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Sample records for negative refraction photonic

  1. Negative Refraction Angular Characterization in One-Dimensional Photonic Crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Lugo, Jesus Eduardo; Doti, Rafael; Faubert, Jocelyn

    2011-01-01

    Background Photonic crystals are artificial structures that have periodic dielectric components with different refractive indices. Under certain conditions, they abnormally refract the light, a phenomenon called negative refraction. Here we experimentally characterize negative refraction in a one dimensional photonic crystal structure; near the low frequency edge of the fourth photonic bandgap. We compare the experimental results with current theory and a theory based on the group velocity de...

  2. Negative refraction angular characterization in one-dimensional photonic crystals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Eduardo Lugo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Photonic crystals are artificial structures that have periodic dielectric components with different refractive indices. Under certain conditions, they abnormally refract the light, a phenomenon called negative refraction. Here we experimentally characterize negative refraction in a one dimensional photonic crystal structure; near the low frequency edge of the fourth photonic bandgap. We compare the experimental results with current theory and a theory based on the group velocity developed here. We also analytically derived the negative refraction correctness condition that gives the angular region where negative refraction occurs.By using standard photonic techniques we experimentally determined the relationship between incidence and negative refraction angles and found the negative refraction range by applying the correctness condition. In order to compare both theories with experimental results an output refraction correction was utilized. The correction uses Snell's law and an effective refractive index based on two effective dielectric constants. We found good agreement between experiment and both theories in the negative refraction zone.Since both theories and the experimental observations agreed well in the negative refraction region, we can use both negative refraction theories plus the output correction to predict negative refraction angles. This can be very useful from a practical point of view for space filtering applications such as a photonic demultiplexer or for sensing applications.

  3. Negative refraction angular characterization in one-dimensional photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugo, Jesus Eduardo; Doti, Rafael; Faubert, Jocelyn

    2011-04-06

    Photonic crystals are artificial structures that have periodic dielectric components with different refractive indices. Under certain conditions, they abnormally refract the light, a phenomenon called negative refraction. Here we experimentally characterize negative refraction in a one dimensional photonic crystal structure; near the low frequency edge of the fourth photonic bandgap. We compare the experimental results with current theory and a theory based on the group velocity developed here. We also analytically derived the negative refraction correctness condition that gives the angular region where negative refraction occurs. By using standard photonic techniques we experimentally determined the relationship between incidence and negative refraction angles and found the negative refraction range by applying the correctness condition. In order to compare both theories with experimental results an output refraction correction was utilized. The correction uses Snell's law and an effective refractive index based on two effective dielectric constants. We found good agreement between experiment and both theories in the negative refraction zone. Since both theories and the experimental observations agreed well in the negative refraction region, we can use both negative refraction theories plus the output correction to predict negative refraction angles. This can be very useful from a practical point of view for space filtering applications such as a photonic demultiplexer or for sensing applications.

  4. Negative refraction at infrared wavelengths in a two-dimensional photonic crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berrier, A.; Mulot, M.; Swillo, M.; Qiu, M.; Thylen, L.; Anand, S.; Talneau, A.

    2004-01-01

    We report on the first experimental evidence of negative refraction at telecommunication wavelengths by a two-dimensional photonic crystal field. Samples were fabricated by chemically assisted ion beam etching in the InP-based low-index constrast system. Experiments of beam imaging and light collection show light focusing by the photonic crystal field. Finite-difference time-domain simulations confirm that the observed focusing is due to negative refraction in the photonic crystal area

  5. Confining light with negative refraction in checkerboard metamaterials and photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramakrishna, S. Anantha; Guenneau, S.; Enoch, S.; Tayeb, G.; Gralak, B.

    2007-01-01

    We present here a finite slab of triangular checkerboard of negative refractive index material that exhibits a form of extraordinary transmission. We show that such a checkerboard can be used to confine light and can act as an open resonator. Effectively even a single point of intersection between three triangular wedges of negative refractive index may act as a resonator that confines light in the limit when n tends toward -1. We find that the quality of the confinement improves by adding more triangular wedges around the initial point in a checkerboard fashion. The confinement effect is also demonstrated by using a photonic crystal that shows the negative refraction effect

  6. Improvement of optical imaging resolution by a negative refraction photonic crystal with a solid immersion lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tseng, M.-C.; Chen, L.-W.; Liu, C.-Y.

    2008-01-01

    Photonic crystals (PCs) have many potential applications because of their ability to control light-wave propagation. We have investigated the solid immersion lens (SIL) technology in imaging system based on negative refraction PCs and analyzed the influence of refractive index and geometric parameters of SIL on imaging resolution. In the finite element method calculation, the resolution of our optical system has improved greatly. The high performance of imaging resolution was achieved with shorter radius and larger refractive index of SIL. Furthermore, the effects of the three kinds of SILs at the same radius were analyzed. Such a mechanism of negative refraction PCs and SILs should open up a new application for designing components in optical imaging systems

  7. Octonacci photonic crystals with negative refraction index materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, E. R.; Vasconcelos, M. S.; Anselmo, D. H. A. L.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the optical transmission spectra for s-polarized (TE) and p-polarized (TM) waves in one-dimensional photonic quasicrystals on a quasiperiodic multilayer structure made up by alternate layers of SiO2 and metamaterials, organized by following the Octonacci sequence. Maxwell's equations and the transfer-matrix technique are used to derive the transmission spectra for the propagation of normally and obliquely incident optical fields. We assume Drude-Lorentz-type dispersive response for the dielectric permittivity and magnetic permeability of the metamaterials. For normally incident waves, we observe that the spectra does not have self-similar behavior or mirror symmetry and it also features the absence of optical band gap. Also for normally incident waves, we show regions of full transmittance when the incident angle θC = 0° in a particular frequency range.

  8. A highly-sensitive label-free biosensor based on two dimensional photonic crystals with negative refraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmir, Narges; Fasihi, Kiazand

    2017-11-01

    In this work, we present a novel high-sensitive optical label-free biosensor based on a two-dimensional photonic crystal (2D PC). The suggested structure is composed of a negative refraction structure in a hexagonal lattice PC, along with a positive refraction structure which is arranged in a square lattice PC. The frequency shift of the transmission peak is measured respect to the changes of refractive indices of the studied materials (the blood plasma, water, dry air and normal air). The studied materials are filled into a W1 line-defect waveguide which is located in the PC structure with positive refraction (the microfluidic nanochannel). Our numerical simulations, which are based on finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, show that in the proposed structure, a sensitivity about 1100 nm/RIU and a transmission efficiency more than 75% can be achieved. With this design, to the best of our knowledge, the obtained sensitivity and the transmission efficiency are one of the highest values in the reported PC label-free biosensors.

  9. Ray trace visualization of negative refraction of light in two-dimensional air-bridged silicon photonic crystal slabs at 1.55 microm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Lin; Liu, Ya-Zhao; Li, Jiang-Yan; Zhang, Ze-Bo; Zhang, Dao-Zhong; Li, Zhi-Yuan

    2009-06-08

    We demonstrate design, fabrication, and ray trace observation of negative refraction of near-infrared light in a two-dimensional square lattice of air holes etched into an air-bridged silicon slab. Special surface morphologies are designed to reduce the impedance mismatch when light refracts from a homogeneous silicon slab into the photonic crystal slab. We clearly observed negative refraction of infrared light for TE-like modes in a broad wavelength range by using scanning near-field optical microscopy technology. The experimental results are in good agreement with finite-difference time-domain simulations. The results indicate the designed photonic crystal structure can serve as polarization beam splitter.

  10. Tunable all-angle negative refraction and photonic band gaps in two-dimensional plasma photonic crystals with square-like Archimedean lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Liu, Shao-Bin; Jiang, Yu-Chi

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the tunable all-angle negative refraction and photonic band gaps (PBGs) in two types of two-dimensional (2D) plasma photonic crystals (PPCs) composed of homogeneous plasma and dielectric (GaAs) with square-like Archimedean lattices (ladybug and bathroom lattices) for TM wave are theoretically investigated based on a modified plane wave expansion method. The type-1 structure is dielectric rods immersed in the plasma background, and the complementary structure is named as type-2 PPCs. Theoretical simulations demonstrate that the both types of PPCs with square-like Archimedean lattices have some advantages in obtaining the higher cut-off frequency, the larger PBGs, more number of PBGs, and the relative bandwidths compared to the conventional square lattices as the filling factor or radius of inserted rods is same. The influences of plasma frequency and radius of inserted rod on the properties of PBGs for both types of PPCs also are discussed in detail. The calculated results show that PBGs can be manipulated by the parameters as mentioned above. The possibilities of all-angle negative refraction in such two types of PPCs at low bands also are discussed. Our calculations reveal that the all-angle negative phenomena can be observed in the first two TM bands, and the frequency range of all-angle negative refraction can be tuned by changing plasma frequency. Those properties can be used to design the optical switching and sensor

  11. Simultaneous negative refraction and focusing of fundamental frequency and second-harmonic fields by two-dimensional photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jun [School of Physics, Beijing Institute of Technology and Beijing Key Laboratory of Fractional Signals and Systems, Beijing 100081 (China); College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Henan Normal University, 453007 Xinxiang, Henan (China); Zhang, Xiangdong, E-mail: zhangxd@bit.edu.cn [School of Physics, Beijing Institute of Technology and Beijing Key Laboratory of Fractional Signals and Systems, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2015-09-28

    Simultaneous negative refraction for both the fundamental frequency (FF) and second-harmonic (SH) fields in two-dimensional nonlinear photonic crystals have been found through both the physical analysis and exact numerical simulation. By combining such a property with the phase-matching condition and strong second-order susceptibility, we have designed a SH lens to realize focusing for both the FF and SH fields at the same time. Good-quality non-near field images for both FF and SH fields have been observed. The physical mechanism for such SH focusing phenomena has been disclosed, which is different from the backward SH generation as has been pointed out in the previous investigations. In addition, the effect of absorption losses on the phenomena has also been discussed. Thus, potential applications of these phenomena to biphotonic microscopy technique are anticipated.

  12. Physics of negative refractive index materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramakrishna, S Anantha

    2005-01-01

    In the past few years, new developments in structured electromagnetic materials have given rise to negative refractive index materials which have both negative dielectric permittivity and negative magnetic permeability in some frequency ranges. The idea of a negative refractive index opens up new conceptual frontiers in photonics. One much-debated example is the concept of a perfect lens that enables imaging with sub-wavelength image resolution. Here we review the fundamental concepts and ideas of negative refractive index materials. First we present the ideas of structured materials or meta-materials that enable the design of new materials with a negative dielectric permittivity, negative magnetic permeability and negative refractive index. We discuss how a variety of resonance phenomena can be utilized to obtain these materials in various frequency ranges over the electromagnetic spectrum. The choice of the wave-vector in negative refractive index materials and the issues of dispersion, causality and energy transport are analysed. Various issues of wave propagation including nonlinear effects and surface modes in negative refractive materials (NRMs) are discussed. In the latter part of the review, we discuss the concept of a perfect lens consisting of a slab of a NRM. This perfect lens can image the far-field radiative components as well as the near-field evanescent components, and is not subject to the traditional diffraction limit. Different aspects of this lens such as the surface modes acting as the mechanism for the imaging of the evanescent waves, the limitations imposed by dissipation and dispersion in the negative refractive media, the generalization of this lens to optically complementary media and the possibility of magnification of the near-field images are discussed. Recent experimental developments verifying these ideas are briefly covered

  13. Perfect imaging without negative refraction

    OpenAIRE

    Leonhardt, Ulf

    2009-01-01

    Perfect imaging has been believed to rely on negative refraction, but here we show that an ordinary positively-refracting optical medium may form perfect images as well. In particular, we establish a mathematical proof that Maxwell's fish eye in two-dimensional integrated optics makes a perfect instrument with a resolution not limited by the wavelength of light. We also show how to modify the fish eye such that perfect imaging devices can be made in practice. Our method of perfect focusing ma...

  14. Perfect imaging without negative refraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonhardt, Ulf [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom)], E-mail: ulf@st-andrews.ac.uk

    2009-09-15

    Perfect imaging has been believed to rely on negative refraction, but here we show that an ordinary positively refracting optical medium may form perfect images as well. In particular, we establish a mathematical proof that Maxwell's fish eye in two-dimensional (2D) integrated optics makes a perfect instrument with a resolution not limited by the wavelength of light. We also show how to modify the fish eye such that perfect imaging devices can be made in practice. Our method of perfect focusing may also find applications outside of optics, in acoustics, fluid mechanics or quantum physics, wherever waves obey the 2D Helmholtz equation.

  15. Perfect antireflection via negative refraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monzon, Juan J.; Barriuso, Alberto G.; Sanchez-Soto, Luis L.

    2006-01-01

    We suggest a geometrical framework to discuss the action of slabs of negatively refracting materials. We show that these slabs generate the same orbits as normal materials, but traced out in opposite directions. This property allows us to confirm that the action of any lossless multilayer can be optically canceled by putting it together with the multilayer constructed as the inverted mirror image, with ε and μ reversed in sign

  16. Dispersion characteristics of negative refraction sonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, L.-Y.; Chen, L.-W.; Wang, R.C.-C.

    2008-01-01

    Dispersion characteristics of negative refraction sonic crystals are investigated. The plane wave expansion method is used to calculate the equifrequency surface; the dependences of refractive direction on frequencies and incident angles for triangular lattices are shown. There exist the positive and negative refractive waves which include k.V g ≥0 and k.V g ≤0 in the second band for the triangular system. We also use the finite element method to demonstrate that the relative intensity of the transmitted acoustic waves is dependent on incident frequencies and angles. The positions of the partial band gaps obtained by the plane wave expansion method are in good agreement with those obtained by the finite element method. The sonic crystals with negative effective index are shown to have higher transmission intensities. By using the negative refraction behavior, we can design a sonic crystal plane lens to focus a sonic wave

  17. Negative refraction using Raman transitions and chirality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikes, D. E.; Yavuz, D. D. [Department of Physics, 1150 University Avenue, University of Wisconsin at Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    We present a scheme that achieves negative refraction with low absorption in far-off resonant atomic systems. The scheme utilizes Raman resonances and does not require the simultaneous presence of an electric-dipole transition and a magnetic-dipole transition near the same wavelength. We show that two interfering Raman tran-sitions coupled to a magnetic-dipole transition can achieve a negative index of refraction with low absorption through magnetoelectric cross-coupling. We confirm the validity of the analytical results with exact numerical simulations of the density matrix. We also discuss possible experimental implementations of the scheme in rare-earth metal atomic systems.

  18. Comment on 'Perfect imaging without negative refraction'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaikie, R. J.

    2010-05-01

    The prediction of 'perfect' imaging without negative refraction for Maxwell's fish-eye lens (Leonhardt U 2009 New J. Phys. 11 093040) is a consequence of imposing an active localized 'drain' at the image point rather than being a general property of the lens. This work then becomes analogous to other work using time-reversal symmetry and/or structured antennae to achieve super-resolution, which can be applied to many types of imaging system beyond the fish-eye lens.

  19. Comment on 'Perfect imaging without negative refraction'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaikie, R J

    2010-01-01

    The prediction of 'perfect' imaging without negative refraction for Maxwell's fish-eye lens (Leonhardt U 2009 New J. Phys. 11 093040) is a consequence of imposing an active localized 'drain' at the image point rather than being a general property of the lens. This work then becomes analogous to other work using time-reversal symmetry and/or structured antennae to achieve super-resolution, which can be applied to many types of imaging system beyond the fish-eye lens.

  20. Dirac directional emission in anisotropic zero refractive index photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xin-Tao; Zhong, Yao-Nan; Zhou, You; Zhong, Zhi-Chao; Dong, Jian-Wen

    2015-08-14

    A certain class of photonic crystals with conical dispersion is known to behave as isotropic zero-refractive-index medium. However, the discrete building blocks in such photonic crystals are limited to construct multidirectional devices, even for high-symmetric photonic crystals. Here, we show multidirectional emission from low-symmetric photonic crystals with semi-Dirac dispersion at the zone center. We demonstrate that such low-symmetric photonic crystal can be considered as an effective anisotropic zero-refractive-index medium, as long as there is only one propagation mode near Dirac frequency. Four kinds of Dirac multidirectional emitters are achieved with the channel numbers of five, seven, eleven, and thirteen, respectively. Spatial power combination for such kind of Dirac directional emitter is also verified even when multiple sources are randomly placed in the anisotropic zero-refractive-index photonic crystal.

  1. 1D Photonic Crystals with a Sawtooth Refractive Index

    OpenAIRE

    Morozov, G. V.; Sprung, D. W. L.; Martorell, J.

    2013-01-01

    Exact analytical results (in terms of Bessel functions) for the bandgaps, reflectance, and transmittance of one-dimensional photonic crystals with a sawtooth refractive index profile on the period are derived for the first time. This extends a group of exactly solvable models of periodic refractive indices. The asymptotic approximations of the above exact results have been also obtained.

  2. Conical Dispersion and Effective Zero Refractive Index in Photonic Quasicrystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Dong; M Chang; X. Huang; Z. Hang; Z. Zhong; W. Chen; Z. Huang; C. Chan; X. Huang; Z. Huang

    2015-01-01

    htmlabstractIt is recognized that for a certain class of periodic photonic crystals, conical dispersion can be related to a zero-refractive index. It is not obvious whether such a notion can be extended to a noncrystalline system. We show that certain photonic quasicrystalline approximants have

  3. Negative Refractive Index Metasurfaces for Enhanced Biosensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan Tanasković

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we review some metasurfaces with negative values of effective refractive index, as scaffolds for a new generation of surface plasmon polariton-based biological or chemical sensors. The electromagnetic properties of a metasurface may be tuned by its full immersion into analyte, or by the adsorption of a thin layer on it, both of which change its properties as a plasmonic guide. We consider various simple forms of plasmonic crystals suitable for this purpose. We start with the basic case of a freestanding, electromagnetically symmetrical plasmonic slab and analyze different ultrathin, multilayer structures, to finally consider some two-dimensional “wallpaper” geometries like split ring resonator arrays and fishnet structures. A part of the text is dedicated to the possibility of multifunctionalization where a metasurface structure is simultaneously utilized both for sensing and for selectivity enhancement. Finally we give an overview of surface-bound intrinsic electromagnetic noise phenomena that limits the ultimate performance of a metasurfaces sensor.

  4. Negative refraction of inhomogeneous waves in lossy isotropic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorov, V Yu; Nakajima, T

    2014-01-01

    We theoretically study negative refraction of inhomogeneous waves at the interface of lossy isotropic media. We obtain explicit (up to the sign) expressions for the parameters of a wave transmitted through the interface between two lossy media characterized by complex permittivity and permeability. We show that the criterion of negative refraction that requires negative permittivity and permeability can be used only in the case of a homogeneous incident wave at the interface between a lossless and lossy media. In a more general situation, when the incident wave is inhomogeneous, or both media are lossy, the criterion of negative refraction becomes dependent on an incidence angle. Most interestingly, we show that negative refraction can be realized in conventional lossy materials (such as metals) if their interfaces are properly oriented. (paper)

  5. Strongly-Refractive One-Dimensional Photonic Crystal Prisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, David Z. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    One-dimensional (1D) photonic crystal prisms can separate a beam of polychromatic electromagnetic waves into constituent wavelength components and can utilize unconventional refraction properties for wavelength dispersion over significant portions of an entire photonic band rather than just near the band edges outside the photonic band gaps. Using a ID photonic crystal simplifies the design and fabrication process and allows the use of larger feature sizes. The prism geometry broadens the useful wavelength range, enables better optical transmission, and exhibits angular dependence on wavelength with reduced non-linearity. The properties of the 1 D photonic crystal prism can be tuned by varying design parameters such as incidence angle, exit surface angle, and layer widths. The ID photonic crystal prism can be fabricated in a planar process, and can be used as optical integrated circuit elements.

  6. Focusing light in a bianisotropic slab with negatively refracting materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yan; Guenneau, Sebastien; Gralak, Boris; Ramakrishna, S Anantha

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the electromagnetic response of a pair of complementary bianisotropic media, which consist of a medium with positive refractive index (+ε, +μ, +ξ) and a medium with negative refractive index(−ε, −μ, −ξ). We show that this idealized system has peculiar imaging properties in that it reproduces images of a source, in principle, with unlimited resolution. We then consider an infinite array of line sources regularly spaced in a 1D photonic crystal (PC) consisting of 2n layers of bianisotropic complementary media. Using coordinate transformations, we map this system into 2D corner chiral lenses of 2n heterogeneous anisotropic complementary media sharing a vertex, within which light circles around closed trajectories. Alternatively, one can consider corner lenses with homogeneous isotropic media and map them into 1D PCs with heterogeneous bianisotropic layers. Interestingly, such complementary media are described by scalar, or matrix valued, sign-shifting parameters, which satisfy a new version of the generalized lens theorem of Pendry and Ramakrishna. This theorem can be derived using Fourier series solutions of the Maxwell–Tellegen equations, or from space–time symmetry arguments. Also of interest are 2D periodic checkerboards consisting of alternating rectangular cells of complementary media which are such that one point source in one cell gives rise to an infinite set of images with an image in every other cell. Such checkerboards can themselves be mapped into a class of 3D corner lenses of complementary bianisotropic media. These theoretical results are illustrated by finite element computations. (paper)

  7. Negative Refraction Using Frequency-Tuned Oxide Multilayer Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalin Lu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available An oxide-based multilayer structure was proposed to realize negative refraction. The multilayer composes of alternative layers having negative permittivity and negative permeability, respectively. In order to realize negative refraction, their dielectric and magnetic resonances of layers will be tuned to the frequency as close as possibly via changing their temperature, composition, structure, and so forth. Such oxide-based NIMs are attractive for their potential applications as optical super lenses, imagers, optical cloaking, sensors, and so forth, those are required with low-loss, low-cost, and good fabrication flexibility.

  8. Creating Materials with Negative Refraction Index using Topology Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Rasmus Ellebæk; Sigmund, Ole

    is used for regularizationand a projection step applied to obtain clean 0/1 designs. A continuation scheme is used to avoidstagnation in the optimization. Metamaterials with negative refraction index designed using this method are presented. The angular dependence of the refraction index......We apply topology optimization along with full modeling of the electromagnetic (acoustic) field to create metamaterials with negative refraction index. We believe that our approach can be used in the design of metamaterials with specific effective permittivity and permeability e.g. by adapting....... The direction of propagation for the prescribed wave is chosen to match the angle of incidence of the incoming plane wave and its position isused to select the refraction index for the slab. We introducing a continuous design field and apply The Method of Moving Asymptotes to perform the optimization. A filter...

  9. Silicon photonic crystal nanostructures for refractive index sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorfner, Dominic; Hürlimann, T.; Zabel, T.

    2008-01-01

    The authors present the fabrication and optical investigation of Silicon on Insulator photonic crystal drop-filters for use as refractive index sensors. Two types of defect nanocavities (L3 and H1-r) are embedded between two W1 photonic crystal waveguides to evanescently route light at the cavity...... mode frequency between input and output waveguides. Optical characterization of the structures in air and various liquids demonstrate detectivities in excess of n=n = 0:018 and n=n = 0:006 for the H1-r and L3 cavities, respectively. The measured cavity-frequencies and detector refractive index...... responsivities are in good agreement with simulations, demonstrating that the method provides a background free transducer signal with frequency selective addressing of a specic area of the sensor chip....

  10. Reflection from a flat dielectric film with negative refractive index

    OpenAIRE

    Hillion, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    We analyse the reflection of a TM electromagnetic field first on a flat dielectric film and second on a Veselago film with negative refractive index, both films being deposited on a metallic substrat acting as a mirror. An incident harmonic plane wave generates inside a conventional dielectric film a refracted propagating wave and an evanescent wave that does not contribute to reflection on the metallic substrat so that part of the information conveyed by the incident field is lost. At the op...

  11. Optical bulk and surface waves with negative refraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agranovich, V.M.; Shen, Y.R.; Baughman, R.H.; Zakhidov, A.A.

    2004-01-01

    In materials with negative refraction, the direction of wave propagation is opposite to the direction of the wave vector. Using an approach that characterizes the optical response of a medium totally by a generalized dielectric permittivity, ε-bar (ω,k-bar), we discuss the possibility of seeing negative refraction for optical waves in a number of nonmagnetic media. These include bulk waves in organic materials and in gyrotropic materials where additional exciton-polariton waves can have a negative group velocity. It is known that dispersion of surface waves can be engineered by tailoring a surface transition layer. We show how this effect can be used to obtain surface waves with negative refraction

  12. Subdiffraction focusing of scanning beams by a negative-refraction layer combined with a nonlinear layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husakou, A; Herrmann, J

    2006-11-13

    We evaluate the possibility to focus scanning light beams below the diffraction limit by using the combination of a nonlinear material with a Kerr-type nonlinearity or two-photon absorption to create seed evanescent components of the beam and a negative-refraction material to enhance them. Superfocusing to spots with a FWHM in the range of 0.2 lambda is theoretically predicted both in the context of the effective-medium theory and by the direct numerical solution of Maxwell equations for an inhomogeneous pho-tonic crystal. The evolution of the transverse spectrum and the dependence of superfocusing on the parameters of the negative-refraction material are also studied. We show that the use of a Kerr-type nonlinear layer for the creation of seed evanescent components yields focused spots with a higher intensity compared with those obtained by the application of a saturable absorber.

  13. Overlapping illusions by transformation optics without any negative refraction material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fei; He, Sailing

    2016-01-01

    A novel method to achieve an overlapping illusion without any negative refraction index material is introduced with the help of the optic-null medium (ONM) designed by an extremely stretching spatial transformation. Unlike the previous methods to achieve such an optical illusion by transformation optics (TO), our method can achieve a power combination and reshape the radiation pattern at the same time. Unlike the overlapping illusion with some negative refraction index material, our method is not sensitive to the loss of the materials. Other advantages over existing methods are discussed. Numerical simulations are given to verify the performance of the proposed devices.

  14. Structures with negative index of refraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukoulis, Costas M [Ames, IA; Zhou, Jiangfeng [Ames, IA; Koschny, Thomas [Ames, IA; Zhang, Lei [Ames, IA; Tuttle, Gary [Ames, IA

    2011-11-08

    The invention provides simplified negative index materials (NIMs) using wire-pair structures, 4-gap single ring split-ring resonator (SRR), fishnet structures and overleaf capacitor SRR. In the wire-pair arrangement, a pair of short parallel wires and continuous wires are used. In the 4-gap single-ring SRR, the SRRs are centered on the faces of a cubic unit cell combined with a continuous wire type resonator. Combining both elements creates a frequency band where the metamaterial is transparent with simultaneously negative .di-elect cons. and .mu.. In the fishnet structure, a metallic mesh on both sides of the dielectric spacer is used. The overleaf capacitor SRR changes the gap capacities to small plate capacitors by making the sections of the SRR ring overlap at the gaps separated by a thin dielectric film. This technique is applicable to conventional SRR gaps but it best deploys for the 4-gap single-ring structures.

  15. Formulating Fermat's principle for light traveling in negative refraction materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veselago, Viktor G

    2002-01-01

    The formulation of Fermat's principle for electromagnetic waves traveling in materials with a negative refractive index is refined. It is shown that a formulation in terms of the minimum (or extremum) of wave travel time between two points is not correct in general. The correct formulation involves the extremum of the total optical length, with the optical length for the wave propagation through left-handed materials taken to be negative. (methodological notes)

  16. Far-field self-focusing and -defocusing radiation behaviors of the electroluminescent light sources due to negative refraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yu-Feng; Lin, Yen-Chen; Tsai, Tsung-Han; Shen, Yi-Chun; Huang, Jianjang

    2013-01-15

    In recent years, researchers have demonstrated negative refraction theoretically and experimentally by pumping optical power into photonic crystal (PhC) or waveguide structures. The concept of negative refraction can be used to create a perfect lens that focuses an object smaller than the wavelength. By inserting two-dimensional PhCs into the peripheral of a semiconductor light emitting structure, this study presents an electroluminescent device with negative refraction in the visible wavelength range. This approach produces polarization dependent collimation behavior in far-field radiation patterns. The modal dispersion of negative refraction results in strong group velocity modulation, and self-focusing and -defocusing behaviors are apparent from light extraction. This study further verifies experimental results by using theoretic calculations based on equifrequency contours.

  17. Towards a Negative Refractive Index in an Atomic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Zach; Brewer, Nick; Yavuz, Deniz

    2014-05-01

    The goal of our experiments is to obtain a negative index of refraction in the optical region of the spectrum using an atomic system. The concept of negative refraction, which was first predicted by Veselago more than four decades ago, has recently emerged as a very exciting field of science. Negative index materials exhibit many seemingly strange properties such as electromagnetic vectors forming a left-handed triad. A key potential application for these materials was discovered in 2000 when Pendry predicted that a slab with a negative refractive index can image objects with a resolution far better than the diffraction limit. Thus far, research in negative index materials has primarily focused on meta-materials. The fixed response and often large absorption of these engineered materials motivates our efforts to work in an atomic system. An atomic media offers the potential to be actively modified, for example by changing laser parameters, and can be tuned to cancel absorption. A doped crystal allows for high atomic densities compared to other atomic systems. So far we have identified a transition in such a material, Eu:YSO, as a candidate for these experiments and are performing spectroscopy on this material.

  18. Origami with negative refractive index to generate super-lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenneau, Fanny; Chakrabarti, Sangeeta; Guenneau, Sebastien; Ramakrishna, S Anantha

    2014-01-01

    Negative refractive index materials (NRIM) enable unique effects including superlenses with a high degree of sub-wavelength image resolution, a capability that stems from the ability of NRIM to support a host of surface plasmon states. Using a generalized lens theorem and the powerful tools of transformational optics, a variety of focusing configurations involving complementary positive and negative refractive index media can be generated. A paradigm of such complementary media are checkerboards that consist of alternating cells of positive and negative refractive index, and are associated with very singular electromagnetics. We present here a variety of multi-scale checkerboard lenses that we call origami lenses and investigate their electromagnetic properties both theoretically and computationally. Some of these meta-structures in the plane display thin bridges of complementary media, and this highly enhances their plasmonic response. We demonstrate the design of three-dimensional checkerboard meta-structures of complementary media using transformational optics to map the checkerboard onto three-dimensional corner lenses, the only restriction being that the corresponding unfolded structures in the plane are constrained by the four color-map theorem. (paper)

  19. Textile inspired flexible metamaterial with negative refractive index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgnies, L.; Lheurette, É.; Lippens, D.

    2015-04-01

    This work introduces metallo-dielectric woven fabric as a metamaterial for phase-front manipulation. Dispersion diagram as well as effective medium parameters retrieved from reflection and transmission coefficients point out negative values of refractive index. By numerical simulations, it is evidenced that a pair of meandered metallic wires, arranged in a top to bottom configuration, can yield to a textile metamaterial with simultaneously negative permittivity and permeability. While the effective negative permittivity stems from the metallic grid arrangement, resonating current loop resulting from the top to bottom configuration of two meandered metallic wires in near proximity produces magnetic activity with negative permeability. By adjusting the distance between pairs of metallic wires, the electric plasma frequency can be shifted to overlap the magnetic resonance. Finally, it is shown that the woven metamaterial is insensitive to the incident angle up to around 60°.

  20. Wave propagation inside one-dimensional photonic crystals with single-negative materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ligang; Chen Hong; Zhu Shiyao

    2006-01-01

    The propagation of light waves in one-dimensional photonic crystals (1DPCs) composed of alternating layers of two kinds of single-negative materials is investigated theoretically. The phase velocity is negative when the frequency of the light wave is smaller than the certain critical frequency ω cr , while the Poynting vector is always positive. At normal incidence, such 1DPCs may act as equivalent left-handed materials. At the inclined incidence, the effective wave vectors inside such 1DPCs do refract negatively, while the effective energy flows do not refract negatively. Therefore, at the inclined incidence, the 1DPCs are not equivalent to the left-handed materials

  1. Evolution of polarization in an atomic vapour with negative refractive index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang Fei; Shen Jianqi

    2006-01-01

    A three-level Lambda-configuration atomic vapour may exhibit simultaneously negative permittivity and permeability in the optical frequency band, and an isotropic left-handed vapour medium could therefore be realized within the framework of quantum optics. One of the most remarkable features of the present scheme is that both the refractive index and the photon helicity reversal inside the vapour can be controllably manipulated by an external coupling light field. The phenomenological Hamiltonian that describes the process of helicity reversal is constructed and the time-dependent Schroedinger equation governing the time evolution of the polarization states of the lightwave is solved by means of the Lewis-Riesenfeld invariant theory. The transition between the polarization states (and hence the accompanied photon helicity reversal), which is exactly analogous to the transition operation between bits in digital circuit, may be valuable for the development of new techniques in quantum optics and would have potential applications in information technology

  2. Refractive Index Measurement within a Photonic Crystal Fibre Based on Short Wavelength Diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel Groothoff

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available A new class of refractive index sensors using solid core photonic crystal fibres isdemonstrated. Coherent scattering at the cladding lattice is used to optically characterizematerials inserted into the fibre holes. The liquid to solid phase transition of water uponfreezing to ice 1h is characterized by determining the refractive index.

  3. Refractive index sensor based on a 1D photonic crystal in a microfluidic channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigues de Sousa Nunes, Pedro André; Mortensen, Asger; Kutter, Jörg Peter

    2010-01-01

    A refractive index sensor has been fabricated in silicon oxynitride by standard UV lithography and dry etching processes. The refractive index sensor consists of a 1D photonic crystal (PhC) embedded in a microfluidic channel addressed by fiber-terminated planar waveguides. Experimental...

  4. Twistacene contained molecule for optical nonlinearity: Excited-state based negative refraction and optical limiting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xingzhi; Xiao, Jinchong; Sun, Ru; Jia, Jidong; Yang, Junyi; Ao, Guanghong; Shi, Guang; Wang, Yuxiao; Zhang, Xueru; Song, Yinglin

    2018-06-01

    Spindle-type molecules containing twisted acenes (PyBTA-1 &PyBTA-2) are designed, synthesized characterized. Picosecond Z-scan experiments under 532 nm show reverse saturable absorption and negative nonlinear refraction, indicating large third-order optical nonlinearity in PyBTA-1. The mechanism of the optical nonlinearity is investigated and the results show that the nonlinear absorption and refraction in PyBTA-1 originates from a charge transfer (CT) state. Furthermore, relatively long lifetime and absorptive cross section of the CT state are measured. Based on the excited state absorption in PyBTA-1, strong optical limiting with ∼0.3 J/cm2 thresholds are obtained when excited by picoseconds and nanoseconds pulses. The findings on nonlinear optics suggest PyBTA-1 a promising material of all optical modulation and laser protection, which enrich the potential applications of these spindle-type molecules. Comparing to the previously reported spindle-type molecules with analogous structures, the introduction of ICT in PyBTA-1 &PyBTA-2 dramatically decreases the two-photon absorption while enhances the nonlinear refraction. The results could be used to selectively tailor the optical nonlinearity in such kind of compounds.

  5. Plasmon-negative refraction at the heterointerface of graphene sheet arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, He; Wang, Bing; Long, Hua; Wang, Kai; Lu, Peixiang

    2014-10-15

    We demonstrate negative refraction of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) at the heterointerface of two monolayer graphene sheet arrays (MGSAs) with different periods. The refraction angle is specifically related to the period ratio of the two MGSAs. By varying the incident Bloch momentum, the SPPs might be refracted in the direction normal to the heterointerface. Moreover, both positive and negative refraction could appear simultaneously. Because of the linear diffraction relation, the incident and refracted SPP beams experience diffraction-free propagation. The heterostructures composed of the MGSAs may find great applications in deep-subwavelength spatial light modulators, optical splitters, and switches.

  6. Optical negative refraction by four-wave mixing in thin metallic nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomba, Stefano; Zhang, Shuang; Park, Yongshik; Bartal, Guy; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2011-10-30

    The law of refraction first derived by Snellius and later introduced as the Huygens-Fermat principle, states that the incidence and refracted angles of a light wave at the interface of two different materials are related to the ratio of the refractive indices in each medium. Whereas all natural materials have a positive refractive index and therefore exhibit refraction in the positive direction, artificially engineered negative index metamaterials have been shown capable of bending light waves negatively. Such a negative refractive index is the key to achieving a perfect lens that is capable of imaging well below the diffraction limit. However, negative index metamaterials are typically lossy, narrow band, and require complicated fabrication processes. Recently, an alternative approach to obtain negative refraction from a very thin nonlinear film has been proposed and experimentally demonstrated in the microwave region. However, such approaches use phase conjugation, which makes optical implementations difficult. Here, we report a simple but different scheme to demonstrate experimentally nonlinear negative refraction at optical frequencies using four-wave mixing in nanostructured metal films. The refractive index can be designed at will by simply tuning the wavelengths of the interacting waves, which could have potential impact on many important applications, such as superlens imaging.

  7. High-negative effective refractive index of silver nanoparticles system in nanocomposite films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altunin, Konstantin K.; Gadomsky, Oleg N.

    2012-03-01

    We have proved on the basis of the experimental optical reflection and transmission spectra of the nanocomposite film of poly(methyl methacrylate) with silver nanoparticles that (PMMA + Ag) nanocomposite films have quasi-zero refractive indices in the optical wavelength range. We show that to achieve quasi-zero values of the complex index of refraction of composite materials is necessary to achieve high-negative effective refractive index in the system of spherical silver nanoparticles.

  8. Negative Refraction in Rare-Earth Doped Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-09

    in the material, which in turn refracts into free- space. The false- color plots in Fig. 10 show the snapshots for the electric field in the two spatial...M. Shelby, Homogeneous Line Broadening of Optical Transitions of Ions and Molecules in Glasses, J. Lumin. 36, 179 (1987). [20] B. S. Ham , P. R

  9. Comment on "Total Negative Refraction in Real Crystals for Ballistic Electrons and Light" (Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 157404 (2003))

    OpenAIRE

    Yau, H. -F.; Liu, J. -P.; Ke, B.; Kuo, C. -H.; Ye, Z.

    2003-01-01

    Recently, Zhang et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 157404 (2003)) have demonstrated that an amphoteric refraction, i. e. both positive and negative refraction, may prevail at the interface of two uniaxial anisotropic crystals when their optical axes are in different directions. The authors subsequently made a correspondence between such a refraction with the negative refraction expected for Left Handed Materials (LHMs). Here we comment that the amphoteric refraction can be observed even with one un...

  10. Printable photonic crystals with high refractive index for applications in visible light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calafiore, Giuseppe; Mejia, Camilo A; Munechika, Keiko; Peroz, Christophe; Piña-Hernandez, Carlos; Fillot, Quentin; Dhuey, Scott; Sassolini, Simone; Salvadori, Filippo; Cabrini, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) of functional high-refractive index materials has proved to be a powerful candidate for the inexpensive manufacturing of high-resolution photonic devices. In this paper, we demonstrate the fabrication of printable photonic crystals (PhCs) with high refractive index working in the visible wavelengths. The PhCs are replicated on a titanium dioxide-based high-refractive index hybrid material by reverse NIL with almost zero shrinkage and high-fidelity reproducibility between mold and printed devices. The optical responses of the imprinted PhCs compare very well with those fabricated by conventional nanofabrication methods. This study opens the road for a low-cost manufacturing of PhCs and other nanophotonic devices for applications in visible light. (paper)

  11. Sensitivity of photonic crystal fiber grating sensors: biosensing, refractive index, strain, and temperature sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindorf, Lars Henning; Bang, Ole

    2008-01-01

    We study the sensitivity of fiber grating sensors in the applications of strain, temperature, internal label-free biosensing, and internal refractive index sensing. New analytical expressions for the sensitivities, valid for photonic crystal fibers are rigorously derived. These are generally vali...

  12. Fabrication of Refractive Index Tunable Polydimethylsiloxane Photonic Crystal for Biosensor Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Karthik; Murthy, T. R. Srinivasa; Hegde, G. M.

    Photonic crystal based nanostructures are expected to play a significant role in next generation nanophotonic devices. Recent developments in two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystal based devices have created widespread interest as such planar photonic structures are compatible with conventional microelectronic and photonic devices. Various optical components such as waveguides, resonators, modulators and demultiplexers have been designed and fabricated based on 2D photonic crystal geometry. This paper presents the fabrication of refractive index tunable Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer based photonic crystals. The advantages of using PDMS are mainly its chemical stability, bio-compatibility and the stack reduces sidewall roughness scattering. The PDMS structure with square lattice was fabricated by using silicon substrate patterned with SU8-2002 resist. The 600 nm period grating of PDMS is then fabricated using Nano-imprinting. In addition, the refractive index of PDMS is modified using certain additive materials. The resulting photonic crystals are suitable for application in photonic integrated circuits and biological applications such as filters, cavities or microlaser waveguides.

  13. Refractive index engineering of high performance coupler for compact photonic integrated circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lu; Zhou, Zhiping

    2017-04-01

    High performance couplers are highly desired in many applications, but the design is limited by nearly unchangeable material refractive index. To tackle this issue, refractive index engineering method is investigated, which can be realized by subwavelength grating. Subwavelength gratings are periodical structures with pitches small enough to locally synthesize the refractive index of photonic waveguides, which allows direct control of optical profile as well as easier fabrication process. This review provides an introduction to the basics of subwavelength structures and pay special attention to the design strategies of some representative examples of subwavelength grating devices, including: edge couplers, fiber-chip grating couplers, directional couplers and multimode interference couplers. Benefited from the subwavelength grating which can engineer the refractive index as well as birefringence and dispersion, these devices show better performance when compared to their conventional counterparts.

  14. Power-controlled transition from standard to negative refraction in reorientational soft matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccardi, Armando; Alberucci, Alessandro; Kravets, Nina; Buchnev, Oleksandr; Assanto, Gaetano

    2014-11-25

    Refraction at a dielectric interface can take an anomalous character in anisotropic crystals, when light is negatively refracted with incident and refracted beams emerging on the same side of the interface normal. In soft matter subject to reorientation, such as nematic liquid crystals, the nonlinear interaction with light allows tuning of the optical properties. We demonstrate that in such material a beam of light can experience either positive or negative refraction depending on input power, as it can alter the spatial distribution of the optic axis and, in turn, the direction of the energy flow when traveling across an interface. Moreover, the nonlinear optical response yields beam self-focusing and spatial localization into a self-confined solitary wave through the formation of a graded-index waveguide, linking the refractive transition to power-driven readdressing of copolarized guided-wave signals, with a number of output ports not limited by diffraction.

  15. Antisymmetric-Symmetric Mode Conversion of Ultrasonic Lamb Waves and Negative Refraction on Thin Steel Plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young H.; Sung, Jin Woo

    2013-01-01

    In this study, focusing of ultrasonic Lamb wave by negative refraction with mode conversion from antisymmetric to symmetric mode was investigated. When a wave propagates backward by negative refraction, the energy flux is antiparallel to the phase velocity. Backward propagation of Lamb wave is quite well known, but the behavior of backward Lamb wave at an interface has rarely been investigated. A pin-type transducer is used to detect Lamb wave propagating on a steel plate with a step change in thickness. Conversion from forward to backward propagating mode leads to negative refraction and thus wave focusing. By comparing the amplitudes of received Lamb waves at a specific frequency measured at different distance between transmitter and interface, the focusing of Lamb wave due to negative refraction was confirmed.

  16. Refractive index dispersion sensing using an array of photonic crystal resonant reflectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermannsson, Pétur Gordon; Vannahme, Christoph; Smith, Cameron

    2015-01-01

    Refractive index sensing plays a key role in various environmental and biological sensing applications. Here, a method is presented for measuring the absolute refractive index dispersion of liquids using an array of photonic crystal resonant reflectors of varying periods. It is shown that by cove......Refractive index sensing plays a key role in various environmental and biological sensing applications. Here, a method is presented for measuring the absolute refractive index dispersion of liquids using an array of photonic crystal resonant reflectors of varying periods. It is shown...... that by covering the array with a sample liquid and measuring the resonance wavelength associated with transverse electric polarized quasi guided modes as a function of period, the refractive index dispersion of the liquid can be accurately obtained using an analytical expression. This method is compact, can...... perform measurements at arbitrary number of wavelengths, and requires only a minute sample volume. The ability to sense a material's dispersion profile offers an added dimension of information that may be of benefit to optofluidic lab-on-a-chip applications. © 2015 AIP Publishing LLC....

  17. Determination of distribution function of refraction index and anion diffusion depth in porous alumina photonic crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kaviani

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available   Band structure of porous alumina photonic crystal in the Γ X direction was calculated using order-N method . In a comparison of calculated results with experimental data of reflective and absorptive index, the variation of refractive index of alumina in the external region of oxide layer, around the pores were studied. A Gaussian distribution function was adopted for phosphate anions in the external oxide layer and the variation of refractive index and diffusion depth were determined. The structure of the first four bands was calculated using the obtained distribution of refractive index in the external oxide layer for both TE and TM mode. This results show a narrow full band gap in the TM mode.

  18. Negative refraction imaging of acoustic metamaterial lens in the supersonic range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianning Han

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic metamaterials with negative refraction index is the most promising method to overcome the diffraction limit of acoustic imaging to achieve ultrahigh resolution. In this paper, we use localized resonant phononic crystal as the unit cell to construct the acoustic negative refraction lens. Based on the vibration model of the phononic crystal, negative quality parameters of the lens are obtained while excited near the system resonance frequency. Simulation results show that negative refraction of the acoustic lens can be achieved when a sound wave transmiting through the phononic crystal plate. The patterns of the imaging field agree well with that of the incident wave, while the dispersion is very weak. The unit cell size in the simulation is 0.0005 m and the wavelength of the sound source is 0.02 m, from which we show that acoustic signal can be manipulated through structures with dimensions much smaller than the wavelength of incident wave.

  19. Negative refraction imaging of solid acoustic waves by two-dimensional three-component phononic crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jing; Liu Zhengyou; Qiu Chunyin

    2008-01-01

    By using of the multiple scattering methods, we study the negative refraction imaging effect of solid acoustic waves by two-dimensional three-component phononic crystals composed of coated solid inclusions placed in solid matrix. We show that localized resonance mechanism brings on a group of flat single-mode bands in low-frequency region, which provides two equivalent frequency surfaces (EFS) close to circular. The two constant frequency surfaces correspond to two Bloch modes, a right-handed and a left-handed, whose leading mode are respectively transverse (T) and longitudinal (L) modes. The negative refraction behaviors of the two kinds of modes have been demonstrated by simulation of a Gaussian beam through a finite system. High-quality far-field imaging by a planar lens for transverse or longitudinal waves has been realized separately. This three-component phononic crystal may thus serve as a mode selector in negative refraction imaging of solid acoustic waves

  20. Omnidirectional Photonic Band Gap Using Low Refractive Index Contrast Materials and its Application in Optical Waveguides

    KAUST Repository

    Vidal Faez, Angelo

    2012-07-01

    Researchers have argued for many years that one of the conditions for omnidirectional reflection in a one-dimensional photonic crystal is a strong refractive index contrast between the two constituent dielectric materials. Using numerical simulations and the theory of Anderson localization of light, in this work we demonstrate that an omnidirectional band gap can indeed be created utilizing low refractive index contrast materials when they are arranged in a disordered manner. Moreover, the size of the omnidirectional band gap becomes a controllable parameter, which now depends on the number of layers and not only on the refractive index contrast of the system, as it is widely accepted. This achievement constitutes a major breakthrough in the field since it allows for the development of cheaper and more efficient technologies. Of particular interest is the case of high index contrast one-dimensional photonic crystal fibers, where the propagation losses are mainly due to increased optical scattering from sidewall roughness at the interfaces of high index contrast materials. By using low index contrast materials these losses can be reduced dramatically, while maintaining the confinement capability of the waveguide. This is just one of many applications that could be proven useful for this discovery.

  1. Generation of highly confined photonic nanojet using crescent-shape refractive index profile in microsphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, H. S.; Kushwaha, P. K.; Swami, M. K.

    2018-05-01

    Photonic nanojets (PNJs) owing to their sub-wavelength near-field features have found many interesting applications like nanoscopy, nano photolithography, high density optical storage, enhancement of Raman signal and single molecule spectroscopy etc. More recently, the focus of research has been on tailoring of PNJs either for better confinement and thus higher peak intensity or for elongation of nanojet for high resolution far field applications. In this paper, we show that crescent-shape refractive index profile (CSRP) of microspheres can be used to generate highly confined PNJ. By optimizing the refractive index of different layers in CSRP microsphere, we show a free space confinement down to ∼ λ / 4 . 5 (FWHM ∼ 110 nm for excitation with 500 nm wavelength). Further, it was observed that the optical properties of substrates also modulate the PNJ characteristics and lead to a further improvement in the transverse confinement to ∼ λ / 6 . 7.

  2. A two-dimensional uniplanar transmission-line metamaterial with a negative index of refraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elek, Francis; Eleftheriades, George V

    2005-01-01

    A uniplanar transmission-line (TL) network has been loaded with lumped elements (chip or printed), enabling one to achieve a two-dimensional (2D) uniplanar negative-refractive-index (NRI) metamaterial. The metamaterial consists of a 2D array of unit cells, composed of TL sections connected in series and loaded in a specified manner. The unit cell dimensions can be designed to be much smaller than the operating wavelength, enabling one to identify the structure as an effective medium, with a negative index of refraction. This NRI metamaterial supports transverse electric (TE) waves, as opposed to related previous work on NRI-TL media that supported transverse magnetic (TM) waves. The dispersion characteristics are calculated using a simple, fast 2D loaded TL model with periodic (Bloch) boundary conditions. Subsequently the dispersion relation is simplified in the homogeneous limit, thus allowing one to identify effective permittivities and permeabilities, which are shown to be simultaneously negative. Simulations demonstrating the negative refraction of a plane wave on an interface between such a NRI uniplanar metamaterial and a commensurate positive-refractive-index (PRI) metamaterial verify the validity of the proposed concept and theory. A fully printed unit cell is presented at microwave frequencies (∼10 GHz) along with a prescription for synthesizing an isotropic 3D transmission line NRI metamaterial based on this unit cell

  3. Additional signals due to negative refraction in acoustic microscopy of anisotropic plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlov, A.V.; Mozhaev, V.G.

    2008-01-01

    The additional V(z) oscillations and pulses are predicted in the case of positive defocusing (focus above the sample surface) in acoustic microscopy of anisotropic plates exhibiting negative refraction of acoustic rays. The relationship between these additional signals and separate points on the acoustic slowness surface of the plate material is elucidated

  4. Additional signals due to negative refraction in acoustic microscopy of anisotropic plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlov, A.V. [Faculty of Physics, Moscow State University, Moscow, 119991 GSP-1 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: av_kozlov@inbox.ru; Mozhaev, V.G. [Faculty of Physics, Moscow State University, Moscow, 119991 GSP-1 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: vgmozhaev@mail.ru

    2008-06-23

    The additional V(z) oscillations and pulses are predicted in the case of positive defocusing (focus above the sample surface) in acoustic microscopy of anisotropic plates exhibiting negative refraction of acoustic rays. The relationship between these additional signals and separate points on the acoustic slowness surface of the plate material is elucidated.

