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Sample records for net isotope effect

  1. Isotopic tracers for net primary productivity for a terrestrial esocystem ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The coupling effect of vapour release and CO2 uptake during photosynthesis plays an important role in the carbon and hydrologic cycles. The water use efficiency (WUE) for transpiration was used in calculating the net primary productivity (NPP) for terrestrial ecosystem. Three parameters were used in calculating the water ...

  2. Influence of 15N enrichment on the net isotopic fractionation factor during the reduction of nitrate to nitrous oxide in soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathieu, O.; Levegue, J.; Henault, C.

    2007-01-01

    or relatively low (15)N enrichment levels and requires a good knowledge of the isotopic fractionation effect inherent to this biological mechanism. This paper reports the measurement of the net and instantaneous isotopic fractionation factor (alpha(i)(s/p)) during the denitrification of NO(3)(-) to N(2)O over...... a range of (15)N substrate enrichments (0.37 to 1.00 atom% (15)N). At natural abundance level, the isotopic fractionation effect reported falls well within the range of data previously observed. For (15)N-enriched substrate, the value of alpha(i)(s/p) was not constant and decreased from 1.024 to 1......Nitrous oxide, a greenhouse gas, is mainly emitted from soils during the denitrification process. Nitrogen stable-isotope investigations can help to characterise the N(2)O source and N(2)O production mechanisms. The stable-isotope approach is increasingly used with (15)N natural abundance...

  3. [Net CO2 exchange and carbon isotope flux in Acacia mangium plantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Lu-Liu; Sun, Gu-Chou; Zhao, Ping; Cai, Xi-An; Zeng, Xiao-Ping; Wang, Quan

    2009-11-01

    By using stable carbon isotope technique, the leaf-level 13C discrimination was integrated to canopy-scale photosynthetic discrimination (Deltacanopy) through weighted the net CO2 assimilation (Anet) of sunlit and shaded leaves and the stand leaf area index (L) in an A. mangium plantation, and the carbon isotope fluxes from photosynthesis and respiration as well as their net exchange flux were obtained. There was an obvious diurnal variation in Deltacanopy, being lower at dawn and at noon time (18.47 per thousand and 19.87 per thousand, respectively) and the highest (21.21 per thousand) at dusk. From the end of November to next May, the Deltacanopy had an increasing trend, with an annual average of (20.37 +/- 0.29) per thousand. The carbon isotope ratios of CO2 from autotrophic respiration (excluding daytime foliar respiration) and heterotrophic respiration were respectively (- 28.70 +/- 0.75) per thousand and (- 26.75 +/- 1.3) per thousand in average. The delta13 C of nighttime ecosystem-respired CO2 in May was the lowest (-30.14 per thousand), while that in November was the highest (-28.01 per thousand). The carbon isotope flux of CO2 between A. mangium forest and atmosphere showed a midday peak of 178.5 and 217 micromol x m(-2) x s(-1) x per thousand in May and July, with the daily average of 638.4 and 873.2 micromol x m(-2) x s(-1) x per thousand, respectively. The carbon isotope flux of CO2 absorbed by canopy leaves was 1.6-2.5 times higher than that of CO2 emitted from respiration, suggesting that a large sum of CO2 was absorbed by A. mangium, which decreased the atmospheric CO2 concentration and improved the environment.

  4. Non-linear Isotope Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Johan Albrecht

    The isotopic fractionation associated with photodissociation of N2O, OCS and CO2, at different altitudes in Earth’s atmosphere, is investigated theoretically using constructed quantum mechanical models of the dissociation processes (i.e. potential energy surfaces and relevant coupling elements......’s stratosphere is nearly mass dependent, and only a small fraction of the observed anomalous oxygen-17 excess can be attributed to N2O photolysis. In contrast, stratospheric photolysis produces a significant inverse clumped isotope effect.(ii) Stratospheric OCS photolysis significantly enrich the remaining OCS...... in heavy carbon. The sulfur fractionation is weak and photolysis of OCS in the stratosphere produces only a small and mass dependent enrichment of heavy sulfur isotopes in the remaining OCS. Sulfur fractionation from the two remaining chemical sinks (oxidation by O(3P) and OH, respectively) is weak...

  5. Net accumulation rates derived from ice core stable isotope records of Pío XI glacier, Southern Patagonia Icefield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schwikowski

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Pío XI, the largest glacier of the Southern Patagonia Icefield, reached its neoglacial maximum extent in 1994 and is one of the few glaciers in that area which is not retreating. In view of the recent warming it is important to understand glacier responses to climate changes. Due to its remoteness and the harsh conditions in Patagonia, no systematic mass balance studies have been performed. In this study we derived net accumulation rates for the period 2000–2006 from a 50 m (33.2 4 m weq ice core collected in the accumulation area of Pío XI (2600 m a.s.l., 49°16'40"S, 73°21'14"W. Borehole temperatures indicate near temperate ice, but the average melt percent is only 16 ± 14%. Records of stable isotopes are well preserved and were used for identification of annual layers. Net accumulation rates range from 3.4–7.1 water equivalent (m weq with an average of 5.8 m weq, comparable to precipitation amounts at the Chilean coast, but not as high as expected for the Icefield. Ice core stable isotope data correlate well with upper air temperatures and may be used as temperature proxy.

  6. Sulfur Isotope Effects of Dissimilatory Sulfite Reductase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William D. Leavitt

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The precise interpretation of environmental sulfur isotope records requires a quantitative understanding of the biochemical controls on sulfur isotope fractionation by the principle isotope-fractionating process within the S cycle, microbial sulfate reduction (MSR. Here we provide the only direct observation of the major (34S/32S and minor (33S/32S, 36S/32S sulfur isotope fractionations imparted by a central enzyme in the energy metabolism of sulfate reducers, dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DsrAB. Results from in vitro sulfite reduction experiments allow us to calculate the in vitro DsrAB isotope effect in 34S/32S (hereafter, 34εDsrAB to be 15.3±2‰, 2σ. The accompanying minor isotope effect in 33S, described as 33λDsrAB, is calculated to be 0.5150±0.0012, 2σ. These observations facilitate a rigorous evaluation of the isotopic fractionation associated with the dissimilatory MSR pathway, as well as of the environmental variables that govern the overall magnitude of fractionation by natural communities of sulfate reducers. The isotope effect induced by DsrAB upon sulfite reduction is a factor of 0.3 to 0.6 times prior indirect estimates, which have ranged from 25 to 53‰ in 34εDsrAB. The minor isotope fractionation observed from DsrAB is consistent with a kinetic or equilibrium effect. Our in vitro constraints on the magnitude of 34εDsrAB is similar to the median value of experimental observations compiled from all known published work, where 34εr-p = 16.1‰ (r – p indicates reactant versus product, n = 648. This value closely matches those of MSR operating at high sulfate reduction rates in both laboratory chemostat experiments (34εSO4-H2S = 17.3±1.5‰ and in modern marine sediments (34εSO4-H2S = 17.3±3.8‰. Targeting the direct isotopic consequences of a specific enzymatic processes is a fundamental step toward a biochemical foundation for reinterpreting the biogeochemical and geobiological sulfur isotope records in modern

  7. Modeling nuclear volume isotope effects in crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauble, Edwin A.

    2013-01-01

    Mass-independent isotope fractionations driven by differences in volumes and shapes of nuclei (the field shift effect) are known in several elements and are likely to be found in more. All-electron relativistic electronic structure calculations can predict this effect but at present are computationally intensive and limited to modeling small gas phase molecules and clusters. Density functional theory, using the projector augmented wave method (DFT-PAW), has advantages in greater speed and compatibility with a three-dimensional periodic boundary condition while preserving information about the effects of chemistry on electron densities within nuclei. These electron density variations determine the volume component of the field shift effect. In this study, DFT-PAW calculations are calibrated against all-electron, relativistic Dirac–Hartree–Fock, and coupled-cluster with single, double (triple) excitation methods for estimating nuclear volume isotope effects. DFT-PAW calculations accurately reproduce changes in electron densities within nuclei in typical molecules, when PAW datasets constructed with finite nuclei are used. Nuclear volume contributions to vapor–crystal isotope fractionation are calculated for elemental cadmium and mercury, showing good agreement with experiments. The nuclear-volume component of mercury and cadmium isotope fractionations between atomic vapor and montroydite (HgO), cinnabar (HgS), calomel (Hg2Cl2), monteponite (CdO), and the CdS polymorphs hawleyite and greenockite are calculated, indicating preferential incorporation of neutron-rich isotopes in more oxidized, ionically bonded phases. Finally, field shift energies are related to Mössbauer isomer shifts, and equilibrium mass-independent fractionations for several tin-bearing crystals are calculated from 119Sn spectra. Isomer shift data should simplify calculations of mass-independent isotope fractionations in other elements with Mössbauer isotopes, such as platinum and uranium

  8. Modeling nuclear volume isotope effects in crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauble, Edwin A

    2013-10-29

    Mass-independent isotope fractionations driven by differences in volumes and shapes of nuclei (the field shift effect) are known in several elements and are likely to be found in more. All-electron relativistic electronic structure calculations can predict this effect but at present are computationally intensive and limited to modeling small gas phase molecules and clusters. Density functional theory, using the projector augmented wave method (DFT-PAW), has advantages in greater speed and compatibility with a three-dimensional periodic boundary condition while preserving information about the effects of chemistry on electron densities within nuclei. These electron density variations determine the volume component of the field shift effect. In this study, DFT-PAW calculations are calibrated against all-electron, relativistic Dirac-Hartree-Fock, and coupled-cluster with single, double (triple) excitation methods for estimating nuclear volume isotope effects. DFT-PAW calculations accurately reproduce changes in electron densities within nuclei in typical molecules, when PAW datasets constructed with finite nuclei are used. Nuclear volume contributions to vapor-crystal isotope fractionation are calculated for elemental cadmium and mercury, showing good agreement with experiments. The nuclear-volume component of mercury and cadmium isotope fractionations between atomic vapor and montroydite (HgO), cinnabar (HgS), calomel (Hg2Cl2), monteponite (CdO), and the CdS polymorphs hawleyite and greenockite are calculated, indicating preferential incorporation of neutron-rich isotopes in more oxidized, ionically bonded phases. Finally, field shift energies are related to Mössbauer isomer shifts, and equilibrium mass-independent fractionations for several tin-bearing crystals are calculated from (119)Sn spectra. Isomer shift data should simplify calculations of mass-independent isotope fractionations in other elements with Mössbauer isotopes, such as platinum and uranium.

  9. Incorporation of a Cuban radiological station to the global net of isotopes in precipitations; Incorporacion de una estacion radiologica cubana a la red global de isotopos en precipitaciones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominguez L, O.; Ramos V, E.O.; Prendes A, M.; Alonso A, D.; Caveda R, C.A. [CPHR, Calle 20 No. 4113 e/41 y 47, Playa, C.P. 11300, A.P. 6195, C.P. 10600 La Habana (Cuba)]. e-mail: orlando@cphr.edu.cu

    2006-07-01

    From March, 2002 the West station of the National Net of Environmental Radiological Surveillance located in the Center of Protection and Hygiene of the Radiations, belongs to the Global Net of Isotopes in Precipitations. The obtained isotopic information of the analysis of the samples of monthly monitored precipitations (oxygen-18, deuterium and tritium) its are stored in a database, which is available through Internet. For the acceptance in the Global Net, it was necessary the incorporation to the monitoring of the station the meteorological surface variables. Also it was developed a software for the calculation of the tension of the water steam starting from the values of humidity and temperature. The obtained results in 2002 and published recently, its are inside the range of values reported for these isotopes in the Caribbean area. (Author)

  10. Renewable Generation Effect on Net Regional Energy Interchange: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diakov, Victor; Brinkman, Gregory; Denholm, Paul; Jenkin, Thomas; Margolis, Robert

    2015-07-30

    Using production-cost model (PLEXOS), we simulate the Western Interchange (WECC) at several levels of the yearly renewable energy (RE) generation, between 13% and 40% of the total load for the year. We look at the overall energy exchange between a region and the rest of the system (net interchange, NI), and find it useful to examine separately (i) (time-)variable and (ii) year-average components of the NI. Both contribute to inter-regional energy exchange, and are affected by wind and PV generation in the system. We find that net load variability (in relatively large portions of WECC) is the leading factor affecting the variable component of inter-regional energy exchange, and the effect is quantifiable: higher regional net load correlation with the rest of the WECC lowers net interchange variability. Further, as the power mix significantly varies between WECC regions, effects of ‘flexibility import’ (regions ‘borrow’ ramping capability) are also observed.

  11. Isotope effects on the crotonase reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahnson, B.J.; Anderson, V.E. (Brown Univ., Providence, RI (USA))

    1989-05-16

    The primary, alpha-secondary, beta-secondary, and beta'-secondary deuterium and primary 18O kinetic isotope effects on V/K for the dehydration of ((3S)-3-hydroxybutyryl)pantetheine by bovine liver crotonase (enoyl-CoA hydratase, EC 4.2.1.17) have been determined by the equilibrium perturbation method. The primary deuterium and 18O kinetic isotope effects are 1.61 and 1.051, respectively. The secondary deuterium effects at C-2, C-3, and C-4 are 1.12, 1.13, and 1.00 per H, respectively. The large 18O isotope effect suggests C-O bond cleavage is largely rate determining but is consistent with either an E1cb or E2 mechanism with a large amount of carbanion character. The beta-secondary effect is a factor of 1.05 greater than the equilibrium isotope effect, indicating that this C-H bond is less stiff in the affected transition state or that its motion is coupled to the reaction coordinate motion. Analytical solutions to the differential equations describing uni-uni equilibrium perturbations are presented.

  12. Carbon and hydrogen isotopic effects of stomatal density in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyejung; Feakins, Sarah J.; Sternberg, Leonel da S. L.

    2016-04-01

    Stomata are key gateways mediating carbon uptake and water loss from plants. Varied stomatal densities in fossil leaves raise the possibility that isotope effects associated with the openness of exchange may have mediated plant wax biomarker isotopic proxies for paleovegetation and paleoclimate in the geological record. Here we use Arabidopsis thaliana, a widely used model organism, to provide the first controlled tests of stomatal density on carbon and hydrogen isotopic compositions of cuticular waxes. Laboratory grown wildtype and mutants with suppressed and overexpressed stomatal densities allow us to directly test the isotope effects of stomatal densities independent of most other environmental or biological variables. Hydrogen isotope (D/H) measurements of both plant waters and plant wax n-alkanes allow us to directly constrain the isotopic effects of leaf water isotopic enrichment via transpiration and biosynthetic fractionations, which together determine the net fractionation between irrigation water and n-alkane hydrogen isotopic composition. We also measure carbon isotopic fractionations of n-alkanes and bulk leaf tissue associated with different stomatal densities. We find offsets of +15‰ for δD and -3‰ for δ13C for the overexpressed mutant compared to the suppressed mutant. Since the range of stomatal densities expressed is comparable to that found in extant plants and the Cenozoic fossil record, the results allow us to consider the magnitude of isotope effects that may be incurred by these plant adaptive responses. This study highlights the potential of genetic mutants to isolate individual isotope effects and add to our fundamental understanding of how genetics and physiology influence plant biochemicals including plant wax biomarkers.

  13. Combining Solvent Isotope Effects with Substrate Isotope Effects in Mechanistic Studies of Alcohol and Amine Oxidation by Enzymes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Paul F.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidation of alcohols and amines is catalyzed by multiple families of flavin-and pyridine nucleotide-dependent enzymes. Measurement of solvent isotope effects provides a unique mechanistic probe of the timing of the cleavage of the OH and NH bonds, necessary information for a complete description of the catalytic mechanism. The inherent ambiguities in interpretation of solvent isotope effects can be significantly decreased if isotope effects arising from isotopically labeled substrates are measured in combination with solvent isotope effects. The application of combined solvent and substrate (mainly deuterium) isotope effects to multiple enzymes is described here to illustrate the range of mechanistic insights that such an approach can provide. PMID:25448013

  14. The effect of dipolar interaction on the magnetic isotope effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mojaza, Matin; Pedersen, Jørgen Boiden; Lukzen, Nikita

    2010-01-01

    A multi-channel kinetic description is used to study the magnetic isotope effect (MIE) in zero magnetic field. The maximal isotope effect is equal to the number of channels, two for the hyperfine interaction but four for the electron spin dipole–dipole interaction of the intermediate radical pair....... Quantum mechanical calculations agree with these conclusion and show that large MIE may be obtained even in the presence of a strong exchange interaction. The observed magnesium isotope effect on the rate of enzymatic synthesis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is approximately 3 implying that the dipolar...... interaction is responsible for the effect. Our calculations provide support for the proposed mechanism....

  15. Study on the Effect of the Separating Unit Optimization on the Economy of Stable Isotope Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Kun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An economic criterion called as yearly net profit of single separating unit (YNPSSU was presented to evaluate the influence of structure optimization on the economy. Using YNPSSU as a criterion, economic analysis was carried out for the structure optimization of separating unit in the case of separating SiF4 to obtain the 28Si and 29Si isotope. YNPSSU was calculated and compared with that before optimization. The results showed that YNPSSU was increased by 12.3% by the structure optimization. Therefore, the structure optimization could increase the economy of the stable isotope separation effectively.

  16. Large deuterium isotope effects and their use: a historical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumbiegel, Peter

    2011-03-01

    Isotope effects are differences in the properties of the isotopes of an element resulting in different reaction rates of a corresponding compound, in equilibrium constants and in the spectra. Shortly after the discovery of stable isotopes of hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon, Jacob Bigeleisen formulated a theory of isotope effects and calculated possible maximum values. Large isotope effects of (2)H (deuterium) against (1)H (protium) were seen to possibly influence interpretations of reaction mechanisms if corresponding labelling is used. Much work was invested to ensure the safety of deuterium use in men in spite of the large isotope effect. On the other hand, large deuterium isotope effects gave rise to several practical applications. Examples are the enhancement of the stability of some technical products against oxidative and against hydrolytic degradation (oils, pharmaceuticals) as well as alterations of the detoxification metabolism of pharmaceuticals in vivo.

  17. Evaluating chlorine isotope effects from isotope ratios and mass spectra of polychlorinated molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, Martin; Hunkeler, Daniel

    2008-06-15

    Compound-specific chlorine isotope analysis receives much interest to assess the fate of chlorinated hydrocarbons in contaminated environments. This paper provides a theoretical basis to calculate isotope ratios and quantify isotope fractionation from ion-current ratios of molecular- and fragment-ion multiplets. Because both (35)Cl and (37)Cl are of high abundance, polychlorinated hydrocarbons consist of molecules containing different numbers of (37)Cl denoted as isotopologues. We show that, during reactions, the changes in isotopologue ratios are proportional to changes in the isotope ratio assuming a nonselective isotope distribution in the initial compound. This proportionality extents even to fragments formed in the ion source of a mass spectrometer such as C 2Cl 2 (double dechlorinated fragment of perchloroethylene, PCE). Fractionation factors and kinetic isotope effects (KIE) may, therefore, be evaluated from isotope, isotopologue or even fragment ratios according to conventional simple equations. The proportionality is exact with symmetric molecules such as dichloroethylene (DCE) and PCE, whereas it is approximately true with molecules containing nonreactive positions such as trichloroethylene (TCE). If in the latter case isotope ratios are derived from dechlorinated fragments, e.g., C 2HCl 2, it is important that fragmentation in the ion source affect all molecular positions alike, as otherwise isotopic changes in reactive positions may be underrepresented.

  18. Combining solvent isotope effects with substrate isotope effects in mechanistic studies of alcohol and amine oxidation by enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2015-11-01

    Oxidation of alcohols and amines is catalyzed by multiple families of flavin- and pyridine nucleotide-dependent enzymes. Measurement of solvent isotope effects provides a unique mechanistic probe of the timing of the cleavage of the OH and NH bonds, necessary information for a complete description of the catalytic mechanism. The inherent ambiguities in interpretation of solvent isotope effects can be significantly decreased if isotope effects arising from isotopically labeled substrates are measured in combination with solvent isotope effects. The application of combined solvent and substrate (mainly deuterium) isotope effects to multiple enzymes is described here to illustrate the range of mechanistic insights that such an approach can provide. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Enzyme Transition States from Theory and Experiment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of dietary net energy concentrations on growth performance and net energy intake of growing gilts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gang Il; Kim, Jong Hyuk; Han, Gi Ppeum; Koo, Do Yoon; Choi, Hyeon Seok; Kil, Dong Yong

    2017-09-01

    This experiment investigated the effect of dietary net energy (NE) concentrations on growth performance and NE intake of growing gilts. Five diets were formulated to contain 9.6, 10.1, 10.6, 11.1, and 11.6 MJ NE/kg, respectively. A metabolism trial with 10 growing pigs (average body weight [BW] = 15.9±0.24 kg) was conducted to determine NE concentrations of 5 diets based on French and Dutch NE systems in a 5×5 replicated Latin square design. A growth trial also was performed with five dietary treatments and 12 replicates per treatment using 60 growing gilts (average BW = 15.9±0.55 kg) for 28 days. A regression analysis was performed to predict daily NE intake from the BW of growing gilts. Increasing NE concentrations of diets did not influence average daily gain and average daily feed intake of growing gilts. There was a quadratic relationship (p = 0.01) between dietary NE concentrations and feed efficiency (G:F), although the difference in G:F among treatment means was relatively small. Regression analysis revealed that daily NE intake was linearly associated with the BW of growing gilts. The prediction equations for NE intake with the BW of growing gilts were: NE intake (MJ/d) = 1.442+(0.562×BW, kg), R 2 = 0.796 when French NE system was used, whereas NE intake (MJ/d) = 1.533+(0.614×BW, kg), R 2 = 0.810 when Dutch NE system was used. Increasing NE concentrations of diets from 9.6 to 11.6 MJ NE/kg have little impacts on growth performance of growing gilts. Daily NE intake can be predicted from the BW between 15 and 40 kg in growing gilts.

  20. Isotopic effect on thermal physical properties of isotopically modified boron single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Quanli [Japan Science and Technology Corporation, Kawaguchi, Saitama (Japan); Noda, Tetsuji; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Araki, Hiroshi; Numazawa, Takenori; Hirano, Toshiyuki [National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Nogi, Naoyuki; Tanaka, Satoru [University of Tokyo, Department of Quantum Engineering and Systems Science, Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-04-01

    The measurement of specific heat and thermal conductivity at low temperature for isotopically modified boron single crystals was performed between 0.5 and 100K using relaxation method and steady heat flow method, respectively. The results indicate that the specific heat has obvious divergences at T<5K. At 40K, the thermal conductivity of {sup 10}B-enriched crystal is about 570 W/m{center_dot}K, which is 40% larger than that of natural boron crystal. The influence of lattice vibration modes and the isotopic effect on specific heat and thermal conductivity for isotopically modified boron are discussed. (author)

  1. Bromine and carbon isotope effects during photolysis of brominated phenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakon, Yevgeni; Halicz, Ludwik; Gelman, Faina

    2013-12-17

    In the present study, carbon and bromine isotope effects during UV-photodegradation of bromophenols in aqueous and ethanolic solutions were determined. An anomalous relatively high inverse bromine isotope fractionation (εreactive position up to +5.1‰) along with normal carbon isotope effect (εreactive position of -12.6‰ to -23.4‰) observed in our study may be attributed to coexistence of both mass-dependent and mass-independent isotope fractionation of C-Br bond cleavage. Isotope effects of a similar scale were observed for all the studied reactions in ethanol, and for 4-bromophenol in aqueous solution. This may point out related radical mechanism for these processes. The lack of any carbon and bromine isotope effects during photodegradation of 2-bromophenol in aqueous solution possibly indicates that C-Br bond cleavage is not a rate-limiting step in the reaction. The bromine isotope fractionation, without any detectable carbon isotope effect, that was observed for 3-bromophenol photolysis in aqueous solution probably originates from mass-independent fractionation.

  2. Effects of net hapa on the survival of Clarias gariepinus (Burchell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of net hapa on the survival of fry from diffe rent brood stock sizes of Clarias gariepinus (Burchell 1822) was investigated in indoor aquaria for five weeks. Net hapa was incorporated to facilitate the separation of hatch lings from unhatched eggs and shells. The use of incubating net hapa with kakabans inside did ...

  3. Partitioning net ecosystem carbon exchange into net assimilation and respiration using 13CO2 measurements: A cost-effective sampling strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    OgéE, J.; Peylin, P.; Ciais, P.; Bariac, T.; Brunet, Y.; Berbigier, P.; Roche, C.; Richard, P.; Bardoux, G.; Bonnefond, J.-M.

    2003-06-01

    The current emphasis on global climate studies has led the scientific community to set up a number of sites for measuring the long-term biosphere-atmosphere net CO2 exchange (net ecosystem exchange, NEE). Partitioning this flux into its elementary components, net assimilation (FA), and respiration (FR), remains necessary in order to get a better understanding of biosphere functioning and design better surface exchange models. Noting that FR and FA have different isotopic signatures, we evaluate the potential of isotopic 13CO2 measurements in the air (combined with CO2 flux and concentration measurements) to partition NEE into FR and FA on a routine basis. The study is conducted at a temperate coniferous forest where intensive isotopic measurements in air, soil, and biomass were performed in summer 1997. The multilayer soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer model MuSICA is adapted to compute 13CO2 flux and concentration profiles. Using MuSICA as a "perfect" simulator and taking advantage of the very dense spatiotemporal resolution of the isotopic data set (341 flasks over a 24-hour period) enable us to test each hypothesis and estimate the performance of the method. The partitioning works better in midafternoon when isotopic disequilibrium is strong. With only 15 flasks, i.e., two 13CO2 nighttime profiles (to estimate the isotopic signature of FR) and five daytime measurements (to perform the partitioning) we get mean daily estimates of FR and FA that agree with the model within 15-20%. However, knowledge of the mesophyll conductance seems crucial and may be a limitation to the method.

  4. Fundamental studies on kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of hydrogen isotope fractionation in natural gas systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Y.; Ma, Q.; Ellis, G.S.; Dai, J.; Katz, B.; Zhang, S.; Tang, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Based on quantum chemistry calculations for normal octane homolytic cracking, a kinetic hydrogen isotope fractionation model for methane, ethane, and propane formation is proposed. The activation energy differences between D-substitute and non-substituted methane, ethane, and propane are 318.6, 281.7, and 280.2cal/mol, respectively. In order to determine the effect of the entropy contribution for hydrogen isotopic substitution, a transition state for ethane bond rupture was determined based on density function theory (DFT) calculations. The kinetic isotope effect (KIE) associated with bond rupture in D and H substituted ethane results in a frequency factor ratio of 1.07. Based on the proposed mathematical model of hydrogen isotope fractionation, one can potentially quantify natural gas thermal maturity from measured hydrogen isotope values. Calculated gas maturity values determined by the proposed mathematical model using ??D values in ethane from several basins in the world are in close agreement with similar predictions based on the ??13C composition of ethane. However, gas maturity values calculated from field data of methane and propane using both hydrogen and carbon kinetic isotopic models do not agree as closely. It is possible that ??D values in methane may be affected by microbial mixing and that propane values might be more susceptible to hydrogen exchange with water or to analytical errors. Although the model used in this study is quite preliminary, the results demonstrate that kinetic isotope fractionation effects in hydrogen may be useful in quantitative models of natural gas generation, and that ??D values in ethane might be more suitable for modeling than comparable values in methane and propane. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Kinetic 15N-isotope effects on algal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriukonis, Eivydas; Gorokhova, Elena

    2017-03-01

    Stable isotope labeling is a standard technique for tracing material transfer in molecular, ecological and biogeochemical studies. The main assumption in this approach is that the enrichment with a heavy isotope has no effect on the organism metabolism and growth, which is not consistent with current theoretical and empirical knowledge on kinetic isotope effects. Here, we demonstrate profound changes in growth dynamics of the green alga Raphidocelis subcapitata grown in 15N-enriched media. With increasing 15N concentration (0.37 to 50 at%), the lag phase increased, whereas maximal growth rate and total yield decreased; moreover, there was a negative relationship between the growth and the lag phase across the treatments. The latter suggests that a trade-off between growth rate and the ability to adapt to the high 15N environment may exist. Remarkably, the lag-phase response at 3.5 at% 15N was the shortest and deviated from the overall trend, thus providing partial support to the recently proposed Isotopic Resonance hypothesis, which predicts that certain isotopic composition is particularly favorable for living organisms. These findings confirm the occurrence of KIE in isotopically enriched algae and underline the importance of considering these effects when using stable isotope labeling in field and experimental studies.

  6. Platinum isotopes in iron meteorites: Galactic cosmic ray effects and nucleosynthetic homogeneity in the p-process isotope 190Pt and the other platinum isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Alison C.; Ek, Mattias; Schönbächler, Maria

    2017-11-01

    Platinum isotopes are sensitive to the effects of galactic cosmic rays (GCR), which can alter isotope ratios and mask nucleosynthetic isotope variations. Platinum also features one p-process isotope, 190Pt, which is very low abundance and therefore challenging to analyse. Platinum-190 is relevant for early solar-system chronology because of its decay to 186Os. Here, we present new Pt isotope data for five iron meteorite groups (IAB, IIAB, IID, IIIAB and IVA), including high-precision measurements of 190Pt for the IAB, IIAB and IIIAB irons, determined by multi-collector ICPMS. New data are in good agreement with previous studies and display correlations between different Pt isotopes. The slopes of these correlations are well-reproduced by the available GCR models. We report Pt isotope ratios for the IID meteorite Carbo that are consistently higher than the predicted effects from the GCR model. This suggests that the model predictions do not fully account for all the GCR effects on Pt isotopes, but also that the pre-atmospheric radii and exposure times calculated for Carbo may be incorrect. Despite this, the good agreement of relative effects in Pt isotopes with the predicted GCR trends confirms that Pt isotopes are a useful in-situ neutron dosimeter. Once GCR effects are accounted for, our new dataset reveals s- and r-process homogeneity between the iron meteorite groups studied here and the Earth. New 190Pt data for the IAB, IIAB and IIIAB iron meteorites indicate the absence of GCR effects and homogeneity in the p-process isotope between these groups and the Earth. This corresponds well with results from other heavy p-process isotopes and suggests their homogenous distribution in the inner solar system, although it does not exclude that potential p-process isotope variations are too diluted to be currently detectable.

  7. Isotope effect on the zero point energy shift upon condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kornblum, Z.C.; Ishida, T.

    1977-07-01

    The various isotope-dependent and independent atomic and molecular properties that pertain to the isotopic difference between the zero point energy (ZPE) shifts upon condensation were derived. The theoretical development of the change of the ZPE associated with the internal molecular vibrations, due to the condensation of the gaseous molecules, is presented on the basis of Wolfsberg's second-order perturbation treatment of the isotope-dependent London dispersion forces between liquid molecules. The isotope effect on the ZPE shift is related to the difference between the sums of the integrated intensities of the infrared absorption bands of the two gaseous isotopic molecules. The effective atomic charges are also calculated from available experimental infrared intensity data. The effects of isotopic substitutions of carbon-13 for carbon-12 and/or deuterium for protium, in ethylene, methane, and the fluorinated methanes, CH/sub 3/F, CH/sub 2/F/sub 2/, CHF/sub 3/, and CF/sub 4/, on the ZPE shift upon condensation are calculated. These results compare well with the Bigeleisen B-factors, which are experimentally obtained from vapor pressure measurements of the isotopic species. Each of the following molecular properties will tend to increase the isotopic difference between the ZPE shifts upon condensation: (1) large number of highly polar bonds, (2) high molecular weight, (3) non-polar (preferably) or massive molecule, (4) non-hydrogenous molecule, and (5) closely packed liquid molecules. These properties will result in stronger dispersion forces in the liquid phase between the lighter molecules than between the isotopically heavier molecules. 36 tables, 9 figures.

  8. H/D Isotope Effects in Hydrogen Bonded Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksander Filarowski

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available An extremely strong H/D isotope effect observed in hydrogen bonded A-H…B systems is connected with a reach diversity of the potential shape for the proton/deuteron motion. It is connected with the anharmonicity of the proton/deuteron vibrations and of the tunneling effect, particularly in cases of short bridges with low barrier for protonic and deuteronic jumping. Six extreme shapes of the proton motion are presented starting from the state without possibility of the proton transfer up to the state with a full ionization. The manifestations of the H/D isotope effect are best reflected in the infra-red absorption spectra. A most characteristic is the run of the relationship between the isotopic ratio nH/nD and position of the absorption band shown by using the example of NHN hydrogen bonds. One can distinguish a critical range of correlation when the isotopic ratio reaches the value of ca. 1 and then increases up to unusual values higher than . The critical range of the isotope effect is also visible in NQR and NMR spectra. In the critical region one observes a stepwise change of the NQR frequency reaching 1.1 MHz. In the case of NMR, the maximal isotope effect is reflected on the curve presenting the dependence of Δd (1H,2H on d (1H. This effect corresponds to the range of maximum on the correlation curve between dH and ΔpKa that is observed in various systems. There is a lack in the literature of quantitative information about the influence of isotopic substitution on the dielectric properties of hydrogen bond except the isotope effect on the ferroelectric phase transition in some hydrogen bonded crystals.

  9. H/D isotope effects in hydrogen bonded systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobczyk, Lucjan; Obrzud, Monika; Filarowski, Aleksander

    2013-04-16

    An extremely strong H/D isotope effect observed in hydrogen bonded A-H…B systems is connected with a reach diversity of the potential shape for the proton/deuteron motion. It is connected with the anharmonicity of the proton/deuteron vibrations and of the tunneling effect, particularly in cases of short bridges with low barrier for protonic and deuteronic jumping. Six extreme shapes of the proton motion are presented starting from the state without possibility of the proton transfer up to the state with a full ionization. The manifestations of the H/D isotope effect are best reflected in the infra-red absorption spectra. A most characteristic is the run of the relationship between the isotopic ratio nH/nD and position of the absorption band shown by using the example of NHN hydrogen bonds. One can distinguish a critical range of correlation when the isotopic ratio reaches the value of ca. 1 and then increases up to unusual values higher than . The critical range of the isotope effect is also visible in NQR and NMR spectra. In the critical region one observes a stepwise change of the NQR frequency reaching 1.1 MHz. In the case of NMR, the maximal isotope effect is reflected on the curve presenting the dependence of Δd (¹H,²H) on d (¹H). This effect corresponds to the range of maximum on the correlation curve between dH and ΔpKa that is observed in various systems. There is a lack in the literature of quantitative information about the influence of isotopic substitution on the dielectric properties of hydrogen bond except the isotope effect on the ferroelectric phase transition in some hydrogen bonded crystals.

  10. Carbon Stable Isotope Values in Plankton and Mussels Reflect Changes in Carbonate Chemistry Associated with Nutrient Enhanced Net Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coastal ecosystems are inherently complex and potentially adaptive as they respond to changes in nutrient loads and climate. We documented the role that carbon stable isotope (δ13C) measurements could play in understanding that adaptation with a series of three Ecostat (i.e...

  11. Net Effects of Ecotourism on Threatened Species Survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf C Buckley

    Full Text Available Many threatened species rely on ecotourism for conservation funding, but simultaneously suffer direct ecological impacts from ecotourism. For a range of IUCN-Redlisted terrestrial and marine bird and mammal species worldwide, we use population viability analyses to calculate the net effects of ecotourism on expected time to extinction, in the presence of other anthropogenic threats such as poaching, primary industries and habitat loss. Species for which these calculations are currently possible, for one or more subpopulations, include: orangutan, hoolock gibbon, golden lion tamarin, cheetah, African wild dog, New Zealand sealion, great green macaw, Egyptian vulture, and African penguin. For some but not all of these species, tourism can extend expected survival time, i.e., benefits outweigh impacts. Precise outcomes depend strongly on population parameters and starting sizes, predation, and ecotourism scale and mechanisms. Tourism does not currently overcome other major conservation threats associated with natural resource extractive industries. Similar calculations for other threatened species are currently limited by lack of basic population data.

  12. Net Effects of Ecotourism on Threatened Species Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Ralf C; Morrison, Clare; Castley, J Guy

    2016-01-01

    Many threatened species rely on ecotourism for conservation funding, but simultaneously suffer direct ecological impacts from ecotourism. For a range of IUCN-Redlisted terrestrial and marine bird and mammal species worldwide, we use population viability analyses to calculate the net effects of ecotourism on expected time to extinction, in the presence of other anthropogenic threats such as poaching, primary industries and habitat loss. Species for which these calculations are currently possible, for one or more subpopulations, include: orangutan, hoolock gibbon, golden lion tamarin, cheetah, African wild dog, New Zealand sealion, great green macaw, Egyptian vulture, and African penguin. For some but not all of these species, tourism can extend expected survival time, i.e., benefits outweigh impacts. Precise outcomes depend strongly on population parameters and starting sizes, predation, and ecotourism scale and mechanisms. Tourism does not currently overcome other major conservation threats associated with natural resource extractive industries. Similar calculations for other threatened species are currently limited by lack of basic population data.

  13. Isotope and density profile effects on pedestal neoclassical transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buller, S.; Pusztai, I.

    2017-10-01

    Cross-field neoclassical transport of heat, particles and momentum is studied in sharp density pedestals, with a focus on isotope and profile effects, using a radially global approach. Global effects—which tend to reduce the peak ion heat flux, and shift it outward—increase with isotope mass for fixed profiles. The heat flux reduction exhibits a saturation with a favorable isotopic trend. A significant part of the heat flux can be convective even in pure plasmas, unlike in the plasma core, and it is sensitive to how momentum sources are distributed between the various species. In particular, if only ion momentum sources are allowed, in global simulations of pure plasmas the ion particle flux remains close to its local value, while this may not be the case for simulations with isotope mixtures or electron momentum sources. The radial angular momentum transport that is a finite orbit width effect, is found to be strongly correlated with heat sources.

  14. Oxygen isotope geochemistry of the amphiboles: Isotope effects of cation substitutions in minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohn, M.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Valley, J.W. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics

    1998-06-01

    The occurrence of coexisting amphiboles in rocks and the likelihood of concurrent isotope closure allows equilibrium oxygen isotope fractionations among the amphiboles to be recovered from natural samples. Oxygen isotope analyses of mineral separates using laser fluorination show that coexisting amphiboles increasingly partition {sup 18}O in the order: hornblende {much_lt} gedrite < cummingtonite {le} anthophyllite. The observed fractionations at {approximately}575 C are: {Delta}(Ged-Hbl) = 0.8%, {Delta}(Cum-Hbl) = 0.9, {Delta}(Cum-Ged) = 0.2, {Delta}(Ath-Ged) = 0.3, and {Delta}(Ath-Hbl) > 0.9. Previously published data for hornblende, actinolite, glaucophane, and garnet show that {Delta}(Act-Hbl) {approximately} 0.2, {Delta}(Gin-Grt) {much_gt} 1, and {Delta}(Hbl-Grt) {approximately} 0. Thus, glaucophane strongly partitions {sup 18}O relative to the calcic amphiboles. The fractionation between two amphiboles of arbitrary composition can be predicted from the known fractionations for mica endmembers, pyroxene endmembers, and exchange components. Applications of the exchange component method reproduce measured amphibole fractionations to within {+-}0.1 to {+-}0.2%, whereas other predictive methods cause misfit for typical metamorphic hornblende of {ge}0.5% at 575 C. Although the isotope effects of cation exchanges may be small at high-T, they magnify dramatically for minerals formed in surficial, diagenetic, and low-T metamorphic environments. Different composition clays are predicted to have equilibrium {delta}{sup 18}O differences of 2--9%. If the isotope fractionation can be determined for one mineral endmember, then calibrated exchanges allow accurate prediction of the isotope fractionations for intermediate compositions of most ortho-, ring-, chain-, and sheet-silicates.

  15. Repellent effect of alphacypermethrin-treated netting against Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, T; Kamal, A; Gogo, E; Saidi, M; Delétré, E; Bonafos, R; Simon, S; Ngouajio, M

    2014-04-01

    For > 20 yr, Bemisia tabaci Gennadius persists as a begomovirus vector and is a serious problem in tomato production in many parts of the world. In tropical countries, the use of netting to protect horticultural crops has proven to be an effective and sustainable tool against Lepidoptera but not against small insects. This study evaluated the repellent effect of AgroNet 0.9T, a 0.9-mm pore diameter and 40-mesh size netting treated with alphacypermethrin insecticide against B. tabaci. This pyrethroid insecticide is known to have toxic and repellent effects against mosquitoes and has been used for treatment of mosquito nets. Two nontreated netting materials were used as control: AgroNet 0.9NT with 0.9-mm pore diameter and 40-mesh size and AgroNet 0.4NT with 0.4-mm pore diameter and 80-mesh size. The behavior of B. tabaci and its parasitoid Encarsia formosa Gahan as they progressed through the treated netting was studied in the laboratory in choice and no-choice tests. The development of wild B. tabaci population on tomato plants protected by the same nets was followed in two field trials implemented in Njoro, Kenya. Results obtained with the no-choice tests showed a significant reduction of movement on the treated net with 40-mesh (19%) compared with nontreated netting (35 and 46% with 80- and 40-mesh, respectively). The mortality of B. tabaci was significantly higher (two-fold) in the test tube containing only the treated netting compared with the nontreated one. The repellent effect of the treated netting was also demonstrated against E. formosa, but it did not have this toxic effect. Unlike for B. tabaci, the treated and nontreated nets appeared to have a similar repellent effect on E. formosa in the choice test, which suggests a learning behavior of the parasitoid. In both field tests, B. tabaci population was significantly lower on tomato protected by the treated net compared with the same nontreated net. However there was no significant difference in B. tabaci

  16. Isotopic phonon effects in β-rhombohedral boron--non-statistical isotope distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werheit, H; Filipov, V; Kuhlmann, U; Schwarz, U; Armbrüster, M; Antadze, M

    2012-05-02

    On the basis of the spectra of IR- and Raman-active phonons, the isotopic phonon effects in β-rhombohedral boron are analysed for polycrystalline (10)B- and (11)B-enriched samples of different origin and high-purity (nat)B single crystals. Intra- and inter-icosahedral B-B vibrations are harmonic, hence meeting the virtual crystal approximation (VCA) requirements. Deviations from the phonon shift expected according to the VCA are attributed to the anharmonic share of the lattice vibrations. In the case of icosahedral vibrations, the agreement with calculations on α-rhombohedral boron by Shirai and Katayama-Yoshida is quite satisfactory. Phonon shifts due to isotopic disorder in (nat)B are separated and determined. Some phonon frequencies are sensitive to impurities. The isotopic phonon effects yield valuable specific information on the nature of the different phonon modes. The occupation of regular boron sites by isotopes deviates significantly from the random distribution. © 2012 IOP Publishing Ltd

  17. Lithium isotope effect accompanying electrochemical intercalation of lithium into graphite

    CERN Document Server

    Yanase, S; Oi, T

    2003-01-01

    Lithium has been electrochemically intercalated from a 1:2 (v/v) mixed solution of ethylene carbonate (EC) and methylethyl carbonate (MEC) containing 1 M LiClO sub 4 into graphite, and the lithium isotope fractionation accompanying the intercalation was observed. The lighter isotope was preferentially fractionated into graphite. The single-stage lithium isotope separation factor ranged from 1.007 to 1.025 at 25 C and depended little on the mole ratio of lithium to carbon of the lithium-graphite intercalation compounds (Li-GIC) formed. The separation factor increased with the relative content of lithium. This dependence seems consistent with the existence of an equilibrium isotope effect between the solvated lithium ion in the EC/MEC electrolyte solution and the lithium in graphite, and with the formation of a solid electrolyte interfaces on graphite at the early stage of intercalation. (orig.)

  18. Effectiveness of insecticide-treated and untreated nets to prevent malaria in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Remoortel, Hans; De Buck, Emmy; Singhal, Maneesh; Vandekerckhove, Philippe; Agarwal, Satya P

    2015-08-01

    India is the most malaria-endemic country in South-East Asia, resulting in a high socio-economic burden. Insecticide-treated or untreated nets are effective interventions to prevent malaria. As part of an Indian first-aid guideline project, we aimed to investigate the magnitude of this effect in India. We searched MEDLINE, Embase and Central to systematically review Indian studies on the effectiveness of treated or untreated vs. no nets. Parasite prevalence and annual parasite incidence served as malaria outcomes. The overall effect was investigated by performing meta-analyses and calculating the pooled risk ratios (RR) and incidence rate ratios. Of 479 articles, we finally retained 16 Indian studies. Untreated nets decreased the risk of parasite prevalence compared to no nets [RR 0.69 (95% CI; 0.55, 0.87) in high-endemic areas, RR 0.49 (95% CI; 0.28, 0.84) in low-endemic areas], as was the case but more pronounced for treated nets [RR 0.35 (95% CI; 0.26, 0.47) in high-endemic areas, risk ratio 0.16 (95% CI; 0.06, 0.44) in low-endemic areas]. Incidence rate ratios showed a similar observation: a significantly reduced rate of parasites in the blood for untreated nets vs. no nets, which was more pronounced in low-endemic areas and for those who used treated nets. The average effect of treated nets (vs. no nets) on parasite prevalence was higher in Indian studies (RR 0.16-0.35) than in non-Indian studies (data derived from a Cochrane systematic review; RR 0.58-0.87). Both treated and untreated nets have a clear protective effect against malaria in the Indian context. This effect is more pronounced there than in other countries. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Transport hysteresis and hydrogen isotope effect on confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, S.-I.; Itoh, K.

    2018-03-01

    A Gedankenexperiment on hydrogen isotope effect is developed, using the transport model with transport hysteresis. The transport model with hysteresis is applied to case where the modulational electron cyclotron heating is imposed near the mid-radius of the toroidal plasmas. The perturbation propagates either outward or inward, being associated with the clockwise (CW) hysteresis or counter-clockwise (CCW) hysteresis, respectively. The hydrogen isotope effects on the CW and CCW hysteresis are investigated. The local component of turbulence-driven transport is assumed to be the gyro-Bohm diffusion. While the effect of hydrogen mass number is screened in the response of CW hysteresis, it is amplified in CCW hysteresis. This result motivates the experimental studies to compare CW and CCW cases in order to obtain further insight into the physics of hydrogen isotope effects.

  20. Isotope and mixture effects on neoclassical transport in the pedestal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusztai, Istvan; Buller, Stefan; Omotani, John T.; Newton, Sarah L.

    2017-10-01

    The isotope mass scaling of the energy confinement time in tokamak plasmas differs from gyro-Bohm estimates, with implications for the extrapolation from current experiments to D-T reactors. Differences in mass scaling in L-mode and various H-mode regimes suggest that the isotope effect may originate from the pedestal. In the pedestal, sharp gradients render local diffusive estimates invalid, and global effects due to orbit-width scale profile variations have to be taken into account. We calculate neoclassical cross-field fluxes from a radially global drift-kinetic equation using the PERFECT code, to study isotope composition effects in density pedestals. The relative reduction to the peak heat flux due to global effects as a function of the density scale length is found to saturate at an isotope-dependent value that is larger for heavier ions. We also consider D-T and H-D mixtures with a focus on isotope separation. The ability to reproduce the mixture results via single-species simulations with artificial ``DT'' and ``HD'' species has been considered. These computationally convenient single ion simulations give a good estimate of the total ion heat flux in corresponding mixtures. Funding received from the International Career Grant of Vetenskapsradet (VR) (330-2014-6313) with Marie Sklodowska Curie Actions, Cofund, Project INCA 600398, and Framework Grant for Strategic Energy Research of VR (2014-5392).

  1. Net Locality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Souza e Silva, Adriana Araujo; Gordon, Eric

    Provides an introduction to the new theory of Net Locality and the profound effect on individuals and societies when everything is located or locatable. Describes net locality as an emerging form of location awareness central to all aspects of digital media, from mobile phones, to Google Maps...... of emerging technologies, from GeoCities to GPS, Wi-Fi, Wiki Me, and Google Android....

  2. Effects of climate change and shifts in forest composition on forest net primary production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jyh-Min Chiang; Louts [Louis] R. Iverson; Anantha Prasad; Kim J. Brown

    2008-01-01

    Forests are dynamic in both structure and species composition, and these dynamics are strongly influenced by climate. However, the net effects of future tree species composition on net primary production (NPP) are not well understood. The objective of this work was to model the potential range shifts of tree species (DISTRIB Model) and predict their impacts on NPP (...

  3. Effects of Net Blotch ( Pyrenophora teres ) on Malt Barley Yield and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) production is constrained by diseases such as net blotch caused by Pyrenophora teres Drechsl. The objectives of this study were to assess the effects of net blotch disease on malt barley yield and grain quality under natural infection. Four malt barley varieties (Beka, HB 120, HB 52 and Holker), ...

  4. Effect of insecticide treated nets fence in protect- ing cattle against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A field trial was carried out to assess the effect of insecticide treated net in pro- tecting cattle from tsetse and other flies. A total of 35 pens were constructed, out of which 30 of them were fenced with insecticide treated net which served as treatment group and the remaining 5 pens were untreated controls. The fly populations ...

  5. The effect of netting solidity ratio and inclined angle on the hydrodynamic characteristics of knotless polyethylene netting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hao; Hu, Fuxiang; Xu, Liuxiong; Dong, Shuchuang; Zhou, Cheng; Wang, Xuefang

    2017-10-01

    Knotless polyethylene (PE) netting has been widely used in aquaculture cages and fishing gears, especially in Japan. In this study, the hydrodynamic coefficient of six knotless PE netting panels with different solidity ratios were assessed in a flume tank under various attack angles of netting from 0° (parallel to flow) to 90° (perpendicular to flow) and current speeds from 40 cm s-1 to 130 cm s-1. It was found that the drag coefficient was related to Reynolds number, solidity ratio and attack angle of netting. The solidity ratio was positively related with drag coefficient for netting panel perpendicular to flow, whereas when setting the netting panel parallel to the flow the opposite result was obtained. For netting panels placed at an angle to the flow, the lift coefficient reached the maximum at an attack angle of 50° and then decreased as the attack angle further increased. The solidity ratio had a dual influence on drag coefficient of inclined netting panels. Compared to result in the literature, the normal drag coefficient of knotless PE netting measured in this study is larger than that of nylon netting or Dyneema netting.

  6. Accelerating quantum instanton calculations of the kinetic isotope effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karandashev, Konstantin; Vaníček, Jiří

    2015-11-21

    Path integral implementation of the quantum instanton approximation currently belongs among the most accurate methods for computing quantum rate constants and kinetic isotope effects, but its use has been limited due to the rather high computational cost. Here, we demonstrate that the efficiency of quantum instanton calculations of the kinetic isotope effects can be increased by orders of magnitude by combining two approaches: The convergence to the quantum limit is accelerated by employing high-order path integral factorizations of the Boltzmann operator, while the statistical convergence is improved by implementing virial estimators for relevant quantities. After deriving several new virial estimators for the high-order factorization and evaluating the resulting increase in efficiency, using ⋅Hα + HβHγ → HαHβ + ⋅ Hγ reaction as an example, we apply the proposed method to obtain several kinetic isotope effects on CH4 + ⋅ H ⇌ ⋅ CH3 + H2 forward and backward reactions.

  7. Quantum instanton evaluation of the kinetic isotope effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanicek, Jiri; Miller, William H.; Castillo, Jesus F.; Aoiz, F.Javier

    2005-04-19

    A general quantum-mechanical method for computing kinetic isotope effects is presented. The method is based on the quantum instanton approximation for the rate constant and on the path integral Metropolis Monte-Carlo evaluation of the Boltzmann operator matrix elements. It computes the kinetic isotope effect directly, using a thermodynamic integration with respect to the mass of the isotope, thus avoiding the more computationally expensive process of computing the individual rate constants. The method is more accurate than variational transition-state theories or the semiclassical instanton method since it does not assume a single reaction path and does not use a semiclassical approximation of the Boltzmann operator. While the general Monte-Carlo implementation makes the method accessible to systems with a large number of atoms, we present numerical results for the Eckart barrier and for the collinear and full three-dimensional isotope variants of the hydrogen exchange reaction H+H{sub 2} {yields} H{sub 2}+H. In all seven test cases, for temperatures between 250 K and 600 K, the error of the quantum instanton approximation for the kinetic isotope effects is less than {approx}10%.

  8. Shifts in rotifer life history in response to stable isotope enrichment: testing theories of isotope effects on organismal growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorokhova, Elena

    2017-03-01

    In ecology, stable isotope labelling is commonly used for tracing material transfer in trophic interactions, nutrient budgets and biogeochemical processes. The main assumption in this approach is that the enrichment with a heavy isotope has no effect on the organism growth and metabolism. This assumption is, however, challenged by theoretical considerations and experimental studies on kinetic isotope effects in vivo. Here, I demonstrate profound changes in life histories of the rotifer Brachionus plicatilis fed 15N-enriched algae (0.4-5.0 at%); i.e. at the enrichment levels commonly used in ecological studies. These findings support theoretically predicted effects of heavy isotope enrichment on growth, metabolism and ageing in biological systems and underline the importance of accounting for such effects when using stable isotope labelling in experimental studies.

  9. Field issues related to effectiveness of insecticide-treated nets in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlanger, T E; Enayati, A A; Hemingway, J; Mshinda, H; Tami, A; Lengeler, C

    2004-06-01

    Insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) impregnated with pyrethroid insecticides have become one of the most promising interventions to prevent malaria in highly endemic areas. Despite the large body of experience documenting their health impact and the best way to distribute them, some key practical issues remain unresolved. For example, the duration of effective life of a net under field conditions is unknown. The most important factor affecting net effectiveness is the issue of regular re-treatment with insecticide. Washing is also an important determinant of insecticide longevity in the field. Trials were undertaken to provide some essential field information on ITNs within the site of an extended ITN programme in the Morogoro region of Tanzania. It was found that 45% of all nets were in bad condition (defined as more than seven large holes). It is concluded that an effective 'life' for polyester nets is 2-3 years. Further, two-thirds of the 20% of nets that were reported as having been re-treated within the last 12 months had less than 5 mg/m(2) of insecticide. According to the World Health Organization this is insufficient to be effective. People reported that they washed their nets four to seven times per year, usually with soap. Observations showed that such washing does not harm the nets and that the wash-water was unlikely to have an impact on the environment. Finally, bioassays were carried out with Anopheles gambiae on polyester netting with 0.5, 2, 5, 10 and 30 mg/m(2) of deltamethrin, alphacypermethrin and lambdacyhalothrin to assess the effectiveness of pyrethroids. The results confirmed that even with low insecticide concentrations, nets can still provide partial protection.

  10. Do evergreen and deciduous trees have different effects on net N mineralization in soil?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Kevin E; Hobbie, Sarah E; Oleksyn, Jacek; Reich, Peter B; Eissenstat, David M

    2012-06-01

    Evergreen and deciduous plants are widely expected to have different impacts on soil nitrogen (N) availability because of differences in leaf litter chemistry and ensuing effects on net N mineralization (N(min)). We evaluated this hypothesis by compiling published data on net N(min) rates beneath co-occurring stands of evergreen and deciduous trees. The compiled data included 35 sets of co-occurring stands in temperate and boreal forests. Evergreen and deciduous stands did not have consistently divergent effects on net N(min) rates; net N(min) beneath deciduous trees was higher when comparing natural stands (19 contrasts), but equivalent to evergreens in plantations (16 contrasts). We also compared net N(min) rates beneath pairs of co-occurring genera. Most pairs of genera did not differ consistently, i.e., tree species from one genus had higher net N(min) at some sites and lower net N(min) at other sites. Moreover, several common deciduous genera (Acer, Betula, Populus) and deciduous Quercus spp. did not typically have higher net N(min) rates than common evergreen genera (Pinus, Picea). There are several reasons why tree effects on net N(min) are poorly predicted by leaf habit and phylogeny. For example, the amount of N mineralized from decomposing leaves might be less than the amount of N mineralized from organic matter pools that are less affected by leaf litter traits, such as dead roots and soil organic matter. Also, effects of plant traits and plant groups on net N(min) probably depend on site-specific factors such as stand age and soil type.

  11. Nuclear quantum effects and kinetic isotope effects in enzyme reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardi-Kilshtain, Alexandra; Nitoker, Neta; Major, Dan Thomas

    2015-09-15

    Enzymes are extraordinarily effective catalysts evolved to perform well-defined and highly specific chemical transformations. Studying the nature of rate enhancements and the mechanistic strategies in enzymes is very important, both from a basic scientific point of view, as well as in order to improve rational design of biomimetics. Kinetic isotope effect (KIE) is a very important tool in the study of chemical reactions and has been used extensively in the field of enzymology. Theoretically, the prediction of KIEs in condensed phase environments such as enzymes is challenging due to the need to include nuclear quantum effects (NQEs). Herein we describe recent progress in our group in the development of multi-scale simulation methods for the calculation of NQEs and accurate computation of KIEs. We also describe their application to several enzyme systems. In particular we describe the use of combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods in classical and quantum simulations. The development of various novel path-integral methods is reviewed. These methods are tailor suited to enzyme systems, where only a few degrees of freedom involved in the chemistry need to be quantized. The application of the hybrid QM/MM quantum-classical simulation approach to three case studies is presented. The first case involves the proton transfer in alanine racemase. The second case presented involves orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase where multidimensional free energy simulations together with kinetic isotope effects are combined in the study of the reaction mechanism. Finally, we discuss the proton transfer in nitroalkane oxidase, where the enzyme employs tunneling as a catalytic fine-tuning tool. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Identifying vital effects in Halimeda algae with Ca isotopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Blättler

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Geochemical records of biogenic carbonates provide some of the most valuable records of the geological past, but are often difficult to interpret without a mechanistic understanding of growth processes. In this experimental study, Halimeda algae are used as a test organism to untangle some of the specific factors that influence their skeletal composition, in particular their Ca-isotope composition. Algae were stimulated to precipitate both calcite and aragonite by growth in artificial Cretaceous seawater, resulting in experimental samples with somewhat malformed skeletons. The Ca-isotope fractionation of the algal calcite (−0.6‰ appears to be much smaller than that for the algal aragonite (−1.4‰, similar to the behaviour observed in inorganic precipitates. However, the carbonate from Halimeda has higher Ca-isotope ratios than inorganic forms by approximately 0.25‰, likely because of Rayleigh distillation within the algal intercellular space. In identifying specific vital effects and the magnitude of their influence on Ca-isotope ratios, this study suggests that mineralogy has a first-order control on the marine Ca-isotope cycle.

  13. The origin of carbon isotope vital effects in coccolith calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, H. L. O.; Bruggeman, J.; Hermoso, M.; Rickaby, R. E. M.

    2017-03-01

    Calcite microfossils are widely used to study climate and oceanography in Earth's geological past. Coccoliths, readily preserved calcite plates produced by a group of single-celled surface-ocean dwelling algae called coccolithophores, have formed a significant fraction of marine sediments since the Late Triassic. However, unlike the shells of foraminifera, their zooplankton counterparts, coccoliths remain underused in palaeo-reconstructions. Precipitated in an intracellular chemical and isotopic microenvironment, coccolith calcite exhibits large and enigmatic departures from the isotopic composition of abiogenic calcite, known as vital effects. Here we show that the calcification to carbon fixation ratio determines whether coccolith calcite is isotopically heavier or lighter than abiogenic calcite, and that the size of the deviation is determined by the degree of carbon utilization. We discuss the theoretical potential for, and current limitations of, coccolith-based CO2 paleobarometry, that may eventually facilitate use of the ubiquitous and geologically extensive sedimentary archive.

  14. Variation of kinetic isotope effect in multiple proton transfer reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Variation of kinetic isotope effect in multiple proton transfer reactions. #. B SARITHA and M DURGA PRASAD. ∗. School of Chemistry, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500 046, India e-mail: mdpsc@uohyd.ernet.in. Abstract. Recently, we had suggested that the motion along the promoter mode in the first part of the IRC.

  15. Clumped isotope effects during OH and Cl oxidation of methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehill, Andrew R.; Joelsson, Lars Magnus T.; Schmidt, Johan A.; Wang, David T.; Johnson, Matthew S.; Ono, Shuhei

    2017-01-01

    A series of experiments were carried out to determine the clumped (13CH3D) methane kinetic isotope effects during oxidation of methane by OH and Cl radicals, the major sink reactions for atmospheric methane. Experiments were performed in a 100 L quartz photochemical reactor, in which OH was produced from the reaction of O(1D) (from O3 photolysis) with H2O, and Cl was from photolysis of Cl2. Samples were taken from the reaction cell and analyzed for methane (12CH4, 12CH3D, 13CH4, 13CH3D) isotopologue ratios using tunable infrared laser direct absorption spectroscopy. Measured kinetic isotope effects for singly substituted species were consistent with previous experimental studies. For doubly substituted methane, 13CH3D, the observed kinetic isotope effects closely follow the product of the kinetic isotope effects for the 13C and deuterium substituted species (i.e., 13,2KIE = 13KIE × 2KIE). The deviation from this relationship is 0.3‰ ± 1.2‰ and 3.5‰ ± 0.7‰ for OH and Cl oxidation, respectively. This is consistent with model calculations performed using quantum chemistry and transition state theory. The OH and Cl reactions enrich the residual methane in the clumped isotopologue in open system reactions. In a closed system, however, this effect is overtaken by the large D/H isotope effect, which causes the residual methane to become anti-clumped relative to the initial methane. Based on these results, we demonstrate that oxidation of methane by OH, the predominant oxidant for tropospheric methane, will only have a minor (∼0.3‰) impact on the clumped isotope signature (Δ13CH3D, measured as a deviation from a stochastic distribution of isotopes) of tropospheric methane. This paper shows that Δ13CH3D will provide constraints on methane source strengths, and predicts that Δ12CH2D2 can provide information on methane sink strengths.

  16. Menopause effect on blood Fe and Cu isotope compositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaouen, Klervia; Balter, Vincent

    2014-02-01

    Iron (δ(56) Fe) and copper (δ(65) Cu) stable isotope compositions in blood of adult human include a sex effect, which still awaits a biological explanation. Here, we investigate the effect of menopause by measuring blood δ(56) Fe and δ(65) Cu values of aging men and women. The results show that, while the Fe and Cu isotope compositions of blood of men are steady throughout their lifetime, postmenopausal women exhibit blood δ(65) Cu values similar to men, and δ(56) Fe values intermediate between men and premenopausal women. The residence time of Cu and Fe in the body likely explains why the blood δ(65) Cu values, but not the δ(56) Fe values, of postmenopausal women resemble that of men. We suggest that the Cu and Fe isotopic fractionation between blood and liver resides in the redox reaction occurring during hepatic solicitation of Fe stores. This reaction affects the Cu speciation, which explains why blood Cu isotope composition is impacted by the cessation of menstruations. Considering that Fe and Cu sex differences are recorded in bones, we believe this work has important implications for their use as a proxy of sex or age at menopause in past populations. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. The effect of net foreign assets on saving rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben David Nissim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Observing empirical data we find that many countries try to delay the decision of increasing saving rate in order to avoid a decrease of the living standards. However the delay leads a deterioration of countries financial stability. We present a simple theoretical model that connects between countries' saving rate and their net foreign assets. Using cross section data set of 135 countries in 2010 we estimated the econometric relation between saving rate in 2010 as dependent variable and two explanatory variables: the current account in 2010 and the aggregated current account during 1980-2010. Our findings show that industrial countries in a bad financial state tend to decrease their saving rate as external debt is larger causing to deterioration in external debt while countries with good financial state tend to increase their saving rate and the tendency increase as financial state becomes better. Only in countries with a very large external debt saving rate tends to grow. The results point that gross foreign debt will keep increasing and will worsen world financial state causing increased risk of getting into a world crisis.

  18. Isotope effects in photo dissociation of ozone with visible light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Früchtl, Marion; Janssen, Christof; Röckmann, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Ozone (O3) plays a key role for many chemical oxidation processes in the Earth's atmosphere. In these chemical reactions, ozone can transfer oxygen to other trace gases. This is particularly interesting, since O3 has a very peculiar isotope composition. Following the mass dependent fractionation equation δ17O = 0.52 * δ18O, most fractionation processes depend directly on mass. However, O3 shows an offset to the mass dependent fractionation line. Processes, which show such anomalies, are termed mass independent fractionations (MIF). A very well studied example for a chemical reaction that leads to mass independent fractionation is the O3 formation reaction. To what degree O3 destruction reactions need to be considered in order to understand the isotope composition of atmospheric O3 is still not fully understood and an open question within scientific community. We set up new experiments to investigate the isotope effect resulting from photo dissociation of O3 in the Chappuis band (R1). Initial O3 is produced by an electric discharge. After photolysis O3 is collected in a cold trap at the triple point temperature of nitrogen (63K). O3 is then converted to O2 in order to measure the oxygen isotopes of O3 using isotope ratio mass spectrometry. To isolate O3 photo dissociation (R1) from O3 decomposition (R2) and secondary O3 formation (R3), we use varying amounts of carbon monoxide (CO) as O atom quencher (R4). In this way we suppress the O + O3 reaction (R3) and determine the isotope fractionation in R1 and R2 separately. We present first results on the isotope effects in O3 photo dissociation with visible light in the presence of different bath gases. Results are interpreted based on chemical kinetics modeling. (R1) O3 + hυ → O (3P) + O2 (R2) O3 + O (3P) → 2 O2 (R3) O + O2 + M → O3 + M (R4) O (3P) + CO + M → CO2 + M

  19. Transverse hydrodynamic dispersion effects on isotope signals in groundwater chlorinated solvents’ plumes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Breukelen, B.M.; Rolle, M.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of transverse hydrodynamic dispersion on altering transformation-induced compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) signals within groundwater pollution plumes have been assessed with reactive transport modeling accommodating diffusion-induced isotope fractionation (DIF) and implementing

  20. Deuterium isotope effects on iron core formation in ferritin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papaefthymiou, G. C., E-mail: gcp@villanova.edu; Viescas, A. J.; Horn, R.; Carney, E. [Villanova University, Department of Physics (United States); Zhao, G.; Chasteen, N. D. [University of New Hampshire, Department of Chemistry (United States); Lee, J. [Brown University, Department of Chemistry (United States); Gorun, S. M. [New Jersey Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry and Environmental Science (United States)

    2005-09-15

    We present comparative Moessbauer investigations of nanosized FeOOH and FeOOD biomineral phases nucleated within the 7-nm diameter cavity of horse-spleen apoferritin in order to assess deuterium isotopic effects on nanoscale, bioinorganic lattice structures with extended hydrogen bond networks. Differences in magnetic anisotropy energy, packing density and degree of crystallinity in the resulting iron oxo-hydroxide nanophases obtained via D{sub 2}O (heavy water) vs. H{sub 2}O (light water) solution chemistry are noted. These observations point to the possibility of stabilizing new thermodynamic states in the solid-state by utilizing isotope effects, with important implications for new synthetic pathways to novel nano materials.

  1. In situ autumn ozone fumigation of mature Norway spruce - Effects on net photosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard; Ro-Poulsen, H.

    2002-01-01

    concentration. The experiment was conducted during 70 days during the autumn. Our system could not detect any ozone effects on dark respiration, but eventually effects on dark respiration could be masked in signal noise. An inhibition of daily net photosynthesis in ozone treated shoots was apparent......, and it is was found that a mean increase in ozone concentration of 10 nl l(-1) reduced net photosynthesis with 7.4 %. This effect should be related to a pre-exposure during the season of AOT40 12.5 mul l(-1) h....

  2. Effects of gill-net trauma, barotrauma, and deep release on postrelease mortality of Lake Trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Elizabeth L.; Fredericks, Jim P.; Quist, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    Unaccounted postrelease mortality violates assumptions of many fisheries studies, thereby biasing parameter estimates and reducing efficiency. We evaluated effects of gill-net trauma, barotrauma, and deep-release treatment on postrelease mortality of lake trout Salvelinus namaycush. Lake trout were captured at depths up to 65 m with gill nets in Priest Lake, Idaho, and held in a large enclosure for 10–12 d. Postrelease mortality was the same for surface-release–and deep-release–treated fish (41%). Mixed-effects logistic regression models were used to evaluate effects of intrinsic and environmental factors on the probability of mortality. Presence of gill-net trauma and degree of barotrauma were associated with increased probability of postrelease mortality. Smaller fish were also more likely to suffer postrelease mortality. On average, deep-release treatment did not reduce postrelease mortality, but effectiveness of treatment increased with fish length. Of the environmental factors evaluated, only elapsed time between lifting the first and last anchors of a gill-net gang (i.e., lift time) was significantly related to postrelease mortality. Longer lift times, which may allow ascending lake trout to acclimate to depressurization, were associated with lower postrelease mortality rates. Our study suggests that postrelease mortality may be higher than previously assumed for lake trout because mortality continues after 48 h. In future studies, postrelease mortality could be reduced by increasing gill-net lift times and increasing mesh size used to increase length of fish captured.

  3. Entomological determinants of insecticide-treated bed net effectiveness in Western Myanmar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smithuis, Frank M.; Kyaw, Moe Kyaw; Phe, U. Ohn; van der Broek, Ingrid; Katterman, Nina; Rogers, Colin; Almeida, Patrick; Kager, Piet A.; Stepniewska, Kasia; Lubell, Yoel; Simpson, Julie A.; White, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    In a large cluster randomized control trial of insecticide-treated bed nets (ITN) in Western Myanmar the malaria protective effect of ITN was found to be highly variable and, in aggregate, the effect was not statistically significant. A coincident entomological investigation measured malaria vector

  4. 47 CFR 32.7910 - Income effect of jurisdictional ratemaking differences-net.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Other Income Accounts § 32.7910 Income effect of jurisdictional ratemaking differences—net. This account shall include the impact on revenues and expenses of the jurisdictional ratemaking practices which vary... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Income effect of jurisdictional ratemaking...

  5. On the Effect of Planetary Stable Isotope Compositions on Growth and Survival of Terrestrial Organisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueshu Xie

    Full Text Available Isotopic compositions of reactants affect the rates of chemical and biochemical reactions. Usually it is assumed that heavy stable isotope enrichment leads to progressively slower reactions. Yet the effect of stable isotopes may be nonlinear, as exemplified by the "isotopic resonance" phenomenon. Since the isotopic compositions of other planets of Solar system, including Mars and Venus, are markedly different from terrestrial (e.g., deuterium content is ≈5 and ≈100 times higher, respectively, it is far from certain that terrestrial life will thrive in these isotopic conditions. Here we found that Martian deuterium content negatively affected survival of shrimp in semi-closed biosphere on a year-long time scale. Moreover, the bacterium Escherichia coli grows slower at Martian isotopic compositions and even slower at Venus's compositions. Thus, the biological impact of varying stable isotope compositions needs to be taken into account when planning interplanetary missions.

