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Sample records for nelf controls transcription

  1. Negative elongation factor NELF controls transcription of immediate early genes in a stimulus-specific manner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Toshitsugu; Piuz, Isabelle; Schlegel, Werner

    2009-01-01

    The transcription rate of immediate early genes (IEGs) is controlled directly by transcription elongation factors at the transcription elongation step. Negative elongation factor (NELF) and 5,6-dichloro-1-β-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB) sensitivity-inducing factor (DSIF) stall RNA polymerase II (pol II) soon after transcription initiation. Upon induction of IEG transcription, DSIF is converted into an accelerator for pol II elongation. To address whether and how NELF as well as DSIF controls overall IEG transcription, its expression was reduced using stable RNA interference in GH4C1 cells. NELF knock-down reduced thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH)-induced transcription of the IEGs c-fos, MKP-1, and junB. In contrast, epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced transcription of these IEGs was unaltered or even slightly increased by NELF knock-down. Thus, stable knock-down of NELF affects IEG transcription stimulation-specifically. Conversely, DSIF knock-down reduced both TRH- and EGF-induced transcription of the three IEGs. Interestingly, TRH-induced activation of the MAP kinase pathway, a pathway essential for transcription of the three IEGs, was down-regulated by NELF knock-down. Thus, stable knock-down of NELF, by modulating intracellular signaling pathways, caused stimulation-specific loss of IEG transcription. These observations indicate that NELF controls overall IEG transcription via multiple mechanisms both directly and indirectly

  2. Enhancer RNA facilitates NELF release from immediate early genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaukowitch, Katie; Joo, Jae-Yeol; Liu, Xihui; Watts, Jonathan K; Martinez, Carlos; Kim, Tae-Kyung

    2014-10-02

    Enhancer RNAs (eRNAs) are a class of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNA) expressed from active enhancers, whose function and action mechanism are yet to be firmly established. Here we show that eRNAs facilitate the transition of paused RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) into productive elongation by acting as a decoy for the negative elongation factor (NELF) complex upon induction of immediate early genes (IEGs) in neurons. eRNAs are synthesized prior to the culmination of target gene transcription and interact with the NELF complex. Knockdown of eRNAs expressed at neuronal enhancers impairs transient release of NELF from the specific target promoters during transcriptional activation, coinciding with a decrease in target mRNA induction. The enhancer-promoter interaction was unaffected by eRNA knockdown. Instead, chromatin looping might enable eRNAs to act locally at a specific promoter. Our findings highlight the spatiotemporally regulated action mechanism of eRNAs during early transcriptional elongation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Transcriptional control of megakaryocyte development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, A N

    2007-10-15

    Megakaryocytes are highly specialized cells that arise from a bipotent megakaryocytic-erythroid progenitor (MEP). This developmental leap requires coordinated activation of megakaryocyte-specific genes, radical changes in cell cycle properties, and active prevention of erythroid differentiation. These programs result from upregulation of megakaryocyte-selective transcription factors, downregulation of erythroid-selective transcription factors and ongoing mediation of common erythro-megakaryocytic transcription factors. Unlike most developmental programs, no single lineage-unique family of master regulators exerts executive control over the megakaryocytic plan. Rather, an assemblage of non-unique factors and signals converge to determine lineage and differentiation. In human megakaryopoiesis, hereditary disorders of platelet production have confirmed contributions from three distinct transcription factor families. Murine models have extended this repertoire to include multiple additional factors. At a mechanistic level, the means by which these non-unique factors collaborate in the establishment of a perfectly unique cell type remains a central question.

  4. Transcriptional control of t lymphocyte differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.J.T. Staal (Frank); F. Weerkamp (Floor); A.W. Langerak (Anton); R.W. Hendriks (Rudi); H.C. Clevers (Hans)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractInitiation of gene transcription by transcription factors (TFs) is an important regulatory step in many developmental processes. The differentiation of T cell progenitors in the thymus is tightly controlled by signaling molecules, ultimately activating

  5. Specificity and robustness in transcription control networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Anirvan M; Djordjevic, Marko; Shraiman, Boris I

    2002-02-19

    Recognition by transcription factors of the regulatory DNA elements upstream of genes is the fundamental step in controlling gene expression. How does the necessity to provide stability with respect to mutation constrain the organization of transcription control networks? We examine the mutation load of a transcription factor interacting with a set of n regulatory response elements as a function of the factor/DNA binding specificity and conclude on theoretical grounds that the optimal specificity decreases with n. The predicted correlation between variability of binding sites (for a given transcription factor) and their number is supported by the genomic data for Escherichia coli. The analysis of E. coli genomic data was carried out using an algorithm suggested by the biophysical model of transcription factor/DNA binding. Complete results of the search for candidate transcription factor binding sites are available at http://www.physics.rockefeller.edu/~boris/public/search_ecoli.

  6. Transcriptional networks and chromatin remodeling controlling adipogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siersbæk, Rasmus; Nielsen, Ronni; Mandrup, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    Adipocyte differentiation is tightly controlled by a transcriptional cascade, which directs the extensive reprogramming of gene expression required to convert fibroblast-like precursor cells into mature lipid-laden adipocytes. Recent global analyses of transcription factor binding and chromatin...... remodeling have revealed 'snapshots' of this cascade and the chromatin landscape at specific time-points of differentiation. These studies demonstrate that multiple adipogenic transcription factors co-occupy hotspots characterized by an open chromatin structure and specific epigenetic modifications....... Such transcription factor hotspots are likely to represent key signaling nodes which integrate multiple adipogenic signals at specific chromatin sites, thereby facilitating coordinated action on gene expression....

  7. Optogenetic control of transcription in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongtao Liu

    Full Text Available Light inducible protein-protein interactions are powerful tools to manipulate biological processes. Genetically encoded light-gated proteins for controlling precise cellular behavior are a new and promising technology, called optogenetics. Here we exploited the blue light-induced transcription system in yeast and zebrafish, based on the blue light dependent interaction between two plant proteins, blue light photoreceptor Cryptochrome 2 (CRY2 and the bHLH transcription factor CIB1 (CRY-interacting bHLH 1. We demonstrate the utility of this system by inducing rapid transcription suppression and activation in zebrafish.

  8. Controllability analysis of transcriptional regulatory networks reveals circular control patterns among transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Österlund, Tobias; Bordel, Sergio; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    we analyze the topology and organization of nine transcriptional regulatory networks for E. coli, yeast, mouse and human, and we evaluate how the structure of these networks influences two of their key properties, namely controllability and stability. We calculate the controllability for each network......Transcriptional regulation is the most committed type of regulation in living cells where transcription factors (TFs) control the expression of their target genes and TF expression is controlled by other TFs forming complex transcriptional regulatory networks that can be highly interconnected. Here...... as a measure of the organization and interconnectivity of the network. We find that the number of driver nodes n(D) needed to control the whole network is 64% of the TFs in the E. coli transcriptional regulatory network in contrast to only 17% for the yeast network, 4% for the mouse network and 8...

  9. A Phase Separation Model for Transcriptional Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnisz, Denes; Shrinivas, Krishna; Young, Richard A; Chakraborty, Arup K; Sharp, Phillip A

    2017-03-23

    Phase-separated multi-molecular assemblies provide a general regulatory mechanism to compartmentalize biochemical reactions within cells. We propose that a phase separation model explains established and recently described features of transcriptional control. These features include the formation of super-enhancers, the sensitivity of super-enhancers to perturbation, the transcriptional bursting patterns of enhancers, and the ability of an enhancer to produce simultaneous activation at multiple genes. This model provides a conceptual framework to further explore principles of gene control in mammals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Transcriptional control of mitosis: deregulation and cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somsubhra eNath

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Research over the past few decades has well established the molecular functioning of mitosis. Deregulation of these functions has also been attributed to the generation of aneuploidy in different tumor types. Numerous studies have given insight into the regulation of mitosis by cell cycle specific proteins. Optimum abundance of these proteins is pivotal to timely execution of mitosis. Aberrant expressions of these mitotic proteins have been reported in different cancer types. Several post-transcriptional mechanisms and their interplay have subsequently been identified that control the level of mitotic proteins. However, to date, infrequent incidences of cancer-associated mutations have been reported for the genes expressing these proteins. Therefore, altered expression of these mitotic regulators in tumor samples can largely be attributed to transcriptional deregulation. This review discusses the biology of transcriptional control for mitosis and evaluates its role in the generation of aneuploidy and tumorigenesis.

  11. Transcriptional control of the cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, I; Dynlacht, B D

    1996-06-01

    Although a significant amount of evidence has demonstrated that there are intimate connections between transcriptional controls and cell cycle regulation, the precise mechanisms underlying these connections remain largely obscure. A number of recent advances have helped to define how critical cell cycle regulators, such as the retinoblastoma family of tumor suppressor proteins and the cyclin-dependent kinases, might function on a biochemical level and how such mechanisms of action have been conserved not only in the regulation of transcription by all three RNA polymerases but also across species lines. In addition, the use of in vivo techniques has begun to explain how the activity of the E2F transcription factor family is tied to the cell cycle dependent expression of target genes.

  12. Mitotic Transcriptional Activation: Clearance of Actively Engaged Pol II via Transcriptional Elongation Control in Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Kaiwei; Woodfin, Ashley R; Slaughter, Brian D; Unruh, Jay R; Box, Andrew C; Rickels, Ryan A; Gao, Xin; Haug, Jeffrey S; Jaspersen, Sue L; Shilatifard, Ali

    2015-11-05

    Although it is established that some general transcription factors are inactivated at mitosis, many details of mitotic transcription inhibition (MTI) and its underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. We have identified mitotic transcriptional activation (MTA) as a key regulatory step to control transcription in mitosis for genes with transcriptionally engaged RNA polymerase II (Pol II) to activate and transcribe until the end of the gene to clear Pol II from mitotic chromatin, followed by global impairment of transcription reinitiation through MTI. Global nascent RNA sequencing and RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrate the existence of transcriptionally engaged Pol II in early mitosis. Both genetic and chemical inhibition of P-TEFb in mitosis lead to delays in the progression of cell division. Together, our study reveals a mechanism for MTA and MTI whereby transcriptionally engaged Pol II can progress into productive elongation and finish transcription to allow proper cellular division. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Transcriptional programs controlling perinatal lung maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Wang, Yanhua; Besnard, Valérie; Ikegami, Machiko; Wert, Susan E; Heffner, Caleb; Murray, Stephen A; Donahue, Leah Rae; Whitsett, Jeffrey A

    2012-01-01

    The timing of lung maturation is controlled precisely by complex genetic and cellular programs. Lung immaturity following preterm birth frequently results in Respiratory Distress Syndrome (RDS) and Broncho-Pulmonary Dysplasia (BPD), which are leading causes of mortality and morbidity in preterm infants. Mechanisms synchronizing gestational length and lung maturation remain to be elucidated. In this study, we designed a genome-wide mRNA expression time-course study from E15.5 to Postnatal Day 0 (PN0) using lung RNAs from C57BL/6J (B6) and A/J mice that differ in gestational length by ∼30 hr (B6controlling lung maturation. We identified both temporal and strain dependent gene expression patterns during lung maturation. For time dependent changes, cell adhesion, vasculature development, and lipid metabolism/transport were major bioprocesses induced during the saccular stage of lung development at E16.5-E17.5. CEBPA, PPARG, VEGFA, CAV1 and CDH1 were found to be key signaling and transcriptional regulators of these processes. Innate defense/immune responses were induced at later gestational ages (E18.5-20.5), STAT1, AP1, and EGFR being important regulators of these responses. Expression of RNAs associated with the cell cycle and chromatin assembly was repressed during prenatal lung maturation and was regulated by FOXM1, PLK1, chromobox, and high mobility group families of transcription factors. Strain dependent lung mRNA expression differences peaked at E18.5. At this time, mRNAs regulating surfactant and innate immunity were more abundantly expressed in lungs of B6 (short gestation) than in A/J (long gestation) mice, while expression of genes involved in chromatin assembly and histone modification were expressed at lower levels in B6 than in A/J mice. The present study systemically mapped key regulators, bioprocesses, and transcriptional networks controlling lung maturation, providing the basis for new therapeutic strategies to enhance lung function in preterm

  14. Transcription-associated quality control of mRNP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmid, Manfred; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2013-01-01

    Although a prime purpose of transcription is to produce RNA, a substantial amount of transcript is nevertheless turned over very early in its lifetime. During transcription RNAs are matured by nucleases from longer precursors and activities are also employed to exert quality control over the RNA...

  15. Transcription-dependent degradation controls the stability of the SREBP family of transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundqvist, Anders; Ericsson, Johan

    2003-11-25

    Cholesterol metabolism is tightly controlled by members of the sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) family of transcription factors. Here we demonstrate that the ubiquitination and degradation of SREBPs depend on their transcriptional activity. Mutations in the transactivation or DNA-binding domains of SREBPs inhibit their transcriptional activity and stabilize the proteins. The transcriptional activity and degradation of these mutants are restored when fused to heterologous transactivation or DNA-binding domains. When SREBP1a was fused to the DBD of Gal4, the ubiquitination and degradation of the fusion protein depended on coexpression of a promoter-reporter gene containing Gal4-binding sites. In addition, disruption of the interaction between WT SREBP and endogenous p300/CBP resulted in inhibition of SREBP-dependent transcription and stabilization of SREBP. Chemical inhibitors of transcription reduced the degradation of transcriptionally active SREBP1a, whereas they had no effect on the stability of transcriptionally inactive mutants, demonstrating that transcriptional activation plays an important role in the degradation of SREBPs. Thus, transcription-dependent degradation of SREBP constitutes a feedback mechanism to regulate the expression of genes involved in cholesterol metabolism and may represent a general mechanism to regulate the duration of transcriptional responses.

  16. Transcription control engineering and applications in synthetic biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Engstrom

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In synthetic biology, researchers assemble biological components in new ways to produce systems with practical applications. One of these practical applications is control of the flow of genetic information (from nucleic acid to protein, a.k.a. gene regulation. Regulation is critical for optimizing protein (and therefore activity levels and the subsequent levels of metabolites and other cellular properties. The central dogma of molecular biology posits that information flow commences with transcription, and accordingly, regulatory tools targeting transcription have received the most attention in synthetic biology. In this mini-review, we highlight many past successes and summarize the lessons learned in developing tools for controlling transcription. In particular, we focus on engineering studies where promoters and transcription terminators (cis-factors were directly engineered and/or isolated from DNA libraries. We also review several well-characterized transcription regulators (trans-factors, giving examples of how cis- and trans-acting factors have been combined to create digital and analogue switches for regulating transcription in response to various signals. Last, we provide examples of how engineered transcription control systems have been used in metabolic engineering and more complicated genetic circuits. While most of our mini-review focuses on the well-characterized bacterium Escherichia coli, we also provide several examples of the use of transcription control engineering in non-model organisms. Similar approaches have been applied outside the bacterial kingdom indicating that the lessons learned from bacterial studies may be generalized for other organisms.

  17. Transcription control engineering and applications in synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engstrom, Michael D; Pfleger, Brian F

    2017-09-01

    In synthetic biology, researchers assemble biological components in new ways to produce systems with practical applications. One of these practical applications is control of the flow of genetic information (from nucleic acid to protein), a.k.a. gene regulation. Regulation is critical for optimizing protein (and therefore activity) levels and the subsequent levels of metabolites and other cellular properties. The central dogma of molecular biology posits that information flow commences with transcription, and accordingly, regulatory tools targeting transcription have received the most attention in synthetic biology. In this mini-review, we highlight many past successes and summarize the lessons learned in developing tools for controlling transcription. In particular, we focus on engineering studies where promoters and transcription terminators ( cis -factors) were directly engineered and/or isolated from DNA libraries. We also review several well-characterized transcription regulators ( trans- factors), giving examples of how cis- and trans -acting factors have been combined to create digital and analogue switches for regulating transcription in response to various signals. Last, we provide examples of how engineered transcription control systems have been used in metabolic engineering and more complicated genetic circuits. While most of our mini-review focuses on the well-characterized bacterium Escherichia coli , we also provide several examples of the use of transcription control engineering in non-model organisms. Similar approaches have been applied outside the bacterial kingdom indicating that the lessons learned from bacterial studies may be generalized for other organisms.

  18. How salicylic acid takes transcriptional control over jasmonic acid signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotte eCaarls

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Transcriptional regulation is a central process in plant immunity. The induction or repression of defense genes is orchestrated by signaling networks that are directed by plant hormones of which salicylic acid (SA and jasmonic acid (JA are the major players. Extensive cross-communication between the hormone signaling pathways allows for fine tuning of transcriptional programs, determining resistance to invaders and trade-offs with plant development. Here, we give an overview of how SA can control transcriptional reprogramming of JA-induced genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. SA can influence activity and/or localization of transcriptional regulators by post-translational modifications of transcription factors and co-regulators. SA-induced redox changes, mediated by thioredoxins and glutaredoxins, modify transcriptional regulators that are involved in suppression of JA-dependent genes, such as NPR1 and TGA transcription factors, which affects their localization or DNA binding activity. Furthermore, SA can mediate sequestering of JA-responsive transcription factors away from their target genes by stalling them in the cytosol or in complexes with repressor proteins in the nucleus. SA also affects JA-induced transcription by inducing degradation of transcription factors with an activating role in JA signaling, as was shown for the ERF transcription factor ORA59. Additionally, SA can induce negative regulators, among which WRKY transcription factors, that can directly or indirectly inhibit JA-responsive gene expression. Finally, at the DNA level, modification of histones by SA-dependent factors can result in repression of JA-responsive genes. These diverse and complex regulatory mechanisms affect important signaling hubs in the integration of hormone signaling networks. Some pathogens have evolved effectors that highjack hormone crosstalk mechanisms for their own good, which are described in this review as well.

  19. Ranges of control in the transcriptional regulation of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenschein, Nikolaus; Hütt, Marc-Thorsten; Stoyan, Helga; Stoyan, Dietrich

    2009-12-24

    The positioning of genes in the genome is an important evolutionary degree of freedom for organizing gene regulation. Statistical properties of these distributions have been studied particularly in relation to the transcriptional regulatory network. The systematics of gene-gene distances then become important sources of information on the control, which different biological mechanisms exert on gene expression. Here we study a set of categories, which has to our knowledge not been analyzed before. We distinguish between genes that do not participate in the transcriptional regulatory network (i.e. that are according to current knowledge not producing transcription factors and do not possess binding sites for transcription factors in their regulatory region), and genes that via transcription factors either are regulated by or regulate other genes. We find that the two types of genes ("isolated" and "regulatory" genes) show a clear statistical repulsion and have different ranges of correlations. In particular we find that isolated genes have a preference for shorter intergenic distances. These findings support previous evidence from gene expression patterns for two distinct logical types of control, namely digital control (i.e. network-based control mediated by dedicated transcription factors) and analog control (i.e. control based on genome structure and mediated by neighborhood on the genome).

  20. Evaluation of the expression of internal control transcripts by real ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of the expression of internal control transcripts by real-time RT-PCR analysis during tomato flower abscission. ... The free software-based applications NormFinder and qBase PLUS were used to statistically identify the best internal controls for a given set of biological samples. The expression stability of a number ...

  1. Control of Transcriptional Elongation by RNA Polymerase II: A Retrospective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kris Brannan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The origins of our current understanding of control of transcription elongation lie in pioneering experiments that mapped RNA polymerase II on viral and cellular genes. These studies first uncovered the surprising excess of polymerase molecules that we now know to be situated at the at the 5′ ends of most genes in multicellular organisms. The pileup of pol II near transcription start sites reflects a ubiquitous bottle-neck that limits elongation right at the start of the transcription elongation. Subsequent seminal work identified conserved protein factors that positively and negatively control the flux of polymerase through this bottle-neck, and make a major contribution to control of gene expression.

  2. Transcriptional control of DNA replication licensing by Myc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valovka, Taras; Schönfeld, Manuela; Raffeiner, Philipp; Breuker, Kathrin; Dunzendorfer-Matt, Theresia; Hartl, Markus; Bister, Klaus

    2013-12-01

    The c-myc protooncogene encodes the Myc transcription factor, a global regulator of fundamental cellular processes. Deregulation of c-myc leads to tumorigenesis, and c-myc is an important driver in human cancer. Myc and its dimerization partner Max are bHLH-Zip DNA binding proteins involved in transcriptional regulation of target genes. Non-transcriptional functions have also been attributed to the Myc protein, notably direct interaction with the pre-replicative complex (pre-RC) controlling the initiation of DNA replication. A key component of the pre-RC is the Cdt1 protein, an essential factor in origin licensing. Here we present data suggesting that the CDT1 gene is a transcriptional target of the Myc-Max complex. Expression of the CDT1 gene in v-myc-transformed cells directly correlates with myc expression. Also, human tumor cells with elevated c-myc expression display increased CDT1 expression. Occupation of the CDT1 promoter by Myc-Max is demonstrated by chromatin immunoprecipitation, and transactivation by Myc-Max is shown in reporter assays. Ectopic expression of CDT1 leads to cell transformation. Our results provide a possible direct mechanistic link of Myc's canonical function as a transcription factor to DNA replication. Furthermore, we suggest that aberrant transcriptional activation of CDT1 by deregulated myc alleles contributes to the genomic instabilities observed in tumor cells.

  3. Transcriptional control of stem cell maintenance in the Drosophila intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardin, Allison J; Perdigoto, Carolina N; Southall, Tony D; Brand, Andrea H; Schweisguth, François

    2010-03-01

    Adult stem cells maintain tissue homeostasis by controlling the proper balance of stem cell self-renewal and differentiation. The adult midgut of Drosophila contains multipotent intestinal stem cells (ISCs) that self-renew and produce differentiated progeny. Control of ISC identity and maintenance is poorly understood. Here we find that transcriptional repression of Notch target genes by a Hairless-Suppressor of Hairless complex is required for ISC maintenance, and identify genes of the Enhancer of split complex [E(spl)-C] as the major targets of this repression. In addition, we find that the bHLH transcription factor Daughterless is essential to maintain ISC identity and that bHLH binding sites promote ISC-specific enhancer activity. We propose that Daughterless-dependent bHLH activity is important for the ISC fate and that E(spl)-C factors inhibit this activity to promote differentiation.

  4. A systems approach to mapping transcriptional networks controlling surfactant homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dave Vrushank

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pulmonary surfactant is required for lung function at birth and throughout life. Lung lipid and surfactant homeostasis requires regulation among multi-tiered processes, coordinating the synthesis of surfactant proteins and lipids, their assembly, trafficking, and storage in type II cells of the lung. The mechanisms regulating these interrelated processes are largely unknown. Results We integrated mRNA microarray data with array independent knowledge using Gene Ontology (GO similarity analysis, promoter motif searching, protein interaction and literature mining to elucidate genetic networks regulating lipid related biological processes in lung. A Transcription factor (TF - target gene (TG similarity matrix was generated by integrating data from different analytic methods. A scoring function was built to rank the likely TF-TG pairs. Using this strategy, we identified and verified critical components of a transcriptional network directing lipogenesis, lipid trafficking and surfactant homeostasis in the mouse lung. Conclusions Within the transcriptional network, SREBP, CEBPA, FOXA2, ETSF, GATA6 and IRF1 were identified as regulatory hubs displaying high connectivity. SREBP, FOXA2 and CEBPA together form a common core regulatory module that controls surfactant lipid homeostasis. The core module cooperates with other factors to regulate lipid metabolism and transport, cell growth and development, cell death and cell mediated immune response. Coordinated interactions of the TFs influence surfactant homeostasis and regulate lung function at birth.

  5. The other side of cardiac Ca2+ signaling: transcriptional control

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    Alejandro eDomínguez-Rodríquez

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Ca2+ is probably the most versatile signal transduction element used by all cell types. In the heart, it is essential to activate cellular contraction in each heartbeat. Nevertheless Ca2+ is not only a key element in excitation-contraction coupling (EC coupling, but it is also a pivotal second messenger in cardiac signal transduction, being able to control processes such as excitability, metabolism, and transcriptional regulation. Regarding the latter, Ca2+ activates Ca2+-dependent transcription factors by a process called excitation-transcription coupling (ET coupling. ET coupling is an integrated process by which the common signaling pathways that regulate EC coupling activate transcription factors. Although ET coupling has been extensively studied in neurons and other cell types, less is known in cardiac muscle. Some hints have been found in studies on the development of cardiac hypertrophy, where two Ca2+-dependent enzymes are key actors: Ca2+/Calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII and phosphatase calcineurin, both of which are activated by the complex Ca2+/ /Calmodulin. The question now is how ET coupling occurs in cardiomyocytes, where intracellular Ca2+ is continuously oscillating. In this focused review, we will draw attention to location of Ca2+ signaling: intranuclear ([Ca2+]n or cytoplasmic ([Ca2+]c, and the specific ionic channels involved in the activation of cardiac ET coupling. Specifically, we will highlight the role of the 1,4,5 inositol triphosphate receptors (IP3Rs in the elevation of [Ca2+]n levels, which are important to locally activate CaMKII, and the role of transient receptor potential channels canonical (TRPCs in [Ca2+]c, needed to activate calcineurin.

  6. Transcriptional control in the segmentation gene network of Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Mark D; Pearce, Michael; Fak, John; Fan, HongQing; Unnerstall, Ulrich; Emberly, Eldon; Rajewsky, Nikolaus; Siggia, Eric D; Gaul, Ulrike

    2004-09-01

    The segmentation gene network of Drosophila consists of maternal and zygotic factors that generate, by transcriptional (cross-) regulation, expression patterns of increasing complexity along the anterior-posterior axis of the embryo. Using known binding site information for maternal and zygotic gap transcription factors, the computer algorithm Ahab recovers known segmentation control elements (modules) with excellent success and predicts many novel modules within the network and genome-wide. We show that novel module predictions are highly enriched in the network and typically clustered proximal to the promoter, not only upstream, but also in intronic space and downstream. When placed upstream of a reporter gene, they consistently drive patterned blastoderm expression, in most cases faithfully producing one or more pattern elements of the endogenous gene. Moreover, we demonstrate for the entire set of known and newly validated modules that Ahab's prediction of binding sites correlates well with the expression patterns produced by the modules, revealing basic rules governing their composition. Specifically, we show that maternal factors consistently act as activators and that gap factors act as repressors, except for the bimodal factor Hunchback. Our data suggest a simple context-dependent rule for its switch from repressive to activating function. Overall, the composition of modules appears well fitted to the spatiotemporal distribution of their positive and negative input factors. Finally, by comparing Ahab predictions with different categories of transcription factor input, we confirm the global regulatory structure of the segmentation gene network, but find odd skipped behaving like a primary pair-rule gene. The study expands our knowledge of the segmentation gene network by increasing the number of experimentally tested modules by 50%. For the first time, the entire set of validated modules is analyzed for binding site composition under a uniform set of

  7. Transcriptional control in the segmentation gene network of Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark D Schroeder

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The segmentation gene network of Drosophila consists of maternal and zygotic factors that generate, by transcriptional (cross- regulation, expression patterns of increasing complexity along the anterior-posterior axis of the embryo. Using known binding site information for maternal and zygotic gap transcription factors, the computer algorithm Ahab recovers known segmentation control elements (modules with excellent success and predicts many novel modules within the network and genome-wide. We show that novel module predictions are highly enriched in the network and typically clustered proximal to the promoter, not only upstream, but also in intronic space and downstream. When placed upstream of a reporter gene, they consistently drive patterned blastoderm expression, in most cases faithfully producing one or more pattern elements of the endogenous gene. Moreover, we demonstrate for the entire set of known and newly validated modules that Ahab's prediction of binding sites correlates well with the expression patterns produced by the modules, revealing basic rules governing their composition. Specifically, we show that maternal factors consistently act as activators and that gap factors act as repressors, except for the bimodal factor Hunchback. Our data suggest a simple context-dependent rule for its switch from repressive to activating function. Overall, the composition of modules appears well fitted to the spatiotemporal distribution of their positive and negative input factors. Finally, by comparing Ahab predictions with different categories of transcription factor input, we confirm the global regulatory structure of the segmentation gene network, but find odd skipped behaving like a primary pair-rule gene. The study expands our knowledge of the segmentation gene network by increasing the number of experimentally tested modules by 50%. For the first time, the entire set of validated modules is analyzed for binding site composition under a

  8. RNA polymerase II transcriptional fidelity control and its functional interplay with DNA modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Liang; Wang, Wei; Chong, Jenny; Shin, Ji Hyun; Xu, Jun; Wang, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Accurate genetic information transfer is essential for life. As a key enzyme involved in the first step of gene expression, RNA polymerase II (Pol II) must maintain high transcriptional fidelity while it reads along DNA template and synthesizes RNA transcript in a stepwise manner during transcription elongation. DNA lesions or modifications may lead to significant changes in transcriptional fidelity or transcription elongation dynamics. In this review, we will summarize recent progress toward understanding the molecular basis of RNA Pol II transcriptional fidelity control and impacts of DNA lesions and modifications on Pol II transcription elongation.

  9. Lipid-activated transcription factors control bile acid glucuronidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier, Olivier; Trottier, Jocelyn; Kaeding, Jenny; Caron, Patrick; Verreault, Mélanie

    2009-06-01

    Bile acids subserve important physiological functions in the control of cholesterol homeostasis. Indeed, hepatic bile acid synthesis and biliary excretion constitute the main route for cholesterol removal from the human body. On the other hand, bile acids serve as natural detergents for the intestinal absorption of dietary cholesterol. However, due to their detergent properties, bile acids are inherently cytotoxic, and their cellular level may be tightly controlled to avoid pathological situations such as cholestasis. Recent investigations have illustrated the crucial roles that a series of ligand-activated transcription factors has in the control of hepatic bile acids synthesis, transport and metabolism. Thus, the lipid-activated nuclear receptors, farnesoid X-receptor (FXR), liver X-receptor (LXR), pregnane X-receptor (PXR) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR alpha), modulate the expression and activity of genes controlling bile acid homeostasis in the liver. Several members of the UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) enzymes family are among the bile acid metabolizing enzymes regulated by these receptors. UGTs catalyze glucuronidation, a major phase II metabolic reaction, which converts hydrophobic bile acids into polar and urinary excretable metabolites. This article summarizes our recent observations on the regulation of bile acid conjugating UGTs upon pharmacological activation of lipid-activated receptors, with a particular interest for the role of PPAR alpha and LXRalpha in controlling human UGT1A3 expression.

  10. Ets transcription factor GABP controls T cell homeostasis and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Chong T; Osmanbeyoglu, Hatice U; Do, Mytrang H; Bivona, Michael R; Toure, Ahmed; Kang, Davina; Xie, Yuchen; Leslie, Christina S; Li, Ming O

    2017-10-20

    Peripheral T cells are maintained in the absence of vigorous stimuli, and respond to antigenic stimulation by initiating cell cycle progression and functional differentiation. Here we show that depletion of the Ets family transcription factor GA-binding protein (GABP) in T cells impairs T-cell homeostasis. In addition, GABP is critically required for antigen-stimulated T-cell responses in vitro and in vivo. Transcriptome and genome-wide GABP-binding site analyses identify GABP direct targets encoding proteins involved in cellular redox balance and DNA replication, including the Mcm replicative helicases. These findings show that GABP has a nonredundant role in the control of T-cell homeostasis and immunity.

  11. Combinatorial transcriptional control of the lactose operon of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlman, Thomas; Zhang, Zhongge; Saier, Milton H; Hwa, Terence

    2007-04-03

    The goal of systems biology is to understand the behavior of the whole in terms of knowledge of the parts. This is hard to achieve in many cases due to the difficulty of characterizing the many constituents involved in a biological system and their complex web of interactions. The lac promoter of Escherichia coli offers the possibility of confronting "system-level" properties of transcriptional regulation with the known biochemistry of the molecular constituents and their mutual interactions. Such confrontations can reveal previously unknown constituents and interactions, as well as offer insight into how the components work together as a whole. Here we study the combinatorial control of the lac promoter by the regulators Lac repressor (LacR) and cAMP-receptor protein (CRP). A previous in vivo study [Setty Y, Mayo AE, Surette MG, Alon U (2003) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 100:7702-7707] found gross disagreement between the observed promoter activities and the expected behavior based on the known molecular mechanisms. We repeated the study by identifying and removing several extraneous factors that significantly modulated the expression of the lac promoter. Through quantitative, systematic characterization of promoter activity for a number of key mutants and guided by the thermodynamic model of transcriptional regulation, we were able to account for the combinatorial control of the lac promoter quantitatively, in terms of a cooperative interaction between CRP and LacR-mediated DNA looping. Specifically, our analysis indicates that the sensitivity of the inducer response results from LacR-mediated DNA looping, which is significantly enhanced by CRP.

  12. Transcriptional control in alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and associated genes, proteins, and methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Brady D; Thompson, David N; Apel, William A; Thompson, Vicki S; Reed, David W; Lacey, Jeffrey A

    2016-11-22

    Isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius are provided. Further provided are methods of modulating transcription or transcription or transcriptional control using isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius.

  13. Transcriptional control in Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and associated genes, proteins, and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Brady Deneys; Thompson, David N; Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki Slavchev; Reed, David W; Lacey, Jeffrey A

    2014-05-06

    Isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius are provided. Further provided are methods of modulating transcription or transcription or transcriptional control using isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius.

  14. Transcriptional control of secondary growth and wood formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan Du; Andrew Groover

    2010-01-01

    Secondary growth and wood formation are products of the vascular cambium, a lateral meristem. Although the mechanisms have only recently begun to be uncovered, transcriptional regulation appears increasingly central to the regulation of secondary growth. The importance of transcriptional regulation is illustrated by the correlation of expression of specific classes of...

  15. Controlling transcription fidelity via TATA-binding protein dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, M.J.E.

    2015-01-01

    Transcription underlies all cellular processes and responses to internal and external cues. Deregulation of transcription has implications for the fitness of the cell or organism. During my PhD I have investigated the importance of proper TATA-binding protein (TBP) regulation as a mechanism to

  16. Transcription factor PIF4 controls the thermosensory activation of flowering

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, S. Vinod

    2012-03-21

    Plant growth and development are strongly affected by small differences in temperature. Current climate change has already altered global plant phenology and distribution, and projected increases in temperature pose a significant challenge to agriculture. Despite the important role of temperature on plant development, the underlying pathways are unknown. It has previously been shown that thermal acceleration of flowering is dependent on the florigen, FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT). How this occurs is, however, not understood, because the major pathway known to upregulate FT, the photoperiod pathway, is not required for thermal acceleration of flowering. Here we demonstrate a direct mechanism by which increasing temperature causes the bHLH transcription factor PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR4 (PIF4) to activate FT. Our findings provide a new understanding of how plants control their timing of reproduction in response to temperature. Flowering time is an important trait in crops as well as affecting the life cycles of pollinator species. A molecular understanding of how temperature affects flowering will be important for mitigating the effects of climate change. © 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  17. First Exon Length Controls Active Chromatin Signatures and Transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole I. Bieberstein

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Here, we explore the role of splicing in transcription, employing both genome-wide analysis of human ChIP-seq data and experimental manipulation of exon-intron organization in transgenic cell lines. We show that the activating histone modifications H3K4me3 and H3K9ac map specifically to first exon-intron boundaries. This is surprising, because these marks help recruit general transcription factors (GTFs to promoters. In genes with long first exons, promoter-proximal levels of H3K4me3 and H3K9ac are greatly reduced; consequently, GTFs and RNA polymerase II are low at transcription start sites (TSSs and exhibit a second, promoter-distal peak from which transcription also initiates. In contrast, short first exons lead to increased H3K4me3 and H3K9ac at promoters, higher expression levels, accuracy in TSS usage, and a lower frequency of antisense transcription. Therefore, first exon length is predictive for gene activity. Finally, splicing inhibition and intron deletion reduce H3K4me3 levels and transcriptional output. Thus, gene architecture and splicing determines transcription quantity and quality as well as chromatin signatures.

  18. Glucocorticoid control of gene transcription in neural tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morsink, Maarten Christian

    2007-01-01

    Glucocorticoid hormones exert modulatory effects on neural function in a delayed genomic fashion. The two receptor types that can bind glucocorticoids, the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), are ligand-inducible transcription factors. Therefore, changes in gene

  19. Transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase in the control of ketogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegardt, F G

    1998-10-01

    Mitochondrial and cytosolic HMG-CoA synthases are encoded by two different genes. Control of ketogenesis is exerted by transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase. Fasting, cAMP, and fatty acids increase its transcriptional rate, while refeeding and insulin repress it. Fatty acids increase transcription through peroxisomal proliferator regulatory element (PPRE), to which peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) can bind. Other transcription factors such as chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor (COUP-TF) and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 (HNF-4) compete for the PPRE site, modulating the response of PPAR.

  20. Genome-wide mapping of boundary element-associated factor (BEAF) binding sites in Drosophila melanogaster links BEAF to transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Nan; Emberly, Eldon; Cuvier, Olivier; Hart, Craig M

    2009-07-01

    Insulator elements play a role in gene regulation that is potentially linked to nuclear organization. Boundary element-associated factors (BEAFs) 32A and 32B associate with hundreds of sites on Drosophila polytene chromosomes. We hybridized DNA isolated by chromatin immunoprecipitation to genome tiling microarrays to construct a genome-wide map of BEAF binding locations. A distinct difference in the association of 32A and 32B with chromatin was noted. We identified 1,820 BEAF peaks and found that more than 85% were less than 300 bp from transcription start sites. Half are between head-to-head gene pairs. BEAF-associated genes are transcriptionally active as judged by the presence of RNA polymerase II, dimethylated histone H3 K4, and the alternative histone H3.3. Forty percent of these genes are also associated with the polymerase negative elongation factor NELF. Like NELF-associated genes, most BEAF-associated genes are highly expressed. Using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, we found that the expression levels of most BEAF-associated genes decrease in embryos and cultured cells lacking BEAF. These results provide an unexpected link between BEAF and transcription, suggesting that BEAF plays a role in maintaining most associated promoter regions in an environment that facilitates high transcription levels.

  1. The Expression of BAFF Is Controlled by IRF Transcription Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöstrand, Maria; Johansson, Alina; Aqrawi, Lara; Olsson, Tomas; Wahren-Herlenius, Marie; Espinosa, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) are typically characterized by the presence of autoantibodies and an IFN-signature. The strength of the IFN-signature positively correlates with disease severity, suggesting that type I IFNs are active players in these diseases. BAFF is a cytokine critical for development and proper selection of B cells, and the targeting of BAFF has emerged as a successful treatment strategy of SLE. Previous reports have suggested that BAFF expression is directly induced by type I IFNs, but the precise mechanism for this remains unknown. In this article, we demonstrate that BAFF is a bona fide ISG and that IFN regulatory factors (IRFs) control the expression of BAFF. We identify IRF1 and IRF2 as positive regulators of BAFF transcription and IRF4 and IRF8 as potent repressors; in addition, we have mapped the precise binding site for these factors in the BAFF promoter. IFN-β injections induced BAFF expression mainly in neutrophils and monocytes, and BAFF expression in neutrophils from pSS patients strongly correlated with the strength of the IFN-signature. In summary, we show that BAFF expression is directly induced by type I IFNs via IRF1 and IRF2, whereas IRF4 and IRF8 are negative regulators of BAFF expression. These data suggest that type I IFN blockade in SLE and pSS patients will lead to downregulation of BAFF and a consequential reduction of autoreactive B cell clones and autoantibodies. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  2. Transcriptional control of the endogenous MYC protooncogene by antisense RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, K.; Imamoto, F.

    1987-01-01

    A plasmid carrying antisense human MYC DNA and the gene encoding Esherichia coli xanthine/guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (Ecogpt) was introduced into human promyelocytic leukemia cell line HL-60 by protoplast fusion. High-level expression of antisense MYC RNA was obtained by selecting cells resistant to progressively higher levels of mycophenolic acid over a period of > 6 months. The constitutive production of MYC protein in clones producing high levels of antisense MYC RNA was reduced by 70% compared to parental HL-60 cells. Inhibition of MYC expression was observed not only at the translational but also at the transcriptional level, implying the antisense RNA can regulate transcription of the MYC gene. The Pst I-Pvu II fragment (920 base pairs) of the MYC leader sequence is the primary transcriptional target of the antisense RNA. The suppression of endogenous MYC gene expression by antisense RNA decreases cell proliferation and triggers monocytic differentiation

  3. How salicylic acid takes transcriptional control over jasmonic acid signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caarls, Lotte|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/371746213; Pieterse, Corné M J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/113115113; van Wees, Saskia C M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/185445373

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation is a central process in plant immunity. The induction or repression of defense genes is orchestrated by signaling networks that are directed by plant hormones of which salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) are the major players. Extensive cross-communication between

  4. Control of cellulose biosynthesis by overexpression of a transcription factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kyung-Hwan; Ko, Jae-Heung; Kim, Won-Chan; Kim; , Joo-Yeol

    2017-05-16

    The invention relates to the over-expression of a transcription factor selected from the group consisting of MYB46, HAM1, HAM2, MYB112, WRKY11, ERF6, and any combination thereof in a plant, which can modulate and thereby modulating the cellulose content of the plant.

  5. Transcriptional Control of Brown Fat Determination by PRDM16

    OpenAIRE

    Seale, Patrick; Kajimura, Shingo; Yang, Wenli; Chin, Sherry; Rohas, Lindsay; Uldry, Marc; Tavernier, Geneviève; Langin, Dominique; Spiegelman, Bruce M.

    2007-01-01

    Brown fat cells are specialized to dissipate energy and can counteract obesity; however, the transcriptional basis of their determination is largely unknown. We show here that the zinc-finger protein PRDM16 is highly enriched in brown fat cells compared to white fat cells. When expressed in white fat cell progenitors, PRDM16 activates a robust brown fat phenotype including induction of PGC-1α, UCP1 and type 2 deiodinase expression, and a remarkable increase in uncoupled respiration. Transgeni...

  6. Engineering transcriptional regulation to control Pdu microcompartment formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Y Kim

    Full Text Available Bacterial microcompartments (MCPs show great promise for the organization of engineered metabolic pathways within the bacterial cytoplasm. This subcellular organelle is composed of a protein shell of 100-200 nm diameter that natively encapsulates multi-enzyme pathways. The high energy cost of synthesizing the thousands of protein subunits required for each MCP demands precise regulation of MCP formation for both native and engineered systems. Here, we study the regulation of the propanediol utilization (Pdu MCP, for which growth on 1,2-propanediol induces expression of the Pdu operon for the catabolism of 1,2-propanediol. We construct a fluorescence-based transcriptional reporter to investigate the activation of the Ppdu promoter, which drives the transcription of 21 pdu genes. Guided by this reporter, we find that MCPs can be expressed in strains grown in rich media, provided that glucose is not present. We also characterize the response of the Ppdu promoter to a transcriptional activator of the pdu operon, PocR, and find PocR to be a necessary component of Pdu MCP formation. Furthermore, we find that MCPs form normally upon the heterologous expression of PocR even in the absence of the natural inducer 1,2-propanediol and in the presence of glucose, and that Pdu MCPs formed in response to heterologous PocR expression can metabolize 1,2-propanediol in vivo. We anticipate that this technique of overexpressing a key transcription factor may be used to study and engineer the formation, size, and/or number of MCPs for the Pdu and related MCP systems.

  7. Transcriptional control by NF-κB: elongation in focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamant, Gil; Dikstein, Rivka

    2013-09-01

    The NF-κB family of transcription factors governs the cellular reaction to a variety of extracellular signals. Following stimulation, NF-κB activates genes involved in inflammation, cell survival, cell cycle, immune cell homeostasis and more. This review focuses on studies of the past decade that uncover the transcription elongation process as a key regulatory stage in the activation pathway of NF-κB. Of interest are studies that point to the elongation phase as central to the selectivity of target gene activation by NF-κB. Particularly, the cascade leading to phosphorylation and acetylation of the NF-κB subunit p65 on serine 276 and lysine 310, respectively, was shown to mediate the recruitment of Brd4 and P-TEFb to many pro-inflammatory target genes, which in turn facilitate elongation and mRNA processing. On the other hand, some anti-inflammatory genes are refractory to this pathway and are dependent on the elongation factor DSIF for efficient elongation and mRNA processing. While these studies have advanced our knowledge of NF-κB transcriptional activity, they have also raised unresolved issues regarding the specific genomic and physiological contexts by which NF-κB utilizes different mechanisms for activation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Termination factor Rho: From the control of pervasive transcription to cell fate determination in Bacillus subtilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Pierre; Repoila, Francis; Bardowski, Jacek; Aymerich, Stéphane

    2017-01-01

    In eukaryotes, RNA species originating from pervasive transcription are regulators of various cellular processes, from the expression of individual genes to the control of cellular development and oncogenesis. In prokaryotes, the function of pervasive transcription and its output on cell physiology is still unknown. Most bacteria possess termination factor Rho, which represses pervasive, mostly antisense, transcription. Here, we investigate the biological significance of Rho-controlled transcription in the Gram-positive model bacterium Bacillus subtilis. Rho inactivation strongly affected gene expression in B. subtilis, as assessed by transcriptome and proteome analysis of a rho–null mutant during exponential growth in rich medium. Subsequent physiological analyses demonstrated that a considerable part of Rho-controlled transcription is connected to balanced regulation of three mutually exclusive differentiation programs: cell motility, biofilm formation, and sporulation. In the absence of Rho, several up-regulated sense and antisense transcripts affect key structural and regulatory elements of these differentiation programs, thereby suppressing motility and biofilm formation and stimulating sporulation. We dissected how Rho is involved in the activity of the cell fate decision-making network, centered on the master regulator Spo0A. We also revealed a novel regulatory mechanism of Spo0A activation through Rho-dependent intragenic transcription termination of the protein kinase kinB gene. Altogether, our findings indicate that distinct Rho-controlled transcripts are functional and constitute a previously unknown built-in module for the control of cell differentiation in B. subtilis. In a broader context, our results highlight the recruitment of the termination factor Rho, for which the conserved biological role is probably to repress pervasive transcription, in highly integrated, bacterium-specific, regulatory networks. PMID:28723971

  9. Controlled Osteogenic Differentiation of Mouse Mesenchymal Stem Cells by Tetracycline-Controlled Transcriptional Activation of Amelogenin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangfang Wang

    Full Text Available Regenerative dental therapies for bone tissues rely on efficient targeting of endogenous and transplanted mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs to guide bone formation. Amelogenin is the primary component of Emdogain, which is used to regenerate periodontal defects; however, the mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effects on alveolar bone remain unclear. The tetracycline (Tet-dependent transcriptional regulatory system is a good candidate to investigate distinct roles of genes of interest during stem cell differentiation. Here, we investigated amelogenin-dependent regulation of osteogenesis in MSCs by establishing a Tet-controlled transcriptional activation system. Clonal mouse bone marrow-derived MSCs were lentivirally transduced with the Tet repressor (TetR expression vector followed by drug selection to obtain MSCs constitutively expressing TetR (MSCs-TetR. Expression vectors that contained the Tet operator and amelogenin-coding (Amelx cDNA fragments were constructed using the Gateway system and lentivirally introduced into MSCs-TetR to generate a Tet regulation system in MSCs (MSCs-TetR/Amelx. MSCs-TetR/Amelx significantly overexpressed the Amelx gene and protein in the presence of the tetracycline derivative doxycycline. Concomitant expression of osterix, bone sialoprotein (BSP, osteopontin, and osteocalcin was modulated by addition or removal of doxycycline under osteogenic guidance. During osteogenic induction, MSCs-TetR/Amelx treated with doxycycline showed significantly increased gene expression of osterix, type I collagen, BSP, and osteocalcin in addition to increased alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralized nodule formation. Enhanced extracellular matrix calcification was observed when forced Amelx expression commenced at the early stage but not at the intermediate or late stages of osteogenesis. These results suggest that a Tet-controlled Amelx gene regulation system for mouse MSCs was successfully established, in which transcriptional

  10. Tunable signal processing through modular control of transcription factor translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Nan; Budnik, Bogdan A; Gunawardena, Jeremy; O'Shea, Erin K

    2013-01-25

    Signaling pathways can induce different dynamics of transcription factor (TF) activation. We explored how TFs process signaling inputs to generate diverse dynamic responses. The budding yeast general stress-responsive TF Msn2 acted as a tunable signal processor that could track, filter, or integrate signals in an input-dependent manner. This tunable signal processing appears to originate from dual regulation of both nuclear import and export by phosphorylation, as mutants with one form of regulation sustained only one signal-processing function. Versatile signal processing by Msn2 is crucial for generating distinct dynamic responses to different natural stresses. Our findings reveal how complex signal-processing functions are integrated into a single molecule and provide a guide for the design of TFs with "programmable" signal-processing functions.

  11. Transcriptional control and hormonal response of thermogenic fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emont, Margo P; Yu, Hui; Wu, Jun

    2015-05-01

    Obesity and its associated metabolic diseases present a major public health problem around the world. The discovery that thermogenic fat is active in adult humans has sparked a renewal of interest in the study of its development and function and in the feasibility of using modulators of thermogenesis to work against obesity. In recent years, it has been shown that there are at least two distinct types of thermogenic fat cells: brown and beige fat. In this review, we discuss the transcriptional mediators of thermogenesis and the signaling molecules that regulate thermogenic cells. We also review the effects of thermogenic fat activation on whole-body metabolic parameters and evaluate the increasing evidence that activating thermogenesis in humans can be a viable method of ameliorating obesity. In these discussions, we highlight targets that can potentially be stimulated or modified in anti-obesity treatments. © 2015 Society for Endocrinology.

  12. YAP/TEAD-mediated transcription controls cellular senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Qi; Chen, Jing; Feng, Han; Peng, Shengyi; Adams, Ursula; Bai, Yujie; Huang, Li; Li, Ji; Huang, Junjian; Meng, Songshu; Yuan, Zengqiang

    2013-06-15

    Transcription coactivator Yes-associated protein (YAP) plays an important role in the regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis. Here, we identify a new role of YAP in the regulation of cellular senescence. We find that the expression levels of YAP proteins decrease following the replication-induced cellular senescence in IMR90 cells. Silencing of YAP inhibits cell proliferation and induces premature senescence. In additional experiments, we observe that cellular senescence induced by YAP deficiency is TEAD- and Rb/p16/p53-dependent. Furthermore, we show that Cdk6 is a direct downstream target gene of YAP in the regulation of cellular senescence, and the expression of Cdk6 is through the YAP-TEAD complex. Ectopic expression of Cdk6 rescued YAP knockdown-induced senescence. Finally, we find that downregulation of YAP in tumor cells increases senescence in response to chemotherapeutic agents, and YAP or Cdk6 expression rescues cellular senescence. Taken together, our findings define the critical role of YAP in the regulation of cellular senescence and provide a novel insight into a potential chemotherapeutic avenue for tumor suppression. ©2013 AACR.

  13. DYRK1A Controls HIV-1 Replication at a Transcriptional Level in an NFAT Dependent Manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thijs Booiman

    Full Text Available Transcription of the HIV-1 provirus is regulated by both viral and host proteins and is very important in the context of viral latency. In latently infected cells, viral gene expression is inhibited as a result of the sequestration of host transcription factors and epigenetic modifications.In our present study we analyzed the effect of host factor dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A on HIV-1 replication. We show that DYRK1A controls HIV-1 replication by regulating provirus transcription. Downregulation or inhibition of DYRK1A increased LTR-driven transcription and viral replication in cell lines and primary PBMC. Furthermore, inhibition of DYRK1A resulted in reactivation of latent HIV-1 provirus to a similar extent as two commonly used broad-spectrum HDAC inhibitors. We observed that DYRK1A regulates HIV-1 transcription via the Nuclear Factor of Activated T-cells (NFAT by promoting its translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Therefore, inhibition of DYRK1A results in increased nuclear levels of NFAT and increased NFAT binding to the viral LTR and thus increasing viral transcription.Our data indicate that host factor DYRK1A plays a role in the regulation of viral transcription and latency. Therefore, DYRK1A might be an attractive candidate for therapeutic strategies targeting the viral reservoir.

  14. Bacterial Genome Editing Strategy for Control of Transcription and Protein Stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Ida; Martinez, Virginia; Ronda, Carlotta

    2018-01-01

    In molecular biology and cell factory engineering, tools that enable control of protein production and stability are highly important. Here, we describe protocols for tagging genes in Escherichia coli allowing for inducible degradation and transcriptional control of any soluble protein of interes...

  15. The TEAD/TEF family of transcription factor Scalloped mediates Hippo signaling in organ size control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Ren, Fangfang; Zhang, Qing; Chen, Yongbin; Wang, Bing; Jiang, Jin

    2008-03-01

    The Hippo (Hpo) signaling pathway governs cell growth, proliferation, and apoptosis by controlling key regulatory genes that execute these processes; however, the transcription factor of the pathway has remained elusive. Here we provide evidence that the TEAD/TEF family transcription factor Scalloped (Sd) acts together with the coactivator Yorkie (Yki) to regulate Hpo pathway-responsive genes. Sd and Yki form a transcriptional complex whose activity is inhibited by Hpo signaling. Sd overexpression enhances, whereas its inactivation suppresses, tissue overgrowth caused by Yki overexpression or tumor suppressor mutations in the Hpo pathway. Inactivation of Sd diminishes Hpo target gene expression and reduces organ size, whereas a constitutively active Sd promotes tissue overgrowth. Sd promotes Yki nuclear localization, whereas Hpo signaling retains Yki in the cytoplasm by phosphorylating Yki at S168. Finally, Sd recruits Yki to the enhancer of the pathway-responsive gene diap1, suggesting that diap1 is a direct transcriptional target of the Hpo pathway.

  16. NLP is a novel transcription regulator involved in VSG expression site control in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Mani Shankar; Kushwaha, Manish; Ersfeld, Klaus; Fullbrook, Alexander; Stanne, Tara M; Rudenko, Gloria

    2011-03-01

    Trypanosoma brucei mono-allelically expresses one of approximately 1500 variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) genes while multiplying in the mammalian bloodstream. The active VSG is transcribed by RNA polymerase I in one of approximately 15 telomeric VSG expression sites (ESs). T. brucei is unusual in controlling gene expression predominantly post-transcriptionally, and how ESs are mono-allelically controlled remains a mystery. Here we identify a novel transcription regulator, which resembles a nucleoplasmin-like protein (NLP) with an AT-hook motif. NLP is key for ES control in bloodstream form T. brucei, as NLP knockdown results in 45- to 65-fold derepression of the silent VSG221 ES. NLP is also involved in repression of transcription in the inactive VSG Basic Copy arrays, minichromosomes and procyclin loci. NLP is shown to be enriched on the 177- and 50-bp simple sequence repeats, the non-transcribed regions around rDNA and procyclin, and both active and silent ESs. Blocking NLP synthesis leads to downregulation of the active ES, indicating that NLP plays a role in regulating appropriate levels of transcription of ESs in both their active and silent state. Discovery of the unusual transcription regulator NLP provides new insight into the factors that are critical for ES control.

  17. Senataxin suppresses the antiviral transcriptional response and controls viral biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Matthew S; Rialdi, Alexander; Ho, Jessica Sook Yuin; Tilove, Micah; Martinez-Gil, Luis; Moshkina, Natasha P; Peralta, Zuleyma; Noel, Justine; Melegari, Camilla; Maestre, Ana M; Mitsopoulos, Panagiotis; Madrenas, Joaquín; Heinz, Sven; Benner, Chris; Young, John A T; Feagins, Alicia R; Basler, Christopher F; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana; Becherel, Olivier J; Lavin, Martin F; van Bakel, Harm; Marazzi, Ivan

    2015-05-01

    The human helicase senataxin (SETX) has been linked to the neurodegenerative diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS4) and ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA2). Here we identified a role for SETX in controlling the antiviral response. Cells that had undergone depletion of SETX and SETX-deficient cells derived from patients with AOA2 had higher expression of antiviral mediators in response to infection than did wild-type cells. Mechanistically, we propose a model whereby SETX attenuates the activity of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) at genes stimulated after a virus is sensed and thus controls the magnitude of the host response to pathogens and the biogenesis of various RNA viruses (e.g., influenza A virus and West Nile virus). Our data indicate a potentially causal link among inborn errors in SETX, susceptibility to infection and the development of neurologic disorders.

  18. Topology and Control of the Cell-Cycle-Regulated Transcriptional Circuitry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, Steven B.; Wittenberg, Curt

    2014-01-01

    Nearly 20% of the budding yeast genome is transcribed periodically during the cell division cycle. The precise temporal execution of this large transcriptional program is controlled by a large interacting network of transcriptional regulators, kinases, and ubiquitin ligases. Historically, this network has been viewed as a collection of four coregulated gene clusters that are associated with each phase of the cell cycle. Although the broad outlines of these gene clusters were described nearly 20 years ago, new technologies have enabled major advances in our understanding of the genes comprising those clusters, their regulation, and the complex regulatory interplay between clusters. More recently, advances are being made in understanding the roles of chromatin in the control of the transcriptional program. We are also beginning to discover important regulatory interactions between the cell-cycle transcriptional program and other cell-cycle regulatory mechanisms such as checkpoints and metabolic networks. Here we review recent advances and contemporary models of the transcriptional network and consider these models in the context of eukaryotic cell-cycle controls. PMID:24395825

  19. Control of Candida albicans morphology and pathogenicity by post-transcriptional mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Candida albicans is a major human fungal pathogen responsible for both systemic and mucosal infections in a wide variety of immunocompromised individuals. Because the ability of C. albicans to undergo a reversible morphological transition from yeast to filaments is important for virulence, significant research efforts have focused on mechanisms that control this transition. While transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms have been well-studied, considerably less is known about the role of post-transcriptional mechanisms. However, in recent years several discoveries have begun to shed light on this important, but understudied, area. Here, I will review a variety of post-transcriptional mechanisms that have recently been shown to control C. albicans morphology, virulence and/or virulence-related processes, including those involving alternative transcript localization, mRNA stability and translation. I will also discuss the role that these mechanisms play in other pathogens as well as the potential they may hold to serve as targets for new antifungal strategies. Ultimately, gaining a better understanding of C. albicans post-transcriptional mechanisms will significantly improve our knowledge of how morphogenesis and virulence are controlled in fungal pathogens and open new avenues for the development of novel and more effective antifungals. PMID:27312239

  20. Sequence organization and control of transcription in the bacteriophage T4 tRNA region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broida, J; Abelson, J

    1985-10-05

    Bacteriophage T4 contains genes for eight transfer RNAs and two stable RNAs of unknown function. These are found in two clusters at 70 X 10(3) base-pairs on the T4 genetic map. To understand the control of transcription in this region we have completed the sequencing of 5000 base-pairs in this region. The sequence contains a part of gene 3, gene 1, gene 57, internal protein I, the tRNA genes and five open reading frames which most likely code for heretofore unidentified proteins. We have used subclones of the region to investigate the kinetics of transcription in vivo. The results show that transcription in this region consists of overlapping early, middle and late transcripts. Transcription is directed from two early promoters, one or two middle promoters and perhaps two late promoters. This region contains all of the features that are seen in T4 transcription and as such is a good place to study the phenomenon in more detail.

  1. Messenger RNA Interferase RelE Controls relBE Transcription by Conditional Cooperativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Martin; Borch, Jonas; Jørgensen, Mikkel G

    2008-01-01

    by binding to one or more operators in the promoter region while the toxin functions as a co-repressor of transcription. Interestingly, the toxin can also stimulate TA operon transcription. Here we analyse mechanistic aspects of how RelE of Escherichia coli can function both as a co-repressor and derepressor...... of relBE transcription. When RelB was in excess to RelE, two trimeric RelB(2)*RelE complexes bound cooperatively to two adjacent operator-sites in the relBE promoter region and repressed transcription. By contrast, RelE in excess stimulated relBE transcription and released the RelB(2)*RelE complex from...... operator DNA. A mutational analysis of the operator-sites showed that RelE in excess counteracted cooperative binding of the RelB(2)*RelE complexes to the operator-sites. Thus, RelE controls relBE transcription by conditional cooperativity....

  2. A Systematic Approach to Identify Candidate Transcription Factors that Control Cell Identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana C. D’Alessio

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Hundreds of transcription factors (TFs are expressed in each cell type, but cell identity can be induced through the activity of just a small number of core TFs. Systematic identification of these core TFs for a wide variety of cell types is currently lacking and would establish a foundation for understanding the transcriptional control of cell identity in development, disease, and cell-based therapy. Here, we describe a computational approach that generates an atlas of candidate core TFs for a broad spectrum of human cells. The potential impact of the atlas was demonstrated via cellular reprogramming efforts where candidate core TFs proved capable of converting human fibroblasts to retinal pigment epithelial-like cells. These results suggest that candidate core TFs from the atlas will prove a useful starting point for studying transcriptional control of cell identity and reprogramming in many human cell types.

  3. Transcriptional control of pre-B cell development and leukemia prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Swee Heng Milon; Carotta, Sebastian; Nutt, Stephen L

    2014-01-01

    The differentiation of early B cell progenitors is controlled by multiple transcriptional regulators and growth-factor receptors. The triad of DNA-binding proteins, E2A, EBF1, and PAX5 is critical for both the early specification and commitment of B cell progenitors, while a larger number of secondary determinants, such as members of the Ikaros, ETS, Runx, and IRF families have more direct roles in promoting stage-specific pre-B gene-expression program. Importantly, it is now apparent that mutations in many of these transcription factors are associated with the progression to acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In this review, we focus on recent studies that have shed light on the transcriptional hierarchy that controls efficient B cell commitment and differentiation as well as focus on the oncogenic consequences of the loss of many of the same factors.

  4. Unraveling transcriptional and translational control in plant energy homeostasis : a bioinformatic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peviani, A.

    2016-01-01

    Due to their sessile nature, plants require a tight regulation of energy homeostasis in order to survive and reproduce in changing environmental conditions. Regulation of gene expression is controlled at several levels, from transcription to translation and beyond. Sugars themselves can act directly

  5. CprK crystal structures reveal mechanism for transcriptional control of halorespiration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joyce, M.G.; Levy, C.; Gabor, K.; Pop, S.M.; Biehl, B.D.; Doukov, T.I.; Ryter, J.M.; Mazon, H.; Smidt, H.; Heuvel, van den R.H.H.; Ragsdale, S.W.; Oost, van der J.; Leys, D.

    2006-01-01

    Halorespiration is a bacterial respiratory process in which haloorganic compounds act as terminal electron acceptors. This process is controlled at transcriptional level by CprK, a member of the ubiquitous CRP-FNR family. Here we present the crystal structures of oxidized CprK in presence of the

  6. Transcriptional mechanisms that control expression of the macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojo, Rocio; Pridans, Clare; Langlais, David; Hume, David A

    2017-08-15

    The proliferation, differentiation, and survival of cells of the macrophage lineage depends upon signals from the macrophage colony-stimulating factor (CSF) receptor (CSF1R). CSF1R is expressed by embryonic macrophages and induced early in adult hematopoiesis, upon commitment of multipotent progenitors to the myeloid lineage. Transcriptional activation of CSF1R requires interaction between members of the E26 transformation-specific family of transcription factors (Ets) (notably PU.1), C/EBP, RUNX, AP-1/ATF, interferon regulatory factor (IRF), STAT, KLF, REL, FUS/TLS (fused in sarcoma/ranslocated in liposarcoma) families, and conserved regulatory elements within the mouse and human CSF1R locus. One element, the Fms-intronic regulatory element (FIRE), within intron 2, is conserved functionally across all the amniotes. Lineage commitment in multipotent progenitors also requires down-regulation of specific transcription factors such as MYB, FLI1, basic leucine zipper transcriptional factor ATF-like (BATF3), GATA-1, and PAX5 that contribute to differentiation of alternative lineages and repress CSF1R transcription. Many of these transcription factors regulate each other, interact at the protein level, and are themselves downstream targets of CSF1R signaling. Control of CSF1R transcription involves feed-forward and feedback signaling in which CSF1R is both a target and a participant; and dysregulation of CSF1R expression and/or function is associated with numerous pathological conditions. In this review, we describe the regulatory network behind CSF1R expression during differentiation and development of cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  7. Fluctuations in spo0A transcription control rare developmental transitions in Bacillus subtilis.

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    Nicolas Mirouze

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorylated Spo0A is a master regulator of stationary phase development in the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis, controlling the formation of spores, biofilms, and cells competent for transformation. We have monitored the rate of transcription of the spo0A gene during growth in sporulation medium using promoter fusions to firefly luciferase. This rate increases sharply during transient diauxie-like pauses in growth rate and then declines as growth resumes. In contrast, the rate of transcription of an rRNA gene decreases and increases in parallel with the growth rate, as expected for stable RNA synthesis. The growth pause-dependent bursts of spo0A transcription, which reflect the activity of the spo0A vegetative promoter, are largely independent of all known regulators of spo0A transcription. Evidence is offered in support of a "passive regulation" model in which RNA polymerase stops transcribing rRNA genes during growth pauses, thus becoming available for the transcription of spo0A. We show that the bursts are followed by the production of phosphorylated Spo0A, and we propose that they represent initial responses to stress that bring the average cell closer to the thresholds for transition to bimodally expressed developmental responses. Measurement of the numbers of cells expressing a competence marker before and after the bursts supports this hypothesis. In the absence of ppGpp, the increase in spo0A transcription that accompanies the entrance to stationary phase is delayed and sporulation is markedly diminished. In spite of this, our data contradicts the hypothesis that sporulation is initiated when a ppGpp-induced depression of the GTP pool relieves repression by CodY. We suggest that, while the programmed induction of sporulation that occurs in stationary phase is apparently provoked by increased flux through the phosphorelay, bet-hedging stochastic transitions to at least competence are induced by bursts in transcription.

  8. Transcription Factor Antagonism Controls Enteroendocrine Cell Specification from Intestinal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yumei; Pang, Zhimin; Huang, Huanwei; Wang, Chenhui; Cai, Tao; Xi, Rongwen

    2017-04-20

    The balanced maintenance and differentiation of local stem cells is required for Homeostatic renewal of tissues. In the Drosophila midgut, the transcription factor Escargot (Esg) maintains undifferentiated states in intestinal stem cells, whereas the transcription factors Scute (Sc) and Prospero (Pros) promote enteroendocrine cell specification. However, the mechanism through which Esg and Sc/Pros coordinately regulate stem cell differentiation is unknown. Here, by combining chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis with genetic studies, we show that both Esg and Sc bind to a common promoter region of pros. Moreover, antagonistic activity between Esg and Sc controls the expression status of Pros in stem cells, thereby, specifying whether stem cells remain undifferentiated or commit to enteroendocrine cell differentiation. Our study therefore reveals transcription factor antagonism between Esg and Sc as a novel mechanism that underlies fate specification from intestinal stem cells in Drosophila.

  9. Precision control of recombinant gene transcription for CHO cell synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Adam J; James, David C

    2016-01-01

    The next generation of mammalian cell factories for biopharmaceutical production will be genetically engineered to possess both generic and product-specific manufacturing capabilities that may not exist naturally. Introduction of entirely new combinations of synthetic functions (e.g. novel metabolic or stress-response pathways), and retro-engineering of existing functional cell modules will drive disruptive change in cellular manufacturing performance. However, before we can apply the core concepts underpinning synthetic biology (design, build, test) to CHO cell engineering we must first develop practical and robust enabling technologies. Fundamentally, we will require the ability to precisely control the relative stoichiometry of numerous functional components we simultaneously introduce into the host cell factory. In this review we discuss how this can be achieved by design of engineered promoters that enable concerted control of recombinant gene transcription. We describe the specific mechanisms of transcriptional regulation that affect promoter function during bioproduction processes, and detail the highly-specific promoter design criteria that are required in the context of CHO cell engineering. The relative applicability of diverse promoter development strategies are discussed, including re-engineering of natural sequences, design of synthetic transcription factor-based systems, and construction of synthetic promoters. This review highlights the potential of promoter engineering to achieve precision transcriptional control for CHO cell synthetic biology. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Control of daily transcript oscillations in Drosophila by light and the circadian clock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman Wijnen

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The transcriptional circuits of circadian clocks control physiological and behavioral rhythms. Light may affect such overt rhythms in two ways: (1 by entraining the clock circuits and (2 via clock-independent molecular pathways. In this study we examine the relationship between autonomous transcript oscillations and light-driven transcript responses. Transcript profiles of wild-type and arrhythmic mutant Drosophila were recorded both in the presence of an environmental photocycle and in constant darkness. Systematic autonomous oscillations in the 12- to 48-h period range were detectable only in wild-type flies and occurred preferentially at the circadian period length. However, an extensive program of light-driven expression was confirmed in arrhythmic mutant flies. Many light-responsive transcripts are preferentially expressed in the compound eyes and the phospholipase C component of phototransduction, NORPA (no receptor potential, is required for their light-dependent regulation. Although there is evidence for the existence of multiple molecular clock circuits in cyanobacteria, protists, plants, and fungi, Drosophila appears to possess only one such system. The sustained photic expression responses identified here are partially coupled to the circadian clock and may reflect a mechanism for flies to modulate functions such as visual sensitivity and synaptic transmission in response to seasonal changes in photoperiod.

