WorldWideScience

Sample records for net mass loss

  1. 26 CFR 1.904(f)-3 - Allocation of net operating losses and net capital losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Allocation of net operating losses and net....904(f)-3 Allocation of net operating losses and net capital losses. For rules relating to the allocation of net operating losses and net capital losses, see § 1.904(g)-3T. ...

  2. Partitioning recent Greenland mass loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broeke, M.R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073765643; Bamber, Jonathan L.; Ettema, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304831913; Rignot, Eric; Schrama, Ernst; van de Berg, W.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304831611; Velicogna, I.; Wouters, Bert|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304120146

    2009-01-01

    Mass budget calculations, validated with satellite gravity observations [from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites], enable us to quantify the individual components of recent Greenland mass loss. The total 2000–2008 mass loss of ~1500 gigatons, equivalent to 0.46

  3. The transition from No Net Loss to a Net Gain of biodiversity is far from trivial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bull, Joseph William; Brownlie, S.

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of No Net Loss and Net Gain have emerged as key principles in conservation policy. Both give rise to mechanisms by which certain unavoidable biodiversity losses associated with development are quantified, and compensated with comparable gains (e.g. habitat restoration). The former...... seeks a neutral outcome for biodiversity after losses and gains are accounted for, and the latter seeks an improved outcome. Policy-makers often assume that the transition from one to the other is straightforward and essentially a question of the amount of compensation provided. Consequently, companies...... increasingly favour Net Gain type commitments, and financial institutions make lending conditional on either objective, depending on the habitat involved. We contend, however, that achieving Net Gain is fundamentally different to achieving No Net Loss, and moving from one to the other is less trivial than...

  4. Biodiversity offsets and the challenge of achieving no net loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Toby A; VON Hase, Amrei; Brownlie, Susie; Ekstrom, Jonathan M M; Pilgrim, John D; Savy, Conrad E; Stephens, R T Theo; Treweek, Jo; Ussher, Graham T; Ward, Gerri; Ten Kate, Kerry

    2013-12-01

    Businesses, governments, and financial institutions are increasingly adopting a policy of no net loss of biodiversity for development activities. The goal of no net loss is intended to help relieve tension between conservation and development by enabling economic gains to be achieved without concomitant biodiversity losses. biodiversity offsets represent a necessary component of a much broader mitigation strategy for achieving no net loss following prior application of avoidance, minimization, and remediation measures. However, doubts have been raised about the appropriate use of biodiversity offsets. We examined what no net loss means as a desirable conservation outcome and reviewed the conditions that determine whether, and under what circumstances, biodiversity offsets can help achieve such a goal. We propose a conceptual framework to substitute the often ad hoc approaches evident in many biodiversity offset initiatives. The relevance of biodiversity offsets to no net loss rests on 2 fundamental premises. First, offsets are rarely adequate for achieving no net loss of biodiversity alone. Second, some development effects may be too difficult or risky, or even impossible, to offset. To help to deliver no net loss through biodiversity offsets, biodiversity gains must be comparable to losses, be in addition to conservation gains that may have occurred in absence of the offset, and be lasting and protected from risk of failure. Adherence to these conditions requires consideration of the wider landscape context of development and offset activities, timing of offset delivery, measurement of biodiversity, accounting procedures and rule sets used to calculate biodiversity losses and gains and guide offset design, and approaches to managing risk. Adoption of this framework will strengthen the potential for offsets to provide an ecologically defensible mechanism that can help reconcile conservation and development. Balances de Biodiversidad y el Reto de No Obtener P

  5. Greenland Ice Sheet Mass Loss from GRACE Monthly Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Louise Sandberg; Forsberg, René

    2010-01-01

    The Greenland ice sheet is currently experiencing a net mass loss. There are however large discrepancies between the published qualitative mass loss estimates, based on different data sets and methods. There are even large differences between the results based on the same data sources, as is the ...

  6. 26 CFR 1.172-10 - Net operating losses of real estate investment trusts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Net operating losses of real estate investment... (continued) § 1.172-10 Net operating losses of real estate investment trusts. (a) Taxable years to which a loss may be carried. (1) A net operating loss sustained by a qualified real estate investment trust (as...

  7. 26 CFR 1.860C-2 - Determination of REMIC taxable income or net loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Determination of REMIC taxable income or net... REMIC taxable income or net loss. (a) Treatment of gain or loss. For purposes of determining the taxable income or net loss of a REMIC under section 860C(b), any gain or loss from the disposition of any asset...

  8. 26 CFR 1.1402(a)-7 - Net operating loss deduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 12 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Net operating loss deduction. 1.1402(a)-7...) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Tax on Self-Employment Income § 1.1402(a)-7 Net operating loss deduction. The deduction provided by section 172, relating to net operating losses sustained in years other...

  9. 26 CFR 1.857-5 - Net income and loss from prohibited transactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Net income and loss from prohibited transactions... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Real Estate Investment Trusts § 1.857-5 Net income and loss... equal to 100 percent of the net income derived from prohibited transactions. A prohibited transaction is...

  10. CLASSICAL CEPHEIDS REQUIRE ENHANCED MASS LOSS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neilson, Hilding R.; Langer, Norbert; Izzard, Robert [Argelander Institute for Astronomy, University of Bonn, Auf dem Huegel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Engle, Scott G.; Guinan, Ed, E-mail: neilsonh@etsu.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Villanova University, 800 Lancaster Ave. Villanova, PA 19085 (United States)

    2012-11-20

    Measurements of rates of period change of Classical Cepheids probe stellar physics and evolution. Additionally, better understanding of Cepheid structure and evolution provides greater insight into their use as standard candles and tools for measuring the Hubble constant. Our recent study of the period change of the nearest Cepheid, Polaris, suggested that it is undergoing enhanced mass loss when compared to canonical stellar evolution model predictions. In this work, we expand the analysis to rates of period change measured for about 200 Galactic Cepheids and compare them to population synthesis models of Cepheids including convective core overshooting and enhanced mass loss. Rates of period change predicted from stellar evolution models without mass loss do not agree with observed rates, whereas including enhanced mass loss yields predicted rates in better agreement with observations. This is the first evidence that enhanced mass loss as suggested previously for Polaris and {delta} Cephei must be a ubiquitous property of Classical Cepheids.

  11. The Cepheid mass discrepancy and pulsation-driven mass loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neilson, H.R.; Cantiello, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304840866; Langer, N.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304829498

    2011-01-01

    Context. A longstanding challenge for understanding classical Cepheids is the Cepheid mass discrepancy, where theoretical mass estimates using stellar evolution and stellar pulsation calculations have been found to differ by approximately 10−20%. Aims. We study the role of pulsation-driven mass loss

  12. 26 CFR 1.172-2 - Net operating loss in case of a corporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... real estate investment trusts. For taxable years ending after October 4, 1976, the net operating loss of a qualified real estate investment trust (as defined in § 1.172-10(b)) is computed by taking into... allowed in computing the net operating loss of a qualified real estate investment trust. ...

  13. 26 CFR 1.172-6 - Illustration of net operating loss carrybacks and carryovers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Illustration of net operating loss carrybacks and carryovers. 1.172-6 Section 1.172-6 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Corporations (continued) § 1.172-6 Illustration of net operating loss carrybacks and carryovers. The...

  14. 26 CFR 1.642(d)-1 - Net operating loss deduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Net operating loss deduction. 1.642(d)-1 Section 1.642(d)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Estates, Trusts, and Beneficiaries § 1.642(d)-1 Net operating loss...

  15. 26 CFR 1.702-2 - Net operating loss deduction of partner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Net operating loss deduction of partner. 1.702-2 Section 1.702-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Partners and Partnerships § 1.702-2 Net operating loss deduction of...

  16. Mass loss from very young massive stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Th.

    The physics of mass loss from very young massive stars is reviewed, and mass-loss rates are determined for several objects on the basis of published observational data. The observational evidence for mass loss of 0.0001-0.001 solar mass/yr with velocity 10-60 km/s, dynamical timescale 1000-100,000 yr, and kinetic energy (1-100) x 10 to the 38th W from these objects is chracterized; techniques for estimating mass-loss rates from H recombination lines, CO line profiles maser data, and IR-continuum observations are described; rates for molecular outflows and ionized winds are presented in tabels; and theoretical models developed to explain the mechanism driving bipolar mass loss are examined critically. It is found that neither radiation pressure on dust grins nor the ionized winds can drive the molecular outflow. The models considered most probable are those involving production of holes by original spherical stellar winds (Canto, 1980, rotationally driven magnetic pressure (Draine, 1983), and infall from an accretion disk (Torbett, 1984).

  17. Mechanisms for mass loss from cool stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, M.

    1987-11-01

    The mechanisms believed responsible for the loss of mass from cool, red giant stars are reviewed. While observations indicate that both radiation pressure on dust grains and pulsations are important, theoretical considerations indicate that neither is sufficient by itself to account for the high rates of mass loss that have been observed. The current picture involves a two-step process wherein pulsations act to levitate matter well above the photosphere to the point at which the gas is sufficiently cool for dust grains to form. Radiation pressure on the dust then drives the matter to infinity. Whereas this model is applicable to spherically symmetric mass loss, the outflowing matter in many mass-losing systems displays a pronounced bipolarity, implying axial symmetry on the large scale. A secondary star appears to be responsible for the geometry of such systems. A new scenario involving two winds is presented to describe how the bipolar geometry might be produced. 91 references.

  18. Advances in mass-loss predictions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, J.S.; Benaglia, P.; Davies, B.; de Koter, A.; Oudmaijer, R.D.; Hamann, W.-R.; Feldmeier, A.; Oskinova, L.

    2008-01-01

    We present the results of Monte Carlo mass-loss predictions for massive stars covering a wide range of stellar parameters. We critically test our predictions against a range of observed massloss rates - in light of the recent discussions on wind clumping. We also present a model to compute the

  19. 26 CFR 301.6511(d)-2 - Overpayment of income tax on account of net operating loss or capital loss carrybacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Overpayment of income tax on account of net... claim for credit or refund relates to an overpayment of income tax attributable to a net operating loss... net operating loss deduction or capital loss carryback (or the effect of such deduction or carryback...

  20. 26 CFR 1.172-5 - Taxable income which is subtracted from net operating loss to determine carryback or carryover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 1955 net operating loss 3,000 Adjusted gross income 6,000 Less: Deduction for medical expense ($410... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Taxable income which is subtracted from net... taxable income is to be deducted. Thus, for such purposes, the net operating loss for the loss year or any...

  1. Adiabatic Mass Loss Model in Binary Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, H. W.

    2012-07-01

    Rapid mass transfer process in the interacting binary systems is very complicated. It relates to two basic problems in the binary star evolution, i.e., the dynamically unstable Roche-lobe overflow and the common envelope evolution. Both of the problems are very important and difficult to be modeled. In this PhD thesis, we focus on the rapid mass loss process of the donor in interacting binary systems. The application to the criterion of dynamically unstable mass transfer and the common envelope evolution are also included. Our results based on the adiabatic mass loss model could be used to improve the binary evolution theory, the binary population synthetic method, and other related aspects. We build up the adiabatic mass loss model. In this model, two approximations are included. The first one is that the energy generation and heat flow through the stellar interior can be neglected, hence the restructuring is adiabatic. The second one is that he stellar interior remains in hydrostatic equilibrium. We model this response by constructing model sequences, beginning with a donor star filling its Roche lobe at an arbitrary point in its evolution, holding its specific entropy and composition profiles fixed. These approximations are validated by the comparison with the time-dependent binary mass transfer calculations and the polytropic model for low mass zero-age main-sequence stars. In the dynamical time scale mass transfer, the adiabatic response of the donor star drives it to expand beyond its Roche lobe, leading to runaway mass transfer and the formation of a common envelope with its companion star. For donor stars with surface convection zones of any significant depth, this runaway condition is encountered early in mass transfer, if at all; but for main sequence stars with radiative envelopes, it may be encountered after a prolonged phase of thermal time scale mass transfer, so-called delayed dynamical instability. We identify the critical binary mass ratio for the

  2. Mass Loss Rates of Fasting Polar Bears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilfold, Nicholas W; Hedman, Daryll; Stirling, Ian; Derocher, Andrew E; Lunn, Nicholas J; Richardson, Evan

    2016-01-01

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) have adapted to an annual cyclic regime of feeding and fasting, which is extreme in seasonal sea ice regions of the Arctic. As a consequence of climate change, sea ice breakup has become earlier and the duration of the open-water period through which polar bears must rely on fat reserves has increased. To date, there is limited empirical data with which to evaluate the potential energetic capacity of polar bears to withstand longer fasts. We measured the incoming and outgoing mass of inactive polar bears (n = 142) that were temporarily detained by Manitoba Conservation and Water Stewardship during the open-water period near the town of Churchill, Manitoba, Canada, in 2009-2014. Polar bears were given access to water but not food and held for a median length of 17 d. Median mass loss rates were 1.0 kg/d, while median mass-specific loss rates were 0.5%/d, similar to other species with high adiposity and prolonged fasting capacities. Mass loss by unfed captive adult males was identical to that lost by free-ranging individuals, suggesting that terrestrial feeding contributes little to offset mass loss. The inferred metabolic rate was comparable to a basal mammalian rate, suggesting that while on land, polar bears can maintain a depressed metabolic rate to conserve energy. Finally, we estimated time to starvation for subadults and adult males for the on-land period. Results suggest that at 180 d of fasting, 56%-63% of subadults and 18%-24% of adult males in this study would die of starvation. Results corroborate previous assessments on the limits of polar bear capacity to withstand lengthening ice-free seasons and emphasize the greater sensitivity of subadults to changes in sea ice phenology.

  3. Artisanal fishing net float loss and a proposal for a float design solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo de Tarso Chaves

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Plastic floats from fishing nets are commonly found washed up on beaches in southern Brazil. They are usually broken and show signs of having been repaired. Characteristics of floats and interviews with fishermen suggest two main causes of float loss. First, collisions between active gear, bottom trawl nets for shrimp, and passive gear, drift nets for fish, destroy nets and release fragments of them, including floats. Second, the difficulty with which floats are inserted on the float rope of the nets when they are used near the surface. Floats are inserted to replace damaged or lost floats, or they may be removed if it is desired that the nets be used in deeper waters. Floats may thus be poorly fixed to the cables and lost. Here a new float design that offers greater safety in use and for the replacement of floats is described and tested.

  4. Tropical forests are a net carbon source based on aboveground measurements of gain and loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccini, A.; Walker, W.; Carvalho, L.; Farina, M.; Sulla-Menashe, D.; Houghton, R. A.

    2017-10-01

    The carbon balance of tropical ecosystems remains uncertain, with top-down atmospheric studies suggesting an overall sink and bottom-up ecological approaches indicating a modest net source. Here we use 12 years (2003 to 2014) of MODIS pantropical satellite data to quantify net annual changes in the aboveground carbon density of tropical woody live vegetation, providing direct, measurement-based evidence that the world’s tropical forests are a net carbon source of 425.2 ± 92.0 teragrams of carbon per year (Tg C year–1). This net release of carbon consists of losses of 861.7 ± 80.2 Tg C year–1 and gains of 436.5 ± 31.0 Tg C year–1. Gains result from forest growth; losses result from deforestation and from reductions in carbon density within standing forests (degradation or disturbance), with the latter accounting for 68.9% of overall losses.

  5. Zero-Net Mass-Flux Actuator Cavity Vortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieg, Michael; Mohseni, Kamran

    2013-11-01

    Zero-Net Mass-Flux (ZNMT) devices are used commonly as synthetic jet actuators for flow control in various applications. The authors have recently proposed using larger ZNMF jet actuators for underwater propulsion; similar to squid and jellyfish. Generally the external flow generated by these devices is characterized according to momentum and energy transfer rates, and little attention is paid to the dynamics of flow inside the cavity. In fact the flow inside the cavity, especially during the refilling phase is not only highly dynamic but greatly influences the pressure distribution at the opening as well as the external flow during the following jetting phase. A completely transparent axisymmetric ZNMF cavity was constructed in order to investigate the internal vortex dynamics. The flow is seeded with reflective particles and illumined with a laser sheet bisecting the axis of symmetry. Standard 2D DPIV techniques are used to recover the velocity field in this cross section. During filling it is observed that a starting jet extending from the opening to the inside of the cavity rolls into a vortex ring much like the jetting phase. However, the effect of the cavity walls becomes apparent almost immediately. In this talk we characterize how the circulation within the cavity decays as a function of both cavity/orifice geometry and the mass flux program. In addition a load cell measures the total thrust acting on the device which is used to validate pressure calculations performed on the moving surface inside the cavity, showing excellent agreement. This work is supported by a grant from the Office of Naval Research.

  6. Loss of protection with insecticide-treated nets against pyrethroid-resistant Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes once nets become holed: an experimental hut study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irish SR

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An important advantage of pyrethroid-treated nets over untreated nets is that once nets become worn or holed a pyrethroid treatment will normally restore protection. The capacity of pyrethroids to kill or irritate any mosquito that comes into contact with the net and prevent penetration of holes or feeding through the sides are the main reasons why treated nets continue to provide protection despite their condition deteriorating over time. Pyrethroid resistance is a growing problem among Anopheline and Culicine mosquitoes in many parts of Africa. When mosquitoes become resistant the capacity of treated nets to provide protection might be diminished, particularly when holed. An experimental hut trial against pyrethroid-resistant Culex quinquefasciatus was therefore undertaken in southern Benin using a series of intact and holed nets, both untreated and treated, to assess any loss of protection as nets deteriorate with use and time. Results There was loss of protection when untreated nets became holed; the proportion of mosquitoes blood feeding increased from 36.2% when nets were intact to between 59.7% and 68.5% when nets were holed to differing extents. The proportion of mosquitoes blood feeding when treated nets were intact was 29.4% which increased to 43.6–57.4% when nets were holed. The greater the number of holes the greater the loss of protection regardless of whether nets were untreated or treated. Mosquito mortality in huts with untreated nets was 12.9–13.6%; treatment induced mortality was less than 12%. The exiting rate of mosquitoes into the verandas was higher in huts with intact nets. Conclusion As nets deteriorate with use and become increasingly holed the capacity of pyrethroid treatments to restore protection is greatly diminished against resistant Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes.

  7. Pulsation, Mass Loss and the Upper Mass Limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapp, J.; Corona-Galindo, M. G.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. La existencia de estrellas con masas en exceso de 100 M0 ha sido cuestionada por mucho tiempo. Lfmites superiores para la masa de 100 M0 han sido obtenidos de teorfas de pulsaci6n y formaci6n estelar. En este trabajo nosotros primero investigamos la estabilidad radial de estrellas masivas utilizando la aproximaci6n clasica cuasiadiabatica de Ledoux, la aproximaci6n cuasiadiabatica de Castor y un calculo completamente no-adiabatico. Hemos encontrado que los tres metodos de calculo dan resultados similares siempre y cuando una pequefia regi6n de las capas externas de la estrella sea despreciada para la aproximaci6n clasica. La masa crftica para estabilidad de estrellas masivas ha sido encontrada en acuerdo a trabajos anteriores. Explicamos Ia discrepancia entre este y trabajos anteriores por uno de los autores. Discunmos calculos no-lineales y perdida de masa con respecto a) lfmite superior de masa. The existence of stars with masses in excess of 100 M0 has been questioned for a very long time. Upper mass limits of 100 Me have been obtained from pulsation and star formation theories. In this work we first investigate the radial stability of massive stars using the classical Ledoux's quasiadiabatic approximation. the Castor quasiadiabatic approximation and a fully nonadiabatic calculation. We have found that the three methods of calculation give similar results provided that a small region in outer layers of the star be neglected for the classical approximation. The critical mass for stability of massive stars is found to be in agreement with previous work. We explain the reason for the discrepancy between this and previous work by one of the authors. We discuss non-linear calculations and mass loss with regard to the upper mass limit. Key words: STARS-MASS FUNCTION - STARS-MASS LOSS - STARS-PULSATION

  8. Offsetting the impacts of mining to achieve no net loss of native vegetation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonter, L J; Barrett, D J; Soares-Filho, B S

    2014-08-01

    Offsets are a novel conservation tool, yet using them to achieve no net loss of biodiversity is challenging. This is especially true when using conservation offsets (i.e., protected areas) because achieving no net loss requires avoiding equivalent loss. Our objective was to determine if offsetting the impacts of mining achieves no net loss of native vegetation in Brazil's largest iron mining region. We used a land-use change model to simulate deforestation by mining to 2020; developed a model to allocate conservation offsets to the landscape under 3 scenarios (baseline, no new offsets; current practice, like-for-like [by vegetation type] conservation offsetting near the impact site; and threat scenario, like-for-like conservation offsetting of highly threatened vegetation); and simulated nonmining deforestation to 2020 for each scenario to quantify avoided deforestation achieved with offsets. Mines cleared 3570 ha of native vegetation by 2020. Under a 1:4 offset ratio, mining companies would be required to conserve >14,200 ha of native vegetation, doubling the current extent of protected areas in the region. Allocating offsets under current practice avoided deforestation equivalent to 3% of that caused by mining, whereas allocating under the threat scenario avoided 9%. Current practice failed to achieve no net loss because offsets did not conserve threatened vegetation. Explicit allocation of offsets to threatened vegetation also failed because the most threatened vegetation was widely dispersed across the landscape, making conservation logistically difficult. To achieve no net loss with conservation offsets requires information on regional deforestation trajectories and the distribution of threatened vegetation. However, in some regions achieving no net loss through conservation may be impossible. In these cases, other offsetting activities, such as revegetation, will be required. © 2014 Society for Conservation Biology.

  9. Neutrophil NETs in reproduction: from infertility to preeclampsia and the possibility of fetal loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinuhe eHahn

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The intention of this review is to provide an overview of the potential role of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs in mammalian reproduction. Neutrophil NETs appear to be involved in various stages of the reproductive cycle, starting with fertility and possibly ending with fetal loss. The first suggestion that NETs may play a role in pregnancy-related disorders was in preeclampsia, where vast numbers were detected in the intervillous space of affected placentae. The induction of NETosis involved an auto-inflammatory component, mediated by the increased release of placental micro-debris in preeclampsia. This report was the first indicating that NETs may be associated with a human pathology not involving infection.Subsequently, NETs have since then been implicated in bovine or equine infertility, in that semen may become entrapped in the female reproductive during their passage to the oocyte. In this instance interesting species-specific differences are apparent, in that equine sperm evade entrapment via expression of a DNAse-like molecule, whereas highly motile bovine sperm, once free from seminal plasma that promotes interaction with neutrophils, appear impervious to NETs entrapment.Although still in the realm of speculation it is plausible that NETs may be involved in recurrent fetal loss mediated by anti-phospholipid antibodies, or perhaps even in fetal abortion triggered by infections with microorganisms such as L. monocytogenes or B. abortus.

  10. Seeking convergence on the key concepts in "no net loss" policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bull, Joseph William; Gordon, Ascelin; Watson, James E.M.

    2016-01-01

    Biodiversity conservation policies incorporating a no net loss (NNL) principle are being implemented in many countries. However, there are linguistic and conceptual inconsistencies in the use of terms underlying these NNL policies. We identify inconsistencies that emerge in the usage of eight key...... terms and phrases associated with NNL policies: biodiversity, frames of reference (i.e. baselines, counterfactuals), no net loss, mitigation hierarchy, biodiversity offset, in-kind/out-of-kind, direct/indirect and multipliers. For each term, we make recommendations to support conceptual convergence....... The recommendations made in this article, on improving clarity and supporting convergence on key no net loss (NNL) concepts, should help eliminate ambiguity in policy documentation. This is crucial if policymakers are to design robust policies that are (i) transparent, (ii) translatable into practice in a consistent...

  11. Mass distribution of free insecticide-treated nets do not interfere with continuous net distribution in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eze, Ikenna C; Kramer, Karen; Msengwa, Amina; Mandike, Renata; Lengeler, Christian

    2014-05-27

    To protect the most vulnerable groups from malaria (pregnant women and infants) the Tanzanian Government introduced a subsidy (voucher) scheme in 2004, on the basis of a public-private partnership. These vouchers are provided to pregnant women at their first antenatal care visit and mothers of infants at first vaccination. The vouchers are redeemed at registered retailers for a long-lasting insecticidal net against the payment of a modest top-up price. The present work analysed a large body of data from the Tanzanian National Voucher Scheme, focusing on interactions with concurrent mass distribution campaigns of free nets. In an ecologic study involving all regions of Tanzania, voucher redemption data for the period 2007-2011, as well as data on potential determinants of voucher redemption were analysed. The four outcome variables were: pregnant woman and infant voucher redemption rates, use of treated bed nets by all household members and by under- five children. Each of the outcomes was regressed with selected determinants, using a generalized estimating equation model and accounting for regional data clustering. There was a consistent improvement in voucher redemption rates over the selected time period, with rates >80% in 2011. The major determinants of redemption rates were the top-up price paid by the voucher beneficiary, the retailer- clinic ratio, and socio-economic status. Improved redemption rates after 2009 were most likely due to reduced top-up prices (following a change in policy). Redemption rates were not affected by two major free net distribution campaigns. During this period, there was a consistent improvement in net use across all the regions, with rates of up to 75% in 2011. The key components of the National Treated Nets Programme (NATNETS) seem to work harmoniously, leading to a high level of net use in the entire population. This calls for the continuation of this effort in Tanzania and for emulation by other countries with endemic malaria.

  12. International trade causes large net economic losses in tropical countries via the destruction of ecosystem services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Junning; Symes, William S; Lim, Felix; Carrasco, L Roman

    2016-05-01

    Despite the large implications of the use of tropical land for exports ("land absorption") on ecosystem services (ES) and global biodiversity conservation, the magnitude of these externalities is not known. We quantify the net value of ES lost in tropical countries as a result of cropland, forestland and pastureland absorption for exports after deducting ES gains through imports ("land displacement"). We find that net ES gains occur only in 7 out of the 41 countries and regions considered. We estimate global annual net losses of over 1.7 x 10(12) international dollars (I$) (I$1.1 x 10(12) if carbon-related services are not considered). After deducting the benefits from agricultural, forest and livestock rents in land replacing tropical forests, the net annual losses are I$1.3 and I$0.7 x 10(12), respectively. The results highlight the large magnitude of tropical ES losses through international trade that are not compensated by the rents of land uses in absorbed land.

  13. Estimating local biodiversity change: a critique of papers claiming no net loss of local diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Andrew; Cardinale, Bradley J; Allington, Ginger R H; Byrnes, Jarrett; Arthur Endsley, K; Brown, Daniel G; Hooper, David U; Isbell, Forest; O'Connor, Mary I; Loreau, Michel

    2016-08-01

    Global species extinction rates are orders of magnitude above the background rate documented in the fossil record. However, recent data syntheses have found mixed evidence for patterns of net species loss at local spatial scales. For example, two recent data meta-analyses have found that species richness is decreasing in some locations and is increasing in others. When these trends are combined, these papers argued there has been no net change in species richness, and suggested this pattern is globally representative of biodiversity change at local scales. Here we reanalyze results of these data syntheses and outline why this conclusion is unfounded. First, we show the datasets collated for these syntheses are spatially biased and not representative of the spatial distribution of species richness or the distribution of many primary drivers of biodiversity change. This casts doubt that their results are representative of global patterns. Second, we argue that detecting the trend in local species richness is very difficult with short time series and can lead to biased estimates of change. Reanalyses of the data detected a signal of study duration on biodiversity change, indicating net biodiversity loss is most apparent in studies of longer duration. Third, estimates of species richness change can be biased if species gains during post-disturbance recovery are included without also including species losses that occurred during the disturbance. Net species gains or losses should be assessed with respect to common baselines or reference communities. Ultimately, we need a globally coordinated effort to monitor biodiversity so that we can estimate and attribute human impacts as causes of biodiversity change. A combination of technologies will be needed to produce regularly updated global datasets of local biodiversity change to guide future policy. At this time the conclusion that there is no net change in local species richness is not the consensus state of knowledge.

  14. A quantitative assessment of policy options for no net loss of biodiversity and ecosystem services in the European Union

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulp, C.J.E.; van Teeffelen, A.J.A.; Tucker, G.; Verburg, P.H.

    2016-01-01

    The Biodiversity Strategy of the European Union includes a target to "ensure no-net-loss of biodiversity and ecosystem services by 2020". Many policy options can be envisioned to achieve such a no-net-loss target, mainly acting on land use and land management. To assess the effectiveness of such

  15. High-elevation mass loss of Greenland increasing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, M. L.; Andersen, S. B.; Ahlstrøm, A. P.

    The Greenland Ice Sheet is losing mass at an accelerated pace. Presently, the mass loss is assumed to be distributed approximately equally between loss in the form of surface melt (surface mass balance, SMB) and solid ice discharge (iceberg calving, D) along the margins. As part of the PROMICE...

  16. Observational constraints on mass loss and evolution of massive stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Koter, A.

    2008-01-01

    We review the empirical mass-loss properties of early-type stars in the upper part of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. Specifically, we focus on the relation between mass loss and chemical composition by comparing properties of massive stars in our galaxy with those in the Magellanic Clouds. The

  17. Estimates of Regional Equilibrium Line Altitudes and Net Mass Balance from MODIS Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, J. M.; Menounos, B.; Moore, R. D.

    2011-12-01

    Glacier mass balance is a key variable used to assess the health of glaciers and ice sheets. Estimates of glacier mass balance are required to model the dynamic response of glaciers and ice sheets to climate change, estimate sea-level contribution from surface melt, and document the response of glaciers to climate forcing. Annually resolved estimates of regional mass balance for mountain ranges is often inferred from a sparse network of ground-based measurements of mass balance for individual glaciers. Given that net mass balance is highly correlated with the annual equilibrium line altitude (ELA), we develop an automated approach to estimate the ELA, and by inference net mass balance, on large glaciers and icefields using MODIS 250 m imagery (MOD02QKM). We discriminate areas of bare ice and snow/firn using the product of MODIS' red (0.620 - 0.670 μ m) and near infrared (0.841 - 0.876 μ m) bands. To assess the skill in estimating glacier ELAs, we compare ELAs derived from (1) manual delineation and (2) unsupervised classification of the band product to ground-based observations of ELA and net mass balance at seven long term mass-balance monitoring sites in western North America (Gulkana, Wolverine, Lemon Creek, Taku, Place, Peyto, and South Cascade). Spatial and temporal variations in MODIS-derived ELAs provide an opportunity to validate regional mass-balance models, estimate surface melt contributions to sea-level rise, and examine the cryospheric response to climate change.

  18. Net financial gain or loss from vaccination in pediatric medical practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Margaret S; Lindley, Megan C; Ekong, John; Rodewald, Lance

    2009-12-01

    The goal was to determine the net return (gain or loss after costs were subtracted from revenues) to private pediatric medical practices from investing time and resources in vaccines and vaccination of their patients. A cross-sectional survey of a convenience sample of private medical practices requested data on all financial and capacity aspects of the practices, including operating expenses; labor composition and wages/salaries; private- and public-purchase vaccine orders and inventories; Medicaid and private insurance reimbursements; patient population; numbers of providers; and numbers, types, and lengths of visits. Costs were assigned to vaccination visits and subtracted from reimbursements from public- and private-pay sources to determine net financial gains/losses from vaccination. Thirty-four practices responded to the survey. More than one half of the respondents broke even or suffered financial losses from vaccinating patients. With greater proportions of Medicaid-enrolled patients served, greater financial loss was noted. On average, private insurance vaccine administration reimbursements did not cover administration costs unless a child received > or = 3 doses of vaccine in 1 visit. Finally, wide ranges of per-dose prices paid and reimbursements received for vaccines indicated that some practices might be losing money in purchasing and delivering vaccines for private-pay patients if they pay high purchase prices but receive low reimbursements. We conclude that the vaccination portion of the business model for primary care pediatric practices that serve private-pay patients results in little or no profit from vaccine delivery. When losses from vaccinating publicly insured children are included, most practices lose money.

  19. Constraining the Mass Loss Geometry of Beta Lyrae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie R. Lomax

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Massive binary stars lose mass by two mechanisms: jet-driven mass loss during periods of active mass transfer and by wind-driven mass loss. Beta Lyrae is an eclipsing, semi-detached binary whose state of active mass transfer provides a unique opportunity to study how the evolution of binary systems is affected by jet-driven mass loss. Roche lobe overflow from the primary star feeds the thick accretion disk which almost completely obscures the mass-gaining star. A hot spot predicted to be on the edge of the accretion disk may be the source of beta Lyrae’s bipolar outflows. I present results from spectropolarimetric data taken with the University of Wisconsin’s Half-Wave Spectropolarimeter and the Flower and Cook Observatory’s photoelastic modulating polarimeter instrument which have implications for our current understanding of the system’s disk geometry. Using broadband polarimetric analysis, I derive new information about the structure of the disk and the presence and location of a hot spot. These results place constraints on the geometrical distribution of material in beta Lyrae and can help quantify the amount of mass lost from massive interacting binary systems during phases of mass transfer and jet-driven mass loss.

  20. Delta progradation in Greenland driven by increasing glacial mass loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendixen, Mette; Lønsmann Iversen, Lars; Anker Bjørk, Anders; Elberling, Bo; Westergaard-Nielsen, Andreas; Overeem, Irina; Barnhart, Katy R.; Abbas Khan, Shfaqat; Box, Jason E.; Abermann, Jakob; Langley, Kirsty; Kroon, Aart

    2017-10-01

    Climate changes are pronounced in Arctic regions and increase the vulnerability of the Arctic coastal zone. For example, increases in melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet and reductions in sea ice and permafrost distribution are likely to alter coastal morphodynamics. The deltas of Greenland are largely unaffected by human activity, but increased freshwater runoff and sediment fluxes may increase the size of the deltas, whereas increased wave activity in ice-free periods could reduce their size, with the net impact being unclear until now. Here we show that southwestern Greenland deltas were largely stable from the 1940s to 1980s, but prograded (that is, sediment deposition extended the delta into the sea) in a warming Arctic from the 1980s to 2010s. Our results are based on the areal changes of 121 deltas since the 1940s, assessed using newly discovered aerial photographs and remotely sensed imagery. We find that delta progradation was driven by high freshwater runoff from the Greenland Ice Sheet coinciding with periods of open water. Progradation was controlled by the local initial environmental conditions (that is, accumulated air temperatures above 0 °C per year, freshwater runoff and sea ice in the 1980s) rather than by local changes in these conditions from the 1980s to 2010s at each delta. This is in contrast to a dominantly eroding trend of Arctic sedimentary coasts along the coastal plains of Alaska, Siberia and western Canada, and to the spatially variable patterns of erosion and accretion along the large deltas of the main rivers in the Arctic. Our results improve the understanding of Arctic coastal evolution in a changing climate, and reveal the impacts on coastal areas of increasing ice mass loss and the associated freshwater runoff and lengthening of open-water periods.

  1. System effectiveness of a targeted free mass distribution of long lasting insecticidal nets in Zanzibar, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abass Ali K

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insecticide-treated nets (ITN and long-lasting insecticidal treated nets (LLIN are important means of malaria prevention. Although there is consensus regarding their importance, there is uncertainty as to which delivery strategies are optimal for dispensing these life saving interventions. A targeted mass distribution of free LLINs to children under five and pregnant women was implemented in Zanzibar between August 2005 and January 2006. The outcomes of this distribution among children under five were evaluated, four to nine months after implementation. Methods Two cross-sectional surveys were conducted in May 2006 in two districts of Zanzibar: Micheweni (MI on Pemba Island and North A (NA on Unguja Island. Household interviews were conducted with 509 caretakers of under-five children, who were surveyed for socio-economic status, the net distribution process, perceptions and use of bed nets. Each step in the distribution process was assessed in all children one to five years of age for unconditional and conditional proportion of success. System effectiveness (the accumulated proportion of success and equity effectiveness were calculated, and predictors for LLIN use were identified. Results The overall proportion of children under five sleeping under any type of treated net was 83.7% (318/380 in MI and 91.8% (357/389 in NA. The LLIN usage was 56.8% (216/380 in MI and 86.9% (338/389 in NA. Overall system effectiveness was 49% in MI and 87% in NA, and equity was found in the distribution scale-up in NA. In both districts, the predicting factor of a child sleeping under an LLIN was caretakers thinking that LLINs are better than conventional nets (OR = 2.8, p = 0.005 in MI and 2.5, p = 0.041 in NA, in addition to receiving an LLIN (OR = 4.9, p Conclusions Targeted free mass distribution of LLINs can result in high and equitable bed net coverage among children under five. However, in order to sustain high effective coverage, there

  2. System effectiveness of a targeted free mass distribution of long lasting insecticidal nets in Zanzibar, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Netta; Ali, Abdullah S; de Savigny, Don; Al-Mafazy, Abdul-Wahiyd H; Ramsan, Mahdi; Abass, Ali K; Omari, Rahila S; Björkman, Anders; Källander, Karin

    2010-06-18

    Insecticide-treated nets (ITN) and long-lasting insecticidal treated nets (LLIN) are important means of malaria prevention. Although there is consensus regarding their importance, there is uncertainty as to which delivery strategies are optimal for dispensing these life saving interventions. A targeted mass distribution of free LLINs to children under five and pregnant women was implemented in Zanzibar between August 2005 and January 2006. The outcomes of this distribution among children under five were evaluated, four to nine months after implementation. Two cross-sectional surveys were conducted in May 2006 in two districts of Zanzibar: Micheweni (MI) on Pemba Island and North A (NA) on Unguja Island. Household interviews were conducted with 509 caretakers of under-five children, who were surveyed for socio-economic status, the net distribution process, perceptions and use of bed nets. Each step in the distribution process was assessed in all children one to five years of age for unconditional and conditional proportion of success. System effectiveness (the accumulated proportion of success) and equity effectiveness were calculated, and predictors for LLIN use were identified. The overall proportion of children under five sleeping under any type of treated net was 83.7% (318/380) in MI and 91.8% (357/389) in NA. The LLIN usage was 56.8% (216/380) in MI and 86.9% (338/389) in NA. Overall system effectiveness was 49% in MI and 87% in NA, and equity was found in the distribution scale-up in NA. In both districts, the predicting factor of a child sleeping under an LLIN was caretakers thinking that LLINs are better than conventional nets (OR = 2.8, p = 0.005 in MI and 2.5, p = 0.041 in NA), in addition to receiving an LLIN (OR = 4.9, p < 0.001 in MI and in OR = 30.1, p = 0.001 in NA). Targeted free mass distribution of LLINs can result in high and equitable bed net coverage among children under five. However, in order to sustain high effective coverage, there is need

  3. The new automotive 42V PowerNet. Preparing for mass production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graf, A. (ed.)

    2001-07-01

    A number of international auto makers have set themselves the target of getting an automobile with a dual 12V/42V PowerNet into mass production by the year 2005. Reports on practical experience of current projects at leading international auto makers and suppliers allow the reader to get a picture of the status of introduction of the 42V PowerNet and of the problems associated with translating development work into mass production, providing them with an idea of the opportunities for structuring their own company or organizing company activities. The book gives an overview of the problems of introducing the 42V PowerNet into automotive engineering. The basic question here is not 'Why 42V?' but rather 'How can a 42V system be introduced into mass production alongside an existing 12V system?''. It provides information from the standpoint of the engineer and the businessman on: The problems of introduction as seen by the auto maker - Proposed solutions to detailed problems such as short circuits and sparking-System reviews, such as Intelligent Power Management - Suggestions for individual components, such as individual semiconductors - Suggested solutions involving new materials - Solution variants and verification by simulation. (orig.)

  4. Association between fat mass, lean mass, and bone loss: the Dubbo Osteoporosis Epidemiology Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, S; Center, J R; Eisman, J A; Nguyen, T V

    2015-04-01

    Lower body fat mass is a risk factor for bone loss at lumbar spine in postmenopausal women, but not in men. Body lean mass and fat mass were not associated with femoral neck bone loss in either gender. Bone density and body mass are closely associated. Whole body lean mass (LM) and fat mass (FM) together account for approximately 95 % of body mass. Bone loss is associated with loss of body mass but which of the components of body mass (FM or LM) is related to bone loss is not well understood. Therefore, in this study, we sought to assess whether baseline FM or LM has predictive value for future relative rate of bone mineral density (BMD) changes (%/year). The present population-based cohort study was part of the ongoing Dubbo Osteoporosis Epidemiology Study (DOES). BMD, FM, and LM were measured with dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (GE-LUNAR Corp, Madison, WI). BMD measurements were taken in approximately every 2 years between 2000 and 2010. We only included the participants with at least two BMD measurements at the femoral neck and lumbar spine. In total, 717 individuals (204 men and 513 women) aged 50 years or older were studied. Rate of bone loss at femoral neck and lumbar spine was faster in women than in men (all P loss at lumbar spine. This magnitude of association remained virtually unchanged after adjusting for LM and/or other covariates (P = 0.03). After adjusting for covariates, variation of FM accounted for ∼1.5 % total variation in lumbar spine bone loss. However, there was no significant association between FM and change in femoral neck BMD in either men or women. Lower FM was an independent but modest risk factor for greater bone loss at the lumbar spine in women but not in men. If further studies confirm our findings, FM can help predict lumbar spine bone loss in women.

  5. Fat mass loss predicts gain in physical function with intentional weight loss in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beavers, Kristen M; Miller, Michael E; Rejeski, W Jack; Nicklas, Barbara J; Krichevsky, Stephen B; Kritchevsky, Stephen B

    2013-01-01

    Clinical recommendation of weight loss (WL) in older adults remains controversial, partially due to concerns regarding lean mass loss and potential loss of physical function. The purpose of this study is to determine the independent associations between changes in fat and lean mass and changes in physical function in older, overweight, and obese adults undergoing intentional WL. Data from three randomized-controlled trials of intentional WL in older adults with similar functional outcomes (short physical performance battery and Pepper assessment tool for disability) were combined. Analyses of covariance models were used to investigate relationships between changes in weight, fat, and lean mass (acquired using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry) and changes in physical function. Overall loss of body weight was -7.8 ± 6.1 kg (-5.6 ± 4.1 kg and -2.7 ± 2.4 kg of fat and lean mass, respectively). In all studies combined, after adjustment for age, sex, and height, overall WL was associated with significant improvements in self-reported mobility disability (p fat and lean mass as independent variables found only the change in fat mass to significantly predict change in mobility disability (β[fat] = 0.04; p fat] = -0.01; p loss of body weight, following intentional WL, is associated with significant improvement in self-reported mobility disability and walking speed in overweight and obese older adults. Importantly, fat mass loss was found to be a more significant predictor of change in physical function than lean mass loss.

  6. Simulated Photoevaporative Mass Loss from Hot Jupiters in 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Anjali; Kratter, Kaitlin M.; Murray-Clay, Ruth A.; Krumholz, Mark R.

    2015-08-01

    Ionizing stellar photons heat the upper regions of planetary atmospheres, driving atmospheric mass loss. Gas escaping from several hot, hydrogen-rich planets has been detected using UV and X-ray transmission spectroscopy. Because these planets are tidally locked, and thus asymmetrically irradiated, escaping gas is unlikely to be spherically symmetric. In this paper, we focus on the effects of asymmetric heating on local outflow structure. We use the Athena code for hydrodynamics to produce 3D simulations of hot Jupiter mass loss that jointly model wind launching and stellar heating via photoionization. Our fiducial planet is an inflated, hot Jupiter with radius {R}{{p}}=2.14{R}{Jup} and mass {M}{{p}}=0.53{M}{Jup}. We irradiate the initially neutral, atomic hydrogen atmosphere with 13.6 eV photons and compute the outflow’s ionization structure. There are clear asymmetries in the atmospheric outflow, including a neutral shadow on the planet’s nightside. Given an incident ionizing UV flux comparable to that of the Sun, we find a steady-state mass loss rate of ˜ 2× {10}10 g s-1. The total mass loss rate and the outflow substructure along the substellar ray show good agreement with earlier 1D models, for two different fluxes. Our 3D data cube can be used to generate the outflow’s extinction spectrum during transit. As a proof of concept, we find absorption of stellar Lyα at Doppler-shifted velocities of up to ±50 km s-1. Our work provides a starting point for further 3D models that can be used to predict observable signatures of hot Jupiter mass loss.

  7. Mass Loss and Nutrient Release through Leaching in Tectona ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    West African Journal of Applied Ecology, vol. 24(1), 2016: 43–58. Mass Loss and Nutrient Release through Leaching in Tectona grandisand Theobroma cacao leaf litter in Ile-Ife, Nigeria. A. I. Odiwe*, C. F. Akinye and O. O. Agboola. Department of Botany, Faculty of Science, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife,. 22005, Osun ...

  8. Near-Infrared Mass Loss Diagnostics for Massive Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonneborn, George; Bouret, J. C.

    2010-01-01

    Stellar wind mass loss is a key process which modifies surface abundances, luminosities, and other physical properties of hot, massive stars. Furthermore, mass loss has to be understood quantitatively in order to accurately describe and predict massive star evolution. Two urgent problems have been identified that challenge our understanding of line-driven winds, the so-called weak-wind problem and wind clumping. In both cases, mass-loss rates are drastically lower than theoretically expected (up to a factor 1001). Here we study how the expected spectroscopic capabilities of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), especially NIRSpec, could be used to significantly improve constraints on wind density structures (clumps) and deep-seated phenomena in stellar winds of massive stars, including OB, Wolf-Rayet and LBV stars. Since the IR continuum of objects with strong winds is formed in the wind, IR lines may sample different depths inside the wind than UV-optical lines and provide new information about the shape of the velocity field and clumping properties. One of the most important applications of IR line diagnostics will be the measurement of mass-loss rates in massive stars with very weak winds by means of the H I Bracket alpha line, which has been identified as one of the most promising diagnostics for this problem.

  9. Mass Loss and Nutrient Release through Leaching in Tectona ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study looked at the mass loss and rate of leaching of nutrients in the two tree species. Bulk of fallen senescent leaf litters were collected from the plantations, air-dried and thoroughly mixed. Two grammes of each species was weighed into a 500 ml beaker and 250 ml of distilled water added and were retrieved at ...

  10. Spending limited resources on de-extinction could lead to net biodiversity loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Joseph R; Maloney, Richard F; Steeves, Tammy E; Brazill-Boast, James; Possingham, Hugh P; Seddon, Philip J

    2017-03-01

    There is contentious debate surrounding the merits of de-extinction as a biodiversity conservation tool. Here, we use extant analogues to predict conservation actions for potential de-extinction candidate species from New Zealand and the Australian state of New South Wales, and use a prioritization protocol to predict the impacts of reintroducing and maintaining populations of these species on conservation of extant threatened species. Even using the optimistic assumptions that resurrection of species is externally sponsored, and that actions for resurrected species can share costs with extant analogue species, public funding for conservation of resurrected species would lead to fewer extant species that could be conserved, suggesting net biodiversity loss. If full costs of establishment and maintenance for resurrected species populations were publicly funded, there could be substantial sacrifices in extant species conservation. If conservation of resurrected species populations could be fully externally sponsored, there could be benefits to extant threatened species. However, such benefits would be outweighed by opportunity costs, assuming such discretionary money could directly fund conservation of extant species. Potential sacrifices in conservation of extant species should be a crucial consideration in deciding whether to invest in de-extinction or focus our efforts on extant species.

  11. Molecular shells in IRC+10216: tracing the mass loss history,.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernicharo, J; Marcelino, N; Agúndez, M; Guélin, M

    2015-03-01

    Thermally-pulsating AGB stars provide three-fourths of the matter returned to the interstellar medium. The mass and chemical composition of their ejecta largely control the chemical evolution of galaxies. Yet, both the mass loss process and the gas chemical composition remain poorly understood. We present maps of the extended 12CO and 13CO emissions in IRC+10216, the envelope of CW Leo, the high mass loss star the closest to the Sun. IRC+10216 is nearly spherical and expands radially with a velocity of 14.5 km s-1. The observations were made On-the-Fly with the IRAM 30 m telescope; their sensibility, calibration, and angular resolution are far higher than all previous studies. The telescope resolution at λ = 1.3 mm (11″ HPBW) corresponds to an expansion time of 500 yr. The CO emission consists of a centrally peaked pedestal and a series of bright, nearly spherical shells. It peaks on CW Leo and remains relatively strong up to rphot = 180″. Further out the emission becomes very weak and vanishes as CO gets photodissociated. As CO is the best tracer of the gas up to rphot, the maps show the mass loss history in the last 8000 yr. The bright CO shells denote over-dense regions. They show that the mass loss process is highly variable on timescales of hundreds of years. The new data, however, do not support previous claims of a strong decrease of the average mass loss in the last few thousand years. The over-dense shells are not perfectly concentric and extend farther to the N-NW. The typical shell separation is 800-1000 yr in the middle of the envelope, but seems to increase outwards. The shell-intershell brightness contrast is ≥3. All those key features can be accounted for if CW Leo has a companion star with a period ≃800 yr that increases the mass loss rate when it comes close to periastron. Higher angular resolution observations are needed to fully resolve the dense shells and measure the density contrast. The latter plays an essential role in our

  12. Importance of baseline specification in evaluating conservation interventions and achieving no net loss of biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, J W; Gordon, A; Law, E A; Suttle, K B; Milner-Gulland, E J

    2014-06-01

    There is an urgent need to improve the evaluation of conservation interventions. This requires specifying an objective and a frame of reference from which to measure performance. Reference frames can be baselines (i.e., known biodiversity at a fixed point in history) or counterfactuals (i.e., a scenario that would have occurred without the intervention). Biodiversity offsets are interventions with the objective of no net loss of biodiversity (NNL). We used biodiversity offsets to analyze the effects of the choice of reference frame on whether interventions met stated objectives. We developed 2 models to investigate the implications of setting different frames of reference in regions subject to various biodiversity trends and anthropogenic impacts. First, a general analytic model evaluated offsets against a range of baseline and counterfactual specifications. Second, a simulation model then replicated these results with a complex real world case study: native grassland offsets in Melbourne, Australia. Both models showed that achieving NNL depended upon the interaction between reference frame and background biodiversity trends. With a baseline, offsets were less likely to achieve NNL where biodiversity was decreasing than where biodiversity was stable or increasing. With a no-development counterfactual, however, NNL was achievable only where biodiversity was declining. Otherwise, preventing development was better for biodiversity. Uncertainty about compliance was a stronger determinant of success than uncertainty in underlying biodiversity trends. When only development and offset locations were considered, offsets sometimes resulted in NNL, but not across an entire region. Choice of reference frame determined feasibility and effort required to attain objectives when designing and evaluating biodiversity offset schemes. We argue the choice is thus of fundamental importance for conservation policy. Our results shed light on situations in which biodiversity offsets may

  13. Quantifying Stellar Mass Loss with High Angular Resolution Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-19

    material – via massive winds, planetary nebulae and supernova explosions – seeding the interstellar medium with heavier elements. Subsequent...loss and mass transfer, which means that their component stars have outer atmospheres which may be inconsistent with their interiors for a given age...by their status as type II supernova progenitors and their potential as independent distance indicators via the wind momentum-luminosity relationship

  14. Mining and biodiversity offsets: a transparent and science-based approach to measure "no-net-loss".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virah-Sawmy, Malika; Ebeling, Johannes; Taplin, Roslyn

    2014-10-01

    Mining and associated infrastructure developments can present themselves as economic opportunities that are difficult to forego for developing and industrialised countries alike. Almost inevitably, however, they lead to biodiversity loss. This trade-off can be greatest in economically poor but highly biodiverse regions. Biodiversity offsets have, therefore, increasingly been promoted as a mechanism to help achieve both the aims of development and biodiversity conservation. Accordingly, this mechanism is emerging as a key tool for multinational mining companies to demonstrate good environmental stewardship. Relying on offsets to achieve "no-net-loss" of biodiversity, however, requires certainty in their ecological integrity where they are used to sanction habitat destruction. Here, we discuss real-world practices in biodiversity offsetting by assessing how well some leading initiatives internationally integrate critical aspects of biodiversity attributes, net loss accounting and project management. With the aim of improving, rather than merely critiquing the approach, we analyse different aspects of biodiversity offsetting. Further, we analyse the potential pitfalls of developing counterfactual scenarios of biodiversity loss or gains in a project's absence. In this, we draw on insights from experience with carbon offsetting. This informs our discussion of realistic projections of project effectiveness and permanence of benefits to ensure no net losses, and the risk of displacing, rather than avoiding biodiversity losses ("leakage"). We show that the most prominent existing biodiversity offset initiatives employ broad and somewhat arbitrary parameters to measure habitat value and do not sufficiently consider real-world challenges in compensating losses in an effective and lasting manner. We propose a more transparent and science-based approach, supported with a new formula, to help design biodiversity offsets to realise their potential in enabling more responsible

  15. Timing of the compensation of winter respiratory carbon losses provides explanatory power for net ecosystem productivity of forests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haeni, M.; Zweifel, R.; Eugster, W.

    2017-01-01

    Accurate predictions of net ecosystem productivity (NEPc) of forest ecosystems are essential for climate change decisions and requirements in the context of national forest growth and greenhouse gas inventories. However, drivers and underlying mechanisms determining NEPc (e.g. climate, nutrients......DOY depended on the integration method for NEPc, forest type, and whether the site had a distinct winter net respiratory carbon loss or not. The integration methods starting in autumn led to better predictions of NEPc from cDOY then the classical calendar method starting at January 1. Limited explanatory power...... of cDOY for NEPc was found for warmer sites with no distinct winter respiratory loss period. Our findings highlight the importance of the influence of winter processes and the delayed responses of previous seasons’ climatic conditions on current year's NEPc. Such carry-over effects may contain...

  16. Importance of Baseline Specification in Evaluating Conservation Interventions and Achieving No Net Loss of Biodiversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, J W; Gordon, A; Law, E A; Suttle, K B; Milner-Gulland, E J

    2014-01-01

    There is an urgent need to improve the evaluation of conservation interventions. This requires specifying an objective and a frame of reference from which to measure performance. Reference frames can be baselines (i.e., known biodiversity at a fixed point in history) or counterfactuals (i.e., a scenario that would have occurred without the intervention). Biodiversity offsets are interventions with the objective of no net loss of biodiversity (NNL). We used biodiversity offsets to analyze the effects of the choice of reference frame on whether interventions met stated objectives. We developed 2 models to investigate the implications of setting different frames of reference in regions subject to various biodiversity trends and anthropogenic impacts. First, a general analytic model evaluated offsets against a range of baseline and counterfactual specifications. Second, a simulation model then replicated these results with a complex real world case study: native grassland offsets in Melbourne, Australia. Both models showed that achieving NNL depended upon the interaction between reference frame and background biodiversity trends. With a baseline, offsets were less likely to achieve NNL where biodiversity was decreasing than where biodiversity was stable or increasing. With a no-development counterfactual, however, NNL was achievable only where biodiversity was declining. Otherwise, preventing development was better for biodiversity. Uncertainty about compliance was a stronger determinant of success than uncertainty in underlying biodiversity trends. When only development and offset locations were considered, offsets sometimes resulted in NNL, but not across an entire region. Choice of reference frame determined feasibility and effort required to attain objectives when designing and evaluating biodiversity offset schemes. We argue the choice is thus of fundamental importance for conservation policy. Our results shed light on situations in which biodiversity offsets may

  17. Mass Loss of Coal Particles Burning in Fluidized Bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pełka, Piotr

    2017-06-01

    In this work many conclusions resulting from research carried out on the coal combustion process of the chosen coal type and its accompanying erosion in a two-phase flow of inert material have been presented. The purpose of this flow was to present a model of the conditions of the central and upper zone of the combustion chamber of the fluidized boiler. In the opinion of many authors (Basu, 1999; Chirone et al., 1991), the erosion process results from the contact of a fuel particle with particles of inert material that is responsible for generating fine fuel particles of less than 100 mm. If the particles are in the upper zone of the boiler where there is oxygen deficit, they can increase the loss of incomplete combustion substantially. The results of research do not confirm this common thesis, but rather indicate that the process of comminution that results from erosion under oxidative conditions contributes to the increase of substantial mass loss of a coal particle, however the increased mass loss of particle during combustion is first and foremost due to the whole process of removal of ash from the reactionary surface of a fuel particle. Nevertheless, in the conditions of oxygen deficit the comminution of particles as a result of the erosion process is negligible

  18. Detecting the sea level fingerprint of accelerated Greenland mass loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradova, Nadya; Davis, James

    2017-04-01

    The tide-gauge record from the North American east coast reveals significant accelerations in sea level starting in the late 20th century. We analyze the tide-gauge data using a model in which the accelerations are assumed to be zero prior to 1990. The estimated accelerations range from near zero to 0.3 mm yr-2 and exhibit a systematic spatial variability. We model this variability using several processes: ongoing mass change in Greenland and Antarctica as measured by the GRACE satellites; ocean dynamic and steric variability provided by the GECCO2 ocean synthesis; and the inverted barometer effect. Because we are using accelerations over several decades, the contribution from glacial isostatic adjustment is negligible, a substantial benefit of this approach. This approach also enables us to estimate admittances for any of these processes. By including an admittance for the Greenland mass loss, we test the hypothesis that the self-attraction and loading sea level fingerprint associated with accelerated mass loss is real and observable in the sea level data. An admittance of zero indicates a rejection of this process. Our estimated admittance is 0.75 ± 0.16, a clear positive detection at the level of 4-5 standard deviations.

  19. Decreasing clouds drive mass loss on the Greenland Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Stefan; Bamber, Jonathan; Tedstone, Andrew; Fettweis, Xavier

    2017-04-01

    The Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) has been losing mass at an accelerating rate since the mid-1990s. This has been due to both increased ice discharge into the ocean and melting at the surface, with the latter being the dominant contribution. This change in state has been attributed to rising temperatures and a decrease in surface albedo. Here we show, using satellite data and climate model output, that the abrupt reduction in surface mass balance since about 1995 can be largely attributed to a coincident trend of decreasing summer cloud cover. Satellite observations show that, from 1995 to 2009, summer cloud cover decreased by 0.9% ± 0.28%.yr. Model output indicates that the GrIS surface mass balance has a sensitivity of -5.4 ± 2 Gt per percent reduction in summer cloud cover, due principally to the impact of increased shortwave radiation over the low albedo ablation zone. The observed reduction in cloud cover is strongly correlated with a state shift of the North Atlantic Oscillation, suggesting that the enhanced surface mass loss from the GrIS is driven by synoptic-scale changes in Arctic-wide atmospheric circulation.

  20. Winter respiratory C losses provide explanatory power for net ecosystem productivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haeni, M.; Zweifel, R.; Eugster, W.; Gessler, A.; Zielis, S.; Bernhofer, C.; Carrara, A.; Grünwald, T.; Havránková, K.; Heinesch, B.; Marek, M.; Moors, E.; Schelhaas, M.J.; Buchmann, N.

    2017-01-01

    Accurate predictions of net ecosystem productivity (NEPc) of forest ecosystems are essential for climate change decisions and requirements in the context of national forest growth and greenhouse gas inventories. However, drivers and underlying mechanisms determining NEPc

  1. Net loss of CaCO3 from coral reef communities due to human induced seawater acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, A.J.; Kuffner, I.B.; MacKenzie, F.T.; Jokiel, P.L.; Rodgers, K.S.; Tan, A.

    2009-01-01

    Acidification of seawater owing to oceanic uptake of atmospheric CO2 originating from human activities such as burning of fossil fuels and land-use changes has raised serious concerns regarding its adverse effects on corals and calcifying communities. Here we demonstrate a net loss of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) material as a result of decreased calcification and increased carbonate dissolution from replicated subtropical coral reef communities (n=3) incubated in continuous-flow mesocosms subject to future seawater conditions. The calcifying community was dominated by the coral Montipora capitata. Daily average community calcification or Net Ecosystem Calcification (NEC=CaCO3 production – dissolution) was positive at 3.3 mmol CaCO3 m−2 h−1 under ambient seawater pCO2 conditions as opposed to negative at −0.04 mmol CaCO3 m−2h−1 under seawater conditions of double the ambient pCO2. These experimental results provide support for the conclusion that some net calcifying communities could become subject to net dissolution in response to anthropogenic ocean acidification within this century. Nevertheless, individual corals remained healthy, actively calcified (albeit slower than at present rates), and deposited significant amounts of CaCO3 under the prevailing experimental seawater conditions of elevated pCO2.

  2. Mass loss from cool stars, facts, fads, and fallacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupree, A. K.

    The accumulation of observational material (ultraviolet spectroscopic measures, quantitative optical spectroscopy, and X-ray photometry) and its use in discerning the presence and character of mass loss across the cool half of the H-R diagram and establishing constraints on theoretical models are discussed. Analogies with closed and open solar magnetic structures are found. Two determinants of atmospheric wind structure, temperature and gravity, may suffice in a most superficial way to define the wind and atmospheric structure in a star, however it is apparent that there is still a missing parameter which may stem from magnetic activity and its particular configuration. Theories that appear successful in reproducing observed line profiles, wind temperatures, and terminal velocities incorporate Alfven wave heating and momentum deposition. Successive observations of an active binary (lambda and G8III-IV) and a supergiant star, alpha Aqr (G2 Ib) revealed that magnetic activity and perhaps mass loss occur on restricted regions of a stellar surface and that long-term structures are present in the wind. These phenomena are present in the solar atmosphere and wind and may be considered a general characteristic of stellar winds.

  3. Timing of the compensation of winter respiratory carbon losses provides explanatory power for net ecosystem productivity of forests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haeni, M.; Zweifel, R.; Eugster, W.

    2017-01-01

    , and Australia, using different NEPc integration methods. We found cDOY to be a particularly powerful predictor for NEPc of temperate evergreen needle-leaf forests (R2 = 0.58) and deciduous broadleaf forests (R2 = 0.68). In general, the latest cDOY correlated with the lowest NEPc. The explanatory power of c......Accurate predictions of net ecosystem productivity (NEPc) of forest ecosystems are essential for climate change decisions and requirements in the context of national forest growth and greenhouse gas inventories. However, drivers and underlying mechanisms determining NEPc (e.g. climate, nutrients......) are not entirely understood yet, particularly when considering the influence of past periods. Here we explored the explanatory power of the compensation day (cDOY) —defined as the day of year when winter net carbon losses are compensated by spring assimilation— for NEPc in 26 forests in Europe, North America...

  4. Remote sensing as a tool for watershed-wide estimation of net solar radiation and water loss to the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorram, S.; Thomas, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented for a study intended to develop a general remote sensing-aided cost-effective procedure to estimate watershed-wide water loss to the atmosphere via evapotranspiration and to estimate net solar radiation over the watershed. Evapotranspiration estimation employs a basic two-stage two-phase sample of three information resolution levels. Net solar radiation is taken as one of the variables at each level of evapotranspiration modeling. The input information for models requiring spatial information will be provided by Landsat digital data, environmental satellite data, ground meteorological data, ground sample unit information, and topographic data. The outputs of the sampling-estimation/data bank system will be in-place maps of evapotranspiration on a data resolution element basis, watershed-wide evapotranspiration isopleths, and estimates of watershed and subbasin total evapotranspiration with associated statistical confidence bounds. The methodology developed is being tested primarily on the Spanish Creek Watershed Plumas County, California.

  5. Asymptotically simple spacetimes and mass loss due to gravitational waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, Vee-Liem

    The cosmological constant Λ used to be a freedom in Einstein’s theory of general relativity (GR), where one had a proclivity to set it to zero purely for convenience. The signs of Λ or Λ being zero would describe universes with different properties. For instance, the conformal structure of spacetime directly depends on Λ: null infinity ℐ is a spacelike, null, or timelike hypersurface, if Λ > 0, Λ = 0, or Λ 0 in Einstein’s theory of GR. A quantity that depends on the conformal structure of spacetime, especially on the nature of ℐ, is the Bondi mass which in turn dictates the mass loss of an isolated gravitating system due to energy carried away by gravitational waves. This problem of extending the Bondi mass to a universe with Λ > 0 has spawned intense research activity over the past several years. Some aspects include a closer inspection on the conformal properties, working with linearization, attempts using a Hamiltonian formulation based on “linearized” asymptotic symmetries, as well as obtaining the general asymptotic solutions of de Sitter-like spacetimes. We consolidate on the progress thus far from the various approaches that have been undertaken, as well as discuss the current open problems and possible directions in this area.

  6. SPUF - a simple polyurethane foam mass loss and response model.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, Michael L.; Lemmon, Gordon H.

    2003-07-01

    A Simple PolyUrethane Foam (SPUF) mass loss and response model has been developed to predict the behavior of unconfined, rigid, closed-cell, polyurethane foam-filled systems exposed to fire-like heat fluxes. The model, developed for the B61 and W80-0/1 fireset foam, is based on a simple two-step mass loss mechanism using distributed reaction rates. The initial reaction step assumes that the foam degrades into a primary gas and a reactive solid. The reactive solid subsequently degrades into a secondary gas. The SPUF decomposition model was implemented into the finite element (FE) heat conduction codes COYOTE [1] and CALORE [2], which support chemical kinetics and dynamic enclosure radiation using 'element death.' A discretization bias correction model was parameterized using elements with characteristic lengths ranging from 1-mm to 1-cm. Bias corrected solutions using the SPUF response model with large elements gave essentially the same results as grid independent solutions using 100-{micro}m elements. The SPUF discretization bias correction model can be used with 2D regular quadrilateral elements, 2D paved quadrilateral elements, 2D triangular elements, 3D regular hexahedral elements, 3D paved hexahedral elements, and 3D tetrahedron elements. Various effects to efficiently recalculate view factors were studied -- the element aspect ratio, the element death criterion, and a 'zombie' criterion. Most of the solutions using irregular, large elements were in agreement with the 100-{micro}m grid-independent solutions. The discretization bias correction model did not perform as well when the element aspect ratio exceeded 5:1 and the heated surface was on the shorter side of the element. For validation, SPUF predictions using various sizes and types of elements were compared to component-scale experiments of foam cylinders that were heated with lamps. The SPUF predictions of the decomposition front locations were compared to the front locations

  7. Role of protein and amino acids in promoting lean mass accretion with resistance exercise and attenuating lean mass loss during energy deficit in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchward-Venne, Tyler A; Murphy, Caoileann H; Longland, Thomas M; Phillips, Stuart M

    2013-08-01

    Amino acids are major nutrient regulators of muscle protein turnover. After protein ingestion, hyperaminoacidemia stimulates increased rates of skeletal muscle protein synthesis, suppresses muscle protein breakdown, and promotes net muscle protein accretion for several hours. These acute observations form the basis for strategized protein intake to promote lean mass accretion, or prevent lean mass loss over the long term. However, factors such as protein dose, protein source, and timing of intake are important in mediating the anabolic effects of amino acids on skeletal muscle and must be considered within the context of evaluating the reported efficacy of long-term studies investigating protein supplementation as part of a dietary strategy to promote lean mass accretion and/or prevent lean mass loss. Current research suggests that dietary protein supplementation can augment resistance exercise-mediated gains in skeletal muscle mass and strength and can preserve skeletal muscle mass during periods of diet-induced energy restriction. Perhaps less appreciated, protein supplementation can augment resistance training-mediated gains in skeletal muscle mass even in individuals habitually consuming 'adequate' (i.e., >0.8 g kg⁻¹ day⁻¹) protein. Additionally, overfeeding energy with moderate to high-protein intake (15-25 % protein or 1.8-3.0 g kg⁻¹ day⁻¹) is associated with lean, but not fat mass accretion, when compared to overfeeding energy with low protein intake (5 % protein or ~0.68 g kg⁻¹ day⁻¹). Amino acids represent primary nutrient regulators of skeletal muscle anabolism, capable of enhancing lean mass accretion with resistance exercise and attenuating the loss of lean mass during periods of energy deficit, although factors such as protein dose, protein source, and timing of intake are likely important in mediating these effects.