  6. On the Effect of Planetary Stable Isotope Compositions on Growth and Survival of Terrestrial Organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xueshu; Zubarev, Roman A

    2017-01-01

    Isotopic compositions of reactants affect the rates of chemical and biochemical reactions. Usually it is assumed that heavy stable isotope enrichment leads to progressively slower reactions. Yet the effect of stable isotopes may be nonlinear, as exemplified by the "isotopic resonance" phenomenon. Since the isotopic compositions of other planets of Solar system, including Mars and Venus, are markedly different from terrestrial (e.g., deuterium content is ≈5 and ≈100 times higher, respectively), it is far from certain that terrestrial life will thrive in these isotopic conditions. Here we found that Martian deuterium content negatively affected survival of shrimp in semi-closed biosphere on a year-long time scale. Moreover, the bacterium Escherichia coli grows slower at Martian isotopic compositions and even slower at Venus's compositions. Thus, the biological impact of varying stable isotope compositions needs to be taken into account when planning interplanetary missions.

  7. Mesh Grid of SILVACO TCAD Effect on Net Doping Profile for NMOS Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redzuan, M.; Ayub, B.; Shahrir, M.; Suziana, O.; Yunus, M.; Abdullah, M. H.; Noor, U. M.; Rusop, M.

    2009-06-01

    Process of developing the NMOS structure is performed in 2D SILVACO Athena and Atlas Simulation. The NMOS fabrication process steps were chosen from reference [4]. Mesh grid effect on net doping profile was obtained by varying the grid. Variation of grid was determined through observation between fine mesh and loosen mesh in y-axis. Simulation results show that mesh grid affects the doping concentration inside the substrate. Doping concentration will affect junction depth formation where the net doping of phosphorus shows a different concentration at the surface of substrate. Changes of junction depth formation will then gave an effect to the value of threshold voltage. Observation using sheet resistance of Athena tool shows that having high density mesh in y-axis will results in increases in net doping in polysilicon and highly doped region but reduced the concentration in the lightly doped region.

  8. Malic enzyme: Tritium isotope effects with alternative dinucleotide substrates and divalent metal ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karsten, W.E.; Harris, B.G.; Cook, P.F. (Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine, Fort Worth (United States))

    1992-01-01

    The NAD-malic enzyme from Ascaris suum catalyzes the divalent metal ion dependent oxidative decarboxylation of L-malate to yield pyruvate, carbon dioxide and NADH. Multiple isotope effect studies suggest a stepwise chemical mechanism with hydride transfer from L-malate to NAD occurring first to form oxalacetate, followed by decarboxylation. Utilizing L-malate-2-T, tritium V/K isotope effects have been determined for the hydride transfer step using a variety of alternative dinucleotide substrates and divalent metal ions. Combination of these data with deuterium isotope effects data and previously determined [sup 13]C isotope effects has allowed the calculation of intrinsic isotope effects for the malic enzyme catalyzed reaction. The identity of both the dinucleotide substrate and divalent metal ion has an effect of the size of the intrinsic isotope effect for hydride transfer.

  9. Estimating climate change effects on net primary production of rangelands in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew C. Reeves; Adam L. Moreno; Karen E. Bagne; Steven W. Running

    2014-01-01

    The potential effects of climate change on net primary productivity (NPP) of U.S. rangelands were evaluated using estimated climate regimes from the A1B, A2 and B2 global change scenarios imposed on the biogeochemical cycling model, Biome-BGC from 2001 to 2100. Temperature, precipitation, vapor pressure deficit, day length, solar radiation, CO2 enrichment and nitrogen...

  10. Assessing marginal, threshold and net effects of financial globalisation on financial development in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Asongu, Simplice

    2017-01-01

    The present inquiry contributes to extant literature by simultaneously accounting for variations in financial development and financial globalisation in the assessment of hypothetical initial financial development conditions for the rewards of financial globalisation. For this purpose, we examine marginal, threshold and net effects of financial globalisation on financial development throughout the conditional distributions of financial development. The empirical evidence is based on contempor...

  11. Negative isotope effect in Hubbard-Holstein model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Da

    In phonon mediated conventional s-wave superconductors, higher-frequency phonon (or smaller atomic mass) leads to a higher superconducting transition temperature, known as the isotope effect. However, in correlated systems, various competing electronic order (such as spin-density-wave, charge-density-wave, and unconventional superconductivity) arises and the effect of electron-phonon coupling on these orders is a long-standing problem. Using the functional renormalization group, here we investigated the interplay between the electron correlation and electron-phonon coupling in the Hubbard-Holstein model on a square lattice. At half-filling, we found spin-density-wave and charge-density-wave phases and the transition between them, while no superconducting phase arises. Upon finite doping, d-wave/s-wave superconductivity emerges in proximity to the spin-density-wave/charge-density-wave phase. Surprisingly, lower-frequency Holstein phonons are either less destructive or even beneficial to the various phases, resulting in a negative isotope effect. For the superconducting phases, such an effect is apparently beyond the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory.

  12. Continuum effects in neutron-drip-line oxygen isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Fossez, K.; Rotureau, J.; Michel, N.; Nazarewicz, W.

    2017-01-01

    The binding-energy pattern along the neutron-rich oxygen chain, governed by an interplay between shell effects and many-body correlations impacted by strong couplings to one- and two-neutron continuum, make these isotopes a unique testing ground for nuclear models. In this work, we investigate ground states and low-lying excited states of $^{23-28}$O using the complex-energy Gamow Shell Model and Density Matrix Renormalization Group method with a finite-range two-body interaction optimized to...

  13. ISOTOPIC EFFECTS IN PARTIALLY DEUTERATED PIEZOELECTRIC CRYSTALS OF ROCHELLE SALT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.R.Levitskii

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We develop a theory for dielectric, piezoelectric, and elastic properties of partially deuterated (quenched disorder crystals of Rochelle salt with taking into account the piezoelectric coupling. Results of numerical calculations are presented for a completely deuterated Rochelle salt and compared with available experimental data. Isotopic effect is explored within the mean crystal approximation, as well as within the developed theory using different trial sets of the fitting parameters. Theory predictions are given for the temperature and composition dependences of the calculated characteristics for partially deuterated crystals.

  14. System effectiveness of a targeted free mass distribution of long lasting insecticidal nets in Zanzibar, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abass Ali K

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insecticide-treated nets (ITN and long-lasting insecticidal treated nets (LLIN are important means of malaria prevention. Although there is consensus regarding their importance, there is uncertainty as to which delivery strategies are optimal for dispensing these life saving interventions. A targeted mass distribution of free LLINs to children under five and pregnant women was implemented in Zanzibar between August 2005 and January 2006. The outcomes of this distribution among children under five were evaluated, four to nine months after implementation. Methods Two cross-sectional surveys were conducted in May 2006 in two districts of Zanzibar: Micheweni (MI on Pemba Island and North A (NA on Unguja Island. Household interviews were conducted with 509 caretakers of under-five children, who were surveyed for socio-economic status, the net distribution process, perceptions and use of bed nets. Each step in the distribution process was assessed in all children one to five years of age for unconditional and conditional proportion of success. System effectiveness (the accumulated proportion of success and equity effectiveness were calculated, and predictors for LLIN use were identified. Results The overall proportion of children under five sleeping under any type of treated net was 83.7% (318/380 in MI and 91.8% (357/389 in NA. The LLIN usage was 56.8% (216/380 in MI and 86.9% (338/389 in NA. Overall system effectiveness was 49% in MI and 87% in NA, and equity was found in the distribution scale-up in NA. In both districts, the predicting factor of a child sleeping under an LLIN was caretakers thinking that LLINs are better than conventional nets (OR = 2.8, p = 0.005 in MI and 2.5, p = 0.041 in NA, in addition to receiving an LLIN (OR = 4.9, p Conclusions Targeted free mass distribution of LLINs can result in high and equitable bed net coverage among children under five. However, in order to sustain high effective coverage, there

  15. System effectiveness of a targeted free mass distribution of long lasting insecticidal nets in Zanzibar, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Netta; Ali, Abdullah S; de Savigny, Don; Al-Mafazy, Abdul-Wahiyd H; Ramsan, Mahdi; Abass, Ali K; Omari, Rahila S; Björkman, Anders; Källander, Karin

    2010-06-18

    Insecticide-treated nets (ITN) and long-lasting insecticidal treated nets (LLIN) are important means of malaria prevention. Although there is consensus regarding their importance, there is uncertainty as to which delivery strategies are optimal for dispensing these life saving interventions. A targeted mass distribution of free LLINs to children under five and pregnant women was implemented in Zanzibar between August 2005 and January 2006. The outcomes of this distribution among children under five were evaluated, four to nine months after implementation. Two cross-sectional surveys were conducted in May 2006 in two districts of Zanzibar: Micheweni (MI) on Pemba Island and North A (NA) on Unguja Island. Household interviews were conducted with 509 caretakers of under-five children, who were surveyed for socio-economic status, the net distribution process, perceptions and use of bed nets. Each step in the distribution process was assessed in all children one to five years of age for unconditional and conditional proportion of success. System effectiveness (the accumulated proportion of success) and equity effectiveness were calculated, and predictors for LLIN use were identified. The overall proportion of children under five sleeping under any type of treated net was 83.7% (318/380) in MI and 91.8% (357/389) in NA. The LLIN usage was 56.8% (216/380) in MI and 86.9% (338/389) in NA. Overall system effectiveness was 49% in MI and 87% in NA, and equity was found in the distribution scale-up in NA. In both districts, the predicting factor of a child sleeping under an LLIN was caretakers thinking that LLINs are better than conventional nets (OR = 2.8, p = 0.005 in MI and 2.5, p = 0.041 in NA), in addition to receiving an LLIN (OR = 4.9, p < 0.001 in MI and in OR = 30.1, p = 0.001 in NA). Targeted free mass distribution of LLINs can result in high and equitable bed net coverage among children under five. However, in order to sustain high effective coverage, there is need

  16. Commercial Manila clam ( Tapes philippinarum) culture in British Columbia, Canada: The effects of predator netting on intertidal sediment characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munroe, Daphne; McKinley, R. Scott

    2007-03-01

    Quantifying risks posed by aquaculture to adjacent coastal ecosystems is necessary to ensure long term stability of coastal systems and the sustainability of industries that exist therein. Research has demonstrated that the use of predator netting in shellfish aquaculture increases sedimentation rates and productivity; here we examine the influence of netting on the west coast of Canada. Changes in percent silt (sediment particles 2 mm), organic and inorganic carbon levels and temperature, and differences in clam populations were monitored on paired netted and non-netted Manila clam ( Tapes philippinarum) plots on four farmed beaches at Baynes Sound, British Columbia in 2003 and 2004. There were no significant differences in the levels of silt ( p = 0.129, n = 8), gravel ( p = 0.723, n = 8), or inorganic carbon ( p = 0.070, n = 8) between netted and non-netted plots. However, the level of organic carbon was significantly higher on netted plots ( p = 0.014, n = 8) and a slight temperature buffering effect of the netting during low-tide events over the period of study. There were significantly more T. philippinarum on netted plots compared to non-netted plots ( p = 0.001, n = 8) and the length frequency distribution of the populations also differed ( p British Columbia, has limited effect on the sediment.

  17. Air pollution causes health effects and net national product of a country decreases: a theoretical framework

    OpenAIRE

    Mohajan, Haradhan

    2011-01-01

    The paper deals with green accounting and accounts the health effects of air pollution. It shows that due to air pollution human capital can not be utilized properly and net national product of a country decreases. The willing to pay system among workers is beneficial to the government, factory owners and workers of a country. The marginal cost-benefit rule for an optimal level of air pollution creates negative health effects. The air pollution cause both direct disutility and indirect welfar...

  18. Introduction to chemistry and applications in nature of mass independent isotope effects special feature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiemens, Mark H

    2013-10-29

    Stable isotope ratio variations are regulated by physical and chemical laws. These rules depend on a relation with mass differences between isotopes. New classes of isotope variation effects that deviate from mass dependent laws, termed mass independent isotope effects, were discovered in 1983 and have a wide range of applications in basic chemistry and nature. In this special edition, new applications of these effects to physical chemistry, solar system origin models, terrestrial atmospheric and biogenic evolution, polar paleo climatology, snowball earth geology, and present day atmospheric sciences are presented.

  19. Introduction to Chemistry and Applications in Nature of Mass Independent Isotope Effects Special Feature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiemens, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    Stable isotope ratio variations are regulated by physical and chemical laws. These rules depend on a relation with mass differences between isotopes. New classes of isotope variation effects that deviate from mass dependent laws, termed mass independent isotope effects, were discovered in 1983 and have a wide range of applications in basic chemistry and nature. In this special edition, new applications of these effects to physical chemistry, solar system origin models, terrestrial atmospheric and biogenic evolution, polar paleo climatology, snowball earth geology, and present day atmospheric sciences are presented. PMID:24167299

  20. The net effect of alternative allocation ratios on recruitment time and trial cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vozdolska, Ralitza; Sano, Mary; Aisen, Paul; Edland, Steven D

    2009-04-01

    Increasing the proportion of subjects allocated to the experimental treatment in controlled clinical trials is often advocated as a method of increasing recruitment rates and improving the performance of trials. The presumption is that the higher likelihood of randomization to the experimental treatment will be perceived by potential study enrollees as an added benefit of participation and will increase recruitment rates and speed the completion of trials. However, studies with alternative allocation ratios require a larger sample size to maintain statistical power, which may result in a net increase in time required to complete recruitment and a net increase in total trial cost. To describe the potential net effect of alternative allocation ratios on recruitment time and trial cost. Models of recruitment time and trial cost were developed and used to compare trials with 1:1 allocation to trials with alternative allocation ratios under a range of per subject costs, per day costs, and enrollment rates. In regard to time required to complete recruitment, alternative allocation ratios are net beneficial if the recruitment rate improves by more than about 4% for trials with a 1.5:1 allocation ratio and 12% for trials with a 2:1 allocation ratio. More substantial improvements in recruitment rate, 13 and 47% respectively for scenarios we considered, are required for alternative allocation to be net beneficial in terms of tangible monetary cost. The cost models were developed expressly for trials comparing proportions or means across treatment groups. Using alternative allocation ratio designs to improve recruitment may or may not be time and cost-effective. Using alternative allocation for this purpose should only be considered for trial contexts where there is both clear evidence that the alternative design does improve recruitment rates and the attained time or cost efficiency justifies the added study subject burden implied by a larger sample size.

  1. Quantum tunneling observed without its characteristic large kinetic isotope effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hama, Tetsuya; Ueta, Hirokazu; Kouchi, Akira; Watanabe, Naoki

    2015-06-16

    Classical transition-state theory is fundamental to describing chemical kinetics; however, quantum tunneling is also important in explaining the unexpectedly large reaction efficiencies observed in many chemical systems. Tunneling is often indicated by anomalously large kinetic isotope effects (KIEs), because a particle's ability to tunnel decreases significantly with its increasing mass. Here we experimentally demonstrate that cold hydrogen (H) and deuterium (D) atoms can add to solid benzene by tunneling; however, the observed H/D KIE was very small (1-1.5) despite the large intrinsic H/D KIE of tunneling (≳ 100). This strong reduction is due to the chemical kinetics being controlled not by tunneling but by the surface diffusion of the H/D atoms, a process not greatly affected by the isotope type. Because tunneling need not be accompanied by a large KIE in surface and interfacial chemical systems, it might be overlooked in other systems such as aerosols or enzymes. Our results suggest that surface tunneling reactions on interstellar dust may contribute to the deuteration of interstellar aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons, which could represent a major source of the deuterium enrichment observed in carbonaceous meteorites and interplanetary dust particles. These findings could improve our understanding of interstellar physicochemical processes, including those during the formation of the solar system.

  2. Isotope effect in superconducting Rb3C60

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, A. P.; Kortan, A. R.; Rosseinsky, M. J.; Duclos, S. J.; Mujsce, A. M.; Haddon, R. C.; Murphy, D. W.; Makhija, A. V.; Zahurak, S. M.; Lyons, K. B.

    1992-02-01

    The effect of isotopic substitution of C-13 for C-12 in Rb2C60 on both Tc and their high-energy intramolecular phonon modes as probed by Raman scattering is reported. It is found that the Raman A(g) and H9(g) modes near 1450/cm shift by 85 percent of the expected amount, consistent with the mass spectrum of the samples. It is also found that Tc shifts by 75 +/- 10 percent of that expected for alpha = 0.5, i.e., alpha = 0.37 +/- 0.05. This constitutes strong evidence that superconductivity in Rb3C60 is driven primarily by phonon-mediated pairing involving carbon vibrations, but with significant Coulomb interaction effects.

  3. Costs and cost-effectiveness of vector control in Eritrea using insecticide-treated bed nets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukich, Joshua O; Zerom, Mehari; Ghebremeskel, Tewolde; Tediosi, Fabrizio; Lengeler, Christian

    2009-03-30

    While insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) are a recognized effective method for preventing malaria, there has been an extensive debate in recent years about the best large-scale implementation strategy. Implementation costs and cost-effectiveness are important elements to consider when planning ITN programmes, but so far little information on these aspects is available from national programmes. This study uses a standardized methodology, as part of a larger comparative study, to collect cost data and cost-effectiveness estimates from a large programme providing ITNs at the community level and ante-natal care facilities in Eritrea. This is a unique model of ITN implementation fully integrated into the public health system. Base case analysis results indicated that the average annual cost of ITN delivery (2005 USD 3.98) was very attractive when compared with past ITN delivery studies at different scales. Financing was largely from donor sources though the Eritrean government and net users also contributed funding. The intervention's cost-effectiveness was in a highly attractive range for sub-Saharan Africa. The cost per DALY averted was USD 13 - 44. The cost per death averted was USD 438-1449. Distribution of nets coincided with significant increases in coverage and usage of nets nationwide, approaching or exceeding international targets in some areas. ITNs can be cost-effectively delivered at a large scale in sub-Saharan Africa through a distribution system that is highly integrated into the health system. Operating and sustaining such a system still requires strong donor funding and support as well as a functional and extensive system of health facilities and community health workers already in place.

  4. Factors shaping effective utilization of health information technology in urban safety-net clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Sheba; Garth, Belinda; Fish, Allison; Baker, Richard

    2013-09-01

    Urban safety-net clinics are considered prime targets for the adoption of health information technology innovations; however, little is known about their utilization in such safety-net settings. Current scholarship provides limited guidance on the implementation of health information technology into safety-net settings as it typically assumes that adopting institutions have sufficient basic resources. This study addresses this gap by exploring the unique challenges urban resource-poor safety-net clinics must consider when adopting and utilizing health information technology. In-depth interviews (N = 15) were used with key stakeholders (clinic chief executive officers, medical directors, nursing directors, chief financial officers, and information technology directors) from staff at four clinics to explore (a) nonhealth information technology-related clinic needs, (b) how health information technology may provide solutions, and (c) perceptions of and experiences with health information technology. Participants identified several challenges, some of which appear amenable to health information technology solutions. Also identified were requirements for effective utilization of health information technology including physical infrastructural improvements, funding for equipment/training, creation of user groups to share health information technology knowledge/experiences, and specially tailored electronic billing guidelines. We found that despite the potential benefit that can be derived from health information technologies, the unplanned and uninformed introduction of these tools into these settings might actually create more problems than are solved. From these data, we were able to identify a set of factors that should be considered when integrating health information technology into the existing workflows of low-resourced urban safety-net clinics in order to maximize their utilization and enhance the quality of health care in such settings.

  5. Effects of decalcification on bulk and compound-specific nitrogen and carbon isotope analyses of dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brault, Emily K; Koch, Paul L; Gier, Elizabeth; Ruiz-Cooley, R I; Zupcic, Jessica; Gilbert, Kwasi N; McCarthy, Matthew D

    2014-12-30

    For bulk carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis of dentin, samples are typically decalcified. Since the non-protein carbon in dentin is low, whole sample analysis may produce reliable data. Compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) of bone and tooth dentin protein is a powerful tool for reconstructing the flow of carbon and nitrogen in modern and past food webs. Decalcification has also been used to prepare bone and dentin samples for CSIA, but the effects of this process on bulk dentin, amino acid composition, and their specific isotope values are not known. The bulk isotope values of raw and decalcified dentin from a sperm whale tooth were measured to determine the effects of decalcification and the accuracy of untreated dentin results. CSIA was also performed on decalcified and raw dentin to examine differences in the amino acid isotope values and molar composition between these two approaches. Analysis of raw dentin yields precise and accurate bulk isotope measurements for this animal. The isotopic values of decalcified samples and raw dentin for individual amino acids were similar, but the average of the isotope value offsets between the two sample types was significant. The presence of inorganic material complicated raw sample processing for individual amino acid isotope values, and may have contributed to the isotopic differences between decalcified and raw samples. Decalcification is not needed to measure bulk isotope values in dentin from this modern odontocete, probably because the lipid and carbonate concentrations are low and the carbon isotope values of dentin protein and carbonate are similar. This method should not be applied in some cases (e.g., with fossil dentin and modern bone). Decalcification should still be used prior to CSIA since significant matrix issues occur with raw dentin processing and decalcification does not alter the amino acid molar composition or isotopic values of dentin. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Effect of network topology on the evolutionary ultimatum game based on the net-profit decision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Shun-Qiang; Wang, Lu; Jones, Michael C.; Ye, Ye; Wang, Meng; Xie, Neng-Gang

    2016-04-01

    The ubiquity of altruist behavior amongst humans has long been a significant puzzle in the social sciences. Ultimatum game has proved to be a useful tool for explaining altruistic behavior among selfish individuals. In an ultimatum game where alternating roles exist, we suppose that players make their decisions based on the net profit of their own. In this paper, we specify a player's strategy with two parameters: offer level α ∈ [ 0,1) and net profit acceptance level β ∈ [ - 1,1). By Monte Carlo simulation, we analyze separately the effect of the size of the neighborhood, the small-world property and the heterogeneity of the degree distributions of the networks. Results show that compared with results observed for homogeneous networks, heterogeneous networks lead to more rational outcomes. Moreover, network structure has no effect on the evolution of kindness level, so moderate kindness is adaptable to any social groups and organizations.

  7. Relationship Between Photosynthetic Light Dosage and Metabolic Isotope Effects in the Long-term Cultured Porites Coral Skeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omata, T.; Suzuki, A.; Sato, T.; Murakami, A.; Kawahata, H.; Maruyama, T.

    2008-12-01

    A long-term culture experiment of Porites spp. corals were conducted at different light dosages (light intensity, 100, 300, or 500 micro mol m-2 s-1; daily light period, 10 or 12 h) at constant temperature to examine the contribution of photosynthetic activity to skeletal carbon isotope composition. As the daily dose of photosynthetically active radiation increased, the rate of annual extension also increased. Mean isotope compositions shifted; the carbon isotope compositions became heavier and the oxygen isotope compositions became lighter at higher radiation dose. Whereas chlorophyll a (Chl a) content per both unit area and cell decreased as light dosage increased, carotenoids/Chl a increased. Skeletal oxygen isotope compositions decrease coincided with increasing skeletal growth rate, indicating the influence of so-called kinetic isotope effects. The observed carbon isotope compositions increase should be subject to both kinetic and metabolic isotope effects. Using a vector approach in the carbon-oxygen isotope compositions' plane (Omata et al., 2005), we discriminated between kinetic and metabolic isotope effects on carbon isotope compositions. The metabolic carbon isotopic fractionation-light was similar to the photosynthesis-irradiance curve, indicating the direct contribution of photosynthetic activity to metabolic isotope effects. In contrast, the fractionation of carbon isotope related to kinetic isotope effects gradually increased as the growth rate increased.

  8. Urbanization has a positive net effect on soil carbon stocks: modelling outcomes for the Moscow region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasenev, Viacheslav; Stoorvogel, Jetse; Leemans, Rik; Valentini, Riccardo

    2016-04-01

    Urbanization is responsible for large environmental changes worldwide. Urbanization was traditionally related to negative environmental impacts, but recent research highlights the potential to store soil carbon (C) in urban areas. The net effect of urbanization on soil C is, however, poorly understood. Negative influences of construction and soil sealing can be compensated by establishing of green areas. We explored possible net effects of future urbanization on soil C-stocks in the Moscow Region. Urbanization was modelled as a function of environmental, socio-economic and neighbourhood factors. This yielded three alternative scenarios: i) including neighbourhood factors; ii) excluding neighbourhood factors and focusing on environmental drivers; and iii) considering the New Moscow Project, establishing 1500km2 of new urbanized area following governmental regulation. All three scenarios showed substantial urbanization on 500 to 2000km2 former forests and arable lands. Our analysis shows a positive net effect on SOC stocks of 5 to 11 TgC. The highest increase occurred on the less fertile Orthic Podzols and Eutric Podzoluvisols, whereas C-storage in Orthic Luvisols, Luvic Chernozems, Dystric Histosols and Eutric Fluvisols increased less. Subsoil C-stocks were much more affected with an extra 4 to 10 TgC than those in the topsoils. The highest increase of both topsoil and subsoil C stocks occurred in the New Moscow scenario with the highest urbanization. Even when the relatively high uncertainties of the absolute C-values are considered, a clear positive net effect of urbanization on C-stocks is apparent. This highlights the potential of cities to enhance C-storage. This will progressively become more important in the future following the increasing world-wide urbanization.

  9. The effect of atmospheric CO2 concentration on carbon isotope fractionation in C3 land plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Brian A.; Jahren, A. Hope

    2012-11-01

    Because atmospheric carbon dioxide is the ultimate source of all land-plant carbon, workers have suggested that pCO2 level may exert control over the amount of 13C incorporated into plant tissues. However, experiments growing plants under elevated pCO2 in both chamber and field settings, as well as meta-analyses of ecological and agricultural data, have yielded a wide range of estimates for the effect of pCO2 on the net isotopic discrimination (Δδ13Cp) between plant tissue (δ13Cp) and atmospheric CO2 (δ13CCO2). Because plant stomata respond sensitively to plant water status and simultaneously alter the concentration of pCO2 inside the plant (ci) relative to outside the plant (ca), any experiment that lacks environmental control over water availability across treatments could result in additional isotopic variation sufficient to mask or cancel the direct influence of pCO2 on Δδ13Cp. We present new data from plant growth chambers featuring enhanced dynamic stabilization of moisture availability and relative humidity, in addition to providing constant light, nutrient, δ13CCO2, and pCO2 level for up to four weeks of plant growth. Within these chambers, we grew a total of 191 C3 plants (128 Raphanus sativus plants and 63 Arabidopsis thaliana) across fifteen levels of pCO2 ranging from 370 to 4200 ppm. Three types of plant tissue were harvested and analyzed for carbon isotope value: above-ground tissues, below-ground tissues, and leaf-extracted nC31-alkanes. We observed strong hyperbolic correlations (R ⩾ 0.94) between the pCO2 level and Δδ13Cp for each type of plant tissue analyzed; furthermore the linear relationships previously suggested by experiments across small (10-350 ppm) changes in pCO2 (e.g., 300-310 ppm or 350-700 ppm) closely agree with the amount of fractionation per ppm increase in pCO2 calculated from our hyperbolic relationship. In this way, our work is consistent with, and provides a unifying relationship for, previous work on carbon isotopes

  10. The costs and effects of a nationwide insecticide-treated net programme: the case of Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ortiz Juan

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insecticide-treated nets (ITNs are a proven intervention to reduce the burden of malaria, yet there remains a debate as to the best method of ensuring they are universally utilized. This study is a cost-effectiveness analysis of an intervention in Malawi that started in 1998, in Blantyre district, before expanding nationwide. Over the 5-year period, 1.5 million ITNs were sold. Methods The costs were calculated retrospectively through analysis of expenditure data. Costs and effects were measured as cost per treated-net year (cost/TNY and cost per net distributed. Results The mean cost/TNY was calculated at $4.41, and the mean cost/ITN distributed at $2.63. It also shows evidence of economies of scale, with the cost/TNY falling from $7.69 in year one (72,196 ITN to $3.44 in year five (720,577 ITN. Cost/ITN distributed dropped from $5.04 to $1.92. Conclusion Combining targeting and social marketing has the potential of being both cost-effective and capable of achieving high levels of coverage, and it is possible that increasing returns to scale can be achieved.

  11. Effect of electron donors on the fractionation of sulfur isotopes by a marine Desulfovibrio sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Min Sub; Ono, Shuhei; Donovan, Katie; Templer, Stefanie P.; Bosak, Tanja

    2011-08-01

    Sulfur isotope effects produced by microbial dissimilatory sulfate reduction are used to reconstruct the coupled cycling of carbon and sulfur through geologic time, to constrain the evolution of sulfur-based metabolisms, and to track the oxygenation of Earth's surface. In this study, we investigate how the coupling of carbon and sulfur metabolisms in batch and continuous cultures of a recently isolated marine sulfate reducing bacterium DMSS-1, a Desulfovibrio sp ., influences the fractionation of sulfur isotopes. DMSS-1 grown in batch culture on seven different electron donors (ethanol, glycerol, fructose, glucose, lactate, malate and pyruvate) fractionates 34S/ 32S ratio from 6‰ to 44‰, demonstrating that the fractionations by an actively growing culture of a single incomplete oxidizing sulfate reducing microbe can span almost the entire range of previously reported values in defined cultures. The magnitude of isotope effect correlates well with cell specific sulfate reduction rates (from 0.7 to 26.1 fmol/cell/day). DMSS-1 grown on lactate in continuous culture produces a larger isotope effect (21-37‰) than the lactate-grown batch culture (6‰), indicating that the isotope effect also depends on the supply rate of the electron donor and microbial growth rate. The largest isotope effect in continuous culture is accompanied by measurable changes in cell length and cellular yield that suggest starvation. The use of multiple sulfur isotopes in the model of metabolic fluxes of sulfur shows that the loss of sulfate from the cell and the intracellular reoxidation of reduced sulfur species contribute to the increase in isotope effects in a correlated manner. Isotope fractionations produced during sulfate reduction in the pure culture of DMSS-1 expand the previously reported range of triple sulfur isotope effects ( 32S, 33S, and 34S) by marine sulfate reducing bacteria, implying that microbial sulfur disproportionation may have a smaller 33S isotopic fingerprint

  12. Isotope Effect on the Thermal Conductivity of Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hengji Zhang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermal conductivity (TC of isolated graphene with different concentrations of isotope (C13 is studied with equilibrium molecular dynamics method at 300 K. In the limit of pure C12 or C13 graphene, TC of graphene in zigzag and armchair directions are ~630 W/mK and ~1000W/mK, respectively. We find that the TC of graphene can be maximally reduced by ~80%, in both armchair and zigzag directions, when a random distribution of C12 and C13 is assumed at different doping concentrations. Therefore, our simulation results suggest an effective way to tune the TC of graphene without changing its atomic and electronic structure, thus yielding a promising application for nanoelectronics and thermoelectricity of graphene-based nano device.

  13. Kinetic Isotope Effects in the Reduction of Methyl Iodide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Torkil

    1999-01-01

    a-Deuterium kinetic isotope effects (KIE's) have been determined for the reaction of methyl iodide with a series of reducing agents. Reagents which transfer hydride ion in an SN2 reaction show small inverse or small normal KIE's. Reagents which transfer an electron to methyl iodide to produce...... methyl radical show large normal KIE's up to 20 % per a-D. Large KIE's were found for the reaction of methyl iodide with sodium, for Pd-catalyzed reaction of methyl iodide with hydrogen, for ET at a platinum cathode, for ET from benzophenone ketyl or from sodium naphthalenide, for iron catalyzed ET from...... a Grignard reagent to methyl iodide, and for reduction of methyl iodide with tributyltin hydride or with gaseous hydrogen iodide. Very small KIE's were found for electron transfer to methyl iodide from magnesium in ether or from sodium in ammonia. The reason may be that these reactions are transport...

  14. Effect of osmolality on net fluid absorption in non-infected and ETEC-infected piglet small intestinal segments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiers, J.L.; Hoogendoorn, A.; Nout, M.J.R.; Rombouts, F.M.; Nabuurs, M.J.A.; Meulen, van der J.

    2006-01-01

    In the small intestinal segment perfusion model the effect of osmolality on net fluid absorption in enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC)-infected and non-infected small intestinal segments of piglets was investigated. In ETEC-infected segments net fluid absorption was reduced. Lowering the

  15. Influence of Organic Agriculture on the Net Greenhouse Effect in the Red River Valley, Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, R. L.

    2004-12-01

    Fluxes for the suite of biologically-produced greenhouse gases (CH4, N2O and CO2) are strongly influenced by agriculture, yet the influence of organic agriculture on all three gases, which comprise the net greenhouse effect (GHE), is not clear in the context of large-scale agricultural production. Greenhouse gas mitigation potential will depend upon the net balance for all three gases [GHE balance (CO2 equiv.)= CO2 flux+ 23CH4flux + 296N2Oflux]. On-farm, field-scale experiments were performed to test the hypothesis that the net GHE at the soil-atmosphere interface is reduced under organic wheat production, compared with conventional, and that effects vary inter-seasonally. Trace gas fluxes were measured at the soil-atmosphere interface for organic and conventional wheat farms in the Red River Valley, Minnesota, one of the most productive agricultural regions in the US. We utilized 40-60 ha field pairs planted with hard red spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Treatment pairs were located 6km apart and consisted of fields continuously cropped for wheat/soybean/sugar beet production for over 20 yr. Ten random, permanent points were generated for each 8.1 ha sub-plot nested inside each field. Each field pair was similar with respect to crop, climate, cultivation history, tillage, rotation, soil texture, pH, macronutrients, bulk density, and water holding capacity. Differences between treatments for the last five years were soil amendments (compost or urea) and herbicide/fungicide application versus mechanical weed control. We collected gas fluxes at each of the 41 points from April (wheat emergence) until the end of July (maturity) to determine the hourly and seasonally integrated net GHE for each management practice, given similar soil/plant/climatic conditions. Moreover, we analyzed inter-seasonal variability to determine the relationship between wheat phenology and flux under field conditions for soil temperature and moisture (water-filled pore space). The net GHE

  16. 2D net shape weaving for cost effective manufacture of textile reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, D. M. P.; Kern, M.; Hoffmann, G.; Cherif, C.

    2017-10-01

    Despite significant weight and performance advantages over metal parts, the today’s demand for fibre-reinforced polymer composites (FRPC) has been limited mainly by their large manufacturing cost. The combination of dry textile preforms and low-cost consolidation processes such as resin transfer molding (RTM) has been appointed as a promising approach to low-cost FRPC manufacture. At the current state of the art, tooling and impregnation technology is well understood whereas preform fabrication technology has not been developed effectively. This paper presents an advanced 2D net shape weaving technology developed with the aim to establish a more cost effective system for the manufacture of dry textile preforms for FRPC. 2D net shape weaving is developed based on open reed weave (ORW) technology and enables the manufacture of 2D contoured woven fabrics with firm edge, so that oversize cutting and hand trimming after molding are no longer required. The introduction of 2D net shape woven fabrics helps to reduce material waste, cycle time and preform manufacturing cost significantly. Furthermore, higher grade of automation in preform fabrication can be achieved.

  17. An improved null model for assessing the net effects of multiple stressors on communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Patrick L; MacLennan, Megan M; Vinebrooke, Rolf D

    2017-07-28

    Ecological stressors (i.e., environmental factors outside their normal range of variation) can mediate each other through their interactions, leading to unexpected combined effects on communities. Determining whether the net effect of stressors is ecologically surprising requires comparing their cumulative impact to a null model that represents the linear combination of their individual effects (i.e., an additive expectation). However, we show that standard additive and multiplicative null models that base their predictions on the effects of single stressors on community properties (e.g., species richness or biomass) do not provide this linear expectation, leading to incorrect interpretations of antagonistic and synergistic responses by communities. We present an alternative, the compositional null model, which instead bases its predictions on the effects of stressors on individual species, and then aggregates them to the community level. Simulations demonstrate the improved ability of the compositional null model to accurately provide a linear expectation of the net effect of stressors. We simulate the response of communities to paired stressors that affect species in a purely additive fashion and compare the relative abilities of the compositional null model and two standard community property null models (additive and multiplicative) to predict these linear changes in species richness and community biomass across different combinations (both positive, negative, or opposite) and intensities of stressors. The compositional model predicts the linear effects of multiple stressors under almost all scenarios, allowing for proper classification of net effects, whereas the standard null models do not. Our findings suggest that current estimates of the prevalence of ecological surprises on communities based on community property null models are unreliable, and should be improved by integrating the responses of individual species to the community level as does our

  18. Costs and effects of the Tanzanian national voucher scheme for insecticide-treated nets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanson Kara

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cost-effectiveness of insecticide-treated nets (ITNs in reducing morbidity and mortality is well established. International focus has now moved on to how best to scale up coverage and what financing mechanisms might be used to achieve this. The approach in Tanzania has been to deliver a targeted subsidy for those most vulnerable to the effects of malaria while at the same time providing support to the development of the commercial ITN distribution system. In October 2004, with funds from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS Tuberculosis and Malaria, the government launched the Tanzania National Voucher Scheme (TNVS, a nationwide discounted voucher scheme for ITNs for pregnant women and their infants. This paper analyses the costs and effects of the scheme and compares it with other approaches to distribution. Methods Economic costs were estimated using the ingredients approach whereby all resources required in the delivery of the intervention (including the user contribution are quantified and valued. Effects were measured in terms of number of vouchers used (and therefore nets delivered and treated nets years. Estimates were also made for the cost per malaria case and death averted. Results and Conclusion The total financial cost of the programme represents around 5% of the Ministry of Health's total budget. The average economic cost of delivering an ITN using the voucher scheme, including the user contribution, was $7.57. The cost-effectiveness results are within the benchmarks set by other malaria prevention studies. The Government of Tanzania's approach to scaling up ITNs uses both the public and private sectors in order to achieve and sustain the level of coverage required to meet the Abuja targets. The results presented here suggest that the TNVS is a cost-effective strategy for delivering subsidized ITNs to targeted vulnerable groups.

  19. Effect of site of starch digestion on portal nutrient net fluxes in steers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozière, Pierre; Rémond, Didier; Lemosquet, Sophie; Chauveau, Béatrice; Durand, Denys; Poncet, Claude

    2005-08-01

    Processing of maize grain is known to modulate the site of starch digestion, thus the nature and amount of nutrients delivered for absorption. We assessed the effect of site of starch digestion on nutrient net fluxes across portal-drained viscera (PDV). Three steers, fitted with permanent digestive cannulas and blood catheters, successively received two diets containing 35 % starch as dent maize grain. Diets differed according to maize presentation: dry and cracked (by-pass, BP) v. wet and ground (control, C). Ruminal physicochemical parameters were not significantly affected. Between C and BP, the decrease in ruminal starch digestion was compensated by an increase in starch digestion in the small intestine. The amount of glucose and soluble alpha-glucoside reaching the ileum was not affected. The amount of glucose disappearing in the small intestine increased from 238 to 531 g/d between C and BP, but portal net flux of glucose remained unchanged (-97 g/d). The portal O2 consumption and net energy release were not significantly affected, averaging 16 % and 57 % of metabolizable energy intake, respectively. The whole-body glucose appearance rate, measured by jugular infusion of [6,6-2H2]glucose, averaged 916 g/d. The present study shows that the increase in the amount of glucose disappearing in the small intestine of conventionally fed cattle at a moderate intake level induces no change in portal net flux of glucose, reflecting an increase in glucose utilization by PDV. That could contribute to the low response of whole-body glucose appearance rate observed at this moderate level of intestinal glucose supply.

  20. Effect of large-scale social marketing of insecticide-treated nets on child survival in rural Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberg, J R; Abdulla, S; Nathan, R; Mukasa, O; Marchant, T J; Kikumbih, N; Mushi, A K; Mponda, H; Minja, H; Mshinda, H; Tanner, M; Lengeler, C

    2001-04-21

    Insecticide-treated nets have proven efficacy as a malaria-control tool in Africa. However, the transition from efficacy to effectiveness cannot be taken for granted. We assessed coverage and the effect on child survival of a large-scale social marketing programme for insecticide-treated nets in two rural districts of southern Tanzania with high perennial malaria transmission. Socially marketed insecticide-treated nets were introduced step-wise over a 2-year period from May, 1997, in a population of 480000 people. Cross-sectional coverage surveys were done at baseline and after 1, 2, and 3 years. A demographic surveillance system (DSS) was set up in an area of 60000 people to record population, births, and deaths. Within the DSS area, the effect of insecticide-treated nets on child survival was assessed by a case-control approach. Cases were deaths in children aged between 1 month and 4 years. Four controls for each case were chosen from the DSS database. Use of insecticide-treated nets and potential confounding factors were assessed by questionnaire. Individual effectiveness estimates from the case-control study were combined with coverage to estimate community effectiveness. Insecticide-treated net coverage of infants in the DSS area rose from less than 10% at baseline to more than 50% 3 years later. Insecticide-treated nets were associated with a 27% increase in survival in children aged 1 month to 4 years (95% CI 3-45). Coverage in such children was higher in areas with longer access to the programme. The modest average coverage achieved by 1999 in the two districts (18% in children younger than 5 years) suggests that insecticide-treated nets prevented 1 in 20 child deaths at that time. Social marketing of insecticide-treated nets has great potential for effective malaria control in rural African settings.

  1. Cost-effectiveness of social marketing of insecticide-treated nets for malaria control in the United Republic of Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Kara; Kikumbih, Nassor; Armstrong Schellenberg, Joanna; Mponda, Haji; Nathan, Rose; Lake, Sally; Mills, Anne; Tanner, Marcel; Lengeler, Christian

    2003-01-01

    To assess the costs and consequences of a social marketing approach to malaria control in children by means of insecticide-treated nets in two rural districts of the United Republic of Tanzania, compared with no net use. Project cost data were collected prospectively from accounting records. Community effectiveness was estimated on the basis of a nested case-control study and a cross-sectional cluster sample survey. The social marketing approach to the distribution of insecticide-treated nets was estimated to cost 1560 US dollars per death averted and 57 US dollars per disability-adjusted life year averted. These figures fell to 1018 US dollars and 37 US dollars, respectively, when the costs and consequences of untreated nets were taken into account. The social marketing of insecticide-treated nets is an attractive intervention for preventing childhood deaths from malaria.

  2. The nitrogen isotope effect of benthic remineralization-nitrification-denitrification coupling in an estuarine environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Alkhatib

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The nitrogen (N stable isotopic composition of pore water nitrate and total dissolved N (TDN was measured in sediments of the St. Lawrence Estuary and the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The study area is characterized by gradients in organic matter reactivity, bottom water oxygen concentrations, as well as benthic respiration rates. N isotope effects on the water column associated with the benthic exchange of nitrate (εapp and TDN (εsed during benthic nitrification-denitrification coupling were investigated. The sediments were a major sink for nitrate and a source of reduced dissolved N (RDN = DON + NH4+. We observed that both the pore water nitrate and RDN pools were enriched in 15N relative to the water column, with increasing δ15N downcore in the sediments. As in other marine environments, the biological nitrate isotope fractionation of net fixed N loss was barely expressed at the scale of sediment-water exchange, with ϵapp values <3‰. The strongest under-expression (i.e. lowest εapp of the biological N isotope fractionation was observed at the most oxygenated sites with the least reactive organic matter, indicating that, through their control on the depth of the denitrification zone, bottom water oxygen concentrations and the organic matter reactivity can modulate εapp. For the first time, actual measurements of δ15N of pore water RDN were included in the calculations of εsed. We argue that large fractions of the sea-floor-derived DON are reactive and, hence, involved in the development of the δ15N of dissolved inorganic N (DIN in the water column. In the St. Lawrence sediments, the combined benthic N transformations yield a flux of 15N-enriched RDN that can significantly elevate εsed above εapp. Calculated εsed values were within the range of 4.6 ± 2

  3. Ab Initio Calculations of Deuterium Isotope Effects on Chemical Shifts of Salt-Bridged Lysines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullah, Saif; Ishimoto, Takayoshi; Williamson, Mike P.

    2011-01-01

    . This method enables the determination of both the electronic and the protonic (deuteronic) wave functions simultaneously and can directly calculate the geometrical difference induced by H/D isotope effects. The calculations show that the one-bond deuterium isotope effects on 15N nuclear shielding, 1Δ15N......Deuterium isotope effects measure the change in chemical shift on substitution of a proton by deuterium. They have been calculated by direct treatment of the H/D nuclear quantum effect using a multicomponent ab initio molecular orbital method based on a non-Born−Oppenheimer approximation...

  4. Isotope effect on gyro-fluid edge turbulence and zonal flows

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, Ole Hauke Heinz

    2016-01-01

    The role of ion polarisation and finite Larmor radius on the isotope effect on turbulent tokamak edge transport and flows is investigated by means of local electromagnetic multi-species gyro-fluid computations. Transport is found to be reduced with the effective plasma mass for protium, deuterium and tritium mixtures. This isotope effect is found for both cold and warm ion models, but significant influence of finite Larmor radius and polarisation effects are identified. Sheared flow reduction of transport through self generated turbulent zonal flows and geodesic acoustic modes in the present model (not including neoclassical flows) is found to play only a minor role on regulating isotopically improved confinement.

  5. Determining and addressing obstacles to the effective use of long-lasting insecticide-impregnated nets in rural Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benziger Peter W

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this project was to achieve high, sustainable levels of net coverage in a village in rural Tanzania by combining free distribution of long-lasting insecticide-impregnated nets (LLINs with community-tailored education. In Tanzania, malaria is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Although malaria bed nets have a well-established role in reducing disease burden, few rural households have access to nets, and effective use depends on personal practices and attitudes. Methods Five practices and attitudes inconsistent with effective LLIN use were identified from household interviews (n = 10. A randomized survey of villagers (n = 132 verified local prevalence of these practices and attitudes. Community leaders held an educational session for two members of every household addressing these practice and attitudes, demonstrating proper LLIN use, and emphasizing behaviour modification. Attendees received one or two LLINs per household. Surveys distributed three weeks (n = 104 and 15 months (n = 104 post-intervention assessed corrected practices and attitudes. Project efficacy was defined by correction of baseline practices and attitudes as well as high rates of reported daily net use, with statistical significance determined by chi-square test. Results Baseline interviews and surveys revealed incorrect practices and attitudes regarding 1 use of nets in dry season, 2 need to retreat LLINs, 3 children napping under nets, 4 need to repair nets, and 5 net procurement as a priority, with 53- 88.6% incorrect responses (11.4-47% correct responses. A three-week follow-up demonstrated 83-95% correct responses. Fifteen-month follow-up showed statistically significant (p Conclusions Results suggest that addressing community-specific practices and attitudes prior to LLIN distribution promotes consistent and correct use, and helps change attitudes towards bed nets as a preventative health measure. Future LLIN distributions

  6. Investigation of the feeding effect on the 13C/12C isotope ratio of the hormones in bovine urine using gas chromatography/combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balizs, Gabor; Jainz, Annett; Horvatovich, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The effect of the feeding on the 13C/12C isotope ratio of four endogenous steroid hormones testosterone (T), epi-testosterone (epi-T), dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and etiocholanolone (ETIO) in bovine urine was investigated. An analytical method to determine the accurate isotope ratio was developed

  7. Effect of interband interaction on isotope effect exponent of MgB2 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    com. MS received 22 September 2004; revised 5 January 2006; accepted 24 January 2005. Abstract. The exact formula of Tc's equation and the isotope effect exponent of two- band s-wave superconductors in the weak-coupling limit are ...

  8. Matrix effects in laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Staci, E-mail: staci.brown@cepast.famu.edu [Department of Physics, Florida A and M University, 2077 E. Paul Dirac Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Ford, Alan, E-mail: alan.ford@alakaidefense.com [Alakai Defense Systems, 197 Replacement Ave, Suite 102, Fort Leonard Wood, MO 65473 (United States); Akpovo, Charlemagne C., E-mail: charlemagne.akpovo@cepast.famu.edu [Department of Physics, Florida A and M University, 2077 E. Paul Dirac Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Martinez, Jorge, E-mail: jmartinez@cepast.famu.edu [Department of Physics, Florida A and M University, 2077 E. Paul Dirac Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Johnson, Lewis, E-mail: lewis@cepast.famu.edu [Department of Physics, Florida A and M University, 2077 E. Paul Dirac Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Recently, it has been shown that laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) can be used for the detection of isotopes of elements via isotopic shifts in diatomic species in a technique known as laser ablation molecular isotopic spectrometry (LAMIS). While LAMIS works quite well for isotopic analysis of pure compounds under optimal conditions, it is desirable for it to be applicable for a variety of compounds and matrices. However, the LIBS plasma emission associated with LAMIS depends on several parameters, including the applied electric field of the laser pulse, the physical properties of the material being investigated, and the presence of additional elements other than the element of interest. In this paper, we address some of the pitfalls arising from these dependencies when using LAMIS for the determination of the relative isotopic abundance of boron-containing materials with varying chemical matrices. - Highlights: • LAMIS usually determines isotopic composition of boron compounds within 3 percent. • LaBO{sub 3} and some boron-containing mixtures yield inaccurate LAMIS results. • Higher laser energy reduces variability but does not remedy poor LAMIS outcomes.

  9. Inflated kinetic isotope effects in the branched mechanism of Neurospora crassa 2-nitropropane dioxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Kevin; Gadda, Giovanni

    2009-03-24

    Catalytic turnover of Neurospora crassa 2-nitropropane dioxygenase with nitroethane as substrate occurs through both nonoxidative and oxidative pathways. The pH dependence of the kinetic isotope effects with [1,1-(2)H(2)]nitroethane as substrate was measured in the current study by monitoring the formation of the nitronate product in the nonoxidative pathway. The kinetic isotope effect on the second-order rate constant for nitronate formation, k(cat)/K(m), decreased from an upper limiting value of 23 +/- 1 at low pH to a lower limiting value of 11 +/- 1 at high pH. These kinetic isotope effects are three times larger than those determined previously through measurements of oxygen consumption that occurs in the oxidative pathway of the enzyme [(2006) Biochemistry 45, 13889]. Analytical expressions for the k(cat)/K(m) values determined in each study show that the difference in the kinetic isotope effects arises from the branching of an enzyme-ethylnitronate reaction intermediate through oxidative and nonoxidative turnover. This branching is isotope sensitive due to a kinetic isotope effect on nitronate release rather than on flavin reduction as indicated by the pH-independent (D)k(red) value of 0.99 +/- 0.06 with ethylnitronate as substrate. The kinetic isotope effect on ethylnitronate release arises from the deprotonation of histidine 196, which provides electrostatic interactions with the nitronate to keep it bound in the active site for oxidation. The isotope effect on branching results in an inflation of the kinetic isotope observed for the nonoxidative pathway to values that are larger than the intrinsic values associated with CH bond cleavage.

  10. Deuterium isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts of 10-Hydroxybenzo[h]quinolines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Erik; Kamounah, Fadhil S.; Gryko, Daniel T.

    2013-01-01

    Deuterium isotope effects on 13C-NMR chemical shifts are investigated in a series of 10-hydroxybenzo[h]quinolines (HBQ’s) The OH proton is deuteriated. The isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts in these hydrogen bonded systems are rather unusual. The formal four-bond effects are found to be nega...... with calculated OH stretching frequencies. Isotope effects on chemical shifts are calculated for systems with OH exchanged by OD. Hydrogen bond potentials are discussed. New and more soluble nitro derivatives are synthesized.......Deuterium isotope effects on 13C-NMR chemical shifts are investigated in a series of 10-hydroxybenzo[h]quinolines (HBQ’s) The OH proton is deuteriated. The isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts in these hydrogen bonded systems are rather unusual. The formal four-bond effects are found...... to be negative, indicating transmission via the hydrogen bond. In addition unusual long-range effects are seen. Structures, NMR chemical shifts and changes in nuclear shieldings upon deuteriation are calculated using DFT methods. Two-bond deuterium isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts are correlated...

  11. Effectiveness and durability of Interceptor® long-lasting insecticidal nets in a malaria endemic area of central India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhatt Rajendra M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the present study, Interceptor®, long-lasting polyester net, 75 denier and bursting strength of minimum 250 kPa coated with alpha-cypermethrin @ 200 mg/m2 was evaluated for its efficacy in reducing the mosquito density, blood feeding inhibition and malaria incidence in a tribal dominated malaria endemic area in Chhattisgarh state, central India. Its durability, washing practices and usage pattern by the community was also assessed up to a period of three years. Methods The study was carried out in two phases. In the first phase (September 2006 to August 2007, 16 malaria endemic villages in district Kanker were randomized into three groups, viz. Interceptor net (LN, untreated polyester net (100 denier and without net. Malaria cases were detected by undertaking fortnightly surveillance by home visits and treated as per the national drug policy. Mosquito collections were made by hand catch and pyrethrum space spray methods from human dwellings once every month. Slide positivity rate (SPR and malaria incidence per 1000 population (PI were compared between the three study arms to assess the impact of use of Interceptor nets. Simultaneously, wash resistance studies were carried out in the laboratory by doing cone bioassays on Interceptor LNs washed up to 20 times. Activities undertaken in second Phase (April 2008 to October 2009 after an interval of about 18 months post-net distribution included questionnaire based surveys at every six months, i.e. 18, 24, 30 and 36 months to observe durability, usage pattern of LNs and washing practices by the community. After 36 months of field use, 30 nets were retrieved and sampled destructively for chemical analysis. Results Interceptor nets were found effective in reducing the density, parity rate and blood feeding success rate of main malaria vector Anopheles culicifacies as compared to that in untreated net and no net villages. SPR in LN villages was 3.7% as compared to 6

  12. Catalytic-site design for inverse heavy-enzyme isotope effects in human purine nucleoside phosphorylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harijan, Rajesh K; Zoi, Ioanna; Antoniou, Dimitri; Schwartz, Steven D; Schramm, Vern L

    2017-06-20

    Heavy-enzyme isotope effects (15N-, 13C-, and 2H-labeled protein) explore mass-dependent vibrational modes linked to catalysis. Transition path-sampling (TPS) calculations have predicted femtosecond dynamic coupling at the catalytic site of human purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP). Coupling is observed in heavy PNPs, where slowed barrier crossing caused a normal heavy-enzyme isotope effect (kchemlight/kchemheavy > 1.0). We used TPS to design mutant F159Y PNP, predicted to improve barrier crossing for heavy F159Y PNP, an attempt to generate a rare inverse heavy-enzyme isotope effect (kchemlight/kchemheavy effect of 1.31 for native PNP and an inverse effect of 0.75 for F159Y PNP. Increased isotopic mass in F159Y PNP causes more efficient transition state formation. Independent validation of the inverse isotope effect for heavy F159Y PNP came from commitment to catalysis experiments. Most heavy enzymes demonstrate normal heavy-enzyme isotope effects, and F159Y PNP is a rare example of an inverse effect. Crystal structures and TPS dynamics of native and F159Y PNPs explore the catalytic-site geometry associated with these catalytic changes. Experimental validation of TPS predictions for barrier crossing establishes the connection of rapid protein dynamics and vibrational coupling to enzymatic transition state passage.

  13. Land Use Effects on Net Greenhouse Gas Fluxes in the US Great Plains: Historical Trends and Model Projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Grosso, S. J.; Parton, W. J.; Ojima, D. S.; Mosier, A. R.; Mosier, A. R.; Paustian, K.; Peterson, G. A.

    2001-12-01

    We present maps showing regional patterns of land use change and soil C levels in the US Great Plains during the 20th century and time series of net greenhouse gas fluxes associated with different land uses. Net greenhouse gas fluxes were calculated by accounting for soil CO2 fluxes, the CO2 equivalents of N2O emissions and CH4 uptake, and the CO2 costs of N fertilizer production. Both historical and modern agriculture in this region have been net sources of greenhouse gases. The primary reason for this, prior to 1950, is that agriculture mined soil C and resulted in net CO2 emissions. When chemical N fertilizer became widely used in the 1950's agricultural soils began to sequester CO2-C but these soils were still net greenhouse gas sources if the effects of increased N2O emissions and decreased CH4 uptake are included. The sensitivity of net greenhouse gas fluxes to conventional and alternative land uses was explored using the DAYCENT ecosystem model. Model projections suggest that conversion to no-till, reduction of the fallow period, and use of nitrification inhibitors can significantly decrease net greenhouse gas emissions in dryland and irrigated systems, while maintaining or increasing crop yields.

  14. Effects of glow discharge cleanings on hydrogen isotope removal for plasma facing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamauchi, Y., E-mail: yamauchi@qe.eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita-13, Nishi-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan); Matsumoto, A.; Kosaka, Y.; Kimura, Y.; Takeda, K. [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita-13, Nishi-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan); Hino, T.; Nobuta, Y. [Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita-13, Nishi-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan); Nishimura, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Ueda, Y. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2013-07-15

    The effect of the discharge cleanings on hydrogen isotope removal have been evaluated for graphite, stainless steel, tungsten, boron and titanium. For all materials, the helium glow discharge cleaning was the most effective on the hydrogen isotope removal among the inert gas discharges. High efficiency of energy transfer to target atom and deep projected range for helium ion might be responsible for the high removal fraction. The effect of argon glow discharge cleaning was small. The small removal fraction for the argon might be owing to re-deposition layer, which acted as a screening to the removal. The hydrogen isotope in the tungsten was hardly removed by the inert gas discharge cleanings. The small removal fraction for the tungsten might be owing to hydrogen isotope retention in deeper regions resulting from diffusion along with the grain boundary or the porous structure. Surface impurity and morphologies significantly influenced the deuterium removal effects.

  15. Isotope effects on chemical shifts in the study of intramolecular hydrogen bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Poul Erik

    2015-01-30

    The paper deals with the use of isotope effects on chemical shifts in characterizing intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Both so-called resonance-assisted (RAHB) and non-RAHB systems are treated. The importance of RAHB will be discussed. Another very important issue is the borderline between "static" and tautomeric systems. Isotope effects on chemical shifts are particularly useful in such studies. All kinds of intramolecular hydrogen bonded systems will be treated, typical hydrogen bond donors: OH, NH, SH and NH+, typical acceptors C=O, C=N, C=S C=N-. The paper will be deal with both secondary and primary isotope effects on chemical shifts. These two types of isotope effects monitor the same hydrogen bond, but from different angles.

  16. Isotope effects on chemical shifts in the study of intramolecular hydrogen bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Erik

    2015-01-01

    The paper deals with the use of isotope effects on chemical shifts in characterizing intramolecular hydrogen bonds. Both so-called resonance-assisted (RAHB) and non-RAHB systems are treated. The importance of RAHB will be discussed. Another very important issue is the borderline between “static......” and tautomeric systems. Isotope effects on chemical shifts are particularly useful in such studies. All kinds of intramolecular hydrogen bonded systems will be treated, typical hydrogen bond donors: OH, NH, SH and NH+, typical acceptors C=O, C=N, C=S C=N−. The paper will be deal with both secondary and primary...... isotope effects on chemical shifts. These two types of isotope effects monitor the same hydrogen bond, but from different angles...

  17. Kinetic and geometric isotope effects originating from different adsorption potential energy surfaces: Cyclohexane on Rh(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koitaya, Takanori; Shimizu, Sumera; Mukai, Kozo; Yoshimoto, Shinya; Yoshinobu, Jun

    2012-06-01

    Novel isotope effects were observed in desorption kinetics and adsorption geometry of cyclohexane on Rh(111) by the use of infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, temperature programmed desorption, photoelectron spectroscopy, and spot-profile-analysis low energy electron diffraction. The desorption energy of deuterated cyclohexane (C6D12) is lower than that of C6H12. In addition, the work function change by adsorbed C6D12 is smaller than that by adsorbed C6H12. These results indicate that C6D12 has a shallower adsorption potential than C6H12 (vertical geometric isotope effect). The lateral geometric isotope effect was also observed in the two-dimensional cyclohexane superstructures as a result of the different repulsive interaction between interfacial dipoles. The observed isotope effects should be ascribed to the quantum nature of hydrogen involved in the C-H...metal interaction.

  18. Effect of photosynthetic light dosage on carbon isotope composition in the coral skeleton: Long-term culture of Porites spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omata, Tamano; Suzuki, Atsushi; Sato, Takanori; Minoshima, Kayo; Nomaru, Eriko; Murakami, Akio; Murayama, Shohei; Kawahata, Hodaka; Maruyama, Tadashi

    2008-06-01

    Whereas the oxygen isotope ratio of the coral skeleton is used for reconstruction of past information on seawater, the carbon isotope ratio is considered a proxy for physiological processes, principally photosynthesis and respiration. However, the fractionation of carbon isotopes in biogenic carbonate such as coral skeleton is still unclear. We conducted a long-term culture experiment of Porites spp. corals at different light dosages (light intensity, 100, 300, or 500 μmol m-2 s-1; daily light period, 10 or 12 h) at 25 ± 0.6°C to examine the contribution of photosynthetic activity to skeletal carbon isotope composition. Corals were grown in sand-filtered seawater and not fed; thus, they subsisted from photosynthesis of symbiotic algae. As the daily dose of photosynthetically active radiation increased, the rate of annual extension also increased. Mean isotope compositions shifted; the carbon isotope compositions (δ13C) became heavier and the oxygen isotope compositions (δ18O) became lighter at higher radiation dose. Skeletal δ18O decrease coincided with increasing skeletal growth rate, indicating the influence of so-called kinetic isotope effects. The observed δ13C increase should be subject to both kinetic and metabolic isotope effects, with the latter reflecting skeletal δ13C enrichment due to photosynthesis by symbiotic algae. Using a vector approach in the δ13C-δ18O plane, we discriminated between kinetic and metabolic isotope effects on δ13C. The calculated δ13C changes from metabolic isotope effects were light dose dependent. The δ13C fractionation curve related to metabolic isotope effects is very similar to the photosynthesis-irradiance curve, indicating the direct contribution of photosynthetic activity to metabolic isotope effects. In contrast, δ13C fractionation related to kinetic isotope effects gradually increased as the growth rate increased. Our experiment demonstrated that the kinetic and metabolic isotope effects in coral skeleton

  19. Effects of ozone on growth, net photosynthesis and yield of two African varieties of Vigna unguiculata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetteh, Rashied; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Wada, Yoshiharu; Funada, Ryo; Izuta, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    To assess the effects of O(3)on growth, net photosynthesis and yield of two African varieties of cowpea(Vigna unguiculata L.), Blackeye and Asontem were exposed as potted plants to air that was either filtered to remove O(3) (FA), non-filtered air (NF), non-filtered with added O3 of approximately 50 nL L(-1) (ppb) from 11:00 to 16:00 (NF + O(3)) for 88 days in open-top chambers. The mean O(3) concentration (11:00-16:00) during the exposure period had a range from 16 ppb in the FA treatment to 118 ppb in the NF + O(3) treatment. Net photosynthetic rate and leaf area per plant were significantly reduced by exposure to O(3), reducing the growth of both varieties. Exposure to O(3) significantly reduced the 100-seed weight and number of seeds per pod. As a result, cowpea yield was significantly reduced by long-term exposure to O(3), with no difference in sensitivity between the varieties.

  20. Tightly bound soil water introduces isotopic memory effects on mobile and extractable soil water pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newberry, Sarah L; Prechsl, Ulrich E; Pace, Matthew; Kahmen, Ansgar

    2017-08-01

    Cryogenic vacuum extraction is the well-established method of extracting water from soil for isotopic analyses of waters moving through the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum. We investigate if soils can alter the isotopic composition of water through isotope memory effects, and determined which mechanisms are responsible for it. Soils with differing physicochemical properties were re-wetted with reference water and subsequently extracted by cryogenic water distillation. Results suggest some reference waters bind tightly to the soil and not all of this tightly bound water is removed during cryogenic vacuum extraction. Kinetic isotopic fractionation occurring when reference water binds to the soil is likely responsible for the (18)O-depletion of re-extracted reference water, suggesting an enrichment of the tightly bound soil water pool. Further re-wetting of cryogenically extracted soils indicates an isotopic memory effect of tightly bound soil water on water added to the soil. The data suggest tightly bound soil water can influence the isotopic composition of mobile soil water. Findings show that soils influence the isotope composition of soil water by (i) kinetic fractionation when water is bound to the soil and (ii) equilibrium fractionation between different soil water pools. These findings could be relevant for plant water uptake investigations and complicate ecohydrological and paleohydrological studies.

  1. Electrochemical H/D isotope effects in PEM fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaninski, Milica P. Marceta; Nikolic, Vladimir M.; Maksic, Aleksandar D.; Tasic, Gvozden S. [Department of Physical Chemistry, Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (RS); Miljanic, Scepan S. [University of Belgrade, Faculty of Physical Chemistry, P.O. Box 276, 11001 Belgrade (RS)

    2008-10-15

    An electrochemical H/D separation system consisting of electrolyzer and PEM fuel cell has been proposed. Isotope separation could be important as a part of the energy saving process in an energy-hydrogen-energy cycle. Any transfer of energy into hydrogen or vice versa induces change of the H/D isotope ratio, which can be considered, as a method to produce heavy water as by-product. In this way, the separation efficiency can contribute to the overall efficiency of the cycle. (author)

  2. Electrochemical H-D isotope effect at metal-perovskite proton conductor interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kek, D.; Bonanos, N.

    1999-01-01

    The H-D isotope effect on the electrode kinetics of a metal-proton conductor interface has been investigated. The current-voltage behaviour depends on the nature of the electrode (Ni, Ag), the atmosphere (H(2), D(2)), the partial pressures of the gases, and the temperature. The isotope effect...... was manifested by a reduction in anodic current densities when H(2) was replaced by D(2). For both nickel and silver, the anodic part of the polarisation curves displayed limiting current behaviour, due to concentration polarisation. The empirical reaction order was not influenced by isotope replacement......, suggesting that the mechanism of reaction is decisively determined by the electrode. Under the specific condition of 1% H(2) and 1% D(2) in the atmosphere and 800 degrees C, the electrochemical isotope effect, given by the limiting current, was 1.4+/-0.15 in the case of Ni and 1.2+/-0.3 in the case of Ag...

  3. Interacting effects of elevated temperature and additional water on plant physiology and net ecosystem carbon fluxes in a high Arctic ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maseyk, Kadmiel; Seibt, Ulrike; Lett, Céline; Lupascu, Massimo; Czimczik, Claudia; Sullivan, Patrick; Welker, Jeff

    2013-04-01

    Arctic ecosystems are experiencing temperature increases more strongly than the global average, and increases in precipitation are also expected amongst the climate impacts on this region in the future. These changes are expected to strongly influence plant physiology and soil biogeochemistry with subsequent implications for system carbon balance. We have investigated the effects of a long-term (10 years) increase in temperature, soil water and the combination of both on a tundra ecosystem at a field manipulation experiment in NW Greenland. Leaf gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence, carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) content and leaf isotopic composition, and leaf morphology were measured on Salix arctica plants in treatment and control plots in June-July 2011, and continuous measurements of net plant and soil fluxes of CO2 and water were made using automatic chambers coupled to a trace gas laser analyzer. Plants in the elevated temperature (T2) treatment had the highest photosynthetic capacity in terms of net CO2 assimilation rates and photosystem II efficiencies, and lowest rates of non-photochemical energy dissipation during photosynthesis. T2 plants also had the highest leaf N content, specific leaf area (SLA) and saturation light level of photosynthesis. It appears that warming increases soil N availability, which the plants direct towards increasing photosynthetic capacity and producing larger thinner leaves. On the other hand, the plants in the plots with both elevated temperatures and additional water (T2W) had the lowest photosystem II efficiencies and the highest rates of non-photochemical energy dissipation, due more to higher levels of constitutive energy dissipation than regulated thermal quenching. Watering, both in combination with higher temperatures and alone (W treatment), also reduced leaf SLA and leaf N relative to control plots. However, net photosynthetic rates remained similar to control plants, due in part to higher stomatal conductance (W) and

  4. Mechanism of the flame ionization detector. II. Isotope effects and heteroatom effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Torkil

    1997-01-01

    of 2%. The reason for the small or non-existent isotope effects is that H/2H exchange takes place in the pre-combustion hydrogenolysis in the flame. This was shown by taking samples from the lower part of the flame by means of a fused silica capillary probe. By the same technique the hydrogenolytic......The relative molar flame ionization detecton (FID) response (RMR) for a hydrocarbon does not change when deuterium is substituted for hydrogen. The exception is methane for which an inverse deuterium effect of 3..5% is observed for tetradeuteriomethane. [13C]Methane shows an inverse isotope effect...... reactions in the hydrogen flame of compounds added to the hydrogen gas in low concentrations were followed. Alcohols, ethers, ketones, and esters all produced methane and carbon monoxide, while amines produced methane and hydrogen cyanide, halogen compounds methane and hydrogen halide, etc. The FID response...

  5. Sex effects on net protein and energy requirements for growth of Saanen goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, A P; St-Pierre, N R; Fernandes, M H R M; Almeida, A K; Vargas, J A C; Resende, K T; Teixeira, I A M A

    2017-06-01

    Requirements for growth in the different sexes remain poorly quantified in goats. The objective of this study was to develop equations for estimating net protein (NP G ) and net energy (NE G ) for growth in Saanen goats of different sexes from 5 to 45 kg of body weight (BW). A data set from 7 comparative slaughter studies (238 individual records) of Saanen goats was used. Allometric equations were developed to determine body protein and energy contents in the empty BW (EBW) as dependent variables and EBW as the allometric predictor. Parameter estimates were obtained using a linearized (log-transformation) expression of the allometric equations using the MIXED procedure in SAS software (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC). The model included the random effect of the study and the fixed effects of sex (intact male, castrated male, and female; n = 94, 73, and 71, respectively), EBW, and their interactions. Net requirements for growth were estimated as the first partial derivative of the allometric equations with respect to EBW. Additionally, net requirements for growth were evaluated based on the degree of maturity. Monte Carlo techniques were used to estimate the uncertainty of the calculated net requirement values. Sex affected allometric relationships for protein and energy in Saanen goats. The allometric equation for protein content in the EBW of intact and castrated males was log 10 protein (g) = 2.221 (±0.0224) + 1.015 (±0.0165) × log 10 EBW (kg). For females, the relationship was log 10 protein (g) = 2.277 (±0.0288) + 0.958 (±0.0218) × log 10 EBW (kg). Therefore, NP G for males was greater than for females. The allometric equation for the energy content in the EBW of intact males was log 10 energy (kcal) = 2.988 (±0.0323) + 1.240 (±0.0238) × log 10 EBW (kg); of castrated males, log 10 energy (kcal) = 2.873 (±0.0377) + 1.359 (±0.0283) × log 10 EBW (kg); and of females, log 10 energy (kcal) = 2.820 (±0.0377) + 1.442 (±0.0281) × log 10 EBW (kg). The NE G

  6. Detrimental effect of cypermethrin treated nets on Culicoides populations (Diptera; Ceratopogonidae) and non-targeted fauna in livestock farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Río, R; Barceló, C; Lucientes, J; Miranda, M A

    2014-01-31

    Bluetongue (BT) is an important disease of ruminants which exhibits its most severe clinical signs on cattle and especially on certain breeds of sheep. The known vectors of BT are small insects of the genus Culicoides (Diptera; Ceratopogonidae). Two species from this genus - Culicoides imicola and Culicoides obsoletus - play the major role in the transmission of the disease in Europe. Several prophylactic methods are used to avoid transmission; however, an easy and cost-effective preventive technique would be very useful for the control of the Culicoides populations near the animals. In the present study, the insecticide effect of cypermethrin treated nets on a Culicoides population was evaluated. A polyethylene net sprayed with 1L cypermethrin solution (1%) surrounding a UV light suction trap was placed at a cattle farm in Majorca (Balearic Islands). Collections of Culicoides and other fauna from the trap and floor around the net were compared with a control. Results showed no significant differences in the collection of Culicoides midges between the insecticide-treated net and the control. However, significant differences were observed in the collection of the non-target fauna between the treated net and the control, indicating that the dose used in the present trial was enough to kill most of the arthropods that contacted the net. The reasons for these equivocal findings and means to improve this technique for the control of Culicoides midges are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Clumped isotope effects during OH and Cl oxidation of methane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whitehill, Andrew R.; Joelsson, Lars Magnus T.; Schmidt, Johan Albrecht

    2017-01-01

    was produced from the reaction of O(1D) (from O3 photolysis) with H2O, and Cl was from photolysis of Cl2. Samples were taken from the reaction cell and analyzed for methane (12CH4, 12CH3D, 13CH4, 13CH3D) isotopologue ratios using tunable infrared laser direct absorption spectroscopy. Measured kinetic isotope...

