μmol L−1. The Most Probable Number test showed relatively lower nitrifier abundance in summer at most sampling stations, indicating a greater specific nitrification rate per cell in the warm season. Temperature appeared to control nitrification rates to a large degree in different seasons. Spatial variability of nitrification rates appeared to be controlled by a combination of many other factors such as nutrient concentrations, nitrifier abundance and dissolved oxygen (DO concentrations. In addition to aerobic respiration, nitrification contributed significantly

  1. Complete nitrification by a single microorganism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Kessel, Maartje A. H. J.; Speth, Daan R.; Albertsen, Mads

    2015-01-01

    Nitrification is a two-step process where ammonia is first oxidized to nitrite by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and/or archaea, and subsequently to nitrate by nitrite-oxidizing bacteria. Already described by Winogradsky in 18901, this division of labour between the two functional groups is a general...... and distribution of ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms. Furthermore, the discovery of the long-sought-after comammox process will change our perception of the nitrogen cycle....... but higher growth yields than canonical ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms3. Still, organisms catalysing this process have not yet been discovered. Here we report the enrichment and initial characterization of two Nitrospira species that encode all the enzymes necessary for ammonia oxidation via nitrite...... to nitrate in their genomes, and indeed completely oxidize ammonium to nitrate to conserve energy. Their ammonia monooxygenase (AMO) enzymes are phylogenetically distinct from currently identified AMOs, rendering recent acquisition by horizontal gene transfer from known ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms...

  2. From Partial nitrification to canon in an aerobic granular SBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez-Padin, J.; Figueroa, M.; Campos, J. L.; Mosquera-Corral, A.; Mendez, R.

    2009-07-01

    Nitrogen removal via nitrification-denitrification processes is commonly used in biology wastewater treatment plants to remove nitrogen compounds. In recent years new technologies emerged bringing solutions to remove nitrogen from wastewaters with not enough COD content to complete the denitrification process. An alternative strategy to the conventional nitrification-denitrification processes has been developed in the nine tries consisting of a combination of the oxidation of half of the ammonium from the wastewater to nitrite via partial nitrification and the removal of both, ammonium and formed nitrite by the Anammox process. (Author)

  3. Effect of heavy metals on nitrification activity as measured by RNA- and DNA-based function-specific assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heavy metals can inhibit nitrification, a key process for nitrogen removal in wastewater treatment. The transcriptional responses of functional genes (amoA, hao, nirK and norB) were measured in conjunction with specific oxygen uptake rate (sOUR) for nitrifying enrichment cultures...

  4. Inhibitory effect of cyanide on wastewater nitrification determined using SOUR and RNA-based gene-specific assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effect of CN- (CN-) on nitrification was examined with samples from nitrifying wastewater enrichments using two different approaches: by measuring substrate (ammonia) specific oxygen uptake rates (SOUR), and by using RT-qPCR to quantify the transcripts of functional genes inv...

  5. Heterogeneity of Rapid Sand Filters and Its Effect on Contaminant Transport and Nitrification Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopato, Laure Rose; Galaj, Zofia; Delpont, Sébastien

    2011-01-01

    flow. A first-order nitrification reaction with spatially variable pore-water velocity could be interpreted as a zero-order reaction with a constant pore-water velocity. A model demonstrated that filter heterogeneity could result in higher filter outlet ammonium concentrations.......Laboratory and full-scale experiments were conducted to investigate the development and effect of heterogeneity caused by filter media nonuniformity, biofilm, particles, precipitates, and gas bubbles in rapid sand filters used for drinking-water treatment. Salt tracer experiments were conducted...... dispersivity of more than 33% in the 116 h after the start of filtration with a constant pore-water velocity and a zero-order nitrification rate of 9 mgN=L=h. The full-scale experiments showed that the rapid sand filter was heterogeneous with pore-water velocities ranging from 2.2 to 3:3 m=h for the same inlet...

  6. Simultaneous heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification by the marine origin bacterium Pseudomonas sp. ADN-42.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ruofei; Liu, Tianqi; Liu, Guangfei; Zhou, Jiti; Huang, Jianyu; Wang, Aijie

    2015-02-01

    Recent research has highlighted the existence of some bacteria that are capable of performing heterotrophic nitrification and have a phenomenal ability to denitrify their nitrification products under aerobic conditions. A high-salinity-tolerant strain ADN-42 was isolated from Hymeniacidon perleve and found to display high heterotrophic ammonium removal capability. This strain was identified as Pseudomonas sp. via 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Gene cloning and sequencing analysis indicated that the bacterial genome contains N2O reductase function (nosZ) gene. NH3-N removal rate of ADN-42 was very high. And the highest removal rate was 6.52 mg/L · h in the presence of 40 g/L NaCl. Under the condition of pure oxygen (DO >8 mg/L), NH3-N removal efficiency was 56.9 %. Moreover, 38.4 % of oxygen remained in the upper gas space during 72 h without greenhouse gas N2O production. Keeping continuous and low level of dissolved oxygen (DO <3 mg/L) was helpful for better denitrification performance. All these results indicated that the strain has heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification abilities, which guarantee future application in wastewater treatment.

  7. Contribution of nitrification and denitrification to N2O emissions from urine patches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carter, Mette Sustmann

    2007-01-01

    and N(2)O loss ratio of nitrification (i.e. moles of N(2)O-N produced per moles of nitrate produced) and denitrification (i.e. moles of NO produced per moles of N(2)O + N(2) Produced). The effect of artificial urine (52.9 g N m(-2)) and ammonium solution (52.9g N m(-2)) was examined in separate...... experiments at 45% and 35% water-filled pore space (WFPS), respectively, and in each experiment a water control was included. The N(2)O loss derived from nitrification or denitrification was determined in the field immediately after application of (15)N-labelled solutions. During the next 24 h, gross...... nitrification rates were measured in the field, whereas the denitrification rates were measured in soil cores in the laboratory. Compared with the water control, urine application increased the N(2)O emission from 3.9 to 42.3 mu g N(2)O-N m(-2) h(-1), whereas application of ammonium increased the emission from...

  8. Partial nitrification performance and mechanism of zeolite biological aerated filter for ammonium wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yongyuan; Chen, Zhenguo; Wang, Xiaojun; Zheng, Lei; Gu, Xiaoyang

    2017-10-01

    A zeolite biological aerated filter (ZBAF) with continuous feeding was successfully applied for achieving stable partial nitrification. Excellent nitrite accumulation (higher than 98.0%) and high nitrite/nitrate production rate (NPR) (approximately 0.760kg/m3/d) were obtained with increase influent ammonium concentration from 250 to 550mg/L within a nitrogen loading rate (NLR) of 0.854-1.200kg/m3/d. Owning to the adsorption of zeolite to ammonium, free ammonia (FA) concentration could remain at an appropriate range for inhibition of nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) and dominance of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), which should be responsible for the excellent partial nitrification realized in ZBAF. Kinetic study showed that the production of nitrite in ZBAF followed the zero-order kinetics model and high-throughput sequencing analysis further presented the enrichment of AOB and inhibition of NOB in ZBAF. All the results demonstrated that ZBAF hold a great potential in the application of partial nitrification for ammonium wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Rapid nitrification of wastewater ammonium near coastal ocean outfalls, Southern California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Karen; Nezlin, Nikolay P.; Howard, Meredith D. A.; Beck, Carly D. A.; Kudela, Raphael M.; Mengel, Michael J.; Robertson, George L.

    2017-02-01

    In the southern California Bight (SCB), there has been a longstanding hypothesis that anthropogenic nutrient loading is insignificant compared to the nutrient loading from upwelling. However, recent studies have demonstrated that, in the nearshore environment, nitrogen (N) flux from wastewater effluent is equivalent to the N flux from upwelling. The composition of the N pool and N:P ratios of wastewater and upwelled water are very different and the environmental effects of wastewater discharges on coastal systems are not well characterized. Capitalizing on routine maintenance of the Orange County Sanitation District's ocean outfall, wherein a wastewater point source was ;turned off; in one area and ;turned on; in another for 23 days, we were able to document changes in coastal N cycling, specifically nitrification, related to wastewater effluent. A ;hotspot; of ammonium (NH4+) and nitrite (NO2-) occurred over the ocean outfall under normal operations and nitrification rates were significantly higher offshore when the deeper outfall pipe was operating. These rates were sufficiently high to transform all effluent NH4+ to nitrate (NO3-). The dual isotopic composition of dissolved NO3- (δ15NNO3 and δ18ONO3) indicated that N-assimilation and denitrification were low relative to nitrification, consistent with the relatively low chlorophyll and high dissolved oxygen levels in the region during the study. The isotopic composition of suspended particulate organic matter (POM) recorded low δ15NPN and δ13CPN values around the outfall under normal operations suggesting the incorporation of ;nitrified; NO3- and wastewater dissolved organic carbon into POM. Our results demonstrate the critical role of nitrification in nitrogen cycling in the nearshore environment of urban oceans.

  10. Control of nitrification/denitrification in an onsite two-chamber intermittently aerated membrane bioreactor with alkalinity and carbon addition: Model and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Mahamalage Kusumitha; Englehardt, James D; Tchobanoglous, George; Shamskhorzani, Reza

    2017-05-15

    Denitrifying membrane bioreactors (MBRs) are being found useful in water reuse treatment systems, including net-zero water (nearly closed-loop), non-reverse osmosis-based, direct potable reuse (DPR) systems. In such systems nitrogen may need to be controlled in the MBR to meet the nitrate drinking water standard in the finished water. To achieve efficient nitrification and denitrification, the addition of alkalinity and external carbon may be required, and control of the carbon feed rate is then important. In this work, an onsite, two-chamber aerobic nitrifying/denitrifying MBR, representing one unit process of a net-zero water, non-reverse osmosis-based DPR system, was modeled as a basis for control of the MBR internal recycling rate, aeration rate, and external carbon feed rate. Specifically, a modification of the activated sludge model ASM2dSMP was modified further to represent the rate of recycling between separate aerobic and anoxic chambers, rates of carbon and alkalinity feed, and variable aeration schedule, and was demonstrated versus field data. The optimal aeration pattern for the modeled reactor configuration and influent matrix was found to be 30 min of aeration in a 2 h cycle (104 m(3) air/d per 1 m(3)/d average influent), to ultimately meet the nitrate drinking water standard. Optimal recycling ratios (inter-chamber flow to average daily flow) were found to be 1.5 and 3 during rest and mixing periods, respectively. The model can be used to optimize aeration pattern and recycling ratio in such MBRs, with slight modifications to reflect reactor configuration, influent matrix, and target nitrogen species concentrations, though some recalibration may be required. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Modelling and simulation of a nitrification biofilter for drinking water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2005-09-30

    Sep 30, 2005 ... of micro-pollutants by active carbon filtration and disinfection with potassium .... and nitrification) occurring in the biofilter the Activated Sludge. Model No. ..... COD was inert and further attention was therefore only paid to.

  12. Fibrous Support Stabilizes Nitrification Performance of a Membrane-Aerated Biofilm: The Effect of Liquid Flow Perturbation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terada, Akihiko; Ito, J; Matsumoto, S

    2009-01-01

    Nitrification stability and biofilm robustness were examined by comparing a fibrous support membrane-aerated biofilm reactor (FS-MABR), where a woven fibrous support was surrounded on a silicone tube, with an MABR. The overall mass transfer coefficient of oxygen for the FS-MABR, assuming no bound......Nitrification stability and biofilm robustness were examined by comparing a fibrous support membrane-aerated biofilm reactor (FS-MABR), where a woven fibrous support was surrounded on a silicone tube, with an MABR. The overall mass transfer coefficient of oxygen for the FS-MABR, assuming...... liquid flow rate condition was 49% and 75% in the FS-MABR and MABR, exhibiting robust biofilms grown on the fibrous support. The FS-MABR provided more stable nitrification performance than the MABR irrespective of a high liquid flow rate. Both reactors have deteriorated ammonium (NH4+-N) removal without...... a high liquid flow rate condition to eliminate excessive biomass, indicating that regular maintenance is essential to eliminate excessive biofilm from a MABR for nitrification, which potentially acts as a NH4+ diffusion barrier....

  13. RESTful NET

    CERN Document Server

    Flanders, Jon

    2008-01-01

    RESTful .NET is the first book that teaches Windows developers to build RESTful web services using the latest Microsoft tools. Written by Windows Communication Foundation (WFC) expert Jon Flanders, this hands-on tutorial demonstrates how you can use WCF and other components of the .NET 3.5 Framework to build, deploy and use REST-based web services in a variety of application scenarios. RESTful architecture offers a simpler approach to building web services than SOAP, SOA, and the cumbersome WS- stack. And WCF has proven to be a flexible technology for building distributed systems not necessa

  14. A new method to estimate photosynthetic parameters through net assimilation rate-intercellular space CO2 concentration (A-Ci ) curve and chlorophyll fluorescence measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moualeu-Ngangue, Dany P; Chen, Tsu-Wei; Stützel, Hartmut

    2017-02-01

    Gas exchange (GE) and chlorophyll fluorescence (CF) measurements are widely used to noninvasively study photosynthetic parameters, for example the rates of maximum Rubisco carboxylation (Vcmax ), electron transport rate (J), daytime respiration (Rd ) and mesophyll conductance (gm ). Existing methods for fitting GE data (net assimilation rate-intercellular space CO2 concentration (A-Ci ) curve) are based on two assumptions: gm is unvaried with CO2 concentration in the intercellular space (Ci ); and light absorption (α) and the proportion of quanta absorbed by photosystem II (β) are constant in the data set. These may result in significant bias in estimating photosynthetic parameters. To avoid the above-mentioned hypotheses, we present a new method for fitting A-Ci curves and CF data simultaneously. This method was applied to a data set obtained from cucumber (Cucumis sativus) leaves of various leaf ages and grown under eight different light conditions. The new method had significantly lower root mean square error and a lower rate of failures compared with previously published methods (6.72% versus 24.1%, respectively) and the effect of light conditions on Vcmax and J was better observed. Furthermore, the new method allows the estimation of a new parameter, the fraction of incoming irradiance harvested by photosystem II, and the dependence of gm on Ci . © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  15. No nitrification in lakes below pH 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeschke, Christina; Falagán, Carmen; Knöller, Kay; Schultze, Martin; Koschorreck, Matthias

    2013-12-17

    Lakes affected by acid mine drainage (AMD) or acid rain often contain elevated concentrations of ammonium, which threatens water quality. It is commonly assumed that this is due to the inhibition of microbial nitrification in acidic water, but nitrification was never directly measured in mine pit lakes. For the first time, we measured nitrification by (15)NH4Cl isotope tracer addition in acidic as well as neutral mine pit lakes in Spain and Germany. Nitrification activity was only detected in neutral lakes. In acidic lakes no conversion of (15)NH4(+) to (15)NO3(-) was observed. This was true both for the water column as well as for biofilms on the surface of macrophytes or dead wood and the oxic surface layer of the sediment. Stable isotope analysis of nitrate showed (18)O values typical for nitrification only in neutral lakes. In a comparison of NH4(+) concentrations in 297 surface waters with different pH, ammonium concentrations higher 10 mg NH4-N L(-1) were only observed in lakes below pH 3. On the basis of the results from stable isotope investigations and the examination of a metadata set we conclude that the lower limit for nitrification in lakes is around pH 3.

  16. NetSig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Heiko; Lawrence, Michael S; Chouinard, Candace R

    2018-01-01

    Methods that integrate molecular network information and tumor genome data could complement gene-based statistical tests to identify likely new cancer genes; but such approaches are challenging to validate at scale, and their predictive value remains unclear. We developed a robust statistic (Net......Sig) that integrates protein interaction networks with data from 4,742 tumor exomes. NetSig can accurately classify known driver genes in 60% of tested tumor types and predicts 62 new driver candidates. Using a quantitative experimental framework to determine in vivo tumorigenic potential in mice, we found that Net......Sig candidates induce tumors at rates that are comparable to those of known oncogenes and are ten-fold higher than those of random genes. By reanalyzing nine tumor-inducing NetSig candidates in 242 patients with oncogene-negative lung adenocarcinomas, we find that two (AKT2 and TFDP2) are significantly amplified...

  17. Sources of nitrous and nitric oxides in paddy soils: nitrification and denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Ting; Han, Yong; Roelcke, Marco; Nieder, Rolf; Car, Zucong

    2014-03-01

    Rice-paddies are regarded as one of the main agricultural sources of N 2O and NO emissions. To date, however, specific N2O and NO production pathways are poorly understood in paddy soils. (15)N-tracing experiments were carried out to investigate the processes responsible for N2O and NO production in two paddy soils with substantially different soil properties. Laboratory incubation experiments were carried out under aerobic conditions at moisture contents corresponding to 60% of water holding capacity. The relative importance of nitrification and denitrification to the flux of N2O was quantified by periodically measuring and comparing the enrichments of the N2O, NH(+)4-N and NO(-)3-N pools. The results showed that both N2O and NO emission rates in an alkaline paddy soil with clayey texture were substantially higher than those in a neutral paddy soil with silty loamy texture. In accordance with most published results, the ammonium N pool was the main source of N2O emission across the soil profiles of the two paddy soils, being responsible for 59.7% to 97.7% of total N2O emissions. The NO(-)3-N pool of N2O emission was relatively less important under the given aerobic conditions. The rates of N2O emission from nitrification (N2On) among different soil layers were significantly different, which could be attributed to both the differences in gross N nitrification rates and to the ratios of nitrified N emitted as N2O among soil layers. Furthermore, NO fluxes were positively correlated with the changes in gross nitrification rates and the ratios of NO/N2O in the two paddy soils were always greater than one (from 1.26 to 6.47). We therefore deduce that, similar to N2O, nitrification was also the dominant source of NO in the tested paddy soils at water contents below 60% water holding capacity. Copyright © 2014 The Research Centre for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Biotransformation of pharmaceuticals under nitrification, nitratation and heterotrophic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Fontaina, E., E-mail: eduardo.fernandez.fontaina@usc.es [Department of Chemical Engineering, Institute of Technology, University of Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Gomes, I.B. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Institute of Technology, University of Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Aga, D.S. [Department of Chemistry, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14260 (United States); Omil, F.; Lema, J.M.; Carballa, M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Institute of Technology, University of Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2016-01-15

    The effect of nitrification, nitratation and heterotrophic conditions on the biotransformation of several pharmaceuticals in a highly enriched nitrifying activated sludge was evaluated in this study by selective activation of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB), nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) and heterotrophic bacteria. Nitrifiers displayed a noticeable capacity to process ibuprofen due to hydroxylation by ammonia monooxygenase (AMO) to produce 2-hydroxy-ibuprofen. Naproxen was also biotransformed under nitrifying conditions. On the other hand, heterotrophic bacteria present in the nitrifying activated sludge (NAS) biotransformed sulfamethoxazole. In contrast, both nitrifying and heterotrophic activities were ineffective against diclofenac, diazepam, carbamazepine and trimethoprim. Similar biotransformation rates of erythromycin, roxithromycin and fluoxetine were observed under all conditions tested. Overall, results from this study give more evidence on the role of the different microbial communities present in activated sludge reactors on the biological removal of pharmaceuticals. - Highlights: • The removal of pharmaceuticals in nitrifying activated sludge (NAS) was studied. • Nitrifying activity increases biotransformation rate of ibuprofen and naproxen. • Hydroxylation of ibuprofen by ammonia monooxygenase of ammonia oxidizing bacteria • Heterotrophic activity enhances biotransformation of sulfamethoxazole in NAS. • Recalcitrance of trimethoprim, diclofenac, carbamazepine and diazepam in NAS.

  19. Petri Nets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Associate Professor of. Computer Science and. Automation at the Indian. Institute of Science,. Bangalore. His research interests are broadly in the areas of stochastic modeling and scheduling methodologies for future factories; and object oriented modeling. GENERAL I ARTICLE. Petri Nets. 1. Overview and Foundations.

  20. Petri Nets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 8. Petri Nets - Overview and Foundations. Y Narahari. General Article Volume 4 Issue 8 August 1999 pp ... Author Affiliations. Y Narahari1. Department ot Computer Science and Automation, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India.

  1. The characteristics of a novel heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification bacterium, Bacillus methylotrophicus strain L7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing-Ling; Liu, Ying; Ai, Guo-Min; Miao, Li-Li; Zheng, Hai-Yan; Liu, Zhi-Pei

    2012-03-01

    Bacillus methylotrophicus strain L7, exhibited efficient heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification ability, with maximum NH(4)(+)-N and NO(2)(-)-N removal rate of 51.58 mg/L/d and 5.81 mg/L/d, respectively. Strain L7 showed different gaseous emitting patterns from those strains ever described. When (15)NH(4)Cl, or Na(15)NO(2), or K(15)NO(3) was used, results of GC-MS indicated that N(2)O was emitted as the intermediate of heterotrophic nitrification or aerobic denitrification, while GC-IRMS results showed that N(2) was produced as end product when nitrite was used. Single factor experiments suggested that the optimal conditions for heterotrophic nitrification were sodium succinate as carbon source, C/N 6, pH 7-8, 0 g/L NaCl, 37 °C and a wide range of NH(4)(+)-N from 80 to 1000 mg/L. Orthogonal tests showed that the optimal conditions for aerobic denitrification were C/N 20, pH 7-8, 10 g/L NaCl and DO 4.82 mg/L (shaking speed 50 r/min) when nitrite was served as substrate. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation of some nitrification inhibitors at different temperatures under laboratory conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehmat Ali, Hina Kanwal, Zafar Iqbal, Mohammad Yaqub

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Effect of eight compounds on nitrification of the applied (NH42 SO4 was studied in two soils incubated at high (35°C and moderate (16°C temperatures. The tested compounds included: 1H-benzotriazole; 4-amino-1,2,4-triazole; benzothiazole; 3-methylpyrazole-1-carboxamide; 4-bromo-3-methylpyrazole; pyrazole; lignosulfonic acid, molecular weight 52000, 6% S; and lignosulfonic acid, molecular weight 12000, 2% S. In the absence of inhibitors, nitrification of the applied ammonium was complete within one week at 35°C, whereas it took two to three weeks at 16°C. At 35°C, ATC was the most effective compound causing 44-71% inhibition up to four weeks when applied at 10 mg kg−1. The inhibitory effect of ATC increased with increasing application rate to 30 mg kg−1 (92–94% inhibition for four weeks. Although another compound viz. PZ applied at 10 mg kg−1 was also effective at 35°C, the inhibitory effect persisted up to three weeks (44-48% inhibition. At 16 °C, six of the test compounds (BTr, ATC, BTh, MPC, BMP and PZ effectively inhibited nitrification at least up to four weeks. At 16 °C also, ATC was the most effective compound causing 84-90% inhibition for four weeks when applied at 10 mg kg−1. The results suggested that ATC can be a potential nitrification inhibitor for agricultural use under summer as well as under winter soil temperatures prevailing in the Indo-Gangetic Plains of the South Asia.

  3. Effects of nitrogen application rates on net annual global warming potential and greenhouse gas intensity in double-rice cropping systems of the Southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhongdu; Chen, Fu; Zhang, Hailin; Liu, Shengli

    2016-12-01

    The net global warming potential (NGWP) and net greenhouse gas intensity (NGHGI) of double-rice cropping systems are not well documented. We measured the NGWP and NGHGI including soil organic carbon (SOC) change and indirect emissions (IE) from double-crop rice fields with fertilizing systems in Southern China. These experiments with three different nitrogen (N) application rates since 2012 are as follows: 165 kgN ha -1 for early rice and 225 kgN ha -1 for late rice (N1), which was the local N application rates as the control; 135 kgN ha -1 for early rice and 180 kgN ha -1 for late rice (N2, 20 % reduction); and 105 kgN ha -1 for early rice and 135 kgN ha -1 for late rice (N3, 40 % reduction). Results showed that yields increased with the increase of N application rate, but without significant difference between N1 and N2 plots. Annual SOC sequestration rate under N1 was estimated to be 1.15 MgC ha -1  year -1 , which was higher than those under other fertilizing systems. Higher N application tended to increase CH 4 emissions during the flooded rice season and significantly increased N 2 O emissions from drained soils during the nonrice season, ranking as N1 > N2 > N3 with significant difference (P < 0.05). Two-year average IE has a huge contribution to GHG emissions mainly coming from the higher N inputs in the double-rice cropping system. Reducing N fertilizer usage can effectively decrease the NGWP and NGHGI in the double-rice cropping system, with the lowest NGHGI obtained in the N2 plot (0.99 kg CO 2 -eq kg -1 yield year -1 ). The results suggested that agricultural economic viability and GHG mitigation can be simultaneously achieved by properly reducing N fertilizer application in double-rice cropping systems.

  4. Nitrogen mineralization and nitrification in a mixed-conifer forest in southern California: controlling factors, fluxes, and nitrogen fertilization response at a high and low nitrogen deposition site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark E. Fenn; Mark A. Poth; Joseph D. Terry; Timothy J. Blubaugh

    2005-01-01

    Net fluxes of nitrogen (N) mineralization and nitrification were measured in situ on a monthly basis for 3 years at a high (HN) and low (LN) N deposition site in the San Bernardino Mountains, California. Mean N mineralization fluxes in the forest floor and top 10 cm of mineral soil were 19.0 and 59.8 kg N·ha–1·year–1 at LN...

  5. Inhibitory effect of cyanide on nitrification process and its eliminating method in a suspended activated sludge process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yuanyuan; Jin, Xibiao; Wang, Yuan; Liu, Yongdi; Chen, Xiurong

    2014-02-01

    Inhibition of nitrification by four typical pollutants (acrylonitrile, acrylic acid, acetonitrile and cyanide) in acrylonitrile wastewater was investigated. The inhibitory effect of cyanide on nitrification was strongest, with a 50% inhibitory concentration of 0.218 mg·gVSS-1 being observed in a municipal activated sludge system. However, the performance of nitrification was recovered when cyanide was completely degraded. The nitrification, which had been inhibited by 4.17 mg·gVSS-1 of free cyanide for 24 h, was recovered to greater than 95% of that without cyanide after 10 days of recovery. To overcome cyanide inhibition, cyanide-degrading bacteria were cultivated in a batch reactor by increasing the influent cyanide concentration in a stepwise manner, which resulted in an increase in the average cyanide degradation rate from 0.14 to 1.01 mg CN-·gVSS-1·h-1 over 20 days. The cultured cyanide-degrading bacteria were shaped like short rods, and the dominant cyanide-degrading bacteria strain was identified as Pseudomonas fluorescens NCIMB by PCR.

  6. Nitrification and denitrification in two-chamber microbial fuel cells for treatment of wastewater containing high concentrations of ammonia nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Haixia; Li, Fusheng; Yu, Zaiji; Feng, Chunhua; Li, Wenhan

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous nitrification and denitrification in the aerated cathode chamber of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) inoculated with nitrifying bacteria were investigated using two-chamber MFCs. Based on the variations of [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] in the cathode chamber of four MFCs added with different concentrations of [Formula: see text] (50, 65, 130 and 230 mg/L), the occurrence of simultaneous nitrification and denitrification leading to effective removal of nitrogen was confirmed. Electrochemical reaction with electrons transferred from the anode chamber was found to be the major mechanism responsible for the removal of [Formula: see text] in the cathode chamber. The estimated values of the first-order rate constant for nitrification and denitrification varied in the range of 0.3-1.7 day(-1) and 0.2-0.9 day(-1), revealing a decreasing trend with increases in the initial [Formula: see text] concentrations and the detected maximum concentration of the nitrification product of [Formula: see text] in the cathode chamber, respectively.

  7. NETS FOR PEACH PROTECTED CULTIVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelia Schettini

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to investigate the radiometric properties of coloured nets used to protect a peach cultivation. The modifications of the solar spectral distribution, mainly in the R and FR wavelength band, influence plant photomorphogenesis by means of the phytochrome and cryptochrome. The phytochrome response is characterized in terms of radiation rate in the red wavelengths (R, 600-700 nm to that in the farred radiation (FR, 700-800 nm, i.e. the R/FR ratio. The effects of the blue radiation (B, 400-500 nm is investigated by the ratio between the blue radiation and the far-red radiation, i.e. the B/FR ratio. A BLUE net, a RED net, a YELLOW net, a PEARL net, a GREY net and a NEUTRAL net were tested in Bari (Italy, latitude 41° 05’ N. Peach trees were located in pots inside the greenhouses and in open field. The growth of the trees cultivated in open field was lower in comparison to the growth of the trees grown under the nets. The RED, PEARL, YELLOW and GREY nets increased the growth of the trees more than the other nets. The nets positively influenced the fruit characteristics, such as fruit weight and flesh firmness.

  8. Is nitrification the only cause of microbiologically induced chloramine decay?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawade, Emma; Monis, Paul; Cook, David; Drikas, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Ammonia degradation was investigated in three batch reactors with differing initial concentrations of bacteria present in the same filtered water source based on pre-treatment filtration techniques. The potential for the bacterial community to degrade the ammonia present was determined in the absence of monochloramine, simulating a distribution system where a loss of disinfectant residual has occurred. Nitrification was observed in only one of the three batch reactors, whereas rapid microbiologically induced chloramine decay was present in two reactors. Results suggest that the microbial decay factor is not a valid tool for indication of nitrification, but may be used as an indicator of the occurrence of rapid monochloramine decay. Intact bacterial cell numbers did not to correlate with changes in ammonia, nitrite or nitrate concentrations and hence did not correlate with the nitrification observed. Neither use of the microbial decay factor or monitoring of ammonia oxidising prokaryotes provided an early indication for the occurrence of nitrification. Hence, monitoring of ammonia and nitrite would still be the most suitable tool for indicating nitrification. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Distinctive microbial ecology and biokinetics of autotrophic ammonia and nitrite oxidation in a partial nitrification bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Joon Ho; Yu, Ran; Chandran, Kartik

    2008-08-15

    Biological nitrogen removal (BNR) based on partial nitrification and denitrification via nitrite is a cost-effective alternate to conventional nitrification and denitrification (via nitrate). The goal of this study was to investigate the microbial ecology, biokinetics, and stability of partial nitrification. Stable long-term partial nitrification resulting in 82.1 +/- 17.2% ammonia oxidation, primarily to nitrite (77.3 +/- 19.5% of the ammonia oxidized) was achieved in a lab-scale bioreactor by operation at a pH, dissolved oxygen and solids retention time of 7.5 +/- 0.1, 1.54 +/- 0.87 mg O(2)/L, and 3.0 days, respectively. Bioreactor ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) populations were most closely related to Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrobacter spp., respectively. The AOB population fraction varied in the range 61 +/- 45% and was much higher than the NOB fraction, 0.71 +/- 1.1%. Using direct measures of bacterial concentrations in conjunction with independent activity measures and mass balances, the maximum specific growth rate (micro(max)), specific decay (b) and observed biomass yield coefficients (Y(obs)) for AOB were 1.08 +/- 1.03 day(-1), 0.32 +/- 0.34 day(-1), and 0.15 +/- 0.06 mg biomass COD/mg N oxidized, respectively. Corresponding micro(max), b, and Y(obs) values for NOB were 2.6 +/- 2.05 day(-1), 1.7 +/- 1.9 day(-1), and 0.04 +/- 0.02 mg biomass COD/mg N oxidized, respectively. The results of this study demonstrate that the highly selective partial nitrification operating conditions enriched for a narrow diversity of rapidly growing AOB and NOB populations unlike conventional BNR reactors, which host a broader diversity of nitrifying bacteria. Further, direct measures of microbial abundance enabled not only elucidation of mixed community microbial ecology but also estimation of key engineering parameters describing bioreactor systems supporting these communities. 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Applicability of two-step models in estimating nitrification kinetics from batch respirograms under different relative dynamics of ammonia and nitrite oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, K; Smets, B F

    2000-10-05

    A mechanistically based nitrification model was formulated to facilitate determination of both NH(4)(+)-N to NO(2)(-)-N and NO(2)(-)-N to NO(3)(-)-N oxidation kinetics from a single NH(4)(+)-N to NO(3)(-)-N batch-oxidation profile by explicitly considering the kinetics of each oxidation step. The developed model incorporated a novel convention for expressing the concentrations of nitrogen species in terms of their nitrogenous oxygen demand (NOD). Stoichiometric coefficients relating nitrogen removal, oxygen uptake, and biomass synthesis were derived from an electron-balanced equation.%A parameter identifiability analysis of the developed two-step model revealed a decrease in correlation and an increase in the precision of the kinetic parameter estimates when NO(2)(-)-N oxidation kinetics became increasingly rate-limiting. These findings demonstrate that two-step models describe nitrification kinetics adequately only when NH(4)(+)-N to NO(3)(-)-N oxidation profiles contain sufficient information pertaining to both nitrification steps. Thus, the rate-determining step in overall nitrification must be identified before applying conventionally used models to describe batch nitrification respirograms.

  11. Fluorescence Sensors for Early Detection of Nitrification in Drinking Water Distribution Systems – Interference Corrections (Poster)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrification event detection in chloraminated drinking water distribution systems (DWDSs) remains an ongoing challenge for many drinking water utilities, including Dallas Water Utilities (DWU) and the City of Houston (CoH). Each year, these utilities experience nitrification eve...

  12. Fluorescence Sensors for Early Detection of Nitrification in Drinking Water Distribution Systems – Interference Corrections (Abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrification event detection in chloraminated drinking water distribution systems (DWDSs) remains an ongoing challenge for many drinking water utilities, including Dallas Water Utilities (DWU) and the City of Houston (CoH). Each year, these utilities experience nitrification eve...

  13. Biological nitrification inhibition (BNI)-Is there potential for genetic interventions in the Triticeae?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Subbarao, Guntur Venkata; Kishii, Masahiro; Nakahara, Kazuhiko; Ishikawa, Takayuki; Ban, Tomohiro; Tsujimoto, Hisashi; George, Timothy S; Berry, Wade L; Hash, C. Tom; Ito, Osamu

    2009-01-01

    The natural ability of plants to release chemical substances from their roots that have a suppressing effect on nitrifier activity and soil nitrification, is termed 'biological nitrification inhibition' (BNI...

  14. Applying Molecular Tools for Monitoring Inhibition of Nitrification by Heavy Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    The biological removal of ammonia in conventional wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is performed by promoting nitrification and denitrification as sequential steps. The first step in nitrification, the oxidation of ammonia to nitrite by ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB), is sens...

  15. Effects of Nitrification Inhibitors and Sulphur Coated Urea(SCU on Different Nitrogen Sources and Wheat Yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Yong-qiang

    2016-05-01

    (CK, only urea, SCU and the combination use of DCD, TFR, THU three concentration gradients(0.5%, 1%, 2% of urea dosage with urea respectively. The results showed:the inhibition of nitrification was gradually enhanced with the increase of its concentration, high dose nitrification inhibitor decreased the content of soil NO3--N significantly, the soil NO3--N concentration with DCD, THU, TFR at the 2% dosage were lower than that with only urea by 29%, 22% and 14% respectively, and the inhibition effect of soil apparent nitrification rate was also 2%DCD> 2%THU> 2%TFR. The SCU treatment effect was close to the 2% DCD function strength, and it reflected the inhibition effect in the early stage of application, the soil apparent nitrification rate in the seventy-fourth days after fertilization was significantly lower than that of using the nitrification inhibition(P<0.05. Both of nitrification inhibitor and SCU could make the soil NH4+-N concentration at a higher level, and the more inhibitor dosage, the higher the content of NH4+-N in soil. Compared with the single application of urea, urea + DCD model could all increase wheat yield at 0.5%, 1%, 2% concentration and reached a significant level(P<0.05. When THU was added at 1% and 2% coucentration, wheat yield was significantly higher than that of the single application of urea, but the increase yield effect was lower than that of DCD treatment. On the whole, the effect of SCU on the control and release nitrogen was more lasting than that of nitrification inhibitor, among three nitrification inhibitors, TFR and DCD were better than THU in controlling soil ammonia nitrogen transformation, soil nitrification inhibition and urease inhibition. The study can provide scientific basis for the screening of nitrification inhibitors and coated fertilizers, but the long-term use of exogenous additives may cause potential harm to soil environment, so it need to be further studied about the morphological transformation and long-term role of

  16. Direct chemical measurement of DNA synthesis and net rates of differentiation of rat lens epithelial cells in vivo: applied to the selenium cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenedella, R J

    1987-05-01

    This report describes a direct chemical method for rapidly estimating DNA synthesis and net rates of epithelial cell differentiation in the ocular lens in vivo. DNA synthesis in the lens of control and selenium-treated rats (12- or 13 days of age) was estimated by chemically isolating and measuring trichloroacetic acid (TCA)-insoluble 3H from the lens following injection of [3H]thymidine. Labeled substrate for DNA synthesis peaked in the lens at 1 hr after injection, decreased markedly by the third hour and was essentially gone by hour 12. Synthesis of labeled DNA in the lens was largely complete by about 3 hr. The [3H]DNA content of the whole lens, measured as TCA-insoluble 3H, remained constant for at least 4 months. The distribution of labeled epithelial cells between the epithelial-cell layer and fiber-cell mass was followed for up to 1 month after injection by measuring the ratio of [3H]DNA in the capsule (epithelial-cell layer) to lens body. Between days 2-3 and day 14 after injection, the ratio of [3H]DNA in the epithelial-cell layer to lens fiber cells decreased linearly in a semilogarithmic plot of the ratio vs. time; i.e. the rate of change of the ratio followed first-order kinetics. Thus, the rate constant (k) for the rate of change in the ratio of [3H]DNA in the capsule layer to lens body can provide an estimate of the percentage of the labeled epithelial cells which leave the capsule per day through differentiation into fiber cells. An apparent rate constant of 0.27 day-1 was estimated from the mean of five experiments; i.e. 27% of labeled epithelial cells were differentiating into cortical fiber cells per day. Therefore, about 70% of the germinative epithelial cells would be replaced every 4 days in these rats. This value is in good agreement with results of studies using autoradiographic technics. The selenium cataract is reported to involve rapid damage to lens epithelial cells. Incorporation of [3H]thymidine into DNA was decreased by at least 60

  17. Enhancing nitrification at low temperature with zeolite in a mining operations retention pond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misha eMiazga-Rodriguez

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Ammonium nitrate explosives are used in mining operations at Diavik Diamond Mines Inc. in the Northwest Territories, Canada. Residual nitrogen is washed into the mine pit and piped to a nearby retention pond where its removal is accomplished by microbial activity prior to a final water treatment step and release into the sub-Arctic lake, Lac de Gras. Microbial removal of ammonium in the retention pond is rapid during the brief ice-free summer, but often slows under ice cover that persists up to nine months of the year. The aluminosilicate mineral zeolite was tested as an additive to retention pond water to increase rates of ammonium removal at 4 °C. Water samples were collected across the length of the retention pond monthly over a year. The structure of the microbial community (bacteria, archaea, and eukarya, as determined by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of PCR-amplified small subunit ribosomal RNA genes, was more stable during cold months than during July-September, when there was a marked phytoplankton bloom. Of the ammonia-oxidizing community, only bacterial amoA genes were consistently detected. Zeolite (10 g was added to retention pond water (100 mL amended with 5 mM ammonium and incubated at 12 °C to encourage development of a nitrifying biofilm. The biofilm community was composed of different amoA phylotypes from those identified in gene clone libraries of native water samples. Zeolite biofilm was added to fresh water samples collected at different times of the year, resulting in a significant increase in laboratory measurements of potential nitrification activity at 4 °C. A significant positive correlation between the amount of zeolite biofilm and potential nitrification activity was observed; rates were unaffected in incubations containing 1-20 mM ammonium. Addition of zeolite to retention ponds in cold environments could effectively increase nitrification rates year round by concentrating active nitrifying biomass.

  18. Chronic impact of tetracycline on nitrification kinetics and the activity of enriched nitrifying microbial culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katipoglu-Yazan, Tugce; Merlin, Christophe; Pons, Marie-Noëlle; Ubay-Cokgor, Emine; Orhon, Derin

    2015-04-01

    This study evaluated the chronic impact of tetracycline on biomass with enriched nitrifying community sustained in a lab-scale activated sludge system. For this purpose, a fill and draw reactor fed with 100 mg COD/L of peptone mixture and 50 mg N/L of ammonia was sustained at a sludge age of 15 days. At steady-state, the reactor operation was continued with a daily tetracycline dosing of 50 mg/L for more than 40 days, with periodic monitoring of the microbial composition, the nitrifying bacteria abundance, as well as the amoA and 16S rRNA gene activity, using molecular techniques. Changes in the kinetics of nitrification were quantified by modelling concentration profiles of major nitrogen fractions and oxygen uptake rate profiles derived from parallel batch experiments. Activated sludge modeling results indicated inhibitory impact of tetracycline on the growth of nitrifiers with a significant increase of the half saturation coefficients in corresponding rate equations. Tetracycline also inactivated biomass components of the enriched culture at a gradually increasing rate with time of exposure, leading to total collapse of nitrification. Molecular analyses revealed significant changes in the composition of the microbial community throughout the observation period. They also showed that continuous exposure to tetracycline inflicted significant reduction in amoA mRNA and 16S rRNA levels directly affecting nitrification. The chronic impact was much more pronounced on the ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) community. These observations explained the basis of numerical changes identified in the growth kinetics of nitrifiers under stress conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Parametric Net Influx Rate Images of68Ga-DOTATOC and68Ga-DOTATATE: Quantitative Accuracy and Improved Image Contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilan, Ezgi; Sandström, Mattias; Velikyan, Irina; Sundin, Anders; Eriksson, Barbro; Lubberink, Mark

    2017-05-01

    68 Ga-DOTATOC and 68 Ga-DOTATATE are radiolabeled somatostatin analogs used for the diagnosis of somatostatin receptor-expressing neuroendocrine tumors (NETs), and SUV measurements are suggested for treatment monitoring. However, changes in net influx rate ( K i ) may better reflect treatment effects than those of the SUV, and accordingly there is a need to compute parametric images showing K i at the voxel level. The aim of this study was to evaluate parametric methods for computation of parametric K i images by comparison to volume of interest (VOI)-based methods and to assess image contrast in terms of tumor-to-liver ratio. Methods: Ten patients with metastatic NETs underwent a 45-min dynamic PET examination followed by whole-body PET/CT at 1 h after injection of 68 Ga-DOTATOC and 68 Ga-DOTATATE on consecutive days. Parametric K i images were computed using a basis function method (BFM) implementation of the 2-tissue-irreversible-compartment model and the Patlak method using a descending aorta image-derived input function, and mean tumor K i values were determined for 50% isocontour VOIs and compared with K i values based on nonlinear regression (NLR) of the whole-VOI time-activity curve. A subsample of healthy liver was delineated in the whole-body and K i images, and tumor-to-liver ratios were calculated to evaluate image contrast. Correlation ( R 2 ) and agreement between VOI-based and parametric K i values were assessed using regression and Bland-Altman analysis. Results: The R 2 between NLR-based and parametric image-based (BFM) tumor K i values was 0.98 (slope, 0.81) and 0.97 (slope, 0.88) for 68 Ga-DOTATOC and 68 Ga-DOTATATE, respectively. For Patlak analysis, the R 2 between NLR-based and parametric-based (Patlak) tumor K i was 0.95 (slope, 0.71) and 0.92 (slope, 0.74) for 68 Ga-DOTATOC and 68 Ga-DOTATATE, respectively. There was no bias between NLR and parametric-based K i values. Tumor-to-liver contrast was 1.6 and 2.0 times higher in the parametric

  20. Nitrification in the Schelde estuary: methodological aspects and factors influencing its activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bie, M.J.M. de; Starink, M.; Boschker, H.T.S.; Peene, J.J.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    2002-01-01

    We present a 15-month dataset on nitrification measurements in the Schelde estuary (Belgium and The Netherlands). Nitrification was estimated using the N-serve sensitive dark 14C-bicarbonate incorporation technique. A peak of nitrification activity was observed in the freshwater part of the

  1. Nitrification in the Schelde estuary: methodological aspects and factors influencing its activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Bie, M.J.M.; Starink, Mathieu; Boschker, H.T.S.; Peene, J.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    2002-01-01

    We present a 15-month dataset on nitrification measurements in the Schelde estuary (Belgium and The Netherlands). Nitrification was estimated using the N-serve sensitive dark 14C-bicarbonate incorporation technique. A peak of nitrification activity was observed in the freshwater part of the estuary.

