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Sample records for nerve palsy ct

  1. Traumatic facial nerve palsy: CT patterns of facial nerve canal fracture and correlation with clinical severity

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    Seo, Jae Cheol; Kim, Sang Joon; Park, Hyun Min; Lee, Young Suk; Lee, Jee Young [College of Medicine, Dankook Univ., Chonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    To analyse the patterns of facial nerve canal injury seen at temporal bone computed tomography (CT) in patients with traumatic facial nerve palsy and to correlate these with clinical manifestations and outcome. Thirty cases of temporal bone CT in 29 patients with traumatic facial nerve palsy were analyzed with regard to the patterns of facial nerve canal involvement. The patterns were correlated with clinical grade, the electroneurographic (ENoG) findings, and clinical outcome. For clinical grading, the House-Brackmann scale was used, as follows:grade I-IV, partial palsy group; grade V-VI, complete palsy group. The electroneuronographic findings were categorized as mild to moderate (below 90%) or severe (90% and over) degeneration. In 25 cases, the bony wall of the facial nerve canals was involved directly (direct finding): discontinuity of the bony wall was onted in 22 cases, bony spicules in ten, and bony wall displacement in five. Indirect findings were canal widening in nine cases and adjacent bone fracture in two. In one case, there were no direct or indirect findings. All cases in which there was complete palsy (n=8) showed one or more direct findings including spicules in six, while in the incomplete palsy group (n=22), 17 cases showed direct findings. In the severe degeneration group (n=13), on ENog, 12 cases demonstrated direct findings, including spicules in nine cases. In 24 patients, symptoms of facial palsy showed improvement at follow up evaluation. Four of the five patients in whom symptoms did not improve had spicules. Among ten patients with spicules, five underwent surgery and symptoms improved in four of these; among the five patients not operated on , symptoms did not improve in three. In most patients with facial palsy after temporal bone injury, temporal bone CT revealed direct or indirect facial nerve canal involvement, and in complete palsy or severe degeneration groups, there were direct findings in most cases. We believe that meticulous

  2. [Peripheral facial nerve palsy].

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    Pons, Y; Ukkola-Pons, E; Ballivet de Régloix, S; Champagne, C; Raynal, M; Lepage, P; Kossowski, M

    2013-06-01

    Facial palsy can be defined as a decrease in function of the facial nerve, the primary motor nerve of the facial muscles. When the facial palsy is peripheral, it affects both the superior and inferior areas of the face as opposed to central palsies, which affect only the inferior portion. The main cause of peripheral facial palsies is Bell's palsy, which remains a diagnosis of exclusion. The prognosis is good in most cases. In cases with significant cosmetic sequelae, a variety of surgical procedures are available (such as hypoglossal-facial anastomosis, temporalis myoplasty and Tenzel external canthopexy) to rehabilitate facial aesthetics and function.

  3. Suprascapular nerve palsy.

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    Moskowitz, E; Rashkoff, E S

    1989-11-01

    Isolated traumatic suprascapular nerve palsy without associated fracture is a rare occurrence. Localized segmental muscle atrophy limited to the supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles associated with weakness in initiating abduction and in external rotation of the shoulder should suggest the diagnosis. Electromyography will confirm the diagnosis by excluding nerve root and brachial plexus involvement with denervation potentials limited to the supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles.

  4. Unilateral sixth nerve palsy.

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    Sotoodehnia, Mehran; Safaei, Arash; Rasooli, Fatemeh; Bahreini, Maryam

    2017-06-01

    The diagnosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis still remains a real challenge. Seizure, unusual headache with sudden onset, unexplained persistently unilateral vascular headache and neurologic deficit-which is difficult to be attributed to a vascular territory are some of the suggestive symptoms. An isolated sixth nerve palsy is discussed as a rare presentation for cerebral venous thrombosis. Following the extensive investigation to rule out other possible diagnoses, magnetic resonance venogram revealed the final etiology of sixth nerve palsy that was ipsilateral left transverse sinus thrombosis; therefore, anticoagulant treatment with low molecular weight heparin was administered. Rapid and accurate diagnosis and treatment cause to achieve excellent outcomes for most patients. Considering different clinical features, risk factors and high index of suspicion are helpful to reach the diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Facial nerve palsy due to birth trauma

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    Seventh cranial nerve palsy due to birth trauma; Facial palsy - birth trauma; Facial palsy - neonate; Facial palsy - infant ... this condition. Some factors that can cause birth trauma (injury) include: Large baby size (may be seen ...

  6. Isolated trochlear nerve palsy with midbrain hemorrhage

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    Raghavendra S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Midbrain hemorrhage causing isolated fourth nerve palsy is extremely rare. Idiopathic, traumatic and congenital abnormalities are the most common causes of fourth nerve palsy. We report acute isolated fourth nerve palsy in an 18-year-old lady due to a midbrain hemorrhage probably due to a midbrain cavernoma. The case highlights the need for neuroimaging in selected cases of isolated trochlear nerve palsy.

  7. Facial Nerve Palsy In Secondary Syphilis

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    Masuria B.L

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of secondary syphilis with right facial nerve palsy is reported. A 28 year old unmarried male presented with diffuse maculopapular rash and facial nerve palsy. He had elevated while cells and protein in cerebrospinal fluid. Serum and cerebrospinal fluid were positive for VDRL and TPHA tests. Facial nerve palsy and maculopapular rash improved with penicillin therapy.

  8. Tumors Presenting as Multiple Cranial Nerve Palsies

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    Kishore Kumar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Cranial nerve palsy could be one of the presenting features of underlying benign or malignant tumors of the head and neck. The tumor can involve the cranial nerves by local compression, direct infiltration or by paraneoplastic process. Cranial nerve involvement depends on the anatomical course of the cranial nerve and the site of the tumor. Patients may present with single or multiple cranial nerve palsies. Multiple cranial nerve involvement could be sequential or discrete, unilateral or bilateral, painless or painful. The presentation could be acute, subacute or recurrent. Anatomic localization is the first step in the evaluation of these patients. The lesion could be in the brain stem, meninges, base of skull, extracranial or systemic disease itself. We present 3 cases of underlying neoplasms presenting as cranial nerve palsies: a case of glomus tumor presenting as cochlear, glossopharyngeal, vagus and hypoglossal nerve palsies, clivus tumor presenting as abducens nerve palsy, and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma presenting as oculomotor, trochlear, trigeminal and abducens nerve palsies due to paraneoplastic involvement. History and physical examination, imaging, autoantibodies and biopsy if feasible are useful for the diagnosis. Management outcomes depend on the treatment of the underlying tumor.

  9. An unusual cause of radial nerve palsy

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    Agrawal Hemendra Kumar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurapraxia frequently occurs following traction injury to the nerve intraoperatively, leading to radial nerve palsy which usually recovers in 5-30 weeks. In our case, we had operated a distal one-third of humeral shaft fracture and fixed it with 4.5 mm limited contact dynamic compression plate. The distal neurovascular status of the limb was assessed postoperatively in the recovery room and was found to be intact and all the sensory-motor functions of the radial nerve were normal. On the second postoperative day, following the suction drain removal and dressing, patient developed immediate radial nerve palsy along with wrist drop. We reviewed theliterature and found no obvious cause for the nerve palsy and concluded that it was due to traction injury to the radial nerve while removing the suction drain in negative pressure. Key words: Radial nerve; Humeral fractures; Paralysis; Diaphyses

  10. Phrenic Nerve Palsy as Initial Presentation of Large Retrosternal Goitre.

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    Hakeem, Arsheed Hussain; Hakeem, Imtiyaz Hussain; Wani, Fozia Jeelani

    2016-12-01

    Unilateral phrenic nerve palsy as initial presentation of the retrosternal goitre is extremely rare event. This is a case report of a 57-year-old woman with history of cough and breathlessness of 3 months duration, unaware of the thyroid mass. She had large cervico-mediastinal goiter and chest radiograph revealed raised left sided hemidiaphragm. Chest CT scan did not reveal any lung parenchymal or mediastinal pathology. The patient underwent a total thyroidectomy through a cervical approach. The final pathology was in favor of multinodular goitre. Even after 1 year of follow up, phrenic nerve palsy did not improve indicating permanent damage. Phrenic nerve palsy as initial presentation of the retrosternal goitre is unusual event. This case is reported not only because of the rare nature of presentation, but also to make clinicians aware of the entity so that early intervention may prevent attendant morbidity.

  11. Surgical management of third nerve palsy

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    Anupam Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Third nerve paralysis has been known to be associated with a wide spectrum of presentation and other associated factors such as the presence of ptosis, pupillary involvement, amblyopia, aberrant regeneration, poor bell′s phenomenon, superior oblique (SO overaction, and lateral rectus (LR contracture. Correction of strabismus due to third nerve palsy can be complex as four out of the six extraocular muscles are involved and therefore should be approached differently. Third nerve palsy can be congenital or acquired. The common causes of isolated third nerve palsy in children are congenital (43%, trauma (20%, inflammation (13%, aneurysm (7%, and ophthalmoplegic migraine. Whereas, in adult population, common etiologies are vasculopathic disorders (diabetes mellitus, hypertension, aneurysm, and trauma. Treatment can be both nonsurgical and surgical. As nonsurgical modalities are not of much help, surgery remains the main-stay of treatment. Surgical strategies are different for complete and partial third nerve palsy. Surgery for complete third nerve palsy may involve supra-maximal recession - resection of the recti. This may be combined with SO transposition and augmented by surgery on the other eye. For partial third nerve, palsy surgery is determined according to nature and extent of involvement of extraocular muscles.

  12. An unusual cause of radial nerve palsy

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    Hemendra Kumar Agrawal; Vipin Khatkar; Mohit Garg; Balvinder Singh; Ashish Jaiman; Vinod Kumar Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Neurapraxia frequently occurs following traction injury to the nerve intraoperatively,leading to radial nerve palsy which usually recovers in 5-30 weeks.In our case,we had operated a distal one-third of humeral shaft fracture and fixed it with 4.5 mm limited contact dynamic compression plate.The distal neurovascular status of the limb was assessed postoperatively in the recovery room and was found to be intact and all the sensory-motor functions of the radial nerve were normal.On the second postoperative day,following the suction drain removal and dressing,patient developed immediate radial nerve palsy along with wrist drop.We reviewed the literature and found no obvious cause for the nerve palsy and concluded that it was due to traction injury to the radial nerve while removing the suction drain in negative pressure.

  13. Peripheral nerve involvement in Bell's palsy

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    J. A. Bueri

    1984-12-01

    Full Text Available A group of patients with Bell's palsy were studied in order to disclose the presence of subclinical peripheral nerve involvement. 20 patients, 8 male and 12 female, with recent Bell's palsy as their unique disease were examined, in all cases other causes of polyneuropathy were ruled out. Patients were investigated with CSF examination, facial nerve latencies in the affected and in the sound sides, and maximal motor nerve conduction velocities, as well as motor terminal latencies from the right median and peroneal nerves. CSF laboratory examination was normal in all cases. Facial nerve latencies were abnormal in all patients in the affected side, and they differed significantly from those of control group in the clinically sound side. Half of the patients showed abnormal values in the maximal motor nerve conduction velocities and motor terminal latencies of the right median and peroneal nerves. These results agree with previous reports which have pointed out that other cranial nerves may be affected in Bell's palsy. However, we have found a higher frequency of peripheral nerve involvement in this entity. These findings, support the hypothesis that in some patients Bell's palsy is the component of a more widespread disease, affecting other cranial and peripheral nerves.

  14. VII NERVE PALSY — EVALUATION AND MANAGEMENT

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    Facial nerve palsy is a devastating and readily visible nerve injury. Loss of tone ... Bell's occurs at any age, with a slight ... Surgery at the Nelson Mandela School of. Medicine, King Edward ..... cosmetic surgery (muscle transfer/ facial slings) is ...

  15. Therapeutic results in sixth nerve palsy

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    Pruna Violeta-Ioana

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Authors aim to assess through a retrospective study the efficiency of different therapeutic methods used in VIth nerve palsy. 60 patients with VIth nerve palsy, admitted and treated in Oftapro Clinic, were divided into two groups: a group with partial dysfunction (paresis of sixth nerve and a group with the complete abolition of neuromuscular function (VIth nerve palsy. Initial examination included assessment of neuromuscular function, binocular vision and existence of medial rectus muscle contracture (ipsi- and contralateral and contralateral lateral rectus inhibitory palsy. Neuromuscular dysfunction was graded from - 8 (paralysis to 0 (normal abduction. Therapeutic modalities ranged from conservative treatment (occlusion, prism correction, botulinum toxin chemodenervation and surgical treatment: medial rectus recession + lateral rectus resection, in cases of paresis, and transposition procedures (Hummelscheim and full tendon transfer in cases of sixth nerve palsy. Functional therapeutic success was defined as absence of diplopia in primary position, with or without prism correction, and surgical success was considered obtaining orthoptic alignment in primary position or a small residual deviation (under 10 PD. 51 patients had unilateral dysfunction, and 9 patients had bilateral VI-th nerve dysfunction. 8 patients had associated fourth or seventh cranial nerves palsy. The most common etiology was traumatic, followed by tumor and vascular causes. There were 18 cases of spontaneous remission, partial or complete (4-8 months after the onset, and 6 cases enhanced by botulinum toxin chemodenervation. 17 paretic eyes underwent surgery, showing a very good outcome, with restoration of binocular single vision. The procedure of choice was recession of medial rectus muscle, combined with resection of lateral rectus muscle. All patients with sixth nerve palsy underwent surgery, except one old female patient, who refused surgery. Hummelscheim procedure was

  16. Management of peripheral facial nerve palsy.

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    Finsterer, Josef

    2008-07-01

    Peripheral facial nerve palsy (FNP) may (secondary FNP) or may not have a detectable cause (Bell's palsy). Three quarters of peripheral FNP are primary and one quarter secondary. The most prevalent causes of secondary FNP are systemic viral infections, trauma, surgery, diabetes, local infections, tumor, immunological disorders, or drugs. The diagnosis of FNP relies upon the presence of typical symptoms and signs, blood chemical investigations, cerebro-spinal-fluid-investigations, X-ray of the scull and mastoid, cerebral MRI, or nerve conduction studies. Bell's palsy may be diagnosed after exclusion of all secondary causes, but causes of secondary FNP and Bell's palsy may coexist. Treatment of secondary FNP is based on the therapy of the underlying disorder. Treatment of Bell's palsy is controversial due to the lack of large, randomized, controlled, prospective studies. There are indications that steroids or antiviral agents are beneficial but also studies, which show no beneficial effect. Additional measures include eye protection, physiotherapy, acupuncture, botulinum toxin, or possibly surgery. Prognosis of Bell's palsy is fair with complete recovery in about 80% of the cases, 15% experience some kind of permanent nerve damage and 5% remain with severe sequelae.

  17. Sixth Nerve Palsy from Cholesterol Granuloma of the Petrous Apex

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    Roemer, Ségolène; Maeder, Philippe; Daniel, Roy Thomas; Kawasaki, Aki

    2017-01-01

    Herein, we report a patient who had an isolated sixth nerve palsy due to a petrous apex cholesterol granuloma. The sixth nerve palsy appeared acutely and then spontaneously resolved over several months, initially suggesting a microvascular origin of the palsy. Subsequent recurrences of the palsy indicated a different pathophysiologic etiology and MRI revealed the lesion at the petrous apex. Surgical resection improved the compressive effect of the lesion at Dorello’s canal and clinical improvement was observed. A relapsing–remitting sixth nerve palsy is an unusual presentation of this rare lesion. PMID:28261154

  18. Facial nerve palsy and hemifacial spasm.

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    Valls-Solé, Josep

    2013-01-01

    Facial nerve lesions are usually benign conditions even though patients may present with emotional distress. Facial palsy usually resolves in 3-6 weeks, but if axonal degeneration takes place, it is likely that the patient will end up with a postparalytic facial syndrome featuring synkinesis, myokymic discharges, and hemifacial mass contractions after abnormal reinnervation. Essential hemifacial spasm is one form of facial hyperactivity that must be distinguished from synkinesis after facial palsy and also from other forms of facial dyskinesias. In this condition, there can be ectopic discharges, ephaptic transmission, and lateral spread of excitation among nerve fibers, giving rise to involuntary muscle twitching and spasms. Electrodiagnostic assessment is of relevance for the diagnosis and prognosis of peripheral facial palsy and hemifacial spasm. In this chapter the most relevant clinical and electrodiagnostic aspects of the two disorders are reviewed, with emphasis on the various stages of facial palsy after axonal degeneration, the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the various features of hemifacial spasm, and the cues for differential diagnosis between the two entities.

  19. Benign recurrent abducens (6th) nerve palsy in two children.

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    Knapp, Christopher M; Gottlob, Irene

    2004-03-01

    Benign recurrent abducens (6th) nerve palsy is rare. We found 23 cases in children reported in the literature; however, many of these cases followed immunization or were associated with viral illness. Here we report two cases of recurrent abducens nerve palsy with no obvious etiology. The diagnosis should be considered in any child who experiences abducens nerve palsy in the absence of any underlying pathology or precipitating factors.

  20. CT findings in patients with cerebral palsy

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    Konno, K. (Akita Univ. (Japan))

    1982-01-01

    Clinical findings and CT findings in 73 cases of cerebral palsy were studied. The causes of cerebral palsy were presumed to be as follows: abnormal cerebral development (36%), asphyxial delivery (34%), and immature delivery (19%), etc. CT findings were abnormal in 58% of the 73 cases, 83% of the spastic tetraplegia patients and all of the spastic hemiplegia patients showed abnormal CT findings. All the patients with spastic monoplegia presented normal CT findings. In 75% of the spastic hemiplegia cases, the CT abnormalities were due to cerebral parenchymal abnormality such as porencephaly and regional low absorption. In cases of spastic tetraplegia, cerebral parenchymal abnormality was found only in 10%. Cortical atrophy was found only in 15 of the 73 cases, whereas central atrophy was found in 36 cases.

  1. NEONATAL NERVE PALSIES: A CONTEMPORARY OBSTETRIC PERSPECTIVE

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    Daren J. Roberts

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background:Birth trauma and its often incorrect inference of iatrogenic causation has led to unfortunate implications for the affected child, the parents, the obstetrician and the midwife due to unwarranted medico-legal attention in our current litigious society.A more discerning evaluation of neonatal nerve palsies following labour and delivery has led to a better understanding of their aetiology with potentially more appropriate outcomes for all parties involved.

  2. Peripheral facial nerve palsy after therapeutic endoscopy.

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    Kim, Eun Jeong; Lee, Jun; Lee, Ji Woon; Lee, Jun Hyung; Park, Chol Jin; Kim, Young Dae; Lee, Hyun Jin

    2015-03-01

    Peripheral facial nerve palsy (FNP) is a mononeuropathy that affects the peripheral part of the facial nerve. Primary causes of peripheral FNP remain largely unknown, but detectable causes include systemic infections (viral and others), trauma, ischemia, tumor, and extrinsic compression. Peripheral FNP in relation to extrinsic compression has rarely been described in case reports. Here, we report a case of a 71-year-old man who was diagnosed with peripheral FNP following endoscopic submucosal dissection. This case is the first report of the development of peripheral FNP in a patient undergoing therapeutic endoscopy. We emphasize the fact that physicians should be attentive to the development of peripheral FNP following therapeutic endoscopy.

  3. Isolated abducens nerve palsy with hyperhomocysteinemia: Association and outcomes

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    Virender Sachdeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic abducens nerve palsy usually presents as isolated cranial nerve palsy in the middle aged and elderly patients with known risk factors such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemia, carotid artery disease, etc., In this report, we describe four patients with isolated abducens nerve palsy who presented with an acute onset diplopia whose detailed history and examination were suggestive of an ischemic etiology. Detailed systemic and laboratory evaluation revealed hyperhomocysteinemia as the only potential risk factor. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of association of hyperhomocysteinemia and isolated abducens nerve palsy.

  4. Pseudoradial Nerve Palsy Caused by Acute Ischemic Stroke

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    Hassan Tahir MD

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Pseudoperipheral palsy has been used to characterize isolated monoparesis secondary to stroke. Isolated hand nerve palsy is a rare presentation for acute cerebral stroke. Our patient presented with clinical features of typical peripheral radial nerve palsy and a normal computed tomography scan of the head, which, without a detailed history and neurological examination, could have been easily misdiagnosed as a peripheral nerve lesion deferring further investigation for a stroke. We stress the importance of including cerebral infarction as a critical differential diagnosis in patients presenting with sensory-motor deficit in an isolated peripheral nerve pattern. A good history and physical exam can differentiate stroke from peripheral neuropathy as the cause of radial nerve palsy.

  5. Sciatic nerve palsy associated with intramuscular quinine injections ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Key Words: Sciatic nerve palsy, intramuscular injections, children, quinine dil~ ... adverse effects which include ototoxicity resulting .... quinine injection into the gluteal muscles of his right ... to maintain joint movement and avoid damage to.

  6. Pontine stroke presenting as isolated facial nerve palsy mimicking Bell's palsy: a case report

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    Saluja Paramveer; Manandhar Lochana; Agarwal Rishi; Grandhi Bala

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Isolated facial nerve palsy usually manifests as Bell's palsy. Lacunar infarct involving the lower pons is a rare cause of solitary infranuclear facial paralysis. The present unusual case is one in which the patient appeared to have Bell's palsy but turned out to have a pontine infarct. Case presentation A 47-year-old Asian Indian man with a medical history of hypertension presented to our institution with nausea, vomiting, generalized weakness, facial droop, and slurred...

  7. Facial nerve palsy: Evaluation by contrast-enhanced MR imaging

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    Kinoshita, T.; Ishii, K.; Okitsu, T.; Okudera, T.; Ogawa, T

    2001-11-01

    AIM: The purpose of this study was to investigate the value of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in patients with peripheral facial nerve palsy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: MR imaging was performed in 147 patients with facial nerve palsy, using a 1.0 T unit. All of 147 patients were evaluated by contrast-enhanced MR imaging and the pattern of enhancement was compared with that in 300 control subjects evaluated for suspected acoustic neurinoma. RESULTS: The intrameatal and labyrinthine segments of the normal facial nerve did not show enhancement, whereas enhancement of the distal intrameatal segment and the labyrinthine segment was respectively found in 67% and 43% of patients with Bell's palsy. The geniculate ganglion or the tympanic-mastoid segment was enhanced in 21% of normal controls versus 91% of patients with Bell's palsy. Abnormal enhancement of the non-paralyzed facial nerve was found in a patient with bilateral temporal bone fracture. CONCLUSION: Enhancement of the distal intrameatal and labyrinthine segments is specific for facial nerve palsy. Contrast-enhanced MR imaging can reveal inflammatory facial nerve lesions and traumatic nerve injury, including clinically silent damage in trauma. Kinoshita T. et al. (2001)

  8. Multiple Cranial Nerve Palsy Due to Cerebral Venous Thrombosis

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    Esra Eruyar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT is a rare clinical condition between cerebrovasculer diases. The most common findings are headache, seizure and focal neurological deficit. Multiple cranial nerve palsy due to CVT is rarely seen and it is not clear pathology. A pathology that could explain the lack of cranial nerve imaging is carrying suspected diagnosis but the disease is known to provide early diagnosis and treatment. We want to emphasize with this case multipl cranial nerve palsy due to CVT is seen rarely and good response to treatment.

  9. The diagnostic yield of neuroimaging in sixth nerve palsy - Sankara Nethralaya Abducens Palsy Study (SNAPS: Report 1

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    Akshay Gopinathan Nair

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim was to assess the etiology of sixth nerve palsy and on the basis of our data, to formulate a diagnostic algorithm for the management in sixth nerve palsy. Design: Retrospective chart review. Results: Of the 104 neurologically isolated cases, 9 cases were attributable to trauma, and 95 (86.36% cases were classified as nontraumatic, neurologically isolated cases. Of the 95 nontraumatic, isolated cases of sixth nerve palsy, 52 cases were associated with vasculopathic risk factors, namely diabetes and hypertension and were classified as vasculopathic sixth nerve palsy (54.7%, and those with a history of sixth nerve palsy from birth (6 cases were classified as congenital sixth nerve palsy (6.3%. Of the rest, neuroimaging alone yielded a cause in 18 of the 37 cases (48.64%. Of the other 19 cases where neuroimaging did not yield a cause, 6 cases were attributed to preceding history of infection (3 upper respiratory tract infection and 3 viral illnesses, 2 cases of sixth nerve palsy were found to be a false localizing sign in idiopathic intracranial hypertension and in 11 cases, the cause was undetermined. In these idiopathic cases of isolated sixth nerve palsy, neuroimaging yielded no positive findings. Conclusions: In the absence of risk factors, a suggestive history, or positive laboratory and clinical findings, neuroimaging can serve as a useful diagnostic tool in identifying the exact cause of sixth nerve palsy. Furthermore, we recommend an algorithm to assess the need for neuroimaging in sixth nerve palsy.

  10. The diagnostic yield of neuroimaging in sixth nerve palsy--Sankara Nethralaya Abducens Palsy Study (SNAPS): Report 1.

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    Nair, Akshay Gopinathan; Ambika, Selvakumar; Noronha, Veena Olma; Gandhi, Rashmin Anilkumar

    2014-10-01

    The aim was to assess the etiology of sixth nerve palsy and on the basis of our data, to formulate a diagnostic algorithm for the management in sixth nerve palsy. Retrospective chart review. Of the 104 neurologically isolated cases, 9 cases were attributable to trauma, and 95 (86.36%) cases were classified as nontraumatic, neurologically isolated cases. Of the 95 nontraumatic, isolated cases of sixth nerve palsy, 52 cases were associated with vasculopathic risk factors, namely diabetes and hypertension and were classified as vasculopathic sixth nerve palsy (54.7%), and those with a history of sixth nerve palsy from birth (6 cases) were classified as congenital sixth nerve palsy (6.3%). Of the rest, neuroimaging alone yielded a cause in 18 of the 37 cases (48.64%). Of the other 19 cases where neuroimaging did not yield a cause, 6 cases were attributed to preceding history of infection (3 upper respiratory tract infection and 3 viral illnesses), 2 cases of sixth nerve palsy were found to be a false localizing sign in idiopathic intracranial hypertension and in 11 cases, the cause was undetermined. In these idiopathic cases of isolated sixth nerve palsy, neuroimaging yielded no positive findings. In the absence of risk factors, a suggestive history, or positive laboratory and clinical findings, neuroimaging can serve as a useful diagnostic tool in identifying the exact cause of sixth nerve palsy. Furthermore, we recommend an algorithm to assess the need for neuroimaging in sixth nerve palsy.

  11. Pontine stroke presenting as isolated facial nerve palsy mimicking Bell's palsy: a case report

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    Saluja Paramveer

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Isolated facial nerve palsy usually manifests as Bell's palsy. Lacunar infarct involving the lower pons is a rare cause of solitary infranuclear facial paralysis. The present unusual case is one in which the patient appeared to have Bell's palsy but turned out to have a pontine infarct. Case presentation A 47-year-old Asian Indian man with a medical history of hypertension presented to our institution with nausea, vomiting, generalized weakness, facial droop, and slurred speech of 14 hours' duration. His physical examination revealed that he was conscious, lethargic, and had mildly slurred speech. His blood pressure was 216/142 mmHg. His neurologic examination showed that he had loss of left-sided forehead creases, inability to close his left eye, left facial muscle weakness, rightward deviation of the angle of the mouth on smiling, and loss of the left nasolabial fold. Afferent corneal reflexes were present bilaterally. MRI of the head was initially read as negative for acute stroke. Bell's palsy appeared less likely because of the acuity of his presentation, encephalopathy-like imaging, and hypertension. The MRI was re-evaluated with a neurologist's assistance, which revealed a tiny 4 mm infarct involving the left dorsal aspect of the pons. The final diagnosis was isolated facial nerve palsy due to lacunar infarct of dorsal pons and hypertensive encephalopathy. Conclusion The facial nerve has a predominant motor component which supplies all muscles concerned with unilateral facial expression. Anatomic knowledge is crucial for clinical localization. Bell's palsy accounts for around 72% of facial palsies. Other causes such as tumors and pontine infarcts can also present as facial palsy. Isolated dorsal infarct presenting as isolated facial palsy is very rare. Our case emphasizes that isolated facial palsy should not always be attributed to Bell's palsy. It can be a presentation of a rare dorsal pontine infarct as observed

  12. Concomitant abducens and facial nerve palsies following blunt head trauma associated with bone fracture.

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    Ji, Min-Jeong; Han, Sang-Beom; Lee, Seung-Jun; Kim, Moosang

    2015-07-15

    A 22-year-old man was referred for horizontal diplopia that worsened on left gaze. He had been admitted for a head trauma caused by a traffic accident. Brain CT scan showed a longitudinal fracture of the left temporal bone with extension to the left carotid canal and central skull base, including sphenoid lateral wall and roof, and left orbit medial wall non-displaced fracture. Prism cover test revealed 20 prism diopters of esotropia and abduction limitation in the left eye. Hess screening test results were compatible with left abducens nerve paralysis. Symptoms suggesting complete lower motor neuron palsy of the left facial nerve, such as unilateral facial drooping, inability to raise the eyebrow and difficulty closing the eye, were present. As there was no improvement in facial paralysis, the patient received surgical intervention using a transmastoidal approach. Three months postoperatively, prism cover test showed orthotropia, however, the facial nerve palsy persisted.

  13. Hemiplegic peripheral neuropathy accompanied with multiple cranial nerve palsy

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    Hirohisa Okuma

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A 32-year-old man experienced double vision around January, 2010, followed by weakness of his left upper and lower extremities. Articulation disorders and loss of hearing in his left ear developed, and he was admitted to our hospital on February 14, 2010. Physical examination was normal, and neurological examination showed clear consciousness with no impairment of cognitive function, but with articulation disorders. Olfactory sensation was reduced. Left ptosis and left gaze palsy, complete left facial palsy, perceptive deafness of the left ear, and muscle weakness of the left trapezius muscle were observed. Paresis in the left upper and lower extremities was graded 4/5 through manual muscle testing. Sensory system evaluation revealed complete left-side palsy, including the face. Deep tendon reflexes were slightly diminished equally on both sides; no pathologic reflex was seen. No abnormality of the brain parenchyma, cerebral nerves or cervicothoracolumbar region was found on brain magnetic resonance imaging. On electroencephalogram, alpha waves in the main frequency band of 8 to 9 Hz were recorded, indicating normal findings. Brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT scan showed reduced blood flow in the right inner frontal lobe and both occipital lobes. Nerve biopsy (left sural nerve showed reduction of nerve density by 30%, with demyelination. The patient also showed manifestations of multiple cranial nerve disorder, i.e., of the trigeminal nerve, glossopharyngeal nerve, vagus nerve, and hypoglossal nerve. Whole-body examination was negative. Finally, based on ischemic brain SPECT images, spinal fluid findings and nerve biopsy results, peripheral neuropathy accompanied with multiple cranial nerve palsy was diagnosed.

  14. Sneddon syndrome presenting with unilateral third cranial nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Gallo, David; Albarrán-Planelles, Cristina; Linares-Barrios, Mario; González-Fernández, Julio A; Espinosa-Rosso, Raúl; Báez-Perea, José M

    2014-03-01

    Sneddon syndrome is a rare systemic vasculopathy affecting the skin as livedo racemosa and the central nervous system as stroke. A 31-year-old man with a history of livedo racemosa presented with a partial left third nerve palsy. Skin biopsy showed signs of endotheliitis with obliteration of dermal blood vessels due to intimal proliferation and fibrin thrombi consistent with Sneddon syndrome. The patient was treated with platelet antiaggregant therapy with complete resolution of his third nerve palsy. Clinicians should be aware of Sneddon syndrome because prompt diagnosis and treatment may prevent potential morbidity and mortality.

  15. Post-Traumatic Isolated Bilateral Sixth Nerve Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jain

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Here we discussed an unusual case of head injury with bilateral sixth nerve palsy without any other neurological deficit. A 40-year-old male was admitted with double vision after an episode of head injury. Case Presentation On examination bilateral lateral rectus palsy was present. No other positive finding recorded in general physical, neurological and ophthalmological examinations. Conclusions Bilaterality of the abducent nerve paralysis is uncommon. It is usually associated with major head injury with brain stem injury and associated neurological findings.

  16. Acute sixth nerve palsy in a young man, beware of the 'red herring'.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Neill, E C

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Cranial nerve palsies has several etiologies including vascular insufficiency, neoplasm, trauma and inflammation. Isolated sixth nerve palsy is an extremely rare presenting feature of leukemia. AIM: We describe an unusual ocular presentation of a bilateral progressive sixth nerve palsy in a young male with a preceding head injury. CONCLUSION: Acquired sixth nerve palsies in young adults may be due to trauma but in the absence of a definitive history other systemic processes must be outruled. We describe a case of bilateral sixth nerve palsy in a patient with ALL with no obvious CNS involvement. Potential etiological mechanisms are discussed.

  17. Peroneal palsy after bariatric surgery: is nerve decompresion always necessary?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M. Ramos-Leví

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We present two patients who underwent successful bariatric surgery and developed peroneal nerve palsy six months after the procedure. This is an unusual complication which determines a significant functional limitation, mainly because of foot drop, and its presence may be a hallmark of excessive and rapid weight loss. We discuss possible pathogenic mechanisms and therapeutic options, and we emphasize the important role of an adequate nutritional management, in order to avoid the need for a surgical nerve decompression.

  18. Hansen's disease and HIV coinfection with facial nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Nidhi; Kar, Sumit; Madke, Bhushan; Gangane, Nitin

    2015-01-01

    There are very few published reports of HIV leprosy co infection in India in spite of having a large burden of both leprosy and HIV. Herein we are reporting a case of co-infection of Hansen's disease and HIV with facial nerve palsy.

  19. Pudendal nerve palsy in trauma and elective orthopaedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyzois, Ioannis; Tsitskaris, Konstantinos; Oussedik, Sam

    2013-12-01

    The incidence of pudendal nerve palsy following routine trauma and elective orthopaedic surgery procedures ranges from 1.9% to 27.6%. Excessive and/or prolonged traction against the perineal post of a traction table, leading to direct compression and localised ischaemia to the nerve are suggested mechanisms of injury. Misuse of traction and the inappropriate placement of the perineal post, leading to crushing and stretching of the pudendal nerve, are two main contributing factors leading to its postoperative palsy. The sequelae may be sensory, motor or mixed. In most cases, these injuries are transient and tend to resolve within several weeks or months. However, complete neurological recovery may be unpredictable and the effects of ongoing dysfunction potentially disastrous for the individual. In terms of preventative measures, magnitude and duration of traction time should be minimised; traction should be limited to the critical operative steps only. Additionally, the perineal post should be placed between the genitalia and the contralateral leg. A well-padded, large-diameter perineal post should be used (>10cm). Adequate muscle relaxation during anaesthesia is particularly important in young men who have strong muscles and thus require larger traction forces when compared to elderly patients. Orthopaedic surgeons should be aware of the pathophysiology behind the development of this palsy and the measures that can be employed to reduce its occurrence. In procedures where a traction table is employed, consenting for pudendal nerve palsy should be considered by the surgical team.

  20. PHRENIC NERVE PALSY AFTER SUPRACLAVICULAR BRACHIAL PLEXUS BLOCK

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    Gupta A K

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A 67 year old male patient was scheduled for implant removal from right upper limb under supraclavicular block. During procedure patient develops right phrenic nerve palsy & complains of dyspnea which was managed conservatively and no intervention done except chest x-ray for confirming the diagnosis. Surgeons completed the implant removal without any invasive intervention or interruption.

  1. CT findings of cerebral palsy and behaviour development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakamoto, Zenji

    1987-06-01

    It is well recognized that CT scan is very useful in the early diagnosis of cerebral palsy. The author has studied this time the CT scan findings of cerebral palsy children in their relations to the type of palsy, cause of palsy, complications in the central nervous system, and prognosis of behaviour development, in order to predict the prognosis of behaviour development. Dilatation of the contralateral cerebral ventricle was found in 82 % of hemiplegic type. Abnormal EEG was found in 73 %, but their behaviour development was satisfactory, with good development of speech regardless to the side of palsy. This might be helped by compensational function of the brain due to plasticity. Diplegia presented bilateral moderate dilatation of ventricles with favorable prognosis. Tetraplegia was caused mostly by asphyxia or congenital anomaly and revealed marked dilatation of ventricles or severe cortical atrophy. Some cases presented diffuse cortical low-density, often associated with abnormal EEG, and their prognosis was worst. Athetosis had normal CT finding or mild ventricular dilatation, but all cases of ataxia presented normal CT findings. Hypotonia had mild ventricular dilatation. Two of three mixed type cases had normal CT findings and another had mild ventricular dilatation. No correlation was found between ventricular dilatation and behaviour development, but statistically significant difference was found in the cases with 30 % or more Evans' ratio (P < 0.05). Prognosis of severe ventricular dilatation cases was poor.

  2. [Treatment of idiopathic peripheral facial nerve paralysis (Bell's palsy)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Martin Willy; Hahn, Christoffer Holst

    2013-01-28

    Bell's palsy is defined as an idiopathic peripheral facial nerve paralysis of sudden onset. It affects 11-40 persons per 100,000 per annum. Many patients recover without intervention; however, up to 30% have poor recovery of facial muscle control and experience facial disfigurement. The aim of this study was to make an overview of which pharmacological treatments have been used to improve outcomes. The available evidence from randomized controlled trials shows significant benefit from treating Bell's palsy with corticosteroids but shows no benefit from antivirals.

  3. Risk factors for recurrent nerve palsy after thyroid surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godballe, Christian; Madsen, Anders Rørbæk; Sørensen, Christian Hjort

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury is a well-known and serious complication to thyroid surgery. The objective was to estimate the frequency of post-thyroidectomy RLN palsy and to identify possible risk factors. Based on the Danish national thyroid surgery database, 6,859 patients treated with...... performed thyroid surgery are the strongest predictors for RLN palsy and patient information should be given accordingly. Incomplete resections should be reserved for isthmectomy only. Centralization of thyroid surgery in larger units might improve quality....

  4. Neuro-ophthalmological approach to facial nerve palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portelinha, Joana; Passarinho, Maria Picoto; Costa, João Marques

    2014-01-01

    Facial nerve palsy is associated with significant morbidity and can have different etiologies. The most common causes are Bell’s palsy, Ramsay–Hunt syndrome and trauma, including surgical trauma. Incidence varies between 17 and 35 cases per 100,000. Initial evaluation should include accurate clinical history, followed by a comprehensive investigation of the head and neck, including ophthalmological, otological, oral and neurological examination, to exclude secondary causes. Routine laboratory testing and diagnostic imaging is not indicated in patients with new-onset Bell’s palsy, but should be performed in patients with risk factors, atypical cases or in any case without resolution within 4 months. Many factors are involved in determining the appropriate treatment of these patients: the underlying cause, expected duration of nerve dysfunction, anatomical manifestations, severity of symptoms and objective clinical findings. Systemic steroids should be offered to patients with new-onset Bell’s palsy to increase the chance of facial nerve recovery and reduce synkinesis. Ophthalmologists play a pivotal role in the multidisciplinary team involved in the evaluation and rehabilitation of these patients. In the acute phase, the main priority should be to ensure adequate corneal protection. Treatment depends on the degree of nerve lesion and on the risk of the corneal damage based on the amount of lagophthalmos, the quality of Bell’s phenomenon, the presence or absence of corneal sensitivity and the degree of lid retraction. The main therapy is intensive lubrication. Other treatments include: taping the eyelid overnight, botulinum toxin injection, tarsorrhaphy, eyelid weight implants, scleral contact lenses and palpebral spring. Once the cornea is protected, longer term planning for eyelid and facial rehabilitation may take place. Spontaneous complete recovery of Bell’s palsy occurs in up to 70% of cases. Long-term complications include aberrant regeneration

  5. Homozygous hemoglobin S (HbSS) presenting with bilateral facial nerve palsy: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Ogundunmade, Babatunde Gbolahan; Jasper, Unyime Sunday

    2014-01-01

    Background Bilateral facial nerve palsy is a relatively rare presentation and often points to a serious underlying medical condition. Several studies have reported presentation of bilateral facial nerve palsy in association with Lyme disease, Guillain-Barre syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus, human immunodeficiency virus, sarcoidosis, diabetes and Hanson disease. While unilateral facial nerve palsy is sometimes associated with hemiplegia in sickle cell patients, no case of bilateral facia...

  6. Medial rectus muscle anchoring in complete oculomotor nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Si Hyung; Chang, Jee Ho

    2015-10-01

    The management of exotropia resulting from complete oculomotor nerve palsy is challenging. Conventional therapeutic interventions, including supramaximal resection and recession, superior oblique tendon resection and transposition, and several ocular anchoring procedures have yielded less-than-adequate results. Here we describe a novel surgical technique of anchoring the medial rectus muscle to the medial orbital wall in combination with lateral rectus disinsertion and reattachment to the lateral orbital wall.

  7. Bony exostosis of the atlas with resultant cranial nerve palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slavotinek, J.P.; Sage, M.R. (Flinders Medical Centre, Bedford Park (Australia). Dept. of Radiology); Brophy, B.P. (Flinders Medical Centre, Bedford Park (Australia). Dept. of Neurosurgery)

    1991-10-01

    A case of tenth and twelfth nerve compression secondary to a bony exostosis of the first cervical vertebra is described. This uncommon phenomenon serves to outline the importance of imaging the course of a cranial nerve when no intracranial abnormality is demonstrable on CT or MRI. The radiologic features of spinal osteochondromas are reviewed. (orig.).

  8. Computed tomographic (CT) scans in cerebral palsy (CP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolawole, T.M.; Patel, P.J. (King Saud Univ., Riyadh (Saudi Arabia). Dept. of Radiology); Mahdi, A.H. (King Saud Univ., Riyadh (Saudi Arabia). Dept. of Paediatrics)

    1989-11-01

    The CT findings in 120 cerebral palsied children are analysed. The 72.5% positive findings are correlated with the clinical types, as well as the aetiological basis for the cerebral palsy. The spastic type, 83.3% of the total number of children, had the highest positive findings. The yield was increased in children with seizures (91.3%) and those in the postnatal group (90%), as well as those with birth trauma and neonatal asphyxia (94%). The findings were those of atrophy in 30.8%, hydrocephalus, in 10%, infarct in 11.6%, porencephaly in 8.3% and others. The atropic changes and their patterns are explained. Treatable lesions, such as tumour, hydrocephalus, subdural haematoma, porencephaly and hygroma were identified in 22.5% of cases. It is concluded that CT scan is definitely efficacious in the management of cerebral palsied children. (orig.).

  9. Femoral and obturator nerves palsy caused by pelvic cement extrusion after hip arthroplasty.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Zwolak

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Cement extrusion into the pelvis with subsequent palsy of the obturator and femoral nerves is a rare entity after hip replacement surgery. Cemented fixation of the acetabular cup has been considered as a safe and reliable standard procedure with very good long term results. We present a case of fifty year old female patient after hip arthroplasty procedure which suffered an obturator and femoral nerve palsy caused by extrusion of bone cement into the pelvis. Postoperative X-rays and CT-scan of the pelvis demonstrated a huge mass consisted of bone cement in close proximity of femoral and obturator nerves. The surgery charts reported shallow and weak bony substance in postero-superior aspect of the acetabulum. This weak bony acetabular substance may have caused extrusion of bone cement during press-fitting of the polyethylene cup into the acetabulum, and the following damage of the both nerves produced by polymerization of bone cement. The bone cement fragment has been surgically removed 3 weeks after arthroplasty. The female patient underwent intensive postoperative physical therapy and electro stimulation which resulted in full recovery of the patient to daily routine and almost normal electromyography results.

  10. [A case of long thoracic nerve palsy, with winged scapula, as a result of prolonged exertion on practicing archery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, J; Nishiyama, K; Takeda, K; Ichiba, T; Sakuta, M

    1990-08-01

    Reports of isolated long thoracic nerve palsy are rare in Japan. We reported a case of isolated long thoracic nerve palsy, resulted from recurrent injury to the nerve. Muscle CT and electrodiagnostic study were useful for confirming diagnosis of this cases. This patient was a student aged 20 years, with nothing of importance in his family or past history. After he started practicing archery, winging of left scapula was gradually developed. Physical examination revealed weakness and atrophy of left serratus anterior muscle. There was no wasting and weakness of other should girdle muscles. Hematochemical tests were normal, except slight hyperthyroidism. Radiography and myelography of the cervical spine were normal. Muscle CT of upper thoracic level demonstrated atrophy of left serratus anterior muscle, and no abnormality were found in other muscles. Electromyogram of the left serratus anterior revealed discrete activity of reduced amplitude, and fibrillation potentials and positive sharp waves. Conduction time for left long thoracic nerve was prolonged, and amplitude of the evoked response was small and there were temporal dispersion. Muscle CT and electrodiagnostic studies were suggestive of neuroapraxia of left long thoracic nerve. Over stretching or compression during exercises may be responsible for the damage to the long thoracic nerve.

  11. Idiopathic Ninth, Tenth, and Twelfth Cranial Nerve Palsy with Ipsilateral Headache: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Seung-Ho

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This case report is to report the effect of Korean traditional treatment for idiopathic ninth, tenth, and twelfth cranial nerve palsy with ipsilateral headache. Methods: The medical history and imaging and laboratory test of a 39-year-old man with cranial palsy were tested to identify the cause of disease. A 0.2-mL dosage of Hwangyeonhaedoktang pharmacopuncture was administered at CV23 and CV17, respectively. Acupuncture was applied at P06, Li05, TE05, and G37 on the right side of the body. Zhuapiandutongbang (左偏頭痛方 was administered at 30 minutes to 1 hour after mealtime three times a day. The symptoms were investigated using Visual Analogue Scale (VAS. Results: The results of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, computed tomography (CT, and laboratory tests were normal. The medical history showed no trauma, other illnesses, family history of diseases, medications, smoking, drinking and so on. All symptoms disappeared at the 10th day of treatment. Conclusion: Korean traditional treatment such as acupuncture, pharmcopuncture, and herbal medicine for the treatment of ninth, tenth, and twelfth cranial nerve palsy of unknown origin is suggested to be effective even though this conclusion is based on a single.

  12. MRI of patients with cerebral palsy and normal CT scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogaert, P. van; Szliwowski, H.B. (Hopital Erasme, Brussels (Belgium). Dept. of Neurology); Baleriaux, D.; Christophe, C. (Hopital Erasme, Brussels (Belgium). Dept. of Radiology (Neuroradiology))

    1992-02-01

    Three children with clinical evidence of cerebral palsy (CP) and normal cerebral computed tomography (CT) scans were evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to identify CT-undetectable white matter lesions in the watershed zones of arterial territories. The two patients with spastic diplegia showed bilateral lesions either in the subcortical regions or in the occipital periventricular regions. The patient with congenital hemiplegia exhibited unilateral lesions in the periventricular region. We conclude that MRI is more informative than CT for the evaluation of patients with CP. (orig.).

  13. Ulnar nerve palsy due to axillary crutch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veerendrakumar M

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A young lady with residual polio, using axillary crutch since early childhood, presented with tingling, numbness and weakness in ulnar nerve distribution of five months duration. Ulnar motor conduction study revealed proximal conduction block near the axilla, at the point of pressure by the crutch while walking. Distal ulnar sensory conduction studies were normal but proximal ulnar sensory conduction studies showed absence of Erb′s point potential. These findings suggested the presence of conduction block in sensory fibers as well. Proper use and change of axillary crutch resulted in clinical recovery and resolution of motor and sensory conduction block.

  14. Cranial nerve palsy in Wegener's granulomatosis--lessons from clinical cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nowack, Rainer; Wachtler, Paul; Kunz, Jürgen;

    2009-01-01

    The problem of diagnosing vasculitic neuropathy is discussed based on case reports of two patients with Wegener's granulomatosis. One patient developed de novo 6(th) nerve palsy as an isolated relapse manifestation and the second patient a sequence of multiple cranial nerve palsies. Brain imaging...

  15. Clinical observation on common peroneal nerve palsy treated with comprehensive therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨丽娟

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the difference of the clinical efficacy on common peroneal nerve palsy between the comprehensive therapy of electroacupuncture,moxibustion and moving cupping method and western medication.Methods Ninety cases of common peroneal nerve palsy were randomized into a comprehensive therapy group and a western medication group,45 cases in each

  16. A 3-year review of cranial nerve palsies from the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital Eye Clinic, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinyere Nnenne Pedro-Egbe

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: This is the first study in the literature on ocular cranial nerve palsies in Southern Nigeria. Third and sixth cranial nerve palsies were the most common cases to present to the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital Eye Clinic. There was a statistically significant association to systemic disorders such as hypertension and DM and majority of cases with 6 th cranial nerve palsy.

  17. MRI of the facial nerve in idiopathic facial palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saatci, I. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe Univ., Hospital Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey); Sahintuerk, F. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe Univ., Hospital Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey); Sennaroglu, L. [Dept. of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Hacettepe Univ., Hospital Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey); Boyvat, F. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe Univ., Hospital Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey); Guersel, B. [Dept. of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Hacettepe Univ., Hospital Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey); Besim, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe Univ., Hospital Sihhiye, Ankara (Turkey)

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to define the enhancement pattern of the facial nerve in idiopathic facial paralysis (Bell`s palsy) on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with routine doses of gadolinium-DTPA (0.1 mmol/kg). Using 0.5 T imager, 24 patients were examined with a mean interval time of 13.7 days between the onset of symptoms and the MR examination. Contralateral asymptomatic facial nerves constituted the control group and five of the normal facial nerves (20.8%) showed enhancement confined to the geniculate ganglion. Hence, contrast enhancement limited to the geniculate ganglion in the abnormal facial nerve (3 of 24) was referred to a equivocal. Not encountered in any of the normal facial nerves, enhancement of other segments alone or associated with geniculate ganglion enhancement was considered to be abnormal and noted in 70.8% of the symptomatic facial nerves. The most frequently enhancing segments were the geniculate ganglion and the distal intracanalicular segment. (orig.)

  18. Guillain-Barre Syndrome Presenting With Bilateral Facial Nerve Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soroor INALOO

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Inaloo S, Katibeh P. Guillain-Barre Syndrome Presenting With Bilateral Facial Nerve Palsy. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Winter;8(1:69-71.ObjectiveThis case study is about an 11-year-old girl with bilateral facial weakness, abnormal taste sensation, and deep tendon reflexes of both knees and ankles were absent. However, the muscle power of the lower and upper extremities across all muscle groups was normal. After 2 days, she developed paresthesia and numbness in the lower extremities. Other neurologic examinations, such as fundoscopic evaluation of the retina were normal with the muscle power of both upper- and lower-extremities intact. A lumbar puncture revealed albumincytological dissociation. EMG and NCV were in favor of Guillain-Barre syndrome, for which IVIG was prescribed and the abnormal sensations in the lower limbs rapidly improved. Bilateral facial diplegia without weakness and paresthesia is a variant of Guillain-Barre syndrome that mostly presents withacute onset, rapid progression with or without limb weakness, paresthesia, and decreased or absent DTR and albumin-cytological dissociation.References:Barbi F, Ariatti A, Funakoshi K, Meacci M, Odaka M, Galassi G. Parvovirus B19 infection antedating Guillain-Barre’ syndrome variant with prominent facial diplegia. J Neurol 2011 Aug; 258(8:1551-2. doi: 10.1007/s00415-011-5949-5. Epub 2011 Feb 15.Yardimci N, Avci AY, Kayhan E, Benli S. Bilateral facial nerve enhancement demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging in Guillain-Barré syndrome. Neurol Sci 2009 Oct; 30(5:431-3. doi:10.1007/s10072-009-0120-0.Lim TC, Yeo WS, Loke KY, Quek SC. Bilateral facial nerve palsy in Kawasaki disease. Ann Acad Med Singapore 2009; 38(8:737-8.Quintas E, Silva A, Sarmento A. Bilateral facial palsy in a young patient after meningococcal meningitis, associated to herpetic infection. Arq Neuro-Psiquiatr 2009; 67(3a: 712-14.Jain V, Deshmukh A, Gollomp S. Bilateral facial

  19. Facial nerve palsy: Providing eye comfort and cosmesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alsuhaibani Adel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of facial nerve palsy (FNP may lead to dramatic change in the patient′s facial function, expression, and emotions. The ophthalmologist may play an important role in the initial evaluation, and the long-term management of patients with new-onset of FNP. In patients with expected temporary facial weakness, no efforts should be wasted to ensure proper corneal protection. Patients with permanent functional deficit may require combination of surgical procedures tailored to the patient′s clinical findings that may require good eye comfort and cosmesis.

  20. Facial Nerve Palsy: Providing Eye Comfort and Cosmesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsuhaibani, Adel H.

    2010-01-01

    Development of facial nerve palsy (FNP) may lead to dramatic change in the patient's facial function, expression, and emotions. The ophthalmologist may play an important role in the initial evaluation, and the long-term management of patients with new-onset of FNP. In patients with expected temporary facial weakness, no efforts should be wasted to ensure proper corneal protection. Patients with permanent functional deficit may require combination of surgical procedures tailored to the patient's clinical findings that may require good eye comfort and cosmesis. PMID:20616921

  1. The truth is in the water: metastatic prostate cancer presenting as an intermittent facial nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooles, N; Gupta, S; Wilkin-Crowe, H; Juratli, A

    2015-04-24

    An elderly man presented to the acute ear, nose and throat (ENT) services with a history of intermittent, self-limiting facial nerve palsy. Full ENT examination was normal, with all cranial nerves and peripheral neurology intact. Multiple imaging modalities suggested an aggressive bony lesion, secondary to locally advanced prostate malignancy with extensive metastatic infiltration. Prostate cancer is known to preferentially metastasise to bone and has been known to cause multiple cranial nerve palsies and ophthalmoplegia. This is the first case described in the literature of metastatic prostate cancer presenting with intermittent facial nerve palsy.

  2. Ulnar nerve palsy after closed forearm fracture: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levent Kucuk

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Closed double bone forearm fractures are among the most common fractures of childhood. These fractures often heal without problems with closed reduction and casting. The leading complications are known as malunion and compartment syndrome. The reports about nerve injuries related with these fractures are very limited. We present an eight years old boy who admitted to our hospital with ulnar nerve palsy symptomps three months after his initial trauma. His initial trauma was a simple fall which caused radius and ulna fractures. Radiological assessment showed proper union of the fractures. We performed surgical exploration to the ulnar nerve. We found a trapped and damaged nerve in the fracture region. Even though the rate of complications about nerve injuries are extremely rare in forearm fractures, neurologic examinations should be performed before and after the reduction maneuvers. Neurologic examination will be not only a guide for fracture management but also an important point for medicolegal problems. [Hand Microsurg 2012; 1(1.000: 30-32

  3. Traumatic bilateral hip dislocation with bilateral sciatic nerve palsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ajay Pal Singh; Amarjit Singh Sidhu; Arun Pal Singh

    2010-01-01

    Bilateral hip dislocation rarely occurs.In this paper, a case of bilateral hip dislocation associated with bilateral sciatic nerve palsy resulted from a road traffic acci-dent is reported.Both hips were emergently reduced under general anaesthesia.Acetabular reconstruction was done bilaterally due to the unstable hips.The patient subsequently developed heterotopic ossification and avascular necrosis on the left hip and underwent total hip arthroplasty.The sciatic nerve on the right side achieved complete recovery but that on the left side only partly recovered and was aug-mented by tendon transfer.Such injuries are serious and one should be aware of the complications because they can resurface and so patients should be followed up for a long time.To the best of our knowledge, this kind of injury has not been reported in the English .language literature.

  4. Horizontal gaze palsy with progressive scoliosis: CT and MR findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bomfim, Rodrigo C.; Tavora, Daniel G.F.; Nakayama, Mauro; Gama, Romulo L. [Sarah Network of Rehabilitation Hospitals, Department of Radiology, Ceara (Brazil)

    2009-02-15

    Horizontal gaze palsy with progressive scoliosis (HGPPS) is a rare congenital disorder characterized by absence of conjugate horizontal eye movements and progressive scoliosis developing in childhood and adolescence. We present a child with clinical and neuroimaging findings typical of HGPPS. CT and MRI of the brain demonstrated pons hypoplasia, absence of the facial colliculi, butterfly configuration of the medulla and a deep midline pontine cleft. We briefly discuss the imaging aspects of this rare entity in light of the current literature. (orig.)

  5. Analysis of cranial CT-scan findings in cerebral palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, F.; Andoh, T.; Une, K.; Takamatsu, T. (Kitakyushu Municipal Sogo-Ryoiku Center (Japan))

    1981-06-01

    CT-scan findings of 87 cerebral palsied children were studied. They consist of 23 cases of spastic quadriplegia, 9 cases of diplegia, 12 cases of paraplegia, 24 cases of athetosis and mixed type, and 19 cases of hemiplegia. In the former four types, ventricular dilatation and cortical atrophy were measured and abnormal changes in cerebral substance and cerebellar atrophy were observed. Spastic quadriplegia showed most intense changes in every aspect of the abnormalities, while paraplegia had almost normal appearance. Athetosis and mixed type had moderate changes. Hemiplegia always showed asymmetrical view on CT-scan, dilatation of lateral ventricle or atrophy of hemisphere in contralateral side being observed.

  6. [A Case of Foramen Magnum Meningioma Manifesting as Hypoglossal Nerve Palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaka, Yasufumi; Otani, Naoki; Nishida, Sho; Ueno, Hideaki; Tomiyama, Arata; Tomura, Satoshi; Toyooka, Terushige; Wada, Kojiro; Mori, Kentaro

    2017-04-01

    We report a case of foramen magnum meningioma manifesting as hypoglossal nerve palsy. A 72-year-old woman presented with progressive hypoglossal nerve palsy and lingual atrophy on the left side. Gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging revealed a heterogeneously enhanced mass lesion with dural tail sign partially extending into the hypoglossal canal. The transcondylar approach was performed to expose the hypoglossal canal and resect the tumor completely. Histological examination revealed a transitional meningioma. The postoperative course was uneventful. Hypoglossal nerve palsy improved gradually after the operation.

  7. Two Cases of Elderly-Onset Hereditary Neuropathy with Liability to Pressure Palsy Manifesting Bilateral Peroneal Nerve Palsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norihiko Kawaguchi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (HNPP is characterized by recurrent focal neuropathies, which usually become symptomatic in the second or third decade of life. However, clinical phenotypic heterogeneity among patients with HNPP has recently been reported. Certain patients show polyneuropathy-type diffuse nerve injuries, whereas others remain asymptomatic at older ages. We present two cases of elderly-onset bilateral peroneal nerve palsies with diffuse muscle weakness in the lower limbs and glove-and-stocking type sensory disturbance. Both patients were diagnosed with HNPP by genetic analyses that detected deletions of chromosome 17p11.2 in peripheral myelin protein 22 genes. Their clinical courses suggested that the Japanese sitting style termed ‘seiza’, a way of sitting on the floor with the lower legs crossed under the thighs, was a precipitating factor for the bilateral peroneal nerve palsies.

  8. Transient facial nerve paralysis (Bell's palsy) following administration of hepatitis B recombinant vaccine: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, R; Stassen, L F A

    2014-01-01

    Bell's palsy is the sudden onset of unilateral transient paralysis of facial muscles resulting from dysfunction of the seventh cranial nerve. Presented here is a 26-year-old female patient with right lower motor neurone facial palsy following hepatitis B vaccination. Readers' attention is drawn to an uncommon cause of Bell's palsy, as a possible rare complication of hepatitis B vaccination, and steps taken to manage such a presentation.

  9. Facial nerve palsy as a primary presentation of advanced carcinoma of the prostate: An unusual occurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Abdulkadir

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: Facial nerve palsy as a primary presentation of advanced cancer of the prostate is unusual, thus, a high index of suspicion is required to establish the diagnosis. ADT provided adequate palliation.

  10. Facial nerve palsy: analysis of cases reported in children in a suburban hospital in Nigeria

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Folayan, M O; Arobieke, R I; Eziyi, E; Oyetola, E O; Elusiyan, J

    2014-01-01

    The study describes the epidemiology, treatment, and treatment outcomes of the 10 cases of facial nerve palsy seen in children managed at the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex, Ile...

  11. Intratemporal facial nerve neuromas and their mimics: CT and MR findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Moon Hee; Chang, Kee Hyun; Lee, Kyung Hwan; Cha, Sang Hoon; Kim, Chong Sun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Joon [Chungang Gil General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-05-15

    CT and MR findings of nine cases with intra temporal facial nerve neuromas were described and compared with CT findings of 3 cases with facial nerve palsy and facial nerve canal erosion which may mimic facial nerve neuroma. The tympanic segment of the facial nerve was involved in 8 cases, mastoid segment in 7 cases and labyrinthine segment in 5 cases. The lesions were easily diagnosed with high resolution CT with bone algorithms by showing the expansion of bony structures along the course of the facial nerves. In 4 cases with large vertical segment tumors, extensive destruction of mastoid air cells and external auditory canals posed difficulty in making a diagnosis. Two out of 5 cases with labyrinthine segment involvement were presented as middle cranial fossa masses. MRI with enhancement was performed in 4 cases and was useful in characterizing the lesion as a tumor with its superior sensitivity to enhancement. Three cases of facial neuroma-mimicking lesion including post-inflammatory peri neural thickening, peri neural extension from parotid adenoid cystic carcinoma, and congenita; cholesteatoma showed irregular erosion or mild expansion of the facial nerve canal which may be helpful for differential diagnosis from neuromas.

  12. Abducens Nerve Palsy and Ipsilateral Horner Syndrome in a Patient With Carotid-Cavernous Fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kal, Ali; Ercan, Zeynep E; Duman, Enes; Arpaci, Enver

    2015-10-01

    The combination of abducens nerve palsy and ipsilateral Horner syndrome was first described by Parkinson and considered as a localizing sign of posterior cavernous sinus lesions. The authors present a case with right abducens nerve palsy with ipsilateral Horner syndrome in a patient with carotid-cavernous fistula because of head trauma. The patient was referred to the ophthalmology clinic with diplopia complaint after suffering a head trauma during a motorcycle accident. Cerebral angiography showed low-flow carotid-cavernous fistula.

  13. Recurrent isolated oculomotor nerve palsy after radiation of a mesencephalic metastasis. Case report and mini-review.

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    Olga eGrabau

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Recurrent oculomotor nerve palsies are extremely rare clinical conditions. Case report: Here, we report on a unique case of a short-lasting recurrent unilateral incomplete external and complete internal oculomotor nerve palsy. The episodic palsies were probably caused by an ipsilateral mesencephalic metastasis of a breast carcinoma and occurred after successful brain radiation therapy. Discussion: While the pathogenic mechanism remains unclear, the recurrent sudden onset and disappearance of the palsies and their decreasing frequency after antiepileptic treatment suggest the occurrence of epilepsy-like brainstem seizures. A review of case reports of spontaneous reversible oculomotor nerve palsies is presented.

  14. Motor palsies of cranial nerves (excluding VII) after vaccination: reports to the US Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Emily Jane; Winiecki, Scott K; Ou, Alan C

    2014-01-01

    We reviewed cranial nerve palsies, other than VII, that have been reported to the US Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS). We examined patterns for differences in vaccine types, seriousness, age, and clinical characteristics. We identified 68 reports of cranial nerve palsies, most commonly involving the oculomotor (III), trochlear (IV), and abducens (VI) nerves. Isolated cranial nerve palsies, as well as palsies occurring as part of a broader clinical entity, were reported. Forty reports (59%) were classified as serious, suggesting that a cranial nerve palsy may sometimes be the harbinger of a broader and more ominous clinical entity, such as a stroke or encephalomyelitis. There was no conspicuous clustering of live vs. inactivated vaccines. The patient age range spanned the spectrum from infants to the elderly. Independent data may help to clarify whether, when, and to what extent the rates of cranial nerve palsies following particular vaccines may exceed background levels.

  15. Iatrogenic cushing syndrome to facial nerve palsy: via intracranial tuberculoma-an interesting journey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Subrata

    2014-12-01

    Isolated Facial nerve palsy is a less common neurological manifestation of intracranial tuberculoma. Again, tuberculoma can arise following development of Cushing syndrome after prolonged intake of steroids due to origin of immunosuppressed state. Thus exogenous steroid administration leading to iatrogenic Cushing Syndrome which again causing tuberculoma, with facial nerve palsy developing as a manifestation of tuberculoma is not unnatural but definitely a unique scenario. The author reports an interesting case where a patient developed left sided facial palsy following development of intracranial tuberculoma from iatrogenic Cushing syndrome after longterm intake of Dexamethasone as a treatment for low back pain. This situation is rarely reported before.

  16. Isolated oculomotor nerve palsy caused by cavernous sinus dural arteriovenous fistula: Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ihn, Yon Kwon; Jung, Won Sang [The Catholic Univ. of Korea, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Bum Soo [The Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Cavernous dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF), which usually presents with conjunctival injection, proptosis, loss of visual acuity, and ophthalmoplegia, is a rare cause of ophthalmoplegia. Thus, it may be overlooked when the typical symptoms are lacking. There have been some cavernous DAVF case reports presenting with isolated oculomotor, abducens and trochlear nerve palsy. We report a patient presenting with isolated oculomotor palsy, caused by cavernous DAVF, which was treated by transvenous coil embolization. This case suggests that cavernous DAVF should be considered in the differential diagnosis of isolated oculomotor nerve palsy and for which case - selective angiography and embolization may be helpful in reaching a diagnosis and providing a guide for optimal treatment.