  8. Gyrokinetic characterization of the isotope effect in turbulent transport at the FT-2 tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niskala, P.; Gurchenko, A. D.; Gusakov, E. Z.; Altukhov, A. B.; Esipov, L. A.; Kantor, M. Yu; Kiviniemi, T. P.; Kouprienko, D.; Korpilo, T.; Lashkul, S. I.; Leerink, S.; Perevalov, A. A.; Rochford, R.

    2017-04-01

    Isotope effect allows fusion devices to perform better when heavier hydrogen isotopes are used as fuel, but the reason for this improvement is not yet understood. We present the first direct evidence of the isotope effect on particle confinement in the FT-2 tokamak and investigate it via gyrokinetic simulations. Experimental measurements for comparable hydrogen and deuterium discharges show that the particle confinement time increases by 40% for the heavier isotope species. The isotope effect on particle flux is reproduced in global and local gyrokinetic simulations. Global ELMFIRE simulations demonstrate a systemic reduction in particle fluxes across the radial range, showing a ratio of fluxes {{{Γ }}}{{H}}/{{{Γ }}}{{D}}=1.3 at the edge and {{{Γ }}}{{H}}/{{{Γ }}}{{D}}=1.4 at r/a=0.6. Local GENE simulations agree qualitatively with the result. Besides the fluctuation level, smaller scales and a favorable shift in the cross-phase between the turbulent fluctuations are found to contribute to the isotope effect in the simulations.

  9. Proteolytic Remodeling of Perineuronal Nets: Effects on Synaptic Plasticity and Neuronal Population Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Lorenzo Bozzelli

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The perineuronal net (PNN represents a lattice-like structure that is prominently expressed along the soma and proximal dendrites of parvalbumin- (PV- positive interneurons in varied brain regions including the cortex and hippocampus. It is thus apposed to sites at which PV neurons receive synaptic input. Emerging evidence suggests that changes in PNN integrity may affect glutamatergic input to PV interneurons, a population that is critical for the expression of synchronous neuronal population discharges that occur with gamma oscillations and sharp-wave ripples. The present review is focused on the composition of PNNs, posttranslation modulation of PNN components by sulfation and proteolysis, PNN alterations in disease, and potential effects of PNN remodeling on neuronal plasticity at the single-cell and population level.

  10. Weaving a two-dimensional fishing net from titanoniobate nanosheets embedded with Fe3O4 nanocrystals for highly efficient capture and isotope labeling of phosphopeptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xueqin; Li, Siyuan; Zhang, Xiaoxia; Min, Qianhao; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2015-03-01

    Qualitative and quantitative characterization of phosphopeptides by means of mass spectrometry (MS) is the main goal of MS-based phosphoproteomics, but suffers from their low abundance in the large haystack of various biological molecules. Herein, we introduce two-dimensional (2D) metal oxides to tackle this biological separation issue. A nanocomposite composed of titanoniobate nanosheets embedded with Fe3O4 nanocrystals (Fe3O4-TiNbNS) is constructed via a facile cation-exchange approach, and adopted for the capture and isotope labeling of phosphopeptides. In this nanoarchitecture, the 2D titanoniobate nanosheets offer enlarged surface area and a spacious microenvironment for capturing phosphopeptides, while the Fe3O4 nanocrystals not only incorporate a magnetic response into the composite but, more importantly, also disrupt the restacking process between the titanoniobate nanosheets and thus preserve a greater specific surface for binding phosphopeptides. Owing to the extended active surface, abundant Lewis acid sites and excellent magnetic controllability, Fe3O4-TiNbNS demonstrates superior sensitivity, selectivity and capacity over homogeneous bulk metal oxides, layered oxides, and even restacked nanosheets in phosphopeptide enrichment, and further allows in situ isotope labeling to quantify aberrantly-regulated phosphopeptides from sera of leukemia patients. This composite nanosheet greatly contributes to the MS analysis of phosphopeptides and gives inspiration in the pursuit of 2D structured materials for separation of other biological molecules of interests.Qualitative and quantitative characterization of phosphopeptides by means of mass spectrometry (MS) is the main goal of MS-based phosphoproteomics, but suffers from their low abundance in the large haystack of various biological molecules. Herein, we introduce two-dimensional (2D) metal oxides to tackle this biological separation issue. A nanocomposite composed of titanoniobate nanosheets embedded with Fe3

  11. Controls of Net Ecosystem Exchange at an Old Field, a Pine Plantation, and a Hardwood Forest under Identical Climatic and Edaphic Conditions-Isotopic Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chanton, J. P.; Mortazavi, B.

    2004-11-04

    During the past year we have submitted two manuscripts. 1. Mortazavi, B., J. Chanton, J.L. Prater, A.C. Oishi, R. Oren and G. Katul. Temporal variability in 13C of respired CO2 in a pine and a hardwood forest subject to similar climatic conditions (in Press). Oecologia 2. Mortazavi, B. and J. P. Chanton. Use of Keeling plots for determining sources of dissolved organic carbon in nearshore and open ocean systems (Published in Limnology and Oceanography (2004) Vol 49 pages 102-108). 3. Mortazavi, B., J. L. Prater, and J. P. Chanton (2004). A field-based method for simultaneous measurements of the 18O and 13C of soil CO2 efflux. Biogeosciences Vol 1:1-16 Most recent products delivered: Mortazavi, B. and J. P. Chanton. Abiotic and biotic controls on the 13C of respired CO2 in the southeastern US forest mosaics and a new technique for measuring the of soil CO2 efflux. Joint Biosphere Stable Isotope Network (US) and Stable Isotopes in Biosphere Atmosphere Exchange (EU) 2004 Meeting, Interlaken, Switzerland, March 31-April 4, 2004. Mortazavi, B., J. Chanton, J.L. Prater, A.C. Oishi, R. Oren and G. Katul. Temporal variability in 13C of respired CO2 in a pine and a hardwood forest subject to similar climatic conditions. American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, San Francisco, USA, December 8-12, 2003. Prater, J., Mortazavi, B. and J. P. Chanton. Measurement of discrimination against 13C during photosynthesis and quantification of the short-term variability of 13C over a diurnal cycle. American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, San Francisco, USA, December 8-12, 2003.

  12. Net Neutrality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savin, Andrej

    2017-01-01

    Repealing “net neutrality” in the US will have no bearing on Internet freedom or security there or anywhere else.......Repealing “net neutrality” in the US will have no bearing on Internet freedom or security there or anywhere else....

  13. Constraints on the vital effect in coccolithophore and dinoflagellate calcite by oxygen isotopic modification of seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermoso, Michaël; Horner, Tristan J.; Minoletti, Fabrice; Rickaby, Rosalind E. M.

    2014-09-01

    In this study, we show that there are independent controls of 18O/16O and 13C/12C fractionation in coccolithophore and dinoflagellate calcite due to the contrasting kinetics of each isotope system. We demonstrate that the direction and magnitude of the oxygen isotope fractionation with respect to equilibrium is related to the balance between calcification rate and the replenishment of the internal pool of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). As such, in fast growing cells, such as those of Emiliania huxleyi and Gephyrocapsa oceanica (forming the so-called ;heavy group;), calcification of the internal carbon pool occurs faster than complete isotopic re-adjustment of the internal DIC pool with H2O molecules. Hence, coccoliths reflect the heavy oxygen isotope signature of the CO2 overprinting the whole DIC pool. Conversely, in large and slow growing cells, such as Coccolithus pelagicus ssp. braarudii, complete re-equilibration is achieved due to limited influx of CO2 leading to coccoliths that are precipitated in conditions close to isotopic equilibrium (;equilibrium group;). Species exhibiting the most negative oxygen isotope composition, such as Calcidiscus leptoporus (;light group;), precipitate coccolith under increased pH in the coccolith vesicle, as previously documented by the ;carbonate ion effect;. We suggest that, for the carbon isotope system, any observed deviation from isotopic equilibrium is only ;apparent;, as the carbon isotopic composition in coccolith calcite is controlled by a Rayleigh fractionation originating from preferential incorporation of 12C into organic matter. Therefore, species with low PIC/POC ratios as E. huxleyi and G. oceanica are shifted towards positive carbon isotope values as a result of predominant carbon fixation into the organic matter. By contrast, cells with higher PIC/POC as C. braarudii and C. leptoporus maintain, to some extent, the original negative isotopic composition of the CO2. The calcareous dinoflagellate

  14. The Isotopologue Record of Repeat Vital Effect Offenders: Tracking (Dis)equilibrium Effects in Sea Urchins and Nannofossil Using Clumped Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, C. M.; Davies, A.; Drury, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    Vital effects vary between species and affect various isotopic systems in unequal proportion. The magnitude of the response of different isotopic systems might thus be key in understanding biologically-mediated disequilibrium, especially in groups that show a tendency to be "repeat offenders" with regards to vital effects. Here we present carbon, oxygen, and clumped isotope data from echinoderm calcite and nannofossil ooze, both of which exhibit strong vital effects in bulk isotopes. Our study is the first to investigate the clumped isotope (dis)equilibrium of echinoids. Results from two echinoids, three marine gastropods and a bivalve mollusk from modern beach deposits of Bali, Indonesia, highlight a significant offset in clumped isotopes of a regular echinoid test from expected values, interpreted as evidence of a similar "vital effect" as observed in surface corals. This is in contrast to the test of an irregular "sand dollar" echinoid, with clumped isotope values within error of expected sea surface temperature. Furthermore, data on the inter-skeletal variability in the clumped isotopic composition of two regular echinoid species shows that the spines of the echinoids are in equilibrium with seawater with respect to clumped isotopes, but the test is not. For the nannofossil material, no clumped isotope vital effects are observed, consistent with previously published studies but at odds with strong vital effects in carbon and oxygen isotopes, often correlated with cell-size. In addition, we reveal that the sea ooze could constitute useful material for clumped isotope studies. An intriguing result of our study is that vital effects are mostly absent in clumped isotopes, even in phylums known for important isotopic effects. It remains to be explained why some parts of the echinoids show clear vital effects, notably enrichment in clumped isotopes of urchin tests. Mechanisms that could explain this include pH effects during calcification. Rapid precipitation of

  15. Multiple isotope effects with alternative dinucleotide substrates as a probe of the malic enzyme reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, P.M.; Urbauer, J.L.; Cleland, W.W. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (United States)); Gavva, S.R.; Harris, B.G.; Cook, P.F. (Texas Coll. of Osteopathic Medicine, Ft. Worth (United States))

    1991-06-11

    Deuterium isotope effects and {sup 13}C isotope effects with deuterium- and protium-labeled malate have been obtained for both NAD- and NADP-malic enzymes by using a variety of alternative dinucleotide substrates. With nicotinamide-containing dinucleotides as the oxidizing substrate, the {sup 13}C effect decreases when deuterated malate is the substrate compared to the value obtained with protium-labeled malate. These data are consistent with a stepwise chemical mechanism in which hydride transfer precedes decarboxylation of the oxalacetate intermediate as previously proposed. When dinucleotide substrates such as thio-NAD, 3-nicotinamide rings are used, the {sup 13}C effect increases when deuterated malate is the substrate compared to the value obtained with protium-labeled malate. These data, at face value, are consistent with a change in mechanism from stepwise to concerted for the oxidative decarboxylation portion of the mechanism. However, the increase in the deuterium isotope effect from 1.5 to 3 with a concomitant decrease in the {sup 13}C isotope effect from 1.034 to 1.003 as the dinucleotide substrate is changed suggests that the reaction may still be stepwise with the non-nicotinamide dinucleotides. A more likely explanation is that a {beta}-secondary {sup 13}C isotope effect accompanies hydride transfer as a result of hyperconjugation of the {beta}-carboxyl of malate as the transition state for the hydride transfer step is approached.

  16. Evaluation of the effects of microscale chemical and isotopic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ecol. 155. 1–25. McConnaughey T 1989 13C and 18O isotopic disequi- librium in biological carbonates: I. Patterns; Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 53 151–162. McCulloch M T, Gagan M K, Mortimer G E, Chivas A R and Isdale P J 1994 A high-resolution Sr/Ca and δ18O coral record from the Great Barrier Reef, Australia, and.

  17. Biochemical effects of salinity on oxygen isotope fractionation during cellulose synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellsworth, Patricia V; Sternberg, Leonel S L

    2014-05-01

    The current isotope tree ring model assumes that 42% of the sucrose oxygen exchanges with stem water during cellulose synthesis and that the oxygen isotope biochemical fractionation is c. 27‰. However, previous studies have indicated that this model can overestimate the cellulose oxygen isotope ratio of plants under salinity or water stress. Saline stress increases soluble carbohydrates and osmolytes, which can alter exchange and biochemical fractionation during cellulose synthesis. To test the effect of salinity as well as the synthesis of osmolytes on exchange and biochemical fractionation, we grew wild-type and a transgenic mannitol synthesizer Arabidopsis thaliana hydroponically with fresh and saline water. We then measured the oxygen isotope ratios of leaf water, stem water and stem cellulose to determine the effects on exchange and biochemical fractionation. Biochemical fractionation did not change, but oxygen isotope exchange was twice as high for plants grown in saline water relative to freshwater-treated plants (0.64 and 0.3, respectively). Mannitol (osmolyte) synthesis did not affect exchange or biochemical fractionation regardless of salinity. Increases in salinity increased oxygen isotope exchange during cellulose synthesis, which may explain the overestimation of cellulose δ(18) O values under saline conditions. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  18. Chemical Ligation and Isotope Labeling to Locate Dynamic Effects during Catalysis by Dihydrofolate Reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, Louis Y P; Ruiz-Pernía, J Javier; Adesina, Aduragbemi S; Loveridge, E Joel; Tuñón, Iñaki; Moliner, Vincent; Allemann, Rudolf K

    2015-07-27

    Chemical ligation has been used to alter motions in specific regions of dihydrofolate reductase from E. coli and to investigate the effects of localized motional changes on enzyme catalysis. Two isotopic hybrids were prepared; one with the mobile N-terminal segment containing heavy isotopes ((2) H, (13) C, (15) N) and the remainder of the protein with natural isotopic abundance, and the other one with only the C-terminal segment isotopically labeled. Kinetic investigations indicated that isotopic substitution of the N-terminal segment affected only a physical step of catalysis, whereas the enzyme chemistry was affected by protein motions from the C-terminal segment. QM/MM studies support the idea that dynamic effects on catalysis mostly originate from the C-terminal segment. The use of isotope hybrids provides insights into the microscopic mechanism of dynamic coupling, which is difficult to obtain with other studies, and helps define the dynamic networks of intramolecular interactions central to enzyme catalysis. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

  19. Isotope effects in the evaporation of water: a status report of the Craig-Gordon model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horita, Juske; Rozanski, Kazimierz; Cohen, Shabtai

    2008-03-01

    The Craig-Gordon model (C-G model) [H. Craig, L.I. Gordon. Deuterium and oxygen 18 variations in the ocean and the marine atmosphere. In Stable Isotopes in Oceanographic Studies and Paleotemperatures, E. Tongiorgi (Ed.), pp. 9-130, Laboratorio di Geologia Nucleare, Pisa (1965).] has been synonymous with the isotope effects associated with the evaporation of water from surface waters, soils, and vegetations, which in turn constitutes a critical component of the global water cycle. On the occasion of the four decades of its successful applications to isotope geochemistry and hydrology, an attempt is made to: (a) examine its physical background within the framework of modern evaporation models, (b) evaluate our current knowledge of the environmental parameters of the C-G model, and (c) comment on a general strategy for the use of these parameters in field applications. Despite its simplistic representation of evaporation processes at the water-air interface, the C-G model appears to be adequate to provide the isotopic composition of the evaporation flux. This is largely due to its nature for representing isotopic compositions (a ratio of two fluxes of different isotopic water molecules) under the same environmental conditions. Among many environmental parameters that are included in the C-G model, accurate description and calculations are still problematic of the kinetic isotope effects that occur in a diffusion-dominated thin layer of air next to the water-air interface. In field applications, it is of importance to accurately evaluate several environmental parameters, particularly the relative humidity and isotopic compositions of the 'free-atmosphere', for a system under investigation over a given time-scale of interest (e.g., hourly to daily to seasonally). With a growing interest in the studies of water cycles of different spatial and temporal scales, including paleoclimate and water resource studies, the importance and utility of the C-G model is also likely to

  20. Ab initio calculations of the Fe(II) and Fe(III) isotopic effects in citrates, nicotianamine, and phytosiderophore, and new Fe isotopic measurements in higher plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynier, Frédéric; Fujii, Toshiyuki; Wang, Kun; Foriel, Julien

    2013-05-01

    Iron is one of the most abundant transition metal in higher plants and variations in its isotopic compositions can be used to trace its utilization. In order to better understand the effect of plant-induced isotopic fractionation on the global Fe cycling, we have estimated by quantum chemical calculations the magnitude of the isotopic fractionation between different Fe species relevant to the transport and storage of Fe in higher plants: Fe(II)-citrate, Fe(III)-citrate, Fe(II)-nicotianamine, and Fe(III)-phytosiderophore. The ab initio calculations show firstly, that Fe(II)-nicotianamine is ˜3‰ (56Fe/54Fe) isotopically lighter than Fe(III)-phytosiderophore; secondly, even in the absence of redox changes of Fe, change in the speciation alone can create up to ˜1.5‰ isotopic fractionation. For example, Fe(III)-phytosiderophore is up to 1.5‰ heavier than Fe(III)-citrate2 and Fe(II)-nicotianamine is up to 1‰ heavier than Fe(II)-citrate. In addition, in order to better understand the Fe isotopic fractionation between different plant components, we have analyzed the iron isotopic composition of different organs (roots, seeds, germinated seeds, leaves and stems) from six species of higher plants: the dicot lentil (Lens culinaris), and the graminaceous monocots Virginia wild rye (Elymus virginicus), Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense), Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis), river oat (Uniola latifolia), and Indian goosegrass (Eleusine indica). The calculations may explain that the roots of strategy-II plants (Fe(III)-phytosiderophore) are isotopically heavier (by about 1‰ for the δ56Fe) than the upper parts of the plants (Fe transported as Fe(III)-citrate in the xylem or Fe(II)-nicotianamine in the phloem). In addition, we suggest that the isotopic variations observed between younger and older leaves could be explained by mixing of Fe received from the xylem and the phloem.

  1. Investigating the Effect of Soil Moisture on Net Ecosystem Exchange in Shale Hills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Z. G.; Davis, K. J.; He, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Carbon sinks have the ability to absorb more carbon dioxide than what they emit. The terrestrial biome acts as a huge carbon sink, however, this ability is dependent on different environmental factors. This study focused on the effects of soil moisture on net ecosystem exchange(NEE) in the Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory, PA. It was hypothesized that the strength of the carbon sink would grow with wetter soils. Data was collected from the eddy-covariance flux tower, a COSMOS soil moisture probe, automated soil respiration chambers and sap flow probes for May to August between the years 2011-2016. Since temperature and photosynthetically active radiation(PAR) also have an effect on carbon fluxes, these variables were isolated to properly study soil moisture and carbon fluxes. Generally, less carbon dioxide was absorbed with increasing soil moisture. Since NEE is a combination of photosynthesis and respiration, the effect of soil moisture was studied separately for each process. The sap flow data showed a decrease in activity with increasing soil moisture, hence photosynthesis was most likely reduced. Additionally, more carbon dioxide was emitted from respiration with increasing soil moisture. These findings could possibly explain why the forest at Shale Hills tends to release more carbon dioxide with increasing soil moisture.

  2. Net effect of wort osmotic pressure on fermentation course, yeast vitality, beer flavor, and haze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigler, K; Matoulková, D; Dienstbier, M; Gabriel, P

    2009-04-01

    The net effect of increased wort osmolarity on fermentation time, bottom yeast vitality and sedimentation, beer flavor compounds, and haze was determined in fermentations with 12 degrees all-malt wort supplemented with sorbitol to reach osmolarity equal to 16 degrees and 20 degrees. Three pitchings were performed in 12 degrees/12 degrees/12 degrees, 16 degrees/16 degrees/12 degrees, and 20 degrees/20 degrees/12 degrees worts. Fermentations in 16 degrees and 20 degrees worts decreased yeast vitality measured as acidification power (AP) by a maximum of 10%, lowered yeast proliferation, and increased fermentation time. Repitching aggravated these effects. The 3rd "back to normal" pitching into 12 degrees wort restored the yeast AP and reproductive abilities while the extended fermentation time remained. Yeast sedimentation in 16 degrees and 20 degrees worts was delayed but increased about two times at fermentation end relative to that in 12 degrees wort. Third "back-to-normal" pitching abolished the delay in sedimentation and reduced its extent, which became nearly equal in all variants. Beer brewed at increased osmolarity was characterized by increased levels of diacetyl and pentanedione and lower levels of dimethylsulfide and acetaldehyde. Esters and higher alcohols displayed small variations irrespective of wort osmolarity or repitching. Increased wort osmolarity had no appreciable effect on the haze of green beer and accelerated beer clarification during maturation. In all variants, chill haze increased with repitching.

  3. Kinetic and metabolic isotope effects in coral skeletal carbon isotopes: A re-evaluation using experimental coral bleaching as a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoepf, Verena; Levas, Stephen J.; Rodrigues, Lisa J.; McBride, Michael O.; Aschaffenburg, Matthew D.; Matsui, Yohei; Warner, Mark E.; Hughes, Adam D.; Grottoli, Andréa G.

    2014-12-01

    Coral skeletal δ13C can be a paleo-climate proxy for light levels (i.e., cloud cover and seasonality) and for photosynthesis to respiration (P/R) ratios. The usefulness of coral δ13C as a proxy depends on metabolic isotope effects (related to changes in photosynthesis) being the dominant influence on skeletal δ13C. However, it is also influenced by kinetic isotope effects (related to calcification rate) which can overpower metabolic isotope effects and thus compromise the use of coral skeletal δ13C as a proxy. Heikoop et al. (2000) proposed a simple data correction to remove kinetic isotope effects from coral skeletal δ13C, as well as an equation to calculate P/R ratios from coral isotopes. However, despite having been used by other researchers, the data correction has never been directly tested, and isotope-based P/R ratios have never been compared to P/R ratios measured using respirometry. Experimental coral bleaching represents a unique environmental scenario to test this because bleaching produces large physiological responses that influence both metabolic and kinetic isotope effects in corals. Here, we tested the δ13C correction and the P/R calculation using three Pacific and three Caribbean coral species from controlled temperature-induced bleaching experiments where both the stable isotopes and the physiological variables that cause isotopic fractionation (i.e., photosynthesis, respiration, and calcification) were simultaneously measured. We show for the first time that the data correction proposed by Heikoop et al. (2000) does not effectively remove kinetic effects in the coral species studied here, and did not improve the metabolic signal of bleached and non-bleached corals. In addition, isotope-based P/R ratios were in poor agreement with measured P/R ratios, even when the data correction was applied. This suggests that additional factors influence δ13C and δ18O, which are not accounted for by the data correction. We therefore recommend that the

  4. Alternate substrates and isotope effects as a probe of the malic enzyme reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavva, S.R.

    1988-01-01

    Dissociation constants for alternative dinucleotide substrates and competitive inhibitors suggest that the dinucleotide binding site of the Ascaris suum NAD-malic enzyme is hydrophobic in the vicinity of the nicotinamide ring. Changes in the divalent metal ion activator from Mg{sup 2+} to Mn{sup 2+} or Cd{sup 2+} results in a decrease in the dinucleotide affinity and an increase in the affinity for malate. Primary deuterium and {sup 13}C isotope effects obtained with the different metal ions suggest either a change in the transition state structure for the hydride transfer or decarboxylation steps or both. Deuterium isotope effects are finite whether reactants are maintained at saturating or limiting concentrations with all the metal ions and dinucleotide substrates used. For the native enzyme, primary deuterium isotope effects increase with a concomitant decrease in the {sup 13}C effects when NAD is replaced by an alternate dinucleotide substrate different in redox potential.

  5. Joint INFN-CERN-EuCARD-AccNet Workshop on Electron-Cloud Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Rumolo, Giovanni; Zimmermann, Frank; ECLOUD'12

    2013-01-01

    This report contains the Proceedings of the Joint INFN-Frascati, INFN-Pisa, CERN-LER and EuCARD-AccNet Mini-Workshop on Electron-Cloud Effects, “ECLOUD12”, held at La Biodola, Isola d’Elba, from 5 to 9 June 2012. The ECLOUD12 workshop reviewed many recent electron-cloud (EC) observations at existing storage rings, EC predictions for future accelerators, electron-cloud studies at DAFNE, EC mitigation by clearing electrodes and graphite/carbon coatings, modeling of incoherent EC effects, self-consistent simulations, synergies with other communities like the Valencia Space Consortium and the European Space Agency. ECLOUD12 discussed new EC observations at existing machines including LHC, CesrTA, PETRA-3, J-PARC, and FNAL MI; latest experimental efforts to characterize the EC – including EC diagnostics, experimental techniques, mitigation techniques such as coating and conditioning, advanced chemical and physical analyses of various vacuum-chamber surfaces, beam instabilities and emittance growth –; the...

  6. The effect of deltamethrin-treated net fencing around cattle enclosures on outdoor-biting mosquitoes in Kumasi, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Marta Ferreira; Abonuusum, Ayimbire; Lorenz, Lena Maria; Clausen, Peter-Henning; Bauer, Burkhard; Garms, Rolf; Kruppa, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Classic vector control strategies target mosquitoes indoors as the main transmitters of malaria are indoor-biting and -resting mosquitoes. However, the intensive use of insecticide-treated bed-nets (ITNs) and indoor residual spraying have put selective pressure on mosquitoes to adapt in order to obtain human blood meals. Thus, early-evening and outdoor vector activity is becoming an increasing concern. This study assessed the effect of a deltamethrin-treated net (100 mg/m(2)) attached to a one-meter high fence around outdoor cattle enclosures on the number of mosquitoes landing on humans. Mosquitoes were collected from four cattle enclosures: Pen A - with cattle and no net; B - with cattle and protected by an untreated net; C - with cattle and protected by a deltamethrin-treated net; D - no cattle and no net. A total of 3217 culicines and 1017 anophelines were collected, of which 388 were Anopheles gambiae and 629 An. ziemanni. In the absence of cattle nearly 3 times more An. gambiae (penclosures. The sporozoite rate of the zoophilic An. ziemanni, known to be a secondary malaria vector, was as high as that of the most competent vector An. gambiae; raising the potential of zoophilic species as secondary malaria vectors. After deployment of the ITNs a deltamethrin persistence of 9 months was observed despite exposure to African weather conditions. The outdoor use of ITNs resulted in a significant reduction of host-seeking culicines inside enclosures. Further studies investigating the effectiveness and spatial repellence of ITNs around other outdoor sites, such as bars and cooking areas, as well as their direct effect on vector-borne disease transmission are needed to evaluate its potential as an appropriate outdoor vector control tool for rural Africa.

  7. Study on Climate Change Effect on Net Irrigation Requirement and Yield for Rice Crop (Case Study: Tajan Plain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sheidaeian

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, impact of climate change on net irrigation requirement (In and yield of Rice Crop using HadCM3 climate projection model, one of the AOGCM models, in Tajan Plain area is evaluated. Changes in temperature and precipitation were simulated run under the IPCC scenario A2 for 2011-2040, 2041-2070 and 2071-2100 periods. This work was done by using statistical and proportional downscaling techniques. For estimating Net Irrigation Requirement, Potential evapotranspiration (ETo and effective rainfall (Pe were calculated using Penman Monteith equation and USDA method With Cropwat Model, respectively. Impact of water deficit on crop yield was estimated using the linear crop-water production function developed by FAO. The results of downscaling by using SDSM model and proportional method indicate that the decrease in rainfall and increase in the temperature are in future periods. CROPWAT model results indicate that the effect of climate change with increased Potential evapotranspiration and decreased effective Rainfall and increased water consumption of the plant, can be increased, the net irrigation requirement of rice plants in the basin duration years future to come by the year 2100. As a result of climate change and rising temperatures and reduced rainfall, the yield reduction percent to low levels to rise in the coming years. So it can be conclude that the effect of climate change closer to the year 2100 when effective rainfall is less could provide water consumption and net irrigation requirement of rice in the area.

  8. Effects of Channel Geometry and Coolant Fluid on Thermoelectric Net Power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rezaniakolaei, Alireza; Rosendahl, Lasse; Sørensen, Kim

    2014-01-01

    generation in TEG for different size of hydraulic diameter of plate-fin heat sink and over a wide range of Reynolds number. The particular focus of this study is to find optimal Reynolds number in each considered channel hydraulic diameter and to explore optimal channel hydraulic diameter for maximum TEG net......, and the maximum net power output occurs at smaller Reynolds number when the channel hydraulic diameter reduces.......Channel geometry has a strong influence on the heat transfer coefficient and cooling energy input in a heat sink. The net power output in a thermoelectric generator (TEG) can be defined as power generation minus the required cooling energy in TEG. This study aims to evaluate the net power...

  9. Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotope Effects of Ammonia Oxidation by Thermophilic Thaumarchaeota from a Geothermal Water Stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Sanae; Konno, Uta; Nakahara, Nozomi; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Saito, Yumi; Imachi, Hiroyuki; Tasumi, Eiji; Makabe, Akiko; Koba, Keisuke; Takai, Ken

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ammonia oxidation regulates the balance of reduced and oxidized nitrogen pools in nature. Although ammonia-oxidizing archaea have been recently recognized to often outnumber ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in various environments, the contribution of ammonia-oxidizing archaea is still uncertain due to difficulties in the in situ quantification of ammonia oxidation activity. Nitrogen and oxygen isotope ratios of nitrite (δ15NNO2− and δ18ONO2−, respectively) are geochemical tracers for evaluating the sources and the in situ rate of nitrite turnover determined from the activities of nitrification and denitrification; however, the isotope ratios of nitrite from archaeal ammonia oxidation have been characterized only for a few marine species. We first report the isotope effects of ammonia oxidation at 70°C by thermophilic Thaumarchaeota populations composed almost entirely of “Candidatus Nitrosocaldus.” The nitrogen isotope effect of ammonia oxidation varied with ambient pH (25‰ to 32‰) and strongly suggests the oxidation of ammonia, not ammonium. The δ18O value of nitrite produced from ammonia oxidation varied with the δ18O value of water in the medium but was lower than the isotopic equilibrium value in water. Because experiments have shown that the half-life of abiotic oxygen isotope exchange between nitrite and water is longer than 33 h at 70°C and pH ≥6.6, the rate of ammonia oxidation by thermophilic Thaumarchaeota could be estimated using δ18ONO2− in geothermal environments, where the biological nitrite turnover is likely faster than 33 h. This study extended the range of application of nitrite isotopes as a geochemical clock of the ammonia oxidation activity to high-temperature environments. IMPORTANCE Because ammonia oxidation is generally the rate-limiting step in nitrification that regulates the balance of reduced and oxidized nitrogen pools in nature, it is important to understand the biological and environmental factors underlying

  10. Evaluating the sterilizing effect of pyriproxyfen treated mosquito nets against Anopheles gambiae at different blood-feeding intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffer, Aneesa; Protopopoff, Natacha; Mosha, Franklin W; Malone, David; Rowland, Mark W; Oxborough, Richard M

    2015-10-01

    Pyrethroid resistant malaria vectors are widespread throughout sub-Saharan Africa and new insecticides with different modes of action are urgently needed. Pyriproxyfen is a juvenile hormone mimic that reduces fecundity and fertility of adult Anopheles mosquitoes when used as a contact insecticide. A long-lasting insecticidal net incorporating pyriproxyfen is under development. As wild, host-seeking females may succeed in blood-feeding at different intervals after initial contact with mosquito nets the aim of this study was to determine the effect that age and gonotrophic status (nulliparous or parous) and the interval between initial pyriproxyfen exposure and blood-feeding has in terms of subsequent reduced fecundity and fertility. Anopheles gambiae s.s. were exposed to pyriproxyfen LLIN for three minutes in WHO cone bioassays. Four regimens were tested with different blood-feeding intervals A-1 hour (nulliparous), B-1 hour (parous), C-24h (nulliparous), or D-120h (nulliparous) after pyriproxyfen exposure. Mosquito oviposition rate, fecundity and fertility of eggs were recorded for several days. All four treatment regimens produced levels of mortality similar to unexposed females. The overall reduction in reproductive rate of 99.9% for regimen A relative to the untreated net was primarily due to oviposition inhibition in exposed females (97%). Pyriproxyfen was equally effective against older parous mosquitoes and when blood-feeding was 24h after exposure. Regimen D produced a reduction in reproductive rate of 60.1% but this was of lesser magnitude than other regimens and was the only regimen that failed to reduce fertility of laid eggs, indicating the effects of pyriproxyfen exposure on reproduction are to some extent reversible as mosquitoes age. In an area of moderate to high mosquito net coverage a host-seeking mosquito is likely to contact a treated mosquito net before: (a) penetrating a holed net and blood-feeding shortly after exposure or, (b) be frustrated

  11. Kinetic isotope effects provide experimental evidence for proton tunneling in methylammonium lead triiodide perovskites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan-Fang; Tsai, Yu-Tang; Hirsch, Lionel; Bassani, Dario M

    2017-10-25

    The occurrence of proton tunneling in MAPbI3 hybrid organic inorganic perovskites is demonstrated through the effect of isotopic labeling of the methylammonium (MA) component on the dielectric permittivity response. Deuteration of the ammonium group results in the acceleration of proton migration (inverse primary isotope effect), whereas deuteration of the methyl group induces a normal secondary isotope effect. The activation energies for proton migration are calculated to be 50 and 27 meV for the tetragonal and orthorhombic phases, respectively, which decrease upon deuteration of the ammonium group. The low activation barrier, and the deviation from unity of the ratio of the pre-exponential factors (AH/AD = 0.3 - 0.4) are consistent with a tunneling mechanism for proton migration. Deuteration of the PEDOT:PSS hole transport layer results in a behavior that is intermediate between that of the deuterated and undeuterated perovskite, due to extrinsic ion migration between the two materials.

  12. A multielement isotopic study of refractory FUN and F CAIs: Mass-dependent and mass-independent isotope effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kööp, Levke; Nakashima, Daisuke; Heck, Philipp R.; Kita, Noriko T.; Tenner, Travis J.; Krot, Alexander N.; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Park, Changkun; Davis, Andrew M.

    2018-01-01

    Calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) are the oldest dated objects that formed inside the Solar System. Among these are rare, enigmatic objects with large mass-dependent fractionation effects (F CAIs), which sometimes also have large nucleosynthetic anomalies and a low initial abundance of the short-lived radionuclide 26Al (FUN CAIs). We have studied seven refractory hibonite-rich CAIs and one grossite-rich CAI from the Murchison (CM2) meteorite for their oxygen, calcium, and titanium isotopic compositions. The 26Al-26Mg system was also studied in seven of these CAIs. We found mass-dependent heavy isotope enrichment in all measured elements, but never simultaneously in the same CAI. The data are hard to reconcile with a single-stage melt evaporation origin and may require reintroduction or reequilibration for magnesium, oxygen and titanium after evaporation for some of the studied CAIs. The initial 26Al/27Al ratios inferred from model isochrons span a range from <1 × 10-6 to canonical (∼5 × 10-5). The CAIs show a mutual exclusivity relationship between inferred incorporation of live 26Al and the presence of resolvable anomalies in 48Ca and 50Ti. Furthermore, a relationship exists between 26Al incorporation and Δ17O in the hibonite-rich CAIs (i.e., 26Al-free CAIs have resolved variations in Δ17O, while CAIs with resolved 26Mg excesses have Δ17O values close to -23‰). Only the grossite-rich CAI has a relatively enhanced Δ17O value (∼-17‰) in spite of a near-canonical 26Al/27Al. We interpret these data as indicating that fractionated hibonite-rich CAIs formed over an extended time period and sampled multiple stages in the isotopic evolution of the solar nebula, including: (1) an 26Al-poor nebula with large positive and negative anomalies in 48Ca and 50Ti and variable Δ17O; (2) a stage of 26Al-admixture, during which anomalies in 48Ca and 50Ti had been largely diluted and a Δ17O value of ∼-23‰ had been achieved in the CAI formation region; and (3

  13. FILTER-NET STRUCTURE AND PUMPING ACTIVITY IN THE POLYCHAETE NEREIS-DIVERSICOLOR - EFFECTS OF TEMPERATURE AND PUMP-MODELING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgård, H.U.; Vedel, A.; Boye, H.

    1992-01-01

    Electron micrographs of the filter-net structure in the facultatively suspension-feeding polychaete Nereis diversicolor O. F. Muller showed that the net is composed of an irregular mesh-work made up of long, relatively thick filaments (up to 300 nm) interconnected with a variety of shorter...... and thinner filaments. The thinner filaments range in diameter from 5 to >25 nm. The average size of the meshes, measured directly on the micrographs, lies between 0.5 and 1.0-mu-m, but due to shrinkage the values represent only about 75 % of the actual dimension of the intact net. The effects of temperature...... increase in clearance, and a doubling of the temperature was followed by a doubling in clearance. Direct measurements of pumping rate showed that high stroke frequency was correlated with high pumping rate. A doubling of temperature from 13 to 23-29-degrees-C led to a doubling of the stroke frequency...

  14. Northern pike bycatch in an inland commercial hoop net fishery: effects of water temperature and net tending frequency on injury, physiology, and survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colotelo, Alison HA; Raby, Graham D.; Hasler, Caleb T.; Haxton, Tim; Smokorowski, Karen; Blouin-Demers, Gabriel; Cooke, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    In lakes and rivers of eastern Ontario (Canada) commercial fishers use hoop nets to target a variety of fishes, but incidentally capture non-target (i.e., bycatch) gamefish species such as northern pike (Esox lucius). Little is known about the consequences of bycatch in inland commercial fisheries, making it difficult to identify regulatory options. Regulations that limit fishing during warmer periods and that require frequent net tending have been proposed as possible strategies to reduce bycatch mortality. Using northern pike as a model, we conducted experiments during two thermal periods (mid-April: 14.45 ± 0.32 °C, and late May: 17.17 ± 0.08 °C) where fish were retained in nets for 2 d and 6 d. A ‘0 d’ control group consisted of northern pike that were angled, immediately sampled and released. We evaluated injury, physiological status and mortality after the prescribed net retention period and for the surviving fish used radio telemetry with manual tracking to monitor delayed post-release mortality. Our experiments revealed that injury levels, in-net mortality, and post-release mortality tended to increase with net set duration and at higher temperatures. Pike exhibited signs of chronic stress and starvation following retention, particularly at higher temperatures. Total mortality rates were negligible for the 2 d holding period at 14 °C, 14% for 6 d holding at 14 °C, 21% for 2 d holding at 17 °C, and 58% for 6 d holding at 17 °C. No mortality was observed in control fish. Collectively, these data reveal that frequent net tending, particularly at warmer temperatures, may be useful for conserving gamefish populations captured as bycatch in inland hoop net fisheries.

  15. Carbon and nitrogen isotope effects associated with the dioxygenation of aniline and diphenylamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, Sarah G; Shin, Kwanghee; Skarpeli-Liati, Marita; Bolotin, Jakov; Eustis, Soren N; Spain, Jim C; Hofstetter, Thomas B

    2012-11-06

    Dioxygenation of aromatic rings is frequently the initial step of biodegradation of organic subsurface pollutants. This process can be tracked by compound-specific isotope analysis to assess the extent of contaminant transformation, but the corresponding isotope effects, especially for dioxygenation of N-substituted, aromatic contaminants, are not well understood. We investigated the C and N isotope fractionation associated with the biodegradation of aniline and diphenylamine using pure cultures of Burkholderia sp. strain JS667, which can biodegrade both compounds, each by a distinct dioxygenase enzyme. For diphenylamine, the C and N isotope enrichment was normal with ε(C)- and ε(N)-values of -0.6 ± 0.1‰ and -1.0 ± 0.1‰, respectively. In contrast, N isotopes of aniline were subject to substantial inverse fractionation (ε(N) of +13 ± 0.5‰), whereas the ε(C)-value was identical to that of diphenylamine. A comparison of the apparent kinetic isotope effects for aniline and diphenylamine dioxygenation with those from abiotic oxidation by manganese oxide (MnO(2)) suggest that the oxidation of a diarylamine system leads to distinct C-N bonding changes compared to aniline regardless of reaction mechanism and oxidant involved. Combined evaluation of the C and N isotope signatures of the contaminants reveals characteristic Δδ(15)N/Δδ(13)C-trends for the identification of diphenylamine and aniline oxidation in contaminated subsurfaces and for the distinction of aniline oxidation from its formation by microbial and/or abiotic reduction of nitrobenzene.

  16. N and O isotope effects during nitrate assimilation by unicellular prokaryotic and eukaryotic plankton cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, J.; Sigman, D. M.; Rohde, M. M.; Maldonado, M. T.; Tortell, P. D.

    2010-02-01

    In order to provide biological systematics from which to interpret nitrogen (N) and oxygen (O) isotope ratios of nitrate ( 15N/ 14N, 18O/ 16O, respectively) in the environment, we previously investigated the isotopic fractionation of nitrate during its assimilation by mono-cultures of eukaryotic algae ( Granger et al., 2004). In this study, we extended our analysis to investigate nitrate assimilation by strains of prokaryotic plankton. We measured the N and O isotope effects, 15ɛ and 18ɛ, during nitrate consumption by cultures of prokaryotic strains and by additional eukaryotic phytoplankton strains (where ɛ is the ratio of reaction rate constants of the light vs. heavy isotopologues, lightk and heavyk; ɛ = lightk/ heavyk - 1 × 1000, expressed in per mil). The observed 15ɛ ranged from 5‰ to 8‰ among eukaryotes, whereas it did not exceed 5‰ for three cyanobacterial strains, and was as low as 0.4‰ for a heterotrophic α-protoeobacterium. Eukaryotic phytoplankton fractionated the N and O isotopes of nitrate to the same extent (i.e., 18ɛ ˜ 15ɛ). The 18ɛ: 15ɛ among the cyanobacteria was also ˜1, whereas the heterotrophic α-proteobacterial strain, which showed the lowest 15ɛ, between 0.4‰ and 1‰, had a distinct 18ɛ: 15ɛ of ˜2, unlike any plankton strain observed previously. Equivalent N vs. O isotope discrimination is thought to occur during internal nitrate reduction by nitrate reductase, such that the cellular efflux of the fractionated nitrate into the medium drives the typically observed 18ɛ: 15ɛ of ˜1. We hypothesize that the higher in the 18ɛ: 15ɛ of the α-proteobacterium may result from isotope discrimination by nitrate transport, which is evident only at low amplitude of ɛ. These observations warrant investigating whether heterotrophic bacterial assimilation of nitrate decreases the community isotope effects at the surface ocean.

  17. Nuclear volume effects in equilibrium stable isotope fractionations of mercury, thallium and lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sha; Liu, Yun

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear volume effects (NVEs) of Hg, Tl and Pb isotope systems are investigated with careful evaluation on quantum relativistic effects via the Dirac’s formalism of full-electron wave function. Equilibrium 202Hg/198Hg, 205Tl/203Tl, 207Pb/206Pb and 208Pb/206Pb isotope fractionations are found can be up to 3.61‰, 2.54‰, 1.48‰ and 3.72‰ at room temperature, respectively, larger than fractionations predicted by classical mass-dependent isotope fractionations theory. Moreover, the NVE can cause mass-independent fractionations (MIF) for odd-mass isotopes and even-mass isotopes. The plot of vs. for Hg-bearing species falls into a straight line with the slope of 1.66, which is close to previous experimental results. For the first time, Pb4+-bearing species are found can enrich heavier Pb isotopes than Pb2+-bearing species to a surprising extent, e.g., the enrichment can be up to 4.34‰ in terms of 208Pb/206Pb at room temperature, due to their NVEs are in opposite directions. In contrast, fractionations among Pb2+-bearing species are trivial. Therefore, the large Pb fractionation changes provide a potential new tracer for redox conditions in young and closed geologic systems. The magnitudes of NVE-driven even-mass MIFs of Pb isotopes (i.e., ) and odd-mass MIFs (i.e., ) are almost the same but with opposite signs. PMID:26224248

  18. Effect of supplementary feeding during the sucking period on net absorption from the small intestine of weaned pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nabuurs, M.J.A.; Hoogendoorn, A.; Zijderveld-van Bemmel, van A.

    1996-01-01

    An intestinal perfusion technique was used to measure the effects of supplementary feeding (experiment 1) and temporary weaning (experiment 2) during the sucking period on the net absorption of fluid, sodium, chloride and potassium from the small intestine of pigs after weaning. The technique was

  19. The cost-effectiveness of permethrin-treated bed nets in an area of intense malaria transmission in western Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiseman, Virginia; Hawley, William A.; ter Kuile, Feiko O.; Phillips-Howard, Penelope A.; Vulule, John M.; Nahlen, Bernard L.; Mills, Anne J.

    2003-01-01

    This study compared the costs and effects of insecticide (permethrin)-treated bed net (ITN) use in children less than five years of age in an area of intense, perennial malaria transmission in western Kenya. The data were derived from a group-randomized controlled trial of ITNs conducted between

  20. Effect of processed and fermented soyabeans on net absorption in enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli-infected piglet small intestine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiers, J.L.; Nout, M.J.R.; Rombouts, F.M.; Andel, van E.E.; Nabuurs, M.J.A.; Meulen, van der J.

    2006-01-01

    Infectious diarrhoea is a major problem in both children and piglets. Infection of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) results in fluid secretion and electrolyte losses in the small intestine. In the present study the effect of processed and fermented soyabean products on net absorption during

  1. Effect of permethrin-treated bed nets on the spatial distribution of malaria vectors in western Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gimnig, John E.; Kolczak, Margarette S.; Hightower, Allen W.; Vulule, John M.; Schoute, Erik; Kamau, Luna; Phillips-Howard, Penelope A.; ter Kuile, Feiko O.; Nahlen, Bernard L.; Hawley, William A.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of insecticide (permethrin)-treated bed nets (ITNs) on the spatial distribution of malaria vectors in neighboring villages lacking ITNs was studied during a randomized controlled trial of ITNs in western Kenya. There was a trend of decreased abundance of Anopheles gambiae with decreasing

  2. VAPOR PRESSURE ISOTOPE EFFECTS IN THE MEASUREMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL TRITIUM SAMPLES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhne, W.

    2012-12-03

    Standard procedures for the measurement of tritium in water samples often require distillation of an appropriate sample aliquot. This distillation process may result in a fractionation of tritiated water and regular light water due to the vapor pressure isotope effect, introducing either a bias or an additional contribution to the total tritium measurement uncertainty. The magnitude of the vapor pressure isotope effect is characterized as functions of the amount of water distilled from the sample aliquot and the heat settings for the distillation process. The tritium concentration in the distillate is higher than the tritium concentration in the sample early in the distillation process, it then sharply decreases due to the vapor pressure isotope effect and becomes lower than the tritium concentration in the sample, until the high tritium concentration retained in the boiling flask is evaporated at the end of the process. At that time, the tritium concentration in the distillate again overestimates the sample tritium concentration. The vapor pressure isotope effect is more pronounced the slower the evaporation and distillation process is conducted; a lower heat setting during the evaporation of the sample results in a larger bias in the tritium measurement. The experimental setup used and the fact that the current study allowed for an investigation of the relative change in vapor pressure isotope effect in the course of the distillation process distinguish it from and extend previously published measurements. The separation factor as a quantitative measure of the vapor pressure isotope effect is found to assume values of 1.034 {+-} 0.033, 1.052 {+-} 0.025, and 1.066 {+-} 0.037, depending on the vigor of the boiling process during distillation of the sample. A lower heat setting in the experimental setup, and therefore a less vigorous boiling process, results in a larger value for the separation factor. For a tritium measurement in water samples, this implies that

  3. Malaria risk factors in North West Tanzania: the effect of spraying, nets and wealth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippa A West

    Full Text Available Malaria prevalence remains high in many African countries despite massive scaling-up of insecticide treated nets (ITN and indoor residual spraying (IRS. This paper evaluates the protective effect of pyrethroid IRS and ITNs in relation to risk factors for malaria based on a study conducted in North-West Tanzania, where IRS has been conducted since 2007 and universal coverage of ITNs has been carried out recently. In 2011 community-based cross-sectional surveys were conducted in the two main malaria transmission periods that occur after the short and long rainy seasons. These included 5,152 and 4,325 children aged 0.5-14 years, respectively. Data on IRS and ITN coverage, household demographics and socio-economic status were collected using an adapted version of the Malaria Indicator Survey. Children were screened for malaria by rapid diagnostic test. In the second survey, haemoglobin density was measured and filter paper blood spots were collected to determine age-specific sero-prevalence in each community surveyed. Plasmodium falciparum infection prevalence in children 0.5-14 years old was 9.3% (95%CI:5.9-14.5 and 22.8% (95%CI:17.3-29.4 in the two surveys. Risk factors for infection after the short rains included households not being sprayed (OR = 0.39; 95%CI:0.20-0.75; low community net ownership (OR = 0.45; 95%CI:0.21-0.95; and low community SES (least poor vs. poorest tertile: OR = 0.13, 95%CI:0.05-0.34. Risk factors after the long rains included household poverty (per quintile increase: OR = 0.89; 95%CI:0.82-0.97 and community poverty (least poor vs. poorest tertile: OR = 0.26, 95%CI:0.15-0.44; household IRS or high community ITN ownership were not protective. Despite high IRS coverage and equitable LLIN distribution, poverty was an important risk factor for malaria suggesting it could be beneficial to target additional malaria control activities to poor households and communities. High malaria prevalence in some clusters

  4. Net ecosystem carbon exchange in three contrasting Mediterranean ecosystems – the effect of drought

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. David

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Droughts reduce gross primary production (GPP and ecosystem respiration (Reco, contributing to most of the inter-annual variability in terrestrial carbon sequestration. In seasonally dry climates (Mediterranean, droughts result from reductions in annual rainfall and changes in rain seasonality. We compared carbon fluxes measured by the eddy covariance technique in three contrasting ecosystems in southern Portugal: an evergreen oak woodland (savannah-like with ca.~21% tree crown cover, a grassland dominated by herbaceous annuals and a coppiced short-rotation eucalyptus plantation. During the experimental period (2003–2006 the eucalyptus plantation was always the strongest sink for carbon: net ecosystem exchange rate (NEE between −861 and −399 g C m−2 year−1. The oak woodland and the grassland were much weaker sinks for carbon: NEE varied in the oak woodland between −140 and −28 g C m−2 year−1 and in the grassland between −190 and +49 g C m−2 year−1. The eucalyptus stand had higher GPP and a lower proportion of GPP spent in respiration than the other systems. The higher GPP resulted from high leaf area duration (LAD, as a surrogate for the photosynthetic photon flux density absorbed by the canopy. The eucalyptus had also higher rain use efficiency (GPP per unit of rain volume and light use efficiency (the daily GPP per unit incident photosynthetic photon flux density than the other two ecosystems. The effects of a severe drought could be evaluated during the hydrological-year (i.e., from October to September of 2004–2005. Between October 2004 and June 2005 the precipitation was only 40% of the long-term average. In 2004–2005 all ecosystems had GPP lower than in wetter years and carbon sequestration was strongly restricted (less negative NEE. The grassland was a net source of carbon dioxide (+49 g C m−2 year−1. In the oak woodland a large proportion of GPP resulted from carbon assimilated by its annual vegetation

  5. Modeling hydrochory effects on the Tunisian island populations of Pancratium maritimum L. using colored Petri nets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanaa, Adnen; Ben Abid, Samir; Boulila, Abdennacer; Messaoud, Chokri; Boussaid, Mohamed; Ben Fadhel, Najeh

    2015-03-01

    Hydrochory, the seed dispersal by water, is a strategy used by many aquatic and some terrestrial plants to move into areas appropriate for establishment. In this paper we model the hydrochory effects on the Tunisian island populations of Pancratium maritimum L. using colored Petri nets. Nineteen Tunisian coastal sites were considered including fourteen mainland and five island sites. The model was simulated for 400 thousand Atlantic Tunisian Current cycles (years). Snapshots of the island population's genetic makeup were taken for 50, 200 and 400 thousand years. The evolution of the obtained dendrograms showed a clear divide between the northern and southern island populations according to their estimated genetic make-up for the considered simulation durations. Hydrochory is not only with important ecological consequences, such as maintaining the populations of P. maritimum but also it may move species into areas appropriate for establishment. In this context, in situ and ex situ conservation measures of P. maritimum populations should be adopted very fast. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [Effects of reduced solar radiation on winter wheat flag leaf net photosynthetic rate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, You-Fei; Ni, Yan-Li; Mai, Bo-Ru; Wu, Rong-Jun; Feng, Yan; Sun, Jian; Li, Jian; Xu, Jing-Xin

    2011-06-01

    Taking winter wheat Triticum aestivum L. (cv. Yangmai 13) as test material, a field experiment was conducted in Nanjing City to study the effects of simulated reduced solar radiation on the diurnal variation of winter wheat flag leaf photosynthetic rate and the main affecting factors. Five treatments were installed, i. e., 15% (T15), 20% (T20) , 40% (T40), 60% (T60), and 100% (CK) of total incident solar radiation. Reduced solar irradiance increased the chlorophyll and lutein contents significantly, but decreased the net photosynthetic rate (Pn). Under different solar irradiance, the diurnal variation of Pn had greater difference, and the daily maximum Pn was in the order of CK > T60 > T40 > T 20 > T15. In CK, the Pn exhibited a double peak diurnal curve; while in the other four treatments, the Pn showed a single peak curve, and the peak was lagged behind that of CK. Correlation analysis showed that reduced solar irradiance was the main factor affecting the diurnal variation of Pn, but the physiological parameters also played important roles in determining the diurnal variation of Pn. In treatments T60 and T40, the photosynthesis active radiation (PAR), leaf temperature (T1) , stomatal conductance (Gs) , and transpiration rate (Tr) were significantly positively correlated with Pn, suggesting their positive effects on Pn. The intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci) and stomatal limitation (Ls) had significant negative correlations with Pn in treatments T60 and T40 but significant positive correlations with Pn in treatments T20 and T15, implying that the Ci and Ls had negative (or positive) effects on Pn when the solar irradiance was higher (or lower) than 40% of incident solar irradiance.

  7. Anharmonicity effects in impurity-vacancy centers in diamond revealed by isotopic shifts and optical measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekimov, E. A.; Krivobok, V. S.; Lyapin, S. G.; Sherin, P. S.; Gavva, V. A.; Kondrin, M. V.

    2017-03-01

    We studied isotopically enriched nano- and microdiamonds with optically active GeV- centers synthesized at high pressures and high temperatures in nonmetallic growth systems. The influence of isotopic composition on optical properties has been thoroughly investigated by photoluminescence-excitation (PLE) and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy to get insight into the nature and electronic structure of this color center. We have demonstrated that the large frequency defect (difference between oscillation frequencies in the ground and excited electronic states) does bring about large discrepancy between PLE and PL spectra and comparatively high isotopic shift of the zero phonon line. Both effects seem to be rather common to split-vacancy centers (for example SiV-), where the frequency defect reaches record high values. Isotopic substitution of carbon atoms in the diamond lattice results in even larger shifts, which are only partially accounted for by a redistribution of electron density caused by the volume change of the diamond lattice. It was shown that the vibronic frequency in this case does not depend on the mass of carbon atoms. The greatest part of this isotopic shift is due to anharmonicity effects, which constitute a substantial part of vibronic frequency observed in this center. The exact physical mechanism, which leads to significant enhancement of anharmonicity on substitution of 12C to 13C, is yet to be clarified.

  8. Isotope effect on electron paramagnetic resonance of boron acceptors in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegner, A. R.; Tezuka, H.; Andlauer, T.; Stutzmann, M.; Thewalt, M. L. W.; Brandt, M. S.; Itoh, K. M.

    2010-09-01

    The fourfold degeneracy of the boron acceptor ground state in silicon, which is easily lifted by any symmetry-breaking perturbation, allows for a strong inhomogeneous broadening of the boron-related electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) lines, e.g., by a random distribution of local strains. However, since EPR of boron acceptors in externally unstrained silicon was reported initially, neither the line shape nor the magnitude of the residual broadening observed in samples with high-crystalline purity were compatible with the low concentrations of carbon and oxygen point defects, being the predominant source of random local strain. Adapting a theoretical model which has been applied to understand the acceptor ground-state splitting in the absence of a magnetic field as an effect due to the presence of different silicon isotopes, we show that local fluctuations of the valence-band edge due to different isotopic configurations in the vicinity of the boron acceptors can quantitatively account for all inhomogeneous broadening effects in high-purity Si with a natural isotope composition. Our calculations show that such an isotopic perturbation also leads to a shift in the g value of different boron-related resonances, which we could verify in our experiments. Further, our results provide an independent test and verification of the valence-band offsets between the different Si isotopes determined in previous works.

  9. Seasonal evolution of net and regenerated silica production around a natural Fe-fertilized area in the Southern Ocean estimated with Si isotopic approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Closset, I.; Lasbleiz, M.; Leblanc, K.; Quéguiner, B.; Cavagna, A.-J.; Elskens, M.; Navez, J.; Cardinal, D.

    2014-10-01

    A massive diatom bloom is observed each year in the surface waters of the naturally Fe-fertilized Kerguelen Plateau (Southern Ocean). We measured biogenic silica production and dissolution fluxes (ρSi and ρDiss, respectively) in the mixed layer in the vicinity of the Kerguelen Plateau during austral spring 2011 (KEOPS-2 cruise). We compare results from a high-nutrient low-chlorophyll reference station and stations with different degrees of iron enrichment and bloom conditions. Above the plateau biogenic ρSi are among the highest reported so far in the Southern Ocean (up to 47.9 mmol m-2 d-1). Although significant (10.2 mmol m-2 d-1 on average), ρDiss were generally much lower than production rates. Uptake ratios (ρSi : ρC and ρSi : ρN) confirm that diatoms strongly dominate primary production in this area. At the bloom onset, decreasing dissolution-to-production ratios (D : P) indicate that the remineralization of silica could sustain most of the low silicon uptake and that the system progressively shifts toward a silica production regime which must be mainly supported by new source of silicic acid. Moreover, by comparing results from the two KEOPS expeditions (spring 2011 and summer 2005), we suggest that there is a seasonal evolution of the processes decoupling Si and N cycles in the area. Indeed, the consumption of H4SiO4 standing stocks occurs only during the growing stage of the bloom when strong net silica production is observed, contributing to higher H4SiO4 depletion relative to NO3-. Then, the decoupling of H4SiO4 and NO3- is mainly controlled by the more efficient nitrogen recycling relative to Si. Gross Si : N uptake ratios were higher in the Fe-rich regions compared to the high-nutrient low-chlorophyll (HNLC) area, likely due to different diatom communities. This suggests that the diatom responses to natural Fe fertilization are more complex than previously thought, and that natural iron fertilization over long timescales does not necessarily

  10. Seasonal evolution of net and regenerated silica production around a natural Fe-fertilized area in the Southern Ocean estimated from Si isotopic approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Closset, I.; Lasbleiz, M.; Leblanc, K.; Quéguiner, B.; Cavagna, A.-J.; Elskens, M.; Navez, J.; Cardinal, D.

    2014-05-01

    A massive diatom-bloom is observed each year in the surface waters of the naturally Fe fertilized Kerguelen Plateau (Southern Ocean). We measured biogenic silica production and dissolution fluxes in the mixed layer in the vicinity of the Kerguelen Plateau during austral spring 2011 (KEOPS-2 cruise). We compare results from a High-Nutrient Low-Chlorophyll reference station and stations with different degrees of iron enrichment and bloom conditions. Above the Plateau biogenic silica production fluxes are among the highest reported so far in the Southern Ocean (up to 47.9 mmol m-2 d-1). Although significant (10.2 mmol m-2 d-1 in average), silica dissolution rates were generally much lower than production rates. Uptake ratios (Si:C and Si:N) confirm that diatoms strongly dominate the primary production in this area. At the bloom onset, decreasing dissolution to production ratios (D:P) indicate that the remineralization of silica could sustained most of the low silicon uptake and that the system progressively shifts toward a silica production regime which must be mainly supported by new source of silicic acid. Moreover, by comparing results from the two KEOPS-expeditions (spring 2011 and summer 2005), we suggest that there is a seasonal evolution on the processes decoupling Si and N cycles in the area. Indeed, the consumption of H4SiO4 standing stocks occurs only during the growing stage of the bloom when strong net silica production is observed, contributing to a higher H4SiO4 depletion relative to NO3-. Then, the decoupling between H4SiO4 and NO3- is mainly controlled by the more efficient nitrogen recycling relative to Si. Gross-Si:N uptake ratios were higher in the Fe-rich regions compared to the HNLC area, likely due to different diatoms communities. This suggests that the diatom responses to natural Fe fertilization are more complex than previously thought, and that natural iron fertilization over long time scales does not necessarily decrease Si:N uptake ratios

  11. Improved energy confinement with nonlinear isotope effects in magnetically confined plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia, J; Jenko, F

    2016-01-01

    The efficient production of electricity from nuclear fusion in magnetically confined plasmas relies on a good confinement of the thermal energy. For more than thirty years, the observation that such confinement depends on the mass of the plasma isotope and its interaction with apparently unrelated plasma conditions has remained largely unexplained and it has become one of the main unsolved issues. By means of numerical studies based on the gyrokinetic theory, we quantitatively show how the plasma microturbulence depends on the isotope mass through nonlinear multiscale microturbulence effects involving the interplay between zonal flows, electromagnetic effects and the torque applied. This finding has crucial consequences for the design of future reactors since, in spite of the fact that they will be composed by multiple ion species, their extrapolation from present day experiments heavily relies on the knowledge obtained from a long experimental tradition based in single isotope plasmas.

  12. Effect of competition on stable carbon isotope ratios of two tussock grass species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, K; Richards, J H; Caldwell, M M

    1991-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that plant carbon isotope composition varies when plants experience differences in water and nutrient availability. However, none have addressed the effect of root interactions, including competition for these soil resources, on carbon isotope ratios. We studied the effect of interspecific root interactions on the productivity and carbon isotope ratios of two Great Basin tussock grass species (Agropyron desertorum and Pseudoroegneria spicata). We compared grasses grown in mixture with sagebrush (Artemisia tridentara) to grasses in similar mixtures but where root interactions with sagebrush were limited by fiberglass partitions. During both years of the study, tussocks growing in competition with sagebrush produced tissue with more negative δ 13 C values than grasses experiencing limited root interaction with sagebrush. The magnitude of this difference (0.5 to 0.9%) is similar to that found in other studies when soil fertility and moisture availability were altered.

  13. Effects of Crystallinity on Zn Isotope Fractionation during Adsorption onto Silica Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, J.; Wasylenki, L.; Bargar, J.; Brown, G. E.; Maher, K.

    2016-12-01

    Interactions between metal ions and minerals surfaces and attendant isotopic fractionation are highly dependent on mineral surface properties and the local chemical environment. Here we present equilibrium adsorption isotherms, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and isotopic measurements to illustrate the effects of substrate crystallinity, ionic strength, and surface coverage on zinc complexation and isotope fractionation. In low ionic strength solutions (I = 0.004 M) at surface loadings adsorption complexes are not observed on amorphous silica surfaces. At higher ionic strength (I = 0.1 M) at higher surface loading (>0.6 µmol m-2), Zn forms inner-sphere, monodentate complexes in tetrahedral coordination with oxygen atoms at the quartz surface (RZn-O = 1.98 Å), with a measured equilibrium isotope fractionation of Δ66/64Znaqueous-sorbed= -0.62 ±0.05‰. At similar chemical conditions and surface loading, Zn forms inner-sphere, monodentate complexes at the amorphous silica surface, in tetrahedral coordination, with shorter zinc-oxygen bond distances (RZn-O = 1.94 Å) and a larger measured equilibrium isotope fractionation of Δ66/64Znaqueous-sorbed= -0.91 ±0.05‰. First row transition metals generally exhibit inner-sphere complexation with simple metal oxide surfaces; however, our results demonstrate that this assumption is not always supported. The impact of crystallinity on the type of adsorbed complexes formed at mineral surfaces is reflected in the equilibrium isotope fractionation. Moreover, different degrees of crystallinity alter bond distances in sorption complex geometries, which result in different equilibrium isotope fractionation factors.

  14. Net profit flow per country from 1980 to 2009: The long-term effects of foreign direct investment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Aim of the paper The paper aims at describing and explaining net profit flows per country for the period 1980–2009. Net profit flows result from Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) stock and profit repatriation: inward stock creating a profit outflow and outward FDI stock a profit inflow. Profit flows, especially ‘normal’ ones are not commonly researched. Theoretical background According to world-system theory, countries are part of a system characterised by a core, semi-periphery and periphery, as shown by network analyses of trade relations. Network analyses based on ownership relations of TransNational Corporations (TNCs) show that the top 50 firms that control about 40% of the world economy are almost exclusively located in core countries. So, we may expect a hierarchy in net profit flows with core countries on top and the periphery at the bottom. FDI outflows from the core countries especially rose in the 1990s, so we may expect that the difference has grown in time. Data and results A dataset on 'net profit flow' per country is developed. There are diverging developments in net profit flows since the 1980s, as expected: ever more positive for core countries, negative and ever lower for semi-peripheral and peripheral countries, in particular from the 1990s onwards. A fixed effects quantile regression using publicly available data confirms the prediction that peripheral countries share a unique characteristic: their outward investments do not have a positive influence on net profit flow as is the case with semi-peripheral and core countries. The most probable explanation is that peripheral outward investments are indirectly owned by firms located in core and semi-peripheral countries, so all peripheral profit inflows end up in those countries. PMID:28654644

  15. Study of Different Effects of Nets Impregnated with Different Pyrethroids on Susceptible and Resistant Strains of Anopheles stephensi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H. Hodjati

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objectives: A laboratory study was carried out to investigate the insecticidal, irritant and anti-feeding effects of nets treated with various pyrethroids against susceptible and highly pyrethroid resistant strains of An. stephensi. Materials & Methods: Tests were carried out inside a mosquito cage measuring 25×25×25 cm where mosquitoes were offered the opportunity to feed blood on an arm through the top face of the cage which had been pyrethroid treated.Results: With all the pyrethroids tested, the resistant strain spent a longer time in contact with a treated net, which was in contact with a human arm, than did the susceptible strain. With permethrin the resistant strain fed significantly more successfully through the treated netting than did the susceptible strain. With deltamethrin there was a non-significant tendency in the same direction in comparing the two strains. However, with alphacypermethrin there was a non-significant tendency in the reverse direction. After 15 min in the cage which tested for the ability to feed through a pyrethroid treated net, observed mortality was higher with the susceptible than the resistant strain. Conclusion: Thus there was no sign that the longer resting of the resistant strain on treated netting would compensate for the fact that a higher dose was needed to kill this strain. Such compensation had been suggested with the West African An. gambiae where treated nets continue to work well against a highly resistant wild population. However this does not seem to apply to our resistant An. stephens.

  16. Net profit flow per country from 1980 to 2009: The long-term effects of foreign direct investment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkermans, Dirk H M

    2017-01-01

    The paper aims at describing and explaining net profit flows per country for the period 1980-2009. Net profit flows result from Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) stock and profit repatriation: inward stock creating a profit outflow and outward FDI stock a profit inflow. Profit flows, especially 'normal' ones are not commonly researched. According to world-system theory, countries are part of a system characterised by a core, semi-periphery and periphery, as shown by network analyses of trade relations. Network analyses based on ownership relations of TransNational Corporations (TNCs) show that the top 50 firms that control about 40% of the world economy are almost exclusively located in core countries. So, we may expect a hierarchy in net profit flows with core countries on top and the periphery at the bottom. FDI outflows from the core countries especially rose in the 1990s, so we may expect that the difference has grown in time. A dataset on 'net profit flow' per country is developed. There are diverging developments in net profit flows since the 1980s, as expected: ever more positive for core countries, negative and ever lower for semi-peripheral and peripheral countries, in particular from the 1990s onwards. A fixed effects quantile regression using publicly available data confirms the prediction that peripheral countries share a unique characteristic: their outward investments do not have a positive influence on net profit flow as is the case with semi-peripheral and core countries. The most probable explanation is that peripheral outward investments are indirectly owned by firms located in core and semi-peripheral countries, so all peripheral profit inflows end up in those countries.

  17. Mixing effects on apparent reaction rates and isotope fractionation during denitrification in a heterogeneous aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, C.T.; Böhlke, J.K.; Bekins, B.A.; Phillips, S.P.