  2. Contributions of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and bacteria to nitrification in Oregon forest soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xinda Lu; Peter J. Bottomley; David D. Myrold

    2015-01-01

    Ammonia oxidation, the first step of nitrification, is mediated by both ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB); however, the relative contributions of AOA and AOB to soil nitrification are not well understood. In this study we used 1-octyne to discriminate between AOA-and AOB-supported nitrifi-cation determined both in soil-water slurries and in unsaturated...

  3. Nitrogen mineralization rates of the acidic, xeric soils of the New Jersey Pinelands: field rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poovarodom, S.; Tate, R.L. III; Bloom, R.A.

    1988-04-01

    Using the buried-bag procedure, the authors quantified nitrogen mineralization rates in the xeric, acidic Lakehurst, and Atsion sands of the New Jersey Pine Barrens. Average annual nitrogen yields in the upper 15 cm for the Lakehurst and the Atsion sands were 38.4 and 53.0 kg N/ha, corresponding to 4.5 and 2.5% of the total nitrogen, respectively. Net nitrogen mineralization in both soils exhibited distinct seasonal patterns with maxima in summer and minimum rates in the winter. Nitrification accounted for only 5% of the total N mineralized in both soils. This is consistent with the finding of low populations of autotrophic nitrifiers in these soils.

  4. Use of bioreactor landfill for nitrogen removal to enhance methane production through ex situ simultaneous nitrification-denitrification and in situ denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaojie; Zhang, Hongxia; Cheng, Zhaowen

    2017-08-01

    High concentrations of nitrate-nitrogen (NO3--N) derived from ex situ nitrification phase can inhibit methane production during ex situ nitrification and in situ denitrification bioreactor landfill. A combined process comprised of ex situ simultaneous nitrification-denitrification (SND) in an aged refuse bioreactor (ARB) and in situ denitrification in a fresh refuse bioreactor (FRB) was conducted to reduce the negative effect of high concentrationsof NO3--N. Ex situ SND can be achieved because NO3--N concentration can be reduced and the removal rate of ammonium-nitrogen (NH4+-N) remains largely unchanged when the ventilation rate of ARB-A2 is controlled. The average NO3--N concentrations of effluent were 470mg/L in ex situ nitrification ARB-A1 and 186mg/L in ex situ SND ARB-A2. The average NH4+-N removal rates of ARB-A1 and ARB-A2 were 98% and 94%, respectively. Based on the experimental data from week 4 to week 30, it is predicted that NH4+-N concentration in FRB-F1 of the ex situ nitrification and in situ denitrification process would reach 25mg/L after 63weeks, and about 40weeks for the FRB-F2 of ex situ SND and in situ denitrification process . Ex situ SND and in situ denitrification process can improve themethane production of FRB-F2. The lag phase time of methane production for the FRB-F2 was 11weeks. This phase was significantly shorter than the 15-week phases of FRB-F1 in ex situ nitrification and in situ denitrification process. A seven-week stabilizationphase was required to increase methane content from 5% to 50% for FRB-F2. Methane content in FRB-F1 did not reach 50% but reached the 45% peak after 20weeks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Sustainable nitrification in fluidised bed reactor with immobilised ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sustainable nitrification in fluidised bed reactor with immobilised sludge pellets. Y Wang, W Zhou, Z Li, W Wu, Z Zhang. Abstract. Sustainable immobilised microbial pellets were developed with water-borne polyurethane (WPU) material together with powdered activated carbon (PAC) and activated sludge as microbial ...

  6. A Mini-Nitrification Test for Toxicity Screening, Minntox

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvin, Erik; Dyreborg, Søren; Menck, C.

    1994-01-01

    There is a high demand for a rapid, simple, and inexpensive test for screening of the toxicity of wastewater, polluted groundwater and chemicals in order to protect sewage treatment plants and aquatic and terrestrial recipients. The mini-nitrification test, MINNTOX, presented here, fulfils...

  7. Inhibition of Nitrification by Creosote-Contaminated Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyreborg, Søren; Arvin, Erik

    1995-01-01

    A leaching experiment was carried out in a saturated sand column contaminated with creosote. The toxicity of the leachate was determined by the inhibition of nitrification. Good correlations between the toxicity and the concentrations of five selected creosote compounds (benzene, toluene, o-xylen...

  8. Modelling and simulation of a nitrification biofilter for drinking water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For the purification of pure and microbiologically safe drinking water, different treatment steps are necessary. One of those steps is the removal of ammonium, which can, e.g. be accomplished through nitrification in a biofilter. In this study, a model for such a nitrifying biofilter was developed and the model was ...

  9. NITRIFICATION AT LOW PH BY AGGREGATED CHEMOLITHOTROPHIC BACTERIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, W. de; Klein Gunnewiek, P.J.A.; Veenhuis, M.; Bock, E.; Laanbroek, H.J.

    1991-01-01

    A study was performed to gain insight into the mechanism of acid-tolerant, chemolithotrophic nitrification. Microorganisms that nitrified at pH 4 were enriched from two Dutch acid soils. Nitrate production in the enrichment cultures was indicated to be of a chemolithoautotrophic nature as it was (i)

  10. Nitrification in acid soils: micro-organisms and mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Boer, W.; Kowalchuk, G.A.

    2001-01-01

    Nitrification in acid soils was first reported in the beginning of the 20th century. Although this finding has been well substantiated by countless studies since then, it has until recently remained unclear which micro-organisms were responsible for nitrate production at low pH. Substantial evidence

  11. Sustainable nitrification in fluidised bed reactor with immobilised ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-02-01

    Feb 1, 2012 ... pH (Ciudad et al., 2007). However, some options are not easily practicable. The inhibition of NOB may not be effective because of microbial adaptation ability. A relatively low DO is a crucial factor to achieve stable partial nitrification(Garrido et al., 1997) but a low-DO condition may cause the growth of ...

  12. Microbial nitrification, denitrification and respiration in the leached cinnamon soil of the upper basin of Miyun Reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wen; Cai, Yan-Peng; Yang, Zhi-Feng; Yin, Xin-An; Tan, Qian

    2017-01-01

    Leached cinnamon soil is the main agricultural soil distributed in the North China Plain. In this research, leached cinnamon soil samples were collected in the upper basin of Miyun Reservoir (northeast of Beijing, China). The BaPS method (Barometric Process Separation) was applied to measure nitrification, denitrification and respiration rates. The rates of nitrification, denitrification and respiration were 0–120.35 μg N/kg SDW h, 0–246.86 μg N/kg SDW h and 0.17–225.85 μg C/kg SDW h (Soil Dry Weight, SDW), respectively. The emission rates of CO2 and NxOy through nitrification, denitrification and respiration were 1.00–547.80 and 6.00–4850.65 μmol/h, respectively. The analysis of relationships between nitrification, denitrification and respiration rates indicated that these three microbial processes were interacted, which posed impacts on soil nitrogen availability. As indicated by the results, C:N ratio coupled with content could be taken as the indicators of content, which is usually the predominant form of N available to plants growing in soil. Results showed that content was the highest (i.e., >62.4 mg/kg) when C:N ratio was 5.30–8.40, meanwhile content was 3.71–4.39 mg/kg. Nevertheless, content was the lowest (i.e., <6.40 mg/kg) when C:N ratio was 9.2–12.10, meanwhile content was 3.41–4.35 mg/kg. PMID:28165035

  13. Inhibition of Nitrification by Root Exudates and Plant Materials fromBrachiaria humidicola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.K Suri

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nitrification inhibitors are synthetic or natural compounds highly specific in inhibiting ammonium oxidation to nitrate. Therefore, they are widely used in combination with ammonium fertilizers. Among plants, grasses always are interested for their role in controlling nitrification, and recently the form of nitrogen (ammonium vs. nitrate was shown to be an important factor in release of natural nitrification inhibitors (NNI from grasses. In this study production and release of natural nitrification inhibitors in Brachiaria humidicola was investigated. To study the effects of nitrogen forms on production and release of NNIs, brachiaria seedlings were grown in nutrient solution culture with either ammonium or nitrate, under controlled conditions. Root exudates were collected in two different mediums, distilled water or ammonium chloride, and with shoot and root homogenates were applied separately for their potential nitrification inhibition effect. The results, however, showed that when root exudates were collected in distilled water, there was no inhibitory effect on nitrification, but when root exudates were collected in a medium containing 1 mM NH4Cl, it showed significant nitrification inhibition in our soil nitrification test (bioassay. Leaf but not root homogenates also showed significant nitrification inhibition, independent of N form. This in turn suggests that synthesis of natural nitrification inhibitors in this grass is independent of nitrogen form. Keywords: Nitrification, Root exudates, Ammonium, Nitrate, Brachiaria humidicola, Leaf and root homogenates

  14. Complete nutrient recovery from source-separated urine by nitrification and distillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udert, K M; Wächter, M

    2012-02-01

    In this study we present a method to recover all nutrients from source-separated urine in a dry solid by combining biological nitrification with distillation. In a first process step, a membrane-aerated biofilm reactor was operated stably for more than 12 months, producing a nutrient solution with a pH between 6.2 and 7.0 (depending on the pH set-point), and an ammonium to nitrate ratio between 0.87 and 1.15 gN gN(-1). The maximum nitrification rate was 1.8 ± 0.3 gN m(-2) d(-1). Process stability was achieved by controlling the pH via the influent. In the second process step, real nitrified urine and synthetic solutions were concentrated in lab-scale distillation reactors. All nutrients were recovered in a dry powder except for some ammonia (less than 3% of total nitrogen). We estimate that the primary energy demand for a simple nitrification/distillation process is four to five times higher than removing nitrogen and phosphorus in a conventional wastewater treatment plant and producing the equivalent amount of phosphorus and nitrogen fertilizers. However, the primary energy demand can be reduced to values very close to conventional treatment, if 80% of the water is removed with reverse osmosis and distillation is operated with vapor compression. The ammonium nitrate content of the solid residue is below the limit at which stringent EU safety regulations for fertilizers come into effect; nevertheless, we propose some additional process steps that will increase the thermal stability of the solid product. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Multivariate statistical assessment of a polluted river under nitrification inhibition in the tropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Thi Thu Huyen; Zeunert, Stephanie; Lorenz, Malte; Meon, Günter

    2017-05-01

    A large complex water quality data set of a polluted river, the Tay Ninh River, was evaluated to identify its water quality problems, to assess spatial variation, to determine the main pollution sources, and to detect relationships between parameters. This river is highly polluted with organic substances, nutrients, and total iron. An important problem of the river is the inhibition of the nitrification. For the evaluation, different statistical techniques including cluster analysis (CA), discriminant analysis (DA), and principal component analysis (PCA) were applied. CA clustered 10 water quality stations into three groups corresponding to extreme, high, and moderate pollution. DA used only seven parameters to differentiate the defined clusters. The PCA resulted in four principal components. The first PC is related to conductivity, NH4-N, PO4-P, and TP and determines nutrient pollution. The second PC represents the organic pollution. The iron pollution is illustrated in the third PC having strong positive loadings for TSS and total Fe. The fourth PC explains the dependence of DO on the nitrate production. The nitrification inhibition was further investigated by PCA. The results showed a clear negative correlation between DO and NH4-N and a positive correlation between DO and NO3-N. The influence of pH on the NH4-N oxidation could not be detected by PCA because of the very low nitrification rate due to the constantly low pH of the river and because of the effect of wastewater discharge with very high NH4-N concentrations. The results are deepening the understanding of the governing water quality processes and hence to manage the river basins sustainably.

  16. The effect of modifying rooting depths and nitrification inhibitors on nutrient uptake from organic biogas residues in maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Charlotte C.; Koller, Robert; Nagel, Kerstin A.; Schickling, Anke; Schrey, Silvia D.; Jablonowski, Nicolai D.

    2017-04-01

    Optimizing the application of and nutrient uptake from organic nutrient sources, such as the nutrient-rich residues ("digestates") from the biogas industry, is becoming a viable option in remediating fertility on previously unsuitable soils for agricultural utilization. Proposedly, concurrent changes in root system architecture and functioning could also serve as the basis of future phytomining approaches. Herein, we evaluate the effect of spatial nutrient availability and nitrification on maize root architecture and nutrient uptake. We test these effects by applying maize-based digestate at a rate of 170 kg/ha in layers of varying depths (10, 25 and 40 cm) and through either the presence or absence of nitrification inhibitors. In order to regularly monitor above- and below-ground plant biomass production, we used the noninvasive phenotyping platform, GROWSCREEN-Rhizo at the Forschungszentrum Jülich, using rhizotrons (Nagel et al., 2012). Measured parameters included projected plant height and leaf area, as well as root length and spatial distribution. Additionally, root diameters were quantified after the destructive harvest, 21 days after sowing (DAS). Spatial nutrient availability significantly affected root system architecture, as for example root system size -the area occupied by roots- increased alongside nutrient layer depths. Fertilization also positively affected root length density (RLD). Within fertilized layers, the presence of nitrification inhibitors increased RLD by up to 30% and was most pronounced in the fine root biomass fraction (0.1 to 0.5mm). Generally, nitrification inhibitors promoted early plant growth by up to 45% across treatments. However, their effect varied in dependence of layer depths, leading to a time-delayed response in deeper layers, accounting for plants having to grow significantly longer roots in order to reach fertilized substrate. Nitrification inhibitors also initiated the comparatively early on-set of growth differences in

  17. Net Gain

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    %) in malaria disease rates following introduction of ITNs. The results of standard clinical trials (randomized, controlled, and using sufficiently large samples) that measured impact on malaria disease in Africa are shown in Table 1. Other studies ...

  18. Simultaneous Heterotrophic Nitrification and Aerobic Denitrification by Chryseobacterium sp. R31 Isolated from Abattoir Wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Pradyut; Pramanik, Arnab; Dasgupta, Arpita; Mukherjee, Somnath; Mukherjee, Joydeep

    2014-01-01

    A heterotrophic carbon utilizing microbe (R31) capable of simultaneous nitrification and denitrification (SND) was isolated from wastewater of an Indian slaughterhouse. From an initial COD value of 583.0 mg/L, 95.54% was removed whilst, from a starting NH4 +-N concentration of 55.7 mg/L, 95.87% was removed after 48 h contact. The concentrations of the intermediates hydroxylamine, nitrite, and nitrate were low, thus ensuring nitrogen removal. Aerobic denitrification occurring during ammonium removal by R31 was confirmed by utilization of both nitrate and nitrite as nitrogen substrates. Glucose and succinate were superior while acetate and citrate were poor substrates for nitrogen removal. Molecular phylogenetic identification, supported by chemotaxonomic and physiological properties, assigned R31 as a close relative of Chryseobacterium haifense. The NH4 +-N utilization rate and growth of strain R31 were found to be higher at C/N = 10 in comparison to those achieved with C/N ratios of 5 and 20. Monod kinetic coefficients, half saturation concentration (K s), maximum rate of substrate utilization (k), yield coefficient, (Y) and endogenous decay coefficient (K d) indicated potential application of R31 in large-scale SND process. This is the first report on concomitant carbon oxidation, nitrification, and denitrification in the genus Chryseobacterium and the associated kinetic coefficients. PMID:24991552

  19. Potential for biological nitrification inhibition to reduce nitrification and N2O emissions in pasture crop-livestock systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbarao, G V; Rao, I M; Nakahara, K; Sahrawat, K L; Ando, Y; Kawashima, T

    2013-06-01

    Agriculture and livestock production systems are two major emitters of greenhouse gases. Methane with a GWP (global warming potential) of 21, and nitrous oxide (N2O) with a GWP of 300, are largely emitted from animal production agriculture, where livestock production is based on pasture and feed grains. The principal biological processes involved in N2O emissions are nitrification and denitrification. Biological nitrification inhibition (BNI) is the natural ability of certain plant species to release nitrification inhibitors from their roots that suppress nitrifier activity, thus reducing soil nitrification and N2O emission. Recent methodological developments (e.g. bioluminescence assay to detect BNIs in plant root systems) have led to significant advances in our ability to quantify and characterize the BNI function. Synthesis and release of BNIs from plants is a highly regulated process triggered by the presence of NH4 + in the rhizosphere, which results in the inhibitor being released precisely where the majority of the soil-nitrifier population resides. Among the tropical pasture grasses, the BNI function is strongest (i.e. BNI capacity) in Brachiaria sp. Some feed-grain crops such as sorghum also have significant BNI capacity present in their root systems. The chemical identity of some of these BNIs has now been established, and their mode of inhibitory action on Nitrosomonas has been characterized. The ability of the BNI function in Brachiaria pastures to suppress N2O emissions and soil nitrification potential has been demonstrated; however, its potential role in controlling N2O emissions in agro-pastoral systems is under investigation. Here we present the current status of our understanding on how the BNI functions in Brachiaria pastures and feed-grain crops such as sorghum can be exploited both genetically and, from a production system's perspective, to develop low-nitrifying and low N2O-emitting production systems that would be economically profitable and

  20. [Inhibitory effect of DMPP on soil nitrification as affected by soil moisture content, pH and organic matter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yan; Wu, Zhi-Jie; Zhang, Li-Li; Gong, Ping; Dong, Xin-Xin; Nie, Yan-Xia

    2012-10-01

    A laboratory incubation test with meadow brown soil was conducted to study the inhibitory effect of 3,4-dimethylpyrazole phosphate (DMPP) on soil nitrification as affected by soil moisture content (40%, 60% and 80% of the maximum field capacity), pH (4, 7 and 10), and organic matter (retained and removal). With the decrease of soil moisture content, the degradation of DMPP in soil tended to slow down, and the oxidation of soil NH4+ was more inhibited. At pH 10, more DMPP was remained in soil, and had the greatest inhibitory effect; at pH 7 and pH 4, the DMPP was lesser remained, with a smaller inhibitory effect. The removal of organic matter prolonged the remaining time of DMPP in soil, and decreased the apparent soil nitrification rate significantly.

  1. Effects of dynamic operating conditions on nitrification in biological rapid sand filters for drinking water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Carson O; Boe-Hansen, Rasmus; Musovic, Sanin; Smets, Barth; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Binning, Philip

    2014-11-01

    Biological rapid sand filters are often used to remove ammonium from groundwater for drinking water supply. They often operate under dynamic substrate and hydraulic loading conditions, which can lead to increased levels of ammonium and nitrite in the effluent. To determine the maximum nitrification rates and safe operating windows of rapid sand filters, a pilot scale rapid sand filter was used to test short-term increased ammonium loads, set by varying either influent ammonium concentrations or hydraulic loading rates. Ammonium and iron (flock) removal were consistent between the pilot and the full-scale filter. Nitrification rates and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea were quantified throughout the depth of the filter. The ammonium removal capacity of the filter was determined to be 3.4 g NH4-N m(-3) h(-1), which was 5 times greater than the average ammonium loading rate under reference operating conditions. The ammonium removal rate of the filter was determined by the ammonium loading rate, but was independent of both the flow and influent ammonium concentration individually. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea were almost equally abundant in the filter. Both ammonium removal and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria density were strongly stratified, with the highest removal and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria densities at the top of the filter. Cell specific ammonium oxidation rates were on average 0.6 × 10(2) ± 0.2 × 10(2) fg NH4-N h(-1) cell(-1). Our findings indicate that these rapid sand filters can safely remove both nitrite and ammonium over a larger range of loading rates than previously assumed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Growth modelling of Nitrosomonas europaea ATCC® 19718 and Nitrobacter winogradskyi ATCC® 25391: A new online indicator of the partial nitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruvellier, Nelly; Poughon, Laurent; Creuly, Catherine; Dussap, C-Gilles; Lasseur, Christophe

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the present work was to study the growth of two nitrifying bacteria. For modelling the nitrifying subsystem of the MELiSSA loop, Nitrosomonas europaea ATCC® 19718 and Nitrobacter winogradskyi ATCC® 25931 were grown separately and in cocultures. The kinetic parameters of a stoichiometric mass balanced Pirt model were identified: μmax=0.054h(-1), decay rate b=0.003h(-1) and maintenance rate m=0.135gN-NH4(+)·gX(-1)·h(-1) for Nitrosomonas europaea; μmax=0.024h(-1), b=0.001h(-1) and m=0.467gN-NO2(-)·gX(-1)·h(-1) for Nitrobacter winogradskyi. A predictive structured model of nitrification in co-culture was developed. The online evolution of the addition of KOH is correlated to the nitritation; the dissolved oxygen concentration is correlated to both nitritation and nitratation. The model suitably represents these two variables so that transient partial nitrification is assessed. This is a clue for avoiding partial nitrification by predictive functional control. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Performance and kinetics of nitrification of low ammonia wastewater at low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-25

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of DO on nitrification in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) treating low ammonia wastewater (40 mg N/L) at low temperature (14oC). During the 130 days of operation, three DO levels (5-6 mg DO/L, 2-3 mg DO/L and 0.8-1.0 mg DO/L) were tested. DO reduction resulted in lower ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) activity with decreasing ammonia conversion ratio (ACR) and increasing nitrite accumulation ratio (NAR). The maximum growth rates of AOB and NOB determined in this study (0.28 and 0.38 d-1) were below the median values from the literatures (0.47 and 0.62 d-1) while the oxygen half saturation coefficients of AOB and NOB (1.36 and 2.79 mg/L) were higher than the literature. The kinetic model explained the SBR performance well. Low DO together with long SRT was recommended for partial nitrification at low temperature.

  4. Simultaneous nitrification and denitrification in a novel membrane bioelectrochemical reactor with low membrane fouling tendency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Zuo, Wei; Tian, Yu; Zhang, Jun; Di, Shijing; Li, Lipin; Su, Xinying

    2017-02-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) can use nitrate as a cathodic electron acceptor for electrochemical denitrification, yet there is little knowledge about how to apply them into current wastewater treatment process to achieve efficient nitrogen removal. In this study, two dual-chamber MFCs were integrated with an aerobic membrane bioreactor to construct a novel membrane bioelectrochemical reactor (MBER) for simultaneous nitrification and denitrification under specific aeration. The effects of chemical oxygen demand (COD) loading rate, COD/N ratio, hydraulic retention time (HRT), and external resistance on the system performance were investigated. High effluent quality was obtained in the MBER in terms of COD and ammonium. During the operation, denitrification simultaneously occurred with nitrification at the bio-cathode of the MBER, achieving a maximal nitrogen removal efficiency of 84.3 %. A maximum power density of 1.8 W/m3 and a current density of 8.5 A/m3 were achieved with a coulombic efficiency of 12.1 %. Furthermore, compared to the control system, the MBER exhibited lower membrane fouling tendency due to mixed liquor volatile suspended solids (MLVSSs) and extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) reductions, EPSp/EPSc ratio decrease, and particle size increase of the sludge. These results suggest that the MBER holds potential for efficient nitrogen removal, electricity production, and membrane fouling mitigation.

  5. Surface Nitrification: A Major Uncertainty in Marine N2O Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, Lauren M.; Oschlies, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The ocean is responsible for up to a third of total global nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, but uncertainties in emission rates of this potent greenhouse gas are high (approaching 100%). Here we use a marine biogeochemical model to assess six major uncertainties in estimates of N2O production, thereby providing guidance in how future studies may most effectively reduce uncertainties in current and future marine N2O emissions. Potential surface N2O production from nitrification causes the largest uncertainty in N2O emissions (estimated up to approximately 1.6 Tg N/yr (sup -1) or 48% of modeled values), followed by the unknown oxygen concentration at which N2O production switches to N2O consumption (0.8 Tg N/yr (sup -1)or 24% of modeled values). Other uncertainties are minor, cumulatively changing regional emissions by less than 15%. If production of N2O by surface nitrification could be ruled out in future studies, uncertainties in marine N2O emissions would be halved.

  6. Estimation of nitrification capacity of rock media trickling filters in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this investigation an average apparent nitrification capacity of approximately 1.25 to 1.29 gN per m2 of media surface area per day [gN/(ms2Ed)] ammonia removal was determined for 2 existing rock media TFs retrofitted as NTFs in the prototype ENBNRAS system (nominal surface area of 45 ms2/m3 for the rock media).

  7. A DO- and pH-Based Early Warning System of Nitrification Inhibition for Biological Nitrogen Removal Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seil; Choi, Il; Lim, Byung Jin; Kim, Hyunook

    2012-01-01

    In Korea, more than 80% of municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) with capacities of 500 m3·d−1 or more are capable of removing nitrogen from wastewater through biological nitrification and denitrification processes. Normally, these biological processes show excellent performance, but if a toxic chemical is present in the influent to a WWTP, the biological processes (especially, the nitrification process) may be affected and fail to function normally; nitrifying bacteria are known very vulnerable to toxic substances. Then, the toxic compound as well as the nitrogen in wastewater may be discharged into a receiving water body without any proper treatment. Moreover, it may take significant time for the process to return back its normal state. In this study, a DO- and pH-based strategy to identify potential nitrification inhibition was developed to detect early the inflow of toxic compounds to a biological nitrogen removal process. This strategy utilizes significant changes observed in the oxygen uptake rate and the pH profiles of the mixed liquor when the activity of nitrifying bacteria is inhibited. Using the strategy, the toxicity from test wastewater with 2.5 mg·L−1 Hg2+, 0.5 mg·L−1 allythiourea, or 0.25 mg·L−1 chloroform could be successfully detected. PMID:23443381

  8. Enhanced ammonia removal at room temperature by pH controlled partial nitrification and subsequent anaerobic ammonium oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán, U; del Val Río, A; Campos, J L; Mosquera-Corral, A; Méndez, R

    2014-01-01

    The Anammox-based processes are suitable for the treatment of wastewaters characterized by a low carbon to nitrogen (C/N) ratio. The application of the Anammox process requires the availability of an effluent with a NO2- -N/NH4+ -N ratio composition around 1 g g-1, which involves the necessity of a previous step where the partial nitrification is performed. In this step, the inhibition of the nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) is crucial. In the present work, a combined partial nitrification-ANaerobic AMmonia OXidation (Anammox) two-units system operated at room temperature (20 degreeC) has been tested for the nitrogen removal of pre-treated pig slurry. To achieve the successful partial nitrification and inhibit the NOB activity, different ammonium/inorganic carbon (NH4+/IC) ratios were assayed from 1.19 to 0.82g NH4+-Ng-1 HCO3-C. This procedure provoked a decrease of the pH value to 6.0 to regulate the inhibitory effect over ammonia-oxidizing bacteria caused by free ammonia. Simultaneously, the NOB experienced the inhibitory effect of free nitrous acid which avoided the presence of nitrate in the effluent. The NH4+/IC ratio which allowed the obtaining of the desired effluent composition (50% of both ammonium and nitrite) was 0.82 +/- 0.02 g NH4+-N g-1 HCO3- -C. The Anammox reactor was fed with the effluent of the partial nitrification unit containing a NO2 -N/NH4+ -N ratio of 1 g g-1' where a nitrogen loading rate of 0.1 g N L-1 d-1 was efficiently removed.

  9. Nitrous oxide emissions from soil amended with 15N-labelled urea with nitrification inhibitor (Nitrapyrin) and mulch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Aamir; Heiling, Maria; Zaman, Mohammad; Resch, Christian

    2017-04-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O), one of the key greenhouse and ozone (O3) depleting gases, constitutes 7% of the anthropogenic greenhouse effect. Its global warming potential is 310 times higher than that of carbon dioxide (CO2) and 16 times than methane (CH4) over a 100-year period. To develop mitigation tools for N2O emissions, and to investigate the relationship between gross N transformation and N2O emission from soil, it is imperative to understand N2O emission from soils as influenced by N inputs, environmental conditions and farm management practices. The use of nitrification inhibitor such as Nitrapyrin and crop residues (mulch) may have a role in mitigating N2O losses from soil because of their effects on nitrification and denitrification. It prevents hydrolytic action on urea and keeps nitrogen in ammonium form. To determine the effects of urea applied with nitrification inhibitor and mulch on N2O emissions from soil, an incubation experiment was conducted under controlled moisture of 60% water filled pore space (WFPS) and temperature (20±2oC) conditions. Soil samples (0-20 cm soil depth) collected from an arable site were treated with 15N-labelled urea (5 atom %) at 150 kg N/ha rate. The 5 treatments including control, (urea, urea with Nitrapyrin (800 g/100 kg urea), urea with mulch (5 tons/ha) and urea with Nitrapyrin and mulch) were replicated 4 times using 500 ml glass jars. The N2O isotopic signature and the intramolecular distribution of 15N were measured by off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (Los Gatos Research). The preliminary results showed that nitrification inhibitor (Nitrapyrin) can be used to distinguish between different pathways of N2O production from soil. In addition to the site preference of the 15N promises to be a helpful tool to determine the source of the generated N2O.

  10. Shifts between ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea in relation to nitrification potential across trophic gradients in two large Chinese lakes (Lake Taihu and Lake Chaohu).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jie; Song, Chunlei; Cao, Xiuyun; Zhou, Yiyong

    2013-05-01

    Ammonia oxidation plays a pivotal role in the cycling and removal of nitrogen in aquatic ecosystems. Recent findings have expanded the known ammonia-oxidizing prokaryotes from Bacteria to Archaea. However, the relative importance of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) in nitrification is still debated. Here we showed that, in two large eutrophic lakes in China (Lake Taihu and Lake Chaohu), the abundance of AOA and AOB varied in opposite patterns according to the trophic state, although both AOA and AOB were abundant. In detail, from mesotrophic to eutrophic sites, the AOA abundance decreased, while the AOB increased in abundance and outnumbered the AOA at hypertrophic sites. In parallel, the nitrification rate increased along these trophic gradients and was significantly correlated with both the AOB abundance and the numerical ratio of AOB to AOA. Phylogenetic analysis of bacterial amoA sequences showed that Nitrosomonas oligotropha- and Nitrosospira-affiliated AOB dominated in both lakes, while Nitrosomonas communis-related AOB were only detected at the eutrophic sites. The diversity of AOB increased from mesotrophic to eutrophic sites and was positively correlated with the nitrification rate. Overall, this study enhances our understanding of the ecology of ammonia-oxidizing prokaryotes by elucidating conditions that AOB may numerically predominated over AOA, and indicated that AOA may play a less important role than AOB in the nitrification process of eutrophic lakes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Optimizing nitrification in biological rapid sand filters: Diagnosing and supplementing micronutrients needed for proper filter performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Carson Odell; Wagner, Florian Benedikt; Boe-Hansen, Rasmus

    , carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and other micronutrients, such as copper, are required to ensure growth and activity. In nitrification, copper is a micronutrient that is needed in the amoA enzyme used by ammonia‐oxidizers to oxidize ammonium to nitrite. Increasing nitrification performance is needed in many...... filters that are unable to meet ammonium guideline values for drinking water, and can also be used to optimize filter performance by increasing water treatment capacity. Although copper supplementation can increase nitrification in some filters with nitrification problems, it does not always work....... Therefore, in order to avoid the time, expense, and regulatory hurdles of supplementing a filter with copper, there is a need to accurately diagnose copper limitations in these filters. To determine if copper addition could increase nitrification in filters with nitrification problems, a bench scale batch...

  12. Relationship between respiratory quotient, nitrification, and nitrous oxide emissions in a forced aerated composting process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Hirofumi; Fujiwara, Taku; Inoue, Daisuke; Ito, Ryusei; Matsukawa, Kazutsugu; Funamizu, Naoyuki

    2015-08-01

    We assessed the relationship between respiratory quotient (RQ) and nitrification and nitrous oxide (N2O) emission in forced aerated composting using lab-scale reactors. Relatively high RQ values from degradation of readily degradable organics initially occurred. RQ then stabilized at slightly lower values, then decreased. Continuous emission of N2O was observed during the RQ decrease. Correlation between nitrification and N2O emission shows that the latter was triggered by nitrification. Mass balances demonstrated that the O2 consumption of nitrification (∼24.8mmol) was slightly higher than that of CO2 emission (∼20.0mmol), indicating that the RQ decrease was caused by the occurrence of nitrification. Results indicate that RQ is a useful index, which not only reflects the bioavailability of organics but also predicts the occurrence of nitrification and N2O emission in forced aerated composting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Remediation of incomplete nitrification and capacity increase of biofilters at different drinking water treatment plants through copper dosing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Florian B; Nielsen, Peter Borch; Boe-Hansen, Rasmus; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2017-12-27

    Drinking water treatment plants based on groundwater may suffer from incomplete ammonium removal, which deteriorates drinking water quality and constrains water utilities in the operation of their plants. Ammonium is normally removed through nitrification in biological granular media filters, and recent studies have demonstrated that dosing of copper can stimulate the removal of ammonium. Here, we investigated if copper dosing could generically improve ammonium removal of biofilters, at treatment plants with different characteristics. Copper was dosed at ≤1.5 μg Cu/L to biofilters at 10 groundwater treatment plants, all of which had displayed several years of incomplete nitrification. Plants exceeded the Danish national water quality standard of 0.05 mg NH4+/L by a factor of 2-12. Within only 2-3 weeks of dosing, ammonium removal rates increased significantly (up to 150%). Nitrification was fully established, with ammonium effluent concentrations of water chemistry, ammonium loading rates, filter design and operation, or treatment plant configuration. However, for filters without primary filtration, it took longer time to reach complete ammonium removal than for filters receiving prefiltered water, likely due to sorption of copper to iron oxides, at plants without prefiltration. With complete ammonium removal, we subjected two plants to short-term loading rate upshifts, to examine the filters' ability to cope with loading rate variations. After 2 months of dosing and an average loading rate of 1.0 g NH4+-N/m3 filter material/h, the loading rate was upshifted by 50%. Yet, a filter managed to completely remove all the influent ammonium, showing that with copper dosing the filter had extra capacity to remove ammonium even beyond its normal loading rates. Depth sampling revealed that the ammonium removal rate of the filter's upper 10 cm increased more than 7-fold from 0.67 to 4.90 g NH4+-N/m3/h, and that nitrite produced from increased ammonium oxidation

  14. Inhibition of Nitrification by Root Exudates and Plant Materials fromBrachiaria humidicola

    OpenAIRE

    M. K. Suri; Arab, M.; Gh Niuman

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Nitrification inhibitors are synthetic or natural compounds highly specific in inhibiting ammonium oxidation to nitrate. Therefore, they are widely used in combination with ammonium fertilizers. Among plants, grasses always are interested for their role in controlling nitrification, and recently the form of nitrogen (ammonium vs. nitrate) was shown to be an important factor in release of natural nitrification inhibitors (NNI) from grasses. In this study production and release of...

  15. Analysis of Microbial Communities in Biofilms from CSTR-Type Hollow Fiber Membrane Biofilm Reactors for Autotrophic Nitrification and Hydrogenotrophic Denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jung-Hun; Kim, Byung-Chun; Choi, Okkyoung; Kim, Hyunook; Sang, Byoung-In

    2015-10-01

    Two hollow fiber membrane biofilm reactors (HF-MBfRs) were operated for autotrophic nitrification and hydrogenotrophic denitrification for over 300 days. Oxygen and hydrogen were supplied through the hollow fiber membrane for nitrification and denitrification, respectively. During the period, the nitrogen was removed with the efficiency of 82-97% for ammonium and 87-97% for nitrate and with the nitrogen removal load of 0.09-0.26 kg NH4(+)-N/m(3)/d and 0.10-0.21 kg NO3(-)-N/m(3)/d, depending on hydraulic retention time variation by the two HF-MBfRs for autotrophic nitrification and hydrogenotrophic denitrification, respectively. Biofilms were collected from diverse topological positions in the reactors, each at different nitrogen loading rates, and the microbial communities were analyzed with partial 16S rRNA gene sequences in denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Detected DGGE band sequences in the reactors were correlated with nitrification or denitrification. The profile of the DGGE bands depended on the NH4(+) or NO3(-) loading rate, but it was hard to find a major strain affecting the nitrogen removal efficiency. Nitrospira-related phylum was detected in all biofilm samples from the nitrification reactors. Paracoccus sp. and Aquaspirillum sp., which are an autohydrogenotrophic bacterium and an oligotrophic denitrifier, respectively, were observed in the denitrification reactors. The distribution of microbial communities was relatively stable at different nitrogen loading rates, and DGGE analysis based on 16S rRNA (341f /534r) could successfully detect nitrate-oxidizing and hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria but not ammonium-oxidizing bacteria in the HF-MBfRs.

  16. Kinetic study of compost liquor nitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnaire, J; Wang, X Y; Chapon, L; Moulin, P; Marrot, B

    2011-01-01

    This study is a first kinetic approach about the compost liquor treatment by activated sludge. This industrial wastewater is highly loaded in organic and nitrogen compounds (COD≈12,000 mg L(-1) and NH(4)(+)-N≈4,000 mg L(-1)). The possibility of its treatment in an urban WWTP is studied measuring ammonia oxidation rate with non-acclimated sludge to the industrial effluent. Compost liquor appears as an inhibitor substrate. The ammonia oxidation rate can be modelled by the Haldane model: U(MAX)=0.180 d(-1), K(S)=12.0 mgN.L(-1) and K(I)=26.0 mgN.L(-1). The ammonia oxidation rate also follows for a synthetic substrate which has the same pollutant load as the real substrate. In this case, the ammonia oxidation rate can be modelled by the Monod model: U(MAX)=0.073 d(-1) and K(S)=4.3 mgN.L(-1). This result confirms that the ammonia oxidising bacteria are inhibited by the real wastewater. The following-up of nitrate production shows also the inhibition of nitrite oxidising bacteria. The compost liquor treatment seems not possible in an urban WWTP (<50,000 p.e.). That's why a specific WWTP is recommended and an acclimation step of activated sludge is essential.

  17. Trait-based representation of biological nitrification: Model development, testing, and predicted community composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick eBouskill

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Trait-based microbial models show clear promise as tools to represent the diversity and activity of microorganisms across ecosystem gradients. These models parameterize specific traits that determine the relative fitness of an ‘organism’ in a given environment, and represent the complexity of biological systems across temporal and spatial scales. In this study we introduce a microbial community trait-based modeling framework (MicroTrait focused on nitrification (MicroTrait-N that represents the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA and nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB using traits related to enzyme kinetics and physiological properties. We used this model to predict nitrifier diversity, ammonia (NH3 oxidation rates and nitrous oxide (N2O production across pH, temperature and substrate gradients. Predicted nitrifier diversity was predominantly determined by temperature and substrate availability, the latter was strongly influenced by pH. The model predicted that transient N2O production rates are maximized by a decoupling of the AOB and NOB communities, resulting in an accumulation and detoxification of nitrite to N2O by AOB. However, cumulative N2O production (over six month simulations is maximized in a system where the relationship between AOB and NOB is maintained. When the reactions uncouple, the AOB become unstable and biomass declines rapidly, resulting in decreased NH3 oxidation and N2O production. We evaluated this model against site level chemical datasets from the interior of Alaska and accurately simulated NH3 oxidation rates and the relative ratio of AOA:AOB biomass. The predicted community structure and activity indicate (a parameterization of a small number of traits may be sufficient to broadly characterize nitrifying community structure and (b changing decadal trends in climate and edaphic conditions could impact nitrification rates in ways that are not captured by extant biogeochemical models.