  17. Relationship between CT findings and electroencephalograms of children with cerebral palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirata, Yoshiaki; Nakano, Masao; Soumiya, Kyoichi; Ito, Masamitsu; Asano, Seiji (Hamamatsu Medical Center Hospital, Shizuoka (Japan)); Tsukimura, Yasuharu

    1983-10-01

    Electroencephalograms and CT findings of 43 infants with cerebral palsy were evaluated. Nineteen of them (44%) had abnormal findings of CT. The incidences of epileptic attacks and abnormal electroencephalograms were 33% and 84% in each group, respectively, with no differences between a normal-CT group and an abnormal-CT one. In electroencephalograms, positive spikes did not correlate with abnormal CT findings, but abnormal basal waves, particularly, low voltage dysrhythmia did well. Lazy activity also correlated with the abnormal CT findings.

  18. A Case of Transient, Isolated Cranial Nerve VI Palsy due to Skull Base Osteomyelitis

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    Brijesh Patel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Otitis externa affects both children and adults. It is often treated with topical antibiotics, with good clinical outcomes. When a patient fails to respond to the treatment, otitis externa can progress to malignant otitis externa. The common symptoms of skull bone osteomyelitis include ear ache, facial pain, and cranial nerve palsies. However, an isolated cranial nerve is rare. Herein, we report a case of 54-year-old female who presented with left cranial nerve VI palsy due to skull base osteomyelitis which responded to antibiotic therapy.

  19. Delayed Femoral Nerve Palsy Associated with Iliopsoas Hematoma after Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty

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    Sandeep Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Femoral nerve neuropathy after total hip arthroplasty is rare but catastrophic complication. Pain and quadriceps muscle weakness caused by this complication can significantly affect the functional outcome. Here we present a case report, describing delayed onset femoral nerve palsy associated with iliopsoas hematoma following pseudoaneurysm of a branch of profunda femoris artery after 3 months of primary total hip arthroplasty in an 80-year-old female patient with single kidney. Hip arthroplasty was done for painful primary osteoarthritis of left hip. Diagnosis of femoral nerve palsy was made by clinical examination and computed tomography imaging of pelvis. Patient was managed by surgical evacuation of hematoma and physiotherapy. The patient’s clinical symptoms were improved after surgical evacuation of hematoma. This is the first case report of its kind in English literature regarding delayed onset femoral nerve palsy after primary total hip arthroplasty due to pseudoaneurysm of a branch of profunda femoris artery without any obvious precipitating factor.

  20. Guillain-Barre Syndrome Presenting With Bilateral Facial Nerve Palsy

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    Soroor INALOO

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract How to Cite This Article: Inaloo S, Katibeh P. Guillain-Barre Syndrome Presenting With Bilateral Facial Nerve Palsy. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Winter;8(1:69-71. Objective This case study is about an 11-year-old girl with bilateral facial weakness, abnormal taste sensation, and deep tendon reflexes of both knees and ankles were absent. However, the muscle power of the lower and upper extremities across all muscle groups was normal. After 2 days, she developed paresthesia and numbness in the lower extremities. Other neurologic examinations, such as fundoscopic evaluation of the retina were normal with the muscle power of both upper- and lower-extremities intact. A lumbar puncture revealed albumincytological dissociation. EMG and NCV were in favor of Guillain-Barre syndrome, for which IVIG was prescribed and the abnormal sensations in the lower limbs rapidly improved. Bilateral facial diplegia without weakness and paresthesia is a variant of Guillain-Barre syndrome that mostly presents with acute onset, rapid progression with or without limb weakness, paresthesia, and decreased or absent DTR and albumin-cytological dissociation.

  1. Characteristics of the perception for unilateral facial nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mun, Sue Jean; Park, Kyung Tae; Kim, Yoonjoong; Park, Joo Hyun; Kim, Young Ho

    2015-11-01

    Patients with facial nerve palsy (FNP) are actually evaluated by other people rather than doctors or the patients themselves. This study was performed to investigate the characteristics of the perception of unilateral FNP in Korean people. A questionnaire using photographs of four patients with four different grades (House-Brackmann) of FNP was given to two hundred people with no FNP. Subjects of each gender, ranging from 20 to 69 years of age, participated. The questionnaire, showing facial expressions of resting, smiling, whistling, eye closing, and frowning, consisted of questions concerning the identification and the involved side of FNP, the unnatural areas of the face, and the unnaturalness of the facial expressions. The overall identification rate of FNP was 75.0%. The identification rate increased according to the increase in the grade of the patient's FNP (p FNP according to education level. However, the overall detection rate of the involved side was higher in the high-education group (p FNP was lower than the rate of identification of FNP and was significantly low in the middle-aged/elderly and low-education level groups.

  2. Operative Management of Sciatic Nerve Palsy due to Impingement on the Metal Cage after Total Hip Revision: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Bistolfi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses a sciatic nerve palsy developed after a right total hip revision with a Burch-Schneider metal cage. A sciatalgic nerve pain appeared after surgery, while the palsy developed in about fifteen days. An electromyography showed the delay of the nerve impulse gluteal level. During the surgical exploration of the hip, a compression of the nerve on the metal cage was observed. The nerve was isolated, released from the fibrotic tissue and from the impingement, and was protected with a muscular flap. The recover from the pain was immediate, while the palsy recovered one month later.

  3. An unusual case of isolated sixth cranial nerve palsy in leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaishampayan, Sanjeev; Borde, Priyanka

    2012-08-15

    Cranial nerve involvement is not common in leprosy. The fifth and seventh cranial nerves are the most commonly affected in leprosy. Herein we present a patient with Hansen disease (BL) with type I reaction who developed isolated involvement of the sixth cranial nerve leading to lateral rectus muscle palsy. He responded to timely anti-reactional therapy and it produced a good response. Careful observation of patients with lepra reaction is needed to avoid damage to important organs.

  4. Posterior communicating artery aneurysm in a 20 year old boy presenting as non-isolated third nerve palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H C Obiudu

    2009-01-01

    Result: A clinical diagnosis of left third and fourth cranial nerve palsies from intracranial space-occupying lesion was made. Computed tomography and computed tomography angiography confirmed left posterior communicating artery aneurysm. Conclusion: Any degree of pupillary involvement in third nerve palsy, whether isolated or not should warrant neuroimaging in view of the high mortality risk from intracranial aneurysms.

  5. Variant Anterior Digastric Muscle Transfer for Marginal Mandibular Branch of Facial Nerve Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J. Zdilla, DC

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Marginal mandibular branch of facial nerve (MMBFN palsy is a common consequence of head and neck surgeries. MMBFN palsy results in paralysis of muscles which depress the inferior lip. Current management of MMBFN palsy involves ruination of normal neuromuscular anatomy and physiology to restore symmetry to the mouth. The article outlines the possibility to transfer variant anterior digastric musculature to accomplish reanimation of the mouth without adversely affecting normal nonvariant anatomy. The procedure may have the additional cosmetic benefit of correcting asymmetrical muscular bulk in the submental region.

  6. Central pontine myelinolysis presenting as isolated sixth nerve palsy in third trimester of pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tushar Divakar Gosavi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 30-year-old primigravida presented with isolated left sixth nerve palsy at 38 weeks gestation. Her MRI showed a lesion consistent with central pontine myelinolysis (CPM. Extensive investigations did not reveal any secondary cause for the CPM. She recovered spontaneously in 2 weeks with complete resolution of her MRI changes. To our knowledge, this is the first report of CPM occurring in third trimester in the absence of identifiable secondary causes and of CPM presenting as an isolated sixth nerve palsy. We discuss the reported causes of CPM in pregnancy, possible pathophysiologic mechanisms involved and the anatomic basis of the unique clinical presentation of sixth nerve palsy in our case.

  7. Palpebral spring in the management of lagophthalmos and exposure keratopathy secondary to facial nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirci, Hakan; Frueh, Bartley R

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the use of a palpebral spring, a dynamic facial reanimation technique, in the management of lagophthalmos and exposure keratopathy secondary to facial nerve palsy. A palpebral spring was placed in 29 eyelids of 28 patients with symptomatic facial nerve palsy. Preoperative and postoperative symptoms, upper eyelid margin to midpupil distance, lagophthalmos, and exposure keratopathy were evaluated. At an average of 83 months follow-up, preoperative symptoms improved or resolved in 26 (90%) eyes. The upper eyelid margin to midpupil distance decreased and lagophthalmos and exposure keratopathy significantly improved after palpebral spring placement (p lagophthalmos and exposure keratopathy in patients with facial nerve palsy who do not receive adequate relief from the static procedures of lower eyelid tightening and upper eyelid lowering. This technique significantly improved symptoms and signs in these patients while allowing some of the blink reflex.

  8. A Case of Oculomotor Nerve Palsy and Choroidal Tuberculous Granuloma Associated with Tuberculous Meningoencephalitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Sunghyuk; Chang, Woohyok

    2008-01-01

    We report a rare case of oculomotor nerve palsy and choroidal tuberculous granuloma associated with tuberculous meningoencephalitis. A 15-year-old male visited our hospital for an acute drop of the left eyelid and diplopia. He has been on anti-tuberculous drugs (isoniazid, rifampin) for 1 year for his tuberculous encephalitis. A neurological examination revealed a conscious clear patient with isolated left oculomotor nerve palsy, which manifested as ptosis, and a fundus examination revealed choroidal tuberculoma. Other anti-tuberculous drugs (pyrazinamide, ethambutol) and a steroid (dexamethasone) were added. After 3 months on this medication, ptosis of the left upper eyelid improved and the choroidal tuberculoma decreasedin size, but a right homonymous visual field defect remained. When a patient with tuberculous meningitis presents with abrupt onset oculomotor nerve palsy, rapid re-diagnosis should be undertaken and proper treatment initiated, because the prognosis is critically dependent on the timing of adequate treatment. PMID:18784452

  9. Horner's syndrome and contralateral abducens nerve palsy associated with zoster meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Bum-Joo; Kim, Ji-Soo; Hwang, Jeong-Min

    2013-12-01

    A 55-year-old woman presented with diplopia following painful skin eruptions on the right upper extremity. On presentation, she was found to have 35 prism diopters of esotropia and an abduction limitation in the left eye. Two weeks later, she developed blepharoptosis and anisocoria with a smaller pupil in the right eye, which increased in the darkness. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed pleocytosis and a positive result for immunoglobulin G antibody to varicella zoster virus. She was diagnosed to have zoster meningitis with Horner's syndrome and contralateral abducens nerve palsy. After intravenous antiviral and steroid treatments, the vesicular eruptions and abducens nerve palsy improved. Horner's syndrome and diplopia resolved after six months. Here we present the first report of Horner's syndrome and contralateral abducens nerve palsy associated with zoster meningitis.

  10. A guide to the evaluation of fourth cranial nerve palsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee; Hayman; Beaver; Prager; Kelder; Scasta; Avilla; von Noorden GK; Tang

    1998-12-01

    PURPOSE To devise a cost-effective guide for the evaluation of fourth nerve palsies (FNP). METHODS A review of the pertinent English language literature was performed to devise a guide for the evaluation (including neuroimaging) of FNP. The authors report a retrospective review of imaging studies performed on 206 patients with FNP. RESULTS The literature was used to develop the imaging guide. In the retrospective chart review of 206 patients from two tertiary care centers, 28 patients (13.6%) underwent a computed tomography scan and/or a magnetic resonance scan. Of these patients, five had associated neurological symptoms (non-isolated), one was traumatic, five were congenital, four were vasculopathic, eleven were non-vasculopathic, and two were progressive. Following the recommendations of the imaging guide, the five isolated congenital FNP and the four isolated vasculopathic FNP would not have undergone neuroimaging studies. The total costs of these neuroimaging studies in these nine patients were 19,000 dollars. Four patients in the retrospective review with associated neurological deficits (non-isolated) should have undergone neuroimaging according to the guide, but did not. CONCLUSIONS Although the evaluation of FNP can be difficult, the decision to order neuroimaging can be improved by using an imaging guide. An imaging guide for the evaluation of FNP may allow more appropriate and cost-effective imaging of these patients. Isolated congenital, old traumatic, or vasculopathic FNP do not require neuroimaging studies. Patients with non-isolated FNP should have directed neuroimaging studies based upon the results of clinical examination.

  11. CT findings in cerebral palsy - An attempt at clinico-radiological correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Hyo Keun; Lee, Kil Woo; Choo, In Wook; Kim, Mee Kang; Bae, Sang Hoon [Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Mun Gyu [Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-07-15

    CT scans of one hundred-three children with cerebral palsy were analyzed retrospectively and correlated with various clinical assessment. Incidence of pathologic CT scans was 71% and most common pathology was brain atrophy (45%). Other pathology consisted of brain anomaly (13%), infarction (11%), hydrocephalus (6%), porencephalic cyst (6%), diffuse periventricular low density (5%) and pathologic calcification (4%). No statistically significant correlation could be found between the types of cerebral palsy and incidence of pathologic CT findings. Higher incidence of pathologic CT scans could be shown in the group that physical handicap was severe and etiological factor was prenatal or postnatal and in the patients with seizure.

  12. Primary central nervous system lymphoma presenting as isolated oculomotor nerve palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terence Tan, MBBS

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The authors report an unusual case of primary central nervous system lymphoma presenting with isolated pupil-involved oculomotor nerve palsy. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated leptomeningeal involvement of the midbrain and interpeduncular cistern, a single hypothalamic lesion, and intraventricular involvement. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma was confirmed by stereotactic intraventricular biopsy. Combination chemotherapy with methotrexate, vincristine, procarbazine and rituximab was instituted with resolution of oculomotor nerve palsy and complete disease remission. An interdisciplinary approach involving neurosurgeons, neuroradiologists, neuropathologists and neurologists is crucial in the management of primary central nervous system lymphoma.

  13. Bilateral Facial Nerve Palsy in Acute B Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Shiraj; Gupta, Arjun; Friedman, Paul; Naina, Harris V

    2016-06-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a haematological malignancy that can involve the central nervous system (CNS). Less than 10 % of patients with ALL have CNS involvement at presentation. The cranial nerve most commonly affected is cranial nerve VII although bilateral involvement is rare. Management and outcomes of these patients are not well understood. Moreover bilateral Bells palsy as a presenting symptom of ALL is extremely uncommon. We report a very unusual presentation of ALL with bilateral facial nerve palsy, and discuss the management strategies and outcomes for patients with ALL that present with cranial nerve palsies.

  14. Correlative CT and anatomic study of the sciatic nerve

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    Pech, P.; Haughton, V.

    1985-05-01

    Sciatica can be caused by numerous processes affecting the sciatic nerve or its components within the pelvis including tumors, infectious diseases, aneurysms, fractures, and endometriosis. The CT diagnosis of these causes of sciatica has not been emphasized. This study identified the course and appearance of the normal sciatic nerve in the pelvis by correlating CT and anatomic slices in cadavers. For purposes of discussion, the sciatic nerve complex is conveniently divided into three parts: presacral, muscular, and ischial. Each part is illustrated here by two cryosections with corresponding CT images.

  15. Oberlin partial ulnar nerve transfer for restoration in obstetric brachial plexus palsy of a newborn: case report

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    Kawamura Kenji

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An 8 month old male infant with Erb's birth palsy was treated with two peripheral nerve transfers. Except for rapid motor reinnervations, elbow flexion was obtained by an Oberlin's partial ulnar nerve transfer, while shoulder abduction was restored by an accessory-to-suprascapular nerve transfer. The initial contraction of the biceps muscle occurred two months after surgery. Forty months after surgery, elbow flexion reached M5 without functional loss of the ulnar nerve. This case demonstrates an excellent result of an Oberlin's nerve transfer for restoration of flexion of the elbow joint in Erb's birth palsy. However, at this time partial ulnar nerve transfer for Erb's birth palsy is an optional procedure; a larger number of cases will need to be studied for it to be widely accepted as a standard procedure for Erb's palsy at birth.

  16. Distal Ulna Fracture With Delayed Ulnar Nerve Palsy in a Baseball Player.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasque, Charles B; Pearson, Clark; Margo, Bradley; Ethel, Robert

    2016-02-01

    We present a case report of a college baseball player who sustained a blunt-trauma, distal-third ulna fracture from a thrown ball with delayed presentation of ulnar nerve palsy. Even after his ulna fracture had healed, the nerve injury made it difficult for the athlete to control a baseball while throwing, resulting in a delayed return to full baseball activity for 3 to 4 months. He had almost complete nerve recovery by 6 months after his injury and complete nerve recovery by 1 year after his injury.

  17. Frequency of the superior rectus muscle overaction/contracture syndrome in unilateral fourth nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, Andrea; Ugrin, Maria Cristina

    2009-12-01

    Superior oblique palsy is accompanied in most cases by overaction of the muscle's ipsilateral antagonist, the inferior oblique muscle. Overaction and contracture of the ipsilateral superior rectus muscle in patients with unilateral fourth (trochlear) nerve palsy is seldom discussed in the literature. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the frequency of superior rectus muscle overaction/contracture syndrome in patients with unilateral trochlear nerve palsy. The records of 198 patients with unilateral trochlear nerve palsy examined by the authors between July 1987 and July 2008 were reviewed retrospectively. All patients underwent complete eye examination with measurement of the deviation in the 9 positions of gaze and with the head tilted to both sides in all cooperative patients. Selection criteria for superior rectus muscle overaction/contracture syndrome in these patients were as follows: vertical deviation of 15(Delta) or larger in primary position, equal or larger hypertropia with the ipsilateral forced tilt test than with the eyes looking straight ahead, more than 5(Delta) hypertropia of the affected eye in horizontal gaze to the same side, hypertropia in all upgazes, and overaction of the contralateral superior oblique muscle. Of 198 patients, 33 (16.6%) met the selection criteria for superior rectus muscle overaction/contracture syndrome. Superior rectus muscle overaction/contracture syndrome frequently occurs in unilateral superior oblique palsy.

  18. CLIVUS METASTASIS PRESENTING AS ISOLATED ABDUCEN S NERVE PALSY – CASE REPORT

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    Chandrashekhar

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: A 50 year old lady with past history of breast carcinoma surgery presented with progressive diplopia of 15 days duration. Examination revealed paresis of right abducens nerve. Though risk factor like Hypertension was present, patient was ordered MRI which showed Clivus and verte bral metastatic foci highly suggestive of metastasis from breast carcinoma. The patient was referred for radiation therapy. Hence, meticulous neuroophthalmic examination and management is necessary to rule out localised metastasis causing isolated abducens nerve palsy.

  19. Rare Presentation of Rhino-Orbital-Cerebral Zygomycosis: Bilateral Facial Nerve Palsy

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    Alireza Mohebbi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhino-orbital-cerebral zygomycosis afflicts primarily diabetics and immunocompromised individual, but can also occur in normal hosts rarely. We here presented an interesting case of facial nerve palsy and multiple cold abscesses of neck due to rhino-orbital-cerebral zygomycosis in an otherwise healthy man. Although some reports of facial nerve paralysis in conjunction with rhino-orbital-cerebral zygomycosis exist, no case of bilateral complete facial paralysis has been reported in the literature to date.

  20. Post-traumatic acute bilateral facial nerve palsy - a management dilemma

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    Kumar Rakesh

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute bilateral facial nerve paralysis is a rare clinical entity, and its management remains very controversial (operative or conservative. Here we are presenting a case of acute onset bilateral facial nerve palsy following head injury with bilateral temporal bone fracture with clinico-radiographic contrary. Patient was managed conservatively with complete recovery. By this article, authors want to stress on combining clinical examination and radiological findings for decision making of this rare entity and tried to evaluate the management.

  1. Bell palsy in lyme disease-endemic regions of canada: a cautionary case of occult bilateral peripheral facial nerve palsy due to Lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Karen; Melanson, Michel; Desai, Jamsheed A

    2012-09-01

    Lyme disease caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi is a multisystem disorder characterized by three clinical stages: dermatologic, neurologic, and rheumatologic. The number of known Lyme disease-endemic areas in Canada is increasing as the range of the vector Ixodes scapularis expands into the eastern and central provinces. Southern Ontario, Nova Scotia, southern Manitoba, New Brunswick, and southern Quebec are now considered Lyme disease-endemic regions in Canada. The use of field surveillance to map risk and endemic regions suggests that these geographic areas are growing, in part due to the effects of climate warming. Peripheral facial nerve palsy is the most common neurologic abnormality in the second stage of Lyme borreliosis, with up to 25% of Bell palsy (idiopathic peripheral facial nerve palsy) occurring due to Lyme disease. Here we present a case of occult bilateral facial nerve palsy due to Lyme disease initially diagnosed as Bell palsy. In Lyme disease-endemic regions of Canada, patients presenting with unilateral or bilateral peripheral facial nerve palsy should be evaluated for Lyme disease with serologic testing to avoid misdiagnosis. Serologic testing should not delay initiation of appropriate treatment for presumed Bell palsy.

  2. Posterior interosseous nerve palsy by synovial cyst of proximal radioulnar joint: our experience after 5 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monacelli, G; Ceci, F; Prezzemoli, G; Spagnoli, A; Lotito, S; Irace, S

    2011-06-01

    The posterior interosseous nerve palsy is a neuropathy of radial nerve interesting its deep motor branch. The neuropathy can appear with a hollow in the proximal half of the forearm without significant swelling, a complete loss of extension of the fingers with radial deviation of the wrist during extension. In some cases, PIN compression may simulate tendon rupture in rheumatologic diseases, because the pain and the paralysis occur suddenly, so often can be difficult to make a diagnosis. The palsy is caused by compression of the posterior interosseous nerve from soft tissue tumours or tumour-like masses: ganglions, lipomas, rheumatoid synovitis, synovial chondromatosis, fibromas, neurofibromas, bursitis, synovial cysts of the elbow and radioulnar proximal joints. The aim of our research was to individuate the better treatment for the posterior interosseous nerve palsy. From 2002 to 2007 we examined 8 patients: 2 female and 6 male. Median age was 43 years. The diagnosis was made by clinical examination, ultrasound, nerve conduction studies and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Patients underwent to decompressing posterior interosseous nerve surgery. After the surgical exploration in 8 cases a globular mass of around 2.5 cm to 4.5 cm diameter was discovered. At the histological examination, a synovial cyst of the elbow joint was found in 7 out of 8 patients and an hemangioma tumor in the one remaining patient. 12 months was the median time for a complete recovery after the operation, confirmed by EMG. The surgical treatment offers a complete resolution in all cases.

  3. FDG-PET/CT can rule out malignancy in patients with vocal cord palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Anders; Nielsen, Anne Lerberg; Lauridsen, Jeppe Kiilerich;

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the performance of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET/CT to rule out malignancy in patients with confirmed vocal cord palsy (VCP). Between January 2011 and June 2013, we retrospectively included consecutive patients referred to PET/CT with paresis or paralysis of one or both...

  4. Facial nerve palsy: Analysis of cases reported in children in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-02-28

    Feb 28, 2013 ... Methodology: This was a retrospective cohort review of pediatric cases of facial ... Key words: Children, facial nerve, malaria, mumps, Nigeria, palsy ... Lyme disease has surpassed otitis media as a cause of the ..... reactions and unknown infectious agents. .... The associated fever makes this a possibility.

  5. Orthodromic Transfer of the Temporalis Muscle in Incomplete Facial Nerve Palsy

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    Jae Ho Aum

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Temporalis muscle transfer produces prompt surgical results with a one-stage operation in facial palsy patients. The orthodromic method is surgically simple, and the vector of muscle action is similar to the temporalis muscle action direction. This article describes transferring temporalis muscle insertion to reconstruct incomplete facial nerve palsy patients.Methods Between August 2009 and November 2011, 6 unilateral incomplete facial nerve palsy patients underwent surgery for orthodromic temporalis muscle transfer. A preauricular incision was performed to expose the mandibular coronoid process. Using a saw, the coronoid process was transected. Three strips of the fascia lata were anchored to the muscle of the nasolabial fold through subcutaneous tunneling. The tension of the strips was adjusted by observing the shape of the nasolabial fold. When optimal tension was achieved, the temporalis muscle was sutured to the strips. The surgical results were assessed by comparing pre- and postoperative photographs. Three independent observers evaluated the photographs.Results The symmetry of the mouth corner was improved in the resting state, and movement of the oral commissure was enhanced in facial animation after surgery.Conclusions The orthodromic transfer of temporalis muscle technique can produce prompt results by applying the natural temporalis muscle vector. This technique preserves residual facial nerve function in incomplete facial nerve palsy patients and produces satisfying cosmetic outcomes without malar muscle bulging, which often occurs in the turn-over technique.

  6. The use of galantamine in the treatment of post-traumatic oculomotor and trochlear nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokarz-Sawińska, Ewa; Lachowicz, Ewelina; Gosławski, Wojciech

    2013-01-01

    To assess the suitability of galantamine for the symptomatic treatment of post-traumatic oculomotor (III) and trochlear (IV) nerve palsy. The routine ophthalmic and strabological examination was performed in five patients (4 females and 1 male) at the age of 31 to 57 years (mean 40.7) with the post-traumatic ophthalmic complications. Due to the unilateral oculomotor and trochlear nerve palsy, which had not resolved within 2-6 (mean duration of 4 months) months following traffic accident, galantamine was used. Nivalin and Reminyl were administered in iontophoresis and orally, respectively, for 10-18 months (mean duration of 14 months). The ocular muscle motion exercises and prism correction were also used. The increased range of ocular motion (100%), reducing of the angle of strabismus horizontally (40%) and vertically (60%), statistically significant extension of palpebral fissure (60%), and regression of diplopia (80% total without correction) were observed. The binocular vision after treatment in the free- and instrument-space environment were also improved (100% simultaneous perception, fusion 80%, stereopsis 60%). The early galantamine administration in patient with n. III and n. IV post-traumatic palsy accelerates the resolution of post-traumatic ophthalmic symptoms. It is an effective treatment which offers the elimination of strabismus, diplopia and ptosis, at the same time improvings ocular movements and binocular vision. galantamine, post-traumatic nerve palsy, oculomotor and trochlear nerves.

  7. Recurrent 6th nerve palsy in a child following different live attenuated vaccines: case report

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    Cheng Daryl R

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recurrent benign 6th nerve palsy in the paediatric age group is uncommon, but has been described following viral and bacterial infections. It has also been temporally associated with immunization, but has not been previously described following two different live attenuated vaccines. Case presentation A case is presented of a 12 month old Caucasian boy with recurrent benign 6th nerve palsy following measles-mumps-rubella and varicella vaccines, given on separate occasions with complete recovery following each episode. No alternate underlying etiology was identified despite extensive investigations and review. Conclusions The majority of benign 6th nerve palsies do not have a sinister cause and have an excellent prognosis, with recovery expected in most cases. The exact pathophysiology is unknown, although hypotheses including autoimmune mechanisms and direct viral invasion could explain the pathophysiology behind immunization related nerve palsies. It is important to rule out other aetiologies with thorough history, physical examination and investigations. There is limited information in the literature regarding the safety of a repeat dose of a live vaccine in this setting. Future immunizations should be considered on a case-by-case basis.

  8. Müllerectomy for upper eyelid retraction and lagophthalmos due to facial nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Adam S; Frueh, Bartley R; Elner, Victor M

    2005-09-01

    Facial nerve palsy often results in symptoms of ocular irritation due to inadequate eyelid closure. Weakened protractor function results in relative upper eyelid retraction and contributes to lagophthalmos. To evaluate the role of müllerectomy in the comprehensive surgical treatment of ocular exposure due to facial nerve palsy. Thirty-four patients with chronic facial nerve palsy underwent unilateral transconjunctival removal of Müller muscle and were followed up for an average of 20 months postoperatively. Other procedures were performed to treat lower eyelid retraction, as required. Preoperative and postoperative ocular exposure symptoms, upper eyelid position, lagophthalmos, and keratopathy were compared. Of the 59 preoperative symptoms, 15 (25%) resolved and 39 (66%) improved. Upper eyelid position was lowered by an average of 1.35 mm (PLagophthalmos (P = .002) and corneal exposure (P<.001) were significantly improved. Three patients required levator aponeurosis repair, 2 for preexisting dehiscence and 1 for inadvertent aponeurosis transection. Müllerectomy is a rapid, safe, and reproducible surgical method for lowering the upper eyelid and reducing ocular exposure symptoms and signs due to chronic facial nerve palsy.

  9. MRI negative meningeal myeloma with abducens nerve palsies responding to intrathecal chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisold, A; Weber, C; Hainfellner, J; Gisslinger, H; Kasprian, G; Auff, E; Sycha, T; Grisold, W

    2014-12-15

    Meningeal involvement of multiple myeloma is rare. A patient with multiple myeloma presented with bilateral abducens nerve palsies. In the MRI neither lytic skull lesions nor meningeal enhancement could be found. The diagnosis was based on CSF studies and cytology. A neurologic remission was achieved with intrathecal chemotherapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Bilateral facial nerve palsy in a newly diagnosed diabetic patient with associated herpes labialis

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    Manish Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bilateral facial nerve palsy is a very rare condition, usually following neurologic, neoplastic, traumatic, infective or metabolic causes. We present here a case of 29-year-old male, diagnosed on admission as diabetic with herpes labialis and bilateral facial paralysis. As the differentials are extensive, diagnostic workup and subsequent treatment should be done keeping various etiological factors in mind.

  11. Postpartum pituitary apoplexy with isolated oculomotor nerve palsy: A rare medical emergency

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    Sujeet Raina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary apoplexy is a clinical syndrome characterized by sudden onset headache, visual deficits, ophthalmoplegia, altered mental status, and hormonal dysfunction due to an expanding mass within the sella turcica resulting from hemorrhage or infarction of pituitary gland. We report a case of pituitary apoplexy that developed in postpartum period following postpartum hemorrhage and presented with isolated third cranial nerve palsy.

  12. Sellar Chordoma Presenting as Pseudo-macroprolactinoma with Unilateral Third Cranial Nerve Palsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-feng Wang; Hong-xi Ma; Cheng-yuan Ma; Yi-nan Luo; Peng-fei Ge

    2012-01-01

    We described a 61-year-old female with a sellar chordoma,which presented as pseudo-macroprolactinoma with unilateral third cranial nerve palsy.Physical examination revealed that her right upper lid could not be raised by itself,right eyeball movement limited to the abduction direction,right pupil dilated to 4.5 mm with negative reaction to light,and hemianopsia in bitemporal sides.CT scanning showed a hyperdense lesion at sellar region without bone destruction.Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed the tumor was 2.3 cm×1.8 cm×2.6 cm,with iso-intensity on T1WI,hyper-intensity on T2WI and heterogeneous enhancement on contrast imaging.Endocrine examination showed her serum prolactin level increased to 1,031.49 mlU/ml.The tumor was sub-totally resected via pterional craniotomy under microscope and was histologically proven to be a chordoma.Postoperatively,she recovered uneventfully but ptosis and hemianopsia remained at the 6th month.

  13. Nerve canals at the fundus of the internal auditory canal on high-resolution temporal bone CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Yoon Ha; Youn, Eun Kyung; Kim, Seung Chul [Sungkyunkwan Univ., School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-12-01

    To identify and evaluate the normal anatomy of nerve canals in the fundus of the internal auditory canal which can be visualized on high-resolution temporal bone CT. We retrospectively reviewed high-resolution (1 mm thickness and interval contiguous scan) temporal bone CT images of 253 ears in 150 patients who had not suffered trauma or undergone surgery. Those with a history of uncomplicated inflammatory disease were included, but those with symptoms of vertigo, sensorineural hearing loss, or facial nerve palsy were excluded. Three radiologists determined the detectability and location of canals for the labyrinthine segment of the facial, superior vestibular and cochlear nerve, and the saccular branch and posterior ampullary nerve of the inferior vestibular nerve. Five bony canals in the fundus of the internal auditory canal were identified as nerve canals. Four canals were identified on axial CT images in 100% of cases; the so-called singular canal was identified in only 68%. On coronal CT images, canals for the labyrinthine segment of the facial and superior vestibular nerve were seen in 100% of cases, but those for the cochlear nerve, the saccular branch of the inferior vestibular nerve, and the singular canal were seen in 90.1%, 87.4% and 78% of cases, respectiveIy. In all detectable cases, the canal for the labyrinthine segment of the facial nerve was revealed as one which traversed anterolateralIy, from the anterosuperior portion of the fundus of the internal auditory canal. The canal for the cochlear nerve was located just below that for the labyrinthine segment of the facial nerve, while that canal for the superior vestibular nerve was seen at the posterior aspect of these two canals. The canal for the saccular branch of the inferior vestibular nerve was located just below the canal for the superior vestibular nerve, and that for the posterior ampullary nerve, the so-called singular canal, ran laterally or posteolateralIy from the posteroinferior aspect of

  14. Case Study of Oriental Medicine Treatment with Acupotomy Therapy of the Peroneal Nerve Palsy through Ultrasound Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Sungha

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In order to estimate clinical effects of Oriental Medicine Treatment with acupotomy therapy of Peroneal nerve Palsy. Methods: From 10th June, 2010 to 19th June, 2010, 1 female patient diagnosed as Peroneal nerve Palsy(clinical diagnosed was treated with general oriental medicine therapy (acupuncture, pharmacopuncture,moxibustion, cupping, physical therapy, herbal medication and acupotomy. Results: The patient's left foot drop was remarkably improved. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that oriental medical treatment with acuputomy therapy has notable effect in improving symptoms of peroneal nerve palsy. as though we had not wide experience in this treatment, more research is needed.

  15. Iatrogenic facial nerve palsy "Prevention is better than cure": Analysis of four cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Iatrogenic facial nerve palsy in mastoid surgery is considered a crime or a taboo in the present scenario of medical science. But one has to accept the fact that every otologist encounters this entity at some point in his/her career. Hence it is of prime importance to be equipped to detect and to manage these cases. The obvious and disfiguring facial deformity it causes makes this a dreaded complication. Our article here discusses our experience in managing four cases of iatrogenic facial palsy. The etiology in all the cases was mastoidectomy for cholesteatoma. The detection of the site and repair was performed by the same surgeon in all cases. The facial nerve was transected completely in three cases, and in one case there was partial loss (>50% of fibers. Cable nerve grafting was utilized in three patients. There was grade 4 improvement in three patients who underwent cable nerve grafting, and one patient had grade 2 recovery after end-to-end anastomosis. A good anatomical knowledge and experience with temporal bone dissection is of great importance in preventing facial nerve injury. If facial nerve injury is detected, it should be managed as early as possible. An end-to-end anastomosis provides better results in final recovery as opposed to cable nerve grafting for facial nerve repair.

  16. Recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy complicating subclavian line insertion: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fishman Jonathan M

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Although recurrent laryngeal nerve injury has been described following central venous access via the jugular route, it has not previously been reported following access via the subclavian route. Case presentation A 63-year-old man presented with acute dysphonia immediately after insertion of a Hickman line via the subclavian route. Flexible laryngoscopy revealed a left vocal fold palsy. A computed tomography scan from the skull base to the thoracic inlet showed no obvious abnormality other than an abducted left vocal cord. The timing of the events and the computed tomography scan results strongly support the conclusion that the left recurrent laryngeal nerve was injured during insertion of the Hickman line, resulting in a left adductor vocal cord palsy. Conclusion This case illustrates an unusual example of iatrogenic injury to the recurrent laryngeal nerve. It is important to recognize the possibility that such injuries may occur in order to prevent them.

  17. CT-diagnosis of optic nerve lesions. Differential diagnostic criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unsoeld, R.

    1982-01-01

    Computed tomograms of 166 optic nerve lesions were analyzed: 97 were mainly orbital and 69 mainly intracranial. The criteria were clinical course, size, density and delineation of the optic nerve shadow, orbital and cerebral soft tissue abnormalities, and bony changes in the optic canal. Characteristic CT features are described of individual disease entities such as optic gliomas, optic nerve sheath meningiomas, neoplastic and inflammatory infiltrations. The differential diagnostic importance of individual CT criteria is evaluated and discussed. Simultaneous visualization of orbital and intracranial soft tissue changes as well as bony changes in the optic canal allow the location and identification of the majority of optic nerve lesions based on the criteria mentioned above, and optic nerve tumors can be differentiated. In 9 patients with optic neuritis due to clinically proven encephalitis and in 17 patients with total optic atrophy, no changes in the size of the optic nerve could be found. CT evaluation of the intraorbital portion of the optic nerve requires special examination techniques. Oblique computer reformations through the optic canal provide excellent visualization of bony changes in the optic canal. The exclusion of intracranial causes of optic nerve lesions requires intravenous injection of contrast material.

  18. Isolated oculomotor nerve palsy resulting from acute traumatic tentorial subdural hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui V

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Victoria Cui,1 Timur Kouliev2 1Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA; 2Emergency Department, Beijing United Family Hospital, Beijing, China Abstract: Acute subdural hematoma (SDH resulting from head trauma is a potentially life-threatening condition that requires expedient diagnosis and intervention to ensure optimal patient outcomes. Rapidly expanding or large hematomas, elevated intracranial pressure, and associated complications of brain herniation are associated with high mortality rates and poor recovery of neurological function. However, smaller bleeds (clot thickness <10 mm or hematomas occurring in infrequent locations, such as the tentorium cerebelli, may be difficult to recognize and patients may present with unusual or subtle signs and symptoms, including isolated cranial nerve palsies. Knowledge of neuroanatomy supported by modern neuroimaging can greatly aid in recognition and diagnosis of such lesions. In this report, we present a case of isolated oculomotor nerve palsy resulting from compressive tentorial SDH following blunt head trauma, review the literature concerning similar cases, and make recommendations regarding the diagnosis of SDH in patients presenting with isolated cranial nerve palsies. Keywords: head injury, oculomotor, palsy, subdural hematoma, trauma, tentorium, cerebral herniation, intracranial hemorrhage

  19. Lyme disease presenting with bilateral facial nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, G D

    1990-09-01

    Facial palsy bilateral, or recurrent, suggests a myriad of diagnostic possibilities. An 11-year-old boy is described whose diagnosis remained elusive for several months. Clinical evolution and subsequent laboratory studies confirmed that he had Lyme disease. Literature review suggests that this disorder is ubiquitous in its manifestations. The diagnosis should be remembered in unexplained neurologic disorders, particularly in cranial and peripheral neuropathies.

  20. [Correlation between facial nerve functional evaluation and efficacy evaluation of acupuncture treatment for Bell's palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhang-ling; Li, Cheng-xin; Jiang, Yue-bo; Zuo, Cong; Cai, Yun; Wang, Rui

    2012-09-01

    To assess and grade facial nerve dysfunction according to the extent of facial paralysis in the clinical course of acupuncture treatment for Bell's palsy, and to observe the interrelationship between the grade, the efficacy and the period of treatment, as well as the effect on prognosis. The authors employed the House-Brackmann scale, a commonly used evaluation scale for facial paralysis motor function, and set standards for eye fissure and lips. According to the improved scale, the authors assessed and graded the degree of facial paralysis in terms of facial nerve dysfunction both before and after treatment. The grade was divided into five levels: mild, moderate, moderately severe, severe dysfunction and complete paralysis. The authors gave acupuncture treatment according to the state of the disease without artificially setting the treatment period. The observation was focused on the efficacy and the efficacy was evaluated throughout the entire treatment process. Fifty-three cases out of 68 patients with Bell's palsy were cured and the overall rate of efficacy was 97%. Statistically significant differences (Pfacial nerve dysfunction. Efficacy was correlated with the damage level of the disease (correlation coefficient r=0.423, Pfacial nerve dysfunction (Pfacial nerve dysfunction. Efficacy is reduced in correlation with an increase in facial nerve dysfunction, and the period of treatment varies in need of different levels of facial nerve dysfunction. It is highly necessary to assess and grade patients before observation and treatment in clinical study, and choose corresponding treatment according to severity of damage of the disease.

  1. Clinical Features and Outcomes of Strabismus Treatment in Third Cranial Nerve Palsy during a 10-Year Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Bagheri

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Surgical management of strabismus in patients with third nerve palsy is difficult and challenging, however the majority of patients achieve ideal results with appropriate and stepwise surgical plans.

  2. An unusual cause of trochlear nerve palsy and brainstem compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmit Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Schwannoma originates from the Schwann cells at the Obersteiner-Redlich zone, which marks the junction of central and peripheral myelin of the cranial nerves. Most frequently affected are the vestibular, trigeminal, and facial nerves followed by the lower cranial nerves. Trochlear schwannoma in the absence of neurofibromatosis is a rare entity. The purpose of this report is to serve as a reminder to consider trochlear nerve schwannoma in the list of differential diagnosis of such tumors as the outcome is far better than the intraaxial tumor in that location.

  3. C5 Nerve root palsies following cervical spine surgery: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy E Epstein

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cervical C5 nerve root palsies may occur in between 0% and 30% of routine anterior or posterior cervical spine operations. They are largely attributed to traction injuries/increased cord migration following anterior/posterior decompressions. Of interest, almost all studies cite spontaneous resolution of these deficits without surgery with 3-24 postoperative months. Methods: Different studies cite various frequencies for C5 root palsies following anterior or posterior cervical spine surgery. In their combined anterior/posterior series involving C4-C5 level  decompressions, Libelski et al. cited up to a 12% incidence of C5 palsies. In Gu et al. series, C5 root palsies occurred in 3.1% of double-door laminoplasty, 4.5% of open-door laminoplasty, and 11.3% of laminectomy. Miller et al. observed an intermediate 6.9% frequency of C5 palsies followed by posterior cervical decompressions and fusions (PCDF. Results: Gu et al. also identified multiple risk factors for developing C5 palsies following posterior surgery; male gender, ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL, narrower foramina, laminectomy, and marked dorsal spinal cord drift. Miller et al. also identified an average $1918 increased cost for physical/occupational therapy for patients with C5 palsies. Conclusions: The incidence of C5 root deficits for anterior/posterior cervical surgery at C4-C5 was 12% in one series, and ranged up to 11.3% for laminectomies, while others cited 0-30%. Although identification of preoperative risk factors for C5 root deficits may help educate patients regarding these risks, there is no clear method for their avoidance at this time.

  4. Dural carotid cavernous sinus fistula presenting as isolated oculomotor nerve palsy: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şehnaz Arıcı

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Indirect (dural carotid cavernous fistula is formed by the connection between meningeal branches of the internal carotid artery and the cavernous sinüs, and low flow circulation with low pressure is occured. Proptosis, ophtalmoplegia, headache, scleral and conjuctival hyperemia expanding around the eyeball can be observed. A forty-eight year old female patient with a background of diabetes mellitus and hypertension was admitted with complaints of double vision. Isolated oculomotor nerve palsy was found in neurological examination and an indirect carotid cavernous fistula was revealed by digital subtraction angiography. Our case with carotid cavernous fistula as a rare cause of isolated oculomotor nerve palsy is worth to be reported.

  5. A Case of Radial Nerve Palsy Treated with Additional Scolopendrae Corpus Herbal-Acupuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seo Jung-Chul

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective : The purpose of this study is to report the patient with radial nerve palsy, who improved by Scolopendrae Corpus Herbal-Acupuncture and other Oriental medical treatments. Methods : The patient was managed by Scolopendrae Corpus Herbal-Acupuncture, body acupunture, physical theraphy and herbal medicine. We took picture of the patient's wrist and checked the power of muscles. Results : After 4 week treatment, the movement and power of wrist was restored to nearly normal range. Conclusion : The results suggest that combination of Scolopendrae Corpus Herbal-Acupuncture and other Oriental medical treatments is good method for treatment of radial nerve palsy. But further studies are required to concretely prove the effectiveness of this methods.

  6. Lateral medullary infarction with ipsilateral hemiparesis, lemniscal sensation loss and hypoglossal nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaodi; Wang, Yuzhou

    2014-04-01

    Here, we present a rare case of a lateral medullary infarction with ipsilateral hemiparesis, lemniscal sensation loss and hypoglossal nerve palsy. In this case, we proved Opalski's hypothesis by diffusion tensor tractography that ipsilateral hemiparesis in a medullary infarction is due to the involvement of the decussated corticospinal tract. We found that the clinical triad of ipsilateral hemiparesis, lemniscal sensation loss and hypoglossal nerve palsy, which had been regarded as a variant of medial medullary syndrome, turned out to be caused by lateral lower medullary infarction. Therefore, this clinical triad does not imply the involvement of the anteromedial part of medulla oblongata, when it is hard to distinguish a massive lateral medullary infarction from a hemimedullary infarction merely from MR images. At last, we suggest that hyperreflexia and Babinski's sign may not be indispensable to the diagnosis of Opalski's syndrome and we propose that "hemimedullary infarction with ipsilateral hemiparesis" is intrinsically a variant of lateral medullary infarction.

  7. Combined Ipsilateral Oculomotor Nerve Palsy and Contralateral Downbeat Nystagmus in a Case of Cerebral Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Matsuzono

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We report a patient with acute cerebral infarction of the left paramedian thalamus, upper mesencephalon and cerebellum who exhibited ipsilateral oculomotor nerve palsy and contralateral downbeat nystagmus. The site of the infarction was considered to be the paramedian thalamopeduncular and cerebellar regions, which are supplied by the superior cerebellar artery containing direct perforating branches or both the superior cerebellar artery and the superior mesencephalic and posterior thalamosubthalamic arteries. Contralateral and monocular downbeat nystagmus is very rare. Our case suggests that the present downbeat nystagmus was due to dysfunction of cerebellar-modulated crossed oculovestibular fibers of the superior cerebellar peduncle or bilateral downbeat nystagmus with one-sided oculomotor nerve palsy.

  8. Thixotropy of levator palpebrae as the cause of lagophthalmos after peripheral facial nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramideh, M; Koelman, J H T M; Devriese, P P; Speelman, J D; Ongerboer de Visser, B W

    2002-05-01

    Patients with facial nerve palsy are at risk of developing corneal ulceration because of lagophthalmos (incomplete closure of the affected eyelid). Lagophthalmos could result from thixotropy of the levator palpebrae muscle--that is, the formation of tight crossbridges between the actin and myosin filaments of the muscle fibres causing stiffness of the muscle--rather than from paralysis of the orbicularis occuli muscle as previously supposed. This possibility was investigated in 13 patients with a peripheral facial nerve palsy in a prospective open study. The levator muscle of the affected eyelid was stretched by manipulation and downward movement of the passively closed upper eyelid for approximately 15 seconds. The amount of lagophthalmos was measured before and immediately after this manoeuvre. In all patients except one there was a clear reduction in lagophthalmos (mean reduction 72%; range 60-100%). Thus in this setting the lagophthalmos appears to be caused by thixotropy of the levator palpebrae muscle, which has implications for treatment.

  9. Prosthetic ambulation in a paraplegic patient with a transfemoral amputation and radial nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, J C; Park, C; Kim, D Y; Choi, Y S; Kim, Y K; Seong, Y J

    2000-08-01

    Great importance and caution should be placed on prosthetic fitting for a paraplegic patient with an anesthetic residual limb if functional ambulation is to be achieved. The combination of paraplegia with a transfemoral amputation and radial nerve palsy is a complex injury that makes the rehabilitation process difficult. This article describes a case of L2 paraplegia with a transfemoral amputation and radial nerve palsy on the right side. Following the rehabilitation course, the patient independently walked using a walker at indoor level with a transfemoral prosthesis with ischial containment socket, polycentric knee assembly, endoskeletal shank and multiaxis foot assembly and a knee ankle foot orthosis on the sound side. The difficulties of fitting a functional prosthesis to an insensate limb and the rehabilitation stages leading to functional ambulation are reviewed.

  10. [Third cranial nerve palsy and Purtscher retinopathy in a child with multiple injuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrañaga-Fragoso, P; del-Barrio, Z; Noval, S; Pastora, N; Royo, A

    2015-07-01

    A 4 year-old girl was referred to our hospital after have suffered a severe accident. The patient was diagnosed with complete third nerve palsy in her right eye and Purtscher retinopathy in her left eye. Purtscher retinopathy is a rare condition. The diagnosis is made on clinical ground and its treatment is not well defined although it is believed that systemic steroids could improve the visual outcome. Traumatic third nerve palsy has a poor spontaneous recovery. The use of botulinum toxin might be useful in children to improve the recovery rate, maintaining binocularity, and avoiding amblyopia in other cases. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. A Case of Wegener’s Granulomatosis Presenting with Unilateral Facial Nerve Palsy

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    Roy Ujjawal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Wegener’s granulomatosis or granulomatosis with polyangiitis is a necrotizing vasculitis affecting both arterioles and venules. The disease is characterized by the classical triad involving acute inflammation of the upper and lower respiratory tracts with renal involvement. However, the disease pathology can affect any organ system. This case presents Wegener’s granulomatosis presenting with facial nerve palsy as the first manifestation of the disease, which is rarely reported in medical literature.

  12. Diagnostic gait pattern of a patient with longstanding left femoral nerve palsy: a case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burke, Neil G

    2010-12-01

    The gait pattern of a 35-year-old man with longstanding, left femoral nerve palsy was assessed using 3-dimensional kinematic and kinetic analysis. Stability of his left knee in stance was achieved by manipulating the external moments of the limb so that the ground reaction force passes in front of the knee joint. This compensatory mechanism of locking the knee in extension is reliant on the posterior capsular structures. The patient was managed conservatively and continued to walk without aids.

  13. Palsy of the rear limbs in Mycobacterium lepraemurium-infected mice results from bone damage and not from nerve involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Espinosa, O; Becerril-Villanueva, E; Wek-Rodríguez, K; Arce-Paredes, P; Reyes-Maldonado, E

    2005-06-01

    A small but relatively constant proportion (3-5%) of mice chronically infected with Mycobacterium lepraemurium (MLM) develops bilateral paralysis of the rear limbs. The aim of the study was to investigate whether or not the bilateral leg palsy results from nerve involvement. Direct bacterial nerve infection or acute/delayed inflammation might possibly affect the nerves. Therefore, palsied animals were investigated for the presence of: (a) histopathological changes in the leg tissues including nerves, bones and annexes, and (b) serum antibodies to M. lepraemurium and M. leprae lipids, including phenolic glycolipid I from M. leprae. Histopathological study of the palsied legs revealed that the paralysis was not the result of direct involvement of the limb nerves, as neither bacilli nor inflammatory cells were observed in the nerve branches studied. Antibodies to brain lipids and cardiolipin were not detected in the serum of the palsied animals, thus ruling out an immune response to self-lipids as the basis for the paralysis. Although high levels of antibodies to MLM lipids were detected in the serum of palsied animals they were not related to limb paralysis, as the nerves of the palsied legs showed no evidence of inflammatory damage. In fact, nerves showed no evidence of damage. Paralysis resulted from severe damage of the leg bones. Within the bones the bone marrow became replaced by extended bacilli-laden granulomas that frequently eroded the bone wall, altering the normal architecture of the bone and its annexes, namely muscle, tendons and connective tissue. Although this study rules out definitively the infectious or inflammatory damage of nerves in murine leprosy, it opens a new avenue of research into the factors that participate in the involvement or the sparing of nerves in human and murine leprosy, respectively.

  14. Transient Femoral Nerve Palsy Complicating “Blind” Transversus Abdominis Plane Block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios K. Manatakis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present two cases of patients who reported quadriceps femoris weakness and hypoesthesia over the anterior thigh after an inguinal hernia repair under transversus abdominis plane (TAP block. Transient femoral nerve palsy is the result of local anesthetic incorrectly injected between transversus abdominis muscle and transversalis fascia and pooling around the femoral nerve. Although it is a minor and self-limiting complication, it requires overnight hospital stay and observation of the patients. Performing the block under ultrasound guidance and injecting the least volume of local anesthetic required are ways of minimizing its incidence.

  15. Facial nerve palsy: incidence of different ethiologies in a tertiary ambulatory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atolini Junior, Nédio

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The ethiologic diferencial diagnostic for facial nerve paralisis is still a challenge and the literature has shown conflictive results concerning its epidemiology. Objective: To outline the incidence of the different ethiologies and the profile of peripheral facial nerve paralysis patients in the otolaryngology ambulatory of the Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas e Biologicas da PUC-SP - campus Sorocaba. Method: The records of 54 patients with facial nerve paralysis seen during the years of 2007 and 2008 were analysed retrospectively. Results: From the 54 patients analysed, 55,5% were male, median age of 40,6 years and had the right side of the face acomitted in 66,6%. Parestesia of the accomited side in 51,85% and increased tears in 66,6% of the patients were observed as associated symptoms. Bell´s palsy was the most frequent ethiology (53,7%, follwed by: traumatic (24%, Ramsay Hunt syndrome (9,2%, Cholesteatoma (5,5%, malignant otitis media (3,7% and acute otits media (3,7%. Three cases of Bell´s palsy during pregancy was also seen in this series. Conclusion: The data found are similiar of the most of the literature, showing that Bell´s palsy is still the most frequent, followed by traumatic causes and others. There is an equilibrium concerning to the gender, with a slight prevalence for males and for the right side of the face.

  16. Superior Oblique Anterior Transposition with Horizontal Recti Recession-Resection for Total Third-Nerve Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhsin Eraslan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To report the results of lateral rectus muscle recession, medial rectus muscle resection, and superior oblique muscle transposition in the restoration and maintenance of ocular alignment in primary position for patients with total third-nerve palsy. Methods. The medical records of patients who underwent surgery between March 2007 and September 2011 for total third-nerve palsy were reviewed. All patients underwent a preoperative assessment, including a detailed ophthalmologic examination. Results. A total of 6 patients (age range, 14–45 years were included. The median preoperative horizontal deviation was 67.5 Prism Diopter (PD (interquartile range [IQR] 57.5–70 and vertical deviation was 13.5 PD (IQR 10–20. The median postoperative horizontal residual exodeviation was 8.0 PD (IQR 1–16, and the vertical deviation was 0 PD (IQR 0–4. The median correction of hypotropia following superior oblique transposition was 13.5 ± 2.9 PD (range, 10–16. All cases were vertically aligned within 5 PD. Four of the six cases were aligned within 10 PD of the horizontal deviation. Adduction and head posture were improved in all patients. All patients gained new area of binocular single vision in the primary position after the operation. Conclusion. Lateral rectus recession, medial rectus resection, and superior oblique transposition may be used to achieve satisfactory cosmetic and functional results in total third-nerve palsy.

  17. Superior Oblique Anterior Transposition with Horizontal Recti Recession-Resection for Total Third-Nerve Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eraslan, Muhsin; Cerman, Eren; Onal, Sumru; Ogut, Mehdi Suha

    2015-01-01

    Aims. To report the results of lateral rectus muscle recession, medial rectus muscle resection, and superior oblique muscle transposition in the restoration and maintenance of ocular alignment in primary position for patients with total third-nerve palsy. Methods. The medical records of patients who underwent surgery between March 2007 and September 2011 for total third-nerve palsy were reviewed. All patients underwent a preoperative assessment, including a detailed ophthalmologic examination. Results. A total of 6 patients (age range, 14–45 years) were included. The median preoperative horizontal deviation was 67.5 Prism Diopter (PD) (interquartile range [IQR] 57.5–70) and vertical deviation was 13.5 PD (IQR 10–20). The median postoperative horizontal residual exodeviation was 8.0 PD (IQR 1–16), and the vertical deviation was 0 PD (IQR 0–4). The median correction of hypotropia following superior oblique transposition was 13.5 ± 2.9 PD (range, 10–16). All cases were vertically aligned within 5 PD. Four of the six cases were aligned within 10 PD of the horizontal deviation. Adduction and head posture were improved in all patients. All patients gained new area of binocular single vision in the primary position after the operation. Conclusion. Lateral rectus recession, medial rectus resection, and superior oblique transposition may be used to achieve satisfactory cosmetic and functional results in total third-nerve palsy. PMID:26640703

  18. Unilateral Hypoglossal Nerve Palsy after Use of the Laryngeal Mask Airway Supreme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichi Takahoko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Hypoglossal nerve palsy after use of the laryngeal mask airway (LMA is an exceptionally rare complication. We present the first case of unilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy after use of the LMA Supreme. Clinical Features. A healthy 67-year-old female was scheduled for a hallux valgus correction under general anesthesia combined with femoral and sciatic nerve blocks. A size 4 LMA Supreme was inserted successfully at the first attempt and the cuff was inflated with air at an intracuff pressure of 60 cmH2O using cuff pressure gauge. Anesthesia was maintained with oxygen, nitrous oxide (67%, and sevoflurane under spontaneous breathing. The surgery was uneventful and the duration of anesthesia was two hours. The LMA was removed as the patient woke and there were no immediate postoperative complications. The next morning, the patient complained of dysarthria and dysphasia. These symptoms were considered to be caused by the LMA compressing the nerve against the hyoid bone. Conservative treatment was chosen and the paralysis recovered completely after 5 months. Conclusion. Hypoglossal nerve injury may occur despite correct positioning of the LMA under the appropriate intracuff pressure. A follow-up period of at least 6 months should be taken into account for the recovery.

  19. FDG-PET/CT can rule out malignancy in patients with vocal cord palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Anders; Nielsen, Anne Lerberg; Lauridsen, Jeppe Kiilerich

    2014-01-01

    vocal cords. PET/CT results were compared to clinical workup and histopathology. The study comprised 65 patients (32 females) with a mean age of 66±12 years (range 37-89). Eleven patients (17%) had antecedent cancer. Twenty-seven (42%) were diagnosed with cancer during follow-up. The palsy was right...

  20. Role of Kabat rehabilitation in facial nerve palsy: a randomised study on severe cases of Bell's palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monini, S; Iacolucci, C M; Di Traglia, M; Lazzarino, A I; Barbara, M

    2016-08-01

    The treatment of Bell's palsy (BP), based on steroids and/or antiviral drugs, may still leave a certain percentage of affected subjects with disfiguring sequelae due to incomplete recovery. The different procedures of physical rehabilitation have not been demonstrated to play a favourable role in this disorder. The aim of the present study was to compare functional outcomes in severe cases of Bell's palsy when treated by steroids alone or by steroids accompanied by Kabat physical rehabilitation. This prospective study included 94 subjects who showed sudden facial nerve (FN) palsy with House-Brackmann grade IV or V and who were divided into two groups on the basis of the therapeutic approach: one group (a) was treated by steroids, and the other (b) received steroids in combination with physical rehabilitation. Medical treatment consisted in administration of steroids at a dosage of 60 mg per day for 15 days; physical rehabilitative treatment consisted in proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation according to Kabat, and was administered to one of the two groups of subjects. Recovery rate, degree of recovery and time for recovery were compared between the two groups using the Mann-Whitney and univariate logistic regression statistical tests (Ward test). Kabat patients (group b) had about 20 times the odds of improving by three HB grades or more (OR = 17.73, 95% CI = 5.72 to 54.98, p Kabat subjects). No difference was observed in the incidence of synkineses between the two groups. Steroid treatment appears to provide better and faster recovery in severe cases (HB IV and V) of BP when complemented with Kabat physical rehabilitation. © Copyright by Società Italiana di Otorinolaringologia e Chirurgia Cervico-Facciale, Rome, Italy.

  1. A Rare Neurological Involvement in Sjogrens Syndrome: Abducens Nerve Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunus Ugan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Sjogren%u2019s syndrome (SS is an autoimmune disorder characterized by lymphocytic infiltration of exocrine organs. Although neurological involvement occurs in approximately one quarter of patients, involvement of cranial nerves is a relatively rare occurrence. Here a rare case of cranial neuropathy related to SS is reported.

  2. Bell's Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... weakness or paralysis. Bell's palsy is named for Sir Charles Bell, a 19th century Scottish surgeon who ... facial nerve function and pain. In general, decompression surgery for Bell's palsy -- to relieve pressure on the ...

  3. Remote therapeutic effect of early nerve transposition in treatment of obstetric al brachial plexus palsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To report a method and remote therape utic effect of early nerve transposition in treatment of obstetrical brachial pl exus palsy.   Methods: From May 1995 to August 1996, 12 patients who had no r ecovery of biceps 3 months after birth were treated with nerve transposition. Ei ght had neuroma at the upper trunk and 4 had rupture or avulsion of the upper tr unk. Mallet test was used to evaluate the results.   Results: The follow-up of 40-52 months showed that excellent and good recovery in functions was found in 75% of the patients and the excellen t rate of phrenic nerve and accessory nerve transposition was 83.3% and 6 6.7% respectively. A complete recovery in shoulder and elbow joint function wa s in 3 patients and Mallet Ⅳ was in 6 patients.   Conclusions: Satisfactory outcome can be obtained by using earl y nerve transposition in treating obstetrical brachial plexus.Paralysis, obstetric; Peripheral nerves; Nerve trans position

  4. A case of bilateral lower cranial nerve palsies after base of skull trauma with complex management issues: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehn, Alexander Christoph; Lettieri, Jennie; Grimley, Rohan

    2012-05-01

    Fractures of the skull base can cause lower cranial nerve palsies because of involvement of the nerves as they traverse the skull. A variety of syndromes have been described, often involving multiple nerves. These are most commonly unilateral, and only a handful of cases of bilateral cranial nerve involvement have been reported. We describe a 64-year-old man with occipital condylar fracture complicated by bilateral palsies of IX and X nerves associated with dramatic physiological derangement causing severe management challenges. Apart from debilitating postural hypotension, he developed dysphagia, severe gastrointestinal dysmotility, issues with airway protection as well as airway obstruction, increased oropharyngeal secretions and variable respiratory control. This is the first report of a patient with traumatic bilateral cranial nerve IX and X nerve palsies. This detailed report and the summary of all 6 previous case reports of traumatic bilateral lower cranial nerve palsies illustrate clinical features, treatment strategies, and outcomes of these rare events.

  5. Transient superficial peroneal nerve palsy after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Majed Alrowaili

    2016-01-01

    A 19-year-old male subject was diagnosed with medial meniscal, lateral meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear. The symptoms did not subside after 4 months of physical therapy, and he underwent arthroscopic partial medial and lateral meniscectomy and ACL reconstruction. Immediately after the patient woke up from general anesthesia, he started experience loss of sensation in the area of superficial peroneal nerve with inverted dorsiflexion of foot and ankle. Instantly, the bandage a...

  6. External iliac artery thrombus masquerading as sciatic nerve palsy in anterior column fracture of the acetabulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narender Kumar Magu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of ischemic neuropathy of the sciatic nerve in a patient with an anterior column fracture of the acetabulum operated by ilioinguinal approach. It resulted from occlusion of the blood supply to the sciatic nerve. There were no signs of a vascular insult until ischemic changes ensued on the 6 th postoperative day on the lateral part of great toe. The patient underwent crossover femoro-femoral bypass grafting and there was a complete reversal of the ischemic changes at 6 months. The sciatic nerve palsy continued to recover until the end of 1 year; by which time the only deficit was a Grade 4 power in the extensor hallucis longus (EHL and the extensor digitorum longus (EDL. There was no further recovery at 2 years followup.

  7. Robust Optic Nerve Segmentation on Clinically Acquired CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Swetasudha; Asman, Andrew J; Delisi, Michael P; Mawn, Louise A; Galloway, Robert L; Landman, Bennett A

    2014-03-21

    The optic nerve is a sensitive central nervous system structure, which plays a critical role in many devastating pathological conditions. Several methods have been proposed in recent years to segment the optic nerve automatically, but progress toward full automation has been limited. Multi-atlas methods have been successful for brain segmentation, but their application to smaller anatomies remains relatively unexplored. Herein we evaluate a framework for robust and fully automated segmentation of the optic nerves, eye globes and muscles. We employ a robust registration procedure for accurate registrations, variable voxel resolution and image field-of-view. We demonstrate the efficacy of an optimal combination of SyN registration and a recently proposed label fusion algorithm (Non-local Spatial STAPLE) that accounts for small-scale errors in registration correspondence. On a dataset containing 30 highly varying computed tomography (CT) images of the human brain, the optimal registration and label fusion pipeline resulted in a median Dice similarity coefficient of 0.77, symmetric mean surface distance error of 0.55 mm, symmetric Hausdorff distance error of 3.33 mm for the optic nerves. Simultaneously, we demonstrate the robustness of the optimal algorithm by segmenting the optic nerve structure in 316 CT scans obtained from 182 subjects from a thyroid eye disease (TED) patient population.

  8. Intratemporal and extratemporal facial nerve schwannoma: CT and MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Keum Won [Pohang Medical Center, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ho Kyu; Shin, Ji Hoon; Choi, Choong Gon; Suh, Dae Chul [Asan Medical Center, Ulsan Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cheong, Hae Kwan [Dongguk Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-05-01

    To analyze the characteristics of CT and MRI findings of facial nerve schwannoma in ten patients. Ten patients with pathologically confirmed facial nerve schwannoma, underwent physical and radilolgic examination. The latter involved MRI in all ten and CT scanning in six. We analyzed the location (epicenter), extent and number of involved segments of tumors, tuumor morphology, and changes in adjacent bony structures. The major symptoms of facial nerve schwannoma were facial nerve paralysis in seven cases and hearing loss in six. Epicenters were detected at the intraparotid portion in five cases, the intracanalicular portion in two, the cisternal portion in one, and the intratemporal portion in two. The segment most frequently involved was the mastoid (n=6), followed by the parotid (n=5), intracanalicular (n=4), cisternal (n=2), the labyrinthine/geniculate ganglion (n=2) and the tympanic segment (n=1). Tumors affected two segments of the facial nerve in eight cases, only one segment in one, and four continuous segments in one. Morphologically, tumors were ice-cream cone shaped in the cisternal segment tumor (1/1), cone shaped in intracanalicular tumors (2/2), oval shaped in geniculate ganglion tumors (1/1), club shaped in intraparotid tumors (5/5) and bead shaped in the diffuse-type tumor (1/1). Changes in adjacent bony structures involved widening of the stylomastoid foramen in intraparotid tumors (5/5), widening of the internal auditary canal in intracanalicular and cisternal tumors (3/3), bony erosion of the geniculate fossa in geniculate ganglion tumors (2/2), and widening of the facial nerve canal in intratemporal and intraparotid tumors (6/6). The characteristic location, shape and change in adjacent bony structures revealed by facial schwannomas on CT and MR examination lead to correct diagnosis.