  8. Acceleration of Mass Losses and Mass Gains of the Antarctic Ice Sheet from 1992 to Present

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwally, H. J.; Li, J.; Robbins, J. W.; Yi, D.

    2016-12-01

    A review of Antarctic mass balance that separated pre-2012 studies and 2012 studies (Hanna et al., 2013) showed the evolution toward results that are more-narrowly distributed between +100 Gt/yr and -100 Gt/yr, with the deletion of earlier more negative values except for a more negative IOM estimate. Subsequent analysis (Zwally et al., 2015) of ICESat data (2003-08) showed mass gains from snow accumulation exceeded discharge losses by 82 ± 25 Gt/yr, reducing global sea-level rise by 0.23 mm/yr, which was consistent with the gain of 112 ± 61 Gt/yr from ERS1/ERS2 (1992-2001). Gains of 136 Gt/yr in East Antarctica and 72 Gt/yr in four drainage systems in West Antarctic exceeded losses of 97 Gt/yr from three coastal DS and 29 Gt/yr from the Antarctic Peninsula. East Antarctic dynamic thickening of 147 Gt/yr was interpreted as a continuing long-term response to increased accumulation (>50%) beginning in the early Holocene. In this paper, we describe newly-constructed time-series (for 2003-2009) of the total mass changes, MT(t), the accumulation-driven component, Ma(t), and the dynamic-driven component, Md(t), by DS, regions, coastal, inland, and overall, as well as similar time-series for 1992-2001. These series are analyzed to characterize the linear and second orders changes, which characterize the time varying effects of accumulation/snowfall variations and the dynamic changes. Published time-series of GRACE mass changes are used to extend the analysis to 2016. Results show an acceleration of dynamic losses in West Antarctic and the Antarctic Peninsula that are partially offset by increases in snowfall. In East Antarctica, overall dynamic-driven changes are undetectable and accumulation-driven changes are small prior to 2009, followed by a significant accumulation-driven increase in the Queen Maud Land region. References:Hanna, E. and 11 others. (2013) Ice sheet mass balance and climate change, Nature 498, doi:10.1038/nature12238.Zwally, H. J., J. Li, J. W. Robbins

  9. Mass loss as a driving mechanism of tectonics of Enceladus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czechowski, Leszek

    2015-04-01

    Summary We suggest that the mass loss from South Polar Terrain (SPT) is the main driving force of the following tectonic processes on Enceladus: subsidence of SPT, flow in the mantle and motion of plates. 1. Introduction Enceladus, a satellite of Saturn, is the smallest celestial body in the Solar System where volcanic activity is observed. Every second, the mass of ~200 kg is ejected into space from the South Polar Terrain (SPT) - [1, 2, 3]. The loss of matter from the body's interior should lead to global compression of the crust. Typical effects of compression are: thrust faults, folding and subduction. However, such forms are not dominant on Enceladus. We propose here special tectonic model that could explain this paradox. 2. Subsidence of SPT and tectonics The volatiles escape from the hot region through the fractures forming plumes in the space. The loss of the volatiles results in a void, an instability, and motion of solid matter into the hot region to fill the void. The motion includes : Subsidence of the 'lithosphere' of SPT. Flow of the matter in the mantle. Motion of plates adjacent to SPT towards the active region. If emerging void is being filled by the subsidence of SPT only, then the velocity of subsidence is ~0.05 mm-yr-1. However, all three types of motion are probably important, so the subsidence is slower but mantle flow and plates' motion also play a role in filling the void. Note that in our model the reduction of the crust area is not a result of compression but it is a result of the plate sinking. Therefore the compressional surface features do not have to be dominant. 3. Models of subsidence The numerical model of suggested process of subsidence is developed. It is based on the typical set of equation: Navier-Stokes equation for incompressible viscous liquid, equation of continuity and equation of heat conduction. The Newtonian and non-Newtonian rheologies are used. The preliminary results of the model indicate that the subsidence rate of

  10. Counterintuitive proposals for trans-boundary ecological compensation under "No Net Loss" biodiversity policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bull, Joseph William; Abatayo, Anna Lou; Strange, Niels

    2017-01-01

    to stakeholders when they are not experts? We surveyed 691 students with limited or no knowledge of NNL policy across three countries, eliciting perceptions of what constitutes sufficient ecological compensation for forest habitat losses from infrastructure development. NNL policies assume that biodiversity...... compensation should be: close to development impacts; greater than losses; smaller, given a background trend of biodiversity decline; and, smaller when gains have co-benefits for biodiversity. However, survey participant proposals violated all four principles. Participants proposed substantial forest...... could deserve consideration. The findings also support proposals to incorporate social considerations into compensation ratios for NNL. Wherever the rationale underlying NNL is discovered to be counterintuitive insofar as relevant stakeholders are concerned, careful communication of policy intentions...

  11. Knee strength maintained despite loss of lean body mass during weight loss in older obese adults with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuewen; Miller, Gary D; Messier, Stephen P; Nicklas, Barbara J

    2007-08-01

    The effects of weight loss on muscle function in older adults have not been well studied. This study determined the effects of a 6-month weight-loss intervention on muscle strength and quality in older obese adults with knee osteoarthritis. Participants were randomized to a weight loss (WL) (n = 44, 70 +/- 6 years) or weight stable (WS) (n = 43, 69 +/- 6 years) group. The WL intervention consisted of weekly educational meetings, a meal replacement diet, and a three-session-per-week structured exercise program to achieve 10%-12% weight loss. The WS intervention included bimonthly group meetings and newsletters. Body composition and knee extensor strength were measured at baseline and after intervention. The WL group decreased body weight, lean body mass, fat mass, and percent body fat (p .05), whereas eccentric extension decreased 6% in WS (p =.028). Concentric muscle quality (strength per kg body weight or lean body mass) increased in WL (p muscle quality decreased in WS (p fat mass were inversely associated with changes in most muscle strength and quality measures (p muscle strength/quality, despite loss of lean body mass in this sample of older men and women. Greater fat loss was associated with greater gains in muscle strength and quality. More studies are needed regarding the mechanisms by which loss of fat mass increases muscle strength and quality.

  12. Turbulence induces metabolically costly behaviors and inhibits food capture in oyster larvae, causing net energy loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Heidi L; Specht, Jaclyn A; Adams, Diane K; Christman, Adam J

    2017-10-01

    Planktotrophic invertebrate larvae require energy to develop, disperse and settle successfully, and it is unknown how their energetics are impacted by turbulence. Ciliated larvae gain metabolic energy from their phytoplankton food to offset the energetic costs of growth, development and ciliary activity for swimming and feeding. Turbulence may affect the energetic balance by inducing behaviors that alter the metabolic costs and efficiency of swimming, by raising the encounter rate with food particles and by inhibiting food capture. We used experiments and an empirical model to quantify the net rate of energy gain, swimming efficiency and food capture efficiency for eyed oyster larvae (Crassostrea virginica) in turbulence. At dissipation rates representative of coastal waters, larvae lost energy even when food concentrations were very high. Both feeding activity and turbulence-induced behaviors incurred high metabolic costs. Swimming efficiency was concave up versus dissipation rate, suggesting that ciliary activity for food handling became more costly while swimming became more efficient with turbulence intensity. Though counter-intuitive, swimming may have become more efficient in turbulence because vorticity-induced rotation caused larvae to swim more horizontally, which requires less effort than swimming vertically against the pull of gravity. Overall, however, larvae failed to offset high activity costs with food energy gains because turbulence reduced food capture efficiency more than it enhanced food encounter rates. Younger, smaller larvae may have some energetic advantages, but competent larvae would lose energy at turbulence intensities they experience frequently, suggesting that turbulence-induced starvation may account for much of oysters' high larval mortality. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. The Influence of Coronal Mass Ejections on the Mass-loss Rates of Hot-Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherenkov, A.; Bisikalo, D.; Fossati, L.; Möstl, C.

    2017-09-01

    Hot-Jupiters are subject to extreme radiation and plasma flows coming from their host stars. Past ultraviolet Hubble Space Telescope observations, supported by hydrodynamic models, confirmed that these factors lead to the formation of an extended envelope, part of which lies beyond the Roche lobe. We use gas-dynamic simulations to study the impact of time variations in the parameters of the stellar wind, namely that of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), on the envelope of the typical hot-Jupiter HD 209458b. We consider three CMEs characterized by different velocities and densities, taking their parameters from typical CMEs observed for the Sun. The perturbations in the ram-pressure of the stellar wind during the passage of each CME tear off most of the envelope that is located beyond the Roche lobe. This leads to a substantial increase of the mass-loss rates during the interaction with the CME. We find that the mass lost by the planet during the whole crossing of a CME is of ≈1015 g, regardless of the CME taken into consideration. We also find that over the course of 1 Gyr, the mass lost by the planet because of CME impacts is comparable to that lost because of high-energy stellar irradiation.

  14. A model on CME/Flare initiation: Loss of Equilibrium caused by mass loss of quiescent prominences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miley, George; Chon Nam, Sok; Kim, Mun Song; Kim, Jik Su

    2015-08-01

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) model should give an answer to enough energy storage for giant bulk plasma into interplanetary space to escape against the sun’s gravitation and its explosive eruption. Advocates of ‘Mass Loading’ model (e.g. Low, B. 1996, SP, 167, 217) suggested a simple mechanism of CME initiation, the loss of mass from a prominence anchoring magnetic flux rope, but they did not associate the mass loss with the loss of equilibrium. The catastrophic loss of equilibrium model is considered as to be a prospective CME/Flare model to explain sudden eruption of magnetic flux systems. Isenberg, P. A., et al (1993, ApJ, 417, 368)developed ideal magnetohydrodynamic theory of the magnetic flux rope to show occurrence of catastrophic loss of equilibrium according to increasing magnetic flux transported into corona.We begin with extending their study including gravity on prominence’s material to obtain equilibrium curves in case of given mass parameters, which are the strengths of the gravitational force compared with the characteristic magnetic force. Furthermore, we study quasi-static evolution of the system including massive prominence flux rope and current sheet below it to obtain equilibrium curves of prominence’s height according to decreasing mass parameter in a properly fixed magnetic environment. The curves show equilibrium loss behaviors to imply that mass loss result in equilibrium loss. Released fractions of magnetic energy are greater than corresponding zero-mass case. This eruption mechanism is expected to be able to apply to the eruptions of quiescent prominences, which is located in relatively weak magnetic environment with 105 km of scale length and 10G of photospheric magnetic field.

  15. An experimental investigation of flows from zero-net mass-flux actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Ryan Jay

    Zero-net mass-flux (ZNMF) devices consist of an oscillating driver, a cavity, and a small opening such as a rectangular slot or a circular orifice. The driver produces a series of vortex pairs (or rings) at the slot/orifice which add momentum and circulation to the flow. ZNMF devices are useful tools for flow control applications such as heat transfer, mixing enhancement, and boundary layer separation control. To date much research has been done to qualify and quantify the effects of ZNMF devices in many applications, both experimental and computational. However, a number of issues still remain. First, there is no universally accepted dimensionless parameter space, which makes device characterization and comparison between studies difficult. Second, most experimental studies do not sufficiently quantify the nearfield behavior, which hinders the fundamental understanding of the underlying flow physics. Of particular interest are the regimes of jet formation, and transition from laminar to turbulent-like flow, which are not well understood. Finally, the accuracy of experimental measurements are seldom reported in the literature. This study unifies the experimental and numerical data presented in the literature for ZNMF flowfields exhausting into a quiescent medium. A quantitative experimental database is also generated to completely characterize the topological regions of ZNMF flows over a useful range of the dimensionless parameter space. The database is derived chiefly from two-dimensional velocity field measurements using particle image velocimetry and laser Doppler anemometry. Vorticity, circulation, Reynolds stress, and turbulent kinetic energy is acquired to characterize the resulting flowfield. Significant insight into the behavior of voice coil driven ZNMF devices is uncovered. Design improvements are made by implementing a sinusoidal controller for piston motion and eliminating the need for a sealing membrane in the cavity. It is shown that the proper

  16. Investigation of the impact of using thermal mass with the net zero energy town house in Toronto using TRNSYS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siddiqui, O.; Fung, A.; Tse, H.; Zhang, D. [Ryerson Polytechnic Univ., Toronto, ON (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Since buildings in Canada account for 30 per cent of the country's total energy consumption, it has become necessary to find ways to reduce the overall energy use in buildings. Heating and cooling loads in buildings can be effectively reduced by using the thermal mass incorporated into the building envelope, particularly in climates where a large daily temperature fluctuations exist. Thermal mass is defined as any building material that has a high heat storage capacity that can be integrated into the structural fabric of the building to use the passive solar energy for heating or cooling purposes. Concrete slabs, bricks and ceramic blocks are some of the commonly used materials. This study analyzed the impact of using thermal mass with a highly insulated building envelope such as that used in Low Energy or Net Zero housing. In particular, TRNSYS was used to simulate a Net Zero Energy Town House located in Toronto, in which a ground source heat pump was integrated with an infloor radiant heating system. The simulation revealed that for colder climates such as in Canada, thermal mass can replace some of the insulation while still providing excellent results in terms of the reductions in daily indoor temperature fluctuations. The impact of thermal mass during the winter was more significant when compared with summer, possibly because of the unique construction and orientation of the Net Zero Energy House. The optimum thickness of the concrete slab was determined to be 6 inches for the winter season and 4 inches for summer. The optimum location for the thermal mass was found to be right next to the gypsum wallboard that forms the interior part of the wall. 12 refs., 1 tab., 11 figs.

  17. VALUASI EKONOMI KEHILANGAN MANFAAT BERSIH AKIBAT BIAYA KESEHATAN PENGGUNAAN PESTISIDA KIMIA (Economic Valuation of Net Benefit Loss Due to Health Cost of Chemical Pesticides Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joko Mariyono

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK Mengingat pestisida merupakan bahan beracun, maka penggunaannya juga menimbulkan  risiko kesehatan. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengestimasi bsarnya kehilangan manfaat bersih akibat adanya eksternalitas yang diakibatkan oleh penggunaan pestisda kimia. Manfaat yang hilang ditentukan menghitung selisih antara manfaat bersihmaksimum dihitung dengan menggunakan konsep yang mendalilkan bahwa manfaat bersih marjinal sama dengan biaya eksternal marjinal. Manfaat bersih marjinal diturunkan dari fungsi produksi, sedangkan biaya eksternal marjinal diperoleh dari fungsi biaya kesehatan yang telah diestimasi oleh peneliti sebelumnya. Studi ini menggunakan data nasional produksi padi mulai tahun 1974 sampai dengan 2000. Hasil studi menunjukkan bahwa kehilangan manfaat bersih akibat biaya kesehatan karena penggunaan pestisida sangat tinggi. Kehilangan manfaat bersih yang sangat tinggi ini terjadi karena elastisitas produksi dari pestisida terhadap padi sangat kecil.   ABSTRACT Since pesticide is a poisonous agent, its use also causes health risk. The objective of this study is to estimate the value of net benefit loss associated with chemical pestiside uses. The net benefit loss is determined by finding the difference between actual value of net benefit and maximum value of net benefit of pesticides use. The maximum value of net benefit can be obtained by employing the concept postulating that the net benefit is occurred when the marginal net benefit is aqual to marginal external cost. The marginal net benefit is derived from estimated production function of rice, whereas the marginal external cost is obtained by adopting health cost function of pesticides use that has been estimated by previous researchers. The study utilized the national data of rice production and agro-chemical input use during from 1974 to 2000. The results of the study show that there are extremely high net benefit losses associated with health costs of pesticides use. It is

  18. The Effect of Mass Media Campaign on the Use of Insecticide-Treated Bed Nets among Pregnant Women in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ankomah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Malaria during pregnancy is a major public health problem in Nigeria especially in malaria-endemic areas. It increases the risk of low birth weight and child/maternal morbidity/mortality. This paper addresses the impact of radio campaigns on the use of insecticide-treated bed nets among pregnant women in Nigeria. Methods. A total of 2,348 pregnant women were interviewed during the survey across 21 of Nigeria’s 36 states. Respondents were selected through a multistage sampling technique. Analysis was based on multivariate logistic regression. Results. Respondents who knew that sleeping under ITN prevents malaria were 3.2 times more likely to sleep under net (OR: 3.15; 95% CI: 2.28 to 4.33; P<0.0001. Those who listened to radio are also about 1.6 times more likely to use ITN (OR: 1.56; 95% CI: 1.07 to 2.28; P=0.020, while respondents who had heard of a specific sponsored radio campaign on ITN are 1.53 times more likely to use a bed net (P=0.019. Conclusion. Pregnant women who listened to mass media campaigns were more likely to adopt strategies to protect themselves from malaria. Therefore, behavior change communication messages that are aimed at promoting net use and antenatal attendance are necessary in combating malaria.

  19. Mid-Pleistocene climate transition drives net mass loss from rapidly uplifting St. Elias mountains, Alaska

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gulick, S.P.S.; Jaeger, J.M.; Mix, A; Asahi, H.; Bahlburg, H.; Belanger, C.L.; Berbel, G.B.B.; Childress, L.; Cowan, E.; Drab, L.; Forwick, M.; Fukumura, A; Ge, S.; Gupta, S.M.; Kioka, A; Konno, S.; LeVay, L.J.; Marz, C.; Matsuzaki, K.M.; McClymont, E.L.; Moy, C.; Muller, J.; Nakamura, A; Ojima, T.; Ribeiro, F.R.; Ridgway, K.D; Romero, O.E.; Slagle, A.L.; Stoner, J.S.; St-Onge, G.; Suto, I.; Walczak, M.D.; Worthington, L.L.; Bailey, I.; Enkelmann, E.; Reece, R.; Swartz, J.M.

    Erosion, sediment production, and routing on a tectonically active continental margin reflect both tectonic and climatic processes; partitioning the relative importance of these processes remains controversial. Gulf of Alaska contains a preserved...

  20. A tipping point in refreezing accelerates mass loss of Greenland's glaciers and ice caps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noël, Brice; van den Berg, J.W.; Lhermitte, S.L.M.; Wouters, B; Machguth, Horst; Howat, Ian; Citterio, M.; Moholdt, G; Lenaerts, Jan T M; van den Broeke, Michiel R.

    2017-01-01

    Melting of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) and its peripheral glaciers and ice caps (GICs) contributes about 43% to contemporary sea level rise. While patterns of GrIS mass loss are well studied, the spatial and temporal evolution of GICs mass loss and the acting processes have remained unclear.

  1. A tipping point in refreezing accelerates mass loss of Greenland’s glaciers and ice caps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noël, B.P.Y.; van de Berg, W.J.; Lhermitte, S.; Wouters, B.; Machguth, Horst; Howat, I.M.; Citterio, M.; Moholdt, G.; Lenaerts, J.T.M.; van den Broeke, M.R.

    2017-01-01

    Melting of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) and its peripheral glaciers and ice caps (GICs) contributes about 43% to contemporary sea level rise. While patterns of GrIS mass loss are well studied, the spatial and temporal evolution of GICs mass loss and the acting processes have remained unclear. Here

  2. Mass Loss and Stellar Evolution Models of Polaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilson, Hilding R.; Engle, S. G.; Guinan, E.; Langer, N.

    2012-01-01

    Polaris is a first-overtone Cepheid with a measured rate of period change that probes real-time evolution of that star. In this work, we compare the measured period change with rates computed from a grid of state-of-the-art stellar evolution models that are consistent with the effective temperature, luminosity and mass of Polaris. We find that the theoretical and measured rates of period change do not agree, and we show this difference implies that Polaris is losing mass at a rate of 10-6 solar masses per year.

  3. Mass Loss in Cepheids: Observational Evidence from IR and Radio Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marengo, Massimo

    2012-05-01

    The recent detection of infrared shells around Polaris and other Cepheids has rekindled the interest of astronomers in Cepheid mass loss. High mass loss rate has been invoked to explain the so-called "Cepheids' mass discrepancy" as well as the large and rapid period change observed in Polaris and other Cepheids. Its existence, however, has been surprisingly difficult to demonstrate unequivocally. I will briefly review the latest observational evidence, at radio and infrared wavelength, of high mass loss rates in Cepheid stars. I will then present the first direct measurement of a Cepheid's stellar wind.

  4. NOy production, ozone loss and changes in net radiative heating due to energetic particle precipitation in 2002–2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sinnhuber

    2018-01-01

    the models in nearly every polar winter, ranging from 10–50 % during solar maximum to 2–10 % during solar minimum. Ozone loss continues throughout polar summer after strong solar proton events in the Southern Hemisphere and after large sudden stratospheric warmings in the Northern Hemisphere. During mid-winter, the ozone loss causes a reduction of the infrared radiative cooling, i.e., a positive change of the net radiative heating (effective warming, in agreement with analyses of geomagnetic forcing in stratospheric temperatures which show a warming in the late winter upper stratosphere. In late winter and spring, the sign of the net radiative heating change turns to negative (effective cooling. This spring-time cooling lasts well into summer and continues until the following autumn after large solar proton events in the Southern Hemisphere, and after sudden stratospheric warmings in the Northern Hemisphere.

  5. Delta progradation in Greenland driven by increasing glacial mass loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Mette; Iversen, Lars Lonsmann; Bjork, Anders Anker

    2017-01-01

    Climate changes are pronounced in Arctic regions and increase the vulnerability of the Arctic coastal zone(1). For example, increases in melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet and reductions in sea ice and permafrost distribution are likely to alter coastal morphodynamics. The deltas of Greenland...... imagery. We find that delta progradation was driven by high freshwater runoff from the Greenland Ice Sheet coinciding with periods of open water. Progradation was controlled by the local initial environmental conditions (that is, accumulated air temperatures above 0 degrees C per year, freshwater runoff...... are largely unaffected by human activity, but increased freshwater runoff and sediment fluxes may increase the size of the deltas, whereas increased wave activity in ice-free periods could reduce their size, with the net impact being unclear until now. Here we show that southwestern Greenland deltas were...

  6. Long-lasting insecticidal nets are synergistic with mass drug administration for interruption of lymphatic filariasis transmission in Nigeria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abel Eigege

    Full Text Available In central Nigeria Anopheles mosquitoes transmit malaria and lymphatic filariasis (LF. The strategy used for interrupting LF transmission in this area is annual mass drug administration (MDA with albendazole and ivermectin, but after 8 years of MDA, entomological evaluations in sentinel villages showed continued low-grade mosquito infection rates of 0.32%. After long-lasting insecticidal net (LLIN distribution by the national malaria program in late 2010, however, we were no longer able to detect infected vectors over a 24-month period. This is evidence that LLINs are synergistic with MDA in interrupting LF transmission.

  7. Experimental validation of CFD mass transfer simulations in flat channels with non-woven net spacers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, F.; Meindersma, G.W.; de Haan, A.B.; Reith, T.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of the present paper is to validate experimentally the mass transfer simulations presented in a previous paper by the same authors [J. Membr. Sci. 208 (2002) 289]. In the present study, mass transfer coefficients were obtained by the limiting current method. The results from CFD

  8. Counteracting age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechshøft, Rasmus; Reitelseder, Søren; Højfeldt, Grith

    2016-01-01

    Background Aging is associated with decreased muscle mass and functional capacity, which in turn decrease quality of life. The number of citizens over the age of 65 years in the Western world will increase by 50 % over the next four decades, and this demographic shift brings forth new challenges ...

  9. Reconciling Change in Oi-Horizon 14C With Mass Loss for an Oak Forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, P J; Swanston, C W; Garten, Jr., C T; Todd, D E; Trumbore, S E

    2005-06-27

    First-year litter decomposition was estimated for an upland-oak forest ecosystem using enrichment or dilution of the {sup 14}C-signature of the Oi-horizon. These isotopically-based mass-loss estimates were contrasted with measured mass-loss rates from past litterbag studies. Mass-loss derived from changes in the {sup 14}C-signature of the Oi-horizon suggested mean mass loss over 9 months of 45% which was higher than the corresponding 9-month rate extrapolated from litterbag studies ({approx}35%). Greater mass loss was expected from the isotopic approach because litterbags are known to limit mass loss processes driven by soil macrofauna (e.g., fragmentation and comminution). Although the {sup 14}C-isotope approach offers the advantage of being a non-invasive method, it exhibited high variability that undermined its utility as an alternative to routine litterbag mass loss methods. However, the {sup 14}C approach measures the residence time of C in the leaf litter, rather than the time it takes for leaves to disappear; hence radiocarbon measures are subject to C immobilization and recycling in the microbial pool, and do not necessarily reflect results from litterbag mass loss. The commonly applied two-compartment isotopic mixing model was appropriate for estimating decomposition from isotopic enrichment of near-background soils, but it produced divergent results for isotopic dilution of a multi-layered system with litter cohorts having independent {sup 14}C-signatures. This discrepancy suggests that cohort-based models are needed to adequately capture the complex processes involved in carbon transport associated with litter mass-loss. Such models will be crucial for predicting intra- and interannual differences in organic horizon decomposition driven by scenarios of climatic change.

  10. Quantifying Atmospheric Mass Loss using Novel Hydrodynamic Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubanenko, Lior; Steinberg, Elad; Schlichting, Hilke; Paige, David A.

    2017-10-01

    After their formation, planets may accrete or lose atmospheric mass following impacts by planetesimals. Quantifying the relation between the impactor energy and the mass it erodes from a planet's atmosphere is crucial to our understanding of the final stages in planetary formation. Particulatly, it could help explain the significant differences between the atmospheres of the three larger terrestrial planets in the solar system.Here we adopt a new hydrodynamic model called RICH, originally developed to solve problems in astrophysics. RICH's implementation include a Voroni tessellation and a moving (semi-Lagrangian) mesh, which allows high resolution, efficient modeling of shockwave propagation in thin atmospheres. Using this model we evaluate the role of smaller planetesimals in eroding Earth's atmosphere compared to larger, Mars-size objects. Additionally, we verify the results obtained by a past 1D analytic model which showed the current differences in Earth's and Venus's atmospheres can potentially be explained by small differences in their initial atmospheric mass and impact history.

  11. A net-jet flow system for mass transfer and microsensor studies of sinking aggregates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ploug, H.; Jørgensen, BB

    1999-01-01

    A flow system was developed which enables studies of hydrodynamics and mass transfer in freely sinking aggregates. The aggregates stabilized their positions in the water phase at an upward flow Velocity which balanced and opposed the sinking velocity of the individual aggregate. The flow field...

  12. Weight Loss Programs May Have Beneficial or Adverse Effects on Fat Mass and Insulin Sensitivity in Overweight and Obese Black Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, Benjamin; Miller, Bernard V; Zalos, Gloria; Courville, Amber B; Sumner, Anne E; Powell-Wiley, Tiffany M; Walter, Mary F; Waclawiw, Myron A; Cannon, Richard O

    2014-01-01

    Weight loss interventions have produced little change in insulin sensitivity in black women, but mean data may obscure metabolic benefit to some and adverse effects for others. Accordingly, we analyzed insulin sensitivity relative to fat mass change following a weight loss program. Fifty-four black women (BMI range 25.9 to 54.7 kg/m2) completed the 6-month program that included nutrition information and worksite exercise facilities. Fat mass was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and insulin sensitivity index (SI) was calculated from an insulin-modified intravenous glucose tolerance test using the minimal model. Baseline SI (range 0.74 to 7.58 l/mU-1•min-1) was inversely associated with fat mass (r = -0.516, p fat mass (baseline 40.8 ± 12.4 to 39.4 ± 12.6 kg [mean ± SD], P fat mass. SI for the group was unchanged (baseline 3.3 ± 1.7 to 3.2 ± 1.6, P = 0.67). However, the tertile with greatest fat mass loss (-3.6 kg, range -10.7 to -1.7 kg) improved insulin sensitivity (SI +0.3 ± 1.2), whereas the tertile with net fat mass gain (+0.9 kg, range -0.1 to +3.8 kg) had reduced insulin sensitivity (SI -0.7 ± 1.3) from baseline values (P loss program who lose fat mass may have improved insulin sensitivity, but fat mass gain with diminished sensitivity is common. Additional support for participants who fail to achieve fat mass loss early in an intervention may be required for success.

  13. Mass loss due to gravitational waves with Λ > 0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, Vee-Liem

    2017-07-01

    The theoretical basis for the energy carried away by gravitational waves that an isolated gravitating system emits was first formulated by Hermann Bondi during the ’60s. Recent findings from the observation of distant supernovae revealed that the rate of expansion of our universe is accelerating, which may be well explained by sticking a positive cosmological constant into the Einstein field equations for general relativity. By solving the Newman-Penrose equations (which are equivalent to the Einstein field equations), we generalize this notion of Bondi mass-energy and thereby provide a firm theoretical description of how an isolated gravitating system loses energy as it radiates gravitational waves, in a universe that expands at an accelerated rate. This is in line with the observational front of LIGO’s first announcement in February 2016 that gravitational waves from the merger of a binary black hole system have been detected.

  14. Trajectory Simulation of Meteors Assuming Mass Loss and Fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Gary A., Jr.; Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Saunders, David A

    2015-01-01

    Program used to simulate atmospheric flight trajectories of entry capsules [1] Includes models of atmospheres of different planetary destinations - Earth, Mars, Venus, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Titan, ... Solves 3-­-degrees of freedom (3DoF) equations for a single body treated as a point mass. Also supports 6-DoF trajectory simula4on and Monte Carlo analyses. Uses Fehlberg-­-Runge-­-Kuna (4th-5th order) time integraion with automaic step size control. Includes rotating spheroidal planet with gravitational field having a J2 harmonic. Includes a variety of engineering aerodynamic and heat flux models. Capable of specifying events - heatshield jettison, parachute deployment, etc. - at predefined altitudes or Mach number. Has material thermal response models of typical aerospace materials integrated.

  15. Mass-loss Rates from Coronal Mass Ejections: A Predictive Theoretical Model for Solar-type Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranmer, Steven R.

    2017-05-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are eruptive events that cause a solar-type star to shed mass and magnetic flux. CMEs tend to occur together with flares, radio storms, and bursts of energetic particles. On the Sun, CME-related mass loss is roughly an order of magnitude less intense than that of the background solar wind. However, on other types of stars, CMEs have been proposed to carry away much more mass and energy than the time-steady wind. Earlier papers have used observed correlations between solar CMEs and flare energies, in combination with stellar flare observations, to estimate stellar CME rates. This paper sidesteps flares and attempts to calibrate a more fundamental correlation between surface-averaged magnetic fluxes and CME properties. For the Sun, there exists a power-law relationship between the magnetic filling factor and the CME kinetic energy flux, and it is generalized for use on other stars. An example prediction of the time evolution of wind/CME mass-loss rates for a solar-mass star is given. A key result is that for ages younger than about 1 Gyr (i.e., activity levels only slightly higher than the present-day Sun), the CME mass loss exceeds that of the time-steady wind. At younger ages, CMEs carry 10-100 times more mass than the wind, and such high rates may be powerful enough to dispel circumstellar disks and affect the habitability of nearby planets. The cumulative CME mass lost by the young Sun may have been as much as 1% of a solar mass.

  16. Equation of Motion of an Interstellar Bussard Ramjet with Radiation and Mass Losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semay, Claude; Silvestre-Brac, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    An interstellar Bussard ramjet is a spaceship using the protons of the interstellar medium in a fusion engine to produce thrust. In recent papers, it was shown that the relativistic equation of motion of an ideal ramjet and that of a ramjet with radiation loss are analytical. When a mass loss appears, the limit speed of the ramjet is more strongly…

  17. Plant litter functional diversity effects on litter mass loss depend on the macro-detritivore community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patoine, Guillaume; Thakur, Madhav P; Friese, Julia; Nock, Charles; Hönig, Lydia; Haase, Josephine; Scherer-Lorenzen, Michael; Eisenhauer, Nico

    2017-11-01

    A better understanding of the mechanisms driving litter diversity effects on decomposition is needed to predict how biodiversity losses affect this crucial ecosystem process. In a microcosm study, we investigated the effects of litter functional diversity and two major groups of soil macro-detritivores on the mass loss of tree leaf litter mixtures. Furthermore, we tested the effects of litter trait community means and dissimilarity on litter mass loss for seven traits relevant to decomposition. We expected macro-detritivore effects on litter mass loss to be most pronounced in litter mixtures of high functional diversity. We used 24 leaf mixtures differing in functional diversity, which were composed of litter from four species from a pool of 16 common European tree species. Earthworms, isopods, or a combination of both were added to each litter combination for two months. Litter mass loss was significantly higher in the presence of earthworms than in that of isopods, whereas no synergistic effects of macro-detritivore mixtures were found. The effect of functional diversity of the litter material was highest in the presence of both macro-detritivore groups, supporting the notion that litter diversity effects are most pronounced in the presence of different detritivore species. Species-specific litter mass loss was explained by nutrient content, secondary compound concentration, and structural components. Moreover, dissimilarity in N concentrations increased litter mass loss, probably because detritivores having access to nutritionally diverse food sources. Furthermore, strong competition between the two macro-detritivores for soil surface litter resulted in a decrease of survival of both macro-detritivores. These results show that the effects of litter functional diversity on decomposition are contingent upon the macro-detritivore community and composition. We conclude that the temporal dynamics of litter trait diversity effects and their interaction with

  18. SYNTHETIC AGB EVOLUTION .3. THE INFLUENCE OF DIFFERENT MASS-LOSS LAWS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GROENEWEGEN, MAT; DEJONG, T

    In Paper I of this series we presented a model to calculate in a synthetic way the evolution of thermal-pulsing AGB stars. The model was applied to the LMC and values were derived for the minimum core mass for third dredge-up and the dredge-up efficiency. In Paper I mass loss on the AGB was

  19. Mass-loss through the L2 Lagrange point - application to main-sequence EMRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linial, Itai; Sari, Re'em

    2017-08-01

    We consider stable mass transfer from the secondary to the primary of an extreme mass ratio binary system. We show that when the mass transfer is sufficiently fast, mass leakage occurs through the outer Lagrange point L2, in addition to the usual transfer through L1. We provide an analytical estimate for the mass leakage rate through L2 and find the conditions in which it is comparable to the mass transfer rate through L1. Focusing on a binary system of a main-sequence star and a supermassive black hole, driven by the emission of gravitational radiation, we show that it may sustain stable mass transfer, along with mass-loss through L2. If such a mass transferring system occurs at our Galactic Centre, it produces a gravitational wave signal detectable by future detectors, such as Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA). The signal evolves according to the star's adiabatic index and cooling time. For low-mass stars, the evolution is faster than the Kelvin-Helmholtz cooling rate driving the star out of the main-sequence. In some cases, the frequency and amplitude of the signal may both decrease with time, contrary to the standard chirp of a coalescing binary. Mass-loss through L2, when occurs, decreases the evolution time-scale of the emitted gravitational wave signal by up to a few tens of per cent. We conclude that L2 mass ejection is a crucial factor in analysing gravitational waves signals produced by such systems.

  20. The loss of skeletal muscle strength, mass, and quality in older adults : the health, aging and body composition study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goodpaster, Bret H; Park, Seok Won; Harris, Tamara B; Kritchevsky, Steven B; Nevitt, Michael; Schwartz, Ann V; Simonsick, Eleanor M; Tylavsky, Frances A; Visser, Marjolein; Newman, Anne B

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The loss of muscle mass is considered to be a major determinant of strength loss in aging. However, large-scale longitudinal studies examining the association between the loss of mass and strength in older adults are lacking. METHODS: Three-year changes in muscle mass and strength were

  1. Mass Loss of Larsen B Tributary Glaciers (Antarctic Peninsula) Unabated Since 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthier, Etienne; Scambos, Ted; Shuman, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    Ice mass loss continues at a high rate among the large glacier tributaries of the Larsen B Ice Shelf following its disintegration in 2002. We evaluate recent mass loss by mapping elevation changes between 2006 and 201011 using differencing of digital elevation models (DEMs). The measurement accuracy of these elevation changes is confirmed by a null test, subtracting DEMs acquired within a few weeks. The overall 2006201011 mass loss rate (9.0 2.1 Gt a-1) is similar to the 2001022006 rate (8.8 1.6 Gt a-1), derived using DEM differencing and laser altimetry. This unchanged overall loss masks a varying pattern of thinning and ice loss for individual glacier basins. On Crane Glacier, the thinning pulse, initially greatest near the calving front, is now broadening and migrating upstream. The largest losses are now observed for the HektoriaGreen glacier basin, having increased by 33 since 2006. Our method has enabled us to resolve large residual uncertainties in the Larsen B sector and confirm its state of ongoing rapid mass loss.

  2. The Impact of Progenitor Mass Loss on the Dynamical and Spectral Evolution of Supernova Remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patnaude, Daniel J.; Lee, Shiu-Hang; Slane, Patrick O.; Badenes, Carles; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Ellison, Donald C.; Milisavljevic, Dan

    2017-11-01

    There is now substantial evidence that the progenitors of some core-collapse supernovae undergo enhanced or extreme mass loss prior to explosion. The imprint of this mass loss is observed in the spectra and dynamics of the expanding blast wave on timescales of days to years after core collapse, and the effects on the spectral and dynamical evolution may linger long after the supernova has evolved into the remnant stage. In this paper, we present, for the first time, largely self-consistent end-to-end simulations for the evolution of a massive star from the pre-main sequence, up to and through core collapse, and into the remnant phase. We present three models and compare and contrast how the progenitor mass-loss history impacts the dynamics and spectral evolution of the supernovae and supernova remnants. We study a model that only includes steady mass loss, a model with enhanced mass loss over a period of ˜5000 yr prior to core collapse, and a model with extreme mass loss over a period of ˜500 yr prior to core collapse. The models are not meant to address any particular supernova or supernova remnant, but rather to highlight the important role that the progenitor evolution plays in the observable qualities of supernovae and supernova remnants. Through comparisons of these three different progenitor evolution scenarios, we find that the mass loss in late stages (during and after core carbon burning) can have a profound impact on the dynamics and spectral evolution of the supernova remnant centuries after core collapse.

  3. Radii and Mass-loss Rates of Type IIb Supernova Progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouchi, Ryoma; Maeda, Keiichi

    2017-05-01

    Several Type IIb supernovae (SNe IIb) have been extensively studied, both in terms of the progenitor radius and the mass-loss rate in the final centuries before the explosion. While the sample is still limited, evidence has been accumulating that the final mass-loss rate tends to be larger for a more extended progenitor, with the difference exceeding an order of magnitude between the more and less extended progenitors. The high mass-loss rates inferred for the more extended progenitors are not readily explained by a prescription commonly used for a single stellar wind. In this paper, we calculate a grid of binary evolution models. We show that the observational relation in the progenitor radii and mass-loss rates may be a consequence of non-conservative mass transfer in the final phase of progenitor evolution without fine tuning. Further, we find a possible link between SNe IIb and SNe IIn. The binary scenario for SNe IIb inevitably leads to a population of SN progenitors surrounded by dense circumstellar matter (CSM) due to extensive mass loss (\\dot{M}≳ {10}-4 {M}⊙ {{yr}}-1) in the binary origin. About 4% of all observed SNe IIn are predicted to have dense CSM, produced by binary non-conservative mass transfer, whose observed characteristics are distinguishable from SNe IIn from other scenarios. Indeed, such SNe may be observationally dominated by systems experiencing huge mass loss in the final 103 yr, leading to luminous SNe IIn or initially bright SNe IIP or IIL with characteristics of SNe IIn in their early spectra.

  4. Net Loss of CaCO3 from a subtropical calcifying community due to seawater acidification: Mesocosm-scale experimental evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, A.J.; Kuffner, I.B.; MacKenzie, F.T.; Jokiel, P.L.; Rodgers, K.S.; Tan, A.

    2009-01-01

    Acidification of seawater owing to oceanic uptake of atmospheric CO 2 originating from human activities such as burning of fossil fuels and land-use changes has raised serious concerns regarding its adverse effects on corals and calcifying communities. Here we demonstrate a net loss of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) material as a result of decreased calcification and increased carbonate dissolution from replicated subtropical coral reef communities (N=3) incubated in continuous-flow mesocosms subject to future seawater conditions. The calcifying community was dominated by the coral Montipora capitata. Daily average community calcification or Net Ecosystem Calcification (NECC=CaCO3 production - dissolution) was positive at 3.3 mmol CaCO3 m-2 h-1 under ambient seawater pCO2 conditions as opposed to negative at -0.04 mmol CaCO3 m-2 h-1 under seawater conditions of double the ambient pCO2. These experimental results provide support for the conclusion that some net calcifying communities could become subject to net dissolution in response to anthropogenic ocean acidification within this century. Nevertheless, individual corals remained healthy, actively calcified (albeit slower than at present rates), and deposited significant amounts of CaCO3 under the prevailing experimental seawater conditions of elevated pCO2.

  5. Net Loss of CaCO3 from a subtropical calcifying community due to seawater acidification: mesocosm-scale experimental evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. S. Rodgers

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Acidification of seawater owing to oceanic uptake of atmospheric CO2 originating from human activities such as burning of fossil fuels and land-use changes has raised serious concerns regarding its adverse effects on corals and calcifying communities. Here we demonstrate a net loss of calcium carbonate (CaCO3 material as a result of decreased calcification and increased carbonate dissolution from replicated subtropical coral reef communities (n=3 incubated in continuous-flow mesocosms subject to future seawater conditions. The calcifying community was dominated by the coral Montipora capitata. Daily average community calcification or Net Ecosystem Calcification (NEC=CaCO3 production – dissolution was positive at 3.3 mmol CaCO3 m−2 h−1 under ambient seawater pCO2 conditions as opposed to negative at −0.04 mmol CaCO3 m−2 h−1 under seawater conditions of double the ambient pCO2. These experimental results provide support for the conclusion that some net calcifying communities could become subject to net dissolution in response to anthropogenic ocean acidification within this century. Nevertheless, individual corals remained healthy, actively calcified (albeit slower than at present rates, and deposited significant amounts of CaCO3 under the prevailing experimental seawater conditions of elevated pCO2.

  6. Sedentary behavior, body mass index, and weight loss maintenance among African American women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Wendell C; Kimbro, Rachel Tolbert; Evans-Hudnall, Gina; Haughton McNeill, Lorna; Barnes, Ann Smith

    2015-01-01

    Relationships among sedentary behavior, weight gain, and weight loss and regain are understudied particularly for African Americans, a high risk group for obesity. The hypotheses were: sedentary behavior is positively associated with current body mass and % of weight loss maintained after initial weight loss; these associations differ by physical activity status. Cross-sectional. National survey. 1,110 African American women. Observational study. A cross-sectional survey was administered to African Americans who had intentionally lost 10% of their body weight. Those who lost weight and maintained at least a 10% weight loss for a year were classified as weight loss maintainers; all others were classified as weight loss re-gainers. Participants were classified into one of four categories based on low and high levels of sedentary behavior and physical activity. The high physical activity, low sedentary behavior category was the reference group. Sociodemographic characteristics and health conditions were covariates. Data were collected in 2009 and analyzed in 2013. Each additional daily hour of sedentary time was associated with an increase in BMI (Pweight loss maintenance (Pweight loss maintained for high but not low physically active participants. High levels of sedentary behavior were associated with poorer weight-loss maintenance among African American women even for those with high levels of physical activity. The implications of this study are that physical activity and sedentary behavior, independently and combined, are associated with BMI and weight-loss maintenance.

  7. Is lost lean mass from intentional weight loss recovered during weight regain in postmenopausal women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beavers, Kristen M; Lyles, Mary F; Davis, Cralen C; Wang, Xuewen; Beavers, Daniel P; Nicklas, Barbara J

    2011-09-01

    Despite the well-known recidivism of obesity, surprisingly little is known about the composition of body weight during weight regain. The objective of this study was to determine whether the composition of body weight regained after intentional weight loss is similar to the composition of body weight lost. The design was a follow-up to a randomized controlled trial of weight loss in which body composition was analyzed and compared in 78 postmenopausal women before the intervention, immediately after the intervention, and 6 and 12 mo after the intervention. All body mass and composition variables were lower immediately after weight loss than at baseline (all P lost with weight loss, which resulted in body-composition changes favoring a lower percentage of body fat and a higher lean-to-fat mass ratio (P weight regain was noted (CV = 1.07). In women who regained ≥2 kg body weight, a decreasing trend in the lean-to-fat mass ratio was observed, which indicated greater fat mass accretion than lean mass accretion (P lost during the weight-loss intervention, 0.26 kg lean tissue was lost; for every 1 kg fat regained over the following year, only 0.12 kg lean tissue was regained. Although not all postmenopausal women who intentionally lose weight will regain it within 1 y, the data suggest that fat mass is regained to a greater degree than is lean mass in those who do experience some weight regain. The health ramifications of our findings remain to be seen.

  8. Is lost lean mass from intentional weight loss recovered during weight regain in postmenopausal women?123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyles, Mary F; Davis, Cralen C; Wang, Xuewen; Beavers, Daniel P; Nicklas, Barbara J

    2011-01-01

    Background: Despite the well-known recidivism of obesity, surprisingly little is known about the composition of body weight during weight regain. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine whether the composition of body weight regained after intentional weight loss is similar to the composition of body weight lost. Design: The design was a follow-up to a randomized controlled trial of weight loss in which body composition was analyzed and compared in 78 postmenopausal women before the intervention, immediately after the intervention, and 6 and 12 mo after the intervention. Results: All body mass and composition variables were lower immediately after weight loss than at baseline (all P lost with weight loss, which resulted in body-composition changes favoring a lower percentage of body fat and a higher lean-to-fat mass ratio (P weight regain was noted (CV = 1.07). In women who regained ≥2 kg body weight, a decreasing trend in the lean-to-fat mass ratio was observed, which indicated greater fat mass accretion than lean mass accretion (P lost during the weight-loss intervention, 0.26 kg lean tissue was lost; for every 1 kg fat regained over the following year, only 0.12 kg lean tissue was regained. Conclusions: Although not all postmenopausal women who intentionally lose weight will regain it within 1 y, the data suggest that fat mass is regained to a greater degree than is lean mass in those who do experience some weight regain. The health ramifications of our findings remain to be seen. PMID:21795437

  9. THE PERIOD CHANGE OF THE CEPHEID POLARIS SUGGESTS ENHANCED MASS LOSS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neilson, Hilding R.; Langer, Norbert [Argelander Institute for Astronomy, University of Bonn, Auf dem Huegel 71, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Engle, Scott G.; Guinan, Ed; Wasatonic, Richard P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Villanova University, 800 Lancaster Ave. Villanova, PA 19085 (United States); Williams, David B., E-mail: hneilson@astro.uni-bonn.de [American Association of Variable Star Observers, 49 Bay State Road, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2012-02-15

    Polaris is one of the most observed stars in the night sky, with recorded observations spanning more than 200 years. From these observations, one can study the real-time evolution of Polaris via the secular rate of change of the pulsation period. However, the measurements of the rate of period change do not agree with predictions from state-of-the-art stellar evolution models. We show that this may imply that Polaris is currently losing mass at a rate of M-dot {approx}10{sup -6} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} based on the difference between modeled and observed rates of period change, consistent with pulsation-enhanced Cepheid mass loss. A relation between the rate of period change and mass loss has important implications for understanding stellar evolution and pulsation, and provides insight into the current Cepheid mass discrepancy.

  10. The Period Change of the Cepheid Polaris Suggests Enhanced Mass Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilson, Hilding R.; Engle, Scott G.; Guinan, Ed; Langer, Norbert; Wasatonic, Richard P.; Williams, David B.

    2012-02-01

    Polaris is one of the most observed stars in the night sky, with recorded observations spanning more than 200 years. From these observations, one can study the real-time evolution of Polaris via the secular rate of change of the pulsation period. However, the measurements of the rate of period change do not agree with predictions from state-of-the-art stellar evolution models. We show that this may imply that Polaris is currently losing mass at a rate of \\dot{M} \\approx 10^{-6}\\, M_\\odot yr-1 based on the difference between modeled and observed rates of period change, consistent with pulsation-enhanced Cepheid mass loss. A relation between the rate of period change and mass loss has important implications for understanding stellar evolution and pulsation, and provides insight into the current Cepheid mass discrepancy.

  11. Mass loss of the Greenland Ice Sheet since the Little Ice Age, implications on sea level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, K. K.; Bjork, A. A.; Khan, Shfaqat Abbas

    -2010, NASA's Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) from 2003-2009, and NASA's Land, Vegetation, and Ice Sensor (LVIS) from 2010, to estimate mass loss throughout the 20th and early 21st Century. We present mass balance estimates of the GrIS since retreat commence from the maximum extent......The impact of mass loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) on 20th Century sea level rise (SLR) has long been subject to intense discussions. While globally distributed tide gauges suggest a global mean SLR of 15-20 cm, quantifying the separate components is of great concern - in particular...... for modeling sea level projections into the 21st Century. Estimates of the past GrIS contribution to SLR have been derived using a number of different approaches, e.g. surface mass balance (SMB) calculations combined with estimates of ice discharge found by in correlating SMB anomalies and calving rates. Here...

  12. Synchrotron-Based in Situ Characterization of the Scaffold Mass Loss from Erosion Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahshon K. Bawolin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The mass loss behavior of degradable tissue scaffolds is critical to their lifespan and other degradation-related properties including mechanical strength and mass transport characteristics. This paper presents a novel method based on synchrotron imaging to characterize the scaffold mass loss from erosion degradation in situ, or without the need of extracting scaffolds once implanted. Specifically, the surface-eroding degradation of scaffolds in a degrading medium was monitored in situ by synchrotron-based imaging; and the time-dependent geometry of scaffolds captured by images was then employed to estimate their mass loss with time, based on the mathematical model that was adopted from the literature of surface erosion with the experimentally-identified model parameters. Acceptable agreement between experimental results and model predictions was observed for scaffolds in a cylindrical shape, made from poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA and polycaprolactone (PCL. This study illustrates that geometry evaluation by synchrotron-based imaging is an effective means to in situ characterize the scaffold mass loss as well as possibly other degradation-related properties.

  13. Elastic uplift in southeast Greenland due to rapid ice mass loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Shfaqat Abbas; Van dam, Tonie; Hamilton, Gordon S.

    2007-01-01

    , calculated from sequential digital elevation models, contributes about 16 mm of the observed uplift, with an additional 5 mm from volume loss of Kangerdlugssuaq Glacier. The remaining uplift signal is attributed to significant melt-induced ice volume loss from the ice sheet margin along the southeast coast......The rapid unloading of ice from the southeastern sector of the Greenland ice sheet between 2001 and 2006 caused an elastic uplift of 35 mm at a GPS site in Kulusuk. Most of the uplift results from ice dynamic-induced volume losses on two nearby outlet glaciers. Volume loss from Helheim Glacier...... between 62N and 66N. Citation: Khan, S. A., J. Wahr, L. A. Stearns, G. S. Hamilton, T. van Dam, K. M. Larson, and O. Francis (2007), Elastic uplift in southeast Greenland due to rapid ice mass loss....

  14. NGC 6819: testing the asteroseismic mass scale, mass loss and evidence for products of non-standard evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handberg, R.; Brogaard, K.; Miglio, A.; Bossini, D.; Elsworth, Y.; Slumstrup, D.; Davies, G. R.; Chaplin, W. J.

    2017-11-01

    We present an extensive peakbagging effort on Kepler data of ˜50 red giant stars in the open star cluster NGC 6819. By employing sophisticated pre-processing of the time series and Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques we extracted individual frequencies, heights and line widths for hundreds of oscillation modes. We show that the `average' asteroseismic parameter δν02, derived from these, can be used to distinguish the stellar evolutionary state between the red giant branch (RGB) stars and red clump (RC) stars. Masses and radii are estimated using asteroseismic scaling relations, both empirically corrected to obtain self-consistency and agreement with independent measures of distance, and using updated theoretical corrections. Remarkable agreement is found, allowing the evolutionary state of the giants to be determined exclusively from the empirical correction to the scaling relations. We find a mean mass of the RGB stars and RC stars in NGC 6819 to be 1.61 ± 0.02 and 1.64 ± 0.02 M⊙, respectively. The difference ΔM = -0.03 ± 0.01 M⊙ is almost insensitive to systematics, suggesting very little RGB mass loss, if any. Stars that are outliers relative to the ensemble reveal overmassive members that likely evolved via mass transfer in a blue straggler phase. We suggest that KIC 4937011, a low-mass Li-rich giant, is a cluster member in the RC phase that experienced very high mass loss during its evolution. Such over- and undermassive stars need to be considered when studying field giants, since the true age of such stars cannot be known and there is currently no way to distinguish them from normal stars.

  15. Energy expenditure in relation to flight speed: whay is the power of mass loss rate estimates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kvist, A.; Klaassen, M.R.J.; Lindström, A.

    1998-01-01

    The relationship between mass loss rate and chemical power in Eying birds is analysed with regard to water and heat balance. Two models are presented: the first model is applicable to situations where heat loads are moderate, i.e. when heat balance can be achieved by regulating non-evaporative heat

  16. The influence of loss and gain of body mass on ovarian activity in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ovarian activity was studied in 36 dry, Bos taurus cows fed to achieve different rates of body mass loss and gain in a 2 x 2 factorial experiment. .... resumption of sexual activity may have been due to gutfill. The present study was initiated to determine ..... Prod. 7, 180. HALE, D.H., 1975. Nutrition, hormones and fertility. Rhod.

  17. Postoperative loss of skeletal muscle mass, complications and quality of life in patients undergoing cardiac surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Venrooij, Lenny M. W.; Verberne, Hein J.; de Vos, Rien; Borgmeijer-Hoelen, Mieke M. M. J.; van Leeuwen, Paul A. M.; de Mol, Bas A. J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to describe postoperative undernutrition in terms of postoperative losses of appendicular skeletal muscle mass (ASMM) with respect to complications, quality of life, readmission, and 1-y mortality after cardiac surgery. Methods: Patients undergoing cardiac

  18. The Influence of Mass Loss on the Eccentricity of Double Star Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docobo, J. A.; Prieto, C.; Ling, J. F.

    In this comunication we study the behaviour of the eccentricity of double star orbits (visual and wide spectroscopic binaries) according to simplified laws of mass loss. Applications to the systems WDS 05245S0224 - HD 35411, WDS 05387S0236 - HD 37468 and WDS 06154S0902 - HD 43362 are included.

  19. Support Loss and Q Factor Enhancement for a Rocking Mass Microgyroscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihua Chen

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A rocking mass gyroscope (RMG is a kind of vibrating mass gyroscope with high sensitivity, whose driving mode and sensing mode are completely uniform. MEMS RMG devices are a research hotspot now because they have the potential to be used in space applications. Support loss is the dominant energy loss mechanism influencing their high sensitivity. An accurate analytical model of support loss for RMGs is presented to enhance their Q factors. The anchor type and support loss mechanism of an RMG are analyzed. Firstly, the support loads, powers flowing into support structure, and vibration energy of an RMG are all developed. Then the analytical model of support loss for the RMG is developed, and its sensitivities to the main structural parameters are also analyzed. High-Q design guidelines for rocking mass microgyroscopes are deduced. Finally, the analytical model is validated by the experimental data and the data from the existing literature. The thicknesses of the prototypes are reduced from 240 µm to 60 µm, while Q factors increase from less than 150 to more than 800. The derived model is general and applicable to various beam resonators, providing significant insight to the design of high-Q MEMS devices.

  20. Evaluation of the association between long-lasting insecticidal nets mass distribution campaigns and child malaria in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyu Hmwe Hmwe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nigeria carries the greatest malaria burden among countries in the world. As part of the National Malaria Control Strategic Plan, free long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs were distributed in 14 states of Nigeria through mass campaigns led by different organizations (the World Bank, UNICEF, or the Global Fund between May 2009 and August 2010. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between LLIN distribution campaigns and child malaria in Nigeria. Methods Data were from the Nigeria Malaria Indicator Survey which was carried out from October to December 2010 on a nationally representative sample of households. Participants were women aged 15–49 years and their children aged less than five years (N = 4082. The main outcome measure was the presence or absence of malaria parasites in blood samples of children (6–59 months. Results Compared with children living in communities with no campaigns, those in the campaign areas were less likely to test positive for malaria after adjusting for geographic locations, community- and individual-level characteristics including child-level use of insecticide-treated nets (ITNs. The protective effects were statistically significant for the World Bank Booster Project areas (OR = 0.18, 95% CI = 0.04-0.73 but did not reach statistical significance for other campaign areas. Results also showed that community-level wealth (OR = 0.51, 95% CI = 0.34-0.76, community-level maternal knowledge regarding malaria prevention (OR = 0.70, 95% CI = 0.50-0.97, and child-level use of ITNs (OR = 0.79, 95% CI = 0.63-0.99 were negatively associated with child malaria. Conclusions The observed protective effects on child malaria of these campaigns (statistically significant in the World Bank Booster Project areas and non-significant in the other areas need to be corroborated by future effectiveness studies. Results also show that improving community

  1. A tipping point in refreezing accelerates mass loss of Greenland's glaciers and ice caps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noël, B; van de Berg, W J; Lhermitte, S; Wouters, B; Machguth, H; Howat, I; Citterio, M; Moholdt, G; Lenaerts, J T M; van den Broeke, M R

    2017-03-31

    Melting of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) and its peripheral glaciers and ice caps (GICs) contributes about 43% to contemporary sea level rise. While patterns of GrIS mass loss are well studied, the spatial and temporal evolution of GICs mass loss and the acting processes have remained unclear. Here we use a novel, 1 km surface mass balance product, evaluated against in situ and remote sensing data, to identify 1997 (±5 years) as a tipping point for GICs mass balance. That year marks the onset of a rapid deterioration in the capacity of the GICs firn to refreeze meltwater. Consequently, GICs runoff increases 65% faster than meltwater production, tripling the post-1997 mass loss to 36±16 Gt-1, or ∼14% of the Greenland total. In sharp contrast, the extensive inland firn of the GrIS retains most of its refreezing capacity for now, buffering 22% of the increased meltwater production. This underlines the very different response of the GICs and GrIS to atmospheric warming.

  2. Accelerated ice-sheet mass loss in Antarctica from 18-year satellite laser ranging measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuanggen Jin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Accurate estimate of the ice-sheet mass balance in Antarctic is very difficult due to complex ice sheet condition and sparse in situ measurements. In this paper, the low-degree gravity field coefficients of up to degree and order 5 derived from Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR measurements are used to determine the ice mass variations in Antarctica for the period 1993–2011. Results show that the ice mass is losing with -36±13 Gt/y in Antarctica, -42±11 Gt/y in the West Antarctica and 6±10 Gt/y in the East Antarctica from 1993 to 2011. The ice mass variations from the SLR 5×5 have a good agreement with the GRACE 5×5, GRACE 5×5 (1&2 and GRACE (60×60 for the entire continent since 2003, but degree 5 from SLR is not sufficient to quantify ice losses in West and East Antarctica, respectively. The rate of ice loss in Antarctica is -28±17 Gt/y for 1993-2002 and -55±17 Gt/y for 2003-2011, indicating significant accelerated ice mass losses since 2003. Furthermore, the results from SLR are comparable with GRACE measurements.

  3. Merging black hole binaries: the effects of progenitor's metallicity, mass-loss rate and Eddington factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacobbo, Nicola; Mapelli, Michela; Spera, Mario

    2018-03-01

    The first four gravitational wave events detected by LIGO were all interpreted as merging black hole binaries (BHBs), opening a new perspective on the study of such systems. Here we use our new population-synthesis code MOBSE, an upgraded version of BSE, to investigate the demography of merging BHBs. MOBSE includes metallicity-dependent prescriptions for mass-loss of massive hot stars. It also accounts for the impact of the electron-scattering Eddington factor on mass-loss. We perform >108 simulations of isolated massive binaries, with 12 different metallicities, to study the impact of mass-loss, core-collapse supernovae and common envelope on merging BHBs. Accounting for the dependence of stellar winds on the Eddington factor leads to the formation of black holes (BHs) with mass up to 65 M⊙ at metallicity Z ˜ 0.0002. However, most BHs in merging BHBs have masses ≲ 40 M⊙. We find merging BHBs with mass ratios in the 0.1-1.0 range, even if mass ratios >0.6 are more likely. We predict that systems like GW150914, GW170814 and GW170104 can form only from progenitors with metallicity Z ≤ 0.006, Z ≤ 0.008 and Z ≤ 0.012, respectively. Most merging BHBs have gone through a common envelope phase, but up to ˜17 per cent merging BHBs at low metallicity did not undergo any common envelope phase. We find a much higher number of mergers from metal-poor progenitors than from metal-rich ones: the number of BHB mergers per unit mass is ˜10-4 M_{⊙}^{-1} at low metallicity (Z = 0.0002-0.002) and drops to ˜10-7 M_{⊙}^{-1} at high metallicity (Z ˜ 0.02).

  4. Systematic survey of the effects of wind mass loss algorithms on the evolution of single massive stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renzo, M.; Ott, C. D.; Shore, S. N.; de Mink, S. E.

    2017-07-01

    Mass loss processes are a key uncertainty in the evolution of massive stars. They determine the amount of mass and angular momentum retained by the star, thus influencing its evolution and presupernova structure. Because of the high complexity of the physical processes driving mass loss, stellar evolution calculations must employ parametric algorithms, and usually only include wind mass loss. We carried out an extensive parameter study of wind mass loss and its effects on massive star evolution using the open-source stellar evolution code MESA. We provide a systematic comparison of wind mass loss algorithms for solar-metallicity, nonrotating, single stars in the initial mass range of 15 M⊙ to 35 M⊙. We consider combinations drawn from two hot phase (I.e., roughly the main sequence) algorithms, three cool phase (I.e., post-main-sequence) algorithms, and two Wolf-Rayet mass loss algorithms. We discuss separately the effects of mass loss in each of these phases. In addition, we consider linear wind efficiency scale factors of 1, 0.33, and 0.1 to account for suggested reductions in mass loss rates due to wind inhomogeneities. We find that the initial to final mass mapping for each zero-age main-sequence (ZAMS) mass has a 50% uncertainty if all algorithm combinations and wind efficiencies are considered. The ad-hoc efficiency scale factor dominates this uncertainty. While the final total mass and internal structure of our models vary tremendously with mass loss treatment, final luminosity and effective temperature are much less sensitive for stars with ZAMS mass ≲ 30 M⊙. This indicates that uncertainty in wind mass loss does not negatively affect estimates of the ZAMS mass of most single-star supernova progenitors from pre-explosion observations. Our results furthermore show that the internal structure of presupernova stars is sensitive to variations in both main sequence and post main-sequence mass loss. The compactness parameter ξ ∝ ℳ /R(ℳ) has been

  5. Instability, finite amplitude pulsation and mass-loss in models of massive OB-type stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Abhay Pratap; Glatzel, Wolfgang

    2017-11-01

    Variability and mass-loss are common phenomena in massive OB-type stars. It is argued that they are caused by violent strange mode instabilities identified in corresponding stellar models. We present a systematic linear stability analysis with respect to radial perturbations of massive OB-type stars with solar chemical composition and masses between 23 and 100 M⊙. For selected unstable stellar models, we perform non-linear simulations of the evolution of the instabilities into the non-linear regime. Finite amplitude pulsations with periods in the range between hours and 100 d are found to be the final result of the instabilities. The pulsations are associated with a mean acoustic luminosity which can be the origin of a pulsationally driven wind. Corresponding mass-loss rates lie in the range between 10-9 and 10-4 M⊙ yr-1 and may thus affect the evolution of massive stars.

  6. Glaciers. Attribution of global glacier mass loss to anthropogenic and natural causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzeion, Ben; Cogley, J Graham; Richter, Kristin; Parkes, David

    2014-08-22

    The ongoing global glacier retreat is affecting human societies by causing sea-level rise, changing seasonal water availability, and increasing geohazards. Melting glaciers are an icon of anthropogenic climate change. However, glacier response times are typically decades or longer, which implies that the present-day glacier retreat is a mixed response to past and current natural climate variability and current anthropogenic forcing. Here we show that only 25 ± 35% of the global glacier mass loss during the period from 1851 to 2010 is attributable to anthropogenic causes. Nevertheless, the anthropogenic signal is detectable with high confidence in glacier mass balance observations during 1991 to 2010, and the anthropogenic fraction of global glacier mass loss during that period has increased to 69 ± 24%. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  7. Explaining individual variation in patterns of mass loss in breeding birds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuthill Innes C

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies of birds have a disproportionate representation in the literature on life-history evolution, because of the (apparent ease with which the costs and benefits can be quantified and manipulated. During reproduction, birds frequently show a highly conserved pattern of mass change and changes in mass loss during breeding have been widely considered to be a valid short-term measure of the costs of reproduction. Experimental manipulations of the breeding attempts of birds usually argue that the presence of a response shows that a cost of reproduction exists, but there is little consensus as to how the size of these costs can be measured. Results We model this mass loss by considering how a parent can maximise its lifetime reproductive success, using a theoretical framework that is particularly suited to modelling parental care in altricial birds. If lifetime reproductive success is taken to be the sum of a parent's current and future reproductive success, we show that the exact forms of these components will influence the optimal amount of mass a parent should lose. In particular, we demonstrate that the shape of the relationship between parental investment and chick survival will lead to differing degrees of investment between parents of different initial qualities: parents with initially high levels of energy reserves could conceivably invested a lesser, similar or greater amount of resources than parents with initially low reserves, and these initially 'heavy' parents could potentially end up being lighter than the initially 'lighter' individuals. Conclusion We argue that it is difficult to make predictions about the dependence of a parent's final mass on its initial mass, and therefore mass loss should only be used as a short-term measure of the costs of reproduction with caution. The model demonstrates that we require a better understanding of the relationship between mass loss and both current and future reproductive

  8. Rapid weight loss and the body fluid balance and hemoglobin mass of elite amateur boxers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reljic, Dejan; Hässler, Eike; Jost, Joachim; Friedmann-Bette, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    Dehydration is assumed to be a major adverse effect associated with rapid loss of body mass for competing in a lower weight class in combat sports. However, the effects of such weight cutting on body fluid balance in a real-life setting are unknown. To examine the effects of 5% or greater loss of body mass within a few days before competition on body water, blood volume, and plasma volume in elite amateur boxers. Case-control study. Sports medicine laboratory. Seventeen male boxers (age = 19.2 ± 2.9 years, height = 175.1 ± 7.0 cm, mass = 65.6 ± 9.2 kg) were assigned to the weight-loss group (WLG; n = 10) or the control group (CON; n = 7). The WLG reduced body mass by restricting fluid and food and inducing excessive sweat loss by adhering to individual methods. The CON participated in their usual precompetition training. During an ordinary training period (t-1), 2 days before competition (t-2), and 1 week after competition (t-3), we performed bioelectrical impedance measurements; calculated total body water, intracellular water, and extracellular water; and estimated total hemoglobin mass (tHbmass), blood volume, and plasma volume by the CO-rebreathing method. In the WLG, the loss of body mass (5.6% ± 1.7%) led to decreases in total body water (6.0% ± 0.9%), extracellular water (12.4% ± 7.6%), tHbmass (5.3% ± 3.8%), blood volume (7.6% ± 2.1%; P .05). At t-3, total body water, extracellular water, and plasma volume had returned to near baseline values, but tHbmass and blood volume still were less than baseline values (P .05). In a real-life setting, the loss of approximately 6% body mass within 5 days induced hypohydration, which became evident by the decreases in body water and plasma volume. The reduction in tHbmass was a surprising observation that needs further investigation.

