WorldWideScience

Sample records for negative energy spectrum

  1. Energy Spectrum of a Positronium Negative Ion in a Parabolic Quantum Well

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIEWen-Fang

    2002-01-01

    The method of few-body physics is applied to calculating the energy levels of low-lying states of a positronium negative ion in a parabolic quantum well.The results show that the energy levels of a positronium negative ion in two-dimensional case are lower than those in three-dimensional case.

  2. Energy Spectrum of a Positronium Negative Ion in a Parabolic Quantum Well

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Wen-Fang

    2002-01-01

    The method of few-body physics is applied to calculating the energy levels of low-lying states ofa positro-nium negative ion in a parabolic quantum well. The results show that the energy levels of a positronium negativeion intwo-dimensional case are lower than those in three-dimensional case.

  3. Superluminal travel requires negative energies

    OpenAIRE

    Olum, Ken D.

    1998-01-01

    I investigate the relationship between faster-than-light travel and weak-energy-condition violation, i.e., negative energy densities. In a general spacetime it is difficult to define faster-than-light travel, and I give an example of a metric which appears to allow superluminal travel, but in fact is just flat space. To avoid such difficulties, I propose a definition of superluminal travel which requires that the path to be traveled reach a destination surface at an earlier time than any neig...

  4. Negativity spectrum of one-dimensional conformal field theories

    CERN Document Server

    Ruggiero, Paola; Calabrese, Pasquale

    2016-01-01

    The partial transpose $\\rho_A^{T_2}$ of the reduced density matrix $\\rho_A$ is the key object to quantify the entanglement in mixed states, in particular through the presence of negative eigenvalues in its spectrum. Here we derive analytically the distribution of the eigenvalues of $\\rho_A^{T_2}$, that we dub negativity spectrum, in the ground sate of gapless one-dimensional systems described by a Conformal Field Theory (CFT), focusing on the case of two adjacent intervals. We show that the negativity spectrum is universal and depends only on the central charge of the CFT, similarly to the entanglement spectrum. The precise form of the negativity spectrum depends on whether the two intervals are in a pure or mixed state, and in both cases, a dependence on the sign of the eigenvalues is found. This dependence is weak for bulk eigenvalues, whereas it is strong at the spectrum edges. We also investigate the scaling of the smallest (negative) and largest (positive) eigenvalues of $\\rho_A^{T_2}$. We check our resu...

  5. Pais-Uhlenbeck Oscillator and Negative Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Pavšič, Matej

    2016-01-01

    We review the occurrence of negative energies in Pais-Uhlenbeck oscillator. We point out that in the absence of interactions negative energies are not problematic, neither in the classical nor in the quantized theory. However, in the presence of interactions that couple positive and negative energy degrees of freedom the system is unstable, unless the potential is bounded from bellow and above. We review some approaches in the literature that attempt to avoid the problem of negative energies in the Pais-Uhlenbeck oscillator.

  6. Energy spectrum control for modulated proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsi, Wen C.; Moyers, Michael F.; Nichiporov, Dmitri; Anferov, Vladimir; Wolanski, Mark; Allgower, Chris E.; Farr, Jonathan B.; Mascia, Anthony E.; Schreuder, Andries N. [Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 and University Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida 32206 (United States); Proton Therapy, Inc., Colton, California 92324 (United States); Indiana University Cyclotron Facility, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 (United States); Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 and University Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida 32206 (United States); Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 (United States); University Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida 32206 (United States) and Westdeutsches Protonentherapiezentrum, Universitaetsklinikum, Hufelandstrasse 55, 45147 Essen (Germany); Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 (United States); University Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida 32206 (United States) and ProCure Treatment Centers, Inc., Bloomington, Indiana 47404 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    In proton therapy delivered with range modulated beams, the energy spectrum of protons entering the delivery nozzle can affect the dose uniformity within the target region and the dose gradient around its periphery. For a cyclotron with a fixed extraction energy, a rangeshifter is used to change the energy but this produces increasing energy spreads for decreasing energies. This study investigated the magnitude of the effects of different energy spreads on dose uniformity and distal edge dose gradient and determined the limits for controlling the incident spectrum. A multilayer Faraday cup (MLFC) was calibrated against depth dose curves measured in water for nonmodulated beams with various incident spectra. Depth dose curves were measured in a water phantom and in a multilayer ionization chamber detector for modulated beams using different incident energy spreads. Some nozzle entrance energy spectra can produce unacceptable dose nonuniformities of up to {+-}21% over the modulated region. For modulated beams and small beam ranges, the width of the distal penumbra can vary by a factor of 2.5. When the energy spread was controlled within the defined limits, the dose nonuniformity was less than {+-}3%. To facilitate understanding of the results, the data were compared to the measured and Monte Carlo calculated data from a variable extraction energy synchrotron which has a narrow spectrum for all energies. Dose uniformity is only maintained within prescription limits when the energy spread is controlled. At low energies, a large spread can be beneficial for extending the energy range at which a single range modulator device can be used. An MLFC can be used as part of a feedback to provide specified energy spreads for different energies.

  7. Energy spectrum control for modulated proton beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsi, Wen C.; Moyers, Michael F.; Nichiporov, Dmitri; Anferov, Vladimir; Wolanski, Mark; Allgower, Chris E.; Farr, Jonathan B.; Mascia, Anthony E.; Schreuder, Andries N.

    2009-01-01

    In proton therapy delivered with range modulated beams, the energy spectrum of protons entering the delivery nozzle can affect the dose uniformity within the target region and the dose gradient around its periphery. For a cyclotron with a fixed extraction energy, a rangeshifter is used to change the energy but this produces increasing energy spreads for decreasing energies. This study investigated the magnitude of the effects of different energy spreads on dose uniformity and distal edge dose gradient and determined the limits for controlling the incident spectrum. A multilayer Faraday cup (MLFC) was calibrated against depth dose curves measured in water for nonmodulated beams with various incident spectra. Depth dose curves were measured in a water phantom and in a multilayer ionization chamber detector for modulated beams using different incident energy spreads. Some nozzle entrance energy spectra can produce unacceptable dose nonuniformities of up to ±21% over the modulated region. For modulated beams and small beam ranges, the width of the distal penumbra can vary by a factor of 2.5. When the energy spread was controlled within the defined limits, the dose nonuniformity was less than ±3%. To facilitate understanding of the results, the data were compared to the measured and Monte Carlo calculated data from a variable extraction energy synchrotron which has a narrow spectrum for all energies. Dose uniformity is only maintained within prescription limits when the energy spread is controlled. At low energies, a large spread can be beneficial for extending the energy range at which a single range modulator device can be used. An MLFC can be used as part of a feedback to provide specified energy spreads for different energies. PMID:19610318

  8. Motion of Inertial Observers Through Negative Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Ford, L H; Roman, Thomas A.

    1993-01-01

    Recent research has indicated that negative energy fluxes due to quantum coherence effects obey uncertainty principle-type inequalities of the form $|\\Delta E|\\,{\\Delta \\tau} \\lprox 1\\,$. Here $|\\Delta E|$ is the magnitude of the negative energy which is transmitted on a timescale $\\Delta \\tau$. Our main focus in this paper is on negative energy fluxes which are produced by the motion of observers through static negative energy regions. We find that although a quantum inequality appears to be satisfied for radially moving geodesic observers in two and four-dimensional black hole spacetimes, an observer orbiting close to a black hole will see a constant negative energy flux. In addition, we show that inertial observers moving slowly through the Casimir vacuum can achieve arbitrarily large violations of the inequality. It seems likely that, in general, these types of negative energy fluxes are not constrained by inequalities on the magnitude and duration of the flux. We construct a model of a non-gravitational ...

  9. Energy spectrum of buoyancy-driven turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Abhishek; Chatterjee, Anando G; Verma, Mahendra K

    2014-08-01

    Using high-resolution direct numerical simulation and arguments based on the kinetic energy flux Π(u), we demonstrate that, for stably stratified flows, the kinetic energy spectrum E(u)(k)∼k(-11/5), the potential energy spectrum E(θ)(k)∼k(-7/5), and Π(u)(k)∼k(-4/5) are consistent with the Bolgiano-Obukhov scaling. This scaling arises due to the conversion of kinetic energy to the potential energy by buoyancy. For weaker buoyancy, this conversion is weak, hence E(u)(k) follows Kolmogorov's spectrum with a constant energy flux. For Rayleigh-Bénard convection, we show that the energy supply rate by buoyancy is positive, which leads to an increasing Π(u)(k) with k, thus ruling out Bolgiano-Obukhov scaling for the convective turbulence. Our numerical results show that convective turbulence for unit Prandt number exhibits a constant Π(u)(k) and E(u)(k)∼k(-5/3) for a narrow band of wave numbers.

  10. Energy spectrum of buoyancy-driven turbulence

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, Abhishek

    2014-08-25

    Using high-resolution direct numerical simulation and arguments based on the kinetic energy flux Πu, we demonstrate that, for stably stratified flows, the kinetic energy spectrum Eu(k)∼k-11/5, the potential energy spectrum Eθ(k)∼k-7/5, and Πu(k)∼k-4/5 are consistent with the Bolgiano-Obukhov scaling. This scaling arises due to the conversion of kinetic energy to the potential energy by buoyancy. For weaker buoyancy, this conversion is weak, hence Eu(k) follows Kolmogorov\\'s spectrum with a constant energy flux. For Rayleigh-Bénard convection, we show that the energy supply rate by buoyancy is positive, which leads to an increasing Πu(k) with k, thus ruling out Bolgiano-Obukhov scaling for the convective turbulence. Our numerical results show that convective turbulence for unit Prandt number exhibits a constant Πu(k) and Eu(k)∼k-5/3 for a narrow band of wave numbers. © 2014 American Physical Society.