    2010-01-01

    Gradients in contaminant concentrations and isotopic compositions commonly are used to derive reaction parameters for natural attenuation in aquifers. Differences between field-scale (apparent) estimated reaction rates and isotopic fractionations and local-scale (intrinsic) effects are poorly understood for complex natural systems. For a heterogeneous alluvial fan aquifer, numerical models and field observations were used to study the effects of physical heterogeneity on reaction parameter estimates. Field measurements included major ions, age tracers, stable isotopes, and dissolved gases. Parameters were estimated for the O2 reduction rate, denitrification rate, O 2 threshold for denitrification, and stable N isotope fractionation during denitrification. For multiple geostatistical realizations of the aquifer, inverse modeling was used to establish reactive transport simulations that were consistent with field observations and served as a basis for numerical experiments to compare sample-based estimates of "apparent" parameters with "true" (intrinsic) values. For this aquifer, non-Gaussian dispersion reduced the magnitudes of apparent reaction rates and isotope fractionations to a greater extent than Gaussian mixing alone. Apparent and true rate constants and fractionation parameters can differ by an order of magnitude or more, especially for samples subject to slow transport, long travel times, or rapid reactions. The effect of mixing on apparent N isotope fractionation potentially explains differences between previous laboratory and field estimates. Similarly, predicted effects on apparent O2 threshold values for denitrification are consistent with previous reports of higher values in aquifers than in the laboratory. These results show that hydrogeological complexity substantially influences the interpretation and prediction of reactive transport. ?? 2010 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. Effects of Educational Intervention on Long-Lasting Insecticidal Nets Use in a Malarious Area, Southeast Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdol Hossein Madani

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs have been advocated as an effective tool against malaria transmission. However, success of this community based intervention largely depends on the knowledge and practice regarding malaria and its prevention. According to the national strategy plan on evaluation of LLINs (Olyset nets, this study was conducted to determine the perceptions and practices about malaria and to improve use of LLINs in Bashagard district, one of the important foci of malaria in southeast Iran. The study area comprised 14 villages that were randomized in two clusters and designated as LLINs and untreated nets. Each of households in both clusters received two bed nets by the free distribution and delivery. After one month quantitative data collection method was used to collect information regarding the objectives of the study. On the basis of this information, an educational program was carried out in both areas to increase motivation for use of bed nets. Community knowledge and practice regarding malaria and LLIN use assessed pre- and post-educational program. The data were analyzed using SPSS ver.16 software. At baseline, 77.5% of respondents in intervention and 69.4 % in control area mentioned mosquito bite as the cause of malaria, this awareness increased significantly in intervention (90.3% and control areas (87.9%, following the educational program. A significant increase also was seen in the proportion of households who used LLINs the previous night (92.5% compared with untreated nets (87.1%. Educational status was an important predictor of LLINs use. Regular use of LLIN was considerably higher than the targeted coverage (80% which recommended by World Heaths Organization. About 81.1% and 85.3% of respondents from LLIN and control areas reported that mosquito nuisance and subsequent malaria transmission were the main determinants of bed net use. These findings highlight a need for educational intervention in implementation of

  19. RESTful NET

    CERN Document Server

    Flanders, Jon

    2008-01-01

    RESTful .NET is the first book that teaches Windows developers to build RESTful web services using the latest Microsoft tools. Written by Windows Communication Foundation (WFC) expert Jon Flanders, this hands-on tutorial demonstrates how you can use WCF and other components of the .NET 3.5 Framework to build, deploy and use REST-based web services in a variety of application scenarios. RESTful architecture offers a simpler approach to building web services than SOAP, SOA, and the cumbersome WS- stack. And WCF has proven to be a flexible technology for building distributed systems not necessa

  20. Unusual Atmospheric Processes: Implications for the Unusual Isotope Effect in Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, S.; Krishnamurthy, R. V.

    2016-12-01

    Several samples associated in particular with thunderstorms collected from Kalamazoo, Michigan reveal oxygen and hydrogen isotope ratios that are not compatible with known thermodynamic fractionation or the so-called Raleigh Distillation Effect. Data gathered from April 2014 to February 2016 can be separated into two categories: (1) samples with expected isotopic values based on previous work, (2) samples with unusually high δ18O and δ2H values. Values as high as 42‰ and 25‰ for δ2H and δ18O respectively are obtained. Recent studies suggest that precipitation produced by deep convection can produce moderately enriched oxygen isotopic values, although no hydrogen values for those precipitations are available. Moreover, no values have been recorded that are as high as some of those presented here. The unusual isotope values cannot be attributed to air mass contributions. It is argued that changes in atmospheric chemistry, most likely induced by lightning associated with thunderstorms are responsible. This is likely since temperatures associated with lightning can reach 40000°K. Several studies have indicated that lightning can significantly impact atmospheric chemistry producing, among other species, ozone and NOx. Atmospheric ozone has enriched isotopic values and likely contributes to enriched Oxygen-18 seen in precipitation. An explanation for enrichment in hydrogen is somewhat elusive, but a likely candidate is ion molecular reactions produced by extremely high temperatures in the corona of lightning.

  1. Effectiveness of insecticidal nets on uncomplicated clinical malaria: a case-control study for operational evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damien, Georgia Barikissou; Djènontin, Armel; Chaffa, Evelyne; Yamadjako, Sandra; Drame, Papa Makhtar; Ndille, Emmanuel Elanga; Henry, Marie-Claire; Corbel, Vincent; Remoué, Franck; Rogier, Christophe

    2016-02-19

    In a context of large-scale implementation of malaria vector control tools, such as the distribution of long-lasting insecticide nets (LLIN), it is necessary to regularly assess whether strategies are progressing as expected and then evaluate their effectiveness. The present study used the case-control approach to evaluate the effectiveness of LLIN 42 months after national wide distribution. This study design offers an alternative to cohort study and randomized control trial as it permits to avoid many ethical issues inherent to them. From April to August 2011, a case-control study was conducted in two health districts in Benin; Ouidah-Kpomasse-Tori (OKT) in the south and Djougou-Copargo-Ouake (DCO) in the north. Children aged 0-60 months randomly selected from community were included. Cases were children with a high axillary temperature (≥37.5 °C) or a reported history of fever during the last 48 h with a positive rapid diagnostic test (RDT). Controls were children with neither fever nor signs suggesting malaria with a negative RDT. The necessary sample size was at least 396 cases and 1188 controls from each site. The main exposure variable was "sleeping every night under an LLIN for the 2 weeks before the survey" (SL). The protective effectiveness (PE) of LLIN was calculated as PE = 1 - odds ratio. The declared SL range was low, with 17.0 and 27.5 % in cases and controls in the OKT area, and 44.9 and 56.5 % in cases and controls, in the DCO area, respectively. The declared SL conferred 40.5 % (95 % CI 22.2-54.5 %) and 55.5 % (95 % CI 28.2-72.4 %) protection against uncomplicated malaria in the OKT and the DCO areas, respectively. Significant differences in PE were observed according to the mother's education level. In the context of a mass distribution of LLIN, their use still conferred protection in up to 55 % against the occurrence of clinical malaria cases in children. Social factors, the poor use and the poor condition of an LLIN can be in disfavour with

  2. Determination of Kinetic Isotope Effects in Yeast Alcohol Dehydrogenase Using Transition Path Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Matthew; Schwartz, Steven

    2015-03-01

    The experimental determination of kinetic isotope effects in enzymatic systems can be a difficult, time-consuming, and expensive process. In this study, we use the Chandler-Bolhius method for the determination of reaction rates within transition path sampling (rTPS) to determine the primary kinetic isotope effect in yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH). In this study, normal mode centroid molecular dynamics (CMD) was applied to the transferring hydride/deuteride in order to correctly incorporate quantum effects into the molecular simulations. Though previous studies have used rTPS to calculate reaction rate constants in various model and real systems, it has not been applied to a system as large as YADH. Due to the fact that particle transfer is not wholly indicative of the chemical step, this method cannot be used to determine reaction rate constants in YADH. However, it is possible to determine the transition rate constant of the particle transfer, and the kinetic isotope effect of that step. This method provides a set of tools to determine kinetic isotope effects with the atomistic detail of molecular simulations.

  3. Determination of the carbon kinetic isotope effects on propane hydroxylation mediated by the methane monooxygenases from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) by using stable carbon isotopic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ded-Shih; Wu, Suh-Huey; Wang, Yane-Shih; Yu, Steve S-F; Chan, Sunney I

    2002-08-02

    Authentic propane with known position-specific carbon isotope composition at each carbon atom was subjected to hydroxylation by the particulate and soluble methane monooxygenase (pMMO and sMMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath), and the corresponding position-specific carbon isotope content was redetermined for the product 2-propanol. Neither the reaction mediated by pMMO nor that with sMMO showed an intermolecular (12)C/(13)C kinetic isotope effect effect on the propane hydroxylation at the secondary carbon; this indicates that there is little structural change at the carbon center attacked during formation of the transition state in the rate-determining step. This finding is in line with the concerted mechanism proposed for pMMO (Bath), and suggested for sMMO (Bath), namely, direct side-on insertion of an active "O" species across the C-H bond, as has been previously reported for singlet carbene insertion.

  4. Management effects on net ecosystem carbon and GHG budgets at European crop sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ceschia, Eric; Bêziat, P; Dejoux, J.F.

    2010-01-01

    , with or without irrigation, etc.) and were cultivated with 15 representative crop species common to Europe. At all sites, carbon inputs (organic fertilisation and seeds), carbon exports (harvest or fire) and net ecosystem production (NEP), measured with the eddy covariance technique, were calculated...... were estimated from the literature for the rice crop site only. At the other sites, CH4 emissions/oxidation were assumed to be negligible compared to other contributions to the net GHGB. Finally, we evaluated crop efficiencies (CE) in relation to global warming potential as the ratio of C exported from...

  5. Nuclear Quantum Effects in the Layering and Diffusion of Hydrogen Isotopes in Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, Piotr; Terzyk, Artur P; Gauden, Piotr A; Furmaniak, Sylwester; Kaneko, Katsumi; Miller, Thomas F

    2015-09-03

    Although recent experimental studies have demonstrated that H2 and D2 molecules wet the inner surface of supergrowth carbon nanotubes at low temperatures, characterization of the structural and dynamical properties in this regime is challenging. This Letter presents a theoretical study of self-diffusion in pure and binary H2, D2, and T2 contact monolayer films formed on the inner surface of a carbon nanotube. Our results show that monolayer formation and self-diffusion both in pure hydrogen isotopes and in H2/T2 and H2/D2 isotope mixtures is impacted by nuclear quantum effects, suggesting potential applications of carbon nanotubes for the separation of hydrogen isotopes.

  6. Petri Nets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Associate Professor of. Computer Science and. Automation at the Indian. Institute of Science,. Bangalore. His research interests are broadly in the areas of stochastic modeling and scheduling methodologies for future factories; and object oriented modeling. GENERAL I ARTICLE. Petri Nets. 1. Overview and Foundations.

  7. Petri Nets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 4; Issue 8. Petri Nets - Overview and Foundations. Y Narahari. General Article Volume 4 Issue 8 August 1999 pp ... Author Affiliations. Y Narahari1. Department ot Computer Science and Automation, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India.

  8. Basic study on isotope separation using light induced drift effects (Progress report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suto, Osamu; Yamaguchi, Hiromi; Suzuki, M. [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Works; Ishii, K.

    1999-03-01

    As a preliminary research on {sup 15}N-isotope separation on the basis of light induced drift (LID) effects in NH{sub 3}, the authors have confirmed the feasibility on {sup 13}C-isotope separation using LID effects in CH{sub 3}F for which all the necessary spectroscopic data are available and found that: (1) Concentration difference at the entrance and at the exit end of the drift tube {delta}n{sub a} (number/cm{sup 3}) was proportional to the energy density absorbed ({delta}W/cm{sup 2}), indicating the validity of theoretical LID equation. (2) Pressure dependence of {delta}n{sub a}/{delta}S was maximum at ca. 0.5 Torr. Lower {delta}n{sub a}/{delta}S values are due to power saturation effects at low pressures and due to absorption line broadening at high pressures. (3) Maximum isotopic selectivity was obtained at 0.5 Torr and to be 1.18. (4) Time needed for {delta}n{sub a} to attain the equilibrium increased with increasing pressure. They concluded that the possibility of {sup 15}N isotope separation using NH{sub 3}-LID effect was in principle confirmed. (S. Ohno)

  9. Kinetic Isotope Effects (KIE) and Density Functional Theory (DFT): A Match Made in Heaven?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Niels Johan; Fristrup, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Determination of experimental kinetic isotope effects (KIE) is one of the most useful tools for the exploration of reaction mechanisms in organometallic chemistry. The approach has been further strengthened during the last decade with advances in modern computational chemistry. This allows...

  10. Deuterium isotope effect on the intramolecular electron transfer in Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Zhang, J; Chi, Q

    2001-01-01

    Intramolecular electron transfer in azurin in water and deuterium oxide has been studied over a broad temperature range. The kinetic deuterium isotope effect, k(H)/k(D), is smaller than unity (0.7 at 298 K), primarily caused by the different activation entropies in water (-56.5 J K(-1) mol(-1...

  11. Effect of cholera toxin on glucose absorption and net movements of water and electrolytes in the intestinal loop of sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, H S; Onaga, T; Mineo, H; Kim, J T; Kato, S

    1996-12-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effect of cholera toxin on glucose absorption and net movement of water and electrolytes in the jejunal loop of sheep. Intraluminal perfusion was performed at the rate of 1 ml/min with isotonic 10 mM glucose solution. Osmolality was adjusted by adding NaCl, and the outflow solution was collected every 10 min. After a 30 min control period, cholera toxin was applied intraluminally for 30 min at doses of 30, 60, and 120 micrograms/loop. In the control period, water, sodium and chloride were absorbed, while potassium and bicarbonate were secreted. Cholera toxin reversed the net absorption of water, sodium and chloride to net secretions, and this secretory response to cholera toxin was dose-dependent. Bicarbonate secretion was stimulated dose-dependently by cholera toxin. Potassium secretion was also increased at all doses, though this response was not dose-dependent. The net glucose absorption was decreased dose-dependently by cholera toxin. In conclusion, these results indicate that cholera toxin stimulates water and electrolyte secretion, and inhibits glucose absorption in the jejunal loop of sheep.

  12. Effect of Calcium Oxide Microstructure on the Diffusion of Isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandes Ramos, João Pedro; Stora, T

    2012-01-01

    Calcium oxide (CaO) powder targets have been successfully used at CERN-ISOLDE to produce neutron deficient exotic argon and carbon isotopes under proton irradiation at high temperatures (>1000°C). These targets outperform the other related targets for the production of the same beams. However, they presented either slow release rates (yields) from the beginning or a rapid decrease over time. This problem was believed to come from the target microstructure degradation, justifying the material investigation. In order to do so, the synthesis, reactivity in ambient air and sintering kinetics of CaO were studied, through surface area determination by N2 adsorption, X-ray diffraction for crystalline phase identification and crystallite size determination, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy to investigate the microstructure. The synthesis studies revealed that a nanometric material is obtained from the decarbonation of CaCO3 in vacuum at temperatures higher than 550°C, which is very reactive in air....

  13. Effect of decreasing dietary phosphorus supply on net recycling of inorganic phosphate in lactating dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puggaard, Liselotte; Kristensen, Niels Bastian; Sehested, Jens Jakob

    2011-01-01

    Five ruminally cannulated lactating Holstein cows, fitted with permanent indwelling catheters in the mesenteric vein, hepatic vein, portal vein, and an artery were used to study intestinal absorption and net recycling of inorganic phosphate (Pi) to the gastrointestinal tract. Treatments were low P...... restrictively, resulting in equal dry matter intakes as well as milk, fat, and protein yields between treatments. Net Pi recycling (primarily salivary) was estimated as the difference between net portal plasma flux (net absorption of Pi) and apparently digested tP (feed – fecal tP difference). Phosphorus intake...... (LP; 2.4 g of P/kg of DM) and high P (HP; 3.4 g of P/kg of DM). The dietary total P (tP) concentrations were obtained by replacing 0.50% calcium carbonate in the LP diet with 0.50% monocalcium phosphate in the HP diet. Diets were fed for 14 d and cows were sampled on d 14 in each period. Cows were fed...

  14. Effect of twine diameter on fishing power of experimental gill nets used in Greenland waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovgård, Holger

    1996-01-01

    The relative fishing powers of experimental gill nets were estimated for shorthorn sculpin (Myoxocephalus scorpius), Greenland cod (Gadus ogac), and Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua). The results suggested that fishing power was negatively correlated to the ratio between twine diameter and mesh size...

  15. Effects of precipitation changes on aboveground net primary production and soil respiration in a switchgrass field

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study attempted to test whether switchgrass aboveground net primary production (ANPP) responds to precipitation (PPT) changes in a double asymmetry pattern as framed by Knapp et al. (2016), and whether it is held true for other ecosystem processes such as soil respiration (SR). Data were colle...

  16. Rotational effects of polymeric fluids on shape of filaments in melt extruded net structures

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rawal, A

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work deals with the net structures, which are produced by replacing the static die (spinneret) with two concentric dies rotating in opposite directions in a melt extrusion process. These dies consist of defined number of slots with non...

  17. The effect of insecticide-treated bed net on malarial parasitaemia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Also, some field studies have indicated that the efficacy achieved might be due to the high coverage rate achieved during the trial that produced a mass killing of mosquitoes in the communities. Aim: To assess the impact of the use of the insecticide-treated bed net in a programme situation, on malarial parasitaemia, ...

  18. Does Size Really Matter? The Steric Isotope Effect in a Supramolecular Host?Guest Exchange Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mugridge, Jeffrey; Bergman, Robert; Raymond, Kenneth

    2010-01-29

    Isotope effects (IEs), which arise from differences in zero point energies (ZPEs) between a parent and isotopically substituted bond, have been used extensively by chemists to probe molecular interactions and reactivity. Due to the anharmonicity of the C-H/D vibrational potential energy function and the lower ZPE of a C-D bond, the average C-D bond length is typically {approx}0.005 {angstrom} shorter than an equivalent C-H bond. It is this difference in size that is often invoked to explain the observation of secondary, inverse kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) in chemical processes which proceed through a sterically strained transition state. This so-called 'steric isotope effect' (SIE) has been observed in processes such as the racemization of ortho-substituted biphenyls[6] and phenanthrenes, ring flipping of cyclophanes, and more recently in the deslipping of rotaxanes, where substitution of the sterically less demanding deuterium for protium results in rate accelerations for these processes. Herein, we use deuterium substitution in a cationic guest molecule to probe the sensitivity limits of the guest exchange process from a highly-charged supramolecular host.

  19. Different isotope effects for parallel pathways of enzyme-catalyzed transmethylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, S.E.; Huskey, W.P.; Borchardt, R.T.; Schowen, R.L.

    1984-09-19

    The isotope effects were measured by using a mixture of S-adenosyl(methyl-/sup 3/H)methionine and S-adenosyl(methyl-/sup 14/C)methionine to methylate dopamine at 37/sup 0/C, pH 7.6, in Hepes buffer with 7 mM Mg/sup 2 +/ with catalysis by rat liver catechol O-methyltransferase. Dopamine was present in excess at concentrations of .25-7.5 mM. The meta and para products were isolated at various times by high performance liquid chromatography. The isotope ratio (k/k/sub 14/) was measured by liquid scintillation counting. The isotope effects (J) were determined for the separated meta (m) and para (p) products. The J values vary with the dopamine concentration. Extrapolation of the data shows that J/sub p/ = 1.35 +/- .05, suggesting that the S/sub N/2 step alone determines the overall rate. J/sub m/ value is 1.16 +/- .07, much smaller than that expected for a pure S/sub N/2 transition step and indicating that a binding step dilutes the isotope effect. 11 references, 1 figure.

  20. Four-bond deuterium isotope effects on the chemical shifts of amide nitrogens in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugarinov, Vitali

    2013-11-01

    An approach towards precision NMR measurements of four-bond deuterium isotope effects on the chemical shifts of backbone amide nitrogen nuclei in proteins is described. Three types of four-bond (15) N deuterium isotope effects are distinguished depending on the site of proton-to-deuterium substitution: (4)ΔN(N(i-1)D), (4)ΔN(N(i+1)D) and (4)ΔN(Cβ,(i-1)D). All the three types of isotope shifts are quantified in the (partially) deuterated protein ubiquitin. The (4)ΔN(N(i+1)D) and (4)ΔN(C(β,i-1)D) effects are by far the largest in magnitude and vary between 16 and 75 ppb and -18 and 46 ppb, respectively. A semi-quantitative correlation between experimental (4)ΔN(N(i+1)D) and (4)ΔN(C(β,i-1)D) values and the distances between nitrogen nuclei and the sites of (1)H-to-D substitution is noted. The largest isotope shifts in both cases correspond to the shortest inter-nuclear distances. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Stable isotope ratios as indicators of trophic status: Uncertainties imposed by geographic effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schell, D.M. [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States). Water Research Center

    1995-12-31

    Isotope ratios of carbon and nitrogen are often suggested as indicators to determine trophic status and carbon sources of marine organisms in explaining relative concentrations of pollutants. Whereas this technique is effective with organisms resident in ecosystems having homogeneous primary productivity regimes and uniform isotope ratios in the productivity base, it often is confounded by migratory movements by larger organisms across isotopic gradients. Tissues containing a temporal record such as baleen plates or whiskers show these effects clearly. Bowhead whales in Alaskan waters seasonally move across carbon isotope gradients of 5{per_thousand} in zooplankton and reflect these differences in the keratin of baleen plates and in overall body composition. However, no significant differences in {delta}{sup 15}N are evident regionally in northern Alaskan zooplankton. In contrast, the Southern Ocean is characterized by extreme latitudinal gradients in both {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 15}N with the most pronounced effects occurring at the subtropical convergence. Prey taken by marine mammals south of this zone are depleted in both {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C by up to 8{per_thousand}. Data on southern right whales (Eubalaena glacialis), Bryde`s whale (Balaenoptera edenl), pygmy right whales (Caperea marginate) and antarctic fur seal (Arctocephalos gazella) show the effects of migratory movements across the gradient in both carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios. Similar patterns in marine mammal tissues from Australia, South Africa and South America indicate that the observed patterns are circumpolar. Within a given region, trophic effects shift {delta}{sup 15}N values consistent with observed feeding habits.

  2. Isotope effects on L-H threshold and confinement in tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, C. F.; Weisen, H.; Hillesheim, J. C.; Chankin, A.; Delabie, E.; Horvath, L.; Auriemma, F.; Carvalho, I. S.; Corrigan, G.; Flanagan, J.; Garzotti, L.; Keeling, D.; King, D.; Lerche, E.; Lorenzini, R.; Maslov, M.; Menmuir, S.; Saarelma, S.; Sips, A. C. C.; Solano, E. R.; Belonohy, E.; Casson, F. J.; Challis, C.; Giroud, C.; Parail, V.; Silva, C.; Valisa, M.; Contributors, JET

    2018-01-01

    The dependence of plasma transport and confinement on the main hydrogenic ion isotope mass is of fundamental importance for understanding turbulent transport and, therefore, for accurate extrapolations of confinement from present tokamak experiments, which typically use a single hydrogen isotope, to burning plasmas such as ITER, which will operate in deuterium–tritium mixtures. Knowledge of the dependence of plasma properties and edge transport barrier formation on main ion species is critical in view of the initial, low-activation phase of ITER operations in hydrogen or helium and of its implications on the subsequent operation in deuterium–tritium. The favourable scaling of global energy confinement time with isotope mass, which has been observed in many tokamak experiments, remains largely unexplained theoretically. Moreover, the mass scaling observed in experiments varies depending on the plasma edge conditions. In preparation for upcoming deuterium–tritium experiments in the JET tokamak with the ITER-like Be/W Wall (JET-ILW), a thorough experimental investigation of isotope effects in hydrogen, deuterium and tritium plasmas is being carried out, in order to provide stringent tests of plasma energy, particle and momentum transport models. Recent hydrogen and deuterium isotope experiments in JET-ILW on L-H power threshold, L-mode and H-mode confinement are reviewed and discussed in the context of past and more recent isotope experiments in tokamak plasmas, highlighting common elements as well as contrasting observations that have been reported. The experimental findings are discussed in the context of fundamental aspects of plasma transport models.

  3. Excitation functions and isotopic effects in (n, p) reactions for stable nickel isotopes from reaction threshold to 20 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lalremruata, B. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Ganeshkhind, Pune-411007, Maharashtra (India)], E-mail: marema@physics.unipune.ernet.in; Ganesan, S. [Reactor Physics Design Division, BARC, Mumbai 58 (India); Bhoraskar, V.N. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Ganeshkhind, Pune-411007, Maharashtra (India)], E-mail: vnb@physics.unipune.ernet; Dhole, S.D. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Ganeshkhind, Pune-411007, Maharashtra (India)], E-mail: sanjay@physics.unipune.ernet.in

    2009-05-01

    The excitation function for (n, p) reactions from reaction threshold to 20 MeV on five nickel isotopes viz; {sup 58}Ni, {sup 60}Ni, {sup 61}Ni, {sup 62}Ni and {sup 64}Ni were calculated using Talys-1.0 nuclear model code involving the fixed set of global parameters. A good agreement between the calculated and measured data is obtained with minimum effort on parameter fitting and only one free parameter called 'Shell damping factor'. This is of importance to the validation of nuclear model approaches with increased predictive power. The systematic decrease in (n, p) cross-sections with increasing neutron number in reactions induced by neutrons on isotopes of nickel is explained in terms of the proton separation energy and the pre-equilibrium model. The compound nucleus and pre-equilibrium reaction mechanism as well as the isotopic effects were also studied.

  4. Effects of vegetation heterogeneity and surface topography on spatial scaling of net primary productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J. M.; Chen, X.; Ju, W.

    2013-07-01

    Due to the heterogeneous nature of the land surface, spatial scaling is an inevitable issue in the development of land models coupled with low-resolution Earth system models (ESMs) for predicting land-atmosphere interactions and carbon-climate feedbacks. In this study, a simple spatial scaling algorithm is developed to correct errors in net primary productivity (NPP) estimates made at a coarse spatial resolution based on sub-pixel information of vegetation heterogeneity and surface topography. An eco-hydrological model BEPS-TerrainLab, which considers both vegetation and topographical effects on the vertical and lateral water flows and the carbon cycle, is used to simulate NPP at 30 m and 1 km resolutions for a 5700 km2 watershed with an elevation range from 518 m to 3767 m in the Qinling Mountain, Shanxi Province, China. Assuming that the NPP simulated at 30 m resolution represents the reality and that at 1 km resolution is subject to errors due to sub-pixel heterogeneity, a spatial scaling index (SSI) is developed to correct the coarse resolution NPP values pixel by pixel. The agreement between the NPP values at these two resolutions is improved considerably from R2 = 0.782 to R2 = 0.884 after the correction. The mean bias error (MBE) in NPP modelled at the 1 km resolution is reduced from 14.8 g C m-2 yr-1 to 4.8 g C m-2 yr-1 in comparison with NPP modelled at 30 m resolution, where the mean NPP is 668 g C m-2 yr-1. The range of spatial variations of NPP at 30 m resolution is larger than that at 1 km resolution. Land cover fraction is the most important vegetation factor to be considered in NPP spatial scaling, and slope is the most important topographical factor for NPP spatial scaling especially in mountainous areas, because of its influence on the lateral water redistribution, affecting water table, soil moisture and plant growth. Other factors including leaf area index (LAI) and elevation have small and additive effects on improving the spatial scaling

  5. Effects of vegetation heterogeneity and surface topography on spatial scaling of net primary productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Chen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to the heterogeneous nature of the land surface, spatial scaling is an inevitable issue in the development of land models coupled with low-resolution Earth system models (ESMs for predicting land-atmosphere interactions and carbon-climate feedbacks. In this study, a simple spatial scaling algorithm is developed to correct errors in net primary productivity (NPP estimates made at a coarse spatial resolution based on sub-pixel information of vegetation heterogeneity and surface topography. An eco-hydrological model BEPS-TerrainLab, which considers both vegetation and topographical effects on the vertical and lateral water flows and the carbon cycle, is used to simulate NPP at 30 m and 1 km resolutions for a 5700 km2 watershed with an elevation range from 518 m to 3767 m in the Qinling Mountain, Shanxi Province, China. Assuming that the NPP simulated at 30 m resolution represents the reality and that at 1 km resolution is subject to errors due to sub-pixel heterogeneity, a spatial scaling index (SSI is developed to correct the coarse resolution NPP values pixel by pixel. The agreement between the NPP values at these two resolutions is improved considerably from R2 = 0.782 to R2 = 0.884 after the correction. The mean bias error (MBE in NPP modelled at the 1 km resolution is reduced from 14.8 g C m−2 yr−1 to 4.8 g C m−2 yr−1 in comparison with NPP modelled at 30 m resolution, where the mean NPP is 668 g C m−2 yr−1. The range of spatial variations of NPP at 30 m resolution is larger than that at 1 km resolution. Land cover fraction is the most important vegetation factor to be considered in NPP spatial scaling, and slope is the most important topographical factor for NPP spatial scaling especially in mountainous areas, because of its influence on the lateral water redistribution, affecting water table, soil moisture and plant growth. Other factors including leaf area index (LAI and elevation have small and additive effects on improving

  6. Interactive Effects of CO2 Concentration and Water Regime on Stable Isotope Signatures, Nitrogen Assimilation and Growth in Sweet Pepper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serret, María D.; Yousfi, Salima; Vicente, Rubén; Piñero, María C.; Otálora-Alcón, Ginés; del Amor, Francisco M.; Araus, José L.

    2018-01-01

    Sweet pepper is among the most widely cultivated horticultural crops in the Mediterranean basin, being frequently grown hydroponically under cover in combination with CO2 fertilization and water conditions ranging from optimal to suboptimal. The aim of this study is to develop a simple model, based on the analysis of plant stable isotopes in their natural abundance, gas exchange traits and N concentration, to assess sweet pepper growth. Plants were grown in a growth chamber for near 6 weeks. Two [CO2] (400 and 800 μmol mol−1), three water regimes (control and mild and moderate water stress) and four genotypes were assayed. For each combination of genotype, [CO2] and water regime five plants were evaluated. Water stress applied caused significant decreases in water potential, net assimilation, stomatal conductance, intercellular to atmospheric [CO2], and significant increases in water use efficiency, leaf chlorophyll content and carbon isotope composition, while the relative water content, the osmotic potential and the content of anthocyanins did change not under stress compared to control conditions support this statement. Nevertheless, water regime affects plant growth via nitrogen assimilation, which is associated with the transpiration stream, particularly at high [CO2], while the lower N concentration caused by rising [CO2] is not associated with stomatal closure. The stable isotope composition of carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen (δ13C, δ18O, and δ15N) in plant matter are affected not only by water regime but also by rising [CO2]. Thus, δ18O increased probably as response to decreases in transpiration, while the increase in δ15N may reflect not only a lower stomatal conductance but a higher nitrogen demand in leaves or shifts in nitrogen metabolism associated with decreases in photorespiration. The way that δ13C explains differences in plant growth across water regimes within a given [CO2], seems to be mediated through its direct relationship with N

  7. Interactive Effects of CO2 Concentration and Water Regime on Stable Isotope Signatures, Nitrogen Assimilation and Growth in Sweet Pepper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María D. Serret

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Sweet pepper is among the most widely cultivated horticultural crops in the Mediterranean basin, being frequently grown hydroponically under cover in combination with CO2 fertilization and water conditions ranging from optimal to suboptimal. The aim of this study is to develop a simple model, based on the analysis of plant stable isotopes in their natural abundance, gas exchange traits and N concentration, to assess sweet pepper growth. Plants were grown in a growth chamber for near 6 weeks. Two [CO2] (400 and 800 μmol mol−1, three water regimes (control and mild and moderate water stress and four genotypes were assayed. For each combination of genotype, [CO2] and water regime five plants were evaluated. Water stress applied caused significant decreases in water potential, net assimilation, stomatal conductance, intercellular to atmospheric [CO2], and significant increases in water use efficiency, leaf chlorophyll content and carbon isotope composition, while the relative water content, the osmotic potential and the content of anthocyanins did change not under stress compared to control conditions support this statement. Nevertheless, water regime affects plant growth via nitrogen assimilation, which is associated with the transpiration stream, particularly at high [CO2], while the lower N concentration caused by rising [CO2] is not associated with stomatal closure. The stable isotope composition of carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen (δ13C, δ18O, and δ15N in plant matter are affected not only by water regime but also by rising [CO2]. Thus, δ18O increased probably as response to decreases in transpiration, while the increase in δ15N may reflect not only a lower stomatal conductance but a higher nitrogen demand in leaves or shifts in nitrogen metabolism associated with decreases in photorespiration. The way that δ13C explains differences in plant growth across water regimes within a given [CO2], seems to be mediated through its direct

  8. Non-linear mixing effects on mass-47 CO2 clumped isotope thermometry: Patterns and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defliese, William F; Lohmann, Kyger C

    2015-05-15

    Mass-47 CO(2) clumped isotope thermometry requires relatively large (~20 mg) samples of carbonate minerals due to detection limits and shot noise in gas source isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). However, it is unreasonable to assume that natural geologic materials are homogenous on the scale required for sampling. We show that sample heterogeneities can cause offsets from equilibrium Δ(47) values that are controlled solely by end member mixing and are independent of equilibrium temperatures. A numerical model was built to simulate and quantify the effects of end member mixing on Δ(47). The model was run in multiple possible configurations to produce a dataset of mixing effects. We verified that the model accurately simulated real phenomena by comparing two artificial laboratory mixtures measured using IRMS to model output. Mixing effects were found to be dependent on end member isotopic composition in δ(13)C and δ(18)O values, and independent of end member Δ(47) values. Both positive and negative offsets from equilibrium Δ(47) can occur, and the sign is dependent on the interaction between end member isotopic compositions. The overall magnitude of mixing offsets is controlled by the amount of variability within a sample; the larger the disparity between end member compositions, the larger the mixing offset. Samples varying by less than 2 ‰ in both δ(13)C and δ(18)O values have mixing offsets below current IRMS detection limits. We recommend the use of isotopic subsampling for δ(13)C and δ(18)O values to determine sample heterogeneity, and to evaluate any potential mixing effects in samples suspected of being heterogonous. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Preliminary Failure Modes, Effects and Criticality Analysis (FMECA) of the conceptual Brayton Isotope Power System (BIPS) Flight System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, L.G.

    1976-01-12

    A failure modes, effects and criticality analysis (FMECA) was made of the Brayton Isotope Power System Flight System (BIPS-FS) as presently conceived. The components analyzed include: Mini-BRU; Heat Source Assembly (HSA); Mini-Brayton Recuperator (MBR); Space Radiator; Ducts and Bellows, Insulation System; Controls; and Isotope Heat Source (IHS). (TFD)

  10. Effectiveness and equity of the Tanzania National Voucher Scheme for mosquito nets over 10 years of implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Karen; Mandike, Renata; Nathan, Rose; Mohamed, Ally; Lynch, Matthew; Brown, Nick; Mnzava, Ally; Rimisho, Wilhelmina; Lengeler, Christian

    2017-06-15

    The Tanzania National Voucher Scheme (TNVS) was a public private partnership managed by the Ministry of Health that provided pregnant women and infants with highly subsidized (long-lasting) insecticide-treated nets between 2004 and 2014. It was implemented in the context of the National Insecticide Treated Nets (NATNETS) Programme and was the main keep up strategy for vulnerable populations. The programme design was adjusted considerably over time to incorporate new evidence, shifting public health policies, and changing donor priorities. Three TNVS models can be distinguished: (1) the fixed discount; (2) the fixed top-up; (3) the hybrid voucher model. The changes improved equity and effectiveness, but also had a profound effect on how the programme was managed and implemented. The TNVS reached the majority of beneficiaries with vouchers, and significantly increased household ownership and use of LLINs. While two mass distribution campaigns implemented between 2009 and 2011 achieved universal coverage and equity, the TNVS ensured continuous protection of the vulnerable populations before, during and after the campaigns. The TNVS stimulated and maintained a large national retail network which managed the LLIN supply chain. The effectiveness of the TNVS was a function of several interdependent factors, including the supply chain of vouchers through the public health system; the supply chain of nets in the commercial sector; the demand for nets from voucher recipients; management and risk mitigation measures; and the influence of global and donor objectives. The TNVS was a highly innovative and globally influential programme, which stimulated the thinking around effectively and equitably distributing ITNs, and contributed directly to the evolution of global policy. It was a fundamental component of the NATNETS programme which protected a malaria-vulnerable population for over a decade.

  11. Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. II. Isotopic effects and wavelength dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berhanu, Tesfaye A.; Erbland, Joseph; Savarino, Joël [Laboratoire de Glaciologie et Géophysique de l’Environnement, CNRS, F-38041 Grenoble (France); Univ. Grenoble Alpes, LGGE, F-38041 Grenoble (France); Meusinger, Carl; Johnson, Matthew S. [Copenhagen Center for Atmospheric Research (CCAR), Department of Chemistry, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Jost, Rémy [Laboratoire de Interdisciplinaire de Physique (LIPHY) Univ. de Grenoble, Grenoble (France); Bhattacharya, S. K. [Research Center for Environmental Changes, Academia Sinica, Nangang, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China)

    2014-06-28

    Atmospheric nitrate is preserved in Antarctic snow firn and ice. However, at low snow accumulation sites, post-depositional processes induced by sunlight obscure its interpretation. The goal of these studies (see also Paper I by Meusinger et al. [“Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. I. Observed quantum yield, domain of photolysis, and secondary chemistry,” J. Chem. Phys. 140, 244305 (2014)]) is to characterize nitrate photochemistry and improve the interpretation of the nitrate ice core record. Naturally occurring stable isotopes in nitrate ({sup 15}N, {sup 17}O, and {sup 18}O) provide additional information concerning post-depositional processes. Here, we present results from studies of the wavelength-dependent isotope effects from photolysis of nitrate in a matrix of natural snow. Snow from Dome C, Antarctica was irradiated in selected wavelength regions using a Xe UV lamp and filters. The irradiated snow was sampled and analyzed for nitrate concentration and isotopic composition (δ{sup 15}N, δ{sup 18}O, and Δ{sup 17}O). From these measurements an average photolytic isotopic fractionation of {sup 15}ε = (−15 ± 1.2)‰ was found for broadband Xe lamp photolysis. These results are due in part to excitation of the intense absorption band of nitrate around 200 nm in addition to the weaker band centered at 305 nm followed by photodissociation. An experiment with a filter blocking wavelengths shorter than 320 nm, approximating the actinic flux spectrum at Dome C, yielded a photolytic isotopic fractionation of {sup 15}ε = (−47.9 ± 6.8)‰, in good agreement with fractionations determined by previous studies for the East Antarctic Plateau which range from −40 to −74.3‰. We describe a new semi-empirical zero point energy shift model used to derive the absorption cross sections of {sup 14}NO{sub 3}{sup −} and {sup 15}NO{sub 3}{sup −} in snow at a chosen temperature. The nitrogen isotopic fractionations obtained by applying

  12. The isotope mass effect on chlorine diffusion in dacite melt, with implications for fractionation during bubble growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, Marc-Antoine; Watson, E. Bruce; Stern, Richard

    2017-12-01

    Previous experimental studies have revealed that the difference in diffusivity of two isotopes can be significant in some media and can lead to an observable fractionation effect in silicate melts based on isotope mass. Here, we report the first characterization of the difference in diffusivities of stable isotopes of Cl (35Cl and 37Cl). Using a piston-cylinder apparatus, we generated quenched melts of dacitic composition enriched in Cl; from these we fabricated diffusion couples in which Cl atoms were induced to diffuse in a chemical gradient at 1200 to 1350 °C and 1 GPa. We analyzed the run products by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) for their isotopic compositions along the diffusion profiles, and we report a diffusivity ratio for 37Cl/35Cl of 0.995 ± 0.001 (β = 0.09 ± 0.02). No significant effect of temperature on the diffusivity ratio was discernable over the 150 °C range covered by our experiments. The observed 0.5% difference in diffusivity of the two isotopes could affect our interpretation of isotopic measurements of Cl isotopes in bubble-bearing or degassed magmas, because bubble growth is regulated in part by the diffusive supply of volatiles to the bubble from the surrounding melt. Through numerical simulations, we constrain the extent of Cl isotopic fractionation between bubble and host melt during this process. Bubble growth rates vary widely in nature-which implies a substantial range in the expected magnitude of isotopic fractionation-but plausible growth scenarios lead to Cl isotopic fractionations up to about 5‰ enrichment of 35Cl relative to 37Cl in the bubble. This effect should be considered when interpreting Cl isotopic measurements of systems that have experienced vapor exsolution.

  13. Effects of pyrethroid resistance on the cost effectiveness of a mass distribution of long-lasting insecticidal nets: a modelling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briët, Olivier J T; Penny, Melissa A; Hardy, Diggory; Awolola, Taiwo S; Van Bortel, Wim; Corbel, Vincent; Dabiré, Roch K; Etang, Josiane; Koudou, Benjamin G; Tungu, Patrick K; Chitnis, Nakul

    2013-02-25

    The effectiveness of insecticide-treated nets in preventing malaria is threatened by developing resistance against pyrethroids. Little is known about how strongly this affects the effectiveness of vector control programmes. Data from experimental hut studies on the effects of long-lasting, insecticidal nets (LLINs) on nine anopheline mosquito populations, with varying levels of mortality in World Health Organization susceptibility tests, were used to parameterize malaria models. Both simple static models predicting population-level insecticidal effectiveness and protection against blood feeding, and complex dynamic epidemiological models, where LLINs decayed over time, were used. The epidemiological models, implemented in OpenMalaria, were employed to study the impact of a single mass distribution of LLINs on malaria, both in terms of episodes prevented during the effective lifetime of the batch of LLINs, and in terms of net health benefits (NHB) expressed in disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) averted during that period, depending on net type (standard pyrethroid-only LLIN or pyrethroid-piperonyl butoxide combination LLIN), resistance status, coverage and pre-intervention transmission level. There were strong positive correlations between insecticide susceptibility status and predicted population level insecticidal effectiveness of and protection against blood feeding by LLIN intervention programmes. With the most resistant mosquito population, the LLIN mass distribution averted up to about 40% fewer episodes and DALYs during the effective lifetime of the batch than with fully susceptible populations. However, cost effectiveness of LLINs was more sensitive to the pre-intervention transmission level and coverage than to susceptibility status. For four out of the six Anopheles gambiae sensu lato populations where direct comparisons between standard LLINs and combination LLINs were possible, combination nets were more cost effective, despite being more expensive

  14. Evaluation of runaway-electron effects on plasma-facing components for NET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolt, H.; Calén, H.

    1991-03-01

    Runaway electrons which are generated during disruptions can cause serious damage to plasma facing components in a next generation device like NET. A study was performed to quantify the response of NET plasma facing components to runaway-electron impact. For the determination of the energy deposition in the component materials Monte Carlo computations were performed. Since the subsurface metal structures can be strongly heated under runaway-electron impact from the computed results damage threshold values for the thermal excursions were derived. These damage thresholds are strongly dependent on the materials selection and the component design. For a carbonmolybdenum divertor with 10 and 20 mm carbon armour thickness and 1 degree electron incidence the damage thresholds are 100 MJ/m 2 and 220 MJ/m 2. The thresholds for a carbon-copper divertor under the same conditions are about 50% lower. On the first wall damage is anticipated for energy depositions above 180 MJ/m 2.

  15. Deuterium isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts of negatively charged NH.N systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul Erik; Pietrzak, Mariusz; Grech, Eugeniusz

    2013-01-01

    ” and equilibrium cases. NMR assignments of the former have been revised. The NH proton is deuteriated. The isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts are rather unusual in these strongly hydrogen bonded systems between a NH and a negatively charged nitrogen atom. The formal four-bond effects are found to be negative......Deuterium isotope effects on 13C chemical shifts are investigated in anions of 1,8-bis(4-toluenesulphonamido)naphthalenes together with N,N-(naphthalene-1,8-diyl)bis(2,2,2-trifluoracetamide) all with bis(1,8-dimethylamino)napthaleneH+ as counter ion. These compounds represent both “static...... indicating transmission via the hydrogen bond. In addition, unusual long range effects are seen. Structures, 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts and changes in nuclear shieldings upon deuteriation are calculated using density functional theory methods...

  16. Effect of Ca content on equilibrium Ca isotope fractionation between orthopyroxene and clinopyroxene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenzhong; Zhou, Chen; Qin, Tian; Kang, Jin-Ting; Huang, Shichun; Wu, Zhongqing; Huang, Fang

    2017-12-01

    Concentration effect on equilibrium inter-mineral isotope fractionation is ubiquitous in solid solution systems, but it is not clear in which concentration range such effect is prominent. Using first-principles calculations, we examine the effect of Ca and Fe contents in orthopyroxene (opx) on its average Casbnd O bond length and the equilibrium Ca isotope fractionation factor (103lnα) between opx and clinopyroxene (cpx). Our results reveal that the average Casbnd O bond length in opx is much smaller than that in cpx and it does not change with variable Ca content x (x and y are mole ratios in CaxFeyMg1-x-ySiO3 thereafter here) when x ≤ 1/48. Incorporation of Fe (y ≥ 1/32) into opx with a fixed Ca content can only slightly increase the average Casbnd O bond length. 103lnαopx-cpx of 44Ca/40Ca is linearly correlated with the average Casbnd O bond length in opx, suggesting that 103lnαopx-cpx of 44Ca/40Ca is controlled by opx Casbnd O bond strength. Our calculations indicate that the Ca concentration effect on 103lnαopx-cpx is significant when x in opx ranges from 2/16 to 1/48, while Fe in natural opx only causes a slight decrease in 103lnαopx-cpx. Our results provide insights into Ca isotope fractionation in high-temperature geochemical processes. Given that Ca content x in opx from natural peridotites is usually lower than 1/32 and Fe content y is generally ∼10 mol%, Ca and Fe concentration effects on 103lnαopx-cpx in natural samples are negligible. Rather, 103lnαopx-cpx is mainly controlled by temperature. 103lnαopx-cpx of 44Ca/40Ca decreases from 0.50‰ to 0.26‰ when temperature increases from 1000 K to 1400 K if the Fe effect is taken into account. Therefore, if Ca isotope fractionation between opx and cpx (Δ44/40Caopx-cpx) in natural peridotites is greater than 0.50‰ or lower than 0.26‰, it may indicate disequilibrium of Ca isotopes. Finally, the large 103lnαopx-cpx relative to our current analytical precision suggests that Δ44/40Caopx

  17. The effect of twine thickness on the size selectivity and fishing power of Baltic cod gill nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, René; Wileman, D.; Madsen, Niels

    2002-01-01

    . Subsequently a model was fitted for the mean selectivity taking between-set variation into account. The selectivity Curve that fitted the data best was given by the sum of two normal distributions. It was found that twine thickness and trials period had relatively little effect upon the shape......Sea trials were carried out on a Danish commercial vessel measuring the size selectivity and fishing power of gill nets used to catch Baltic cod (Gadus morhua). A comparison was made of two different twine thicknesses at two different times of the year. Nominal mesh sizes of 70-130 mm were used....... Method of capture, condition factor and girths were measured for sub- samples of the cod caught. A model of the size selectivity of the gill nets was adapted to the experimental conditions where two gears were fished on the same population. This model was fitted to the catch data for each set...

  18. Effect of Different Carbon Substrates on Nitrate Stable Isotope Fractionation During Microbial Denitrification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wunderlich, Anja; Meckenstock, Rainer; Einsiedl, Florian

    2012-01-01

    In batch experiments, we studied the isotope fractionation in N and O of dissolved nitrate during dentrification. Denitrifying strains Thauera aromatica and “Aromatoleum aromaticum strain EbN1” were grown under strictly anaerobic conditions with acetate, benzoate, and toluene as carbon sources. 18O......-labeled water and 18O-labeled nitrite were added to the microcosm experiments to study the effect of putative backward reactions of nitrite to nitrate on the stable isotope fractionation. We found no evidence for a reverse reaction. Significant variations of the stable isotope enrichment factor ε were observed...... depending on the type of carbon source used. For toluene (ε15N, −18.1 ± 0.6‰ to −7.3 ± 1.4‰; ε18O, −16.5 ± 0.6‰ to −16.1 ± 1.5‰) and benzoate (ε15N, −18.9 ± 1.3‰; ε18O, −15.9 ± 1.1‰) less negative isotope enrichment factors were calculated compared to those derived from acetate (ε15N, −23.5 ± 1.9‰ to −22...

  19. Isotope exchange reactions on ceramic breeder materials and their effect on tritium inventory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishikawa, M.; Baba, A. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Kawamura, Y.; Nishi, M.

    1998-03-01

    Though lithium ceramic materials such as Li{sub 2}O, LiAlO{sub 2}, Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}, Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} and Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} are considered as breeding materials in the blanket of a D-T fusion reactor, the release behavior of the bred tritium in these solid breeder materials has not been fully understood. The isotope exchange reaction rate between hydrogen isotopes in the purge gas and tritium on the surface of breeding materials have not been quantified yet, although helium gas with hydrogen or deuterium is planned to be used as the blanket purge gas in the recent blanket designs. The mass transfer coefficient representing the isotope exchange reaction between H{sub 2} and D{sub 2}O or that between D{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O in the ceramic breeding materials bed is experimentally obtained in this study. Effects of isotope exchange reactions on the tritium inventory in the bleeding blanket is discussed based on data obtained in this study where effects of diffusion of tritium in the grain, absorption of water in the bulk of grain, and adsorption of water on the surface of grain, together with two types of isotope exchange reactions are considered. The way to estimate the tritium inventory in a Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} blanket used in this study shows a good agreement with data obtained in such in-situ experiments as MOZART, EXOTIC-5, 6 and TRINE experiments. (author)

  20. Effect of light on N2 fixation and net nitrogen release of Trichodesmium in a field study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yangyang; Wen, Zuozhu; Shi, Dalin; Chen, Mingming; Zhang, Yao; Bonnet, Sophie; Li, Yuhang; Tian, Jiwei; Kao, Shuh-Ji

    2018-01-01

    Dinitrogen fixation (NF) by marine cyanobacteria is an important pathway to replenish the oceanic bioavailable nitrogen inventory. Light is the key to modulating NF; however, field studies investigating the light response curve (NF-I curve) of NF rate and the effect of light on diazotroph-derived nitrogen (DDN) net release are relatively sparse in the literature, hampering prediction using models. A dissolution method was applied using uncontaminated 15N2 gas to examine how the light changes may influence the NF intensity and DDN net release in the oligotrophic ocean. Experiments were conducted at stations with diazotrophs dominated by filamentous cyanobacterium Trichodesmium spp. in the western Pacific and the South China Sea. The effect of light on carbon fixation (CF) was measured in parallel using the 13C tracer method specifically for a station characterized by Trichodesmium bloom. Both NF-I and CF-I curves showed a Ik (light saturation coefficient) range of 193 to 315 µE m-2 s-1, with light saturation at around 400 µE m-2 s-1. The proportion of DDN net release ranged from ˜ 6 to ˜ 50 %, suggesting an increasing trend as the light intensity decreased. At the Trichodesmium bloom station, we found that the CF / NF ratio was light-dependent and the ratio started to increase as light was lower than the carbon compensation point of 200 µE m-2 s-1. Under low-light stress, Trichodesmium physiologically preferred to allocate more energy for CF to alleviate the intensive carbon consumption by respiration; thus, there is a metabolism tradeoff between CF and NF pathways. Results showed that short-term ( < 24 h) light change modulates the physiological state, which subsequently determined the C / N metabolism and DDN net release by Trichodesmium. Reallocation of energy associated with the variation in light intensity would be helpful for prediction of the global biogeochemical cycle of N by models involving Trichodesmium blooms.

  1. Effects of Brine Salinity on Clumped Isotopes and Implications for Applications to Carbonate Diagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluge, T.; John, C. M.; Jourdan, A.

    2012-12-01

    Carbonate clumped isotope thermometry relies on the overabundance of 13C-18O bonds in the crystal lattice compared to a stochastic distribution and was calibrated in laboratory experiments using carbonates precipitated from (mainly) de-ionized water that was supersaturated with calcium carbonate (Ghosh et al., 2006). However, the clumped isotope method has also been applied to carbonates that precipitated in the marine and subsurface environments from fluids with significant salt concentrations. These saline fluids differ markedly from the solution used for laboratory calibration. Variations in the electro-chemical potential due to changes in the ion composition and concentration of the solution could influence the physical properties of the clumped isotope bonding and lead to deviations from the commonly used temperature calibration. Consequently, calibrations at high salinities and high temperatures are needed to confidently extend the application of clumped isotopes to diagenetic processes. We investigated the effect of salinity on clumping by precipitating carbonates (mainly calcite) in the laboratory between 23 and 90 °C using a setup analogous to the experiments of Ghosh et al. (2006). A first subset of experiments was performed at low salinities, while during a second subset of experiments we saturated the solution with NaCl (about 35 g/100 ml) in order to mimic a highly saline brine. Since the same experimental procedures were used for both sub-sets (same temperatures of precipitation and rates of nitrogen gas bubbling), we can directly compare clumped isotope values in highly saline versus low-salinity solutions. The initial clumped isotope results obtained from the brine solution agree within uncertainty with results from carbonates precipitated from a NaCl-free solution at the same temperatures. This suggests that clumped isotopes can be applied to carbonates precipitated under highly saline conditions. We acknowledge the financial support of QCCSRC

  2. Thermal decomposition of energetic materials. 2. Deuterium isotope effects and isotopic scrambling in condensed-phase decomposition of octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrens, R.; Bulusu, S.

    1993-02-01

    The products formed in the thermal decomposition of octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) have been traced to using mixtures of different isotopically labeled analogues of HMX. The isotopic analogues of HMX used in the experiments include 2H, 13C, 15NO2, 15N sub ring, and 18O. The fraction of isotopic scrambling and the extent of the deuterium kinetic isotope effect (DKIE) are reported for the different thermal decomposition products. Isotopic scrambling is not observed for the N-N bond in N2O and the C-H bonds in CH2O. Only one of the C-N bonds in N-methylformamide (NMFA) undergoes isotopic scrambling. The lack of complete isotopic scrambling of the N-NO bond in 1-nitroso-3,5,7-trinitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (ONTNTA) is shown to imply that some HMX decomposition occurs in the lattice. The behavior of the DKIE in different mixtures of isotopic analogues of HMX suggests that water probably acts as a catalyst in the decomposition. The results demonstrate that decomposition of HMX in the condensed phase has several reaction branches.... DKIE, Isotope effect, Isotopic scrambling, HMX, NMFA, ONTNTA, Thermal decomposition.

  3. Temperature dependence of the kinetic isotope effect in β-pinene ozonolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gensch, Iulia; Laumer, Werner; Stein, Olaf; Kammer, Beatrix; Hohaus, Thorsten; Saathoff, Harald; Wegener, Robert; Wahner, Andreas; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid

    2011-10-01

    The temperature dependence of the kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of β-pinene ozonolysis was investigated experimentally at 258, 273 and 303 K in the AIDA atmospheric simulation chamber. Compound specific carbon isotopic analysis of gas phase samples was performed off-line with a Thermo Desorption-Gas Chromatography-Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (TD-GC-IRMS) system. From the temporal behavior of the δ13C of β-pinene a KIE of 1.00358 ± 0.00013 was derived at 303 K, in agreement with literature data. Furthermore, KIE values of 1.00380 ± 0.00014 at 273 K and 1.00539 ± 0.00012 at 258 K were determined, showing an increasing KIE with decreasing temperature. A parameterization of the observed KIE temperature dependence was deduced and used in a sensitivity study carried out with the global chemistry transport model MOZART-3. Two scenarios were compared, the first neglecting, the second implementing the KIE temperature dependence in the simulations. β-Pinene stable carbon isotope ratio and concentration were computed, with emphasis on boreal zones. For early spring it is shown that when neglecting the temperature dependence of KIE, the calculated average age of β-pinene in the atmosphere can be up to two times over- or underestimated. The evolution of the isotopic composition of the major β-pinene oxidation product, nopinone, was examined using Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM) simulations. The tested hypothesis that formation of nopinone and its associated KIE are the determining factors for the observed δ13C values of nopinone is supported at high β-pinene conversion levels.

  4. The effect of bonding environment on iron isotope fractionation between minerals at high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sossi, Paolo A.; O'Neill, Hugh St. C.

    2017-01-01

    Central to understanding the processes that drive stable isotope fractionation in nature is their quantification under controlled experimental conditions. The polyvalent element iron, given its abundance in terrestrial rocks, exerts controls on the structural and chemical properties of minerals and melts. The iron isotope compositions of typical high temperature minerals are, however, poorly constrained and their dependence on intensive (e.g. fO2) and extensive (e.g. compositional) variables is unknown. In this work, experiments involving a reference phase, 2 M FeCl2·4H2O(l), together with an oxide mix corresponding to the bulk composition of the chosen mineral were performed in a piston cylinder in Ag capsules. The oxide mix crystallised in situ at 1073 K and 1 GPa, in equilibrium with the iron chloride, and was held for 72 h. In order to characterise the effect of co-ordination and oxidation state on the isotope composition independently, exclusively Fe2+ minerals were substituted in: VIII-fold almandine, VI-fold ilmenite, fayalite and IV-fold chromite and hercynite. Δ57FeMin-FeCl2 increases in the order VIII iron being the smaller, ferric ion. The composition of the VIFe2+-bearing minerals is similar to that of the aqueous FeCl2 fluid. To the degree that this represents the speciation of iron in fluids exsolving from magmas, the fractionation between them should be small, unless the iron is hosted in magnetite. By contrast, predominantly Fe2+-bearing mantle garnets should preserve a much lighter δ57Fe than their lower pressure spinel counterparts, a signature that may be reflected in partial melts from these lithologies. As the Fe-O bond lengths in fayalite and ilmenite are comparable, their isotope compositions overlap, suggesting that high Ti mare basalts acquired their heavy isotopic signature from ilmenite that crystallised late during lunar magma ocean solidification.

  5. Effects of light, temperature and canopy position on net photosynthesis and isoprene emission from sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harley, P.; Guenther, A.; Zimmerman, P.

    1996-01-01

    In June 1993, net photosynthetic rates, stomatal conductance and isoprene emission rates of sweetgum leaves (Liquidambar styraciflua L.) were measured at the top of the forest canopy (sun leaves) and within the canopy at a height of 8-10 m above ground level (shade leaves). Large differences in net photosynthetic rates and stomatal conductance were found between sun and shade leaves. Mean rates of isoprene emission, expressed on a leaf area basis, were significantly lower in shade leaves than in sun leaves (4.1 versus 17.1 nmol m(-2) s(-1)); however, because specific leaf area of sun leaves was lower than that of shade leaves (0.0121 versus 0.0334 m(2) g(-1)), the difference between sun and shade leaves was less, though still significant, when isoprene emissions were expressed on a dry mass basis (45.5 versus 29.0 micro g C g(-1) h(-1)). Saturation of both net photosynthesis and isoprene emission occurred at lower PPFDs in shade leaves than in sun leaves. The effect of leaf temperature on isoprene emissions also differed between sun and shade leaves. Sun leaves lost a significantly greater percentage of fixed carbon as isoprene than shade leaves. The leaf-level physiological measurements were used to derive parameters for a canopy-level isoprene flux model. The importance of incorporating differences between sun- and shade-leaf properties into existing models is discussed.

  6. [Effects of lead stress on net photosynthetic rate, SPAD value and ginsenoside production in Ginseng (Panax ginseng)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yao; Jiang, Xiao-Li; Yang, Fen-Tuan; Cao, Qing-Jun; Li, Gang

    2014-08-01

    The paper aimed to evaluate the effects of lead stress on photosynthetic performance and ginsenoside content in ginseng (Panax ginseng). To accomplish this, three years old ginseng were cultivated in pot and in phytotron with different concentrations of lead, ranging from 0 to 1000 mg x kg(-1) soil for a whole growth period (about 150 days). The photosynthetic parameters in leaves and ginsenoside content in roots of ginseng were determined in green fruit stage and before withering stage, respectively. In comparison with the control, net photosynthetic rate and SPAD value in ginseng leaves cultivated with 100 and 250 mg x kg(-1) of lead changed insignificantly, however, ginseng supplied with 500 and 1 000 mg x kg(-1) of lead showed a noticeably decline in the net rate of photosynthesis and SPAD value (P lead, with decline of 57.8%,11.0%, respectively. Total content of ginsenoside in ginseng roots cultivated with 100 mg x kg(-1) of lead showed insignificantly change compared to the control, but the content increased remarkably in treatments supplied with 250, 500, 1 000 mg x kg(-1) of lead (P lead. The net photosynthetic rate and SPAD value in leaves of ginseng both showed significantly negative linear correlations with lead stress level (P lead concentration was also observed (P lead negatively affects photosynthetic performance in ginseng leaves, but benefits for accumulation of secondary metabolism (total content of ginsenoside) in ginseng root.

  7. Effects of preservatives on stable isotope analyses of four marine species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carabel, Sirka; Verísimo, Patricia; Freire, Juan

    2009-04-01

    The aim of the present study is to quantify the effect of formalin-ethanol preservation on the carbon and nitrogen stable isotope signatures of four taxonomical groups of marine species ( Himanthalia elongata, Anemonia sulcata, Mytilus galloprovincialis and Patella vulgata). To examine temporal changes in the effects of preservation and to determine if preservation induced predictable shifts in δ13C and δ15N signatures, repeated analyses were carried out after 6, 12 and 24 months of preservation. Data from our study showed highly variable effects of the formalin-ethanol preservation on carbon and nitrogen isotope signatures between species. The use of a general correction factor was not possible, or else it should be species-specific. Differences in nitrogen isotopic values between preserved and unpreserved samples were minor compared to the assumed enrichment between trophic levels. The combined use of data from preserved and unpreserved samples could lead to biases in the estimation of the trophic level of organisms. Changes that preservatives caused in carbon values were variable between species and not always small enough to be ignored. So the use of data from preserved samples could change the interpretation of the mixing models used to determine the importance of multiple sources of carbon. In order to elucidate the effects that preservatives have in other species, further studies will be necessary.

  8. Effect of netting direction and number of meshes around on size selection in the codend for Baltic cod (Gadus morhua)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wienbeck, Harald; Herrmann, Bent; Moderhak, Waldemar

    2011-01-01

    We investigated experimentally the effect that turning the netting direction 90° (T90) and halving the number of meshes around in the circumference in a diamond mesh codend had on size selection of Baltic cod. The results generally agreed with predictions of a previous simulation-based study. Both...... modifications had a significant positive effect on the size selection of cod. The best selection results were obtained for a codend in which both factors were applied together. For that codend, very little between-haul variation in cod size selection was detected, especially compared to the reference codend...

  9. High-precision measurement of isotope effects on noncovalent host-guest interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugridge, Jeffrey S; Bergman, Robert G; Raymond, Kenneth N

    2010-02-03

    The self-assembled supramolecular host [Ga(4)L(6)](12-) can bind cationic guest molecules to both the interior and exterior of the host assembly through noncovalent interactions. Very small equilibrium isotope effects (EIEs) have been precisely measured for the association of benzyltrimethylphosphonium isotopologues to the host exterior surface by adapting an NMR titration method originally developed by the Perrin group for measuring isotope effects on acidity constants. Deuteration of the phosphonium methyl groups was found to have a larger EIE than deuteration at the ring and benzyl positions, suggesting subtle differences in the noncovalent interactions between the host exterior and different guest C-H/D bonds. The application of this method to the measurement of EIEs on noncovalent host-guest interactions demonstrates the generality of this NMR technique in precisely measuring relative equilibrium constants.

  10. NETS FOR PEACH PROTECTED CULTIVATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelia Schettini

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to investigate the radiometric properties of coloured nets used to protect a peach cultivation. The modifications of the solar spectral distribution, mainly in the R and FR wavelength band, influence plant photomorphogenesis by means of the phytochrome and cryptochrome. The phytochrome response is characterized in terms of radiation rate in the red wavelengths (R, 600-700 nm to that in the farred radiation (FR, 700-800 nm, i.e. the R/FR ratio. The effects of the blue radiation (B, 400-500 nm is investigated by the ratio between the blue radiation and the far-red radiation, i.e. the B/FR ratio. A BLUE net, a RED net, a YELLOW net, a PEARL net, a GREY net and a NEUTRAL net were tested in Bari (Italy, latitude 41° 05’ N. Peach trees were located in pots inside the greenhouses and in open field. The growth of the trees cultivated in open field was lower in comparison to the growth of the trees grown under the nets. The RED, PEARL, YELLOW and GREY nets increased the growth of the trees more than the other nets. The nets positively influenced the fruit characteristics, such as fruit weight and flesh firmness.

  11. Mechanism of Nitrogenase H 2 Formation by Metal-Hydride Protonation Probed by Mediated Electrocatalysis and H/D Isotope Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khadka, Nimesh [Department of Chemistry; Milton, Ross D. [Department of Chemistry, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112, United States; Shaw, Sudipta [Department of Chemistry; Lukoyanov, Dmitriy [Department; Dean, Dennis R. [Department of Biochemistry, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061, United States; Minteer, Shelley D. [Department of Chemistry, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112, United States; Raugei, Simone [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352, United States; Hoffman, Brian M. [Department; Seefeldt, Lance C. [Department of Chemistry

    2017-09-15

    Nitrogenase catalyzes the reduction of dinitrogen (N2) to ammonia (NH3) with obligatory reduction of protons (H+) to dihydrogen (H2) through a mechanism involving reductive elimination of two [Fe-H-Fe] bridging hydrides at its active site FeMo-cofactor. The overall rate-limiting step is associated with ATP-driven electron delivery from Fe protein, precluding isotope effect measurements on substrate reduction steps. Here, we use mediated bioelectrocatalysis to drive electron delivery to MoFe protein without Fe protein and ATP hydrolysis, thereby eliminating the normal rate-limiting step. The ratio of catalytic current in mixtures of H2O and D2O, the proton inventory, changes linearly with the D2O/H2O ratio, revealing that a single H/D is involved in the rate limiting step. Kinetic models, along with measurements that vary the electron/proton delivery rate and use different substrates, reveal that the rate-limiting step under these conditions is the H2 formation reaction. Altering the chemical environment around the active site FeMo-cofactor in the MoFe protein either by substituting nearby amino acids or transferring the isolated FeMo-cofactor into a different peptide matrix, changes the net isotope effect, but the proton inventory plot remains linear, consistent with an unchanging rate-limiting step. Density functional theory predicts a transition state for H2 formation where the proton from S-H+ moves to the hydride in Fe-H-, predicting the number and magnitude of the observed H/D isotope effect. This study not only reveals the mechanism of H2 formation, but also illustrates a strategy for mechanistic study that can be applied to other enzymes and to biomimetic complexes.

  12. SkyNet: Modular nuclear reaction network library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippuner, Jonas; Roberts, Luke F.

    2017-10-01

    The general-purpose nuclear reaction network SkyNet evolves the abundances of nuclear species under the influence of nuclear reactions. SkyNet can be used to compute the nucleosynthesis evolution in all astrophysical scenarios where nucleosynthesis occurs. Any list of isotopes can be evolved and SkyNet supports various different types of nuclear reactions. SkyNet is modular, permitting new or existing physics, such as nuclear reactions or equations of state, to be easily added or modified.

  13. Isotopic Effects on Stereodynamics of the C+ + H2 → CH+ + H Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lu; Yang, Yun-Fan; Fan, Xiao-Xing; Ma, Feng-Cai; Li, Yong-Qing

    2017-05-01

    The effects of isotope substitution on stereodynamic properties for the reactions {C}++{H}2/{H D}/{H T}\\to {{C H}}++H/D/T have been studied applying a quasi classical trajectory method occurring on the new ground state {{C H}}2+ potential energy surface [J. Chem. Phys. 142 (2015) 124302]. In the center of mass coordinates applying the quasi classical trajectory method to investigate the orientation and the alignment of the product molecule. Differential cross section and three angle distribution functions P(θr), P(ϕr), P( {θ }r,{φ }r ) on the potential energy surface that fixed the collision energy with a value is 40 kcal/mol have been studied. The isotope effect becomes more and more important with the reagent molecules H 2 changing into HD and HT. P({θ }r,{φ }r) as the joint probability density function of both polar angles θ r and ϕ r , which can illustrate more detailed dynamics information. The isotope effect is obvious influence on the properties of stereodynamics in the reactions of {C}++{H}2/{H D}/{H T}\\to {{C H}}++H/D/T. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11474141, 11274149, 11544015, the Program for Liaoning Excellent Talents in University under Grant No. LJQ2015040, and the Scientific Research Foundation for the Returned Overseas Chinese Scholars, State Education Ministry (2014-1685)

  14. Mg isotopes in biocarbonates: new insight into vital effects associated to echinoderms and bivalves calcification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planchon, F.; Hermans, J.; Borremans, C.; Dubois, P.; Poulain, C.; Paulet, Y.; Andre, L.

    2007-12-01

    Mg isotopes can be helpful tracers to reveal the fundamental pathways of Mg incorporation during biomineralisation. We report in this study a detailed characterisation of the Mg isotopic signatures of different biominerals: high magnesium calcitic skeletons of selected echinoderms (sea urchins and starfish) and low magnesium aragonitic shells of a bivalve species (clam). State of the art analytical procedures were applied including sample purification step followed by high precision measurements using MC-ICP-MS (Nu instrument) in dry plasma conditions. 26Mg/24Mg and 25Mg/24Mg are expressed as per mil deviations from the DSM3 (Dead Sea Metal 3) reference standard in delta notation (d26Mg and d25Mg). For echinoderms, we considered: (a) adult specimens of six starfish species (Asteria r., Marthasterias g., Anseropoda p., Asterina g., Echinaster s. and Henricia o.), sampled in Brittany (France); (b) a sea urchin species (Paracentrotus lividus) with field samples (Mediterranean Sea, Marseille, France) and culture specimen under T and S controlled conditions. In vivo endoskeletons display negative, but different d26Mg values of -3.06 for starfish (with uniform interspecies signatures) and -2.65 for sea urchin. Relative to seawater signature (-0.82), all echinoderms favour the incorporation of light isotopes during biocalcification. The d26Mg depletion is lower than theoretically expected from a inorganic calcite precipitation from seawater (at -3.5). These differences suggest that on its route from seawater to the shell, Mg isotopes are partly biologically fractionationated through "vital effects" leaving heavier Mg isotopic signatures. Taken into account that calcification in echinoderms is an intra- cellular process involving transient amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) phase, the observed bio-fractionation factors can be related to: (1) changes in the isotopic composition of the precipitating intracellular fluids due to active pumping in and out of the cell; (2) a

  15. [Effects of environmental factors on catch variation of main species of stow net fisheries in East China Sea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Sufang; Fan, Wei; Cui, Xuesen; Cheng, Yanhong

    2004-09-01

    Stow net fishery is one of the important fishing methods in the East China Sea. This paper used the generalized additive models (GAMs) to quantitatively describe the relationships between stow net catch and environmental factors (sea surface temperature SST, water depth, fishing position and tide) in the East China Sea. The results indicated that each factor had its own nonlinear effect on the catch per unit effort (CPUE) of haitail (Trichiurus japonicus), small yellow croaker (Larimichthys polyactis) and butter fish (Pampus spp.), and SST and water depth were the key factors. The GAMs' fitting results showed that SST had the strongest effect on the catch per unit effort of haitail, and water depth had the second one. The effects of fishing location and tide were very small. Water depth was the most influential variable when adjusted for the effects on small yellow croaker. SST, fishing location and tide had similar effects. Meanwhile, water depth and SST were the key factors affecting the catch per unit effort of butter fish. They had similar intensity.