  9. Mutations in Cancer Cause Gain of Cysteine, Histidine, and Tryptophan at the Expense of a Net Loss of Arginine on the Proteome Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktoriia Tsuber

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of somatic mutations is critical for the transition of a normal cell to become cancerous. Mutations cause amino acid substitutions that change properties of proteins. However, it has not been studied as to what extent the composition and accordingly chemical properties of the cell proteome is altered as a result of the increased mutation load in cancer. Here, we analyzed data on amino acid substitutions caused by mutations in about 2000 protein coding genes from the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia that contains information on nucleotide and amino acid alterations in 782 cancer cell lines, and validated the analysis with information on amino acid substitutions for the same set of proteins in the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC; v78 in circa 18,000 tumor samples. We found that nonsynonymous single nucleotide substitutions in the analyzed proteome subset ultimately result in a net gain of cysteine, histidine, and tryptophan at the expense of a net loss of arginine. The extraordinary loss of arginine may be attributed to some extent to composition of its codons as well as to the importance of arginine in the functioning of prominent tumor suppressor proteins like p53.

  10. Local reduction of decadal glacier thickness loss through mass balance management in ski resorts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Andrea; Helfricht, Kay; Stocker-Waldhuber, Martin

    2016-11-01

    For Austrian glacier ski resorts, established in the 1970s and 1980s during a period of glacier advance, negative mass balances with resulting glacier area loss and decrease in surface elevation present an operational challenge. Glacier cover, snow farming, and technical snow production were introduced as adaptation measures based on studies on the effect of these measures on energy and mass balance. After a decade of the application of the various measures, we studied the transition from the proven short-term effects of the measures on mass balance to long-term effects on elevation changes. Based on lidar digital elevation models and differential GPS measurements, decadal surface elevation changes in 15 locations with mass balance management were compared to those without measures (apart from piste grooming) in five Tyrolean ski resorts on seven glaciers. The comparison of surface elevation changes presents clear local differences in mass change, and it shows the potential to retain local ice thickness over 1 decade. Locally up to 21.1 m ± 0.4 m of ice thickness was preserved on mass balance managed areas compared to non-maintained areas over a period of 9 years. In this period, mean annual thickness loss in 15 of the mass balance managed profiles is 0.54 ± 0.04 m yr-1 lower (-0.23 ± 0.04 m yr-1on average) than in the respective reference areas (-0.78 ± 0.04 m yr-1). At two of these profiles the surface elevation was preserved altogether, which is promising for a sustainable maintenance of the infrastructure at glacier ski resorts. In general the results demonstrate the high potential of the combination of mass balance management by snow production and glacier cover, not only in the short term but also for multi-year application to maintain the skiing infrastructure.

  11. Prepregnancy and early adulthood body mass index and adult weight change in relation to fetal loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskins, Audrey J; Rich-Edwards, Janet W; Colaci, Daniela S; Afeiche, Myriam C; Toth, Thomas L; Gillman, Matthew W; Missmer, Stacey A; Chavarro, Jorge E

    2014-10-01

    To examine prospectively the relationships of prepregnancy body mass index (BMI), BMI at age 18 years, and weight change since age 18 years with risk of fetal loss. Our prospective cohort study included 25,719 pregnancies reported by 17,027 women in the Nurses' Health Study II between 1990 and 2009. In 1989, height, current weight, and weight at age 18 years were self-reported. Current weight was updated every 2 years thereafter. Pregnancies were self-reported, with case pregnancies lost spontaneously and comparison pregnancies ending in ectopic pregnancy, induced abortion, or live birth. Incident fetal loss was reported in 4,494 (17.5%) pregnancies. Compared with those of normal BMI, the multivariate relative risks of fetal loss were 1.07 (95% CI [confidence interval] 1.00-1.15) for overweight women, 1.10 (95% CI 0.98-1.23) for class I obese women, and 1.27 (95% CI 1.11-1.45) for class II and class III obese women (P trend ≤ .001). Body mass index at age 18 years was not associated with fetal loss (P trend=.59). Compared with women who maintained a stable weight (± 4 kg) between age 18 years and before pregnancy, women who lost weight had a 20% (95% CI 9-29%) lower risk of fetal loss. This association was stronger among women who were overweight at age 18 years. Being overweight or obese before pregnancy was associated with higher risk of fetal loss. In women overweight or obese at age 18 years, losing 4 kg or more was associated with a lower risk of fetal loss. : II.

  12. Managing for No Net Loss of Ecological Services: An Approach for Quantifying Loss of Coastal Wetlands due to Sea Level Rise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassakian, Jennifer; Jones, Ann; Martinich, Jeremy; Hudgens, Daniel

    2017-05-01

    Sea level rise has the potential to substantially alter the extent and nature of coastal wetlands and the critical ecological services they provide. In making choices about how to respond to rising sea level, planners are challenged with weighing easily quantified risks (e.g., loss of property value due to inundation) against those that are more difficult to quantify (e.g., loss of primary production or carbon sequestration services provided by wetlands due to inundation). Our goal was to develop a cost-effective, appropriately-scaled, model-based approach that allows planners to predict, under various sea level rise and response scenarios, the economic cost of wetland loss-with the estimates proxied by the costs of future restoration required to maintain the existing level of wetland habitat services. Our approach applies the Sea Level Affecting Marshes Model to predict changes in wetland habitats over the next century, and then applies Habitat Equivalency Analysis to predict the cost of restoration projects required to maintain ecological services at their present, pre-sea level rise level. We demonstrate the application of this approach in the Delaware Bay estuary and in the Indian River Lagoon (Florida), and discuss how this approach can support future coastal decision-making.

  13. Milk as a rehydration fluid following exercise-induced loss of body mass

    OpenAIRE

    Seery, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    peer-reviewed The effectiveness of 0.1% fat milk (M) at restoring fluid balance after exercise and heat induced hypohydration was compared to a commercially available carbohydrate-electrolyte (CE) sports drink and water (W) using a metered rate of fluid ingestion. After losing 2.1 (0.2) % body mass, participants (n = 7) consumed a drink volume equivalent to 150% of their body mass loss, over a period of 2.5-3 hours. A metered rate of fluid ingestion was chosen as it is widely acknowledged ...

  14. Sustained mass loss of the northeast Greenland ice sheet triggered by regional warming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Shfaqat Abbas; Kjaer, Kurt H.; Bevis, Michael

    2014-01-01

    and northwest Greenland. Here, we show that the northeast Greenland ice stream, which extends more than 600 km into the interior of the ice sheet, is now undergoing sustained dynamic thinning, linked to regional warming, after more than a quarter of a century of stability. This sector of the Greenland ice sheet...... is of particular interest, because the drainage basin area covers 16% of the ice sheet (twice that of Jakobshavn Isbrae) and numerical model predictions suggest no significant mass loss for this sector, leading to an under-estimation of future global sea-level rise. The geometry of the bedrock and monotonic trend...... in glacier speed-up and mass loss suggests that dynamic drawdown of ice in this region will continue in the near future....

  15. Fire spread in chaparral: comparison of data with flame-mass loss relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    David R. Weise; Thomas H. Fletcher; Shankar Mahalingam; Xiangyang Zhou; Lulu Sun

    2017-01-01

    The relationships between flame length, mass loss rate, and the Froude number have become well-established for many different fuels over the past 60 years. Chaparral, a mixture of shrub plants from the Mediterranean climate zone of southwestern North America, represents a fuel type—living plants—that has seldom been included in the development of these relationships....

  16. Early solar mass loss, opacity uncertainties, and the solar abundance problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzik, Joyce Ann [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Keady, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kilcrease, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Solar models calibrated with the new element abundance mixture of Asplund et al. published in 2005 no longer produce good agreement with the sound speed, convection zone depth, and convection zone helium abundance inferred from solar oscillation data. Attempts to modify the input physics of the standard model, for example, by including enhanced diffusion, increased opacities, accretion, convective overshoot, or gravity waves have not restored the good agreement attained with the prior abundances. Here we present new models including early mass loss via a stronger solar wind. Early mass loss has been investigated prior to the solar abundance problem to deplete lithium and resolve the 'faint early sun problem'. We find that mass loss modifies the core structure and deepens the convection zone, and so improves agreement with oscillation data using the new abundances: however the amount of mass loss must be small to avoid destroying all of the surface lithium, and agreement is not fully restored. We also considered the prospects for increasing solar interior opacities. In order to increase mixture opacities by the 30% required to mitigate the abundance problem, the opacities of individual elements (e.g., O, N, C, and Fe) must be revised by a factor of two to three for solar interior conditions: we are investigating the possibility of broader calculated line wings for bound-bound transitions at the relevant temperatures to enhance opacity. We find that including all of the elements in the AGS05 opacity mixture (through uranium at atomic number Z=92) instead of only the 17 elements in the OPAL opacity mixture increases opacities by a negligible 0.2%.

  17. ANP system activity predicts variability of fat mass reduction and insulin sensitivity during weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brachs, Maria; Wiegand, Susanna; Leupelt, Verena; Ernert, Andrea; Kintscher, Ulrich; Jumpertz von Schwarzenberg, Reiner; Decker, Anne-Marie; Bobbert, Thomas; Hübner, Norbert; Chen, Wei; Krude, Heiko; Spranger, Joachim; Mai, Knut

    2016-06-01

    In weight loss trials, a considerable inter-individual variability in reduction of fat mass and changes of insulin resistance is observed, even under standardized study conditions. The underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Given the metabolic properties of the atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) system, we hypothesized that ANP signaling might be involved in this phenomenon by changes of ANP secretion or receptor balance. Therefore, we investigated the impact of systemic, adipose and myocellular ANP system on metabolic and anthropometric improvements during weight loss. We comprehensively investigated 143 subjects (31 male, 112 female) before and after a 3 month-standardized weight loss program. The time course of BMI, fat mass, insulin sensitivity, circulating mid-regional proANP (MR-proANP) levels as well as adipose and myocellular natriuretic receptor A (NPR-A) and C (NPR-C) mRNA expression were investigated. BMI decreased by -12.6±3.7%. This was accompanied by a remarkable decrease of adipose NPR-C expression (1005.0±488.4 vs. 556.7±465.6; pANP receptor expression predicted the degree of weight loss induced fat mass reduction. Our comprehensive human data support that peripheral ANP signalling is involved in control of adipose tissue plasticity and function during weight loss. (Funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (KFO281/2), the Berlin Institute of Health (BIH) and the German Centre for Cardiovascular Research (DZHK/BMBF); ClinicalTrials.gov number: NCT00850629). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of pyrethroid resistance on the cost effectiveness of a mass distribution of long-lasting insecticidal nets: a modelling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briët, Olivier J T; Penny, Melissa A; Hardy, Diggory; Awolola, Taiwo S; Van Bortel, Wim; Corbel, Vincent; Dabiré, Roch K; Etang, Josiane; Koudou, Benjamin G; Tungu, Patrick K; Chitnis, Nakul

    2013-02-25

    The effectiveness of insecticide-treated nets in preventing malaria is threatened by developing resistance against pyrethroids. Little is known about how strongly this affects the effectiveness of vector control programmes. Data from experimental hut studies on the effects of long-lasting, insecticidal nets (LLINs) on nine anopheline mosquito populations, with varying levels of mortality in World Health Organization susceptibility tests, were used to parameterize malaria models. Both simple static models predicting population-level insecticidal effectiveness and protection against blood feeding, and complex dynamic epidemiological models, where LLINs decayed over time, were used. The epidemiological models, implemented in OpenMalaria, were employed to study the impact of a single mass distribution of LLINs on malaria, both in terms of episodes prevented during the effective lifetime of the batch of LLINs, and in terms of net health benefits (NHB) expressed in disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) averted during that period, depending on net type (standard pyrethroid-only LLIN or pyrethroid-piperonyl butoxide combination LLIN), resistance status, coverage and pre-intervention transmission level. There were strong positive correlations between insecticide susceptibility status and predicted population level insecticidal effectiveness of and protection against blood feeding by LLIN intervention programmes. With the most resistant mosquito population, the LLIN mass distribution averted up to about 40% fewer episodes and DALYs during the effective lifetime of the batch than with fully susceptible populations. However, cost effectiveness of LLINs was more sensitive to the pre-intervention transmission level and coverage than to susceptibility status. For four out of the six Anopheles gambiae sensu lato populations where direct comparisons between standard LLINs and combination LLINs were possible, combination nets were more cost effective, despite being more expensive

  19. Initial fungal colonizer affects mass loss and fungal community development in Picea abies logs 6 yr after inoculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel L. Lindner; Rimvydas Vasaitis; Ariana Kubartova; Johan Allmer; Hanna Johannesson; Mark T. Banik; Jan. Stenlid

    2011-01-01

    Picea abies logs were inoculated with Resinicium bicolor, Fomitopsis pinicola or left un-inoculated and placed in an old-growth boreal forest. Mass loss and fungal community data were collected after 6 yr to test whether simplification of the fungal community via inoculation affects mass loss and fungal community development. Three...

  20. Comoving frame models of hot star winds. II. Reduction of O star wind mass-loss rates in global models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krtička, J.; Kubát, J.

    2017-10-01

    We calculate global (unified) wind models of main-sequence, giant, and supergiant O stars from our Galaxy. The models are calculated by solving hydrodynamic, kinetic equilibrium (also known as NLTE) and comoving frame (CMF) radiative transfer equations from the (nearly) hydrostatic photosphere to the supersonic wind. For given stellar parameters, our models predict the photosphere and wind structure and in particular the wind mass-loss rates without any free parameters. Our predicted mass-loss rates are by a factor of 2-5 lower than the commonly used predictions. A possible cause of the difference is abandoning of the Sobolev approximation for the calculation of the radiative force, because our models agree with predictions of CMF NLTE radiative transfer codes. Our predicted mass-loss rates agree nicely with the mass-loss rates derived from observed near-infrared and X-ray line profiles and are slightly lower than mass-loss rates derived from combined UV and Hα diagnostics. The empirical mass-loss rate estimates corrected for clumping may therefore be reconciled with theoretical predictions in such a way that the average ratio between individual mass-loss rate estimates is not higher than about 1.6. On the other hand, our predictions are by factor of 4.7 lower than pure Hα mass-loss rate estimates and can be reconciled with these values only assuming a microclumping factor of at least eight.

  1. Comparison of the Heat Release Rate from the Mass Loss Calorimeter to the Cone Calorimeter for Wood-based Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laura E. Hasburgh; Robert H. White; Mark A. Dietenberger; Charles R. Boardman

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing demand for material properties to be used as inputs in fi re behavior models designed to address building fire safety. This comparative study evaluates using the mass loss calorimeter as an alternative to the cone calorimeter for obtaining heat release rates of wood-based materials. For this study, a modified mass loss calorimeter utilized an...

  2. Effects of changing mosquito host searching behaviour on the cost effectiveness of a mass distribution of long-lasting, insecticidal nets : a modelling study

    OpenAIRE

    Briët, Olivier JT; Chitnis, Nakul

    2013-01-01

    Background The effectiveness of long-lasting, insecticidal nets (LLINs) in preventing malaria is threatened by the changing biting behaviour of mosquitoes, from nocturnal and endophagic to crepuscular and exophagic, and by their increasing resistance to insecticides. Methods Using epidemiological stochastic simulation models, we studied the impact of a mass LLIN distribution on Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Specifically, we looked at impact in terms of episodes prevented during the effective...

  3. Reduction of mass loss by the hot Jupiter WASP-12b due to its magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakcheev, A. S.; Zhilkin, A. G.; Kaigorodov, P. V.; Bisikalo, D. V.; Kosovichev, A. G.

    2017-11-01

    The influence of the dipolar magnetic field of a "hot Jupiter" with the parameters of the object WASP-12b on the mass-loss rate from its atmosphere is investigated. The results of three-dimensional gas-dynamical and magnetohydrodynamical computations show that the presence of a magnetic moment with a strength of 0.1 the magnetic moment of Jupiter leads to appreciable variations of the matter flow structure. For example, in the case of the exoplanet WASP-12b with its specified set of atmospheric parameters, the stream from the vicinity of the Lagrange point L1 is not stopped by the dynamical pressure of the stellar wind, and the envelope remains open. Including the effect of the magnetic field leads to a variation in this picture—the atmosphere becomes quasi-closed, with a characteristic size of order 14 planetary radii, which, in turn, substantially decreases the mass-loss rate by the exoplanet atmosphere (by 70%). This reduction of the mass-loss rate due to the influence of the magnetic fieldmakes it possible for exoplanets to form closed and quasi-closed envelopes in the presence of more strongly overflowing Roche lobes than is possible without a magnetic field.

  4. The effects in humans of rapid loss of body mass on a boxing-related task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M S; Dyson, R; Hale, T; Harrison, J H; McManus, P

    2000-09-01

    The physiological effects of strategies for a rapid loss of body mass immediately before weighing-in for competition in weight-governed sports are unclear. This study examined the effects of a 3%-4% loss in body mass on a boxing-related task. Seven novice amateur boxers completed three 3 min rounds of simulated boxing on a prototype boxing ergometer in an euhydrated state (E-trial) and after exercise-induced thermal dehydration (D-trial). All subjects lost body mass following dehydration-mean body mass fell 3.8 (SD +/- 0.3)% [77.3 (SD +/- 11.3) to 74.4 (SD +/- 10.7) kg, PPV) were inconsistent. Four subjects suffered reductions in PV between 15% and 30%, one subject maintained his E-trial value and two recorded an increase. The D-trial mean PV value was 8.0 (SD +/- 17.2)% lower but this fall was not statistically significant (P>0.05). Analysis of D-trial boxing performance showed one subject maintained his performance over the two trials and a second improved 17.8%. A two-way ANOVA (condition x time) with repeated measures on both factors showed no significant main effect differences for condition (F1,6 = 3.93 P>0.05), time (F1.83,48 = 1.12, P>0.05) or interaction between them (F1.93,48, P>0.05). Furthermore, neither heart rate nor blood lactate responses in the boxing task differed between trials. These data were affected by the small sample. Power and effect size analysis using eta(2) procedure and removing the outlier data produced a mean fall in boxing performance of 26.8%. However, some subjects appeared able to resist the deleterious effects of a rapid loss of body mass prior to competition and further research is needed to explain the mechanisms under-pinning this ability.

  5. Managing for No Net Loss of Ecological Services: An Approach for Quantifying Loss of Coastal Wetlands due to Sea Level Rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassakian, Jennifer; Jones, Ann; Martinich, Jeremy; Hudgens, Daniel

    2017-05-01

    Sea level rise has the potential to substantially alter the extent and nature of coastal wetlands and the critical ecological services they provide. In making choices about how to respond to rising sea level, planners are challenged with weighing easily quantified risks (e.g., loss of property value due to inundation) against those that are more difficult to quantify (e.g., loss of primary production or carbon sequestration services provided by wetlands due to inundation). Our goal was to develop a cost-effective, appropriately-scaled, model-based approach that allows planners to predict, under various sea level rise and response scenarios, the economic cost of wetland loss—with the estimates proxied by the costs of future restoration required to maintain the existing level of wetland habitat services. Our approach applies the Sea Level Affecting Marshes Model to predict changes in wetland habitats over the next century, and then applies Habitat Equivalency Analysis to predict the cost of restoration projects required to maintain ecological services at their present, pre-sea level rise level. We demonstrate the application of this approach in the Delaware Bay estuary and in the Indian River Lagoon (Florida), and discuss how this approach can support future coastal decision-making.

  6. Modification of vortex dynamics and transport properties of transitional axisymmetric jets using zero-net-mass-flux actuation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Önder, Asim; Meyers, Johan, E-mail: johan.meyers@mech.kuleuven.be [Department of Mechanical Engineering, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 300A, B3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2014-07-15

    We study the near field of a zero-net-mass-flux (ZNMF) actuated round jet using direct numerical simulations. The Reynolds number of the jet Re{sub D} = 2000 and three ZNMF actuators are used, evenly distributed over a circle, and directed towards the main jet. The actuators are triggered in phase, and have a relatively low momentum coefficient of C{sub μ} = 0.0049 each. We study four different control frequencies with Strouhal numbers ranging from St{sub D} = 0.165 to St{sub D} = 1.32; next to that, also two uncontrolled baseline cases are included in the study. We find that this type of ZNMF actuation leads to strong deformations of the near-field jet region that are very similar to those observed for non-circular jets. At the end of the jet's potential core (x/D = 5), the jet-column cross section is deformed into a hexagram-like geometry that results from strong modifications of the vortex structures. Two mechanisms lead to these modifications, i.e., (i) self-deformation of the jet's primary vortex rings started by distortions in their azimuthal curvature by the actuation, and (ii) production of side jets by the development and subsequent detachment of secondary streamwise vortex pairs. Further downstream (x/D = 10), the jet transforms into a triangular pattern, as the sharp corner regions of the hexagram entrain fluid and spread. We further investigate the global characteristics of the actuated jets. In particular when using the jet preferred frequency, i.e., St{sub D} = 0.33, parameters such as entrainment, centerline decay rate, and mean turbulent kinetic energy are significantly increased. Furthermore, high frequency actuation, i.e., St{sub D} = 1.32, is found to suppress the mechanisms leading to large scale structure growth and turbulent kinetic energy production. The simulations further include a passive scalar equation, and passive scalar mixing is also quantified and visualized.

  7. Greenland ice sheet surface temperature, melt and mass loss: 2000-06

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, D.K.; Williams, R.S.; Luthcke, S.B.; DiGirolamo, N.E.

    2008-01-01

    A daily time series of 'clear-sky' surface temperature has been compiled of the Greenland ice sheet (GIS) using 1 km resolution moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) land-surface temperature (LST) maps from 2000 to 2006. We also used mass-concentration data from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) to study mass change in relationship to surface melt from 2003 to 2006. The mean LST of the GIS increased during the study period by ???0.27??Ca-1. The increase was especially notable in the northern half of the ice sheet during the winter months. Melt-season length and timing were also studied in each of the six major drainage basins. Rapid (melt begins. Initiation of large-scale surface melt was followed rapidly by mass loss. This indicates that surface meltwater is flowing rapidly to the base of the ice sheet, causing acceleration of outlet glaciers, thus highlighting the metastability of parts of the GIS and the vulnerability of the ice sheet to air-temperature increases. If air temperatures continue to rise over Greenland, increased surface melt will play a large role in ice-sheet mass loss.

  8. Globular cluster mass-loss in the context of multiple populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastian, Nate; Lardo, Carmela

    2015-10-01

    Many scenarios for the origin of the chemical anomalies observed in globular clusters (GCs; i.e. multiple populations) require that GCs were much more massive at birth, up to 10-100 times, than they are presently. This is invoked in order to have enough material processed through first generation stars in order to form the observed numbers of enriched stars (inferred to be second generation stars in these models). If such mass-loss was due to tidal stripping, gas expulsion, or tidal interaction with the birth environment, there should be clear correlations between the fraction of enriched stars and other cluster properties, whereas the observations show a remarkably uniform enriched fraction of 0.68 ± 0.07 (from 33 observed GCs). If interpreted in the heavy mass-loss paradigm, this means that all GCs lost the same fraction of their initial mass (between 95 and 98 per cent), regardless of their mass, metallicity, location at birth or subsequent migration, or epoch of formation. This is incompatible with predictions, hence we suggest that GCs were not significantly more massive at birth, and that the fraction of enriched to primordial stars observed in clusters today likely reflects their initial value. If true, this would rule out self-enrichment through nucleosynthesis as a viable solution to the multiple population phenomenon.

  9. Pre-explosion Spiral Mass Loss of a Binary Star Merger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pejcha, Ondřej; Metzger, Brian D.; Tyles, Jacob G.; Tomida, Kengo

    2017-11-01

    Binary stars commonly pass through phases of direct interaction, which result in the rapid loss of mass, energy, and angular momentum. Though crucial to understanding the fates of these systems, including their potential as gravitational wave sources, this short-lived phase is poorly understood and has thus far been unambiguously observed in only a single event, V1309 Sco. Here we show that the complex and previously unexplained photometric behavior of V1309 Sco prior to its main outburst results naturally from the runaway loss of mass and angular momentum from the outer Lagrange point, which lasts for thousands of orbits prior to the final dynamical coalescence, much longer than predicted by contemporary models. This process enshrouds the binary in a “death spiral” outflow, which affects the amplitude and phase modulation of its light curve, and contributes to driving the system together. The total amount of mass lost during this gradual phase (∼ 0.05 {M}ȯ ) rivals the mass lost during the subsequent dynamical interaction phase, which has been the main focus of “common envelope” modeling so far. Analogous features in related transients suggest that this behavior is ubiquitous.

  10. Growth hormone mitigates loss of periosteal bone formation and muscle mass in disuse osteopenic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grubbe, M-C; Thomsen, Jesper Skovhus; Nyengaard, J R

    2014-01-01

    limb. Sixty female Wistar rats, 14 weeks old, were divided into the following groups: baseline, controls, BTX, BTX+GH, and GH. GH was given at a dosage of 5 mg/kg/d for 4 weeks. Compared with controls, BTX resulted in lower periosteal bone formation rate (BFR/BS,-79%, P...Growth hormone (GH) is a potent anabolic agent capable of increasing both bone and muscle mass. The aim was to investigate whether GH could counteract disuse-induced loss of bone and muscle mass in a rat model. Paralysis was induced by injecting 4 IU Botox (BTX) into the muscles of the right hind......BMD, -13%, Pmuscle mass (-69%, Pmuscle cell cross sectional area (CSA) (-73%, P

  11. Luminosities and mass-loss rates of Local Group AGB stars and red supergiants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Sloan, G. C.

    2018-01-01

    Context. Mass loss is one of the fundamental properties of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, and through the enrichment of the interstellar medium, AGB stars are key players in the life cycle of dust and gas in the universe. However, a quantitative understanding of the mass-loss process is still largely lacking. Aims: We aim to investigate mass loss and luminosity in a large sample of evolved stars in several Local Group galaxies with a variety of metalliticies and star-formation histories: the Small and Large Magellanic Cloud, and the Fornax, Carina, and Sculptor dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs). Methods: Dust radiative transfer models are presented for 225 carbon stars and 171 oxygen-rich evolved stars in several Local Group galaxies for which spectra from the Infrared Spectrograph on Spitzer are available. The spectra are complemented with available optical and infrared photometry to construct spectral energy distributions. A minimization procedure was used to determine luminosity and mass-loss rate (MLR). Pulsation periods were derived for a large fraction of the sample based on a re-analysis of existing data. Results: New deep K-band photometry from the VMC survey and multi-epoch data from IRAC (at 4.5 μm) and AllWISE and NEOWISE have allowed us to derive pulsation periods longer than 1000 days for some of the most heavily obscured and reddened objects. We derive (dust) MLRs and luminosities for the entire sample. The estimated MLRs can differ significantly from estimates for the same objects in the literature due to differences in adopted optical constants (up to factors of several) and details in the radiative transfer modelling. Updated parameters for the super-AGB candidate MSX SMC 055 (IRAS 00483-7347) are presented. Its current mass is estimated to be 8.5 ± 1.6 M⊙, suggesting an initial mass well above 8 M⊙ in agreement with estimates based on its large Rubidium abundance. Using synthetic photometry, we present and discuss colour-colour and

  12. Mass-Loss Evolution in the EUV Low Corona from SDO/AIA Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Fernando M.; Hebe Cremades, M.; Nuevo, Federico A.; Balmaceda, Laura A.; Vásquez, Alberto M.

    2017-01-01

    We carry out an analysis of the mass that is ejected from three coronal dimming regions observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The three events are unambiguously identified with white-light coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that are associated in turn with surface activity of diverse nature: an impulsive (M-class) flare, a weak (B-class) flare, and a filament eruption without a flare. The use of three AIA coronal passbands allows applying a differential emission measure technique to define the dimming regions and identify their ejected mass through the analysis of the electronic density depletion associated with the eruptions. The temporal evolution of the mass loss from the three dimmings can be approximated by an exponential equation followed by a linear fit. We determine the mass of the associated CMEs from COR2 data. The results show that the ejected masses from the low corona represent a considerable amount of the CME mass. We also find that plasma is still being ejected from the low corona at the time when the CMEs reach the COR2 field of view. The temporal evolution of the angular width of the CMEs, of the dimming regions in the low corona, and of the flux registered by GOES in soft X-rays are all in close relation with the behavior of mass ejection from the low corona. We discuss the implications of our findings toward a better understanding of the temporal evolution of several parameters associated with the analyzed dimmings and CMEs.

  13. Assessment of fat-mass loss during weight reduction in obese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogelholm, G M; Sievänen, H T; van Marken Lichtenbelt, W D; Westerterp, K R

    1997-08-01

    Methods for assessing body fat mass (FM) loss were compared in 32 obese (body mass index [BMI], 29 to 41 kg/m2) premenopausal women before and after a weight loss of 13.0 +/- 3.4 kg (mean +/- SD). A four-component (4C) model was used as the criterion. The other methods were as follows: three-component models (body density with total body water [3W] or bone minerals [3M]), underwater weighing, dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry ([DXA] XR-26, software 2.5.2; Norland, Ft Atkinson, WI), bioelectric impedance analysis (BIA) with an obese-specific equation [Segal et al), skinfolds (Durnin and Womersley), and an equation with BMI (Deurenberg et al). The 3W model (bias +/- SD, 0.5 +/- 0.4 kg), XR-26 (0.6 +/- 2.1 kg), and BMI equation (-0.3 +/- 2.1 kg) gave practically unbiased mean estimations of fat loss. All other methods underestimated fat loss by at least 1.6 kg (range of bias, -2.7 to -1.6 kg). The small bias (0.7 +/- 1.0 kg) between underwater weighing and model 4C before weight reduction indicates that the two-component assumptions were valid in premenopausal, weight-stable obese women. However, particularly the water fraction of the fat-free body component (4C model) was increased after weight reduction (before, 72.9% +/- 1.4%; after, 75.7% +/- 2.2%), making both underwater weighing and the 3M model uncertain for assessment of body composition changes. A general tendency for overestimating FM was seen before and more clearly after weight reduction. However, most methods underestimated fat loss, apparently because of unexpected changes in hydration of the fat-free body component.

  14. The role of fat and lean mass in bone loss in older men: findings from the CHAMP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleicher, Kerrin; Cumming, Robert G; Naganathan, Vasikaran; Travison, Thomas G; Sambrook, Philip N; Blyth, Fiona M; Handelsman, David J; Le Couteur, David G; Waite, Louise M; Creasey, Helen M; Seibel, Markus J

    2011-12-01

    Weight loss is associated with bone loss; however, it is unclear whether loss of fat or loss of lean body mass plays the key role in this relationship. The aim of this longitudinal analysis was to clarify the relationship between hip BMD, hip BMC and whole body BMC with changes in fat and lean tissue mass in older men. The Concord Health and Aging in Men Project (CHAMP) is a population-based study in Sydney, Australia, involving 1705 men aged 70-97 years. Bone mineral density (BMD) of the total hip, and bone mineral content (BMC) of the hip and whole body (WB), lean mass and fat mass were measured with Dual X-ray Absorptiometry (DXA). Multivariate linear regression models were used to assess relationships. Over 2.2 years of follow-up, 368(33%) men lost at least 2% of their body weight, which included a mean loss of 0.8 kg/year of lean body mass and 0.9 kg/year of fat body mass. Fat loss was strongly associated with BMD loss in men who lost weight. As a group, weight losers lost 1.0% of hip BMD annually compared to 0.2% in men who gained weight, with each kilo of fat loss associated with 0.6%/year hip BMD loss (p<0.0001). Lean mass was not associated with hip BMD loss in weight losers, however, lean mass change was associated with BMD change in men who gained weight (0.3% hip BMD increase per kilo increase of lean mass p<0.01). Maintaining body weight is important for bone health in elderly men. Body fat plays an important role in this relationship, which may reflect the additional metabolic function of adipose tissue. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Greater body mass index is related to greater self-identified cold tolerance and greater insensible body mass loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Dahee; Kim, Dami; Park, Joonhee; Lee, Joo Young

    2016-08-22

    Insensible body mass loss (IBL) from the human body continuously occurs, which is an important component in body heat exchange. The purpose of this study was to examine the relevance of IBL to anthropometric characteristics and self-identified thermal tolerance. A total of 289 healthy young Korean males were chosen and sorted into the following three groups: heat tolerable only (HTO, N = 79), cold tolerable only (CTO, N = 104), neither heat nor cold tolerable (NHC, N = 106). They weighed before and after a 30-min rest under lightly clothed condition at an air temperature of 23 ± 1 °C with a relative humidity 55 ± 5 %RH. (1) The IBL of 289 males had a mean of 90 ± 75 g h(-1) (48 ± 40 g h(-1) m(-2)); (2) No significant difference in IBL among the three groups were found; (3) Significant differences in body weight and body mass index (BMI) among three groups were found (P body surface area (P = 0.059); (4) CTO was approximately 4.1 kg heavier in body weight (P body surface area. For healthy young males within normal anthropometric ranges in Korea, IBL was positively related to BMI, and individuals with greater BMI showed greater self-identified cold tolerance, but no direct relationship was found between IBL and self-identified cold tolerance. This suggests that body physique (e.g., BMI) could be an explanatory factor between insensible body heat loss and subjective cognition on cold tolerance.

  16. Global glacier changes: a revised assessment of committed mass losses and sampling uncertainties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H. Mernild

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Most glaciers and ice caps (GIC are out of balance with the current climate. To return to equilibrium, GIC must thin and retreat, losing additional mass and raising sea level. Because glacier observations are sparse and geographically biased, there is an undersampling problem common to all global assessments. Here, we further develop an assessment approach based on accumulation-area ratios (AAR to estimate committed mass losses and analyze the undersampling problem. We compiled all available AAR observations for 144 GIC from 1971 to 2010, and found that most glaciers and ice caps are farther from balance than previously believed. Accounting for regional and global undersampling errors, our model suggests that GIC are committed to additional losses of 32 ± 12% of their area and 38 ± 16% of their volume if the future climate resembles the climate of the past decade. These losses imply global mean sea-level rise of 163 ± 69 mm, assuming total glacier volume of 430 mm sea-level equivalent. To reduce the large uncertainties in these projections, more long-term glacier measurements are needed in poorly sampled regions.

  17. Determination of clothing evaporative resistance on a sweating thermal manikin in an isothermal condition: heat loss method or mass loss method?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Faming; Gao, Chuansi; Kuklane, Kalev; Holmér, Ingvar

    2011-08-01

    This paper addresses selection between two calculation options, i.e heat loss option and mass loss option, for thermal manikin measurements on clothing evaporative resistance conducted in an isothermal condition (T(manikin) = T(a) = T(r)). Five vocational clothing ensembles with a thermal insulation range of 1.05-2.58 clo were selected and measured on a sweating thermal manikin 'Tore'. The reasons why the isothermal heat loss method generates a higher evaporative resistance than that of the mass loss method were thoroughly investigated. In addition, an indirect approach was applied to determine the amount of evaporative heat energy taken from the environment. It was found that clothing evaporative resistance values by the heat loss option were 11.2-37.1% greater than those based on the mass loss option. The percentage of evaporative heat loss taken from the environment (H(e,env)) for all test scenarios ranged from 10.9 to 23.8%. The real evaporative cooling efficiency ranged from 0.762 to 0.891, respectively. Furthermore, it is evident that the evaporative heat loss difference introduced by those two options was equal to the heat energy taken from the environment. In order to eliminate the combined effects of dry heat transfer, condensation, and heat pipe on clothing evaporative resistance, it is suggested that manikin measurements on the determination of clothing evaporative resistance should be performed in an isothermal condition. Moreover, the mass loss method should be applied to calculate clothing evaporative resistance. The isothermal heat loss method would appear to overestimate heat stress and thus should be corrected before use.

  18. Collisional Mass Loss and Change of Volatile Content in Planet Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maindl, Thomas I.; Haghighipour, Nader; Burger, Christoph; Bancelin, David; Schaefer, Christoph

    2017-10-01

    It is widely accepted that the majority of Earth’s water was delivered to it by water carrying planetesimals and planetary embryos from the outer part of the asteroid belt. Modern planet formation simulations show this process with high resolution, but typically still treat embryo growth and water delivery in a rudimentary way: perfect merging is assumed whenever a collision occurs. This neglects collisional loss of material - especially volatiles - and hence leads to planetary water contents that are far too high. Faced with the challenge of estimating planetary embryo growth and their water content with increased accuracy, we study typical collision scenarios from our previous n-body simulations. These scenarios differ in the masses of the involved planetary embryos, their water contents, the impact angles, and the collision speeds. We perform several suites of detailed simulations with our smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) collision code covering part of the mentioned parameter space. We thrive for deriving a reasonable analytic estimate for collisional mass loss and volatile transfer that can (a) be included efficiently in planet formation simulations and (b) be used as a post-formation means to estimate realistic water budgets of terrestrial planets. While more extensive parameter studies are needed for deriving such a relation, we present first results valid for the simulated range of masses, velocities, and collision angles and discuss their implications for models of terrestrial planet formation.

  19. The bile duct ligated rat: A relevant model to study muscle mass loss in cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosoi, Cristina R; Oliveira, Mariana M; Ochoa-Sanchez, Rafael; Tremblay, Mélanie; Ten Have, Gabriella A; Deutz, Nicolaas E; Rose, Christopher F; Bemeur, Chantal

    2017-04-01

    Muscle mass loss and hepatic encephalopathy (complex neuropsychiatric disorder) are serious complications of chronic liver disease (cirrhosis) which impact negatively on clinical outcome and quality of life and increase mortality. Liver disease leads to hyperammonemia and ammonia toxicity is believed to play a major role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. However, the effects of ammonia are not brain-specific and therefore may also affect other organs and tissues including muscle. The precise pathophysiological mechanisms underlying muscle wasting in chronic liver disease remains to be elucidated. In the present study, we characterized body composition as well as muscle protein synthesis in cirrhotic rats with hepatic encephalopathy using the 6-week bile duct ligation (BDL) model which recapitulates the main features of cirrhosis. Compared to sham-operated control animals, BDL rats display significant decreased gain in body weight, altered body composition, decreased gastrocnemius muscle mass and circumference as well as altered muscle morphology. Muscle protein synthesis was also significantly reduced in BDL rats compared to control animals. These findings demonstrate that the 6-week BDL experimental rat is a relevant model to study liver disease-induced muscle mass loss.

  20. Body mass index, waist circumference, physical activity, and risk of hearing loss in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curhan, Sharon G; Eavey, Roland; Wang, Molin; Stampfer, Meir J; Curhan, Gary C

    2013-12-01

    Acquired hearing loss is highly prevalent, but prospective data on potentially modifiable risk factors are limited. In cross-sectional studies, higher body mass index (BMI), larger waist circumference, and lower physical activity have been associated with poorer hearing, but these have not been examined prospectively. We examined the independent associations between BMI, waist circumference, and physical activity, and self-reported hearing loss in 68,421 women in the Nurses' Health Study II from 1989 to 2009. Baseline and updated information on BMI, waist circumference, and physical activity was obtained from biennial questionnaires. After more than 1.1 million person-years of follow-up, 11,286 cases of hearing loss were reported to have occurred. Higher BMI and larger waist circumference were associated with increased risk of hearing loss. Compared with women with BMI 88 cm was 1.27 (95% CI, 1.17-1.38). Higher physical activity was related inversely to risk; compared with women in the lowest quintile of physical activity, the multivariate-adjusted RR for women in the highest quintile was 0.83 (95% CI, 0.78-0.88). Walking 2 hours per week or more was associated inversely with risk. Simultaneous adjustment for BMI, waist circumference, and physical activity slightly attenuated the associations but they remained statistically significant. Higher BMI and larger waist circumference are associated with increased risk, and higher physical activity is associated with reduced risk of hearing loss in women. These findings provide evidence that maintaining healthy weight and staying physically active, potentially modifiable lifestyle factors, may help reduce the risk of hearing loss. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Generating Porosity in the Critical Zone: Does Volumetric Strain Dominate Chemical Mass Loss?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, J. L.; Riebe, C. S.; Holbrook, W. S.; Hartsough, P. C.

    2015-12-01

    The opening of pore space by weathering near Earth's surface influences a broad array of hydrological and biogeochemical processes, including water storage, surface-groundwater interactions, and nutrient cycling. Understanding how porosity is generated by physical and chemical processes is therefore a fundamental challenge in critical zone science. However, the relative importance and spatial variability of mechanisms that generate porosity remain poorly understood, because the subsurface is hidden from direct observation except by drilling and geophysical measurements. Here we use observations from both drilling and geophysics to quantify the relative importance of volumetric strain and chemical mass loss in the Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory. Our results from cores of saprolite show that porosity decreases with depth from 0.65 to 0.35 in the top 11 meters of saprolite. Although seismic refraction surveys reveal velocities that correctly predict the porosity variations, they cannot distinguish between volumetric strain and chemical mass losses. To overcome this limitation, we quantified bulk density and immobile element concentrations in our samples of saprolite. We found that volumetric strain decreases with depth from 1.1 to 0.3. Conversely, the overall mass loss due to chemical weathering shows no trend with depth. Together these results suggest that the changes in porosity are due to physical rather than chemical processes in the upper 11 meters. However neither bioturbation nor frost cracking are likely to extend so deep. Moreover, the paucity of hydrous minerals in the bedrock implies that mineral expansion cannot explain the high volumetric strain in the saprolite. Our results are consistent with porosity generated by the opening of fractures due to the release of confining stress during exhumation of bedrock.

  2. Exercise associated hormonal signals as powerful determinants of an effective fat mass loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajer, B; Vlcek, M; Galusova, A; Imrich, R; Penesova, A

    2015-07-01

    Obesity management for achieving an effective weight loss includes dietary modification and exercise [resistance (strength), endurance (cardiovascular) or intervals training (high-intensity intermittent exercise)]. Regular exercise acutely increases fat oxidation, which induces loss of fat mass and increases energy expenditure. Moreover, it has a positive effect on the physical (improved insulin sensitivity, lipid profile, etc.) and mental health (mood, cognition, memory, sleep, etc.). Endocrine responses to muscle actions are affected by many factors, including the exercise muscle groups (lower and upper body), load/volume, time-under tension, and rest-period intervals between sets, training status, gender, and age. The aim of this review is to summarize, evaluate, and clarify the literature data focusing on the endocrine responses to different types of exercise, including the frequency, intensity, and type of movement with regard to the fat loss strategies. Many studies have investigated anabolic [growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), testosterone] and gluco- and appetite- regulatory (insulin, cortisol, ghrelin) hormone responses and adaptations of skeletal muscles to exercise. Muscle tissue is a critical endocrine organ, playing important role in the regulation of several physiological and metabolic events. Moreover, we are also describing the response of some other substances to exercise, such as myokines [irisin, apelin, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), myostatin, and fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21)]. It is proposed that reducing intra-abdominal fat mass and increasing cardiorespiratory fitness through improving nutritional quality, reducing sedentary behavior, and increase the participation in physical activity/exercise, might be associated with clinical benefits, sometimes even in the absence of weight loss.

  3. The Spontaneous Loss of Coherence Catastrophe in Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizikov, Konstantin; Mathur, Raman; O’Connor, Peter B.

    2009-01-01

    The spontaneous loss of coherence catastrophe (SLCC) is a frequently observed, yet poorly studied, space-charge related effect in Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS). This manuscript presents an application of the filter diagonalization method (FDM) in the analysis of this phenomenon. The temporal frequency behavior reproduced by frequency shift analysis using the FDM shows the complex nature of the SLCC, which can be explained by a combination of factors occurring concurrently, governed by electrostatics and ion packet trajectories inside the ICR cell. PMID:19013078

  4. Full computation of massive AGB evolution. II. The role of mass loss and cross-sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, P.; D'Antona, F.

    2005-09-01

    In the course of a systematic exploration of the uncertainties associated with the input micro- and macro-physics in the modeling of the evolution of intermediate mass stars during their Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) phase, we focus on the role of the nuclear reactions rates and mass loss. We consider masses 3≤ M/M_⊙ ≤ 6.5 for a metallicity typical for globular clusters, Z=0.001, and compare the results obtained by computing the full nucleosynthesis with hot bottom burning (HBB), for a network of 30 elements, using either the NACRE or the Cameron & Fowler (CF88) cross-sections. The results differ in particular with respect to the 23Na nucleosynthesis (which is more efficient in the NACRE case) and the magnesium isotopes ratios. For both choices, however, the CNO nucleosynthesis shows that the C+N+O is constant within a factor of two, in our models employing a very efficient convection treatment. Different mass loss rates alter the physical conditions for HBB and the length of the AGB phase, indirectly changing the chemical yields. These computations show that the predictive power of our AGB models is undermined by these uncertainties. In particular, it appears at the moment very difficult to strongly accept or dismiss that these sources play a key-role in the pollution of Globular Clusters (GCs), and that they have been the main stellar site responsible for the chemical anomalies that are observed at the surface of giant and turn-off stars of GCs, in the self-enrichment scenarios.

  5. Zones of rock mass stability loss and support of main haulage roads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shmigol' , A.V.; Losev, G.F.; Martyushev, V.S. (Obedinenie Pavlogradugol' (USSR))

    1989-04-01

    Discusses the effect of rock mass stability loss on mining conditions in the im. Leninskogo Komsomola mine, where two 0.6-0.65 m and 0.9-1 m thick seams, lying near each other, were worked. In the unstable zones all types of support suffered destruction during 2-4 months. Convergence between roof and floor reached 400 mm/month in comparison with 50 mm/month outside these zones. A zone of lost rock mass stability that formed at the eastern wing of the mine as a result of the fact that the rock mass had been cut to a high degree by development workings is described and shown in a drawing. The occurrence intensity of elevated rock pressure and the duration time of its active stage depend on dimensions of support pillars and on the number and relative position of workings. The duration time varies between 8 and 24 months. Measures taken to stabilize the rock mass and the support types used for this purpose are described. The effect of these measures and of development workings on roof, floor and sidewall convergence is discussed.

  6. A path model of sarcopenia on bone mass loss in elderly subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondanelli, M; Guido, D; Opizzi, A; Faliva, M A; Perna, S; Grassi, M

    2014-01-01

    Aging is associated with decreases in muscle mass, strength, power (sarcopenia) and bone mineral density (BMD). The aims of this study were to investigate in elderly the role of sarcopenia on BMD loss by a path model, including adiposity, inflammation, and malnutrition associations. Body composition and BMD were measured by dual X-ray absorptiometry in 159 elderly subjects (52 male/107 female; mean age 80.3 yrs). Muscle strength was determined with dynamometer. Serum albumin and PCR were also assessed. Structural equations examined the effect of sarcopenia (measured by Relative Skeletal Muscle Mass, Total Muscle Mass, Handgrip, Muscle Quality Score) on osteoporosis (measured by Vertebral and Femoral T-scores) in a latent variable model including adiposity (measured by Total Fat Mass, BMI, Ginoid/Android Fat), inflammation (PCR), and malnutrition (serum albumin). The sarcopenia assumed a role of moderator in the adiposity-osteoporosis relationship. Specifically, increasing the sarcopenia, the relationship adiposity-osteoporosis (β: -0.58) decrease in intensity. Adiposity also influences sarcopenia (β: -0.18). Malnutrition affects the inflammatory and the adiposity states (β: +0.61, and β: -0.30, respectively), while not influencing the sarcopenia. Thus, adiposity has a role as a mediator of the effect of malnutrition on both sarcopenia and osteoporosis. Malnutrition decreases adiposity; decreasing adiposity, in turn, increase the sarcopenia and osteoporosis. This study suggests such as in a group of elderly sarcopenia affects the link between adiposity and BMD, but not have a pure independent effect on osteoporosis.

  7. Changes in lower extremity muscle mass and muscle strength after weight loss in obese men: A prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bokun; Tsujimoto, Takehiko; So, Rina; Tanaka, Kiyoji

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is not only associated with internal diseases but also with surgical problems. Surgical diseases related to obesity frequently occur in the load bearing joints of the lower limbs. To decrease the occurrence of surgical diseases related to obesity, weight loss has been recommended. It is important for obese men to maintain muscle mass and muscle strength after weight loss because low muscle mass and muscle strength are also related to the occurrence of surgical diseases. To date, the importance of muscle mass and muscle strength after weight loss in obese men has been underappreciated. The purpose of this study was to investigate changes in lower extremity muscle mass and muscle strength resulting from a weight loss programme consisting of caloric restriction and exercise. All participants concurrently attended a 12-week diet class 1day/week and a 12-week exercise class 3days/week. Body weight and body composition by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and knee extensor strength by dynamometry were assessed. The weight loss programme led to a 14.1% weight loss accompanied by significant loss of leg muscle mass, static maximal muscle strength, dynamic maximal muscle strength and dynamic muscle endurance but not with significant loss of dynamic muscle power. Decline of muscle strength was related to a decrease in muscle mass, but not completely dependent on a decrease in muscle mass. Body weight-normalised muscle strength increased significantly. We recommend utilising resistance exercise to restore muscle mass and muscle strength in the legs after substantial weight loss. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Plant diversity does not buffer drought effects on early-stage litter mass loss rates and microbial properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Anja; Eisenhauer, Nico; Weigelt, Alexandra; Scherer-Lorenzen, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Human activities are decreasing biodiversity and changing the climate worldwide. Both global change drivers have been shown to affect ecosystem functioning, but they may also act in concert in a non-additive way. We studied early-stage litter mass loss rates and soil microbial properties (basal respiration and microbial biomass) during the summer season in response to plant species richness and summer drought in a large grassland biodiversity experiment, the Jena Experiment, Germany. In line with our expectations, decreasing plant diversity and summer drought decreased litter mass loss rates and soil microbial properties. In contrast to our hypotheses, however, this was only true for mass loss of standard litter (wheat straw) used in all plots, and not for plant community-specific litter mass loss. We found no interactive effects between global change drivers, that is, drought reduced litter mass loss rates and soil microbial properties irrespective of plant diversity. High mass loss rates of plant community-specific litter and low responsiveness to drought relative to the standard litter indicate that soil microbial communities were adapted to decomposing community-specific plant litter material including lower susceptibility to dry conditions during summer months. Moreover, higher microbial enzymatic diversity at high plant diversity may have caused elevated mass loss of standard litter. Our results indicate that plant diversity loss and summer drought independently impede soil processes. However, soil decomposer communities may be highly adapted to decomposing plant community-specific litter material, even in situations of environmental stress. Results of standard litter mass loss moreover suggest that decomposer communities under diverse plant communities are able to cope with a greater variety of plant inputs possibly making them less responsive to biotic changes. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Does the amount of fat mass predict age-related loss of lean mass, muscle strength, and muscle quality in older adults?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, A.; Ding, J.; Stenholm, S.; Caserotti, P.; Houston, D.K.; Nicklas, B.J.; You, T.; Lee, J.S.; Visser, M.; Newman, A.B.; Schwartz, A.V.; Cauley, J.A.; Tylavsky, F.A.; Goodpaster, B.H.; Kritchevsky, S.B.; Harris, T.B.

    2011-01-01

    Background. An excessive amount of adipose tissue may contribute to sarcopenia and may be one mechanism underlying accelerated loss of muscle mass and strength with aging. We therefore examined the association of baseline total body fat with changes in leg lean mass, muscle strength, and muscle

  10. Evolution of thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch stars. IV. Constraining mass loss and lifetimes of low mass, low metallicity AGB stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenfield, Philip; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Weisz, Daniel; Williams, Benjamin F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Marigo, Paola [Department of Physics and Astronomy G. Galilei, University of Padova, Vicolo dell' Osservatorio 3, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Girardi, Léo; Gullieuszik, Marco [Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova—INAF, Vicolo dell' Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Bressan, Alessandro [Astrophysics Sector, SISSA, Via Bonomea 265, I-34136 Trieste (Italy); Dolphin, Andrew [Raytheon Company, 1151 East Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85756 (United States); Aringer, Bernhard [Department of Astrophysics, University of Vienna, Turkenschanzstraße 17, A-1180 Wien (Austria)

    2014-07-20

    The evolution and lifetimes of thermally pulsating asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) stars suffer from significant uncertainties. In this work, we analyze the numbers and luminosity functions of TP-AGB stars in six quiescent, low metallicity ([Fe/H] ≲ –0.86) galaxies taken from the ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury sample, using Hubble Space Telescope (HST) photometry in both optical and near-infrared filters. The galaxies contain over 1000 TP-AGB stars (at least 60 per field). We compare the observed TP-AGB luminosity functions and relative numbers of TP-AGB and red giant branch (RGB) stars, N{sub TP-AGB}/N{sub RGB}, to models generated from different suites of TP-AGB evolutionary tracks after adopting star formation histories derived from the HST deep optical observations. We test various mass-loss prescriptions that differ in their treatments of mass loss before the onset of dust-driven winds (pre-dust). These comparisons confirm that pre-dust mass loss is important, since models that neglect pre-dust mass loss fail to explain the observed N{sub TP-AGB}/N{sub RGB} ratio or the luminosity functions. In contrast, models with more efficient pre-dust mass loss produce results consistent with observations. We find that for [Fe/H] ≲ –0.86, lower mass TP-AGB stars (M ≲ 1 M{sub ☉}) must have lifetimes of ∼0.5 Myr and higher masses (M ≲ 3 M{sub ☉}) must have lifetimes ≲ 1.2 Myr. In addition, assuming our best-fitting mass-loss prescription, we show that the third dredge-up has no significant effect on TP-AGB lifetimes in this mass and metallicity range.

  11. Asymptotic behaviour of vacuum spacetimes with non-zero cosmological constant, Bondi mass-loss formula

    CERN Document Server

    Saw, Vee-Liem

    2016-01-01

    We derive the asymptotic solutions for vacuum spacetimes with non-zero cosmological constant $\\Lambda$, using the Newman-Penrose formalism. Our approach is based exclusively on the physical spacetime, i.e. no reference of conformal rescaling nor conformal spacetime is made, at least not explicitly. By investigating the Schwarzschild-de Sitter spacetime in spherical coordinates, we subsequently stipulate the fall-offs of the null tetrad and spin coefficients for asymptotically de Sitter spacetimes such that the terms which would give rise to the Bondi mass-loss due to energy carried by gravitational radiation (i.e. involving $\\sigma^o$) must be non-zero. After solving the vacuum Newman-Penrose equations asymptotically, we obtain the Bondi mass-loss formula by integrating the Bianchi identity involving $D'\\Psi_2$ over a compact 2-surface on $\\mathcal{I}$. Whilst our original intention was to study asymptotically de Sitter spacetimes, the use of spherical coordinates implies that this readily applies for $\\Lambd...

  12. Carboxylic acid functional group analysis using constant neutral loss scanning-mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dron, Julien [Laboratoire de Chimie et Environnement, Marseille Universites (case 29), 3 place Victor Hugo, 13331 Marseille Cedex 3 (France)], E-mail: julien.dron@up.univ-mrs.fr; Eyglunent, Gregory; Temime-Roussel, Brice; Marchand, Nicolas; Wortham, Henri [Laboratoire de Chimie et Environnement, Marseille Universites (case 29), 3 place Victor Hugo, 13331 Marseille Cedex 3 (France)

    2007-12-12

    The present study describes the development of a new analytical technique for the functional group determination of the carboxylic moiety using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (APCI-MS/MS) operated in the constant neutral loss scanning (CNLS) mode. Carboxylic groups were first derivatized into their corresponding methyl esters by reacting with BF{sub 3}/methanol mix and the reaction mixture was then directly injected into the APCI chamber. The loss of methanol (m/z = 32 amu) resulting from the fragmentation of the protonated methyl esters was then monitored. Applying this method together with a statistical approach to reference mixtures containing 31 different carboxylic acids at randomly calculated concentrations demonstrated its suitability for quantitative functional group measurements with relative standard deviations below 15% and a detection limit of 0.005 mmol L{sup -1}. Its applicability to environmental matrices was also shown through the determination of carboxylic acid concentrations inside atmospheric aerosol samples. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time that the tandem mass spectrometry was successfully applied to functional group analysis, offering great perspectives in the characterization of complex mixtures which are prevailing in the field of environmental analysis as well as in the understanding of the chemical processes occurring in these matrices.

  13. Implementation of a method to visualize noise-induced hearing loss in mass stranded cetaceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morell, Maria; Brownlow, Andrew; McGovern, Barry; Raverty, Stephen A.; Shadwick, Robert E.; André, Michel

    2017-02-01

    Assessment of the impact of noise over-exposure in stranded cetaceans is challenging, as the lesions that lead to hearing loss occur at the cellular level and inner ear cells are very sensitive to autolysis. Distinguishing ante-mortem pathology from post-mortem change has been a major constraint in diagnosing potential impact. Here, we outline a methodology applicable to the detection of noise-induced hearing loss in stranded cetaceans. Inner ears from two mass strandings of long-finned pilot whales in Scotland were processed for scanning electron microscopy observation. In one case, a juvenile animal, whose ears were fixed within 4 hours of death, revealed that many sensory cells at the apex of the cochlear spiral were missing. In this case, the absence of outer hair cells would be compatible with overexposure to underwater noise, affecting the region which transduces the lowest frequencies of the pilot whales hearing spectrum. Perfusion of cochlea with fixative greatly improved preservation and enabled diagnostic imaging of the organ of Corti, even 30 hours after death. This finding supports adopting a routine protocol to detect the pathological legacy of noise overexposure in mass stranded cetaceans as a key to understanding the complex processes and implications that lie behind such stranding events.

  14. Cosmogenic nuclides in cometary materials: Implications for rate of mass loss and exposure history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, G. F.; Englert, P. A. J.; Reedy, R. C.

    1989-01-01

    As planned, the Rosetta mission will return to earth with a 10-kg core and a 1-kg surface sample from a comet. The selection of a comet with low current activity will maximize the chance of obtaining material altered as little as possible. Current temperature and level of activity, however, may not reliably indicate previous values. Fortunately, from measurements of the cosmogenic nuclide contents of cometary material, one may estimate a rate of mass loss in the past and perhaps learn something about the exposure history of the comet. Perhaps the simplest way to estimate the rate of mass loss is to compare the total inventories of several long-lived cosmogenic radionuclides with the values expected on the basis of model calculations. Although model calculations have become steadily more reliable, application to bodies with the composition of comets will require some extension beyond the normal range of use. In particular, the influence of light elements on the secondary particle cascade will need study, in part through laboratory irradiations of volatile-rich materials. In the analysis of cometary data, it would be valuable to test calculations against measurements of short-lived isotopes.

  15. Mass loss of stars on the asymptotic giant branch. Mechanisms, models and measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höfner, Susanne; Olofsson, Hans

    2018-01-01

    As low- and intermediate-mass stars reach the asymptotic giant branch (AGB), they have developed into intriguing and complex objects that are major players in the cosmic gas/dust cycle. At this stage, their appearance and evolution are strongly affected by a range of dynamical processes. Large-scale convective flows bring newly-formed chemical elements to the stellar surface and, together with pulsations, they trigger shock waves in the extended stellar atmosphere. There, massive outflows of gas and dust have their origin, which enrich the interstellar medium and, eventually, lead to a transformation of the cool luminous giants into white dwarfs. Dust grains forming in the upper atmospheric layers play a critical role in the wind acceleration process, by scattering and absorbing stellar photons and transferring their outward-directed momentum to the surrounding gas through collisions. Recent progress in high-angular-resolution instrumentation, from the visual to the radio regime, is leading to valuable new insights into the complex dynamical atmospheres of AGB stars and their wind-forming regions. Observations are revealing asymmetries and inhomogeneities in the photospheric and dust-forming layers which vary on time-scales of months, as well as more long-lived large-scale structures in the circumstellar envelopes. High-angular-resolution observations indicate at what distances from the stars dust condensation occurs, and they give information on the chemical composition and sizes of dust grains in the close vicinity of cool giants. These are essential constraints for building realistic models of wind acceleration and developing a predictive theory of mass loss for AGB stars, which is a crucial ingredient of stellar and galactic chemical evolution models. At present, it is still not fully possible to model all these phenomena from first principles, and to predict the mass-loss rate based on fundamental stellar parameters only. However, much progress has been made

  16. Moderate exercise attenuates the loss of skeletal muscle mass that occurs with intentional caloric restriction-induced weight loss in older, overweight to obese adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomentowski, Peter; Dubé, John J; Amati, Francesca; Stefanovic-Racic, Maja; Zhu, Shanjian; Toledo, Frederico G S; Goodpaster, Bret H

    2009-05-01

    Aging is associated with a loss of muscle mass and increased body fat. The effects of diet-induced weight loss on muscle mass in older adults are not clear. This study examined the effects of diet-induced weight loss, alone and in combination with moderate aerobic exercise, on skeletal muscle mass in older adults. Twenty-nine overweight to obese (body mass index = 31.8 +/- 3.3 kg/m(2)) older (67.2 +/- 4.2 years) men (n = 13) and women (n = 16) completed a 4-month intervention consisting of diet-induced weight loss alone (WL; n = 11) or with exercise (WL/EX; n = 18). The WL intervention consisted of a low-fat, 500-1,000 kcal/d caloric restriction. The WL/EX intervention included the WL intervention with the addition of aerobic exercise, moderate-intensity walking, three to five times per week for 35-45 minutes per session. Whole-body dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, thigh computed tomography (CT), and percutaneous muscle biopsy were performed to assess changes in skeletal muscle mass at the whole-body, regional, and cellular level, respectively. Mixed analysis of variance demonstrated that both groups had similar decreases in bodyweight (WL, -9.2% +/- 1.0%; WL/EX, -9.1% +/- 1.0%) and whole-body fat mass (WL, -16.5%, WL/EX, -20.7%). However, whole-body fat-free mass decreased significantly (p muscle cross-sectional area by CT decreased in both groups (WL, -5.2% +/- 1.1%; WL/EX, -3.0% +/- 1.0%) and was not statistically different between groups. Type I muscle fiber area decreased in WL (-19.2% +/- 7.9%, p = .01) but remained unchanged in WL/EX (3.4% +/- 7.5%). Similar patterns were observed in type II fibers (WL, -16.6% +/- 4.0%; WL/EX, -0.2% +/- 6.5%). Diet-induced weight loss significantly decreased muscle mass in older adults. However, the addition of moderate aerobic exercise to intentional weight loss attenuated the loss of muscle mass.

  17. Changes in lower extremity muscle mass and muscle strength after weight loss in obese patients with knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Christensen, Robin; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the effects of low-energy diet-induced weight loss on lower-extremity muscle mass and knee muscle strength in obese patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA), and the associations of these effects.......To investigate the effects of low-energy diet-induced weight loss on lower-extremity muscle mass and knee muscle strength in obese patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA), and the associations of these effects....

  18. Flammability properties and radiant fraction of FRT wood plastic composites using mass loss calorimeter under HRR hood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark A. Dietenberger; Charles R. Boardman; Nicole Stark

    2017-01-01

    A special test arrangement was used to assess the flammability of 4 different wood plastic composites (WPC), most with fire retardants, all of which has a tendency to high smoke production leading to high radiant energy losses to the apparatus walls. The mass loss calorimeter (MLC) was modified to include a thermopile on the exhaust pipe stack to compensate for radiant...

  19. A new programme for monitoring the mass loss of the Greenland ice sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlstrøm, Andreas P.; Gravesen, Peter; Bech Andersen, Signe

    2008-01-01

    The Greenland ice sheet has been losing mass at a dramatic rate in recent years, raising political concern worldwide due to the possible impact on global sea level rise and climate dynamics (Luthcke et al. 2006; Rignot & Kanagaratnam 2006; Velicogna & Wahr 2006; IPCC 2007; Shepherd & Wingham 2007...... of the Greenland ice sheet, track changes in the extent of local glaciers and ice caps, and track changes in the position of the ice-sheet margin.......The Greenland ice sheet has been losing mass at a dramatic rate in recent years, raising political concern worldwide due to the possible impact on global sea level rise and climate dynamics (Luthcke et al. 2006; Rignot & Kanagaratnam 2006; Velicogna & Wahr 2006; IPCC 2007; Shepherd & Wingham 2007...... for Monitoring of the Green land Ice Sheet (PROMICE), designed and operated by the Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS) in collaboration with the National Space Institute at the Technical University of Denmark and Asiaq (Greenland Survey). The aim of the programme is to quantify the annual mass loss...

  20. Decreasing cloud cover drives the recent mass loss on the Greenland Ice Sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Stefan; Tedstone, Andrew J; Fettweis, Xavier; Bamber, Jonathan L

    2017-06-01

    The Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) has been losing mass at an accelerating rate since the mid-1990s. This has been due to both increased ice discharge into the ocean and melting at the surface, with the latter being the dominant contribution. This change in state has been attributed to rising temperatures and a decrease in surface albedo. We show, using satellite data and climate model output, that the abrupt reduction in surface mass balance since about 1995 can be attributed largely to a coincident trend of decreasing summer cloud cover enhancing the melt-albedo feedback. Satellite observations show that, from 1995 to 2009, summer cloud cover decreased by 0.9 ± 0.3% per year. Model output indicates that the GrIS summer melt increases by 27 ± 13 gigatons (Gt) per percent reduction in summer cloud cover, principally because of the impact of increased shortwave radiation over the low albedo ablation zone. The observed reduction in cloud cover is strongly correlated with a state shift in the North Atlantic Oscillation promoting anticyclonic conditions in summer and suggests that the enhanced surface mass loss from the GrIS is driven by synoptic-scale changes in Arctic-wide atmospheric circulation.

  1. Spatial and temporal distribution of mass loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet since AD 1900

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Kristian Kjellerup; Korsgaard, Niels J.; Bjørk, Anders A

    2015-01-01

    The response of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) to changes in temperature during the twentieth century remains contentious, largely owing to difficulties in estimating the spatial and temporal distribution of ice mass changes before 1992, when Greenland-wide observations first became available....... The only previous estimates of change during the twentieth century are based on empirical modelling and energy balance modelling. Consequently, no observation-based estimates of the contribution from the GIS to the global-mean sea level budget before 1990 are included in the Fifth Assessment Report...... of the nineteenth century. We estimate the total ice mass loss and its spatial distribution for three periods: 1900-1983 (75.1 ± 29.4 gigatonnes per year), 1983-2003 (73.8 ± 40.5 gigatonnes per year), and 2003-2010 (186.4 ± 18.9 gigatonnes per year). Furthermore, using two surface mass balance models we partition...