  18. The nitrogen isotope effect of benthic remineralization-nitrification-denitrification coupling in an estuarine environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Alkhatib

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The nitrogen (N stable isotopic composition of pore water nitrate and total dissolved N (TDN was measured in sediments of the St. Lawrence Estuary and the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The study area is characterized by gradients in organic matter reactivity, bottom water oxygen concentrations, as well as benthic respiration rates. N isotope effects on the water column associated with the benthic exchange of nitrate (εapp and TDN (εsed during benthic nitrification-denitrification coupling were investigated. The sediments were a major sink for nitrate and a source of reduced dissolved N (RDN = DON + NH4+. We observed that both the pore water nitrate and RDN pools were enriched in 15N relative to the water column, with increasing δ15N downcore in the sediments. As in other marine environments, the biological nitrate isotope fractionation of net fixed N loss was barely expressed at the scale of sediment-water exchange, with ϵapp values <3‰. The strongest under-expression (i.e. lowest εapp of the biological N isotope fractionation was observed at the most oxygenated sites with the least reactive organic matter, indicating that, through their control on the depth of the denitrification zone, bottom water oxygen concentrations and the organic matter reactivity can modulate εapp. For the first time, actual measurements of δ15N of pore water RDN were included in the calculations of εsed. We argue that large fractions of the sea-floor-derived DON are reactive and, hence, involved in the development of the δ15N of dissolved inorganic N (DIN in the water column. In the St. Lawrence sediments, the combined benthic N transformations yield a flux of 15N-enriched RDN that can significantly elevate εsed above εapp. Calculated εsed values were within the range of 4.6 ± 2

  19. Gross nitrous oxide production drives net nitrous oxide fluxes across a salt marsh landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wendy H; Silver, Whendee L

    2016-06-01

    Sea level rise will change inundation regimes in salt marshes, altering redox dynamics that control nitrification - a potential source of the potent greenhouse gas, nitrous oxide (N2 O) - and denitrification, a major nitrogen (N) loss pathway in coastal ecosystems and both a source and sink of N2 O. Measurements of net N2 O fluxes alone yield little insight into the different effects of redox conditions on N2 O production and consumption. We used in situ measurements of gross N2 O fluxes across a salt marsh elevation gradient to determine how soil N2 O emissions in coastal ecosystems may respond to future sea level rise. Soil redox declined as marsh elevation decreased, with lower soil nitrate and higher ferrous iron in the low marsh compared to the mid and high marshes (P < 0.001 for both). In addition, soil oxygen concentrations were lower in the low and mid-marshes relative to the high marsh (P < 0.001). Net N2 O fluxes differed significantly among marsh zones (P = 0.009), averaging 9.8 ± 5.4 μg N m(-2)  h(-1) , -2.2 ± 0.9 μg N m(-2)  h(-1) , and 0.67 ± 0.57 μg N m(-2)  h(-1) in the low, mid, and high marshes, respectively. Both net N2 O release and uptake were observed in the low and high marshes, but the mid-marsh was consistently a net N2 O sink. Gross N2 O production was highest in the low marsh and lowest in the mid-marsh (P = 0.02), whereas gross N2 O consumption did not differ among marsh zones. Thus, variability in gross N2 O production rates drove the differences in net N2 O flux among marsh zones. Our results suggest that future studies should focus on elucidating controls on the processes producing, rather than consuming, N2 O in salt marshes to improve our predictions of changes in net N2 O fluxes caused by future sea level rise. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Quorum Quenching of Nitrobacter winogradskyi Suggests that Quorum Sensing Regulates Fluxes of Nitrogen Oxide(s) during Nitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellbye, Brett L; Giguere, Andrew T; Bottomley, Peter J; Sayavedra-Soto, Luis A

    2016-10-25

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a widespread process in bacteria used to coordinate gene expression with cell density, diffusion dynamics, and spatial distribution through the production of diffusible chemical signals. To date, most studies on QS have focused on model bacteria that are amenable to genetic manipulation and capable of high growth rates, but many environmentally important bacteria have been overlooked. For example, representatives of proteobacteria that participate in nitrification, the aerobic oxidation of ammonia to nitrate via nitrite, produce QS signals called acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs). Nitrification emits nitrogen oxide gases (NO, NO2, and N2O), which are potentially hazardous compounds that contribute to global warming. Despite considerable interest in nitrification, the purpose of QS in the physiology/ecology of nitrifying bacteria is poorly understood. Through a quorum quenching approach, we investigated the role of QS in a well-studied AHL-producing nitrite oxidizer, Nitrobacter winogradskyi We added a recombinant AiiA lactonase to N. winogradskyi cultures to degrade AHLs to prevent their accumulation and to induce a QS-negative phenotype and then used mRNA sequencing (mRNA-Seq) to identify putative QS-controlled genes. Our transcriptome analysis showed that expression of nirK and nirK cluster genes (ncgABC) increased up to 19.9-fold under QS-proficient conditions (minus active lactonase). These data led to us to query if QS influenced nitrogen oxide gas fluxes in N. winogradskyi Production and consumption of NOx increased and production of N2O decreased under QS-proficient conditions. Quorum quenching transcriptome approaches have broad potential to identify QS-controlled genes and phenotypes in organisms that are not genetically tractable. Bacterial cell-cell signaling, or quorum sensing (QS), is a method of bacterial communication and gene regulation that is well studied in bacteria. However, little is known about the purpose of QS in many

  1. NA-NET numerical analysis net

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dongarra, J. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Computer Science]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Rosener, B. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Computer Science

    1991-12-01

    This report describes a facility called NA-NET created to allow numerical analysts (na) an easy method of communicating with one another. The main advantage of the NA-NET is uniformity of addressing. All mail is addressed to the Internet host ``na-net.ornl.gov`` at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Hence, members of the NA-NET do not need to remember complicated addresses or even where a member is currently located. As long as moving members change their e-mail address in the NA-NET everything works smoothly. The NA-NET system is currently located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It is running on the same machine that serves netlib. Netlib is a separate facility that distributes mathematical software via electronic mail. For more information on netlib consult, or send the one-line message ``send index`` to netlib{at}ornl.gov. The following report describes the current NA-NET system from both a user`s perspective and from an implementation perspective. Currently, there are over 2100 members in the NA-NET. An average of 110 mail messages pass through this facility daily.

  2. NA-NET numerical analysis net

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dongarra, J. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Computer Science Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Rosener, B. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Computer Science)

    1991-12-01

    This report describes a facility called NA-NET created to allow numerical analysts (na) an easy method of communicating with one another. The main advantage of the NA-NET is uniformity of addressing. All mail is addressed to the Internet host na-net.ornl.gov'' at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Hence, members of the NA-NET do not need to remember complicated addresses or even where a member is currently located. As long as moving members change their e-mail address in the NA-NET everything works smoothly. The NA-NET system is currently located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It is running on the same machine that serves netlib. Netlib is a separate facility that distributes mathematical software via electronic mail. For more information on netlib consult, or send the one-line message send index'' to netlib{at}ornl.gov. The following report describes the current NA-NET system from both a user's perspective and from an implementation perspective. Currently, there are over 2100 members in the NA-NET. An average of 110 mail messages pass through this facility daily.

  3. Bioaugmentation to improve nitrification in activated sludge treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leu, Shao-Yuan; Stenstrom, Michael K

    2010-06-01

    Bioaugmentation is a proposed technique to improve nutrient removal in municipal wastewater treatment. Compared with commonly used nitrification/denitrification (NDN) processes, bioaugmentation may be able to reduce tankage or land requirements. Many approaches for bioaugmentation have been developed, but few studies have compared the benefits among different approaches. This paper quantifies the effectiveness of bioaugmentation processes and investigates three major "onsite" bioaugmentation alternatives: 1) the parallel-plants approach, which uses acclimated biomass grown in a nitrifying "long-SRT" (sludge retention time) plant to augment a low-SRT treatment plant; 2) the enricher-reactor approach, which uses an offline reactor to produce the augmentation cultures; and 3) the enricher-reactor/return activated sludge (ER-RAS) approach, which grows enrichment culture in a reaeration reactor that receives a portion of the recycle activated sludge. Kinetic models were developed to simulate each approach, and the benefits of various approaches are presented on the same basis with controllable parameters, such as bioaugmentation levels, aeration tank volume, and temperatures. Examples were given to illustrate the potential benefits of bioaugmentation by upgrading a "carbon-only" wastewater treatment plant to nitrification. Simulation results suggested that all bioaugmentation approaches can decrease the minimum SRT for nitrification. The parallel-plants approach creates the highest concentration of biomass but may fail at too low temperature. The ER-RAS approach likely would be more useful at lower temperature and required less reactor volume; enricher-reactor approach would likely be more advantageous in the presence of inhibitory compound(s).

  4. Phylogenetically Distinct Phylotypes Modulate Nitrification in a Paddy Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jun; Wang, Baozhan

    2015-01-01

    Paddy fields represent a unique ecosystem in which regular flooding occurs, allowing for rice cultivation. However, the taxonomic identity of the microbial functional guilds that catalyze soil nitrification remains poorly understood. In this study, we provide molecular evidence for distinctly different phylotypes of nitrifying communities in a neutral paddy soil using high-throughput pyrosequencing and DNA-based stable isotope probing (SIP). Following urea addition, the levels of soil nitrate increased significantly, accompanied by an increase in the abundance of the bacterial and archaeal amoA gene in microcosms subjected to SIP (SIP microcosms) during a 56-day incubation period. High-throughput fingerprints of the total 16S rRNA genes in SIP microcosms indicated that nitrification activity positively correlated with the abundance of Nitrosospira-like ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), soil group 1.1b-like ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), and Nitrospira-like nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB). Pyrosequencing of 13C-labeled DNA further revealed that 13CO2 was assimilated by these functional groups to a much greater extent than by marine group 1.1a-associated AOA and Nitrobacter-like NOB. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that active AOB communities were closely affiliated with Nitrosospira sp. strain L115 and the Nitrosospira multiformis lineage and that the 13C-labeled AOA were related to phylogenetically distinct groups, including the moderately thermophilic “Candidatus Nitrososphaera gargensis,” uncultured fosmid 29i4, and acidophilic “Candidatus Nitrosotalea devanaterra” lineages. These results suggest that a wide variety of microorganisms were involved in soil nitrification, implying physiological diversification of soil nitrifying communities that are constantly exposed to environmental fluctuations in paddy fields. PMID:25724959

  5. Net Gain: A New Method for Preventing Malaria Deaths | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    A finely spun net could prevent as many as one-third of all child deaths in Africa, reports IDRC's new publication, Net Gain. Studies conducted in Gambia, Ghana, and Kenya show that the insecticide-treated mosquito net reduced the mortality rate of children under 5 years of age by up to 63 percent. Net Gain reviews and ...

  6. Nitrification inhibition as measured by RNA- and DNA-based function-specific assays and microbial community structure analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract: The biological removal of ammonia in conventional wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is performed by promoting nitrification, which transforms ammonia into nitrate, which in turn is converted into nitrogen gas by denitrifying bacteria. The first step in nitrification, ...

  7. A novel nonwoven hybrid bioreactor (NWHBR) for enhancing simultaneous nitrification and denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fangang; Wang, Yuan; Huang, Li-Nan; Li, Jie; Jiang, Feng; Li, Shiyu; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2013-07-01

    This study proposed a nonwoven hybrid bioreactor (NWHBR) in which the nonwoven fabric played dual roles as a biofilm carrier and membrane-like separation of the flocculent sludge in the reactor. The results of long-term monitoring demonstrated that the NWHBR could achieve simultaneous nitrification and denitrification (SND), with nearly complete ammonium removal and 80% removal of total nitrogen. The biofilm attached to the nonwoven fabric removed 27% of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) and 36% of the nitrate in the reactor, an enhanced elimination of nutrients that was attributed to the increased mass transfer within the biofilm due to permeate drag. The results of batch experiments showed that the flocculent sludge played a more dominant role in nitrification and denitrification (79% and 61%, respectively) than the biofilm (21% and 36%, respectively). The batch experiments also revealed that the enforced mass transfer, with an effluent recirculation rate of 4.3 L/m(2)h (which was the same as the flux during the reactor's long-term operation), improved the denitrification rate by 58% (i.e., from 9.0 to 14.2 mg-NO(3)(-)-N/h). Pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene amplification revealed a high microbial diversity in both the flocculent sludge and biofilm, with Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Chloroflexi as the dominant groups. A phylogenetic (P) test indicated that the NWHBR contained phylogenetically distinct microbial communities: those in the biofilm differed from those in the flocculent sludge. However, the communities on the exterior and interior of the biofilm were more similar to each other. Due to its good SND performance, low physical back-washing frequency and low air-to-water ratio, the NWHBR represents an attractive alternative for the wider application of either low-cost membrane bioreactors or biofilm reactors. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. An Operations Manual for Achieving Nitrification in an Activated Sludge Plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ontario Ministry of the Environment, Toronto.

    In Ontario, the attainment of nitrification (oxidation of ammonia) in activated sludge plants is receiving increased attention. Nitrification of waste water is a necessary requirement because it reduces plant discharge of nitrogenous oxygen demand and/or toxic ammonia. However, this new requirement will result in added responsibility for…

  9. Diagnostics in biological rapid sand filters treating groundwater – governing factors for nitrification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen; Gülay, Arda; Smets, Barth F.

    To improve the insight in the processes in biological rapid sand filters a range of methods were developed to diagnose the microbial mediated processes – particularly nitrification.......To improve the insight in the processes in biological rapid sand filters a range of methods were developed to diagnose the microbial mediated processes – particularly nitrification....

  10. Relationship between respiratory quotient, nitrification, and nitrous oxide emissions in a forced aerated composting process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsutsui, Hirofumi, E-mail: jm-tsutsuih@kochi-u.ac.jp [Research and Education Faculty, Natural Sciences Cluster, Agriculture Unit, Kochi University, B200 Monobe, Nankoku, Kochi (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST (Japan); Fujiwara, Taku [Research and Education Faculty, Natural Sciences Cluster, Agriculture Unit, Kochi University, B200 Monobe, Nankoku, Kochi (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST (Japan); Inoue, Daisuke [Department of Health Science, School of Allied Health Sciences, Kitasato University, 1-15-1 Kitasato, Sagamihara-Minami, Kanagawa (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST (Japan); Ito, Ryusei [Department of Environmental Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita-13, Nishi-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST (Japan); Matsukawa, Kazutsugu [Research and Education Faculty, Multidisciplinary Science Cluster, Life and Environmental Medicine Science Unit, Kochi University, B200 Monobe, Nankoku, Kochi (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST (Japan); Funamizu, Naoyuki [Department of Environmental Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita-13, Nishi-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • RQ can be an indicator of N{sub 2}O emission in forced aerated composting process. • Emission of N{sub 2}O with nitrification was observed with RQ decrease. • Mass balances demonstrated the RQ decrease was caused by nitrification. • Conversion ratio of oxidized ammonia and total N to N{sub 2}O were ∼2.7%. - Abstract: We assessed the relationship between respiratory quotient (RQ) and nitrification and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) emission in forced aerated composting using lab-scale reactors. Relatively high RQ values from degradation of readily degradable organics initially occurred. RQ then stabilized at slightly lower values, then decreased. Continuous emission of N{sub 2}O was observed during the RQ decrease. Correlation between nitrification and N{sub 2}O emission shows that the latter was triggered by nitrification. Mass balances demonstrated that the O{sub 2} consumption of nitrification (∼24.8 mmol) was slightly higher than that of CO{sub 2} emission (∼20.0 mmol), indicating that the RQ decrease was caused by the occurrence of nitrification. Results indicate that RQ is a useful index, which not only reflects the bioavailability of organics but also predicts the occurrence of nitrification and N{sub 2}O emission in forced aerated composting.

  11. Impact of quinoline on activity and microbial culture of partial nitrification process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Zhimin; Zhao, Ji

    2015-12-01

    In this study, the effect of quinoline on nitrification in an activated sludge system was evaluated in batch assays. Quinoline was evaluated to partial nitrification process or to partial nitrification-quinoline degrading process. In partial nitrification assays, 50-150mg/L quinoline presence promoted the ammonium oxidation efficiency (200-100%). Nonetheless, the consumption efficiencies for quinoline were less than 66.6%. On the other hand, in partial nitrification-quinoline degrading process, the promotion effect of quinoline (50-150mg/L) diminished significantly, ammonium oxidation were similarity to the control. However, the consumption efficiencies for quinoline were nearly 100%. DGGE results showed that the bacteria communities varied significantly. Acidovorax sp. JS42 and Acidovorax ebreus TPSY were responsible for ammonium oxidation in partial nitrification process, while Nitrosomonas in partial nitrification-quinoline degrading process. This information might be useful for treating wastewaters of ammonium/quinoline by partial nitrification technology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Plants adaptation to control nitrification process in tropical region; case study with Acrocomia totai and Brachiaria humidicola plants

    OpenAIRE

    Souri Mohammad Kazem

    2016-01-01

    In this study we focused on nitrification inhibition properties from tropical and subtropical plants; Acrocomia totai (palm tree) and Brachiaria humidicola (grass plant). Hexane extracted seed oil as well as dry powder of seed covers was applied in a quick nitrification bioassay for 24 or 50 hours to investigate their effects on nitrification process. Similarly B. humidicola shoot homogenates were applied in the same quick nitrification bioassay for their potential inhibitory effects...

  13. Nitrous oxide production from reactive nitrification intermediates: a concerted action of biological and chemical processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüggemann, Nicolas; Heil, Jannis; Liu, Shurong; Wei, Jing; Vereecken, Harry

    2017-04-01

    This contribution tries to open up a new perspective on biogeochemical N2O production processes, taking the term bio-geo-chemistry literally. What if a major part of N2O is produced from reactive intermediates of microbiological N turnover processes ("bio…") leaking out of the involved microorganisms into the soil ("…geo…") and then reacting chemically ("…chemistry") with the surrounding matrix? There are at least two major reactive N intermediates that might play a significant role in these coupled biological-chemical reactions, i.e. hydroxylamine (NH2OH) and nitrite (NO2-), both of which are produced during nitrification under oxic conditions, while NO2- is also produced during denitrification under anoxic conditions. Furthermore, NH2OH is assumed to be also a potential intermediate of DNRA and/or anammox. First, this contribution will summarize information about several chemical reactions involving NH2OH and NO2- leading to the formation of N2O. These abiotic reactions are: reactions of NO2- with reduced metal cations, nitrosation reactions of NO2- and soil organic matter (SOM), the reaction between NO2- and NH2OH, and the oxidation of NH2OH by oxidized metal ions. While these reactions can occur over a broad range of soil characteristics, they are ignored in most current N trace gas studies in favor of biological processes only. Disentangling microbiological from purely chemical N2O production is further complicated by the fact that the chemically formed N2O is either undiscernible from N2O produced during nitrification, or shows an intermediate 15N site preference between that of N2O from nitrification and denitrification, respectively. Results from experiments with live and sterilized soil samples, with artificial soil mixtures and with phenolic lignin decomposition model compounds will be presented that demonstrate the potential contribution of these abiotic processes to soil N trace gas emissions, given a substantial leakage rate of these reactive

  14. Nitrification in moving bed and fixed bed biofilters treating effluent water from a large commercial outdoor rainbow trout RAS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suhr, Karin; Pedersen, Per Bovbjerg

    2010-01-01

    were measured 3(1/2) months after start-up, and inlet water was supplemented with ammonium chloride in order to determine maximum nitrification rates (0-order kinetics). The filters were conditioned at in inlet TAN concentration of 2.89 +/- 0.1 mg l(-1) and water in-flow ranging from 1 l s(-1) to 4 l s......(-1). Expressed as volumetric total ammonia-N (TAN) removal rate, the MB filters had significantly higher removal rate (23 +/- 17 g N-1 m(-3) d(-1)) compared to the FB filters (92 +/- 2 g N-1 m(-3) d(-1)). Expressed as surface specific TAN removal rate MB filters had significantly lower removal (0.......06 mg l(-1). Below approximately 60% saturation (7.1 mg O-2 l(-1)) measured at the filter outlet, nitrification rates started decreasing rapidly. An exponential expression (y = -10.05 + 10.48(1 - e(-0.0798x)), R-2=0.96) was found to model the whole data range from 40% to 80% DO saturation well. (C) 2009...

  15. Impact of Short-Term Acidification on Nitrification and Nitrifying Bacterial Community Dynamics in Soilless Cultivation Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levkovitch, Irit; Negreanu, Yael; Dowd, Scot; Frenk, Sammy; Silber, Avner

    2012-01-01

    Soilless medium-based horticulture systems are highly prevalent due to their capacity to optimize growth of high-cash crops. However, these systems are highly dynamic and more sensitive to physiochemical and pH perturbations than traditional soil-based systems, especially during nitrification associated with ammonia-based fertilization. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of nitrification-generated acidification on ammonia oxidation rates and nitrifying bacterial community dynamics in soilless growth media. To achieve this goal, perlite soilless growth medium from a commercial bell pepper greenhouse was incubated with ammonium in bench-scale microcosm experiments. Initial quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicated that betaproteobacterial ammonia oxidizers were significantly more abundant than ammonia-oxidizing archaea, and therefore, research focused on this group. Ammonia oxidation rates were highest between 0 and 9 days, when pH values dropped from 7.4 to 4.9. Pyrosequencing of betaproteobacterial ammonia-oxidizing amoA gene fragments indicated that r-strategist-like Nitrosomonas was the dominant ammonia-oxidizing bacterial genus during this period, seemingly due to the high ammonium concentration and optimal growth conditions in the soilless media. Reduction of pH to levels below 4.8 resulted in a significant decrease in both ammonia oxidation rates and the diversity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, with increased relative abundance of the r-strategist-like Nitrosospira. Nitrite oxidizers (Nitrospira and Nitrobacter) were on the whole more abundant and less sensitive to acidification than ammonia oxidizers. This study demonstrates that nitrification and nitrifying bacterial community dynamics in high-N-load intensive soilless growth media may be significantly different from those in in-terra agricultural systems. PMID:22773643

  16. Impact of short-term acidification on nitrification and nitrifying bacterial community dynamics in soilless cultivation media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cytryn, Eddie; Levkovitch, Irit; Negreanu, Yael; Dowd, Scot; Frenk, Sammy; Silber, Avner

    2012-09-01

    Soilless medium-based horticulture systems are highly prevalent due to their capacity to optimize growth of high-cash crops. However, these systems are highly dynamic and more sensitive to physiochemical and pH perturbations than traditional soil-based systems, especially during nitrification associated with ammonia-based fertilization. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of nitrification-generated acidification on ammonia oxidation rates and nitrifying bacterial community dynamics in soilless growth media. To achieve this goal, perlite soilless growth medium from a commercial bell pepper greenhouse was incubated with ammonium in bench-scale microcosm experiments. Initial quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicated that betaproteobacterial ammonia oxidizers were significantly more abundant than ammonia-oxidizing archaea, and therefore, research focused on this group. Ammonia oxidation rates were highest between 0 and 9 days, when pH values dropped from 7.4 to 4.9. Pyrosequencing of betaproteobacterial ammonia-oxidizing amoA gene fragments indicated that r-strategist-like Nitrosomonas was the dominant ammonia-oxidizing bacterial genus during this period, seemingly due to the high ammonium concentration and optimal growth conditions in the soilless media. Reduction of pH to levels below 4.8 resulted in a significant decrease in both ammonia oxidation rates and the diversity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, with increased relative abundance of the r-strategist-like Nitrosospira. Nitrite oxidizers (Nitrospira and Nitrobacter) were on the whole more abundant and less sensitive to acidification than ammonia oxidizers. This study demonstrates that nitrification and nitrifying bacterial community dynamics in high-N-load intensive soilless growth media may be significantly different from those in in-terra agricultural systems.

  17. Copper deficiency can limit nitrification in biological rapid sand filters for drinking water production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Florian Benedikt; Nielsen, Peter Borch; Boe-Hansen, Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    Incomplete nitrification in biological filters during drinking water treatment is problematic, as it compromises drinking water quality. Nitrification problems can be caused by a lack of nutrients for the nitrifying microorganisms. Since copper is an important element in one of the essential...... enzymes in nitrification, we investigated the effect of copper dosing on nitrification in different biological rapid sand filters treating groundwater. A lab-scale column assay with filter material from a water works demonstrated that addition of a trace metal mixture, including copper, increased ammonium...... removal compared to a control without addition. Subsequently, another water works was investigated in full-scale, where copper influent concentrations were below 0.05 μg Cu L-1 and nitrification was incomplete. Copper dosing of less than 5 μg Cu L-1 to a full-scale filter stimulated ammonium removal...

  18. Disruption of narH, narJ, and moaE Inhibits Heterotrophic Nitrification in Pseudomonas Strain M19

    OpenAIRE

    Nemergut, D.R.; Schmidt, S K

    2002-01-01

    Interruptions in three nitrate reductase-related genes, narH, narJ, and moaE, inhibited heterotrophic nitrification in Pseudomonas strain M19. No nitrate was detected in the medium, and nitrification proceeded in the presence of a nitrate reductase inhibitor. Heterotrophic nitrification was greatly stimulated by the addition of nitrate.

  19. Comparison of Simultaneous Nitrification and Denitrification for Three Different Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanitchaidecha, W.; Nakaruk, A.; Koshy, P.; Futaba, K.

    2015-01-01

    Discharge of high NH4-N containing wastewater into water bodies has become a critical and serious issue due to its negative impact on water and environmental quality. In this research, the performance of three different reactors was assessed and compared with regard to the removal of NH4-N from wastewater. The highest nitrogen removal efficiency of 98.3% was found when the entrapped sludge reactor (ESR), in which the sludge was entrapped in polyethylene glycol polymer, was used. Under intermittent aeration, nitrification and denitrification occurred simultaneously in the aerobic and anaerobic periods. Moreover, internal carbon was consumed efficiently for denitrification. On the other hand, internal carbon consumption was not found to occur in the suspended sludge reactor (SSR) and the mixed sludge reactor (MSR) and this resulted in nitrogen removal efficiencies of SSR and MSR being 64.7 and 45.1%, respectively. Nitrification and denitrification were the main nitrogen removal processes in the aerobic and anaerobic periods, respectively. However, due to the absence of sufficient organic carbon, denitrification was uncompleted resulting in high NO3-N contents in the effluent. PMID:26380304

  20. Texture Based Image Analysis With Neural Nets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilovici, Irina S.; Ong, Hoo-Tee; Ostrander, Kim E.

    1990-03-01

    In this paper, we combine direct image statistics and spatial frequency domain techniques with a neural net model to analyze texture based images. The resultant optimal texture features obtained from the direct and transformed image form the exemplar pattern of the neural net. The proposed approach introduces an automated texture analysis applied to metallography for determining the cooling rate and mechanical working of the materials. The results suggest that the proposed method enhances the practical applications of neural nets and texture extraction features.

  1. Impact of food to microorganism (F/M) ratio and colloidal chemical oxygen demand on nitrification performance of a full-scale membrane bioreactor treating thin film transistor liquid crystal display wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yi-Ju; Whang, Liang-Ming; Chang, Ming-Yu; Fukushima, Toshikazu; Lee, Ya-Chin; Cheng, Sheng-Shung; Hsu, Shu-Fu; Chang, Cheng-Huey; Shen, Wason; Yang, Charn-Yi; Fu, Ryan; Tsai, Tsair-Yuan

    2013-08-01

    This study investigated impact of food to microorganism (F/M) ratio and colloidal chemical oxygen demand (COD) on nitrification performance in one full-scale membrane bioreactor (MBR) treating monoethanolamine (MEA)/dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)-containing thin film transistor liquid crystal display (TFT-LCD) wastewater. Poor nitrification was observed under high organic loading and high colloidal COD conditions, suggesting that high F/M ratio and colloidal COD situations should be avoided to minimize their negative impacts on nitrification. According to the nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMS) statistical analyses on terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) results of ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) gene, the occurrence of Nitrosomonas oligotropha-like ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) was positively related to successful nitrification in the MBR systems, while Nitrosomonas europaea-like AOB was positively linked to nitrification rate, which can be attributed to the high influent total nitrogen condition. Furthermore, Nitrobacter- and Nitrospira-like nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) were both abundant in the MBR systems, but the continuously low nitrite environment is likely to promote the growth of Nitrospira-like NOB. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The side effects of nitrification inhibitors on leaching water and soil salinization in a field experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diez, J. A.; Arauzo, M.; Hernaiz, P.; Sanz, A.

    2010-07-01

    In experiments carried out in greenhouses, some authors have shown that ammonium sulphate induces greater soil acidity and salinity than other sources of N. Moreover, nitrification inhibitors (NI) tend to cause ammonium to accumulate in soil by retarding its oxidation to nitrate. This accumulated ammonium would also have an effect on soil salinity. Consequently, the aim of this paper was to evaluate the soil and leaching water salinization effects associated with adding NI, dicyandiamide (DCD) and dimethylpyrazole-phosphate (DMPP) to ammonium sulphate nitrate (ASN) fertilizer. This experiment was carried out in the field with an irrigated maize crop. Drainage and Na concentration were measured during both seasons (2006 and 2007) and leached Na was determined. The treatments with NI (DCD and DMPP) were associated with greater Na concentrations in soil solutions and consequently higher rates of Na leaching (in 2007, ASN-DCD 1,292 kg Na ha{sup -}1, ASN-DMPP 1,019 kg Na ha{sup -}1). A treatment involving only ASN also increased the Na concentration in soil and the amount of Na leached in relation to the Control (in 2007, ASN 928 kg Na ha{sup -}1 and Control 587 kg Na ha{sup -}1). The increase in the ammonium concentration in the soil due to the NI treatments could have been the result of the displacement of Na ions from the soil exchange complex through a process which finally led to an increase in soil salinity. Treatments including ammonium fertilizer formulated with NI produced a greater degree of soil salinization due to the presence of ammonium from the fertilizer and accumulated ammonium from the nitrification inhibition. (Author) 31 refs.

  3. Effect of nitrogen-sulphur nutrition and inhibitors of nitrification on the yield and quality of maize grain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto Ložek

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Effect of split application of nitrogen and nitrogen+sulphur nutrition in comparison with one shot application of nitrogen + sulphur + inhibitors of nitrification (dikyandiamid, DCD and 1, 2, 4 triazol,TZ on the yield and quality of maize grain was examined in three-year small-plot experiment with maize (hybrid ,Chapalu FAO 350 on medium heavy degraded brownsoil. On the average of three experimental years one-shot application of nitrogen-sulphur nutrition in the form of ENSIN fertilizer containing nitrification inhibitors applied before maize seeding at the rate of 160 kg/ha N and 80 kg/ha1 S showed the most considerable effect on all investigated parameters. Yield of grain was increased highly significantly by 1.56 t/ha (+21.8 % against control treatment. Both parameters TKW (thousand kernel weight and content of crude protein were elevated by 7.9 % and 8.3 %, respectively. Production of protein per hectare was increased by 253 kg, that is by 31.9 % and natural effectiveness of fertilization achieved the highest value, namely 9.8 kg of grain per 1 kg of applied nitrogen. When fertilizer ENSIN (contains inhibitors of nitrification was applied in maize nutrition the achieved results were insignificantly better in all examined parameters in comparison with the split application of DASA 26/13 fertilizer under the same rate of both nitrogen and sulphur. There was found out positive tendency of favourable effect on yield and quality of grain of maize and decrease of application costs as a consequence of one shot application in this treatment. Addition of sulphur to nitrogen as well as an addition of inhibitors + sulphur to nitrogen significantly increased only grain yield of maize. Content of crude protein and TKW were increased insignificantly. Natural effectiveness of nitrogen fertilization was increasing in accordance with raising yields of maize grain as follows: nitrogen < nitrogen + sulphur < nitrogen + sulphur + inhibitors.

  4. Nitrification and Microbial Activity in Response to Wastewater Effluent in the Sacramento/San Joaquin River Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challenor, T.; Damashek, J.; Tolar, B. B.; Francis, C.; Casciotti, K. L.

    2016-12-01

    Nitrification, the oxidation of ammonium (NH4+) to nitrate (NO3-) by a coterie of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA), is a crucial step in removing nitrogen from marine ecosystems. The Sacramento/San Joaquin River delta receives ammonium-laden effluent from the Sacramento Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant (SRWTP) and nitrate from agriculture runoff. The system provides freshwater to irrigate the Central Valley and drinking water for many millions of people. In recent years, however, this environment has experienced ecological turmoil - the Pelagic Organism Decline (POD) refers to a die-out of fish and other species over the course of three decades. One explanation implicated excessive ammonium input, claiming it limited primary productivity and hurt pelagic fish down the line. A new hypothesis, however, posits that the ecosystem may soon face the opposite problem: over-productivity and hypoxia due to increased light availability and reduced turbidity. Studying the rate of nitrification and the makeup of the microbial community will further elucidate how nutrient loading has impacted this ecosystem. Nitrification rates were calculated from water samples collected in the Sacramento River starting at the SRWTP and moving downstream. Samples were spiked with 15N-labeled ammonium and incubated for 24 hours in triplicate. Four time-points were extracted and the "denitrifier" method was used to measure the isotopic ratio of N over time. DNA and RNA were extracted from filtered water at each site and PCR and qPCR assays were used targeting the amoA gene, which encodes the α-subunit of ammonia monooxygenase, responsible for oxidizing ammonium to nitrite (NO2-). Consistent with previous nitrification data, rates were highest in the lower river downstream of the SRWTP, where nitrate concentrations were correspondingly elevated. AOB predominated in the ammonia oxidizing community, and some clades were unique to this ecosystem. Nitrifying microbes provide an

  5. Professional Enterprise NET

    CERN Document Server

    Arking, Jon

    2010-01-01

    Comprehensive coverage to help experienced .NET developers create flexible, extensible enterprise application code If you're an experienced Microsoft .NET developer, you'll find in this book a road map to the latest enterprise development methodologies. It covers the tools you will use in addition to Visual Studio, including Spring.NET and nUnit, and applies to development with ASP.NET, C#, VB, Office (VBA), and database. You will find comprehensive coverage of the tools and practices that professional .NET developers need to master in order to build enterprise more flexible, testable, and ext

  6. Partial nitrification in sequencing batch reactors treating low ammonia strength synthetic wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jun; Xu, Hengjuan; Shen, Dongsheng

    2014-07-01

    Sequencing batch reactors fed with low ammonium strength synthetic wastewater under C/N ratios of 0.5, 1.5, and 3.0 were used to investigate the transition from full to partial nitrification. Two strategies for establishing partial nitrification, aeration duration control and process parameter control, were compared. The effect of C/N ratio on nitrite accumulation was also evaluated. Results showed that partial nitrification established by controlling aeration duration presented better performance with higher nitrite accumulation. An increase of C/N ratio helped nitrite accumulation; however, non-filamentous bulking of sludge happened at high C/N ratio. Based on mass balances for nitrogen, results for nitrogen during full and partial nitrification were distinct from one another. For low C/N ratio, during full nitrification, almost 100% of NH(4+)-N was oxidized to NO(3-)-N without nitrogen loss; however, nitrogen loss increased obviously during partial nitrification, which indicated that dissolved oxygen concentration and C/N ratio influenced nitrogen loss significantly during nitrification.

  7. Gill net and trammel net selectivity in the northern Aegean Sea, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Saadet Karakulak

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Fishing trials were carried out with gill nets and trammel nets in the northern Aegean Sea from March 2004 to February 2005. Four different mesh sizes for the gill nets and the inner panel of trammel nets (16, 18, 20 and 22 mm bar length were used. Selectivity parameters for the five most economically important species, bogue (Boops boops, annular sea bream (Diplodus annularis, striped red mullet (Mullus surmuletus, axillary sea bream (Pagellus acarne and blotched picarel (Spicara maena, caught by the two gears were estimated. The SELECT method was used to estimate the selectivity parameters of a variety of models. Catch composition and catch proportion of several species were different in gill and trammel nets. The length frequency distributions of the species caught by the two gears were significantly different. The bi-modal model selectivity curve gave the best fit for gill net and trammel net data, and there was little difference between the modal lengths of these nets. However, a clear difference was found in catching efficiency. The highest catch rates were obtained with the trammel net. Given that many discard species and small fish are caught by gill nets and trammel nets with a mesh size of 16 mm, it is clear that these nets are not appropriate for fisheries. Consequently, the best mesh size for multispecies fisheries is 18 mm. This mesh size will considerably reduce the numbers of small sized individuals and discard species in the catch.

  8. Quorum Quenching of Nitrobacter winogradskyi Suggests that Quorum Sensing Regulates Fluxes of Nitrogen Oxide(s during Nitrification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett L. Mellbye

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Quorum sensing (QS is a widespread process in bacteria used to coordinate gene expression with cell density, diffusion dynamics, and spatial distribution through the production of diffusible chemical signals. To date, most studies on QS have focused on model bacteria that are amenable to genetic manipulation and capable of high growth rates, but many environmentally important bacteria have been overlooked. For example, representatives of proteobacteria that participate in nitrification, the aerobic oxidation of ammonia to nitrate via nitrite, produce QS signals called acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs. Nitrification emits nitrogen oxide gases (NO, NO2, and N2O, which are potentially hazardous compounds that contribute to global warming. Despite considerable interest in nitrification, the purpose of QS in the physiology/ecology of nitrifying bacteria is poorly understood. Through a quorum quenching approach, we investigated the role of QS in a well-studied AHL-producing nitrite oxidizer, Nitrobacter winogradskyi. We added a recombinant AiiA lactonase to N. winogradskyi cultures to degrade AHLs to prevent their accumulation and to induce a QS-negative phenotype and then used mRNA sequencing (mRNA-Seq to identify putative QS-controlled genes. Our transcriptome analysis showed that expression of nirK and nirK cluster genes (ncgABC increased up to 19.9-fold under QS-proficient conditions (minus active lactonase. These data led to us to query if QS influenced nitrogen oxide gas fluxes in N. winogradskyi. Production and consumption of NOx increased and production of N2O decreased under QS-proficient conditions. Quorum quenching transcriptome approaches have broad potential to identify QS-controlled genes and phenotypes in organisms that are not genetically tractable.

  9. Nitrification exhibits Haldane kinetics in an agricultural soil treated with ammonium sulfate or dairy-waste compost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koper, Teresa E; Stark, John M; Habteselassie, Mussie Y; Norton, Jeanette M

    2010-11-01

    An agricultural soil was treated with dairy-waste compost, ammonium-sulfate fertilizer or no added nitrogen (control) and planted to silage corn for 6 years. The kinetics of nitrification were determined in laboratory-shaken slurry assays with a range of substrate concentrations (0-20 mM NH(4)(+)) over a 24-h period for soils from the three treatments. Determined concentrations of substrate and product were fit to Michaelis-Menten and Haldane models. For all the treatments, the Haldane model was a better fit, suggesting that significant nitrification inhibition may occur in soils under high ammonium conditions similar to those found immediately after fertilization or waste applications. The maximum rate of nitrification (V(max)) was significantly higher for the fertilized and compost-treated soils (1.74 and 1.50 mmol N kg(-1) soil day(-1)) vs. control soil (0.98 mmol kg(-1) soil day(-1)). The K(m) and K(i) values were not significantly different, with average values of 0.02 and 27 mM NH(4)(+), respectively. Our results suggest that both N sources increased nitrifier community size, but did not shift the nitrifier community structure in ways that influenced enzyme affinity or sensitivity to ammonium. The K(m) values are comparable to those determined directly in other soils, but are substantially lower than those from most pure cultures of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. © 2010 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. No claim to original US government works.

  10. Transport zonation limits coupled nitrification-denitrification in permeable sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessler, Adam John; Glud, R.N.; Cardenas, M.B.

    2013-01-01

    Measurement of biogeochemical processes in permeable sediments (including the hyporheic zone) is difficult because of complex multidimensional advective transport. This is especially the case for nitrogen cycling, which involves several coupled redox-sensitive reactions. To provide detailed insig......- and N-15-N-2 gas. The measured two-dimensional profiles correlate with computational model simulations, showing a deep pool of N-2 gas forming, and being advected to the surface below ripple peaks. Further isotope pairing calculations on these data indicate that coupled nitrification......-denitrification is severely limited in permeable sediments because the flow and transport field limits interaction between oxic and anoxic pore water. The approach allowed for new detailed insight into subsurface denitrification zones in complex permeable sediments....

  11. Estimating the net effect of progesterone elevation on the day of hCG on live birth rates after IVF: a cohort analysis of 3296 IVF cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venetis, Christos A; Kolibianakis, Efstratios M; Bosdou, Julia K; Lainas, George T; Sfontouris, Ioannis A; Tarlatzis, Basil C; Lainas, Tryfon G

    2015-03-01

    What is the proper way of assessing the effect of progesterone elevation (PE) on the day of hCG on live birth in women undergoing fresh embryo transfer after in vitro fertilization (IVF) using GnRH analogues and gonadotrophins? This study indicates that a multivariable approach, where the effect of the most important confounders is controlled for, can lead to markedly different results regarding the association between PE on the day of hCG and live birth rates after IVF when compared with the bivariate analysis that has been typically used in the relevant literature up to date. PE on the day of hCG is associated with decreased pregnancy rates in fresh IVF cycles. Evidence for this comes from observational studies that mostly failed to control for potential confounders. This is a retrospective analysis of a cohort of fresh IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycles (n = 3296) performed in a single IVF centre during the period 2001-2013. Patients in whom ovarian stimulation was performed with gonadotrophins and GnRH analogues. Natural cycles and cycles where stimulation involved the administration of clomiphene were excluded. In order to reflect routine clinical practice, no other exclusion criteria were imposed on this dataset. The primary outcome measure for this study was live birth defined as the delivery of a live infant after 24 weeks of gestation. We compared the association between PE on the day of hCG (defined as P > 1.5 ng/ml) and live birth rates calculated by simple bivariate analyses with that derived from multivariable logistic regression. The multivariable analysis controlled for female age, number of oocytes retrieved, number of embryos transferred, developmental stage of embryos at transfer (cleavage versus blastocyst), whether at least one good-quality embryo was transferred, the woman's body mass index, the total dose of FSH administered during ovarian stimulation and the type of GnRH analogues used (agonists versus antagonists) during ovarian

  12. Prolonged starvation and subsequent recovery of nitrification process in a simulated photovoltaic aeration SBR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fangshu; Li, Anding; Li, Boyin; Cui, Zhibo; Shi, Chunhong; Zhou, Beihai

    2015-07-01

    The ability of a new SBR (sequencing batch reactor) based on simulating photovoltaic aeration for maintaining nitrification activity under a 25-day starvation period was studied. The activity and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) and the diversity of AOB were investigated. The measured biomass decay rates were 0.017 day(-1) and 0.029 day(-1) for AOB and NOB, respectively. These decay rates correlated well with AOB and NOB population quantified by real-time PCR. The recovery of ammonia oxidation rate and nitrite oxidation rate needed 4 and 7 days, respectively, indicating that NOB was more affected than AOB by starvation conditions. According to the real-time PCR results, Nitrospira was the dominant NOB in the reactor. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that Nitrosomonas oligotropha cluster was the dominant major cluster before and after starvation. Moreover, Pareto-Lorenz evenness distribution curves were plotted to interpret the interspecies abundance of AOB; the results suggested that AOB community possessed a balanced structure with medium Fo (Functional organization). Thus, the community can potentially deal with changing environmental conditions (e.g., starvation) and preserve its functionality according to the concept of functional redundancy.