  16. H/D isotope effects on femtosecond electron reactivity in aqueous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauduel, Y.; Pommeret, S.; Migus, A.; Antonetti, A. (Ecole Polytechnique-ENS Techniques Avancees, Palaiseau (France))

    1991-01-24

    The effects of isotope substitution on the primary steps of electron reactivity in aqueous media have been investigated by using femtosecond near-infrared and visible spectroscopy. In neat deuterated water, a precursor of the hydrated electron has been identified. For both H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O, this localized state (e{sub prehyd}{sup {minus}}) which absorbs in the infrared is distinct from the fully hydrated state (e{sub hyd}{sup {minus}}). In neat D{sub 2}O the dynamics of electron localization is slightly slower (9%) than in H{sub 2}O; however, the lifetime of this transient electronic state (250 fs) remains similar to the analogue in light water. The absence of an H/D isotope effect on the electron hydration dynamics is confirmed in ionic aqueous media and in organized assemblies by using an anionic species (chloride ion) and a chromophore (phenothiazine), respectively, as the electron donor. In pure aqueous solutions, the changes due to isotope substitution are mainly observed during the early electron-radical pair recombination (e{sub hyd}{sup {minus}} + X{sub 3}O{sub +}, e{sub hyd}{sup {minus}} + OX with X = H or D). The percentage of hydrated electrons involved in the fast recombination is increased in D{sub 2}O. This moderate H/D isotope effect can be linked to a change in the initial spatial distribution of the electron and prototropic radicals. The analysis of the femtosecond kinetics provides evidence that the primary electron-radical pairs (e{sub hyd}{sup {minus}}{hor ellipsis}X{sub 3}O{sup +}, e{sub hyd}{sup {minus}}{hor ellipsis}OX) execute a one-dimensional (1D) walk before undergoing recombination.

  17. CO2 laser tritium isotope separation: Collisional effects in multiphoton dissociation of trifluoromethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Kazuo; Inoue, Ichiro; Nakane, Ryohei; Makide, Yoshihiro; Kato, Shuji; Tominaga, Takeshi

    1982-01-01

    Multiphoton dissociation of ppm level CTF3 in CHF3 is reported. The effect of buffer gas pressure on the specific dissociation rates and the isotopic selectivity is investigated. Pulse energy dependence of the dissociation rates is converted to the intrinsic relation between the fractional conversion per pulse and the fluence by means of the new deconvolution technique. By addition of 100 Torr argon, the critical fluence of CTF3 was decreased from 136 to 34 J/cm2, while the intrinsic selectivity was increased from 34 to 580. In the absence of buffer gas argon, the fractional conversion per pulse exhibits two different pressure dependences. Unlike in the case below 15 Torr, the system shows strong pressure dependence and loss of the isotopic selectivity above 15 Torr. Possible application to the tritium removal process is also discussed.

  18. Lattice Boltzmann Simulation of Kinetic Isotope Effect During Snow Crystal Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, G.; Depaolo, D. J.; Kang, Q.; Zhang, D.

    2007-12-01

    and allows us to scale the numerical calculations to atmospheric conditions. Our calculations confirm that the crystal/vapor isotopic fractionation approaches the equilibrium value, and the crystals are compact (circular in 2D) as the saturation factor approaches unity (S= 1.0). However, few natural crystals form under such conditions. At higher oversaturation (e.g. S = 1.2), dendritic crystals of millimeter size develop on timescales appropriate to cloud processes, and kinetic effects control isotopic fractionation. Fractionation factors for dendritic crystals are similar to those predicted by the spherical diffusion model, but the model also gives estimates of crystal heterogeneity. Dendritic crystals are constrained to be relatively large, with dimension much greater than about 20D/k. The most difficult aspect of the modeling is to account for the large density difference between air and ice, which requires us to use a fictitious higher density for the vapor-oversaturated air and scale the crystal growth time accordingly. An approach using a larger scale simulation and the domain decomposition method can provide a vapor flux for a nested smaller scale calculation. The results clarify the controls on crystal growth, and the relationships between saturation state, growth rate, crystal morphology and isotopic fractionation.

  19. EFFECT OF ELECTROLYZER CONFIGURATION AND PERFORMANCE ON HYBRID SULFUR PROCESS NET THERMAL EFFICIENCY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorensek, M

    2007-03-16

    Hybrid Sulfur cycle is gaining popularity as a possible means for massive production of hydrogen from nuclear energy. Several different ways of carrying out the SO{sub 2}-depolarized electrolysis step are being pursued by a number of researchers. These alternatives are evaluated with complete flowsheet simulations and on a common design basis using Aspen Plus{trademark}. Sensitivity analyses are performed to assess the performance potential of each configuration, and the flowsheets are optimized for energy recovery. Net thermal efficiencies are calculated for the best set of operating conditions for each flowsheet and the results compared. This will help focus attention on the most promising electrolysis alternatives. The sensitivity analyses should also help identify those features that offer the greatest potential for improvement.

  20. Ab initio calculation of the Zn isotope effect in phosphates, citrates, and malates and applications to plants and soil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Fujii

    Full Text Available Stable Zn isotopes are fractionated in roots and leaves of plants. Analyses demonstrate that the heavy Zn isotopes are enriched in the root system of plants with respect to shoots and leaves as well as the host soil, but the fractionation mechanisms remain unclear. Here we show that the origin of this isotope fractionation is due to a chemical isotope effect upon complexation by Zn malates and citrates in the aerial parts and by phosphates in the roots. We calculated the Zn isotope effect in aqueous citrates, malates, and phosphates by ab initio methods. For pH<5, the Zn isotopic compositions of the various parts of the plants are expected to be similar to those of groundwater. In the neutral to alkaline region, the calculations correctly predict that (66Zn is enriched over (64Zn in roots, which concentrate phosphates, with respect to leaves, which concentrate malates and citrates, by about one permil. It is proposed that Zn isotope fractionation represents a useful tracer of Zn availability and mobility in soils.

  1. Diffusion related isotopic fractionation effects with one-dimensional advective–dispersive transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Bruce S. [Civil Engineering Department, University of Toronto, 35 St George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 1A4 (Canada); Lollar, Barbara Sherwood [Earth Sciences Department, University of Toronto, 22 Russell Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3B1 (Canada); Passeport, Elodie [Civil Engineering Department, University of Toronto, 35 St George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 1A4 (Canada); Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry Department, University of Toronto, 200 College Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3E5 (Canada); Sleep, Brent E., E-mail: sleep@ecf.utoronto.ca [Civil Engineering Department, University of Toronto, 35 St George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 1A4 (Canada)

    2016-04-15

    Aqueous phase diffusion-related isotope fractionation (DRIF) for carbon isotopes was investigated for common groundwater contaminants in systems in which transport could be considered to be one-dimensional. This paper focuses not only on theoretically observable DRIF effects in these systems but introduces the important concept of constraining “observable” DRIF based on constraints imposed by the scale of measurements in the field, and on standard limits of detection and analytical uncertainty. Specifically, constraints for the detection of DRIF were determined in terms of the diffusive fractionation factor, the initial concentration of contaminants (C{sub 0}), the method detection limit (MDL) for isotopic analysis, the transport time, and the ratio of the longitudinal mechanical dispersion coefficient to effective molecular diffusion coefficient (D{sub mech}/D{sub eff}). The results allow a determination of field conditions under which DRIF may be an important factor in the use of stable carbon isotope measurements for evaluation of contaminant transport and transformation for one-dimensional advective–dispersive transport. This study demonstrates that for diffusion-dominated transport of BTEX, MTBE, and chlorinated ethenes, DRIF effects are only detectable for the smaller molar mass compounds such as vinyl chloride for C{sub 0}/MDL ratios of 50 or higher. Much larger C{sub 0}/MDL ratios, corresponding to higher source concentrations or lower detection limits, are necessary for DRIF to be detectable for the higher molar mass compounds. The distance over which DRIF is observable for VC is small (less than 1 m) for a relatively young diffusive plume (< 100 years), and DRIF will not easily be detected by using the conventional sampling approach with “typical” well spacing (at least several meters). With contaminant transport by advection, mechanical dispersion, and molecular diffusion this study suggests that in field sites where D{sub mech}/D{sub eff} is

  2. Stable Isotope Signatures of Middle Palaeozoic Ahermatypic Rugose Corals - Deciphering Secondary Alteration, Vital Fractionation Effects, and Palaeoecological Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubowicz, Michal; Berkowski, Blazej; López Correa, Matthias; Jarochowska, Emilia; Joachimski, Michael; Belka, Zdzislaw

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates stable isotope signatures of five species of Silurian and Devonian deep-water, ahermatypic rugose corals, providing new insights into isotopic fractionation effects exhibited by Palaeozoic rugosans, and possible role of diagenetic processes in modifying their original isotopic signals. To minimize the influence of intraskeletal cements on the observed signatures, the analysed specimens included unusual species either devoid of large intraskeletal open spaces ('button corals': Microcyclus, Palaeocyclus), or typified by particularly thick corallite walls (Calceola). The corals were collected at four localities in the Holy Cross Mountains (Poland), Mader Basin (Morocco) and on Gotland (Sweden), representing distinct diagenetic histories and different styles of diagenetic alteration. To evaluate the resistance of the corallites to diagenesis, we applied various microscopic and trace element preservation tests. Distinct differences between isotopic compositions of the least-altered and most-altered skeleton portions emphasise a critical role of material selection for geochemical studies of Palaeozoic corals. The least-altered parts of the specimens show marine or near-marine stable isotope signals and lack positive correlation between δ13C and δ18O. In terms of isotopic fractionation mechanisms, Palaeozoic rugosans must have differed considerably from modern deep-water scleractinians, typified by significant depletion in both 18O and 13C, and pronounced δ13C-δ18O co-variance. The fractionation effects exhibited by rugosans seem similar rather to the minor isotopic effects typical of modern non-scleractinian corals (octocorals and hydrocorals). The results of the present study add to growing evidence for significant differences between Scleractinia and Rugosa, and agree with recent studies indicating that calcification mechanisms developed independently in these two groups of cnidarians. Consequently, particular caution is needed in using

  3. Stable Isotope Signatures of Middle Palaeozoic Ahermatypic Rugose Corals – Deciphering Secondary Alteration, Vital Fractionation Effects, and Palaeoecological Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubowicz, Michal; Berkowski, Blazej; López Correa, Matthias; Jarochowska, Emilia; Joachimski, Michael; Belka, Zdzislaw

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates stable isotope signatures of five species of Silurian and Devonian deep-water, ahermatypic rugose corals, providing new insights into isotopic fractionation effects exhibited by Palaeozoic rugosans, and possible role of diagenetic processes in modifying their original isotopic signals. To minimize the influence of intraskeletal cements on the observed signatures, the analysed specimens included unusual species either devoid of large intraskeletal open spaces ('button corals': Microcyclus, Palaeocyclus), or typified by particularly thick corallite walls (Calceola). The corals were collected at four localities in the Holy Cross Mountains (Poland), Mader Basin (Morocco) and on Gotland (Sweden), representing distinct diagenetic histories and different styles of diagenetic alteration. To evaluate the resistance of the corallites to diagenesis, we applied various microscopic and trace element preservation tests. Distinct differences between isotopic compositions of the least-altered and most-altered skeleton portions emphasise a critical role of material selection for geochemical studies of Palaeozoic corals. The least-altered parts of the specimens show marine or near-marine stable isotope signals and lack positive correlation between δ13C and δ18O. In terms of isotopic fractionation mechanisms, Palaeozoic rugosans must have differed considerably from modern deep-water scleractinians, typified by significant depletion in both 18O and 13C, and pronounced δ13C-δ18O co-variance. The fractionation effects exhibited by rugosans seem similar rather to the minor isotopic effects typical of modern non-scleractinian corals (octocorals and hydrocorals). The results of the present study add to growing evidence for significant differences between Scleractinia and Rugosa, and agree with recent studies indicating that calcification mechanisms developed independently in these two groups of cnidarians. Consequently, particular caution is needed in using

  4. Evaluating cleansing effects on trace elements and stable isotope values in feathers of oiled birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valladares, Sonia; Moreno, Roćio; Jover, Lluis; Sanpera, Carola

    2010-01-01

    Feathers of seabirds are widely used as a nondestructive tissue for pollution monitoring of trace elements, as well as convenient samples for trophic ecology studies by means of stable isotope analysis (SIA). Nevertheless, feathers can be occasionally impregnated with oil from deliberate ship discharges and from massive oil spill accidents. The feather structure makes them effective traps for particles and are subject to external contamination. It is unknown to what extent the oil adhered to feathers can change trace element concentrations or stable isotope signatures. This study has two primary objectives: (1) to assess if there are differences between trace element concentrations and stable isotope signatures of oiled and clean feathers, and (2) to determine if the cleansing of oiled feathers using commonly applied techniques such as sodium hydroxide (NaOH) washes in combination with an organic solvent (hexane) is more effective than using NaOH alone. In order to do this, we analysed trace elements (Se, Hg, Pb, Cu and Zn) and stable isotopes (delta(13)C and delta(15)N) of individual feathers of yellow-legged gulls (Larus michahellis) which were affected by the 2002 Prestige oil spill in Galicia (NW Spain). Two sets of feathers were analysed, one group were oil-free (Control group) and the other had oil adhered to its surface (Oiled group). We expected to find differences between control and oiled feathers when cleaning exclusively with NaOH and no differences when using hexane. Our results did not show significant differences between Control and Oiled groups as a consequence of the cleansing method used. Unexpectedly, the additional cleansing with hexane resulted in decreasing selenium concentrations and increasing zinc and delta(15)N values in all groups of feathers.

  5. Communication: Isotopic effects on tunneling motions in the water trimer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videla, Pablo E.; Rossky, Peter J.; Laria, D.

    2016-02-01

    We present results of ring polymer molecular dynamics simulations that shed light on the effects of nuclear quantum fluctuations on tunneling motions in cyclic [H2O]3 and [D2O]3, at the representative temperature of T = 75 K. In particular, we focus attention on free energies associated with two key isomerization processes: The first one corresponds to flipping transitions of dangling OH bonds, between up and down positions with respect to the O-O-O plane of the cluster; the second involves the interchange between connecting and dangling hydrogen bond character of the H-atoms in a tagged water molecule. Zero point energy and tunneling effects lead to sensible reductions of the free energy barriers. Due to the lighter nature of the H nuclei, these modifications are more marked in [H2O]3 than in [D2O]3. Estimates of the characteristic time scales describing the flipping transitions are consistent with those predicted based on standard transition-state-approximation arguments.

  6. Communication: Isotopic effects on tunneling motions in the water trimer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Videla, Pablo E. [Departamento de Química Inorgánica Analítica y Química-Física e INQUIMAE, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellón II, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Rossky, Peter J. [Department of Chemistry, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77251-1892 (United States); Laria, D., E-mail: dhlaria@cnea.gov.ar [Departamento de Química Inorgánica Analítica y Química-Física e INQUIMAE, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellón II, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Avenida Libertador 8250, 1429 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2016-02-14

    We present results of ring polymer molecular dynamics simulations that shed light on the effects of nuclear quantum fluctuations on tunneling motions in cyclic [H{sub 2}O]{sub 3} and [D{sub 2}O]{sub 3}, at the representative temperature of T = 75 K. In particular, we focus attention on free energies associated with two key isomerization processes: The first one corresponds to flipping transitions of dangling OH bonds, between up and down positions with respect to the O–O–O plane of the cluster; the second involves the interchange between connecting and dangling hydrogen bond character of the H-atoms in a tagged water molecule. Zero point energy and tunneling effects lead to sensible reductions of the free energy barriers. Due to the lighter nature of the H nuclei, these modifications are more marked in [H{sub 2}O]{sub 3} than in [D{sub 2}O]{sub 3}. Estimates of the characteristic time scales describing the flipping transitions are consistent with those predicted based on standard transition-state-approximation arguments.

  7. Effect of amino acids on the precipitation kinetics and Ca isotopic composition of gypsum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harouaka, Khadouja; Kubicki, James D.; Fantle, Matthew S.

    2017-12-01

    Stirred gypsum (CaSO4 · 2H2O) precipitation experiments (initial Ωgypsum = 2.4 ± 0.14, duration ≈ 1.0-1.5 h) were conducted in the presence of the amino acids glycine (190 μM), L-alanine (190 μM), D- and L-arginine (45 μM), and L-tyrosine (200 μM) to investigate the effect of simple organic compounds on both the precipitation kinetics and Ca isotopic composition of gypsum. Relative to abiotic controls, glycine, tyrosine, and alanine inhibited precipitation rates by ∼22%, 27%, and 29%, respectively, while L- and D-arginine accelerated crystal growth by ∼8% and 48%, respectively. With the exception of tyrosine, amino acid induced inhibition resulted in fractionation factors (αs-f) associated with precipitation that were no more than 0.3‰ lower than amino acid-free controls. In contrast, the tyrosine and D- and L-arginine experiments had αs-f values associated with precipitation that were similar to the controls. Our experimental results indicate that Ca isotopic fractionation associated with gypsum precipitation is impacted by growth inhibition in the presence of amino acids. Specifically, we propose that the surface-specific binding of amino acids to gypsum can change the equilibrium fractionation factor of the bulk mineral. We investigate the hypothesis that amino acids can influence the growth of gypsum at specific crystal faces via adsorption and that different faces have distinct fractionation factors (αface-fluid). Accordingly, preferential sorption of amino acids at particular faces changes the relative, face-specific mass fluxes of Ca during growth, which influences the bulk isotopic composition of the mineral. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations suggest that the energetic favorability of glycine sorption onto gypsum crystal faces occurs in the order: (1 1 0) > (0 1 0) > (1 2 0) > (0 1 1), while glycine sorption onto the (-1 1 1) face was found to be energetically unfavorable. Face-specific fractionation factors constrained by

  8. Cost-effectiveness of social marketing of insecticide-treated nets for malaria control in the United Republic of Tanzania

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hanson, Kara; Kikumbih, Nassor; Armstrong Schellenberg, Joanna; Mponda, Haji; Nathan, Rose; Lake, Sally; Mills, Anne; Tanner, Marcel; Lengeler, Christian

    2003-01-01

    To assess the costs and consequences of a social marketing approach to malaria control in children by means of insecticide-treated nets in two rural districts of the United Republic of Tanzania, compared with no net use...

  9. Effects of hydrogen isotopes in the irradiation damage of CLAM steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, M.Z.; Liu, P.P.; Zhu, Y.M.; Wan, F.R. [School of Material Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); He, Z.B. [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science & Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhan, Q., E-mail: qzhan@mater.ustb.edu.cn [School of Material Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2015-11-15

    The isotope effect of hydrogen in irradiation damage plays an important role in the development of reduced activation Ferritic/Martensitic steels in nuclear reactors. The evolutions of microstructures and mechanical properties of China low active martensitic (CLAM) steel subjected to hydrogen and deuterium ions irradiation are studied comparatively. Under the same irradiation conditions, larger size and smaller density of dislocation loops are generated by deuterium ion than by hydrogen ion. Irradiation hardening occurs under the ion irradiation and the hardening induced by hydrogen ion is higher than by deuterium ion. Moreover, the coarsening of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitates is observed, which can be explained by the solute drag mechanisms. It turns out that the coarsening induced by deuterium ion irradiation is more distinct than by hydrogen ion irradiation. No distinct variations for the compositions of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitates are found by a large number of statistical data after hydrogen isotopes irradiation. - Highlights: • The irradiation hardening caused by hydrogen ion is higher than deuterium ion. • No distinct variations on the composition of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitates were found after hydrogen isotopes irradiation. • The coarsening of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitates in both ion irradiated samples can be explained by the solute drag mechanisms.

  10. Effects of volatilization on carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios of MTBE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuder, Tomasz; Philp, Paul; Allen, Jon

    2009-03-15

    Contaminant attenuation studies utilizing CSIA (compound-specific isotope analysis) routinely assume that isotope effects (IEs) result only from degradation. Experimental results on MTBE behavior in diffusive volatilization and dynamic vapor extraction show measurable changes in the isotope ratios of the MTBE remaining in the aqueous or nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) matrix. A conceptual model for interpretation of those IEs is proposed, based on the physics of liquid-air partitioning. Normal or inverse IEs were observed for different volatilization scenarios. The range of carbon enrichment factors (epsilon) was from +0.7 per thousand (gasoline vapor extraction) to -1 per thousand (diffusive volatilization of MTBE from gasoline), the range of hydrogen epsilon was from +7 per thousand (gasoline vapor extraction) to -12 per thousand (air sparging of aqueous MTBE). The observed IEs are lower than those associated with MTBE degradation. However, under a realistic scenario for MTBE vapor removal, their magnitude is within the detection limits of CSIA. The potential for interference of those IEs is primarily in confusing the interpretation of samples with a small extent of fractionation and where only carbon CSIA data are available. The IEs resulting from volatilization and biodegradation, respectively, can be separated by combined carbon and hydrogen 2D-CSIA.

  11. Garnet effect on Nd-Hf isotope decoupling: Evidence from the Jinfosi batholith, Northern Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hui; Niu, Yaoling; Mo, Xuanxue

    2017-03-01

    The initial Nd and Hf isotope ratios of a 420 Ma post-collisional dioritic-granitic batholith from the Northern Tibetan plateau define a negative trend above and orthogonal to the ԐHf(t)-ԐNd(t) terrestrial array. This uncommon trend offers an insight into the origin of the puzzling Nd-Hf isotope decoupling in the crustal rocks. On this trend, samples depleted in heavy rare earth elements (HREEs, i.e., [Dy/Yb]N ≫ 1) deviate most from the terrestrial array whereas samples with flat HREEs (i.e., [Dy/Yb]N ≥ 1) deviate less or plot within the terrestrial array, pointing to the controlling effect of garnet in the magma source. Ancient garnet-bearing residues after melt extraction will have elevated Lu/Hf ratios and can evolve with time to produce high ԐHf(t) at a low ԐNd(t) value. Mixing of melts derived from such source lithologies (high Lu/Hf) with melts possessing a within-terrestrial array Nd-Hf isotopic composition (low Lu/Hf) best explains the observed trend orthogonal to the terrestrial array. The samples from the Jinfosi batholith with the most decoupled Nd-Hf isotope compositions require a larger degree (> 40%) and ancient (i.e., ≥ 1.8 Gyr) previous melt extraction from their source. It follows that the ancient melts with depleted HREEs complementary to those garnet-bearing residues should have low ԐHf values and plot below the terrestrial array, which is indeed shown by some Archean/Paleoproterozic TTGs.

  12. Flood effects on efflux and net production of nitrous oxide in river floodplain soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Muhammad; Bruderer, Christian; Niklaus, Pascal A.; Luster, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    Floodplain soils are often rich in nutrients and exhibit high spatial heterogeneity in terms of geomorphology, soil environmental conditions and substrate availability for processes involved in carbon and nutrient cycling. In addition, fluctuating water tables lead to temporally changing redox conditions. In such systems, there are ideal conditions for the occurrence of hot spots and moments of nitrous oxide emissions, a potent greenhouse gas. The factors that govern the spatial heterogeneity and dynamics of N2O formation in floodplain soils and the surface efflux of this gas are not fully understood. A particular issue is the contribution of N2O formation in the subsoil to surface efflux. We studied this question in the floodplain of a restored section of the Thur river (NE Switzerland) which is characterized by a flashy flow regime. As a consequence, the floodplain soils are unsaturated most of the time. We showed earlier that saturation during flood pulses leads to short phases of generally anoxic conditions followed by a drying phase with anoxic conditions within aggregates and oxic conditions in larger soil pores. The latter conditions are conducive for spatially closely-coupled nitrification-denitrification and related hot moments of nitrous oxide formation. In a floodplain zone characterized by about one meter of young, sandy sediments, that are mostly covered by the tall grass Phalaris arundinacea, we measured at several time points before and after a small flood event N2O surface efflux with the closed-chamber method, and assessed N2O concentrations in the soil air at four different depths using gas-permeable tubings. In addition, we calculated the N2O diffusivity in the soil from Radon diffusivity. The latter was estimated in-situ from the recovery of Radon concentration in the gas-permeable tubings after purging with ambient air. All these data were then used to calculate net N2O production rates at different soil depths with the gradient method. In

  13. Isotopic studies in Pacific Panama mangrove estuaries reveal lack of effect of watershed deforestation on food webs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Inés G; Valiela, Ivan; Martinetto, Paulina; Monteiro Pierce, Rita; Fox, Sophia E

    2015-02-01

    Stable isotopic N, C, and S in food webs of 8 mangrove estuaries on the Pacific coast of Panama were measured to 1) determine whether the degree of deforestation of tropical forests on the contributing watersheds was detectable within the estuarine food web, and 2) define external sources of the food webs within the mangrove estuaries. Even though terrestrial rain forest cover on the contributing watersheds differed between 23 and 92%, the effect of deforestation was not detectable on stable isotopic values in food webs present at the mouth of the receiving estuaries. We used stable isotopic measures to identify producers or organic sources that supported the estuarine food web. N isotopic values of consumers spanned a broad range, from about 2.7 to 12.3‰. Mean δ(15)N of primary producers and organic matter varied from 3.3 for macroalgae to 4.7‰ for suspended particulate matter and large particulate matter. The δ(13)C consumer data varied between -26 and -9‰, but isotopic values of the major apparent producers or organic matter sampled could not account for this range variability. The structure of the food web was clarified when we added literature isotopic values of microphytobenthos and coralline algae, suggesting that these, or other producers with similar isotopic signature, may be part of the food webs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Kinetic isotope effects in the OH and Cl reactions of the clumped methane species 13CH3D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joelsson, Magnus

    Methane is an potent greenhouse gas, second only to carbon dioxide of the anthropogenic greenhouse gases in its influence on Earth’s radiative budget. Although less abundant in the atmosphere, methane’s global warming potential is about twentyeight times that of carbon dioxide. Sources of methane....... In Papers I and II, isotopically-labeled methane was used and the reactions were studied using Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). In Paper III; natural abundance methane was used and only the reaction yield was measured with FTIR spectroscopy. Meanwhile, the isotopic compositions were measured...... the clumping effect by a reaction, the apparent clumpiness is defined as the deviation of the Kinetic Isotope Effect (KIE) of the reaction with the clumped isotope (13CH3D) from the combination of KIEs of reactions with the single substituted isotopologues (13CH4 and 12CH3D). If the KIE of the reaction with 13...

  15. Effects of Permafrost Thaw on Net Ecosystem Carbon Balance in a Subarctic Peatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z.; Roulet, N. T.; Moore, T. R.

    2014-12-01

    This research is to assess changes in net ecosystem carbon balance (NECB) with permafrost thaw in northern peatland: in particular how changes in C biogeochemistry influence NECB. Thawed transects associated with varying stages of permafrost thaw: from palsas with intact permafrost (P), through edge of palsa (EP), dry lawn (DL), wet lawn (WL), edge of thawed pond (ET), pond sedges (PS), to several thawed ponds (TP) in a subarctic peatland in northern Quebec were sampled in the snow free seasons of 2013 and 2014. The exchange of CO2 and CH4, vegetation, dissolved organic C (DOC) concentration and biodegradability, active layer depth, air and peat temperatures, water table depth (WT), pH, and conductivity were measured. Peat temperatures were quite similar among different locations, but the WT decreased significantly along the transect creating varied environmental conditions that supporting different plant communities. From dry to wet area, vegetation abundance and biomass showed reductions of shrubs and lichens, and increases of Sphagnum, grasses and sedges. Pore water pH increased from dry to wet area, and conductivity slightly decreased. Wet thaw area WL, ET and PS had relatively higher season gross ecosystem production (GEP) and higher season ecosystem respiration (ER), but relative similar net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE). Only TP had a significant higher positive season NEE. Palsa was the only CH4 sink, and quite high CH4 emissions were found after it thawed. CH4-C release significantly increased from dry to wet in thawed area, which even several times bigger than total C exchange in ET and PS. Generally, wet area had higher DOC concentration and higher DOC biodegradability indicated by lower SUVA254 (except PS which received great influence from pond). All components in the NECB (GEP, ER, CH4, DOC) increased significantly in magnitude from palsa to wet thawed area, and ecosystem C sink turned into source as palsa thawed into PS and TP. These results

  16. Geometric isotope effects on small chloride ion water clusters with path integral molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qi [Department of Chemistry, Tsukuba University, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba 305-8571 (Japan); Suzuki, Kimichi [Research Institute for Nanosystem, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Chuo-2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Nagashima, Umpei, E-mail: u.nagashima@aist.go.jp [Department of Chemistry, Tsukuba University, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba 305-8571 (Japan); Research Institute for Nanosystem, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Chuo-2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Tachikawa, Masanori [Quantum Chemistry Division, Graduate School of Science, Yokohama-City University, Seto 22-2, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama 236-0027 (Japan); Yan, Shiwei [College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: • PIMD simulations with PM6-DH+ potential are carried out for Cl{sup −}(H{sub 2}O){sub n} clusters. • The geometric isotope effects on the rearrangement of single and multi shell structures are presented. • The competition of intramolecular and intermolecular nuclear quantum effects on the cluster structures is shown. • The correlations between r(Cl…O) and other vibration motions are discussed. - Abstract: The geometric isotope effects on the structures of hydrated chloride ionic hydrogen bonded clusters are explored by carrying out path integral molecular dynamics simulations. First, an outer shell coordinate is selected to display the rearrangement of single and multi hydration shell cluster structures. Next, to show the competition of intramolecular and intermolecular nuclear quantum effects, the intramolecular OH{sup ∗} stretching and intermolecular ion–water wagging motions are studied for single and multi shell structures, respectively. The results indicate that the intermolecular nuclear quantum effects stabilize the ionic hydrogen bonds in single shell structures, while they are destabilized through the competition with intramolecular nuclear quantum effects in multi shell structures. In addition, the correlations between ion–water stretching motion and other cluster vibrational coordinates are discussed. The results indicate that the intermolecular nuclear quantum effects on the cluster structures are strongly related to the cooperation of the water–water hydrogen bond interactions.

  17. The effect of changing cow production and fitness traits on net income and greenhouse gas emissions from Australian dairy systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, M J; Eckard, R J; Haile-Mariam, M; Pryce, J E

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effect of changing a range of biological traits on farm net income and greenhouse gas emissions (expressed in carbon dioxide equivalents, CO2-eq.) in the Australian dairy cow population. An average cow was modeled, using breed-average information for Holsteins and Jerseys from the Australian Dairy Herd Improvement Scheme. A Markov chain approach was used to describe the steady-state herd structure, as well as estimate the CO2-eq. emissions per cow and per kilogram of milk solids. The effects of a single unit change in herd milk volume, fat and protein yields, live weight, survival, dry matter intake, somatic cell count, and calving interval were assessed. With the traits studied, the only single-unit change that would bring about a desirable increase in both net income and reduced emissions intensity per cow and per kilogram of milk solids in Australian dairy herds would be an increase in survival and reductions in milk volume, live weight, DMI, SCC, and calving interval. The models developed can be used to assess lifetime dairy system abatement options by breeding, feeding, and management. Selective breeding and appropriate management can both improve health, fertility, and feed utilization of Australian dairy systems and reduce its environmental impact. Copyright © 2013 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Surface Oxide Net Charge of a Titanium Alloy; Comparison Between Effects of Treatment With Heat or Radiofrequency Plasma Glow Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Daniel E.; Rapuano, Bruce E.; Schniepp, Hannes C.

    2010-01-01

    In the current study, we have compared the effects of heat and radiofrequency plasma glow discharge (RFGD) treatment of a Ti6Al4V alloy on the physico-chemical properties of the alloy’s surface oxide. Titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) disks were passivated alone, heated to 600 °C, or RFGD plasma treated in pure oxygen. RFGD treatment did not alter the roughness, topography, elemental composition or thickness of the alloy’s surface oxide layer. In contrast, heat treatment altered oxide topography by creating a pattern of oxide elevations approximately 50–100 nm in diameter. These nanostructures exhibited a three-fold increase in roughness compared to untreated surfaces when RMS roughness was calculated after applying a spatial high-pass filter with a 200 nm cutoff wavelength. Heat treatment also produced a surface enrichment in aluminum and vanadium oxides. Both RFGD and heat treatment produced similar increases in oxide wettability. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements of metal surface oxide net charge signified by a long range force of attraction to or repulsion from a (negatively charged) silicon nitride AFM probe were also obtained for all three experimental groups. Force measurements showed that the RFGD-treated Ti6Al4V samples demonstrated a higher net positive surface charge at pH values below 6 and a higher net negative surface charge at physiological pH (pH values between 7 and 8) compared to control and heat-treated samples These findings suggest that RFGD treatment of metallic implant materials can be used to study the role of negatively charged surface oxide functional groups in protein bioactivity, osteogenic cell behavior and osseointegration independently of oxide topography. PMID:20880672

  19. Effect of varying frontal systems on stable oxygen and carbon isotopic compositions of modern planktic foraminifera of Southern Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Tiwari, M.; Mohan, R.; Meloth, T.; Naik, S.S.; Sudhakar, M.

    SCIENCE, VOL. 100, NO. 6, 25 MARCH 2011 881 *For correspondence. (e-mail: manish@ncaor.org) Effect of varying frontal systems on stable oxygen and carbon isotopic compositions of modern planktic foraminifera of Southern Ocean Manish Tiwari 1...: Carbon isotopes, foraminifera, oxygen iso- topes, Southern Ocean. PLANKTIC foraminifera thrive in various environments of the upper water column and are sensitive to changes occurring in the temperature, salinity, nutrients, food availability...

  20. Net air emissions from electric vehicles: the effect of carbon price and charging strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Scott B; Whitacre, J F; Apt, Jay

    2011-03-01

    Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) may become part of the transportation fleet on time scales of a decade or two. We calculate the electric grid load increase and emissions due to vehicle battery charging in PJM and NYISO with the current generation mix, the current mix with a $50/tonne CO(2) price, and this case but with existing coal generators retrofitted with 80% CO(2) capture. We also examine all new generation being natural gas or wind+gas. PHEV fleet percentages between 0.4 and 50% are examined. Vehicles with small (4 kWh) and large (16 kWh) batteries are modeled with driving patterns from the National Household Transportation Survey. Three charging strategies and three scenarios for future electric generation are considered. When compared to 2020 CAFE standards, net CO(2) emissions in New York are reduced by switching from gasoline to electricity; coal-heavy PJM shows somewhat smaller benefits unless coal units are fitted with CCS or replaced with lower CO(2) generation. NO(X) is reduced in both RTOs, but there is upward pressure on SO(2) emissions or allowance prices under a cap.

  1. The Effect of Phytase on the Oxygen Isotope Composition of Phosphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Sperber, C.; Tamburini, F.; Bernasconi, S. M.; Frossard, E.

    2013-12-01

    Plants and microorganisms under phosphorus (P) stress release extracellular phosphatases as a strategy to acquire inorganic phosphate (Pi) (1-2). These enzymes catalyze the hydrolysis of phosphoesters leading to a release of Pi. The enzymatic hydrolysis leads, via a nucleophilic attack, to the incorporation of one oxygen atom from the water into the newly formed Pi molecule. During the incorporation, an isotopic fractionation occurs, which might be used to identify the origin of Pi in the environment (3-6). While the effect of phosphomonoesterases and phosphodiesterases on the oxygen isotope composition of phosphate has been examined, there are, so far, no studies dealing with the effect of phytases (4-6). Phytases catalyze the hydrolysis of myo-inositol-hexakis-phosphate (IP6), which is an important component of organic P in many ecosystems (7). Enzymatic assays with phytase from wheat germ and Aspergillus niger were prepared under sterile and temperature controlled conditions in order to determine the effect of phytases on the oxygen isotope composition of phosphate, which has been liberated from IP6 via enzymatic hydrolysis. Assays with phytase from wheat germ lead to a turnover of the substrate close to 100%, while assays with phytase from Aspergillus niger lead to a turnover of the substrate close to 80%. In the case of the assays with phytase from wheat germ, our results indicate that one sixth of the total 24 oxygen which are associated to the phosphates in IP6 are exchanged with oxygen from water. From this we conclude that the incorporation of one oxygen atom from water occurs only at four phosphate molecules of IP6, while two phosphate molecules do not experience an incorporation of oxygen. This suggests that during the enzymatic hydrolysis, four P-O bonds and two C-O bonds are broken. Provided that, the isotopic fractionation can be calculated with an isotopic mass balance resulting in -8.4‰ (×3.6 SD). This is a value very similar to those reported

  2. Effects of changing mosquito host searching behaviour on the cost effectiveness of a mass distribution of long-lasting, insecticidal nets : a modelling study

    OpenAIRE

    Briët, Olivier JT; Chitnis, Nakul

    2013-01-01

    Background The effectiveness of long-lasting, insecticidal nets (LLINs) in preventing malaria is threatened by the changing biting behaviour of mosquitoes, from nocturnal and endophagic to crepuscular and exophagic, and by their increasing resistance to insecticides. Methods Using epidemiological stochastic simulation models, we studied the impact of a mass LLIN distribution on Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Specifically, we looked at impact in terms of episodes prevented during the effective...

  3. Effects of elemental composition on the incorporation of dietary nitrogen and carbon isotopic signatures in an omnivorous songbird

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearson, Scott, F.; Levey, Douglas, J.; Greenberg, Catheryn, H.; Martinez del Rio, Carlos

    2003-02-28

    Pearson, S.F., D.J. Levey, C.H. Greenberg, and C.M. del Rio. 2003. Effects of elemental composition on the incorporation of dietary nitrogen and carbon isotopic signatures in an omnivorous songbird. Oecologia. 135:516-523. The use of stable isotopes to infer diet requires quantifying the relationship between diet and tissues and, in particular, knowing of how quickly isotopes turnover in different tissues and how isotopic concentrations of different food components change (discriminate) when incorporated into consumer tissues. We used feeding trials with wild-caught yellow-rumped warblers (Dendroica coronata) to determine d15N and d13C turnover rates for blood, d15N and d13C diet-tissue discrimination factors, and diet-tissue relationships for blood and feathers. After 3 weeks on a common diet, 36 warblers were assigned to one of four diets differing in the relative proportion of fruit and insects. Plasma half-life estimates ranged from 0.4 to 0.7 days for d13C and from 0.5 to 1.7 days for d15N. Half-life did not differ among diets. Whole blood half-life for d13C ranged from 3.9 to 6.1 days. Yellow-rumped warbler tissues were enriched relative to diet by 1.7.3.6% for nitrogen isotopes and by 1.2 to 4.3% for carbon isotopes, depending on tissue and diet. Consistent with previous studies, feathers were the most enriched and whole blood and plasma were the least enriched or, in the case of carbon, slightly depleted relative to diet. In general, tissues were more enriched relative to diet for birds with high percentages of insects. For all tissues, carbon and nitrogen isotope discrimination factors increased with carbon and nitrogen concentrations of diets. The isotopic signature of plasma increased linearly with the sum of the isotopic signature of the diet and the discrimination factor. Because the isotopic signature of tissues depends on both elemental concentration and isotopic signature of the diet, attempts to reconstruct diet from stable isotope signatures

  4. Effects of UVB radiation on net community production in the upper global ocean

    KAUST Repository

    Garcia-Corral, Lara S.

    2016-08-31

    Aim Erosion of the stratospheric ozone layer together with oligotrophication of the subtropical ocean is leading to enhanced exposure to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation in ocean surface waters. The impact of increased exposure to UVB on planktonic primary producers and heterotrophs is uncertain. Here we test the null hypothesis that net community production (NCP) of plankton communities in surface waters of the tropical and subtropical ocean is not affected by ambient UVB radiation and extend this test to the global ocean, including the polar oceans and the Mediterranean Sea using previous results. Location We conducted experiments with 131 surface communities sampled during a circumnavigation cruise along the tropical and subtropical ocean and combined these results with 89 previous reports encompassing the Atlantic, Pacific, Arctic and Southern Oceans and the Mediterranean Sea. Methods The use of quartz (transparent to UVB radiation) and borosilicate glass materials (opaque to most UVB) for incubations allowed us to compare NCP between communities where UVB is excluded and those receiving natural UVB radiation. Results We found that NCP varies when exposed to natural UVB radiation compared to those where UVB was removed. NCP of autotrophic communities tended to decrease under natural UVB radiation, whereas the NCP of heterotrophic communities tended to increase. However, these variations showed the opposite trend under higher levels of UVB radiation. Main conclusions Our results suggest that earlier estimates of NCP for surface communities, which were hitherto derived using materials blocking UVB radiation were biased, with the direction and magnitude of this bias depending on the metabolic status of the communities and the underwater penetration of UVB radiation.

  5. Effect of Shock-Induced Cavitation Bubble Collapse on the damage in the Simulated Perineuronal Net of the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuan-Ting; Adnan, Ashfaq

    2017-07-13

    The purpose of this study is to conduct modeling and simulation to understand the effect of shock-induced mechanical loading, in the form of cavitation bubble collapse, on damage to the brain's perineuronal nets (PNNs). It is known that high-energy implosion due to cavitation collapse is responsible for corrosion or surface damage in many mechanical devices. In this case, cavitation refers to the bubble created by pressure drop. The presence of a similar damage mechanism in biophysical systems has long being suspected but not well-explored. In this paper, we use reactive molecular dynamics (MD) to simulate the scenario of a shock wave induced cavitation collapse within the perineuronal net (PNN), which is the near-neuron domain of a brain's extracellular matrix (ECM). Our model is focused on the damage in hyaluronan (HA), which is the main structural component of PNN. We have investigated the roles of cavitation bubble location, shockwave intensity and the size of a cavitation bubble on the structural evolution of PNN. Simulation results show that the localized supersonic water hammer created by an asymmetrical bubble collapse may break the hyaluronan. As such, the current study advances current knowledge and understanding of the connection between PNN damage and neurodegenerative disorders.

  6. Non-linear isotope and fast ions effects: routes for low turbulence in DT plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Jeronimo

    2017-10-01

    The isotope effect, i.e. the fact that heat and particle fluxes do not follow the expected Gyro-Bohm estimate for turbulent transport when the plasma mass is changed, is one of the main challenges in plasma theory. Of particular interest is the isotope exchange between the fusion of deuterium (DD) and deuterium-tritium (DT) nuclei as there are no clear indications of what kind of transport difference can be expected in burning plasmas. The GENE code is therefore used for computing DD vs DT linear and nonlinear microturbulence characteristics in the core plasma region of a previously ITER hybrid scenario at high beta obtained in the framework of simplified integrated modelling. Scans on common turbulence related quantitates as external ExB flow shear, Parallel Velocity Gradient (PVG), plasma beta, colisionality or the number of ion species have been performed. Additionally, the role of energetic particles, known to reduce Ion Temperature Gradient (ITG) turbulence has been also addressed. It is obtained that the ITER operational point will be close to threshold and in these conditions turbulence is dominated by ITG modes. A purely weak non-linear isotope effect, absent in linear scans, can be found when separately adding moderate ExB flow shear or electromagnetic effects, whereas collisionality just modulates the intensity. The isotope effect, on the other hand, becomes very strong in conditions with simultaneously moderate ExB flow shear, beta and low q profile with significant reductions of ion heat transport from DD to DT. By analyzing the radial structure of the two point electrostatic potential correlation function it has been found that the inherent Gyro-Bohm scaling for plasma microturbulence, which increases the radial correlation length at short scales form DD to DT, is counteracted by the concomitant appearance of a complex nonlinear multiscale space interaction involving external ExB flow shear, zonal flow activity, magnetic geometry and electromagnetic

  7. Isotopes through the looking glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mårtensson Pendrill, Ann Marie

    2000-08-01

    Nuclear distributions affect many aspects of atomic spectra. As an example, recent experimental results for the hyperfine anomaly in Fr isotopes are considered. These depend on nuclear charge and magnetization distributions. The variations in charge radii for these isotopes were studied earlier by measuring optical isotope shifts. The hyperfine anomalies for the odd-odd isotopes involve the neutron distributions, of interest for studies of parity nonconserving effects along a chain of isotopes.

  8. Solvent deuterium isotope effects in the catalysis of oxygen-18 exchange by human carbonic anhydrase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, C K; Silverman, D N

    1982-12-07

    By measuring the rate of exchange at chemical equilibrium of 18O between HCO3- and H2O catalyzed by human carbonic anhydrase II in the absence of buffers, we have determined the rate of release from the enzyme of water bearing substrate oxygen. The ratio of this rate measured in H2O to the rate measured in D2O, the solvent deuterium isotope effect, is between 4 and 9 in the range of pH(D) from 5.8 to 8.0, with a value of 8.0 +/- 0.7 at pH(D) 6.6 (uncorrected pH meter reading). The magnitude of this isotope effect at pH(D) 6.6 has an exponential dependence on the atom fraction of deuterium in solvent water. We conclude that an intramolecular proton transfer between a proton shuttle group on the enzyme and the active site is rate limiting for the release from the enzyme of water bearing substrate oxygen and involves a change in bonding of more than one proton. In contrast, the solvent deuterium isotope effect on the intermolecular proton transfer between the external buffer imidazole and the active site (or proton shuttle group) of the enzyme is small, 2.3 at pH(D) 7.0, as determined from initial velocity experiments. With a rate constant near 9 X 10(8) M-1 s-1, this intermolecular transfer is limited to a significant extent by diffusion processes.

  9. Stable isotope analysis as an early monitoring tool for community-scale effects of rat eradication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigro, Katherine M.; Hathaway, Stacie A.; Wegmann, Alex; Miller-ter Kuile, Ana; Fisher, Robert N.; Young, Hillary S.

    2017-01-01

    Invasive rats have colonized most of the islands of the world, resulting in strong negative impacts on native biodiversity and on ecosystem functions. As prolific omnivores, invasive rats can cause local extirpation of a wide range of native species, with cascading consequences that can reshape communities and ecosystems. Eradication of rats on islands is now becoming a widespread approach to restore ecosystems, and many native island species show strong numerical responses to rat eradication. However, the effect of rat eradication on other consumers can extend beyond direct numerical effects, to changes in behavior, dietary composition, and other ecological parameters. These behavioral and trophic effects may have strong cascading impacts on the ecology of restored ecosystems, but they have rarely been examined. In this study, we explore how rat eradication has affected the trophic ecology of native land crab communities. Using stable isotope analysis of rats and crabs, we demonstrate that the diet or trophic position of most crabs changed subsequent to rat eradication. Combined with the numerical recovery of two carnivorous land crab species (Geograpsus spp.), this led to a dramatic widening of the crab trophic niche following rat eradication. Given the established importance of land crabs in structuring island communities, particularly plants, this suggests an unappreciated mechanism by which rat eradication may alter island ecology. This study also demonstrates the potential for stable isotope analysis as a complementary monitoring tool to traditional techniques, with the potential to provide more nuanced assessments of the community- and ecosystem-wide effects of restoration.

  10. Kinetic isotope effect on the proton-transfer in indigo carmine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwakura, Izumi; Yabushita, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    2010-01-01

    We have found that photo-excited indigo carmine causes stepwise proton transfer to generate mono-alcohol intermediate, which immediately returns to the parent molecule [I. Iwakura, A. Yabushita, T. Kobayashi, Chem. Lett. 38 (2009) 1020]. The kinetic isotope effect in the proton transfer of this system has been studied by direct observation of the real-time molecular vibrational amplitude during the reaction including the transition state using a sub-5-fs laser pulse. The kaH/kaD ratio for the proton transfer after photo-excitation is observed to be 1.5 ± 0.1.

  11. Global nitrogen cycle: pre-Anthropocene mass and isotope fluxes and effects of human perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Y.; Li, D. D.; Lerman, A.; Mackenzie, F. T.

    2012-12-01

    The size of the largest nitrogen reservoir -- the Earth atmosphere -- and its long residence time of approximately 17 million years suggest that the global N cycle was likely to be balanced at geological time scales. After the industrial revolution, human activities, such as mining, fossil fuel burning, land use change, and artificial fertilization, have resulted in perturbations and numerous flux changes of the N cycle. The effects of human activities on the mass and isotopic composition of the N reservoirs can be predicted using a detailed N cycle model with estimated additions. For the pre-Anthropocene period, a balanced steady-state N cycle model was constructed based on the Redfield ratios and an extensive literature review. The model includes 14 N reservoirs in the domains of the atmosphere, land, and ocean. The biotic reservoirs on land and in the ocean (land plants and marine biota) interact with atmospheric N2 and dissolved inorganic N (DIN) in ocean and soil waters. DIN further interacts with dissolved organic N (DON), particulate organic matter (POM), and ocean sediments. Atmosphere supplies N to land and ocean domains mainly by N fixation, deposition, and dissolution, and these fluxes are balanced by denitrification and volatilization back to atmosphere. Riverine transport of dissolved and particulate N connects land and ocean domains. Once the cycle is mass-balanced, the isotopic composition of reservoir and the size of fractionation accompanying microbial transformations and transfers of N species between the reservoirs were estimated by numerical iteration of the flux equations based on the reported δ15N values and fractionation factors. The calculated fractionation factors tend to be smaller in magnitude than the experimentally measured ones in natural systems, which can be interpreted as an indication of N-limited conditions prevailing in pre-Anthropocene world: a smaller isotope fractionation can be interpreted as an indication of nitrogen

  12. Effect of Glucagon on Net Splanchnic Cyclic AMP Production in Normal and Diabetic Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljenquist, John E.; Bomboy, James D.; Lewis, Stephen B.; Sinclair-Smith, Bruce C.; Felts, Philip W.; Lacy, William W.; Crofford, Oscar B.; Liddle, Grant W.

    1974-01-01

    Glucagon activates hepatic adenylate cyclase, thereby increasing acutely the liver content of cyclic AMP (cAMP) as well as the release of cAMP into the hepatic vein. Insulin, on the other hand, antagonizes this glucagon-mediated cAMP production, thus providing a hypothetical mechanism through which insulin might correct some of the metabolic abnormalities of diabetes. To study this hormonal interaction in man, net splanchnic cAMP production (NScAMPP) was investigated in normal and insulin-dependent diabetic men under basal conditions and in response to intravenous glucagon, 50 ng/kg/min for 2 h. In normals (n=19), basal hepatic vein cAMP concentration was 23.6±1.1 nM and NScAMPP was 1.7±0.6 nmol/min. Glucagon stimulated NScAMPP in four normal subjects to a peak of 99.6±43 nmol/min at 25 min with a subsequent fall to 12.4±5.1 nmol/min by 90 min despite continuing glucagon infusion. Endogenous insulin secretion was stimulated as indicated by rising levels of immunoreactive insulin and C-peptide (connecting peptide) immunoreactivity, raising the possibility that endogenous insulin might be responsible for the fall in NScAMPP that followed the initial spike. In the diabetics (n=8), basal hepatic vein cAMP concentration was 24.7±1.2 nM and NScAMPP was undetectable. Glucagon stimulated NScAMPP in five diabetics to a peak of 169.9±42.6 with a subsequent fall to 17.4±3.9 nmol/min by 90 min even though endogenous insulin secretion was not stimulated (no rise in C-peptide immunoreactivity). Although the mean increase in NScAMPP was greater in the diabetics, the two groups did not differ significantly. Conclusions. In normal resting man the liver is a significant source of circulating cAMP. Diabetics do not release abnormally large amounts of hepatic cAMP under basal conditions. Glucagon markedly enhances hepatic cAMP release with a spike-decline pattern in both normal and diabetic men. The decline in hepatic cAMP release despite continuing glucagon stimulation is due

  13. Analytical modelling of stable isotope fractionation of volatile organic compounds in the unsaturated zone

    CERN Document Server

    Bouchard, D; Höhener, P; Hunkeler, D; 10.1016/j.jconhyd.2010.09.006

    2011-01-01

    Analytical models were developed that simulate stable isotope ratios of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) near a point source contamination in the unsaturated zone. The models describe diffusive transport of VOCs, biodegradation and source ageing. The mass transport is governed by Fick's law for diffusion, and the equation for reactive transport of VOCs in the soil gas phase was solved for different source geometries and for different boundary conditions. Model results were compared to experimental data from a one-dimensional laboratory column and a radial-symmetric field experiment, and the comparison yielded a satisfying agreement. The model results clearly illustrate the significant isotope fractionation by gas-phase diffusion under transient state conditions. This leads to an initial depletion of heavy isotopes with increasing distance from the source. The isotope evolution of the source is governed by the combined effects of isotope fractionation due to vaporization, diffusion and biodegradation. The net...

  14. Thermal effects on rare earth element and strontium isotope chemistry in single conodont elements.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Armstrong, H.A.; Pearson, D.G.; Griselin, M.

    2001-01-01

    A low-blank, high sensitivity isotope dilution, ICP-MS analytical technique has been used to obtain REE abundance data from single conodont elements weighing as little as 5 μg. Sr isotopes can also be measured from the column eluants enabling Sr isotope ratios and REE abundance to be determined from

  15. Isotopic quantum effects on the structure of low density amorphous ice

    CERN Document Server

    Urquidi, J; Neuefeind, J; Tomberli, B; Tulk, C A; Guthrie, M; Egelstaff, P A; Klug, D D

    2003-01-01

    Careful neutron diffraction measurements on deuterated low density amorphous (LDA) ice confirm that at 120 K it can be considered a fully 'annealed' structure, as no significant changes are observed in the amorphous spectra until crystallization occurred over time at 130 K. On this basis, the measurement of structural differences between the hydrogenated and deuterated forms of LDA ice at 120 K, have been carried out using 98 keV electromagnetic radiation diffraction techniques. The maximum observed isotope effect in LDA ice is approx 3.4% at 40 K when compared to the magnitude of the first peak in the electronic structure factor at Q = 1.70 A sup - sup 1. This compares to a maximum effect of approx 1.6% previously measured in liquid water at room temperature (Tomberli et al 2000 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter. 12 2597). The isotope effect is shown to be similar to a temperature shift in the structure of light LDA ice. However, the existence of a first sharp diffraction peak at Q = 1.0 A sup - sup 1 in the isotopi...

  16. The Effect of Redox Mechanisms on the Fractionation of Uranium `Stable' Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltenbach, A.; Stirling, C. H.; Porcelli, D.; Hilton, D. R.; Kulongoski, J. T.

    2010-12-01

    Uranium is the heaviest naturally occurring element. It consists of three natural isotopes, 238U, 235U and 234U and has four oxidation states, U(III)-U(VI), of which only U(IV) and U(VI) are common. In the oxidized, hexavalent condition, U(VI) exists as uranyl ion (UO22+), which forms soluble, non-reactive complexes with carbonates. In the reduced condition, tetravalent U(IV) forms immobile minerals with hydroxides, fluorides and phosphates that are removed from the water column. In the recent years, isotopic fractionation between 235U and 238U has been detected in a range of terrestrial environments. Changes to U concentrations in natural waters occur due to biological uptake, adsorption/desorption to/from particulates and surfaces, diffusion into sediments, and chemically and biologically induced redox mechanisms (Swarzenski et al., 1999, Mar. Chem. 67, 181). The largest isotopic shifts evidently occur during the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) in waters, during which precipitation changes the dissolved U concentration. However, the exact mechanisms controlling 235U/238U fractionation remain unclear. Some results implicate mass-dependent zero-point energy effects (preferential removal of 235U over 238U) (Rademacher et al., 2006, Environ. Sci. Technol. 40, 6943) as the main cause for the isotopic variations measured, while others suggest volume-dependent nuclear field shift effects (preferential removal of 238U over 235U) (Weyer et al., 2008, GCA 72, 345, Bopp et al., 2010, Environ. Sci. Technol. 44, 5927), which are predicted to be of the opposite sign and up to three times larger than mass-dependent effects. In this study, profiles of two different water masses were examined for their uranium concentration and their 235U/238U isotopic composition to determine the magnitude of the natural isotopic shifts as well as their origins. One set of samples was collected from a 160 m depth profile in the Framvaren Fjord, an anoxic basin. In this basin, the biogeochemical

  17. Moderating factors of immediate, gross, and net cross-brand effects of price promotions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Horváth (Csilla); D. Fok (Dennis)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThis article examines cross-price promotional effects in a dynamic context. Among other things, we investigate whether previously established findings hold when consumer and competitive dynamics are taken into account. Five main influential effects (asymmetric price effect, neighborhood

  18. Oxygen isotopes in tree rings record variation in precipitation δ(18)O and amount effects in the south of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brienen, Roel J W; Hietz, Peter; Wanek, Wolfgang; Gloor, Manuel

    2013-12-01

    [1] Natural archives of oxygen isotopes in precipitation may be used to study changes in the hydrological cycle in the tropics, but their interpretation is not straightforward. We studied to which degree tree rings of Mimosa acantholoba from southern Mexico record variation in isotopic composition of precipitation and which climatic processes influence oxygen isotopes in tree rings (δ(18)Otr). Interannual variation in δ(18)Otr was highly synchronized between trees and closely related to isotopic composition of rain measured at San Salvador, 710 km to the southwest. Correlations with δ(13)C, growth, or local climate variables (temperature, cloud cover, vapor pressure deficit (VPD)) were relatively low, indicating weak plant physiological influences. Interannual variation in δ(18)Otr correlated negatively with local rainfall amount and intensity. Correlations with the amount of precipitation extended along a 1000 km long stretch of the Pacific Central American coast, probably as a result of organized storm systems uniformly affecting rainfall in the region and its isotope signal; episodic heavy precipitation events, of which some are related to cyclones, deposit strongly (18)O-depleted rain in the region and seem to have affected the δ(18)Otr signal. Large-scale controls on the isotope signature include variation in sea surface temperatures of tropical north Atlantic and Pacific Ocean. In conclusion, we show that δ(18)Otr of M. acantholoba can be used as a proxy for source water δ(18)O and that interannual variation in δ(18)Oprec is caused by a regional amount effect. This contrasts with δ(18)O signatures at continental sites where cumulative rainout processes dominate and thus provide a proxy for precipitation integrated over a much larger scale. Our results confirm that processes influencing climate-isotope relations differ between sites located, e.g., in the western Amazon versus coastal Mexico, and that tree ring isotope records can help in

  19. Costs and effects of two public sector delivery channels for long-lasting insecticidal nets in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strachan Daniel

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Uganda, long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLIN have been predominantly delivered through two public sector channels: targeted campaigns or routine antenatal care (ANC services. Their combination in a mixed-model strategy is being advocated to quickly increase LLIN coverage and maintain it over time, but there is little evidence on the efficiency of each system. This study evaluated the two delivery channels regarding LLIN retention and use, and estimated the associated costs, to contribute towards the evidence-base on LLIN delivery channels in Uganda. Methods Household surveys were conducted 5-7 months after LLIN distribution, combining questionnaires with visual verification of LLIN presence. Focus groups and interviews were conducted to further investigate determinants of LLIN retention and use. Campaign distribution was evaluated in Jinja and Adjumani while ANC distribution was evaluated only in the latter district. Costs were calculated from the provider perspective through retrospective analysis of expenditure data, and effects were estimated as cost per LLIN delivered and cost per treated-net-year (TNY. These effects were calculated for the total number of LLINs delivered and for those retained and used. Results After 5-7 months, over 90% of LLINs were still owned by recipients, and between 74% (Jinja and 99% (ANC Adjumani were being used. Costing results showed that delivery was cheapest for the campaign in Jinja and highest for the ANC channel, with economic delivery cost per net retained and used of USD 1.10 and USD 2.31, respectively. Financial delivery costs for the two channels were similar in the same location, USD 1.04 for campaign or USD 1.07 for ANC delivery in Adjumani, but differed between locations (USD 0.67 for campaign delivery in Jinja. Economic cost for ANC distribution were considerably higher (USD 2.27 compared to campaign costs (USD 1.23 in Adjumani. Conclusions Targeted campaigns and routine ANC

  20. Costs and effects of two public sector delivery channels for long-lasting insecticidal nets in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolaczinski, Jan H; Kolaczinski, Kate; Kyabayinze, Daniel; Strachan, Daniel; Temperley, Matilda; Wijayanandana, Nayantara; Kilian, Albert

    2010-04-20

    In Uganda, long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLIN) have been predominantly delivered through two public sector channels: targeted campaigns or routine antenatal care (ANC) services. Their combination in a mixed-model strategy is being advocated to quickly increase LLIN coverage and maintain it over time, but there is little evidence on the efficiency of each system. This study evaluated the two delivery channels regarding LLIN retention and use, and estimated the associated costs, to contribute towards the evidence-base on LLIN delivery channels in Uganda. Household surveys were conducted 5-7 months after LLIN distribution, combining questionnaires with visual verification of LLIN presence. Focus groups and interviews were conducted to further investigate determinants of LLIN retention and use. Campaign distribution was evaluated in Jinja and Adjumani while ANC distribution was evaluated only in the latter district. Costs were calculated from the provider perspective through retrospective analysis of expenditure data, and effects were estimated as cost per LLIN delivered and cost per treated-net-year (TNY). These effects were calculated for the total number of LLINs delivered and for those retained and used. After 5-7 months, over 90% of LLINs were still owned by recipients, and between 74% (Jinja) and 99% (ANC Adjumani) were being used. Costing results showed that delivery was cheapest for the campaign in Jinja and highest for the ANC channel, with economic delivery cost per net retained and used of USD 1.10 and USD 2.31, respectively. Financial delivery costs for the two channels were similar in the same location, USD 1.04 for campaign or USD 1.07 for ANC delivery in Adjumani, but differed between locations (USD 0.67 for campaign delivery in Jinja). Economic cost for ANC distribution were considerably higher (USD 2.27) compared to campaign costs (USD 1.23) in Adjumani. Targeted campaigns and routine ANC services can both achieve high LLIN retention and use among

  1. Effect of baking and fermentation on the stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios of grain-based food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostic, Joshua N; Palafox, Sherilyn J; Rottmueller, Marina E; Jahren, A Hope

    2015-05-30

    Isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) is used extensively to reconstruct general attributes of prehistoric and modern diets in both humans and animals. In order to apply these methods to the accurate determination of specific intakes of foods/nutrients of interest, the isotopic signature of individually consumed foods must be constrained. For example, 86% of the calories consumed in the USA are derived from processed and prepared foods, but the relationship between the stable isotope composition of raw ingredients and the resulting products has not been characterized. To examine the effect of common cooking techniques on the stable isotope composition of grain-based food items, we prepared yeast buns and sugar cookies from standardized recipes and measured bulk δ(13) C and δ(15) N values of samples collected throughout a 75 min fermentation process (buns) and before and after baking at 190°C (buns and cookies). Simple isotope mixing models were used to determine if the isotopic signatures of 13 multi-ingredient foods could be estimated from the isotopic signatures of their constituent raw ingredients. No variations in δ(13) C or δ(15) N values were detected between pre- and post-baked yeast buns (pre: -24.78‰/2.61‰, post: -24.75‰/2.74‰), beet-sugar cookies (pre: -24.48‰/3.84‰, post: -24.47‰/3.57‰), and cane-sugar cookies (pre: -19.07‰/2.97‰, post: -19.02‰/3.21‰), or throughout a 75 min fermentation process in yeast buns. Using isotopic mass balance equations, the δ(13) C/δ(15) N values of multi-ingredient foods were estimated from the isotopic composition of constituent raw ingredients to within 0.14 ± 0.13‰/0.24 ± 0.17‰ for gravimetrically measured recipes and 0.40 ± 0.38‰/0.58 ± 0.53‰ for volumetrically measured recipes. Two common food preparation techniques, baking and fermentation, do not substantially affect the carbon or nitrogen isotopic signature of grain-based foods. Mass-balance equations can be used to

  2. The kinetic and solvent deuterium isotope effects in the 4- and 5-positions of the indole ring on the enzymatic decomposition of L-tryptophan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winnicka, Elzbieta; Dabrowski, Pawel; Winek, Tomasz; Kanska, Marianna

    2010-06-01

    The kinetic and solvent deuterium isotope effects in the 4- and 5-positions of the indole ring on the enzymatic decomposition of l-tryptophan catalysed by the enzyme TPase (EC. 4.1.99.1) were determined. The isotope effects were investigated by the non-competitive method using [4'-(2)H]-l-tryptophan, which was enriched in deuterium in 70% in the 4-position. The numerical values of isotope effects for 100% enrichment in deuterated label in that position were calculated by approximation. Those same isotope effects were determined for [5'-(2)H]-l-tryptophan fully deuteriated in the 5' -position.

  3. Isotope effects in mass-spectrometry; Les effets isotopiques en spectrometrie de masse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leicknam, J.P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires. Departement de physico-chimie, service des isotopes stables, section de spectrometrie de masse

    1967-05-01

    In the first part, a review is made of the work concerning the influence of isotopic substitution on the stabilities of ionised molecules and the bond-breaking probabilities; metastable transitions are also affected by this substitution. A model based on the Franck-Condon principle accounts for the experimentally observed isotopic effects for diatomic molecules; to a certain extent it is possible to generalise the calculation for the case of isotopic molecules of carbon dioxide gas. For deuterated polyatomic molecules there exist a {pi} effect making it possible to compare the relative stabilities of the X-H and X-D bonds, and a {gamma} effect which characterizes the different behaviours of the X-H bond in a normal molecule and in its partially deuterated homologue. Usually there is a very marked {pi} effect (e.g. the C-D bonds are more difficult to break than the homologous C-H bonds) and a {gamma} effect, the partial deuteration of a molecule leading in general to an increase in the probability of breakage of a given bond. An interpretation of {pi} and {gamma} effects based on Rosenstock near-equilibrium theory accounts for the observed phenomena, qualitatively at least, in the case of propane and acetylene. In the second part are gathered together results concerning isotopic effects produced during the formation of rearranged ions. The existence of cyclic transition ions has made it possible for Mc Lafferty to explain the existence of these ions in the mass spectrum; isotopic substitution leads to a modification of the rearrangement mechanism, the bonding forces being no longer the same. (author) [French] Dans une premiere partie, on rassemble les travaux concernant l'influence de la substitution isotopique sur les stabilites des molecules ionisees et les probabilites de rupture des liaisons; les transitions metastables sont egalement modifiees par cette substitution. Un modele base sur le principe de Franck-Condon rend compte des effets isotopiques

  4. Effect of the Aerosol Type Selection for the Retrieval of Shortwave Ground Net Radiation: Case Study Using Landsat 8 Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana Bassani

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the aerosol radiative effects involved in the accuracy of shortwave net radiation, R n . s w , with s w ∈ (400–900 nm, retrieved by the Operational Land Imager (OLI, the new generation sensor of the Landsat mission. Net radiation is a key parameter for the energy exchange between the land and atmosphere; thus, R n . s w retrieval from space is under investigation by exploiting the increased spatial resolution of the visible and near-infrared OLI data. We adopted the latest version of the Second Simulation of a Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum (6SV atmospheric radiative transfer model implemented in the atmospheric correction algorithm (OLI Atmospherically-Corrected Reflectance Imagery (OLI@CRI developed specifically for OLI data. The values of R n . s w were obtained by varying the microphysical properties of the aerosol during the OLI@CRI retrieval of both the OLI surface reflectance, ρ p x l o l i , and the incoming solar irradiance at the surface. The analysis of the aerosol effects on the R n . s w was carried out on a spectrally-homogeneous desert area located in the southwestern Nile Delta. The results reveal that the R n . s w available for energy exchange between the land and atmosphere reduces the accuracy (NRMSE ≃ 14% when the local aerosol microphysical properties are not considered during the processing of space data. Consequently, these findings suggest that the aerosol type should be considered for variables retrieved by satellite observations concerning the energy exchange in the natural ecosystems, such as Photosynthetically-Active Radiation (PAR. This will also improve the accuracy of land monitoring and of solar energy for power generation when space data are used.

  5. The effect of cannibalism intensity on the net primary production and the dynamics of trophic links in the aquatic ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirobokova, I.; Pechurkin, N.

    The aim of the work was to construct a mathematical model of the effect of cannibalism intensity on the dynamic behavior and functional characteristics of simple aquatic ecosystems. A mathematical model of an aquatic ecosystem has been constructed, with the following principal trophic links: limiting nutrient concentration, producers (phytoplankton), predators of the first order, and predators of the second order. The model takes into account the age structure of the second-order predator and includes two age groups (the young and adults). The adult predators of the second order are cannibals feeding on both first-order predators and their own young, which consume phytoplankton. The model was used to investigate the effect of cannibalism intensity on the net primary production and the dynamics of trophic links in the aquatic ecosystem characterized by cannibalism at the upper trophic level or by the emergence of a third-order predator in the system. It has been found that when cannibalism increases above a certain level, the concentrations of both adults and the young of the 2nd-order predators decrease. At the same time, the concentrations of the 1st-order predators and of nutrients increase, while the biomass of producers decreases. When the cannibalism intensity is low, the net primary production of the system increases to a certain level with the increase in cannibalism intensity and drops sharply when the level of consumption of the young is high. The emergence of the 3rd-order predator in the system leads to a change in the dynamics of links in conformity with the "bottom-up" and "top-down" control. Thus, cannibalism of a certain magnitude can lead to an increase in integrated parameters of aquatic ecosystems: the amount of energy used by the ecosystem and the productivity in the photosynthesis link.

  6. Strong Ionic Hydrogen Bonding Causes a Spectral Isotope Effect in Photoactive Yellow Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaledhonkar, Sandip; Hara, Miwa; Stalcup, T. Page; Xie, Aihua; Hoff, Wouter D.

    2013-01-01

    Standard hydrogen bonds are of great importance for protein structure and function. Ionic hydrogen bonds often are significantly stronger than standard hydrogen bonds and exhibit unique properties, but their role in proteins is not well understood. We report that hydrogen/deuterium exchange causes a redshift in the visible absorbance spectrum of photoactive yellow protein (PYP). We expand the range of interpretable isotope effects by assigning this spectral isotope effect (SIE) to a functionally important hydrogen bond at the active site of PYP. The inverted sign and extent of this SIE is explained by the ionic nature and strength of this hydrogen bond. These results show the relevance of ionic hydrogen bonding for protein active sites, and reveal that the inverted SIE is a novel, to our knowledge, tool to probe ionic hydrogen bonds. Our results support a classification of hydrogen bonds that distinguishes the properties of ionic hydrogen bonds from those of both standard and low barrier hydrogen bonds, and show how this classification helps resolve a recent debate regarding active site hydrogen bonding in PYP. PMID:24314088

  7. Aliphatic Claisen rearrangement transition state structure from secondary. cap alpha. -deuterium isotope effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gajewski, J.J.; Conrad, N.D.

    1979-05-09

    The kinetics isotope effects (KIE) at C/sub 4/ and C/sub 6/ in the 3,3 shift of 3-oxa-1,5-hexadiene appear to reveal that the transition state comes early, and that it involves much more bond breaking than making in contrast to the carbon 3,3 shift of relatively unperturbed dienes. At 160/sup 0/C the normal KIE at C/sub 4/ is 1.092 and the inverse KIE at C/sub 6/ is 1.025. The ratio of the KIE to the equilibrium isotope effect at the bond breaking site is (0.09/1.27) or 1/3, while that of the bond making site is only (1.025/1.16) or < 1/6. These results seem to confirm that the transition state is early because of the exothermicity of the reaction. The transition state structure suggests that radical stabilizing substituents on C/sub 1/, C/sub 4/, and C/sub 6/ will stabilize the transition state to a greater extent than placement of the same substituents on C/sub 2/ and C/sub 5/.