  11. FACT. Energy spectrum of the Crab Nebula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temme, Fabian; Einecke, Sabrina; Buss, Jens [TU Dortmund, Experimental Physics 5, Otto-Hahn-Str.4, 44221 Dortmund (Germany); Collaboration: FACT-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The First G-APD Cherenkov Telescope is the first Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescope which uses silicon photon detectors (G-APDs aka SiPM) as photo sensors. With more than four years of operation, FACT proved an application of SiPMs is suitable for the field of ground-based gamma-ray astronomy. Due to the stable flux at TeV energies, the Crab Nebula is handled as a ''standard candle'' in Cherenkov astronomy. The analysis of its energy spectrum and comparison with other experiments, allows to evaluate the performance of FACT. A modern analysis chain, based on data stream handling and multivariate analysis methods was developed in close cooperation with the department of computer science at the TU Dortmund. In this talk, this analysis chain and its application are presented. Further to this, results, including the energy spectrum of the Crab Nebula, measured with FACT, are shown.

  12. Energy Levels of a Positronium Negative Ion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段斌; 顾晓艳; 马中骐

    2001-01-01

    The energy levels of a positronium negative ion are calculated directly from the Schrodinger equation. After removing the translational and rotational degrees of freedom, only three internal variables are involved in both functions and equations. The singularity of the solution is eliminated by choosing the right internal variables, and the series in calculation converges very fast.

  13. Low Energy Background Spectrum in CDMSlite

    CERN Document Server

    Barker, D

    2016-01-01

    One trend in dark matter direct detection is the development of techniques which will lower experimental thresholds and achieve sensitivity to light mass dark matter particles. In doing so, it is necessary to have an understanding of the low energy spectrum of the major background components. Geant4 has a number of specialized low energy physics processes that can be implemented when simulating an experimental geometry. To understand this low energy region for the Super Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (SuperCDMS), a variety of these models have been simulated and compared against theoretical calculations and SuperCDMS calibration data. Most of the low energy processes include a more complete description of the atomic structure, allowing us to observe the phenomenon of Compton steps in the simulation. An important application of this low energy background modeling is for the SuperCDMS low ionization threshold experiment (CDMSlite). CDMSlite has reached world-leading sensitivities in the search for low mass weakly...

  14. Extended-spectrum ß-lactamases in gram negative bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepti Rawat

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Extended-spectrum ß-lactamases (ESBLs are a group of plasmid-mediated, diverse, complex and rapidly evolving enzymes that are posing a major therapeutic challenge today in the treatment of hospitalized and community-based patients. Infections due to ESBL producers range from uncomplicated urinary tract infections to life-threatening sepsis. Derived from the older TEM is derived from Temoniera, a patient from whom the strain was first isolated in Greece. ß-lactamases, these enzymes share the ability to hydrolyze third-generation cephalosporins and aztreonam and yet are inhibited by clavulanic acid. In addition, ESBL-producing organisms exhibit co-resistance to many other classes of antibiotics, resulting in limitation of therapeutic option. Because of inoculum effect and substrate specificity, their detection is also a major challenge. At present, however, organizations such as the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (formerly the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards provide guidelines for the detection of ESBLs in Klebsiella pneumoniae, K. oxytoca, Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis. In common to all ESBL-detection methods is the general principle that the activity of extended-spectrum cephalosporins against ESBL-producing organisms will be enhanced by the presence of clavulanic acid. Carbapenems are the treatment of choice for serious infections due to ESBL-producing organisms, yet carbapenem-resistant isolates have recently been reported. ESBLs represent an impressive example of the ability of gram-negative bacteria to develop new antibiotic-resistance mechanisms in the face of the introduction of new antimicrobial agents. Thus there is need for efficient infection-control practices for containment of outbreaks; and intervention strategies, e.g., antibiotic rotation to reduce further selection and spread of these increasingly resistant pathogens.

  15. D{sup -} energy spectrum in toroidal quantum ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, C A; Gutierrez, W; Garcia, L F [Universidad Industrial de Santander, Bucaramanga (Colombia); Marin, J H, E-mail: jhmarin@unal.edu.c [Universidad Nacional-Colombia, Medellin-Colombia, AA3840 (Colombia)

    2009-05-01

    The structure of energy spectrum of the negative donor centre in a toroidal-shaped quantum ring with two different morphologies of the cross-section is analyzed. By using the adiabatic procedure we have deduced a one-dimensional wave equation with periodic conditions which describes the low-lying energy levels related to the electrons rotation around the symmetry axis. Our results are in good agreement with those previously obtained as the size of the ring cross-section tends to zero.

  16. The energy spectrum of cosmic rays at the highest energies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsunesada Yoshiki

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available One of several working groups established for this workshop was charged with examining results and methods associated with the UHECR energy spectrum. We summarize the results of our discussions, which include a better understanding of the analysis choices made by groups and their motivation. We find that the energy spectra determined by the larger experiments are consistent in normalization and shape after energy scaling factors are applied. Those scaling factors are within systematic uncertainties in the energy scale, and we discuss future work aimed at reducing these systematics.

  17. Structural invariance and the energy spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leyvraz, F.; Mendez, R.A.; Seligman, T.H. [Laboratorio de Cuernavaca, Instituto de Fisica, Unam (Italy)

    1999-10-01

    We extend the application of the concept of structural invariance to bounded time-independent systems. This concept, previously introduced by two of us to argue that the connection between random matrix theory and quantum systems with a chaotic classical counterpart is in fact largely exact in the semiclassical limit is extended to the energy spectra of bounded time-independent systems. We proceed by showing that the results obtained previously for the quasi-energies and eigenphases of the S-matrix can be extended to the eigenphases of the quantum Poincare map which is unitary in the semiclassical limit. We then show that its eigenphases in the chaotic case move rather stiffly around the unit circle and thus their local statistical fluctuations transfer to the energy spectrum via Bogomolny's prescription. We verify our results by studying numerically the properties of the eigenphases of the quantum Poincare map for billiards by using the boundary integral method. (author)

  18. Structural Invariance and the Energy Spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Leyvraz, F; Seligman, T H

    1999-01-01

    We extend the application of the concept of structural invariance to bounded time independent systems. This concept, previously introduced by two of us to argue that the connection between random matrix theory and quantum systems with a chaotic classical counterpart is in fact largely exact in the semiclassical limit, is extended to the energy spectra of bounded time independent systems. We proceed by showing that the results obtained previously for the quasi-energies and eigenphases of the S-matrix can be extended to the eigenphases of the quantum Poincare map which is unitary in the semiclassical limit. We then show that its eigenphases in the chaotic case move rather stiffly around the unit circle and thus their local statistical fluctuations transfer to the energy spectrum via Bogomolny's prescription. We verify our results by studying numerically the properties of the eigenphases of the quantum Poincare map for billiards by using the boundary integral method.

  19. Residual Energy Spectrum of Solar Wind Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, C H K; Salem, C S; Maruca, B A

    2013-01-01

    It has long been known that the energy in velocity and magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind is not in equipartition. In this paper, we present an analysis of 5 years of Wind data at 1 AU to investigate the reason for this. The residual energy (difference between energy in velocity and magnetic field fluctuations) was calculated using both the standard magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) normalization for the magnetic field and a kinetic version, which includes temperature anisotropies and drifts between particle species. It was found that with the kinetic normalization, the fluctuations are closer to equipartition, with a mean normalized residual energy of sigma_r = -0.19 and mean Alfven ratio of r_A = 0.71. The spectrum of residual energy, in the kinetic normalization, was found to be steeper than both the velocity and magnetic field spectra, consistent with some recent MHD turbulence predictions and numerical simulations, having a spectral index close to -1.9. The local properties of residual energy and cros...

  20. End of the cosmic neutrino energy spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anchordoqui, L.A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Lehman College, City University of New York, Bronx, NY 10468 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States); Barger, V. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Goldberg, H. [Department of Physics, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Learned, J.G.; Marfatia, D.; Pakvasa, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Paul, T.C. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States); Department of Physics, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Weiler, T.J., E-mail: t.weiler@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States)

    2014-12-12

    There may be a high-energy cutoff of neutrino events in IceCube data. In particular, IceCube does not observe either continuum events above 2 PeV, or the Standard Model Glashow-resonance events expected at 6.3 PeV. There are also no higher energy neutrino signatures in the ANITA and Auger experiments. This absence of high-energy neutrino events motivates a fundamental restriction on neutrino energies above a few PeV. We postulate a simple scenario to terminate the neutrino spectrum that is Lorentz-invariance violating, but with a limiting neutrino velocity that is always smaller than the speed of light. If the limiting velocity of the neutrino applies also to its associated charged lepton, then a significant consequence is that the two-body decay modes of the charged pion are forbidden above two times the maximum neutrino energy, while the radiative decay modes are suppressed at higher energies. Such stabilized pions may serve as cosmic ray primaries.

  1. Negative Energy: From Lamb Shift to Entanglement

    CERN Document Server

    Bu, Shou-Liang

    2016-01-01

    "Negative energy" has been one of the most enduring puzzles in quantum theory, whereas the present work reveals that it actually plays a central role in clarifying various controversies of quantum theory. The basic idea is contained in a hypothesis on negative energy, and it is shown that the idea: (1)is compatible with both relativistic quantum mechanics and known experimental results; (2)helps to clarify the essence of matter waves, and therefore better understand the reality of the wave function, the so-called 'wave-packet reduction' occurring in quantum measurement, and the ghost like correlations between entangled systems; (3)is helpful for distinguishing the vacuum from the ground state of the quantized field, and may supply a possible way for removing the deep-rooted infinities in quantum field theory. The vacuum energy density of the electromagnetic field is calculated here as an example. By employing the same idea, the Lamb-Shift is recalculated in a different way from conventional renormalization me...