  13. Shifts in Nitrification Kinetics and Microbial Community during Bioaugmentation of Activated Sludge with Nitrifiers Enriched on Sludge Reject Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lifang; Peng, Dangcong; Pan, Ruiling

    2012-01-01

    This study used two laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) to evaluate the shifts in nitrification kinetics and microbial communities of an activated sludge sewage treatment system (main stream) during bioaugmentation with nitrifiers cultivated on real sludge reject water (side stream). Although bioaugmentation exerted a strong influence on the microbial community and the nitrification kinetics in the main stream, there was 58% of maximum ammonia uptake rate (AUR) and 80% of maximum nitrite uptake rate (NUR) loss of the seed source after bioaugmentation. In addition, nitrite accumulation occurred during bioaugmentation due to the unequal and asynchronous increase of the AUR (from 2.88 to 13.36 mg N/L·h) and NUR (from 0.76 to 4.34 mg N/L·h). FISH results showed that ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) was inclined to be washed out with effluent in contrast to nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB), and Nitrosococcus mobilis lineage was the dominant AOB, while the dominant NOB in the main stream gradually transferred from Nitrospira to Nitrobacter. Nitrospina and Nitrococcus which existed in the seed source could not be detected in the main stream. It can be inferred that nitrite accumulation occurred due to the mismatch of NOB structure but washed out with effluent. PMID:23091354

  14. Shifts in Nitrification Kinetics and Microbial Community during Bioaugmentation of Activated Sludge with Nitrifiers Enriched on Sludge Reject Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lifang Yu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study used two laboratory-scale sequencing batch reactors (SBRs to evaluate the shifts in nitrification kinetics and microbial communities of an activated sludge sewage treatment system (main stream during bioaugmentation with nitrifiers cultivated on real sludge reject water (side stream. Although bioaugmentation exerted a strong influence on the microbial community and the nitrification kinetics in the main stream, there was 58% of maximum ammonia uptake rate (AUR and 80% of maximum nitrite uptake rate (NUR loss of the seed source after bioaugmentation. In addition, nitrite accumulation occurred during bioaugmentation due to the unequal and asynchronous increase of the AUR (from 2.88 to 13.36 mg N/L·h and NUR (from 0.76 to 4.34 mg N/L·h. FISH results showed that ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB was inclined to be washed out with effluent in contrast to nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB, and Nitrosococcus mobilis lineage was the dominant AOB, while the dominant NOB in the main stream gradually transferred from Nitrospira to Nitrobacter. Nitrospina and Nitrococcus which existed in the seed source could not be detected in the main stream. It can be inferred that nitrite accumulation occurred due to the mismatch of NOB structure but washed out with effluent.

  15. Impact of solid retention time and nitrification capacity on the ability of activated sludge to remove pharmaceuticals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falås, Per; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus; Ledin, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Removal of five acidic pharmaceuticals (ibuprofen, ketoprofen, naproxen, diclofenac and clofibric acid) by activated sludge from five municipal activated sludge treatment processes, with various sludge ages and nitrification capacities, was assessed through batch experiments. The increase...... in aerobic sludge age from 1-3 to 7 days seemed to be critical for the removal of naproxen and ketoprofen, with markedly higher rates of removal at sludge ages of 7 days or more. No removal was shown for diclofenac and clofibric acid, while high rates were observed for ibuprofen in all investigated sludges....... Parallel examinations of activated sludge batches with and without allylthiourea (12 mg/L), an inhibitor of ammonia monooxygenase, showed minor to moderate influence on the removal rates of ketoprofen and naproxen. These results suggest that the removal rates of biodegradable pharmaceuticals in municipal...

  16. WaveNet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-30

    Coastal Inlets Research Program WaveNet WaveNet is a web-based, Graphical-User-Interface ( GUI ) data management tool developed for Corps coastal...generates tabular and graphical information for project planning and design documents. The WaveNet is a web-based GUI designed to provide users with a...data from different sources, and employs a combination of Fortran, Python and Matlab codes to process and analyze data for USACE applications

  17. Coloured Petri Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kurt

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes how Coloured Petri Nets (CP-nets) have been developed — from being a promising theoretical model to being a full-fledged language for the design, specification, simulation, validation and implementation of large software systems (and other systems in which human beings and...... use of CP-nets — because it means that the function representation and the translations (which are a bit mathematically complex) no longer are parts of the basic definition of CP-nets. Instead they are parts of the invariant method (which anyway demands considerable mathematical skills...

  18. Game Coloured Petri Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergaard, Michael

    2006-01-01

    This paper introduces the notion of game coloured Petri nets. This allows the modeler to explicitly model what parts of the model comprise the modeled system and what parts are the environment of the modeled system. We give the formal definition of game coloured Petri nets, a means of reachability...... analysis of this net class, and an application of game coloured Petri nets to automatically generate easy-to-understand visualizations of the model by exploiting the knowledge that some parts of the model are not interesting from a visualization perspective (i.e. they are part of the environment...

  19. Programming NET Web Services

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrara, Alex

    2007-01-01

    Web services are poised to become a key technology for a wide range of Internet-enabled applications, spanning everything from straight B2B systems to mobile devices and proprietary in-house software. While there are several tools and platforms that can be used for building web services, developers are finding a powerful tool in Microsoft's .NET Framework and Visual Studio .NET. Designed from scratch to support the development of web services, the .NET Framework simplifies the process--programmers find that tasks that took an hour using the SOAP Toolkit take just minutes. Programming .NET

  20. Annotating Coloured Petri Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindstrøm, Bo; Wells, Lisa Marie

    2002-01-01

    -net. An example of such auxiliary information is a counter which is associated with a token to be able to do performance analysis. Modifying colour sets and arc inscriptions in a CP-net to support a specific use may lead to creation of several slightly different CP-nets – only to support the different uses...... a method which makes it possible to associate auxiliary information, called annotations, with tokens without modifying the colour sets of the CP-net. Annotations are pieces of information that are not essential for determining the behaviour of the system being modelled, but are rather added to support...

  1. Effect of nitrification inhibitors (DMPP and 3MP+TZ) on soil nitrous oxide emissions from a sub-tropical vegetable production system in Queensland, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheer, Clemens; Deuter, Peter; Firrell, Mary; Rowlings, David; Grace, Peter

    2015-04-01

    residues into the soil. It also shows that the use of nitrification inhibitors can lead to elevated N2O emissions by storing N in the soil profile that is available to soil microbes during the decomposition of the vegetable residues over the post-harvest phase. Hence the use of nitrification inhibitors in vegetable systems has to be treated carefully and fertiliser rates need to be adjusted to avoid excess soil nitrogen during the postharvest phase.

  2. Using the quantum yields of photosystem II and the rate of net photosynthesis to monitor high irradiance and temperature stress in chrysanthemum (Dendranthema grandiflora)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wakjera, Eshetu Janka; Körner, Oliver; Rosenqvist, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Under a dynamic greenhouse climate control regime, temperature is adjusted to optimise plant physiological responses to prevailing irradiance levels; thus, both temperature and irradiance are used by the plant to maximise the rate of photosynthesis, assuming other factors are not limiting...... irradiance, the maximum Pn and ETR were reached at 24 °C. Increased irradiance decreased the PSII operating efficiency and increased NPQ, while both high irradiance and temperature had a significant effect on the PSII operating efficiency at temperatures >28 °C. Under high irradiance and temperature, changes...... in the NPQ determined the PSII operating efficiency, with no major change in the fraction of open PSII centres (qL) (indicating a QA redox state). We conclude that 1) chrysanthemum plants cope with excess irradiance by non-radiative dissipation or a reversible stress response, with the effect on the Pn...

  3. Salinity effect on simultaneous nitrification and denitrification, microbial characteristics in a hybrid sequencing batch biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Zonglian; Wu, Lan; Wang, Qun; Gao, Mengchun; Jin, Chunji; Zhao, Yangguo; Zhao, Linting; Guo, Liang

    2017-10-09

    The effect of increasing salinity on nitrogen removal via simultaneous nitrification and denitrification, microbial activities and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) were investigated in a hybrid sequencing batch biofilm reactor filled with soft combination carriers. In the influent salinity range from 1.0 to 2.0%, average COD, NH4(+)-N and TN removal efficiencies were higher than 97.1, 97.8 and 86.4% at the steady state. When salinity was increased to 2.5 and 3.0%, ammonium oxidation was obviously inhibited in the reactor. For both suspended sludge (S-sludge) and biofilm, specific ammonium oxidation rate, specific nitrite oxidation rate, specific oxygen uptake rate and dehydrogenase activity reduced with the increase of salinity. The quantity of total EPS increased with the increase of salinity from 1.0 to 2.0%. Generally, humic substances were the dominant composition of EPS in both S-sludge and biofilm, with the percentages of 43.9-54.0 and 43.8-64.6% in total EPS.

  4. Start-up analysis of partial nitrification process in SBR reactors for different initial conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iliaszewicz Paula

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There are a lot of technical solutions that are designed to improve the efficiency of nitrogen removal from wastewater. One of the most interesting processes are autotrophic nitrogen removal process ANAMMOX. Essential for the ANAMMOX process is prepare the wastewater containing the correct proportion of ammonium and nitrite. The study tested strategies for start-up of the partial nitrification from wastewater streams from sludge dewatering after the methane fermentation process. The start-up was tested for partial nitrification process from full nitrification process in pilot scale. For the initial conditions was developed strategies. In this strategy was chosen initial parameters such as pH, temperature, and DO to the partial nitrification process will be well.

  5. Living oysters and their shells as sites of nitrification and denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffrey, Jane M; Hollibaugh, James T; Mortazavi, Behzad

    2016-11-15

    Oysters provide a critical habitat, are a food resource for higher trophic levels and support important commercial fisheries throughout the world. Oyster reefs can improve water quality by removing phytoplankton. While sediment denitrification may be enhanced adjacent to oyster reefs, little is known about nitrification and denitrification associated with living oysters and their shells. We measured nitrification and denitrification in living oysters (Crassostrea virginica and Crassostrea gigas) and empty oyster shells. Nitrification was similar between live oysters and empty oyster shells, however, denitrification was enhanced significantly on living oysters compared to shells. This is the first demonstration of nitrification and denitrification associated with living oysters and their shells. Our data suggest that loss of historic oyster reefs has likely affected the resilience of estuaries to eutrophication. The additional benefit of oyster mediated denitrification should be considered in restoration of oyster reefs as a tool for managing eutrophication. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. How inhibiting nitrification affects nitrogen cycle and reduces environmental impacts of anthropogenic nitrogen input

    Science.gov (United States)

    We conducted a meta-analysis of 103 nitrification inhibitor (NI) studies, and evaluated how NI application affects crop productivity and other ecosystem services in agricultural systems. Our results showed that, compared to conventional fertilizer practice, applications of NI alo...

  7. Drinking Water Microbiome as a Screening Tool for Nitrification in Chloraminated Drinking Water Distribution Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many water utilities in the US using chloramine as disinfectant treatment in their distribution systems have experienced nitrification episodes, which detrimentally impact the water quality. A chloraminated drinking water distribution system (DWDS) simulator was operated throug...

  8. Effect of a rapid repair mechanism for nitrification capacity in the load impact wastewater treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Wei; Zhang, Bing; Sun, Changdong; Tan, Xin; Liu, Bo; Zou, Xiaofeng

    2017-05-01

    The nitrification capacity in the wastewater treatment is very important, and is particularly vulnerable to impacts. In this study, a rapid repair mechanism for nitrification was built and the result showing that, with the addition of exogenous nitrifying bacteria and organic nutrient, the nitrification capacity in the pilot scale equipment was restored in 20h, the concentration of NH3-N in discharge conforms to the one-class A permitted criterion (GB 18918-2002) and remain stable for long time, while the nitrification capacity in control group would not be fixed by itself in 196h. The repaired experimental group has the advantage of strong shock resistance and stable operation, and under the second high impact load, the concentration of NH3-N in effluent remain stable.

  9. Subsurface aeration of anaerobic groundwater : iron colloid formation and the nitrification process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolthoorn, A.

    2003-01-01

    Keywords: Iron, anaerobic groundwater, groundwater purification, heterogeneous oxidation, iron colloid formation, electron microscopy, nitrification In anaerobic groundwater iron and ammonium can be found in relatively high concentrations. These substances need to be removed when groundwater is used

  10. Effect of Volatile Fatty Acids and Trimethylamine on Nitrification in Activated Sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eilersen, Ann Marie; Henze, Mogens; Kløft, Lene

    1994-01-01

    The effect of volatile fatty acids and trimethylamine on the nitrification activity of activated sludge was studied in laboratory batch experiments. The critical concentration of inhibitor IK at which the activity ceases was determined by modelling. IK values for ammonia oxidation were found...... wastewater stripped of sulphide showed that volatile fatty acids and trimethylamine alone cannot account for the inhibition of the nitrification activity, indicating that other factors are also involved....

  11. Nitrification inhibitors mitigated reactive gaseous nitrogen intensity in intensive vegetable soils from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Changhua; Li, Bo; Xiong, Zhengqin

    2018-01-15

    Nitrification inhibitors, a promising tool for reducing nitrous oxide (N2O) losses and promoting nitrogen use efficiency by slowing nitrification, have gained extensive attention worldwide. However, there have been few attempts to explore the broad responses of multiple reactive gaseous nitrogen emissions of N2O, nitric oxide (NO) and ammonia (NH3) and vegetable yield to nitrification inhibitor applications across intensive vegetable soils in China. A greenhouse pot experiment with five consecutive vegetable crops was performed to assess the efficacies of two nitrification inhibitors, namely, nitrapyrin and dicyandiamide on reactive gaseous nitrogen emissions, vegetable yield and reactive gaseous nitrogen intensity in four typical vegetable soils representing the intensive vegetable cropping systems across mainland China: an Acrisol from Hunan Province, an Anthrosol from Shanxi Province, a Cambisol from Shandong Province and a Phaeozem from Heilongjiang Province. The results showed soil type had significant influences on reactive gaseous nitrogen intensity, with reactive gaseous nitrogen emissions and yield mainly driven by soil factors: pH, nitrate, C:N ratio, cation exchange capacity and microbial biomass carbon. The highest reactive gaseous nitrogen emissions and reactive gaseous nitrogen intensity were in Acrisol while the highest vegetable yield occurred in Phaeozem. Nitrification inhibitor applications decreased N2O and NO emissions by 1.8-61.0% and 0.8-79.5%, respectively, but promoted NH3 volatilization by 3.2-44.6% across all soils. Furthermore, significant positive correlations were observed between inhibited N2O+NO and stimulated NH3 emissions with nitrification inhibitor additions across all soils, indicating that reduced nitrification posed the threat of NH3 losses. Additionally, reactive gaseous nitrogen intensity was significantly reduced in the Anthrosol and Cambisol due to the reduced reactive gaseous nitrogen emissions and increased yield

  12. Net zero water

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lindeque, M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Is it possible to develop a building that uses a net zero amount of water? In recent years it has become evident that it is possible to have buildings that use a net zero amount of electricity. This is possible when the building is taken off...

  13. SolNet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jordan, Ulrike; Vajen, Klaus; Bales, Chris

    2014-01-01

    SolNet, founded in 2006, is the first coordinated International PhD education program on Solar Thermal Engineering. The SolNet network is coordinated by the Institute of Thermal Engineering at Kassel University, Germany. The network offers PhD courses on solar heating and cooling, conference...

  14. Kunstige neurale net

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hørning, Annette

    1994-01-01

    Artiklen beskæftiger sig med muligheden for at anvende kunstige neurale net i forbindelse med datamatisk procession af naturligt sprog, specielt automatisk talegenkendelse.......Artiklen beskæftiger sig med muligheden for at anvende kunstige neurale net i forbindelse med datamatisk procession af naturligt sprog, specielt automatisk talegenkendelse....

  15. Evaluating the effect of dissolved oxygen on simultaneous nitrification and denitrification in polyurethane foam contact oxidation reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chong; Ma, Fang; Li, Ang; Qiu, Shan; Li, Jianzheng

    2013-03-01

    The effects of dissolved oxygen on simultaneous nitrification and denitrification were evaluated in polyurethane foam contact oxidation reactors in a municipal wastewater treatment process. It was observed that nitrate could be removed at low dissolved oxygen levels, but the removal rate was gradually reduced as the dissolved oxygen concentration increased to a higher level of 6.0 mg/L. Nitrogen removal remained optimal within the dissolved oxygen range of 0.5 to 1.0 mg/L. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis revealed that the diversity of the microbial community changed accompanying dissolved oxygen values of 0.5 to 1.0 mg/L, 2.5 to 3.5 mg/L, 6.0 to 6.5 mg/L, and 10.0 to 12.0 mg/L, in turn, which was supported by the Shannon-Wiener index of 1.56, 1.71, 1.43, and 1.56, accordingly. Both DGGE profiling and phylogenetic analysis confirmed that the nitrifiers in reactors that are responsible for nitrification during the experiment include Nitrosospira sp., Nitrosomonas sp., and Nitrospira sp.

  16. The effects of salinity on coupled nitrification and aerobic denitrification in an estuarine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mengfan; Xue, Dongmei; Meng, Fanqiao; Wang, Zhong-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Salinity has significant effects on nitrification and denitrification processes, particularly in estuarine systems. A dissolved oxygen-enriched river and its estuary in northern China were selected to investigate the impact of salinity gradients (0.6, 4, 7.6, 11.4 and 14.7‰) obtained from the mixing of river samples and estuarine samples with different proportions on coupled nitrification and aerobic denitrification via incubation experiments (35 and 10 °C). Results indicated that: (a) nitrification and coupled nitrification-aerobic denitrification occurred for all treatments, which resulted in NO3- being either accumulated or removed at the end of the incubation; (b) a suitable range of salinity is 4.0-11.4‰ for nitrification and 4.0-7.6‰ for coupled nitrification-aerobic denitrification; and (c) the relatively higher temperature (35 °C) can effectively stimulate N transformation processes compared to the lover temperature (10 °C) in the incubation experiment.

  17. Using nitrification inhibitors to mitigate agricultural N2 O emission: a double-edged sword?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Shu Kee; Suter, Helen; Mosier, Arvin R; Chen, Deli

    2017-02-01

    Nitrification inhibitors show promise in decreasing nitrous oxide (N2 O) emission from agricultural systems worldwide, but they may be much less effective than previously thought when both direct and indirect emissions are taken into account. Whilst nitrification inhibitors are effective at decreasing direct N2 O emission and nitrate (NO3- ) leaching, limited studies suggest that they may increase ammonia (NH3 ) volatilization and, subsequently, indirect N2 O emission. These dual effects are typically not considered when evaluating the inhibitors as a climate change mitigation tool. Here, we collate results from the literature that simultaneously examined the effects of nitrification inhibitors on N2 O and NH3 emissions. We found that nitrification inhibitors decreased direct N2 O emission by 0.2-4.5 kg N2 O-N ha-1 (8-57%), but generally increased NH3 emission by 0.2-18.7 kg NH3 -N ha-1 (3-65%). Taking into account the estimated indirect N2 O emission from deposited NH3 , the overall impact of nitrification inhibitors ranged from -4.5 (reduction) to +0.5 (increase) kg N2 O-N ha-1 . Our results suggest that the beneficial effect of nitrification inhibitors in decreasing direct N2 O emission can be undermined or even outweighed by an increase in NH3 volatilization. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. The herbicide Glyphosate affects nitrification in the Elbe estuary, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Tina; Lassen, Stephan

    2015-04-01

    The Elbe River is one of the biggest European rivers discharging into the North Sea. It also transports high amounts of nutrients and pollutants like pesticides. Important source regions of both nutrients and pollutants are located within the river catchment, which is dominated by agricultural land-use. From these agricultural soils, pesticides can be carried via the river and estuary into the North Sea. Glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl) glycine) is the most commonly used herbicide worldwide and mainly used to regulate unwanted plant growth and for the expedition of crop ripening. In Germany, ~ 6000 tons of glyphosate are applied yearly in agriculture and private use. Glyphosate is degradable by microorganisms and has a half-life in water of 35 to 60 days. This herbicide specifically inhibits 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS), an enzyme that catalyzes the biosynthesis of essential aromatic amino acids in plants, fungi, and bacteria. Nitrifying bacteria, which play an important role in the internal nitrogen cycling in the Elbe estuary, also possess this enzyme. The aim of our study was to quantify the concentration of glyphosate in water and sediment samples of the Elbe to get an overview about relevant environmental levels and to assess the impact of glyphosate on inhibition of nitrifying activities. To quantify the effect of glyphosate on nitrification activity, natural samples as well as pure cultures of Nitrosomonas europea (strain Nm50) were incubated with different concentrations of glyphosate over a period of some weeks. The nitrifying activity was determined according to changes of the nitrite and nitrate concentration as well as the cell number. Glyphosate was detectable in water and sediment samples in the Elbe estuary with up to 5 ppb mainly in the Port of Hamburg region. In both incubation experiments an inhibiting effect of glyphosate on nitrification could be shown. The incubated natural water sample was affected by a glyphosate

  19. Low temperature effects on nitrification and nitrifier community structure in V-ASP for decentralized wastewater treatment and its improvement by bio-augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jiajia; Dong, Wenyi; Sun, Feiyun; Zhao, Ke

    2017-12-19

    The vegetation-activated sludge process (V-ASP) has been proved to be an environment-friendly decentralized wastewater treatment system with extra esthetic function and less footprint. However, the effects of low temperature on the treatment performance of V-ASP and related improvement methods are rarely investigated, up to now. In this work, the effect of low temperature on nitrification in V-ASP was comprehensively investigated from overall nitrification performance, substrate utilization kinetics, functional enzymatic activities, and microbial community structure shift by comparison with conventional ASP. Bio-augmentation methods in terms of single-time nitrifier-enriched biomass dosage were employed to improve nitrification efficiency in bench- and full-scale systems. The experiment results demonstrated that the NH4+-N removal efficiency in V-ASP system decreased when the operational temperature decreased from 30 to 15 °C, and the decreasing extent was rather smaller compared to ASP, as well as ammonium and nitrite oxidation rates and enzymatic activities, which indicated the V-ASP system possesses high resistance to low temperature. With direct dosage of 1.6 mg nitrifier/gSS sludge, the nitrification efficiency in V-ASP was enhanced dramatically from below 50% to above 90%, implying that bio-augmentation was effective for V-ASP whose enzymatic activities and microbial communities were both also improved. The feasibility and effectiveness of bio-augmentation was further confirmed in a full-scale V-ASP system after a long-term experiment which is instructive for the practical application.

  20. Effect of free ammonium and free nitrous acid on the activity, aggregate morphology and extracellular polymeric substance distribution of ammonium oxidizing bacteria in partial nitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Qian; Peng, Dangcong; Wang, Bo; Chen, Yuanyuan; Li, Jiaqi; Zhao, Qiaodi; Wang, Binbin

    2017-09-01

    Successful partial nitrification not only guarantees the inhibition of nitrite oxidation, but also does not excessively retard the ammonia oxidation rate. Therefore, the performance of ammonium oxidizing bacteria (AOB) during partial nitrification is fundamental to this process. In this study, two lab-scale partial nitrification bioreactors containing different inhibition conditions-one with free ammonium (FA) inhibition, the other with free nitrous acid (FNA) inhibition-were used to compare the differences between activity, quantity, aggregation morphology and extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) distribution of AOB. The results showed that although stable, long-term, partial nitrification was achieved in both reactors, there were differences in AOB activity, microbial spatial distribution and EPS characteristic. In the FA bioreactor, FA concentration was conducted at more than 40 mg/L, which had a strong impact on the metabolism of AOB. The activity and quantity decreased by 50%. Higher EPS (42.44 ± 2.31 mg g-1 mixed liquor volatile suspended solids [MLVSS]) and protein were introduced into the EPS matrix. However, in the FNA bioreactor, the FNA concentration was about 0.23 mg/L. It did not reach a level to affect AOB metabolism. The AOB activity and quantity were maintained at high levels and the total EPS content was 28.29 ± 2.04 mg g-1 MLVSS. Additionally, the microscopic results showed that in the FA bioreactor, AOB cells aggregated in microcolonies, while they appeared to be self-flocculating with no specific conformation in the other reactor. β-polysaccharides located inside sludge flocs in the FA bioreactor but only accumulated around the outer layer of activated sludge flocs in the FNA condition. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Pro NET Best Practices

    CERN Document Server

    Ritchie, Stephen D

    2011-01-01

    Pro .NET Best Practices is a practical reference to the best practices that you can apply to your .NET projects today. You will learn standards, techniques, and conventions that are sharply focused, realistic and helpful for achieving results, steering clear of unproven, idealistic, and impractical recommendations. Pro .NET Best Practices covers a broad range of practices and principles that development experts agree are the right ways to develop software, which includes continuous integration, automated testing, automated deployment, and code analysis. Whether the solution is from a free and

  2. Getting to Net Zero

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-09-01

    The technology necessary to build net zero energy buildings (NZEBs) is ready and available today, however, building to net zero energy performance levels can be challenging. Energy efficiency measures, onsite energy generation resources, load matching and grid interaction, climatic factors, and local policies vary from location to location and require unique methods of constructing NZEBs. It is recommended that Components start looking into how to construct and operate NZEBs now as there is a learning curve to net zero construction and FY 2020 is just around the corner.

  3. Instant Lucene.NET

    CERN Document Server

    Heydt, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Filled with practical, step-by-step instructions and clear explanations for the most important and useful tasks. A step-by-step guide that helps you to index, search, and retrieve unstructured data with the help of Lucene.NET.Instant Lucene.NET How-to is essential for developers new to Lucene and Lucene.NET who are looking to get an immediate foundational understanding of how to use the library in their application. It's assumed you have programming experience in C# already, but not that you have experience with search techniques such as information retrieval theory (although there will be a l

  4. [Identification of a high ammonia nitrogen tolerant and heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification bacterial strain TN-14 and its nitrogen removal capabilities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Xin; Yao, Li; Lu, Lei; Leng, Lu; Zhou, Ying-Qin; Guo, Jun-Yuan

    2014-10-01

    A new strain of high ammonia nitrogen tolerant and heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic denitrification bacterium TN-14 was isolated from the environment. Its physiological and biochemical characteristics and molecular identification, performences of heterotrophic nitrification-aerobic, the abilities of resistance to ammonia nitrogen as well as the decontamination abilities were studied, respectively. It was preliminary identified as Acinetobacter sp. according to its physiological and biochemical characteristics and molecular identification results. In heterotrophic nitrification system, the ammonia nitrogen and total nitrogen removal rate of the bacterial strain TN-14 could reach 97.13% and 93.53% within 24 h. In nitrates denitrification system, the nitrate concentration could decline from 94.24 mg · L(-1) to 39.32 mg · L(-1) within 24 h, where the removal rate was 58.28% and the denitrification rate was 2.28 mg · (L · h)(-1); In nitrite denitrification systems, the initial concentration of nitrite could be declined from 97.78 mg · L(-1) to 21.30 mg x L(-1), with a nitrite nitrogen removal rate of 78.22%, and a denitrification rate of 2.55 mg · (L· h)(-1). Meanwhile, strain TN-14 had the capability of flocculant production, and the flocculating rate could reach 94.74% when its fermentation liquid was used to treat 0.4% kaolin suspension. Strain TN-14 could grow at an ammonia nitrogen concentration as high as 1200 mg · L(-1). In the aspect of actual piggery wastewater treatment by strain TN-14, the removal rate of COD, ammonia nitrogen, TN and TP cloud reached 85.30%, 65.72%, 64.86% and 79.41%, respectively. Strain TN-14 has a good application prospect in biological treatment of real high- ammonia wastewater.

  5. Effects of Simulated Rare Earth Recycling Wastewaters on Biological Nitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Yoshiko; Barnes, Joni; Eslamimanesh, Ali; Lencka, Malgorzata M; Anderko, Andrzej; Riman, Richard E; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2015-08-18

    Increasing rare earth element (REE) supplies by recycling and expanded ore processing will result in generation of new wastewaters. In some cases, disposal to a sewage treatment plant may be favored, but plant performance must be maintained. To assess the potential effects of such wastewaters on biological treatment, model nitrifying organisms Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrobacter winogradskyi were exposed to simulated wastewaters containing varying levels of yttrium or europium (10, 50, and 100 ppm), and the extractant tributyl phosphate (TBP, at 0.1 g/L). Y and Eu additions at 50 and 100 ppm inhibited N. europaea, even when virtually all of the REE was insoluble. Provision of TBP with Eu increased N. europaea inhibition, although TBP alone did not substantially alter activity. For N. winogradskyi cultures, Eu or Y additions at all tested levels induced significant inhibition, and nitrification shut down completely with TBP addition. REE solubility was calculated using the previously developed MSE (Mixed-Solvent Electrolyte) thermodynamic model. The model calculations reveal a strong pH dependence of solubility, typically controlled by the precipitation of REE hydroxides but also likely affected by the formation of unknown phosphate phases, which determined aqueous concentrations experienced by the microorganisms.

  6. Cocurrent biological nitrification and denitrification in wastewater treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spector, M.

    1998-11-01

    Repetitive conditioning of recycle activated sludge (RAS) under strict anaerobic conditions gradually changes the products of ammonia oxidation from nitrite and nitrate to nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) and nitrogen (N{sub 2}). Nitrite inhibits oxygen respiration of anaerobically conditioned sludge; biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) is then oxidized by nitrite, which is reduce to N{sub 2}O and N{sub 2}. When anaerobic RAS conditioning is initially imposed on a nitrifying system, Nitrobacter species continue to oxidize nitrite to nitrate and thus reduce the nitrite available to oxidize BOD. However, Nitrobacter in the mixed liquor gradually tend to wash out because the sole source of Nictrobacter energy, the oxidation of nitrite to nitrate, is diminished to the extent that nitrite is reduced. Incorporation of an RAS conditioning zone to the activate-sludge process results in evolution of a nonfilamentous biomass, which affects both cocurrent biological nitrification and denitrification (CBND) and biological phosphorus removal (BPR). The initial feed zone may be either aerobic or anaerobic. A final anoxic denitrification zone is desirable for removal of residual nitrite plus nitrate (NO{sub x}) from aeration effluent. Nitrous oxide, the main reaction product of CBND, promotes both global warming and destruction of the stratospheric ozone layer.

  7. Depth investigation of rapid sand filters for drinking water production reveals strong stratification in nitrification biokinetic behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tatari, Karolina; Smets, Barth F.; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    -flow lab-scale assay. NH4 + removal capacity, estimated from short term loading up-shifts, was at least 10 times higher in the top than in the middle and bottom filter layers, consistent with the stratification of Ammonium Oxidizing Bacteria (AOB). AOB density increased consistently with the NH4 + removal...... rate, indicating their primarily role in nitrification under the imposed experimental conditions. The maximum AOB cell specific NH4 + removal rate observed at the bottom was at least 3 times lower compared to the top and middle layers. Additionally, a significant up-shift capacity (4.6 and 3.5 times......) was displayed from the top and middle layers, but not from the bottom layer at increased loading conditions. Hence, AOB with different physiological responses were active at the different depths. The biokinetic analysis predicted that despite the low NH4 + removal capacity at the bottom layer, the entire filter...

  8. Heterotrophic nitrification by Achromobacter xylosoxidans S18 isolated from a small-scale slaughterhouse wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Pradyut; Pramanik, Arnab; Mitra, Sayani; Choudhury, Jayanta Debabrata; Mukherjee, Joydeep; Mukherjee, Somnath

    2012-06-01

    Heterotrophic carbon utilizing microbes were acclimatized in the laboratory by inoculating sludge collected from the waste discharge pond of a small-scale rural abattoir in India in a nutrient solution intermittently fed with glucose and ammonium chloride. Cultures of 10 well-developed isolates were selected and grown in a basal medium containing glucose and ammonium chloride. Culture supernatants were periodically analyzed for ammonium nitrogen (NH(4)(+)-N) and chemical oxygen demand (COD). Polyphasic taxonomic study of the most active nitrifier (S18) was done. Half saturation concentration (K(s)), maximum rate of substrate utilization (k), yield coefficient (Y) and decay coefficient (K(d)) were determined from the Lineweaver-Burk plot using the modified Monod equation. S18 was able to remove 97 ± 2% of (NH(4)(+)-N) and 88 ± 3% of COD. Molecular phylogenetic study supported by physiological and biochemical characteristics assigned S18 as Achromobacter xylosoxidans. Nitrification activity of A. xylosoxidans was demonstrated for the first time, while interestingly, the distinctive anaerobic denitrification property was preserved in S18. K (s) values were determined as 232.13 ± 1.5 mg/l for COD reduction and 2.131 ± 1.9 mg/l for NH(4)(+)-N utilization. Yield coefficients obtained were 0.4423 ± 0.1134 mg of MLVSS/mg of COD and 0.2461 ± 0.0793 mg of MLVSS/mg of NH(4)(+)-N while the decay coefficients were 0.0627 ± 0.0013 per day and 0.0514 ± 0.0008 per day, respectively. After a contact period of 24 h, 650 ± 5 mg/l solids were produced when the initial concentration of COD and NH(4)(+)-N were 1820 ± 10 mg/l and 120 ± 5.5 mg/l, respectively. This is the first report on the kinetic coefficients for carbon oxidation and nitrification by a single bacterium isolated from slaughterhouse wastewater.

  9. Nitrification resilience and community dynamics of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria with respect to ammonia loading shock in a nitrification reactor treating steel wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyungjin; Shin, Seung Gu; Lee, Joonyeob; Koo, Taewoan; Kim, Woong; Hwang, Seokhwan

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the nitrification resilience pattern and examine the key ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) with respect to ammonia loading shocks (ALSs) in a nitrification bioreactor treating steel wastewater. The perturbation experiments were conducted in a 4-L bioreactor operated in continuous mode with a hydraulic retention time of 10 d. Three sequential ALSs were given to the bioreactor (120, 180 and 180 mg total ammonia nitrogen (TAN)/L. When the first shock was given, the nitrification process completely recovered after 14 d of further operation. However, the resilience duration was significantly reduced to ∼1 d after the second and third ALSs. In the bioreactor, Nitrosomonas aestuarii dominated the other AOB species, Nitrosomonas europaea and N. nitrosa, throughout the process. In addition, the population of N. aestuarii increased with ammonia utilization following each ALS; i.e., this species responded to acute ammonia overloadings by contributing to ammonia oxidation. This finding suggests that N. aestuarii could be exploited to achieve stable nitrification in industrial wastewaters that contain high concentrations of ammonia. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Net Zero Energy Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marszal, Anna Joanna; Bourrelle, Julien S.; Musall, Eike

    2010-01-01

    and identify possible renewable energy supply options which may be considered in calculations. Finally, the gap between the methodology proposed by each organisation and their respective national building code is assessed; providing an overview of the possible changes building codes will need to undergo......The international cooperation project IEA SHC Task 40 / ECBCS Annex 52 “Towards Net Zero Energy Solar Buildings”, attempts to develop a common understanding and to set up the basis for an international definition framework of Net Zero Energy Buildings (Net ZEBs). The understanding of such buildings...... parameters used in the calculations are discussed and the various renewable supply options considered in the methodologies are summarised graphically. Thus, the paper helps to understand different existing approaches to calculate energy balance in Net ZEBs, highlights the importance of variables selection...

  11. PhysioNet

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The PhysioNet Resource is intended to stimulate current research and new investigations in the study of complex biomedical and physiologic signals. It offers free...

  12. TideNet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-30

    query tide data sources in a desired geographic region of USA and its territories (Figure 1). Users can select a tide data source through the Google Map ...select data sources according to the desired geographic region. It uses the Google Map interface to display data from different sources. Recent...Coastal Inlets Research Program TideNet The TideNet is a web-based Graphical User Interface (GUI) that provides users with GIS mapping tools to

  13. Building Neural Net Software

    OpenAIRE

    Neto, João Pedro; Costa, José Félix

    1999-01-01

    In a recent paper [Neto et al. 97] we showed that programming languages can be translated on recurrent (analog, rational weighted) neural nets. The goal was not efficiency but simplicity. Indeed we used a number-theoretic approach to machine programming, where (integer) numbers were coded in a unary fashion, introducing a exponential slow down in the computations, with respect to a two-symbol tape Turing machine. Implementation of programming languages in neural nets turns to be not only theo...

  14. Interaction Nets in Russian

    OpenAIRE

    Salikhmetov, Anton

    2013-01-01

    Draft translation to Russian of Chapter 7, Interaction-Based Models of Computation, from Models of Computation: An Introduction to Computability Theory by Maribel Fernandez. "In this chapter, we study interaction nets, a model of computation that can be seen as a representative of a class of models based on the notion of 'computation as interaction'. Interaction nets are a graphical model of computation devised by Yves Lafont in 1990 as a generalisation of the proof structures of linear logic...

  15. Programming NET 35

    CERN Document Server

    Liberty, Jesse

    2009-01-01

    Bestselling author Jesse Liberty and industry expert Alex Horovitz uncover the common threads that unite the .NET 3.5 technologies, so you can benefit from the best practices and architectural patterns baked into the new Microsoft frameworks. The book offers a Grand Tour" of .NET 3.5 that describes how the principal technologies can be used together, with Ajax, to build modern n-tier and service-oriented applications. "

  16. A paradigm shift towards low-nitrifying production systems: the role of biological nitrification inhibition (BNI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbarao, G. V.; Sahrawat, K. L.; Nakahara, K.; Rao, I. M.; Ishitani, M.; Hash, C. T.; Kishii, M.; Bonnett, D. G.; Berry, W. L.; Lata, J. C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Agriculture is the single largest geo-engineering initiative that humans have initiated on planet Earth, largely through the introduction of unprecedented amounts of reactive nitrogen (N) into ecosystems. A major portion of this reactive N applied as fertilizer leaks into the environment in massive amounts, with cascading negative effects on ecosystem health and function. Natural ecosystems utilize many of the multiple pathways in the N cycle to regulate N flow. In contrast, the massive amounts of N currently applied to agricultural systems cycle primarily through the nitrification pathway, a single inefficient route that channels much of this reactive N into the environment. This is largely due to the rapid nitrifying soil environment of present-day agricultural systems. Scope In this Viewpoint paper, the importance of regulating nitrification as a strategy to minimize N leakage and to improve N-use efficiency (NUE) in agricultural systems is highlighted. The ability to suppress soil nitrification by the release of nitrification inhibitors from plant roots is termed ‘biological nitrification inhibition’ (BNI), an active plant-mediated natural function that can limit the amount of N cycling via the nitrification pathway. The development of a bioassay using luminescent Nitrosomonas to quantify nitrification inhibitory activity from roots has facilitated the characterization of BNI function. Release of BNIs from roots is a tightly regulated physiological process, with extensive genetic variability found in selected crops and pasture grasses. Here, the current status of understanding of the BNI function is reviewed using Brachiaria forage grasses, wheat and sorghum to illustrate how BNI function can be utilized for achieving low-nitrifying agricultural systems. A fundamental shift towards ammonium (NH4+)-dominated agricultural systems could be achieved by using crops and pastures with high BNI capacities. When viewed from an agricultural and

  17. [Response of nitrification/denitrification and their associated microbes to soil moisture change in paddy soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ruo-Xuan; He, Ji-Zheng; Zhang, Li-Mei

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the effect of moisture change on nitrification and denitrification and their corresponding functional microbes, an acidic paddy soil from Taoyuan, Hunan Province was selected as the study object, and soil microcosm experiment containing 4 different water holding capacity (WHC) levels (30% WHC, 60% WHC, 90% WHC, and waterlog) was set up in this study. Results showed that no active nitrification and denitrification occurred in 30% WHC treatment as there were no obvious ammonia consumption and nitrate accumulation, while nitrification was active in 60% WHC and 90% WHC treatments as indicated by the obvious accumulation of nitrate in those two treatments. Meanwhile, significant ammonia consumption and N2O emission were only observed in 90% WHC treatment, implying that a much stronger nitrification in 90% WHC treatment than in 60% WHC treatment and the co-occurrence of nitrification and denitrification in 90% WHC treatment. In waterlog treatment, relatively lower N2O emission was detected and no obvious nitrification was detected, corresponding to a significant lower soil Eh in this treatment than in the other three non-waterlog treatments. Except the early stage of incubation (7 d), the abundance of nirS, nirK and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) amoA genes showed similar responses to soil moisture change over time. Except the slight decrease in waterlog treatment, the abundances of the three genes increased significantly as the soil moisture increased, and the highest abundances of nirS, nirK, and amoA gene were observed in 90% WHC treatment in which the highest nitrification and denitrification activity was detected. T-RFLP analysis showed that the community composition of nirS gene-containing denitrifiers changed significantly in response to soil moisture change after two weeks, and soil Eh and C(w) were the main factors affecting the community composition of denitrifiers.

  18. A paradigm shift towards low-nitrifying production systems: the role of biological nitrification inhibition (BNI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbarao, G V; Sahrawat, K L; Nakahara, K; Rao, I M; Ishitani, M; Hash, C T; Kishii, M; Bonnett, D G; Berry, W L; Lata, J C

    2013-07-01

    Agriculture is the single largest geo-engineering initiative that humans have initiated on planet Earth, largely through the introduction of unprecedented amounts of reactive nitrogen (N) into ecosystems. A major portion of this reactive N applied as fertilizer leaks into the environment in massive amounts, with cascading negative effects on ecosystem health and function. Natural ecosystems utilize many of the multiple pathways in the N cycle to regulate N flow. In contrast, the massive amounts of N currently applied to agricultural systems cycle primarily through the nitrification pathway, a single inefficient route that channels much of this reactive N into the environment. This is largely due to the rapid nitrifying soil environment of present-day agricultural systems. In this Viewpoint paper, the importance of regulating nitrification as a strategy to minimize N leakage and to improve N-use efficiency (NUE) in agricultural systems is highlighted. The ability to suppress soil nitrification by the release of nitrification inhibitors from plant roots is termed 'biological nitrification inhibition' (BNI), an active plant-mediated natural function that can limit the amount of N cycling via the nitrification pathway. The development of a bioassay using luminescent Nitrosomonas to quantify nitrification inhibitory activity from roots has facilitated the characterization of BNI function. Release of BNIs from roots is a tightly regulated physiological process, with extensive genetic variability found in selected crops and pasture grasses. Here, the current status of understanding of the BNI function is reviewed using Brachiaria forage grasses, wheat and sorghum to illustrate how BNI function can be utilized for achieving low-nitrifying agricultural systems. A fundamental shift towards ammonium (NH4(+))-dominated agricultural systems could be achieved by using crops and pastures with high BNI capacities. When viewed from an agricultural and environmental perspective, the

  19. Nitrification inhibitors can increase post-harvest nitrous oxide emissions in an intensive vegetable production system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheer, Clemens; Rowlings, David; Firrell, Mary; Deuter, Peter; Morris, Stephen; Riches, David; Porter, Ian; Grace, Peter

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the effect of nitrification inhibitors (NIs) 3,4-dimethylpyrazole phosphate (DMPP) and 3-methylpyrazole 1,2,4-triazole (3MP + TZ), on N2O emissions and yield from a typical vegetable rotation in sub-tropical Australia we monitored soil N2O fluxes continuously over an entire year using an automated greenhouse gas measurement system. The temporal variation of N2O fluxes showed only low emissions over the vegetable cropping phases, but significantly higher emissions were observed post-harvest accounting for 50-70% of the annual emissions. NIs reduced N2O emissions by 20-60% over the vegetable cropping phases; however, this mitigation was offset by elevated N2O emissions from the NIs treatments over the post-harvest fallow period. Annual N2O emissions from the conventional fertiliser, the DMPP treatment, and the 3MP + TZ treatment were 1.3, 1.1 and 1.6 (sem = 0.2) kg-N ha-1 year-1, respectively. This study highlights that the use of NIs in vegetable systems can lead to elevated N2O emissions by storing N in the soil profile that is available to soil microbes during the decomposition of the vegetable residues. Hence the use of NIs in vegetable systems has to be treated carefully and fertiliser rates need to be adjusted to avoid an oversupply of N during the post-harvest phase.