  8. Isotopic effects in the interaction of O- with D2 and H2 at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plašil, Radek; Tran, Thuy Dung; Roučka, Štěpán; Jusko, Pavol; Mulin, Dmytro; Zymak, Illia; Rednyk, Serhiy; Kovalenko, Artem; Dohnal, Petr; Glosík, Juraj; Houfek, Karel; Táborský, Jiří; Čížek, Martin

    2017-12-01

    The isotopic effects in reactions of O- ions with H2 and D2 have been studied experimentally using a cryogenic 22-pole radio-frequency ion trap. The rate coefficients for associative detachment leading to H2O +e- and to D2O +e- and for atom transfer reactions leading to formation of OH- and OD- ions were determined at temperatures ranging from 15 to 300 K. The measured temperature dependencies of the rate coefficients for both channels of reactions of O- with H2 and D2 are compared with the results of the classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulation of the O-+H2 and O-+D2 collisions using the newly calculated potential energy surfaces. The measured temperature dependencies of the reaction rate coefficients for associative detachment are in very good agreement with the calculated ones. Agreement between experimental and calculated temperature dependencies of the rate coefficients of atom transfer reactions is off at most by a factor of 3 and the isotope effect is reproduced.

  9. Deuterium isotope effect on the intramolecular electron transfer in Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O.; Zhang, Jingdong; Chi, Qijin

    2001-01-01

    Intramolecular electron transfer in azurin in water and deuterium oxide has been studied over a broad temperature range. The kinetic deuterium isotope effect, k(H)/k(D), is smaller than unity (0.7 at 298 K), primarily caused by the different activation entropies in water (-56.5 J K-1 mol(-1......)) and in deuterium oxide (-35.7 J K-1 mol(-1)). This difference suggests a role for distinct protein solvation in the two media, which is supported by the results of voltammetric measurements: the reduction potential (E-0') of Cu2+/+ at 298 K is 10 mV more positive in D2O than in H2O, The temperature dependence of E......-0' is also different, yielding entropy changes of -57 J K-1 mol-l in water and -84 J K-1 mol(-1) in deuterium oxide. The driving force difference of 10 mV is in keeping with the kinetic isotope effect, but the contribution to DeltaS(double dagger) from the temperature dependence of E-0' is positive...

  10. The NET effect of dispersants : A critical review of testing and modelling of surface oil dispersion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marieke Zeinstra-Helfrich; Wierd Koops; Albertinka J. Murk

    2015-01-01

    Application of chemical dispersants or mechanical dispersion on surface oil is a trade-off between surface effects (impact of floating oil) and sub-surface effects (impact of suspended oil). Making an informed decision regarding such response, requires insight in the induced change in fate and

  11. The NET effect of dispersants - a critical review of testing and modelling of surface oil dispersion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeinstra-Helfrich, Marieke; Koops, Wierd; Murk, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    Application of chemical dispersants or mechanical dispersion on surface oil is a trade-off between surface effects (impact of floating oil) and sub-surface effects (impact of suspended oil). Making an informed decision regarding such response, requires insight in the induced change in fate and

  12. Middle-School Understanding of the Greenhouse Effect using a NetLogo Computer Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, L.; Koons, P. O.; Schauffler, M.

    2009-12-01

    We investigated the effectiveness of a freely available agent based, modeling program as a learning tool for seventh and eighth grade students to explore the greenhouse effect without added curriculum. The investigation was conducted at two Maine middle-schools with 136 seventh-grade students and 11 eighth-grade students in eight classes. Students were given a pre-test that consisted of a concept map, a free-response question, and multiple-choice questions about how the greenhouse effect influences the Earth's temperature. The computer model simulates the greenhouse effect and allows students to manipulate atmospheric and surface conditions to observe the effects on the Earth’s temperature. Students explored the Greenhouse Effect model for approximately twenty minutes with only two focus questions for guidance. After the exploration period, students were given a post-test that was identical to the pre-test. Parametric post-test analysis of the assessments indicated middle-school students gained in their understanding about how the greenhouse effect influences the Earth's temperature after exploring the computer model for approximately twenty minutes. The magnitude of the changes in pre- and post-test concept map and free-response scores were small (average free-response post-test score of 7.0) compared to an expert's score (48), indicating that students understood only a few of the system relationships. While students gained in their understanding about the greenhouse effect, there was evidence that students held onto their misconceptions that (1) carbon dioxide in the atmosphere deteriorates the ozone layer, (2) the greenhouse effect is a result of humans burning fossil fuels, and (3) infrared and visible light have similar behaviors with greenhouse gases. We recommend using the Greenhouse Effect computer model with guided inquiry to focus students’ investigations on the system relationships in the model.

  13. Nuclear field shift effect in isotope fractionation of mercury during abiotic reduction in the absence of light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wang; Hintelmann, Holger

    2010-04-01

    We investigated the abiotic reduction of inorganic Hg(II) by dissolved organic matter (DOM) and stannous(II) chloride (SnCl(2)) in the absence of light and quantified fractionation of Hg isotopes during these processes. The kinetics of reduction by DOM was characterized using multiple parallel pseudo-first-order reactions, implying different reactive Hg(II) species resulting from Hg-DOM complexation. Significant mass independent isotopic anomalies were observed in reduction by both reducing reagents. Isotopes with odd atomic masses ((199)Hg and (201)Hg) showed less enrichment in reactants Hg(II) than expected for a mass dependent fractionation process. The fractionation factors (alpha) showed an odd-even staggering pattern that resembles the variation of nuclear charge radii. We demonstrated that these isotopic anomalies originated from nuclear field shift effect (NFS). The contribution of NFS to the measured fractionation factors was estimated and found to be as significant as the mass dependent effect. The observed Delta(199)Hg/Delta(201)Hg slope was explained by NFS and determined to be between 1.5 and 1.6 in abiotic nonphotochemical reduction, which is distinguishable from slopes determined for photochemical reduction. Therefore, we first demonstrated experimentally the significance of the nuclear field shift effect during reduction of Hg(II) and showed the application of isotope fractionation to distinguish between different reduction pathways.

  14. Isotope Effects on Trapped-Electron-Mode Driven Turbulence and Zonal Flows in Helical and Tokamak Plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Motoki; Nunami, Masanori; Sugama, Hideo; Watanabe, Tomo-Hiko

    2017-04-21

    Impacts of isotope ion mass on trapped-electron-mode (TEM)-driven turbulence and zonal flows in magnetically confined fusion plasmas are investigated. Gyrokinetic simulations of TEM-driven turbulence in three-dimensional magnetic configuration of helical plasmas with hydrogen isotope ions and real-mass kinetic electrons are realized for the first time, and the linear and the nonlinear nature of the isotope and collisional effects on the turbulent transport and zonal-flow generation are clarified. It is newly found that combined effects of the collisional TEM stabilization by the isotope ions and the associated increase in the impacts of the steady zonal flows at the near-marginal linear stability lead to the significant transport reduction with the opposite ion mass dependence in comparison to the conventional gyro-Bohm scaling. The universal nature of the isotope effects on the TEM-driven turbulence and zonal flows is verified for a wide variety of toroidal plasmas, e.g., axisymmetric tokamak and non-axisymmetric helical or stellarator systems.

  15. Net profit flow per country from 1980 to 2009 : The long-term effects of foreign direct investment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkermans, Dirk H.M.

    2017-01-01

    Aim of the paper The paper aims at describing and explaining net profit flows per country for the period 1980-2009. Net profit flows result from Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) stock and profit repatriation: inward stock creating a profit outflow and outward FDI stock a profit inflow. Profit flows,

  16. It's like night and day: Diel net-effects on Cercopagidae densities in the Laurentian Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armenio, Patricia M.; Bunnell, David B.; Adams, Jean V.; Watson, Nicole M.; Woelmer, Whitney

    2017-01-01

    In the Laurentian Great Lakes, zooplankters are often sampled using standard ≤153 μm mesh nets without regard to the time of day they are collected. We sampled Cercopagidae during 2013–2014 in northern Lake Huron during day, dusk, and night using two different nets (a 0.5 m wide 153 μm mesh “standard” net and a 0.75 m wide 285 μm mesh “Bythotrephes” net) to determine if there were any differences in their sampled densities. Bythotrephes densities with the standard net were approximately 2.07-fold greater when captured at night than during the day. No time of day bias occurred with the Bythotrephes net. Nighttime Bythotrephes densities did not differ between the two net types. Cercopagis densities did not vary with net type or the time of day in this study, but future work should revisit this result given our low sample size and the low occurrence of Cercopagis in Lake Huron. To reduce bias and calculate accurate density estimates, Cercopagidae should be sampled at night if using a standard net or any time of day with the Bythotrephes net. Given the large impact of invasive predatory cladocerans Bythotrephes longimanus and Cercopagis pengoi on food webs since their invasion in the Laurentian Great Lakes in the 1980s, proper estimation of their densities is essential.

  17. Quantum and thermal ionic motion, oxygen isotope effect, and superexchange distribution in La2CuO4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haefliger, P. S.; Gerber, S.; Pramod, R.

    2014-01-01

    for theoretical estimates of the distribution of magnetic interaction parameters, J, in an effective one-band model for the cuprate plane. We find that ionic motion causes only small (1%) effects on the average value , which vary with temperature and O isotope, but results in dramatic (10-20%) fluctuations...

  18. Net effects of nitrogen fertilization on the nutritive value and digestibility of oat forages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applications of soil amendments containing N are part of routine forage management strategies for grasses, with a primary goal of increasing forage yield. However, the effects of N fertilization on forage nutritive value, estimates of energy density, and in-vitro DM or NDF disappearance often have b...

  19. Net effects of gasoline price changes on transit ridership in U.S. urban areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Using panel data of transit ridership and gasoline prices for ten selected U.S. urbanized areas over the time period of 2002 to 2011, : this study analyzes the effect of gasoline prices on ridership of the four main transit modesbus, light rail, h...

  20. Topographical effects of climate dataset and their impacts on the estimation of regional net primary productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, L. Qing; Feng, Feng X.

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we first built and compared two different climate datasets for Wuling mountainous area in 2010, one of which considered topographical effects during the ANUSPLIN interpolation was referred as terrain-based climate dataset, while the other one did not was called ordinary climate dataset. Then, we quantified the topographical effects of climatic inputs on NPP estimation by inputting two different climate datasets to the same ecosystem model, the Boreal Ecosystem Productivity Simulator (BEPS), to evaluate the importance of considering relief when estimating NPP. Finally, we found the primary contributing variables to the topographical effects through a series of experiments given an overall accuracy of the model output for NPP. The results showed that: (1) The terrain-based climate dataset presented more reliable topographic information and had closer agreements with the station dataset than the ordinary climate dataset at successive time series of 365 days in terms of the daily mean values. (2) On average, ordinary climate dataset underestimated NPP by 12.5% compared with terrain-based climate dataset over the whole study area. (3) The primary climate variables contributing to the topographical effects of climatic inputs for Wuling mountainous area were temperatures, which suggest that it is necessary to correct temperature differences for estimating NPP accurately in such a complex terrain.

  1. Effect of stroke rate on the distribution of net mechanical power in rowing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofmijster, M.J.; Landman, E.H.; Smith, R.M.; van Soest, A.J.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of manipulating stroke rate on the distribution of mechanical power in rowing. Two causes of inefficient mechanical energy expenditure were identified in rowing. The ratio between power not lost at the blades and generated mechanical power (P̄

  2. Effect of 2H and 18O water isotopes in kinesin-1 gliding assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy Maloney

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We show for the first time the effects of heavy-hydrogen water (2H2O and heavy-oxygen water (H218O on the gliding speed of microtubules on kinesin-1 coated surfaces. Increased fractions of isotopic waters used in the motility solution decreased the gliding speed of microtubules by a maximum of 21% for heavy-hydrogen and 5% for heavy-oxygen water. We also show that gliding microtubule speed returns to its original speed after being treated with heavy-hydrogen water. We discuss possible interpretations of these results and the importance for future studies of water effects on kinesin and microtubules. We also discuss the implication for using heavy waters in biomolecular devices incorporating molecular motors.

  3. Alpha heating and isotopic mass effects in JET plasmas with sawteeth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budny, R. V. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Team, JET [EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB, UK

    2016-02-09

    The alpha heating experiment in the Joint European Torus (JET) 1997 DTE1 campaign is re-examined. Several effects correlated with tritium content and thermal hydrogenic isotopic mass < A> weaken the conclusion that alpha heating was clearly observed. These effects delayed the occurrence of significant sawtooth crashes allowing the electron and ion temperatures T e and T i to achieve higher values. Under otherwise equal circumstances T e and T i were typically higher for discharges with higher < A >, and significant scaling of T i, T e, and total stored energy with < A > were observed. The higher T i led to increased ion–electron heating rates with magnitudes comparable to those computed for alpha electron heating. Rates of other heating/loss processes also had comparable magnitudes. Simulations of T e assuming the observed scaling of T i are qualitatively consistent with the measured profiles, without invoking alpha heating

  4. Effects of organic fertilizer on net global warming potential under an intensively managed vegetable field in southeastern China: A three-year field study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M.; Li, B.; Xiong, Z. Q.

    2016-11-01

    Organic fertilizer may not only improve soil quality but may also contribute to climate protection by increasing carbon sequestration in agricultural ecosystems. A 3-yr study was conducted with ten consecutive vegetable crops in intensively managed vegetable cropping systems in southeastern China to examine the effects of organic fertilizer application (ORGA) on net global warming potential (net GWP) after accounting for carbon dioxide equivalent emissions from all sources including methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, agrochemical inputs and farm operations and sinks (i.e., soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration derived from the net ecosystem carbon budget). Results indicated that ORGA significantly increased ecosystem respiration by 13.9% without obvious effects on CH4 and N2O emissions as compared to local conventional chemical fertilization (CHEM). The SOC sequestration rates during the 3-year observation period were estimated at -0.52 t C ha-1 for the control, -0.42 t C ha-1 for the CHEM plot and 0.27 t C ha-1 for the ORGA plot, respectively, and thus contributed significantly to the net GWP. Overall, compared with CHEM, the ORGA significantly decreased net GWP and greenhouse gas intensity by 15.3% and 27.4%, respectively. Our findings suggest that higher yields and lower greenhouse gas intensities and carbon costs can be achieved by substituting chemical nitrogen fertilizers with organic fertilization strategies.

  5. Host pollination mode and mutualist pollinator presence: net effect of internally ovipositing parasite in the fig-wasp mutualism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fengping; Peng, Yanqiong; Compton, Stephen G.; Zhao, Yi; Yang, Darong

    2009-04-01

    The Ficus-their specific pollinating fig wasps (Chalcidoidea, Agaonidae) interaction presents a striking example of mutualism. Figs also shelter numerous non-pollinating fig wasps (NPFW) that exploit the fig-pollinator mutualism. Only a few NPFW species can enter figs to oviposit, they do not belong to the pollinating lineage Agaonidae. The internally ovipositing non-agaonid fig wasps can efficiently pollinate the Ficus species that were passively pollinated. However, there is no study to focus on the net effect of these internally ovipositing non-agaonid wasps in actively pollinated Ficus species. By collecting the data of fig wasp community and conducting controlled experiments, our results showed that internally ovipositing Diaziella bizarrea cannot effectively pollinate Ficus glaberrima, an actively pollinated monoecious fig tree. Furthermore, D. bizarrea failed to reproduce if they were introduced into figs without Eupristina sp., the regular pollinator, as all the figs aborted. Furthermore, although D. bizarrea had no effect on seed production in shared figs, it significantly reduced the number of Eupristina sp. progeny emerging from them. Thus, our experimental evidence shows that reproduction in Diaziella depends on the presence of agaonid pollinators, and whether internally ovipositing parasites can act as pollinators depends on the host fig’s pollination mode (active or passive). Overall, this study and others suggest a relatively limited mutualistic role for internally ovipositing fig wasps from non-pollinator (non-Agaonidae) lineages.

  6. Net benefits: assessing the effectiveness of clinical networks in Australia through qualitative methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background In the 21st century, government and industry are supplementing hierarchical, bureaucratic forms of organization with network forms, compatible with principles of devolved governance and decentralization of services. Clinical networks are employed as a key health policy approach to engage clinicians in improving patient care in Australia. With significant investment in such networks in Australia and internationally, it is important to assess their effectiveness and sustainability as implementation mechanisms. Methods In two purposively selected, musculoskeletal clinical networks, members and stakeholders were interviewed to ascertain their perceptions regarding key factors relating to network effectiveness and sustainability. We adopted a three-level approach to evaluating network effectiveness: at the community, network, and member levels, across the network lifecycle. Results Both networks studied are advisory networks displaying characteristics of the ‘enclave’ type of non-hierarchical network. They are hybrids of the mandated and natural network forms. In the short term, at member level, both networks were striving to create connectivity and collaboration of members. Over the short to medium term, at network level, both networks applied multi-disciplinary engagement in successfully developing models of care as key outputs, and disseminating information to stakeholders. In the long term, at both community and network levels, stakeholders would measure effectiveness by the broader statewide influence of the network in changing and improving practice. At community level, in the long term, stakeholders acknowledged both networks had raised the profile, and provided a ‘voice’ for musculoskeletal conditions, evidencing some progress with implementation of the network mission while pursuing additional implementation strategies. Conclusions This research sheds light on stakeholders’ perceptions of assessing clinical network effectiveness at

  7. Net benefits: assessing the effectiveness of clinical networks in Australia through qualitative methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cunningham Frances C

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the 21st century, government and industry are supplementing hierarchical, bureaucratic forms of organization with network forms, compatible with principles of devolved governance and decentralization of services. Clinical networks are employed as a key health policy approach to engage clinicians in improving patient care in Australia. With significant investment in such networks in Australia and internationally, it is important to assess their effectiveness and sustainability as implementation mechanisms. Methods In two purposively selected, musculoskeletal clinical networks, members and stakeholders were interviewed to ascertain their perceptions regarding key factors relating to network effectiveness and sustainability. We adopted a three-level approach to evaluating network effectiveness: at the community, network, and member levels, across the network lifecycle. Results Both networks studied are advisory networks displaying characteristics of the ‘enclave’ type of non-hierarchical network. They are hybrids of the mandated and natural network forms. In the short term, at member level, both networks were striving to create connectivity and collaboration of members. Over the short to medium term, at network level, both networks applied multi-disciplinary engagement in successfully developing models of care as key outputs, and disseminating information to stakeholders. In the long term, at both community and network levels, stakeholders would measure effectiveness by the broader statewide influence of the network in changing and improving practice. At community level, in the long term, stakeholders acknowledged both networks had raised the profile, and provided a ‘voice’ for musculoskeletal conditions, evidencing some progress with implementation of the network mission while pursuing additional implementation strategies. Conclusions This research sheds light on stakeholders’ perceptions of assessing clinical

  8. Effects of winter temperature and summer drought on net ecosystem exchange of CO2 in a temperate peatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfter, Carole; Campbell, Claire; Dinsmore, Kerry; Drewer, Julia; Coyle, Mhairi; Anderson, Margaret; Skiba, Ute; Nemitz, Eiko; Billett, Michael; Sutton, Mark

    2014-05-01

    Northern peatlands are one of the most important global sinks of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2); their ability to sequester C is a natural feedback mechanism controlled by climatic variables such as precipitation, temperature, length of growing season and period of snow cover. In the UK it has been predicted that peatlands could become a net source of carbon in response to climate change with climate models predicting a rise in global temperature of ca. 3oC between 1961-1990 and 2100. Land-atmosphere exchange of CO2in peatlands exhibits marked seasonal and inter-annual variations, which have significant short- and long-term effects on carbon sink strength. Net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2 has been measured continuously by eddy-covariance (EC) at Auchencorth Moss (55° 47'32 N, 3° 14'35 W, 267 m a.s.l.), a temperate peatland in central Scotland, since 2002. Auchencorth Moss is a low-lying, ombrotrophic peatland situated ca. 20 km south-west of Edinburgh. Peat depth ranges from 5 m and the site has a mean annual precipitation of 1155 mm. The vegetation present within the flux measurement footprint comprises mixed grass species, heather and substantial areas of moss species (Sphagnum spp. and Polytrichum spp.). The EC system consists of a LiCOR 7000 closed-path infrared gas analyser for the simultaneous measurement of CO2 and water vapour and of a Gill Windmaster Pro ultrasonic anemometer. Over the 10 year period, the site was a consistent yet variable sink of CO2 ranging from -34.1 to -135.9 g CO2-C m-2 yr-1 (mean of -69.1 ± 33.6 g CO2-C m-2 yr-1). Inter-annual variability in NEE was positively correlated to the length of the growing seasons and mean winter air temperature explained 93% of the variability in summertime sink strength, indicating a phenological memory-effect. Plant development and productivity were stunted by colder winters causing a net reduction in the annual carbon sink strength of this peatland where autotrophic processes are thought to be

  9. Effects of Net Metering on the Use of Small-Scale Wind Systems in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsyth, T. L.; Pedden, M.; Gagliano, T.

    2002-11-01

    Factors such as technological advancements, steadily decreasing costs, consumer demand, and state and federal policies are combining to make wind energy the world's fastest growing energy source. State and federal policies are facilitating the growth of the domestic, large-scale wind power market; however, small-scale wind projects (those with a capacity of less than 100 kilowatts[kW]) still face challenges in many states. Net metering, also referred to as net billing, is one particular policy that states are implementing to encourage the use of small renewable energy systems. Net metering allows individual, grid-tied customers who generate electricity using a small renewable energy system to receive credit from their utility for any excess power they generate beyond what they consume. Under most state rules, residential, commercial, and industrial customers are eligible for net metering; however, some states restrict eligibility to particular customer classes. This paper illustrates how net metering programs in certain states vary considerably in terms of how customers are credited for excess power they generate; the type and size of eligible technologies and whether the utility; the state, or some other entity administers the program. This paper focuses on10 particular states where net metering policies are in place. It analyzes how the different versions of these programs affect the use of small-scale wind technologies and whether some versions are more favorable to this technology than others. The choice of citizens in some states to net meter with photovoltaics is also examined.

  10. The effect of warming on grassland evapotranspiration partitioning using laser-based isotope monitoring techniques

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Lixin

    2013-06-01

    The proportion of transpiration (T) in total evapotranspiration (ET) is an important parameter that provides insight into the degree of biological influence on the hydrological cycles. Studies addressing the effects of climatic warming on the ecosystem total water balance are scarce, and measured warming effects on the T/ET ratio in field experiments have not been seen in the literature. In this study, we quantified T/ET ratios under ambient and warming treatments in a grassland ecosystem using a stable isotope approach. The measurements were made at a long-term grassland warming site in Oklahoma during the May-June peak growing season of 2011. Chamber-based methods were used to estimate the δ2H isotopic composition of evaporation (δE), transpiration (δT) and the aggregated evapotranspiration (δET). A modified commercial conifer leaf chamber was used for δT, a modified commercial soil chamber was used for δE and a custom built chamber was used for δET. The δE, δET and δT were quantified using both the Keeling plot approach and a mass balance method, with the Craig-Gordon model approach also used to calculate δE. Multiple methods demonstrated no significant difference between control and warming plots for both δET and δT. Though the chamber-based estimates and the Craig-Gordon results diverged by about 12‰, all methods showed that δE was more depleted in the warming plots. This decrease in δE indicates that the evaporation flux as a percentage of total water flux necessarily decreased for δET to remain constant, which was confirmed by field observations. The T/ET ratio in the control treatment was 0.65 or 0.77 and the ratio found in the warming treatment was 0.83 or 0.86, based on the chamber method and the Craig-Gordon approach. Sensitivity analysis of the Craig-Gordon model demonstrates that the warming-induced decrease in soil liquid water isotopic composition is the major factor responsible for the observed δE depletion and the temperature

  11. Cost-effective sampling of ¹³⁷Cs-derived net soil redistribution: part 1--estimating the spatial mean across scales of variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y; Chappell, A; Nyamdavaa, B; Yu, H; Davaasuren, D; Zoljargal, K

    2015-03-01

    The (137)Cs technique for estimating net time-integrated soil redistribution is valuable for understanding the factors controlling soil redistribution by all processes. The literature on this technique is dominated by studies of individual fields and describes its typically time-consuming nature. We contend that the community making these studies has inappropriately assumed that many (137)Cs measurements are required and hence estimates of net soil redistribution can only be made at the field scale. Here, we support future studies of (137)Cs-derived net soil redistribution to apply their often limited resources across scales of variation (field, catchment, region etc.) without compromising the quality of the estimates at any scale. We describe a hybrid, design-based and model-based, stratified random sampling design with composites to estimate the sampling variance and a cost model for fieldwork and laboratory measurements. Geostatistical mapping of net (1954-2012) soil redistribution as a case study on the Chinese Loess Plateau is compared with estimates for several other sampling designs popular in the literature. We demonstrate the cost-effectiveness of the hybrid design for spatial estimation of net soil redistribution. To demonstrate the limitations of current sampling approaches to cut across scales of variation, we extrapolate our estimate of net soil redistribution across the region, show that for the same resources, estimates from many fields could have been provided and would elucidate the cause of differences within and between regional estimates. We recommend that future studies evaluate carefully the sampling design to consider the opportunity to investigate (137)Cs-derived net soil redistribution across scales of variation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Modelling effects of seasonal variation in water table depth on net ecosystem CO2 exchange of a tropical peatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezbahuddin, M.; Grant, R. F.; Hirano, T.

    2014-02-01

    Seasonal variation in water table depth (WTD) determines the balance between aggradation and degradation of tropical peatlands. Longer dry seasons together with human interventions (e.g. drainage) can cause WTD drawdowns making tropical peatland C storage highly vulnerable. Better predictive capacity for effects of WTD on net CO2 exchange is thus essential to guide conservation of tropical peat deposits. Mathematical modelling of basic eco-hydrological processes under site-specific conditions can provide such predictive capacity. We hereby deploy a process-based mathematical model ecosys to study effects of seasonal variation in WTD on net ecosystem productivity (NEP) of a drainage affected tropical peat swamp forest at Palangkaraya, Indonesia. Simulated NEP suggested that the peatland was a C source (NEP ~ -2 g C m-2 d-1, where a negative sign represents a C source and a positive sign a C sink) during rainy seasons with shallow WTD, C neutral or a small sink (NEP ~ +1 g C m-2 d-1) during early dry seasons with intermediate WTD and a substantial C source (NEP ~ -4 g C m-2 d-1) during late dry seasons with deep WTD from 2002 to 2005. These values were corroborated by regressions (P 0.8, intercepts approaching 0 and slopes approaching 1. We also simulated a gradual increase in annual NEP from 2002 (-609 g C m-2) to 2005 (-373 g C m-2) with decreasing WTD which was attributed to declines in duration and intensity of dry seasons following the El Niño event of 2002. This increase in modelled NEP was corroborated by EC-gap filled annual NEP estimates. Our modelling hypotheses suggested that (1) poor aeration in wet soils during shallow WTD caused slow nutrient (predominantly phosphorus) mineralization and consequent slow plant nutrient uptake that suppressed gross primary productivity (GPP) and hence NEP (2) better soil aeration during intermediate WTD enhanced nutrient mineralization and hence plant nutrient uptake, GPP and NEP and (3) deep WTD suppressed NEP through a

  13. Net effects of nitrogen fertilization on the nutritive value and digestibility of oat forages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coblentz, W K; Akins, M S; Cavadini, J S; Jokela, W E

    2017-03-01

    Applications of soil amendments containing N are part of routine forage-management strategies for grasses, with a primary goal of increasing forage yield. However, the effects of N fertilization on forage nutritive value, estimates of energy density, and in vitro dry matter or neutral detergent fiber disappearance sometimes have been erratic or inconsistent. Our objectives were to evaluate the effects of N fertilization on the nutritive value of a single cultivar (ForagePlus, Kratz Farms, Slinger, WI) of fall-grown oat fertilized at planting with 20, 40, 60, 80, or 100 kg of N/ha of urea or 2 rates of dairy slurry (42,300 or 84,600 L/ha). Nitrogen fertilization exhibited consistent effects on fiber components; forages fertilized with urea or dairy slurry had greater concentrations of fiber components compared with those harvested from unfertilized check plots (0 kg of N/ha), and fiber concentrations increased linearly with urea fertilization rate. In contrast, concentrations of water-soluble carbohydrates were greatest for unfertilized forages (21.2%), but declined linearly with urea fertilization, exhibiting a minimum of 13.5% at the 80 kg of N/ha urea application rate. Similarly, nonfiber carbohydrates also declined linearly, from 34.8% for unfertilized check plots to a minimum of 24.6% at the 80 kg of N/ha urea application rate. Fertilization with urea resulted in consistent linear increases in crude protein (CP), neutral detergent soluble CP, neutral detergent insoluble CP, and acid detergent insoluble CP; however, the partitioning of CP on the basis of association with specific fiber fractions could not be related to N fertilization when concentrations were expressed on a percentage of CP basis. The summative calculation of energy, expressed as total digestible nutrients was closely related to N fertilization rate during both the 2013 (y = -0.038x + 72.2; R2 = 0.961) and 2014 (y = -0.040x + 69.2; R2 = 0.771) production years. Following 30- or 48-h incubations

  14. Effect of propolis ethanol extract on myostatin gene expression and muscle morphometry of Nile tilapia in net cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, E L; Mizubuti, I Y; Alfieri, A A; Otonel, R A A; Buck, L Y; Souza, F P; Prado-Calixto, O P; Poveda-Parra, A R; Alexandre Filho, L; Lopera-Barrero, N M

    2017-03-16

    Propolis can be used as growth enhancer due to its antimicrobial, antioxidant, and immune-stimulant properties, but its effects on morphometry and muscle gene expression are largely unknown. The present study evaluates the influence of propolis on muscle morphometry and myostatin gene expression in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) bred in net cages. Reversed males (GIFT strain) with an initial weight of 170 ± 25 g were distributed in a (2 x 4) factorial scheme, with two diets (DPRO, commercial diet with 4% propolis ethanol extract and DCON, commercial diet without propolis, control) and four assessment periods (0, 35, 70, and 105 experimental days). Muscles were evaluated at each assessment period. Histomorphometric analysis classified the fiber diameters into four groups: 50 μm. RT-qPCR was performed to assess myostatin gene expression. Fibers 30 µm (30-50 and > 50 µm) at 70 days were 25.39% and 40.07% for DPRO and DCON, respectively. There was greater myostatin gene expression at 105 days, averaging 1.93 and 1.89 for DCON and DPRO, respectively, with no significant difference in any of the analyzed periods. Propolis ethanol extract did not affect the diameter of muscle fibers or the gene expression of myostatin. Future studies should describe the mechanisms of natural products' effects on muscle growth and development since these factors are highly relevant for fish production performance.

  15. Effects of system net charge and electrostatic truncation on all-atom constant pH molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Shen, Jana K

    2014-10-15

    Constant pH molecular dynamics offers a means to rigorously study the effects of solution pH on dynamical processes. Here, we address two critical questions arising from the most recent developments of the all-atom continuous constant pH molecular dynamics (CpHMD) method: (1) What is the effect of spatial electrostatic truncation on the sampling of protonation states? (2) Is the enforcement of electrical neutrality necessary for constant pH simulations? We first examined how the generalized reaction field and force-shifting schemes modify the electrostatic forces on the titration coordinates. Free energy simulations of model compounds were then carried out to delineate the errors in the deprotonation free energy and salt-bridge stability due to electrostatic truncation and system net charge. Finally, CpHMD titration of a mini-protein HP36 was used to understand the manifestation of the two types of errors in the calculated pK(a) values. The major finding is that enforcing charge neutrality under all pH conditions and at all time via cotitrating ions significantly improves the accuracy of protonation-state sampling. We suggest that such finding is also relevant for simulations with particle mesh Ewald, considering the known artifacts due to charge-compensating background plasma. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Effects of system net charge and electrostatic truncation on all-atom constant pH molecular dynamics †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Shen, Jana K.

    2014-01-01

    Constant pH molecular dynamics offers a means to rigorously study the effects of solution pH on dynamical processes. Here we address two critical questions arising from the most recent developments of the all-atom continuous constant pH molecular dynamics (CpHMD) method: 1) What is the effect of spatial electrostatic truncation on the sampling of protonation states? 2) Is the enforcement of electrical neutrality necessary for constant pH simulations? We first examined how the generalized reaction field and force shifting schemes modify the electrostatic forces on the titration coordinates. Free energy simulations of model compounds were then carried out to delineate the errors in the deprotonation free energy and salt-bridge stability due to electrostatic truncation and system net charge. Finally, CpHMD titration of a mini-protein HP36 was used to understand the manifestation of the two types of errors in the calculated pK a values. The major finding is that enforcing charge neutrality under all pH conditions and at all time via co-titrating ions significantly improves the accuracy of protonation-state sampling. We suggest that such finding is also relevant for simulations with particle-mesh Ewald, considering the known artifacts due to charge-compensating background plasma. PMID:25142416

  17. Effectiveness and costs of specialised physiotherapy given via ParkinsonNet: a retrospective analysis of medical claims data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ypinga, Jan H L; de Vries, Nienke M; Boonen, Lieke H H M; Koolman, Xander; Munneke, Marten; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2018-02-01

    Parkinson's disease is a complex condition that is best managed by specialised professionals. Trials show that specialised allied health interventions are cost-effective, as compared with usual care. We aimed to study the long-term benefits of specialised physiotherapy using the ParkinsonNet approach in real-world practice. We did an observational study, retrospectively analysing a database of health insurance claims that included a representative population of Dutch patients with Parkinson's disease, who were followed for up to 3 years (Jan 1, 2013, to Dec 31, 2015). Eligibility criteria included having both a diagnosis of Parkinson's disease and having received physiotherapy for the disease. Allocation to specialised or usual care physiotherapy was based on the choices of patients and referring physicians. We used a mixed-effects model to compare health-care use and outcomes between patients treated by specialised or usual care physiotherapists. The primary outcome was the percentage of patients with a Parkinson's disease-related complication (ie, visit or admission to hospital because of fracture, other orthopaedic injuries, or pneumonia) adjusted for baseline variables. We compared physiotherapist caseload, the number of physiotherapy sessions, physiotherapy costs, and total health-care costs (including hospital care, but excluding community care, long-term care, and informal care) between the groups, and used a Cox's proportional hazard model for survival time to establish whether mortality was influenced by treatment by a specialised physiotherapist. We analysed 2129 patients (4649 observations) receiving specialised physiotherapy and 2252 patients (5353 observations) receiving usual care physiotherapy. Significantly fewer patients treated by a specialised physiotherapist had a Parkinson's disease-related complication (n=368 [17%]) than patients treated by a usual care physiotherapist (n=480 [21%]; odds ratio 0·67, 95% CI 0·56-0·81, plower for specialised

  18. Effect of Feeding On The Carbon and Oxygen Isotopic Composition In The Tissues and Skeleton of The Zooxanthellate Coral Stylophora Pistillata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynaud-Vaganay, S.; Ferrier-Pagès, C.; Sambrotto, R.; Juillet-Leclerc, A.; Jaubert, J.

    and J.-P. Gattuso4 1Centre Scientifique de Monaco, Avenue Saint Martin, MC-98000, Principality of Monaco 2Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, 61 Rt. 9W/ P.O. Box 1000, Palisades, NY 10964 U.S.A 3Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement, Laboratoire mixte CNRS- CEA, F-91180 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex, France 4Observatoire Océanologique, Laboratoire d'Océanographie, CNRS-UPMC, BP 28, F- 06234 Villefranche-sur-mer Cedex, France The effect of feeding on the carbon isotopic composition of zooxanthellae, animal tissue and skeleton was investigated in the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata. Two sets of corals were grown with filtered seawater under controlled conditions. One group of colonies was fed with Artemia nauplii and compared to a control group that was starved. Fed corals exhibited higher concentrations of chlorophyll protein calcification rates than starved colonies. The net photosynthetic rate was higher in starved than in fed corals, whereas dark respiration was not significantly different. The average ? C value of Artemia nauplii used for feeding was -12. ? C was 13 13 significantly heavier in zooxanthellae than in animal tissues, for both fed (-10.1vs. -11.7) and starved colonies (-10.9vs. -13.2). Isotopic data reflected the incorporation of Artemia carbon into the coral tissue in that the ? C was 13 significantly heavier in fed than in starved colonies (-11.7 to -13.2 respectively), although there was no difference in the ? C of the zooxanthellae fraction. Skeletal 13 ? C was similar in fed and starved colonies (mean = -4.6). Skeletal ? O 13 18 composition was, however, significantly different between the two treatments (-4.24 to -4.05 for fed and starved colonies respectively). These data are used to establish a conceptual model of the carbon flow between the various compartments of a symbiotic coral.

  19. Advances in Kinetic Isotope Effect Measurement Techniques for Enzyme Mechanism Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Gu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Kinetic isotope effects (KIEs are a very powerful tool for investigating enzyme mechanisms. Precision of measurement is the most important factor for KIE determinations, especially for small heavy atom KIEs. Internal competition is commonly used to measure small KIEs on V/K. Several methods, including such as liquid scintillation counting, mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and polarimetry have been used to determine KIEs. In this paper, which does not aspire to be an exhaustive review, we briefly review different experimental approaches for the measurement of KIEs on enzymatic reaction with an emphasis on newer techniques employing mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry as well as some corresponding examples.

  20. Improved calculation on the isotope effect in dissociative electron attachment to acetylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chourou, S. T.; Orel, A. E.

    2009-09-01

    We performed nuclear dynamics calculations on C2H2 and C2D2 to study the isotope effect in dissociative electron attachment (DEA). Our previous calculations at 0 K led to a ratio σ0→DEA(C2H-)/σ0→DEA(C2D-) of about 28.9 which is about a factor of 2 higher than recent experimental results. This discrepancy was attributed to the contribution of higher vibrational modes in the yield of the anion fragments. We included the four lowest bending vibrational states presenting nonvanishing populations at the experiment temperature of T=333K . The resulting ratio is found to be 17.9 which is in closer agreement with the measured value.

  1. Isotope Effects as Probes for Enzyme Catalyzed Hydrogen-Transfer Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amnon Kohen

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Kinetic Isotope effects (KIEs have long served as a probe for the mechanisms of both enzymatic and solution reactions. Here, we discuss various models for the physical sources of KIEs, how experimentalists can use those models to interpret their data, and how the focus of traditional models has grown to a model that includes motion of the enzyme and quantum mechanical nuclear tunneling. We then present two case studies of enzymes, thymidylate synthase and alcohol dehydrogenase, and discuss how KIEs have shed light on the C-H bond cleavages those enzymes catalyze. We will show how the combination of both experimental and computational studies has changed our notion of how these enzymes exert their catalytic powers.

  2. Deuterium isotope effect on 13C chemical shifts of tetrabutylammonium salts of Schiff bases amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozwadowski, Z

    2006-09-01

    Deuterium isotope effects on 13C chemical shift of tetrabutylammonium salts of Schiff bases, derivatives of amino acids (glycine, L-alanine, L-phenylalanine, L-valine, L-leucine, L-isoleucine and L-methionine) and various ortho-hydroxyaldehydes in CDCl3 have been measured. The results have shown that the tetrabutylammonium salts of the Schiff bases amino acids, being derivatives of 2-hydroxynaphthaldehyde and 3,5-dibromosalicylaldehyde, exist in the NH-form, while in the derivatives of salicylaldehyde and 5-bromosalicylaldehyde a proton transfer takes place. The interactions between COO- and NH groups stabilize the proton-transferred form through a bifurcated intramolecular hydrogen bond. Copyright (c) 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. The role of symmetry in the mass independent isotope effect in ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, Greg; Bhattacharya, S. K.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the internal distribution of “anomalous” isotope enrichments has important implications for validating theoretical postulates on the origin of these enrichments in molecules such as ozone and for understanding the transfer of these enrichments to other compounds in the atmosphere via mass transfer. Here, we present an approach, using the reaction NO2− + O3, for assessing the internal distribution of the Δ17O anomaly and the δ18O enrichment in ozone produced by electric discharge. The Δ17O results strongly support the symmetry mechanism for generating mass independent fractionations, and the δ18O results are consistent with published data. Positional Δ17O and δ18O enrichments in ozone can now be more effectively used in photochemical models that use mass balance oxygen atom transfer mechanisms to infer atmospheric oxidation chemistry. PMID:19307571

  4. Reaction rates and kinetic isotope effects of H2 + OH → H2O + H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisner, Jan; Kästner, Johannes

    2016-05-07

    We calculated reaction rate constants including atom tunneling of the reaction of dihydrogen with the hydroxy radical down to a temperature of 50 K. Instanton theory and canonical variational theory with microcanonical optimized multidimensional tunneling were applied using a fitted potential energy surface [J. Chen et al., J. Chem. Phys. 138, 154301 (2013)]. All possible protium/deuterium isotopologues were considered. Atom tunneling increases at about 250 K (200 K for deuterium transfer). Even at 50 K the rate constants of all isotopologues remain in the interval 4 ⋅ 10(-20) to 4 ⋅ 10(-17) cm(3) s(-1), demonstrating that even deuterated versions of the title reaction are possibly relevant to astrochemical processes in molecular clouds. The transferred hydrogen atom dominates the kinetic isotope effect at all temperatures.

  5. Relative rate study of the kinetic isotope effect in the 13CH3D + Cl reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joelsson, Lars Magnus Torvald; Forecast, Roslyn; Schmidt, Johan Albrecht

    2014-01-01

    The 13CH3D/12CH4kinetic isotope effect, α13CH3D, of CH4 + Cl is determined for the first time, using the relative rate technique and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. α13CH3D is found to be 1.60 ± 0.04. In addition, a quantum chemistry/transition state theory model with tunneling...... correction is constructed and the primary cause for α13CH3D is found to be the substantially reduced reactivity of the D atom, which, in turn, can be explained by a significant increase in the reaction barrier due to changes in the vibrational zero point energy and to a lesser extent tunneling....

  6. Accounting for the effects of a ruminal nitrogen deficiency within the structure of the Cornell Net Carbohydrate and Protein System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tedeschi, L. O; Fox, D. G; Russell, J. B

    2000-01-01

    .... The Cornell Net Carbohydrate and Protein System (CNCPS) prediction of fiber digestion and microbial mass production from ruminally degraded carbohydrate has been adjusted to accommodate a ruminal N deficiency...

  7. Accounting for the effects of a ruminal nitrogen deficiency within the structure of the Cornell Net Carbonhydrate and Protein System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    L O Tedeschi; D G Fox; J B Russell

    2000-01-01

      The Cornell Net Carbohydrate and Protein System (CNCPS) prediction of fiber digestion and microbial mass production from ruminally degraded carbohydrate has been adjusted to accommodate a ruminal N deficiency...

  8. Comparison of the effects of two bongo net mesh sizes on the estimation of abundance and size of Engraulidae eggs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Menegassi del Favero

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Studies of ichthyoplankton retention by nets of different mesh sizes are important because they help in choosing a sampler when planning collection and the establishment of correction factors. These factors make it possible to compare studies performed with nets of different mesh sizes. In most studies of mesh retention of fish eggs, the taxonomic identification is done at the family level, resulting in the loss of detailed information. We separated Engraulidae eggs, obtained with 0.333 mm and 0.505 mm mesh bongo nets at 172 oceanographic stations in the southeastern Brazilian Bight, into four groups based on their morphometric characteristics. The difference in the abundance of eggs caught by the two nets was not significant for those groups with highest volume, types A and B, but in type C (Engraulis anchoita, the most eccentric, and in type D, of the smallest volume, the difference was significant. However, no significant difference was observed in the egg size sampled with each net for E. anchoita and type D, which exhibited higher abundance in the 0.333 mm mesh net and minor axis varying from 0.45-0.71 mm, smaller than the 0.505 mm mesh aperture and the mesh diagonal.

  9. Temperature dependence of carbon kinetic isotope effect for the oxidation reaction of ethane by OH radicals under atmospherically relevant conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piansawan, Tammarat; Saccon, Marina; Laumer, Werner; Gensch, Iulia; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid

    2015-04-01

    Modeling of the global distribution of atmospheric ethane sources and sinks by using the 13C isotopic composition requires accurate knowledge of the carbon kinetic isotope effect (KIE) of its atmospheric removal reactions. The quantum mechanical prediction implies the necessity to elucidate the temperature dependence of KIE within atmospherically relevant temperature range by experiment. In this study, the KIE and its temperature dependence for ethane oxidation by OH radicals was investigated at ambient pressure in a temperature range of 243 K to 303 K. The chemical reactions were carried out in a 15 L PFE reaction chamber, suspended in a thermally controlled oven. The isotope ratios of the gas phase components during the course of the reactions were measured by Thermal Desorption -- Gas Chromatography -- Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (TD-GC-IRMS). For each temperature, the KIE was derived from the temporal evolution of the concentration and stable carbon isotope ratio (δ13C) of ethane using a method adapted from the relative reaction rate concept. The room temperature KIE of the ethane reaction with OH radicals was found to be 6.85 ± 0.32 ‰. This value is in agreement with the previously reported value of 8.57 ± 1.95 ‰ [Anderson et al. 2004] but has a substantially lower uncertainty. The experimental results will be discussed with the KIE temperature dependence predicted by quantum mechanical calculations. Reference: Rebecca S. Anderson, Lin Huang, Richard Iannone, Alexandra E. Thompson, and Jochen Rudolph (2004), Carbon Kinetic Isotope Effects in the Gas Phase Reactions of Light Alkanes and Ethene with the OH Radical at 296 ± 4 K, J. Phys. Chem. A, 108, 11537--11544

  10. Inner Sphere and Outer Sphere Electron Transfer to Methyl Iodide. Deuterium and 13C Kinetic Isotope Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Torkil; Crossland, Ingolf

    1996-01-01

    Deuterium and 13C kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) have been determined for the conversion of methyl iodide into methyl radical via inner sphere ET (electron transfer) and via outer sphere ET. The alfa-deuterium KIE was found to be very high for in...

  11. alfa-Deuterium kinetic isotope effects in reactions of methyllithium. Is better aggregation the cause of lower reactivity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Torkil

    1996-01-01

    The value of kH/kD for alfa deuterium kinetic isotope effects for the reaction of methyllithium and methylmagnesium iodid with a series of substrates are consistently ca. 10-15 % higher for the lithium reagent. This may indicate a pre-equilibrium...

  12. Effect of leaf litter degradation and seasonality on D/H isotope ratios of n-alkane biomarkers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zech, M.; Pedentchouk, N.; Buggle, B.; Leiber, K.; Kalbitz, K.; Markovic, S.B.; Glaser, B.

    2011-01-01

    During the last decade, compound-specific hydrogen isotope analysis of plant leaf-wax and sedimentary n-alkyl lipids has become a promising tool for paleohydrological reconstructions. However, with the exception of several previous studies, there is a lack of knowledge regarding possible effects of

  13. Synergistic effect of embryo vaccination with Eimeria profilin and Clostridium perfringens NetB proteins on inducing protective immunity against necrotic enteritis in broiler chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of embryo vaccination with Eimeria profilin plus Clostridium perfringens NetB toxin proteins in combination with the Montanide IMS-OVO adjuvant on the chicken immune response to necrotic enteritis were investigated using an E. maxima/C. perfringens co-infection model. Eighteen-day-old br...

  14. The effects of substitution of incandescent light bulbs over the energy net; Os efeitos da substituicao de lampadas incandescentes sobre a rede eletrica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blum, Juergen [A-Eberle GmbH (Germany)

    2010-11-15

    Fluorescent compact lamps and LED light require reactors to work. Analyzing the consumed power by these lamps, complex effects with no positive consequences over the electric energy net is observed. In the context of the harmonics, should be considered mainly the reactive power of distortion. The article clarifies the related concepts and presents practical examples.

  15. Effects of permethrin-treated bed nets on immunity to malaria in western Kenya II. Antibody responses in young children in an area of intense malaria transmission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kariuki, Simon K.; Lal, Altaf A.; Terlouw, Dianne J.; ter Kuile, Feiko O.; Ong'echa, John M. O.; Phillips-Howard, Penelope A.; Orago, Alloys S. S.; Kolczak, Margarette S.; Hawley, William A.; Nahlen, Bernard L.; Shi, Ya Ping

    2003-01-01

    As part of a large community-based trial on the impact of insecticide (permethrin)-treated bed nets (ITNs) on childhood morbidity and mortality in an area of intense perennial malaria transmission in western Kenya, we assessed the effects of ITNs on malaria-specific humoral responses in young

  16. The use of mediation analysis to assess the effects of a behaviour change communication strategy on bed net ideation and household universal coverage in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricotta, Emily E; Boulay, Marc; Ainslie, Robert; Babalola, Stella; Fotheringham, Megan; Koenker, Hannah; Lynch, Matthew

    2015-01-21

    SBCC campaigns are designed to act on cognitive, social and emotional factors at the individual or community level. The combination of these factors, referred to as 'ideation', play a role in determining behaviour by reinforcing and confirming decisions about a particular health topic. This study introduces ideation theory and mediation analysis as a way to evaluate the impact of a malaria SBCC campaign in Tanzania, to determine whether exposure to a communication programme influenced universal coverage through mediating ideational variables. A household survey in three districts where community change agents (CCAs) were active was conducted to collect information on ITN use, number of ITNs in the household, and perceptions about ITN use and ownership. Variables relating to attitudes and beliefs were combined to make 'net ideation'. Using an ideational framework, a mediation analysis was conducted to see the impact exposure to a CCA only, mass media and community (M & C) messaging only, or exposure to both, had on household universal coverage, through the mediating variable net ideation. All three levels of exposure (CCA, M & C messaging, or exposure to both) were significantly associated with increased net ideation (CCA: 0.283, 95% CI: 0.136-0.429, p-value: effects between any exposure and universal coverage when controlling for net ideation. The results of this study indicate that mediation analysis is an applicable new tool to assess SBCC campaigns. Ideation as a mediator of the effects of communication exposure on household universal coverage has implications for designing SBCC to support both mass and continuous distribution efforts, since both heavily rely on consumer participation to obtain and maintain ITNs. Such systems can be strengthened by SBCC programming, generating demand through improving social norms about net ownership and use, perceived benefits of nets, and other behavioural constructs.

  17. Landscape Scale Study of the Net Effect of Proximity to a Neonicotinoid-Treated Crop on Bee Colony Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balfour, Nicholas J; Al Toufailia, Hasan; Scandian, Luciano; Blanchard, Héloïse E; Jesse, Matthew P; Carreck, Norman L; Ratnieks, Francis L W

    2017-09-19

    Since 2013, the European Commission has restricted the use of three neonicotinoid insecticides as seed dressings on bee-attractive crops. Such crops represent an important source of forage for bees, which is often scarce in agro-ecosystems. However, this benefit has often been overlooked in the design of previous field studies, leaving the net impact of neonicotinoid treated crops on bees relatively unknown. Here, we determine the combined benefit (forage) and cost (insecticide) of oilseed rape grown from thiamethoxam-treated seeds on Bombus terrestris and Apis mellifera colonies. In April 2014, 36 colonies per species were located adjacent to three large oilseed rape fields (12 colonies per field). Another 36 were in three nearby locations in the same agro-ecosystem, but several kilometers distant from any oilseed rape fields. We found that Bombus colony growth and reproduction were unaffected by location (distant versus adjacent) following the two month flowering period. Apis colony and queen survival were unaffected. However, there was a small, but significant, negative relationship between honey and pollen neonicotinoid contamination and Apis colony weight gain. We hypothesize that any sublethal effects of neonicotinoid seed dressings on Bombus colonies are potentially offset by the additional foraging resources provided. A better understanding of the ecological and agronomic factors underlying neonicotinoid residues is needed to inform evidence-based policy.

  18. NA-NET numerical analysis net

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dongarra, J. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Computer Science]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Rosener, B. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Computer Science

    1991-12-01

    This report describes a facility called NA-NET created to allow numerical analysts (na) an easy method of communicating with one another. The main advantage of the NA-NET is uniformity of addressing. All mail is addressed to the Internet host ``na-net.ornl.gov`` at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Hence, members of the NA-NET do not need to remember complicated addresses or even where a member is currently located. As long as moving members change their e-mail address in the NA-NET everything works smoothly. The NA-NET system is currently located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It is running on the same machine that serves netlib. Netlib is a separate facility that distributes mathematical software via electronic mail. For more information on netlib consult, or send the one-line message ``send index`` to netlib{at}ornl.gov. The following report describes the current NA-NET system from both a user`s perspective and from an implementation perspective. Currently, there are over 2100 members in the NA-NET. An average of 110 mail messages pass through this facility daily.

  19. NA-NET numerical analysis net

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dongarra, J. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Computer Science Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Rosener, B. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Computer Science)

    1991-12-01

    This report describes a facility called NA-NET created to allow numerical analysts (na) an easy method of communicating with one another. The main advantage of the NA-NET is uniformity of addressing. All mail is addressed to the Internet host na-net.ornl.gov'' at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Hence, members of the NA-NET do not need to remember complicated addresses or even where a member is currently located. As long as moving members change their e-mail address in the NA-NET everything works smoothly. The NA-NET system is currently located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It is running on the same machine that serves netlib. Netlib is a separate facility that distributes mathematical software via electronic mail. For more information on netlib consult, or send the one-line message send index'' to netlib{at}ornl.gov. The following report describes the current NA-NET system from both a user's perspective and from an implementation perspective. Currently, there are over 2100 members in the NA-NET. An average of 110 mail messages pass through this facility daily.

  20. Isotope effects in visible light photolysis and chemical destruction of ozone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Früchtl, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/372648096

    2015-01-01

    Ozone (O3) plays a key role for the radiative balance of the earth and for chemical processes in the atmosphere. In addition, it has a very peculiar isotopic composition: The heavy stable isotopes of oxygen, 17O and 18O are strongly enriched in O3 and the enrichments are of almost equal magnitude,

  1. Effects of changing mosquito host searching behaviour on the cost effectiveness of a mass distribution of long-lasting, insecticidal nets: a modelling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briët, Olivier J T; Chitnis, Nakul

    2013-06-26

    The effectiveness of long-lasting, insecticidal nets (LLINs) in preventing malaria is threatened by the changing biting behaviour of mosquitoes, from nocturnal and endophagic to crepuscular and exophagic, and by their increasing resistance to insecticides. Using epidemiological stochastic simulation models, we studied the impact of a mass LLIN distribution on Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Specifically, we looked at impact in terms of episodes prevented during the effective life of the batch and in terms of net health benefits (NHB) expressed in disability adjusted life years (DALYs) averted, depending on biting behaviour, resistance (as measured in experimental hut studies), and on pre-intervention transmission levels. Results were very sensitive to assumptions about the probabilistic nature of host searching behaviour. With a shift towards crepuscular biting, under the assumption that individual mosquitoes repeat their behaviour each gonotrophic cycle, LLIN effectiveness was far less than when individual mosquitoes were assumed to vary their behaviour between gonotrophic cycles. LLIN effectiveness was equally sensitive to variations in host-searching behaviour (if repeated) and to variations in resistance. LLIN effectiveness was most sensitive to pre-intervention transmission level, with LLINs being least effective at both very low and very high transmission levels, and most effective at around four infectious bites per adult per year. A single LLIN distribution round remained cost effective, except in transmission settings with a pre-intervention inoculation rate of over 128 bites per year and with resistant mosquitoes that displayed a high proportion (over 40%) of determined crepuscular host searching, where some model variants showed negative NHB. Shifts towards crepuscular host searching behaviour can be as important in reducing LLIN effectiveness and cost effectiveness as resistance to pyrethroids. As resistance to insecticides is likely to slow down the

  2. A study of hydrogen isotopes fuel control by wall effect in magnetic fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motevalli, S.M., E-mail: motavali@umz.ac.ir; Safari, M.

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • A particle balance model for the main plasma and wall inventory in magnetic fusion device has been represented. • The dependence of incident particles energy on the wall has been considered in 10–300 eV for the sputtering yield and recycling coefficient. • The effect of fueling methods on plasma density behavior has been studied. - Abstract: Determination of plasma density behavior in magnetic confinement system needs to study the plasma materials interaction in the facing components such as first wall, limiter and divertor. Recycling of hydrogen isotope is an effective parameter in plasma density rate and plasma fueling. Recycling coefficient over the long pulse operation, gets to the unity, so it has a significant effect on steady state in magnetic fusion devices. Typically, sputtered carbon atoms from the plasma facing components form hydrocarbons and they redeposit on the wall. In this case little rate of hydrogen loss occurs. In present work a zero dimensional particle equilibrium model has been represented to determine particles density rate in main plasma and wall inventory under recycling effect and codeposition of hydrogen in case of continues and discontinues fueling methods and effective parameters on the main plasma decay has been studied.

  3. Kinetic Isotope Effects Support the Twisted Amide Mechanism of Pin1 Peptidyl-Prolyl Isomerase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercedes-Camacho, Ana Y.; Mullins, Ashley B.; Mason, Matthew D.; Xu, Guoyan G.; Mahoney, Brendan J.; Wang, Xingsheng; Peng, Jeffrey W.; Etzkorn, Felicia A.

    2013-01-01

    The Pin1 peptidyl-prolyl isomerase (PPIase) catalyzes isomerization of pSer/pThr-Pro motifs in regulating the cell cycle. Peptide substrates, Ac–Phe–Phe–phosphoSer–Pro–Arg–p-nitroaniline, were synthesized in unlabeled form, and with deuterium labeled Ser-d3 and Pro-d7 amino acids. Kinetic data was collected as a function of Pin1 concentration to measure kinetic isotope effects (KIE) on catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km). The normal secondary (2°) KIE value measured for the Ser-d3 substrate (kH/kD = 1.6 ± 0.2) indicates that the serine carbonyl does not rehybridize from sp2 to sp3 in the rate-determining step, ruling out a nucleophilic addition mechanism. The normal 2° KIE can be explained by hyperconjugation between Ser α-C–H/D and C=O, and release of steric strain upon rotation of the amide bond from cis to syn-exo. The inverse 2° KIE value (kH/kD = 0.86 ± 0.08) measured for the Pro-d7 substrate indicates rehybridization of the prolyl nitrogen from sp2 to sp3 during the rate-limiting step of isomerization. No solvent kinetic isotope was measured by NMR exchange spectroscopy (EXSY) (kH2O/kD2O = 0.92 ± 0.12), indicating little or no involvement of exchangeable protons in the mechanism. These results support the formation of a simple twisted-amide transition state as the mechanism for peptidyl prolyl isomerization catalyzed by Pin1. A model of the reaction mechanism is presented using crystal structures of Pin1 with ground state analogues and an inhibitor that resembles a twisted amide transition state. PMID:24116866

  4. Clumped Isotope Values from the Doushantuo Formation of South China: Evaluation of Hydrothermal Influence, Disequilibria and Diagenetic Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, I. S.; Zhu, M.; Lu, M.; Bristow, T.; Bonifacie, M.; Tripati, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Ediacaran Doushantuo Formation (635 - 551 Ma) of southern China is a phosphate-dolostone-black shale sequence following the Marinoan "Snowball Earth" episode that represents an important period in Earth history. It contains abundant phosphate-preserved microfossils, and extremely low carbon isotope values in the cap dolostone unit that have been interpreted to reflect formation in a methane seep environment [1]. Previous clumped isotope analysis of 13C-depleted carbonate veins from the basal Doushantuo samples have been interpreted to reflect hydrothermally-derived thermogenic methane oxidation [2], however recent work on modern and ancient cold seep samples suggests clumped isotope signatures in these environments are influenced by disequilibria effects [3] and are vulnerable to post-depositional diagenesis via internal reordering at temperatures exceeding ~ 100 - 120 ˚C [4]. Here we present initial data from the cap-carbonates overlying the Nantuo diamictite. Our analysis includes a variety of micro-facies from the cap-carbonate including pure calcite and micrite, with a range of carbonate carbon isotopic values. Data presented here will be used to attempt to determine if the samples exhibit disequilibria effects such as those observed in modern cold seep environments, as well as to evaluate the role of hydrothermal activity in the Doushantuo Formation. [1] Jiang, G., Kennedy, M.J., Christie-Blick, N., 2003. Stable isotope evidence for methane seeps in Neoproterozoic postglacial cap carbonates. Nature 426, 822-826. [2] Bristow, T.F., Bonifacie, M., Derkowski, A., Eiler, J.M., Grotzinger, J.P., 2011. A hydrothermal origin for isotopically anomalous cap dolostone cements from south China. Nature 474, 68-72. [3] Loyd, S., Sample, J.C., Orphan, V.J., Marlow, J., Eagle, R., Tripati, A.K., 2012. Clumped isotope analyses of cold seep carbonates: Insights into formation environment and mechanisms. Abstract B51G-0639 presented at 2012 Fall Meeting, AGU, San Francisco

  5. Estimating Damage Cost of Net Primary Production due to Climate Change and Ozone(O3) Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J. H.; Lee, D. K.; Park, C.; Sung, S.; Kim, H. G.; Mo, Y.; Kim, S.; Kil, S.

    2016-12-01

    productivity, net primary productivity (NPP), in Korea is about 622 gC/m2/yr in the results. And the result shows that NPP decreases about 2.3% by O3 negative effect. The NPP in the future also decreases about 1-2% and the negative effect of O3 is similar. Finally, damage cost by O3 in the future is bigger than damage by climate change.

  6. Theoretical Study of H/D Isotope Effects on Nuclear Magnetic Shieldings Using an ab initio Multi-Component Molecular Orbital Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Tachikawa

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We have theoretically analyzed the nuclear quantum effect on the nuclear magnetic shieldings for the intramolecular hydrogen-bonded systems of σ-hydroxy acyl aromatic species using the gauge-including atomic orbital technique combined with our multi-component density functional theory. The effect of H/D quantum nature for geometry and nuclear magnetic shielding changes are analyzed. Our study clearly demonstrated that the geometrical changes of hydrogen-bonds induced by H/D isotope effect (called geometrical isotope effect: GIE is the dominant factor of deuterium isotope effect on 13C chemical shift.

  7. Secondary. cap alpha. -deuterium kinetic isotope effects in solvolyses of ferrocenylmethyl acetate and benzoate in ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutic, D. (Univ. of Zagreb, Yugoslavia); Asperger, S.; Borcic, S.

    1982-12-17

    Secondary ..cap alpha..-deuterium kinetic isotope effects (KIE) in solvolyses of ferrocenyldideuteriomethyl acetate and benzoate were determined in 96% (v/v) ethanol, at 25/sup 0/C, as k/sub H//k/sub D/ = 1.24 and 1.26, respectively. The KIEs were also determined in the presence of 0.1 mol dm/sup -3/ lithium perchlorate: the k/sub H//k/ sub D/ values were 1.23 and 1.22 for acetate and benzoate complexes, respectively. The maximum KIE for the C-O bond cleavage of a primary substrate is as large as, or larger than, that of secondary derivatives, which is estimated to be 1.23 per deuterium. The measured KIE of about 12% per D therefore represents a strongly reduced effect relative to its maximum. The solvolyses exhibit ''a special salt effect''. This effect indicates the presence of solvent-separated ion pairs and the return to tight pairs. As the maximum KIE is expected in solvolyses involving transformation of one type of ion pair into another, the strongly reduced ..cap alpha..-D KIE supports the structure involving direct participation of electrons that in the ground state are localized at the iron atom. The alkyl-oxygen cleavage is accompanied by 10-15% acyl-oxygen cleavage.

  8. Pharmacovigilance in hospice/palliative care: the net immediate and short-term effects of dexamethasone for anorexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatano, Yutaka; Moroni, Matteo; Wilcock, Andrew; Quinn, Stephen; Csikós, Ágnes; Allan, Simon G; Agar, Meera; Clark, Katherine; Clayton, Josephine M; Currow, David C

    2016-09-01

    Loss of appetite is prevalent in palliative care and distressing for patients and families. Therapies include corticosteroids or progestogens. This study explores the net effect of dexamethasone on anorexia. Prospective data were collected when dexamethasone was started for anorexia as part of routine care. The National Cancer Institute's Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events (NCICTCAE) Likert scales assessed severity of anorexia and immediate and short-term harms at 2 time points: baseline and 7 days. This study (41 sites, 8 countries) collected data (July 2013 to July 2014) from 114 patients (mean age 71 (SD 11), 96% with cancer). Median Australian-modified Karnofsky Performance Scale was 50% (range 20-70). Mean baseline NCICTCAE anorexia score was 2.7 (SD 0.6; median 3). 6 patients died by day 7. Of 108 evaluable patients, 74 (68.5%; 95% CI 59.0% to 76.7%) reported ≥1 reduction anorexia scores by day 7, of whom 30 were 0. Mean dexamethasone dose on day 7 was 4.1 mg/day (SD 3.4; median 4; range 0-46 mg). 24 patients reported ≥1 harms (32.4% CI 22.6% to 44.1%; insomnia n=10, depression n=7, euphoria n=7 and hyperglycaemia n=7). Of 24 patients with no benefit, 10 reported ≥1 harms. This study shows positive and negative effects of 7 days of dexamethasone as an appetite stimulant in patients with advanced life-limiting illnesses. Identifying clinicodemographic characteristics of people most at risk of harms with no benefit is a crucial next step. Longer term follow-up will help to understand longer term and cumulative harms. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  9. Master Robotic Net

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Lipunov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of the MASTER-Net project is to produce a unique fast sky survey with all sky observed over a single night down to a limiting magnitude of 19-20. Such a survey will make it possible to address a number of fundamental problems: search for dark energy via the discovery and photometry of supernovae (including SNIa, search for exoplanets, microlensing effects, discovery of minor bodies in the Solar System, and space-junk monitoring. All MASTER telescopes can be guided by alerts, and we plan to observe prompt optical emission from gamma-ray bursts synchronously in several filters and in several polarization planes.

  10. Measuring SNM Isotopic Distributions using FRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geist, William H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-12-02

    The first group of slides provides background information on the isotopic composition of plutonium. It is shown that 240Pu is the critical isotope in neutron coincidence/multiplicity counting. Next, response function analysis to determine isotopic composition is discussed. The isotopic composition can be determined by measuring the net peak counts from each isotope and then taking the ratio of the counts for each isotope relative to the total counts for the element. Then FRAM (Fixed energy Response function Analysis with Multiple efficiencies) is explained. FRAM can control data acquisition, automatically analyze newly acquired data, analyze previously acquired data, provide information on the quality of the analysis, and facilitate analysis in unusual situations (non-standard energy calibrations, gamma rays from non-SNM isotopes, poor spectra (within limits)).

  11. [Effect of processes in the earth's crust on evolution of photosynthesis (as indicated by data on carbon isotopic composition)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivlev, A A

    2010-01-01

    A probable mechanism of effect of processes occurring in the Earth's crust on evolution of photosynthesis is considered. According to the hypothesis, this effect is realized through entrance to the Earth's atmosphere of carbon dioxide that stimulates photosynthesis. Supply of CO2 is irregular and is due to irregular movements of the Earth's crust plates. This is accompanied by destruction of carbonates and conversion of carbon of the organic matter to CO2 due to processes of reduction of sulfates. The CO2 content in atmosphere rises for relatively short orogenic periods, due to intensive crust plate movement, while for the subsequent long periods, called the geosynclinal ones, of the relatively slow plate movement, the CO2 content falls due to the higher rate of its consumption for photosynthesis. Owing to the carbon isotopic fractionation accompanying photosynthesis, regular isotopic differences appear between the atmospheric CO2 and the "living" matter (Relay's effect); these differences are then transformed to isotope differences of the carbonate and organic carbon. At the appearance in atmosphere of free oxygen--product of photosynthesis--in organisms there appears photorespiration that also is accompanied by fractionation of carbon isotopes, but with effect of opposite sign. This leads to enrichment of the photosynthesizing biomass with 13C isotope at the orogenic periods. As a result, the initially pronounced isotope differences of the carbonate and organic carbon decrease by the end of the geosyclinal periods. According to the proposed model, concentrations of CO2 and O2 are exchanged in the antiphase. They lead to alternation of periods of warning up and cooling off on the Earth. The former coincide with the orogenic periods, the latter appear at the end of geosyclinal periods when oxygen is accumulated in atmosphere, while organic substance in sediments. Accumulation of organic substance leads to formation of petroleum-maternal masses. To substantiate the

  12. Net Ecosystem Carbon Flux

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Net Ecosystem Carbon Flux is defined as the year-over-year change in Total Ecosystem Carbon Stock, or the net rate of carbon exchange between an ecosystem and the...

  13. Freezing and fractionation: effects of preservation on carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios of some limnetic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, J Marshall; Johnson, Brett; Silver, Douglas; Pate, William; Christianson, Kyle

    2016-03-15

    Stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen have become important natural tracers for studying food-web structure and function. Considerable research has demonstrated that chemical preservatives and fixatives shift the isotopic ratios of aquatic organisms. Much less is known about the effects of freezing as a preservation method although this technique is commonly used. We conducted a controlled experiment to test the effects of freezing (-10 °C) and flash freezing (–79 °C) on the carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios of zooplankton (Cladocera), Mysis diluviana and Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Subsamples (~0.5 mg) of dried material were analyzed for percentage carbon, percentage nitrogen, and the relative abundance of stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes (δ13C and δ15N values) using a Carlo Erba NC2500 elemental analyzer interfaced to a ThermoFinnigan MAT Delta Plus isotope ratio mass spectrometer. The effects of freezing were taxon-dependent. Freezing had no effect on the isotopic or elemental values of Rainbow Trout muscle. Effects on the δ13C and δ15N values of zooplankton and Mysis were statistically significant but small relative to typical values of trophic fractionation. The treatment-control offsets had larger absolute values for Mysis (δ13C: ≤0.76 ± 0.41‰, δ15N: ≤0.37 ± 0.16‰) than for zooplankton (δ13C: ≤0.12 ± 0.06‰, δ15N: ≤0.30 ± 0.27‰). The effects of freezing were more variable for the δ13C values of Mysis, and more variable for the δ15N values of zooplankton. Generally, both freezing methods reduced the carbon content of zooplankton and Mysis, but freezing had a negative effect on the %N of zooplankton and a positive effect on the %N of Mysis. The species-dependencies and variability of freezing effects on aquatic organisms suggest that more research is needed to understand the mechanisms responsible for freezing-related fractionation before standardized protocols for freezing as a preservation method can be adopted.

  14. Effects of environmental and biotic factors on carbon isotopic fractionation during decomposition of soil organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoan; Jia, Yufu; Li, Wei

    2015-06-01

    Decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM) plays an important role in the global carbon cycle because the CO2 emitted from soil respiration is an important source of atmospheric CO2. Carbon isotopic fractionation occurs during SOM decomposition, which leads to 12C to enrich in the released CO2 while 13C to enrich in the residual SOM. Understanding the isotope fractionation has been demonstrated to be helpful for studying the global carbon cycle. Soil and litter samples were collected from soil profiles at 27 different sites located along a vertical transect from 1200 to 4500 m above sea level (a.s.l.) in the south-eastern side of the Tibetan Plateau. Their carbon isotope ratios, C and N concentrations were measured. In addition, fiber and lignin in litter samples were also analyzed. Carbon isotope fractionation factor (α) during SOM decomposition was estimated indirectly as the slope of the relationship between carbon isotope ratios of SOM and soil C concentrations. This study shows that litter quality and soil water play a significant role in isotope fractionation during SOM decomposition, and the carbon isotope fractionation factor, α, increases with litter quality and soil water content. However, we found that temperature had no significant impact on the α variance.