  2. ADAPTIVE FULL-SPECTRUM SOLOR ENERGY SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byard D. Wood

    2004-04-01

    This RD&D project is a three year team effort to develop a hybrid solar lighting (HSL) system that transports solar light from a paraboloidal dish concentrator to a luminaire via a large core polymer fiber optic. The luminaire can be a device to distribute sunlight into a space for the production of algae or it can be a device that is a combination of solar lighting and electric lighting. A benchmark prototype system has been developed to evaluate the HSL system. Sunlight is collected using a one-meter paraboloidal concentrator dish with two-axis tracking. A secondary mirror consisting of eight planar-segmented mirrors directs the visible part of the spectrum to eight fibers (receiver) and subsequently to eight luminaires. This results in about 8,200 lumens incident at each fiber tip. Each fiber can illuminate about 16.7 m{sup 2} (180 ft{sup 2}) of office space. The IR spectrum is directed to a thermophotovoltaic (TPV) array to produce electricity. During this reporting period, the project team made advancements in the design of the second generation (Alpha) system. For the Alpha system, the eight individual 12 mm fibers have been replaced with a centralized bundle of 3 mm fibers. The TRNSYS Full-Spectrum Solar Energy System model has been updated and new components have been added. The TPV array and nonimaging device have been tested and progress has been made in the fiber transmission models. A test plan was developed for both the high-lumen tests and the study to determine the non-energy benefits of daylighting. The photobioreactor team also made major advancements in the testing of model scale and bench top lab-scale systems.

  3. Resource management for energy and spectrum harvesting sensor networks

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Deyu; Zhou, Haibo; Shen, Xuemin (Sherman)

    2017-01-01

    This SpringerBrief offers a comprehensive review and in-depth discussion of the current research on resource management. The authors explain how to best utilize harvested energy and temporally available licensed spectrum. Throughout the brief, the primary focus is energy and spectrum harvesting sensor networks (ESHNs) including energy harvesting (EH)-powered spectrum sensing and dynamic spectrum access. To efficiently collect data through the available licensed spectrum, this brief examines the joint management of energy and spectrum. An EH-powered spectrum sensing and management scheme for Heterogeneous Spectrum Harvesting Sensor Networks (HSHSNs) is presented in this brief. The scheme dynamically schedules the data sensing and spectrum access of sensors in ESHSNs to optimize the network utility, while considering the stochastic nature of EH process, PU activities and channel conditions. This brief also provides useful insights for the practical resource management scheme design for ESHSNs and motivates a ne...

  4. Energy spectrum of interplanetary magnetic flux ropes and its connection with solar activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, D. J.; Feng, H. Q.; Chao, J. K.

    2008-03-01

    Context: Recent observations of the solar wind show that interplanetary magnetic flux ropes (IMFRs) have a continuous scale-distribution from small-scale flux ropes to large-scale magnetic clouds. Aims: In this work, we investigate the energy spectrum of IMFRs and its possible connection with solar activity. Methods: In consideration of the detectable probability of an IMFR to be proportional to its diameter, the actual energy spectrum of IMFRs can be obtained from the observed spectrum based on spacecraft observations in the solar wind. Results: It is found that IMFRs have a negative power-law spectrum with an index α = 1.36±0.03, which is similar to that of solar flares, and is probably representative of interplanetary energy spectrum of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), that is, the energy spectrum of interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs). This indicates that the energy distribution of CMEs has a similar negative power-law spectrum. In particular, there are numerous small-scale CMEs in the solar corona, and their interplanetary consequences may be directly detected in situ by spacecraft in the solar wind as small-scale IMFRs, although they are too weak to appear clearly in current coronagraph observations. Conclusions: The presence of small-scale CMEs, especially the energy spectrum of CMEs is potentially important for understanding both the solar magneto-atmosphere and CMEs.

  5. Effects of Dirac's Negative Energy Sea on Quantum Numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Jackiw, R.

    1999-01-01

    One route towards understanding both fractional charges and chiral anomalies delves into Dirac's negative energy sea. Usually we think of Dirac's negative energy sea as an unphysical construct, invented to render quantum field theory physically acceptable by hiding the negative energy solutions. I suggest that in fact physical consequences can be drawn from Dirac's construction.

  6. Energy flow in negative index materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lorenzo Bolla; Michele Midrio; Carlo G. Someda

    2004-01-01

    From Maxwell's equations, we compute the speed and the direction of propagation of active power refractedfrom air into a negative index material. We prove, both analytically and numerically that the power mayrefract positively even if phase fronts refract negatively. Considerations on the usage of ray optics inproblems involving negative index materials are drawn.

  7. Negative Energy Density in Calabi-Yau Compactifications

    OpenAIRE

    Hertog, Thomas; Horowitz, Gary T.; Maeda, Kengo

    2003-01-01

    We show that a large class of supersymmetric compactifications, including all simply connected Calabi-Yau and G_2 manifolds, have classical configurations with negative energy density as seen from four dimensions. In fact, the energy density can be arbitrarily negative -- it is unbounded from below. Nevertheless, positive energy theorems show that the total ADM energy remains positive. Physical consequences of the negative energy density include new thermal instabilities, and possible violati...

  8. An exposition on Friedmann Cosmology with Negative Energy Densities

    CERN Document Server

    Nemiroff, Robert J; Patla, Bijunath R

    2014-01-01

    How would negative energy density affect a classic Friedmann cosmology? Although never measured and possibly unphysical, certain realizations of quantum field theories leaves the door open for such a possibility. In this paper we analyze the evolution of a universe comprising varying amounts of negative energy forms. Negative energy components have negative normalized energy densities, $\\Omega 1/3$. Assuming that such energy forms generate pressure like perfect fluids, the attractive or repulsive nature of negative energy components are reviewed. The Friedmann equation is satisfied only when negative energy forms are coupled to a greater magnitude of positive energy forms or positive curvature. We show that the solutions exhibit cyclic evolution with bounces and turnovers.The future and fate of such universes in terms of curvature, temperature, acceleration, and energy density are reviewed. The end states are dubbed Big Crunch, Big Void, or Big Rip and further qualified as "Warped", "Curved", or "Flat", "Hot...

  9. Neural mechanisms of negative reinforcement in children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Damiano, Cara R.; Cockrell, Dillon C.; DUNLAP, KAITLYN; Hanna, Eleanor K; Miller, Stephanie; Bizzell, Joshua; Kovac, Megan; Turner-Brown, Lauren; Sideris, John; Kinard, Jessica; Dichter, Gabriel S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous research has found accumulating evidence for atypical reward processing in autism spectrum disorders (ASD), particularly in the context of social rewards. Yet, this line of research has focused largely on positive social reinforcement, while little is known about the processing of negative reinforcement in individuals with ASD. Methods The present study examined neural responses to social negative reinforcement (a face displaying negative affect) and non-social negative re...

  10. Energy spectrum of fermionized bosonic atoms in optical lattices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiurong Han; Haichao Zhang; Yuzhu Wang

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the energy spectrum of fermionized bosonic atoms, which behave very much like spinless noninteracting fermions, in optical lattices by means of the perturbation expansion and the retarded Green's function method. The results show that the energy spectrum splits into two energy bands with single-occupation; the fermionized bosonic atom occupies nonvanishing energy state and left hole has a vanishing energy at any given momentum, and the system is in Mott-insulating state with a energy gap.Using the characteristic of energy spectra we obtained a criterion with which one can judge whether the Tonks-Girardeau (TG) gas is achieved or not.

  11. Electromagnetic field energy density in homogeneous negative index materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivanand; Webb, Kevin J

    2012-05-07

    An exact separation of both electric and magnetic energies into stored and lost energies is shown to be possible in the special case when the wave impedance is independent of frequency. A general expression for the electromagnetic energy density in such a dispersive medium having a negative refractive index is shown to be accurate in comparison with numerical results. Using an example metamaterial response that provides a negative refractive index, it is shown that negative time-averaged stored energy can occur. The physical meaning of this negative energy is explained as the energy temporarily borrowed by the field from the material. This observation for negative index materials is of interest when approaching properties for a perfect lens. In the broader context, the observation of negative stored energy is of consequence in the study of dispersive materials.

  12. Negative Energy Cosmology and the Cosmological Constant

    CERN Document Server

    Prokopec, Tomislav

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that string theories naturally compactify on anti-de Sitter spaces, and yet cosmological observations show no evidence of a negative cosmological constant in the early Universe's evolution. In this letter we present two simple nonlocal modifications of the standard Friedmann cosmology that can lead to observationally viable cosmologies with an initial (negative) cosmological constant. The nonlocal operators we include are toy models for the quantum cosmological backreaction. In Model I an initial quasiperiodic oscillatory epoch is followed by inflation and a late time matter era, representing a dark matter candidate. The backreaction in Model II quickly compensates the negative cosmological term such that the Ricci curvature scalar rapidly approaches zero, and the Universe ends up in a late time radiation era.