  20. Nitrification inhibitors can increase post-harvest nitrous oxide emissions in an intensive vegetable production system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheer, Clemens; Rowlings, David; Firrell, Mary; Deuter, Peter; Morris, Stephen; Riches, David; Porter, Ian; Grace, Peter

    2017-03-07

    To investigate the effect of nitrification inhibitors (NIs) 3,4-dimethylpyrazole phosphate (DMPP) and 3-methylpyrazole 1,2,4-triazole (3MP + TZ), on N2O emissions and yield from a typical vegetable rotation in sub-tropical Australia we monitored soil N2O fluxes continuously over an entire year using an automated greenhouse gas measurement system. The temporal variation of N2O fluxes showed only low emissions over the vegetable cropping phases, but significantly higher emissions were observed post-harvest accounting for 50-70% of the annual emissions. NIs reduced N2O emissions by 20-60% over the vegetable cropping phases; however, this mitigation was offset by elevated N2O emissions from the NIs treatments over the post-harvest fallow period. Annual N2O emissions from the conventional fertiliser, the DMPP treatment, and the 3MP + TZ treatment were 1.3, 1.1 and 1.6 (sem = 0.2) kg-N ha-1 year-1, respectively. This study highlights that the use of NIs in vegetable systems can lead to elevated N2O emissions by storing N in the soil profile that is available to soil microbes during the decomposition of the vegetable residues. Hence the use of NIs in vegetable systems has to be treated carefully and fertiliser rates need to be adjusted to avoid an oversupply of N during the post-harvest phase.

  1. Nitrification and aerobic denitrification in anoxic-aerobic sequencing batch reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzate Marin, Juan C; Caravelli, Alejandro H; Zaritzky, Noemí E

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of achieving nitrogen (N) removal using a lab-scale sequencing batch reactor (SBR) exposed to anoxic/aerobic (AN/OX) phases, focusing to achieve aerobic denitrification. This process will minimize emissions of N2O greenhouse gas. The effects of different operating parameters on the reactor performance were studied: cycle duration, AN/OX ratio, pH, dissolved oxygen concentration (DOC), and organic load. The highest inorganic N removal (NiR), close to 70%, was obtained at pH=7.5, low organic load (440mgCOD/(Lday)) and high aeration given by 12h cycle, AN/OX ratio=0.5:1.0 and DOC higher than 4.0mgO2/L. Nitrification followed by high-rate aerobic denitrification took place during the aerobic phase. Aerobic denitrification could be attributed to Tetrad-forming organisms (TFOs) with phenotype of glycogen accumulating organisms using polyhydroxyalkanoate and/or glycogen storage. The proposed AN/OX system constitutes an eco-friendly N removal process providing N2 as the end product. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Net accumulation of the Greenland ice sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilsholm, Sissi; Christensen, Jens Hesselbjerg; Dethloff, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    improvement compared to the driving OAGCM. Estimates of the regional net balance are also better represented by the RCM. In the future climate the net balance for the Greenland Ice Sheet is reduced in all the simulation, but discrepancies between the amounts when based on ECHAM4/OPYC3 and HIRHAM are found....... In both scenarios, the estimated melt rates are larger in HIRHAM than in the driving model....

  3. Taxa alimentar no desempenho de juvenis de robalo-peva em tanque-rede=Feeding rate in the performance of juveniles of fat-snook Centropomus parallelus in net cage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinicius Ronzani Cerqueira

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available O conhecimento da taxa ótima de alimentação para uma determinada espécie não só é importante para promover o maior crescimento e a melhor eficiência na alimentação, mas também para prevenir a deterioração de qualidade de água como resultado do excesso de alimento. O presente estudo teve como objetivo avaliar o desempenho do robalo-peva, Centropomus parallelus cultivado em tanques-rede flutuantes sob o efeito de diferentes taxas alimentares (1; 1,5; 2 e 2,5% da biomassa ao dia e a taxa controle que foi até a saciedade, em condições de cultivo no ambiente natural. Durante 40 dias, cada tratamento foi avaliado em triplicatas e foram verificados os parâmetros biológicos (sobrevivência, taxa de crescimento específico, peso e comprimentos médios finais e nutricionais (taxa de conversão alimentar aparente. A análise de regressão polinomial da taxa de crescimento específico sugere que em temperaturas médias de 25°C a taxa alimentar que resulta em melhor crescimento para juvenis de robalo-peva é de 1,7% da biomassa viva por dia.Knowing the optimal feeding rate for a given species is important not only to promote higher growth and greater feeding efficiency, but also to prevent the deterioration of water quality resulting from excess food. This study aimed to evaluate the performance of the fat-snook Centropomus parallelus cultivated in net cages under the effect of different feeding rates (1, 1.5, 2 and 2.5% live biomass daily and control rate up to apparent satiation in natural environment conditions. For 40 days, each treatment was evaluated in triplicate, in which the biological parameters (survival, specific growth rate, final average weight and length and nutritional parameters (feed conversion ratio were assessed. A polynomial regression analysis of specific growth rate suggests that in average temperatures of 25°C, the feeding rate which results in best growth for juvenile fat-snook is 1.7% of live biomass per day.

  4. Potential Nitrification and Nitrogen Mineral of Soil in Coffee Agroforestry System with Various Shading Trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purwanto .

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The role of shading trees in coffee farms has been well understood to establish suitable condition for the growth of coffee trees, on the other hand their role in nitrogen cycle in coffee farming is not yet well understood. The objectives of this study are to investigate the influence of various legume shading trees on the concentration of soil mineral N (N-NH4 + and N-NO3-, potential nitrification and to study the controlling factors of nitrification under field conditions. This field explorative research was carried out in Sumberjaya, West Lampung. Twelve observation plots covered four land use systems (LUS, i.e. 1 Coffee agroforestry with Gliricidiasepium as shade trees; 2 Coffee agroforestry with Gliricidiaas shade trees and Arachis pintoias cover crops; 3Coffee agroforestry with Paraserianthes falcataria as shade trees; and 4 Mixed/multistrata coffee agroforestry with Gliricidiaand other fruit crops as shade trees. Measurements of soil mineral-N concentration were carried out every three weeks for three months. Results showed that shade tree species in coffee agroforestry significantly affected concentrations of soil NH4 +, NO3- and potential nitrification. Mixed coffee agroforestry had the highest NH4+/N-mineral ratio (7.16% and the lowest potential nitrification (0.13 mg NO2-kg-1 hour -1 compared to other coffee agroforestry systems using single species of leguminous shade trees. Ratio of NH4 + /N-mineral increased 0.8—21% while potential nitrification decreased 55—79% in mixed coffee agroforestry compared to coffee agroforestry with Gliricidia or P. falcatariaas shade trees. Coffee agroforestry with P. falcatariaas shade trees had potential nitrification 53% lower and ratio of NH4 + /N-mineral concentration 20% higher than that with Gliricidia. Coffee agroforestry with P. falcataria as shade trees also had organic C content 17% higher, total N 40% higher, available P 112% higher than that with Gliricidia. The presence of A. pintoiin

  5. Regulation and role of epiphytic nitrification and denitrification in macrophyte-dominated systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksson, Peder G.

    2000-02-01

    This thesis examines mechanisms regulating bacterial nitrification and denitrification in attached microbial communities on surfaces of aquatic macrophytes. It also evaluates the role of epiphytic nitrification and denitrification for the nitrogen turnover in macrophyte-dominated nutrient-rich freshwater. Epiphytic nitrification is promoted in light and epiphytic denitrification occurs mainly in dark, because the metabolic activity of the aquatic macrophyte and its epiphytes induce in light high and in dark low oxygen concentrations in epiphytic communities. Epiphytic nitrification and denitrification are also affected by the physical and chemical characteristics of the aquatic macrophyte. The spatial distribution of nitrification in emergent macrophyte wetlands is related to the species composition of the emergent vegetation, possibly because of a macrophyte species-related release of organic nitrification inhibitors. Contrasting to nitrifying bacteria, which are lithotrophic, denitrifying bacteria use organic substances as an energy source and are therefore stimulated by the release of organic matter from aquatic macrophytes. Epiphytic communities support more denitrification in nutrient-rich than in nutrient-poor environments. In lakes and ponds, epiphytic denitrification is higher at sheltered locations than at locations exposed to wind-induced water movements or currents. In flowing water, epiphytic denitrification occurs mainly at low oxygen concentrations in the surrounding water. However, because aquatic macrophytes impede water flow and induce low oxygen concentrations in dark, epiphytic denitrification can be present within dense vegetation despite of high oxygen concentrations in the surrounding water. Epiphytic nitrification is almost unaffected by flow conditions, and can occur both in light and in dark. In shallow-water systems such as treatment wetlands, aquatic macrophytes often provide most of the accessible surface area for attached nitrifying and

  6. Comparison of different aerobic granular sludge types for activated sludge nitrification bioaugmentation potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figdore, Bryce A; Stensel, H David; Winkler, Mari-Karoliina H

    2017-11-06

    Three types of nitrifying granules were grown on media simulating anaerobic digestion dewatering reject water and compared for their potential to increase nitrification capacity when added to mainstream flocculent activated sludge treatment. An advantage of nitrification bioaugmentation with sidestream granules instead of flocculent biomass is that the granules can be selectively maintained at longer retention times than flocs and thus provide higher nitrification capacity from bioaugmentation. The three granule types and feeding conditions were: nitrifying granules with aerobic feeding, nitrifying-denitrifying granules with anoxic feeding, and nitrifying-denitrifying/phosphate-accumulating (NDN-PAO) granules with anaerobic feeding. NDN-PAO granular sludge showed the highest potential for nitrification bioaugmentation due to its better treatment performance, granule physical characteristics, and much greater production of granular mass and nitrification capacity. Dechloromonas-associated organisms were dominant in these granules; Candidatus Accumulibacter-related organisms were also present. Nitrosomonas was the dominant ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, while Candidatus Nitrotoga was an abundant nitrite-oxidizer in all granule types. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Reduced nitrification and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in acidic soil amended with biochar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenyu; Zong, Haiying; Zheng, Hao; Liu, Guocheng; Chen, Lei; Xing, Baoshan

    2015-11-01

    Adding biochar into soils has potential to manipulate soil nitrification process due to its impacts on nitrogen (N) cycling, however, the exact mechanisms underlying the alteration of nitrification process in soils are still not clear. Nitrification in an acidic orchard soil amended with peanut shell biochar (PBC) produced at 400 °C was investigated. Nitrification was weakened by PBC addition due to the decreased NH4(+)-N content and reduced ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) abundance in PBC-amended soils. Adding phenolic compounds (PHCs) free biochar (PBC-P) increased the AOB abundance and the DGGE band number, indicating that PHCs remaining in the PBC likely reduced AOB abundance and diversity. However, PBC addition stimulated rape growth and increased N bioavailability. Overall, adding PBC could suppress the nitrification process and improve N bioavailability in the agricultural soils, and thus possibly mitigate the environmental negative impacts and improving N use efficiency in the acidic soils added with N fertilizer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Recovery of partial nitrification in a down-flow hanging sponge reactor by salt shock loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubayashi, Miri; Harada, Hideki; Okubo, Tsutomu; Uemura, Shigeki

    2016-01-01

    Partial nitrification of ammonium-containing artificial wastewater was achieved using a down-flow hanging sponge (DHS) reactor with a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 2 h by adjusting the influent salinity to 25 g Cl L(-1) with NaCl. The effect of HRT on partial nitrification was examined by varying HRT from 1 to 4 h. Extending HRT from 2 to 4 h had the effect of decreasing nitrite production and increasing nitrates. Since partial nitrification was not completely recovered after returning the HRT to 2 h, we examined the effect of salt shock loading on the recovery of partial nitrification. Salt shock loading with 150 gCl L(-1) for 72 h resulted in the fraction of NO2-N to total inorganic nitrogen in the effluent reaching 83.0% as much as 83 days after returning the salinity to the original level. Thus, despite the time required for the restoration of partial nitrification, the effectiveness of salt shock loading to achieve this aim was verified.

  9. Using the Triple Labelling Technique to apportion N2O Emissions to Nitrification and Denitrification from different Nitrogen Sources at different Water-Filled-Pore-Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loick, Nadine; Dixon, Elizabeth R.; Repullo Ruibérriz de Torres, Miguel A.; Ciganda, Veronica; Lopez-Aizpun, Maria A.; Matthews, G. Peter; Müller, Christoph; Cardenas, Laura M.

    2017-04-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is considered to be an important greenhouse gas (GHG) accounting for approximately 6% of the current global warming. The atmospheric N2O concentration has been increasing since the Industrial Revolution, with soils representing its major source, making the understanding of its sources and removal processes very important for the development of mitigation strategies. In soils N gases are mainly produced via nitrification and denitrification. It is assumed that under dry/aerobic conditions nitrification is the dominant N consuming process, while denitrification becomes dominant under wetter conditions promoting anaerobicity. Nitrification and denitrification may occur simultaneously in different microsites of the same soil but there is often uncertainty associated with which process dominates in a particular soil under specific conditions. N2O predominantly derives from incomplete denitrification of nitrate (NO3-). The existence of different pools of NO3- in soils, namely the native soil pool, and the fertiliser-added one, has been suggested through a series of laboratory incubation experiments (Meijide et al., 2010; Bergstermann et al., 2011) using the denitrification incubation system, DENIS (Cardenas et al., 2003), in which soil cores are incubated under an N-free atmosphere, allowing direct measurements of all emitted N gases (NO, N2O and N2) as well as CO2. A third pool, NO3- produced from nitrification of applied NH4+, can also be a source of N2O via denitrification and also from nitrification. In this study labelling of substrate-N with 15N is used to quantify the underlying gross N transformation rates and link them to N-emissions to identify the production and consumption pathways and temporal dynamics of N2O. In three experiments twelve soil cores each were incubated in the DENIS to measure gaseous emissions, while parallel incubations under the same conditions were set up for destructive soil sampling at 7 time points. Using the triple

  10. Biochar decelerates soil organic nitrogen cycling but stimulates soil nitrification in a temperate arable field trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prommer, Judith; Wanek, Wolfgang; Hofhansl, Florian; Trojan, Daniela; Offre, Pierre; Urich, Tim; Schleper, Christa; Sassmann, Stefan; Kitzler, Barbara; Soja, Gerhard; Hood-Nowotny, Rebecca Clare

    2014-01-01

    Biochar production and subsequent soil incorporation could provide carbon farming solutions to global climate change and escalating food demand. There is evidence that biochar amendment causes fundamental changes in soil nutrient cycles, often resulting in marked increases in crop production, particularly in acidic and in infertile soils with low soil organic matter contents, although comparable outcomes in temperate soils are variable. We offer insight into the mechanisms underlying these findings by focusing attention on the soil nitrogen (N) cycle, specifically on hitherto unmeasured processes of organic N cycling in arable soils. We here investigated the impacts of biochar addition on soil organic and inorganic N pools and on gross transformation rates of both pools in a biochar field trial on arable land (Chernozem) in Traismauer, Lower Austria. We found that biochar increased total soil organic carbon but decreased the extractable organic C pool and soil nitrate. While gross rates of organic N transformation processes were reduced by 50-80%, gross N mineralization of organic N was not affected. In contrast, biochar promoted soil ammonia-oxidizer populations (bacterial and archaeal nitrifiers) and accelerated gross nitrification rates more than two-fold. Our findings indicate a de-coupling of the soil organic and inorganic N cycles, with a build-up of organic N, and deceleration of inorganic N release from this pool. The results therefore suggest that addition of inorganic fertilizer-N in combination with biochar could compensate for the reduction in organic N mineralization, with plants and microbes drawing on fertilizer-N for growth, in turn fuelling the belowground build-up of organic N. We conclude that combined addition of biochar with fertilizer-N may increase soil organic N in turn enhancing soil carbon sequestration and thereby could play a fundamental role in future soil management strategies.

  11. Biochar decelerates soil organic nitrogen cycling but stimulates soil nitrification in a temperate arable field trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Prommer

    Full Text Available Biochar production and subsequent soil incorporation could provide carbon farming solutions to global climate change and escalating food demand. There is evidence that biochar amendment causes fundamental changes in soil nutrient cycles, often resulting in marked increases in crop production, particularly in acidic and in infertile soils with low soil organic matter contents, although comparable outcomes in temperate soils are variable. We offer insight into the mechanisms underlying these findings by focusing attention on the soil nitrogen (N cycle, specifically on hitherto unmeasured processes of organic N cycling in arable soils. We here investigated the impacts of biochar addition on soil organic and inorganic N pools and on gross transformation rates of both pools in a biochar field trial on arable land (Chernozem in Traismauer, Lower Austria. We found that biochar increased total soil organic carbon but decreased the extractable organic C pool and soil nitrate. While gross rates of organic N transformation processes were reduced by 50-80%, gross N mineralization of organic N was not affected. In contrast, biochar promoted soil ammonia-oxidizer populations (bacterial and archaeal nitrifiers and accelerated gross nitrification rates more than two-fold. Our findings indicate a de-coupling of the soil organic and inorganic N cycles, with a build-up of organic N, and deceleration of inorganic N release from this pool. The results therefore suggest that addition of inorganic fertilizer-N in combination with biochar could compensate for the reduction in organic N mineralization, with plants and microbes drawing on fertilizer-N for growth, in turn fuelling the belowground build-up of organic N. We conclude that combined addition of biochar with fertilizer-N may increase soil organic N in turn enhancing soil carbon sequestration and thereby could play a fundamental role in future soil management strategies.

  12. Biochar Decelerates Soil Organic Nitrogen Cycling but Stimulates Soil Nitrification in a Temperate Arable Field Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prommer, Judith; Wanek, Wolfgang; Hofhansl, Florian; Trojan, Daniela; Offre, Pierre; Urich, Tim; Schleper, Christa; Sassmann, Stefan; Kitzler, Barbara; Soja, Gerhard; Hood-Nowotny, Rebecca Clare

    2014-01-01

    Biochar production and subsequent soil incorporation could provide carbon farming solutions to global climate change and escalating food demand. There is evidence that biochar amendment causes fundamental changes in soil nutrient cycles, often resulting in marked increases in crop production, particularly in acidic and in infertile soils with low soil organic matter contents, although comparable outcomes in temperate soils are variable. We offer insight into the mechanisms underlying these findings by focusing attention on the soil nitrogen (N) cycle, specifically on hitherto unmeasured processes of organic N cycling in arable soils. We here investigated the impacts of biochar addition on soil organic and inorganic N pools and on gross transformation rates of both pools in a biochar field trial on arable land (Chernozem) in Traismauer, Lower Austria. We found that biochar increased total soil organic carbon but decreased the extractable organic C pool and soil nitrate. While gross rates of organic N transformation processes were reduced by 50–80%, gross N mineralization of organic N was not affected. In contrast, biochar promoted soil ammonia-oxidizer populations (bacterial and archaeal nitrifiers) and accelerated gross nitrification rates more than two-fold. Our findings indicate a de-coupling of the soil organic and inorganic N cycles, with a build-up of organic N, and deceleration of inorganic N release from this pool. The results therefore suggest that addition of inorganic fertilizer-N in combination with biochar could compensate for the reduction in organic N mineralization, with plants and microbes drawing on fertilizer-N for growth, in turn fuelling the belowground build-up of organic N. We conclude that combined addition of biochar with fertilizer-N may increase soil organic N in turn enhancing soil carbon sequestration and thereby could play a fundamental role in future soil management strategies. PMID:24497947

  13. Control of nitratation in an oxygen-limited autotrophic nitrification/denitrification rotating biological contactor through disc immersion level variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtens, Emilie N P; Boon, Nico; De Clippeleir, Haydée; Berckmoes, Karla; Mosquera, Mariela; Seuntjens, Dries; Vlaeminck, Siegfried E

    2014-03-01

    With oxygen supply playing a crucial role in an oxygen-limited autotrophic nitrification/denitrification (OLAND) rotating biological contactor (RBC), its controlling factors were investigated in this study. Disc rotation speeds (1.8 and 3.6rpm) showed no influence on the process performance of a lab-scale RBC, although abiotic experiments showed a significant effect on the oxygenation capacity. Estimations of the biological oxygen uptake rate revealed that 85-89% of the oxygen was absorbed by the microorganisms during the air exposure of the discs. Indeed, increasing the disc immersion (50 to 75-80%) could significantly suppress undesired nitratation, on the short and long term. The presented results demonstrated that nitratation could be controlled by the immersion level and revealed that oxygen control in an OLAND RBC should be predominantly based on the atmospheric exposure percentage of the discs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Rapid Start-up and Loading of an Attached Growth, Simultaneous Nitrification/Denitrification Membrane Aerated Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Caitlin E.; Pensinger, Stuart; Pickering, Karen D.; Barta, Daniel; Shull, Sarah A.; Vega, Letticia M.; Christenson, Dylan; Jackson, W. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Membrane aerated bioreactors (MABR) are attached-growth biological systems used for simultaneous nitrification and denitrification to reclaim water from waste. This design is an innovative approach to common terrestrial wastewater treatments for nitrogen and carbon removal and implementing a biologically-based water treatment system for long-duration human exploration is an attractive, low energy alternative to physiochemical processes. Two obstacles to implementing such a system are (1) the "start-up" duration from inoculation to steady-state operations and (2) the amount of surface area needed for the biological activity to occur. The Advanced Water Recovery Systems (AWRS) team at JSC explored these two issues through two tests; a rapid inoculation study and a wastewater loading study. Results from these tests demonstrate that the duration from inoculation to steady state can be reduced to under two weeks, and that despite low ammonium removal rates, the MABRs are oversized.

  15. New primary production and nitrification in the western subtropical North Atlantic: A modeling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, A. P.; Pondaven, P.

    2006-12-01

    The original definition of new primary production rests on the assumption that nitrogenous substrate taken up to fuel algal growth is coming into contact with phytoplankton for the first time that year. Therefore, should the generation of nitrate from ammonium by nitrification turn out to be significant in surface waters then nitrate uptake can no longer be simply ascribed to new production. A modeling study is presented centered on the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Station, in the oligotrophic subtropical North Atlantic. We quantify the role of nitrification in providing nitrate to fuel primary production through a full annual cycle for the first time. The results confirm previous limited observations suggesting that a major fraction of nitrate uptake in oligotrophic regions (where nitrification will be most influential), previously ascribed to new production, may actually involve "recycled" nitrate.

  16. Genetic mitigation strategies to tackle agricultural GHG emissions: The case for biological nitrification inhibition technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbarao, G V; Arango, J; Masahiro, K; Hooper, A M; Yoshihashi, T; Ando, Y; Nakahara, K; Deshpande, S; Ortiz-Monasterio, I; Ishitani, M; Peters, M; Chirinda, N; Wollenberg, L; Lata, J C; Gerard, B; Tobita, S; Rao, I M; Braun, H J; Kommerell, V; Tohme, J; Iwanaga, M

    2017-09-01

    Accelerated soil-nitrifier activity and rapid nitrification are the cause of declining nitrogen-use efficiency (NUE) and enhanced nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from farming. Biological nitrification inhibition (BNI) is the ability of certain plant roots to suppress soil-nitrifier activity, through production and release of nitrification inhibitors. The power of phytochemicals with BNI-function needs to be harnessed to control soil-nitrifier activity and improve nitrogen-cycling in agricultural systems. Transformative biological technologies designed for genetic mitigation are needed, so that BNI-enabled crop-livestock and cropping systems can rein in soil-nitrifier activity, to help reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and globally make farming nitrogen efficient and less harmful to environment. This will reinforce the adaptation or mitigation impact of other climate-smart agriculture technologies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. La plataforma .NET

    OpenAIRE

    Fornas Estrada, Miquel

    2008-01-01

    L'aparició de la plataforma .NET Framework ha suposat un canvi molt important en la forma de crear i distribuir aplicacions, degut a que incorpora una sèrie d'innovacions tècniques i productives que simplifiquen molt les tasques necessàries per desenvolupar un projecte. La aparición de la plataforma. NET Framework ha supuesto un cambio muy importante en la forma de crear y distribuir aplicaciones, debido a que incorpora una serie de innovaciones técnicas y productivas que simplifican mucho...

  18. Biological Petri Nets

    CERN Document Server

    Wingender, E

    2011-01-01

    It was suggested some years ago that Petri nets might be well suited to modeling metabolic networks, overcoming some of the limitations encountered by the use of systems employing ODEs (ordinary differential equations). Much work has been done since then which confirms this and demonstrates the usefulness of this concept for systems biology. Petri net technology is not only intuitively understood by scientists trained in the life sciences, it also has a robust mathematical foundation and provides the required degree of flexibility. As a result it appears to be a very promising approach to mode

  19. Effective mitigation of nitrate leaching and nitrous oxide emissions in intensive vegetable production systems using a nitrification inhibitor, dicyandiamide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Min; Sun, Xuecheng; Hu, Chengxiao; Tan, Qiling; Zhao, Changsheng [Huazhong Agricultural Univ., Wuhan (China). Key Lab. of Subtropical Agricultural Resources and Environment; Di, Hong J. [Lincoln Univ., Christchurch (New Zealand). Center for Soil and Environment Research

    2011-07-15

    Vegetable production is one of the most intensive agricultural systems with high rates of nitrogen (N) fertilizer use and irrigation, conditions conducive for nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup -}) leaching, and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) emissions. The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a nitrification inhibitor, dicyandiamide (DCD), in decreasing NO{sub 3}{sup -} leaching and N{sub 2}O emissions in vegetable production systems. Twenty-four undisturbed soil monolith lysimeters (610 mm in diameter; 700 mm in depth; surface area, 0.29 m{sup 2}) with two different soils, Huangzongrang (alfisol) and Chaotu (fluvisols), were collected and installed in a field lysimeter facility in Central China under irrigated vegetable production conditions. Urea fertilizer was applied at 650 kg N ha{sup -1}, and DCD was applied at 10 kg ha{sup -1} to the lysimeters planted with three kinds of vegetables (capsicum, Capsicum annuum L.; amaranth, Amaranthus mangostanus L.; radish, Raphanus sativus L.). The results showed that DCD reduced NO3- leaching by 58.5% and 36.2% and N{sub 2}O emissions factor by 83.8% and 72.7% in the two soils. The average NO{sub 3}{sup -}-N concentration in the drainage water was decreased from 4.9 mg NL{sup -1} to 2.3 mg NL{sup -1} and from 4.4 mg NL{sup -1} to 3.3 mg NL{sup -1}, in the Huangzongrang and Chaotu soils, respectively. In addition to the environmental benefits, the use of DCD also increased the yields of capsicum and radish in alfisol soil significantly (P < 0.01); only the amaranth yield in fluvisol soil was declined (P < 0.01), and the other vegetables yields were not affected. Total N concentrations of the three vegetables were increased significantly (P < 0.01) with the application of DCD with urea compared with urea alone. These results showed that the nitrification inhibitor DCD has the potential to significantly reduce NO{sub 3}{sup -} leaching and N{sub 2}O emissions and to make vegetable farming more environmentally

  20. Roughness and temperature effects on the filter media of a trickling filter for nitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Naoyuki; Ohara, Tetsuya; Hinobayashi, Jouji; Hashimoto, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    The performance of trickling filters using two types of plastic media with the same material, the same shape and different roughness was evaluated during a temperature-decreasing period to understand the roughness and temperature effects on the filter media. Real restaurant wastewater was used for the experiments. The chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal and nitrification performance of plastic media with a rough surface (LT-15) was superior to that with a smooth surface (KT-15). Because the biomass of microorganisms attached on the LT-15 was twice that attached on the KT-15, the larger biomass attached on the LT-15 was thought to be responsible for the higher performance. During the operation, the COD loading and water temperature varied in the range from 0.37 to 1.9 kg m(-3) d(-1) and 17.0--10.0 degrees C, respectively. However, the COD removal performance was not dependent on the COD loading or water temperature. On the contrary, the COD loading and the water temperature influenced the nitrification performance. Although a nitrification efficiency of 100% was recorded at a COD loading of 0.37 kg m(-3) d(-1), it deteriorated to 17-28% at higher COD loading. Moreover, a decline in the water temperature decreased the nitrification performance. The temperature-activity coefficient for nitrification was estimated to be 1.096. Based on this value, it was inferred that the COD loading should be set at less than 0.20 kg m(-3) d(-1) for the complete nitrification of the restaurant wastewater in winter, when the water temperature usually drops to around 10 degrees C.

  1. Pepperweed invasion increases nitrogen cycling rates in irrigated grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portier, E. F.; Yang, W. H.; Silver, W. L.

    2011-12-01

    Pepperweed (Lepidium latifolium) is a perennial exotic species that has spread throughout the western United States, invading natural and agricultural systems. Pepperweed has been documented to increase soil microbial enzyme activity associated with nitrogen (N) mineralization, but the effect of pepperweed on soil N cycling has not been determined. The objectives of this study were to determine if (1) pepperweed elevates gross mineralization rates in bulk soil, (2) pepperweed impacts rates of other gross N cycling processes, and (3) N cycling patterns change with soil depth. We used 15N pool dilution and tracer techniques to measure rates of gross N mineralization, gross nitrification, dissimilatory nitrate (NO3-) reduction to ammonium (NH4+) (DNRA), and net N2O fluxes from replicate plots (n = 6 per cover type) dominated by pepperweed versus dominated by an invasive annual grass (Hordenum murinem) with no pepperweed present. Because pepperweed has extensive root systems, we measured gross N cycling rates at three depths (0-20, 20-40, 40-60 cm) to determine pepperweed effects through the soil profile. Soil NH4+ and NO3- concentrations, microbial biomass N (MBN), and gravimetric soil moisture content were also measured at each soil depth. Soil oxygen (O2) concentrations were measured from soil equilibration chambers buried at 10, 30, and 50 cm depth. Pepperweed plots exhibited significantly higher soil NH4+ concentrations, gross mineralization rates, and soil O2 concentrations across all depths (p < 0.05, ANOVAs). Gross nitrification rates, MBN, soil NO3- concentrations, and soil moisture did not differ significantly between pepperweed-dominated and grass-dominated plots. Between the cover types, soil concentrations of NH4+ and O2 as well as rates of mineralization and DNRA were higher in surface soils (0-20 cm) than deeper soils (20-40 and 40-60 cm) (p < 0.05, ANOVAs). Gross mineralization rates in surface soils (0-20 cm) averaged 30.1 ± 4.3 μg g-1 d-1 in grass

  2. Modest net autotrophy in the oligotrophic ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letscher, Robert T.; Moore, J. Keith

    2017-04-01

    The metabolic state of the oligotrophic subtropical ocean has long been debated. Net community production (NCP) represents the balance of autotrophic carbon fixation with heterotrophic respiration. Many in vitro NCP estimates based on oxygen incubation methods and the corresponding scaling relationships used to predict the ecosystem metabolic balance have suggested the ocean gyres to be net heterotrophic; however, all in situ NCP methods find net autotrophy. Reconciling net heterotrophy requires significant allochthonous inputs of organic carbon to the oligotrophic gyres to sustain a preponderance of respiration over in situ production. Here we use the first global ecosystem-ocean circulation model that contains representation of the three allochthonous carbon sources to the open ocean, to show that the five oligotrophic gyres exhibit modest net autotrophy throughout the seasonal cycle. Annually integrated rates of NCP vary in the range 1.5-2.2 mol O2 m-2 yr-1 across the five gyre systems; however, seasonal NCP rates are as low as 1 ± 0.5 mmol O2 m-2 d-1 for the North Atlantic. Volumetric NCP rates are heterotrophic below the 10% light level; however, they become net autotrophic when integrated over the euphotic zone. Observational uncertainties when measuring these modest autotrophic NCP rates as well as the metabolic diversity encountered across space and time complicate the scaling up of in vitro measurements to the ecosystem scale and may partially explain the previous reports of net heterotrophy. The oligotrophic ocean is autotrophic at present; however, it could shift toward seasonal heterotrophy in the future as rising temperatures stimulate respiration.

  3. Systematic model development for partial nitrification of landfill leachate in a SBR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ganigue, R.; Volcke, E.I.P.; Puig, S.

    2010-01-01

    This study deals with partial nitrification in a sequencing batch reactor (PN-SBR) treating raw urban landfill leachate. In order to enhance process insight (e.g. quantify interactions between aeration, CO2 stripping, alkalinity, pH, nitrification kinetics), a mathematical model has been set up....... Following a systematic procedure, the model was successfully constructed, calibrated and validated using data from short-term (one cycle) operation of the PN-SBR. The evaluation of the model revealed a good fit to the main physical-chemical measurements (ammonium, nitrite, nitrate and inorganic carbon...

  4. ADAPTATION OF THE ACTIVATED SLUDGE TO THE DIGESTATE LIQUORS DURING THE NITRIFICATION AND DENITRIFICATION PROCESSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Barbara Majtacz

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The activated sludge process of the digestate liquors after chemical separation was conducted using a 10 L lab-scale sequencing batch reactor (SBR and a 0.50 m3 pilot-scale SBR independently (with pH control. Due to the relatively high concentration of free ammonia (FA, clear inhibitory effects of the digestate liquors on the nitrifying bacteria were observed. The adaptation of the activated sludge to the toxicity was evaluated by the trend of ammonia uptake rate (AUR and nitrate utilization rate (NUR. The lab-scale AUR values decreased from 5.3 to 2.6 g N/(kg VSS·h over time after the addition of digestate liquors (5 – 10% of the reactor working volume, indicating an apparent FA inhibition on the nitrification process in the FA concentration range of 0.3 - 0.5 mg N/L. The pilot-scale AUR values increased from 1.8 to 3.6 g N/(kg VSS·h in the first two weeks and then decreased to 2.4 g N/(kg VSS·h, showing a lag of the inhibition on the nitrifying bacteria at the FA concentration ≈ 0.15 mg N/L. The lab-scale NURs increased from 2.6 to 10.4 g N/(kg VSS·h over time, and the pilot-scale NURs increased from 1.0 to 4.0 g N/(kg VSS·h in a similar pattern. The clear dependence of both the lab- and pilot-scale NURs on time indicated the adaptation of the heterotrophic biomass to the digestate liquors. Ethanol instead of fusel oil was found to be a more efficient external carbon source for better adaptation of the activated sludge under unfavorable conditions.

  5. Petri Nets-Applications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 9. Petri Nets - Applications. Y Narahari. General Article Volume 4 Issue 9 September 1999 pp 44-52. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/004/09/0044-0052. Author Affiliations. Y Narahari ...

  6. Safety nets or straitjackets?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilsøe, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Does regulation of working hours at national and sector level impose straitjackets, or offer safety nets to employees seeking working time flexibility? This article compares legislation and collective agreements in the metal industries of Denmark, Germany and the USA. The industry has historically...

  7. Coloured Petri Nets

    CERN Document Server

    Jensen, Kurt

    2009-01-01

    Coloured Petri Nets (CPN) is a graphical language for modelling and validating concurrent and distributed systems, and other systems in which concurrency plays a major role. This book introduces the constructs of the CPN modelling language and presents the related analysis methods. It provides a comprehensive road map for the practical use of CPN.

  8. Boom Booom Net Radio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimshaw, Mark Nicholas; Yong, Louisa; Dobie, Ian

    1999-01-01

    of an existing Internet radio station; Boom Booom Net Radio. Whilst necessity dictates some use of technology-related terminology, wherever possible we have endeavoured to keep such jargon to a minimum and to either explain it in the text or to provide further explanation in the appended glossary....

  9. Game Theory .net.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shor, Mikhael

    2003-01-01

    States making game theory relevant and accessible to students is challenging. Describes the primary goal of GameTheory.net is to provide interactive teaching tools. Indicates the site strives to unite educators from economics, political and computer science, and ecology by providing a repository of lecture notes and tests for courses using…

  10. Coloured Petri Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kurt; Kristensen, Lars Michael

    Coloured Petri Nets (CPN) is a graphical language for modelling and validating concurrent and distributed systems, and other systems in which concurrency plays a major role. The development of such systems is particularly challenging because of inherent intricacies like possible nondeterminism...

  11. Sea-ice melt CO2-carbonate chemistry in the western Arctic Ocean: meltwater contributions to air-sea CO2 gas exchange, mixed layer properties and rates of net community production under sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, N. R.; Garley, R.; Frey, K. E.; Shake, K. L.; Mathis, J. T.

    2014-01-01

    The carbon dioxide (CO2)-carbonate chemistry of sea-ice melt and co-located, contemporaneous seawater has rarely been studied in sea ice covered oceans. Here, we describe the CO2-carbonate chemistry of sea-ice melt (both above sea ice as "melt ponds" and below sea ice as "interface waters") and mixed layer properties in the western Arctic Ocean in the early summer of 2010 and 2011. At nineteen stations, the salinity (~ 0.5 to 1500 μatm) with the majority of melt ponds acting as potentially strong sources of CO2 to the atmosphere. The pH of melt pond waters was also highly variable ranging from mildly acidic (6.1 to 7) to slightly more alkaline than underlying seawater (8 to 10.7). All of observed melt ponds had very low (pH/Ωaragonite than the co-located mixed layer beneath. Sea-ice melt thus contributed to the suppression of mixed layer pCO2 enhancing the surface ocean's capacity to uptake CO2 from the atmosphere. Meltwater contributions to changes in mixed-layer DIC were also used to estimate net community production rates (mean of 46.9 ±29.8 g C m-2 for the early-season period) under sea-ice cover. Although sea-ice melt is a transient seasonal feature, above-ice melt pond coverage can be substantial (10 to > 50%) and under-ice interface melt water is ubiquitous during this spring/summer sea-ice retreat. Our observations contribute to growing evidence that sea-ice CO2-carbonate chemistry is highly variable and its contribution to the complex factors that influence the balance of CO2 sinks and sources (and thereby ocean acidification) is difficult to predict in an era of rapid warming and sea ice loss in the Arctic Ocean.

  12. Nitrification and its influence on biogeochemical cycles from the equatorial Pacific to the Arctic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiozaki, Takuhei; Ijichi, Minoru; Isobe, Kazuo; Hashihama, Fuminori; Nakamura, Ken-Ichi; Ehama, Makoto; Hayashizaki, Ken-Ichi; Takahashi, Kazutaka; Hamasaki, Koji; Furuya, Ken

    2016-09-01

    We examined nitrification in the euphotic zone, its impact on the nitrogen cycles, and the controlling factors along a 7500 km transect from the equatorial Pacific Ocean to the Arctic Ocean. Ammonia oxidation occurred in the euphotic zone at most of the stations. The gene and transcript abundances for ammonia oxidation indicated that the shallow clade archaea were the major ammonia oxidizers throughout the study regions. Ammonia oxidation accounted for up to 87.4% (average 55.6%) of the rate of nitrate assimilation in the subtropical oligotrophic region. However, in the shallow Bering and Chukchi sea shelves (bottom ⩽67 m), the percentage was small (0-4.74%) because ammonia oxidation and the abundance of ammonia oxidizers were low, the light environment being one possible explanation for the low activity. With the exception of the shallow bottom stations, depth-integrated ammonia oxidation was positively correlated with depth-integrated primary production. Ammonia oxidation was low in the high-nutrient low-chlorophyll subarctic region and high in the Bering Sea Green Belt, and primary production in both was influenced by micronutrient supply. An ammonium kinetics experiment demonstrated that ammonia oxidation did not increase significantly with the addition of 31-1560 nm ammonium at most stations except in the Bering Sea Green Belt. Thus, the relationship between ammonia oxidation and primary production does not simply indicate that ammonia oxidation increased with ammonium supply through decomposition of organic matter produced by primary production but that ammonia oxidation might also be controlled by micronutrient availability as with primary production.

  13. Ammonia-oxidizing microbial communities in reactors with efficient nitrification at low-dissolved oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Colin M; Camejo, Pamela; Oshlag, J Zachary; Noguera, Daniel R

    2015-03-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing microbial communities involved in ammonia oxidation under low dissolved oxygen (DO) conditions (<0.3 mg/L) were investigated using chemostat reactors. One lab-scale reactor (NS_LowDO) was seeded with sludge from a full-scale wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) not adapted to low-DO nitrification, while a second reactor (JP_LowDO) was seeded with sludge from a full-scale WWTP already achieving low-DO nitrifiaction. The experimental evidence from quantitative PCR, rDNA tag pyrosequencing, and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) suggested that ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in the Nitrosomonas genus were responsible for low-DO nitrification in the NS_LowDO reactor, whereas in the JP_LowDO reactor nitrification was not associated with any known ammonia-oxidizing prokaryote. Neither reactor had a significant population of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) or anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) organisms. Organisms isolated from JP_LowDO were capable of autotrophic and heterotrophic ammonia utilization, albeit without stoichiometric accumulation of nitrite or nitrate. Based on the experimental evidence we propose that Pseudomonas, Xanthomonadaceae, Rhodococcus, and Sphingomonas are involved in nitrification under low-DO conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Low temperature biological phosphorus removal and partial nitrification in a pilot sequencing batch reactor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Qiuyan; Oleszkiewicz, Jan A

    2011-01-01

    Partial nitrification and biological phosphorus removal appear to hold promise of a cost-effective and sustainable biological nutrient removal process. Pilot sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) were operated under anaerobic/aerobic configuration for 8 months. It was found that biological phosphorus removal can be achieved in an SBR system, along with the partial nitrification process. Sufficient volatile fatty acids supply was the key for enhanced biological phosphorus removal. This experiment demonstrated that partial nitrification can be achieved even at low temperature with high dissolved oxygen (>3 mg/L) concentration. Shorter solid retention time (SRT) for nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) than for ammonia oxidizing bacteria due to the nitrite substrate limitation at the beginning of the aeration cycle was the reason that caused NOB wash-out. Controlling SRT should be the strategy for an SBR operated in cold climate to achieve partial nitrification. It was also found that the aerobic phosphorus accumulating organisms' P-uptake was more sensitive to nitrite inhibition than the process of anaerobic P-release.

  15. Drinking Water Microbiome as a Screening Tool for Nitrification in Chloraminated Drinking Water Distribution Systems (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many water utilities in the US using chloramine as disinfectant treatment in their distribution systems have experienced nitrification episodes, which detrimentally impact the water quality. Here, we used 16S rRNA sequencing data to generate high-resolution taxonomic profiles of...

  16. Mathematical model for sizing combined nitrification and pre-denitrification activated sludge systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esposito, G.; Fabbricino, M.; Lens, P.N.L.; Pirozzi, F.