  2. Loss of β-catenin induces multifocal periosteal chondroma-like masses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantley, Leslie; Saunders, Cheri; Guttenberg, Marta; Candela, Maria Elena; Ohta, Yoichi; Yasuhara, Rika; Kondo, Naoki; Sgariglia, Federica; Asai, Shuji; Zhang, Xianrong; Qin, Ling; Hecht, Jacqueline T; Chen, Di; Yamamoto, Masato; Toyosawa, Satoru; Dormans, John P; Esko, Jeffrey D; Yamaguchi, Yu; Iwamoto, Masahiro; Pacifici, Maurizio; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2013-03-01

    Osteochondromas and enchondromas are the most common tumors affecting the skeleton. Osteochondromas can occur as multiple lesions, such as those in patients with hereditary multiple exostoses. Unexpectedly, while studying the role of β-catenin in cartilage development, we found that its conditional deletion induces ectopic chondroma-like cartilage formation in mice. Postnatal ablation of β-catenin in cartilage induced lateral outgrowth of the growth plate within 2 weeks after ablation. The chondroma-like masses were present in the flanking periosteum by 5 weeks and persisted for more than 6 months after β-catenin ablation. These long-lasting ectopic masses rarely contained apoptotic cells. In good correlation, transplants of β-catenin-deficient chondrocytes into athymic mice persisted for a longer period of time and resisted replacement by bone compared to control wild-type chondrocytes. In contrast, a β-catenin signaling stimulator increased cell death in control chondrocytes. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the amount of detectable β-catenin in cartilage cells of osteochondromas obtained from hereditary multiple exostoses patients was much lower than that in hypertrophic chondrocytes in normal human growth plates. The findings in our study indicate that loss of β-catenin expression in chondrocytes induces periosteal chondroma-like masses and may be linked to, and cause, the persistence of cartilage caps in osteochondromas. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The geometry and dynamics of mass-loss at milli-arcsecond scales of massive stars in transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wit, W. J.; Wheelwright, H.; Oudmaijer, R. D.; Mehner, A.

    2013-06-01

    The dynamics, geometry and abundances of circumstellar material provide the crucial information necessary to reconstruct the post-main sequence evolution and final fate of high-mass stars. In this context, we will present recent discoveries made by means of infra-red high spectral and spatial resolution observations using VLTI/AMBER, VLTI/PIONIER and VLT/CRIRES. The observations shed new light on the ongoing mass-loss of high-mass stars transiting the HR-diagram. In particular, we discuss new results on the milli-arcsecond (mas) scale mass-loss geometry of the yellow hypergiant IRC+10420. They indicate an hour-glass wind geometry and a high mass-loss rate that results in a pseudo-photosphere (Oudmaijer & de Wit 2013). Whether the wind is shaped because of a secondary component or because of slow/fast wind interactions is discussed. In the case of supergiant B[e] stars, binarity may have an important effect on the dynamics and geometry of the mass loss on masscales (Wheelwright et al. 2012a, 2012b, 2013). Our studies of the circumstellar environment of sgB[e] stars have discovered several circumbinary discs that exhibit Keplerian rotation, contrary to expectations based on the dual outflow model. We raise the question of whether binarity is responsible for the Galactic sgB[e] phenomenon or whether the blue supergiant component's mass loss is intrinsically peculiar in sgB[e]s.

  4. Theoretical investigation on the mass loss impact on asteroseismic grid-based estimates of mass, radius, and age for RGB stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, G.; Dell'Omodarme, M.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Degl'Innocenti, S.

    2018-01-01

    Aims: We aim to perform a theoretical evaluation of the impact of the mass loss indetermination on asteroseismic grid based estimates of masses, radii, and ages of stars in the red giant branch (RGB) phase. Methods: We adopted the SCEPtER pipeline on a grid spanning the mass range [0.8; 1.8] M⊙. As observational constraints, we adopted the star effective temperatures, the metallicity [Fe/H], the average large frequency spacing Δν, and the frequency of maximum oscillation power νmax. The mass loss was modelled following a Reimers parametrization with the two different efficiencies η = 0.4 and η = 0.8. Results: In the RGB phase, the average random relative error (owing only to observational uncertainty) on mass and age estimates is about 8% and 30% respectively. The bias in mass and age estimates caused by the adoption of a wrong mass loss parameter in the recovery is minor for the vast majority of the RGB evolution. The biases get larger only after the RGB bump. In the last 2.5% of the RGB lifetime the error on the mass determination reaches 6.5% becoming larger than the random error component in this evolutionary phase. The error on the age estimate amounts to 9%, that is, equal to the random error uncertainty. These results are independent of the stellar metallicity [Fe/H] in the explored range. Conclusions: Asteroseismic-based estimates of stellar mass, radius, and age in the RGB phase can be considered mass loss independent within the range (η ∈ [0.0,0.8]) as long as the target is in an evolutionary phase preceding the RGB bump.

  5. Resource loss as a predictor of posttrauma symptoms among college women following the mass shooting at Virginia Tech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littleton, Heather; Grills-Taquechel, Amie; Axsom, Danny

    2009-01-01

    We examined risk factors for posttrauma symptomatology, 2 and 6 months following the April 2007 mass shooting at Virginia Tech. Using a conservation of resources framework and a Web-based survey methodology, we prospectively evaluated the relations among preshooting distress, social support, resource loss, and posttrauma symptomatology in a sample of 293 female students enrolled at the university at the time of the shootings. Structural equation modeling supported that preshooting social support and distress predicted resource loss postshooting. Resource loss predicted symptomatology 2 months and 6 months after the shooting. Implications of the results for research and intervention following mass trauma are discussed.

  6. Direct or indirect composite veneers in anterior teeth: which method causes higher tooth mass loss? An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Alessandra Nunes; Coelho-de-Souza, Fabio Herrmann; Rolla, Juliana Nunes; Erhardt, Maria Carolina Guilherme; Demarco, Flavio Fernando

    2014-01-01

    There is little information in the literature regarding the relationship between preparations made for direct and indirect veneers and the loss of tooth structure required for each technique. This in vitro study sought to quantify the different mass losses from preparation techniques used for direct and indirect veneers. Thirty artificial teeth were weighted using a digital balance and placed in a dental manikin in the position corresponding to the right maxillary central incisor. Five clinicians-all experts in esthetic dentistry-were asked to perform conventional preparations for both a direct composite resin veneer and an indirect ceramic veneer. After preparations, specimens were weighted again in the same digital balance. Teeth undergoing veneer preparations demonstrated a statistically significant mass loss compared to unprepared teeth. Indirect ceramic veneer preparations produced more mass loss than direct composite veneer preparations (P < 0.01).

  7. Contributions of natural and anthropogenic radiative forcing to mass loss of Northern Hemisphere mountain glaciers and quantifying their uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirabayashi, Yukiko; Nakano, Kazunari; Zhang, Yong; Watanabe, Satoshi; Tanoue, Masahiro; Kanae, Shinjiro

    2016-07-01

    Observational evidence indicates that a number of glaciers have lost mass in the past. Given that glaciers are highly impacted by the surrounding climate, human-influenced global warming may be partly responsible for mass loss. However, previous research studies have been limited to analyzing the past several decades, and it remains unclear whether past glacier mass losses are within the range of natural internal climate variability. Here, we apply an optimal fingerprinting technique to observed and reconstructed mass losses as well as multi-model general circulation model (GCM) simulations of mountain glacier mass to detect and attribute past glacier mass changes. An 8,800-year control simulation of glaciers enabled us to evaluate detectability. The results indicate that human-induced increases in greenhouse gases have contributed to the decreased area-weighted average masses of 85 analyzed glaciers. The effect was larger than the mass increase caused by natural forcing, although the contributions of natural and anthropogenic forcing to decreases in mass varied at the local scale. We also showed that the detection of anthropogenic or natural influences could not be fully attributed when natural internal climate variability was taken into account.

  8. Ice sheet mass loss caused by dust and black carbon accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Goelles

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Albedo is the dominant factor governing surface melt variability in the ablation area of ice sheets and glaciers. Aerosols such as mineral dust and black carbon (soot accumulate on the ice surface and cause a darker surface and therefore a lower albedo. The darkening effect on the ice surface is currently not included in sea level projections, and the effect is unknown. We present a model framework which includes ice dynamics, aerosol transport, aerosol accumulation and the darkening effect on ice albedo and its consequences for surface melt. The model is applied to a simplified geometry resembling the conditions of the Greenland ice sheet, and it is forced by several temperature scenarios to quantify the darkening effect of aerosols on future mass loss. The effect of aerosols depends non-linearly on the temperature rise due to the feedback between aerosol accumulation and surface melt. According to our conceptual model, accounting for black carbon and dust in future projections of ice sheet changes until the year 3000 could induce an additional volume loss of 7 %. Since we have ignored some feedback processes, the impact might be even larger.

  9. Deviation from goal pace, body temperature and body mass loss as predictors of road race performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, William M; Hosokawa, Yuri; Belval, Luke N; Huggins, Robert A; Stearns, Rebecca L; Casa, Douglas J

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between pacing, gastrointestinal temperature (TGI), and percent body mass loss (%BML) on relative race performance during a warm weather 11.3km road race. Observational study of a sample of active runners competing in the 2014 Falmouth Road Race. Participants ingested a TGI pill and donned a GPS enabled watch with heart rate monitoring capabilities prior to the start of the race. Percent off predicted pace (%OFF) was calculated for seven segments of the race. Separate linear regression analyses were used to assess the relationship between pace, T​GI, and %BML on relative race performance. One-way ANOVA was used to analyse post race TGI (≥40°C vs 0.05). There was a trend in a slower pace (p=0.055) and greater %OFF (p=0.056) in runners finishing the race with a TGI>40°C. Overall, finish time was influenced by greater variations in pace during the first two miles of the race. In addition, runners who minimized fluid losses and had lower TGI were associated with meeting self-predicted goals. Copyright © 2016 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Asymptotic giant branch stars at low metallicity: the challenging interplay between the mass-loss and molecular opacities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, P.; Marigo, P.

    2010-11-01

    We investigate the main physical properties of low-metallicity asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars with the aim of quantifying the uncertainties that presently affect the predicted chemical yields of these stars, associated with the mass-loss and description of molecular opacities. We find that above a threshold mass, M ~= 3.5Msolar for Z = 0.001, the results are little dependent on the opacity treatment, as long as the hot-bottom burning (HBB) prevents the surface C/O ratio from exceeding unity; the yields of these massive AGB stars are expected to be mostly determined by the efficiency of convection, with a relatively mild dependence on the mass-loss description. A much higher degree of uncertainty is associated with the yields of less-massive models, which critically depend on the adopted molecular opacities. An interval of masses exists, say, 2.0-3.0Msolar (the exact range depends on the mass-loss), in which the HBB may be even extinguished following the cooling produced by the opacity of C-bearing molecules. The yields of these stars are the most uncertain, the variation range being the largest (up to ~2dex) for the nitrogen and sodium yields. For very low mass models, not experiencing the HBB (M <= 1.5Msolar), the description of mass-loss and the treatment of the convective boundaries are crucial for the occurrence of the third dredge-up, with a sizeable impact on the CNO yields.

  11. Sauna-Induced Body Mass Loss in Young Sedentary Women and Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Podstawski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the relationship between body mass index (BMI and body mass loss (BML induced by thermal stress in a dry sauna. The study was conducted on a group of 674 sedentary students, 326 women and 348 men aged 19-20. The correlations between BMI scores and BML were determined. The subjects were placed in supine position in a dry sauna for two sessions of 10 minutes each with a 5-minute break. The influence of BMI on the amount of BML in the sauna was determined by nonlinear stepwise regression. The smallest BML was noted in underweight subjects; students with normal weight lost more weight, whereas the greatest BML was reported in overweight and obese subjects. Persons with a high BMI are at higher risk of dehydration, and they should pay particular attention to replenishing fluids during a visit to the sauna. The proposed equations for calculating BML based on a person's BMI can be useful in estimating the amount of fluids that should be replenished by both men and women during a visit to a dry sauna.

  12. Dietary protein supplementation in the elderly for limiting muscle mass loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancha, Antonio Herbert; Zanella, Rudyard; Tanabe, Stefan Gleissner Ohara; Andriamihaja, Mireille; Blachier, Francois

    2017-01-01

    Supplementation with whey and other dietary protein, mainly associated with exercise training, has been proposed to be beneficial for the elderly to gain and maintain lean body mass and improve health parameters. The main objective of this review is to examine the evidence provided by the scientific literature indicating benefit from such supplementation and to define the likely best strategy of protein uptake for optimal objectified results in the elderly. Overall, it appears that an intake of approximately 0.4 g protein/kg BW per meal thus representing 1.2-1.6 g protein/kg BW/day may be recommended taking into account potential anabolic resistance. The losses of the skeletal muscle mass contribute to lower the capacity to perform activities in daily living, emphasizing that an optimal protein consumption may represent an important parameter to preserve independence and contribute to health status. However, it is worth noting that the maximal intake of protein with no adverse effect is not known, and that high levels of protein intake is associated with increased transfer of protein to the colon with potential deleterious effects. Thus, it is important to examine in each individual case the benefit that can be expected from supplementation with whey protein, taking into account the usual protein dietary intake.

  13. Multi-decadal mass loss of glaciers in the Everest area (Nepal Himalaya derived from stereo imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Bolch

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Mass loss of Himalayan glaciers has wide-ranging consequences such as changing runoff distribution, sea level rise and an increasing risk of glacial lake outburst floods (GLOFs. The assessment of the regional and global impact of glacier changes in the Himalaya is, however, hampered by a lack of mass balance data for most of the range. Multi-temporal digital terrain models (DTMs allow glacier mass balance to be calculated. Here, we present a time series of mass changes for ten glaciers covering an area of about 50 km2 south and west of Mt. Everest, Nepal, using stereo Corona spy imagery (years 1962 and 1970, aerial images and recent high resolution satellite data (Cartosat-1. This is the longest time series of mass changes in the Himalaya. We reveal that the glaciers have been significantly losing mass since at least 1970, despite thick debris cover. The specific mass loss for 1970–2007 is 0.32 ± 0.08 m w.e. a−1, however, not higher than the global average. Comparisons of the recent DTMs with earlier time periods indicate an accelerated mass loss. This is, however, hardly statistically significant due to high uncertainty, especially of the lower resolution ASTER DTM. The characteristics of surface lowering can be explained by spatial variations of glacier velocity, the thickness of the debris-cover, and ice melt due to exposed ice cliffs and ponds.

  14. Multi-decadal mass loss of glaciers in the Everest area (Nepal Himalaya) derived from stereo imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolch, T.; Pieczonka, T.; Benn, D. I.

    2011-04-01

    Mass loss of Himalayan glaciers has wide-ranging consequences such as changing runoff distribution, sea level rise and an increasing risk of glacial lake outburst floods (GLOFs). The assessment of the regional and global impact of glacier changes in the Himalaya is, however, hampered by a lack of mass balance data for most of the range. Multi-temporal digital terrain models (DTMs) allow glacier mass balance to be calculated. Here, we present a time series of mass changes for ten glaciers covering an area of about 50 km2 south and west of Mt. Everest, Nepal, using stereo Corona spy imagery (years 1962 and 1970), aerial images and recent high resolution satellite data (Cartosat-1). This is the longest time series of mass changes in the Himalaya. We reveal that the glaciers have been significantly losing mass since at least 1970, despite thick debris cover. The specific mass loss for 1970-2007 is 0.32 ± 0.08 m w.e. a-1, however, not higher than the global average. Comparisons of the recent DTMs with earlier time periods indicate an accelerated mass loss. This is, however, hardly statistically significant due to high uncertainty, especially of the lower resolution ASTER DTM. The characteristics of surface lowering can be explained by spatial variations of glacier velocity, the thickness of the debris-cover, and ice melt due to exposed ice cliffs and ponds.

  15. Bone Marrow Fat Changes After Gastric Bypass Surgery Are Associated With Loss of Bone Mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tiffany Y; Schwartz, Ann V; Li, Xiaojuan; Xu, Kaipin; Black, Dennis M; Petrenko, Dimitry M; Stewart, Lygia; Rogers, Stanley J; Posselt, Andrew M; Carter, Jonathan T; Shoback, Dolores M; Schafer, Anne L

    2017-11-01

    Bone marrow fat is a unique fat depot that may regulate bone metabolism. Marrow fat is increased in states of low bone mass, severe underweight, and diabetes. However, longitudinal effects of weight loss and improved glucose homeostasis on marrow fat are unclear, as is the relationship between marrow fat and bone mineral density (BMD) changes. We hypothesized that after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery, marrow fat changes are associated with BMD loss. We enrolled 30 obese women, stratified by diabetes status. Before and 6 months after RYGB, we measured BMD by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and quantitative computed tomography (QCT) and vertebral marrow fat content by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. At baseline, those with higher marrow fat had lower BMD. Postoperatively, total body fat declined dramatically in all participants. Effects of RYGB on marrow fat differed by diabetes status (p = 0.03). Nondiabetic women showed no significant mean change in marrow fat (+1.8%, 95% confidence interval [CI] -1.8% to +5.4%, p = 0.29), although those who lost more total body fat were more likely to have marrow fat increases (r = -0.70, p = 0.01). In contrast, diabetic women demonstrated a mean marrow fat change of -6.5% (95% CI -13.1% to 0%, p = 0.05). Overall, those with greater improvements in hemoglobin A1c had decreases in marrow fat (r = 0.50, p = 0.01). Increases in IGF-1, a potential mediator of the marrow fat-bone relationship, were associated with marrow fat declines (r = -0.40, p = 0.05). Spinal volumetric BMD decreased by 6.4% ± 5.9% (p fat and BMD changes were negatively associated, such that those with marrow fat increases had more BMD loss at both spine (r = -0.58, p loss may influence marrow fat behavior, and marrow fat may be a determinant of bone metabolism. © 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. © 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  16. Granulocyte maturation determines ability to release chromatin NETs and loss of DNA damage response; these properties are absent in immature AML granulocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukášová, Emilie; Kořistek, Zdeněk; Klabusay, Martin; Ondřej, Vladan; Grigoryev, Sergei; Bačíková, Alena; Řezáčová, Martina; Falk, Martin; Vávrová, Jiřina; Kohútová, Viera; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2013-03-01

    Terminally-differentiated cells cease to proliferate and acquire specific sets of expressed genes and functions distinguishing them from less differentiated and cancer cells. Mature granulocytes show lobular structure of cell nuclei with highly condensed chromatin in which HP1 proteins are replaced by MNEI. These structural features of chromatin correspond to low level of gene expression and the loss of some important functions as DNA damage repair, shown in this work and, on the other hand, acquisition of a new specific function consisting in the release of chromatin extracellular traps in response to infection by pathogenic microbes. Granulocytic differentiation is incomplete in myeloid leukemia and is manifested by persistence of lower levels of HP1γ and HP1β isoforms. This immaturity is accompanied by acquisition of DDR capacity allowing to these incompletely differentiated multi-lobed neutrophils of AML patients to respond to induction of DSB by γ-irradiation. Immature granulocytes persist frequently in blood of treated AML patients in remission. These granulocytes contrary to mature ones do not release chromatin for NETs after activation with phorbol myristate-12 acetate-13 and do not exert the neutrophil function in immune defence. We suggest therefore the detection of HP1 expression in granulocytes of AML patients as a very sensitive indicator of their maturation and functionality after the treatment. Our results show that the changes in chromatin structure underlie a major transition in functioning of the genome in immature granulocytes. They show further that leukemia stem cells can differentiate ex vivo to mature granulocytes despite carrying the translocation BCR/ABL. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Influence of previous body mass index and sex on regional fat changes in a weight loss intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito, Pedro J; Cupeiro, Rocio; Peinado, Ana B; Rojo, Miguel A; Maffulli, Nicola

    2017-11-01

    Men and women may lose weight in a different fashion. This study compares the changes in different anatomical regions after a well-controlled weight loss program by sex and initial BMI. A total of 180 subjects (48 overweight women, 36 overweight men, and 48 obese women and 48 obese men) were recruited to participate in a 22-week weight loss programme (diet + exercise). Regarding percentage body weight change from baseline, there was no triple interaction (BMI, sex and anatomical region), but there was interaction between BMI and anatomical region (F2,840 = 34.5; p weight in obese participants, but men lose the highest percentage of mass from the trunk. There were differences between men and women for the areas of left trunk mass (750g), right trunk mass (700g), total mass of the trunk (1400g), android mass (350g), and finally in the total mass in overweight participants (1300g), with higher values for men than for women. The region that loses more weight and fat is the trunk, followed by the legs, and then the arms, when the loss is observed in function of the total weight or fat lost. Both BMI and sex exert a definite influence fat loss, especially in some anatomical regions.

  18. Multi-decadal mass loss of glaciers in the Everest area (Nepal Himalaya) derived from stereo imagery

    OpenAIRE

    Bolch, T; Pieczonka, T; Benn, D I

    2011-01-01

    Mass loss of Himalayan glaciers has wide-ranging consequences such as changing runoff distribution, sea level rise and an increasing risk of glacial lake outburst floods (GLOFs). The assessment of the regional and global impact of glacier changes in the Himalaya is, however, hampered by a lack of mass balance data for most of the range. Multi-temporal digital terrain models (DTMs) allow glacier mass balance to be calculated. Here, we present a time series of mass changes for ten glaciers cove...

  19. ACUTE EFFECTS OF SELF-SELECTED REGIMEN OF RAPID BODY MASS LOSS IN COMBAT SPORTS ATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaan Ereline

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to assess the acute effects of the self-selected regimen of rapid body mass loss (RBML on muscle performance and metabolic response to exercise in combat sports athletes. Seventeen male athletes (20.8 ± 1.0 years; mean ± SD reduced their body mass by 5.1 ± 1.1% within 3 days. The RBML was achieved by a gradual reduction of energy and fluid intake and mild sauna procedures. A battery of tests was performed before (Test 1 and immediately after (Test 2 RBML. The test battery included the measurement of the peak torque of knee extensors for three different speeds, assessment of total work (Wtot performed during a 3-min intermittent intensity knee extension exercise and measurements of blood metabolites (ammonia, lactate, glucose and urea. Absolute peak torque was lower in Test 2 compared with Test 1 at angular velocities of 1.57 rad·s-1 (218.6 ± 40.9 vs. 234.4 ± 42.2 N·m; p = 0.013 and 3.14 rad·s-1 (100.3 ± 27.8 vs. 111.7 ± 26.2 N·m; p = 0.008. The peak torque in relation to body mass remained unchanged for any speed. Absolute Wtot was lower in Test 2 compared with Test 1 (6359 ± 2326 vs. 7452 ± 3080 J; p = 0.003 as well as Wtot in relation to body mass (89.1 ± 29.9 vs. 98.6 ± 36.4 J·kg-1; p = 0.034, respectively. As a result of RBML, plasma urea concentration increased from 4.9 to 5.9 mmol·l-1 (p = 0.003. The concentration of ammonia in a post-test sample in Test 2 tended to be higher in comparison with Test 1 (80.9 ± 29.1 vs. 67.6 ± 26.5 mmol·l-1; p = 0.082. The plasma lactate and glucose responses to exercise were similar in Test 1 and Test 2. We conclude that the self-selected regimen of RBML impairs muscle performance in 3-min intermittent intensity exercise and induces an increase in blood urea concentration in experienced male combat sports athletes

  20. ADIABATIC MASS LOSS IN BINARY STARS. II. FROM ZERO-AGE MAIN SEQUENCE TO THE BASE OF THE GIANT BRANCH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, Hongwei; Chen, Xuefei; Han, Zhanwen [Yunnan Observatories, The Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Webbink, Ronald F., E-mail: hongwei.ge@gmail.com, E-mail: rwebbink@illinois.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois, 1002 W. Green St., Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2015-10-10

    In the limit of extremely rapid mass transfer, the response of a donor star in an interacting binary becomes asymptotically one of adiabatic expansion. We survey here adiabatic mass loss from Population I stars (Z = 0.02) of mass 0.10 M{sub ⊙}–100 M{sub ⊙} from the zero-age main sequence to the base of the giant branch, or to central hydrogen exhaustion for lower main sequence stars. The logarithmic derivatives of radius with respect to mass along adiabatic mass-loss sequences translate into critical mass ratios for runaway (dynamical timescale) mass transfer, evaluated here under the assumption of conservative mass transfer. For intermediate- and high-mass stars, dynamical mass transfer is preceded by an extended phase of thermal timescale mass transfer as the star is stripped of most of its envelope mass. The critical mass ratio q{sub ad} (throughout this paper, we follow the convention of defining the binary mass ratio as q ≡ M{sub donor}/M{sub accretor}) above which this delayed dynamical instability occurs increases with advancing evolutionary age of the donor star, by ever-increasing factors for more massive donors. Most intermediate- or high-mass binaries with nondegenerate accretors probably evolve into contact before manifesting this instability. As they approach the base of the giant branch, however, and begin developing a convective envelope, q{sub ad} plummets dramatically among intermediate-mass stars, to values of order unity, and a prompt dynamical instability occurs. Among low-mass stars, the prompt instability prevails throughout main sequence evolution, with q{sub ad} declining with decreasing mass, and asymptotically approaching q{sub ad} = 2/3, appropriate to a classical isentropic n = 3/2 polytrope. Our calculated q{sub ad} values agree well with the behavior of time-dependent models by Chen and Han of intermediate-mass stars initiating mass transfer in the Hertzsprung gap. Application of our results to cataclysmic variables, as systems

  1. The effect of leptin, caffeine/ephedrine, and their combination upon visceral fat mass and weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ann G; Smith, Steven R; Fujioka, Ken; Greenway, Frank L

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the effects of combination caffeine/ephedrine and leptin A-200 on visceral fat mass and weight loss over 24 weeks. In this randomized, double-blind, parallel-arm trial, 90 obese subjects received one of the three treatments for 24 weeks: 200 mg caffeine/20 mg ephedrine t.i.d. (CE), leptin A-200 (recombinant methionyl human Fc-leptin, 20 mg q.d.) (L), or combination leptin A-200 and caffeine/ephedrine (LCE). Outcomes included change in weight, visceral fat mass by computed tomography, lean mass and fat mass by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Groups treated with CE and LCE lost significant amounts of weight (-5.9 ± 1.2% and -6.5 ± 1.1%, P fat mass (-9.6 ± 2.4% and -12.4 ± 2.3%, P fat mass (-11.0 ± 3.3%, P loss agent and produces significant reductions in fat mass. Leptin A-200 was not effective in producing weight loss and did not have any significant additive or synergistic actions when combined with CE. Copyright © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  2. Effect of molar ratio on thermal mass loss kinetics of poly({epsilon}-caprolactone-b-propylene adipate) copolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanaki, Stavroula G. [Laboratory of Polymer Chemistry and Technology, Department of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-541 24, Thessaloniki, Macedonia (Greece); Chrissafis, K. [Solid State Physics Section, Physics Department, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-541 24, Thessaloniki, Macedonia (Greece); Bikiaris, Dimitrios N., E-mail: dbic@chem.auth.gr [Laboratory of Polymer Chemistry and Technology, Department of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-541 24, Thessaloniki, Macedonia (Greece)

    2011-04-20

    Research highlights: {yields} Thermal decomposition behaviour of PCL-b-PPAd block copolymers was estimated. {yields} The prepared copolymers have higher thermal stability than neat polymers. {yields} In copolymers the evaporation of PPAd short blocks and formed {epsilon}-CL is delayed. {yields} This is because copolymers degrade with a different mechanism than neat polymers. - Abstract: Poly({epsilon}-caprolactone-b-propylene adipate) copolymers were synthesized using a combination of polycondensation and ring opening polymerisation. GPC was used for molecular weight determination. {sup 1}H-NMR and {sup 13}C-NMR spectroscopy was also used for copolymer characterization and composition, which was found similar to the feeding ratio. DSC study was used in order to define T{sub g}, T{sub m} and {Delta}H{sub m} values of neat polymers and copolymers. Mass loss upon heating kinetics of neat polymers and their copolymers were studied by using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). It was found that copolymers have almost the same thermal stability as PCL, which is the most stable part. The influence of PPAd in copolymers can mainly be seen at the beginning of mass loss where a small overlapped peak can be observed. The kinetic parameters of mass loss upon heating of all polyesters were calculated while the activation energies were estimated using the Ozawa, Flynn and Wall (OFW) and Friedman methods. Mass loss upon heating was found to be described by two mechanisms that follow each other. The first mechanism is attributed to a small mass loss, while the second mechanism is attributed to the main mass loss as in autocatalysis n{sup th}-order (reaction model Cn) or n{sup th} order (reaction model Fn).

  3. Low body mass index is an important risk factor for low bone mass and increased bone loss in early postmenopausal women. Early Postmenopausal Intervention Cohort (EPIC) study group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Pernille; Cizza, G; Bjarnason, N H

    1999-01-01

    Thinness (low percentage of body fat, low body mass index [BMI], or low body weight) was evaluated as a risk factor for low bone mineral density (BMD) or increased bone loss in a randomized trial of alendronate for prevention of osteoporosis in recently postmenopausal women with normal bone mass (n...... = 1609). The 2-year data from the placebo group were used (n = 417). Percentage of body fat, BMI, and body weight were correlated with baseline BMD (r = -0. 13 to -0.43, p bone loss (r = -0.14 to -0.19, p ... to 12% lower BMD at baseline and a more than 2-fold higher 2-year bone loss as compared with women in the highest tertiles (p

  4. Spatial pattern of mass loss processes across the Greenland Ice Sheet from the Little Ice Age to 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, K. H.; Korsgaard, N. J.; Kjeldsen, K. K.

    of the LIA, which enables us to obtain vertical point-based differences associated with former ice extent. These point measurements are combined with contemporary ice surface differences derived using NASA's Airborne Topographic Mapper (ATM) from 2003-2010, NASA's Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite...... (ICESat) from 2003-2009, NASA's Land, Vegetation, and Ice Sensor (LVIS) from 2010, and ASTER (Silcast AST14DMO) co-registered to ICESat, to estimate mass loss throughout the 20th and early 21st Century. The mass balance estimates of the GrIS since retreat from maximum LIA is combined with a SMB model......The Greenland Ice Sheet loses mass through surface meltwater runoff and discharge from marine terminating outlet glaciers. The spatial variability and magnitude of these processes have been studied and described in detail for the past decades. Here, we combine the mass loss between the LIA to 2010...

  5. Photometry of SN 2002ic and implications for the progenitor mass-loss history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood-Vasey, W.M.; Wang, L.; Aldering, G.

    2004-05-06

    We present new pre-maximum and late-time optical photometry of the Type Ia/IIn supernova 2002ic. These observations are combined with the published V-band magnitudes of Hamuy et al. (2003) and the VLT spectrophotometry of Wang et al. (2004) to construct the most extensive light curve to date of this unusual supernova. The observed flux at late time is significantly higher relative to the flux at maximum than that of any other observed Type Ia supernova and continues to fade very slowly a year after explosion. Our analysis of the light curve suggests that a non-Type Ia supernova component becomes prominent {approx}20 days after explosion. Modeling of the non-Type Ia supernova component as heating from the shock interaction of the supernova ejecta with pre-existing circumstellar material suggests the presence of a {approx}1.7 x 1015 cm gap or trough between the progenitor system and the surrounding circumstellar material. This gap could be due to significantly lower mass-loss {approx}15 (nu{sub omega}/10 km/s) -1 years prior to explosion or evacuation of the circumstellar material by a low-density fast wind. The latter is consistent with observed properties of proto-planetary nebulae and with models of white-dwarf + asymptotic giant branch star progenitor systems with the asymptotic giant branch star in the proto-planetary nebula phase.

  6. Materials testing for spacecraft use. [by measurement of Total Mass Loss of Volatile Condensable Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J. J.

    1979-01-01

    A technique has been developed for determining the outgassing characteristics of materials intended for spacecraft use. A measurement of the total mass loss (TML) and of the collected volatile condensable materials (CVCM) is used as a guide for selecting those materials low in outgassing. The data were used to compare the outgassing from two conductive black paints. In addition, the apparatus was also used in an attempt to simulate expected launch temperatures by collecting the outgassed molecules on a glass plate, which simulates a nearby thermal control surface. The glass plate was then irradiated in vacuum by simulated sunlight. Transmittance patterns of the clean glass plate and also with the condensed material on it were compared with the transmittance pattern after irradiation of the condensate. The transmittance patterns showed a drastic change. The resultant discoloration indicated the detrimental effects of the contamination and aided in selecting the better conductive paint. Additional tests utilizing an aluminized mirror collector plate have been run to show the effect of irradiation upon the CVCM from certain different classes of materials often used on spacecraft.

  7. Sustained mass loss of the northeast Greenland ice sheet triggered by regional warming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Shfaqat Abbas; Kjaer, Kurt H.; Bevis, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The Greenland ice sheet has been one of the largest contributors to global sea-level rise over the past 20 years, accounting for 0.5 mm yr(-1) of a total of 3.2 mm yr(-1). A significant portion of this contribution is associated with the speed-up of an increased number of glaciers in southeast...... and northwest Greenland. Here, we show that the northeast Greenland ice stream, which extends more than 600 km into the interior of the ice sheet, is now undergoing sustained dynamic thinning, linked to regional warming, after more than a quarter of a century of stability. This sector of the Greenland ice sheet...... is of particular interest, because the drainage basin area covers 16% of the ice sheet (twice that of Jakobshavn Isbrae) and numerical model predictions suggest no significant mass loss for this sector, leading to an under-estimation of future global sea-level rise. The geometry of the bedrock and monotonic trend...

  8. Net Locality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Souza e Silva, Adriana Araujo; Gordon, Eric

    Provides an introduction to the new theory of Net Locality and the profound effect on individuals and societies when everything is located or locatable. Describes net locality as an emerging form of location awareness central to all aspects of digital media, from mobile phones, to Google Maps...... of emerging technologies, from GeoCities to GPS, Wi-Fi, Wiki Me, and Google Android....

  9. Net Neutrality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savin, Andrej

    2017-01-01

    Repealing “net neutrality” in the US will have no bearing on Internet freedom or security there or anywhere else.......Repealing “net neutrality” in the US will have no bearing on Internet freedom or security there or anywhere else....

  10. e-MERLIN 21 cm constraints on the mass-loss rates of OB stars in Cyg OB2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morford, J. C.; Fenech, D. M.; Prinja, R. K.; Blomme, R.; Yates, J. A.

    2016-11-01

    We present e-MERLIN 21 cm (L-band) observations of single luminous OB stars in the Cygnus OB2 association, from the Cyg OB2 Radio Survey Legacy programme. The radio observations potentially offer the most straightforward, least model-dependent, determinations of mass-loss rates, and can be used to help resolve current discrepancies in mass-loss rates via clumped and structured hot star winds. We report here that the 21 cm flux densities of O3 to O6 supergiant and giant stars are less than ˜70 μJy. These fluxes may be translated to `smooth' wind mass-loss upper limits of ˜4.4-4.8 × 10-6 M⊙ yr -1 for O3 supergiants and ≲2.9 × 10-6 M⊙ yr -1 for B0 to B1 supergiants. The first ever resolved 21 cm detections of the hypergiant (and luminous blue variable candidate) Cyg OB2 #12 are discussed; for multiple observations separated by 14 d, we detect an ˜69 per cent increase in its flux density. Our constraints on the upper limits for the mass-loss rates of evolved OB stars in Cyg OB2 support the model that the inner wind region close to the stellar surface (where Hα forms) is more clumped than the very extended geometric region sampled by our radio observations.

  11. Constraining ice mass loss from Jakobshavn Isbræ (Greenland) using InSAR-measured crustal uplift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Lin; Wahr, John; Howat, Ian

    2012-01-01

    . Overall, our results suggest that despite the inherent difficulties of working with a signal that has significant large-scale components, InSAR-measured crustal deformation can be used to study the ice mass loss of a rapidly thinning glacier and its surrounding catchment, providing both a constraint...

  12. EG And: Providing the Missing Link Required for Modelling Red Giant Mass-loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espey, Brian

    2009-07-01

    For the majority of red giant stars the basic mass-loss processes at work are unknown. Indeed, for stars of spectral types between K0 III and M5-M6 III, much remains unknown about the regions above the visible photosphere and the transportation of the processed material outwards to the ISM. Eclipsing symbiotic binary systems, consisting of an evolved giant in orbit with a white dwarf, provide an opportunity to take advantage of the finite size of the hot component to probe different levels of the chromosphere and wind acceleration region in absorption. This provides spatially resolved thermal, ionisation and dynamic information on the wind which can then be compared against predictions of hydrodynamical stellar atmosphere codes. The symbiotic binary EG And can be considered as a rosetta stone for understanding the winds of these objects. The system is ideal on a number of counts for utilising the ultraviolet eclipse of the white dwarf {WD} component to probe, layer-by-layer, the thermal and dynamic conditions at the very base of the wind and chromosphere of the RG. This information is vital for constraining, testing and calibrating the new generation of cool giant wind+chromosphere models and is not possible to obtain for isolated RGs. This team has studied the UV eclipses of this system in depth and detail, however in order to definitively constrain the wind acceleration profile and identify the location of the temperature rise just above the photosphere we require 4 STIS E140M observations of EG And at specific orbital phases. We are also requesting a E230M observation of an isolated spectral standard, corresponding to the RG inthe binary, which will help place the EG And results into the context of the general RG population from analysis of the MgII wind diagnostic lines.

  13. Effects of changing mosquito host searching behaviour on the cost effectiveness of a mass distribution of long-lasting, insecticidal nets: a modelling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briët, Olivier J T; Chitnis, Nakul

    2013-06-26

    The effectiveness of long-lasting, insecticidal nets (LLINs) in preventing malaria is threatened by the changing biting behaviour of mosquitoes, from nocturnal and endophagic to crepuscular and exophagic, and by their increasing resistance to insecticides. Using epidemiological stochastic simulation models, we studied the impact of a mass LLIN distribution on Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Specifically, we looked at impact in terms of episodes prevented during the effective life of the batch and in terms of net health benefits (NHB) expressed in disability adjusted life years (DALYs) averted, depending on biting behaviour, resistance (as measured in experimental hut studies), and on pre-intervention transmission levels. Results were very sensitive to assumptions about the probabilistic nature of host searching behaviour. With a shift towards crepuscular biting, under the assumption that individual mosquitoes repeat their behaviour each gonotrophic cycle, LLIN effectiveness was far less than when individual mosquitoes were assumed to vary their behaviour between gonotrophic cycles. LLIN effectiveness was equally sensitive to variations in host-searching behaviour (if repeated) and to variations in resistance. LLIN effectiveness was most sensitive to pre-intervention transmission level, with LLINs being least effective at both very low and very high transmission levels, and most effective at around four infectious bites per adult per year. A single LLIN distribution round remained cost effective, except in transmission settings with a pre-intervention inoculation rate of over 128 bites per year and with resistant mosquitoes that displayed a high proportion (over 40%) of determined crepuscular host searching, where some model variants showed negative NHB. Shifts towards crepuscular host searching behaviour can be as important in reducing LLIN effectiveness and cost effectiveness as resistance to pyrethroids. As resistance to insecticides is likely to slow down the

  14. The impact of mass drug administration and long-lasting insecticidal net distribution on Wuchereria bancrofti infection in humans and mosquitoes: an observational study in northern Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Ruth A; Kyabayinze, Daniel J; Opio, Tom; Auma, Anna; Edwards, Tansy; Matwale, Gabriel; Onapa, Ambrose; Brooker, Simon; Kolaczinski, Jan H

    2011-07-15

    Lymphatic filariasis (LF) in Uganda is caused by Wuchereria bancrofti and transmitted by anopheline mosquitoes. The mainstay of elimination has been annual mass drug administration (MDA) with ivermectin and albendazole, targeted to endemic districts, but has been sporadic and incomplete in coverage. Vector control could potentially contribute to reducing W. bancrofti transmission, speeding up progress towards elimination. To establish whether the use of long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs) can contribute towards reducing transmission of W. bancrofti in a setting with ongoing MDA, a study was conducted in an area of Uganda highly endemic for both LF and malaria. Baseline parasitological and entomological assessments were conducted in 2007, followed by high-coverage LLIN distribution. Net use and entomological surveys were carried out after one year, and final parasitological and entomological evaluations were conducted in 2010. Three rounds of MDA had taken place before the study commenced, with a further three rounds completed during the course of the study. In 2007, rapid mapping indicated 22.3% of schoolchildren were W. bancrofti antigen positive, and a baseline survey during the same year found age-adjusted microfilaraemia prevalence was 3.7% (95% confidence interval (CI): 2.6-5.3%). In 2010, age-adjusted microfilaraemia prevalence had fallen to 0.4%, while antigenaemia rates were 0.2% in children < 5 years and 6.0% in ≥ 5 years. In 2010, universal coverage of mosquito nets in a household was found to be protective against W. bancrofti antigen (odds ratio = 0.44, 95% CI: 0.22-0.89). Prevalence of W. bancrofti larvae in anopheline mosquitoes had decreased significantly between the 2007 and 2010 surveys, but there was an apparent increase in vector densities. A marked reduction in W. bancrofti infection and infectivity in humans was observed in the study area, where both MDA and LLINs were used to reduce transmission. The extent to which LLINs contributed to

  15. Spin-induced mass loss from rubble piles and the formation of asteroid satellites and pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanga, P.; Campo Bagatin, A.; Thirouin, A.; Cellino, A.; Comito, C.; Ortiz, J.; Richardson, D.; Hestroffer, D.

    2014-07-01

    Non-gravitational effects may change the angular momentum of asteroids up to a few tens of km in size to the point that rotational stability is lost at high spin rates. Once instability is initiated, mass loss may happen and potentially create satellites or dynamically detached components (pairs). We have studied this problem by means of numerical simulations and investigated the production of secondary objects of different sizes by direct splitting of the parent body under the assumption of a low internal angle of friction. We focused our attention on the effect of progressive spin-up of objects as a consequence of the YORP effect. Since asteroids are clearly not fluid but rocky bodies, one can assume that equilibrium theories --- also describing bifurcations (e.g., [1]) --- do not directly apply [2]. The equilibrium shapes of non-fluid bodies have been studied in the recent past by several authors, assuming that rubble-pile asteroids can be modeled as cohesionless granular systems in the frame of continuum theories [2--5]. [6] shows that a small amount of tensile strength could be sufficient for the survival of some fast rotators, even if they are internally fragmented. More relevant to this work are the results obtained by [7,8] by the same N-body approach that we use, i.e., by simulating the dynamics and the collisions of mono-dispersed hard spheres utilizing the PKDGRAV code [9,10]. The YORP effect is modeled by increasing rigid rotation by small increments with enough time to relax between subsequent spin-ups. In this work, our approach is based again on the same simulation code; however, our new exploration of the parameter space is broader than the previous study in the near-fluid regime, which is achieved by randomizing the initial particle positions somewhat to break the otherwise crystalline structure of monodisperse particle packing. We find that the transformation of objects into prolate ellipsoids is an efficient process when the internal angle of

  16. Does the amount of fat mass predict age-related loss of lean mass, muscle strength, and muscle quality in older adults?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, Annemarie; Ding, Jingzhong; Stenholm, Sari; Caserotti, Paolo; Houston, Denise K; Nicklas, Barbara J; You, Tongjian; Lee, Jung Sun; Visser, Marjolein; Newman, Anne B; Schwartz, Ann V; Cauley, Jane A; Tylavsky, Frances A; Goodpaster, Bret H; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Harris, Tamara B

    2011-08-01

    An excessive amount of adipose tissue may contribute to sarcopenia and may be one mechanism underlying accelerated loss of muscle mass and strength with aging. We therefore examined the association of baseline total body fat with changes in leg lean mass, muscle strength, and muscle quality over 7 years of follow-up and whether this link was explained by adipocytokines and insulin resistance. Data were from 2,307 men and women, aged 70-79 years, participating in the Health, Aging, and Body Composition study. Total fat mass was acquired from dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Leg lean mass was assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry in Years 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 8. Knee extension strength was measured by isokinetic dynamometer in Years 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8. Muscle quality was calculated as muscle strength divided by leg lean mass. Every SD greater fat mass was related to 1.3 kg more leg lean mass at baseline in men and 1.5 kg in women (p women (0.02 kg/year, p disability and mobility impairments.

  17. MTOR signaling and ubiquitin-proteosome gene expression in the preservation of fat free mass following high protein, calorie restricted weight loss

    OpenAIRE

    McIver Cassandra M; Wycherley Thomas P; Clifton Peter M

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Caloric restriction is one of the most efficient ways to promote weight loss and is known to activate protective metabolic pathways. Frequently reported with weight loss is the undesirable consequence of fat free (lean muscle) mass loss. Weight loss diets with increased dietary protein intake are popular and may provide additional benefits through preservation of fat free mass compared to a standard protein, high carbohydrate diet. However, the precise mechanism by which a high prote...

  18. Free mass distribution of long lasting insecticidal nets lead to high levels of LLIN access and use in Madagascar, 2010: A cross-sectional observational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyssa M Finlay

    Full Text Available Madagascar conducted the first two phases of a national free mass distribution campaign of long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs during a political crisis in 2009 aiming to achieve coverage of two LLINs per household as part of the National Malaria Control Strategy. The campaign targeted households in 19 out of 91 total health districts.A community-based cross-sectional household survey using a three-stage cluster sample design was conducted four months post campaign to assess LLIN ownership, access and use. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with household LLIN access and individual LLIN use.A total of 2211 households were surveyed representing 8867 people. At least one LLIN was present in 93.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 91.6-95.5% of households and 74.8% (95% CI, 71.0-78.6% owned at least two LLINs. Access measured as the proportion of the population that could potentially be covered by household-owned LLINs was 77.2% (77.2% (95% CI, 72.9-81.3% and LLIN use by all individuals was 84.2% (95% CI, 81.2-87.2%. LLIN use was associated with knowledge of insecticide treated net use to prevent malaria (OR = 3.58, 95% CI, 1.85-6.94, household ownership of more LLINs (OR 2.82, 95% CI 1.85-4.3, presence of children under five (OR = 2.05, 95% CI, 1.67-2.51, having traveled to the distribution point and receiving information about hanging a bednet (OR = 1.56, 95% CI, 1.41-1.74, and having received a post-campaign visit by a community mobilizer (OR = 1.75, 95% CI, 1.26-2.43. Lower LLIN use was associated with increasing household size (OR = 0.81 95% CI 0.77-0.85 and number of sleeping spaces (OR = 0.55, 95% CI, 0.44-0.68.A large scale free mass LLIN distribution campaign was feasible and effective at achieving high LLIN access and use in Madagascar. Campaign process indicators highlighted potential areas for strengthening implementation to optimize access and equity.

  19. Free mass distribution of long lasting insecticidal nets lead to high levels of LLIN access and use in Madagascar, 2010: A cross-sectional observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butts, Jessica; Ranaivoharimina, Harilala; Cotte, Annett H.; Ramarosandratana, Benjamin; Rabarijaona, Henintsoa; Tuseo, Luciano; Chang, Michelle; Vanden Eng, Jodi

    2017-01-01

    Background Madagascar conducted the first two phases of a national free mass distribution campaign of long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs) during a political crisis in 2009 aiming to achieve coverage of two LLINs per household as part of the National Malaria Control Strategy. The campaign targeted households in 19 out of 91 total health districts. Methods A community-based cross-sectional household survey using a three-stage cluster sample design was conducted four months post campaign to assess LLIN ownership, access and use. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with household LLIN access and individual LLIN use. Results A total of 2211 households were surveyed representing 8867 people. At least one LLIN was present in 93.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 91.6–95.5%) of households and 74.8% (95% CI, 71.0–78.6%) owned at least two LLINs. Access measured as the proportion of the population that could potentially be covered by household-owned LLINs was 77.2% (77.2% (95% CI, 72.9–81.3%) and LLIN use by all individuals was 84.2% (95% CI, 81.2–87.2%). LLIN use was associated with knowledge of insecticide treated net use to prevent malaria (OR = 3.58, 95% CI, 1.85–6.94), household ownership of more LLINs (OR 2.82, 95% CI 1.85–4.3), presence of children under five (OR = 2.05, 95% CI, 1.67–2.51), having traveled to the distribution point and receiving information about hanging a bednet (OR = 1.56, 95% CI, 1.41–1.74), and having received a post-campaign visit by a community mobilizer (OR = 1.75, 95% CI, 1.26–2.43). Lower LLIN use was associated with increasing household size (OR = 0.81 95% CI 0.77–0.85) and number of sleeping spaces (OR = 0.55, 95% CI, 0.44–0.68). Conclusions A large scale free mass LLIN distribution campaign was feasible and effective at achieving high LLIN access and use in Madagascar. Campaign process indicators highlighted potential areas for strengthening implementation to optimize

  20. Weight loss may be a better approach for managing musculoskeletal conditions than increasing muscle mass and strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bokun; Tsujimoto, Takehiko; So, Rina; Zhao, Xiaoguang; Suzuki, Shun; Kim, Taeho; Tanaka, Kiyoji

    2015-12-01

    To prevent or remedy musculoskeletal conditions, the relationship between obesity and the characteristics of muscle mass and strength need to be clarified. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 259 Japanese males aged 30-64 years were classified into 4 groups according to the Japanese obesity criteria. Body composition was evaluated, and handgrip strength and knee extensor strength were measured for the upper and lower extremities, respectively. Physical performance was evaluated with a jump test. [Results] Obesity was positively correlated with skeletal muscle mass index, percentage of whole-body fat, and leg muscle strength and negatively correlated with the percentage of muscle mass index, body weight-normalized handgrip strength, and knee extensor strength, and the jump test results. [Conclusion] Weight loss may be a better approach than increasing muscle mass and strength to improve musculoskeletal conditions in obese adult males.

  1. Long-lasting insecticidal net (LLIN) ownership, use and cost of implementation after a mass distribution campaign in Kasaï Occidental Province, Democratic Republic of Congo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntuku, Henry Maggi; Ruckstuhl, Laura; Julo-Réminiac, Jean-Emmanuel; Umesumbu, Solange E; Bokota, Alain; Tshefu, Antoinette Kitoto; Lengeler, Christian

    2017-01-09

    Long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLIN) are a highly effective means for preventing malaria infection and reducing associated morbidity and mortality. Mass free distribution campaigns have been shown to rapidly increase LLIN ownership and use. Around 3.5 million LLINs were distributed free of charge in the Kasaï Occidental Province in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) in September-October 2014, using two different approaches, a fixed delivery strategy and a door-to-door strategy including hang-up activities. Repeated community-based cross-sectional surveys were conducted 2 months before and six months after the mass distribution. Descriptive statistics were used to measure changes in key malaria household indicators. LLIN ownership and use were compared between delivery strategies. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to identify factors associated with LLIN use before and after the mass distribution. A comparative financial cost analysis between the fixed delivery and door-to-door distribution strategies was carried out from the provider's perspective. Household ownership of at least one LLIN increased from 39.4% pre-campaign to 91.4% post-campaign and LLIN universal coverage, measured as the proportion of households with at least one LLIN for every two people increased from 4.1 to 41.1%. Population access to LLIN within the household increased from 22.2 to 80.7%, while overall LLIN use increased from 18.0 to 68.3%. Higher LLIN ownership was achieved with the fixed delivery strategy compared with the door-to-door (92.5% [95% CI 90.2-94.4%] versus 85.2% [95% CI 78.5-90.0%]), while distribution strategy did not have a significant impact on LLIN use (69.6% [95% CI 63.1-75.5%] versus 65.7% [95% CI 52.7-76.7%]). Malaria prevalence among children aged 6-59 months was 44.8% post-campaign. Living in a household with sufficient numbers of LLIN to cover all members was the strongest determinant of LLIN use. The total financial cost per

  2. Impact of mass distribution of free long-lasting insecticidal nets on childhood malaria morbidity: The Togo National Integrated Child Health Campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sodahlon Yao K

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An evaluation of the short-term impact on childhood malaria morbidity of mass distribution of free long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs to households with children aged 9-59 months as part of the Togo National Integrated Child Health Campaign. Methods The prevalence of anaemia and malaria in children aged zero to 59 months was measured during two cross-sectional household cluster-sample surveys conducted during the peak malaria transmission, three months before (Sept 2004, n = 2521 and nine months after the campaign (Sept 2005, n = 2813 in three districts representative of Togo's three epidemiological malaria transmission regions: southern tropical coastal plains (Yoto, central fertile highlands (Ogou and northern semi-arid savannah (Tone. Results In households with children 65% in all 3 districts. Reported ITN use by children during the previous night was 35.9%, 43.8% and 80.6% in Yoto, Ogou and Tone, respectively. Rainfall patterns were comparable in both years. The overall prevalence of moderate to severe anaemia (Hb The effect was predominantly seen in children aged 18-59 months and in the two southern districts: PR (95% CI for moderate to severe anaemia and clinical malaria: Yoto 0.62 (0.44-0.88 and 0.49 (0.35-0.75; Ogou 0.54 (0.37-0.79 and 0.85 (0.57-1.27, respectively. Similar reductions occurred in children Conclusions A marked reduction in childhood malaria associated morbidity was observed in the year following mass distribution of free LLINs in two of the three districts in Togo. Sub-national level impact evaluations will contribute to a better understanding of the impact of expanding national malaria control efforts.

  3. Reduction in energy expenditure during weight loss is higher than predicted based on fat free mass and fat mass in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Haaf, Twan; Verreijen, Amely M; Memelink, Robert G; Tieland, Michael; Weijs, Peter J M

    2016-12-23

    The aim of this study was to describe a decrease in resting energy expenditure during weight loss that is larger than expected based on changes in body composition, called adaptive thermogenesis (AT), in overweight and obese older adults. Multiple studies were combined to assess AT in younger and older subjects. Body composition and resting energy expenditure (REE) were measured before and after weight loss. Baseline values were used to predict fat free mass and fat mass adjusted REE after weight loss. AT was defined as the difference between predicted and measured REE after weight loss. The median age of 55 y was used as a cutoff to compare older with younger subjects. The relation between AT and age was investigated using linear regression analysis. In this study 254 (M = 88, F = 166) overweight and obese subjects were included (BMI: 31.7 ± 4.4 kg/m2, age: 51 ± 14 y). The AT was only significant for older subjects (64 ± 185 kcal/d, 95% CI [32, 96]), but not for younger subjects (19 ± 152 kcal/d, 95% CI [-9, 46]). The size of the AT was significantly higher for older compared to younger adults (β = 47, p = 0.048), independent of gender and type and duration of the weight loss program. We conclude that adaptive thermogenesis is present only in older subjects, which might have implications for weight management in older adults. A reduced energy intake is advised to counteract the adaptive thermogenesis. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. 26 CFR 1.381(c)(1)-2 - Net operating loss carryovers; two or more dates of distribution or transfer in the taxable year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Transferor corporation Z 1954 xxx xxx ($30,000) 1955 xxx xxx 1,000 1956 xxx xxx 1,000 1957 ($20,000) ($25,000) 1,000 Ending 6-30-58 xxx 1,000 xxx Ending 9-30-58 xxx xxx 1,000 1958 36,500 xxx xxx The sequence in..., computed as follows: Z's 1954 loss xxx Y's 1957 loss $14,800 X's 1957 loss 91,900 Total 16,700 ...

  5. A Study of Massive Star Evolution and Mass Loss With Multi-Wavelength Observations of Type IIn Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Ori; Skrutskie, Michael; Chevalier, Roger; Smith, Nathan; Chandra, Poonam; Filippenko, Alex

    2012-12-01

    Type IIn supernovae (SNe IIn) are a rare (list of subclasses, suggesting multiple progenitors may be responsible. Multi-wavelength observations, spanning the X-ray to the infrared (IR) to the radio regime, can probe various aspects of shock interaction and dust formation associated with the dense CSM for months to years after the radioactive emission fades. Such diagnostics probe the progenitor mass-loss history, CSM characteristics, and even the elusive SN shock breakout. Given the required coordination amongst space-based and large ground-based telescopes, however, existing data sets are sparse and insufficient. Here we submit a joint Spitzer/Chandra proposal to trace the mass-loss history of SNe IIn with a thorough, coordinated, multi-wavelength approach. With guaranteed time on Keck and JVLA already at our disposal and an aligned team of SNe IIn experts spanning all wavelengths, now is the time for such a program.

  6. RESTful NET

    CERN Document Server

    Flanders, Jon

    2008-01-01

    RESTful .NET is the first book that teaches Windows developers to build RESTful web services using the latest Microsoft tools. Written by Windows Communication Foundation (WFC) expert Jon Flanders, this hands-on tutorial demonstrates how you can use WCF and other components of the .NET 3.5 Framework to build, deploy and use REST-based web services in a variety of application scenarios. RESTful architecture offers a simpler approach to building web services than SOAP, SOA, and the cumbersome WS- stack. And WCF has proven to be a flexible technology for building distributed systems not necessa

  7. Beyond Body Mass Index: Are Weight-loss Programs the Best Way to Improve the Health of African American Women?

    OpenAIRE

    Dodgen, Leilani; Spence-Almaguer, Emily

    2017-01-01

    African American women have higher prevalence (82%) of overweight (body mass index [BMI] 25?29) and obesity (BMI ?30) than white women (63.2%) or Hispanic women (77.2%), and weight-loss programs yield minimal results in this population. We examine the concept of BMI as a measure of health for African American women and suggests a more holistic, multifaceted approach to preventing chronic disease.

  8. The impact of mass drug administration and long-lasting insecticidal net distribution on Wuchereria bancrofti infection in humans and mosquitoes: an observational study in northern Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwards Tansy

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lymphatic filariasis (LF in Uganda is caused by Wuchereria bancrofti and transmitted by anopheline mosquitoes. The mainstay of elimination has been annual mass drug administration (MDA with ivermectin and albendazole, targeted to endemic districts, but has been sporadic and incomplete in coverage. Vector control could potentially contribute to reducing W. bancrofti transmission, speeding up progress towards elimination. To establish whether the use of long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs can contribute towards reducing transmission of W. bancrofti in a setting with ongoing MDA, a study was conducted in an area of Uganda highly endemic for both LF and malaria. Baseline parasitological and entomological assessments were conducted in 2007, followed by high-coverage LLIN distribution. Net use and entomological surveys were carried out after one year, and final parasitological and entomological evaluations were conducted in 2010. Three rounds of MDA had taken place before the study commenced, with a further three rounds completed during the course of the study. Results In 2007, rapid mapping indicated 22.3% of schoolchildren were W. bancrofti antigen positive, and a baseline survey during the same year found age-adjusted microfilaraemia prevalence was 3.7% (95% confidence interval (CI: 2.6-5.3%. In 2010, age-adjusted microfilaraemia prevalence had fallen to 0.4%, while antigenaemia rates were 0.2% in children W. bancrofti antigen (odds ratio = 0.44, 95% CI: 0.22-0.89. Prevalence of W. bancrofti larvae in anopheline mosquitoes had decreased significantly between the 2007 and 2010 surveys, but there was an apparent increase in vector densities. Conclusion A marked reduction in W. bancrofti infection and infectivity in humans was observed in the study area, where both MDA and LLINs were used to reduce transmission. The extent to which LLINs contributed to this decline is equivocal, however. Further work investigating the impact of

  9. DLK1 is a novel regulator of bone mass that mediates estrogen deficiency-induced bone loss in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Basem M; Ditzel, Nicholas; Mahmood, Amer

    2011-01-01

    . In a number of in vitro culture systems, Dlk1 stimulated osteoclastogenesis indirectly through osteoblast-dependent increased production of proinflammatory bone-resorbing cytokines (eg, Il7, Tnfa, and Ccl3). We found that ovariectomy (ovx)-induced bone loss was associated with increased production of Dlk1...... in the bone marrow by activated T cells. Interestingly, Dlk1(-/-) mice were significantly protected from ovx-induced bone loss compared with wild-type mice. Thus we identified Dlk1 as a novel regulator of bone mass that functions to inhibit bone formation and to stimulate bone resorption. Increasing DLK1...... production by T cells under estrogen deficiency suggests its possible use as a therapeutic target for preventing postmenopausal bone loss....

  10. Long lasting insecticidal bed nets ownership, access and use in a high malaria transmission setting before and after a mass distribution campaign in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanzira, Humphrey; Eganyu, Thomas; Mulebeke, Ronald; Bukenya, Fred; Echodu, Dorothy; Adoke, Yeka

    2018-01-01

    Uganda is conducting a second mass LLIN distribution campaign and Katakwi district recently received LLINs as part of this activity. This study was conducted to measure the success of the campaign in this setting, an area of high transmission, with the objectives to estimate LLIN ownership, access and use pre and post campaign implementation. Two identical cross sectional surveys, based on the Malaria Indicator Survey methodology, were conducted in three sub-counties in this district (Kapujan, Magoro and Toroma), six months apart, one before and another after the mass distribution campaign. Data on three main LLIN indicators including; household LLIN ownership, population with access to an LLIN and use were collected using a household and a women's questionnaire identical to the Malaria Indicator Survey. A total of 601 and 607 households were randomly selected in survey one and two respectively. At baseline, 60.57% (56.53-64.50) of households owned at least one net for every two persons who stayed in the household the night before the survey which significantly increased to 70.35% (66.54-73.96) after the campaign (p = 0.001). Similarly, the percentage of the household population with access to an LLIN significantly increased from 84.76% (82.99-86.52) to 91.57% (90.33-92.81), p = 0.001 and the percentage of household population that slept under an LLIN the night before the survey also significantly increased from 56.85% (55.06-58.82) to 81.72% (76.75-83.21), p = 0.001. The LLIN mass campaign successfully achieved the national target of over eighty-five percent of the population with access to an LLIN in this setting, however, universal household coverage and use were fourteen and three percent points less than the national target respectively. This is useful for malaria programs to consider during the planning of future campaigns by tailoring efforts around deficient areas like mechanisms to increase universal coverage and behavior change communication.

  11. Petri Nets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Associate Professor of. Computer Science and. Automation at the Indian. Institute of Science,. Bangalore. His research interests are broadly in the areas of stochastic modeling and scheduling methodologies for future factories; and object oriented modeling. GENERAL I ARTICLE. Petri Nets. 1. Overview and Foundations.

  12. Petri Nets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 8. Petri Nets - Overview and Foundations. Y Narahari. General Article Volume 4 Issue 8 August 1999 pp ... Author Affiliations. Y Narahari1. Department ot Computer Science and Automation, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India.

  13. Phase-space Analysis in the Group and Cluster Environment: Time Since Infall and Tidal Mass Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Jinsu; Smith, Rory; Choi, Hoseung; Yi, Sukyoung K.; Jaffé, Yara; Candlish, Graeme; Sánchez-Jánssen, Ruben

    2017-07-01

    Using the latest cosmological hydrodynamic N-body simulations of groups and clusters, we study how location in phase-space coordinates at z = 0 can provide information on environmental effects acting in clusters. We confirm the results of previous authors showing that galaxies tend to follow a typical path in phase-space as they settle into the cluster potential. As such, different regions of phase-space can be associated with different times since first infalling into the cluster. However, in addition, we see a clear trend between total mass loss due to cluster tides and time since infall. Thus, we find location in phase-space provides information on both infall time and tidal mass loss. We find the predictive power of phase-space diagrams remains even when projected quantities are used (I.e., line of sight velocities, and projected distances from the cluster). We provide figures that can be directly compared with observed samples of cluster galaxies and we also provide the data used to make them as supplementary data to encourage the use of phase-space diagrams as a tool to understand cluster environmental effects. We find that our results depend very weakly on galaxy mass or host mass, so the predictions in our phase-space diagrams can be applied to groups or clusters alike, or to galaxy populations from dwarfs up to giants.

  14. Zoledronate prevents lactation induced bone loss and results in additional post-lactation bone mass in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendelboe, Mette Høegh; Thomsen, Jesper Skovhus; Henriksen, Kim; Vegger, Jens Bay; Brüel, Annemarie

    2016-06-01

    In rodents, lactation is associated with a considerable and very rapid bone loss, which almost completely recovers after weaning. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the bisphosphonate Zoledronate (Zln) can inhibit lactation induced bone loss, and if Zln interferes with recovery of bone mass after lactation has ceased. Seventy-six 10-weeks-old NMRI mice were divided into the following groups: Baseline, Pregnant, Lactation, Lactation+Zln, Recovery, Recovery+Zln, and Virgin Control (age-matched). The lactation period was 12days, then the pups were removed, and thereafter recovery took place for 28days. Zln, 100μg/kg, was given s.c. on the day of delivery, and again 4 and 8days later. Mechanical testing, μCT, and dynamic histomorphometry were performed. At L4, lactation resulted in a substantial loss of bone strength (-55% vs. Pregnant, plactation induced loss of bone strength, BV/TV, and Tb.Th at L4. Full recovery of micro-architectural and mechanical properties was found 28days after weaning in vehicle-treated mice. Interestingly, the recovery group treated with Zln during the lactation period had higher BV/TV (+45%, plactation bone formation is not dependent on a preceding lactation induced bone loss. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. DXA, bioelectrical impedance, ultrasonography and biometry for the estimation of fat and lean mass in cats during weight loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borges Naida C

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few equations have been developed in veterinary medicine compared to human medicine to predict body composition. The present study was done to evaluate the influence of weight loss on biometry (BIO, bioimpedance analysis (BIA and ultrasonography (US in cats, proposing equations to estimate fat (FM and lean (LM body mass, as compared to dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA as the referenced method. For this were used 16 gonadectomized obese cats (8 males and 8 females in a weight loss program. DXA, BIO, BIA and US were performed in the obese state (T0; obese animals, after 10% of weight loss (T1 and after 20% of weight loss (T2. Stepwise regression was used to analyze the relationship between the dependent variables (FM, LM determined by DXA and the independent variables obtained by BIO, BIA and US. The better models chosen were evaluated by a simple regression analysis and means predicted vs. determined by DXA were compared to verify the accuracy of the equations. Results The independent variables determined by BIO, BIA and US that best correlated (p r2, 19 equations were selected (12 for FM, 7 for LM; however, only 7 equations accurately predicted FM and one LM of cats. Conclusions The equations with two variables are better to use because they are effective and will be an alternative method to estimate body composition in the clinical routine. For estimated lean mass the equations using body weight associated with biometrics measures can be proposed. For estimated fat mass the equations using body weight associated with bioimpedance analysis can be proposed.

  16. Impact of mass distribution of free long-lasting insecticidal nets on childhood malaria morbidity: the Togo National Integrated Child Health Campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terlouw, Dianne J; Morgah, Kodjo; Wolkon, Adam; Dare, Aboudou; Dorkenoo, Ameyo; Eliades, M James; Vanden Eng, Jodi; Sodahlon, Yao K; ter Kuile, Feiko O; Hawley, William A

    2010-07-12

    An evaluation of the short-term impact on childhood malaria morbidity of mass distribution of free long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs) to households with children aged 9-59 months as part of the Togo National Integrated Child Health Campaign. The prevalence of anaemia and malaria in children aged zero to 59 months was measured during two cross-sectional household cluster-sample surveys conducted during the peak malaria transmission, three months before (Sept 2004, n=2521) and nine months after the campaign (Sept 2005, n=2813) in three districts representative of Togo's three epidemiological malaria transmission regions: southern tropical coastal plains (Yoto), central fertile highlands (Ogou) and northern semi-arid savannah (Tone). In households with children65% in all 3 districts. Reported ITN use by children during the previous night was 35.9%, 43.8% and 80.6% in Yoto, Ogou and Tone, respectively. Rainfall patterns were comparable in both years. The overall prevalence of moderate to severe anaemia (HbPR] 0.72, 95% CI 0.62-0.84) and mean haemoglobin was increased by 0.35 g/dL (95% CI 0.25-0.45).The effect was predominantly seen in children aged 18-59 months and in the two southern districts: PR (95% CI) for moderate to severe anaemia and clinical malaria: Yoto 0.62 (0.44-0.88) and 0.49 (0.35-0.75); Ogou 0.54 (0.37-0.79) and 0.85 (0.57-1.27), respectively. Similar reductions occurred in children<18 months in Ogou, but not in Yoto. No effect was seen in the semi-arid northern district despite a high malaria burden and ITN coverage. A marked reduction in childhood malaria associated morbidity was observed in the year following mass distribution of free LLINs in two of the three districts in Togo. Sub-national level impact evaluations will contribute to a better understanding of the impact of expanding national malaria control efforts.