  13. The Cosmic Rays Energy Spectrum observed by the TALE detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuzayyad, Tareq; Telescope Array Collaboration Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    We report on a cosmic ray energy spectrum measurement by the Telescope Array Low-Energy extension (TALE) fluorescence detector (FD). The TALE FD is an air fluorescence detector which is also sensitive to the Cerenkov light produced by shower particles. Low energy cosmic rays, in the PeV energy range, are detectable by TALE as ``Cerenkov Events''. Using these events, we measure the energy spectrum from a low energy of 4 PeV to an energy greater than 100 PeV. Starting at around 100 PeV, TALE also observes showers by their fluorescence light; and above this energy fluorescence becomes the dominant light production mechanism by which most showers are observed. The event processing and reconstruction procedures are identical for both low and high energy regions. This allows for treating the Cherenkov events and Fluorescence events as a single data set and thus calculating a single cosmic rays energy spectrum based on this data set, which extends from an energy of 4 PeV to above 1 EeV. In this talk, we will describe the detector, explain the technique, and present results from the measurement of the spectrum in this energy range by the Telescope Array experiment.

  14. Electron energy spectrum in core-shell elliptic quantum wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.Holovatsky

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The electron energy spectrum in core-shell elliptic quantum wire and elliptic semiconductor nanotubes are investigated within the effective mass approximation. The solution of Schrodinger equation based on the Mathieu functions is obtained in elliptic coordinates. The dependencies of the electron size quantization spectrum on the size and shape of the core-shell nanowire and nanotube are calculated. It is shown that the ellipticity of a quantum wire leads to break of degeneration of quasiparticle energy spectrum. The dependences of the energy of odd and even electron states on the ratio between semiaxes are of a nonmonotonous character. The anticrosing effects are observed at the dependencies of electron energy spectrum on the transversal size of the core-shell nanowire.

  15. Energy detection for spectrum sensing in cognitive radio

    CERN Document Server

    Atapattu, Saman; Jiang, Hai

    2014-01-01

    This Springer Brief focuses on the current state-of-the-art research on spectrum sensing by using energy detection, a low-complexity and low-cost technique. It includes a comprehensive summary of recent research, fundamental theories, possible architectures, useful performance measurements of energy detection and applications of energy detection. Concise, practical chapters explore conventional energy detectors, alternative forms of energy detectors, performance measurements, diversity techniques and cooperative networks. The careful analysis enables reader to identify the most efficient techn

  16. Ontological Metaphors for Negative Energy in an Interdisciplinary Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyfus, Benjamin W.; Geller, Benjamin D.; Gouvea, Julia; Sawtelle, Vashti; Turpen, Chandra; Redish, Edward F.

    2014-01-01

    Teaching about energy in interdisciplinary settings that emphasize coherence among physics, chemistry, and biology leads to a more central role for chemical bond energy. We argue that an interdisciplinary approach to chemical energy leads to modeling chemical bonds in terms of negative energy. While recent work on ontological metaphors for energy…

  17. Wormholes and negative energy from the gravitationally squeezed vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochberg, David

    1992-01-01

    Minkowski-signature wormhole solutions of the Einstein field equations require the existence of negative energy density in the vicinity of their throats. We point out that the gravitational interaction automatically generates squeezed vacuum states of matter, which by their nature, entail negative energy and, thus, provide a natural source for maintaining this class of wormholes.

  18. Spectrum and energy transfer in steady Burgers turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girimaji, Sharath S.; Zhou, YE

    1995-01-01

    The spectrum, energy transfer, and spectral interactions in steady Burgers turbulence are studied using numerically generated data. The velocity field is initially random and the turbulence is maintained steady by forcing the amplitude of a band of low wavenumbers to be invariant in time, while permitting the phase to change as dictated by the equation. The spectrum, as expected, is very different from that of Navier-Stokes turbulence. It is demonstrated that the far range of the spectrum scales as predicted by Burgers. Despite the difference in their spectra, in matters of the spectral energy transfer and triadic interactions Burgers turbulence is similar to Navier-Stokes turbulence.

  19. On the possibility of negative activation energies in bimolecular reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the rate constants for model reacting systems was studied to understand some recent experimental measurements which imply the existence of negative activation energies. A collision theory model and classical trajectory calculations are used to demonstrate that the reaction probability can vary inversely with collision energy for bimolecular reactions occurring on attractive potential energy surfaces. However, this is not a sufficient condition to ensure that the rate constant has a negative temperature dependence. On the basis of these calculations, it seems unlikely that a true bimolecular reaction between neutral molecules will have a negative activation energy.

  20. Ontological metaphors for negative energy in an interdisciplinary context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyfus, Benjamin W.; Geller, Benjamin D.; Gouvea, Julia; Sawtelle, Vashti; Turpen, Chandra; Redish, Edward F.

    2014-12-01

    Teaching about energy in interdisciplinary settings that emphasize coherence among physics, chemistry, and biology leads to a more central role for chemical bond energy. We argue that an interdisciplinary approach to chemical energy leads to modeling chemical bonds in terms of negative energy. While recent work on ontological metaphors for energy has emphasized the affordances of the substance ontology, this ontology is problematic in the context of negative energy. Instead, we apply a dynamic ontologies perspective to argue that blending the substance and location ontologies for energy can be effective in reasoning about negative energy in the context of reasoning about chemical bonds. We present data from an introductory physics for the life sciences course in which both experts and students successfully use this blended ontology. Blending these ontologies is most successful when the substance and location ontologies are combined such that each is strategically utilized in reasoning about particular aspects of energetic processes.

  1. Ontological metaphors for negative energy in an interdisciplinary context

    CERN Document Server

    Dreyfus, Benjamin W; Gouvea, Julia; Sawtelle, Vashti; Turpen, Chandra; Redish, Edward F

    2013-01-01

    Teaching about energy in interdisciplinary settings that emphasize coherence among physics, chemistry, and biology leads to a more central role for chemical bond energy. We argue that an interdisciplinary approach to chemical energy leads to modeling chemical bonds in terms of negative energy. While recent work on ontological metaphors for energy has emphasized the affordances of the substance ontology, this ontology is problematic in the context of negative energy. Instead, we apply a dynamic ontologies perspective to argue that blending the substance and location ontologies for energy can be effective in reasoning about negative energy in the context of reasoning about chemical bonds. We present data from an introductory physics for the life sciences (IPLS) course in which both experts and students successfully use this blended ontology. Blending these ontologies is most successful when the substance and location ontologies are combined such that each is strategically utilized in reasoning about particular ...

  2. Screening of Extended Spectrum Beta lactamase Producing Gram Negative Bacilli Isolated from Clinical Cases

    OpenAIRE

    H Hoseinzadegan; A Hassani; M Azadpoor; S Soleimannezhad; F. Mohamadi

    2007-01-01

    Background and objectives:(ESBL) strain is one of the emerging health related problems in the world recently.Some of the species of the gram-negative bacilli including Klebsiella Pneumonia &Escherichia Coli are well known ESBL producing among bacteria, and they causeuncontrollable infections. This Cross-sectional study was designed to asses theESBL producing gram negative bacilli among inpatients of Shohada-ye- ashayerhospital (Khorram Abad).Extended Spectrum Betalactamase producingMaterials ...

  3. On the Linearly-Balanced Kinetic Energy Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Huei,-Iin; Robertson, F. R.

    1999-01-01

    It is well known that the earth's atmospheric motion can generally be characterized by the two dimensional quasi-geostrophic approximation, in which the constraints on global integrals of kinetic energy, entrophy and potential vorticity play very important roles in redistributing the wave energy among different scales of motion. Assuming the hypothesis of Kolmogrov's local isotropy, derived a -3 power law of the equilibrium two-dimensional kinetic energy spectrum that entails constant vorticity and zero energy flows from the energy-containing wave number up to the viscous cutoff. In his three dimensional quasi-geostrophic theory, showed that the spectrum function of the vertical scale turbulence - expressible in terms of the available potential energy - possesses the same power law as the two dimensional kinetic energy spectrum. As the slope of kinetic energy spectrum in the inertial range is theoretically related to the predictability of the synoptic scales (Lorenz, 1969), many general circulation models includes a horizontal diffusion to provide reasonable kinetic energy spectra, although the actual power law exhibited in the atmospheric general circulation is controversial. Note that in either the atmospheric modeling or the observational analyses, the proper choice of wave number Index to represent the turbulence scale Is the degree of the Legendre polynomial.

  4. Effects of the Energy Error Distribution of Fluorescence Telescopes on the UHECR energy spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Carvalho, Washington; de Souza, Vitor; 10.1016/j.astropartphys.2007.04.010

    2008-01-01

    The measurement of the ultra high energy cosmic ray (UHECR) spectrum is strongly affected by uncertainties on the reconstructed energy. The determination of the presence or absence of the GZK cutoff and its position in the energy spectrum depends not only on high statistics but also on the shape of the energy error distribution. Here we determine the energy error distribution for fluorescence telescopes, based on a Monte Carlo simulation. The HiRes and Auger fluorescence telescopes are simulated in detail. We analyze the UHECR spectrum convolved with this energy error distribution. We compare this spectrum with one convolved with a lognormal error distribution as well as with a Gaussian error distribution. We show that the energy error distribution for fluorescence detectors can not be represented by these known distributions. We conclude that the convolved energy spectrum will be smeared but not enough to affect the GZK cutoff detection. This conclusion stands for both HiRes and Auger fluorescence telescopes...

  5. Using Reframing to Reduce Negative Statements in Social Conversation for Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koegel, Lynn Kern; Navab, Anahita; Ashbaugh, Kristen; Koegel, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects of teaching the reframing of negative statements through self-management and video-feedback on social conversation in adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). A multiple baseline design across five participants showed that, following intervention, all were able to increase their positive and neutral statements…

  6. Hadron intensity and energy spectrum at 4380 m above level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cananov, S. D.; Chadranyan, E. K.; Khizanishvili, L. A.; Ladaria, N. K.; Roinishvili, N. N.