  11. Comparative genomic reconstruction of transcriptional networks controlling central metabolism in the Shewanella genus

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    Kovaleva Galina

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-scale prediction of gene regulation and reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks in bacteria is one of the critical tasks of modern genomics. The Shewanella genus is comprised of metabolically versatile gamma-proteobacteria, whose lifestyles and natural environments are substantially different from Escherichia coli and other model bacterial species. The comparative genomics approaches and computational identification of regulatory sites are useful for the in silico reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks in bacteria. Results To explore conservation and variations in the Shewanella transcriptional networks we analyzed the repertoire of transcription factors and performed genomics-based reconstruction and comparative analysis of regulons in 16 Shewanella genomes. The inferred regulatory network includes 82 transcription factors and their DNA binding sites, 8 riboswitches and 6 translational attenuators. Forty five regulons were newly inferred from the genome context analysis, whereas others were propagated from previously characterized regulons in the Enterobacteria and Pseudomonas spp.. Multiple variations in regulatory strategies between the Shewanella spp. and E. coli include regulon contraction and expansion (as in the case of PdhR, HexR, FadR, numerous cases of recruiting non-orthologous regulators to control equivalent pathways (e.g. PsrA for fatty acid degradation and, conversely, orthologous regulators to control distinct pathways (e.g. TyrR, ArgR, Crp. Conclusions We tentatively defined the first reference collection of ~100 transcriptional regulons in 16 Shewanella genomes. The resulting regulatory network contains ~600 regulated genes per genome that are mostly involved in metabolism of carbohydrates, amino acids, fatty acids, vitamins, metals, and stress responses. Several reconstructed regulons including NagR for N-acetylglucosamine catabolism were experimentally validated in S

  12. Regulatory elements and transcriptional control of chickenvasahomologue (CVH) promoter in chicken primordial germ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, So Dam; Lee, Bo Ram; Hwang, Young Sun; Lee, Hong Jo; Rim, Jong Seop; Han, Jae Yong

    2017-01-01

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs), the precursors of functional gametes, have distinct characteristics and exhibit several unique molecular mechanisms to maintain pluripotency and germness in comparison to somatic cells. They express germ cell-specific RNA binding proteins (RBPs) by modulating tissue-specific cis - and trans -regulatory elements. Studies on gene structures of chicken vasa homologue ( CVH ), a chicken RNA binding protein, involved in temporal and spatial regulation are thus important not only for understanding the molecular mechanisms that regulate germ cell fate, but also for practical applications of primordial germ cells. However, very limited studies are available on regulatory elements that control germ cell-specific expression in chicken. Therefore, we investigated the intricate regulatory mechanism(s) that governs transcriptional control of CVH . We constructed green fluorescence protein (GFP) or luciferase reporter vectors containing the various 5' flanking regions of CVH gene. From the 5' deletion and fragmented assays in chicken PGCs, we have identified a CVH promoter that locates at -316 to +275 base pair fragment with the highest luciferase activity. Additionally, we confirmed for the first time that the 5' untranslated region (UTR) containing intron 1 is required for promoter activity of the CVH gene in chicken PGCs. Furthermore, using a transcription factor binding prediction, transcriptome analysis and siRNA-mediated knockdown, we have identified that a set of transcription factors play a role in the PGC-specific CVH gene expression. These results demonstrate that cis -elements and transcription factors localizing in the 5' flanking region including the 5' UTR and an intron are important for transcriptional regulation of the CVH gene in chicken PGCs. Finally, this information will contribute to research studies in areas of reproductive biology, constructing of germ cell-specific synthetic promoter for tracing primordial germ cells as well

  13. Hes1 Directly Controls Cell Proliferation through the Transcriptional Repression of p27Kip1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Kaoru; Hattori, Masakazu; Hirai, Norihito; Shinozuka, Yoriko; Hirata, Hiromi; Kageyama, Ryoichiro; Sakai, Toshiyuki; Minato, Nagahiro

    2005-01-01

    A transcriptional regulator, Hes1, plays crucial roles in the control of differentiation and proliferation of neuronal, endocrine, and T-lymphocyte progenitors during development. Mechanisms for the regulation of cell proliferation by Hes1, however, remain to be verified. In embryonic carcinoma cells, endogenous Hes1 expression was repressed by retinoic acid in concord with enhanced p27Kip1 expression and cell cycle arrest. Conversely, conditional expression of a moderate but not maximal level of Hes1 in HeLa cells by a tetracycline-inducible system resulted in reduced p27Kip1 expression, which was attributed to decreased basal transcript rather than enhanced proteasomal degradation, with concomitant increases in the growth rate and saturation density. Hes1 induction repressed the promoter activity of a 5′ flanking basal enhancer region of p27Kip1 gene in a manner dependent on Hes1 expression levels, and this was mediated by its binding to class C sites in the promoter region. Finally, hypoplastic fetal thymi, as well as livers and brains of Hes1-deficient mice, showed significantly increased p27Kip1 transcripts compared with those of control littermates. These results have suggested that Hes1 directly contributes to the promotion of progenitor cell proliferation through transcriptional repression of a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p27Kip1. PMID:15870295

  14. Transcriptional Mechanisms Controlling miR-375 Gene Expression in the Pancreas

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    Tali Avnit-Sagi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of small non-coding RNAs that play an important role in mediating a broad and expanding range of biological activities. miR-375 is expressed selectively in the pancreas. We have previously shown that selective expression of miR-375 in pancreatic beta cells is controlled by transcriptional mechanisms operating through a TATA box-containing promoter. Expression of miR-375 has been reported in non-beta cells within the endocrine pancreas, and indeed inactivation of miR-375 leads to perturbation in cell mass and number of both alpha and beta cells. Consistent with its expression throughout the endocrine pancreas, we now show that the promoter of the miR-375 gene shows selective activity in pancreatic endocrine alpha cells, comparable to that observed in beta cells. We previously identified a novel negative regulatory element located downstream of the miR-375 gene transcription start site. By generating luciferase reporter genes, we now show that the sequence is functional also when positioned upstream of a heterologous promoter, thus proving that the repressor effect is mediated at least in part at the level of transcription. Further characterization of the transcriptional control mechanism regulating expression of miR-375 and other pancreatic miRNAs will contribute to a better understanding of pancreas development and function.

  15. A central regulatory system largely controls transcriptional activation and repression responses to phosphate starvation in Arabidopsis.

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    Regla Bustos

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Plants respond to different stresses by inducing or repressing transcription of partially overlapping sets of genes. In Arabidopsis, the PHR1 transcription factor (TF has an important role in the control of phosphate (Pi starvation stress responses. Using transcriptomic analysis of Pi starvation in phr1, and phr1 phr1-like (phl1 mutants and in wild type plants, we show that PHR1 in conjunction with PHL1 controls most transcriptional activation and repression responses to phosphate starvation, regardless of the Pi starvation specificity of these responses. Induced genes are enriched in PHR1 binding sequences (P1BS in their promoters, whereas repressed genes do not show such enrichment, suggesting that PHR1(-like control of transcriptional repression responses is indirect. In agreement with this, transcriptomic analysis of a transgenic plant expressing PHR1 fused to the hormone ligand domain of the glucocorticoid receptor showed that PHR1 direct targets (i.e., displaying altered expression after GR:PHR1 activation by dexamethasone in the presence of cycloheximide corresponded largely to Pi starvation-induced genes that are highly enriched in P1BS. A minimal promoter containing a multimerised P1BS recapitulates Pi starvation-specific responsiveness. Likewise, mutation of P1BS in the promoter of two Pi starvation-responsive genes impaired their responsiveness to Pi starvation, but not to other stress types. Phylogenetic footprinting confirmed the importance of P1BS and PHR1 in Pi starvation responsiveness and indicated that P1BS acts in concert with other cis motifs. All together, our data show that PHR1 and PHL1 are partially redundant TF acting as central integrators of Pi starvation responses, both specific and generic. In addition, they indicate that transcriptional repression responses are an integral part of adaptive responses to stress.

  16. Dual Regulation of Bacillus subtilis kinB Gene Encoding a Sporulation Trigger by SinR through Transcription Repression and Positive Stringent Transcription Control

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    Yasutaro Fujita

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available It is known that transcription of kinB encoding a trigger for Bacillus subtilis sporulation is under repression by SinR, a master repressor of biofilm formation, and under positive stringent transcription control depending on the adenine species at the transcription initiation nucleotide (nt. Deletion and base substitution analyses of the kinB promoter (PkinB region using lacZ fusions indicated that either a 5-nt deletion (Δ5, nt -61/-57, +1 is the transcription initiation nt or the substitution of G at nt -45 with A (G-45A relieved kinB repression. Thus, we found a pair of SinR-binding consensus sequences (GTTCTYT; Y is T or C in an inverted orientation (SinR-1 between nt -57/-42, which is most likely a SinR-binding site for kinB repression. This relief from SinR repression likely requires SinI, an antagonist of SinR. Surprisingly, we found that SinR is essential for positive stringent transcription control of PkinB. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA analysis indicated that SinR bound not only to SinR-1 but also to SinR-2 (nt -29/-8 consisting of another pair of SinR consensus sequences in a tandem repeat arrangement; the two sequences partially overlap the ‘-35’ and ‘-10’ regions of PkinB. Introduction of base substitutions (T-27C C-26T in the upstream consensus sequence of SinR-2 affected positive stringent transcription control of PkinB, suggesting that SinR binding to SinR-2 likely causes this positive control. EMSA also implied that RNA polymerase and SinR are possibly bound together to SinR-2 to form a transcription initiation complex for kinB transcription. Thus, it was suggested in this work that derepression of kinB from SinR repression by SinI induced by Spo0A∼P and occurrence of SinR-dependent positive stringent transcription control of kinB might induce effective sporulation cooperatively, implying an intimate interplay by stringent response, sporulation, and biofilm formation.

  17. G-quadruplexes as novel cis-elements controlling transcription during embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Aldana P; Margarit, Ezequiel; Domizi, Pablo; Banchio, Claudia; Armas, Pablo; Calcaterra, Nora B

    2016-05-19

    G-quadruplexes are dynamic structures folded in G-rich single-stranded DNA regions. These structures have been recognized as a potential nucleic acid based mechanism for regulating multiple cellular processes such as replication, transcription and genomic maintenance. So far, their transcriptional role in vivo during vertebrate embryonic development has not yet been addressed. Here, we performed an in silico search to find conserved putative G-quadruplex sequences (PQSs) within proximal promoter regions of human, mouse and zebrafish developmental genes. Among the PQSs able to fold in vitro as G-quadruplex, those present in nog3, col2a1 and fzd5 promoters were selected for further studies. In cellulo studies revealed that the selected G-quadruplexes affected the transcription of luciferase controlled by the SV40 nonrelated promoter. G-quadruplex disruption in vivo by microinjection in zebrafish embryos of either small ligands or DNA oligonucleotides complementary to the selected PQSs resulted in lower transcription of the targeted genes. Moreover, zebrafish embryos and larvae phenotypes caused by the presence of complementary oligonucleotides fully resembled those ones reported for nog3, col2a1 and fzd5 morphants. To our knowledge, this is the first work revealing in vivo the role of conserved G-quadruplexes in the embryonic development, one of the most regulated processes of the vertebrates biology. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. NFIA co-localizes with PPARγ and transcriptionally controls the brown fat gene program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hiraike, Yuta; Waki, Hironori; Yu, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Brown fat dissipates energy as heat and protects against obesity. Here, we identified nuclear factor I-A (NFIA) as a transcriptional regulator of brown fat by a genome-wide open chromatin analysis of murine brown and white fat followed by motif analysis of brown-fat-specific open chromatin region....... These results indicate that NFIA activates the cell-type-specific enhancers and facilitates the binding of PPARγ to control the brown fat gene program.......Brown fat dissipates energy as heat and protects against obesity. Here, we identified nuclear factor I-A (NFIA) as a transcriptional regulator of brown fat by a genome-wide open chromatin analysis of murine brown and white fat followed by motif analysis of brown-fat-specific open chromatin regions....... NFIA and the master transcriptional regulator of adipogenesis, PPARγ, co-localize at the brown-fat-specific enhancers. Moreover, the binding of NFIA precedes and facilitates the binding of PPARγ, leading to increased chromatin accessibility and active transcription. Introduction of NFIA into myoblasts...

  19. Transcriptional control by two leucine-responsive regulatory proteins in Halobacterium salinarum R1

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    Tarasov Valery

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Archaea combine bacterial-as well as eukaryotic-like features to regulate cellular processes. Halobacterium salinarum R1 encodes eight leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp-homologues. The function of two of them, Irp (OE3923F and lrpA1 (OE2621R, were analyzed by gene deletion and overexpression, including genome scale impacts using microarrays. Results It was shown that Lrp affects the transcription of multiple target genes, including those encoding enzymes involved in amino acid synthesis, central metabolism, transport processes and other regulators of transcription. In contrast, LrpA1 regulates transcription in a more specific manner. The aspB3 gene, coding for an aspartate transaminase, was repressed by LrpA1 in the presence of L-aspartate. Analytical DNA-affinity chromatography was adapted to high salt, and demonstrated binding of LrpA1 to its own promoter, as well as L-aspartate dependent binding to the aspB3 promoter. Conclusion The gene expression profiles of two archaeal Lrp-homologues report in detail their role in H. salinarum R1. LrpA1 and Lrp show similar functions to those already described in bacteria, but in addition they play a key role in regulatory networks, such as controlling the transcription of other regulators. In a more detailed analysis ligand dependent binding of LrpA1 was demonstrated to its target gene aspB3.

  20. YAP1 Exerts Its Transcriptional Control via TEAD-Mediated Activation of Enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Claudia; Bardet, Anaïs Flore; Roma, Guglielmo; Bergling, Sebastian; Clay, Ieuan; Ruchti, Alexandra; Agarinis, Claudia; Schmelzle, Tobias; Bouwmeester, Tewis; Schübeler, Dirk; Bauer, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    YAP1 is a major effector of the Hippo pathway and a well-established oncogene. Elevated YAP1 activity due to mutations in Hippo pathway components or YAP1 amplification is observed in several types of human cancers. Here we investigated its genomic binding landscape in YAP1-activated cancer cells, as well as in non-transformed cells. We demonstrate that TEAD transcription factors mediate YAP1 chromatin-binding genome-wide, further explaining their dominant role as primary mediators of YAP1-transcriptional activity. Moreover, we show that YAP1 largely exerts its transcriptional control via distal enhancers that are marked by H3K27 acetylation and that YAP1 is necessary for this chromatin mark at bound enhancers and the activity of the associated genes. This work establishes YAP1-mediated transcriptional regulation at distal enhancers and provides an expanded set of target genes resulting in a fundamental source to study YAP1 function in a normal and cancer setting.

  1. YAP1 Exerts Its Transcriptional Control via TEAD-Mediated Activation of Enhancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Stein

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available YAP1 is a major effector of the Hippo pathway and a well-established oncogene. Elevated YAP1 activity due to mutations in Hippo pathway components or YAP1 amplification is observed in several types of human cancers. Here we investigated its genomic binding landscape in YAP1-activated cancer cells, as well as in non-transformed cells. We demonstrate that TEAD transcription factors mediate YAP1 chromatin-binding genome-wide, further explaining their dominant role as primary mediators of YAP1-transcriptional activity. Moreover, we show that YAP1 largely exerts its transcriptional control via distal enhancers that are marked by H3K27 acetylation and that YAP1 is necessary for this chromatin mark at bound enhancers and the activity of the associated genes. This work establishes YAP1-mediated transcriptional regulation at distal enhancers and provides an expanded set of target genes resulting in a fundamental source to study YAP1 function in a normal and cancer setting.

  2. Bacteriophage Nf DNA region controlling late transcription: structural and functional homology with bacteriophage phi 29.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuez, B; Salas, M

    1993-06-25

    The putative region for the control of late transcription of the Bacillus subtilis phage Nf has been identified by DNA sequence homology with the equivalent region of the evolutionary related phage phi 29. A similar arrangement of early and late promoters has been detected in the two phages, suggesting that viral transcription could be regulated in a similar way at late times of the infection. Transcription of late genes requires the presence of a viral early protein, gpF in phage Nf and p4 in phage phi 29, being the latter known to bind to a DNA region located upstream from the phage phi 29 late promoter. We have identified a DNA region located upstream from the putative late promoter of phage Nf that is probably involved in binding protein gpF. Furthermore, we show that the phage phi 29 protein p4 is able to bind to this region and activate transcription from the phage Nf putative late promoter. Sequence alignment has also revealed the existence of significant internal homology between the two early promoters contained in this region of each phage.

  3. The MYST family histone acetyltransferase complex regulates stress resistance and longevity through transcriptional control of DAF-16/FOXO transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Takako; Uno, Masaharu; Honjoh, Sakiko; Nishida, Eisuke

    2017-08-09

    The well-known link between longevity and the Sir2 histone deacetylase family suggests that histone deacetylation, a modification associated with repressed chromatin, is beneficial to longevity. However, the molecular links between histone acetylation and longevity remain unclear. Here, we report an unexpected finding that the MYST family histone acetyltransferase complex (MYS-1/TRR-1 complex) promotes rather than inhibits stress resistance and longevity in Caenorhabditis elegans Our results show that these beneficial effects are largely mediated through transcriptional up-regulation of the FOXO transcription factor DAF-16. MYS-1 and TRR-1 are recruited to the promoter regions of the daf-16 gene, where they play a role in histone acetylation, including H4K16 acetylation. Remarkably, we also find that the human MYST family Tip60/TRRAP complex promotes oxidative stress resistance by up-regulating the expression of FOXO transcription factors in human cells. Tip60 is recruited to the promoter regions of the foxo1 gene, where it increases H4K16 acetylation levels. Our results thus identify the evolutionarily conserved role of the MYST family acetyltransferase as a key epigenetic regulator of DAF-16/FOXO transcription factors. © 2017 The Authors.

  4. Vesicular Trafficking Systems Impact TORC1-Controlled Transcriptional Programs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

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    Joanne M. Kingsbury

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Target of Rapamycin Complex I (TORC1 orchestrates global reprogramming of transcriptional programs in response to myriad environmental conditions, yet, despite the commonality of the TORC1 complex components, different TORC1-inhibitory conditions do not elicit a uniform transcriptional response. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, TORC1 regulates the expression of nitrogen catabolite repressed (NCR genes by controlling the nuclear translocation of the NCR transactivator Gln3. Moreover, Golgi-to-endosome trafficking was shown to be required for nuclear translocation of Gln3 upon a shift from rich medium to the poor nitrogen source proline, but not upon rapamycin treatment. Here, we employed microarray profiling to survey the full impact of the vesicular trafficking system on yeast TORC1-orchestrated transcriptional programs. In addition to the NCR genes, we found that ribosomal protein, ribosome biogenesis, phosphate-responsive, and sulfur-containing amino acid metabolism genes are perturbed by disruption of Golgi-to-endosome trafficking following a nutritional shift from rich to poor nitrogen source medium, but not upon rapamycin treatment. Similar to Gln3, defects in Golgi-to-endosome trafficking significantly delayed cytoplasmic–nuclear translocation of Sfp1, but did not detectably affect the cytoplasmic–nuclear or nuclear–cytoplasmic translocation of Met4, which are the transactivators of these genes. Thus, Golgi-to-endosome trafficking defects perturb TORC1 transcriptional programs via multiple mechanisms. Our findings further delineate the downstream transcriptional responses of TORC1 inhibition by rapamycin compared with a nitrogen quality downshift. Given the conservation of both TORC1 and endomembrane networks throughout eukaryotes, our findings may also have implications for TORC1-mediated responses to nutritional cues in mammals and other eukaryotes.

  5. Vesicular Trafficking Systems Impact TORC1-Controlled Transcriptional Programs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsbury, Joanne M; Cardenas, Maria E

    2016-01-06

    The Target of Rapamycin Complex I (TORC1) orchestrates global reprogramming of transcriptional programs in response to myriad environmental conditions, yet, despite the commonality of the TORC1 complex components, different TORC1-inhibitory conditions do not elicit a uniform transcriptional response. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, TORC1 regulates the expression of nitrogen catabolite repressed (NCR) genes by controlling the nuclear translocation of the NCR transactivator Gln3. Moreover, Golgi-to-endosome trafficking was shown to be required for nuclear translocation of Gln3 upon a shift from rich medium to the poor nitrogen source proline, but not upon rapamycin treatment. Here, we employed microarray profiling to survey the full impact of the vesicular trafficking system on yeast TORC1-orchestrated transcriptional programs. In addition to the NCR genes, we found that ribosomal protein, ribosome biogenesis, phosphate-responsive, and sulfur-containing amino acid metabolism genes are perturbed by disruption of Golgi-to-endosome trafficking following a nutritional shift from rich to poor nitrogen source medium, but not upon rapamycin treatment. Similar to Gln3, defects in Golgi-to-endosome trafficking significantly delayed cytoplasmic-nuclear translocation of Sfp1, but did not detectably affect the cytoplasmic-nuclear or nuclear-cytoplasmic translocation of Met4, which are the transactivators of these genes. Thus, Golgi-to-endosome trafficking defects perturb TORC1 transcriptional programs via multiple mechanisms. Our findings further delineate the downstream transcriptional responses of TORC1 inhibition by rapamycin compared with a nitrogen quality downshift. Given the conservation of both TORC1 and endomembrane networks throughout eukaryotes, our findings may also have implications for TORC1-mediated responses to nutritional cues in mammals and other eukaryotes. Copyright © 2016 Kingsbury and Cardenas.

  6. Precise integration of inducible transcriptional elements (PrIITE) enables absolute control of gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinto, Rita; Hansen, Lars; Hintze, John Birger Hjalmar

    2017-01-01

    Tetracycline-based inducible systems provide powerful methods for functional studies where gene expression can be controlled. However, the lack of tight control of the inducible system, leading to leakiness and adverse effects caused by undesirable tetracycline dosage requirements, has proven......) a safe harbor locus. Using PrIITE cells harboring a GFP reporter or CDX2 transcription factor, we demonstrate discrete inducibility of gene expression with complete abrogation of leakiness. CDX2 PrIITE cells generated by this approach uncovered novel CDX2 downstream effector genes. Our results provide...

  7. Transcriptional regulation is a major controller of cell cycle transition dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romanel, Alessandro; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Cardelli, Luca

    2012-01-01

    DNA replication, mitosis and mitotic exit are critical transitions of the cell cycle which normally occur only once per cycle. A universal control mechanism was proposed for the regulation of mitotic entry in which Cdk helps its own activation through two positive feedback loops. Recent discoveries...... in various organisms showed the importance of positive feedbacks in other transitions as well. Here we investigate if a universal control system with transcriptional regulation(s) and post-translational positive feedback(s) can be proposed for the regulation of all cell cycle transitions. Through...

  8. Control of virulence gene transcription by indirect readout in Vibrio cholerae and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorman, Charles J; Dorman, Matthew J

    2017-10-01

    Indirect readout mechanisms of transcription control rely on the recognition of DNA shape by transcription factors (TFs). TFs may also employ a direct readout mechanism that involves the reading of the base sequence in the DNA major groove at the binding site. TFs with winged helix-turn-helix (wHTH) motifs use an alpha helix to read the base sequence in the major groove while inserting a beta sheet 'wing' into the adjacent minor groove. Such wHTH proteins are important regulators of virulence gene transcription in many pathogens; they also control housekeeping genes. This article considers the cases of the non-invasive Gram-negative pathogen Vibrio cholerae and the invasive pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Both possess clusters of A + T-rich horizontally acquired virulence genes that are silenced by the nucleoid-associated protein H-NS and regulated positively or negatively by wHTH TFs: for example, ToxR and LeuO in V. cholerae; HilA, LeuO, SlyA and OmpR in S. Typhimurium. Because of their relatively relaxed base sequence requirements for target recognition, indirect readout mechanisms have the potential to engage regulatory proteins with many more targets than might be the case using direct readout, making indirect readout an important, yet often ignored, contributor to the expression of pathogenic phenotypes. © 2017 The Authors. Environmental Microbiology published by Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Control of seed dormancy in Arabidopsis by a cis-acting noncoding antisense transcript.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedak, Halina; Palusinska, Malgorzata; Krzyczmonik, Katarzyna; Brzezniak, Lien; Yatusevich, Ruslan; Pietras, Zbigniew; Kaczanowski, Szymon; Swiezewski, Szymon

    2016-11-29

    Seed dormancy is one of the most crucial process transitions in a plant's life cycle. Its timing is tightly controlled by the expression level of the Delay of Germination 1 gene (DOG1). DOG1 is the major quantitative trait locus for seed dormancy in Arabidopsis and has been shown to control dormancy in many other plant species. This is reflected by the evolutionary conservation of the functional short alternatively polyadenylated form of the DOG1 mRNA. Notably, the 3' region of DOG1, including the last exon that is not included in this transcript isoform, shows a high level of conservation at the DNA level, but the encoded polypeptide is poorly conserved. Here, we demonstrate that this region of DOG1 contains a promoter for the transcription of a noncoding antisense RNA, asDOG1, that is 5' capped, polyadenylated, and relatively stable. This promoter is autonomous and asDOG1 has an expression profile that is different from known DOG1 transcripts. Using several approaches we show that asDOG1 strongly suppresses DOG1 expression during seed maturation in cis, but is unable to do so in trans Therefore, the negative regulation of seed dormancy by asDOG1 in cis results in allele-specific suppression of DOG1 expression and promotes germination. Given the evolutionary conservation of the asDOG1 promoter, we propose that this cis-constrained noncoding RNA-mediated mechanism limiting the duration of seed dormancy functions across the Brassicaceae.

  10. Transcriptional patterns identify resource controls on the diazotroph Trichodesmium in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouco, Mónica; Frischkorn, Kyle R; Haley, Sheean T; Alexander, Harriet; Dyhrman, Sonya T

    2018-02-28

    The N 2 -fixing cyanobacterium Trichodesmium is intensely studied because of the control this organism exerts over the cycling of carbon and nitrogen in the low nutrient ocean gyres. Although iron (Fe) and phosphorus (P) bioavailability are thought to be major drivers of Trichodesmium distributions and activities, identifying resource controls on Trichodesmium is challenging, as Fe and P are often organically complexed and their bioavailability to a single species in a mixed community is difficult to constrain. Further, Fe and P geochemistries are linked through the activities of metalloenzymes, such as the alkaline phosphatases (APs) PhoX and PhoA, which are used by microbes to access dissolved organic P (DOP). Here we identified significant correlations between Trichodesmium-specific transcriptional patterns in the North Atlantic (NASG) and North Pacific Subtropical Gyres (NPSG) and patterns in Fe and P biogeochemistry, with the relative enrichment of Fe stress markers in the NPSG, and P stress markers in the NASG. We also observed the differential enrichment of Fe-requiring PhoX transcripts in the NASG and Fe-insensitive PhoA transcripts in the NPSG, suggesting that metalloenzyme switching may be used to mitigate Fe limitation of DOP metabolism in Trichodesmium. This trait may underpin Trichodesmium success across disparate ecosystems.

  11. Cell cycle transcription control: DREAM/MuvB and RB-E2F complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Martin; Müller, Gerd A

    2017-12-01

    The precise timing of cell cycle gene expression is critical for the control of cell proliferation; de-regulation of this timing promotes the formation of cancer and leads to defects during differentiation and development. Entry into and progression through S phase requires expression of genes coding for proteins that function in DNA replication. Expression of a distinct set of genes is essential to pass through mitosis and cytokinesis. Expression of these groups of cell cycle-dependent genes is regulated by the RB pocket protein family, the E2F transcription factor family, and MuvB complexes together with B-MYB and FOXM1. Distinct combinations of these transcription factors promote the transcription of the two major groups of cell cycle genes that are maximally expressed either in S phase (G1/S) or in mitosis (G2/M). In this review, we discuss recent work that has started to uncover the molecular mechanisms controlling the precisely timed expression of these genes at specific cell cycle phases, as well as the repression of the genes when a cell exits the cell cycle.

  12. B lymphocyte lineage specification, commitment and epigenetic control of transcription by early B cell factor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagman, James; Ramírez, Julita; Lukin, Kara

    2012-01-01

    Early B cell factor 1 (EBF1) is a transcription factor that is critical for both B lymphopoiesis and B cell function. EBF1 is a requisite component of the B lymphocyte transcriptional network and is essential for B lineage specification. Recent studies revealed roles for EBF1 in B cell commitment. EBF1 binds its target genes via a DNA-binding domain including a unique 'zinc knuckle', which mediates a novel mode of DNA recognition. Chromatin immunoprecipitation of EBF1 in pro-B cells defined hundreds of new, as well as previously identified, target genes. Notably, expression of the pre-B cell receptor (pre-BCR), BCR and PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathways is controlled by EBF1. In this review, we highlight these current developments and explore how EBF1 functions as a tissue-specific regulator of chromatin structure at B cell-specific genes.

  13. The transcription factor Etv5 controls TH17 cell development and allergic airway inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Duy; Sehra, Sarita; Sun, Xin; Kaplan, Mark H

    2014-07-01

    The differentiation of TH17 cells, which promote pulmonary inflammation, requires the cooperation of a network of transcription factors. We sought to define the role of Etv5, an Ets-family transcription factor, in TH17 cell development and function. TH17 development was examined in primary mouse T cells wherein Etv5 expression was altered by retroviral transduction, small interfering RNA targeting a specific gene, and mice with a conditional deletion of Etv5 in T cells. The direct function of Etv5 on the Il17 locus was tested with chromatin immunoprecipitation and reporter assays. The house dust mite-induced allergic inflammation model was used to test the requirement for Etv5-dependent TH17 functions in vivo. We identify Etv5 as a signal transducer and activator of transcription 3-induced positive regulator of TH17 development. Etv5 controls TH17 differentiation by directly promoting Il17a and Il17f expression. Etv5 recruits histone-modifying enzymes to the Il17a-Il17f locus, resulting in increased active histone marks and decreased repressive histone marks. In a model of allergic airway inflammation, mice with Etv5-deficient T cells have reduced airway inflammation and IL-17A/F production in the lung and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid compared with wild-type mice, without changes in TH2 cytokine production. These data define signal transducer and activator of transcription 3-dependent feed-forward control of TH17 cytokine production and a novel role for Etv5 in promoting T cell-dependent airway inflammation. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Two distinct promoter architectures centered on dynamic nucleosomes control ribosomal protein gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Britta; Kubik, Slawomir; Ghosh, Bhaswar; Bruzzone, Maria Jessica; Geertz, Marcel; Martin, Victoria; Dénervaud, Nicolas; Jacquet, Philippe; Ozkan, Burak; Rougemont, Jacques; Maerkl, Sebastian J; Naef, Félix; Shore, David

    2014-08-01

    In yeast, ribosome production is controlled transcriptionally by tight coregulation of the 138 ribosomal protein genes (RPGs). RPG promoters display limited sequence homology, and the molecular basis for their coregulation remains largely unknown. Here we identify two prevalent RPG promoter types, both characterized by upstream binding of the general transcription factor (TF) Rap1 followed by the RPG-specific Fhl1/Ifh1 pair, with one type also binding the HMG-B protein Hmo1. We show that the regulatory properties of the two promoter types are remarkably similar, suggesting that they are determined to a large extent by Rap1 and the Fhl1/Ifh1 pair. Rapid depletion experiments allowed us to define a hierarchy of TF binding in which Rap1 acts as a pioneer factor required for binding of all other TFs. We also uncovered unexpected features underlying recruitment of Fhl1, whose forkhead DNA-binding domain is not required for binding at most promoters, and Hmo1, whose binding is supported by repeated motifs. Finally, we describe unusually micrococcal nuclease (MNase)-sensitive nucleosomes at all RPG promoters, located between the canonical +1 and -1 nucleosomes, which coincide with sites of Fhl1/Ifh1 and Hmo1 binding. We speculate that these "fragile" nucleosomes play an important role in regulating RPG transcriptional output. © 2014 Knight et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  15. The NDR/LATS family kinase Cbk1 directly controls transcriptional asymmetry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Mazanka

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Cell fate can be determined by asymmetric segregation of gene expression regulators. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the transcription factor Ace2 accumulates specifically in the daughter cell nucleus, where it drives transcription of genes that are not expressed in the mother cell. The NDR/LATS family protein kinase Cbk1 is required for Ace2 segregation and function. Using peptide scanning arrays, we determined Cbk1's phosphorylation consensus motif, the first such unbiased approach for an enzyme of this family, showing that it is a basophilic kinase with an unusual preference for histidine -5 to the phosphorylation site. We found that Cbk1 phosphorylates such sites in Ace2, and that these modifications are critical for Ace2's partitioning and function. Using proteins marked with GFP variants, we found that Ace2 moves from isotropic distribution to the daughter cell nuclear localization, well before cytokinesis, and that the nucleus must enter the daughter cell for Ace2 accumulation to occur. We found that Cbk1, unlike Ace2, is restricted to the daughter cell. Using both in vivo and in vitro assays, we found that two critical Cbk1 phosphorylations block Ace2's interaction with nuclear export machinery, while a third distal modification most likely acts to increase the transcription factor's activity. Our findings show that Cbk1 directly controls Ace2, regulating the transcription factor's activity and interaction with nuclear export machinery through three phosphorylation sites. Furthermore, Cbk1 exhibits a novel specificity that is likely conserved among related kinases from yeast to metazoans. Cbk1 is functionally restricted to the daughter cell, and cannot diffuse from the daughter to the mother. In addition to providing a mechanism for Ace2 segregation, these findings show that an isotropically distributed cell fate determinant can be asymmetrically partitioned in cytoplasmically contiguous cells through spatial segregation

  16. Multiple phosphorylation events control chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor I orphan nuclear receptor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Frédérique; Baráth, Peter; Desbois-Le Péron, Christine; Métivier, Raphaël; Le Guével, Rémy; Birse, Darcy; Salbert, Gilles

    2002-06-01

    Chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor I (COUP-TFI) is an orphan member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily that comprises key regulators of many biological functions, such as embryonic development, metabolism, homeostasis, and reproduction. Although COUP-TFI can both actively silence gene transcription and antagonize the functions of various other nuclear receptors, the COUP-TFI orphan receptor also acts as a transcriptional activator in certain contexts. Moreover, COUP-TFI has recently been shown to serve as an accessory factor for some ligand-bound nuclear receptors, suggesting that it may modulate, both negatively and positively, a wide range of hormonal responses. In the absence of any identified cognate ligand, the mechanisms involved in the regulation of COUP-TFI activity remain unclear. The elucidation of several putative phosphorylation sites for MAPKs, PKC, and casein kinase II within the sequence of this orphan receptor led us to investigate phosphorylation events regulating the various COUP-TFI functions. After showing that COUP-TFI is phosphorylated in vivo, we provide evidence that in vivo inhibition of either MAPK or PKC signaling pathway leads to a specific and pronounced decrease in COUP-TFI-dependent transcriptional activation of the vitronectin gene promoter. Focusing on the molecular mechanisms underlying the MAPK- and PKC-mediated regulation of COUP-TFI activity, we show that COUP-TFI can be directly targeted by PKC and MAPK. These phosphorylation events differentially modulate COUP-TFI functions: PKC-mediated phosphorylation enhances COUP-TFI affinity for DNA and MAPK-mediated phosphorylation positively regulates the transactivation function of COUP-TFI, possibly through enhancing specific coactivator recruitment. These data provide evidence that COUP-TFI is likely to integrate distinct signaling pathways and raise the possibility that multiple extracellular signals influence biological processes controlled by COUP-TFI.

  17. Control of stomach smooth muscle development and intestinal rotation by transcription factor BARX1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayewickreme, Chenura D; Shivdasani, Ramesh A

    2015-09-01

    Diverse functions of the homeodomain transcription factor BARX1 include Wnt-dependent, non-cell autonomous specification of the stomach epithelium, tracheo-bronchial septation, and Wnt-independent expansion of the spleen primordium. Tight spatio-temporal regulation of Barx1 levels in the mesentery and stomach mesenchyme suggests additional roles. To determine these functions, we forced constitutive BARX1 expression in the Bapx1 expression domain, which includes the mesentery and intestinal mesenchyme, and also examined Barx1(-/)(-) embryos in further detail. Transgenic embryos invariably showed intestinal truncation and malrotation, in part reflecting abnormal left-right patterning. Ectopic BARX1 expression did not affect intestinal epithelium, but intestinal smooth muscle developed with features typical of the stomach wall. BARX1, which is normally restricted to the developing stomach, drives robust smooth muscle expansion in this organ by promoting proliferation of myogenic progenitors at the expense of other sub-epithelial cells. Undifferentiated embryonic stomach and intestinal mesenchyme showed modest differences in mRNA expression and BARX1 was sufficient to induce much of the stomach profile in intestinal cells. However, limited binding at cis-regulatory sites implies that BARX1 may act principally through other transcription factors. Genes expressed ectopically in BARX1(+) intestinal mesenchyme and reduced in Barx1(-/-) stomach mesenchyme include Isl1, Pitx1, Six2 and Pitx2, transcription factors known to control left-right patterning and influence smooth muscle development. The sum of evidence suggests that potent BARX1 functions in intestinal rotation and stomach myogenesis occur through this small group of intermediary transcription factors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Identification of a ZEB2-MITF-ZEB1 transcriptional network that controls melanogenesis and melanoma progression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Denecker (Geertrui); A.M. Vandamme (Anne Mieke); E. Akay (Ela); D. Koludrovic (D.); J. Taminau (J.); K. Lemeire (K.); A. Gheldof (A.); B. de Craene (B.); M. van Gele (M.); L. Brochez (L.); G.M. Udupi (G.); S.M. Rafferty; B. Balint (B.); W.M. Gallagher (W.); M.A.I. Ghanem (Mazen); D. Huylebroeck (Danny); K. Haigh (Katharina); J.J. van den Oord (Joost); L. Larue; I. Davidson (Irwin); J.-C. Marine (J.); G. Berx (Geert)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractDeregulation of signaling pathways that control differentiation, expansion and migration of neural crest-derived melanoblasts during normal development contributes also to melanoma progression and metastasis. Although several epithelial-to-mesenchymal (EMT) transcription factors, such as

  19. ETS transcription factors control transcription of EZH2 and epigenetic silencing of the tumor suppressor gene Nkx3.1 in prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Kunderfranco

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available ETS transcription factors regulate important signaling pathways involved in cell differentiation and development in many tissues and have emerged as important players in prostate cancer. However, the biological impact of ETS factors in prostate tumorigenesis is still debated.We performed an analysis of the ETS gene family using microarray data and real-time PCR in normal and tumor tissues along with functional studies in normal and cancer cell lines to understand the impact in prostate tumorigenesis and identify key targets of these transcription factors. We found frequent dysregulation of ETS genes with oncogenic (i.e., ERG and ESE1 and tumor suppressor (i.e., ESE3 properties in prostate tumors compared to normal prostate. Tumor subgroups (i.e., ERG(high, ESE1(high, ESE3(low and NoETS tumors were identified on the basis of their ETS expression status and showed distinct transcriptional and biological features. ERG(high and ESE3(low tumors had the most robust gene signatures with both distinct and overlapping features. Integrating genomic data with functional studies in multiple cell lines, we demonstrated that ERG and ESE3 controlled in opposite direction transcription of the Polycomb Group protein EZH2, a key gene in development, differentiation, stem cell biology and tumorigenesis. We further demonstrated that the prostate-specific tumor suppressor gene Nkx3.1 was controlled by ERG and ESE3 both directly and through induction of EZH2.These findings provide new insights into the role of the ETS transcriptional network in prostate tumorigenesis and uncover previously unrecognized links between aberrant expression of ETS factors, deregulation of epigenetic effectors and silencing of tumor suppressor genes. The link between aberrant ETS activity and epigenetic gene silencing may be relevant for the clinical management of prostate cancer and design of new therapeutic strategies.

  20. The bZIP transcription factor PERIANTHIA: A multifunctional hub for meristem control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan eLohmann

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available As sessile organisms, plants are exposed to extreme variations in environmental conditions over the course of their lives. Since plants grow and initiate new organs continuously, they have to modulate the underlying developmental program accordingly to cope with this challenge. At the heart of this extraordinary developmental plasticity are pluripotent stem cells, which are maintained during the entire life-cycle of the plant and that are embedded within dynamic stem cell niches. While the complex regulatory principles of plant stem cell control under artificial constant growth conditions begin to emerge, virtually nothing is known about how this circuit adapts to variations in the environment. In addition to the local feedback system constituted by the homeodomain transcription factor WUSCHEL (WUS and the CLAVATA signaling cascade in the center of the shoot apical meristem (SAM, the bZIP transcription factor PERIANTHIA (PAN not only has a broader expression domain in SAM and flowers, but also carries out more diverse functions in meristem maintenance: pan mutants show alterations in environmental response, shoot meristem size, floral organ number and exhibit severe defects in termination of floral stem cells in an environment dependent fashion. Genetic and genomic analyses indicate that PAN interacts with a plethora of developmental pathways including light, plant hormone and meristem control systems, suggesting that PAN is as an important regulatory node in the network of plant stem cell control.

  1. The ETS-5 transcription factor regulates activity states in Caenorhabditis elegans by controlling satiety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juozaityte, Vaida; Pladevall-Morera, David; Podolska, Agnieszka

    2017-01-01

    Animal behavior is shaped through interplay among genes, the environment, and previous experience. As in mammals, satiety signals induce quiescence in Caenorhabditis elegans Here we report that the C. elegans transcription factor ETS-5, an ortholog of mammalian FEV/Pet1, controls satiety......-induced quiescence. Nutritional status has a major influence on C. elegans behavior. When foraging, food availability controls behavioral state switching between active (roaming) and sedentary (dwelling) states; however, when provided with high-quality food, C. elegans become sated and enter quiescence. We show......-regulated behavioral state switching. Taken together, our results identify a neuronal mechanism for controlling intestinal fat stores and organismal behavioral states in C. elegans, and establish a paradigm for the elucidation of obesity-relevant mechanisms....

  2. OpaR controls a network of downstream transcription factors in Vibrio parahaemolyticus BB22OP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Kernell Burke

    Full Text Available Vibrio parahaemolyticus is an emerging world-wide human pathogen that is associated with food-borne gastroenteritis when raw or undercooked seafood is consumed. Expression of virulence factors in this organism is modulated by the phenomenon known as quorum sensing, which permits differential gene regulation at low versus high cell density. The master regulator of quorum sensing in V. parahaemolyticus is OpaR. OpaR not only controls virulence factor gene expression, but also the colony and cellular morphology associated with growth on a surface and biofilm formation. Whole transcriptome Next Generation sequencing (RNA-Seq was utilized to determine the OpaR regulon by comparing strains BB22OP (opaR+, LM5312 and BB22TR (∆opaR1, LM5674. This work, using the published V. parahaemolyticus BB22OP genome sequence, confirms and expands upon a previous microarray analysis for these two strains that used an Affymetrix GeneChip designed from the closely related V. parahaemolyticus RIMD2210633 genome sequence. Overall there was excellent correlation between the microarray and RNA-Seq data. Eleven transcription factors under OpaR control were identified by both methods and further confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR analysis. Nine of these transcription factors were demonstrated to be direct OpaR targets via in vitro electrophoretic mobility shift assays with purified hexahistidine-tagged OpaR. Identification of the direct and indirect targets of OpaR, including small RNAs, will enable the construction of a network map of regulatory interactions important for the switch between the nonpathogenic and pathogenic states.

  3. 1Novel MEFV transcripts in Familial Mediterranean fever patients and controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalkh Nadine

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Familial Mediterranean fever is a recessive autoinflammatory disease frequently encountered in Armenians, Jews, Arabs and Turks. The MEFV gene is responsible for the disease. It encodes a protein called pyrin/marenostrin involved in the innate immune system. A large number of clinically diagnosed FMF patients carry only one MEFV mutation. This study aims at studying the MEFV gene splicing pattern in heterozygous FMF patients and healthy individuals, in an attempt to understand the mechanism underlying the disease in these patients. Methods RNA was extracted from peripheral blood leucocytes of 41 FMF patients and 34 healthy individuals. RT-PCR was then performed, and the amplified products were migrated on a polyacrylamide electrophoresis gel, characterized by gel extraction of the corresponding bands followed by sequencing. Results Five novel splicing events were observed in both patients and controls deleting either exons 3, 4 (del34, or exons 2, 3, 4 (del234, or exons 2, 3, 4, 5 (del2345 or exon7 (del7 or exons 7 and 8 (del78. Conclusions The observation of such qualitative variability in the expression of the MEFV gene suggests a complex transcriptional regulation. However, the expression of these novel transcripts in both patients and controls is not in favour of a severe pathogenic effect.

  4. Transcription activator-like effector hybrids for conditional control and rewiring of chromosomal transgene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Moore, Richard; Guinn, Michael; Bleris, Leonidas

    2012-01-01

    The ability to conditionally rewire pathways in human cells holds great therapeutic potential. Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) are a class of naturally occurring specific DNA binding proteins that can be used to introduce targeted genome modifications or control gene expression. Here we present TALE hybrids engineered to respond to endogenous signals and capable of controlling transgenes by applying a predetermined and tunable action at the single-cell level. Specifically, we first demonstrate that combinations of TALEs can be used to modulate the expression of stably integrated genes in kidney cells. We then introduce a general purpose two-hybrid approach that can be customized to regulate the function of any TALE either using effector molecules or a heterodimerization reaction. Finally, we demonstrate the successful interface of TALEs to specific endogenous signals, namely hypoxia signaling and microRNAs, essentially closing the loop between cellular information and chromosomal transgene expression.

  5. Enhancer transcription reveals subtype-specific gene expression programs controlling breast cancer pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Hector L; Nagari, Anusha; Malladi, Venkat S; Li, Wenqian; Xi, Yuanxin; Richardson, Dana; Allton, Kendra L; Tanaka, Kaori; Li, Jing; Murakami, Shino; Keyomarsi, Khandan; Bedford, Mark T; Shi, Xiaobing; Li, Wei; Barton, Michelle C; Dent, Sharon Y R; Kraus, W Lee

    2018-02-01

    Noncoding transcription is a defining feature of active enhancers, linking transcription factor (TF) binding to the molecular mechanisms controlling gene expression. To determine the relationship between enhancer activity and biological outcomes in breast cancers, we profiled the transcriptomes (using GRO-seq and RNA-seq) and epigenomes (using ChIP-seq) of 11 different human breast cancer cell lines representing five major molecular subtypes of breast cancer, as well as two immortalized ("normal") human breast cell lines. In addition, we developed a robust and unbiased computational pipeline that simultaneously identifies putative subtype-specific enhancers and their cognate TFs by integrating the magnitude of enhancer transcription, TF mRNA expression levels, TF motif P -values, and enrichment of H3K4me1 and H3K27ac. When applied across the 13 different cell lines noted above, the Total Functional Score of Enhancer Elements (TFSEE) identified key breast cancer subtype-specific TFs that act at transcribed enhancers to dictate gene expression patterns determining growth outcomes, including Forkhead TFs, FOSL1, and PLAG1. FOSL1, a Fos family TF, (1) is highly enriched at the enhancers of triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells, (2) acts as a key regulator of the proliferation and viability of TNBC cells, but not Luminal A cells, and (3) is associated with a poor prognosis in TNBC breast cancer patients. Taken together, our results validate our enhancer identification pipeline and reveal that enhancers transcribed in breast cancer cells direct critical gene regulatory networks that promote pathogenesis. © 2018 Franco et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  6. Transcriptional control in embryonic Drosophila midline guidance assessed through a whole genome approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomancak Pavel

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the development of the Drosophila central nervous system the process of midline crossing is orchestrated by a number of guidance receptors and ligands. Many key axon guidance molecules have been identified in both invertebrates and vertebrates, but the transcriptional regulation of growth cone guidance remains largely unknown. It is established that translational regulation plays a role in midline crossing, and there are indications that transcriptional regulation is also involved. To investigate this issue, we conducted a genome-wide study of transcription in Drosophila embryos using wild type and a number of well-characterized Drosophila guidance mutants and transgenics. We also analyzed a previously published microarray time course of Drosophila embryonic development with an axon guidance focus. Results Using hopach, a novel clustering method which is well suited to microarray data analysis, we identified groups of genes with similar expression patterns across guidance mutants and transgenics. We then systematically characterized the resulting clusters with respect to their relevance to axon guidance using two complementary controlled vocabularies: the Gene Ontology (GO and anatomical annotations of the Atlas of Pattern of Gene Expression (APoGE in situ hybridization database. The analysis indicates that regulation of gene expression does play a role in the process of axon guidance in Drosophila. We also find a strong link between axon guidance and hemocyte migration, a result that agrees with mounting evidence that axon guidance molecules are co-opted in vertebrate vascularization. Cell cyclin activity in the context of axon guidance is also suggested from our array data. RNA and protein expression patterns of cell cyclins in axon guidance mutants and transgenics support this possible link. Conclusion This study provides important insights into the regulation of axon guidance in vivo.

  7. A molecular threshold for effector CD8+ T cell differentiation controlled by transcription factors Blimp-1 and T-bet

    OpenAIRE

    Xin, Annie; Masson, Frederick; Liao, Yang; Preston, Simon; Guan, Tianxia; Gloury, Renee; Olshansky, Moshe; Lin, Jian-Xin; Li, Peng; Speed, Terence P; Smyth, Gordon K; Ernst, Matthias; Leonard, Warren J; Pellegrini, Marc; Kaech, Susan M

    2016-01-01

    T cell responses are guided by cytokines that induce transcriptional regulators, which ultimately control differentiation of effector and memory T cells. However, it is unknown how the activities of these molecular regulators are coordinated and integrated during the differentiation process. Using genetic approaches and transcriptional profiling of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells, we reveal a common program of effector differentiation that is regulated by IL-2 and IL-12 signaling and the combin...

  8. A Pitx transcription factor controls the establishment and maintenance of the serotonergic lineage in planarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    März, Martin; Seebeck, Florian; Bartscherer, Kerstin

    2013-11-01

    In contrast to adult vertebrates, which have limited capacities for neurogenesis, adult planarians undergo constitutive cellular turnover during homeostasis and are even able to regenerate a whole brain after decapitation. This enormous plasticity derives from pluripotent stem cells residing in the planarian body in large numbers. It is still obscure how these stem cells are programmed for differentiation into specific cell lineages and how lineage identity is maintained. Here we identify a Pitx transcription factor of crucial importance for planarian regeneration. In addition to patterning defects that are co-dependent on the LIM homeobox transcription factor gene islet1, which is expressed with pitx at anterior and posterior regeneration poles, RNAi against pitx results in islet1-independent specific loss of serotonergic (SN) neurons during regeneration. Besides its expression in terminally differentiated SN neurons we found pitx in stem cell progeny committed to the SN fate. Also, intact pitx RNAi animals gradually lose SN markers, a phenotype that depends neither on increased apoptosis nor on stem cell-based turnover or transdifferentiation into other neurons. We propose that pitx is a terminal selector gene for SN neurons in planarians that controls not only their maturation but also their identity by regulating the expression of the Serotonin production and transport machinery. Finally, we made use of this function of pitx and compared the transcriptomes of regenerating planarians with and without functional SN neurons, identifying at least three new neuronal targets of Pitx.

  9. Novel lncRNAs in myogenesis: a miR-31 overlapping transcript controls myoblast differentiation.

    KAUST Repository

    Ballarino, Monica

    2014-12-15

    Transcriptome analysis allowed the identification of new long noncoding RNAs differentially expressed during murine myoblast differentiation. These transcripts were classified on the basis of their expression under proliferating versus differentiated conditions, muscle-restricted activation, and subcellular localization. Several species displayed preferential expression in dystrophic (mdx) versus wild-type muscles, indicating their possible link with regenerative processes. One of the identified transcripts, lnc-31, even if originating from the same nuclear precursor of miR-31, is produced by a pathway mutually exclusive. We show that lnc-31 and its human homologue hsa-lnc-31 are expressed in proliferating myoblasts, where they counteract differentiation. In line with this, both species are more abundant in mdx muscles and in human Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) myoblasts, than in their normal counterparts. Altogether, these data suggest a crucial role for lnc-31 in controlling the differentiation commitment of precursor myoblasts and indicate that its function is maintained in evolution despite the poor sequence conservation with the human counterpart.

  10. SMN control of RNP assembly: from post-transcriptional gene regulation to motor neuron disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Darrick K; Tisdale, Sarah; Lotti, Francesco; Pellizzoni, Livio

    2014-08-01

    At the post-transcriptional level, expression of protein-coding genes is controlled by a series of RNA regulatory events including nuclear processing of primary transcripts, transport of mature mRNAs to specific cellular compartments, translation and ultimately, turnover. These processes are orchestrated through the dynamic association of mRNAs with RNA binding proteins and ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes. Accurate formation of RNPs in vivo is fundamentally important to cellular development and function, and its impairment often leads to human disease. The survival motor neuron (SMN) protein is key to this biological paradigm: SMN is essential for the biogenesis of various RNPs that function in mRNA processing, and genetic mutations leading to SMN deficiency cause the neurodegenerative disease spinal muscular atrophy. Here we review the expanding role of SMN in the regulation of gene expression through its multiple functions in RNP assembly. We discuss advances in our understanding of SMN activity as a chaperone of RNPs and how disruption of SMN-dependent RNA pathways can cause motor neuron disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Natural Guided Genome Engineering Reveals Transcriptional Regulators Controlling Quorum-Sensing Signal Degradation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas El Sahili

    Full Text Available Quorum-quenching (QQ are natural or engineered processes disrupting the quorum-sensing (QS signalling which controls virulence and persistence (e.g. biofilm in numerous bacteria. QQ involves different enzymes including lactonases, amidases, oxidases and reductases which degrade the QS molecules such as N-acylhomoserine lactones (NAHL. Rhodococcus erythropolis known to efficiently degrade NAHL is proposed as a biocontrol agent and a reservoir of QQ-enzymes for biotechnology. In R. erythropolis, regulation of QQ-enzymes remains unclear. In this work, we performed genome engineering on R. erythropolis, which is recalcitrant to reverse genetics, in order to investigate regulation of QQ-enzymes at a molecular and structural level with the aim to improve the QQ activity. Deep-sequencing of the R. erythropolis enhanced variants allowed identification of a punctual mutation in a key-transcriptional factor QsdR (Quorum sensing degradation Regulation which regulates the sole QQ-lactonase QsdA identified so far. Using biophysical and structural studies on QsdR, we demonstrate that QQ activity can be improved by modifying the regulation of QQ-enzymes degrading QS signal. This modification requiring the change of only one amino-acid in a transcriptional factor leads to an enhanced R. erythropolis in which the QS-signal degradation pathway is strongly activated.

  12. CDK9-mediated phosphorylation controls the interaction of TIP60 with the transcriptional machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauns-Schubert, Prisca; Schubert, Florian; Wissler, Manuela; Weiss, Martina; Schlicher, Lisa; Bessler, Simon; Safavi, Mariam; Miething, Cornelius; Borner, Christoph; Brummer, Tilman; Maurer, Ulrich

    2018-02-01

    The acetyltransferase TIP60 is regulated by phosphorylation, and we have previously shown that phosphorylation of TIP60 on S86 by GSK-3 promotes p53-mediated induction of the BCL-2 protein PUMA. TIP60 phosphorylation by GSK-3 requires a priming phosphorylation on S90, and here, we identify CDK9 as a TIP60S90 kinase. We demonstrate that a phosphorylation-deficient mutant, TIP60 S90A , exhibits reduced interaction with chromatin, histone 3 and RNA Pol II, while its association with the TIP60 complex subunit EPC1 is not affected. Consistently, we find a diminished association of TIP60 S90A with the MYC gene. We show that cells expressing TIP60 S90A , but also TIP60 S86A , which retains S90 phosphorylation, exhibit reduced histone 4 acetylation and proliferation. Thus, our data indicate that, during transcription, phosphorylation of TIP60 at two sites has different regulatory effects on TIP60, whereby S90 phosphorylation controls association with the transcription machinery, and S86 phosphorylation is regulating TIP60 HAT activity. © 2018 The Authors.

  13. Genetically tunable frustration controls allostery in an intrinsically disordered transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; White, Jordan T; Saavedra, Harry; Wrabl, James O; Motlagh, Hesam N; Liu, Kaixian; Sowers, James; Schroer, Trina A; Thompson, E Brad; Hilser, Vincent J

    2017-10-12

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) present a functional paradox because they lack stable tertiary structure, but nonetheless play a central role in signaling, utilizing a process known as allostery. Historically, allostery in structured proteins has been interpreted in terms of propagated structural changes that are induced by effector binding. Thus, it is not clear how IDPs, lacking such well-defined structures, can allosterically affect function. Here, we show a mechanism by which an IDP can allosterically control function by simultaneously tuning transcriptional activation and repression, using a novel strategy that relies on the principle of 'energetic frustration'. We demonstrate that human glucocorticoid receptor tunes this signaling in vivo by producing translational isoforms differing only in the length of the disordered region, which modulates the degree of frustration. We expect this frustration-based model of allostery will prove to be generally important in explaining signaling in other IDPs.

  14. Genetically tunable frustration controls allostery in an intrinsically disordered transcription factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; White, Jordan T; Saavedra, Harry; Wrabl, James O; Motlagh, Hesam N; Liu, Kaixian; Sowers, James; Schroer, Trina A; Thompson, E Brad

    2017-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) present a functional paradox because they lack stable tertiary structure, but nonetheless play a central role in signaling, utilizing a process known as allostery. Historically, allostery in structured proteins has been interpreted in terms of propagated structural changes that are induced by effector binding. Thus, it is not clear how IDPs, lacking such well-defined structures, can allosterically affect function. Here, we show a mechanism by which an IDP can allosterically control function by simultaneously tuning transcriptional activation and repression, using a novel strategy that relies on the principle of ‘energetic frustration’. We demonstrate that human glucocorticoid receptor tunes this signaling in vivo by producing translational isoforms differing only in the length of the disordered region, which modulates the degree of frustration. We expect this frustration-based model of allostery will prove to be generally important in explaining signaling in other IDPs. PMID:29022880

  15. A molecular threshold for effector CD8+ T cell differentiation controlled by transcription factors Blimp-1 and T-bet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Annie; Masson, Frederick; Liao, Yang; Preston, Simon; Guan, Tianxia; Gloury, Renee; Olshansky, Moshe; Lin, Jian-Xin; Li, Peng; Speed, Terence P; Smyth, Gordon K; Ernst, Matthias; Leonard, Warren J; Pellegrini, Marc; Kaech, Susan M; Nutt, Stephen L; Shi, Wei; Belz, Gabrielle T; Kallies, Axel

    2017-01-01

    T cell responses are guided by cytokines that induce transcriptional regulators, which ultimately control differentiation of effector and memory T cells. However, it is unknown how the activities of these molecular regulators are coordinated and integrated during the differentiation process. Using genetic approaches and transcriptional profiling of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells, we reveal a common program of effector differentiation that is regulated by IL-2 and IL-12 signaling and the combined activities of the transcriptional regulators Blimp-1 and T-bet. The loss of both T-bet and Blimp-1 leads to abrogated cytotoxic function and ectopic IL-17 production in CD8+ T cells. Overall, our data reveal two major overlapping pathways of effector differentiation governed by the availability of Blimp-1 and T-bet and suggest a model for cytokine-induced transcriptional changes that combine, quantitatively and qualitatively, to promote robust effector CD8+ T cell differentiation. PMID:26950239

  16. A molecular threshold for effector CD8(+) T cell differentiation controlled by transcription factors Blimp-1 and T-bet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Annie; Masson, Frederick; Liao, Yang; Preston, Simon; Guan, Tianxia; Gloury, Renee; Olshansky, Moshe; Lin, Jian-Xin; Li, Peng; Speed, Terence P; Smyth, Gordon K; Ernst, Matthias; Leonard, Warren J; Pellegrini, Marc; Kaech, Susan M; Nutt, Stephen L; Shi, Wei; Belz, Gabrielle T; Kallies, Axel

    2016-04-01

    T cell responses are guided by cytokines that induce transcriptional regulators, which ultimately control differentiation of effector and memory T cells. However, it is unknown how the activities of these molecular regulators are coordinated and integrated during the differentiation process. Using genetic approaches and transcriptional profiling of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells, we reveal a common program of effector differentiation that is regulated by IL-2 and IL-12 signaling and the combined activities of the transcriptional regulators Blimp-1 and T-bet. The loss of both T-bet and Blimp-1 leads to abrogated cytotoxic function and ectopic IL-17 production in CD8(+) T cells. Overall, our data reveal two major overlapping pathways of effector differentiation governed by the availability of Blimp-1 and T-bet and suggest a model for cytokine-induced transcriptional changes that combine, quantitatively and qualitatively, to promote robust effector CD8(+) T cell differentiation.

  17. Regulatory elements involved in the post-transcriptional control of stage-specific gene expression in Trypanosoma cruzi: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia R Araújo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi, a protozoan parasite that causes Chagas disease, exhibits unique mechanisms for gene expression such as constitutive polycistronic transcription of protein-coding genes, RNA editing and trans-splicing. In the absence of mechanism controlling transcription initiation, organized subsets of T. cruzi genes must be post-transcriptionally co-regulated in response to extracellular signals. The mechanisms that regulate stage-specific gene expression in this parasite have become much clearer through sequencing its whole genome as well as performing various proteomic and microarray analyses, which have demonstrated that at least half of the T. cruzi genes are differentially regulated during its life cycle. In this review, we attempt to highlight the recent advances in characterising cis and trans-acting elements in the T. cruzi genome that are involved in its post-transcriptional regulatory machinery.

  18. The CHR Promoter Element Controls Cell Cycle-Dependent Gene Transcription and Binds the DREAM and MMB Complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Müller, Gerd A.; Quaas, Marianne; Schümann, Michael; Krause, Eberhard; Fischer, Martin; Engeland, Kurt; Padi, Megha; Litovchick, Larisa; DeCaprio, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Cell cycle-dependent gene expression is often controlled on the transcriptional level. Genes like \\(cyclin B, CDC2\\) and \\(CDC25C\\) are regulated by cell cycle-dependent element (CDE) and cell cycle genes homology region (CHR) promoter elements mainly through repression in \\(G_0/G_1\\). It had been suggested that E2F4 binding to CDE sites is central to transcriptional regulation. However, some promoters are only controlled by a CHR. We identify the DREAM complex binding to the CHR of mouse and...

  19. Transcriptional control of steroid biosynthesis genes in the Drosophila prothoracic gland by ventral veins lacking and knirps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Thomas Danielsen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Specialized endocrine cells produce and release steroid hormones that govern development, metabolism and reproduction. In order to synthesize steroids, all the genes in the biosynthetic pathway must be coordinately turned on in steroidogenic cells. In Drosophila, the steroid producing endocrine cells are located in the prothoracic gland (PG that releases the steroid hormone ecdysone. The transcriptional regulatory network that specifies the unique PG specific expression pattern of the ecdysone biosynthetic genes remains unknown. Here, we show that two transcription factors, the POU-domain Ventral veins lacking (Vvl and the nuclear receptor Knirps (Kni, have essential roles in the PG during larval development. Vvl is highly expressed in the PG during embryogenesis and is enriched in the gland during larval development, suggesting that Vvl might function as a master transcriptional regulator in this tissue. Vvl and Kni bind to PG specific cis-regulatory elements that are required for expression of the ecdysone biosynthetic genes. Knock down of either vvl or kni in the PG results in a larval developmental arrest due to failure in ecdysone production. Furthermore, Vvl and Kni are also required for maintenance of TOR/S6K and prothoracicotropic hormone (PTTH signaling in the PG, two major pathways that control ecdysone biosynthesis and PG cell growth. We also show that the transcriptional regulator, Molting defective (Mld, controls early biosynthetic pathway steps. Our data show that Vvl and Kni directly regulate ecdysone biosynthesis by transcriptional control of biosynthetic gene expression and indirectly by affecting PTTH and TOR/S6K signaling. This provides new insight into the regulatory network of transcription factors involved in the coordinated regulation of steroidogenic cell specific transcription, and identifies a new function of Vvl and Knirps in endocrine cells during post-embryonic development.

  20. Cooperative Control of Ecdysone Biosynthesis in Drosophila by Transcription Factors Séance, Ouija Board, and Molting Defective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uryu, Outa; Ou, Qiuxiang; Komura-Kawa, Tatsuya; Kamiyama, Takumi; Iga, Masatoshi; Syrzycka, Monika; Hirota, Keiko; Kataoka, Hiroshi; Honda, Barry M; King-Jones, Kirst; Niwa, Ryusuke

    2018-02-01

    Ecdysteroids are steroid hormones that control many aspects of development and physiology. During larval development, ecdysone is synthesized in an endocrine organ called the prothoracic gland through a series of ecdysteroidogenic enzymes encoded by the Halloween genes. The expression of the Halloween genes is highly restricted and dynamic, indicating that their spatiotemporal regulation is mediated by their tight transcriptional control. In this study, we report that three zinc finger-associated domain (ZAD)-C 2 H 2 zinc finger transcription factors-Séance (Séan), Ouija board (Ouib), and Molting defective (Mld)-cooperatively control ecdysone biosynthesis in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster Séan and Ouib act in cooperation with Mld to positively regulate the transcription of neverland and spookier , respectively, two Halloween genes. Remarkably, loss-of-function mutations in séan , ouib , or mld can be rescued by the expression of neverland , spookier , or both, respectively. These results suggest that the three transcription factors have distinct roles in coordinating the expression of just two genes in Drosophila Given that neverland and spookier are located in constitutive heterochromatin, Séan, Ouib, and Mld represent the first example of a transcription factor subset that regulates genes located in constitutive heterochromatin. Copyright © 2018 by the Genetics Society of America.

  1. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition transcription factors control pluripotent adult stem cell migration in vivo in planarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abnave, Prasad; Aboukhatwa, Ellen; Kosaka, Nobuyoshi; Thompson, James; Hill, Mark A; Aboobaker, A Aziz

    2017-10-01

    Migration of stem cells underpins the physiology of metazoan animals. For tissues to be maintained, stem cells and their progeny must migrate and differentiate in the correct positions. This need is even more acute after tissue damage by wounding or pathogenic infection. Inappropriate migration also underpins metastasis. Despite this, few mechanistic studies address stem cell migration during repair or homeostasis in adult tissues. Here, we present a shielded X-ray irradiation assay that allows us to follow stem cell migration in planarians. We demonstrate the use of this system to study the molecular control of stem cell migration and show that snail-1 , snail-2 and zeb-1 EMT transcription factor homologs are necessary for cell migration to wound sites and for the establishment of migratory cell morphology. We also observed that stem cells undergo homeostatic migration to anterior regions that lack local stem cells, in the absence of injury, maintaining tissue homeostasis. This requires the polarity determinant notum Our work establishes planarians as a suitable model for further in-depth study of the processes controlling stem cell migration in vivo . © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. Dendrite architecture organized by transcriptional control of the F-actin nucleator Spire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Tiago; Ou, Yimiao; Li, Sally; Giniger, Edward; van Meyel, Donald J

    2014-02-01

    The architectures of dendritic trees are crucial for the wiring and function of neuronal circuits because they determine coverage of receptive territories, as well as the nature and strength of sensory or synaptic inputs. Here, we describe a cell-intrinsic pathway sculpting dendritic arborization (da) neurons in Drosophila that requires Longitudinals Lacking (Lola), a BTB/POZ transcription factor, and its control of the F-actin cytoskeleton through Spire (Spir), an actin nucleation protein. Loss of Lola from da neurons reduced the overall length of dendritic arbors, increased the expression of Spir, and produced inappropriate F-actin-rich dendrites at positions too near the cell soma. Selective removal of Lola from only class IV da neurons decreased the evasive responses of larvae to nociception. The increased Spir expression contributed to the abnormal F-actin-rich dendrites and the decreased nocifensive responses because both were suppressed by reduced dose of Spir. Thus, an important role of Lola is to limit expression of Spir to appropriate levels within da neurons. We found Spir to be expressed in dendritic arbors and to be important for their development. Removal of Spir from class IV da neurons reduced F-actin levels and total branch number, shifted the position of greatest branch density away from the cell soma, and compromised nocifensive behavior. We conclude that the Lola-Spir pathway is crucial for the spatial arrangement of branches within dendritic trees and for neural circuit function because it provides balanced control of the F-actin cytoskeleton.

  3. Step out of the groove : Epigenetic gene control systems and engineered transcription factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschure, Pernette J.; Visser, Astrid E.; Rots, Marianne G.; Hall, JC; Dunlap, JC; Friedmann, T; VanHeyningen,

    2006-01-01

    At the linear DNA level, gene activity is believed to be driven by binding of transcription factors, which subsequently recruit the RNA polymerase to the gene promoter region. However, it has become clear that transcriptional activation involves large complexes of many different proteins, which not

  4. Step out of the groove : epigenetic gene control systems and engineered transcription factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschure, P.J.; Visser, A.E.; Rots, M.G.

    2006-01-01

    At the linear DNA level, gene activity is believed to be driven by binding of transcription factors, which subsequently recruit the RNA polymerase to the gene promoter region. However, it has become clear that transcriptional activation involves large complexes of many different proteins, which not

  5. Spatially resolved metabolic analysis reveals a central role for transcriptional control in carbon allocation to wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Melissa; Arrivault, Stéphanie; Mahboubi, Amir; Krohn, Nicole; Sulpice, Ronan; Stitt, Mark; Niittylä, Totte

    2017-06-15

    The contribution of transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation to modifying carbon allocation to developing wood of trees is not well defined. To clarify the role of transcriptional regulation, the enzyme activity patterns of eight central primary metabolism enzymes across phloem, cambium, and developing wood of aspen (Populus tremula L.) were compared with transcript levels obtained by RNA sequencing of sequential stem sections from the same trees. Enzymes were selected on the basis of their importance in sugar metabolism and in linking primary metabolism to lignin biosynthesis. Existing enzyme assays were adapted to allow measurements from ~1 mm3 sections of dissected stem tissue. These experiments provided high spatial resolution of enzyme activity changes across different stages of wood development, and identified the gene transcripts probably responsible for these changes. In most cases, there was a clear positive relationship between transcripts and enzyme activity. During secondary cell wall formation, the increases in transcript levels and enzyme activities also matched with increased levels of glucose, fructose, hexose phosphates, and UDP-glucose, emphasizing an important role for transcriptional regulation in carbon allocation to developing aspen wood. These observations corroborate the efforts to increase carbon allocation to wood by engineering gene regulatory networks. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  6. Functional analysis of Dof transcription factors controlling heading date and PPDK gene expression in rice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Chapter 1 presents a general introduction to the factors involved in crop domestication and the specific role of transcription factors in this process. Chapter 2 describes the functional analysis of a Dof-type transcription factor, named OsDof24, from rice.chapter 3 describes the role of OsDof25 in

  7. Transcription factor control of growth rate dependent genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A three factor design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fazio, Alessandro; Jewett, Michael Christopher; Daran-Lapujade, Pascale

    2008-01-01

    transcription factor target sets, transcription factors that coordinate balanced growth were also identified. Our analysis shows that FhII, Rap1, and Sfp1, regulating protein biosynthesis, have significantly enriched target sets for genes up-regulated with increasing growth rate. Cell cycle regulators...

  8. The transcriptional network that controls growth arrest and differentiation in a human myeloid leukemia cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suzuki, Harukazu; Forrest, Alistair R R; van Nimwegen, Erik

    2009-01-01

    , we identified the key transcription regulators, their time-dependent activities and target genes. Systematic siRNA knockdown of 52 transcription factors confirmed the roles of individual factors in the regulatory network. Our results indicate that cellular states are constrained by complex networks......Using deep sequencing (deepCAGE), the FANTOM4 study measured the genome-wide dynamics of transcription-start-site usage in the human monocytic cell line THP-1 throughout a time course of growth arrest and differentiation. Modeling the expression dynamics in terms of predicted cis-regulatory sites...... involving both positive and negative regulatory interactions among substantial numbers of transcription factors and that no single transcription factor is both necessary and sufficient to drive the differentiation process....

  9. A general approach for controlling transcription and probing epigenetic mechanisms: application to the CD4 locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Mimi; Kaundal, Ravinder; Huang, Haichang; Zhao, Jiugang; Yang, Xiaojun; Chaiyachati, Barbara H; Li, Sicong; Chi, Tian

    2013-01-15

    Synthetic regulatory proteins such as tetracycline (tet)-controlled transcription factors are potentially useful for repression as well as ectopic activation of endogenous genes and also for probing their regulatory mechanisms, which would offer a versatile genetic tool advantageous over conventional gene targeting methods. In this study, we provide evidence supporting this concept using Cd4 as a model. CD4 is expressed in double-positive and CD4 cells but irreversibly silenced in CD8 cells. The silencing is mediated by heterochromatin established during CD8 lineage development via transient action of the Cd4 silencer; once established, the heterochromatin becomes self-perpetuating independently of the Cd4 silencer. Using a tet-sensitive Cd4 allele harboring a removable Cd4 silencer, we found that a tet-controlled repressor recapitulated the phenotype of Cd4-deficient mice, inhibited Cd4 expression in a reversible and dose-dependent manner, and could surprisingly replace the Cd4 silencer to induce irreversible Cd4 silencing in CD8 cells, thus suggesting the Cd4 silencer is not the (only) determinant of heterochromatin formation. In contrast, a tet-controlled activator reversibly disrupted Cd4 silencing in CD8 cells. The Cd4 silencer impeded this disruption but was not essential for its reversal, which revealed a continuous role of the silencer in mature CD8 cells while exposing a remarkable intrinsic self-regenerative ability of heterochromatin after forced disruption. These data demonstrate an effective approach for gene manipulation and provide insights into the epigenetic Cd4 regulatory mechanisms that are otherwise difficult to obtain.