  17. Estimates of Glacier Mass Loss and Contribution to Streamflow in the Wind River Range in Wyoming: Case Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marks, Jeffrey [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Piburn, Jesse [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Tootle, Glenn [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States). Dept. of Civil Construction and Environmental Engineering; Kerr, Greg [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Office of Water Programs; Oubeidillah, Abdoul [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States). Dept. of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering

    2014-09-11

    The Wind River Range is a continuous mountain range, approximately 160 km in length, in west-central Wyoming. The presence of glaciers results in meltwater contributions to streamflow during the late summer (July, August, and September: JAS) when snowmelt is decreasing; temperatures are high; precipitation is low; evaporation rates are high; and municipal, industrial, and irrigation water are at peak demands. Therefore, the quantification of glacier meltwater (e.g., volume and mass) contributions to late summer/early fall streamflow is important, given that this resource is dwindling owing to glacier recession. The current research expands upon previous research efforts and identifies two glaciated watersheds, one on the east slope (Bull Lake Creek) and one on the west slope (Green River) of the Wind River Range, in which unimpaired streamflow is available from 1966 to 2006. Glaciers were delineated within each watershed and area estimates (with error) were obtained for the years 1966, 1989, and 2006. Glacier volume (mass) loss (with error) was estimated by using empirically based volume-area scaling relationships. For 1966 to 2006, glacier mass contributions to JAS streamflow on the east slope were approximately 8%, whereas those on the west slope were approximately 2%. Furthermore, the volume-area scaling glacier mass estimates compared favorably with measured (stereo pair remote sensed data) estimates of glacier mass change for three glaciers (Teton, Middle Teton, and Teepe) in the nearby Teton Range and one glacier (Dinwoody) in the Wind River Range.

  18. Waggle dance effect: dancing in autumn reduces the mass loss of a honeybee colony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Ryuichi; Akamatsu, Tadaaki; Iwata, Kanako; Ikeno, Hidetoshi; Kimura, Toshifumi; Ohashi, Mizue; Aonuma, Hitoshi; Ito, Etsuro

    2012-05-15

    A honeybee informs her nestmates about the location of a profitable food source that she has visited by means of a waggle dance: a round dance and a figure-of-eight dance for a short- and long-distance food source, respectively. Consequently, the colony achieves an effective collection of food. However, it is still not fully understood how much effect the dance behavior has on the food collection, because most of the relevant experiments have been performed only in limited locations under limited experimental conditions. Here, we examined the efficacy of the waggle dances by physically preventing bees from dancing and then analyzing the changes in daily mass of the hive as an index of daily food collection. To eliminate place- and year-specific effects, the experiments were performed under fully natural conditions in three different cities in Japan from mid September to early October in three different years. Because the experiments were performed in autumn, all six of the tested colonies lost mass on most of the experimental days. When the dance was prevented, the daily reduction in mass change was greater than when the dance was allowed, i.e. the dance inhibited the reduction of the hive mass. This indicates that dance is effective for food collection. Furthermore, clear inhibition was observed on the first two days of the experiments; after that, inhibition was no longer evident. This result suggests that the bee colony adapted to the new environment.

  19. Mass loss from the southern half of the Greenland Ice Sheet since the Little Ice Age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Kristian Kjellerup; Kjær, Kurt H.; Bjørk, Anders Anker

    the 1961-1990 average, with the coldest interval between c. 1600 and 1800. Even though winter temperatures may have dominated the cooling, also the summer temperatures which are most closely correlated with glacier mass balances, dropped, to c. 0.6 below the average in the northern hemisphere including...

  20. Acceleration of the Greenland ice sheet mass loss as observed by GRACE: Confidence and sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Peter Limkilde; Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    2013-01-01

    We examine the scale and spatial distribution of the mass change acceleration in Greenland and its statistical significance, using processed gravimetric data from the GRACE mission for the period 2002-2011. Three different data products - the CNES/GRGS, DMT-1b and GGFC GRACE solutions - have been...

  1. Tuberculous Mastoiditis Presenting with Unilateral Hearing Loss,Facial Paralysis and Neck Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Safi-Khani

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a rare cause of mastoiditis, but diagnosis is often delayed, with potentially serious results. Case: We report a case of tuberculous mastoiditis with unilateral hearing loss, facial paralysis, and cervical lymph adenopathy on presentation. Conclusion: Tuberculous mastoiditis must be considered in all cases of chronic refractory mastoiditis especially in the presence of demonstrable complications such as facial paralysis, other cranial nerve palsies, and destruction of middle ear osscicles.

  2. Type 1 Interferons Suppress Accelerated Osteoclastogenesis and Prevent Loss of Bone Mass During Systemic Inflammatory Responses to Pneumocystis Lung Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkison, Michelle; Gauss, Katherine; Ran, Yanchao; Searles, Steve; Taylor, David; Meissner, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    HIV infection causes loss of CD4+ T cells and type 1 interferon (IFN)–producing and IFN-responsive dendritic cells, resulting in immunodeficiencies and susceptibility to opportunistic infections, such as Pneumocystis. Osteoporosis and bone marrow failure are additional unexplained complications in HIV-positive patients and patients with AIDS, respectively. We recently demonstrated that mice that lack lymphocytes and IFN a/b receptor (IFrag−/−) develop bone marrow failure after Pneumocystis lung infection, whereas lymphocyte-deficient, IFN α/β receptor–competent mice (RAG−/−) had normal hematopoiesis. Interestingly, infected IFrag−/− mice also exhibited bone fragility, suggesting loss of bone mass. We quantified bone changes and evaluated the potential connection between progressing bone fragility and bone marrow failure after Pneumocystis lung infection in IFrag−/− mice. We found that Pneumocystis infection accelerated osteoclastogenesis as bone marrow failure progressed. This finding was consistent with induction of osteoclastogenic factors, including receptor-activated nuclear factor-κB ligand and the proapoptotic factor tumor necrosis factor–related apoptosis-inducing ligand, in conjunction with their shared decoy receptor osteoprotegerin, in the bone marrow of infected IFrag−/− mice. Deregulation of this axis has also been observed in HIV-positive individuals. Biphosphonate treatment of IFrag−/− mice prevented bone loss and protected loss of hematopoietic precursor cells that maintained activity in vitro but did not prevent loss of mature neutrophils. Together, these data show that bone loss and bone marrow failure are partially linked, which suggests that the deregulation of the receptor-activated nuclear factor-κB ligand/osteoprotegerin/tumor necrosis factor–related apoptosis-inducing ligand axis may connect the two phenotypes in our model. PMID:22626807

  3. Reductions in electricity losses in the distribution power system in case of the mass use of compact fluorescent lamps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trifunovic, J.; Mikulovic, J.; Djurisic, Z.; Kostic, M. [Faculty of Electrical Engineering, University of Belgrade, Bulevar kralja Aleksandra 73, 11000 Belgrade (RS)

    2011-02-15

    The paper presents a method for the evaluation of the reductions in the technical and non-technical distribution losses in case of the mass use of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) in buildings in Serbia. The evaluation was based on an assumption that the two most used incandescent lamps in each of the 25-50% of the total number of dwellings in Serbia will be replaced with adequate CFLs, and that the same total number of lamps will be replaced in residential and non-residential sectors. A general methodology for the hourly estimation of the distribution loss reduction in case of reduced electricity consumption, based on the statistical processing of available data and on an integral (macroscopic) approach, is presented and used in the calculations. Such a methodology is appropriate because the electricity cost rate in the region changes on an hourly basis, being highest during hours when peaks of both the power demand and the decrease of distribution power losses occur. The paper illustrates that considerable reductions in both the technical and non-technical losses in the Serbian distribution power system can be achieved by applying energy efficient light sources. (author)

  4. Screening of genetic alterations related to non-syndromic hearing loss using MassARRAY iPLEX® technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svidnicki, Maria Carolina Costa Melo; Silva-Costa, Sueli Matilde; Ramos, Priscila Zonzini; dos Santos, Nathalia Zocal Pereira; Martins, Fábio Tadeu Arrojo; Castilho, Arthur Menino; Sartorato, Edi Lúcia

    2015-09-23

    Recent advances in molecular genetics have enabled to determine the genetic causes of non-syndromic hearing loss, and more than 100 genes have been related to the phenotype. Due to this extraordinary genetic heterogeneity, a large percentage of patients remain without any molecular diagnosis. This condition imply the need for new methodological strategies in order to detect a greater number of mutations in multiple genes. In this work, we optimized and tested a panel of 86 mutations in 17 different genes screened using a high-throughput genotyping technology to determine the molecular etiology of hearing loss. The technology used in this work was the MassARRAY iPLEX® platform. This technology uses silicon chips and DNA amplification products for accurate genotyping by mass spectrometry of previous reported mutations. The generated results were validated using conventional techniques, as direct sequencing, multiplex PCR and RFLP-PCR. An initial genotyping of control subjects, showed failures in 20 % of the selected alterations. To optimize these results, the failed tests were re-designed and new primers were synthesized. Then, the specificity and sensitivity of the panel demonstrated values above 97 %. Additionally, a group of 180 individuals with NSHL without a molecular diagnosis was screened to test the diagnostic value of our panel, and mutations were identified in 30 % of the cases. In 20 % of the individuals, it was possible to explain the etiology of the HL. Mutations in GJB2 gene were the most prevalent, followed by other mutations in in SLC26A4, CDH23, MT-RNR1, MYO15A, and OTOF genes. The MassARRAY technology has the potential for high-throughput identification of genetic variations. However, we demonstrated that optimization is required to increase the genotyping success and accuracy. The developed panel proved to be efficient and cost-effective, being suitable for applications involving the molecular diagnosis of hearing loss.

  5. Impact of body mass index on graft loss in normal and overweight patients: retrospective analysis of 206 renal transplants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalia, Teresa; Greco, Rosita; Lofaro, Danilo; Maestripieri, Simona; Mancuso, Domenico; Bonofiglio, Renzo

    2010-01-01

    Excess body mass is increasingly prevalent in transplant recipients. Currently, most investigators consider body mass index (BMI) a categorical variable, which assumes that all risk factors and transplant outcomes will be similar in all patients within the same category. We investigated the effect of categorical and continuous BMI increments on renal transplant outcome in normal weight (NW: BMI 18.5-24.9) and overweight (OW: BMI 25-30) patients. We retrospectively studied 206 patients. The mean BMI of our population was 24.3 ± 2.83 kg/m(2) . Patients of each group were similar regarding age, gender, time on dialysis, donor type, cold ischemia time, and number of HLA mismatches. The independent association of BMI with survival was determined using Cox multivariate regression. OW patients showed a higher prevalence of co-morbidities. In patients with graft loss, there was a higher incidence of delayed graft function, chronic allograft nephropathy, acute rejection, and hypertension. Graft survival was significantly lower in OW patients compared to NW patients upon Kaplan-Meier analysis (p = 0.008). In a multivariate Cox regression analysis, the initial BMI, evaluated as a continuous variable, remained an independent predictor of graft loss (hazard ratio 1.21, 95% CI 1.04-1.47). However, with patient stratification into World Health Organization BMI category and, further, into quartiles of initial BMI, no significant correlation between BMI category and graft loss was found. We suggest that increasing BMI value, although without categorical variation, may represent an independent risk factor for graft loss. Our retrospective analysis of a small sample population will require further studies to confirm these data. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  6. The VLTI/MIDI view on the inner mass loss of evolved stars from the Herschel MESS sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paladini, C.; Klotz, D.; Sacuto, S.; Lagadec, E.; Wittkowski, M.; Richichi, A.; Hron, J.; Jorissen, A.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Kerschbaum, F.; Verhoelst, T.; Rau, G.; Olofsson, H.; Zhao-Geisler, R.; Matter, A.

    2017-04-01

    Context. The mass-loss process from evolved stars is a key ingredient for our understanding of many fields of astrophysics, including stellar evolution and the chemical enrichment of the interstellar medium (ISM) via stellar yields. Nevertheless, many questions are still unsolved, one of which is the geometry of the mass-loss process. Aims: Taking advantage of the results from the Herschel Mass loss of Evolved StarS (MESS) programme, we initiated a coordinated effort to characterise the geometry of mass loss from evolved red giants at various spatial scales. Methods: For this purpose we used the MID-infrared interferometric Instrument (MIDI) to resolve the inner envelope of 14 asymptotic giant branch stars (AGBs) in the MESS sample. In this contribution we present an overview of the interferometric data collected within the frame of our Large Programme, and we also add archive data for completeness. We studied the geometry of the inner atmosphere by comparing the observations with predictions from different geometric models. Results: Asymmetries are detected for the following five stars: R Leo, RT Vir, π1Gruis, omi Ori, and R Crt. All the objects are O-rich or S-type, suggesting that asymmetries in the N band are more common among stars with such chemistry. We speculate that this fact is related to the characteristics of the dust grains. Except for one star, no interferometric variability is detected, i.e. the changes in size of the shells of non-mira stars correspond to changes of the visibility of less than 10%. The observed spectral variability confirms previous findings from the literature. The detection of dust in our sample follows the location of the AGBs in the IRAS colour-colour diagram: more dust is detected around oxygen-rich stars in region II and in the carbon stars in region VII. The SiC dust feature does not appear in the visibility spectrum of the U Ant and S Sct, which are two carbon stars with detached shells. This finding has implications for

  7. Strong ELA increase causes fast mass loss of glaciers in central Spitsbergen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Małecki, J.

    2015-11-01

    Svalbard is a heavily glacier covered archipelago in the Arctic. Its central regions, including Dickson Land (DL), are occupied by small alpine glaciers, which post-Little Ice Age (LIA) changes remain only sporadically investigated. This study presents a comprehensive analysis of glacier changes in DL based on inventories compiled from topographic maps and digital elevation models (DEMs) for LIA, 1960's, 1990 and 2009/11. The 37.9 ± 12.1 % glacier area decrease in DL (i.e. from 334.1 ± 38.4 km2 during LIA to 207.4 ± 4.6 km2 in 2009/11) has been primarily caused by accelerating termini retreat. The mean 1990-2009/11 geodetic mass balance of glaciers was -0.70 ± 0.06 m a-1 (-0.63 ± 0.05 m w.e. a-1), being one of the most negative from Svalbard regional means known from the literature. If the same figure was to be applied for other similar regions of central Spitsbergen, that would result in a considerable contribution to total Svalbard mass balance despite negligible proportion to total glacier area. Glacier changes in Dickson Land were linked to dramatic equilibrium line altitude (ELA) shift, which in the period 1990-2009/11 has been located ca. 500 m higher than required for steady-state. The mass balance of central Spitsbergen glaciers seems to be therefore more sensitive to climate change than previously thought.

  8. Carbon input belowground is the major C flux contributing to leaf litter mass loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubino, Mauro; Dungait; Evershed

    2010-01-01

    Partitioning of the quantities of C lost by leaf litter through decomposition into (i) CO2 efflux to the atmosphere and (ii) C input to soil organic matter (SOM) is essential in order to develop a deeper understanding of the litter-soil biogeochemical continuum. However, this is a challenging task...... due to the occurrence of many different processes contributing to litter biomass loss. With the aim of quantifying different fluxes of C lost by leaf litter decomposition, a field experiment was performed at a short rotation coppice poplar plantation in central Italy. Populus nigra leaf litter......, enriched in 13C (d13C +160‰) was placed within collars to decompose in direct contact with the soil (d13C -26‰) for 11 months. CO2 efflux from within the collars and its isotopic composition were determined at monthly intervals. After 11 months, remaining litter and soil profiles (0–20 cm) were sampled...

  9. Mass fractionation during transonic escape and implications for loss of water from Mars and Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahnle, Kevin J.; Kasting, James F.

    1986-01-01

    Hydrodynamic escape of hydrogen from a planetary atmosphere can remove heavier gases as well as hydrogen, provided that the escape rate is sufficiently large. Analytic approximations for the degree of mass fractionation of a trace species during hydrodynamic escape are compared with accurate numerical solutions for the case of transonic outflow. The analytic approximations are most accurate when the ratio of molecular weights of the heavier and lighter constituents is large so that nonlinear terms in the momentum equation for the heavy constituent become small. The simplest analytic formula is readily generalized to the case where a heavy constituent is also a major species. Application of the generalized formula to hypothetical episodes of hydrodynamic escape from Venus and Mars suggests that both hydrogen and oxygen could have escaped; thus, substantial quantities of water may have been lost without the need to oxidize large amounts of the crust.

  10. Mass loss of Greenland from GRACE, IceSat and CryoSat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsberg, René; Sørensen, Louise Sandberg; Fredenslund Levinsen, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    CryoSat data over the Greenland Ice Sheet are used to continue elevation height change data over the Greenland ice sheet, following a decade of detailed monitoring of ice sheet changes with GRACE and IceSat. The combination and validation of the different data for measuring changes is quantified...... by using available airborne lidar data from IceBridge and CryoVEx. There is a special challenge of using CryoSat as fill-in between EnviSat and Sentinel-3 for the longterm measurements of surface elevation changes, a key essential climate variable in the ESA Climate Change Initiative. Another challenge...... is the joint utilization of both altimetry and gravity field change measurements for consistent estimates of regional change patterns. In the paper we analyze GRACE, IceSat and CryoSat data since 2003, and present consistent estimates of overall mass changes with average values around -220 GT/year, showing...

  11. Timing and origin of recent regional ice-mass loss in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sasgen, Ingo; van den Broeke, Michiel; Bamber, J.L.Jonathan L.

    2012-01-01

    and Kanagaratnam, 2006) together with output of the regional atmospheric climate modelling (RACMO2/GR; Ettema et al., 2009), and surface-elevation changes from the Ice, cloud and land elevation satellite (ICESat; Sørensen et al., 2011). We show that changing ice discharge (D), surface melting and subsequent run......Within the last decade, the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) and its surroundings have experienced record high surface temperatures (Mote, 2007; Box et al., 2010), ice sheet melt extent (Fettweis et al., 2011) and record-low summer sea-ice extent (Nghiem et al., 2007). Using three independent data sets......, we derive, for the first time, consistent ice-mass trends and temporal variations within seven major drainage basins from gravity fields from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE; Tapley et al., 2004), surface-ice velocities from Inteferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR; Rignot...

  12. Time-Course of Muscle Mass Loss, Damage, and Proteolysis in Gastrocnemius following Unloading and Reloading: Implications in Chronic Diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Chacon-Cabrera

    Full Text Available Disuse muscle atrophy is a major comorbidity in patients with chronic diseases including cancer. We sought to explore the kinetics of molecular mechanisms shown to be involved in muscle mass loss throughout time in a mouse model of disuse muscle atrophy and recovery following immobilization.Body and muscle weights, grip strength, muscle phenotype (fiber type composition and morphometry and muscle structural alterations, proteolysis, contractile proteins, systemic troponin I, and mitochondrial content were assessed in gastrocnemius of mice exposed to periods (1, 2, 3, 7, 15 and 30 days of non-invasive hindlimb immobilization (plastic splint, I cohorts and in those exposed to reloading for different time-points (1, 3, 7, 15, and 30 days, R cohorts following a seven-day period of immobilization. Groups of control animals were also used.Compared to non-exposed controls, muscle weight, limb strength, slow- and fast-twitch cross-sectional areas, mtDNA/nDNA, and myosin content were decreased in mice of I cohorts, whereas tyrosine release, ubiquitin-proteasome activity, muscle injury and systemic troponin I levels were increased. Gastrocnemius reloading following splint removal improved muscle mass loss, strength, fiber atrophy, injury, myosin content, and mtDNA/nDNA, while reducing ubiquitin-proteasome activity and proteolysis.A consistent program of molecular and cellular events leading to reduced gastrocnemius muscle mass and mitochondrial content and reduced strength, enhanced proteolysis, and injury, was seen in this non-invasive mouse model of disuse muscle atrophy. Unloading of the muscle following removal of the splint significantly improved the alterations seen during unloading, characterized by a specific kinetic profile of molecular events involved in muscle regeneration. These findings have implications in patients with chronic diseases including cancer in whom physical activity may be severely compromised.

  13. [Interrelations between physician, hairdresser and mass media in management of hair loss].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trüeb, R M

    2000-10-01

    Hair problems are attacked at the levels of information supply, trichological competence and evidence based medical treatment. The alopecias represent a major health care challenge, and the psychological significance of hair loss has only recently found appreciation in the medical community. They may pose a vexing problem for non-specialized physicians, who tend to trivialize such complaints, although the patient's perception of abnormality determines whether or not advice is sought. Perception of a hair problem is subject to sociocultural standards; films and advertisements help determine the threshold for "normality" and what is "healthy" and "beautiful", and the media provide an abundance of undiscriminating information with respect to hair care. Patients with hair problems frequently consult the hairdresser prior to the medical specialist. Thus additional areas of competence should be incorporated into the hairdresser's training qualifications. Besides manual, creative and psychological aptitudes, "trichological competence" relating to the recognition of most important hair disorders, recognition of personal limitations and cooperation with the medical specialist are required. To optimize the interaction between the physician, hairdressers and the media, more effective communication and public activities from the medical profession are desirable, with success depending on full identification of the set goals, qualification and adherence to the standards determined by the medical speciality.

  14. Cordilleran Ice Sheet mass loss preceded climate reversals near the Pleistocene Termination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menounos, B; Goehring, B M; Osborn, G; Margold, M; Ward, B; Bond, J; Clarke, G K C; Clague, J J; Lakeman, T; Koch, J; Caffee, M W; Gosse, J; Stroeven, A P; Seguinot, J; Heyman, J

    2017-11-10

    The Cordilleran Ice Sheet (CIS) once covered an area comparable to that of Greenland. Previous geologic evidence and numerical models indicate that the ice sheet covered much of westernmost Canada as late as 12.5 thousand years ago (ka). New data indicate that substantial areas throughout westernmost Canada were ice free prior to 12.5 ka and some as early as 14.0 ka, with implications for climate dynamics and the timing of meltwater discharge to the Pacific and Arctic oceans. Early Bølling-Allerød warmth halved the mass of the CIS in as little as 500 years, causing 2.5 to 3.0 meters of sea-level rise. Dozens of cirque and valley glaciers, along with the southern margin of the CIS, advanced into recently deglaciated regions during the Bølling-Allerød and Younger Dryas. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  15. Role of Protein Carbonylation in Skeletal Muscle Mass Loss Associated with Chronic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Barreiro

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Muscle dysfunction, characterized by a reductive remodeling of muscle fibers, is a common systemic manifestation in highly prevalent conditions such as chronic heart failure (CHF, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, cancer cachexia, and critically ill patients. Skeletal muscle dysfunction and impaired muscle mass may predict morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic diseases, regardless of the underlying condition. High levels of oxidants may alter function and structure of key cellular molecules such as proteins, DNA, and lipids, leading to cellular injury and death. Protein oxidation including protein carbonylation was demonstrated to modify enzyme activity and DNA binding of transcription factors, while also rendering proteins more prone to proteolytic degradation. Given the relevance of protein oxidation in the pathophysiology of many chronic conditions and their comorbidities, the current review focuses on the analysis of different studies in which the biological and clinical significance of the modifications induced by reactive carbonyls on proteins have been explored so far in skeletal muscles of patients and animal models of chronic conditions such as COPD, disuse muscle atrophy, cancer cachexia, sepsis, and physiological aging. Future research will elucidate the specific impact and sites of reactive carbonyls on muscle protein content and function in human conditions.

  16. Dynorphin knockout reduces fat mass and increases weight loss during fasting in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainsbury, Amanda; Lin, Shu; McNamara, Keely; Slack, Katy; Enriquez, Ronaldo; Lee, Nicola J; Boey, Dana; Smythe, George A; Schwarzer, Christoph; Baldock, Paul; Karl, Tim; Lin, En-Ju D; Couzens, Michelle; Herzog, Herbert

    2007-07-01

    Endogenous opioids, particularly dynorphins, have been implicated in regulation of energy balance, but it is not known how they mediate this in vivo. We investigated energy homeostasis in dynorphin knockout mice (Dyn(-/-) mice) and probed the interactions between dynorphins and the neuropeptide Y (NPY) system. Dyn(-/-) mice were no different from wild types with regards to body weight and basal and fasting-induced food intake, but fecal output was increased, suggesting decreased nutrient absorption, and they had significantly less white fat and lost more weight during a 24-h fast. The neuroendocrine and thermal responses to fasting were at least as pronounced in Dyn(-/-) as in wild types, and there was no stimulatory effect of dynorphin knockout on 24-h energy expenditure (kilocalories of heat produced) or physical activity. However, Dyn(-/-) mice showed increased circulating concentrations of 3,4-dihydroxyphenlacetic acid and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylglycol, suggesting increased activity of the sympathetic nervous system. The respiratory exchange ratio of male but not female Dyn(-/-) mice was reduced, demonstrating increased fat oxidation. Interestingly, expression of the orexigenic acting NPY in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus was reduced in Dyn(-/-) mice. However, fasting-induced increases in pre-prodynorphin expression in the arcuate nucleus, the paraventricular nucleus, and the ventromedial hypothalamus but not the lateral hypothalamus were abolished by deletion of Y(1) but not Y(2) receptors. Therefore, ablation of dynorphins results in increases in fatty acid oxidation in male mice, reductions in adiposity, and increased weight loss during fasting, possibly via increases in sympathetic activity, decreases in intestinal nutrient absorption, and interactions with the NPYergic system.

  17. Asteroseismology of old open clusters with Kepler: direct estimate of the integrated red giant branch mass-loss in NGC 6791 and 6819

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miglio, A.; Brogaard, K.; Stello, D.; Chaplin, W.J.; D'Antona, F.; Montalbán, J.; Basu, S.; Bressan, A.; Grundahl, F.; Pinsonneault, M.; Serenelli, A.M.; Elsworth, Y.; Hekker, S.; Kallinger, T.; Mosser, B.; Ventura, P.; Bonanno, A.; Noels, A.; Silva Aguirre, V.; Szabo, R.; Li, J.; McCauliff, S.; Middour, C.K.; Kjeldsen, H.

    2012-01-01

    Mass-loss of red giant branch (RGB) stars is still poorly determined, despite its crucial role in the chemical enrichment of galaxies. Thanks to the recent detection of solar-like oscillations in G-K giants in open clusters with Kepler, we can now directly determine stellar masses for a

  18. Low free testosterone is associated with loss of appendicular muscle mass in Japanese community-dwelling women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuki, Atsumu; Ando, Fujiko; Otsuka, Rei; Shimokata, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    Sarcopenia accelerates frailty syndrome, and adversely affects activities of daily living and quality of life. The aim of the present study was to assess longitudinal relationships between baseline androgen and muscle mass changes in Japanese women. Data were collected from 539 community-dwelling, Japanese women aged 40-79 years at baseline who participated in both baseline and follow-up examinations of a longitudinal study of aging (mean duration 8.3 years). Appendicular skeletal muscle mass was measured with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry at baseline and follow-up examinations. The cut-off point for sarcopenia was a skeletal muscle index (appendicular skeletal muscle mass/height(2) ) testosterone, free testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone-sulphate were measured by radioimmunoassay at baseline. The androgens were categorized into three groups by serum levels. Multiple logistic regression models were fit to determine the associations between androgens and sarcopenia while controlling for baseline age, body mass index, leisure-time physical activity, nutritional intakes (total energy, total protein, vitamin D), serum C-reactive protein levels, medical histories (heart disease, osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis), menopause and smoking habit. The fully adjusted odds ratio of sarcopenia for the low-free testosterone group (free testosterone group (≥1.2 pg/mL) was 3.59 (95% confidence interval 1.25-10.34). Sarcopenia was not significantly related to total testosterone or dehydroepiandrosterone-sulphate. A low-free testosterone level appears to be a significant predictor of the risk for loss of appendicular muscle in Japanese women. © 2014 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  19. Optimizing the supply chain of biomass and biogas for a single plant considering mass and energy losses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ida Græsted; Münster, Marie; Pisinger, David

    2017-01-01

    plants. In this paper, a mixed integer programming (MIP) model for finding the optimal production and investment plan for a biogas supply chain is presented to ensure better economy for the full chain hopefully stimulating future investments in biogas. The model makes use of step-wise linear functions...... to represent capital and operational expenditures at the biogas plant; considers the chain from the farmer to the end market; and includes changes of mass and energy content along the chain by modeling the losses and gains for all processes in the chain. Biomass inputs are scheduled on a weekly basis whereas...... energy outputs are scheduled on an hourly basis to better capture the changes of energy prices and potentially take advantage of these changes. The model is tested on a case study with co-digestion of straw, sugar beet and manure, considering natural gas, heat, and electricity as end products. The model...

  20. Litter decomposition of Rhizophora stylosa in Sabang-Weh Island, Aceh, Indonesia; evidence from mass loss and nutrients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IRMA DEWIYANTI

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Dewiyanti I (2010 Litter decomposition of Rhizophora stylosa in Sabang-Weh Island, Aceh, Indonesia; evidence from mass loss and nutrients. Biodiversitas 11: 139-144. Mangrove is an essential coastal ecosystem that provides nutrients to estuarine and its surrounding environments through its litter decomposition. This vegetation can be considered as an important ecosystem in food web along the coast. The research was conducted in mangrove forest in Sabang-Weh Island, Aceh. Rhizophora stylosa was dominant species of mangrove in the study area that still remains after tsunami catastrophe in 2004. This study was conducted from February to April 2008, and the purposes were to obtain the decomposition rate of senescent leaves and to measure mass loss, and nutrient contents of decomposing leaves under different inundation regime. Three plots were established in each site. Decomposition of R. stylosa leaves were studied by using litter bag technique. They were made of synthetic nylon which had size 20x30 cm and mesh size was 1x1.25 mm2. Senescent leaves were used because they present major leaves on the forest floor and started to decay. Remaining leaves decreased during experiment period because decomposition process had been taking placein the study area. Time required for decomposing a half of the initial material (t50 was 67 days and 63 days for site next to the land and site next to the sea, respectively. The decay rate can be expressed by the decay coefficient (K and the results of K were 0.010 and 0.011 (d-1. The value of carbon (C, nitrogen (N, C: N ratio and phosphorous (P during decomposition periods were no significant difference in sites but significant difference in time. The C: N ratio of decomposing leaves decreased in both sites. Low C: N ratio in the last of observation indicated that R. stylosa leaves were decomposed easier at the end of observation than that in the beginning of observation.

  1. Unprecedented mass bleaching and loss of coral across 12° of latitude in Western Australia in 2010-11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, James A Y; Bellchambers, Lynda M; Depczynski, Martial R; Evans, Richard D; Evans, Scott N; Field, Stuart N; Friedman, Kim J; Gilmour, James P; Holmes, Thomas H; Middlebrook, Rachael; Radford, Ben T; Ridgway, Tyrone; Shedrawi, George; Taylor, Heather; Thomson, Damian P; Wilson, Shaun K

    2012-01-01

    Globally, coral bleaching has been responsible for a significant decline in both coral cover and diversity over the past two decades. During the summer of 2010-11, anomalous large-scale ocean warming induced unprecedented levels of coral bleaching accompanied by substantial storminess across more than 12° of latitude and 1200 kilometers of coastline in Western Australia (WA). Extreme La-Niña conditions caused extensive warming of waters and drove considerable storminess and cyclonic activity across WA from October 2010 to May 2011. Satellite-derived sea surface temperature measurements recorded anomalies of up to 5°C above long-term averages. Benthic surveys quantified the extent of bleaching at 10 locations across four regions from tropical to temperate waters. Bleaching was recorded in all locations across regions and ranged between 17% (±5.5) in the temperate Perth region, to 95% (±3.5) in the Exmouth Gulf of the tropical Ningaloo region. Coincident with high levels of bleaching, three cyclones passed in close proximity to study locations around the time of peak temperatures. Follow-up surveys revealed spatial heterogeneity in coral cover change with four of ten locations recording significant loss of coral cover. Relative decreases ranged between 22%-83.9% of total coral cover, with the greatest losses in the Exmouth Gulf. The anomalous thermal stress of 2010-11 induced mass bleaching of corals along central and southern WA coral reefs. Significant coral bleaching was observed at multiple locations across the tropical-temperate divide spanning more than 1200 km of coastline. Resultant spatially patchy loss of coral cover under widespread and high levels of bleaching and cyclonic activity, suggests a degree of resilience for WA coral communities. However, the spatial extent of bleaching casts some doubt over hypotheses suggesting that future impacts to coral reefs under forecast warming regimes may in part be mitigated by southern thermal refugia.

  2. Unprecedented Mass Bleaching and Loss of Coral across 12° of Latitude in Western Australia in 2010–11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, James A. Y.; Bellchambers, Lynda M.; Depczynski, Martial R.; Evans, Richard D.; Evans, Scott N.; Field, Stuart N.; Friedman, Kim J.; Gilmour, James P.; Holmes, Thomas H.; Middlebrook, Rachael; Radford, Ben T.; Ridgway, Tyrone; Shedrawi, George; Taylor, Heather; Thomson, Damian P.; Wilson, Shaun K.

    2012-01-01

    Background Globally, coral bleaching has been responsible for a significant decline in both coral cover and diversity over the past two decades. During the summer of 2010–11, anomalous large-scale ocean warming induced unprecedented levels of coral bleaching accompanied by substantial storminess across more than 12° of latitude and 1200 kilometers of coastline in Western Australia (WA). Methodology/Principal Findings Extreme La-Niña conditions caused extensive warming of waters and drove considerable storminess and cyclonic activity across WA from October 2010 to May 2011. Satellite-derived sea surface temperature measurements recorded anomalies of up to 5°C above long-term averages. Benthic surveys quantified the extent of bleaching at 10 locations across four regions from tropical to temperate waters. Bleaching was recorded in all locations across regions and ranged between 17% (±5.5) in the temperate Perth region, to 95% (±3.5) in the Exmouth Gulf of the tropical Ningaloo region. Coincident with high levels of bleaching, three cyclones passed in close proximity to study locations around the time of peak temperatures. Follow-up surveys revealed spatial heterogeneity in coral cover change with four of ten locations recording significant loss of coral cover. Relative decreases ranged between 22%–83.9% of total coral cover, with the greatest losses in the Exmouth Gulf. Conclusions/Significance The anomalous thermal stress of 2010–11 induced mass bleaching of corals along central and southern WA coral reefs. Significant coral bleaching was observed at multiple locations across the tropical-temperate divide spanning more than 1200 km of coastline. Resultant spatially patchy loss of coral cover under widespread and high levels of bleaching and cyclonic activity, suggests a degree of resilience for WA coral communities. However, the spatial extent of bleaching casts some doubt over hypotheses suggesting that future impacts to coral reefs under forecast

  3. Excess Body Mass Index Loss at 3 Months: A Predictive Factor of Long-Term Result after Sleeve Gastrectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Philouze

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy (SG is considered as successful if the percentage of Excess Body Mass Index Loss (% EBMIL remains constant over 50% with long-term follow-up. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether early % EBMIL was predictive of success after SG. Methods. This retrospective study included patients who had SG with two years of follow-up. Patients had follow-up appointments at 3 (M3, 6, 12, and 24 months (M24. Data as weight and Body Mass Index (BMI were collected systematically. We estimated the % EBMIL necessary to establish a correlation between M3 and M24 compared to % EBMIL speeds and calculated a limit value of % EBMIL predictive of success. Results. Data at operative time, M3, and M24 were available for 128 patients. Pearson test showed a correlation between % EBMIL at M3 and that at M24 (r=0.74;  p<0.0001. % EBMIL speed between surgery and M3 (p=0.0011 was significant but not between M3 and M24. A linear regression analysis proved that % EBMIL over 20.1% at M3 (p<0.0001 predicted a final % EBMIL over 50%. Conclusions. % EBMIL at M3 after SG is correlated with % EBMIL in the long term. % EBMIL speed was significant in the first 3 months. % EBMIL over 20.1% at M3 leads to the success of SG.

  4. Effects of COLIA1 polymorphisms and haplotypes on perimenopausal bone mass, postmenopausal bone loss and fracture risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    González-Bofill, N; Husted, Camilla L.; Harsløf, Torben

    2011-01-01

    mineral density (BMD) and increased bone turnover at menopause and after 10 years of follow-up. Introduction We wanted to investigate whether the -1997G/T, -1663indelT and +1245G/T polymorphisms in the COLIA1 gene are associated with perimenopausal bone mass, early postmenopausal bone loss and interact......Summary One thousand seven hundred seventeen perimenopausal women from the Danish Osteoporosis Prevention Study were genotyped for the -1997G/T, -1663indelT and +1245G/T polymorphisms in the COLIA1 gen. We found that the -1997T allele and a haplotype containing it were associated with reduced bone...... after 10 years although statistical significance was lost. Haplotype 3 (-1997T-1663ins+1245G) was associated with lower bone mass and higher levels of bone turnover. Compared with haplotype 1, haplotype 3 carriers had lower BMDat the lumbar spine, femoral neck and total hip by 0.016±0.007 g/cm2, 0...

  5. 47 CFR 32.4341 - Net deferred tax liability adjustments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... income tax charges and credits pertaining to Account 32.4361, Deferred tax regulatory adjustments—net. (b... carryforward net operating losses and carryforward investment tax credits expected to reduce future taxes... carryforward net operating losses and carryforward investment tax credits previously recorded in this account...

  6. HST/WFC3 OBSERVATIONS OF LOW-MASS GLOBULAR CLUSTERS AM 4 AND PALOMAR 13: PHYSICAL PROPERTIES AND IMPLICATIONS FOR MASS LOSS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamren, Katherine M.; Smith, Graeme H.; Guhathakurta, Puragra [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew E. [Raytheon, 1151 East Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85756 (United States); Weisz, Daniel R. [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Rajan, Abhijith [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, 781 East Terrace Road, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Grillmair, Carl J., E-mail: khamren@ucolick.org [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Mail Stop 220-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the loss of low-mass stars in two of the faintest globular clusters known, AM 4 and Palomar 13 (Pal 13), using HST/WFC3 F606W and F814W photometry. To determine the physical properties of each cluster—age, mass, metallicity, extinction, and present day mass function (MF)—we use the maximum likelihood color-magnitude diagram (CMD) fitting program MATCH and the Dartmouth, Padova, and BaSTI stellar evolution models. For AM 4, the Dartmouth models provide the best match to the CMD and yield an age of >13 Gyr, metallicity log Z/Z {sub ☉} = –1.68 ± 0.08, a distance modulus (m – M) {sub V} = 17.47 ± 0.03, and reddening A{sub V} = 0.19 ± 0.02. For Pal 13 the Dartmouth models give an age of 13.4 ± 0.5 Gyr, log Z/Z {sub ☉} = –1.55 ± 0.06, (m – M) {sub V} = 17.17 ± 0.02, and A{sub V} = 0.43 ± 0.01. We find that the systematic uncertainties due to choice in assumed stellar model greatly exceed the random uncertainties, highlighting the importance of using multiple stellar models when analyzing stellar populations. Assuming a single-sloped power-law MF, we find that AM 4 and Pal 13 have spectral indices α = +0.68 ± 0.34 and α = –1.67 ± 0.25 (where a Salpeter MF has α = +1.35), respectively. Comparing our derived slopes with literature measurements of cluster integrated magnitude (M{sub V} ) and MF slope indicates that AM 4 is an outlier. Its MF slope is substantially steeper than clusters of comparable luminosity, while Pal 13 has an MF in line with the general trend. We discuss both primordial and dynamical origins for the unusual MF slope of AM 4 and tentatively favor the dynamical scenario. However, MF slopes of more low luminosity clusters are needed to verify this hypothesis.

  7. MTOR signaling and ubiquitin-proteosome gene expression in the preservation of fat free mass following high protein, calorie restricted weight loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McIver Cassandra M

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Caloric restriction is one of the most efficient ways to promote weight loss and is known to activate protective metabolic pathways. Frequently reported with weight loss is the undesirable consequence of fat free (lean muscle mass loss. Weight loss diets with increased dietary protein intake are popular and may provide additional benefits through preservation of fat free mass compared to a standard protein, high carbohydrate diet. However, the precise mechanism by which a high protein diet may mitigate dietary weight loss induced reductions in fat free mass has not been fully elucidated. Maintenance of fat free mass is dependent upon nutrient stimulation of protein synthesis via the mTOR complex, although during caloric restriction a decrease (atrophy in skeletal muscle may be driven by a homeostatic shift favouring protein catabolism. This review evaluates the relationship between the macronutrient composition of calorie restricted diets and weight loss using metabolic indicators. Specifically we evaluate the effect of increased dietary protein intake and caloric restricted diets on gene expression in skeletal muscle, particularly focusing on biosynthesis, degradation and the expression of genes in the ubiquitin-proteosome (UPP and mTOR signaling pathways, including MuRF-1, MAFbx/atrogin-1, mTORC1, and S6K1.

  8. Weight Loss Composition is One-Fourth Fat-Free Mass: A Critical Review and Critique of This Widely Cited Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heymsfield, Steven B.; Cristina Gonzalez, M. C.; Shen, Wei; Redman, Leanne; Thomas, Diana

    2014-01-01

    Maximizing fat loss while preserving lean tissue mass and function is a central goal of modern obesity treatments. A widely cited rule guiding expected loss of lean tissue as fat-free mass (FFM) states that approximately one-fourth of weight loss will be FFM (i.e., ΔFFM/ΔWeight = ~0.25) with the remaining three-fourths fat mass. This review examines the dynamic relations between FFM, fat mass, and weight changes that follow induction of negative energy balance with hypocaloric dieting and/or exercise. Historical developments in the field are traced with the “Quarter FFM Rule” used as a framework to examine evolving concepts on obesity tissue, excess weight, and what is often cited as “Forbes’ Rule”. Temporal effects in the fractional contribution of FFM to changes in body weight are examined as are lean tissue moderating effects such as aging, inactivity, and exercise that frequently accompany structured low-calorie diet weight loss protocols. Losses of lean tissue with dieting typically tend to be small, raising questions about study design, power, and applied measurement method reliability. Our review elicits important questions related to the fractional loss of lean tissues with dieting and provides a foundation for future research on this topic. PMID:24447775

  9. Effects of protein supplementation on fat-free mass in response to different weight loss programs in obese women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andiara Schwingel

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate whether protein supplementation helps prevent the loss of fat-free mass during weight loss. The sample was composed of seventy-eight obese adult Japanese women, assigned into four different programs: diet-alone (D, n=24, diet-alone with protein supplementation (DP, n=16, diet-plusexercise (DE, n=17, and diet-plus-exercise with protein supplementation (DEP, n=21. All participants restricted their energy intakes to 1200 kcal/day, and participants in DE and DEP had the exercise session including aerobic exercise of approximately 90 min/day, 3 day/week. Participants enrolled in protein supplementation groups received an additional 14 g/day of protein. Measures on body composition were conducted before and after the program by DXA. All programs yielded significant weight (6.9 to 9.5 kg and fat (4.1 to 7.6% reduction. Total fat-free mass significantly decreased in D, DP and DE groups, whereas for DEP group the decrease was not significant. Regionalfat-free mass lowered for D and DP groups in leg, arms and trunk. For those in DE group, fat-free mass in trunk was not significantly decreased, and for those in DEP group, fat-free mass in leg and trunk did not differ significantly after the program. However, no significant differences of changes in fat-free mass were observed in comparisons among all groups. Our results confirmed the efficiency of weight loss intervention on fat-mass reduction through diet and exercise. However, fat-free mass does not appear to be preserved by protein supplementation, suggesting that its influence on a short-term weight reduction program is not apparent. RESUMO O objetivo deste estudo foi investigar a influência da suplementação protéica na preservação da massa magra durante programas de emagrecimento. Setenta e oito mulheres adultas japonesas e obesas foram submetidas a quatro programas diferentes: dieta (D, n=24, dieta com suplementação proteica (DP, n=16, dieta com exerc

  10. Physical durability of two types of long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs) three years after a mass LLIN distribution campaign in Mozambique, 2008-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Juliette; Abílio, Ana Paula; do Rosario Pondja, Maria; Marrenjo, Dulcisária; Luciano, Jacinta; Fernandes, Guilhermina; Sabindy, Samira; Wolkon, Adam; Ponce de Leon, Gabriel; Chan, Adeline; Vanden Eng, Jodi

    2015-02-01

    We conducted a prospective evaluation to measure the physical durability of two brands of long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs) distributed during a campaign in 2008 in Nampula Province, Mozambique. Households with LLINs tagged during the campaign (6,000) were geo-located (34%) and a random sample was selected for each of 3 years of follow-up. The LLINs were evaluated in the field and a laboratory for presence of holes and a proportional hole index (pHI) was calculated following the World Health Organization guidelines. We performed 567 interviews (79.0%) and found 75.3% (72.1-78.4%) of households retained at least one LLIN after 3 years; the most common cause of attrition was damage beyond repair (51.0%). Hole damage was evident after 1 year, and increased by year. Olyset had a significantly greater mean number of holes and pHI compared with PermaNet 2.0 brand (all P values ≤ 0.001). Additional information about LLIN durability is recommended to improve malaria control efforts. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  11. Constraints on Decreases in Eta Carinae's Mass-loss from 3D Hydrodynamic Simulations of Its Binary Colliding Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madura, T. I.; Gull, T. R.; Okazaki, A. T.; Russell, C. M. P.; Owocki, S. P.; Groh, J. H.; Corcoran, M. F.; Hamaguchi, K.; Teodoro, M.

    2013-01-01

    Recent work suggests that the mass-loss rate of the primary star Eta-A in the massive colliding wind binary Eta Carinae dropped by a factor of 2-3 between 1999 and 2010. We present result from large- (+/- 1545 au) and small- (+/- 155 au) domain, 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of Eta Car's colliding winds for three Eta-A mass-loss rates ( (dot-M(sub Eta-A) = 2.4, 4.8 and 8.5 × 10(exp -4) M(solar)/ yr), investigating the effects on the dynamics of the binary wind-wind collision (WWC). These simulations include orbital motion, optically thin radiative cooling and radiative forces. We find that dot-M Eta-A greatly affects the time-dependent hydrodynamics at all spatial scales investigated. The simulations also show that the post-shock wind of the companion star Eta-B switches from the adiabatic to the radiative-cooling regime during periastron passage (Phi approx.= 0.985-1.02). This switchover starts later and ends earlier the lower the value of dot-M Eta-A and is caused by the encroachment of the wind of Eta-A into the acceleration zone of Eta-B's wind, plus radiative inhibition of Eta-B's wind by Eta-A. The SPH simulations together with 1D radiative transfer models of Eta-A's spectra reveal that a factor of 2 or more drop in dot-M EtaA should lead to substantial changes in numerous multiwavelength observables. Recent observations are not fully consistent with the model predictions, indicating that any drop in dot- M Eta-A was likely by a factor of approx. < 2 and occurred after 2004. We speculate that most of the recent observed changes in Eta Car are due to a small increase in the WWC opening angle that produces significant effects because our line of sight to the system lies close to the dense walls of the WWC zone. A modest decrease in dot-M Eta-A may be responsible, but changes in the wind/stellar parameter of Eta-B, while less likely, cannot yet be fully ruled out. We suggest observations during Eta-Car's next periastron in 2014 to further

  12. Anesthetic management of a patient with 10 l of blood loss during operation for a retroperitoneal mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueqin Zhu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Bleeding is a common problem during resection of a retroperitoneal mass. Massive bleeding may occur in case of injury of an adjacent major vessel or organ. This case report describes a successful anesthetic management of a patient with 10 l of blood loss within three hours surgery. A 44-year-old woman who underwent an operation for resection of a retroperitoneal mass, went to a hypovolemic shock, due to acute life-threatening intra-operative bleeding, and was successfully rescued with a combination of measures, including control of surgical bleeding, supportive treatment with rapid fluid infusion, massive transfusion of blood products and administration of intravenous vasoactive agents for maintaining tissue perfusion and oxygenation, utilizing intraoperative autologous blood salvaged via cell saver, as well as prevention and treatment of complications. The patient received a total of 22 units of Packet Red Blood Cells (PRBCs, 18 units of Fresh Frozen Plasma (FFP, 10 units of cryoprecipitate, 3750 ml of her own salvage blood. Postoperatively, she was transferred to the intensive care unit (ICU with mechanical ventilator support, where she received another 5.4 units of FFP, 10 units of cryoprecipitate. The patient developed features of early acute lung injury such as fever and hypoxemia, and was managed successfully with mechanical ventilator support for a few days. At a three-month follow-up, the patient was doing very well. This paper explores the pathogenesia, implications, prevention and treatment of the transfusion-associated complications such as acidosis, hypothermia, electrolyte abnormalities, and transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI. Particular attention is given to the prevention of secondary coagulopathy of the patient requiring massive blood transfusion. This case study presents a good reference for similar anesthetic scenario in the future.

  13. Impact of Weight Loss on Physical Function with Changes in Strength, Muscle Mass, and Muscle Fat Infiltration in Overweight to Moderately Obese Older Adults: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Santanasto, Adam J.; Glynn, Nancy W.; Mark A. Newman; Taylor, Christopher A.; Maria Mori Brooks; Goodpaster, Bret H.; Newman, Anne B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Evaluate the effects of weight loss on muscle mass and area, muscle fat infiltration, strength, and their association with physical function. Methods. Thirty-six overweight to moderately obese, sedentary older adults were randomized into either a physical activity plus weight loss (PA+WL) or physical activity plus successful aging health education (PA+SA) program. Measurements included body composition by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, computerized tomography, knee extensor stren...

  14. Changes in lower extremity muscle mass and muscle strength after weight loss in obese patients with knee osteoarthritis: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Marius; Christensen, Robin; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente; Bliddal, Henning

    2012-02-01

    To investigate the effects of low-energy diet-induced weight loss on lower-extremity muscle mass and knee muscle strength in obese patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA), and the associations of these effects. We studied 159 obese patients with knee OA and available data from body composition analysis that had been performed using dual x-ray absorptiometry scanning and isometric muscle strength testing of the knee in extension and in flexion. The data had been obtained as part of a randomized controlled trial, with measurements performed before and after a supervised low-energy diet-induced weight loss intervention lasting 16 weeks. The patients lost an average of 12.9 kg (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 10.2, 15.7) (13% of baseline weight). The weight loss consisted of 10.9 kg fat mass (95% CI 8.9, 12.9), of which 3.8 kg (95% CI 2.7, 4.9) was leg fat mass. Total lean body mass was reduced by 1.9 kg (95% CI 0.05, 3.8), of which 0.785 kg (95% CI 0.09, 1.476) was leg lean mass. Absolute muscle strength decreased by ∼3-4% after the weight loss, whereas body mass-normalized muscle strength increased by 11-12%. At baseline, leg lean mass was significantly related to muscle strength, but changes in these measurements at followup were not related. Weight loss induced by a low-energy diet led to independent losses of leg muscle tissue and strength. The weight loss was accompanied by increased normalized muscle strength along with improved self-reported disability and pain--all of which are beneficial to patients with knee OA. The present results suggest that significant weight loss in patients with knee OA should be followed by an exercise regimen to restore or increase muscle mass. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  15. Magnetic confinement, Alfven wave reflection, and the origins of X-ray and mass-loss 'dividing lines' for late-type giants and supergiants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, R.; An, C.-H.; Musielak, Z. E.; Moore, R. L.; Suess, S. T.

    1991-01-01

    A simple qualitative model for the origin of the coronal and mass-loss dividing lines separating late-type giants and supergiants with and without hot, X-ray-emitting corona, and with and without significant mass loss is discussed. The basic physical effects considered are the necessity of magnetic confinement for hot coronal material on the surface of such stars and the large reflection efficiency for Alfven waves in cool exponential atmospheres. The model assumes that the magnetic field geometry of these stars changes across the observed 'dividing lines' from being mostly closed on the high effective temperature side to being mostly open on the low effective temperature side.

  16. A drop in the pond: the effect of rapid mass-loss on the dynamics and interaction rate of collisionless particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penoyre, Zephyr; Haiman, Zoltán

    2018-01-01

    In symmetric gravitating systems experiencing rapid mass-loss, particle orbits change almost instantaneously, which can lead to the development of a sharply contoured density profile, including singular caustics for collisionless systems. This framework can be used to model a variety of dynamical systems, such as accretion discs following a massive black hole merger and dwarf galaxies following violent early star formation feedback. Particle interactions in the high-density peaks seem a promising source of observable signatures of these mass-loss events (i.e. a possible EM counterpart for black hole mergers or strong gamma-ray emission from dark matter annihilation around young galaxies), because the interaction rate depends on the square of the density. We study post-mass-loss density profiles, both analytic and numerical, in idealized cases and present arguments and methods to extend to any general system. An analytic derivation is presented for particles on Keplerian orbits responding to a drop in the central mass. We argue that this case, with initially circular orbits, gives the most sharply contoured profile possible. We find that despite the presence of a set of singular caustics, the total particle interaction rate is reduced compared to the unperturbed system; this is a result of the overall expansion of the system dominating over the steep caustics. Finally, we argue that this result holds more generally, and the loss of central mass decreases the particle interaction rate in any physical system.

  17. NUV Transit Spectroscopy of HD189733b: Measuring the Mass-loss and Ionization State of a Prototypical Escaping Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossati, Luca

    2017-08-01

    The benchmark hot Jupiters HD209458b and HD189733b have provided the foundations of comparative planetology for giant exoplanets, making them of paramount importance for atmospheric studies of short-period planets. HD189733b is the closest transiting hot Jupiter to Earth and transit observations have been obtained and studied across the electromagnetic spectrum, with the surprising exception of the near-ultraviolet: a unique window for atmospheric mass-loss studies owing to the strong resonance lines and large photospheric flux in this band. In order to make a quantitative assessment of the metallicity, ionization state, and outflow rate of this important system, and to complete the panchromatic archive of transit spectroscopy of this archetypal object, we request 15 HST orbits to obtain three STIS near-ultraviolet transit light curves of HD189733b. These observations will allow us to study the physical properties of the planet's upper atmosphere, constrain the composition of the haze layer characterising the optical transmission spectrum, and provide a reference spectrum for NASA's recently funded Colorado Ultraviolet Transit Experiment (CUTE) exoplanet mission, which will carry out a 1-year science mission to observe multiple near-ultraviolet transits of the brightest and most nearby short-period transiting planets to study the physics of atmospheric escape.

  18. Titanium Mass-balance Analysis of Paso Robles Soils: Elemental Gains and Losses as Affected by Acid Alteration Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Brad; Ming, Douglas W.

    2010-01-01

    The Columbia Hills soils have been exposed to aqueous alteration in alkaline [1] as well as acid conditions [2,3]. The Paso Robles class soils are bright soils that possess the highest S concentration of any soil measured on Mars [2]. Ferric-sulfate detection by Moessbauer analysis indicated that acid solutions were involved in forming these soils [4]. These soils are proposed to have formed by alteration of nearby rock by volcanic hydrothermal or fumarolic activity. The Paso Robles soils consist of the original Paso Robles-disturbed-Pasadena (PR-dist), Paso Robles- PasoLight (PR-PL), Arad-Samra, Arad-Hula, Tyrone- Berker Island1 and Tyrone-MountDarwin [2 ,3. ]Chemical characteristics indicate that the PR-dist and PR-PL soils could be derived from acid weathering of local Wishstone rocks while the Samra and Hula soils are likely derived from local Algonquin-Iroquet rock [3]. The Paso Robles soils were exposed to acidic sulfur bearing fluids; however, little else is known about the chemistry of the alteration fluid and its effects on the alteration of the proposed parent materials. The objectives of this work are to conduct titanium normalized mass-balance analysis to1) assess elemental gains and losses from the parent materials in the formation of the Paso Robles soils and 2) utilize this information to indicate the chemical nature of the alteration fluids.

  19. Effect of a high protein diet and/or resistance exercise on the preservation of fat free mass during weight loss in overweight and obese older adults : a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verreijen, Amely M; Engberink, Mariëlle F; Memelink, Robert G; van der Plas, Suzanne E; Visser, Marjolein; Weijs, Peter J M

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intentional weight loss in obese older adults is a risk factor for accelerated muscle mass loss. We investigated whether a high protein diet and/or resistance exercise preserves fat free mass (FFM) during weight loss in overweight and obese older adults. METHODS: We included 100

  20. The contribution of fat-free mass to resting energy expenditure: implications for weight loss strategies in the treatment of adolescent obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Matthew G; Evans, Ronald K

    2015-08-01

    Owing to the strong relationship between fat-free mass (FFM) and resting energy expenditure (REE), the preservation of FFM is often emphasized in the treatment of adolescent obesity. Typical treatment regimens including an increased dietary consumption of protein and participation in resistance training are common components of adolescent weight management programs, despite limited evidence of a positive influence of FFM on weight loss outcomes in adolescents. Given the larger volume of FFM in obese relative to normal weight adolescents and the common treatment goals of both maximizing weight loss and attenuating the loss of FFM, a better understanding of the influence of FFM on energy balance is needed to determine whether strategies to preserve lean tissue or maximize absolute weight loss should be most emphasized. We review the associations among FFM, REE, and weight loss outcomes, focusing on how these relationships might influence energy balance in obese adolescents.

  1. Effects of lorcaserin on fat and lean mass loss in obese and overweight patients without and with type 2 diabetes mellitus: the BLOSSOM and BLOOM-DM studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apovian, C; Palmer, K; Fain, R; Perdomo, C; Rubino, D

    2016-09-01

    Body composition was determined using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in a subset of patients without (BLOSSOM) and with (BLOOM-DM) type 2 diabetes who received diet and exercise counselling along with either lorcaserin 10 mg twice daily or placebo. DXA scans were performed on study day 1 (baseline), week 24 and week 52. Baseline demographics of the subpopulations (without diabetes, n = 189; with diabetes, n = 63) were similar between studies and representative of their study populations. At week 52, patients without diabetes on lorcaserin lost significantly more fat mass relative to those on placebo (-12.06% vs -5.93%; p = 0.008). In patients with diabetes, fat mass was also decreased with lorcaserin relative to placebo (-9.87% vs -1.65%; p fat mass was lost in the trunk region with lorcaserin compared with placebo (without diabetes: -3.31% vs -2.05%; with diabetes: -3.65% vs -0.36%). Weight loss with lorcaserin was associated with a greater degree of fat mass loss than lean mass loss, and most of the fat mass lost for patients without and with diabetes was from the central region of the body. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Effect of weight loss and regain on adipose tissue distribution, composition of lean mass and resting energy expenditure in young overweight and obese adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosy-Westphal, A; Schautz, B; Lagerpusch, M; Pourhassan, M; Braun, W; Goele, K; Heller, M; Glüer, C-C; Müller, M J

    2013-10-01

    Although weight cycling is frequent in obese patients, the adverse consequences on body composition and an increased propensity to weight gain remain controversial. We investigated the effect of intentional weight loss and spontaneous regain on fat distribution, the composition of lean mass and resting energy expenditure (REE). Weight regainers (≥ 30% of loss, n=27) and weight-stable subjects (within weight change, n=20) were selected from 103 overweight and obese subjects (body mass index 28-43 kg m(-2), 24-45 years) who passed a 13-week low-calorie diet intervention. REE and body composition (by densitometry and whole-body magnetic resonance imaging) were examined at baseline, after weight loss and at 6 months of follow-up. Mean weight loss was -12.3 ± 3.3 kg in weight-stable subjects and -9.0 ± 4.3 kg in weight regainers (PWeight regain was incomplete, accounting for 83 and 42% of weight loss in women and men. Regain in total fat and different adipose tissue depots was in proportion to weight regain except for a higher regain in adipose tissue of the extremities in women and a lower regain in extremity and visceral adipose tissue in men. In both genders, regain in skeletal muscle of the trunk lagged behind skeletal muscle regain at the extremities. In contrast to weight-stable subjects, weight regainers showed a reduced REE adjusted for changes in organ and tissue masses after weight loss (PWeight regain did not adversely affect body fat distribution. Weight loss-associated adaptations in REE may impair weight loss and contribute to weight regain.

  3. MASS LOSS AND NITROGEN DYNAMICS DURING THE DECOMPOSITION OF A N-LABELED N2-FIXING EPOPHYTIC LICHEN, LOBARIA OREGANA (TUCK.) MULL. ARG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    We studied mass loss and nitrogen dynamics during fall and spring initiated decomposition of an N2-fixing epiphytic lichen, Lobaria oregana (Tuck.) Mull. Arg. using 15N. We developed a method of labeling lichens with 15N that involved spraying lichen material with a nutrient sol...

  4. Constraints on Porosity and Mass Loss in O-star Winds from the Modeling of X-ray Emission Line Profile Shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Cohen, David H.; Sundqvist, Jon O.; Owocki, Stanley P.

    2013-01-01

    We fit X-ray emission line profiles in high resolution XMM-Newton and Chandra grating spectra of the early O supergiant Zeta Pup with models that include the effects of porosity in the stellar wind. We explore the effects of porosity due to both spherical and flattened clumps. We find that porosity models with flattened clumps oriented parallel to the photosphere provide poor fits to observed line shapes. However, porosity models with isotropic clumps can provide acceptable fits to observed line shapes, but only if the porosity effect is moderate. We quantify the degeneracy between porosity effects from isotropic clumps and the mass-loss rate inferred from the X-ray line shapes, and we show that only modest increases in the mass-loss rate (40%) are allowed if moderate porosity effects (h(sub infinity) less than approximately R(sub *)) are assumed to be important. Large porosity lengths, and thus strong porosity effects, are ruled out regardless of assumptions about clump shape. Thus, X-ray mass-loss rate estimates are relatively insensitive to both optically thin and optically thick clumping. This supports the use of X-ray spectroscopy as a mass-loss rate calibration for bright, nearby O stars

  5. Mass loss and nutrient concentrations of buried wood as a function of organic matter removal, soil compaction, and vegetation control in a regenerating oak-pine forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix Ponder; John M. Kabrick; Mary Beth Adams; Deborah S. Page-Dumroese; Marty F. Jurgensen

    2017-01-01

    Mass loss and nutrient concentrations of northern red oak (Quercus rubra) and white oak (Q. alba) wood stakes were measured 30 months after their burial in the upper 10 cm of soil in a regenerating forest after harvesting and soil disturbance. Disturbance treatments were two levels of organic matter (OM) removal (only...

  6. Establishment of age- and sex-adjusted reference data for hand bone mass and investigation of hand bone loss in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørnbjerg, Lykke Midtbøll; Østergaard, Mikkel; Jensen, Trine

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rheumatoid arthritis is characterised by progressive joint destruction and loss of periarticular bone mass. Hand bone loss (HBL) has therefore been proposed as an outcome measure for treatment efficacy. A definition of increased HBL adjusted for age- and sex-related bone loss is lacking....... In this study, we aimed to: 1) establish reference values for normal hand bone mass (bone mineral density measured by digital x-ray radiogrammetry (DXR-BMD)); and 2) examine whether HBL is normalised in rheumatoid arthritis patients during treatment with tumour necrosis factor alpha inhibitors (TNFI). METHODS......: DXR-BMD was measured from hand x-rays in a reference cohort (1485 men/2541 women) without arthritis randomly selected from an urban Danish population. Sex- and age-related HBL/year was estimated. DXR-BMD was measured in rheumatoid arthritis patients (n = 350: at start of TNFI, and ~2 years after TNFI...

  7. Physical condition and maintenance of mosquito bed nets in Kwale County, coastal Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutuku Francis M

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the extensive ownership and use of insecticide-treated nets (ITNs over the last decade, the effective lifespan of these nets, especially their physical integrity, under true operational conditions is not well-understood. Usefulness of nets declines primarily due to physical damage or loss of insecticidal activity. Methods A community based cross-sectional survey was used to determine the physical condition and to identify predictors of poor physical condition for bed nets owned by individuals from communities in Kwale County, coastal Kenya. A proportionate hole index (pHI was used as a standard measure, and the cut-offs for an ‘effective net’ (offer substantial protection against mosquito bites and ‘ineffective nets’ (offer little or no protection against mosquito bites were determined (pHI ≤88 (about ≤500 cm2 of holes surface area and pHI of >88 (≥500 cm2 of holes surface area, respectively. Results The vast majority (78% of the surveyed nets had some holes. The median pHI was 92 (range: 1–2,980. Overall, half of the nets were categorized as ‘effective nets’ or ‘serviceable nets’. Physical deterioration of nets was associated with higher use and washing frequency. Young children and older children were found to use ineffective bed nets significantly more often than infants, while the physical integrity of nets owned by pregnant women was similar to those owned by infants. Estuarine environment inhabitants owned nets with the worst physical condition, while nets owned by the coastal slope inhabitants were in fairly good physical condition. The results suggest that bed nets are optimally utilized when they are new and physically intact. Thereafter, bed net utilization decreases gradually with increasing physical deterioration, with most net owners withdrawing physically damaged nets from routine use. This withdrawal commonly happens following 1.5 years of use, making bed net use the most

  8. Proper Motions, Shear, Mass-Loss Rates and C-Shocks in the HH 7-11 Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartigan, Patrick

    2017-08-01

    We propose to obtain the first complete set of narrow band HST images of the iconic HH 7-11 protostellar jet. Owing to positional errors, both previous attempts to image the system failed to capture the HH 7 bow shock, arguably the best example we have of a well-resolved, strong shock in molecular gas. The proposed observations will tie together the optical and the IR emission in HH 7 and establish whether the molecular gas is heated by a continuous shock or a jump shock, physics of direct relevance to upcoming JWST observations of protostars. HST is needed to measure proper motions, to detect offsets between H-alpha and the forbidden lines that define the directions of shock propagation throughout the flow, and to resolve small scale structures present in the previous images. The portions of the jet imaged in 1995 and 1998 show several curious features, including two 'rings' that may result from the jet penetrating through preexisting sheets or filaments. I f this explanation is correct, the shocks in the rings will have expanded perpendicular to the axis of the jet by measurable amounts in the last 20 years. Any shear or entrainment along the jet will manifest itself as differential motions in the shocked gas. Our proposal employs a WFC3 quad filter to measure electron densities at each pixel. Combined with proper motion measurements, these observations will allow us to separate jet material from shocked gas along the cavity, observe dynamical instabilities if they exist behind the shock, and assess the accuracy of simple mass loss calculations that depend solely upon integrated line luminosities.