  9. Clinical studies of photodynamic therapy for malignant brain tumors: facial nerve palsy after temporal fossa photoillumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Paul J.; Wilson, Brian C.; Lilge, Lothar D.; Varma, Abhay; Bogaards, Arjen; Fullagar, Tim; Fenstermaker, Robert; Selker, Robert; Abrams, Judith

    2003-06-01

    In two randomized prospective studies of brain tumor PDT more than 180 patients have been accrued. At the Toronto site we recognized two patients who developed a lower motor neuron (LMN) facial paralysis in the week following the PDT treatment. In both cases a temporal lobectomy was undertaken and the residual tumor cavity was photo-illuminated. The surface illuminated included the temporal fossa floor, thus potentially exposing the facial nerve to the effect of PDT. The number of frontal, temporal, parietal, and occipital tumors in this cohort was 39, 24, 12 and 4, respectively. Of the 24 temporal tumors 18 were randomized to Photofrin-PDT. Of these 18 a temporal lobectomy was carried out exposing the middle fossa floor as part of the tumor resection. In two of the 10 patients where the lobectomy was carried out and the fossa floor was exposed to light there occurred a postoperative facial palsy. Both patients recovered facial nerve function in 6 and 12 weeks, respectively. 46 J/cm2 were used in the former and 130 J/cm2 in the latter. We did not encounter a single post-operative LMN facial plasy in the 101 phase 2 patients treated with Photofrin-PDT. Among 688 supratentorial brain tumor operations in the last decade involving all pathologies and all locations no case of early post-operative LMN facial palsy was identified in the absence of PDT. One further patient who had a with post-PDT facial palsy was identified at the Denver site. Although it is possible that these patients had incidental Bell's palsy, we now recommend shielding the temporal fossa floor during PDT.

  10. [Dermoid Cyst in Meckel's Cave Presenting with Oculomotor Nerve Palsy and Trigeminal Neuralgia:A Case Report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Nozomu; Tomita, Takahiro; Nagai, Shoichi; Kuwayama, Naoya; Noguchi, Kyo; Kuroda, Satoshi

    2016-10-01

    The authors report a rare case of an intracranial dermoid cyst found in Meckel's cave. A 63-year-old woman developed left oculomotor nerve palsy and was referred to their hospital. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a cystic lesion in the left Meckel's cave and prepontine cistern, but her symptoms gradually improved during conservative observation. However, three years later she complained of left facial pain in the territory of the second branch of the trigeminal nerve. The left oculomotor nerve palsy exacerbated again. Although her trigeminal neuralgia improved after carbamazepine administration, her oculomotor nerve palsy did not recover. Therefore, she underwent direct surgery through the anterior transpetrosal approach, and the fat-containing tumor cyst was completely resected. The tumor was strongly compressing the left trigeminal nerve and its ganglion in Meckel's cave. After surgery, her facial pain completely resolved and her oculomotor nerve palsy gradually improved. Histological examination revealed that the cyst wall was composed of a single layer of squamous epithelium and contained hair and keratin. A pathological diagnosis of a dermoid cyst was made.

  11. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumour: CT and MRI Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Sperandio

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour (MPNST is extremely rare malignancy in the general population, occurring more frequently in patients with Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1. In the literature five cases of MPNST arising from the parapharyngeal space (PPS in patients without neurofibromatosis have been reported. We report imaging techniques in a patient with MPNST in the PPS, who had neither a family history nor sign of NF1. Computed tomography (CT scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI were performed for a correct therapeutic planning. CT and MRI findings were correlated with hystopathological diagnosis.

  12. Comparative analysis of CT and pathological findings of peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张雪林; 王晓琪; 邱士军

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To improve the qualitative diagnosis of peripheral nerve sheath tumors by computed tomography (CT). Methods: CT findings of 64 cases of pathologically confirmed nerve sheath tumors were compared with the pathological findings of the tumors. Results: Low density of the tumors shown in plain CT images was related to dominating reticular structure in the tumor as found pathologically. Tumors with intact capsule found by pathological findings were shown with smooth margin in CT images. Inhomogeneous density and enhancement of the tumors in CT images was related to tumor necrosis, liquefaction and cystic degeneration, and inhomogeneous enhancement also involved the reticular structure. Conclusion: Nerve sheath tumors are characterized by distribution along the nerves, lower density than that of muscles in plain CT images, and inhomogeneous enhancement in enhanced CT, which can help differentiate nerve sheath tumors from other soft tissue tumors. When nerve sheath tumors lack distinctive CT features, the diagnoses have to depend on their pathological findings.

  13. Transient Superficial Peroneal Nerve Palsy After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrowaili, Majed

    2016-04-26

    A 19-year-old male subject was diagnosed with medial meniscal, lateral meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear. The symptoms did not subside after 4 months of physical therapy, and he underwent arthroscopic partial medial and lateral meniscectomy and ACL reconstruction. Immediately after the patient woke up from general anesthesia, he started experience loss of sensation in the area of superficial peroneal nerve with inverted dorsiflexion of foot and ankle. Instantly, the bandage and knee brace was removed and a diagnosis of compartment syndrome was ruled out. After eight hours, post-operatively, the patient started receiving physiotherapy. He complained of numbness and tingling in the same area. After 24 h, post-operatively, the patient started to regain dorsiflexion and eversion gradually. Two days after the surgery, the patient exhibited complete recovery of neurological status.

  14. Transient superficial peroneal nerve palsy after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majed Alrowaili

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A 19-year-old male subject was diagnosed with medial meniscal, lateral meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL tear. The symptoms did not subside after 4 months of physical therapy, and he underwent arthroscopic partial medial and lateral meniscectomy and ACL reconstruction. Immediately after the patient woke up from general anesthesia, he started experience loss of sensation in the area of superficial peroneal nerve with inverted dorsiflexion of foot and ankle. Instantly, the bandage and knee brace was removed and a diagnosis of compartment syndrome was ruled out. After eight hours, post-operatively, the patient started receiving physiotherapy. He complained of numbness and tingling in the same area. After 24 h, post-operatively, the patient started to regain dorsiflexion and eversion gradually. Two days after the surgery, the patient exhibited complete recovery of neurological status.

  15. Post Traumatic Delayed Bilateral Facial Nerve Palsy (FNP): Diagnostic Dilemma of Expressionless Face.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rakesh; Mittal, Radhey Shyam

    2015-04-01

    Bilateral facial nerve palsy [FNP] is a rare condition. Mostly it is idiopathic. Post traumatic bilateral FNP is even more rare and having unique neurosurgical considerations. Post traumatic delayed presentation of bilateral FNP is socially debilitating and also having diagnostic challenge. Due to lack of facial asymmetry as present in unilateral facial paralysis, it is difficult to recognize. We are presenting a case of delayed onset bilateral FNP who developed FNP after 12 days of head injury with a brief discussion of its diagnostic dilemma and management along with literature review.

  16. CT-guided suprascapular nerve blocks: a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider-Kolsky, M.E.; Pike, J.; Connell, D.A. [Department of Medical Imaging, Victoria House Private Hospital, 316 Malvern Road, Prahran 3181, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)

    2004-05-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the suprascapular nerve block using CT guidance and to evaluate the short- and medium-term efficacy in a range of shoulder pathologies. CT-guided infiltration around the suprascapular nerve was performed with bupivacaine and Celestone Chronodose on 40 consecutive patients presenting with chronic shoulder pathologies unresponsive to conventional treatment. Patients were interviewed using the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI) before the procedure, 30 min after the procedure and at 3 days, 3 weeks and 6 weeks afterwards. Within 30 min of the block overall pain scores decreased from a mean ({+-}SEM) pain score of 7.0 ({+-}0.4) to 3.5 ({+-}0.5) (n=39, P<0.001). At 3 days after the procedure, the mean overall improvement of the pain and disability scores were 20.4% ({+-}4.9, P<0.001) and 16.8% ({+-}4.8, P=0.004) respectively. Sustained pain relief and reduced disability were achieved in 10 of 35 (29%) patients at 3 weeks and longer. Patients suffering from soft tissue pathologies were the most likely patients to benefit from the injection. No serious side effects were noted. In some patients with chronic soft tissue pathologies who do not respond to conventional treatment, a CT-guided suprascapular nerve block can provide safe short- and medium-term relief from pain and disability. (orig.)

  17. Case of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis with convulsion, gait disturbance, facial palsy and with multifocal CT lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagano, Tetsu; Kurihara, Eiji; Mizuno, Yoshihiko; Tamagawa, Kimiko; Komiya, Kazuhiko; Mizuguchi, Masashi.

    1988-07-01

    A case of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) was presented. The patient was a 4-year-old boy with convulsion, ataxic gait, facial palsy. It was postulated that the influenza vaccine might induce the disease in this case. Cranial CT showed a low density arease in the right temporal lobe, which disappeared afterwards when other low density areas appeared in the right cerebellar hemisphere and in inner portion of the body of the left lateral ventricle. All symptoms disappeared without therapy and the CT findings improved within three months after onset.

  18. [A case presenting with trochlear nerve palsy and segmental sensory disturbance due to circumscribed midbrain and upper pontine hemorrhage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Kenji; Furutani, Rikiya; Shiota, Jun-ichi; Kawamura, Mitsuru

    2003-07-01

    We describe a patient presenting with trochlear nerve palsy and segmental sensory disturbance due to circumscribed mesencephalic hemorrhage. A 36-year-old man with no past illness visited our hospital complaining of sudden onset of diplopia, dysesthesia of the left face and upper extremity, and acuphenes of the left ear. Neurological examination revealed left trochlear nerve palsy and segmental sensory disturbance of the left side almost above T11 level. Pain and temperature sensation were disturbed, but vibration, joint position, graphesthesia, kinesthesia, and discrimination sensation were spared. Magnetic resonance imaging of the head, performed 7 days after onset, revealed acute to subacute phase hemorrhage at the right inferior colliculus. No abnormalities were identified on cerebral angiography. Symptoms gradually improved with conservative therapy. After about ten weeks, diplopia disappeared and area of sensory disturbance was reduced (disturbance of pain sensation reduced to about T4 level, temperature sensation to about T9). Segmental sensory disturbance usually accompanies spinal cord lesion. However, several cases of similar symptoms following cerebrovascular disease of the brainstem have been reported. Conversely, some reports have indicated that trochlear nerve palsy due to midbrain hemorrhage accompanies sensory disturbance contralateral to the lesion. The nature of sensory disturbance is thus variable. The present case suggests that segmental sensory disturbance might accompany trochlear nerve palsy caused by hemorrhage of the inferior colliculus, as intramedullary fibers of the trochlear nerve and spinothalamic tract are located nearby and somatotopy of the spinothalamic tract is preserved even at the level of the midbrain.

  19. Comparative study between subjective assessment and quantitative evaluation of CT findings with cerebral palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugie, Y.; Sugie, H.; Kitai, A.; Maruyama, H.; Fukuyama, Y. (Tokyo Women' s Medical Coll. (Japan))

    1982-07-01

    Computed tomography (CT) was performed on 200 children with cerebral palsy with Hitachi CT-H250. The CT scans of 136 cases revealed cerebral atrophy with ventricular and/or subarachnoid space enlargement. The lateral ventricles, the third ventricle and the two parts of subarachnoid space on the CT picture were subjectively evaluated and divided into five grades ranging from no enlargement to marked enlargement. In addition, the size of the ventricles and the subarachnoid spaces were quantitatively determined; the transverse diameter of brain (b), the largest width of the anterior horns of the lateral ventricles (c), the bicaudate nuclear distance (d), the greatest width of the third ventricle, the longitudinal cerebral fissure and sylvian fissures as described by Miyao et al. (1978). Comparison of these quantitative techniques confirmed the initial subjective evaluation. However, in some cases, amendment of the subjective evaluation was needed. As mentioned before (Miyao et al.), the cerebral longitudinal fissure was relatively wide in normal infants. Accordingly, it was often difficult to find out abnormal widening only by subjective evaluation. The purpose of this paper was to establish the criteria of quantitative measuring and assessing of the lateral and third ventricles, the cerebral longitudinal fissures, and the sylvian fissures enlargement. Interpretation of some problem cases associated with measuring was also discussed. The quantitative CT evaluation may be a good reference in assessing cerebral atrophy in cerebral palsy and other neurological diseases.

  20. Effects of Electroacupuncture on Facial Nerve Function and HSV-1 DNA Quantity in HSV-1 Induced Facial Nerve Palsy Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hongzhi; Feng, Shuwei; Chen, Jiao; Yang, Jie; Yang, Mingxiao; Zhong, Zhendong; Li, Ying; Liang, Fanrong

    2014-01-01

    Acupuncture is a common and effective therapeutic method to treat facial nerve palsy (FNP). However, its underlying mechanism remains unclear. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of electroacupuncture on symptoms and content of HSV-1 DNA in FNP mice. Mice were randomized into four groups, an electroacupuncture treatment group, saline group, model animal group, and blank control group. Electroacupuncture was applied at Jiache (ST6) and Hegu (LI4) in electroacupuncture group once daily for 14 days, while electroacupuncture was not applied in model animal group. In electroacupuncture group, mice recovered more rapidly and HSV-1 DNA content also decreased more rapidly, compared with model animal group. We conclude that electroacupuncture is effective to alleviate symptoms and promote the reduction of HSV-1 in FNP.

  1. Effects of Electroacupuncture on Facial Nerve Function and HSV-1 DNA Quantity in HSV-1 Induced Facial Nerve Palsy Mice

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    Hongzhi Tang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acupuncture is a common and effective therapeutic method to treat facial nerve palsy (FNP. However, its underlying mechanism remains unclear. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of electroacupuncture on symptoms and content of HSV-1 DNA in FNP mice. Mice were randomized into four groups, an electroacupuncture treatment group, saline group, model animal group, and blank control group. Electroacupuncture was applied at Jiache (ST6 and Hegu (LI4 in electroacupuncture group once daily for 14 days, while electroacupuncture was not applied in model animal group. In electroacupuncture group, mice recovered more rapidly and HSV-1 DNA content also decreased more rapidly, compared with model animal group. We conclude that electroacupuncture is effective to alleviate symptoms and promote the reduction of HSV-1 in FNP.

  2. MRI enhancement of the facial nerve with Gd-DTPA, 2; Investigation of enhanced nerve portions in patients with facial palsy

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    Yanagida, Masahiro (Kansai Medical School, Moriguchi, Osaka (Japan))

    1993-08-01

    We performed enhanced MRI using Gd-DTPA in 84 patients with facial palsy. After assessing enhancement of the normal facial nerve, we examined enhancement in patients with Bell's palsy and Ramsay Hunt syndrome. In 95% of patients with Bell's palsy, enhancement was obtained in the distal IAC and labyrinthine portions. In 72%, enhancement was significant from the distal IAC portion through the vertical portion. In some of the patients who underwent enhanced MRI twice, increased signal intensity was observed in distal portions such as the vertical portion. In many cases of Ramsay Hunt syndrome, enhancement was seen extensively in the IAC portion through the vertical portion. In the subjects with internal auditory symptoms such as vertigo and tinnitus, enhancement of the IAC portion was seen not only in the facial nerve but also in the vestibular and the cochlear nerves. These results suggest that the vascular permeability of lesions in Bell's palsy may be increased from the distal IAC portion to the vertical portion. Judging from the present findings with Ramsay Hunt syndrome, symptoms related to the enhanced portions suggest that accompanying internal auditory symptoms occur due to inflammation of the IAC portions of cochlear and vestibular nerves. (author).

  3. Long-Lasting Cranial Nerve III Palsy as a Presenting Feature of Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy

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    Rossella Spataro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a patient with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP in which an adduction deficit and ptosis in the left eye presented several years before the polyneuropathy. A 52-year-old man presented with a 14-year history of unremitting diplopia, adduction deficit, and ptosis in the left eye. At the age of 45 a mild bilateral foot drop and impaired sensation in the four limbs appeared, with these symptoms showing a progressive course. The diagnostic workup included EMG/ENG which demonstrated reduced conduction velocity with bilateral and symmetrical sensory and motor involvement. Cerebrospinal fluid studies revealed a cytoalbuminologic dissociation. A prolonged treatment with corticosteroids allowed a significant improvement of the limb weakness. Diplopia and ptosis remained unchanged. This unusual form of CIDP presented as a long-lasting isolated cranial nerve palsy. A diagnostic workup for CIDP should therefore be performed in those patients in which an isolated and unremitting cranial nerve palsy cannot be explained by common causes.

  4. Burkitt's non-Hodgkins lymphoma presenting as facial nerve palsy in HIV-positive patients.

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    Woodcock, H; Nelson, M

    2011-02-01

    An isolated facial nerve palsy is rare as the presentation of a central nervous system lymphoma. In this case series, we present the clinical features of three HIV-positive patients presenting with facial nerve palsies due to HIV-associated Burkitt's lymphoma. These patients had a non-resolving facial paralysis, which occurred during a late stage of HIV. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) did not show leptomeningeal enhancement. Cerebrospinal fluid revealed a lymphocytosis with elevated protein and low glucose levels. The diagnosis of Burkitt's lymphoma was made on histology which showed the characteristic 'starry sky' appearance due to scattered tangible body-laden macrophages. The patients were commenced on the intensive chemotherapy regimen of CODOX-M/IVAC. Two patients died of disease progression and the third patient died of chemotherapy toxicity. This case series highlights the need for a high index of suspicion for underlying malignancy when a patient presents with a persistent facial paralysis in the later stages of HIV infection.

  5. Spontaneous resolution of a Meckel's cave arachnoid cyst causing sixth cranial nerve palsy.

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    Jacob, Maud; Gujar, Sachin; Trobe, Jonathan; Gandhi, Dheeraj

    2008-09-01

    A 32-year-old pregnant woman developed a progressive right sixth cranial nerve palsy as an isolated finding. Brain MRI disclosed a discrete lobulated lesion centered in the right Meckel's cave with intermediate signal on T1, high signal on T2, and diffusion characteristics similar to those of cerebrospinal fluid on apparent diffusion coefficient mapping. The initial radiologic diagnosis was schwannoma or meningioma. No intervention occurred. Shortly after cesarean delivery, the abduction deficit began to lessen spontaneously. One month later, the abduction deficit had further improved; 7 months later it had completely resolved. Repeat MRI after delivery failed to disclose the lesion, which was now interpreted as consistent with an arachnoid cyst arising within Meckel's cave. Twenty-one similar cases of Meckel's cave arachnoid cyst or meningocele have been reported, 7 found incidentally and 14 causing symptoms, 2 of which produced ipsilateral sixth cranial nerve palsies. All previously reported symptomatic patients were treated surgically. This is the first report of an arachnoid cyst arising from Meckel's cave in pregnancy and having spontaneous resolution.

  6. Management of Synkinesis and Asymmetry in Facial Nerve Palsy: A Review Article

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    Abbasali pourmomeny

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The important sequelae of facial nerve palsy are synkinesis, asymmetry, hypertension and contracture; all of which have psychosocial effects on patients. Synkinesis due to mal regeneration causes involuntary movements during a voluntary movement. Previous studies have advocated treatment using physiotherapy modalities alone or with exercise therapy, but no consensus exists on the optimal approach. Thus, this review summarizes clinical controlled studies in the management of synkinesis and asymmetry in facial nerve palsy.   Materials and Methods: Case-controlled clinical studies of patients at the acute stage of injury were selected for this review article. Data were obtained from English-language databases from 1980 until mid-2013.   Results: Among 124 articles initially captured, six randomized controlled trials involving 269 patients were identified with appropriate inclusion criteria. The results of all these studies emphasized the benefit of exercise therapy. Four studies considered electromyogram (EMG biofeedback to be effective through neuromuscular re-education.   Conclusion:  Synkinesis and inconsistency of facial muscles could be treated with educational exercise therapy. EMG biofeedback is a suitable tool for this exercise therapy.

  7. Diagnostic pitfall: Adenoid cystic carcinoma of the tongue presenting as an isolated hypoglossal nerve palsy, case report and literature review

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    Wee Hide Elfrida

    2016-01-01

    In malignancies that have a propensity for PI such as ACC, patients may present atypically with nerve palsies. In infiltrative lesions, the primary tumour may not be evident on magnetic resonance imaging. Therefore, to achieve a diagnosis, a high index of suspicion is required. When the diagnosis is in question, deep biopsy and positron emission tomography may be useful.

  8. Bilateral abducens nerve and right facial nerve palsy occuring after head trauma

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    ismail Boyraz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Lesions of the nervus abducens, the 6th cranial nerve tend to be rare, usually occur suddenly following head injuries. A 43-year-old male patient presented with a history of fall from a height due to an occupational accident on the date of 11.01.2014. Cranial tomography demonstrated bilateral epidural hematoma. The epidural hematoma was drained during the operation. After the surgery, eye examination showed no vision loss, except limited bilateral lateral gaze. When the patient was unable to walk due to diplopia, he was advised to close one eye. On the right side, there were findings suggesting central facial paralysis. There may be multiple cranial nerve damage following head injury. Therefore, all cranial nerves should be thoroughly examined. [J Contemp Med 2016; 6(2.000: 110-113

  9. Congenital third nerve palsy with synergistic depression on attempted adduction and trigemino-oculomotor synkinesis: Underpinnings of a spectral dysinnervation disorder

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    Pramod Kumar Pandey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors describe a case of congenital partial pupil-sparing third cranial nerve palsy with absent adduction, synergistic depression of globe and widening of palpebral fissure on attempted adduction and synergistic elevation and adduction on mouth opening and sideways thrusting of jaw. The case illustrates trigemino-oculomotor synkinesis associated with congenital third nerve palsy. The possible mechanism of miswiring involving the medial longitudinal fasciculus and trigeminal nuclei is discussed. At least some cases of congenital third cranial nerve palsy may fall in the realm of congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders (CCDDs sharing a much wider spectrum of presentation.

  10. Congenital third nerve palsy with synergistic depression on attempted adduction and trigemino-oculomotor synkinesis: Underpinnings of a spectral dysinnervation disorder.

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    Pandey, Pramod Kumar; Bhambhwani, Vishaal; Ranjith, P C; Kadav, Mandar; Aparnaa, C

    2016-05-01

    The authors describe a case of congenital partial pupil-sparing third cranial nerve palsy with absent adduction, synergistic depression of globe and widening of palpebral fissure on attempted adduction and synergistic elevation and adduction on mouth opening and sideways thrusting of jaw. The case illustrates trigemino-oculomotor synkinesis associated with congenital third nerve palsy. The possible mechanism of miswiring involving the medial longitudinal fasciculus and trigeminal nuclei is discussed. At least some cases of congenital third cranial nerve palsy may fall in the realm of congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders (CCDDs) sharing a much wider spectrum of presentation.

  11. Tourniquet-Related Iatrogenic Femoral Nerve Palsy after Knee Surgery: Case Report and Review of the Literature

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    Juan Mingo-Robinet

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Tourniquet-induced nerve injuries have been reported in the literature, but even if electromyography abnormalities in knee surgery are frequent, only two cases of permanent femoral nerve palsies have been reported, both after prolonged tourniquet time. We report a case of tourniquet-related permanent femoral nerve palsy after knee surgery. Case Report. We report a case of a 58-year-old woman who underwent surgical treatment of a patella fracture. Tourniquet was inflated to 310 mmHg for 45 minutes. After surgery, patient complained about paralysis of the quadriceps femoris with inability to extend the knee. Electromyography and nerve conduction study showed a severe axonal neuropathy of the left femoral nerve, without clinical remission after several months. Discussion. Even if complications are not rare, safe duration and pressure for tourniquet use remain a controversy. Nevertheless, subtle clinical lesions of the femoral nerve or even subclinical lesions only detectable by nerve conduction and EMG activity are frequent, so persistent neurologic dysfunction, even if rare, may be an underreported complication of tourniquet application. Elderly persons with muscle atrophy and flaccid, loose skin might be in risk for iatrogenic nerve injury secondary to tourniquet.

  12. Bupivacaine Injection for Management of Lagophthalmos Due to Long-Standing Idiopathic Facial Nerve Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabi, Mohammad Taher; Shadravan, Mahla; Mazloumi, Mehdi; Tabatabaie, Syed Ziaeddin; Hosseini, Seyedeh Simindokht; Rajabi, Mohammad Bagher

    2015-01-01

    To report the results of bupivacaine injection into the orbicularis oculi muscle to treat lagophthalmos in patients with long-standing Bell palsy. In this prospective interventional case series, bupivacaine, 5 ml of a 0.750% solution, was injected into the preseptal and pretarsal area of the orbicularis oculi in each of 10 patients with idiopathic peripheral facial nerve palsy. The measures of vertical eyelid apertures during open and closed eyes were made before the procedure and 1, 3, and 6 months after injection. A total of 10 eyes including 2 men and 8 women with an average age of 43 years (26-64 years) were studied. The mean amount of lagophthalmos before injection and after 6 months of follow up were 3.9 mm and 2.3 mm, respectively (p = 0.01)). The mean amount of corneal exposure before injection and after 6 months of follow up was 1.05 mm and 0.25 mm, respectively (p lagophthalmos and epiphora.

  13. Femoral nerve palsy caused by ileopectineal bursitis after total hip replacement: a case report

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    Bähr Mathias

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Infectious ileopectineal bursitis is a rare complication after total hip replacement and is associated mainly with rheumatoid arthritis. The main complications are local swelling and pain, but communication of the inflamed bursa with the joint can occur, leading to subsequent cartilage damage and bone destruction. Case presentation We report a case of a 47-year-old Caucasian woman without rheumatoid arthritis who reported pain and palsy in her left leg almost one year after total hip replacement. She was diagnosed with an ileopectineal bursitis after total hip replacement, leading to femoral nerve palsy. The diagnosis was obtained by thorough clinical examination, the results of focused computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of non-infectious ileopectineal bursitis in a patient without rheumatoid arthritis as a complication of total hip replacement. This rare case underlines the importance of proper neurologic examination of persistent conditions after orthopedic intervention in otherwise healthy individuals. We believe this case should be useful for a broad spectrum of medical specialties, including orthopedics, neurology, radiology, and general practice.

  14. Double Augmented Vertical Rectus Transposition for Large-Angle Esotropia Due to Sixth Nerve Palsy.

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    Singh, Priyanka; Vijayalakshmi, Perumalsamy; Shetty, Shashikant; Vora, Priyanka; Kalwaniya, Suresh

    2016-11-01

    To study the binocular alignment and ocular motility in patients with large-angle esotropia due to sixth nerve palsy treated with double augmented vertical recti transposition. This was a prospective interventional study. Fifteen patients with non-resolving sixth nerve palsy who underwent surgical correction were included in the study. Fourteen patients also underwent an additional medial rectus recession. Two patients with an associated small vertical deviation had a selective augmentation of one vertical rectus muscle. Binocular alignment, ocular motility, duction limitation, improvement in head posture, induced vertical deviations, and field of diplopia-free binocular single vision (when possible) were analyzed. Successful outcome was defined as a residual horizontal deviation of 10 prism diopters (PD) or less with no vertical deviation at final follow-up (6 months). The double augmented Hummelsheim procedure improved esotropia from 58.3 ± 10.8 PD preoperatively to 7.2 ± 5.1 PD postoperatively (P = .001). Three (20%) patients had residual deviation of greater than 10 PD, of which 1 patient had diplopia and was treated with prisms. Postoperative binocular field of vision was performed in 6 patients, the mean of which was 20° for abduction and 45° for adduction. Three of 6 patients had elimination of face turn and the rest had residual head posture of less than 5°. Two patients had an induced vertical deviation of less than 4 PD. In patients who had selective augmentation, the vertical deviation was completely corrected. The patients operated on with double augmentation of the Hummelsheim procedure combined with medial rectus recession had reduced mean primary esotropia and improved diplopia-free field of vision postoperatively. [J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. 2016;53(6):369-374.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Concurrent Rotator Cuff Tear and Axillary Nerve Palsy Associated with Anterior Dislocation of the Shoulder and Large Glenoid Rim Fracture: A “Terrible Tetrad”

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    Fumiaki Takase

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of concurrent rotator cuff tear and axillary nerve palsy resulting from anterior dislocation of the shoulder and a large glenoid rim fracture—a “terrible tetrad.” A 61-year-old woman fell on her right shoulder. Radiographs showed anterior dislocation of the shoulder with a glenoid rim fracture, and an MRI two months after injury revealed a rotator cuff tear. Upon referral to our hospital, physical and electrophysiological examinations revealed axillary nerve palsy. The axillary nerve palsy was incomplete and recovering, and displacement of the glenoid rim fracture was minimal and already united; therefore, we surgically repaired only the rotator cuff tear three months after injury. The patient recovered satisfactorily following the operation. In patients whose axillary nerve palsy is recovering, surgeons should consider operating on rotator cuff tears in an attempt to prevent rotator cuff degeneration.

  16. Outcome of patients presenting with idiopathic facial nerve paralysis (Bell's palsy) in a tertiary centre--a five year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, I P; Lee, S C; Shashinder, S; Raman, R

    2009-06-01

    This is a retrospective study. The objective of this study is to review the factors influencing the outcome of treatment for the patients presented with idiopathic facial nerve paralysis. The demographic data, clinical presentation and management of 84 patients with idiopathic facial nerve paralysis (Bell's palsy) were collected from the medical record office, reviewed and analyzed from 2000 to 2005. Thirty-four (72.3%) out of 47 patients who were treated with oral prednisolone alone, fully recovered from Bell's palsy meanwhile 36 (97%) out of 37 patients who were treated with combination of oral prednisolone and acyclovir fully recovered. The difference was statistically significant. 42 (93.3%) out of 45 patients who presented within three days to our clinic, fully recovered while 28 (71.8%) out of 39 patients presented later then three days had full recovery from Bell's palsy. The difference was statistically significant. The outcome of full recovery is better with the patients treated with combined acyclovir and prednisolone compared with prednisolone alone. The patients who were treated after three days of clinical presentation, who were more than 50 years of age, who had concurrent chronic medical illness and facial nerve paralysis HB Grade IV to VI during initial presentation have reduced chance of full recovery of facial nerve paralysis.

  17. CT and MR imaging of the normal and pathologic conditions of the facial nerve

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    Jaeger, Lorenz E-mail: jaeger@ikra.med.uni-muenchen.de; Reiser, Maximilian

    2001-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are well established imaging modalities to examine the facial nerve as well as the course of the facial nerve itself. High spatial resolution is guaranteed not only in the x- and y-axis, but also in the z-axis using multislice spiral CT. With this technique, reformatted multiplanar images in oblique planes, avoiding additional examinations in the coronal plane, facilitate the delineation of the facial nerve canal. This is beneficial in patients with temporal bone trauma, malformation or osseous changes. MR has a superior soft-tissue contrast to CT that enables imaging of the facial nerve itself. Therefore the normal facial nerve as well as pathologic changes of the facial nerve is readily visualized from the brain stem to the parotid gland. This review article presents anatomy, pathology and imaging strategies in the diagnostics of the facial nerve.

  18. Èlectroneuromyographiс parameters as prognostic criteria in facial nerve palsy outcome

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    N. G. Savitskaya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article we present the results of the retrospective clinico-electrophysiological analysis of 182 patients suffering from the idiopathic neuropathy of the facial nerve (Bell`s palsy. The comparison of the most common electromyographical (ENMG predictors of outcomes was made. It was demonstrated that the most sensitive method in the acutest period (less then 5 days is the level of excitability of the nerve, in the acute period (less then 14 days – estimation of M-answer amplitude loss, and from the 21st day – the presence of denervation in muscles. The most specific electromyographical approach to estimate the therapy efficiency is an analysis of the M-answer amplitude and latency. In conclusion, neurologists have the possibility to predict the outcome and to control the therapy efficiency in any period of the disease. The correlation dynamics ÈNMG sensitivity settings – NLN on different dates can be used to determine the volume of ÈNMG – the NLN study depending on the timing for the treatment of patients.

  19. Peripheral Neuropathy and VIth Nerve Palsy Related to Randall Disease Successfully Treated by High-Dose Melphalan, Autologous Blood Stem Cell Transplantation, and VIth Nerve Decompression Surgery

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    C. Foguem

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Randall disease is an unusual cause of extraocular motor nerve (VI palsy. A 35-year-old woman was hospitalized for sicca syndrome. The physical examination showed general weakness, weight loss, diplopia related to a left VIth nerve palsy, hypertrophy of the submandibular salivary glands, and peripheral neuropathy. The biological screening revealed renal insufficiency, serum monoclonal kappa light chain immunoglobulin, urinary monoclonal kappa light chain immunoglobulin, albuminuria, and Bence-Jones proteinuria. Bone marrow biopsy revealed medullar plasma cell infiltration. Immunofixation associated with electron microscopy analysis of the salivary glands showed deposits of kappa light chains. Randall disease was diagnosed. The patient received high-dose melphalan followed by autostem cell transplantation which led to rapid remission. Indeed, at the 2-month followup assessment, the submandibular salivary gland hypertrophy and renal insufficiency had disappeared, and the peripheral neuropathy, proteinuria, and serum monoclonal light chain had decreased significantly. The persistent diplopia was treated with nerve decompression surgery of the left extraocular motor nerve. Cranial nerve complications of Randall disease deserve to be recognized.

  20. Acute abducens nerve palsy as a presenting feature in carotid-cavernous fistula in a 6-year-old girl [

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    Pawar, Neelam

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available [english] Carotid-cavernous fistulas (CCF are abnormal communications between the internal carotid artery and the cavernous sinus. Traumatic carotid-cavernous fistulae are rare potential complications of craniofacial trauma. Typical findings of CCF are proptosis, chemosis, headache, oculomotor or abducens nerve palsy, trigeminal pain and pulsating bruit over the temporal skull and the bulb.CCF are reported very rarely in childhood. This report describes the clinical and radiological findings of a pediatric patient presented with CCF.

  1. Unilateral Abducens Nerve Palsy as an Early Feature of Multiple Mononeuropathy Associated with Anti-GQ1b Antibody

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    Ryuta Kinno

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Patients with anti-GQ1b antibody syndrome show various combinations of ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, areflexia, or altered sensorium as clinical features. We describe herein a unique case with unilateral abducens nerve palsy as an early feature of multiple mononeuropathy involving dysfunctions of the inferior dental plexus and the ulnar nerve, which was thought to be associated with anti-GQ1b antibody. A 27-year-old man presented with acute-onset diplopia. He subsequently experienced numbness not only in the right lower teeth and gums but also on the ulnar side of the left hand. Neurological examinations revealed dysfunctions of the right abducens nerve, the right inferior dental plexus, and the left ulnar nerve, suggesting multiple mononeuropathy. Serum anti-GQ1b antibody was positive. This is a rare case report of a patient with unilateral abducens nerve palsy as an early feature of multiple mononeuropathy associated with anti-GQ1b antibody. We suggest that anti-GQ1b antibody syndrome should be taken into consideration as a differential diagnosis of acute multiple mononeuropathy if ophthalmoplegia is present unilaterally.

  2. [Facial palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavoy, R

    2013-09-01

    Facial palsy is a daily challenge for the clinicians. Determining whether facial nerve palsy is peripheral or central is a key step in the diagnosis. Central nervous lesions can give facial palsy which may be easily differentiated from peripheral palsy. The next question is the peripheral facial paralysis idiopathic or symptomatic. A good knowledge of anatomy of facial nerve is helpful. A structure approach is given to identify additional features that distinguish symptomatic facial palsy from idiopathic one. The main cause of peripheral facial palsies is idiopathic one, or Bell's palsy, which remains a diagnosis of exclusion. The most common cause of symptomatic peripheral facial palsy is Ramsay-Hunt syndrome. Early identification of symptomatic facial palsy is important because of often worst outcome and different management. The prognosis of Bell's palsy is on the whole favorable and is improved with a prompt tapering course of prednisone. In Ramsay-Hunt syndrome, an antiviral therapy is added along with prednisone. We also discussed of current treatment recommendations. We will review short and long term complications of peripheral facial palsy.

  3. Pupil-sparing complete third nerve palsy from cryptogenic midbrain stroke in an otherwise-healthy young adult with patent foramen ovale

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    Arif O Khan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although pupil-sparing in acute unilateral complete third nerve palsy is often a sign of ischemic nerve injury, it is not specific for injury outside of the midbrain. This report documents acute pupil-sparing complete third nerve palsy in an otherwise healthy young adult with patent foramen ovale and associated atrial dilatation who suffered cryptogenic focal midbrain stroke, presumably from a paradoxical embolism. The patent foramen ovale was surgically closed. Over the next several months neurological recovery was complete except for diplopia and relatively comitant hypotropia, which responded well to conventional strabismus surgery.

  4. Bell's Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... facial nerve, such as a tumor or skull fracture. Most people with Bell's palsy recover fully — with or without treatment. There's no one-size-fits-all treatment for Bell's palsy, but your doctor may suggest medications or physical therapy to help speed your recovery. Surgery is rarely ...

  5. Occurrence and severity of upper eyelid skin contracture in facial nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziahosseini, K; Venables, V; Neville, C; Nduka, C; Patel, B; Malhotra, R

    2016-05-01

    PurposeTo describe the occurrence and severity of upper eyelid skin contracture in facial nerve palsy (FNP).MethodsWe enroled consecutive patients with unilateral FNP into this study. Patients with previous upper eyelid surgery for either side were excluded. We developed a standardised technique to measure the distance between the upper eyelid margin and the lower border of brow (LMBD). FNP was graded using the Sunnybrook grading scale. Its aetiology, duration, and treatment were noted. Upper and lower marginal reflex distance and lagophthalmos were also noted.ResultsSixty-six patients (mean age 51 years) were included. FNP was owing to a variety of aetiologies. LMBD on the paralytic side was shorter than the normal contralateral side in 47 (71%), equal in 15 (23%), and larger in four (6%) patients. The mean contracture was 3.4 mm (median: 3, range: 1-12) with 11 (17%) patients showing 5 mm or more of skin contracture. The mean LMBD on the paralytic side in all patients was significantly smaller than the contralateral side; 30±3.7 (median: 30; 95% CI 29-31) compared with 32±3.7 (median: 32; 95% CI 32-33), respectively, Pcontracture and to caution surgeons against unnecessary upper eyelid skin excision.

  6. Foot Drop: Looking Beyond Common Peroneal Nerve Palsy – A Neurophysiology Centre Experience

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    Yap, SM

    2016-04-01

    Foot drop is a complex symptom with a considerable range in aetiology, severity and prognosis. We aim to characterise the aetiologies of foot drop and assess the diagnostic contribution of neurophysiologic testing (NCS\\/EMG). Retrospective review of consecutive referrals of foot drop to the Neurophysiology Department in Cork University Hospital was performed over a two year period (January 2012 to December 2013). Of a total of 59 referrals, common peroneal nerve (CPN) palsy comprised only slightly more than half of cases; 3(5%) have central origin; 3(5%) have motor neuron disease. Six (10%) have diabetes; 7(12%) have cancer; 5(8%) were bilateral. NCS\\/EMG altered initial working diagnosis in 14 out of 52 (27%) cases whereby initial diagnosis was provided. However one-third of all cases revealed additional coexistent pathology in an anatomic location remote to that of the primary diagnosis. Foot drop with central and proximal localisations are important and under recognised. NCS\\/EMG is valuable and also reveals additional pathology which warrants investigation

  7. Common Peroneal Nerve Palsy with Multiple-Ligament Knee Injury and Distal Avulsion of the Biceps Femoris Tendon

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    Takeshi Oshima

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A multiple-ligament knee injury that includes posterolateral corner (PLC disruption often causes palsy of the common peroneal nerve (CPN, which occurs in 44% of cases with PLC injury and biceps femoris tendon rupture or avulsion of the fibular head. Approximately half of these cases do not show functional recovery. This case report aims to present a criteria-based approach to the operation and postoperative management of CPN palsy that resulted from a multiple-ligament knee injury in a 22-year-old man that occurred during judo. We performed a two-staged surgery. The first stage was to repair the injuries to the PLC and biceps femoris. The second stage involved anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The outcomes were excellent, with a stable knee, excellent range of motion, and improvement in the palsy. The patient was able to return to judo competition 27 weeks after the injury. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report describing a return to sports following CPN palsy with multiple-ligament knee injury.

  8. Rhino-oculo Cerebral Mucormycosis with Multiple Cranial Nerve Palsy in Diabetic Patient: Review of Six Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeva, Kavita

    2013-12-01

    AIM of the study is to evaluate etiopathogenesis role played by predisposing conditions (Diabetes, Immunosupression), precipitating factors (trauma/surgery/ketoacidosis) and possible role of occupational hazard is discussed briefly. Clinical presentation and management of patients presenting with rhinoorbitocerebral mucormycosis is discussed. The prospective study of patient undergoing treatment of mucormycosis] without control Setting was done in ENT Deptt. NSCB Medical College, Jabalpur (tertiary referral centre of mid India). Subject were patients presenting with invasive fungal rhino sinusitis presenting with orbital involvement and cranial nerve palsies undergoing treatment. The detailed history, clinical examination including cranial nerve examination, blood test, CTscan and biopsy. Nasal endoscopy, CWL surgery and medical management with 6 month follow up. All six patients were diabetic when evaluated on presentation. Two patients had ketoacidosis. Four had history of surgery in recent past. Blood stained nasal discharge and dysaesthesia of face are early warning signs. They had necrotic lesion in nose and infraorbital area with 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 cranial nerve involvement. Skin necrosis/Mucosal necrosis, facial palsy and diplopia signify advanced disease. Altered sensorium, panopthalmitis & diabetes complicated with ketoacidosis signify bad prognosis. In present study two patients with advanced disease, altered sensorium and ketoacidosis succumbed within 72 hours in spite of anti fungal medicine. Of the four surviving patients, all responded well to treatment but had residual sixth and seventh nerve palsy. One patient defaulted in diabetes control & had recurrence after 6 months. Early diagnosis, aggressive surgical debridement and proper management of underlying metabolic abnormality along with amphotericin B can avert the bad prognosis of rhinoorbitocerebral mucormycosis.

  9. MEDIAL EPICONDYLE FRACTURE OF THE HUMERUS WITH ULNAR NERVE PALSY OF AN 11-MONTH-OLD INFANT:CASE REPORT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张楷乐; 张自明; 张菁

    2013-01-01

    <正>To our knowledge,there is no report concerning medial epicondyle fracture of the humerus for infants,the clinical course and treatment outcome of an 11 -month-old boy with such fracture with ulnar nerve palsy was described in this article.Ulnar nerve detection and scar tissue release were performed.The bony fragment was anatomically reduced and fixed with an anchor.The above-elbow wellpadded anterior plastic splint was used postoperatively for 4 weeks.After removing the splint,the motion of hand had no obvious improvement accompanied with claw hand deformity,and nerve transplantation was suggested to the patient’s parent.We would like to remind clinicians of encountering the clinical manifestations to be vigilant for any possibilities.

  10. High-resolution CT of lesions of the optic nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peyster, R.G.; Hoover, E.D.; Hershey, B.L.; Haskin, M.E.

    1983-05-01

    The optic nerves are well demonstrated by high-resolution computed tomography. Involvement of the optic nerve by optic gliomas and optic nerve sheath meningiomas is well known. However, nonneoplastic processes such as increased intracranial pressure, optic neuritis, Grave ophthalmopathy, and orbital pseudotumor may also alter the appearance of the optic nerve/sheath on computed tomography. Certain clinical and computed tomographic features permit distinction of these nonneoplastic tumefactions from tumors.

  11. A Novel CT-Guided Transpsoas Approach to Diagnostic Genitofemoral Nerve Block and Ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parris, David; Fischbein, Nancy; Mackey, Sean; Carroll, Ian

    2010-01-01

    Background Inguinal hernia repair is associated with a high incidence of chronic postsurgical pain. This pain may be caused by injury to the iliohypogastric, ilioinguinal, or genitofemoral nerves. It is often difficult to identify the specific source of the pain, in part, because these nerves are derived from overlapping nerve roots and closely colocalize in the area of surgery. It is therefore technically difficult to selectively block these nerves individually proximal to the site of surgical injury. In particular, the genitofemoral nerve is retroperitoneal before entering the inguinal canal, a position that puts anterior approaches to the proximal nerve at risk of transgressing into the peritoneum. We report a computed tomography (CT)-guided transpsoas technique to selectively block the genitofemoral nerve for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes while avoiding injury to the nearby ureter and intestines. Case A 39-year-old woman with chronic lancinating right groin pain after inguinal hernia repair underwent multiple pharmacologic interventions and invasive procedures without relief. Using CT and Stimuplex nerve stimulator guidance, the genitofemoral nerve was localized on the anterior surface of the psoas muscle and a diagnostic block with local anesthetic block was performed. The patient had immediate relief of her symptoms for 36 hours, confirming the diagnosis of genitofemoral neuralgia. She subsequently underwent CT-guided radiofrequency and phenol ablation of the genitofemoral nerve but has not achieved long-term analgesia. Conclusion CT-guided transpsoas genitofemoral nerve block is a viable option for safely and selectively blocking the genitofemoral nerve for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes proximal to injury caused by inguinal surgery. PMID:20546515

  12. Bell's Palsy (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bell's palsy was named after a Scottish doctor, Sir Charles Bell, who studied the two facial nerves ... better. It's rare that a doctor would do surgery for Bell's palsy. Instead, he or she might ...

  13. Transient facial nerve paralysis (Bell's palsy following intranasal delivery of a genetically detoxified mutant of Escherichia coli heat labile toxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J M Lewis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: An association was previously established between facial nerve paralysis (Bell's palsy and intranasal administration of an inactivated influenza virosome vaccine containing an enzymatically active Escherichia coli Heat Labile Toxin (LT adjuvant. The individual component(s responsible for paralysis were not identified, and the vaccine was withdrawn. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Subjects participating in two contemporaneous non-randomized Phase 1 clinical trials of nasal subunit vaccines against Human Immunodeficiency Virus and tuberculosis, both of which employed an enzymatically inactive non-toxic mutant LT adjuvant (LTK63, underwent active follow-up for adverse events using diary-cards and clinical examination. Two healthy subjects experienced transient peripheral facial nerve palsies 44 and 60 days after passive nasal instillation of LTK63, possibly a result of retrograde axonal transport after neuronal ganglioside binding or an inflammatory immune response, but without exaggerated immune responses to LTK63. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: While the unique anatomical predisposition of the facial nerve to compression suggests nasal delivery of neuronal-binding LT-derived adjuvants is inadvisable, their continued investigation as topical or mucosal adjuvants and antigens appears warranted on the basis of longstanding safety via oral, percutaneous, and other mucosal routes.

  14. Unilateral blindness with third cranial nerve palsy and abnormal enhancement of extraocular muscles on magnetic resonance imaging of orbit after the ingestion of methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Tae Nyoung; Kim, Sun Wook; Park, Yoo Seok; Park, Incheol

    2010-05-01

    Methanol is generally known to cause visual impairment and various systemic manifestations. There are a few reported specific findings for methanol intoxication on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain. A case is reported of unilateral blindness with third cranial nerve palsy oculus sinister (OS) after the ingestion of methanol. Unilateral damage of the retina and optic nerve were confirmed by fundoscopy, flourescein angiography, visual evoked potential and electroretinogram. The optic nerve and extraocular muscles (superior rectus, medial rectus, inferior rectus and inferior oblique muscle) were enhanced by gadolinium-DTPA on MRI of the orbit. This is the first case report of permanent monocular blindness with confirmed unilateral damage of the retina and optic nerve, combined with third cranial nerve palsy after methanol ingestion.

  15. Occurrence and severity of upper eyelid skin contracture in facial nerve palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziahosseini, K; Venables, V; Neville, C; Nduka, C; Patel, B; Malhotra, R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To describe the occurrence and severity of upper eyelid skin contracture in facial nerve palsy (FNP). Methods We enroled consecutive patients with unilateral FNP into this study. Patients with previous upper eyelid surgery for either side were excluded. We developed a standardised technique to measure the distance between the upper eyelid margin and the lower border of brow (LMBD). FNP was graded using the Sunnybrook grading scale. Its aetiology, duration, and treatment were noted. Upper and lower marginal reflex distance and lagophthalmos were also noted. Results Sixty-six patients (mean age 51 years) were included. FNP was owing to a variety of aetiologies. LMBD on the paralytic side was shorter than the normal contralateral side in 47 (71%), equal in 15 (23%), and larger in four (6%) patients. The mean contracture was 3.4 mm (median: 3, range: 1–12) with 11 (17%) patients showing 5 mm or more of skin contracture. The mean LMBD on the paralytic side in all patients was significantly smaller than the contralateral side; 30±3.7 (median: 30; 95% CI 29–31) compared with 32±3.7 (median: 32; 95% CI 32–33), respectively, P<0.0001, two-tailed paired t-test. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first study that quantitatively demonstrates contraction of the upper eyelid skin in FNP. This finding is valuable in directing optimal early management to minimise skin contracture and to caution surgeons against unnecessary upper eyelid skin excision. PMID:26939561

  16. A Case Presentation of a Third-Nerve Palsy as a Characteristic of Miller Fisher Syndrome

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    Trennda L. Rittenbach, OD

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: A rare clinical variant of Guillain-Barre syndrome, known as Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS, is an immunemediated neuropathy classically characterized by a triad consisting of ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, and areflexia.1,2 Although MFS is thought to be a disease of immunological basis, other pathological entities may give rise to the syndrome as well. The diagnosis of MFS relies upon clinical signs, a combination of lab tests including antibody serum, cerebrospinal fluid, and electrophysiological findings. Understanding the clinical course of MFS and its ocular components can aid in the rehabilitation and co-management of these patients. Case Report: A 79-year-old white male presented with a four day onset of double vision and an inability to walk unassisted. An examination revealed a pupil-sparing third-nerve palsy with a left eye ptosis. Due to the patient being in moderate pain throughout his entire body and presenting with an acute onset of symptoms, the patient was sent to the emergency room in the same hospital building. The patient was immediately admitted for evaluation and testing which revealed the diagnosis of MFS. Conclusions: Although a complaint of diplopia can lead to an array of diagnoses, when accompanied by an acute inability to walk, MFS should be on the list of possible causes. Although mostly a self-limiting disease, there is the possibility of progressing to respiratory failure. Knowledge of the syndrome, its clinical course, and prognosis, along with an appropriate evaluation with current laboratory testing, will lead to the proper diagnosis, treatment, and management.

  17. Evaluation of variation in the course of the facial nerve, nerve adhesion to tumors, and postoperative facial palsy in acoustic neuroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sameshima, Tetsuro; Morita, Akio; Tanikawa, Rokuya; Fukushima, Takanori; Friedman, Allan H; Zenga, Francesco; Ducati, Alessandro; Mastronardi, Luciano

    2013-02-01

    Objective To investigate the variation in the course of the facial nerve (FN) in patients undergoing acoustic neuroma (AN) surgery, its adhesion to tumors, and the relationship between such adhesions and postoperative facial palsy. Methods The subjects were 356 patients who underwent AN surgery in whom the course of the FN could be confirmed. Patients were classified into six groups: ventro-central surface of the tumor (VCe), ventro-rostral (VR), ventro-caudal (VCa), rostral (R), caudal (C), and dorsal (D). Results The FN course was VCe in 185 cases, VR in 137, VCa in 19, R in 10, C in 4, and D in one. For tumors  3.0 cm, there was an increasing tendency for the FN to adhere strongly to the tumor capsule, and postoperative facial palsy was more severe in patients with stronger adhesions. Conclusions The VCe pattern was most common for small tumors. Strong or less strong adhesion to the tumor capsule was most strongly associated with postoperative FN palsy.

  18. Diagnostic value of 18F-FDG PET/CT for cancer pain of peripheral nerves

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    Lei FANG

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To observe the characteristics of cancer pain of the peripheral nerves on 18F-FDG PET/CT images, and explore the diagnostic value of 18F-FDG PET/CT for cancer pain of the peripheral nerves. Methods Imaging data of 18F-FDG PET/CT of 10 patients with cancer pain of the peripheral nerves confirmed by histopathology or long-term follow-up were analyzed retrospectively. The similarities and differences in PET/CT manifestations between the diseased side peripheral nerves and contralateral normal peripheral nerves were observed, and the maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax were compared by paired t test with SPSS 17.0 software. Results Seventeen secondary malignant peripheral nerve lesions were found in 10 cases. On PET images, the lesions were found to spread along the plexus, nerve bundle or intervertebral foramen, and manifested as bundle-, root-hair- or nodule-like high 18F-FDG metabolic tissue, with the SUVmax as high as 6.67±3.24. The lesions on CT images manifested as bundle-, root-hair- or nodule-like soft tissue density shadows spreading along the nerve bundle or nerve root canal, and there was no clear border between the lesions and the surrounding soft and fat tissues. The contralateral normal peripheral nerves showed no abnormal images on 18F-FDG PET or CT, and the SUVmax was 1.19±0.48, which was significantly different from that of nerves on disease side (t=9.389, P<0.001. Conclusion 18F-FDG PET/CT can accurately show invasion and metastasis to the peripheral nerve of tumor, and it also can display the size, shape, distribution and tumor activity of the lesions, thus it is valuable for the diagnosis of cancer pain of the peripheral nerves. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2013.11.009

  19. Causes of isolated recurrent ipsilateral sixth nerve palsies in older adults: a case series and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan JW

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Jane W Chan,1,2 Jeff Albretson3 1Department of Neurology, 2Department of Ophthalmology, College of Medicine, University of Arizona, Phoenix, AZ, USA; 3University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV, USA Purpose: The etiology of recurrent isolated sixth nerve palsies in older adults has not been well described in the literature. Sixth nerve palsies presenting with a chronic, relapsing, and remitting course are uncommon, but can herald a diagnosis of high morbidity and mortality in the older population. Patients and methods: Our method was a retrospective case series study. A review of clinical records of 782 patients ≥50 years of age diagnosed with recurrent sixth nerve palsies was performed over a 10-year period from 1995–2005 in a neuro-ophthalmology clinic in Reno, Nevada. A review of the current literature regarding similar cases was also performed on PubMed. Results: Seven patients ≥50 years of age with chronic, recurrent sixth nerve palsies were identified. Five were males and two were females. Four of seven (57% patients had structural lesions located in the parasellar or petrous apex cavernous sinus regions. One of seven (14.29% had a recurrent painful ophthalmoplegic neuropathy (International Headache Society [IHS] 13.9, previously termed ophthalmoplegic migraine; one of seven (14.29% presented with an intracavernous carotid artery aneurysm; and one of seven (14.29% presented with microvascular disease. Conclusion: The clinical presentation of an isolated recurrent diplopia from a sixth nerve palsy should prompt the neurologist or ophthalmologist to order a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scan of the brain with and without gadolinium as part of the initial workup to rule out a non-microvascular cause, such as a compressive lesion, which can increase morbidity and mortality in adults >50 years of age. Keywords: cranial nerve palsy, skull base tumor, aneurysm, meningioma, ophthalmoplegic migraine, microvascular disease

  20. Treatment of Cervical Internal Carotid Artery Spontaneous Dissection with Pseudoaneurysm and Unilateral Lower Cranial Nerves Palsy by Two Silk Flow Diverters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelenak, Kamil, E-mail: zelenak@unm.sk [University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Slovakia); Zelenakova, Jana [University Hospital, Department of Neurology (Slovakia); DeRiggo, Julius [University Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery (Slovakia); Kurca, Egon; Kantorova, Ema [University Hospital, Department of Neurology (Slovakia); Polacek, Hubert [University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Slovakia)

    2013-08-01

    Internal carotid artery (ICA) lesions in the parapharyngeal space (a dissection and a pseudoaneurysm) may present as isolated lower cranial nerves (IX, X, XI, and XII) palsy (Collet-Sicard syndrome). Some arteriopathies such as fibromuscular dysplasia and tortuosity make a vessel predisposed to dissection. Extreme vessel tortuosity makes the treatment by a stent graft impossible. Two Silk stents were used in a 46 year-old man with left lower cranial nerves (IX-XII) palsy for the treatment of left ICA spontaneous dissection with pseudoaneurysm. A follow-up angiogram 5 months later confirmed pseudoaneurysm thrombosis and patency of the left ICA. The patient recovered completely from the deficits.

  1. Sciatic nerve compression by neurogenic heterotopic ossification: use of CT to determine surgical indications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salga, Marjorie [Hopital Raymond Poincare, APHP, CIC-IT 805, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Garches (France); Jourdan, Claire [Hopital Raymond Poincare, APHP, CIC-IT 805, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Garches (France); Universite de Versailles Saint Quentin en Yvelines, Handi-Resp, (EA4047), Versailles (France); Durand, Marie-Christine [Hopital Raymond Poincare, APHP, CIC-IT 805, Department of Neurophysiology, Garches (France); Universite de Versailles Saint Quentin en Yvelines, Groupement de Recherche Clinique et Technologique sur le Handicap (GRCTH, EA 4497), Versailles (France); Hangard, Chloe; Carlier, Robert-Yves [Hopital Raymond Poincare, APHP, CIC-IT 805, Department of Medical Imaging, Garches (France); Denormandie, Philippe [Universite de Versailles Saint Quentin en Yvelines, Groupement de Recherche Clinique et Technologique sur le Handicap (GRCTH, EA 4497), Versailles (France); Hopital Raymond Poincare, APHP, CIC-IT 805, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Garches (France); Genet, Francois [Hopital Raymond Poincare, APHP, CIC-IT 805, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Garches (France); Universite de Versailles Saint Quentin en Yvelines, Groupement de Recherche Clinique et Technologique sur le Handicap (GRCTH, EA 4497), Versailles (France); Military Medical Service, Hopital d' Instruction des Armees Percy, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Clamart (France)

    2014-09-14

    To describe the characteristics of neurogenic heterotopic ossification (NHO) based on clinical tests, electroneuromyography (ENMG) and CT in a database of patients with lesions of the central nervous system who required sciatic nerve neurolysis along with posterior hip NHO resection, and to determine the respective roles of ENMG and CT in the management of posterior hip NHOs in patients who are unable to communicate or express pain. The consistency of the ENMG results with clinical findings, CT results and macroscopic signs of lesions was retrospectively assessed after sciatic nerve neurolysis and ablation of 55 posterior hip NHOs. Sciatic nerve neurolysis was necessary in 55 cases (47.4 %; 55 out of 116). CT showed contact of the NHO with the nerve in all cases: 5 in contact with no deflection, 3 in contact with deflection, 21 moulded into a gutter and 26 entrapped in the NHO. There were clinical signs of sciatic nerve lesion in 21.8 % of cases (12 out of 55). ENMG showed signs of sciatic nerve lesions in only 55.6 % (10 out of 18), only 4 of whom presented with clinical signs of a nerve lesion. No significant relationship was found between clinical symptoms and ENMG findings of sciatic nerve compression (n = 13, p = 0.77). Nerve compression by NHO is likely an underdiagnosed condition, particularly in patients who are unable to communicate. Diagnosis of sciatic compression by NHO should be based on regular clinical examinations and CT. ENMG is not sufficiently sensitive to be used alone for surgical decision-making. (orig.)

  2. Noninvasive and painless magnetic stimulation of nerves improved brain motor function and mobility in a cerebral palsy case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flamand, Véronique H; Schneider, Cyril

    2014-10-01

    Motor deficits in cerebral palsy disturb functional independence. This study tested whether noninvasive and painless repetitive peripheral magnetic stimulation could improve motor function in a 7-year-old boy with spastic hemiparetic cerebral palsy. Stimulation was applied over different nerves of the lower limbs for 5 sessions. We measured the concurrent aftereffects of this intervention on ankle motor control, gait (walking velocity, stride length, cadence, cycle duration), and function of brain motor pathways. We observed a decrease of ankle plantar flexors resistance to stretch, an increase of active dorsiflexion range of movement, and improvements of corticospinal control of ankle dorsiflexors. Joint mobility changes were still present 15 days after the end of stimulation, when all gait parameters were also improved. Resistance to stretch was still lower than prestimulation values 45 days after the end of stimulation. This case illustrates the sustained effects of repetitive peripheral magnetic stimulation on brain plasticity, motor function, and gait. It suggests a potential impact for physical rehabilitation in cerebral palsy.

  3. Angiogenesis in tissue-engineered nerves evaluated objectively using MICROFIL perfusion and micro-CT scanning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-kui Wang; Ya-xian Wang; Cheng-bin Xue; Zhen-mei-yu Li; Jing Huang; Ya-hong Zhao; Yu-min Yang; Xiao-song Gu

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a key process in regenerative medicine generally, as well as in the speciifc ifeld of nerve regeneration. However, no conve-nient and objective method for evaluating the angiogenesis of tissue-engineered nerves has been reported. In this study, tissue-engineered nerves were constructedin vitro using Schwann cells differentiated from rat skin-derived precursors as supporting cells and chitosan nerve conduits combined with silk ifbroin ifbers as scaffolds to bridge 10-mm sciatic nerve defects in rats. Four weeks after surgery, three-di-mensional blood vessel reconstructions were made through MICROFIL perfusion and micro-CT scanning, and parameter analysis of the tissue-engineered nerves was performed. New blood vessels grew into the tissue-engineered nerves from three main directions: the prox-imal end, the distal end, and the middle. The parameter analysis of the three-dimensional blood vessel images yielded several parameters, including the number, diameter, connection, and spatial distribution of blood vessels. The new blood vessels were mainly capillaries and microvessels, with diameters ranging from 9 to 301µm. The blood vessels with diameters from 27 to 155µm accounted for 82.84% of the new vessels. The microvessels in the tissue-engineered nerves implantedin vivo were relatively well-identiifed using the MICROFIL perfusion and micro-CT scanning method, which allows the evaluation and comparison of differences and changes of angiogenesis in tis-sue-engineered nerves implantedin vivo.

  4. An unusual presentation of adenoid cystic carcinoma of the minor salivary glands with cranial nerve palsy: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris Pierre A

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma (ACC is a rare tumor entity and comprises about 1% of all malignant tumor of the oral and maxillofacial region. It is slow growing but a highly invasive cancer with a high recurrence rate. Intracranial ACC is even more infrequent and could be primary or secondary occurring either by direct invasion, hematogenous spread, or perineural spread. We report the first case of the 5th and 6th nerve palsy due to cavernous sinus invasion by adenoid cystic carcinoma. Case presentation A 49-year-old African American female presented to the emergency room complaining of severe right-sided headache, photophobia, dizziness and nausea, with diplopia. The patient had a 14 year history migraine headaches, hypertension, and mild intermittent asthma. Physical examination revealed right lateral rectus muscle palsy with esotropia. There was numbness in all three divisions of the right trigeminal nerve. Motor and sensory examination of extremities was normal. An MRI of the brain/brain stem was obtained which showed a large mass in the clivus extending to involve the nasopharynx, pterygoid plate, sphenoid and right cavernous sinuses. Biopsy showed an ACC tumor with a cribriform pattern of the minor salivary glands. The patient underwent total gross surgical resection and radiation therapy. Conclusion This is a case of ACC of the minor salivary glands with intracranial invasion. The patient had long history of headaches which changed in character during the past year, and symptoms of acute 5th and 6th cranial nerve involvement. Our unique case demonstrates direct invasion of cavernous sinus and could explain the 5th and 6th cranial nerve involvement as histopathology revealed no perineural invasion.

  5. MRI-guided and CT-guided cervical nerve root infiltration therapy. A cost comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurer, M.H.; Froeling, V.; Roettgen, R.; Bucourt, M. de; Hamm, B.; Streitparth, F. [Charite University Medicine Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Bretschneider, T. [Magdeburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine; Hartwig, T.; Disch, A.C. [Charite University Medicine Berlin (Germany). Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate and compare the costs of MRI-guided and CT-guided cervical nerve root infiltration for the minimally invasive treatment of radicular neck pain. Materials and Methods: Between September 2009 and April 2012, 22 patients (9 men, 13 women; mean age: 48.2 years) underwent MRI-guided (1.0 Tesla, Panorama HFO, Philips) single-site periradicular cervical nerve root infiltration with 40 mg triamcinolone acetonide. A further 64 patients (34 men, 30 women; mean age: 50.3 years) were treated under CT fluoroscopic guidance (Somatom Definition 64, Siemens). The mean overall costs were calculated as the sum of the prorated costs of equipment use (purchase, depreciation, maintenance, and energy costs), personnel costs and expenditure for disposables that were identified for MRI- and CT-guided procedures. Additionally, the cost of ultrasound guidance was calculated. Results: The mean intervention time was 24.9 min. (range: 12-36 min.) for MRI-guided infiltration and 19.7 min. (range: 5-54 min.) for CT-guided infiltration. The average total costs per patient were EUR 240 for MRI-guided interventions and EUR 124 for CT-guided interventions. These were (MRI/CT guidance) EUR 150/60 for equipment use, EUR 46/40 for personnel, and EUR 44/25 for disposables. The mean overall cost of ultrasound guidance was EUR 76. Conclusion: Cervical nerve root infiltration using MRI guidance is still about twice as expensive as infiltration using CT guidance. However, since it does not involve radiation exposure for patients and personnel, MRI-guided nerve root infiltration may become a promising alternative to the CT-guided procedure, especially since a further price decrease is expected for MRI devices and MR-compatible disposables. In contrast, ultrasound remains the less expensive method for nerve root infiltration guidance. (orig.)