  10. Transcription factors, transcriptional coregulators, and epigenetic modulation in the control of pulmonary vascular cell phenotype: therapeutic implications for pulmonary hypertension (2015 Grover Conference series).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullamsetti, Soni S; Perros, Frédéric; Chelladurai, Prakash; Yuan, Jason; Stenmark, Kurt

    2016-12-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a complex and multifactorial disease involving genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors. Numerous stimuli and pathological conditions facilitate severe vascular remodeling in PH by activation of a complex cascade of signaling pathways involving vascular cell proliferation, differentiation, and inflammation. Multiple signaling cascades modulate the activity of certain sequence-specific DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs) and coregulators that are critical for the transcriptional regulation of gene expression that facilitates PH-associated vascular cell phenotypes, as demonstrated by several studies summarized in this review. Past studies have largely focused on the role of the genetic component in the development of PH, while the presence of epigenetic alterations such as microRNAs, DNA methylation, histone levels, and histone deacetylases in PH is now also receiving increasing attention. Epigenetic regulation of chromatin structure is also recognized to influence gene expression in development or disease states. Therefore, a complete understanding of the mechanisms involved in altered gene expression in diseased cells is vital for the design of novel therapeutic strategies. Recent technological advances in DNA sequencing will provide a comprehensive improvement in our understanding of mechanisms involved in the development of PH. This review summarizes current concepts in TF and epigenetic control of cell phenotype in pulmonary vascular disease and discusses the current issues and possibilities in employing potential epigenetic or TF-based therapies for achieving complete reversal of PH.

  11. Forkhead containing transcription factor Albino controls tetrapyrrole-based body pigmentation in planarian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chen; Han, Xiao-Shuai; Li, Fang-Fang; Huang, Shuang; Qin, Yong-Wen; Zhao, Xian-Xian; Jing, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Pigmentation processes occur from invertebrates to mammals. Owing to the complexity of the pigmentary system, in vivo animal models for pigmentation study are limited. Planarians are capable of regenerating any missing part including the dark-brown pigments, providing a promising model for pigmentation study. However, the molecular mechanism of planarian body pigmentation is poorly understood. We found in an RNA interference screen that a forkhead containing transcription factor, Albino, was required for pigmentation without affecting survival or other regeneration processes. In addition, the body color recovered after termination of Albino double stranded RNA feeding owing to the robust stem cell system. Further expression analysis revealed a spatial and temporal correlation between Albino and pigmentation process. Gene expression arrays revealed that the expression of three tetrapyrrole biosynthesis enzymes, ALAD, ALAS and PBGD, was impaired upon Albino RNA interference. RNA interference of PBGD led to a similar albinism phenotype caused by Albino RNA interference. Moreover, PBGD was specifically expressed in pigment cells and can serve as a pigment cell molecular marker. Our results revealed that Albino controls planarian body color pigmentation dominantly via regulating tetrapyrrole biogenesis. These results identified Albino as the key regulator of the tetrapyrrole-based planarian body pigmentation, suggesting a role of Albino during stem cell-pigment cell fate decision and provided new insights into porphyria pathogenesis. PMID:27551436

  12. Identification and selection of normalization controls for quantitative transcript analysis in Blumeria graminis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Helen G; Li, Linhan; Spanu, Pietro D

    2016-05-01

    The investigation of obligate biotrophic pathogens, for example Blumeria graminis, presents a number of challenges. The sensitivity of many assays is reduced because of the presence of host material. Furthermore, the fungal structures inside and outside of the plant possess very different characteristics. Normalization genes are used in quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to compensate for changes as a result of the quantity and quality of template material. Such genes are used as references against which genes of interest are compared, enabling true quantification. Here, we identified six potential B. graminis and five barley genes for qPCR normalization. The relative changes in abundance of the transcripts were assayed across an infection time course in barley epidermis, in B. graminis epiphytic structures and haustoria. The B. graminis glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), actin (ACT) and histone 3 (H3) genes and the barley GAPDH, ubiquitin (UBI) and α-tubulin 2B (TUBA2B) genes were optimal normalization controls for qPCR during the infection cycle. These genes were then used for normalization in the quantification of the members of a Candidate Secreted Effector Protein (CSEP) family 21, a conidia-specific gene and barley genes encoding putative interactors of CSEP0064. The analysis demonstrates the importance of identifying which reference genes are appropriate for each investigation. © 2015 THE AUTHORS. MOLECULAR PLANT PATHOLOGY PUBLISHED BY BRITISH SOCIETY FOR PLANT PATHOLOGY AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  13. Transcription factor IRF8 controls Th1-like regulatory T-cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wonyong; Kim, Hyeong Su; Baek, Song Yi; Lee, Gap Ryol

    2016-11-01

    Recent studies have suggested that regulatory T (Treg) cells comprise a heterogeneous population that regulates various aspects of the immune response, and that Treg cells use the factors that are expressed in their target cells to regulate them. We searched for factors that regulate Th1 response in Treg cells using a meta-analysis. In the process, we discovered that transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 8 (IRF8) was selectively expressed in Treg and Th1 cells. IRF8-deficient Treg cells showed defective expression of CXCR3 and aberrant expression of the Il4 and Il17 genes. Upon treatment with alpha galactosyl-C18-ceramide (αGal-C18-Cer), IRF8-deficient mice showed defective Treg cell recruitment in the liver. Eliciting Th1 immune response by anti-CD40 antibody injection in mice induced IRF8 expression in Treg cells. The expression of IRF8 was induced by Foxp3 in Treg cells. IRF8 had no effect on T-bet expression in Treg and vice versa. Thus, our results strongly suggest that IRF8 controls Th1 immune response in Treg cells independent of T-bet.

  14. Synthetic Transcription Amplifier System for Orthogonal Control of Gene Expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anssi Rantasalo

    Full Text Available This work describes the development and characterization of a modular synthetic expression system that provides a broad range of adjustable and predictable expression levels in S. cerevisiae. The system works as a fixed-gain transcription amplifier, where the input signal is transferred via a synthetic transcription factor (sTF onto a synthetic promoter, containing a defined core promoter, generating a transcription output signal. The system activation is based on the bacterial LexA-DNA-binding domain, a set of modified, modular LexA-binding sites and a selection of transcription activation domains. We show both experimentally and computationally that the tuning of the system is achieved through the selection of three separate modules, each of which enables an adjustable output signal: 1 the transcription-activation domain of the sTF, 2 the binding-site modules in the output promoter, and 3 the core promoter modules which define the transcription initiation site in the output promoter. The system has a novel bidirectional architecture that enables generation of compact, yet versatile expression modules for multiple genes with highly diversified expression levels ranging from negligible to very strong using one synthetic transcription factor. In contrast to most existing modular gene expression regulation systems, the present system is independent from externally added compounds. Furthermore, the established system was minimally affected by the several tested growth conditions. These features suggest that it can be highly useful in large scale biotechnology applications.

  15. Core Transcriptional Regulatory Circuit Controlled by the TAL1 Complex in Human T Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Sanda, Takaomi; Lawton, Lee N.; Barrasa, M. Inmaculada; Fan, Zi Peng; Kohlhammer, Holger; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Ma, Wenxue; Tatarek, Jessica; Ahn, Yebin; Kelliher, Michelle A.; Jamieson, Catriona H.M.; Staudt, Louis M.; Young, Richard A.; Look, A. Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The oncogenic transcription factor TAL1/SCL is aberrantly expressed in over 40% of cases of human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), emphasizing its importance in the molecular pathogenesis of T-ALL. Here we identify the core transcriptional regulatory circuit controlled by TAL1 and its regulatory partners HEB, E2A, LMO1/2, GATA3 and RUNX1. We show that TAL1 forms a positive interconnected auto-regulatory loop with GATA3 and RUNX1, and that the TAL1 complex directly activates the MY...

  16. Control of the Inflammatory Macrophage Transcriptional Signature by miR-155

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonski, Kyle A.; Gaudet, Andrew D.; Amici, Stephanie A.; Popovich, Phillip G.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory M1 spectrum macrophages protect from infection but can cause inflammatory disease and tissue damage, whereas alternatively activated/M2 spectrum macrophages reduce inflammation and promote tissue repair. Modulation of macrophage phenotype may be therapeutically beneficial and requires further understanding of the molecular programs that control macrophage differentiation. A potential mechanism by which macrophages differentiate may be through microRNA (miRNA), which bind to messenger RNA and post-transcriptionally modify gene expression, cell phenotype and function. We hypothesized that the inflammation-associated miRNA, miR-155, would be required for typical development of macrophage inflammatory state. miR-155 was rapidly up-regulated over 100-fold in inflammatory M1(LPS + IFN-γ), but not M2(IL-4), macrophages. Inflammatory genes Inos, Il1b and Tnfa and their corresponding protein or enzymatic products were reduced up to 72% in miR-155 knockout mouse M1(LPS + IFN-γ) macrophages, but miR-155 deficiency did not affect expression of the M2-associated gene Arg1 in M2(IL-4) macrophages. Additionally, a miR-155 oligonucleotide inhibitor efficiently suppressed Inos and Tnfa gene expression in wild-type M1(LPS + IFN-γ) macrophages. Comparative transcriptional profiling of unstimulated and M1(LPS + IFN-γ) macrophages derived from wild-type (WT) and miR-155 knockout (KO) mice revealed that half (approximately 650 genes) of the signature we previously identified in WT M1(LPS + IFN-γ) macrophages was dependent on miR-155. Real-Time PCR of independent datasets confirmed that miR-155 contributed to suppression of its validated mRNA targets Inpp5d, Tspan14, Ptprj and Mafb and induction of Inos, Il1b, Tnfa, Il6 and Il12. Overall, these data indicate that miR-155 plays an essential role in driving the inflammatory phenotype of M1(LPS+ IFN-γ) macrophages. PMID:27447824

  17. Control of the Inflammatory Macrophage Transcriptional Signature by miR-155.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle A Jablonski

    Full Text Available Inflammatory M1 spectrum macrophages protect from infection but can cause inflammatory disease and tissue damage, whereas alternatively activated/M2 spectrum macrophages reduce inflammation and promote tissue repair. Modulation of macrophage phenotype may be therapeutically beneficial and requires further understanding of the molecular programs that control macrophage differentiation. A potential mechanism by which macrophages differentiate may be through microRNA (miRNA, which bind to messenger RNA and post-transcriptionally modify gene expression, cell phenotype and function. We hypothesized that the inflammation-associated miRNA, miR-155, would be required for typical development of macrophage inflammatory state. miR-155 was rapidly up-regulated over 100-fold in inflammatory M1(LPS + IFN-γ, but not M2(IL-4, macrophages. Inflammatory genes Inos, Il1b and Tnfa and their corresponding protein or enzymatic products were reduced up to 72% in miR-155 knockout mouse M1(LPS + IFN-γ macrophages, but miR-155 deficiency did not affect expression of the M2-associated gene Arg1 in M2(IL-4 macrophages. Additionally, a miR-155 oligonucleotide inhibitor efficiently suppressed Inos and Tnfa gene expression in wild-type M1(LPS + IFN-γ macrophages. Comparative transcriptional profiling of unstimulated and M1(LPS + IFN-γ macrophages derived from wild-type (WT and miR-155 knockout (KO mice revealed that half (approximately 650 genes of the signature we previously identified in WT M1(LPS + IFN-γ macrophages was dependent on miR-155. Real-Time PCR of independent datasets confirmed that miR-155 contributed to suppression of its validated mRNA targets Inpp5d, Tspan14, Ptprj and Mafb and induction of Inos, Il1b, Tnfa, Il6 and Il12. Overall, these data indicate that miR-155 plays an essential role in driving the inflammatory phenotype of M1(LPS+ IFN-γ macrophages.

  18. Roles of Transcriptional and Translational Control Mechanisms in Regulation of Ribosomal Protein Synthesis in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos, Hector L; O'Connor, Kevin; Sanchez-Vazquez, Patricia; Gourse, Richard L

    2017-11-01

    Bacterial ribosome biogenesis is tightly regulated to match nutritional conditions and to prevent formation of defective ribosomal particles. In Escherichia coli , most ribosomal protein (r-protein) synthesis is coordinated with rRNA synthesis by a translational feedback mechanism: when r-proteins exceed rRNAs, specific r-proteins bind to their own mRNAs and inhibit expression of the operon. It was recently discovered that the second messenger nucleotide guanosine tetra and pentaphosphate (ppGpp), which directly regulates rRNA promoters, is also capable of regulating many r-protein promoters. To examine the relative contributions of the translational and transcriptional control mechanisms to the regulation of r-protein synthesis, we devised a reporter system that enabled us to genetically separate the cis -acting sequences responsible for the two mechanisms and to quantify their relative contributions to regulation under the same conditions. We show that the synthesis of r-proteins from the S20 and S10 operons is regulated by ppGpp following shifts in nutritional conditions, but most of the effect of ppGpp required the 5' region of the r-protein mRNA containing the target site for translational feedback regulation and not the promoter. These results suggest that most regulation of the S20 and S10 operons by ppGpp following nutritional shifts is indirect and occurs in response to changes in rRNA synthesis. In contrast, we found that the promoters for the S20 operon were regulated during outgrowth, likely in response to increasing nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) levels. Thus, r-protein synthesis is dynamic, with different mechanisms acting at different times. IMPORTANCE Bacterial cells have evolved complex and seemingly redundant strategies to regulate many high-energy-consuming processes. In E. coli , synthesis of ribosomal components is tightly regulated with respect to nutritional conditions by mechanisms that act at both the transcription and translation steps. In

  19. Transcriptional control of drug resistance, virulence and immune system evasion in pathogenic fungi: a cross-species comparison.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Pais

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factors are key players in the control of the activation or repression of gene expression programs in response to environmental stimuli. The study of regulatory networks taking place in fungal pathogens is a promising research topic that can help in the fight against these pathogens by targeting specific fungal pathways as a whole, instead of targeting more specific effectors of virulence or drug resistance. This review is focused on the analysis of regulatory networks playing a central role in the referred mechanisms in the human fungal pathogens Aspergillus fumigatus, Cryptococcus neoformans, Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida parapsilosis and Candida tropicalis. Current knowledge on the activity of the transcription factors characterized in each of these pathogenic fungal species will be addressed. Particular focus is given to their mechanisms of activation, regulatory targets and phenotypic outcome. The review further provides an evaluation on the conservation of transcriptional circuits among different fungal pathogens, highlighting the pathways that translate common or divergent traits among these species in what concerns their drug resistance, virulence and host immune evasion features. It becomes evident that the regulation of transcriptional networks is complex and presents significant variations among different fungal pathogens. Only the oxidative stress regulators Yap1 and Skn7 are conserved among all studied species; while some transcription factors, involved in nutrient homeostasis, pH adaptation, drug resistance and morphological switching are present in several, though not all species. Interestingly, in some cases not very homologous transcription factors display orthologous functions, whereas some homologous proteins have diverged in terms of their function in different species. A few cases of species specific transcription factors are also observed.

  20. Transcriptional Control of Drug Resistance, Virulence and Immune System Evasion in Pathogenic Fungi: A Cross-Species Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pais, Pedro; Costa, Catarina; Cavalheiro, Mafalda; Romão, Daniela; Teixeira, Miguel C

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors are key players in the control of the activation or repression of gene expression programs in response to environmental stimuli. The study of regulatory networks taking place in fungal pathogens is a promising research topic that can help in the fight against these pathogens by targeting specific fungal pathways as a whole, instead of targeting more specific effectors of virulence or drug resistance. This review is focused on the analysis of regulatory networks playing a central role in the referred mechanisms in the human fungal pathogens Aspergillus fumigatus, Cryptococcus neoformans, Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida parapsilosis , and Candida tropicalis . Current knowledge on the activity of the transcription factors characterized in each of these pathogenic fungal species will be addressed. Particular focus is given to their mechanisms of activation, regulatory targets and phenotypic outcome. The review further provides an evaluation on the conservation of transcriptional circuits among different fungal pathogens, highlighting the pathways that translate common or divergent traits among these species in what concerns their drug resistance, virulence and host immune evasion features. It becomes evident that the regulation of transcriptional networks is complex and presents significant variations among different fungal pathogens. Only the oxidative stress regulators Yap1 and Skn7 are conserved among all studied species; while some transcription factors, involved in nutrient homeostasis, pH adaptation, drug resistance and morphological switching are present in several, though not all species. Interestingly, in some cases not very homologous transcription factors display orthologous functions, whereas some homologous proteins have diverged in terms of their function in different species. A few cases of species specific transcription factors are also observed.

  1. The transcription factor Rbf1 is the master regulator for b-mating type controlled pathogenic development in Ustilago maydis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Heimel

    Full Text Available In the phytopathogenic basidiomycete Ustilago maydis, sexual and pathogenic development are tightly connected and controlled by the heterodimeric bE/bW transcription factor complex encoded by the b-mating type locus. The formation of the active bE/bW heterodimer leads to the formation of filaments, induces a G2 cell cycle arrest, and triggers pathogenicity. Here, we identify a set of 345 bE/bW responsive genes which show altered expression during these developmental changes; several of these genes are associated with cell cycle coordination, morphogenesis and pathogenicity. 90% of the genes that show altered expression upon bE/bW-activation require the zinc finger transcription factor Rbf1, one of the few factors directly regulated by the bE/bW heterodimer. Rbf1 is a novel master regulator in a multilayered network of transcription factors that facilitates the complex regulatory traits of sexual and pathogenic development.

  2. Transcription of human 7S K DNA in vitro and in vivo is exclusively controlled by an upstream promoter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinert, H.; Benecke, B.J.

    1988-02-25

    The authors have analyzed the transcription of a recently isolated human 7S K RNA gene in vitro and in vivo. In contrast to hitherto characterized class III genes (genes transcribed by RNA polymerase III), the coding sequence of this gene is not required for faithful and efficient transcription by RNA polymerase III. In fact, a procaryotic vector DNA sequence was efficiently transcribed by RNA polymerase III under the control of the 7S K RNA gene upstream sequence in vitro and in vivo. S/sub 1/-nuclease protection analyses confirmed that the 7S K 5'flanking sequence was sufficient for accurate transcription initiation. These data demonstrate that 7S K DNA represents a novel class III gene, the promoter elements of which are located outside the coding sequence.

  3. Elongator and SPT4/SPT5 complexes as proxy to study RNA polymerase II transcript elongation control of plant development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lijsebettens, Mieke; Dürr, Julius; Woloszynska, Magdalena; Grasser, Klaus D

    2014-10-01

    The elongation phase of the RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) transcription process is dynamic and regulated. Elongator and SUPPRESSOR OF Ty4 (SPT4)/SPT5 are transcript elongation factors that contribute to the regulation of mRNA synthesis by RNA polymerase II in the chromatin context. Recently, the Elongator complex consisting of six subunits and the SPT4/SPT5 heterodimer were isolated from Arabidopsis. Mutant plants affected in the expression of Elongator or SPT4/SPT5 share various auxin-signaling phenotypes. In line with that observation, auxin-related genes are prominent among the genes differentially expressed in these mutants. Exemplified by Elongator and SPT4/SPT5, we discuss here the role that transcript elongation factors may play in the control of plant growth and development. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. The CHR promoter element controls cell cycle-dependent gene transcription and binds the DREAM and MMB complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Gerd A; Quaas, Marianne; Schümann, Michael; Krause, Eberhard; Padi, Megha; Fischer, Martin; Litovchick, Larisa; DeCaprio, James A; Engeland, Kurt

    2012-02-01

    Cell cycle-dependent gene expression is often controlled on the transcriptional level. Genes like cyclin B, CDC2 and CDC25C are regulated by cell cycle-dependent element (CDE) and cell cycle genes homology region (CHR) promoter elements mainly through repression in G(0)/G(1). It had been suggested that E2F4 binding to CDE sites is central to transcriptional regulation. However, some promoters are only controlled by a CHR. We identify the DREAM complex binding to the CHR of mouse and human cyclin B2 promoters in G(0). Association of DREAM and cell cycle-dependent regulation is abrogated when the CHR is mutated. Although E2f4 is part of the complex, a CDE is not essential but can enhance binding of DREAM. We show that the CHR element is not only necessary for repression of gene transcription in G(0)/G(1), but also for activation in S, G(2) and M phases. In proliferating cells, the B-myb-containing MMB complex binds the CHR of both promoters independently of the CDE. Bioinformatic analyses identify many genes which contain conserved CHR elements in promoters binding the DREAM complex. With Ube2c as an example from that screen, we show that inverse CHR sites are functional promoter elements that can bind DREAM and MMB. Our findings indicate that the CHR is central to DREAM/MMB-dependent transcriptional control during the cell cycle.

  5. Control of Transcriptional Fidelity by Active Center Tuning as Derived from RNA Polymerase Endonuclease Reaction*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosunova, Ekaterina; Sosunov, Vasily; Epshtein, Vitaly; Nikiforov, Vadim; Mustaev, Arkady

    2013-01-01

    Precise transcription by cellular RNA polymerase requires the efficient removal of noncognate nucleotide residues that are occasionally incorporated. Mis-incorporation causes the transcription elongation complex to backtrack, releasing a single strand 3′-RNA segment bearing a noncognate residue, which is hydrolyzed by the active center that carries two Mg2+ ions. However, in most x-ray structures only one Mg2+ is present. This Mg2+ is tightly bound to the active center aspartates, creating an inactive stable state. The first residue of the single strand RNA segment in the backtracked transcription elongation complex strongly promotes transcript hydrolytic cleavage by establishing a network of interactions that force a shift of stably bound Mg2+ to release some of its aspartate coordination valences for binding to the second Mg2+ thus enabling catalysis. Such a rearrangement that we call active center tuning (ACT) occurs when all recognition contacts of the active center-bound RNA segment are established and verified by tolerance to stress. Transcription factor Gre builds on the ACT mechanism in the same reaction by increasing the retention of the second Mg2+ and by activating the attacking water, causing 3000–4000-fold reaction acceleration and strongly reinforcing proofreading. The unified mechanism for RNA synthesis and degradation by RNA polymerase predicts that ACT also executes NTP selection thereby contributing to high transcription fidelity. PMID:23283976

  6. Control of transcriptional fidelity by active center tuning as derived from RNA polymerase endonuclease reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosunova, Ekaterina; Sosunov, Vasily; Epshtein, Vitaly; Nikiforov, Vadim; Mustaev, Arkady

    2013-03-01

    Precise transcription by cellular RNA polymerase requires the efficient removal of noncognate nucleotide residues that are occasionally incorporated. Mis-incorporation causes the transcription elongation complex to backtrack, releasing a single strand 3'-RNA segment bearing a noncognate residue, which is hydrolyzed by the active center that carries two Mg(2+) ions. However, in most x-ray structures only one Mg(2+) is present. This Mg(2+) is tightly bound to the active center aspartates, creating an inactive stable state. The first residue of the single strand RNA segment in the backtracked transcription elongation complex strongly promotes transcript hydrolytic cleavage by establishing a network of interactions that force a shift of stably bound Mg(2+) to release some of its aspartate coordination valences for binding to the second Mg(2+) thus enabling catalysis. Such a rearrangement that we call active center tuning (ACT) occurs when all recognition contacts of the active center-bound RNA segment are established and verified by tolerance to stress. Transcription factor Gre builds on the ACT mechanism in the same reaction by increasing the retention of the second Mg(2+) and by activating the attacking water, causing 3000-4000-fold reaction acceleration and strongly reinforcing proofreading. The unified mechanism for RNA synthesis and degradation by RNA polymerase predicts that ACT also executes NTP selection thereby contributing to high transcription fidelity.

  7. Control of VEGF-A transcriptional programs by pausing and genomic compartmentalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaikkonen, Minna U; Niskanen, Henri; Romanoski, Casey E; Kansanen, Emilia; Kivelä, Annukka M; Laitalainen, Jarkko; Heinz, Sven; Benner, Christopher; Glass, Christopher K; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2014-11-10

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) is a master regulator of angiogenesis, vascular development and function. In this study we investigated the transcriptional regulation of VEGF-A-responsive genes in primary human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) using genome-wide global run-on sequencing (GRO-Seq). We demonstrate that half of VEGF-A-regulated gene promoters are characterized by a transcriptionally competent paused RNA polymerase II (Pol II). We show that transition into productive elongation is a major mechanism of gene activation of virtually all VEGF-regulated genes, whereas only ∼40% of the genes are induced at the level of initiation. In addition, we report a comprehensive chromatin interaction map generated in HUVECs using tethered conformation capture (TCC) and characterize chromatin interactions in relation to transcriptional activity. We demonstrate that sites of active transcription are more likely to engage in chromatin looping and cell type-specific transcriptional activity reflects the boundaries of chromatin interactions. Furthermore, we identify large chromatin compartments with a tendency to be coordinately transcribed upon VEGF-A stimulation. We provide evidence that these compartments are enriched for clusters of regulatory regions such as super-enhancers and for disease-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Collectively, these findings provide new insights into mechanisms behind VEGF-A-regulated transcriptional programs in endothelial cells. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Connections between transcription, mRNP assembly and quality control in S. cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Torben Heick

    Processing of mRNA and proper formation of messenger ribonucleoprotein particles (mRNPs) require co-transcriptional loading of proteins onto nascent transcripts, which is critically dependent on the function of the THO/TREX complex, as well as on proper mRNA 3’-end formation.To better determine t...... the role(s) of the THO complex, we have searched for mutant alleles that exhibit a genetic interaction with a strain carrying a deletion of the THO complex component MFT1. Our results suggest that the THO complex is functionally connected to the 3’end formation/mRNA export step. High...... to the new 3’-end. Mutations in several genes involved in mRNA export and in mRNP assembly lead to retention of mRNPs in transcription site-foci and to partial degradation of the mRNA by the nuclear exosome. Here, we demonstrate a prominent role of the rate of transcription in the constitution of an export......-competent mRNP. We show that a transcription-defective allele of the Rad3p helicase, a component of the TFIIH transcription initiation factor, suppress several export-related phenotypes linked to mutation of Rna14p and members of the THO complex. Biochemical and genetic data indicate that mutation of Rad3p...

  9. Cloning of embryonal stem cell-specific genes: characterization of the transcriptionally controlled gene esg-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierbaum, P; MacLean-Hunter, S; Ehlert, F; Möröy, T; Müller, R

    1994-01-01

    We have isolated, by differential library screening, eight cDNAs representing genes that are specifically expressed in the embryonal stem cell line IMT-11, when compared to the parietal endoderm-like cell line PYS-2 or to NIH3T3 fibroblasts. One of these genes, embryonal stem cell gene 1 (esg-1), was analyzed in detail. esg-1 mRNA is found at high levels in both IMT-11 and F9 embryonal carcinoma cells and disappears during the differentiation of the stem cells. Furthermore, expression of the gene was found to be extremely low in, or absent from, oocytes and fertilized eggs, but it is strongly induced at the 2-cell stage, reaching maximum levels at the 4-cell stage. In contrast, esg-1 expression is detectable neither in midgestation embryos nor in neonatal tissues. These results strongly suggest that esg-1 is expressed specifically or at least predominantly in embryonal stem cells. Antibodies directed against a glutathione S-transferase-esg-1 fusion product detect a protein of M(r) approximately 14,000 in F9 embryonal carcinoma cells, but not in differentiated cells. Apart from the esg-1 gene, which contains two introns, there are at least seven esg-1-related pseudogenes in the mouse genome that differ from the esg-1 gene by the presence of multiple point mutations, by the lack of intervening sequences, and/or by the presence of a polyadenylated stretch at the 3' end. The esg-1 gene is under stringent transcriptional control in differentiating and differentiated cells, as shown by both nuclear run-on assays and the transient F9 stem cell-specific expression of constructs consisting of esg-1 upstream sequences fused to a luciferase reporter gene.

  10. Extensive polymerase pausing during Drosophila axis patterning enables high-level and pliable transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Abbie; Core, Leighton J; Sutcliffe, Catherine; Lis, John T; Ashe, Hilary L

    2013-05-15

    Cascades of zygotic gene expression pattern the anterior-posterior (AP) and dorsal-ventral (DV) axes of the early Drosophila embryo. Here, we used the global run-on sequencing assay (GRO-seq) to map the genome-wide RNA polymerase distribution during early Drosophila embryogenesis, thus providing insights into how genes are regulated. We identify widespread promoter-proximal pausing yet show that the presence of paused polymerase does not necessarily equate to direct regulation through pause release to productive elongation. Our data reveal that a subset of early Zelda-activated genes is regulated at the level of polymerase recruitment, whereas other Zelda target and axis patterning genes are predominantly regulated through pause release. In contrast to other signaling pathways, we found that bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) target genes are collectively more highly paused than BMP pathway components and show that BMP target gene expression requires the pause-inducing negative elongation factor (NELF) complex. Our data also suggest that polymerase pausing allows plasticity in gene activation throughout embryogenesis, as transiently repressed and transcriptionally silenced genes maintain and lose promoter polymerases, respectively. Finally, we provide evidence that the major effect of pausing is on the levels, rather than timing, of transcription. These data are discussed in terms of the efficiency of transcriptional activation required across cell populations during developmental time constraints.

  11. Transcriptional control of the isoeugenol monooxygenase of Pseudomonas nitroreducens Jin1 in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Ji-Young; Seo, Jiyoung; Ahn, Joong-Hoon; Sadowsky, Michael J; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2012-01-01

    Vanillin is one of the most valuable compounds in the flavoring and fragrance industries, and many attempts to produce natural vanillin have been made in recent years. Isoeugenol monooxygenase (Iem) converts the phenylpropanoid compound isoeugenol to vanillin. In Pseudomonas nitroreducens Jin1, the positive regulatory protein IemR is divergently expressed from Iem, and the promoter region is located between the genes. In this study, we investigated the transcriptional regulation of iem in Escherichia coli. We focused on inducers and regulatory protein IemR. Transcription of iem was found to be dependent on the amounts of isoeugenol and IemR. Isoeugenol was found to be the best inducer of iem, followed by trans-anethole, which induced iem to 58% of the transcription level observed for isoeugenol. Overproduction of IemR in E. coli significantly increased the transcription of iem, up to 96-fold, even in the absence of isoeugenol, as compared to basally expressed IemR. Results of this study indicate that the transcription of iem iss dependent on the type of inducers and on IemR. They should contribute to the development of bioengineering strategies for increased production of vanillin through high-level expression of the isoeugenol monooxygenase gene in microorganisms.

  12. KDM4C and ATF4 Cooperate in Transcriptional Control of Amino Acid Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhu Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The histone lysine demethylase KDM4C is often overexpressed in cancers primarily through gene amplification. The molecular mechanisms of KDM4C action in tumorigenesis are not well defined. Here, we report that KDM4C transcriptionally activates amino acid biosynthesis and transport, leading to a significant increase in intracellular amino acid levels. Examination of the serine-glycine synthesis pathway reveals that KDM4C epigenetically activates the pathway genes under steady-state and serine deprivation conditions by removing the repressive histone modification H3 lysine 9 (H3K9 trimethylation. This action of KDM4C requires ATF4, a transcriptional master regulator of amino acid metabolism and stress responses. KDM4C activates ATF4 transcription and interacts with ATF4 to target serine pathway genes for transcriptional activation. We further present evidence for KDM4C in transcriptional coordination of amino acid metabolism and cell proliferation. These findings suggest a molecular mechanism linking KDM4C-mediated H3K9 demethylation and ATF4-mediated transactivation in reprogramming amino acid metabolism for cancer cell proliferation.

  13. The post-transcriptional regulatory system CSR controls the balance of metabolic pools in upper glycolysis of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Manon; Ropers, Delphine; Letisse, Fabien; Laguerre, Sandrine; Portais, Jean-Charles; Cocaign-Bousquet, Muriel; Enjalbert, Brice

    2016-05-01

    Metabolic control in Escherichia coli is a complex process involving multilevel regulatory systems but the involvement of post-transcriptional regulation is uncertain. The post-transcriptional factor CsrA is stated as being the only regulator essential for the use of glycolytic substrates. A dozen enzymes in the central carbon metabolism (CCM) have been reported as potentially controlled by CsrA, but its impact on the CCM functioning has not been demonstrated. Here, a multiscale analysis was performed in a wild-type strain and its isogenic mutant attenuated for CsrA (including growth parameters, gene expression levels, metabolite pools, abundance of enzymes and fluxes). Data integration and regulation analysis showed a coordinated control of the expression of glycolytic enzymes. This also revealed the imbalance of metabolite pools in the csrA mutant upper glycolysis, before the phosphofructokinase PfkA step. This imbalance is associated with a glucose-phosphate stress. Restoring PfkA activity in the csrA mutant strain suppressed this stress and increased the mutant growth rate on glucose. Thus, the carbon storage regulator system is essential for the effective functioning of the upper glycolysis mainly through its control of PfkA. This work demonstrates the pivotal role of post-transcriptional regulation to shape the carbon metabolism. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Transcriptional programs that control expression of the autoimmune regulator gene Aire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzig, Yonatan; Nevo, Shir; Bornstein, Chamutal; Brezis, Miriam R; Ben-Hur, Sharon; Shkedy, Aya; Eisenberg-Bord, Michal; Levi, Ben; Delacher, Michael; Goldfarb, Yael; David, Eyal; Weinberger, Leehee; Viukov, Sergey; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Giraud, Matthieu; Hanna, Jacob H; Breiling, Achim; Lyko, Frank; Amit, Ido; Feuerer, Markus; Abramson, Jakub

    2017-02-01

    Aire is a transcriptional regulator that induces promiscuous expression of thousands of genes encoding tissue-restricted antigens (TRAs) in medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs). While the target genes of Aire are well characterized, the transcriptional programs that regulate its own expression have remained elusive. Here we comprehensively analyzed both cis-acting and trans-acting regulatory mechanisms and found that the Aire locus was insulated by the global chromatin organizer CTCF and was hypermethylated in cells and tissues that did not express Aire. In mTECs, however, Aire expression was facilitated by concurrent eviction of CTCF, specific demethylation of exon 2 and the proximal promoter, and the coordinated action of several transcription activators, including Irf4, Irf8, Tbx21, Tcf7 and Ctcfl, which acted on mTEC-specific accessible regions in the Aire locus.

  15. B Lymphocyte Lineage Specification, Commitment and Epigenetic Control of Transcription by Early B Cell Factor 1

    OpenAIRE

    Hagman, James; Ramírez, Julita; Lukin, Kara

    2012-01-01

    Early B cell factor 1 (EBF1) is a transcription factor that is critical for both B lymphopoiesis and B cell function. EBF1 is a requisite component of the B lymphocyte transcriptional network and is essential for B lineage specification. Recent studies revealed roles for EBF1 in B cell commitment. EBF1 binds its target genes via a DNA-binding domain including a unique ‘zinc knuckle’, which mediates a novel mode of DNA recognition. Chromatin immunoprecipitation of EBF1 in pro-B cells defined h...

  16. Transcriptional control by G-quadruplexes: In vivo roles and perspectives for specific intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armas, Pablo; David, Aldana; Calcaterra, Nora B

    2017-01-01

    G-quadruplexes are non-canonical DNA secondary structures involved in several genomic and molecular processes. Here, we summarize the main G-quadruplex features and evidences proving the in vivo role on the transcriptional regulation of genes required for zebrafish embryonic development. We also discuss alternative strategies for specifically interfering G-quadruplex in vivo.

  17. The NBS1-Treacle complex controls ribosomal RNA transcription in response to DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Dorthe H; Hari, Flurina; Clapperton, Julie A

    2014-01-01

    Chromosome breakage elicits transient silencing of ribosomal RNA synthesis, but the mechanisms involved remained elusive. Here we discover an in trans signalling mechanism that triggers pan-nuclear silencing of rRNA transcription in response to DNA damage. This is associated with transient recrui...

  18. Role of transcription pausing in the control of the pyrE attenuator in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J. T.; Jensen, Kaj Frank; Poulsen, Peter

    1991-01-01

    Expression of the Escherichia coli pyrE gene is regulated by transcription attenuation in the intercistronic orfE–pyrE region and modulated by the distance between the transcribing RNA polymerase and the leading ribosome as a function of the supply of UTP and GTP. In this communication we show...... that pyrE expression is hyper-repressed in vivo following addition of uracil in strains carrying the nusAcs10 mutation. This phenotype, previously seen in rpsL 1204 strains whose ribosomes are pseudodependent on streptomycin and work at suboptimal elongation rate, indicates that RNA polymerase escapes from...... the ribosomes in the pyrE attenuator region in the nusA mutant. In vitro transcription studies revealed that the build-up of the full-length attenuated orfE transcript occurred more slowly in the presence of the NusA protein than in its absence. Moreover, the NusA protein enhanced several transcription pauses...

  19. The Drosophila Zinc Finger Transcription Factor Ouija Board Controls Ecdysteroid Biosynthesis through Specific Regulation of spookier.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuya Komura-Kawa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Steroid hormones are crucial for many biological events in multicellular organisms. In insects, the principal steroid hormones are ecdysteroids, which play essential roles in regulating molting and metamorphosis. During larval and pupal development, ecdysteroids are synthesized in the prothoracic gland (PG from dietary cholesterol via a series of hydroxylation and oxidation steps. The expression of all but one of the known ecdysteroid biosynthetic enzymes is restricted to the PG, but the transcriptional regulatory networks responsible for generating such exquisite tissue-specific regulation is only beginning to be elucidated. Here, we report identification and characterization of the C2H2-type zinc finger transcription factor Ouija board (Ouib necessary for ecdysteroid production in the PG in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Expression of ouib is predominantly limited to the PG, and genetic null mutants of ouib result in larval developmental arrest that can be rescued by administrating an active ecdysteroid. Interestingly, ouib mutant animals exhibit a strong reduction in the expression of one ecdysteroid biosynthetic enzyme, spookier. Using a cell culture-based luciferase reporter assay, Ouib protein stimulates transcription of spok by binding to a specific ~15 bp response element in the spok PG enhancer element. Most remarkable, the developmental arrest phenotype of ouib mutants is rescued by over-expression of a functionally-equivalent paralog of spookier. These observations imply that the main biological function of Ouib is to specifically regulate spookier transcription during Drosophila development.

  20. Identification of a Transcription Factor Controlling pH-Dependent Organic Acid Response in Aspergillus niger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Lars; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Lantz, Anna Eliasson

    2012-01-01

    Acid formation in Aspergillus niger is known to be subjected to tight regulation, and the acid production profiles are fine-tuned to respond to the ambient pH. Based on transcriptome data, putative trans-acting pH responding transcription factors were listed and through knock out studies, mutants...

  1. Identification of a transcription factor controlling pH-dependent organic acid response in Aspergillus niger.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Poulsen

    Full Text Available Acid formation in Aspergillus niger is known to be subjected to tight regulation, and the acid production profiles are fine-tuned to respond to the ambient pH. Based on transcriptome data, putative trans-acting pH responding transcription factors were listed and through knock out studies, mutants exhibiting an oxalate overproducing phenotype were identified. The yield of oxalate was increased up to 158% compared to the wild type and the corresponding transcription factor was therefore entitled Oxalic Acid repression Factor, OafA. Detailed physiological characterization of one of the ΔoafA mutants, compared to the wild type, showed that both strains produced substantial amounts of gluconic acid, but the mutant strain was more efficient in re-uptake of gluconic acid and converting it to oxalic acid, particularly at high pH (pH 5.0. Transcriptional profiles showed that 241 genes were differentially expressed due to the deletion of oafA and this supported the argument of OafA being a trans-acting transcription factor. Furthermore, expression of two phosphoketolases was down-regulated in the ΔoafA mutant, one of which has not previously been described in fungi. It was argued that the observed oxalate overproducing phenotype was a consequence of the efficient re-uptake of gluconic acid and thereby a higher flux through glycolysis. This results in a lower flux through the pentose phosphate pathway, demonstrated by the down-regulation of the phosphoketolases. Finally, the physiological data, in terms of the specific oxygen consumption, indicated a connection between the oxidative phosphorylation and oxalate production and this was further substantiated through transcription analysis.

  2. Control of the C. albicans cell wall damage response by transcriptional regulator Cas5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent M Bruno

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The fungal cell wall is vital for growth, development, and interaction of cells with their environment. The response to cell wall damage is well understood from studies in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where numerous cell wall integrity (CWI genes are activated by transcription factor ScRlm1. Prior evidence suggests the hypothesis that both response and regulation may be conserved in the major fungal pathogen Candida albicans. We have tested this hypothesis by using a new C. albicans genetic resource: we have screened mutants defective in putative transcription factor genes for sensitivity to the cell wall biosynthesis inhibitor caspofungin. We find that the zinc finger protein CaCas5, which lacks a unique ortholog in S. cerevisiae, governs expression of many CWI genes. CaRlm1 has a modest role in this response. The transcriptional coactivator CaAda2 is also required for expression of many CaCas5-dependent genes, as expected if CaCas5 recruits CaAda2 to activate target gene transcription. Many caspofungin-induced C. albicans genes specify endoplasmic reticulum and secretion functions. Such genes are not induced in S. cerevisiae, but promote its growth in caspofungin. We have used a new resource to identify a key C. albicans transcriptional regulator of CWI genes and antifungal sensitivity. Our gene expression findings indicate that both divergent and conserved response genes may have significant functional roles. Our strategy may be broadly useful for identification of pathogen-specific regulatory pathways and critical response genes.

  3. The transcription factor Prep1 controls hepatic insulin sensitivity and gluconeogenesis by targeting nuclear localization of FOXO1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulebyakin, Konstantin; Penkov, Dmitry; Blasi, Francesco; Akopyan, Zhanna; Tkachuk, Vsevolod

    2016-12-02

    Liver plays a key role in controlling body carbohydrate homeostasis by switching between accumulation and production of glucose and this way maintaining constant level of glucose in blood. Increased blood glucose level triggers release of insulin from pancreatic β-cells. Insulin represses hepatic glucose production and increases glucose accumulation. Insulin resistance is the main cause of type 2 diabetes and hyperglycemia. Currently thiazolidinediones (TZDs) targeting transcriptional factor PPARγ are used as insulin sensitizers for treating patients with type 2 diabetes. However, TZDs are reported to be associated with cardiovascular and liver problems and stimulate obesity. Thus, it is necessary to search new approaches to improve insulin sensitivity. A promising candidate is transcriptional factor Prep1, as it was shown earlier it could affect insulin sensitivity in variety of insulin-sensitive tissues. The aim of the present study was to evaluate a possible involvement of transcriptional factor Prep1 in control of hepatic glucose accumulation and production. We created mice with liver-specific Prep1 knockout and discovered that hepatocytes derived from these mice are much more sensitive to insulin, comparing to their WT littermates. Incubation of these cells with 100 nM insulin results in almost complete inhibition of gluconeogenesis, while in WT cells this repression is only partial. However, Prep1 doesn't affect gluconeogenesis in the absence of insulin. Also, we observed that nuclear content of gluconeogenic transcription factor FOXO1 was greatly reduced in Prep1 knockout hepatocytes. These findings suggest that Prep1 may control hepatic insulin sensitivity by targeting FOXO1 nuclear stability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Zinc finger artificial transcription factor-based nearest inactive analogue/nearest active analogue strategy used for the identification of plant genes controlling homologous recombination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jia, Qi; van Verk, Marcel C.; Pinas, Johan E.; Lindhout, Beatrice I.; Hooykaas, Paul J.J.; Van der Zaal, Bert J.

    2013-01-01

    In previous work, we selected a particular transcription factor, designated VP16-HRU, from a pool of zinc finger artificial transcription factors (ZF-ATFs) used for genome interrogation. When expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana under control of the ribosomal protein S5A promoter, the RPS5A::VP16-HRU

  5. The transcription factor snail controls epithelial-mesenchymal transitions by repressing E-cadherin expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cano, A; Pérez-Moreno, M A; Rodrigo, I

    2000-01-01

    The Snail family of transcription factors has previously been implicated in the differentiation of epithelial cells into mesenchymal cells (epithelial-mesenchymal transitions) during embryonic development. Epithelial-mesenchymal transitions are also determinants of the progression of carcinomas......, occurring concomitantly with the cellular acquisition of migratory properties following downregulation of expression of the adhesion protein E-cadherin. Here we show that mouse Snail is a strong repressor of transcription of the E-cadherin gene. Epithelial cells that ectopically express Snail adopt...... a fibroblastoid phenotype and acquire tumorigenic and invasive properties. Endogenous Snail protein is present in invasive mouse and human carcinoma cell lines and tumours in which E-cadherin expression has been lost. Therefore, the same molecules are used to trigger epithelial-mesenchymal transitions during...

  6. The transcription factor c-Maf controls touch receptor development and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wende, Hagen; Lechner, Stefan G; Cheret, Cyril; Bourane, Steeve; Kolanczyk, Maria E; Pattyn, Alexandre; Reuter, Katja; Munier, Francis L; Carroll, Patrick; Lewin, Gary R; Birchmeier, Carmen

    2012-03-16

    The sense of touch relies on detection of mechanical stimuli by specialized mechanosensory neurons. The scarcity of molecular data has made it difficult to analyze development of mechanoreceptors and to define the basis of their diversity and function. We show that the transcription factor c-Maf/c-MAF is crucial for mechanosensory function in mice and humans. The development and function of several rapidly adapting mechanoreceptor types are disrupted in c-Maf mutant mice. In particular, Pacinian corpuscles, a type of mechanoreceptor specialized to detect high-frequency vibrations, are severely atrophied. In line with this, sensitivity to high-frequency vibration is reduced in humans carrying a dominant mutation in the c-MAF gene. Thus, our work identifies a key transcription factor specifying development and function of mechanoreceptors and their end organs.

  7. Nuclear PTEN functions as an essential regulator of SRF-dependent transcription to control smooth muscle differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horita, Henrick; Wysoczynski, Christina L.; Walker, Lori A.; Moulton, Karen S.; Li, Marcella; Ostriker, Allison; Tucker, Rebecca; McKinsey, Timothy A.; Churchill, Mair E. A.; Nemenoff, Raphael A.; Weiser-Evans, Mary C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Vascular disease progression is associated with marked changes in vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotype and function. SMC contractile gene expression and, thus differentiation, is under direct transcriptional control by the transcription factor, serum response factor (SRF); however, the mechanisms dynamically regulating SMC phenotype are not fully defined. Here we report that the lipid and protein phosphatase, PTEN, has a novel role in the nucleus by functioning as an indispensible regulator with SRF to maintain the differentiated SM phenotype. PTEN interacts with the N-terminal domain of SRF and PTEN–SRF interaction promotes SRF binding to essential promoter elements in SM-specific genes. Factors inducing phenotypic switching promote loss of nuclear PTEN through nucleo-cytoplasmic translocation resulting in reduced myogenically active SRF, but enhanced SRF activity on target genes involved in proliferation. Overall decreased expression of PTEN was observed in intimal SMCs of human atherosclerotic lesions underlying the potential clinical importance of these findings. PMID:26940659

  8. Core transcriptional regulatory circuit controlled by the TAL1 complex in human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanda, Takaomi; Lawton, Lee N; Barrasa, M Inmaculada; Fan, Zi Peng; Kohlhammer, Holger; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Ma, Wenxue; Tatarek, Jessica; Ahn, Yebin; Kelliher, Michelle A; Jamieson, Catriona H M; Staudt, Louis M; Young, Richard A; Look, A Thomas

    2012-08-14

    The oncogenic transcription factor TAL1/SCL is aberrantly expressed in over 40% of cases of human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), emphasizing its importance in the molecular pathogenesis of T-ALL. Here we identify the core transcriptional regulatory circuit controlled by TAL1 and its regulatory partners HEB, E2A, LMO1/2, GATA3, and RUNX1. We show that TAL1 forms a positive interconnected autoregulatory loop with GATA3 and RUNX1 and that the TAL1 complex directly activates the MYB oncogene, forming a positive feed-forward regulatory loop that reinforces and stabilizes the TAL1-regulated oncogenic program. One of the critical downstream targets in this circuitry is the TRIB2 gene, which is oppositely regulated by TAL1 and E2A/HEB and is essential for the survival of T-ALL cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Transcriptional control of effector and memory CD8+ T cell differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Kaech, Susan M.; Cui, Weiguo

    2012-01-01

    During an infection, T cells can differentiate into multiple types of effector and memory T cells, which help to mediate pathogen clearance and provide long-term protective immunity. These cells can vary in their phenotype, function and location, and in their long-term fate in terms of their ability to populate the memory T cell pool. Over the past decade, the signalling pathways and transcriptional programmes that regulate the formation of heterogeneous populations of effector and memory CD8...

  10. Post-transcriptional regulation of gene PA5507 controls PQS concentration in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Tipton, Kyle A.; Coleman, James P.; Pesci, Everett C.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa can sense and respond to a myriad of environmental signals and utilizes a system of small molecules to communicate through intercellular signaling. The small molecule 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone (Pseudomonas Quinolone Signal [PQS]) is one of these signals and its synthesis is important for virulence. Previously, we identified an RpiR-type transcriptional regulator, QapR, that positively affects PQS production by repressing the qapR operon. An in-frame deletion of thi...

  11. Spatial arrangement of an RNA zipcode identifies mRNAs under post-transcriptional control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vivek L; Mitra, Somdeb; Harris, Richard; Buxbaum, Adina R; Lionnet, Timothée; Brenowitz, Michael; Girvin, Mark; Levy, Matthew; Almo, Steven C; Singer, Robert H; Chao, Jeffrey A

    2012-01-01

    How RNA-binding proteins recognize specific sets of target mRNAs remains poorly understood because current approaches depend primarily on sequence information. In this study, we demonstrate that specific recognition of messenger RNAs (mRNAs) by RNA-binding proteins requires the correct spatial positioning of these sequences. We characterized both the cis-acting sequence elements and the spatial restraints that define the mode of RNA binding of the zipcode-binding protein 1 (ZBP1/IMP1/IGF2BP1) to the β-actin zipcode. The third and fourth KH (hnRNP K homology) domains of ZBP1 specifically recognize a bipartite RNA element comprised of a 5' element (CGGAC) followed by a variable 3' element (C/A-CA-C/U) that must be appropriately spaced. Remarkably, the orientation of these elements is interchangeable within target transcripts bound by ZBP1. The spatial relationship of this consensus binding site identified conserved transcripts that were verified to associate with ZBP1 in vivo. The dendritic localization of one of these transcripts, spinophilin, was found to be dependent on both ZBP1 and the RNA elements recognized by ZBP1 KH34.

  12. Srebf1a is a key regulator of transcriptional control for adipogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala-Sumuano, Jorge-Tonatiuh; Velez-Delvalle, Cristina; Beltrán-Langarica, Alicia; Marsch-Moreno, Meytha; Cerbón-Solorzano, Jorge; Kuri-Harcuch, Walid

    2011-01-01

    Adipogenesis is regulated by a complex cascade of transcriptional factors, but little is known about the early events that regulate the adipogenic program. Here, we report the role of the srebf1a gene in the differentiation of fibroblastic 3T3-F442A cells. We found that expression of srebf1a depended on GSK3β activity and that GSK3β activity was necessary for C/EBPβ phosphorylation at Thr188. Knockdown of srebf1a inhibited the adipogenic program because it blocked the expression of genes encoding PPARγ2, C/EBPα, SREBP1c and even FABP4, demonstrating that SREBP1a activation is upstream of these three essential adipogenic transcription factors. Kinetic analysis during differentiation illustrated that the order of expression of adipogenic genes was the following: cebpb, srebf1a, pparg2, cebpa, srebp1c and fabp4. Our data suggest that srebf1a acts as an essential link between the GSK3β-C/EBPβ signaling axis and the beginning of the adipogenic transcriptional cascade.

  13. An Orchestrated Intron Retention Program in Meiosis Controls Timely Usage of Transcripts during Germ Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naro, Chiara; Jolly, Ariane; Di Persio, Sara; Bielli, Pamela; Setterblad, Niclas; Alberdi, Antonio J; Vicini, Elena; Geremia, Raffaele; De la Grange, Pierre; Sette, Claudio

    2017-04-10

    Global transcriptome reprogramming during spermatogenesis ensures timely expression of factors in each phase of male germ cell differentiation. Spermatocytes and spermatids require particularly extensive reprogramming of gene expression to switch from mitosis to meiosis and to support gamete morphogenesis. Here, we uncovered an extensive alternative splicing program during this transmeiotic differentiation. Notably, intron retention was largely the most enriched pattern, with spermatocytes showing generally higher levels of retention compared with spermatids. Retained introns are characterized by weak splice sites and are enriched in genes with strong relevance for gamete function. Meiotic intron-retaining transcripts (IRTs) were exclusively localized in the nucleus. However, differently from other developmentally regulated IRTs, they are stable RNAs, showing longer half-life than properly spliced transcripts. Strikingly, fate-mapping experiments revealed that IRTs are recruited onto polyribosomes days after synthesis. These studies reveal an unexpected function for regulated intron retention in modulation of the timely expression of select transcripts during spermatogenesis. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Epigenetic control of virulence gene expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by a LysR-type transcription regulator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith H Turner

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Phenotypic variation within an isogenic bacterial population is thought to ensure the survival of a subset of cells in adverse conditions. The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa variably expresses several phenotypes, including antibiotic resistance, biofilm formation, and the production of CupA fimbriae. Here we describe a previously unidentified bistable switch in P. aeruginosa. This switch controls the expression of a diverse set of genes, including aprA, which encodes the secreted virulence factor alkaline protease. We present evidence that bistable expression of PA2432, herein named bexR (bistable expression regulator, which encodes a LysR-type transcription regulator, controls this switch. In particular, using DNA microarrays, quantitative RT-PCR analysis, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and reporter gene fusions, we identify genes directly under the control of BexR and show that these genes are bistably expressed. Furthermore, we show that bexR is itself bistably expressed and positively autoregulated. Finally, using single-cell analyses of a GFP reporter fusion, we present evidence that positive autoregulation of bexR is necessary for bistable expression of the BexR regulon. Our findings suggest that a positive feedback loop involving a LysR-type transcription regulator serves as the basis for an epigenetic switch that controls virulence gene expression in P. aeruginosa.

  15. Post-Transcriptional Control of Gene Expression in Mouse Early Embryo Development: A View from the Tip of the Iceberg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Sette

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Fertilization is a very complex biological process that requires the perfect cooperation between two highly specialized cells: the male and female gametes. The oocyte provides the physical space where this process takes place, most of the energetic need, and half of the genetic contribution. The spermatozoon mostly contributes the other half of the chromosomes and it is specialized to reach and to penetrate the oocyte. Notably, the mouse oocyte and early embryo are transcriptionally inactive. Hence, they fully depend on the maternal mRNAs and proteins stored during oocyte maturation to drive the onset of development. The new embryo develops autonomously around the four-cell stage, when maternal supplies are exhausted and the zygotic genome is activated in mice. This oocyte-to-embryo transition needs an efficient and tightly regulated translation of the maternally-inherited mRNAs, which likely contributes to embryonic genome activation. Full understanding of post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression in early embryos is crucial to understand the reprogramming of the embryonic genome, it might help driving reprogramming of stem cells in vitro and will likely improve in vitro culturing of mammalian embryos for assisted reproduction. Nevertheless, the knowledge of the mechanism(s underlying this fundamental step in embryogenesis is still scarce, especially if compared to other model organisms. We will review here the current knowledge on the post-transcriptional control of gene expression in mouse early embryos and discuss some of the unanswered questions concerning this fascinating field of biology.

  16. Antisense RNA controls LRP1 Sense transcript expression through interaction with a chromatin-associated protein, HMGB2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Yasunari; Faghihi, Mohammad Ali; Magistri, Marco; Alvarez-Garcia, Oscar; Lotz, Martin; Wahlestedt, Claes

    2015-05-12

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), including natural antisense transcripts (NATs), are expressed more extensively than previously anticipated and have widespread roles in regulating gene expression. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanisms of action of the majority of NATs remain largely unknown. Here, we identify a NAT of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (Lrp1), referred to as Lrp1-AS, that negatively regulates Lrp1 expression. We show that Lrp1-AS directly binds to high-mobility group box 2 (Hmgb2) and inhibits the activity of Hmgb2 to enhance Srebp1a-dependent transcription of Lrp1. Short oligonucleotides targeting Lrp1-AS inhibit the interaction of antisense transcript and Hmgb2 protein and increase Lrp1 expression by enhancing Hmgb2 activity. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of brain tissue samples from Alzheimer's disease patients and aged-matched controls revealed upregulation of LRP1-AS and downregulation of LRP1. Our data suggest a regulatory mechanism whereby a NAT interacts with a ubiquitous chromatin-associated protein to modulate its activity in a locus-specific fashion. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Antisense RNA Controls LRP1 Sense Transcript Expression through Interaction with a Chromatin-Associated Protein, HMGB2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasunari Yamanaka

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs, including natural antisense transcripts (NATs, are expressed more extensively than previously anticipated and have widespread roles in regulating gene expression. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanisms of action of the majority of NATs remain largely unknown. Here, we identify a NAT of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (Lrp1, referred to as Lrp1-AS, that negatively regulates Lrp1 expression. We show that Lrp1-AS directly binds to high-mobility group box 2 (Hmgb2 and inhibits the activity of Hmgb2 to enhance Srebp1a-dependent transcription of Lrp1. Short oligonucleotides targeting Lrp1-AS inhibit the interaction of antisense transcript and Hmgb2 protein and increase Lrp1 expression by enhancing Hmgb2 activity. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of brain tissue samples from Alzheimer’s disease patients and aged-matched controls revealed upregulation of LRP1-AS and downregulation of LRP1. Our data suggest a regulatory mechanism whereby a NAT interacts with a ubiquitous chromatin-associated protein to modulate its activity in a locus-specific fashion.

  18. CD8 T cells control cytomegalovirus latency by epitope-specific sensing of transcriptional reactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Christian O; Holtappels, Rafaela; Tervo, Hanna-Mari; Böhm, Verena; Däubner, Torsten; Oehrlein-Karpi, Silke A; Kühnapfel, Birgit; Renzaho, Angélique; Strand, Dennis; Podlech, Jürgen; Reddehase, Matthias J; Grzimek, Natascha K A

    2006-11-01

    During murine cytomegalovirus (mCMV) latency in the lungs, most of the viral genomes are transcriptionally silent at the major immediate-early locus, but rare and stochastic episodes of desilencing lead to the expression of IE1 transcripts. This low-frequency but perpetual expression is accompanied by an activation of lung-resident effector-memory CD8 T cells specific for the antigenic peptide 168-YPHFMPTNL-176, which is derived from the IE1 protein. These molecular and immunological findings were combined in the "silencing/desilencing and immune sensing hypothesis" of cytomegalovirus latency and reactivation. This hypothesis proposes that IE1 gene expression proceeds to cell surface presentation of the IE1 peptide by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecule L(d) and that its recognition by CD8 T cells terminates virus reactivation. Here we provide experimental evidence in support of this hypothesis. We generated mutant virus mCMV-IE1-L176A, in which the antigenic IE1 peptide is functionally deleted by a point mutation of the C-terminal MHC class I anchor residue Leu into Ala. Two revertant viruses, mCMV-IE1-A176L and the wobble nucleotide-marked mCMV-IE1-A176L*, in which Leu is restored by back-mutation of Ala codon GCA into Leu codons CTA and CTT, respectively, were constructed. Pulmonary latency of the mutant virus was found to be associated with an increased prevalence of IE1 transcription and with events of IE3 transactivator splicing. In conclusion, IE1-specific CD8 T cells recognize and terminate virus reactivation in vivo at the first opportunity in the reactivated gene expression program. The perpetual gene expression and antigen presentation might represent the driving molecular force in CMV-associated immunosenescence.

  19. Interacting TCP and NLP transcription factors control plant responses to nitrate availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Peizhu; Ripoll, Juan-José; Wang, Renhou; Vuong, Lam; Bailey-Steinitz, Lindsay J; Ye, Dening; Crawford, Nigel M

    2017-02-28

    Plants have evolved adaptive strategies that involve transcriptional networks to cope with and survive environmental challenges. Key transcriptional regulators that mediate responses to environmental fluctuations in nitrate have been identified; however, little is known about how these regulators interact to orchestrate nitrogen (N) responses and cell-cycle regulation. Here we report that teosinte branched1/cycloidea/proliferating cell factor1-20 (TCP20) and NIN-like protein (NLP) transcription factors NLP6 and NLP7, which act as activators of nitrate assimilatory genes, bind to adjacent sites in the upstream promoter region of the nitrate reductase gene, NIA1 , and physically interact under continuous nitrate and N-starvation conditions. Regions of these proteins necessary for these interactions were found to include the type I/II Phox and Bem1p (PB1) domains of NLP6&7, a protein-interaction module conserved in animals for nutrient signaling, and the histidine- and glutamine-rich domain of TCP20, which is conserved across plant species. Under N starvation, TCP20-NLP6&7 heterodimers accumulate in the nucleus, and this coincides with TCP20 and NLP6&7-dependent up-regulation of nitrate assimilation and signaling genes and down-regulation of the G 2 /M cell-cycle marker gene, CYCB1;1 TCP20 and NLP6&7 also support root meristem growth under N starvation. These findings provide insights into how plants coordinate responses to nitrate availability, linking nitrate assimilation and signaling with cell-cycle progression.

  20. The DNA damage- and transcription-associated protein Paxip1 controls thymocyte development and emigration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callen, E.; Faryabi, R.B.; Daniel, Jeremy Austin

    2012-01-01

    -mediated cleavage and repair during V(D)J recombination in CD4 CD8 DP thymocytes. Loss of PAXIP1 in developing thymocytes diminished Jα H3K4me3 and germline transcription, suppressed double strand break formation at 3' Jα segments, but resulted in accumulation of unresolved T cell receptor α-chain gene (Tcra......Histone 3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) is associated with promoters of active genes and found at hot spots for DNA recombination. Here we have shown that PAXIP1 (also known as PTIP), a protein associated with MLL3 and MLL4 methyltransferase and the DNA damage response, regulates RAG...

  1. Transcriptional control of effector and memory CD8+ T cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaech, Susan M; Cui, Weiguo

    2012-11-01

    During an infection, T cells can differentiate into multiple types of effector and memory T cells, which help to mediate pathogen clearance and provide long-term protective immunity. These cells can vary in their phenotype, function and location, and in their long-term fate in terms of their ability to populate the memory T cell pool. Over the past decade, the signalling pathways and transcriptional programmes that regulate the formation of heterogeneous populations of effector and memory CD8(+) T cells have started to be characterized, and this Review discusses the major advances in these areas.

  2. Transcript levels of major interleukins in relation to the clinicopathological profile of patients with tuberculous intervertebral discs and healthy controls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Liu

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to simultaneously examine the transcript levels of a large number of interleukins (ILs; IL-9, IL-10, IL-12, IL-13, IL-16, IL-17, IL-18, IL-26, and IL-27 and investigate their correlation with the clinicopathological profiles of patients with tuberculous intervertebral discs.Clinical data were collected from 150 patients participating in the study from January 2013 to December 2013. mRNA expression levels in 70 tuberculous, 70 herniated, and 10 control intervertebral disc specimens were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction.IL-10, IL-16, IL-17, IL-18, and IL-27 displayed stronger expression in tuberculous spinal disc tissue than in normal intervertebral disc tissue (P<0.05. Our results illustrated multiple correlations among IL-10, IL-16, IL-17, IL-18, and IL-27 mRNA expression in tuberculous samples. Smoking habits were found to have a positive correlation with IL-17 transcript levels and a negative correlation with IL-10 transcript levels (P<0.05. Pain intensity, symptom duration, C-reactive protein levels, and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate exhibited multiple correlations with the transcript levels of several ILs (P<0.05.The experimental data imply a double-sided effect on the activity of ILs in tuberculous spinal intervertebral discs, suggesting that they may be involved in intervertebral discs destruction. Our findings also suggest that smoking may affect the intervertebral discs destruction process of spinal tuberculosis. However, further studies are necessary to elucidate the exact role of ILs in the intervertebral discs destruction process of spinal tuberculosis.

  3. Structural hierarchy controlling dimerization and target DNA recognition in the AHR transcriptional complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seok, Seung-Hyeon; Lee, Woojong; Jiang, Li; Molugu, Kaivalya; Zheng, Aiping; Li, Yitong; Park, Sanghyun; Bradfield, Christopher A.; Xing, Yongna (UW)

    2017-04-10

    he aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) belongs to the PAS (PER-ARNT-SIM) family transcription factors and mediates broad responses to numerous environmental pollutants and cellular metabolites, modulating diverse biological processes from adaptive metabolism, acute toxicity, to normal physiology of vascular and immune systems. The AHR forms a transcriptionally active heterodimer with ARNT (AHR nuclear translocator), which recognizes the dioxin response element (DRE) in the promoter of downstream genes. We determined the crystal structure of the mammalian AHR–ARNT heterodimer in complex with the DRE, in which ARNT curls around AHR into a highly intertwined asymmetric architecture, with extensive heterodimerization interfaces and AHR interdomain interactions. Specific recognition of the DRE is determined locally by the DNA-binding residues, which discriminates it from the closely related hypoxia response element (HRE), and is globally affected by the dimerization interfaces and interdomain interactions. Changes at the interdomain interactions caused either AHR constitutive nuclear localization or failure to translocate to nucleus, underlying an allosteric structural pathway for mediating ligand-induced exposure of nuclear localization signal. These observations, together with the global higher flexibility of the AHR PAS-A and its loosely packed structural elements, suggest a dynamic structural hierarchy for complex scenarios of AHR activation induced by its diverse ligands.

  4. Sumoylation controls CLOCK-BMAL1-mediated clock resetting via CBP recruitment in nuclear transcriptional foci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yool; Chun, Sung Kook; Kim, Kyungjin

    2015-10-01

    CLOCK-BMAL1 is a key transcription factor complex of the molecular clock system that generates circadian gene expression and physiology in mammals. Here, we demonstrate that sumoylation of BMAL1 mediates the rapid activation of CLOCK-BMAL1 by CREB-binding protein (CBP) in nuclear foci and also the resetting of the circadian clock. Under physiological conditions, a bimolecular fluorescence complementation-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer (BiFC-FRET) assay revealed that CLOCK-BMAL1 rapidly dimerized and formed a ternary complex with CBP in discrete nuclear foci in response to serum stimuli. We found that the formation of this ternary complex requires sumoylation of BMAL1 by SUMO3. These processes were abolished by both the ectopic expression of the SUMP2/3-specific protease, SUSP1, and mutation of the major sumoylation site (Lys259) of BMAL1. Moreover, molecular inhibition of BMAL1 sumoylation abrogated acute Per1 transcription and severely dampened the circadian gene oscillation triggered by clock synchronization stimuli. Taken together, these findings suggest that sumoylation plays a critical role in the spatiotemporal co-activation of CLOCK-BMAL1 by CBP for immediate-early Per induction and the resetting of the circadian clock. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. RNA exosome-regulated long non-coding RNA transcription controls super-enhancer activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pefanis, Evangelos; Wang, Jiguang; Rothschild, Gerson; Lim, Junghyun; Kazadi, David; Sun, Jianbo; Federation, Alexander; Chao, Jaime; Elliott, Oliver; Liu, Zhi-Ping; Economides, Aris N; Bradner, James E; Rabadan, Raul; Basu, Uttiya

    2015-05-07

    We have ablated the cellular RNA degradation machinery in differentiated B cells and pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) by conditional mutagenesis of core (Exosc3) and nuclear RNase (Exosc10) components of RNA exosome and identified a vast number of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) and enhancer RNAs (eRNAs) with emergent functionality. Unexpectedly, eRNA-expressing regions accumulate R-loop structures upon RNA exosome ablation, thus demonstrating the role of RNA exosome in resolving deleterious DNA/RNA hybrids arising from active enhancers. We have uncovered a distal divergent eRNA-expressing element (lncRNA-CSR) engaged in long-range DNA interactions and regulating IgH 3' regulatory region super-enhancer function. CRISPR-Cas9-mediated ablation of lncRNA-CSR transcription decreases its chromosomal looping-mediated association with the IgH 3' regulatory region super-enhancer and leads to decreased class switch recombination efficiency. We propose that the RNA exosome protects divergently transcribed lncRNA expressing enhancers by resolving deleterious transcription-coupled secondary DNA structures, while also regulating long-range super-enhancer chromosomal interactions important for cellular function. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. RNA exosome regulated long non-coding RNA transcription controls super-enhancer activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pefanis, Evangelos; Wang, Jiguang; Rothschild, Gerson; Lim, Junghyun; Kazadi, David; Sun, Jianbo; Federation, Alexander; Chao, Jaime; Elliott, Oliver; Liu, Zhi-Ping; Economides, Aris N.; Bradner, James E.; Rabadan, Raul; Basu, Uttiya

    2015-01-01

    We have ablated the cellular RNA degradation machinery in differentiated B cells and pluripotent embryonic stem (ES) cells by conditional mutagenesis of core (Exosc3) and nuclear RNase (Exosc10) components of RNA exosome and identified a vast number of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) and enhancer RNAs (eRNAs) with emergent functionality. Unexpectedly, eRNA-expressing regions accumulate R-loop structures upon RNA exosome ablation, thus demonstrating the role of RNA exosome in resolving deleterious DNA/RNA hybrids arising from active enhancers. We have uncovered a distal divergent eRNA-expressing element (lncRNA-CSR) engaged in long-range DNA interactions and regulating IgH 3′ regulatory region super-enhancer function. CRISPR-Cas9 mediated ablation of lncRNA-CSR transcription decreases its chromosomal looping-mediated association with the IgH 3′regulatory region super-enhancer and leads to decreased class switch recombination efficiency. We propose that the RNA exosome protects divergently transcribed lncRNA expressing enhancers, by resolving deleterious transcription-coupled secondary DNA structures, while also regulating long-range super-enhancer chromosomal interactions important for cellular function. PMID:25957685

  7. Selenium controls transcription of paralogous formate dehydrogenase genes in the termite gut acetogen, Treponema primitia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Eric G; Zhang, Xinning; Leadbetter, Jared R

    2010-08-01

    The termite gut spirochete, Treponema primitia, is a CO(2)-reductive acetogen that is phylogenetically distinct from other distantly related and more extensively studied acetogens such as Moorella thermoacetica. Research on T. primitia has revealed details about the role of spirochetes in CO(2)-reductive acetogenesis, a process important to the mutualism occurring between termites and their gut microbial communities. Here, a locus of the T. primitia genome containing Wood-Ljungdahl pathway genes for CO(2)-reductive acetogenesis was sequenced. This locus contained methyl-branch genes of the pathway (i.e. for the reduction of CO(2) to the level of methyl-tetrahydrofolate) including paralogous genes for cysteine and selenocysteine (Sec) variants of formate dehydrogenase (FDH) and genes for Sec incorporation. The FDH variants affiliated phylogenetically with hydrogenase-linked FDH enzymes, suggesting that T. primitia FDH enzymes utilize electrons derived directly from molecular H(2). Sub-nanomolar concentrations of selenium decreased transcript levels of the cysteine variant FDH gene. Selenium concentration did not markedly influence the level of mRNA upstream of the Sec-codon in the Sec variant FDH; however, the level of transcript extending downstream of the Sec-codon increased incrementally with increasing selenium concentrations. The features and regulation of these FDH genes are an indication that T. primitia may experience dynamic selenium availability in its H(2)-rich gut environment. © 2010 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Fibroblast growth factor receptor-1 (FGFR1) nuclear dynamics reveal a novel mechanism in transcription control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham-Ems, Star M; Lee, Yu-Wei; Stachowiak, Ewa K; Pudavar, Haridas; Claus, Peter; Prasad, Paras N; Stachowiak, Michal K

    2009-05-01

    Nuclear FGFR1 acts as a developmental gene regulator in cooperation with FGF-2, RSK1, and CREB-binding protein (CBP). FRAP analysis revealed three nuclear FGFR1 populations: i) a fast mobile, ii) a slower mobile population reflecting chromatin-bound FGFR1, and iii) an immobile FGFR1 population associated with the nuclear matrix. Factors (cAMP, CBP) that induce FGFR1-mediated gene activation shifted FGFR1 from the nuclear matrix (immobile) to chromatin (slow) and reduced the movement rate of the chromatin-bound population. Transcription inhibitors accelerated FGFR1 movement; the content of the chromatin-bound slow FGFR1 decreased, whereas the fast population increased. The transcriptional activation appears to involve conversion of the immobile matrix-bound and the fast nuclear FGFR1 into a slow chromatin-binding population through FGFR1's interaction with CBP, RSK1, and the high-molecular-weight form of FGF-2. Our findings support a general mechanism in which gene activation is governed by protein movement and collisions with other proteins and nuclear structures.