    1985-01-01

    The flux value of hadrons with E (sup gamma) h or = 5 TeV, where E (sup gamma) h or = is the energy transferred into electromagnetic component is presented. It is shown that the energy spectrum slope beta of hadrons with E h or = 20 TeV is equal to 1.9.

  7. NREL Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation: Issue 3 (Book)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-11-01

    This quarterly magazine is dedicated to stepping beyond the technical journals to reveal NREL's vital work in a real-world context for our stakeholders. Continuum provides insights into the latest and most impactful clean energy innovations, while spotlighting those talented researchers and unique facilities that make it all happen. This edition focuses on the NREL Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation.

  8. Energy spectrum analysis - A model of echolocation processing. [in animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. A.; Titlebaum, E. L.

    1976-01-01

    The paper proposes a frequency domain approach based on energy spectrum analysis of the combination of a signal and its echoes as the processing mechanism for the echolocation process used by bats and other animals. The mechanism is a generalized wide-band one and can account for the large diversity of wide-band signals used for orientation. The coherency in the spectrum of the signal-echo combination is shown to be equivalent to correlation.

  9. Energy spectrum of black holes: A new view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majhi, Abhishek

    2017-01-01

    Energy of a black hole is usually quantized by invoking some area quantization scheme after expressing the energy in terms of the horizon area. However, in this approach one has to quantize the local and asymptotic energy of the black hole separately and the two results do not manifest any physical correspondence with each other. Here, as opposed to this practice, we find the unique energy spectrum of black holes by adopting a top-down approach. The physical links among the underlying quantum theory, statistical mechanics and thermodynamics of the black hole horizon play the central role in determining the energy spectrum. The energy spectrum that we obtain explicitly reveals the correspondence between asymptotic and local observations through the presence of the surface gravity of the horizon as a parameter in the spectrum, rather than being expressed as a function of area and consequently getting quantized in the usual approach. Thus, our result presents a new view as far as black hole energy quantization is concerned. The calculations are performed using the quantum geometric description of black hole horizons as laid down by loop quantum gravity.

  10. "We Dance and Find Each Other"1: Effects of Dance/Movement Therapy on Negative Symptoms in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Malin K Hildebrandt; Sabine C Koch; Thomas Fuchs

    2016-01-01

    .... The randomized controlled trial at hand investigated the effects of a 10-week manualized dance and movement therapy intervention on negative symptoms in participants with autism spectrum disorder...

  11. Energy Spectrum of Ground State and Excitation Spectrum of Quasi-particle for Hard-Core Boson in Optical Lattices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the energy spectrum of ground state and quasi-particle excitation spectrum of hard-core bosons, which behave very much like spinless noninteracting fermions, in optical lattices by means of the perturbation expansion and Bogoliubov approach. The results show that the energy spectrum has a single band structure, and the energy is lower near zero momentum; the excitation spectrum gives corresponding energy gap, and the system is in Mott-insulating state at Tonks limit. The analytic result of energy spectrum is in good agreement with that calculated in terms of Green's function at strong correlation limit.

  12. Spectrum of energy depositions in the Auger Water Cherenkov Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Humberto

    1999-08-01

    The measured spectrum of energy depositions in a Water Cherenkov Detector (WCD) prototype for the Pierre Auger Observatory is presented. A WCD (area 10 m2 )is located in the Puebla University campus at a depth of 800 g/cm2 (2200 m above sea level). Differential and integral spectra in a wide energy deposition range (0.5 - 150 of vertical equivalent muons) are presented. The problem of the WCD "self calibration" procedure (by rate of the muon events) is discussed. The characteristic change of the slopes of the differential spectrum at the transition from single muon signals to EAS signals is also discussed. The measured energy deposition spectrum at extreme signals is used to estimate the linearity of the response of the WCD PMTs. Key words: Auger array, water Cherenkov detector, extensive air showers

  13. Multislot Simultaneous Spectrum Sensing and Energy Harvesting in Cognitive Radio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Liu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In cognitive radio (CR, the spectrum sensing of the primary user (PU may consume some electrical power from the battery capacity of the secondary user (SU, resulting in a decrease in the transmission power of the SU. In this paper, a multislot simultaneous spectrum sensing and energy harvesting model is proposed, which uses the harvested radio frequency (RF energy of the PU signal to supply the spectrum sensing. In the proposed model, the sensing duration is divided into multiple sensing slots consisting of one local-sensing subslot and one energy-harvesting subslot. If the PU is detected to be present in the local-sensing subslot, the SU will harvest RF energy of the PU signal in the energy-harvesting slot, otherwise, the SU will continue spectrum sensing. The global decision on the presence of the PU is obtained through combining local sensing results from all the sensing slots by adopting “Or-logic Rule”. A joint optimization problem of sensing time and time splitter factor is proposed to maximize the throughput of the SU under the constraints of probabilities of false alarm and detection and energy harvesting. The simulation results have shown that the proposed model can clearly improve the maximal throughput of the SU compared to the traditional sensing-throughput tradeoff model.

  14. A Similarity Theory of the Tropospheric Turbulence Energy Spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, F. A.

    1988-04-01

    A three-range model is proposed for the energy spectrum of tropospheric turbulence in which the range-I spectrum is governed by the cascade of eddy enstrophy, that of range-II by the cascade of eddy kinetic energy, and that of range-III by viscous dissipation. Values of the spectral densities in ranges-I and -II, as well as wavenumbers of transition from range-I to -II to -III, are determined in terms of the integrated values of the energy spectrum, V2¯, and the dissipation spectrum, , of range-II. The resulting spectra for ranges-I and -II are shown to agree well with the recent GASP data on atmospheric spectra covering wave-lengths of from less than 3 km to 10000 km. A property of this model is that /V2¯ = f, the Coriolis parameter. This is shown to give very close agreement with the observed latitude variation of the GASP-Spectrum in range-II, to correctly indicate that this variation is much greater in range-I, and to explain why the atmosphere's eddy viscosity, K, is more variable over the globe than the energy-dissipation rate, . The observed seasonal variation of spectra is explained by the hemispheric variation of due to the seasonal change in the pole-equator temperature gradient.

  15. Interference Energy Spectrum of the Infinite Square Well

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mordecai Waegell

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Certain superposition states of the 1-D infinite square well have transient zeros at locations other than the nodes of the eigenstates that comprise them. It is shown that if an infinite potential barrier is suddenly raised at some or all of these zeros, the well can be split into multiple adjacent infinite square wells without affecting the wavefunction. This effects a change of the energy eigenbasis of the state to a basis that does not commute with the original, and a subsequent measurement of the energy now reveals a completely different spectrum, which we call the interference energy spectrum of the state. This name is appropriate because the same splitting procedure applied at the stationary nodes of any eigenstate does not change the measurable energy of the state. Of particular interest, this procedure can result in measurable energies that are greater than the energy of the highest mode in the original superposition, raising questions about the conservation of energy akin to those that have been raised in the study of superoscillations. An analytic derivation is given for the interference spectrum of a given wavefunction Ψ ( x , t with N known zeros located at points s i = ( x i , t i . Numerical simulations were used to verify that a barrier can be rapidly raised at a zero of the wavefunction without significantly affecting it. The interpretation of this result with respect to the conservation of energy and the energy-time uncertainty relation is discussed, and the idea of alternate energy eigenbases is fleshed out. The question of whether or not a preferred discrete energy spectrum is an inherent feature of a particle’s quantum state is examined.

  16. On the energy spectrum of strong magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Perez, Jean Carlos; Boldyrev, Stanislav; Cattaneo, Fausto

    2012-01-01

    The energy spectrum of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence attracts interest due to its fundamental importance and its relevance for interpreting astrophysical data. Here we present measurements of the energy spectra from a series of high-resolution direct numerical simulations of MHD turbulence with a strong guide field and for increasing Reynolds number. The presented simulations, with numerical resolutions up to 2048^3 mesh points and statistics accumulated over 30 to 150 eddy turnover times, constitute, to the best of our knowledge, the largest statistical sample of steady state MHD turbulence to date. We study both the balanced case, where the energies associated with Alfv\\'en modes propagating in opposite directions along the guide field, E^+ and $E^-, are equal, and the imbalanced case where the energies are different. In the balanced case, we find that the energy spectrum converges to a power law with exponent -3/2 as the Reynolds number is increased, consistent with phenomenological models that include sc...

  17. Negative cognitive styles synergistically predict suicidal ideation in bipolar spectrum disorders: a 3-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stange, Jonathan P; Hamilton, Jessica L; Burke, Taylor A; Kleiman, Evan M; O'Garro-Moore, Jared K; Seligman, Nicole D; Abramson, Lyn Y; Alloy, Lauren B

    2015-03-30

    Rates of suicidal ideation and behavior are extremely high in bipolar spectrum disorders (BSDs). However, relatively little work has evaluated potentially synergistic relationships between cognitive and emotion-regulatory processes proposed by theoretical models of suicidality in BSDs. The present study evaluated whether negative cognitive style and subtypes of rumination would exacerbate the impact of self-criticism on suicidal ideation in a prospective study of individuals with BSDs. Seventy-two young adults with BSDs (bipolar II, bipolar NOS, or cyclothymia) completed diagnostic interviews and trait measures of self-criticism, negative cognitive style, and brooding and reflective rumination at a baseline assessment. The occurrence of suicidal ideation was assessed as part of diagnostic interviews completed every 4 months for an average of 3 years of follow-up. Negative cognitive style and reflective rumination strengthened the association between self-criticism and the prospective occurrence of suicidal ideation across follow-up. Individuals with high levels of self-criticism in conjunction with negative cognitive style or reflective rumination were most likely to experience the onset of suicidal ideation. Self-criticism may work synergistically with negative cognitive style and rumination to confer risk for suicidal ideation in bipolar spectrum disorders. These results support theoretical models of suicidality in BSDs and indicate that evaluating and understanding negative cognitive styles may help to identify individuals who are at risk of suicide.