  5. Design of negative refractive index metamaterial with water droplets using 3D-printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zhaoyang; Yang, Helin; Huang, Xiaojun; Yu, Zetai

    2017-11-01

    We numerically and experimentally demonstrate a negative refractive index (NRI) behavior in combined water droplets and photosensitive resin materials operating in the microwave regime. The NRI is achieved over a very wide frequency range in 10.27-15 GHz with bandwidth of 4.63 GHz. The simulated results approximately agree with the experimental results. The negative index band can be controlled by water droplet radius. The proposed metamaterial production process is simple and may have potential applications in broadband tunable devices.

  6. Negative refractions by triangular lattice sonic crystals in partial band gaps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alagoz, S.; Sahin, A.; Alagoz, B. B.; Nur, S.

    2015-01-01

    This study numerically demonstrates the effects of partial band gaps on the negative refraction properties of sonic crystal. The partial band gap appearing at the second band edge leads to the efficient transmissions of scattered wave envelopes in the transverse directions inside triangular lattice sonic crystal, and therefore enhances the refraction property of sonic crystal. Numerical simulation results indicate a diagonal guidance of coupled scattered wave envelopes inside crystal structure at the partial band gap frequencies and then output waves are restored in the vicinity of the output interface of sonic crystal by combining phase coherent scattered waves according to Huygens’ principles. This mechanism leads to two operations for wavefront engineering: one is spatial wavefront shifting operation and the other is convex–concave wavefront inversion operation. The effects of this mechanism on the negative refraction and wave focalization are investigated by using the finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations. This study contributes to a better understanding of negative refraction and wave focusing mechanisms at the band edge frequencies, and shows the applications of the slab corner beam splitting and SC-air multilayer acoustic system. (paper)

  7. Investigation on bandgap, diffraction, interference, and refraction effects of photonic crystal structure in GaN/InGaN LEDs for light extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Saroj Kanta; Adhikari, Sonachand; Pal, Suchandan

    2014-06-20

    In this paper, we have made a clear differentiation among bandgap, diffraction, interference, and refraction effects in photonic crystal structures (PhCs). For observing bandgap, diffraction, and refraction effects, PhCs are considered on the top p-GaN surface of light emitting diodes (LEDs), whereas for interference effect, hole type PhCs are considered to be embedded within n-GaN layer of LED. From analysis, it is observed that at a particular lattice periodicity, for which bandgap lies within the wavelength of interest shows a significant light extraction due to inhibition of guided mode. Beyond a certain periodicity, diffraction effect starts dominating and light extraction improves further. The interference effect is observed in embedded photonic crystal LEDs, where depth of etching supports constructive interference of outward light waves. We have also shed light on refraction effects exhibited by the PhCs and whether negative refraction properties of PhCs may be useful in case of LED light extraction.

  8. All-angle negative refraction and active flat lensing of ultraviolet light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ting; Agrawal, Amit; Abashin, Maxim; Chau, Kenneth J; Lezec, Henri J

    2013-05-23

    Decades ago, Veselago predicted that a material with simultaneously negative electric and magnetic polarization responses would yield a 'left-handed' medium in which light propagates with opposite phase and energy velocities--a condition described by a negative refractive index. He proposed that a flat slab of left-handed material possessing an isotropic refractive index of -1 could act like an imaging lens in free space. Left-handed materials do not occur naturally, and it has only recently become possible to achieve a left-handed response using metamaterials, that is, electromagnetic structures engineered on subwavelength scales to elicit tailored polarization responses. So far, left-handed responses have typically been implemented using resonant metamaterials composed of periodic arrays of unit cells containing inductive-capacitive resonators and conductive wires. Negative refractive indices that are isotropic in two or three dimensions at microwave frequencies have been achieved in resonant metamaterials with centimetre-scale features. Scaling the left-handed response to higher frequencies, such as infrared or visible, has been done by shrinking critical dimensions to submicrometre scales by means of top-down nanofabrication. This miniaturization has, however, so far been achieved at the cost of reduced unit-cell symmetry, yielding a refractive index that is negative along only one axis. Moreover, lithographic scaling limits have so far precluded the fabrication of resonant metamaterials with left-handed responses at frequencies beyond the visible. Here we report the experimental implementation of a bulk metamaterial with a left-handed response to ultraviolet light. The structure, based on stacked plasmonic waveguides, yields an omnidirectional left-handed response for transverse magnetic polarization characterized by a negative refractive index. By engineering the structure to have a refractive index close to -1 over a broad angular range, we achieve Veselago

  9. Electromagnetic forces in negative-refractive-index metamaterials: A first-principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yannopapas, Vassilios; Galiatsatos, Pavlos G.

    2008-04-01

    According to the theory of Veselago, when a particle immersed within a metamaterial with negative refractive index is illuminated by plane wave, it experiences a reversed radiation force due to the antiparallel directions of the phase velocity and energy flow. By employing an ab initio method, we show that, in the limit of zero losses, the effect of reversed radiation pressure is generally true only for the specular beam. Waves generated by diffraction of the incident light at the surface of the slab of the metamaterial can produce a total force which is parallel to the radiation flow. However, when the actual losses of the materials are taken into account, the phenomenon of reversed radiation force is evident within the whole range of a negative refractive index band.

  10. Elastic metamaterial with simultaneously negative refraction for longitudinal and transverse waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-En Wu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a study of elastic metamaterial that possesses multiple local resonances. We demonstrated that the elastic metamaterial can have simultaneously three negative effective parameters, i.e., negative effective mass, effective bulk modulus and effective shear modulus at a certain frequency range. Through the analysis of the resonant field, it has been elucidated that the three negative parameters are induced by dipolar, monopolar and quadrupolar resonance respectively. The dipolar and monopolar resonances result into the negative band for longitudinal waves, while the dipolar and quadrupolar resonances cause the negative band for transverse waves. The two bands have an overlapping frequency regime. A simultaneously negative refraction for both longitudinal waves and transverse waves has been demonstrated in the system.

  11. Diffraction by a grating made of a uniaxial dielectric-magnetic medium exhibiting negative refraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Depine, Ricardo A [Grupo de Electromagnetismo Aplicado, Departamento de FIsica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellon I, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Lakhtakia, Akhlesh [CATMAS-Computational and Theoretical Materials Sciences Group, Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802-6812 (United States); Department of Physics, Imperial College, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom)

    2005-08-01

    Diffraction of linearly polarized plane electromagnetic waves at the periodically corrugated boundary of vacuum and a linear, homogeneous, uniaxial, dielectric-magnetic medium is formulated as a boundary-value problem and solved using the Rayleigh method. The focus is on situations where the diffracted fields maintain the same polarization state as the s- or p-polarized incident plane wave. Attention is paid to two classes of diffracting media: those with negative definite permittivity and permeability tensors, and those with indefinite permittivity and permeability tensors. For the situations investigated, whereas the dispersion equations in the diffracting medium turn out to be elliptic for the first class of diffracting media, they are hyperbolic for the second class. Examples are reported with the first class of diffracting media of instances when the grating acts either as a positively refracting interface or as a negatively refracting interface. For the second class of diffracting media, hyperbolic dispersion equations imply the possibility of an infinite number of refraction channels.

  12. Diffraction by a grating made of a uniaxial dielectric-magnetic medium exhibiting negative refraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depine, Ricardo A; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2005-01-01

    Diffraction of linearly polarized plane electromagnetic waves at the periodically corrugated boundary of vacuum and a linear, homogeneous, uniaxial, dielectric-magnetic medium is formulated as a boundary-value problem and solved using the Rayleigh method. The focus is on situations where the diffracted fields maintain the same polarization state as the s- or p-polarized incident plane wave. Attention is paid to two classes of diffracting media: those with negative definite permittivity and permeability tensors, and those with indefinite permittivity and permeability tensors. For the situations investigated, whereas the dispersion equations in the diffracting medium turn out to be elliptic for the first class of diffracting media, they are hyperbolic for the second class. Examples are reported with the first class of diffracting media of instances when the grating acts either as a positively refracting interface or as a negatively refracting interface. For the second class of diffracting media, hyperbolic dispersion equations imply the possibility of an infinite number of refraction channels

  13. In-line photonic microcells based on the elliptical microfibers for refractive index sensors applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Wa; Liu, Xuejing; Jin, Wei

    2017-10-01

    We report the fabrication of in-line photonic microcells (PMCs) by encapsulating tapered elliptical microfibers (MFs) inside glass tubes. The encapsulation does not change the optical property of the MF but protects the elliptical MF from external disturbance and contamination and makes the micro-laboratory robust. Such micro-laboratory can be easily integrated into standard fiber-optic circuits with low loss, making the elliptical MF-based devices more practical for real-world applications. Evanescent field sensing is realized by fabricating micro-channel on the PMC for ingress/egress of sample liquids/gas. Based on the encapsulated elliptical MF PMCs, we demonstrated RI sensitivity of 2024 nm per refractive index unit (nm/RIU) in gaseous environment and 21231 nm/RIU in water.

  14. The electromagnetically induced negative refractive index in the Er3+:YAlO3 crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Chunxu; Zhang Jisen; Liu Junye; Jin Guang

    2009-01-01

    We carried out the negative refractive index in the solid medium Er 3+ :YAlO 3 crystal with a Λ-type four-level scheme proposed for atomic vapour by Thommen and Mandel, and Kaestel (Phys. Rev. Lett. 2006 96 053601 and 2007 98 069301) based on quantum interference and electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). The results show that the frequency band with the negative index is much wider (∼1 MHz) than reported previously. Usually, Im[n] is always positive, corresponding to absorption, and the figure of merit (FOM, the ratio of real to imaginary, namely |Re[n]/Im[n]|) is only on the order of unity. We achieve FOM |Re[n]/Im[n]| = 4.6. The corresponding negative Im[n] is related to the stimulated emission of 4 I 13/2 → 4 I 15/2 of the rare earth ion Er 3+ under external electromagnetic fields. It is concluded that the rare earth ion doped material with abundant energy levels and various electric and magnetic transitions is an outstanding and practical candidate for the electromagnetically induced negative refractive index material.

  15. Enhanced complete photonic bandgap in a moderate refractive index contrast chalcogenide-air system with connected-annular-rods photonic crystals

    KAUST Repository

    Hou, Jin

    2018-03-27

    Connected-annular-rods photonic crystals (CARPCs) in both triangular and square lattices are proposed to enhance the two-dimensional complete photonic bandgap (CPBG) for chalcogenide material systems with moderate refractive index contrast. For the typical chalcogenide-glass–air system with an index contrast of 2.8:1, the optimized square lattice CARPC exhibits a significantly larger normalized CPBG of about 13.50%, though the use of triangular lattice CARPC is unable to enhance the CPBG. It is almost twice as large as our previously reported result [IEEE J. Sel. Top. Quantum Electron. 22, 4900108 (2016) [CrossRef] ]. Moreover, the CPBG of the square-lattice CARPC could remain until an index contrast as low as 2.24:1. The result not only favors wideband CPBG applications for index contrast systems near 2.8:1, but also makes various optical applications that are dependent on CPBG possible for more widely refractive index contrast systems.

  16. Alternative methods for ray tracing in uniaxial media. Application to negative refraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellver-Cebreros, Consuelo; Rodriguez-Danta, Marcelo

    2007-03-01

    In previous papers [C. Bellver-Cebreros, M. Rodriguez-Danta, Eikonal equation, alternative expression of Fresnel's equation and Mohr's construction in optical anisotropic media, Opt. Commun. 189 (2001) 193; C. Bellver-Cebreros, M. Rodriguez-Danta, Internal conical refraction in biaxial media and graphical plane constructions deduced from Mohr's method, Opt. Commun. 212 (2002) 199; C. Bellver-Cebreros, M. Rodriguez-Danta, Refraccion conica externa en medios biaxicos a partir de la construccion de Mohr, Opt. Pura AppliE 36 (2003) 33], the authors have developed a method based on the local properties of dielectric permittivity tensor and on Mohr's plane graphical construction in order to study the behaviour of locally plane light waves in anisotropic media. In this paper, this alternative methodology is compared with the traditional one, by emphasizing the simplicity of the former when studying ray propagation through uniaxial media (comparison is possible since, in this case, traditional construction becomes also plane). An original and simple graphical method is proposed in order to determine the direction of propagation given by the wave vector from the knowledge of the extraordinary ray direction (given by Poynting vector). Some properties of light rays in these media not described in the literature are obtained. Finally, two applications are considered: a description of optical birefringence under normal incidence and the study of negative refraction in uniaxial media.

  17. Chiral metamaterials: from optical activity and negative refractive index to asymmetric transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zhaofeng; Mutlu, Mehmet; Ozbay, Ekmel

    2013-01-01

    We summarize the progress in the development and application of chiral metamaterials. After a brief review of the salient features of chiral metamaterials, such as giant optical activity, circular dichroism, and negative refractive index, the common method for the retrieval of effective parameters for chiral metamaterials is surveyed. Then, we introduce some typical chiral structures, e.g., chiral metamaterial consisting of split ring resonators, complementary chiral metamaterial, and composite chiral metamaterial, on the basis of the studies of the authors’ group. The coupling effect during the construction of bulk chiral metamaterials is mentioned and discussed. We introduce the application of bianisotropic chiral structures in the field of asymmetric transmission. Finally, we mention a few directions for future research on chiral metamaterials. (review article)

  18. Role of shape of hole in transmission and negative refractive index of sandwiched metamaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Min; Ye Yong-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Transmission and negative refractive index (NRI) of metal—dielectric—metal (MDM) sandwiched metamaterial perforated with four kinds of shapes of holes are numerically studied. Results indicate that positions of all transmission peaks of these kinds of holes are sensitive to the shape of the hole. Under the same conditions, the circular hole can obtain the maximum NRI and the rectangular hole can obtain the maximum frequency bandwidth of NRI. Moreover, the figure of merit (FOM) of the circular hole is the maximum too. As a result, we can obtain a higher NRI and FOM metamaterial by drilling circular hole arrays on MDM metamaterial. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  19. Negative refraction by a planar Ag/SiO2 multilayer at ultraviolet wavelength to the limit of silver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Zhao

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available For planar structured hyperbolic metamaterial, the shortest wavelength achievable for negative refraction is often limited by dielectric layers, which are usually wide band gap semiconductors that absorb light strongly at wavelength shorter than their absorption edge. Here we proposed that using SiO2 may break such limitation based on effective medium theory. Through calculation and simulation we demonstrated broad angle negative refraction by a planar Ag/SiO2 layered structure at wavelength down to 326 nm. Its imaging and focusing abilities were also presented. The lower limit of wavelength here is defined by the property of silver, whose permittivity turns positive below 324 nm.

  20. Two and four photon absorption and nonlinear refraction in undoped, chromium doped and copper doped ZnS quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Dimple; Malik, B. P.; Gaur, Arun

    2015-12-01

    The ZnS quantum dots (QDs) with Cr and Cu doping were synthesized by chemical co-precipitation method. The nanostructures of the prepared undoped and doped ZnS QDs were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The sizes of QDs were found to be within 3-5 nm range. The nonlinear parameters viz. Two photon absorption coefficient (β2), nonlinear refractive index (n2), third order nonlinear susceptibility (χ3) at wavelength 532 nm and Four photon absorption coefficient (β4) at wavelength 1064 nm have been calculated by Z-scan technique using nanosecond Nd:YAG laser in undoped, Cr doped and Cu doped ZnS QDs. Higher values of nonlinear parameters for doped ZnS infer that they are potential material for the development of photonics devices and sensor protection applications.

  1. Multi-band Microwave Antennas and Devices based on Generalized Negative-Refractive-Index Transmission Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Colan Graeme Matthew

    Focused on the quad-band generalized negative-refractive-index transmission line (G-NRI-TL), this thesis presents a variety of novel printed G-NRI-TL multi-band microwave device and antenna prototypes. A dual-band coupled-line coupler, an all-pass G-NRI-TL bridged-T circuit, a dual-band metamaterial leaky-wave antenna, and a multi-band G-NRI-TL resonant antenna are all new developments resulting from this research. In addition, to continue the theme of multi-band components, negative-refractive-index transmission lines are used to create a dual-band circularly polarized transparent patch antenna and a two-element wideband decoupled meander antenna system. High coupling over two independently-specified frequency bands is the hallmark of the G-NRI-TL coupler: it is 0.35lambda0 long but achieves approximately -3 dB coupling over both bands with a maximum insertion loss of 1 dB. This represents greater design flexibility than conventional coupled-line couplers and less loss than subsequent G-NRI-TL couplers. The single-ended bridged-T G-NRI-TL offers a metamaterial unit cell with an all-pass magnitude response up to 8 GHz, while still preserving the quad-band phase response of the original circuit. It is shown how the all-pass response leads to wider bandwidths and improved matching in quad-band inverters, power dividers, and hybrid couplers. The dual-band metamaterial leaky-wave antenna presented here was the first to be reported in the literature, and it allows broadside radiation at both 2 GHz and 6 GHz without experiencing the broadside stopband common to conventional periodic antennas. Likewise, the G-NRI-TL resonant antenna is the first reported instance of such a device, achieving quad-band operation between 2.5 GHz and 5.6 GHz, with a minimum radiation efficiency of 80%. Negative-refractive-index transmission line loading is applied to two devices: an NRI-TL meander antenna achieves a measured 52% impedance bandwidth, while a square patch antenna incorporates

  2. Antimony orthophosphate glasses with large nonlinear refractive indices, low two-photon absorption coefficients, and ultrafast response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falcao-Filho, E.L.; Araujo, Cid B. de; Bosco, C.A.C.; Maciel, G.S.; Acioli, L.H.; Nalin, M.; Messaddeq, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Antimony glasses based on the composition Sb 2 O 3 -SbPO 4 were prepared and characterized. The samples present high refractive index, good transmission from 380 to 2000 nm, and high thermal stability. The nonlinear refractive index, n 2 , of the samples was studied using the optical Kerr shutter technique at 800 nm. The third-order correlation signals between pump and probe pulses indicate ultrafast response ( 2 was observed by adding lead oxide to the Sb 2 O 3 -SbPO 4 composition. Large values of n 2 ≅10 -14 cm 2 /W and negligible two-photon absorption coefficients (smaller than 0.01 cm/GW) were determined for all samples. The glass compositions studied present appropriate figure-of-merit for all-optical switching applications

  3. Analysis of photon-scanning tunneling microscope images of inhomogeneous samples: Determination of the local refractive index of channel waveguides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourillot, E.; Fornel, F. de.; Goudonnet, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    Channel waveguides are imaged by a photon-scanning tunneling microscope (PSTM). The polarization of the light and its orientation with respect to the guide aids are shown to be very important parameters in the analysis of the images of such samples. We simulated image formation for the plane of incidence parallel to the axis of the guide. Our theoretical results are qualitatively in agreement with our measurements. These results show the ability of the PSTM to give information about the local refractive-index variations of a sample. 21 refs., 14 figs

  4. Ultra-refractive and extended-range one-dimensional photonic crystal superprisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, D. Z. Y.

    2003-01-01

    We describe theoretical analysis and design of one-dimensional photonic crystal prisms. We found that inside the photonic crystal, for frequencies near the band edges, light propagation direction is extremely sensitive to the variations in wavelength and incident angle.

  5. Broad self-trapped and slow light bands based on negative refraction and interference of magnetic coupled modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Yun-tuan; Ni, Zhi-yao; Zhu, Na; Zhou, Jun

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new mechanism to achieve light localization and slow light. Through the study on the coupling of two magnetic surface modes, we find a special convex band that takes on a negative refraction effect. The negative refraction results in an energy flow concellation effect from two degenerated modes on the convex band. The energy flow concellation effect leads to forming of the self-trapped and slow light bands. In the self-trapped band light is localized around the source without reflection wall in the waveguide direction, whereas in the slow light band, light becomes the standing-waves and moving standing-waves at the center and the two sides of the waveguide, respectively. (paper)

  6. Experimental demonstrations in audible frequency range of band gap tunability and negative refraction in two-dimensional sonic crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichard, Hélène; Richoux, Olivier; Groby, Jean-Philippe

    2012-10-01

    The propagation of audible acoustic waves in two-dimensional square lattice tunable sonic crystals (SC) made of square cross-section infinitely rigid rods embedded in air is investigated experimentally. The band structure is calculated with the plane wave expansion (PWE) method and compared with experimental measurements carried out on a finite extend structure of 200 cm width, 70 cm depth and 15 cm height. The structure is made of square inclusions of 5 cm side with a periodicity of L = 7.5 cm placed inbetween two rigid plates. The existence of tunable complete band gaps in the audible frequency range is demonstrated experimentally by rotating the scatterers around their vertical axis. Negative refraction is then analyzed by use of the anisotropy of the equi-frequency surface (EFS) in the first band and of a finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. Experimental results finally show negative refraction in the audible frequency range.

  7. Broad self-trapped and slow light bands based on negative refraction and interference of magnetic coupled modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yun-Tuan; Ni, Zhi-Yao; Zhu, Na; Zhou, Jun

    2016-01-13

    We propose a new mechanism to achieve light localization and slow light. Through the study on the coupling of two magnetic surface modes, we find a special convex band that takes on a negative refraction effect. The negative refraction results in an energy flow concellation effect from two degenerated modes on the convex band. The energy flow concellation effect leads to forming of the self-trapped and slow light bands. In the self-trapped band light is localized around the source without reflection wall in the waveguide direction, whereas in the slow light band, light becomes the standing-waves and moving standing-waves at the center and the two sides of the waveguide, respectively.

  8. Nonresonant excess photon detachment of negative hydrogen ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulley, M. S.; Zhao, Xin Miao; Bryant, H. C.; Strauss, Charlie E. M.; Funk, David J.; Stintz, A.; Rislove, D. C.; Kyrala, G. A.; Ingalls, W. B.; Miller, W. A.

    1999-01-01

    One-photon detachment and two-photon nonresonant excess photon detachment of electrons from the H - ion (outer-electron binding energy = 0.7542 eV) are observed with 1.165 eV laser pulses from a Nd:YAG laser (where YAG denotes yttrium aluminum garnet). A Penning ion source produces a pulsed 8 μA, 35 keV H - beam that intersects a laser beam cylindrically focused down to a 17 μm full width at half maximum waist in the ion beam direction, creating a high-intensity interaction region with peak intensities of up to 10 11 W/cm 2 . The interaction time is 7 ps. The detached electrons are detected by a time-of-flight apparatus enabling us to detect a very small two-photon signal in the presence of a very large signal from single photon detachments. By rotating the linear polarization angle, we study the angular distribution of the electrons for both one- and two-photon detachments. The spectra are modeled to determine the asymmetry parameters and one- and two-photon cross sections. We find β 2 to be 2.54+0.44/-0.60 and β 4 to be 2.29+0.07/-0.31, corresponding to a D state of 89+3/-12% of the S wave and D wave detachments for the two-photon results. The relative phase angle between the S and D amplitudes is measured to be less than 59 degree sign . The measured cross sections are found to be consistent with theoretical predictions. The one-photon photodetachment cross section is measured to be (3.6±1.7)x10 -17 cm 2 . The two-photon photodetachment generalized cross section is (1.3±0.5)x10 -48 cm 4 sec, consistent with theoretical calculations of the cross section. The three-photon generalized cross section is less than 4.4x10 -79 cm 6 sec 2 . (c) 1999 The American Physical Society

  9. Tunable multichannel filter in photonic crystal heterostructure containing permeability-negative materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Xiaoyong; Liu Zheng; Gong Qihuang

    2008-01-01

    A tunable multichannel filter is demonstrated theoretically based on a one-dimensional photonic crystal heterostructure containing permeability-negative material. The filtering properties of the photonic crystal filter, including the channel number and frequency, can be tuned by adjusting the structure parameters or by a pump laser. The angular response of the photonic crystal filter and the influences of the losses on the filtering properties are also analyzed

  10. Tunable multichannel filter in photonic crystal heterostructure containing permeability-negative materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu Xiaoyong [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics, Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)], E-mail: xiaoyonghu@pku.edu.cn; Liu Zheng [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics, Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Gong Qihuang [State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics, Department of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)], E-mail: qhgong@pku.edu.cn

    2008-01-14

    A tunable multichannel filter is demonstrated theoretically based on a one-dimensional photonic crystal heterostructure containing permeability-negative material. The filtering properties of the photonic crystal filter, including the channel number and frequency, can be tuned by adjusting the structure parameters or by a pump laser. The angular response of the photonic crystal filter and the influences of the losses on the filtering properties are also analyzed.

  11. Accurate wavelength prediction of photonic crystal resonant reflection and applications in refractive index measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermannsson, Pétur Gordon; Vannahme, Christoph; Smith, Cameron L. C.

    2014-01-01

    and superstrate materials. The importance of accounting for material dispersion in order to obtain accurate simulation results is highlighted, and a method for doing so using an iterative approach is demonstrated. Furthermore, an application for the model is demonstrated, in which the material dispersion......In the past decade, photonic crystal resonant reflectors have been increasingly used as the basis for label-free biochemical assays in lab-on-a-chip applications. In both designing and interpreting experimental results, an accurate model describing the optical behavior of such structures...... is essential. Here, an analytical method for precisely predicting the absolute positions of resonantly reflected wavelengths is presented. The model is experimentally verified to be highly accurate using nanoreplicated, polymer-based photonic crystal grating reflectors with varying grating periods...

  12. Parity-Time Symmetric Nonlocal Metasurfaces: All-Angle Negative Refraction and Volumetric Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monticone, Francesco; Valagiannopoulos, Constantinos A.; Alù, Andrea

    2016-10-01

    Lens design for focusing and imaging has been optimized through centuries of developments; however, conventional lenses, even in their most ideal realizations, still suffer from fundamental limitations, such as limits in resolution and the presence of optical aberrations, which are inherent to the laws of refraction. In addition, volume-to-volume imaging of three-dimensional regions of space is not possible with systems based on conventional refractive optics, which are inherently limited to plane-to-plane imaging. Although some of these limitations have been at least theoretically relaxed with the advent of metamaterials, several challenges still stand in the way of ideal imaging of three-dimensional regions of space. Here, we show that the concept of parity-time symmetry, combined with tailored nonlocal responses, enables overcoming some of these challenges, and we propose the design of a loss-immune, linear, transversely invariant, planarized metamaterial lens, with reduced aberrations and the potential to realize volume-to-volume imaging.

  13. Parity-Time Symmetric Nonlocal Metasurfaces: All-Angle Negative Refraction and Volumetric Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Monticone

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Lens design for focusing and imaging has been optimized through centuries of developments; however, conventional lenses, even in their most ideal realizations, still suffer from fundamental limitations, such as limits in resolution and the presence of optical aberrations, which are inherent to the laws of refraction. In addition, volume-to-volume imaging of three-dimensional regions of space is not possible with systems based on conventional refractive optics, which are inherently limited to plane-to-plane imaging. Although some of these limitations have been at least theoretically relaxed with the advent of metamaterials, several challenges still stand in the way of ideal imaging of three-dimensional regions of space. Here, we show that the concept of parity-time symmetry, combined with tailored nonlocal responses, enables overcoming some of these challenges, and we propose the design of a loss-immune, linear, transversely invariant, planarized metamaterial lens, with reduced aberrations and the potential to realize volume-to-volume imaging.

  14. Ultra-compact air-mode photonic crystal nanobeam cavity integrated with bandstop filter for refractive index sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fujun; Fu, Zhongyuan; Wang, Chunhong; Ding, Zhaoxiang; Wang, Chao; Tian, Huiping

    2017-05-20

    We propose and investigate an ultra-compact air-mode photonic crystal nanobeam cavity (PCNC) with an ultra-high quality factor-to-mode volume ratio (Q/V) by quadratically tapering the lattice space of the rectangular holes from the center to both ends while other parameters remain unchanged. By using the three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain method, an optimized geometry yields a Q of 7.2×10 6 and a V∼1.095(λ/n Si ) 3 in simulations, resulting in an ultra-high Q/V ratio of about 6.5×10 6 (λ/n Si ) -3 . When the number of holes on either side is 8, the cavity possesses a high sensitivity of 252 nm/RIU (refractive index unit), a high calculated Q-factor of 1.27×10 5 , and an ultra-small effective V of ∼0.758(λ/n Si ) 3 at the fundamental resonant wavelength of 1521.74 nm. Particularly, the footprint is only about 8×0.7  μm 2 . However, inevitably our proposed PCNC has several higher-order resonant modes in the transmission spectrum, which makes the PCNC difficult to be used for multiplexed sensing. Thus, a well-designed bandstop filter with weak sidelobes and broad bandwidth based on a photonic crystal nanobeam waveguide is created to connect with the PCNC to filter out the high-order modes. Therefore, the integrated structure presented in this work is promising for building ultra-compact lab-on-chip sensor arrays with high density and parallel-multiplexing capability.

  15. Brain refractive index measured in vivo with high-NA defocus-corrected full-field OCT and consequences for two-photon microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binding, Jonas; Ben Arous, Juliette; Léger, Jean-François; Gigan, Sylvain; Boccara, Claude; Bourdieu, Laurent

    2011-03-14

    Two-photon laser scanning microscopy (2PLSM) is an important tool for in vivo tissue imaging with sub-cellular resolution, but the penetration depth of current systems is potentially limited by sample-induced optical aberrations. To quantify these, we measured the refractive index n' in the somatosensory cortex of 7 rats in vivo using defocus optimization in full-field optical coherence tomography (ff-OCT). We found n' to be independent of imaging depth or rat age. From these measurements, we calculated that two-photon imaging beyond 200 µm into the cortex is limited by spherical aberration, indicating that adaptive optics will improve imaging depth.

  16. The photo refractive polymers, physics and photonic applications of these new materials; Los polimeros fotorrefractivos, fisica y aplicaciones fotonicas de estos nuevos materiales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maldonado, J. L. [Centro de Investigacion en Optica, Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico); Garcia M, J. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2001-12-01

    This paper is a review about the new photo refractive organic materials and their potential photonic applications, the photo refractive polymers. The physical properties required for observing photo refractivity, including charge generation, transport, and nonlinear optical properties are discussed for amorphous polymers. The nonlinear optical properties on a macroscopic level are related to the microscopic properties by using the Oriented Gas model. Four Wave Mixing (FWM) and Two Beam Coupling (TBC) experiments, to investigate the photo refractive properties of the material by measuring the diffraction efficiency {eta} of the polymeric gratings, and the optical gain coefficient {eta} are described. Kogelnik's Coupled Wave model to describe the photo refractive polymeric gratings is reviewed. Finally some applications of these new polymers are presented. [Spanish] Este articulo es una revision sobre los nuevos materiales organicos fotorrrefractivos y sus potenciales aplicaciones fotonicas: los polimeros fotorrefractivos. Se discuten las propiedades fisicas requeridas para observar fotorrefractividad, incluyendo la generacion de cargas, el transporte y las propiedades opticas no lineales en polimeros amorfos. Usando el modelo de gas orientado, se muestra como se relacionan las propiedades opticas no lineales a nivel marcoscopico con las propiedades microscopicas. Se describen los experimentos de mezcla de cuatro ondas (FWM) y dos ondas (TBC) para investigar las propiedades fotorrefractivas del material, midiendo la eficiencia de difraccion {eta} de las rejillas polimericas y el coeficiente de ganancia optica {eta}. Se revisa el modelo de ondas acopladas de Kogelnik para describir las rejillas polimericas fotorrefractivas. Finalmente se presentan algunas aplicaciones de estos nuevos polimeros.

  17. Broadband one-dimensional photonic crystal wave plate containing single-negative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yihang

    2010-09-13

    The properties of the phase shift of wave reflected from one-dimensional photonic crystals consisting of periodic layers of single-negative (permittivity- or permeability-negative) materials are demonstrated. As the incident angle increases, the reflection phase shift of TE wave decreases, while that of TM wave increases. The phase shifts of both polarized waves vary smoothly as the frequency changes across the photonic crystal stop band. Consequently, the difference between the phase shift of TE and that of TM wave could remain constant in a rather wide frequency range inside the stop band. These properties are useful to design wave plate or retarder which can be used in wide spectral band. In addition, a broadband photonic crystal quarter-wave plate is proposed.

  18. Microwave photonic filters with negative coefficients based on phase inversion in an electro-optic modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capmany, José; Pastor, Daniel; Martinez, Alfonso; Ortega, Beatriz; Sales, Salvador

    2003-08-15

    We report on a novel technical approach to the implementation of photonic rf filters that is based on the pi phase inversion that a rf modulating signal suffers in an electro-optic Mach-Zehnder modulator, which depends on whether the positive or the negative linear slope of the signal's modulation transfer function is employed. Experimental evidence is provided of the implementation of filters with negative coefficients that shows excellent agreement with results predicted by the theory.

  19. Fundamentals of negative refractive index optical trapping: forces and radiation pressures exerted by focused Gaussian beams using the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosio, Leonardo A; Hernández-Figueroa, Hugo E

    2010-11-04

    Based on the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory (GLMT), this paper reveals, for the first time in the literature, the principal characteristics of the optical forces and radiation pressure cross-sections exerted on homogeneous, linear, isotropic and spherical hypothetical negative refractive index (NRI) particles under the influence of focused Gaussian beams in the Mie regime. Starting with ray optics considerations, the analysis is then extended through calculating the Mie coefficients and the beam-shape coefficients for incident focused Gaussian beams. Results reveal new and interesting trapping properties which are not observed for commonly positive refractive index particles and, in this way, new potential applications in biomedical optics can be devised.

  20. Microwave photonic filters using low-cost sources featuring tunability, reconfigurability and negative coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capmany, José; Mora, José; Ortega, Beatriz; Pastor, Daniel

    2005-03-07

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate two configurations of photonic filters for the processing of microwave signals featuring tunability, reconfigurability and negative coefficients based on the use of low cost optical sources. The first option is a low power configuration based on spectral slicing of a broadband source. The second is a high power configuration based on fixed lasers. Tunability, reconfigurability and negative coefficients are achieved by means of a MEMS cross-connect, a variable optical attenuator array and simple 2x2 switches respectively.

  1. Superluminal and negative delay times in isotropic-anisotropic one-dimensional photonic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouchani, N.; El Moussaouy, A.; Aynaou, H.; El Hassouani, Y.; El Boudouti, E. H.; Djafari-Rouhani, B.

    2017-11-01

    In this work, we investigate the possibility of superluminal and negative delay times for electromagnetic wave propagation in a linear and passive periodic structure consisting of alternating isotropic and anisotropic media. This phenomenon is due to the birefringence of the anisotropic layers of the structure. By adjusting the orientations of these layers, the delay times of transmitted waves can be controlled from subluminality to superluminality and vice versa. Numerical results indicate that the apparent superluminal propagation of light occurs inside the photonic band-gaps when the principal axes of the anisotropic layers are parallel or perpendicular to the fixed axes. For other orientations of these layers, tunneling and superluminal regimes appear inside the photonic bandgaps and in the allowed bands for frequencies close to the transmission minima. The effect of the number of unit cells of the photonic crystal structure on the propagation of light with superluminal and negative delay times is also investigated. We show that the structure exhibits the Hartman effect in which the tunneling delay time of the electromagnetic wave through the photonic band-gap of the structure converges asymptotically to a finite value with increasing the number of layers. The Green's function approach has been used to derive the transmission and reflection coefficients, the density of states, and the delay times of electromagnetic waves propagating through the structure. The control of the magnitude and the sign of the delay time of light propagation represent a key point in slow and fast light technologies. The proposed structure in this study represents a new system for controlling the delay times of wave propagation without a need of active or non-linear media as well as lossy or asymmetric periodic structures.

  2. Photonic-resonant left-handed medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Jianqi

    2006-01-01

    A new scheme to realize simultaneously negative permittivity and permeability in a coherent atomic vapor medium (photonic-resonant material) via a coherent driving mechanism is suggested. It is verified that the atomic system coherently driven by a strong optical field will give rise to a negative refractive index in certain probe frequency ranges. One of the most remarkable features of the present scheme is such that a slab fabricated by the left-handed vapor medium is an ideal candidate for designing perfect lenses since the photonic-resonant atomic vapor cannot only exhibit an isotropic negative refractive index, but also provide a good impedance match at the air-medium interfaces

  3. Entanglement with negative Wigner function of almost 3,000 atoms heralded by one photon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Robert; Zhang, Hao; Hu, Jiazhong; Ćuk, Senka; Vuletić, Vladan

    2015-03-26

    Quantum-mechanically correlated (entangled) states of many particles are of interest in quantum information, quantum computing and quantum metrology. Metrologically useful entangled states of large atomic ensembles have been experimentally realized, but these states display Gaussian spin distribution functions with a non-negative Wigner quasiprobability distribution function. Non-Gaussian entangled states have been produced in small ensembles of ions, and very recently in large atomic ensembles. Here we generate entanglement in a large atomic ensemble via an interaction with a very weak laser pulse; remarkably, the detection of a single photon prepares several thousand atoms in an entangled state. We reconstruct a negative-valued Wigner function--an important hallmark of non-classicality--and verify an entanglement depth (the minimum number of mutually entangled atoms) of 2,910 ± 190 out of 3,100 atoms. Attaining such a negative Wigner function and the mutual entanglement of virtually all atoms is unprecedented for an ensemble containing more than a few particles. Although the achieved purity of the state is slightly below the threshold for entanglement-induced metrological gain, further technical improvement should allow the generation of states that surpass this threshold, and of more complex Schrödinger cat states for quantum metrology and information processing. More generally, our results demonstrate the power of heralded methods for entanglement generation, and illustrate how the information contained in a single photon can drastically alter the quantum state of a large system.

  4. Negative space charge effects in photon-enhanced thermionic emission solar converters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segev, G.; Weisman, D.; Rosenwaks, Y.; Kribus, A.

    2015-01-01

    In thermionic energy converters, electrons in the gap between electrodes form a negative space charge and inhibit the emission of additional electrons, causing a significant reduction in conversion efficiency. However, in Photon Enhanced Thermionic Emission (PETE) solar energy converters, electrons that are reflected by the electric field in the gap return to the cathode with energy above the conduction band minimum. These electrons first occupy the conduction band from which they can be reemitted. This form of electron recycling makes PETE converters less susceptible to negative space charge loss. While the negative space charge effect was studied extensively in thermionic converters, modeling its effect in PETE converters does not account for important issues such as this form of electron recycling, nor the cathode thermal energy balance. Here, we investigate the space charge effect in PETE solar converters accounting for electron recycling, with full coupling of the cathode and gap models, and addressing conservation of both electric and thermal energy. The analysis shows that the negative space charge loss is lower than previously reported, allowing somewhat larger gaps compared to previous predictions. For a converter with a specific gap, there is an optimal solar flux concentration. The optimal solar flux concentration, the cathode temperature, and the efficiency all increase with smaller gaps. For example, for a gap of 3 μm the maximum efficiency is 38% and the optimal flux concentration is 628, while for a gap of 5 μm the maximum efficiency is 31% and optimal flux concentration is 163

  5. The effect of spectral property and intensity of light on natural refractive development and compensation to negative lenses in guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wentao; Lan, Weizhong; Yang, Shiqi; Liao, Yunru; Xu, Qinglin; Lin, Lixia; Yang, Zhikuan

    2014-10-02

    To investigate the effect of spectral composition and light intensity on refractive development in guinea pigs. One-week-old guinea pigs were randomly assigned to groups exposed to broad-spectrum Solux halogen light (BS) or spiked-spectrum fluorescent light (FL) at both high (Hi, 10,000 lux) and low (Lo, 500 lux) intensities under a 12:12 light/dark cycle. Half of the animals in each group were used as controls (n = 24, 20, 22, and 20, respectively), and half were fitted with binocular -4-diopter (D) lenses (L, lenses; n = 22, 20, 24, and 22, respectively). Refractive error, corneal curvature, and axial dimensions were determined by cycloplegic retinoscopy, photokeratometry, and A-scan ultrasonography, respectively. Guinea pigs exposed to FL and BS showed similar changes in refraction under both high (HiFL: 2.26 ± 0.55 D versus HiBS: 2.17 ± 0.65 D, P > 0.05)- and low-intensity lighting (LoFL: 1.39 ± 0.88 D versus LoBS: 1.40 ± 0.93 D, P > 0.05). This was also true for the groups wearing lenses (HiFL-L: -1.81 ± 0.73 D versus HiBS-L: -1.45 ± 0.99 D, P > 0.05; LoFL-L: -2.58 ± 0.65 D versus LoBS-L: -2.29 ± 0.50 D, P > 0.05). Nevertheless, animals under high-intensity lighting exhibited a significantly larger hyperopic shift compared with those under low-intensity lighting (HiFL versus LoFL: P development and negative lens compensation. As found in other species, effects of light intensity on refractive development were also observed in guinea pigs in both illuminants. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  6. Negative refraction of elastic waves in 2D phononic crystals: Contribution of resonant transmissions to the construction of the image of a point source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Christine Hladky-Hennion

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Negative refraction properties of a two-dimensional phononic crystal (PC, made of a triangular lattice of steel rods embedded in epoxy are investigated both experimentally and numerically. First, experiments have been carried out on a prism shaped PC immersed in water. Then, for focusing purposes, a flat lens is considered and the construction of the image of a point source is analyzed in details, when indices are matched between the PC and the surrounding fluid medium, whereas acoustic impedances are mismatched. Optimal conditions for focusing longitudinal elastic waves by such PC flat lens are then discussed.

  7. Highly birefringent photonic crystal fiber with ultra-flattened negative dispersion over S + C + L + U bands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Habib, Selim; Khandker, Emran

    2015-01-01

    We present a new cladding design for photonic crystal fiber (PCF) on a decagonal structure to simultaneously achieve ultra-flattened large negative dispersion and ultrahigh birefringence. Numerical results confirm that the proposed PCFexhibits ultra-flattened large negative dispersion over the S ...

  8. Numerical analysis and experimental investigation of highly sensitive photonic crystal fiber long-period grating refractive index sensor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zhu, Y.; He, Z.; Kaňka, Jiří; Du, H.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 129, č. 1 (2008), s. 99-105 ISSN 0925-4005 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1P05OC002 Grant - others:National Science Foundation(US) ECS-0404002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Source of funding: V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : photonic crystals * Bragg gratings * optical fibres * fibre optic sensors * refractometers Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.122, year: 2008

  9. Three-Dimensionally Isotropic Negative Refractive Index Materials from Block Copolymer Self-Assembled Chiral Gyroid Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Hur, Kahyun

    2011-10-17

    Metamaterials are engineered artificial materials that offer new functionalities such as super-resolution imaging and cloaking. Calculations of the photonic properties of three-dimensionally isotropic metamaterials with cubic double gyroid and alternating gyroid morphologies from block copolymer self-assembly are presented.

  10. Photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, David L

    2015-01-01

    Discusses the basic physical principles underlying Biomedical Photonics, spectroscopy and microscopy This volume discusses biomedical photonics, spectroscopy and microscopy, the basic physical principles underlying the technology and its applications. The topics discussed in this volume are: Biophotonics; Fluorescence and Phosphorescence; Medical Photonics; Microscopy; Nonlinear Optics; Ophthalmic Technology; Optical Tomography; Optofluidics; Photodynamic Therapy; Image Processing; Imaging Systems; Sensors; Single Molecule Detection; Futurology in Photonics. Comprehensive and accessible cov

  11. Photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, David L

    2015-01-01

    Discusses the basic physical principles underlying the technology instrumentation of photonics This volume discusses photonics technology and instrumentation. The topics discussed in this volume are: Communication Networks; Data Buffers; Defense and Security Applications; Detectors; Fiber Optics and Amplifiers; Green Photonics; Instrumentation and Metrology; Interferometers; Light-Harvesting Materials; Logic Devices; Optical Communications; Remote Sensing; Solar Energy; Solid-State Lighting; Wavelength Conversion Comprehensive and accessible coverage of the whole of modern photonics Emphas

  12. Photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, David L

    2015-01-01

    Discusses the basic physical principles underlying thescience and technology of nanophotonics, its materials andstructures This volume presents nanophotonic structures and Materials.Nanophotonics is photonic science and technology that utilizeslight/matter interactions on the nanoscale where researchers arediscovering new phenomena and developing techniques that go wellbeyond what is possible with conventional photonics andelectronics.The topics discussed in this volume are: CavityPhotonics; Cold Atoms and Bose-Einstein Condensates; Displays;E-paper; Graphene; Integrated Photonics; Liquid Cry

  13. Photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, David L

    2015-01-01

    This book covers modern photonics accessibly and discusses the basic physical principles underlying all the applications and technology of photonicsThis volume covers the basic physical principles underlying the technology and all applications of photonics from statistical optics to quantum optics. The topics discussed in this volume are: Photons in perspective; Coherence and Statistical Optics; Complex Light and Singular Optics; Electrodynamics of Dielectric Media; Fast and slow Light; Holography; Multiphoton Processes; Optical Angular Momentum; Optical Forces, Trapping and Manipulation; Pol

  14. Massive photon properties in 3D photonic crystals, filled by dielectrics or metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorelik, V S

    2009-01-01

    The optical properties of 3D photonic crystals-artificial opals, consisting of monosized silica globules-have been investigated. The volume between globules was filled by various dielectrics or metals. The dispersion law of electromagnetic waves of this type of crystal has been obtained. It was shown that the sign of photonic mass in globular photonic crystals may be positive or negative for different points on dispersion curves. The value of the effective mass of photons depends on the refractive index of the substance infiltrated into the globular photonic crystal.

  15. Influence of refraction index strength on the light propagation in dielectrics material with periodic refraction index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidayat, Arif; Latifah, Eny; Kurniati, Diana; Wisodo, Hari

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of refraction index strength on the light propagation in refraction index-varied dielectric material. This dielectric material served as photonic lattice. The behavior of light propagation influenced by variation of refraction index in photonic lattice was investigated. Modes of the guiding light were determined numerically using squared-operator iteration method. It was found that the greater the strength of refraction index, the smaller the guiding modes.

  16. Coagulase-negative staphylococci isolated from ocular wound infections after laser refractive surgery: attachment to and accumulation on soft contact lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghri, Jamshid; Razavi, Mohamad Reza

    2009-03-01

    Disposable soft contact lenses that are commonly used after laser refractive surgery are known to be colonized by bacteria and play a key role in Bacterial Keraitis (BK) pathogenesis. Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) have been found to be the most common pathogen involved in this postoperative infection. In this study a rapid and a simple assay was developed for studying attachment and accumulation of CoNS on soft contact lenses in vitro using [3H] thymidine. Thirty-five isolates of CoNS were obtained from 27 laser refractive surgery patients. Twenty-five of these thirty-five CoNS were isolated in multiple cultures. Ten CoNS were isolated in cultures from patients who underwent reoperation. The assay was optimized using a biofilm-producing strain, S. epidermidis RP62A, which was subcultured overnight at 37 degrees C on blood agar medium. Quantitative determination of biofilm production was tested. Presence of the genes icaADB and icaD was determined in all isolates. All isolates were biochemically analyzed using the Phene Plate (PhP) system modified for typing of CoNS. The CoNS isolates were further characterized to species level using ID32Staph.Mann-Whitney rank sum test and chi-square test were used to identify statistical differences in adherence, index, antibiotic susceptibility patterns, and biofilm production or presence of the ica operon between clinically significant isolates and non-postoperative BK isolates. No differences in attachment and accumulation were found between isolates causing BK after laser refractive surgery and contaminant isolates. In addition, there were no differences in the distribution of the ica operon between the two groups, as determined by polymerase chain reaction. Nevertheless, the ability to produce biofilm was found to be present significantly more frequently among BK isolates than among non-postoperative BK isolates. This study shows that the method using radioactive thymidine to analyze adherence of CoNS to soft

  17. Evidence for subwavelength imaging with positive refraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Yun Gui [Temasek Laboratories, National University of Singapore, Singapore 119260 (Singapore); Sahebdivan, Sahar; Tyc, Tomas; Leonhardt, Ulf [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Ong, C K, E-mail: ulf@st-andrews.ac.uk [Centre for Superconducting and Magnetic Materials, Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore)

    2011-03-15

    The resolution of lenses is normally limited by the wave nature of light. Imaging with perfect resolution was believed to rely on negative refraction, but here we present experimental evidence for subwavelength imaging with positive refraction.

  18. Evidence for subwavelength imaging with positive refraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Yun Gui; Sahebdivan, Sahar; Tyc, Tomas; Leonhardt, Ulf; Ong, C K

    2011-01-01

    The resolution of lenses is normally limited by the wave nature of light. Imaging with perfect resolution was believed to rely on negative refraction, but here we present experimental evidence for subwavelength imaging with positive refraction.

  19. Evidence for subwavelength imaging with positive refraction

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Yun Gui; Sahebdivan, Sahar; Ong, C. K.; Tyc, Tomas; Leonhardt, Ulf

    2011-01-01

    The resolution of lenses is normally limited by the wave nature of light. Imaging with perfect resolution was believed to rely on negative refraction, but here we present experimental evidence for subwavelength imaging with positive refraction. Publisher PDF Peer reviewed

  20. Direct Observation of Bloch Harmonics and Negative Phase Velocity in Photonic Crystal Waveguides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gersen, H.; Karle, T.J.; Engelen, R.J.P.; Engelen, R.J.P.; Bogaerts, W.; Korterik, Jeroen P.; van Hulst, N.F.; Krauss, T.F.; Kuipers, L.

    2005-01-01

    The eigenfield distribution and the band structure of a photonic crystal waveguide have been measured with a phase-sensitive near-field scanning optical microscope. Bloch modes, which consist of more than one spatial frequency, are visualized in the waveguide. In the band structure, multiple

  1. Electromagnetic Wave Propagation in Two-Dimensional Photonic Crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foteinopoulou, Stavroula [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2003-01-01

    In this dissertation, they have undertaken the challenge to understand the unusual propagation properties of the photonic crystal (PC). The photonic crystal is a medium where the dielectric function is periodically modulated. These types of structures are characterized by bands and gaps. In other words, they are characterized by frequency regions where propagation is prohibited (gaps) and regions where propagation is allowed (bands). In this study they focus on two-dimensional photonic crystals, i.e., structures with periodic dielectric patterns on a plane and translational symmetry in the perpendicular direction. They start by studying a two-dimensional photonic crystal system for frequencies inside the band gap. The inclusion of a line defect introduces allowed states in the otherwise prohibited frequency spectrum. The dependence of the defect resonance state on different parameters such as size of the structure, profile of incoming source, etc., is investigated in detail. For this study, they used two popular computational methods in photonic crystal research, the Finite Difference Time Domain method (FDTD) and the Transfer Matrix Method (TMM). The results for the one-dimensional defect system are analyzed, and the two methods, FDTD and TMM, are compared. Then, they shift their attention only to periodic two-dimensional crystals, concentrate on their band properties, and study their unusual refractive behavior. Anomalous refractive phenomena in photonic crystals included cases where the beam refracts on the ''wrong'' side of the surface normal. The latter phenomenon, is known as negative refraction and was previously observed in materials where the wave vector, the electric field, and the magnetic field form a left-handed set of vectors. These materials are generally called left-handed materials (LHM) or negative index materials (NIM). They investigated the possibility that the photonic crystal behaves as a LHM, and how this behavior relates

  2. Light rays in gravitating, refractive media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noonan, T.W.

    1982-01-01

    The field-to-particle method of H. P. Robertson is applied to the general-relativistic Maxwell equations in order to obtain the general-relativistic equation of motion for a photon in a refractive medium. For the special case of an uncharged, refractive, spherically symmetric mass, the exact first-order differential equation for the light-ray path is given

  3. Plasmon-Enhanced Photonic Crystal Negative Index Materials for Superlensing Applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Negative index materials (NIMs) offer tremendous potential for the formation of highly compact as well as large-area deployable thin-film optical components. Omega...