  6. Drusen of the optic nerve head in CT imaging; Druzy tarczy nerwu wzrokowego w obrazie tomografii komputerowej

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabula, S.; Stefaniak, E.; Burzynska-Makuch, M.; Boron, Z. [Akademia Medyczna, Bydgoszcz (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    The optic nerve head drusen are non-cell formations, which are almost always calcified. They have a characteristic feature in CT examination, what can be helpful in differentiation from calcifications of the other origin, located in the posterior globe. Authors present cases of the optic nerve head drusen with typical feature in CT examination. (author). 4 refs, 1 fig.

  7. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor: MRI and CT Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. O. Kragha

    2015-01-01

    important in its diagnosis. A rare case of MPNST that produced urinary retention and bowel incontinence is presented that may aid clinicians in the diagnosis of this rare clinical entity. Motor weakness, central enhancement, and immunohistochemistry may assist in the diagnosis of MPNST and differentiation between benign peripheral nerve sheath tumor (BPNST and MPNST.

  8. A novel mechanotronic orthosis enables symmetrical gait kinematics in a patient with a femoral nerve palsy - a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobusch, G M; Hasenöhrl, T; Pieber, K; Schmalz, T; Dana, S; Ambrozy, C; Pohlig, K; Dietl, H; Crevenna, R; Skrbensky, G von; Hofer, C; Auberger, R; Windhager, R

    2017-04-01

    The usage of stance- and swing-phase control orthoses (SSCOs) is a good option in patients with neuromuscular insufficiency of the quadriceps muscle in a broad range of musculo-skeletal disorders. The subjective sensation of improved mobility in daily life and walking comfort could be objectively confirmed by the ability to walk without crutches and by harmonization of the gait patterns in hip and knee. They could also be a considered mobility device after limb salvage surgery, which may even have an impact on preoperative decision making. IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATION Symmetric gate in spite of femoral nerve palsy. Early gate improvements even after hours. High patient?s motivation to use the device.

  9. Intracranial Complication of Rhinosinusitis from Actinomycosis of the Paranasal Sinuses: A Rare Case of Abducens Nerve Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. L. Fadda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sinonasal actinomycosis should be suspected when a patient with chronic sinusitis does not respond to medical therapy or has a history of facial trauma, dental disease, cancer, immunodeficiency, long-term steroid therapy, diabetes, or malnutrition. Radiological evaluation with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are important in differential diagnosis, evaluating the extent of disease, and understanding clinical symptoms. Endoscopic sinus surgery associated with long-term intravenous antibiotic therapy is the gold standard for treatment of sinonasal actinomycosis. We report an unusual case of abducens nerve palsy resulting from invasive sinonasal actinomycosis in a patient with an abnormally enlarged sphenoid sinus. A review of the current literature highlighting clinical presentation, radiological findings, and treatment of this uncommon complication is also presented.

  10. Ulnar nerve dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuropathy - ulnar nerve; Ulnar nerve palsy; Mononeuropathy; Cubital tunnel syndrome ... neuropathy occurs when there is damage to the ulnar nerve. This ... syndrome may result. When damage destroys the nerve covering ( ...

  11. Vascular endothelial growth factor gene therapy improves nerve regeneration in a model of obstetric brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillenbrand, Matthias; Holzbach, Thomas; Matiasek, Kaspar; Schlegel, Jürgen; Giunta, Riccardo E

    2015-03-01

    The treatment of obstetric brachial plexus palsy has been limited to conservative therapies and surgical reconstruction of peripheral nerves. In addition to the damage of the brachial plexus itself, it also leads to a loss of the corresponding motoneurons in the spinal cord, which raises the need for supportive strategies that take the participation of the central nervous system into account. Based on the protective and regenerative effects of VEGF on neural tissue, our aim was to analyse the effect on nerve regeneration by adenoviral gene transfer of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in postpartum nerve injury of the brachial plexus in rats. In the present study, we induced a selective crush injury to the left spinal roots C5 and C6 in 18 rats within 24 hours after birth and examined the effect of VEGF-gene therapy on nerve regeneration. For gene transduction an adenoviral vector encoding for VEGF165 (AdCMV.VEGF165) was used. In a period of 11 weeks, starting 3 weeks post-operatively, functional regeneration was assessed weekly by behavioural analysis and force measurement of the upper limb. Morphometric evaluation was carried out 8 months post-operatively and consisted of a histological examination of the deltoid muscle and the brachial plexus according to defined criteria of degeneration. In addition, atrophy of the deltoid muscle was evaluated by weight determination comparing the left with the right side. VEGF expression in the brachial plexus was quantified by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Furthermore the motoneurons of the spinal cord segment C5 were counted comparing the left with the right side. On the functional level, VEGF-treated animals showed faster nerve regeneration. It was found less degeneration and smaller mass reduction of the deltoid muscle in VEGF-treated animals. We observed significantly less degeneration of the brachial plexus and a greater number of surviving motoneurons (P regeneration and survival of nerve cells

  12. Cerebellar and brainstem infarction as a complication of CT-guided transforaminal cervical nerve root block

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suresh, S. [The Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Berman, J. [The Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Anaesthetic Department, London (United Kingdom); Connell, David A. [The Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom)

    2007-05-15

    A 60-year-old man with a 4-year history of intractable neck pain and radicular pain in the C5 nerve root distribution presented to our department for a CT-guided transforaminal left C5 nerve root block. He had had a similar procedure on the right 2 months previously, and had significant improvement of his symptoms with considerable pain relief. On this occasion he was again accepted for the procedure after the risks and potential complications had been explained. Under CT guidance, a 25G spinal needle was introduced and after confirmation of the position of the needle, steroid was injected. Immediately the patient became unresponsive, and later developed a MR-proven infarct affecting the left vertebral artery (VA) territory. This is the first report of a major complication of a cervical root injection under CT guidance reported in the literature. We present this case report and the literature review of the potential complications of this procedure. (orig.)

  13. Facial nerve palsy: incidence of different ethiologies in a tertiary ambulatory

    OpenAIRE

    Atolini Junior, Nédio; Jorge Junior, José Jarjura; Gignon, Vinícius de Faria; Kitice, Adriano Tomio; Prado, Letícia Suriano de Almeida; Santos, Vânia Gracia Wolff

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: The ethiologic diferencial diagnostic for facial nerve paralisis is still a challenge and the literature has shown conflictive results concerning its epidemiology. Objective: To outline the incidence of the different ethiologies and the profile of peripheral facial nerve paralysis patients in the otolaryngology ambulatory of the Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas e Biologicas da PUC-SP - campus Sorocaba. Method: The records of 54 patients with facial nerve paralysis seen during the y...

  14. A rare case of human immunodeficiency virus associated bilateral facial nerve palsy in North India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Gupta

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV cases are on the increase in India and worldwide, so are its various complications. Neurological complications are important causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with HIV infection. They can occur at any stage of the disease and can affect any level of the central or peripheral nervous systems. In the literature, several cases of HIV-associated facial paralysis have been reported; however, bilateral facial palsy is rarely reported

  15. A rare case of human immunodeficiency virus associated bilateral facial nerve palsy in North India

    OpenAIRE

    Sanjay Gupta; Jitendra Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) cases are on the increase in India and worldwide, so are its various complications. Neurological complications are important causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with HIV infection. They can occur at any stage of the disease and can affect any level of the central or peripheral nervous systems. In the literature, several cases of HIV-associated facial paralysis have been reported; however, bilateral facial palsy is rarely reported

  16. Improvement in the field of binocular single vision following bilateral phacoemulsification with toric intraocular lens implantation in a patient with a partial third nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subash, Malavika; Sloper, John J; Wilkins, Mark R

    2010-12-01

    A 44-year-old female teacher with partial third (oculomotor) nerve palsy had a small central field of binocular single vision (BSV) following three strabismus procedures. Over several years her field of BSV constricted further, coincident with the development of myopia in one eye secondary to early lens change and in the presence of significant astigmatism. Following bilateral lens extraction with toric intraocular lens implants, her field of BSV reexpanded.

  17. Review: oculomotor cranial nerve palsies: symptoms, problems and non-surgical preoperative management of the resultant complex incomitant strabismus and monocular and binocular vision disturbances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khawam, Edward; Fahed, Daoud

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is first to describe the symptoms and problems encountered in cranial nerve palsies (CNP). The purpose is also to describe the different means of treatment during the observational preoperative period and their positive or negative impact on each of the symptoms and problems. Finally, we will present our way of handling these patients in their preoperative period: practical, inexpensive, and unsophisticated means that keep the patient comfortable and prevent the secondary untoward effects that can take place.

  18. Hypoglossal nerve palsy following the robotic thyroidectomy for the papillary thyroid carcinoma: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suk-Won Ahn

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Although the robotic surgery is a creative technique and has been known to be safe and effective, the risk of this surgery including traumatic nerve injury should be taken into account before surgery.

  19. Functional and anatomical basis for brain plasticity in facial palsy rehabilitation using the masseteric nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buendia, Javier; Loayza, Francis R; Luis, Elkin O; Celorrio, Marta; Pastor, Maria A; Hontanilla, Bernardo

    2016-03-01

    Several techniques have been described for smile restoration after facial nerve paralysis. When a nerve other than the contralateral facial nerve is used to restore the smile, some controversy appears because of the nonphysiological mechanism of smile recovering. Different authors have reported natural results with the masseter nerve. The physiological pathways which determine whether this is achieved continue to remain unclear. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, brain activation pattern measuring blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal during smiling and jaw clenching was recorded in a group of 24 healthy subjects (11 females). Effective connectivity of premotor regions was also compared in both tasks. The brain activation pattern was similar for smile and jaw-clenching tasks. Smile activations showed topographic overlap though more extended for smile than clenching. Gender comparisons during facial movements, according to kinematics and BOLD signal, did not reveal significant differences. Effective connectivity results of psychophysiological interaction (PPI) from the same seeds located in bilateral facial premotor regions showed significant task and gender differences (p facial nerve and masseter nerve areas is supported by the broad cortical overlap in the representation of facial and masseter muscles.

  20. 18F-FDG PET/CT diagnosis of vagus nerve neurolymphomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Hailey Hoi Ching; Lee, Elaine Yuen Phin; Anthony, Marina-Portia; Khong, Pek-Lan

    2012-09-01

    A 62-year-old woman was in remission from previously treated stage IV diffuse large B-cell lymphoma with cranial involvement. She presented with new-onset hoarseness of voice and choking; MRI of the brain showed disease recurrence in the left cavernous sinus. She was subsequently referred for F-FDG PET/CT with contrast for further evaluation of lymphomatous recurrence. F-FDG PET/CT not only revealed hypermetabolic activity in the left cavernous sinus correlating to the MRI findings but also showed an interesting manifestation explaining the patient's hoarseness of voice, being neurolymphomatosis along the left vagus nerve.

  1. Acute necrosis after Gamma Knife surgery in vestibular schwannoma leading to multiple cranial nerve palsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapitza, Sandra; Pangalu, Athina; Horstmann, Gerhard A; van Eck, Albert T; Regli, Luca; Tarnutzer, Alexander A

    2016-08-01

    We discuss a rare acute complication after Gamma Knife therapy (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) in a single patient. A 52-year-old woman presented with vertigo, facial weakness and hearing loss emerging 48hours following Gamma Knife radiosurgery for a right-sided vestibular schwannoma. Neurological examination 6days after symptom onset showed right-sided facial palsy, spontaneous left-beating nystagmus and pathologic head-impulse testing to the right. Pure-tone audiogram revealed right-sided sensorineural hearing loss. A diagnosis of acute vestibulocochlear and facial neuropathy was made. Brain MRI demonstrated focal contrast sparing within the schwannoma, likely related to acute radiation necrosis. Acute multiple cranial neuropathies of the cerebellopontine angle after Gamma Knife treatment should raise suspicion of acute tissue damage within the schwannoma and should result in urgent MRI. Treatment with steroids may be considered based on accompanying swelling and edema. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Deep peroneal nerve palsy with isolated lateral compartment syndrome secondary to peroneus longus tear: a report of two cases and a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramatsu, Kunihiko; Yonetani, Yasukazu; Kinugasa, Kazutaka; Nakamura, Norimasa; Yamamoto, Koji; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Hamada, Masayuki

    2016-06-01

    Drop foot is typically caused by neurologic disease such as lumbar disc herniation, but we report two rare cases of deep peroneal nerve palsy with isolated lateral compartment syndrome secondary to peroneus longus tears. Both patients developed mild pain in the lower legs while playing sport, and were aware of drop foot. As compartment pressures were elevated, fasciotomy was performed immediately, and the tendon of the peroneus longus was completely detached from its proximal origin. The patients were able to return their original sports after 3 months, and clinical examination revealed no hypesthesia or muscle weakness in the deep peroneal nerve area at the time of last follow-up. The common peroneal nerve pierced the deep fascia and lay over the fibular neck, which formed the floor of a short tunnel (the so-called fibular tunnel), then passed the lateral compartment just behind the peroneus longus. The characteristic anatomical situation between the fibular tunnel and peroneus longus might have caused deep peroneal nerve palsy in these two cases after hematoma adjacent to the fibular tunnel increased lateral compartment pressure.

  3. Suprascapular nerve palsy after arthroscopic Latarjet procedure: a case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastre, Sergi; Peidro, Lluis; Méndez, Anna; Calvo, Emilio

    2016-02-01

    The Bristow and Latarjet procedures have become popular among orthopaedic surgeons thanks to the development of new instruments that allow the use of arthroscopic techniques to treat cases of glenohumeral instability with bone defects or capsular deficiency. Nonetheless, several complications have been reported after Latarjet procedures, including neurological injuries. This report describes surgical damage to the suprascapular nerve, an unusual complication. Level of evidence Expert opinion, Level V.

  4. Persistent posterior interosseous nerve palsy associated with a chronic type I Monteggia fracture-dislocation in a child: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruchelsman, David E; Pasqualetto, Michele; Price, Andrew E; Grossman, John A I

    2009-06-01

    We present a rare case of persistent complete posterior interosseous nerve palsy associated with a chronic type I Monteggia elbow fracture-dislocation consisting of anterior dislocation of the radial head and malunion of the ulna in an 8-year-old child requiring surgical treatment. Posterior interosseous nerve neuropraxia following acute Monteggia injury patterns about the elbow has been described and is thought to be secondary to traction or direct trauma. The condition typically resolves following successful closed reduction of the radial head. This report describes combined treatment of the nerve and skeletal injury for the chronic type I Monteggia injury. The literature is reviewed, and diagnostic challenges with and treatment options for chronic Monteggia fracture-dislocations in children are discussed.

  5. 18F-FDG PET/CT/MRI Fusion Images Showing Cranial and Peripheral Nerve Involvement in Neurolymphomatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, Ana Carolina; Ribeiro, Fernanda Borges; Itikawa, Emerson Nobuyuki; Alexandre, Leonardo Santos; Pitella, Felipe Arriva; Santos, Antonio Carlos; Simões, Belinda Pinto; Wichert-Ana, Lauro

    2017-01-01

    We report a 56-year-old female patient with non-Hodgkin's diffuse large B cell lymphoma (NHL) who, on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a T1 weighted and gadolinium-enhanced imaging, was found to have thickening and infiltration in 75% of peripheral nerves of the patient and enlargements of cranial nerves, possibly related to lymphomatous infiltration. Subsequent positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) using 18F-labeled 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-d-glucose (18F-FDG) showed widespread active involvement of the cervical plexus, bilateral peripheral nerves, right femoral nerve, the parasellar region of the skull, and marked hypermetabolism in the left trigeminal ganglia. This case re-emphasizes that while CT and MRI provide anatomical details, 18F-FDG PET/CT images better delineate the metabolic activity of neurolymphomatosis (NL) in the peripheral and central nervous system.

  6. Facial Nerve Palsy: An Unusual Presenting Feature of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozcan Yildiz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the second most common type of cancer in the world and is the most common cause of cancer-related death in men and women; it is responsible for 1.3 million deaths annually worldwide. It can metastasize to any organ. The most common site of metastasis in the head and neck region is the brain; however, it can also metastasize to the oral cavity, gingiva, tongue, parotid gland and lymph nodes. This article reports a case of small cell lung cancer presenting with metastasis to the facial nerve.

  7. The Relationships of the Maxillary Sinus With the Superior Alveolar Nerves and Vessels as Demonstrated by Cone-Beam CT Combined With μ-CT and Histological Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasahara, Norio; Morita, Wataru; Tanaka, Ray; Hayashi, Takafumi; Kenmotsu, Shinichi; Ohshima, Hayato

    2016-05-01

    There are no available detailed data on the three-dimensional courses of the human superior alveolar nerves and vessels. This study aimed to clarify the relationships of the maxillary sinus with the superior alveolar nerves and vessels using cone-beam computed tomography (CT) combined with μ-CT and histological analyses. Digital imaging and communication in medicine data obtained from the scanned heads/maxillae of cadavers used for undergraduate/postgraduate dissection practice and skulls using cone-beam CT were reconstructed into three-dimensional (3D) images using software. The 3D images were compared with μ-CT images and histological sections. Cone-beam CT clarified the relationships of the maxillary sinus with the superior alveolar canals/grooves. The main anterior superior alveolar canal/groove ran anteriorly through the upper part of the sinus and terminated at the bottom of the nasal cavity near the piriform aperture. The main middle alveolar canal ran downward from the upper part of the sinus to ultimately join the anterior one. The main posterior alveolar canal ran through the lateral lower part of the sinus and communicated with the anterior one. Histological analyses demonstrated the existence of nerves and vessels in these canals/grooves, and the quantities of these structures varied across each canal/groove. Furthermore, the superior dental nerve plexus exhibited a network that was located horizontally to the occlusal plane, although these nerve plexuses appeared to be the vertical network that is described in most textbooks. In conclusion, cone-beam CT is suggested to be a useful method for clarifying the superior alveolar canals/grooves including the nerves and vessels.

  8. Employees with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... problems in the muscles or nerves. Instead, faulty development or damage to motor areas in the brain disrupt the brain's ability to adequately control movement and posture (United Cerebral Palsy, 2010). "Cerebral" refers to the ...

  9. Report of a child with acute herpes zoster ophthalmicus induced partial third nerve palsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suraida AR; Evelyn-Tai LM; Madhusudhan; LK Thavaratnam; Mohtar Ibrahim; Wan Hazabbah WH

    2015-01-01

    Herpes zoster is a reactivation of the varicella zoster virus (VZV), which may remain dormant in the dorsal root ganglion of the trigeminal nerve for decades after the patient's initial exposure. The ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve, i.e., the innervation to the ocular structures, is one of the most commonly involved dermatomes, giving rise to herpes zoster ophthalmicus (HZO). A 10-year-old indigenous Malaysian girl presented with a complaint of painful blurring of vision in the right eye for one week. It was followed a few days later by cutaneous vesicular eruptions over the right side of her face and nose and drooping of the right upper lid, associated with double vision. In children, the disease usually follows a mild course, resolving without residual damage. However, this child achieved a best corrected visual acuity of only 6/36 in the affected eye due to corneal scarring. The rashes healed by formation of disfiguring keloids over the right nasal area. This is another rarely reported complication of HZO in immunocompetent individuals.

  10. Evidence and recommendation. Intermitent neuromonitoring in thyroid surgery is usefulness for reduction of recurrent nerve palsy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis PARDAL-REFOYO

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: Clinical Question. In a patient with thyroid disease [patient], submitted to thyroidectomy [intervention], the use of neuromonitoring against the single visual identification of recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN [comparison], offers advantages? [result]. Material and Methods: Literature review in PubMed, Scopus and Cochrane Library data descriptors and search strategy: (((((((laryngeal OR larynx AND nerve AND monitoring AND thyroidectomy AND meta-analysis. 10 items in English or Spanish of which 7 were selected for the qualitative study were obtained. Results: Level of evidence. Evidence for the lower incidence of transient unilateral paralysis in patients with neuromonitoring is moderate-high. Evidence on the lower incidence of permanent unilateral paralysis of RLN with NM is low. Evidence on the lower incidence of bilateral paralysis of RLN with neuromonitoring is low. Conclusions: Recommendation. Concerning the reduction of transient paralysis of the RLN the recommendation of the use of neuromonitoring in thyroid surgery is strongly in favor. Regarding permanent paralysis recommendation is weak in favor (no recommendation against. Regarding prevention of bilateral laryngeal paralysis recommendation for weak. The decision to use NM cannot be based on the incidence of RLN paralysis.

  11. Cranial nerve injury after minor head trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coello, Alejandro Fernández; Canals, Andreu Gabarrós; Gonzalez, Juan Martino; Martín, Juan José Acebes

    2010-09-01

    There are no specific studies about cranial nerve (CN) injury following mild head trauma (Glasgow Coma Scale Score 14-15) in the literature. The aim of this analysis was to document the incidence of CN injury after mild head trauma and to correlate the initial CT findings with the final outcome 1 year after injury. The authors studied 49 consecutive patients affected by minor head trauma and CN lesions between January 2000 and January 2006. Detailed clinical and neurological examinations as well as CT studies using brain and bone windows were performed in all patients. Based on the CT findings the authors distinguished 3 types of traumatic injury: no lesion, skull base fracture, and other CT abnormalities. Patients were followed up for 1 year after head injury. The authors distinguished 3 grades of clinical recovery from CN palsy: no recovery, partial recovery, and complete recovery. Posttraumatic single nerve palsy was observed in 38 patients (77.6%), and multiple nerve injuries were observed in 11 (22.4%). Cranial nerves were affected in 62 cases. The most affected CN was the olfactory nerve (CN I), followed by the facial nerve (CN VII) and the oculomotor nerves (CNs III, IV, and VI). When more than 1 CN was involved, the most frequent association was between CNs VII and VIII. One year after head trauma, a CN deficit was present in 26 (81.2%) of the 32 cases with a skull base fracture, 12 (60%) of 20 cases with other CT abnormalities, and 3 (30%) of 10 cases without CT abnormalities. Trivial head trauma that causes a minor head injury (Glasgow Coma Scale Score 14-15) can result in CN palsies with a similar distribution to moderate or severe head injuries. The CNs associated with the highest incidence of palsy in this study were the olfactory, facial, and oculomotor nerves. The trigeminal and lower CNs were rarely damaged. Oculomotor nerve injury can have a good prognosis, with a greater chance of recovery if no lesion is demonstrated on the initial CT scan.

  12. Cranial nerves palsy as an initial feature of an early onset distal hereditary motor neuropathy--a new distal hereditary motor neuropathy phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberlová, J; Claeys, K G; De Jonghe, P; Seeman, P

    2009-06-01

    Distal hereditary motor neuropathy is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterised by a pure motor axonal neuropathy. It is occasionally associated with additional signs such as facial weakness, vocal cord paralysis, weakness of the diaphragm, and pyramidal signs. Although predominantly the inheritance is autosomal dominant, all types of inheritance have been described. Here we report a Czech family with cranial nerves palsy as an initial feature of a non progressive infantile onset dominant distal hereditary motor neuropathy. This family may represent a new subtype of distal hereditary motor neuropathy.

  13. Facial nerve neuromas: MR imaging. Report of four cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, N. (G.H. Pitie-Salpetriere, 75 - Paris (France). Dept. of Neuroradiology); Sterkers, O. (Hospital Beaujon, Clichy (France). Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology); Mompoint, D.; Nahum, H. (Hopital Beaujon, Clichy (France). Dept. of Radiology)

    1992-02-01

    Four cases of facial nerve neuroma were evaluated by computed tomographic (CT) scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The extension of the tumor in the petrous bone or the parotid gland was well defined by MRI in all cases. CT scan was useful to demonstrate bone erosions and the relation of the tumor to inner ear structures. In cases of progressive facial palsy, CT and MRI should be combined to detect a facial neuroma and to plan the surgical approach for tumor removal and nerve grafting. (orig.).

  14. CT anatomy of the vagus nerve with radiological-pathological correlation of the intrathoracic vagal neurogenic tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyagawa, Hideo [Nagoya City Univ. (Japan). Medical School

    2000-11-01

    The correlation in the title was evaluated since vagus nerve in the thoracic cavity had not been assessed by CT hitherto. For the purpose to examine the nerve imaging, subjects were a patient of neurofibromatosis and a normal volunteer. CT was done with Siemens Somato Plus 4 and General Electric-Yokokawa HiSpeed Advantage SG. For the same purpose, 100 cases of thoracic image by the latter apparatus were retrospectively assessed. Finally, the correlation in the title was examined retrospectively with combination of MR imaging in 9 cases who had undergone a surgery treatment of vagal neurogenic tumors (4 malignant and 4 benign cases of schwannoma and 1 neurofibromatosis). The nerve was found to be imaged by the ordinary CT and thus, which was thought to be useful for surgery, prognosis assessment and diagnosis of neurogenic tumors together with MRI. (K.H.)

  15. Restoration of hand function in C7-T1 brachial plexus palsies using a staged approach with nerve and tendon transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng-Gang; Dong, Zhen; Gu, Yu-Dong

    2014-11-01

    Brachial plexus palsies of C7-T1 result in the complete loss of hand function, including finger and thumb flexion and extension as well as intrinsic muscle function. The task of reanimating such a hand remains challenging, and so far there has been no reliable neurological reconstructive method for restoring hand function. The authors aimed to establish a reliable strategy to reanimate the paralyzed hand. Two patients had sustained C7-T1 complete lesions. In the first stage of the operative procedure, a supinator motor branch to posterior interosseous nerve transfer was performed with brachialis motor branch transfer to the median nerve to restore finger and thumb extension and flexion. In the second stage, the intact brachioradialis muscle was used for abductorplasty to restore thumb opposition. Both patients regained good finger extension and flexion. Thumb opposition was also attained, and overall hand function was satisfactory. The described strategy proved effective and reliable in restoring hand function after C7-T1 brachial plexus palsies.

  16. CT-guided obturator nerve block for diagnosis and treatment of painful conditions of the hip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heywang-Koebrunner, S.H.; Amaya, B.; Pickuth, D.; Spielmann, R.P. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Martin-Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (Germany); Okoniewski, M. [Dept. of Orthopaedics, Martin-Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (Germany)

    2001-06-01

    Obturator nerve blocks (ONB) have been performed by anaesthesiologists mainly to eliminate the obturator reflex during transurethral resections. An effect on hip pain has also been described. However, being a time-consuming and operator-dependent procedure if performed manually, it has not been widely used for chronic hip pain. The purpose of this pilot study was to check whether CT guidance could improve reproducibility of the block (= immediate effect) and to test its potential value for treatment of chronic hip pain. Fifteen chronically ill patients with osteoarthritis underwent a single ONB. Sixteen millilitres of Lidocaine 1 % mixed with 2 ml Iopramide was injected into the obturator canal. The patients were followed up to 9 months after the intervention. With a single injection pain relief was achieved for 1-8 weeks in 7 of 15 patients. Excellent pain relief for 3-11 months was achieved in another 4 patients. Reasons for a mid-term or even long-term effect based on a single injection of local anaesthetic are not exactly known. The CT-guided ONB is a fast, easy and safe procedure that may be useful for mid-term (weeks) and sometimes even long-term (months) treatment of hip pain. (orig.)

  17. Detection of third and sixth cranial nerve palsies with a novel method for eye tracking while watching a short film clip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadani, Uzma; Farooq, Sameer; Ritlop, Robert; Warren, Floyd; Reyes, Marleen; Lamm, Elizabeth; Alex, Anastasia; Nehrbass, Elena; Kolecki, Radek; Jureller, Michael; Schneider, Julia; Chen, Agnes; Shi, Chen; Mendhiratta, Neil; Huang, Jason H; Qian, Meng; Kwak, Roy; Mikheev, Artem; Rusinek, Henry; George, Ajax; Fergus, Robert; Kondziolka, Douglas; Huang, Paul P; Smith, R Theodore

    2015-03-01

    Automated eye movement tracking may provide clues to nervous system function at many levels. Spatial calibration of the eye tracking device requires the subject to have relatively intact ocular motility that implies function of cranial nerves (CNs) III (oculomotor), IV (trochlear), and VI (abducent) and their associated nuclei, along with the multiple regions of the brain imparting cognition and volition. The authors have developed a technique for eye tracking that uses temporal rather than spatial calibration, enabling detection of impaired ability to move the pupil relative to normal (neurologically healthy) control volunteers. This work was performed to demonstrate that this technique may detect CN palsies related to brain compression and to provide insight into how the technique may be of value for evaluating neuropathological conditions associated with CN palsy, such as hydrocephalus or acute mass effect. The authors recorded subjects' eye movements by using an Eyelink 1000 eye tracker sampling at 500 Hz over 200 seconds while the subject viewed a music video playing inside an aperture on a computer monitor. The aperture moved in a rectangular pattern over a fixed time period. This technique was used to assess ocular motility in 157 neurologically healthy control subjects and 12 patients with either clinical CN III or VI palsy confirmed by neuro-ophthalmological examination, or surgically treatable pathological conditions potentially impacting these nerves. The authors compared the ratio of vertical to horizontal eye movement (height/width defined as aspect ratio) in normal and test subjects. In 157 normal controls, the aspect ratio (height/width) for the left eye had a mean value ± SD of 1.0117 ± 0.0706. For the right eye, the aspect ratio had a mean of 1.0077 ± 0.0679 in these 157 subjects. There was no difference between sexes or ages. A patient with known CN VI palsy had a significantly increased aspect ratio (1.39), whereas 2 patients with known CN III

  18. The treatment of spastic cerebral palsy by side to side neurorrhaphy of peripheral nerves%周围神经侧侧缝合治疗痉挛性脑性瘫痪的初步观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    修先伦; 王宁; 张少成; 祝玉玺; 王季; 王吉波

    2002-01-01

    Objective To discuss a new method and its mechanism for the treatment of spastic cerebral palsy. Methods 6 cases were treated.The injurious nerve trunk was kept abreast of neighbor donor nerve at suitable segement, the epineurium and fascicu of two neighboring area were incised to appear nerve fibers,then side to side anastomosed each other through the epineurium and fascicu. Result All cases were followed up for 4~ 15 months.The spastic limb and deformity of all cases have obvious relieve, 5 cases had no spasm without extra stimulation and have the main function recovered.Conclusion Side to side neurorrhaphy is a new method to treat spastic cerebral palsy.After operation, the spastic muscle could obtain normal never control,thereby,the cervical orientation area was changed.

  19. Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Follow The Academy Professionals: Education Guidelines News Multimedia Public & Patients: Contact Us About the Academy Jobs at the Academy Financial Relationships with Industry Medical Disclaimer Privacy Policy Terms of Service For Advertisers For Media Ophthalmology Job Center © American Academy of ...

  20. CT, MRI, and (18)F-FDG PET/CT findings of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ha Youn; Hwang, Ji Young; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Kim, Yi Kyung; Cha, Jihoon; Park, Gyeong Min; Kim, Sung Tae

    2017-10-01

    Background Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) is a highly malignant tumor and rarely occurs in the head and neck. Purpose To describe the imaging features of MPNST of the head and neck. Material and Methods We retrospectively analyzed computed tomography (CT; n = 14), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; n = 16), and (18)F-FDG PET/CT (n = 5) imaging features of 18 MPNSTs of the head and neck in 17 patients. Special attention was paid to determine the nerve of origin from which the tumor might have arisen. Results All lesions were well-defined (n = 3) or ill-defined (n = 15) masses (mean, 6.1 cm). Lesions were at various locations but most commonly the neck (n = 8), followed by the intracranial cavity (n = 3), paranasal sinus (n = 2), and orbit (n = 2). The nerve of origin was inferred for 11 lesions: seven in the neck, two in the orbit, one in the cerebellopontine angle, and one on the parietal scalp. Attenuation, signal intensity, and enhancement pattern of the lesions on CT and MRI were non-specific. Necrosis/hemorrhage/cystic change within the lesion was considered to be present on images in 13 and bone change in nine. On (18)F-FDG PET/CT images, all five lesions demonstrated various hypermetabolic foci with maximum standard uptake value (SUVmax) from 3.2 to 14.6 (mean, 7.16 ± 4.57). Conclusion MPNSTs can arise from various locations in the head and neck. Though non-specific, a mass with an ill-defined margin along the presumed course of the cranial nerves may aid the diagnosis of MPSNT in the head and neck.

  1. The short- and medium-term effectiveness of CT-guided selective cervical nerve root injection for pain and disability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, Amidevi; Saha, Shouvik; Sharma, Naveen; Huckerby, Lauren; Houghton, Russell [Guy' s and St. Thomas' Hospitals, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-15

    CT-guided cervical nerve root injection with corticosteroid and/or local anesthetic is a recognized technique in the evaluation and treatment of cervical radiculopathy. There are few prospective studies on the efficacy of the various techniques employed in cervical nerve root injection. We present our results from a 1-year prospective series using a CT-guided anterolateral transforaminal approach for cervical nerve root injection of bupivacaine and dexamethasone. Pain using a numeric rating scale was assessed at pre-injection, 15 min post-injection, 1 month, and 3 months. Disability was assessed using the Oswestry Neck Disability Index (NDI) questionnaire at pre-injection, 1 month post-injection, and 3 months. In total, 50 patients were followed for 3 months. The mean reductions in pain were: 15 min (77 %), 1 month (39 %), and 3 months (33 %). The mean reductions in NDI were: 1 month (26 %) and 3 months (also 26 %). Results were statistically significant. CT-guided selective cervical nerve root injection in the treatment of cervical radicular pain and related disability produces statistically significant reductions in pain and disability to at least 3 months post-procedure. (orig.)

  2. 颈总动脉交感神经网剥脱术治疗脑性瘫痪的探讨%Discussion of common carotid artery sympathetic nerve net exfoliation therapy treating cerebral palsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹彪中; 李如求; 成顺成

    2002-01-01

    Objective To discuss mechanism of common carotid artery sympathetic nerve net exfoliation therapy treating sequela of cerebral palsy. Methods Examing and assessing before and after operation, curative effect analysis, Wals value assay and 1 year follow up to 124 patients. Result Score of patients in this group reached excellent 1 week after operation, reached good 1 year after operation, Wals value measure P≤ 0.05. Conclusion This operation had an effect on the promotion of mixed type; athetosis type cerebral palsy, upper limb function disorder and malfunction.

  3. Delayed diagnosed intermuscular lipoma causing a posterior interosseous nerve palsy in a patient with cervical spondylosis: the “priceless” value of the clinical examination in the technological era

    Science.gov (United States)

    COLASANTI, R.; IACOANGELI, M.; DI RIENZO, A.; DOBRAN, M.; DI SOMMA, L.; NOCCHI, N.; SCERRATI, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Posterior interosseous nerve (PIN) palsy may present with various symptoms, and may resemble cervical spondylosis. Case report We report about a 59-year-old patient with cervical spondylosis which delayed the diagnosis of posterior interosseous nerve (PIN) palsy due to an intermuscular lipoma. Initial right hand paraesthesias and clumsiness, together with MR findings of right C5–C6 and C6–C7 foraminal stenosis, misled the diagnostic investigation. The progressive loss of extension of all right hand fingers brought to detect a painless mass compressing the PIN. Electrophysiological studies confirmed a right radial motor neuropathy at the level of the forearm. Results Surgical tumor removal and nerve decompression resulted in a gradual motor deficits recovery. Conclusions A thorough clinical examination is paramount, and electrophysiology may differentiate between cervical and peripheral nerve lesions. Ultrasonography and MR offer an effective evaluation of lipomas, which represent a rare cause of PIN palsy. Surgical decompression and lipoma removal generally determine excellent prognoses, with very few recurrences. PMID:27142825

  4. 耳源性面神经麻痹的手术治疗%Surgical treatment in otogenic facial nerve palsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯国栋; 高志强; 翟梦瑶; 吕威; 亓放; 姜鸿; 查洋; 沈鹏

    2008-01-01

    objective To study the character of facial nerve palsy due to four difierent auris diseases including chronic otitis media,Hunt syndrome,tumor and physical or chemical factors,and to discuss the principles of the surgical management of otogenic facial nerve palsy.Methods The clinical charaeters of 24 patients with otogenic facial nerve palsy because of the four different auris diseases were retrospectively analyzed,all the cases were performed surgical management from October 1991 to March 2007.Facial nerve function Was evaluated with House-Brackmann(HB) grading system.Results The 24 patients including 10 males and 14 females were analysised,of whom 12 cases due to cholesteatoma,3 cases due to chronic otitis media,3 cases due to Hunt syndrome,2 cases resulted from acute otitis media,2 cases due to Dhysical or chemical factors and 2 cases due to tumor.All cases were treated with operations included facial nerve decompression,lesion resection with facial nerve decompression and lesion resection without facial nerve decompression,I patient'S facial nerve was resected because of the tumor.According to HB grade system,I degree recovery was attained in 4 cases,while Ⅱ degree in 10 cases,Ⅲ degree in 6 cases,Ⅳ degree in 2 cases,V degree in 2 cases and Ⅵ degree in 1 case.Conclusions Removing the lesions completely Was the basic factor to the surgery of otogenie facial palsy,moreover,it was important to have facial nerve decompression soon after lesion removal.%目的 总结由于中耳炎、Hunt综合征、肿瘤及理化损伤4种常见耳源性疾病导致的面神经麻痹手术治疗的经验,增加对手术治疗耳源性面神经麻痹的认识.方法 回顾性分析1991年10月至2007年3月间由于上述4种耳部疾病导致面神经麻痹的24例患者的临床资料.面神经功能评估采用House-Brackman分级.结果 24例患者中男10例,女14例;年龄14~82岁,平均44.5岁.耳部病变包括:胆脂瘤中耳炎12例(其中合并Hunt综合征1

  5. A NEW METHOD TO SHORTEN THE LENGTH OF NERVE GRAFT AND TO SECURE THE NERVE REPAIR (AN INTRAOPERATIVE EXPERIENCE BASED ON 30 CASES OF OBSTETRICAL BRACHIAL PLEXUS PALSY)

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: to compare the result of using a stay stitch to bridge the nerve gaps with repair the nerve gap without using a stay stitch, to compare both ways on the length of graft, number of grafts and number of cables per graft. Methods: a comparative study between 2 groups of babies with OBPP in which each group consists of 15 infants. In all the patients in both groups, neuroma excision and nerve grafting was indicated. In group (A) the defects were measured directly after neuroma excision w...

  6. An Unusual Complication of Hypertensive Hemorrhage – Delayed Oculomotor Palsy: Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Dardis

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of oculomotor palsy due to hypertensive hemorrhage in the caudate nucleus, with intraventricular extension. To our knowledge, this is the only instance of this complication occurring due to hypertensive hemorrhage. Our patient initially developed headache at the time of her hemorrhage; 8 days later, she developed complete third nerve palsy, which showed improvement at follow-up 4 months later. This was due to tracking of blood into the perimesencephalic cistern. The presence of hemorrhage in the basal cisterns was not visible on the initial CT scans and highlights the role of MRI in evaluating the brainstem for the presence of blood products.

  7. Hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis and rehabilitation in patients with complete facial palsy: cohort study of 30 patients followed up for three years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla Toffola, Elena; Pavese, Chiara; Cecini, Miriam; Petrucci, Lucia; Ricotti, Susanna; Bejor, Maurizio; Salimbeni, Grazia; Biglioli, Federico; Klersy, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Our study evaluates the grade and timing of recovery in 30 patients with complete facial paralysis (House-Brackmann grade VI) treated with hypoglossal-facial nerve (XII-VII) anastomosis and a long-term rehabilitation program, consisting of exercises in facial muscle activation mediated by tongue movement and synkinesis control with mirror feedback. Reinnervation after XII-VII anastomosis occurred in 29 patients, on average 5.4 months after surgery. Three years after the anastomosis, 23.3% of patients had grade II, 53.3% grade III, 20% grade IV and 3.3% grade VI ratings on the House-Brackmann scale. Time to reinnervation was associated with the final House-Brackmann grade. Our study demonstrates that patients undergoing XIIVII anastomosis and a long-term rehabilitation program display a significant recovery of facial symmetry and movement. The recovery continues for at Hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis and rehabilitation in patients with complete facial palsy: cohort study of 30 patients followed up for three years least three years after the anastomosis, meaning that prolonged follow-up of these patients is advisable.

  8. Early and reliable detection of herpes simplex virus type 1 and varicella zoster virus DNAs in oral fluid of patients with idiopathic peripheral facial nerve palsy: Decision support regarding antiviral treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackner, Andreas; Kessler, Harald H; Walch, Christian; Quasthoff, Stefan; Raggam, Reinhard B

    2010-09-01

    Idiopathic peripheral facial nerve palsy has been associated with the reactivation of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) or varicella zoster virus (VZV). In recent studies, detection rates were found to vary strongly which may be caused by the use of different oral fluid collection devices in combination with molecular assays lacking standardization. In this single-center pilot study, liquid phase-based and absorption-based oral fluid collection was compared. Samples were collected with both systems from 10 patients with acute idiopathic peripheral facial nerve palsy, 10 with herpes labialis or with Ramsay Hunt syndrome, and 10 healthy controls. Commercially available IVD/CE-labeled molecular assays based on fully automated DNA extraction and real-time PCR were employed. With the liquid phase-based oral fluid collection system, three patients with idiopathic peripheral facial nerve palsy tested positive for HSV-1 DNA and another two tested positive for VZV DNA. All patients with herpes labialis tested positive for HSV-1 DNA and all patients with Ramsay Hunt syndrome tested positive for VZV DNA. With the absorption-based oral fluid collection system, detections rates and viral loads were found to be significantly lower when compared to those obtained with the liquid phase-based collection system. Collection of oral fluid with a liquid phase-based system and the use of automated and standardized molecular methods allow early and reliable detection of HSV-1 and VZV DNAs in patients with acute idiopathic peripheral facial nerve palsy and may provide a valuable decision support regarding start of antiviral treatment at the first clinical visit.

  9. The significance of a hypoplastic bony canal for the cochlear nerve in patients with sensorineural hearing loss: CT and MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yoon Jung; Park, Sang Yoo; Kim, Myung Soon; Sung, Ki Jun [College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the significance of the hypoplastic canal for the cochlear nerve in patients with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) and the relationship between the hypoplastic bony canal and aplasia or hypoplasia of the cochlear nerve. A retrospective review of high resolution temporal CT(HRCT) and MRI findings was conducted. The narrow bony canal of the cochlear nerve and the relative size of the internal auditory canal were correlated with the cochlear nerve deficiency on MRI. The comparative size of the component nerves (facial, cochlear, superior vestibular, inferior vestibular nerve), and the relative size of the internal auditory canal and the bony canal of the cochlear nerve were measured. The clinical history and the results of the clinical examination were reviewed for each patient. High resolution MRI showed aplasia of the common vestibulocochlear nerve in one patient and a deficiency of the cochlear nerve in 9 patients. These abnormalities occurred in association with a prominent narrowing of the canal for the cochlear nerve and a stenosis of the internal auditory canal, which was observed on temporal bone CT in 9 patients with congenital SNHL. Three patients had normal IAC, despite the presence of a hypoplastic cochlear nerve on the side on which they had SNHL. In one patient, the narrowing of the canal for the cochlear nerve and internal auditory canal were not found to be associated with acquired SNHL. The hypoplastic bony canal for the cochlear nerve might be more highly indicative of congenital cochlear nerve deficiency than that of the narrow internal auditory canal, and the position of the crista falciformis should also be carefully.

  10. The value of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in the management of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khiewvan, Benjapa [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Mahidol University, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Bangkok (Thailand); Macapinlac, Homer A.; Chuang, Hubert H. [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Lev, Dina; Al Sannaa, Ghadah [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Cancer Biology, Houston, TX (United States); McCutcheon, Ian E. [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Houston, TX (United States); Slopis, John M. [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Neuro-Oncology, Houston, TX (United States); Wei, Wei [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Biostatistics, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Our objective was to determine how positron emission tomography (PET)/CT had been used in the clinical treatment of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) patients at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. We reviewed a database of MPNST patients referred to MD Anderson Cancer Center during 1995-2011. We enrolled 47 patients who underwent PET/CT imaging. Disease stage was based on conventional imaging and PET/CT findings using National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines. Treatment strategies based on PET/CT and conventional imaging were determined by chart review. The maximum and mean standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}, SUV{sub mean}), metabolic tumor volume (MTV), total lesion glycolysis (TLG), change in SUV{sub max}, change in MTV, and change in TLG were calculated from the PET/CT studies before and after treatment. Response prediction was based on imaging studies performed before and after therapy and categorized as positive or negative for residual tumor. Clinical outcome was determined from chart review. PET/CT was performed for staging in 16 patients, for restaging in 29 patients, and for surveillance in 2 patients. Of the patients, 88 % were correctly staged with PET/CT, whereas 75 % were correctly staged with conventional imaging. The sensitivity to detect local recurrence and distant metastasis at restaging was 100 and 100 % for PET/CT compared to 86 and 83 % for conventional imaging, respectively. PET/CT findings resulted in treatment changes in 31 % (5/16) and 14 % (4/29) of patients at staging and restaging, respectively. Recurrence, MTV, and TLG were prognostic factors for survival, whereas SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub mean} were not predictive. For 21 patients who had imaging studies performed both before and after treatment, PET/CT was better at predicting outcome (overall survival, progression-free survival) than conventional imaging. A decreasing SUV{sub max} ≥ 30 % and decrease in TLG and MTV were significant

  11. An objective functional evaluation of the flexor carpi ulnaris set of triple tendon transfer in radial nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latheef, L; Bhardwaj, P; Sankaran, A; Sabapathy, S R

    2017-02-01

    This study reports an objective assessment of postoperative function of 11 triple transfers for high radial palsies, using pronator teres for wrist extension, flexor carpi ulnaris for finger extension and palmaris longus for thumb extension. The mean follow-up was 3.3 years. Assessment was done by recording the active ranges of wrist motion, grip strength, wrist and finger strength and work simulation. The mean strength and range of wrist extension were 42% and 86%, respectively, of the contralateral wrist. Other measured movements were within the functional range and work simulation confirmed good restoration of function. The mean DASH score was 3.45, with no patient reporting any specific functional complaints. This study shows that even though the range of wrist motion and the strength of the wrist and fingers are less than normal, hand function remains good. We conclude that the flexor carpi ulnaris set of tendon transfer works well. 3.

  12. Using a laser guidance system for CT-guided biopsy and treatment of nerve block; Verwendung eines Laserzielgeraetes fuer CT-gesteuerte Biopsien und Nervenblockaden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwaan, M. [Inst. fuer Radiologie, Medizinische Univ. Luebeck (Germany); Frahm, C. [Inst. fuer Radiologie, Medizinische Univ. Luebeck (Germany); Kloess, W. [Inst. fuer Radiologie, Medizinische Univ. Luebeck (Germany); Preuss, S. [Schmerzambulanz, Klinik fuer Anaesthesiologie, Medizinische Univ. Luebeck (Germany); Baumeier, W. [Schmerzambulanz, Klinik fuer Anaesthesiologie, Medizinische Univ. Luebeck (Germany); Grande-Nagel, I. [Inst. fuer Radiologie, Medizinische Univ. Luebeck (Germany); Gehl, H.B. [Inst. fuer Radiologie, Medizinische Univ. Luebeck (Germany); Weiss, H.D. [Inst. fuer Radiologie, Medizinische Univ. Luebeck (Germany)

    1996-07-01

    CT-guided intervention is a simple and pin-pointed modality for obtaining cytologic, biopsy, or microbiologic samples, and for treatment of the nerve blockade. In order to enhance the precision of punctures, and reduce complications, the authors developed and tested a novel laser guidance system (wavelength 365 nm at 4.5 mW). In 56 consecutive patients (representing 24 nerve blocks, 16 tumor biopsies, 16 microbiological punctures), a CT-guided intervention was performed. Despite a high accuracy (80 punctures), false punctures (6) could not be avoided in cases where anatomic conditions were misleading the needle, or due to patient movements. The system is not to be blamed for these unsuccessful attempts. As the system operates contactless guided by laser light, it is a good tool ensuring simple and sterile needle biopsy. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die computertomographisch gesteuerte Intervention ist ein einfaches und zielsicheres Verfahren fuer die Gewinnung zystologischer, bioptischer oder mikrobiologischer Proben und zur therapeutischen Nervenblockade. Zur Erhoehung der Punktionsgenauigkeit und zur Reduktion von Komplikationen haben wir fuer diese Indikationsgebiete ein neu entwickeltes Laserzielgeraet (Wellenlaenge 365 m bei 4,5 mW) erprobt. Es wurde bei 56 konsekutiven Patienten (24 Nervenblockaden, 16 Tumorbiopsien, 16 mikrobiologische Materialentnahmen) eine CT-gesteuerte Intervention duchgefuehrt. Trotz einer hohen Treffgenauigkeit (80 Punktionen) kann es aber weiterhin zu Fehlpunktionen (6) kommen, falls Koerperstrukturen zum Abweichen oder Abbiegen der Punktionsnadel fuehren oder der Patient sich bewegt. Dies ist dem System selbst nicht anzulasten. Da es mit Laserlicht beruehrungsfrei arbeitet, ist eine einfache und sterile Punktion sehr gut moeglich. (orig.)

  13. Cerebrospinal fluid dissemination of anaplastic intraventricular meningioma: report of a case presenting with progressive brainstem dysfunction and multiple cranial nerve palsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimaki, Motoki; Takanashi, Masashi; Kobayashi, Manami; Wada, Kei-ichiro; Machida, Yutaka; Kondo, Akihide; Hattori, Nobutaka; Miwa, Hideto

    2016-05-31

    It is extremely rare to see cerebrospinal fluid dissemination of intraventricular meningioma, particularly with the development of acute, progressive brainstem/cerebellar dysfunction with an absence of mass formation in the corresponding anatomical sites. An 81-year-old man was admitted because of double vision, right facial nerve palsy and truncal ataxia. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed normal findings except for a tumor mass in the left lateral ventricle, which had been noted over 6 months previously. The patient developed hiccups, hyperventilation, and drowsiness, which worsened progressively, and did not respond to corticosteroid or intraventricular immunoglobulin therapy. Cerebrospinal fluid study revealed a mild elevation of protein, and cytology was negative. The patient died and an autopsy was performed. Postmortem investigation disclosed a malignant transformation of benign fibroid meningioma with cerebrospinal fluid dissemination of the malignant cells, diversely involving the surface of brainstem, cerebellum, and spinal cords, secondarily resulting in extensive ischemia in the brain parenchyma by vessel occlusion. If a patient with an intraventricular tumor develops acute, progressive neurological symptoms, the possibility that it is be caused by cerebrospinal fluid dissemination of tumor cells, after malignant transformation, should be considered.

  14. Intramuscular myxoid lipoma in the proximal forearm presenting as an olecranon mass with superficial radial nerve palsy: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Hildebrand Kevin A; Medlicott Shaun AC; Lewkonia Peter

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Extremity lipomas may occur in any location, including the proximal forearm. We describe a case of a patient with an intramuscular lipoma presenting as an unusual posterior elbow mass. Case presentation We discuss the case of a 57-year-old Caucasian man who presented with a tender, posterior elbow mass initially diagnosed as chronic olecranon bursitis. A minor sensory disturbance in the distribution of the superficial radial nerve was initially thought to be unrelated, but...

  15. Diagnostic Accuracy of PET/CT-Guided Percutaneous Biopsies for Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors in Neurofibromatosis Type 1 Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Brahmi

    Full Text Available Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST are one of the most frequent causes of death in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1. Early detection is crucial because complete surgical resection is the only curative treatment. It has been previously reported that an 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT image with a T/L (Tumor/Liver SUV max ratio > 1.5 provides a high negative predictive value; however, it is not specific enough to make a NF1-related MPNST diagnosis. A formal proof of malignant transformation from a histological analysis is necessary before surgical excision because the procedure can cause mutilation. The objective of the present work was to investigate the effectiveness of and complications associated with PET/CT-guided percutaneous biopsies for an NF1-related MPNST diagnosis.PET/CT-guided percutaneous biopsy procedures performed on 26 NF1 patients with a clinical suspicion of MPNST and a suspect lesion from a PET/CT scan (T/L SUV max ratio > 1.5 were retrospectively evaluated. The localization of the suspected malignant site was determined using PET/CT. A stereotactic (ultrasonic and CT control core biopsy technique was used with a local anesthesia.The first PET/CT-guided percutaneous biopsies enabled a pathological diagnosis for all of the patients (no "inconclusive " results were obtained, and no secondary procedures were needed. Among the 26 patients, the histopathological results from the biopsy were malignant in 17 cases and benign (BPNST with atypical cells in nine cases. No complications from the diagnostic procedure were observed. A surgical resection was performed in 18 patients (seven benign and 11 malignant biopsies, removing the fine needle biopsy scar. In addition, six locally advanced/metastatic MPNST were treated with chemo/radiotherapy, and two BPNST had no progression after a follow-up of 14 and 39 months, respectively. The PET/CT-guided percutaneous

  16. Anterior opercular cortex lesions cause dissociated lower cranial nerve palsies and anarthria but no aphasia: Foix-Chavany-Marie syndrome and "automatic voluntary dissociation" revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, M

    1993-01-01

    Anarthria and bilateral central facio-linguovelo-pharyngeo-masticatory paralysis with "automatic voluntary dissociation" are the clinical hallmarks of Foix-Chavany-Marie syndrome (FCMS), the corticosubcortial type of suprabulbar palsy. A literature review of 62 FCMS reports allowed the differentiation of five clinical types of FCMS: (a) the classical and most common form associated with cerebrovascular disease, (b) a subacute form caused by central nervous system infections, (c) a developmental form probably most often related to neuronal migration disorders, (d) a reversible form in children with epilepsy, and (e) a rare type associated with neurodegenerative disorders. Bilateral opercular lesions were confirmed in 31 of 41 patients who had CT or MRI performed, and by necropsy in 7 of 10 patients. FCMS could be attributed to unilateral lesions in 2 patients. The typical presentation and differential diagnosis of FCMS provide important clues to lesion localization in clinical neurology. FCMS is a paretic and not an apraxic disorder and is not characterized by language disturbances. Its clinical features prove divergent corticobulbar pathways for voluntary and automatic motor control of craniofacial muscles. Precise clinico-neuroradiological correlations should facilitate the identification of the structural substrate of "automatic voluntary dissociation" in FCMS.

  17. Does pain relief by CT-guided indirect cervical nerve root injection with local anesthetics and steroids predict pain relief after decompression surgery for cervical nerve root compression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniadis, Alexander; Dietrich, Tobias J; Farshad, Mazda

    2016-10-01

    The relationship of pain relief from a recently presented CT-guided indirect cervical nerve root injection with local anesthetics and steroids to surgical decompression as a treatment for single-level cervical radiculopathy is not clear. This retrospective study aimed to compare the immediate and 6-week post-injection effects to the short- and long-term outcomes after surgical decompression, specifically in regard to pain relief. Patients (n = 39, age 47 ± 10 years) who had undergone CT-guided indirect injection with local anesthetics and steroids as an initial treatment for single cervical nerve root radiculopathy and who subsequently needed surgical decompression were included retrospectively. Pain levels (VAS scores) were monitored before, immediately after, and 6 weeks after injection (n = 34), as well as 6 weeks (n = 38) and a mean of 25 months (SD ± 12) after surgical decompression (n = 36). Correlation analysis was performed to find potential associations of pain relief after injection and after surgery to investigate the predictive value of post-injection pain relief. There was no correlation between immediate pain relief after injection (-32 ± 27 %) and 6 weeks later (-7 ± 19 %), (r = -0.023, p = 0.900). There was an association by tendency between immediate pain relief after injection and post-surgical pain relief at 6 weeks (-82 ± 27 %), (r = 0.28, p = 0.08). Pain relief at follow-up remained high at -70 ± 21 % and was correlated with the immediate pain amelioration effect of the injection (r = 0.37, p = 0.032). Five out of seven patients who reported no pain relief from injection had a pain relief from surgery in excess of 50 %. The amount of immediate radiculopathic pain relief after indirect cervical nerve root injection is associated with the amount of pain relief achieved at long-term follow-up after surgical decompression of single-level cervical radiculopathy

  18. Accuracy and complications of CT-guided core needle biopsy of peripheral nerve sheath tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pianta, Marcus; Chock, Eric; Schlicht, Stephen [St Vincent' s Hospital, Fitzroy, VIC (Australia); McCombe, David [St Vincent' s Hospital and Victorian Hand Surgery Associates, Victoria (Australia)

    2015-09-15

    This single-centre study retrospectively reviews the complications in patients that have occurred following peripheral nerve sheath tumour biopsy, and assesses whether there is an association with biopsy technique or underlying lesion characteristics. 41 consecutive core needle biopsies of proven peripheral nerve sheath tumours over a 2-year period in a tertiary teaching hospital were reviewed. Patient demographics and symptoms, tumour characteristics and radiological appearances were recorded. Biopsy and surgical histology were correlated, and post-biopsy and surgical complications analyzed. 41 biopsies were performed in 38 patients. 68 % schwannomas, 24 % neurofibromas and 7 % malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours. Biopsy histology correlated with surgery in all cases. 71 % of lesions were surgically excised. 60 % of patients reported pain related to their lesion. Following the biopsy, 12 % reported increased pain, which resolved in all cases. Pain exacerbation was noted in tumours smaller in size, more superficial and in closer proximity of the biopsy needle tip to the traversing nerve. Number of biopsy needle passes was not associated with an increased incidence of procedure-related pain. Core biopsy of a suspected peripheral nerve sheath tumour may be performed safely before excisional surgery to confirm lesion histology and assist prognosis. There is excellent correlation between core biopsy and excised surgical specimen histology. The most common complication of pain exacerbation is seen in a minority and is temporary, and more likely with smaller, more superficial lesions and a closer needle-tip to traversing nerve distance during biopsy. (orig.)

  19. Hip dysplasia, pelvic obliquity, and scoliosis in cerebral palsy: a qualitative analysis using 3D CT reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, Mark D.; Abel, Mark F.

    1998-06-01

    Five patients with cerebral palsy, hip dysplasia, pelvic obliquity, and scoliosis were evaluated retrospectively using three dimensional computed tomography (3DCT) scans of the proximal femur, pelvis, and lumbar spine to qualitatively evaluate their individual deformities by measuring a number of anatomical landmarks. Three dimensional reconstructions of the data were visualized, analyzed, and then manipulated interactively to perform simulated osteotomies of the proximal femur and pelvis to achieve surgical correction of the hip dysplasia. Severe deformity can occur in spastic cerebral palsy, with serious consequences for the quality of life of the affected individuals and their families. Controversy exists regarding the type, timing and efficacy of surgical intervention for correction of hip dysplasia in this population. Other authors have suggested 3DCT studies are required to accurately analyze acetabular deficiency, and that this data allows for more accurate planning of reconstructive surgery. It is suggested here that interactive manipulation of the data to simulate the proposed surgery is a clinically useful extension of the analysis process and should also be considered as an essential part of the pre-operative planning to assure that the appropriate procedure is chosen. The surgical simulation may reduce operative time and improve surgical correction of the deformity.

  20. "C3, 4, 5 Keeps the Diaphragm Alive." Is phrenic nerve palsy part of the pathophysiological mechanism in strangulation and hanging? Should diaphragm paralysis be excluded in survived cases?: A review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Susan J

    2010-03-01

    The phrenic nerve arises in the neck. It is formed from C3, C4, and C5 nerve fibers and descends along the anterior surface of the scalenus anterior muscle before entering the thorax to supply motor and sensory input to the diaphragm. Its anatomic location in the neck leaves the nerve vulnerable to traumatic injury. Phrenic nerve injury can arise as a result of transection, stretching or compression of the nerve, and may result in paralysis of the diaphragm. Consequences of diaphragm paralysis include respiratory compromise, gastrointestinal obstruction, and cardiac arrhythmias. There may be serious morbidity and onset of symptoms may be delayed. Cases of diaphragm paralysis occurring as a consequence of neck trauma are documented in the literature. In some cases, the forces involved are relatively minor and include whiplash injury, occurring in minor motor vehicle collisions, chiropractic manipulation, and compression of neck structures, including a case involving external neck compression by industrial machinery. It is concluded that phrenic nerve palsy might be part of the pathophysiological mechanism in strangulation and hanging, and clinical investigation to exclude diaphragm paralysis in survived cases should be considered.

  1. Intramuscular myxoid lipoma in the proximal forearm presenting as an olecranon mass with superficial radial nerve palsy: a case report

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    Hildebrand Kevin A

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extremity lipomas may occur in any location, including the proximal forearm. We describe a case of a patient with an intramuscular lipoma presenting as an unusual posterior elbow mass. Case presentation We discuss the case of a 57-year-old Caucasian man who presented with a tender, posterior elbow mass initially diagnosed as chronic olecranon bursitis. A minor sensory disturbance in the distribution of the superficial radial nerve was initially thought to be unrelated, but was likely caused by mass effect from the lipoma. No pre-operative advanced imaging was obtained because the diagnosis was felt to have already been made. At the time of surgery, a fatty mass originating in the volar forearm muscles was found to have breached the dorsal forearm fascia and displaced the olecranon bursa. Tissue diagnosis was made by histopathology as a myxoid lipoma with no aggressive features. Post-operative recovery was uneventful. Conclusion We present a case of an unusual elbow mass presenting with symptoms consistent with chronic olecranon bursitis, a relatively common condition. The only unexplained pre-operative finding was the non-specific finding of a transient superficial radial nerve deficit. We remind clinicians to be cautious when diagnosing soft tissue masses in the extremities when unexplained physical findings are present.

  2. Relevance of CT and MRI in retinoblastoma for the diagnosis of postlaminar invasion with normal-size optic nerve: a retrospective study of 150 patients with histological comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brisse, Herve J.; Guesmi, Myriam; Neuenschwander, Sylvia [Institute Curie, Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Aerts, Isabelle [Institute Curie, Department of Paediatric Oncology, Paris (France); Sastre-Garau, Xavier [Institute Curie, Department of Pathology, Paris (France); Savignoni, Alexia; Asselain, Bernard; Bours, Daniele [Institute Curie, Department of Biostatistics, Paris (France); Lumbroso-Le Rouic, Livia; Desjardins, Laurence [Institute Curie, Department of Ocular Oncology, Paris (France); Doz, Francois [Institute Curie, Department of Paediatric Oncology, Paris (France); Faculty of Medicine, Department of Paediatrics, Paris (France)

    2007-07-15

    Detection of optic nerve invasion is mandatory in children primarily enucleated for retinoblastoma to ensure a free resection margin. To assess the accuracy of CT and MRI for the detection of postlaminar invasion in normal-size nerves. A total of 150 patients enucleated for retinoblastoma were included. Imaging data (119 CT and 46 MRI) were retrospectively reviewed and compared with histological findings. Abnormal contrast enhancement of the optic nerve was used as diagnostic criterion for invasion. The associations between postlaminar invasion and several indirect signs were also assessed. Statistical analysis was performed with the Kruskal-Wallis and Fisher exact tests. Postlaminar invasion on histology was observed in 8% (12/150). The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and negative and positive predictive values were 60%, 95%, 91%, 95% and 60% for MRI, and 0%, 100%, 94% and 94% (PPV not assessable) for CT, respectively. Tumour diameter was the only indirect radiological sign significantly associated with postlaminar optic nerve invasion (P=0.002). Our results suggest that MRI is more relevant than CT for preoperative detection of optic nerve invasion in patients with retinoblastoma. Tumour diameter is the only indirect sign significantly associated with postlaminar invasion. (orig.)

  3. Bilateral conjugacy of movement initiation is retained at the eye but not at the mouth following long-term unilateral facial nerve palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulson, Susan E; O'Dwyer, Nicholas J; Adams, Roger D; Croxson, Glen R

    2006-08-01

    Voluntary eyelid closure and smiling were studied in 11 normal subjects and 11 patients with long-term unilateral facial nerve palsy (FNP). The conjugacy of eyelid movements shown previously for blinks was maintained for voluntary eye closures in normal subjects, with movement onset being synchronous in both eyes. Bilateral onset synchrony of the sides of the mouth was also observed in smiling movements in normal subjects. In FNP patients, initiation of movement of the paretic and non-paretic eyelids was also synchronous, but markedly delayed relative to normal (by 136 ms = 32%). The initiation of bilateral movements at the mouth was similarly delayed, but in contrast to the eyes, it was not synchronous. Central neural processing in the FNP subjects was normal, however, since unilateral movements at the mouth were not delayed. The delays therefore point to considerable additional information processing needed for initiating bilateral facial movements after FNP. The maintenance of bilateral onset synchrony in eyelid closure and its loss in smiling following FNP is an important difference in the neural control of these facial regions. Bilateral conjugacy of eyelid movements is probably crucial for coordinating visual input and was achieved apparently without conscious effort on the part of the patients. Bilateral conjugacy of movements at the sides of the mouth may be less critical for normal function, although patients would very much like to achieve it in order to improve the appearance of their smile. Since the everyday frequency of eyelid movements is considerably greater than that of smiling, it is possible that the preserved eyelid conjugacy in these patients with long-term FNP is merely a product of greater experience. However, if synchrony of movement onset is found to be preserved in patients with acute FNP, then it would suggest that eyelid conjugacy has a privileged status in the neural organisation of the face.

  4. Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerebral palsy is a group of disorders that affect a person's ability to move and to maintain balance ... do not get worse over time. People with cerebral palsy may have difficulty walking. They may also have ...