  9. Characterization of molecular mechanisms controlling fabAB transcription in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herbert P Schweizer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The FabAB pathway is one of the unsaturated fatty acid (UFA synthesis pathways for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. It was previously noted that this operon was upregulated in biofilms and repressed by exogenous UFAs. Deletion of a 30 nt fabA upstream sequence, which is conserved in P. aeruginosa, P. putida, and P. syringae, led to a significant decrease in fabA transcription, suggesting positive regulation by an unknown positive regulatory mechanism. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, genetic and biochemical approaches were employed to identify a potential fabAB activator. Deletion of candidate genes such as PA1611 or PA1627 was performed to determine if any of these gene products act as a fabAB activator. However, none of these genes were involved in the regulation of fabAB transcription. Use of mariner-based random mutagenesis to screen for fabA activator(s showed that several genes encoding unknown functions, rpoN and DesA may be involved in fabA regulation, but probably via indirect mechanisms. Biochemical attempts performed did fail to isolate an activator of fabAB operon. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The data suggest that fabA expression might not be regulated by protein-binding, but by a distinct mechanism such as a regulatory RNA-based mechanism.

  10. Light-harvesting complex gene expression is controlled by both transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms during photoacclimation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    CERN Document Server

    Durnford Dion, G; McKim, Sarah M; Sarchfield, Michelle L

    2003-01-01

    To compensate for increases in photon flux density (PFD), photosynthetic organisms possess mechanisms for reversibly modulating their photosynthetic apparatus to minimize photodamage. The photoacclimation response in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was assessed following a 10-fold increase in PFD over 24h. In addition to a 50% reduction in the amount of chlorophyll and light-harvesting complexes (LHC) per cell, the expression of genes encoding polypeptides of the light-harvesting antenna were also affected. The abundance of Lhcb (a LHCH gene), Lhcb4 (a CP29-like gene), and Lhca (a LHCI gene) transcripts were reduced by 65 to 80%, within 1-2 h; however, the RNA levels of all three genes recovered to their low-light (LL) concentrations within 6-8 h. To determine the role of transcript turnover in this transient decline in abundance, the stability of all transcripts was measured. Although there was no change in the Lhcb or Lhca transcript turnover time, the Lhcb4 mRNA stability decreased 2.5-fold immediately following...

  11. Cellular Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein-1 (cIAP1) Can Regulate E2F1 Transcription Factor-mediated Control of Cyclin Transcription*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartier, Jessy; Berthelet, Jean; Marivin, Arthur; Gemble, Simon; Edmond, Valérie; Plenchette, Stéphanie; Lagrange, Brice; Hammann, Arlette; Dupoux, Alban; Delva, Laurent; Eymin, Béatrice; Solary, Eric; Dubrez, Laurence

    2011-01-01

    The inhibitor of apoptosis protein cIAP1 (cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein-1) is a potent regulator of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor family and NF-κB signaling pathways in the cytoplasm. However, in some primary cells and tumor cell lines, cIAP1 is expressed in the nucleus, and its nuclear function remains poorly understood. Here, we show that the N-terminal part of cIAP1 directly interacts with the DNA binding domain of the E2F1 transcription factor. cIAP1 dramatically increases the transcriptional activity of E2F1 on synthetic and CCNE promoters. This function is not conserved for cIAP2 and XIAP, which are cytoplasmic proteins. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrate that cIAP1 is recruited on E2F binding sites of the CCNE and CCNA promoters in a cell cycle- and differentiation-dependent manner. cIAP1 silencing inhibits E2F1 DNA binding and E2F1-mediated transcriptional activation of the CCNE gene. In cells that express a nuclear cIAP1 such as HeLa, THP1 cells and primary human mammary epithelial cells, down-regulation of cIAP1 inhibits cyclin E and A expression and cell proliferation. We conclude that one of the functions of cIAP1 when localized in the nucleus is to regulate E2F1 transcriptional activity. PMID:21653699

  12. Cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein-1 (cIAP1) can regulate E2F1 transcription factor-mediated control of cyclin transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartier, Jessy; Berthelet, Jean; Marivin, Arthur; Gemble, Simon; Edmond, Valérie; Plenchette, Stéphanie; Lagrange, Brice; Hammann, Arlette; Dupoux, Alban; Delva, Laurent; Eymin, Béatrice; Solary, Eric; Dubrez, Laurence

    2011-07-29

    The inhibitor of apoptosis protein cIAP1 (cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein-1) is a potent regulator of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor family and NF-κB signaling pathways in the cytoplasm. However, in some primary cells and tumor cell lines, cIAP1 is expressed in the nucleus, and its nuclear function remains poorly understood. Here, we show that the N-terminal part of cIAP1 directly interacts with the DNA binding domain of the E2F1 transcription factor. cIAP1 dramatically increases the transcriptional activity of E2F1 on synthetic and CCNE promoters. This function is not conserved for cIAP2 and XIAP, which are cytoplasmic proteins. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrate that cIAP1 is recruited on E2F binding sites of the CCNE and CCNA promoters in a cell cycle- and differentiation-dependent manner. cIAP1 silencing inhibits E2F1 DNA binding and E2F1-mediated transcriptional activation of the CCNE gene. In cells that express a nuclear cIAP1 such as HeLa, THP1 cells and primary human mammary epithelial cells, down-regulation of cIAP1 inhibits cyclin E and A expression and cell proliferation. We conclude that one of the functions of cIAP1 when localized in the nucleus is to regulate E2F1 transcriptional activity.

  13. The NBS1-Treacle complex controls ribosomal RNA transcription in response to DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Dorthe H; Hari, Flurina; Clapperton, Julie A; Gwerder, Myriam; Gutsche, Katrin; Altmeyer, Matthias; Jungmichel, Stephanie; Toledo, Luis I; Fink, Daniel; Rask, Maj-Britt; Grøfte, Merete; Lukas, Claudia; Nielsen, Michael L; Smerdon, Stephen J; Lukas, Jiri; Stucki, Manuel

    2014-08-01

    Chromosome breakage elicits transient silencing of ribosomal RNA synthesis, but the mechanisms involved remained elusive. Here we discover an in trans signalling mechanism that triggers pan-nuclear silencing of rRNA transcription in response to DNA damage. This is associated with transient recruitment of the Nijmegen breakage syndrome protein 1 (NBS1), a central regulator of DNA damage responses, into the nucleoli. We further identify TCOF1 (also known as Treacle), a nucleolar factor implicated in ribosome biogenesis and mutated in Treacher Collins syndrome, as an interaction partner of NBS1, and demonstrate that NBS1 translocation and accumulation in the nucleoli is Treacle dependent. Finally, we provide evidence that Treacle-mediated NBS1 recruitment into the nucleoli regulates rRNA silencing in trans in the presence of distant chromosome breaks.

  14. Collaborative regulation of development but independent control of metabolism by two epidermis-specific transcription factors in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Jiaofang; He, Kan; Wang, Hao; Ho, Wing Sze; Ren, Xiaoliang; An, Xiaomeng; Wong, Ming Kin; Yan, Bin; Xie, Dongying; Stamatoyannopoulos, John; Zhao, Zhongying

    2013-11-15

    Cell fate specification is typically initiated by a master regulator, which is relayed by tissue-specific regulatory proteins (usually transcription factors) for further enforcement of cell identities, but how the factors are coordinated among each other to "finish up" the specification remains poorly understood. Caenorhabditis elegans epidermis specification is initiated by a master regulator, ELT-1, that activates its targets, NHR-25 and ELT-3, two epidermis-specific transcription factors that are important for development but not for initial specification of epidermis, thus providing a unique paradigm for illustrating how the tissue-specific regulatory proteins work together to enforce cell fate specification. Here we addressed the question through contrasting genome-wide in vivo binding targets between NHR-25 and ELT-3. We demonstrate that the two factors bind discrete but conserved DNA motifs, most of which remain in proximity, suggesting formation of a complex between the two. In agreement with this, gene ontology analysis of putative target genes suggested differential regulation of metabolism but coordinated control of epidermal development between the two factors, which is supported by quantitative analysis of expression of their specific or common targets in the presence or absence of either protein. Functional validation of a subset of the target genes showed both activating and inhibitory roles of NHR-25 and ELT-3 in regulating their targets. We further demonstrated differential control of specification of AB and C lineage-derived epidermis. The results allow us to assemble a comprehensive gene network underlying C. elegans epidermis development that is likely to be widely used across species and provides insights into how tissue-specific transcription factors coordinate with one another to enforce cell fate specification initiated by its master regulator.

  15. Collaborative Regulation of Development but Independent Control of Metabolism by Two Epidermis-specific Transcription Factors in Caenorhabditis elegans*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Jiaofang; He, Kan; Wang, Hao; Ho, Wing Sze; Ren, Xiaoliang; An, Xiaomeng; Wong, Ming Kin; Yan, Bin; Xie, Dongying; Stamatoyannopoulos, John; Zhao, Zhongying

    2013-01-01

    Cell fate specification is typically initiated by a master regulator, which is relayed by tissue-specific regulatory proteins (usually transcription factors) for further enforcement of cell identities, but how the factors are coordinated among each other to “finish up” the specification remains poorly understood. Caenorhabditis elegans epidermis specification is initiated by a master regulator, ELT-1, that activates its targets, NHR-25 and ELT-3, two epidermis-specific transcription factors that are important for development but not for initial specification of epidermis, thus providing a unique paradigm for illustrating how the tissue-specific regulatory proteins work together to enforce cell fate specification. Here we addressed the question through contrasting genome-wide in vivo binding targets between NHR-25 and ELT-3. We demonstrate that the two factors bind discrete but conserved DNA motifs, most of which remain in proximity, suggesting formation of a complex between the two. In agreement with this, gene ontology analysis of putative target genes suggested differential regulation of metabolism but coordinated control of epidermal development between the two factors, which is supported by quantitative analysis of expression of their specific or common targets in the presence or absence of either protein. Functional validation of a subset of the target genes showed both activating and inhibitory roles of NHR-25 and ELT-3 in regulating their targets. We further demonstrated differential control of specification of AB and C lineage-derived epidermis. The results allow us to assemble a comprehensive gene network underlying C. elegans epidermis development that is likely to be widely used across species and provides insights into how tissue-specific transcription factors coordinate with one another to enforce cell fate specification initiated by its master regulator. PMID:24097988

  16. An LHX1-Regulated Transcriptional Network Controls Sleep/Wake Coupling and Thermal Resistance of the Central Circadian Clockworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedont, Joseph L; LeGates, Tara A; Buhr, Ethan; Bathini, Abhijith; Ling, Jonathan P; Bell, Benjamin; Wu, Mark N; Wong, Philip C; Van Gelder, Russell N; Mongrain, Valerie; Hattar, Samer; Blackshaw, Seth

    2017-01-09

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the central circadian clock in mammals. It is entrained by light but resistant to temperature shifts that entrain peripheral clocks [1-5]. The SCN expresses many functionally important neuropeptides, including vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), which drives light entrainment, synchrony, and amplitude of SCN cellular clocks and organizes circadian behavior [5-16]. The transcription factor LHX1 drives SCN Vip expression, and cellular desynchrony in Lhx1-deficient SCN largely results from Vip loss [17, 18]. LHX1 regulates many genes other than Vip, yet activity rhythms in Lhx1-deficient mice are similar to Vip -/- mice under light-dark cycles and only somewhat worse in constant conditions. We suspected that LHX1 targets other than Vip have circadian functions overlooked in previous studies. In this study, we compared circadian sleep and temperature rhythms of Lhx1- and Vip-deficient mice and found loss of acute light control of sleep in Lhx1 but not Vip mutants. We also found loss of circadian resistance to fever in Lhx1 but not Vip mice, which was partially recapitulated by heat application to cultured Lhx1-deficient SCN. Having identified VIP-independent functions of LHX1, we mapped the VIP-independent transcriptional network downstream of LHX1 and a largely separable VIP-dependent transcriptional network. The VIP-independent network does not affect core clock amplitude and synchrony, unlike the VIP-dependent network. These studies identify Lhx1 as the first gene required for temperature resistance of the SCN clockworks and demonstrate that acute light control of sleep is routed through the SCN and its immediate output regions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Transcriptional control of monolignol biosynthesis in Pinus taeda: factors affecting monolignol ratios and carbon allocation in phenylpropanoid metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anterola, Aldwin M.; Jeon, Jae-Heung; Davin, Laurence B.; Lewis, Norman G.

    2002-01-01

    Transcriptional profiling of the phenylpropanoid pathway in Pinus taeda cell suspension cultures was carried out using quantitative real time PCR analyses of all known genes involved in the biosynthesis of the two monolignols, p-coumaryl and coniferyl alcohols (lignin/lignan precursors). When the cells were transferred to a medium containing 8% sucrose and 20 mm potassium iodide, the monolignol/phenylpropanoid pathway was induced, and transcript levels for phenylalanine ammonia lyase, cinnamate 4-hydroxylase, p-coumarate 3-hydroxylase, 4-coumarate:CoA ligase, caffeoyl-CoA O-methyltransferase, cinnamoyl-CoA reductase, and cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase were coordinately up-regulated. Provision of increasing levels of exogenously supplied Phe to saturating levels (40 mm) to the induction medium resulted in further up-regulation of their transcript levels in the P. taeda cell cultures; this in turn was accompanied by considerable increases in both p-coumaryl and coniferyl alcohol formation and excretion. By contrast, transcript levels for both cinnamate 4-hydroxylase and p-coumarate 3-hydroxylase were only slightly up-regulated. These data, when considered together with metabolic profiling results and genetic manipulation of various plant species, reveal that carbon allocation to the pathway and its differential distribution into the two monolignols is controlled by Phe supply and differential modulation of cinnamate 4-hydroxylase and p-coumarate 3-hydroxylase activities, respectively. The coordinated up-regulation of phenylalanine ammonia lyase, 4-coumarate:CoA ligase, caffeoyl-CoA O-methyltransferase, cinnamoyl-CoA reductase and cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase in the presence of increasing concentrations of Phe also indicates that these steps are not truly rate-limiting, because they are modulated according to metabolic demand. Finally, the transcript profile of a putative acid/ester O-methyltransferase, proposed as an alternative catalyst for O-methylation leading

  18. An evolutionarily conserved intronic region controls the spatiotemporal expression of the transcription factor Sox10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavan William J

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A major challenge lies in understanding the complexities of gene regulation. Mutation of the transcription factor SOX10 is associated with several human diseases. The disease phenotypes reflect the function of SOX10 in diverse tissues including the neural crest, central nervous system and otic vesicle. As expected, the SOX10 expression pattern is complex and highly dynamic, but little is known of the underlying mechanisms regulating its spatiotemporal pattern. SOX10 expression is highly conserved between all vertebrates characterised. Results We have combined in vivo testing of DNA fragments in zebrafish and computational comparative genomics to identify the first regulatory regions of the zebrafish sox10 gene. Both approaches converged on the 3' end of the conserved 1st intron as being critical for spatial patterning of sox10 in the embryo. Importantly, we have defined a minimal region crucial for this function. We show that this region contains numerous binding sites for transcription factors known to be essential in early neural crest induction, including Tcf/Lef, Sox and FoxD3. We show that the identity and relative position of these binding sites are conserved between zebrafish and mammals. A further region, partially required for oligodendrocyte expression, lies in the 5' region of the same intron and contains a putative CSL binding site, consistent with a role for Notch signalling in sox10 regulation. Furthermore, we show that β-catenin, Notch signalling and Sox9 can induce ectopic sox10 expression in early embryos, consistent with regulatory roles predicted from our transgenic and computational results. Conclusion We have thus identified two major sites of sox10 regulation in vertebrates and provided evidence supporting a role for at least three factors in driving sox10 expression in neural crest, otic epithelium and oligodendrocyte domains.

  19. Epigenetic control of viral life-cycle by a DNA-methylation dependent transcription factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsty Flower

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV encoded transcription factor Zta (BZLF1, ZEBRA, EB1 is the prototype of a class of transcription factor (including C/EBPalpha that interact with CpG-containing DNA response elements in a methylation-dependent manner. The EBV genome undergoes a biphasic methylation cycle; it is extensively methylated during viral latency but is reset to an unmethylated state following viral lytic replication. Zta is expressed transiently following infection and again during the switch between latency and lytic replication. The requirement for CpG-methylation at critical Zta response elements (ZREs has been proposed to regulate EBV replication, specifically it could aid the activation of viral lytic gene expression from silenced promoters on the methylated genome during latency in addition to preventing full lytic reactivation from the non-methylated EBV genome immediately following infection. We developed a computational approach to predict the location of ZREs which we experimentally assessed using in vitro and in vivo DNA association assays. A remarkably different binding motif is apparent for the CpG and non-CpG ZREs. Computational prediction of the location of these binding motifs in EBV revealed that the majority of lytic cycle genes have at least one and many have multiple copies of methylation-dependent CpG ZREs within their promoters. This suggests that the abundance of Zta protein coupled with the methylation status of the EBV genome act together to co-ordinate the expression of lytic cycle genes at the majority of EBV promoters.

  20. MCPIP-1, alias Regnase-1 controls epithelial inflammation by post-transcriptional regulation of IL-8 production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobosz, E.; Wilamowski, M.; Lech, M.; Bugara, B.; Jura, J.; Potempa, J.; Koziel, J.

    2016-01-01

    Pattern recognition receptors are critical for the detection of invading microorganisms. They activate multiple pathways that lead to the induction of pro-inflammatory responses and pathogen clearance. The intensity and duration of this immune reaction must be tightly controlled spatially and temporally in every tissue by different negative regulators. We hypothesized that monocyte chemoattractant protein-1–induced protein-1 (MCPIP-1) might play a role in maintaining immune homeostasis in the epithelium both under physiological conditions and upon bacterial infection. To this end, we examined the distribution of MCPIP-1 transcript and protein in various tissues. The MCPIP-1 protein level was higher in epithelial cells than in myeloid cells. MCPIP-1 exerted RNase activity towards the IL-8 transcript and the life-span of IL-8 was determined by the presence of the stem-loops/hairpin (SL) structures at the 3′ UTR region of IL-8 mRNA. Moreover, using fully active, purified recombinant MCPIP-1 protein, we elucidated the mechanism by which MCPIP-1 controls the IL-8 mRNA level. In conclusion, we uncovered a novel IL-8–dependent mechanism via which MCPIP-1 maintains epithelial homeostasis. This study reveals for the first time that MCPIP-1 plays a crucial anti-inflammatory role not only in myeloid cells but also in epithelial cells. PMID:27513529

  1. Post-transcriptional controls by ribonucleoprotein complexes in the acquisition of drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hoin; Kim, Chongtae; Lee, Heejin; Kim, Wook; Lee, Eun Kyung

    2013-08-20

    Acquisition of drug resistance leads to failure of anti-cancer treatments and therapies. Although several successive chemotherapies are available, along with efforts towards clinical applications of new anti-cancer drugs, it is generally realized that there is a long way to go to treat cancers. Resistance to anti-cancer drugs results from various factors, including genetic as well as epigenetic differences in tumors. Determining the molecular and cellular mechanisms responsible for the acquisition of drug resistance may be a helpful approach for the development of new therapeutic strategies to overcome treatment failure. Several studies have shown that the acquisition of drug resistance is tightly regulated by post-transcriptional regulators such as RNA binding proteins (RBPs) and microRNAs (miRNAs), which change the stability and translation of mRNAs encoding factors involved in cell survival, proliferation, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and drug metabolism. Here, we review our current understanding of ribonucleoprotein complexes, including RBPs and miRNAs, which play critical roles in the acquisition of drug resistance and have potential clinical implications for cancer.

  2. Post-Transcriptional Controls by Ribonucleoprotein Complexes in the Acquisition of Drug Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Kyung Lee

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Acquisition of drug resistance leads to failure of anti-cancer treatments and therapies. Although several successive chemotherapies are available, along with efforts towards clinical applications of new anti-cancer drugs, it is generally realized that there is a long way to go to treat cancers. Resistance to anti-cancer drugs results from various factors, including genetic as well as epigenetic differences in tumors. Determining the molecular and cellular mechanisms responsible for the acquisition of drug resistance may be a helpful approach for the development of new therapeutic strategies to overcome treatment failure. Several studies have shown that the acquisition of drug resistance is tightly regulated by post-transcriptional regulators such as RNA binding proteins (RBPs and microRNAs (miRNAs, which change the stability and translation of mRNAs encoding factors involved in cell survival, proliferation, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and drug metabolism. Here, we review our current understanding of ribonucleoprotein complexes, including RBPs and miRNAs, which play critical roles in the acquisition of drug resistance and have potential clinical implications for cancer.

  3. A distal intergenic region controls pancreatic endocrine differentiation by acting as a transcriptional enhancer and as a polycomb response element.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joris van Arensbergen

    Full Text Available Lineage-selective expression of developmental genes is dependent on the interplay between activating and repressive mechanisms. Gene activation is dependent on cell-specific transcription factors that recognize transcriptional enhancer sequences. Gene repression often depends on the recruitment of Polycomb group (PcG proteins, although the sequences that underlie the recruitment of PcG proteins, also known as Polycomb response elements (PREs, remain poorly understood in vertebrates. While distal PREs have been identified in mammals, a role for positive-acting enhancers in PcG-mediated repression has not been described. Here we have used a highly efficient procedure based on lentiviral-mediated transgenesis to carry out in vivo fine-mapping of, cis-regulatory sequences that control lineage-specific activation of Neurog3, a master regulator of pancreatic endocrine differentiation. Our findings reveal an enhancer region that is sufficient to drive correct spacio-temporal expression of Neurog3 and demonstrate that this same region serves as a PRE in alternative lineages where Neurog3 is inactive.

  4. SUMO2/3 modification of activating transcription factor 5 (ATF5) controls its dynamic translocation at the centrosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yunsheng; Gaither, Kari; Kim, Eugene; Liu, Edward; Hu, Ming; Lengel, Kathy; Qian, Dongmeng; Xu, Yidi; Wang, Bin; Knipprath, Henning; Liu, David X

    2018-02-23

    Activating transcription factor 5 (ATF5) is a member of the ATF/cAMP response element-binding protein family of transcription factors. ATF5 regulates stress responses and cell survival, proliferation, and differentiation and also plays a role in viral infections, cancer, diabetes, schizophrenia, and the olfactory system. Moreover, it was found to also have a critical cell cycle-dependent structural function at the centrosome. However, the mechanism that controls the localization of ATF5 at the centrosome is unclear. Here we report that ATF5 is small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) 2/3-modified at a conserved SUMO-targeting consensus site in various types of mammalian cells. We found that SUMOylation of ATF5 is elevated in the G 1 phase of the cell cycle and diminished in the G 2 /M phase. ATF5 SUMOylation disrupted the interaction of ATF5 with several centrosomal proteins and dislodged ATF5 from the centrosome at the end of the M phase. Of note, blockade of ATF5 SUMOylation deregulated the centrosome cycle, impeded ATF5 translocation from the centrosome, and caused genomic instability and G 2 /M arrest in HeLa cells. Our results indicate that ATF5 SUMOylation is an essential mechanism that regulates ATF5 localization and function at the centrosome. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. The Hog1p kinase regulates Aft1p transcription factor to control iron accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Telma S; Pereira, Clara; Canadell, David; Vilaça, Rita; Teixeira, Vítor; Moradas-Ferreira, Pedro; de Nadal, Eulàlia; Posas, Francesc; Costa, Vítor

    2018-01-01

    Iron acquisition systems have to be tightly regulated to assure a continuous supply of iron, since it is essential for survival, but simultaneously to prevent iron overload that is toxic to the cells. In budding yeast, the low‑iron sensing transcription factor Aft1p is a master regulator of the iron regulon. Our previous work revealed that bioactive sphingolipids modulate iron homeostasis as yeast cells lacking the sphingomyelinase Isc1p exhibit an upregulation of the iron regulon. In this study, we show that Isc1p impacts on iron accumulation and localization. Notably, Aft1p is activated in isc1Δ cells due to a decrease in its phosphorylation and an increase in its nuclear levels. Consistently, the expression of a phosphomimetic version of Aft1p-S210/S224 that favours its nuclear export abolished iron accumulation in isc1Δ cells. Notably, the Hog1p kinase, homologue of mammalian p38, interacts with and directly phosphorylates Aft1p at residues S210 and S224. However, Hog1p-Aft1p interaction decreases in isc1Δ cells, which likely contributes to Aft1p dephosphorylation and consequently to Aft1p activation and iron overload in isc1Δ cells. These results suggest that alterations in sphingolipid composition in isc1Δ cells may impact on iron homeostasis by disturbing the regulation of Aft1p by Hog1p. To our knowledge, Hog1p is the first kinase reported to directly regulate Aft1p, impacting on iron homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The Rts1 regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 2A is required for control of G1 cyclin transcription and nutrient modulation of cell size.

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    Karen Artiles

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The key molecular event that marks entry into the cell cycle is transcription of G1 cyclins, which bind and activate cyclin-dependent kinases. In yeast cells, initiation of G1 cyclin transcription is linked to achievement of a critical cell size, which contributes to cell-size homeostasis. The critical cell size is modulated by nutrients, such that cells growing in poor nutrients are smaller than cells growing in rich nutrients. Nutrient modulation of cell size does not work through known critical regulators of G1 cyclin transcription and is therefore thought to work through a distinct pathway. Here, we report that Rts1, a highly conserved regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A, is required for normal control of G1 cyclin transcription. Loss of Rts1 caused delayed initiation of bud growth and delayed and reduced accumulation of G1 cyclins. Expression of the G1 cyclin CLN2 from an inducible promoter rescued the delayed bud growth in rts1Delta cells, indicating that Rts1 acts at the level of transcription. Moreover, loss of Rts1 caused altered regulation of Swi6, a key component of the SBF transcription factor that controls G1 cyclin transcription. Epistasis analysis revealed that Rts1 does not work solely through several known critical upstream regulators of G1 cyclin transcription. Cells lacking Rts1 failed to undergo nutrient modulation of cell size. Together, these observations demonstrate that Rts1 is a key player in pathways that link nutrient availability, cell size, and G1 cyclin transcription. Since Rts1 is highly conserved, it may function in similar pathways in vertebrates.

  7. A-11: cell type-specific and single-active-X transcription controls of newly found gene in cultured human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadon, N.; Korn, N.; DeMars, R.

    1988-01-01

    We describe the isolation and characterization of a human X-chromosomal gene that is subject to both single-active-X control and tissue-specific control. The A-11 gene was identified by a cDNA that hydridizes to a 3.2-kb EcoR1 fragment of genomic DNA on the long arm of the human X chromosome. A-11 transcripts are normally present in fibroblasts but not in B- or T-lymphoblasts. However, A-11 transcription was activated in four of 11 independent, gamma ray-induced B-lymphoblastoid HLA antigen-loss mutants. Cell hybrids with a human fibroblast-derived active X contained A-11 transcripts but hybrids carrying the human inactive X did not. Azacytidine, a potent inhibitor of DNA methylation, readily reactivated the A-11 locus on the inactive X in hybrid cells, indicating that differential methylation is likely to be involved in the single-active-X control of A-11 transcription in fibroblasts. Failure of cells to remethylate DNA synthesized to repair gamma ray-induced damage may also have resulted in the activation of A-11 transcription among the lymphoblastoid mutants. The A-11 locus provides an opportunity to study the relationship between two types of transcriptional regulation of a gene

  8. Increasing Malonyl-CoA Derived Product through Controlling the Transcription Regulators of Phospholipid Synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoxu; Yang, Xiaoyu; Shen, Yu; Hou, Jin; Bao, Xiaoming

    2017-05-19

    Malonyl-CoA is a precursor of a variety of compounds such as polyketides and flavonoids. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, malonyl-CoA concentration is tightly regulated and therefore maintained at a very low level, limiting the production of malonyl-CoA-derived chemicals. Here we manipulated the phospholipid synthesis transcriptional regulators to control the malonyl-CoA levels and increase the downstream product. Through manipulating different regulators including Ino2p, Ino4p, Opi1p, and a series of synthetic Ino2p variants, combining with studying the inositol and choline effect, the engineered strain achieved a 9-fold increase of the titer of malonyl-CoA-derived product 3-hydroxypropionic acid, which is among the highest improvement relative to previously reported strategies. Our study provides a new strategy to regulate malonyl-CoA availability and will contribute to the production of other highly valued malonyl-CoA-derived chemicals.

  9. Transcriptional Regulation by Nuclear Corepressors and PGC-1α: Implications for Mitochondrial Quality Control and Insulin Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengtang Qi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs and estrogen-related receptor (ERRα are ligand-activated nuclear receptors that coordinately regulate gene expression. Recent evidence suggests that nuclear corepressors, NCoR, RIP140, and SMRT, repress nuclear receptors-mediated transcriptional activity on specific promoters, and thus regulate insulin sensitivity, adipogenesis, mitochondrial number, and activity in vivo. Moreover, the coactivator PGC-1α that increases mitochondrial biogenesis during exercise and calorie restriction directly regulates autophagy in skeletal muscle and mitophagy in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. In this paper, we discuss the PGC-1α’s novel role in mitochondrial quality control and the role of nuclear corepressors in regulating insulin sensitivity and interacting with PGC-1α.

  10. Involvement of TORC2, a CREB co-activator, in the in vivo-specific transcriptional control of HTLV-1

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    Furuta Rika A

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 causes adult T -cell leukemia (ATL but the expression of HTLV-1 is strongly suppressed in the peripheral blood of infected people. However, such suppression, which may explain the long latency in the development of ATL, is readily reversible, and viral expression resumes quickly with ex vivo culture of infected T -cells. To investigate the mechanism of in vivo -specific transcriptional suppression, we established a mouse model in which mice were intraperitoneally administered syngeneic EL4 T -lymphoma cells transduced with a recombinant retrovirus expressing a GFP-Tax fusion protein, Gax, under the control of the HTLV-1 enhancer (EL4-Gax. Results Gax gene transcription was silenced in vivo but quickly up-regulated in ex vivo culture. Analysis of integrated Gax reporter gene demonstrated that neither CpG methylation of the promoter DNA nor histone modification was associated with the reversible suppression. ChIP-analysis of LTR under suppression revealed reduced promoter binding of TFIIB and Pol-II, but no change in the binding of CREB or CBP/p300 to the viral enhancer sequence. However, the expression of TORC2, a co-activator of CREB, decreased substantially in the EL4-Gax cells in vivo, and this returned to normal levels in ex vivo culture. The reduced expression of TORC2 was associated with translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. A knock-down experiment with siRNA confirmed that TORC2 was the major functional protein of the three TORC-family proteins (TORC1, 2, 3 in EL4-Gax cells. Conclusion These results suggest that the TORC2 may play an important role in the in vivo -specific transcriptional control of HTLV-1. This study provides a new model for the reversible mechanism that suppresses HTLV-1 expression in vivo without the DNA methylation or hypoacetylated histones that is observed in the primary cells of most HTLV-1 -infected carriers and a substantial number of ATL

  11. The transcriptional coactivators p/CIP and SRC-1 control insulin resistance through IRS1 in obesity models.

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    Zhiyong Wang

    Full Text Available Three p160 family members, p/CIP, SRC1, and TIF2, have been identified as transcriptional coactivators for nuclear hormone receptors and other transcription factors in vitro. In a previous study, we reported initial characterization of the obesity-resistant phenotypes of p/CIP and SRC-1 double knockout (DKO mice, which exhibit increased energy expenditure, and suggested that nuclear hormone receptor target genes were involved in these phenotypes. In this study, we demonstrate that p/CIP and SRC1 control insulin signaling in a cell-autonomous manner both in vitro and in vivo. Genetic deletion of p/CIP and SRC-1 increases glucose uptake and enhances insulin sensitivity in both regular chow- and high fat diet-fed DKO mice despite increased food intake. Interestingly, we discover that loss of p/CIP and SRC-1 results in resistance to age-related obesity and glucose intolerance. We show that expression levels of a key insulin signaling component, insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1, are significantly increased in two cell lines representing fat and muscle lineages with p/CIP and SRC-1 deletions and in white adipose tissue and skeletal muscle of DKO mice; this may account for increased glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity. This is the first evidence that the p160 coactivators control insulin signaling and glucose metabolism through IRS1. Therefore, our studies indicate that p/CIP and SRC-1 are potential therapeutic targets not only for obesity but also for diabetes.

  12. Post-transcriptional control by bacteriophage T4: mRNA decay and inhibition of translation initiation

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    Miller Eric S

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Over 50 years of biological research with bacteriophage T4 includes notable discoveries in post-transcriptional control, including the genetic code, mRNA, and tRNA; the very foundations of molecular biology. In this review we compile the past 10 - 15 year literature on RNA-protein interactions with T4 and some of its related phages, with particular focus on advances in mRNA decay and processing, and on translational repression. Binding of T4 proteins RegB, RegA, gp32 and gp43 to their cognate target RNAs has been characterized. For several of these, further study is needed for an atomic-level perspective, where resolved structures of RNA-protein complexes are awaiting investigation. Other features of post-transcriptional control are also summarized. These include: RNA structure at translation initiation regions that either inhibit or promote translation initiation; programmed translational bypassing, where T4 orchestrates ribosome bypass of a 50 nucleotide mRNA sequence; phage exclusion systems that involve T4-mediated activation of a latent endoribonuclease (PrrC and cofactor-assisted activation of EF-Tu proteolysis (Gol-Lit; and potentially important findings on ADP-ribosylation (by Alt and Mod enzymes of ribosome-associated proteins that might broadly impact protein synthesis in the infected cell. Many of these problems can continue to be addressed with T4, whereas the growing database of T4-related phage genome sequences provides new resources and potentially new phage-host systems to extend the work into a broader biological, evolutionary context.

  13. Control of Proteobacterial Central Carbon Metabolism by the HexR Transcriptional Regulator. A Case Study in Shewanella oneidensis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leyn, Semen; Li, Xiaoqing; Zheng, Qijing; Novichkov, Pavel; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Yang, Chen; Osterman, Andrei L.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.

    2011-08-17

    Bacteria exploit multiple mechanisms for controlling central carbon metabolism (CCM). Thus, a bioinformatic analysis together with some experimental data implicated HexR transcriptional factor as a global CCM regulator in some lineages of Gammaproteobacteria operating as a functional replacement of Cra regulator characteristic of Enterobacteriales. In this study we combined a large-scale comparative genomic reconstruction of HexRcontrolled regulons in 87 species of Proteobacteria with the detailed experimental analysis of HexR regulatory network in Shewanella oneidensis model system. Although nearly all of the HexR-controlled genes are associated with CCM, remarkable variations were revealed in the scale (from 1-2 target operons in Enterobacteriales up to 20 operons in Aeromonadales) and gene content of HexR regulons between 11 compared lineages. A predicted 17-bp pseudo-palindrome with a consensus tTGTAATwwwATTACa, was confirmed as HexR-binding motif for 15 target operons (comprising 30 genes) by in vitro binding assays. The negative effect of the key CCM intermediate, 2-keto-3-deoxy-6- phosphogluconate, on the DNA-regulator complex formation was verified. A dual mode of HexR action on various target promoters, repression of genes involved in catabolic pathways and activation of gluconeogenic genes, was for the first time predicted by the bioinformatc analysis and experimentally verified by changed gene expression pattern in S. oneidensis AhexR mutant. Phenotypic profiling revealed the inability of this mutant to grow on lactate or pyruvate as a single carbon source. A comparative metabolic flux analysis of wild-type and mutant strains of S. oneidensis using 13Clactate labeling and GC-MS analysis confirmed the hypothesized HexR role as a master regulator of gluconeogenic flux from pyruvate via the transcriptional activation of phosphoenolpyruvate synthase (PpsA).

  14. A game with many players: Control of gdh transcription in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hänssler, E.; Müller, T.; Palumbo, K.; Pátek, Miroslav; Brocker, M.; Krämer, R.; Burkovski, A.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 142, č. 2 (2009), s. 114-122 ISSN 0168-1656 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : glutamate dehydrogenase * nitrogen control * nitrogen regulation Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.881, year: 2009

  15. An improved reprogrammable mouse model harbouring the reverse tetracycline-controlled transcriptional transactivator 3

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    S. Alaei

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Reprogrammable mouse models engineered to conditionally express Oct-4, Klf-4, Sox-2 and c-Myc (OKSM have been instrumental in dissecting molecular events underpinning the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells. However, until now these models have been reported in the context of the m2 reverse tetracycline-controlled transactivator, which results in low reprogramming efficiency and consequently limits the number of reprogramming intermediates that can be isolated for downstream profiling. Here, we describe an improved OKSM mouse model in the context of the reverse tetracycline-controlled transactivator 3 with enhanced reprogramming efficiency (>9-fold and increased numbers of reprogramming intermediate cells albeit with similar kinetics, which we believe will facilitate mechanistic studies of the reprogramming process.

  16. The helicase senataxin suppresses the antiviral transcriptional response and controls viral biogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Matthew S.; Rialdi, Alexander; Ho, Jessica Sook Yuin; Tilove, Micah; Martinez-Gil, Luis; Moshkina, Natasha P.; Peralta, Zuleyma; Noel, Justine; Melegari, Camilla; Maestre, Ana; Mitsopoulos, Panagiotis; Madrenas, Joaquín; Heinz, Sven; Benner, Chris; Young, John A. T.; Feagins, Alicia R.; Basler, Christopher; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana; Becherel, Olivier J.; Lavin, Martin F.; van Bakel, Harm; Marazzi, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    The human helicase senataxin (SETX) is implicated in the neurodegenerative diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS4) and ataxia with oculomotor apraxia (AOA2). Here, we reveal a role for SETX in controlling the antiviral response. Cells depleted for SETX and AOA2 patient-derived SETX-deficient cells exhibit increased expression of antiviral mediators in response to infection. Mechanistically, we propose a model whereby SETX attenuates RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) activity at genes stimulated upon viral sensing, thus controlling the magnitude of the host response to pathogens and the biogenesis of numerous RNA viruses (e. g. Influenza A virus and West Nile virus). Our data indicate a potentially causal link between SETX inborn errors, susceptibility to infection and development of neurologic disorders. PMID:25822250

  17. Transcription controls growth, cell kinetics and cholesterol supply to sustain ACTH responses

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    Robert I Menzies

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic ACTH exposure is associated with adrenal hypertrophy and steroidogenesis. The underlying molecular processes in mice have been analysed by microarray, histological and immunohistochemical techniques. Synacthen infused for 2 weeks markedly increased adrenal mass and plasma corticosterone levels. Microarray analysis found greater than 2-fold changes in expression of 928 genes (P 4-fold and cross-sectional area of fasciculata cells was 2-fold greater. In contrast, genes associated with apoptosis (eg Casp12, Clu, were downregulated and apoptotic cells (Tunel staining were fewer (P < 0.001 and more widely distributed throughout the cortex. In summary, long-term steroidogenesis with ACTH excess is sustained by genes controlling cholesterol supply and adrenal mass. ACTH effects on adrenal morphology and genes controlling cell hypertrophy, proliferation and apoptosis suggest the involvement of different cell types and separate molecular pathways.

  18. Transcription controls growth, cell kinetics and cholesterol supply to sustain ACTH responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, Robert I; Zhao, Xin; Mullins, Linda J; Mullins, John J; Cairns, Carolynn; Wrobel, Nicola; Dunbar, Donald R; Bailey, Matthew A; Kenyon, Christopher J

    2017-10-01

    Chronic ACTH exposure is associated with adrenal hypertrophy and steroidogenesis. The underlying molecular processes in mice have been analysed by microarray, histological and immunohistochemical techniques. Synacthen infused for 2 weeks markedly increased adrenal mass and plasma corticosterone levels. Microarray analysis found greater than 2-fold changes in expression of 928 genes ( P  4-fold and cross-sectional area of fasciculata cells was 2-fold greater. In contrast, genes associated with apoptosis (eg Casp12, Clu, ) were downregulated and apoptotic cells (Tunel staining) were fewer ( P  < 0.001) and more widely distributed throughout the cortex. In summary, long-term steroidogenesis with ACTH excess is sustained by genes controlling cholesterol supply and adrenal mass. ACTH effects on adrenal morphology and genes controlling cell hypertrophy, proliferation and apoptosis suggest the involvement of different cell types and separate molecular pathways. © 2017 The authors.

  19. Transcriptional Control of Dual Transporters Involved in α-Ketoglutarate Utilization Reveals Their Distinct Roles in UropathogenicEscherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Wentong; Cai, Xuwang; Yang, Yongwu; Yan, Shigan; Zhang, Haibin

    2017-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) are the primary causative agents of urinary tract infections. Some UPEC isolates are able to infect renal proximal tubule cells, and can potentially cause pyelonephritis. We have previously shown that to fulfill their physiological roles renal proximal tubule cells accumulate high concentrations of α-ketoglutarate (KG) and that gene cluster c5032 - c5039 contribute to anaerobic utilization of KG by UPEC str. CFT073, thereby promoting its in vivo fitness. Given the importance of utilizing KG for UPEC, this study is designed to investigate the roles of two transporters KgtP and C5038 in KG utilization, their transcriptional regulation, and their contributions to UPEC fitness in vivo . Our phylogenetic analyses support that kgtP is a widely conserved locus in commensal and pathogenic E. coli , while UPEC-associated c5038 was acquired through horizontal gene transfer. Global anaerobic transcriptional regulators Fumarate and nitrate reduction (FNR) and ArcA induced c5038 expression in anaerobiosis, and C5038 played a major role in anaerobic growth on KG. KgtP was required for aerobic growth on KG, and its expression was repressed by FNR and ArcA under anaerobic conditions. Analyses of FNR and ArcA binding sites and results of EMS assays suggest that FNR and ArcA likely inhibit kgtP expression through binding to the -35 region of kgtP promoter and occluding the occupancy of RNA polymerases. Gene c5038 can be specifically induced by KG, whereas the expression of kgtP does not respond to KG, yet can be stimulated during growth on glycerol. In addition, c5038 and kgtP expression were further shown to be controlled by different alternative sigma factors RpoN and RpoS, respectively. Furthermore, dual-strain competition assays in a murine model showed that c5038 mutant but not kgtP mutant was outcompeted by the wild-type strain during the colonization of murine bladders and kidneys, highlighting the importance of C5038 under in vivo

  20. FoxO1 regulates myocardial glucose oxidation rates via transcriptional control of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, Keshav; Saleme, Bruno; Al Batran, Rami; Aburasayn, Hanin; Eshreif, Amina; Ho, Kim L; Ma, Wayne K; Almutairi, Malak; Eaton, Farah; Gandhi, Manoj; Park, Edwards A; Sutendra, Gopinath; Ussher, John R

    2017-09-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) is the rate-limiting enzyme for glucose oxidation and a critical regulator of metabolic flexibility during the fasting to feeding transition. PDH is regulated via both PDH kinases (PDHK) and PDH phosphatases, which phosphorylate/inactivate and dephosphorylate/activate PDH, respectively. Our goal was to determine whether the transcription factor forkhead box O1 (FoxO1) regulates PDH activity and glucose oxidation in the heart via increasing the expression of Pdk4 , the gene encoding PDHK4. To address this question, we differentiated H9c2 myoblasts into cardiac myocytes and modulated FoxO1 activity, after which Pdk4 /PDHK4 expression and PDH phosphorylation/activity were assessed. We assessed binding of FoxO1 to the Pdk4 promoter in cardiac myocytes in conjunction with measuring the role of FoxO1 on glucose oxidation in the isolated working heart. Both pharmacological (1 µM AS1842856) and genetic (siRNA mediated) inhibition of FoxO1 decreased Pdk4 /PDHK4 expression and subsequent PDH phosphorylation in H9c2 cardiac myocytes, whereas 10 µM dexamethasone-induced Pdk4 /PDHK4 expression was abolished via pretreatment with 1 µM AS1842856. Furthermore, transfection of H9c2 cardiac myocytes with a vector expressing FoxO1 increased luciferase activity driven by a Pdk4 promoter construct containing the FoxO1 DNA-binding element region, but not in a Pdk4 promoter construct lacking this region. Finally, AS1842856 treatment in fasted mice enhanced glucose oxidation rates during aerobic isolated working heart perfusions. Taken together, FoxO1 directly regulates Pdk4 transcription in the heart, thereby controlling PDH activity and subsequent glucose oxidation rates. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Although studies have shown an association between FoxO1 activity and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 expression, our study demonstrated that pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 is a direct transcriptional target of FoxO1 (but not FoxO3/FoxO4) in the heart. Furthermore, we

  1. Selective control of primer usage in multiplex one-step reverse transcription PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Natasha

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiplex RT-PCR is a valuable technique used for pathogen identification, disease detection and relative quantification of gene expression. The simplification of this protocol into a one-step procedure saves time and reagents. However, intensive PCR optimization is often required to overcome competing undesired PCR primer extension during the RT step. Results Herein, we report multiplex one-step RT-PCR experiments in which the PCR primers contain thermolabile phosphotriester modification groups. The presence of these groups minimizes PCR primer extension during the RT step and allows for control of PCR primer extension until the more stringent, elevated temperatures of PCR are reached. Results reveal that the use of primers whose extension can be controlled in a temperature-mediated way provides improved one-step RT-PCR specificity in both singleplex and multiplex reaction formats. Conclusions The need for an accurate and sensitive technique to quantify mRNA expression levels makes the described modified primer technology a promising tool for use in multiplex one-step RT-PCR. A more accurate representation of the abundances in initial template sample is feasible with modified primers, as artifacts of biased PCR are reduced because of greater improvements in reaction specificity.

  2. Local Transcriptional Control of YUCCA Regulates Auxin Promoted Root-Growth Inhibition in Response to Aluminium Stress in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guangchao; Gao, Shan; Tian, Huiyu; Wu, Wenwen; Robert, Hélène S; Ding, Zhaojun

    2016-10-01

    Auxin is necessary for the inhibition of root growth induced by aluminium (Al) stress, however the molecular mechanism controlling this is largely unknown. Here, we report that YUCCA (YUC), which encodes flavin monooxygenase-like proteins, regulates local auxin biosynthesis in the root apex transition zone (TZ) in response to Al stress. Al stress up-regulates YUC3/5/7/8/9 in the root-apex TZ, which we show results in the accumulation of auxin in the root-apex TZ and root-growth inhibition during the Al stress response. These Al-dependent changes in the regulation of YUCs in the root-apex TZ and YUC-regulated root growth inhibition are dependent on ethylene signalling. Increasing or disruption of ethylene signalling caused either enhanced or reduced up-regulation, respectively, of YUCs in root-apex TZ in response to Al stress. In addition, ethylene enhanced root growth inhibition under Al stress was strongly alleviated in yuc mutants or by co-treatment with yucasin, an inhibitor of YUC activity, suggesting a downstream role of YUCs in this process. Moreover, ethylene-insensitive 3 (EIN3) is involved into the direct regulation of YUC9 transcription in this process. Furthermore, we demonstrated that PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR4 (PIF4) functions as a transcriptional activator for YUC5/8/9. PIF4 promotes Al-inhibited primary root growth by regulating the local expression of YUCs and auxin signal in the root-apex TZ. The Al-induced expression of PIF4 in root TZ acts downstream of ethylene signalling. Taken together, our results highlight a regulatory cascade for YUCs-regulated local auxin biosynthesis in the root-apex TZ mediating root growth inhibition in response to Al stress.

  3. Local Transcriptional Control of YUCCA Regulates Auxin Promoted Root-Growth Inhibition in Response to Aluminium Stress in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangchao Liu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Auxin is necessary for the inhibition of root growth induced by aluminium (Al stress, however the molecular mechanism controlling this is largely unknown. Here, we report that YUCCA (YUC, which encodes flavin monooxygenase-like proteins, regulates local auxin biosynthesis in the root apex transition zone (TZ in response to Al stress. Al stress up-regulates YUC3/5/7/8/9 in the root-apex TZ, which we show results in the accumulation of auxin in the root-apex TZ and root-growth inhibition during the Al stress response. These Al-dependent changes in the regulation of YUCs in the root-apex TZ and YUC-regulated root growth inhibition are dependent on ethylene signalling. Increasing or disruption of ethylene signalling caused either enhanced or reduced up-regulation, respectively, of YUCs in root-apex TZ in response to Al stress. In addition, ethylene enhanced root growth inhibition under Al stress was strongly alleviated in yuc mutants or by co-treatment with yucasin, an inhibitor of YUC activity, suggesting a downstream role of YUCs in this process. Moreover, ethylene-insensitive 3 (EIN3 is involved into the direct regulation of YUC9 transcription in this process. Furthermore, we demonstrated that PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR4 (PIF4 functions as a transcriptional activator for YUC5/8/9. PIF4 promotes Al-inhibited primary root growth by regulating the local expression of YUCs and auxin signal in the root-apex TZ. The Al-induced expression of PIF4 in root TZ acts downstream of ethylene signalling. Taken together, our results highlight a regulatory cascade for YUCs-regulated local auxin biosynthesis in the root-apex TZ mediating root growth inhibition in response to Al stress.

  4. Fruit-surface flavonoid accumulation in tomato is controlled by a SlMYB12-regulated transcriptional network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avital Adato

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The cuticle covering plants' aerial surfaces is a unique structure that plays a key role in organ development and protection against diverse stress conditions. A detailed analysis of the tomato colorless-peel y mutant was carried out in the framework of studying the outer surface of reproductive organs. The y mutant peel lacks the yellow flavonoid pigment naringenin chalcone, which has been suggested to influence the characteristics and function of the cuticular layer. Large-scale metabolic and transcript profiling revealed broad effects on both primary and secondary metabolism, related mostly to the biosynthesis of phenylpropanoids, particularly flavonoids. These were not restricted to the fruit or to a specific stage of its development and indicated that the y mutant phenotype is due to a mutation in a regulatory gene. Indeed, expression analyses specified three R2R3-MYB-type transcription factors that were significantly down-regulated in the y mutant fruit peel. One of these, SlMYB12, was mapped to the genomic region on tomato chromosome 1 previously shown to harbor the y mutation. Identification of an additional mutant allele that co-segregates with the colorless-peel trait, specific down-regulation of SlMYB12 and rescue of the y phenotype by overexpression of SlMYB12 on the mutant background, confirmed that a lesion in this regulator underlies the y phenotype. Hence, this work provides novel insight to the study of fleshy fruit cuticular structure and paves the way for the elucidation of the regulatory network that controls flavonoid accumulation in tomato fruit cuticle.

  5. The membrane-associated transcription factor NAC089 controls ER-stress-induced programmed cell death in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zheng-Ting; Wang, Mei-Jing; Sun, Ling; Lu, Sun-Jie; Bi, Dong-Ling; Sun, Le; Song, Ze-Ting; Zhang, Shuang-Shuang; Zhou, Shun-Fan; Liu, Jian-Xiang

    2014-03-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is activated to sustain cell survival by reducing misfolded protein accumulation in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The UPR also promotes programmed cell death (PCD) when the ER stress is severe; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms are less understood, especially in plants. Previously, two membrane-associated transcriptions factors (MTFs), bZIP28 and bZIP60, were identified as the key regulators for cell survival in the plant ER stress response. Here, we report the identification of another MTF, NAC089, as an important PCD regulator in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants. NAC089 relocates from the ER membrane to the nucleus under ER stress conditions. Inducible expression of a truncated form of NAC089, in which the transmembrane domain is deleted, induces PCD with increased caspase 3/7-like activity and DNA fragmentation. Knock-down NAC089 in Arabidopsis confers ER stress tolerance and impairs ER-stress-induced caspase-like activity. Transcriptional regulation analysis and ChIP-qPCR reveal that NAC089 plays important role in regulating downstream genes involved in PCD, such as NAC094, MC5 and BAG6. Furthermore, NAC089 is up-regulated by ER stress, which is directly controlled by bZIP28 and bZIP60. These results show that nuclear relocation of NAC089 promotes ER-stress-induced PCD, and both pro-survival and pro-death signals are elicited by bZIP28 and bZIP60 during plant ER stress response.

  6. Roles of Forkhead-box Transcription Factors in Controlling Development, Pathogenicity, and Stress Response in Magnaporthe oryzae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaejin Park

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Although multiple transcription factors (TFs have been characterized via mutagenesis to understand their roles in controlling pathogenicity and infection-related development in Magnaporthe oryzae, the causal agent of rice blast, if and how forkhead-box (FOX TFs contribute to these processes remain to be characterized. Four putative FOX TF genes were identified in the genome of M. oryzae, and phylogenetic analysis suggested that two of them (MoFKH1 and MoHCM1 correspond to Ascomycota-specific members of the FOX TF family while the others (MoFOX1 and MoFOX2 are Pezizomycotina-specific members. Deletion of MoFKH1 (ΔMofkh1 resulted in reduced mycelial growth and conidial germination, abnormal septation and stress response, and reduced virulence. Similarly, ΔMohcm1 exhibited reduced mycelial growth and conidial germination. Conidia of ΔMofkh1 and ΔMohcm1 were more sensitive to one or both of the cell cycle inhibitors hydroxyurea and benomyl, suggesting their role in cell cycle control. On the other hand, loss of MoFOX1 (ΔMofox1 did not show any noticeable changes in development, pathogenicity, and stress response. Deletion of MoFOX2 was not successful even after repeated attempts. Taken together, these results suggested that MoFKH1 and Mo-HCM1 are important in fungal development and that MoFKH1 is further implicated in pathogenicity and stress response in M. oryzae.

  7. Promoter decoding of transcription factor dynamics involves a trade-off between noise and control of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Anders S; O'Shea, Erin K

    2013-11-05

    Numerous transcription factors (TFs) encode information about upstream signals in the dynamics of their activation, but how downstream genes decode these dynamics remains poorly understood. Using microfluidics to control the nucleocytoplasmic translocation dynamics of the budding yeast TF Msn2, we elucidate the principles that govern how different promoters convert dynamical Msn2 input into gene expression output in single cells. Combining modeling and experiments, we classify promoters according to their signal-processing behavior and reveal that multiple, distinct gene expression programs can be encoded in the dynamics of Msn2. We show that both oscillatory TF dynamics and slow promoter kinetics lead to higher noise in gene expression. Furthermore, we show that the promoter activation timescale is related to nucleosome remodeling. Our findings imply a fundamental trade-off: although the cell can exploit different promoter classes to differentially control gene expression using TF dynamics, gene expression noise fundamentally limits how much information can be encoded in the dynamics of a single TF and reliably decoded by promoters.

  8. Fear-of-intimacy-mediated zinc transport controls the function of zinc-finger transcription factors involved in myogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco-Rando, Marta; Atienza-Manuel, Alexandra; Martín, Paloma; Burke, Richard; Ruiz-Gómez, Mar

    2016-06-01

    Zinc is a component of one-tenth of all human proteins. Its cellular concentration is tightly regulated because its dyshomeostasis has catastrophic health consequences. Two families of zinc transporters control zinc homeostasis in organisms, but there is little information about their specific developmental roles. We show that the ZIP transporter Fear-of-intimacy (Foi) is necessary for the formation of Drosophila muscles. In foi mutants, myoblasts segregate normally, but their specification is affected, leading to the formation of a misshapen muscle pattern and distorted midgut. The observed phenotypes could be ascribed to the inactivation of specific zinc-finger transcription factors (ZFTFs), supporting the hypothesis that they are a consequence of intracellular depletion of zinc. Accordingly, foi phenotypes can be rescued by mesodermal expression of other ZIP members with similar subcellular localization. We propose that Foi acts mostly as a transporter to regulate zinc intracellular homeostasis, thereby impacting on the activity of ZFTFs that control specific developmental processes. Our results additionally suggest a possible explanation for the presence of large numbers of zinc transporters in organisms based on differences in ion transport specificity and/or degrees of activity among transporters. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  9. A Transcript-Specific eIF3 Complex Mediates Global Translational Control of Energy Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meera Shah

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The multi-subunit eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF3 is thought to assist in the recruitment of ribosomes to mRNA. The expression of eIF3 subunits is frequently disrupted in human cancers, but the specific roles of individual subunits in mRNA translation and cancer remain elusive. Using global transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic profiling, we found a striking failure of Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells lacking eIF3e and eIF3d to synthesize components of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, leading to a defect in respiration, endogenous oxidative stress, and premature aging. Energy balance was maintained, however, by a switch to glycolysis with increased glucose uptake, upregulation of glycolytic enzymes, and strict dependence on a fermentable carbon source. This metabolic regulatory function appears to be conserved in human cells where eIF3e binds metabolic mRNAs and promotes their translation. Thus, via its eIF3d-eIF3e module, eIF3 orchestrates an mRNA-specific translational mechanism controlling energy metabolism that may be disrupted in cancer.

  10. Developmental control of transcription of a retina-specific gene, QR1, during differentiation: involvement of factors from the POU family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierani, A; Pouponnot, C; Calothy, G

    1995-02-01

    Developmental control of gene expression often results from the coupling of growth arrest with the establishment of differentiation programs. QR1 is a gene specifically expressed in retinas during the late phase of embryogenesis. At this stage neuroectodermal precursors have reached terminal mitosis and are undergoing differentiation into distinct cell types. Transcription of the QR1 gene is tightly regulated during retinal development: this gene is expressed between embryonic day 9 (ED9) and ED17 and is completely repressed at hatching in quail. Moreover, QR1 transcription is downregulated when postmitotic neural retina cells are induced to proliferate by pp60v-src. We studied the stage-dependent transcriptional control of this gene during quail neural retina (QNR) cell development. Transient transfection experiments with QR1/CAT constructs at various stages of development showed that a region located between -935 and -1265 bp upstream of the transcription start site is necessary to promote transcription in retina cells during the late phase of embryonal development (QNR9, corresponding to ED9). By in vivo footprinting assays we identified at least two elements that are occupied by DNA-protein complexes in QNR cells: the A and B boxes. The A box allows formation of several biochemically distinct complexes: C1, C2, C3, and C4. Formation of the C2 complex mainly during early stages (ED7) and of C2, C3, and C4 complexes during postnatal life correlates with repression of QR1 transcription, whereas the C1 complex is strongly induced at ED11 when the QR1 gene is expressed. We previously showed that C1 was involved in downregulation of QR1 transcription by pp60v-src. Several complexes are also formed on the B box. We show that these complexes are exclusively present in neural tissues and that they involve members of the POU family of transcription factors. Mutations of each one of the two regions which abolish the binding of the C1 factor(s) on the A box and of the POU

  11. Reproducibility of detection of tyrosinase and MART-1 transcripts in the peripheral blood of melanoma patients: a quality control study using real-time quantitative RT-PCR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, T. J.; Fourkour, A.; Punt, C. J.; van de Locht, L. T.; Wobbes, T.; van den Bosch, S.; de Rooij, M. J.; Mensink, E. J.; Ruiter, D. J.; van Muijen, G. N.

    1999-01-01

    In recent years, large discrepancies were described in the success rate of the tyrosinase reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for detecting melanoma cells in the peripheral blood of melanoma patients. We present a quality control study in which we analysed the reproducibility of

  12. Multi-species, multi-transcription factor binding highlights conserved control of tissue-specific biological pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballester, Benoit; Medina-Rivera, Alejandra; Schmidt, Dominic; Gonzàlez-Porta, Mar; Carlucci, Matthew; Chen, Xiaoting; Chessman, Kyle; Faure, Andre J; Funnell, Alister PW; Goncalves, Angela; Kutter, Claudia; Lukk, Margus; Menon, Suraj; McLaren, William M; Stefflova, Klara; Watt, Stephen; Weirauch, Matthew T; Crossley, Merlin; Marioni, John C; Odom, Duncan T; Flicek, Paul; Wilson, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    As exome sequencing gives way to genome sequencing, the need to interpret the function of regulatory DNA becomes increasingly important. To test whether evolutionary conservation of cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) gives insight into human gene regulation, we determined transcription factor (TF) binding locations of four liver-essential TFs in liver tissue from human, macaque, mouse, rat, and dog. Approximately, two thirds of the TF-bound regions fell into CRMs. Less than half of the human CRMs were found as a CRM in the orthologous region of a second species. Shared CRMs were associated with liver pathways and disease loci identified by genome-wide association studies. Recurrent rare human disease causing mutations at the promoters of several blood coagulation and lipid metabolism genes were also identified within CRMs shared in multiple species. This suggests that multi-species analyses of experimentally determined combinatorial TF binding will help identify genomic regions critical for tissue-specific gene control. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02626.001 PMID:25279814

  13. RhoB controls coordination of adult angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis following injury by regulating VEZF1-mediated transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald, Damien; Adini, Irit; Shechter, Sharon; Perruzzi, Carole; Varnau, Joseph; Hopkins, Benjamin; Kazerounian, Shiva; Kurschat, Peter; Blachon, Stephanie; Khedkar, Santosh; Bagchi, Mandrita; Sherris, David; Prendergast, George C.; Klagsbrun, Michael; Stuhlmann, Heidi; Rigby, Alan C.; Nagy, Janice A.; Benjamin, Laura E.

    2013-11-01

    Mechanisms governing the distinct temporal dynamics that characterize post-natal angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis elicited by cutaneous wounds and inflammation remain unclear. RhoB, a stress-induced small GTPase, modulates cellular responses to growth factors, genotoxic stress and neoplastic transformation. Here we show, using RhoB null mice, that loss of RhoB decreases pathological angiogenesis in the ischaemic retina and reduces angiogenesis in response to cutaneous wounding, but enhances lymphangiogenesis following both dermal wounding and inflammatory challenge. We link these unique and opposing roles of RhoB in blood versus lymphatic vasculatures to the RhoB-mediated differential regulation of sprouting and proliferation in primary human blood versus lymphatic endothelial cells. We demonstrate that nuclear RhoB-GTP controls expression of distinct gene sets in each endothelial lineage by regulating VEZF1-mediated transcription. Finally, we identify a small-molecule inhibitor of VEZF1-DNA interaction that recapitulates RhoB loss in ischaemic retinopathy. Our findings establish the first intra-endothelial molecular pathway governing the phased response of angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis following injury.

  14. Pak2 Controls Acquisition of NKT Cell Fate by Regulating Expression of the Transcription Factors PLZF and Egr2

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Hagan, Kyle L.; Zhao, Jie; Pryshchep, Olga; Wang, Chyung-Ru

    2015-01-01

    NKT cells constitute a small population of T cells developed in the thymus that produce large amounts of cytokines and chemokines in response to lipid Ags. Signaling through the Vα14-Jα18 TCR instructs commitment to the NKT cell lineage, but the precise signaling mechanisms that instruct their lineage choice are unclear. In this article, we report that the cytoskeletal remodeling protein, p21-activated kinase 2 (Pak2), was essential for NKT cell development. Loss of Pak2 in T cells reduced stage III NKT cells in the thymus and periphery. Among different NKT cell subsets, Pak2 was necessary for the generation and function of NKT1 and NKT2 cells, but not NKT17 cells. Mechanistically, expression of Egr2 and promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF), two key transcription factors for acquiring the NKT cell fate, were markedly diminished in the absence of Pak2. Diminished expression of Egr2 and PLZF were not caused by aberrant TCR signaling, as determined using a Nur77-GFP reporter, but were likely due to impaired induction and maintenance of signaling lymphocyte activation molecule 6 expression, a TCR costimulatory receptor required for NKT cell development. These data suggest that Pak2 controls thymic NKT cell development by providing a signal that links Egr2 to induce PLZF, in part by regulating signaling lymphocyte activation molecule 6 expression. PMID:26519537

  15. Pak2 Controls Acquisition of NKT Cell Fate by Regulating Expression of the Transcription Factors PLZF and Egr2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hagan, Kyle L; Zhao, Jie; Pryshchep, Olga; Wang, Chyung-Ru; Phee, Hyewon

    2015-12-01

    NKT cells constitute a small population of T cells developed in the thymus that produce large amounts of cytokines and chemokines in response to lipid Ags. Signaling through the Vα14-Jα18 TCR instructs commitment to the NKT cell lineage, but the precise signaling mechanisms that instruct their lineage choice are unclear. In this article, we report that the cytoskeletal remodeling protein, p21-activated kinase 2 (Pak2), was essential for NKT cell development. Loss of Pak2 in T cells reduced stage III NKT cells in the thymus and periphery. Among different NKT cell subsets, Pak2 was necessary for the generation and function of NKT1 and NKT2 cells, but not NKT17 cells. Mechanistically, expression of Egr2 and promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF), two key transcription factors for acquiring the NKT cell fate, were markedly diminished in the absence of Pak2. Diminished expression of Egr2 and PLZF were not caused by aberrant TCR signaling, as determined using a Nur77-GFP reporter, but were likely due to impaired induction and maintenance of signaling lymphocyte activation molecule 6 expression, a TCR costimulatory receptor required for NKT cell development. These data suggest that Pak2 controls thymic NKT cell development by providing a signal that links Egr2 to induce PLZF, in part by regulating signaling lymphocyte activation molecule 6 expression. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  16. Conserved and non-conserved enhancers direct tissue specific transcription in ancient germ layer specific developmental control genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bourque Guillaume

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identifying DNA sequences (enhancers that direct the precise spatial and temporal expression of developmental control genes remains a significant challenge in the annotation of vertebrate genomes. Locating these sequences, which in many cases lie at a great distance from the transcription start site, has been a major obstacle in deciphering gene regulation. Coupling of comparative genomics with functional validation to locate such regulatory elements has been a successful method in locating many such regulatory elements. But most of these studies looked either at a single gene only or the whole genome without focusing on any particular process. The pressing need is to integrate the tools of comparative genomics with knowledge of developmental biology to validate enhancers for developmental transcription factors in greater detail Results Our results show that near four different genes (nkx3.2, pax9, otx1b and foxa2 in zebrafish, only 20-30% of highly conserved DNA sequences can act as developmental enhancers irrespective of the tissue the gene expresses in. We find that some genes also have multiple conserved enhancers expressing in the same tissue at the same or different time points in development. We also located non-conserved enhancers for two of the genes (pax9 and otx1b. Our modified Bacterial artificial chromosome (BACs studies for these 4 genes revealed that many of these enhancers work in a synergistic fashion, which cannot be captured by individual DNA constructs and are not conserved at the sequence level. Our detailed biochemical and transgenic analysis revealed Foxa1 binds to the otx1b non-conserved enhancer to direct its activity in forebrain and otic vesicle of zebrafish at 24 hpf. Conclusion Our results clearly indicate that high level of functional conservation of genes is not necessarily associated with sequence conservation of its regulatory elements. Moreover certain non conserved DNA elements might have

  17. Expression of Shigella flexneri gluQ-rs gene is linked to dksA and controlled by a transcriptional terminator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caballero Valeria C

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutamyl queuosine-tRNAAsp synthetase (GluQ-RS is a paralog of the catalytic domain of glutamyl-tRNA synthetase and catalyzes the formation of glutamyl-queuosine on the wobble position of tRNAAsp. Here we analyze the transcription of its gene in Shigella flexneri, where it is found downstream of dksA, which encodes a transcriptional regulator involved in stress responses. Results The genomic organization, dksA-gluQ-rs, is conserved in more than 40 bacterial species. RT-PCR assays show co-transcription of both genes without a significant change in transcript levels during growth of S. flexneri. However, mRNA levels of the intergenic region changed during growth, increasing at stationary phase, indicating an additional level of control over the expression of gluQ-rs gene. Transcriptional fusions with lacZ as a reporter gene only produced β-galactosidase activity when the constructs included the dksA promoter, indicating that gluQ-rs do not have a separate promoter. Using bioinformatics, we identified a putative transcriptional terminator between dksA and gluQ-rs. Deletion or alteration of the predicted terminator resulted in increased expression of the lacZ reporter compared with cells containing the wild type terminator sequence. Analysis of the phenotype of a gluQ-rs mutant suggested that it may play a role in some stress responses, since growth of the mutant was impaired in the presence of osmolytes. Conclusions The results presented here, show that the expression of gluQ-rs depends on the dksA promoter, and strongly suggest the presence and the functionality of a transcriptional terminator regulating its expression. Also, the results indicate a link between glutamyl-queuosine synthesis and stress response in Shigella flexneri.

  18. The FOXO transcription factor controls insect growth and development by regulating juvenile hormone degradation in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Baosheng; Huang, Yuping; Xu, Jun; Shiotsuki, Takahiro; Bai, Hua; Palli, Subba Reddy; Huang, Yongping; Tan, Anjiang

    2017-07-14

    Forkhead box O (FOXO) functions as the terminal transcription factor of the insulin signaling pathway and regulates multiple physiological processes in many organisms, including lifespan in insects. However, how FOXO interacts with hormone signaling to modulate insect growth and development is largely unknown. Here, using the transgene-based CRISPR/Cas9 system, we generated and characterized mutants of the silkworm Bombyx mori FOXO ( BmFOXO ) to elucidate its physiological functions during development of this lepidopteran insect. The BmFOXO mutant (FOXO-M) exhibited growth delays from the first larval stage and showed precocious metamorphosis, pupating at the end of the fourth instar (trimolter) rather than at the end of the fifth instar as in the wild-type (WT) animals. However, different from previous reports on precocious metamorphosis caused by juvenile hormone (JH) deficiency in silkworm mutants, the total developmental time of the larval period in the FOXO-M was comparable with that of the WT. Exogenous application of 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) or of the JH analog rescued the trimolter phenotype. RNA-seq and gene expression analyses indicated that genes involved in JH degradation but not in JH biosynthesis were up-regulated in the FOXO-M compared with the WT animals. Moreover, we identified several FOXO-binding sites in the promoter of genes coding for JH-degradation enzymes. These results suggest that FOXO regulates JH degradation rather than its biosynthesis, which further modulates hormone homeostasis to control growth and development in B. mori In conclusion, we have uncovered a pivotal role for FOXO in regulating JH signaling to control insect development. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Amino acid availability controls TRB3 transcription in liver through the GCN2/eIF2α/ATF4 pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Carraro

    Full Text Available In mammals, plasma amino acid concentrations are markedly affected by dietary or pathological conditions. It has been well established that amino acids are involved in the control of gene expression. Up to now, all the information concerning the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of gene transcription by amino acid availability has been obtained in cultured cell lines. The present study aims to investigate the mechanisms involved in transcriptional activation of the TRB3 gene following amino acid limitation in mice liver. The results show that TRB3 is up-regulated in the liver of mice fed a leucine-deficient diet and that this induction is quickly reversible. Using transient transfection and chromatin immunoprecipitation approaches in hepatoma cells, we report the characterization of a functional Amino Acid Response Element (AARE in the TRB3 promoter and the binding of ATF4, ATF2 and C/EBPβ to this AARE sequence. We also provide evidence that only the binding of ATF4 to the AARE plays a crucial role in the amino acid-regulated transcription of TRB3. In mouse liver, we demonstrate that the GCN2/eIF2α/ATF4 pathway is essential for the induction of the TRB3 gene transcription in response to a leucine-deficient diet. Therefore, this work establishes for the first time that the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of gene transcription by amino acid availability are functional in mouse liver.

  20. Deregulation of p53 and RB Transcriptional Control Leads to Overexpression of DNA Methyltransferases in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-An Tang

    2014-06-01

    Conclusions: This study provides cell and clinical evidence that p53 and RB pathways transcriptionally repress DNMT expression. Normal expression of DNMT3A, RB and MDM2 proteins can be a biomarker for good prognosis in lung cancer.