  4. Intra-connected three-dimensionally isotropic bulk negative index photonic metamaterial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guney, Durdu; Koschny, Thomas; Soukoulis, Costas

    2010-01-01

    Isotropic negative index metamaterials (NIMs) are highly desired, particularly for the realization of ultra-high resolution lenses. However, existing isotropic NIMs function only two-dimensionally and cannot be miniaturized beyond microwaves. Direct laser writing processes can be a paradigm shift toward the fabrication of three-dimensionally (3D) isotropic bulk optical metamaterials, but only at the expense of an additional design constraint, namely connectivity. Here, we demonstrate with a proof-of-principle design that the requirement connectivity does not preclude fully isotropic left-handed behavior. This is an important step towards the realization of bulk 3D isotropic NIMs at optical wavelengths.

  5. Emmetropisation and the aetiology of refractive errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flitcroft, D I

    2014-01-01

    The distribution of human refractive errors displays features that are not commonly seen in other biological variables. Compared with the more typical Gaussian distribution, adult refraction within a population typically has a negative skew and increased kurtosis (ie is leptokurtotic). This distribution arises from two apparently conflicting tendencies, first, the existence of a mechanism to control eye growth during infancy so as to bring refraction towards emmetropia/low hyperopia (ie emmetropisation) and second, the tendency of many human populations to develop myopia during later childhood and into adulthood. The distribution of refraction therefore changes significantly with age. Analysis of the processes involved in shaping refractive development allows for the creation of a life course model of refractive development. Monte Carlo simulations based on such a model can recreate the variation of refractive distributions seen from birth to adulthood and the impact of increasing myopia prevalence on refractive error distributions in Asia. PMID:24406411

  6. A new photonic crystal fiber design on the high negative ultra-flattened dispersion for both X and Y polarization modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahmud, Russel Reza; Razzak, S. M Abdur; Hasan, Md Imran

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of numerical design and properties of a new silica based photonic crystal fiber (PCF) are proposed in this manuscript. The design performs ultra-flattened negative chromatic dispersion (UNCD) in the optical windows 2nd and 3rd involving O to U bands in the infrared (IF) portion. The guid...

  7. Transition between metamaterial and photonic-crystal behavior in arrays of dielectric rods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dominec, Filip; Kadlec, Christelle; Němec, Hynek; Kužel, Petr; Kadlec, Filip

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 25 (2014), s. 30492-30503 ISSN 1094-4087 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-25639S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : metamaterials * photonic crystals * negative refractive index * dielectrics Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.488, year: 2014

  8. Thermal tuning of a silicon photonic crystal cavity infilled with an elastomer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erdamar, A.K.; Van Leest, M.M.; Picken, S.J.; Caro, J.

    2011-01-01

    Thermal tuning of the transmission of an elastomer infilled photonic crystal cavity is studied. An elastomer has a thermal expansion-induced negative thermo-optic coefficient that leads to a strong decrease of the refractive index upon heating. This property makes elastomer highly suitable for

  9. Refractive index inhomogeneity within an aerogel block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellunato, T.; Calvi, M.; Da Silva Costa, C.F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Musy, M.; Perego, D.L.

    2006-01-01

    Evaluating local inhomogeneities of the refractive index inside aerogel blocks to be used as Cherenkov radiator is important for a high energy physics experiment where angular resolution is crucial. Two approaches are described and compared. The first one is based on the bending of a laser beam induced by refractive index gradients along directions normal to the unperturbed optical path. The second method exploits the Cherenkov effect itself by shooting an ultra-relativistic collimated electron beam through different points of the aerogel surface. Local refractive index variations result in sizable differences in the Cherenkov photons distribution

  10. Multiband super-resolution imaging of graded-index photonic crystal flat lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jianlan; Wang, Junzhong; Ge, Rui; Yan, Bei; Liu, Exian; Tan, Wei; Liu, Jianjun

    2018-05-01

    Multiband super-resolution imaging of point source is achieved by a graded-index photonic crystal flat lens. With the calculations of six bands in common photonic crystal (CPC) constructed with scatterers of different refractive indices, it can be found that the super-resolution imaging of point source can be realized by different physical mechanisms in three different bands. In the first band, the imaging of point source is based on far-field condition of spherical wave while in the second band, it is based on the negative effective refractive index and exhibiting higher imaging quality than that of the CPC. However, in the fifth band, the imaging of point source is mainly based on negative refraction of anisotropic equi-frequency surfaces. The novel method of employing different physical mechanisms to achieve multiband super-resolution imaging of point source is highly meaningful for the field of imaging.

  11. Simulations of wave propagation and disorder in 3D non-close-packed colloidal photonic crystals with low refractive index contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glushko, O; Meisels, R; Kuchar, F

    2010-03-29

    The plane-wave expansion method (PWEM), the multiple-scattering method (MSM) and the 3D finite-difference time-domain method (FDTD) are applied for simulations of propagation of electromagnetic waves through 3D colloidal photonic crystals. The system investigated is not a "usual" artificial opal with close-packed fcc lattice but a dilute bcc structure which occurs due to long-range repulsive interaction between electrically charged colloidal particles during the growth process. The basic optical properties of non-close-packed colloidal PhCs are explored by examining the band structure and reflection spectra for a bcc lattice of silica spheres in an aqueous medium. Finite size effects and correspondence between the Bragg model, band structure and reflection spectra are discussed. The effects of size, positional and missing-spheres disorder are investigated. In addition, by analyzing the results of experimental work we show that the fabricated structures have reduced plane-to-plane distance probably due to the effect of gravity during growth.

  12. Rectification of light refraction in curved waveguide arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhi, Stefano

    2009-02-15

    An "optical ratchet" for discretized light in photonic lattices, which enables observing rectification of light refraction at any input beam conditions, is theoretically presented, and a possible experimental implementation based on periodically curved zigzag waveguide arrays is proposed.

  13. Rectification of light refraction in curved waveguide arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Longhi, S.

    2010-01-01

    An 'optical ratchet' for discretized light in photonic lattices, which enables to observe rectification of light refraction at any input beam conditions, is theoretically presented, and a possible experimental implementation based on periodically-curved zigzag waveguide arrays is proposed.

  14. Refractive index contrast in porous silicon multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nava, R.; Mora, M.B. de la; Tagueena-Martinez, J. [Centro de Investigacion en Energia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Temixco, Morelos (Mexico); Rio, J.A. del [Centro de Investigacion en Energia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Temixco, Morelos (Mexico); Centro Morelense de Innovacion y Transferencia Tecnologica, Consejo de Ciencia y Tecnologia del Estado de Morelos (Mexico)

    2009-07-15

    Two of the most important properties of a porous silicon multilayer for photonic applications are flat interfaces and a relative large refractive index contrast between layers in the optical wavelength range. In this work, we studied the effect of the current density and HF electrolyte concentration on the refractive index of porous silicon. With the purpose of increasing the refractive index contrast in a multilayer, the refractive index of porous silicon produced at low current was studied in detail. The current density applied to produce the low porosity layers was limited in order to keep the electrolyte flow through the multilayer structure and to avoid deformation of layer interfaces. We found that an electrolyte composed of hydrofluoric acid, ethanol and glycerin in a ratio of 3:7:1 gives a refractive index contrast around 1.3/2.8 at 600 nm. Several multilayer structures with this refractive index contrast were fabricated, such as dielectric Bragg mirrors and microcavities. Reflectance spectra of the structures show the photonic quality of porous silicon multilayers produced under these electrochemical conditions. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  15. Characterising refractive index dispersion in chalcogenide glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Y.; Sojka, L.; Jayasuriya, D.

    2016-01-01

    Much effort has been devoted to the study of glasses that contain the chalcogen elements (sulfur, selenium and tellurium) for photonics' applications out to MIR wavelengths. In this paper we describe some techniques for determining the refractive index dispersion characteristics of these glasses...

  16. Manipulating light with strongly modulated photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notomi, Masaya

    2010-01-01

    Recently, strongly modulated photonic crystals, fabricated by the state-of-the-art semiconductor nanofabrication process, have realized various novel optical properties. This paper describes the way in which they differ from other optical media, and clarifies what they can do. In particular, three important issues are considered: light confinement, frequency dispersion and spatial dispersion. First, I describe the latest status and impact of ultra-strong light confinement in a wavelength-cubic volume achieved in photonic crystals. Second, the extreme reduction in the speed of light is reported, which was achieved as a result of frequency dispersion management. Third, strange negative refraction in photonic crystals is introduced, which results from their unique spatial dispersion, and it is clarified how this leads to perfect imaging. The last two sections are devoted to applications of these novel properties. First, I report the fact that strong light confinement and huge light-matter interaction enhancement make strongly modulated photonic crystals promising for on-chip all-optical processing, and present several examples including all-optical switches/memories and optical logics. As a second application, it is shown that the strong light confinement and slow light in strongly modulated photonic crystals enable the adiabatic tuning of light, which leads to various novel ways of controlling light, such as adiabatic frequency conversion, efficient optomechanics systems, photon memories and photons pinning.

  17. Squeezing and other non-classical features in k-photon anharmonic oscillator in binomial and negative binomial states of the field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, A.; Lawande, S.V.

    1990-01-01

    A systematic study of squeezing obtained from k-photon anharmonic oscillator (with interaction hamiltonian of the form (a † ) k , k ≥ 2) interacting with light whose statistics can be varied from sub-Poissonian to poissonian via binomial state of field and super-Poissonian to poissonian via negative binomial state of field is presented. The authors predict that for all values of k there is a tendency increase in squeezing with increased sub-Poissonian character of the field while the reverse is true with super-Poissonian field. They also present non-classical behavior of the first order coherence function explicitly for k = 2 case (i.e., for two-photon anharmonic oscillator model used for a Kerr-like medium) with variation in the statistics of the input light

  18. RADIO REFRACTIVITY RADIO REFRACTIVITY STUDY IN AKURE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    Propagation of waves in a microwave link is through the troposphere which is the non-ionized lowest portion of the atmosphere [5]. The refractive index is defined as [5]. (1). Where εr is the dielectric constant of the troposphere. C is the speed of light and V is the phase velocity of the wave in the medium. The refractive index ...

  19. Photonic-crystal waveguide biosensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skivesen, Nina; Têtu, Amélie; Kristensen, Martin

    2007-01-01

    A photonic-crystal waveguide sensor is presented for biosensing. The sensor is applied for refractive index measurements and detection of protein-concentrations. Concentrations around 10 μg/ml (0.15μMolar) are measured with excellent signal to noise ratio, and a broad, dynamic refractive index se...

  20. Perfect imaging without refraction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaikie, R. J.

    2011-12-01

    Recent work suggesting that ‘perfect’ far-field imaging is possible using Maxwell's fish-eye lens (Leonhardt 2009 New J. Phys. 11 093040) has raised a number of questions and controversies about the nature of imaging and field localization in inhomogeneous media. In this brief paper we present analogous results for a purely reflector-based imaging system—an elliptical cavity. With a source at one focus of the ellipse we show that sub-wavelength field localization can be achieved at the other focus when an active ‘drain’ is present there, but not without it. Does this show that far-field ‘perfect’ imaging is possible even without refraction (negative or positive)? Unfortunately not, giving further evidence that these are solely drain-induced effects.

  1. Perfect imaging without refraction?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaikie, R J

    2011-01-01

    Recent work suggesting that ‘perfect’ far-field imaging is possible using Maxwell's fish-eye lens (Leonhardt 2009 New J. Phys. 11 093040) has raised a number of questions and controversies about the nature of imaging and field localization in inhomogeneous media. In this brief paper we present analogous results for a purely reflector-based imaging system—an elliptical cavity. With a source at one focus of the ellipse we show that sub-wavelength field localization can be achieved at the other focus when an active ‘drain’ is present there, but not without it. Does this show that far-field ‘perfect’ imaging is possible even without refraction (negative or positive)? Unfortunately not, giving further evidence that these are solely drain-induced effects. (paper)

  2. Refractive neutron lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrov, P.V.; Kolchevsky, N.N.

    2013-01-01

    Model of the refractive neutron lens is proposed. System of N lenses acts as one thin lens with a complex refraction index n*. The maximum number N max of individual lenses for 'thick' neutron lens is calculated. Refractive neutron lens properties (resolution, focal depth) as function of resolution factor F 0 =ρbc/μ and depth of field factor dF 0 =λF 0 =λρbc/μ are calculated. It is shown that micro resolution of the refractive neutron optics is far from the wavelength in size and its open possibilities for progress in refractive neutron optics. (authors)

  3. Refraction in exoplanet atmospheres: Photometric signatures, implications for transmission spectroscopy, and search in Kepler data

    OpenAIRE

    Alp, Dennis; Demory, Brice-Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Refraction deflects photons that pass through atmospheres, which affects transit light curves. Refraction thus provides an avenue to probe physical properties of exoplanet atmospheres and to constrain the presence of clouds and hazes. In addition, an effective surface can be imposed by refraction, thereby limiting the pressure levels probed by transmission spectroscopy. The main objective of the paper is to model the effects of refraction on photometric light curves for realistic planets and ...

  4. Photonic metamaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litchinitser, N M; Shalaev, V M

    2008-01-01

    The invention of metamaterials prompts reconsideration of a number of fundamental physical phenomena and enables a variety of unique properties and functionalities. These include negative refractive index, magnetism at optical frequencies, sub-wavelength resolution, ''backward'' phase matching conditions for nonlinear optical processes, and even rendering objects invisible – cloaking. In this brief review, recent progress in basic theory, design, fabrication, characterization, and potential applications of optical metamaterials is discussed

  5. Full utilization of semi-Dirac cones in photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasa, Utku G.; Turduev, Mirbek; Giden, Ibrahim H.; Kurt, Hamza

    2018-05-01

    In this study, realization and applications of anisotropic zero-refractive-index materials are proposed by exposing the unit cells of photonic crystals that exhibit Dirac-like cone dispersion to rotational symmetry reduction. Accidental degeneracy of two Bloch modes in the Brillouin zone center of two-dimensional C2-symmetric photonic crystals gives rise to the semi-Dirac cone dispersion. The proposed C2-symmetric photonic crystals behave as epsilon-and-mu-near-zero materials (ɛeff≈ 0 , μeff≈ 0 ) along one propagation direction, but behave as epsilon-near-zero material (ɛeff≈ 0 , μeff≠ 0 ) for the perpendicular direction at semi-Dirac frequency. By extracting the effective medium parameters of the proposed C4- and C2-symmetric periodic media that exhibit Dirac-like and semi-Dirac cone dispersions, intrinsic differences between isotropic and anisotropic materials are investigated. Furthermore, advantages of utilizing semi-Dirac cone materials instead of Dirac-like cone materials in photonic applications are demonstrated in both frequency and time domains. By using anisotropic transmission behavior of the semi-Dirac materials, photonic application concepts such as beam deflectors, beam splitters, and light focusing are proposed. Furthermore, to the best of our knowledge, semi-Dirac cone dispersion is also experimentally demonstrated for the first time by including negative, zero, and positive refraction states of the given material.

  6. Refractive index dependence of Papilio Ulysses butterfly wings reflectance spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isnaeni, Muslimin, Ahmad Novi; Birowosuto, Muhammad Danang

    2016-02-01

    We have observed and utilized butterfly wings of Papilio Ulysses for refractive index sensor. We noticed this butterfly wings have photonic crystal structure, which causes blue color appearance on the wings. The photonic crystal structure, which consists of cuticle and air void, is approximated as one dimensional photonic crystal structure. This photonic crystal structure opens potential to several optical devices application, such as refractive index sensor. We have utilized small piece of Papilio Ulysses butterfly wings to characterize refractive index of several liquid base on reflectance spectrum of butterfly wings in the presence of sample liquid. For comparison, we simulated reflectance spectrum of one dimensional photonic crystal structure having material parameter based on real structure of butterfly wings. We found that reflectance spectrum peaks shifted as refractive index of sample changes. Although there is a slight difference in reflectance spectrum peaks between measured spectrum and calculated spectrum, the trend of reflectance spectrum peaks as function of sample's refractive index is the similar. We assume that during the measurement, the air void that filled by sample liquid is expanded due to liquid pressure. This change of void shape causes non-similarity between measured spectrum and calculated spectrum.

  7. Atmospheric refraction : a history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehn, WH; van der Werf, S

    2005-01-01

    We trace the history of atmospheric refraction from the ancient Greeks up to the time of Kepler. The concept that the atmosphere could refract light entered Western science in the second century B.C. Ptolemy, 300 years later, produced the first clearly defined atmospheric model, containing air of

  8. Iterative supervirtual refraction interferometry

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Hagan, Ola

    2014-05-02

    In refraction tomography, the low signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) can be a major obstacle in picking the first-break arrivals at the far-offset receivers. To increase the S/N, we evaluated iterative supervirtual refraction interferometry (ISVI), which is an extension of the supervirtual refraction interferometry method. In this method, supervirtual traces are computed and then iteratively reused to generate supervirtual traces with a higher S/N. Our empirical results with both synthetic and field data revealed that ISVI can significantly boost up the S/N of far-offset traces. The drawback is that using refraction events from more than one refractor can introduce unacceptable artifacts into the final traveltime versus offset curve. This problem can be avoided by careful windowing of refraction events.

  9. Parsimonious refraction interferometry

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif

    2016-09-06

    We present parsimonious refraction interferometry where a densely populated refraction data set can be obtained from just two shot gathers. The assumptions are that the first arrivals are comprised of head waves and direct waves, and a pair of reciprocal shot gathers is recorded over the line of interest. The refraction traveltimes from these reciprocal shot gathers can be picked and decomposed into O(N2) refraction traveltimes generated by N virtual sources, where N is the number of geophones in the 2D survey. This enormous increase in the number of virtual traveltime picks and associated rays, compared to the 2N traveltimes from the two reciprocal shot gathers, allows for increased model resolution and better condition numbers in the normal equations. Also, a reciprocal survey is far less time consuming than a standard refraction survey with a dense distribution of sources.

  10. Parsimonious refraction interferometry

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2016-01-01

    We present parsimonious refraction interferometry where a densely populated refraction data set can be obtained from just two shot gathers. The assumptions are that the first arrivals are comprised of head waves and direct waves, and a pair of reciprocal shot gathers is recorded over the line of interest. The refraction traveltimes from these reciprocal shot gathers can be picked and decomposed into O(N2) refraction traveltimes generated by N virtual sources, where N is the number of geophones in the 2D survey. This enormous increase in the number of virtual traveltime picks and associated rays, compared to the 2N traveltimes from the two reciprocal shot gathers, allows for increased model resolution and better condition numbers in the normal equations. Also, a reciprocal survey is far less time consuming than a standard refraction survey with a dense distribution of sources.

  11. Iterative supervirtual refraction interferometry

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Hagan, Ola; Hanafy, Sherif M.; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2014-01-01

    In refraction tomography, the low signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) can be a major obstacle in picking the first-break arrivals at the far-offset receivers. To increase the S/N, we evaluated iterative supervirtual refraction interferometry (ISVI), which is an extension of the supervirtual refraction interferometry method. In this method, supervirtual traces are computed and then iteratively reused to generate supervirtual traces with a higher S/N. Our empirical results with both synthetic and field data revealed that ISVI can significantly boost up the S/N of far-offset traces. The drawback is that using refraction events from more than one refractor can introduce unacceptable artifacts into the final traveltime versus offset curve. This problem can be avoided by careful windowing of refraction events.

  12. Parsimonious Refraction Interferometry and Tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2017-01-01

    We present parsimonious refraction interferometry and tomography where a densely populated refraction data set can be obtained from two reciprocal and several infill shot gathers. The assumptions are that the refraction arrivals are head waves

  13. Single-shot measurement of nonlinear absorption and nonlinear refraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayabalan, J; Singh, Asha; Oak, Shrikant M

    2006-06-01

    A single-shot method for measurement of nonlinear optical absorption and refraction is described and analyzed. A spatial intensity variation of an elliptical Gaussian beam in conjugation with an array detector is the key element of this method. The advantages of this single-shot technique were demonstrated by measuring the two-photon absorption and free-carrier absorption in GaAs as well as the nonlinear refractive index of CS2 using a modified optical Kerr setup.

  14. Tunable negative-tap photonic microwave filter based on a cladding-mode coupler and an optically injected laser of large detuning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Sze-Chun; Liu, Qing; Wang, Zhu; Chiang, Kin Seng

    2011-06-20

    A tunable negative-tap photonic microwave filter using a cladding-mode coupler together with optical injection locking of large wavelength detuning is demonstrated. Continuous and precise tunability of the filter is realized by physically sliding a pair of bare fibers inside the cladding-mode coupler. Signal inversion for the negative tap is achieved by optical injection locking of a single-mode semiconductor laser. To couple light into and out of the cladding-mode coupler, a pair of matching long-period fiber gratings is employed. The large bandwidth of the gratings requires injection locking of an exceptionally large wavelength detuning that has never been demonstrated before. Experimentally, injection locking with wavelength detuning as large as 27 nm was achieved, which corresponded to locking the 36-th side mode. Microwave filtering with a free-spectral range tunable from 88.6 MHz to 1.57 GHz and a notch depth larger than 35 dB was obtained.

  15. Uncorrected refractive errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidoo, Kovin S; Jaggernath, Jyoti

    2012-01-01

    Global estimates indicate that more than 2.3 billion people in the world suffer from poor vision due to refractive error; of which 670 million people are considered visually impaired because they do not have access to corrective treatment. Refractive errors, if uncorrected, results in an impaired quality of life for millions of people worldwide, irrespective of their age, sex and ethnicity. Over the past decade, a series of studies using a survey methodology, referred to as Refractive Error Study in Children (RESC), were performed in populations with different ethnic origins and cultural settings. These studies confirmed that the prevalence of uncorrected refractive errors is considerably high for children in low-and-middle-income countries. Furthermore, uncorrected refractive error has been noted to have extensive social and economic impacts, such as limiting educational and employment opportunities of economically active persons, healthy individuals and communities. The key public health challenges presented by uncorrected refractive errors, the leading cause of vision impairment across the world, require urgent attention. To address these issues, it is critical to focus on the development of human resources and sustainable methods of service delivery. This paper discusses three core pillars to addressing the challenges posed by uncorrected refractive errors: Human Resource (HR) Development, Service Development and Social Entrepreneurship.

  16. Uncorrected refractive errors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovin S Naidoo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Global estimates indicate that more than 2.3 billion people in the world suffer from poor vision due to refractive error; of which 670 million people are considered visually impaired because they do not have access to corrective treatment. Refractive errors, if uncorrected, results in an impaired quality of life for millions of people worldwide, irrespective of their age, sex and ethnicity. Over the past decade, a series of studies using a survey methodology, referred to as Refractive Error Study in Children (RESC, were performed in populations with different ethnic origins and cultural settings. These studies confirmed that the prevalence of uncorrected refractive errors is considerably high for children in low-and-middle-income countries. Furthermore, uncorrected refractive error has been noted to have extensive social and economic impacts, such as limiting educational and employment opportunities of economically active persons, healthy individuals and communities. The key public health challenges presented by uncorrected refractive errors, the leading cause of vision impairment across the world, require urgent attention. To address these issues, it is critical to focus on the development of human resources and sustainable methods of service delivery. This paper discusses three core pillars to addressing the challenges posed by uncorrected refractive errors: Human Resource (HR Development, Service Development and Social Entrepreneurship.

  17. Correction of refractive errors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Pfeifer

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Spectacles and contact lenses are the most frequently used, the safest and the cheapest way to correct refractive errors. The development of keratorefractive surgery has brought new opportunities for correction of refractive errors in patients who have the need to be less dependent of spectacles or contact lenses. Until recently, RK was the most commonly performed refractive procedure for nearsighted patients.Conclusions: The introduction of excimer laser in refractive surgery has given the new opportunities of remodelling the cornea. The laser energy can be delivered on the stromal surface like in PRK or deeper on the corneal stroma by means of lamellar surgery. In LASIK flap is created with microkeratome in LASEK with ethanol and in epi-LASIK the ultra thin flap is created mechanically.

  18. Electrical Double Layer-Induced Ion Surface Accumulation for Ultrasensitive Refractive Index Sensing with Nanostructured Porous Silicon Interferometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Stefano; Strambini, Lucanos Marsilio; Barillaro, Giuseppe

    2018-03-23

    Herein, we provide the first experimental evidence on the use of electrical double layer (EDL)-induced accumulation of charged ions (using both Na + and K + ions in water as the model) onto a negatively charged nanostructured surface (e.g., thermally growth SiO 2 )-Ion Surface Accumulation, ISA-as a means of improving performance of nanostructured porous silicon (PSi) interferometers for optical refractometric applications. Nanostructured PSi interferometers are very promising optical platforms for refractive index sensing due to PSi huge specific surface (hundreds of m 2 per gram) and low preparation cost (less than $0.01 per 8 in. silicon wafer), though they have shown poor resolution ( R) and detection limit (DL) (on the order of 10 -4 -10 -5 RIU) compared to other plasmonic and photonic platforms ( R and DL on the order of 10 -7 -10 -8 RIU). This can be ascribed to both low sensitivity and high noise floor of PSi interferometers when bulk refractive index variation of the solution infiltrating the nanopores either approaches or is below 10 -4 RIU. Electrical double layer-induced ion surface accumulation (EDL-ISA) on oxidized PSi interferometers allows the interferometer output signal (spectral interferogram) to be impressively amplified at bulk refractive index variation below 10 -4 RIU, increasing, in turn, sensitivity up to 2 orders of magnitude and allowing reliable measurement of refractive index variations to be carried out with both DL and R of 10 -7 RIU. This represents a 250-fold-improvement (at least) with respect to the state-of-the-art literature on PSi refractometers and pushes PSi interferometer performance to that of state-of-the-art ultrasensitive photonics/plasmonics refractive index platforms.

  19. Cuvette and method for measuring refractive index in a spectrophotometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    Embodiments of the present invention include a cuvette (100) for use in determining a refractive index of a sample matter in a spectrophotometer (600), the cuvette comprising a container (102) for holding the sample matter, the container (102) having an entry window (121) that allows input...... or integrally formed in the container and arranged in the radiation path, the photonic crystal having a grating part (111) causing a reflectance spectrum of the photonic crystal to exhibit a resonance. A spectrophotometer is also provided....

  20. Preliminary study of the correlation between refractive error and corneal refractive power, corneal asphericity in myopic eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi-Chao Han

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the correlation between myopic refractive error and relative factors, including the corneal refractive power, posterior refractive power, axial length, corneal asphericity coefficient Q value, central cornea thickness(CCTand intraocular pressure(IOP. METHODS:According to the degree of myopia measured by subjective refraction, 138 myopia patients were divided into three subgroups: mild group(-1.00D--3.00D, moderate group(-3.25D--6.00D, high group(>6.00D. The Pentacam anterior segment tomographer(Germany, Oculus Companywas used to measure the corneal refractive power, posterior refractive power, and corneal asphericity in the right eye. IOP, CCT and axial length were measured by a non-contact tonometer and A-scan ultrasonic, respectively. The data was analyzed with a Pearson correlation analysis and one-way ANOVA. RESULTS: The myopic refractive error was negatively correlated with the axial length(r=-0.682, Pr=0.009, P=0.925. The axial length was negatively correlated with corneal refractive power(r=-0.554, Pr=0.674, Pr=-0.375, P=0.01. There was no significantly correlation between the myopic refractive error and CCT, IOP(r=-0.138, P=0.141; r=-0.121, P=0.157. CONCLUSION:The corneal refractive power plays the role of emmetropization during the development of myopia. There is clinic significance for the correlation between Q value and refractive error, IOP to guide the corneal refractive surgery.

  1. Babinet's principle in double-refraction systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ropars, Guy; Le Floch, Albert

    2014-06-01

    Babinet's principle applied to systems with double refraction is shown to involve spatial interchanges between the ordinary and extraordinary patterns observed through two complementary screens. As in the case of metamaterials, the extraordinary beam does not follow the Snell-Descartes refraction law, the superposition principle has to be applied simultaneously at two points. Surprisingly, by contrast to the intuitive impression, in the presence of the screen with an opaque region, we observe that the emerging extraordinary photon pattern, which however has undergone a deviation, remains fixed when a natural birefringent crystal is rotated while the ordinary one rotates with the crystal. The twofold application of Babinet's principle implies intensity and polarization interchanges but also spatial and dynamic interchanges which should occur in birefringent metamaterials.

  2. Reconfigurable topological photonic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalaev, Mikhail I.; Desnavi, Sameerah; Walasik, Wiktor; Litchinitser, Natalia M.

    2018-02-01

    Topological insulators are materials that conduct on the surface and insulate in their interior due to non-trivial topology of the band structure. The edge states on the interface between topological (non-trivial) and conventional (trivial) insulators are topologically protected from scattering due to structural defects and disorders. Recently, it was shown that photonic crystals (PCs) can serve as a platform for realizing a scatter-free propagation of light waves. In conventional PCs, imperfections, structural disorders, and surface roughness lead to significant losses. The breakthrough in overcoming these problems is likely to come from the synergy of the topological PCs and silicon-based photonics technology that enables high integration density, lossless propagation, and immunity to fabrication imperfections. For many applications, reconfigurability and capability to control the propagation of these non-trivial photonic edge states is essential. One way to facilitate such dynamic control is to use liquid crystals (LCs), which allow to modify the refractive index with external electric field. Here, we demonstrate dynamic control of topological edge states by modifying the refractive index of a LC background medium. Background index is changed depending on the orientation of a LC, while preserving the topology of the system. This results in a change of the spectral position of the photonic bandgap and the topological edge states. The proposed concept might be implemented using conventional semiconductor technology, and can be used for robust energy transport in integrated photonic devices, all-optical circuity, and optical communication systems.

  3. Photon-photon interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilman, F.J.

    1980-01-01

    A brief summary of the present status of photon-photon interactions is presented. Stress is placed on the use of two-photon collisions to test present ideas on the quark constituents of hadrons and on the theory of strong interactions

  4. Negative-ion states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compton, R.N.

    1982-01-01

    In this brief review, we discuss some of the properties of atomic and molecular negative ions and their excited states. Experiments involving photon reactions with negative ions and polar dissociation are summarized. 116 references, 14 figures

  5. Refractive index based measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    In a method for performing a refractive index based measurement of a property of a fluid such as chemical composition or temperature, a chirp in the local spatial frequency of interference fringes of an interference pattern is reduced by mathematical manipulation of the recorded light intensity...

  6. Conceptualization of Light Refraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolowski, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    There have been a number of papers dealing quantitatively with light refraction. Yet the conceptualization of the phenomenon that sets the foundation for a more rigorous math analysis is minimized. The purpose of this paper is to fill that gap. (Contains 3 figures.)

  7. Nonlinearity of the refractive index due to an excitonic molecule resonance state in CdS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumert, R.; Broser, I.; Buschick, K.

    1986-01-01

    The authors report the observation of an intensity-dependent refractive-index nonlinearity in CdS due to a resonance state where an excitonic molecule is created by induced absorption of light. The refractive index n as a function of the incident laser photon energy E is measured directly by light refraction in thin crystal prisms. A renormalized dielectric function describes the measured n(E) spectra well. This strong refractive-index nonlinearity is well suited to produce an optical bistability and to further strengthen the evidence of CdS to be an important material for laser-induced dynamic gratings

  8. Photonic analogies of gravitational attractors

    KAUST Repository

    San-Romá n-Alerigi, Damiá n P.; Alsunaidi, Mohammad A.; Ng, Tien Khee; Ooi, Boon S.; Ben Slimane, Ahmed; Zhang, Yaping

    2013-01-01

    In our work we demonstrate a Gaussian-like refractive index mapping to realize light trapping. Our study shows that this centro-symmetrical photonic structure is able to mime the light geodesics described by celestial mechanics. Possible applications are discussed. © 2013 IEEE.

  9. Refractive index modulation in LiNbO3: MgO slab through Lamb wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Suraj; Sharma, Gaurav; Yadav, Gulab Chand; Singh, Vivek

    2018-05-01

    Present theoretical analysis deals with inducing refractive index contrast in Y-Z LiNbO3:MgO plate via GHz Lamb wave perturbation for photonic applications. Dispersion curves for Lamb wave in plate are plotted by employing displacement potential technique. Selecting wave parameters from dispersion curve, fundamental symmetric Lamb mode (S0) is excited in slab for 6GHz frequency. Produced displacement field by propagating S0 mode and thus developed strain is estimated to calculate refractive index modulation by applying photo-elastic relations. Modulated refractive index is of sinusoidal nature with period of modulation dependence on Lamb's wavelength. This plate having periodically modulated refractive index can be used as photonic crystal for different applications with acoustically tunable photonic band gap.

  10. Extraordinary refraction and self-collimation properties of multilayer metallic-dielectric stratified structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Liwei, E-mail: zlwhpu@hotmail.com [School of Physics and Chemistry, Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo 454000 (China); Chen, Liang [School of Physics and Chemistry, Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo 454000 (China); Zhang, Zhengren [School of Science, Chongqing Jiaotong University, Chongqing 400074 (China); Wang, Wusong [Guizhou Aerospace Institute of Measuring and Testing Technology, Guiyang 550009 (China); Zhao, Yuhuan; Song, Kechao; Kang, Chaoyang [School of Physics and Chemistry, Henan Polytechnic University, Jiaozuo 454000 (China)

    2015-01-15

    The extraordinary refraction with negative or zero refraction angle of the layered metamaterial consisting of alternating dielectric and plasmonic layers is theoretically studied. It is shown that the electromagnetic properties can be tuned by the filling factor, the permittivity of the dielectric layer and the plasma frequency of the metallic layer. At different frequency, the layered structures possess different refraction properties with positive, zero or negative refraction angle. By choosing appropriate parameters, positive-to-zero-to-negative-to positive refraction at the desired frequency can be realized. At the frequency with flat equal frequency contour, self-collimation and slow light properties are also found. Such properties can be used in the performance of negative refraction, subwavelength imaging and information propagation.

  11. Photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, D.L.

    1982-10-01

    Studies of photon-photon collisions are reviewed with particular emphasis on new results reported to this conference. These include results on light meson spectroscopy and deep inelastic e#betta# scattering. Considerable work has now been accumulated on resonance production by #betta##betta# collisions. Preliminary high statistics studies of the photon structure function F 2 /sup #betta#/(x,Q 2 ) are given and comments are made on the problems that remain to be solved

  12. Photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haissinski, J.

    1986-06-01

    The discussions presented in this paper deal with the following points: distinctive features of gamma-gamma collisions; related processes; photon-photon elastic scattering in the continuum and γγ →gg; total cross section; γγ → V 1 V 2 (V=vector meson); radiative width measurements and light meson spectroscopy; exclusive channels at large /t/; jets and inclusive particle distribution in γγ collisions; and, the photon structure function F γ 2

  13. Photon-photon colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sessler, A.M.

    1995-04-01

    Since the seminal work by Ginsburg, et at., the subject of giving the Next Linear Collider photon-photon capability, as well as electron-positron capability, has drawn much attention. A 1990 article by V.I. Teinov describes the situation at that time. In March 1994, the first workshop on this subject was held. This report briefly reviews the physics that can be achieved through the photon-photon channel and then focuses on the means of achieving such a collider. Also reviewed is the spectrum of backscattered Compton photons -- the best way of obtaining photons. We emphasize the spectrum actually obtained in a collider with both polarized electrons and photons (peaked at high energy and very different from a Compton spectrum). Luminosity is estimated for the presently considered colliders, and interaction and conversion-point geometries are described. Also specified are laser requirements (such as wavelength, peak power, and average power) and the lasers that might be employed. These include conventional and free-electron lasers. Finally, we describe the R ampersand D necessary to make either of these approaches viable and explore the use of the SLC as a test bed for a photon-photon collider of very high energy

  14. Black and gray Helmholtz-Kerr soliton refraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez-Curto, Julio; Chamorro-Posada, Pedro; McDonald, Graham S.

    2011-01-01

    Refraction of black and gray solitons at boundaries separating different defocusing Kerr media is analyzed within a Helmholtz framework. A universal nonlinear Snell's law is derived that describes gray soliton refraction, in addition to capturing the behavior of bright and black Kerr solitons at interfaces. Key regimes, defined by beam and interface characteristics, are identified, and predictions are verified by full numerical simulations. The existence of a unique total nonrefraction angle for gray solitons is reported; both internal and external refraction at a single interface is shown possible (dependent only on incidence angle). This, in turn, leads to the proposal of positive or negative lensing operations on soliton arrays at planar boundaries.

  15. Far-Field Focus and Dispersionless Anticrossing Bands in Two-Dimensional Photonic Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoshuang Chen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the simulation work for the far-field focus and dispersionless anticrossing bands in two-dimensional (2D photonic crystals. In a two-dimensional photonic-crystal-based concave lens, the far-field focus of a plane wave is given by the distance between the focusing point and the lens. Strong and good-quality far-field focusing of a transmitted wave, explicitly following the well-known wave-beam negative refraction law, can be achieved. The spatial frequency information of the Bloch mode in multiple Brillouin zones (BZs is investigated in order to indicate the wave propagation in two different regions. When considering the photonic transmission in a 2D photonic crystal composed of a negative phase-velocity medium (NPVM, it is shown that the dispersionless anticrossing bands are generated by the couplings among the localized surface polaritons of the NPVM rods. The photonic band structures of the NPVM photonic crystals are characterized by a topographical continuous dispersion relationship accompanied by many anticrossing bands.

  16. Refractive index in generalized superconductors with Born-Infeld electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jun; Pan, Qiyuan; Yu, Hongwei; Jing, Jiliang

    2018-03-01

    We investigate, in the probe limit, the negative refraction in the generalized superconductors with the Born-Infeld electrodynamics. We observe that the system has a negative Depine-Lakhtakia index in the superconducting phase at small frequencies and the greater the Born-Infeld corrections the larger the range of frequencies or the range of temperatures for which the negative refraction occurs. Furthermore, we find that the tunable Born-Infeld parameter can be used to improve the propagation of light in the holographic setup. Our analysis indicates that the Born-Infeld electrodynamics plays an important role in determining the optical properties of the boundary theory.

  17. Refractive error magnitude and variability: Relation to age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, Elizabeth L; Machan, Carolyn M; Lam, Sharon; Hrynchak, Patricia K; Lillakas, Linda

    2018-03-19

    To investigate mean ocular refraction (MOR) and astigmatism, over the human age range and compare severity of refractive error to earlier studies from clinical populations having large age ranges. For this descriptive study patient age, refractive error and history of surgery affecting refraction were abstracted from the Waterloo Eye Study database (WatES). Average MOR, standard deviation of MOR and astigmatism were assessed in relation to age. Refractive distributions for developmental age groups were determined. MOR standard deviation relative to average MOR was evaluated. Data from earlier clinically based studies with similar age ranges were compared to WatES. Right eye refractive errors were available for 5933 patients with no history of surgery affecting refraction. Average MOR varied with age. Children <1 yr of age were the most hyperopic (+1.79D) and the highest magnitude of myopia was found at 27yrs (-2.86D). MOR distributions were leptokurtic, and negatively skewed. The mode varied with age group. MOR variability increased with increasing myopia. Average astigmatism increased gradually to age 60 after which it increased at a faster rate. By 85+ years it was 1.25D. J 0 power vector became increasingly negative with age. J 45 power vector values remained close to zero but variability increased at approximately 70 years. In relation to comparable earlier studies, WatES data were most myopic. Mean ocular refraction and refractive error distribution vary with age. The highest magnitude of myopia is found in young adults. Similar to prevalence, the severity of myopia also appears to have increased since 1931. Copyright © 2018 Spanish General Council of Optometry. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Omnidirectional reflection in one-dimensional ternary photonic crystals and photonic heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shiqi [MOE Key Laboratory of Laser Life Science and Institute of Laser Life Science, College of Biophotonics, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China); Yang, Xiangbo, E-mail: 20001038@m.scnu.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Laser Life Science and Institute of Laser Life Science, College of Biophotonics, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China); School of Physical Education and Sports Science, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Liu, Chengyi Timon [School of Physical Education and Sports Science, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2014-03-01

    Designing dielectric systems to create omnidirectional band gaps (OBGs) is an attractive topic in the field of photonic band gap (PBG) structures. In this Letter, we propose a new approach to create OBGs by ternary photonic heterostructures (TPHs) composed of three kinds of materials with different refractive indices and obtain the formulae of the structures of TPHs, i.e., those of the thicknesses of materials and the number of sub-ternary photonic crystals. It may provide a powerful technique for designing the structures being able to produce OBGs by use of usual materials, lowcost materials, and materials with low refractive indices, etc.

  19. Omnidirectional reflection in one-dimensional ternary photonic crystals and photonic heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Shiqi; Yang, Xiangbo; Liu, Chengyi Timon

    2014-01-01

    Designing dielectric systems to create omnidirectional band gaps (OBGs) is an attractive topic in the field of photonic band gap (PBG) structures. In this Letter, we propose a new approach to create OBGs by ternary photonic heterostructures (TPHs) composed of three kinds of materials with different refractive indices and obtain the formulae of the structures of TPHs, i.e., those of the thicknesses of materials and the number of sub-ternary photonic crystals. It may provide a powerful technique for designing the structures being able to produce OBGs by use of usual materials, lowcost materials, and materials with low refractive indices, etc.

  20. Refractive index based measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    In a method for performing a refractive index based measurement of a property of a fluid such as chemical composition or temperature by observing an apparent angular shift in an interference fringe pattern produced by back or forward scattering interferometry, ambiguities in the measurement caused...... by the apparent shift being consistent with one of a number of numerical possibilities for the real shift which differ by 2n are resolved by combining measurements performed on the same sample using light paths therethrough of differing lengths....

  1. Transmission character of general function photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiang-Yao; Zhang, Bo-Jun; Yang, Jing-Hai; Zhang, Si-Qi; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Wang, Jing; Ba, Nuo; Hua, Zhong; Yin, Xin-Guo

    2012-08-01

    In the paper, we present a new general function photonic crystals (GFPCs), whose refractive index of medium is a arbitrary function of space position. Unlike conventional photonic crystals (PCs), whose structure grows from two mediums A and B, with different constant refractive indexes na and nb. Based on the Fermat principle, we give the motion equations of light in one-dimensional GFPCs, and calculate its transfer matrix, which is different from the conventional PCs. We choose the linearity refractive index function for two mediums A and B, and find the transmissivity of one-dimensional GFPCs can be much larger or smaller than 1 for different slope linearity refractive index functions, which are different from the transmissivity of conventional PCs (its transmissivity is in the range of 0 and 1). Otherwise, we study the effect of different incident angles, the number of periods and optical thickness on the transmissivity, and obtain some new results different from the conventional PCs.

  2. Flatland Photonics: Circumventing Diffraction with Planar Plasmonic Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionne, Jennifer Anne

    On subwavelength scales, photon-matter interactions are limited by diffraction. The diffraction limit restricts the size of optical devices and the resolution of conventional microscopes to wavelength-scale dimensions, severely hampering our ability to control and probe subwavelength-scale optical phenomena. Circumventing diffraction is now a principle focus of integrated nanophotonics. Surface plasmons provide a particularly promising approach to sub-diffraction-limited photonics. Surface plasmons are hybrid electron-photon modes confined to the interface between conductors and transparent materials. Combining the high localization of electronic waves with the propagation properties of optical waves, plasmons can achieve extremely small mode wavelengths and large local electromagnetic field intensities. Through their unique dispersion, surface plasmons provide access to an enormous phase space of refractive indices and propagation constants that can be readily tuned with material or geometry. In this thesis, we explore both the theory and applications of dispersion in planar plasmonic architectures. Particular attention is given to the modes of metallic core and plasmon slot waveguides, which can span positive, near-zero, and even negative indices. We demonstrate how such basic plasmonic geometries can be used to develop a suite of passive and active plasmonic components, including subwavelength waveguides, color filters, negative index metamaterials, and optical MOS field effect modulators. Positive index modes are probed by near- and far-field techniques, revealing plasmon wavelengths as small as one-tenth of the excitation wavelength. Negative index modes are characterized through direct visualization of negative refraction. By fabricating prisms comprised of gold, silicon nitride, and silver multilayers, we achieve the first experimental demonstration of a negative index material at visible frequencies, with potential applications for sub

  3. Direct Electrospray Printing of Gradient Refractive Index Chalcogenide Glass Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Spencer; Lin, Pao Tai; Li, Cheng; Lumdee, Chatdanai; Hu, Juejun; Agarwal, Anuradha; Kik, Pieter G; Deng, Weiwei; Richardson, Kathleen

    2017-08-16

    A spatially varying effective refractive index gradient using chalcogenide glass layers is printed on a silicon wafer using an optimized electrospray (ES) deposition process. Using solution-derived glass precursors, IR-transparent Ge 23 Sb 7 S 70 and As 40 S 60 glass films of programmed thickness are fabricated to yield a bilayer structure, resulting in an effective gradient refractive index (GRIN) film. Optical and compositional analysis tools confirm the optical and physical nature of the gradient in the resulting high-optical-quality films, demonstrating the power of direct printing of multimaterial structures compatible with planar photonic fabrication protocols. The potential application of such tailorable materials and structures as they relate to the enhancement of sensitivity in chalcogenide glass based planar chemical sensor device design is presented. This method, applicable to a broad cross section of glass compositions, shows promise in directly depositing GRIN films with tunable refractive index profiles for bulk and planar optical components and devices.

  4. One-dimensional photonic crystal design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mee, Cornelis van der; Contu, Pietro; Pintus, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    In this article we present a method to determine the band spectrum, band gaps, and discrete energy levels, of a one-dimensional photonic crystal with localized impurities. For one-dimensional crystals with piecewise constant refractive indices we develop an algorithm to recover the refractive index distribution from the period map. Finally, we derive the relationship between the period map and the scattering matrix containing the information on the localized modes.

  5. Measurement of the Microwave Refractive Index of Materials Based on Parallel Plate Waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, F.; Pei, J.; Kan, J. S.; Zhao, Q.

    2017-12-01

    An electrical field scanning apparatus based on a parallel plate waveguide method is constructed, which collects the amplitude and phase matrices as a function of the relative position. On the basis of such data, a method for calculating the refractive index of the measured wedge samples is proposed in this paper. The measurement and calculation results of different PTFE samples reveal that the refractive index measured by the apparatus is substantially consistent with the refractive index inferred with the permittivity of the sample. The proposed refractive index calculation method proposed in this paper is a competitive method for the characterization of the refractive index of materials with positive refractive index. Since the apparatus and method can be used to measure and calculate arbitrary direction of the microwave propagation, it is believed that both of them can be applied to the negative refractive index materials, such as metamaterials or “left-handed” materials.

  6. Refraction in exoplanet atmospheres. Photometric signatures, implications for transmission spectroscopy, and search in Kepler data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alp, D.; Demory, B.-O.

    2018-01-01

    Context. Refraction deflects photons that pass through atmospheres, which affects transit light curves. Refraction thus provides an avenue to probe physical properties of exoplanet atmospheres and to constrain the presence of clouds and hazes. In addition, an effective surface can be imposed by refraction, thereby limiting the pressure levels probed by transmission spectroscopy. Aims: The main objective of the paper is to model the effects of refraction on photometric light curves for realistic planets and to explore the dependencies on atmospheric physical parameters. We also explore under which circumstances transmission spectra are significantly affected by refraction. Finally, we search for refraction signatures in photometric residuals in Kepler data. Methods: We use the model of Hui & Seager (2002, ApJ, 572, 540) to compute deflection angles and refraction transit light curves, allowing us to explore the parameter space of atmospheric properties. The observational search is performed by stacking large samples of transit light curves from Kepler. Results: We find that out-of-transit refraction shoulders are the most easily observable features, which can reach peak amplitudes of 10 parts per million (ppm) for planets around Sun-like stars. More typical amplitudes are a few ppm or less for Jovians and at the sub-ppm level for super-Earths. In-transit, ingress, and egress refraction features are challenging to detect because of the short timescales and degeneracies with other transit model parameters. Interestingly, the signal-to-noise ratio of any refraction residuals for planets orbiting Sun-like hosts are expected to be similar for planets orbiting red dwarfs and ultra-cool stars. We also find that the maximum depth probed by transmission spectroscopy is not limited by refraction for weakly lensing planets, but that the incidence of refraction can vary significantly for strongly lensing planets. We find no signs of refraction features in the stacked Kepler

  7. Electromagnetic stress at the boundary: Photon pressure or tension?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shubo; Ng, Jack; Xiao, Meng; Chan, Che Ting

    2016-03-01

    It is well known that incident photons carrying momentum ℏk exert a positive photon pressure. But if light is impinging from a negative refractive medium in which ℏk is directed toward the source of radiation, should light exert a photon "tension" instead of a photon pressure? Using an ab initio method that takes the underlying microstructure of a material into account, we find that when an electromagnetic wave propagates from one material into another, the electromagnetic stress at the boundary is, in fact, indeterminate if only the macroscopic parameters are specified. Light can either pull or push the boundary, depending not only on the macroscopic parameters but also on the microscopic lattice structure of the polarizable units that constitute the medium. Within the context of an effective-medium approach, the lattice effect is attributed to electrostriction and magnetostriction, which can be accounted for by the Helmholtz stress tensor if we use the macroscopic fields to calculate the boundary optical stress.

  8. Refractive index based measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    A refractive index based measurement of a property of a fluid is measured in an apparatus comprising a variable wavelength coherent light source (16), a sample chamber (12), a wavelength controller (24), a light sensor (20), a data recorder (26) and a computation apparatus (28), by - directing...... coherent light having a wavelength along an input light path, - producing scattering of said light from each of a plurality of interfaces within said apparatus including interfaces between said fluid and a surface bounding said fluid, said scattering producing an interference pattern formed by said...... scattered light, - cyclically varying the wavelength of said light in said input light path over a 1 nm to 20nm wide range of wavelengths a rate of from 10Hz to 50 KHz, - recording variation of intensity of the interfering light with change in wavelength of the light at an angle of observation...

  9. Subwavelength silicon photonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheben, P.; Bock, P.J.; Schmid, J.H.; Lapointe, J.; Janz, S.; Xu, D.-X.; Densmore, A.; Delage, A.; Lamontagne, B.; Florjanczyk, M.; Ma, R.