  5. The image variations in mastoid segment of facial nerve and sinus tympani in congenital aural atresia by HRCT and 3D VR CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Hou, Qian; Wang, Pu; Sun, Zhaoyong; Fan, Yue; Wang, Yun; Xue, Huadan; Jin, Zhengyu; Chen, Xiaowei

    2015-09-01

    To find the variations of middle ear structures including the spatial pattern of mastoid segment of facial nerve and the shapes of the sinus tympani in patients with congenital aural atresia (CAA) by using the high-resolution (HR) CT and 3D volume rendered (VR) CT images. HRCT was performed in 25 patients with congenital aural atresia including six bilateral atresia patients (n=25, 21 males, 4 females, mean age 13.8 years, range 6-19). Along the long axis of the posterior semicircular canal ampulla, the oblique axial multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) was set to view the depiction of the round window and the mastoid segment of facial nerve. Volumetric rending technique was used to demonstrate the morphologic features. HRCT and 3D VR findings in atresia ears were compared with those in 19 normal ears of the unilateral ears of atresia patients. On the basic plane, the horizontal line distances between the mastoid segment of the facial nerve and the round window (h-RF) in atresia ears significantly decreased compared to the control ears (PVR CT images. HRCT and 3D VR CT could help a better understanding of different kinds of variations in mastoid segment of facial nerve and sinus tympani in CAA ears. And it may further help surgeons to make the correct decision for hearing rehabilitation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [CT-guided electrode placement for sacral nerve stimulation in the treatment of faecal incontinence (cSNS)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goos, M; Ruf, G; Jargon, D; Trummer, C; Thomusch, O; Grüneberger, J; Bulla, S; Kotter, E; Ruthmann, O

    2014-12-01

    The sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) can be performed in the screening phase under local anaesthesia. Implantation of the tined-lead electrodes is usually performed in an inpatient setting under general anaesthesia. An outpatient procedure for both PNE and implantation of the electrodes offers decisive advantages with respect to the accuracy of electrode placement. From 2006 to 2011 a total of 51 patients was treated with SNS in an outpatient setting. Of 51 patients having the PNE, in four patients the procedure could not successfully be completed. In 39 of the 47 patients screened, the testing was positive. Eight times the screening was negative. The functional results show a significant decline in the Cleveland scores from 14.9 to 6.4. The manometric resting pressure improved from 23.4 mmHg to 43.81 mmHg, the squeezing pressure improved from 42.2 mmHg to 76.12 mmHg. Due to patients' perception and according to the response on the stimulus, the electrodes were placed on the left in S4 11 times, 23 times in the left S3, 3 times in the right S3, once in the left S2 and once in the right S2. CT-guided electrode placement is safe for temporary (subchronic) and permanent (chronic) sacral nerve stimulation and provides a valuable means for placement of the stimulating material. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Isolated oculomotor nerve palsy inspontaneous internal carotid artery dissection: case report Paralisia isolada do nervo oculomotor na dissecção de artéria carótida interna: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Resende Campos

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Partial oculosympathetic palsy followed by ischemic manifestations in brain or retina are the main symptoms of extracranial internal carotid artery (ICA dissection. Unusually, cranial nerves may be affected. Isolated oculomotor nerve palsy is found only rarely. CASE: We present a 50-year-old nondiabetic man who experienced acute onset of right occipital headache which spread to the right retro-orbital region. Five days later he noticed diplopia and right blurred vision sensation. Neurologic examination disclosed only impaired adduction and upward gaze of right eye, slight ipsilateral pupillary dilatation, without ptosis. Brain MRI was normal. Angiography showed right internal carotid artery dissection with forward occlusion to the base of the skull. Intravenous heparin followed by warfarin was prescribed. The headache and the oculomotor nerve deficit gradually resolved in the next three weeks. DISCUSSION: Isolated oculomotor nerve palsy is underrecognized as a clinical presentation of extracranial ICA dissection. If the angiographic evaluation is incomplete without careful study of extracranial arteries, misdiagnosis may lead to failure to initiate early treatment to prevent thromboembolic complications. For this reason we draw attention to the need for careful evaluation of cervical arteries in patients with oculomotor nerve palsy. Mechanical compression or stretching of the third nerve are possible mechanisms, but the direct impairment of the blood supply to the third nerve seems to be the most plausible explanation.A paralisia oculosimpática parcial (síndrome de Horner seguida por manifestações isquêmicas cerebrais ou retinianas são os principais sintomas da dissecção da artéria carótida interna (ACI extracraniana. O acometimento de nervos cranianos é incomum. Apenas raramente a paralisia isolada do nervo oculomotor pode ser encontrada. CASO: homem de 50 anos, sem diabetes, apresentou cefaléia occipital de início s

  8. CT-clinical approach to patients with symptoms related to the V, VII, IX-XII cranial nerves and cervical sympathetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalovidouris, A.; Mancuso, A.A.; Dillon, W.

    1984-06-01

    Forty-three patients who had signs and symptoms possibly related to the extracranial course of cranial nerves V, VII, IX, X-XII, and the cervical sympathetics were examined prospectively using high resolution CT to obtain images of thin sections during rapid drip infusion of contrast material. Anatomic areas in the scan protocols included the posterior fossa, cavernous and paranasal sinuses, skull base, temporal bone, nasopharynx, parotid gland, tongue base, and neck. Nine of the 23 patients with possible fifth nerve deficits had extracranial structural lesions that explained the symptoms; none of these nine, however, had typical trigeminal neuralgia. Of eight patients with peripheral seventh nerve abnormalities, two had positive findings on scans. Of five patients presenting with referred ear pain, three had carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract. The authors' experience suggests that patients at high risk for structural lesions responsible for cranial nerve deficits can be selected by clinical criteria. Protocols for each clinical setting are presented.

  9. Clinical potential and limitation of MRI for degenerative lumbar spinal diseases. Comparison of MRI, myelography, CT and selective nerve root infiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seki, Michihiro; Kikuchi, Shinichi [Fukushima Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1994-12-01

    To assess the clinical potential and limitations of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in degenerative lumbar spinal diseases, the findings of MR imaging were compared with those of myelography and CT. The subjects were 80 patients with intervertebral disc herniation (46), spondylosis (28), degenerative spondylolisthesis (5), and spondylolysis (one). There was a good correlation between sagittal MRI (T1-weighted images) and myelography in measuring the anteroposterior diameter and the compression rate of the injured dural canal in all disease categories. However, MRI was inferior, irrespective of sagittal and coronal images, to myelography in detecting blocking of the dural canal and intradural findings such as redundant nerve roots. MRI was inferior to selective nerve root infiltration in visualizing the compression of the nerve root, irrespective of diseases; however, there was no difference in abnormal findings of the running of nerve root between the two modalities. Transverse MRI was superior to CT in visualizing the nerve root. Thus, MRI alone is insufficient for the diagnosis of degenerative lumbar spinal diseases, and the other modalities should be supplementary for pathophysiological understanding of these diseases. (N.K.).

  10. Clinical Observation on Effect of Clearing the Governor Vessel and Refreshing the Mind Needling on Head SPECT and CT Scanning of Kids with Cerebral Palsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘振寰; 祁岩超; 潘佩光; 马美美; 钱旭光; 符文杰; 张宏雁

    2007-01-01

    目的:探讨针灸在脑瘫康复中的脑功能代偿作用.方法:100例脑瘫患儿随机分为治疗组(50例)和对照组(50例),治疗组采用通督补肾组穴:督脉穴13针配伍涌泉、阳陵泉、足三里、三阴交.和醒神头针(神庭透百会,百会透脑户和四神聪).配合康复训练.对照组单纯用康复训练.观察两组临床疗效以及头颅CT、SPECT病变恢复情况.结果:治疗组总有效率为84%,显著高于对照组总有效率的52%.治疗后发育商(DQ)治疗显著组高于对照组(P<0.01).头颅CT脑发育不良,脑萎缩的好转率和头颅SPECT脑神经元代谢功能恢复正常率,治疗组高于对照组(P<0.01)结论:针灸能促进脑功能的代偿作用.%To investigate the brain functional compensation of acupuncture in cerebral palsy rehabilitation. Method: All 100 cerebral palsy kids were randomized into a treatment group (50 cases) and a control group (50 cases). For cases in the treatment group,points of connecting the Governor Vessels and tonifying the kidney were selected: 13 points of the Governor Vessel, Yongquan (Kid 1), Yanglingquan (GB 34), Zusanli (ST 36) and Sanyinjiao (SP 6), and points of refreshing the mind were also selected: puncturing Shenting (GV 24) toward Baihui (GV 20) and puncturing Baihui (GV 20) toward Naohu (GV 17) and Sishencong (Ex-HN 1). In addition, rehabilitation training was also combined. For cases in the control group,rehabilitation training alone was adopted. Then the clinical effect and improvement through head CT scanning and SPECT were observed. Result: The total effective rate of the treatment group was 84%, significantly higher than 52% of the control group. After treatment, the DQ in the treatment group was significantly higher than the control group (P<0.01). Also, the improvement rate of brain maldevelopment and brain atrophy showed by CT scan and restoration rate of brain neuron metabolic function in the treatment group were higher than the control group

  11. Results of Facial Nerve Microsurgery for Peripheral Facial Palsy in 15 Patients%面神经减压术治疗周围性面瘫15例临床分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方瑾; 李海同; 潘军燕; 陈晓红; 周水洪; 柴亮; 杨雪明; 王媚; 鲍洋洋; 钱林荣

    2014-01-01

    Objcetive To report results of facial nerve decompression for peripheral facial palsy caused by different facial never diseases.Methods Etiologies in this group included trauma (n=9), Bell’s palsy (n=3) and cholesteatoma in middle ear (n=3).All patients were treated with facial nerve decompression via transmastoid, subtemporal or supralabyrinthine approach-es.The House-Brackmann facial nerve grade was assessed during the 0.5 to 2 years follow up.Results Among the 9 traumat-ic facial palsy patients caused by temporal bone fracture, 5 received surgery within 2 to 4 weeks and achieved grade I (n=4) or II (n=1) facial function;3 received surgery within 5 to 8 weeks and achieved gradeⅡ(n=2) orⅢ(n=1) facial function;and 1 received the operation within 9 to 12 weeks after the injury and achieved only gradeⅣfacial function.Two patients with Bell ’s palsy were operated on within 9 to12 weeks and achieved grade I or II facial function. One Bell’s palsy patient achieved gradeⅢfacial function after receiving surgery 12 weeks after disease onset. The 3 cases of middle ear cholesteatoma were oper-ated upon in 1 to 2 weeks and all achieved grade I facial function. Conclusions Appropriate timing and facial nerve decom-pression operations based on the etiologies can lead to good facial function results.%目的:探讨不同面神经疾病致周围性面瘫行面神经减压手术的疗效。方法对9例外伤性面瘫、3例贝尔氏面瘫及3例中耳胆脂瘤所致的周围性面瘫,经乳突-颞下迷路上隐窝进路面神经显微减压手术,术后随访0.5~2年,按面瘫H-B分级法评估面神经功能恢复程度。结果9例颞骨骨折面瘫(Ⅳ级2例,V级6例,Ⅵ级1例),伤后2~4周手术5例,术后面神经功能恢复I级4例,Ⅱ级1例;伤后5~8周手术3例,面神经功能恢复Ⅱ级2例,Ⅲ级1例;伤后9~12周手术1例,恢复Ⅳ级。3例贝尔面瘫(Ⅳ级1例,V级2例),9~12周手术2

  12. Development of a CT-guided standard approach for tined lead implantation at the sacral nerve root S3 in minipigs for chronic neuromodulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foditsch EE

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Elena Esra Foditsch,1 Reinhold Zimmermann2 1Urology, Spinal Cord Injury and Tissue Regeneration Center Salzburg, Paracelsus Medical University, 2University Clinic of Urology and Andrology, Salzburg General Hospital, Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg, Austria Purpose: The aim of this study was to develop a controlled approach for sacral neuromodulation (SNM to improve both nerve targeting and tined lead placement, for which a new computed tomography (CT-guided implantation technique was analyzed in minipigs.Materials and methods: This study included five female, adult Göttingen minipigs. In deep sedoanalgesia, the minipigs were placed in an extended prone position. Commercially available SNM materials were used (needle, introduction sheath, and quadripolar tined lead electrode. Gross anatomy was displayed by CT, and the nerves were bilaterally identified. The optimal angles to puncture the S3 foramen, the resulting access path, and the site for the skin incision were defined subsequently. The needle puncture and the tined lead placement were followed by successive CT scans/3D-reconstruction images. Once proper CT-guided placement of the needle and electrode was established, response to functional stimuli was intraoperatively checked to verify correct positioning.Results: Successful bilateral tined lead implantation was performed in four out of five minipigs. Implantation was different from the clinical situation because the puncture was done from the contralateral side at a 30° angle to the midline and 60° horizontal angle to ensure both passage through the foramen and nerve access. Surgery time was 50–150 minutes. Stimulation response comprised a twitch of the perianal musculature and tail rotation to the contralateral side.Conclusion: We have established a new, minimally invasive, highly standardized, CT-guided SNM electrode implantation technique. Functional outcomes are clearly defined and reproducible. All procedures can be

  13. Acupuncture for Bell's palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ning; Zhou, Muke; He, Li; Zhou, Dong; Li, N

    2010-08-04

    Bell's palsy or idiopathic facial palsy is an acute facial paralysis due to inflammation of the facial nerve. A number of studies published in China have suggested acupuncture is beneficial for facial palsy. The objective of this review was to examine the efficacy of acupuncture in hastening recovery and reducing long-term morbidity from Bell's palsy. We updated the searches of the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Trials Specialized Register (24 May 2010), The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Issue 2, 2010), MEDLINE (January 1966 to May 2010), EMBASE (January 1980 to May 2010), AMED (January 1985 to May 2010), LILACS (from January 1982 to May 2010) and the Chinese Biomedical Retrieval System (January 1978 to May 2010) for randomised controlled trials using 'Bell's palsy' and its synonyms, 'idiopathic facial paralysis' or 'facial palsy' as well as search terms including 'acupuncture'. Chinese journals in which we thought we might find randomised controlled trials relevant to our study were handsearched. We reviewed the bibliographies of the randomised trials and contacted the authors and known experts in the field to identify additional published or unpublished data. We included all randomised controlled trials involving acupuncture by needle insertion in the treatment of Bell's palsy irrespective of any language restrictions. Two review authors identified potential articles from the literature search, extracted data and assessed quality of each trial independently. All disagreements were resolved by discussion between the review authors. The literature search and handsearching identified 49 potentially relevant articles. Of these, six RCTs were included involving 537 participants with Bell's palsy. Two more possible trials were identified in the update than the previous version of this systematic review, but both were excluded because they were not real RCTs. Of the six included trials, five used acupuncture while the other one used

  14. Bell’s Palsy As a Rare First Presentation of Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Hosseini

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Otalgia and Bell’s palsy are rare manifestations of metastasis and the most common presentation of an inflammatory process in the temporal bone.Case presentation: This article explains a 34-year-old woman with breast cancer who presented with cranial nerve palsy symptoms. The 7th and 8th cranial nerves were involved in the metastatic phase and then hoarseness was added to her symptoms. Brain MRI showed a petrous lesion in the temporal bone due to metastasis, which was the first clue to cancer. Her metastatic workup showed multiple bone lesions. On chest CT scan, multiple lung lesions were noted. Also, a breast mass was discovered on her chest CT scan. On breast examination an irregular mass fixed to the pectoralis muscle was found. Pathologic evaluation of samples obtained through ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of invasive ductal carcinoma.Conclusion: Temporal bone metastases are rare and may be asymptomatic, or with mild symptoms mimicking mastoid infections. Physicians should consider metastatic cancer on the list of differential diagnoses in patients presenting with prolonged otologic symptoms or facial nerve disorders.

  15. Cerebral Palsy (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Right Sport for You Healthy School Lunch Planner Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Teens > Cerebral Palsy Print A A ... do just what everyone else does. What Is Cerebral Palsy? Cerebral palsy (CP) is a disorder of the ...

  16. [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT in the diagnosis of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours in neurofibromatosis type-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warbey, Victoria S.; O' Doherty, Michael J. [King' s College London, Clinical PET Centre, Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Ferner, Rosalie E. [King' s College London, Department of Neurology, Guy' s and St Thomas' Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Dunn, Joel T. [King' s College London, Clinical PET Centre, Division of Imaging Sciences, Guy' s, King' s and St Thomas' School of Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Calonje, Eduardo [Guy' s and St Thomas' Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Dermatopathology, London (United Kingdom)

    2009-05-15

    The detection of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours (MPNSTs) in patients with neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) remains a clinical challenge. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of [{sup 18}F]2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose PET/CT (FDG PET/CT with early and delayed imaging) in patients with symptomatic neurofibromas, to revalidate current cut-off values for identification of malignant change within neurofibromas and to examine the relationship between SUV and tumour grade. Patients with symptomatic neurofibromas underwent FDG PET/CT imaging at 90 and 240 min. Semiquantitative analysis using maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) was performed and correlated with histology. In 69 patients, 85 lesions were identified for analysis, including 10 atypical neurofibromas and 21 MPNSTs. Sensitivity of FDG PET/CT in diagnosing NF1-associated MPNST was 0.97 (95% CI 0.81-0.99) and the specificity was 0.87 (CI 0.74-0.95). There was a significant difference in SUVmax between early and delayed imaging and in SUVmax between tumours identified as benign and malignant on PET/CT. There was also a significant difference in SUVmax between tumour grades. FDG PET/CT is a highly sensitive and specific imaging modality for the diagnosis of MPNST in NF1 patients. We recommend performing early (90 min) and delayed imaging at 4 h for accurate lesion characterization and using a cut-off SUVmax of 3.5 on delayed imaging to achieve maximal sensitivity. (orig.)

  17. Paralisia facial periférica bilateral na leucemia linfóide aguda: relato de caso Bilateral peripheric facial nerve palsy in acute linfoid leukemia: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos L. Antunes

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available A mímica facial é fundamental para a expressão e comunicação humana, que são possíveis apenas através da integridade do nervo facial. Sendo assim, a paralisia facial periférica (PFP pode deixar seqüelas estéticas, funcionais e psicológicas. A causa mais comum é a paralisia de Bell (50 a 80%, onde a maioria dos pacientes apresenta manifestação unilateral. O acometimento bilateral simultâneo é raro, sendo a leucemia a neoplasia que com maior freqüência pode resultar nesse tipo de manifestação. A seguir, relatamos o caso de um paciente de dezoito anos de idade apresentando leucemia linfóide aguda (LLA e PFP simultânea, ambas refratárias ao tratamento quimioterápico, culminando com o óbito cinco meses após o início da PFP. Realizou-se considerações importantes sobre a fisiopatologia da PFP na LLA, além de uma revisão da literatura.The facial mimic is very important to the human expression and communication, which depend on the integrity of the facial nerve. So, the peripheric facial palsy (PFP can leave esthetics, functional and psychological sequelae. The more common etiology is Bell's palsy (50 to 80% and most of the patients show a unilateral manifestation. The simultaneous bilateral PFP is rare, and the leukemia is the neoplasia that can often that kind of manifestation. We present a clinical case of an 18-year-old patient with acute lymphoid leukemia and simultaneous bilateral facial palsy, who did not recover after the chemotherapy treatment, and died five months after the initial manifestation of the facial palsy. Important considerations were accomplished about the physiopathology of PFP in acute lymphoid leukemia, besides literature review.

  18. Hepatocellular carcinoma metastasizing to the skull base involving multiple cranial nerves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Soo Ryang Kim; Fumio Kanda; Hiroshi Kobessho; Koji Sugimoto; Toshiyuki Matsuoka; Masatoshi Kudo; Yoshitake Hayashi

    2006-01-01

    We describe a rare case of HCV-related recurrent multiple hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) metastasizing to the skull base involving multiple cranial nerves in a 50-yearold woman. The patient presented with symptoms of ptosis, fixation of the right eyeball, and left abducens palsy, indicating disturbances of the right oculomotor and trochlear nerves and bilateral abducens nerves. Brain contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) revealed an ill-defined mass with abnormal enhancement around the sella turcica. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)disclosed that the mass involved the clivus, cavernous sinus, and petrous apex. On contrast-enhanced MRI with gadolinium-chelated contrast medium, the mass showed inhomogeneous intermediate enhancement.The diagnosis of metastatic HCC to the skull base was made on the basis of neurological findings and imaging studies including CT and MRI, without histological examinations. Further studies may provide insights into various methods for diagnosing HCC metastasizing to the craniospinal area.

  19. Delayed recurrent nerve paralysis following post-traumatic aortic pseudoaneurysm

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    Mesolella Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Blunt trauma to the neck or to the chest are increasingly observed in the emergency clinical practice. They usually follow motor vehicle accidents or may be work or sports related. A wide pattern of clinical presentation can be potentially encountered. We report the uncommon case of a patient who was referred to our observation presenting with hoarseness and disphagia. Twenty days before he had sustained a car accident with trauma to the chest, neck and the mandible. Laryngoscopy showed a left recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy. Further otolaryngo-logical examination showed no other abnormality. At CT and MR imaging a post-traumatic aortic pseudoaneurysm was revealed. The aortic pseudoaneurysm was consequently repaired by implantation of an endovascular stent graft under local anesthesia. The patient was discharged 10 days later. At 30-days follow-up laryngoscopy the left vocal cord palsy was completely resolved.

  20. From recurrent peripheral facial palsy to multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanković, Mira; Demarin, Vida

    2011-09-01

    Peripheral facial palsy is a clinical entity, which may be presented as the first symptom of multiple sclerosis (MS). Although MS is mostly a multifocal chronic inflammation of the central nervous system, peripheral nervous system can also be involved. Isolated cranial nerve palsies are rare and occur in 1.6% of MS patients. In this report, a case is presented of a 35-year-old woman who developed isolated seventh nerve palsy that was misdiagnosed as Bell's palsy. Despite recurrent peripheral facial palsy, positive cerebrospinal fluid finding and magnetic resonance imaging, the diagnosis of MS could only be confirmed when the patient developed other neurologic symptoms and when the criteria for dissemination in space were satisfied. In clinical presentation, the patient had only cranial nerve involvement, with complete recovery.

  1. 电针改善单纯外展神经麻痹性眼球运动障碍的临床分析%Clinical analysis of abducens nerve palsy treated by electroacupuncture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马朝廷; 杨迎新; 马秋艳; 张丹丹; 赵彦萍; 李喜文

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To observe the clinical curative effect of electroacupuncture connecting Qiuhou ( EX-HN7) and Hegu( LI-4) for eyeball movement disorder caused by acquired simplex abducens nerve palsy. METHODS:Randomly we divided 48 cases(48 eyes) into treatment group(26 cases with 26 eyes) and control group (22 cases with 22 eyes), diagnosed with abducens nerve palsy from March 2012 to March 2015 at ophthalmology department of Beijing hospital of traditional Chinese medicine affiliated to Capital Medical University.Patients in treatment group were treated by electroacupuncture connecting Qiuhou ( EX-HN7) and Hegu ( LI-4), with body acupuncture and acupoints around eye. Control group took methylcobalamin (0.5mg,3 times per day) orally and subcutaneously injection of compound anisodine hydrobromide by the superficial temporal vein (2mL, once a day ) as the treatment. During the treatment, affected eyes of all the patients were covered. The course of treatments was 1mo.The improvement of eye movements was observed. RESULTS:The date of the two groups was comparable at baseline.After 1mo treatments, the eye movement of treatment group was significantly improved from 13.06±2.31mm pre-treatment to 19.35±3.21mm post-treatment, than that of the control group. The difference was statistically significant (t=-5.43, P<0.01).The effective rate of the treatment group was 88.5%, higher than that of the control group (63.6%).The difference was statistically significant (χ2=4.16, P=0.04). CONCLUSION: The electroacupuncture connecting Qiuhou(EX-HN7) and Hegu (LI-4)has certain effects on the treatment of eyeball movement disorder caused by simplex abduction paralysis.It is worth further clinical research.%AIM: To observe the clinical curative effect of electroacupuncture connecting Qiuhou ( EX -HN7 ) and Hegu(LI -4 ) for eyeball

  2. FACIAL PALSY AS FIRST PRESENTATION OF ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA: A CASE REPORT

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    S. Inaloo

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveFacial paralysis in children is very often idiopathic and isolated facial nerve palsy, resulting from leukemic infiltration is a rare occurrence. Here we present the case of a 14 year-old boy with acute lymphobastic leukemia, who first presented with isolated right side peripheral facial nerve paralysis and was initially diagnosed with Bell's palsy.ConclusionThe presence of Bell's palsy in young children requires a complete evaluation, keeping in mind the possibility of leptomeningeal disease.Key words: Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Facial nerve palsy, Children.

  3. A case of myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (MPO-ANCA)-associated hypertrophic pachymeningitis presenting with multiple cranial nerve palsies and diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Ken; Sainouchi, Makoto; Goto, Masahiro; Murase, Nagako; Ohtani, Ryo; Nakamura, Michikazu

    2016-05-31

    A 61-year-old woman developed hearing difficulties and became thirsty after experiencing cold symptoms. A neurological examination revealed a loss of odor sensation, facial palsy, dysphasia, and dysarthria. Vocal cord palsy was observed during pharyngoscopy. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a thickened pituitary stalk and swelling of the pituitary gland, but no high signal intensity regions were seen in the posterior portion of the pituitary gland. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI demonstrated a thickened dura mater over the anterior cranial fossa. A biopsy specimen of the thickened dura mater showed fibrosis, granulomatous inflammation, and necrotic foci. Blood tests detected myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (MPO-ANCA). The patient's urine osmolarity was low even though she exhibited hypernatremia. We diagnosed her with hypertrophic pachymeningitis associated with MPO-ANCA and diabetes insipidus. The patient received two courses of 5-day high-dose intravenous methylprednisolone (1.0 g/day), and was subsequently administered oral prednisolone, which gradually relieved her symptoms. However, the patient's symptoms recurred despite the high-dose prednisolone treatment. It was difficult to control the patient's symptoms in this case with oral prednisolone monotherapy, but combined treatment with cyclosporine resulted in sustained remission. It is considered that patients with MPO-ANCA-positive hypertrophic pachymeningitis require combination therapy with prednisolone and immunosuppressive agents at an early stage.

  4. Peripheral facial weakness (Bell's palsy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basić-Kes, Vanja; Dobrota, Vesna Dermanović; Cesarik, Marijan; Matovina, Lucija Zadro; Madzar, Zrinko; Zavoreo, Iris; Demarin, Vida

    2013-06-01

    Peripheral facial weakness is a facial nerve damage that results in muscle weakness on one side of the face. It may be idiopathic (Bell's palsy) or may have a detectable cause. Almost 80% of peripheral facial weakness cases are primary and the rest of them are secondary. The most frequent causes of secondary peripheral facial weakness are systemic viral infections, trauma, surgery, diabetes, local infections, tumor, immune disorders, drugs, degenerative diseases of the central nervous system, etc. The diagnosis relies upon the presence of typical signs and symptoms, blood chemistry tests, cerebrospinal fluid investigations, nerve conduction studies and neuroimaging methods (cerebral MRI, x-ray of the skull and mastoid). Treatment of secondary peripheral facial weakness is based on therapy for the underlying disorder, unlike the treatment of Bell's palsy that is controversial due to the lack of large, randomized, controlled, prospective studies. There are some indications that steroids or antiviral agents are beneficial but there are also studies that show no beneficial effect. Additional treatments include eye protection, physiotherapy, acupuncture, botulinum toxin, or surgery. Bell's palsy has a benign prognosis with complete recovery in about 80% of patients, 15% experience some mode of permanent nerve damage and severe consequences remain in 5% of patients.

  5. Correlation between facial nerve functional evaluation and efficacy evaluation of acupuncture treatment for Bell's palsy%面神经功能评价对针刺治疗贝尔麻痹疗效评估的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周章玲; 李呈新; 姜岳波; 左聪; 蔡云; 王瑞

    2012-01-01

    目的:在针灸治疗贝尔麻痹的过程中,依据面神经麻痹程度进行面神经功能障碍评价分级,并观察该分级与疗效、疗程的关系及在判断预后方面的作用.方法:以面瘫常用运动功能评价量表House-Brackmann量表为准,并对眼裂和唇角设定量标准,治疗前和治疗结束时,根据该量表评分对患者面部瘫痪程度进行面神经功能障碍评估分级,依次分为轻度、中度、中重度、重度功能障碍和完全麻痹5个级别.按患者疾病分期采用针刺对症治疗,不人为设定治疗时程,全程观察,以最终疗效为准.结果:68例病例中,治愈53例,总有效率为97%.5种不同面神经功能障碍之间的治疗效果差异有统计学意义(P<0.01);疗效与病情轻重相关,等级相关分析相关系数为0.423 (P<0.01);其疗程也随着面神经功能障碍级别加重而延长(P<0.01).结论:贝尔麻痹患者存在面神经功能障碍轻重的差别,针灸治疗的效果随着面神经功能障碍的加重而下降,不同级别面神经功能障碍患者治疗所需疗程不同.临床研究中非常有必要对患者进行评估分级后再做观察治疗,并依据病情轻重程度选择不同治疗方法.%OBJECTIVE: To assess and grade facial nerve dysfunction according to the extent of facial paralysis in the clinical course of acupuncture treatment for Bell's palsy, and to observe the interrelationship between the grade, the efficacy and the period of treatment, as well as the effect on prognosis. METHODS: The authors employed the House-Brackmann scale, a commonly used evaluation scale for facial paralysis motor function, and set standards for eye fissure and lips. According to the improved scale, the authors assessed and graded the degree of facial paralysis in terms of facial nerve dysfunction both before and after treatment. The grade was divided into five levels: mild, moderate, moderately severe, severe dysfunction and complete paralysis. The

  6. Delayed presentation of traumatic facial nerve (CN VII) paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoli, Anthony M; Panagos, Peter

    2005-11-01

    Facial nerve paralysis (Cranial Nerve VII, CN VII) can be a disfiguring disorder with profound impact upon the patient. The etiology of facial nerve paralysis may be congenital, iatrogenic, or result from neoplasm, infection, trauma, or toxic exposure. In the emergency department, the most common cause of unilateral facial paralysis is Bell's palsy, also known as idiopathic facial paralysis (IFP). We report a case of delayed presentation of unilateral facial nerve paralysis 3 days after sustaining a traumatic head injury. Re-evaluation and imaging of this patient revealed a full facial paralysis and temporal bone fracture extending into the facial canal. Because cranial nerve injuries occur in approximately 5-10% of head-injured patients, a good history and physical examination is important to differentiate IFP from another etiology. Newer generation high-resolution computed tomography (CT) scans are commonly demonstrating these fractures. An understanding of this complication, appropriate patient follow-up, and early involvement of the Otolaryngologist is important in management of these patients. The mechanism as well as the timing of facial nerve paralysis will determine the proper evaluation, consultation, and management for the patient. Patients with total or immediate paralysis as well as those with poorly prognostic audiogram results are good candidates for surgical repair.

  7. Employees with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Home | Accommodation and Compliance Series: Employees with Cerebral Palsy (CP) By Eddie Whidden, MA Preface Introduction Information ... SOAR) at http://AskJAN.org/soar. Information about Cerebral Palsy (CP) What is CP? Cerebral palsy is a ...

  8. CT and MR imaging for pediatric cochlear implantation: emphasis on the relationship between the cochlear nerve canal and the cochlear nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyasaka, Mikiko; Nosaka, Shunsuke; Masaki, Hidekazu [National Center for Child Health and Development, Department of Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Morimoto, Noriko; Taiji, Hidenobu [National Center for Child Health and Development, Department of Otolaryngology, Tokyo (Japan)

    2010-09-15

    Cochlear implantation has become an accepted treatment for deafness. As the frequency of cochlear implantation has increased, requests for images have also increased in the work-up for candidates. An absent cochlear nerve (CN) is a contraindication to cochlear implantation. Therefore, MRI is performed to evaluate the CN in patients with sensorineural hearing loss. Recently, some authors have reported the relationship between cochlear nerve canal (CNC) stenosis and CN hypoplasia. To review the relationship between CNC and CN. During a period of 78 months, 21 children (42 ears) with unilateral or bilateral sensorineural hearing loss underwent both HRCT and MRI of the cochlear nerve. We retrospectively reviewed two factors: the evaluation of inner ear malformations and the relationship between CNC stenosis and CN hypoplasia. Inner ear malformations were recognized in ten ears. The mean CNC diameter was approximately 2 mm (ranging from 0.6 to 2.7 mm). CN hypoplasia was seen in eight of the 42 ears; all eight were associated with CNC stenosis ({<=}1.5 mm). Of the 34 ears with normal CN, 32 had CNC >1.5 mm in diameter and the remaining two ears, with incomplete partition type I, had CNC stenosis. Children with CNC stenosis had a high incidence of CN hypoplasia. CNC stenosis ({<=}1.5 mm) suggests CN hypoplasia. On the other hand, CN hypoplasia was not seen in children with CNC diameter >1.5 mm. Therefore, we conclude that children with CNC stenosis or malformations on HRCT should receive MR imaging of the CN. (orig.)

  9. [A case of slowly progressive type 1 diabetes mellitus developing myeloperoxidase-specific anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis with hypertrophic pachymeningitis manifesting as multiple cranial nerve palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Yuko; Oku, Kayo; Suzuki, Atsushi; Ohsone, Yasuo; Handa, Michiko; Okano, Yutaka

    2011-01-01

    We report a 63-year-old man with a 35-year history of slowly progressive type 1 diabetes mellitus (SPIDDM), complicated with myeloperoxidase-specific anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (MPO-ANCA)-associated vasculitis presenting alveolar hemorrhage and pachymeningitis. The patient was first diagnosed as having DM at age of 28 years old and deteriorated secretion of insulin and the typical clinical course led us to the diagnosis of SPIDDM. When he was 58 years old, he suffered from fever, headache, and alveolar hemorrhage. He was diagnosed as having MPO-ANCA associated vasculitis based on a high titer of MPO-ANCA and histological findings of lung biopsy. Treatment with steroid pulse therapy, followed by oral prednisolone and oral cyclophosohamide, resulted in clinical improvement. Five years later, he complained of double vision. A gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study of the brain showed normal. Two months later, he developed right cranial nerve V~XII palsy. A second MRI study revealed thickening of the right temporal region and cerebellar dura mater, leading us to the diagnosis of hypertrophic pachymeningitis. He responded well to oral prednisolone (50 mg/day) and intravenous cyclophosohamide (500 mg). This is the first case report of SPIDDM complicated with MPO-ANCA-associated vasculitis, manifesting as alveolar hemorrhage and hypertrophic pachymeningitis.

  10. Recurrent nerve paralysis: Assessment of intrathoracic findings by computed tomography. Rekurrensparesen: Computertomographische Analyse intrathorakaler Befunde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delorme, S.; Knopp, M.V.; Kauczor, H.U.; Zuna, I.; Trost, U.; Haberkorn, U.; Kaick, G. van (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg (Germany). Forschungsschwerpunkt Radiologische Diagnostik und Therapie)

    1992-09-01

    The long and singular course of the inferior (recurrent) laryngeal nerve makes it very vulnerable to infiltration by tumors of various locations. In particular, mediastinal and pulmonary lesions must be considered in the case of left vocal chord palsy. Recurrent nerve paralysis caused by a tumor indicates advanced disease. We retrospectively reviewed the computed tomography (CT) findings in 29 patients with bronchogenic carcinoma or mediastinal tumors and recurrent nerve paralysis with respect to the site, size and extent of the tumor and the lumph node status. The review revealed a marked predominance of left upper lobe tumors with extensive lymph node metastases to the anterior mediastinum and the aortopulmonary window. The extent of mediastinal involvement exceeded the average involvement in a control group of 30 randomly selected patients with bronchogenic carcinoma at the time of presentation. In all patients CT demonstrated tumor tissue which could have caused the paralysis at one or more sites along the anatomical course of the recurrent nerve. In most cases the tumor was located at the aortic arch. The left paratracheal region, right paratracheal region and right pulmonary apex were affected in one case each. We conclude that in patients with cancer, CT is a suitable method for localizing a recurrent nerve lesion. (orig.).

  11. Uncommon Dorsal Radiocarpal Fracture Dislocation Complicated With Median Nerve Palsy: Case Report, Review of the Literature, and a New Classification System Guiding the Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hing-Cheong Wong

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 36-year-old lorry driver who sustained left dorsal radiocarpal fracture dislocation and left median nerve injury in a traffic accident in 2010. Emergency operation of closed reduction, cross-wrist-bridging external fixation, percutaneous transradial styloid Kirschner wire fixation, decompression of left median nerve, and repair of the partially torn palmar radiocarpal ligament were performed under general anaesthesia. Because of the persistent depressed dorsal articular rim fracture of left distal radius, another operation of open reduction, corticocancellous bone grafting, and dorsal buttress plating was performed 5 days after the initial operation. Six months after the operation, the patient enjoyed good range of wrist motion but weak twisting power, especially in supination. There was no radiological feature of radiocarpal subluxation.

  12. Efficacy of intraoperative monitoring of transcranial electrical stimulation-induced motor evoked potentials and spontaneous electromyography activity to identify acute-versus delayed-onset C-5 nerve root palsy during cervical spine surgery: clinical article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalodia, Vidya M; Schwartz, Daniel M; Sestokas, Anthony K; Bloomgarden, Gary; Arkins, Thomas; Tomak, Patrick; Gorelick, Judith; Wijesekera, Shirvinda; Beiner, John; Goodrich, Isaac

    2013-10-01

    Deltoid muscle weakness due to C-5 nerve root injury following cervical spine surgery is an uncommon but potentially debilitating complication. Symptoms can manifest upon emergence from anesthesia or days to weeks following surgery. There is conflicting evidence regarding the efficacy of spontaneous electromyography (spEMG) monitoring in detecting evolving C-5 nerve root compromise. By contrast, transcranial electrical stimulation-induced motor evoked potential (tceMEP) monitoring has been shown to be highly sensitive and specific in identifying impending C-5 injury. In this study the authors sought to 1) determine the frequency of immediate versus delayed-onset C-5 nerve root injury following cervical spine surgery, 2) identify risk factors associated with the development of C-5 palsies, and 3) determine whether tceMEP and spEMG neuromonitoring can help to identify acutely evolving C-5 injury as well as predict delayed-onset deltoid muscle paresis. The authors retrospectively reviewed the neuromonitoring and surgical records of all patients who had undergone cervical spine surgery involving the C-4 and/or C-5 level in the period from 2006 to 2008. Real-time tceMEP and spEMG monitoring from the deltoid muscle was performed as part of a multimodal neuromonitoring protocol during all surgeries. Charts were reviewed to identify patients who had experienced significant changes in tceMEPs and/or episodes of neurotonic spEMG activity during surgery, as well as those who had shown new-onset deltoid weakness either immediately upon emergence from the anesthesia or in a delayed fashion. Two hundred twenty-nine patients undergoing 235 cervical spine surgeries involving the C4-5 level served as the study cohort. The overall incidence of perioperative C-5 nerve root injury was 5.1%. The incidence was greatest (50%) in cases with dual corpectomies at the C-4 and C-5 spinal levels. All patients who emerged from anesthesia with deltoid weakness had significant and unresolved

  13. Immediate Postoperative Bell's Palsy: Viral Etiology or Post-Traumatic Phenomena?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ghasem Shams

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bell’s palsy is a sudden unilateral paralysis of the facial nerve. Postoperative Bell’s palsy following surgery is rare. It occurs in less than 1% of operations. The hypothesis: We premise that the main cause of immediate postoperative Bell's palsy is latent herpes viruses (herpes simplex virus type 1 and herpes zoster virus, which are reactivated from cranial nerve ganglia. Inflammation of the nerve initially results in a reversible neurapraxia, but ultimately Wallerian degeneration ensues. The palsy is often sudden in onset and evolves rapidly, with maximal facial weakness developing within two days. Associated symptoms of-ten seen in idiopathic Bell’s palsy are tearing problems, hyperacusis and altered taste.Evaluation of the hypothesis: Facial paralysis presenting postoperatively is distressing and poses a diagnostic chal-lenge. A complete interruption of the facial nerve at the sty-lomastoid foramen paralyzes all the muscles of facial expression. Taste sensation may be lost unilaterally and hye-racusis may be present. Idiopathic Bell’s palsy is due to inflammation of the facial nerve in the facial canal. Bell’s palsy may also occur from lesions that invade the temporal bone (carotid body, cholesteatoma, dermoid cyst, acoustic neu-romas. Although traumatic Bell’s palsy cannot be ruled out, it seems logic to postulate that the main cause of immediate postoperative Bell's palsy is latent herpes viruses.

  14. Common questions about Bell palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, Janet R; Tamang, Stephen

    2014-02-01

    Bell palsy is an acute affliction of the facial nerve, resulting in sudden paralysis or weakness of the muscles on one side of the face. Testing patients with unilateral facial paralysis for diabetes mellitus or Lyme disease is not routinely recommended. Patients with Lyme disease typically present with additional manifestations, such as arthritis, rash, or facial swelling. Diabetes may be a comorbidity of Bell palsy, but testing is not needed in the absence of other indications, such as hypertension. In patients with atypical symptoms, magnetic resonance imaging with contrast enhancement can be used to rule out cranial mass effect and to add prognostic value. Steroids improve resolution of symptoms in patients with Bell palsy and remain the preferred treatment. Antiviral agents have a limited role, and may improve outcomes when combined with steroids in patients with severe symptoms. When facial paralysis is prolonged, surgery may be indicated to prevent ocular desiccation secondary to incomplete eyelid closure. Facial nerve decompression is rarely indicated or performed. Physical therapy modalities, including electrostimulation, exercise, and massage, are neither beneficial nor harmful.

  15. Contralateral reinnervation of midline muscles in nonidiopathic facial palsy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilhuis, H.J.; Beurskens, C.H.G.; Vries, J. de; Marres, H.A.M.; Hartman, E.H.M.; Zwarts, M.J.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze contralateral reinnervation of the facial nerve in eight patients with complete facial palsy after surgery or trauma and seven healthy volunteers. All patients had contralateral reinnervation of facial muscles as demonstrated by electrical nerve stimulation v

  16. CT and MR Manifestations of Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor in Spine%脊柱恶性外周神经鞘瘤的CT和MRI表现

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郎宁; 刘晓光; 袁慧书; 谢敬霞

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore ihe CT and MRI manifestations of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor ( MPNST) located in spine and to improve the preoperative diagnostic accuracy. Materials and Methods The CT (n = 10} and/or MRI( n =11) data of 12 cases of MPNST proved by pathological results were analyzed retrospectively. Results MPNST manifested as circular ( n = 2 ) or irregularly tabulated tumors ( n = 10). Three cases showed inconspicuous bone destruction and 9 cases showed adjacent vertebrae invasion, in which mainly invaded the pedicle of vertebral arch and vertebral laminae adjacent to ihe neural foramens as well as vertebral bodies adjacent to tumors. The bone destruction was mainly osteolytic destruction ( n = 8) - Coexistence of osteolytic destruction and irregular tumor bone were seen in one case. The tumors were isodensity(n =4) ,coexistence of iso/hypo-density (n =4) ,or iso/hyper-density (n = 2) on plain CT imaging. The tumors appeared as hyper-intensity on T2 WI and hypo-intensity on T1WI. There were patchy hyper intensity areas (n = 8 ) , punctu-al/stripy hypo-intensity areas (n =2) ,clustered vessel signals (n = 1 ) in tumors on T2WI. Inhomogeneous enhancement was seen on contrast-enhanced scan in all the cases- Conclusion The imaging features of tumors included enlarged neural foramens,obvious peripheral bone destruction, inhomogeneous enhancement with non enhanced necrotic area, especially connected with spinal nerve,will help to make a diagnosis of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor.%目的 分析脊柱恶性外周神经鞘瘤(maligrant peripheral nerve sheath tumor,MPNST)的CT和MRI表现,提高术前对该病诊断的准确性.资料与方法 回顾性分析12例经病理证实的脊柱MPNST的CT(n =10)和/或MRI(n=11)表现.结果 MPNST表现为类圆形(n=2)或不规则分叶状(n=10)肿块.3例未见明显骨质破坏,9例有邻近椎骨侵犯,主要侵犯神经孔相邻的椎弓根、椎板及相邻局部椎体,骨质破

  17. Laser-guided cervical selective nerve root block with the Dyna-CT: initial experience of three-dimensional puncture planning with an ex-vivo model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam I E Freundt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cervical selective nerve root block (CSNRB is a well-established, minimally invasive procedure to treat radicular cervical pain. However, the procedure is technically challenging and might lead to major complications. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of a three-dimensional puncture planning and two-dimensional laser-guidance system for CSNRB in an ex-vivo model. METHODS: Dyna-CT of the cervical spine of an ex-vivo lamb model was performed with the Artis Zee® Ceiling (Siemens Medical Solutions, Erlangen, Germany to acquire multiplanar reconstruction images. 15 cervical nerve root punctures were planned and conducted with the syngo iGuide® laser-guidance system. Needle tip location and contrast dye distribution were analyzed by two independent investigators. Procedural, planning, and fluoroscopic time, tract length, and dose area product (DAP were acquired for each puncture. RESULTS: All 15 punctures were rated as successful with 12 punctures on the first attempt. Total procedural time was approximately 5 minutes. Mean planning time for the puncture was 2.03 (±0.39 min. Mean puncture time was 2.16 (±0.32 min, while mean fluoroscopy time was 0.17 (±0.06 min. Mean tract length was 2.68 (±0.23 cm. Mean total DAP was 397.45 (±15.63 µGy m(2. CONCLUSION: CSNRB performed with Dyna-CT and the tested laser guidance system is feasible. 3D pre-puncture planning is easy and fast and the laser-guiding system ensures very accurate and intuitive puncture control.

  18. Treatment outcomes in VI nerve palsy corrected by Carlson & Jampolsky technique Resultados do tratamento da paralisia de VI nervo operada pela técnica de Carlson-Jampolsky

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    Fábio Ejzenbaum

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To study the results of Carlson & Jampolsky technique in 31 patients with VI nerve palsy. METHODS: We had 23 unilateral and 8 bilateral cases. The mean unilateral preoperative esotropia was 56.8 PD ± 24 PD (30 PD to 100 PD and they had a mean postoperative follow-up of 14 ± 17.9 months (3 to 72. The mean bilateral preoperative esotropia deviation angle in primary position was 74.5 PD ± 20.7 PD (45 PD to 100 PD and the mean postoperative follow-up was 14.7 ± 15.7 months (4 to 47. RESULTS: In the unilateral group, 18 patients had good results and reoperation was not necessary. Out of 5 patients who were reoperated (2 undercorrections and 3 overcorrections, 2 had to use prismatic glasses. Among the bilateral patients, 2 cases were reoperated (1 undercorrection and 1 overcorrection, and the undercorrected patient remained with esotropia (ET13 PD, and also had to use prismatic glasses. CONCLUSIONS: Carlson & Jampolsky technique was useful to treat patients with VI nerve palsy. We had low reoperation rates and, among the 7 patients who needed a second intervention, only 3 did not achieve good results.OBJETIVO: Estudar os resultados da técnica de Carlson-Jampolsky em 31 pacientes com paralisia de VI nervo. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados 23 casos unilaterais e 8 bilaterais. A média da esotropia pré-operatória em posição primária nos casos unilaterais foi de 56.8 DP ± 24 DP (30 DP a 100 DP, o seguimento dos pacientes após a cirurgia foi de 14 ± 17.9 meses (3 a 72. A média da esotropia pré-operatória em posição primária nos casos bilaterais foi de 74.5 DP ± 20.7 DP (45 DP to 100 DP, o seguimento dos pacientes após a cirurgia foi de 14.7 ± 15.7 meses (4 a 47. RESULTADOS: Entre os pacientes do grupo unilateral, 18 casos tiveram bons resultados, sem necessitar de reoperação. Entre 5 pacientes que foram reoperados (2 subcorreções e 3 supercorreções, 2 tiveram que usar óculos com adição de prismas. Entre os casos bilaterais

  19. Enhanced MRI in patients with facial palsy; Study of time-related enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagida, Masahiro; Kato, Tsutomu; Ushiro, Koichi; Kitajiri, Masanori; Yamashita, Toshio; Kumazawa, Tadami; Tanaka, Yoshimasa (Kansai Medical School, Moriguchi, Osaka (Japan))

    1991-03-01

    We performed Gd-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations at several stages in 40 patients with peripheral facial nerve palsy (Bell's palsy and Ramsay-Hunt syndrome). In 38 of the 40 patients, one and more enhanced region could be seen in certain portion of the facial nerve in the temporal bone on the affected side, whereas no enhanced regions were seen on the intact side. Correlations between the timing of the MRI examination and the location of the enhanced regions were analysed. In all 6 patients examined by MRI within 5 days after the onset of facial nerve palsy, enhanced regions were present in the meatal portion. In 3 of the 8 patients (38%) examined by MRI 6 to 10 days after the onset of facial palsy, enhanced areas were seen in both the meatal and labyrinthine portions. In 8 of the 9 patients (89%) tested 11 to 20 days after the onset of palsy, the vertical portion was enhanced. In the 12 patients examined by MRI 21 to 40 days after the onset of facial nerve palsy, the meatal portion was not enhanced while the labyrinthine portion, the horizontal portion and the vertical portion were enhanced in 5 (42%), 8 (67%) and 11 (92%), respectively. Enhancement in the vertical portion was observed in all 5 patients examined more than 41 days after the onset of facial palsy. These results suggest that the central portion of the facial nerve in the temporal bone tends to be enhanced in the early stage of facial nerve palsy, while the peripheral portion is enhanced in the late stage. These changes of Gd-DTPA enhanced regions in the facial nerve may suggest dromic degeneration of the facial nerve in peripheral facial nerve palsy. (author).

  20. Ocular problems in children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Ayhan Tuzcu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to evaluate eye problemsin children with cerebral palsy in our region.Materials and Methods: 90 patients which was diagnosedas cerebral palsy, treated and followed up in PediatricNeurology Department of Mustafa Kemal University,were included to this study. The history was taken, anda physical examination was performed to determine theetiology of the disease and type of SP. All of the patientswere underwent a detailed ophthalmological examinationincluding visual acuity, refractive error, amblyopia, strabismus,nystagmus and fundus examination.Results: Totally 90 patients, 51 male and 39 female,were included to the study. When the etiologic factorswere evaluated, the asphyxia was seen in 33.3% of thepatients. The most common type of cerebral palsy wasspastic quadriplegia at the rate of 43.3%. Eye problemswere detected in 60% of our cases. Of this, 54.4% wererefractive errors, 35.6% were strabismus, and 22.2%were optic nerve pathologies. Amblyopia was found in11.1% of cases. Although strabismus is more common inspastic diplegia type of cerebral palsy, there was no statisticallysignificant differenceConclusions: In conclusion, eye problems are commonin children with cerebral palsy. Therefore, we recommendroutine eye examination in these patients due to be beneficialin reducing the detection and communication difficulties.Key words: Cerebral palsy, refractive error, strabismus,optic atrophy

  1. Evaluation of intratumoural heterogeneity on {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for characterization of peripheral nerve sheath tumours in neurofibromatosis type 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salamon, Johannes; Derlin, Thorsten; Bannas, Peter; Busch, Jasmin D.; Herrmann, Jochen; Adam, Gerhard [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); Bockhorn, Maximilian [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, Hamburg (Germany); Hagel, Christian [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Institute of Neuropathology, Hamburg (Germany); Friedrich, Reinhard E. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Hamburg (Germany); Mautner, Victor F. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Neurology, Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-05-15

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the potential usefulness of intratumoural tracer uptake heterogeneity on {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/CT as compared to a cut-off maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) for characterization of peripheral nerve sheath tumours (PNSTs) in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Fifty patients suffering from NF1 were examined by {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT. Intralesional tracer uptake was analysed qualitatively and semi-quantitatively by measuring the mean and maximum SUV. Uptake heterogeneity was graded qualitatively using a three-point scale and semi-quantitatively by calculating an SUV-based heterogeneity index (HI{sub SUV}). Cohen's {kappa} was used to determine inter- and intra-rater agreement. Histopathological evaluation and clinical as well as radiological follow-up examinations served as the reference standards. A highly significant correlation between the degree of intratumoural uptake heterogeneity on {sup 18}F-FDG PET and malignant transformation of PNSTs was observed (p < 0.0001). Semi-quantitative HI{sub SUV} was significantly higher in malignant PNSTs (MPNSTs) than in benign tumours (p = 0.0002). Both intralesional heterogeneity and SUV{sub max} could be used to identify malignant tumours with a sensitivity of 100 %. Cohen's {kappa} was 0.86 for inter-rater agreement and 0.88 for intra-rater agreement on heterogeneity. MPNSTs in patients with NF1 demonstrate considerable intratumoural uptake heterogeneity on {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT. Assessment of tumour heterogeneity is highly reproducible. Both tumour heterogeneity and a cut-off SUV{sub max} may be used to sensitively identify malignant PNSTs, but the specificity is higher for the latter. A combination of both methods leads to a non-significant improvement in diagnostic performance. (orig.)

  2. Case of neuro-Behcet syndrome with brainstem lesions confirmed by MRI. Relationship between X-ray CT and MRI findings and neurological symptoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takizawa, Shunya; Haida, Munetaka; Ohsuga, Hitoshi; Takagi, Shigeharu; Shinohara, Yukito

    1988-03-01

    A 49-year-old man presented with a 30-year history of oral and genital aphthous ulcers and joint pain. One day before his admission he developed double vision and weakness in the right extremities. Neurological examination revealed right 5th nerve palsy, left 6th to 18th nerve palsy, left Horner's sign, and motor and sensory impairment in the right upper and lower extremities. X-ray CT showed diffuse, weak, low-density areas in the brainstem. T1 weighted images showed low signals in the left side of the mid-pons, the left tegmentum and the right basis of the upper pons, and the left tegmentum of the midbrain. T2 weighted images showed high signals in the whole pons and the left side of the midbrain. MRI allowed the differentiation of reversible lesions, such as brain edema, and irreversible lesions, such as necrosis and demyelination of the tissue. (Namekawa, K.).

  3. Laser Phototherapy As Modality of Clinical Treatment in Bell's Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, A. M. C.; Soares, L. G. P.; Marques, R. C.; Pinheiro, A. L. B.; Dent, M.

    2011-08-01

    Bell's palsy is defined as a peripheral facial nerve palsy, idiophatic, and sudden onset and is considered the most common cause of this pathology. It is caused by damage to cranial nerves VII, resulting in complete or partial paralysis of the facial mimic. May be associated with taste disturbances, salivation, tearing and hyperacusis. It is diagnosed after ruling out all possible etiologies, because its cause is not fully understood.Some researches shows that herpes virus may cause this type of palsy due to reactivation of the virus or by imunnomediated post-viral nerve demielinization. Physical therapy, corticosteroids and antiviral therapy have become the most widely accepted treatments for Bell's palsy. Therapy with low-level laser (LLLT) may induce the metabolism of injured nerve tissue for the production of proteins associated with its growth and to improve nerve regeneration. The success of the treatment of Bell's palsy by using laser phototherapy isolated or in association with other therapeutic approach has been reported on the literature. In most cases, the recovery occurs without uneventfully (complications), the acute illness is not associated with serious disorders. We will present a clinical approach for treating this condition.

  4. Permanent neurologic deficit after inferior alveolar nerve block: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenkman, Z; Findler, M; Lossos, A; Barak, S; Katz, J

    1996-10-01

    Permanent neurologic damage after an inferior dental nerve block is reported. Clinical manifestations included hemisensory syndrome, facial nerve palsy, hearing impairment, and ataxia. Possible mechanisms and preventive measures are discussed.

  5. Case report of clival tuberculoma. Difficult to diagnose by means of a CT scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichikawa, F.; Tachibana, S.; Miyasaka, Y.; Suwa, T.; Iida, H.; Kan, S.; Matsuda, Y.

    1987-02-01

    A patient with tuberculoma at the skull base was reported. Twenty-two years old, she had complained for ten years of amenorrhea, headache, and visual disturbance. On neurological examination, bitemporal hemianopsia, bilateral sixth nerve palsy, and recent right-side facial palsy were demonstrated. On radiological examination, a destructive lesion was found at the clivus. CT and MRI demonstrated, a space-taking lesion expanding to the floor of the third ventricle anteriorly, to the cerebello-pontine angle superiorly, and to the epipharynx inferiorly, and a marked swelling of the cerebellum, though no confirmative diagnosis could be obtained without a biopsy of the epipharyngeal tumor. The histological examination revealed that the tumor was tuberculoma. Medical treatment with INH, RFP, and steroids was effective. Although tuberculoma involving the skull base is very rare and rather difficult to diagnose, the authors would like to stress that early accurate diagnosis is very important because the lesion is curable with appropriate medical treatment.

  6. Etiopathogenesis of lower motor neuron facial palsy: Our experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Venugopal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Facial nerve is the seventh cranial nerve having important functions, and hence its paralysis can lead to a great deal of mechanical impairment and emotional embarrassment. Etiopathogenisis of lower motor neuron facial palsy is still a diagnostic challenge and the literature has shown varying results pertaining to the same. This study was designed to sketch out the prevalence of disease causation and the profile of peripheral facial palsy patients presenting to the ENT department at Government Medical College, Kozhikode. Materials and Methods : A prospective study involving 60 patients with facial nerve palsy, presented during the period November 2006 to October 2008, was undertaken. Detailed analysis of etiopathogenesis, age and sex distribution, severity of palsy, anatomical levels and follow up for 1 year was done. Results : Trauma, both iatrogenic and non-iatrogenic, was the most widespread etiology in our study, followed by Bell′s palsy which is described as the commonest cause in world literature. Majority of the patients belonged to the age group of 31-40 years and there was slight male preponderance Non-iatrogenic facial palsy following road traffic accident was common in young males, while females dominated in infectious palsies. Majority of cases reported with grade III palsy, followed by grade IV. High-resolution computed tomography of temporal bone is exceedingly sensitive in delineating facial canal. Conclusions : Data analysis shows similarity with the existing literature except a novel trend towards amplified incidence of trauma surpassing Bell′s palsy. The need for comprehensive history taking, meticulous clinical examination, judicious investigations and appropriate intervention is substantiated by the study.

  7. Isolated Bell’s palsy - An unusual presentation of dengue infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter S; Malhotra N; Peter P; Sood R

    2013-01-01

    Dengue fever is a very common arthropod – borne infection in tropical countries. Neurological complications in dengue fever are relatively uncommon and among these, isolated cranial neuropathies have been reported only very rarely. We present an unusual neurological complication of Bell’s palsy (lower motor neuron 7 th nerve palsy) associated with dengue infection. To the best of our knowledge, there have been very few documented cases of Flavivirus causing isolated Bell’s palsy.

  8. The history of facial palsy and spasm: Hippocrates to Razi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajadi, Mohammad M; Sajadi, Mohamad-Reza M; Tabatabaie, Seyed Mahmoud

    2011-07-12

    Although Sir Charles Bell was the first to provide the anatomic basis for the condition that bears his name, in recent years researchers have shown that other European physicians provided earlier clinical descriptions of peripheral cranial nerve 7 palsy. In this article, we describe the history of facial distortion by Greek, Roman, and Persian physicians, culminating in Razi's detailed description in al-Hawi. Razi distinguished facial muscle spasm from paralysis, distinguished central from peripheral lesions, gave the earliest description of loss of forehead wrinkling, and gave the earliest known description of bilateral facial palsy. In doing so, he accurately described the clinical hallmarks of a condition that we recognize as Bell palsy.

  9. United Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be sure to follow us on Twitter . United Cerebral Palsy UCP educates, advocates and provides support services to ... Partners Merz Logo Sprint Relay Copyright © 2015 United Cerebral Palsy 1825 K Street NW Suite 600 Washington, DC ...

  10. Nerve Sheath Tumors in Neurofibromatosis Type 1: Assessment of Whole-Body Metabolic Tumor Burden Using F-18-FDG PET/CT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Salamon

    Full Text Available To determine the metabolically active whole-body tumor volume (WB-MTV on F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-18-FDG PET/CT in individuals with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1 using a three-dimensional (3D segmentation and computerized volumetry technique, and to compare PET WB-MTV between patients with benign and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (PNSTs.Thirty-six NF1 patients (18 patients with malignant PNSTs and 18 age- and sex-matched controls with benign PNSTs were examined by F-18-FDG PET/CT. WB-MTV, whole-body total lesion glycolysis (WB-TLG and a set of semi-quantitative imaging-based parameters were analyzed both on a per-patient and a per-lesion basis.On a per-lesion basis, malignant PNSTs demonstrated both a significantly higher MTV and TLG than benign PNSTs (p < 0.0001. On a per-patient basis, WB-MTV and WB-TLG were significantly higher in patients with malignant PNSTs compared to patients with benign PNSTs (p < 0.001. ROC analysis showed that MTV and TLG could be used to differentiate between benign and malignant tumors.WB-MTV and WB-TLG may identify malignant change and may have the potential to provide a basis for investigating molecular biomarkers that correlate with metabolically active disease manifestations. Further evaluation will determine the potential clinical impact of these PET-based parameters in NF1.

  11. Bell's Palsy in Children: Role of the School Nurse in Early Recognition and Referral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Shirley C.

    2008-01-01

    Bell's palsy is the most common condition affecting facial nerves. It is an acute, rapidly progressing, idiopathic, unilateral facial paralysis that is generally self-limiting and non-life threatening that occurs in all age groups (Okuwobi, Omole, & Griffith, 2003). The school nurse may be the first person to assess facial palsy and muscle…

  12. Cerebral Palsy (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CPR: A Real Lifesaver Kids Talk About: Coaches Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Kids > Cerebral Palsy Print A A A What's in this article? ... the first word you spoke? For kids with cerebral palsy, called CP for short, taking a first step ...

  13. Bells Palsy in Children (BellPIC): protocol for a multicentre, placebo-controlled randomized trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Franz E Babl; Mark T Mackay; Meredith L Borland; David W Herd; Amit Kochar; Jason Hort; Arjun Rao; John A Cheek; Jeremy Furyk; Lisa Barrow; Shane George; Michael Zhang; Kaya Gardiner; Katherine J Lee; Andrew Davidson; Robert Berkowitz

    2017-01-01

      Background Bell's palsy or acute idiopathic lower motor neurone facial paralysis is characterized by sudden onset paralysis or weakness of the muscles to one side of the face controlled by the facial nerve...

  14. Comparison of the Efficacy of Combination Therapy of Prednisolone - Acyclovir with Prednisolone Alone in Bell's Palsy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Khajeh, Ali; Fayyazi, Afshin; Soleimani, Gholamreza; Miri-Aliabad, Ghasem; Shaykh Veisi, Sara; Khajeh, Behrouz

    2015-01-01

    Bell's palsy is a rapid onset, usually, unilateral paralysis of the facial nerve that causes significant changes in an individual's life such as a decline in personal, social, and educational performance...

  15. 先天性上斜肌麻痹下斜肌的CT三维重建%Application of three - dimensional CT reconstruction technology on inferior oblique muscle in congenital superior oblique palsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张阳; 宋籽浔; 王晓青

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the viability of the morphology of inferior oblique muscle observed stereoscopically using 3-dimensional CT reconstruction technique. METHODS: This control study included of 29 cases which were clinically diagnosed with monocular congenital superior oblique palsy, examined by dimensional CT. The images of the inferior oblique muscle were reconstructed by Mimics software. 3D digital images on the basis of CT scanning data of the individuals were established. Observing the morphology of binocular inferior oblique muscle by self-controlled design, we compared the maximum transverse diameter of inferior oblique muscle of paralyzed eye with non-paralyzed one. We chose 5% as the significant level. RESULTS: The reconstructed results of 3-dimensional CT scan showed that not all of the inferior oblique abdominal muscle of paralyzed eyes were thinner than that of the non-paralyzed eye in maximum transverse diameter of cross - sectional area. The maximum transverse diameter of inferior oblique muscle was measured. The average maximum transverse diameter of the paralyzed eye was 6. 797±1. 083mm and the non-paralyzed eye was 6. 507 ± 0. 848mm. The maximum transverse diameter of inferior oblique muscle of paralyzed eye did not, however, differ significantly from the normal (P>0. 05). CONCLUSION: The three - dimensional CT reconstruction technology can be used for preoperative evaluation of the morphology of inferior oblique muscle.%目的:探索应用CT三维重建技术立体观察下斜肌形态的可行性。  方法:临床诊断单眼先天性上斜肌麻痹的患者29例进行眼眶CT扫描。用Mimics软件对原始CT扫描数据进行三维重建,建立基于个体CT扫描数据的下斜肌数字图像,观察双眼下斜肌的3D形态。用自身对照设计,比较麻痹眼和健眼下斜肌最大横径差异,设定P  结果:先天性上斜肌麻痹患者麻痹眼的下斜肌有的比健眼下斜肌粗;有的比健眼下斜

  16. Ocular microtremor in oculomotor palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolger, C; Bojanic, S; Sheahan, N F; Coakley, D; Malone, J F

    1999-03-01

    Ocular microtremor (OMT) is a high frequency tremor of the eyes present in all individuals. Recent reports suggest that OMT may be a useful indicator of brainstem function. However, the actual origin of ocular microtremor remains controversial. This study aims to provide evidence that OMT has a neurogenic origin. The OMT activity of five subjects with unilateral oculomotor nerve palsy and one subject with complete unilateral internal and external ophthalmoplegia were recorded from both eyes of each subject using the piezoelectric strain gauge technique, with the normal eye acting as a control. Five parameters of OMT activity were studied in each subject: the peak count, the power of the high frequency peak, the percentage power between 60 and 100 Hz, the percentage power between 70 and 80 Hz, and the 10 dB cut-off point. In the five subjects with oculomotor nerve palsy, the mean peak count in the normal eye was 88.4 Hz (SD+/-16.9) and in the affected eye was 59 Hz (SD+/-8.6), P < 0.0096. There was also a fall in the peak power, the power between 60 and 100 Hz, and the power between 70 and 80 Hz. In subject six, who had complete opthalmoplegia, there was no evidence of OMT activity in the denervated eye. These results suggest that innervation of the extraocular muscles is necessary for normal OMT activity, and OMT therefore has a neurogenic origin.