  9. Lycopene treatment against loss of bone mass, microarchitecture and strength in relation to regulatory mechanisms in a postmenopausal osteoporosis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardawi, Mohammed-Salleh M; Badawoud, Mohammed H; Hassan, Sherif M; Rouzi, Abdulrahim A; Ardawi, Jumanah M S; AlNosani, Nouf M; Qari, Mohammed H; Mousa, Shaker A

    2016-02-01

    Lycopene supplementation decreases oxidative stress and exhibits beneficial effects on bone health, but the mechanisms through which it alters bone metabolism in vivo remain unclear. The present study aims to evaluate the effects of lycopene treatment on postmenopausal osteoporosis. Six-month-old female Wistar rats (n=264) were sham-operated (SHAM) or ovariectomized (OVX). The SHAM group received oral vehicle only and the OVX rats were randomized into five groups receiving oral daily lycopene treatment (mg/kg body weight per day): 0 OVX (control), 15 OVX, 30 OVX, and 45 OVX, and one group receiving alendronate (ALN) (2μg/kg body weight per day), for 12weeks. Bone densitometry measurements, bone turnover markers, biomechanical testing, and histomorphometric analysis were conducted. Micro computed tomography was also used to evaluate changes in microarchitecture. Lycopene treatment suppressed the OVX-induced increase in bone turnover, as indicated by changes in biomarkers of bone metabolism: serum osteocalcin (s-OC), serum N-terminal propeptide of type 1 collagen (s-PINP), serum crosslinked carboxyterminal telopeptides (s-CTX-1), and urinary deoxypyridinoline (u-DPD). Significant improvement in OVX-induced loss of bone mass, bone strength, and microarchitectural deterioration was observed in lycopene-treated OVX animals. These effects were observed mainly at sites rich in trabecular bone, with less effect in cortical bone. Lycopene treatment down-regulated osteoclast differentiation concurrent with up-regulating osteoblast together with glutathione peroxidase (GPx) catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities. These findings demonstrate that lycopene treatment in OVX rats primarily suppressed bone turnover to restore bone strength and microarchitecture. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. [Contribution of soil fauna to the mass loss of Betula albosinensis leaf litter at early decomposition stage of subalpine forest litter in western Sichuan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Lei; Wu, Fu-Zhong; Yang, Wan-Qin; Tan, Bo

    2012-02-01

    In order to quantify the contribution of soil fauna to the decomposition of birch (Betula albosinensis) leaf litter in subalpine forests in western Sichuan of Southwest China during freeze-thaw season, a field experiment with different mesh sizes (0.02, 0.125, 1 and 3 mm) of litterbags was conducted in a representative birch-fir (Abies faxoniana) forest to investigate the mass loss rate of the birch leaf litter from 26 October, 2010 to 18 April, 2011, and the contributions of micro-, meso- and macro-fauna to the decomposition of the leaf litter. Over the freeze-thaw season, 11.8%, 13.2%, 15.4% and 19.5% of the mass loss were detected in the litterbags with 0.02, 0. 125, 1 and 3 mm mesh sizes, respectively. The total contribution of soil fauna to the litter decomposition accounted for 39.5% of the mass loss, and the taxa and individual relative density of the soil fauna in the litterbags had the similar variation trend with that of the mass loss rate. The contribution rate of soil fauna to the leaf litter mass loss showed the order of micro- fauna, with the highest contribution of micro-fauna (7.9%), meso-fauna (11.9%), and macro-fauna (22.7%) at the onset of freezing stage, deeply frozen stage, and thawing stage, respectively. The results demonstrated that soil fauna played an important role in the litter decomposition in subalpine forests of western Sichuan during freeze-thaw season.

  11. Asteroseismology of old open clusters with Kepler: direct estimate of the integrated red giant branch mass-loss in NGC 6791 and 6819

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miglio, A.; Brogaard, Karsten Frank; Stello, D.

    2012-01-01

    Mass-loss of red giant branch (RGB) stars is still poorly determined, despite its crucial role in the chemical enrichment of galaxies. Thanks to the recent detection of solar-like oscillations in G–K giants in open clusters with Kepler, we can now directly determine stellar masses...... for a statistically significant sample of stars in the old open clusters NGC 6791 and 6819. The aim of this work is to constrain the integrated RGB mass-loss by comparing the average mass of stars in the red clump (RC) with that of stars in the low-luminosity portion of the RGB [i.e. stars with L≲L(RC)]. Stellar...... masses were determined by combining the available seismic parameters νmax and Δν with additional photometric constraints and with independent distance estimates. We measured the masses of 40 stars on the RGB and 19 in the RC of the old metal-rich cluster NGC 6791. We find that the difference between...

  12. Body fat is associated with increased and lean mass with decreased knee cartilage loss in older adults: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, C; Stannus, O; Cicuttini, F; Antony, B; Jones, G

    2013-06-01

    To determine the associations between body composition at baseline and knee cartilage loss over 2.9 years in older adults. A total of 395 randomly selected subjects (mean 62 years, range 51-81, 50% female) were studied at baseline and 2.9 years later. T1-weighted fat-suppressed magnetic resonance imaging of the right knee was performed to determine knee cartilage volume and tibial bone area at baseline and follow-up. Height, weight and radiographic osteoarthritis were measured by standard protocols at baseline. Fat mass and lean mass were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry at baseline. Tibial cartilage volume decreased by 2.0-2.7% per annum. In multivariable analysis, annual change in medial cartilage volume was negatively and significantly associated with body mass index (β: -0.14% per kg m(-2), 95% confidence interval (CI): -0.25%, -0.02%), percentage total body fat (β: -0.19% per %, 95% CI: -0.30%, -0.07%) and percentage trunk fat (β: -0.10% per %, 95% CI: -0.19%, -0.02%), and positively associated with percentage lean mass (β: 0.20% per %, 95% CI: 0.08%, 0.32%). Change in lateral tibial cartilage volume was also significantly associated with percentage total body fat (β: -0.11% per %, 95% CI: -0.21%, -0.001%) and total lean mass (β: 0.13% per kg, 95% CI: 0.04%, 0.22%). These were independent of sex and age even though both were also significant predictors. Body fat adversely affects tibial cartilage loss over time, whereas lean mass is protective. Strategies aimed at reducing body fat but increasing lean mass may reduce knee cartilage loss in older people.

  13. NA-NET numerical analysis net

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dongarra, J. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Computer Science]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Rosener, B. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Computer Science

    1991-12-01

    This report describes a facility called NA-NET created to allow numerical analysts (na) an easy method of communicating with one another. The main advantage of the NA-NET is uniformity of addressing. All mail is addressed to the Internet host ``na-net.ornl.gov`` at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Hence, members of the NA-NET do not need to remember complicated addresses or even where a member is currently located. As long as moving members change their e-mail address in the NA-NET everything works smoothly. The NA-NET system is currently located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It is running on the same machine that serves netlib. Netlib is a separate facility that distributes mathematical software via electronic mail. For more information on netlib consult, or send the one-line message ``send index`` to netlib{at}ornl.gov. The following report describes the current NA-NET system from both a user`s perspective and from an implementation perspective. Currently, there are over 2100 members in the NA-NET. An average of 110 mail messages pass through this facility daily.

  14. NA-NET numerical analysis net

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dongarra, J. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Computer Science Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Rosener, B. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Computer Science)

    1991-12-01

    This report describes a facility called NA-NET created to allow numerical analysts (na) an easy method of communicating with one another. The main advantage of the NA-NET is uniformity of addressing. All mail is addressed to the Internet host na-net.ornl.gov'' at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Hence, members of the NA-NET do not need to remember complicated addresses or even where a member is currently located. As long as moving members change their e-mail address in the NA-NET everything works smoothly. The NA-NET system is currently located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It is running on the same machine that serves netlib. Netlib is a separate facility that distributes mathematical software via electronic mail. For more information on netlib consult, or send the one-line message send index'' to netlib{at}ornl.gov. The following report describes the current NA-NET system from both a user's perspective and from an implementation perspective. Currently, there are over 2100 members in the NA-NET. An average of 110 mail messages pass through this facility daily.

  15. Experiments and simulation of a net closing mechanism for tether-net capture of space debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharf, Inna; Thomsen, Benjamin; Botta, Eleonora M.; Misra, Arun K.

    2017-10-01

    This research addresses the design and testing of a debris containment system for use in a tether-net approach to space debris removal. The tether-net active debris removal involves the ejection of a net from a spacecraft by applying impulses to masses on the net, subsequent expansion of the net, the envelopment and capture of the debris target, and the de-orbiting of the debris via a tether to the chaser spacecraft. To ensure a debris removal mission's success, it is important that the debris be successfully captured and then, secured within the net. To this end, we present a concept for a net closing mechanism, which we believe will permit consistently successful debris capture via a simple and unobtrusive design. This net closing system functions by extending the main tether connecting the chaser spacecraft and the net vertex to the perimeter and around the perimeter of the net, allowing the tether to actuate closure of the net in a manner similar to a cinch cord. A particular embodiment of the design in a laboratory test-bed is described: the test-bed itself is comprised of a scaled-down tether-net, a supporting frame and a mock-up debris. Experiments conducted with the facility demonstrate the practicality of the net closing system. A model of the net closure concept has been integrated into the previously developed dynamics simulator of the chaser/tether-net/debris system. Simulations under tether tensioning conditions demonstrate the effectiveness of the closure concept for debris containment, in the gravity-free environment of space, for a realistic debris target. The on-ground experimental test-bed is also used to showcase its utility for validating the dynamics simulation of the net deployment, and a full-scale automated setup would make possible a range of validation studies of other aspects of a tether-net debris capture mission.

  16. Change in fat-free mass assessed by bioelectrical impedance, total body potassium and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry during prolonged weight loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendel, H W; Gotfredsen, A; Højgaard, L

    1996-01-01

    A total of 16 obese women (body mass index (BMI) 30-43 kg m(-2)) participated in a weight reduction study. Before and after a weight loss of 11.7 +/- 7.4 kg (mean +/- SD), body composition was assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and total body potassium counting (TBK). These measu......A total of 16 obese women (body mass index (BMI) 30-43 kg m(-2)) participated in a weight reduction study. Before and after a weight loss of 11.7 +/- 7.4 kg (mean +/- SD), body composition was assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and total body potassium counting (TBK......). These measurements were compared with bioimpedance analysis (BIA) by applying 11 predictive BIA equations published in the literature. Predictive equations for the present study population were developed, with the use of fat-free mass (FFM) as assessed by TBK and DXA as references in multiple regression analysis....... The results of the BIA equations varied widely; FFM was generally overestimated by BIA as compared with DXA and TBK before and after weight loss. During weight loss, the FFM did not change, as estimated by DXA (1.3 +/- 2.3 kg, p > 0.05) and TBK (0.9 +/- 2.9 kg, p > 0.05). The recorded change in impedance (R...

  17. Hyperinsulinemia is associated with the loss of appendicular skeletal muscle mass at 4.6 year follow-up in older men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Teros, Miriam T; Ramírez C, Fátima A; Alemán-Mateo, Heliodoro

    2015-10-01

    Homeostasis model assessment as a marker of insulin resistance has been associated with the pronounced loss of appendicular skeletal muscle mass in older adults. In the present study, we hypothesized that hyperinsulinemia as an early predictor of insulin resistance may be associated with the loss of appendicular skeletal muscle mass (ASM). This is a cohort study that included 147 well-functioning older men and women subjects who were followed for a period of 4.6 ± 1.8 years. Lean tissue in arm and legs, or ASM, was derived from dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry at baseline with follow-up measurements to obtain the relative change. Hyperinsulinemia was defined empirically at the 75th percentile. The relative change in ASM was negative and significant throughout the quartiles of fasting insulin levels (p ≤ 0.05); however, the loss of ASM was more pronounced in the later quartiles (-0.7 kg) compared with the relative change in Q1 and Q2 (-0.5 kg and -0.3 kg). The unadjusted analysis indicates a significant association between hyperinsulinemia and the loss of ASM (β = -0.28, 95% CI-0.57-0.009, p = 0.05), an association that remained significant after adjusting for several covariates. Hyperinsulinemia as an early marker of insulin resistance was associated with the loss of ASM in a cohort study of community-dwelling older men and women subjects without other chronic health conditions. The use of fasting insulin levels >8.4 μU/mL may help clinicians identify individuals in the geriatric population who are at a high risk of loss of appendicular skeletal muscle mass. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of Exercise Training on Fat Loss and Lean Mass Gain in Mexican-American and Korean Premenopausal Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shenghui; Park, Kyung-Shin; McCormick, Joseph B

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the effect of exercise training on body composition change in women. Nineteen Mexican-American and 18 Korean premenopausal overweight/obese women were randomized into one of the following groups: control, low-intensity training group (LI), and high-intensity training group (HI). Subjects completed 12 weeks of training at 50-56% maximal oxygen consumption (LI) or 65-70% maximal oxygen consumption (HI). Body composition components were measured at baseline and after training using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry for Mexican-Americans, while whole-body composition was measured by the direct segmental multifrequency bioelectrical impedance analysis and abdominal fat was measured by single-slice computed tomography for Koreans. Data were analyzed using mixed-model repeated measures independent of age, ethnicity, and body mass index (BMI). Exercise training showed a significant effect on BMI, fat percentage, fat mass, lean mass, and visceral adipose tissue area. HI significantly decreased fat mass and fat percentage but increased lean mass (all P fat mass, fat percentage, and visceral adipose tissue area but increased lean mass (all P fat percentage, fat mass, and visceral adipose tissue area but had no effect on increasing lean mass for Mexican-American and Korean premenopausal overweight/obese women.

  19. Net Ecosystem Carbon Flux

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Net Ecosystem Carbon Flux is defined as the year-over-year change in Total Ecosystem Carbon Stock, or the net rate of carbon exchange between an ecosystem and the...

  20. Planning long lasting insecticide treated net campaigns: should households' existing nets be taken into account?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukich, Joshua; Bennett, Adam; Keating, Joseph; Yukich, Rudy K; Lynch, Matt; Eisele, Thomas P; Kolaczinski, Kate

    2013-06-14

    Mass distribution of long-lasting insecticide treated bed nets (LLINs) has led to large increases in LLIN coverage in many African countries. As LLIN ownership levels increase, planners of future mass distributions face the challenge of deciding whether to ignore the nets already owned by households or to take these into account and attempt to target individuals or households without nets. Taking existing nets into account would reduce commodity costs but require more sophisticated, and potentially more costly, distribution procedures. The decision may also have implications for the average age of nets in use and therefore on the maintenance of universal LLIN coverage over time. A stochastic simulation model based on the NetCALC algorithm was used to determine the scenarios under which it would be cost saving to take existing nets into account, and the potential effects of doing so on the age profile of LLINs owned. The model accounted for variability in timing of distributions, concomitant use of continuous distribution systems, population growth, sampling error in pre-campaign coverage surveys, variable net 'decay' parameters and other factors including the feasibility and accuracy of identifying existing nets in the field. Results indicate that (i) where pre-campaign coverage is around 40% (of households owning at least 1 LLIN), accounting for existing nets in the campaign will have little effect on the mean age of the net population and (ii) even at pre-campaign coverage levels above 40%, an approach that reduces LLIN distribution requirements by taking existing nets into account may have only a small chance of being cost-saving overall, depending largely on the feasibility of identifying nets in the field. Based on existing literature the epidemiological implications of such a strategy is likely to vary by transmission setting, and the risks of leaving older nets in the field when accounting for existing nets must be considered. Where pre-campaign coverage

  1. Planning long lasting insecticide treated net campaigns: should households’ existing nets be taken into account?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Mass distribution of long-lasting insecticide treated bed nets (LLINs) has led to large increases in LLIN coverage in many African countries. As LLIN ownership levels increase, planners of future mass distributions face the challenge of deciding whether to ignore the nets already owned by households or to take these into account and attempt to target individuals or households without nets. Taking existing nets into account would reduce commodity costs but require more sophisticated, and potentially more costly, distribution procedures. The decision may also have implications for the average age of nets in use and therefore on the maintenance of universal LLIN coverage over time. Methods A stochastic simulation model based on the NetCALC algorithm was used to determine the scenarios under which it would be cost saving to take existing nets into account, and the potential effects of doing so on the age profile of LLINs owned. The model accounted for variability in timing of distributions, concomitant use of continuous distribution systems, population growth, sampling error in pre-campaign coverage surveys, variable net ‘decay’ parameters and other factors including the feasibility and accuracy of identifying existing nets in the field. Results Results indicate that (i) where pre-campaign coverage is around 40% (of households owning at least 1 LLIN), accounting for existing nets in the campaign will have little effect on the mean age of the net population and (ii) even at pre-campaign coverage levels above 40%, an approach that reduces LLIN distribution requirements by taking existing nets into account may have only a small chance of being cost-saving overall, depending largely on the feasibility of identifying nets in the field. Based on existing literature the epidemiological implications of such a strategy is likely to vary by transmission setting, and the risks of leaving older nets in the field when accounting for existing nets must be considered

  2. Dust composition and mass-loss return from the luminous blue variable R71 in the LMC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guha Niyogi, S.; Min, M.; Meixner, M.; Waters, L.B.F.M.; Seale, J.; Tielens, A.G.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    Context. We present an analysis of mid- and far-infrared (IR) spectrum and spectral energy distribution (SED) of the luminous blue variable (LBV) R71 in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Aims. This work aims to understand the overall contribution of high-mass LBVs to the total dust-mass budget of

  3. Long-term ketogenic diet causes glucose intolerance and reduced β- and α-cell mass but no weight loss in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellenbroek, Johanne H; van Dijck, Laura; Töns, Hendrica A; Rabelink, Ton J; Carlotti, Françoise; Ballieux, Bart E P B; de Koning, Eelco J P

    2014-03-01

    High-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diets (KD) are used for weight loss and for treatment of refractory epilepsy. Recently, short-time studies in rodents have shown that, besides their beneficial effect on body weight, KD lead to glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. However, the long-term effects on pancreatic endocrine cells are unknown. In this study we investigate the effects of long-term KD on glucose tolerance and β- and α-cell mass in mice. Despite an initial weight loss, KD did not result in weight loss after 22 wk. Plasma markers associated with dyslipidemia and inflammation (cholesterol, triglycerides, leptin, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, IL-1β, and IL-6) were increased, and KD-fed mice showed signs of hepatic steatosis after 22 wk of diet. Long-term KD resulted in glucose intolerance that was associated with insufficient insulin secretion from β-cells. After 22 wk, insulin-stimulated glucose uptake was reduced. A reduction in β-cell mass was observed in KD-fed mice together with an increased number of smaller islets. Also α-cell mass was markedly decreased, resulting in a lower α- to β-cell ratio. Our data show that long-term KD causes dyslipidemia, a proinflammatory state, signs of hepatic steatosis, glucose intolerance, and a reduction in β- and α-cell mass, but no weight loss. This indicates that long-term high-fat, low-carbohydrate KD lead to features that are also associated with the metabolic syndrome and an increased risk for type 2 diabetes in humans.

  4. Variation in C-reactive protein following weight loss in obese insulin resistant postmenopausal women: is there an independent contribution of lean body mass?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsalani, R; Riesco, É; Perreault, K; Imbeault, P; Brochu, M; Dionne, I J

    2015-03-01

    We showed that obese insulin resistant postmenopausal women are characterized by higher lean body mass and elevated C-reactive protein. Although counterintuitive, we hypothesized that losses in muscle mass following caloric restriction and increase in muscle quality will be associated with improvements in glucose homeostasis through decreases in C-reactive protein. To determine 1) if improvements in C-reactive protein concentrations occurs through losses in lean body mass; and 2) if decreases in C-reactive protein levels contribute to improvements in insulin sensitivity. 50 postmenopausal women (body mass index>26 kg/m(²)) with impaired glucose disposal (fat distribution (VAT and SAT by CT scan) and plasma high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and interleukin-6 (Il-6). Significant correlations were observed between Δ hsCRP levels with Δ Il-6 (r=0.33, p≤0.05), Δ total LBM index (r=0.44, p≤0.01), Δ trunk LBM (r=0.38, p≤0.01) Δ SAT (r=0.35, p≤0.05) and ∆ glucose disposal rate (r=- 0.44, p≤0.01). After including all the correlated variables in Stepwise linear regression model, Δ LBM index was the only independent predictor of the reduction in hsCRP levels (R(2)=0.20, p≤0.01). Losses in total lean body mass are independently associated with improvements in inflammatory state (CRP levels) in obese postmenopausal women with impaired glucose disposal. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Professional Enterprise NET

    CERN Document Server

    Arking, Jon

    2010-01-01

    Comprehensive coverage to help experienced .NET developers create flexible, extensible enterprise application code If you're an experienced Microsoft .NET developer, you'll find in this book a road map to the latest enterprise development methodologies. It covers the tools you will use in addition to Visual Studio, including Spring.NET and nUnit, and applies to development with ASP.NET, C#, VB, Office (VBA), and database. You will find comprehensive coverage of the tools and practices that professional .NET developers need to master in order to build enterprise more flexible, testable, and ext

  6. A high whey protein-, leucine-, and vitamin D-enriched supplement preserves muscle mass during intentional weight loss in obese older adults: a double-blind randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verreijen, A.M.; Verlaan, S.; Engberink, M.F.; Swinkels, S.; Bosch, J.; Weijs, P.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intentional weight loss in obese older adults is a risk factor for muscle loss and sarcopenia. Objective: The objective was to examine the effect of a high whey protein-, leucine-, and vitamin D-enriched supplement on muscle mass preservation during intentional weight loss in obese older

  7. Double-muscled and conventional cattle have the same net energy requirements if these are related to mature and current body protein mass, and to gain composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavon, S; Bittante, G

    2012-11-01

    The hypothesis tested in this paper is that double-muscled (DBM) and conventional cattle, considerably differing in body composition, have similar NE requirements when: a) NE(m) is scaled as a function of current (P(i)) and adult (P(m)) protein mass; and b) ME for gain (ME(g)) is estimated from protein (Pr) and lipid (Lr) retention and their partial ME use efficiencies, the k(p) and k(l) values, respectively. First, 2 databases were examined: 1 was developed combining well known literature information from comparative slaughter trials conducted on British beef steers; the other was based on a trial conducted using extremely lean DBM Piemontese bulls. From the first database, NE(m) was calculated to be 1.625 × P(i) ÷ P(m) × P(m)(0.73) (MJ/kg(0.73)). From the second database, the daily ME(g) was determined as 22.8 MJ × Pr ÷ k(p) + 38.74 MJ × Lr ÷ k(l), assuming (from prior reports) that k(p) = 0.20 and k(l) = 0.75. Thereafter, ME(m) was defined as ME intake minus ME(g), and, hence, NE(m) was predicted as 1.625 × P(i) ÷ P(m) × P(m)(0.73) (where 1.625 was the value obtained from the first dataset). The resulting k(m) (NE(m)/ME(m)) averaged 0.67. This k(m) value did not differ from that (0.65; P = 0.12) predicted by Garrett's equation, which uses dietary ME content as the only predictive variable. Second, the procedure was tested for the ability to detect effects on k(m) caused by increasing BW and dietary factors not estimable from the dietary ME content only. Data were gathered from a trial involving 48 DBM Piemontese bulls divided into 4 groups fed 1 of 4 diets differing in CP content (145 or 108 g/kg DM), with or without addition of 80 g/d of rumen-protected CLA (rpCLA). Bulls were examined at 3 consecutive periods of growth, corresponding to 365, 512 and 631 kg of average BW. All energy balance items were influenced by increasing BW, except k(m) (P = 0.61), in agreement with the expectation that NE(m) requirement depends on the degree of maturity (P

  8. Influence of body mass loss and myoglobinuria on the development of muscle fatigue after a marathon in a warm environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Coso, Juan; Salinero, Juan José; Abián-Vicen, Javier; González-Millán, Cristina; Garde, Sergio; Vega, Pablo; Pérez-González, Benito

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the changes in body mass and myoglobinuria concentration in recreational runners during a marathon in a warm environment, and the relation of these changes to muscle fatigue. We recruited 138 amateur runners (114 men and 24 women) for the study. Before the race, leg muscle power output was measured during a countermovement jump on a force platform, body weight was measured, and a urine sample was obtained. Within 3 min of race completion (28 °C; 46% relative humidity), the runners repeated the countermovement jump, body weight was measured again, and a second urine sample was obtained. Myoglobin concentration was determined in the urine samples. After the race, mean body mass reduction was 2.2% ± 1.2%. Fifty-five runners (40% of the total) reduced their body mass by less than 2%, and 10 runners (7.2%) reduced their body mass by more than 4%. Only 3 runners increased their body mass after the marathon. Mean leg muscle power reduction was 16% ± 10%. Twenty-four runners reduced their muscle power by over 30%. No myoglobin was detected in the prerace urine specimens, whereas postrace urinary myoglobin concentration increased to 3.5 ± 9.5 μg·mL(-1) (p < 0.05). Muscle power change after the marathon significantly correlated with postrace urine myoglobin concentration (r = -0.55; p < 0.001), but not with body mass change (r = -0.08; p = 0.35). After a marathon in a warm environment, interindividual variability in body mass change was high, but only 7% of the runners reduced their body mass by more than 4%. The correlation between myoglobinuria and muscle power change suggests that muscle fatigue is associated with muscle breakdown.

  9. Analysis of Non-Enzymatically Glycated Peptides: Neutral-Loss Triggered MS3 Versus Multi-Stage Activation Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qibin; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Orton, Daniel J.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Yang, Feng; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2008-10-15

    Non-enzymatic glycation of tissue proteins has important implications in the development of complications of diabetes mellitus. While electron transfer dissociation (ETD) has been shown to outperform collision-induced dissociation (CID) in sequencing glycated peptides by tandem mass spectrometry, ETD instrumentation is not yet available in all laboratories. In this study, we evaluated different advanced CID techniques (i.e., neutral-loss triggered MS3 and multi-stage activation) during LC-MSn analyses of Amadori-modified peptides enriched from human serum glycated in vitro. During neutral-loss triggered MS3 experiments, MS3 scans triggered by neutral-losses of 3 H2O or 3 H2O + HCHO produced similar results in terms of glycated peptide identifications. However, neutral losses of 3 H2O resulted in significantly more glycated peptide identifications during multi-stage activation experiments. Overall, the multi-stage activation approach produced more glycated peptide identifications, while the neutral-loss triggered MS3 approach resulted in much higher specificity. Both techniques offer a viable alternative to ETD for identifying glycated peptides when that method is unavailable.

  10. Effects of 4 weight-loss diets differing in fat, protein, and carbohydrate on fat mass, lean mass, visceral adipose tissue, and hepatic fat: results from the POUNDS LOST trial123

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Russell J; Carey, Vincent J; Hall, Kevin D; LeBoff, Meryl S; Loria, Catherine M; Laranjo, Nancy M; Sacks, Frank M; Smith, Steven R

    2012-01-01

    Background: Weight loss reduces body fat and lean mass, but whether these changes are influenced by macronutrient composition of the diet is unclear. Objective: We determined whether energy-reduced diets that emphasize fat, protein, or carbohydrate differentially reduce total, visceral, or hepatic fat or preserve lean mass. Design: In a subset of participants in a randomized trial of 4 weight-loss diets, body fat and lean mass (n = 424; by using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry) and abdominal and hepatic fat (n = 165; by using computed tomography) were measured after 6 mo and 2 y. Changes from baseline were compared between assigned amounts of protein (25% compared with 15%) and fat (40% compared with 20%) and across 4 carbohydrate amounts (35% through 65%). Results: At 6 mo, participants lost a mean (±SEM) of 4.2 ± 0.3 kg (12.4%) fat and 2.1 ± 0.3 kg (3.5%) lean mass (both P fat (P ≥ 0.34), or 65% and 35% carbohydrate (P ≥ 0.27). Participants lost 2.3 ± 0.2 kg (13.8%) abdominal fat: 1.5 ± 0.2 kg (13.6%) subcutaneous fat and 0.9 ± 0.1 kg (16.1%) visceral fat (all P fat than did men relative to total-body fat loss. Participants regained ∼40% of these losses by 2 y, with no differences between diets (P ≥ 0.23). Weight loss reduced hepatic fat, but there were no differences between groups (P ≥ 0.28). Dietary goals were not fully met; self-reported contrasts were closer to 2% protein, 8% fat, and 14% carbohydrate at 6 mo and 1%, 7%, and 10%, respectively, at 2 y. Conclusion: Participants lost more fat than lean mass after consumption of all diets, with no differences in changes in body composition, abdominal fat, or hepatic fat between assigned macronutrient amounts. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00072995. PMID:22258266

  11. Quality change and mass loss of paddy during airtight storage in a ferro-cement bin in Sri Lanka

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adhikarinayake, T.B.; Palipane, K.B.; Müller, J.

    2006-01-01

    In Sri Lanka, prices for paddy fluctuate severely showing a minimum price at harvest. To benefit from higher prices, farmers strive to store paddy, but lack of facilities and poor storage management cause quantitative and qualitative losses by rodents, insects and microbial deterioration. To

  12. Less-than-expected weight loss in normal-weight women undergoing caloric restriction and exercise is accompanied by preservation of fat-free mass and metabolic adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, K; De Souza, M J; Williams, N I

    2017-03-01

    Normal-weight women frequently restrict their caloric intake and exercise, but little is known about the effects on body weight, body composition and metabolic adaptations in this population. We conducted a secondary analysis of data from a randomized controlled trial in sedentary normal-weight women. Women were assigned to a severe energy deficit (SEV: -1062±80 kcal per day; n=9), a moderate energy deficit (MOD: -633±71 kcal per day; n=7) or energy balance (BAL; n=9) while exercising five times per week for 3 months. Outcome variables included changes in body weight, body composition, resting metabolic rate (RMR) and metabolic hormones associated with energy conservation. Weight loss occurred in SEV (-3.7±0.9 kg, Pweight loss was significantly less than predicted (SEV: -11.1±1.0 kg; MOD: -6.5±1.1 kg; both P0.33). RMR decreased by -6±2% in MOD (P=0.020). In SEV, RMR did not change on a group level (P=0.66), but participants whose RMR declined lost more weight (P=0.020) and had a higher baseline RMR (P=0.026) than those whose RMR did not decrease. Characteristic changes in leptin (P=0.003), tri-iodothyronine (P=0.013), insulin-like growth factor-1 (P=0.016) and ghrelin (P=0.049) occurred only in SEV. The energy deficit and adaptive changes in RMR explained 54% of the observed weight loss. In normal-weight women, caloric restriction and exercise resulted in less-than-predicted weight loss. In contrast to previous literature, weight loss consisted almost exclusively of fat mass, whereas fat-free mass was preserved.

  13. Higher compared with lower dietary protein during an energy deficit combined with intense exercise promotes greater lean mass gain and fat mass loss: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longland, Thomas M; Oikawa, Sara Y; Mitchell, Cameron J; Devries, Michaela C; Phillips, Stuart M

    2016-03-01

    A dietary protein intake higher than the Recommended Dietary Allowance during an energy deficit helps to preserve lean body mass (LBM), particularly when combined with exercise. The purpose of this study was to conduct a proof-of-principle trial to test whether manipulation of dietary protein intake during a marked energy deficit in addition to intense exercise training would affect changes in body composition. We used a single-blind, randomized, parallel-group prospective trial. During a 4-wk period, we provided hypoenergetic (~40% reduction compared with requirements) diets providing 33 ± 1 kcal/kg LBM to young men who were randomly assigned (n = 20/group) to consume either a lower-protein (1.2 g · kg(-1) · d(-1)) control diet (CON) or a higher-protein (2.4 g · kg(-1) · d(-1)) diet (PRO). All subjects performed resistance exercise training combined with high-intensity interval training for 6 d/wk. A 4-compartment model assessment of body composition was made pre- and postintervention. As a result of the intervention, LBM increased (P mass than did the CON group (PRO: -4.8 ± 1.6 kg; CON: -3.5 ± 1.4kg; P mass when combined with a high volume of resistance and anaerobic exercise. Changes in serum cortisol were associated with changes in body fat and LBM, but did not explain much variance in either measure. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01776359. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  14. Testing the Color Charge and Mass Dependence of Parton Energy Loss with Heavy-to-light Ratios at RHIC and LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Armesto-Pérez, Nestor; Salgado, C A; Wiedemann, Urs Achim; Dainese, Andrea; Salgado, Carlos A.; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2005-01-01

    The ratio of nuclear modification factors of high-pT heavy-flavored mesons to light-flavored hadrons ("heavy-to-light ratio") in nucleus-nucleus collisions tests the partonic mechanism expected to underlie jet quenching. Heavy-to-light ratios are mainly sensitive to the mass and color-charge dependences of medium-induced parton energy loss. Here, we assess the potential for identifying these two effects in D and B meson production at RHIC and at the LHC. To this end, we supplement the perturbative QCD factorized formalism for leading hadron production with radiative parton energy loss. For D meson spectra at high but experimentally accessible transverse momentum (10 < pT < 20 GeV) in Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC, we find that charm quarks behave essentially like light quarks. However, since light-flavored hadron yields are dominated by gluon parents, the heavy-to-light ratio of D mesons is a sensitive probe of the color charge dependence of parton energy loss. In contrast, due to the larger b quark mass,...

  15. WaveNet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-30

    Coastal Inlets Research Program WaveNet WaveNet is a web-based, Graphical-User-Interface ( GUI ) data management tool developed for Corps coastal...generates tabular and graphical information for project planning and design documents. The WaveNet is a web-based GUI designed to provide users with a...data from different sources, and employs a combination of Fortran, Python and Matlab codes to process and analyze data for USACE applications

  16. Risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes by prepregnancy body mass index: a population-based study to inform prepregnancy weight loss counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schummers, Laura; Hutcheon, Jennifer A; Bodnar, Lisa M; Lieberman, Ellice; Himes, Katherine P

    2015-01-01

    To estimate the absolute risks of adverse maternal and perinatal outcomes based on small differences in prepregnancy body mass (eg, 10% of body mass or 10-20 pounds). This population-based cohort study (N=226,958) was drawn from all singleton pregnancies in British Columbia (Canada) from 2004 to 2012. The relationships between prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) (as a continuous, nonlinear variable) and adverse pregnancy outcomes were examined using logistic regression models. Analyses were adjusted for maternal age, height, parity, and smoking in pregnancy. Adjusted absolute risks of each outcome are reported according to incremental differences in prepregnancy BMI and weight in pounds. A 10% difference in prepregnancy BMI was associated with at least a 10% lower risk of preeclampsia, gestational diabetes, indicated preterm delivery, macrosomia, and stillbirth. In contrast, larger differences in prepregnancy BMI (20-30% differences in BMI) were necessary to meaningfully reduce risks of cesarean delivery, shoulder dystocia, neonatal intensive care unit stay 48 hours or longer, and in-hospital newborn mortality. Prepregnancy BMI was not associated with risk of postpartum hemorrhage requiring intervention, severe maternal morbidity or maternal mortality, or spontaneous preterm delivery before 32 weeks of gestation. These results can inform prepregnancy weight loss counseling by defining achievable weight loss goals for patients that may reduce their risk of poor perinatal outcomes. II.

  17. High whey protein intake delayed the loss of lean body mass in healthy old rats, whereas protein type and polyphenol/antioxidant supplementation had no effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Mosoni

    Full Text Available Our aim was to compare and combine 3 nutritional strategies to slow down the age-related loss of muscle mass in healthy old rats: 1 increase protein intake, which is likely to stimulate muscle protein anabolism; 2 use leucine rich, rapidly digested whey proteins as protein source (whey proteins are recognized as the most effective proteins to stimulate muscle protein anabolism. 3 Supplement animals with a mixture of chamomile extract, vitamin E, vitamin D (reducing inflammation and oxidative stress is also effective to improve muscle anabolism. Such comparisons and combinations were never tested before. Nutritional groups were: casein 12% protein, whey 12% protein, whey 18% protein and each of these groups were supplemented or not with polyphenols/antioxidants. During 6 months, we followed changes of weight, food intake, inflammation (plasma fibrinogen and alpha-2-macroglobulin and body composition (DXA. After 6 months, we measured muscle mass, in vivo and ex-vivo fed and post-absorptive muscle protein synthesis, ex-vivo muscle proteolysis, and oxidative stress parameters (liver and muscle glutathione, SOD and total antioxidant activities, muscle carbonyls and TBARS. We showed that although micronutrient supplementation reduced inflammation and oxidative stress, the only factor that significantly reduced the loss of lean body mass was the increase in whey protein intake, with no detectable effect on muscle protein synthesis, and a tendency to reduce muscle proteolysis. We conclude that in healthy rats, increasing protein intake is an effective way to delay sarcopenia.

  18. Modelling Energy Loss Mechanisms and a Determination of the Electron Energy Scale for the CDF Run II W Mass Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riddick, Thomas [Univ. College London, Bloomsbury (United Kingdom)

    2012-06-15

    The calibration of the calorimeter energy scale is vital to measuring the mass of the W boson at CDF Run II. For the second measurement of the W boson mass at CDF Run II, two independent simulations were developed. This thesis presents a detailed description of the modification and validation of Bremsstrahlung and pair production modelling in one of these simulations, UCL Fast Simulation, comparing to both geant4 and real data where appropriate. The total systematic uncertainty on the measurement of the W boson mass in the W → eve channel from residual inaccuracies in Bremsstrahlung modelling is estimated as 6.2 ±3.2 MeV/c2 and the total systematic uncertainty from residual inaccuracies in pair production modelling is estimated as 2.8± 2.7 MeV=c2. Two independent methods are used to calibrate the calorimeter energy scale in UCL Fast Simulation; the results of these two methods are compared to produce a measurement of the Z boson mass as a cross-check on the accuracy of the simulation.

  19. Mass loss from the southern half of the Greenland Ice Sheet since the Little Ice Age Maximum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Kristian Kjellerup; Kjær, Kurt H.; Bjørk, Anders Anker

    the 1961-1990 average, with the coldest interval between c. 1600 and 1800. Even though winter temperatures may have dominated the cooling, also the summer temperatures which are most closely correlated with glacier mass balances, dropped, to c. 0.6 below the average in the northern hemisphere including...

  20. Parametric amplification in a micro Coriolis mass flow sensor: reduction of power dissipation without loss of sensitivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenesteijn, Jarno; Droogendijk, H.; Wiegerink, Remco J.; Lammerink, Theodorus S.J.; Lötters, Joost Conrad; Sanders, Remco G.P.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the application of parametric amplification to a micro Coriolis mass flow sensor to reduce the system’s power dissipation while retaining sensitivity to flow. By reducing this power dissipation, less heat will be transferred to the fluid and channel, potentially resulting in more

  1. Coloured Petri Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kurt

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes how Coloured Petri Nets (CP-nets) have been developed — from being a promising theoretical model to being a full-fledged language for the design, specification, simulation, validation and implementation of large software systems (and other systems in which human beings and...... use of CP-nets — because it means that the function representation and the translations (which are a bit mathematically complex) no longer are parts of the basic definition of CP-nets. Instead they are parts of the invariant method (which anyway demands considerable mathematical skills...

  2. Game Coloured Petri Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergaard, Michael

    2006-01-01

    This paper introduces the notion of game coloured Petri nets. This allows the modeler to explicitly model what parts of the model comprise the modeled system and what parts are the environment of the modeled system. We give the formal definition of game coloured Petri nets, a means of reachability...... analysis of this net class, and an application of game coloured Petri nets to automatically generate easy-to-understand visualizations of the model by exploiting the knowledge that some parts of the model are not interesting from a visualization perspective (i.e. they are part of the environment...

  3. Programming NET Web Services

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrara, Alex

    2007-01-01

    Web services are poised to become a key technology for a wide range of Internet-enabled applications, spanning everything from straight B2B systems to mobile devices and proprietary in-house software. While there are several tools and platforms that can be used for building web services, developers are finding a powerful tool in Microsoft's .NET Framework and Visual Studio .NET. Designed from scratch to support the development of web services, the .NET Framework simplifies the process--programmers find that tasks that took an hour using the SOAP Toolkit take just minutes. Programming .NET

  4. Annotating Coloured Petri Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindstrøm, Bo; Wells, Lisa Marie

    2002-01-01

    -net. An example of such auxiliary information is a counter which is associated with a token to be able to do performance analysis. Modifying colour sets and arc inscriptions in a CP-net to support a specific use may lead to creation of several slightly different CP-nets – only to support the different uses...... a method which makes it possible to associate auxiliary information, called annotations, with tokens without modifying the colour sets of the CP-net. Annotations are pieces of information that are not essential for determining the behaviour of the system being modelled, but are rather added to support...

  5. Change in fat-free mass assessed by bioelectrical impedance, total body potassium and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry during prolonged weight loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendel, H W; Gotfredsen, A; Højgaard, L

    1996-01-01

    A total of 16 obese women (body mass index (BMI) 30-43 kg m(-2)) participated in a weight reduction study. Before and after a weight loss of 11.7 +/- 7.4 kg (mean +/- SD), body composition was assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and total body potassium counting (TBK....... The results of the BIA equations varied widely; FFM was generally overestimated by BIA as compared with DXA and TBK before and after weight loss. During weight loss, the FFM did not change, as estimated by DXA (1.3 +/- 2.3 kg, p > 0.05) and TBK (0.9 +/- 2.9 kg, p > 0.05). The recorded change in impedance (R...... the literature, which included equations specific for the degree of obesity in the study group, and the group specific equations developed for the present population predicted significant changes in FFM during weight loss (from 2.3 +/- 3.0 to 5.0 +/- 3.0 kg, p

  6. Impact of weight loss on physical function with changes in strength, muscle mass, and muscle fat infiltration in overweight to moderately obese older adults: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santanasto, Adam J; Glynn, Nancy W; Newman, Mark A; Taylor, Christopher A; Brooks, Maria Mori; Goodpaster, Bret H; Newman, Anne B

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Evaluate the effects of weight loss on muscle mass and area, muscle fat infiltration, strength, and their association with physical function. Methods. Thirty-six overweight to moderately obese, sedentary older adults were randomized into either a physical activity plus weight loss (PA+WL) or physical activity plus successful aging health education (PA+SA) program. Measurements included body composition by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, computerized tomography, knee extensor strength, and short physical performance battery (SPPB). Results. At 6 months, PA+WL lost greater thigh fat and muscle area compared to PA+SA. PA+WL lost 12.4% strength; PA+SA lost 1.0%. Muscle fat infiltration decreased significantly in PA+WL and PA+SA. Thigh fat area decreased 6-fold in comparison to lean area in PA+WL. Change in total SPPB score was strongly inversely correlated with change in fat but not with change in lean or strength. Conclusion. Weight loss resulted in additional improvements in function over exercise alone, primarily due to loss of body fat.

  7. Impact of Weight Loss on Physical Function with Changes in Strength, Muscle Mass, and Muscle Fat Infiltration in Overweight to Moderately Obese Older Adults: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam J. Santanasto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Evaluate the effects of weight loss on muscle mass and area, muscle fat infiltration, strength, and their association with physical function. Methods. Thirty-six overweight to moderately obese, sedentary older adults were randomized into either a physical activity plus weight loss (PA+WL or physical activity plus successful aging health education (PA+SA program. Measurements included body composition by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, computerized tomography, knee extensor strength, and short physical performance battery (SPPB. Results. At 6 months, PA+WL lost greater thigh fat and muscle area compared to PA+SA. PA+WL lost 12.4% strength; PA+SA lost 1.0%. Muscle fat infiltration decreased significantly in PA+WL and PA+SA. Thigh fat area decreased 6-fold in comparison to lean area in PA+WL. Change in total SPPB score was strongly inversely correlated with change in fat but not with change in lean or strength. Conclusion. Weight loss resulted in additional improvements in function over exercise alone, primarily due to loss of body fat.

  8. Change in fat-free mass assessed by bioelectrical impedance, total body potassium and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry during prolonged weight loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendel, H W; Gotfredsen, A; Højgaard, L

    1996-01-01

    A total of 16 obese women (body mass index (BMI) 30-43 kg m(-2)) participated in a weight reduction study. Before and after a weight loss of 11.7 +/- 7.4 kg (mean +/- SD), body composition was assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and total body potassium counting (TBK...... the literature, which included equations specific for the degree of obesity in the study group, and the group specific equations developed for the present population predicted significant changes in FFM during weight loss (from 2.3 +/- 3.0 to 5.0 +/- 3.0 kg, p obesity most predictive....... The results of the BIA equations varied widely; FFM was generally overestimated by BIA as compared with DXA and TBK before and after weight loss. During weight loss, the FFM did not change, as estimated by DXA (1.3 +/- 2.3 kg, p > 0.05) and TBK (0.9 +/- 2.9 kg, p > 0.05). The recorded change in impedance (R...

  9. The role of glucocorticoids in naturally fasting grey seal (Halichoerus grypus) pups: dexamethasone stimulates mass loss and protein utilisation, but not departure from the colony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, K A; Fedak, M A; Moss, S E W; Pomeroy, P P; Speakman, J R; Hall, A J

    2013-03-15

    Seals must manage their energy reserves carefully while they fast on land to ensure that they go to sea with sufficient fuel to sustain them until they find food. Glucocorticoids (GCs) have been implicated in the control of fuel metabolism and termination of fasting in pinnipeds. Here we tested the hypothesis that dexamethasone, an artificial GC, increases fat and protein catabolism, and induces departure from the breeding colony in wild, fasting grey seal pups. A single intramuscular dose of dexamethasone completely suppressed cortisol production for 24-72 h, demonstrating activation of GC receptors. In experiment 1, we compared the effects of a single dose of dexamethasone or saline administered 10 days after weaning on fasting mass and body composition changes, cortisol, blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and glucose levels, and timing of departure from the colony. In experiment 2, we investigated the effects of dexamethasone on short-term (5 days) changes in mass loss, body composition and BUN levels. In experiment 1, dexamethasone induced a short-lived increase in mass loss, but there was no difference in timing of departure between dexamethasone- and saline-treated pups (N=10). In experiment 2, dexamethasone increased protein and water loss and prevented a decrease in BUN levels (N=11). Our data suggest changes in cortisol contribute to regulation of protein catabolism in fasting seal pups, irrespective of the sex of the animal, but do not terminate fasting. By affecting the rate of protein depletion, lasting changes in cortisol levels could influence the amount of time seal pups have to find food, and thus may have important consequences for their survival.

  10. SEARCHING FOR COOL DUST IN THE MID-TO-FAR INFRARED: THE MASS-LOSS HISTORIES OF THE HYPERGIANTS μ Cep, VY CMa, IRC+10420, AND ρ Cas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shenoy, Dinesh; Humphreys, Roberta M.; Jones, Terry J.; Gehrz, Robert D. [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street, SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Marengo, Massimo [Department of Physics, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Helton, L. Andrew [USRA-SOFIA Science Center, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Hoffmann, William F.; Skemer, Andrew J.; Hinz, Philip M., E-mail: shenoy@astro.umn.edu [Department of Astronomy/Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    We present mid- and far-IR imaging of four famous hypergiant stars: the red supergiants μ Cep and VY CMa, and the warm hypergiants IRC +10420 and ρ Cas. Our 11–37 μm SOFIA/FORCAST imaging probes cool dust not detected in visual and near-IR imaging studies. Adaptive optics 8–12 μm imaging of μ Cep and IRC +10420 with MMT/MIRAC reveals extended envelopes that are the likely sources of these stars’ strong silicate emission features. We find μ Cep’s mass-loss rate to have declined by about a factor of five over a 13,000 year history, ranging from 5 × 10{sup −6} down to ∼1× 10{sup −6} M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}. The morphology of VY CMa indicates a cooler dust component coincident with the highly asymmetric reflection nebulae seen in the visual and near-IR. The lack of cold dust at greater distances around VY CMa indicates that its mass-loss history is limited to the last ∼1200 years, with an average rate of 6 × 10{sup −4} M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}. We find two distinct periods in the mass-loss history of IRC +10420 with a high rate of 2 × 10{sup −3} M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1} until approximately 2000 years ago, followed by an order of magnitude decrease in the recent past. We interpret this change as evidence of its evolution beyond the RSG stage. Our new infrared photometry of ρ Cas is consistent with emission from the expanding dust shell ejected in its 1946 eruption, with no evidence of newer dust formation from its more recent events.

  11. Mass loss of Greenland's glaciers and ice caps 2003-2008 revealed from ICES at laser altimetry data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolch, T.; Sørensen, Louise Sandberg; Simonsen, Sebastian Bjerregaard

    2013-01-01

    The recently finalized inventory of Greenland's glaciers and ice caps (GIC) allows for the first time to determine the mass changes of the GIC separately from the ice sheet using space-borne laser altimetry data. Corrections for firn compaction and density that are based on climatic conditions...... are applied for the conversion from volume to mass changes. The GIC which are clearly separable from the icesheet (i.e., have a distinct ice divide or no connection) lost 27.9 ± 10.7 Gt a-1 or 0.08 ± 0.03 mm a-1 sea-level equivalent (SLE) between October 2003 and March 2008. All GIC (including those...

  12. Net zero water

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lindeque, M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Is it possible to develop a building that uses a net zero amount of water? In recent years it has become evident that it is possible to have buildings that use a net zero amount of electricity. This is possible when the building is taken off...

  13. SolNet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jordan, Ulrike; Vajen, Klaus; Bales, Chris

    2014-01-01

    SolNet, founded in 2006, is the first coordinated International PhD education program on Solar Thermal Engineering. The SolNet network is coordinated by the Institute of Thermal Engineering at Kassel University, Germany. The network offers PhD courses on solar heating and cooling, conference...

  14. Kunstige neurale net

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hørning, Annette

    1994-01-01

    Artiklen beskæftiger sig med muligheden for at anvende kunstige neurale net i forbindelse med datamatisk procession af naturligt sprog, specielt automatisk talegenkendelse.......Artiklen beskæftiger sig med muligheden for at anvende kunstige neurale net i forbindelse med datamatisk procession af naturligt sprog, specielt automatisk talegenkendelse....

  15. Determinants of age at natural menopause in the Isparta Menopause and Health Study: premenopausal body mass index gain rate and episodic weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Zeynep D

    2010-01-01

    The influence of body weight and weight change on age at natural menopause (ANM) is controversial. We aimed to explore these associations by overcoming two possible reasons for inconsistent findings: (1) a lack of information on weight change from a fixed time point up until menopause and (2) a possibility of capturing a spurious association between later ANM and greater weight gain because of a longer time span. Cross-sectionally, we evaluated static (body mass index [BMI] at age 25 y and height) and dynamic (history of premenopausal episodic weight loss and BMI gain rate) anthropometric indicators as predictors of ANM in Cox proportional hazards models. BMI gain rate was calculated based on weight change from age 25 y to menopause (or to current age in premenopausal women). Of 1,106 women, 46% were postmenopausal. Dynamic anthropometric indicators were stronger determinants of ANM compared with static indicators. Being in the higher quartile of BMI gain rate and having a history of episodic weight loss of more than 5 kg were independently associated with later ANM (hazard ratio [95% CI], 0.832 [0.765-0.905] and 0.433 [0.344-0.546], respectively). After controlling for history of episodic weight loss of more than 5 kg, smoking and premenopausal type 2 diabetes emerged as time-dependent predictors of ANM (hazard ratio [95% CI], 1.371 [1.093-1.720] and 1.640 [1.141-2.356], respectively). Premenopausal BMI gain rate and premenopausal history of episodic weight loss of more than 5 kg are independently associated with later ANM. Smoking predicts an earlier menopause after the age of initiation and type 2 diabetes predicts an earlier menopause after the age of diagnosis. The latter two associations are significant only after adjusting for a history of episodic weight loss of more than 5 kg.

  16. Non-breeding Cackling, Ross's and Snow Geese on Baffin Island show no loss of body mass during wing moult

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fox, Anthony David; Leafloor, James O.; Balsby, Thorsten Johannes Skovbjerg

    2016-01-01

    would normally moult later. This suggests that in a non-breeding year (i.e. in the absence of competition from large numbers of goslings), locally moulting geese can obtain sufficient exogenous energy to meet their needs during the flightless wing moult period without losing body mass. This also...... is consistent with the hypothesis that in other species of geese, accumulation of fat stores prior to, and depletion of such stores during, wing moult is adaptive and likely to be a feature of individual plasticity to meet particular needs, such as undertaking moult migration to remote sites where precise...

  17. Chronic Alcohol Abuse Leads to Low Bone Mass with No General Loss of Bone Structure or Bone Mechanical Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulhøi, Maiken Parm; Meldgaard, Karoline; Steiniche, Torben

    2017-01-01

    Chronic alcohol abuse (CAA) has deleterious effects on skeletal health. This study examined the impact of CAA on bone with regard to bone density, structure, and strength. Bone specimens from 42 individuals with CAA and 42 individuals without alcohol abuse were obtained at autopsy. Dual-energy X...... wall thickness of trabecular osteons compared to individuals without alcohol abuse. No significant difference was found for bone strength and structure. Conclusion: CAA leads to low bone mass due to a decrease in bone formation but with no destruction of bone architecture nor a decrease in bone...

  18. A well-balanced diet combined or not with exercise induces fat mass loss without any decrease of bone mass despite bone micro-architecture alterations in obese rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbaix, Maude; Metz, Lore; Mac-Way, Fabrice; Lavet, Cédric; Guillet, Christelle; Walrand, Stéphane; Masgrau, Aurélie; Vico, Laurence; Courteix, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    The association of a well-balanced diet with exercise is a key strategy to treat obesity. However, weight loss is linked to an accelerated bone loss. Furthermore, exercise is known to induce beneficial effects on bone. We investigated the impact of a well-balanced isoenergetic reducing diet (WBR) and exercise on bone tissue in obese rats. Sixty male rats had previously been fed with a high fat/high sucrose diet (HF/HS) for 4months to induce obesity. Then, 4 regimens were initiated for 2months: HF/HS diet plus exercise (treadmill: 50min/day, 5days/week), WBR diet plus exercise, HF/HS diet plus inactivity and WBR diet plus inactivity. Body composition and total BMD were assessed using DXA and visceral fat mass was weighed. Tibia densitometry was assessed by Piximus. Bone histomorphometry was performed on the proximal metaphysis of tibia and on L2 vertebrae (L2). Trabecular micro-architectural parameters were measured on tibia and L2 by 3D microtomography. Plasma concentration of osteocalcin and CTX were measured. Both WBR diet and exercise had decreased global weight, global fat and visceral fat mass (pbone mass and BMD. However, Tb.Th, bone volume density and degree of anisotropy of tibia were decreased by the WBR diet (pExercise had significantly improved BMD of the tibia possibly by inhibiting the bone resorption, as evidenced by no change in plasma osteocalcin levels, a decrease of CTX levels (pbone mass and BMD of obese rats despite alterations of their bone micro-architecture. The moderate intensity exercise performed had improved the tibia BMD of obese rats without any trabecular and cortical adaptation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Molecular pathways leading to loss of skeletal muscle mass in cancer cachexia--can findings from animal models be translated to humans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Tara C; Bachmann, Jeannine; Prokopchuk, Olga; Friess, Helmut; Martignoni, Marc E

    2016-02-08

    Cachexia is a multi-factorial, systemic syndrome that especially affects patients with cancer of the gastrointestinal tract, and leads to reduced treatment response, survival and quality of life. The most important clinical feature of cachexia is the excessive wasting of skeletal muscle mass. Currently, an effective treatment is still lacking and the search for therapeutic targets continues. Even though a substantial number of animal studies have contributed to a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of the loss of skeletal muscle mass, subsequent clinical trials of potential new drugs have not yet yielded any effective treatment for cancer cachexia. Therefore, we questioned to which degree findings from animal studies can be translated to humans in clinical practice and research. A substantial amount of animal studies on the molecular mechanisms of muscle wasting in cancer cachexia has been conducted in recent years. This extensive review of the literature showed that most of their observations could not be consistently reproduced in studies on human skeletal muscle samples. However, studies on human material are scarce and limited in patient numbers and homogeneity. Therefore, their results have to be interpreted critically. More research is needed on human tissue samples to clarify the signaling pathways that lead to skeletal muscle loss, and to confirm pre-selected drug targets from animal models in clinical trials. In addition, improved diagnostic tools and standardized clinical criteria for cancer cachexia are needed to conduct standardized, randomized controlled trials of potential drug candidates in the future.

  20. Effects of high-protein diets on fat-free mass and muscle protein synthesis following weight loss: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasiakos, Stefan M; Cao, Jay J; Margolis, Lee M; Sauter, Edward R; Whigham, Leah D; McClung, James P; Rood, Jennifer C; Carbone, John W; Combs, Gerald F; Young, Andrew J

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine the effects of varying levels of dietary protein on body composition and muscle protein synthesis during energy deficit (ED). A randomized controlled trial of 39 adults assigned the subjects diets providing protein at 0.8 (recommended dietary allowance; RDA), 1.6 (2×-RDA), and 2.4 (3×-RDA) g kg(-1) d(-1) for 31 d. A 10-d weight-maintenance (WM) period was followed by a 21 d, 40% ED. Body composition and postabsorptive and postprandial muscle protein synthesis were assessed during WM (d 9-10) and ED (d 30-31). Volunteers lost (Pregardless of dietary protein. The proportion of weight loss due to reductions in fat-free mass was lower (P0.05) from WM for 2×-RDA and 3×-RDA, but was lower during ED than WM for those consuming RDA levels of protein (energy × protein interaction, P<0.05). To assess muscle protein metabolic responses to varied protein intakes during ED, RDA served as the study control. In summary, we determined that consuming dietary protein at levels exceeding the RDA may protect fat-free mass during short-term weight loss.

  1. Testing the color charge and mass dependence of parton energy loss with heavy-to-light ratios at BNL RHIC and CERN LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Armesto, N; Salgado, C A; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2005-01-01

    The ratio of nuclear modification factors of high-p/sub T/ heavy- flavored mesons to light-flavored hadrons ("heavy-to-light ratio") in nucleus-nucleus collisions tests the partonic mechanism expected to underlie jet quenching. Heavy-to-light ratios are mainly sensitive to the mass and color-charge dependences of medium-induced parton energy loss. Here, we assess the potential for identifying these two effects in D and B meson production at RHIC and at the LHC. To this end, we supplement the perturbative QCD factorized formalism for leading hadron production with radiative parton energy loss. For D meson spectra at high but experimentally accessible transverse momentum (10loss. I...

  2. Impact of food craving and calorie intake on body mass index (BMI) changes during an 18-month behavioral weight loss trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscemi, Joanna; Rybak, Tiffany M; Berlin, Kristoffer S; Murphy, James G; Raynor, Hollie A

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore relations between food craving, caloric intake, and body mass index (BMI) changes over the course of an 18-month weight loss trial. Two-hundred two obese adults (mean BMI = 34.9 kg/m(2); mean age = 51.30 years, 92.2% White; 57.8% female) who participated in a behavioral weight loss trial completed measures of food craving, caloric intake, and BMI at baseline, 6 and 18 months. From baseline to 6 months, higher initial food cravings were associated with more gradual and less steep reductions in BMI. Additionally, the relation between changes in food craving and BMI changes varied by levels of change in caloric intake, such that BMI change and change in food cravings were positively associated at low levels of change in caloric intake, but were unrelated at average and high levels of change in caloric intake. Similarly, from baseline to 6 months and from 6 to 18 months, the relation between changes in food craving and BMI changes also varied by initial levels of caloric intake. Explicit clinical targeting of food craving management may be beneficial for individuals beginning weight loss programs, especially for those who report higher levels of food craving at baseline. Baseline caloric intake and change in calorie intake over time may serve as moderators of the relation between food cravings and BMI.

  3. Chronic Alcohol Abuse Leads to Low Bone Mass with No General Loss of Bone Structure or Bone Mechanical Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulhøi, Maiken Parm; Meldgaard, Karoline; Steiniche, Torben; Odgaard, Anders; Vesterby, Annie

    2017-01-01

    Chronic alcohol abuse (CAA) has deleterious effects on skeletal health. This study examined the impact of CAA on bone with regard to bone density, structure, and strength. Bone specimens from 42 individuals with CAA and 42 individuals without alcohol abuse were obtained at autopsy. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA), compression testing, ashing, and bone histomorphometry were performed. Individuals with CAA had significantly lower bone mineral density (BMD) in the femoral neck and significantly lower bone volume demonstrated by thinner trabeculae, decreased extent of osteoid surfaces, and lower mean wall thickness of trabecular osteons compared to individuals without alcohol abuse. No significant difference was found for bone strength and structure. CAA leads to low bone mass due to a decrease in bone formation but with no destruction of bone architecture nor a decrease in bone strength. It is questionable whether this per se increases fracture risk. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  4. Traditional Nets Interfere with the Uptake of Long-Lasting Insecticidal Nets in the Peruvian Amazon: The Relevance of Net Preference for Achieving High Coverage and Use

    OpenAIRE

    Koen Peeters Grietens; Joan Muela Ribera; Veronica Soto; Alex Tenorio; Sarah Hoibak; Angel Rosas Aguirre; Elizabeth Toomer; Hugo Rodriguez; Alejandro Llanos Cuentas; Umberto D'Alessandro; Dionicia Gamboa; Annette Erhart

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: While coverage of long-lasting insecticide-treated nets (LLIN) has steadily increased, a growing number of studies report gaps between net ownership and use. We conducted a mixed-methods social science study assessing the importance of net preference and use after Olyset(R) LLINs were distributed through a mass campaign in rural communities surrounding Iquitos, the capital city of the Amazonian region of Peru. METHODS: The study was conducted in the catchment area of the Paujil a...

  5. Association between loss of bone mass due to short sleep and leptin-sympathetic nervous system activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriyama, Nagato; Inaba, Masaaki; Ozaki, Etsuko; Yoneda, Yutaro; Matsui, Daisuke; Hashiguchi, Kanae; Koyama, Teruhide; Iwai, Komei; Watanabe, Isao; Tanaka, Rika; Omichi, Chie; Mizuno, Shigeto; Kurokawa, Masao; Horii, Motoyuki; Niwa, Fumitoshi; Iwasa, Koichi; Yamada, Shinsuke; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki

    Sleep has been reported to be an important factor in bone metabolism, and sympathetic nervous system activity has been reported to regulate bone metabolism. In this study, we evaluated the association between sleep, sympathetic nervous system activity, and bone mass. The study subjects were 221 individuals (108 males; 113 females; mean age: 55.1±7.0years) divided into two groups: those who slept for less than 6h a day (short sleep [SS] group), and those who slept 6h or longer (normal sleep [NS] group). The groups were compared with regard to lifestyle, cortical bone thickness, cancellous bone density, bone metabolism markers, blood leptin levels, and sympathetic nervous system activity as evaluated by heart rate variability analysis. Significant differences were observed between the two groups in cortical bone thickness, blood TRACP-5b, and leptin levels. The L/H ratio (an index of sympathetic nervous system activity) was higher in the SS group than in the NS group. Significant negative correlations were observed between cortical bone thickness and both the L/H ratio and leptin levels, and a significant positive correlation was observed between the L/H ratio and leptin levels. Short sleep was associated with a decline in cortical bone thickness due to the promotion of bone resorption and sympathetic nervous system hyperactivity in the middle-aged group. Leptin levels and cortical bone thickness were found to be closely related, suggesting that cortical bone mass may be regulated via interaction with the leptin-sympathetic nervous system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Pro NET Best Practices

    CERN Document Server

    Ritchie, Stephen D

    2011-01-01

    Pro .NET Best Practices is a practical reference to the best practices that you can apply to your .NET projects today. You will learn standards, techniques, and conventions that are sharply focused, realistic and helpful for achieving results, steering clear of unproven, idealistic, and impractical recommendations. Pro .NET Best Practices covers a broad range of practices and principles that development experts agree are the right ways to develop software, which includes continuous integration, automated testing, automated deployment, and code analysis. Whether the solution is from a free and

  7. Getting to Net Zero

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-09-01

    The technology necessary to build net zero energy buildings (NZEBs) is ready and available today, however, building to net zero energy performance levels can be challenging. Energy efficiency measures, onsite energy generation resources, load matching and grid interaction, climatic factors, and local policies vary from location to location and require unique methods of constructing NZEBs. It is recommended that Components start looking into how to construct and operate NZEBs now as there is a learning curve to net zero construction and FY 2020 is just around the corner.

  8. Instant Lucene.NET

    CERN Document Server

    Heydt, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Filled with practical, step-by-step instructions and clear explanations for the most important and useful tasks. A step-by-step guide that helps you to index, search, and retrieve unstructured data with the help of Lucene.NET.Instant Lucene.NET How-to is essential for developers new to Lucene and Lucene.NET who are looking to get an immediate foundational understanding of how to use the library in their application. It's assumed you have programming experience in C# already, but not that you have experience with search techniques such as information retrieval theory (although there will be a l

  9. Structure and evolution of the drainage system of a Himalayan debris-covered glacier, and its relationship with patterns of mass loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benn, Douglas I.; Thompson, Sarah; Gulley, Jason; Mertes, Jordan; Luckman, Adrian; Nicholson, Lindsey

    2017-09-01

    We provide the first synoptic view of the drainage system of a Himalayan debris-covered glacier and its evolution through time, based on speleological exploration and satellite image analysis of Ngozumpa Glacier, Nepal. The drainage system has several linked components: (1) a seasonal subglacial drainage system below the upper ablation zone; (2) supraglacial channels, allowing efficient meltwater transport across parts of the upper ablation zone; (3) sub-marginal channels, allowing long-distance transport of meltwater; (4) perched ponds, which intermittently store meltwater prior to evacuation via the englacial drainage system; (5) englacial cut-and-closure conduits, which may undergo repeated cycles of abandonment and reactivation; and (6) a "base-level" lake system (Spillway Lake) dammed behind the terminal moraine. The distribution and relative importance of these elements has evolved through time, in response to sustained negative mass balance. The area occupied by perched ponds has expanded upglacier at the expense of supraglacial channels, and Spillway Lake has grown as more of the glacier surface ablates to base level. Subsurface processes play a governing role in creating, maintaining, and shutting down exposures of ice at the glacier surface, with a major impact on spatial patterns and rates of surface mass loss. Comparison of our results with observations on other glaciers indicate that englacial drainage systems play a key role in the response of debris-covered glaciers to sustained periods of negative mass balance.

  10. Benefits of group living include increased feeding efficiency and lower mass loss during desiccation in the social and inbreeding spider Stegodyphus dumicola.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bram eVanthournout

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Group living carries a price: it inherently entails increased competition for resources and reproduction, and may also be associated with mating among relatives, which carries costs of inbreeding. Nonetheless, group living and sociality is found in many animals, and understanding the direct and indirect benefits of cooperation that override the inherent costs remains a challenge in evolutionary ecology. Individuals in groups may benefit from more efficient management of energy or water reserves, for example in the form of reduced water or heat loss from groups of animals huddling, or through reduced energy demands afforded by shared participation in tasks. We investigated the putative benefits of group living in the permanently social spider Stegodyphus dumicola by comparing the effect of group size on standard metabolic rate, lipid/protein content as a body condition measure, feeding efficiency, per capita web investment and weight/water loss and survival during desiccation. Because energetic expenditure is temperature sensitive, some assays were performed under varying temperature conditions. We found that feeding efficiency increased with group size, and the rate of weight loss was higher in solitary individuals than in animals in groups of various sizes during desiccation. Interestingly, this was not translated into differences in survival or in standard metabolic rate. We did not detect any group size effects for other parameters, and group size effects did not co-vary with experimental temperature in a predictive manner. Both feeding efficiency and mass loss during desiccation are relevant ecological factors as the former results in lowered predator exposure time, and the latter benefits social spiders which occupy arid, hot environments.

  11. Net Zero Energy Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marszal, Anna Joanna; Bourrelle, Julien S.; Musall, Eike

    2010-01-01

    and identify possible renewable energy supply options which may be considered in calculations. Finally, the gap between the methodology proposed by each organisation and their respective national building code is assessed; providing an overview of the possible changes building codes will need to undergo......The international cooperation project IEA SHC Task 40 / ECBCS Annex 52 “Towards Net Zero Energy Solar Buildings”, attempts to develop a common understanding and to set up the basis for an international definition framework of Net Zero Energy Buildings (Net ZEBs). The understanding of such buildings...... parameters used in the calculations are discussed and the various renewable supply options considered in the methodologies are summarised graphically. Thus, the paper helps to understand different existing approaches to calculate energy balance in Net ZEBs, highlights the importance of variables selection...