    2011-01-01

    With the goal of developing photonic components that are compatible with silicon microelectronic integrated circuits, silicon photonics has been the subject of intense research activity. Silicon is an excellent material for confining and manipulating light at the submicrometer scale. Silicon optoelectronic integrated devices have the potential to be miniaturized and mass-produced at affordable cost for many applications, including telecommunications, optical interconnects, medical screening, and biological and chemical sensing. We review recent advances in silicon photonics research at the National Research Council Canada. A new type of optical waveguide is presented, exploiting subwavelength grating (SWG) effect. We demonstrate subwavelength grating waveguides made of silicon, including practical components operating at telecom wavelengths: input couplers, waveguide crossings and spectrometer chips. SWG technique avoids loss and wavelength resonances due to diffraction effects and allows for single-mode operation with direct control of the mode confinement by changing the refractive index of a waveguide core over a range as broad as 1.6 - 3.5 simply by lithographic patterning. The light can be launched to these waveguides with a coupling loss as small as 0.5 dB and with minimal wavelength dependence, using coupling structures similar to that shown in Fig. 1. The subwavelength grating waveguides can cross each other with minimal loss and negligible crosstalk which allows massive photonic circuit connectivity to overcome the limits of electrical interconnects. These results suggest that the SWG waveguides could become key elements for future integrated photonic circuits. (authors)

  10. Spectrum Control through Discrete Frequency Diffraction in the Presence of Photonic Gauge Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Chengzhi; Zhou, Feng; Peng, Yugui; Sounas, Dimitrios; Zhu, Xuefeng; Wang, Bing; Dong, Jianji; Zhang, Xinliang; Alù; , Andrea; Lu, Peixiang

    2018-03-01

    By using optical phase modulators in a fiber-optical circuit, we theoretically and experimentally demonstrate large control over the spectrum of an impinging signal, which may evolve analogously to discrete diffraction in spatial waveguide arrays. The modulation phase acts as a photonic gauge potential in the frequency dimension, realizing efficient control of the central frequency and bandwidth of frequency combs. We experimentally achieve a 50 GHz frequency shift and threefold bandwidth expansion of an impinging comb, as well as the frequency analogue of various refraction phenomena, including negative refraction and perfect focusing in the frequency domain, both for discrete and continuous incident spectra. Our study paves a promising way towards versatile frequency management for optical communications and signal processing using time modulation schemes.

  11. Photon-photon collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    The study of photon-photon collisions has progressed enormously, stimulated by new data and new calculational tools for QCD. In the future we can expect precise determinations of ..cap alpha../sub s/ and ..lambda../sup ms/ from the ..gamma..*..gamma.. ..-->.. ..pi../sup 0/ form factor and the photon structure function, as well as detailed checks of QCD, determination of the shape of the hadron distribution amplitudes from ..gamma gamma.. ..-->.. H anti H, reconstruction of sigma/sub ..gamma gamma../ from exclusive channels at low W/sub ..gamma gamma../, definitive studies of high p/sub T/ hadron and jet production, and studies of threshold production of charmed systems. Photon-photon collisions, along with radiative decays of the psi and UPSILON, are ideal for the study of multiquark and gluonic resonances. We have emphasized the potential for resonance formation near threshold in virtually every hadronic exclusive channel, including heavy quark states c anti c c anti c, c anti c u anti u, etc. At higher energies SLC, LEP, ...) parity-violating electroweak effects and Higgs production due to equivalent Z/sup 0/ and W/sup + -/ beams from e ..-->.. eZ/sup 0/ and e ..-->.. nu W will become important. 44 references.

  12. Photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    The study of photon-photon collisions has progressed enormously, stimulated by new data and new calculational tools for QCD. In the future we can expect precise determinations of α/sub s/ and Λ/sup ms/ from the γ*γ → π 0 form factor and the photon structure function, as well as detailed checks of QCD, determination of the shape of the hadron distribution amplitudes from γγ → H anti H, reconstruction of sigma/sub γγ/ from exclusive channels at low W/sub γγ/, definitive studies of high p/sub T/ hadron and jet production, and studies of threshold production of charmed systems. Photon-photon collisions, along with radiative decays of the psi and UPSILON, are ideal for the study of multiquark and gluonic resonances. We have emphasized the potential for resonance formation near threshold in virtually every hadronic exclusive channel, including heavy quark states c anti c c anti c, c anti c u anti u, etc. At higher energies SLC, LEP, ...) parity-violating electroweak effects and Higgs production due to equivalent Z 0 and W +- beams from e → eZ 0 and e → nu W will become important. 44 references

  13. Photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    The current status, both theoretical and experimental, of two photon collision physics is reviewed with special emphasis on recent experimental results from e + e - storage rings. After a complete presentation of the helicity amplitude formalism for the general process e + e - → Xe + e - , various approximations (transverse photon, Weisaecker Williams) are discussed. Beam polarisation effects and radiative corrections are also briefly considered. A number of specific processes, for which experimental results are now available, are then described. In each case existing theoretical prediction are confronted with experimental results. The processes described include single resonance production, lepton and hadron pair production, the structure functions of the photon, the production of high Psub(T) jets and the total photon photon cross section. In the last part of the review the current status of the subject is summarised and some comments are made on future prospects. These include both extrapolations of current research to higher energy machines (LEP, HERA) as well as a brief mention of both the technical realisation and the physics interest of the real γγ and eγ collisions which may be possible using linear electron colliders in the 1 TeV energy range

  14. Photonic crystal waveguides in PECVD glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Haoling; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn; Têtu, Amélie

    Silicon oxynitride (SiON) on silicon has found wide use as a robust and versatileplatform for integrated, optical devices. With plasma-enhanced chemical vapourdeposition (PECVD) the refractive index can be varied all the way from 1.5 (pure silica,SiO2) to 2.0 (pure silicon nitride, Si3N4). We have...... fabricated glasses with refractive indexup to approximately 1.75, with which value it is possible to fabricate photonic crystalwaveguides. These structures have the advantage of being transparent in the whole of thevisible region, which makes them different from photonic crystals made...

  15. Polymer X-ray refractive nano-lenses fabricated by additive technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, A K; Bessonov, V O; Abrashitova, K A; Kokareva, N G; Safronov, K R; Barannikov, A A; Ershov, P A; Klimova, N B; Lyatun, I I; Yunkin, V A; Polikarpov, M; Snigireva, I; Fedyanin, A A; Snigirev, A

    2017-06-26

    The present work demonstrates the potential applicability of additive manufacturing to X-Ray refractive nano-lenses. A compound refractive lens with a radius of 5 µm was produced by the two-photon polymerization induced lithography. It was successfully tested at the X-ray microfocus laboratory source and a focal spot of 5 μm was measured. An amorphous nature of polymer material combined with the potential of additive technologies may result in a significantly enhanced focusing performance compared to the best examples of modern X-ray compound refractive lenses.

  16. Essentials of photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Rogers, Alan; Baets, Roel

    2008-01-01

    Photons and ElectronsHistorical SketchThe Wave Nature of LightPolarizationThe Electromagnetic SpectrumEmission and Absorption ProcessesPhoton Statistics The Behaviour of Electrons LasersSummaryWave Properties of LightThe Electromagnetic SpectrumWave RepresentationElectromagnetic WavesReflection and RefractionTotal Internal ReflectionInterference of LightLight WaveguidingInterferometersDiffractionGaussian Beams and Stable Optical ResonatorsPolarization OpticsThe Polarization EllipseCrystal OpticsRetarding WaveplatesA Variable Waveplate: The Soleil-Babinet Compensator Polarizing PrismsLinear BirefringenceCircular BirefringenceElliptical BirefringencePractical Polarization EffectsPolarization AnalysisThe Form of the Jones MatricesLight and Matter Emission, Propagation, and Absorption ProcessesClassical Theory of Light Propagation in Uniform Dielectric Media Optical Dispersion Emission and Absorption of LightOptical Coherence and CorrelationIntroductionMeasure of Coherence Wiener-Khinchin TheoremDual-Beam Interfe...

  17. Realization of a complementary medium using dielectric photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao; Fang, Anan; Jia, Ziyuan; Ji, Liyu; Hang, Zhi Hong

    2017-12-01

    By exploiting the scaling invariance of photonic band diagrams, a complementary photonic crystal slab structure is realized by stacking two uniformly scaled double-zero-index dielectric photonic crystal slabs together. The space cancellation effect in complementary photonic crystals is demonstrated in both numerical simulations and microwave experiments. The refractive index dispersion of double-zero-index dielectric photonic crystal is experimentally measured. Using pure dielectrics, our photonic crystal structure will be an ideal platform to explore various intriguing properties related to a complementary medium.

  18. Modelling of photonic crystal fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Erik

    2003-01-01

    , as well as a honeycomb bandgap fibre and the first analysis of semi-periodic layered air-hole fibres. Using the modelling framework established as a basis, we provide an analysis of microbend loss, by regarding displacement of a fibre core as a stationary stochastic process, inducing mismatch between......In the presenta ph.d. work a theoretical study of aspects of modelling photonic crystal fibres was carried out. Photonic crystal fibres form a class of optical waveguides where guidance is no longer provided by a difference in refractive index between core and cladding. Instead, guidance...... is provided by an arrangement of air-holes running along the length of the fibre. Depending on the geometry of the fibre, the guiding mechanism may be either arising from the formation of a photonic bandgap in the cladding structure (photonic bandgap fibre), or by an effect resembling total internal...

  19. Compound FDTD method for silicon photonics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Olyaee

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Attempt to manufacture photonics devices on silicon requires theoretical and numerical prediction. This essay presents Compound FDTD (C-FDTD method for comprehensive simulation of silicon photonics devices. Although this method is comprehensive, it maintains conventional Yee algorithm. The method involves variation of refractive index due to nonlinear effects. With the help of this simulator, refractive index change due to free-carriers created through two photon absorption and Kerr effect in silicon waveguide is considered. Results indicate how to choose pump pulse shape to optimum operation of active photonics devices. Also conductivity variation of Si waveguide due to change in free-carrier density is studied. By considering variations in conductivity profile, we are able to design better schemes for sweep free carriers away with reverse bias or nonlinear photovoltaic effect for fast devices and Raman amplifiers.

  20. Effect of refractive error on temperament and character properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Emine; Kalkan; Akcay; Fatih; Canan; Huseyin; Simavli; Derya; Dal; Hacer; Yalniz; Nagihan; Ugurlu; Omer; Gecici; Nurullah; Cagil

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the effect of refractive error on temperament and character properties using Cloninger’s psychobiological model of personality.METHODS: Using the Temperament and Character Inventory(TCI), the temperament and character profiles of 41 participants with refractive errors(17 with myopia,12 with hyperopia, and 12 with myopic astigmatism) were compared to those of 30 healthy control participants.Here, temperament comprised the traits of novelty seeking, harm-avoidance, and reward dependence, while character comprised traits of self-directedness,cooperativeness, and self-transcendence.RESULTS: Participants with refractive error showed significantly lower scores on purposefulness,cooperativeness, empathy, helpfulness, and compassion(P <0.05, P <0.01, P <0.05, P <0.05, and P <0.01,respectively).CONCLUSION: Refractive error might have a negative influence on some character traits, and different types of refractive error might have different temperament and character properties. These personality traits may be implicated in the onset and/or perpetuation of refractive errors and may be a productive focus for psychotherapy.

  1. Wave propagation in photonic crystals and metamaterials: Surface waves, nonlinearity and chirality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Bingnan [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    nonlinear SRRs are built and modeled to study the nonlinearity in magnetic metamaterials and the results will be presented in Chapter 3. Negative refractive index n is one of the major target in the research of metamaterials. Negative n can be obtained with a metamaterial with both ϵ and μ negative. As an alternative, negative index for one of the circularly polarized waves could be achieved with metamaterials having a strong chirality ?. In this case neither ϵ} nor μ negative is required. My work on chiral metamaterials will be presented in Chapter 4.

  2. Photonic quasicrystals for application in WDM systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romero-Vivas, J.; Chigrin, D. N.; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2005-01-01

    Photonic quasicrystals can possess an isotropic (complete) photonic bandgap even in the case of low refractive indices of the constitutive materials, which makes them atrractive optical materials with important technological applications. In this work, several aspects related to the design...... of waveguides and cavities using the two-dimensional (2D) octagonal quasiperiodic lattice are investigated numerically. As an example, the integration of waveguides and a resonating cavity to design an add/drop filer for wavelength division multiplexing applications is brieflydescribed....

  3. The uncorrected refractive error challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovin Naidoo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Refractive error affects people of all ages, socio-economic status and ethnic groups. The most recent statistics estimate that, worldwide, 32.4 million people are blind and 191 million people have vision impairment. Vision impairment has been defined based on distance visual acuity only, and uncorrected distance refractive error (mainly myopia is the single biggest cause of worldwide vision impairment. However, when we also consider near visual impairment, it is clear that even more people are affected. From research it was estimated that the number of people with vision impairment due to uncorrected distance refractive error was 107.8 million,1 and the number of people affected by uncorrected near refractive error was 517 million, giving a total of 624.8 million people.

  4. CONFERENCE: Photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    Despite being difficult to observe, photon-photon collisions have opened up a range of physics difficult, or even impossible, to access by other methods. The progress which has been made in this field was evident at the fifth international workshop on photon-photon collisions, held in Aachen from 13-16 April and attended by some 120 physicists

  5. Parsimonious Refraction Interferometry and Tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif

    2017-02-04

    We present parsimonious refraction interferometry and tomography where a densely populated refraction data set can be obtained from two reciprocal and several infill shot gathers. The assumptions are that the refraction arrivals are head waves, and a pair of reciprocal shot gathers and several infill shot gathers are recorded over the line of interest. Refraction traveltimes from these shot gathers are picked and spawned into O(N2) virtual refraction traveltimes generated by N virtual sources, where N is the number of geophones in the 2D survey. The virtual traveltimes can be inverted to give the velocity tomogram. This enormous increase in the number of traveltime picks and associated rays, compared to the many fewer traveltimes from the reciprocal and infill shot gathers, allows for increased model resolution and a better condition number with the system of normal equations. A significant benefit is that the parsimonious survey and the associated traveltime picking is far less time consuming than that for a standard refraction survey with a dense distribution of sources.

  6. Photon technology. Hard photon technology; Photon technology. Hard photon gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    Research results of hard photon technology have been summarized as a part of novel technology development highly utilizing the quantum nature of photon. Hard photon technology refers to photon beam technologies which use photon in the 0.1 to 200 nm wavelength region. Hard photon has not been used in industry due to the lack of suitable photon sources and optical devices. However, hard photon in this wavelength region is expected to bring about innovations in such areas as ultrafine processing and material synthesis due to its atom selective reaction, inner shell excitation reaction, and spatially high resolution. Then, technological themes and possibility have been surveyed. Although there are principle proposes and their verification of individual technologies for the technologies of hard photon generation, regulation and utilization, they are still far from the practical applications. For the photon source technology, the laser diode pumped driver laser technology, laser plasma photon source technology, synchrotron radiation photon source technology, and vacuum ultraviolet photon source technology are presented. For the optical device technology, the multi-layer film technology for beam mirrors and the non-spherical lens processing technology are introduced. Also are described the reduction lithography technology, hard photon excitation process, and methods of analysis and measurement. 430 refs., 165 figs., 23 tabs.

  7. All-polymer photonic crystal slab sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermannsson, Pétur Gordon; Sørensen, Kristian Tølbøl; Vannahme, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    An all-polymer photonic crystal slab sensor is presented, and shown to exhibit narrow resonant reflection with a FWHM of less than 1 nm and a sensitivity of 31 nm/RIU when sensing media with refractive indices around that of water. This results in a detection limit of 4.5x10-6 RIU when measured...

  8. Photonic crystal nanostructures for optical biosensing applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorfner, D.; Zabel, T.; Hürlimann, T.

    2009-01-01

    We present the design, fabrication and optical investigation of photonic crystal (PhC) nanocavity drop filters for use as optical biosensors. The resonant cavity mode wavelength and Q-factor are studied as a function of the ambient refractive index and as a function of adsorbed proteins (bovine...

  9. Theoretical study of relative width of photonic band gap for the 3-D ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... of refractive index and relative radius of the photonic band gap for the fcc closed packed 3-D dielectric microstructure are reported and comparison of experimental observations and theoretical predictions are given. This work is useful for the understanding of photonic crystals and occurrence of the photonic band gap.

  10. Polychromatic photons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Ole

    2002-01-01

    train quantum electrodynamics. A brief description of particle (photon) position operators is given, and it is shown that photons usually are only algebraically confined in an emission process. Finally, it is demonstrated that the profile of the birth domain of a radio-frequency photon emitted...

  11. Characterizing conical refraction optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, C.; McDougall, C.; Rafailov, E.; McGloin, D.

    2014-12-01

    Conical refraction occurs when a beam of light travels through an appropriately cut biaxial crystal. By focussing the conically refracted beam through a high numerical aperture microscope objective, conical refraction optical tweezers can be created, allowing for particle manipulation in both Raman spots and in the Lloyd/Poggendorff rings. We present a thorough quantification of the trapping properties of such a beam, focussing on the trap stiffness and how this varies with trap power and trapped particle location. We show that the lower Raman spot can be thought of as a single-beam optical gradient force trap, while radiation pressure dominates in the upper Raman spot, leading to optical levitation rather than trapping. Particles in the Lloyd/Poggendorff rings experience a lower trap stiffness than particles in the lower Raman spot but benefit from rotational control.

  12. Engineering of refractive index in sulfide chalcogenide glass by direct laser writing

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yaping; Gao, Yangqin; Ng, Tien Khee; Ooi, Boon S.; Chew, Basil; Hedhili, Mohamed N.; Zhao, Donghui; Jain, Himanshu

    2010-01-01

    Arsenic trisulfide (As2S3) glass is an interesting material for photonic integrated circuits (PICs) as infrared (IR) or nonlinear optical components. In this paper, direct laser writing was applied to engineer the refractive index of As2S3 thin film

  13. Performance of a Be Refractive Lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smither, R.K.; Khounsary, A.M.; Mancini, D.C.; Saleem, K. Abu

    2004-01-01

    The performance of a beryllium compound refractive lens (CRL) was tested in the energy range of 11.5 to 8.0 keV. The beryllium refractive lens consists of 50 aligned, 1-mm-diameter, hollow spheres in a solid block of beryllium, 30 mm x 20 mm x 55 mm. The minimum web between each hollow sphere was 0.10 mm. The measured focal length of the lens for x-rays close to the axis of the beam was 147.7 cm +/- 2.0 cm at 10 keV and 120.2 +/- 2.0 cm at 9.1 keV. These values agree well with the theoretical values of 146.6 cm and 121.4 cm, respectively. The diameter of the best focus obtained at 10 keV was 35 μm horizontal and 45 μm vertical. For the modified version of the lens used in the 9.1 keV experiment these values were 25 μm horizontal and 35 μm vertical. The x-ray beam cross section for the 10 keV and the 9.1 keV experiments were 0.50 mm x 0.50 mm and 0.30 mm x 0.30 mm, respectively. The enhancement of the flux (photons per sq. mm) was 50:1 at 10 keV and 80:1 in the 9.1 keV experiment

  14. THE OPTICS OF REFRACTIVE SUBSTRUCTURE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Michael D.; Narayan, Ramesh, E-mail: mjohnson@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Newly recognized effects of refractive scattering in the ionized interstellar medium have broad implications for very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) at extreme angular resolutions. Building upon work by Blandford and Narayan, we present a simplified, geometrical optics framework, which enables rapid, semi-analytic estimates of refractive scattering effects. We show that these estimates exactly reproduce previous results based on a more rigorous statistical formulation. We then derive new expressions for the scattering-induced fluctuations of VLBI observables such as closure phase, and we demonstrate how to calculate the fluctuations for arbitrary quantities of interest using a Monte Carlo technique.

  15. Negative thermal expansion materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, J.S.O.

    1997-01-01

    The recent discovery of negative thermal expansion over an unprecedented temperature range in ZrW 2 O 8 (which contracts continuously on warming from below 2 K to above 1000 K) has stimulated considerable interest in this unusual phenomenon. Negative and low thermal expansion materials have a number of important potential uses in ceramic, optical and electronic applications. We have now found negative thermal expansion in a large new family of materials with the general formula A 2 (MO 4 ) 3 . Chemical substitution dramatically influences the thermal expansion properties of these materials allowing the production of ceramics with negative, positive or zero coefficients of thermal expansion, with the potential to control other important materials properties such as refractive index and dielectric constant. The mechanism of negative thermal expansion and the phase transitions exhibited by this important new class of low-expansion materials will be discussed. (orig.)

  16. REFLECTION AND REFRACTION, VOLUME 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    KLAUS, DAVID J.; AND OTHERS

    THIS VOLUME 2 OF A TWO-VOLUME SET PROVIDES AUTOINSTRUCTION IN PHYSICS. THE UNITS COVERED IN THIS VOLUME ARE (1) REFLECTION OF LIGHT, (2) PHOTOMETRY, (3) POLARIZATION, (4) REFRACTION OF LIGHT, (5) SNELL'S LAW, (6) LENSES, FOCUS, AND FOCAL POINTS, (7) IMAGE FORMATION, AND (8) ABERRATIONS, THE EYE, AND MAGNIFICATION. THE INTRODUCTION AND UNITS ON…

  17. Absolute photonic band gap in 2D honeycomb annular photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Dan; Gao, Yihua; Tong, Aihong; Hu, Sen

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A two-dimensional honeycomb annular photonic crystal (PC) is proposed. • The absolute photonic band gap (PBG) is studied. • Annular PCs show larger PBGs than usual air-hole PCs for high refractive index. • Annular PCs with anisotropic rods show large PBGs for low refractive index. • There exist optimal parameters to open largest band gaps. - Abstract: Using the plane wave expansion method, we investigate the effects of structural parameters on absolute photonic band gap (PBG) in two-dimensional honeycomb annular photonic crystals (PCs). The results reveal that the annular PCs possess absolute PBGs that are larger than those of the conventional air-hole PCs only when the refractive index of the material from which the PC is made is equal to 4.5 or larger. If the refractive index is smaller than 4.5, utilization of anisotropic inner rods in honeycomb annular PCs can lead to the formation of larger PBGs. The optimal structural parameters that yield the largest absolute PBGs are obtained

  18. Determination of femtosecond-laser-induced refractive-index changes in an optical fiber from far-field measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savolainen, Juha-Matti; Grüner-Nielsen, Lars; Kristensen, Poul

    2014-01-01

    A new method for direct writing of localized, circularly symmetric refractive-index changes in optical fibers with a femtosecond laser is demonstrated. The refractive-index changes are characterized using a novel approach employing comparison of numerical simulations to the measured far......-field profiles of unmodified and modified fibers. From the analysis, a negative refractive-index change of −0.015 0.005 within a radius of 0.6 0.1 μm is determined....

  19. Refraction in the lower troposphere: Higher order image distortion effects due to refractive profile curvature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Daniel J.

    the arrival angles shows the target viewed by an observer will appear stretched, or magnified (towering). Conversely, with a negative lensing action the target viewed will appear shortened or compressed (stooping). The lensing can be modeled with a parabolic refractive index profile and the curvature of the profile is characterized by the curvature parameter alpha (units: m-1). The objective of chapter 4 is to estimate the curvature parameter from an analysis of the images collected by the camera system. In effect, the camera acts as a device that measures ray angle of arrival so image changes that appear as a stretch can be related to changes in the curvature of the index profile. Time-lapse images of the F & A Dairy products building in Las Cruces, NM (15.3 km range from the camera at the NMSU campus) were analyzed using a manual cursor-marking MATLAB script developed for this project. For several different dates, we found the largest stretches occur in the morning. For example, a comparison of two morning images separated by an hour shows the apparent height of the building in a second image gained about 34 pixels compared to the first image. The refractive index curvature change for this case is calculated and found to be alpha = 6.0 x 10-5 m-1 . As the day progressed the image slowly compressed back to the early morning size. Optical measurements of the local index of refraction profile of the atmosphere have been made in the past but usually only for isolated events or time periods. There is little data to describe occurrence probabilities, spatial or temporal properties, or relative strength of effects for different seasons, or even durations of weeks. In this dissertation, time-lapse image data from two separate weeks were analyzed for daily stretching/compressing events and presented graphically. The results show a systematic trend of dramatic size changes in the morning and a slow progression to normal building size as the day continues. Using the optical

  20. Optical switching in nonlinear photonic crystals lightly doped with nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Mahi R [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada); Lipson, R H [Department of Chemistry, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 5B7 (Canada)

    2008-01-14

    A possible switching mechanism has been investigated for nonlinear photonic crystals doped with an ensemble of non-interacting three-level nanoparticles. In this scheme, an intense pump laser field is used to change the refractive index of the nonlinear photonic crystal while a weaker probe field monitors an absorption transition in the nanoparticles. In the absence of the strong laser field the system transmits the probe field when the resonance energy of the nanoparticles lies near the edge of the photonic band gap due to strong coupling between the photonic crystal and the nanoparticles. However, upon application of an intense pump laser field the system becomes absorbing due to a band edge frequency shift that arises due to a nonlinear Kerr effect which changes the refractive index of the crystal. It is anticipated that the optical switching mechanism described in this work can be used to make new types of photonic devices.

  1. Photonic crystals: features and applications (physics research and technology)

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    The present book is focused on the study of unprecedented control and manipulation of light by photonic crystals (PCs) and their applications. These are micro- or usually nano-structures composed of periodic indexes of refraction of dielectrics with high refractive index contrast. They exhibit optical frequency band gaps in analogy to electronic bands for a periodic potential of a semiconductor crystal lattice. The gemstone opal and butterflys feathers colours are already referred to as natural examples of photonic crystals. The characteristics of such supper-lattices were first reported by Yablonovitch in 1987. The exploitation of photonic crystals is a promising tool in communication, sensors, optical computing, and nanophotonics. Discussed are the various features of one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystals, photonic quasi crystals, heterostuctures and PC fibres under a variety of conditions using several materials, and metamaterials. It also focuses on the applications of PCs in opt...

  2. Fabrication and Characterization of Three Dimensional Photonic Crystals Generated by Multibeam Interference Lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Also, refractive indexes for SU8 and alumina were measured as 1.57 and 1.60, respectively. Focused Ion Beam Milling: Cross-sections of polymer and...Holographically defined polymer photonic crystals can serve as templates for subsequent deposition of high refractive index materials for applications...initiation, the polymerization reaction occurs during exposure and the interference pattern may be distorted by the resulting refractive index shifts

  3. Photonic Hypercrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgenii E. Narimanov

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a new “universality class” of artificial optical media—photonic hypercrystals. These hyperbolic metamaterials, with periodic spatial variation of dielectric permittivity on subwavelength scale, combine the features of optical metamaterials and photonic crystals. In particular, surface waves supported by a hypercrystal possess the properties of both the optical Tamm states in photonic crystals and surface-plasmon polaritons at the metal-dielectric interface.

  4. Progress on photonic crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoq, P; Gundacker, S; Hillemanns, H; Jarron, P; Knapitsch, A; Leclercq, J L; Letartre, X; Meyer, T; Pauwels, K; Powolny, F; Seassal, C

    2010-01-01

    The renewal of interest for Time of Flight Positron Emission Tomography (TOF PET) has highlighted the need for increasing the light output of scintillating crystals and in particular for improving the light extraction from materials with a high index of refraction. One possible solution to overcome the problem of total internal reflection and light losses resulting from multiple bouncing within the crystal is to improve the light extraction efficiency at the crystal/photodetector interface by means of photonic crystals, i.e. media with a periodic modulation of the dielectric constant at the wavelength scale. After a short reminder of the underlying principles this contribution proposes to present the very encouraging results we have recently obtained on LYSO pixels and the perspectives on other crystals such as BGO, LuYAP and LuAG. These results confirm the impressive predictions from our previously published Monte Carlo simulations. A detailed description of the sample preparation procedure is given as well ...

  5. Past and present of corneal refractive surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Anders Højslet

    Surgical correction of refractive errors is becoming increasingly popular. In the 1990s, the excimer laser revolutionized the field of corneal refractive surgery with PRK and LASIK, and lately refractive lenticule extraction (ReLEx) of intracorneal tissue, using only a femtosecond laser, has become...

  6. Refracting surface plasmon polaritons with nanoparticle arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radko, I.P.; Evlyukhin, A.B.; Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2008-01-01

    Refraction of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) by various structures formed by a 100-nm-period square lattice of gold nanoparticles on top of a gold film is studied by leakage radiation microscopy. SPP refraction by a triangular-shaped nanoparticle array indicates that the SPP effective refractive...... to design nanoparticle arrays for specific applications requiring in-plane SPP manipulation....

  7. Photonic Crystal Biosensor Chip for Label-Free Detection of Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Martin; Krüger, Asger Christian; Groothoff, Nathaniel

    Narrow polarization-mixing resonances in planar photonic crystals are studied as candidate components for label-free refractive index sensors for detecting bacteria causing sepsis through the identification of DNA strands....

  8. Microwave photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Chi H

    2006-01-01

    Wireless, optical, and electronic networks continue to converge, prompting heavy research into the interface between microwave electronics, ultrafast optics, and photonic technologies. New developments arrive nearly as fast as the photons under investigation, and their commercial impact depends on the ability to stay abreast of new findings, techniques, and technologies. Presenting a broad yet in-depth survey, Microwave Photonics examines the major advances that are affecting new applications in this rapidly expanding field.This book reviews important achievements made in microwave photonics o

  9. Modification of Low Refractive Index Polycarbonate for High Refractive Index Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunjan Suri

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycarbonates and polythiourethanes are the most popular materials in use today, for optical applications. Polycarbonates are of two types which fall in the category of low refractive index and medium refractive index. The present paper describes the conversion of low refractive index polycarbonates into high refractive index material by the use of a high refractive index monomer, polythiol, as an additive. Novel polycarbonates, where the properties of refractive index and Abbe number can be tailor made, have been obtained. Thermal studies and refractive index determination indicate the formation of a new polymer with improved properties and suitable for optical applications.

  10. TM-TE hybridization and tunable refraction in magnetophotonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khanikaev, A.B. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1, Hibari-Ga-Oka, Toyohashi 441-8580 (Japan)]. E-mail: khanikaev@maglab.eee.tut.ac.jp; Inoue, M. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1, Hibari-Ga-Oka, Toyohashi 441-8580 (Japan); Granovsky, A.B. [Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninski Gory, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation)

    2006-05-15

    In the present work we study the photonic band structure (PBS) and the polarization state of the Bloch eigenmodes of a two-dimensional magnetophotonic crystal (MPC) with square lattice formed from magneto-optically (MO) active cylinders. The refraction of light at the boundary of the MPC is analyzed. We found that both-the PBS and eigenmodes of the MPC-are most significantly altered by the MO activity in the vicinity of the degeneracies. For this case we demonstrated the possibility of an abrupt change in the propagation direction of light by the application of a magnetic field. For the Bloch wave vectors and frequencies corresponding to non-degenerate branches, the alteration of the PBS is shown to be negligible and eigenmodes almost completely coincide with linearly TE- and/or TM-polarized eigenmodes of the non-magnetic photonic crystal.

  11. TM-TE hybridization and tunable refraction in magnetophotonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanikaev, A.B.; Inoue, M.; Granovsky, A.B.

    2006-01-01

    In the present work we study the photonic band structure (PBS) and the polarization state of the Bloch eigenmodes of a two-dimensional magnetophotonic crystal (MPC) with square lattice formed from magneto-optically (MO) active cylinders. The refraction of light at the boundary of the MPC is analyzed. We found that both-the PBS and eigenmodes of the MPC-are most significantly altered by the MO activity in the vicinity of the degeneracies. For this case we demonstrated the possibility of an abrupt change in the propagation direction of light by the application of a magnetic field. For the Bloch wave vectors and frequencies corresponding to non-degenerate branches, the alteration of the PBS is shown to be negligible and eigenmodes almost completely coincide with linearly TE- and/or TM-polarized eigenmodes of the non-magnetic photonic crystal

  12. Super-Virtual Refraction Interferometric Redatuming: Enhancing the Refracted Energy

    KAUST Repository

    Aldawood, Ali

    2012-02-26

    onshore seismic data processing. Refraction tomography is becoming a common way to estimate an accurate near surface velocity model. One of the problems with refraction tomography is the low signal to noise ration in far offset data. To improve, we propose using super-virtual refraction interferometry to enhance the weak energy at far offsets. We use Interferometric Green\\'s functions to redatum sources by cross-correlating two traces recorded at receiver stations, A and B, from a source at location W. The result is a redatumed trace with a virtual source at A and a receiver at B, which can also be obtained by correlating two traces recorded at A and B from different shots. Stacking them would enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of this "virtual" trace. We next augment redatuming with convolution and stacking. The trace recorded at B from a virtual source at A is convolved with the original trace recorded at A from a source at W. The result is a "super-virtual" trace at B in the far-offset from a source at W. Stacking N traces gives a vN-improvement. We applied our method to noisy synthetic and field data recorded over a complex near-surface and we could pick more traces at far offsets. It was possible to accommodate more picks resulting in a better subsurface coverage

  13. Super-Virtual Refraction Interferometric Redatuming: Enhancing the Refracted Energy

    KAUST Repository

    Aldawood, Ali; Alshuhail, Abdulrahman Abdullatif Abdulrahman; Hanafy, Sherif

    2012-01-01

    onshore seismic data processing. Refraction tomography is becoming a common way to estimate an accurate near surface velocity model. One of the problems with refraction tomography is the low signal to noise ration in far offset data. To improve, we propose using super-virtual refraction interferometry to enhance the weak energy at far offsets. We use Interferometric Green's functions to redatum sources by cross-correlating two traces recorded at receiver stations, A and B, from a source at location W. The result is a redatumed trace with a virtual source at A and a receiver at B, which can also be obtained by correlating two traces recorded at A and B from different shots. Stacking them would enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of this "virtual" trace. We next augment redatuming with convolution and stacking. The trace recorded at B from a virtual source at A is convolved with the original trace recorded at A from a source at W. The result is a "super-virtual" trace at B in the far-offset from a source at W. Stacking N traces gives a vN-improvement. We applied our method to noisy synthetic and field data recorded over a complex near-surface and we could pick more traces at far offsets. It was possible to accommodate more picks resulting in a better subsurface coverage

  14. Three-dimensional ordered particulate structures: Method to retrieve characteristics from photonic band gap data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miskevich, Alexander A.; Loiko, Valery A.

    2015-01-01

    A method to retrieve characteristics of ordered particulate structures, such as photonic crystals, is proposed. It is based on the solution of the inverse problem using data on the photonic band gap (PBG). The quasicrystalline approximation (QCA) of the theory of multiple scattering of waves and the transfer matrix method (TMM) are used. Retrieval of the refractive index of particles is demonstrated. Refractive indices of the artificial opal particles are estimated using the published experimental data.

  15. Yb-doped rod-type photonic crystal fibers for single-mode amplification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poli, Frederica; Passaro, Davide; Cucinotta, Annamaria

    2009-01-01

    The competition among the guided modes in rod-type photonic crystal fibers with a low refractive index ring in the Yb-doped core is investigated with an amplifier model to demonstrate the effective higher-order mode suppression.......The competition among the guided modes in rod-type photonic crystal fibers with a low refractive index ring in the Yb-doped core is investigated with an amplifier model to demonstrate the effective higher-order mode suppression....

  16. Guided mode gain competition in Yb-doped rod-type photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poli, Federica; Passaro, Davide; Cucinotta, Annamaria

    2009-01-01

    The gain competition among the guided modes in Yb-doped rod-type photonic crystal fibers with a low refractive index core is investigated with a spatial model to demonstrate the fiber effective single-mode behaviour.......The gain competition among the guided modes in Yb-doped rod-type photonic crystal fibers with a low refractive index core is investigated with a spatial model to demonstrate the fiber effective single-mode behaviour....

  17. Energy dispersion of x-ray continua in the energy range 9kev to 19kev refraction on Si wafers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebel, H.; Streli, C.; Pepponi, G.; Wobrauschek, P.

    2000-01-01

    Total reflection of x-rays in matter at given grazing incidence angle is characterized by the occurrence of an energy cut-off. Photons with energies greater than the cut-off energy penetrate into matter and are refracted according to a transition from the optically more dense to the optically less dense medium. Since the refractive index depends on photon energy, an energy dispersion of continuous x-radiation is observed. The present investigation is dedicated to the energy dispersion of continuous x-radiation (Mo, 45 kV) by Si wafers. Theory and experimental results are in excellent agreement. (author)

  18. Optofluidic tuning of photonic crystal band edge lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernal, Felipe; Christiansen, Mads Brøkner; Gersborg-Hansen, Morten

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate optofluidic tuning of polymer photonic crystal band edge lasers with an imposed rectangular symmetry. The emission wavelength depends on both lattice constant and cladding refractive index. The emission wavelength is shown to change 1 nm with a cladding refractive index change of 10......−2. The rectangular symmetry modification alters the emission characteristics of the devices and the relative emission intensities along the symmetry axes depend on cladding refractive index, suggesting a sensor concept based on detection of intensity rather than wavelength....

  19. Crystalline lens power and refractive error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iribarren, Rafael; Morgan, Ian G; Nangia, Vinay; Jonas, Jost B

    2012-02-01

    To study the relationships between the refractive power of the crystalline lens, overall refractive error of the eye, and degree of nuclear cataract. All phakic participants of the population-based Central India Eye and Medical Study with an age of 50+ years were included. Calculation of the refractive lens power was based on distance noncycloplegic refractive error, corneal refractive power, anterior chamber depth, lens thickness, and axial length according to Bennett's formula. The study included 1885 subjects. Mean refractive lens power was 25.5 ± 3.0 D (range, 13.9-36.6). After adjustment for age and sex, the standardized correlation coefficients (β) of the association with the ocular refractive error were highest for crystalline lens power (β = -0.41; P lens opacity grade (β = -0.42; P lens power (β = -0.95), lower corneal refractive power (β = -0.76), higher lens thickness (β = 0.30), deeper anterior chamber (β = 0.28), and less marked nuclear lens opacity (β = -0.05). Lens thickness was significantly lower in eyes with greater nuclear opacity. Variations in refractive error in adults aged 50+ years were mostly influenced by variations in axial length and in crystalline lens refractive power, followed by variations in corneal refractive power, and, to a minor degree, by variations in lens thickness and anterior chamber depth.

  20. Turbulent effective absorptivity and refractivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rax, J.M.

    1984-09-01

    The problem of wave propagation in a turbulent magnetized plasma is investigated. Considering small scale, low frequency density fluctuations we solve the Maxwell equations and show that the eikonal approximation remains valid with an effective refractivity and an effective absorptivity taking into account the energy diffusion due to the turbulent motion. Then the result is applied to the problem of lower hybrid waves scattering by drift waves density fluctuations in tokamaks

  1. Crystalline lens and refractive development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iribarren, Rafael

    2015-07-01

    Individual refractive errors usually change along lifespan. Most children are hyperopic in early life. This hyperopia is usually lost during growth years, leading to emmetropia in adults, but myopia also develops in children during school years or during early adult life. Those subjects who remain emmetropic are prone to have hyperopic shifts in middle life. And even later, at older ages, myopic shifts are developed with nuclear cataract. The eye grows from 15 mm in premature newborns to approximately 24 mm in early adult years, but, in most cases, refractions are maintained stable in a clustered distribution. This growth in axial length would represent a refractive change of more than 40 diopters, which is compensated by changes in corneal and lens powers. The process which maintains the balance between the ocular components of refraction during growth is still under study. As the lens power cannot be measured in vivo, but can only be calculated based on the other ocular components, there have not been many studies of lens power in humans. Yet, recent studies have confirmed that the lens loses power during growth in children, and that hyperopic and myopic shifts in adulthood may be also produced by changes in the lens. These studies in children and adults give a picture of the changing power of the lens along lifespan. Other recent studies about the growth of the lens and the complexity of its internal structure give clues about how these changes in lens power are produced along life. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. What is refractive optical bistability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzhehov, Tomislav

    1993-01-01

    The basic elements of the theory of refractive optical bistability, assuming mediums with linear absorption are given. Special attention is paid to bistable etalons of semiconductor materials an oxide glasses, since some of them are considered as promising components for optical bistability applications. The design optimization of such devices for minimum switching intensity is analyzed. Computer simulation of the transfer characteristic recording for two InSb etalons is presented. (author)

  3. Comment on ``Perfect imaging with positive refraction in three dimensions''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlin, R.

    2010-11-01

    Leonhardt and Philbin [Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.81.011804 81, 011804(R) (2010)] have recently constructed a mathematical proof that the Maxwell's fish-eye lens provides perfect imaging of electromagnetic waves without negative refraction. In this comment, we argue that the unlimited resolution is an artifact of having introduced an unphysical drain at the position of the geometrical image. The correct solution gives focusing consistent with the standard diffraction limit.

  4. Comment on ''Perfect imaging with positive refraction in three dimensions''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merlin, R.

    2010-01-01

    Leonhardt and Philbin [Phys. Rev. A 81, 011804(R) (2010)] have recently constructed a mathematical proof that the Maxwell's fish-eye lens provides perfect imaging of electromagnetic waves without negative refraction. In this comment, we argue that the unlimited resolution is an artifact of having introduced an unphysical drain at the position of the geometrical image. The correct solution gives focusing consistent with the standard diffraction limit.

  5. Polymer Compund Refractive Lenses for Hard X-ray Nanofocusing

    OpenAIRE

    Krywka, Christina; Last, Arndt; Marschall, Felix; Markus, Otto; Georgi, Sebastian; Mueller, Martin; Mohr, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Compound refractive lenses fabricated out of SU-8 negative photoresist have been used to generate a nanofocused, i.e. sub-μm sized X-ray focal spot at an X-ray nanodiffraction setup. X-ray microscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques have conceptually different demands on nanofocusing optical elements and so with the application of X-ray nanodiffraction in mind, this paper presents the results of an initial characterization of polymer lenses used as primary focusin...

  6. Anomalous refraction of light through slanted-nanoaperture arrays on metal surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Myungji; Jung, Yun Suk; Xi, Yonggang; Kim, Hong Koo

    2015-01-01

    We report a nanoapertured metal surface that demonstrates anomalous refraction of light for a wide range of incident angles. A nanoslit aperture is designed to serve as a tilted vertical-dipole whose radiation pattern orients to a glancing angle direction to substrate. An array of such slanted nanoslits formed in a metal film redirects an incident beam into the direction of negative refraction angle: the aperture-transmitted wave makes a far-field propagation to the tilt-oriented direction of radiation pattern. The thus-designed nanoaperture array demonstrates the −1st order diffraction (i.e., to the negative refraction-angle direction) with well-suppressed background transmission (the zero-order direct transmission and other higher-order diffractions). Engineering the radiation pattern of nanoaperture offers an approach to overcoming the limits of conventional diffractive/refractive optics and complementing metasurface-based nano-optics

  7. Three-dimensional ordered particulate structures: Method to retrieve characteristics from photonic band gap data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miskevich, Alexander A.; Loiko, Valery A.

    2015-01-01

    A method to retrieve characteristics of ordered particulate structures, such as photonic crystals, is proposed. It is based on the solution of the inverse problem using data on the photonic band gap (PBG). The quasicrystalline approximation (QCA) of the theory of multiple scattering of waves and the transfer matrix method (TMM) are used. Retrieval of the refractive index of particles is demonstrated. Refractive indices of the artificial opal particles are estimated using the published experimental data. - Highlights: • A method to retrieve characteristics of photonic crystals is proposed. • The method is based on the inverse problem solution using the photonic band gap data. • Retrieval of the refractive index of photonic crystal particles is demonstrated. • Retrieval results show inhomogeneous distribution of synthetic opal particle pores

  8. Photon technology. Hard photon technology; Photon technology. Hard photon gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    For the application of photon to industrial technologies, in particular, a hard photon technology was surveyed which uses photon beams of 0.1-200nm in wavelength. Its features such as selective atom reaction, dense inner shell excitation and spacial high resolution by quantum energy are expected to provide innovative techniques for various field such as fine machining, material synthesis and advanced inspection technology. This wavelength region has been hardly utilized for industrial fields because of poor development of suitable photon sources and optical devices. The developmental meaning, usable time and issue of a hard photon reduction lithography were surveyed as lithography in ultra-fine region below 0.1{mu}m. On hard photon analysis/evaluation technology, the industrial use of analysis, measurement and evaluation technologies by micro-beam was viewed, and optimum photon sources and optical systems were surveyed. Prediction of surface and surface layer modification by inner shell excitation, the future trend of this process and development of a vacuum ultraviolet light source were also surveyed. 383 refs., 153 figs., 17 tabs.

  9. Inverse photon-photon processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carimalo, C.; Crozon, M.; Kesler, P.; Parisi, J.

    1981-12-01

    We here consider inverse photon-photon processes, i.e. AB → γγX (where A, B are hadrons, in particular protons or antiprotons), at high energies. As regards the production of a γγ continuum, we show that, under specific conditions the study of such processes might provide some information on the subprocess gg γγ, involving a quark box. It is also suggested to use those processes in order to systematically look for heavy C = + structures (quarkonium states, gluonia, etc.) showing up in the γγ channel. Inverse photon-photon processes might thus become a new and fertile area of investigation in high-energy physics, provided the difficult problem of discriminating between direct photons and indirect ones can be handled in a satisfactory way

  10. Fano resonance in anodic aluminum oxide based photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Guo Liang; Fei, Guang Tao; Zhang, Yao; Yan, Peng; Xu, Shao Hui; Ouyang, Hao Miao; Zhang, Li De

    2014-01-08

    Anodic aluminum oxide based photonic crystals with periodic porous structure have been prepared using voltage compensation method. The as-prepared sample showed an ultra-narrow photonic bandgap. Asymmetric line-shape profiles of the photonic bandgaps have been observed, which is attributed to Fano resonance between the photonic bandgap state of photonic crystal and continuum scattering state of porous structure. And the exhibited Fano resonance shows more clearly when the sample is saturated ethanol gas than air-filled. Further theoretical analysis by transfer matrix method verified these results. These findings provide a better understanding on the nature of photonic bandgaps of photonic crystals made up of porous materials, in which the porous structures not only exist as layers of effective-refractive-index material providing Bragg scattering, but also provide a continuum light scattering state to interact with Bragg scattering state to show an asymmetric line-shape profile.

  11. Measurement of infrared optical constants with visible photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterova, Anna; Yang, Hongzhi; An, Chengwu; Kalashnikov, Dmitry; Krivitsky, Leonid

    2018-04-01

    We demonstrate a new scheme for infrared spectroscopy with visible light sources and detectors. The technique relies on the nonlinear interference of correlated photons, produced via spontaneous parametric down conversion in a nonlinear crystal. Visible and infrared photons are split into two paths and the infrared photons interact with the sample under study. The photons are reflected back to the crystal, resembling a conventional Michelson interferometer. Interference of the visible photons is observed and it is dependent on the phases of all three interacting photons: pump, visible and infrared. The transmission coefficient and the refractive index of the sample in the infrared range can be inferred from the interference pattern of visible photons. The method does not require the use of potentially expensive and inefficient infrared detectors and sources, it can be applied to a broad variety of samples, and it does not require a priori knowledge of sample properties in the visible range.

  12. Refractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Anna Katrine; Søberg, Martin; Lorentsen, Elise

    2016-01-01

    The book focuses on new directions in architectural research, how architects develop new knowledge through their artistic design practice, working in a field between Art and Science. What new digital potentials are there in architectural media like models and drawings and how to put words...... on artistic research? The book offers theoretical articles, picture galleries of artistic projects, and interviews with senior-researchers at the Danish Academy of Architecture in Copenhagen and their built architectural projects....

  13. Refractive errors among children, adolescents and adults attending eye clinics in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Gomez-Salazar

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To assess the proportion of refractive errors in the Mexican population that visited primary care optometry clinics in fourteen states of Mexico. METHODS: Refractive data from 676 856 patients aged 6 to 90y were collected from optometry clinics in fourteen states of Mexico between 2014 and 2015. The refractive errors were classified by the spherical equivalent (SE, as follows: sphere+½ cylinder. Myopia (SE>-0.50 D, hyperopia (SE>+0.50 D, emmetropia (-0.50≤SE≤+0.50, and astigmatism alone (cylinder≥-0.25 D. A negative cylinder was selected as a notation. RESULTS: The proportion (95% confidence interval among all of the subjects was hyperopia 21.0% (20.9-21.0, emmetropia 40.7% (40.5-40.8, myopia 24.8% (24.7-24.9 and astigmatism alone 13.5% (13.4-13.5. Myopia was the most common refractive error and frequency seemed to increase among the young population (10 to 29 years old, however, hyperopia increased among the aging population (40 to 79 years old, and astigmatism alone showed a decreasing trend with age (6 to 90y; from 19.7% to 10.8%. There was a relationship between age and all refractive errors (approximately 60%, aged 50 and older. The proportion of any clinically important refractive error was higher in males (61.2% than in females (58.3%; P<0.0001. From fourteen states that collected information, the proportion of refractive error showed variability in different geographical areas of Mexico. CONCLUSION: Myopia is the most common refractive error in the population studied. This study provides the first data on refractive error in Mexico. Further programs and studies must be developed to address the refractive errors needs of the Mexican population.

  14. Photon generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan-Rao, Triveni

    2002-01-01

    A photon generator includes an electron gun for emitting an electron beam, a laser for emitting a laser beam, and an interaction ring wherein the laser beam repetitively collides with the electron beam for emitting a high energy photon beam therefrom in the exemplary form of x-rays. The interaction ring is a closed loop, sized and configured for circulating the electron beam with a period substantially equal to the period of the laser beam pulses for effecting repetitive collisions.

  15. Refractive Surgery: Malpractice Litigation Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custer, Benjamin L; Ballard, Steven R; Carroll, Robert B; Barnes, Scott D; Justin, Grant A

    2017-10-01

    To review data on malpractice claims related to refractive surgery to identify common allegations and injuries and financial outcomes. The WestlawNext database was reviewed for all malpractice lawsuits/settlements related to refractive eye surgery. Data evaluated included patient demographics, type of operation performed, plaintiff allegation, nature of injury, and litigation outcomes. A total of 167 cases met the inclusion criteria, of which 108 cases (64.7%) were found to be favorable and 59 cases (35.3%) unfavorable to the defendant. A total of 141 cases were tried by a jury with 108 cases (76.4%) favorable and 33 cases (23.6%) unfavorable to the defendant. Laser in situ keratomileusis was performed in 127 cases (76%). The most common allegations were negligence in treatment or surgery in 127 cases (76%) and lack of informed consent in 83 cases (49.7%). For all cases, the need for future surgery (P = 0.0001) and surgery resulting in keratoconus (P = 0.05) were more likely to favor the plaintiff. In jury verdict decisions, cases in which failure to diagnose a preoperative condition was alleged favored the defendant (P = 0.03), whereas machine malfunction (P = 0.05) favored the plaintiff. After adjustment for inflation, the overall mean award was $1,287,872. Jury verdicts and settlements led to mean awards of $1,604,801 and $826,883, respectively. Malpractice litigation in refractive surgery tends to favor the defendant. However, large awards and settlements were given in cases that were favorable to the plaintiff. The need for future surgery and surgery leading to keratoconus increased the chance of an unfavorable outcome.