  17. The role of iatrogenic foraminal stenosis from lordotic correction in the development of C5 palsy after posterior laminectomy and fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Blizzard, Daniel J.; Gallizzi, Michael A.; Sheets, Charles; Klement, Mitchell R.; Kleeman, Lindsay T.; Caputo, Adam M.; Eure, Megan; Brown, Christopher R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Post-operative C5 nerve root palsy is a known complication following cervical spine surgery. Although several theories have been proposed, there remains no consensus as to the etiology of the palsies. Multiple pre-operative radiographic measures have been assessed for utility in predicting palsy. The purpose of this study is to evaluate published radiographic parameters as well as specifically evaluate the effect of cervical lordosis in the development of C5 palsy to establish thre...

  18. 耳蜗神经管扩大合并蜗轴阙如的CT表现%CT appearances of enlarged cochlear nerve canal with absent modiolus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张劲松; 杨勇; 魏梦绮; 彭勇; 徐俊卿; 宦怡

    2011-01-01

    Objective To describe the CT features of the enlarged bony canal of the cochlear nerve ( ECNC) and absent modiolu sin patients with congenital sensorineural hearing loss ( SNHL). Methods The width of cochlear nerve canal (CNC) was measured in 6 cases of ECNC on CT images and the results were compared with that in three other control groups (each group composed 30 patients) including children with SNHL group, children with otitis or mastoiditis group and adults with sudden deafness or tinnitus group with SPSS 10. 0 . Results The width of CNC rangcd from 2. 5 mm to 3. 3 mm , mean diamcter was ( 2. 944±0. 268 ) mm in ECNC , and accompanied with the absence of modiolus . The width of CNC in other control groups showed was about ( 2. 044±0. 207) mm . The width of the bony canal was of significant difference between ECNC group and control group (P<0. 05). Conclusion ECNC with absent modiolus in the paticnts with SNHL may be indicative of a previously unrccognized embryologic malformation of modilus,CT can help in diagnosis of it.%目的 研究耳蜗神经管(CNC)扩大合并蜗轴阙如的CT表现及相关临床意义.方法 回顾性分析6例聋哑儿童伴耳蜗神经管扩大和蜗轴阙如的高分辨CT表现并测量相应耳蜗神经管宽度,同时与颞骨CT表现"正常"的聋哑儿童组、儿童中耳炎组及成人正常内耳对照组(每组分别为30例)的耳蜗神经管宽度进行比较,并通过SPSS10.0统计软件进行分析.结果 6例耳蜗神经管扩大组CNC宽度在2.5~3.3 mm之间,平均(2.944±0.268) mm,同时伴有明显耳蜗蜗轴的发育缺失;而其他对照组颞骨CT测量CNC宽度无明显统计学差异,对照组合计CNC宽度平均值为(2.044±0.207) mm.前者与对照组测量值间有明显统计学差异.结论 CNC扩大合并蜗轴阙如是先天性耳蜗发育畸形的一种表现,会引起感音性神经性耳聋,CT可以帮助明确诊断.

  19. ulnar nerve contribution in the innervation of the triceps brachii ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-12-12

    Dec 12, 2016 ... The ulnar nerve is considered the thickest terminal branch of the medial cord in the brachial plexus ... quantified, measured with manual mechanical .... Handlebar palsy — a compression syndrome of the deep terminal.

  20. Acute sciatic neuropathy: "Saturday night palsy"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manigoda Miodrag

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a case report of 25-year old, unemployed male, admitted to hospital due to acute onset of the left foot drop, subsequent walking difficulty and numbness of the left calf and foot. Symptoms began after prolonged sleep with previous heroin abuse by sniffing. During neurological examination, mild weakness of knee flexors, moderate weakness of plantar flexors and paralysis of foot dorsiflexors, together with hypesthesia of the left calf, foot and fingers, predominantly in the innervation area of common peroneal nerve on the same side, were observed. The electrophysiologic examination revealed predominant involvement of peroneal division within the sciatic nerve, together with recorded conduction block indicating the compression as possible mechanism of nerve injury. The patient was administered corticosteroid therapy during two months, what resulted in almost complete recovery. The peculiarity of this case report is in the presence of the sciatic nerve "Saturday night palsy" with possible effect of former heroin abuse.

  1. Facial nerve paralysis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciorba, Andrea; Corazzi, Virginia; Conz, Veronica; Bianchini, Chiara; Aimoni, Claudia

    2015-12-16

    Facial nerve palsy is a condition with several implications, particularly when occurring in childhood. It represents a serious clinical problem as it causes significant concerns in doctors because of its etiology, its treatment options and its outcome, as well as in little patients and their parents, because of functional and aesthetic outcomes. There are several described causes of facial nerve paralysis in children, as it can be congenital (due to delivery traumas and genetic or malformative diseases) or acquired (due to infective, inflammatory, neoplastic, traumatic or iatrogenic causes). Nonetheless, in approximately 40%-75% of the cases, the cause of unilateral facial paralysis still remains idiopathic. A careful diagnostic workout and differential diagnosis are particularly recommended in case of pediatric facial nerve palsy, in order to establish the most appropriate treatment, as the therapeutic approach differs in relation to the etiology.

  2. 多层螺旋CT扫描及曲面重建在外伤性面瘫的应用价值%Applied Value of Multislice Spiral CT and Curved PlanarReformation for Traumatic Facial Nerve Paralysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄少鹏; 叶青; 林美福; 陈娟; 王一红; 李瑞玉

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨多层螺旋CT(MSCT)扫描及面神经管曲面重建(CPR)在外伤性面瘫中的应用价值.方法 对15例外伤性面瘫患者的颞骨行MSCT高分辨率扫描,并通过工作站行CPR,观察面神经损伤平面,并选择相应的手术径路行面神经减压术.结果 术前MSCT扫描及CPR提示,3例面神经损伤主要在迷路段及膝状神经节的,采用颅中窝乳突联合径路;12例损伤主要位于膝状神经节以下,选择乳突径路.术中所见与术前CT提示均一致.术后随访6月~5年,15例患者Ⅰ级恢复7例、Ⅱ级恢复7例、Ⅲ级恢复1例.结论 MSCT扫描及CPR能清晰显示面神经管的全貌及其损伤部位,对外伤性面瘫的诊断及手术治疗具有重要意义.%Objective To investigate the applied value of multislice spiral CT(MSCT) and Curved planar reformation(CPR) for traumatic facial nerve paralysis and the guidance significance for surgery.Methods 15 cases of traumatic facial nerve paralysis were scanned by MSCT, Post processing images of facial nerve canal were completed by GE Advantage 4.2 work station. Different Surgical approaches of facial nerve decompression were selected according to the injured location described by MSCT and CPR.Results A combined middle fossa and transmastoid approach was chosen in 3 cases whose injured location above geniculate ganglion. A pure transmastoid route was performed in the other 12 cases whose injured location under geniculate ganglion. After 0.5-5 years' follow-up, 7 cases recovered to grade Ⅰ according to House-Brackmann facial nerve function scores, 7 cases recovered to grade Ⅱ and the other 1 case recovered to grade Ⅲ. Conclusion multislice spiral CT (MSCT) and Curved planar reformation (CPR)could help to study the facial nerve canal and describe precise localization for traumatic facial nerve paralysis, which provide reliable basis for clinical diagnosis and treatment.

  3. Computed tomography in spastic cerebral palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedersen, H.; Taudorf, K.; Melchior, J.C.

    1982-09-01

    Eighty-three children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) were examined with cranial CT. In 56 cases the CT findings were abnormal. The most frequent abnormality was atrophy, present in 44 patients. The frequency of pathologic CT increased with severity of the CP. Patients with CP of postnatal aetiology more often had abnormal CT than patients with other known causes. Pathologic CT findings were seen more often in patients with seizures than in patients without. Infarctions and hemiatrophy were much more frequent in patients with hemiplegia than in patients with other types of spastic CP. A special kind of central atrophy, called isolated atrophy around the cella media, is described. This condition was seen in 20% of cases, most often in hemi- and paraplegic patients. Early infarctions in the border areas between the vascular territories of the internal carotid and the posterior cerebral artery may be the reason for this kind of atrophy.

  4. 超短波、低频脉冲电疗联合电针治疗腓总神经麻痹的疗效%Therapeutic effect of ultrashort wave,low frequency pulse electrotherapy and electroacupuncture therapy on common peroneal nerve palsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘敏; 李嵩; 张玉淼; 刘春辉; 石汉文

    2012-01-01

    Objective To observe the effectiveness of ultrashort wave, low frequency pulse electrotherapy and electroacupuncture therapy in treatment of patients with common peroneal nerve palsy. Methods Forty patients with common peroneal nerve palsy were randomly divided into two groups: treatment group (20 cases) and control group (20 cases). The patients in treatment group were treated with ultrashort wave, low frequency pulse electrotherapy and electroacupuncture therapy, while those in control group were treated mainly with drug. All patients were scored with MMT and MCRR pre and post treatment. Results It was shown that the lower limb motor function of all patients was significantly improved after treatment and MMT and MCRR scores of patients in treatment group were higher than those in control group (P<0. 05). Furthermore, the excellent and good rate was 85.00% in treatment group, while it was 60.00% in control group ( P < 0. 05 ). Conclusion Ultrashort wave, low frequency pulse electrotherapy and electroacupuncture therapy can effectively improve the lower limb motor function in patients with common peroneal nerve palsy.%目的 观察超短波、低频脉冲电疗联合电针治疗腓总神经麻痹的疗效.方法 随机选择治疗组20例、对照组20例腓总神经麻痹患者,治疗组在常规药物治疗同时配合超短波、低频脉冲电疗和电针治疗,对照组用常规药物治疗并早期康复治疗.治疗前及治疗8周后用徒手肌力法(MMT)和神经功能愈合标准评分法(MCRR标准)对下肢功能进行评定.结果 治疗后,治疗组MMT评分值较对照组明显增高(P<0.05),治疗组优良率为85.00%,对照组为60.00%,两组间差异有显著性意义(P<0.05).结论 超短波、低频脉冲电疗联合电针治疗可以有效改善腓总神经麻痹患者下肢的运动功能.

  5. Bilateral Facial Nerve Palsy: A Diagnostic Dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohil Pothiawala

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion. We reinforce the importance of considering the range of differential diagnosis in all cases presenting with bilateral FNP. These patients warrant admission and prompt laboratory and radiological investigation for evaluation of the underlying cause and specific further management as relevant.

  6. CT and MRI features of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of children%儿童恶性外周神经鞘瘤的CT和MRI表现

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘志敏; 宋蕾; 高军; 于彤; 尹光恒; 蒋玲; 彭芸; 胡克非

    2015-01-01

    目的:分析儿童恶性外周神经鞘瘤(MPNST)的CT和MRI特点,提高对本病的认识。方法回顾性分析16例经手术病理证实的MPNST的CT和MRI表现。男8例、女8例;年龄0.3~11.0岁,中位年龄2.5岁。16例均进行了CT平扫,其中8例行CT增强扫描,3例进行了MR检查。2名高年资儿童影像医师共同对图像进行分析,并协商达成一致意见。结果16例瘤灶位于颈部3例、腰背部5例、腹盆腔3例、足部2例、左侧锁骨下1例、右纵隔1例、右侧眼眶1例。15例呈肿块型,1例呈弥漫生长。CT表现:15例肿块型平扫呈实性为主(8例)或囊实性(7例)。增强扫描实性成分呈中度以上强化、渐进延迟强化,囊性成分未见明显强化。1例弥漫生长病变位于左侧颈部,与周围组织分界不清。MRI表现:2例肿块型MRI表现为T1WI呈等低信号,T2WI呈等高信号,T2WI囊性成分明显高信号,增强后有明显不均匀强化。1例弥漫生长病变MRI表现:T1WI呈稍低信号,T2WI呈等稍高信号,并明显强化。16例均呈不同程度侵袭性生长,11例伴多脏器转移及复发,4例合并神经纤维瘤病Ⅰ型,并脊柱侧弯。结论恶性外周神经鞘瘤CT及MRI表现具有一定特征改变,并能显示其侵袭性表现及多脏器转移表现,有利于明确诊断并协助临床医生制定治疗方案。%Objective To analyze CT and MR features of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST)of children. Methods Sixteen patients with histologically proven MPNST were retrospectively reviewed.There were 8 male and 8 female, ages from 0.3 to 11.0 years, and median age was 2.5 years. Sixteen cases were performed with CT plain scan, and eight cases with CT enhancement scans, and three with MR examination. The imaging data were analyzed by two highly experienced doctors and obtained agreements after mutual consultation. Results Among 16 cases, 3 cases were located at neck, 5

  7. [Examination of Bell's palsy in consideration of the Austrian private accident insurance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchler, Wolfgang Willibald

    2017-08-23

    In western Europe peripheral facial palsy is the most common cranial nerve disorder. The constitutional palsy may be ideopathic or combined with other disorders, above all Lyme's disease and otogenic zoster. The traumatic palsy is nearly always combined with other severe injuries and above all caused by accidents.Constitutional palsies have a less degree of partial recovery compared to the traumatic forms. The expert has to evaluate the actual status of palsy at the time of examination and also to consider prognostic outcome. The Austrian private accident insurance covers the risk of injuries caused by an accident. Accident according to the meaning of the insurance is a term of wide comprehension including facial palsy due to tick bite. First of all accidental dysfunctions are covered by the insurance. However, the insurance also offers restricted coverage concerning aesthetic consequences as a result of dysfunction. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies: a single-center experience in southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo José Lorenzoni

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The spectrum of clinical and electrophysiological features in hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP is broad. We analyze a series of Brazilian patients with HNPP. Correlations between clinical manifestations, laboratory features, electrophysiological analyze, histological and molecular findings were done. In five cases, more than one episode occurred before diagnosis. Median nerve in the carpal tunnel at the wrist, ulnar nerve in its groove at the elbow, fibular nerve in the head of the fibula at the knee, radial nerve in its groove of the humerus and suprascapular nerve in its notch at the supraspinous fossa were found as focal neuropathies. One patient presented with persistent writer’s cramp after ulnar nerve palsy. Nerve conduction studies showed focal neuropathy in all patients and concomitant generalized symmetrical neuropathy in eight patients. Molecular analysis of the PMP22 gene detected deletion of the 1.5-Mb fragment in all patients.

  9. Hereditary Neuropathy With Liability to Pressure Palsies: A Single-Center Experience in Southern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzoni, Paulo José; Kay, Cláudia Suemi Kamoi; Cavalet, Cristiane; Arndt, Raquel C.; Werneck, Lineu Cesar; Scola, Rosana Herminia

    2016-01-01

    The spectrum of clinical and electrophysiological features in hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is broad. We analyze a series of Brazilian patients with HNPP. Correlations between clinical manifestations, laboratory features, electrophysiological analyze, histological and molecular findings were done. In five cases, more than one episode occurred before diagnosis. Median nerve in the carpal tunnel at the wrist, ulnar nerve in its groove at the elbow, fibular nerve in the head of the fibula at the knee, radial nerve in its groove of the humerus and suprascapular nerve in its notch at the supraspinous fossa were found as focal neuropathies. One patient presented with persistent writer’s cramp after ulnar nerve palsy. Nerve conduction studies showed focal neuropathy in all patients and concomitant generalized symmetrical neuropathy in eight patients. Molecular analysis of the PMP22 gene detected deletion of the 1.5-Mb fragment in all patients. PMID:27761228

  10. Imaging the hypoglossal nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Pedro [Department of Radiology, Centro Hospitalar de Lisboa Central-Hospital de Sao Jose, Rua Jose Antonio Serrano, 1150-199 Lisboa Codex (Portugal)], E-mail: tojais.pedro@gmail.com

    2010-05-15

    The hypoglossal nerve is a pure motor nerve. It provides motor control to the intrinsic and extrinsic tongue muscles thus being essential for normal tongue movement and coordination. In order to design a useful imaging approach and a working differential diagnosis in cases of hypoglossal nerve damage one has to have a good knowledge of the normal anatomy of the nerve trunk and its main branches. A successful imaging evaluation to hypoglossal diseases always requires high resolution studies due to the small size of the structures being studied. MRI is the preferred modality to directly visualize the nerve, while CT is superior in displaying the bony anatomy of the neurovascular foramina of the skull base. Also, while CT is only able to detect nerve pathology by indirect signs, such as bony expansion of the hypoglossal canal, MRI is able to visualize directly the causative pathological process as in the case of small tumors, or infectious/inflammatory processes affecting the nerve. The easiest way to approach the study of the hypoglossal nerve is to divide it in its main segments: intra-axial, cisternal, skull base and extracranial segment, tailoring the imaging technique to each anatomical area while bearing in mind the main disease entities affecting each segment.

  11. Imaging the trigeminal nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Alexandra [Radiology Department, Instituto Portugues de Oncologia Francisco Gentil, Centro de Lisboa, Rua Prof. Lima Basto, 1093, Lisboa (Portugal)], E-mail: borgalexandra@gmail.com; Casselman, Jan [Department of Radiology, A. Z. St Jan Brugge and A. Z. St Augustinus Antwerpen Hospitals (Belgium)

    2010-05-15

    Of all cranial nerves, the trigeminal nerve is the largest and the most widely distributed in the supra-hyoid neck. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. In order to adequately image the full course of the trigeminal nerve and its main branches a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy and imaging technique is required. Although the main trunk of the trigeminal nerve is consistently seen on conventional brain studies, high-resolution tailored imaging is mandatory to depict smaller nerve branches and subtle pathologic processes. Increasing developments in imaging technique made possible isotropic sub-milimetric images and curved reconstructions of cranial nerves and their branches and led to an increasing recognition of symptomatic trigeminal neuropathies. Whereas MRI has a higher diagnostic yield in patients with trigeminal neuropathy, CT is still required to demonstrate the bony anatomy of the skull base and is the modality of choice in the context of traumatic injury to the nerve. Imaging of the trigeminal nerve is particularly cumbersome as its long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches and its rich anastomotic network impede, in most cases, a topographic approach. Therefore, except in cases of classic trigeminal neuralgia, in which imaging studies can be tailored to the root entry zone, the full course of the trigeminal nerve has to be imaged. This article provides an update in the most recent advances on MR imaging technique and a segmental imaging approach to the most common pathologic processes affecting the trigeminal nerve.

  12. A patient with bilateral facial palsy associated with hypertension and chickenpox: learning points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Abadi, Eslam; Milford, David V; Smith, Martin

    2010-11-26

    Bilateral facial nerve paralysis is an uncommon presentation and even more so in children. There are reports of different causes of bilateral facial nerve palsy. It is well-established that hypertension and chickenpox causes unilateral facial paralysis and the importance of checking the blood pressure in children with facial nerve paralysis cannot be stressed enough. The authors report a boy with bilateral facial nerve paralysis in association with hypertension and having recently recovered from chickenpox. The authors review aspects of bilateral facial nerve paralysis as well as hypertension and chickenpox causing facial nerve paralysis.

  13. CT-guided cervical nerve root injections: comparing the immediate post-injection anesthetic-related effects of the transforaminal injection with a new indirect technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutter, Reto; Pfirrmann, Christian W.A.; Peterson, Cynthia K. [Orthopaedic University Hospital of Balgrist, Department of Radiology, Zuerich (Switzerland); Zanetti, Marco [Hirslanden Hospital, Department of Radiology, Zuerich (Switzerland); Hodler, Juerg [University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2011-12-15

    To describe an ''indirect'' cervical nerve root injection technique with a dorsal approach that should carry less inherent risk than the ''direct'' cervical transforaminal injection approach, and to compare the immediate post-injection results of the two procedures. The indirect and direct cervical nerve root injection procedures are described in detail. Fifty-three consecutive patients receiving the indirect nerve root injections during 2009-2010 were age- and gender-matched to 53 patients who underwent direct transforaminal nerve root injections performed in 2006. Pain level data were collected immediately before and 20-30 min after each procedure. The percentages of pain change in the two groups were compared using the unpaired Student's t test. Fifty-two men (mean age 49) and 54 women (mean age 55) were included. The mean percentage of pain reduction for patients receiving indirect nerve root injections was 38.4% and for those undergoing the direct nerve root injections approach it was 43.2%. This was not significantly different (P = 0.455). No immediate or late adverse effects were reported after either injection procedure. The indirect cervical nerve root injection procedure is a potentially safer alternative to direct cervical transforaminal nerve root injections. The short-term pain reduction is similar using the two injection methods. (orig.)

  14. Cerebral Palsy (CP) Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SSI file Error processing SSI file Pop Quiz: Cerebral Palsy Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... Sandy is the parent of a child with cerebral palsy and the Board President of Gio’s Garden , a ...

  15. 多节段脊髓型颈椎病经颈后路不同术式治疗后C5神经根麻痹的观察对比%Comparative observation of C5 nerve root palsy after posterior surgical treatment of multilevel cervical spondylotic myelopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺建军; 梁盾; 陆兴

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the incidence of C5 nerve root palsy after laminoplasty and laminectomy with internal fixation for treating multilevel cervical spondylotic myelopathy (MCSM).Methods From January 2008 to August 2012,98 patients with MCSM were treated with laminoplasty (47 patients,group A) or laminectomy (51 patients,group B) with internal fixation.All the patients were followed up for 13-56(26.5 ± 7.9) months.In both groups,Cobb's method was applied to measure cervical lordotic angle,and Ishihara's method was conducted to measure cervical curvature index (CCI) before and after operation.The incidence of C5 nerveroot palsy was recorded and compared.Results The incidence of C5 nerve root palsy in group A was 2.1% (1/47),while 21.6 % (11/51) in group B (x2 =5.430,P < 0.05).The JOA scores in group A and group B before and after operation and improvement rate of JOA scores had no significant difference (P> 0.05).The cervical lordotic angle and CCI in group A and group B before and after operation had no significant difference (P > 0.05).The improvement rate of CCI between two groups had no significant difference (P > 0.05).All of 11 patients with C5 nerve root palsy were group B 1,and other 40 patients were group B2.The improvement rate of CCI in group B1 was significantly higher than that in group B2 [(38.7 ± 18.3)% vs.(22.1 ± 12.1)%](t =1.772,P< 0.05).Conclusions Compared with laminoplasty,laminectomy with internal fixation has a higher incidence of C5 nerve root palsy.The C5 nerve root palsy may be associated with postoperative increase of cervical lordosis angle.Moreover,tethering of the C5 root may he one of its important pathomechanisms.%目的 分析颈后路单开门椎管成形术与椎板切除内固定术治疗多节段脊髓型颈椎病术后C5神经根麻痹的发生率及其原因.方法 2008年1月至2012年8月因多节段脊髓型颈椎病分别接受椎管成形术的患者47例(A组)、接受椎

  16. Lagophthalmos after facial palsy: current therapeutic options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vásquez, Luz María; Medel, Ramón

    2014-01-01

    As the facial nerve carries sensory, motor and parasympathetic fibres involved in facial muscle innervation, facial palsy results in functional and cosmetic impairment. It can result from a wide variety of causes like infectious processes, trauma, neoplasms, autoimmune diseases, and most commonly Bell's palsy, but it can also be of iatrogenic origin. The main ophthalmic sequel is lagophthalmos. The increased surface exposure increases the risk of keratitis, corneal ulceration, and potentially loss of vision. Treatment options are wide; some are temporary, some permanent. In addition to gold standard and traditional therapies and procedures, new options are being proposed aiming to improve not only lagophthalmos but also the quality of life of these patients. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Herpes zoster ophthalmicus associated with abducens palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nibrass Chaker

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The extraocular muscle palsies associated with herpes zoster ophthalmicus (HZO are transient, self-limiting conditions, usually seen in elderly patients. There are different treatment recommendations for paralytic complications, but prognosis has generally reported to be favorable. A 75-year-old male patient presented with diplopia. Clinical history revealed left facial vesicular eruptions and pain treated by oral aciclovir 1 week following symptom onset. On examination, we observed cicatricial lesions with crusts involving left hemiface, a limitation in abduction of the left eye, and a superficial punctuate keratitis (SPK with decreased visual acuity (4/10. Examination of the right eye was unremarkable. Hess screen test confirmed left six nerve palsy.

  18. Isolated long thoracic nerve paralysis - a rare complication of anterior spinal surgery: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameri Ebrahim

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Isolated long thoracic nerve injury causes paralysis of the serratus anterior muscle. Patients with serratus anterior palsy may present with periscapular pain, weakness, limitation of shoulder elevation and scapular winging. Case presentation We present the case of a 23-year-old woman who sustained isolated long thoracic nerve palsy during anterior spinal surgery which caused external compressive force on the nerve. Conclusion During positioning of patients into the lateral decubitus position, the course of the long thoracic nerve must be attended to carefully and the nerve should be protected from any external pressure.

  19. Computed tomographic findings in cerebral palsy: Analysis of hemisphere and lateral ventricular volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Seoung Hwan; Kim, Hak Jin; Sol, Chang Hyo; Kim, Byung Soo [Pusan National University College of Medicine, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-04-15

    Authors analysed the CT findings of 28 cerebral palsy patients at Pusan National University Hospital from January, 1984 to December, 1987. Volumes of hemispheres, lateral ventricles and paranchymes were measured in patients who showed no remarkable abnormality on CT film, and compared with those of normal control group. 1. Among the 28 cerebral palsy patients, there were 6 cases of diffuse atrophy in CT findings, and unilateral atrophy in 2 cases and encephalomalacia and diffuse white matter low density in 1 case and generalized symmetrical white matter low density in 1 case, but remaining 18 cases had no specific abnormal finding on CT. 2. Difference in volumes of brain parenchyma and lateral ventricles of each hemisphere was greater than that of control group. 3. There were more enlarged lateral ventricles and prominent unilateral brain atrophy in 18 cases of cerebral palsy who showed no specific abnormality on CT as compared with normal control group.

  20. 3 dimensional volume MR imaging of intratemporal facial nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Jeong Jin; Kang, Heoung Keun; Kim, Hyun Ju; Kim, Jae Kyu; Jung, Hyun Ung; Moon, Woong Jae [Chonnam University Medical School, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-10-15

    To evaluate the usefulness of 3 dimensional volume MR imaging technique for demonstrating the facial nerves and to describe MR findings in facial palsy patients and evaluate the significance of facial nerve enhancement. We reviewed the MR images of facial nerves obtained with 3 dimensional volume imaging technique before and after intravenous administration of Gadopentetate dimeglumine in 13 cases who had facial paralysis and 33 cases who had no facial palsy. And we analyzed the detectability of ananatomical segments of intratemporal facial nerves and facial nerve enhancement. When the 3 dimensional volume MR images of 46 nerves were analyzed subjectively, the nerve courses of 43(93%) of 46 nerves were effectively demonstrated on 3 dimensional volume MR images. Internal acoustic canal portions and geniculate ganglion of facial nerve were well visualized on axial images and tympanic and mastoid segments were well depicted on oblique sagittal images. 10 of 13 patients(77%) were visibly enhanced along at least one segment of the facial nerve with swelling or thickening, and nerves of 8 of normal 33 cases(24%) were enhanced without thickening or swelling. MR findings of facial nerve parelysis is asymmetrical thickening of facial nerve with contrast enhancement. The 3 dimensional volume MR imaging technique should be a useful study for the evaluation of intratemporal facial nerve disease.

  1. Diagnosis of Bell palsy with gadolinium magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becelli, R; Perugini, M; Carboni, A; Renzi, G

    2003-01-01

    Bell palsy is a condition resulting from a peripheral edematous compression on the nervous fibers of the facial nerve. This pathological condition often has clinical characteristics of no importance and spontaneously disappears in a short time in a high percentage of cases. Facial palsy concerning cranial nerve VII can also be caused by other conditions such as mastoid fracture, acoustic neurinoma, tumor spread to the temporal lobe (e.g., cholesteatoma), neoformation of the parotid gland, Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome, and Ramsay-Hunt syndrome. Therefore, it is important to adopt an accurate diagnostic technique allowing the rapid detection of Bell palsy and the exclusion of causes of facial paralysis requiring surgical treatment. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with medium contrast of the skull shows a marked increase in revealing lesions, even of small dimensions, inside the temporal bone and at the cerebellopontine angle. The authors present a clinical case to show the important role played by gadolinium MRI in reaching a diagnosis of Bell palsy in the differential diagnosis of the various conditions that determine paralysis of the facial nerve and in selecting the most suitable treatment or surgery to be adopted.

  2. Blink restoration by the functional electrical stimulation in unilateral facial nerve palsy rabbits%功能性电刺激恢复周围性面神经麻痹兔眨眼功能的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛玉斌; 冯国栋; 丁秀勇; 赵杨; 崔婷婷; 高志强

    2014-01-01

    兔的双侧同步眨眼.%Objective Tocompare the effects of different waveforms and parameters of electrical stimulation to elicit a blink,and construct a functional electrical stimulation (FES) system to restore synchronous blink in unilateral facial nerve palsy (FNP).Methods Firstly,twenty-four rabbits were surgically induced unilateral FNP and were divided into three groups,who received square,sine and triangle pulse wareforms,respectirely.Both the healthy and the paralysis eyelids of the rabbits received pulse train stimulation to produce a blink in both eyes.For each rabbit,twenty-seven combinations of frequencies (25 Hz,50 Hz and 100 Hz) and nine pulse widths (1-9 ms) were stimulated.The threshold amplitude and electric charge to elicit a blink was compared between different waveforms and different parameters.Secondly,a FES system was constructed to treat six surgically induced unilateral FNP rabbit chosen in the twenty-four rabbits,it consisted by an electromyogram (EMG) amplifier module which record the EMG of the healthy muscle,and a stimulator which received the EMG input and output a pulse train stimulation when triggered by the EMG.Results When the carrier frequency of the pulse train was 25 Hz,it was not able to induce a smooth blink.However,when the carrier frequencies were 50 Hz and 100 Hz,a smooth blink could be induced.The voltage required by 100 Hz was lower than 50 Hz,but it cost more electric charge.The amplitude that square waveforms required was far lower than sine and triangle,but the electric charge between the three waveforms was similar.Synchronous blink could be restored in the six unilateral FNP rabbits with the FES system.Conclusions To elicit a blink,square pulse train delivered in 50 Hz is a preferable option.The motion of the healthy eyelids as a source of information for stimulation of the paralyzed sides can restore the synchronous blink in unilateral FNP rabbits.

  3. Hereditary Neuropathy With Liability to Pressure Palsies: A Single-Center Experience in Southern Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The spectrum of clinical and electrophysiological features in hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is broad. We analyze a series of Brazilian patients with HNPP. Correlations between clinical manifestations, laboratory features, electrophysiological analyze, histological and molecular findings were done. In five cases, more than one episode occurred before diagnosis. Median nerve in the carpal tunnel at the wrist, ulnar nerve in its groove at the elbow, fibular nerv...

  4. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy: an investigation in a rare and large Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuan; Wu, Qiang; Xu, Zhipeng; Wang, Qianqian; Wang, Weili; Li, Dezhong; Liu, Wanhong; He, Xiaohua

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (HNPP), mainly associated with the peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) gene, is generally an autosomal-dominant inherited peripheral neuropathy. The present large family including four generations provides an exciting opportunity to gain important insights into HNPP in China. A large 43-member family with ten members suspected to be affected by HNPP was studied. Neurologic examinations, electrophysiological and neuropathological studies and molecular genetic testing were used for these kindred. Clinically, the proband had limb hyposthenia and atrophy, and his mother showed declined tendon reflexes in the right lower limb. Electrophysiologically, sensory and motor nerve conduction velocities were generalized reduced. Sural nerve biopsy for the proband showed focal thickesning of the myelin sheaths. Furthermore, real-time quantitative PCR demonstrated that the PMP22 gene has a higher Ct value than reference gene in all suspected patients. These results indicated that the family is indeed a rare and large pedigree of HNPP caused by the deletion of PMP22 gene. Given that the suspected patient in the fourth generation is absent, this family is still worthy of further follow-up study. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Acute bulbar palsy plus syndrome: A rare variant of Guillain-Barre syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Sanghamitra; Jain, Prakash Chand

    2016-01-01

    Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) is the most common cause of acute flaccid paralysis worldwide both in adult and pediatric population. Although flaccid paralysis is the hallmark of this disease, there are some rare variants which may be easily missed unless suspected. Here, we present a very rare variant of GBS - acute bulbar palsy plus syndrome in a pediatric patient. A 13-year-old female child presented with right-sided lower motor neuron type of facial palsy and palsy of bilateral glossopharyngeal and vagus nerve of 2 weeks duration. On detailed neurological examination, motor and sensory system were normal, but the deep tendon reflexes were absent universally. Nerve conduction study showed demyelinating motor neuropathy. Based on typical clinical course and electrophysiological studies, the diagnosis was made. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first pediatric case of unilateral facial palsy with bulbar involvement without any motor abnormality.

  6. Neural stem cell transplantation for cerebral palsy: nerve repair and safety evaluation%神经干细胞移植治疗脑性瘫痪:神经修复的效果和安全性评估

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘俊华; 王大斌; 顾教伟; 冯雪连; 郑昆; 赵峰

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Neural stem cels can repair the damaged brain tissues with potentials of proliferation and differentiation, which become one of the important directions for treating cerebral palsy. OBJECTIVE:To observe the clinical effect and safety of neural stem cel transplantation on the treatment of cerebral palsy in children. METHODS:Neural stem cels were isolated from human embryonic brain and identified by immunofluorescence staining, which were transplanted intravenously into 26 children with cerebral palsy. Children's motor functions were evaluated by gross motor function measure scale and Peabody development motor scale-fine motor scale before treatment, and 3 and 6 months after treatment. Routine blood test and liver-kidney function were detected before and after treatment. Clinical adverse reactions in children with cerebral palsy were monitored. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:The lost cases were not found during 6 months of folow-up. Specific proteins of neural stem cels were al positive in this study. At 3 and 6 months after transplantation, the A, B, C functional area scores and total score on the gross motor function measure scale were obviously increased (P 0.05). At 3 months after transplantation, the fine motor quotient, grasping subtest and visual-motor integration were not remarkably increased (P > 0.05); these scores, however, were elevated after 6 months with statistical significance (P 0.05);患儿精细运动发育商、抓握能力指数和视觉感知能力指数在细胞移植3个月未见明显提高(P > 0.05),但在移植6个月均有显著提高(P < 0.05,P< 0.01).26例脑瘫患儿细胞移植前后血常规和肝肾功能各项指标均处于正常范围,整个移植治疗过程中未见明显严重不良反应.表明人胚胎脑神经干细胞移植较安全,能改善脑性瘫痪患儿的运动功能,且对粗大运动的治疗起效比精细运动更快.

  7. Rapid genetic screening of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaobo Li; Kun Xia; Beisha Tang; Ruxu Zhang; Xiaohong Zi; Lin Li; Yajing Zhan; Shunxiang Huang; Jin Li; Xuning Li; Xigui Li; Zhengmao Hu

    2012-01-01

    We used the allele-specific PCR-double digestion method on peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) to determine duplication and deletion mutations in the proband and family members of one family with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 and one family with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies. The proband and one subclinical family member from the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 family had a PMP22 gene duplication; one patient from the hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies family had a PMP22 gene deletion. Electron microscopic analysis of ultrathin sections of the superficial peroneal nerve from the two probands demonstrated demyelination and myelin sheath hyperplasia, as well as an ‘onion-like’ structure in the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A patient. We observed an irregular thickened myelin sheath and ‘mouse-nibbled’-like changes in the patient with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies. In the Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A patient, nerve electrophysiological examination revealed moderate-to-severe reductions in the motor and sensory conduction velocities of the bilateral median nerve, ulnar nerve, tibial nerve, and sural nerve. Moreover, the compound muscle action potential amplitude was decreased. In the patient with hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies, the nerve conduction velocity of the bilateral tibial nerve and sural nerve was moderately reduced, and the nerve conduction velocity of the median nerve and ulnar nerve of both upper extremities was slightly reduced.

  8. Newborn with congenital facial palsy and bilateral anotia/atresia of external auditory canal: Rare occurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahale, Rohan R.; Mehta, Anish; John, Aju Abraham; Buddaraju, Kiran; Shankar, Abhinandan K.; Rangasetty, Srinivasa

    2016-01-01

    Congenital facial palsy (CFP) is clinically defined as facial palsy of the seventh cranial nerve which is present at birth or shortly thereafter. It is generally considered to be either developmental or acquired in origin. Facial palsy of developmental origin is associated with other anomalies including those of pinna and external auditory canal, which range from mild defects to severe microtia and atresia. We report a 2-day-old male newborn that had right CFP with bilateral anotia and atresia of external auditory canals which is rare. PMID:27857806

  9. Nerve biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biopsy - nerve ... A nerve biopsy is most often done on a nerve in the ankle, forearm, or along a rib. The health care ... feel a prick and a mild sting. The biopsy site may be sore for a few days ...

  10. An Infant with Benign Isolated Abducens Palsy After Vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celebi Kocaoglu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Benign isolated abducens palsy is a self-improving clinical entity characterized by esotropia and diplopia led by the deficiency of abduction, and accompanied by no other neurological findings. The entity may occur after experiencing minor fever episodes, viral infection. The pathophysiological mechanism of cellular injury remains unclear. Hypotheses involve damage arising from autoimmune mediation or direct viral invasion causing demyelination, localized arteritis or genetic predisposition, which could increase susceptibility to such nerve palsies. Diagnosed with benign isolated abducens palsy, a 19-month-old girl infant admitted to our outpatient clinic with an acute onset of esotropia in the right eye developing two weeks after the vaccination of diphtheria, acellular pertussis, tetanus, inactivated polio and Haemophilus influenzae type b (DTPa-IP-Hib was presented in this report.

  11. Long term outcomes from CT-guided indirect cervical nerve root blocks and their relationship to the MRI findings. A prospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bensler, Susanne; Sutter, Reto; Pfirrmann, Christian W.A.; Peterson, Cynthia K. [Orthopedic University Hospital Balgrist, Department of Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Faculty of Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2015-11-15

    To investigate long-term pain reduction and 'improvement' in patients with indirect cervical nerve-root-blocks in comparison to MRI findings. One hundred and twelve patients with MRI confirmed cervical radiculopathy and an indirect cervical nerve-root-block were included. Two radiologists independently evaluated the MRI examinations. 12 different MRI abnormalities at the level and side of infiltration were compared to pain relief and 'improvement' at 1-month, 3-months and 1-year post injection. The proportion of patients reporting clinically relevant 'improvement' was 36.7 % at 1-month, 53.9 % at 3-months and 68.1 % at 1-year. At 1-month post injection, a statistically significantly lower percentage of patients eventually requiring surgery reported improvement and lower NRS change scores compared to those who did not undergo surgery (p = 0.001). Patients with extrusion of the disc were around 4-times more likely to have surgery. At 1-year post-injection the presence of nerve-root compromise was significantly linked to treatment outcome (p = 0.011). Patients with nerve root compression were more likely to report improvement at 1 year. Patients with disc extrusions have less pain relief and are 4 times more likely to go to surgery than patients with disc protrusions. (orig.)

  12. Bilateral cervical synpathectomy and trapping of cervical vagus nerves for refractory mixed cerebral palsy%双侧颈动脉鞘交感神经切除术联合颈部迷走神经孤立术治疗混合型脑瘫

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李爱民; 于炎冰; 张黎; 徐晓利; 许骏

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study the curative effect of the bilateral cervical sympathetomy and trapping of the cervical vagus nerves on the refractory mixed cerebral palsy. Methods The clinical data of 682 patients with refractory mixed cerebral palsy, of whom, 57 (group A) were treated by the bilateral cervical sympathectomy and 625 (group B) by the bilateral cervical sympathectomy and trapping of the cervical vagus nerves, were analyzed retrospectively. The expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (THA) in the connective tissues around the cervical vagus nerves of 85 patients in group B was determined by immunohistochemical technique. The curative effects and oprative complication were compared between both the groups. Results All the patients were followed-up from 6 to 134 months (mean, 54.4 months). The improvment rates of improved motor function in group A and B were 45.6% and 67.4% respectively. The improvement rates of life quality in groups A and B were 50.9% and 73.9% respectively and total effective rates in groups A and B were 77.2% and 94.7% respectively. The recurrence rates of the improved symptoms in group A and B were 18.2% and 6.76% respectively. There were significant differences in the improvement rates of mator function and the life quality, the total effective rate and recurrence rates of the improved symptoms during the following-up between both the groups (P0.05). The positive expression of THA was found in the connective tissues around the cervical vagus nerves of 85 patients in group B. Conclusions Trapping of cervical vagus nerves is beneficial to the enhancement of the curative effect of the bilateral cervical sympathectomy on the refractory mixed cerebral palsy without the increase in the operative complications. There are sympathetic nerve fibers shown by THA-positive expression in the connective tissues around the cervical vagus nerves.%  目的探讨迷走神经孤立术在颈动脉鞘交感神经切除术治疗难治性混合型脑瘫中

  13. Nanomedicine in cerebral palsy

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    Balakrishnan B

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Bindu Balakrishnan,1 Elizabeth Nance,1 Michael V Johnston,2 Rangaramanujam Kannan,3 Sujatha Kannan1 1Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins University; Baltimore, MD, USA; 2Department of Neurology and Pediatrics, Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, MD, USA; 3Department of Ophthalmology, Center for Nanomedicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: Cerebral palsy is a chronic childhood disorder that can have diverse etiologies. Injury to the developing brain that occurs either in utero or soon after birth can result in the motor, sensory, and cognitive deficits seen in cerebral palsy. Although the etiologies for cerebral palsy are variable, neuroinflammation plays a key role in the pathophysiology of the brain injury irrespective of the etiology. Currently, there is no effective cure for cerebral palsy. Nanomedicine offers a new frontier in the development of therapies for prevention and treatment of brain injury resulting in cerebral palsy. Nanomaterials such as dendrimers provide opportunities for the targeted delivery of multiple drugs that can mitigate several pathways involved in injury and can be delivered specifically to the cells that are responsible for neuroinflammation and injury. These materials also offer the opportunity to deliver agents that would promote repair and regeneration in the brain, resulting not only in attenuation of injury, but also enabling normal growth. In this review, the current advances in nanotechnology for treatment of brain injury are discussed with specific relevance to cerebral palsy. Future directions that would facilitate clinical translation in neonates and children are also addressed. Keywords: dendrimer, cerebral palsy, neuroinflammation, nanoparticle, neonatal brain injury, G4OH-PAMAM

  14. Bilateral traumatic paralysis of abducent nerves and clivus fracture: Case Report

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    Calderon-Miranda Willen Guillermo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Clivus fractures are a rare pathology, frecuently associated tohigh power trauma. Such injuries may be associated with vascular and cranial nerves lesions. The abducens nerve is particularly vulnerable to traumatic injuries due to its long intracranial course, since their real origin until the lateral rectus muscle. The unilateral abducens nerve palsy of 1- 2-7% occurs in patients with cranial trauma, bilateral paralysis is rare. We report a patient who presented bilateral abducens nerve palsy associated with a clivus fracture

  15. Missed ulnar nerve injury and closed forearm fracture in a child

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    Amit Batra

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Ulnar nerve injury in closed fracture of forearm in children is uncommon. Commonly, neurapraxia is the reason for this palsy but other severe injuries or nerve entrapment has been reported in some cases. The impor-tance of diagnosis concerning the types of the nerve injury lies in the fact that they have totally different management. We present a case of ulnar nerve deficit in a child following a closed fracture of the forearm bones. It is imperative to diagnose exact cause of palsy as it forms the basis for treatment. MRI scan can help diagnosis and accordingly guide the management. Simple nerve contusion should be treated conservatively, and exploration with fixation of the fracture should be done in lacerations and entrapments of the nerve. Surgery is not the treatment of choice in cases that could be managed conservatively. Key words: Ulnar nerve; Peripheral nerve injuries; Forearm injuries; Child

  16. MR of acoustic neuromas; Relationship to cranial nerves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Masayuki; Takashima, Tsutomu; Kadoya, Masumi; Takahashi, Shiroh; Miyayama, Shiroh; Taira, Sakae; Kashihara, Kengo; Yamashima, Tetsumori; Itoh, Haruhide (Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1989-08-01

    In this report, the relationship of acoustic neuromas to the adjacent cranial nerves is discussed. On T{sub 1}-weighted images, the trigeminal nerve was detected in all 13 cases. Mild to marked compression of these nerves by the tumors was observed in eight cases. The extent of compression did not always correspond to the clinical symptoms. In four cases with a maximum tumor diameter of 2 cm or less, the 7th and 8th cranial nerves were identified. There was no facial palsy in these patients. Two patients with a tumor diameter of more than 2 cm also had no facial palsy. All patients, including those with small tumors, complained of hearing loss and/or tinnitus. While MR imaging has some limitations, it is an effective imaging modality for showing the relationship between tumors and nerves. (author).

  17. CT evaluation of the greater superficial petrosal nerve canal and its surrounding structures%岩浅大神经管及其周围结构的CT径线测量

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牟晓飞; 李芹; 晁宝婷; 巩若箴

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the use of CT depiction of greater superficial petrosal nerve canal (GSPNC) and its surrounding structures in evaluation of middle fossa approach surgery. Methods This study included prospectively 64 consecutive patients without any structural abnormalities of inner ear. anamnesis of head trauma or surgical history of temporal bone undergoing CT scan for other reasons between August and November 2011 at our institute. Relative relationships of the main structures were depicted on CT images using MPR and obtained value in measurement of the main diameters were analyzed by SPSS 16. 0. Results Mean length of GSPNC was (2. 9±2. 5) mm (0~15. 7) mm. Mean thickness of bone covering geniculate ganglion was (2. 0±1.7) mm (0~7. 4) mm. Mean distance between spinous foramen and hiatus of great superficial petrosal nerve (GSPN) was (10. 3±2. 2) mm (5. 5~15. 1) mm. Significant difference existed in the bony thickness covering geniculate ganglion between left and right side. There was no significant difference in the other diameters between left and right side. Conclusion Temporal bone CT with high resolution has the ability to depict bony structures and their relative relationship of temporal bone. Conduction of pre-operational CT examination for the patients, who are going to undergo surgery utilizing middle cranial fossa approach, is helpful in selection of individualized surgical planning.%目的 探讨岩浅大神经管(grcater superficial petrosal nerve canal,GSPNC)及其周围解剖结构在CT上的显示及其应用于颅中窝入路手术的重要意义.方法 搜集我所行颞骨CT扫描的64例患者(内耳畸形、颞骨外伤史或颞骨手术史患者除外),在工作站上采用MPR后处理技术调整并显示GSPNC及其周围解剖结构的相对位置关系.测量主要结构间的径线值并进行统计学分析.结果 测得GSPNC的平均长度为(2.9±2.5)mm(0~15.7)mm,膝状神经窝表面骨质平均厚度为(2.0±1.7)mm(0~7

  18. Anatomical Study of the Ulnar Nerve Variations at High Humeral Level and Their Possible Clinical and Diagnostic Implications

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background. Descriptive evaluation of nerve variations plays a pivotal role in the usefulness of clinical or surgical practice, as an anatomical variation often sets a risk of nerve palsy syndrome. Ulnar nerve (UN) is one amongst the major nerves involved in neuropathy. In the present anatomical study, variations related to ulnar nerve have been identified and its potential clinical implications discussed. Materials and Method. We examined 50 upper limb dissected specimens for possible ulnar...

  19. The history of facial palsy and spasm: Hippocrates to Razi

    OpenAIRE

    Sajadi, Mohammad M.; Sajadi, Mohamad-Reza M.; Tabatabaie, Seyed Mahmoud

    2011-01-01

    Although Sir Charles Bell was the first to provide the anatomic basis for the condition that bears his name, in recent years researchers have shown that other European physicians provided earlier clinical descriptions of peripheral cranial nerve 7 palsy. In this article, we describe the history of facial distortion by Greek, Roman, and Persian physicians, culminating in Razi's detailed description in al-Hawi. Razi distinguished facial muscle spasm from paralysis, distinguished central from pe...

  20. UNUSUAL PRESENTATION OF BRAINSTEM GLIOMA AS PROGRESSIVE BULBAR PALSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suma

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Brain stem gliomas/astrocytomas are slowly growing tumors affecting children and young adults. They usually present with unilateral cranial nerve palsies followed by long tract signs. Here we present a case report of a 42 year old male patient, who initially presented with thyrotoxicosis and slowly progressing dysphagia, dysarthria and dysphonia with no other long tract signs, and was later found to have brain stem glioma.

  1. Radiation induced femoral palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aranda, B.; Esnault, S.; Brunet, P. (Hopital de la Salpetriere, Paris (France))

    1982-01-01

    We report four cases of femoral palsy due to compressive fibrosis, after pelvic radiation therapy. Three patients had Hodgkin's disease, and one testicular seminoma. Prominent clinical features include major groin induration and underlying swelling. Unlike what is usually seen in tumoral relapse, little or no pain is associated with these neuropathies. The femoral post-radic palsy develops earlier and faster than brachial plexus palsy of same aetiology. In one case, progressive aggravation led to surgical neurolysis which resulted in dramatic and long lasting improvement. The principal preventive and therapeutic management methods are discussed: since compressive fibrosis is related to the use of isolated and massive electron beam therapy, various associations of cobalt and electron beam therapy are designed to best prevent the side effects of each of these methods. The early treatment of developing fibrosis by D. penicillamine is discussed.

  2. [Brachial plexus palsy in adults with radicular lesions, general concepts, diagnostic approach and results ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberlin, C

    2003-12-01

    In post-traumatic brachial plexus lesions in adults, early repair will necessitate a variety of nerve grafting and nerve transfer procedures. In complete palsies, a graft is performed from a radicular stump, using intercostal nerve transfers, partial cross C7 transfer, and the distal spinal accessory nerve. This will provide elbow flexion and extension in 75% of cases, and shoulder abduction or rotation in 50% of cases. In the upper type palsies, ulnar-biceps transfer is the standard procedure. Grafting from a ruptured cervical root, when available, is performed to reanimate the shoulder. In C5 C6 and C7 palsies, extension of the wrist and fingers is provided by tendon transfers. In chronic palsies, elbow flexion and extension loss is treated by means of free muscle transfers, (latissimus dorsi or gracilis) combined with nerve transfers (intercostals or spinal accessory). Secondary procedures are routinely necessary following recovery of elbow flexion. For the shoulder-humeral shaft osteotomy or fusion, for the hand-cosmetic fusion of the wrist and distal radio-ulnar joint in the prone position, or palliative treatment in case of partial recovery. For such weak "plexic hands", we have developed a specific hierarchical functional scale, useful for surgical decisions.

  3. Computerized tomographic studies in cerebral palsy. Analysis of 200 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugie, Y. (Tokyo Women' s Medical Coll. (Japan))

    1981-09-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) findings in 200 children with cerebral palsy (CP) were analysed from the viewpoint of clinical manifestations, disease complications and etiological factors. CT scans of 135 cases (67.5%) were found to be abnormal and there were 14 (7%) borderline cases. The major abnormality found on CT scans was cerebral atrophy. Other important changes included focal or diffuse low density area in the brain tissue, congenital malformation, and cerebellar atrophy. From the clinical point of view, a large number of patients with spastic tetraplegia and spastic diplegia showed highly abnormal CT scans. On the other hand, in patients with spastic monoplegia, spastic paraplegia, and athetotic type, CT findings were normal or revealed only minor cerebral atrophy. Most children showing asymmetric clinical symptoms had corresponding asymmetric CT abnormalities which included ventricular enlargement, low density area in the brain tissue, and hemispherical volume. There was a significant correlation between the severity of physical impairment and the extent of CT abnormalities. Severely affected children had grossly abnormal CT scans such as hydranencephaly, polycystic change, and extensive cerebral atrophy. In the patients complicated with epilepsy, the incidence and severity of abnormal CT were higher than those of non-epileptic patients. Mentally retarded patients had variable enlargement of the subarachnoidal space depending on the severity of their mental retardation. Patients with suspected postnatal etiology also had high incidence of severe CT abnormality. CT scan is a valuable tool for evaluating patients with CP and in some cases, possible etiology of the disease may be discovered.

  4. Optic nerve hypoplasia

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    Savleen Kaur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH is a congenital anomaly of the optic disc that might result in moderate to severe vision loss in children. With a vast number of cases now being reported, the rarity of ONH is obviously now refuted. The major aspects of ophthalmic evaluation of an infant with possible ONH are visual assessment, fundus examination, and visual electrophysiology. Characteristically, the disc is small, there is a peripapillary double-ring sign, vascular tortuosity, and thinning of the nerve fiber layer. A patient with ONH should be assessed for presence of neurologic, radiologic, and endocrine associations. There may be maternal associations like premature births, fetal alcohol syndrome, maternal diabetes. Systemic associations in the child include endocrine abnormalities, developmental delay, cerebral palsy, and seizures. Besides the hypoplastic optic nerve and chiasm, neuroimaging shows abnormalities in ventricles or white- or gray-matter development, septo-optic dysplasia, hydrocephalus, and corpus callosum abnormalities. There is a greater incidence of clinical neurologic abnormalities in patients with bilateral ONH (65% than patients with unilateral ONH. We present a review on the available literature on the same to urge caution in our clinical practice when dealing with patients with ONH. Fundus photography, ocular coherence tomography, visual field testing, color vision evaluation, neuroimaging, endocrinology consultation with or without genetic testing are helpful in the diagnosis and management of ONH. (Method of search: MEDLINE, PUBMED.

  5. Traction injury of the brachial plexus confused with nerve injury due to interscalene brachial block: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Ferrero-Manzanal

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: When postoperative brachial plexus palsy appears, nerve block is a confusing factor that tends to be attributed as the cause of palsy by the orthopedic surgeon. The beach chair position may predispose brachial plexus traction injury. The head and neck position should be regularly checked during long procedures, as intraoperative maneuvers may cause eventual traction of the brachial plexus.

  6. Autopsied case of primary malignant lymphoma of the central nervous system presenting an unusual clinical course and CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamashita, Kazuya; Kobayashi, Shotai; Yamaguchi, Shuhei and others

    1987-08-01

    A case of primary malignant lymphoma of the central nervous system was reported. A 58-year-old man was admitted because of diplopia in March, 1986. Last year in June he lost consciousness, accompanied by headache, vertigo, a floating sensation, and tinnitus, though his symptoms disappeared the next day. Last year in October and November, he complained of weakness of the left hand, but it soon disappeared. A neurological examination on admission revealed left trochlear nerve palsy, a decreased sensitivity to pain on the left side of the face and the opposite side of the body, and a mild left-side lack of coordination. A head CT scan and angiography showed no abnormalities. An examination of the CSF revealed increased protein with mild pleocytosis and IgG, but cytology was negative. After admission, he complained of left trigeminal neuralgia, but it disappeared upon steroid pulse therapy. When the steroids were tapered off, however, peripheral facialnerve palsy developed. Therefore, a second course of steroid pulse therapy was done, with some effect. In June, however, the patient became unconscious while the orally administered steroid was being tapered off. A head CT scan showed isodensity masses in the basal ganglia, the thalamus, and the periventricular white matter on a plain scan, and homogeneous masses with ring enhancement and edema on the use of a contrast medium. A histopathological examination showed primary cerebral malignant lymphoma (large-cell type).

  7. Use of intercostal nerves for different target neurotization in brachial plexus reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lykissas, Marios G; Kostas-Agnantis, Ioannis P; Korompilias, Ananstasios V; Vekris, Marios D; Beris, Alexandros E

    2013-01-01

    Intercostal nerve transfer is a valuable procedure in devastating plexopathies. Intercostal nerves are a very good choice for elbow flexion or extension and shoulder abduction when the intraplexus donor nerves are not available. The best results are obtained in obstetric brachial plexus palsy patients, when direct nerve transfer is performed within six months from the injury. Unlike the adult posttraumatic patients after median and ulnar nerve neurotization with intercostal nerves, almost all obstetric brachial plexus palsy patients achieve protective sensation in the hand and some of them achieve active wrist and finger flexion. Use in combination with proper muscles, intercostal nerve transfer can yield adequate power to the paretic upper limb. Reinnervation of native muscles (i.e., latissimus dorsi) should always be sought as they can successfully be transferred later on for further functional restoration. PMID:23878776

  8. HERPES SIMPLEX VIRUS IN SALIVA OF PATIENTS WITH BELL'S PALSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H. Harirchian

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute idiopathic peripheral facial paralysis (Bell's palsy is the most common disorder of the facial nerve. Most patients recover completely, although some have permanent disfiguring facial weakness. Many studies have attempted to identify an infectious etiology for this disease. Although the cause of Bell's palsy remains unknown, recent studies suggest a possible association with Herpes Simplex Virus-1(HSV-1 infection. In this case-control study we investigated the presence of DNA of HSV in the saliva of 26 patients with Bells palsy in first and second weeks of disorder compared to normal population who were matched in sex, age, as well as history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension and labial herpes. In the case group 3 and 7 patients had positive polymerase chain reaction (PCR for HSV in first and second weeks of disease respectively compared to 4 in controls. It means that there was not any relationship between Bell's palsy and HSV in saliva either in first or in second week. Two and 6 of positive results from the sample of first and second weeks were from patients with severe (grade 4-6 Bell's palsy. Although the positive results were more in second week in patient group and more in severe palsies, but a significant relationship between Bell's palsy or its severity and positive PCR for HSV was not detected (P >0.05.

  9. Iatrogenic Ulnar Nerve Injury post Laceration Suturing – An Unusual Presentation

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    Murali Mothilal

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nerve entrapment while suturing a lacerated wound is a complication that is easily avoidable. We report a case low ulnar nerve palsy due to nerve entrapment while suturing a lacerated wound. Case Report: A 48 year old lady came with complaints of pain and a lacerated wound over the dorsomedial aspect of lower third of the left forearm. The lacerated wound was sutured elsewhere one week back. She had fracture of lower third of the ulna which was stabilised with plates and screws using a separate dorsal incision. She developed ulnar claw hand on the third postoperative day. Strength duration curve revealed neurotmesis of ulnar nerve. Ulnar nerve exploration was done and the nerve was found to be ligated at the site of original laceration. The ligature was released and nerve was found to be thinned out at the site. There was no neurological recovery at 5 months follow up and reconstruction procedures in form of tendon tranfer are planned for the patient. Conclusion: This is a case of iatrogenic ulnar nerve palsy which is very rare in our literature. This can be easily avoided if proper care is taken while suturing the primary laceration. A nerve can be mistakenly sutured for a bleeding vein and proper exposure while suturing will be necessary especially at areas where nerves are superficial. Keywords: Iatrogenic, ulnar nerve palsy

  10. Facial palsy, a disorder belonging to influential neurological dynasty: Review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ujwala R Newadkar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Facial paralysis is one of the common problem leading to facial deformation. Bell′s palsy (BP is defined as a lower motor neuron palsy of acute onset and idiopathic origin. BP is regarded as a benign common neurological disorder of unknown cause. It has an acute onset and is almost always a mononeuritis. The facial nerve is a mixed cranial nerve with a predominant motor component, which supplies all muscles concerned with unilateral facial expression. Knowledge of its course is vital for anatomic localization and clinical correlation. BP accounts for approximately 72% of facial palsies. Almost a century later, the management and etiology of BP is still a subject of controversy. Here, we present a review of literature on this neurologically significant entity.

  11. Effects of electroacupuncture therapy for Bell's palsy from acute stage: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhi-dan; He, Jiang-bo; Guo, Si-si; Yang, Zhi-xin; Shen, Jun; Li, Xiao-yan; Liang, Wei; Shen, Wei-dong

    2015-08-25

    Although many patients with facial paralysis have obtained benefits or completely recovered after acupuncture or electroacupuncture therapy, it is still difficult to list intuitive evidence besides evaluation using neurological function scales and a few electrophysiologic data. Hence, the aim of this study is to use more intuitive and reliable detection techniques such as facial nerve magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), nerve electromyography, and F waves to observe changes in the anatomic morphology of facial nerves and nerve conduction before and after applying acupuncture or electroacupuncture, and to verify their effectiveness by combining neurological function scales. A total of 132 patients with Bell's palsy (grades III and IV in the House-Brackmann [HB] Facial Nerve Grading System) will be randomly divided into electroacupuncture, manual acupuncture, non-acupuncture, and medicine control groups. All the patients will be given electroacupuncture treatment after the acute period, except for patients in the medicine control group. The acupuncture or electroacupuncture treatments will be performed every 2 days until the patients recover or withdraw from the study. The primary outcome is analysis based on facial nerve functional scales (HB scale and Sunnybrook facial grading system), and the secondary outcome is analysis based on MRI, nerve electromyography and F-wave detection. All the patients will undergo MRI within 3 days after Bell's palsy onset for observation of the signal intensity and facial nerve swelling of the unaffected and affected sides. They will also undergo facial nerve electromyography and F-wave detection within 1 week after onset of Bell's palsy. Nerve function will be evaluated using the HB scale and Sunnybrook facial grading system at each hospital visit for treatment until the end of the study. The MRI, nerve electromyography, and F-wave detection will be performed again at 1 month after the onset of Bell's palsy. Chinese Clinical Trials

  12. Modern concepts in facial nerve reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantel Mira

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reconstructive surgery of the facial nerve is not daily routine for most head and neck surgeons. The published experience on strategies to ensure optimal functional results for the patients are based on small case series with a large variety of surgical techniques. On this background it is worthwhile to develop a standardized approach for diagnosis and treatment of patients asking for facial rehabilitation. Conclusion A standardized approach is feasible: Patients with chronic facial palsy first need an exact classification of the palsy's aetiology. A step-by-step clinical examination, if necessary MRI imaging and electromyographic examination allow a classification of the palsy's aetiology as well as the determination of the severity of the palsy and the functional deficits. Considering the patient's desire, age and life expectancy, an individual surgical concept is applicable using three main approaches: a early extratemporal reconstruction, b early reconstruction of proximal lesions if extratemporal reconstruction is not possible, c late reconstruction or in cases of congenital palsy. Twelve to 24 months after the last step of surgical reconstruction a standardized evaluation of the therapeutic results is recommended to evaluate the necessity for adjuvant surgical procedures or other adjuvant procedures, e.g. botulinum toxin application. Up to now controlled trials on the value of physiotherapy and other adjuvant measures are missing to give recommendation for optimal application of adjuvant therapies.

  13. Bell’s palsy in a case of Darier’s disease – a rare disease association or coincidental finding?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kritika Pandey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Darier’s disease (DD is a rare acantholytic dyskeratotic autosomal dominant genodermatosis characterized by the presence of warty, brown papules and plaques affecting the seborrhoeic areas. Frequent bacterial, fungal and viral particularly herpes simplex virus (HSV infections complicate DD. Bell’s palsy is an acute onset, idiopathic facial paralysis resulting from a dysfunction anywhere along the peripheral part of the facial nerve. Reactivation of HSV is considered to be the main cause of Bell’s palsy. This case represents, to the best of our knowledge, the first case of DD presenting with Bell’s palsy. This case underlines the importance of recognizing HSV infection in DD.

  14. Bell's palsy before Bell : Evert Jan Thomassen a Thuessink and idiopathic peripheral facial paralysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Graaf, R. C.; IJpma, F. F. A.; Nicolai, J-P A.; Werker, P. M. N.

    2009-01-01

    Bell's palsy is the eponym for idiopathic peripheral facial paralysis. It is named after Sir Charles Bell (1774-1842), who, in the first half of the nineteenth century, discovered the function of the facial nerve and attracted the attention of the medical world to facial paralysis. Our knowledge of

  15. Bell's palsy before Bell : Evert Jan Thomassen a Thuessink and idiopathic peripheral facial paralysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Graaf, R. C.; IJpma, F. F. A.; Nicolai, J-P A.; Werker, P. M. N.

    2009-01-01

    Bell's palsy is the eponym for idiopathic peripheral facial paralysis. It is named after Sir Charles Bell (1774-1842), who, in the first half of the nineteenth century, discovered the function of the facial nerve and attracted the attention of the medical world to facial paralysis. Our knowledge of

  16. High resolution CT on multiple plane reconstruction of lesion of 5th lumbar nerve at the same slice%第5腰神经病变 HRCT 重建同层显示的初步探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭建鸿; 王磊; 黄自立; 肖越勇; 林井副

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨第5腰神经(L5)病变高分辨率CT(high-resolution computed tomography, HRCT)重建同层显示的可行性,为该神经病变的临床诊断提供依据。方法筛选20例(40侧)正常及30例(41侧)病变者的L5神经。使用美国GE公司Light Speed 16层和PHILIPS iCT 256层螺旋CT扫描,然后传至工作站( GE,ADW4.1及Philips Brilliance 3.0)进行多平面重建,观察L5神经正常解剖及病变基本表现。结果正常L5神经在斜冠状面上呈双侧对称的弧形条索状,整体形态呈“八字形”,由硬膜囊穿出至椎管外腰大肌缘20例(100%);16例(80%)显示至骶髂关节上段。斜冠状内旋切面上20例(100%)显示起点至骶髂关节平面处;6例(30%)至骶丛神经或坐骨神经上段。显示L5神经病变处走行方向及张力状态改变16例(24侧),模糊15例(18侧),受压及萎缩12例(18侧),局部增粗3例(5侧),扭曲变形1例(1侧)。其中导致神经病变L5~S1椎间盘侧方突出伴骨质增生10例(15侧),L5横突肥大5例(8侧),L5峡部裂8例(10侧),L5压缩骨折3例(4侧),腰骶段恶性肿瘤4例(4侧)。结论 HRCT重建同层显示技术能够清晰显示L5神经解剖及相关疾病,对该神经疾病可提供有价值的诊断信息。%Objective To explore the feasibility of CT on multiple plane reconstruction of the lesion 5th lumber nerve at the same slice, providing the basis for the clinical diagnosis of L 5 neuropathy.Methods 30 patients with of L5 neuropathy and 20 normal adults were scanned by GE Light Speed 16 and PHILIPS iCT 256-slice CT, reconstructed with their own workstations ( GE, ADW4.1 and Philips Brilliance 3.0) to observe the normal anatomy and basic disease of L 5 nerve.Results 20 cases (40 sides)of normal L5 nerve were symmetrically displayed from starting point to margin of psoas major and 15 cases (75%) to upper sacroiliac

  17. Improved Quality of Life in A Case of Cerebral Palsy after Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Sharma

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral palsy (CP is a non progressive, demyelinating disorder that affects a child’s development and posture and may be associated with sensation, cognition, communication and perception abnormalities. In CP, cerebral white matter is injured resulting in the loss of oligodendrocytes. This causes damage to the myelin and disruption of nerve conduction. Cell therapy is being explored as an alternate therapeutic strategy as there is no treatment currently available for CP. To study the benefits of this treatment we have administered autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNCs to a 12-year-old CP case. He was clinically re-evaluated after six months and found to demonstrate positive clinical and functional outcomes. His trunk strength, upper limb control, hand functions, walking stability, balance, posture and coordination improved. His ability to perform activities of daily living improved. On repeating the Functional Independence Measure (FIM, the score increased from 90 to 113. A repeat positron emission tomography- computed tomography (PET-CT scan of the brain six months after intervention showed progression of the mean standard deviation values towards normalization which correlated to the functional changes. At one year, all clinical improvements have remained. This indicated that cell transplantation may improve quality of life and have a potential for treatment of CP.