  1. Molecular Dissection of the 8 Phase Transcriptional Program Controlled by Cyclin E-P220 NPAT Signaling Pathway

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nalepa, Grzegorz; Harper, Jeffrey

    2005-01-01

    .... Recent studies suggest a role for cyclin E/Cdk2 in activation of histone transcription during S phase via the Cajal body-associated protein p22ONPAT, and in addition, p220 can promote S-phase entry...

  2. Molecular Dissection of the 8 Phase Transcriptional Program Controlled by Cyclin E/P220 NPAT Signaling Pathway

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nalepa, Grzegorz

    2004-01-01

    Deregulation of the cyclin E pathway is associated with breast cancer. p220 links cyclin E to important S-phase events that are required for DNA replication, including induction of histone gene transcription...

  3. Molecular Dissection of the 8 Phase Transcriptional Program Controlled by Cyclin E-P220 NPAT Signaling Pathway

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nalepa, Grzegorz; Harper, Jeffrey

    2005-01-01

    Cyclin E/Cdk2, a central regulator of the G1/S transition, coordinates multiple cell cycle events, including DNA replication, centrosome duplication, and activation of the E2F transcriptional program...

  4. The ETS transcription factors ELK1 and GABPA regulate different gene networks to control MCF10A breast epithelial cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odrowaz, Zaneta; Sharrocks, Andrew D

    2012-01-01

    Members of the ETS transcription factor family often target the same binding regions and hence have the potential to regulate the same genes and downstream biological processes. However, individual family members also preferentially bind to other genomic regions, thus providing the potential for controlling distinct transcriptional programmes and generating specific biological effects. The ETS transcription factor ELK1 controls cell migration in breast epithelial cells through targeting a cohort of genes, independently from another family member GABPA, and therefore achieves biological specificity. Here, we demonstrate that GABPA also controls cell migration in breast epithelial cells. However, GABPA controls the expression of a different network of target genes to ELK1. Both direct and indirect target genes for GABPA are identified and amongst the direct targets we confirm the importance of RAC1 and KIF20A for cell migration. Therefore, although ELK1 and GABPA ultimately control the same biological process, they do so by regulating different cohorts of target genes associated with cytoskeletal functions and cell migration control.

  5. MYB3Rs, plant homologs of Myb oncoproteins, control cell cycle-regulated transcription and form DREAM-like complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kosuke; Suzuki, Toshiya; Iwata, Eriko; Magyar, Zoltán; Bögre, László; Ito, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    Plant MYB3R transcription factors, homologous to Myb oncoproteins, regulate the genes expressed at G2 and M phases in the cell cycle. Recent studies showed that MYB3Rs constitute multiprotein complexes that may correspond to animal complexes known as DREAM or dREAM. Discovery of the putative homologous complex in plants uncovered their significant varieties in structure, function, dynamics, and heterogeneity, providing insight into conserved and diversified aspects of cell cycle-regulated gene transcription.

  6. The transcription factor Foxg1 regulates telencephalic progenitor proliferation cell autonomously, in part by controlling Pax6 expression levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quinn Jane C

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transcription factor Foxg1 is an important regulator of telencephalic cell cycles. Its inactivation causes premature lengthening of telencephalic progenitor cell cycles and increased neurogenic divisions, leading to severe hypoplasia of the telencephalon. These proliferation defects could be a secondary consequence of the loss of Foxg1 caused by the abnormal expression of several morphogens (Fibroblast growth factor 8, bone morphogenetic proteins in the telencephalon of Foxg1 null mutants. Here we investigated whether Foxg1 has a cell autonomous role in the regulation of telencephalic progenitor proliferation. We analysed Foxg1+/+↔Foxg1-/- chimeras, in which mutant telencephalic cells have the potential to interact with, and to have any cell non-autonomous defects rescued by, normal wild-type cells. Results Our analysis showed that the Foxg1-/- cells are under-represented in the chimeric telencephalon and the proportion of them in S-phase is significantly smaller than that of their wild-type neighbours, indicating that their under-representation is caused by a cell autonomous reduction in their proliferation. We then analysed the expression of the cell-cycle regulator Pax6 and found that it is cell-autonomously downregulated in Foxg1-/- dorsal telencephalic cells. We went on to show that the introduction into Foxg1-/- embryos of a transgene designed to reverse Pax6 expression defects resulted in a partial rescue of the telencephalic progenitor proliferation defects. Conclusions We conclude that Foxg1 exerts control over telencephalic progenitor proliferation by cell autonomous mechanisms that include the regulation of Pax6, which itself is known to regulate proliferation cell autonomously in a regional manner.

  7. Zinc finger artificial transcription factor-based nearest inactive analogue/nearest active analogue strategy used for the identification of plant genes controlling homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Qi; van Verk, Marcel C; Pinas, Johan E; Lindhout, Beatrice I; Hooykaas, Paul J J; van der Zaal, Bert J

    2013-12-01

    In previous work, we selected a particular transcription factor, designated VP16-HRU, from a pool of zinc finger artificial transcription factors (ZF-ATFs) used for genome interrogation. When expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana under control of the ribosomal protein S5A promoter, the RPS5A::VP16-HRU construct led to a 200- to 300-fold increase in the frequency of somatic intrachromosomal homologous recombination (iHR). Because the expression of each ZF-ATF leads to a large number of transcriptional changes, we designed a strategy employing a collection of structurally similar ZF-ATFs to filter out the transcriptional changes relevant to the phenotype by deep sequencing. In that manner, 30 transcripts were found to be consistently induced in plants with enhanced homologous recombination (HR). For 25 of the cognate genes, their effect on the HR process was assessed using cDNA/gDNA expression constructs. For three genes, ectopic expression indeed led to enhanced iHR frequencies, albeit much lower than the frequency observed when a HR-inducing ZF-ATF was present. Altogether, our data demonstrate that despite the large number of transcriptional changes brought about by individual ZF-ATFs, causal changes can be identified. In our case, the picture emerged that a natural regulatory switch for iHR does not exist but that ZF-ATFs-like VP16-HRU act as an ectopic master switch, orchestrating the timely expression of a set of plant genes that each by themselves only have modest effects, but when acting together support an extremely high iHR frequency. © 2013 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. cDNA cloning and transcriptional controlling of a novel low dose radiation-induced gene and its function analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Pingkun; Sui Jianli

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To clone a novel low dose radiation-induced gene (LRIGx) and study its function as well as its transcriptional changes after irradiation. Methods: Its cDNA was obtained by DDRT-PCR and RACE techniques. Northern blot hybridization was used to investigate the gene transcription. Bioinformatics was employed to analysis structure and function of this gene. Results: LRIGx cDNA was cloned. The sequence of LRIGx was identical to a DNA clone located in human chromosome 20 q 11.2-12 Bioinformatics analysis predicted an encoded protein with a conserved helicase domain. Northern analysis revealed a ∼8.5 kb transcript which was induced after 0.2 Gy as well as 0.02 Gy irradiation, and the transcript level was increased 5 times at 4 h after 0.2 Gy irradiation. The induced level of LRIGx transcript by 2.0 Gy high dose was lower than by 0.2 Gy. Conclusion: A novel low dose radiation-induced gene has been cloned. It encodes a protein with a conserved helicase domain that could involve in DNA metabolism in the cellular process of radiation response

  9. YB-1 gene expression is kept constant during myocyte differentiation through replacement of different transcription factors and then falls gradually under the control of neural activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Shunsuke; Tanaka, Toru; Moue, Masamitsu; Ohashi, Sachiyo; Nishikawa, Taishi

    2015-11-01

    We have previously reported that translation of acetylcholine receptor α-subunit (AChR α) mRNA in skeletal muscle cells is regulated by Y-box binding protein 1 (YB-1) in response to neural activity, and that in the postnatal mouse developmental changes in the amount of YB-1 mRNA are similar to those of AChR α mRNA, which is known to be regulated by myogenic transcription factors. Here, we examined transcriptional regulation of the YB-1 gene in mouse skeletal muscle and differentiating C2C12 myocytes. Although neither YB-1 nor AChR α was detected at either the mRNA or protein level in adult hind limb muscle, YB-1 expression was transiently activated in response to denervation of the sciatic nerve and completely paralleled that of AChR α, suggesting that these genes are regulated by the same transcription factors. However, during differentiation of C2C12 cells to myotubes, the level of YB-1 remained constant even though the level of AChR α increased markedly. Reporter gene, gel mobility shift and ChIP assays revealed that in the initial stage of myocyte differentiation, transcription of the YB-1 gene was regulated by E2F1 and Sp1, and was then gradually replaced under the control of both MyoD and myogenin through an E-box sequence in the proximal region of the YB-1 gene promoter. These results suggest that transcription factors for the YB-1 gene are exchanged during skeletal muscle cell differentiation, perhaps playing a role in translational control of mRNAs by YB-1 in both myotube formation and the response of skeletal muscle tissues to neural stimulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The Pseudomonas transcriptional regulator AlgR controls LipA expression via the noncoding RNA RsmZ in Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Menggang; Yan, Jinyong; Yan, Yunjun

    2017-05-20

    Pseudomonas lipases are well studied enzymes. However, few studies have been conducted to explore the mechanism underlying the regulation of lipases expression. AlgR, a global regulator, controls the expression of multiple genes, regulates bacterial peristalsis, and participates in the regulation of quorum-sensing (QS) system, and so on. In this study, the effect of AlgR on lipase expression was investigated by knocking out the algR and rsmZ genes or overexpressing them. It is found out that AlgR can regulate the expression of lipA at both transcriptional and translational levels, but the transcriptional level was dominant. AlgR is also able to regulate the expression of rsmX/rsmY/rsmZ. Additionally, using algR/rsmZ double gene knock-out, it showed that AlgR could directly bind to the promoter sequence of rsmZ to regulate lipA activity. In conclusion, this study for the first time indicates that AlgR directly binds to rsmZ to regulates the expression of lipA via regulating transcription of rsmZ, and mainly regulates the expression of lipA at transcriptional level in P. protegens Pf-5. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The bHLH Factors Extramacrochaetae and Daughterless Control Cell Cycle in Drosophila Imaginal Discs through the Transcriptional Regulation of the cdc25 Phosphatase string

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade-Zapata, Irene; Baonza, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    One of the major issues in developmental biology is about having a better understanding of the mechanisms that regulate organ growth. Identifying these mechanisms is essential to understand the development processes that occur both in physiological and pathological conditions, such as cancer. The E protein family of basic helix-loop helix (bHLH) transcription factors, and their inhibitors the Id proteins, regulate cell proliferation in metazoans. This notion is further supported because the activity of these factors is frequently deregulated in cancerous cells. The E protein orthologue Daughterless (Da) and the Id orthologue Extramacrochaetae (Emc) are the only members of these classes of bHLH proteins in Drosophila. Although these factors are involved in controlling proliferation, the mechanism underlying this regulatory activity is poorly understood. Through a genetic analysis, we show that during the development of epithelial cells in the imaginal discs, the G2/M transition, and hence cell proliferation, is controlled by Emc via Da. In eukaryotic cells, the main activator of this transition is the Cdc25 phosphatase, string. Our genetic analyses reveal that the ectopic expression of string in cells with reduced levels of Emc or high levels of Da is sufficient to rescue the proliferative defects seen in these mutant cells. Moreover, we present evidence demonstrating a role of Da as a transcriptional repressor of string. Taken together, these findings define a mechanism through which Emc controls cell proliferation by regulating the activity of Da, which transcriptionally represses string. PMID:24651265

  12. Targeted Recruitment of the Basal Transcriptional Machinery by LNK Clock Components Controls the Circadian Rhythms of Nascent RNAs in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuan; Gil, Sergio; Grasser, Klaus D; Mas, Paloma

    2018-04-04

    The rhythms of steady-state mRNA expression pervade nearly all circadian systems. However, the mechanisms behind the rhythmic transcriptional synthesis and its correlation with circadian expression remain fully unexplored, particularly in plants. Here, we discovered a multi-functional protein complex that orchestrates the rhythms of transcriptional activity in Arabidopsis thaliana. The expression of the circadian oscillator genes TOC1 (TIMING OF CAB EXPRESSION1/PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATOR1) and PRR5 (PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATOR5) initially relies on the modular function of the clock-related factor RVE8: its MYB domain provides the DNA binding specificity, while its LCL domain recruits the clock components, LNKs, to target promoters. LNKs, in turn, specifically interact with RNA Polymerase II and the transcript elongation FACT complex to rhythmically co-occupy the target loci. The functional interaction of these components is central for chromatin status, transcript initiation and elongation, as well as proper rhythms in nascent RNAs. Our findings thus explain how genome readout of environmental information ultimately results in rhythmic changes of gene expression. © 2018 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  13. Proteasome-dependent degradation of transcription factor activating enhancer-binding protein 4 (TFAP4) controls mitotic division

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'Annibale, Sara; Kim, Jihoon; Magliozzi, Roberto; Low, Teck Yew; Mohammed, Shabaz; Heck, Albert J R; Guardavaccaro, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    TFAP4, a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that regulates the expression of a multitude of genes involved in the regulation of cellular proliferation, stemness, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition, is up-regulated in colorectal cancer and a number of other human malignancies. We have

  14. Sporozoite Route of Infection Influences In Vitro var Gene Transcription of Plasmodium falciparum Parasites From Controlled Human Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimonte, Sandra; Bruske, Ellen I; Hass, Johanna; Supan, Christian; Salazar, Carmen L; Held, Jana; Tschan, Serena; Esen, Meral; Flötenmeyer, Matthias; Koch, Iris; Berger, Jürgen; Bachmann, Anna; Sim, Betty K L; Hoffman, Stephen L; Kremsner, Peter G; Mordmüller, Benjamin; Frank, Matthias

    2016-09-15

    Antigenic variation in Plasmodium falciparum is mediated by the multicopy var gene family. Each parasite possesses about 60 var genes, and switching between active var loci results in antigenic variation. In the current study, the effect of mosquito and host passage on in vitro var gene transcription was investigated. Thirty malaria-naive individuals were inoculated by intradermal or intravenous injection with cryopreserved, isogenic NF54 P. falciparum sporozoites (PfSPZ) generated from 1 premosquito culture. Microscopic parasitemia developed in 22 individuals, and 21 in vitro cultures were established. The var gene transcript levels were determined in early and late postpatient cultures and in the premosquito culture. At the early time point, all cultures preferentially transcribed 8 subtelomeric var genes. Intradermal infections had higher var gene transcript levels than intravenous infections and a significantly longer intrahost replication time (P = .03). At the late time point, 9 subtelomeric and 8 central var genes were transcribed at the same levels in almost all cultures. Premosquito and late postpatient cultures transcribed the same subtelomeric and central var genes, except for var2csa  The duration of intrahost replication influences in vitro var gene transcript patterns. Differences between premosquito and postpatient cultures decrease with prolonged in vitro growth. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Transcription factor 19 interacts with histone 3 lysine 4 trimethylation and controls gluconeogenesis via the nucleosome-remodeling-deacetylase complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Sabyasachi; Sanyal, Sulagna; Srivastava, Dushyant Kumar; Dasgupta, Dipak; Roy, Siddhartha; Das, Chandrima

    2017-12-15

    Transcription factor 19 (TCF19) has been reported as a type 1 diabetes-associated locus involved in maintenance of pancreatic β cells through a fine-tuned regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis. TCF19 also exhibits genomic association with type 2 diabetes, although the precise molecular mechanism remains unknown. It harbors both a plant homeodomain and a forkhead-associated domain implicated in epigenetic recognition and gene regulation, a phenomenon that has remained unexplored. Here, we show that TCF19 selectively interacts with histone 3 lysine 4 trimethylation through its plant homeodomain finger. Knocking down TCF19 under high-glucose conditions affected many metabolic processes, including gluconeogenesis. We found that TCF19 overexpression represses de novo glucose production in HepG2 cells. The transcriptional repression of key genes, induced by TCF19, coincided with NuRD (nucleosome-remodeling-deacetylase) complex recruitment to the promoters of these genes. TCF19 interacted with CHD4 (chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 4), which is a part of the NuRD complex, in a glucose concentration-independent manner. In summary, our results show that TCF19 interacts with an active transcription mark and recruits a co-repressor complex to regulate gluconeogenic gene expression in HepG2 cells. Our study offers critical insights into the molecular mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of gluconeogenesis and into the roles of chromatin readers in metabolic homeostasis. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. FoxO3a transcriptional regulation of Bim controls apoptosis in paclitaxel-treated breast cancer cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sunters, A.; Fernandez de Mattos, S.; Stahl, M.; Brosens, J.J.; Zoumpoulidou, G.; Saunders, C.A.; Coffer, P.J.; Medema, R.H.; Coombes, R.C.; Lam, E.W.-F.

    2003-01-01

    Paclitaxel is used to treat breast cancers, but the mechanisms by which it induces apoptosis are poorly understood. Consequently, we have studied the role of the FoxO transcription factors in determining cellular response to paclitaxel. Western blotting revealed that in a panel of nine breast cancer

  17. FoxO3a transcriptional regulation of bim controls apoptosis in paclitaxel-treated breast cancer cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sunters, A; de Mattos, SF; Stahl, M; Brosens, JJ; Zoumpoulidou, G; Saunders, CA; Coffer, PJ; Medema, RH; Coombes, RC; Lam, EWF

    2003-01-01

    Paclitaxel is used to treat breast cancers, but the mechanisms by which it induces apoptosis are poorly understood. Consequently, we have studied the role of the FoxO transcription factors in determining cellular response to paclitaxel. Western blotting revealed that in a panel of nine breast cancer

  18. Deciphering Transcriptional Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valen, Eivind

    RNA); and ii) translation, in which the mRNA is translated into a protein. This thesis focus on the ¿rst of these steps, transcription, and speci¿cally the initiation of this. Simpli¿ed, initiation is preceded by the binding of several proteins, known as transcription factors (TFs), to DNA. This takes place...... published providing an unbiased overview of the transcription start site (TSS) usage in a tissue. We have paired this method with high-throughput sequencing technology to produce a library of unprecedented depth (DeepCAGE) for the mouse hippocampus. We investigated this in detail and focused particularly...... control spanning the range from completely muted to cranked up to maximum. The volume, in this case, is the production rate of proteins. This production is the result of a two step procedure: i) transcription, in which a small part of DNA from the genome (a gene) is transcribed into an RNA molecule (an m...

  19. Control of gene expression during T cell activation: alternate regulation of mRNA transcription and mRNA stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorospe Myriam

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray technology has become highly valuable for identifying complex global changes in gene expression patterns. The effective correlation of observed changes in gene expression with shared transcription regulatory elements remains difficult to demonstrate convincingly. One reason for this difficulty may result from the intricate convergence of both transcriptional and mRNA turnover events which, together, directly influence steady-state mRNA levels. Results In order to investigate the relative contribution of gene transcription and changes in mRNA stability regulation to standard analyses of gene expression, we used two distinct microarray methods which individually measure nuclear gene transcription and changes in polyA mRNA gene expression. Gene expression profiles were obtained from both polyA mRNA (whole-cell and nuclear run-on (newly transcribed RNA across a time course of one hour following the activation of human Jurkat T cells with PMA plus ionomycin. Comparative analysis revealed that regulation of mRNA stability may account for as much as 50% of all measurements of changes in polyA mRNA in this system, as inferred by the absence of any corresponding regulation of nuclear gene transcription activity for these groups of genes. Genes which displayed dramatic elevations in both mRNA and nuclear run-on RNA were shown to be inhibited by Actinomycin D (ActD pre-treatment of cells while large numbers of genes regulated only through altered mRNA turnover (both up and down were ActD-resistant. Consistent patterns across the time course were observed for both transcribed and stability-regulated genes. Conclusion We propose that regulation of mRNA stability contributes significantly to the observed changes in gene expression in response to external stimuli, as measured by high throughput systems.

  20. The transcriptional regulators Id2 and Id3 control the formation of distinct memory CD8+ T cell subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cliff Y; Best, J Adam; Knell, Jamie; Yang, Edward; Sheridan, Alison D; Jesionek, Adam K; Li, Haiyan S; Rivera, Richard R; Lind, Kristin Camfield; D'Cruz, Louise M; Watowich, Stephanie S; Murre, Cornelis; Goldrath, Ananda W

    2011-11-06

    During infection, naive CD8(+) T cells differentiate into effector cells, which are armed to eliminate pathogens, and memory cells, which are poised to protect against reinfection. The transcriptional program that regulates terminal differentiation into short-lived effector-memory versus long-lived memory cells is not clearly defined. Through the use of mice expressing reporters for the DNA-binding inhibitors Id2 and Id3, we identified Id3(hi) precursors of long-lived memory cells before the peak of T cell population expansion or upregulation of cell-surface receptors that indicate memory potential. Deficiency in Id2 or Id3 resulted in loss of distinct CD8(+) effector and memory populations, which demonstrated unique roles for these inhibitors of E-protein transcription factors. Furthermore, cytokines altered the expression of Id2 and Id3 differently, which provides insight into how external cues influence gene expression.

  1. Unusual proliferation arrest and transcriptional control properties of a newly discovered E2F family member, E2F-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaubatz, S; Wood, J G; Livingston, D M

    1998-08-04

    E2F transcription factors play an important role in the regulation of cell cycle progression. We report here the cloning and characterization of an additional member of this family, E2F-6. E2F-6 lacks pocket protein binding and transactivation domains, and it is a potent transcriptional repressor that contains a modular repression domain at its carboxyl terminus. Overproduction of E2F-6 had no specific effect on cell cycle progression in asynchronously growing Saos2 and NIH 3T3 cells, but it inhibited entry into S phase of NIH 3T3 cells stimulated to exit G0. Taken together, these data suggest that E2F-6 can regulate a subset of E2F-dependent genes whose products are required for entry into the cell cycle but not for normal cell cycle progression.

  2. Leptin-induced mTOR activation defines a specific molecular and transcriptional signature controlling CD4+ effector T cell responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Procaccini, Claudio; De Rosa, Veronica; Galgani, Mario

    2012-01-01

    The sensing by T cells of metabolic and energetic changes in the microenvironment can determine the differentiation, maturation, and activation of these cells. Although it is known that mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) gauges nutritonal and energetic signals in the extracellular milieu......, it is not known how mTOR and metabolism influence CD4+CD25-FOXP3- effector T cell (Teff) responses. In this article, we show that leptin-induced activation of mTOR, which, in turn, controls leptin production and signaling, causes a defined cellular, biochemical, and transcriptional signature that determine...... the outcome of Teff responses, both in vitro and in vivo. The blockade of leptin/leptin receptor signaling, induced by genetic means or by starvation, leads to impaired mTOR activity that inhibits the proliferation of Teffs in vivo. Notably, the transcriptional signature of Teffs in the presence of leptin...

  3. Fkh1 and Fkh2 associate with Sir2 to control CLB2 transcription under normal and oxidative stress conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eLinke

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The Forkhead box family of transcription factors is evolutionary conserved from yeast to higher eukaryotes and its members are involved in many physiological processes including metabolism, DNA repair, cell cycle, stress resistance, apoptosis and aging. In budding yeast, four Forkhead transcription factors were identified, namely Fkh1, Fkh2, Fhl1, and Hcm1, which are implicated in chromatin silencing, cell cycle regulation and stress response. These factors impinge transcriptional regulation during cell cycle progression, and histone deacetylases play an essential role in this process, e.g. the nuclear localisation of Hcm1 depends on Sir2 activity, whereas Sin3/Rpd3 silence cell cycle specific gene transcription in G2/M phase. However, a direct involvement of Sir2 in Fkh1/Fkh2-dependent regulation of target genes is at present unknown. Here, we show that Fkh1 and Fkh2 associate with Sir2 in G1 and M phase, and that Fkh1/Fkh2-mediated activation of reporter genes is antagonized by Sir2. We further report that Sir2 overexpression strongly affects cell growth in an Fkh1/Fkh2-dependent manner. In addition, Sir2 regulates the expression of the mitotic cyclin Clb2 through Fkh1/Fkh2-mediated binding to the CLB2 promoter in G1 and M phase. We finally demonstrate that Sir2 is also enriched at the CLB2 promoter under stress conditions, and that the nuclear localization of Sir2 is dependent on Fkh1 and Fkh2. Taken together, our results show a functional interplay between Fkh1/Fkh2 and Sir2 suggesting a novel mechanism of cell cycle repression. Thus, in budding yeast, not only the regulation of G2/M gene expression but also the protective response against stress could be directly coordinated by Fkh1 and Fkh2.

  4. Active Center Control of Termination by RNA Polymerase III and tRNA Gene Transcription Levels In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshab Rijal

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The ability of RNA polymerase (RNAP III to efficiently recycle from termination to reinitiation is critical for abundant tRNA production during cellular proliferation, development and cancer. Yet understanding of the unique termination mechanisms used by RNAP III is incomplete, as is its link to high transcription output. We used two tRNA-mediated suppression systems to screen for Rpc1 mutants with gain- and loss- of termination phenotypes in S. pombe. 122 point mutation mutants were mapped to a recently solved 3.9 Å structure of yeast RNAP III elongation complex (EC; they cluster in the active center bridge helix and trigger loop, as well as the pore and funnel, the latter of which indicate involvement of the RNA cleavage domain of the C11 subunit in termination. Purified RNAP III from a readthrough (RT mutant exhibits increased elongation rate. The data strongly support a kinetic coupling model in which elongation rate is inversely related to termination efficiency. The mutants exhibit good correlations of terminator RT in vitro and in vivo, and surprisingly, amounts of transcription in vivo. Because assessing in vivo transcription can be confounded by various parameters, we used a tRNA reporter with a processing defect and a strong terminator. By ruling out differences in RNA decay rates, the data indicate that mutants with the RT phenotype synthesize more RNA than wild type cells, and than can be accounted for by their increased elongation rate. Finally, increased activity by the mutants appears unrelated to the RNAP III repressor, Maf1. The results show that the mobile elements of the RNAP III active center, including C11, are key determinants of termination, and that some of the mutations activate RNAP III for overall transcription. Similar mutations in spontaneous cancer suggest this as an unforeseen mechanism of RNAP III activation in disease.

  5. MYB3Rs, plant homologs of Myb oncoproteins, control cell cycle-regulated transcription and form DREAM-like complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Kobayashi, Kosuke; Suzuki, Toshiya; Iwata, Eriko; Magyar, Zoltán; Bögre, László; Ito, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    Plant MYB3R transcription factors, homologous to Myb oncoproteins, regulate the genes expressed at G2 and M phases in the cell cycle. Recent studies showed that MYB3Rs constitute multiprotein complexes that may correspond to animal complexes known as DREAM or dREAM. Discovery of the putative homologous complex in plants uncovered their significant varieties in structure, function, dynamics, and heterogeneity, providing insight into conserved and diversified aspects of cell cycle-regulated gen...

  6. The interface between transcriptional and epigenetic control of effector and memory CD8⁺ T-cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Simon M; Kaech, Susan M; Staron, Matthew M

    2014-09-01

    Immunity to many intracellular pathogens requires the proliferation, differentiation, and function of CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). While the majority of effector CTLs die upon clearance of the pathogen, a small proportion of them survive to become long-lived memory CTLs. Memory CTLs can provide protective immunity against re-exposure to the same pathogen and are the principle motivation behind T-cell- based vaccine design. While a large body of cellular immunologic research has proven invaluable to define effector and memory CTLs by their different phenotypes and functions, an emerging focus in the field has been to understand how environmental cues regulate CTL differentiation on a genomic level. Genome-wide studies to profile transcriptional and epigenetic changes during infection have revealed that dynamic changes in DNA methylation patterns and histone modifications accompany transcriptional signatures that define and regulate CTL differentiation states. In this review, we emphasize the importance of epigenetic regulation of CD8(+) T-cell differentiation and the likely role that transcription factors play in this process. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. The interface between transcriptional and epigenetic control of effector and memory CD8+ T-cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Simon M.; Kaech, Susan M.; Staron, Matthew M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Immunity to many intracellular pathogens requires the proliferation, differentiation, and function of CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). While the majority of effector CTLs die upon clearance of the pathogen, a small proportion of them survive to become long-lived memory CTLs. Memory CTLs can provide protective immunity against re-exposure to the same pathogen and are the principle motivation behind T-cell- based vaccine design. While a large body of cellular immunologic research has proven invaluable to define effector and memory CTLs by their different phenotypes and functions, an emerging focus in the field has been to understand how environmental cues regulate CTL differentiation on a genomic level. Genome-wide studies to profile transcriptional and epigenetic changes during infection have revealed that dynamic changes in DNA methylation patterns and histone modifications accompany transcriptional signatures that define and regulate CTL differentiation states. In this review, we emphasize the importance of epigenetic regulation of CD8+ T-cell differentiation and the likely role that transcription factors play in this process. PMID:25123283

  8. The transcription factor lymphoid enhancer factor 1 controls invariant natural killer T cell expansion and Th2-type effector differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Tiffany; Krishnamoorthy, Veena; Yu, Shuyang; Xue, Hai-Hui; Kee, Barbara L; Verykokakis, Mihalis

    2015-05-04

    Invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells) are innate-like T cells that rapidly produce cytokines that impact antimicrobial immune responses, asthma, and autoimmunity. These cells acquire multiple effector fates during their thymic development that parallel those of CD4(+) T helper cells. The number of Th2-type effector iNKT cells is variable in different strains of mice, and their number impacts CD8 T, dendritic, and B cell function. Here we demonstrate a unique function for the transcription factor lymphoid enhancer factor 1 (LEF1) in the postselection expansion of iNKT cells through a direct induction of the CD127 component of the receptor for interleukin-7 (IL-7) and the transcription factor c-myc. LEF1 also directly augments expression of the effector fate-specifying transcription factor GATA3, thus promoting the development of Th2-like effector iNKT cells that produce IL-4, including those that also produce interferon-γ. Our data reveal LEF1 as a central regulator of iNKT cell number and Th2-type effector differentiation. © 2015 Carr et al.

  9. Transcription Factors Oct-1 and GATA-3 Cooperatively Regulate Th2 Cytokine Gene Expression via the RHS5 within the Th2 Locus Control Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kiwan; Kim, Najung; Lee, Gap Ryol

    2016-01-01

    The T helper type 2 (Th2) locus control region (LCR) regulates Th2 cell differentiation. Several transcription factors bind to the LCR to modulate the expression of Th2 cytokine genes, but the molecular mechanisms behind Th2 cytokine gene regulation are incompletely understood. Here, we used database analysis and an oligonucleotide competition/electrophoretic mobility shift assays to search for transcription factors binding to RHS5, a DNase I hypersensitive site (DHS) within the Th2 LCR. Consequently, we demonstrated that GATA-binding protein-3 (GATA-3), E26 transformation-specific protein 1 (Ets-1), octamer transcription factor-1 (Oct-1), and Oct-2 selectively associate with RHS5. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation and luciferase reporter assays showed that Oct-1 and Oct-2 bound within the Il4 promoter region and the Th2 LCR, and that Oct-1 and GATA-3 or Oct-2 synergistically triggered the transactivational activity of the Il4 promoter through RHS5. These results suggest that Oct-1 and GATA-3/Oct-2 direct Th2 cytokine gene expression in a cooperative manner. PMID:26840450

  10. Negative transcriptional control of ERBB2 gene by MBP-1 and HDAC1: diagnostic implications in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contino, Flavia; Mazzarella, Claudia; Ferro, Arianna; Lo Presti, Mariavera; Roz, Elena; Lupo, Carmelo; Perconti, Giovanni; Giallongo, Agata; Feo, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    The human ERBB2 gene is frequently amplified in breast tumors, and its high expression is associated with poor prognosis. We previously reported a significant inverse correlation between Myc promoter-binding protein-1 (MBP-1) and ERBB2 expression in primary breast invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC). MBP-1 is a transcriptional repressor of the c-MYC gene that acts by binding to the P2 promoter; only one other direct target of MBP-1, the COX2 gene, has been identified so far. To gain new insights into the functional relationship linking MBP-1 and ERBB2 in breast cancer, we have investigated the effects of MBP-1 expression on endogenous ERBB2 transcript and protein levels, as well as on transcription promoter activity, by transient-transfection of SKBr3 cells. Reporter gene and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays were used to dissect the ERBB2 promoter and identify functional MBP-1 target sequences. We also investigated the relative expression of MBP-1 and HDAC1 in IDC and normal breast tissues by immunoblot analysis and immunohistochemistry. Transfection experiments and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays in SKBr3 cells indicated that MBP-1 negatively regulates the ERBB2 gene by binding to a genomic region between nucleotide −514 and −262 of the proximal promoter; consistent with this, a concomitant recruitment of HDAC1 and loss of acetylated histone H4 was observed. In addition, we found high expression of MBP-1 and HDAC1 in normal tissues and a statistically significant inverse correlation with ErbB2 expression in the paired tumor samples. Altogether, our in vitro and in vivo data indicate that the ERBB2 gene is a novel MBP-1 target, and immunohistochemistry analysis of primary tumors suggests that the concomitant high expression of MBP-1 and HDAC1 may be considered a diagnostic marker of cancer progression for breast IDC

  11. Transcriptional corepressors HIPK1 and HIPK2 control angiogenesis via TGF-β-TAK1-dependent mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulei Shang

    Full Text Available Several critical events dictate the successful establishment of nascent vasculature in yolk sac and in the developing embryos. These include aggregation of angioblasts to form the primitive vascular plexus, followed by the proliferation, differentiation, migration, and coalescence of endothelial cells. Although transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β is known to regulate various aspects of vascular development, the signaling mechanism of TGF-β remains unclear. Here we show that homeodomain interacting protein kinases, HIPK1 and HIPK2, are transcriptional corepressors that regulate TGF-β-dependent angiogenesis during embryonic development. Loss of HIPK1 and HIPK2 leads to marked up-regulations of several potent angiogenic genes, including Mmp10 and Vegf, which result in excessive endothelial proliferation and poor adherens junction formation. This robust phenotype can be recapitulated by siRNA knockdown of Hipk1 and Hipk2 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells, as well as in endothelial cell-specific TGF-β type II receptor (TβRII conditional mutants. The effects of HIPK proteins are mediated through its interaction with MEF2C, and this interaction can be further enhanced by TGF-β in a TAK1-dependent manner. Remarkably, TGF-β-TAK1 signaling activates HIPK2 by phosphorylating a highly conserved tyrosine residue Y-361 within the kinase domain. Point mutation in this tyrosine completely eliminates the effect of HIPK2 as a transcriptional corepressor in luciferase assays. Our results reveal a previously unrecognized role of HIPK proteins in connecting TGF-β signaling pathway with the transcriptional programs critical for angiogenesis in early embryonic development.

  12. Transcription of key genes regulating gonadal steroidogenesis in control and ketoconazole- or vinclozolin-exposed fathead minnows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villeneuve, Daniel L.; Blake, Lindsey S.; Brodin, Jeffrey; Greene, Katie J.; Knoebl, Iris; Miracle, Ann L.; Martinovic, Dalma; Ankley, Gerald T.

    2007-08-01

    This study evaluated changes in the expression of steroidogenesis-related genes in male fathead minnows exposed to ketoconazole (KTC) or vinclozolin (VZ) for 21 days. The aim was to evaluate links between molecular changes and higher level outcomes after exposure to endocrine-active chemicals (EACs) with different modes of action. To aid our analysis and interpretation of EAC-related effects, we first examined variation in the relative abundance of steroidogenesis-related gene transcripts in the gonads of male and female fathead minnows as a function of age, gonad development, and spawning status, independent of EAC exposure. Gonadal expression of several genes varied with age and/or gonadal somatic index in either males or females. However, with the exception of aromatase, steroidogenesis-related gene expression did not vary with spawning status. Following the baseline experiments, expression of the selected genes in male fathead minnows exposed to KTC or VZ was evaluated in the context of effects observed at higher levels of organization. Exposure to KTC elicited changes in gene transcription that were consistent with an apparent compensatory response to the chemical's anticipated direct inhibition of steroidogenic enzyme activity. Exposure to VZ, an antiandrogen expected to indirectly impact steroidogenesis, increased pituitary expression of follicle-stimulating hormone beta-subunit as well as testis expression of 20beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and luteinizing hormone receptor transcripts. Results of this study contribute to ongoing research aimed at understanding responses of the teleost hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis to different types of EACs and how changes in molecular endpoints translate into apical outcomes reflective of either adverse effect or compensation.

  13. SnoN/SKIL modulates proliferation through control of hsa-miR-720 transcription in esophageal cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinozuka, Eriko; Miyashita, Masao; Mizuguchi, Yoshiaki; Akagi, Ichiro; Kikuchi, Kunio; Makino, Hiroshi; Matsutani, Takeshi; Hagiwara, Nobutoshi; Nomura, Tsutomu; Uchida, Eiji; Takizawa, Toshihiro

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► SnoN modulated miR-720, miR-1274A, and miR-1274B expression levels in TE-1 cells. ► miR-720 and miR-1274A suppressed the expression of target proteins p63 and ADAM9. ► Silencing of SnoN significantly upregulated cell proliferation in TE-1 cells. ► Esophageal cancer tissues have lower SnoN expression levels than normal tissues. ► Esophageal cancer tissues have higher miR-720 expression levels than normal tissues. -- Abstract: It is now evident that changes in microRNA are involved in cancer progression, but the mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of miRNAs remain unknown. Ski-related novel gene (SnoN/SKIL), a transcription co-factor, acts as a potential key regulator within a complex network of p53 transcriptional repressors. SnoN has pro- and anti-oncogenic functions in the regulation of cell proliferation, senescence, apoptosis, and differentiation. We characterized the roles of SnoN in miRNA transcriptional regulation and its effects on cell proliferation using esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cells. Silencing of SnoN altered a set of miRNA expression profiles in TE-1cells, and the expression levels of miR-720, miR-1274A, and miR-1274B were modulated by SnoN. The expression of these miRNAs resulted in changes to the target protein p63 and a disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain 9 (ADAM9). Furthermore, silencing of SnoN significantly upregulated cell proliferation in TE-1 cells, indicating a potential anti-oncogenic function. These results support our observation that cancer tissues have lower expression levels of SnoN, miR-720, and miR-1274A compared to adjacent normal tissues from ESCC patients. These data demonstrate a novel mechanism of miRNA regulation, leading to changes in cell proliferation.

  14. ELT-2 Is the Predominant Transcription Factor Controlling Differentiation and Function of the C. elegans Intestine, from Embryo to Adult

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGhee, James D.; Fukushige, Tetsunari; Krause, Michael W.; Minnema, Stephanie E.; Goszczynski, Barbara; Gaudet, Jeb; Kohara, Yuji; Bossinger, Olaf; Zhao, Yongjun; Khattra, Jaswinder; Hirst, Martin; Jones, Steven J.M.; Marra, Marco A.; Ruzanov, Peter; Warner, Adam; Zapf, Richard; Moerman, Donald G.; Kalb, John M.

    2009-01-01

    Starting with SAGE-libraries prepared from C. elegans FAC-sorted embryonic intestine cells (8E-16E cell stage), from total embryos and from purified oocytes, and taking advantage of the NextDB in situ hybridization data base, we define sets of genes highly expressed from the zygotic genome, and expressed either exclusively or preferentially in the embryonic intestine or in the intestine of newly hatched larvae; we had previously defined a similarly expressed set of genes from the adult intestine. We show that an extended TGATAA-like sequence is essentially the only candidate for a cis-acting regulatory motif common to intestine genes expressed at all stages. This sequence is a strong ELT-2 binding site and matches the sequence of GATA-like sites found to be important for the expression of every intestinal gene so far analyzed experimentally. We show that the majority of these three sets of highly expressed intestinal-specific/intestinal-enriched genes respond strongly to ectopic expression of ELT-2 within the embryo. By flow-sorting elt-2(null) larvae from elt-2(+) larvae and then preparing Solexa/Illumina-SAGE libraries, we show that the majority of these genes also respond strongly to loss-of-function of ELT-2. To test the consequences of loss of other transcription factors identified in the embryonic intestine, we develop a strain of worms that is RNAi-sensitive only in the intestine; however, we are unable (with one possible exception) to identify any other transcription factor whose intestinal loss-of-function causes a phenotype of comparable severity to the phenotype caused by loss of ELT-2. Overall, our results support a model in which ELT-2 is the predominant transcription factor in the post-specification C. elegans intestine and participates directly in the transcriptional regulation of the majority (> 80%) of intestinal genes. We present evidence that ELT-2 plays a central role in most aspects of C. elegans intestinal physiology: establishing the

  15. Transcription Factor Bcl11b Controls Effector and Memory CD8 T cell Fate Decision and Function During Poxvirus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges Abboud

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available CD8+ T cells play an important role in host resistance to many viral infections, but the underlying transcriptional mechanisms governing their differentiation and functionality remain poorly defined. By using a highly virulent systemic and respiratory poxvirus infection in mice, we show that the transcription factor Bcl11b provides a dual trigger that sustains the clonal expansion of virus-specific effector CD8+ T cells, while simultaneously suppressing the expression of surface markers associated with short-lived effector cell (SLEC differentiation. Additionally, we demonstrate that Bcl11b supports the acquisition of memory precursor effector cell (MPEC phenotype, and thus its absence causes near complete loss of lymphoid and lung-resident memory cells. Interestingly, despite having normal levels of T-bet and Eomesodermin, Bcl11b-deficient CD8+ T cells failed to execute effector differentiation needed for anti-viral cytokine production and degranulation, suggesting a non-redundant role of Bcl11b in regulation of this program. Thus, Bcl11b is a critical player in fate decision of SLECs and MPECs, as well as effector function and memory formation.

  16. Evolutionarily conserved transcription factor Apontic controls the G1/S progression by inducing cyclin e during eye development

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Qingxin

    2014-06-16

    During Drosophila eye development, differentiation initiates in the posterior region of the eye disk and progresses anteriorly as a wave marked by the morphogenetic furrow (MF), which demarcates the boundary between anterior undifferentiated cells and posterior differentiated photoreceptors. However, the mechanism underlying the regulation of gene expression immediately before the onset of differentiation remains unclear. Here, we show that Apontic (Apt), which is an evolutionarily conserved transcription factor, is expressed in the differentiating cells posterior to the MF. Moreover, it directly induces the expression of cyclin E and is also required for the G1-to-S phase transition, which is known to be essential for the initiation of cell differentiation at the MF. These observations identify a pathway crucial for eye development, governed by a mechanism in which Cyclin E promotes the G1-to-S phase transition when regulated by Apt.

  17. Environmental sensing by mature B cells is controlled by the transcription factors PU.1 and SpiB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Simon N; Tellier, Julie; Liao, Yang; Trezise, Stephanie; Light, Amanda; O'Donnell, Kristy; Garrett-Sinha, Lee Ann; Shi, Wei; Tarlinton, David M; Nutt, Stephen L

    2017-11-10

    Humoral immunity requires B cells to respond to multiple stimuli, including antigen, membrane and soluble ligands, and microbial products. Ets family transcription factors regulate many aspects of haematopoiesis, although their functions in humoral immunity are difficult to decipher as a result of redundancy between the family members. Here we show that mice lacking both PU.1 and SpiB in mature B cells do not generate germinal centers and high-affinity antibody after protein immunization. PU.1 and SpiB double-deficient B cells have a survival defect after engagement of CD40 or Toll-like receptors (TLR), despite paradoxically enhanced plasma cell differentiation. PU.1 and SpiB regulate the expression of many components of the B cell receptor signaling pathway and the receptors for CD40L, BAFF and TLR ligands. Thus, PU.1 and SpiB enable B cells to appropriately respond to environmental cues.

  18. Regulation of acetate metabolism in Corynebacterium glutamicum: transcriptional control of the isocitrate lyase and malate synthase genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendisch, V F; Spies, M; Reinscheid, D J; Schnicke, S; Sahm, H; Eikmanns, B J

    1997-10-01

    In the amino-acid-producing microorganism Corynebacterium glutamicum, the specific activities of the acetate-activating enzymes acetate kinase and phosphotransacetylase and those of the glyoxylate cycle enzymes isocitrate lyase and malate synthase were found to be high when the cells were grown on acetate (0.8, 2.9, 2.1, and 1.8 U/mg protein, respectively). When the cells were grown on glucose or on other carbon sources such as lactate, succinate, or glutamate, the specific activities were two- to fourfold (acetate kinase and phosphotransacetylase) and 45- to 100-fold (isocitrate lyase and malate synthase) lower, indicating that the synthesis of the four enzymes is regulated by acetate in the growth medium. A comparative Northern (RNA) analysis of the C. glutamicum isocitrate lyase and malate synthase genes (aceA and aceB) and transcriptional cat fusion experiments revealed that aceA and aceB are transcribed as 1.6- and 2.7-kb monocistronic messages, respectively, and that the regulation of isocitrate lyase and malate synthase synthesis is exerted at the level of transcription from the respective promoters. Surprisingly, C. glutamicum mutants defective in either acetate kinase or phosphotransacetylase showed low specific activities of the other three enzymes (phosphotransacetylase, isocitrate lyase, and malate synthase or acetate kinase, isocitrate lyase, and malate synthase, respectively) irrespective of the presence or absence of acetate in the medium. This result and a correlation of a high intracellular acetyl coenzyme A concentration with high specific activities of isocitrate lyase, malate synthase, acetate kinase, and phosphotransacetylase suggest that acetyl coenzyme A or a derivative thereof may be a physiological trigger for the genetic regulation of enzymes involved in acetate metabolism of C. glutamicum.

  19. CYCLING DOF FACTOR 1 represses transcription through the TOPLESS co-repressor to control photoperiodic flowering in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goralogia, Greg S; Liu, Tong-Kun; Zhao, Lin; Panipinto, Paul M; Groover, Evan D; Bains, Yashkarn S; Imaizumi, Takato

    2017-10-01

    CYCLING DOF FACTOR 1 (CDF1) and its homologs play an important role in the floral transition by repressing the expression of floral activator genes such as CONSTANS (CO) and FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) in Arabidopsis. The day-length-specific removal of CDF1-dependent repression is a critical mechanism in photoperiodic flowering. However, the mechanism by which CDF1 represses CO and FT transcription remained elusive. Here we demonstrate that Arabidopsis CDF proteins contain non-EAR motif-like conserved domains required for interaction with the TOPLESS (TPL) co-repressor protein. This TPL interaction confers a repressive function on CDF1, as mutations of the N-terminal TPL binding domain largely impair the ability of CDF1 protein to repress its targets. TPL proteins are present on specific regions of the CO and FT promoters where CDF1 binds during the morning. In addition, TPL binding increases when CDF1 expression is elevated, suggesting that TPL is recruited to these promoters in a time-dependent fashion by CDFs. Moreover, reduction of TPL activity induced by expressing a dominant negative version of TPL (tpl-1) in phloem companion cells results in early flowering and a decreased sensitivity to photoperiod in a manner similar to a cdf loss-of-function mutant. Our results indicate that the mechanism of CDF1 repression is through the formation of a CDF-TPL transcriptional complex, which reduces the expression levels of CO and FT during the morning for seasonal flowering. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Control of lipid metabolism by phosphorylation-dependent degradation of the SREBP family of transcription factors by SCF(Fbw7).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundqvist, Anders; Bengoechea-Alonso, Maria T; Ye, Xin; Lukiyanchuk, Vasyl; Jin, Jianping; Harper, J Wade; Ericsson, Johan

    2005-06-01

    The sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) family of transcription factors controls cholesterol and lipid metabolism. The nuclear forms of these proteins are rapidly degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, but the signals and factors required for this are unknown. Here, we identify a phosphodegron in SREBP1a that serves as a recognition motif for the SCF(Fbw7) ubiquitin ligase. Fbw7 interacts with nuclear SREBP1a and enhances its ubiquitination and degradation in a manner dependent on the phosphorylation of T426 and S430 by GSK-3. Fbw7 also degrades nuclear SREBP1c and SREBP2, and inactivation of endogenous Fbw7 results in stabilization of nuclear SREBP1 and -2, enhanced expression of SREBP target genes, enhanced synthesis of cholesterol and fatty acids, and enhanced receptor-mediated uptake of LDL. Thus, our results suggest that Fbw7 may be a major regulator of lipid metabolism through control of the phosphorylation-dependent degradation of the SREBP family of transcription factors.

  1. The transcription factors Tbx18 and Wt1 control the epicardial epithelial-mesenchymal transition through bi-directional regulation of Slug in murine primary epicardial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makiko Takeichi

    Full Text Available During cardiac development, a subpopulation of epicardial cells migrates into the heart as part of the epicardial epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT and differentiates into smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts. However, the roles of transcription factors in the epicardial EMT are poorly understood. Here, we show that two transcription factors expressed in the developing epicardium, T-box18 (Tbx18 and Wilms' tumor 1 homolog (Wt1, bi-directionally control the epicardial EMT through their effects on Slug expression in murine primary epicardial cells. Knockdown of Wt1 induced the epicardial EMT, which was accompanied by an increase in the migration and expression of N-cadherin and a decrease in the expression of ZO-1 as an epithelial marker. By contrast, knockdown of Tbx18 inhibited the mesenchymal transition induced by TGFβ1 treatment and Wt1 knockdown. The expression of Slug but not Snail decreased as a result of Tbx18 knockdown, but Slug expression increased following knockdown of Wt1. Knockdown of Slug also attenuated the epicardial EMT induced by TGFβ1 treatment and Wt1 knockdown. Furthermore, in normal murine mammary gland-C7 (NMuMG-C7 cells, Tbx18 acted to increase Slug expression, while Wt1 acted to decrease Slug expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and promoter assay revealed that Tbx18 and Wt1 directly bound to the Slug promoter region and regulated Slug expression. These results provide new insights into the regulatory mechanisms that control the epicardial EMT.

  2. The transcription factors Tbx18 and Wt1 control the epicardial epithelial-mesenchymal transition through bi-directional regulation of Slug in murine primary epicardial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeichi, Makiko; Nimura, Keisuke; Mori, Masaki; Nakagami, Hironori; Kaneda, Yasufumi

    2013-01-01

    During cardiac development, a subpopulation of epicardial cells migrates into the heart as part of the epicardial epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and differentiates into smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts. However, the roles of transcription factors in the epicardial EMT are poorly understood. Here, we show that two transcription factors expressed in the developing epicardium, T-box18 (Tbx18) and Wilms' tumor 1 homolog (Wt1), bi-directionally control the epicardial EMT through their effects on Slug expression in murine primary epicardial cells. Knockdown of Wt1 induced the epicardial EMT, which was accompanied by an increase in the migration and expression of N-cadherin and a decrease in the expression of ZO-1 as an epithelial marker. By contrast, knockdown of Tbx18 inhibited the mesenchymal transition induced by TGFβ1 treatment and Wt1 knockdown. The expression of Slug but not Snail decreased as a result of Tbx18 knockdown, but Slug expression increased following knockdown of Wt1. Knockdown of Slug also attenuated the epicardial EMT induced by TGFβ1 treatment and Wt1 knockdown. Furthermore, in normal murine mammary gland-C7 (NMuMG-C7) cells, Tbx18 acted to increase Slug expression, while Wt1 acted to decrease Slug expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and promoter assay revealed that Tbx18 and Wt1 directly bound to the Slug promoter region and regulated Slug expression. These results provide new insights into the regulatory mechanisms that control the epicardial EMT.

  3. Post-Transcriptional Control of Type I Interferon Induction by Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus in Its Natural Host Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuqing Wang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV is not only a poor inducer of type I interferon but also inhibits the efficient induction of type I interferon by porcine transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV and synthetic dsRNA molecules, Poly I:C. However, the mechanistic basis by which PRRSV interferes with the induction of type I interferon in its natural host cells remains less well defined. The purposes of this review are to summarize the key findings in supporting the post-transcriptional control of type I interferon in its natural host cells and to propose the possible role of translational control in the regulation of type I interferon induction by PRRSV.

  4. The Polycistronic miR166k-166h Positively Regulates Rice Immunity via Post-transcriptional Control of EIN2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Salvador-Guirao

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small RNAs acting as regulators of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. In plants, most miRNAs are generated from independent transcriptional units, and only a few polycistronic miRNAs have been described. miR166 is a conserved miRNA in plants targeting the HD-ZIP III transcription factor genes. Here, we show that a polycistronic miRNA comprising two miR166 family members, miR166k and miR166h, functions as a positive regulator of rice immunity. Rice plants with activated MIR166k-166h expression showed enhanced resistance to infection by the fungal pathogens Magnaporthe oryzae and Fusarium fujikuroi, the causal agents of the rice blast and bakanae disease, respectively. Disease resistance in rice plants with activated MIR166k-166h expression was associated with a stronger expression of defense responses during pathogen infection. Stronger induction of MIR166k-166h expression occurred in resistant but not susceptible rice cultivars. Notably, the ethylene-insensitive 2 (EIN2 gene was identified as a novel target gene for miR166k. The regulatory role of the miR166h-166k polycistron on the newly identified target gene results from the activity of the miR166k-5p specie generated from the miR166k-166h precursor. Collectively, our findings support a role for miR166k-5p in rice immunity by controlling EIN2 expression. Because rice blast is one of the most destructive diseases of cultivated rice worldwide, unraveling miR166k-166h-mediated mechanisms underlying blast resistance could ultimately help in designing appropriate strategies for rice protection.

  5. The transcription factor Jdp2 controls bone homeostasis and antibacterial immunity by regulating osteoclast and neutrophil differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Kenta; Fukasaka, Masahiro; Vandenbon, Alexis; Saitoh, Tatsuya; Kawasaki, Takumi; Kondo, Takeshi; Yokoyama, Kazunari K; Kidoya, Hiroyasu; Takakura, Nobuyuki; Standley, Daron; Takeuchi, Osamu; Akira, Shizuo

    2012-12-14

    Jdp2 is an AP-1 family transcription factor that regulates the epigenetic status of histones. Previous in vitro studies revealed that Jdp2 is involved in osteoclastogenesis. However, the roles of Jdp2 in vivo and its pleiotropic functions are largely unknown. Here we generated Jdp2(-/-) mice and discovered its crucial roles not only in bone metabolism but also in differentiation of neutrophils. Jdp2(-/-) mice exhibited osteopetrosis resulting from impaired osteoclastogenesis. Jdp2(-/-) neutrophils were morphologically normal but had impaired surface expression of Ly6G, bactericidal function, and apoptosis. We also found that ATF3 was an inhibitor of neutrophil differentiation and that Jdp2 directly suppresses its expression via inhibition of histone acetylation. Strikingly, Jdp2(-/-) mice were highly susceptible to Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans infection. Thus, Jdp2 plays pivotal roles in in vivo bone homeostasis and host defense by regulating osteoclast and neutrophil differentiation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Retinoic Acid Receptors Control Spermatogonia Cell-Fate and Induce Expression of the SALL4A Transcription Factor.

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    Aurore Gely-Pernot

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA is instrumental to male germ cell differentiation, but its mechanism of action remains elusive. To address this question, we have analyzed the phenotypes of mice lacking, in spermatogonia, all rexinoid receptors (RXRA, RXRB and RXRG or all ATRA receptors (RARA, RARB and RARG. We demonstrate that the combined ablation of RXRA and RXRB in spermatogonia recapitulates the set of defects observed both upon ablation of RAR in spermatogonia. We also show that ATRA activates RAR and RXR bound to a conserved regulatory region to increase expression of the SALL4A transcription factor in spermatogonia. Our results reveal that this major pluripotency gene is a target of ATRA signaling and that RAR/RXR heterodimers are the functional units driving its expression in spermatogonia. They add to the mechanisms through which ATRA promote expression of the KIT tyrosine kinase receptor to trigger a critical step in spermatogonia differentiation. Importantly, they indicate also that meiosis eventually occurs in the absence of a RAR/RXR pathway within germ cells and suggest that instructing this process is either ATRA-independent or requires an ATRA signal originating from Sertoli cells.

  7. Initiation and beyond: molecular determinants of gene regulation. Mechanisms of Transcription Control, A Jacques Monod Conference, sponsored by the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Roscoff, France, September 30-October 4, 1991.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umek, R M

    1992-03-01

    The study of the mechanisms of transcriptional control continues to be an exciting area of research. The characterization of the constituents of the initiation complex and their interactions are leading to a greater understanding of gene regulation. The findings presented at this meeting emphasized the need to understand these interactions in three-dimensional space to effectively account for the observed regulation of the initiation of transcription.

  8. Dynamic transcriptional control of macrophage miRNA signature via inflammation responsive enhancers revealed using a combination of next generation sequencing-based approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czimmerer, Zsolt; Horvath, Attila; Daniel, Bence; Nagy, Gergely; Cuaranta-Monroy, Ixchelt; Kiss, Mate; Kolostyak, Zsuzsanna; Poliska, Szilard; Steiner, Laszlo; Giannakis, Nikolas; Varga, Tamas; Nagy, Laszlo

    2018-01-01

    MicroRNAs are important components of the post-transcriptional fine-tuning of macrophage gene expression in physiological and pathological conditions. However, the mechanistic underpinnings and the cis-acting genomic factors of how macrophage polarizing signals induce miRNA expression changes are not well characterized. Therefore, we systematically evaluated the transcriptional basis underlying the inflammation-mediated regulation of macrophage microRNome using the combination of different next generation sequencing datasets. We investigated the LPS-induced expression changes at mature miRNA and pri-miRNA levels in mouse macrophages utilizing a small RNA-seq method and publicly available GRO-seq dataset, respectively. Next, we identified an enhancer set associated with LPS-responsive pri-miRNAs based on publicly available H3K4 mono-methylation-specific ChIP-seq and GRO-seq datasets. This enhancer set was further characterized by the combination of publicly available ChIP and ATAC-seq datasets. Finally, direct interactions between the miR-155-coding genomic region and its distal regulatory elements were identified using a 3C-seq approach. Our analysis revealed 15 robustly LPS-regulated miRNAs at the transcriptional level. In addition, we found that these miRNA genes are associated with an inflammation-responsive enhancer network. Based on NFκB-p65 and JunB transcription factor binding, we showed two distinct enhancer subsets associated with LPS-activated miRNAs that possess distinct epigenetic characteristics and LPS-responsiveness. Finally, our 3C-seq analysis revealed the LPS-induced extensive reorganization of the pri-miR-155-associated functional chromatin domain as well as chromatin loop formation between LPS-responsive enhancers and the promoter region. Our genomic approach successfully combines various genome-wide datasets and allows the identification of the putative regulatory elements controlling miRNA expression in classically activated macrophages

  9. Identification of novel microRNAs in post-transcriptional control of Nrf2 expression and redox homeostasis in neuronal, SH-SY5Y cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhusudhanan Narasimhan

    Full Text Available Nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2/NFE2L2, a redox-sensitive transcription factor plays a critical role in adaptation to cellular stress and affords cellular defense by initiating transcription of antioxidative and detoxification genes. While a protein can be regulated at multiple levels, control of Nrf2 has been largely studied at post-translational regulation points by Keap1. Importantly, post-transcriptional/translational based regulation of Nrf2 is less understood and to date there are no reports on such mechanisms in neuronal systems. In this context, studies involving the role of microRNAs (miRs which are normally considered as fine tuning regulators of protein production through translation repression and/or post-transcriptional alterations, are in place. In the current study, based on in-silico analysis followed by immunoblotting and real time analysis, we have identified and validated for the first time that human NFE2L2 could be targeted by miR153/miR27a/miR142-5p/miR144 in neuronal, SH-SY5Y cells. Co-transfection studies with individual miR mimics along with either WT 3' UTR of human Nrf2 or mutated miRNA targeting seed sequence within Nrf2 3' UTR, demonstrated that Nrf2 is a direct regulatory target of these miRs. In addition, ectopic expression of miR153/miR27a/miR142-5p/miR144 affected Nrf2 mRNA abundance and nucleo-cytoplasmic concentration of Nrf2 in a Keap1 independent manner resulting in inefficient transactivating ability of Nrf2. Furthermore, forced expression of miRs diminished GCLC and GSR expression resulting in alteration of Nrf2 dependent redox homeostasis. Finally, bioinformatics based miRNA-disease network analysis (MDN along with extended computational network analysis of Nrf2 associated pathologic processes suggests that if in a particular cellular scenario where any of these miR153/miR27a/miR142-5p/miR144 either individually or as a group is altered, it could affect Nrf2 thus triggering and

  10. Expression of Pit-1 in nonsomatotrope cell lines induces human growth hormone locus control region histone modification and hGH-N transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Katherine A; Jefferson, Holly S; Karschner, Vesna A; Shewchuk, Brian M

    2009-07-03

    The POU domain transcription factor Pit-1 is expressed in somatotropes, lactotropes, and thyrotropes of the anterior pituitary. Pit-1 is essential for the establishment of these lineages during development and regulates the expression of genes encoding the peptide hormones secreted by each cell type, including the growth hormone gene expressed in somatotropes. In contrast to rodent growth hormone loci, the human growth hormone (hGH) locus is regulated by a distal locus control region (LCR), which is required in cis for the proper expression of the hGH gene cluster in transgenic mice. The hGH LCR mediates a domain of histone acetylation targeted to the hGH locus that is associated with distal hGH-N activation, and the discrete determinants of this activity coincide with DNaseI hypersensitive site (HS) I of the LCR. The identification of three in vitro Pit-1 binding sites within the HS-I region suggested a model in which Pit-1 binding at HS-I initiates the chromatin modification mechanism associated with hGH LCR activity. To test this hypothesis directly and to determine whether Pit-1 expression is sufficient to confer hGH locus histone acetylation and activate hGH-N transcription from an inactive locus, we expressed Pit-1 in nonpituitary cell types. We show that Pit-1 expression established a domain of histone hyperacetylation at the LCR and hGH-N promoter in these cells similar to that observed in pituitary chromatin. This was accompanied by the activation of hGH-N transcription and an increase in intergenic and CD79b transcripts proximal to HS-I. These effects were coincident with Pit-1 occupancy at HS-I and the hGH-N promoter and were observed irrespective of the basal histone modification status of HS-I in the heterologous cell line. These findings are consistent with a role for Pit-1 as an initiating factor in hGH locus activation during somatotrope ontogeny, acting through binding sites at HS-I of the hGH LCR.

  11. p53 and cell cycle dependent transcription of kinesin family member 23 (KIF23 is controlled via a CHR promoter element bound by DREAM and MMB complexes.

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    Martin Fischer

    Full Text Available The microtubule-dependent molecular motor KIF23 (Kinesin family member 23 is one of two components of the centralspindlin complex assembled during late stages of mitosis. Formation of this complex is known as an essential step for cytokinesis. Here, we identified KIF23 as a new transcriptional target gene of the tumor suppressor protein p53. We showed that p53 reduces expression of KIF23 on the mRNA as well as the protein level in different cell types. Promoter reporter assays revealed that this repression results from downregulation of KIF23 promoter activity. CDK inhibitor p21(WAF1/CIP1 was shown to be necessary to mediate p53-dependent repression. Furthermore, we identified the highly conserved cell cycle genes homology region (CHR in the KIF23 promoter to be strictly required for p53-dependent repression as well as for cell cycle-dependent expression of KIF23. Cell cycle- and p53-dependent regulation of KIF23 appeared to be controlled by differential binding of DREAM and MMB complexes to the CHR element. With this study, we describe a new mechanism for transcriptional regulation of KIF23. Considering the strongly supporting function of KIF23 in cytokinesis, its p53-dependent repression may contribute to the prevention of uncontrolled cell growth.

  12. Combinatorial control of adhesion of Brucella abortus 2308 to host cells by transcriptional rewiring of the trimeric autotransporter btaE gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieira, Rodrigo; Bialer, Magalí G; Roset, Mara S; Ruiz-Ranwez, Verónica; Langer, Tomás; Arocena, Gastón M; Mancini, Estefanía; Zorreguieta, Angeles

    2017-02-01

    Regulatory network plasticity is a key attribute underlying changes in bacterial gene expression and a source of phenotypic diversity to interact with the surrounding environment. Here, we sought to study the transcriptional circuit of HutC, a regulator of both metabolic and virulence genes of the facultative intracellular pathogen Brucella. Using in silico and biochemical approaches, we identified a novel functional HutC-binding site upstream of btaE, a trimeric-autotransporter adhesin involved in the attachment of Brucella to host extracellular matrix components. Moreover, we identified two additional regulators, one of which, MdrA, acts in concert with HutC to exert a combinatorial control of both btaE promoter activity and attachment of Brucella to HeLa cells. Analysis of btaE promoter sequences of different species indicated that this HutC-binding site was generated de novo by a single point mutation in a virulent Brucella strain, indicative of a transcriptional rewiring event. In addition to major domain organization differences existing between BtaE proteins within the genus Brucella, our analyses revealed that sequences upstream of btaE display high variability probably associated to intrinsic promoter structural features, which may serve as a substrate for reciprocal selection during co-evolution between this pathogen and its mammalian host. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Sp6 and Sp8 Transcription Factors Control AER Formation and Dorsal-Ventral Patterning in Limb Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haro, Endika; Delgado, Irene; Junco, Marisa; Yamada, Yoshihiko; Mansouri, Ahmed; Oberg, Kerby C.; Ros, Marian A.

    2014-01-01

    The formation and maintenance of the apical ectodermal ridge (AER) is critical for the outgrowth and patterning of the vertebrate limb. The induction of the AER is a complex process that relies on integrated interactions among the Fgf, Wnt, and Bmp signaling pathways that operate within the ectoderm and between the ectoderm and the mesoderm of the early limb bud. The transcription factors Sp6 and Sp8 are expressed in the limb ectoderm and AER during limb development. Sp6 mutant mice display a mild syndactyly phenotype while Sp8 mutants exhibit severe limb truncations. Both mutants show defects in AER maturation and in dorsal-ventral patterning. To gain further insights into the role Sp6 and Sp8 play in limb development, we have produced mice lacking both Sp6 and Sp8 activity in the limb ectoderm. Remarkably, the elimination or significant reduction in Sp6;Sp8 gene dosage leads to tetra-amelia; initial budding occurs, but neither Fgf8 nor En1 are activated. Mutants bearing a single functional allele of Sp8 (Sp6−/−;Sp8+/−) exhibit a split-hand/foot malformation phenotype with double dorsal digit tips probably due to an irregular and immature AER that is not maintained in the center of the bud and on the abnormal expansion of Wnt7a expression to the ventral ectoderm. Our data are compatible with Sp6 and Sp8 working together and in a dose-dependent manner as indispensable mediators of Wnt/βcatenin and Bmp signaling in the limb ectoderm. We suggest that the function of these factors links proximal-distal and dorsal-ventral patterning. PMID:25166858

  14. Eukaryotic transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staby, Lasse; O'Shea, Charlotte; Willemoës, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Gene-specific transcription factors (TFs) are key regulatory components of signaling pathways, controlling, for example, cell growth, development, and stress responses. Their biological functions are determined by their molecular structures, as exemplified by their structured DNA-binding domains...... them to participate in large interactomes, how they use only a few hydrophobic residues, short sequence motifs, prestructured motifs, and coupled folding and binding for their interactions with co-activators, and how their accessibility to post-translational modification affects their interactions...

  15. Increased renal gene transcription of protein kinase C-beta in human diabetic nephropathy: relationship to long-term glycaemic control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langham, R.G.; Kelly, D.J.; Gow, R.M.

    2008-01-01

    are unknown. We sought to determine whether in addition to activation, diabetes may lead to increased transcription of two PKC isoforms that have been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy, PKC-alpha and PKC-beta. METHODS: Recent advances in molecular biological techniques now permit...... quantitative analysis of mRNA from archival, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections. RNA was extracted from scraped 6 microm sections of biopsy tissue, and PRKC-alpha and PRKC-beta (also known as PRKCA and PRKCB) mRNA measured using real-time PCR. Expression of genes encoding PKC isoforms...... was examined in renal biopsies (n=25) with classical histological features of diabetic nephropathy and compared with that in normal control tissue (n=6). Peptide localisation of PKC-alpha, PKC-beta and the activated forms phosphorylated PKC-alpha and -beta was also performed on matched paraffin...

  16. Different control mechanisms regulate glucoamylase and protease gene transcription in Aspergillus oryzae in solid-state and submerged fermentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesebeke, te R.; Biezen, de N.; Vos, de W.M.; Hondel, van den C.A.M.J.J.; Punt, P.J.

    2005-01-01

    Solid-state fermentation (SSF) with Aspergillus oryzae results in high levels of secreted protein. However, control mechanisms of gene expression in SSF have been only poorly studied. In this study we show that both glucoamylase (glaB) and protease (alpA, nptB) genes are highly expressed during

  17. The Neurospora Transcription Factor ADV-1 Transduces Light Signals and Temporal Information to Control Rhythmic Expression of Genes Involved in Cell Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekhang, Rigzin; Wu, Cheng; Smith, Kristina M.; Lamb, Teresa M.; Peterson, Matthew; Bredeweg, Erin L.; Ibarra, Oneida; Emerson, Jillian M.; Karunarathna, Nirmala; Lyubetskaya, Anna; Azizi, Elham; Hurley, Jennifer M.; Dunlap, Jay C.; Galagan, James E.; Freitag, Michael; Sachs, Matthew S.; Bell-Pedersen, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Light and the circadian clock have a profound effect on the biology of organisms through the regulation of large sets of genes. Toward understanding how light and the circadian clock regulate gene expression, we used genome-wide approaches to identify the direct and indirect targets of the light-responsive and clock-controlled transcription factor ADV-1 in Neurospora crassa. A large proportion of ADV-1 targets were found to be light- and/or clock-controlled, and enriched for genes involved in development, metabolism, cell growth, and cell fusion. We show that ADV-1 is necessary for transducing light and/or temporal information to its immediate downstream targets, including controlling rhythms in genes critical to somatic cell fusion. However, while ADV-1 targets are altered in predictable ways in Δadv-1 cells in response to light, this is not always the case for rhythmic target gene expression. These data suggest that a complex regulatory network downstream of ADV-1 functions to generate distinct temporal dynamics of target gene expression relative to the central clock mechanism. PMID:27856696

  18. Opposing Post-transcriptional Control of InR by FMRP and LIN-28 Adjusts Stem Cell-Based Tissue Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Luhur

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Although the intrinsic mechanisms that control whether stem cells divide symmetrically or asymmetrically underlie tissue growth and homeostasis, they remain poorly defined. We report that the RNA-binding protein fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP limits the symmetric division, and resulting expansion, of the stem cell population during adaptive intestinal growth in Drosophila. The elevated insulin sensitivity that FMRP-deficient progenitor cells display contributes to their accelerated expansion, which is suppressed by the depletion of insulin-signaling components. This FMRP activity is mediated solely via a second conserved RNA-binding protein, LIN-28, known to boost insulin signaling in stem cells. Via LIN-28, FMRP controls progenitor cell behavior by post-transcriptionally repressing the level of insulin receptor (InR. This study identifies the stem cell-based mechanism by which FMRP controls tissue adaptation, and it raises the possibility that defective adaptive growth underlies the accelerated growth, gastrointestinal, and other symptoms that affect fragile X syndrome patients. : Luhur et al. report that FMRP acts via LIN-28 in progenitor cells to dampen the adaptive expansion of intestinal tissue in the fruit fly, raising the possibility that defective LIN28-mediated adaptive growth underlies some of the symptoms that affect fragile X syndrome patients. Keywords: FMRP, fmr1, LIN-28, insulin receptor, IIS, adaptive growth, tissue resizing, intestinal stem cell, insulin sensitivity

  19. The Neurospora Transcription Factor ADV-1 Transduces Light Signals and Temporal Information to Control Rhythmic Expression of Genes Involved in Cell Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rigzin Dekhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Light and the circadian clock have a profound effect on the biology of organisms through the regulation of large sets of genes. Toward understanding how light and the circadian clock regulate gene expression, we used genome-wide approaches to identify the direct and indirect targets of the light-responsive and clock-controlled transcription factor ADV-1 in Neurospora crassa. A large proportion of ADV-1 targets were found to be light- and/or clock-controlled, and enriched for genes involved in development, metabolism, cell growth, and cell fusion. We show that ADV-1 is necessary for transducing light and/or temporal information to its immediate downstream targets, including controlling rhythms in genes critical to somatic cell fusion. However, while ADV-1 targets are altered in predictable ways in Δadv-1 cells in response to light, this is not always the case for rhythmic target gene expression. These data suggest that a complex regulatory network downstream of ADV-1 functions to generate distinct temporal dynamics of target gene expression relative to the central clock mechanism.