    2007-01-01

    Two mathematical steady-state models for sizing single activated sludge systems aimed at nitrogen and organics removal from wastewater are proposed. The attention is focused on the combined nitrification system and the pre-denitrification system, considering three (soluble and particulate

  17. Page 1 Caloride, Vi/afect Nitrife Measurements in Monsoon Rain ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Caloride, Vi/afect Nitrife Measurements in Monsoon Rain Water 519. The Observatory being situated in the extreme south of Bombay. City alld at a distance of more than four miles from its busy portions, there is not 1ntleh roſld traffic in its neighbourhood and with a prevailing westerly to south-westerly wild the samples of ...

  18. Variability of nitrification potentials in patches of undergrowth vegetation in primary Scots pine stands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Boer, W.; Kester, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    We investigated whether the distribution of undergrowth species could explain small-scale spatial variability of nitrate production in primary Scots pine stands. This was done by measuring the nitrification potential, i.e. the accumulation of NO3--N in homogenized samples of the ectorganic layer, in

  19. Stratification of nitrification activity in rapid sand filters for drinking water treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tatari, Karolina; Smets, Barth F.; Musovic, Sanin

    2013-01-01

    Rapid sand filters used in groundwater treatment remove ammonium, iron and manganese from the water. Ammonium is removed biologically by nitrifying microorganisms attached on the sand surface. Nitrification kinetics and activity is strongly affected by filter design and operation, which are the k...

  20. Feasibility of simultaneous nitrification and denitrification in a pilot-scale airlift-loop reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hao, X.; Nieuwstad, T.J.

    1993-01-01

    Airlift-loop reactors have become competitive in treating municipal wastewater. Many studies have verified that high COD conversion efficiencies can be reached. When simultaneous nitrification and denitrification could be realised to the same degree as is possible in low loaded conventional

  1. Effects of dynamic operating conditions on nitrification in biological rapid sand filters for drinking water treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Carson Odell; Boe-Hansen, Rasmus; Musovic, Sanin

    2014-01-01

    Biological rapid sand filters are often used to remove ammonium from groundwater for drinking water supply. They often operate under dynamic substrate and hydraulic loading conditions, which can lead to increased levels of ammonium and nitrite in the effluent. To determine the maximum nitrification...

  2. A model for determination of operational conditions for successful shortcut nitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoguang; Kim, Mingu; Nakhla, George

    2017-02-01

    Accumulation of nitrite in shortcut nitrification is influenced by several factors including dissolved oxygen concentration (DO), pH, temperature, free ammonia (FA), and free nitrous acid (FNA). In this study, a model based on minimum dissolved oxygen concentration (DOmin), minimum/maximum substrate concentration (Smin and Smax), was developed. The model evaluated the influence of pH (7-9), temperature (10-35 °C), and solids retention time (SRT) (5 days-infinity) on MSC values. The evaluation was conducted either by controlling total ammonium nitrogen (TAN) or total nitrite nitrogen (TNN), concentration at 50 mg N/L while allowing the other to vary from 0 to 1000 mg N/L. In addition, specific application for shortcut nitrification-anammox process at 10 °C was analyzed. At any given operational condition, the model was able to predict if shortcut nitrification can be achieved and provide the operational DO range which is higher than the DOmin of AOB and lower than that of NOB. Furthermore, experimental data from different literature studies were taken for model simulation and the model prediction fit well the experiment. For the Sharon process, model prediction with default kinetics did not work but the model could make good prediction after adjusting the kinetic values based on the Sharon-specific kinetics reported in the literature. The model provides a method to identify feasible combinations of pH, DO, TAN, TNN, and SRT for successful shortcut nitrification.

  3. Nitrification of archaeal ammonia oxidizers in acid soils is supported by hydrolysis of urea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lu; Han, Wenyan; Zhang, Jinbo; Wu, Yucheng; Wang, Baozhan; Lin, Xiangui; Zhu, Jianguo; Cai, Zucong; Jia, Zhongjun

    2012-01-01

    The hydrolysis of urea as a source of ammonia has been proposed as a mechanism for the nitrification of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in acidic soil. The growth of Nitrososphaera viennensis on urea suggests that the ureolysis of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) might occur in natural environments. In this study, 15N isotope tracing indicates that ammonia oxidation occurred upon the addition of urea at a concentration similar to the in situ ammonium content of tea orchard soil (pH 3.75) and forest soil (pH 5.4) and was inhibited by acetylene. Nitrification activity was significantly stimulated by urea fertilization and coupled well with abundance changes in archaeal amoA genes in acidic soils. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes at whole microbial community level demonstrates the active growth of AOA in urea-amended soils. Molecular fingerprinting further shows that changes in denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprint patterns of archaeal amoA genes are paralleled by nitrification activity changes. However, bacterial amoA and 16S rRNA genes of AOB were not detected. The results strongly suggest that archaeal ammonia oxidation is supported by hydrolysis of urea and that AOA, from the marine Group 1.1a-associated lineage, dominate nitrification in two acidic soils tested. PMID:22592820

  4. Nitrification in lake sediment with addition of drinking water treatment residuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Changhui; Liu, Juanfeng; Wang, Zhixin; Pei, Yuansheng

    2014-06-01

    Drinking water treatment residuals (WTRs), non-hazardous by-products generated during potable water production, can effectively reduce the lake internal phosphorus (P) loading and improve water quality in lakes. It stands to reason that special attention regarding the beneficial reuse of WTRs should be given not only to the effectiveness of P pollution control, but also to the effects on the migration and transformation of other nutrients (e.g., nitrogen (N)). In this work, based on laboratory enrichment tests, the effects of WTRs addition on nitrification in lake sediment were investigated using batch tests, fluorescence in situ hybridization, quantitative polymerase chain reaction and phylogenetic analysis techniques. The results indicated that WTRs addition had minor effects on the morphologies of AOB and NOB; however, the addition slightly enhanced the sediment nitrification potential from 12.8 to 13.2 μg-N g(-1)-dry sample h(-1) and also increased the ammonia oxidation bacteria (AOB) and nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB) abundances, particularly the AOB abundances (P nitrification in lake sediment after WTRs addition were primarily due to the decrease of bioavailable P, the introduction of new nitrifiers and the increase of favorable carriers for microorganism attachment in sediments. Overall, these results suggested that WTRs reuse for the control of lake internal P loading would also lead to conditions that are beneficial to nitrification. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Detection of nitrifiers and evaluation of partial nitrification for wastewater treatment: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Shijian; Wang, Shanyun; Yang, Xiong; Qiu, Shuang; Li, Baikun; Peng, Yongzhen

    2015-12-01

    Partial nitrification has gained broad interests in the biological nitrogen removal (BNR) from wastewater, since it alleviates carbon limitation issues and acts as a shortcut nitrogen removal system combined with anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) process. The occurrence and maintenance of partial nitrification relies on various conditions, which favor ammonium oxidizing bacteria (AOB) but inhibit or limit nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB). The studies of the AOB and NOB activities have been conducted by state-of-the-art molecular techniques, such as Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), Quantitative PCR, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique, Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP), Live/Dead BacLight, and quinone profile. Furthermore, control strategies for obtaining partial nitrification are mainly focused on the pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen concentration, real-time aeration control, sludge retention time, substrate concentration, alternating anoxic and aerobic operation, inhibitor and ultrasonic treatment. Existing problems and further perspectives for the scale-up of partial nitrification are also proposed and suggested. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Quantifying the chronic effect of low DO on the nitrification process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guoqiang; Wang, Jianmin

    2015-12-01

    Our previous study indicated that a low dissolved oxygen (DO) could enrich and shift nitrifier community, making complete nitrification feasible under long-term low DO conditions. This research determined nitrifier kinetic constants, and quantified the chronic effect of low DO on the overall nitrification process. For ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB), the half-velocity constants of DO on the growth (KDO-g) and decay (KDO-d) were 0.29 and 0.48mgL(-1), respectively. For nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB), those values were 0.08 and 0.69mgL(-1), respectively. The low KDO-g values for both AOB and NOB suggest that a DO of greater than 1mgL(-1) does not provide further benefit to nitrification, and the lower KDO-g value for NOB suggests that nitrite oxidation is less impacted by a low DO. The KDO-d values of 0.48 and 0.69mgL(-1) for AOB and NOB, respectively, suggest that a low DO of less than 1mgL(-1) significantly inhibits the decay of both AOB and NOB, resulting in their enrichment. The relationship between the operational DO and required SRT for complete nitrification was developed to provide a theoretical foundation for operating an advanced wastewater treatment plant under low DO, to significantly improve aeration energy efficiency. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of graphite nanoparticles on nitrification in an activated sludge system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Qian; Liu, Yanchen; Shi, Hanchang; Huang, Xia

    2017-09-01

    Graphite nanoparticles (GNPs) might result in unexpected effects during their transportation and transformation in wastewater treatment systems, including strong thermo-catalytic and catalytic effects and microbial cytotoxicity. In particular, the effects of GNPs on the nitrification process in activated sludge systems should be addressed. This study aimed to estimate the influence of GNPs on the nitrification process in a short-term nitrification reactor with exposure to different light sources. The results indicated that GNPs could only improve the efficiency of photothermal transformation slightly in the activated sludge system because of its photothermal effects under the standard illuminant (imitating 1 × sun). However, even with better photothermal effects, the nitrification efficiency still decreased significantly with GNP dosing under the standard illuminant, which might result from stronger cytotoxic effects of GNPs on the nitrifying bacteria. The disappearance of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) around bacterial cells was observed, and the total quantity of viable bacteria decreased significantly after GNP exposuring. Variation in bacterial groups primarily occurred in nitrifying microbial communities, including Nitrosomonas sp., Nitrosospira sp., Comamonas sp. and Bradyrhizobiace sp. Nitrifiers significantly decreased, while the phyla Gammaproteobacteria, Deinocccus, and Bacteroidetes exhibited greater stability during GNP treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of moisture level and potassium on NH4+ nitrification and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To understand the impact of moisture level and potassium on NH4+ nitrification a greenhouse and laboratory studies were conducted using surface soil of Typic Hapludert (0–30 cm) of Ginchi, central Ethiopia. The treatments were two levels of moisture and three levels of fertilizer (six combinations replicated three times).

  9. Food Safety Nets:

    OpenAIRE

    Haggblade, Steven; Diallo, Boubacar; Staatz, John; Theriault, Veronique; Traoré, Abdramane

    2013-01-01

    Food and social safety nets have a history as long as human civilization. In hunter gatherer societies, food sharing is pervasive. Group members who prove unlucky in the short run, hunting or foraging, receive food from other households in anticipation of reciprocal consideration at a later time (Smith 1988). With the emergence of the first large sedentary civilizations in the Middle East, administrative systems developed specifically around food storage and distribution. The ancient Egyptian...

  10. Net technical assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Wegmann, David G.

    1989-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. The present and near term military balance of power between the U.S. and the Soviet Union can be expressed in a variety of net assessments. One can examine the strategic nuclear balance, the conventional balance in Europe, the maritime balance, and many others. Such assessments are essential not only for policy making but for arms control purposes and future force structure planning. However, to project the future military balance, on...

  11. Using WordNet for Building WordNets

    CERN Document Server

    Farreres, X; Farreres, Xavier; Rodriguez, Horacio; Rigau, German

    1998-01-01

    This paper summarises a set of methodologies and techniques for the fast construction of multilingual WordNets. The English WordNet is used in this approach as a backbone for Catalan and Spanish WordNets and as a lexical knowledge resource for several subtasks.

  12. Developing a chloramine decay index to understand nitrification: A case study of two chloraminated drinking water distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Sina; Liu, Sanly; Chow, Christopher W K; van Leeuwen, John; Cook, David; Drikas, Mary; Amal, Rose

    2017-07-01

    The management of chloramine decay and the prevention of nitrification are some of the critical issues faced by water utilities that use chloramine as a disinfectant. In this study, potential association between high performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) data obtained with multiple wavelength Ultraviolet (UV) detection from two drinking water distribution systems in Australia and nitrification occurrence was investigated. An increase in the absorbance signal of HPSEC profiles with UV detection at λ=230nm between apparent molecular weights of 200 to 1000Da was observed at sampling sites that experienced rapid chloramine decay and nitrification while its absorbance signal at λ=254nm decreased. A chloramine decay index (C.D.I) defined as the ratio of area beneath the HPSEC spectra at two different wavelengths of 230 and 254nm, was used in assessing chloramine decay occurrences. The C.D.Is of waters at locations that experienced nitrification were consistently higher than locations not experiencing nitrification. A simulated laboratory study showed that the formation of nitrite/nitrate and/or soluble microbial products and/or the release of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) during nitrification may contribute to the C.D.I. increase. These findings suggest that C.D.I derived from HPSEC with multiple wavelength UV detection could be an informative index to track the occurrence of rapid chloramine decay and nitrification. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Characteristics of N2O production and hydroxylamine variation in short-cut nitrification SBR process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bo; Ye, Junhong; Zhao, Jianqiang; Ding, Xiaoqian; Yang, Liwei; Tian, Xiaolei

    2018-01-01

    In order to study the characteristics of nitrous oxide (N2O) production and hydroxylamine (NH2OH) variation under oxic conditions, concentrations of NH2OH and N2O were simultaneously monitored in a short-cut nitrification sequencing batch reactor (SBR) operated with different influent ammonia concentrations. In the short-cut nitrification process, N2O production was increased with the increasing of ammonia concentration in influent. The maximum concentrations of dissolved N2O-N in the reactor were 0.11 mg/L and 0.52 mg/L when ammonia concentrations in the influent were 50 mg/L and 70 mg/L respectively. Under the low and medium ammonia load phases, the concentrations of NH2OH-N in the reactor were remained at a low level which fluctuated around 0.06 mg/L in a small range, and did not change with the variation of influent NH4+-N concentration. Based on the determination results, the half-saturation of NH2OH in the biochemical conversion process of NH2OH to NO2--N was very small, and the value of 0.05 mg NH2OH-N/L proposed in the published literature was accurate. NH2OH is an important intermediate in the nitrification process, and the direct determination of NH2OH in the nitrification process was beneficial for revealing the kinetic process of NH2OH production and consumption as well as the effects of NH2OH on N2O production in the nitrification process.

  14. Reconciling catch differences from multiple fishery independent gill net surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Richard T.; Vandergoot, Christopher; Kocovsky, Patrick M.; Rogers, Mark W.; Cook, H. Andrew; Brenden, Travis O.

    2017-01-01

    Fishery independent gill net surveys provide valuable demographic information for population assessment and resource management, but relative to net construction, the effects of ancillary species, and environmental variables on focal species catch rates are poorly understood. In response, we conducted comparative deployments with three unique, inter-agency, survey gill nets used to assess walleye Sander vitreus in Lake Erie. We used an information-theoretic approach with Akaike’s second-order information criterion (AICc) to evaluate linear mixed models of walleye catch as a function of net type (multifilament and two types of monofilament netting), mesh size (categorical), Secchi depth, temperature, water depth, catch of ancillary species, and interactions among selected variables. The model with the greatest weight of evidence showed that walleye catches were positively associated with potential prey and intra-guild predators and negatively associated with water depth and temperature. In addition, the multifilament net had higher average walleye catches than either of the two monofilament nets. Results from this study both help inform decisions about proposed gear changes to stock assessment surveys in Lake Erie, and advance our understanding of how multispecies associations explain variation in gill net catches. Of broader interest to fishery-independent gill net studies, effects of abiotic variables and ancillary species on focal specie’s catch rates were small in comparison with net characteristics of mesh size or twine type.

  15. Tracking and quantification of nitrifying bacteria in biofilm and mixed liquor of a partial nitrification MBBR pilot plant using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abzazou, Tarik, E-mail: tabzazou@ub.edu [Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Biology, University of Barcelona, Av. Diagonal 643, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Araujo, Rosa M., E-mail: raraujo@ub.edu [Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Biology, University of Barcelona, Av. Diagonal 643, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Auset, María, E-mail: maria.auset.vallejo@acciona.com [ACCIONA AGUA, S.A., Av de les Garrigues 22, El Prat de Llobregat, 08820 Barcelona (Spain); Salvadó, Humbert, E-mail: hsalvado@ub.edu [Department of Animal Biology, Faculty of Biology, University of Barcelona, Av. Diagonal 643, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2016-01-15

    A moving bead biofilm reactor (MBBR) pilot plant was implemented as a partial nitrification process for pre-treatment of ammonium-rich liquors (676 ± 195 mg L{sup −1}), and studied for 479 days under variations in hydraulic retention time. The main purpose of this work, was the study of dynamics abundance of total bacteria and single-cells nitrifying bacteria belonging to ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) in biofilms and mixed liquor of the plant. The microbial monitoring was successfully achieved using fluorescence in situ hybridization combined with flocs disaggregation protocol as a useful microbial monitoring tool. A partial nitrification process with a N-NH{sub 4}{sup +} removal rate of about 38.6 ± 14.8% was successfully achieved at 211 days after start-up, with a clear dominance of AOB, which accounted for 11.3 ± 17.0% of total bacterial cells compared with only 2.1 ± 4.0% of NOB. The effluent obtained was subsequently supplied to an Anammox reactor for complete ammonium treatment. - Highlights: • Partial nitrification process in a MBBR fed with ammonium-rich liquor was achieved. • The operational key parameters were the HRT and temperature. • DAPI and FISH were useful to monitoring microbial composition of MBBR pilot plant. • The AOB were the dominant nitrifying bacteria, presenting 11.3% of total bacteria. • A significant correlation (R = 0.68) between AOB and ammonia removal was found.

  16. Proof nets for lingusitic analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moot, R.C.A.

    2002-01-01

    This book investigates the possible linguistic applications of proof nets, redundancy free representations of proofs, which were introduced by Girard for linear logic. We will adapt the notion of proof net to allow the formulation of a proof net calculus which is soundand complete for the

  17. Teaching Tennis for Net Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Bryce

    1989-01-01

    A program for teaching tennis to beginners, NET (Net Easy Teaching) is described. The program addresses three common needs shared by tennis students: active involvement in hitting the ball, clearing the net, and positive reinforcement. A sample lesson plan is included. (IAH)

  18. Net4Care Ecosystem Website

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik Bærbak; Hansen, Klaus Marius; Rasmussen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    is a tele-monitoring scenario in which Net4Care clients are deployed in a gateway in private homes. Medical devices then connect to these gateways and transmit their observations to a Net4Care server. In turn the Net4Care server creates valid clinical HL7 documents, stores them in a national XDS repository...

  19. Effects of cattle slurry and nitrification inhibitor application on spatial O2 dynamics and N2O production pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Quan Van; Wu, Di; Kong, Xianwang

    2017-01-01

    decomposition. Here, we applied O2 planar optode and N2O isotopomer techniques to investigate the linkage between soil O2 dynamics and N2O production pathways in soils treated with cattle slurry (treatment CS) and tested the effect of the nitrification inhibitor 3,4-dimethyl pyrazole phosphate, DMPP (treatment...... and CSD treatments were similar, and hence nitrification did not influence N2O emissions for several days under the experimental conditions of this study. The second peak of N2O emission occurring only in CS peaking around day 14, could be due to both nitrification and bacterial denitrification of nitrate...

  20. Effect of irrigation, nitrogen application, and a nitrification inhibitor on nitrous oxide, carbon dioxide and methane emissions from an olive (Olea europaea L.) orchard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maris, S C; Teira-Esmatges, M R; Arbonés, A; Rufat, J

    2015-12-15

    Drip irrigation combined with nitrogen (N) fertigation is applied in order to save water and improve nutrient efficiency. Nitrification inhibitors reduce greenhouse gas emissions. A field study was conducted to compare the emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O), carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) associated with the application of N fertiliser through fertigation (0 and 50kgNha(-1)), and 50kgNha(-1)+nitrification inhibitor in a high tree density Arbequina olive orchard. Spanish Arbequina is the most suited variety for super intensive olive groves. This system allows reducing production costs and increases crop yield. Moreover its oil has excellent sensorial features. Subsurface drip irrigation markedly reduced N2O and N2O+N2 emissions compared with surface drip irrigation. Fertiliser application significantly increased N2O+N2, but not N2O emissions. Denitrification was the main source of N2O. The N2O losses (calculated as emission factor) ranging from -0.03 to 0.14% of the N applied, were lower than the IPCC (2007) values. The N2O+N2 losses were the largest, equivalent to 1.80% of the N applied, from the 50kgNha(-1)+drip irrigation treatment which resulted in water filled pore space >60% most of the time (high moisture). Nitrogen fertilisation significantly reduced CO2 emissions in 2011, but only for the subsurface drip irrigation strategies in 2012. The olive orchard acted as a net CH4 sink for all the treatments. Applying a nitrification inhibitor (DMPP), the cumulative N2O and N2O+N2 emissions were significantly reduced with respect to the control. The DMPP also inhibited CO2 emissions and significantly increased CH4 oxidation. Considering global warming potential, greenhouse gas intensity, cumulative N2O emissions and oil production, it can be concluded that applying DMPP with 50kgNha(-1)+drip irrigation treatment was the best option combining productivity with keeping greenhouse gas emissions under control. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Development of partial nitrification as a first step of nitrite shunt process in a Sequential Batch Reactor (SBR) using Ammonium Oxidizing Bacteria (AOB) controlled by mixing regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Moomen; Eldyasti, Ahmed

    2016-12-01

    Shortcut biological nitrogen removal is a non-conventional way of removing nitrogen from wastewater using two processes either nitrite shunt or deammonification. In the nitrite shunt process, the ammonia oxidation step stops at the nitrite stage, which is known as partial nitrification, then nitrite is directly reduced to nitrogen gas. Effective partial nitrification could be achieved by accumulating Ammonia Oxidizing Bacteria (AOB) and inhibiting Nitrite Oxidizing Bacteria (NOB). In this research, a novel control strategy has been developed to control the DO using the variable mixing regime in a suspended growth system using a Sequential Batch Reactor (SBR) in order to achieve a stable ammonia removal efficiency (ARE) and nitrite accumulation rate (NAR) at a high nitrogen loading rate (NLR). The new controlled SBR system has been successfully running at NLR up to 1.2kg/(m3.day) and achieved an ARE of 98.6±2.8% and NAR of 93.0±0.7%. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Master Robotic Net

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Lipunov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of the MASTER-Net project is to produce a unique fast sky survey with all sky observed over a single night down to a limiting magnitude of 19-20. Such a survey will make it possible to address a number of fundamental problems: search for dark energy via the discovery and photometry of supernovae (including SNIa, search for exoplanets, microlensing effects, discovery of minor bodies in the Solar System, and space-junk monitoring. All MASTER telescopes can be guided by alerts, and we plan to observe prompt optical emission from gamma-ray bursts synchronously in several filters and in several polarization planes.

  3. Art/Net/Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christian Ulrik; Lindstrøm, Hanne

    2006-01-01

    The seminar Art|Net|Work deals with two important changes in our culture. On one side, the network has become essential in the latest technological development. The Internet has entered a new phase, Web 2.0, including the occurrence of as ‘Wiki’s’, ‘Peer-2-Peer’ distribution, user controlled...... the praxis of the artist. We see different kinds of interventions and activism (including ‘hacktivism’) using the network as a way of questioning the invisible rules that govern public and semi-public spaces. Who ‘owns’ them? What kind of social relationships do they generate? On what principle...

  4. Helminth.net: expansions to Nematode.net and an introduction to Trematode.net

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, John; Rosa, Bruce A.; Ozersky, Philip; Hallsworth-Pepin, Kymberlie; Zhang, Xu; Bhonagiri-Palsikar, Veena; Tyagi, Rahul; Wang, Qi; Choi, Young-Jun; Gao, Xin; McNulty, Samantha N.; Brindley, Paul J.; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2015-01-01

    Helminth.net (http://www.helminth.net) is the new moniker for a collection of databases: Nematode.net and Trematode.net. Within this collection we provide services and resources for parasitic roundworms (nematodes) and flatworms (trematodes), collectively known as helminths. For over a decade we have provided resources for studying nematodes via our veteran site Nematode.net (http://nematode.net). In this article, (i) we provide an update on the expansions of Nematode.net that hosts omics data from 84 species and provides advanced search tools to the broad scientific community so that data can be mined in a useful and user-friendly manner and (ii) we introduce Trematode.net, a site dedicated to the dissemination of data from flukes, flatworm parasites of the class Trematoda, phylum Platyhelminthes. Trematode.net is an independent component of Helminth.net and currently hosts data from 16 species, with information ranging from genomic, functional genomic data, enzymatic pathway utilization to microbiome changes associated with helminth infections. The databases’ interface, with a sophisticated query engine as a backbone, is intended to allow users to search for multi-factorial combinations of species’ omics properties. This report describes updates to Nematode.net since its last description in NAR, 2012, and also introduces and presents its new sibling site, Trematode.net. PMID:25392426

  5. Evaluation of Nitrification Inhibition Using Bench-Scale Rate Measurements, Profile Sampling, and Process Simulation Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Yi, Phill Hokyung

    2010-01-01

    The Hampton Roads Sanitation District (HRSD) operates thirteen treatment plants in the eastern Virginia area with a combined capacity of 231 million gallons per day (mgd). The Nansemond Treatment Plant (NTP) is one of the larger facilities, and is designed to treat 30 mgd using a 3-stage Virginia Initiative Process (VIP) biological nutrient removal (BNR) process. The majority of the influent is domestic, but there is also a large industrial contribution, particularly from a hog processing fa...

  6. [Nitrous oxide emission, nitrification, denitrification and nitrogen mineralization during rice growing season in 2 soils from Uruguay].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illarze, Gabriela; Del Pino, Amabelia; Riccetto, Sara; Irisarri, Pilar

    2017-09-23

    Microbial processes such as mineralization, nitrification and denitrification regulate nitrogen dynamics in the soil. The last two processes may produce nitrous oxide (N2O). In this work N2O fluxes were quantified at four moments of the rice cycle, sowing, tillering, panicle initiation and maturity, in two sites that differed mainly in their soil organic matter (OM) content, Salto (higher OM) and Treinta y Tres. Potential net N mineralization, ammonium oxidation and denitrification as well as the most probable numbers (MPN) of ammonia oxidizers and denitrifiers were determined. Potential N mineralization did not vary with the soil type and increased at rice maturity. Neither ammonia oxidation potential nor MPN were different among the soils. However, the soil with higher OM exhibited higher activity and MPN of denitrifiers, irrespective of the rice stage. In turn, at the latest phases of the crop, the MPN of denitrifiers increased coinciding with the highest mineralization potential and mineral N content of the soil. Significant differences in N2O flux were observed in Salto, where the highest emissions were detected at rice maturity, after the soil was drained (44.2 vs 20.8g N-N2O/ha d in Treinta y Tres). This work shows the importance of considering the soil type and end-of-season drainage of the rice field to elaborate GHGs (greenhouse gases) inventories. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. METHANE EMISSION FROM DIRECT SEEDED RICE UNDER THE INFLUENCES OF RICE STRAW AND NITRIFICATION INHIBITOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Wihardjaka

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Incorporation of rice straw into soil is a common practice to improve soil productivity and increase inorganic fertilizer availability. However, this practice could contribute to methane (CH4 emission; one of the greenhouse gases that causes global warming. Nitrification inhibitors such as neem cake and carbofuran may reduce methane emission following application of rice straw. The study aimed to evaluate the application of rice straw and nitrification inhibitor to methane emission in rainfed lowland rice system. A factorial randomized block design was used with three replications. The first factor was rice straw incorporation (5 t ha-1 fresh straw, 5 t ha-1 composted straw, and the second factor was nitrification inhibitor application (20 kg ha-1 neem cake, 20 kg ha-1 carbofuran. The experiment was conducted at rainfed lowland in Pati, Central Java, during 2009/2010 wet season. Ciherang variety was planted as direct seeded rice with spacing of 20 cm x 20 cm in each plot of 4 m x 5 m. The rice straw was treated together with soil tillage, whereas nitrification inhibitor was applied together with urea application. Parameters observed were methane flux, plant height, plant biomass, grain yield, organic C content, and bacterial population in soil. The methane flux and soil organic C were measured at 25, 45, 60, 75, and 95 days after emergence. The results showed that composted rice straw incorporation significantly emitted methane lower (73.2 ± 6.6 kg CH4 ha-1 season-1 compared to the fresh rice straw (93.5 ± 4.0 CH4 ha-1 season-1. Application of nitrification inhibitors neem cake and carbofuran reduced methane emission as much as 20.7 and 15.4 kg CH4 ha-1 season-1, respectively. Under direct seeded rice system, methane flux level correlated with plant biomass as shown by linear regression of Y = 0.0015 X + 0.0575 (R2 = 0.2305, n = 27. This means that higher plant biomass produced more methane flux. The study indicates that application of

  8. Utilization of insecticide treated nets in Arbaminch Town and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bernt Lindtjorn

    using structured, pretested, interviewer-administered questionnaire. Data entry and analysis was performed using SPSS. 11.0 for windows. Univariate, bivariate and multivariate analyses were carried out. Results: The coverage for any net and ITN was 75.1% and 58.8% respectively; the utilization rate for any net and ITN.

  9. [Effects of biochar and nitrification inhibitor incorporation on global warming potential of a vegetable field in Nanjing, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Li, Qiao-Ling; Fan, Chang-Hua; Sun, Li-Ying; Xiong, Zheng-Qin

    2014-09-01

    The influences of biochar and nitrification inhibitor incorporation on global warming potential (GWP) of a vegetable field were studied using the static chamber and gas chromatography method. Compared with the treatments without biochar addition, the annual GWP of N2O and CH4 and vegetable yield were increased by 8.7%-12.4% and 16.1%-52.5%, respectively, whereas the greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) were decreased by 5.4%-28.7% following biochar amendment. Nitrification inhibitor significantly reduced the N2O emission while had little influence on CH4 emission, decreased GWP by 17.5%-20.6%, increased vegetable yield by 21.2%-40.1%, and decreased the GHGI significantly. The combined application of biochar and nitrification inhibitor significantly increased both vegetable yield and GWP, but to a greater extent for vegetable yield. Therefore, nitrification inhibitor incorporation could be served as an appropriate practice for increasing vegetable yield and mitigating GHG emissions in vegetable field.

  10. Land Use Effects on Net Greenhouse Gas Fluxes in the US Great Plains: Historical Trends and Model Projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Grosso, S. J.; Parton, W. J.; Ojima, D. S.; Mosier, A. R.; Mosier, A. R.; Paustian, K.; Peterson, G. A.

    2001-12-01

    We present maps showing regional patterns of land use change and soil C levels in the US Great Plains during the 20th century and time series of net greenhouse gas fluxes associated with different land uses. Net greenhouse gas fluxes were calculated by accounting for soil CO2 fluxes, the CO2 equivalents of N2O emissions and CH4 uptake, and the CO2 costs of N fertilizer production. Both historical and modern agriculture in this region have been net sources of greenhouse gases. The primary reason for this, prior to 1950, is that agriculture mined soil C and resulted in net CO2 emissions. When chemical N fertilizer became widely used in the 1950's agricultural soils began to sequester CO2-C but these soils were still net greenhouse gas sources if the effects of increased N2O emissions and decreased CH4 uptake are included. The sensitivity of net greenhouse gas fluxes to conventional and alternative land uses was explored using the DAYCENT ecosystem model. Model projections suggest that conversion to no-till, reduction of the fallow period, and use of nitrification inhibitors can significantly decrease net greenhouse gas emissions in dryland and irrigated systems, while maintaining or increasing crop yields.

  11. Nitrogen removal from slaughterhouse wastewater through partial nitrification followed by denitrification in intermittently aerated sequencing batch reactors at 11 degreeC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Min; Henry, Liam Garry; Liu, Rui; Huang, Xiaoming

    2014-01-01

    This study is aimed to examine the removal of nitrogen from high strength slaughterhouse wastewater at 11 degreeC via partial nitrification followed by denitrification (PND), using the intermittently aerated sequencing batch reactor (IASBR) technology. The slaughterhouse wastewater contained chemical oxygen demand (COD) of 6068 mg/L, total nitrogen (TN) of 571 mg/L, total phosphorus (TP) of 51 mg/L and suspended solids of 1.8 g/L, on average. The laboratory-scale IASBR reactors had a working volume of 8 L and was operated at an average organic loading rate of 0.61 g COD/(L-d). At the cycle duration of 12 h, COD was efficiently removed under three aeration rates of 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8 L air/min. Among the three aeration rates, the optimum aeration rate was 0.6 L air/min with removals of COD, TN, and TP of 98%, 98%, and 96%, respectively. The treated wastewater met the Irish emission standards. The microbial community analysis by fluorescence in situ hybridization shows 12 +/- 0.4% of ammonium oxidizing bacteria, and 7.2 - 0.4% of nitrite oxidizing bacteria in the general bacteria (EUB) in the activated sludge at the aeration rate of 0.6 L air/min, leading to efficient partial nitrification. PND effectively removed nitrogen from slaughterhouse wastewater at 11degreeC, but PND efficiency was dependent on the aeration rate applied. PND efficiencies were up to 75.8%, 70.1% and only 25.4% at the aeration rates of 0.4, 0.6, and 0.8 L air/min.

  12. The equivalency between logic Petri workflow nets and workflow nets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Yu, ShuXia; Du, YuYue

    2015-01-01

    Logic Petri nets (LPNs) can describe and analyze batch processing functions and passing value indeterminacy in cooperative systems. Logic Petri workflow nets (LPWNs) are proposed based on LPNs in this paper. Process mining is regarded as an important bridge between modeling and analysis of data mining and business process. Workflow nets (WF-nets) are the extension to Petri nets (PNs), and have successfully been used to process mining. Some shortcomings cannot be avoided in process mining, such as duplicate tasks, invisible tasks, and the noise of logs. The online shop in electronic commerce in this paper is modeled to prove the equivalence between LPWNs and WF-nets, and advantages of LPWNs are presented.

  13. Coloured Petri Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kurt; Kristensen, Lars Michael

    studies that illustrate the practical use of CPN modelling and validation for design, specification, simulation, verification and implementation in various application domains. Their presentation primarily aims at readers interested in the practical use of CPN. Thus all concepts and constructs are first......Coloured Petri Nets (CPN) is a graphical language for modelling and validating concurrent and distributed systems, and other systems in which concurrency plays a major role. The development of such systems is particularly challenging because of inherent intricacies like possible nondeterminism...... and the immense number of possible execution sequences. In this textbook, Jensen and Kristensen introduce the constructs of the CPN modelling language and present the related analysis methods in detail. They also provide a comprehensive road map for the practical use of CPN by showcasing selected industrial case...

  14. High rates of nitrogen cycling in volcanic soils from Chilean grasslands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, E R; Cardenas, L; Alfaro, M; Salazar, F; Hatch, D J

    2011-06-15

    There are over one million hectares of pasture in Chile, and 80% and 50% of the country's milk and meat comes from 72% of this area, situated in the lake region of southern Chile. The soils are volcanic and a major characteristic is that they have very high organic matter (OM) contents with the potential to support plant growth with only moderate levels of added nitrogen (N). To understand better the potential fertility of these soils in order to maximise production and minimise losses of N, we undertook studies using the stable isotope of N ((15)N) to resolve the rates of the main internal N cycling processes in three soils representing the two main volcanic soil types: Osorno and Chiloé (Andisol) and Cudico (Ultisol). We also assessed the longer-term potential of these soils to sustain N release using anaerobic incubation. Gross rates (µg N g(-1) day(-1)) of mineralisation were 27.9, 27.1 and 15.5 and rates of immobilisation were 5.9, 12.0 and 6.3 for Osorno, Chiloé and Cudico, respectively, implying high rates of net mineralisation in these soils. This was confirmed by anaerobic incubation which gave potential seasonal net mineralisation indices of 1225, 1059 and 450 kg N ha(-1) in the top 10 cm soil layers of the three soils. However, plant production may still benefit from added N, as the release of N from organic sources may not be closely synchronised with crop demand. The low rates of nitrification that we found with these acidic soils suggest that the more mobile N (viz. nitrate-N) would be in limited supply and plants would have to compete for the less mobile ammonium-N with the soil microbial biomass. Nitrogen was mineralised in appreciable amounts even down to 60 cm depth, so that leaching could become significant, particularly if the soils were limed, which could enhance nitrification and N mobility through the soil profile. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Nitrogen transformations in modern agriculture and the role of biological nitrification inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coskun, Devrim; Britto, Dev T; Shi, Weiming; Kronzucker, Herbert J

    2017-06-06

    The nitrogen (N)-use efficiency of agricultural plants is notoriously poor. Globally, about 50% of the N fertilizer applied to cropping systems is not absorbed by plants, but lost to the environment as ammonia (NH 3 ), nitrate (NO 3 - ), and nitrous oxide (N 2 O, a greenhouse gas with 300 times the heat-trapping capacity of carbon dioxide), raising agricultural production costs and contributing to pollution and climate change. These losses are driven by volatilization of NH 3 and by a matrix of nitrification and denitrification reactions catalysed by soil microorganisms (chiefly bacteria and archaea). Here, we discuss mitigation of the harmful and wasteful process of agricultural N loss via biological nitrification inhibitors (BNIs) exuded by plant roots. We examine key recent discoveries in the emerging field of BNI research, focusing on BNI compounds and their specificity and transport, and discuss prospects for their role in improving agriculture while reducing its environmental impact.

  16. Operational conditions for successful partial nitrification in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) based on process kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoguang; Kim, Mingu; Nakhla, George

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze the factors affecting the performance of partial nitrification in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) using kinetic models. During the 4-month operation, dissolved oxygen (DO) and influent ammonia concentration were selected as operating variables to evaluate nitrite accumulation. Stable partial nitrification was observed with two conditions, influent ammonia concentration of 190 mg N/L and a DO of 0.6-3.0 mg/L as well as influent ammonia concentration of 100 mg N/L and a DO of 0.15-2.0 mg/L with intermittent aeration. At a DO of 0.6-3.0 mg O 2 /L and influent ammonia concentration of 90 mg N/L, nitrite-oxidizing bacteria growth was not suppressed. Kinetic parameters were determined or estimated with batch tests and model simulation. The kinetic model predicted the SBR performance well.

  17. Nitrification of leachates from manure composting under field conditions and their use in horticulture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceres, Rafaela; Magrí, Albert; Marfà, Oriol

    2015-10-01

    This work aimed to demonstrate the feasibility of nitrification applied to the treatment of leachates formed during composting of cattle and pig manure in order to promote their further use as liquid fertilizer in horticulture. Nitrification trials were successfully conducted in summer and winter seasons under Mediterranean climate conditions. Subsequently, effect of using the nitrified effluents as nutritive solution in the fertigation of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) was assessed in terms of productivity and nutrient uptake. Similar productivities were obtained when using the nitrified effluents and a standard nutritive solution. However, results also evidenced high nutrient uptake, which indicates that dosage should be adjusted to culture requirements. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Side Effects of Nitrification Inhibitors on Non Target Microbial Processes in Soils

    OpenAIRE

    Johannes Carl Gottlieb Ottow; Gero Benckiser; Ferisman Tindaon

    2011-01-01

    Agricultural chemicals have been used extensively in modern agriculture and toxicological studies suggest a great potential for inducing undesirable effects on non target organisms. A model experiment was conducted in order to determine side effects of three nitrification inhibitors (NIs, 3,4dimethylpyrazolephosphate = DMPP, 4-Chlormethylpyrazole phosphate = ClMPP and dicyandiamide = DCD) on non target microbial processes in soils. Side effects and dose response curve of three NIs were quanti...

  19. Effects of Nitrification Inhibitors on Mineral Nitrogen Dynamics in Agriculture Soils

    OpenAIRE

    Tindaon, Ferisman; Benckiser, Gero; Ottow, Johannes Carl Gottlieb

    2011-01-01

    Experiments were conducted under laboratory conditions to elucidate the effect of three nitrification inhibitors viz, 3.4dime-thylpyrazo-lephosphate (DMPP), 4-Chlormethylpyrazole (ClMP) and dicyandiamide (DCD) on mineral nitrogen dynamics of (NH4)2SO4 in soil incubated at 25oC in soils. The quantitative determination of ammonium, nitrite and nitrate were carried out spectrophotometrically, while potential denitrify-cation capacity (PDC) was measured gas chromatographically. DMPP, ClMP and DCD...

  20. GLORIA observations of de-/nitrification during the Arctic winter 2015/16 POLSTRACC campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Marleen; Woiwode, Wolfgang; Höpfner, Michael; Johansson, Sören; Friedl-Vallon, Felix; Oelhaf, Hermann; Preusse, Peter; Ungermann, Jörn; Grooß, Jens-Uwe; Jurkat, Tina; Khosrawi, Farahnaz; Kirner, Ole; Marsing, Andreas; Sinnhuber, Björn-Martin; Voigt, Christiane; Ziereis, Helmut; Orphal, Johannes

    2017-04-01

    Denitrification, the condensation and sedimentation of HNO3-containing particles in the winter stratosphere at high latitudes, is an important process affecting the deactivation of ozone-depleting halogen species. It modulates the vertical partitioning of chemically active NOy and the vertical redistribution of HNO3 can affect low stratospheric altitudes under sufficiently cold conditions. The capability of associated nitrification to disturb the NOy budget of the climate-relevant lowermost stratosphere (LMS) has hardly been investigated in detail and represents a challenge for model simulations. The Arctic winter 2015/16 was characterized by exceptionally cold stratospheric temperatures and widespread polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) that were observed from mid-December 2015 until the end of February 2016 down to the LMS. Observations by the GLORIA (Gimballed Limb Observer for Radiance Imaging of the Atmosphere) spectrometer during the POLSTRACC (Polar Stratosphere in a Changing Climate) aircraft mission allow us to study the development of nitrification of the Arctic LMS during and after the 2015/16 PSC period with high vertical resolution. The vertical cross-sections of HNO3 distribution along the HALO (High Altitude and LOng range research aircraft) flight tracks derived from GLORIA observations show the result of significant vertical redistribution of NOy with strong nitrification of up to 6 ppbv in the LMS. We compare the results of the GLORIA observations with simulations by the state-of-the-art chemical-transport model CLaMS and the climate-chemistry model EMAC and discuss the capability of these models to reproduce nitrification of the Arctic LMS.

  1. Energy efficient process of nitrification and denitrification in activated sludge system with low organic load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulshin I.A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article summarizes the results of the second phase of a comprehensive study of energy efficient wastewater treatment processes in oxidation ditches. Dependence of the efficiency of simultaneous nitrification and denitrification at the change of oxygen regime have been determined at the second phase of the study. Results of the phase confirm the fundamental possibility of the withdrawal of biomass in energy-efficient mode with high quality of wastewater treatment.