  16. Manipulation of photons at the surface of three-dimensional photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizaki, Kenji; Noda, Susumu

    2009-07-16

    In three-dimensional (3D) photonic crystals, refractive-index variations with a periodicity comparable to the wavelength of the light passing through the crystal give rise to so-called photonic bandgaps, which are analogous to electronic bandgaps for electrons moving in the periodic electrostatic potential of a material's crystal structure. Such 3D photonic bandgap crystals are envisioned to become fundamental building blocks for the control and manipulation of photons in optical circuits. So far, such schemes have been pursued by embedding artificial defects and light emitters inside the crystals, making use of 3D bandgap directional effects. Here we show experimentally that photons can be controlled and manipulated even at the 'surface' of 3D photonic crystals, where 3D periodicity is terminated, establishing a new and versatile route for photon manipulation. By making use of an evanescent-mode coupling technique, we demonstrate that 3D photonic crystals possess two-dimensional surface states, and we map their band structure. We show that photons can be confined and propagate through these two-dimensional surface states, and we realize their localization at arbitrary surface points by designing artificial surface-defect structures through the formation of a surface-mode gap. Surprisingly, the quality factors of the surface-defect mode are the largest reported for 3D photonic crystal nanocavities (Q up to approximately 9,000). In addition to providing a new approach for photon manipulation by photonic crystals, our findings are relevant for the generation and control of plasmon-polaritons in metals and the related surface photon physics. The absorption-free nature of the 3D photonic crystal surface may enable new sensing applications and provide routes for the realization of efficient light-matter interactions.

  17. Theory of supervirtual refraction interferometry

    KAUST Repository

    Bharadwaj, Pawan; Schuster, Gerard T.; Mallinson, Ian; Dai, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Inverting for the subsurface velocity distribution by refraction traveltime tomography is a well-accepted imaging method by both the exploration and earthquake seismology communities. A significant drawback, however, is that the recorded traces become noisier with increasing offset from the source position, and so accurate picking of traveltimes in far-offset traces is often prevented. To enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the far-offset traces, we present the theory of supervirtual refraction interferometry where the SNR of far-offset head-wave arrivals can be theoretically increased by a factor proportional to; here, N is the number of receiver or source positions associated with the recording and generation of the head-wave arrival. There are two steps to this methodology: correlation and summation of the data to generate traces with virtual head-wave arrivals, followed by the convolution of the data with the virtual traces to create traces with supervirtual head-wave arrivals. This method is valid for any medium that generates head-wave arrivals recorded by the geophones. Results with both synthetic traces and field data demonstrate the feasibility of this method. There are at least four significant benefits of supervirtual interferometry: (1) an enhanced SNR of far-offset traces so the first-arrival traveltimes of the noisy far-offset traces can be more reliably picked to extend the useful aperture of the data, (2) the SNR of head waves in a trace that arrive later than the first arrival can be enhanced for accurate traveltime picking and subsequent inversion by later-arrival traveltime tomography, (3) common receiver-pair gathers can be analysed to detect the presence of diving waves in the first arrivals, which can be used to assess the nature of the refracting boundary, and (4) the source statics term is eliminated in the correlation operations so that the timing of the virtual traces is independent of the source excitation time. This suggests the

  18. Enhanced Gain in Photonic Crystal Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ek, Sara; Semenova, Elizaveta; Hansen, Per Lunnemann

    2012-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate enhanced gain in the slow-light regime of quantum well photonic crystal amplifiers. A strong gain enhancement is observed with the increase of the group refractive index, due to light slow-down. The slow light enhancement is shown in a amplified spontaneous emission....... These results are promising for short and efficient semiconductor optical amplifiers. This effect will also benefit other devices, such as mode locked lasers....

  19. Peripheral refraction in normal infant rhesus monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Li-Fang; Ramamirtham, Ramkumar; Huang, Juan; Qiao-Grider, Ying; Smith, Earl L.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To characterize peripheral refractions in infant monkeys. Methods Cross-sectional data for horizontal refractions were obtained from 58 normal rhesus monkeys at 3 weeks of age. Longitudinal data were obtained for both the vertical and horizontal meridians from 17 monkeys. Refractive errors were measured by retinoscopy along the pupillary axis and at eccentricities of 15, 30, and 45 degrees. Axial dimensions and corneal power were measured by ultrasonography and keratometry, respectively. Results In infant monkeys, the degree of radial astigmatism increased symmetrically with eccentricity in all meridians. There were, however, initial nasal-temporal and superior-inferior asymmetries in the spherical-equivalent refractive errors. Specifically, the refractions in the temporal and superior fields were similar to the central ametropia, but the refractions in the nasal and inferior fields were more myopic than the central ametropia and the relative nasal field myopia increased with the degree of central hyperopia. With age, the degree of radial astigmatism decreased in all meridians and the refractions became more symmetrical along both the horizontal and vertical meridians; small degrees of relative myopia were evident in all fields. Conclusions As in adult humans, refractive error varied as a function of eccentricity in infant monkeys and the pattern of peripheral refraction varied with the central refractive error. With age, emmetropization occurred for both central and peripheral refractive errors resulting in similar refractions across the central 45 degrees of the visual field, which may reflect the actions of vision-dependent, growth-control mechanisms operating over a wide area of the posterior globe. PMID:18487366

  20. Peripheral refractive correction and automated perimetric profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, J M; Wood, J M; Crews, S J

    1988-06-01

    The effect of peripheral refractive error correction on the automated perimetric sensitivity profile was investigated on a sample of 10 clinically normal, experienced observers. Peripheral refractive error was determined at eccentricities of 0 degree, 20 degrees and 40 degrees along the temporal meridian of the right eye using the Canon Autoref R-1, an infra-red automated refractor, under the parametric conditions of the Octopus automated perimeter. Perimetric sensitivity was then undertaken at these eccentricities (stimulus sizes 0 and III) with and without the appropriate peripheral refractive correction using the Octopus 201 automated perimeter. Within the measurement limits of the experimental procedures employed, perimetric sensitivity was not influenced by peripheral refractive correction.

  1. Fiber optic refractive index sensor using optofluidic anti-resonant reflecting guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ran; Lu, Danfeng; Cheng, Jin; Qi, Zhi-mei

    2017-10-01

    An optofluidic anti-resonant reflecting guidance has been proposed and experimental demonstrated for the measurement of liquid refractive index. Two micro-channels were fabricated for the delivery of the liquid sample in the hollow core photonic crystal fiber by using femtosecond laser micromachining, serving as an inlet and outlet. The refractive index can be detected by using the resonant condition of the Fabry-Perot resonator, which is interrogated through the wavelength shift and of the lossy dip in the transmission spectrum. The experimental results show that the sensitivity of up to 1328 nm/RIU is achieved for the refractive index in the range from 1.345 to 1.363 RIU, respectively. The proposed sensor appears to have potential applications of precise measurement in chemistry, medicine, and biology.

  2. Determination of the refractive index of n+- and p-type porous Si samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setzu, S.; Romestain, R.; Chamard, V.

    2004-01-01

    Photochemical etching of porous Si layers has been shown to be able to create micrometer or submicrometer-scale lateral gratings very promising for photonic applications. However, the reduced size of this lateral periodicity hinders standard measurements of refractive index variations. Therefore accurate characterizations of such gratings are usually difficult. In this paper we address this problem by reproducing on a larger scale (millimeter) the micrometer scale light-induced refractive index variations associated to the lateral periodicity. Using this procedure we perform standard X-ray and optical reflectivity measurements on our samples. One can then proceed to the determination of light-induced variations of porosity and refractive index. We present results for p-type samples, where the photo-dissolution can only be realized after the formation of the porous layer, as well as for n + -type samples, where light action can only be effective during the formation of the porous layer

  3. [Complications after refractive surgery abroad].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzi, E; Kern, T; Kohnen, T

    2008-05-01

    In this article a retrospective analysis of patients presenting at a German university following refractive surgery abroad is presented. A total of 20 cases of patients who had undergone treatment between 1998 and 2006 in China (1 case), Greece (1 case), Iran (1 case), Russia (2 cases), Switzerland (1 case), Slovakia (1 case), Spain (2 cases), South Africa (3 cases), Turkey (6 cases) and the USA (2 cases) were analyzed retrospectively. The following complications were observed: epithelial ingrowth into the interface with or without melting of the flap (6 cases), corneal ectasia (2 cases), dislocation of a phakic posterior chamber intraocular lens and prolapse into the anterior chamber with endothelial cell loss (1 case), secondary increase of intraocular pressure following implantation of a phakic intraocular lens (1 case), flap-related complications following laser-in-situ keratomileusis (LASIK) (2 cases), keratitis (1 case), dislocation of the complete flap (1 case), diffuse lamellar keratitis (DLK) grade IV (1 case), hyperopia as a consequence of radial keratotomy (1 case), and under correction/over correction and poor optical quality following laser epithelial keratomileusis (LASEK) and LASIK for high myopia (5 cases) with possible early corneal ectasia. There are four important problems arising from refractive surgery abroad, often referred to as "LASIK tourism": wrong indications, insufficient management of complications, lack of postoperative care and the health economic aspect.

  4. Image distortion due to refraction by planar surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arizaga, R; Cap, N; Rabal, H; Trivi, M

    2010-01-01

    The term 'apparent depth' is commonly treated in textbooks as an issue easily understandable from the point of view of paraxial optical geometrical optics. Nevertheless, everyday life tells us that most of the time the observation of objects immersed in water is made under a great range of visual angles where the paraxial approximation is not valid. Here we developed a non-paraxial treatment to calculate the position and shape of the image of objects immersed in liquids of different refractive indices. The approach was focused on the parametric positions of the images of a single point at different viewing angles. Then we calculated how the image of an extended object is distorted. By using the Matlab software, it is possible to visualize the images for different geometrical conditions. We also include the analysis for refractive index with negative values as is the case of metamaterials.

  5. Image distortion due to refraction by planar surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arizaga, R; Cap, N; Rabal, H; Trivi, M [Centro de Investigaciones Opticas (CONICET La Plata-CIC) and OPTIMO Dto de Ciencias Basicas, Fac. de Ingenieria UNLP, PO Box 3, 1897 Gonnet, La Plata (Argentina)

    2010-01-15

    The term 'apparent depth' is commonly treated in textbooks as an issue easily understandable from the point of view of paraxial optical geometrical optics. Nevertheless, everyday life tells us that most of the time the observation of objects immersed in water is made under a great range of visual angles where the paraxial approximation is not valid. Here we developed a non-paraxial treatment to calculate the position and shape of the image of objects immersed in liquids of different refractive indices. The approach was focused on the parametric positions of the images of a single point at different viewing angles. Then we calculated how the image of an extended object is distorted. By using the Matlab software, it is possible to visualize the images for different geometrical conditions. We also include the analysis for refractive index with negative values as is the case of metamaterials.

  6. Optofluidic and photothermal control of InGaAsP photonic crystal nanocavities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dundar, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    A photonic crystal (PhC), which is an artificial material with a periodic modulation of the refractive index, provides an ultimate miniaturization of photonic devices since it can influence the flow of light on the optical wavelength scale. A particular useful device is the PhC cavity. It can be

  7. A study on new types of metallic photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, M.I.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, I tried to synthesize a one dimension dielectric photonic crystal. I have succeeded in depositing single layers of zinc oxide and magnesium oxide on glass substrates. Each single layer was characterized by a scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, A Mirue interferometer, and a spectrophotometer. The refractive indices, extinction coefficients, and absorption coefficients of each single layer were calculated from the measured transmittance, reflectance, and thickness data. Using the calculated parameters (refractive indices) and measured parameters (thicknesses) the transmission spectrum of the one dimension photonic crystal composed of zinc oxide and magnesium oxide was modelled. Using the transfer matrix method, a comparative study of the one dimension-dielectric and metallic photonic crystals was done. Effect of the refractive index difference, filling factor, number of periods, Plasmon frequency, damping coefficient, and incidence angle on the transmittance of the dielectric and metallic photonic crystal was carried out. A multilayered structure composed of Silver and Gallium Nitride was designed to transmit in the visible region, block UV frequencies, and reflect the IR and microwave frequencies. Using a combination of MaxwellGarnett Approximation and the transfer matrix method; the properties of a nanocomposite photonic crystal consisting of Cryolite and spherical nanoparticles of silver distributed in a dielectric matrix of titanium dioxide was studied. Effect of the nanoparticle concentration, lattice constant and incidence angle on the polaritonic and structure photonic band gap were studied.

  8. Questionnaires for Measuring Refractive Surgery Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, Himal; Khadka, Jyoti; Lundström, Mats; Goggin, Michael; Pesudovs, Konrad

    2017-06-01

    To identify the questionnaires used to assess refractive surgery outcomes, assess the available questionnaires in regard to their psychometric properties, validity, and reliability, and evaluate the performance of the available questionnaires in measuring refractive surgery outcomes. An extensive literature search was done on PubMed, MEDLINE, Scopus, CINAHL, Cochrane, and Web of Science databases to identify articles that described or used at least one questionnaire to assess refractive surgery outcomes. The information on content quality, validity, reliability, responsiveness, and psychometric properties was extracted and analyzed based on an extensive set of quality criteria. Eighty-one articles describing 27 questionnaires (12 refractive error-specific, including 4 refractive surgery-specific, 7 vision-but-non-refractive, and 8 generic) were included in the review. Most articles (56, 69.1%) described refractive error-specific questionnaires. The Quality of Life Impact of Refractive Correction (QIRC), the Quality of Vision (QoV), and the Near Activity Visual Questionnaire (NAVQ) were originally constructed using Rasch analysis; others were developed using the Classical Test Theory. The National Eye Institute Refractive Quality of Life questionnaire was the most frequently used questionnaire, but it does not provide a valid measurement. The QoV, QIRC, and NAVQ are the three best existing questionnaires to assess visual symptoms, quality of life, and activity limitations, respectively. This review identified three superior quality questionnaires for measuring different aspects of quality of life in refractive surgery. Clinicians and researchers should choose a questionnaire based on the concept being measured with superior psychometric properties. [J Refract Surg. 2017;33(6):416-424.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Single-mode optical waveguides on native high-refractive-index substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard R. Grote

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available High-refractive-index semiconductor optical waveguides form the basis for modern photonic integrated circuits (PICs. However, conventional methods for achieving optical confinement require a thick lower-refractive-index support layer that impedes large-scale co-integration with electronics and limits the materials on which PICs can be fabricated. To address this challenge, we present a general architecture for single-mode waveguides that confine light in a high-refractive-index material on a native substrate. The waveguide consists of a high-aspect-ratio fin of the guiding material surrounded by lower-refractive-index dielectrics and is compatible with standard top-down fabrication techniques. This letter describes a physically intuitive, semi-analytical, effective index model for designing fin waveguides, which is confirmed with fully vectorial numerical simulations. Design examples are presented for diamond and silicon at visible and telecommunications wavelengths, respectively, along with calculations of propagation loss due to bending, scattering, and substrate leakage. Potential methods of fabrication are also discussed. The proposed waveguide geometry allows PICs to be fabricated alongside silicon CMOS electronics on the same wafer, removes the need for heteroepitaxy in III-V PICs, and will enable wafer-scale photonic integration on emerging material platforms such as diamond and SiC.

  10. Quantum photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Pearsall, Thomas P

    2017-01-01

    This textbook employs a pedagogical approach that facilitates access to the fundamentals of Quantum Photonics. It contains an introductory description of the quantum properties of photons through the second quantization of the electromagnetic field, introducing stimulated and spontaneous emission of photons at the quantum level. Schrödinger’s equation is used to describe the behavior of electrons in a one-dimensional potential. Tunneling through a barrier is used to introduce the concept of non­locality of an electron at the quantum level, which is closely-related to quantum confinement tunneling, resonant tunneling, and the origin of energy bands in both periodic (crystalline) and aperiodic (non-crystalline) materials. Introducing the concepts of reciprocal space, Brillouin zones, and Bloch’s theorem, the determination of electronic band structure using the pseudopotential method is presented, allowing direct computation of the band structures of most group IV, group III-V, and group II-VI semiconducto...

  11. Study of the refractive index of gasoline+alcohol pseudo-binary mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nita Irina

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The properties of gasoline change as a result of blending with a bioalcohol, affecting the behavior of the pseudo-binary system. The aim of this paper is to present experimental data of the refractive index for pseudobinary mixtures of a reformate gasoline with ethanol, isopropanol and n-butanol over the entire composition range and for temperature ranging from 293.15 K to 313.15 K. The accuracy of different equations to predict the refractive index of the mixtures was tested. The best prediction accuracy (the lower AAD corresponded to Eykman and Lorentz-Lorenz mixing rules. A logarithmic equation proposed to correlate the refractive index with composition and temperature of gasoline+alcohol mixtures showed a good accuracy (the absolute average deviation AAD < 0.052%. The deviations in refractive index for investigated systems are negative over the entire composition range and at all investigated temperatures.

  12. One-step patterning of double tone high contrast and high refractive index inorganic spin-on resist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanchetta, E.; Della Giustina, G.; Brusatin, G. [Industrial Engineering Department and INSTM, Via Marzolo 9, 35131 Padova (Italy)

    2014-09-14

    A direct one-step and low temperature micro-fabrication process, enabling to realize large area totally inorganic TiO₂ micro-patterns from a spin-on resist, is presented. High refractive index structures (up to 2 at 632 nm) without the need for transfer processes have been obtained by mask assisted UV lithography, exploiting photocatalytic titania properties. A distinctive feature not shared by any of the known available resists and boosting the material versatility, is that the system behaves either as a positive or as negative tone resist, depending on the process parameters and on the development chemistry. In order to explain the resist double tone behavior, deep comprehension of the lithographic process parameters optimization and of the resist chemistry and structure evolution during the lithographic process, generally uncommon in literature, is reported. Another striking property of the presented resist is that the negative tone shows a high contrast up to 19, allowing to obtain structures resolution down to 2 μm wide. The presented process and material permit to directly fabricate different titania geometries of great importance for solar cells, photo-catalysis, and photonic crystals applications.

  13. Green photonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quan, Frederic

    2012-01-01

    Photonics, the broad merger of electronics with the optical sciences, encompasses such a wide swath of technology that its impact is almost universal in our everyday lives. This is a broad overview of some aspects of the industry and their contribution to the ‘green’ or environmental movement. The rationale for energy conservation is briefly discussed and the impact of photonics on our everyday lives and certain industries is described. Some opinions from industry are presented along with market estimates. References are provided to some of the most recent research in these areas. (review article)

  14. REFRACTIVE ERROR STATUS IN BAYELSA STATE, NIGERIA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    LIVINGSTON

    deepening poverty because of their inability to see well” . In 2002, the .... all the refractions) and other health workers. During the period .... To the best of our knowledge, there is no ... 2020 and eliminate uncorrected refractive error within the ...

  15. Microstructured optical fiber refractive index sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Town, Graham E.; McCosker, Ravi; Yuan, Scott Wu

    2010-01-01

    We describe a dual-core microstructured optical fiber designed for refractive index sensing of fluids. We show that by using the exponential dependence of intercore coupling on analyte refractive index, both large range and high sensitivity can be achieved in the one device. We also show...

  16. Measurements of photoinduced refractive index changes in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We report the pump–probe measurements of nonlinear refractive index changes in photochromic bacteriorhodopsin films. The photoinduced absorption is caused by pump beam at 532 nm and the accompanying refractive index changes are studied using a probe beam at 633 nm. The proposed technique is ...

  17. 3D super-virtual refraction interferometry

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Kai; AlTheyab, Abdullah; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2014-01-01

    Super-virtual refraction interferometry enhances the signal-to-noise ratio of far-offset refractions. However, when applied to 3D cases, traditional 2D SVI suffers because the stationary positions of the source-receiver pairs might be any place

  18. Infrared photon-echo spectroscopy of water : The thermalization effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.; Yeremenko, Sergey; Wiersma, Douwe A.; Kobayashi, Takayoshi; Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Nelson, Keith A.; Okada, Tadashi; Silvestri, Sandro De

    2005-01-01

    The larger part of the nonlinear response in IR photon-echo and transient-grating spectroscopy on HDO-D2O mixtures at > 1-ps delays is found to originate from the D2O refractive index modulation due to local volume thermalization.

  19. Mechanism of photonic band gap, optical properties, tuning and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiwari, A.; Johri, M.

    2006-05-01

    Mechanism of occurrence of Photonic Band Gap (PBG) is presented for 3-D structure using close packed face centered cubic lattice. Concepts and our work, specifically optical properties of 3-D photonic crystal, relative width, filling fraction, effective refractive index, alternative mechanism of photonic band gap scattering strength and dielectric contrast, effect of fluctuations and minimum refractive index contrast, are reported. The temperature tuning and anisotropy of nematic and ferroelectric liquid crystal infiltrated opal for different phase transitions are given. Effective dielectric constant with filling fraction using Maxwell Garnet theory (MG), multiple modified Maxwell Garnet (MMMG) and Effective Medium theory (EM) and results are compared with experiment to understand the occurrence of PBG. Our calculations of Lamb shifts including fluctuations are given and compared with those of literature values. We have also done band structure calculations including anisotropy and compared isotropic characteristic of liquid crystal. A possibility of lowest refractive index contrast useful for the fabrication of PBG is given. Our calculations for relative width as a function of refractive index contrast are reported and comparisons with existing theoretical and experimental optimal values are briefed. Applications of photonic crystals are summarized. The investigations conducted on PBG materials and reported here may pave the way for understanding the challenges in the field of PBG. (author)

  20. Creating aperiodic photonic structures by synthesized Mathieu-Gauss beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiljević, Jadranka M.; Zannotti, Alessandro; Timotijević, Dejan V.; Denz, Cornelia; Savić, Dragana M. Jović

    2017-08-01

    We demonstrate a kind of aperiodic photonic structure realized using the interference of multiple Mathieu-Gauss beams. Depending on the beam configurations, their mutual distances, angles of rotation, or phase relations we are able to observe different classes of such aperiodic optically induced refractive index structures. Our experimental approach is based on the optical induction in a single parallel writing process.

  1. Quantum aspects of photon propagation in transparent infinite homogeneous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nistor, Rudolf Emil

    2008-01-01

    The energy balance photon - medium, during the light travelling, through a specific continuous interaction between a single photon and a homogeneous, infinite medium (fully ionized plasma or a transparent dielectric), was studied. We obtained a wave equation for the interacting photon. To explain the interaction in quantum terms, we assume a certain photon - medium interaction energy, macroscopically materialized by the existence of the refractive index. It turns out that the interaction is of a scalar type, for vanishing rest mass and of spin 1 particle submitted both to scalar and vectorial fields. We found out an expression of the propagation equation of the photon through a non-dissipative medium, using a coupling between the photon spin S vector and the scalar interaction field ( E S vector,H S vector). (authors)

  2. Refractive regression after laser in situ keratomileusis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Mabel K; Chang, John Sm; Chan, Tommy Cy

    2018-04-26

    Uncorrected refractive errors are a leading cause of visual impairment across the world. In today's society, laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) has become the most commonly performed surgical procedure to correct refractive errors. However, regression of the initially achieved refractive correction has been a widely observed phenomenon following LASIK since its inception more than two decades ago. Despite technological advances in laser refractive surgery and various proposed management strategies, post-LASIK regression is still frequently observed and has significant implications for the long-term visual performance and quality of life of patients. This review explores the mechanism of refractive regression after both myopic and hyperopic LASIK, predisposing risk factors and its clinical course. In addition, current preventative strategies and therapies are also reviewed. © 2018 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  3. Engineering of refractive index in sulfide chalcogenide glass by direct laser writing

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yaping

    2010-01-01

    Arsenic trisulfide (As2S3) glass is an interesting material for photonic integrated circuits (PICs) as infrared (IR) or nonlinear optical components. In this paper, direct laser writing was applied to engineer the refractive index of As2S3 thin film. Film samples were exposed to focused above bandgap light with wavelength at 405 nm using different fluence adjusted by laser power and exposure time. The index of refraction before and after laser irradiation was calculated by fitting the experimental data obtained from Spectroscopic Ellipsometer (SE) measurement to Tauc-Lorenz dispersion formula. A positive change in refractive index (Δn = 0.19 at 1.55 μm) as well as an enhancement in anisotropy was achieved in As2S3 film by using 10 mW, 0.3 μs laser irradiation. With further increasing the fluence, refractive index increased while anisotropic property weakened. Due to the rapid and large photo-induced modification of refractive index obtainable with high spatial resolution, this process is promising for integrated optic device fabrication.

  4. Photon Differentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjøth, Lars; Frisvad, Jeppe Revall; Erleben, Kenny

    2007-01-01

    illumination features. This is often not desirable as these may lose clarity or vanish altogether. We present an accurate method for reconstruction of indirect illumination with photon mapping. Instead of reconstructing illumination using classic density estimation on finite points, we use the correlation...

  5. Photon Rao

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Volume 2 Issue 5 May 1997 pp 69-72 Feature Article. Molecule of the Month Molecular–Chameleon: Solvatochromism at its Iridescent Best! Photon Rao · More Details Fulltext PDF. Volume 16 Issue 12 December 2011 pp 1303-1306. Molecule of the Month - Molecular-Chameleon: Solvatochromism at its Iridescent Best!

  6. Fully 3D refraction correction dosimetry system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manjappa, Rakesh; Makki, S Sharath; Kanhirodan, Rajan; Kumar, Rajesh; Vasu, Ram Mohan

    2016-01-01

    The irradiation of selective regions in a polymer gel dosimeter results in an increase in optical density and refractive index (RI) at those regions. An optical tomography-based dosimeter depends on rayline path through the dosimeter to estimate and reconstruct the dose distribution. The refraction of light passing through a dose region results in artefacts in the reconstructed images. These refraction errors are dependant on the scanning geometry and collection optics. We developed a fully 3D image reconstruction algorithm, algebraic reconstruction technique-refraction correction (ART-rc) that corrects for the refractive index mismatches present in a gel dosimeter scanner not only at the boundary, but also for any rayline refraction due to multiple dose regions inside the dosimeter. In this study, simulation and experimental studies have been carried out to reconstruct a 3D dose volume using 2D CCD measurements taken for various views. The study also focuses on the effectiveness of using different refractive-index matching media surrounding the gel dosimeter. Since the optical density is assumed to be low for a dosimeter, the filtered backprojection is routinely used for reconstruction. We carry out the reconstructions using conventional algebraic reconstruction (ART) and refractive index corrected ART (ART-rc) algorithms. The reconstructions based on FDK algorithm for cone-beam tomography has also been carried out for comparison. Line scanners and point detectors, are used to obtain reconstructions plane by plane. The rays passing through dose region with a RI mismatch does not reach the detector in the same plane depending on the angle of incidence and RI. In the fully 3D scanning setup using 2D array detectors, light rays that undergo refraction are still collected and hence can still be accounted for in the reconstruction algorithm. It is found that, for the central region of the dosimeter, the usable radius using ART-rc algorithm with water as RI matched

  7. Fully 3D refraction correction dosimetry system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjappa, Rakesh; Makki, S Sharath; Kumar, Rajesh; Vasu, Ram Mohan; Kanhirodan, Rajan

    2016-02-21

    The irradiation of selective regions in a polymer gel dosimeter results in an increase in optical density and refractive index (RI) at those regions. An optical tomography-based dosimeter depends on rayline path through the dosimeter to estimate and reconstruct the dose distribution. The refraction of light passing through a dose region results in artefacts in the reconstructed images. These refraction errors are dependant on the scanning geometry and collection optics. We developed a fully 3D image reconstruction algorithm, algebraic reconstruction technique-refraction correction (ART-rc) that corrects for the refractive index mismatches present in a gel dosimeter scanner not only at the boundary, but also for any rayline refraction due to multiple dose regions inside the dosimeter. In this study, simulation and experimental studies have been carried out to reconstruct a 3D dose volume using 2D CCD measurements taken for various views. The study also focuses on the effectiveness of using different refractive-index matching media surrounding the gel dosimeter. Since the optical density is assumed to be low for a dosimeter, the filtered backprojection is routinely used for reconstruction. We carry out the reconstructions using conventional algebraic reconstruction (ART) and refractive index corrected ART (ART-rc) algorithms. The reconstructions based on FDK algorithm for cone-beam tomography has also been carried out for comparison. Line scanners and point detectors, are used to obtain reconstructions plane by plane. The rays passing through dose region with a RI mismatch does not reach the detector in the same plane depending on the angle of incidence and RI. In the fully 3D scanning setup using 2D array detectors, light rays that undergo refraction are still collected and hence can still be accounted for in the reconstruction algorithm. It is found that, for the central region of the dosimeter, the usable radius using ART-rc algorithm with water as RI matched

  8. Refractive index of silica aerogel: Uniformity and dispersion law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellunato, T.; Calvi, M.; Matteuzzi, C.; Musy, M.; Perego, D.L.; Storaci, B.

    2008-01-01

    Two methods for the measurement of the uniformity of the refractive index n within a single block of silica aerogel are described. One is based on the deflection of a laser beam induced by transverse index gradients. The second exploits the Cherenkov effect, measuring the emission angle of photons radiated by 500 MeV electrons traversing the aerogel. The beam can scan the full aerogel surface providing information on point to point variations of n. The measurement of the dispersion law n(λ) is also reported. An Xe lamp coupled to a diffraction grating provides the monochromatic source. The index for each λ is measured by the prism method at a corner of an aerogel sample. A Sellmeier functional form for n(λ) is assumed, and the parameters best fitting the experimental data are given

  9. A bright single-photon source based on a photonic trumpet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munsch, Mathieu; Malik, Nitin S.; Bleuse, Joël

    Fiber-like photonic nanowires, which are optical waveguides made of a high refractive index material n, have recently emerged as non-resonant systems providing an efficient spontaneous emission (SE) control. When they embed a quantum emitter like a quantum dot (QD), they find application to the r......Fiber-like photonic nanowires, which are optical waveguides made of a high refractive index material n, have recently emerged as non-resonant systems providing an efficient spontaneous emission (SE) control. When they embed a quantum emitter like a quantum dot (QD), they find application...... to the realization of bright sources of quantum light and, reversibly, provide an efficient interface between propagating photons and the QD. For a wire diameter ∼ λ/n (λ is the operation wavelength), the fraction of QD SE coupled to the fundamental guided mode exceeds 90%. The collection of the photons can...... be brought close to unity with a proper engineering of the wire ends. In particular, a tapering of the top wire end is necessary to achieve a directive far-field emission pattern [1]. Recently, we have realized a single-photon source featuring a needle-like taper. The source efficiency, though record...

  10. Quasi-D-shaped optical fiber plasmonic refractive index sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Guowen; Li, Shuguang; Wang, Haiyang; Zhang, Xuenan; Yan, Xin

    2018-03-01

    A quasi-D-shaped photonic crystal fiber plasmonic sensor with a rectangular lattice is proposed by using Au as a plasmonic layer and graphene to enhance the sensing performance. By moving the core to the edge of the fiber, a shorter polishing depth is achieved, which makes the fiber proposed have a greater mechanical strength than other common D-shaped fibers. Benefiting from the natural advantage of the rectangular lattice, the dual sensing channels make the proposed sensor show a maximum wavelength interrogation sensitivity of 3877 nm/RIU with the dynamic refractive index range from 1.33 to 1.42 and a maximum amplitude sensitivity of 1236 RIU-1 with the analyte RI = 1.41 in the visible region. The corresponding resolutions are 2.58 × 10-5 and 8.1 × 10-6 with the methods of the wavelength interrogation method and amplitude- or phase-based method. These advantages make the proposed sensor a competitive candidate for biosensing in the field of refractive index detection, such as water quality analysis, clinical medicine detection, and pharmaceutical testing.

  11. Dark refraction shift with allowance for astigmatism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.D.H. Gillan

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To show that the dark refraction shift (dark focus is a more complicated phenomenon than implied when presented as spherical. Methods: Fifty autorefractor measurements of refractive state of the right eye were obtained in light  and  dark  conditions.  Multivariate  methods were used to analyze the data and stereo-pair scat-ter plots, polar meridional profiles and other means of presenting results are used to show important characteristics of the dark refraction shift. Results: The complexity of the dark refrac-tion shift is indicated by stereo-pair scatter plots showing the amount of stigmatic and antistigmatic variation that occurs in light and dark conditions. The mean dark refraction shift is presented in a complete manner including all three components of refractive state. The greater variance and covari-ance under dark conditions is clearly shown by the term-by-term dark-light variance-covariance ratio and polar profiles  of variance and covariance.Conclusions: The  dark  refraction  shift  is  a more complicated phenomenon than implied by representations as purely spherical in nature.

  12. Photon Collider Physics with Real Photon Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gronberg, J; Asztalos, S

    2005-01-01

    Photon-photon interactions have been an important probe into fundamental particle physics. Until recently, the only way to produce photon-photon collisions was parasitically in the collision of charged particles. Recent advances in short-pulse laser technology have made it possible to consider producing high intensity, tightly focused beams of real photons through Compton scattering. A linear e + e - collider could thus be transformed into a photon-photon collider with the addition of high power lasers. In this paper they show that it is possible to make a competitive photon-photon collider experiment using the currently mothballed Stanford Linear Collider. This would produce photon-photon collisions in the GeV energy range which would allow the discovery and study of exotic heavy mesons with spin states of zero and two

  13. Directly patternable high refractive index ferroelectric sol–gel resist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garoli, D., E-mail: denis.garoli@iit.it [Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Morego 16, 16136 Genova (Italy); Della Giustina, G. [Industrial Engineering Department, University of Padova and INSTM, Via Marzolo 9, 35131 Padova (Italy)

    2015-08-15

    The development of a ferroelectric negative tone sol–gel resist for Ultraviolet (UV) and Electron Beam (EB) lithography is presented. A new system based on Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT, with formula PbZr{sub 0.52}Ti{sub 0.48}O{sub 3}) was synthesized by sol–gel method. The lithographic performances were investigated and several structures spanning from the micron range down to less than 50 nm have been achieved by UV and EB lithography. The system interaction with UV light and Electron beam was thoroughly characterized by FT-IT spectroscopy. The exposed PZT was annealed at high temperatures in order to study the crystalline phase evolution, the optical constants values and stability of patterned structures. After exposure and annealing, the refractive index of the material can vary from 1.68 up to 2.33 (@400 nm), while the ferroelectric behaviour seems to be maintained after high temperature annealing. These results suggest a possible application of PZT resist not only as ferroelectric but also as nanopatternable high refractive index material. Moreover, direct nanopatterning by means of Focused Ion Beam (FIB) lithography was verified and the potentiality for the preparation of high aspect ratio hollow nanostructures will be presented. - Highlights: • A new formula directly patternable PZT high refractive index resist is presented. • The gel is sensitive to both UV and electron beam exposure. • The refractive index can vary from 1.68 up to 2.33 (@400 nm). • Direct nanopatterning by means of Focused Ion Beam (FIB) lithography was verified. • High aspect ratio hollow nanostructures will be presented.

  14. Measurement of the Nuclear Dependence of Direct Photon and Neutral Meson Production at High Transverse Momentum by Negative 515-GeV/c Pions Incident on Beryllium and Copper Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorrell, Lee Ronald [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    1995-01-01

    The nuclear dependence of inclusive direct photon production and inclusive neutral meson production by a 515 GeV/c $\\pi^-$ beam has been measured using data collected by the E706 experiment during the 19.90 fixed, target run at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The experiment utilized a finely segmented liquid argon calorimeter and a high precision charged particle spectrometer to make precision measurements of inclusive direct photon, neutral pion, and $\\eta$ production in the rapidity interval from -0.75 < $y$ < 0.75. The $\\pi^0$ data is reported for the $P_T$ range from 0.6 GeV /c to 12 GeV /c, while the $\\eta$ data is reported for the range from 3.5 GeV /c to 7.0 GeV /c. The direct photon nuclear dependence results are reported for the range from approxlmately 4.0 GeV/c to 8.5 GeV/c. The data from the beryllium and copper targets have been fit using the parameterization $\\sigma_A$ = $\\sigma_0$ x $A^{\\alpha}$. The neutral meson results are in good agreement with previous charged meson results. The direct photon results are consistent with no anomalous enhancement.

  15. Infrared transparent graphene heater for silicon photonic integrated circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schall, Daniel; Mohsin, Muhammad; Sagade, Abhay A; Otto, Martin; Chmielak, Bartos; Suckow, Stephan; Giesecke, Anna Lena; Neumaier, Daniel; Kurz, Heinrich

    2016-04-18

    Thermo-optical tuning of the refractive index is one of the pivotal operations performed in integrated silicon photonic circuits for thermal stabilization, compensation of fabrication tolerances, and implementation of photonic operations. Currently, heaters based on metal wires provide the temperature control in the silicon waveguide. The strong interaction of metal and light, however, necessitates a certain gap between the heater and the photonic structure to avoid significant transmission loss. Here we present a graphene heater that overcomes this constraint and enables an energy efficient tuning of the refractive index. We achieve a tuning power as low as 22 mW per free spectral range and fast response time of 3 µs, outperforming metal based waveguide heaters. Simulations support the experimental results and suggest that for graphene heaters the spacing to the silicon can be further reduced yielding the best possible energy efficiency and operation speed.

  16. Wave refraction and backward magnon-plasmon polaritons in left-handed antiferromagnet/semiconductor superlattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarkhanyan, R.H.; Niarchos, D.G.

    2007-01-01

    Characteristics of the bulk electromagnetic waves in teraHertz frequency region are examined in a left-handed superlattice (SL) which consists of alternating layers of nonmagnetic semiconductor and nonconducting antiferromagnetic materials. General problem on the sign of the refractive index for anisotropic media is considered. It is shown that the phase refraction index is always positive while the group refractive index can be negative when some general conditions are fulfilled. Effective permittivity and permeability tensors of the SL are derived for perpendicular and parallel orientation of the magnetic anisotropy axis with respect to the plane of the layers. Problem of anomalous refraction for transverse electric and transverse magnetic-type polarized waves is examined in such media. Analytical expressions for both the phase and group refractive indices are obtained for various propagated modes. It is shown that, in general, three different types of the refracted waves with different relative orientation of the phase and group velocity vectors are possible in left-handed media. Unusual peculiarities of the backward modes corresponding to the coupled magnon-plasmon polaritons are considered. It is shown, in particular, that the number of the backward modes depends on the free charge carrier's density in semiconductor layers, variation of which allows to create different frequency regions for the wave propagation

  17. Understanding refraction contrast using a comparison of absorption and refraction computed tomographic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebe, S.; Rhoades, G.; Wei, Z.; Rosenberg, A.; Belev, G.; Chapman, D.

    2013-05-01

    Refraction x-ray contrast is an imaging modality used primarily in a research setting at synchrotron facilities, which have a biomedical imaging research program. The most common method for exploiting refraction contrast is by using a technique called Diffraction Enhanced Imaging (DEI). The DEI apparatus allows the detection of refraction between two materials and produces a unique ''edge enhanced'' contrast appearance, very different from the traditional absorption x-ray imaging used in clinical radiology. In this paper we aim to explain the features of x-ray refraction contrast as a typical clinical radiologist would understand. Then a discussion regarding what needs to be considered in the interpretation of the refraction image takes place. Finally we present a discussion about the limitations of planar refraction imaging and the potential of DEI Computed Tomography. This is an original work that has not been submitted to any other source for publication. The authors have no commercial interests or conflicts of interest to disclose.

  18. REFractions: The Representing Equivalent Fractions Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Stephen I.

    2014-01-01

    Stephen Tucker presents a fractions game that addresses a range of fraction concepts including equivalence and computation. The REFractions game also improves students' fluency with representing, comparing and adding fractions.

  19. Intelligent Planning for Laser Refractive Surgeries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Yue, Yong; Elsheikh, Ahmed; Bao, Fangjun

    2018-02-01

    Refractive error is one of leading ophthalmic diseases for both genders all over the world. Laser refractive correction surgery, e.g., laser in-situ keratomileusis (LASIK), has been commonly used worldwide. The prediction of surgical parameters, e.g., corneal ablation depth, depends on the doctor’s experience, theoretical formula and surgery reference manual in the preoperative diagnosis. The error of prediction may present a potential surgical risk and complication. Being aware of the surgery parameters is important because these can be used to estimate a patient’s post-operative visual quality and help the surgeon plan a suitable treatment. Therefore, in this paper we discuss data mining techniques that can be utilized for the prediction of laser refractive correction surgery parameters. It can provide the surgeon with a reference for possible surgical parameters and outcomes of the patient before the laser refractive correction surgery.

  20. Development of a subjective refraction simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perches, S.; Ares, J.; Collados, M. V.

    2013-11-01

    We have developed simulation software by Matlab (MathworksInc.) with a graphical interface designed for non-expert users. This simulator allows you to complete the process of subjective refraction starting from the aberrometry of the patients and analyse the influence of different factors during the exam. In addition to explain the graphical interface and its working, we show two examples about a complete process of subjective refraction with the influence of high order aberrations and without them showing the retinal image obtained in each step of the refraction process. When the Jackson Cross-Cylinder technique is made with this software, it becomes clear the difficulty of chosen between two images when high order aberrations are present. Therefore, the variability of response during the refraction can be a problem when the examiner has to reach an adequate optical prescription.

  1. Isaac Newton and the astronomical refraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehn, Waldemar H

    2008-12-01

    In a short interval toward the end of 1694, Isaac Newton developed two mathematical models for the theory of the astronomical refraction and calculated two refraction tables, but did not publish his theory. Much effort has been expended, starting with Biot in 1836, in the attempt to identify the methods and equations that Newton used. In contrast to previous work, a closed form solution is identified for the refraction integral that reproduces the table for his first model (in which density decays linearly with elevation). The parameters of his second model, which includes the exponential variation of pressure in an isothermal atmosphere, have also been identified by reproducing his results. The implication is clear that in each case Newton had derived exactly the correct equations for the astronomical refraction; furthermore, he was the first to do so.

  2. The refractive index of relic gravitons

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    The dynamical evolution of the refractive index of the tensor modes of the geometry produces a specific class of power spectra characterized by a blue (i.e. slightly increasing) slope which is directly determined by the competition of the slow-roll parameter and of the rate of variation of the refractive index. Throughout the conventional stages of the inflationary and post-inflationary evolution, the microwave background anisotropies measurements, the pulsar timing limits and the big-bang nucleosythesis constraints set stringent bounds on the refractive index and on its rate of variation. Within the physically allowed region of the parameter space the cosmic background of relic gravitons leads to a potentially large signal for the ground based detectors (in their advanced version) and for the proposed space-borne interferometers. Conversely, the lack of direct detection of the signal will set a qualitatively new bound on the dynamical variation of the refractive index.

  3. Deviations of Lambert-Beer???s law affect corneal refractive parameters after refractive surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Jim??nez Cuesta, Jos?? Ram??n; Rodr??guez-Mar??n, Francisco; Gonz??lez Anera, Rosario; Jim??nez del Barco Jaldo, Luis Miguel

    2006-01-01

    We calculate whether deviations of Lambert-Beer???s law, which regulates depth ablation during corneal ablation, significantly influence corneal refractive parameters after refractive surgery and whether they influence visual performance. For this, we compute a point-to-point correction on the cornea while assuming a non-linear (including a quadratic term) fit for depth ablation. Post-surgical equations for refractive parameters using a non-linear fit show significant differences with respect...

  4. Acoustic metasurface for refracted wave manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Li-Xiang; Yao, Yuan-Wei; Zhang, Xin; Wu, Fu-Gen; Dong, Hua-Feng; Mu, Zhong-Fei; Li, Jing-bo

    2018-02-01

    Here we present a design of a transmitted acoustic metasurface based on a single row of Helmholtz resonators with varying geometric parameters. The proposed metasurface can not only steer an acoustic beam as expected from the generalized Snell's law of refraction, but also exhibits various interesting properties and potential applications such as insulation of two quasi-intersecting transmitted sound waves, ultrasonic Bessel beam generator, frequency broadening effect of anomalous refraction and focusing.

  5. Refractive index modulation of Sb70Te30 phase-change thin films by multiple femtosecond laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei, Kai; Wang, Yang; Jiang, Minghui; Wu, Yiqun

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the controllable effective refractive index modulation of Sb 70 Te 30 phase-change thin films between amorphous and crystalline states was achieved experimentally by multiple femtosecond laser pulses. The modulation mechanism was analyzed comprehensively by a spectral ellipsometer measurement, surface morphology observation, and two-temperature model calculations. We numerically demonstrate the application of the optically modulated refractive index of the phase-change thin films in a precisely adjustable color display. These results may provide further insights into ultrafast phase-transition mechanics and are useful in the design of programmable photonic and opto-electrical devices based on phase-change memory materials.

  6. Comparison of objective refraction in darkness to cycloplegic refraction: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Balamurali; Ciuffreda, Kenneth J; Meehan, Kelly; Grk, Dejana; Cox, Misty

    2016-03-01

    The aim was to assess non-cycloplegic objective refraction in darkness using an open-field auto-refractor, and furthermore to compare it with distance cycloplegic subjective refraction and distance cycloplegic retinoscopy in the light, in children and young adults. Twenty-three, visually-normal, young-adults (46 eyes) ages 23 to 31 years, and five children (10 eyes) ages five to 12 years, participated in the study. The spherical component of their refraction ranged from -2.25 D to +3.75 D with a mean of +1.80 D, and a mean cylinder of -0.70 D. Three techniques were used to assess refractive error. An objective measure of the non-cycloplegic refractive state was obtained using an open-field autorefractor (WAM-5500) after five minutes in the dark to allow for dissipation of accommodative transients and relaxation of accommodation. In addition, both distance retinoscopy and subjective distance refraction were performed following cycloplegia (Cyclopentolate, 1%) using conventional clinical procedures. All measurements were obtained on the same day within a single session. The spherical component of the refraction was compared among the three techniques in both the children and adults. There was no significant difference in spherical refraction among the three techniques: non-cycloplegic objective refraction in the dark, distance cycloplegic retinoscopy and distance cycloplegic subjective refraction, in either the adults [F(2, 137) = 0.79, p = 0.45] or the children [F(2, 27) = 0.47, p = 0.62]. Mean difference in the spherical component between refraction in the dark and the cycloplegic distance retinoscopy was -0.34 D (r = 0.89) in the adults and +0.14 D (r = 0.96) in the children. The mean difference in spherical component between refraction in the dark and the cycloplegic distance subjective refraction was -0.25 D (r = 0.92) in the adults and -0.05 D (r = 0.95) in the children. Comparison of the spherical refractive component between the three techniques was not

  7. Photon mass and electrogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolgov, Alexander; Pelliccia, Diego N.

    2007-01-01

    We show that if the photon possesses a tiny but non-vanishing mass, the universe cannot be electrically neutral. A cosmological electric asymmetry could be generated either at an early stage by the different evaporation rates of the primordial black holes with respect to positively and negatively charged particles or by a predominant capture of protons in comparison to electrons by the heavy galactic black holes in the contemporary universe. An impact of this phenomenon on the generation of large scale magnetic fields and on the acceleration of the universe is considered

  8. On the effective refractive index of blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahmad-Rohen, Alexander; Contreras-Tello, Humberto; Morales-Luna, Gesuri; García-Valenzuela, Augusto

    2016-01-01

    We calculated the real and imaginary parts of the effective refractive index {n}{eff} of blood as functions of wavelength from 400 to 800 nm; we employed van de Hulst’s theory, together with the anomalous diffraction approximation, for the calculation. We modelled blood as a mixture of plasma and erythrocytes. Our results indicate that erythrocyte orientation has a strong effect on {n}{eff}, making blood an optically anisotropic medium except when the erythrocytes are randomly oriented. In the case in which their symmetry axis is perpendicular to the wave vector, {n}{eff} equals the refractive index of plasma at certain wavelengths. Furthermore, the erythrocytes’ shape affects their contribution to {n}{eff} in an important way, implying that studies on the effective refractive index of blood should avoid approximating them as spheres or spheroids. Finally, the effective refractive index of blood predicted by van de Hulst’s theory is different from what would be obtained by averaging the refractive indices of its constituents weighted by volume; such a volume-weighted average is appropriate only for haemolysed blood. We then measured the real part of the refractive index of various blood solutions using two different experimental setups. One of the most important results of our expriment is that {n}{eff} is measurable to a good degree of precision even for undiluted blood, although not all measuring apparatuses are appropriate. The experimental data is self-consistent and in reasonable agreement with our theoretical calculations.

  9. Reflective and refractive objects for mixed reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knecht, Martin; Traxler, Christoph; Winklhofer, Christoph; Wimmer, Michael

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we present a novel rendering method which integrates reflective or refractive objects into a differential instant radiosity (DIR) framework usable for mixed-reality (MR) applications. This kind of objects are very special from the light interaction point of view, as they reflect and refract incident rays. Therefore they may cause high-frequency lighting effects known as caustics. Using instant-radiosity (IR) methods to approximate these high-frequency lighting effects would require a large amount of virtual point lights (VPLs) and is therefore not desirable due to real-time constraints. Instead, our approach combines differential instant radiosity with three other methods. One method handles more accurate reflections compared to simple cubemaps by using impostors. Another method is able to calculate two refractions in real-time, and the third method uses small quads to create caustic effects. Our proposed method replaces parts in light paths that belong to reflective or refractive objects using these three methods and thus tightly integrates into DIR. In contrast to previous methods which introduce reflective or refractive objects into MR scenarios, our method produces caustics that also emit additional indirect light. The method runs at real-time frame rates, and the results show that reflective and refractive objects with caustics improve the overall impression for MR scenarios.

  10. When negation is not negation

    OpenAIRE

    Milicevic, Nataša

    2008-01-01

    In this paper I will discuss the formation of different types of yes/no questions in Serbian (examples in (1)), focusing on the syntactically and semantically puzzling example (1d), which involves the negative auxiliary inversion. Although there is a negative marker on the fronted auxiliary, the construction does not involve sentential negation. This coincides with the fact that the negative quantifying NPIs cannot be licensed. The question formation and sentential negation have similar synta...

  11. Refractive microlenses produced by excimer laser machining of poly(methyl methacrylate)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin Frøhling; Krühne, Ulrich; H., L.

    2005-01-01

    A method has been developed whereby refractive microlenses can be produced in poly (methyl methacrylate) by excimer laser irradiation at λ = 248 nm. The lenses are formed by a combined photochemical and thermal process. The lenses are formed as depressions in the substrate material (negative foca...

  12. Reflectance properties of one-dimensional metal-dielectric ternary photonic crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, G. N., E-mail: gnpandey2009@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Amity Institute of Applied Sciences, AmityUniversity, Noida (U.P.) (India); Kumar, Narendra [Department of Physics (CASH), Modi University of Science and Technology, Lakshmangarh, Sikar, Rajsthan (India); Thapa, Khem B. [Department of Physics, U I E T, ChhatrapatiShahu Ji Maharaj University, Kanpur- (UP) (India); Ojha, S. P. [Department of Physics IIT, Banaras Hindu University (India)

    2016-05-06

    Metallic photonic crystal has a very important application in absorption enhancement in solar cells. It has been found that an ultra-thin metallic layer becomes transparent due to internal scattering of light through the each interface of the dielectric and metal surfaces. The metal has absorption due to their surface plasmon and the plasmon has important parameters for changing optical properties of the metal. We consider ternary metallic-dielectric photonic crystal (MDPC) for having large probabilities to change the optical properties of the MDPC and the photonic crystals may be changed by changing dimensionality, symmetry, lattice parameters, Filling fraction and effective refractive index refractive index contrast. In this present communication, we try to show that the photonic band gap in ternary metal-dielectric photonic crystal can be significantly enlarged when air dielectric constant is considered. All the theoretical analyses are made based on the transfer matrix method together with the Drude model of metal.