  18. High Energy Atmospheric Neutrino Fluxes From a Realistic Primary Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos Penha, Felipe; Dembinski, Hans; Gaisser, Thomas K.; Tilav, Serap

    2016-03-01

    Atmospheric neutrino fluxes depend on the energy spectrum of primary nucleons entering the top of the atmosphere. Before the advent of AMANDA and the IceCube Neutrino Observatory, measurements of the neutrino fluxes were generally below ~ 1TeV , a regime in which a simple energy power law sufficed to describe the primary spectrum. Now, IceCube's muon neutrino data extends beyond 1PeV , including a combination of neutrinos from astrophysical sources with background from atmospheric neutrinos. At such high energies, the steepening at the knee of the primary spectrum must be accounted for. Here, we describe a semi-analytical approach for calculating the atmospheric differential neutrino fluxes at high energies. The input is a realistic primary spectrum consisting of 4 populations with distinct energy cutoffs, each with up to 7 representative nuclei, where the parameters were extracted from a global fit. We show the effect of each component on the atmospheric neutrino spectra, above 10TeV . The resulting features follow directly from recent air shower measurements included in the fit. Felipe Campos Penha gratefully acknowledges financial support from CAPES (Processo BEX 5348/14-5), CNPq (Processo 142180/2012-2), and the Bartol Research Institute.

  19. A commercialization strategy for carbon-negative energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Daniel L.; Kammen, Daniel M.

    2016-01-01

    Climate change mitigation requires gigatonne-scale CO2 removal technologies, yet few examples exist beyond niche markets. The flexibility of thermochemical conversion of biomass and fossil energy, coupled with carbon capture and storage, offers a route to commercializing carbon-negative energy.

  20. Localization of negative energy and the Bekenstein bound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, David D; Casini, Horacio

    2013-11-27

    A simple argument shows that negative energy cannot be isolated far away from positive energy in a conformal field theory and strongly constrains its possible dispersal. This is also required by consistency with the Bekenstein bound written in terms of the positivity of relative entropy. We prove a new form of the Bekenstein bound based on the monotonicity of the relative entropy, involving a "free" entropy enclosed in a region which is highly insensitive to space-time entanglement, and show that it further improves the negative energy localization bound.

  1. Limiting energy spectrum of a saturated radiation belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Michael; Davidson, Gerald T.

    1988-01-01

    The condition for magnetospheric wave growth in the presence of anisotropic charged particle distributions is used to extend the Kennel-Petschek theory that traditionally imposes an upper bound on the integral flux of charged particles at energies above a certain threshold to provide a limit on the differential flux at any energy above this threshold. A closed-form expression is derived for the limiting energy spectrum consistent with marginal occurrence of a magnetospheric maser at all wave frequencies below a certain fraction of the electron or proton gyrofrequency. The bounded integral can be recast in such a way that repeated differentiations with respect to v(parallel) actually generate a closed expression for the limiting form of the velocity space distribution, and thus for the limiting energy spectrum of the corresponding particles, whenever the anisotropy parameter is an integer.

  2. Compressive sampling for energy spectrum estimation of turbulent flows

    CERN Document Server

    Adalsteinsson, Gudmundur F

    2014-01-01

    Recent results from compressive sampling (CS) have demonstrated that accurate reconstruction of sparse signals often requires far fewer samples than suggested by the classical Nyquist--Shannon sampling theorem. Typically, signal reconstruction errors are measured in the $\\ell^2$ norm and the signal is assumed to be sparse, compressible or having a prior distribution. Our spectrum estimation by sparse optimization (SpESO) method uses prior information about isotropic homogeneous turbulent flows with power law energy spectra and applies the methods of CS to 1-D and 2-D turbulence signals to estimate their energy spectra with small logarithmic errors. SpESO is distinct from existing energy spectrum estimation methods which are based on sparse support of the signal in Fourier space. SpESO approximates energy spectra with an order of magnitude fewer samples than needed with Shannon sampling. Our results demonstrate that SpESO performs much better than lumped orthogonal matching pursuit (LOMP), and as well or bette...

  3. Energy Spectrum Symmetry of Heisenberg Model in Fock Space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG An-Min; ZHU Ren-Gui

    2006-01-01

    @@ We extend the BCS paring model with equally spaced energy levels to a general one-dimensional spin-l/2 Heisenberg model. The two well-known symmetries of the Heisenberg model, i.e. permutational and spin-inversion symmetries, no longer exist. However, when jointing these two operations together, we find a new symmetry of energy spectrum between its subspace n and subspace L - n of the Fock space. A rigorous proof is presented.

  4. Energy Spectrum of Anyons in a Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Illuminati, F

    1993-01-01

    For the many-anyon system in external magnetic field, we derive the energy spectrum as an exact solution of the quantum eigenvalue problem with particular topological constraints. Our results agree with the numerical spectra recently obtained for the 3- and the 4-anyon systems.

  5. Negative ions as a source of low energy neutral beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    Little consideration has been given to the impact of recent developments in negative ion source technology on the design of low energy neutral beam injectors. However, negative ion sources of improved operating efficiency, higher gas efficiency, and smaller beam divergence will lead to neutral deuterium injectors, operating at less than 100 keV, with better operating efficiencies and more compact layouts than can be obtained from positive ion systems.

  6. The effect of silver nanoparticles on Gram-negative bacilli Resistant to Extended-Spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doudi M

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Antibiotic resistant to Antimicrobial agents isone of the most important concerns in hospitals, which can lead toincreased costs, treatment fails and mortality rates. The aim of this studywas identification of Gram-negative bacilli resistant to extended-spectrumβ-lactamase Enzymes (ESBLs and determination of the effect of silvernanoparticles on them.Materials & Methods: Of 276 clinical samples referred to three hospitalsof Isfahan city, 186 gram negative bacilli were studied. To recognizeESBLs production, the bacilli was assessed by disk diffusion method andconfirmed by DDT and Double Disk approximation Test. The ESBLproducing bacteria were subjected to increasing concentrations (12.5, 25,50,100,200,400 and 500 ppm of silver nanoparticles, prepared in TehranNano Pars Company, and Inhibitory zone diameter was measured.Results: Of 186 isolates, 140 (%75/3 are gram-negative bacilli producingESBLs and 46 (24.7% of them without this capability. Most of ESBLsbacteria are belonged to urine infections and the most prevalent bacteriumis Klebsiella pneumonia. All samples are sensitive to the nano silversolution with density of 100 ppm. Enterobacter aerogenes (24 mm andPseudomonas aeruginosa (23mm have the greatest Inhibitory zonediameter in the presence of 500 ppm of silver nanoparticles.Conclusion: It seems that silver nanoparticles have inhibitory effect on allstudied gram negative bacilli. The inhibitory effect of silver nanoparticlesagainst ESBL producing Gram negative bacteria is dose depended.Keywords: Gram-negative bacilli, ESBLs, silver nanoparticles

  7. On the Energy Spectrum of Strong Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Carlos Perez

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The energy spectrum of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence attracts interest due to its fundamental importance and its relevance for interpreting astrophysical data. Here we present measurements of the energy spectra from a series of high-resolution direct numerical simulations of magnetohydrodynamics turbulence with a strong guide field and for increasing Reynolds number. The presented simulations, with numerical resolutions up to 2048^{3} mesh points and statistics accumulated over 30 to 150 eddy turnover times, constitute, to the best of our knowledge, the largest statistical sample of steady state magnetohydrodynamics turbulence to date. We study both the balanced case, where the energies associated with Alfvén modes propagating in opposite directions along the guide field, E^{+}(k_{⊥} and E^{-}(k_{⊥}, are equal, and the imbalanced case where the energies are different. In the balanced case, we find that the energy spectrum converges to a power law with exponent -3/2 as the Reynolds number is increased, which is consistent with phenomenological models that include scale-dependent dynamic alignment. For the imbalanced case, with E^{+}>E^{-}, the simulations show that E^{-}∝k_{⊥}^{-3/2} for all Reynolds numbers considered, while E^{+} has a slightly steeper spectrum at small Re. As the Reynolds number increases, E^{+} flattens. Since E^{±} are pinned at the dissipation scale and anchored at the driving scales, we postulate that at sufficiently high Re the spectra will become parallel in the inertial range and scale as E^{+}∝E^{-}∝k_{⊥}^{-3/2}. Questions regarding the universality of the spectrum and the value of the “Kolmogorov constant” are discussed.

  8. Decay energy of 55Fe from its inner Bremsstrahlung spectrum

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S L Keshava; K Gopala; P Venkataramaiah

    2001-06-01

    Several measurements of decay energy using the inner Bremsstrahlung spectrum (IB) due to radiative electron capture in 55Fe has been made. But the results are not uniform. Hence another attempt has been made at the same. Experimental data was obtained with a 4.445 cm. dia × 5.08 cm thick NaI (Tl) detector. It was subjected to suitable statistical treatment and various corrections using Liden and Starfelt procedure. The corrected spectrum agrees well with the Glauber and Martin theory for 1s electron capture beyond 100 keV. From the Jauch plot, the decay energy of 232.36 ± 0.64 keV was obtained.