  2. Assistance of Ectoine on Acinetobacter sp. A06 of simultaneous heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification denitrifying at stress condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, P.; Li, X. W.; Tan, F. X.; Qu, A.; Yuan, X. N.; Zhang, L. H.

    2017-08-01

    The simultaneous heterotrophic nitrification and aerobic denitrification (SND) performed by Acinetobacter sp. A06 could be inhibited by high salt, high ammonia nitrogen concentrations and extreme pH. To improve the SND nitrogen removal efficiency of Acinetobacter sp. A06 in adverse environment, we investigated the effects on nitrogen removal by Acinetobacter sp. A06 of five compatible solutes. The results show that Ectoine was the best effect in five osmotic compensation solutes when the salt concentration was 15 g/L, 30 g/L, 45 g/L, and 60 g/L, adding Ectoine, nitrogen removal were increased by 21.10%, 26.94%, 14.67% and 11.21%, respectively. When the NH4 +-N concentration was 1.5 g/L, 2 g/L and 2.5 g/L, adding Ectoine, the nitrogen removal rate increased by 15.93%, 10.07% and 7.11%, respectively,. When the extreme pH of pH was 5 or 9, adding Ectoine, the nitrogen removal rate was increased by 20.70% and 10.44%, respectively.

  3. Depth investigation of rapid sand filters for drinking water production reveals strong stratification in nitrification biokinetic behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatari, K; Smets, B F; Albrechtsen, H-J

    2016-09-15

    The biokinetic behavior of NH4(+) removal was investigated at different depths of a rapid sand filter treating groundwater for drinking water preparation. Filter materials from the top, middle and bottom layers of a full-scale filter were exposed to various controlled NH4(+) loadings in a continuous-flow lab-scale assay. NH4(+) removal capacity, estimated from short term loading up-shifts, was at least 10 times higher in the top than in the middle and bottom filter layers, consistent with the stratification of Ammonium Oxidizing Bacteria (AOB). AOB density increased consistently with the NH4(+) removal rate, indicating their primarily role in nitrification under the imposed experimental conditions. The maximum AOB cell specific NH4(+) removal rate observed at the bottom was at least 3 times lower compared to the top and middle layers. Additionally, a significant up-shift capacity (4.6 and 3.5 times) was displayed from the top and middle layers, but not from the bottom layer at increased loading conditions. Hence, AOB with different physiological responses were active at the different depths. The biokinetic analysis predicted that despite the low NH4(+) removal capacity at the bottom layer, the entire filter is able to cope with a 4-fold instantaneous loading increase without compromising the effluent NH4(+). Ultimately, this filter up-shift capacity was limited by the density of AOB and their biokinetic behavior, both of which were strongly stratified. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Insights on the marine microbial nitrogen cycle from isotopic approaches to nitrification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen L Casciotti

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The microbial nitrogen (N cycle involves a variety of redox processes that control the availability and speciation of N in the environment and are involved with the production of nitrous oxide (N2O, a climatically important greenhouse gas. Isotopic measurements of ammonium (NH4+, nitrite (NO2-, nitrate (NO3-, and N2O can now be used to track the cycling of these compounds and to infer their sources and sinks, which has lead to new and exciting discoveries. For example, dual isotope measurements of NO3- and NO2- have shown that there is NO3- regeneration in the ocean’s euphotic zone, as well as in and around oxygen deficient zones, indicating that nitrification may play more roles in the ocean’s N cycle than generally thought. Likewise, the inverse isotope effect associated with NO2- oxidation yields unique information about the role of this process in NO2- cycling in the primary and secondary NO2- maxima. Finally, isotopic measurements of N2O in the ocean are indicative of an important role for nitrification in its production. These interpretations rely on knowledge of the isotope effects for the underlying microbial processes, in particular ammonia oxidation and nitrite oxidation. Here we review the isotope effects involved with the nitrification process, the insights provided by this information, and provide a prospectus for future work in this area.

  5. Biodegradation of plastics in soil and effects on nitrification activity. A laboratory approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia eBettas Ardisson

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The progressive application of new biodegradable plastics in agriculture calls for improved testing approaches to assure their environmental safety. Full biodegradation (≥ 90% prevents accumulation in soil, which is the first tier of testing. The application of specific ecotoxicity tests is the second tier of testing needed to show safety for the soil ecosystem. Soil microbial nitrification is widely used as a bioindicator for evaluating the impact of chemicals on soil but it is not applied for evaluating the impact of biodegradable plastics. In this work the International Standard test for biodegradation of plastics in soil (ISO 17556, 2012 was applied both to measure biodegradation and to prepare soil samples needed for a subsequent nitrification test based on another International Standard (ISO 14238, 2012. The plastic mulch film tested in this work showed full biodegradability and no inhibition of the nitrification potential of the soil in comparison with the controls. The laboratory approach suggested in this Technology Report enables (i to follow the course of biodegradation, (ii a strict control of variables and environmental conditions, (iii the application of very high concentrations of test material (to maximize the possible effects. This testing approach could be taken into consideration in improved testing schemes aimed at defining the biodegradability of plastics in soil.

  6. Biodegradation of plastics in soil and effects on nitrification activity. A laboratory approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettas Ardisson, Giulia; Tosin, Maurizio; Barbale, Marco; Degli-Innocenti, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The progressive application of new biodegradable plastics in agriculture calls for improved testing approaches to assure their environmental safety. Full biodegradation (≥90%) prevents accumulation in soil, which is the first tier of testing. The application of specific ecotoxicity tests is the second tier of testing needed to show safety for the soil ecosystem. Soil microbial nitrification is widely used as a bioindicator for evaluating the impact of chemicals on soil but it is not applied for evaluating the impact of biodegradable plastics. In this work the International Standard test for biodegradation of plastics in soil (ISO 17556, 2012) was applied both to measure biodegradation and to prepare soil samples needed for a subsequent nitrification test based on another International Standard (ISO 14238, 2012). The plastic mulch film tested in this work showed full biodegradability and no inhibition of the nitrification potential of the soil in comparison with the controls. The laboratory approach suggested in this Technology Report enables (i) to follow the course of biodegradation, (ii) a strict control of variables and environmental conditions, (iii) the application of very high concentrations of test material (to maximize the possible effects). This testing approach could be taken into consideration in improved testing schemes aimed at defining the biodegradability of plastics in soil.

  7. The nitrogen cycle in cryoconites: naturally occurring nitrification-denitrification granules on a glacier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segawa, Takahiro; Ishii, Satoshi; Ohte, Nobuhito; Akiyoshi, Ayumi; Yamada, Akinori; Maruyama, Fumito; Li, Zhongqin; Hongoh, Yuichi; Takeuchi, Nozomu

    2014-10-01

    Cryoconites are microbial aggregates commonly found on glacier surfaces where they tend to take spherical, granular forms. While it has been postulated that the microbes in cryoconite granules play an important role in glacier ecosystems, information on their community structure is still limited, and their functions remain unclear. Here, we present evidence for the occurrence of nitrogen cycling in cryoconite granules on a glacier in Central Asia. We detected marker genes for nitrogen fixation, nitrification and denitrification in cryoconite granules by digital polymerase chain reaction (PCR), while digital reverse transcription PCR analysis revealed that only marker genes for nitrification and denitrification were abundantly transcribed. Analysis of isotope ratios also indicated the occurrence of nitrification; nitrate in the meltwater on the glacier surface was of biological origin, while nitrate in the snow was of atmospheric origin. The predominant nitrifiers on this glacier belonged to the order Nitrosomonadales, as suggested by amoA sequences and 16S ribosomal RNA pyrosequencing analysis. Our results suggest that the intense carbon and nitrogen cycles by nitrifiers, denitrifiers and cyanobacteria support abundant and active microbes on the Asian glacier. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Partial nitrification using aerobic granules in continuous-flow reactor: rapid startup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Chunli; Sun, Supu; Lee, Duu-Jong; Liu, Xiang; Wang, Li; Yang, Xue; Pan, Xiangliang

    2013-08-01

    This study applied a novel strategy to rapid startup of partial nitrification in continuous-flow reactor using aerobic granules. Mature aerobic granules were first cultivated in a sequencing batch reactor at high chemical oxygen demand in 16 days. The strains including the Pseudoxanthomonas mexicana strain were enriched in cultivated granules to enhance their structural stability. Then the cultivated granules were incubated in a continuous-flow reactor with influent chemical oxygen deamnad being stepped decreased from 1,500 ± 100 (0-19 days) to 750 ± 50 (20-30 days), and then to 350 ± 50 mg l(-1) (31-50 days); while in the final stage 350 mg l(-1) bicarbonate was also supplied. Using this strategy the ammonia-oxidizing bacterium, Nitrosomonas europaea, was enriched in the incubated granules to achieve partial nitrification efficiency of 85-90% since 36 days and onwards. The partial nitrification granules were successfully harvested after 52 days, a period much shorter than those reported in literature. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Insights on the marine microbial nitrogen cycle from isotopic approaches to nitrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casciotti, Karen L.; Buchwald, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    The microbial nitrogen (N) cycle involves a variety of redox processes that control the availability and speciation of N in the environment and that are involved with the production of nitrous oxide (N2O), a climatically important greenhouse gas. Isotopic measurements of ammonium (NH+4), nitrite (NO−2), nitrate (NO−3), and N2O can now be used to track the cycling of these compounds and to infer their sources and sinks, which has lead to new and exciting discoveries. For example, dual isotope measurements of NO−3 and NO−2 have shown that there is NO−3 regeneration in the ocean's euphotic zone, as well as in and around oxygen deficient zones (ODZs), indicating that nitrification may play more roles in the ocean's N cycle than generally thought. Likewise, the inverse isotope effect associated with NO−2 oxidation yields unique information about the role of this process in NO−2 cycling in the primary and secondary NO−2 maxima. Finally, isotopic measurements of N2O in the ocean are indicative of an important role for nitrification in its production. These interpretations rely on knowledge of the isotope effects for the underlying microbial processes, in particular ammonia oxidation and nitrite oxidation. Here we review the isotope effects involved with the nitrification process and the insights provided by this information, then provide a prospectus for future work in this area. PMID:23091468

  10. Biological nitrification inhibition by rice root exudates and its relationship with nitrogen-use efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Li; Lu, Yufang; Yu, Fangwei; Kronzucker, Herbert J; Shi, Weiming

    2016-11-01

    Microbial nitrification in soils is a major contributor to nitrogen (N) loss in agricultural systems. Some plants can secrete organic substances that act as biological nitrification inhibitors (BNIs), and a small number of BNIs have been identified and characterized. However, virtually no research has focused on the important food crop, rice (Oryza sativa). Here, 19 rice varieties were explored for BNI potential on the key nitrifying bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea. Exudates from both indica and japonica genotypes were found to possess strong BNI potential. Older seedlings had higher BNI abilities than younger ones; Zhongjiu25 (ZJ25) and Wuyunjing7 (WYJ7) were the most effective genotypes among indica and japonica varieties, respectively. A new nitrification inhibitor, 1,9-decanediol, was identified, shown to block the ammonia monooxygenase (AMO) pathway of ammonia oxidation and to possess an 80% effective dose (ED80 ) of 90 ng μl-1 . Plant N-use efficiency (NUE) was determined using a 15 N-labeling method. Correlation analyses indicated that both BNI abilities and 1,9-decanediol amounts of root exudates were positively correlated with plant ammonium-use efficiency and ammonium preference. These findings provide important new insights into the plant-bacterial interactions involved in the soil N cycle, and improve our understanding of the BNI capacity of rice in the context of NUE. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  11. Inhibition of nitrification in municipal wastewater-treating photobioreactors: Effect on algal growth and nutrient uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krustok, I; Odlare, M; Truu, J; Nehrenheim, E

    2016-02-01

    The effect of inhibiting nitrification on algal growth and nutrient uptake was studied in photobioreactors treating municipal wastewater. As previous studies have indicated that algae prefer certain nitrogen species to others, and because nitrifying bacteria are inhibited by microalgae, it is important to shed more light on these interactions. In this study allylthiourea (ATU) was used to inhibit nitrification in wastewater-treating photobioreactors. The nitrification-inhibited reactors were compared to control reactors with no ATU added. Microalgae had higher growth in the inhibited reactors, resulting in a higher chlorophyll a concentration. The species mix also differed, with Chlorella and Scenedesmus being the dominant genera in the control reactors and Cryptomonas and Chlorella dominating in the inhibited reactors. The nitrogen speciation in the reactors after 8 days incubation was also different in the two setups, with N existing mostly as NH4-N in the inhibited reactors and as NO3-N in the control reactors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Experimental study of biological nitrogen and phosphorus removal in anaerobic/anoxic SBR reactor with separated biofilm nitrification; Indagine sperimentale sulla rimozione biologica di azoto e fosforo in un reattore SBR anaerobico/anossico con nitrificazione separata su biofiltro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bortone, G.; Malaspina, F.; Stante, L.; Tilche, A. [ENEA, Bologna (Italy). Area Energia Ambiente e Salute; Andreottola, G. [Trento Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria Civile-Ambientale

    1995-04-01

    An Anaerobic/Anoxic Sequencing Batch Reactor (A/A SBR) with separated batch biofilm nitrification was tested for nutrient removal against a five step anaerobic anoxic/Oxic SBR (A/O SBR). Piggery waste water, particularly challenging for its low COD/N ratio, was used as feed. A/A SBR, especially in the configuration tested in the second experimental period, showed very good N (97%) and P (90%) removal capacities with excellent sludge settling properties (SVI 52 ml/gSS). On the other hand, organic carbon removal efficiency with nitrate was a little bit lower than with oxygen (90% in A/A SBR against 92% in A/O SBR). Batch biofilm nitrification was very effective, with very high nitrification rates (1.4 mgN gVSS{sup -1} h{sup -1}; 0.1 khN m{sup 3}d{sup -1}). Presence of poly P bacteria in the A/A SBR sludge was assessed through microscopic observation and from the high cellular poly-phosphate content.

  13. Genetic and epigenetic drivers of neuroendocrine tumours (NET).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Domenico, Annunziata; Wiedmer, Tabea; Marinoni, Ilaria; Perren, Aurel

    2017-09-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours (NET) of the gastrointestinal tract and the lung are a rare and heterogeneous group of tumours. The molecular characterization and the clinical classification of these tumours have been evolving slowly and show differences according to organs of origin. Novel technologies such as next-generation sequencing revealed new molecular aspects of NET over the last years. Notably, whole-exome/genome sequencing (WES/WGS) approaches underlined the very low mutation rate of well-differentiated NET of all organs compared to other malignancies, while the engagement of epigenetic changes in driving NET evolution is emerging. Indeed, mutations in genes encoding for proteins directly involved in chromatin remodelling, such as DAXX and ATRX are a frequent event in NET. Epigenetic changes are reversible and targetable; therefore, an attractive target for treatment. The discovery of the mechanisms underlying the epigenetic changes and the implication on gene and miRNA expression in the different subgroups of NET may represent a crucial change in the diagnosis of this disease, reveal new therapy targets and identify predictive markers. Molecular profiles derived from omics data including DNA mutation, methylation, gene and miRNA expression have already shown promising results in distinguishing clinically and molecularly different subtypes of NET. In this review, we recapitulate the major genetic and epigenetic characteristics of pancreatic, lung and small intestinal NET and the affected pathways. We also discuss potential epigenetic mechanisms leading to NET development. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  14. Relationships between root density of the African grass Hyparrhenia diplandra and nitrification at the decimetric scale: an inhibition-stimulation balance hypothesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Lata, J.C.; Guillaume, K; Degrange, V; Abbadie, L.; Lensi, R

    2000-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that Lamto savannah exhibits two different types of nitrogen cycle with high and low nitrification sites and suggested that the perennial grass Hyparrhenia diplandra is responsible for this duality at a subpopulation level, with one ecotype being thought to be able to inhibit nitrification. The present work aimed to investigate the relationships between nitrification and the roots of H. diplandra at two scales. (i) Site-scale experiments gave new insight into the h...

  15. Fishing with bed nets on Lake Tanganyika: a randomized survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Kate A; Byanaku, Aisha; Kubikonse, Augustine; Tshowe, Vincent; Katensi, Said; Lehman, Amy G

    2014-10-07

    Malaria is among the most common causes of death along Lake Tanganyika, a problem which many aid organizations have attempted to combat through the distribution of free mosquito bed nets to high-risk communities. The Lake Tanganyika Floating Health Clinic (LTFHC), a health-based non-governmental organization (NGO), has observed residents of the Lake Tanganyika basin using bed nets to fish small fry near the shoreline, despite a series of laws that prohibit bed net use and other fine-gauge nets for fishing, implemented to protect the near-shore fish ecology. The LTFHC sought to quantify the sources of bed nets and whether they were being used for fishing. The LTFHC conducted a survey of seven lakeside villages in Lagosa Ward, Tanzania. The government has divided each village into two to six pre-existing geographic sub-villages depending on population size. Seven households per sub-village were chosen at random for survey administration. The survey consisted of 23 questions regarding mosquito bed net practices, including the use of bed nets for fishing, as well as questions pertaining to any perceived changes to the fish supply. A total of 196 surveys were administered over a four-week period with a 100% response rate. Over 87% of households surveyed have used a mosquito bed net for fishing at some point. The majority of respondents reported receiving their bed net for free (96.4%), observing "many" residents of their village using bed nets for fishing (97.4%), and noticing a subjective decrease in the fish supply over time (64.9%). The findings of this study raise concerns that the use of free malaria bed nets for fishing is widespread along Lake Tanganyika, and that this dynamic will have an adverse effect on fish ecology. Further studies are indicated to fully define the scope of bed net misuse and the effects of alternative vector control strategies in water-based communities.

  16. Estimation of nitrification capacity of rock media trickling filters in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    about 14 mgN/ℓ (96%), or 149 kgN/d, of the influent ammonia load applied to the NTFs (average influent flow rate of 10 Mℓ/d). General concordance was found with corresponding nitrate and nitrite production and alkalinity usage measurements, which substantiated the observed removal performance. This paper details ...

  17. Linear Logic on Petri Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, Uffe Henrik; Winskel, Glynn

    This article shows how individual Petri nets form models of Girard's intuitionistic linear logic. It explores questions of expressiveness and completeness of linear logic with respect to this interpretation. An aim is to use Petri nets to give an understanding of linear logic and give some apprai...

  18. Reference Guide Microsoft.NET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee M van der; Verspaij GJ; Rosbergen S; IMP; NMD

    2003-01-01

    Developers, administrators and managers can get more understanding of the .NET technology with this report. They can also make better choices how to use this technology. The report describes the results and conclusions of a study of the usability for the RIVM of this new generation .NET development

  19. Net neutrality and audiovisual services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijk, N.; Nikoltchev, S.

    2011-01-01

    Net neutrality is high on the European agenda. New regulations for the communication sector provide a legal framework for net neutrality and need to be implemented on both a European and a national level. The key element is not just about blocking or slowing down traffic across communication

  20. A Small Universal Petri Net

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry A. Zaitsev

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A universal deterministic inhibitor Petri net with 14 places, 29 transitions and 138 arcs was constructed via simulation of Neary and Woods' weakly universal Turing machine with 2 states and 4 symbols; the total time complexity is exponential in the running time of their weak machine. To simulate the blank words of the weakly universal Turing machine, a couple of dedicated transitions insert their codes when reaching edges of the working zone. To complete a chain of a given Petri net encoding to be executed by the universal Petri net, a translation of a bi-tag system into a Turing machine was constructed. The constructed Petri net is universal in the standard sense; a weaker form of universality for Petri nets was not introduced in this work.

  1. Nitrogen removal via short-cut simultaneous nitrification and denitrification in an intermittently aerated moving bed membrane bioreactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Shuai, E-mail: yangshuai1125@hotmail.com [East China Sea Environmental Monitoring Center, Shanghai 200137 (China); Yang, Fenglin [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering, MOE, School of Environmental and Biological Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {yields} An intermittently aerated MBMBR was investigated to achieve SND via nitrite. {yields} The intermittent-aeration strategy was an effective approach to achieve nitrition. {yields} The activities of NOBs were inhibited under the intermittently aerated mode. {yields} The intermittently aerated mode had no effect on the activities of AOBs. - Abstract: An intermittently aerated moving bed membrane bioreactor (MBMBR) was developed and crucial parameters affecting nitrogen removal from wastewater by simultaneous nitrification and denitrification via nitrite were investigated, without strict control of solids retention time. Changes in the microbiological community and distribution in the reactor were monitored simultaneously. The intermittent-aeration strategy proved effective in achieving nitrition and the chemical oxygen demand (COD) to total nitrogen (TN) ratio was an important factor affecting TN removal. In the MBMBR, the nitrite accumulation rate reached 79.4% and TN removal efficiency averaged at 87.8% with aeration 2 min/mix 4 min and an influent COD/TN ratio of 5. Batch tests indicated that under the intermittently aerated mode, nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) were not completely washed out from the reactor but NOB activity was inhibited. The intermittently aerated mode had no effect on the activities of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria. Fluorescence in situ hybridizations (FISH) results also suggested that NOBs remained within the system.

  2. A New Developed Airlift Reactor Integrated Settling Process and Its Application for Simultaneous Nitrification and Denitrification Nitrogen Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Wei, Chaohai

    2013-01-01

    This study presented the performance of simultaneous nitrification and denitrification (SND) process using a new developed hybrid airlift reactor which integrated the activated sludge reaction process in the airlift reactor and the sludge settling separation process in the clarifier. The proposed reactor was started up successfully after 76 days within which the COD and total nitrogen removal rate can reach over 90% and 76.3%, respectively. The effects of different COD/N and DO concentrations on the performance of reactor were investigated. It was found that the influent COD/N maintained at 10 was sufficient for SND and the optimum DO concentration for SND was in the range of 0.5 to 0.8 mg L−1. Batch test demonstrated that both macroscopic environment caused by the spatial DO concentration difference and microscopic environment caused by the stratification of activated sludge may be responsible for the SND process in the reactor. The hybrid airlift reactor can accomplish SND process in a single reactor and in situ automatic separation of sludge; therefore, it may serve as a promising reactor in COD and nitrogen removal fields. PMID:23935415

  3. Unraveling characteristics of simultaneous nitrification, denitrification and phosphorus removal (SNDPR) in an aerobic granular sequencing batch reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qiulai; Zhang, Shilu; Zou, Zhuocheng; Zheng, Li-An; Wang, Hongyu

    2016-11-01

    An aerobic granular sequencing batch reactor (SBR) on an aerobic/oxic/anoxic (AOA) mode was operated for 50days with acetate sodium as the sole carbon source for simultaneous carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus removal. Excellent removal efficiencies for chemical oxygen demand (COD) (94.46±3.59%), nitrogen (96.56±3.44% for ammonia nitrogen (NH4(+)-N) and 93.88±6.78% for total inorganic nitrogen (TIN)) and phosphorus (97.71±3.63%) were obtained over operation. Mechanisms for simultaneous nutrients removal were explored and the results indicated that simultaneous nitrification, denitrification and phosphorus removal (SNDPR) under aerobic conditions was mainly responsible for most of nitrogen and phosphorus removal. Identification and quantification of the granular AOA SBR revealed that higher rates of nutrients removal and more potentials were to be exploited by optimizing the operating conditions including time durations for AOA mode and the feeding compositions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Online measurement of nitrification inhibitors in sewage received by an industrial sewage treatment plant. Development of a nitrification toximeter; Online-Messung nitrifikationshemmender Stoffe im Zulauf einer Industrieklaeranlage - Entwicklung eines Nitrifikationstoximeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haid, M. [BASF AG, Ludwigshafen am Rhein (Germany)

    1999-07-01

    At an industrial sewage treatment plant, the ammonium freight in the effluent is to be further reduced in the future through nitrification. But constantly low effluent concentrations are only possible if the nitrification process is not inhibited. Bouts of critical concentrations of nitrification inhibitors in sewage received by treatment plant are potentially disturbing. Online measurement of nitrification inhibitors in sewage arriving at the treatment plant is to recognize such bouts and permit timely alert so that counter-measures can be taken, which may consist in routing sewage with such toxic concentrations into a storage basin, whereby a sharp slump in the nitrification process can be avoided. (orig.) [German] In einer Industrieklaeranlage soll kuenftig durch Nitrifikation die Ammoniumfracht im Auslauf weiter gesenkt werden. Konstant niedrige Ablaufwerte sind aber nur dann moeglich, wenn der Nitrifikationsprozess ungestoert ablaufen kann. Stoesse nitrifikationshemmender Stoffe in kritischen Konzentrationen im Zulauf zur Klaeranlage sind eine moegliche Stoergroesse. Mit Hilfe einer Online-Nitrifikationshemmmessung im Klaeranlagenzulauf sollen solche Stoesse erkannt und rechtzeitig alarmiert werden, damit Gegenmassnahmen, wie z.B. das Auffangen des toxischen Stosses durch eine Sicherheitsschaltung in einem Speicherbecken, eingeleitet und so signifikante Einbrueche des Nitrifikationsprozesses vermieden werden koennen. (orig.)

  5. Effect of irrigation, nitrogen application, and a nitrification inhibitor on nitrous oxide, carbon dioxide and methane emissions from an olive (Olea europaea L.) orchard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maris, S.C., E-mail: stefania@macs.udl.cat [University of Lleida, Environment and Soil Science Department, Av. Alcalde Rovira Roure 191, E-25198 Lleida (Spain); Teira-Esmatges, M.R. [University of Lleida, Environment and Soil Science Department, Av. Alcalde Rovira Roure 191, E-25198 Lleida (Spain); Arbonés, A.; Rufat, J. [Programa Ús Eficient de l’Aigua, Institut de Recerca i Tecnologia Agroalimentàries (IRTA), Parc Científic i Tecnològic Agroalimentari de Lleida (PCiTAL). Parc de Gardeny, Edifici Fruitcentre, E-2503 Lleida (Spain)

    2015-12-15

    Drip irrigation combined with nitrogen (N) fertigation is applied in order to save water and improve nutrient efficiency. Nitrification inhibitors reduce greenhouse gas emissions. A field study was conducted to compare the emissions of nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and methane (CH{sub 4}) associated with the application of N fertiliser through fertigation (0 and 50 kg N ha{sup −1}), and 50 kg N ha{sup −1} + nitrification inhibitor in a high tree density Arbequina olive orchard. Spanish Arbequina is the most suited variety for super intensive olive groves. This system allows reducing production costs and increases crop yield. Moreover its oil has excellent sensorial features. Subsurface drip irrigation markedly reduced N{sub 2}O and N{sub 2}O + N{sub 2} emissions compared with surface drip irrigation. Fertiliser application significantly increased N{sub 2}O + N{sub 2}, but not N{sub 2}O emissions. Denitrification was the main source of N{sub 2}O. The N{sub 2}O losses (calculated as emission factor) ranging from − 0.03 to 0.14% of the N applied, were lower than the IPCC (2007) values. The N{sub 2}O + N{sub 2} losses were the largest, equivalent to 1.80% of the N applied, from the 50 kg N ha{sup −1} + drip irrigation treatment which resulted in water filled pore space > 60% most of the time (high moisture). Nitrogen fertilisation significantly reduced CO{sub 2} emissions in 2011, but only for the subsurface drip irrigation strategies in 2012. The olive orchard acted as a net CH{sub 4} sink for all the treatments. Applying a nitrification inhibitor (DMPP), the cumulative N{sub 2}O and N{sub 2}O + N{sub 2} emissions were significantly reduced with respect to the control. The DMPP also inhibited CO{sub 2} emissions and significantly increased CH{sub 4} oxidation. Considering global warming potential, greenhouse gas intensity, cumulative N{sub 2}O emissions and oil production, it can be concluded that applying DMPP with 50 kg N ha{sup −1

  6. High-level Petri Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    High-level Petri nets are now widely used in both theoretical analysis and practical modelling of concurrent systems. The main reason for the success of this class of net models is that they make it possible to obtain much more succinct and manageable descriptions than can be obtained by means...... of low-level Petri nets - while, on the other hand, they still offer a wide range of analysis methods and tools. The step from low-level nets to high-level nets can be compared to the step from assembly languages to modern programming languages with an elaborated type concept. In low-level nets...... there is only one kind of token and this means that the state of a place is described by an integer (and in many cases even by a boolean). In high-level nets each token can carry a complex information/data - which, e.g., may describe the entire state of a process or a data base. Today most practical...

  7. Use of a novel nitrification inhibitor to reduce nitrous oxide emission from (15)N-labelled dairy slurry injected into soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittert, K; Bol, R; King, R; Chadwick, D; Hatch, D

    2001-01-01

    Recent recommendations for environmentally sound use of liquid animal manure often include injection of slurry into soil. Two of the most important undesired side effects, ammonia (NH(3)) volatilisation and odour emissions, are usually significantly reduced by slurry injection. On the other hand, because of the higher amount of nitrogen (N) remaining in soil, the risk of nitrate (NO(3)(-)) leaching and nitrous oxide (N(2)O) emissions is increased. Thus, the reduction of local effects caused by NH(3) deposition, e.g. N enrichment and soil acidification, may be at the cost of large-scale effects such as ozone depletion and global warming as a result of emitted N(2)O. In this context, nitrification inhibitors can contribute significantly to a reduction in NO(3)(-) leaching and N(2)O production. A field experiment was carried out at IGER, North Wyke, which aimed to evaluate the effect of the new nitrification inhibitor 3,4-dimethylpyrazole phosphate (DMPP/ENTEC). For this experiment, (15)N enriched dairy slurry was used and the isotopic label in soil N as well as in N(2)O were studied. After slurry injection into the grassland soil in August 2000, the major emissions of N(2)O occurred during the first ten days. As expected, high N(2)O emission rates and (15)N content of the emissions were concentrated on the slurry injection slots, showing a steep decrease towards the untreated centre-point between slurry injection slots. The nitrification inhibitor DMPP proved to be very efficient in reducing N(2)O emissions. At a rate of 2 kg DMPP ha(-1), the total amount of N(2)O emitted was reduced by 32%, when compared with slurry injection without DMPP. The isotopic label of the emitted N(2)O showed that during the 22-day experimental period, emissions from the slurry N pool were strongly reduced by DMPP from 0.93 kg N(2)O-N ha(-1) (-DMPP) to 0.50 kg N(2)O-N ha(-1) (+DMPP), while only a minor effect on emissions from the soil N pool was observed (0.69 to 0.60 kg N(2)O-N ha(-1

  8. Effects of inoculum type and bulk dissolved oxygen concentration on achieving partial nitrification by entrapped-cell-based reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rongsayamanont, Chaiwat; Limpiyakorn, Tawan; Khan, Eakalak

    2014-07-01

    An entrapment of nitrifiers into gel matrix is employed as a tool to fulfill partial nitrification under non-limiting dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations in bulk solutions. This study aims to clarify which of these two attributes, inoculum type and DO concentration in bulk solutions, is the decisive factor for partial nitrification in an entrapped-cell based system. Four polyvinyl alcohol entrapped inocula were prepared to have different proportions of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) and nitrite-oxidizing activity. At a DO concentration of 3 mg l(-1), the number of active NOB cells in an inoculum was the decisive factor for partial nitrification enhancement. However, when the DO concentration was reduced to 2 mg l(-1), all entrapped cell inocula showed similar degrees of partial nitrification. The results suggested that with the lower bulk DO concentration, the preparation of entrapped cell inocula is not useful as the DO level becomes the decisive factor for achieving partial nitrification. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Purifying capability, enzyme activity, and nitrification potentials in December in integrated vertical flow constructed wetland with earthworms and different substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Defu; Gu, Jiaru; Li, Yingxue; Zhang, Yu; Howard, Alan; Guan, Yidong; Li, Jiuhai; Xu, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The response of purifying capability, enzyme activity, nitrification potentials, and total number of bacteria in the rhizosphere in December to wetland plants, substrates, and earthworms was investigated in integrated vertical flow constructed wetlands (IVFCW). The removal efficiency of total nitrogen (TN), NH4-N, chemical oxygen demand (COD), and total phosphorus (TP) was increased when earthworms were added into IVFCW. A significantly average removal efficiency of N in IVFCW that employed river sand as substrate and in IVFCW that employed a mixture of river sand and Qing sand as substrate was not found. However, the average removal efficiency of P was higher in IVFCW with a mixture of river sand and Qing sand as substrate than in IVFCW with river sand as substrate. Invertase activity in December was higher in IVFCW that used a mixture of river sand and Qing sand as substrate than in IVFCW which used only river sand as substrate. However, urease activity, nitrification potential, and total number of bacteria in December was higher in IVFCW that employed river sand as substrate than in IVFCW with a mixture of river sand and Qing sand as substrate. The addition of earthworms into the integrated vertical flow constructed wetland increased the above-ground biomass, enzyme activity (catalase, urease, and invertase), nitrification potentials, and total number of bacteria in December. The above-ground biomass of wetland plants was significantly positively correlated with urease and nitrification potentials (p nitrification potentials in December, which resulted in improving purifying capability.

  10. Effect of earthworm Eisenia fetida and wetland plants on nitrification and denitrification potentials in vertical flow constructed wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Defu; Li, Yingxue; Howard, Alan; Guan, Yidong

    2013-06-01

    The response of nitrification potentials, denitrification potentials, and N removal efficiency to the introduction of earthworms and wetland plants in a vertical flow constructed wetland system was investigated. Addition of earthworms increased nitrification and denitrification potentials of substrate in non-vegetated constructed wetland by 236% and 8%, respectively; it increased nitrification and denitrification potentials in rhizosphere in vegetated constructed wetland (Phragmites austrail, Typha augustifolia and Canna indica), 105% and 5%, 187% and 12%, and 268% and 15% respectively. Denitrification potentials in rhizosphere of three wetland plants were not significantly different, but nitrification potentials in rhizosphere followed the order of C. indica>T. augustifolia>P. australis when addition of earthworms into constructed wetland. Addition of earthworms to the vegetated constructed significantly increased the total number of bacteria and fungi of substrates (Pnitrification potentials (r=913, Pnitrification potentials than denitrification potentials. The removal efficiency of N was improved via stimulated nitrification potentials by earthworms and higher N uptake by wetland plants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Loss of protection with insecticide-treated nets against pyrethroid-resistant Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes once nets become holed: an experimental hut study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irish SR

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An important advantage of pyrethroid-treated nets over untreated nets is that once nets become worn or holed a pyrethroid treatment will normally restore protection. The capacity of pyrethroids to kill or irritate any mosquito that comes into contact with the net and prevent penetration of holes or feeding through the sides are the main reasons why treated nets continue to provide protection despite their condition deteriorating over time. Pyrethroid resistance is a growing problem among Anopheline and Culicine mosquitoes in many parts of Africa. When mosquitoes become resistant the capacity of treated nets to provide protection might be diminished, particularly when holed. An experimental hut trial against pyrethroid-resistant Culex quinquefasciatus was therefore undertaken in southern Benin using a series of intact and holed nets, both untreated and treated, to assess any loss of protection as nets deteriorate with use and time. Results There was loss of protection when untreated nets became holed; the proportion of mosquitoes blood feeding increased from 36.2% when nets were intact to between 59.7% and 68.5% when nets were holed to differing extents. The proportion of mosquitoes blood feeding when treated nets were intact was 29.4% which increased to 43.6–57.4% when nets were holed. The greater the number of holes the greater the loss of protection regardless of whether nets were untreated or treated. Mosquito mortality in huts with untreated nets was 12.9–13.6%; treatment induced mortality was less than 12%. The exiting rate of mosquitoes into the verandas was higher in huts with intact nets. Conclusion As nets deteriorate with use and become increasingly holed the capacity of pyrethroid treatments to restore protection is greatly diminished against resistant Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes.

  12. Pro asynchronous programming with .NET

    CERN Document Server

    Blewett, Richard; Ltd, Rock Solid Knowledge

    2014-01-01

    Pro Asynchronous Programming with .NET teaches the essential skill of asynchronous programming in .NET. It answers critical questions in .NET application development, such as: how do I keep my program responding at all times to keep my users happy how do I make the most of the available hardware how can I improve performanceIn the modern world, users expect more and more from their applications and devices, and multi-core hardware has the potential to provide it. But it takes carefully crafted code to turn that potential into responsive, scalable applications.With Pro Asynchronous Programming

  13. Conformal Nets II: Conformal Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Arthur; Douglas, Christopher L.; Henriques, André

    2017-08-01

    Conformal nets provide a mathematical formalism for conformal field theory. Associated to a conformal net with finite index, we give a construction of the `bundle of conformal blocks', a representation of the mapping class groupoid of closed topological surfaces into the category of finite-dimensional projective Hilbert spaces. We also construct infinite-dimensional spaces of conformal blocks for topological surfaces with smooth boundary. We prove that the conformal blocks satisfy a factorization formula for gluing surfaces along circles, and an analogous formula for gluing surfaces along intervals. We use this interval factorization property to give a new proof of the modularity of the category of representations of a conformal net.

  14. Isotopomer Signatures of Nitrous Oxide Emissions From Soils During Nitrification, Denitrification and Chemodenitrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clough, T. J.; Sherlock, R. R.; Griffith, D. W.; Wilson, S. R.; Toyoda, S.; Yoshida, N.

    2004-12-01

    New Zealand's greenhouse gas budget is atypical amongst developed nations in that 49.2% of total emissions in 2002 were produced by the agriculture sector. Agricultural soils are the source of most of the N2O emissions in New Zealand and have increased by 27.6% since 1990. Emissions of N2O arise directly from agriculture soils as a result of fertilizer, predominantly urea, and animal urine deposition onto grazed pastures. Identification of N2O source mechanisms in soils would enable better targeting, timing and development of appropriate mitigation strategies. N2O isotopomers have shown promise as a means for distinguishing the mechanisms that generate N2O emissions due to the differential enrichment in the central N position (α ) relative to the terminal N position (β ). Pérez et al. (2001) reported the first isotopomer measurements from agricultural soils with nitrification preferentially enriching the α position. Sutka et al. (2003) reported the first measured N2O isotopomer values for isolated microbial processes finding significant differences in site preference following hydroxylamine oxidation by Nitrosomonas and Methylococcus species The results of Yamulki et al. (2001) suggested a possible change from nitrification to denitrification processes following cow urine applications to soil. However, in the urine patch there are three possible mechanisms for N2O formation, nitrification, chemodenitrification, and denitrification. These mechanisms may possibly occur separately or simultaneously. The objective of our work was to measure isotopomer signatures of N2O, from the three N2O production mechanisms mentioned above, from soils in the laboratory under carefully delineated conditions. Interim results to date are reported on.

  15. Ureic nitrogen transformation in multi-layer soil columns treated with urease and nitrification inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannini, Camilla; Garcia-Mina, Josè M; Ciavatta, Claudio; Marzadori, Claudio

    2009-06-10

    The use of N-(n-butyl)thiophosphoric triamide (NBPT), as a urease inhibitor, is one of the most successful strategies utilized to increase the efficiency of urea-based fertilization. To date, NBPT has been added to the soil incorporated in fertilizers containing either urea or the inhibitor at a fixed percentage on the urea weight. The possibility of using NBPT physically separated from urea-based fertilizers could make its use more flexible. In particular, a granulated product containing NBPT could be utilized in soils treated with different urea-based fertilizers including livestock urine, the amount depending on soil characteristics and/or the urea source (e.g., mineral fertilizer, organo-mineral fertilizer, or animal slurry). In this study, a multilayer soil column device was used to investigate the influence of an experimental granular product (RV) containing NBPT and a garlic extract, combining the ability to protect NBPT by oxidation and nitrification inhibition activity, on (a) spatial variability of soil urease and nitrification activities and (b) timing of urea hydrolysis and mineral-N form accumulation (NO(2)(-), NO(3)(-), NH(4)(+)) in soil treated with urea. The results clearly demonstrated that RV can, effectively, inhibit the soil urease activity along the soil column profile up to 8-10 cm soil layer depth and that the inhibition power of RV was dependent on time and soil depth. However, nitrification activity is not significantly influenced by RV addition. In addition, the soil N transformations were clearly affected by RV; in fact, RV retarded urea hydrolysis and reduced the accumulation of NH(4)(+)-N and NO(2)(-)-N ions along the soil profile. The RV product was demonstrated to be an innovative additive able to modify some key ureic N trasformation processes correlated with the efficiency of the urea-based fertilization, in a soil column higher than 10 cm.

  16. Can nitrification bring us to Mars? The role of microbial interactions on nitrogen recovery in life support systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiaens, Marlies E. R.; Lasseur, Christophe; Clauwaert, Peter; Boon, Nico; Ilgrande, Chiara; Vlaeminck, Siegfried

    2016-07-01

    Human habitation in space requires artificial environment recirculating fundamental elements to enable the highest degree of autonomy . The European Space Agency, supported by a large consortoium of European organisationsdevelop the Micro-Ecological Life Support System (MELiSSA) to transform the mission wastes waste (a.o. organic fibers, CO2, and urine) into water, oxygen, and food (Lasseur et al., 2010). Among these wastes, astronauts' urine has a high potential to provide nitrogen as a fertilizer for food production. As higher plant growth in space is typically proposed to be performed in hydroponics, liquid fertilizer containing nitrates is preferred. An Additional Unit for Water Treatment is developed for urine nitrification by means of a synthetic microbial community. The key players in this consortium are ureolytic bacteria to hydrolyse the main nitrogen source in urine, urea, to ammonium and carbon dioxide as well as oxidation of organic compounds present in urine, ammonium oxidizing bacteria (AOB) to convert ammonium to nitrite (nitritation), and the nitrate oxidizing bacteria (NOB) to produce nitrate (nitratation). Pure AOB strains Nitrosomonas ureae Nm10 and Nitrosomonas europaea ATCC 19718, pure NOB strains Nitrobacter winogradskyi Nb-255 and Nitrobacter vulgaris Z, and interactions within synthetic consortia of one AOB and one NOB or all together were tested. As the initial salinity of fresh urine can be as high as 30 mS/cm, the functionality of selected pure strains and synthetic consortia was evaluated by means of the nitritation and nitratation activity at varying NaCl salinities (5, 10, and 30 mS/cm). The nitritation activity of pure AOB strains was compared with the synthetic consortia. Both N. ureae and Ns. europaea benefit from the presence of Nb. winogradskyi as the ammonium oxidation rates of 1.7 ± 0.7 and 6.4 ± 0.6 mg N/L.d at 5 mS/cm, respectively, doubled. These results are in line with the findings of Perez et al (2015) observing a lower

  17. Chitosan-based nanocomposites for de-nitrification of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masheane, Monaheng L.; Nthunya, Lebea N.; Malinga, Soraya P.; Nxumalo, Edward N.; Mhlanga, Sabelo D.