  18. Improved Quality of Life in A Case of Cerebral Palsy after Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Alok; Sane, Hemangi; Kulkarni, Pooja; D'sa, Myola; Gokulchandran, Nandini; Badhe, Prerna

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a non progressive, demyelinating disorder that affects a child's development and posture and may be associated with sensation, cognition, communication and perception abnormalities. In CP, cerebral white matter is injured resulting in the loss of oligodendrocytes. This causes damage to the myelin and disruption of nerve conduction. Cell therapy is being explored as an alternate therapeutic strategy as there is no treatment currently available for CP. To study the benefits of this treatment we have administered autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNCs) to a 12-year-old CP case. He was clinically re-evaluated after six months and found to demonstrate positive clinical and functional outcomes. His trunk strength, upper limb control, hand functions, walking stability, balance, posture and coordination improved. His ability to perform activities of daily living improved. On repeating the Functional Independence Measure (FIM), the score increased from 90 to 113. A repeat positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) scan of the brain six months after intervention showed progression of the mean standard deviation values towards normalization which correlated to the functional changes. At one year, all clinical improvements have remained. This indicated that cell transplantation may improve quality of life and have a potential for treatment of CP.

  19. MRI of peripheral nerve lesions of the lower limbs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacour-Petit, M.C.; Ducreux, D. [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Hopital Bicetre, Kremlin-Bicetre (France); Lozeron, P. [Dept. of Neurology, Hopital Bicetre, Kremlin-Bicetre (France)

    2003-03-01

    Our aim is to illustrate the contribution of MRI to diagnosis of lesions of the lower-limb nerve trunks. We report six patients who had clinical and electrophysiological examination for a peroneal or tibial nerve palsy. MRI of the knee showed in three cases a nonenhancing cystic lesion of the peroneal nerve suggesting an intraneural ganglion cyst, confirmed by histological study in one case. One patient with known neurofibromatosis had an enhancing nodular lesion of the peroneal nerve compatible with a neurofibroma. Two patients had diffuse hypertrophy with high signal on T2-weighted images, without contrast enhancement of the sciatic nerve or its branches. These lesions were compatible with localised hypertrophic neuropathy. In one case, biopsy of the superficial branch of the peroneal nerve showed insignificant axonal degeneration. MRI can provide information about the size and site of the abnormal segment of a nerve before treatment and can be used to distinguish different patterns of focal lesion. (orig.)

  20. Postoperative recovery from posterior communicating aneurysm complicated by oculomotor palsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Ming-qi; WANG Shuo; ZHAO Yuan-li; ZHANG Dong; ZHAO Ji-zong

    2008-01-01

    Background Oculomotor palsy is a common complication in patients with posterior communicating aneurysm.This study was conducted to investigate the postoperative recovery of patients with posterior communicating aneurysm complicated with oculomotor palsy and to analyze the factors influencing length of recovery.Methods From 2000 to 2006,148 patients with posterior communicating aneurysm were treated at our hospital,with 74 of them having concurrent unilateral oculomotor palsy.All of the patients underwent craniotomy after the diagnosis by means of whole-brain digital subtraction angiography (DSA).The patients were divided into two groups for observation of postoperative recovery during the follow-up period.Patients in group A were treated with simple pedicle clipping of the aneurysm while patients in group B were treated with pedicle clipping of the aneurysm and decompression of the oculomotor nerve.Results Of the 40 patients in group A.20 underwent surgery within 14 days and completely recovered from oculomotor palsy in 10-40 days.Fourteen patients underwent surgery within 14-30 days.of whom 12 completely recovered within 30-90 days and 2 cases recovered incompletely.The remaining six patients underwent surgery after more than 30 days:of these.four patients recovered completely and two recovered incompletely.Of the 34 cases in group B,15 underwent surgery within 14 days and completely recovered from oculomotor palsy in 10-40 days.Sixteen patients underwent surgery in 14-30 days.of whom 14 completely recovered in 30-90 days and 2 recovered incompletely.The remaining three patients underwent surgery after more than 30 days,of whom two patients recovered completely and one recovered incompletely.Conclusions Early diagnosis and surgical treatment of patients with unilateral oculomotor palsy induced by posterior communicating aneurysm are important to full postoperative recovery of the oculomotor nerve.No correlation was found,however,between decompression of the

  1. MR imaging in Bell's palsy and herpes zoster opticus: correlation with clinical findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Jung Ho; Mo, Jong Hyun; Moon, Sung Hee; Lee, Sang Sun; Park, Yang Hee; Lee, Kyung Hee [National Police Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Ik Joon [Sejong General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-09-01

    To evaluate the MRI findings of acute facial nerve paralysis in Bell's palsy and herpes zoster opticus, and to correlate these with the clinical findings. We retrowspectively reviewed the MRI findings in six cases of BEll's palsy(BP) and two of herpes zoster oticus(HZO), and compared them with the findings for 30 normal facial nerves. This nerve was considered abnormal when its signal intensity was greater than that of brain parenchyma or the contralateral normal side on Gd-enhanced T1-weighted axial and coronal MR images. We analysed the location and degree of contrast enhancement, interval change, and clinical progression in correlation with House-Brackmann(HB) grade and electroneuronography (ENoG) findings. Fifteen of 30 normal facial nerves(50%) seen on Gd-enhanced MRI were mildly enhanced in the geniculate ganglion, the proximal tympanic, and the proximal mastoid segment of the facial nerve. No enhancement of the internal auditory canal(IAC) or labyrinthine segment of the facial nerve was noted, however. In BP and HZO, Gd-enhanced MR images revealed fair to marked enhancement for more than two segments from the internal auditory canal to the mastoid segment of the facial nerve. During follow-up MRI, enhancement of the facial nerve varied in location and signal intensity, though gradually decreased in intensity approximately eight weeks after the onset of facial nerve palsy. No correlation between clinical HB grade, ENoG, and follow up MRI findings was noted. Except in the internal auditory canal and labyrinthine segment, normal facial nevemay show mild and relatively symmetrical enhancement. In BP and HZO, the facial nerve showed diffuse enhancement from the IAC to the mastoid segment.=20.

  2. 鼠神经生长因子球后注射治疗脑瘫皮质盲的临床观察%Clinical Observation on the Effect of Retrobulbar Injection of Mouse Nerve Growth Factor on Cortical Blindness in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翟红印; 谢晓明; 孙莉

    2014-01-01

    Objective To observe the effect of retrobulbar injection of mouse nerve growth factor(mNGF) on cortical blindness in children with cerebral palsy, we aim to find the treatments for children with cortical blindness. Methods Using mNGF configuration solution by bilateral retrobulbar injection, and press the acupuncture point for 3 mins. The whole treatment consists of three courses, ten times per course and three times a week. After that the curative effect are evaluated. Rerult After observing 20 patients, 13 recovered, 2 effective, and 5 invalid. More over, 11 cases showed effective results during the first course. Conclusion Retrobulbar injection of mNGF is truly effective to cure cortical blindness.%目的:观察鼠神经生长因子球后注射治疗小儿脑瘫(cerebral palsy,CP)皮质盲的效果,寻找治疗小儿皮质盲的治疗方法。方法采用鼠神经生长因子配置液,穴位为双侧球后,注射后按压3 min止血,每周治疗3次,10次为1个疗程,治疗3个疗程评估。结果观察20例,痊愈13例,有效2例,其中无效5例,其中11例第1个疗程见效。结论通过鼠神经生长因子球后注射治疗皮质盲有确切疗效。

  3. Facial nerve involvement in pseudotumor cerebri.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakshi S

    1992-07-01

    Full Text Available A woman with history of bifrontal headache, vomiting and loss of vision was diagnosed as a case of pseudotumor cerebri based on clinical and MRI findings. Bilateral abducens and facial nerve palsies were detected. Pseudotumor cerebri in this patient was not associated with any other illness or related to drug therapy. Treatment was given to lower the raised intracranial pressure to which the patient responded.

  4. Bilateral Facial Nerve Paralysis as First Presentation of Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadi Hamouri

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis is rare, and its precise incidence is unknown. It is associated with a wide spectrum of solid and hematological malignancies. To complicate its diagnosis, the clinical presentation of leptomeningeal carcinomatosis can be variable. We report a case of a 38-year-old male with bilateral facial nerve paralysis as first presentation of lung adenocarcinoma. To our knowledge, this is the only case describing bilateral facial nerve palsy as the first and only manifestation of lung adenocarcinoma.

  5. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for detection of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours in neurofibromatosis type 1: tumour-to-liver ratio is superior to an SUV{sub max} cut-off

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salamon, Johannes [University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); Veldhoen, Simon [University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); University Medical Centre Wuerzburg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Apostolova, Ivayla [Otto-von-Guericke University, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Magdeburg (Germany); Bannas, Peter; Yamamura, Jin; Herrmann, Jochen; Adam, Gerhard; Derlin, Thorsten [University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); Friedrich, Reinhard E. [University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Hamburg (Germany); Mautner, Victor F. [University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Neurology, Hamburg (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    To evaluate the usefulness of normalising intra-tumour tracer accumulation on {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) to reference tissue uptake for characterisation of peripheral nerve sheath tumours (PNSTs) in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) compared with the established maximum standardised uptake value (SUVmax) cut-off of >3.5. Forty-nine patients underwent FDG PET/CT. Intra-tumour tracer uptake (SUVmax) was normalised to three different reference tissues (tumour-to-liver, tumour-to-muscle and tumour-to-fat ratios). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses were used out to assess the diagnostic performance. Histopathology and follow-up served as the reference standard. Intra-tumour tracer uptake correlated significantly with liver uptake (r{sub s} = 0.58, P = 0.016). On ROC analysis, the optimum threshold for tumour-to-liver ratio was >2.6 (AUC = 0.9735). Both the SUVmax cut-off value of >3.5 and a tumour-to-liver ratio >2.6 provided a sensitivity of 100 %, but specificity was significantly higher for the latter (90.3 % vs 79.8 %; P = 0.013). In patients with NF1, quantitative {sup 18}F-FDG PET imaging may identify malignant change in neurofibromas with high accuracy. Specificity could be significantly increased by using the tumour-to-liver ratio. The authors recommend further evaluation of a tumour-to-liver ratio cut-off value of >2.6 for diagnostic intervention planning. (orig.)

  6. 颈椎管成形微钛板固定与椎板切除内固定后C5神经根麻痹的比较%Comparison of C5 nerve root palsy after laminoplasty with mini-titanium plate fixation and laminectomy with internal fixation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯大鹏; 许卫兵; 赵智; 袁亮; 李光灿; 南丰; 李正维

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Laminoplasty and laminectomy are the most commonly used treatment methods for multilevel cervical spondylotic myelopathy, which is more common in elderly patients. C5 nerve root palsy is the common postoprative complication after posterior cervical repair. OBJECTIVE:To compare the incidence of C5 nerve root palsy after laminoplasty with mini-titanium plate fixation and laminectomy with internal fixation in repair of multilevel cervical spondylotic myelopathy. METHODS:Total y 134 patients with multilevel cervical spondylotic myelopathy from August 2010 to December 2014 were enrol ed, and then divided into laminoplasty group (n=45) and laminectomy group (n=89) owing to different ways of repair. Patients in the laminoplasty group were treated with laminoplasty with mini-titanium plate fixation, and patients in the laminectomy group were treated with laminectomy with internal fixation. C5 nerve root palsy condition after repair was recorded and evaluated. The cervical lordosis angle (Cobb angle) and cervical curvature index were compared. The Japanese Orthopaedic Association score was used for neurological assessment. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:Al patients in both groups were fol owed up for more than 6 months. There were no significant differences in cervical lordotic angle and cervical curvature index at the first week before and after the treatment between these two groups (P>0.05). The Japanese Orthopaedic Association scores of patients after 6 months of treatment were significantly improved compared with that before treatment in these two groups (P  目的:比较颈椎管成形微钛板固定与椎板切除内固定修复多节段脊髓型颈椎病后C5神经根麻痹的发生率。方法:2010年8月至2014年12月纳入多节段脊髓型颈椎病患者134例,因修复方式不同分为两组,椎管成形组45例接受颈椎管成形微钛板固定,颈板切除组89例接受椎板切除内固定。记录并评估修复后C5神经根麻痹情

  7. Facial Nerve Paralysis due to a Pleomorphic Adenoma with the Imaging Characteristics of a Facial Nerve Schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nader, Marc-Elie; Bell, Diana; Sturgis, Erich M; Ginsberg, Lawrence E; Gidley, Paul W

    2014-08-01

    Background Facial nerve paralysis in a patient with a salivary gland mass usually denotes malignancy. However, facial paralysis can also be caused by benign salivary gland tumors. Methods We present a case of facial nerve paralysis due to a benign salivary gland tumor that had the imaging characteristics of an intraparotid facial nerve schwannoma. Results The patient presented to our clinic 4 years after the onset of facial nerve paralysis initially diagnosed as Bell palsy. Computed tomography demonstrated filling and erosion of the stylomastoid foramen with a mass on the facial nerve. Postoperative histopathology showed the presence of a pleomorphic adenoma. Facial paralysis was thought to be caused by extrinsic nerve compression. Conclusions This case illustrates the difficulty of accurate preoperative diagnosis of a parotid gland mass and reinforces the concept that facial nerve paralysis in the context of salivary gland tumors may not always indicate malignancy.

  8. 鼠神经生长因子治疗婴幼儿痉挛型脑瘫与非痉挛型脑瘫的临床疗效比较%Comparison of Clinical Outcome with Mouse Nerve Growth Factor(NGF) Treatment of Spastic Cerebral Palsy and Non-Spastic Cerebral Palsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢凤玲; 陈继栋; 李伟明

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨鼠神经生长因子对治疗痉挛性脑瘫和非痉挛型型脑瘫的疗效比较。方法将60例符合诊断标准及条件的脑瘫患儿按痉挛型及非痉挛型脑瘫分成两组。其中痉挛型脑瘫组35例,包含年龄≤36个月23例和>36个月12例,非痉挛型脑瘫组25例,包含年龄≤36个月15例和>36个月10例。两组均进行常规的综合康复治疗,采用运动治疗为主,配合推拿、按摩、针灸等,同时应用鼠神经生长因子(NGF)20μg(≥9000 AU/支)加注射用水2 mL,肌内注射,每日1次,20次为1个疗程。第1个疗程结束后停药1周再进行第2个疗程,共使用2个疗程。分别观察治疗前和2个疗程结束后,两组粗大运动功能测试量表(GMFM-88)变化情况。结果①两个疗程结束后两组GMFM-88评分均较治疗前明显提高,差异有统计学意义(P36个月的患儿,通过治疗粗大运动得分上均有显著性提高,差异有统计学意义(P<0.01),提示治疗对不同年龄段患儿普遍显效;③两组临床疗效比较差异无统计学意义(P>0.05),提示二者均疗效显著。结论 NGF能安全治疗婴幼儿脑性瘫痪,并对于痉挛型脑瘫和非痉挛型脑瘫均能取得满意疗效。%ObjectiveTo compare NGF treatment outcome in Pediatric spastic and non spastic cerebral palsy.MethodsTotal 60 cases of pediatric cerebal palsy into two groups: spastic and non spastic. Spastic group has 35 cases of age equal or younger than 36 month old; 12 cases of age older than 36 month old. Non -spastic group has 15 cases of age equal or younger than 36 month old; 10 cases age older than 36 month.Both group reveived NGF treatment along with standard physiotherapy : primarily exercise, massage, acupuncture. NGF treatment regimen is 20 times. Total two cycles and one -week break between cycles. The observation of pre and post treatments' GMFM 88 scores.Result①After two treatment regimens, both GMFM

  9. Crossing axons in the third nerve nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienfang, D C

    1975-12-01

    The research presented in this paper studied the pathway taken by the crossed fibers of the third nerve nucleus in an animal whose nucleus has been well mapped and found to correlate well with higher mammals and man. Autoradiography using tritiated amino acid labeled the cell bodies an axons of the left side of the oculomotor nucleus of the cat. Axons so labeled could be seen emerging from the ventral portion of the left nucleus through the median longitudinal fasciculus (mlf) to join the left oculomotor nerve. Labeled axons were also seen to emerge from the medial border of the caudal left nucleus, cross the midline, and pass through the right nucleus and the right mlf to join the right oculomotor nerve. These latter axons must be the crossed axons of the superior rectus and levator palpebrae subnuclei. Since the path of these crossed axons is through the caudal portion of the nucleus of the opposite side, the destruction of one lateral half of the oculomotor nucleus would result in a bilateral palsy of the crossed subnuclei. Bilateral palsy of the superior rectus and bilateral assymetrical palsy of the levator palpebrae muscles would result.

  10. Treatment of os odontoideum in a patient with spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpolat, Yusuf T; Fegale, Ben; Cheng, Wayne K

    2015-08-01

    Severe atlantoaxial instability due to os odontoideum in a patient with spastic cerebral palsy has not been well described. There is no consensus on treatment, particularly with regard to conservative or surgical options. Our patient was a 9-year-old girl with spastic cerebral palsy and unstable os odontoideum as an incidental finding. During the waiting period for elective surgical treatment, the patient developed respiratory compromise. Surgery was performed to reduce the subluxation and for C1-C2 arthrodesis and the girl regained baseline respiratory function. A CT scan was obtained 1 year after the initial surgery and revealed adequate maintenance of reduction and patency of the spinal canal. This patient highlights the fact that unstable os odontoideum can cause mortality due to respiratory distress in patients with spastic cerebral palsy. This is an important factor in deciding treatment options for cerebral palsy patients with low functional demand. We review the relevant literature. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Facial Nerve Paralysis: A Rare Complication of Parotid Abscess

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Benign parotid neoplasm and inflammatory processes of the parotid resulting in facial paralysis are extremely rare. We report a 72-year-old Malay female with poorly-controlled diabetes mellitus who presented with a painful right parotid swelling associated with right facial nerve palsy. The paralysis (Grade VI, House and Brackmann classification) remained after six months.

  12. Pseudobulbar palsy associated with trismus.

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, M M; Howard, R S

    1994-01-01

    A 60 year old patient presented with an acute pseudobulbar palsy associated with trismus. A computed tomography scan revealed low attenuation areas consistent with infarction affecting the genu of the internal capsules bilaterally. Trismus has not previously been described as the presenting feature of a pseudobulbar palsy.

  13. Pseudobulbar palsy associated with trismus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, M. M.; Howard, R. S.

    1994-01-01

    A 60 year old patient presented with an acute pseudobulbar palsy associated with trismus. A computed tomography scan revealed low attenuation areas consistent with infarction affecting the genu of the internal capsules bilaterally. Trismus has not previously been described as the presenting feature of a pseudobulbar palsy. Images Figure 1 PMID:7824418

  14. [Detection of oculomotor nerve compression by 3D-FIESTA MRI in a patient with pituitary apoplexy and diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Takahiro; Kitai, Ryuhei; Neishi, Hiroyuki; Tsunetoshi, Kenzo; Matsuda, Ken; Arishima, Hidetaka; Kodera, Toshiaki; Arai, Yoshikazu; Takeuchi, Hiroaki; Kikuta, Ken-ichiro

    2014-02-01

    We report the usefulness of 3D-FIESTA magnetic resonance imaging(MRI)for the detection of oculomotor nerve palsy in a case of pituitary apoplexy. A 69-year-old man with diabetes mellitus presented with complete left-side blepharoptosis. Computed tomography of the brain showed an intrasellar mass with hemorrhage. MRI demonstrated a pituitary adenoma with a cyst toward the left cavernous sinus, which was diagnosed as pituitary apoplexy. 3D-FIESTA revealed that the left oculomotor nerve was compressed by the cyst. He underwent trans-sphenoid tumor resection at 5 days after his hospitalization. Post-operative 3D-FIESTA MRI revealed decrease in compression of the left oculomotor nerve by the cyst. His left oculomotor palsy recovered completely within a few months. Oculomotor nerve palsy can occur due to various diseases, and 3D-FIESTA MRI is useful for detection of oculomotor nerve compression, especially in the field of parasellar lesions.

  15. Missed ulnar nerve injury and closed forearm fracture in a child

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Batra Amit; Devgan Ashish; Verma Vinit; Singh Raj; Batra Shivani; Magu Narender; Singla Rohit

    2013-01-01

    Ulnar nerve injury in closed fracture of forearm in children is uncommon.Commonly,neurapraxia is the reason for this palsy but other severe injuries or nerve entrapment has been reported in some cases.The importance of diagnosis concerning the types of the nerve injury lies in the fact that they have totally different management.We present a case of ulnar nerve deficit in a child following a closed fracture of the forearm bones.It is imperative to diagnose exact cause of palsy as it forms the basis for treatment.MRI scan can help diagnosis and accordingly guide the management.Simple nerve contusion should be treated conservatively,and exploration with fixation of the fracture should be done in lacerations and entrapments of the nerve.Surgery is not the treatment of choice in cases that could be managed conservatively.

  16. The therapy with the large dosage of methylprednisolone for the Bell palsy%大剂量甲基强的松龙冲击治疗面神经炎

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏新敏; 陆正齐; 蓝瑞琼

    2002-01-01

    @@ Background: The main pathological impairments include edema of facial nerve and different level degeneration of myelin sheath or axis cylinder in Bell's palsy. The prognosis of the disease results from severe degree of the disease and whether treatments are timely or not. The therapy with large dosages of Methylprednisolone (MPS) in vein for Bell's palsy, can relieve local edema,improve nerve conduction,avoid progressive impairments of myeline sheath and axis cylinder and promote repairs of myeline sheath.

  17. Facial nerve paralysis after cervical traction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Edmund Cheung

    2010-10-01

    Cervical traction is a frequently used treatment in rehabilitation clinics for cervical spine problems. This modality works, in principle, by decompressing the spinal cord or its nerve roots by applying traction on the cervical spine through a harness placed over the mandible (Olivero et al., Neurosurg Focus 2002;12:ECP1). Previous reports on treatment complications include lumbar radicular discomfort, muscle injury, neck soreness, and posttraction pain (LaBan et al., Arch Phys Med Rehabil 1992;73:295-6; Lee et al., J Biomech Eng 1996;118:597-600). Here, we report the first case of unilateral facial nerve paralysis developed after 4 wks of intermittent cervical traction therapy. Nerve conduction velocity examination revealed a peripheral-type facial nerve paralysis. Symptoms of facial nerve paralysis subsided after prednisolone treatment and suspension of traction therapy. It is suspected that a misplaced or an overstrained harness may have been the cause of facial nerve paralysis in this patient. Possible causes were (1) direct compression by the harness on the right facial nerve near its exit through the stylomastoid foramen; (2) compression of the right external carotid artery by the harness, causing transient ischemic injury at the geniculate ganglion; or (3) coincidental herpes zoster virus infection or idiopathic Bell's palsy involving the facial nerve.

  18. CEREBRAL PALSY : ANTENATAL RISK FACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasa Rao

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Cerebral palsy (CP is a group of permanent movement disorders that appear in early childhood. Cerebral palsy is caused by abnormal development or damage to the parts of the brain that control movement, balance, and posture. Most often the problems occur during pregnancy; however, they may also occur during childbirth, or shortly after birth. Often the cause is unknown. AIM: To study the different antenatal maternal risk factors associated with cerebral palsy in the study group. MATERIA LS AND METHODS: Retrospective study was done to assess possible associated antenatal risk factors for cerebral palsy. Mothers of 100 cerebral palsy children were selected who are treated in Rani Chandramani Devi Hospital, a Government hospital in Visakhapa tn am, Andhra Pradesh State, India , from 2012 to 2014 and 100 controls, mothers of normal children were studied. Detailed antenatal history was obtained from the mothers of the children in both affected and control group. RESULTS: From the data, we conclude that the association of maternal anaemia with cerebral palsy is 7.3 times higher; association of maternal hypertension with cerebral palsy is 6.6 time higher, association with Pre - eclampsia is 6 times higher; association with Eclampsia is 8.6 times higher ; with antepartum haemorrhage, the association is 8.6 times higher and association of multiple pregnancy with cerebral palsy is 4.8 times higher than with controls. CONCLUSION: From this study of the role of antenatal risk factors, in the occurrence of cer ebral palsy in children it is concluded that the most common risk factor associated with cerebral palsy is the maternal anaemia and the other important risk factors associated being hypertension, pre eclampsia, eclampsia, antepartum haemorrhage and multipl e births.

  19. Acute facial palsy in children--a 2-year follow-up study with focus on Lyme neuroborreliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skogman, B Hedin; Croner, S; Odkvist, L

    2003-06-01

    Acute facial palsy in children is believed to be a rather benign neurological condition. Follow-up-studies are sparse, especially including a thorough otoneurological re-examination. The aim of this study was to examine children with a history of facial palsy in order to register the incidence of complete recovery and the severity and nature of sequelae. We also wanted to investigate whether there was a correlation between sequelae and Lyme Borreliosis, treatment or other health problems. Twenty-seven children with a history of facial palsy were included. A re-examination was performed by an Ear-Nose-Throat (ENT) specialist 1-2.9 years (median 2) after the acute facial palsy. The otoneurological examination included grading the three branches of the facial nerve with the House-Brackman score, otomicroscopy and investigation with Frenzel glasses. A paediatrician interviewed the families. Medical files were analysed. The incidence of complete recovery was 78% at the 2-year follow-up. In six out of 27 children (22%), the facial nerve function was mildly or moderately impaired. Four children reported problems with tear secretion and pronunciation. There was no correlation between sequelae after the facial palsy and gender, age, related symptoms, Lyme neuroborreliosis (NB), treatment, other health problems or performance. One fifth of children with an acute facial palsy get a permanent dysfunction of the facial nerve. Other neurological symptoms or health problems do not accompany the sequelae of the facial palsy. Lyme NB or treatment seems to have no correlation to clinical outcome. Factors of importance for complete recovery after an acute facial palsy are still not known.

  20. Reconstruction and measurement of optic nerve sheath imaging in normal population with multi-slice spiral CT%正常人眶内段视神经的CT重建和参数测量

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    游勇; 成洪波; 樊宁; 王宁利; 杨洁; 刘璐; 刘旭阳

    2015-01-01

    Background Optical nerve damage of glaucomatous eyes is associated with intracranial pressure.Conventional method of evaluating intracranial pressure is to measure cerebrospinal pressure by lumber puncture.However,the measurement of intraorbital optical nerve parameters,a novel method of evaluating intracranial pressure,is introduced in this field.Objective This study was to measure and analyze the intraorbital optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) and cross sectional area (ONSA) in normal population using multi-slice spiral CT.Methods This study protocol was approved by Clinical Ethic Committee of Shenzhen Chinese Traditional Medical Hospital and followed Hersinki Declaration.Informed consent was obtained from each individual prior to any medical examination.One hundred and five eyes of 105 normal persons with normal cerebral CT image were enrolled in Shenzhen Chinese Traditional Medical Hospital from January 2012 to September 2013.Cerebral volume was scanned in all the individuals by 64 slice spiral CT.The brain images were obtained for the curve planar rebuilding of intraorbital optical nerve on image post-processing workstation.The maximum and minimum of ONSD and the ONSA in axial sections at 3,6,9,12 and 15 mm far away from globe wall were measured using a standardized technique to analyze the change of optical nerve parameters at different point locations.These parameters were compared in different gender or eyes.The correlation among age and the optical nerve parameters at 3 mm far away from globe wall was evaluated by multivariate regression analysis.Results The average maximal ONSDs were (6.24±0.47), (5.56±0.44),(5.18±0.43),(4.82±0.41) and (4.69±0.41) mm;the average minimal ONSDs were (5.56±0.50),(4.97± 0.41) ,(4.55±0.35),(4.26±0.39) and (4.10±0.40) mm;the average ONSAs were (27.68±4.40),(22.02±3.35) , (18.74± 2.75) , (16.34±2.72) , (15.40±2.68) mm2 at 3,6,9,12 and 15 mm far away from posterior eyeball wall,respectively, showing significant

  1. Treatment of Combined Injuries of the Axillary and Suprascapular Nerves with Scapulothoracic Dissociation

    OpenAIRE

    Sano, Kazufumi; Ozeki, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    A 20-year-old man suffered the combined axillary and suprascapular nerve palsies associated with scapulothoracic dissociation by motorcycle accident. The dislocated shoulder girdle was reduced and stabilized with osteosynthesis of the fractured clavicle and reattachment of the trapezius avulsed from the scapular spine for removal of continuous traction force to these damaged nerves. Because of no evidence of recovery on manual muscle test and electromyogram, exploration for these nerves was a...

  2. Middle ear osteoma causing progressive facial nerve weakness: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Curtis, Kate; Bance, Manohar; Carter, Michael; Hong, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Facial nerve weakness is most commonly due to Bell’s palsy or cerebrovascular accidents. Rarely, middle ear tumor presents with facial nerve dysfunction. Case presentation We report a very unusual case of middle ear osteoma in a 49-year-old Caucasian woman causing progressive facial nerve deficit. A subtle middle ear lesion was observed on otoscopy and computed tomographic images demonstrated an osseous middle ear tumor. Complete surgical excision resulted in the partial recovery...

  3. [Isolated traumatic injuries of the axillary nerve. Radial nerve transfer in four cases and literatura review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Páez, Miguel; Socolovsky, Mariano; Di Masi, Gilda; Arráez-Sánchez, Miguel Ángel

    2012-11-01

    To analyze the results of an initial series of four cases of traumatic injuries of the axillary nerve, treated by a nerve transfer from the triceps long branch of the radial nerve. An extensive analysis of the literature has also been made. Four patients aged between 21 and 42 years old presenting an isolated traumatic palsy of the axillary nerve were operated between January 2007 and June 2010. All cases were treated by nerve transfer six to eight months after the trauma. The results of these cases are analyzed, the same as the axillary nerve injuries series presented in the literature from 1982. One year after the surgery, all patients improved their abduction a mean of 70° (range 30 to 120°), showing a M4 in the British Medical Council Scale. No patient complained of triceps weakness after the procedure. These results are similar to those published employing primary grafting for the axillary nerve. Isolated injuries of the axillary nerve should be treated with surgery when spontaneous recovery is not verified 6 months after the trauma. Primary repair with grafts is the most popular surgical technique, with a rate of success of approximately 90%. The preliminary results of a nerve transfer employing the long triceps branch are similar, and a definite comparison of both techniques with a bigger number of cases should be done in the future. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of Acupoint Injection of Mouse Nerve Growth Factor to Improvement of the mMuscular Tension of the Quadriceps Femoris Muscle of Child with Spastic Cerebral Palsy%鼠神经生长因子穴位注射对痉挛型脑瘫患儿股四头肌肌力的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐成娥; 武光丽; 邓欣云

    2015-01-01

    目的:观察鼠神经生长因子穴位注射对痉挛型脑瘫患儿股四头肌肌力的影响.方法:将64例患者随机分为治疗组32例与对照组32例.分别在治疗前、治疗后1M、2M、3M进行肌电测试.治疗组鼠神经生长因子穴位注射配合康复训练.对照组生理盐水穴位注射配合康复训练.肌电信号采集应用加拿大ThoughtTechnology公司生产的表面肌电仪及Ag/Agcl表面电极.结果:治疗1M初次经行肌电测试时,2组患者股四头肌肌电无统计学意义(P>0.05).治疗2M测试时,治疗组的股四头肌肌电较对照组出现差异(P<0.05).治疗3M股四头肌肌电较对照组均出现显著差异,且2组差异增大.结论:鼠神经生长因子穴位注射对痉挛型脑瘫患儿股四头肌肌力的提高生理盐水穴位注射配合康复训练效果显著.%Objective: To observe the effect of acupoint injection of MouseNerveGrowthFactor (MNGF) to improvement of the muscular tension of the quadriceps femoris muscle of children with spastic cerebral palsy.Methods:64 cases of infantile cerebral palsy children were divided into treating group(32 cases) and control group(32 cases).The treatment group was given acupoint injection with MNGF accompanied by normal rehabilitation training.The control group was given acupoints infection with saline accompanied by normal rehabilitation training.The electromyogram (EMG) was tested pre- and post treatment (one month,two months and three months after treatment respectively);To test surface EMG (sEMG),surface EMG instrument and Ag/Agcl surface electrode produced by Thought Technology Company were used.Results:No significant difference was found between the two groups when the sEMG was compared between pre- and post treatment for one month.Significant difference was found between the two groups after two months treatment(P<0.05).Significant difference was found between the two groups after three months treatment After Three months treatment

  5. Surgical outcomes of lateral approach for jugular foramen schwannoma: postoperative facial nerve and lower cranial nerve functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yang-Sun; So, Yoon Kyoung; Park, Kwan; Baek, Chung-Hwan; Jeong, Han-Sin; Hong, Sung Hwa; Chung, Won-Ho

    2009-01-01

    The lateral surgical approach to jugular foramen schwannomas (JFS) may result in complications such as temporary facial nerve palsy (FNP) and hearing loss due to the complicated anatomical location. Ten patients with JFS surgically treated by variable methods of lateral approach were retrospectively reviewed with emphasis on surgical methods, postoperative FNP, and lower cranial nerve status. Gross total removal of the tumors was achieved in eight patients. Facial nerves were rerouted at the first genu (1G) in six patients and at the second genu in four patients. FNP of House-Brackmann (HB) grade III or worse developed immediately postoperatively in six patients regardless of the extent of rerouting. The FNP of HB grade III persisted for more than a year in one patient managed with rerouting at 1G. Among the lower cranial nerves, the vagus nerve was most frequently paralyzed preoperatively and lower cranial nerve palsies were newly developed in two patients. The methods of the surgical approach to JFS can be modified depending on the size and location of tumors to reduce injury of the facial nerve and loss of hearing. Careful manipulation and caution are also required for short facial nerve rerouting as well as for long rerouting to avoid immediately postoperative FNP.

  6. Utility of electrodiagnostic testing and computed tomography myelography in the preoperative evaluation of neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderhave, Kelly L; Bovid, Karen; Alpert, Hilary; Chang, Kate Wan-Chu; Quint, Douglas J; Leonard, James A; Yang, Lynda J S

    2012-03-01

    The rate of neonatal brachial plexus palsy (NBPP) remains 0.4%-4% despite improvements in perinatal care. Among affected children, the extent of brachial plexus palsy differs greatly, as does the prognosis. Controversial elements in management include indications and timing of nerve repair as well as type of reconstruction in patients in whom function will ultimately not be recovered without surgical intervention. Differentiating preganglionic (avulsion) from postganglionic (rupture) lesions is critical because preganglionic lesions cannot spontaneously recover motor function. Distinguishing between these lesions at initial presentation based on clinical examination alone can be difficult in infants. The purpose of the present study was to determine the sensitivity of preoperative electrodiagnostic studies (EDSs) and CT myelography (CTM) in determining the presence of nerve root rupture and avulsions in infants with NBPP. After receiving institutional review board approval, the authors conducted a retrospective review of patients referred to the Neonatal Brachial Plexus Program between 2007 and 2010. Inclusion criteria included children who underwent brachial plexus exploration following preoperative EDSs and CTM. The CTM scans were interpreted by a staff neuroradiologist, EDSs were conducted by a single physiatrist, and intraoperative findings were recorded by the operating neurosurgeon. The findings from the preoperative EDSs and CTM were then compared with intraoperative findings. The sensitivities and 95% confidence intervals were determined to evaluate performance accuracy of each preoperative measure. Twenty-one patients (8 male amd 13 female) met inclusion criteria for this study. The sensitivity of EDSs and CTM for detecting a postganglionic rupture was 92.8% (CI 0.841-0.969) and 58.3% (CI 0.420-0.729), respectively. The sensitivity for EDSs and CTM for preganglionic nerve root avulsion was 27.8% (CI 0.125-0.509) and 72.2% (CI 0.491-0.875), respectively. In

  7. CEREBRAL PALSY AND MUSIC ACHIEVEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miodrag L. STOSHLJEVIKJ

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Pupils with cerebral palsy attend elementary education accordind to a regular and special teaching plan and program. Regular school curriculum was reformed in 1992, while special plan and program has not been changed and adapted according to pupil’s needs and capacities. Music is one of the best means of expressing oneself and plays a very important role in the development of every child, the child with cerebral palsy in particular.In order to test the possibility of pupils with cerebral palsy, with and without mental retardation, to apprehend the actual program content, we have conducted research on musical achievement of children with cerebral palsy. During 2007 a research was carried out, on the sample of 27 pupils with cerebral palsy and mild mental retardation who attended classes in the school “Miodrag Matikj”, and a sample of16 students with cerebral palsy without mental retardation who attended the school “Dr. Dragan Hercog” in Belgrade.Results of the research, as well as analysis of music curriculum content, indicated that the capacities of students with cerebral palsy to carry out the curriculum tasks require special approach and methodology. Therefore, we introduced some proposals to overcome the difficulties in fulfilling music curriculum demands of those pupils. We made special emphasis on the use of computer based Assistive technology which facilitates the whole process to a large extent.

  8. Parents' attitudes toward the use of complementary therapy by their children with moderate or severe cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wray, Jo; Edwards, Vanessa; Wyatt, Katrina; Maddick, Andrew; Logan, Stuart; Franck, Linda

    2014-02-01

    To describe the use of, and attitudes toward, complementary therapy (CT) by parents of children with moderate to severe cerebral palsy. Parents of 32 children with cerebral palsy (age 5-12 years) enrolled in a randomized trial of cranial osteopathy prospectively participated in semi-structured interviews in the home to explore the use of CT and views regarding access to and expectations of these therapies. Interview transcripts were analyzed thematically, and content analysis was used to determine the frequency of use of different therapies. Sixteen children (50%) had received one or more types of CT, although only three were currently receiving any CT. The primary reasons for trying CT were to reduce children's pain and improve physical function. Parents had limited knowledge of the range of, and possible indications for, CT and expressed concerns about CT safety and effectiveness. Practical considerations of time and cost were also identified. Some parents had strong beliefs about the benefits, and, overall, parents indicated a high level of commitment to finding any treatments, conventional or CT, to help their children. Parents of children with cerebral palsy want to help their child, but they need information, guidance, and practical support to facilitate their decision-making regarding the use of CT. A clearer understanding of factors predictive of optimal outcomes will enable resources to be targeted effectively.

  9. Facial Nerve Schwannoma of Parotid Gland: Difficulties in Diagnosis and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Damar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Facial nerve schwannomas (FNS are encapsulated benign tumors arising from Schwann cells of seventh cranial nerve. Most of the facial nerve schwannomas are localized in intratemporal region; only 9% of cases involve a portion of the extratemporal segment. Preoperative diagnosis is often unclear; diagnosis is often made intraoperatively. Management of intraparotid FNS is troublesome because of the facial nerve paralysis. In this report we presented a case of intraparotid schwannoma in a 55-year-old male patient complaining of a painless mass without peripheral facial nerve palsy in left parotid gland. Clinical features, preoperative and intraoperative diagnosis, and difficulties during management are discussed with the review of the literature.

  10. Bell's palsy and choreiform movements during peginterferon α and ribavirin therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sener Barut; Hatice Karaer; Erol Oksuz; Asl Gündodu Eken; Ayse Nazl Basak

    2009-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric side effects of long-term recombinant interferon-α therapy consist of a large spectrum of symptoms. In the literature, cranial neuropathy, especially Bell's palsy, and movement disorders, have been reported much less often than other neurotoxic effects. We report a case of Bell's palsy in a patient with chronic hepatitis C during peginterferon-α and ribavirin therapy. The patient subsequently developed clinically inapparent facial nerve involvement on the contralateral side and showed an increase in choreic movements related to Huntington's disease during treatment.

  11. Imaging of the facial nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veillon, F. [Service de Radiologie I, Hopital de Hautepierre, 67098 Strasbourg Cedex (France)], E-mail: Francis.Veillon@chru-strasbourg.fr; Ramos-Taboada, L.; Abu-Eid, M. [Service de Radiologie I, Hopital de Hautepierre, 67098 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Charpiot, A. [Service d' ORL, Hopital de Hautepierre, 67098 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Riehm, S. [Service de Radiologie I, Hopital de Hautepierre, 67098 Strasbourg Cedex (France)

    2010-05-15

    The facial nerve is responsible for the motor innervation of the face. It has a visceral motor function (lacrimal, submandibular, sublingual glands and secretion of the nose); it conveys a great part of the taste fibers, participates to the general sensory of the auricle (skin of the concha) and the wall of the external auditory meatus. The facial mimic, production of tears, nasal flow and salivation all depend on the facial nerve. In order to image the facial nerve it is mandatory to be knowledgeable about its normal anatomy including the course of its efferent and afferent fibers and about relevant technical considerations regarding CT and MR to be able to achieve high-resolution images of the nerve.

  12. Thoracic CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lungs; CT scan - chest Images CT scan Thyroid cancer - CT scan Pulmonary nodule, solitary - CT scan Lung mass, right upper ... Chest Injuries and Disorders CT Scans Emphysema Lung Cancer Lung Diseases Pleural Disorders Pneumonia Pulmonary Embolism Tuberculosis Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A. ...

  13. Peroneal nerve palsy due to compartment syndrome after facial plastic surgery Paralisia de nervo fibular devido a síndrome compartimental após cirurgia plástica da face

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clécio O. Godeiro-Júnior

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available A 25-year-old white man, right after bilateral rhytidoplasty, presented with agitation, necessiting use of haloperidol. Some hours after, he developed severe pain in his legs and a diagnosis of neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS was considered. Even with treatment for NMS he still complained of pain. A diagnosis of lower limb compartment syndrome (CS was done only 12 hours after the initial event, being submitted to fasciotomy in both legs, disclosing very pale muscles, due to previous ischemia. This syndrome was not explained only by facial surgery, his position and duration of the procedure. It can be explained by a sequence of events. He had a history of pain in his legs during physical exercises, usually seen in chronic compartment syndrome. He used to take anabolizant and venlafaxine, not previously related, and the agitation could be related to serotoninergic syndrome caused by interaction between venlafaxine and haloperidol. Rhabdomyolisis could lead to oedema and ischmemia in both anterior leg compartment. This report highlights the importance of early diagnosis of compartment syndrome, otherwise, even after fasciotomy, a permanent disability secondary to peripheral nerve compression could occur.Logo após ritidoplastia bilateral, um jovem de 25 anos apresentou agitação, necessitando uso de haloperidol. Algumas horas após, desenvolveu dor intensa em membros inferiores, e o diagnóstico de síndrome neuroléptica maligna foi considerado. Mesmo com o tratamento para tal, persistiu com dor. Após 12 horas do início do quadro, foi realizado o diagnóstico de síndrome compartimental de membros inferiores e o jovem foi submetido a fasciotomia bilateral. Uma seqüência de eventos desencadeou esta síndrome, já que sua ocorrência dificilmente seria justificada pela cirurgia facial e/ou posição do paciente durante o procedimento. O jovem apresentava previamente dor em membros inferiores aos exercícios, sugerindo a ocorrência de uma s

  14. 3D-FT MRI of the facial nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girard, N. (Neuroradiology, Hopital Nord, 13 Marseille (France)); Raybaud, C. (Neuroradiology, Hopital Nord, 13 Marseille (France)); Poncet, M. (Neuroradiology, Hopital Nord, 13 Marseille (France))

    1994-08-01

    Contrast-enhanced 3D-FT MRI of the intrapetrous facial nerve was obtained in 38 patients with facial nerve disease, using a 1.0 T magnet and fast gradient-echo acquisition sequences. Contiguous millimetric sections were obtained, which could be reformatted in any desired plane. Acutely ill patients, were examined within the first 2 months, included: 24 with Bell's palsy and 6 with other acute disorders (Herpes zoster, trauma, neuroma, meningeal metastasis, middle ear granuloma). Six patients investigated more than a year after the onset of symptoms included 3 with congenital cholesteatoma, 2 with neuromas and one with a chronic Bell's palsy. The lesion was found incidentally in two cases (a suspected neurofibroma and a presumed drop metastasis from an astrocytoma). Patients with tumours had nodular, focally-enhancing lesions, except for the leptomeningeal metastasis in which the enhancement was linear. Linear, diffuse contrast enhancement of the facial nerve was found in trauma, and in the patient with a middle ear granuloma. Of the 24 patients with an acute Bell's palsy 15 exhibited linear contrast enhancement of the facial nerve. Three of these were lost to follow-up, but correlation of clinical outcome and contrast enhancement showed that only 4 of the 11 patients who made a complete recovery and all 10 patients with incomplete recovery demonstrated enhancement. Possible explanations for these findings are suggested by pathological data from the literature. 3D-FT imaging of the facial nerve thus yields direct information about the of the nerve condition and defines the morphological abnormalities. It can also demonstrate contrast enhancement which seems to have some prognostic value in acute idiopathic Bell's palsy. (orig.)

  15. A conduction block in sciatic nerves can be detected by magnetic motor root stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Hideyuki; Konoma, Yuko; Fujii, Kengo; Hanajima, Ritsuko; Terao, Yasuo; Ugawa, Yoshikazu

    2013-08-15

    Useful diagnostic techniques for the acute phase of sciatic nerve palsy, an entrapment neuropathy, are not well established. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the diagnostic utility of magnetic sacral motor root stimulation for sciatic nerve palsy. We analyzed the peripheral nerves innervating the abductor hallucis muscle using both electrical stimulations at the ankle and knee and magnetic stimulations at the neuro-foramina and conus medullaris levels in a patient with sciatic nerve palsy at the level of the piriformis muscle due to gluteal compression related to alcohol consumption. On the fourth day after onset, magnetic sacral motor root stimulation using a MATS coil (the MATS coil stimulation method) clearly revealed a conduction block between the knee and the sacral neuro-foramina. Two weeks after onset, needle electromyography supported the existence of the focal lesion. The MATS coil stimulation method clearly revealed a conduction block in the sciatic nerve and is therefore a useful diagnostic tool for the abnormal neurophysiological findings associated with sciatic nerve palsy even at the acute phase.

  16. A clinical study of autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells for cerebral palsy patients: a new frontier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Alok; Sane, Hemangi; Gokulchandran, Nandini; Kulkarni, Pooja; Gandhi, Sushant; Sundaram, Jyothi; Paranjape, Amruta; Shetty, Akshata; Bhagwanani, Khushboo; Biju, Hema; Badhe, Prerna

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is a nonprogressive heterogeneous group of neurological disorders with a growing rate of prevalence. Recently, cellular therapy is emerging as a potential novel treatment strategy for cerebral palsy. The various mechanisms by which cellular therapy works include neuroprotection, immunomodulation, neurorestoration, and neurogenesis. We conducted an open label, nonrandomized study on 40 cases of cerebral palsy with an aim of evaluating the benefit of cellular therapy in combination with rehabilitation. These cases were administered autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells intrathecally. The follow-up was carried out at 1 week, 3 months, and 6 months after the intervention. Adverse events of the treatment were also monitored in this duration. Overall, at six months, 95% of patients showed improvements. The study population was further divided into diplegic, quadriplegic, and miscellaneous group of cerebral palsy. On statistical analysis, a significant association was established between the symptomatic improvements and cell therapy in diplegic and quadriplegic cerebral palsy. PET-CT scan done in 6 patients showed metabolic improvements in areas of the brain correlating to clinical improvements. The results of this study demonstrate that cellular therapy may accelerate the development, reduce disability, and improve the quality of life of patients with cerebral palsy.

  17. A Clinical Study of Autologous Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells for Cerebral Palsy Patients: A New Frontier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral palsy is a nonprogressive heterogeneous group of neurological disorders with a growing rate of prevalence. Recently, cellular therapy is emerging as a potential novel treatment strategy for cerebral palsy. The various mechanisms by which cellular therapy works include neuroprotection, immunomodulation, neurorestoration, and neurogenesis. We conducted an open label, nonrandomized study on 40 cases of cerebral palsy with an aim of evaluating the benefit of cellular therapy in combination with rehabilitation. These cases were administered autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells intrathecally. The follow-up was carried out at 1 week, 3 months, and 6 months after the intervention. Adverse events of the treatment were also monitored in this duration. Overall, at six months, 95% of patients showed improvements. The study population was further divided into diplegic, quadriplegic, and miscellaneous group of cerebral palsy. On statistical analysis, a significant association was established between the symptomatic improvements and cell therapy in diplegic and quadriplegic cerebral palsy. PET-CT scan done in 6 patients showed metabolic improvements in areas of the brain correlating to clinical improvements. The results of this study demonstrate that cellular therapy may accelerate the development, reduce disability, and improve the quality of life of patients with cerebral palsy.

  18. Neurocysticercosis presenting as pseudobulbar palsy

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    Arinaganahalli Subbanna Praveen Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurocysticercosis (NCC is the most common helminthic infestation of the central nervous system (CNS and a leading cause of acquired epilepsy worldwide. The common manifestations of NCC are seizures and headache. The NCC as a cause of pseudobulbar palsy is very unusual and not reported yet in the literature. A pseudobulbar palsy can occur in any disorder that causes bilateral corticobulbar disease. The common etiologies of pseudobulbar palsy are vascular, demyelinative, or motor neuron disease. We report a 38-year-old female patient who presented with partial seizures and pseudobulbar palsy. The MRI brain showed multiple small cysts with scolex in both the cerebral hemispheres and a giant intraparenchymal cyst. Our patient responded well to standard treatment of neurocysticercosis and antiepileptics.

  19. NEYROPSYCHOLOGICAL CONSECUENCES OF CEREBRAL PALSY

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    ANA MARÍA NAVARRO MELENDRO

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral Palsy is defined as a movement alteration result of a non progressive damage witch is permanent in anencephalon that has not acquired its final maturation. Patients that suffer cerebral palsy present learning disabilities,that varies between being completely normal to severe as a consequence of memory, gnosis, praxis, perceptive andlanguage impairments. Nevertheless the consequences of this disease are not always predictable. This paper pretendsto make a description of the cognitive and behavioral deficits that overcomes along with the manifestation of thecerebral palsy and its possible treatment. We used a complete neuropsychological battery to evaluate a 7 years oldpatient who was diagnosed of cerebral palsy and spastic diplegia finding some cognitive impairment in fields such asmnesic, gnosic and attention processes.

  20. Learn More About Cerebral Palsy

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-03-30

    This podcast describes the causes, preventions, types, and signs and symptoms of cerebral palsy.  Created: 3/30/2008 by National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities.   Date Released: 3/21/2008.

  1. Prevalence of nerve-vessel contact at cisternal segments of the oculomotor nerve in asymptomatic patients evaluated with magnetic resonance images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jin; GONG Xiang-yang; SUN Yi; HU Xing-yue

    2010-01-01

    Background Some studies indicated that cases of idiopathic oculomotor nerve palsy can be explained by vascular compression of the oculomotor nerve. Vascular contact with or compression to the cisternal segment of the oculomotor nerve has been reported frequently in asymptomatic individuals. In this study, we retrospectively analyzed the relationship between the oculomotor nerve's cisternal segment and adjacent arteries in asymptomatic patients and the prevalence of this occurrence via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).Method MRI of bilateral oculomotor nerves in 93 asymptomatic patients were reviewed. The oculomotor nerve-artery relationship was evaluated and classified from levels 1 to 3, representing the degrees of contact on oblique transverse and oblique sagittal reconstructed MRI. Prevalence of the nerve-artery relationship at each level was described. The correlation between the nerve-vessel relationship (levels) and the age was analyzed by Spearman's rank correlation analysis.Results Cisternal segment of the oculomotor nerve did not have contact with any artery (level 1) in 27.4% (51/186) nerves. One hundred nerves made contact with at least one artery (level 2), but their shapes or configurations were not changed; 35 nerves (18.8%) were displaced or distorted due to artery compression (level 3). The posterior cerebral artery had the greatest incidence of making contact with or compressing the cisternal segment of the oculomotor nerve (58.1%). No significant correlation between nerve-vessel relationship (levels) and the age was found in this study. Conclusions Whether oculomotor nerve contact with or compression by one or more arteries is of high prevalence in asymptomatic individuals as evidenced by MRI examination. There is no correlation with individual age. Discretion should be used when making an etiological diagnosis of vascular compression for patients with oculomotor nerve palsy. Further investigation of other causes is warranted.

  2. Acupuncture-induced changes in functional connectivity of the primary somatosensory cortex varied with pathological stages of Bell's palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaoxuan; Zhu, Yifang; Li, Chuanfu; Park, Kyungmo; Mohamed, Abdalla Z; Wu, Hongli; Xu, Chunsheng; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Linying; Yang, Jun; Qiu, Bensheng

    2014-10-01

    Bell's palsy is the most common cause of acute facial nerve paralysis. In China, Bell's palsy is frequently treated with acupuncture. However, its efficacy and underlying mechanism are still controversial. In this study, we used functional MRI to investigate the effect of acupuncture on the functional connectivity of the brain in Bell's palsy patients and healthy individuals. The patients were further grouped according to disease duration and facial motor performance. The results of resting-state functional MRI connectivity show that acupuncture induces significant connectivity changes in the primary somatosensory region of both early and late recovery groups, but no significant changes in either the healthy control group or the recovered group. In the recovery group, the changes also varied with regions and disease duration. Therefore, we propose that the effect of acupuncture stimulation may depend on the functional connectivity status of patients with Bell's palsy.

  3. 3D-Ultrasonography for evaluation of facial muscles in patients with chronic facial palsy or defective healing: a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Volk, Gerd Fabian; Pohlmann, Martin; Finkensieper, Mira; Chalmers, Heather J.; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando

    2014-01-01

    Background While standardized methods are established to examine the pathway from motorcortex to the peripheral nerve in patients with facial palsy, a reliable method to evaluate the facial muscles in patients with long-term palsy for therapy planning is lacking. Methods A 3D ultrasonographic (US) acquisition system driven by a motorized linear mover combined with conventional US probe was used to acquire 3D data sets of several facial muscles on both sides of the face in a healthy subject an...

  4. Malignant otitis externa with bilateral cranial nerve involvement: Report of a unique case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somnath Saha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant otitis externa is an inflammatory condition caused by pseudomonas infection usually in the elderly diabetics, or an immunosuppressive condition that presents with diffuse otitis externa along with excruciating pain and granulations tissue in the external auditory meatus. Facial paralysis is common along with occasional involvement of other cranial nerves. Case report describing a patient of malignant otitis externa who presented to a tertiary referral hospital of eastern India. This patient had ipsilateral facial and tenth cranial nerve paralysis along with delayed-onset contralateral sixth and twelfth cranial nerve palsy. The patient was treated initially with intravenous anti-pseudomonal antibody followed by tympanic platectomy, facial nerve decompression and medialisation thyroplasty. The contralateral cranial nerve palsy was managed conservatively with partial recovery of function. Malignant otitis externa, though a common disease, may occasionally present with uncommon or unexplained presentations. The management of these cases should be prompt and aggressive and specifically address each of the debilitating complications.

  5. Results of hemihypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis in the treatment of facial nerve paralysis after failed stereotactic radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziedzic, Tomasz A; Kunert, Przemysław; Marchel, Andrzej

    2017-04-01

    Vestibular schwannoma treatment with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) carries a risk of facial nerve (CNVII) palsy that is lower than that with microneurosurgery. The results of hemihypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis (HHFA) have not been described yet in CNVII palsy after failed stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Here we report a case series of the first four consecutive patients (three women; average age 58.5, age range: 46-74), who underwent HHFA due to failed SRS. All patients were admitted because of progressive peripheral facial nerve palsy. Three patients received retrosigmoid craniotomy due to tumor enlargement that resulted in facial nerve paralysis. All patients achieved satisfactory (House-Brackmann grade III) CNVII regeneration. No or minimal tongue atrophy occurred on the side of the anastomosis. Patients reported no problems with phonation or swallowing, except for the patients with preexisting lower cranial nerve deficits. HHFA effectively treats facial palsy after failed SRS with minimal risk of tongue atrophy and minimal morbidity. The results of the treatment are comparable to those achieved with patients without previous SRS.

  6. MR imaging of cerebral palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saginoya, Toshiyuki [Urasoe General Hospital, Okinawa (Japan); Yamaguchi, Keiichiro; Kuniyoshi, Kazuhide [and others

    1996-06-01

    We evaluated 35 patients with cerebral palsy on the basis of MR imaging findings in the brain. The types of palsy were spastic quadriplegia (n=11), spastic diplegia (n=9), spastic hemiplegia (n=2), double hemiplegia (n=1), athetosis (n=10) and mixed (n=2). Of all patients, 28 (80%) generated abnormal findings. In spastic quadriplegia, although eight cases revealed severe brain damage, two cases showed no abnormal findings in the brain. One of the three had cervical cord compression caused by atlanto-axial subluxation. In spastic diplegia, the findings were divided according to whether the patient was born at term or preterm. If the patient had been born prematurely, the findings showed periventricular leukomalacia and abnormally high intensity in the posterior limbs of the internal capsule on T2-weighted images. MR imaging in spastic hemiplegia revealed cerebral infarction. In the athetoid type, half of all cases showed either no abnormal findings or slight widening of the lateral ventricle. Three cases showed abnormal signals of the basal ganglia. The reason why athetoid-type palsy did not show severe abnormality is unknown. We believe that MR imaging is a useful diagnostic modality to detect damage in the brain in cerebral palsy and plays an important role in the differentiation of cerebral palsy from the spastic palsy disease. (author)

  7. The masseteric nerve: a versatile power source in facial animation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, B; Ferri, A; Ferrari, S; Copelli, C; Salvagni, L; Sesenna, E

    2014-03-01

    The masseteric nerve has many advantages including low morbidity, its proximity to the facial nerve, the strong motor impulse, its reliability, and the fast reinnervation that is achievable in most patients. Reinnervation of a neuromuscular transplant is the main indication for its use, but it has been used for the treatment of recent facial palsies with satisfactory results. We have retrospectively evaluated 60 patients who had facial animation procedures using the masseteric nerve during the last 10 years. The patients included those with recent, and established or congenital, unilateral and bilateral palsies. The masseteric nerve was used for coaptation of the facial nerve either alone or in association with crossfacial nerve grafting, or for the reinnervation of gracilis neuromuscular transplants. Reinnervation was successful in all cases, the mean (range) time being 4 (2-5) months for facial nerve coaptation and 4 (3-7) months for neuromuscular transplants. Cosmesis was evaluated (moderate, n=10, good, n=30, and excellent, n=20) as was functional outcome (no case of impairment of masticatory function, all patients able to smile, and achievement of a smile independent from biting). The masseteric nerve has many uses, including in both recent, and established or congenital, cases. In some conditions it is the first line of treatment. The combination of combined techniques gives excellent results in unilateral palsies and should therefore be considered a valid option.

  8. Imaging of the optic nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Minerva [Head and Neck and Maxillofacial Radiology, Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland)], E-mail: minerva.becker@hcuge.ch; Masterson, Karen [Head and Neck and Maxillofacial Radiology, Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Delavelle, Jacqueline [Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Viallon, Magalie [Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Vargas, Maria-Isabel [Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Becker, Christoph D. [Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, CH - 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland)

    2010-05-15

    This article provides an overview of the imaging findings of diseases affecting the optic nerve with special emphasis on clinical-radiological correlation and on the latest technical developments in MR imaging and CT. The review deals with congenital malformations, tumors, toxic/nutritional and degenerative entities, inflammatory and infectious diseases, compressive neuropathy, vascular conditions and trauma involving the optic nerve from its ocular segment to the chiasm. The implications of imaging findings on patient management and outcome and the importance of performing high-resolution tailored examinations adapted to the clinical situation are discussed.

  9. Electrophysiological findings in a family with Hereditary Neuropathy and Liability to Pressure Palsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Khosrawi

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies is an autosomal dominant and demyelinative peripheral neuropathy which characterized by reversible episodes of sensorimotor deficits after neural compression injuries. Their clinical hallmarks are recurrent and painless focal neuropathies maintly preceded by minor trauma or compression at entrapment sites of peripheral nerves. We describe multiple compression mononeuropathies in an individual who presented with left sided ulnar palsy after drilling for a period of 8 hours and report neurophysiologic findings in two clinically asymptomatic family members. We believe that this entity may be clinically and neurophysiologically underdiagnosed by orthopaedic surgeons and electromyographers. Electrophysiological abnormalities can be detected even in asymptomatic patients and it should be considered in differential diagnosis of patients with atypical presentations of compression neuropathies. Key Words: Hereditary Neuropathy with liability to Pressure Palsies- Electrodiagnostic tests

  10. 11 Things to Know about Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... processing SSI file 11 Things to Know about Cerebral Palsy Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Cerebral palsy (CP) is the most common motor disability in ...

  11. Normal and pathological findings for the facial nerve on magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Noury, K., E-mail: Kalnoury@kau.edu.sa [Department of Otolaryngology, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Lotfy, A. [Radiology Department, King Abdulaziz University Hospital and International Medical Centre, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia)

    2011-08-15

    Aim: To demonstrate the enhanced radiological anatomy and common pathological conditions of the facial nerve by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and methods: A retrospective review of the MRI findings of the facial nerve of 146 patients who visited a tertiary academic referral center was conducted. Results: The radiological anatomy of the facial nerve was well illustrated using MRI, as were most of the common pathological conditions of the facial nerve. Conclusions: Enhancement of the facial nerve in MRI should be correlated with the clinical data. Normal individuals can show enhancement of the tympanic or vertical segments of the facial nerve. Enhancement of the labyrinthine portion of the nerve is almost diagnostic of Bell's palsy. No specific enhancement patterns were observed for tumours or for infections of the middle or external ear. A larger population study is required for the accurate assessment of facial nerve enhancement in multiple sclerosis patients.

  12. Neuroevolutional Approach to Cerebral Palsy and Speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mysak, Edward D.

    Intended for cerebral palsy specialists, the book emphasizes the contribution that a neuroevolutional approach to therapy can make to habilitation goals of the child with cerebral palsy and applies the basic principles of the Bobath approach to therapy. The first section discusses cerebral palsy as a reflection of disturbed neuro-ontogenisis and…

  13. Genetics Home Reference: progressive supranuclear palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... affected individuals also experience changes in personality and behavior, such as a general loss of interest and ... supranuclear palsy MalaCards: supranuclear palsy, progressive Merck Manual Consumer ... X, Wiederholt W, Hansen L, Masliah E, Thal LJ, Katzman R, Xia Y, Saitoh T. Genetic evidence for the involvement of tau in progressive supranuclear palsy. Ann Neurol. ...

  14. Neuroevolutional Approach to Cerebral Palsy and Speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mysak, Edward D.

    Intended for cerebral palsy specialists, the book emphasizes the contribution that a neuroevolutional approach to therapy can make to habilitation goals of the child with cerebral palsy and applies the basic principles of the Bobath approach to therapy. The first section discusses cerebral palsy as a reflection of disturbed neuro-ontogenisis and…

  15. Restoration of elbow extension after primary reconstruction in obstetric brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzis, Julia K; Kokkalis, Zinon T

    2010-03-01

    Elbow extension is important for the elbow joint, and it is more difficult to restore with microsurgery than elbow flexion. The purpose of this article is to describe the experience of the authors with elbow extension reconstruction in obstetric brachial plexus palsy patients. The outcomes were analyzed in relation to the type of brachial plexus lesion, timing of surgery, and the type of nerve reconstruction. Fifty-five children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy who underwent nerve reconstruction for elbow extension restoration were studied. The mean follow-up period was 6.4 years (range, 2-22 y). Reinnervation of the triceps muscle was accomplished with indirect neurotization of the posterior cord from intraplexus donors or with direct neurotization from extraplexus donors, such as the contralateral C7 and the intercostal nerves. Thirty-seven (67%) of the 55 cases showed good or excellent results (>or=M3+). The average postoperative muscle grading for the triceps was 3.34+/-0.99 compared with 1.19+/-1.29 preoperatively (P<0.0001). Patients with C5 to C7 palsy achieved significantly stronger elbow extension than those with C5 to T1 palsy. In addition, the timing of surgery significantly influenced the final outcome. Elbow extension is one of big challenges to be restored, especially in obstetric brachial plexus palsy. In early cases (within 6 mo) intraplexus reconstruction of the posterior cord can give excellent results. In later cases, or in cases of multiple avulsions, extraplexus motor donors, which selectively targeted the triceps, can give variable results.