  20. Overexpression of a pine Dof transcription factor in hybrid poplars: A comparative study in trees growing under controlled and natural conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda-López, Marina; Pascual, María Belén; Pallero, Mercedes; Henao, Luisa María; Lasa, Berta; Jauregui, Ivan; Aparicio-Tejo, Pedro M; Cánovas, Francisco M; Ávila, Concepción

    2017-01-01

    In this work, the role of the pine transcriptional regulator Dof 5 in carbon and nitrogen metabolism has been examined in poplar trees. The overexpression of the gene and potential effects on growth and biomass production were compared between trees growing in a growth chamber under controlled conditions and trees growing in a field trial during two growth seasons. Ten-week-old transgenic poplars exhibited higher growth than untransformed controls and exhibited enhanced capacity for inorganic nitrogen uptake in the form of nitrate. Furthermore, the transgenic trees accumulated significantly more carbohydrates such as glucose, fructose, sucrose and starch. Lignin content increased in the basal part of the stem likely due to the thicker stem of the transformed plants. The enhanced levels of lignin were correlated with higher expression of the PAL1 and GS1.3 genes, which encode key enzymes involved in the phenylalanine deamination required for lignin biosynthesis. However, the results in the field trial experiment diverged from those observed in the chamber system. The lines overexpressing PpDof5 showed attenuated growth during the two growing seasons and no modification of carbon or nitrogen metabolism. These results were not associated with a decrease in the expression of the transgene, but they can be ascribed to the nitrogen available in the field soil compared to that available for growth under controlled conditions. This work highlights the paramount importance of testing transgenic lines in field trials.

  1. GATA-4/-6 and HNF-1/-4 families of transcription factors control the transcriptional regulation of the murine Muc5ac mucin during stomach development and in epithelial cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonckheere, Nicolas; Vincent, Audrey; Franquet-Ansart, Hélène; Witte-Bouma, Janneke; Korteland-van Male, Anita; Leteurtre, Emmanuelle; Renes, Ingrid B; Van Seuningen, Isabelle

    2012-08-01

    During human embryonic and fetal development of the gastrointestinal tract, the gene encoding the MUC5AC mucin has a spatio-temporal pattern of expression restricted to the stomach. In order to better understand the molecular mechanisms responsible for this restricted pattern of expression, we have studied Muc5ac expression in the developing stomach of the mouse and correlated it to that of transcription factors known to be involved in cell differentiation programs during development. Our results indicate that GATA-6 and HNF-4α expression increased concomitantly with the induction of Muc5ac expression in embryonic stomach. We then studied Muc5ac transcriptional regulation by these transcription factors and showed that they all transactivate Muc5ac promoter. We also identified several active GATA-4/-5/-6 and HNF-1/-4 cis-elements using gel shift assays, chromatin immunoprecipitation and site-directed mutagenesis. Among all Muc5ac regulators, only GATA-6 and HNF-4a expression was concomitant to that of Muc5ac in the developing stomach. This is thus in favor of an important role for these two transcription factors as regulators of expression of the Muc5ac mucin during stomach development and in epithelial cancer cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. MicroRNA319-regulated TCPs interact with FBHs and PFT1 to activate CO transcription and control flowering time in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Cheng, Xiliu; Liu, Pan; Li, Dayong; Chen, Tao; Gu, Xiaofeng; Sun, Jiaqiang

    2017-05-01

    The transcription factor CONSTANS (CO) is a central component that promotes Arabidopsis flowering under long-day conditions (LDs). Here, we show that the microRNA319-regulated TEOSINTE BRANCHED/CYCLOIDEA/PCF (TCP) transcription factors promote photoperiodic flowering through binding to the CO promoter and activating its transcription. Meanwhile, these TCPs directly interact with the flowering activators FLOWERING BHLH (FBHs), but not the flowering repressors CYCLING DOF FACTORs (CDFs), to additively activate CO expression. Furthermore, both the TCPs and FBHs physically interact with the flowering time regulator PHYTOCHROME AND FLOWERING TIME 1 (PFT1) to facilitate CO transcription. Our findings provide evidence that a set of transcriptional activators act directly and additively at the CO promoter to promote CO transcription, and establish a molecular mechanism underlying the regulation of photoperiodic flowering time in Arabidopsis.

  3. The nuclear mitotic apparatus protein NuMA controls rDNA transcription and mediates the nucleolar stress response in a p53-independent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, Swaathi; Chittiboyina, Shirisha; Bai, Yunfeng; Abad, Patricia C; Vidi, Pierre-Alexandre; Stauffacher, Cynthia V; Lelièvre, Sophie A

    2017-11-16

    The nuclear mitotic apparatus protein, NuMA, is involved in major cellular events such as DNA damage response, apoptosis and p53-mediated growth-arrest, all of which are under the control of the nucleolus upon stress. Proteomic investigation has identified NuMA among hundreds of nucleolar proteins. Yet, the precise link between NuMA and nucleolar function remains undetermined. We confirm that NuMA is present in the nucleolus and reveal redistribution of NuMA upon actinomycin D or doxorubicin-induced nucleolar stress. NuMA coimmunoprecipitates with RNA polymerase I, with ribosomal proteins RPL26 and RPL24, and with components of B-WICH, an ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complex associated with rDNA transcription. NuMA also binds to 18S and 28S rRNAs and localizes to rDNA promoter regions. Downregulation of NuMA expression triggers nucleolar stress, as shown by decreased nascent pre-rRNA synthesis, fibrillarin perinucleolar cap formation and upregulation of p27kip1, but not p53. Physiologically relevant nucleolar stress induction with reactive oxygen species reaffirms a p53-independent p27kip1 response pathway and leads to nascent pre-rRNA reduction. It also promotes the decrease in the amount of NuMA. This previously uncharacterized function of NuMA in rDNA transcription and p53-independent nucleolar stress response supports a central role for this nuclear structural protein in cellular homeostasis. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. SsaA, a Member of a Novel Class of Transcriptional Regulators, Controls Sansanmycin Production in Streptomyces sp. Strain SS through a Feedback Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qinglian; Wang, Lifei; Xie, Yunying; Wang, Songmei; Chen, Ruxian

    2013-01-01

    Sansanmycins, produced by Streptomyces sp. strain SS, are uridyl peptide antibiotics with activities against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In this work, the biosynthetic gene cluster of sansanmycins, comprised of 25 open reading frames (ORFs) showing considerable amino acid sequence identity to those of the pacidamycin and napsamycin gene cluster, was identified. SsaA, the archetype of a novel class of transcriptional regulators, was characterized in the sansanmycin gene cluster, with an N-terminal fork head-associated (FHA) domain and a C-terminal LuxR-type helix-turn-helix (HTH) motif. The disruption of ssaA abolished sansanmycin production, as well as the expression of the structural genes for sansanmycin biosynthesis, indicating that SsaA is a pivotal activator for sansanmycin biosynthesis. SsaA was proved to directly bind several putative promoter regions of biosynthetic genes, and comparison of sequences of the binding sites allowed the identification of a consensus SsaA binding sequence, GTMCTGACAN2TGTCAGKAC. The DNA binding activity of SsaA was inhibited by sansanmycins A and H in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, sansanmycins A and H were found to directly interact with SsaA. These results indicated that SsaA strictly controls the production of sansanmycins at the transcriptional level in a feedback regulatory mechanism by sensing the accumulation of the end products. As the first characterized regulator of uridyl peptide antibiotic biosynthesis, the understanding of this autoregulatory process involved in sansanmycin biosynthesis will likely provide an effective strategy for rational improvements in the yields of these uridyl peptide antibiotics. PMID:23475969

  5. The Methionine Transamination Pathway Controls Hepatic Glucose Metabolism through Regulation of the GCN5 Acetyltransferase and the PGC-1α Transcriptional Coactivator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Clint D J; Sharabi, Kfir; Dominy, John E; Lee, Yoonjin; Isasa, Marta; Orozco, Jose M; Jedrychowski, Mark P; Kamenecka, Theodore M; Griffin, Patrick R; Gygi, Steven P; Puigserver, Pere

    2016-05-13

    Methionine is an essential sulfur amino acid that is engaged in key cellular functions such as protein synthesis and is a precursor for critical metabolites involved in maintaining cellular homeostasis. In mammals, in response to nutrient conditions, the liver plays a significant role in regulating methionine concentrations by altering its flux through the transmethylation, transsulfuration, and transamination metabolic pathways. A comprehensive understanding of how hepatic methionine metabolism intersects with other regulatory nutrient signaling and transcriptional events is, however, lacking. Here, we show that methionine and derived-sulfur metabolites in the transamination pathway activate the GCN5 acetyltransferase promoting acetylation of the transcriptional coactivator PGC-1α to control hepatic gluconeogenesis. Methionine was the only essential amino acid that rapidly induced PGC-1α acetylation through activating the GCN5 acetyltransferase. Experiments employing metabolic pathway intermediates revealed that methionine transamination, and not the transmethylation or transsulfuration pathways, contributed to methionine-induced PGC-1α acetylation. Moreover, aminooxyacetic acid, a transaminase inhibitor, was able to potently suppress PGC-1α acetylation stimulated by methionine, which was accompanied by predicted alterations in PGC-1α-mediated gluconeogenic gene expression and glucose production in primary murine hepatocytes. Methionine administration in mice likewise induced hepatic PGC-1α acetylation, suppressed the gluconeogenic gene program, and lowered glycemia, indicating that a similar phenomenon occurs in vivo These results highlight a communication between methionine metabolism and PGC-1α-mediated hepatic gluconeogenesis, suggesting that influencing methionine metabolic flux has the potential to be therapeutically exploited for diabetes treatment. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. A Regulatory Circuit Composed of a Transcription Factor, IscR, and a Regulatory RNA, RyhB, Controls Fe-S Cluster Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Mandin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Fe-S clusters are cofactors conserved through all domains of life. Once assembled by dedicated ISC and/or SUF scaffolds, Fe-S clusters are conveyed to their apo-targets via A-type carrier proteins (ATCs. Escherichia coli possesses four such ATCs. ErpA is the only ATC essential under aerobiosis. Recent studies reported a possible regulation of the erpA mRNA by the small RNA (sRNA RyhB, which controls the expression of many genes under iron starvation. Surprisingly, erpA has not been identified in recent transcriptomic analysis of the iron starvation response, thus bringing into question the actual physiological significance of the putative regulation of erpA by RyhB. Using an sRNA library, we show that among 26 sRNAs, only RyhB represses the expression of an erpA-lacZ translational fusion. We further demonstrate that this repression occurs during iron starvation. Using mutational analysis, we show that RyhB base pairs to the erpA mRNA, inducing its disappearance. In addition, IscR, the master regulator of Fe-S homeostasis, represses expression of erpA at the transcriptional level when iron is abundant, but depleting iron from the medium alleviates this repression. The conjunction of transcriptional derepression by IscR and posttranscriptional repression by RyhB under Fe-limiting conditions is best described as an incoherent regulatory circuit. This double regulation allows full expression of erpA at iron concentrations for which Fe-S biogenesis switches from the ISC to the SUF system. We further provide evidence that this regulatory circuit coordinates ATC usage to iron availability.

  7. A functional screen reveals an extensive layer of transcriptional and splicing control underlying RAS/MAPK signaling in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariel Ashton-Beaucage

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The small GTPase RAS is among the most prevalent oncogenes. The evolutionarily conserved RAF-MEK-MAPK module that lies downstream of RAS is one of the main conduits through which RAS transmits proliferative signals in normal and cancer cells. Genetic and biochemical studies conducted over the last two decades uncovered a small set of factors regulating RAS/MAPK signaling. Interestingly, most of these were found to control RAF activation, thus suggesting a central regulatory role for this event. Whether additional factors are required at this level or further downstream remains an open question. To obtain a comprehensive view of the elements functionally linked to the RAS/MAPK cascade, we used a quantitative assay in Drosophila S2 cells to conduct a genome-wide RNAi screen for factors impacting RAS-mediated MAPK activation. The screen led to the identification of 101 validated hits, including most of the previously known factors associated to this pathway. Epistasis experiments were then carried out on individual candidates to determine their position relative to core pathway components. While this revealed several new factors acting at different steps along the pathway--including a new protein complex modulating RAF activation--we found that most hits unexpectedly work downstream of MEK and specifically influence MAPK expression. These hits mainly consist of constitutive splicing factors and thereby suggest that splicing plays a specific role in establishing MAPK levels. We further characterized two representative members of this group and surprisingly found that they act by regulating mapk alternative splicing. This study provides an unprecedented assessment of the factors modulating RAS/MAPK signaling in Drosophila. In addition, it suggests that pathway output does not solely rely on classical signaling events, such as those controlling RAF activation, but also on the regulation of MAPK levels. Finally, it indicates that core splicing

  8. Comprehensive Definition of the SigH Regulon of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Reveals Transcriptional Control of Diverse Stress Responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared D Sharp

    Full Text Available Expression of SigH, one of 12 Mycobacterium tuberculosis alternative sigma factors, is induced by heat, oxidative and nitric oxide stresses. SigH activation has been shown to increase expression of several genes, including genes involved in maintaining redox equilibrium and in protein degradation. However, few of these are known to be directly regulated by SigH. The goal of this project is to comprehensively define the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes and operons that are directly controlled by SigH in order to gain insight into the role of SigH in regulating M. tuberculosis physiology. We used ChIP-Seq to identify in vivo SigH binding sites throughout the M. tuberculosis genome, followed by quantification of SigH-dependent expression of genes linked to these sites and identification of SigH-regulated promoters. We identified 69 SigH binding sites, which are located both in intergenic regions and within annotated coding sequences in the annotated M. tuberculosis genome. 41 binding sites were linked to genes that showed greater expression following heat stress in a SigH-dependent manner. We identified several genes not previously known to be regulated by SigH, including genes involved in DNA repair, cysteine biosynthesis, translation, and genes of unknown function. Experimental and computational analysis of SigH-regulated promoter sequences within these binding sites identified strong consensus -35 and -10 promoter sequences, but with tolerance for non-consensus bases at specific positions. This comprehensive identification and validation of SigH-regulated genes demonstrates an extended SigH regulon that controls an unexpectedly broad range of stress response functions.

  9. Transcriptional profile of breast muscle in heat stressed layers is similar to that of broiler chickens at control temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahoor, Imran; de Koning, Dirk-Jan; Hocking, Paul M

    2017-09-20

    In recent years, the commercial importance of changes in muscle function of broiler chickens and of the corresponding effects on meat quality has increased. Furthermore, broilers are more sensitive to heat stress during transport and at high ambient temperatures than smaller egg-laying chickens. We hypothesised that heat stress would amplify muscle damage and expression of genes that are involved in such changes and, thus, lead to the identification of pathways and networks associated with broiler muscle and meat quality traits. Broiler and layer chickens were exposed to control or high ambient temperatures to characterise differences in gene expression between the two genotypes and the two environments. Whole-genome expression studies in breast muscles of broiler and layer chickens were conducted before and after heat stress; 2213 differentially-expressed genes were detected based on a significant (P heat-stressed layers. Expression of these genes was further increased in heat-stressed broilers. Differences in gene expression between broiler and layer chickens under control and heat stress conditions suggest that damage of breast muscles in broilers at normal ambient temperatures is similar to that in heat-stressed layers and is amplified when broilers are exposed to heat stress. The patterns of gene expression of the two genotypes under heat stress were almost the polar opposite of each other, which is consistent with the conclusion that broiler chickens were not able to cope with heat stress by dissipating their body heat. The differentially expressed gene networks and pathways were consistent with the pathological changes that are observed in the breast muscle of heat-stressed broilers.

  10. Comprehensive Definition of the SigH Regulon of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Reveals Transcriptional Control of Diverse Stress Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Jared D; Singh, Atul K; Park, Sang Tae; Lyubetskaya, Anna; Peterson, Matthew W; Gomes, Antonio L C; Potluri, Lakshmi-Prasad; Raman, Sahadevan; Galagan, James E; Husson, Robert N

    2016-01-01

    Expression of SigH, one of 12 Mycobacterium tuberculosis alternative sigma factors, is induced by heat, oxidative and nitric oxide stresses. SigH activation has been shown to increase expression of several genes, including genes involved in maintaining redox equilibrium and in protein degradation. However, few of these are known to be directly regulated by SigH. The goal of this project is to comprehensively define the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes and operons that are directly controlled by SigH in order to gain insight into the role of SigH in regulating M. tuberculosis physiology. We used ChIP-Seq to identify in vivo SigH binding sites throughout the M. tuberculosis genome, followed by quantification of SigH-dependent expression of genes linked to these sites and identification of SigH-regulated promoters. We identified 69 SigH binding sites, which are located both in intergenic regions and within annotated coding sequences in the annotated M. tuberculosis genome. 41 binding sites were linked to genes that showed greater expression following heat stress in a SigH-dependent manner. We identified several genes not previously known to be regulated by SigH, including genes involved in DNA repair, cysteine biosynthesis, translation, and genes of unknown function. Experimental and computational analysis of SigH-regulated promoter sequences within these binding sites identified strong consensus -35 and -10 promoter sequences, but with tolerance for non-consensus bases at specific positions. This comprehensive identification and validation of SigH-regulated genes demonstrates an extended SigH regulon that controls an unexpectedly broad range of stress response functions.

  11. Transcriptional networks of TCP transcription factors in Arabidopsis development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Danisman, S.D.

    2011-01-01

    Leaves are a plant’s main organs of photosynthesis and hence the development of this organ is under strict control. The different phases of leaf development are under the control of both endogenous and exogenous influences. In this work we were interested in a particular class of transcription

  12. Differential regulation of closely related R2R3-MYB transcription factors controls flavonol accumulation in different parts of the Arabidopsis thaliana seedling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stracke, Ralf; Ishihara, Hirofumi; Huep, Gunnar; Barsch, Aiko; Mehrtens, Frank; Niehaus, Karsten; Weisshaar, Bernd

    2007-05-01

    The genes MYB11, MYB12 and MYB111 share significant structural similarity and form subgroup 7 of the Arabidopsis thaliana R2R3-MYB gene family. To determine the regulatory potential of these three transcription factors, we used a combination of genetic, functional genomics and metabolite analysis approaches. MYB11, MYB12 and MYB111 show a high degree of functional similarity and display very similar target gene specificity for several genes of flavonoid biosynthesis, including CHALCONE SYNTHASE, CHALCONE ISOMERASE, FLAVANONE 3-HYDROXYLASE and FLAVONOL SYNTHASE1. Seedlings of the triple mutant myb11 myb12 myb111, which genetically lack a complete subgroup of R2R3-MYB genes, do not form flavonols while the accumulation of anthocyanins is not affected. In developing seedlings, MYB11, MYB12 and MYB111 act in an additive manner due to their differential spatial activity; MYB12 controls flavonol biosynthesis mainly in the root, while MYB111 controls flavonol biosynthesis primarily in cotyledons. We identified and confirmed additional target genes of the R2R3-MYB subgroup 7 factors, including the UDP-glycosyltransferases UGT91A1 and UGT84A1, and we demonstrate that the accumulation of distinct and structurally identified flavonol glycosides in seedlings correlates with the expression domains of the different R2R3-MYB factors. Therefore, we refer to these genes as PFG1-3 for 'PRODUCTION OF FLAVONOL GLYCOSIDES'.

  13. Transcriptional Activator GmrA, Encoded in Genomic Island OI-29, Controls the Motility of EnterohemorrhagicEscherichia coliO157:H7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bin; Wang, Shaomeng; Huang, Jianxiao; Yin, Zhiqiu; Jiang, Lingyan; Hou, Wenqi; Li, Xiaomin; Feng, Lu

    2018-01-01

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 is a major human enteric pathogen capable of causing large outbreaks of severe infections that induce bloody diarrhea, hemorrhagic colitis, and hemolytic uremic syndrome. Its genome contains 177 unique O islands (OIs) including those carrying the main virulence elements, Shiga toxin-converting phages (OI-45 and OI-93) and locus for enterocyte effacement (OI-148). However, many of these islands harbor only genes of unknown function. Here, we demonstrate that OI-29 encodes a newly discovered transcriptional activator, Z0639 (named GmrA), that is required for motility and flagellar synthesis in O157:H7. GmrA directly binds to the promoter of fliA , an RNA polymerase sigma factor, and thereby regulates flagellar genes controlled by FliA. Expression of gmrA is maximal under host conditions (37°C, neutral pH, and physiological osmolarity), and in the presence of host epithelial cells, indicative of a role of this gene in infection by promoting motility. Finally, GmrA was found to be a widespread regulator of bacterial motility and flagellar synthesis in different pathotypes of E. coli . Our work largely enriches our understanding of bacterial motility control, and provides another example of regulators acquired laterally that mediate flagellar synthesis.

  14. Transcription factor, promoter, and enhancer utilization in human myeloid cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joshi, Anagha; Pooley, Christopher; Freeman, Tom C.; Lennartsson, Andreas; Babina, Magda; Schmidl, Christian; Geijtenbeek, Teunis; Michoel, Tom; Severin, Jessica; Itoh, Masayoshi; Lassmann, Timo; Kawaji, Hideya; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Rehli, Michael; Hume, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The generation of myeloid cells from their progenitors is regulated at the level of transcription by combinatorial control of key transcription factors influencing cell-fate choice. To unravel the global dynamics of this process at the transcript level, we generated transcription profiles for 91

  15. Controlling the transcription levels of argGH redistributed L-arginine metabolic flux in N-acetylglutamate kinase and ArgR-deregulated Corynebacterium crenatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qinqin; Luo, Yuchang; Dou, Wenfang; Zhang, Xian; Zhang, Xiaomei; Zhang, Weiwei; Xu, Meijuan; Geng, Yan; Rao, Zhiming; Xu, Zhenghong

    2016-01-01

    Corynebacterium crenatum SYPA5-5, an L-arginine high-producer obtained through multiple mutation-screening steps, had been deregulated by the repression of ArgR that inhibits L-arginine biosynthesis at genetic level. Further study indicated that feedback inhibition of SYPA5-5 N-acetylglutamate kinase (CcNAGK) by L-arginine, as another rate-limiting step, could be deregulated by introducing point mutations. Here, we introduced two of the positive mutations (H268N or R209A) of CcNAGK into the chromosome of SYPA5-5, however, resulting in accumulation of large amounts of the intermediates (L-citrulline and L-ornithine) and decreased production of L-arginine. Genetic and enzymatic levels analysis involved in L-arginine biosynthetic pathway of recombinants SYPA5-5-NAGKH268N (H-7) and SYPA5-5-NAGKR209A (R-8) showed that the transcription levels of argGH decreased accompanied with the reduction of argininosuccinate synthase and argininosuccinase activities, respectively, which led to the metabolic obstacle from L-citrulline to L-arginine. Co-expression of argGH with exogenous plasmid in H-7 and R-8 removed this bottleneck and increased L-arginine productivity remarkably. Compared with SYPA5-5, fermentation period of H-7/pDXW-10-argGH (H-7-GH) reduced to 16 h; meanwhile, the L-arginine productivity improved about 63.6%. Fed-batch fermentation of H-7-GH in 10 L bioreactor produced 389.9 mM L-arginine with the productivity of 5.42 mM h(-1). These results indicated that controlling the transcription of argGH was a key factor for regulating the metabolic flux toward L-arginine biosynthesis after deregulating the repression of ArgR and feedback inhibition of CcNAGK, and therefore functioned as another regulatory mode for L-arginine production. Thus, deregulating all these three regulatory modes was a powerful strategy to construct L-arginine high-producing C. crenatum.

  16. Polymorphisms in SREBF1 and SREBF2, two antipsychotic-activated transcription factors controlling cellular lipogenesis, are associated with schizophrenia in German and Scandinavian samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Hellard, S; Mühleisen, T W; Djurovic, S

    2010-01-01

    in glial cell lines that antipsychotic drugs induce the expression of genes involved in cholesterol and fatty acids biosynthesis through activation of the sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) transcription factors, encoded by the sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 1 (SREBF1......) and sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 2 (SREBF2) genes. Considering the importance of these factors in the lipid biosynthesis and their possible involvement in antipsychotic drug effects, we hypothesized that genetic variants of SREBF1 and/or SREBF2 could affect schizophrenia...

  17. Enhancing Flower Color through Simultaneous Expression of the B-peru and mPAP1 Transcription Factors under Control of a Flower-Specific Promoter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-Hye Kim

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Flower color is a main target for flower breeding. A transgenic approach for flower color modification requires a transgene and a flower-specific promoter. Here, we expressed the B-peru gene encoding a basic helix loop helix (bHLH transcription factor (TF together with the mPAP1 gene encoding an R2R3 MYB TF to enhance flower color in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L., using the tobacco anthocyanidin synthase (ANS promoter (PANS to drive flower-specific expression. The transgenic tobacco plants grew normally and produced either dark pink (PANSBP_DP or dark red (PANSBP_DR flowers. Quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR revealed that the expression of five structural genes in the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway increased significantly in both PANSBP_DP and PANSBP_DR lines, compared with the non-transformed (NT control. Interestingly, the expression of two regulatory genes constituting the active MYB-bHLH-WD40 repeat (WDR (MBW complex decreased significantly in the PANSBP_DR plants but not in the PANSBP_DP plants. Total flavonol and anthocyanin abundance correlated with flower color, with an increase of 1.6–43.2 fold in the PANSBP_DP plants and 2.0–124.2 fold in the PANSBP_DR plants. Our results indicate that combinatorial expression of B-peru and mPAP1 genes under control of the ANS promoter can be a useful strategy for intensifying flower color without growth retardation.

  18. Ethylene Antagonizes Salt-Induced Growth Retardation and Cell Death Process via Transcriptional Controlling of Ethylene-, BAG- and Senescence-Associated Genes in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ya-Jie; Liu, Ling; Lin, Ying-Chao; Zu, Yuan-Gang; Li, Lei-Peng; Tang, Zhong-Hua

    2016-01-01

    The existing question whether ethylene is involved in the modulation of salt-induced cell death to mediate plant salt tolerance is important for understanding the salt tolerance mechanisms. Here, we employed Arabidopsis plants to study the possible role of ethylene in salt-induced growth inhibition and programmed cell death (PCD) profiles. The root length, DNA ladder and cell death indicated by Evan's blue detection were measured by compared to the control or salt-stressed seedlings. Secondly, the protoplasts isolated from plant leaves and dyed with Annexin V-FITC were subjected to flow cytometric (FCM) assay. Our results showed that ethylene works effectively in seedling protoplasts, antagonizing salt-included root retardation and restraining cell death both in seedlings or protoplasts. Due to salinity, the entire or partial insensitivity of ethylene signaling resulted in an elevated levels of cell death in ein2-5 and ein3-1 plants and the event were amended in ctr1-1 plants after salt treatment. The subsequent experiment with exogenous ACC further corroborated that ethylene could modulate salt-induced PCD process actively. Plant Bcl-2-associated athanogene (BAG) family genes are recently identified to play an extensive role in plant PCD processes ranging from growth, development to stress responses and even cell death. Our result showed that salinity alone significantly suppressed the transcripts of BAG6, BAG7 and addition of ACC in the saline solution could obviously re-activate BAG6 and BAG7 expressions, which might play a key role to inhibit the salt-induced cell death. In summary, our research implies that ethylene and salinity antagonistically control BAG family-, ethylene-, and senescence-related genes to alleviate the salt-induced cell death.

  19. The Varicella-Zoster Virus Immediate-Early 63 protein affects chromatin controlled gene transcription in a cell-type dependent manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bontems Sébastien

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Varicella Zoster Virus Immediate Early 63 protein (IE63 has been shown to be essential for VZV replication, and critical for latency establishment. The activity of the protein as a transcriptional regulator is not fully clear yet. Using transient transfection assays, IE63 has been shown to repress viral and cellular promoters containing typical TATA boxes by interacting with general transcription factors. Results In this paper, IE63 regulation properties on endogenous gene expression were evaluated using an oligonucleotide-based micro-array approach. We found that IE63 modulates the transcription of only a few genes in HeLa cells including genes implicated in transcription or immunity. Furthermore, we showed that this effect is mediated by a modification of RNA POL II binding on the promoters tested and that IE63 phosphorylation was essential for these effects. In MeWo cells, the number of genes whose transcription was modified by IE63 was somewhat higher, including genes implicated in signal transduction, transcription, immunity, and heat-shock signalling. While IE63 did not modify the basal expression of several NF-κB dependent genes such as IL-8, ICAM-1, and IκBα, it modulates transcription of these genes upon TNFα induction. This effect was obviously correlated with the amount of p65 binding to the promoter of these genes and with histone H3 acetylation and HDAC-3 removal. Conclusion While IE63 only affected transcription of a small number of cellular genes, it interfered with the TNF-inducibility of several NF-κB dependent genes by the accelerated resynthesis of the inhibitor IκBα.

  20. Hha controls Escherichia coli O157:H7 biofilm formation by differential regulation of global transcriptional regulators FlhDC and CsgD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vijay K; Bearson, Bradley L

    2013-04-01

    Although molecular mechanisms promoting adherence of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 on epithelial cells are well characterized, regulatory mechanisms controlling biofilm formation are not fully understood. In this study, we demonstrate that biofilm formation in EHEC O157:H7 strain 86-24 is highly repressed compared to that in an isogenic hha mutant. The hha mutant produced large quantities of biofilm compared to the wild-type strain at 30°C and 37°C. Complementation of the hha mutant reduced the level of biofilm formation to that of the wild-type strain, indicating that Hha is a negative regulator of biofilm production. While swimming motility and expression of the flagellar gene fliC were significantly reduced, the expression of csgA (encoding curlin of curli fimbriae) and the ability to bind Congo red were significantly enhanced. The expression of both fliC and csgA and the phenotypes of motility and curli production affected by these two genes, respectively, were restored to wild-type levels in the complemented hha mutant. The csgA deletion abolished biofilm formation in the hha mutant and wild-type strain, and csgA complementation restored biofilm formation to these strains, indicating the importance of csgA and curli in biofilm formation. The regulatory effects of Hha on flagellar and curli gene expression appear to occur via the induction and repression of FlhDC and CsgD, as demonstrated by reduced flhD and increased csgD transcription in the hha mutant, respectively. In gel shift assays Hha interacted with flhDC and csgD promoters. In conclusion, Hha regulates biofilm formation in EHEC O157:H7 by differential regulation of FlhDC and CsgD, the global regulators of motility and curli production, respectively.

  1. Structural insights into transcription complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, I.; Blanco, A.G.; Boelens, R.; Cavarelli, J.; Coll, M.; Folkers, G.E.; Nie, Y.; Pogenberg, V.; Schultz, P.; Wilmanns, M.; Moras, D.; Poterszman, A.

    2011-01-01

    Control of transcription allows the regulation of cell activity in response to external stimuli and research in the field has greatly benefited from efforts in structural biology. In this review, based on specific examples from the European SPINE2-COMPLEXES initiative, we illustrate the impact of

  2. Chromatin and Transcription in Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rando, Oliver J.; Winston, Fred

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms by which chromatin structure controls eukaryotic transcription has been an intense area of investigation for the past 25 years. Many of the key discoveries that created the foundation for this field came from studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, including the discovery of the role of chromatin in transcriptional silencing, as well as the discovery of chromatin-remodeling factors and histone modification activities. Since that time, studies in yeast have continued to contribute in leading ways. This review article summarizes the large body of yeast studies in this field. PMID:22345607

  3. Polymorphisms in SREBF1 and SREBF2, two antipsychotic-activated transcription factors controlling cellular lipogenesis, are associated with schizophrenia in German and Scandinavian samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Hellard, S; Mühleisen, T W; Djurovic, S

    2010-01-01

    collaboration of psychiatric etiology study, SCOPE) replicated the association for the five SREBF1 markers and for two markers in SREBF2. A combined analysis of all samples resulted in highly significant genotypic P-values of 9 x 10(-4) for SREBF1 (rs11868035, odd ration (OR)=1.26, 95% confidence interval (CI...... in glial cell lines that antipsychotic drugs induce the expression of genes involved in cholesterol and fatty acids biosynthesis through activation of the sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) transcription factors, encoded by the sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 1 (SREBF1......) and sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 2 (SREBF2) genes. Considering the importance of these factors in the lipid biosynthesis and their possible involvement in antipsychotic drug effects, we hypothesized that genetic variants of SREBF1 and/or SREBF2 could affect schizophrenia...

  4. HIV-1 reverse transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wei-Shau; Hughes, Stephen H

    2012-10-01

    Reverse transcription and integration are the defining features of the Retroviridae; the common name "retrovirus" derives from the fact that these viruses use a virally encoded enzyme, reverse transcriptase (RT), to convert their RNA genomes into DNA. Reverse transcription is an essential step in retroviral replication. This article presents an overview of reverse transcription, briefly describes the structure and function of RT, provides an introduction to some of the cellular and viral factors that can affect reverse transcription, and discusses fidelity and recombination, two processes in which reverse transcription plays an important role. In keeping with the theme of the collection, the emphasis is on HIV-1 and HIV-1 RT.

  5. Transcriptional regulation of the operon encoding stress-responsive ECF sigma factor SigH and its anti-sigma factor RshA, and control of its regulatory network in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Busche Tobias

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The expression of genes in Corynebacterium glutamicum, a Gram-positive non-pathogenic bacterium used mainly for the industrial production of amino acids, is regulated by seven different sigma factors of RNA polymerase, including the stress-responsive ECF-sigma factor SigH. The sigH gene is located in a gene cluster together with the rshA gene, putatively encoding an anti-sigma factor. The aim of this study was to analyze the transcriptional regulation of the sigH and rshA gene cluster and the effects of RshA on the SigH regulon, in order to refine the model describing the role of SigH and RshA during stress response. Results Transcription analyses revealed that the sigH gene and rshA gene are cotranscribed from four sigH housekeeping promoters in C. glutamicum. In addition, a SigH-controlled rshA promoter was found to only drive the transcription of the rshA gene. To test the role of the putative anti-sigma factor gene rshA under normal growth conditions, a C. glutamicum rshA deletion strain was constructed and used for genome-wide transcription profiling with DNA microarrays. In total, 83 genes organized in 61 putative transcriptional units, including those previously detected using sigH mutant strains, exhibited increased transcript levels in the rshA deletion mutant compared to its parental strain. The genes encoding proteins related to disulphide stress response, heat stress proteins, components of the SOS-response to DNA damage and proteasome components were the most markedly upregulated gene groups. Altogether six SigH-dependent promoters upstream of the identified genes were determined by primer extension and a refined consensus promoter consisting of 45 original promoter sequences was constructed. Conclusions The rshA gene codes for an anti-sigma factor controlling the function of the stress-responsive sigma factor SigH in C. glutamicum. Transcription of rshA from a SigH-dependent promoter may serve to quickly

  6. Systematic mutagenesis of all predicted gntR genes in Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris reveals a GntR family transcriptional regulator controlling hypersensitive response and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Shi-Qi; Lu, Guang-Tao; Su, Hui-Zhao; Li, Rui-Fang; He, Yong-Qiang; Jiang, Bo-Le; Tang, Dong-Jie; Tang, Ji-Liang

    2011-09-01

    The GntR family is one of the most abundant and widely distributed groups of helix-turn-helix transcriptional regulators in bacteria. Six open reading frames in the genome of the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris were predicted to encode GntR regulators. All six of the predicted GntR-encoding genes were individually mutagenized and mutants from five of them were successfully obtained. Plant disease response assays revealed that one, whose product belongs to the YtrA subfamily and has been named HpaR1, is involved in the hypersensitive response (HR) and virulence. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and in vitro transcription assays revealed that HpaR1 could repress its own transcription level through binding to its promoter sequence, indicating an autoregulatory feedback inhibition mechanism for HpaR1 expression. Promoter-gusA reporter and reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that HpaR1 positively and negatively affects the expression of HR and pathogenicity (hrp) genes in host plant and standard media, respectively. Constitutive expression of the key hrp regulator, hrpG, in the hpaR1 mutant could bypass the requirement of HpaR1 for the induction of wild-type HR, suggesting that HpaR1 regulates the expression of hrp genes that encode the type III secretion system via hrpG.

  7. The effects of Lactobacillus plantarum on small intestinal barrier function and mucosal gene transcription; a randomized double-blind placebo controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mujagic, Zlatan; Vos, de Paul; Boekschoten, Mark; Govers, Coen; Pieters, Harm J.H.M.; Wit, de Nicole; Bron, Peter A.; Masclee, Ad A.M.; Troost, Freddy J.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of three Lactobacillus plantarum strains on in-vivo small intestinal barrier function and gene transcription in human subjects. The strains were selected for their differential effects on TLR signalling and tight junction protein rearrangement,

  8. The effects of Lactobacillus plantarum on small intestinal barrier function and mucosal gene transcription; A randomized double-blind placebo controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mujagic, Zlatan; Vos, De Paul; Boekschoten, Mark V.; Govers, Coen; Pieters, Harm J.H.M.; Wit, De Nicole J.W.; Bron, Peter A.; Masclee, Ad A.M.; Troost, Freddy J.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of three Lactobacillus plantarum strains on in-vivo small intestinal barrier function and gut mucosal gene transcription in human subjects. The strains were selected for their differential effects on TLR signalling and tight junction protein

  9. Lipase A gene transcription in Pseudomonas alcaligenes is under control of RNA polymerase s54 and response regulator LipR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krzeslak, Joanna; Papaioannou, Evelina; van Merkerk, Ronald; Paal, Krisztina A.; Bischoff, Rainer; Cool, Robbert H.; Quax, Wim J.

    Initial analysis has shown that the transcription of the Pseudomonas alcaligenes lipA gene, which encodes an extracellular lipase, is governed by the LipQR two-component system consisting of sensor kinase LipQ and DNA-binding regulator LipR. This study further analyzes lipA gene expression and

  10. A putative flowering-time-related Dof transcription factor gene, JcDof3, is controlled by the circadian clock in Jatropha curcas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; Yang, Ming-Feng; Zhang, Wen-Peng; Chen, Fan; Shen, Shi-Hua

    2011-12-01

    Plant-specific DNA-binding transcription factors with one finger (Dof) perform important roles in several biological processes. A yeast one-hybrid cDNA library of Jatropha curcas was used to identify Dof-type transcription factors. JcDof3, isolated from the library as a full-length cDNA, encoded a protein of 518 amino acids and contained a highly conserved Dof domain. Yeast one-hybrid systems and subcellular localization assays confirmed that JcDof3 was a typical transcription factor. In contrast to arrhythmic expression at basal level in etiolated cotyledons under continuous dark conditions, the circadian oscillations of JcDof3 transcripts were observed under long day, short day or continuous light regimes. A phylogenetic analysis showed that JcDof3 was clustered into the same clade with CYCLING DOF FACTOR (CDF), which interacts with F-box protein to regulate photoperiodic flowering. Moreover, a yeast two-hybrid assay showed that JcDof3 also interacted with F-box proteins. Our results suggest that JcDof3 is a circadian clock regulated gene, and might be involved in the flowering time regulation of J. curcas. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The effects of Lactobacillus plantarum on small intestinal barrier function and mucosal gene transcription; a randomized double-blind placebo controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mujagic, Zlatan; de Vos, Paul; Boekschoten, Mark V.; Govers, Coen; Pieters, Harm-Jan H M; de Wit, Nicole J. W.; Bron, Peter A.; Masclee, Ad A M; Troost, Freddy J

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of three Lactobacillus plantarum strains on in-vivo small intestinal barrier function and gut mucosal gene transcription in human subjects. The strains were selected for their differential effects on TLR signalling and tight junction protein

  12. Identification and characterization of a FOXA2-regulated transcriptional enhancer at a type 2 diabetes intronic locus that controls GCKR expression in liver cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Rodríguez, Maykel; Kaminska, Dorota; Lappalainen, Kati; Pihlajamäki, Jussi; Kaikkonen, Minna U; Laakso, Markku

    2017-07-06

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 100 genetic loci associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D). However, the underlying biological mechanisms for many of these associations remain unknown. GWAS signals close to the glucokinase regulatory protein gene (GCKR) have been reported for lipid and glucose metabolism traits and the risk of T2D. We investigated the regulatory function of an intronic locus at GCKR represented by the lead single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs780094. We used ENCODE project histone modification and transcription factor binding data to determine the regulatory features of a GCKR intronic locus formed by the high linkage disequilibrium rs780094(C/T), rs780095(G/A), and rs780096(G/C) SNPs. Characterization of the transcriptional activity of this region was assessed by luciferase reporter assays in HepG2 cells and mouse primary hepatocytes. ChIP-qPCR was used to determine the levels of haplotype specific transcription factor binding and histone marks. A CRISPR-dCas9 transcriptional activator system and qPCR were used to activate the locus and measure GCKR expression, respectively. Differential haplotype expression was measured from human liver biopsies. The ENCODE data suggest the existence of a liver-specific intragenic enhancer at the locus represented by s780094. We observed that FOXA2 increased the transcriptional activity of this region in a haplotype specific way (CGG > TAC; rs780094, rs780095, and rs780096). In addition, the CGG haplotype showed higher binding to FOXA2 and higher levels of the H3K27Ac histone mark. The epigenetic activation of this locus increased the expression of endogenous GCKR in HepG2 cells, confirming that GCKR is the direct target gene of the enhancer. Finally, we confirmed that the CGG haplotype exhibits higher levels of transcription in human liver. Our results demonstrate the existence of a liver-specific FOXA2-regulated transcriptional enhancer at an intronic T2D locus represented by

  13. HYPER RECOMBINATION1 of the THO/TREX complex plays a role in controlling transcription of the REVERSION-TO-ETHYLENE SENSITIVITY1 gene in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congyao Xu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Arabidopsis REVERSION-TO-ETHYLENE SENSITIVITY1 (RTE1 represses ethylene hormone responses by promoting ethylene receptor ETHYLENE RESPONSE1 (ETR1 signaling, which negatively regulates ethylene responses. To investigate the regulation of RTE1, we performed a genetic screening for mutations that suppress ethylene insensitivity conferred by RTE1 overexpression in Arabidopsis. We isolated HYPER RECOMBINATION1 (HPR1, which is required for RTE1 overexpressor (RTE1ox ethylene insensitivity at the seedling but not adult stage. HPR1 is a component of the THO complex, which, with other proteins, forms the TRanscription EXport (TREX complex. In yeast, Drosophila, and humans, the THO/TREX complex is involved in transcription elongation and nucleocytoplasmic RNA export, but its role in plants is to be fully determined. We investigated how HPR1 is involved in RTE1ox ethylene insensitivity in Arabidopsis. The hpr1-5 mutation may affect nucleocytoplasmic mRNA export, as revealed by in vivo hybridization of fluorescein-labeled oligo(dT45 with unidentified mRNA in the nucleus. The hpr1-5 mutation reduced the total and nuclear RTE1 transcript levels to a similar extent, and RTE1 transcript reduction rate was not affected by hpr1-5 with cordycepin treatment, which prematurely terminates transcription. The defect in the THO-interacting TEX1 protein of TREX but not the mRNA export factor SAC3B also reduced the total and nuclear RTE1 levels. SERINE-ARGININE-RICH (SR proteins are involved mRNA splicing, and we found that SR protein SR33 co-localized with HPR1 in nuclear speckles, which agreed with the association of human TREX with the splicing machinery. We reveal a role for HPR1 in RTE1 expression during transcription elongation and less likely during export. Gene expression involved in ethylene signaling suppression was not reduced by the hpr1-5 mutation, which indicates selectivity of HPR1 for RTE1 expression affecting the consequent ethylene response. Thus

  14. Transcriptional attenuation controls macrolide inducible efflux and resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae and in other Gram-positive bacteria containing mef/mel(msr(D elements.

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    Scott T Chancey

    Full Text Available Macrolide resistance, emerging in Streptococcus pneumoniae and other Gram-positive bacteria, is increasingly due to efflux pumps encoded by mef/mel(msr operons found on discrete mobile genetic elements. The regulation of mef/mel(msr in these elements is not well understood. We identified the mef(E/mel transcriptional start, localized the mef(E/mel promoter, and demonstrated attenuation of transcription as a mechanism of regulation of macrolide-inducible mef-mediated macrolide resistance in S. pneumoniae. The mef(E/mel transcriptional start site was a guanine 327 bp upstream of mef(E. Consensus pneumococcal promoter -10 (5'-TATACT-3' and -35 (5'-TTGAAC-3' boxes separated by 17 bp were identified 7 bp upstream of the start site. Analysis of the predicted secondary structure of the 327 5' region identified four pairs of inverted repeats R1-R8 predicted to fold into stem-loops, a small leader peptide [MTASMRLR, (Mef(EL] required for macrolide induction and a Rho-independent transcription terminator. RNA-seq analyses provided confirmation of transcriptional attenuation. In addition, expression of mef(EL was also influenced by mef(EL-dependent mRNA stability. The regulatory region 5' of mef(E was highly conserved in other mef/mel(msr-containing elements including Tn1207.1 and the 5612IQ complex in pneumococci and Tn1207.3 in Group A streptococci, indicating a regulatory mechanism common to a wide variety of Gram-positive bacteria containing mef/mel(msr elements.

  15. Fatty Acid–Regulated Transcription Factors in the Liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jump, Donald B.; Tripathy, Sasmita; Depner, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acid regulation of hepatic gene transcription was first reported in the early 1990s. Several transcription factors have been identified as targets of fatty acid regulation. This regulation is achieved by direct fatty acid binding to the transcription factor or by indirect mechanisms where fatty acids regulate signaling pathways controlling the expression of transcription factors or the phosphorylation, ubiquitination, or proteolytic cleavage of the transcription factor. Although dietary fatty acids are well-established regulators of hepatic transcription factors, emerging evidence indicates that endogenously generated fatty acids are equally important in controlling transcription factors in the context of glucose and lipid homeostasis. Our first goal in this review is to provide an up-to-date examination of the molecular and metabolic bases of fatty acid regulation of key transcription factors controlling hepatic metabolism. Our second goal is to link these mechanisms to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a growing health concern in the obese population. PMID:23528177

  16. Transcriptional profiling during the early differentiation of granulocyte and monocyte progenitors controlled by conditional versions of the E2a-Pbx1 oncoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, David B; Scheele, Jurgen; Pasillas, Martina; Kamps, Mark P

    2003-07-01

    The E2a-Pbx1 oncoprotein of human pre-B cell leukemia prevents differentiation and maintains continued cell division in cultured myeloid progenitors. Previously, estrogen-dependent forms of E2a-Pbx1 were generated that immortalized neutrophil (ECoM-G cells) or monocyte (ECoM-M cells) progenitors and that permitted their terminal differentiation upon estrogen withdrawal. Here, representational difference analysis (RDA) and Affymetrix array analysis are used to identify changes in gene expression that accompany the early differentiation of these cells. The promoters of these genes, whose expression changes upon E2a-Pbx1 inactivation, integrate the biochemical mechanism through which E2a-Pbx1 arrests differentiation and maintains cell division. Inactivation of E2a-Pbx1 caused the 10- to 80-fold up regulation of a small subset of myeloid differentiation genes (MRP8, Cnlp, NB1, Bactenecin, YM1, Stefin 1, Lipocortin, Lactoferrin, gp91 phox and Ly6-G) and a 10-fold down regulation of the TLE1 corepressor gene, as well as of a group of genes expressed in dividing cells (c-Myc, Nucleophosmin, Spermidine synthase, NOP56, Hnrpa1). Transcription of 97% of cellular genes, including 300 other transcription factor genes (21 Hox genes) and other myeloid genes, varied less than 3-fold, with most varying less than 50%. Therefore, E2a-Pbx1 prevents transcription and maintains the cell cycle by a specific rather than a global transcriptional mechanism. Monocyte progenitors were distinguished by persistent expression of IRF8 and of a category of other genes characterized as "interferon-stimulated" (ISG15, ISG20, Ifit1, Ifi202a, Ifi203, IfiS204, Ifi204-related, IRF7 and Ly6-E.1), as well as by the upregulation of the Lrg21 bZip transcription factor gene during late differentiation. The synchronous expression of stage-specific and cell cycle genes regulated by E2a-Pbx1 in these cell lines comprises a model system in which analysis of their promoters can be used as a starting point to

  17. Euglena Transcript Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWatters, David C; Russell, Anthony G

    2017-01-01

    RNA transcript processing is an important stage in the gene expression pathway of all organisms and is subject to various mechanisms of control that influence the final levels of gene products. RNA processing involves events such as nuclease-mediated cleavage, removal of intervening sequences referred to as introns and modifications to RNA structure (nucleoside modification and editing). In Euglena, RNA transcript processing was initially examined in chloroplasts because of historical interest in the secondary endosymbiotic origin of this organelle in this organism. More recent efforts to examine mitochondrial genome structure and RNA maturation have been stimulated by the discovery of unusual processing pathways in other Euglenozoans such as kinetoplastids and diplonemids. Eukaryotes containing large genomes are now known to typically contain large collections of introns and regulatory RNAs involved in RNA processing events, and Euglena gracilis in particular has a relatively large genome for a protist. Studies examining the structure of nuclear genes and the mechanisms involved in nuclear RNA processing have revealed that indeed Euglena contains large numbers of introns in the limited set of genes so far examined and also possesses large numbers of specific classes of regulatory and processing RNAs, such as small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs). Most interestingly, these studies have also revealed that Euglena possesses novel processing pathways generating highly fragmented cytosolic ribosomal RNAs and subunits and non-conventional intron classes removed by unknown splicing mechanisms. This unexpected diversity in RNA processing pathways emphasizes the importance of identifying the components involved in these processing mechanisms and their evolutionary emergence in Euglena species.

  18. HIV-1 Reverse Transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Wei-Shau; Hughes, Stephen H.

    2012-01-01

    Reverse transcription and integration are the defining features of the Retroviridae; the common name “retrovirus” derives from the fact that these viruses use a virally encoded enzyme, reverse transcriptase (RT), to convert their RNA genomes into DNA. Reverse transcription is an essential step in retroviral replication. This article presents an overview of reverse transcription, briefly describes the structure and function of RT, provides an introduction to some of the cellular and viral fact...

  19. A downstream CpG island controls transcript initiation and elongation and the methylation state of the imprinted Airn macro ncRNA promoter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha V Koerner

    Full Text Available A CpG island (CGI lies at the 5' end of the Airn macro non-protein-coding (nc RNA that represses the flanking Igf2r promoter in cis on paternally inherited chromosomes. In addition to being modified on maternally inherited chromosomes by a DNA methylation imprint, the Airn CGI shows two unusual organization features: its position immediately downstream of the Airn promoter and transcription start site and a series of tandem direct repeats (TDRs occupying its second half. The physical separation of the Airn promoter from the CGI provides a model to investigate if the CGI plays distinct transcriptional and epigenetic roles. We used homologous recombination to generate embryonic stem cells carrying deletions at the endogenous locus of the entire CGI or just the TDRs. The deleted Airn alleles were analyzed by using an ES cell imprinting model that recapitulates the onset of Igf2r imprinted expression in embryonic development or by using knock-out mice. The results show that the CGI is required for efficient Airn initiation and to maintain the unmethylated state of the Airn promoter, which are both necessary for Igf2r repression on the paternal chromosome. The TDRs occupying the second half of the CGI play a minor role in Airn transcriptional elongation or processivity, but are essential for methylation on the maternal Airn promoter that is necessary for Igf2r to be expressed from this chromosome. Together the data indicate the existence of a class of regulatory CGIs in the mammalian genome that act downstream of the promoter and transcription start.

  20. The Hypoxia-Inducible Transcription Factor ZNF395 Is Controlled by IĸB Kinase-Signaling and Activates Genes Involved in the Innate Immune Response and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordanovski, Darko; Herwartz, Christine; Pawlowski, Anna; Taute, Stefanie; Frommolt, Peter; Steger, Gertrud

    2013-01-01

    Activation of the hypoxia inducible transcription factor HIF and the NF-ĸB pathway promotes inflammation-mediated tumor progression. The cellular transcription factor ZNF395 has repeatedly been found overexpressed in various human cancers, particularly in response to hypoxia, implying a functional relevance. To understand the biological activity of ZNF395, we identified target genes of ZNF395 through a genome-wide expression screen. Induced ZNF395 expression led to the upregulation of genes known to play a role in cancer as well as a subset of interferon (IFN)-stimulated genes (ISG) involved in antiviral responses such as IFIT1/ISG56, IFI44 and IFI16. In cells that lack ZNF395, the IFN-α-mediated stimulation of these factors was impaired, demonstrating that ZNF395 is required for the full induction of these antiviral genes. Transient transfections revealed that ZNF395-mediated activation of the IFIT1/ISG56 promoter depends on the two IFN-stimulated response elements within the promoter and on the DNA-binding domain of ZNF395, a so-called C-clamp. We also show that IĸBα kinase (IKK)-signaling is necessary to allow ZNF395 to activate transcription and simultaneously enhances its proteolytic degradation. Thus, ZNF395 becomes activated at the level of protein modification by IKK. Moreover, we confirm that the expression of ZNF395 is induced by hypoxia. Our results characterize ZNF395 as a novel factor that contributes to the maximal stimulation of a subset of ISGs. This transcriptional activity depends on IKK signaling further supporting a role of ZNF395 in the innate immune response. Given these results it is possible that under hypoxic conditions, elevated levels of ZNF395 may support inflammation and cancer progression by activating the target genes involved in the innate immune response and cancer. PMID:24086395

  1. The hypoxia-inducible transcription factor ZNF395 is controlled by IĸB kinase-signaling and activates genes involved in the innate immune response and cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darko Jordanovski

    Full Text Available Activation of the hypoxia inducible transcription factor HIF and the NF-ĸB pathway promotes inflammation-mediated tumor progression. The cellular transcription factor ZNF395 has repeatedly been found overexpressed in various human cancers, particularly in response to hypoxia, implying a functional relevance. To understand the biological activity of ZNF395, we identified target genes of ZNF395 through a genome-wide expression screen. Induced ZNF395 expression led to the upregulation of genes known to play a role in cancer as well as a subset of interferon (IFN-stimulated genes (ISG involved in antiviral responses such as IFIT1/ISG56, IFI44 and IFI16. In cells that lack ZNF395, the IFN-α-mediated stimulation of these factors was impaired, demonstrating that ZNF395 is required for the full induction of these antiviral genes. Transient transfections revealed that ZNF395-mediated activation of the IFIT1/ISG56 promoter depends on the two IFN-stimulated response elements within the promoter and on the DNA-binding domain of ZNF395, a so-called C-clamp. We also show that IĸBα kinase (IKK-signaling is necessary to allow ZNF395 to activate transcription and simultaneously enhances its proteolytic degradation. Thus, ZNF395 becomes activated at the level of protein modification by IKK. Moreover, we confirm that the expression of ZNF395 is induced by hypoxia. Our results characterize ZNF395 as a novel factor that contributes to the maximal stimulation of a subset of ISGs. This transcriptional activity depends on IKK signaling further supporting a role of ZNF395 in the innate immune response. Given these results it is possible that under hypoxic conditions, elevated levels of ZNF395 may support inflammation and cancer progression by activating the target genes involved in the innate immune response and cancer.

  2. The hypoxia-inducible transcription factor ZNF395 is controlled by IĸB kinase-signaling and activates genes involved in the innate immune response and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordanovski, Darko; Herwartz, Christine; Pawlowski, Anna; Taute, Stefanie; Frommolt, Peter; Steger, Gertrud

    2013-01-01

    Activation of the hypoxia inducible transcription factor HIF and the NF-ĸB pathway promotes inflammation-mediated tumor progression. The cellular transcription factor ZNF395 has repeatedly been found overexpressed in various human cancers, particularly in response to hypoxia, implying a functional relevance. To understand the biological activity of ZNF395, we identified target genes of ZNF395 through a genome-wide expression screen. Induced ZNF395 expression led to the upregulation of genes known to play a role in cancer as well as a subset of interferon (IFN)-stimulated genes (ISG) involved in antiviral responses such as IFIT1/ISG56, IFI44 and IFI16. In cells that lack ZNF395, the IFN-α-mediated stimulation of these factors was impaired, demonstrating that ZNF395 is required for the full induction of these antiviral genes. Transient transfections revealed that ZNF395-mediated activation of the IFIT1/ISG56 promoter depends on the two IFN-stimulated response elements within the promoter and on the DNA-binding domain of ZNF395, a so-called C-clamp. We also show that IĸBα kinase (IKK)-signaling is necessary to allow ZNF395 to activate transcription and simultaneously enhances its proteolytic degradation. Thus, ZNF395 becomes activated at the level of protein modification by IKK. Moreover, we confirm that the expression of ZNF395 is induced by hypoxia. Our results characterize ZNF395 as a novel factor that contributes to the maximal stimulation of a subset of ISGs. This transcriptional activity depends on IKK signaling further supporting a role of ZNF395 in the innate immune response. Given these results it is possible that under hypoxic conditions, elevated levels of ZNF395 may support inflammation and cancer progression by activating the target genes involved in the innate immune response and cancer.

  3. The dual transcriptional regulator CysR in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 controls a subset of genes of the McbR regulon in response to the availability of sulphide acceptor molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koch Daniel J

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regulation of sulphur metabolism in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 has been studied intensively in the last few years, due to its industrial as well as scientific importance. Previously, the gene cg0156 was shown to belong to the regulon of McbR, a global transcriptional repressor of sulphur metabolism in C. glutamicum. This gene encodes a putative ROK-type regulator, a paralogue of the activator of sulphonate utilisation, SsuR. Therefore, it is an interesting candidate for study to further the understanding of the regulation of sulphur metabolism in C. glutamicum. Results Deletion of cg0156, now designated cysR, results in the inability of the mutant to utilise sulphate and aliphatic sulphonates. DNA microarray hybridisations revealed 49 genes with significantly increased and 48 with decreased transcript levels in presence of the native CysR compared to a cysR deletion mutant. Among the genes positively controlled by CysR were the gene cluster involved in sulphate reduction, fpr2 cysIXHDNYZ, and ssuR. Gel retardation experiments demonstrated that binding of CysR to DNA depends in vitro on the presence of either O-acetyl-L-serine or O-acetyl-L-homoserine. Mapping of the transcription start points of five transcription units helped to identify a 10 bp inverted repeat as the possible CysR binding site. Subsequent in vivo tests proved this motif to be necessary for CysR-dependent transcriptional regulation. Conclusion CysR acts as the functional analogue of the unrelated LysR-type regulator CysB from Escherichia coli, controlling sulphide production in response to acceptor availability. In both bacteria, gene duplication events seem to have taken place which resulted in the evolution of dedicated regulators for the control of sulphonate utilisation. The striking convergent evolution of network topology indicates the strong selective pressure to control the metabolism of the essential but often toxic sulphur

  4. A Novel TetR Family Transcriptional Regulator, CalR3, Negatively Controls Calcimycin Biosynthesis in Streptomyces chartreusis NRRL 3882

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lixia Gou

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Calcimycin is a unique ionophoric antibiotic that is widely used in biochemical and pharmaceutical applications, but the genetic basis underlying the regulatory mechanisms of calcimycin biosynthesis are unclear. Here, we identified the calR3 gene, which encodes a novel TetR family transcriptional regulator and exerts a negative effect on calcimycin biosynthesis. Disruption of calR3 in Streptomyces chartreusis NRRL 3882 led to significantly increased calcimycin and its intermediate cezomycin. Gene expression analysis showed that the transcription of calR3 and its adjacent calT gene were dramatically enhanced (30- and 171-fold, respectively in GLX26 (ΔcalR3 mutants compared with the wild-type strains. Two CalR3-binding sites within the bidirectional calR3-calT promoter region were identified using a DNase I footprinting assay, indicating that CalR3 directly repressed the transcription of its own gene and the calT gene. In vitro electrophoretic mobility shift assays suggested that both calcimycin and cezomycin can act as CalR3 ligands to induce CalR3 to dissociate from its binding sites. These findings indicate negative feedback for the regulation of CalR3 in calcimycin biosynthesis and suggest that calcimycin production can be improved by manipulating its biosynthetic machinery.

  5. A Novel TetR Family Transcriptional Regulator, CalR3, Negatively Controls Calcimycin Biosynthesis inStreptomyces chartreusisNRRL 3882.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Lixia; Han, Tiesheng; Wang, Xiaoxia; Ge, Jingxuan; Liu, Wenxiu; Hu, Fen; Wang, Zhijun

    2017-01-01

    Calcimycin is a unique ionophoric antibiotic that is widely used in biochemical and pharmaceutical applications, but the genetic basis underlying the regulatory mechanisms of calcimycin biosynthesis are unclear. Here, we identified the calR3 gene, which encodes a novel TetR family transcriptional regulator and exerts a negative effect on calcimycin biosynthesis. Disruption of calR3 in Streptomyces chartreusis NRRL 3882 led to significantly increased calcimycin and its intermediate cezomycin. Gene expression analysis showed that the transcription of calR3 and its adjacent calT gene were dramatically enhanced (30- and 171-fold, respectively) in GLX26 (Δ calR3 ) mutants compared with the wild-type strains. Two CalR3-binding sites within the bidirectional calR3-calT promoter region were identified using a DNase I footprinting assay, indicating that CalR3 directly repressed the transcription of its own gene and the calT gene. In vitro electrophoretic mobility shift assays suggested that both calcimycin and cezomycin can act as CalR3 ligands to induce CalR3 to dissociate from its binding sites. These findings indicate negative feedback for the regulation of CalR3 in calcimycin biosynthesis and suggest that calcimycin production can be improved by manipulating its biosynthetic machinery.

  6. The N‐acetylglucosamine catabolic gene cluster in Trichoderma reesei is controlled by the Ndt80‐like transcription factor RON1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappel, Lisa; Gaderer, Romana; Flipphi, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Summary Chitin is an important structural constituent of fungal cell walls composed of N‐acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) monosaccharides, but catabolism of GlcNAc has not been studied in filamentous fungi so far. In the yeast C andida albicans, the genes encoding the three enzymes responsible for stepwise conversion of GlcNAc to fructose‐6‐phosphate are clustered. In this work, we analysed GlcNAc catabolism in ascomycete filamentous fungi and found that the respective genes are also clustered in these fungi. In contrast to C . albicans, the cluster often contains a gene for an Ndt80‐like transcription factor, which we named RON1 (regulator of N‐acetylglucosamine catabolism 1). Further, a gene for a glycoside hydrolase 3 protein related to bacterial N‐acetylglucosaminidases can be found in the GlcNAc gene cluster in filamentous fungi. Functional analysis in T richoderma reesei showed that the transcription factor RON1 is a key activator of the GlcNAc gene cluster and essential for GlcNAc catabolism. Furthermore, we present an evolutionary analysis of Ndt80‐like proteins in Ascomycota. All GlcNAc cluster genes, as well as the GlcNAc transporter gene ngt1, and an additional transcriptional regulator gene, csp2, encoding the homolog of N eurospora crassa  CSP2/GRHL, were functionally characterised by gene expression analysis and phenotypic characterisation of knockout strains in T . reesei. PMID:26481444

  7. The DMD locus harbours multiple long non-coding RNAs which orchestrate and control transcription of muscle dystrophin mRNA isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovolenta, Matteo; Erriquez, Daniela; Valli, Emanuele; Brioschi, Simona; Scotton, Chiara; Neri, Marcella; Falzarano, Maria Sofia; Gherardi, Samuele; Fabris, Marina; Rimessi, Paola; Gualandi, Francesca; Perini, Giovanni; Ferlini, Alessandra

    2012-01-01

    The 2.2 Mb long dystrophin (DMD) gene, the largest gene in the human genome, corresponds to roughly 0.1% of the entire human DNA sequence. Mutations in this gene cause Duchenne muscular dystrophy and other milder X-linked, recessive dystrophinopathies. Using a custom-made tiling array, specifically designed for the DMD locus, we identified a variety of novel long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), both sense and antisense oriented, whose expression profiles mirror that of DMD gene. Importantly, these transcripts are intronic in origin and specifically localized to the nucleus and are transcribed contextually with dystrophin isoforms or primed by MyoD-induced myogenic differentiation. Furthermore, their forced ectopic expression in both human muscle and neuronal cells causes a specific and negative regulation of endogenous dystrophin full length isoforms and significantly down-regulate the activity of a luciferase reporter construct carrying the minimal promoter regions of the muscle dystrophin isoform. Consistent with this apparently repressive role, we found that, in muscle samples of dystrophinopathic female carriers, lncRNAs expression levels inversely correlate with those of muscle full length DMD isoforms. Overall these findings unveil an unprecedented complexity of the transcriptional pattern of the DMD locus and reveal that DMD lncRNAs may contribute to the orchestration and homeostasis of the muscle dystrophin expression pattern by either selective targeting and down-modulating the dystrophin promoter transcriptional activity.

  8. SMADs and YAP compete to control elongation of β-catenin:LEF-1-recruited RNAPII during hESC differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estarás, Conchi; Benner, Chris; Jones, Katherine A

    2015-06-04

    The Wnt3a/β-catenin and Activin/SMAD2,3 signaling pathways synergize to induce endodermal differentiation of human embryonic stem cells; however, the underlying mechanism is not well understood. Using ChIP-seq and GRO-seq analyses, we show here that Wnt3a-induced β-catenin:LEF-1 enhancers recruit cohesin to direct enhancer-promoter looping and activate mesendodermal (ME) lineage genes. Moreover, we find that LEF-1 and other hESC enhancers recruit RNAPII complexes (eRNAPII) that are highly phosphorylated at Ser5, but not Ser7. Wnt3a signaling further increases Ser5P-RNAPII at LEF-1 sites and ME gene promoters, indicating that elongation remains limiting. However, subsequent Activin/SMAD2,3 signaling selectively increases transcription elongation, P-TEFb occupancy, and Ser7P-RNAPII levels at these genes. Finally, we show that the Hippo regulator, YAP, functions with TEAD to regulate binding of the NELF negative elongation factor and block SMAD2,3 induction of ME genes. Thus, the Wnt3a/β-catenin and Activin/SMAD2,3 pathways act in concert to counteract YAP repression and upregulate ME genes during early hESC differentiation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The Transcription Factor Encyclopedia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yusuf, Dimas; Butland, Stefanie L.; Swanson, Magdalena I.; Bolotin, Eugene; Ticoll, Amy; Cheung, Warren A.; Zhang, Xiao Yu Cindy; Dickman, Christopher T. D.; Fulton, Debra L.; Lim, Jonathan S.; Schnabl, Jake M.; Ramos, Oscar H. P.; Vasseur-Cognet, Mireille; de Leeuw, Charles N.; Simpson, Elizabeth M.; Ryffel, Gerhart U.; Lam, Eric W.-F.; Kist, Ralf; Wilson, Miranda S. C.; Marco-Ferreres, Raquel; Brosens, Jan J.; Beccari, Leonardo L.; Bovolenta, Paola; Benayoun, Bérénice A.; Monteiro, Lara J.; Schwenen, Helma D. C.; Grontved, Lars; Wederell, Elizabeth; Mandrup, Susanne; Veitia, Reiner A.; Chakravarthy, Harini; Hoodless, Pamela A.; Mancarelli, M. Michela; Torbett, Bruce E.; Banham, Alison H.; Reddy, Sekhar P.; Cullum, Rebecca L.; Liedtke, Michaela; Tschan, Mario P.; Vaz, Michelle; Rizzino, Angie; Zannini, Mariastella; Frietze, Seth; Farnham, Peggy J.; Eijkelenboom, Astrid; Brown, Philip J.; Laperrière, David; Leprince, Dominique; de Cristofaro, Tiziana; Prince, Kelly L.; Putker, Marrit; del Peso, Luis; Camenisch, Gieri; Wenger, Roland H.; Mikula, Michal; Rozendaal, Marieke; Mader, Sylvie; Ostrowski, Jerzy; Rhodes, Simon J.; van Rechem, Capucine; Boulay, Gaylor; Olechnowicz, Sam W. Z.; Breslin, Mary B.; Lan, Michael S.; Nanan, Kyster K.; Wegner, Michael; Hou, Juan; Mullen, Rachel D.; Colvin, Stephanie C.; Noy, Peter John; Webb, Carol F.; Witek, Matthew E.; Ferrell, Scott; Daniel, Juliet M.; Park, Jason; Waldman, Scott A.; Peet, Daniel J.; Taggart, Michael; Jayaraman, Padma-Sheela; Karrich, Julien J.; Blom, Bianca; Vesuna, Farhad; O'Geen, Henriette; Sun, Yunfu; Gronostajski, Richard M.; Woodcroft, Mark W.; Hough, Margaret R.; Chen, Edwin; Europe-Finner, G. Nicholas; Karolczak-Bayatti, Magdalena; Bailey, Jarrod; Hankinson, Oliver; Raman, Venu; Lebrun, David P.; Biswal, Shyam; Harvey, Christopher J.; Debruyne, Jason P.; Hogenesch, John B.; Hevner, Robert F.; Héligon, Christophe; Luo, Xin M.; Blank, Marissa Cathleen; Millen, Kathleen Joyce; Sharlin, David S.; Forrest, Douglas; Dahlman-Wright, Karin; Zhao, Chunyan; Mishima, Yuriko; Sinha, Satrajit; Chakrabarti, Rumela; Portales-Casamar, Elodie; Sladek, Frances M.; Bradley, Philip H.; Wasserman, Wyeth W.

    2012-01-01

    Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130 mini review

  10. The transcriptional landscape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    The application of new and less biased methods to study the transcriptional output from genomes, such as tiling arrays and deep sequencing, has revealed that most of the genome is transcribed and that there is substantial overlap of transcripts derived from the two strands of DNA. In protein codi...

  11. Mechanical Properties of Transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevier, Stuart A.; Levine, Herbert

    2017-06-01

    The mechanical properties of transcription have recently been shown to play a central role in gene expression. However, a full physical characterization of this central biological process is lacking. In this Letter, we introduce a simple description of the basic physical elements of transcription where RNA elongation, RNA polymerase rotation, and DNA supercoiling are coupled. The resulting framework describes the relative amount of RNA polymerase rotation and DNA supercoiling that occurs during RNA elongation. Asymptotic behavior is derived and can be used to experimentally extract unknown mechanical parameters of transcription. Mechanical limits to transcription are incorporated through the addition of a DNA supercoiling-dependent RNA polymerase velocity. This addition can lead to transcriptional stalling and resulting implications for gene expression, chromatin structure and genome organization are discussed.