  15. Effects of environmental and biotic factors on carbon isotopic fractionation during decomposition of soil organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoan; Jia, Yufu; Li, Wei

    2015-06-09

    Decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM) plays an important role in the global carbon cycle because the CO2 emitted from soil respiration is an important source of atmospheric CO2. Carbon isotopic fractionation occurs during SOM decomposition, which leads to (12)C to enrich in the released CO2 while (13)C to enrich in the residual SOM. Understanding the isotope fractionation has been demonstrated to be helpful for studying the global carbon cycle. Soil and litter samples were collected from soil profiles at 27 different sites located along a vertical transect from 1200 to 4500 m above sea level (a.s.l.) in the south-eastern side of the Tibetan Plateau. Their carbon isotope ratios, C and N concentrations were measured. In addition, fiber and lignin in litter samples were also analyzed. Carbon isotope fractionation factor (α) during SOM decomposition was estimated indirectly as the slope of the relationship between carbon isotope ratios of SOM and soil C concentrations. This study shows that litter quality and soil water play a significant role in isotope fractionation during SOM decomposition, and the carbon isotope fractionation factor, α, increases with litter quality and soil water content. However, we found that temperature had no significant impact on the α variance.

  16. Secondary deuterium isotope effects and transition state structure in the aromatic claisen rearrangement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMichael, K.D.; Korver, G.L.

    1979-05-09

    Kinetic experiments were carried out simultaneously on separate methyl salicylate solutions of allyl phenyl ether and its deuterated phenyl analogues at 170 to 195/sup 0/C. Gas chromatographic analysis for allyl phenyl ether using an internal standard (anisole) and mechanical integration produced concentration/time data which were fitted to the exponential form of the first-order rate equation by a standard and nonlinear least-square program. At least 15 points were obtained for each run, covering 10 to 85% reaction. The derived isotope effects show no temperature dependence. Averages for 6 runs with each compound are k/sub H//k/sub ..cap alpha..-D/sub 2// = 1.18 and K/sub H//k/sub ..gamma..-D/sub 2// = 0.95. An equilibrium ..cap alpha.. effect of 1.30 and a ..gamma.. effect of 0.87 may be calculated for both deuterium atoms at 185/sup 0/C. These results show that the C--H vibration frequencies are approximately (1.18 - 1)/(1.27 - 1) or 57 to 77% of the way from those of allyl phenyl ether to those of the cyclohexadiene intermediate. The C--H frequencies of the ..gamma.. carbon in the transition state are about (0.95 - 1)/(0.88 - 1) or 22 to 62% of the way to those of the intermediate. The structure of the transition state, as far as these bonding frequencies are concerned, is consistent with the Claisen rearrangement.

  17. Kinetics and deuterium kinetic isotope effects in 3,3- and 2,3-sigmatropic reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emrani, J.

    1985-01-01

    In previous work, Conrad, using ..cap alpha..-2/sup 0/ deuterium kinetic isotope effects (KIE), showed that variable transition states are involved in Cope and Claisen rearrangements, two groups of sigmatropic reactions. The variation could be understood in terms of substituents affecting the relative extents of bond making and bond breaking. The kinetics and KIEs have now been determined for rearrangements of allyl trimethyl silyl ketene actal (TMS-KA), diisopropyl allylamine-oxide (diamo), and 1,3- and 1,4-diphenyl-1,5-hexadienes. Measurements of KIE in the reaction of TMS-KA and diamo, have shown that the transition state of both these reactions involve much more bond breaking than bond making. Solvent and phenyl substituent effects have been measured for TMS-KA, and these verify a non-polar reaction with substantial bond cleavage. The origin of the behavior is discussed. Measurements of the activation free energies for Cope rearrangement of 1,3- and 1,4-diphenyl-1,5-hexadienes reveal parameters similar to that of 3-phenyl-1,5-hexadiene. The values are consistent with a theoretical model developed for substituent effects in these reactions.

  18. Isospin splitting of nucleon effective mass and symmetry energy in isotopic nuclear reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ya-Fei; Chen, Peng-Hui; Niu, Fei; Zhang, Hong-Fei; Jin, Gen-Ming; Feng, Zhao-Qing

    2017-10-01

    Within an isospin and momentum dependent transport model, the dynamics of isospin particles (nucleons and light clusters) in Fermi-energy heavy-ion collisions are investigated for constraining the isospin splitting of nucleon effective mass and the symmetry energy at subsaturation densities. The impacts of the isoscalar and isovector parts of the momentum dependent interaction on the emissions of isospin particles are explored, i.e., the mass splittings of and (). The single and double neutron to proton ratios of free nucleons and light particles are thoroughly investigated in the isotopic nuclear reactions of 112Sn+112Sn and 124Sn+124Sn at incident energies of 50 and 120 MeV/nucleon, respectively. It is found that both the effective mass splitting and symmetry energy impact the kinetic energy spectra of the single ratios, in particular at the high energy tail (larger than 20 MeV). The isospin splitting of nucleon effective mass slightly impacts the double ratio spectra at the energy of 50 MeV/nucleon. A soft symmetry energy with stiffness coefficient of γs=0.5 is constrained from the experimental data with the Fermi-energy heavy-ion collisions. Supported by Major State Basic Research Development Program in China (2014CB845405, 2015CB856903), National Natural Science Foundation of China (11722546, 11675226, 11675066, U1332207) and Youth Innovation Promotion Association of Chinese Academy of Sciences

  19. Cost effectiveness and resource allocation of Plasmodium falciparum malaria control in Myanmar: a modelling analysis of bed nets and community health workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Tom L; Kyaw, Shwe Sin; Kyaw, Myat Phone; Smithuis, Frank M; Day, Nicholas P J; White, Lisa J; Lubell, Yoel

    2015-09-29

    Funding for malaria control and elimination in Myanmar has increased markedly in recent years. While there are various malaria control tools currently available, two interventions receive the majority of malaria control funding in Myanmar: (1) insecticide-treated bed nets and (2) early diagnosis and treatment through malaria community health workers. This study aims to provide practical recommendations on how to maximize impact from investment in these interventions. A simple decision tree is used to model intervention costs and effects in terms of years of life lost. The evaluation is from the perspective of the service provider and costs and effects are calculated in line with standard methodology. Sensitivity and scenario analysis are undertaken to identify key drivers of cost effectiveness. Standard cost effectiveness analysis is then extended via a spatially explicit resource allocation model. Community health workers have the potential for high impact on malaria, particularly where there are few alternatives to access malaria treatment, but are relatively costly. Insecticide-treated bed nets are comparatively inexpensive and modestly effective in Myanmar, representing a low risk but modest return intervention. Unlike some healthcare interventions, bed nets and community health workers are not mutually exclusive nor are they necessarily at their most efficient when universally applied. Modelled resource allocation scenarios highlight that in this case there is no "one size fits all" cost effectiveness result. Health gains will be maximized by effective targeting of both interventions.

  20. Direct and indirect effects of climatic variations on the interannual variability in net ecosystem exchange across terrestrial ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjiong Shao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Climatic variables not only directly affect the interannual variability (IAV in net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE but also indirectly drive it by changing the physiological parameters. Identifying these direct and indirect paths can reveal the underlying mechanisms of carbon (C dynamics. In this study, we applied a path analysis using flux data from 65 sites to quantify the direct and indirect climatic effects on IAV in NEE and to evaluate the potential relationships among the climatic variables and physiological parameters that represent physiology and phenology of ecosystems. We found that the maximum photosynthetic rate was the most important factor for the IAV in gross primary productivity (GPP, which was mainly induced by the variation in vapour pressure deficit. For ecosystem respiration (RE, the most important drivers were GPP and the reference respiratory rate. The biome type regulated the direct and indirect paths, with distinctive differences between forests and non-forests, evergreen needleleaf forests and deciduous broadleaf forests, and between grasslands and croplands. Different paths were also found among wet, moist and dry ecosystems. However, the climatic variables can only partly explain the IAV in physiological parameters, suggesting that the latter may also result from other biotic and disturbance factors. In addition, the climatic variables related to NEE were not necessarily the same as those related to GPP and RE, indicating the emerging difficulty encountered when studying the IAV in NEE. Overall, our results highlight the contribution of certain physiological parameters to the IAV in C fluxes and the importance of biome type and multi-year water conditions, which should receive more attention in future experimental and modelling research.

  1. Applying the net-benefit framework for analyzing and presenting cost-effectiveness analysis of a maternal and newborn health intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hounton, Sennen; Newlands, David

    2012-01-01

    Coverage of maternal and newborn health (MNH) interventions is often influenced by important determinants and decision makers are often concerned with equity issues. The net-benefit framework developed and applied alongside clinical trials and in pharmacoeconomics offers the potential for exploring how cost-effectiveness of MNH interventions varies at the margin by important covariates as well as for handling uncertainties around the ICER estimate. We applied the net-benefit framework to analyze cost-effectiveness of the Skilled Care Initiative and assessed relative advantages over a standard computation of incremental cost effectiveness ratios. Household and facility surveys were carried out from January to July 2006 in Ouargaye district (where the Skilled Care Initiative was implemented) and Diapaga (comparison site) district in Burkina Faso. Pregnancy-related and perinatal mortality were retrospectively assessed and data were collected on place of delivery, education, asset ownership, place, and distance to health facilities, costs borne by households for institutional delivery, and cost of standard provision of maternal care. Descriptive and regression analyses were performed. There was a 30% increase in institutional births in the intervention district compared to 10% increase in comparison district, and a significant reduction of perinatal mortality rates (OR 0.75, CI 0.70-0.80) in intervention district. The incremental cost for achieving one additional institutional delivery in Ouargaye district compared to Diapaga district was estimated to be 170 international dollars and varied significantly by covariates. However, the joint probability distribution (net-benefit framework) of the effectiveness measure (institutional delivery), the cost data and covariates indicated distance to health facilities as the single most important determinant of the cost-effectiveness analysis with implications for policy making. The net-benefit framework, the application of which

  2. Chlorine isotope effects and composition of naturally produced organochlorines from chloroperoxidases, flavin-dependent halogenases, and in forest soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeppli, Christoph; Bastviken, David; Andersson, Per; Gustafsson, Orjan

    2013-07-02

    The use of stable chlorine isotopic signatures (δ(37)Cl) of organochlorine compounds has been suggested as a tool to determine both their origins and transformations in the environment. Here we investigated the δ(37)Cl fractionation of two important pathways for enzymatic natural halogenation: chlorination by chloroperoxidase (CPO) and flavin-dependent halogenases (FDH). Phenolic products of CPO were highly (37)Cl depleted (δ(37)Cl = -12.6 ± 0.9‰); significantly more depleted than all known industrially produced organochlorine compounds (δ(37)Cl = -7 to +6‰). In contrast, four FDH products did not exhibit any observable isotopic shifts (δ(37)Cl = -0.3 ± 0.6‰). We attributed the different isotopic effect to the distinctly different chlorination mechanisms employed by the two enzymes. Furthermore, the δ(37)Cl in bulk organochlorines extracted from boreal forest soils were only slightly depleted in (37)Cl relative to inorganic Cl. In contrast to previous suggestions that CPO plays a key role in production of soil organochlorines, this observation points to the additional involvement of either other chlorination pathways, or that dechlorination of naturally produced organochlorines can neutralize δ(37)Cl shifts caused by CPO chlorination. Overall, this study demonstrates that chlorine isotopic signatures are highly useful to understand sources and cycling of organochlorines in nature. Furthermore, this study presents δ(37)Cl values of FDH products as well of bulk organochlorines extracted from pristine forest soil for the first time.

  3. The effects of nitrogen pollutants on the isotopic signal (δ15N) of Ulva lactuca: Microcosm experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlandi, Lucia; Calizza, Edoardo; Careddu, Giulio; Carlino, Pasquale; Costantini, Maria Letizia; Rossi, Loreto

    2017-02-15

    Effects of two chemical forms of Nitrogen (NH4+ and NO3-) on δ15N in Ulva lactuca were analysed separately and in mixture at two concentrations. We assessed whether the δ15N values of U. lactuca discriminate between Nitrogen from synthetic fertilisers (inorganic) and from fresh cow manure (organic), and the isotopic ability of the macroalga to reflect Nitrogen concentrations. Isotopic signature and N content of the macroalga reflected different nitrogenous sources and their concentrations after 48h. The inorganic Nitrogen source (NH4NO3) altered the isotopic values of the macroalgae more than Nitrogen from fresh cow manure (NO3-). δ15N values observed in the mixed solution did not differ from those displayed in NH4NO3 treatment alone. We conclude that stable isotope analysis of U. lactuca collected in an unpolluted site and experimentally submerged in sites suspected of being affected by disturbance is a useful tool for rapid monitoring of anthropogenic discharges of Nitrogen pollutants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Measurements of isotope effects in the photoionization of N2 and implications for Titan's atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croteau, Philip; Randazzo, John B.; Kostko, Oleg; Ahmed, Musahid; Liang, Mao-Chang; Yung, Yuk L.; Boering, Kristie A.

    2010-12-30

    Isotope effects in the non-dissociative photoionization of molecular nitrogen (N2 + h nu -> N2+ + e-) may play a role in determining the relative abundances of isotopic species containing nitrogen in interstellar clouds and planetary atmospheres but have not been previously measured. Measurements of the photoionization efficiency spectra of 14N2, 15N14N, and 15N2 from 15.5 to 18.9 eV (65.6-80.0 nm) using the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory show large differences in peak energies and intensities, with the ratio of the energy-dependent photoionization cross-sections, sigma(14N2)/sigma(15N14N), ranging from 0.4 to 3.5. Convolving the cross-sections with the solar flux and integrating over the energies measured, the ratios of photoionization rate coefficients are J(15N14N)/J(14N2)=1.00+-0.02 and J(15N2)/J(14N2)=1.00+-0.02, suggesting that isotopic fractionation between N2 and N2+ should be small under such conditions. In contrast, in a one-dimensional model of Titan's atmosphere, isotopic self-shielding of 14N2 leads to values of J(15N14N)/J(14N2) as large as ~;;1.17, larger than under optically thin conditions but still much smaller than values as high as ~;;29 predicted for N2 photodissociation. Since modeled photodissociation isotope effects overpredict the HC15N/HC14N ratio in Titan's atmosphere, and since both N atoms and N2+ ions may ultimately lead to the formation of HCN, estimates of the potential of including N2 photoionization to contribute to a more quantitative explanation of 15N/14N for HCN in Titan's atmosphere are explored.

  5. Vitamin B12 effects on chlorinated methanes-degrading microcosms: Dual isotope and metabolically active microbial populations assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Fernández, Diana; Torrentó, Clara; Guivernau, Miriam; Viñas, Marc; Hunkeler, Daniel; Soler, Albert; Domènech, Cristina; Rosell, Mònica

    2017-10-17

    Field-derived anoxic microcosms were used to characterize chloroform (CF) and carbon tetrachloride (CT) natural attenuation to compare it with biostimulation scenarios in which vitamin B12 was added (B12/pollutant ratio of 0.01 and 0.1) by means of by-products, carbon and chlorine compound-specific stable-isotope analysis, and the active microbial community through 16S rRNA MiSeq high-throughput sequencing. Autoclaved slurry controls discarded abiotic degradation processes. B12 catalyzed CF and CT biodegradation without the accumulation of dichloromethane, carbon disulphide, or CF. The carbon isotopic fractionation value of CF (ƐCCF) with B12 was -14±4‰, and the value for chlorine (ƐClCF) was -2.4±0.4‰. The carbon isotopic fractionation values of CT (ƐCCT) were -16±6 with B12, and -13±2‰ without B12; and the chlorine isotopic fractionation values of CT (ƐClCT) were -6±3 and -4±2‰, respectively. Acidovorax, Ancylobacter, and Pseudomonas were the most metabolically active genera, whereas Dehalobacter and Desulfitobacterium were below 0.1% of relative abundance. The dual C-Cl element isotope slope (Λ=Δδ13C/Δδ37Cl) for CF biodegradation (only detected with B12, 7±1) was similar to that reported for CF reduction by Fe(0) (8±2). Several reductive pathways might be competing in the tested CT scenarios, as evidenced by the lack of CF accumulation when B12 was added, which might be linked to a major activity of Pseudomonas stutzeri; by different chlorine apparent kinetic isotope effect values and Λ which was statistically different with and without B12 (5±1 vs 6.1±0.5), respectively. Thus, positive B12 effects such as CT and CF degradation catalyst were quantified for the first time in isotopic terms, and confirmed with the major activity of species potentially capable of their degradation. Moreover, the indirect benefits of B12 on the degradation of chlorinated ethenes were proved, creating a basis for remediation strategies in multi

  6. Effects of smelter sulfur dioxide emissions: a spatiotemporal perspective using carbon isotopes in tree rings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Savard, M M; Bégin, C; Parent, M; Smirnoff, A; Marion, J

    2004-01-01

    ... from the smelter to evaluate conditions prior to and during the periods of smelter operation. The carbon isotope results obtained from spruce tree rings at our test site reveal an unprecedented and abrupt shift...

  7. Review of computer simulations of isotope effects on biochemical reactions: From the Bigeleisen equation to Feynman's path integral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kin-Yiu; Xu, Yuqing; Xu, Liang

    2015-11-01

    Enzymatic reactions are integral components in many biological functions and malfunctions. The iconic structure of each reaction path for elucidating the reaction mechanism in details is the molecular structure of the rate-limiting transition state (RLTS). But RLTS is very hard to get caught or to get visualized by experimentalists. In spite of the lack of explicit molecular structure of the RLTS in experiment, we still can trace out the RLTS unique "fingerprints" by measuring the isotope effects on the reaction rate. This set of "fingerprints" is considered as a most direct probe of RLTS. By contrast, for computer simulations, oftentimes molecular structures of a number of TS can be precisely visualized on computer screen, however, theoreticians are not sure which TS is the actual rate-limiting one. As a result, this is an excellent stage setting for a perfect "marriage" between experiment and theory for determining the structure of RLTS, along with the reaction mechanism, i.e., experimentalists are responsible for "fingerprinting", whereas theoreticians are responsible for providing candidates that match the "fingerprints". In this Review, the origin of isotope effects on a chemical reaction is discussed from the perspectives of classical and quantum worlds, respectively (e.g., the origins of the inverse kinetic isotope effects and all the equilibrium isotope effects are purely from quantum). The conventional Bigeleisen equation for isotope effect calculations, as well as its refined version in the framework of Feynman's path integral and Kleinert's variational perturbation (KP) theory for systematically incorporating anharmonicity and (non-parabolic) quantum tunneling, are also presented. In addition, the outstanding interplay between theory and experiment for successfully deducing the RLTS structures and the reaction mechanisms is demonstrated by applications on biochemical reactions, namely models of bacterial squalene-to-hopene polycyclization and RNA 2'-O

  8. What is the net effect of introducing vitrification for cryopreservation of surplus 2PN oocytes in an IVF program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golakov, Manja; Depenbusch, Marion; Schultze-Mosgau, Askan; Schoepper, Beate; Hajek, Jennifer; Neumann, Kay; Griesinger, Georg

    2018-02-01

    impressively higher cryo-survival rates with vitrification. The "true" net efficacy effect of introducing 2PN vitrification in an IVF program will, in real life, be lower due to patients not having surplus 2PN oocytes available for freezing and later transfer.

  9. The Effect of Mass Media Campaign on the Use of Insecticide-Treated Bed Nets among Pregnant Women in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ankomah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Malaria during pregnancy is a major public health problem in Nigeria especially in malaria-endemic areas. It increases the risk of low birth weight and child/maternal morbidity/mortality. This paper addresses the impact of radio campaigns on the use of insecticide-treated bed nets among pregnant women in Nigeria. Methods. A total of 2,348 pregnant women were interviewed during the survey across 21 of Nigeria’s 36 states. Respondents were selected through a multistage sampling technique. Analysis was based on multivariate logistic regression. Results. Respondents who knew that sleeping under ITN prevents malaria were 3.2 times more likely to sleep under net (OR: 3.15; 95% CI: 2.28 to 4.33; P<0.0001. Those who listened to radio are also about 1.6 times more likely to use ITN (OR: 1.56; 95% CI: 1.07 to 2.28; P=0.020, while respondents who had heard of a specific sponsored radio campaign on ITN are 1.53 times more likely to use a bed net (P=0.019. Conclusion. Pregnant women who listened to mass media campaigns were more likely to adopt strategies to protect themselves from malaria. Therefore, behavior change communication messages that are aimed at promoting net use and antenatal attendance are necessary in combating malaria.

  10. Pore pressure effects on fracture net pressure and hydraulic fracture containment : Insights from an empirical and simulation approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prabhakaran, R.; de Pater, C.J.; Shaoul, Josef

    2017-01-01

    Pore pressure and its relationship with fracture net pressure has been reported qualitatively from both field and experimental observations. From a modeling perspective, the ubiquitously used pseudo 3D (P3D) models that are based on linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) do not include the

  11. Professional Enterprise NET

    CERN Document Server

    Arking, Jon

    2010-01-01

    Comprehensive coverage to help experienced .NET developers create flexible, extensible enterprise application code If you're an experienced Microsoft .NET developer, you'll find in this book a road map to the latest enterprise development methodologies. It covers the tools you will use in addition to Visual Studio, including Spring.NET and nUnit, and applies to development with ASP.NET, C#, VB, Office (VBA), and database. You will find comprehensive coverage of the tools and practices that professional .NET developers need to master in order to build enterprise more flexible, testable, and ext

  12. The Isotopic Effect in the Nuclear Capture of Negative Muons in Xenon

    CERN Document Server

    Mamedov, T N; Gritsaj, K I; Duginov, V N; Zhukov, V A; Olshevsky, V G; Stojkov, A V

    2000-01-01

    The lifetime of negative muons in 1s-state of ^129 Xe has been measured for the first time. The nuclear capture rate of muon for ^129 Xe is compared with the analogous results for ^132,136 Xe isotopes. The noticeable dependence of the nuclear capture rate of muon on mass number for the above-mentioned isotopes is observed. The experimental results are compared with the ones calculated according to the semi-empirical Goulard - Primakoff formula.

  13. A Stochastic Method for Estimating the Effect of Isotopic Uncertainties in Spent Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeHart, M.D.

    2001-08-24

    This report describes a novel approach developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the estimation of the uncertainty in the prediction of the neutron multiplication factor for spent nuclear fuel. This technique focuses on burnup credit, where credit is taken in criticality safety analysis for the reduced reactivity of fuel irradiated in and discharged from a reactor. Validation methods for burnup credit have attempted to separate the uncertainty associated with isotopic prediction methods from that of criticality eigenvalue calculations. Biases and uncertainties obtained in each step are combined additively. This approach, while conservative, can be excessive because of a physical assumptions employed. This report describes a statistical approach based on Monte Carlo sampling to directly estimate the total uncertainty in eigenvalue calculations resulting from uncertainties in isotopic predictions. The results can also be used to demonstrate the relative conservatism and statistical confidence associated with the method of additively combining uncertainties. This report does not make definitive conclusions on the magnitude of biases and uncertainties associated with isotopic predictions in a burnup credit analysis. These terms will vary depending on system design and the set of isotopic measurements used as a basis for estimating isotopic variances. Instead, the report describes a method that can be applied with a given design and set of isotopic data for estimating design-specific biases and uncertainties.

  14. Carbon Kinetic Isotope Effects in the Reactions of Atmospheric NMHC with OH, Cl and O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R. S.; Iannone, R.; Thompson, A. E.; Huang, L.; Ernst, D.; Rudolph, J.

    2003-12-01

    It has recently been shown that stable carbon isotope measurements are extremely useful for better understanding of processes involving NMHC in the atmosphere. Knowledge of the isotopic fractionation associated with the chemical removal of NMHC is vital for the interpretation of these measurements. Oxidation by OH-radicals is by far the most important atmospheric removal process of NMHC. Contributions to isotopic fractionation due to removal by reactions with Cl and O3 should also be understood to better interpret stable carbon isotope measurements. From our measurements, in normal urban and background air, reactions with O3 account for 15-25% of the isotopic fractionation in light C2-C4 alkenes. In polar sunrise conditions, reactions with Cl atoms may have a significant impact on the isotopic fractionation in light alkanes. An overview of the measured KIEs for the reactions of C2-C9 NMHC with atmospheric oxidants OH, Cl and O3 will be presented. Possibilities for using specific structural and thermal dependencies of measured KIEs for estimations of unmeasured KIEs of atmospheric interest will be discussed.

  15. Deuterium kinetic isotope effect (DKIE) in copper-induced LDL peroxidation: Interrelated effects of on inhibition and propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinchuk, Ilya; Lichtenberg, Dov

    2017-06-01

    LDL peroxidation plays a major role in many physiological and pathophysiological processes. The mechanisms of LDL peroxidation induced by transition metal ions have therefore been studied intensively. It has been proposed that the mechanism involves free radical production that occurs via decomposition of hydroperoxides. This, in turn, requires the cleavage of O-H bonds. Cleavage of O-D bond is slower and comparison of the kinetics in D2O to the kinetics in H2O is therefore a straightforward way to test this aspect of the alleged mechanism. The kinetics of peroxidation exhibit marked deuterium kinetic isotope effects at all the stages of oxidation under all the studied conditions. We found that the rate of propagation of copper-induced peroxidation is a monotonically decreasing function of D2O fraction in D2O/H2O mixtures. The only elementary reaction that involves "exchangeable" hydrogen at this stage is copper-induced decomposition of conjugated hydroperoxides. Therefore, we conclude that the latter step is rate-limiting reaction including cleavage of oxygen-hydrogen bond of hydroperoxide. The lag preceding rapid peroxidation exhibits a biphasic dependence on the fraction of D2O. This may be understood on the basis of the effect of substituting hydrogen atoms by deuterium. Specifically, such substitution is expected to decrease both the rate of initiation of peroxidation and the potency of the antioxidant. We interpret our results in terms of the effects of isotopic substitution on the rates of the reactions that involve the abstraction of "exchangeable" hydrogen atoms of OH groups in tocopherol and hydroperoxides. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of preservation methods of muscle tissue from upper-trophic level reef fishes on stable isotope values (δ13C and δ15N

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher D. Stallings

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Research that uses stable isotope analysis often involves a delay between sample collection in the field and laboratory processing, therefore requiring preservation to prevent or reduce tissue degradation and associated isotopic compositions. Although there is a growing literature describing the effects of various preservation techniques, the results are often contextual, unpredictable and vary among taxa, suggesting the need to treat each species individually. We conducted a controlled experiment to test the effects of four preservation methods of muscle tissue from four species of upper trophic-level reef fish collected from the eastern Gulf of Mexico (Red Grouper Epinephelus morio, Gag Mycteroperca microlepis, Scamp Mycteroperca phenax, and Red Snapper Lutjanus campechanus. We used a paired design to measure the effects on isotopic values for carbon and nitrogen after storage using ice, 95% ethanol, and sodium chloride (table salt, against that in a liquid nitrogen control. Mean offsets for both δ13C and δ15N values from controls were lowest for samples preserved on ice, intermediate for those preserved with salt, and highest with ethanol. Within species, both salt and ethanol significantly enriched the δ15N values in nearly all comparisons. Ethanol also had strong effects on the δ13C values in all three groupers. Conversely, for samples preserved on ice, we did not detect a significant offset in either isotopic ratio for any of the focal species. Previous studies have addressed preservation-induced offsets in isotope values using a mass balance correction that accounts for changes in the isotope value to that in the C/N ratio. We tested the application of standard mass balance corrections for isotope values that were significantly affected by the preservation methods and found generally poor agreement between corrected and control values. The poor performance by the correction may have been due to preferential loss of lighter isotopes

  17. The effects of biomanipulation on the biogeochemistry, carbon isotopic composition and pelagic food web relations of a shallow lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. M. Bontes

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we investigated the effects of experimental biomanipulation on community structure, ecosystem metabolism, carbon biogeochemistry and stable isotope composition of a shallow eutrophic lake in the Netherlands. Three different biomanipulation treatments were applied. In two parts of the lake, isolated from the rest, fish was removed and one part was used as a reference treatment in which no biomanipulation was applied. Stable isotopes have proved useful to trace trophic interactions at higher food web levels but until now methodological limitations have restricted species specific isotope analysis in the plankton community. We applied a new approach based on the combination of fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS and isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS to trace carbon flow through the planktonic food web. With this method we aimed at obtaining group specific δ13C signatures of phytoplankton and to trace possible shifts in δ13C resulting from fish removal. Biomanipulation led to an increase in transparency and macrophyte biomass and decrease in phytoplankton abundance, but zooplankton numbers did not increase. Fish removal also resulted in high pH, high O2, low CO2 and more negative δ13CDIC values than expected, which is attributed to chemical enhanced diffusion with large negative fractionation. Despite high temporal variation we detected differences between the isotopic signatures of the primary producers and between the different treatments. The fractionation values of green algae (~21 and diatoms (~23 were similar and independent of treatment, while fractionation factors of filamentous cyanobacteria were variable between the treatments that differed in CO2 availability. 13C-labeling of the phytoplankton groups showed that biomanipulation led to increased growth rates of green algae and diatoms at the expense of cyanobacteria. Finally, consumers seemed generalists to the available food sources.

  18. The anatectic effect on the zircon Hf isotope composition of migmatites and associated granites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Xiang; Gao, Peng; Zheng, Yong-Fei

    2015-12-01

    Zircon Hf isotope composition is widely used to trace the growth and evolution of continental crust. However, it is controversial whether the Hf isotope composition of magmatic zircons can faithfully reflect that of their sources, especially for S-type granites. In order to provide an insight into this issue, we have revisited the published Lu-Hf isotope data of zircons from well-studied migmatites and associated granites in the Sulu orogen and the Cathaysian terrane, respectively. The results show greatly elevated 176Hf/177Hf ratios (by more than 10ε units) for newly grown zircon domains compared to the relict zircon domains. This indicates considerable contributions from non-zircon Hf to anatectic melts during crustal anatexis and subsequent magmatism. Furthermore, this more radiogenic Hf isotope signature was not erased during magmatic processes such as crystal fractionation during melt ascent and emplacement. The budget of Hf isotopes in source rocks with respect to mineral Lu/Hf ratios suggests the involvement of Hf-bearing major minerals in anatectic reactions by dissolving Hf-bearing major minerals into the anatectic melts. The significant Hf isotope variations in some anatectic and magmatic zircon domains from the migmatites and granites suggest not only the source heterogeneity but also the variable non-zircon Hf contributions. As such, the Hf isotope compositions of anatectic and magmatic zircons are substantially dictated by the mass balance between the non-zircon Hf from anatectic reactions and the zircon-Hf from the dissolution of protolith zircons into the anatectic melts. They are primarily controlled by P-T conditions and mechanism of crustal anatexis, and the magmatic processes during melt evolution. The present study highlights the important contribution of non-zircon Hf to the anatectic and magmatic zircon domains. In this regard, the greatly elevated 176Hf/177Hf ratios for newly grown zircon domains in the migmatites and granites cannot reflect

  19. Ab initio path-integral calculations of kinetic and equilibrium isotope effects on base-catalyzed RNA transphosphorylation models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kin-Yiu; Xu, Yuqing; York, Darrin M

    2014-06-30

    Detailed understandings of the reaction mechanisms of RNA catalysis in various environments can have profound importance for many applications, ranging from the design of new biotechnologies to the unraveling of the evolutionary origin of life. An integral step in the nucleolytic RNA catalysis is self-cleavage of RNA strands by 2'-O-transphosphorylation. Key to elucidating a reaction mechanism is determining the molecular structure and bonding characteristics of transition state. A direct and powerful probe of transition state is measuring isotope effects on biochemical reactions, particularly if we can reproduce isotope effect values from quantum calculations. This article significantly extends the scope of our previous joint experimental and theoretical work in examining isotope effects on enzymatic and nonenzymatic 2'-O-transphosphorylation reaction models that mimic reactions catalyzed by RNA enzymes (ribozymes), and protein enzymes such as ribonuclease A (RNase A). Native reactions are studied, as well as reactions with thio substitutions representing chemical modifications often used in experiments to probe mechanism. Here, we report and compare results from eight levels of electronic-structure calculations for constructing the potential energy surfaces in kinetic and equilibrium isotope effects (KIE and EIE) computations, including a "gold-standard" coupled-cluster level of theory [CCSD(T)]. In addition to the widely used Bigeleisen equation for estimating KIE and EIE values, internuclear anharmonicity and quantum tunneling effects were also computed using our recently developed ab initio path-integral method, that is, automated integration-free path-integral method. The results of this work establish an important set of benchmarks that serve to guide calculations of KIE and EIE for RNA catalysis. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Effect of Wood Aging on Wine Mineral Composition and 87Sr/86Sr Isotopic Ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Ayse D; Bruno de Sousa, Raúl; Curvelo-Garcia, António S; Ricardo-da-Silva, Jorge M; Catarino, Sofia

    2017-06-14

    The evolution of mineral composition and wine strontium isotopic ratio 87Sr/86Sr (Sr IR) during wood aging were investigated. A red wine was aged in stainless steel tanks with French oak staves (Quercus sessiliflora Salisb.), with three industrial scale replicates. Sampling was carried out after 30, 60, and 90 days of aging, and the wines were evaluated in terms of general analysis, phenolic composition, total polysaccharides, multielement composition, and Sr IR. Li, Be, Mg, Al, Sc, Ti, V, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Ge, As, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Mo, Sb, Cs, Ba, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Dy, Ho, Er, Yb, Lu, Tl, and Pb elements and 87Sr/86Sr were determined by quadrupole inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (Q-ICP-MS) and Na, K, Ca, and Fe by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). Two-way ANOVA was applied to assess wood aging and time effect on Sr IR and mineral composition. Wood aging resulted in significantly higher concentrations of Mg, V, Co, Ni, and Sr. At the end of the aging period, wine exhibited statistically identical Sr IR compared to control. Study suggests that wood aging does not affect 87Sr/86Sr, not precluding the use of this parameter for wine traceability purposes.

  1. Probing Reversible Chemistry in Coenzyme B12-Dependent Ethanolamine Ammonia Lyase with Kinetic Isotope Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Alex R; Rentergent, Julius; Scrutton, Nigel S; Hay, Sam

    2015-01-01

    Coenzyme B12-dependent enzymes such as ethanolamine ammonia lyase have remarkable catalytic power and some unique properties that enable detailed analysis of the reaction chemistry and associated dynamics. By selectively deuterating the substrate (ethanolamine) and/or the β-carbon of the 5′-deoxyadenosyl moiety of the intrinsic coenzyme B12, it was possible to experimentally probe both the forward and reverse hydrogen atom transfers between the 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical and substrate during single-turnover stopped-flow measurements. These data are interpreted within the context of a kinetic model where the 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical intermediate may be quasi-stable and rearrangement of the substrate radical is essentially irreversible. Global fitting of these data allows estimation of the intrinsic rate constants associated with CoC homolysis and initial H-abstraction steps. In contrast to previous stopped-flow studies, the apparent kinetic isotope effects are found to be relatively small. PMID:25950663

  2. Forces in EDO-TTF: Theoretical study of isotope and charge effects on vibronic coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Ken

    Isotope and charge effects on vibronic coupling constant (V) and energy gradient (g) of ethylenedioxy-tetrathiafulvalen (EDO-TTF) upon the electron injection into cation and electron removal from neutral molecule are investigated. It is found that normal modes which include C = C stretching motion generally have large V and g. For electron removal, three normal modes (v460, v470, and v480) have large Vi+ and gi+, and deuteration results in decrease of V46+ and increase of V47+. For electron injection, five normal modes (ν+42, ν+44, ν+45, ν+47, and ν+48) have large vi0 and gi0 deuteration results in increase of V045 and V048 and decrease of V047. From the analysis of vibronic coupling constants using vibronic coupling density (VCD), regional vibronic coupling constant (RVCC), and atomic vibronic coupling constant (AVCC), it is revealed that the change in normal mode vectors (d) due to the deuteration and electron removal (or injection) leads to the change in V.

  3. Probing reversible chemistry in coenzyme B12 -dependent ethanolamine ammonia lyase with kinetic isotope effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Alex R; Rentergent, Julius; Scrutton, Nigel S; Hay, Sam

    2015-06-08

    Coenzyme B12 -dependent enzymes such as ethanolamine ammonia lyase have remarkable catalytic power and some unique properties that enable detailed analysis of the reaction chemistry and associated dynamics. By selectively deuterating the substrate (ethanolamine) and/or the β-carbon of the 5'-deoxyadenosyl moiety of the intrinsic coenzyme B12 , it was possible to experimentally probe both the forward and reverse hydrogen atom transfers between the 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical and substrate during single-turnover stopped-flow measurements. These data are interpreted within the context of a kinetic model where the 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical intermediate may be quasi-stable and rearrangement of the substrate radical is essentially irreversible. Global fitting of these data allows estimation of the intrinsic rate constants associated with CoC homolysis and initial H-abstraction steps. In contrast to previous stopped-flow studies, the apparent kinetic isotope effects are found to be relatively small. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

  4. High secondary [alpha]-deuterium kinetic isotope effect in the acetolysis and formolysis of dideuterioferrocenylmethyl benzoate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asperger, S. (Research Center of the Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts, Zagreb (Croatia)); Kukric, Z.; Sutic, D. (Sarajevo Univ. (Yugoslavia). Faculty of Natural Sciences and Mathematics); Saunders, W.H. Jr. (Rochester Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1992-02-01

    Acetolysis and formolysis of dideuterioferrocenylmethyl benzoate exhibit large secondary deuterium kinetic isotope effects and an abnormal temperature dependence. In the presence of LiClO[sub 4], which prevents the reversion from solvent-separated to contact ion-pairs, K[sub H]/K[sub D] at 25 [sup o]C amount to 1.53 [+-] 0.02 (acetolysis) and 1.48 [+-] 0.03 (formolysis). In the presence of LiClO[sub 4] the ratios of Arrhenius pre-exponential factors, A[sub H]/A[sub D], are significantly less than unity and amount to 0.49 [+-] 0.01 (acetolysis) and 0.38 [+-] 0.04 (formolysis). In the absence of LiClO[sub 4] the A[sub H]/A[sub D] ratios are much smaller (0.02 both in acetolysis and formolysis). We suggest that these surprisingly low values result from a change in rate-determining step over the temperature range, from formation of the solvent-separated ion-pair at low temperatures to reaction of the dissociated carbocation with solvent at the highest temperatures. Whether tunnelling plays any role in these solvolyses is discussed. (Author).

  5. Hydrogen and carbon vapour pressure isotope effects in liquid fluoroform studied by density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oi, Takao; Mitome, Ryota; Yanase, Satoshi [Sophia Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Science and Technology

    2017-06-01

    H/D and {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C vapour pressure isotope effects (VPIEs) in liquid fluoroform (CHF{sub 3}) were studied at the MPW1PW91/6-31 ++ G(d) level of theory. The CHF{sub 3} monomer and CHF{sub 3} molecules surrounded by other CHF{sub 3} molecules in every direction in CHF{sub 3} clusters were used as model molecules of vapour and liquid CHF{sub 3}. Although experimental results in which the vapour pressure of liquid {sup 12}CHF{sub 3} is higher than that of liquid {sup 12}CDF{sub 3} and the vapour pressure of liquid {sup 13}CHF{sub 3} is higher than that of liquid {sup 12}CHF{sub 3} between 125 and 212 K were qualitatively reproduced, the present calculations overestimated the H/D VPIE and underestimated the {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C VPIE. Temperature-dependent intermolecular interactions between hydrogen and fluorine atoms of neighbouring molecules were required to explain the temperature dependences of both H/D and {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C VPIEs.

  6. Free Air Respiratory Carbon Isotope Enrichment Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, L. D.; Greaver, T.; Schaffer, B.; Moreno, T.

    2003-12-01

    Recycling of respiratory carbon in canopies is difficult to measure. Other than a steady state model, there are currently no direct methods of measuring recycling. Respiratory carbon recycling not only will affect the carbon isotope ratio signature of the canopy, but is also important in partitioning gross photosynthesis and respiration from net ecosystem exchange (NEE). In order to better understand recycling, we empirically derived an integrated measure of recycling in a cover crop (Crotalaria juncea L.) and compared it with that derived by the steady state model. A measured dose of nitrogen gas having CO2 with a high Carbon-13 abundance (41%) was applied at ground level ( ˜10 cm above the soil surface) with a system of hoses in a 10 by 10 m plot embedded in a 30 by 30 m plot. We adjusted the flux rate of this enriched gas weekly to correspond to weekly measurements of soil respiration rates. The gas application rates at ground level were sufficiently low so as to not affect the carbon dynamics of the treatment plot relative to that of a control plot with only nitrogen (no CO2) applied. The isotopic composition of the applied gas, however, was high enough to significantly increase the isotopic composition of respired CO2. Using the carbon isotopic composition of respiration and biomass from the control and treatment plots and mass balance principles we calculated that 45% of the total respired CO2 is recycled by this crop, which compares well with that derived by the steady state model (48%). Partitioning of gross photosynthesis and respiration by isotopic methods usually assumes no recycling. Recycling, however, will have an effect on the isotopic composition of respired CO2. After correcting for the recycling effects on the carbon isotope ratios of respired CO2 leaving the canopy, we calculated that the average gross photosynthesis for this crop was 40.4μ moles/m2s and gross respiration was in the order of 17.8 μ moles/m2s. These values are similar to those

  7. Isotope separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Rodney J.; Morrey, John R.

    1978-01-01

    A method and apparatus is described for separating gas molecules containing one isotope of an element from gas molecules containing other isotopes of the same element in which all of the molecules of the gas are at the same electronic state in their ground state. Gas molecules in a gas stream containing one of the isotopes are selectively excited to a different electronic state while leaving the other gas molecules in their original ground state. Gas molecules containing one of the isotopes are then deflected from the other gas molecules in the stream and thus physically separated.

  8. Temperature effect on leaf water deuterium enrichment and isotopic fractionation during leaf lipid biosynthesis: results from controlled growth of C3 and C4 land plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Youping; Grice, Kliti; Chikaraishi, Yoshito; Stuart-Williams, Hilary; Farquhar, Graham D; Ohkouchi, Naohiko

    2011-02-01

    The hydrogen isotopic ratios ((2)H/(1)H) of land plant leaf water and the carbon-bound hydrogen of leaf wax lipids are valuable indicators for climatic, physiological, metabolic and geochemical studies. Temperature will exert a profound effect on the stable isotopic composition of leaf water and leaf lipids as it directly influences the isotopic equilibrium (IE) during leaf water evaporation and cellular water dissociation. It is also expected to affect the kinetics of enzymes involved in lipid biosynthesis, and therefore the balance of hydrogen inputs along different biochemical routes. We conducted a controlled growth experiment to examine the effect of temperature on the stable hydrogen isotopic composition of leaf water and the biological and biochemical isotopic fractionations during lipid biosynthesis. We find that leaf water (2)H enrichment at 20°C is lower than that at 30°C. This is contrary to the expectation that at lower temperatures leaf water should be more enriched in (2)H due to a larger equilibrium isotope effect associated with evapotranspiration from the leaf if all other variables are held constant. A hypothesis is presented to explain the apparent discrepancy whereby lower temperature-induced down-regulation of available aquaporin water channels and/or partial closure of transmembrane water channel forces water flow to "detour" to a more convoluted apoplastic pathway, effectively increasing the length over which diffusion acts against advection as described by the Péclet effect (Farquhar and Lloyd, 1993) and decreasing the average leaf water enrichment. The impact of temperature on leaf water enrichment is not reflected in the biological isotopic fractionation or the biochemical isotopic fractionation during lipid biosynthesis. Neither the biological nor biochemical fractionations at 20°C are significantly different from that at 30°C, implying that temperature has a negligible effect on the isotopic fractionation during lipid biosynthesis

  9. Effects of alkalinity and salinity at low and high light intensity on hydrogen isotope fractionation of long-chain alkenones produced by Emiliania huxleyi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Gabriella M.; Pfannerstill, Eva Y.; Schouten, Stefan; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; van der Meer, Marcel T. J.

    2017-12-01

    Over the last decade, hydrogen isotopes of long-chain alkenones have been shown to be a promising proxy for reconstructing paleo sea surface salinity due to a strong hydrogen isotope fractionation response to salinity across different environmental conditions. However, to date, the decoupling of the effects of alkalinity and salinity, parameters that co-vary in the surface ocean, on hydrogen isotope fractionation of alkenones has not been assessed. Furthermore, as the alkenone-producing haptophyte, Emiliania huxleyi, is known to grow in large blooms under high light intensities, the effect of salinity on hydrogen isotope fractionation under these high irradiances is important to constrain before using δDC37 to reconstruct paleosalinity. Batch cultures of the marine haptophyte E. huxleyi strain CCMP 1516 were grown to investigate the hydrogen isotope fractionation response to salinity at high light intensity and independently assess the effects of salinity and alkalinity under low-light conditions. Our results suggest that alkalinity does not significantly influence hydrogen isotope fractionation of alkenones, but salinity does have a strong effect. Additionally, no significant difference was observed between the fractionation responses to salinity recorded in alkenones grown under both high- and low-light conditions. Comparison with previous studies suggests that the fractionation response to salinity in culture is similar under different environmental conditions, strengthening the use of hydrogen isotope fractionation as a paleosalinity proxy.

  10. Isotope effect in acetylene C2H2 and C2D2 rotations on Cu(001)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchadilova, Yulia E.; Tikhodeev, Sergei G.; Paulsson, Magnus; Ueba, Hiromu

    2014-04-01

    A comprehensive analysis of the elementary processes behind the scanning tunneling microscope controlled rotation of C2H2 and C2D2, isotopologues of a single acetylene molecule adsorbed on the Cu(001) surface, is given, with a focus on the isotope effects. With the help of density-functional theory we calculate the vibrational modes of C2H2 and C2D2 on Cu(001) and estimate the anharmonic couplings between them, using a simple strings-on-rods model. The probability of the elementary processes, nonlinear and combination band, is estimated using the Keldysh diagram technique. This allows us to clarify the main peculiarities and the isotope effects of the C2H2 and C2D2 on Cu(001) rotation, discovered in the pioneering work [B. C. Stipe et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 1263 (1998), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.81.1263], which have not been previously understood.

  11. Partially-deuterated samples of HET-s(218–289) fibrils: assignment and deuterium isotope effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Albert A.; Ravotti, Francesco; Testori, Emilie; Cadalbert, Riccardo; Ernst, Matthias, E-mail: maer@ethz.ch [ETH Zürich, Physical Chemistry (Switzerland); Böckmann, Anja, E-mail: a.bockmann@ibcp.fr [Institut de Biologie et Chimie des Protéines, Bases Moléculaires et Structurales des Systèmes Infectieux, Labex Ecofect, UMR 5086 CNRS, Université de Lyon (France); Meier, Beat H., E-mail: beme@ethz.ch [ETH Zürich, Physical Chemistry (Switzerland)

    2017-02-15

    Fast magic-angle spinning and partial sample deuteration allows direct detection of {sup 1}H in solid-state NMR, yielding significant gains in mass sensitivity. In order to further analyze the spectra, {sup 1}H detection requires assignment of the {sup 1}H resonances. In this work, resonance assignments of backbone H{sup N} and Hα are presented for HET-s(218–289) fibrils, based on the existing assignment of Cα, Cβ, C’, and N resonances. The samples used are partially deuterated for higher spectral resolution, and the shifts in resonance frequencies of Cα and Cβ due to the deuterium isotope effect are investigated. It is shown that the deuterium isotope effect can be estimated and used for assigning resonances of deuterated samples in solid-state NMR, based on known resonances of the protonated protein.

  12. Partially-deuterated samples of HET-s(218-289) fibrils: assignment and deuterium isotope effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Albert A; Ravotti, Francesco; Testori, Emilie; Cadalbert, Riccardo; Ernst, Matthias; Böckmann, Anja; Meier, Beat H

    2017-02-01

    Fast magic-angle spinning and partial sample deuteration allows direct detection of 1H in solid-state NMR, yielding significant gains in mass sensitivity. In order to further analyze the spectra, 1H detection requires assignment of the 1H resonances. In this work, resonance assignments of backbone HN and Hα are presented for HET-s(218-289) fibrils, based on the existing assignment of Cα, Cβ, C', and N resonances. The samples used are partially deuterated for higher spectral resolution, and the shifts in resonance frequencies of Cα and Cβ due to the deuterium isotope effect are investigated. It is shown that the deuterium isotope effect can be estimated and used for assigning resonances of deuterated samples in solid-state NMR, based on known resonances of the protonated protein.

  13. Effects of particle size and dry matter content of a total mixed ration on intraruminal equilibration and net portal flux of volatile fatty acids in lactating dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storm, Adam Christian; Kristensen, Niels Bastian

    2010-01-01

    ration (44.3 and 53.8%). The feed DM did not affect chewing time, ruminal variables, or net portal flux of VFA. However, decreasing the FPS decreased the overall chewing and rumination times by 151 ± 55 and 135 ± 29 min/d, respectively. No effect of the reduced chewing time was observed on ruminal p...

  14. Experiments and simulation of a net closing mechanism for tether-net capture of space debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharf, Inna; Thomsen, Benjamin; Botta, Eleonora M.; Misra, Arun K.

    2017-10-01

    This research addresses the design and testing of a debris containment system for use in a tether-net approach to space debris removal. The tether-net active debris removal involves the ejection of a net from a spacecraft by applying impulses to masses on the net, subsequent expansion of the net, the envelopment and capture of the debris target, and the de-orbiting of the debris via a tether to the chaser spacecraft. To ensure a debris removal mission's success, it is important that the debris be successfully captured and then, secured within the net. To this end, we present a concept for a net closing mechanism, which we believe will permit consistently successful debris capture via a simple and unobtrusive design. This net closing system functions by extending the main tether connecting the chaser spacecraft and the net vertex to the perimeter and around the perimeter of the net, allowing the tether to actuate closure of the net in a manner similar to a cinch cord. A particular embodiment of the design in a laboratory test-bed is described: the test-bed itself is comprised of a scaled-down tether-net, a supporting frame and a mock-up debris. Experiments conducted with the facility demonstrate the practicality of the net closing system. A model of the net closure concept has been integrated into the previously developed dynamics simulator of the chaser/tether-net/debris system. Simulations under tether tensioning conditions demonstrate the effectiveness of the closure concept for debris containment, in the gravity-free environment of space, for a realistic debris target. The on-ground experimental test-bed is also used to showcase its utility for validating the dynamics simulation of the net deployment, and a full-scale automated setup would make possible a range of validation studies of other aspects of a tether-net debris capture mission.

  15. Hydro-ecological Effects on the Isotopic Composition of Soil and Leaf Water in Humid Deciduous Forests of Southern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, G.; Jahren, A. H.

    2001-05-01

    Paleoclimatic information inferred from the oxygen and hydrogen isotope abundance of fossil plant tissues and biomarkers relies on the observed close relationship between values of δ D and δ 18O for rainwater and environmental parameters (i.e., temperature, humidity, etc). However, the isotope content of rainwater can be altered during its passage through the canopy and the soil zone. Moreover, large isotope fractionations can occur after water enters the vascular system of plants as a result of leaf evaporation and biological processes. A number of studies, for instance, have addressed the effect of soil evaporation in arid and semi-arid regions that produces an enrichment of up to 20‰ in 18O and 80‰ in D in soil and stem water. Little is known, however, about fractionation effects in highly productive sub-tropical/temperate areas. With this study, we seek to evaluate evaporation effect on three humid deciduous forests of southern United States located along a 460-km transect that shows a precipitation gradient of about 200-mm in annual precipitation. The predominant tree species at the studied sites include dogwood, sugar gum, and silver maple. Rainwater was collected for isotopic determinations at the three localities, showing values that plot along the Meteoric Water Line. No significant difference (up to 0.4‰ for δ 18O and 4‰ for δ D) was observed in the isotopic composition of open rainfall and throughfall precipitation at the three sites. Soil water was cryogenically extracted from samples collected every 25-cm at the three sites during the growing season of 1997. Soil water from the upper soil horizons at the wettest site (Saint Bernard Park, Mississippi) showed isotopic values similar to those of rainfall. Moreover, isotopic values for soil water at this site were similar with depth, having a maximum difference of about 0.3‰ for δ 18O and of about 2‰ for δ D. Isotopic values for soil water at the driest locality (Natchez Lake, Arkansas

  16. Photochemistry of bacteriochlorophylls in human blood plasma: 2. Reaction mechanism investigated by product analysis and deuterium isotope effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandler, Jörg; Wilhelm, Brigitte; Scheer, Hugo

    2010-01-01

    Transmetalated (Pd) bacteriochlorophyll derivatives are currently being clinically tested as sensitizers for photodynamic therapy. Protocols using short delay times between injection and irradiation generate interest in the photochemistry of these pigments in the blood. Using near-infrared irradiation where these pigments absorb strongly, we have studied the mechanism of photo-oxidation in two lipoprotein fractions, low- and high-density lipoproteins, derived from human blood plasma that preferentially accumulate these pigments (Dandler et al. [2009] Photochem. Photobiol., 85, in press). Using quenchers of reactive oxygen species, and chemical reporters, in particular peroxides generated from cholesterol as an inherent component of the lipoproteins, a Type II mechanism generating singlet oxygen has been demonstrated for Pd- and Zn-bacteriopheophorbides. In homogeneous systems, accelerated bleaching in D(2)O, compared with H(2)O, supports this mechanism. An unusual deuterium isotope effect was observed, by contrast, in heterogeneous amphiphilic-water systems. In the early phase, and under high oxygen concentrations, again a positive D-isotope effect is observed which later, in a second phase, is reversed to a negative D-isotope effect. The latter cannot be explained by heterogeneous pigment populations in the amphiphilic system; we, therefore, conclude a mechanistic switch, and discuss a possible mechanism.

  17. Thermodynamics Isotope Effects of LaNi4.25Al0.75 Absorbing Protium,Deuterium and Tritium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIANG Bin-bin1;ZHAO Wei-wei1;HE Chang-shui1;QUE Ji2;YANG Hong-guang1

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The P-C-T curves of LaNi4.25Al0.75 alloy absorbing protium, deuterium and tritium were investigated at constant temperature and volume in our metal hydride research system. According to the Van’t Hoff Equation, the thermodynamics parameters of the hydride phase were determined. Enthalpy change and entropy change for protium, deuterium and tritium were -44.5, -45.0, -47.1 kJ/mol and -118.0, -121.8, -127.5 J•mol-1•K-1. The experiments indicated that the isotope effect did not obviously at low temperature, however, as the temperature increasing to 100 ℃, there were obvious thermodynamics isotope effect with hydrogen absorption by LaNi4.25Al0.75 alloy. The order of equilibrium pressure absorbing gases was T2>D2>H2. However, the enthalpy and entropy appeared to be in verse order, T2>D2>H2. The results showed that hydrogen isotope effect with LaNiAl alloys were depended on temperature.

  18. Effectiveness of essential amino acid supplementation in stimulating whole body net protein anabolism is comparable between COPD patients and healthy older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonker, Renate; Deutz, Nicolaas Ep; Erbland, Marcia L; Anderson, Paula J; Engelen, Mariëlle Pkj

    2017-04-01

    The development of effective nutritional strategies in support of muscle growth for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) remains challenging. Dietary essential amino acids (EAAs) are the main driver of postprandial net protein anabolism. In agreement, EAA supplements in healthy older adults are more effective than supplements with the composition of complete proteins. In patients with COPD it is still unknown whether complete protein supplements can be substituted with only EAAs, and whether they are as effective as in healthy older adults. According to a double-blind randomized crossover design, we examined in 23 patients with moderate to very severe COPD (age: 65±2 years, FEV1: 40±2% of predicted) and 19 healthy age-matched subjects (age: 64±2 years), whether a free EAA mixture with a high proportion (40%) of leucine (EAA mixture) stimulated whole body net protein gain more than a similar mixture of balanced free EAAs and non-EAAs as present in whey protein (TAA mixture). Whole body net protein gain and splanchnic extraction of phenylalanine (PHE) were assessed by continuous IV infusion of L-[ring-2H5]-PHE and L-[ring-2H2]-tyrosine, and enteral intake of L-[15N]-PHE (added to the mixtures). Besides an excellent positive linear relationship between PHE intake and net protein gain in both groups (r=0.84-0.91, Panabolism more than free amino acid supplements with the composition of complete proteins. Therefore, free EAA supplements may aid in the prevention and treatment of muscle wasting in this patient population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Stable isotopes reveal the effect of trawl fisheries on the diet of commercially exploited species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinz, Hilmar; Moranta, Joan; Balestrini, Stephen; Sciberras, Marija; Pantin, Julia R; Monnington, James; Zalewski, Alex; Kaiser, Michel J; Sköld, Mattias; Jonsson, Patrik; Bastardie, Francois; Hiddink, Jan Geert

    2017-07-24

    Bottom trawling can change food availability for benthivorous demersal species by (i) changing benthic prey composition through physical seabed impacts and (ii) by removing overall benthic consumer biomass increasing the net availability of benthic prey for remaining individuals. Thus trawling may both negatively and positively influence the quantity and quality of food available. Using δ 13C and δ 15N we investigated potential diet changes of three commercially exploited species across trawling gradients in the Kattegat (plaice, dab and Norway lobster (Nephrops)) and the Irish Sea (Nephrops). In the Kattegat, trawling affected primarily the biomass of benthic consumers, lowering competition. Nephrops showed significant positive relationships for δ 13C and a domed relationship for δ 15N with trawling. In the Irish Sea, intense trawling had a negative effect on benthic prey. δ 13C and δ 15N thus showed the inverse relationships to those observed in the Kattegat. Plaice from the Kattegat, showed a significant relationship with trawling intensity for δ 13C, but not for δ 15N. No relationship was found for dab. Changes of δ 13C and δ 15N correlated with changes in condition of species. The results show that the removal of demersal competitors and benthos by trawling can change the diets of commercial species, ultimately affecting their body condition.

  20. Mechanistic Insights into Dye-Decolorizing Peroxidase Revealed by Solvent Isotope and Viscosity Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shrestha, Ruben [Department; Huang, Gaochao [Department; Meekins, David A. [Department; Geisbrecht, Brian V. [Department; Li, Ping [Department

    2017-08-18

    Dye-decolorizing peroxidases (DyPs) are a family of H2O2-dependent heme peroxidases that have shown potential applications in lignin degradation and valorization. However, the DyP kinetic mechanism remains underexplored. Using structural biology and solvent isotope (sKIE) and viscosity effects, many mechanistic characteristics have been determined for the B-class ElDyP from Enterobacter lignolyticus. Its structure revealed that a water molecule acts as the sixth axial ligand and two channels at diameters of ~3.0 and 8.0 Å lead to the heme center. A conformational change of ERS* to ERS, which have identical spectral characteristics, was proposed as the final step in DyPs’ bisubstrate Ping-Pong mechanism. This step is also the rate-determining step in ABTS oxidation. The normal KIE of wild-type ElDyP with D2O2 at pD 3.5 suggested that compound 0 deprotonation by the distal aspartate is rate-limiting in the formation of compound I, which is more reactive under acidic pH than under neutral or alkaline pH. The viscosity effects and other biochemical methods implied that the reducing substrate binds with compound I instead of the free enzyme. The significant inverse sKIEs of kcat/KM and kERS* suggested that the aquo release in ElDyP is mechanistically important and may explain the enzyme’s adoption of two-electron reduction for compound I. The distal aspartate is catalytically more important than the distal arginine and plays key roles in determining ElDyP’s optimum acidic pH. The kinetic mechanism of D143H-ElDyP was also briefly studied. The results obtained will pave the way for future protein engineering to improve DyPs’ lignolytic activity.

  1. Mechanistic Insights into Dye-Decolorizing Peroxidase Revealed by Solvent Isotope and Viscosity Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Ruben; Huang, Gaochao; Meekins, David A; Geisbrecht, Brian V; Li, Ping

    2017-09-01

    Dye-decolorizing peroxidases (DyPs) are a family of H 2 O 2 -dependent heme peroxidases, which have shown potential applications in lignin degradation and valorization. However, the DyP kinetic mechanism remains underexplored. Using structural biology and solvent isotope (sKIE) and viscosity effects, many mechanistic characteristics have been uncovered for the B-class El DyP from Enterobacter lignolyticus . Its structure revealed that a water molecule acts as the sixth axial ligand with two channels at diameters of ~3.0 and 8.0 Å leading to the heme center. A conformational change of ERS * to ERS, which have identical spectral characteristics, was proposed as the final step in DyPs' bisubstrate Ping-Pong mechanism. This step is also the rate-determining step in ABTS oxidation. The normal KIE of wild-type El DyP with D 2 O 2 at pH 3.5 suggested that cmpd 0 deprotonation by the distal aspartate is rate-limiting in the formation of cmpd I, which is more reactive under acidic pH than under neutral or alkaline pH. The viscosity effects and other biochemical methods implied that the reducing substrate binds with cmpd I instead of the free enzyme. The significant inverse sKIEs of k cat / K M and k ERS* suggested that the aquo release in DyPs is mechanistically important and may explain the enzyme's adoption of two-electron reduction for cmpd I. The distal aspartate is catalytically more important than the distal arginine and plays key roles in determining DyPs' acidic pH optimum. The kinetic mechanism of D143H- El DyP was also briefly studied. The results obtained will pave the way for future protein engineering to improve DyPs' lignolytic activity.

  2. Equilibrium isotope effects on noncovalent interactions in a supramolecular host-guest system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugridge, Jeffrey S; Bergman, Robert G; Raymond, Kenneth N

    2012-02-01

    The self-assembled supramolecular complex [Ga(4)L(6)](12-) (1; L = 1,5-bis[2,3-dihydroxybenzamido]naphthalene) can act as a molecular host in aqueous solution and bind cationic guest molecules to its highly charged exterior surface or within its hydrophobic interior cavity. The distinct internal cavity of host 1 modifies the physical properties and reactivity of bound guest molecules and can be used to catalyze a variety of chemical transformations. Noncovalent host-guest interactions in large part control guest binding, molecular recognition and the chemical reactivity of bound guests. Herein we examine equilibrium isotope effects (EIEs) on both exterior and interior guest binding to host 1 and use these effects to probe the details of noncovalent host-guest interactions. For both interior and exterior binding of a benzylphosphonium guest in aqueous solution, protiated guests are found to bind more strongly to host 1 (K(H)/K(D) > 1) and the preferred association of protiated guests is driven by enthalpy and opposed by entropy. Deuteration of guest methyl and benzyl C-H bonds results in a larger EIE than deuteration of guest aromatic C-H bonds. The observed EIEs can be well explained by considering changes in guest vibrational force constants and zero-point energies. DFT calculations further confirm the origins of these EIEs and suggest that changes in low-frequency guest C-H/D vibrational motions (bends, wags, etc.) are primarily responsible for the observed EIEs. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  3. Stable isotope-resolved metabolomic analysis of lithium effects on glial-neuronal metabolism and interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Peixiong; Lane, Andrew N.; Higashi, Richard M.; Wang, Yun; Hamidi, Anahita B.; Zhou, Rulun; Guitart, Xavier; Chen, Guang; Manji, Husseini K.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the long-established therapeutic efficacy of lithium in the treatment of bipolar disorder (BPD), its molecular mechanism of action remains elusive. Newly developed stable isotope-resolved metabolomics (SIRM) is a powerful approach that can be used to elucidate systematically how lithium impacts glial and neuronal metabolic pathways and activities, leading ultimately to deciphering its molecular mechanism of action. The effect of lithium on the metabolism of three different 13C-labeled precursors ([U-13C]-glucose, 13C-3-lactate or 13C-2,3-alanine) was analyzed in cultured rat astrocytes and neurons by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Using [U-13C]-glucose, lithium was shown to enhance glycolytic activity and part of the Krebs cycle activity in both astrocytes and neurons, particularly the anaplerotic pyruvate carboxylation (PC). The PC pathway was previously thought to be active in astrocytes but absent in neurons. Lithium also stimulated the extracellular release of 13C labeled-lactate, -alanine (Ala), -citrate, and -glutamine (Gln) by astrocytes. Interrogation of neuronal pathways using 13C-3-lactate or 13C-2,3-Ala as tracers indicated a high capacity of neurons to utilize lactate and Ala in the Krebs cycle, particularly in the production of labeled Asp and Glu via PC and normal cycle activity. Prolonged lithium treatment enhanced lactate metabolism via PC but inhibited lactate oxidation via the normal Krebs cycle in neurons. Such lithium modulation of glycolytic, PC and Krebs cycle activity in astrocytes and neurons as well as release of fuel substrates by astrocytes should help replenish Krebs cycle substrates for Glu synthesis while meeting neuronal demands for energy. Further investigations into the molecular regulation of these metabolic traits should provide new insights into the pathophysiology of mood disorders and early diagnostic markers, as well as new target(s) for effective

  4. ISOTOPE METHODS IN HOMOGENEOUS CATALYSIS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BULLOCK,R.M.; BENDER,B.R.

    2000-12-01

    The use of isotope labels has had a fundamentally important role in the determination of mechanisms of homogeneously catalyzed reactions. Mechanistic data is valuable since it can assist in the design and rational improvement of homogeneous catalysts. There are several ways to use isotopes in mechanistic chemistry. Isotopes can be introduced into controlled experiments and followed where they go or don't go; in this way, Libby, Calvin, Taube and others used isotopes to elucidate mechanistic pathways for very different, yet important chemistries. Another important isotope method is the study of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) and equilibrium isotope effect (EIEs). Here the mere observation of where a label winds up is no longer enough - what matters is how much slower (or faster) a labeled molecule reacts than the unlabeled material. The most careti studies essentially involve the measurement of isotope fractionation between a reference ground state and the transition state. Thus kinetic isotope effects provide unique data unavailable from other methods, since information about the transition state of a reaction is obtained. Because getting an experimental glimpse of transition states is really tantamount to understanding catalysis, kinetic isotope effects are very powerful.

  5. WaveNet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-30

    Coastal Inlets Research Program WaveNet WaveNet is a web-based, Graphical-User-Interface ( GUI ) data management tool developed for Corps coastal...generates tabular and graphical information for project planning and design documents. The WaveNet is a web-based GUI designed to provide users with a...data from different sources, and employs a combination of Fortran, Python and Matlab codes to process and analyze data for USACE applications

  6. Core correlation effects in multiconfiguration calculations of isotope shifts in Mg I

    CERN Document Server

    Filippin, Livio; Ekman, Jörgen; Jönsson, Per

    2016-01-01

    The present work reports results from systematic multiconfiguration Dirac-Hartree-Fock calculations of isotope shifts for several well-known transitions in neutral magnesium. Relativistic normal and specific mass shift factors as well as the electronic probability density at the origin are calculated. Combining these electronic quantities with available nuclear data, energy and transition level shifts are determined for the $^{26}$Mg$-^{24}$Mg pair of isotopes. Different models for electron correlation are adopted. It is shown that although valence and core-valence models provide accurate values for the isotope shifts, the inclusion of core-core excitations in the computational strategy significantly improves the accuracy of the transition energies and normal mass shift factors.

  7. Coloured Petri Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kurt

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes how Coloured Petri Nets (CP-nets) have been developed — from being a promising theoretical model to being a full-fledged language for the design, specification, simulation, validation and implementation of large software systems (and other systems in which human beings and...... use of CP-nets — because it means that the function representation and the translations (which are a bit mathematically complex) no longer are parts of the basic definition of CP-nets. Instead they are parts of the invariant method (which anyway demands considerable mathematical skills...

  8. Game Coloured Petri Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergaard, Michael

    2006-01-01

    This paper introduces the notion of game coloured Petri nets. This allows the modeler to explicitly model what parts of the model comprise the modeled system and what parts are the environment of the modeled system. We give the formal definition of game coloured Petri nets, a means of reachability...... analysis of this net class, and an application of game coloured Petri nets to automatically generate easy-to-understand visualizations of the model by exploiting the knowledge that some parts of the model are not interesting from a visualization perspective (i.e. they are part of the environment...

  9. Programming NET Web Services

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrara, Alex

    2007-01-01

    Web services are poised to become a key technology for a wide range of Internet-enabled applications, spanning everything from straight B2B systems to mobile devices and proprietary in-house software. While there are several tools and platforms that can be used for building web services, developers are finding a powerful tool in Microsoft's .NET Framework and Visual Studio .NET. Designed from scratch to support the development of web services, the .NET Framework simplifies the process--programmers find that tasks that took an hour using the SOAP Toolkit take just minutes. Programming .NET

  10. Annotating Coloured Petri Nets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindstrøm, Bo; Wells, Lisa Marie

    2002-01-01

    -net. An example of such auxiliary information is a counter which is associated with a token to be able to do performance analysis. Modifying colour sets and arc inscriptions in a CP-net to support a specific use may lead to creation of several slightly different CP-nets – only to support the different uses...... a method which makes it possible to associate auxiliary information, called annotations, with tokens without modifying the colour sets of the CP-net. Annotations are pieces of information that are not essential for determining the behaviour of the system being modelled, but are rather added to support...