  9. Exact Ultra Cold Neutrons' Energy Spectrum in Gravitational Quantum Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Pedram, Pouria

    2013-01-01

    We find exact energy eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the quantum bouncer in the presence of the minimal length uncertainty and the maximal momentum. This form of Generalized (Gravitational) Uncertainty Principle (GUP) agrees with various theories of quantum gravity and predicts a minimal length uncertainty proportional to $\\hbar\\sqrt{\\beta}$ and a maximal momentum proportional to $1/\\sqrt{\\beta}$, where $\\beta$ is the deformation parameter. We also find the semiclassical energy spectrum and discuss the effects of this GUP on the transition rate of the ultra cold neutrons in gravitational spectrometers. Then, based on the Nesvizhevsky's famous experiment, we obtain an upper bound on the dimensionless GUP parameter.

  10. Exact ultra cold neutrons' energy spectrum in gravitational quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedram, Pouria

    2013-10-01

    We find exact energy eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the quantum bouncer in the presence of the minimal length uncertainty and the maximal momentum. This form of Generalized (Gravitational) Uncertainty Principle (GUP) agrees with various theories of quantum gravity and predicts a minimal length uncertainty proportional to and a maximal momentum proportional to , where β is the deformation parameter. We also find the semiclassical energy spectrum and discuss the effects of this GUP on the transition rate of the ultra cold neutrons in gravitational spectrometers. Then, based on Nesvizhevsky's famous experiment, we obtain an upper bound on the dimensionless GUP parameter.

  11. Dynamic Spectrum Access in Cognitive Radio Networks with RF Energy Harvesting

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Xiao; Wang,Ping; Dusit, Niyato; Ekram, Hossain

    2014-01-01

    Spectrum efficiency and energy efficiency are two critical issues in designing wireless networks. Through dynamic spectrum access, cognitive radios can improve the spectrum efficiency and capacity of wireless networks. On the other hand, radio frequency (RF) energy harvesting has emerged as a promising technique to supply energy to wireless networks and thereby increase their energy efficiency. Therefore, to achieve both spectrum and energy efficiencies, the secondary users in a cognitive rad...

  12. The energy production rate & the generation spectrum of UHECRs

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, Boaz; Waxman, Eli

    2008-01-01

    We derive simple analytic expressions for the flux and spectrum of ultra-high energy cosmic-rays (UHECRs) predicted in models where the CRs are protons produced by extra-Galactic sources. For a power-law scaling of the CR production rate with redshift and energy, d\\dot{n} /dE\\propto E^-\\alpha (1+z)^m, our results are accurate at high energy, E>10^18.7 eV, to better than 15%, providing a simple and straightforward method for inferring d\\dot{n}/dE from the observed flux at E. We show that current measurements of the UHECR spectrum, including the latest Auger data, imply E^2d\\dot{n}/dE(z=0)=(0.45\\pm0.15)(\\alpha-1) 10^44 erg Mpc^-3 yr^-1 at E<10^19.5 eV with \\alpha roughly confined to 2\\lesseq\\alpha<2.7. The uncertainty is dominated by the systematic and statistic errors in the experimental determination of individual CR event energy, (\\Delta E/E)_{sys}~(\\Delta E/E)_{stat} ~20%. At lower energy, d\\dot{n}/dE is uncertain due to the unknown Galactic contribution. Simple models in which \\alpha\\simeq 2 and the ...

  13. Model-based x-ray energy spectrum estimation algorithm from CT scanning data with spectrum filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Wang, Lin-Yuan; Yan, Bin

    2016-10-01

    With the development of technology, the traditional X-ray CT can't meet the modern medical and industry needs for component distinguish and identification. This is due to the inconsistency of X-ray imaging system and reconstruction algorithm. In the current CT systems, X-ray spectrum produced by X-ray source is continuous in energy range determined by tube voltage and energy filter, and the attenuation coefficient of object is varied with the X-ray energy. So the distribution of X-ray energy spectrum plays an important role for beam-hardening correction, dual energy CT image reconstruction or dose calculation. However, due to high ill-condition and ill-posed feature of system equations of transmission measurement data, statistical fluctuations of X ray quantum and noise pollution, it is very hard to get stable and accurate spectrum estimation using existing methods. In this paper, a model-based X-ray energy spectrum estimation method from CT scanning data with energy spectrum filter is proposed. First, transmission measurement data were accurately acquired by CT scan and measurement using phantoms with different energy spectrum filter. Second, a physical meaningful X-ray tube spectrum model was established with weighted gaussian functions and priori information such as continuity of bremsstrahlung and specificity of characteristic emission and estimation information of average attenuation coefficient. The parameter in model was optimized to get the best estimation result for filtered spectrum. Finally, the original energy spectrum was reconstructed from filtered spectrum estimation with filter priori information. Experimental results demonstrate that the stability and accuracy of X ray energy spectrum estimation using the proposed method are improved significantly.

  14. Energy-Efficient Spectrum Sensing for Cognitive Radio Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maleki, S.

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic spectrum access employing cognitive radios has been proposed, in order to opportunistically use underutilized spectrum portions of a heavily licensed electromagnetic spectrum. Cognitive radios opportunistically share the spectrum, while avoiding any harmful interference to the primary licens

  15. Energy-Efficient Spectrum Sensing for Cognitive Radio Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maleki, S.

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic spectrum access employing cognitive radios has been proposed, in order to opportunistically use underutilized spectrum portions of a heavily licensed electromagnetic spectrum. Cognitive radios opportunistically share the spectrum, while avoiding any harmful interference to the primary licens

  16. [Detection of endotoxins of Gram-negative bacteria on the basis of electromagnetic radiation frequency spectrum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likhoded, V G; Kuleshova, N V; Sergieva, N V; Konev, Iu V; Trubnikova, I A; Sudzhian, E V

    2007-01-01

    Method of Gram-negative bacteria endotoxins detection on the basis of their own spectrum of electromagnetic radiation frequency was developed. Frequency spectrum typical for chemotype Re glycolipid, which is a part of lypopolysaccharides in the majority of Gram-negative bacteria, was used. Two devices--"Mini- Expert-DT" (manufactured by IMEDIS, Moscow) and "Bicom" (manufactured by Regumed, Germany)--were used as generators of electromagnetic radiation. Detection of endotoxin using these devices was performed by electropuncture vegetative resonance test. Immunoenzyme reaction with antibodies to chemotype Re glycolipid was used during analysis of preparations for assessment of resonance-frequency method specificity. The study showed that resonance-frequency method can detect lypopolysaccharides of different enterobacteria in quantities up to 0.1 pg as well as bacteria which contain lypopolysaccharides. At the same time, this method does not detect such bacteria as Staphylococcus aureus, Bifidobacterium spp., Lactobacillus spp., and Candida albicans. The method does not require preliminary processing of blood samples and can be used for diagnostics of endotoxinemia, and detection of endotoxins in blood samples or injection solutions.

  17. The high energy spectrum of 3C 273

    CERN Document Server

    Esposito, V; Jean, P; Tramacere, A; Türler, M; Lähteenmäki, A; Tornikoski, M

    2015-01-01

    Aims. The high energy spectrum of 3C 273 is usually understood in terms of inverse-Compton emission in a relativistic leptonic jet. This model predicts variability patterns and delays that could be tested with simultaneous observations from the radio to the GeV range. Methods. The instruments IBIS, SPI, JEM-X on board INTEGRAL, PCA on board RXTE, and LAT on board Fermi have enough sensitivity to follow the spectral variability of 3C 273 from the keV to the GeV. We looked for correlations between the different energy bands, including radio data at 37 GHz collected at the Mets\\"ahovi Radio Observatory and built quasi-simultaneous multiwavelength spectra in the high energy domain when the source is flaring either in the X-rays or in the {\\gamma} rays. Results. Both temporal and spectral analysis suggest a two-component model to explain the complete high energy spectrum. X-ray emission is likely dominated by a Seyfert-like component while the {\\gamma}-ray emission is dominated by a blazar-like component produced ...

  18. Significance of Negative Energy States in Quantum Field Theory $(1) $

    CERN Document Server

    Chen Sow Hsin

    2002-01-01

    We suppose that there are both particles with negative energies described by $\\QTR{cal}{L}_{W}$ and particles with positive energies described by $\\QTR{cal}{L}_{F},$ $\\QTR{cal}{L=L}_{F\\text{}}+\\QTR{cal}{L}_{W},$ $\\QTR{cal}{L}_{F\\text{}}$ is equivalent to Lagragian density of the conventional QED, $\\QTR{cal}{L}_{W}$ and $\\QTR{cal}{L}_{F\\text{}}$ are symmetric, independent of each other before quantization and dependent on each other after quantization. From this we define transfomation operators and quantize free fields by the transformation operators replacing the creation and annihilation operators in the conventional QED. That the energy of the vacuum state is equal to zero is naturally obtained. Thus we can easily determine the cosmological constant according to data of astronomical observation, and it is possible to correct nonperturbational methods which depend on the energy of the ground state in quantum field theory.

  19. Universality of energy spectrum in turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Kunlun; Hoeller, Judith; Brown, Eric

    2016-11-01

    We present study of energy spectrum in turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection, in both cylindrical and cubic containers, tilting and non-tilting conditions, and with Rayleigh number ranging from 0 . 5 ×109 to 1 ×1010 . For these different conditions of geometry, tilt, and Rayleigh number, the temperature spectra measured on the system side walls are significantly different from each other. Even for the same condition, the spectrum varies depending on whether the sensors locate in the path of large-scale circulations. However, quite interestingly, once the signals of large-scale circulations are subtracted from the raw temperature, all spectra display a universal shape, regardless of system geometry, tilt, Rayleigh number, and location of sensors. It suggests that one could model the large-scale circulations and small-scale fluctuations separately in turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection.