  12. PhysioNet

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The PhysioNet Resource is intended to stimulate current research and new investigations in the study of complex biomedical and physiologic signals. It offers free...

  13. NetSig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Heiko; Lawrence, Michael S; Chouinard, Candace R

    2018-01-01

    Methods that integrate molecular network information and tumor genome data could complement gene-based statistical tests to identify likely new cancer genes; but such approaches are challenging to validate at scale, and their predictive value remains unclear. We developed a robust statistic (Net......Sig) that integrates protein interaction networks with data from 4,742 tumor exomes. NetSig can accurately classify known driver genes in 60% of tested tumor types and predicts 62 new driver candidates. Using a quantitative experimental framework to determine in vivo tumorigenic potential in mice, we found that Net......Sig candidates induce tumors at rates that are comparable to those of known oncogenes and are ten-fold higher than those of random genes. By reanalyzing nine tumor-inducing NetSig candidates in 242 patients with oncogene-negative lung adenocarcinomas, we find that two (AKT2 and TFDP2) are significantly amplified...

  14. Charge Transfer Dissociation (CTD) Mass Spectrometry of Peptide Cations: Study of Charge State Effects and Side-Chain Losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengfei; Jackson, Glen P.

    2017-07-01

    1+, 2+, and 3+ precursors of substance P and bradykinin were subjected to helium cation irradiation in a 3D ion trap mass spectrometer. Charge exchange with the helium cations produces a variety of fragment ions, the number and type of which are dependent on the charge state of the precursor ions. For 1+ peptide precursors, fragmentation is generally restricted to C-CO backbone bonds ( a and x ions), whereas for 2+ and 3+ peptide precursors, all three backbone bonds (C-CO, C-N, and N-Cα) are cleaved. The type of backbone bond cleavage is indicative of possible dissociation channels involved in CTD process, including high-energy, kinetic-based, and ETD-like pathways. In addition to backbone cleavages, amino acid side-chain cleavages are observed in CTD, which are consistent with other high-energy and radical-mediated techniques. The unique dissociation pattern and supplementary information available from side-chain cleavages make CTD a potentially useful activation method for the structural study of gas-phase biomolecules.

  15. Amphetamine and derivatives in natural weight loss pills and dietary supplements by capillary electrophoresis-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Vagner Bezerra; Daniel, Daniela; Singh, Melina; do Lago, Claudimir Lucio

    2016-12-01

    A capillary electrophoresis-tandem mass spectrometry (CE-MS/MS) method for amphetamine (AM), phentermine (PTM), methamphetamine (MAM), methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), and methylenedioxyethylamphetamine (MDEA) in commercial samples of homeopathic and phytotherapic medicines and dietary supplements is presented. The samples were submitted to a modified QuEChERS extraction procedure (at apparent pH 13) followed by electrophoretic separation in 0.1molL-1 formic acid electrolyte (pH 2.4) and detection by ESI-MS/MS. A polyvinyl alcohol coated capillary was employed to prevent the adsorption of the analytes to the capillary wall. The limits of detection and quantitation were from 0.02 to 0.06μgL-1 and from 0.06 to 0.21μgL-1, respectively, with recovery ranging from 85 to 123% and the standard deviations were not greater than 6.1%. In addition, the separation occurs in less than six minutes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. TideNet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-30

    query tide data sources in a desired geographic region of USA and its territories (Figure 1). Users can select a tide data source through the Google Map ...select data sources according to the desired geographic region. It uses the Google Map interface to display data from different sources. Recent...Coastal Inlets Research Program TideNet The TideNet is a web-based Graphical User Interface (GUI) that provides users with GIS mapping tools to

  17. Building Neural Net Software

    OpenAIRE

    Neto, João Pedro; Costa, José Félix

    1999-01-01

    In a recent paper [Neto et al. 97] we showed that programming languages can be translated on recurrent (analog, rational weighted) neural nets. The goal was not efficiency but simplicity. Indeed we used a number-theoretic approach to machine programming, where (integer) numbers were coded in a unary fashion, introducing a exponential slow down in the computations, with respect to a two-symbol tape Turing machine. Implementation of programming languages in neural nets turns to be not only theo...

  18. Interaction Nets in Russian

    OpenAIRE

    Salikhmetov, Anton

    2013-01-01

    Draft translation to Russian of Chapter 7, Interaction-Based Models of Computation, from Models of Computation: An Introduction to Computability Theory by Maribel Fernandez. "In this chapter, we study interaction nets, a model of computation that can be seen as a representative of a class of models based on the notion of 'computation as interaction'. Interaction nets are a graphical model of computation devised by Yves Lafont in 1990 as a generalisation of the proof structures of linear logic...

  19. Programming NET 35

    CERN Document Server

    Liberty, Jesse

    2009-01-01

    Bestselling author Jesse Liberty and industry expert Alex Horovitz uncover the common threads that unite the .NET 3.5 technologies, so you can benefit from the best practices and architectural patterns baked into the new Microsoft frameworks. The book offers a Grand Tour" of .NET 3.5 that describes how the principal technologies can be used together, with Ajax, to build modern n-tier and service-oriented applications. "

  20. ALMA Compact Array observations of the Fried Egg nebula: Evidence for large-scale asymmetric mass-loss from the yellow hypergiant IRAS 17163-3907.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallström, S H J; Lagadec, E; Muller, S; Black, J H; Cox, N L J; Galván-Madrid, R; Justtanont, K; Longmore, S; Olofsson, H; Oudmaijer, R D; Quintana-Lacaci, G; Szczerba, R; Vlemmings, W; van Winckel, H; Zijlstra, A

    2017-01-10

    Yellow hypergiants are rare and represent a fast evolutionary stage of massive evolved stars. That evolutionary phase is characterised by a very intense mass loss, the understanding of which is still very limited. Here we report ALMA Compact Array observations of a 50″-mosaic toward the Fried Egg nebula, around one of the few Galactic yellow hypergiants IRAS 17163-3907. The emission from the 12CO J=2-1 line, H30α recombination line, and continuum is imaged at a resolution of ~8″, revealing the morphology of the molecular environment around the star. The continuum emission is unresolved and peaks at the position of the star. The radio recombination line H30α shows unresolved emission at the star, with an approximately gaussian spectrum centered on a velocity of 21±3 km s-1 with a width of 57±6 km s-1. In contrast, the CO 2-1 emission is complex and decomposes into several components beyond the contamination from interstellar gas in the line of sight. The CO spectrum toward the star is a broad plateau, centered at the systemic velocity of +18 km s-1 and with an expansion velocity of 100±10 km s-1. Assuming isotropic and constant mass-loss, we estimate a mass-loss rate of 8±1.5 ×10-5 M⊙ yr-1. At a radius of 25″ from the star, we detect CO emission associated with the dust ring previously imaged by Herschel. The kinematics of this ring, however, is not consistent with an expanding shell, but show a velocity gradient of vsys ±20 km s-1. In addition, we find a puzzling bright feature radially connecting the star to the CO ring, at a velocity of +40 km s-1 relative to the star. This spur feature may trace a unidirectional ejection event from the star. Our ACA observations reveal the complex morphology around IRAS 17163 and illustrate the breakthroughs that ALMA will bring to the field of massive stellar evolution.

  1. Improved specificity of serum phosphatidylcholine detection based on side-chain losses during negative electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Shawn A; Jayasinge, Dushmanthi; Wang, Li; Goodenowe, Dayan B

    2016-11-01

    Many current tandem mass spectrometry (MS) methods for measuring phosphatidylcholines (PtdChos) rely only on precursor ion scanning of the common 184 m/z phosphocholine fragment with positive electrospray ionization (+ESI), and thus measure pools of PtdChos rather than specific isoforms. In this paper, we developed and compared an isotope dilution, tandem MS method capable of quantifying PtdChos based on specific fatty acid side-chains to the traditional 184 m/z method. The method is based on the detection of PtdCho ammonium formate (AmF) adduct as parent ions and fatty acid fragment daughter ions under negative electrospray ionization (-ESI). Accuracy, imprecision, and recovery were below 15 %, with acceptable linearity (R 2 > 0.99) up to 5 μg/mL. We used the method to analyze the distributions of PtdChos with common side-chain combinations among 60 subjects and showed that it was possible for two individuals to have the same PtdCho pool concentration based on detection of the 184 m/z fragment, but up to a fourfold difference in the levels of specific isoforms comprising the pool based on our method. We then compared the results of both methods across 572 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), Alzheimer's disease (AD), or no impairment (NI), which showed that statistically significant associations between specific PtdCho isoforms and AD were masked with the 184 m/z method. Our findings demonstrate the importance of isoform specificity for quantifying PtdChos, and suggest caution when interpreting analytical data based on pools of biomarkers.

  2. Iron sources used by the nonpathogenic lactic acid bacterium Lactobacillus sakei as revealed by electron energy loss spectroscopy and secondary-ion mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duhutrel, Philippe; Bordat, Christian; Wu, Ting-Di; Zagorec, Monique; Guerquin-Kern, Jean-Luc; Champomier-Vergès, Marie-Christine

    2010-01-01

    Lactobacillus sakei is a lactic acid bacterium naturally found on meat. Although it is generally acknowledged that lactic acid bacteria are rare species in the microbial world which do not have iron requirements, the genome sequence of L. sakei 23K has revealed quite complete genetic equipment dedicated to transport and use of this metal. Here, we aimed to investigate which iron sources could be used by this species as well as their role in the bacterium's physiology. Therefore, we developed a microscopy approach based on electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) analysis and nano-scale secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) in order to analyze the iron content of L. sakei cells. This revealed that L. sakei can use iron sources found in its natural ecosystem, myoglobin, hemoglobin, hematin, and transferrin, to ensure long-term survival during stationary phase. This study reveals that analytical image methods (EELS and SIMS) are powerful complementary tools for investigation of metal utilization by bacteria.

  3. Intermittent Fasting Promotes Fat Loss With Lean Mass Retention, Increased Hypothalamic Norepinephrine Content, and Increased Neuropeptide Y Gene Expression in Diet-Induced Obese Male Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotthardt, Juliet D; Verpeut, Jessica L; Yeomans, Bryn L; Yang, Jennifer A; Yasrebi, Ali; Roepke, Troy A; Bello, Nicholas T

    2016-02-01

    Clinical studies indicate alternate-day, intermittent fasting (IMF) protocols result in meaningful weight loss in obese individuals. To further understand the mechanisms sustaining weight loss by IMF, we investigated the metabolic and neural alterations of IMF in obese mice. Male C57/BL6 mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD; 45% fat) ad libitum for 8 weeks to promote an obese phenotype. Mice were divided into four groups and either maintained on ad libitum HFD, received alternate-day access to HFD (IMF-HFD), and switched to ad libitum low-fat diet (LFD; 10% fat) or received IMF of LFD (IMF-LFD). After 4 weeks, IMF-HFD (∼13%) and IMF-LFD (∼18%) had significantly lower body weights than the HFD. Body fat was also lower (∼40%-52%) in all diet interventions. Lean mass was increased in the IMF-LFD (∼12%-13%) compared with the HFD and IMF-HFD groups. Oral glucose tolerance area under the curve was lower in the IMF-HFD (∼50%), whereas the insulin tolerance area under the curve was reduced in all diet interventions (∼22%-42%). HPLC measurements of hypothalamic tissue homogenates indicated higher (∼55%-60%) norepinephrine (NE) content in the anterior regions of the medial hypothalamus of IMF compared with the ad libitum-fed groups, whereas NE content was higher (∼19%-32%) in posterior regions in the IMF-LFD group only. Relative gene expression of Npy in the arcuate nucleus was increased (∼65%-75%) in IMF groups. Our novel findings indicate that intermittent fasting produces alterations in hypothalamic NE and neuropeptide Y, suggesting the counterregulatory processes of short-term weight loss are associated with an IMF dietary strategy.

  4. The Effect of Bariatric Surgery Type on Lipid Profile: An Age, Sex, Body Mass Index and Excess Weight Loss Matched Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Filipe M; Oliveira, Joana; Preto, John; Saavedra, Ana; Costa, Maria M; Magalhães, Daniela; Lau, Eva; Bettencourt-Silva, Rita; Freitas, Paula; Varela, Ana; Carvalho, Davide

    2016-05-01

    Bariatric surgery improves lipid profile. A still unanswered question is whether this improvement is merely weight-dependent or also results from factors inherent to specificities of the bariatric procedure. We aimed to study lipid profile 1 year after bariatric surgery and compare its changes between the different procedures in patients matched for initial weight and weight loss. We retrospectively analysed patients submitted to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), adjustable gastric banding (AGB) or sleeve gastrectomy (SG) between 2010 and 2013. Patients were matched for age (±5 years), sex, pre-surgery body mass index (BMI) (±2 Kg/m(2)) and excess weight loss (EWL) (±5%). Baseline and 1-year lipid profile, its variation and percentage of variation was compared between surgeries. We analysed 229 patients: 72 pairs RYGB-AGB, 47 pairs RYGB-SG and 33 pairs AGB-SG. The median age was 41 (35-52) years and 11.8% were male. Pre-operative BMI was 44.0 ± 4.6 and 32.1 ± 4.4 Kg/m(2) at 1 year. EWL at 1 year was 64.2 ± 18.9%. There were no differences in baseline lipid profile between patients submitted to different types of bariatric surgery. At 1 year, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) and triglycerides (TG) improved similarly with all surgeries. Total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) at 1 year decreased significantly more in patients submitted to RYGB than in weight-matched patients undergoing AGB or SG. RYGB is the only bariatric surgery that reduces TC and LDL in age-, sex-, BMI- and EWL-matched patients. All three procedures improved TG and HDL similarly when the confounding effect of weight loss is eliminated.

  5. A Self-consistent Model for a Full Cycle of Recurrent Novae—Wind Mass-Loss Rate and X-Ray Luminosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Mariko; Saio, Hideyuki; Hachisu, Izumi

    2017-04-01

    An unexpectedly slow evolution in the pre-optical-maximum phase was suggested in the very short recurrence period of nova M31N 2008-12a. To obtain reasonable nova light curves we have improved our calculation method by consistently combining optically thick wind solutions of hydrogen-rich envelopes with white dwarf (WD) structures calculated by a Henyey-type evolution code. The wind mass-loss rate is properly determined with high accuracy. We have calculated light curve models for 1.2 M ⊙ and 1.38 M ⊙ WDs with mass accretion rates corresponding to recurrence periods of 10 yr and 1 yr, respectively. The outburst lasts 590/29 days, in which the pre-optical-maximum phase is 82/16 days, for 1.2/1.38 M ⊙, respectively. Optically thick winds start at the end of the X-ray flash and cease at the beginning of the supersoft X-ray phase. We also present supersoft X-ray light curves including a prompt X-ray flash and later supersoft X-ray phase.

  6. An altered hormonal profile and elevated rate of bone loss are associated with low bone mass in professional horse-racing jockeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Eimear; McGoldrick, Adrian; Davenport, Colin; Kelleher, Grainne; Byrne, Brendan; Tormey, William; Smith, Diarmuid; Warrington, Giles D

    2012-09-01

    Horse-racing jockeys are a group of weight-restricted athletes, who have been suggested as undertaking rapid and extreme weight cycling practices in order to comply with stipulated body-mass standards. The aim of this study was to examine bone mass, turnover and endocrine function in jockeys and to compare this group with age, gender and body mass index matched controls. Twenty male professional jockeys and 20 healthy male controls participated. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry scans and early morning fasting blood and urine samples were used to measure bone mass, turnover and a hormonal profile. Total body bone mineral density (BMD) was significantly lower in jockeys (1.143 ± 0.05 vs. 1.27 ± 0.06 g cm(-3), p < 0.01). Bone resorptive activity was elevated in the jockey group as indicated by significantly higher urinary NTx/creatinine (76.94 ± 29.52 vs. 55.9 ± 13.9 nmol mmol(-1), p < 0.01), resulting in a significantly negative uncoupling index between bone resorption and formation. Sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) levels were significantly higher in jockeys (41.21 ± 9.77 vs. 28.24 ± 9.98 nmol L(-1), p < 0.01) with a lower percentage of bioavailable testosterone (48.89 ± 7.38 vs. 59.18 ± 6.74 %, p < 0.01). SHBG and insulin-like growth factor-1 were independent predictors of total body and femoral neck BMD, respectively (p < 0.05). In conclusion, it appears that professional jockeys have an elevated rate of bone loss and reduced bone mass that appears to be associated with disrupted hormonal activity. It is likely that this may have occurred in response to the chronic weight cycling habitually experienced by this group.

  7. Intrauterine stress induces bone loss in adult offspring of C3H/HeJ mice having high bone mass phenotype but not C57BL/6J mice with low bone mass phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raygorodskaya, M; Gabet, Y; Shochat, C; Kobyliansky, E; Torchinsky, A; Karasik, D

    2016-06-01

    In this study we examined to what extent and how genetics may modify osteoporosis risk arising due to environmental stresses which act during the antenatal period of life and have the potential to induce bone loss in adulthood. C57Bl/6J (C57) and C3H/HeJ (C3H) mice were used as a model system. The mice were exposed to a single injection of 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-AZA) on day 10 of pregnancy and the structure and bone mineral density (BMD) of the femur and 3rd lumbar vertebra of 3- and 6-month-old male and female offspring were evaluated by micro-computed tomography (μCT). Besides, we also attempted to evaluate whether 5-AZA affects the expression of some osteogenic genes in the embryonic limb buds. The main observation of this study is that 5-AZA-induced loss of bone quality was registered in 6-mo-old C3H offspring but not in their C57 counterparts. We also observed that C57 and C3H embryos may differ in their response to 5-AZA-induced detrimental stimuli: whereas 5-AZA treated C3H embryos exhibited a decreased expression of Col1a1, C57 embryos exhibit a decreased expression of Sox9. Overall, our study, by thorough characterization of bone homeostasis in 3- and 6-month-old offspring of 5-AZA-exposed C57 and C3H mice, allows hypothesizing that the adaptive response to antenatal insults may be stronger in offspring inherently exhibiting a low bone mass phenotype than in offspring inherently exhibiting a high bone mass phenotype. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Quantifying the loss of methane through secondary gas mass transport (or 'slip') from a micro-porous membrane contactor applied to biogas upgrading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Andrew; Jefferson, Bruce; McAdam, Ewan J

    2013-07-01

    Secondary gas transport during the separation of a binary gas with a micro-porous hollow fibre membrane contactor (HMFC) has been studied for biogas upgrading. In this application, the loss or 'slip' of the secondary gas (methane) during separation is a known concern, specifically since methane possesses the intrinsic calorific value. Deionised (DI) water was initially used as the physical solvent. Under these conditions, carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) absorption were dependent upon liquid velocity (V(L)). Whilst the highest CO2 flux was recorded at high V(L), selectivity towards CO2 declined due to low residence times and a diminished gas-side partial pressure, and resulted in slip of approximately 5.2% of the inlet methane. Sodium hydroxide was subsequently used as a comparative chemical absorption solvent. Under these conditions, CO2 mass transfer increased by increasing gas velocity (VG) which is attributed to the excess of reactive hydroxide ions present in the solvent, and the fast conversion of dissolved CO2 to carbonate species reinitiating the concentration gradient at the gas-liquid interface. At high gas velocities, CH4 slip was reduced to 0.1% under chemical conditions. Methane slip is therefore dependent upon whether the process is gas phase or liquid phase controlled, since methane mass transport can be adequately described by Henry's law within both physical and chemical solvents. The addition of an electrolyte was found to further retard CH4 absorption via the salting out effect. However, their applicability to physical solvents is limited since electrolytic concentration similarly impinges upon the solvents' capacity for CO2. This study illustrates the significance of secondary gas mass transport, and furthermore demonstrates that gas-phase controlled systems are recommended where greater selectivity is required. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Chronologically scheduled snacking with high-protein products within the habitual diet in type-2 diabetes patients leads to a fat mass loss: a longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez J Alfredo

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity is the most relevant overnutrition disease worldwide and is associated to different metabolic disorders such as insulin resistance and type-2 diabetes. Low glycemic load foods and diets and moderately high protein intake have been shown to reduce body weight and fat mass, exerting also beneficial effects on LDL-cholesterol, triglyceride concentrations, postprandial glucose curve and HDL-cholesterol levels. The present study aimed at studying the potential functionality of a series of low glycemic index products with moderately high protein content, as possible coadjuvants in the control of type-2 diabetes and weight management following a chronologically planned snacking offer (morning and afternoon. Methods The current trial followed a single group, sequential, longitudinal design, with two consecutive periods of 4 weeks each. A total of 17 volunteers participated in the study. The first period was a free living period, with volunteers' habitual ad libitum dietary pattern, while the second period was a free-living period with structured meal replacements at breakfast, morning snack and afternoon snack, which were exchanged by specific products with moderately high protein content and controlled low glycemic index, following a scheduled temporal consumption. Blood extractions were performed at the beginning and at the end of each period (free-living and intervention. Parameters analysed were: fasting glucose, insulin, glycosylated hemoglobin, total-, HDL- and LDL-cholesterol, triglyceride, C - reactive protein and Homocysteine concentrations. Postprandial glucose and insulin were also measured. Anthropometrical parameters were monitored each 2 weeks during the whole study. Results A modest but significant (p = 0.002 reduction on body weight (1 kg was observed during the intervention period, mainly due to the fat mass loss (0.8 kg, p = 0.02. This weight reduction was observed without apparently associated changes in

  10. La plataforma .NET

    OpenAIRE

    Fornas Estrada, Miquel

    2008-01-01

    L'aparició de la plataforma .NET Framework ha suposat un canvi molt important en la forma de crear i distribuir aplicacions, degut a que incorpora una sèrie d'innovacions tècniques i productives que simplifiquen molt les tasques necessàries per desenvolupar un projecte. La aparición de la plataforma. NET Framework ha supuesto un cambio muy importante en la forma de crear y distribuir aplicaciones, debido a que incorpora una serie de innovaciones técnicas y productivas que simplifican mucho...

  11. Biological Petri Nets

    CERN Document Server

    Wingender, E

    2011-01-01

    It was suggested some years ago that Petri nets might be well suited to modeling metabolic networks, overcoming some of the limitations encountered by the use of systems employing ODEs (ordinary differential equations). Much work has been done since then which confirms this and demonstrates the usefulness of this concept for systems biology. Petri net technology is not only intuitively understood by scientists trained in the life sciences, it also has a robust mathematical foundation and provides the required degree of flexibility. As a result it appears to be a very promising approach to mode

  12. Petri Nets-Applications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 9. Petri Nets - Applications. Y Narahari. General Article Volume 4 Issue 9 September 1999 pp 44-52. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/004/09/0044-0052. Author Affiliations. Y Narahari ...

  13. Safety nets or straitjackets?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilsøe, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Does regulation of working hours at national and sector level impose straitjackets, or offer safety nets to employees seeking working time flexibility? This article compares legislation and collective agreements in the metal industries of Denmark, Germany and the USA. The industry has historically...

  14. Coloured Petri Nets

    CERN Document Server

    Jensen, Kurt

    2009-01-01

    Coloured Petri Nets (CPN) is a graphical language for modelling and validating concurrent and distributed systems, and other systems in which concurrency plays a major role. This book introduces the constructs of the CPN modelling language and presents the related analysis methods. It provides a comprehensive road map for the practical use of CPN.

  15. Boom Booom Net Radio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimshaw, Mark Nicholas; Yong, Louisa; Dobie, Ian

    1999-01-01

    of an existing Internet radio station; Boom Booom Net Radio. Whilst necessity dictates some use of technology-related terminology, wherever possible we have endeavoured to keep such jargon to a minimum and to either explain it in the text or to provide further explanation in the appended glossary....

  16. Game Theory .net.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shor, Mikhael

    2003-01-01

    States making game theory relevant and accessible to students is challenging. Describes the primary goal of GameTheory.net is to provide interactive teaching tools. Indicates the site strives to unite educators from economics, political and computer science, and ecology by providing a repository of lecture notes and tests for courses using…

  17. Coloured Petri Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kurt; Kristensen, Lars Michael

    Coloured Petri Nets (CPN) is a graphical language for modelling and validating concurrent and distributed systems, and other systems in which concurrency plays a major role. The development of such systems is particularly challenging because of inherent intricacies like possible nondeterminism...

  18. Do psychological factors help to reduce body mass in obesity or is it vice versa? Selected psychological aspects and effectiveness of the weight-loss program in the obese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Bąk-Sosnowska

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the strength and direction of the correlation between cognitive appraisal, emotional state, social functioning and the effectiveness of a weight-loss program undertaken by obese subjects. The out-patient weight-loss program encompassed 150 obese women. Assessments were carried out at four time points: at the start of the weight-loss program and then after a 5%, 10% and a 15% reduction of the initial body mass. The research tools used were: a survey, the Situation Appraisal Questionnaire (SAQ, the Emotional State Questionnaire (ESQ, and the Q-Sort Social Functioning Questionnaire. The cognitive appraisal, emotional state and social functioning of the study group changed significantly (P<0.001. Significantly more individuals with a 15% body mass reduction, as compared with individuals with no body mass reduction, had an early obesity onset, i.e. at the age of <10 years old (P<0.001. Significantly more individuals with no body mass reduction, compared with individuals with a 15% reduction, had a later obesity onset, i.e. between the ages of 20 and 30 (P<0.001 and between 50 and 60 (P<0.001. Significantly more individuals with a 15% body mass reduction, compared with individuals with no mass reduction, had previously experienced the jojo effect (P<0.001 and had successfully lost weight (P<0.001. Significantly more individuals with no body mass reduction, compared with individuals with a15% reduction, had a history of unsuccessful attempts at reducing body mass (P<0.001. We conclude that the attitude of obese patients towards a weight-loss program is not a deciding factor for its effectiveness. As body mass reduces, the attitude improves.

  19. A High Resolution/Accurate Mass (HRAM) Data-Dependent MS3 Neutral Loss Screening, Classification, and Relative Quantitation Methodology for Carbonyl Compounds in Saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dator, Romel; Carrà, Andrea; Maertens, Laura; Guidolin, Valeria; Villalta, Peter W.; Balbo, Silvia

    2017-04-01

    Reactive carbonyl compounds (RCCs) are ubiquitous in the environment and are generated endogenously as a result of various physiological and pathological processes. These compounds can react with biological molecules inducing deleterious processes believed to be at the basis of their toxic effects. Several of these compounds are implicated in neurotoxic processes, aging disorders, and cancer. Therefore, a method characterizing exposures to these chemicals will provide insights into how they may influence overall health and contribute to disease pathogenesis. Here, we have developed a high resolution accurate mass (HRAM) screening strategy allowing simultaneous identification and relative quantitation of DNPH-derivatized carbonyls in human biological fluids. The screening strategy involves the diagnostic neutral loss of hydroxyl radical triggering MS3 fragmentation, which is only observed in positive ionization mode of DNPH-derivatized carbonyls. Unique fragmentation pathways were used to develop a classification scheme for characterizing known and unanticipated/unknown carbonyl compounds present in saliva. Furthermore, a relative quantitation strategy was implemented to assess variations in the levels of carbonyl compounds before and after exposure using deuterated d 3 -DNPH. This relative quantitation method was tested on human samples before and after exposure to specific amounts of alcohol. The nano-electrospray ionization (nano-ESI) in positive mode afforded excellent sensitivity with detection limits on-column in the high-attomole levels. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a method using HRAM neutral loss screening of carbonyl compounds. In addition, the method allows simultaneous characterization and relative quantitation of DNPH-derivatized compounds using nano-ESI in positive mode.

  20. Development of net cage acoustic alarm system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Shih-Wei; Wei, Ruey-Chang

    2004-05-01

    In recent years, the fishery production has been drastically decreased in Taiwan, mainly due to overfishing and coast pollution; therefore, fishermen and corporations are encouraged by government to invest in ocean net cage aquaculture. However, the high-price fishes in the net cage are often coveted, so incidences of fish stealing and net cage breaking were found occasionally, which cause great economical loss. Security guards or a visual monitoring system has limited effect, especially in the night when these intrusions occur. This study is based on acoustic measure to build a net cage alarm system, which includes the sonobuoy and monitor station on land. The sonobuoy is a passive sonar that collects the sounds near the net cage and transmits the suspected signal to the monitor station. The signals are analyzed by the control program on the personal computer in the monitor station, and the alarms at different stages could be activated by the sound levels and durations of the analyzed data. To insure long hours of surveillance, a solar panel is applied to charge the battery, and a photodetector is used to activate the system.

  1. Shock-powered light curves of luminous red novae as signatures of pre-dynamical mass-loss in stellar mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Brian D.; Pejcha, Ondřej

    2017-11-01

    Luminous red novae (LRN) are a class of optical transients believed to originate from the mergers of binary stars, or `common envelope' events. Their light curves often show secondary maxima, which cannot be explained in the previous models of thermal energy diffusion or hydrogen recombination without invoking multiple independent shell ejections. We propose that double-peaked light curves are a natural consequence of a collision between dynamically ejected fast shell and pre-existing equatorially focused material, which was shed from the binary over many orbits preceding the dynamical event. The fast shell expands freely in the polar directions, powering the initial optical peak through cooling envelope emission. Radiative shocks from the collision in the equatorial plane power the secondary light-curve peak on the radiative diffusion time-scale of the deeper layers, similar to luminous Type IIn supernovae and some classical novae. Using a detailed 1D analytic model, informed by complementary 3D hydrodynamical simulations, we show that shock-powered emission can explain the observed range of peak time-scales and luminosities of the secondary peaks in LRN for realistic variations in the binary parameters and fraction of the binary mass ejected. The dense shell created by the radiative shocks in the equatorial plane provides an ideal location for dust nucleation consistent with the inferred aspherical geometry of dust in LRN. For giant stars, the ejecta forms dust when the shock-powered luminosity is still high, which could explain the infrared transients recently discovered by Spitzer. Our results suggest that pre-dynamical mass-loss is common if not ubiquitous in stellar mergers, providing insight into the instabilities responsible for driving the binary merger.

  2. Quantitative and qualitative assessment of anchorage loss during en-masse retraction with indirectly loaded miniscrews in patients with bimaxillary protrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monga, Nitika; Kharbanda, Om Prakash; Samrit, Vilas

    2016-08-01

    This study provides vital insight in assessing anchorage loss when miniscrews are indirectly loaded. The study sample comprised 18 patients with bimaxillary protrusion (14 girls, 4 boys; mean age, 17.3 ± 4.6 years) selected from a database of 89 patients treated with miniscrews. All subjects who were selected required extraction of all first premolars and maximum anchorage. After initial leveling and aligning, miniscrews were placed between the first molar and the second premolar in all 4 quadrants and loaded by the indirect method at 3 weeks after placement with 200-g nickel-titanium alloy closed-coil springs for en-masse retraction. Mean treatment duration was 29.7 ± 6.8 months. Pretreatment and posttreatment lateral cephalograms were analyzed to measure the amount of anchorage loss, incisor retraction, and the incisors' angular change in reference to the pterygoid vertical reference line and were evaluated by the structural superimposition method. The ratio of incisor retraction to molar protraction was 4.2 in the maxilla and 4.7 in the mandible. The first molars showed mean extrusion of 0.20 mm in the maxilla and 0.57 mm in the mandible; these were statistically insignificant. The mean angular change of the first molars was -2.43° in the maxilla and -0.03° in the mandible. The mean anchorage loss in reference to the pterygoid vertical was 1.3 mm in the maxilla and 1.1 mm in the mandible; these were statistically significant. Structural superimpositions showed mean change in molar position of 0.83 mm in the maxilla and 0.87 mm in the mandible, and 5.77 mm in the maxillary incisor and 5.43 mm in the mandibular incisor. These results were compared with the direct anchorage method reported in the literature. Indirect miniscrew anchorage can be a viable alternative to direct anchorage. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Gaseous nitrogen losses from field plots grown with pea (Pisum sativum L.) or spring barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) estimated by 15N mass balance and acetylene inhibition techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, F.; Jensen, E.S.

    1992-01-01

    In a mass balance of N-15-labelled nitrate added to soil grown with pea or barley, denitrification estimates using the acetylene-inhibition technique were compared with unaccounted for N-15. During the growth season of 1989, which was drier than average, N losses due to denitrification estimated...... of the plants. Volatilization of ammonia from the aerial parts of the plants is a possible explanation of the observed loss. An estimation of denitrification relying only on the N-15 mass balance would have resulted in an overestimation of denitrification....

  4. Protection of total body water content and absence of hyperthermia despite 2% body mass loss ('voluntary dehydration') in soldiers drinking ad libitum during prolonged exercise in cool environmental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolte, Heinrich W; Noakes, Timothy D; van Vuuren, Bernard

    2011-11-01

    The extent to which humans need to replace fluid losses during exercise remains contentious despite years of focused research. The primary objective was to evaluate ad libitum drinking on hydration status to determine whether body mass loss can be used as an accurate surrogate for changes in total body water (TBW) during exercise. Data were collected during a 14.6-km route march (wet bulb globe temperature of 14.1°C ). 18 subjects with an average age of 26 ± 2.5 (SD) years participated. Their mean ad libitum total fluid intake was 2.1 ± 1.4 litres during the exercise. Predicted sweat rate was 1.289 ± 0.530 l/h. There were no significant changes (p>0.05) in TBW, urine specific gravity or urine osmolality despite an average body mass loss (ploss during exercise includes losses other than water or there is an endogenous body water source that is released during exercise not requiring replacement during exercise, or both. Ad libitum water replacement between 65% and 70% of sweat losses maintained safe levels of hydration during the experiment. The finding that TBW was protected by ad libitum drinking despite approximately 2% body mass loss suggests that the concept of 'voluntary dehydration' may require revision.

  5. A Closer Earth and the Faint Young Sun Paradox: Modification of the Laws of Gravitation or Sun/Earth Mass Losses?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Iorio

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Given a solar luminosity LAr = 0.75L0 at the beginning of the Archean 3.8 Ga ago, where L0 is the present-day one, if the heliocentric distance, r, of the Earth was rAr = 0.956r0, the solar irradiance would have been as large as IAr = 0.82I0. It would have allowed for a liquid ocean on the terrestrial surface, which, otherwise, would have been frozen, contrary to the empirical evidence. By further assuming that some physical mechanism subsequently displaced the Earth towards its current distance in such a way that the irradiance stayed substantially constant over the entire Archean from 3.8 to 2.5 Ga ago, a relative recession per year as large as r˙/r ≈3.4 × 10−11 a−1 would have been required. Although such a figure is roughly of the same order of magnitude of the value of the Hubble parameter 3.8 Ga ago HAr = 1.192H0 = 8.2 × 10−11 a−1, standard general relativity rules out cosmological explanations for the hypothesized Earth’s recession rate. Instead, a class of modified theories of gravitation with nonminimal coupling between the matter and the metric naturally predicts a secular variation of the relative distance of a localized two-body system, thus yielding a potentially viable candidate to explain the putative recession of the Earth’s orbit. Another competing mechanism of classical origin that could, in principle, allow for the desired effect is the mass loss, which either the Sun or the Earth itself may have experienced during the Archean. On the one hand, this implies that our planet should have lost 2% of its present mass in the form of eroded/evaporated hydrosphere. On the other hand, it is widely believed that the Sun could have lost mass at an enhanced rate, due to a stronger solar wind in the past for not more than ≈ 0.2–0.3 Ga.

  6. Probabilistic calibration of a Greenland Ice Sheet model using spatially-resolved synthetic observations: toward projections of ice mass loss with uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, W.; Applegate, P. J.; Haran, M.; Keller, K.

    2014-03-01

    Computer models of ice sheet behavior are important tools for projecting future sea level rise. The simulated modern ice sheets generated by these models differ markedly as input parameters are varied. To ensure accurate ice sheet mass loss projections, these parameters must be constrained using observational data. Which model parameter combinations make sense, given observations? Our method assigns probabilities to parameter combinations based on how well the model reproduces the Greenland Ice Sheet profile. We improve on the previous state of the art by accounting for spatial information, and by carefully sampling the full range of realistic parameter combinations, using statistically rigorous methods. Specifically, we estimate the joint posterior probability density function of model parameters using Gaussian process-based emulation and calibration. This method is an important step toward probabilistic projections of ice sheet contributions to sea level rise, in that it uses observational data to learn about parameter values. This information can, in turn, be used to make projections while taking into account various sources of uncertainty, including parametric uncertainty, data-model discrepancy, and spatial correlation in the error structure. We demonstrate the utility of our method using a perfect model experiment, which shows that many different parameter combinations can generate similar modern ice sheet profiles. This result suggests that the large divergence of projections from different ice sheet models is partly due to parametric uncertainty. Moreover, our method enables insight into ice sheet processes represented by parameter interactions in the model.

  7. Probabilistic calibration of a Greenland Ice Sheet model using spatially resolved synthetic observations: toward projections of ice mass loss with uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, W.; Applegate, P. J.; Haran, M.; Keller, K.

    2014-09-01

    Computer models of ice sheet behavior are important tools for projecting future sea level rise. The simulated modern ice sheets generated by these models differ markedly as input parameters are varied. To ensure accurate ice sheet mass loss projections, these parameters must be constrained using observational data. Which model parameter combinations make sense, given observations? Our method assigns probabilities to parameter combinations based on how well the model reproduces the Greenland Ice Sheet profile. We improve on the previous state of the art by accounting for spatial information and by carefully sampling the full range of realistic parameter combinations, using statistically rigorous methods. Specifically, we estimate the joint posterior probability density function of model parameters using Gaussian process-based emulation and calibration. This method is an important step toward calibrated probabilistic projections of ice sheet contributions to sea level rise, in that it uses data-model fusion to learn about parameter values. This information can, in turn, be used to make projections while taking into account various sources of uncertainty, including parametric uncertainty, data-model discrepancy, and spatial correlation in the error structure. We demonstrate the utility of our method using a perfect model experiment, which shows that many different parameter combinations can generate similar modern ice sheet profiles. This result suggests that the large divergence of projections from different ice sheet models is partly due to parametric uncertainty. Moreover, our method enables insight into ice sheet processes represented by parameter interactions in the model.

  8. Iron Sources Used by the Nonpathogenic Lactic Acid Bacterium Lactobacillus sakei as Revealed by Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy and Secondary-Ion Mass Spectrometry▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duhutrel, Philippe; Bordat, Christian; Wu, Ting-Di; Zagorec, Monique; Guerquin-Kern, Jean-Luc; Champomier-Vergès, Marie-Christine

    2010-01-01

    Lactobacillus sakei is a lactic acid bacterium naturally found on meat. Although it is generally acknowledged that lactic acid bacteria are rare species in the microbial world which do not have iron requirements, the genome sequence of L. sakei 23K has revealed quite complete genetic equipment dedicated to transport and use of this metal. Here, we aimed to investigate which iron sources could be used by this species as well as their role in the bacterium's physiology. Therefore, we developed a microscopy approach based on electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) analysis and nano-scale secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) in order to analyze the iron content of L. sakei cells. This revealed that L. sakei can use iron sources found in its natural ecosystem, myoglobin, hemoglobin, hematin, and transferrin, to ensure long-term survival during stationary phase. This study reveals that analytical image methods (EELS and SIMS) are powerful complementary tools for investigation of metal utilization by bacteria. PMID:19933352

  9. Optimizing sampling design to deal with mist-net avoidance in Amazonian birds and bats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Tiago Marques

    Full Text Available Mist netting is a widely used technique to sample bird and bat assemblages. However, captures often decline with time because animals learn and avoid the locations of nets. This avoidance or net shyness can substantially decrease sampling efficiency. We quantified the day-to-day decline in captures of Amazonian birds and bats with mist nets set at the same location for four consecutive days. We also evaluated how net avoidance influences the efficiency of surveys under different logistic scenarios using re-sampling techniques. Net avoidance caused substantial declines in bird and bat captures, although more accentuated in the latter. Most of the decline occurred between the first and second days of netting: 28% in birds and 47% in bats. Captures of commoner species were more affected. The numbers of species detected also declined. Moving nets daily to minimize the avoidance effect increased captures by 30% in birds and 70% in bats. However, moving the location of nets may cause a reduction in netting time and captures. When moving the nets caused the loss of one netting day it was no longer advantageous to move the nets frequently. In bird surveys that could even decrease the number of individuals captured and species detected. Net avoidance can greatly affect sampling efficiency but adjustments in survey design can minimize this. Whenever nets can be moved without losing netting time and the objective is to capture many individuals, they should be moved daily. If the main objective is to survey species present then nets should still be moved for bats, but not for birds. However, if relocating nets causes a significant loss of netting time, moving them to reduce effects of shyness will not improve sampling efficiency in either group. Overall, our findings can improve the design of mist netting sampling strategies in other tropical areas.

  10. Optimizing sampling design to deal with mist-net avoidance in Amazonian birds and bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, João Tiago; Ramos Pereira, Maria J; Marques, Tiago A; Santos, Carlos David; Santana, Joana; Beja, Pedro; Palmeirim, Jorge M

    2013-01-01

    Mist netting is a widely used technique to sample bird and bat assemblages. However, captures often decline with time because animals learn and avoid the locations of nets. This avoidance or net shyness can substantially decrease sampling efficiency. We quantified the day-to-day decline in captures of Amazonian birds and bats with mist nets set at the same location for four consecutive days. We also evaluated how net avoidance influences the efficiency of surveys under different logistic scenarios using re-sampling techniques. Net avoidance caused substantial declines in bird and bat captures, although more accentuated in the latter. Most of the decline occurred between the first and second days of netting: 28% in birds and 47% in bats. Captures of commoner species were more affected. The numbers of species detected also declined. Moving nets daily to minimize the avoidance effect increased captures by 30% in birds and 70% in bats. However, moving the location of nets may cause a reduction in netting time and captures. When moving the nets caused the loss of one netting day it was no longer advantageous to move the nets frequently. In bird surveys that could even decrease the number of individuals captured and species detected. Net avoidance can greatly affect sampling efficiency but adjustments in survey design can minimize this. Whenever nets can be moved without losing netting time and the objective is to capture many individuals, they should be moved daily. If the main objective is to survey species present then nets should still be moved for bats, but not for birds. However, if relocating nets causes a significant loss of netting time, moving them to reduce effects of shyness will not improve sampling efficiency in either group. Overall, our findings can improve the design of mist netting sampling strategies in other tropical areas.

  11. Food Safety Nets:

    OpenAIRE

    Haggblade, Steven; Diallo, Boubacar; Staatz, John; Theriault, Veronique; Traoré, Abdramane

    2013-01-01

    Food and social safety nets have a history as long as human civilization. In hunter gatherer societies, food sharing is pervasive. Group members who prove unlucky in the short run, hunting or foraging, receive food from other households in anticipation of reciprocal consideration at a later time (Smith 1988). With the emergence of the first large sedentary civilizations in the Middle East, administrative systems developed specifically around food storage and distribution. The ancient Egyptian...

  12. Net technical assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Wegmann, David G.

    1989-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. The present and near term military balance of power between the U.S. and the Soviet Union can be expressed in a variety of net assessments. One can examine the strategic nuclear balance, the conventional balance in Europe, the maritime balance, and many others. Such assessments are essential not only for policy making but for arms control purposes and future force structure planning. However, to project the future military balance, on...

  13. Using WordNet for Building WordNets

    CERN Document Server

    Farreres, X; Farreres, Xavier; Rodriguez, Horacio; Rigau, German

    1998-01-01

    This paper summarises a set of methodologies and techniques for the fast construction of multilingual WordNets. The English WordNet is used in this approach as a backbone for Catalan and Spanish WordNets and as a lexical knowledge resource for several subtasks.

  14. Proof nets for lingusitic analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moot, R.C.A.

    2002-01-01

    This book investigates the possible linguistic applications of proof nets, redundancy free representations of proofs, which were introduced by Girard for linear logic. We will adapt the notion of proof net to allow the formulation of a proof net calculus which is soundand complete for the

  15. Teaching Tennis for Net Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Bryce

    1989-01-01

    A program for teaching tennis to beginners, NET (Net Easy Teaching) is described. The program addresses three common needs shared by tennis students: active involvement in hitting the ball, clearing the net, and positive reinforcement. A sample lesson plan is included. (IAH)

  16. Net4Care Ecosystem Website

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik Bærbak; Hansen, Klaus Marius; Rasmussen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    is a tele-monitoring scenario in which Net4Care clients are deployed in a gateway in private homes. Medical devices then connect to these gateways and transmit their observations to a Net4Care server. In turn the Net4Care server creates valid clinical HL7 documents, stores them in a national XDS repository...

  17. Master Robotic Net

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Lipunov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of the MASTER-Net project is to produce a unique fast sky survey with all sky observed over a single night down to a limiting magnitude of 19-20. Such a survey will make it possible to address a number of fundamental problems: search for dark energy via the discovery and photometry of supernovae (including SNIa, search for exoplanets, microlensing effects, discovery of minor bodies in the Solar System, and space-junk monitoring. All MASTER telescopes can be guided by alerts, and we plan to observe prompt optical emission from gamma-ray bursts synchronously in several filters and in several polarization planes.

  18. Art/Net/Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christian Ulrik; Lindstrøm, Hanne

    2006-01-01

    The seminar Art|Net|Work deals with two important changes in our culture. On one side, the network has become essential in the latest technological development. The Internet has entered a new phase, Web 2.0, including the occurrence of as ‘Wiki’s’, ‘Peer-2-Peer’ distribution, user controlled...... the praxis of the artist. We see different kinds of interventions and activism (including ‘hacktivism’) using the network as a way of questioning the invisible rules that govern public and semi-public spaces. Who ‘owns’ them? What kind of social relationships do they generate? On what principle...

  19. Helminth.net: expansions to Nematode.net and an introduction to Trematode.net

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, John; Rosa, Bruce A.; Ozersky, Philip; Hallsworth-Pepin, Kymberlie; Zhang, Xu; Bhonagiri-Palsikar, Veena; Tyagi, Rahul; Wang, Qi; Choi, Young-Jun; Gao, Xin; McNulty, Samantha N.; Brindley, Paul J.; Mitreva, Makedonka

    2015-01-01

    Helminth.net (http://www.helminth.net) is the new moniker for a collection of databases: Nematode.net and Trematode.net. Within this collection we provide services and resources for parasitic roundworms (nematodes) and flatworms (trematodes), collectively known as helminths. For over a decade we have provided resources for studying nematodes via our veteran site Nematode.net (http://nematode.net). In this article, (i) we provide an update on the expansions of Nematode.net that hosts omics data from 84 species and provides advanced search tools to the broad scientific community so that data can be mined in a useful and user-friendly manner and (ii) we introduce Trematode.net, a site dedicated to the dissemination of data from flukes, flatworm parasites of the class Trematoda, phylum Platyhelminthes. Trematode.net is an independent component of Helminth.net and currently hosts data from 16 species, with information ranging from genomic, functional genomic data, enzymatic pathway utilization to microbiome changes associated with helminth infections. The databases’ interface, with a sophisticated query engine as a backbone, is intended to allow users to search for multi-factorial combinations of species’ omics properties. This report describes updates to Nematode.net since its last description in NAR, 2012, and also introduces and presents its new sibling site, Trematode.net. PMID:25392426

  20. NETS FOR PEACH PROTECTED CULTIVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelia Schettini

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to investigate the radiometric properties of coloured nets used to protect a peach cultivation. The modifications of the solar spectral distribution, mainly in the R and FR wavelength band, influence plant photomorphogenesis by means of the phytochrome and cryptochrome. The phytochrome response is characterized in terms of radiation rate in the red wavelengths (R, 600-700 nm to that in the farred radiation (FR, 700-800 nm, i.e. the R/FR ratio. The effects of the blue radiation (B, 400-500 nm is investigated by the ratio between the blue radiation and the far-red radiation, i.e. the B/FR ratio. A BLUE net, a RED net, a YELLOW net, a PEARL net, a GREY net and a NEUTRAL net were tested in Bari (Italy, latitude 41° 05’ N. Peach trees were located in pots inside the greenhouses and in open field. The growth of the trees cultivated in open field was lower in comparison to the growth of the trees grown under the nets. The RED, PEARL, YELLOW and GREY nets increased the growth of the trees more than the other nets. The nets positively influenced the fruit characteristics, such as fruit weight and flesh firmness.

  1. Which nets are being used: factors associated with mosquito net use in Amhara, Oromia and Southern Nations, Nationalities and Peoples' Regions of Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosher Aryc W

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There has been recent large scale-up of malaria control interventions in Ethiopia where transmission is unstable. While household ownership of long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLIN has increased greatly, there are concerns about inadequate net use. This study aimed to investigate factors associated with net use at two time points, before and after mass distribution of nets. Methods Two cross sectional surveys were carried out in 2006 and 2007 in Amhara, Oromia and SNNP regions. The latter was a sub-sample of the national Malaria Indicator Survey (MIS 3R. Each survey wave used multi-stage cluster random sampling with 25 households per cluster (224 clusters with 5,730 households in Baseline 2006 and 245 clusters with 5,910 households in MIS 3R 2007. Net ownership was assessed by visual inspection while net utilization was reported as use of the net the previous night. This net level analysis was restricted to households owning at least one net of any type. Logistic regression models of association between net use and explanatory variables including net type, age, condition, cost and other household characteristics were undertaken using generalized linear latent and mixed models (GLLAMM. Results A total of 3,784 nets in 2,430 households were included in the baseline 2006 analysis while the MIS 3R 2007 analysis comprised 5,413 nets in 3,328 households. The proportion of nets used the previous night decreased from 85.1% to 56.0% between baseline 2006 and MIS 3R 2007, respectively. Factors independently associated with increased proportion of nets used were: LLIN net type (at baseline 2006; indoor residual spraying (at MIS 3R 2007; and increasing wealth index at both surveys. At both baseline 2006 and MIS 3R 2007, reduced proportion of nets used was independently associated with increasing net age, increasing damage of nets, increasing household net density, and increasing altitude (>2,000 m. Conclusion This study identified

  2. Energy and momentum analysis of the deployment dynamics of nets in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botta, Eleonora M.; Sharf, Inna; Misra, Arun K.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, the deployment dynamics of nets in space is investigated through a combination of analysis and numerical simulations. The considered net is deployed by ejecting several corner masses and thanks to momentum and energy transfer from those to the innermost threads of the net. In this study, the net is modeled with a lumped-parameter approach, and assumed to be symmetrical, subject to symmetrical initial conditions, and initially slack. The work-energy and momentum conservation principles are employed to carry out centroidal analysis of the net, by conceptually partitioning the net into a system of corner masses and the net proper and applying the aforementioned principles to the corresponding centers of mass. The analysis provides bounds on the values that the velocity of the center of mass of the corner masses and the velocity of the center of mass of the net proper can individually attain, as well as relationships between these and different energy contributions. The analytical results allow to identify key parameters characterizing the deployment dynamics of nets in space, which include the ratio between the mass of the corner masses and the total mass, the initial linear momentum, and the direction of the initial velocity vectors. Numerical tools are employed to validate and interpret further the analytical observations. Comparison of deployment results with and without initial velocity of the net proper suggests that more complete and lasting deployment can be achieved if the corner masses alone are ejected. A sensitivity study is performed for the key parameters identified from the energy/momentum analysis, and the outcome establishes that more lasting deployment and safer capture (i.e., characterized by higher traveled distance) can be achieved by employing reasonably lightweight corner masses, moderate shooting angles, and low shooting velocities. A comparison with current literature on tether-nets for space debris capture confirms overall

  3. The equivalency between logic Petri workflow nets and workflow nets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Yu, ShuXia; Du, YuYue

    2015-01-01

    Logic Petri nets (LPNs) can describe and analyze batch processing functions and passing value indeterminacy in cooperative systems. Logic Petri workflow nets (LPWNs) are proposed based on LPNs in this paper. Process mining is regarded as an important bridge between modeling and analysis of data mining and business process. Workflow nets (WF-nets) are the extension to Petri nets (PNs), and have successfully been used to process mining. Some shortcomings cannot be avoided in process mining, such as duplicate tasks, invisible tasks, and the noise of logs. The online shop in electronic commerce in this paper is modeled to prove the equivalence between LPWNs and WF-nets, and advantages of LPWNs are presented.

  4. Mars MetNet Mission Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harri, Ari-Matti; Aleksashkin, Sergei; Arruego, Ignacio; Schmidt, Walter; Genzer, Maria; Vazquez, Luis; Haukka, Harri

    2015-04-01

    New kind of planetary exploration mission for Mars is under development in collaboration between the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI), Lavochkin Association (LA), Space Research Institute (IKI) and Institutio Nacional de Tecnica Aerospacial (INTA). The Mars MetNet mission is based on a new semi-hard landing vehicle called MetNet Lander (MNL). The scientific payload of the Mars MetNet Precursor [1] mission is divided into three categories: Atmospheric instruments, Optical devices and Composition and structure devices. Each of the payload instruments will provide significant insights in to the Martian atmospheric behavior. The key technologies of the MetNet Lander have been qualified and the electrical qualification model (EQM) of the payload bay has been built and successfully tested. 1. MetNet Lander The MetNet landing vehicles are using an inflatable entry and descent system instead of rigid heat shields and parachutes as earlier semi-hard landing devices have used. This way the ratio of the payload mass to the overall mass is optimized. The landing impact will burrow the payload container into the Martian soil providing a more favorable thermal environment for the electronics and a suitable orientation of the telescopic boom with external sensors and the radio link antenna. It is planned to deploy several tens of MNLs on the Martian surface operating at least partly at the same time to allow meteorological network science. 2. Scientific Payload The payload of the two MNL precursor models includes the following instruments: Atmospheric instruments: 1. MetBaro Pressure device 2. MetHumi Humidity device 3. MetTemp Temperature sensors Optical devices: 1. PanCam Panoramic 2. MetSIS Solar irradiance sensor with OWLS optical wireless system for data transfer 3. DS Dust sensor The descent processes dynamic properties are monitored by a special 3-axis accelerometer combined with a 3-axis gyrometer. The data will be sent via auxiliary beacon antenna throughout the

  5. Coloured Petri Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kurt; Kristensen, Lars Michael

    studies that illustrate the practical use of CPN modelling and validation for design, specification, simulation, verification and implementation in various application domains. Their presentation primarily aims at readers interested in the practical use of CPN. Thus all concepts and constructs are first......Coloured Petri Nets (CPN) is a graphical language for modelling and validating concurrent and distributed systems, and other systems in which concurrency plays a major role. The development of such systems is particularly challenging because of inherent intricacies like possible nondeterminism...... and the immense number of possible execution sequences. In this textbook, Jensen and Kristensen introduce the constructs of the CPN modelling language and present the related analysis methods in detail. They also provide a comprehensive road map for the practical use of CPN by showcasing selected industrial case...

  6. Hearing loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decreased hearing; Deafness; Loss of hearing; Conductive hearing loss; Sensorineural hearing loss; Presbycusis ... Symptoms of hearing loss may include: Certain sounds seeming too loud Difficulty following conversations when two or more people are talking ...

  7. A novel Dual Amylin and Calcitonin Receptor Agonist (DACRA), KBP-089, induces weight loss through a reduction in fat, but not lean mass, while improving food preference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gydesen, Sofie; Hjuler, Sara Toftegaard; Freving, Zenia

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose Obesity and associated co-morbidities, such as type 2 diabetes and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, are major health challenges – hence, development of weight loss therapies with the ability to reduce the co-morbidities is key. Experimental Approach The effect of the dual...... rats were treated with KBP-089 s.c., at 0.625, 1.25, 2.5 µg∙kg-1 and vehicle resulting in a dose-dependent and sustained ~17% weight loss by the 2.5 µg∙kg-1 (p ... a sustained weight loss, leading to improved metabolic parameters including food preference, and these are beyond those observed simply by diet-induced weight loss....

  8. Linear Logic on Petri Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, Uffe Henrik; Winskel, Glynn

    This article shows how individual Petri nets form models of Girard's intuitionistic linear logic. It explores questions of expressiveness and completeness of linear logic with respect to this interpretation. An aim is to use Petri nets to give an understanding of linear logic and give some apprai...

  9. Reference Guide Microsoft.NET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee M van der; Verspaij GJ; Rosbergen S; IMP; NMD

    2003-01-01

    Developers, administrators and managers can get more understanding of the .NET technology with this report. They can also make better choices how to use this technology. The report describes the results and conclusions of a study of the usability for the RIVM of this new generation .NET development

  10. Net neutrality and audiovisual services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijk, N.; Nikoltchev, S.

    2011-01-01

    Net neutrality is high on the European agenda. New regulations for the communication sector provide a legal framework for net neutrality and need to be implemented on both a European and a national level. The key element is not just about blocking or slowing down traffic across communication

  11. Neutral losses of sodium benzoate and benzoic acid in the fragmentation of the [M + Na]+ ions of methoxyfenozide and tebufenozide via intramolecular rearrangement in electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Yunfeng; Gao, Guanwei; Shen, Shanshan; Liu, Xin; Lu, Chengyin

    2017-02-15

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) tandem mass spectrometry can be applied to determine structural information about organic compounds. The [M + Na]+ ion is one of the major precursor ions in ESI mass spectrometry, but its fragmentation mechanism study is still insufficient. This study reveals the interesting fragmentation reactions of the [M + Na]+ ions of methoxyfenozide and tebufenozide. The fragmentations of the [M + Na]+ , [M + Li]+ , and [M + H]+ ions of methoxyfenozide and tebufenozide were studied using a hybrid quadrupole-orbitrap mass spectrometer and an ion trap mass spectrometer. A hydrogen/deuterium (H/D)-exchange experiment in the amide group of methoxyfenozide allowed for the confirmation of the fragmentation mechanism. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed for a further understanding of the fragmentation mechanism of the [M + Na]+ ion of methoxyfenozide. Neutral losses of sodium benzoate and benzoic acid in the fragmentation of the [M + Na]+ ions of methoxyfenozide and tebufenozide were observed as the major fragmentation pathways. In contrast, similar fragmentations were not observed or minor pathways in the fragmentation of the [M + Li]+ and [M + H]+ ions of methoxyfenozide and tebufenozide. In addition, a minor product ion resulting from loss of NaOH was identified, which was the first reported example in the fragmentation of sodiated compounds in mass spectrometry. Losses of sodium benzoate and benzoic acid in the fragmentation of the [M + Na]+ ions of methoxyfenozide and tebufenozide are proposed to be formed through an intramolecular rearrangement reaction, which is supported by DFT calculations. An H/D-exchange experiment confirms that the carboxyl hydrogen of benzoic acid and the hydrogen of NaOH exclusively derive from the amide hydrogen of the precursor ion. This study enriches our knowledge on the Na+ -induced fragmentation reactions. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John

  12. A Small Universal Petri Net

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry A. Zaitsev

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A universal deterministic inhibitor Petri net with 14 places, 29 transitions and 138 arcs was constructed via simulation of Neary and Woods' weakly universal Turing machine with 2 states and 4 symbols; the total time complexity is exponential in the running time of their weak machine. To simulate the blank words of the weakly universal Turing machine, a couple of dedicated transitions insert their codes when reaching edges of the working zone. To complete a chain of a given Petri net encoding to be executed by the universal Petri net, a translation of a bi-tag system into a Turing machine was constructed. The constructed Petri net is universal in the standard sense; a weaker form of universality for Petri nets was not introduced in this work.

  13. Energy performance of windows based on the net energy gain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Svend; Kragh, Jesper; Laustsen, Jacob Birck

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents a new method to set up energy performance requirements and energy classes for windows of all dimensions and configurations. The net energy gain of windows is the solar gain minus the heat loss integrated over the heating season. The net energy gain can be calculated for one...... orientation or averaged over different orientations. The averaged value may be used for energy labeling of windows of standard size. Requirements in building codes may also be based on the net energy gain instead of the thermal transmittance of the window. The size and the configuration of the window, i.......e. number of glazing units, have a very large effect on the net energy gain. Therefore the energy labeling or the requirements based on the standard size may not give valid information on the energy performance of windows of non-standard size. The paper presents a method to set up requirements and classes...

  14. Calculation Tool for Determining the Net Energy Gain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Jacob Birck; Svendsen, Svend

    2002-01-01

    for windows are presented. Based on these methods a program has been developed that determines the heat loss coefficient, U, and the total solar energy transmittance, g, for windows compounded of specific window components selected from a database. The program calculates the net energy gain for specific....... A proper and direct way to describe the energy performance of windows is by the net energy gain, E, which expresses the energy balance for the window. It is defined as the solar heat gain transmitted in minus the heat loss transmitted out through the window during the heating season. The net energy gain...... is dependent on both the U-values and the g-values. Beyond this it is dependent on the orientation of the windows and the climate and the actual period. This makes it difficult to choose the glazings and windows that are optimal with regard to energy performance in a given case. These facts have aroused a need...

  15. High-level Petri Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    High-level Petri nets are now widely used in both theoretical analysis and practical modelling of concurrent systems. The main reason for the success of this class of net models is that they make it possible to obtain much more succinct and manageable descriptions than can be obtained by means...... of low-level Petri nets - while, on the other hand, they still offer a wide range of analysis methods and tools. The step from low-level nets to high-level nets can be compared to the step from assembly languages to modern programming languages with an elaborated type concept. In low-level nets...... there is only one kind of token and this means that the state of a place is described by an integer (and in many cases even by a boolean). In high-level nets each token can carry a complex information/data - which, e.g., may describe the entire state of a process or a data base. Today most practical...

  16. A high whey protein-, leucine-, and vitamin D-enriched supplement preserves muscle mass during intentional weight loss in obese older adults: a double-blind randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verreijen, Amely M; Verlaan, Sjors; Engberink, Mariëlle F; Swinkels, Sophie; de Vogel-van den Bosch, Johan; Weijs, Peter J M

    2015-02-01

    Intentional weight loss in obese older adults is a risk factor for muscle loss and sarcopenia. The objective was to examine the effect of a high whey protein-, leucine-, and vitamin D-enriched supplement on muscle mass preservation during intentional weight loss in obese older adults. We included 80 obese older adults in a double-blind randomized controlled trial. During a 13-wk weight loss program, all subjects followed a hypocaloric diet (-600 kcal/d) and performed resistance training 3×/wk. Subjects were randomly allocated to a high whey protein-, leucine-, and vitamin D-enriched supplement including a mix of other macro- and micronutrients (150 kcal, 21 g protein; 10×/wk, intervention group) or an isocaloric control. The primary outcome was change in appendicular muscle mass. The secondary outcomes were body composition, handgrip strength, and physical performance. Data were analyzed by using ANCOVA and mixed linear models with sex and baseline value as covariates. At baseline, mean ± SD age was 63 ± 5.6 y, and body mass index (in kg/m(2)) was 33 ± 4.4. During the trial, protein intake was 1.11 ± 0.28 g · kg body weight(-1) · d(-1) in the intervention group compared with 0.85 ± 0.24 g · kg body weight(-1) · d(-1) in the control group (P weight (-3.4 ± 3.6 kg and -2.8 ± 2.8 kg; both P obese older adults during a hypocaloric diet and resistance exercise program and might therefore reduce the risk of sarcopenia. This trial was registered at the Dutch Trial Register (http://www.trialregister.nl) as NTR2751. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  17. Contribution of Soil Fauna to Foliar Litter-Mass Loss in Winter in an Ecotone between Dry Valley and Montane Forest in the Upper Reaches of the Minjiang River.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Peng

    Full Text Available Litter decomposition during winter can provide essential nutrients for plant growth in the subsequent growing season, which plays important role in preventing the expansion of dry areas and maintaining the stability of ecotone ecosystems. However, limited information is currently available on the contributions of soil fauna to litter decomposition during winter in such ecosystems. Therefore, a field experiment that included litterbags with two different mesh sizes (0.04 mm and 3 mm was conducted to investigate the contribution of soil fauna to the loss of foliar litter mass in winter from November 2013 to April 2014 along the upper reaches of the Minjiang River. Two litter types of the dominant species were selected in each ecosystem: cypress (Cupressus chengiana and oak (Quercus baronii in ecotone; cypress (Cupressus chengiana and clovershrub (Campylotropis macrocarpa in dry valley; and fir (Abies faxoniana and birch (Betula albosinensis in montane forest. Over one winter incubation, foliar litter lost 6.0%-16.1%, 11.4%-26.0%, and 6.4%-8.5% of initial mass in the ecotone, dry valley and montane forest, respectively. Soil fauna showed obvious contributions to the loss of foliar litter mass in all of the ecosystems. The highest contribution (48.5%-56.8% was observed in the ecotone, and the lowest contribution (0.4%-25.8% was observed in the montane forest. Compared with other winter periods, thawing period exhibited higher soil fauna contributions to litter mass loss in ecotone and dry valley, but both thawing period and freezing period displayed higher soil fauna contributions in montane forest. Statistical analysis demonstrated that the contribution of soil fauna was significantly correlated with temperature and soil moisture during the winter-long incubation. These results suggest that temperature might be the primary control factor in foliar litter decomposition, but more active soil fauna in the ecotone could contribute more in litter

  18. Contribution of Soil Fauna to Foliar Litter-Mass Loss in Winter in an Ecotone between Dry Valley and Montane Forest in the Upper Reaches of the Minjiang River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yan; Yang, Wanqin; Li, Jun; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Chuan; Yue, Kai; Wu, Fuzhong

    2015-01-01

    Litter decomposition during winter can provide essential nutrients for plant growth in the subsequent growing season, which plays important role in preventing the expansion of dry areas and maintaining the stability of ecotone ecosystems. However, limited information is currently available on the contributions of soil fauna to litter decomposition during winter in such ecosystems. Therefore, a field experiment that included litterbags with two different mesh sizes (0.04 mm and 3 mm) was conducted to investigate the contribution of soil fauna to the loss of foliar litter mass in winter from November 2013 to April 2014 along the upper reaches of the Minjiang River. Two litter types of the dominant species were selected in each ecosystem: cypress (Cupressus chengiana) and oak (Quercus baronii) in ecotone; cypress (Cupressus chengiana) and clovershrub (Campylotropis macrocarpa) in dry valley; and fir (Abies faxoniana) and birch (Betula albosinensis) in montane forest. Over one winter incubation, foliar litter lost 6.0%-16.1%, 11.4%-26.0%, and 6.4%-8.5% of initial mass in the ecotone, dry valley and montane forest, respectively. Soil fauna showed obvious contributions to the loss of foliar litter mass in all of the ecosystems. The highest contribution (48.5%-56.8%) was observed in the ecotone, and the lowest contribution (0.4%-25.8%) was observed in the montane forest. Compared with other winter periods, thawing period exhibited higher soil fauna contributions to litter mass loss in ecotone and dry valley, but both thawing period and freezing period displayed higher soil fauna contributions in montane forest. Statistical analysis demonstrated that the contribution of soil fauna was significantly correlated with temperature and soil moisture during the winter-long incubation. These results suggest that temperature might be the primary control factor in foliar litter decomposition, but more active soil fauna in the ecotone could contribute more in litter decomposition and

  19. Long-term ketogenic diet causes glucose intolerance and reduced β- and α-cell mass but no weight loss in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellenbroek, Johanne H; van Dijck, Laura; Töns, Hendrica A; Rabelink, Ton J; Carlotti, Françoise; Ballieux, Bart E P B; de Koning, Eelco J P

    2014-01-01

    High-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diets (KD) are used for weight loss and for treatment of refractory epilepsy. Recently, short-time studies in rodents have shown that, besides their beneficial effect on body weight, KD lead to glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. However, the long-term

  20. Pro asynchronous programming with .NET

    CERN Document Server

    Blewett, Richard; Ltd, Rock Solid Knowledge

    2014-01-01

    Pro Asynchronous Programming with .NET teaches the essential skill of asynchronous programming in .NET. It answers critical questions in .NET application development, such as: how do I keep my program responding at all times to keep my users happy how do I make the most of the available hardware how can I improve performanceIn the modern world, users expect more and more from their applications and devices, and multi-core hardware has the potential to provide it. But it takes carefully crafted code to turn that potential into responsive, scalable applications.With Pro Asynchronous Programming

  1. Conformal Nets II: Conformal Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Arthur; Douglas, Christopher L.; Henriques, André

    2017-08-01

    Conformal nets provide a mathematical formalism for conformal field theory. Associated to a conformal net with finite index, we give a construction of the `bundle of conformal blocks', a representation of the mapping class groupoid of closed topological surfaces into the category of finite-dimensional projective Hilbert spaces. We also construct infinite-dimensional spaces of conformal blocks for topological surfaces with smooth boundary. We prove that the conformal blocks satisfy a factorization formula for gluing surfaces along circles, and an analogous formula for gluing surfaces along intervals. We use this interval factorization property to give a new proof of the modularity of the category of representations of a conformal net.