  11. Effects of caloric restriction on nitrogen and carbon stable isotope ratios in adult rat bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Kimberly L; Rowland, Neil E; Krigbaum, John

    2014-10-15

    Stable isotope analysis is a valuable technique for dietary estimation in ecological and archaeological research, yet many variables can potentially affect tissue stable isotope signatures. Controlled feeding studies across a range of species have consistently demonstrated impacts of caloric restriction on tissue stable isotope ratios, but most have focused on juvenile, fasting, and/or starving individuals, and most have utilized soft tissues despite the importance of bone for paleodietary analyses. The goal of this study was to determine whether temporally defined, moderate food restriction could affect stable carbon and/or nitrogen isotope ratios in adult mammalian bone - a tissue that arguably reflects long-term dietary signals. Adult rats fed a standard laboratory diet were restricted to 45% of ad libitum intakes for 3 or 6 months. Relevant anatomical and physiological parameters were measured to confirm that the restriction protocol resulted in significant nutritional stress and to provide independent data to facilitate interpretation of stable isotope ratios. Femoral bone δ(13)Ccollagen, δ(15)Ncollagen, and δ(13)Capatite values were determined by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Calorie-restricted animals exhibited a small, yet significant enrichment in (15)Ncollagen compared with control animals, reflecting protein-calorie stress. While the δ(13)Ccollagen values did not differ, the δ(13)Capatite values revealed less enrichment in (13)C than in controls, reflecting catabolism of body fat. Independent anatomical and physiological data from these same individuals support these interpretations. Results indicate that moderate caloric restriction does not appreciably undermine broad interpretations of dietary signals in adult mammalian bone. Significant variability among individuals or groups, however, is best explained by marked differences in energy intake over variable timescales. An inverse relationship between the δ(13)Capatite and δ(15)Ncollagen

  12. Use of carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios to assess the effects of environmental contaminants on aquatic food webs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caquet, Thierry [Unite Mixte de Recherche 985 Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, Agrocampus Rennes ' Ecobiologie et Qualite des Hydrosystemes Continentaux' , Equipe Ecotoxicologie et Qualite des Milieux aquatiques, 65 rue de Saint-Brieuc, F-35042 Rennes cedex (France)]. E-mail: Thierry.Caquet@rennes.inra.fr

    2006-05-15

    In this study, the value of carbon ({delta} {sup 13}C) and nitrogen ({delta} {sup 15}N) stable isotope ratios were determined in nymphs of a top-predator, the common backswimmer (Notonecta glauca L.), collected in 18 m{sup 3} outdoor freshwater mesocosms used to assess the fate and ecotoxicological effects of a diphenyl ether herbicide, fomesafen, applied alone or in combination with Agral 90[reg] (mixture of polyethoxylated derivatives of nonylphenol). Both treatments had a negative effect on {delta} {sup 13}C values which may reflect changes in carbon fluxes across food webs in the treated ponds associated with a shift in phytoplankton structure. A decrease in {delta} {sup 15}N values was observed in the nymphs collected in mixture-treated ponds, which was presumably due to an increase in the abundance of rotifers and Chironominae larvae in these ponds. These preliminary results indicate that stable isotope ratios may be used as shortcuts to detect qualitative or quantitative shifts in the structure of aquatic food webs caused by pollutants. - Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios may be used to detect the impact of pollutants on aquatic food webs.

  13. Effects of a clearcut on the net rates of nitrification and N mineralization in a northern hardwood forest, Catskill Mountains, New York, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Douglas A.; Murdoch, Peter S.

    2005-01-01

    The Catskill Mountains of southeastern New York receive among the highest rates of atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition in eastern North America, and ecosystems in the region may be sensitive to human disturbances that affect the N cycle. We studied the effects of a clearcut in a northern hardwood forest within a 24-ha Catskill watershed on the net rates of N mineralization and nitrification in soil plots during 6 years (1994-1999) that encompassed 3-year pre- and post-harvesting periods. Despite stream NO3- concentrations that increased by more than 1400 ??mol l-1 within 5 months after the clearcut, and three measures of NO3- availability in soil that increased 6- to 8-fold during the 1st year after harvest, the net rates of N mineralization and nitrification as measured by in situ incubation in the soil remained unchanged. The net N-mineralization rate in O-horizon soil was 1- 2 mg N kg-1 day-1 and the net nitrification rate was about 1 mg N kg-1 day-1, and rates in B-horizon soil were only one-fifth to one-tenth those of the O-horizon. These rates were obtained in single 625 m2 plots in the clearcut watershed and reference area, and were confirmed by rate measurements at 6 plots in 1999 that showed little difference in N-mineralization and nitrification rates between the treatment and reference areas. Soil temperature increased 1 ?? 0.8??C in a clearcut study plot relative to a reference plot during the post-harvest period, and soil moisture in the clearcut plot was indistinguishable from that in the reference plot. These results are contrary to the initial hypothesis that the clearcut would cause net rates of these N-cycling processes to increase sharply. The in situ incubation method used in this study isolated the samples from ambient roots and thereby prevented plant N uptake; therefore, the increases in stream NO3- concentrations and export following harvest largely reflect diminished uptake. Changes in temperature and moisture after the clearcut were

  14. Edge effects on foliar stable isotope values in a Madagascan tropical dry forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Brooke E; McGoogan, Keriann C; Lehman, Shawn M

    2012-01-01

    Edge effects represent an inevitable and important consequence of habitat loss and fragmentation. These effects include changes in microclimate, solar radiation, or temperature. Such abiotic effects can, in turn, impact biotic factors. They can have a substantial impact on species, communities, and ecosystems. Here we examine clinal variations in stable carbon and nitrogen isotope values for trees along an edge-interior gradient in the dry deciduous forest at Ankarafantsika National Park. We predicted that soil respiration and differences in solar irradiance would result in stratified δ¹³C values where leaves collected close to the forest floor would have lower δ¹³C values than those growing higher up in the canopy. We also anticipated that plants growing at the savannah-forest boundary would have higher δ¹³C and δ¹⁵N values than plants growing in the forest interior. As expected, we detected a small but significant canopy effect. Leaves growing below 2 m from the forest floor exhibit δ¹³C values that are, on average, 1.1‰ lower than those growing above this threshold. We did not, however, find any relationship between foliar δ¹³C and distance from the edge. Unpredictably, we detected a striking positive relationship between foliar δ¹⁵N values and increasing distance into the forest interior. Variability in physiology among species, anthropogenic influence, organic input, and rooting depth cannot adequately explain this trend. Instead, this unexpected relationship most likely reflects decreasing nutrient or water availability, or a shift in N-sources with increasing distance from the savannah. Unlike most forest communities, the trees at Ampijoroa are growing in nutrient-limited sands. In addition to being nutrient poor, these well-drained soils likely decrease the amount of soil water available to forest vegetation. Continued research on plant responses to edge effects will improve our understanding of the conservation biology of forest

  15. Edge effects on foliar stable isotope values in a Madagascan tropical dry forest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooke E Crowley

    Full Text Available Edge effects represent an inevitable and important consequence of habitat loss and fragmentation. These effects include changes in microclimate, solar radiation, or temperature. Such abiotic effects can, in turn, impact biotic factors. They can have a substantial impact on species, communities, and ecosystems. Here we examine clinal variations in stable carbon and nitrogen isotope values for trees along an edge-interior gradient in the dry deciduous forest at Ankarafantsika National Park. We predicted that soil respiration and differences in solar irradiance would result in stratified δ¹³C values where leaves collected close to the forest floor would have lower δ¹³C values than those growing higher up in the canopy. We also anticipated that plants growing at the savannah-forest boundary would have higher δ¹³C and δ¹⁵N values than plants growing in the forest interior. As expected, we detected a small but significant canopy effect. Leaves growing below 2 m from the forest floor exhibit δ¹³C values that are, on average, 1.1‰ lower than those growing above this threshold. We did not, however, find any relationship between foliar δ¹³C and distance from the edge. Unpredictably, we detected a striking positive relationship between foliar δ¹⁵N values and increasing distance into the forest interior. Variability in physiology among species, anthropogenic influence, organic input, and rooting depth cannot adequately explain this trend. Instead, this unexpected relationship most likely reflects decreasing nutrient or water availability, or a shift in N-sources with increasing distance from the savannah. Unlike most forest communities, the trees at Ampijoroa are growing in nutrient-limited sands. In addition to being nutrient poor, these well-drained soils likely decrease the amount of soil water available to forest vegetation. Continued research on plant responses to edge effects will improve our understanding of the conservation

  16. Effect of different crop management systems on net primary productivity and relative carbon allocation coefficients for corn (Zea mays L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Khorramdel

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate the effect of different crop management practices on corn (Zea mays L. net primary productivity (NPP and relative carbon allocation coefficients, a field experiment was conducted based on a completely randomized block design with four replications in the Agricultural Research Station, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran during two growing season 2008-2009 and 2009-2010. Treatments including two low input management systems based on application of cow manure and compost municipal made from house-hold waste, a medium input system and a high input system. Application of inputs and management practices were based on a basic assumption made prior to the start of the experiment. On the other words, for each of the management system the particular set of inputs were allocated. In this respect, for low input system 30 t.ha-1 cow manure or 30 t.ha-1 compost municipal made from house-hold waste, twice hand weeding were used. In medium management system, 15 t.ha-1 compost municipal made from house-hold waste, 150 kg.ha-1 urea, two seed bed operations, 1.5 l.ha-1 2, 4-D herbicide applied at five-leaf stage and one time hand weeding were used. In high input system, the inputs were two seed bed operations, 2 l.ha-1 Paraquat herbicide used after seeding and 1.5 l.ha-1 2, 4-D applied at five-leaf stage. Results showed that the effect of different crop management practices on the shoot biomass, seed weight, root biomass, total biomass, shoot biomass: root biomass (S:R, SRL and HI were significant (p≥0.01. High input management system enhanced total biomass and S:R and decreased seed weight, root biomass and SRL. The highest and the lowest total biomass observed in high input (18.3 kg.m-2.yr-1 and low input with using compost (10.3 kg.m-2.yr-1, respectively. The maximum SRL observed in low input based on cow manure application (19.8 cm.cm-3 soil and the minimum SRL was in high input (1.3 cm.cm-3 soil. Range of relative carbon allocation

  17. Proton-transport mechanisms in cytochrome c oxidase revealed by studies of kinetic isotope effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Ann-Louise; Chakrabarty, Suman; Siöberg, Catrine Berthold; Högbom, Martin; Warshel, Arieh; Brzezinski, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (CytcO) is a membrane-bound enzyme, which catalyzes the reduction of di-oxygen to water and uses a major part of the free energy released in this reaction to pump protons across the membrane. In the Rhodobacter sphaeroides aa3 CytcO all protons that are pumped across the membrane, as well as one half of the protons that are used for O2 reduction, are transferred through one specific intraprotein proton pathway, which holds a highly conserved Glu286 residue. Key questions that need to be addressed in order to understand the function of CytcO at a molecular level are related to the timing of proton transfers from Glu286 to a “pump site” and the catalytic site, respectively. Here, we have investigated the temperature dependencies of the H/D kinetic-isotope effects of intramolecular proton-transfer reactions in the wild-type CytcO as well as in two structural CytcO variants, one in which proton uptake from solution is delayed and one in which proton pumping is uncoupled from O2 reduction. These processes were studied for two specific reaction steps linked to transmembrane proton pumping, one that involves only proton transfer (peroxy–ferryl, P→F, transition) and one in which the same sequence of proton transfers is also linked to electron transfer to the catalytic site (ferryl–oxidized, F→O, transition). An analysis of these reactions in the framework of theory indicates that that the simpler, P→F reaction is rate-limited by proton transfer from Glu286 to the catalytic site. When the same proton-transfer events are also linked to electron transfer to the catalytic site (F→O), the proton-transfer reactions are gated by a protein structural change, which presumably ensures that the proton-pumping stoichiometry is maintained also in the presence of a transmembrane electrochemical gradient. PMID:21463601

  18. Deuterium isotope effects on the interaction between hyperbranched polyethylene imine and an anionic surfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastardo, L A; Mészaros, R; Varga, I; Gilanyi, T; Cleasson, P M

    2005-08-25

    Solvent isotope effects on the interaction between the hyperbranched cationic polyelectrolyte, polyethylene imine (PEI), and the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) were investigated using potentiometric titration and eletrophoretic mobility measurements. In the basic pH range, a significantly higher fraction of the amine groups was found to be protonated when the PEI was dissolved in D2O compared to H2O at the same pH/pD. The difference in polymer charge in the two solvents decreases gradually with decreasing pH, and it completely diminishes at around pH = 4. Electrophoretic mobility measurements of PEI/SDS complexes at different pH values correlated very well with these observations. At pH/pD approximately 9 a much higher mobility of the PEI/SDS complexes was found in D2O than in H2O at low surfactant concentrations, and the charge neutralization point shifted to a considerably larger surfactant concentration in heavy water. These results can be explained by the significantly higher charge density of the PEI in D2O compared to H2O. However, at the natural pH/pD as well as at pH = 4 and pD = 4 conditions the PEI molecules have roughly equal charge densities, which result in very similar charged characteristics (mobilities) of the PEI/SDS complexes as well as the same charge neutralization SDS concentration. It can be concluded that extreme care must be taken in the general analysis of those experiments in which weak polyelectrolyte/surfactant aggregates are investigated in heavy water, and then these observations are correlated with structures of the same system in water.

  19. Effects of gill-net fishing on marine birds in a biological hotspot in the northwest Atlantic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoren, Gail K

    2007-08-01

    Marine biological hotspots, or areas where high abundances of species overlap in space and time, are ecologically important areas because energy flow through marine food webs, a key ecosystem process, is maximized in these areas. I investigated whether top predators aggregated at persistent spawning sites of a key forage fish species, capelin (Mallotus villosus), on the NE coast of Newfoundland during July and August 2000-2003. By examining the distributional patterns of top predators through ship-based surveys at multiple spatial and temporal scales, I found that the biomasses of birds-dominated by Common Murres (Uria aalge)-and mammals-dominated by whale species-were concentrated along the coast, with a biological hotspot forming near two persistent spawning sites of capelin in all years. The formation of this hotspot was well defined in space and time from middle of July to middle of August, likely coinciding with the spawning chronology of capelin. Within this hotspot, there was a high spatial and temporal overlap of Common Murres and gill nets set to capture Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua). This resulted in breeding murres becoming entangled in gill nets while feeding on spawning capelin. Despite an acknowledged uncertainty of bycatch mortality, estimates for the larger regional-scale area (1936-4973 murres/year; 0.2-0.6% of the breeding population) underestimated mortality relative to estimates within the hotspot (3053-14054 murres/year; 0.4-1.7%). Although fishing effort for Atlantic cod has declined substantially since the groundfish moratorium in 1992, chronic, unnatural, and additive mortality through bycatch continues in coastal Newfoundland. Restricted use of gill nets within this and other biological hotspots during the capelin spawning period appears to be a straightforward application of the "ecological and biologically significant area" management framework in Canada's Oceans Act. This protection would minimize murre bycatch and maintain ecosystem

  20. Coupled eco-hydrology and biogeochemistry algorithms enable the simulation of water table depth effects on boreal peatland net CO2 exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezbahuddin, Mohammad; Grant, Robert F.; Flanagan, Lawrence B.

    2017-12-01

    Water table depth (WTD) effects on net ecosystem CO2 exchange of boreal peatlands are largely mediated by hydrological effects on peat biogeochemistry and the ecophysiology of peatland vegetation. The lack of representation of these effects in carbon models currently limits our predictive capacity for changes in boreal peatland carbon deposits under potential future drier and warmer climates. We examined whether a process-level coupling of a prognostic WTD with (1) oxygen transport, which controls energy yields from microbial and root oxidation-reduction reactions, and (2) vascular and nonvascular plant water relations could explain mechanisms that control variations in net CO2 exchange of a boreal fen under contrasting WTD conditions, i.e., shallow vs. deep WTD. Such coupling of eco-hydrology and biogeochemistry algorithms in a process-based ecosystem model, ecosys, was tested against net ecosystem CO2 exchange measurements in a western Canadian boreal fen peatland over a period of drier-weather-driven gradual WTD drawdown. A May-October WTD drawdown of ˜ 0.25 m from 2004 to 2009 hastened oxygen transport to microbial and root surfaces, enabling greater microbial and root energy yields and peat and litter decomposition, which raised modeled ecosystem respiration (Re) by 0.26 µmol CO2 m-2 s-1 per 0.1 m of WTD drawdown. It also augmented nutrient mineralization, and hence root nutrient availability and uptake, which resulted in improved leaf nutrient (nitrogen) status that facilitated carboxylation and raised modeled vascular gross primary productivity (GPP) and plant growth. The increase in modeled vascular GPP exceeded declines in modeled nonvascular (moss) GPP due to greater shading from increased vascular plant growth and moss drying from near-surface peat desiccation, thereby causing a net increase in modeled growing season GPP by 0.39 µmol CO2 m-2 s-1 per 0.1 m of WTD drawdown. Similar increases in GPP and Re caused no significant WTD effects on modeled

  1. Coupled eco-hydrology and biogeochemistry algorithms enable the simulation of water table depth effects on boreal peatland net CO2 exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mezbahuddin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Water table depth (WTD effects on net ecosystem CO2 exchange of boreal peatlands are largely mediated by hydrological effects on peat biogeochemistry and the ecophysiology of peatland vegetation. The lack of representation of these effects in carbon models currently limits our predictive capacity for changes in boreal peatland carbon deposits under potential future drier and warmer climates. We examined whether a process-level coupling of a prognostic WTD with (1 oxygen transport, which controls energy yields from microbial and root oxidation–reduction reactions, and (2 vascular and nonvascular plant water relations could explain mechanisms that control variations in net CO2 exchange of a boreal fen under contrasting WTD conditions, i.e., shallow vs. deep WTD. Such coupling of eco-hydrology and biogeochemistry algorithms in a process-based ecosystem model, ecosys, was tested against net ecosystem CO2 exchange measurements in a western Canadian boreal fen peatland over a period of drier-weather-driven gradual WTD drawdown. A May–October WTD drawdown of  ∼  0.25 m from 2004 to 2009 hastened oxygen transport to microbial and root surfaces, enabling greater microbial and root energy yields and peat and litter decomposition, which raised modeled ecosystem respiration (Re by 0.26 µmol CO2 m−2 s−1 per 0.1 m of WTD drawdown. It also augmented nutrient mineralization, and hence root nutrient availability and uptake, which resulted in improved leaf nutrient (nitrogen status that facilitated carboxylation and raised modeled vascular gross primary productivity (GPP and plant growth. The increase in modeled vascular GPP exceeded declines in modeled nonvascular (moss GPP due to greater shading from increased vascular plant growth and moss drying from near-surface peat desiccation, thereby causing a net increase in modeled growing season GPP by 0.39 µmol CO2 m−2 s−1 per 0.1 m of WTD drawdown. Similar increases in

  2. Long-lasting insecticidal mosquito nets: effects of washing processes on pesticide residues, and human and environmental exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Ouattara, Jean Pierre Nabléni

    2014-01-01

    Malaria is one of the public health problems in the world. More than 3.3 billion people are at risk of malaria. Children under the age of five year, and pregnant women are most severely affected. The disease is transmitted to human through the bite of an infected female mosquito of the genus Anopheles. Nowadays Long-Lasting Insecticidal Mosquito Nets (LNs) are the most popular and useful tools for malaria control. At the same time LNs face some challenges as the need for reliable methods to c...

  3. Combined and isolated effects of pCO2 and soil water content on carbon isotope discrimination during C3 photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, B.; Jahren, A. H.

    2016-12-01

    Biomass produced via C3 photosynthesis dominates the terrestrial organic matter (TOM) found within the geologic record. Our previous work revealed an increase in net discrimination (Δ13C) ≈ +4‰ across an increase in pCO2 level from ambient to RCO2 = 6x within the model C3 plant Arabidopsis thaliana, grown to maturity under constant conditions of light, moisture, and nutrient availability (Schubert and Jahren, 2012, GCA), leading us to suggest that changes in ancient pCO2 level can be reconstructed from Δ13C within terrestrial sediments. Others have observed an average change in Δ13C ≈ +4‰ when comparing the δ13C value of herbarium samples collected from cool-cold forests to tropical environments against the MAP recorded (Diefendorf et al., 2010, PNAS), leading those authors to suggest that changes in the Δ13C value of TOM recovered from the geological record can be interpreted as changes in precipitation level and/or water availability. Because decreasing moisture availability and increasing pCO2 level exert control over Δ13C through distinctly different mechanisms (i.e., decreased stomatal conductance vs. inhibition of photorespiration, respectively), a simultaneous change in both pCO2 level and moisture availability could combine to influence carbon isotope fractionation. Here we present experiments in which we grew 230 A. thaliana plants at each of 5 levels of pCO2: 390, 685, 1075, 1585, and 2175 ppmv. Within each growth chamber, soil moisture content (θm) was maintained at 1.50 g g-1 for 11 days following germination. Afterwards, we allowed 170 of the plants to dry to θm = 0.83, 0.44, and 0.38 g g-1. After 3 weeks of total growth, tissues were analyzed for δ13C value. We compare the isolated and combined effects of pCO2 and soil moisture upon carbon isotope fractionation across the total range of pCO2 levels reconstructed for the last 350 million years and across moisture levels associated with a 4.5x change in plant biomass.

  4. Effects of Insect-Proof Net Cultivation, Rice-Duck Farming, and Organic Matter Return on Rice Dry Matter Accumulation and Nitrogen Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Xu, Guochun; Wang, Qiangsheng; Hang, Yuhao

    2017-01-01

    Insect-proof net cultivation (IPN), rice-duck farming (RD), and organic matter return (OM) are important methods to realize sustainable development of rice production. A split-plot field experiment was performed to study the effects of IPN, RD, and OM on the rice yield, dry matter accumulation and N utilization. Results showed that compared to inorganic N fertilizer (IN), wheat straw return, and biogas residue return increased the rice yield by 2.11-4.28 and 4.78-7.67%, respectively, and also improved dry matter and N accumulation after the elongation stage (EG), dry matter and N translocation, and N recovery efficiency (NRE). These results attributed to an increase in leaf SPAD values and net photosynthetic rate (Pn) after the EG. Compared to conventional rice farming (CR), RD promoted the rice yield by 1.52-3.74%, and contributed to higher the leaf photosynthesis, dry matter and N accumulation, dry matter and N translocation, and NRE. IPN decreased the intensity of sun radiation in the nets due to the coverage of the insect-proof nets, which declined the leaf Pn, dry matter accumulation and translocation, N absorption and translocation, and NRE compared to open field cultivation (OFC). The rice yield of IPN were 2.48-4.98% lower than that of OFC. Compared to the interaction between CR and IN, the interaction between RD and OM improved the rice yield by 5.26-9.33%, and increased dry matter and N accumulation after the EG, dry matter and N translocation, and NRE. These results indicated that OM, RD and the interaction between RD and OM could promote dry matter accumulation and N utilization, which was beneficial to improve the rice yield.

  5. Effects of Insect-Proof Net Cultivation, Rice-Duck Farming, and Organic Matter Return on Rice Dry Matter Accumulation and Nitrogen Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Xu, Guochun; Wang, Qiangsheng; Hang, Yuhao

    2017-01-01

    Insect-proof net cultivation (IPN), rice-duck farming (RD), and organic matter return (OM) are important methods to realize sustainable development of rice production. A split-plot field experiment was performed to study the effects of IPN, RD, and OM on the rice yield, dry matter accumulation and N utilization. Results showed that compared to inorganic N fertilizer (IN), wheat straw return, and biogas residue return increased the rice yield by 2.11–4.28 and 4.78–7.67%, respectively, and also improved dry matter and N accumulation after the elongation stage (EG), dry matter and N translocation, and N recovery efficiency (NRE). These results attributed to an increase in leaf SPAD values and net photosynthetic rate (Pn) after the EG. Compared to conventional rice farming (CR), RD promoted the rice yield by 1.52–3.74%, and contributed to higher the leaf photosynthesis, dry matter and N accumulation, dry matter and N translocation, and NRE. IPN decreased the intensity of sun radiation in the nets due to the coverage of the insect-proof nets, which declined the leaf Pn, dry matter accumulation and translocation, N absorption and translocation, and NRE compared to open field cultivation (OFC). The rice yield of IPN were 2.48–4.98% lower than that of OFC. Compared to the interaction between CR and IN, the interaction between RD and OM improved the rice yield by 5.26–9.33%, and increased dry matter and N accumulation after the EG, dry matter and N translocation, and NRE. These results indicated that OM, RD and the interaction between RD and OM could promote dry matter accumulation and N utilization, which was beneficial to improve the rice yield. PMID:28174589

  6. Effect of periodic melting on geochemical and isotopic signals in an ice core from Lomonosovfonna, Svalbard

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pohjola, V.A.; Moore, J.C.; Isaksson, E.; Jauhiainen, T.; Wal, R.S.W. van de; Martma, T.; Meijer, H.A.J.; Vaikmäe, R.

    2002-01-01

    [1] We examine the quality of atmospherically deposited ion and isotope signals in an ice core taken from a periodically melting ice field, Lomonosovfonna in central Spitsbergen, Svalbard. The aim is to determine the degree to which the signals are altered by periodic melting of the ice. We use

  7. Soil moisture effects on the carbon isotope composition of soil respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claire L. Phillips; Nick Nickerson; David Risk; Zachary E. Kayler; Chris Andersen; Alan Mix; Barbara J. Bond

    2010-01-01

    The carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of recently assimilated plant carbon is known to depend on water-stress, caused either by low soil moisture or by low atmospheric humidity. Air humidity has also been shown to correlate with the δ13C of soil respiration, which suggests indirectly that recently fixed photosynthates...

  8. Maximum reasonable radioxenon releases from medical isotope production facilities and their effect on monitoring nuclear explosions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowyer, Theodore W; Kephart, Rosara; Eslinger, Paul W; Friese, Judah I; Miley, Harry S; Saey, Paul R J

    2013-01-01

    Fission gases such as (133)Xe are used extensively for monitoring the world for signs of nuclear testing in systems such as the International Monitoring System (IMS). These gases are also produced by nuclear reactors and by fission production of (99)Mo for medical use. Recently, medical isotope production facilities have been identified as the major contributor to the background of radioactive xenon isotopes (radioxenon) in the atmosphere (Stocki et al., 2005; Saey, 2009). These releases pose a potential future problem for monitoring nuclear explosions if not addressed. As a starting point, a maximum acceptable daily xenon emission rate was calculated, that is both scientifically defendable as not adversely affecting the IMS, but also consistent with what is possible to achieve in an operational environment. This study concludes that an emission of 5 × 10(9) Bq/day from a medical isotope production facility would be both an acceptable upper limit from the perspective of minimal impact to monitoring stations, but also appears to be an achievable limit for large isotope producers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Lu-Hf isotope systematics of fossil biogenic apatite and their effects on geochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herwartz, Daniel; Münker, Carsten; Tütken, Thomas; Hoffmann, J. Elis; Wittke, Andreas; Barbier, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Reliable methods for direct dating of biogenic apatite from pre-Pleistocene fossils are currently not available, and recent attempts using the Lu-Hf decay system yielded highly inaccurate ages for both bones and teeth. The geological processes accounting for this poor accuracy of Lu-Hf chronometry are not yet understood. Here we explore Lu-Hf systematics in fossil bones and teeth in detail, by applying five different sample digestion techniques that are tested on bones and composites of bone and sediment. Our current dataset implies that dissolution methods only slightly affect the resulting Lu-Hf ages, while clear differences between the individual digestion techniques became apparent for element concentrations. By analysing the insoluble leftovers from incomplete sample dissolution, four main reservoirs of Hf in fossil bones were identified: (1) a radiogenic end-member associated with apatite; (2) an unradiogenic end-member represented by the authigenic minerals or the embedding sediment; (3) a highly unradiogenic end-member that can be attributed to detrital zircon; and (4) a moderately soluble phase (probably a Zr(Hf)-phosphate) that yielded very low Lu/Hf but a highly radiogenic Hf isotope composition at the same time. This Zr(Hf)-phase must have been precipitated within the fossil bone sample at a late stage of burial history, thereby incorporating radiogenic 176Hf released from apatite surfaces over geological timescales. A second focus of our study is the effect of different sediment matrices and of crystal size on the preservation of pristine Lu-Hf isotope compositions in bioapatite. Because near-depositional Lu-Hf ages of phosphate fossils have previously been reported for the London Clay (England) and a calcareous marl from Tendaguru (Tanzania), we herein investigate specimens fossilised in carbonate matrices (calcareous marl from Oker, Germany; carbonate concretions from the Santana Formation, Brazil; carbonate from the Eifel, Germany) and argillaceous

  10. Net zero water

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lindeque, M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Is it possible to develop a building that uses a net zero amount of water? In recent years it has become evident that it is possible to have buildings that use a net zero amount of electricity. This is possible when the building is taken off...

  11. SolNet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jordan, Ulrike; Vajen, Klaus; Bales, Chris

    2014-01-01

    SolNet, founded in 2006, is the first coordinated International PhD education program on Solar Thermal Engineering. The SolNet network is coordinated by the Institute of Thermal Engineering at Kassel University, Germany. The network offers PhD courses on solar heating and cooling, conference...

  12. Kunstige neurale net

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hørning, Annette

    1994-01-01

    Artiklen beskæftiger sig med muligheden for at anvende kunstige neurale net i forbindelse med datamatisk procession af naturligt sprog, specielt automatisk talegenkendelse.......Artiklen beskæftiger sig med muligheden for at anvende kunstige neurale net i forbindelse med datamatisk procession af naturligt sprog, specielt automatisk talegenkendelse....

  13. Effect of origin, breeding and processing conditions on the isotope ratios of bioelements in dry-cured ham.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perini, Matteo; Camin, Federica; Sánchez del Pulgar, José; Piasentier, Edi

    2013-02-15

    The stable isotope ratios (SIR) of the bioelements ((2)H/(1)H, (13)C/(12)C, (15)N/(14)N, (18)O/(16)O, (34)S/(32)S) of the defatted dry matter and marbling and subcutaneous fat fractions, were assessed on 86 ham samples belonging to six different types, with the aim of ascertaining the effect of origin and production system on 11 isotopic ratios. The ham types were obtained from pigs reared in three regions, examining in every location one different production factor at two levels of expression: pig genotype (local breed vs. industrial hybrid) in Friuli (Italy), pig feeding regime (Bellota vs. Campo) in Extremadura (Spain) and ham seasoning time (mid vs. end) in Emilia (Italy). The isotopic composition of meteoric water and the dietary abundance of C(4) plants allowed to distinguish Italian PDO from Spanish hams. The contrasting treatments within the regional batches generated promising differences in SIR, potentially useful for tracing the whole ham production system, including the processing procedure. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. New constraints on kinetic isotope effects during CO2(aq) hydration and hydroxylation: Revisiting theoretical and experimental data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sade, Ziv; Halevy, Itay

    2017-10-01

    CO2 (de)hydration (i.e., CO2 hydration/HCO3- dehydration) and (de)hydroxylation (i.e., CO2 hydroxylation/HCO3- dehydroxylation) are key reactions in the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) system. Kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) during these reactions are likely to be expressed in the DIC and recorded in carbonate minerals formed during CO2 degassing or dissolution of gaseous CO2. Thus, a better understanding of KIEs during CO2 (de)hydration and (de)hydroxylation would improve interpretations of disequilibrium compositions in carbonate minerals. To date, the literature lacks direct experimental constraints on most of the oxygen KIEs associated with these reactions. In addition, theoretical estimates describe oxygen KIEs during separate individual reactions. The KIEs of the related reverse reactions were neither derived directly nor calculated from a link to the equilibrium fractionation. Consequently, KIE estimates of experimental and theoretical studies have been difficult to compare. Here we revisit experimental and theoretical data to provide new constraints on oxygen KIEs during CO2 (de)hydration and (de)hydroxylation. For this purpose, we provide a clearer definition of the KIEs and relate them both to isotopic rate constants and equilibrium fractionations. Such relations are well founded in studies of single isotope source/sink reactions, but they have not been established for reactions that involve dual isotopic sources/sinks, such as CO2 (de)hydration and (de)hydroxylation. We apply the new quantitative constraints on the KIEs to investigate fractionations during simultaneous CaCO3 precipitation and HCO3- dehydration far from equilibrium.

  15. Digesting the data - Effects of predator ingestion on the oxygen isotopic signature of micro-mammal teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barham, Milo; Blyth, Alison J.; Wallwork, Melinda D.; Joachimski, Michael M.; Martin, Laure; Evans, Noreen J.; Laming, Belinda; McDonald, Bradley J.

    2017-11-01

    Biogenic minerals such as dental apatite have become commonly analysed archives preserving geochemical indicators of past environmental conditions and palaeoecologies. However, post-mortem, biogenic minerals are modified due to the alteration/replacement of labile components, and recent moves to utilise micro-mammal tooth δ18O signatures for refined Cenozoic terrestrial palaeoclimate reconstructions has lacked consideration of the chemical effects of predator digestion. Here, the physical and chemical condition of laboratory-raised mouse (Mus musculus) teeth have been investigated in conjunction with their bulk phosphate and tissue-specific δ18O values prior, and subsequent, to ingestion and excretion by various predator species (owls, mammals and a reptile). Substantial variability (up to 2‰) in the δ18O values of both undigested teeth and those ingested by specific predators suggests significant natural heterogeneity of individual prey δ18O. Statistically distinct, lower δ18O values (∼0.7‰) are apparent in teeth ingested by barn owls compared to undigested controls as a result of the chemically and enzymatically active digestive and waste-pellet environments. Overall, dentine tissues preserve lower δ18O values than enamel, while the greatest modification of oxygen isotope signals is exhibited in the basal enamel of ingested teeth as a result of its incompletely mineralised state. However, recognition of 18O-depletion in chemically purified phosphate analyses demonstrates that modification of original δ18O values is not restricted to labile oxygen-bearing carbonate and organic phases. The style and magnitude of digestive-alteration varies with predator species and no correlation was identified between specific physical or minor/trace-element (patterns or concentrations) modification of ingested teeth and disruption of their primary oxygen isotope values. Therefore, there is a current lack of any screening tool for oxygen isotope disruption as a result

  16. Studies on the optogalvanic effect and isotope-selective excitation of ytterbium in a hollow cathode discharge lamp using a pulsed dye laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Kumar, Jitendra; Prakash, Om; Saini, Vinod K; Dixit, Sudhir K; Nakhe, Shankar V

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents studies on the pulsed optogalvanic effect and isotope-selective excitation of Yb 555.648 nm (0 cm(-1) → 17 992.007 cm(-1)) and 581.067 nm (17 992.007 cm(-1) → 35 196.98 cm(-1)) transitions, in a Yb/Ne hollow cathode lamp. The Yb atoms were excited by narrow linewidth (500-1000 MHz) Rh110 and Rh6G dye based pulsed lasers. Optogalvanic signal inversion for ground state transition at 555.648 nm was observed beyond a hollow cathode discharge current of 8.5 mA, in contrast to normal optogalvanic signal at 581.067 nm up to maximum current of 14 mA. The isotope-selective excitation studies of Yb were carried out by recording Doppler limited optogalvanic signals as a function of dye laser wavelength. For the 581.067 nm transition, three even isotopes, (172)Yb, (174)Yb, and (176)Yb, and one odd isotope, (171)Yb, were clearly resolved. These data were compared with selective isotope excitation by 10 MHz linewidth continuous-wave dye laser. For 555.648 nm transition, isotopes were not clearly resolved, although isotope peaks of low modulation were observed.

  17. Hf isotope evidence for effective impact melt homogenisation at the Sudbury impact crater, Ontario, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Gavin G.; Petrus, Joseph A.; Whitehouse, Martin J.; Daly, J. Stephen; Kamber, Balz S.

    2017-10-01

    We report on the first zircon hafnium-oxygen isotope and trace element study of a transect through one of the largest terrestrial impact melt sheets. The differentiated melt sheet at the 1.85 Ga, originally ca. 200 km in diameter Sudbury impact crater, Ontario, Canada, yields a tight range of uniform zircon Hf isotope compositions (εHf(1850) of ca. -9 to -12). This is consistent with its well-established crustal origin and indicates differentiation from a single melt that was initially efficiently homogenised. We propose that the heterogeneity in other isotopic systems, such as Pb, in early-emplaced impact melt at Sudbury is associated with volatility-related depletion during the impact cratering process. This depletion leaves the isotopic systems of more volatile elements more susceptible to contamination during post-impact assimilation of country rock, whereas the systems of more refractory elements preserve initial homogeneities. Zircon oxygen isotope compositions in the melt sheet are also restricted in range relative to those in the impacted target rocks. However, they display a marked offset approximately one-third up the melt sheet stratigraphy that is interpreted to be a result of post-impact assimilation of 18O-enirched rocks into the base of the cooling impact melt. Given that impact cratering was a more dominant process in the early history of the inner Solar System than it is today, and the possibility that impact melt sheets were sources of ex situ Hadean zircon grains, these findings may have significance for the interpretation of the early zircon Hf record. We speculate that apparent εHf-time arrays observed in the oldest terrestrial and lunar zircon datasets may be related to impact melting homogenising previously more diverse crust. We also show that spatially restricted partial melting of rocks buried beneath the superheated impact melt at Sudbury provided a zircon crystallising environment distinct to the impact melt sheet itself.

  18. Stable isotopic analyses in paleoclimatic reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wigand, P.E. [Univ. and Community College System of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Most traditional paleoclimatic proxy data have inherent time lags between climatic input and system response that constrain their use in accurate reconstruction of paleoclimate chronology, scaling of its variability, and the elucidation of the processes that determine its impact on the biotic and abiotic environment. With the exception of dendroclimatology, and studies of short-lived organisms and pollen recovered from annually varved lacustrine sediments, significant periods of time ranging from years, to centuries, to millennia may intervene between climate change and its first manifestation in paleoclimatic proxy data records. Reconstruction of past climate through changes in plant community composition derived from pollen sequences and plant remains from ancient woodrat middens, wet environments and dry caves all suffer from these lags. However, stable isotopic analyses can provide more immediate indication of biotic response to climate change. Evidence of past physiological response of organisms to changes in effective precipitation as climate varies can be provided by analyses of the stable isotopic content of plant macrofossils from various contexts. These analyses consider variation in the stable isotopic (hydrogen, oxygen and carbon) content of plant tissues as it reflects (1) past global or local temperature through changes in meteoric (rainfall) water chemistry in the case of the first two isotopes, and (2) plant stress through changes in plant respiration/transpiration processes under differing water availability, and varying atmospheric CO, composition (which itself may actually be a net result of biotic response to climate change). Studies currently being conducted in the Intermountain West indicate both long- and short-term responses that when calibrated with modem analogue studies have the potential of revealing not only the timing of climate events, but their direction, magnitude and rapidity.

  19. Effects of different water storage procedures on the dissolved Fe concentration and isotopic composition of chemically contrasted waters from the Amazon River Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulholland, Daniel S; Poitrasson, Franck; Boaventura, Geraldo R

    2015-11-15

    Although recent studies have investigated the Fe isotopic composition of dissolved, colloidal and particulate phases from continental and oceanic natural waters, few efforts have been made to evaluate whether water sample storage and the separation of different pore-size fractions through filtration can cause any change to the Fe isotopic compositions. The present study investigates the possible biases introduced by different water storage conditions on the dissolved Fe concentration and isotopic composition of chemically different waters. Water samples were collected from an organic-rich river and from mineral particulate-rich rivers. Filtered and unfiltered water samples were stored either at room temperature or frozen at -18°C in order to assess possible biases due to (i) different water storage temperature, and (ii) storage of bulk (unfiltered) vs filtered water. Iron isotope measurements were performed by Multicollector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry with a Thermo Electron Neptune instrument, after Fe purification using anion-exchange resins. Our data reveal that bulk water storage at room temperature without filtration produces minor changes in the dissolved Fe isotopic composition of mineral particulate-rich waters, but significant isotopic composition changes in organic-rich waters. In both cases, however, the impact of the different procedures on the Fe concentrations was strong. On the other hand, the bulk water stored frozen without filtration produced more limited changes in the dissolved Fe concentrations, and also on isotopic compositions, relative to the samples filtered in the field. The largest effect was again observed for the organic-rich waters. These findings suggest that a time lag between water collection and filtration may cause isotopic exchanges between the dissolved and particulate Fe fractions. When it is not possible to filter the samples in the field immediately after collection, the less detrimental approach is to

  20. Stable isotopes reveal the effect of trawl fisheries on the diet of commercially exploited species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinz, Hilmar; Moranta, Joan; Balestrini, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Bottom trawling can change food availability for benthivorous demersal species by (i) changing benthic prey composition through physical seabed impacts and (ii) by removing overall benthic consumer biomass increasing the net availability of benthic prey for remaining individuals. Thus trawling ma...... that the removal of demersal competitors and benthos by trawling can change the diets of commercial species, ultimately affecting their body condition....

  1. Leatherback Isotopes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — SWFSC is currently working on a project identifying global marine isotopes using leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) as the indicator species. We currently...

  2. Isotope Identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpius, Peter Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-18

    The objective of this training modules is to examine the process of using gamma spectroscopy for radionuclide identification; apply pattern recognition to gamma spectra; identify methods of verifying energy calibration; and discuss potential causes of isotope misidentification.

  3. Adsorption isotope effects of water on mesoporous silica and alumina with implications for the land-vegetation-atmosphere system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ying; Horita, Juske; Abe, Osamu

    2018-02-01

    Soil water dynamics within a vadose (unsaturated) zone is a key component in the hydrologic cycle, especially in arid regions. In applying the Craig-Gordon evaporation model to obtain isotopic compositions of soil water and the evaporated vapor in land-surface models (LSMs), it has been assumed that the equilibrium isotope fractionation factors between soil water and water vapor, α(2H) and α(18O), are identical to those between liquid and vapor of bulk water. Isotope effects in water condensation arise from intermolecular hydrogen bonding in the condensed phase and the appearance of hindered rotation/translation. Hydrogen bonding between water molecules and pore surface hydroxyl groups influences adsorption isotope effects. To test whether equilibrium fractionation factors between soil water and water vapor are identical to those between liquid and vapor of bulk water and to evaluate the influence of pore size and chemical composition upon adsorption isotope effects, we extended our previous experiments of a mesoporous silica (15 nm) to two other mesoporous materials, a silica (6 nm) and an alumina (5.8 nm). Our results demonstrated that α(2H) and α(18O) between adsorbed water and water vapor are 1.057 and 1.0086 for silica (6 nm) and 1.041 and 1.0063 for alumina (5.8 nm), respectively, at saturation pressure (po), which are smaller than 1.075 and 1.0089, respectively, between liquid and vapor phases of free water at 30 °C and that the differences exaggerate at low water contents. However, the profiles of α values with relative pressures (p/po) for these three materials differ due to the differences in chemical compositions and pore sizes. Empirical formula relating α(2H) and α(18O) values to the proportions of filled pores (f) are developed for potential applications to natural soils. Our results from triple oxygen isotope analyses demonstrated that the isotope fractionation does not follow a canonical law. For the silica (15 nm), fractionation exponents

  4. The effectiveness of using carbonate isotope measurements of body tissues to infer diet in human evolution: Evidence from wild western chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahy, Geraldine E; Boesch, Christophe; Hublin, Jean-Jacques; Richards, Michael P

    2015-11-01

    Changes in diet throughout hominin evolution have been linked with important evolutionary changes. Stable carbon isotope analysis of inorganic apatite carbonate is the main isotopic method used to reconstruct fossil hominin diets; to test its effectiveness as a paleodietary indicator we present bone and enamel carbonate carbon isotope data from a well-studied population of modern wild western chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus) of known sex and age from Taï, Cote d'Ivoire. We found a significant effect of age class on bone carbonate values, with adult chimpanzees being more (13)C- and (18)O-depleted compared to juveniles. Further, to investigate habitat effects, we compared our data to existing apatite data on eastern chimpanzees (P. troglodytes schweinfurthii) and found that the Taï chimpanzees are significantly more depleted in enamel δ(13)Cap and δ(18)Oap compared to their eastern counterparts. Our data are the first to present a range of tissue-specific isotope data from the same group of wild western chimpanzees and, as such, add new data to the growing number of modern non-human primate comparative isotope datasets providing valuable information for the interpretation of diet throughout hominin evolution. By comparing our data to published isotope data on fossil hominins we found that our modern chimpanzee bone and enamel data support hypotheses that the trend towards increased consumption of C4 foods after 4 Ma (millions of years ago) is unique to hominins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Net neutrality and inflation of traffic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peitz, M.; Schütt, Florian

    Under strict net neutrality Internet service providers (ISPs) are required to carry data without any differentiation and at no cost to the content provider. We provide a simple framework with a monopoly ISP to evaluate the short-run effects of different net neutrality rules. Content differs in its

  6. Nitrogen isotope dynamics and fractionation during sedimentary denitrification in Boknis Eck, Baltic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Dähnke

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The global marine nitrogen cycle is constrained by nitrogen fixation as a source of reactive nitrogen, and denitrification or anammox on the sink side. These processes with their respective isotope effects set the marine nitrate 15N-isotope value (δ15N to a relatively constant average of 5‰. This value can be used to better assess the magnitude of these sources and sink terms, but the underlying assumption is that sedimentary denitrification and anammox, processes responsible for approximately one-third of global nitrogen removal, have little to no isotope effect on nitrate in the water column. We investigated the isotope fractionation in sediment incubations, measuring net denitrification and nitrogen and oxygen stable isotope fractionation in surface sediments from the coastal Baltic Sea (Boknis Eck, northern Germany, a site with seasonal hypoxia and dynamic nitrogen turnover. Sediment denitrification was fast, and regardless of current paradigms assuming little fractionation during sediment denitrification, we measured fractionation factors of 18.9‰ for nitrogen and 15.8‰ for oxygen in nitrate. While the input of nitrate to the water column remains speculative, these results challenge the current view of fractionation during sedimentary denitrification and imply that nitrogen budget calculations may need to consider this variability, as both preferential uptake of light nitrate and release of the remaining heavy fraction can significantly alter water column nitrate isotope values at the sediment–water interface.

  7. In vivo metabolic flux profiling with stable isotopes discriminates sites and quantifies effects of mitochondrial dysfunction in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergano, Samantha Schrier; Rao, Meera; McCormack, Shana; Ostrovsky, Julian; Clarke, Colleen; Preston, Judith; Bennett, Michael J; Yudkoff, Marc; Xiao, Rui; Falk, Marni J

    2014-03-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) disease diagnosis is complicated both by an absence of biomarkers that sufficiently divulge all cases and limited capacity to quantify adverse effects across intermediary metabolism. We applied high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and mass spectrometry (MS) studies of stable-isotope based precursor-product relationships in the nematode, C. elegans, to interrogate in vivo differences in metabolic flux among distinct genetic models of primary RC defects and closely related metabolic disorders. C. elegans strains studied harbor single nuclear gene defects in complex I, II, or III RC subunits (gas-1, mev-1, isp-1); enzymes involved in coenzyme Q biosynthesis (clk-1), the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA, idh-1), or pyruvate metabolism (pdha-1); and central nodes of the nutrient-sensing signaling network that involve insulin response (daf-2) or the sirtuin homologue (sir-2.1). Synchronous populations of 2000 early larval stage worms were fed standard Escherichia coli on nematode growth media plates containing 1,6-(13)C2-glucose throughout their developmental period, with samples extracted on the first day of adult life in 4% perchloric acid with an internal standard. Quantitation of whole animal free amino acid concentrations and isotopic incorporation into amino and organic acids throughout development was performed in all strains by HPLC and isotope ratio MS, respectively. GC/MS analysis was also performed to quantify absolute isotopic incorporation in all molecular species of key TCA cycle intermediates in gas-1 and N2 adult worms. Genetic mutations within different metabolic pathways displayed distinct metabolic profiles. RC complex I (gas-1) and III (isp-1) subunit mutants, together with the coenzyme Q biosynthetic mutant (clk-1), shared a similar amino acid profile of elevated alanine and decreased glutamate. The metabolic signature of the complex II mutant (mev-1) was distinct from that of the other RC mutants but

  8. A safety-net antibiotic prescription for otitis media: the effects of a PBRN study on patients and practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Robert M; Bien, James; Lichtenstein, Philip; Davis, James; Khoury, Jane C; Knight, Jamie E; Kiely, Michele; Bernier, Jeralyn

    2006-07-01

    Pediatricians can decrease antibiotic use by treating acute otitis media (AOM) with a safety-net antibiotic prescription (SNAP). This study assessed whether the practitioners of the Practice-Based Research Network who participated in the study continued to use the SNAP and report a 60-day follow-up of the study patients. Charts were reviewed of study patients for 60 days following study enrollment. A survey on antibiotic use for AOM was mailed to the 17 study practitioners (SP) and 30 randomly selected community pediatricians (CP). Eight of the SP used the SNAP more than 20 times over the year following the study vs 1 of the CP. Sixty-two percent of patients never received antibiotics. The recurrence/relapse rate was greater in children younger than 2 years old compared to those older, 34% vs 10%. Practitioners who participate in a Practice-Based Research Network study are more likely to use a study intervention than others.

  9. Pro NET Best Practices

    CERN Document Server

    Ritchie, Stephen D

    2011-01-01

    Pro .NET Best Practices is a practical reference to the best practices that you can apply to your .NET projects today. You will learn standards, techniques, and conventions that are sharply focused, realistic and helpful for achieving results, steering clear of unproven, idealistic, and impractical recommendations. Pro .NET Best Practices covers a broad range of practices and principles that development experts agree are the right ways to develop software, which includes continuous integration, automated testing, automated deployment, and code analysis. Whether the solution is from a free and

  10. Getting to Net Zero

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-09-01

    The technology necessary to build net zero energy buildings (NZEBs) is ready and available today, however, building to net zero energy performance levels can be challenging. Energy efficiency measures, onsite energy generation resources, load matching and grid interaction, climatic factors, and local policies vary from location to location and require unique methods of constructing NZEBs. It is recommended that Components start looking into how to construct and operate NZEBs now as there is a learning curve to net zero construction and FY 2020 is just around the corner.

  11. Instant Lucene.NET

    CERN Document Server

    Heydt, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Filled with practical, step-by-step instructions and clear explanations for the most important and useful tasks. A step-by-step guide that helps you to index, search, and retrieve unstructured data with the help of Lucene.NET.Instant Lucene.NET How-to is essential for developers new to Lucene and Lucene.NET who are looking to get an immediate foundational understanding of how to use the library in their application. It's assumed you have programming experience in C# already, but not that you have experience with search techniques such as information retrieval theory (although there will be a l

  12. Agricultural Nutrient Cycling at the Strawberry Creek Watershed: Insights Into Processes Using Stable Isotope Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuss, E.; English, M. C.; Spoelstra, J.

    2009-05-01

    When nitrogen availability exceeds biological demand, excess nitrogen, especially nitrate, may subsequently pollute ground and surface water. Agricultural practices in Southern Ontario typically supplement soils with organic and inorganic nutrients to aid in crop development, and employ various management techniques to limit nutrient loss. Excess nitrogen has several potential fates, which are controlled by the net effects of numerous nitrogen cycling reactions in the soil that are often difficult to measure directly. Nitrogen cycling in soils is controlled in large part by soil moisture, as it affects microbial activity and soil redox conditions. Stable isotope geochemistry is a powerful tool that provides information on nitrogen sources and processes. This study uses crop nitrogen and carbon isotope ratios to provide insights into the net effects of soil nitrogen cycling and nitrogen fate. This research was conducted at the Strawberry Creek Watershed (SCW), an agricultural research watershed located between Kitchener-Waterloo and Guelph, Ontario. The SCW exhibits elevated nitrate concentrations in groundwater, tile discharge, and the stream itself. Previous isotopic work revealed that this nitrate is largely derived from chemical fertilizer and manure applications. Field-scale hydrological processes lead to areas where the fate of applied nitrogen differs, which has an isotopic effect on the residual nitrogen that is available to plants. Results of this study indicate significant patterns in the isotopic signature of plant tissue, in both temporal and spatial scales. At the plot-scale where soil conditions are similar, there is little to no variation in foliar isotope values, but at the field-scale there appears to be a significant amount of variability related to soil moisture and nitrogen loss. This relationship can potentially provide insight into ideal conditions for nitrogen uptake efficiency. Reducing agricultural nitrogen leaching to ground and surface

  13. Thermal decomposition of energetic materials. 2. Deuterium isotope effects and isotopic scrambling in condensed-phase decomposition of octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro- 1,3,5,7-tetrazocine. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrens, R.; Bulusu, S.

    1991-12-31

    The products formed in the thermal decomposition of octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro- 1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) have been traced by using mixtures of different isotopically labeled analogues of HMX. The fraction of isotropic scrambling and the extent of the deuterium kinetic isotope effect (DKIE) are reported for the different thermal decomposition products. Isotropic scrambling is not observed for the N-Nbond in N2O and the C-H bonds in CH2O. Only one of the C-N bonds in N-methylformamide (NMFA) undergoes isotropic scrambling. The lack of complete isotopic scrambling of the N-NO bond in 1-nitroso-3,5-7-trinitro- 1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (ONTNTA) is shown to imply that some HMX decomposition occurs in the lattice. The behavior of the DKIE in different mixtures of isotopic analogues of HMX suggests that water probably acts as a catalyst in the decomposition. The results demonstrate that decomposition of HMX in the condensed phase has several reaction branches.

  14. Insecticidal and sterilizing effect of Olyset Duo®, a permethrin and pyriproxyfen mixture net against pyrethroid-susceptible and -resistant strains of Anopheles gambiae s.s.: a release-recapture assay in experimental huts

    OpenAIRE

    Djènontin, A; Ahoua Alou, LP; Koffi, A; Zogo, B; Duarte, E.; N'Guessan, R; Moiroux, N; Pennetier, C

    2015-01-01

    In the context of the widespread distribution of pyrethroid resistance among malaria vectors, we did a release-recapture trial in experimental huts to investigate the insecticidal and sterilizing effects of a novel long-lasting net (LN), Olyset (R) Duo, incorporating a mixture of permethrin (PER) and the insect growth regulator (IGR), pyriproxyfen (PPF). An LN containing PPF alone and a classic Olyset (R) Net were tested in parallel as positive controls. The effect of progressive number of ho...

  15. Altitude effect on leaf wax carbon isotopic composition in humid tropical forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mong Sin; Feakins, Sarah J.; Martin, Roberta E.; Shenkin, Alexander; Bentley, Lisa Patrick; Blonder, Benjamin; Salinas, Norma; Asner, Gregory P.; Malhi, Yadvinder

    2017-06-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of plant leaf wax biomarkers is commonly used to reconstruct paleoenvironmental conditions. Adding to the limited calibration information available for modern tropical forests, we analyzed plant leaf and leaf wax carbon isotopic compositions in forest canopy trees across a highly biodiverse, 3.3 km elevation gradient on the eastern flank of the Andes Mountains. We sampled the dominant tree species and assessed their relative abundance in each tree community. In total, 405 sunlit canopy leaves were sampled across 129 species and nine forest plots along the elevation profile for bulk leaf and leaf wax n-alkane (C27-C33) concentration and carbon isotopic analyses (δ13C); a subset (76 individuals, 29 species, five forest plots) were additionally analyzed for n-alkanoic acid (C22-C32) concentrations and δ13C. δ13C values display trends of +0.87 ± 0.16‰ km-1 (95% CI, r2 = 0.96, p families, suggesting the biochemical response to environment is robust to taxonomic turnover. We calculate fractionations and compare to adiabatic gradients, environmental variables, leaf wax n-alkane concentrations, and sun/shade position to assess factors influencing foliar chemical response. For the 4 km forested elevation range of the Andes, 4-6‰ higher δ13C values are expected for upland versus lowland C3 plant bulk leaves and their n-alkyl lipids, and we expect this pattern to be a systematic feature of very wet tropical montane environments. This elevation dependency of δ13C values should inform interpretations of sedimentary archives, as 13C-enriched values may derive from C4 grasses, petrogenic inputs or upland C3 plants. Finally, we outline the potential for leaf wax carbon isotopes to trace biomarker sourcing within catchments and for paleoaltimetry.

  16. An experiment to assess the effects of diatom dissolution on oxygen isotope ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew C; Leng, Melanie J; Swann, George E A; Barker, Philip A; Mackay, Anson W; Ryves, David B; Sloane, Hilary J; Chenery, Simon R N; Hems, Mike

    2016-01-30

    Current studies which use the oxygen isotope composition from diatom silica (δ(18) Odiatom ) as a palaeoclimate proxy assume that the δ(18) Odiatom value reflects the isotopic composition of the water in which the diatom formed. However, diatoms dissolve post mortem, preferentially losing less silicified structures in the water column and during/after burial into sediments. The impact of dissolution on δ(18) Odiatom values and potential misinterpretation of the palaeoclimate record are evaluated. Diatom frustules covering a range of ages (6 samples from the Miocene to the Holocene), environments and species were exposed to a weak alkaline solution for 48 days at two temperatures (20 °C and 4 °C), mimicking natural dissolution post mucilage removal. Following treatment, dissolution was assessed using scanning electron microscope images and a qualitative diatom dissolution index. The diatoms were subsequently analysed for their δ(18) O values using step-wise fluorination and isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Variable levels of diatom dissolution were observed between the six samples; in all cases higher temperatures resulted in more frustule degradation. Dissolution was most evident in younger samples, probably as a result of the more porous nature of the silica. The degree of diatom dissolution does not directly equate to changes in the isotope ratios; the δ(18) Odiatom value was, however, lower after dissolution, but in only half the samples was this reduction outside the analytical error (2σ analytical error = 0.46‰). We have shown that dissolution can have a small negative impact on δ(18) Odiatom values, causing reductions of up to 0.59‰ beyond analytical error (0.46‰) at natural environmental temperatures. These findings need to be considered in palaeoenvironmental reconstructions using δ(18) Odiatom values, especially when interpreting variations in these values of <1‰. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Possible effects of diagenesis on the stable isotope composition of amino acids in carbonaceous meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Michael H.

    2015-09-01

    The initial report of indigenous, non-racemic protein amino acids (L-enantiomer excess) in the Murchison meteorite was based on the fact that only eight of the twenty amino acids characteristic of all life on Earth was present in this stone1. The absence of the other protein amino acids indicated that contamination subsequent to impact was highly unlikely. The development of new techniques for determining the stable isotope composition of individual amino acid enantiomers in the Murchison meteorite further documented the extraterrestrial origins of these compounds2,3. The stable isotope approach continues to be used to document the occurrence of an extraterrestrial L-enantiomer excess of protein amino acids in other carbonaceous meteorites4. It has been suggested that this L-enantiomer excess may result from aqueous reprocessing on meteorite parent bodies4,5. Preliminary results of simulation experiments are presented that are used to determine the extent to which the stable isotope compositions of amino acid constituents of carbonaceous meteorites may have been altered by these types of diagenetic processes subsequent to synthesis.

  18. The contributions of nitrate uptake and efflux to isotope fractionation during algal nitrate assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsh, K. L.; Trull, T. W.; Sigman, D. M.; Thompson, P. A.; Granger, J.

    2014-05-01

    In order to strengthen environmental application of nitrate N and O isotopes, we measured the N and O isotopic fractionation associated with cellular nitrate uptake and efflux in the nitrate-assimilating marine diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii. We isolated nitrate uptake and efflux from nitrate reduction by growing the cells in the presence of tungsten, which substitutes for molybdenum in assimilatory nitrate reductase, yielding an inactive enzyme. After growth on ammonium and then N starvation, cells were exposed to nitrate. Numerical models fit to the evolution of intracellular nitrate concentration and N and O isotopic composition yielded distinct N isotope effects (15ɛ) for nitrate uptake and nitrate efflux (2.0 ± 0.3‰ and 1.2 ± 0.4‰, respectively). The O isotope effects (18ɛ) for nitrate uptake and nitrate efflux were indistinguishable (2.8 ± 0.6‰), yielding a ratio of O to N isotopic fractionation for uptake of 1.4 ± 0.4 and for efflux of 2.3 ± 0.9. The 15ɛ for nitrate uptake can account for at most 40% of the organism-level N isotope effect (15ɛorg) measured in laboratory studies of T. weissflogii and in the open ocean (typically 5‰ or greater). This observation supports previous evidence that most isotope fractionation during nitrate assimilation is due to intracellular nitrate reduction, with nitrate efflux allowing the signal to be communicated to the environment. An O to N fractionation ratio (18ɛorg:15ɛorg) of ˜1 has been measured for nitrate assimilation in algal cultures and linked to the N and O isotope effects of nitrate reductase. Our results suggest that the ratios of O to N fractionation for both nitrate uptake and efflux may be distinct from a ratio of 1, to a degree that could cause the net 18ɛorg:15ɛorg to rise appreciably above 1 when 15ɛorg is low (e.g., yielding a ratio of 1.1 when 15ɛorg is 5‰). However, field and culture studies have consistently measured nearly equivalent fractionation of N and O isotopes in

  19. Therapeutic use of radioactive isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    Caroline Duc

    2013-01-01

    In December, researchers from ISOLDE-CERN, the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) and the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) published the results of an in vivo study which successfully proved the effectiveness of four terbium isotopes for diagnosing and treating cancerous tumours.   Four terbium isotopes suitable for clinical purposes. “ISOLDE is the only installation capable of supplying terbium isotopes of such purity and intensity in the case of three out of the four types used in this study,” explains Karl Johnson, a physicist at ISOLDE.  “Producing over a thousand different isotopes, our equipment offers the widest choice of isotopes in the world!” Initially intended for fundamental physics research, ISOLDE has diversified its activities over time to invest in various projects in the materials science, biochemistry and nuclear medicine fields. The proof-of-concept study has confirmed that the four terbium isotopes 149Tb, 152Tb, 155Tb produ...

  20. Evaluation of spurious results in the infrared measurement of isotope ratios due to spectral effects: a computer simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, C. D.; Rutt, H. N.

    1999-05-01

    The application of infrared spectroscopy to the measurement of carbon isotope ratio breath tests is a promising alternative to conventional techniques, offering relative simplicity and lower costs. However, when designing such an instrument one should be conscious of several spectral effects that may be misinterpreted as changes in the isotope concentration and which therefore lead to spurious results. Through a series of computer simulations which model the behaviour of the absorption spectrum, the risk these effects pose to reliable measurement of ratios and the measures required to eliminate them are evaluated. The computer model provides a flexible high-resolution spectrum of the four main isotopomer fundamental transitions and fifteen of their most significant hotband transitions. It is demonstrated that the infrared source, infrared windows and breath sample itself all exhibit strong temperature-induced errors but pressure effects do not produce significant errors. We conclude that for reliable measurement of ratios using infrared spectroscopy no pressure controls are required, window effects are eliminated using windows wedged at a minimum angle of 0.8-2.2 mrad, depending on the material, and the temperature sensitivity of source and gas cells necessitates stabilization to an accuracy of at least 0.2 K.

  1. Phonon enhancement of electronic order and negative isotope effect in the Hubbard-Holstein model on a square lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Da; Wang, Wan-Sheng; Wang, Qiang-Hua

    2015-11-01

    In phonon mediated conventional s -wave superconductors, higher-frequency phonon (or smaller atomic mass) leads to a higher superconducting transition temperature, known as the isotope effect. However, in correlated systems, various competing electronic order (such as spin-density-wave, charge-density-wave, and unconventional superconductivity) arises and the effect of electron-phonon coupling on these orders is a long-standing problem. Using the functional renormalization group, here we investigated the interplay between the electron correlation and electron-phonon coupling in the Hubbard-Holstein model on a square lattice. At half-filling, we found spin-density-wave and charge-density-wave phases and the transition between them, while no superconducting phase arises. Upon finite doping, d -wave/s -wave superconductivity emerges in proximity to the spin-density-wave/charge-density-wave phase. Surprisingly, lower-frequency Holstein phonons are either less destructive or even beneficial to the various phases, resulting in a negative isotope effect. For the superconducting phases, such an effect is apparently beyond the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory.

  2. Studies of reactor irradiation effect on hydrogen isotope release from vanadium alloy V4Cr4Ti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulsartov, T. [Kazakhstan State University, Tole-bi-str. 96a., Almaty (Kazakhstan); Shestakov, V. [Kazakhstan State University, Tole-bi-str. 96a., Almaty (Kazakhstan); Chikhray, Y. [Kazakhstan State University, Tole-bi-str. 96a., Almaty (Kazakhstan); Kenzhin, Y. [Institute of Atomic Energy NNC RK, Krasnoarmeyskaya-str. 10, Kurchatov (Kazakhstan); Kolbayenkov, A. [Institute of Atomic Energy NNC RK, Krasnoarmeyskaya-str. 10, Kurchatov (Kazakhstan); Tazhibayeva, I. [National Nuclear Center, Lenin-str. 6, Kurchatov (Kazakhstan)

    2007-08-01

    Vanadium alloys are most promising materials being considered for lithium blanket-breeder in future fusion reactors. The primary reason for these stems from good combination of physical-mechanical and radiation properties of vanadium alloys. In operational conditions of fusion reactors the very important issue is behavior of vanadium alloy with respect to hydrogen isotopes under neutron and gamma irradiation. This paper shows results of the experimental studies of reactor irradiation influence on parameters of hydrogen release from vanadium alloys. Experiments were carried out for various levels of reactor irradiation and showed the effect of irradiation on parameters of hydrogen release from vanadium alloy V4Cr4Ti.

  3. Costing the distribution of insecticide-treated nets: a review of cost and cost-effectiveness studies to provide guidance on standardization of costing methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolaczinski, Jan; Hanson, Kara

    2006-05-08

    Insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) are an effective and cost-effective means of malaria control. Scaling-up coverage of ITNs is challenging. It requires substantial resources and there are a number of strategies to choose from. Information on the cost of different strategies is still scarce. To guide the choice of a delivery strategy (or combination of strategies), reliable and standardized cost information for the different options is required. The electronic online database PubMed was used for a systematic search of the published English literature on costing and economic evaluations of ITN distribution programmes. The keywords used were: net, bednet, insecticide, treated, ITN, cost, effectiveness, economic and evaluation. Identified papers were analysed to determine and evaluate the costing methods used. Methods were judged against existing standards of cost analysis to arrive at proposed standards for undertaking and presenting cost analyses. Cost estimates were often not readily comparable or could not be adjusted to a different context. This resulted from the wide range of methods applied and measures of output chosen. Most common shortcomings were the omission of certain costs and failure to adjust financial costs to generate economic costs. Generalisability was hampered by authors not reporting quantities and prices of resources separately and not examining the sensitivity of their results to variations in underlying assumptions. The observed shortcomings have arisen despite the abundance of literature and guidelines on costing of health care interventions. This paper provides ITN specific recommendations in the hope that these will help to standardize future cost estimates.

  4. Net Zero Energy Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marszal, Anna Joanna; Bourrelle, Julien S.; Musall, Eike

    2010-01-01

    and identify possible renewable energy supply options which may be considered in calculations. Finally, the gap between the methodology proposed by each organisation and their respective national building code is assessed; providing an overview of the possible changes building codes will need to undergo......The international cooperation project IEA SHC Task 40 / ECBCS Annex 52 “Towards Net Zero Energy Solar Buildings”, attempts to develop a common understanding and to set up the basis for an international definition framework of Net Zero Energy Buildings (Net ZEBs). The understanding of such buildings...... parameters used in the calculations are discussed and the various renewable supply options considered in the methodologies are summarised graphically. Thus, the paper helps to understand different existing approaches to calculate energy balance in Net ZEBs, highlights the importance of variables selection...

  5. PhysioNet

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The PhysioNet Resource is intended to stimulate current research and new investigations in the study of complex biomedical and physiologic signals. It offers free...

  6. NetSig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Heiko; Lawrence, Michael S; Chouinard, Candace R

    2018-01-01

    Methods that integrate molecular network information and tumor genome data could complement gene-based statistical tests to identify likely new cancer genes; but such approaches are challenging to validate at scale, and their predictive value remains unclear. We developed a robust statistic (Net......Sig) that integrates protein interaction networks with data from 4,742 tumor exomes. NetSig can accurately classify known driver genes in 60% of tested tumor types and predicts 62 new driver candidates. Using a quantitative experimental framework to determine in vivo tumorigenic potential in mice, we found that Net......Sig candidates induce tumors at rates that are comparable to those of known oncogenes and are ten-fold higher than those of random genes. By reanalyzing nine tumor-inducing NetSig candidates in 242 patients with oncogene-negative lung adenocarcinomas, we find that two (AKT2 and TFDP2) are significantly amplified...

  7. On the strong and selective isotope effect in the UV excitation of N2 with implications toward the nebula and Martian atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muskatel, B H; Remacle, F; Thiemens, Mark H; Levine, R D

    2011-04-12

    Isotopic effects associated with molecular absorption are discussed with reference to natural phenomena including early solar system processes, Titan and terrestrial atmospheric chemistry, and Martian atmospheric evolution. Quantification of the physicochemical aspects of the excitation and dissociation processes may lead to enhanced understanding of these environments. Here we examine a physical basis for an additional isotope effect during photolysis of molecular nitrogen due to the coupling of valence and Rydberg excited states. The origin of this isotope effect is shown to be the coupling of diabatic electronic states of different bonding nature that occurs after the excitation of these states. This coupling is characteristic of energy regimes where two or more excited states are nearly crossing or osculating. A signature of the resultant isotope effect is a window of rapid variation in the otherwise smooth distribution of oscillator strengths vs. frequency. The reference for the discussion is the numerical solution of the time dependent Schrödinger equation for both the electronic and nuclear modes with the light field included as part of the Hamiltonian. Pumping is to all extreme UV dipole-allowed, valence and Rydberg, excited states of N(2). The computed absorption spectra are convoluted with the solar spectrum to demonstrate the importance of including this isotope effect in planetary, interstellar molecular cloud, and nebular photochemical models. It is suggested that accidental resonance with strong discrete lines in the solar spectrum such as the CIII line at 97.703 nm can also have a marked effect.

  8. [Metabolic isotopic effects of carbon and production process in cultivated plants in light of oscillatory concept for photosynthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivlev, A A; Dubinskiĭ, A Iu; Pichuzhkin, V I

    2013-01-01

    Some perspectives on the use of stable carbon isotopes (13C/12C) in studying production processes are considered. It has been shown that the efficiency of the isotope technique depends on the adequacy of the chosen model. The model of isotope fractionation proposed based on the oscillatory concept of photosynthesis provides for more accurate and comprehensive description of the observed empirical correlations between the yield (bioproductivity) and carbon isotope composition in cereal cultures as compared with the widely used stationary model.

  9. TideNet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-30

    query tide data sources in a desired geographic region of USA and its territories (Figure 1). Users can select a tide data source through the Google Map ...select data sources according to the desired geographic region. It uses the Google Map interface to display data from different sources. Recent...Coastal Inlets Research Program TideNet The TideNet is a web-based Graphical User Interface (GUI) that provides users with GIS mapping tools to

  10. Building Neural Net Software

    OpenAIRE

    Neto, João Pedro; Costa, José Félix

    1999-01-01

    In a recent paper [Neto et al. 97] we showed that programming languages can be translated on recurrent (analog, rational weighted) neural nets. The goal was not efficiency but simplicity. Indeed we used a number-theoretic approach to machine programming, where (integer) numbers were coded in a unary fashion, introducing a exponential slow down in the computations, with respect to a two-symbol tape Turing machine. Implementation of programming languages in neural nets turns to be not only theo...

  11. Interaction Nets in Russian

    OpenAIRE

    Salikhmetov, Anton

    2013-01-01

    Draft translation to Russian of Chapter 7, Interaction-Based Models of Computation, from Models of Computation: An Introduction to Computability Theory by Maribel Fernandez. "In this chapter, we study interaction nets, a model of computation that can be seen as a representative of a class of models based on the notion of 'computation as interaction'. Interaction nets are a graphical model of computation devised by Yves Lafont in 1990 as a generalisation of the proof structures of linear logic...

  12. Programming NET 35

    CERN Document Server

    Liberty, Jesse

    2009-01-01

    Bestselling author Jesse Liberty and industry expert Alex Horovitz uncover the common threads that unite the .NET 3.5 technologies, so you can benefit from the best practices and architectural patterns baked into the new Microsoft frameworks. The book offers a Grand Tour" of .NET 3.5 that describes how the principal technologies can be used together, with Ajax, to build modern n-tier and service-oriented applications. "