  13. Photon absorptiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valkema, R.; Blokland, J.A.K.; Papapoulos, S.E.; Bijvoet, O.L.M.; Pauwels, E.K.J.

    1989-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a significant health problem in the western world, with important medical, social and economical consequences. Prevention and treatment require reliable methods for in vivo monitoring of the bone mineral content (BMC) and its change in time. This paper presents an overview of currently used radiological methods, based on photon absorptiometry, and their clinical applications. With recent methods based on dual energy X-ray absorptiometry accurate and precise measurements of axial BMC can be obtained. Whether this improvements allows reliable detection of small changes in BMC remains to be investigated. (Author). 95 refs.; 1 tab

  14. Large-area photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhl, Tilmann; Spahn, Peter; Hellmann, Gotz P.; Winkler, Holger

    2004-09-01

    Materials with a periodically modulated refractive index, with periods on the scale of light wavelengths, are currently attracting much attention because of their unique optical properties which are caused by Bragg scattering of the visible light. In nature, 3d structures of this kind are found in the form of opals in which monodisperse silica spheres with submicron diameters form a face-centered-cubic (fcc) lattice. Artificial opals, with the same colloidal-crystalline fcc structure, have meanwhile been prepared by crystallizing spherical colloidal particles via sedimentation or drying of dispersions. In this report, colloidal crystalline films are introduced that were produced by a novel technique based on shear flow in the melts of specially designed submicroscopic silica-polymer core-shell hybrid spheres: when the melt of these spheres flows between the plates of a press, the spheres crystallize along the plates, layer by layer, and the silica cores assume the hexagonal order corresponding to the (111) plane of the fcc lattice. This process is fast and yields large-area films, thin or thick. To enhance the refractive index contrast in these films, the colloidal crystalline structure was inverted by etching out the silica cores with hydrofluoric acid. This type of an inverse opal, in which the fcc lattice is formed by mesopores, is referred to as a polymer-air photonic crystal.

  15. Probing a Possible Vacuum Refractive Index with Gamma-Ray Telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John; Nanopoulos, D V; PH-TH

    2009-01-01

    We have used a stringy model of quantum space-time foam to suggest that the vacuum may exhibit a non-trivial refractive index depending linearly on gamma-ray energy: eta -1 ~ E_gamma/M_QG1, where M_QG1 is some mass scale typical of quantum gravity that may be ~ 10^18 GeV: see Phys. Lett. B 665, 412 (2008) and references therein. The MAGIC, HESS and Fermi gamma-ray telescopes have recently probed the possible existence of such an energy-dependent vacuum refractive index. All find indications of time-lags for higher-energy photons, but cannot exclude the possibility that they are due to intrinsic delays at the sources. However, the MAGIC and HESS observations of time-lags in emissions from AGNs Mkn 501 and PKS 2155-304 are compatible with each other and a refractive index depending linearly on the gamma-ray energy, with M_QG1 ~ 10^18 GeV. We combine their results to estimate the time-lag Delta t to be expected for the highest-energy photon from GRB 080916c measured by the Fermi telescope, which has an energy ~ ...

  16. Massive hidden photons as lukewarm dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redondo, Javier; Postma, Marieke

    2008-11-01

    We study the possibility that a keV-MeV mass hidden photon (HP), i.e. a hidden sector U(1) gauge boson, accounts for the observed amount of dark matter. We focus on the case where the HP interacts with the standard model sector only through kinetic mixing with the photon. The relic abundance is computed including all relevant plasma effects into the photon's self-energy, which leads to a resonant yield almost independent of the HP mass. The HP can decay into three photons. Moreover, if light enough it can be copiously produced in stars. Including bounds from cosmic photon backgrounds and stellar evolution, we find that the hidden photon can only give a subdominant contribution to the dark matter. This negative conclusion may be avoided if another production mechanism besides kinetic mixing is operative. (orig.)

  17. Massive hidden photons as lukewarm dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redondo, Javier [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Postma, Marieke [Nationaal Inst. voor Kernfysica en Hoge-Energiefysica (NIKHEF), Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2008-11-15

    We study the possibility that a keV-MeV mass hidden photon (HP), i.e. a hidden sector U(1) gauge boson, accounts for the observed amount of dark matter. We focus on the case where the HP interacts with the standard model sector only through kinetic mixing with the photon. The relic abundance is computed including all relevant plasma effects into the photon's self-energy, which leads to a resonant yield almost independent of the HP mass. The HP can decay into three photons. Moreover, if light enough it can be copiously produced in stars. Including bounds from cosmic photon backgrounds and stellar evolution, we find that the hidden photon can only give a subdominant contribution to the dark matter. This negative conclusion may be avoided if another production mechanism besides kinetic mixing is operative. (orig.)

  18. Negative index effects from a homogeneous positive index prism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Sherman W.; Epstein, Ariel

    2017-12-01

    Cellular structured negative index metamaterials in the form of a right triangular prism have often been tested by observing the refraction of a beam across the prism hypotenuse which is serrated in order to conform to the cell walls. We show that not only can this negative index effect be obtained from a homogeneous dielectric prism having a positive index of refraction, but in addition, for sampling at the walls of the cellular structure, the phase in the material has the illusory appearance of moving in a negative direction. Although many previous reports relied on refraction direction and phase velocity of prism structures to verify negative index design, our investigation indicates that to unambiguously demonstrate material negativity additional empirical evidence is required.

  19. Generation of J_0-Bessel-Gauss beam by a heterogeneous refractive index map

    KAUST Repository

    San Roman Alerigi, Damian; Alsunaidi, Mohammad; Ben Slimane, Ahmed; Ng, Tien Khee; Ooi, Boon S.; Zhang, Yaping

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present the theoretical studies of a refractive index map to implement a Gauss to a J0-Bessel-Gauss convertor. We theoretically demonstrate the viability of a device that could be fabricated on a Si/Si1-yOy/Si1-x-yGexCy platform or by photo-refractive media. The proposed device is 200 ?m in length and 25 ?m in width, and its refractive index varies in controllable steps across the light propagation and transversal directions. The computed conversion efficiency and loss are 90%, and -0.457 dB, respectively. The theoretical results, obtained from the beam conversion efficiency, self-regeneration, and propagation through an opaque obstruction, demonstrate that a two-dimensional (2D) graded index map of the refractive index can be used to transform a Gauss beam into a J0-Bessel-Gauss beam. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of such beam transformation by means of a 2D index-mapping that is fully integrable in silicon photonics based planar lightwave circuits (PLCs). The concept device is significant for the eventual development of a new array of technologies, such as micro optical tweezers, optical traps, beam reshaping and nonlinear beam diode lasers. © 2012 Optical Society of America.

  20. Generation of J_0-Bessel-Gauss beam by a heterogeneous refractive index map

    KAUST Repository

    San Roman Alerigi, Damian

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we present the theoretical studies of a refractive index map to implement a Gauss to a J0-Bessel-Gauss convertor. We theoretically demonstrate the viability of a device that could be fabricated on a Si/Si1-yOy/Si1-x-yGexCy platform or by photo-refractive media. The proposed device is 200 ?m in length and 25 ?m in width, and its refractive index varies in controllable steps across the light propagation and transversal directions. The computed conversion efficiency and loss are 90%, and -0.457 dB, respectively. The theoretical results, obtained from the beam conversion efficiency, self-regeneration, and propagation through an opaque obstruction, demonstrate that a two-dimensional (2D) graded index map of the refractive index can be used to transform a Gauss beam into a J0-Bessel-Gauss beam. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of such beam transformation by means of a 2D index-mapping that is fully integrable in silicon photonics based planar lightwave circuits (PLCs). The concept device is significant for the eventual development of a new array of technologies, such as micro optical tweezers, optical traps, beam reshaping and nonlinear beam diode lasers. © 2012 Optical Society of America.

  1. Anomalous Refraction of Acoustic Guided Waves in Solids with Geometrically Tapered Metasurfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongfei; Semperlotti, Fabio

    2016-07-15

    The concept of a metasurface opens new exciting directions to engineer the refraction properties in both optical and acoustic media. Metasurfaces are typically designed by assembling arrays of subwavelength anisotropic scatterers able to mold incoming wave fronts in rather unconventional ways. The concept of a metasurface was pioneered in photonics and later extended to acoustics while its application to the propagation of elastic waves in solids is still relatively unexplored. We investigate the design of acoustic metasurfaces to control elastic guided waves in thin-walled structural elements. These engineered discontinuities enable the anomalous refraction of guided wave modes according to the generalized Snell's law. The metasurfaces are made out of locally resonant toruslike tapers enabling an accurate phase shift of the incoming wave, which ultimately affects the refraction properties. We show that anomalous refraction can be achieved on transmitted antisymmetric modes (A_{0}) either when using a symmetric (S_{0}) or antisymmetric (A_{0}) incident wave, the former clearly involving mode conversion. The same metasurface design also allows achieving structure embedded planar focal lenses and phase masks for nonparaxial propagation.

  2. Cryogenic refractive index of Heraeus homosil glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kevin H.; Quijada, Manuel A.; Leviton, Douglas B.

    2017-08-01

    This paper reports measurements of the refractive index of Homosil (Heraeus) over the wavelength range of 0.34—3.16 μm and temperature range of 120—335 K. These measurements were performed by using the Cryogenic High Accuracy Refraction Measuring System (CHARMS) facility at the NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. These measurements were in support of an integrated Structural-Thermal-Optical-Performance (STOP) model that was developed for a fieldwidened Michelson interferometer that is being built and tested for the High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) project at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). The cryogenic refractive index measurements were required in order to account for the highly sensitive performance of the HSRL instrument to changes in refractive index with temperature, temperature gradients, thermal expansion, and deformation due to mounting stresses. A dense coverage of the absolute refractive index over the aforementioned wavelength and temperature ranges was used to determine the thermo-optic coefficient (dn/dT) and dispersion relation (dn/dλ) as a function of wavelength and temperature. Our measurements of Homosil will be compared with measurements of other glasses from the fused silica family studied in CHARMS as well as measurements reported elsewhere in the literature.

  3. Continuing research on the classical spiraling photon model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongrui

    2014-11-01

    Based no the classical spiraling photon model proposed by Hongrui Li, the laws of reflection, refraction of a single photon can be derived. Moreover, the polarization, total reflection, evanescent wave and Goos-Hanchen shift of a single photon can be elucidated. However, this photon model is still unfinished. Especially, the spiraling diameter of a photon is not definite. In this paper, the continuous research works on this new theory are reported. According to the facts that the diffraction limit of light and the smallest diameter of the focal spot of lenses are all equal to the wavelength λ of the light, we can get that the spiraling diameter of a photon equals to the wavelength λ, so we gain that the angle between the linear velocity of the spiraling photon υ and the component of the linear velocity in the forward direction υb is 45°, and the energy of a classical spiraling photon E = (1/2)mυ2 = (1/2)m2c2 = mc2. This coincides with Einstein's mass-energy relation. While it is obtained that the velocity of the evanescent wave in the vacuum is slower than the velocity of light in glass in straight line. In such a way, the optical fiber can slow the light down. In addition, the force analysis of a single photon in optical tweezers system is discussed. And the reason that the laser beam can capture the particle slightly downstream from the focal point can be explained.

  4. Band structure of magneto-metallo-dielectric photonic crystals with hybrid one- and two-dimensional periodicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes-Ayona, E. [Instituto de Fisica, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Apartado Postal J-48, Puebla 72570 (Mexico); Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica Optica y Electronica, Apartado Postal 51, Puebla 72000 (Mexico); Halevi, P. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica Optica y Electronica, Apartado Postal 51, Puebla 72000 (Mexico)

    2012-06-15

    We calculate the band structure of a magneto-metallo-dielectric photonic crystal (PC) with hybrid one- and two-dimensional periodicity. Namely, the permittivity (permeability) is periodic in a plane (single direction). The metallic and magnetic properties are described, respectively, by means of the Drude model and a specific permeability model for Barium-M ferrite. Because of the dispersion of both the permeability and the permittivity, we obtain a non-standard eigenvalue problem which is possible to solve by means of a linearization technique. We found that the first band of this PC is very sensitive to the filling fraction of the magnetic component: by changing this fraction from 0.20 to 0.16 the slope - and effective index of refraction - changes from positive to negative. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Engineering the near-field imaging of a rectangular-lattice photonic-crystal slab in the second band

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Imaging properties of a two-dimensional rectangular-lattice photonic crystal (PC) slab consisting of air holes immersed in a dielectric are studied in this work. The field patterns of electromagnetic waves radiated from a point source through the PC slab are calculated with the finite-difference time-domain method. Comparing the field patterns with the corresponding equifrequency-surface contours simulated by the plane-wave expansion method, we find that an excellent-quality near-field image may be formed through the PC slab by the mechanisms of the simultaneous action of the self-collimation effect and the negative-refraction effect. Near-field imaging may be obtained within two different frequency regions in two vertical directions of the PC slab.

  6. Physics at high energy photon photon colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1994-06-01

    I review the physic prospects for high energy photon photon colliders, emphasizing results presented at the LBL Gamma Gamma Collider Workshop. Advantages and difficulties are reported for studies of QCD, the electroweak gauge sector, supersymmetry, and electroweak symmetry breaking

  7. Resonance formation in photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gidal, G.

    1988-08-01

    Recent experimental progress on resonance formation in photon-photon collisions is reviewed with particular emphasis on the pseudoscalar and tensor nonents and on the γγ* production of spin-one resonances. 37 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs

  8. Temperature stability of the refractive index and the direct bandedge in TlInGaAs quaternary alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imada, A.; Lee, H.-J.; Fujiwara, A.; Mukai, T.; Hasegawa, S.; Asahi, H.

    2004-01-01

    TlInGaAs quaternary alloy layers were grown on InP substrates by gas-source molecular-beam epitaxy. Refractive index dispersions were determined at the temperature range of 300-340 K in the photon-energy region below and a little above the direct bandedge E 0 by the optical reflectance measurements. The temperature dependence of the refractive index was analyzed with the first-order Sellmeier equation. The temperature dependence of the E 0 edge was also determined by the absorption measurements. It was found that the temperature coefficients of both refractive index and E 0 edge of TlInGaAs are much smaller than those for InGaAs. These results facilitate the fabrication of the temperature-stable-wavelength optoelectronic devices using this alloy system

  9. Negative mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammond, Richard T

    2015-01-01

    Some physical aspects of negative mass are examined. Several unusual properties, such as the ability of negative mass to penetrate any armor, are analysed. Other surprising effects include the bizarre system of negative mass chasing positive mass, naked singularities and the violation of cosmic censorship, wormholes, and quantum mechanical results as well. In addition, a brief look into the implications for strings is given. (paper)

  10. Influence of corneal asphericity on the refractive outcome of intraocular lens implantation in cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savini, Giacomo; Hoffer, Kenneth J; Barboni, Piero

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the possible influence of anterior corneal surface asphericity on the refractive outcomes in eyes having intraocular lens (IOL) implantation after cataract surgery. Fondazione G.B. Bietti IRCCS, Rome, Italy. Retrospective comparative case series. Intraocular lens power was calculated using the Haigis, Hoffer Q, Holladay 1, and SRK/T formulas. Asphericity (Q-value) was measured at 8.0 mm with a Placido-disk corneal topographer (Keratron), a rotating Scheimpflug camera (Pentacam), and a rotating Scheimpflug camera combined with Placido-disk corneal topography (Sirius). The relationship between the error in refraction prediction (ie, difference between expected refraction and refraction measured 1 month after surgery) and the Q-value was assessed by linear regression. The same IOL model (Acrysof SA60AT) was implanted in 115 eyes of 115 consecutive patients. Regression analysis showed a statistically significant relationship between the error in refraction prediction and the Q-value with all formulas and all devices. In all cases, a more negative Q-value (prolate cornea) was associated with a myopic outcome, whereas a more positive Q-value (oblate cornea) was associated with a hyperopic outcome. The highest coefficient of determination was detected between the Hoffer Q formula and the Placido-disk corneal topographer (R(2) = 0.2630), for which the error in refraction prediction (y) was related to the Q-value (x) according to the formula y = -0.2641 + 1.4589 × x. Corneal asphericity influences the refractive outcomes of IOL implantation and should be taken into consideration when using third-generation IOL power formulas. Dr. Hoffer receives book royalties from Slack, Inc., Thorofare, New Jersey, and formula royalties from all manufacturers using the Hoffer Q formula. No other author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Copyright © 2015 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The refractive index of curved spacetime II: QED, Penrose limits and black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollowood, Timothy J.; Shore, Graham M.; Stanley, Ross J.

    2009-01-01

    This work considers the way that quantum loop effects modify the propagation of light in curved space. The calculation of the refractive index for scalar QED is reviewed and then extended for the first time to QED with spinor particles in the loop. It is shown how, in both cases, the low frequency phase velocity can be greater than c, as found originally by Drummond and Hathrell, but causality is respected in the sense that retarded Green functions vanish outside the lightcone. A 'phenomenology' of the refractive index is then presented for black holes, FRW universes and gravitational waves. In some cases, some of the polarization states propagate with a refractive index having a negative imaginary part indicating a potential breakdown of the optical theorem in curved space and possible instabilities.

  12. Hadron production in photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandita, P.N.; Singh, Y.

    1976-01-01

    We analyze deep-inelastic photon-photon collisions via the two-photon mechanism in electron-positron (-electron) colliding beams in a form especially suitable for experimental analysis. It is shown that by a helicity analysis similar to that used in electroproduction experiments, we can separate five of the eight structure functions describing the process γ* + γ* → hadrons. The helicity cross sections for this process and for the process with one real photon (inelastic electron-photon scattering) are related to structure functions, and are evaluated using quark light-cone algebra. There are anomalous contributions to the structure functions for the inelastic electron-photon scattering which arise both in parton as well as generalized vector-meson-dominance models. This suggests a connection between these two types of models for photon-photon scattering. Further, we use vector-meson dominance to construct a sum rule for sigma/sub gamma//sub gamma/ /sub arrow-right/ from which it is estimated that roughly 20% of the cross section should be built up from higher-mass vector states. Using a spectral representation for the total transverse cross section, and the ''aligned-jet'' vector-dominance model we achieve a connection, via a ''correspondence principle,'' with the parton model for the hadron multiplicities in photon-photon collisions. We also comment on inclusive pion multiplicities and the approach to scaling for photon-photon processes in the light-cone algebra

  13. Integrated refractive index optical ring resonator detector for capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongying; White, Ian M; Suter, Jonathan D; Zourob, Mohammed; Fan, Xudong

    2007-02-01

    We developed a novel miniaturized and multiplexed, on-capillary, refractive index (RI) detector using liquid core optical ring resonators (LCORRs) for future development of capillary electrophoresis (CE) devices. The LCORR employs a glass capillary with a diameter of approximately 100 mum and a wall thickness of a few micrometers. The circular cross section of the capillary forms a ring resonator along which the light circulates in the form of the whispering gallery modes (WGMs). The WGM has an evanescent field extending into the capillary core and responds to the RI change due to the analyte conducted in the capillary, thus permitting label-free measurement. The resonating nature of the WGM enables repetitive light-analyte interaction, significantly enhancing the LCORR sensitivity. This LCORR architecture achieves dual use of the capillary as a sensor head and a CE fluidic channel, allowing for integrated, multiplexed, and noninvasive on-capillary detection at any location along the capillary. In this work, we used electro-osmotic flow and glycerol as a model system to demonstrate the fluid transport capability of the LCORRs. In addition, we performed flow speed measurement on the LCORR to demonstrate its flow analysis capability. Finally, using the LCORR's label-free sensing mechanism, we accurately deduced the analyte concentration in real time at a given point on the capillary. A sensitivity of 20 nm/RIU (refractive index units) was observed, leading to an RI detection limit of 10-6 RIU. The LCORR marries photonic technology with microfluidics and enables rapid on-capillary sample analysis and flow profile monitoring. The investigation in this regard will open a door to novel high-throughput CE devices and lab-on-a-chip sensors in the future.

  14. Effects of Atmospheric Refraction on an Airborne Weather Radar Detection and Correction Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effect of atmospheric refraction, affected by temperature, atmospheric pressure, and humidity, on airborne weather radar beam paths. Using three types of typical atmospheric background sounding data, we established a simulation model for an actual transmission path and a fitted correction path of an airborne weather radar beam during airplane take-offs and landings based on initial flight parameters and X-band airborne phased-array weather radar parameters. Errors in an ideal electromagnetic beam propagation path are much greater than those of a fitted path when atmospheric refraction is not considered. The rates of change in the atmospheric refraction index differ with weather conditions and the radar detection angles differ during airplane take-off and landing. Therefore, the airborne radar detection path must be revised in real time according to the specific sounding data and flight parameters. However, an error analysis indicates that a direct linear-fitting method produces significant errors in a negatively refractive atmosphere; a piecewise-fitting method can be adopted to revise the paths according to the actual atmospheric structure. This study provides researchers and practitioners in the aeronautics and astronautics field with updated information regarding the effect of atmospheric refraction on airborne weather radar detection and correction methods.

  15. Wave-vector and polarization dependence of conical refraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turpin, A; Loiko, Yu V; Kalkandjiev, T K; Tomizawa, H; Mompart, J

    2013-02-25

    We experimentally address the wave-vector and polarization dependence of the internal conical refraction phenomenon by demonstrating that an input light beam of elliptical transverse profile refracts into two beams after passing along one of the optic axes of a biaxial crystal, i.e. it exhibits double refraction instead of refracting conically. Such double refraction is investigated by the independent rotation of a linear polarizer and a cylindrical lens. Expressions to describe the position and the intensity pattern of the refracted beams are presented and applied to predict the intensity pattern for an axicon beam propagating along the optic axis of a biaxial crystal.

  16. Photorefractive keratectomy in refractive accommodative esotropia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgihan, K; Akata, F; Or, M; Hasanreisoğlu, B

    1997-01-01

    Photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) was performed on a 19-year-old man with hyperopic astigmatism and refractive accommodative esotropia. The patient was orthophoric while wearing spectacles, but had an esotropia of 30 prism dioptres at near and distance vision without spectacles. The best corrected visual acuity of the right eye was 20/50 and of the left eye was 20/20. The excessive accommodative convergence of the patient was eliminated by correcting the hyperopic refractive error by performing PRK, and the patient became orthophoric after the treatment.

  17. Negative Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Negative Leadership by Colonel David M. Oberlander United States Army United States Army War...SUBTITLE Negative Leadership 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Colonel David M...Dr. Richard C. Bullis Department of Command Leadership , and Management 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING

  18. Negative liability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dari-Mattiacci, G.

    2009-01-01

    Negative and positive externalities pose symmetrical problems to social welfare. The law internalizes negative externalities by providing general tort liability rules. According to such rules, those who cause harm to others should pay compensation. In theory, in the presence of positive

  19. Negative ... concord?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giannakidou, A

    The main claim of this paper is that a general theory of negative concord (NC) should allow for the possibility of NC involving scoping of a universal quantifier above negation. I propose that Greek NC instantiates this option. Greek n-words will be analyzed as polarity sensitive universal

  20. Interferometric measurement of refractive index modification in a single mode microfiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Farid; Ahsani, Vahid; Jun, Martin B. G.

    2017-02-01

    Efficient and cost effective measurement of the refractive index profile in an optical fiber is a significant technical job to design and manufacture in-fiber photonic devices and communication systems. For instance, to design fiber gratings, it is required to estimate the refractive index modulation to be inscribed by the fabrication apparatus such as ultraviolet or infrared lasers. Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) based quantification of refractive index change written in single mode microfiber by femtosecond laser radiation is presented in this study. The MZI is constructed by splicing a microfiber (core diameter: 3.75 μm, cladding diameter: 40 μm) between standard single mode fibers. To measure the RI inscribed by infrared femtosecond laser, 200 μm length of the core within the MZI was scanned with laser radiation. As the higher index was written within 200 μm length of the core, the transmission spectrum of the interferometer displayed a corresponding red shift. The observed spectral shift was used to calculate the amount of refractive index change inscribed by the femtosecond irradiation. For the MZI length of 3.25 mm, and spectral shift of 0.8 nm, the calculated refractive index was found to be 0.00022. The reported results display excellent agreement between theory and experimental findings. Demonstrated method provides simple yet very effective on-site measurement of index change in optical fibers. Since the MZI can be constructed in diverse fiber types, this technique offers flexibility to quantify index change in various optical fibers.

  1. Characterization of photonic structures using visible and infrared polarimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kral Z.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Photonic Crystals are materials with a spatial periodic variation of the refractive index on the wavelength scale. This confers these materials interesting photonic properties such as the existence of photonic bands and forbidden photon frequency ranges, the photonic band gaps. Among their applications it is worth mentioning the achievement of low-threshold lasers and high-Q resonant cavities. A particular case of the Photonic Crystals is well-known and widely studied since a long time: the periodic thin film coatings. The characterization of thin film coatings is a classical field of study with a very well established knowledge. However, characterization of 2D and 3D photonic crystals needs to be studied in detail as it poses new problems that have to be solved. In this sense, Polarimetry is a specially suited tool given their inherent anisotropy: photonic bands depend strongly on the propagation direction and on polarization. In this work we show how photonic crystal structures can be characterized using polarimetry equipment. We compare the numerical modeling of the interaction of the light polarization with the photonic crystal with the polarimetry measurements. With the S-Matrix formalism, the Mueller matrix of a Photonic Crystal for a given wavelength, angle of incidence and propagation direction can be obtained. We will show that useful information from polarimetry (and also from spectrometry can be obtained when multivariate spectra are considered. We will also compare the simulation results with Polarimetry measurements on different kinds of samples: macroporous silicon photonic crystals in the near-IR range and Laser-Interference-Lithography nanostructured photoresist.

  2. On metallic gratings coated conformally with isotropic negative-phase-velocity materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inchaussandague, Marina E.; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh; Depine, Ricardo A.

    2008-01-01

    Application of the differential method (also called the C method) to plane-wave diffraction by a perfectly conducting, sinusoidally corrugated metallic grating coated with a linear, homogeneous, isotropic, lossless dielectric-magnetic material shows that coating materials with negative index of refraction may deliver enhanced maximum nonspecular reflection efficiencies in comparison to coating materials with positive index of refraction

  3. On metallic gratings coated conformally with isotropic negative-phase-velocity materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inchaussandague, Marina E. [GEA-Grupo de Electromagnetismo Aplicado, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellon I, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); CONICET-Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, Rivadavia 1917, Buenos Aires (Argentina)], E-mail: mei@df.uba.ar; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh [CATMAS-Computational and Theoretical Materials Sciences Group, Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802-6812 (United States)], E-mail: akhlesh@psu.edu; Depine, Ricardo A. [GEA-Grupo de Electromagnetismo Aplicado, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellon I, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); CONICET-Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, Rivadavia 1917, Buenos Aires (Argentina)], E-mail: rdep@df.uba.ar

    2008-03-31

    Application of the differential method (also called the C method) to plane-wave diffraction by a perfectly conducting, sinusoidally corrugated metallic grating coated with a linear, homogeneous, isotropic, lossless dielectric-magnetic material shows that coating materials with negative index of refraction may deliver enhanced maximum nonspecular reflection efficiencies in comparison to coating materials with positive index of refraction.

  4. Refractive index dispersion law of silica aerogel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellunato, T.; Calvi, M.; Matteuzzi, C.; Musy, M.; Perego, D.L.; Storaci, B.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents measurements of the refractive index of a hygroscopic silica aerogel block at several wavelengths. The measurements, performed with a monochromator, have been compared with different parameterisations for n(λ), in order to determine the best chromaticity law for the aerogel. This is an important input for design and operation of RICH detectors with silica aerogel radiator. (orig.)

  5. Compound refractive X-ray lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nygren, D.R.; Cahn, R.; Cederstrom, B.; Danielsson, M.; Vestlund, J.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for focusing X-rays. In one embodiment, his invention is a commercial-grade compound refractive X-ray lens. The commercial-grade compound refractive X-ray lens includes a volume of low-Z material. The volume of low-Z material has a first surface which is adapted to receive X-rays of commercially-applicable power emitted from a commercial-grade X-ray source. The volume of low-Z material also has a second surface from which emerge the X-rays of commercially-applicable power which were received at the first surface. Additionally, the commercial-grade compound refractive X-ray lens includes a plurality of openings which are disposed between the first surface and the second surface. The plurality of openings are oriented such that the X-rays of commercially-applicable power which are received at the first surface, pass through the volume of low-Z material and through the plurality openings. In so doing, the X-rays which emerge from the second surface are refracted to a focal point

  6. Real time refractive index measurement by ESPI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torroba, R.; Joenathan, C.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper a method to measure refractive index variations in real time is reported. A technique to introduce reference fringes in real time is discussed. Both the theoretical and experimental results are presented and an example with phase shifting is given. (author). 8 refs, 5 figs

  7. Compound refractive X-ray lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygren, David R.; Cahn, Robert; Cederstrom, Bjorn; Danielsson, Mats; Vestlund, Jonas

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for focusing X-rays. In one embodiment, his invention is a commercial-grade compound refractive X-ray lens. The commercial-grade compound refractive X-ray lens includes a volume of low-Z material. The volume of low-Z material has a first surface which is adapted to receive X-rays of commercially-applicable power emitted from a commercial-grade X-ray source. The volume of low-Z material also has a second surface from which emerge the X-rays of commercially-applicable power which were received at the first surface. Additionally, the commercial-grade compound refractive X-ray lens includes a plurality of openings which are disposed between the first surface and the second surface. The plurality of openings are oriented such that the X-rays of commercially-applicable power which are received at the first surface, pass through the volume of low-Z material and through the plurality openings. In so doing, the X-rays which emerge from the second surface are refracted to a focal point.

  8. seismic refraction investigation of the subsurface structure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    employed for exploration include magnetic, electrical and gravitational methods, which depends on the earth's natural fields. Others are seismic and electromagnetic methods, which depends on the introduction of artificial energy in thereof. The seismic refraction method uses the seismic energy that returns to the surface of ...

  9. Wave refraction studies off Agonda beach (Goa)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Krishnakumar, V.; Pathak, M.C.; Kotnala, K.L.

    Analysis of wave refraction and longshore current has been carried out for a narrow strip off the shores of Agonda (Goa, India). Zones with high wave energy and rip currents have been demarcated. It is found from the analysis that the southern part...

  10. Bioinspired adaptive gradient refractive index distribution lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Kezhen; Lai, Chuan-Yar; Wang, Jia; Ji, Shanzuo; Aldridge, James; Feng, Jingxing; Olah, Andrew; Baer, Eric; Ponting, Michael

    2018-02-01

    Inspired by the soft, deformable human eye lens, a synthetic polymer gradient refractive index distribution (GRIN) lens with an adaptive geometry and focal power has been demonstrated via multilayer coextrusion and thermoforming of nanolayered elastomeric polymer films. A set of 30 polymer nanolayered films comprised of two thermoplastic polyurethanes having a refractive index difference of 0.05 were coextruded via forced-assembly technique. The set of 30 nanolayered polymer films exhibited transmission near 90% with each film varying in refractive index by 0.0017. An adaptive GRIN lens was fabricated from a laminated stack of the variable refractive index films with a 0.05 spherical GRIN. This lens was subsequently deformed by mechanical ring compression of the lens. Variation in the optical properties of the deformable GRIN lens was determined, including 20% variation in focal length and reduced spherical aberration. These properties were measured and compared to simulated results by placido-cone topography and ANSYS methods. The demonstration of a solid-state, dynamic focal length, GRIN lens with improved aberration correction was discussed relative to the potential future use in implantable devices.

  11. Photonic time crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Lunwu; Xu, Jin; Wang, Chengen; Zhang, Jianhua; Zhao, Yuting; Zeng, Jing; Song, Runxia

    2017-12-07

    When space (time) translation symmetry is spontaneously broken, the space crystal (time crystal) forms; when permittivity and permeability periodically vary with space (time), the photonic crystal (photonic time crystal) forms. We proposed the concept of photonic time crystal and rewritten the Maxwell's equations. Utilizing Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method, we simulated electromagnetic wave propagation in photonic time crystal and photonic space-time crystal, the simulation results show that more intensive scatter fields can obtained in photonic time crystal and photonic space-time crystal.

  12. Time evolution of absorption process in nonlinear metallic photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Mahi R.; Hatef, Ali [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London (Canada)

    2009-05-15

    The time evolution of the absorption coefficient in metallic photonic crystals has been studied numerically. These crystals are made from metallic spheres which are arranged periodically in air. The refractive index of the metallic spheres depends on the plasma frequency. Probe and pump fields are applied to monitor the absorption process. Ensembles of three-level particles are embedded in the crystal. Nanoparticles are interacting with the metallic crystals via the electron-photon interaction. It is found that when the resonance states lie away from the band edges system goes to transparent state. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. Spatial filtering of light by chirped photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staliunas, Kestutis; Sanchez-Morcillo, Victor J.

    2009-01-01

    We propose an efficient method for spatial filtering of light beams by propagating them through two-dimensional (also three dimensional) chirped photonic crystals, i.e., through the photonic structures with fixed transverse lattice period and with the longitudinal lattice period varying along the direction of the beam propagation. We prove the proposed idea by numerically solving the paraxial propagation equation in refraction-index-modulated media and we evaluate the efficiency of the process by harmonic-expansion analysis. The technique can be also applied for filtering (for cleaning) of the packages of atomic waves (Bose condensates), also to improve the directionality of acoustic and mechanical waves.

  14. Is LASIK for Me? A Patient's Guide to Refractive Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Is LASIK for Me? A Patient’s Guide to Refractive Surgery October 2008 Is LASIK for Me? A Patient’s Guide to Refractive Surgery Table of Contents LASIK: A COMPREHENSIVE GUIDE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 What Is ...

  15. Axial Length/Corneal Radius of Curvature Ratio and Refractive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-06-14

    Jun 14, 2017 ... of individuals,[2,5-8] the relationship between CR and refractive status ... the relationship between refractive error and ocular .... AG, 07740 Jena Germany). ..... adult population in rural Myanmar: The Meiktila eye study. Clin.

  16. Prevalence of Refractive errors among Primary School Pupils in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Effective management of blindness due to refractive errors is readily available in developed countries. 1 ... Key words: Refractive errors, Children, Prevalence, Kenya. 165 .... financial support towards the funding of this study. REFERENCES. 1.

  17. refractive errors among secondary school students in Isuikwuato

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eyamba

    STUDENTS IN ISUIKWUATO LOCAL GOVERNMENT AREA OF ... the prevalence and types of refractive errors among secondary school students ... KEYWORDS: Refractive error, Secondary School students, ametropia, .... interviews of the teachers as regards the general performance of those students with obvious visual.

  18. Detection of Photons Generated in PWO Scintillator Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Baccaro, Stefania; Cavallari, Francesca; Dafinei, Ioan; Diemoz, Marcella; Festinesi, Armando; Longo, Egidio; Montecchi, Marco; Organtini, Giovanni; Piegari, A

    1998-01-01

    This work deals with the optical characterization of the surface of EG&G and Hamamatsu APD's and performance of an antireflection coating made of Y2O3 and deposited on a PWO test piece. The effectiveness of antireflection treatments of PWO and Si surfaces is evaluated in a simplified and a realistic situation by means of the ratio of "detected to emitted photons". The complex refractive index of the Dow Corning 02-3067 optical grease is also reported.

  19. Low-loss negative index metamaterials for X, Ku, and K microwave bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Lee

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Low-loss, negative-index of refraction metamaterials were designed and tested for X, Ku, and K microwave frequency bands. An S-shaped, split-ring resonator was used as a unit cell to design homogeneous slabs of negative-index metamaterials. Then, the slabs of metamaterials were cut unto prisms to measure experimentally the negative index of refraction of a plane electromagnetic wave. Theoretical simulations using High-Frequency Structural Simulator, a finite element equation solver, were in good agreement with experimental measurements. The negative index of refraction was retrieved from the angle- and frequency-dependence of the transmitted intensity of the microwave beam through the metamaterial prism and compared well to simulations; in addition, near-field electromagnetic intensity mapping was conducted with an infrared camera, and there was also a good match with the simulations for expected frequency ranges for the negative index of refraction.

  20. Photonics and electronics for nitrogen vacancy control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaun Ho

    2014-01-01

    Deterministic indistinguishable single photon sources are one of the key requirements for the realisation of Optical Quantum Computing. Recent low temperature experiments have shown the potential of the negatively charged nitrogen vacancy (NV-) centre as a source of indistinguishable photons. Furthermore its ground state spin structure with extensional decoherence time and spin dependent transitions means it can be harnessed as a spin-photon interface. However, development of these potential applications requires exquisite control of te electronic and spin states via Stark and Zeeman shifting, as well as enhanced photon collection through photonic structures. Here we present the integration of micro-fabricated solid immersion lenses with lithographically defined gold electrodes for control and spin manipulation. (author)

  1. Amorphous silicon as high index photonic material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipka, T.; Harke, A.; Horn, O.; Amthor, J.; Müller, J.

    2009-05-01

    Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) photonics has become an attractive research topic within the area of integrated optics. This paper aims to fabricate SOI-structures for optical communication applications with lower costs compared to standard fabrication processes as well as to provide a higher flexibility with respect to waveguide and substrate material choice. Amorphous silicon is deposited on thermal oxidized silicon wafers with plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The material is optimized in terms of optical light transmission and refractive index. Different a-Si:H waveguides with low propagation losses are presented. The waveguides were processed with CMOS-compatible fabrication technologies and standard DUV-lithography enabling high volume production. To overcome the large mode-field diameter mismatch between incoupling fiber and sub-μm waveguides three dimensional, amorphous silicon tapers were fabricated with a KOH etched shadow mask for patterning. Using ellipsometric and Raman spectroscopic measurements the material properties as refractive index, layer thickness, crystallinity and material composition were analyzed. Rapid thermal annealing (RTA) experiments of amorphous thin films and rib waveguides were performed aiming to tune the refractive index of the deposited a-Si:H waveguide core layer after deposition.

  2. Photon-Photon Collisions -- Past and Future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2005-01-01

    I give a brief review of the history of photon-photon physics and a survey of its potential at future electron-positron colliders. Exclusive hadron production processes in photon-photon and electron-photon collisions provide important tests of QCD at the amplitude level, particularly as measures of hadron distribution amplitudes. There are also important high energy γγ and eγ tests of quantum chromodynamics, including the production of jets in photon-photon collisions, deeply virtual Compton scattering on a photon target, and leading-twist single-spin asymmetries for a photon polarized normal to a production plane. Since photons couple directly to all fundamental fields carrying the electromagnetic current including leptons, quarks, W's and supersymmetric particles, high energy γγ collisions will provide a comprehensive laboratory for Higgs production and exploring virtually every aspect of the Standard Model and its extensions. High energy back-scattered laser beams will thus greatly extend the range of physics of the International Linear Collider

  3. On-chip photonic memory elements employing phase-change materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, Carlos; Hosseini, Peiman; Wright, C David; Bhaskaran, Harish; Pernice, Wolfram H P

    2014-03-05

    Phase-change materials integrated into nanophotonic circuits provide a flexible way to realize tunable optical components. Relying on the enormous refractive-index contrast between the amorphous and crystalline states, such materials are promising candidates for on-chip photonic memories. Nonvolatile memory operation employing arrays of microring resonators is demonstrated as a route toward all-photonic chipscale information processing. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Photon-photon collisions and photon structure functions at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Patt, J

    2000-01-01

    The present knowledge of the structure of the photon based on measurements of photon structure functions is discussed. This review covers recent results on QED structure functions and on the hadronic structure function F/sub 2//sup gamma /. (13 refs).

  5. Corneal perforation after conductive keratoplasty with previous refractive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kymionis, George D; Titze, Patrik; Markomanolakis, Marinos M; Aslanides, Ioannis M; Pallikaris, Ioannis G

    2003-12-01

    A 56-year-old woman had conductive keratoplasty (CK) for residual hyperopia and astigmatism. Three years before the procedure, the patient had arcuate keratotomy, followed by laser in situ keratomileusis 2 years later for high astigmatism correction in both eyes. During CK, a corneal perforation occurred in the right eye; during the postoperative examination, an iris perforation and anterior subcapsule opacification were seen beneath the perforation site. The perforation was managed with a bandage contact lens and an antibiotic-steroid ointment; it had a negative Seidel sign by the third day. The surgery in the left eye was uneventful. Three months after the procedure, the uncorrected visual acuity was 20/32 and the best corrected visual acuity 20/20 in both eyes with a significant improvement in corneal topography. Care must be taken to prevent CK-treated spots from coinciding with areas in the corneal stroma that might have been altered by previous refractive procedures.

  6. Photonic slab heterostructures based on opals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios-Lidon, Elisa; Galisteo-Lopez, Juan F.; Juarez, Beatriz H.; Lopez, Cefe

    2004-09-01

    In this paper the fabrication of photonic slab heterostructures based on artificial opals is presented. The innovated method combines high-quality thin-films growing of opals and silica infiltration by Chemical Vapor Deposition through a multi-step process. By varying structure parameters, such as lattice constant, sample thickness or refractive index, different heterostructures have been obtained. The optical study of these systems, carried out by reflectance and transmittance measurements, shows that the prepared samples are of high quality further confirmed by Scanning Electron Microscopy micrographs. The proposed novel method for sample preparation allows a high control of the involved structure parameters, giving the possibility of tunning their photonic behavior. Special attention in the optical response of these materials has been addressed to the study of planar defects embedded in opals, due to their importance in different photonic fields and future technological applications. Reflectance and transmission measurements show a sharp resonance due to localized states associated with the presence of planar defects. A detailed study of the defect mode position and its dependance on defect thickness and on the surrounding photonic crystal is presented as well as evidence showing the scalability of the problem. Finally, it is also concluded that the proposed method is cheap and versatile allowing the preparation of opal-based complex structures.

  7. Photonic Crystal Sensors Based on Porous Silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Pacholski

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Porous silicon has been established as an excellent sensing platform for the optical detection of hazardous chemicals and biomolecular interactions such as DNA hybridization, antigen/antibody binding, and enzymatic reactions. Its porous nature provides a high surface area within a small volume, which can be easily controlled by changing the pore sizes. As the porosity and consequently the refractive index of an etched porous silicon layer depends on the electrochemial etching conditions photonic crystals composed of multilayered porous silicon films with well-resolved and narrow optical reflectivity features can easily be obtained. The prominent optical response of the photonic crystal decreases the detection limit and therefore increases the sensitivity of porous silicon sensors in comparison to sensors utilizing Fabry-Pérot based optical transduction. Development of porous silicon photonic crystal sensors which allow for the detection of analytes by the naked eye using a simple color change or the fabrication of stacked porous silicon photonic crystals showing two distinct optical features which can be utilized for the discrimination of analytes emphasize its high application potential.

  8. Photonic Crystal Sensors Based on Porous Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacholski, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Porous silicon has been established as an excellent sensing platform for the optical detection of hazardous chemicals and biomolecular interactions such as DNA hybridization, antigen/antibody binding, and enzymatic reactions. Its porous nature provides a high surface area within a small volume, which can be easily controlled by changing the pore sizes. As the porosity and consequently the refractive index of an etched porous silicon layer depends on the electrochemial etching conditions photonic crystals composed of multilayered porous silicon films with well-resolved and narrow optical reflectivity features can easily be obtained. The prominent optical response of the photonic crystal decreases the detection limit and therefore increases the sensitivity of porous silicon sensors in comparison to sensors utilizing Fabry-Pérot based optical transduction. Development of porous silicon photonic crystal sensors which allow for the detection of analytes by the naked eye using a simple color change or the fabrication of stacked porous silicon photonic crystals showing two distinct optical features which can be utilized for the discrimination of analytes emphasize its high application potential. PMID:23571671

  9. Double Negative Materials (DNM), Phenomena and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    5697–5711. Maksimović, M., and Z. Jakšić. “Emittance and Absorptance Tailoring by Negative Refractive Index Metamaterial-Based Cantor Multilayers.” J...TOKEN=48950826 Popov, A. K., S. A. Myslivets, T. F. George , and V. M. Shalaev. “Tailoring Transparency of Negative-Index Metamaterials With Parametric...Popov, A. K., S. A. Myslivets, T. F. George , and V. M. Shalaev. “Compensating Losses in Positive- and Negative-Index Metamaterials Through

  10. Photonic Crystals Towards Nanoscale Photonic Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Lourtioz, Jean-Michel; Berger, Vincent; Gérard, Jean-Michel; Maystre, Daniel; Tchelnokov, Alexei; Pagnoux, Dominique

    2008-01-01

    Just like the periodical crystalline potential in solid state crystals determines their properties for the conduction of electrons, the periodical structuring of photonic crystals leads to envisioning the possibility of achieving a control of the photon flux in dielectric and metallic materials. The use of photonic crystals as cages for storing, filtering or guiding light at the wavelength scale paves the way to the realization of optical and optoelectronic devices with ultimate properties and dimensions. This will contribute towards meeting the demands for greater miniaturization imposed by the processing of an ever increasing number of data. Photonic Crystals will provide students and researchers from different fields with the theoretical background required for modelling photonic crystals and their optical properties, while at the same time presenting the large variety of devices, ranging from optics to microwaves, where photonic crystals have found application. As such, it aims at building bridges between...

  11. Photonic Crystals Towards Nanoscale Photonic Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Lourtioz, Jean-Michel; Berger, Vincent; Gérard, Jean-Michel; Maystre, Daniel; Tchelnokov, Alexis

    2005-01-01

    Just like the periodical crystalline potential in solid-state crystals determines their properties for the conduction of electrons, the periodical structuring of photonic crystals leads to envisioning the possibility of achieving a control of the photon flux in dielectric and metallic materials. The use of photonic crystals as a cage for storing, filtering or guiding light at the wavelength scale thus paves the way to the realisation of optical and optoelectronic devices with ultimate properties and dimensions. This should contribute toward meeting the demands for a greater miniaturisation that the processing of an ever increasing number of data requires. Photonic Crystals intends at providing students and researchers from different fields with the theoretical background needed for modelling photonic crystals and their optical properties, while at the same time presenting the large variety of devices, from optics to microwaves, where photonic crystals have found applications. As such, it aims at building brid...

  12. Refraction and eye anterior segment parameters in schizophrenic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tongabay Cumurcu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: To evaluate the difference in terms of refractive errors and anterior segment parameters between schizophrenic patients and healthy volunteers. Methods: This study compared 70 patients (48 men who were diagnosed with schizophrenia with a control group of 60 (35 men who were similar in terms of age, gender, education, and socioeconomic level. Anterior segment examination was performed using a Scheimflug system. Axial length and lens thickness (LT were measured using optic biometry. The following tests were administered to the psychiatric patient group: Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS, Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS, and Scale for the Assessment of Positive Symptoms (SAPS. Results: Mild myopia was detected in both the schizophrenic and control groups, with no statistically significant difference (p>0.005. Corneal volume (CV, anterior chamber volume (ACV, anterior chamber depth (ACD, and central corneal thickness (CCT values were lower in the schizophrenic group, and there was a statistically significant between-group difference (p=0.026, p=0.014, p=0.048, and p=0.005, respectively. LT was greater in schizophrenics, and the difference was found to be statistically significant (p=0.006. A statistically significant negative correlation was found between SAPS and cylinder values (p=0.008. The axial eye length, cylinder value, pupil diameter, mean keratometric value, and anterior chamber angle revealed no statistically significant difference between the groups (p>0.05. Conclusion: No statistically significant difference was detected in terms of refraction disorders between schizophrenics and the healthy control group, while some differences in anterior chamber parameters were present. These results demonstrate that schizophrenics may exhibit clinical and structural differences in the eye.

  13. Estimation of photonic band gap in the hollow core cylindrical multilayer structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chourasia, Ritesh Kumar; Singh, Vivek

    2018-04-01

    The propagation characteristic of two hollow core cylindrical multilayer structures having high and low refractive index contrast of cladding regions have been studied and compared at two design wavelengths i.e. 1550 nm and 632.8 nm. With the help of transfer matrix method a relation between the incoming light wave and outgoing light wave has been developed using the boundary matching technique. In high refractive index contrast, small numbers of layers are sufficient to provide perfect band gap in both design wavelengths. The spectral position and width of band gap is highly depending on the optical path of incident light in all considered cases. For sensing application, the sensitivity of waveguide can be obtained either by monitoring the width of photonic band gap or by monitoring the spectral shift of photonic band gap. Change in the width of photonic band gap with the core refractive index is larger in high refractive index contrast of cladding materials. However, in the case of monitoring the spectral shift of band gap, the obtained sensitivity is large for low refractive index contrast of cladding materials and further it increases with increase of design wavelength.

  14. Athermal Photonic Devices and Circuits on a Silicon Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunathan, Vivek

    In recent years, silicon based optical interconnects has been pursued as an effective solution that can offer cost, energy, distance and bandwidth density improvements over copper. Monolithic integration of optics and electronics has been enabled by silicon photonic devices that can be fabricated using CMOS technology. However, high levels of device integration result in significant local and global temperature fluctuations that prove problematic for silicon based photonic devices. In particular, high temperature dependence of Si refractive index (thermo-optic (TO) coefficient) shifts the filter response of resonant devices that limit wavelength resolution in various applications. Active thermal compensation using heaters and thermo-electric coolers are the legacy solution for low density integration. However, the required electrical power, device foot print and number of input/output (I/O) lines limit the integration density. We present a passive approach to an athermal design that involves compensation of positive TO effects from a silicon core by negative TO effects of the polymer cladding. In addition, the design rule involves engineering the waveguide core geometry depending on the resonance wavelength under consideration to ensure desired amount of light in the polymer. We develop exact design requirements for a TO peak stability of 0 pm/K and present prototype performance of 0.5 pm/K. We explore the material design space through initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) of 2 polymer cladding choices. We study the effect of cross-linking on the optical properties of a polymer and establish the superior performance of the co-polymer cladding compared to the homo-polymer. Integration of polymer clad devices in an electronic-photonic architecture requires the possibility of multi-layer stacking capability. We use a low temperature, high density plasma chemical vapor deposition of SiO2/SiN x to hermetically seal the athermal. Further, we employ visible light for

  15. Photon and photon reactions: elementary theoretical introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diu, B.