  2. Petri Net Tool Overview 1986

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kurt; Feldbrugge, Frits

    1987-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the characteristics of all currently available net based tools. It is a compilation of information provided by tool authors or contact persons. A concise one page overview is provided as well....

  3. Understanding Net Zero Energy Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salom, Jaume; Widén, Joakim; Candanedo, José

    2011-01-01

    Although several alternative definitions exist, a Net-Zero Energy Building (Net ZEB) can be succinctly described as a grid-connected building that generates as much energy as it uses over a year. The “net-zero” balance is attained by applying energy conservation and efficiency measures...... and by incorporating renewable energy systems. While based on annual balances, a complete description of a Net ZEB requires examining the system at smaller time-scales. This assessment should address: (a) the relationship between power generation and building loads and (b) the resulting interaction with the power grid....... This paper presents and categorizes quantitative indicators suitable to describe both aspects of the building’s performance. These indicators, named LMGI - Load Matching and Grid Interaction indicators, are easily quantifiable and could complement the output variables of existing building simulation tools...

  4. PolicyNet Publication System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The PolicyNet Publication System project will merge the Oracle-based Policy Repository (POMS) and the SQL-Server CAMP system (MSOM) into a new system with an Oracle...

  5. KM3NeT

    CERN Multimedia

    KM3NeT is a large scale next-generation neutrino telescope located in the deep waters of the Mediterranean Sea, optimized for the discovery of galactic neutrino sources emitting in the TeV energy region.

  6. Net Neutrality: Background and Issues

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gilroy, Angele A

    2006-01-01

    .... The move to place restrictions on the owners of the networks that compose and provide access to the Internet, to ensure equal access and nondiscriminatory treatment, is referred to as "net neutrality...

  7. Petri Nets in Cryptographic Protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crazzolara, Federico; Winskel, Glynn

    2001-01-01

    A process language for security protocols is presented together with a semantics in terms of sets of events. The denotation of process is a set of events, and as each event specifies a set of pre and postconditions, this denotation can be viewed as a Petri net. By means of an example we illustrate...... how the Petri-net semantics can be used to prove security properties....

  8. The Economics of Net Neutrality

    OpenAIRE

    Hahn, Robert W.; Wallsten, Scott

    2006-01-01

    This essay examines the economics of "net neutrality" and broadband Internet access. We argue that mandating net neutrality would be likely to reduce economic welfare. Instead, the government should focus on creating competition in the broadband market by liberalizing more spectrum and reducing entry barriers created by certain local regulations. In cases where a broadband provider can exercise market power the government should use its antitrust enforcement authority to police anticompetitiv...

  9. Geodetic measurements reveal similarities between post–Last Glacial Maximum and present-day mass loss from the Greenland ice sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Shfaqat Abbas; Sasgen, Ingo; Bevis, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Accurate quantification of the millennial-scale mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) and its contribution to global sea-level rise remain challenging because of sparse in situ observations in key regions. Glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) is the ongoing response of the solid Earth to ice...

  10. Establishment of age- and sex-adjusted reference data for hand bone mass and investigation of hand bone loss in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørnbjerg, Lykke Midtbøll; Østergaard, Mikkel; Jensen, Trine

    2016-01-01

    . In this study, we aimed to: 1) establish reference values for normal hand bone mass (bone mineral density measured by digital x-ray radiogrammetry (DXR-BMD)); and 2) examine whether HBL is normalised in rheumatoid arthritis patients during treatment with tumour necrosis factor alpha inhibitors (TNFI). METHODS...

  11. A novel dual amylin and calcitonin receptor agonist, KBP-089, induces weight loss through a reduction in fat, but not lean mass, while improving food preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gydesen, Sofie; Hjuler, Sara Toftegaard; Freving, Zenia; Andreassen, Kim Vietz; Sonne, Nina; Hellgren, Lars I; Karsdal, Morten Asser; Henriksen, Kim

    2017-04-01

    Obesity and associated co-morbidities, such as type 2 diabetes and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, are major health challenges. Hence, there is an important need to develop weight loss therapies with the ability to reduce the co-morbidities. The effect of the dual amylin and calcitonin receptor agonist (DACRA), KBP-089, on body weight, glucose homeostasis and fatty acid accumulation in liver and muscle tissue and on food preference was investigated. Furthermore, we elucidated weight-independent effects of KBP-089 using a weight-matched group. Rats fed a high-fat diet were treated, s.c., with KBP-089 0.625, 1.25, 2.5 μg·kg-1 or vehicle. KB-089 induced in a dose-dependent and sustained weight loss (~17% by 2.5 μg·kg-1 ). Moreover, KBP-089 reduced fat depot size and reduced lipid accumulation in muscle and liver. In Zucker Diabetic Fatty rats, KBP-089 improved glucose homeostasis through improved insulin action. To obtain a weight-matched group, significantly less food was offered (9% less than in the KBP-089 group). Weight matching led to improved glucose homeostasis by reducing plasma insulin; however, these effect were inferior compared to those of KBP-089. In the food preference test, rats fed a normal diet obtained 74% of their calories from chocolate. KBP-089 reduced total caloric intake and induced a relative increase in chow consumption while drastically reducing chocolate consumption compared with vehicle. The novel DACRA, KBP-089, induces a sustained weight loss, leading to improved metabolic parameters including food preference, and these are beyond those observed simply by diet-induced weight loss. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  12. Lifestyle patterns associated with diet, physical activity, body mass index and amount of recent weight loss in a sample of successful weight losers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuglestad, Paul T; Jeffery, Robert W; Sherwood, Nancy E

    2012-06-26

    Research suggests that the interaction between biological susceptibility and environmental risk is complex and that further study of behavioral typologies related to obesity and associated behaviors is important to further elucidate the nature of obesity risk and how to approach it for intervention. The current investigation aims to identify phenotypical lifestyle patterns that might begin to unify our understanding of obesity and obesity related behaviors. Individuals who had recently lost substantial weight of their own initiative completed measures of intentional weight control behaviors and lifestyle behaviors associated with eating. These behaviors were factor analyzed and the resulting factors were examined in relation to BMI, recent weight loss, diet, and physical activity. Four meaningful lifestyle and weight control behavioral factors were identified- regularity of meals, TV related viewing and eating, intentional strategies for weight control, and eating away from home. Greater meal regularity was associated with greater recent weight loss and greater fruit and vegetable intake. Greater TV related viewing and eating was associated with greater BMI and greater fat and sugar intake. More eating away from home was related to greater fat and sugar intake, lower fruit and vegetable intake, and less physical activity. Greater use of weight control strategies was most consistently related to better weight, diet, and physical activity outcomes. Compared to the individual behavior variables, the identified lifestyle patterns appeared to be more reliably related to diet, physical activity, and weight (both BMI and recent weight loss). These findings add to the growing body of literature identifying behavioral patterns related to obesity and the overall weight control strategy of eating less and exercising more. In future research it will be important to replicate these behavioral factors (over time and in other samples) and to examine how changes in these factors

  13. A mass shooting at Port Arthur, Tasmania, Australia: a study of its impact on early pregnancy losses using a conception time-based methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, R G; Dean, J; Heller, G Z; Leader, L R

    2015-11-01

    Does an acute calamity in a community cause early miscarriage and is this association the same for male and female fetuses? Estimated losses of 29.5% of first trimester pregnancies in the affected region could be associated with an acute calamity, with no statistically significant difference in estimated losses by fetal sex. There are very few studies on the impact of a calamity on early pregnancy loss and its differential effects on male and female fetuses. A decline in the human sex ratio at birth associated with the events of 9/11 in New York has been documented. This is a retrospective descriptive study of birth register data in Tasmania, Australia, from 1991 to 1997, covering the period in which the calamity occurred. The register contains data on all pregnancies that proceeded to >20 weeks gestation. The conception date was calculated by subtracting gestational age from birth date. We estimated that 40 318 pregnancies were conceived in the period 1991-1996 inclusive. These were aggregated to 4-weekly blocks classified by region and sex. The acute calamity was at Port Arthur, Tasmania, Australia. On 28 April 1996, a gunman opened fire on visitors and staff in a tourist cafe. A very stressful 20 h period, ended with 35 people dead and 22 injured. A negative binomial regression model was used to assess the association between this calamity and pregnancy loss. This loss is evidenced by a shortfall in the registration of pregnancies that were in their first trimester at the time of the calamity. We estimated a shortfall of 29.5% or 229 registered pregnancies among those in the first trimester at the time of the calamity (P < 0.001), in the region surrounding the calamity site. There was no sex effect in this shortfall (P = 0.911). There was no corresponding shortfall in other parts of Tasmania (P = 0.349). The study is descriptive and cannot produce causal inferences. These first trimester miscarriages are estimated statistically and it is understood that

  14. Chapter 27: Mortality of Marbled Murrelets in Gill Nets in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harry R. Carter; Michael L.C. McAllister; M.E. Pete Isleib

    1995-01-01

    Mortality of Marbled Murrelets (Brachyramphus marmoratus) due to accidental capture in gill nets is one of the major threats to murrelet populations. Gill-net mortality of murrelets throughout their range has been occurring for several decades and probably has contributed to declines in populations, in conjunction with loss of nesting habitat and...

  15. 29 CFR 4204.13 - Net income and net tangible assets tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Net income and net tangible assets tests. 4204.13 Section....13 Net income and net tangible assets tests. (a) General. The criteria under this section are that either— (1) Net income test. The purchaser's average net income after taxes for its three most recent...

  16. Bondi Mass in Scalar Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ching-Yuan

    2003-07-01

    The asymptotically flat space-time with scalar fields is studied. It shows that the concepts of Bondi mass, Bondi mass loss, etc., are also applicable to other fields, although they were originally defined by gravity. The generating formulae of Bondi mass loss and angular momentum loss by a dynamics Hamiltonian over a hyperb oloid are given by the linearised theory.

  17. Impact of insecticide treated mosquito nets and low dose monthly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lymphatic filariasis (LF) is among the poverty related neglected tropical diseases earmarked for elimination using mass drug administration (MDA) strategy. Additional use of insecticide treated mosquito nets (ITNs) might enhance elimination of LF infection. Between August 1998 and July 1999, all individuals aged ≥ 8 ...

  18. Effect of a high protein diet and/or resistance exercise on the preservation of fat free mass during weight loss in overweight and obese older adults: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verreijen, Amely M; Engberink, Mariëlle F; Memelink, Robert G; van der Plas, Suzanne E; Visser, Marjolein; Weijs, Peter J M

    2017-02-06

    Intentional weight loss in obese older adults is a risk factor for accelerated muscle mass loss. We investigated whether a high protein diet and/or resistance exercise preserves fat free mass (FFM) during weight loss in overweight and obese older adults. We included 100 overweight and obese adults (55-80 year) in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) with a 2 × 2 factorial design and intention-to-treat analysis. During a 10-week weight loss program all subjects followed a hypocaloric diet. Subjects were randomly allocated to either a high protein (1.3 g/kg body weight) or normal protein diet (0.8 g/kg), with or without a resistance exercise program 3 times/week. FFM was assessed by air displacement plethysmography. At baseline, mean (±SD) BMI was 32 ± 4 kg/m 2 . During intervention, protein intake was 1.13 ± 0.35 g/kg in the high protein groups vs. 0.98 ± 0.29 in the normal protein groups, which reflects a 16.3 ± 5.2 g/d higher protein intake in the high protein groups. Both high protein diet and exercise did not significantly affect change in body weight, FFM and fat mass (FM). No significant protein*exercise interaction effect was observed for FFM. However, within-group analysis showed that high protein in combination with exercise significantly increased FFM (+0.6 ± 1.3 kg, p = 0.011). A high protein diet, though lower than targeted, did not significantly affect changes in FFM during modest weight loss in older overweight and obese adults. There was no significant interaction between the high protein diet and resistance exercise for change in FFM. However, only the group with the combined intervention of high protein diet and resistance exercise significantly increased in FFM. Dutch Trial Register, number NTR4556, date 05-01-2014.

  19. Tendency toward Weight Loss among Iranian Adolescent Girls: Study on Perceived Weight, Ideal Body Mass Index and Attitude toward Eating Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malihe Farid

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Adolescents’ perception of their weight is a strong factor in shaping dietary habits and weight control and management. Among non-overweight and overweight adolescents, both overestimation and underestimation of weight status are associated with harmful effects. This study aimed to examine the relationship between perceived weight and attitude toward eating disorders among adolescent girls living in Karaj, Iran. Materials and Methods Involving a two-stage random sampling, this cross-sectional study was conducted on a total of 537 high school girls 14-18 years of age living in Karaj. The Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26 was employed to screen for attitude toward eating disorders. Also, anthropometric measurements (weight and height, perceived and the ideal weights of the participants were assessed.  Results The average age of girls participating in the study was 16.12±1.20. According to the results, 70% of girls had normal body mass index. It was found that the ideal weight of 55% of the girls in the normal body mass index group fell under the lower than normal boundary. Moreover, the prevalence of eating disorders was estimated to be 23.6%. The attitude toward eating disorder was significantly correlated with body mass index of participants and their self-concept (P

  20. THE EFFECTS OF SPRAY-CHILLING ASSOCIATED TO CONVENTIONAL CHILLING ON MASS LOSS, BACTERIOLOGYCAL AND PHYSICO-CHEMICAL QUALITY OF BEEF CARCASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moacir Evandro Lage

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to verify the effect of conventional air chilling associated to intermittent spray-chilling treatment, on weight loss, physico-chemical and bacteriological quality of beef carcasses. Two plants of commercial beef slaughterhouse located in Goiânia and fiscalized by the Federal Inspection Service were used to develop the research. The spray-chilling treatment was accomplished in an intermittent way, commanded by acontrolled logical program, with cycles of 90 seconds, in intervals of 30 minutes, during the first 4 hours of the chilling process. Physico-chemical and bacteriological analysis were made in spray-chilled water and carcasses samples, according to recommendation of the effective legislation.The average values of carcasses weight loss of treatment group were lower to the ones verified for the control group,in both plants, A and B, (P < 0,001, showing a high economic potential. As a conclusion of physico-chemical and bacteriological analysis results of water and meat samples, it is clear that the technology of chilling beef carcasses inthe conventional system associated to spraying did not interfere in the quality of meat, and it can become an analysis object on part of official organs for sanitary regulation and fiscalization, for its definitive adoption. KEY WORDS: Spray-chilling, shrinkage, beef carcass.

  1. Atmosphere Impact Losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlichting, Hilke E.; Mukhopadhyay, Sujoy

    2018-02-01

    Determining the origin of volatiles on terrestrial planets and quantifying atmospheric loss during planet formation is crucial for understanding the history and evolution of planetary atmospheres. Using geochemical observations of noble gases and major volatiles we determine what the present day inventory of volatiles tells us about the sources, the accretion process and the early differentiation of the Earth. We further quantify the key volatile loss mechanisms and the atmospheric loss history during Earth's formation. Volatiles were accreted throughout the Earth's formation, but Earth's early accretion history was volatile poor. Although nebular Ne and possible H in the deep mantle might be a fingerprint of this early accretion, most of the mantle does not remember this signature implying that volatile loss occurred during accretion. Present day geochemistry of volatiles shows no evidence of hydrodynamic escape as the isotopic compositions of most volatiles are chondritic. This suggests that atmospheric loss generated by impacts played a major role during Earth's formation. While many of the volatiles have chondritic isotopic ratios, their relative abundances are certainly not chondritic again suggesting volatile loss tied to impacts. Geochemical evidence of atmospheric loss comes from the {}3He/{}^{22}Ne, halogen ratios (e.g., F/Cl) and low H/N ratios. In addition, the geochemical ratios indicate that most of the water could have been delivered prior to the Moon forming impact and that the Moon forming impact did not drive off the ocean. Given the importance of impacts in determining the volatile budget of the Earth we examine the contributions to atmospheric loss from both small and large impacts. We find that atmospheric mass loss due to impacts can be characterized into three different regimes: 1) Giant Impacts, that create a strong shock transversing the whole planet and that can lead to atmospheric loss globally. 2) Large enough impactors (m_{cap} ≳ √{2

  2. TimeNET Optimization Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Bodenstein

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a novel tool for simulation-based optimization and design-space exploration of Stochastic Colored Petri nets (SCPN is introduced. The working title of this tool is TimeNET Optimization Environment (TOE. Targeted users of this tool are people modeling complex systems with SCPNs in TimeNET who want to find parameter sets that are optimal for a certain performance measure (fitness function. It allows users to create and simulate sets of SCPNs and to run different optimization algorithms based on parameter variation. The development of this tool was motivated by the need to automate and speed up tests of heuristic optimization algorithms to be applied for SCPN optimization. A result caching mechanism is used to avoid recalculations.

  3. Glacier Mass Loss during the 1960s and 1970s in the Ak-Shirak Range (Kyrgyzstan from Multiple Stereoscopic Corona and Hexagon Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz Goerlich

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Comprehensive research on glacier changes in the Tian Shan is available for the current decade; however, there is limited information about glacier investigations of previous decades and especially before the mid 1970s. The earliest stereo images from the Corona missions were acquired in the 1960s but existing studies dealing with these images focus on single glaciers or small areas only. We developed a workflow to generate digital terrain models (DTMs and orthophotos from 1964 Corona KH-4 for an entire mountain range (Ak-Shirak located in the Central Tian Shan. From these DTMs and orthoimages, we calculated geodetic mass balances and length changes in comparison to 1973 and 1980 Hexagon KH-9 data. We found mass budgets between −0.4 ± 0.1 m·w.e.a−1 (1964–1980 and −0.9 ± 0.4 m·w.e.a−1 (1973–1980 for the whole region and individual glaciers. The length changes, on the other hand, vary heterogeneously between +624 ± 18 m (+39.0 ± 1.1 m·a−1 and −923 ± 18 m (−57.7 ± 1.1 m·a−1 for 1964–1980. An automation of the processing line can successively lead to region-wide Corona data processing allowing the analysis and interpretation of glacier changes on a larger scale and supporting a refinement of glacier modelling.

  4. An HST Survey of Cassiopeia A's Reverse Shock, High-Velocity Ejecta, and Shocked Clouds of Pre-SN Mass Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesen, Robert

    2017-08-01

    The young Galactic supernova remnant Cassiopeia A (Cas A) provides us with the clearest look at the properties and explosion dynamics of a high mass, core-collapse supernova (CCSN). With an explosion date around 1670, Cas A is the youngest Galactic core-collapse SNR known and, at an estimated distance of 3.4 kpc, it is also among the closest. Cas A's main shell ejecta knots are typically 0.1 - 0.5 arcsec in size and can show emission and morphological changes on timescales of just a few months. No other remnant, with the exception of SN 1987A, shows such rapid optical changes across large portions of its structure.Here we propose a new, complete optical survey of Cas A, the first since 2004, in order to measure the velocity and asymmetry of Cas A's reverse shock front across the whole remnant and map the distribution of its high-velocity outer ejecta, particularly in regions which align to the motion of the central compact source. Halpha images of the remnant's shocked CSM clumps will also provide strong tests of shock-cloud models across a broad range of cloud densities and sizes. These data will constitute a rich and unique archive both for Cas A and the general study of high mass CCSNe.

  5. Implementing NetScaler VPX

    CERN Document Server

    Sandbu, Marius

    2014-01-01

    An easy-to-follow guide with detailed step-by step-instructions on how to implement the different key components in NetScaler, with real-world examples and sample scenarios.If you are a Citrix or network administrator who needs to implement NetScaler in your virtual environment to gain an insight on its functionality, this book is ideal for you. A basic understanding of networking and familiarity with some of the different Citrix products such as XenApp or XenDesktop is a prerequisite.

  6. Net4Care PHMR Library

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The Net4Care PHMR library contains a) A GreenCDA approach for constructing a data object representing a PHMR document: SimpleClinicalDocument, and b) A Builder which can produce a XML document representing a valid Danish PHMR (following the MedCom profile) document from the SimpleClinicalDocument......The Net4Care PHMR library contains a) A GreenCDA approach for constructing a data object representing a PHMR document: SimpleClinicalDocument, and b) A Builder which can produce a XML document representing a valid Danish PHMR (following the MedCom profile) document from the Simple...

  7. Pro DLR in NET 4

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Chaur

    2011-01-01

    Microsoft's Dynamic Language Runtime (DLR) is a platform for running dynamic languages such as Ruby and Python on an equal footing with compiled languages such as C#. Furthermore, the runtime is the foundation for many useful software design and architecture techniques you can apply as you develop your .NET applications. Pro DLR in .NET 4 introduces you to the DLR, showing how you can use it to write software that combines dynamic and static languages, letting you choose the right tool for the job. You will learn the core DLR components such as LINQ expressions, call sites, binders, and dynami

  8. Hierarchies in Coloured Petri Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huber, Peter; Jensen, Kurt; Shapiro, Robert M.

    1991-01-01

    The paper shows how to extend Coloured Petri Nets with a hierarchy concept. The paper proposes five different hierarchy constructs, which allow the analyst to structure large CP-nets as a set of interrelated subnets (called pages). The paper discusses the properties of the proposed hierarchy...... constructs, and it illustrates them by means of two examples. The hierarchy constructs can be used for theoretical considerations, but their main use is to describe and analyse large real-world systems. All of the hierarchy constructs are supported by the editing and analysis facilities in the CPN Palette...

  9. Moderate Walking Enhances the Effects of an Energy-Restricted Diet on Fat Mass Loss and Serum Insulin in Overweight and Obese Adults in a 12-Week Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleist, Bernadette; Wahrburg, Ursel; Stehle, Peter; Schomaker, Ralph; Greiwing, Andreas; Stoffel-Wagner, Birgit; Egert, Sarah

    2017-08-09

    Background: Increased physical activity may be advantageous for weight loss.Objective: We investigated the effects of an energy-restricted diet with and without moderate walking on body weight, body composition, resting energy expenditure (REE), and endocrine and cardiometabolic risk variables in overweight and obese participants.Methods: A 12-wk, randomized, 2-arm, parallel, controlled, energy-restricted (500-800 kcal/d) dietary intervention study was conducted in 82 men and women [mean baseline characteristics: age, 39.4 y; weight, 99.3 kg; body mass index (in kg/m(2)), 31.9]. Participants were divided into 2 groups. One group received a hypoenergetic diet (DI) only (n = 44). The second group received the same DI and participated in a regular walking program of 2.5 h/wk (DI + walking; n = 38).Results: After the 12-wk intervention, body weight was significantly decreased in the DI + walking group and the DI group (-8.8 compared with -7.0 kg, P = 0.064 for intergroup differences). The decrease in body weight was accompanied by a significant reduction in total fat mass, which was significantly more pronounced in the DI + walking group than in the DI group (-6.4 ± 3.1 compared with -4.8 ± 3.0 kg; P = 0.020). REE after 12 wk was not significantly different compared with the baseline REE. Diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure, LDL cholesterol, and non-HDL cholesterol were similarly significantly improved by both interventions. In the DI + walking group, insulin and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index were also significantly reduced. Serum free triiodothyronine was significantly decreased and serum cortisol was significantly increased in both groups.Conclusions: Participation in a 12-wk weight-loss study resulted in significant reductions in body weight and fat mass and was associated with significant improvements in biomarkers for cardiovascular disease risk. Moderate weight loss was not accompanied by a reduction in REE

  10. Throughout the history of the inshore net-fisheries in the Western ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    denise

    Sharks and skates. 6. 2. 33. Total. 21 671. 4 156. 19. 3 147. 2 141. 68. * Given by mass. Table XI: Comparison of observed and reported bycatch rates for 44–64 mm gillnets. Species. Observed cpue. Estimated annual. Reported cpue. Reported annual. (number net-day-1) catch (number)*. (number net-day-1) catch (number).

  11. 16 CFR 500.7 - Net quantity of contents, method of expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Net quantity of contents, method of expression. 500.7 Section 500.7 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION RULES, REGULATIONS, STATEMENT... expression. The net quantity of contents shall be expressed in terms of weight or mass, measure, numerical...

  12. Ghrelin mitigates β-cell mass loss during insulitis in an animal model of autoimmune diabetes mellitus, the BioBreeding/Worcester rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baena-Nieto, Gloria; Lomas-Romero, Isabel M; Mateos, Rosa M; Leal-Cosme, Noelia; Perez-Arana, Gonzalo; Aguilar-Diosdado, Manuel; Segundo, Carmen; Lechuga-Sancho, Alfonso M

    2017-01-01

    Ghrelin is a peptide hormone with pleiotropic effects. It stimulates cell proliferation and inhibits apoptosis-mediated cell death. It prevents diabetes mellitus in several models of chemical, surgical and biological toxic insults to pancreas in both in vivo and in vitro models and promotes glucose-stimulated insulin secretion under cytotoxic conditions. It has not yet been tested in vivo in an autoimmune model of diabetes with a persistent insult to the β-cell. Given the immunomodulating effects of ghrelin and its trophic effects on β-cells, we hypothesized that ghrelin treatment during the early stages of insulitis would delay diabetes onset. BioBreeding/Worcester male rats received ghrelin (10 ng/kg/day) before insulitis development. Glucose metabolism was characterized by glucose and insulin tolerance tests. β-cell mass, islet area, islet number, β-cell clusters, proliferation and apoptosis and degree of insulitis were analysed by histomorphometry. A Kaplan-Meier survival curve was plotted and analysed applying the log-rank (Mantel-Cox) test. Ghrelin treatment significantly reduced the probability of developing diabetes in our model (p ghrelin treatment did not induce any metabolic perturbations. These findings support the hypothesis that ghrelin delays the development of autoimmune diabetes by attenuating insulitis and supporting β-cell mass. Ghrelin promotes β-cell viability and function through diverse mechanisms that may have significant implications for diabetes prevention, therapy and also transplant success of both islets and complete pancreas. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Memory loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... amnesia (sudden, temporary loss of memory) of unclear cause Transient ischemic attack (TIA) or stroke Hydrocephalus (fluid collection in the brain) Sometimes, memory loss occurs with mental health problems, such as: After a major, traumatic or stressful ...

  14. Hair Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... overall hair thinning and not bald patches. Full-body hair loss. Some conditions and medical treatments, such as ... in the loss of hair all over your body. The hair usually grows back. Patches of scaling that spread ...

  15. Attribution of Net Carbon Change by Disturbance Type across Forest Lands of the Continental United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, S. C.; Harris, N.; Saatchi, S. S.; Domke, G. M.; Woodall, C. W.; Pearson, T.

    2016-12-01

    We generated spatially comprehensive maps of carbon stocks and net carbon changes from US forestlands between 2005 and 2010 and attributed the changes to natural and anthropogenic processes. The prototype system created to produce these maps is designed to assist with national GHG inventories and support decisions associated with land management. Here, we present the results and methodological framework of our analysis. In summary, combining estimates of net C losses and gains results in net carbon change of 269±49 Tg C yr-1 (sink) in the coterminous US forest land, with carbon loss from harvest acting as the predominent source process.

  16. Aktivasi Keterlibatan Publik dalam Program Berita ‘NET 10’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinar Safa Anggraeni

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This research entitled Activation of The Public Engagement in `NET 10` News Program. An intrinsic case study by Robert E. Stake on Activating The Public Engagement in `NET 10` Citizen Journalism NET TV’s News Program. This research aimed to understand NET TV’s public management strategy in 'NET 10' news program. In addition, this research also aimed to determine how the editorial staff considere the standard of news value and news judgment on citizen journalist news, and the function of public sphere in the mass media of citizen journalism. The method used qualitative research with intrinsic case study approach by Robert E. Stake to NET TV’s editorial. The results showed the editorial’s strategy of public management by following action: (1 provided easily of joining  'NET CJ', (2 created  campaigns to increase the number of CJ, (3 nature CJ by keeping good and giving relationship evaluations, (4 provides rewards for the creator of CJ news aired in 'NET 10', and (5 educates CJ in making a citizen journalism news. NET TV used curation techniques in the process of citizen journalism news gatekeeper to keep the news value and news judment standard of citizen journalism news. Unfortunately, ‘NET 10’’s citizen journalism news rate of the proportion of news comprehensive continues to fall down because the editorial put loyalty forward. 'NET CJ' act as a opinions catalyst of the citizens to the government.

  17. Experiencing Loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Maria; Younis, Tarek; Hassani, Amani

    2015-01-01

    , who narrates her experience of losing herhusband to lung cancer. By drawing on a religious framework, Aisha creates meaning fromher loss, which enables her to incorporate this loss into her life history and sustain agency.Her narrative invites wider audiences to witness her tale of overcoming loss...

  18. Mass loss controlled thermal pretreatment system to assess the effects of pretreatment temperature on organic matter solubilization and methane yield from food waste.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Minale Yeshanew

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of thermal pretreatment (TP on the main characteristics of food waste (FW and its biochemical methane potential (BMP and distribution of volatile fatty acids (VFAs under mesophilic condition (35 ⁰C were investigated. The TP experiments were carried out at 80 °C, 100 °C, 120 °C for 2 hour and 140 °C for 1 hour. The designed TP set-up was able to minimize the organic matter loss during the course of the pretreatments. Soluble organic fractions evaluated in terms of chemical oxygen demand (COD and soluble protein increased linearly with pretreatment temperature. In contrast, the carbohydrate solubilization was more enhanced (30 % higher solubilization by the TP at lower temperature (80 °C. A slight increment of soluble phenols was found, particularly for temperatures exceeding 100 °C. Thermally pretreated FW under all conditions exhibited an improved methane yield than the untreated FW, due to the increased organic matter solubilization. The highest cumulative methane yield of 442 (± 8.6 mL/gVSadded, corresponding to a 28.1 % enhancement compared to the untreated FW, was obtained with a TP at 80 °C. No significant variation in the VFAs trends were observed during the BMP tests under all investigated conditions.

  19. D.NET case study

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    lremy

    developing products, marketing tools and building capacity of the grass root telecentre workers. D.Net recognized that it had several ideas worth developing into small interventions that would make big differences, but resource constraints were a barrier for scaling-up these initiatives. More demands, limited resources.

  20. Surgery for GEP-NETs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knigge, Ulrich; Hansen, Carsten Palnæs

    2012-01-01

    Surgery is the only treatment that may cure the patient with gastroentero-pancreatic (GEP) neuroendocrine tumours (NET) and neuroendocrine carcinomas (NEC) and should always be considered as first line treatment if R0/R1 resection can be achieved. The surgical and interventional procedures for GEP...

  1. Net Neutrality in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijk, N.

    2014-01-01

    The Netherlands is among the first countries that have put specific net neutrality standards in place. The decision to implement specific regulation was influenced by at least three factors. The first was the prevailing social and academic debate, partly due to developments in the United States. The

  2. Complexity Metrics for Workflow Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Kristian Bisgaard; van der Aalst, Wil M.P.

    2009-01-01

    Process modeling languages such as EPCs, BPMN, flow charts, UML activity diagrams, Petri nets, etc.\\ are used to model business processes and to configure process-aware information systems. It is known that users have problems understanding these diagrams. In fact, even process engineers and system...

  3. Structure and evolution of the drainage system of a Himalayan debris-covered glacier, and its relationship with patterns of mass loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. I. Benn

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We provide the first synoptic view of the drainage system of a Himalayan debris-covered glacier and its evolution through time, based on speleological exploration and satellite image analysis of Ngozumpa Glacier, Nepal. The drainage system has several linked components: (1 a seasonal subglacial drainage system below the upper ablation zone; (2 supraglacial channels, allowing efficient meltwater transport across parts of the upper ablation zone; (3 sub-marginal channels, allowing long-distance transport of meltwater; (4 perched ponds, which intermittently store meltwater prior to evacuation via the englacial drainage system; (5 englacial cut-and-closure conduits, which may undergo repeated cycles of abandonment and reactivation; and (6 a "base-level" lake system (Spillway Lake dammed behind the terminal moraine. The distribution and relative importance of these elements has evolved through time, in response to sustained negative mass balance. The area occupied by perched ponds has expanded upglacier at the expense of supraglacial channels, and Spillway Lake has grown as more of the glacier surface ablates to base level. Subsurface processes play a governing role in creating, maintaining, and shutting down exposures of ice at the glacier surface, with a major impact on spatial patterns and rates of surface mass loss. Comparison of our results with observations on other glaciers indicate that englacial drainage systems play a key role in the response of debris-covered glaciers to sustained periods of negative mass balance.

  4. Very-low-calorie ketogenic diet with aminoacid supplement versus very low restricted-calorie diet for preserving muscle mass during weight loss: a pilot double-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merra, G; Miranda, R; Barrucco, S; Gualtieri, P; Mazza, M; Moriconi, E; Marchetti, M; Chang, T F M; De Lorenzo, A; Di Renzo, L

    2016-07-01

    Obesity plays a relevant pathophysiological role in the development of health problems, arising as result of complex interaction of genetic, nutritional and metabolic factors. We conducted a dietary intervention case-control randomized trial, to compare the effectiveness on body composition of two nutritional protocols: a very-low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet (VLCKD), integrated by an aminoacid supplement with whey protein, and very low restricted-calorie diet (VLCD). The clinical study was conducted with a randomized case-control in which twenty-five healthy subjects gave informed consent to participate in the interventional study and were evaluated for their health and nutritional status, by anthropometric, and body composition evaluation. The results of this pilot study show that a diet low in carbohydrates, associated with a decreased caloric intake, is effective in weight loss. After VLCKD, versus VLCD, no significant differences in body lean of the trunk, body lean distribution (android and gynoid), total body lean were observed (p > 0.05). After VLCKD, no increasing of sarcopenia frequency, according ASSMI, was observed. Many studies have shown the effectiveness of the ketogenic diet on weight loss; even if not know how to work effectively, as some researchers believe that the weight loss is due to reduced calorie intake, satiety could also be induced by the effect of the proteins, rather than the low-carbohydrates. Our pilot study showed that a VLCKD was highly effective in terms of body weight reduction without to induce lean body mass loss, preventing the risk of sarcopenia. Further clinical trials are needed on a larger population and long-term body weight maintenance and risk factors management effects of VLCKD. There is no doubt, however, that a proper dietary approach would impact significantly on the reduction of public expenditure costs, in view of prospective data on increasing the percentage of obese people in our nation.

  5. Loss of the Otx2-Binding Site in the Nanog Promoter Affects the Integrity of Embryonic Stem Cell Subtypes and Specification of Inner Cell Mass-Derived Epiblast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Acampora

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs and the inner cell mass (ICM-derived epiblast exhibit naive pluripotency. ESC-derived epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs and the postimplantation epiblast exhibit primed pluripotency. Although core pluripotency factors are well-characterized, additional regulators, including Otx2, recently have been shown to function during the transition from naive to primed pluripotency. Here we uncover a role for Otx2 in the control of the naive pluripotent state. We analyzed Otx2-binding activity in ESCs and EpiSCs and identified Nanog, Oct4, and Sox2 as direct targets. To unravel the Otx2 transcriptional network, we targeted the strongest Otx2-binding site in the Nanog promoter, finding that this site modulates the size of specific ESC-subtype compartments in cultured cells and promotes Nanog expression in vivo, predisposing ICM differentiation to epiblast. Otx2-mediated Nanog regulation thus contributes to the integrity of the ESC state and cell lineage specification in preimplantation development.

  6. Inactivation of Vhl in Osteochondral Progenitor Cells Causes High Bone Mass Phenotype and Protects Against Age-Related Bone Loss in Adult Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Tujun; Xie, Yangli; Huang, Junlan; Luo, Fengtao; Yi, Lingxian; He, Qifen; Chen, Di; Chen, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that disruption of von Hippel–Lindau gene (Vhl) coincides with activation of hypoxia-inducible factor α (HIFα) signaling in bone cells and plays an important role in bone development, homeostasis, and regeneration. It is known that activation of HIF1α signaling in mature osteoblasts is central to the coupling between angiogenesis and bone formation. However, the precise mechanisms responsible for the coupling between skeletal angiogenesis and osteogenesis during bone remodeling are only partially elucidated. To evaluate the role of Vhl in bone homeostasis and the coupling between vascular physiology and bone, we generated mice lacking Vhl in osteochondral progenitor cells (referred to as Vhl cKO mice) at postnatal and adult stages in a tamoxifen-inducible manner and changes in skeletal morphology were assessed by micro–computed tomography (µCT), histology, and bone histomorphometry. We found that mice with inactivation of Vhl in osteochondral progenitor cells at the postnatal stage largely phenocopied that of mice lacking Vhl in mature osteoblasts, developing striking and progressive accumulation of cancellous bone with increased microvascular density and bone formation. These were accompanied with a significant increase in osteoblast proliferation, upregulation of differentiation marker Runx2 and osteocalcin, and elevated expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and phosphorylation of Smad1/5/8. In addition, we found that Vhl deletion in osteochondral progenitor cells in adult bone protects mice from aging-induced bone loss. Our data suggest that the VHL-mediated signaling in osteochondral progenitor cells plays a critical role in bone remodeling at postnatal/adult stages through coupling osteogenesis and angiogenesis. © 2014 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:23999831

  7. Caught in the Net: Perineuronal Nets and Addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Slaker

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to drugs of abuse induces plasticity in the brain and creates persistent drug-related memories. These changes in plasticity and persistent drug memories are believed to produce aberrant motivation and reinforcement contributing to addiction. Most studies have explored the effect drugs of abuse have on pre- and postsynaptic cells and astrocytes; however, more recently, attention has shifted to explore the effect these drugs have on the extracellular matrix (ECM. Within the ECM are unique structures arranged in a net-like manner, surrounding a subset of neurons called perineuronal nets (PNNs. This review focuses on drug-induced changes in PNNs, the molecules that regulate PNNs, and the expression of PNNs within brain circuitry mediating motivation, reward, and reinforcement as it pertains to addiction.

  8. Traditional nets interfere with the uptake of long-lasting insecticidal nets in the Peruvian Amazon: the relevance of net preference for achieving high coverage and use.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koen Peeters Grietens

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: While coverage of long-lasting insecticide-treated nets (LLIN has steadily increased, a growing number of studies report gaps between net ownership and use. We conducted a mixed-methods social science study assessing the importance of net preference and use after Olyset® LLINs were distributed through a mass campaign in rural communities surrounding Iquitos, the capital city of the Amazonian region of Peru. METHODS: The study was conducted in the catchment area of the Paujil and Cahuide Health Centres (San Juan district between July 2007 and November 2008. During a first qualitative phase, participant observation and in-depth interviews collected information on key determinants for net preference and use. In a second quantitative phase, a survey among recently confirmed malaria patients evaluated the acceptability and use of both LLINs and traditional nets, and a case control study assessed the association between net preference/use and housing structure (open vs. closed houses. RESULTS: A total of 10 communities were selected for the anthropological fieldwork and 228 households participated in the quantitative studies. In the study area, bed nets are considered part of the housing structure and are therefore required to fulfil specific architectural and social functions, such as providing privacy and shelter, which the newly distributed Olyset® LLINs ultimately did not. The LLINs' failure to meet these criteria could mainly be attributed to their large mesh size, transparency and perceived ineffectiveness to protect against mosquitoes and other insects, resulting in 63.3% of households not using any of the distributed LLINs. Notably, LLIN usage was significantly lower in houses with no interior or exterior walls (35.2% than in those with walls (73.8% (OR = 5.2, 95CI [2.2; 12.3], p<0.001. CONCLUSION: Net preference can interfere with optimal LLIN use. In order to improve the number of effective days of LLIN protection per dollar

  9. Army Net Zero Prove Out. Army Net Zero Training Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-20

    sensors were strategically placed throughout the installation by magnetically attaching them to water main valve stems. The sensors check sound...Recycle Wrap  Substitutes for Packaging Materials  Re-Use of Textiles and Linens  Setting Printers to Double-Sided Printing Net Zero Waste...can effectively achieve source reduction. Clean and Re-Use Shop Rags - Shop rags represent a large textile waste stream at many installations. As a

  10. Army Net Zero Prove Out. Net Zero Waste Best Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-20

    Anaerobic Digesters – Although anaerobic digestion is not a new technology and has been used on a large-scale basis in wastewater treatment , the...technology and has been used on a large-scale basis in wastewater treatment , the use of the technology should be demonstrated with other...approaches can be used for cardboard and cellulose -based packaging materials. This approach is in line with the Net Zero Waste hierarchy in terms of

  11. Net present biodiversity value and the design of biodiversity offsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overton, Jacob McC; Stephens, R T Theo; Ferrier, Simon

    2013-02-01

    There is an urgent need to develop sound theory and practice for biodiversity offsets to provide a better basis for offset multipliers, to improve accounting for time delays in offset repayments, and to develop a common framework for evaluating in-kind and out-of-kind offsets. Here, we apply concepts and measures from systematic conservation planning and financial accounting to provide a basis for determining equity across type (of biodiversity), space, and time. We introduce net present biodiversity value (NPBV) as a theoretical and practical measure for defining the offset required to achieve no-net-loss. For evaluating equity in type and space we use measures of biodiversity value from systematic conservation planning. Time discount rates are used to address risk of non-repayment, and loss of utility. We illustrate these concepts and measures with two examples of biodiversity impact-offset transactions. Considerable further work is required to understand the characteristics of these approaches.

  12. Online radicalization: the net or the netizen?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Femi Richard Omotoyinbo

    2014-10-01

    of two categories that include the broad category and the jargon category. The Netizen in the former category was later on conceived as the principal cause of online radicalization.Research limitations/implications - The study averred that all attempts/measures to bring about a reversal in the status quo of online radicalization [De-Radicalization measures] should be directly applied to the principal cause, which is the Netizen. Although the content of the de-radicalization measures were not fully provided by this study due to the reason that the contents can best be supplied by almost everyone that has a vivid understanding of online radicalization. The study continues to affirm that the application of the measures of de-radicalization on the Netizen will bring a corresponding ameliorative effect on the Net against its perpetuation of online radicalization.Practical implications - It is important for domain name providers, governments, internet service providers, mass media, NGOs, parents, politicians, religious organisations, schools, teachers, and web hosting companies to collaborate to create practicable contents for a Gradual Online De-Radicalization (G.O.D which will suppress the perturbing rate of Online Radicalization to the minimal. No unit or sector can singly tackle online radicalization effectively. Therefore, measures of De-Radicalization should be governed by international treaties and laws, and there should be credible agents to legislate and execute the laws respectively.Originality and value - This study broadens the possibilities of reducing online radicalization to the barest minimum globally with some novel strategies categorized broadly as Gradual Online De-Radicalization (G.O.D. The analytic methods applied were plausible skills from the realm of Philosophy and Science respectively. Thus, the findings and suggestions of this study are considered reasonable and universally pragmatic.Research type - general review and viewpoint.

  13. Regional trends in evaporation loss and water yield based on stable isotope mass balance of lakes: The Ontario Precambrian Shield surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, J. J.; Birks, S. J.; Jeffries, D.; Yi, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Stable isotopes of water, oxygen-18 and deuterium, were measured in water samples collected from a network of 300 lakes sampled in six ∼100 km2 blocks (centred at 49.72°N, 91.46°W; 48.49°N, 91.58°W; 50.25°N, 86.62°W; 49.78°N, 83.98°W; 48.24°N, 85.49°W; 47.73, 84.52°W) within Precambrian shield drainages in the vicinity of Lake Superior, northern Ontario, Canada. Additional sampling was also conducted within the Turkey Lakes watershed (47.03°N, 84.38°W), a research basin situated in the Algoma region located 50 km north of Sault Saint Marie, Ontario. The studies were undertaken to gain a better understanding of hydrology and geochemistry of watersheds in the region in order to better predict acid sensitivity of lakes. The main objective of this paper is to describe the hydrologic variations observed based on stable isotope results. Evaporative isotopic enrichment of lake water was found to be systematic across the region, and its deviation from the isotopic composition of precipitation was used to estimate the evaporation/inflow to the lakes as well as runoff (or water yield) based on a simple isotope mass balance model. The analysis illustrates significant variability in the water yield to lakes and reveals a pattern of positively skewed distributions in all six widely spaced blocks, suggesting that a high proportion of lakes have relatively limited runoff whereas relatively few have greater runoff. Such basic information on the drainage structure of an area can be valuable for site-specific hydrologic assessments but also has significant implications for critical loads assessment, as low runoff systems tend to be less buffered and therefore are more sensitive to acidification. Importantly, the Turkey Lakes sampling program also suggests that isotope-based water yield is comparable in magnitude to hydrometric gauging estimates, and also establishes that uncertainty related to stratification can be as high as ±20% or more for individual lakes

  14. Counteracting Age-related Loss of Skeletal Muscle Mass: a clinical and ethnological trial on the role of protein supplementation and training load (CALM Intervention Study): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechshøft, Rasmus Leidesdorff; Reitelseder, Søren; Højfeldt, Grith; Castro-Mejía, Josué Leonardo; Khakimov, Bekzod; Ahmad, Hajar Fauzan Bin; Kjær, Michael; Engelsen, Søren Balling; Johansen, Susanne Margrete Bølling; Rasmussen, Morten Arendt; Lassen, Aske Juul; Jensen, Tenna; Beyer, Nina; Serena, Anja; Perez-Cueto, Frederico Jose Armando; Nielsen, Dennis Sandris; Jespersen, Astrid Pernille; Holm, Lars

    2016-08-09

    Aging is associated with decreased muscle mass and functional capacity, which in turn decrease quality of life. The number of citizens over the age of 65 years in the Western world will increase by 50 % over the next four decades, and this demographic shift brings forth new challenges at both societal and individual levels. Only a few longitudinal studies have been reported, but whey protein supplementation seems to improve muscle mass and function, and its combination with heavy strength training appears even more effective. However, heavy resistance training may reduce adherence to training, thereby attenuating the overall benefits of training. We hypothesize that light load resistance training is more efficient when both adherence and physical improvement are considered longitudinally. We launched the interdisciplinary project on Counteracting Age-related Loss of Skeletal Muscle Mass (CALM) to investigate the impact of lifestyle changes on physical and functional outcomes as well as everyday practices and habits in a qualitative context. We will randomize 205 participants older than 65 years to be given 1 year of two daily nutrient supplements with 10 g of sucrose and 20 g of either collagen protein, carbohydrates, or whey. Further, two groups will perform either heavy progressive resistance training or light load training on top of the whey supplement. The primary outcome of the CALM Intervention Study is the change in thigh cross-sectional area. Moreover, we will evaluate changes in physical performance, muscle fiber type and acute anabolic response to whey protein ingestion, sensory adaptation, gut microbiome, and a range of other measures, combined with questionnaires on life quality and qualitative interviews with selected subjects. The CALM Intervention Study will generate scientific evidence and recommendations to counteract age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass in elderly individuals. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02034760 . Registered on 10 January 2014

  15. HANPP Collection: Human Appropriation of Net Primary Productivity as a Percentage of Net Primary Productivity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Human Appropriation of Net Primary Productivity (HANPP) as a Percentage of Net Primary Productivity (NPP) portion of the Human Appropriation of Net Primary...

  16. Hydrodynamic characteristics of plane netting used for aquaculture net cages in uniform current

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    DONG, SHUCHUANG; HU, FUXIANG; KUMAZAWA, TAISEI; SIODE, DAISUKE; TOKAI, TADASHI

    2016-01-01

      The hydrodynamic characteristics of polyethylene (PE) netting and chain link wire netting with different types of twine diameter and mesh size for aquaculture net cages were examined by experiments in a flume tank...

  17. [A field study of tundra plant litter decomposition rate via mass loss and carbon dioxide emission: the role of biotic and abiotic controls, biotope, season of year, and spatial-temporal scale].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pochikalov, A V; Karelin, D V

    2014-01-01

    Although many recently published original papers and reviews deal with plant matter decomposition rates and their controls, we are still very short in understanding of these processes in boreal and high latiude plant communities, especially in permafrost areas of our planet. First and foremost, this is holds true for winter period. Here, we present the results of 2-year field observations in south taiga and south shrub tundra ecosystems in European Russia. We pioneered in simultaneous application of two independent methods: classic mass loss estimation by litter-bag technique, and direct measurement of CO2 emission (respiration) of the same litter bags with different types of dead plant matter. Such an approach let us to reconstruct intra-seasonal dynamics of decomposition rates of the main tundra litter fractions with high temporal resolution, to estimate the partial role of different seasons and defragmentation in the process of plant matter decomposition, and to determine its factors under different temporal scale.

  18. Isolated unit tests in .Net

    OpenAIRE

    Haukilehto, Tero

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis isolation in unit testing is studied to get a precise picture of the isolation frameworks available for .Net environment. At the beginning testing is discussed in theory with the benefits and the problems it may have been linked with. The theory includes software development in general in connection with testing. Theory of isolation is also described before the actual isolation frameworks are represented. Common frameworks are described in more detail and comparable informa...

  19. Prevalence of body mass index and body weight cut-off points for in vitro fertilization treatment at U.S. clinics and current clinic weight loss strategy recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle M; Grant, Breănna L

    2015-09-01

    The goal of this study was to determine how many clinics providing in vitro fertilization (IVF) in the United States require a body mass index (BMI) or body weight cut-off point to determine treatment eligibility. US clinics listed as members on the Society of Assisted Reproduction website in late 2013 were contacted by phone between January and March 2014. Clinic personnel were asked if a BMI or body weight cut-off points was used to determine IVF treatment eligibility and what strategies they recommended for their patients to achieve a healthy body weight. Of the 379 clinics contacted, 347 responded (92% response rate) and 35% (n = 120) reported using a BMI or body weight cut-off points to determine eligibility for IVF treatment. Mean BMI (± SD) cut-off points was 38.4 ± 5.2 kg/m(2) and mean body weight (± SD) cut-off points was 130.2 ± 14.8 kg. Of the clinics using a set cut-off points, half (46%) provided no weight loss recommendations for patients. A sizable portion of US IVF clinics report a required or preferred BMI or body weight cut-off points for treatment. Despite this, most clinics did not provide a recommended program or approach for weight loss with very few clinics reporting an in-house program.

  20. Cutaneous water loss and sphingolipids in the stratum corneum of house sparrows, Passer domesticus L., from desert and mesic environments as determined by reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with atmospheric pressure photospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Garcia, Agustí; Ro, Jennifer; Brown, Johnie C; Williams, Joseph B

    2008-02-01

    Because cutaneous water loss (CWL) represents half of total water loss in birds, selection to reduce CWL may be strong in desert birds. We previously found that CWL of house sparrows from a desert population was about 25% lower than that of individuals from a mesic environment. The stratum corneum (SC), the outer layer of the epidermis, serves as the primary barrier to water vapor diffusion through the skin. The avian SC is formed by layers of corneocytes embedded in a lipid matrix consisting of cholesterol, free fatty acids and two classes of sphingolipids, ceramides and cerebrosides. The SC of birds also serves a thermoregulatory function; high rates of CWL keep body temperatures under lethal limits in episodes of heat stress. In this study, we used high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with atmospheric pressure photoionization-mass spectrometry (HPLC/APPI-MS) to identify and quantify over 200 sphingolipids in the SC of house sparrows from desert and mesic populations. Principal components analysis (PCA) led to the hypotheses that sphingolipids in the SC of desert sparrows have longer carbon chains in the fatty acid moiety and are more polar than those found in mesic sparrows. We also tested the association between principal components and CWL in both populations. Our study suggested that a reduction in CWL found in desert sparrows was, in part, the result of modifications in chain length and polarity of the sphingolipids, changes that apparently determine the interactions of the lipid molecules within the SC.

  1. Event hierarchies in DanNet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bolette Sandford; Nimb, Sanni

    2008-01-01

    Artiklen omhandler udarbejdelsen af et verbumshierarki i det leksikalsk-semantiske ordnet, DanNet.......Artiklen omhandler udarbejdelsen af et verbumshierarki i det leksikalsk-semantiske ordnet, DanNet....

  2. The Uniframe .Net Web Service Discovery Service

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Berbeco, Robert W

    2003-01-01

    Microsoft .NET allows the creation of distributed systems in a seamless manner Within NET small, discrete applications, referred to as Web services, are utilized to connect to each other or larger applications...

  3. Long Term RadNet Quality Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This RadNet Quality Data Asset includes all data since initiation and when ERAMS was expanded to become RadNet, name changed to reflect new mission. This includes...

  4. Traditional nets interfere with the uptake of long-lasting insecticidal nets in the Peruvian Amazon: the relevance of net preference for achieving high coverage and use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grietens, Koen Peeters; Muela Ribera, Joan; Soto, Veronica; Tenorio, Alex; Hoibak, Sarah; Aguirre, Angel Rosas; Toomer, Elizabeth; Rodriguez, Hugo; Llanos Cuentas, Alejandro; D'Alessandro, Umberto; Gamboa, Dionicia; Erhart, Annette

    2013-01-01

    While coverage of long-lasting insecticide-treated nets (LLIN) has steadily increased, a growing number of studies report gaps between net ownership and use. We conducted a mixed-methods social science study assessing the importance of net preference and use after Olyset® LLINs were distributed through a mass campaign in rural communities surrounding Iquitos, the capital city of the Amazonian region of Peru. The study was conducted in the catchment area of the Paujil and Cahuide Health Centres (San Juan district) between July 2007 and November 2008. During a first qualitative phase, participant observation and in-depth interviews collected information on key determinants for net preference and use. In a second quantitative phase, a survey among recently confirmed malaria patients evaluated the acceptability and use of both LLINs and traditional nets, and a case control study assessed the association between net preference/use and housing structure (open vs. closed houses). A total of 10 communities were selected for the anthropological fieldwork and 228 households participated in the quantitative studies. In the study area, bed nets are considered part of the housing structure and are therefore required to fulfil specific architectural and social functions, such as providing privacy and shelter, which the newly distributed Olyset® LLINs ultimately did not. The LLINs' failure to meet these criteria could mainly be attributed to their large mesh size, transparency and perceived ineffectiveness to protect against mosquitoes and other insects, resulting in 63.3% of households not using any of the distributed LLINs. Notably, LLIN usage was significantly lower in houses with no interior or exterior walls (35.2%) than in those with walls (73.8%) (OR = 5.2, 95CI [2.2; 12.3], ppreference can interfere with optimal LLIN use. In order to improve the number of effective days of LLIN protection per dollar spent, appropriate quantitative and qualitative methods for collecting

  5. PsychoNet: a psycholinguistc commonsense ontology

    OpenAIRE

    Mohtasseb, Haytham; Ahmed, Amr

    2010-01-01

    Ontologies have been widely accepted as the most advanced knowledge representation model. This paper introduces PsychoNet, a new knowledgebase that forms the link between psycholinguistic taxonomy, existing in LIWC, and its semantic textual representation in the form of commonsense semantic ontology, represented by ConceptNet. The integration of LIWC and ConceptNet and the added functionalities facilitate employing ConceptNet in psycholinguistic studies. Furthermore, it simplifies utilization...

  6. Experimental induction of necrotic enteritis in chickens by a netB-positive Japanese isolate of Clostridium perfringens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Ho; Suzuki, Takayuki; Kawahara, Fumiya; Uetsuka, Koji; Nagai, Shinya; Nunoya, Tetsuo

    2017-02-28

    Necrotic enteritis (NE) is one of the most important bacterial diseases in terms of economic losses. Clostridium perfringens necrotic enteritis toxin B, NetB, was recently proposed as a new key virulent factor for the development of NE. The goal of this work was to develop a necrotic enteritis model in chickens by using a Japanese isolate of C. perfringens. The Japanese isolate has been found to contain netB gene, which had the same nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences as those of prototype gene characterized in Australian strain EHE-NE18, and also expressed in vitro a 33-kDa protein identified as NetB toxin by nano-scale liquid chromatographic tandem mass spectrometry. In the challenge experiment, broiler chickens fed a commercial chicken starter diet for 14 days post-hatch were changed to a high protein feed mixed 50:50 with fishmeal for 6 days. At day 21 of age, feed was withheld for 24 hr, and each chicken was orally challenged twice daily with 2 ml each of C. perfringens culture (10 9 to 10 10 CFU) on 5 consecutive days. The gross necrotic lesions were observed in 90 and 12.5% of challenged and control chickens, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first study that demonstrated that a netB-positive Japanese isolate of C. perfringens is able to induce the clinical signs and lesions characteristic of NE in the experimental model, which may be useful for evaluating the pathogenicity of field isolates, the efficacy of a vaccine or a specific drug against NE.

  7. 78 FR 72451 - Net Investment Income Tax

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-02

    ... Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-BL74 Net Investment Income Tax AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service...). These regulations provide guidance on the computation of net investment income. The regulations affect... lesser of: (A) The individual's net investment income for such taxable year, or (B) the excess (if any...

  8. 47 CFR 69.302 - Net investment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Net investment. 69.302 Section 69.302... Apportionment of Net Investment § 69.302 Net investment. (a) Investment in Accounts 2001, 1220 and Class B Rural...) Investment in Accounts 2002, 2003 and to the extent such inclusions are allowed by this Commission, Account...

  9. 47 CFR 65.450 - Net income.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Net income. 65.450 Section 65.450... OF RETURN PRESCRIPTION PROCEDURES AND METHODOLOGIES Exchange Carriers § 65.450 Net income. (a) Net income shall consist of all revenues derived from the provision of interstate telecommunications services...

  10. 47 CFR 65.500 - Net income.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Net income. 65.500 Section 65.500... OF RETURN PRESCRIPTION PROCEDURES AND METHODOLOGIES Interexchange Carriers § 65.500 Net income. The net income methodology specified in § 65.450 shall be utilized by all interexchange carriers that are...

  11. NetBeans IDE 8 cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Salter, David

    2014-01-01

    If you're a Java developer of any level using NetBeans and want to learn how to get the most out of NetBeans, then this book is for you. Learning how to utilize NetBeans will provide a firm foundation for your Java application development.

  12. Characterizing behavioural congruences for Petri nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mogens; Priese, Lutz; Sassone, Vladimiro

    1995-01-01

    We exploit a notion of interface for Petri nets in order to design a set of net combinators. For such a calculus of nets, we focus on the behavioural congruences arising from four simple notions of behaviour, viz., traces, maximal traces, step, and maximal step traces, and from the corresponding...

  13. 27 CFR 4.37 - Net contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the volume of wine within the container, except that the following tolerances shall be allowed: (1... THE TREASURY LIQUORS LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF WINE Labeling Requirements for Wine § 4.37 Net contents. (a) Statement of net contents. The net contents of wine for which a standard of fill is...

  14. 'Fat mass and obesity associated' gene (FTO: No significant association of variant rs9939609 with weight loss in a lifestyle intervention and lipid metabolism markers in German obese children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müller Timo D

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously identified strong association of six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in FTO (fat mass and obesity associated gene to early onset extreme obesity within the first genome wide association study (GWA for this phenotype. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the obesity risk allele of one of these SNPs (rs9939609 is associated with weight loss in a lifestyle intervention program. Additionally, we tested for association of rs9939609 alleles with fasting blood parameters indicative of glucose and lipid metabolism. Methods We initially analysed rs9939609 in a case-control study comprising 519 German overweight and obese children and adolescents and 178 normal weight adults. In 207 of the obese individuals who took part in the outpatient obesity intervention program 'Obeldicks' we further analysed whether carrier status of the obesity risk A-allele of rs9939609 has a differential influence on weight loss after the intervention program. Additionally, we investigated in 480 of the overweight and obese patients whether rs9939609 is associated with fasting blood levels of glucose, triglycerides and HDL and LDL-cholesterol. Genotyping was performed using allele specific polymerase chain reaction (ARMS-PCR. For the association study (case-control approach, the Cochran-Armitage trend test was applied. Blood parameters were analysed using commercially available test kits and the log10-transformed blood parameters and changes in BMI-standard deviation scores (BMI-SDS were analysed by linear regression with sex and age as covariates under an additive mode of inheritance with the rs9939609 A-allele as risk allele. Results We confirmed the association of the risk A-allele of rs9939609 with overweight and early onset obesity (one sided p = 0.036. However, we observed no association of rs9939609 alleles with weight loss or fasting levels of blood glucose, triglycerides and cholesterol. Conclusion We confirmed

  15. NET 40 Generics Beginner's Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Mukherjee, Sudipta

    2012-01-01

    This is a concise, practical guide that will help you learn Generics in .NET, with lots of real world and fun-to-build examples and clear explanations. It is packed with screenshots to aid your understanding of the process. This book is aimed at beginners in Generics. It assumes some working knowledge of C# , but it isn't mandatory. The following would get the most use out of the book: Newbie C# developers struggling with Generics. Experienced C++ and Java Programmers who are migrating to C# and looking for an alternative to other generic frameworks like STL and JCF would find this book handy.

  16. The Net Reclassification Index (NRI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pepe, Margaret S.; Fan, Jing; Feng, Ziding

    2015-01-01

    The Net Reclassification Index (NRI) is a very popular measure for evaluating the improvement in prediction performance gained by adding a marker to a set of baseline predictors. However, the statistical properties of this novel measure have not been explored in depth. We demonstrate the alarming...... marker is proven to erroneously yield a positive NRI. Some insight into this phenomenon is provided. Since large values for the NRI statistic may simply be due to use of poorly fitting risk models, we suggest caution in using the NRI as the basis for marker evaluation. Other measures of prediction...

  17. Mars MetNet Mission - Martian Atmospheric Observational Post Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hari, Ari-Matti; Haukka, Harri; Aleksashkin, Sergey; Arruego, Ignacio; Schmidt, Walter; Genzer, Maria; Vazquez, Luis; Siikonen, Timo; Palin, Matti

    2017-04-01

    A new kind of planetary exploration mission for Mars is under development in collaboration between the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI), Lavochkin Association (LA), Space Research Institute (IKI) and Institutio Nacional de Tecnica Aerospacial (INTA). The Mars MetNet mission is based on a new semi-hard landing vehicle called MetNet Lander (MNL). The scientific payload of the Mars MetNet Precursor [1] mission is divided into three categories: Atmospheric instruments, Optical devices and Composition and structure devices. Each of the payload instruments will provide significant insights in to the Martian atmospheric behavior. The key technologies of the MetNet Lander have been qualified and the electrical qualification model (EQM) of the payload bay has been built and successfully tested. 1. MetNet Lander The MetNet landing vehicles are using an inflatable entry and descent system instead of rigid heat shields and parachutes as earlier semi-hard landing devices have used. This way the ratio of the payload mass to the overall mass is optimized. The landing impact will burrow the payload container into the Martian soil providing a more favorable thermal environment for the electronics and a suitable orientation of the telescopic boom with external sensors and the radio link antenna. It is planned to deploy several tens of MNLs on the Martian surface operating at least partly at the same time to allow meteorological network science. 2. Strawman Scientific Payload The strawman payload of the two MNL precursor models includes the following instruments: Atmospheric instruments: - MetBaro Pressure device - MetHumi Humidity device - MetTemp Temperature sensors Optical devices: - PanCam Panoramic - MetSIS Solar irradiance sensor with OWLS optical wireless system for data transfer - DS Dust sensor Composition and Structure Devices: Tri-axial magnetometer MOURA Tri-axial System Accelerometer The descent processes dynamic properties are monitored by a special 3-axis

  18. Bone loss, contraception and lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, S

    1993-04-01

    Loss of bone mass with age, is a universal phenomenon and is more pronounced in women than in men. The condition where the bone loss has proceeded to the extent that fractures occur is termed osteoporosis. As the number of elderly persons in the population increases, its magnitude is likely to increase, both in the developing and the developed countries. Bone mass increases rapidly in childhood and the adolescent years, reaching a peak in the third decade of life, and begins to decline soon thereafter. Several factors are thought to influence bone loss: these include race, diet, smoking, and physical exercise. Although the rate of bone loss accelerates in the immediate postmenopausal period, the process actually begins in the premenopausal years. By the time osteoporosis is clinically apparent and manifested by fracture, it probably cannot be reversed. The peak adult bone mass achieved, and the subsequent rate of bone loss are the major factors that determine a woman's susceptibility to postmenopausal osteoporosis. A primary cause of bone loss after menopause is the associated decline in ovarian function. Scanty information is available on the factors that affect bone mineral density or initiate bone loss before menopause, although both estrogens and progestins have been shown to prevent bone loss in postmenopausal women. Available data on the relationship between steroid hormone contraceptive use and bone mass/density is limited to combined oral contraceptives and one report related to the use of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Hair Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to treat acne, bipolar disorder, and ADHD. Diet pills that contain amphetamines also can cause hair loss. Alopecia areata (pronounced: al-uh-PEE-shuh air-ee-AH-tuh) . This skin disease causes hair ...

  20. Biological and nutritional properties of blackcurrant berries (Ribes nigrum L.) under conditions of shading nets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordjevic, Boban; Šavikin, Katarina; Djurovic, Dejan; Veberic, Robert; Mikulič Petkovšek, Maja; Zdunić, Gordana; Vulic, Todor

    2015-09-01

    Changes of environmental factors, created under the influence of various shading nets, could significantly affect the biological characteristics of plants grown in such conditions as well as biosynthesis of primary metabolites and ascorbic acid. Five blackcurrant cultivars - 'Ben Sarek', 'Ben Nevis', 'Ben Lomond', 'Ometa' and 'Čačanska Crna' - were cultivated in the shade of two green polyethylene nets and exposed to direct sunlight during two experimental seasons. In the control treatment, all cultivars contained the highest amounts of soluble solid content and number of flower buds per shoot in both years of cultivation. The bushes exposed to direct sunlight had the highest sunburn damage to the berries and leaves, and loss of yield. The greatest yield loss caused by berry damage in the present study during the experimental period was in cultivar 'Ben Sarek': 9.0% in 2010 and 15.4% in 2011. Growing in the shade of light-green net contributed the highest content of ascorbic acid. Control bushes and those shaded by light-green net had significantly higher radical scavenging activity, with values between 1.15 and 1.22 mg mL(-1). Plants shaded by nets in both years of cultivation had lower damage to leaves and berries and percentage of loss of yield, and usage of the net would be economically advantageous to growers. Fruit of blackcurrant cultivars grown in shading conditions still represent a good source of valuable nutritive and biologically active compounds. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.