  16. Nerve damage in leprosy: An electrophysiological evaluation of ulnar and median nerves in patients with clinical neural deficits: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Sumit; Krishnan, Ajay; Singh, Neha; Singh, Ramji; Pawar, Sachin

    2013-04-01

    Leprosy involves peripheral nerves sooner or later in the course of the disease leading to gross deformities and disabilities. Sadly, by the time it becomes clinically apparent, the nerve damage is already quite advanced. However, if the preclinical damage is detected early in the course of disease, it can be prevented to a large extent. We conducted an electrophysiological pilot study on 10 patients with clinically manifest leprosy, in the Dermatology Department of Mahatma Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences, Sewagram. This study was done to assess the nerve conduction velocity, amplitude and latency of ulnar and median nerves. We found reduced conduction velocities besides changes in latency and amplitude in the affected nerves. Changes in sensory nerve conduction were more pronounced. Also, sensory latencies and amplitude changes were more severe than motor latencies and amplitude in those presenting with muscle palsies. However, further studies are going on to identify parameters to detect early nerve damage in leprosy.

  17. Extratemporal Malignant Nerve Sheath Tumor of Facial Nerve with Coexistent Intratemporal Neurofibroma Mimicking Malignant Intratemporal Extension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuhiko Nakahira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an extremely unusual case of an extratemporal facial nerve malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST arising from preexistent intratemporal neurofibroma, illustrating a difficulty in discriminating between perineural spread of the MPNST and the preexistent intratemporal neurofibroma on preoperative radiographic images. The most interesting point was that preoperative CT scan and MR images led to misinterpretation that MPNST extended proximally along the facial nerve canal. It is important to recognize that the intratemporal perineural spread of neurofibromas and MPNST share common imaging characteristics. This is the first report (to our knowledge of these 2 lesions coexisting in the facial nerve, leading to misinterpretation on preoperative images.

  18. Intramuscular nerve distribution patterns of anterior forearm muscles in children: a guide for botulinum toxin injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fangjiu; Zhang, Xiaoming; Xie, Xiadan; Yang, Shengbo; Xu, Yan; Xie, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (BoNT) can relieve muscle spasticity by blocking axon terminals acetylcholine release at the motor endplate (MEP) and is the safest and most effective agent for the treatment of muscle spasticity in children with cerebral palsy. In order to achieve maximum effect with minimum effective dose of BoNT, one needs to choose an injection site as near to the MEP zone as possible. This requires a detailed understanding about the nerve terminal distributions within the muscles targeted for BoNT injection. This study focuses on BoNT treatment in children with muscle spasms caused by cerebral palsy. Considering the differences between children and adults in anatomy, we used child cadavers and measured both the nerve entry points and nerve terminal sense zones in three deep muscles of the anterior forearm: flexor digitorum profundus (FDP), flexor pollicis longus (FPL), and pronator quadratus (PQ). We measured the nerve entry points by using the forearm midline as a reference and demonstrated intramuscular nerve terminal dense zones by using a modified Sihler's nerve staining technique. The locations of the nerve entry points and that of the nerve terminal dense zones in the muscles were compared. We found that all nerve entry points are away from the corresponding intramuscular nerve terminal dense zones. Simply selecting nerve entry points as the sites for BoNT injection may not be an optimal choice for best effects in blocking muscle spasm. We propose that the location of the nerve terminal dense zones in each individual muscle should be used as the optimal target sites for BoNT injection when treating muscle spasms in children with cerebral palsy.

  19. Trigeminal neuralgia and facial nerve paralysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Alexandra [IPOFG, Department of Radiology, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2005-03-01

    The trigeminal nerve is the largest of the cranial nerves. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. The facial nerve is the cranial nerve with the longest extracranial course, and its main functions include motor innervation to the muscles of facial expression, sensory control of lacrimation and salivation, control of the stapedial reflex and to carry taste sensation from the anterior two-thirds of the tongue. In order to be able adequately to image and follow the course of these cranial nerves and their main branches, a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy is required. As we are dealing with very small anatomic structures, high resolution dedicated imaging studies are required to pick up normal and pathologic nerves. Whereas CT is best suited to demonstrate bony neurovascular foramina and canals, MRI is preferred to directly visualize the nerve. It is also the single technique able to detect pathologic processes afflicting the nerve without causing considerable expansion such as is usually the case in certain inflammatory/infectious conditions, perineural spread of malignancies and in very small intrinsic tumours. Because a long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches is seen, it is useful to subdivide the nerve in several segments and then tailor the imaging modality and the imaging study to that specific segment. This is particularly true in cases where topographic diagnosis can be used to locate a lesion in the course of these nerves. (orig.)

  20. Kabat rehabilitation for Bell's palsy in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monini, Simonetta; Buffoni, Antonella; Romeo, Martina; Di Traglia, Mario; Filippi, Chiara; Atturo, Francesca; Barbara, Maurizio

    2017-06-01

    This study has confirmed the importance of combining the physical rehabilitation to the steroid treatment for a better outcome from BP in all age groups, especially in the old HB grade V. To investigate the role played by aging in the recovery rate from peripheral facial nerve palsy. In the present study, subjects affected by peripheral facial nerve palsy, distributed by age, were randomly assigned to medical treatment, either alone or associated with Kabat physical rehabilitation. Rate and speed of recovery were assessed in the younger and older groups. All the patients were also asked to fill in a specific questionnaire (beta FAce scale). A series of non-parametric tests (McNemar Chi-square and Chi-square) have been applied to verify the hypothesis of dependence of the final recovery level from the variables age and rehabilitation. The results show that, when treated only by medical therapy, the HB V subjects showed no significant age difference in relation to the achievement of a HB Grade III (100% in the over 65, 80% in the under 65), whilst, in the HB IV subjects, the younger population showed a better recovery, with 89% of a good recovery (HB I or II). In the patients who received the combined protocol, a better recovery rate was found, both in HB IV and V subjects, and the younger population could reach a good recovery in 90% of HB V cases in respect to the older population (50%).

  1. Ganglioneuromas involving the hypoglossal nerve and the vagus nerve in a child: Surgical difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakshi, Jaimanti; Mohammed, Abdul Wadood; Lele, Saudamini; Nada, Ritambra

    2016-02-01

    Ganglioneuromas are benign tumors that arise from the Schwann cells of the autonomic nervous system. They are usually seen in the posterior mediastinum and the paraspinal retroperitoneum in relation to the sympathetic chain. In the head and neck, they are usually related to the cervical sympathetic ganglia or to the ganglion nodosum of the vagus nerve or the hypoglossal nerve. We describe what we believe is the first reported case of multiple ganglioneuromas of the parapharyngeal space in which two separate cranial nerves were involved. The patient was a 10-year-old girl who presented with a 2-year history of a painless and slowly progressive swelling on the left side of her neck and a 1-year history hoarseness. She had no history of relevant trauma or surgery. Intraoperatively, we found two tumors in the left parapharyngeal space-one that had arisen from the hypoglossal nerve and the other from the vagus nerve. Both ganglioneuromas were surgically removed, but the affected nerves had to be sacrificed. Postoperatively, the patient exhibited hypoglossal nerve and vocal fold palsy, but she was asymptomatic. In addition to the case description, we discuss the difficulties we faced during surgical excision.

  2. Lyme disease and Bell's palsy: an epidemiological study of diagnosis and risk in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Lilli; Branagan-Harris, Michael; Tuson, Richard; Nduka, Charles

    2017-05-01

    Lyme disease is caused by a tick-borne spirochaete of the Borrelia species. It is associated with facial palsy, is increasingly common in England, and may be misdiagnosed as Bell's palsy. To produce an accurate map of Lyme disease diagnosis in England and to identify patients at risk of developing associated facial nerve palsy, to enable prevention, early diagnosis, and effective treatment. Hospital episode statistics (HES) data in England from the Health and Social Care Information Centre were interrogated from April 2011 to March 2015 for International Classification of Diseases 10th revision (ICD-10) codes A69.2 (Lyme disease) and G51.0 (Bell's palsy) in isolation, and as a combination. Patients' age, sex, postcode, month of diagnosis, and socioeconomic groups as defined according to the English Indices of Deprivation (2004) were also collected. Lyme disease hospital diagnosis increased by 42% per year from 2011 to 2015 in England. Higher incidence areas, largely rural, were mapped. A trend towards socioeconomic privilege and the months of July to September was observed. Facial palsy in combination with Lyme disease is also increasing, particularly in younger patients, with a mean age of 41.7 years, compared with 59.6 years for Bell's palsy and 45.9 years for Lyme disease (P = 0.05, analysis of variance [ANOVA]). Healthcare practitioners should have a high index of suspicion for Lyme disease following travel in the areas shown, particularly in the summer months. The authors suggest that patients presenting with facial palsy should be tested for Lyme disease. © British Journal of General Practice 2017.

  3. Causes of Acquired Vocal Cord Palsy in Indian Scenario.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapna Sebastian

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Vocal cord paresis or paralysis occurs due to lesion in the vagus nerve. Vocal cord paralysis can lead to dysphonia as well as dysphagia which lead the patient to frustration and emotional problems. The literature available on the etiology and the problems faced by them in Indian population is very scanty. Hence a prospective study was done on 41 Patients with vocal cord palsy who were referred to the Department of ENT for voice assessment and management from March 1st 2012 till 1st August 2012. The medical and surgical reports were examined. They were evaluated by an otorhinolaryngologist, and a Speech Language Pathologist. Diagnosis was made based on video stroboscopic findings. We also examined voice-related quality of life (V-RQOL outcomes in these patients. In this study, endo-tracheal intubation (15/41; 36.5% was the major cause of vocal cord palsy. The second major cause for vocal cord palsy in our study was surgical trauma (iatrogenic which constituted 26.8% (11/41, out of which thyroidectomy contributed to 81.81% (9/11 and cardiac surgery (Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting (CABG contributed to 18.18% (2/11. Neurological problems caused 14.63% (6/41 of the total cases. Non-surgical trauma constituted 9.75% (4/41 of the total patients. Left recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis was found as a complication of heart disease in 7.3%(3/41. Tuberculosis of lungs and cancer of lungs accounted to be the rarest causes. Hoarseness of voice was the most common symptom with associated dysphagia in a few. The voice related quality of life of these patients was found to be poor. They were found to have problems in the social-emotional domain and physical functioning domain.

  4. Sonographic and electrodiagnostic features of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginanneschi, Federica; Filippou, Georgios; Giannini, Fabio; Carluccio, Maria A; Adinolfi, Antonella; Frediani, Bruno; Dotti, Maria T; Rossi, Alessandro

    2012-12-01

    In hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP), the increase in distal motor latencies (DMLs) is often out of proportion to the slowing of conduction velocities, but the pathophysiological mechanism is still unclear. We used a combined electrophysiological and ultrasonographic (US) approach to provide insight into this issue. Twelve HNPP subjects underwent extensive electrophysiological studies and US measurements of the cross-sectional area (CSA) of several peripheral nerves. US nerve enlargement was only observed in the carpal tunnel, Guyon's canal, the elbow and the fibular head. We did not observe US abnormalities at sites where nerve entrapment is uncommon. An increase in DMLs was observed regardless of US nerve enlargement. The increased nerve CSA only in common sites of entrapment likely reflected the well-documented nerve vulnerability to mechanical stress in HNPP. No morphometric changes were seen in the distal nerve segments where compression/entrapment is unlikely, despite the fact that the DMLs were increased. These data suggest that factors other than mechanical stress are responsible for the distal slowing of action potential propagation. We speculate that a mixture of mechanical insults and an axon-initiated process in the distal nerves underlies the distal slowing and/or conduction failure in HNPP. © 2012 Peripheral Nerve Society.

  5. Prednisolone and acupuncture in Bell's palsy: study protocol for a randomized, controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Kangjun

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are a variety of treatment options for Bell's palsy. Evidence from randomized controlled trials indicates corticosteroids can be used as a proven therapy for Bell's palsy. Acupuncture is one of the most commonly used methods to treat Bell's palsy in China. Recent studies suggest that staging treatment is more suitable for Bell's palsy, according to different path-stages of this disease. The aim of this study is to compare the effects of prednisolone and staging acupuncture in the recovery of the affected facial nerve, and to verify whether prednisolone in combination with staging acupuncture is more effective than prednisolone alone for Bell's palsy in a large number of patients. Methods/Design In this article, we report the design and protocol of a large sample multi-center randomized controlled trial to treat Bell's palsy with prednisolone and/or acupuncture. In total, 1200 patients aged 18 to 75 years within 72 h of onset of acute, unilateral, peripheral facial palsy will be assessed. There are six treatment groups, with four treated according to different path-stages and two not. These patients are randomly assigned to be in one of the following six treatment groups, i.e. 1 placebo prednisolone group, 2 prednisolone group, 3 placebo prednisolone plus acute stage acupuncture group, 4 prednisolone plus acute stage acupuncture group, 5 placebo prednisolone plus resting stage acupuncture group, 6 prednisolone plus resting stage acupuncture group. The primary outcome is the time to complete recovery of facial function, assessed by Sunnybrook system and House-Brackmann scale. The secondary outcomes include the incidence of ipsilateral pain in the early stage of palsy (and the duration of this pain, the proportion of patients with severe pain, the occurrence of synkinesis, facial spasm or contracture, and the severity of residual facial symptoms during the study period. Discussion The result of this trial will assess the

  6. Preauricular transparotid approach to mandibular condylar fractures without dissecting facial nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabe, Tetsuji; Tsuda, Tomoyuki; Hirose, Shunsuke; Ozawa, Toshiyuki

    2013-07-01

    Preauricular transparotid approach without dissecting the facial nerve was used for surgical treatment of 15 condylar fractures in 14 patients. The parotid fascia was opened just above the fracture site, and by dissecting the parotid gland and masseter muscle, the fracture was directly exposed. The facial nerve itself was not dissected expressly. All fractures could be reduced accurately and fixed firmly with miniplates. A direct approach just above the fracture site provided good vision of the fracture, avoiding facial nerve palsy caused by strong retraction. Moreover, by not dissecting the facial nerve, the operation time was shortened. This approach was useful for surgical treatment of both condylar neck and subcondylar fractures.

  7. Facial nerve palsy as a primary presentation of advanced carcinoma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A. Abdulkadir

    2016-07-02

    Jul 2, 2016 ... d Department of Radiology, Bayero University/Aminu Kano ... The prostate had malignant features on digital rectal examination (DRE) and the prostate .... because of the poor health seeking behaviour and ignorance. Hence,.

  8. Cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DongFuhui

    2004-01-01

    The cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome is named that, the cutaneous nerve's functional disorder caused by some chronic entrapment, moreover appears a series of nerve's feeling obstacle,vegetative nerve function obstacle, nutrition obstacle, even motor function obstacle in various degree.

  9. Nerve biopsy (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerve biopsy is the removal of a small piece of nerve for examination. Through a small incision, a sample ... is removed and examined under a microscope. Nerve biopsy may be performed to identify nerve degeneration, identify ...

  10. Vagus Nerve Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagus nerve stimulation Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Vagus nerve stimulation is a procedure that involves implantation of a device that stimulates the vagus nerve with electrical impulses. There's one vagus nerve on ...

  11. Plexiform neurofibromatosis of the mediastinum: CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chul Joong; Lee, Min Jin; Oh, Yu Whan; Suh, Won Hyuck; Lee, Yung Suk [College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-11-15

    Plexiform neurofibroma usually occur in the neck, pelvis and extremities, but they may seen virtually at any location, including the thorax. To evaluate the findings and the role of CT in plexiform neurofibromatosis of the mediastinum. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical results and thoracic CT scans of five patients with pathologically proved plexiform neurofibromatosis of the mediastinum. The CT scans were reviewed with attention to the distribution of the lesions, appearance and attenuation of mediastinal lesions, enhancement pattern after intravenous contrast infusion and associated findings such as intercostal neurofibroma. In all five patients CT scans demonstrated fusiform low attenuated masses which were oriented longitudinally and extended over multiple contiguous scans along the distribution of major mediastinal nerves. In four patients, mediastinal lesions appeared infiltrative, obliterating adjacent mediastinal fat plane. One patient had well defined fusiform masses along the major mediastinal nerves. Postcontrast enhanced CT scans revealed slight central enhancement in two patient and no contrast enhancement in three patients. Associated findings such as neurofibromas of intercostal nerves and sympathetic trunk, or subcutaneous neurofibromas were detected on CT scans in all five patients. Characteristic CT findings of low attenuation masses along the major mediastinal nerves are helpful to differentiate plexiform neurofibromatosis from mediastinal lymphadenopathy and to prevent from misreading as a malignant disease.

  12. Cerebral palsy update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krägeloh-Mann, Ingeborg; Cans, Christine

    2009-08-01

    A common language on CP has been developed for the European registers by the SCPE (Surveillance of Cerebral Palsy in Europe) working group and the common database allows prevalence analyses on a larger basis. CP prevalence increases with lower birthweight and higher immaturity. Increase of survival after preterm birth has first also increased CP rates. But already in the 80s this trend was reversed for LBW infants, and in the 90 s also for VLBW or very immature infants. The outcome with respect to CP in the group of extremely LBW or immature infants remains a matter of specific concern, as prevalence seems to be rather stable on a high level. CP is caused in more than 80% by brain lesions or maldevelopments which can be attributed to different timing periods of the developing brain. Extent and topography determine the clinical subtype of CP and are related also to the presence and severity of associated disabilities. CP, thus, offers a model to study plasticity of the developing brain. Reorganisation following unilateral lesions is mainly interhemispheric and homotopic. In the motor system, it involves the recruitment of ipsilateral tracts; functionality seems to be limited and decreases already towards the end of gestation. There is no clear evidence for substantial reorganisation in the sensory system. The best compensatory potential is described concerning language function following left hemispheric lesions. Language function reorganized to the right hemisphere eventually seems not to be impaired, this occurs, however, on the expense of primary right hemispheric functions.

  13. [Advances in genetic research of cerebral palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang-Fang; Luo, Rong; Qu, Yi; Mu, De-Zhi

    2017-09-01

    Cerebral palsy is a group of syndromes caused by non-progressive brain injury in the fetus or infant and can cause disabilities in childhood. Etiology of cerebral palsy has always been a hot topic for clinical scientists. More and more studies have shown that genetic factors are closely associated with the development of cerebral palsy. With the development and application of various molecular and biological techniques such as chromosome microarray analysis, genome-wide association study, and whole exome sequencing, new achievements have been made in the genetic research of cerebral palsy. Chromosome abnormalities, copy number variations, susceptibility genes, and single gene mutation associated with the development of cerebral palsy have been identified, which provides new opportunities for the research on the pathogenesis of cerebral palsy. This article reviews the advances in the genetic research on cerebral palsy in recent years.

  14. Bilateral Abducent Palsy in Leptospirosis- An Eye Opener to a Rare Neuro Ocular Manifestation: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahadevaiah Mahesh

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis, a disease of great significance in tropical countries, presents commonly as a biphasic illness with acute febrile episode in the first phase followed by a brief afebrile period and then by the second phase of fever with or without jaundice and renal failure. However, it has varied manifestations and unusual clinical features ascribed to immunological phenomena can occur due to the additional involvement of pulmonary, cardiovascular, and neurological systems. Among the various neurological features, aseptic meningitis is the most common myeloradiculopathy, myelopathy, cerebellar dysfunction, transverse myelitis, Guillain-Barre syndrome, optic neuritis, peripheral neuropathy are also described. Cranial neuropathy involving facial nerve is a rare, but known neurological manifestation. Sixth nerve palsy in neuroleptospirosis has so far not been reported. We hereby present the occurrence of bilateral abducent nerve palsy in a patient with leptospirosis.

  15. Lifetime costs of cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Marie; Michelsen, Susan Ishøy; Flachs, Esben Meulengracht

    2009-01-01

    This study quantified the lifetime costs of cerebral palsy (CP) in a register-based setting. It was the first study outside the US to assess the lifetime costs of CP. The lifetime costs attributable to CP were divided into three categories: health care costs, productivity costs, and social costs....... The population analyzed was retrieved from the Danish Cerebral Palsy Register, which covers the eastern part of the country and has registered about half of the Danish population of individuals with CP since 1950. For this study we analyzed 2367 individuals with CP, who were born in 1930 to 2000 and were alive...

  16. Entrapment of Common Peroneal Nerve by Surgical Suture following Distal Biceps Femoris Tendon Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aki Fukuda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe entrapment of the common peroneal nerve by a suture after surgical repair of the distal biceps femoris tendon. Complete rupture of the distal biceps femoris tendon of a 16-year-old male athlete was surgically repaired. Postoperative common peroneal nerve palsy was evident, but conservative treatment did not cause any neurological improvement. Reexploration revealed that the common peroneal nerve was entrapped by the surgical suture. Complete removal of the suture and external neurolysis significantly improved the palsy. The common peroneal nerve is prone to damage as a result of its close proximity to the biceps femoris tendon and it should be identified during surgical repair of a ruptured distal biceps femoris tendon.

  17. Overview of pediatric peripheral facial nerve paralysis: analysis of 40 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özkale, Yasemin; Erol, İlknur; Saygı, Semra; Yılmaz, İsmail

    2015-02-01

    Peripheral facial nerve paralysis in children might be an alarming sign of serious disease such as malignancy, systemic disease, congenital anomalies, trauma, infection, middle ear surgery, and hypertension. The cases of 40 consecutive children and adolescents who were diagnosed with peripheral facial nerve paralysis at Baskent University Adana Hospital Pediatrics and Pediatric Neurology Unit between January 2010 and January 2013 were retrospectively evaluated. We determined that the most common cause was Bell palsy, followed by infection, tumor lesion, and suspected chemotherapy toxicity. We noted that younger patients had generally poorer outcome than older patients regardless of disease etiology. Peripheral facial nerve paralysis has been reported in many countries in America and Europe; however, knowledge about its clinical features, microbiology, neuroimaging, and treatment in Turkey is incomplete. The present study demonstrated that Bell palsy and infection were the most common etiologies of peripheral facial nerve paralysis.

  18. Serious axillary nerve injury caused by subscapular artery compression resulting from use of backpacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haninec, Pavel; Mencl, Libor; Bačinský, Peter; Kaiser, Radek

    2013-12-01

    A palsy of the brachial plexus elements caused by carrying a heavy backpack is a very rare injury usually occurring in soldiers or hikers, and recovery is usually spontaneous. We describe here the case of male civilian presenting with an isolated serious axillary nerve palsy associated with chronic backpack use. During the surgery, a dumbbell-shaped neuroma-in-continuity was found which was caused by direct pressure from the subscapular artery. After resection of the neuroma, a nerve graft from the sural nerve was used to reconstruct the nerve. Reinnervation was successful and the patient was able to abduct his arm to its full range, with full muscle strength, within 24 months.

  19. [Palsy of the upper limb: Obstetrical brachial plexus palsy, arthrogryposis, cerebral palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazard, B; Philandrianos, C; Tekpa, B

    2016-10-01

    "Palsy of the upper limb" in children includes various diseases which leads to hypomobility of the member: cerebral palsy, arthrogryposis and obstetrical brachial plexus palsy. These pathologies which differ on brain damage or not, have the same consequences due to the early achievement: negligence, stiffness and deformities. Regular entire clinical examination of the member, an assessment of needs in daily life, knowledge of the social and family environment, are key points for management. In these pathologies, the rehabilitation is an emergency, which began at birth and intensively. Splints and physiotherapy are part of the treatment. Surgery may have a functional goal, hygienic or aesthetic in different situations. The main goals of surgery are to treat: joints stiffness, bones deformities, muscles contractures and spasticity, paresis, ligamentous laxity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Surgical trainees neuropraxia? An unusual case of compression of the lateral cutaneous nerve of the forearm.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Seoighe, D M

    2010-09-01

    Compression of the lateral cutaneous nerve of the forearm is an uncommon diagnosis but has been associated with strenuous upper limb activity. We report the unique case of a 32-year-old male orthopaedic trainee who suffered this nerve palsy as a result of prolonged elbow extension and forearm pronation while the single assistant during a hip resurfacing procedure. Conservative measures were sufficient for sensory recovery to be clinically detectable after 12 weeks.

  1. Facial nerve neurinoma presenting as middle cranial fossa and cerebellopontine angle mass : a case report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devi B

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Facial nerve neurinomas are rare. The tumours arising from the geniculate ganglion may grow anteriorly and superiorly and present as a mass in the middle cranial fossa. Only a few cases of facial nerve neurinomas presenting as middle cranial fossa mass have so far been reported. These tumours present with either long standing or intermittent facial palsy along with cerebellopontine angle syndrome.

  2. Potential Mechanism for Some Post-operative C5 Palsies - an Anatomical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Fernando; Voin, Vlad; Iwanaga, Joe; Hanscom, David; Chapman, Jens R; Oskouian, Rod J; Loukas, Marios; Tubbs, R Shane

    2017-06-09

    Anatomical Study. Determine if shoulder depression (e.g., taping the shoulders) might result in C5 nerve traction and subsequent injury. Postoperative C5 nerve palsy is a recognized entity that is still often enigmatic. Inferior shoulder depression is usually employed to assist with surgical visualization during cervical spine procedures. In the supine position, ten adult fresh frozen human cadavers underwent dissection of the spinal cord and its adjacent dorsal, ventral roots and spinal nerves from C4 to T1. In the supine position, the head was rotated ipsilaterally, contralaterally and in lateral flexion. The shoulder was elevated, retracted, protracted and depressed all with direct observation of nerve roots, intradural ventral/dorsal rootlets, or the spinal cord. The effects of these movements upon the cervical nerve rootlets were measured. The greatest displacement of nervous tissue was generated by shoulder depression and occurred primarily at the intradural rootlet level. The nerve rootlets that underwent the greatest average displacement were found at C5, with a decreasing gradient to C7 and no gross motion at C8 or T1. With maximal shoulder depression, C5-C7 rootlet tension produced cord movement to the ipsilateral side, touching the dura mater covering the lateral vertebral column with the C5 nerve root moving farthest. Shoulder depression is often used during cervical spine surgery. In cadavers, shoulder depression causes significant tension and displacement of the C5 nerve rootlets, and in the extreme, cord displacement to the ipsilateral side. This could be a mechanism for injury, putting patients at greater risk for postoperative C5 palsy. 5.

  3. Imaging the ocular motor nerves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Teresa [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: T.A.Ferreira@lumc.nl; Verbist, Berit [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: B.M.Verbist@lumc.nl; Buchem, Mark van [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: M.A.van_Buchem@lumc.nl; Osch, Thijs van [C.J. Gorter for High-Field MRI, Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: M.J.P.van_Osch@lumc.nl; Webb, Andrew [C.J. Gorter for High-Field MRI, Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center (Netherlands)], E-mail: A.Webb@lumc.nl

    2010-05-15

    The ocular motor nerves (OMNs) comprise the oculomotor, trochlear and the abducens nerves. According to their course, they are divided into four or five anatomic segments: intra-axial, cisternal, cavernous and intra-orbital and, for the abducens nerve, an additional interdural segment. Magnetic resonance imaging is the imaging method of choice in the evaluation of the normal and pathologic ocular motor nerves. CT still plays a limited but important role in the evaluation of the intraosseous portions at the skull base and bony foramina. We describe for each segment of these cranial nerves, the normal anatomy, the most appropriate image sequences and planes, their imaging appearance and pathologic conditions. Magnetic resonance imaging with high magnetic fields is a developing and promising technique. We describe our initial experience with a Phillips 7.0 T MRI scanner in the evaluation of the brainstem segments of the OMNs. As imaging becomes more refined, an understanding of the detailed anatomy is increasingly necessary, as the demand on radiology to diagnose smaller lesions also increases.

  4. Imaging the ocular motor nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Teresa; Verbist, Berit; van Buchem, Mark; van Osch, Thijs; Webb, Andrew

    2010-05-01

    The ocular motor nerves (OMNs) comprise the oculomotor, trochlear and the abducens nerves. According to their course, they are divided into four or five anatomic segments: intra-axial, cisternal, cavernous and intra-orbital and, for the abducens nerve, an additional interdural segment. Magnetic resonance imaging is the imaging method of choice in the evaluation of the normal and pathologic ocular motor nerves. CT still plays a limited but important role in the evaluation of the intraosseous portions at the skull base and bony foramina. We describe for each segment of these cranial nerves, the normal anatomy, the most appropriate image sequences and planes, their imaging appearance and pathologic conditions. Magnetic resonance imaging with high magnetic fields is a developing and promising technique. We describe our initial experience with a Phillips 7.0T MRI scanner in the evaluation of the brainstem segments of the OMNs. As imaging becomes more refined, an understanding of the detailed anatomy is increasingly necessary, as the demand on radiology to diagnose smaller lesions also increases.

  5. Schwannoma of the 6th nerve: case report and review of the literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Li; Jingjun Li; Jing Li; Zhen Wu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Schwannomas of the 6th nerve are extremely rare.Only 22 cases of intracranial schwannomas of the 6th cranial nerve pathologically confirmed have been reported.Case Presentation: Here, we report a case of a 14-year-old girl who presented with isolated progressive 6th nerve palsy.A cisternal type of schwannomawas found from neuro-imaging.Subtotal removal of the tumor was performed by a routine left subtemporal craniotomy with an petrosectomy.The attachment to the 6th nerve was found.After surgery, the patient's 6th nerve palsy remained.Histological images revealed a cellular schwannoma.Then the classification, clinical presentation, diagnosis, operation, stereotactic radiosurgery are reviewed.Conclusions: The location and the attachment to the 6th nerve is the key for diagnosis.Most cases are treated surgically.It looks like it is not easy to completely remove for CA type because of invasion of the cavernous sinus or firm adherence to the nerves.The 6th nerve function seldom completely recovered postoperatively.The direction of further research is to improve the diagnosis and therapy to have better nerve recovery.

  6. Endoscopic laryngeal patterns in vagus nerve stimulation therapy for drug-resistant epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felisati, Giovanni; Gardella, Elena; Schiavo, Paolo; Saibene, Alberto Maria; Pipolo, Carlotta; Bertazzoli, Manuela; Chiesa, Valentina; Maccari, Alberto; Franzini, Angelo; Canevini, Maria Paola

    2014-01-01

    In 30% of patients with epilepsy seizure control cannot be achieved with medications. When medical therapy is not effective, and epilepsy surgery cannot be performed, vagus nerve stimulator (VNS) implantation is a therapeutic option. Laryngeal patterns in vagus nerve stimulation have not been extensively studied yet. The objective was to evaluate laryngeal patterns in a cohort of patients affected by drug-resistant epilepsy after implantation and activation of a vagus nerve stimulation therapy device. 14 consecutive patients underwent a systematic otolaryngologic examination between 6 months and 5 years after implantation and activation of a vagus nerve stimulation therapy device. All patients underwent fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation, which was recorded on a portable device allowing a convenient slow-motion analysis of laryngeal patterns. All recordings were blindly evaluated by two of the authors. We observed three different laryngeal patterns. Four patients showed left vocal cord palsy at the baseline and during vagus nerve stimulation; seven showed left vocal cord palsy at the baseline and left vocal cord adduction during vagus nerve stimulation; and three patients showed a symmetric pattern at the baseline and constant left vocal cord adduction during vagus nerve stimulation. These laryngeal findings are here described for the first time in the literature and can be only partially explained by existing knowledge of laryngeal muscles and vagus nerve physiology. This might represent a new starting point for studies concerning laryngeal physiology and phonation, while the vagus nerve stimulation therapy could act as a new and ethical experimental model for human laryngeal physiology.

  7. Ocular defects in cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katoch Sabita

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a high prevalence of ocular defects in children with developmental disabilities. This study evaluated visual disability in a group of 200 cerebral palsy (CP patients and found that 68% of the children had significant visual morbidity. These findings emphasize the need for an early ocular examination in patients with CP.

  8. Embodying Investigations of Cerebral Palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martiny, Kristian Møller Moltke

    The main question of Kristian Martiny’s dissertation is: how do we help persons living with the brain damage, cerebral palsy (CP)? This question is as complex and difficult to answer as any healthcare question. Martiny argues that we need to ‘open up’ how we do ( cognitive ) science in order...

  9. Effect of excision of peripheral sympathetic nerve network in common carotid artery in children with cerebral palsy and its effect on their cognitive function%颈总动脉周围交感神经网剥脱切除术治疗脑性瘫痪患儿的效果及对其认知功能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵家鹏; 王家勤; 常崇旺; 王玉峰; 马世江; 冯宇飞

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical effect of excision of peripheral sympathetic nerve network in common carotid artery on children with cerebral palsy (CP)and the effect on their cognitive function. Methods A ret-rospective study method was admitted to preschool children with CP in 69 cases in Center of Brain Disease,the Third Hospital Affiliated to Xinxiang Medical University from July 2008 to August 2014, the common carotid artery sympathetic with the surrounding network stripping off resection treatment of 43 cases ( surgery group) ,without the use of surgery in the treatment of children with 26 cases ( no operation group) . The muscle tension improved, movement to improve the ability of 2 groups before and after treatment 6 months were detected and compared. Developmental quotient ( DQ) ,intelligence quotient ( IQ) ,bilateral middle cerebral artery ( MCA) hemodynamic index difference were deter-mined between 2 groups before and after treatment 6 months. Results After treatment 6 months,the muscle tension score and walking ability score of the surgery group were significantly better than those of no operation group [(2. 2± 1. 1) scores vs (4. 5±0. 6)scores,(3. 5±0. 7) scores vs (2. 7±0. 8) scores,all P<0. 05],and significantly improved compared with before treatment[(4. 8±0. 6)scores,(2. 2±0. 9)scores,all P<0. 05]. After treatment 6 months,the IQ score,fine motor, social adaptation, personal social, language score and MCA mean velocity ( MV ) , peak velocity ( PV) ,resistance index ( RI) ,pulsatility index ( PI) determination value of the surgery group were significantly higher than those of no operation group and before treatment (all P<0. 05). Conclusions Excision of peripheral sympathetic nerve network on common carotid artery has a good clinical effect in the treatment of CP , and can significantly improve the cognitive function of children with CP .%目的:探讨颈总动脉周围交感神经网剥脱切除术治疗脑性瘫痪( CP )患儿的临床

  10. Ulnar nerve compression neuropathy at Guyon's canal caused by crutch walking: case report with ultrasonographic nerve imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginanneschi, Federica; Filippou, Georgios; Milani, Paolo; Biasella, Alessia; Rossi, Alessandro

    2009-03-01

    This report is the first account of Guyon's syndrome after the bilateral use of forearm crutches. Crutch palsy is usually neuropraxic in nature and associated with clinical and electrophysiologic recovery of nerve function, especially if patients are instructed to not bear excessive weight on the wrist. The present case history follows this pattern. In establishing the diagnosis of a focal compression neuropathy, a combination of clinical assessment and neurophysiologic studies are typically used. This report describes the additional application of ultrasound imaging to verify the diagnosis and to track changes in the appearance of the nerve during follow-up.

  11. injection-induced sciatic nerve injury among children managed in an

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    of the patients was the right while the left was affected in 16 (48.5%) patients. The right side was more ... KEY WORDS: children, sciatic nerve palsy, injection. INTRODUCTION .... followed by passive movement (72.7%), muscle strengthening ...

  12. Acupuncture-induced changes in functional connectivity of the primary somatosensory cortex varied with pathological stages of Bell’s palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaoxuan; Zhu, Yifang; Park, Kyungmo; Mohamed, Abdalla Z.; Wu, Hongli; Xu, Chunsheng; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Linying; Yang, Jun; Qiu, Bensheng

    2014-01-01

    Bell’s palsy is the most common cause of acute facial nerve paralysis. In China, Bell’s palsy is frequently treated with acupuncture. However, its efficacy and underlying mechanism are still controversial. In this study, we used functional MRI to investigate the effect of acupuncture on the functional connectivity of the brain in Bell’s palsy patients and healthy individuals. The patients were further grouped according to disease duration and facial motor performance. The results of resting-state functional MRI connectivity show that acupuncture induces significant connectivity changes in the primary somatosensory region of both early and late recovery groups, but no significant changes in either the healthy control group or the recovered group. In the recovery group, the changes also varied with regions and disease duration. Therefore, we propose that the effect of acupuncture stimulation may depend on the functional connectivity status of patients with Bell’s palsy. PMID:25121624

  13. CT diagnosis of retinoblastoma with histopathologic correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivecrona, H. [Dept. of Radiology, King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Agerberg, P.A. [Dept. of Radiology, King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Huaman, A. [Dept. of Pathology, King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    1994-08-01

    The authors correlated the radiologic and histopathologic characteristics of 108 retinoblastomas in 98 patients. Calcifications were demonstrable by CT scans in 92.6% of the cases, whereas only 82% were evident upon routine histologic study. Cases of severe invasion of the optic nerve beyond the lamina cribrosa and up to the surgical margin of the nerve were detected by CT scans. Lesser degrees of invasion could not be determined by the same method. Orbital extension was also demonstrable, whereas invasion limited to the sclera was rarely accessible to CT diagnosis. Choroidal invasion was not detectable. Computerized tomography detected enlargement of the ipsilateral lacrimal gland in 17.5% of patients. This phenomenon correlates with invasion of the choroid and the optic nerve. (orig.)

  14. Health-related quality of life in 794 patients with a peripheral facial palsy using the FaCE Scale: a retrospective cohort study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleiss, I.J.; Hohman, M.H.; Susarla, S.M.; Marres, H.A.M.; Hadlock, T.A.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the health-related quality of life of patients visiting a tertiary referral centre for facial palsy, and to analyse factors associated with health-related quality of life, using the FaCE Scale instrument. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. SETTING: The Facial Nerve Center at

  15. Backpack palsy: A rare complication of backpack use in children and young adults - A new case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Katy; Davies, Anne; Pitt, Matthew; Ratnasinghe, Didi; D'Argenzio, Luigi

    2016-09-01

    Backpack palsy is a well-recognised, albeit rare, complication of carrying backpacks. Although it has been mostly described in cadets during strenuous training, sporadic cases of brachial nerve impairment have been reported in children and young adults. Here we reported the case of a 15-year-old girl who presented with a left-side brachial palsy with axonal denervation of C5C7 motor roots following a school challenge for the Duke of Edinburgh Award. Her symptoms began soon after starting the challenge and included weakness of shoulder abduction and elevation, as well as forearm, wrist and fingers extension. After 6 months of physiotherapy her motor function was completely restored. Backpack palsy can sometimes present in children and young adults. This disorder should be taken in consideration when planning for daily, as well as more challenging, physical activities in these age groups.

  16. Hereditary Neuropathy with Liability to Pressure Palsy: A Recurrent and Bilateral Foot Drop Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipa Flor-de-Lima

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy is characterized by acute, painless, recurrent mononeuropathies secondary to minor trauma or compression. A 16-year-old boy had the first episode of right foot drop after minor motorcycle accident. Electromyography revealed conduction block and slowing velocity conduction of the right deep peroneal nerve at the fibular head. After motor rehabilitation, he fully recovered. Six months later he had the second episode of foot drop in the opposite site after prolonged squatting position. Electromyography revealed sensorimotor polyneuropathy of left peroneal, sural, posterior tibial, and deep peroneal nerves and also of ulnar, radial, and median nerves of both upper limbs. Histological examination revealed sensory nerve demyelination and focal thickenings of myelin fibers. The diagnosis of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy was confirmed by PMP22 deletion of chromosome 17p11.2. He started motor rehabilitation and avoidance of stressing factors with progressive recovery. After one-year followup, he was completely asymptomatic. Recurrent bilateral foot drop history, “sausage-like” swellings of myelin in histological examination, and the results of electromyography led the authors to consider the diagnosis despite negative family history. The authors highlight this rare disease in pediatric population and the importance of high index of clinical suspicion for its diagnosis.

  17. Head CT scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain CT; Cranial CT; CT scan - skull; CT scan - head; CT scan - orbits; CT scan - sinuses; Computed tomography - cranial; CAT scan - brain ... hold your breath for short periods. A complete scan usually take only 30 seconds to a few ...

  18. CT-guided plexus and splanchnic nerve neurolytic block. Experience in 150 cases and techniques optimization; Il blocco neurolitico del plesso celiaco e dei nervi splancnici con tomografia computerizzata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marra, V.; Frigerio, A.; Menna, S.; Di Virgilio, M.R. [Ospedale San Giovanni, Turin (Italy). Serv. di Radiologia; Debernardi, F.; Musso, L. [Ospedale San Giovanni, Turin (Italy). Serv. di Anestesia, Rianimazione e Terapia Antalgica

    1999-09-01

    The paper reports the personal experience in computerized tomography guided celiac plexus and splanchnic nerve neurolytic block blocks. [Italian] Scopo del lavoro e' illustrare l'esperienza personale nell'uso della tomografia computerizzata nel trattamento del dolore da neoplasie addominali superiori, rivoluzionando le tecniche di esecuzione, aumentandone la precisione e riducendone notevolmente il rischio di complicanze.

  19. Bell Palsy and Acupuncture Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betul Battaloglu Ižnanc

    2013-08-01

    A 22-year-old female patient, a midwifery student, had treatment with corticosteroid and antiviral agents as soon as Bell Palsy (BP was diagnosed (House-Breckman stage 6. Six weeks later, patient didn’t recover, while in House-Breckman stage 3, acupuncture was perfomed and local and distal acupoints were used with ears, body and face. Ear acupuncture point was used two times with detection. In the course of six sessions body and face points were stimulated by electroacupuncture. After ten acupuncture treatments, the subjective symptoms and the facial motion on the affected side improved. There was an spotting ecchymosis the ST2 points on. The symmetry of the face is a determinant of facial charm and influences interpersonal attraction for adults, children and pregnant women. Medical options for the sequelae of BP are limited. Acupuncture’s effectively in Bell palsy patients’ should be shown with more clinical and electrophysiological studies.

  20. Cerebral palsy and congenital malformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garne, Ester; Dolk, Helen; Krägeloh-Mann, Inge

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To determine the proportion of children with cerebral palsy (CP) who have cerebral and non-cerebral congenital malformations. METHODS: Data from 11 CP registries contributing to the European Cerebral Palsy Database (SCPE), for children born in the period 1976-1996. The malformations were...... classified as recognized syndromes, chromosomal anomalies, cerebral malformations or non-cerebral malformations. Prevalence of malformations was compared to published data on livebirths from a European database of congenital malformations (EUROCAT). RESULTS: Overall 547 out of 4584 children (11.9%) with CP...... were reported to have a congenital malformation. The majority (8.6% of all children) were diagnosed with a cerebral malformation. The most frequent types of cerebral malformations were microcephaly and hydrocephaly. Non-cerebral malformations were present in 97 CP children and in further 14 CP children...

  1. The treatment of facial palsy from the point of view of physical and rehabilitation medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafshak, T S

    2006-03-01

    There are evidences to support recommending the early intake of prednisone (in its appropriate dose of 1 mg/kg body weight for up to 70 or 80 mg/day) or the combined use of prednisone and acyclovir (or valacyclovir) within 72 h following the onset of paralysis in order to improve the outcome of Bell's palsy (BP). Although there may be a controversy about the role of physiotherapy in BP or facial palsy, it seemed that local superficial heat therapy, massage, exercises, electrical stimulation and biofeedback training have a place in the treatment of lower motor facial palsy. However, each modality has its indications. Moreover, some rehabilitative surgical methods might be of benefit for some patients with traumatic facial injuries or long standing paralysis without recovery, but early surgery in BP is usually not recommended. However, few may recommend early surgery in BP when there is 90-100% facial nerve degeneration. The efficacy of acupuncture, magnetic pellets and other modalities of physiotherapy needs further investigation. The general principles and the different opinions in treating and rehabilitating facial palsy are discussed and the need for further research in this field is suggested.

  2. Raising the suborbicularis oculi fat (SOOF): its role in chronic facial palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olver, J.

    2000-01-01

    AIMS—To determine the adjuvant role of unilateral suborbicularis oculi fat (SOOF) lift in the periorbital rehabilitation of patients with chronic facial palsy.
METHODS—In a non-comparative prospective case series nine adult patients (seven male, two female) aged 34-90 years (mean 60.5) with chronic unrecovered facial palsy (over 1 year), who had not had any previous rehabilitative periorbital surgery, were studied. Lateral tarsal strip and adjuvant transconjunctival approach subperiosteal SOOF lift under local or general anaesthesia were performed; medial canthoplasty was performed where indicated. There was clinical observation of the long term (over 1 year) effect on the ptotic palpebral-malar sulcus and lower eyelid retraction.
RESULTS—The patients were followed up for 12-24 months (mean 16). Seven patients (77%) had sustained clinical reduction of palpebral-malar sulcus ptosis. All patients had sustained reduction of lagophthalmos. Early postoperative complications included conjunctival cheimosis in 77%. Three patients with persistent keratitis required further surgical procedures on their upper eyelid to reduce the palpebral aperture. There were no cases of infraorbital nerve anaesthesia or recurrent lower eyelid retraction.
CONCLUSIONS—The SOOF lift has an adjuvant role in chronic facial palsy with lower eyelid retraction and ptotic-palpebral malar sulcus. It supports the lower eyelid elevation and tightening achieved with the lateral tarsal strip. The best results were obtained in congenital facial palsy.

 PMID:11090482

  3. Photographic Standards for Patients With Facial Palsy and Recommendations by Members of the Sir Charles Bell Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santosa, Katherine B; Fattah, Adel; Gavilán, Javier; Hadlock, Tessa A; Snyder-Warwick, Alison K

    2017-07-01

    There is no widely accepted assessment tool or common language used by clinicians caring for patients with facial palsy, making exchange of information challenging. Standardized photography may represent such a language and is imperative for precise exchange of information and comparison of outcomes in this special patient population. To review the literature to evaluate the use of facial photography in the management of patients with facial palsy and to examine the use of photography in documenting facial nerve function among members of the Sir Charles Bell Society-a group of medical professionals dedicated to care of patients with facial palsy. A literature search was performed to review photographic standards in patients with facial palsy. In addition, a cross-sectional survey of members of the Sir Charles Bell Society was conducted to examine use of medical photography in documenting facial nerve function. The literature search and analysis was performed in August and September 2015, and the survey was conducted in August and September 2013. The literature review searched EMBASE, CINAHL, and MEDLINE databases from inception of each database through September 2015. Additional studies were identified by scanning references from relevant studies. Only English-language articles were eligible for inclusion. Articles that discussed patients with facial palsy and outlined photographic guidelines for this patient population were included in the study. The survey was disseminated to the Sir Charles Bell Society members in electronic form. It consisted of 10 questions related to facial grading scales, patient-reported outcome measures, other psychological assessment tools, and photographic and videographic recordings. In total, 393 articles were identified in the literature search, 7 of which fit the inclusion criteria. Six of the 7 articles discussed or proposed views specific to patients with facial palsy. However, none of the articles specifically focused on

  4. Trigeminal neuromas: Assessment of MRI and CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beges, C.; Revel, M.P.; Gaston, A.; Brugieres, P. (Dept. of Neuroradiology, Hopital Henri Mondor, Creteil (France)); Meder, J.F. (Dept. of Neuroradiology, Hopital Sainte Anne, Paris (France)); Martin, N. (Dept. of Neuroradiology, Hopital de la Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France))

    1992-06-01

    We report four cases of trigeminal neuroma. One of the patients had von Recklinghausen's neurofibromatosis with plexiform neurofibromas of the branches of the trigeminal nerve. MRI provided more information than CT as regards the spread of tumor: extension to the mandibular and maxillary division of the trigeminal nerve was well demonstrated on sagittal and coronal sections. This examination yielded an accurate census of the intraocular plexiform neurofibromas and allowed a correct preoperative diagnosis to be obtained. With Gd-DOTA, better definition of the outline of the tumours and of cystic components was obtained. However, CT was better for demonstration of bone erosions. (orig.).

  5. [Acupuncture and moxibustion for peripheral facial palsy at different stages: multi-central large-sample randomized controlled trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Li, Yan; Liu, Li-an; Zhao, Ling; Hu, Ka-ming; Wu, Xi; Chen, Xiao-qin; Li, Gui-ping; Mang, Ling-ling; Qi, Qi-hua

    2011-04-01

    To explore the best intervention time of acupuncture and moxibustion for peripheral facial palsy (Bell's palsy) and the clinical advantage program of selective treatment with acupuncture and moxibustion. Multi-central large-sample randomized controlled trial was carried out. Nine hundreds cases of Bell's palsy were randomized into 5 treatment groups, named selective filiform needle group (group A), selective acupuncture + moxibustion group (group B), selective acupuncture + electroacupuncture (group C), selective acupuncture + line-up needling on muscle region of meridian group (group D) and non-selective filiform needle group (group E). Four sessions of treatment were required in each group. Separately, during the enrollment, after 4 sessions of treatment, in 1 month and 3 months of follow-up after treatment, House-Brackmann Scale, Facial Disability Index Scale and Degree of Facial Nerve Paralysis (NFNP) were adopted for efficacy assessment. And the efficacy systematic analysis was provided in view of the intervention time and nerve localization of disease separately. The curative rates of intervention in acute stage and resting stage were 50.1% (223/445) and 52.1% (162/311), which were superior to recovery stage (25.9%, 35/135) separately. There were no statistical significant differences in efficacy in comparison among 5 treatment programs at the same stage (all P > 0.05). The efficacy of intervention of group A and group E in acute stage was superior to that in recovery stage (both P < 0.01). The difference was significant statistically between the efficacy on the localization above chorda tympani nerve and that on the localization below the nerve in group D (P < 0.01). The efficacy on the localization below chorda tympani nerve was superior to the localization above the nerve. The best intervention time for the treatment of Bell's palsy is in acute stage and resting stage, meaning 1 to 3 weeks after occurrence. All of the 5 treatment programs are advantageous

  6. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies in childhood: Case series and literature update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrestian, Nicolas; McMillan, Hugh; Poulin, Chantal; Campbell, Craig; Vajsar, Jiri

    2015-09-01

    Hereditary Neuropathy with Liability to Pressure Palsy (HNPP) is a rare condition in childhood with a diverse range of clinical presentations. We analyzed the clinical presentation and electrophysiological data of 12 children with a confirmed PMP22 gene deletion and reviewed the published reports of HNPP in children and compared our data with the reports from the literature review. Peroneal palsy was the most common presentation (42%) followed by brachial plexus palsy in 25% of our cases. Nerve conduction studies were always suggestive of the diagnosis demonstrating 3 major patterns: multifocal demyelination at the area of entrapment, generalized sensory-motor polyneuropathy and a combination of the two first patterns in a vast majority (60%). Surprisingly, there was bilateral or unilateral electrophysiological entrapment of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel in all our patients. The clinical presentation of HNPP in childhood is heterogeneous and electrophysiological findings are helpful in establishing the diagnosis. Any unexplained mononeuropathy or multifocal neuropathy should lead to PMP22 gene testing to look for the deletion. Early diagnosis is important in order to facilitate appropriate genetic counseling and also for the appropriate care for these patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The nerves around the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blum, Alain, E-mail: alain.blum@gmail.com [Service d’Imagerie GUILLOZ, CHU Nancy, Nancy 54000 (France); Lecocq, Sophie; Louis, Matthias; Wassel, Johnny; Moisei, Andreea; Teixeira, Pedro [Service d’Imagerie GUILLOZ, CHU Nancy, Nancy 54000 (France)

    2013-01-15

    Neuropathies of the shoulder are considered to be entrapment syndromes. They are relatively common, accounting for about 2% of cases of sport-related shoulder pain. Many instances involve suprascapular neuropathy, but the clinical diagnosis is often delayed because of nonspecific symptoms. Classically, EMG is the gold standard investigation but MRI currently reveals muscular abnormality in 50% of cases. Muscle edema, the most characteristic symptom, is nonspecific. In general, the topography of edema, the presence of a lesion compressing the nerve and clinical history contribute to the diagnosis. Although atrophy and fatty degeneration may persist after the disappearance of edema, they are rarely symptomatic. The main differential diagnosis is Parsonage–Turner syndrome. Evidence of a cyst pressing on a nerve may prompt puncture-infiltration guided by ultrasonography or CT-scan.

  8. Large Posterior Communicating Artery Aneurysm: Initial Presentation with Reproducible Facial Pain Without Cranial Nerve Deficit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacie Zelman

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Unruptured posterior communicating artery (PCOM aneurysms can be difficult to diagnose and, when large (≥ 7mm, represent a substantial risk to the patient. While most unruptured PCOM aneurysms are asymptomatic, when symptoms do occur, clinical manifestations typically include severe headache (HA, visual acuity loss, and cranial nerve deficit. This case report describes an atypical initial presentation of a large unruptured PCOM aneurysm with symptoms mimicking trigeminal neuralgia, without other associated cranial nerve palsies or neurologic deficits. The patient returned to the emergency department four days later with a HA, trigeminal neuralgia, and a new cranial nerve III palsy. After appropriate imaging, she was found to have a large PCOM aneurysm, which was treated with surgical clipping with significant improvement in patient’s symptoms.

  9. Ultrasound-guided perineural injection for nerve blockade: Does a single-sided injection produce circumferential nerve coverage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwawka, O Kenechi; Miller, Theodore T; Jawetz, Shari T; Saboeiro, Gregory R

    2016-10-01

    Our current clinical technique for sonographic-guided perineural injection consists of two-sided perineural needle placement to obtain circumferential distribution of the injectate. This study aimed to determine if a single-side needle position will produce circumferential nerve coverage. Fresh-frozen cadaveric specimens were used for this study. In six upper extremities, a needle was positioned along the deep surface of median, radial, and ulnar nerves in the carpal tunnel, radial tunnel, and cubital tunnel, respectively, and 2 ml of contrast was injected for each nerve. In three pelvic specimens, a needle was positioned deep to the sciatic nerves bilaterally, and 5 ml of contrast was injected. An additional four median nerve injections were performed using superficial surface needle position. The specimens then underwent CT scanning to assess the distribution of the perineural contrast medium. One hundred percent of the radial, ulnar, and sciatic nerves demonstrated circumferential distribution on CT. Only 50% of the median nerve injections with the needle placed deep to the nerve produced circumferential coverage, whereas 100% of median nerves injected with the needle between the nerve and retinaculum demonstrated circumferential coverage. The average length of spread of perineural injectate was 11.6 cm in the upper extremity and 10.3 cm for the sciatic nerves. Using clinical volumes of fluid, needle positioning at the deep surface of upper extremity and sciatic nerves was sufficient to produce circumferential coating of the nerve, except in the carpal tunnel, where placement of the needle between the nerve and flexor retinaculum is recommended. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Ultrasound 44:465-469, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Case of huge neurofibroma expanding extra- and intracranially through the enlarged jugular foramen. CT scan findings and surgical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanakita, Junya; Imataka, Kiyoharu; Handa, Hajime (Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1984-01-01

    The surgical approach to the jugular foramen has been considered to be very difficult and troublesome, because of the location in which important structures, such as the internal jugular vein, internal carotid artery and lower cranial nerves, converge in the narrow deep space. A case of huge neurofibroma, which extended from the tentorium cerebelli through the dilated jugular foramen to the level of the vertebral body of C/sub 3/ was presented. A 12-year-old girl was admitted with complaints of visual disturbance and palsy of the V-XII cranial nerves of the left side. Plain skull film showed prominent widening of the cranial sutures and enlargement of the sella turcica. Horizontal CT scan with contrast showed symmetrical ventricular dilatation and a heterogeneously enhanced mass, which was situated mainly in the left CP angle. Coronal CT scan with contrast revealed a huge mass and enlarged jugular foramen, through which the tumor extended to the level of the vertebral body of C/sub 3/. Occlusion of the sigmoid sinus and the internal jugular vein of the left side was noticed in the vertebral angiography. Two-stage approach, the first one for removal of the intracranial tumor and the second one for extracranial tumor, was performed for its huge tumor. Several authors have reported excellent surgical approaches for the tumors situated in the jugular foramen. By our approach, modifying Gardner's original one, a wide operative field was obtained to remove the tumor around the jugular foramen with success. Our approach for the jugular foramen was described with illustrations.

  11. Genetic factors for nerve susceptibility to injuries-lessons from PMP22 deifciency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Li

    2014-01-01

    Genetic factors may be learnt from families with gene mutations that render nerve-injury sus-ceptibility even to ordinary physical activities. A typical example is hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP). HNPP is caused by a heterozygous deletion of PMP22 gene. PMP22 deficiency disrupts myelin junctions (such as tight junction and adherens junctions), leading to abnormally increased myelin permeability that explains the nerve susceptibility to injury. This ifnding should motivate investigators to identify additional genetic factors contribut-ing to nerve vulnerability of injury.

  12. Imaging of muscular denervation secondary to motor cranial nerve dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connor, S.E.J. [Neuroradiology Department, Kings College Hospital, Denmark Hill, London SE5 9RS (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: sejconnor@tiscali.co.uk; Chaudhary, N. [Neuroradiology Department, Kings College Hospital, Denmark Hill, London SE5 9RS (United Kingdom); Fareedi, S. [Neuroradiology Department, Kings College Hospital, Denmark Hill, London SE5 9RS (United Kingdom); Woo, E.K. [Neuroradiology Department, Kings College Hospital, Denmark Hill, London SE5 9RS (United Kingdom)

    2006-08-15

    The effects of motor cranial nerve dysfunction on the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances of head and neck muscles are reviewed. Patterns of denervation changes are described and illustrated for V, VII, X, XI and XII cranial nerves. Recognition of the range of imaging manifestations, including the temporal changes in muscular appearances and associated muscular grafting or compensatory hypertrophy, will avoid misinterpretation as local disease. It will also prompt the radiologist to search for underlying cranial nerve pathology, which may be clinically occult. The relevant cranial nerve motor division anatomy will be described to enable a focussed search for such a structural abnormality.

  13. Mobility Experiences of Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palisano, Robert J.; Shimmell, Lorie J.; Stewart, Debra; Lawless, John J.; Rosenbaum, Peter L.; Russell, Dianne J.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe how youth with cerebral palsy experience mobility in their daily lives using a phenomenological approach. The participants were 10 youth with cerebral palsy, 17 to 20 years of age, selected using purposeful sampling with maximum variation strategies. A total of 14 interviews were completed. Transcripts…

  14. Mobility Experiences of Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palisano, Robert J.; Shimmell, Lorie J.; Stewart, Debra; Lawless, John J.; Rosenbaum, Peter L.; Russell, Dianne J.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe how youth with cerebral palsy experience mobility in their daily lives using a phenomenological approach. The participants were 10 youth with cerebral palsy, 17 to 20 years of age, selected using purposeful sampling with maximum variation strategies. A total of 14 interviews were completed. Transcripts…

  15. Clinical practice guideline: Bell's Palsy executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baugh, Reginald F; Basura, Gregory J; Ishii, Lisa E; Schwartz, Seth R; Drumheller, Caitlin Murray; Burkholder, Rebecca; Deckard, Nathan A; Dawson, Cindy; Driscoll, Colin; Gillespie, M Boyd; Gurgel, Richard K; Halperin, John; Khalid, Ayesha N; Kumar, Kaparaboyna Ashok; Micco, Alan; Munsell, Debra; Rosenbaum, Steven; Vaughan, William

    2013-11-01

    The American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation (AAO-HNSF) has published a supplement to this issue featuring the new Clinical Practice Guideline: Bell's Palsy. To assist in implementing the guideline recommendations, this article summarizes the rationale, purpose, and key action statements. The 11 recommendations developed encourage accurate and efficient diagnosis and treatment and, when applicable, facilitate patient follow-up to address the management of long-term sequelae or evaluation of new or worsening symptoms not indicative of Bell's palsy. There are myriad treatment options for Bell's palsy; some controversy exists regarding the effectiveness of several of these options, and there are consequent variations in care. In addition, there are numerous diagnostic tests available that are used in the evaluation of patients with Bell's palsy. Many of these tests are of questionable benefit in Bell's palsy. Furthermore, while patients with Bell's palsy enter the health care system with facial paresis/paralysis as a primary complaint, not all patients with facial paresis/paralysis have Bell's palsy. It is a concern that patients with alternative underlying etiologies may be misdiagnosed or have an unnecessary delay in diagnosis. All of these quality concerns provide an important opportunity for improvement in the diagnosis and management of patients with Bell's palsy.

  16. [Surgical treatment of benign recurrent goiter with pre-existing unilateral recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis--a report of experiences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasiak, J; Pohle, T

    1996-01-01

    Operations for recurrent goiter are considered to range among the most difficult procedures in thyroid surgery, because the risk of a permanent recurrent nerve palsy increases to 10 or 30%. In case of pre-existing unilateral lesion of the nerve the danger of bilateral paralysis of the vocal chord will become even larger. The results from 29 patients with an intracapsular resection (nearly total removement of the thyroid tissue without the preparation of the recurrent nerve) are presented and compared with those found in 4 patients with an extracapsular approach. All four patients, where the operation was performed extracapsularly, must be tracheotomized although the palsy did recover within 21 days till 14 months. After an intracapsular resection of the recurrence at the side of an intact nerve (29 patients) a tracheotomy had not been necessary.

  17. Correlation between current intensity and effective duration in the treatment of botulinus toxin for cerebral palsy by myoelectricity locating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianjun Liu; Shurong Ji; Yingyuan Hu; Yanchun Li; Weihong Wu; Huabao Lu; Yan Zhang

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Researches prove that the treatment of cerebral palsy by botulinus toxin (BTX-A) can improve effect and prolong effective duration. Current intensity is the important factor during injection.OBJECTIVE: To observe the changes of motor function and muscular intensity of children with spastic cerebral palsy after injecting BTX-A and analyze correlation between current intensity and effective duration.DESIGN: Cases control trial before and after nerves block.SETTING: Capital University of Medical Sciences, China Rehabilitation Research Center.PARTICTPANTS: From June 2002 to November 2004, 14 children with spastic cerebral palsy were treated by BTX-A block. All children were hospitalized in the Children Rehabilitation Department of China Rehabilitation Research Center. The children included 9 male and 5 female, and ranged from 4 to 13 years old, and average age was (6±2) years. Muscular tension ranged from grade 1 to grade 3. The diagnosis and the tape of cerebral palsy based on standard of the Fist Nationwide Cerebral Palsy Symposium, and all children were diagnosed with electroencephalogram (EEG), CT and MRI, and permitted by their guardians.METHODS: ① Locating and calculation: To locate block points by G6805-2A electro-therapeutic apparatus (Shanghai Huayi Electronic Instrument Plant) at the least stimulating current (continuous wave; impulse frequency; 2.667-83.333 Hz; current intensity: 0-6 mA; voltage: 6 V) to touch off muscles contraction. The current intensity of each point was recorded, and the average current intensity of each patient was calculated at the same time. ② Dose of BTX-A: Basing upon the spastic degree and weight of patients, the dose was made certain:dose (IU)=(scores of Modified Ashworth Scale +2.5) ×weight (kg). The number of the block points was in all 4.The dose of injection ranged from 50 IU to 160 IU with the average of (73.6±25.8) IU. The BTX-A was made by Lanzhou Institute of Biological Products, and each bottle contains

  18. Isolated unilateral oculomotor nerve neuropraxia following a trivial fall in a patient with calcified posterior petroclinoid ligament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, Maneesha Anil

    2015-01-01

    Isolated traumatic oculomotor nerve palsy caused by a trivial fall is extremely rare. We report a case of this condition. A 49-year-old woman had distal radius fracture and ptosis on the same side after having a trivial domestic fall. She did not show any clinical or radiological signs of head injury. Computerized tomography revealed a calcified posterior petroclinoid ligament which has direct anatomical and pathological relation with the oculomotor nerve. PMID:25767590

  19. Combined radial and median nerve injury in diaphyseal fracture of humerus: a case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rajesh Rohilla; Rohit Singla; Narender Kumar Magu; Roop Singh; Ashish Devgun; Reetadyuti Mukhopadhyay; Paritosh Gogna

    2013-01-01

    Radial nerve palsy is the most common neurological involvement in humeral shaft fractures.But combined radial and median nerve injury in a closed diaphyseal fracture of the humerus is rare.Combined injury to both radial and median nerve can cause significant disability.A detailed clinical examination is therefore necessary following humeral shaft fractures.We report a patient with closed diaphyseal humeral fracture (AO 12A-2.3) together with radial and median nerve palsy,its management and review of the literature.As the patient had two nerves involved,surgical exploration was planned.Fracture was reduced and fixed with a 4.5 mm narrow dynamic compression pla te.There was no external injury to both radial and median nerves on surgical exploration.Neurological recovery started at 3 weeks' follow-up.Complete recovery was seen at 12 weeks.Careful clinical examination is of the utmost importance in early diagnosis of combined nerve injuries,which allows better management and rehabilitation of the patient.

  20. Ulnar Nerve Injury as a Result of Galeazzi Fracture: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roettges, Paul; Turker, Tolga

    2017-09-01

    Sparse documentation of Galeazzi fracture with associated nerve injury exists in the medical literature. The purpose of this report is to review the available literature in regard to incidence, nerve injury type, treatment strategies, and expected outcomes. We present a classic Galeazzi fracture dislocation with associated complete ulnar nerve transection injury at the level of the wrist. After rigid internal bony stabilization, allograft nerve repair was performed. The patient's presentation, operative management, recovery, and a thorough literature review are discussed. Fracture union was attained with near full wrist and elbow range of motion. Despite lack of ulnar nerve function return, the patient was able to resume manual labor occupation. Despite its close proximity to the dislocating distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ), thorough review reveals rare associated ulnar nerve palsy. If there is suspicion for nerve injury in the setting of open DRUJ dislocation, the nerve should be explored to identify possible entrapment or transection. Literature supports likely return of nerve function in cases of intact nerve; however, management of nerve transection remains debatable.