    The electromagnetic field and associated quanta, the photons, are simply and briefly studied. The conventional electromagnetism laws are recalled. Fundamental concepts such as gauge invariance, the electromagnetic current conservation, and photon behavior against the internal symmetries of strong interactions are simply introduced. Results and notations are applied to analysis of reactions where photons intervene in initial or final states (photoproduction) within the limits of amplitude properties in the conventional space-time. The helicity and invariant amplitude formalisms are compared [fr

  16. Negative CO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meysman, F.J.R.; Montserrat, F.

    2017-01-01

    Negative emission technologies (NETs) target the removal of carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere, and are being actively investigated as a strategy to limit global warming to within the 1.5–2°C targets of the 2015 UN climate agreement. Enhanced silicate weathering (ESW) proposes to

  17. Negative Certainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariso, José María

    2017-01-01

    The definitions of "negative knowledge" and the studies in this regard published to date have not considered the categorial distinction Wittgenstein established between knowledge and certainty. Hence, the important role that certainty, despite its omission, should have in these definitions and studies has not yet been shown. In this…

  18. Active Photonic Crystal Waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ek, Sara

    This thesis deals with the fabrication and characterization of active photonic crystal waveguides, realized in III-V semiconductor material with embedded active layers. The platform offering active photonic crystal waveguides has many potential applications. One of these is a compact photonic...... due to photonic crystal dispersion. The observations are explained by the enhancement of net gain by light slow down. Another application based on active photonic crystal waveguides is micro lasers. Measurements on quantum dot micro laser cavities with different mirror configurations and photonic...

  19. Reversing the direction of space and inverse Doppler effect in positive refraction index media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Fei; He, Sailing

    2017-01-01

    A negative refractive index medium, in which all spatial coordinates are reversed (i.e. a left-hand triplet is formed) by a spatial folding transformation, can create many novel electromagnetic phenomena, e.g. backward wave propagation, and inversed Doppler effect (IDE). In this study, we use coordinate rotation transformation to reverse only two spatial coordinates (e.g. x ′ and y ′), while keeping z ′ unchanged. In this case, some novel phenomena, e.g. radiation-direction-reversing illusions and IDE, can be achieved in a free space region wrapped by the proposed shell without any negative refractive index medium, which is easier for experimental realization and future applications. (paper)

  20. Regular shock refraction in planar ideal MHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delmont, P; Keppens, R

    2010-01-01

    We study the classical problem of planar shock refraction at an oblique density discontinuity, separating two gases at rest, in planar ideal (magneto)hydrodynamics. In the hydrodynamical case, 3 signals arise and the interface becomes Richtmyer-Meshkov unstable due to vorticity deposition on the shocked contact. In the magnetohydrodynamical case, on the other hand, when the normal component of the magnetic field does not vanish, 5 signals will arise. The interface then typically remains stable, since the Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions in ideal MHD do not allow for vorticity deposition on a contact discontinuity. We present an exact Riemann solver based solution strategy to describe the initial self similar refraction phase. Using grid-adaptive MHD simulations, we show that after reflection from the top wall, the interface remains stable.

  1. Characteristics of the thick, compound refractive lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantell, Richard H.; Feinstein, Joseph; Beguiristain, H. Raul; Piestrup, Melvin A.; Gary, Charles K.; Cremer, Jay T.

    2003-01-01

    A compound refractive lens (CRL), consisting of a series of N closely spaced lens elements each of which contributes a small fraction of the total focusing, can be used to focus x rays or neutrons. The thickness of a CRL can be comparable to its focal length, whereupon a thick-lens analysis must be performed. In contrast with the conventional optical lens, where the ray inside the lens follows a straight line, the ray inside the CRL is continually changing direction because of the multiple refracting surfaces. Thus the matrix representation for the thick CRL is quite different from that for the thick optical lens. Principal planes can be defined such that the thick-lens matrix can be converted to that of a thin lens. For a thick lens the focal length is greater than for a thin lens with the same lens curvature, but this lengthening effect is less for the CRL than for the conventional optical lens

  2. Uncladded sensing fiber for refractive index measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhardwaj, V.; Gangwar, R. K.; Pathak, A. K.; Singh, V. K.

    2016-01-01

    The formation of chemically etched optical fiber for use in refractive index sensor is addressed. This presented design of a refractive index (RI) sensor is based on recording the power loss exhibited by radiation propagating through an etched multimode fiber (MMF) immersed in the liquid under study. The decreasing diameters of fibers are found to be strongly dependent on the temperature and etchant composition. This experiment was performed for different unclad etched fibers for same sensing length and the RI changes from 1.33 RIU to 1.38 RIU. When the multimode fiber (MMF) is etched for 12 hours the sensitivity of the sensor is approximately 204.25dBm/RIU, which is larger than without etched fiber having sensitivity 127.2dBm/RIU.

  3. Uncladded sensing fiber for refractive index measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, V.; Gangwar, R. K.; Pathak, A. K.; Singh, V. K.

    2016-05-01

    The formation of chemically etched optical fiber for use in refractive index sensor is addressed. This presented design of a refractive index (RI) sensor is based on recording the power loss exhibited by radiation propagating through an etched multimode fiber (MMF) immersed in the liquid under study. The decreasing diameters of fibers are found to be strongly dependent on the temperature and etchant composition. This experiment was performed for different unclad etched fibers for same sensing length and the RI changes from 1.33 RIU to 1.38 RIU. When the multimode fiber (MMF) is etched for 12 hours the sensitivity of the sensor is approximately 204.25dBm/RIU, which is larger than without etched fiber having sensitivity 127.2dBm/RIU.

  4. Uncladded sensing fiber for refractive index measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhardwaj, V., E-mail: bhardwajphyism@gmail.com; Gangwar, R. K.; Pathak, A. K.; Singh, V. K. [Department of Applied Physics Indian School of Mines Dhanbad, Jharkhand (India)

    2016-05-06

    The formation of chemically etched optical fiber for use in refractive index sensor is addressed. This presented design of a refractive index (RI) sensor is based on recording the power loss exhibited by radiation propagating through an etched multimode fiber (MMF) immersed in the liquid under study. The decreasing diameters of fibers are found to be strongly dependent on the temperature and etchant composition. This experiment was performed for different unclad etched fibers for same sensing length and the RI changes from 1.33 RIU to 1.38 RIU. When the multimode fiber (MMF) is etched for 12 hours the sensitivity of the sensor is approximately 204.25dBm/RIU, which is larger than without etched fiber having sensitivity 127.2dBm/RIU.

  5. Parabolic refractive X-ray lenses: a breakthrough in X-ray optics

    CERN Document Server

    Lengeler, B; Benner, B; Guenzler, T F; Kuhlmann, M; Tümmler, J; Simionovici, A S; Drakopoulos, M; Snigirev, A; Snigireva, I

    2001-01-01

    Refractive X-ray lenses, considered for a long time as unfeasible, have been realized with a rotational parabolic profile at our institute: The main features of the new lenses are: they focus in two directions and are free of spherical aberration. By varying the number of individual lenses in the stack the focal length can be chosen in a typical range from 0.5 to 2 m for photon energies between about 6 and 60 keV. The aperture of the lens is about 1 mm matching the angular divergence of undulator beams at 3d generation synchrotron radiation sources. They cope without problems with the heat load from the white beam of an undulator. Finally, they are easy to align and to operate. Refractive X-ray lenses can be used with hard X-rays in the same way as glass lenses can be used for visible light, if it is take into account that the numerical aperture is small (of the order 10 sup - sup 4). Being high-quality optical elements, the refractive X-ray lenses can be used for generating a focal spot in the mu m range wit...

  6. Transients of the electromagnetically-induced-transparency-enhanced refractive Kerr nonlinearity: Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pack, M. V.; Camacho, R. M.; Howell, J. C.

    2006-01-01

    We present a theory describing the transients and rise times of the refractive Kerr nonlinearity which is enhanced using electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). We restrict our analysis to the case of a pulsed signal field with continuous-wave EIT fields, and all fields are well below saturation. These restrictions enable the reduction of an EIT Kerr, four-level, density-matrix equation to a two-level Bloch-vector equation which has a simple and physically intuitive algebraic solution. The physically intuitive picture of a two-level Bloch vector provides insights that are easily generalized to more complex and experimentally realistic models. We consider generalization to the cases of Doppler broadening, many-level EIT systems (we consider the D1 line of 87 Rb), and optically thick media. For the case of optically thick media we find that the rise time of the refractive EIT Kerr effect is proportional to the optical thickness. The rise time of the refractive EIT Kerr effect sets important limitations for potential few-photon applications

  7. Discontinuous Galerkin Approximations for Computing Electromagnetic Bloch Modes in Photonic Crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, Zhongjie; Cesmelioglu, A.; van der Vegt, Jacobus J.W.; Xu, Yan

    We analyze discontinuous Galerkin finite element discretizations of the Maxwell equations with periodic coefficients. These equations are used to model the behavior of light in photonic crystals, which are materials containing a spatially periodic variation of the refractive index commensurate with

  8. Effective spectral dispersion of refractive index modulation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vojtíšek, Petr; Květoň, M.; Richter, I.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 4 (2017), č. článku 045603. ISSN 2040-8978 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1206 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : volume gratings * holography * dispersion * refractive index modulation Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 1.741, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/2040-8986/aa6092/meta

  9. Lens Design Using Group Indices of Refraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, A. H.

    1995-01-01

    An approach to lens design is described in which the ratio of the group velocity to the speed of light (the group index) in glass is used, in conjunction with the more familiar phase index of refraction, to control certain chromatic properties of a system of thin lenses in contact. The first-order design of thin-lens systems is illustrated by examples incorporating the methods described.

  10. Refractive outcomes after multifocal intraocular lens exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eric J; Sajjad, Ahmar; Montes de Oca, Ildamaris; Koch, Douglas D; Wang, Li; Weikert, Mitchell P; Al-Mohtaseb, Zaina N

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the refractive outcomes after multifocal intraocular lens (IOL) exchange. Cullen Eye Institute, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USA. Retrospective case series. Patients had multifocal IOL explantation followed by IOL implantation. Outcome measures included type of IOL, surgical indication, corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA), and refractive prediction error. The study comprised 29 patients (35 eyes). The types of IOLs implanted after multifocal IOL explantation included in-the-bag IOLs (74%), iris-sutured IOLs (6%), sulcus-fixated IOLs with optic capture (9%), sulcus-fixated IOLs without optic capture (9%), and anterior chamber IOLs (3%). The surgical indication for exchange included blurred vision (60%), photic phenomena (57%), photophobia (9%), loss of contrast sensitivity (3%), and multiple complaints (29%). The CDVA was 20/40 or better in 94% of eyes before the exchange and 100% of eyes after the exchange (P = .12). The mean refractive prediction error significantly decreased from 0.22 ± 0.81 diopter (D) before the exchange to -0.09 ± 0.53 D after the exchange (P exchange to 0.23 D after the exchange (P exchange can be performed safely with good visual outcomes using different types of IOLs. A lower refractive prediction error and a higher likelihood of 20/40 or better vision can be achieved with the implantation of the second IOL compared with the original multifocal IOL, regardless of the final IOL position. Copyright © 2017 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Diffraction limit of refractive compound lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolchevsky, N.N.; Petrov, P.V.

    2015-01-01

    A compound X-ray and neutron lenses is an array of lenses with a common axis. The resolution limited by aberration and by diffraction. Diffraction limit comes from theory based on absorption aperture of the compound refractive lenses. Beam passing through transparent lenses form Airy pattern. Results of calculation of diffraction resolution limit for non-transparent X-ray and neutron lenses are discussed. (authors)

  12. 3D super-virtual refraction interferometry

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Kai

    2014-08-05

    Super-virtual refraction interferometry enhances the signal-to-noise ratio of far-offset refractions. However, when applied to 3D cases, traditional 2D SVI suffers because the stationary positions of the source-receiver pairs might be any place along the recording plane, not just along a receiver line. Moreover, the effect of enhancing the SNR can be limited because of the limitations in the number of survey lines, irregular line geometries, and azimuthal range of arrivals. We have developed a 3D SVI method to overcome these problems. By integrating along the source or receiver lines, the cross-correlation or the convolution result of a trace pair with the source or receiver at the stationary position can be calculated without the requirement of knowing the stationary locations. In addition, the amplitudes of the cross-correlation and convolution results are largely strengthened by integration, which is helpful to further enhance the SNR. In this paper, both synthetic and field data examples are presented, demonstrating that the super-virtual refractions generated by our method have accurate traveltimes and much improved SNR.

  13. Inverse opal photonic crystal of chalcogenide glass by solution processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohoutek, Tomas; Orava, Jiri; Sawada, Tsutomu; Fudouzi, Hiroshi

    2011-01-15

    Chalcogenide opal and inverse opal photonic crystals were successfully fabricated by low-cost and low-temperature solution-based process, which is well developed in polymer films processing. Highly ordered silica colloidal crystal films were successfully infilled with nano-colloidal solution of the high refractive index As(30)S(70) chalcogenide glass by using spin-coating method. The silica/As-S opal film was etched in HF acid to dissolve the silica opal template and fabricate the inverse opal As-S photonic crystal. Both, the infilled silica/As-S opal film (Δn ~ 0.84 near λ=770 nm) and the inverse opal As-S photonic structure (Δn ~ 1.26 near λ=660 nm) had significantly enhanced reflectivity values and wider photonic bandgaps in comparison with the silica opal film template (Δn ~ 0.434 near λ=600 nm). The key aspects of opal film preparation by spin-coating of nano-colloidal chalcogenide glass solution are discussed. The solution fabricated "inorganic polymer" opal and the inverse opal structures exceed photonic properties of silica or any organic polymer opal film. The fabricated photonic structures are proposed for designing novel flexible colloidal crystal laser devices, photonic waveguides and chemical sensors. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Terahertz gas sensing based on a simple one-dimensional photonic crystal cavity with high-quality factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, T.; Han, Z. H.; Liu, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    We report in this paper terahertz gas sensing using a simple 1D photonic crystal cavity. The resonant frequencies of the cavity depend linearly on the refractive index of the ambient gas, which can then be measured by monitoring the resonance shift. Although quite easy to manufacture, this cavity...... exhibits high-quality factors, facilitating the realization of high sensitivity in the gas refractive index sensing. In our experiment, 6% of the change of hydrogen concentration in air, which corresponds to a refractive index change of 1.4 x 10(-5), can be steadily detected, and different gas samples can...

  15. Negative ion detachment cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champion, R.L.; Doverspike, L.D.

    1992-10-01

    The authors have measured absolute cross sections for electron detachment and charge exchange for collision of O and S with atomic hydrogen, have investigated the sputtering and photodesorption of negative ions from gas covered surfaces, and have begun an investigation of photon-induced field emission of electrons from exotic structures. Brief descriptions of these activities as well as future plans for these projects are given below

  16. Modelling of solar cells with down-conversion of high energy photons, anti-reflection coatings and light trapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vos, Alexis de; Szymanska, Aleksandra; Badescu, Viorel

    2009-01-01

    In classical solar cells, each absorbed photon gives rise to one electron-hole pair, irrespective of the photon energy. By applying an appropriate photoluminescent layer in front of the solar cell semiconductor, one can convert one high energy photon into two low energy photons (so-called down-conversion). In the present study, we do not consider photoluminescent layers that merely shift down photon energies (without enhancing the number of photons). In principle, these two photons can then generate two electron-hole pairs in the solar cell, thus increasing the efficiency of the device. However, the two photons emitted by the converter, are not necessarily emitted in the direction of the semiconductor: they can also be emitted in the direction 'back to the sun'. As most semiconductors have a high refractive index, in case the luminescent material has a low refractive index, more than half of the photoluminescence emission is lost in the sun direction, resulting in a net loss of light current generated by the solar cell instead of an increase. On the other hand, a high refractive index of the conversion layer (e.g. equal to the solar cell refractive index) will lead to a bad optical coupling with the air and a good optical coupling with the semiconductor, and therefore, more than 50% of the emitted low energy photons will actually reach the solar cell. However, in the latter case, many solar photons do not reach the converter in the first place because of reflection at the air-converter interface. As a result, it turns out that, in the absence of any anti-reflection coating, a refractive index n 2 of the converting layer in the range between n 1 1/2 and n 1 is optimal, where n 1 is the refractive index of the solar cell material. If, however, an anti-reflection coating is applied between air and the converter, the best choice for n 2 is n 1 . Finally, if two anti-reflection coatings are applied (the former between air and the converter, the latter between the

  17. Photonic crystals: towards nanoscale photonic devices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lourtioz, J.-M

    2005-01-01

    .... From this point of view, the emergence of photonic bandgap materials and photonic crystals at the end of the 1980s can be seen as a revenge to the benefit this time of optics and electromagnetism. In the same way as the periodicity of solid state crystals determines the energy bands and the conduction properties of electrons, the periodical structur...

  18. Refractive index modulation of Sb{sub 70}Te{sub 30} phase-change thin films by multiple femtosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei, Kai; Wang, Yang, E-mail: ywang@siom.ac.cn; Jiang, Minghui; Wu, Yiqun [Key Laboratory of High Power Laser Materials, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2016-05-07

    In this study, the controllable effective refractive index modulation of Sb{sub 70}Te{sub 30} phase-change thin films between amorphous and crystalline states was achieved experimentally by multiple femtosecond laser pulses. The modulation mechanism was analyzed comprehensively by a spectral ellipsometer measurement, surface morphology observation, and two-temperature model calculations. We numerically demonstrate the application of the optically modulated refractive index of the phase-change thin films in a precisely adjustable color display. These results may provide further insights into ultrafast phase-transition mechanics and are useful in the design of programmable photonic and opto-electrical devices based on phase-change memory materials.

  19. Modification of the refractive index of dielectrica by means of ionizing radiation; Modifikation des Brechungsindexes von Dielektrika mit Hilfe ionisierender Strahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreas, B.

    2005-05-01

    Refractive-index changes are studied, which result by interaction of ionizing radiation with dielectric, optically transparent solids. As examples two materials are studied. At the one hand it deals with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), a polymer, which is irradiated with synchrotron radiation, and at the other hand with lithium niobate (LiNbO{sub 3}), an oxidic crystal, which is irradiated by fast helium ions. In both materials refractive-index changes in the range 10{sup -4} to 10{sup -3} can be produced, which is very interesting for many applications in photonics.

  20. Jet and hadron production in photon-photon collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Soldner-Rembold, Stefan

    1999-01-01

    Di-jet and inclusive charged hadron production cross-sections measured in photon-photon collisions by OPAL are compared to NLO pQCD calculations. Jet shapes measured in photon-photon scattering by OPAL, in deep-inelastic ep scattering by H1 and in photon-proton scattering by ZEUS are shown to be consistent in similar kinematic ranges. New results from TOPAZ on prompt photon production in photon-photon interactions are presented.

  1. Photonic crystal pioneer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anscombe, Nadya

    2011-08-01

    Over the past ten years, Crystal Fiber, now part of NKT Photonics, has been busy commercializing photonic crystal fibre. Nadya Anscombe finds out about the evolution of the technology and its applications.

  2. Photonic Design for Photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosten, E.; Callahan, D.; Horowitz, K.; Pala, R.; Atwater, H.

    2014-08-28

    We describe photonic design approaches for silicon photovoltaics including i) trapezoidal broadband light trapping structures ii) broadband light trapping with photonic crystal superlattices iii) III-V/Si nanowire arrays designed for broadband light trapping.

  3. Photonic crystal light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, James G [Albuquerque, NM; Lin, Shawn-Yu [Albuquerque, NM; Bur, James A [Corrales, NM

    2004-07-27

    A light source is provided by a photonic crystal having an enhanced photonic density-of-states over a band of frequencies and wherein at least one of the dielectric materials of the photonic crystal has a complex dielectric constant, thereby producing enhanced light emission at the band of frequencies when the photonic crystal is heated. The dielectric material can be a metal, such as tungsten. The spectral properties of the light source can be easily tuned by modification of the photonic crystal structure and materials. The photonic crystal light source can be heated electrically or other heating means. The light source can further include additional photonic crystals that exhibit enhanced light emission at a different band of frequencies to provide for color mixing. The photonic crystal light source may have applications in optical telecommunications, information displays, energy conversion, sensors, and other optical applications.

  4. Photon structure function - theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardeen, W.A.

    1984-12-01

    The theoretical status of the photon structure function is reviewed. Particular attention is paid to the hadronic mixing problem and the ability of perturbative QCD to make definitive predictions for the photon structure function. 11 references

  5. Keratocyte apoptosis and corneal antioxidant enzyme activities after refractive corneal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgihan, K; Bilgihan, A; Adiguzel, U; Sezer, C; Yis, O; Akyol, G; Hasanreisoglu, B

    2002-01-01

    Refractive corneal surgery induces keratocyte apoptosis and generates reactive oxygen radicals (ROS) in the cornea. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the correlation between keratocyte apoptosis and corneal antioxidant enzyme activities after different refractive surgical procedures in rabbits. Rabbits were divided into six groups. All groups were compared with the control group (Group 1), after epithelial scraping (Group 2), epithelial scrape and photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) (traditional PRK: Group 3), transepithelial PRK (Group 4), creation of a corneal flap with microkeratome (Group 5) and laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK, Group 6). Terminal deoxyribonucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-digoxigenin nick-end labelling assay (to detect DNA fragmentation in situ) and light microscopy were used to detect apoptosis in rabbit eyes. Glutathione peroxidase (Gpx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities of the corneal tissues were measured with spectrophotometric methods. Corneal Gpx and SOD activities decreased significantly in all groups when compared with the control group (P<0.05) and groups 2, 3 and 6 showed a significantly higher amount of keratocyte apoptosis (P<0.05). Not only a negative correlation was observed between corneal SOD activity and keratocyte apoptosis (cc: -0.3648) but Gpx activity also showed negative correlation with keratocyte apoptosis (cc: -0.3587). The present study illustrates the negative correlation between keratocyte apoptosis and corneal antioxidant enzyme activities. This finding suggests that ROS may be partly responsible for keratocyte apoptosis after refractive surgery.

  6. Nanofocusing refractive X-ray lenses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boye, Pit

    2010-02-05

    This thesis is concerned with the optimization and development of the production of nanofocusing refractive X-ray lenses. These optics made of either silicon or diamond are well-suited for high resolution X-ray microscopy. The goal of this work is the design of a reproducible manufacturing process which allows the production of silicon lenses with high precision, high quality and high piece number. Furthermore a process for the production of diamond lenses is to be developed and established. In this work, the theoretical basics of X-rays and their interaction with matter are described. Especially, aspects of synchrotron radiation are emphasized. Important in X-ray microscopy are the different optics. The details, advantages and disadvantages, in particular those of refractive lenses are given. To achieve small X-ray beams well beyond the 100 nm range a small focal length is required. This is achieved in refractive lenses by moving to a compact lens design where several single lenses are stacked behind each other. The, so-called nanofocusing refractive lenses (NFLs) have a parabolic cylindrical shape with lateral structure sizes in the micrometer range. NFLs are produced by using micro-machining techniques. These micro-fabrication processes and technologies are introduced. The results of the optimization and the final fabrication process for silicon lenses are presented. Subsequently, two experiments that are exemplary for the use of NFLs, are introduced. The rst one employs a high-resolution scanning fluorescence mapping of a geological sample, and the second one is a coherent x-ray diffraction imaging (CXDI) experiment. CXDI is able to reconstruct the illuminated object from recorded coherent diffraction patterns. In a scanning mode, referred to as ptychography, this method is even able to reconstruct the illumination and the object simultaneously. Especially the reconstructed illumination and the possibility of computed propagation of the wave field along the

  7. Nanofocusing refractive X-ray lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boye, Pit

    2010-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the optimization and development of the production of nanofocusing refractive X-ray lenses. These optics made of either silicon or diamond are well-suited for high resolution X-ray microscopy. The goal of this work is the design of a reproducible manufacturing process which allows the production of silicon lenses with high precision, high quality and high piece number. Furthermore a process for the production of diamond lenses is to be developed and established. In this work, the theoretical basics of X-rays and their interaction with matter are described. Especially, aspects of synchrotron radiation are emphasized. Important in X-ray microscopy are the different optics. The details, advantages and disadvantages, in particular those of refractive lenses are given. To achieve small X-ray beams well beyond the 100 nm range a small focal length is required. This is achieved in refractive lenses by moving to a compact lens design where several single lenses are stacked behind each other. The, so-called nanofocusing refractive lenses (NFLs) have a parabolic cylindrical shape with lateral structure sizes in the micrometer range. NFLs are produced by using micro-machining techniques. These micro-fabrication processes and technologies are introduced. The results of the optimization and the final fabrication process for silicon lenses are presented. Subsequently, two experiments that are exemplary for the use of NFLs, are introduced. The rst one employs a high-resolution scanning fluorescence mapping of a geological sample, and the second one is a coherent x-ray diffraction imaging (CXDI) experiment. CXDI is able to reconstruct the illuminated object from recorded coherent diffraction patterns. In a scanning mode, referred to as ptychography, this method is even able to reconstruct the illumination and the object simultaneously. Especially the reconstructed illumination and the possibility of computed propagation of the wave field along the

  8. Photon wave function

    OpenAIRE

    Bialynicki-Birula, Iwo

    2005-01-01

    Photon wave function is a controversial concept. Controversies stem from the fact that photon wave functions can not have all the properties of the Schroedinger wave functions of nonrelativistic wave mechanics. Insistence on those properties that, owing to peculiarities of photon dynamics, cannot be rendered, led some physicists to the extreme opinion that the photon wave function does not exist. I reject such a fundamentalist point of view in favor of a more pragmatic approach. In my view, t...

  9. Optical bistability induced by quantum coherence in a negative index atomic medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hong-Jun; Sun Hui; Li Jin-Ping; Yin Bao-Yin; Guo Hong-Ju

    2013-01-01

    Bistability behaviors in an optical ring cavity filled with a dense V-type four-level atomic medium are theoretically investigated. It is found that the optical bistability can appear in the negative refraction frequency band, while both the bistability and multi-stability can occur in the positive refraction frequency bands. Therefore, optical bistability can be realized from conventional material to negative index material due to quantum coherence in our scheme. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  10. Diffusion Based Photon Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjøth, Lars; Fogh Olsen, Ole; Sporring, Jon

    2007-01-01

    . To address this problem we introduce a novel photon mapping algorithm based on nonlinear anisotropic diffusion. Our algorithm adapts according to the structure of the photon map such that smoothing occurs along edges and structures and not across. In this way we preserve the important illumination features......, while eliminating noise. We call our method diffusion based photon mapping....

  11. Diffusion Based Photon Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjøth, Lars; Olsen, Ole Fogh; Sporring, Jon

    2006-01-01

    . To address this problem we introduce a novel photon mapping algorithm based on nonlinear anisotropic diffusion. Our algorithm adapts according to the structure of the photon map such that smoothing occurs along edges and structures and not across. In this way we preserve the important illumination features......, while eliminating noise. We call our method diffusion based photon mapping....

  12. Photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægsgaard, Jesper; Hansen, K P; Nielsen, M D

    2003-01-01

    Photonic crystal fibers having a complex microstructure in the transverse plane constitute a new and promising class of optical fibers. Such fibers can either guide light through total internal reflection or the photonic bandgap effect, In this paper, we review the different types and applications...... of photonic crystal fibers with particular emphasis on recent advances in the field....

  13. Glass-embedded two-dimensional silicon photonic crystal devices with a broad bandwidth waveguide and a high quality nanocavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Seung-Woo; Han, Jin-Kyu; Song, Bong-Shik; Noda, Susumu

    2010-08-30

    To enhance the mechanical stability of a two-dimensional photonic crystal slab structure and maintain its excellent performance, we designed a glass-embedded silicon photonic crystal device consisting of a broad bandwidth waveguide and a nanocavity with a high quality (Q) factor, and then fabricated the structure using spin-on glass (SOG). Furthermore, we showed that the refractive index of the SOG could be tuned from 1.37 to 1.57 by varying the curing temperature of the SOG. Finally, we demonstrated a glass-embedded heterostructured cavity with an ultrahigh Q factor of 160,000 by adjusting the refractive index of the SOG.

  14. Measurement of the effective refractive index of a turbid colloidal suspension using light refraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes-Coronado, A; Garcia-Valenzuela, A; Sanchez-Perez, C; Barrera, R G

    2005-01-01

    We propose and analyse a simple method to measure simultaneously the real and imaginary parts of the effective refractive index of a turbid suspension of particles. The method is based on measurements of the angle of refraction and transmittance of a laser beam that traverses a hollow glass prism filled with a colloidal suspension. We provide a comprehensive assessment of the method. It can offer high sensitivity while still being simple to interpret. We present results of experiments using an optically turbid suspension of polystyrene particles and compare them with theoretical predictions. We also report experimental evidence showing that the refractive behaviour of the diffuse component of light coming from a suspension depends on the volume fraction of the colloidal particles

  15. The refractive index of human hemoglobin in the visible range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhernovaya, O; Tuchin, V; Sydoruk, O; Douplik, A

    2011-01-01

    Because the refractive index of hemoglobin in the visible range is sensitive to the hemoglobin concentration, optical investigations of hemoglobin are important for medical diagnostics and treatment. Direct measurements of the refractive index are, however, challenging; few such measurements have previously been reported, especially in a wide wavelength range. We directly measured the refractive index of human deoxygenated and oxygenated hemoglobin for nine wavelengths between 400 and 700 nm for the hemoglobin concentrations up to 140 g l -1 . This paper analyzes the results and suggests a set of model functions to calculate the refractive index depending on the concentration. At all wavelengths, the measured values of the refractive index depended on the concentration linearly. Analyzing the slope of the lines, we determined the specific refraction increments, derived a set of model functions for the refractive index depending on the concentration, and compared our results with those available in the literature. Based on the model functions, we further calculated the refractive index at the physiological concentration within the erythrocytes of 320 g l -1 . The results can be used to calculate the refractive index in the visible range for arbitrary concentrations provided that the refractive indices depend on the concentration linearly.

  16. Dual curved photonic crystal ring resonator based channel drop filter using two-dimensional photonic crystal structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chhipa, Mayur Kumar, E-mail: mayurchhipa1@gmail.com [Deptt. of Electronics and Communication Engineering, Government Engineering College Ajmer Rajasthan INDIA (India); Dusad, Lalit Kumar [Rajasthan Technical University Kota, Rajasthan (India)

    2016-05-06

    In this paper channel drop filter (CDF) is designed using dual curved photonic crystal ring resonator (PCRR). The photonic band gap (PBG) is calculated by plane wave expansion (PWE) method and the photonic crystal (PhC) based on two dimensional (2D) square lattice periodic arrays of silicon (Si) rods in air structure have been investigated using finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. The number of rods in Z and X directions is 21 and 20 respectively with lattice constant 0.540 nm and rod radius r = 0.1 µm. The channel drop filter has been optimized for telecommunication wavelengths λ = 1.591 µm with refractive indices 3.533. In the designed structure further analysis is also done by changing whole rods refractive index and it has been observed that this filter may be used for filtering several other channels also. The designed structure is useful for CWDM systems. This device may serve as a key component in photonic integrated circuits. The device is ultra compact with the overall size around 123 µm{sup 2}.

  17. Illusion optics via one-dimensional ultratransparent photonic crystals with shifted spatial dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhongqi; Luo, Jie; Lai, Yun

    2017-12-11

    In this work, we propose that one-dimensional ultratransparent dielectric photonic crystals with wide-angle impedance matching and shifted elliptical equal frequency contours are promising candidate materials for illusion optics. The shift of the equal frequency contour does not affect the refractive behaviors, but enables a new degree of freedom in phase modulation. With such ultratransparent photonic crystals, we demonstrate some applications in illusion optics, including creating illusions of a different-sized scatterer and a shifted source with opposite phase. Such ultratransparent dielectric photonic crystals may establish a feasible platform for illusion optics devices at optical frequencies.

  18. Unidirectional Wave Propagation in Low-Symmetric Colloidal Photonic-Crystal Heterostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassilios Yannopapas

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We show theoretically that photonic crystals consisting of colloidal spheres exhibit unidirectional wave propagation and one-way frequency band gaps without breaking time-reversal symmetry via, e.g., the application of an external magnetic field or the use of nonlinear materials. Namely, photonic crystals with low symmetry such as the monoclinic crystal type considered here as well as with unit cells formed by the heterostructure of different photonic crystals show significant unidirectional electromagnetic response. In particular, we show that the use of scatterers with low refractive-index contrast favors the formation of unidirectional frequency gaps which is the optimal route for achieving unidirectional wave propagation.

  19. Unidirectional Wave Propagation in Low-Symmetric Colloidal Photonic-Crystal Heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yannopapas, Vassilios

    2015-03-19

    We show theoretically that photonic crystals consisting of colloidal spheres exhibit unidirectional wave propagation and one-way frequency band gaps without breaking time-reversal symmetry via, e.g., the application of an external magnetic field or the use of nonlinear materials. Namely, photonic crystals with low symmetry such as the monoclinic crystal type considered here as well as with unit cells formed by the heterostructure of different photonic crystals show significant unidirectional electromagnetic response. In particular, we show that the use of scatterers with low refractive-index contrast favors the formation of unidirectional frequency gaps which is the optimal route for achieving unidirectional wave propagation.

  20. Design of integrated all optical digital to analog converter (DAC) using 2D photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moniem, Tamer A.; El-Din, Eman S.

    2017-11-01

    A novel design of all optical 3 bit digital to analog (DAC) converter will be presented in this paper based on 2 Dimension photonic crystals (PhC). The proposed structure is based on the photonic crystal ring resonators (PCRR) with combining the nonlinear Kerr effect on the PCRR. The total size of the proposed optical 3 bit DAC is equal to 44 μm × 37 μm of 2D square lattice photonic crystals of silicon rods with refractive index equal to 3.4. The finite different time domain (FDTD) and Plane Wave Expansion (PWE) methods are used to back the overall operation of the proposed optical DAC.

  1. EDITORIAL: Sensitive structures: refractive indices in nanotechnology Sensitive structures: refractive indices in nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demming, Anna

    2012-12-01

    Refractive index effects using nanoscale systems are frequently applied in new imaging, sensing and even visibility cloaking technology. In this issue, researchers in Japan use simulations and experiments to describe the confinement of optical vortices in nanoscale fin structures and the sensitivity of these systems to the refractive index of the surrounding media [1]. The effects of refraction as light rays pass between different media were recorded as long ago as the first century AD, by Ptolemy [2]. Over the following centuries the phenomena inspired Ibn Sahl in 984 [3], Thomas Harriot in 1602 [4], Willebrord Snellius in 1621 [5] and Rene Descartes in 1637 [6] to independently derive the more accurate and elegant equation for refraction so familiar to us today. Recent studies of the interactions between light and matter continue to reveal a wealth of phenomena that originate in the effects of the refractive indices of materials. Nanostructures can be used to manipulate conditions that affect the refractive indices of materials, such as temperature. A E Aliev et al at the University of Texas reported a striking demonstration of temperature-dependent refractive index effects using a free-standing, highly aligned carbon nanotube aerogel sheet [7]. They used the extremely low thermal capacitance and high heat transfer ability of transparent carbon nanotube sheets to enable high-frequency modulation of the sheet temperature over an enormous temperature range. The resulting sharp, rapidly changing gradient of the refractive index in the surrounding liquid or gas makes objects seem to disappear and can be used for visibility cloaking. Light-matter interaction resonances, where light is confined at the nanoscale, can be extremely sensitive to changes in the refractive index of the surrounding media [8], even allowing single-molecule detection [9]. Plasmons, the collective oscillations of electrons in response to incident light, are a typical example. Researchers at Rice

  2. Photon acceleration in laser wakefield accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trines, R. M. G. M.

    2007-01-01

    If the index of a refraction of a dispersive medium, such as a plasma, changes in time, it can be used to change the frequency of light propagating through the medium. This effect is called photon acceleration. It has been predicted in both theory and simulations, and also been demonstrated experimentally for the case of moving ionization fronts in gases (the so-called ionization blueshift) as well as for laser-driven wakefields.Here, we present studies of photon acceleration in laser-driven plasma wakefields. The unique spectral characteristics of this process will be discussed, to distinguish it from e.g. photon acceleration by ionization fronts, frequency domain interferometry or self-phase modulation. The dynamics of the photons in laser-wakefield interaction are studied through both regular particle-in-cell and wave-kinetic simulations. The latter approach provides a powerful, versatile, and easy-to-use method to track the propagation of individual spectral components, providing new insight into the physics of laser-plasma interaction. Theory, simulations and experimental results will be brought together to provide a full understanding of the dynamics of a laser pulse in its own wakefield.Even though the wave-kinetic approach mentioned above has mainly been developed for the description of laser-plasma interaction, it can be applied to a much wider range of fast wave-slow wave interaction processes: Langmuir waves-ion acoustic waves, drift waves-zonal flow, Rossby waves-zonal flow, or even photons-gravitational waves. Several recent results in these areas will be shown, often with surprising results

  3. Silicon Microspheres Photonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serpenguzel, A.

    2008-01-01

    Electrophotonic integrated circuits (EPICs), or alternatively, optoelectronic integrated circuit (OEICs) are the natural evolution of the microelectronic integrated circuit (IC) with the addition of photonic capabilities. Traditionally, the IC industry has been based on group IV silicon, whereas the photonics industry on group III-V semiconductors. However, silicon based photonic microdevices have been making strands in siliconizing photonics. Silicon microspheres with their high quality factor whispering gallery modes (WGMs), are ideal candidates for wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) applications in the standard near-infrared communication bands. In this work, we will discuss the possibility of using silicon microspheres for photonics applications in the near-infrared

  4. Photon correlation holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Dinesh N; Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Ezawa, Takahiro; Miyamoto, Yoko; Takeda, Mitsuo

    2011-01-17

    Unconventional holography called photon correlation holography is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. Using photon correlation, i.e. intensity correlation or fourth order correlation of optical field, a 3-D image of the object recorded in a hologram is reconstructed stochastically with illumination through a random phase screen. Two different schemes for realizing photon correlation holography are examined by numerical simulations, and the experiment was performed for one of the reconstruction schemes suitable for the experimental proof of the principle. The technique of photon correlation holography provides a new insight into how the information is embedded in the spatial as well as temporal correlation of photons in the stochastic pseudo thermal light.

  5. A simplified analytical approach to calculation of the electromagnetic behavior of left-handed metamaterials with a graded refractive index profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalarsson N.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the spectral properties of a new class of nanostructured artificial composite materials with tailored electromagnetic response, i.e. negative refractive index materials, also known as "left-handed" metamaterials. We analyzed structures incorporating both ordinary positive index media and negative refractive index metamaterials where the interface may be graded to an arbitrary degree. Utilizing a modified version of the Rosen-Morse function, we derived analytical expressions for the field intensity and spectral reflection and transmission through a graded interface between positive and negative index materials. We compared our results to numerical solutions obtained using the transfer matrix technique. .

  6. Electron and Photon ID

    CERN Document Server

    Hryn'ova, Tetiana; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The identification of prompt photons and the rejection of background coming mostly from photons from hadron decays relies on the high granularity of the ATLAS calorimeter. The electron identification used in ATLAS for run 2 is based on a likelihood discrimination to separate isolated electron candidates from candidates originating from photon conversions, hadron misidentification and heavy flavor decays. In addition, isolation variables are used as further handles to separate signal and background. Several methods are used to measure with data the efficiency of the photon identification requirements, to cover a broad energy spectrum. At low energy, photons from radiative Z decays are used. In the medium energy range, similarities between electrons and photon showers are exploited using Z->ee decays. At high energy, inclusive photon samples are used. The measurement of the efficiencies of the electron identification and isolation cuts are performed with the data using tag and probe techniques with large statis...

  7. Ultra-broadband THz time-domain spectroscopy of common polymers using THz air photonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D’Angelo, Francesco; Mics, Zoltán; Bonn, Mischa

    2014-01-01

    -domain spectrometer employing air-photonics for the generation and detection of single-cycle sub-50 fs THz transients. The time domain measurements provide direct access to both the absorption and refractive index spectra. The polymers LDPE and TOPAS® demonstrate negligible absorption and spectrally-flat refractive...... index across the entire spectroscopy window, revealing the high potential of these polymers for applications in THz photonics such as ultra-broadband polymer-based dielectric mirrors, waveguides, and fibers. Resonant high-frequency polar vibrational modes are observed and assigned in polymers PA6...... and PTFE, and their dielectric functions in the complete frequency window 2-15 THz are theoretically reproduced. Our results demonstrate the potential of ultrabroadband air-photonics-based THz time domain spectroscopy as a valuable analytic tool for materials science....

  8. Refractive Index of Black and Green Liquors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Avramenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lack of reliable data on the optical properties of black and green liquors complicates control of their composition in technological process of sulphate cellulose production. In this regard the paper presents measurement results of refraction index of black liquors n (k,t at concentration in solutions of bone-dry solids up to k = 70% and at temperatures t = 10-90 °C, as well as in green liquors n(C,t at the total alkalinity of C = 0-250 g/l and in the same temperature range. All samples of solutions of black and green liquors were provided by Segezha Pulp and Paper Mill and certified in factory laboratory. Measurements were taken by means of the laboratory Abbe refractometer (URL-1, digital refractometer "Expert pro", goniometer spectrometer GS-5, and ultra-violet spectrophotometer as well. The work also presents optical D density spectra in the ultra-violet region of the wavelengths for the samples of a green liquor and main mineral component to form it, i.e. Na2S (sodium sulphide. To calculate dispersion of n (λ in the visible spectral range, here a Lorentz single-oscillator model was used. The paper discusses study results of dispersive dependence of refraction index in green liquors with various concentration and chemical components of n (λ, C forming them at t = 20°C. Computing and experimental dependences of n (λ had not only good qualitative, but also quite satisfactory quantitative compliance. The work also describes main mineral components defining optical properties in these liquors. Given here data on concentration and temperature dependences of a refraction index in black n(k,t and green n(C,t liquors have been never published before. These data are of essential interest to control soda recovery technologies in manufacturing sulphate cellulose. The received results can be also used to tune and calibrate modern domestic and foreign industrial refractometers.

  9. Super-virtual refraction interferometry: Theory

    KAUST Repository

    Bharadwaj, Pawan

    2011-01-01

    Inverting for the subsurface velocity distribution by refraction traveltime tomography is a well-accepted imaging method by both the exploration and earthquake seismology communities. A significant drawback, however, is that the recorded traces become noisier with increasing offset from the source position, and so prevents accurate picking of traveltimes in far-offset traces. To enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of the far-offset traces, we present the theory of super-virtual refraction interferometry where the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of far-offset head-wave arrivals can be theoretically increased by a factor proportional to N; here, N is the number of receiver and source positions associated with the recording and generation of the head-wave arrival. There are two steps to this methodology: correlation and summation of the data to generate traces with virtual head-wave arrivals, followed by the convolution of the data with the virtual traces to create traces with super-virtual head-wave arrivals. This method is valid for any medium that generates head-wave arrivals. There are at least three significant benefits to this methodology: 1). enhanced SNR of far-offset traces so the first-arrival traveltimes of the noisy far-offset traces can be more reliably picked to extend the useful aperture of data, 2). the SNR of head waves in a trace that arrive after the first arrival can be enhanced for accurate traveltime picking and subsequent inversion by traveltime tomography, and 3). common receiver-pair gathers can be analyzed to detect the presence of diving waves in the first arrivals, which can be used to assess the nature of the refracting boundary. © 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  10. Bayesian inversion of refraction seismic traveltime data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryberg, T.; Haberland, Ch

    2018-03-01

    We apply a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (McMC) formalism to the inversion of refraction seismic, traveltime data sets to derive 2-D velocity models below linear arrays (i.e. profiles) of sources and seismic receivers. Typical refraction data sets, especially when using the far-offset observations, are known as having experimental geometries which are very poor, highly ill-posed and far from being ideal. As a consequence, the structural resolution quickly degrades with depth. Conventional inversion techniques, based on regularization, potentially suffer from the choice of appropriate inversion parameters (i.e. number and distribution of cells, starting velocity models, damping and smoothing constraints, data noise level, etc.) and only local model space exploration. McMC techniques are used for exhaustive sampling of the model space without the need of prior knowledge (or assumptions) of inversion parameters, resulting in a large number of models fitting the observations. Statistical analysis of these models allows to derive an average (reference) solution and its standard deviation, thus providing uncertainty estimates of the inversion result. The highly non-linear character of the inversion problem, mainly caused by the experiment geometry, does not allow to derive a reference solution and error map by a simply averaging procedure. We present a modified averaging technique, which excludes parts of the prior distribution in the posterior values due to poor ray coverage, thus providing reliable estimates of inversion model properties even in those parts of the models. The model is discretized by a set of Voronoi polygons (with constant slowness cells) or a triangulated mesh (with interpolation within the triangles). Forward traveltime calculations are performed by a fast, finite-difference-based eikonal solver. The method is applied to a data set from a refraction seismic survey from Northern Namibia and compared to conventional tomography. An inversion test

  11. Influence of changes in an eye's optical system on refraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartkowska, Janina

    1998-10-01

    The optical system of eye is composed of cornea, lens, anterior chamber, and vitreous body. In the standard schematic eye there are 6 refracting surfaces. The changes of the curvature radii, of the distances between them, of the refractive indices influence the ametropia, refractive power of the eye and retinal image size. The influence of these changes can be appreciated by ray tracing or by an analytical method. There are presented simplified formulae for the differentials of ametropia and refractive power of the eye with respect to the surfaces curvatures, refracting power of cornea and lens, refractive indices. The relations are valid too for bigger changes if ametropia is measured in the cornea vertex. The formulae for the differentials with respect to distances, lens translation, eye axis length are valid if ametropia is measured in the object focus of the eye.

  12. Transient thermal effect, nonlinear refraction and nonlinear absorption properties of graphene oxide sheets in dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Liang; Liu, Zhi-Bo; Li, Xiao-Chun; Ma, Qiang; Chen, Xu-Dong; Tian, Jian-Guo; Xu, Yan-Fei; Chen, Yong-Sheng

    2013-03-25

    The nonlinear refraction (NLR) properties of graphene oxide (GO) in N, N-Dimethylformamide (DMF) was studied in nanosecond, picosecond and femtosecond time regimes by Z-scan technique. Results show that the dispersion of GO in DMF exhibits negative NLR properties in nanosecond time regime, which is mainly attributed to transient thermal effect in the dispersion. The dispersion also exhibits negative NLR in picosecond and femtosecond time regimes, which are arising from sp(2)- hybridized carbon domains and sp(3)- hybridized matrix in GO sheets. To illustrate the relations between NLR and nonlinear absorption (NLA), NLA properties of the dispersion were also studied in nanosecond, picosecond and femtosecond time regimes.

  13. Inclusive hard processes in photon-photon and photon-proton interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Glasman, Claudia

    1999-01-01

    Measurements of jet, prompt photon, high-pT hadron and heavy quark production in photon-induced processes provide tests of QCD and are sensitive to the photon parton densities. A review of the latest experimental results in photon-photon and photon-proton interactions is presented. Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations for these measurements are discussed.

  14. Strong Photonic-Band-Gap Effect on the Spontaneous Emission in 3D Lead Halide Perovskite Photonic Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xue; Li, Mingzhu; Wang, Kang; Li, Huizeng; Li, Yanan; Li, Chang; Yan, Yongli; Zhao, Yongsheng; Song, Yanlin

    2018-03-25

    Stimulated emission in perovskite-embedded polymer opal structures is investigated. A polymer opal structure is filled with a perovskite, and perovskite photonic crystals are prepared. The spontaneous emission of the perovskite embedded in the polymer opal structures exhibits clear signatures of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) via gain modulation. The difference in refractive-index contrast between the perovskite and the polymer opal is large enough for retaining photonic-crystals properties. The photonic band gap has a strong effect on the fluorescence emission intensity and lifetime. The stimulated emission spectrum exhibits a narrow ASE rather than a wide fluorescence peak in the thin film. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Diffraction tomography for plasma refractive index measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, J.; Nazikian, R.; Sharp, L.E.

    1989-01-01

    Measurement of the properties of probing beams of coherent electromagnetic radiation yields essential information about the line of sight integrated plasma refractive index. Presented is a scalar diffraction treatment of forward angle scattering plasma diagnostics based on the diffraction projection theorem first presented by E. Wolf in 1969. New results are obtained for near field scattering from probing Gaussian beams and it is demonstrated that the effects of diffraction need to be addressed for tomographic inversion of near field scattering and interferometry data. 33 refs., 10 figs

  16. Refraction and absorption of microwaves in wood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziherl, Saša; Bajc, Jurij; Čepič, Mojca

    2013-01-01

    A demonstration experiment for physics students showing the dependence of the refractive index and absorption coefficient of wood on the direction of microwaves is presented. Wood and microwaves enable study of anisotropic properties, which are typically found in crystals. Wood is used as the persuasive representative of uniaxial anisotropic materials due to its visible structure and its consequent anisotropic properties. Wood can be cut in a general direction and wooden plates a few centimetres thick with well-defined fibre orientation are easily prepared. Microwaves are used because wood is transparent for microwaves and their centimetre-scale wavelength is comparable to the wood structure. (paper)

  17. Differences between wavefront and subjective refraction for infrared light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teel, Danielle F W; Jacobs, Robert J; Copland, James; Neal, Daniel R; Thibos, Larry N

    2014-10-01

    To determine the accuracy of objective wavefront refractions for predicting subjective refractions for monochromatic infrared light. Objective refractions were obtained with a commercial wavefront aberrometer (COAS, Wavefront Sciences). Subjective refractions were obtained for 30 subjects with a speckle optometer validated against objective Zernike wavefront refractions on a physical model eye (Teel et al., Design and validation of an infrared Badal optometer for laser speckle, Optom Vis Sci 2008;85:834-42). Both instruments used near-infrared (NIR) radiation (835 nm for COAS, 820 nm for the speckle optometer) to avoid correction for ocular chromatic aberration. A 3-mm artificial pupil was used to reduce complications attributed to higher-order ocular aberrations. For comparison with paraxial (Seidel) and minimum root-mean-square (Zernike) wavefront refractions, objective refractions were also determined for a battery of 29 image quality metrics by computing the correcting lens that optimizes retinal image quality. Objective Zernike refractions were more myopic than subjective refractions for 29 of 30 subjects. The population mean discrepancy was -0.26 diopters (D) (SEM = 0.03 D). Paraxial (Seidel) objective refractions tended to be hyperopically biased (mean discrepancy = +0.20 D, SEM = 0.06 D). Refractions based on retinal image quality were myopically biased for 28 of 29 metrics. The mean bias across all 31 measures was -0.24 D (SEM = 0.03). Myopic bias of objective refractions was greater for eyes with brown irises compared with eyes with blue irises. Our experimental results are consistent with the hypothesis that reflected NIR light captured by the aberrometer originates from scattering sources located posterior to the entrance apertures of cone photoreceptors, near the retinal pigment epithelium. The larger myopic bias for brown eyes suggests that a greater fraction of NIR light is reflected from choroidal melanin in brown eyes compared with blue eyes.