  12. MicroRNA-126-mediated control of cell fate in B-cell myeloid progenitors as a potential alternative to transcriptional factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyama, Kazuki; Ikawa, Tomokatsu; Gentner, Bernhard; Hozumi, Katsuto; Harnprasopwat, Ratanakanit; Lu, Jun; Yamashita, Riu; Ha, Daon; Toyoshima, Takae; Chanda, Bidisha; Kawamata, Toyotaka; Yokoyama, Kazuaki; Wang, Shusheng; Ando, Kiyoshi; Lodish, Harvey F; Tojo, Arinobu; Kawamoto, Hiroshi; Kotani, Ai

    2013-08-13

    Lineage specification is thought to be largely regulated at the level of transcription, where lineage-specific transcription factors drive specific cell fates. MicroRNAs (miR), vital to many cell functions, act posttranscriptionally to decrease the expression of target mRNAs. MLL-AF4 acute lymphocytic leukemia exhibits both myeloid and B-cell surface markers, suggesting that the transformed cells are B-cell myeloid progenitor cells. Through gain- and loss-of-function experiments, we demonstrated that microRNA 126 (miR-126) drives B-cell myeloid biphenotypic leukemia differentiation toward B cells without changing expression of E2A immunoglobulin enhancer-binding factor E12/E47 (E2A), early B-cell factor 1 (EBF1), or paired box protein 5, which are critical transcription factors in B-lymphopoiesis. Similar induction of B-cell differentiation by miR-126 was observed in normal hematopoietic cells in vitro and in vivo in uncommitted murine c-Kit(+)Sca1(+)Lineage(-) cells, with insulin regulatory subunit-1 acting as a target of miR-126. Importantly, in EBF1-deficient hematopoietic progenitor cells, which fail to differentiate into B cells, miR-126 significantly up-regulated B220, and induced the expression of B-cell genes, including recombination activating genes-1/2 and CD79a/b. These data suggest that miR-126 can at least partly rescue B-cell development independently of EBF1. These experiments show that miR-126 regulates myeloid vs. B-cell fate through an alternative machinery, establishing the critical role of miRNAs in the lineage specification of multipotent mammalian cells.

  13. Expression of the Vibrio cholerae gene encoding aldehyde dehydrogenase is under control of ToxR, the cholera toxin transcriptional activator.

    OpenAIRE

    Parsot, C; Mekalanos, J J

    1991-01-01

    The toxR gene of Vibrio cholerae encodes a transcriptional activator required for the expression of the cholera toxin genes (ctxAB) and more than 15 other genes encoding secreted or membrane proteins. The latter group includes virulence genes involved in the biogenesis of the TCP pilus, the accessory colonization factor, and such ToxR-activated genes as tagA, mutations in which cause no detectable virulence defect in the suckling mouse model. To analyze the regulation of expression and the st...

  14. Early B-cell factor 1 (EBF1) is critical for transcriptional control of SLAMF1 gene in human B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Anton M; Putlyaeva, Lidia V; Covich, Milica; Klepikova, Anna V; Akulich, Kseniya A; Vorontsov, Ilya E; Korneev, Kirill V; Dmitriev, Sergey E; Polanovsky, Oleg L; Sidorenko, Svetlana P; Kulakovskiy, Ivan V; Kuprash, Dmitry V

    2016-10-01

    Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule family member 1 (SLAMF1)/CD150 is a co-stimulatory receptor expressed on a variety of hematopoietic cells, in particular on mature lymphocytes activated by specific antigen, costimulation and cytokines. Changes in CD150 expression level have been reported in association with autoimmunity and with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia. We characterized the core promoter for SLAMF1 gene in human B-cell lines and explored binding sites for a number of transcription factors involved in B cell differentiation and activation. Mutations of SP1, STAT6, IRF4, NF-kB, ELF1, TCF3, and SPI1/PU.1 sites resulted in significantly decreased promoter activity of varying magnitude, depending on the cell line tested. The most profound effect on the promoter strength was observed upon mutation of the binding site for Early B-cell factor 1 (EBF1). This mutation produced a 10-20 fold drop in promoter activity and pinpointed EBF1 as the master regulator of human SLAMF1 gene in B cells. We also identified three potent transcriptional enhancers in human SLAMF1 locus, each containing functional EBF1 binding sites. Thus, EBF1 interacts with specific binding sites located both in the promoter and in the enhancer regions of the SLAMF1 gene and is critical for its expression in human B cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Variants in the IFNγ transcription factor genes TBET, STAT1, STAT4, and HLX and the risk of pulmonary tuberculosis in a Colombian population: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Dulfary; Lefebvre, Céline; García, Luis F; Barrera, Luis F

    2013-01-01

    Interferon gamma (IFNγ) is the most potent cytokine involved in the control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the etiological agent of human tuberculosis (TB). Patients with active TB present reduced levels of IFNγ, which may explain the lack of effective immunity against Mtb in these patients. The diminished expression of or functional alterations in trans-acting factors that regulate IFNγ gene expression may explain the reduced levels of IFNγ in TB patients. To investigate the relationships of genetic variants in the transcription factors TBET, STAT1, STAT4, and HLX to susceptibility/resistance to pulmonary TB. Eight candidate single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected, and genotyped in 466 unrelated pulmonary TB patients and 300 healthy controls from Colombia, and the allelic and genetic associations with TB were analyzed. The results indicate that no SNP in the transcription factors studied is associated with TB. However, polymorphism rs11650354 in the TBET gene may be associated with a decreased risk of TB; the TT genotype was significantly associated with TB protection in a recessive genetic model (OR=0.089, 95% CI: 0.01-0.73, p=0.0069), although this association was not maintained after multiple test correction (EMP2= 0.61). In this study, the rs11650354 variant of TBET was suggested to promote resistance to TB in a Colombian population. A future replication case-control study using additional samples will be necessary to confirm this suggestive association.

  16. Specificity in ROS Signaling and Transcript Signatures

    OpenAIRE

    Vaahtera, Lauri; Brosché, Mikael; Wrzaczek, Michael; Kangasjärvi, Jaakko

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Reactive oxygen species (ROS), important signaling molecules in plants, are involved in developmental control and stress adaptation. ROS production can trigger broad transcriptional changes; however, it is not clear how specificity in transcriptional regulation is achieved. Recent Advances: A large collection of public transcriptome data from the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana is available for analysis. These data can be used for the analysis of biological processes that are a...

  17. Alternative Oxidase Transcription Factors AOD2 and AOD5 ofNeurospora crassaControl the Expression of Genes Involved in Energy Production and Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhigang; Smith, Kristina M; Bredeweg, Erin L; Bosnjak, Natasa; Freitag, Michael; Nargang, Frank E

    2017-02-09

    In Neurospora crassa , blocking the function of the standard mitochondrial electron transport chain results in the induction of an alternative oxidase (AOX). AOX transfers electrons directly from ubiquinol to molecular oxygen. AOX serves as a model of retrograde regulation since it is encoded by a nuclear gene that is regulated in response to signals from mitochondria. The N. crassa transcription factors AOD2 and AOD5 are necessary for the expression of the AOX gene. To gain insight into the mechanism by which these factors function, and to determine if they have roles in the expression of additional genes in N. crassa , we constructed strains expressing only tagged versions of the proteins. Cell fractionation experiments showed that both proteins are localized to the nucleus under both AOX inducing and noninducing conditions. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation and high throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) analysis revealed that the proteins are bound to the promoter region of the AOX gene under both conditions. ChIP-seq also showed that the transcription factors bind to the upstream regions of a number of genes that are involved in energy production and metabolism. Dependence on AOD2 and AOD5 for the expression of several of these genes was verified by quantitative PCR. The majority of ChIP-seq peaks observed were enriched for both AOD2 and AOD5. However, we also observed occasional sites where one factor appeared to bind preferentially. The most striking of these was a conserved sequence that bound large amounts of AOD2 but little AOD5. This sequence was found within a 310 bp repeat unit that occurs at several locations in the genome. Copyright © 2017 Qi et al.

  18. Concerted effects of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C1/C2 to control vitamin D-directed gene transcription and RNA splicing in human bone cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Rui; Park, Juw Won; Chun, Rene F; Lisse, Thomas S; Garcia, Alejandro J; Zavala, Kathryn; Sea, Jessica L; Lu, Zhi-Xiang; Xu, Jianzhong; Adams, John S; Xing, Yi; Hewison, Martin

    2017-01-25

    Traditionally recognized as an RNA splicing regulator, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C1/C2 (hnRNPC1/C2) can also bind to double-stranded DNA and function in trans as a vitamin D response element (VDRE)-binding protein. As such, hnRNPC1/C2 may couple transcription induced by the active form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH) 2 D) with subsequent RNA splicing. In MG63 osteoblastic cells, increased expression of the 1,25(OH) 2 D target gene CYP24A1 involved immunoprecipitation of hnRNPC1/C2 with CYP24A1 chromatin and RNA. Knockdown of hnRNPC1/C2 suppressed expression of CYP24A1, but also increased expression of an exon 10-skipped CYP24A1 splice variant; in a minigene model the latter was attenuated by a functional VDRE in the CYP24A1 promoter. In genome-wide analyses, knockdown of hnRNPC1/C2 resulted in 3500 differentially expressed genes and 2232 differentially spliced genes, with significant commonality between groups. 1,25(OH) 2 D induced 324 differentially expressed genes, with 187 also observed following hnRNPC1/C2 knockdown, and a further 168 unique to hnRNPC1/C2 knockdown. However, 1,25(OH) 2 D induced only 10 differentially spliced genes, with no overlap with differentially expressed genes. These data indicate that hnRNPC1/C2 binds to both DNA and RNA and influences both gene expression and RNA splicing, but these actions do not appear to be linked through 1,25(OH) 2 D-mediated induction of transcription. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. The Theobroma cacao B3 domain transcription factor TcLEC2 plays a duel role in control of embryo development and maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yufan; Clemens, Adam; Maximova, Siela N; Guiltinan, Mark J

    2014-04-24

    The Arabidopsis thaliana LEC2 gene encodes a B3 domain transcription factor, which plays critical roles during both zygotic and somatic embryogenesis. LEC2 exerts significant impacts on determining embryogenic potential and various metabolic processes through a complicated genetic regulatory network. An ortholog of the Arabidopsis Leafy Cotyledon 2 gene (AtLEC2) was characterized in Theobroma cacao (TcLEC2). TcLEC2 encodes a B3 domain transcription factor preferentially expressed during early and late zygotic embryo development. The expression of TcLEC2 was higher in dedifferentiated cells competent for somatic embryogenesis (embryogenic calli), compared to non-embryogenic calli. Transient overexpression of TcLEC2 in immature zygotic embryos resulted in changes in gene expression profiles and fatty acid composition. Ectopic expression of TcLEC2 in cacao leaves changed the expression levels of several seed related genes. The overexpression of TcLEC2 in cacao explants greatly increased the frequency of regeneration of stably transformed somatic embryos. TcLEC2 overexpressing cotyledon explants exhibited a very high level of embryogenic competency and when cultured on hormone free medium, exhibited an iterative embryogenic chain-reaction. Our study revealed essential roles of TcLEC2 during both zygotic and somatic embryo development. Collectively, our evidence supports the conclusion that TcLEC2 is a functional ortholog of AtLEC2 and that it is involved in similar genetic regulatory networks during cacao somatic embryogenesis. To our knowledge, this is the first detailed report of the functional analysis of a LEC2 ortholog in a species other then Arabidopsis. TcLEC2 could potentially be used as a biomarker for the improvement of the SE process and screen for elite varieties in cacao germplasm.

  20. Antisense transcription-dependent chromatin signature modulates sense transcript dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Thomas; Howe, Françoise S; Murray, Struan C; Wouters, Meredith; Lorenz, Philipp; Seward, Emily; Rata, Scott; Angel, Andrew; Mellor, Jane

    2018-02-12

    Antisense transcription is widespread in genomes. Despite large differences in gene size and architecture, we find that yeast and human genes share a unique, antisense transcription-associated chromatin signature. We asked whether this signature is related to a biological function for antisense transcription. Using quantitative RNA-FISH, we observed changes in sense transcript distributions in nuclei and cytoplasm as antisense transcript levels were altered. To determine the mechanistic differences underlying these distributions, we developed a mathematical framework describing transcription from initiation to transcript degradation. At GAL1 , high levels of antisense transcription alter sense transcription dynamics, reducing rates of transcript production and processing, while increasing transcript stability. This relationship with transcript stability is also observed as a genome-wide association. Establishing the antisense transcription-associated chromatin signature through disruption of the Set3C histone deacetylase activity is sufficient to similarly change these rates even in the absence of antisense transcription. Thus, antisense transcription alters sense transcription dynamics in a chromatin-dependent manner. © 2018 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  1. Light and the E3 ubiquitin ligase COP1/SPA control the protein stability of the MYB transcription factors PAP1 and PAP2 involved in anthocyanin accumulation in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Alexander; Schrader, Andrea; Kokkelink, Leonie; Falke, Christian; Welter, Bastian; Iniesto, Elisa; Rubio, Vicente; Uhrig, Joachim F; Hülskamp, Martin; Hoecker, Ute

    2013-05-01

    Anthocyanins are natural pigments that accumulate only in light-grown and not in dark-grown Arabidopsis plants. Repression of anthocyanin accumulation in darkness requires the CONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1/SUPPRESSOR OF PHYA-105 (COP1/SPA) ubiquitin ligase, as cop1 and spa mutants produce anthocyanins also in the dark. Here, we show that COP1 and SPA proteins interact with the myeloblastosis (MYB) transcription factors PRODUCTION OF ANTHOCYANIN PIGMENT1 (PAP)1 and PAP2, two members of a small protein family that is required for anthocyanin accumulation and for the expression of structural genes in the anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway. The increased anthocyanin levels in cop1 mutants requires the PAP1 gene family, indicating that COP1 functions upstream of the PAP1 gene family. PAP1 and PAP2 proteins are degraded in the dark and this degradation is dependent on the proteasome and on COP1. Hence, the light requirement for anthocyanin biosynthesis results, at least in part, from the light-mediated stabilization of PAP1 and PAP2. Consistent with this conclusion, moderate overexpression of PAP1 leads to an increase in anthocyanin levels only in the light and not in darkness. Here we show that SPA genes are also required for reducing PAP1 and PAP2 transcript levels in dark-grown seedlings. Taken together, these results indicate that the COP1/SPA complex affects PAP1 and PAP2 both transcriptionally and post-translationally. Thus, our findings have identified mechanisms via which the COP1/SPA complex controls anthocyanin levels in Arabidopsis that may be useful for applications in biotechnology directed towards increasing anthocyanin content in plants. © 2013 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Transcriptional Control of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation by Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-γ: Therapeutic Implications for Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Gizard

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs is a critical process for the development of atherosclerosis and complications of procedures used to treat atherosclerotic diseases, including postangioplasty restenosis, vein graft failure, and transplant vasculopathy. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR γ is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily and the molecular target for the thiazolidinediones (TZD, used clinically to treat insulin resistance in patients with type 2 diabetes. In addition to their efficacy to improve insulin sensitivity, TZD exert a broad spectrum of pleiotropic beneficial effects on vascular gene expression programs. In SMCs, PPARγ is prominently upregulated during neointima formation and suppresses the proliferative response to injury of the arterial wall. Among the molecular target genes regulated by PPARγ in SMCs are genes encoding proteins involved in the regulation of cell-cycle progression, cellular senescence, and apoptosis. This inhibition of SMC proliferation is likely to contribute to the prevention of atherosclerosis and postangioplasty restenosis observed in animal models and proof-of-concept clinical studies. This review will summarize the transcriptional target genes regulated by PPARγ in SMCs and outline the therapeutic implications of PPARγ activation for the treatment and prevention of atherosclerosis and its complications.

  3. Rho-kinase signaling controls nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of class IIa Histone Deacetylase (HDAC7) and transcriptional activation of orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compagnucci, Claudia; Barresi, Sabina; Petrini, Stefania; Bertini, Enrico; Zanni, Ginevra

    2015-01-01

    Rho-kinase (ROCK) has been well documented to play a key role in RhoA-induced actin remodeling. ROCK activation results in myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation either by direct action on MLC kinase (MLCK) or by inhibition of MLC phosphatase (MLCP), modulating actin–myosin contraction. We found that inhibition of the ROCK pathway in induced pluripotent stem cells, leads to nuclear export of HDAC7 and transcriptional activation of the orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1 while in cells with constitutive ROCK hyperactivity due to loss of function of the RhoGTPase activating protein Oligophrenin-1 (OPHN1), the orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1 is downregulated. Our study identify a new target of ROCK signaling via myosin phosphatase subunit (MYPT1) and Histone Deacetylase (HDAC7) at the nuclear level and provide new insights in the cellular functions of ROCK. - Highlights: • ROCK regulates nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of HDAC7 via phosphorylation of MYPT1. • Nuclear export of HDAC7 and upregulation of NR4A1 occurs with low ROCK activity. • High levels of ROCK activity due to OPHN1 loss of function downregulate NR4A1

  4. Rho-kinase signaling controls nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of class IIa Histone Deacetylase (HDAC7) and transcriptional activation of orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compagnucci, Claudia; Barresi, Sabina [Unit of Molecular Medicine for Neuromuscular and Neurodegenerative Disorders, Department of Neurosciences, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, IRCCS, Rome (Italy); Petrini, Stefania [Research Laboratories, Confocal Microscopy Core Facility, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, IRCCS, Rome (Italy); Bertini, Enrico [Unit of Molecular Medicine for Neuromuscular and Neurodegenerative Disorders, Department of Neurosciences, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, IRCCS, Rome (Italy); Zanni, Ginevra, E-mail: ginevra.zanni@opbg.net [Unit of Molecular Medicine for Neuromuscular and Neurodegenerative Disorders, Department of Neurosciences, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, IRCCS, Rome (Italy)

    2015-04-03

    Rho-kinase (ROCK) has been well documented to play a key role in RhoA-induced actin remodeling. ROCK activation results in myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation either by direct action on MLC kinase (MLCK) or by inhibition of MLC phosphatase (MLCP), modulating actin–myosin contraction. We found that inhibition of the ROCK pathway in induced pluripotent stem cells, leads to nuclear export of HDAC7 and transcriptional activation of the orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1 while in cells with constitutive ROCK hyperactivity due to loss of function of the RhoGTPase activating protein Oligophrenin-1 (OPHN1), the orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1 is downregulated. Our study identify a new target of ROCK signaling via myosin phosphatase subunit (MYPT1) and Histone Deacetylase (HDAC7) at the nuclear level and provide new insights in the cellular functions of ROCK. - Highlights: • ROCK regulates nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of HDAC7 via phosphorylation of MYPT1. • Nuclear export of HDAC7 and upregulation of NR4A1 occurs with low ROCK activity. • High levels of ROCK activity due to OPHN1 loss of function downregulate NR4A1.

  5. The Exon Junction Complex Controls the Efficient and Faithful Splicing of a Subset of Transcripts Involved in Mitotic Cell-Cycle Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Fukumura

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The exon junction complex (EJC that is deposited onto spliced mRNAs upstream of exon–exon junctions plays important roles in multiple post-splicing gene expression events, such as mRNA export, surveillance, localization, and translation. However, a direct role for the human EJC in pre-mRNA splicing has not been fully understood. Using HeLa cells, we depleted one of the EJC core components, Y14, and the resulting transcriptome was analyzed by deep sequencing (RNA-Seq and confirmed by RT–PCR. We found that Y14 is required for efficient and faithful splicing of a group of transcripts that is enriched in short intron-containing genes involved in mitotic cell-cycle progression. Tethering of EJC core components (Y14, eIF4AIII or MAGOH to a model reporter pre-mRNA harboring a short intron showed that these core components are prerequisites for the splicing activation. Taken together, we conclude that the EJC core assembled on pre-mRNA is critical for efficient and faithful splicing of a specific subset of short introns in mitotic cell cycle-related genes.

  6. DNA residence time is a regulatory factor of transcription repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauß, Karen; Popp, Achim P; Schulze, Lena; Hettich, Johannes; Reisser, Matthias; Escoter Torres, Laura; Uhlenhaut, N Henriette; Gebhardt, J Christof M

    2017-11-02

    Transcription comprises a highly regulated sequence of intrinsically stochastic processes, resulting in bursts of transcription intermitted by quiescence. In transcription activation or repression, a transcription factor binds dynamically to DNA, with a residence time unique to each factor. Whether the DNA residence time is important in the transcription process is unclear. Here, we designed a series of transcription repressors differing in their DNA residence time by utilizing the modular DNA binding domain of transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) and varying the number of nucleotide-recognizing repeat domains. We characterized the DNA residence times of our repressors in living cells using single molecule tracking. The residence times depended non-linearly on the number of repeat domains and differed by more than a factor of six. The factors provoked a residence time-dependent decrease in transcript level of the glucocorticoid receptor-activated gene SGK1. Down regulation of transcription was due to a lower burst frequency in the presence of long binding repressors and is in accordance with a model of competitive inhibition of endogenous activator binding. Our single molecule experiments reveal transcription factor DNA residence time as a regulatory factor controlling transcription repression and establish TALE-DNA binding domains as tools for the temporal dissection of transcription regulation. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. Characterization of the CrbS/R Two-Component System in Pseudomonas fluorescens Reveals a New Set of Genes under Its Control and a DNA Motif Required for CrbR-Mediated Transcriptional Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgardo Sepulveda

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The CrbS/R system is a two-component signal transduction system that regulates acetate utilization in Vibrio cholerae, P. aeruginosa, and P. entomophila. CrbS is a hybrid histidine kinase that belongs to a recently identified family, in which the signaling domain is fused to an SLC5 solute symporter domain through aSTAC domain. Upon activation by CrbS, CrbR activates transcription of the acs gene, which encodes an acetyl-CoA synthase (ACS, and the actP gene, which encodes an acetate/solute symporter. In this work, we characterized the CrbS/R system in Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25. Through the quantitative proteome analysis of different mutants, we were able to identify a new set of genes under its control, which play an important role during growth on acetate. These results led us to the identification of a conserved DNA motif in the putative promoter region of acetate-utilization genes in the Gammaproteobacteria that is essential for the CrbR-mediated transcriptional activation of genes under acetate-utilizing conditions. Finally, we took advantage of the existence of a second SLC5-containing two-component signal transduction system in P. fluorescens, CbrA/B, to demonstrate that the activation of the response regulator by the histidine kinase is not dependent on substrate transport through the SLC5 domain.

  8. A p53-like transcription factor similar to Ndt80 controls the response to nutrient stress in the filamentous fungus, Aspergillus nidulans [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/y2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret E Katz

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The Aspergillus nidulans xprG gene encodes a putative transcriptional activator that is a member of the Ndt80 family in the p53-like superfamily of proteins. Previous studies have shown that XprG controls the production of extracellular proteases in response to starvation. We undertook transcriptional profiling to investigate whether XprG has a wider role as a global regulator of the carbon nutrient stress response. Our microarray data showed that the expression of a large number of genes, including genes involved in secondary metabolism, development, high-affinity glucose uptake and autolysis, were altered in an xprGΔ null mutant. Many of these genes are known to be regulated in response to carbon starvation. We confirmed that sterigmatocystin and penicillin production is reduced in xprG- mutants. The loss of fungal mass and secretion of pigments that accompanies fungal autolysis in response to nutrient depletion was accelerated in an xprG1 gain-of-function mutant and decreased or absent in an xprG- mutant. The results support the hypothesis that XprG plays a major role in the response to carbon limitation and that nutrient sensing may represent one of the ancestral roles for the p53-like superfamily. Disruption of the AN6015 gene, which encodes a second Ndt80-like protein, showed that it is required for sexual reproduction in A. nidulans.

  9. The Transcription Factor Encyclopedia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yusuf, Dimas; Butland, Stefanie L; Swanson, Magdalena I

    2012-01-01

    mini review articles on pertinent human, mouse and rat TFs. Notable features of the TFe website include a high-quality PDF generator and web API for programmatic data retrieval. TFe aims to rapidly educate scientists about the TFs they encounter through the delivery of succinct summaries written......ABSTRACT: Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130...... and vetted by experts in the field. TFe is available at http://www.cisreg.ca/tfe....

  10. The transcription factor encyclopedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, Dimas; Butland, Stefanie L; Swanson, Magdalena I; Bolotin, Eugene; Ticoll, Amy; Cheung, Warren A; Zhang, Xiao Yu Cindy; Dickman, Christopher T D; Fulton, Debra L; Lim, Jonathan S; Schnabl, Jake M; Ramos, Oscar H P; Vasseur-Cognet, Mireille; de Leeuw, Charles N; Simpson, Elizabeth M; Ryffel, Gerhart U; Lam, Eric W-F; Kist, Ralf; Wilson, Miranda S C; Marco-Ferreres, Raquel; Brosens, Jan J; Beccari, Leonardo L; Bovolenta, Paola; Benayoun, Bérénice A; Monteiro, Lara J; Schwenen, Helma D C; Grontved, Lars; Wederell, Elizabeth; Mandrup, Susanne; Veitia, Reiner A; Chakravarthy, Harini; Hoodless, Pamela A; Mancarelli, M Michela; Torbett, Bruce E; Banham, Alison H; Reddy, Sekhar P; Cullum, Rebecca L; Liedtke, Michaela; Tschan, Mario P; Vaz, Michelle; Rizzino, Angie; Zannini, Mariastella; Frietze, Seth; Farnham, Peggy J; Eijkelenboom, Astrid; Brown, Philip J; Laperrière, David; Leprince, Dominique; de Cristofaro, Tiziana; Prince, Kelly L; Putker, Marrit; del Peso, Luis; Camenisch, Gieri; Wenger, Roland H; Mikula, Michal; Rozendaal, Marieke; Mader, Sylvie; Ostrowski, Jerzy; Rhodes, Simon J; Van Rechem, Capucine; Boulay, Gaylor; Olechnowicz, Sam W Z; Breslin, Mary B; Lan, Michael S; Nanan, Kyster K; Wegner, Michael; Hou, Juan; Mullen, Rachel D; Colvin, Stephanie C; Noy, Peter John; Webb, Carol F; Witek, Matthew E; Ferrell, Scott; Daniel, Juliet M; Park, Jason; Waldman, Scott A; Peet, Daniel J; Taggart, Michael; Jayaraman, Padma-Sheela; Karrich, Julien J; Blom, Bianca; Vesuna, Farhad; O'Geen, Henriette; Sun, Yunfu; Gronostajski, Richard M; Woodcroft, Mark W; Hough, Margaret R; Chen, Edwin; Europe-Finner, G Nicholas; Karolczak-Bayatti, Magdalena; Bailey, Jarrod; Hankinson, Oliver; Raman, Venu; LeBrun, David P; Biswal, Shyam; Harvey, Christopher J; DeBruyne, Jason P; Hogenesch, John B; Hevner, Robert F; Héligon, Christophe; Luo, Xin M; Blank, Marissa Cathleen; Millen, Kathleen Joyce; Sharlin, David S; Forrest, Douglas; Dahlman-Wright, Karin; Zhao, Chunyan; Mishima, Yuriko; Sinha, Satrajit; Chakrabarti, Rumela; Portales-Casamar, Elodie; Sladek, Frances M; Bradley, Philip H; Wasserman, Wyeth W

    2012-01-01

    Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130 mini review articles on pertinent human, mouse and rat TFs. Notable features of the TFe website include a high-quality PDF generator and web API for programmatic data retrieval. TFe aims to rapidly educate scientists about the TFs they encounter through the delivery of succinct summaries written and vetted by experts in the field. TFe is available at http://www.cisreg.ca/tfe.

  11. The expression of the T-box selector gene midline in the leg imaginal disc is controlled by both transcriptional regulation and cell lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svendsen, Pia C; Ryu, Jae-Ryeon; Brook, William J

    2015-11-18

    The Drosophila Tbx20 homologs midline and H15 act as selector genes for ventral fate in Drosophila legs. midline and H15 expression defines the ventral domain of the leg and the two genes are necessary and sufficient for the development of ventral fate. Ventral-specific expression of midline and H15 is activated by Wingless (Wg) and repressed by Decapentaplegic (Dpp). Here we identify VLE, a 5 kb enhancer that drives ventral specific expression in the leg disc that is very similar to midline expression. Subdivision of VLE identifies two regions that mediate both activation and repression and third region that only mediates repression. Loss- and gain-of-function genetic mosaic analysis shows that the activating and repressing regions respond to Wg and Dpp signaling respectively. All three repression regions depend on the activity of Mothers-against-decapentaplegic, a Drosophila r-Smad that mediates Dpp signaling, and respond to ectopic expression of the Dpp target genes optomoter-blind and Dorsocross 3. However, only one repression region is responsive to loss of schnurri, a co-repressor required for direct repression by Dpp-signaling. Thus, Dpp signaling restricts midline expression through both direct repression and through the activation of downstream repressors. We also find that midline and H15 expression are both subject to cross-repression and feedback inhibition. Finally, a lineage analysis indicates that ventral midline-expressing cells and dorsal omb-expressing cells do not mix during development. Together this data indicates that the ventral-specific expression of midline results from both transcriptional regulation and from a lack of cell-mixing between dorsal and ventral cells. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. The expression of the T-box selector gene midline in the leg imaginal disc is controlled by both transcriptional regulation and cell lineage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia C. Svendsen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Drosophila Tbx20 homologs midline and H15 act as selector genes for ventral fate in Drosophila legs. midline and H15 expression defines the ventral domain of the leg and the two genes are necessary and sufficient for the development of ventral fate. Ventral-specific expression of midline and H15 is activated by Wingless (Wg and repressed by Decapentaplegic (Dpp. Here we identify VLE, a 5 kb enhancer that drives ventral specific expression in the leg disc that is very similar to midline expression. Subdivision of VLE identifies two regions that mediate both activation and repression and third region that only mediates repression. Loss- and gain-of-function genetic mosaic analysis shows that the activating and repressing regions respond to Wg and Dpp signaling respectively. All three repression regions depend on the activity of Mothers-against-decapentaplegic, a Drosophila r-Smad that mediates Dpp signaling, and respond to ectopic expression of the Dpp target genes optomoter-blind and Dorsocross 3. However, only one repression region is responsive to loss of schnurri, a co-repressor required for direct repression by Dpp-signaling. Thus, Dpp signaling restricts midline expression through both direct repression and through the activation of downstream repressors. We also find that midline and H15 expression are both subject to cross-repression and feedback inhibition. Finally, a lineage analysis indicates that ventral midline-expressing cells and dorsal omb-expressing cells do not mix during development. Together this data indicates that the ventral-specific expression of midline results from both transcriptional regulation and from a lack of cell-mixing between dorsal and ventral cells.

  13. Machine Dictation and Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Evelyn; And Others

    This instructional package contains both an instructor's manual and a student's manual for a course in machine dictation and transcription. The instructor's manual contains an overview with tips on teaching the course, letters for dictation, and a key to the letters. The student's manual contains an overview of the course and of the skills needed…

  14. Automatic Music Transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapuri, Anssi; Virtanen, Tuomas

    Written musical notation describes music in a symbolic form that is suitable for performing a piece using the available musical instruments. Traditionally, musical notation indicates the pitch, target instrument, timing, and duration of each sound to be played. The aim of music transcription either by humans or by a machine is to infer these musical parameters, given only the acoustic recording of a performance.

  15. Bayesian Music Transcription

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cemgil, A.T.

    2004-01-01

    Music transcription refers to extraction of a human readable and interpretable description from a recording of a music performance. The final goal is to implement a program that can automatically infer a musical notation that lists the pitch levels of notes and corresponding score positions in any

  16. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 2 post-transcriptional control protein p28 is required for viral infectivity and persistence in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Brenda; Li, Min; Kesic, Matthew; Younis, Ihab; Lairmore, Michael D; Green, Patrick L

    2008-05-12

    Human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV) type 1 and type 2 are related but distinct pathogenic complex retroviruses. HTLV-1 is associated with adult T-cell leukemia and a variety of immune-mediated disorders including the chronic neurological disease termed HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. In contrast, HTLV-2 displays distinct biological differences and is much less pathogenic, with only a few reported cases of leukemia and neurological disease associated with infection. In addition to the structural and enzymatic proteins, HTLV encodes regulatory (Tax and Rex) and accessory proteins. Tax and Rex positively regulate virus production and are critical for efficient viral replication and pathogenesis. Using an over-expression system approach, we recently reported that the accessory gene product of the HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 open reading frame (ORF) II (p30 and p28, respectively) acts as a negative regulator of both Tax and Rex by binding to and retaining their mRNA in the nucleus, leading to reduced protein expression and virion production. Further characterization revealed that p28 was distinct from p30 in that it was devoid of major transcriptional modulating activity, suggesting potentially divergent functions that may be responsible for the distinct pathobiologies of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2. In this study, we investigated the functional significance of p28 in HTLV-2 infection, proliferation, and immortaliztion of primary T-cells in culture, and viral survival in an infectious rabbit animal model. An HTLV-2 p28 knockout virus (HTLV-2Deltap28) was generated and evaluated. Infectivity and immortalization capacity of HTLV-2Deltap28 in vitro was indistinguishable from wild type HTLV-2. In contrast, we showed that viral replication was severely attenuated in rabbits inoculated with HTLV-2Deltap28 and the mutant virus failed to establish persistent infection. We provide direct evidence that p28 is dispensable for viral replication and cellular immortalization of

  17. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 2 post-transcriptional control protein p28 is required for viral infectivity and persistence in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesic Matthew

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV type 1 and type 2 are related but distinct pathogenic complex retroviruses. HTLV-1 is associated with adult T-cell leukemia and a variety of immune-mediated disorders including the chronic neurological disease termed HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. In contrast, HTLV-2 displays distinct biological differences and is much less pathogenic, with only a few reported cases of leukemia and neurological disease associated with infection. In addition to the structural and enzymatic proteins, HTLV encodes regulatory (Tax and Rex and accessory proteins. Tax and Rex positively regulate virus production and are critical for efficient viral replication and pathogenesis. Using an over-expression system approach, we recently reported that the accessory gene product of the HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 open reading frame (ORF II (p30 and p28, respectively acts as a negative regulator of both Tax and Rex by binding to and retaining their mRNA in the nucleus, leading to reduced protein expression and virion production. Further characterization revealed that p28 was distinct from p30 in that it was devoid of major transcriptional modulating activity, suggesting potentially divergent functions that may be responsible for the distinct pathobiologies of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2. Results In this study, we investigated the functional significance of p28 in HTLV-2 infection, proliferation, and immortaliztion of primary T-cells in culture, and viral survival in an infectious rabbit animal model. An HTLV-2 p28 knockout virus (HTLV-2Δp28 was generated and evaluated. Infectivity and immortalization capacity of HTLV-2Δp28 in vitro was indistinguishable from wild type HTLV-2. In contrast, we showed that viral replication was severely attenuated in rabbits inoculated with HTLV-2Δp28 and the mutant virus failed to establish persistent infection. Conclusion We provide direct evidence that p28 is dispensable for

  18. A comparison of gene transcription profiles of domesticated and wild Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) at early life stages, reared under controlled conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicskei, Beatrix; Bron, James E; Glover, Kevin A; Taggart, John B

    2014-10-09

    Atlantic salmon have been subject to domestication for approximately ten generations, beginning in the early 1970s. This process of artificial selection will have created various genetic differences between wild and farmed stocks. Each year, hundreds of thousands of farmed fish escape into the wild. These escapees may interbreed with wild conspecifics raising concerns for both the fish-farming industry and fisheries managers. Thus, a better understanding of the interactions between domesticated and wild salmon is essential to the continued sustainability of the aquaculture industry and to the maintenance of healthy wild stocks. We compared the transcriptomes of a wild Norwegian Atlantic salmon population (Figgjo) and a Norwegian farmed strain (Mowi) at two life stages: yolk sac fry and post first-feeding fry. The analysis employed 44 k oligo-microarrays to analyse gene expression of 36 farmed, wild and hybrid (farmed dam x wild sire) individuals reared under identical hatchery conditions. Although some of the transcriptional differences detected overlapped between sampling points, our results highlighted the importance of studying various life stages. Compared to the wild population, the Mowi strain displayed up-regulation in mRNA translation-related and down regulation in nervous and immune system -related pathways in the sac fry, whereas up-regulation of digestive and endocrine activities, carbohydrate, energy, amino acid and lipid metabolism and down-regulation of environmental information processing and immune system pathways were evident in the feeding fry. Differentially regulated pathways that were common among life stages generally belonged to environmental information processing and immune system functional groups. In addition, we found indications of strong maternal effects, reinforcing the importance of including reciprocal hybrids in the analysis. In agreement with previous studies we showed that domestication has caused changes in the transcriptome of

  19. Runx transcription factors in neuronal development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiga Takashi

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Runt-related (Runx transcription factors control diverse aspects of embryonic development and are responsible for the pathogenesis of many human diseases. In recent years, the functions of this transcription factor family in the nervous system have just begun to be understood. In dorsal root ganglion neurons, Runx1 and Runx3 play pivotal roles in the development of nociceptive and proprioceptive sensory neurons, respectively. Runx appears to control the transcriptional regulation of neurotrophin receptors, numerous ion channels and neuropeptides. As a consequence, Runx contributes to diverse aspects of the sensory system in higher vertebrates. In this review, we summarize recent progress in determining the role of Runx in neuronal development.

  20. Dynamic analysis of stochastic transcription cycles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire V Harper

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In individual mammalian cells the expression of some genes such as prolactin is highly variable over time and has been suggested to occur in stochastic pulses. To investigate the origins of this behavior and to understand its functional relevance, we quantitatively analyzed this variability using new mathematical tools that allowed us to reconstruct dynamic transcription rates of different reporter genes controlled by identical promoters in the same living cell. Quantitative microscopic analysis of two reporter genes, firefly luciferase and destabilized EGFP, was used to analyze the dynamics of prolactin promoter-directed gene expression in living individual clonal and primary pituitary cells over periods of up to 25 h. We quantified the time-dependence and cyclicity of the transcription pulses and estimated the length and variation of active and inactive transcription phases. We showed an average cycle period of approximately 11 h and demonstrated that while the measured time distribution of active phases agreed with commonly accepted models of transcription, the inactive phases were differently distributed and showed strong memory, with a refractory period of transcriptional inactivation close to 3 h. Cycles in transcription occurred at two distinct prolactin-promoter controlled reporter genes in the same individual clonal or primary cells. However, the timing of the cycles was independent and out-of-phase. For the first time, we have analyzed transcription dynamics from two equivalent loci in real-time in single cells. In unstimulated conditions, cells showed independent transcription dynamics at each locus. A key result from these analyses was the evidence for a minimum refractory period in the inactive-phase of transcription. The response to acute signals and the result of manipulation of histone acetylation was consistent with the hypothesis that this refractory period corresponded to a phase of chromatin remodeling which significantly

  1. The transcriptional regulator NtrC controls glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase expression and polyhydroxybutyrate synthesis through NADPH availability in Herbaspirillum seropedicae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacomboio, Euclides Nenga Manuel; Kim, Edson Yu Sin; Correa, Henrique Leonardo Ruchaud; Bonato, Paloma; Pedrosa, Fabio de Oliveira; de Souza, Emanuel Maltempi; Chubatsu, Leda Satie; Müller-Santos, Marcelo

    2017-10-19

    The NTR system is the major regulator of nitrogen metabolism in Bacteria. Despite its broad and well-known role in the assimilation, biosynthesis and recycling of nitrogenous molecules, little is known about its role in carbon metabolism. In this work, we present a new facet of the NTR system in the control of NADPH concentration and the biosynthesis of molecules dependent on reduced coenzyme in Herbaspirillum seropedicae SmR1. We demonstrated that a ntrC mutant strain accumulated high levels of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB), reaching levels up to 2-fold higher than the parental strain. In the absence of NtrC, the activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (encoded by zwf) increased by 2.8-fold, consequently leading to a 2.1-fold increase in the NADPH/NADP + ratio. A GFP fusion showed that expression of zwf is likewise controlled by NtrC. The increase in NADPH availability stimulated the production of polyhydroxybutyrate regardless the C/N ratio in the medium. The mutant ntrC was more resistant to H 2 O 2 exposure and controlled the propagation of ROS when facing the oxidative condition, a phenotype associated with the increase in PHB content.

  2. FOXA and master transcription factors recruit Mediator and Cohesin to the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Michèle; Bourriquen, Gaëlle; Lamaze, Fabien C.; Côté, Maxime C.; Fournier, Éric; Joly-Beauparlant, Charles; Caron, Vicky; Gobeil, Stéphane; Droit, Arnaud; Bilodeau, Steve

    2016-10-01

    Controlling the transcriptional program is essential to maintain the identity and the biological functions of a cell. The Mediator and Cohesin complexes have been established as central cofactors controlling the transcriptional program in normal cells. However, the distribution, recruitment and importance of these complexes in cancer cells have not been fully investigated. Here we show that FOXA and master transcription factors are part of the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of cancer cells and are essential to recruit M ediator and Cohesin. Indeed, Mediator and Cohesin occupied the enhancer and promoter regions of actively transcribed genes and maintained the proliferation and colony forming potential. Through integration of publically available ChIP-Seq datasets, we predicted the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of each cancer cell. Unexpectedly, for all cells investigated, the pioneer transcription factors FOXA1 and/or FOXA2 were identified in addition to cell-specific master transcription factors. Loss of both types of transcription factors phenocopied the loss of Mediator and Cohesin. Lastly, the master and pioneer transcription factors were essential to recruit Mediator and Cohesin to regulatory regions of actively transcribed genes. Our study proposes that maintenance of the cancer cell state is dependent on recruitment of Mediator and Cohesin through FOXA and master transcription factors.

  3. DNA Topoisomerases in Transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rødgaard, Morten Terpager

    2015-01-01

    This Ph.D. thesis summarizes the main results of my studies on the interplay between DNA topoisomerases and transcription. The work was performed from 2011 to 2015 at Aarhus University in the Laboratory of Genome Research, and was supervised by associate professor Anni H. Andersen. Most of the ex......This Ph.D. thesis summarizes the main results of my studies on the interplay between DNA topoisomerases and transcription. The work was performed from 2011 to 2015 at Aarhus University in the Laboratory of Genome Research, and was supervised by associate professor Anni H. Andersen. Most...... topoisomerase-DNA cleavage complex. The second study is an investigation of how topoisomerases influence gene regulation by keeping the genome in an optimal topological state....

  4. Spanish dialects: phonetic transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno Bilbao, M. Asunción; Mariño Acebal, José Bernardo

    1998-01-01

    It is well known that canonical Spanish, the dialectal variant `central' of Spain, so called Castilian, can be transcribed by rules. This paper deals with the automatic grapheme to phoneme transcription rules in several Spanish dialects from Latin America. Spanish is a language spoken by more than 300 million people, has an important geographical dispersion compared among other languages and has been historically influenced by many native languages. In this paper authors expand the Castilian ...

  5. Hha Controls Escherichia coli O157:H7 Biofilm Formation by Differential Regulation of Global Transcriptional Regulators FlhDC and CsgD

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Vijay K.; Bearson, Bradley L.

    2013-01-01

    Although molecular mechanisms promoting adherence of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 on epithelial cells are well characterized, regulatory mechanisms controlling biofilm formation are not fully understood. In this study, we demonstrate that biofilm formation in EHEC O157:H7 strain 86-24 is highly repressed compared to that in an isogenic hha mutant. The hha mutant produced large quantities of biofilm compared to the wild-type strain at 30°C and 37°C. Complementation of the ...

  6. Cross-Family Transcription Factor Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bemer, Marian; Dijk, van Aalt-Jan; Immink, Richard G.H.; Angenent, Gerco C.

    2017-01-01

    Specific and dynamic gene expression strongly depends on transcription factor (TF) activity and most plant TFs function in a combinatorial fashion. They can bind to DNA and control the expression of the corresponding gene in an additive fashion or cooperate by physical interactions, forming larger

  7. KP4 to control Ustilago tritici in wheat: Enhanced greenhouse resistance to loose smut and changes in transcript abundance of pathogen related genes in infected KP4 plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Diaz Quijano

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ustilago tritici causes loose smut, which is a seed-borne fungal disease of wheat, and responsible for yield losses up to 40%. Loose smut is a threat to seed production in developing countries where small scale farmers use their own harvest as seed material. The killer protein 4 (KP4 is a virally encoded toxin from Ustilago maydis and inhibits growth of susceptible races of fungi from the Ustilaginales. Enhanced resistance in KP4 wheat to stinking smut, which is caused by Tilletia caries, had been reported earlier. We show that KP4 in genetically engineered wheat increased resistance to loose smut up to 60% compared to the non-KP4 control under greenhouse conditions. This enhanced resistance is dose and race dependent. The overexpression of the transgene kp4 and its effect on fungal growth have indirect effects on the expression of endogenous pathogen defense genes.

  8. Nuclear localization of the transcriptional coactivator YAP is associated with invasive lobular breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlug, E.J.; Ven, R.A. van de; Vermeulen, J.F.; Bult, P.; Diest, P.J. van; Derksen, P.W.B.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Yes Associated Protein (YAP) has been implicated in the control of organ size by regulating cell proliferation and survival. YAP is a transcriptional coactivator that controls cellular responses through interaction with TEAD transcription factors in the nucleus, while its transcriptional

  9. FRUITING GENES OF SCHIZOPHYLLUM-COMMUNE ARE TRANSCRIPTIONALLY REGULATED

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHUREN, FHJ; VANDERLENDE, TR; WESSELS, JGH

    Fruiting genes in Schizophyllum commune are controlled by the mating-type genes and other regulatory genes. To examine whether differential accumulation of mRNAs for these fruiting genes is caused by transcriptional regulation, run-on transcription assaYs were performed with nuclei isolated from

  10. Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription Factor 6 Signaling Contributes to Control Host Lung Pathology but Favors Susceptibility against Toxocara canis Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faz-López, Berenice; Ledesma-Soto, Yadira; Romero-Sánchez, Yolanda; Calleja, Elsa; Martínez-Labat, Pablo; Terrazas, Luis I.

    2013-01-01

    Using STAT6−/− BALB/c mice, we have analyzed the role of STAT6-induced Th2 response in determining the outcome of experimental toxocariasis caused by embryonated eggs of the helminth parasite Toxocara canis. Following T. canis infection wild-type BALB/c mice developed a strong Th2-like response, produced high levels of IgG1, IgE, and IL-4, recruited alternatively activated macrophages, and displayed a moderate pathology in the lungs; however, they harbored heavy parasite loads in different tissues. In contrast, similarly infected STAT6−/− BALB/c mice mounted a weak Th2-like response, did not recruit alternatively activated macrophages, displayed a severe pathology in the lungs, but efficiently controlled T. canis infection. These findings demonstrate that Th2-like response induced via STAT6-mediated signaling pathway mediates susceptibility to larval stage of T. canis. Furthermore, they also indicate that unlike most gastrointestinal helminths, immunity against larvae of T. canis is not mediated by a Th2-dominant response. PMID:23509764

  11. Battles and hijacks: Noncoding transcription in plants

    KAUST Repository

    Ariel, Federico

    2015-06-01

    Noncoding RNAs have emerged as major components of the eukaryotic transcriptome. Genome-wide analyses revealed the existence of thousands of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in several plant species. Plant lncRNAs are transcribed by the plant-specific RNA polymerases Pol IV and Pol V, leading to transcriptional gene silencing, as well as by Pol II. They are involved in a wide range of regulatory mechanisms impacting on gene expression, including chromatin remodeling, modulation of alternative splicing, fine-tuning of miRNA activity, and the control of mRNA translation or accumulation. Recently, dual noncoding transcription by alternative RNA polymerases was implicated in epigenetic and chromatin conformation dynamics. This review integrates the current knowledge on the regulatory mechanisms acting through plant noncoding transcription. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Deciphering the Innate Lymphoid Cell Transcriptional Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril Seillet

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs are enriched at mucosal surfaces, where they provide immune surveillance. All ILC subsets develop from a common progenitor that gives rise to pre-committed progenitors for each of the ILC lineages. Currently, the temporal control of gene expression that guides the emergence of these progenitors is poorly understood. We used global transcriptional mapping to analyze gene expression in different ILC progenitors. We identified PD-1 to be specifically expressed in PLZF+ ILCp and revealed that the timing and order of expression of the transcription factors NFIL3, ID2, and TCF-1 was critical. Importantly, induction of ILC lineage commitment required only transient expression of NFIL3 prior to ID2 and TCF-1 expression. These findings highlight the importance of the temporal program that permits commitment of progenitors to the ILC lineage, and they expand our understanding of the core transcriptional program by identifying potential regulators of ILC development.

  13. Transcription regulatory networks analysis using CAGE

    KAUST Repository

    Tegnér, Jesper N.

    2009-10-01

    Mapping out cellular networks in general and transcriptional networks in particular has proved to be a bottle-neck hampering our understanding of biological processes. Integrative approaches fusing computational and experimental technologies for decoding transcriptional networks at a high level of resolution is therefore of uttermost importance. Yet, this is challenging since the control of gene expression in eukaryotes is a complex multi-level process influenced by several epigenetic factors and the fine interplay between regulatory proteins and the promoter structure governing the combinatorial regulation of gene expression. In this chapter we review how the CAGE data can be integrated with other measurements such as expression, physical interactions and computational prediction of regulatory motifs, which together can provide a genome-wide picture of eukaryotic transcriptional regulatory networks at a new level of resolution. © 2010 by Pan Stanford Publishing Pte. Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Dynamics of chromatin accessibility and gene regulation by MADS-domain transcription factorsin flower development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pajoro, A.; Madrigal, P.; Muiño, J.M.; Tomas Matus, J.; Jin, J.; Mecchia, M.A.; Debernardi, J.M.; Palatnik, J.F.; Balazadeh, S.; Arif, M.; Ó’Maoiléidigh, D.S.; Wellmer, F.; Krajewski, P.; Riechmann, J.L.; Angenent, G.C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Development of eukaryotic organisms is controlled by transcription factors that trigger specific and global changes in gene expression programs. In plants, MADS-domain transcription factors act as master regulators of developmental switches and organ specification. However, the

  15. Characterization of the reconstituted UTase/UR-PII-NRII-NRI bicyclic signal transduction system that controls the transcription of nitrogen-regulated (Ntr) genes in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Peng; Ventura, Alejandra C; Ninfa, Alexander J

    2012-11-13

    A reconstituted UTase/UR-PII-NRII-NRI bicyclic cascade regulated PII uridylylation and NRI phosphorylation in response to glutamine. We examined the sensitivity and robustness of the responses of the individual cycles and of the bicyclic system. The sensitivity of the glutamine response of the upstream UTase/UR-PII monocycle depended upon the PII concentration, and we show that PII exerted substrate inhibition of the UTase activity of UTase/UR, potentially contributing to this dependence of sensitivity on PII. In the downstream NRII-NRI monocycle, PII controlled NRI phosphorylation state, and the response to PII was hyperbolic at both saturating and unsaturating NRI concentration. As expected from theory, the level of NRI∼P produced by the NRII-NRI monocycle was robust to changes in the NRII or NRI concentrations when NRI was in excess over NRII, as long as the NRII concentration was above a threshold value, an example of absolute concentration robustness (ACR). Because of the parameters of the system, at physiological protein levels and ratios of NRI to NRII, the level of NRI∼P depended upon both protein concentrations. In bicyclic UTase/UR-PII-NRII-NRI systems, the NRI phosphorylation state response to glutamine was always hyperbolic, regardless of the PII concentration or sensitivity of the upstream UTase/UR-PII cycle. In these bicyclic systems, NRI phosphorylation state was only robust to variation in the PII/NRII ratio within a narrow range; when PII was in excess NRI∼P was low, and when NRII was in excess NRI phosphorylation was elevated, throughout the physiological range of glutamine concentrations. Our results show that the bicyclic system produced a graded response of NRI phosphorylation to glutamine under a range of conditions, and that under most conditions the response of NRI phosphorylation state to glutamine levels depended on the concentrations of NRI, NRII, and PII.

  16. A group of grapevine MYBA transcription factors located in chromosome 14 control anthocyanin synthesis in vegetative organs with different specificities compared with the berry color locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matus, José Tomás; Cavallini, Erika; Loyola, Rodrigo; Höll, Janine; Finezzo, Laura; Dal Santo, Silvia; Vialet, Sandrine; Commisso, Mauro; Roman, Federica; Schubert, Andrea; Alcalde, José Antonio; Bogs, Jochen; Ageorges, Agnès; Tornielli, Giovanni Battista; Arce-Johnson, Patricio

    2017-07-01

    Grapevine organs accumulate anthocyanins in a cultivar-specific and environmentally induced manner. The MYBA1-A2 genes within the berry color locus in chromosome 2 represent the major genetic determinants of fruit color. The simultaneous occurrence of transposon insertions and point mutations in these genes is responsible for most white-skinned phenotypes; however, the red pigmentation found in vegetative organs suggests the presence of additional regulators. This work describes a genomic region of chromosome 14 containing three closely related R2R3-MYB genes, named MYBA5, MYBA6 and MYBA7. Ectopic expression of the latter two genes in grapevine hairy roots promoted anthocyanin accumulation without affecting other phenylpropanoids. Transcriptomic profiling of hairy roots expressing MYBA1, MYBA6 and MYBA7 showed that these regulators share the activation of late biosynthetic and modification/transport-related genes, but differ in the activation of the FLAVONOID-3'5'-HYDROXYLASE (F3'5'H) family. An alternatively spliced MYBA6 variant was incapable of activating anthocyanin synthesis, however, because of the lack of an MYC1 interaction domain. MYBA1, MYBA6.1 and MYBA7 activated the promoters of UDP-GLUCOSE:FLAVONOID 3-O-GLUCOSYLTRANSFERASE (UFGT) and ANTHOCYANIN 3-O-GLUCOSIDE-6″-O-ACYLTRANSFERASE (3AT), but only MYBA1 induced F3'5'H in concordance with the low proportion of tri-hydroxylated anthocyanins found in MYBA6-A7 hairy roots. This putative new color locus is related to the red/cyanidic pigmentation of vegetative organs in black- and white-skinned cultivars, and forms part of the UV-B radiation response pathway orchestrated by ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL 5 (HY5). These results demonstrate the involvement of additional anthocyanin regulators in grapevine and suggest an evolutionary divergence between the two grape color loci for controlling additional targets of the flavonoid pathway. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Transcriptional regulation of xenobiotic detoxification in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Jyoti R.; Horner, Michael A.; Lam, Geanette; Thummel, Carl S.

    2011-01-01

    Living organisms, from bacteria to humans, display a coordinated transcriptional response to xenobiotic exposure, inducing enzymes and transporters that facilitate detoxification. Several transcription factors have been identified in vertebrates that contribute to this regulatory response. In contrast, little is known about this pathway in insects. Here we show that the Drosophila Nrf2 (NF-E2-related factor 2) ortholog CncC (cap ‘n’ collar isoform-C) is a central regulator of xenobiotic detoxification responses. A binding site for CncC and its heterodimer partner Maf (muscle aponeurosis fibromatosis) is sufficient and necessary for robust transcriptional responses to three xenobiotic compounds: phenobarbital (PB), chlorpromazine, and caffeine. Genetic manipulations that alter the levels of CncC or its negative regulator, Keap1 (Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1), lead to predictable changes in xenobiotic-inducible gene expression. Transcriptional profiling studies reveal that more than half of the genes regulated by PB are also controlled by CncC. Consistent with these effects on detoxification gene expression, activation of the CncC/Keap1 pathway in Drosophila is sufficient to confer resistance to the lethal effects of the pesticide malathion. These studies establish a molecular mechanism for the regulation of xenobiotic detoxification in Drosophila and have implications for controlling insect populations and the spread of insect-borne human diseases. PMID:21896655

  18. Transcriptional Regulation in Haematopoiesis:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Felicia K B

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are responsible for the formation of all of the distinct mature cell types found in the blood. HSCs can – as the only cells of the haematopoietic system – regenerate all of the blood cells when transplanted into a irradiated host, because they are endowed...... of distinct lineage affiliated genes in the otherwise highly purified HSCs. Taken together, these studies demonstrate the use of our model as a tool for isolating superior HSCs, and show that low-level expression of mature lineage markers is inherent in the highly purified stem cell compartment. In the second...... in transplantation studies. Consistent with this, transcriptome profiling revealed very low expression of cell cycle genes in these reporter-dim HSCs. Sequencing of >1200 single HSCs confirmed that the main source of transcriptional heterogeneity was the cell cycle. It also revealed a low-level expression...

  19. Transcriptional regulatory network controlling secondary cell wall ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Secondary wall is an abundant component of plant biomass and has a potential to be a renewable resource of bioenergy and biomaterials. It is important to unravel the molecular mechanism underlying secondary wall formation and how it contributes to plant biomass production. In this review, we summarized the potential ...

  20. Transcriptional Control of Mitosis: Deregulation and Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Nath, Somsubhra; Ghatak, Dishari; Das, Pijush; Roychoudhury, Susanta

    2015-01-01

    Research over the past few decades has well established the molecular functioning of mitosis. Deregulation of these functions has also been attributed to the generation of aneuploidy in different tumor types. Numerous studies have given insight into the regulation of mitosis by cell cycle specific proteins. Optimum abundance of these proteins is pivotal to timely execution of mitosis. Aberrant expressions of these mitotic proteins have been reported in different cancer types. Several post-tra...

  1. Initiation of HIV Reverse Transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Marquet

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Reverse transcription of retroviral genomes into double stranded DNA is a key event for viral replication. The very first stage of HIV reverse transcription, the initiation step, involves viral and cellular partners that are selectively packaged into the viral particle, leading to an RNA/protein complex with very specific structural and functional features, some of which being, in the case of HIV-1, linked to particular isolates. Recent understanding of the tight spatio-temporal regulation of reverse transcription and its importance for viral infectivity further points toward reverse transcription and potentially its initiation step as an important drug target.

  2. Quantitative analysis of tyrosinase transcripts in blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, M; Pisa, E K; Törmänen, V; Arstrand, K; Kågedal, B

    2000-07-01

    Tyrosinase is an enzyme unique to pigment-forming cells. Methods using this transcript for detection of melanoma cells in blood have given divergent results. Quantitative analytical procedures are therefore needed to study the analytical performance of the methods. Mononucleated cells were isolated by Percoll centrifugation. RNA was isolated by each of three methods: Ultraspec(TM)-II RNA isolation system, FastRNA(TM) GREEN Kit, and QIAamp RNA Blood Mini Kit. cDNA was synthesized using random hexamer primers. A tyrosinase-specific product of 207 bp was amplified by PCR. As an internal standard (and competitor) we used a 207-bp cDNA with a base sequence identical to the tyrosinase target except for a 20-bp probe-binding region. The PCR products were identified by 2, 4-dinitrophenol (DNP)-labeled probes specific for tyrosinase (5'DNP-GGGGAGCCTTGGGGTTCTGG-3') and internal standard (5'DNP-CGGAGCCCCGAAACCACATC-3') and quantified by ELISA. The calibration curves were linear and had a broad dynamic measuring range. A detection limit (2 SD above zero) of 48 transcripts/mL of blood was obtained from a low control. The analytical imprecision was 50% and 48% at concentrations of 1775 and 17 929 transcripts/mL (n = 12 and 14, respectively). With the cell line SK-Mel 28 added to blood and RNA extracted with the Ultraspec, Fast RNA, and QIAamp RNA methods, we found (mean +/- SD) 1716+/-1341, 2670+/-3174, and 24 320+/-5332 transcripts/mL of blood. Corresponding values were 527+/-497, 2497+/-1033, 14 930+/-1927 transcripts/mL of blood when the cell line JKM86-4 was added. One high-risk patient was followed by repeated analysis of tyrosinase transcripts in blood. The melanoma marker 5-S-cysteinyldopa in serum and urine was within reference values, but tyrosinase mRNA was slightly increased (120-168 transcripts/mL of blood). The tyrosinase mRNA increased to 1860 transcripts/mL concomitant with the increase in 5-S-cysteinyldopa; later a spleen metastasis was found. The results

  3. RNA polymerase II collision interrupts convergent transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hobson, David J; Wei, Wu; Steinmetz, Lars M

    2012-01-01

    and genetic approaches in yeast to show that polymerases transcribing opposite DNA strands cannot bypass each other. RNAPII stops but does not dissociate upon head-to-head collision in vitro, suggesting that opposing polymerases represent insurmountable obstacles for each other. Head-to-head collision in vivo...... genes. These results provide insight into fundamental mechanisms of gene traffic control and point to an unexplored effect of antisense transcription on gene regulation via polymerase collision....

  4. Quantification of yeast and bacterial gene transcripts in retail cheeses by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnet, Christophe; Straub, Cécile; Castellote, Jessie; Onesime, Djamila; Bonnarme, Pascal; Irlinger, Françoise

    2013-01-01

    The cheese microbiota contributes to a large extent to the development of the typical color, flavor, and texture of the final product. Its composition is not well defined in most cases and varies from one cheese to another. The aim of the present study was to establish procedures for gene transcript quantification in cheeses by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR. Total RNA was extracted from five smear-ripened cheeses purchased on the retail market, using a method that does not involve prior separation of microbial cells. 16S rRNA and malate:quinone oxidoreductase gene transcripts of Corynebacterium casei, Brevibacterium aurantiacum, and Arthrobacter arilaitensis and 26S rRNA and beta tubulin gene transcripts of Geotrichum candidum and Debaryomyces hansenii could be detected and quantified in most of the samples. Three types of normalization were applied: against total RNA, against the amount of cheese, and against a reference gene. For the first two types of normalization, differences of reverse transcription efficiencies from one sample to another were taken into account by analysis of exogenous control mRNA. No good correlation was found between the abundances of target mRNA or rRNA transcripts and the viable cell concentration of the corresponding species. However, in most cases, no mRNA transcripts were detected for species that did not belong to the dominant species. The applications of gene expression measurement in cheeses containing an undefined microbiota, as well as issues concerning the strategy of normalization and the assessment of amplification specificity, are discussed.

  5. Mitotic bookmarking by transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadauke, Stephan; Blobel, Gerd A

    2013-04-02

    Mitosis is accompanied by dramatic changes in chromatin organization and nuclear architecture. Transcription halts globally and most sequence-specific transcription factors and co-factors are ejected from mitotic chromatin. How then does the cell maintain its transcriptional identity throughout the cell division cycle? It has become clear that not all traces of active transcription and gene repression are erased within mitotic chromatin. Many histone modifications are stable or only partially diminished throughout mitosis. In addition, some sequence-specific DNA binding factors have emerged that remain bound to select sites within mitotic chromatin, raising the possibility that they function to transmit regulatory information through the transcriptionally silent mitotic phase, a concept that has been termed "mitotic bookmarking." Here we review recent approaches to studying potential bookmarking factors with regards to their mitotic partitioning, and summarize emerging ideas concerning the in vivo functions of mitotically bound nuclear factors.

  6. Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Receptor and p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signals Inversely Regulate Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 Activity to Control Human Dental Pulp Stem Cell Quiescence, Propagation, and Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandomme, Jerome; Touil, Yasmine; Ostyn, Pauline; Olejnik, Cecile; Flamenco, Pilar; El Machhour, Raja; Segard, Pascaline; Masselot, Bernadette; Bailliez, Yves; Formstecher, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) remain quiescent until activated in response to severe dental pulp damage. Once activated, they exit quiescence and enter regenerative odontogenesis, producing reparative dentin. The factors and signaling molecules that control the quiescence/activation and commitment to differentiation of human DPSCs are not known. In this study, we determined that the inhibition of insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) signaling commonly activates DPSCs and promotes their exit from the G0 phase of the cell cycle as well as from the pyronin Ylow stem cell compartment. The inhibition of these two pathways, however, inversely determines DPSC fate. In contrast to p38 MAPK inhibitors, IGF-1R inhibitors enhance dental pulp cell sphere-forming capacity and reduce the cells' colony-forming capacity without inducing cell death. The inverse cellular changes initiated by IGF-1R and p38 MAPK inhibitors were accompanied by inverse changes in the levels of active signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) factor, inactive glycogen synthase kinase 3, and matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein, a marker of early odontoblast differentiation. Our data suggest that there is cross talk between the IGF-1R and p38 MAPK signaling pathways in DPSCs and that the signals provided by these pathways converge at STAT3 and inversely regulate its activity to maintain quiescence or to promote self-renewal and differentiation of the cells. We propose a working model that explains the possible interactions between IGF-1R and p38 MAPK at the molecular level and describes the cellular consequences of these interactions. This model may inspire further fundamental study and stimulate research on the clinical applications of DPSC in cellular therapy and tissue regeneration. PMID:24266654

  7. 21 CFR 12.98 - Official transcript.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., participants, and counsel have 30 days from the time the transcript becomes available to propose corrections in the transcript of oral testimony. Corrections are permitted only for transcription errors. The... a verbatim stenographic transcript of oral testimony and for necessary copies of the transcript. (b...

  8. Curated compendium of human transcriptional biomarker data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golightly, Nathan P; Bell, Avery; Bischoff, Anna I; Hollingsworth, Parker D; Piccolo, Stephen R

    2018-04-17

    One important use of genome-wide transcriptional profiles is to identify relationships between transcription levels and patient outcomes. These translational insights can guide the development of biomarkers for clinical application. Data from thousands of translational-biomarker studies have been deposited in public repositories, enabling reuse. However, data-reuse efforts require considerable time and expertise because transcriptional data are generated using heterogeneous profiling technologies, preprocessed using diverse normalization procedures, and annotated in non-standard ways. To address this problem, we curated 45 publicly available, translational-biomarker datasets from a variety of human diseases. To increase the data's utility, we reprocessed the raw expression data using a uniform computational pipeline, addressed quality-control problems, mapped the clinical annotations to a controlled vocabulary, and prepared consistently structured, analysis-ready data files. These data, along with scripts we used to prepare the data, are available in a public repository. We believe these data will be particularly useful to researchers seeking to perform benchmarking studies-for example, to compare and optimize machine-learning algorithms' ability to predict biomedical outcomes.

  9. Transcriptional Regulation of Emergency Granulopoiesis in Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirin Hasan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Neutropenic conditions are prevalent in leukemia patients and are often associated with increased susceptibility to infections. In fact, emergency granulopoiesis (EG, a process regulating neutrophil homeostasis in inflammatory conditions and infections, may occur improperly in leukemic conditions, leading to reduced neutrophil counts. Unfortunately, the mechanisms central to dysfunctional EG remain understudied in both leukemia patients and leukemic mouse models. However, despite no direct studies on EG response in leukemia are reported, recently certain transcription factors (TFs have been found to function at the crossroads of leukemia and EG. In this review, we present an update on TFs that can potentially govern the fate of EG in leukemia. Transcriptional control of Fanconi DNA repair pathway genes is also highlighted, as well as the newly discovered role of Fanconi proteins in innate immune response and EG. Identifying the TFs regulating EG in leukemia and dissecting their underlying mechanisms may facilitate the discovery of therapeutic drugs for the treatment of neutropenia.

  10. Transcriptional repressor DREAM regulates trigeminal noxious perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedet, Tomaso; Gonzalez, Paz; Oliveros, Juan C; Dopazo, Jose M; Ghimire, Kedar; Palczewska, Malgorzata; Mellstrom, Britt; Naranjo, Jose R

    2017-05-01

    Expression of the downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM) protein in dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord is related to endogenous control mechanisms of acute and chronic pain. In primary sensory trigeminal neurons, high levels of endogenous DREAM protein are preferentially localized in the nucleus, suggesting a major transcriptional role. Here, we show that transgenic mice expressing a dominant active mutant of DREAM in trigeminal neurons show increased responses following orofacial sensory stimulation, which correlates with a decreased expression of prodynorphin and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in trigeminal ganglia. Genome-wide analysis of trigeminal neurons in daDREAM transgenic mice identified cathepsin L and the monoglyceride lipase as two new DREAM transcriptional targets related to pain. Our results suggest a role for DREAM in the regulation of trigeminal nociception. This article is part of the special article series "Pain". © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  11. Chromosomal contact permits transcription between coregulated genes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Fanucchi, Stephanie

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Transcription of coregulated genes occurs in the context of long-range chromosomal contacts that form multigene complexes. Such contacts and transcription are lost in knockout studies of transcription factors and structural chromatin proteins...

  12. Transcriptional Silencing of Retroviral Vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M.; Pedersen, F.S.

    1996-01-01

    Although retroviral vector systems have been found to efficiently transduce a variety of cell types in vitro, the use of vectors based on murine leukemia virus in preclinical models of somatic gene therapy has led to the identification of transcriptional silencing in vivo as an important problem....... Extinction of long-term vector expression has been observed after implantation of transduced hematopoietic cells as well as fibroblasts, myoblasts and hepatocytes. Here we review the influence of vector structure, integration site and cell type on transcriptional silencing. While down-regulation of proviral...... transcription is known from a number of cellular and animal models, major insight has been gained from studies in the germ line and embryonal cells of the mouse. Key elements for the transfer and expression of retroviral vectors, such as the viral transcriptional enhancer and the binding site for the t...

  13. RNA-guided transcriptional regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, George M.; Mali, Prashant G.; Esvelt, Kevin M.

    2016-02-23

    Methods of modulating expression of a target nucleic acid in a cell are provided including introducing into the cell a first foreign nucleic acid encoding one or more RNAs complementary to DNA, wherein the DNA includes the target nucleic acid, introducing into the cell a second foreign nucleic acid encoding a nuclease-null Cas9 protein that binds to the DNA and is guided by the one or more RNAs, introducing into the cell a third foreign nucleic acid encoding a transcriptional regulator protein or domain, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein, and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain are expressed, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain co-localize to the DNA and wherein the transcriptional regulator protein or domain regulates expression of the target nucleic acid.

  14. Initiation of HIV Reverse Transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Isel, Catherine; Ehresmann, Chantal; Marquet, Roland

    2010-01-01

    Reverse transcription of retroviral genomes into double stranded DNA is a key event for viral replication. The very first stage of HIV reverse transcription, the initiation step, involves viral and cellular partners that are selectively packaged into the viral particle, leading to an RNA/protein complex with very specific structural and functional features, some of which being, in the case of HIV-1, linked to particular isolates. Recent understanding of the tight spatio-temporal regulation of...

  15. National Capital Planning Commission Meeting Transcripts

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Capital Planning Commission — Transcripts of the monthly (with the exception of August) National Capital Planning Commission meeting transcripts are provided for research to confirm actions taken...

  16. RNA profiling and chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing reveal that PTF1a stabilizes pancreas progenitor identity via the control of MNX1/HLXB9 and a network of other transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thompson, Nancy; Gésina, Emilie; Scheinert, Peter

    2012-01-01

    by PTF1a. These proteins, most of which were previously shown to be necessary for pancreas bud maintenance or formation, form a transcription factor network that allows the maintenance of pancreas progenitors. In addition, we identify Bmp7, Nr5a2, RhoV, and P2rx1 as new targets of PTF1a in pancreas...

  17. Classical swine fever virus detection: results of a real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction ring trial conducted in the framework of the European network of excellence for epizootic disease diagnosis and control.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoffmann, B.; Blome, S.; Bonulauri, P.; Fernández-Pinero, J.; Greiser-Wilke, I.; Haegeman, A.; Isaksson, M.; Koenen, F.; Leblanc, N.; Leifer, I.; Potier, Le M.F.; Loeffen, W.; Rasmussen, T.B.; Stadejek, T.; Stahl, K.; Tignon, M.; Uttenthal, A.; Poel, van der W.H.M.

    2011-01-01

    The current study reports on a real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (real-time RT-PCR) ring trial for the detection of Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) genomic RNA undertaken by 10 European laboratories. All laboratories were asked to use their routine in-house real-time

  18. Transcriptional regulation of mononuclear phagocyte development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxane eTussiwand

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThe mononuclear-phagocyte system (MPS, which comprises dendritic cells (DCs, macrophages and monocytes, is a heterogeneous group of myeloid cells. The complexity of the MPS is equally reflected by the plasticity in function and phenotype that characterizes each subset depending on their location and activation state. Specialized subsets of Mononuclear Phagocytes (MP reside in defined anatomical locations, are critical for the homeostatic maintenance of tissues, and provide the link between innate and adaptive immune responses during infections. The ability of MP to maintain or to induce the correct tolerogenic or inflammatory milieu also resides in their complex subset specialization. Such subset heterogeneity is obtained through lineage diversification and specification, which is controlled by defined transcriptional networks and programs. Understanding the MP biology means to define their transcriptional signature, which is required during lineage commitment, and which characterizes each subset’s features. This review will focus on the transcriptional regulation of the MPS; in particular what determines lineage commitment and functional identity; we will emphasizes recent advances in the field of single cell analysis and highlight unresolved questions in the field.