    2017-08-01

    Novel chitosan (CTs) nanocomposite beads containing alumina (Al2O3, denoted as Al in the nanocomposites) and functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (f-MWCNTs) (CTsAl/f-MWCNTs) were prepared using an environmentally benign phase inversion method and subsequently used for the removal of nitrates (NO3-) in water. The ellipsoidal beads with an average size of 3 mm were readily formed at room temperature and contained a small amount of Al (20 wt%) and f-MWCNTs (5%). The beads were found to adsorb nitrates effectively over a wide range of pH (pH 2 - pH 6) and showed maximum nitrates removal of 96.8% from a 50 mg/L nitrate water solution. Pure CTs beads on the other hand removed only 23% at pH 4. Kinetic studies suggested that the particle diffusion was rate controlling step for the adsorption of nitrates on CTsAl/f-MWCNT nanocomposite beads. Langmuir-Freundlich isotherms revealed that the adsorption of nitrates was on the heterogeneous surface of CTsAl/f-MWCNT beads. The Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm further revealed that the adsorption of nitrates was by electrostatic interaction. Thermodynamic studies suggested that the adsorption was spontaneous and exothermic. More than 70% recovery was achieved for 5 cycles of desorption-degeneration studies. Al and f-MWCNTs have shown to improve swelling and solubility of CTs.

  18. Succession of Biofilm Microbial Community during Nitrification in Lab-Scale Reactors Simulating Chloraminated Drinking Water Distribution System Conditions: the Impact of Simultaneously Increasing Monochloramine and Chlorine to Nitrogen Mass Ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chloramination has been shown to promote nitrifying bacteria and 30 to 63% of utility plants using secondary chloramine disinfection experience nitrification episodes. Although nitrifying bacteria are not considered human pathogens, nitrification can affect drinking water qualit...

  19. External and internal sources which inhibit the nitrification process in wastewater treatment plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sinkjær, O.; Bøgebjerg, P.; Grüttner, Henrik

    1996-01-01

    monitoring the influent to the Lynetten WWTP and the Damhusaen WWTP and the catchment areas have revealed that discharges from industries are to be considered the most important external sources of inhibition. The load from the external sources has decreased during the investigation period, and since 1993......, and the long-term effects on the nitrification process were tested in pilot plants or at full-scale. A distinction could be made between effects produced by wastewater from external sources in the catchment area and internally circulated flows in the wastewater treatment plant. Results from programmes...

  20. A case study of nitrification and nitrite isotope fractionation in a eutrophic temperate river system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Juliane; Dähnke, Kirstin; Sanders, Tina

    2014-05-01

    Stable isotopes of nitrate are often used to assess processing of nitrate in the water column of oceans, estuaries, and rivers. In all these environments, nitrate regeneration via nitrification is an important source of new nitrate. The bulk isotope effect of nitrification is hard to predict: It is a two-step-process by distinct groups of microorganisms oxidizing ammonium to nitrate via nitrite. Both processes have divergent isotope effects, and it is even more difficult to unravel these effects in natural environments, because nitrite usually does not accumulate and isotope analysis is not possible. During our routine sampling scheme at the River Elbe an exceptional flood occurred in June 2013, and nitrite and ammonium accumulated, allowing us to investigate isotope fractionation of nitrification in a natural river system. We measured nutrient concentrations, dual nitrate isotopes, δ15N-NO2, and, where possible, δ15N-NH4. Nitrate leached from catchment area, and δ15N-NO3 and δ18O-NO3 decreased from typical spring bloom values (9.0 o and 3.5 o respectively) to winter nitrate background values (7.4 o and 2.1 o respectively). This indicates that riverine assimilation was minimal during the flood. Ammonium and nitrite concentrations increased to 12.5 μM and 5.7 μM, respectively, which likely was due to remineralization and nitrification in the water column. Ammonium δ15N-NH4 values increased up to 12 o and nitrite δ15N-NO2 values ranged from -4.8 o and -14.2 ‰Nitrite oxidation and decreasing concentrations were coupled with a fractionation factor 15ɛ of -8.6 o following normal, and not inverse, isotope fractionation. This deviates from findings in pure cultures of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria. We assume that the mechanisms responsible for inverse fractionation apply in natural environment as well, but that the resulting trend in δ15N-NO2 is masked by dilution with fresh nitrite stemming from ammonium oxidation. Our data are a first approximation of the

  1. Inhibition of the nitrification process in municipal wastewater treatment plants by industrial discharges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grüttner, Henrik; Winther-Nielsen, M.; Jorgensen, L.

    1994-01-01

    More than three years of pilot-plant operation has documented that inhibition of nitrification was found to influence the dimensioning of the largest Danish wastewater treatment plant, which serves a major part of Copenhagen. Hence, a program for investigating the sources of substances inhibitory...... of inhibitory substances are to be found among the industries, and that nearly all of the industries investigated exhibited some kind of inhibitory effect. Further, is was demonstrated that the toxic unit calculation might be used in the quantification of the sources, and that the observed effects could...

  2. Biological filter capable of simultaneous nitrification and denitrification for Aquatic Habitat in International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemoto, H.; Shoji, T.; Uchida, S.

    2014-04-01

    The biological filter capable of simultaneous nitrification and denitrification was constructed for aquatic animal experiments in the International Space Station (ISS). The biological filter will be used to remove harmful ammonia excreted from aquatic animals in a closed water circulation system (Aquatic Habitat). The biological filter is a cylindrical tank packed with porous glass beads for nitrification and dual plastic bags for denitrification. The porous beads are supporting media for Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrobacter winogradskyi. The N. europaea cells and N. winogradskyi cells on the porous beads, oxidize the excreted ammonia to nitrate via nitrite. On the other hand, the dual bag is composed of an outer non-woven fabric bag and an inner non-porous polyethylene film bag. The outer bag is supporting media for Paracoccus pantotrophus. The inner bag, in which 99.5% ethanol is packed, releases the ethanol slowly, since ethanol can permeate through the non-porous polyethylene film. The P. pantotrophus cells on the outer bag reduce the produced nitrate to nitrogen gas by using the released ethanol as an electron donor for denitrification. The biological filter constructed in this study consequently removed the ammonia without accumulating nitrate. Most of the excess ethanol was consumed and did not affect the nitrification activity of the N. europaea cells and N. winogradskyi cells severely. In accordance with the aquatic animal experiments in the ISS, small freshwater fish had been bred in the closed water circulation system equipped with the biological filter for 90 days. Ammonia concentration daily excreted from fish is assumed to be 1.7 mg-N/L in the recirculation water. Under such conditions, the harmful ammonia and nitrite concentrations were kept below 0.1 mg-N/L in the recirculation water. Nitrate and total organic carbon concentrations in the recirculation water were kept below 5 mg-N/L and 3 mg-C/L, respectively. All breeding fish were alive and ate

  3. Petri Net Tool Overview 1986

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kurt; Feldbrugge, Frits

    1987-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the characteristics of all currently available net based tools. It is a compilation of information provided by tool authors or contact persons. A concise one page overview is provided as well....

  4. Understanding Net Zero Energy Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salom, Jaume; Widén, Joakim; Candanedo, José

    2011-01-01

    Although several alternative definitions exist, a Net-Zero Energy Building (Net ZEB) can be succinctly described as a grid-connected building that generates as much energy as it uses over a year. The “net-zero” balance is attained by applying energy conservation and efficiency measures...... and by incorporating renewable energy systems. While based on annual balances, a complete description of a Net ZEB requires examining the system at smaller time-scales. This assessment should address: (a) the relationship between power generation and building loads and (b) the resulting interaction with the power grid....... This paper presents and categorizes quantitative indicators suitable to describe both aspects of the building’s performance. These indicators, named LMGI - Load Matching and Grid Interaction indicators, are easily quantifiable and could complement the output variables of existing building simulation tools...

  5. PolicyNet Publication System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The PolicyNet Publication System project will merge the Oracle-based Policy Repository (POMS) and the SQL-Server CAMP system (MSOM) into a new system with an Oracle...

  6. KM3NeT

    CERN Multimedia

    KM3NeT is a large scale next-generation neutrino telescope located in the deep waters of the Mediterranean Sea, optimized for the discovery of galactic neutrino sources emitting in the TeV energy region.

  7. Net Neutrality: Background and Issues

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gilroy, Angele A

    2006-01-01

    .... The move to place restrictions on the owners of the networks that compose and provide access to the Internet, to ensure equal access and nondiscriminatory treatment, is referred to as "net neutrality...

  8. Flood effects on efflux and net production of nitrous oxide in river floodplain soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Muhammad; Bruderer, Christian; Niklaus, Pascal A.; Luster, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    Floodplain soils are often rich in nutrients and exhibit high spatial heterogeneity in terms of geomorphology, soil environmental conditions and substrate availability for processes involved in carbon and nutrient cycling. In addition, fluctuating water tables lead to temporally changing redox conditions. In such systems, there are ideal conditions for the occurrence of hot spots and moments of nitrous oxide emissions, a potent greenhouse gas. The factors that govern the spatial heterogeneity and dynamics of N2O formation in floodplain soils and the surface efflux of this gas are not fully understood. A particular issue is the contribution of N2O formation in the subsoil to surface efflux. We studied this question in the floodplain of a restored section of the Thur river (NE Switzerland) which is characterized by a flashy flow regime. As a consequence, the floodplain soils are unsaturated most of the time. We showed earlier that saturation during flood pulses leads to short phases of generally anoxic conditions followed by a drying phase with anoxic conditions within aggregates and oxic conditions in larger soil pores. The latter conditions are conducive for spatially closely-coupled nitrification-denitrification and related hot moments of nitrous oxide formation. In a floodplain zone characterized by about one meter of young, sandy sediments, that are mostly covered by the tall grass Phalaris arundinacea, we measured at several time points before and after a small flood event N2O surface efflux with the closed-chamber method, and assessed N2O concentrations in the soil air at four different depths using gas-permeable tubings. In addition, we calculated the N2O diffusivity in the soil from Radon diffusivity. The latter was estimated in-situ from the recovery of Radon concentration in the gas-permeable tubings after purging with ambient air. All these data were then used to calculate net N2O production rates at different soil depths with the gradient method. In

  9. Impacts of Edaphic Factors on Communities of Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea, Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria and Nitrification in Tropical Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gannes, Vidya; Eudoxie, Gaius; Hickey, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Nitrification is a key process in soil nitrogen (N) dynamics, but relatively little is known about it in tropical soils. In this study, we examined soils from Trinidad to determine the edaphic drivers affecting nitrification levels and community structure of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) in non-managed soils. The soils were naturally vegetated, ranged in texture from sands to clays and spanned pH 4 to 8. The AOA were detected by qPCR in all soils (ca. 105 to 106 copies archaeal amoA g−1 soil), but AOB levels were low and bacterial amoA was infrequently detected. AOA abundance showed a significant negative correlation (pNitrification potential was positively correlated with clay content and pH (pnitrification appeared to mainly reflect impacts on AOA or AOB activity, rather than selection for AOA or AOB phylotypes differing in nitrifying capacity. PMID:24586878

  10. Petri Nets in Cryptographic Protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crazzolara, Federico; Winskel, Glynn

    2001-01-01

    A process language for security protocols is presented together with a semantics in terms of sets of events. The denotation of process is a set of events, and as each event specifies a set of pre and postconditions, this denotation can be viewed as a Petri net. By means of an example we illustrate...... how the Petri-net semantics can be used to prove security properties....

  11. The Economics of Net Neutrality

    OpenAIRE

    Hahn, Robert W.; Wallsten, Scott

    2006-01-01

    This essay examines the economics of "net neutrality" and broadband Internet access. We argue that mandating net neutrality would be likely to reduce economic welfare. Instead, the government should focus on creating competition in the broadband market by liberalizing more spectrum and reducing entry barriers created by certain local regulations. In cases where a broadband provider can exercise market power the government should use its antitrust enforcement authority to police anticompetitiv...

  12. Nitrification and denitrification in a midwestern stream containing high nitrate: In situ assessment using tracers in dome-shaped incubation chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R.L.; Böhlke, J.K.; Repert, D.A.; Hart, C.P.

    2009-01-01

    The extent to which in-stream processes alter or remove nutrient loads in agriculturally impacted streams is critically important to watershed function and the delivery of those loads to coastal waters. In this study, patch-scale rates of in-stream benthic processes were determined using large volume, open-bottom benthic incubation chambers in a nitrate-rich, first to third order stream draining an area dominated by tile-drained row-crop fields. The chambers were fitted with sampling/mixing ports, a volume compensation bladder, and porewater samplers. Incubations were conducted with added tracers (NaBr and either 15N[NO3-], 15N[NO2-], or 15N[NH4+]) for 24-44 h intervals and reaction rates were determined from changes in concentrations and isotopic compositions of nitrate, nitrite, ammonium and nitrogen gas. Overall, nitrate loss rates (220-3,560 ??mol N m-2 h-1) greatly exceeded corresponding denitrification rates (34-212 ??mol N m-2 h-1) and both of these rates were correlated with nitrate concentrations (90-1,330 ??M), which could be readily manipulated with addition experiments. Chamber estimates closely matched whole-stream rates of denitrification and nitrate loss using 15N. Chamber incubations with acetylene indicated that coupled nitrification/denitrification was not a major source of N2 production at ambient nitrate concentrations (175 ??M), but acetylene was not effective for assessing denitrification at higher nitrate concentrations (1,330 ??M). Ammonium uptake rates greatly exceeded nitrification rates, which were relatively low even with added ammonium (3.5 ??mol N m-2 h-1), though incubations with nitrite demonstrated that oxidation to nitrate exceeded reduction to nitrogen gas in the surface sediments by fivefold to tenfold. The chamber results confirmed earlier studies that denitrification was a substantial nitrate sink in this stream, but they also indicated that dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) turnover rates greatly exceeded the rates of

  13. Use of dissolved inorganic carbon isotopes to track photosynthesis, respiration, and nitrification along a 56 mile transect in the Sacramento River and San Francisco Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, S. R.; Kendall, C.; Peek, S.; Young, M. B.

    2013-12-01

    A decline in phytoplankton stocks in the San Francisco Bay and Delta is thought to contribute to the pelagic organism decline observed over the past two decades. One factor controlling phytoplankton growth rate is the availability of nutrients. Although there is an excess of nutrients in the Bay and Delta, the type and relative abundance of nutrients is critical to phytoplankton growth. To evaluate the response of phytoplankton to nutrient sources and to better understand phytoplankton dynamics downstream, we tested the hypothesis that the δ13C values of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) along with conventional water chemistry analyses will record events such as increased nitrification (related to the Sacramento River Wastewater Treatment Plant ammonium input) and algal blooms, and reflect the balance between photosynthesis and bacterial respiration. Multiple parameters affect [DIC] and its δ13C, including DIC sources, pH, and biological processes. Consumption of CO2 by phytoplankton during photosynthesis and by autotrophic bacteria during nitrification both result in increases in δ13C-DIC. However, photosynthesis and nitrification have very different relationships to chlorophyll and nutrient concentrations. The balance between heterotrophic bacterial respiration and photosynthesis should be reflected in trends in DIC, nutrient, and chlorophyll concentration, and δ13C-DIC. The δ13C of DIC should also be reflected in the δ13C of phytoplankton with approximately a 20 per mil fractionation. Significant deviation in the fractionation factor may indicate local variations in growth rate, nutrient availability, or speciation. Combined, these parameters should provide a gauge of the relative importance of the above mentioned processes. To test this hypothesis, we collected 19 water samples per cruise between July 2012 and July 2013 along a 56 mile transect between Rio Vista on the Sacramento River and San Francisco Bay near Angel Island during 8 cruises on the USGS RV

  14. Nitrogen management in grasslands and forage-based production systems – Role of biological nitrification inhibition (BNI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.V. Subbarao

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen (N, the most critical and essential nutrient for plant growth, largely determines the productivity in both extensive and intensive grassland systems. Nitrification and denitrification processes in the soil are the primary drivers of generating reactive N (NO3-, N2O and NO, largely responsible for N loss and degradation of grasslands. Suppressing nitrification can thus facilitate retention of soil N to sustain long-term productivity of grasslands and forage-based production systems. Certain plants can suppress soil nitrification by releasing inhibitors from roots, a phenomenon termed ‘biological nitrification inhibition’ (BNI. Recent methodological developments [e.g. bioluminescence assay to detect biological nitrification inhibitors (BNIs from plant-root systems] led to significant advances in our ability to quantify and characterize BNI function in pasture grasses. Among grass pastures, BNI capacity is strongest in low-N environment grasses such as Brachiaria humidicola and weakest in high-N environment grasses such as Italian ryegrass (Lolium perenne and B. brizantha. The chemical identity of some of the BNIs produced in plant tissues and released from roots has now been established and their mode of inhibitory action determined on nitrifying Nitrosomonas bacteria. Synthesis and release of BNIs is a highly regulated and localized process, triggered by the presence of NH4+ in the rhizosphere, which facilitates release of BNIs close to soil-nitrifier sites. Substantial genotypic variation is found for BNI capacity in B. humidicola, which opens the way for its genetic manipulation. Field studies suggest that Brachiaria grasses suppress nitrification and N2O emissions from soil. The potential for exploiting BNI function (from a genetic improvement and a system perspective to develop production systems, that are low-nitrifying, low N2O-emitting, economically efficient and ecologically sustainable, is discussed.

  15. Dynamics of mineral N, water-soluble carbon and potential nitrification in band-steamed arable soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elsgaard, Lars

    2010-01-01

    mechanically with the band-steamer. In the steamed soil, ammonium concentrations increased from 1.1 to 20.3 μg NH4+-N g-1 dry weight during 28 days. This coincided with an immediate and persistent inhibition of potential nitrification (33-61% inhibition during 90 days). Assays of the temperature response...... of potential nitrification confirmed the temperature sensitivity and showed an optimum temperature of 27.1°C and a temperature coefficient (Q 10) of 1.9. The effects of band-steaming on concentrations of nitrate and water-soluble carbon were divergent and stimulatory, respectively, but generally...

  16. 26 CFR 1.904(f)-3 - Allocation of net operating losses and net capital losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Allocation of net operating losses and net....904(f)-3 Allocation of net operating losses and net capital losses. For rules relating to the allocation of net operating losses and net capital losses, see § 1.904(g)-3T. ...

  17. 29 CFR 4204.13 - Net income and net tangible assets tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Net income and net tangible assets tests. 4204.13 Section....13 Net income and net tangible assets tests. (a) General. The criteria under this section are that either— (1) Net income test. The purchaser's average net income after taxes for its three most recent...

  18. Mass distribution of free insecticide-treated nets do not interfere with continuous net distribution in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eze, Ikenna C; Kramer, Karen; Msengwa, Amina; Mandike, Renata; Lengeler, Christian

    2014-05-27

    To protect the most vulnerable groups from malaria (pregnant women and infants) the Tanzanian Government introduced a subsidy (voucher) scheme in 2004, on the basis of a public-private partnership. These vouchers are provided to pregnant women at their first antenatal care visit and mothers of infants at first vaccination. The vouchers are redeemed at registered retailers for a long-lasting insecticidal net against the payment of a modest top-up price. The present work analysed a large body of data from the Tanzanian National Voucher Scheme, focusing on interactions with concurrent mass distribution campaigns of free nets. In an ecologic study involving all regions of Tanzania, voucher redemption data for the period 2007-2011, as well as data on potential determinants of voucher redemption were analysed. The four outcome variables were: pregnant woman and infant voucher redemption rates, use of treated bed nets by all household members and by under- five children. Each of the outcomes was regressed with selected determinants, using a generalized estimating equation model and accounting for regional data clustering. There was a consistent improvement in voucher redemption rates over the selected time period, with rates >80% in 2011. The major determinants of redemption rates were the top-up price paid by the voucher beneficiary, the retailer- clinic ratio, and socio-economic status. Improved redemption rates after 2009 were most likely due to reduced top-up prices (following a change in policy). Redemption rates were not affected by two major free net distribution campaigns. During this period, there was a consistent improvement in net use across all the regions, with rates of up to 75% in 2011. The key components of the National Treated Nets Programme (NATNETS) seem to work harmoniously, leading to a high level of net use in the entire population. This calls for the continuation of this effort in Tanzania and for emulation by other countries with endemic malaria.

  19. Modeling the role of nitrification in open ocean productivity and the nitrogen cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yool, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The ocean is an important component of the global carbon cycle, and currently serves as the principal sink for anthropogenic CO(2) from the atmosphere. A key role in the natural oceanic carbon cycle is played by the plankton ecosystem, which acts to elevate the storage capacity of the ocean, but it is believed that this will experience change in the future in response to anthropogenic forcing. One of the approaches used to understand and forecast the oceanic carbon cycle is ecosystem modeling, and this is typically grounded on the nitrogen cycle because of the strong regulatory role this element plays in biological productivity. Nitrification is one of the central processes in the oceanic nitrogen cycle, one whose role may change in the future, but also one with a particular relevance to observational efforts to quantify the biological carbon cycle. Here, we describe and summarize current efforts to model nitrification in pelagic open ocean ecosystems, and look forward to future avenues for progress. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Conditions for partial nitrification in biofilm reactors and a kinetic explanation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Julio; Costa, Engràcia; Kreft, Jan-Ulrich

    2009-06-01

    Nitrification is a two-step process in which ammonia is incompletely oxidized by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria or archaea (AOB) to nitrite, which is then further oxidized to nitrate by nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB). Literature reports show that segregation of initially coexisting ammonia and nitrite oxidizing populations co-immobilized in gel cubes and cultured in a set-up with three reactors in series (without recirculation) is attained. In those studies NOB were present and nitrite was oxidized mainly in the last reactor. We developed a mathematical model for immobilized biomass that allows for one-dimensional gradients of metabolites and changes of porosity within the gel due to growth. The model reproduced the experimentally observed compartmentalization under the conditions used by Noto et al. (Noto et al., 1998. Water Res 32(3): 769- 773), using standard kinetic parameters of nitrifying bacteria including free ammonia inhibition of AOB and NOB. The model predicted compartmentalization when the ammonium load was sufficiently high and liquid phase mixing sufficiently limited (close to plug-flow). Modeling results demonstrated that inhibition of NOB by free ammonia did not substantially contribute to the compartmentalization in biofilm reactors. Additional simulations identified the higher oxygen affinity of AOB as the key parameter leading to compartmentalization (i.e., partial nitrification) in artificial and natural biofilms since they enable the formation of oxygen gradients. As a result, a tendency for compartmentalization was found even at equal competitiveness. Copyright 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. A novel sulfate reduction, autotrophic denitrification, nitrification integrated (SANI) process for saline wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin; Lu, Hui; Chen, Guang-Hao; Lau, G Ngai; Tsang, W L; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2009-05-01

    This paper reports on a lab-scale evaluation of a novel and integrated biological nitrogen removal process: the sulfate reduction, autotrophic denitrification and nitrification integrated (SANI) process that was recently proposed for saline sewage treatment. The process consisted of an up-flow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) for sulfate reduction, an anoxic filter for autotrophic denitrification and an aerobic filter for nitrification. The experiments were conducted to evaluate the performance of the lab-scale SANI system with synthetic saline wastewater at various hydraulic retention times, nitrate concentrations, dissolved oxygen levels and recirculation ratios for over 500 days. The system successfully demonstrated 95% chemical oxygen demand (COD) and 74% nitrogen removal efficiency without excess sludge withdrawal throughout the 500 days of operation. The organic removal efficiency was dependent on the hydraulic retention time, up-flow velocity, and mixing conditions in the UASB. Maintaining a sufficient mixing condition in the UASB is important for achieving effective sulfate reduction. For a typical Hong Kong wastewater composition 80% of COD can be removed through sulfate reduction. A minimum sulfide sulfur to nitrate nitrogen ratio of 1.6 in the influent of the anoxic filter is necessary for achieving over 90% nitrate removal through autotrophic denitrifiers which forms the major contribution to the total nitrogen removal in the SANI system. Sulfur balance analyses confirmed that accumulation of elementary sulfur and loss of hydrogen sulfide in the system were negligible.

  2. Interactions between Thaumarchaea, Nitrospira and methanotrophs modulate autotrophic nitrification in volcanic grassland soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daebeler, Anne; Bodelier, Paul LE; Yan, Zheng; Hefting, Mariet M; Jia, Zhongjun; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J

    2014-01-01

    Ammonium/ammonia is the sole energy substrate of ammonia oxidizers, and is also an essential nitrogen source for other microorganisms. Ammonia oxidizers therefore must compete with other soil microorganisms such as methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) in terrestrial ecosystems when ammonium concentrations are limiting. Here we report on the interactions between nitrifying communities dominated by ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and Nitrospira-like nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB), and communities of MOB in controlled microcosm experiments with two levels of ammonium and methane availability. We observed strong stimulatory effects of elevated ammonium concentration on the processes of nitrification and methane oxidation as well as on the abundances of autotrophically growing nitrifiers. However, the key players in nitrification and methane oxidation, identified by stable-isotope labeling using 13CO2 and 13CH4, were the same under both ammonium levels, namely type 1.1a AOA, sublineage I and II Nitrospira-like NOB and Methylomicrobium-/Methylosarcina-like MOB, respectively. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria were nearly absent, and ammonia oxidation could almost exclusively be attributed to AOA. Interestingly, although AOA functional gene abundance increased 10-fold during incubation, there was very limited evidence of autotrophic growth, suggesting a partly mixotrophic lifestyle. Furthermore, autotrophic growth of AOA and NOB was inhibited by active MOB at both ammonium levels. Our results suggest the existence of a previously overlooked competition for nitrogen between nitrifiers and methane oxidizers in soil, thus linking two of the most important biogeochemical cycles in nature. PMID:24858784

  3. Impacts of silver nanoparticle coating on the nitrification potential of Nitrosomonas europaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaout, Christina L; Gunsch, Claudia K

    2012-05-15

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are increasingly used as bacteriostatic agents to prevent microbial growth. AgNPs are manufactured with a variety of coatings, and their potential impacts on wastewater treatment in general are poorly understood. In the present study, Nitrosomonas europaea, a model ammonia oxidizing bacterium, was exposed to AgNPs with citrate, gum arabic (GA), and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). GA and citrate AgNPs inhibited nitrification most strongly (67.9 ± 3.6% and 91.4 ± 0.2%, respectively at 2 ppm). Our data indicate that Ag(+) dissolution and colloid stability of AgNPs were the main factors in AgNP toxicity. In general, low amounts of dissolved Ag initially caused a post-transcriptional interruption of membrane-bound nitrifying enzyme function, reducing nitrification by 10% or more. A further increase in dissolved Ag resulted in heavy metal stress response (e.g., merA up-regulation) and ultimately led to membrane disruption. The highest effect on membrane disruption was observed for citrate AgNPs (64 ± 11% membranes compromised at 2 ppm), which had high colloidal stability. This study demonstrates that coating plays a very important role in determining Ag dissolution and ultimately toxicity to nitrifiers. More research is needed to characterize these parameters in complex growth media such as wastewater.

  4. Interactions between Thaumarchaea, Nitrospira and methanotrophs modulate autotrophic nitrification in volcanic grassland soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daebeler, Anne; Bodelier, Paul L E; Yan, Zheng; Hefting, Mariet M; Jia, Zhongjun; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J

    2014-12-01

    Ammonium/ammonia is the sole energy substrate of ammonia oxidizers, and is also an essential nitrogen source for other microorganisms. Ammonia oxidizers therefore must compete with other soil microorganisms such as methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) in terrestrial ecosystems when ammonium concentrations are limiting. Here we report on the interactions between nitrifying communities dominated by ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and Nitrospira-like nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB), and communities of MOB in controlled microcosm experiments with two levels of ammonium and methane availability. We observed strong stimulatory effects of elevated ammonium concentration on the processes of nitrification and methane oxidation as well as on the abundances of autotrophically growing nitrifiers. However, the key players in nitrification and methane oxidation, identified by stable-isotope labeling using (13)CO2 and (13)CH4, were the same under both ammonium levels, namely type 1.1a AOA, sublineage I and II Nitrospira-like NOB and Methylomicrobium-/Methylosarcina-like MOB, respectively. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria were nearly absent, and ammonia oxidation could almost exclusively be attributed to AOA. Interestingly, although AOA functional gene abundance increased 10-fold during incubation, there was very limited evidence of autotrophic growth, suggesting a partly mixotrophic lifestyle. Furthermore, autotrophic growth of AOA and NOB was inhibited by active MOB at both ammonium levels. Our results suggest the existence of a previously overlooked competition for nitrogen between nitrifiers and methane oxidizers in soil, thus linking two of the most important biogeochemical cycles in nature.

  5. Occurrence and fate of nitrification and urease inhibitors in the aquatic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheurer, Marco; Brauch, Heinz-Jürgen; Schmidt, Carsten K; Sacher, Frank

    2016-08-10

    Nitrification and urease inhibitors (NUIs) decelerate the bacterial oxidation of nitrogen species by suppressing the activity of soil microorganisms. Thus, nitrogen losses can be limited and the efficiency of nitrogen fertilizers can be increased. After application NUI transfers to surface water may occur through leaching or surface run-off. In order to assess the occurrence of nitrification and urease inhibitors in the aquatic environment a multi-analyte high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method was developed. 1H-1,2,4-Triazole and dicyandiamide (DCD) were detected for the first time in German surface waters. Only at a few sites 1H-1,2,4-triazole has been episodically detected with concentrations up to the μg L(-1)-range. DCD was ubiquitously present in German surface waters. An industrial site was identified as the point source of DCD being responsible for exceptionally high DCD concentrations of up to 7.2 mg L(-1) in close proximity to the point of discharge. Both compounds were also detected in at least one wastewater treatment plant effluent, but their concentrations in surface waters did not correlate with those of typical markers for domestic wastewater. Other NUIs were not detected in any of the samples. Laboratory-scale batch tests proved that 1H-1,2,4-triazole and DCD are not readily biodegradable, are not prone to hydrolysis and do not tend to adsorb onto soil particles. Ozonation and activated carbon filtration proved to be ineffective for their removal.

  6. TimeNET Optimization Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Bodenstein

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a novel tool for simulation-based optimization and design-space exploration of Stochastic Colored Petri nets (SCPN is introduced. The working title of this tool is TimeNET Optimization Environment (TOE. Targeted users of this tool are people modeling complex systems with SCPNs in TimeNET who want to find parameter sets that are optimal for a certain performance measure (fitness function. It allows users to create and simulate sets of SCPNs and to run different optimization algorithms based on parameter variation. The development of this tool was motivated by the need to automate and speed up tests of heuristic optimization algorithms to be applied for SCPN optimization. A result caching mechanism is used to avoid recalculations.

  7. Plant water stress effects on the net dispersal rate of the insect vector Homalodisca vitripennis (Germar) (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) and movement of its egg parasitoid, Gonatocerus ashmeadi Girault (Hymenoptera: Mymaridae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homalodisca vitripennis, one of the main vectors of Xylella fastidiosa, is associated with citrus plantings in California, USA. Infested citrus orchards act as a source of vectors to adjacent vineyards where X. fastidiosa causes Pierce’s disease (PD). An analysis of the pattern and rate of movement ...

  8. Influence of growth manner on nitrifying bacterial communities and nitrification kinetics in three lab-scale bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Liu, Yi; Wang, Jinghan; Zhang, Yalei; Yang, Haizhen

    2012-04-01

    The effects of growth type, including attached growth, suspended growth, and combined growth, on the characteristics of communities of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) were studied in three lab-scale Anaerobic/Anoxic(m)-Oxic(n) (AmOn) systems. These systems amplified activated sludge, biofilms, and a mixture of activated sludge and biofilm (AS-BF). Identical inocula were adopted to analyze the selective effects of mixed growth patterns on nitrifying bacteria. Fluctuations in the concentration of nitrifying bacteria over the 120 days of system operation were analyzed, as was the composition of nitrifying bacterial community in the stabilized stage. Analysis was conducted using polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and real-time PCR. According to the DGGE patterns, the primary AOB lineages were Nitrosomonas europaea (six sequences), Nitrosomonas oligotropha (two sequences), and Nitrosospira (one sequence). The primary subclass of NOB community was Nitrospira, in which all identified sequences belonged to Nitrospira moscoviensis (14 sequences). Nitrobacter consisted of two lineages, namely Nitrobacter vulgaris (three sequences) and Nitrobacter alkalicus (two sequences). Under identical operating conditions, the composition of nitrifying bacterial communities in the AS-BF system demonstrated significant differences from those in the activated sludge system and those in the biofilm system. Major varieties included several new, dominant bacterial sequences in the AS-BF system, such as N. europaea and Nitrosospira and a higher concentration of AOB relative to the activated sludge system. However, no similar differences were discovered for the concentration of the NOB population. A kinetic study of nitrification demonstrated a higher maximum specific growth rate of mixed sludge and a lower half-saturation constant of mixed biofilm, indicating that the AS-BF system maintained relatively good

  9. Evaluation of DeNitrification DeComposition Model to Estimate Ammonia Fluxes from Chemical Fertilizer Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, S.; Nelson, A. J.; Koloutsou-Vakakis, S.; Lin, J.; Myles, L.; Rood, M. J.

    2016-12-01

    Biogeochemical models such as DeNitrification DeComposition (DNDC) are used to model greenhouse and other trace gas fluxes (e.g., ammonia (NH3)) from agricultural ecosystems. NH3 is of interest to air quality because it is a precursor to ambient particulate matter. NH3 fluxes from chemical fertilizer application are uncertain due to dependence on local weather and soil properties, and farm nitrogen management practices. DNDC can be advantageously implemented to model the underlying spatial and temporal trends to support air quality modeling. However, such implementation, requires a detailed evaluation of model predictions, and model behavior. This is the first study to assess DNDC predictions of NH3 fluxes to/from the atmosphere, from chemical fertilizer application, during an entire crop growing season, in the United States. Relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) measurements over corn in Central Illinois, in year 2014, were used to evaluate magnitude and trends in modeled NH3 fluxes. DNDC was able to replicate both magnitude and trends in measured NH3 fluxes, with greater accuracy during the initial 33 days after application, when NH3 was mostly emitted to the atmosphere. However, poorer performance was observed when depositional fluxes were measured. Sensitivity analysis using Monte Carlo simulations indicated that modeled NH3 fluxes were most sensitive to input air temperature and precipitation, soil organic carbon, field capacity and pH and fertilizer loading rate, timing, and application depth and tilling date. By constraining these inputs for conditions in Central Illinois, uncertainty in annual NH3 fluxes was estimated to vary from -87% to 61%. Results from this study provides insight to further improve DNDC predictions and inform efforts for upscaling site predictions to regional scale for the development of emission inventories for air quality modeling.

  10. Implementing NetScaler VPX

    CERN Document Server

    Sandbu, Marius

    2014-01-01

    An easy-to-follow guide with detailed step-by step-instructions on how to implement the different key components in NetScaler, with real-world examples and sample scenarios.If you are a Citrix or network administrator who needs to implement NetScaler in your virtual environment to gain an insight on its functionality, this book is ideal for you. A basic understanding of networking and familiarity with some of the different Citrix products such as XenApp or XenDesktop is a prerequisite.

  11. Net4Care PHMR Library

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The Net4Care PHMR library contains a) A GreenCDA approach for constructing a data object representing a PHMR document: SimpleClinicalDocument, and b) A Builder which can produce a XML document representing a valid Danish PHMR (following the MedCom profile) document from the SimpleClinicalDocument......The Net4Care PHMR library contains a) A GreenCDA approach for constructing a data object representing a PHMR document: SimpleClinicalDocument, and b) A Builder which can produce a XML document representing a valid Danish PHMR (following the MedCom profile) document from the Simple...

  12. Pro DLR in NET 4

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Chaur

    2011-01-01

    Microsoft's Dynamic Language Runtime (DLR) is a platform for running dynamic languages such as Ruby and Python on an equal footing with compiled languages such as C#. Furthermore, the runtime is the foundation for many useful software design and architecture techniques you can apply as you develop your .NET applications. Pro DLR in .NET 4 introduces you to the DLR, showing how you can use it to write software that combines dynamic and static languages, letting you choose the right tool for the job. You will learn the core DLR components such as LINQ expressions, call sites, binders, and dynami

  13. Hierarchies in Coloured Petri Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huber, Peter; Jensen, Kurt; Shapiro, Robert M.

    1991-01-01

    The paper shows how to extend Coloured Petri Nets with a hierarchy concept. The paper proposes five different hierarchy constructs, which allow the analyst to structure large CP-nets as a set of interrelated subnets (called pages). The paper discusses the properties of the proposed hierarchy...... constructs, and it illustrates them by means of two examples. The hierarchy constructs can be used for theoretical considerations, but their main use is to describe and analyse large real-world systems. All of the hierarchy constructs are supported by the editing and analysis facilities in the CPN Palette...

  14. Meta-analysis of the effect of urease and nitrification inhibitors on crop productivity and nitrogen use efficience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abalos, D.; Jeffery, S.L.; Sanz-Cobena, A.; Guardia, G.; Vallejo, A.

    2014-01-01

    Nitrification and urease inhibitors are proposed as means to reduce nitrogen losses, thereby increasing crop nitrogen use efficiency (NUE). However, their effect on crop yield is variable. A meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate their effectiveness at increasing NUE and crop productivity. Commonly

  15. Influences of nitrification inhibitor 3,4-dimethyl pyrazole phosphate on nitrogen and soil salt-ion leaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qiaogang; Ye, Xuezhu; Chen, Yingxu; Zhang, Zhijian; Tian, Guangming

    2008-01-01

    An undisturbed heavy clay soil column experiment was conducted to examine the influence of the new nitrification inhibitor, 3,4-dimethylpyrazole phosphate (DMPP), on nitrogen and soil salt-ion leaching. Regular urea was selected as the nitrogen source in the soil. The results showed that the cumulative leaching losses of soil nitrate-N under the treatment of urea with DMPP were from 57.5% to 63.3% lower than those of the treatment of urea without DMPP. The use of nitrification inhibitors as nitrate leaching retardants may be a proposal in regulations to prevent groundwater contaminant. However, there were no great difference between urea and urea with DMPP treatments on ammonium-N leaching. Moreover, the soil salt-ion leaching losses of Ca2+, Mg2+, K+, and Na+ were reduced from 26.6% to 28.8%, 21.3% to 27.8%, 33.3% to 35.5%, and 21.7% to 32.1%, respectively. So, the leaching losses of soil salt-ion were declined for nitrification inhibitor DMPP addition, being beneficial to shallow groundwater protection and growth of crop. These results indicated the possibility of ammonium or ammonium producing compounds using nitrification inhibitor DMPP to control the nitrate and nutrient cation leaching losses, minimizing the risk of nitrate pollution in shallow groundwater.

  16. Dimethyl pyrazol-based nitrification inhibitors effect on nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria to mitigate N2O emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torralbo, Fernando; Menéndez, Sergio; Barrena, Iskander; Estavillo, José M; Marino, Daniel; González-Murua, Carmen

    2017-10-23

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions have been increasing as a result of intensive nitrogen (N) fertilisation. Soil nitrification and denitrification are the main sources of N2O, and the use of ammonium-based fertilisers combined with nitrification inhibitors (NIs) could be useful in mitigating N2O emissions from agricultural systems. In this work we looked at the N2O mitigation capacity of two dimethylpyrazol-based NIs, 3,4-dimethylpyrazole phosphate (DMPP) and 2-(N-3,4-dimethyl-1H-pyrazol-1-yl) succinic acid isomeric mixture (DMPSA), on soil nitrifying and denitrifying microbial populations under two contrasting soil water contents (40% and 80% soil water filled pore space; WFPS). Our results show that DMPP and DMPSA are equally efficient at reducing N2O emissions under 40% WFPS conditions by inhibiting bacterial ammonia oxidation. In contrast, at 80% WFPS DMPSA was less efficient than DMPP at reducing N2O emissions. Interestingly, at 80% WFPS, where lowered oxygen availability limits nitrification, both DMPP and DMPSA not only inhibited nitrification but also stimulated N2O reduction to molecular nitrogen (N2) via nitrous oxide reductase activity (Nos activity). Therefore, in this work we observed that DMP-based NIs stimulated the reduction of N2O to N2 by nitrous oxide reductase during the denitrification process.

  17. Neem (Azadirachta indica) seed kernel powder retards urease and nitrification activities in different soils at contrasting moisture and temperature regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Sangita; Patra, Ashok K; Chhonkar, Pramod K

    2008-03-01

    A laboratory experiment was conducted to examine the potentiality of a natural resource neem (Azadirachta indica) seed kernel powder (NSKP) to reduce the urease and nitrification activities in different soils (viz., normal, acid, and sodic) at contrasting moisture (1:1 soil to water and field capacity) and temperature regimes (10 degrees C and 37 degrees C). Results have revealed that application of NSKP with urea did not exhibit any urease inhibitory property in normal and sodic soils, but in acid soil it had maintained higher concentration of urea than the urea alone treated samples for two weeks after application. At 37 degrees C and under field capacity moisture level, urea hydrolysis was more rapid than at 10 degrees C and under waterlogged (1:1) conditions. The NSKP has showed variable effects (4-28%) to inhibit nitrification during 7-21 days after application, depending upon the soil types, temperature and moisture regimes. The nitrification activity was significantly low in acid soil followed by normal and sodic soils. The present study suggests that NSKP has the potential to retard the urease activity in acid soil, and nitrification in all the soils, and thus it may be used along with urea for the better use of applied -N.

  18. Modeling Nitrous Oxide Production during Biological Nitrogen Removal via Nitrification and Denitrification: Extensions to the General ASM Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ni, Bing-Jie; Ruscalleda, Maël; Pellicer i Nàcher, Carles

    2011-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) can be formed during biological nitrogen (N) removal processes. In this work, a mathematical model is developed that describes N2O production and consumption during activated sludge nitrification and denitrification. The well-known ASM process models are extended to capture N2O...

  19. A novel bench-scale column assay to investigate site-specific nitrification biokinetics in biological rapid sand filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tatari, Karolina; Smets, Barth F.; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    A bench-scale assay was developed to obtain site-specific nitrification biokinetic information from biological rapid sand filters employed in groundwater treatment. The experimental set-up uses granular material subsampled from a full-scale filter, packed in a column, and operated with controlled...

  20. Evaluation of DeNitrification DeComposition model for estimating ammonia fluxes from chemical fertilizer application

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeNitrification DeComposition (DNDC) model predictions of NH3 fluxes following chemical fertilizer application were evaluated by comparison to relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) measurements, in Central Illinois, United States, over the 2014 growing season of corn. Practical issues for evaluating closu...