  18. Refractive Error in a Sample of Black High School Children in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wajuihian, Samuel Otabor; Hansraj, Rekha

    2017-12-01

    This study focused on a cohort that has not been studied and who currently have limited access to eye care services. The findings, while improving the understanding of the distribution of refractive errors, also enabled identification of children requiring intervention and provided a guide for future resource allocation. The aim of conducting the study was to determine the prevalence and distribution of refractive error and its association with gender, age, and school grade level. Using a multistage random cluster sampling, 1586 children, 632 males (40%) and 954 females (60%), were selected. Their ages ranged between 13 and 18 years with a mean of 15.81 ± 1.56 years. The visual functions evaluated included visual acuity using the logarithm of minimum angle of resolution chart and refractive error measured using the autorefractor and then refined subjectively. Axis astigmatism was presented in the vector method where positive values of J0 indicated with-the-rule astigmatism, negative values indicated against-the-rule astigmatism, whereas J45 represented oblique astigmatism. Overall, patients were myopic with a mean spherical power for right eye of -0.02 ± 0.47; mean astigmatic cylinder power was -0.09 ± 0.27 with mainly with-the-rule astigmatism (J0 = 0.01 ± 0.11). The prevalence estimates were as follows: myopia (at least -0.50) 7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 6 to 9%), hyperopia (at least 0.5) 5% (95% CI, 4 to 6%), astigmatism (at least -0.75 cylinder) 3% (95% CI, 2 to 4%), and anisometropia 3% (95% CI, 2 to 4%). There was no significant association between refractive error and any of the categories (gender, age, and grade levels). The prevalence of refractive error in the sample of high school children was relatively low. Myopia was the most prevalent, and findings on its association with age suggest that the prevalence of myopia may be stabilizing at late teenage years.

  19. Validity of automated refraction after segmented refractive multifocal intraocular lens implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarrán-Diego, César; Muñoz, Gonzalo; Rohrweck, Stephanie; García-Lázaro, Santiago; Albero, José Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical utility of automated refraction (AR) and keratometry (KR) compared with subjective or manifest refraction (MR) after cataract or refractive lens exchange surgery with implantation of Lentis Mplus X (Oculentis GmbH) refractive multifocal intraocular lens (IOL). Eighty-six eyes implanted with the Lentis Mplus X multifocal IOL were included. MR was performed in all patients followed by three consecutive AR measurements using the Topcon KR-8000 autorefractor. Assessment of repeatability of consecutive AR before and after dilation with phenylephrine 10%, and comparison of the AR and KR with MR using vector analysis were performed at 3mo follow-up. Analysis showed excellent repeatability of the AR measurements. Linear regression of AR versus MR showed good correlation for sphere and spherical equivalent, whereas the correlation for astigmatism was low. The mean difference AR-MR was -1.28±0.29 diopters (D) for sphere. Astigmatism showed better correlation between KR and MR. We suggest AR sphere plus 1.25 D and the KR cylinder as the starting point for MR in eyes with a Lentis Mplus X multifocal IOL. If AR measurements are equal to MR, decentration of the IOL should be suspected.

  20. Validity of automated refraction after segmented refractive multifocal intraocular lens implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Albarrán-Diego

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate the clinical utility of automated refraction (AR and keratometry (KR compared with subjective or manifest refraction (MR after cataract or refractive lens exchange surgery with implantation of Lentis Mplus X (Oculentis GmbH refractive multifocal intraocular lens (IOL. METHODS: Eighty-six eyes implanted with the Lentis Mplus X multifocal IOL were included. MR was performed in all patients followed by three consecutive AR measurements using the Topcon KR-8000 autorefractor. Assessment of repeatability of consecutive AR before and after dilation with phenylephrine 10%, and comparison of the AR and KR with MR using vector analysis were performed at 3mo follow-up. RESULTS: Analysis showed excellent repeatability of the AR measurements. Linear regression of AR versus MR showed good correlation for sphere and spherical equivalent, whereas the correlation for astigmatism was low. The mean difference AR-MR was -1.28±0.29 diopters (D for sphere. Astigmatism showed better correlation between KR and MR. CONCLUSION: We suggest AR sphere plus 1.25 D and the KR cylinder as the starting point for MR in eyes with a Lentis Mplus X multifocal IOL. If AR measurements are equal to MR, decentration of the IOL should be suspected.

  1. Programmable Quantum Photonic Processor Using Silicon Photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    8 Figure 6: (a) Proposed on-demand single photon source based on dynamic cavity storage . (b) Example of a gate implementation...electronic architectures tuned to implement artificial neural networks that improve upon both computational speed and energy efficiency. 3.6 All...states are in the dual- rail logic representation. Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited. 6 Figure 3: Schematic of two-photon

  2. Optimization of planar self-collimating photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumpf, Raymond C; Pazos, Javier J

    2013-07-01

    Self-collimation in photonic crystals has received a lot of attention in the literature, partly due to recent interest in silicon photonics, yet no performance metrics have been proposed. This paper proposes a figure of merit (FOM) for self-collimation and outlines a methodical approach for calculating it. Performance metrics include bandwidth, angular acceptance, strength, and an overall FOM. Two key contributions of this work include the performance metrics and identifying that the optimum frequency for self-collimation is not at the inflection point. The FOM is used to optimize a planar photonic crystal composed of a square array of cylinders. Conclusions are drawn about how the refractive indices and fill fraction of the lattice impact each of the performance metrics. The optimization is demonstrated by simulating two spatially variant self-collimating photonic crystals, where one has a high FOM and the other has a low FOM. This work gives optical designers tremendous insight into how to design and optimize robust self-collimating photonic crystals, which promises many applications in silicon photonics and integrated optics.

  3. Experimental Determination of Refractive Index of Gas Hydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bylov, Martin; Rasmussen, Peter

    1997-01-01

    . For methane hydrate (structure I) the refractive index was found to be 1.346 and for natural gas hydrate (structure II) it was found to be 1.350. The measurements further suggest that the gas hydrate growth rate increases if the water has formed hydrates before. The induction time, on the other hand, seems......The refractive indexes of methane hydrate and natural gas hydrate have been experimentally determined. The refractive indexes were determined in an indirect manner making use of the fact that two non-absorbing materials will have the same refractive index if they cannot be distinguished visually...

  4. Conical Refraction: new observations and a dual cone model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolovskii, G S; Carnegie, D J; Kalkandjiev, T K; Rafailov, E U

    2013-05-06

    We propose a paraxial dual-cone model of conical refraction involving the interference of two cones of light behind the exit face of the crystal. The supporting experiment is based on beam selecting elements breaking down the conically refracted beam into two separate hollow cones which are symmetrical with one another. The shape of these cones of light is a product of a 'competition' between the divergence caused by the conical refraction and the convergence due to the focusing by the lens. The developed mathematical description of the conical refraction demonstrates an excellent agreement with experiment.

  5. New Refractive Surgery Procedures and Their Implications for Aviation Safety

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nakagawara, Van B; Wood, Kathryn J; Montgomery, Ron W

    2006-01-01

    ...., myopia, hyperopia, astigmatism) with corrective surgery. Prior Federal Aviation Administration research studies have shown that the number of civil airmen with refractive surgery continues to increase...

  6. Relationship between visual field progression and baseline refraction in primary open-angle glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Tomoko; Yoshikawa, Keiji; Mizoue, Shiro; Nanno, Mami; Kimura, Tairo; Suzumura, Hirotaka; Umeda, Yuzo; Shiraga, Fumio

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the relationship between visual field (VF) progression and baseline refraction in Japanese patients with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) including normal-tension glaucoma. In this retrospective study, the subjects were patients with POAG who had undergone VF tests at least ten times with a Humphrey Field Analyzer (Swedish interactive thresholding algorithm standard, Central 30-2 program). VF progression was defined as a significantly negative value of mean deviation (MD) slope at the final VF test. Multivariate logistic regression models were applied to detect an association between MD slope deterioration and baseline refraction. A total of 156 eyes of 156 patients were included in this analysis. Significant deterioration of MD slope was observed in 70 eyes of 70 patients (44.9%), whereas no significant deterioration was evident in 86 eyes of 86 patients (55.1%). The eyes with VF progression had significantly higher baseline refraction compared to those without apparent VF progression (-1.9±3.8 diopter [D] vs -3.5±3.4 D, P=0.0048) (mean ± standard deviation). When subject eyes were classified into four groups by the level of baseline refraction applying spherical equivalent (SE): no myopia (SE > -1D), mild myopia (-1D ≥ SE > -3D), moderate myopia (-3D ≥ SE > -6D), and severe myopia (-6D ≥ SE), the Cochran-Armitage trend analysis showed a decreasing trend in the proportion of MD slope deterioration with increasing severity of myopia (P=0.0002). The multivariate analysis revealed that baseline refraction (P=0.0108, odds ratio [OR]: 1.13, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.03-1.25) and intraocular pressure reduction rate (P=0.0150, OR: 0.97, 95% CI: 0.94-0.99) had a significant association with MD slope deterioration. In the current analysis of Japanese patients with POAG, baseline refraction was a factor significantly associated with MD slope deterioration as well as intraocular pressure reduction rate. When baseline refraction was classified into

  7. Nonlinear silicon photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghi, M.; Castellan, C.; Signorini, S.; Trenti, A.; Pavesi, L.

    2017-09-01

    Silicon photonics is a technology based on fabricating integrated optical circuits by using the same paradigms as the dominant electronics industry. After twenty years of fervid development, silicon photonics is entering the market with low cost, high performance and mass-manufacturable optical devices. Until now, most silicon photonic devices have been based on linear optical effects, despite the many phenomenologies associated with nonlinear optics in both bulk materials and integrated waveguides. Silicon and silicon-based materials have strong optical nonlinearities which are enhanced in integrated devices by the small cross-section of the high-index contrast silicon waveguides or photonic crystals. Here the photons are made to strongly interact with the medium where they propagate. This is the central argument of nonlinear silicon photonics. It is the aim of this review to describe the state-of-the-art in the field. Starting from the basic nonlinearities in a silicon waveguide or in optical resonator geometries, many phenomena and applications are described—including frequency generation, frequency conversion, frequency-comb generation, supercontinuum generation, soliton formation, temporal imaging and time lensing, Raman lasing, and comb spectroscopy. Emerging quantum photonics applications, such as entangled photon sources, heralded single-photon sources and integrated quantum photonic circuits are also addressed at the end of this review.

  8. Critical Dispersion-Theory Tests of Silicon's IR Refractive Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karstens, William; Smith, D. Y.

    Silicon strongly absorbs both visible and UV light, but is highly transparent in the IR. Hence, it is a common choice for infrared windows and lenses. However, optical design is hindered by literature index values that disagree by up to 1%. In contrast optical-glass indices are known to 0.01% or better. The most widely available silicon IR indices are based on bulk measurements using either Snell's-Law refraction by a prism or channel-spectra interference of front- and backsurface reflections from a planar sample. To test the physical acceptability of these data, we have developed criteria based on a Taylor expansion of the Kramers-Kronig relation for the index at energies below strong inter-band transitions. These tests require that the coefficients of the series in powers of energy squared must be positive within the region of transparency. This is satisfied by essentially all prism measurements; their small scatter arises primarily from impurities and doping. In contrast, channel-spectra data fail in the second and third coefficients. A review of the experimental analysis indicates three problems besides purity: incorrect channel number arising from a channel-spectra model that neglects spectrum distortion by the weak lattice absorption; use of a series expansion of mixed parity in photon energy to describe the even-parity index; and use of an incorrect absorption energy in the Li-Sellmeier dispersion formula. Recommendations for IR index values for pure silicon will be discussed. Supported in part by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  9. Single-photon sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lounis, Brahim; Orrit, Michel

    2005-01-01

    The concept of the photon, central to Einstein's explanation of the photoelectric effect, is exactly 100 years old. Yet, while photons have been detected individually for more than 50 years, devices producing individual photons on demand have only appeared in the last few years. New concepts for single-photon sources, or 'photon guns', have originated from recent progress in the optical detection, characterization and manipulation of single quantum objects. Single emitters usually deliver photons one at a time. This so-called antibunching of emitted photons can arise from various mechanisms, but ensures that the probability of obtaining two or more photons at the same time remains negligible. We briefly recall basic concepts in quantum optics and discuss potential applications of single-photon states to optical processing of quantum information: cryptography, computing and communication. A photon gun's properties are significantly improved by coupling it to a resonant cavity mode, either in the Purcell or strong-coupling regimes. We briefly recall early production of single photons with atomic beams, and the operation principles of macroscopic parametric sources, which are used in an overwhelming majority of quantum-optical experiments. We then review the photophysical and spectroscopic properties and compare the advantages and weaknesses of various single nanometre-scale objects used as single-photon sources: atoms or ions in the gas phase and, in condensed matter, organic molecules, defect centres, semiconductor nanocrystals and heterostructures. As new generations of sources are developed, coupling to cavities and nano-fabrication techniques lead to improved characteristics, delivery rates and spectral ranges. Judging from the brisk pace of recent progress, we expect single photons to soon proceed from demonstrations to applications and to bring with them the first practical uses of quantum information

  10. Photonic crystal-based optical biosensor: a brief investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divya, J.; Selvendran, S.; Sivanantha Raja, A.

    2018-06-01

    In this paper, a two-dimensional photonic crystal biosensor for medical applications based on two waveguides and a nanocavity was explored with different shoulder-coupled nanocavity structures. The most important biosensor parameters, like the sensitivity and quality factor, can be significantly improved. By injecting an analyte into a sensing hole, the refractive index of the hole was changed. This refractive index biosensor senses the changes and shifts its operating wavelength accordingly. The transmission characteristics of light in the biosensor under different refractive indices that correspond to the change in the analyte concentration are analyzed by the finite-difference time-domain method. The band gap for each structure is designed and observed by the plane wave expansion method. These proposed structures are designed to obtain an analyte refractive index variation of about 1–1.5 in an optical wavelength range of 1.250–1.640 µm. Accordingly, an improved sensitivity of 136.6 nm RIU‑1 and a quality factor as high as 3915 is achieved. An important feature of this structure is its very small dimensions. Such a combination of attributes makes the designed structure a promising element for label-free biosensing applications.

  11. Sources of medical error in refractive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshirfar, Majid; Simpson, Rachel G; Dave, Sonal B; Christiansen, Steven M; Edmonds, Jason N; Culbertson, William W; Pascucci, Stephen E; Sher, Neal A; Cano, David B; Trattler, William B

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate the causes of laser programming errors in refractive surgery and outcomes in these cases. In this multicenter, retrospective chart review, 22 eyes of 18 patients who had incorrect data entered into the refractive laser computer system at the time of treatment were evaluated. Cases were analyzed to uncover the etiology of these errors, patient follow-up treatments, and final outcomes. The results were used to identify potential methods to avoid similar errors in the future. Every patient experienced compromised uncorrected visual acuity requiring additional intervention, and 7 of 22 eyes (32%) lost corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA) of at least one line. Sixteen patients were suitable candidates for additional surgical correction to address these residual visual symptoms and six were not. Thirteen of 22 eyes (59%) received surgical follow-up treatment; nine eyes were treated with contact lenses. After follow-up treatment, six patients (27%) still had a loss of one line or more of CDVA. Three significant sources of error were identified: errors of cylinder conversion, data entry, and patient identification error. Twenty-seven percent of eyes with laser programming errors ultimately lost one or more lines of CDVA. Patients who underwent surgical revision had better outcomes than those who did not. Many of the mistakes identified were likely avoidable had preventive measures been taken, such as strict adherence to patient verification protocol or rigorous rechecking of treatment parameters. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Corneal polarimetry after LASIK refractive surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Juan M.; Berrio, Esther; Artal, Pablo

    2006-01-01

    Imaging polarimetry provides spatially resolved information on the polarization properties of a system. In the case of the living human eye, polarization could be related to the corneal biomechanical properties, which vary from the normal state as a result of surgery or pathologies. We have used an aberro-polariscope, which we recently developed, to determine and to compare the spatially resolved maps of polarization parameters across the pupil between normal healthy and post-LASIK eyes. The depolarization distribution is not uniform across the pupil, with post-surgery eyes presenting larger levels of depolarization. While retardation increases along the radius in normal eyes, this pattern becomes irregular after LASIK refractive surgery. The maps of slow axis also differ in normal and post-surgery eyes, with a larger disorder in post-LASIK eyes. Since these changes in polarization indicate subtle structural modifications of the cornea, this approach can be useful in a clinical environment to follow the biomechanical and optical changes of the cornea after refractive surgery or for the early diagnosis of different corneal pathologies.

  13. Personalized pseudophakic model for refractive assessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filomena J Ribeiro

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To test a pseudophakic eye model that allows for intraocular lens power (IOL calculation, both in normal eyes and in extreme conditions, such as post-LASIK. METHODS: PARTICIPANTS: The model's efficacy was tested in 54 participants (104 eyes who underwent LASIK and were assessed before and after surgery, thus allowing to test the same method in the same eye after only changing corneal topography. MODELLING: The Liou-Brennan eye model was used as a starting point, and biometric values were replaced by individual measurements. Detailed corneal surface data were obtained from topography (Orbscan® and a grid of elevation values was used to define corneal surfaces in an optical ray-tracing software (Zemax®. To determine IOL power, optimization criteria based on values of the modulation transfer function (MTF weighted according to contrast sensitivity function (CSF, were applied. RESULTS: Pre-operative refractive assessment calculated by our eye model correlated very strongly with SRK/T (r = 0.959, p0.05. Comparison of post-operative refractive assessment obtained using our eye model with the average of currently used formulas showed a strong correlation (r = 0.778, p0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest that personalized pseudophakic eye models and ray-tracing allow for the use of the same methodology, regardless of previous LASIK, independent of population averages and commonly used regression correction factors, which represents a clinical advantage.

  14. Personalized pseudophakic model for refractive assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Filomena J; Castanheira-Dinis, António; Dias, João M

    2012-01-01

    To test a pseudophakic eye model that allows for intraocular lens power (IOL) calculation, both in normal eyes and in extreme conditions, such as post-LASIK. The model's efficacy was tested in 54 participants (104 eyes) who underwent LASIK and were assessed before and after surgery, thus allowing to test the same method in the same eye after only changing corneal topography. MODELLING: The Liou-Brennan eye model was used as a starting point, and biometric values were replaced by individual measurements. Detailed corneal surface data were obtained from topography (Orbscan®) and a grid of elevation values was used to define corneal surfaces in an optical ray-tracing software (Zemax®). To determine IOL power, optimization criteria based on values of the modulation transfer function (MTF) weighted according to contrast sensitivity function (CSF), were applied. Pre-operative refractive assessment calculated by our eye model correlated very strongly with SRK/T (r = 0.959, p0.05). Comparison of post-operative refractive assessment obtained using our eye model with the average of currently used formulas showed a strong correlation (r = 0.778, p0.05). Results suggest that personalized pseudophakic eye models and ray-tracing allow for the use of the same methodology, regardless of previous LASIK, independent of population averages and commonly used regression correction factors, which represents a clinical advantage.

  15. Pulse energy dependence of refractive index change in lithium niobium silicate glass during femtosecond laser direct writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jing; Poumellec, Bertrand; Brisset, François; Lancry, Matthieu

    2018-03-19

    Femtosecond laser-induced refractive index changes in lithium niobium silicate glass were explored at high repetition rate (300 fs, 500 kHz) by polarized light microscopy, full-wave retardation plate, quantitative birefringence microscopy, and digital holographic microscopy. We found three regimes on energy increase. The first one corresponds to isotropic negative refractive index change (for pulse energy ranging 0.4-0.8 μJ/pulse, 0.6 NA, 5μm/s, 650μm focusing depth in the glass). The second one (0.8-1.2 μJ/pulse) corresponds to birefringence with well-defined slow axis orientation. The third one (above 1.2 μJ/pulse) is related to birefringence direction fluctuation. Interestingly, these regimes are consistent with crystallization ones. In addition, an asymmetric orientational writing effect has been detected on birefringence. These topics extend the possibility of controlling refractive index change in multi-component glasses.

  16. Potassium channel and NKCC cotransporter involvement in ocular refractive control mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila G Crewther

    Full Text Available Myopia affects well over 30% of adult humans globally. However, the underlying physiological mechanism is little understood. This study tested the hypothesis that ocular growth and refractive compensation to optical defocus can be controlled by manipulation of potassium and chloride ion-driven transretinal fluid movements to the choroid. Chicks were raised with +/-10D or zero power optical defocus rendering the focal plane of the eye in front of, behind, or at the level of the retinal photoreceptors respectively. Intravitreal injections of barium chloride, a non-specific inhibitor of potassium channels in the retina and RPE or bumetanide, a selective inhibitor of the sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter were made, targeting fluid control mechanisms. Comparison of refractive compensation to 5 mM Ba(2+ and 10(-5 M bumetanide compared with control saline injected eyes shows significant change for both positive and negative lens defocus for Ba(2+ but significant change only for negative lens defocus with bumetanide (Rx(SAL(-10D = -8.6 +/- .9 D; Rx(Ba2+(-10D = -2.9 +/- .9 D; Rx(Bum(-10D = -2.9 +/- .9 D; Rx(SAL(+10D = +8.2 +/- .9 D; Rx(Ba2+(+10D = +2.8 +/- 1.3 D; Rx(Bum(+10D = +8.0 +/- .7 D. Vitreous chamber depths showed a main effect for drug conditions with less depth change in response to defocus shown for Ba(2+ relative to Saline, while bumetanide injected eyes showed a trend to increased depth without a significant interaction with applied defocus. The results indicate that both K channels and the NKCC cotransporter play a role in refractive compensation with NKCC blockade showing far more specificity for negative, compared with positive, lens defocus. Probable sites of action relevant to refractive control include the apical retinal pigment epithelium membrane and the photoreceptor/ON bipolar synapse. The similarities between the biometric effects of NKCC inhibition and biometric reports of the blockade of the retinal ON response, suggest a

  17. Resonant optical tunneling-induced enhancement of the photonic spin Hall effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xing; Wang, Qingkai; Guo, Jun; Zhang, Jin; Chen, Shuqing; Dai, Xiaoyu; Xiang, Yuanjiang

    2018-04-01

    Due to the quantum analogy with optics, the resonant optical tunneling effect (ROTE) has been proposed to investigate both the fundamental physics and the practical applications of optical switches and liquid refractive index sensors. In this paper, the ROTE is used to enhance the spin Hall effect (SHE) of transmitted light. It is demonstrated that sandwiching a layer of a high-refractive-index medium (boron nitride crystal) between two low-refractive-index layers (silica) can effectively enhance the photonic SHE due to the increased refractive index gradient and an enhanced evanescent field near the interface between silica and boron nitride. A maximum transverse shift of the horizontal polarization state in the ROTE structure of about 22.25 µm has been obtained, which is at least three orders of magnitude greater than the transverse shift in the frustrated total internal reflection structure. Moreover, the SHE can be manipulated by controlling the component materials and the thickness of the ROTE structure. These findings open the possibility for future applications of photonic SHE in precision metrology and spin-based photonics.

  18. Pressure dependence of the refractive index in wurtzite and rocksalt indium nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliva, R. [Institut Jaume Almera, Consell Superior d' Investigacions Científiques (CSIC), Lluís Solé i Sabarís s.n., 08028 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); MALTA-Consolider Team, Departament de Física Aplicada, ICMUV, Universitat de València, c/Dr. Moliner 50, 46100 Burjassot, València (Spain); Segura, A. [MALTA-Consolider Team, Departament de Física Aplicada, ICMUV, Universitat de València, c/Dr. Moliner 50, 46100 Burjassot, València (Spain); Ibáñez, J., E-mail: jibanez@ictja.csic.es; Artús, L. [Institut Jaume Almera, Consell Superior d' Investigacions Científiques (CSIC), Lluís Solé i Sabarís s.n., 08028 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Yamaguchi, T.; Nanishi, Y. [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Ritsumeikan University, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan)

    2014-12-08

    We have performed high-pressure Fourier transform infrared reflectance measurements on a freestanding InN thin film to determine the refractive index of wurtzite InN and its high-pressure rocksalt phase as a function of hydrostatic pressure. From a fit to the experimental refractive-index curves including the effect of the high-energy optical gaps, phonons, free carriers, and the direct (fundamental) band-gap in the case of wurtzite InN, we obtain pressure coefficients for the low-frequency (electronic) dielectric constant ε{sub ∞}. Negative pressure coefficients of −8.8 × 10{sup −2 }GPa{sup −1} and −14.8 × 10{sup −2 }GPa{sup −1} are obtained for the wurtzite and rocksalt phases, respectively. The results are discussed in terms of the electronic band structure and the compressibility of both phases.

  19. Pressure dependence of the refractive index in wurtzite and rocksalt indium nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliva, R.; Segura, A.; Ibáñez, J.; Artús, L.; Yamaguchi, T.; Nanishi, Y.

    2014-01-01

    We have performed high-pressure Fourier transform infrared reflectance measurements on a freestanding InN thin film to determine the refractive index of wurtzite InN and its high-pressure rocksalt phase as a function of hydrostatic pressure. From a fit to the experimental refractive-index curves including the effect of the high-energy optical gaps, phonons, free carriers, and the direct (fundamental) band-gap in the case of wurtzite InN, we obtain pressure coefficients for the low-frequency (electronic) dielectric constant ε ∞ . Negative pressure coefficients of −8.8 × 10 −2  GPa −1 and −14.8 × 10 −2  GPa −1 are obtained for the wurtzite and rocksalt phases, respectively. The results are discussed in terms of the electronic band structure and the compressibility of both phases

  20. Some features of light propagation through layers with a complex refractive index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efimov, V.V.; Sementsov, D.I.

    1994-01-01

    By solving Maxwell's equations, expressions are obtained for the energy fluxes both inside and outside a layer with a complex refractive index at normal incidence of light. It is shown that inside the layer, along with fluxes of forward and backward waves, an interference flux can be distinguished whose magnitude is proportional to the imaginary part of the refractive index. A detailed numerical analysis of the energy transmission (T) and reflection (R) coefficients versus the thickness of the layer with negative absorption is performed for normal incidence of light onto the layer surface. Total distribution of the energy flux over the layer thickness is considered both for absorbing and amplifying layers. 13 refs., 4 figs

  1. Single-photon imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Seitz, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The acquisition and interpretation of images is a central capability in almost all scientific and technological domains. In particular, the acquisition of electromagnetic radiation, in the form of visible light, UV, infrared, X-ray, etc. is of enormous practical importance. The ultimate sensitivity in electronic imaging is the detection of individual photons. With this book, the first comprehensive review of all aspects of single-photon electronic imaging has been created. Topics include theoretical basics, semiconductor fabrication, single-photon detection principles, imager design and applications of different spectral domains. Today, the solid-state fabrication capabilities for several types of image sensors has advanced to a point, where uncoooled single-photon electronic imaging will soon become a consumer product. This book is giving a specialist´s view from different domains to the forthcoming “single-photon imaging” revolution. The various aspects of single-photon imaging are treated by internati...

  2. Heavy quark pair production in polarized photon-photon collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jikia, G.; Tkabladze, A.

    2000-04-01

    We present the cross sections of the heavy quark-antiquark pair production in polarized photon photon collision for the general case of photon polarizations. The numerical results for top-antitop production cross sections together with production asymmetries are obtained for linearly polarized photon-photon collisions, including QCD radiative corrections. (orig.)

  3. Photonics in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bollig, C

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available : photonics, ultrafast and ultra- intense laser science (Heinrich Schwoerer, University of Stellenbosch); quantum information processing and communication (Francesco Petruccione, University of KwaZulu-Natal); medicinal chemistry and nanotechnology... of experience in diamond research, where scientists are now turning their attention to diamond for photonic devices. �ere is an active community in South Africa studying the potential of diamond as a single-photon source for applications in quantum...

  4. Integrated Microwave Photonics

    OpenAIRE

    Marpaung, David; Roeloffzen, Chris; Heideman, René; Leinse, Arne; Sales Maicas, Salvador; Capmany Francoy, José

    2013-01-01

    Microwave photonics (MWP) is an emerging field in which radio frequency (RF) signals are generated, distributed, processed and analyzed using the strength of photonic techniques. It is a technology that enables various functionalities which are not feasible to achieve only in the microwave domain. A particular aspect that recently gains significant interests is the use of photonic integrated circuit (PIC) technology in the MWP field for enhanced functionalities and robustness as well as the r...

  5. Two-photon physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardeen, W.A.

    1981-10-01

    A new experimental frontier has recently been opened to the study of two photon processes. The first results of many aspects of these reactions are being presented at this conference. In contrast, the theoretical development of research ito two photon processes has a much longer history. This talk reviews the many different theoretical ideas which provide a detailed framework for our understanding of two photon processes

  6. Review on Dark Photon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curciarello Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available e+e− collider experiments at the intensity frontier are naturally suited to probe the existence of a force beyond the Standard Model between WIMPs, the most viable dark matter candidates. The mediator of this new force, known as dark photon, should be a new vector gauge boson very weakly coupled to the Standard Model photon. No significant signal has been observed so far. I will report on current limits set on the coupling factor ε2 between the photon and the dark photon by e+e− collider experiments.

  7. Towards THz integrated photonics

    OpenAIRE

    Hübers, Heinz-Wilhelm

    2010-01-01

    The demonstration of an integrated terahertz transceiver featuring a quantum cascade laser and a Schottky diode mixer promises new applications for compact and convenient terahertz photonic instrumentation.

  8. Tale of two photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    A very profitable spinoff from electron- positron collisions is two-photon physics. Rather than the electron and positron interacting directly via an exchanged photon, two virtual (transient) photons, one from each particle, get tangled up. With new electron-positron colliders appearing on the scene, a topical meeting on two-photon physics - 'From DAPHNE to LEP 200 and beyond' - held from 2-4 February in Paris, in the premises of the Ministry of Higher Education and Research, was particularly timely. Some 60 physicists, both experimentalists and theorists, participated, with some thirty speakers

  9. Advanced Photon Source (APS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratoryprovides this nation's (in fact, this hemisphere's) brightest storage...

  10. Photonic Integrated Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krainak, Michael; Merritt, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Integrated photonics generally is the integration of multiple lithographically defined photonic and electronic components and devices (e.g. lasers, detectors, waveguides passive structures, modulators, electronic control and optical interconnects) on a single platform with nanometer-scale feature sizes. The development of photonic integrated circuits permits size, weight, power and cost reductions for spacecraft microprocessors, optical communication, processor buses, advanced data processing, and integrated optic science instrument optical systems, subsystems and components. This is particularly critical for small spacecraft platforms. We will give an overview of some NASA applications for integrated photonics.

  11. Single photon emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buvat, Irene

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this lecture is to present the single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging technique. Content: 1 - Introduction: anatomic, functional and molecular imaging; Principle and role of functional or molecular imaging; 2 - Radiotracers: chemical and physical constraints, main emitters, radioisotopes production, emitters type and imaging techniques; 3 - Single photon emission computed tomography: gamma cameras and their components, gamma camera specifications, planar single photon imaging characteristics, gamma camera and tomography; 4 - Quantification in single photon emission tomography: attenuation, scattering, un-stationary spatial resolution, partial volume effect, movements, others; 5 - Synthesis and conclusion

  12. Photon virtual bound state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, J.; Ohtaka, K.

    2004-01-01

    We study virtual bound states in photonics, which are a vectorial extension of electron virtual bound states. The condition for these states is derived. It is found that the Mie resonant state which satisfies the condition that the size parameter is less than the angular momentum should be interpreted as a photon virtual bound state. In order to confirm the validity of the concept, we compare the photonic density of states, the width of which represents the lifetime of the photon virtual bound states, with numerical results

  13. Biomedical photonics handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2003-01-01

    1.Biomedical Photonics: A Revolution at the Interface of Science and Technology, T. Vo-DinhPHOTONICS AND TISSUE OPTICS2.Optical Properties of Tissues, J. Mobley and T. Vo-Dinh3.Light-Tissue Interactions, V.V. Tuchin 4.Theoretical Models and Algorithms in Optical Diffusion Tomography, S.J. Norton and T. Vo-DinhPHOTONIC DEVICES5.Laser Light in Biomedicine and the Life Sciences: From the Present to the Future, V.S. Letokhov6.Basic Instrumentation in Photonics, T. Vo-Dinh7.Optical Fibers and Waveguides for Medical Applications, I. Gannot and

  14. Photo-crosslinkable polymers for fabrication of photonic multilayer sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiappelli, Maria; Hayward, Ryan C.

    2013-03-01

    We have used photo-crosslinkable polymers to fabricate photonic multilayer sensors. Benzophenone is utilized as a covalently incorporated pendent photo-crosslinker, providing a convenient means of fabricating multilayer films by sequential spin-coating and crosslinking processes. Colorimetric temperature sensors were designed from thermally-responsive, low-refractive index poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) and high-refractive index poly(para-methyl styrene) (P pMS). Copolymer chemistries and layer thicknesses were selected to provide robust multilayer sensors which show color changes across nearly the full visible spectrum due to changes in temperature of the hydrated film stack. We have characterized the uniformity and interfacial broadening within the multilayers, the kinetics of swelling and de-swelling, and the reversibility over multiple hydration/dehydration cycles. We also describe how the approach can be extended to alternative sensor designs through the ability to tailor each layer independently, as well as to additional stimuli by selecting alternative copolymer chemistries.

  15. Periodic transmission peak splitting in one dimensional disordered photonic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegel, Ilka; Scotognella, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    In the present paper we present ways to modulate the periodic transmission peaks arising in disordered one dimensional photonic structures with hundreds of layers. Disordered structures in which the optical length nd (n is the refractive index and d the layer thickness) is the same for each layer show regular peaks in their transmission spectra. A proper variation of the optical length of the layers leads to a splitting of the transmission peaks. Notably, the variation of the occurrence of high and low refractive index layers, gives a tool to tune also the width of the peaks. These results are of highest interest for optical application, such as light filtering, where the manifold of parameters allows a precise design of the spectral transmission ranges.

  16. Novel multichannel surface plasmon resonance photonic crystal fiber biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, Mohamed Farhat O.; Alrayk, Yassmin K. A.; Shaalan, A. A.; El Deeb, Walid S.; Obayya, S. S. A.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a novel design of highly sensitive biosensor based on photonic crystal fiber is presented and analyzed using full vectorial finite element method. The suggested design depends on using silver layer as a plasmonic active material coated by a gold layer to protect silver oxidation. The reported sensor is based on the detection using the quasi transverse electric (TE) and quasi transverse magnetic (TM) modes which offers the possibility of multi-channel/multi-analyte sensing. The sensor geometrical parameters are optimized to achieve high sensitivity for the two polarized modes. High refractive index sensitivity of about 4750 nm/RIU (refractive index unit) and 4300 nm/RIU with corresponding resolutions of 2.1×10-5 RIU, and 2.33×10-5 RIU can be obtained for the quasi TM and quasi TE modes, respectively.

  17. Develop Roll-to-Roll Manufacturing Process of ZrO2 Nanocrystals/Acrylic Nanocomposites for High Refractive Index Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Pooran C [ORNL; Compton, Brett G [ORNL; Li, Jianlin [ORNL; Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle [ORNL; Duty, Chad E [ORNL

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was to develop and evaluate ZrO2/acrylic nanocomposite coatings for integrated optoelectronic applications. The formulations engineered to be compatible with roll-to-roll process were evaluated in terms of optical and dielectric properties. The uniform distribution of the ZrO2 nanocrystals in the polymer matrix resulted in highly tunable refractive index and dielectric response suitable for advanced photonic and electronic device applications.

  18. Indications for and outcomes of tertiary referrals in refractive surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patryn, Eliza K.; Vrijman, Violette; Nieuwendaal, Carla P.; van der Meulen, Ivanka J. E.; Mourits, Maarten P.; Lapid-Gortzak, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    To review the spectrum of disease, symptomatology, and management offered to patients referred for a second opinion after refractive surgery. A prospective cohort study was done on all patients referred from October 1, 2006, to September 30, 2011, to a tertiary eye clinic after refractive surgery of

  19. Prevalence of Refractive Error and Visual Impairment among Rural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    prevalence of refractive error was 3.5% (myopia 2.6% and hyperopia 0.9%). Refractive error ... 2Department of Ophthalmology, Addis Ababa University Medical Faculty, Ethiopia. Corresponding ... the main cause of low vision and the second cause of blindness .... the visual loss. All data were entered into computers using.

  20. Refractive aim and visual outcome after phacoemulsification: A 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-03-24

    Mar 24, 2016 ... was met, 21 eyes (14.3%) did not meet their refractive aim, 20 eyes (12.7%) were ... countries, where blindness is associated with considerable ... and better, the total range of refractive errors postoperatively ... required intraocular lenses (IOL), medical record efficiency, ..... problem that can be alleviated.

  1. Anterior segment surgery IOLs, lasers, and refractive keratoplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stark, W.J.; Terry, A.C.; Maumenee, A.E.

    1987-01-01

    The contributors to this text combine their expertise to make this book available on intraocular lenses, refractive corneal surgery, and the use of the YAG laser. Included is information on; IOL power calculations; the use of the YAG laser; retinal damage by short wavelength light; reviews of corneal refractive surgery; possibilities for the medical prevention of cataracts; and more.

  2. Macroeconomic landscape of refractive surgery in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Kevin J

    2015-07-01

    This review examines the economic history of refractive surgery and the decline of laser-assisted in-situ keratomileusis (LASIK) in the USA, and the emergence of refractive cataract surgery as an area of growth. Since it peaked in 2007 at 1.4 million procedures per year, LASIK has declined 50% in the USA, whereas refractive cataract surgery, including presbyopia-correcting intraocular lenses (IOLs), astigmatism-correcting IOLs, and femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery, has grown to 350 000 procedures per year, beginning in 2003. Patients are price-sensitive and responsive to publicity (good or bad) about refractive surgery and refractive cataract surgery. LASIK's decline has been partially offset by the emergence of refractive cataract surgery. About 11% of all cataract surgery in the USA involves presbyopia-correcting IOLs, astigmatism-correcting IOLs, or a femtosecond laser. From the surgeon's perspective, there are high barriers to entry into the marketplace for refractive surgery and refractive cataract surgery due to the high capital cost of excimer and femtosecond lasers, the high skill level required to deliver spectacular results to demanding patients who pay out of pocket, and the necessity to perform a high volume of surgeries to satisfy both of these requirements. Probably, less than 7% of US cataract surgeons can readily meet all of these requirements.

  3. Refractive and diffractive neutron optics with reduced chromatic aberration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Stefan Othmar; Poulsen, Henning Friis; Bentley, P.M.

    2014-01-01

    by the use of optics for focusing and imaging. Refractive and diffractive optical elements, e.g. compound refractive lenses and Fresnel zone plates, are attractive due to their low cost, and simple alignment. These optical elements, however, suffer from chromatic aberration, which limit their effectiveness...

  4. Prevalence of Refractive Error and Visual Impairment among Rural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Refractive error was the major cause of visual impairment accounting for 54% of all causes in the study group. No child was found wearing ... So, large scale community level screening for refractive error should be conducted and integrated with regular school eye screening programs. Effective strategies need to be devised ...

  5. Application of seismic refraction tomography for subsurface imaging ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seismic refraction tomography involves the measurement of the travel times of seismic refracted raypaths in order to define an image of seismic velocity in the intervening ground. This technique was used to estimate the depth to the fresh basement, estimate thickness of the weathered basement and to determine the ...

  6. Empirical temperature dependence of the refractive index of semiconductors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herve, P.J.L.; Vandamme, L.K.J.

    1995-01-01

    Values of the temperature coefficient of the refractive index were obtained from the derivation of a simple relation between energy band-gap and refractive index in semiconductors. These values, (dn/dT)/n, were compared to the experimental data found in literature. Our model, with only one fitting

  7. Index of Refraction Measurements Using a Laser Distance Meter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, Romulo; Fiorillo, Richard; Ochoa, Cris

    2014-01-01

    We present a simple method to determine the refractive indices of transparent media using a laser distance meter. Indices of refraction have been obtained by measuring the speed of light in materials. Some speed of light techniques use time-of-flight measurements in which pulses are emitted by lasers and the time interval is measured for the pulse…

  8. Generalized laws of reflection and refraction from transformation optics

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Yadong; Yao, Kan; Chen, Huanyang

    2012-01-01

    Based on transformation optics, we introduce another set of generalized laws of reflection and refraction (differs from that of [Science 334, 333 (2011)]), through which a transformation media slab is derived as a meta-surface, producing anomalous reflection and refraction for all polarizations of incident light.

  9. Refraction in Terms of the Deviation of the Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Fred M.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses refraction in terms of the deviation of light. Points out that in physics courses where very little mathematics is used, it might be more suitable to describe refraction entirely in terms of the deviation, rather than by introducing Snell's law. (DH)

  10. Measurement of Refractive Index Using a Michelson Interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fendley, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    Describes a novel and simple method of measuring the refractive index of transparent plates using a Michelson interferometer. Since it is necessary to use a computer program when determining the refractive index, undergraduates could be given the opportunity of writing their own programs. (Author/JN)

  11. Prevalence of refractive errors among junior high school students in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Among school children, uncorrected refractive errors have a considerable impact on their participation and learning in class. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of refractive error among students in the Ejisu-Juabeng Municipality of Ghana. A survey with multi-stage sampling was undertaken. We interviewed ...

  12. Sci—Fri PM: Dosimetry—01: Radiation-induced refraction artefacts in the optical CT readout of polymer gel dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, Warren G; Jirasek, Andrew; Wells, Derek M

    2014-01-01

    Polymer gel dosimeters (PGDs) are a desirable tool for the verification of advanced radiotherapy treatments. Fully 3D, deformable, and tissue-equivalent, the PGD polymerizes wherever it absorbs dose. To measure the dose absorbed by a PGD, optical computed tomography (CT) can be used to evaluate, in full 3D, the opacity distribution that coincides with polymerization. In addition to an increase in opacity with dose, an increase in refractive index (RI) is also known to occur in irradiated polymer gels. The increase in RI is slight and was previously assumed insignificant. This work reveals the effects that radiation-induced RI changes can have on the optical CT readout of PGDs. A fan-beam optical CT scanner was used to image a cylindrical PGD irradiated by a pair of 3×3 cm 2 , 6 MV photon beams in an orthogonal arrangement. Investigative scans were performed to evaluate refraction errors occurring: i) within the plane, and ii) out of the plane of the fan-beam. In-plane refraction was shown to cause distinct streaking artefacts along dose gradients (i.e. RI gradients) due to higher intensity rays being refracted into more opaque regions. Out-of-plane refraction was shown to produce severe, widespread artefacts due to rays missing the detector array. An iterative Savitzky-Golay filtering technique was developed to reduce both types of artefacts by specifically targeting structured errors in sinogram space. Results introduce a new category of imaging artefacts to be aware of when using optical CT for PGD readout

  13. Human resources for refraction services in Central Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, Himal; Murthy, G V S; Bascaran, Covadonga

    2015-07-01

    Uncorrected refractive error is a public health problem globally and in Nepal. Planning of refraction services is hampered by a paucity of data. This study was conducted to determine availability and distribution of human resources for refraction, their efficiency, the type and extent of their training; the current service provision of refraction services and the unmet need in human resources for refraction in Central Nepal. This was a descriptive cross-sectional study. All refraction facilities in the Central Region were identified through an Internet search and interviews of key informants from the professional bodies and parent organisations of primary eye centres. A stratified simple random sampling technique was used to select 50 per cent of refraction facilities. The selected facilities were visited for primary data collection. Face-to-face interviews were conducted with the managers and the refractionists available in the facilities using a semi-structured questionnaire. Data was collected in 29 centres. All the managers (n=29; response rate 100 per cent) and 50 refractionists (Response rate 65.8 per cent) were interviewed. Optometrists and ophthalmic assistants were the main providers of refraction services (n=70, 92.11 per cent). They were unevenly distributed across the region, highly concentrated around urban areas. The median number of refractions per refractionist per year was 3,600 (IQR: 2,400 - 6,000). Interviewed refractionists stated that clients' knowledge, attitude and practice related factors such as lack of awareness of the need for refraction services and/or availability of existing services were the major barriers to the output of refraction services. The total number of refractions carried out in the Central Region per year was 653,176. An additional 170 refractionists would be needed to meet the unmet need of 1,323,234 refractions. The study findings demand a major effort to develop appropriately trained personnel when planning

  14. Nanofocusing Parabolic Refractive X-Ray Lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroer, C.G.; Kuhlmann, M.; Hunger, U.T.; Guenzler, T.F.; Kurapova, O.; Feste, S.; Lengeler, B.; Drakopoulos, M.; Somogyi, A.; Simionovici, A. S.; Snigirev, A.; Snigireva, I.

    2004-01-01

    Parabolic refractive x-ray lenses with short focal distance can generate intensive hard x-ray microbeams with lateral extensions in the 100nm range even at short distance from a synchrotron radiation source. We have fabricated planar parabolic lenses made of silicon that have a focal distance in the range of a few millimeters at hard x-ray energies. In a crossed geometry, two lenses were used to generate a microbeam with a lateral size of 330nm by 110nm at 25keV in a distance of 41.8m from the synchrotron radiation source. First microdiffraction and fluorescence microtomography experiments were carried out with these lenses. Using diamond as lens material, microbeams with lateral size down to 20nm and below are conceivable in the energy range from 10 to 100keV

  15. Nanofocusing parabolic refractive x-ray lenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroer, C.G.; Kuhlmann, M.; Hunger, U.T.; Guenzler, T.F.; Kurapova, O.; Feste, S.; Frehse, F.; Lengeler, B.; Drakopoulos, M.; Somogyi, A.; Simionovici, A.S.; Snigirev, A.; Snigireva, I.; Schug, C.; Schroeder, W.H.

    2003-01-01

    Parabolic refractive x-ray lenses with short focal distance can generate intensive hard x-ray microbeams with lateral extensions in the 100 nm range even at a short distance from a synchrotron radiation source. We have fabricated planar parabolic lenses made of silicon that have a focal distance in the range of a few millimeters at hard x-ray energies. In a crossed geometry, two lenses were used to generate a microbeam with a lateral size of 380 nm by 210 nm at 25 keV in a distance of 42 m from the synchrotron radiation source. Using diamond as the lens material, microbeams with a lateral size down to 20 nm and below are conceivable in the energy range from 10 to 100 keV

  16. Photon-phonon interaction in photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueta, T

    2010-01-01

    Photon-phonon interaction on the analogy of electron-phonon interaction is considered in one-dimensional photonic crystal. When lattice vibration is artificially introduced to the photonic crystal, a governing equation of electromagnetic field is derived. A simple model is numerically analysed and the following novel phenomena are found out. The lattice vibration generates the light of frequency which added the integral multiple of the vibration frequency to that of the incident wave and also amplifies the incident wave resonantly. On a resonance, the amplification factor increases very rapidly with the number of layers increases. Resonance frequencies change with the phases of lattice vibration. The amplification phenomenon is analytically discussed for low frequency of the lattice vibration.

  17. Refractive index as materials property. Der Brechungsindex als Stoffeigenschaft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zilian, U. (Ciba-Geigy AG, Basel (Switzerland))

    1991-10-01

    The investigation of the relationship between refractive index (n) and molecular structure of a series of gases, liquids, and solids led to the conclusion that the refractive index of a substance is an independent molecular property. Light is refracted by two types of electron pairs. a) Bonding Electron Pairs (BEP) and b) Response Electron Pairs (REP). - Paraffins exhibit only BEPs which can easily be counted. REP is a new term we introduce to quantify the effects of several nonbonding electrons. The inert gases, for example, refract solely with REPs. They can be determined, and the most important ones are herein tabulated or delineated in the text. For compounds with known formular weight (M) and density (d), the refractive index can be simply calculated using the following formula. (orig.).

  18. Log-pile photonic crystal of CdS-polymer nanocomposites fabricated by combination of two-photon polymerization and in situ synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Z.-B.; Dong, X.-Z.; Chen, W.-Q.; Duan, X.-M.; Nakanishi, S.; Kawata, S.

    2007-01-01

    A log-pile photonic crystal of CdS nanoparticles-polymer nanocomposites was successfully fabricated by a novel method combining the two-photon polymerization technique and in situ synthesis of CdS nanoparticles in a polymer matrix. The photonic band gap of the three-dimensional (3D) log-pile photonic crystal is confirmed and becomes more effective for CdS nanoparticles-polymer nanocomposites than polymer doped with Cd 2+ ions, because the nanocomposites possess a higher refractive index than the polymer. The proposed concept in the new fabrication method for a 3D microstructure of polymer nanocomposites should be of critical importance in providing a general methodology for functionalization of materials via functional nanocomposites used in the field of laser microstructure fabrication. (orig.)

  19. Prompt photon production in photoproduction at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowak, Krzysztof

    2010-03-15

    This thesis presents measurement of the production of prompt photons in photoproduction with the H1 experiment at HERA. The analysis is based on the data taken in the years 2004-2007, with a total integrated luminosity of 340 pb{sup -1}. The main difficulty of the measurement comes from the high background of neutral mesons decaying into photons. It is accounted for with the help of multivariate analysis. Prompt photon cross sections are measured with the low negative four-momentum transfer squared Q{sup 2} < 1GeV{sup 2} and in the inelasticity range 0.1 < y < 0.7 for photons with a transverse energy 6 < E{sub T}{sup {gamma}} < 15GeV and in the pseudorapidity range.1.0 < {eta}{sup {gamma}} < 2.4 as a function of photons transverse energy and its pseudorapidity. Cross sections for prompt photon events with an additional hadronic jet are measured as a function of the transverse energy and pseudorapidity of the jet and of the momentum fractions x{sub {gamma}} and x{sub p} of the incident photon and proton carried by the constituents participating in the hard scattering process. Additionally, the transverse correlation between the photon and the jet is studied. The results are compared with predictions of a next-to-leading order calculation and a calculation based on the k{sub T} factorisation approach. Neither of calculations is able to describe all the aspects of the measurement. (orig.)

  20. Theoretical analyses of the refractive implications of transepithelial PRK ablations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arba Mosquera, Samuel; Awwad, Shady T

    2013-07-01

    To analyse the refractive implications of single-step, transepithelial photorefractive keratectomy (TransPRK) ablations. A simulation for quantifying the refractive implications of TransPRK ablations has been developed. The simulation includes a simple modelling of corneal epithelial profiles, epithelial ablation profiles as well as refractive ablation profiles, and allows the analytical quantification of the refractive implications of TransPRK in terms of wasted tissue, achieved optical zone (OZ) and induced refractive error. Wasted tissue occurs whenever the actual corneal epithelial profile is thinner than the applied epithelial ablation profile, achieved OZ is reduced whenever the actual corneal epithelial profile is thicker than the applied epithelial ablation profile and additional refractive errors are induced whenever the actual difference centre-to-periphery in the corneal epithelial profile deviates from the difference in the applied epithelial ablation profile. The refractive implications of TransPRK ablations can be quantified using simple theoretical simulations. These implications can be wasted tissue (∼14 µm, if the corneal epithelial profile is thinner than the ablated one), reduced OZ (if the corneal epithelial profile is thicker than ablated one, very severe for low corrections) and additional refractive errors (∼0.66 D, if the centre-to-periphery progression of the corneal epithelial profile deviates from the progression of the ablated one). When TransPRK profiles are applied to normal, not previously treated, non-pathologic corneas, no specific refractive implications associated to the transepithelial profile can be anticipated; TransPRK would provide refractive outcomes equal to those of standard PRK. Adjustments for the planned OZ and, in the event of retreatments, for the target sphere can be easily derived.