  19. The Mediator complex and transcription regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poss, Zachary C.; Ebmeier, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    The Mediator complex is a multi-subunit assembly that appears to be required for regulating expression of most RNA polymerase II (pol II) transcripts, which include protein-coding and most non-coding RNA genes. Mediator and pol II function within the pre-initiation complex (PIC), which consists of Mediator, pol II, TFIIA, TFIIB, TFIID, TFIIE, TFIIF and TFIIH and is approximately 4.0 MDa in size. Mediator serves as a central scaffold within the PIC and helps regulate pol II activity in ways that remain poorly understood. Mediator is also generally targeted by sequence-specific, DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs) that work to control gene expression programs in response to developmental or environmental cues. At a basic level, Mediator functions by relaying signals from TFs directly to the pol II enzyme, thereby facilitating TF-dependent regulation of gene expression. Thus, Mediator is essential for converting biological inputs (communicated by TFs) to physiological responses (via changes in gene expression). In this review, we summarize an expansive body of research on the Mediator complex, with an emphasis on yeast and mammalian complexes. We focus on the basics that underlie Mediator function, such as its structure and subunit composition, and describe its broad regulatory influence on gene expression, ranging from chromatin architecture to transcription initiation and elongation, to mRNA processing. We also describe factors that influence Mediator structure and activity, including TFs, non-coding RNAs and the CDK8 module. PMID:24088064

  20. Transcriptional changes of mitochondrial genes in irradiated cells ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    human endogenous hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase. (HPRT) gene. Reverse transcription and cDNA ... by normalization to the endogenous control HPRT and to the control nonirradiated sample. There was no ... The threshold cycle (Ct) is defined as the fractional cycle number at which the fluorescence passes the ...

  1. Is Gene Transcription Involved in Seed Dry After-Ripening?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meimoun, Patrice; Mordret, Ernest; Langlade, Nicolas B.; Balzergue, Sandrine; Arribat, Sandrine; Bailly, Christophe; El-Maarouf-Bouteau, Hayat

    2014-01-01

    Orthodox seeds are living organisms that survive anhydrobiosis and may display dormancy, an inability to germinate at harvest. Seed germination potential can be acquired during a prolonged period of dry storage called after-ripening. The aim of this work was to determine if gene transcription is an underlying regulatory mechanism for dormancy alleviation during after-ripening. To identify changes in gene transcription strictly associated with the acquisition of germination potential but not with storage, we used seed storage at low relative humidity that maintains dormancy as control. Transcriptome profiling was performed using DNA microarray to compare change in gene transcript abundance between dormant (D), after-ripened non-dormant (ND) and after-ripened dormant seeds (control, C). Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was used to confirm gene expression. Comparison between D and ND showed the differential expression of 115 probesets at cut-off values of two-fold change (p<0.05). Comparisons between both D and C with ND in transcript abundance showed that only 13 transcripts, among 115, could be specific to dormancy alleviation. qPCR confirms the expression pattern of these transcripts but without significant variation between conditions. Here we show that sunflower seed dormancy alleviation in the dry state is not related to regulated changes in gene expression. PMID:24466101

  2. Is gene transcription involved in seed dry after-ripening?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrice Meimoun

    Full Text Available Orthodox seeds are living organisms that survive anhydrobiosis and may display dormancy, an inability to germinate at harvest. Seed germination potential can be acquired during a prolonged period of dry storage called after-ripening. The aim of this work was to determine if gene transcription is an underlying regulatory mechanism for dormancy alleviation during after-ripening. To identify changes in gene transcription strictly associated with the acquisition of germination potential but not with storage, we used seed storage at low relative humidity that maintains dormancy as control. Transcriptome profiling was performed using DNA microarray to compare change in gene transcript abundance between dormant (D, after-ripened non-dormant (ND and after-ripened dormant seeds (control, C. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR was used to confirm gene expression. Comparison between D and ND showed the differential expression of 115 probesets at cut-off values of two-fold change (p<0.05. Comparisons between both D and C with ND in transcript abundance showed that only 13 transcripts, among 115, could be specific to dormancy alleviation. qPCR confirms the expression pattern of these transcripts but without significant variation between conditions. Here we show that sunflower seed dormancy alleviation in the dry state is not related to regulated changes in gene expression.

  3. Dataset of transcriptional landscape of B cell early activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander S. Garruss

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Signaling via B cell receptors (BCR and Toll-like receptors (TLRs result in activation of B cells with distinct physiological outcomes, but transcriptional regulatory mechanisms that drive activation and distinguish these pathways remain unknown. At early time points after BCR and TLR ligand exposure, 0.5 and 2 h, RNA-seq was performed allowing observations on rapid transcriptional changes. At 2 h, ChIP-seq was performed to allow observations on important regulatory mechanisms potentially driving transcriptional change. The dataset includes RNA-seq, ChIP-seq of control (Input, RNA Pol II, H3K4me3, H3K27me3, and a separate RNA-seq for miRNA expression, which can be found at Gene Expression Omnibus Dataset GSE61608. Here, we provide details on the experimental and analysis methods used to obtain and analyze this dataset and to examine the transcriptional landscape of B cell early activation.

  4. Integrated transcriptional and metabolic profiling in human endotoxemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamisoglu, Kubra; Calvano, Steve E; Coyle, Susette M; Corbett, Siobhan A; Androulakis, Ioannis P

    2014-12-01

    In this meta-study, we aimed to integrate biological insights gained from two levels of -omics analyses on the response to systemic inflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide in humans. We characterized the interplay between plasma metabolite compositions and transcriptional response of leukocytes through integration of transcriptomics with plasma metabonomics. We hypothesized that the drastic changes in the immediate environment of the leukocytes might have an adaptive effect on shaping their transcriptional response in conjunction with the initial inflammatory stimuli. Indeed, we observed that leukocytes, most notably, tune the activity of lipid- and protein-associated processes at the transcriptional level in accordance with the fluctuations in metabolite compositions of surrounding plasma. A closer look into the transcriptional control of only metabolic pathways uncovered alterations in bioenergetics and defenses against oxidative stress closely associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and shifts in energy production observed during inflammatory processes.

  5. BACH transcription factors in innate and adaptive immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Kazuhiko; Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Roychoudhuri, Rahul

    2017-07-01

    BTB and CNC homology (BACH) proteins are transcriptional repressors of the basic region leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor family. Recent studies indicate widespread roles of BACH proteins in controlling the development and function of the innate and adaptive immune systems, including the differentiation of effector and memory cells of the B and T cell lineages, CD4 + regulatory T cells and macrophages. Here, we emphasize similarities at a molecular level in the cell-type-specific activities of BACH factors, proposing that competitive interactions of BACH proteins with transcriptional activators of the bZIP family form a common mechanistic theme underlying their diverse actions. The findings contribute to a general understanding of how transcriptional repressors shape lineage commitment and cell-type-specific functions through repression of alternative lineage programmes.

  6. Validation of reference transcripts in strawberry (Fragaria spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Maureen A; Rosli, Hernan G; Chamala, Srikar; Barbazuk, W Brad; Civello, P Marcos; Folta, Kevin M

    2013-12-01

    Contemporary methods to assay gene expression depend on a stable set of reference transcripts for accurate quantitation. A lack of well-tested reference genes slows progress in characterizing gene expression in high-value specialty crops. In this study, a set of strawberry (Fragaria spp.) constitutively expressed reference genes has been identified by merging digital gene expression data with expression profiling. Constitutive reference candidates were validated using quantitative PCR and hybridization. Several transcripts have been identified that show improved stability across tissues relative to traditional reference transcripts. Results are similar between commercial octoploid strawberry and the diploid model. Our findings also show that while some never-before-used references are appropriate for most applications, even the most stable reference transcripts require careful assessment across the diverse tissues and fruit developmental states before being adopted as controls.

  7. 16 CFR 1502.36 - Official transcript.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... the time the transcript becomes available to propose corrections in the transcript of oral testimony. Corrections are permitted only for transcription errors. The presiding officer shall promptly order justified... presiding officer will arrange for a verbatim stenographic transcript of oral testimony and for necessary...

  8. Transcriptional Profiling Mycobacterium tuberculosis from Patient Sputa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildner, Leticia Muraro; Gould, Katherine A; Waddell, Simon J

    2018-01-01

    The emergence of drug resistance threatens to destroy tuberculosis control programs worldwide, with resistance to all first-line drugs and most second-line drugs detected. Drug tolerance (or phenotypic drug resistance) is also likely to be clinically relevant over the 6-month long standard treatment for drug-sensitive tuberculosis. Transcriptional profiling the response of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to antimicrobial drugs offers a novel interpretation of drug efficacy and mycobacterial drug-susceptibility that likely varies in dynamic microenvironments, such as the lung. This chapter describes the noninvasive sampling of tuberculous sputa and techniques for mRNA profiling M. tb bacilli during patient therapy to characterize real-world drug actions.

  9. Co-transcriptional nuclear actin dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percipalle, Piergiorgio

    2013-01-01

    Actin is a key player for nuclear structure and function regulating both chromosome organization and gene activity. In the cell nucleus actin interacts with many different proteins. Among these proteins several studies have identified classical nuclear factors involved in chromatin structure and function, transcription and RNA processing as well as proteins that are normally involved in controlling the actin cytoskeleton. These discoveries have raised the possibility that nuclear actin performs its multi task activities through tight interactions with different sets of proteins. This high degree of promiscuity in the spectrum of protein-to-protein interactions correlates well with the conformational plasticity of actin and the ability to undergo regulated changes in its polymerization states. Several of the factors involved in controlling head-to-tail actin polymerization have been shown to be in the nucleus where they seem to regulate gene activity. By focusing on the multiple tasks performed by actin and actin-binding proteins, possible models of how actin dynamics controls the different phases of the RNA polymerase II transcription cycle are being identified.

  10. Finite Set Control Transcription for Optimal Control Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    planets. The relative motion of an n-body system can be described by r̈jc = −G(mj + mc) r3jc rjc + G n∑ i=1 i 6=j,c mi ( rij r3ij − ric r3ic ) . (B.2) This...computes the acceleration of the cth body relative to the jth body, where rjc = rc−rj and r = |r|. In the case of the Sun-Earth/Moon libration

  11. The post-transcriptional operon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tenenbaum, Scott A.; Christiansen, Jan; Nielsen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    model (PTO) is used to describe data from an assortment of methods (e.g. RIP-Chip, CLIP-Chip, miRNA profiling, ribosome profiling) that globally address the functionality of mRNA. Several examples of post-transcriptional operons have been documented in the literature and demonstrate the usefulness...

  12. NAC transcription factors in senescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Podzimska-Sroka, Dagmara; O'Shea, Charlotte; Gregersen, Per L.

    2015-01-01

    Within the last decade, NAC transcription factors have been shown to play essential roles in senescence, which is the focus of this review. Transcriptome analyses associate approximately one third of Arabidopsis NAC genes and many crop NAC genes with senescence, thereby implicating NAC genes as i...

  13. Transcription factor-based biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Jeffrey A; Keasling, Jay D

    2013-10-08

    The present invention provides for a system comprising a BmoR transcription factor, a .sigma..sup.54-RNA polymerase, and a pBMO promoter operatively linked to a reporter gene, wherein the pBMO promoter is capable of expression of the reporter gene with an activated form of the BmoR and the .sigma..sup.54-RNA polymerase.

  14. HDG1 transcription factor targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horstman, A.; Boutilier, K.A.; Sanchez Perez, Gabino

    2015-01-01

    The AIL transcription factor BABY BOOM (BBM) is required together with the related PLETHORA proteins for embryo and root meristem development and its expression is sufficient to confer pluripotency and totipotency to somatic tissues. We show that BBM and other AIL proteins interact with multiple

  15. Transcription profile of Escherichia coli: genomic SELEX search for regulatory targets of transcription factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihama, Akira; Shimada, Tomohiro; Yamazaki, Yukiko

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial genomes are transcribed by DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP), which achieves gene selectivity through interaction with sigma factors that recognize promoters, and transcription factors (TFs) that control the activity and specificity of RNAP holoenzyme. To understand the molecular mechanisms of transcriptional regulation, the identification of regulatory targets is needed for all these factors. We then performed genomic SELEX screenings of targets under the control of each sigma factor and each TF. Here we describe the assembly of 156 SELEX patterns of a total of 116 TFs performed in the presence and absence of effector ligands. The results reveal several novel concepts: (i) each TF regulates more targets than hitherto recognized; (ii) each promoter is regulated by more TFs than hitherto recognized; and (iii) the binding sites of some TFs are located within operons and even inside open reading frames. The binding sites of a set of global regulators, including cAMP receptor protein, LeuO and Lrp, overlap with those of the silencer H-NS, suggesting that certain global regulators play an anti-silencing role. To facilitate sharing of these accumulated SELEX datasets with the research community, we compiled a database, ‘Transcription Profile of Escherichia coli’ (www.shigen.nig.ac.jp/ecoli/tec/). PMID:26843427

  16. Transcription profile of Escherichia coli: genomic SELEX search for regulatory targets of transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihama, Akira; Shimada, Tomohiro; Yamazaki, Yukiko

    2016-03-18

    Bacterial genomes are transcribed by DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP), which achieves gene selectivity through interaction with sigma factors that recognize promoters, and transcription factors (TFs) that control the activity and specificity of RNAP holoenzyme. To understand the molecular mechanisms of transcriptional regulation, the identification of regulatory targets is needed for all these factors. We then performed genomic SELEX screenings of targets under the control of each sigma factor and each TF. Here we describe the assembly of 156 SELEX patterns of a total of 116 TFs performed in the presence and absence of effector ligands. The results reveal several novel concepts: (i) each TF regulates more targets than hitherto recognized; (ii) each promoter is regulated by more TFs than hitherto recognized; and (iii) the binding sites of some TFs are located within operons and even inside open reading frames. The binding sites of a set of global regulators, including cAMP receptor protein, LeuO and Lrp, overlap with those of the silencer H-NS, suggesting that certain global regulators play an anti-silencing role. To facilitate sharing of these accumulated SELEX datasets with the research community, we compiled a database, 'Transcription Profile of Escherichia coli' (www.shigen.nig.ac.jp/ecoli/tec/). © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. Tead and AP1 Coordinate Transcription and Motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiangfan; Li, Huapeng; Rajurkar, Mihir; Li, Qi; Cotton, Jennifer L; Ou, Jianhong; Zhu, Lihua J; Goel, Hira L; Mercurio, Arthur M; Park, Joo-Seop; Davis, Roger J; Mao, Junhao

    2016-02-09

    The Tead family transcription factors are the major intracellular mediators of the Hippo-Yap pathway. Despite the importance of Hippo signaling in tumorigenesis, Tead-dependent downstream oncogenic programs and target genes in cancer cells remain poorly understood. Here, we characterize Tead4-mediated transcriptional networks in a diverse range of cancer cells, including neuroblastoma, colorectal, lung, and endometrial carcinomas. By intersecting genome-wide chromatin occupancy analyses of Tead4, JunD, and Fra1/2, we find that Tead4 cooperates with AP1 transcription factors to coordinate target gene transcription. We find that Tead-AP1 interaction is JNK independent but engages the SRC1-3 co-activators to promote downstream transcription. Furthermore, we show that Tead-AP1 cooperation regulates the activity of the Dock-Rac/CDC42 module and drives the expression of a unique core set of target genes, thereby directing cell migration and invasion. Together, our data unveil a critical regulatory mechanism underlying Tead- and AP1-controlled transcriptional and functional outputs in cancer cells. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Tead and AP1 Coordinate Transcription and Motility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangfan Liu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Tead family transcription factors are the major intracellular mediators of the Hippo-Yap pathway. Despite the importance of Hippo signaling in tumorigenesis, Tead-dependent downstream oncogenic programs and target genes in cancer cells remain poorly understood. Here, we characterize Tead4-mediated transcriptional networks in a diverse range of cancer cells, including neuroblastoma, colorectal, lung, and endometrial carcinomas. By intersecting genome-wide chromatin occupancy analyses of Tead4, JunD, and Fra1/2, we find that Tead4 cooperates with AP1 transcription factors to coordinate target gene transcription. We find that Tead-AP1 interaction is JNK independent but engages the SRC1–3 co-activators to promote downstream transcription. Furthermore, we show that Tead-AP1 cooperation regulates the activity of the Dock-Rac/CDC42 module and drives the expression of a unique core set of target genes, thereby directing cell migration and invasion. Together, our data unveil a critical regulatory mechanism underlying Tead- and AP1-controlled transcriptional and functional outputs in cancer cells.

  19. Cdk phosphorylation of the Ste11 transcription factor constrains differentiation-specific transcription to G1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaerulff, Søren; Andersen, Nicoline Resen; Borup, Mia Trolle

    2007-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells normally differentiate from G(1); here we investigate the mechanism preventing expression of differentiation-specific genes outside G(1). In fission yeast, induction of the transcription factor Ste11 triggers sexual differentiation. We find that Ste11 is only active in G(1) when...... S phase. When we mutated T82 to aspartic acid, mimicking constant phosphorylation, cells no longer underwent differentiation. Conversely, changing T82 to alanine rendered Ste11-controlled transcription constitutive through the cell cycle, and allowed mating from S phase with increased frequency....... Thus, Cdk phosphorylation mediates periodic expression of Ste11 and its target genes, and we suggest this to be part of the mechanism restricting differentiation to G(1)....

  20. Classical swine fever virus detection: results of a real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction ring trial conducted in the framework of the European network of excellence for epizootic disease diagnosis and control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Bernd; Blome, Sandra; Bonilauri, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    The current study reports on a real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (real-time RT-PCR) ring trial for the detection of Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) genomic RNA undertaken by 10 European laboratories. All laboratories were asked to use their routine in-house real-time RT...... and specificity values. Nevertheless, some in-house systems had unspecific reactions or suboptimal sensitivity with only a single CSFV genotype. Follow-up actions involved either improvement of suboptimal assays or replacement of specific laboratory assays with the FLI protocol, with or without modifications...

  1. Technical Advance: Transcription factor, promoter, and enhancer utilization in human myeloid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Anagha; Pooley, Christopher; Freeman, Tom C; Lennartsson, Andreas; Babina, Magda; Schmidl, Christian; Geijtenbeek, Teunis; Michoel, Tom; Severin, Jessica; Itoh, Masayoshi; Lassmann, Timo; Kawaji, Hideya; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair R R; Rehli, Michael; Hume, David A

    2015-05-01

    The generation of myeloid cells from their progenitors is regulated at the level of transcription by combinatorial control of key transcription factors influencing cell-fate choice. To unravel the global dynamics of this process at the transcript level, we generated transcription profiles for 91 human cell types of myeloid origin by use of CAGE profiling. The CAGE sequencing of these samples has allowed us to investigate diverse aspects of transcription control during myelopoiesis, such as identification of novel transcription factors, miRNAs, and noncoding RNAs specific to the myeloid lineage. We further reconstructed a transcription regulatory network by clustering coexpressed transcripts and associating them with enriched cis-regulatory motifs. With the use of the bidirectional expression as a proxy for enhancers, we predicted over 2000 novel enhancers, including an enhancer 38 kb downstream of IRF8 and an intronic enhancer in the KIT gene locus. Finally, we highlighted relevance of these data to dissect transcription dynamics during progressive maturation of granulocyte precursors. A multifaceted analysis of the myeloid transcriptome is made available (www.myeloidome.roslin.ed.ac.uk). This high-quality dataset provides a powerful resource to study transcriptional regulation during myelopoiesis and to infer the likely functions of unannotated genes in human innate immunity. © The Author(s).

  2. The thioredoxin MoTrx2 protein mediates reactive oxygen species (ROS) balance and controls pathogenicity as a target of the transcription factor MoAP1 in Magnaporthe oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingzhen; Yin, Ziyi; Tang, Wei; Cai, Xingjia; Gao, Chuyun; Zhang, Haifeng; Zheng, Xiaobo; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Zhengguang

    2017-12-01

    We have shown previously that the transcription factor MoAP1 governs the oxidative response and is important for pathogenicity in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. To explore the underlying mechanism, we have identified thioredoxin MoTrx2 as a target of MoAP1 in M. oryzae. Thioredoxins are highly conserved 12-kDa oxidoreductase enzymes containing a dithiol-disulfide active site, and function as antioxidants against free radicals, such as reactive oxygen species (ROS). In yeast and fungi, thioredoxins are important for oxidative stress tolerance and growth. To study the functions of MoTrx2, we generated ΔMotrx2 mutants that exhibit various defects, including sulfite assimilation, asexual and sexual differentiation, infectious hyphal growth and pathogenicity. We found that ΔMotrx2 mutants possess a defect in the scavenging of ROS during host cell invasion and in the active suppression of the rice defence response. We also found that ΔMotrx2 mutants display higher intracellular ROS levels during conidial germination, but lower peroxidase and laccase activities, which contribute to the attenuation in virulence. Given that the function of MoTrx2 overlaps that of MoAP1 in the stress response and pathogenicity, our findings further indicate that MoTrx2 is a key thioredoxin protein whose function is subjected to transcriptional regulation by MoAP1 in M. oryzae. © 2016 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  3. X chromosome dosage compensation via enhanced transcriptional elongation in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larschan, Erica; Bishop, Eric P; Kharchenko, Peter V; Core, Leighton J; Lis, John T; Park, Peter J; Kuroda, Mitzi I

    2011-03-03

    The evolution of sex chromosomes has resulted in numerous species in which females inherit two X chromosomes but males have a single X, thus requiring dosage compensation. MSL (Male-specific lethal) complex increases transcription on the single X chromosome of Drosophila males to equalize expression of X-linked genes between the sexes. The biochemical mechanisms used for dosage compensation must function over a wide dynamic range of transcription levels and differential expression patterns. It has been proposed that the MSL complex regulates transcriptional elongation to control dosage compensation, a model subsequently supported by mapping of the MSL complex and MSL-dependent histone 4 lysine 16 acetylation to the bodies of X-linked genes in males, with a bias towards 3' ends. However, experimental analysis of MSL function at the mechanistic level has been challenging owing to the small magnitude of the chromosome-wide effect and the lack of an in vitro system for biochemical analysis. Here we use global run-on sequencing (GRO-seq) to examine the specific effect of the MSL complex on RNA Polymerase II (RNAP II) on a genome-wide level. Results indicate that the MSL complex enhances transcription by facilitating the progression of RNAP II across the bodies of active X-linked genes. Improving transcriptional output downstream of typical gene-specific controls may explain how dosage compensation can be imposed on the diverse set of genes along an entire chromosome.

  4. Transcriptional landscape of a RETC634Y-mutated iPSC and its CRISPR-corrected isogenic control reveals the putative role of EGR1 transcriptional program in the development of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A-associated cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Hadoux

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available MEN2A is a hereditary cancer-predisposing syndrome that affects patients with germline RET mutations. The effects of this oncogenic tyrosine kinase in the context of primitive stem cells are not known. In order to study these events, we generated a MEN2A induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC line from a patient with RET mutation and an isogenic counterpart by CRISPR-Cas9 correction of the mutation. Whole exome sequencing of iPSC before and after CRISPR-Cas9 genome edition revealed no major exonic off target effect of the CRISPR correction. However, an integrative differential gene expression analysis of iPSC with oncogenic RETC634Y and its gene-corrected iPSC with RETY634C as well as RETwt iPSCs revealed activation of the Early Growth Response 1 (EGR1 transcriptional program in RET-mutated iPSC, a pathway shown to be involved in RET-induced oncogenesis. These data constitute the first proof of concept of the feasibility of the use of an iPSC and its genome-corrected counterpart to unravel the molecular mechanisms underlying the development of the hereditary MEN2A cancer predisposing syndrome.

  5. Alternative staffing services. Contract transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessier, C

    1992-03-01

    Contract medical transcription services can be of great assistance in meeting the demands for transcription, without jeopardizing patient, physician, or institutional confidentiality. You simply must require the contract service to provide at least the same degree of protection and preservation of confidentiality that you should require inhouse. To achieve this you must make these requirements explicit, comprehensive, comprehensible, believable, and enforceable. Discuss the requirements with prospective contractors. Review them at least annually with existing contractors and when contracts are due for renewal. Be sure to specify the consequence of breaching confidentiality, and if there are breaches, enforce the terms of the contract. Consult your institution's legal counsel both in developing the contract and in enforcing its provisions. Take into consideration your department's and institution's policies, AHIMA's statement on confidentiality, as well as local, state, and federal laws. Above all, never lose sight of the patient. Ultimately, it is not patient information that you are obligated to protect. It is the patient.

  6. Regulation of circadian clock transcriptional output by CLOCK:BMAL1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trott, Alexandra J; Menet, Jerome S

    2018-01-01

    The mammalian circadian clock relies on the transcription factor CLOCK:BMAL1 to coordinate the rhythmic expression of 15% of the transcriptome and control the daily regulation of biological functions. The recent characterization of CLOCK:BMAL1 cistrome revealed that although CLOCK:BMAL1 binds synchronously to all of its target genes, its transcriptional output is highly heterogeneous. By performing a meta-analysis of several independent genome-wide datasets, we found that the binding of other transcription factors at CLOCK:BMAL1 enhancers likely contribute to the heterogeneity of CLOCK:BMAL1 transcriptional output. While CLOCK:BMAL1 rhythmic DNA binding promotes rhythmic nucleosome removal, it is not sufficient to generate transcriptionally active enhancers as assessed by H3K27ac signal, RNA Polymerase II recruitment, and eRNA expression. Instead, the transcriptional activity of CLOCK:BMAL1 enhancers appears to rely on the activity of ubiquitously expressed transcription factors, and not tissue-specific transcription factors, recruited at nearby binding sites. The contribution of other transcription factors is exemplified by how fasting, which effects several transcription factors but not CLOCK:BMAL1, either decreases or increases the amplitude of many rhythmically expressed CLOCK:BMAL1 target genes. Together, our analysis suggests that CLOCK:BMAL1 promotes a transcriptionally permissive chromatin landscape that primes its target genes for transcription activation rather than directly activating transcription, and provides a new framework to explain how environmental or pathological conditions can reprogram the rhythmic expression of clock-controlled genes.

  7. Myocardin-related transcription factor regulates Nox4 protein expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rozycki, Matthew; Bialik, Janne Folke; Speight, Pam

    2016-01-01

    TGFβ-induced expression of the NADPH oxidase Nox4 is essential for fibroblast-myofibroblast transition. Rho has been implicated in Nox4 regulation, but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Myocardin-related transcription factor (MRTF), a Rho/actin polymerization-controlled coactivator o...

  8. Polycomb group protein-mediated repression of transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morey, Lluís; Helin, Kristian

    2010-01-01

    The polycomb group (PcG) proteins are essential for the normal development of multicellular organisms. They form multi-protein complexes that work as transcriptional repressors of several thousand genes controlling differentiation pathways during development. How the PcG proteins work as transcri...

  9. eRNAs reach the heart of transcription

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.A. Melo (Carlos); N. Léveillé (Nicolas); R. Agami (Reuven)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractRecently, various studies shed light on the functional significance of enhancer RNAs. Two recent studies published in Nature by Li et al. and Lam et al. highlight the importance of these newly characterized RNA molecules and their key role in controlling transcriptional programs.

  10. Controlling

    OpenAIRE

    Hriňáková, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    The topic of my diploma thesis is controlling. The first part is theoretical where I describe the history, meaning and functions of controlling. After that I also specify the methods of strategical, operational and cost controlling. The practical part applied method of controlling to the selected company. The aim of this study is to determine the benefits of controlling for the company. At the operational level it describes the process of controlling in the firm and there are given suggestion...

  11. Production of the 2400 kb Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene transcript; transcription time and cotranscriptional splicing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tennyson, C.N.; Worton, R.G. [Univ. of Toronto and the Hospital for Sick Children, Ontario (Canada)

    1994-09-01

    The largest known gene in any organism is the human DMD gene which has 79 exons that span 2400 kb. The extreme nature of the DMD gene raises questions concerning the time required for transcription and whether splicing begins before transcription is complete. DMD gene transcription is induced as cultured human myoblasts differentiate to form multinucleated myotubes, providing a system for studying the kinetics of transcription and splicing. Using quantitative RT-PCR, transcript accumulation was monitored from four different regions within the gene following induction of expression. By comparing the accumulation of transcripts from the 5{prime} and 3{prime} ends of the gene we have shown that approximately 12 hours are required to transcribe 1770 kb of the gene, extrapolating to a time of 16 hours for the transcription unit expressed in muscle. Comparison of accumulation profiles for spliced and total transcript demonstrated that transcripts are spliced at the 5{prime} end before transcription is complete, providing strong evidence for cotranscriptional splicing of DMD gene transcripts. Finally, the rate of transcript accumulation was reduced at the 3{prime} end of the gene relative to the 5{prime} end, perhaps due to premature termination of transcription complexes as they traverse this enormous transcription unit. The lag between transcription initiation and the appearance of complete transcripts could be important in limiting transcript production in dividing cells and to the timing of mRNA appearance in differentiating muscle.

  12. Control of Gene Expression in Leptospira spp. by Transcription Activator-Like Effectors Demonstrates a Potential Role for LigA and LigB in Leptospira interrogans Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Christopher J; Picardeau, Mathieu

    2015-11-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease that affects ∼1 million people annually, with a mortality rate of >10%. Currently, there is an absence of effective genetic manipulation tools for targeted mutagenesis in pathogenic leptospires. Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) are a recently described group of repressors that modify transcriptional activity in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells by directly binding to a targeted sequence within the host genome. To determine the applicability of TALEs within Leptospira spp., two TALE constructs were designed. First, a constitutively expressed TALE gene specific for the lacO-like region upstream of bgaL was trans inserted in the saprophyte Leptospira biflexa (the TALEβgal strain). Reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) analysis and enzymatic assays demonstrated that BgaL was not expressed in the TALEβgal strain. Second, to study the role of LigA and LigB in pathogenesis, a constitutively expressed TALE gene with specificity for the homologous promoter regions of ligA and ligB was cis inserted into the pathogen Leptospira interrogans (TALElig). LigA and LigB expression was studied by using three independent clones: TALElig1, TALElig2, and TALElig3. Immunoblot analysis of osmotically induced TALElig clones demonstrated 2- to 9-fold reductions in the expression levels of LigA and LigB, with the highest reductions being noted for TALElig1 and TALElig2, which were avirulent in vivo and nonrecoverable from animal tissues. This study reconfirms galactosidase activity in the saprophyte and suggests a role for LigA and LigB in pathogenesis. Collectively, this study demonstrates that TALEs are effective at reducing the expression of targeted genes within saprophytic and pathogenic strains of Leptospira spp., providing an additional genetic manipulation tool for this genus. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Regulating retrotransposon activity through the use of alternative transcription start sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Jenna; Steglich, Babett; Smialowska, Agata

    2016-01-01

    . This enforces the use of a downstream TSS and the production of a truncated RNA incapable of reverse transcription and retrotransposition. However, in stressed cells, nucleosome occupancy at LTR elements is reduced, and the TSS shifts to allow for productive transcription. We propose that controlled...... a new mechanism of retrotransposon regulation through transcription start site (TSS) selection by altered nucleosome occupancy. We show that Fun30 chromatin remodelers cooperate to maintain a high level of nucleosome occupancy at retrotransposon-flanking long terminal repeat (LTR) elements...... retrotransposon transcription from a nonproductive TSS allows for rapid stress-induced activation, while preventing uncontrolled transposon activity in the genome....

  14. Current and emerging approaches to define intestinal epithelium-specific transcriptional networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Anders Krüger; Boyd, Mette; Danielsen, Erik Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Upon developmental or environmental cues, the composition of transcription factors in a transcriptional regulatory network is deeply implicated in controlling the signature of the gene expression and thereby specifies the cell or tissue type. Novel methods including ChIP-chip and ChIP-Seq have been...

  15. Current and emerging approaches to define intestinal epithelium-specific transcriptional networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Anders Krûger; Boyd, Mette; Danielsen, Erik Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Upon developmental or environmental cues, the composition of transcription factors in a transcriptional regulatory network is deeply implicated in controlling the signature of the gene expression and thereby specifies the cell- or tissue-type. Novel methods including ChIP-chip and ChIP-Seq have...

  16. Phonetic Transcription Training Improves Adults' Explicit Phonemic Awareness: Evidence from Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werfel, Krystal L.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of phonetic transcription training on the explicit phonemic awareness of adults. Fifty undergraduate students enrolled in a phonetic transcription course and 107 control undergraduate students completed a paper-and-pencil measure of explicit phonemic awareness on the first and last days of…

  17. Transcriptional regulation of cardiac genes balance pro- and anti-hypertrophic mechanisms in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Gennebäck

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM is characterized by unexplained left ventricular hypertrophy. HCM is often hereditary, but our knowledge of the mechanisms leading from mutation to phenotype is incomplete. The transcriptional expression patterns in the myocar - dium of HCM patients may contribute to understanding the mechanisms that drive and stabilize the hypertrophy. Cardiac myectomies/biopsies from 8 patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM and 5 controls were studied with whole genome Illumina microarray gene expression (detecting 18 189 mRNA. When comparing HOCM myocardium to controls, there was significant transcriptional down-regulation of the MYH6, EGR1, APOB and FOS genes, and significant transcriptional up-regulation of the ACE2, JAK2, NPPA (ANP, APOA1 and HDAC5 genes. The transcriptional regulation revealed both pro- and anti-hypertrophic mechanisms. The pro-hypertrophic response was explained by the transcriptional down-regulation of MYH6, indicating that the switch to the fetal gene program is maintained, and the transcriptional up-regulation of JAK2 in the JAK-STAT pathway. The anti-hypertrophic response was seen as a transcriptional down-regulation of the immediate early genes (IEGs, FOS and EGR1, and a transcriptional up-regulation of ACE2 and HDAC5. This can be interpreted as a transcriptional endogenous protection system in the heart of the HOCM patients, neither growing nor suppressing the already hypertrophic myocardium.

  18. Targeted genome regulation via synthetic programmable transcriptional regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatek, Agnieszka; Mahfouz, Magdy M

    2017-06-01

    Regulation of gene transcription controls cellular functions and coordinates responses to developmental, physiological and environmental cues. Precise and efficient molecular tools are needed to characterize the functions of single and multiple genes in linear and interacting pathways in a native context. Modular DNA-binding domains from zinc fingers (ZFs) and transcriptional activator-like proteins (TALE) are amenable to bioengineering to bind DNA target sequences of interest. As a result, ZF and TALE proteins were used to develop synthetic programmable transcription factors. However, these systems are limited by the requirement to re-engineer proteins for each new target sequence. The clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR associated 9 (Cas9) genome editing tool was recently repurposed for targeted transcriptional regulation by inactivation of the nuclease activity of Cas9. Due to the facile engineering, simplicity, precision and amenability to library construction, the CRISPR/Cas9 system is poised to revolutionize the functional genomics field across diverse eukaryotic species. In this review, we discuss the development of synthetic customizable transcriptional regulators and provide insights into their current and potential applications, with special emphasis on plant systems, in characterization of gene functions, elucidation of molecular mechanisms and their biotechnological applications.

  19. Screening Driving Transcription Factors in the Processing of Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangzhong Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Construction of the transcriptional regulatory network can provide additional clues on the regulatory mechanisms and therapeutic applications in gastric cancer. Methods. Gene expression profiles of gastric cancer were downloaded from GEO database for integrated analysis. All of DEGs were analyzed by GO enrichment and KEGG pathway enrichment. Transcription factors were further identified and then a global transcriptional regulatory network was constructed. Results. By integrated analysis of the six eligible datasets (340 cases and 43 controls, a bunch of 2327 DEGs were identified, including 2100 upregulated and 227 downregulated DEGs. Functional enrichment analysis of DEGs showed that digestion was a significantly enriched GO term for biological process. Moreover, there were two important enriched KEGG pathways: cell cycle and homologous recombination. Furthermore, a total of 70 differentially expressed TFs were identified and the transcriptional regulatory network was constructed, which consisted of 566 TF-target interactions. The top ten TFs regulating most downstream target genes were BRCA1, ARID3A, EHF, SOX10, ZNF263, FOXL1, FEV, GATA3, FOXC1, and FOXD1. Most of them were involved in the carcinogenesis of gastric cancer. Conclusion. The transcriptional regulatory network can help researchers to further clarify the underlying regulatory mechanisms of gastric cancer tumorigenesis.

  20. Transcriptional regulators of Na, K-ATPase subunits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqin eLi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Na,K-ATPase classically serves as an ion pump creating an electrochemical gradient across the plasma membrane that is essential for transepithelial transport, nutrient uptake and membrane potential. In addition, Na,K-ATPase also functions as a receptor, a signal transducer and a cell adhesion molecule. With such diverse roles, it is understandable that the Na,K-ATPase subunits, the catalytic alpha-subunit, the beta-subunit and the FXYD proteins, are controlled extensively during development and to accommodate physiological needs. The spatial and temporal expression of Na,K-ATPase is partially regulated at the transcriptional level. Numerous transcription factors, hormones, growth factors, lipids and extracellular stimuli modulate the transcription of the Na,K-ATPase subunits. Moreover, epigenetic mechanisms also contribute to the regulation of Na,K-ATPase expression. With the ever growing knowledge about diseases associated with the malfunction of Na,K-ATPase, this review aims at summarizing the best-characterized transcription regulators that modulate Na,K-ATPase subunit levels. As abnormal expression of Na,K-ATPase subunits have been observed in many carcinoma, we will also discuss transcription factors that are associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, a crucial step in the progression of many tumors to malignant disease.

  1. Targeted genome regulation via synthetic programmable transcriptional regulators

    KAUST Repository

    Piatek, Agnieszka Anna

    2016-04-19

    Regulation of gene transcription controls cellular functions and coordinates responses to developmental, physiological and environmental cues. Precise and efficient molecular tools are needed to characterize the functions of single and multiple genes in linear and interacting pathways in a native context. Modular DNA-binding domains from zinc fingers (ZFs) and transcriptional activator-like proteins (TALE) are amenable to bioengineering to bind DNA target sequences of interest. As a result, ZF and TALE proteins were used to develop synthetic programmable transcription factors. However, these systems are limited by the requirement to re-engineer proteins for each new target sequence. The clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR associated 9 (Cas9) genome editing tool was recently repurposed for targeted transcriptional regulation by inactivation of the nuclease activity of Cas9. Due to the facile engineering, simplicity, precision and amenability to library construction, the CRISPR/Cas9 system is poised to revolutionize the functional genomics field across diverse eukaryotic species. In this review, we discuss the development of synthetic customizable transcriptional regulators and provide insights into their current and potential applications, with special emphasis on plant systems, in characterization of gene functions, elucidation of molecular mechanisms and their biotechnological applications. © 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group

  2. Matrix formalism to describe functional states of transcriptional regulatory systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwin P Gianchandani

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Complex regulatory networks control the transcription state of a genome. These transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs have been mathematically described using a Boolean formalism, in which the state of a gene is represented as either transcribed or not transcribed in response to regulatory signals. The Boolean formalism results in a series of regulatory rules for the individual genes of a TRN that in turn can be used to link environmental cues to the transcription state of a genome, thereby forming a complete transcriptional regulatory system (TRS. Herein, we develop a formalism that represents such a set of regulatory rules in a matrix form. Matrix formalism allows for the systemic characterization of the properties of a TRS and facilitates the computation of the transcriptional state of the genome under any given set of environmental conditions. Additionally, it provides a means to incorporate mechanistic detail of a TRS as it becomes available. In this study, the regulatory network matrix, R, for a prototypic TRS is characterized and the fundamental subspaces of this matrix are described. We illustrate how the matrix representation of a TRS coupled with its environment (R* allows for a sampling of all possible expression states of a given network, and furthermore, how the fundamental subspaces of the matrix provide a way to study key TRS features and may assist in experimental design.

  3. Transcription factors TFIIF and TFIIS promote transcript elongation by RNA polymerase II by synergistic and independent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweikhard, Volker; Meng, Cong; Murakami, Kenji; Kaplan, Craig D; Kornberg, Roger D; Block, Steven M

    2014-05-06

    Recent evidence suggests that transcript elongation by RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) is regulated by mechanical cues affecting the entry into, and exit from, transcriptionally inactive states, including pausing and arrest. We present a single-molecule optical-trapping study of the interactions of RNAPII with transcription elongation factors TFIIS and TFIIF, which affect these processes. By monitoring the response of elongation complexes containing RNAPII and combinations of TFIIF and TFIIS to controlled mechanical loads, we find that both transcription factors are independently capable of restoring arrested RNAPII to productive elongation. TFIIS, in addition to its established role in promoting transcript cleavage, is found to relieve arrest by a second, cleavage-independent mechanism. TFIIF synergistically enhances some, but not all, of the activities of TFIIS. These studies also uncovered unexpected insights into the mechanisms underlying transient pauses. The direct visualization of pauses at near-base-pair resolution, together with the load dependence of the pause-entry phase, suggests that two distinct mechanisms may be at play: backtracking under forces that hinder transcription and a backtrack-independent activity under assisting loads. The measured pause lifetime distributions are inconsistent with prevailing views of backtracking as a purely diffusive process, suggesting instead that the extent of backtracking may be modulated by mechanisms intrinsic to RNAPII. Pauses triggered by inosine triphosphate misincorporation led to backtracking, even under assisting loads, and their lifetimes were reduced by TFIIS, particularly when aided by TFIIF. Overall, these experiments provide additional insights into how obstacles to transcription may be overcome by the concerted actions of multiple accessory factors.

  4. Transcriptional Auto-Regulation of RUNX1 P1 Promoter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Milka; Hinojosa, Marcela; Trombly, Daniel; Morin, Violeta; Stein, Janet; Stein, Gary; Javed, Amjad; Gutierrez, Soraya E.

    2016-01-01

    RUNX1 a member of the family of runt related transcription factors (RUNX), is essential for hematopoiesis. The expression of RUNX1 gene is controlled by two promoters; the distal P1 promoter and the proximal P2 promoter. Several isoforms of RUNX1 mRNA are generated through the use of both promoters and alternative splicing. These isoforms not only differs in their temporal expression pattern but also exhibit differences in tissue specificity. The RUNX1 isoforms derived from P2 are expressed in a variety of tissues, but expression of P1-derived isoform is restricted to cells of hematopoietic lineage. However, the control of hematopoietic-cell specific expression is poorly understood. Here we report regulation of P1-derived RUNX1 mRNA by RUNX1 protein. In silico analysis of P1 promoter revealed presence of two evolutionary conserved RUNX motifs, 0.6kb upstream of the transcription start site, and three RUNX motifs within 170bp of the 5’UTR. Transcriptional contribution of these RUNX motifs was studied in myeloid and T-cells. RUNX1 genomic fragment containing all sites show very low basal activity in both cell types. Mutation or deletion of RUNX motifs in the UTR enhances basal activity of the RUNX1 promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that RUNX1 protein is recruited to these sites. Overexpression of RUNX1 in non-hematopoietic cells results in a dose dependent activation of the RUNX1 P1 promoter. We also demonstrate that RUNX1 protein regulates transcription of endogenous RUNX1 mRNA in T-cell. Finally we show that SCL transcription factor is recruited to regions containing RUNX motifs in the promoter and the UTR and regulates activity of the RUNX1 P1 promoter in vitro. Thus, multiple lines of evidence show that RUNX1 protein regulates its own gene transcription. PMID:26901859

  5. Transcriptional Auto-Regulation of RUNX1 P1 Promoter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milka Martinez

    Full Text Available RUNX1 a member of the family of runt related transcription factors (RUNX, is essential for hematopoiesis. The expression of RUNX1 gene is controlled by two promoters; the distal P1 promoter and the proximal P2 promoter. Several isoforms of RUNX1 mRNA are generated through the use of both promoters and alternative splicing. These isoforms not only differs in their temporal expression pattern but also exhibit differences in tissue specificity. The RUNX1 isoforms derived from P2 are expressed in a variety of tissues, but expression of P1-derived isoform is restricted to cells of hematopoietic lineage. However, the control of hematopoietic-cell specific expression is poorly understood. Here we report regulation of P1-derived RUNX1 mRNA by RUNX1 protein. In silico analysis of P1 promoter revealed presence of two evolutionary conserved RUNX motifs, 0.6kb upstream of the transcription start site, and three RUNX motifs within 170bp of the 5'UTR. Transcriptional contribution of these RUNX motifs was studied in myeloid and T-cells. RUNX1 genomic fragment containing all sites show very low basal activity in both cell types. Mutation or deletion of RUNX motifs in the UTR enhances basal activity of the RUNX1 promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that RUNX1 protein is recruited to these sites. Overexpression of RUNX1 in non-hematopoietic cells results in a dose dependent activation of the RUNX1 P1 promoter. We also demonstrate that RUNX1 protein regulates transcription of endogenous RUNX1 mRNA in T-cell. Finally we show that SCL transcription factor is recruited to regions containing RUNX motifs in the promoter and the UTR and regulates activity of the RUNX1 P1 promoter in vitro. Thus, multiple lines of evidence show that RUNX1 protein regulates its own gene transcription.

  6. The Journey of a Transcription Factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pireyre, Marie

    in their regulation at multiple steps of their activation. Plant signaling in connection with transcription factor regulation is an exciting field, allowing research on multiple regulatory mechanisms. This thesis shed light on the importance of integrating all steps of transcription factor activation in a regulatory......Plants have developed astonishing networks regulating their metabolism to adapt to their environment. The complexity of these networks is illustrated by the expansion of families of regulators such as transcription factors in the plant kingdom. Transcription factors specifically impact...... MYBs to activate transcription of GLS biosynthetic genes. A lot is known about transcriptional regulation of these nine GLS regulators. This thesis aimed at identifying regulatory mechanisms at the protein level, allowing rapid and specific regulation of transcription factors using GLS as a model...

  7. Global analysis of photosynthesis transcriptional regulatory networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saheed Imam

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthesis is a crucial biological process that depends on the interplay of many components. This work analyzed the gene targets for 4 transcription factors: FnrL, PrrA, CrpK and MppG (RSP_2888, which are known or predicted to control photosynthesis in Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq identified 52 operons under direct control of FnrL, illustrating its regulatory role in photosynthesis, iron homeostasis, nitrogen metabolism and regulation of sRNA synthesis. Using global gene expression analysis combined with ChIP-seq, we mapped the regulons of PrrA, CrpK and MppG. PrrA regulates ∼34 operons encoding mainly photosynthesis and electron transport functions, while CrpK, a previously uncharacterized Crp-family protein, regulates genes involved in photosynthesis and maintenance of iron homeostasis. Furthermore, CrpK and FnrL share similar DNA binding determinants, possibly explaining our observation of the ability of CrpK to partially compensate for the growth defects of a ΔFnrL mutant. We show that the Rrf2 family protein, MppG, plays an important role in photopigment biosynthesis, as part of an incoherent feed-forward loop with PrrA. Our results reveal a previously unrealized, high degree of combinatorial regulation of photosynthetic genes and significant cross-talk between their transcriptional regulators, while illustrating previously unidentified links between photosynthesis and the maintenance of iron homeostasis.

  8. Global Analysis of Photosynthesis Transcriptional Regulatory Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imam, Saheed; Noguera, Daniel R.; Donohue, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthesis is a crucial biological process that depends on the interplay of many components. This work analyzed the gene targets for 4 transcription factors: FnrL, PrrA, CrpK and MppG (RSP_2888), which are known or predicted to control photosynthesis in Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) identified 52 operons under direct control of FnrL, illustrating its regulatory role in photosynthesis, iron homeostasis, nitrogen metabolism and regulation of sRNA synthesis. Using global gene expression analysis combined with ChIP-seq, we mapped the regulons of PrrA, CrpK and MppG. PrrA regulates ∼34 operons encoding mainly photosynthesis and electron transport functions, while CrpK, a previously uncharacterized Crp-family protein, regulates genes involved in photosynthesis and maintenance of iron homeostasis. Furthermore, CrpK and FnrL share similar DNA binding determinants, possibly explaining our observation of the ability of CrpK to partially compensate for the growth defects of a ΔFnrL mutant. We show that the Rrf2 family protein, MppG, plays an important role in photopigment biosynthesis, as part of an incoherent feed-forward loop with PrrA. Our results reveal a previously unrealized, high degree of combinatorial regulation of photosynthetic genes and significant cross-talk between their transcriptional regulators, while illustrating previously unidentified links between photosynthesis and the maintenance of iron homeostasis. PMID:25503406

  9. Gene transcription and electromagnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, A.S.

    1992-01-01

    Our overall aim is to obtain sufficient information to allow us to ultimately determine whether ELF EM field exposure is an initiating factor in neoplastic transformation and/or if exposure can mimic characteristics of the second-step counterpart in neoplastic disease. This aim is based on our previous findings that levels of some transcripts are increased in cells exposed to EM fields. While the research is basic in nature, the ramifications have bearing on the general safety of exposure to EM fields in industrial and everyday life. A large array of diverse biological effects are reported to occur as the result of exposure to elf EM fields, suggesting that the cell response to EM fields is at a basic level, presumably initiated by molecular and/or biophysical events at the cell membrane. The hypothesized route is a signal transduction pathway involving membrane calcium fluxes. Information flow resulting from signal transduction can mediate the induction of regulatory factors in the cell, and directly affect how transcription is regulated.

  10. Co-Transcriptional Folding and Regulation Mechanisms of Riboswitches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sha Gong

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Riboswitches are genetic control elements within non-coding regions of mRNA. These self-regulatory elements have been found to sense a range of small metabolites, ions, and other physical signals to exert regulatory control of transcription, translation, and splicing. To date, more than a dozen riboswitch classes have been characterized that vary widely in size and secondary structure. Extensive experiments and theoretical studies have made great strides in understanding the general structures, genetic mechanisms, and regulatory activities of individual riboswitches. As the ligand-dependent co-transcriptional folding and unfolding dynamics of riboswitches are the key determinant of gene expression, it is important to investigate the thermodynamics and kinetics of riboswitches both in the presence and absence of metabolites under the transcription. This review will provide a brief summary of the studies about the regulation mechanisms of the pbuE, SMK, yitJ, and metF riboswitches based on the ligand-dependent co-transcriptional folding of the riboswitches.

  11. Global transcriptional characterization of CD8+ T cell memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttcher, Jan; Knolle, Percy A

    2015-02-01

    The differentiation of memory CD8T cells after acute infections comprises generation of functionally distinct populations that either have proliferative potential or display cytotoxic effector functions and that either recirculate into lymphoid tissues or remain tissue-resident. The development of these functionally distinct cell populations is dictated by defined signals from the microenvironment that result in a coordinated expression of a network of transcription factors, which determine the functionality of memory T cells. Distinct transcriptional regulation observed during chronic viral infection that results in generation of T cells that control viral replication in the absence of immunopathology suggests the existence of so far unappreciated functional adaptation of T cell function to the particular need during chronic infections to control infection and avoid immunopathology. Furthermore, the non-canonical generation of CD8T cell memory outside of lymphoid tissues in the liver in the absence of inflammation is correlated with a distinct transcriptional profile and indicates further complexity in the commensurate immune response to infectious pathogens that escape innate immunity. Taken together, distinct profiles of transcriptional regulation are linked to CD8T cells with different functions and provide important mechanistic insight into the continuous functional adaptation of CD8T cells to generate a commensurate immune response to infectious challenges. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression in Yersinia species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea A Schiano

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Proper regulation of gene expression is required by bacterial pathogens to respond to continually changing environmental conditions and the host response during the infectious process. While transcriptional regulation is perhaps the most well understood form of controlling gene expression, recent studies have demonstrated the importance of post-transcriptional mechanisms of gene regulation that allow for more refined management of the bacterial response to host conditions. Yersinia species of bacteria are known to use various forms of post-transcriptional regulation for control of many virulence-associated genes. These include regulation by cis- and trans-acting small non-coding RNAs, RNA-binding proteins, RNases, and thermoswitches. The effects of these and other regulatory mechanisms on Yersinia physiology can be profound and have been shown to influence type III secretion, motility, biofilm formation, host cell invasion, intracellular survival and replication, and more. In this review, we will discuss these and other post-transcriptional mechanisms and their influence on virulence gene regulation, with a particular emphasis on how these processes influence the virulence of Yersinia in the host.

  13. Functional analysis of limb transcriptional enhancers in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolte, Mark J; Wang, Ying; Deng, Jian Min; Swinton, Paul G; Wei, Caimiao; Guindani, Michele; Schwartz, Robert J; Behringer, Richard R

    2014-01-01

    Transcriptional enhancers are genomic sequences bound by transcription factors that act together with basal transcriptional machinery to regulate gene transcription. Several high-throughput methods have generated large datasets of tissue-specific enhancer sequences with putative roles in developmental processes. However, few enhancers have been deleted from the genome to determine their roles in development. To understand the roles of two enhancers active in the mouse embryonic limb bud we deleted them from the genome. Although the genes regulated by these enhancers are unknown, they were selected because they were identified in a screen for putative limb bud-specific enhancers associated with p300, an acetyltransferase that participates in protein complexes that promote active transcription, and because the orthologous human enhancers (H1442 and H280) drive distinct lacZ expression patterns in limb buds of embryonic day (E) 11.5 transgenic mice. We show that the orthologous mouse sequences, M1442 and M280, regulate dynamic expression in the developing limb. Although significant transcriptional differences in enhancer-proximal genes in embryonic limb buds accompany the deletion of M1442 and M280 no gross limb malformations during embryonic development were observed, demonstrating that M1442 and M280 are not required for mouse limb development. However, M280 is required for the development and/or maintenance of body size; M280 mice are significantly smaller than controls. M280 also harbors an "ultraconserved" sequence that is identical between human, rat, and mouse. This is the first report of a phenotype resulting from the deletion of an ultraconserved element. These studies highlight the importance of determining enhancer regulatory function by experiments that manipulate them in situ and suggest that some of an enhancer's regulatory capacities may be developmentally tolerated rather than developmentally required. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. In silico comparative genomic analysis of GABAA receptor transcriptional regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Christopher J

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Subtypes of the GABAA receptor subunit exhibit diverse temporal and spatial expression patterns. In silico comparative analysis was used to predict transcriptional regulatory features in individual mammalian GABAA receptor subunit genes, and to identify potential transcriptional regulatory components involved in the coordinate regulation of the GABAA receptor gene clusters. Results Previously unreported putative promoters were identified for the β2, γ1, γ3, ε, θ and π subunit genes. Putative core elements and proximal transcriptional factors were identified within these predicted promoters, and within the experimentally determined promoters of other subunit genes. Conserved intergenic regions of sequence in the mammalian GABAA receptor gene cluster comprising the α1, β2, γ2 and α6 subunits were identified as potential long range transcriptional regulatory components involved in the coordinate regulation of these genes. A region of predicted DNase I hypersensitive sites within the cluster may contain transcriptional regulatory features coordinating gene expression. A novel model is proposed for the coordinate control of the gene cluster and parallel expression of the α1 and β2 subunits, based upon the selective action of putative Scaffold/Matrix Attachment Regions (S/MARs. Conclusion The putative regulatory features identified by genomic analysis of GABAA receptor genes were substantiated by cross-species comparative analysis and now require experimental verification. The proposed model for the coordinate regulation of genes in the cluster accounts for the head-to-head orientation and parallel expression of the α1 and β2 subunit genes, and for the disruption of transcription caused by insertion of a neomycin gene in the close vicinity of the α6 gene, which is proximal to a putative critical S/MAR.

  15. Transcriptional and Posttranscriptional Regulation of Dormancy-Associated Gene Expression by Afterripening in Wild Oat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bailin.; Foley, M. E.

    1996-04-01

    To investigate whether the afterripening-induced changes in gene expression are at the transcriptional or posttranscriptional level in wild oat (Avena fatua) seeds, we chose four dormancy-associated genes to estimate their relative transcription activities and the stability of their corresponding transcripts in afterripened and dormant embryos. The transcription activities for those genes were 1.5 to 7 times higher in dormant embryos than in afterripened embryos 24 h after incubation, as determined by nuclear run-on assays. The half-lives of the transcripts in afterripened and dormant embryos were estimated by the use of actinomycin D. The application of actinomycin D resulted in the stabilization of the transcripts. Nevertheless, the results indicated that the half-lives of the transcripts were much greater in dormant embryos than in afterripened embryos. Considering the great differences in the steady-state levels and the half-lives of the mRNAs, and the relatively small differences in transcription activities of the genes between afterripened and dormant embryos, we conclude that afterripening regulates the expression of dormancy-associated genes in excised embryos mainly at the posttranscriptional level and that transcriptional control plays a minor role.

  16. Transcriptional Activation of Inflammatory Genes: Mechanistic Insight into Selectivity and Diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsar U. Ahmed

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Acute inflammation, an integral part of host defence and immunity, is a highly conserved cellular response to pathogens and other harmful stimuli. An inflammatory stimulation triggers transcriptional activation of selective pro-inflammatory genes that carry out specific functions such as anti-microbial activity or tissue healing. Based on the nature of inflammatory stimuli, an extensive exploitation of selective transcriptional activations of pro-inflammatory genes is performed by the host to ensure a defined inflammatory response. Inflammatory signal transductions are initiated by the recognition of inflammatory stimuli by transmembrane receptors, followed by the transmission of the signals to the nucleus for differential gene activations. The differential transcriptional activation of pro-inflammatory genes is precisely controlled by the selective binding of transcription factors to the promoters of these genes. Among a number of transcription factors identified to date, NF-κB still remains the most prominent and studied factor for its diverse range of selective transcriptional activities. Differential transcriptional activities of NF-κB are dictated by post-translational modifications, specificities in dimer formation, and variability in activation kinetics. Apart from the differential functions of transcription factors, the transcriptional activation of selective pro-inflammatory genes is also governed by chromatin structures, epigenetic markers, and other regulators as the field is continuously expanding.

  17. Transcriptional reprogramming in yeast using dCas9 and combinatorial gRNA strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard Jensen, Emil; Ferreira, Raphael; Jakociunas, Tadas

    2017-01-01

    Transcriptional reprogramming is a fundamental process of living cells in order to adapt to environmental and endogenous cues. In order to allow flexible and timely control over gene expression without the interference of native gene expression machinery, a large number of studies have focused...... on developing synthetic biology tools for orthogonal control of transcription. Most recently, the nuclease-deficient Cas9 (dCas9) has emerged as a flexible tool for controlling activation and repression of target genes, by the simple RNA-guided positioning of dCas9 in the vicinity of the target gene...... transcription start site. In this study we compared two different systems of dCas9-mediated transcriptional reprogramming, and applied them to genes controlling two biosynthetic pathways for biobased production of isoprenoids and triacylglycerols (TAGs) in baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. By testing 101...

  18. A Cellular Factor for Regulation of Transcriptional Elongation by HIV TAT

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhou, Qiang

    1998-01-01

    Control of transcriptional elongation has been recognized as an important step in gene regulation, but mechanisms regulating the efficiency of elongation by RNA polymerase II have not been extensively studied...

  19. Transcription factors: Time to deliver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulasov, Alexey V; Rosenkranz, Andrey A; Sobolev, Alexander S

    2018-01-10

    Transcription factors (TFs) are at the center of the broad regulatory network orchestrating gene expression programs that elicit different biological responses. For a long time, TFs have been considered as potent drug targets due to their implications in the pathogenesis of a variety of diseases. At the same time, TFs, located at convergence points of cellular regulatory pathways, are powerful tools providing opportunities both for cell type change and for managing the state of cells. This task formulation requires the TF modulation problem to come to the fore. We review several ways to manage TF activity (small molecules, transfection, nanocarriers, protein-based approaches), analyzing their limitations and the possibilities to overcome them. Delivery of TFs could revolutionize the biomedical field. Whether this forecast comes true will depend on the ability to develop convenient technologies for targeted delivery of TFs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Transcriptional regulation by cyclic AMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montminy, M

    1997-01-01

    A number of hormones and growth factors have been shown to stimulate target cells via second messenger pathways that in turn regulate the phosphorylation of specific nuclear factors. The second messenger cyclic AMP, for example, regulates a striking number of physiologic processes, including intermediary metabolism, cellular proliferation, and neuronal signaling, by altering basic patterns of gene expression. Our understanding of cyclic AMP signaling in the nucleus has expanded considerably over the past decade, owing in large part to the characterization of cyclic AMP-responsive promoter elements, transcription factors that bind them, and signal-dependent coactivators that mediate target gene induction. More importantly, these studies have revealed new insights into biological problems as diverse as biological clocks and long-term memory. The purpose of this review is to describe the components of the cyclic AMP response unit and to analyze how these components cooperate to induce target gene expression in response to hormonal stimulation.

  1. An R2R3 MYB transcription factor associated with regulation of the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway in Rosaceae (on linr)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Kui-Lin; Bolitho, Karen; Grafton, Karryn; Kortstee, A.J.; Karunairetnam, Sakuntala; McGhie, T.K.; Espley, R.V.; Hellens, R.P.; Allan, A.C.

    2010-01-01

    Background - The control of plant anthocyanin accumulation is via transcriptional regulation of the genes encoding the biosynthetic enzymes. A key activator appears to be an R2R3 MYB transcription factor. In apple fruit, skin anthocyanin levels are controlled by a gene called MYBA or MYB1, while the

  2. Transcription of Byzantine Chant - Problems, Possibilities, Formats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troelsgård, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Discusses the problems and possibilities for transsription of Byzantine chant on the basis of medieval musical manuscripts. A relatively 'neutral' style of transcription is suggested for musicological purposes....

  3. Retroviral transcriptional regulation and embryonic stem cells: war and peace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, Sharon; Goff, Stephen P

    2015-03-01

    Retroviruses have evolved complex transcriptional enhancers and promoters that allow their replication in a wide range of tissue and cell types. Embryonic stem (ES) cells, however, characteristically suppress transcription of proviruses formed after infection by exogenous retroviruses and also of most members of the vast array of endogenous retroviruses in the genome. These cells have unusual profiles of transcribed genes and are poised to make rapid changes in those profiles upon induction of differentiation. Many of the transcription factors in ES cells control both host and retroviral genes coordinately, such that retroviral expression patterns can serve as markers of ES cell pluripotency. This overlap is not coincidental; retrovirus-derived regulatory sequences are often used to control cellular genes important for pluripotency. These sequences specify the temporal control and perhaps "noisy" control of cellular genes that direct proper cell gene expression in primitive cells and their differentiating progeny. The evidence suggests that the viral elements have been domesticated for host needs, reflecting the wide-ranging exploitation of any and all available DNA sequences in assembling regulatory networks. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Keeping your armour intact: how HIV-1 evades detection by the innate immune system: HIV-1 capsid controls detection of reverse transcription products by the cytosolic DNA sensor cGAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maelfait, Jonathan; Seiradake, Elena; Rehwinkel, Jan

    2014-07-01

    HIV-1 infects dendritic cells (DCs) without triggering an effective innate antiviral immune response. As a consequence, the induction of adaptive immune responses controlling virus spread is limited. In a recent issue of Immunity, Lahaye and colleagues show that intricate interactions of HIV capsid with the cellular cofactor cyclophilin A (CypA) control infection and innate immune activation in DCs. Manipulation of HIV-1 capsid to increase its affinity for CypA results in reduced virus infectivity and facilitates access of the cytosolic DNA sensor cGAS to reverse transcribed DNA. This in turn induces a strong host response. Here, we discuss these findings in the context of recent developments in innate immunity and consider the implications for disease control and vaccine design. © 2014 The Authors. Bioessays published by WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Transcriptional changes common to human cocaine, cannabis and phencyclidine abuse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elin Lehrmann

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available A major goal of drug abuse research is to identify and understand drug-induced changes in brain function that are common to many or all drugs of abuse. As these may underlie drug dependence and addiction, the purpose of the present study was to examine if different drugs of abuse effect changes in gene expression that converge in common molecular pathways. Microarray analysis was employed to assay brain gene expression in postmortem anterior prefrontal cortex (aPFC from 42 human cocaine, cannabis and/or phencyclidine abuse cases and 30 control cases, which were characterized by toxicology and drug abuse history. Common transcriptional changes were demonstrated for a majority of drug abuse cases (N = 34, representing a number of consistently changed functional classes: Calmodulin-related transcripts (CALM1, CALM2, CAMK2B were decreased, while transcripts related to cholesterol biosynthesis and trafficking (FDFT1, APOL2, SCARB1, and Golgi/endoplasmic reticulum (ER functions (SEMA3B, GCC1 were all increased. Quantitative PCR validated decreases in calmodulin 2 (CALM2 mRNA and increases in apolipoprotein L, 2 (APOL2 and semaphorin 3B (SEMA3B mRNA for individual cases. A comparison between control cases with and without cardiovascular disease and elevated body mass index indicated that these changes were not due to general cellular and metabolic stress, but appeared specific to the use of drugs. Therefore, humans who abused cocaine, cannabis and/or phencyclidine share a decrease in transcription of calmodulin-related genes and increased transcription related to lipid/cholesterol and Golgi/ER function. These changes represent common molecular features of drug abuse, which may underlie changes in synaptic function and plasticity that could have important ramifications for decision-making capabilities in drug abusers.

  6. Sensitive detection of viral transcripts in human tumor transcriptomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven-Eric Schelhorn

    Full Text Available In excess of 12% of human cancer incidents have a viral cofactor. Epidemiological studies of idiopathic human cancers indicate that additional tumor viruses remain to be discovered. Recent advances in sequencing technology have enabled systematic screenings of human tumor transcriptomes for viral transcripts. However, technical problems such as low abundances of viral transcripts in large volumes of sequencing data, viral sequence divergence, and homology between viral and human factors significantly confound identification of tumor viruses. We have developed a novel computational approach for detecting viral transcripts in human cancers that takes the aforementioned confounding factors into account and is applicable to a wide variety of viruses and tumors. We apply the approach to conducting the first systematic search for viruses in neuroblastoma, the most common cancer in infancy. The diverse clinical progression of this disease as well as related epidemiological and virological findings are highly suggestive of a pathogenic cofactor. However, a viral etiology of neuroblastoma is currently contested. We mapped 14 transcriptomes of neuroblastoma as well as positive and negative controls to the human and all known viral genomes in order to detect both known and unknown viruses. Analysis of controls, comparisons with related methods, and statistical estimates demonstrate the high sensitivity of our approach. Detailed investigation of putative viral transcripts within neuroblastoma samples did not provide evidence for the existence of any known human viruses. Likewise, de-novo assembly and analysis of chimeric transcripts did not result in expression signatures associated with novel human pathogens. While confounding factors such as sample dilution or viral clearance in progressed tumors may mask viral cofactors in the data, in principle, this is rendered less likely by the high sensitivity of our approach and the number of biological replicates

  7. System-wide analysis of the transcriptional network of human myelomonocytic leukemia cells predicts attractor structure and phorbol-ester-induced differentiation and dedifferentiation transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Katsumi; Ohyanagi, Hajime; Sato, Shinji; Nobori, Hiroya; Hayashi, Akiko; Ishii, Hideshi; Daub, Carsten O.; Kawai, Jun; Suzuki, Harukazu; Saito, Toshiyuki

    2015-02-01

    We present a system-wide transcriptional network structure that controls cell types in the context of expression pattern transitions that correspond to cell type transitions. Co-expression based analyses uncovered a system-wide, ladder-like transcription factor cluster structure composed of nearly 1,600 transcription factors in a human transcriptional network. Computer simulations based on a transcriptional regulatory model deduced from the system-wide, ladder-like transcription factor cluster structure reproduced expression pattern transitions when human THP-1 myelomonocytic leukaemia cells cease proliferation and differentiate under phorbol myristate acetate stimulation. The behaviour of MYC, a reprogramming Yamanaka factor that was suggested to be essential for induced pluripotent stem cells during dedifferentiation, could be interpreted based on the transcriptional regulation predicted by the system-wide, ladder-like transcription factor cluster structure. This study introduces a novel system-wide structure to transcriptional networks that provides new insights into network topology.

  8. TOBFAC: the database of tobacco transcription factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brannock Jennifer F

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regulation of gene expression at the level of transcription is a major control point in many biological processes. Transcription factors (TFs can activate and/or repress the transcriptional rate of target genes and vascular plant genomes devote approximately 7% of their coding capacity to TFs. Global analysis of TFs has only been performed for three complete higher plant genomes – Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana, poplar (Populus trichocarpa and rice (Oryza sativa. Presently, no large-scale analysis of TFs has been made from a member of the Solanaceae, one of the most important families of vascular plants. To fill this void, we have analysed tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum TFs using a dataset of 1,159,022 gene-space sequence reads (GSRs obtained by methylation filtering of the tobacco genome. An analytical pipeline was developed to isolate TF sequences from the GSR data set. This involved multiple (typically 10–15 independent searches with different versions of the TF family-defining domain(s (normally the DNA-binding domain followed by assembly into contigs and verification. Our analysis revealed that tobacco contains a minimum of 2,513 TFs representing all of the 64 well-characterised plant TF families. The number of TFs in tobacco is higher than previously reported for Arabidopsis and rice. Results TOBFAC: the database of tobacco transcription factors, is an integrative database that provides a portal to sequence and phylogeny data for the identified TFs, together with a large quantity of other data concerning TFs in tobacco. The database contains an individual page dedicated to each of the 64 TF families. These contain background information, domain architecture via Pfam links, a list of all sequences and an assessment of the minimum number of TFs in this family in tobacco. Downloadable phylogenetic trees of the major families are provided along with detailed information on the bioinformatic pipeline that was used to find

  9. The 5'HS2 of the globin locus control region enhances transcription through the interaction of a multimeric complex binding at two functionally distinct NF-E2 binding sites.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Talbot; F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractThe locus control region (LCR) of the human beta-globin locus consists of four hypersensitive regions (5'HS 1-4). One of these sites, 5'HS2, is active in both transient and stable transfection assays and transgenic mice. It has previously been shown that the jun/fos consensus binding

  10. Transcriptional networks of TCP transcription factors in Arabidopsis development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Danisman, S.D.

    2011-01-01

    Leaves are a plant’s main organs of photosynthesis and hence the development of this organ is under strict control. The different phases of leaf development are under the control of both endogenous and exogenous influences. In this work we were interested in a particular class of

  11. Regulation of transcription in hyperthermophilic archaea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, A.B.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the research presented here was to insight in the mechanisms by which transcription in hyperthermophilic archaea is regulated. To accomplish this, we have aimed (I) to identify transcriptional regulatory proteins from hyperthermophilic archaea, (II) to characterize these

  12. 40 CFR 179.94 - Transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... of particular oral testimony first becomes available to propose corrections in the transcript of that testimony. Corrections are permitted only for transcription errors. The presiding officer shall promptly... have all oral testimony stenographically reported or recorded and transcribed, with evidence that is...

  13. Transcription Through Chromatin - Dynamic Organization of Genes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Remodeling of chromatin confers it the ability for dynamic change. Remodeling is essential for transcriptional regulation, the first step of gene expression. Chromatin Structure and Gene Expression. Transcription is the first step of gene expression in which RNA synthesis occurs from the DNA (gene) template in a series of.

  14. Overlapping transcription structure of human cytomegalovirus ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-01-21

    Jan 21, 2013 ... Transcription of human cytomegalovirus UL/b′ region