  20. ENERGY EFFICIENT COOPERATIVE SPECTRUM SENSING IN COGNITIVE RADIO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramzi Saifan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Sensing in cognitive radio (CR protects the primary user (PU from bad interference. Therefore, it is assumed to be a requirement. However, sensing has two main challenges; first the CR is required to sense the PU under very low signal to noise ratios which will take longer sensing time, and second, some CR nodes may suffer from deep fading and shadowing effects. Cooperative spectrum sensing (CSS is supposed to solve these challenges. However, CSS adds extra energy consumption due to CRs send the sensing result to the fusion center and receive the final decision from the fusion center. This is in addition to the sensing energy itself. Therefore, CSS may consume considerable energy out of the battery of the CR node. Therefore in this paper, we try to find jointly the sensing time required from each CR node and the number of CR nodes who should perform sensing such that the energy and energy efficiency (i.e., ratio of throughput to energy consumed are optimized. Simulation results show that the joint optimization achieves better in terms of energy efficiency than other approaches that perform separate optimization.

  1. Energy efficient cross layer design for spectrum sharing systems

    KAUST Repository

    Alabbasi, Abdulrahman

    2016-10-06

    We propose a cross layer design that optimizes the energy efficiency of spectrum sharing systems. The energy per good bit (EPG) is considered as an energy efficiency metric. We optimize the secondary user\\'s transmission power and media access frame length to minimize the EPG metric. We protect the primary user transmission via an outage probability constraint. The non-convex targeted problem is optimized by utilizing the generalized convexity theory and verifying the strictly pseudo-convex structure of the problem. Analytical results of the optimal power and frame length are derived. We also used these results in proposing an algorithm, which guarantees the existence of a global optimal solution. Selected numerical results show the improvement of the proposed system compared to other systems. © 2016 IEEE.

  2. Influence of some factors on alpha energy spectrum of 241Am fire alarm source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Several primary factors influencing the alpha energy spectrum of 241Am fire alarm source have been studied in order to get betteralpha energy spectrum.The results show that the homogeneity andthe thickness of metal surface coat and the size of active area of thesource have considerable influence on the alpha energy spectrum of thesource.

  3. Probing the inflaton: Small-scale power spectrum constraints from measurements of the CMB energy spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Chluba, Jens; Ben-Dayan, Ido

    2012-01-01

    In the early Universe, energy stored in small-scale density perturbations is quickly dissipated by Silk-damping, a process that inevitably generates mu- and y-type spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). These spectral distortions depend on the shape and amplitude of the primordial power spectrum at wavenumbers k < 10^4 Mpc^{-1}. Here we study constraints on the primordial power spectrum derived from COBE/FIRAS and forecasted for PIXIE. We show that measurements of mu and y impose strong bounds on the integrated small-scale power, and we demonstrate how to compute these constraints using k-space window functions that account for the effects of thermalization and dissipation physics. We show that COBE/FIRAS places a robust upper limit on the amplitude of the small-scale power spectrum. This limit is about three orders of magnitude stronger than the one derived from primordial black holes in the same scale range. Furthermore, this limit could be improved by another three orders of magn...

  4. Energy Spectrum Extraction and Optimal Imaging via Dual-Energy Material Decomposition

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Qiude; Niu, Tianye

    2015-01-01

    Inferior soft-tissue contrast resolution is a major limitation of current CT scanners. The aim of the study is to improve the contrast resolution of CT scanners using dual-energy acquisition. Based on dual-energy material decomposition, the proposed method starts with extracting the outgoing energy spectrum by polychromatic forward projecting the material-selective images. The extracted spectrum is then reweighted to boost the soft-tissue contrast. A simulated water cylinder phantom with inserts that contain a series of six solutions of varying iodine concentration (range, 0-20 mg/mL) is used to evaluate the proposed method. Results show the root mean square error (RMSE) and mean energy difference between the extracted energy spectrum and the spectrum acquired using an energy-resolved photon counting detector(PCD), are 0.044 and 0.01 keV, respectively. Compared to the method using the standard energy-integrating detectors, dose normalized contrast-to-noise ratio (CNRD) for the proposed method are improved fro...

  5. Monte Carlo Evaluation of Tritium Beta Spectrum Energy Deposition in Gallium Nitride (GaN) Direct Energy Conversion Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Monte Carlo Evaluation of Tritium Beta Spectrum Energy Deposition in Gallium Nitride (GaN) Direct Energy Conversion Devices by Marc Litz...MD 20783-1138 ARL-TR-7082 September 2014 Monte Carlo Evaluation of Tritium Beta Spectrum Energy Deposition in Gallium Nitride (GaN... Tritium Beta Spectrum Energy Deposition in Gallium Nitride (GaN) Direct Energy Conversion Devices 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM

  6. Negative dependence of surface magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy on film thickness in Co33Fe67 alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, De-Lai; Cui, Ming-Qi; Yang, Dong-Liang; Dong, Jun-Cai; Xu, Wei

    2016-10-01

    In this work, the magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy (MAE) on the surface of Fe33Co67 alloy film is extracted from x-ray magnetic linear dichroism (XMLD) experiments. The result indicates that the surface MAE value is negatively correlated with thickness. Through spectrum calculations and analysis, we find that besides the thickness effect, another principal possible cause may be the shape anisotropy resulting from the presence of interface roughness. These two factors lead to different electron structures on the fermi surface with different exchange fields, which produces different spin-orbit interaction anisotropies. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11075176 and 11375131).

  7. Sharp knee phenomenon of primary cosmic ray energy spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Ter-Antonyan, Samvel

    2014-01-01

    Primary energy spectral models are tested in the energy range of 1-200 PeV using standardized extensive air shower responses from BASJE-MAS, Tibet, GAMMA and KASCADE scintillation shower arrays. Results point towards the two-component origin of observed cosmic ray energy spectra in the knee region (GAPS spectral model) consisting of a pulsar component superimposed upon rigidity-dependent power law diffuse galactic flux. The two-component energy spectral model accounts for both the sharp knee shower spectral phenomenon and observed irregularity of all-particle energy spectrum in the region of 50-100 PeV. Alternatively, tested multi-population primary energy spectra predicted by non-linear diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) models describe observed shower spectra in the knee region provided that the cutoff magnetic rigidities of accelerating particles are 6.0+/-0.3 PV and 45+/-2 PV for the first two populations respectively. Both tested spectral models confirm the predominant H-He primary nuclei origin of obser...

  8. Energy spectrum for a strongly correlated network and local magnetism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-li LIU; Qiao BI

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we consider a quantum strongly correlated network described by an Anderson s-d mixing model. By introducing the Green function on the projected formalism of the Schrieffer and Wolf transformation, the energy spectrum of the system can be obtained. Using this result we calculate the survivability distribution of the network and discuss the local magnetism in the network, which shows that the survivability is an important statistical characteristic quantity not just to reflect the network topological property but also dynamics.

  9. Joint cluster and non-negative least squares analysis for aerosol mass spectrum data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, T; Zhu, W [Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3600 (United States); McGraw, R [Environmental Sciences Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States)], E-mail: zhu@ams.sunysb.edu

    2008-07-15

    Aerosol mass spectrum (AMS) data contain hundreds of mass to charge ratios and their corresponding intensities from air collected through the mass spectrometer. The observations are usually taken sequentially in time to monitor the air composition, quality and temporal change in an area of interest. An important goal of AMS data analysis is to reduce the dimensionality of the original data yielding a small set of representing tracers for various atmospheric and climatic models. In this work, we present an approach to jointly apply the cluster analysis and the non-negative least squares method towards this goal. Application to a relevant study demonstrates the effectiveness of this new approach. Comparisons are made to other relevant multivariate statistical techniques including the principal component analysis and the positive matrix factorization method, and guidelines are provided.

  10. Sensitivity of EAS measurements to the energy spectrum of muons

    CERN Document Server

    Espadanal, J; Conceição, R

    2016-01-01

    We have studied how the energy spectrum of muons at production affects some of the most common measurements related to muons in extensive air shower studies, namely, the number of muons at the ground, the slope of the lateral distribution of muons, the apparent muon production depth, and the arrival time delay of muons at ground. We found that by changing the energy spectrum by an amount consistent with the difference between current models (namely EPOS-LHC and QGSjet-II.04), the muon surface density at ground increases $5\\%$ at $20^\\circ$ zenith angle and $17\\%$ at $60^\\circ$ zenith angle. This effect introduces a zenith angle dependence on the reconstructed number of muons which might be experimentally observed. The maximum of the muon production depth distribution at $40^\\circ$ increases $\\sim10\\text{ g/cm}^2$ and $\\sim0\\text{ g/cm}^2$ at $60^\\circ$, which, from pure geometrical considerations, increases the arrival time delay of muons. There is an extra contribution to the delay due to the subluminal velo...

  11. Sensitivity of EAS measurements to the energy spectrum of muons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espadanal, J.; Cazon, L.; Conceição, R.

    2017-01-01

    We have studied how the energy spectrum of muons at production affects some of the most common measurements related to muons in extensive air shower studies, namely, the number of muons at the ground, the slope of the lateral distribution of muons, the apparent muon production depth, and the arrival time delay of muons at ground. We found that by changing the energy spectrum by an amount consistent with the difference between current models (namely EPOS-LHC and QGSJET-II.04), the muon surface density at ground increases 5% at 20° zenith angle and 17% at 60° zenith angle. This effect introduces a zenith angle dependence on the reconstructed number of muons which might be experimentally observed. The maximum of the muon production depth distribution at 40° increases ∼ 10 g/cm2 and ∼ 0 g/cm2 at 60°, which, from pure geometrical considerations, increases the arrival time delay of muons. There is an extra contribution to the delay due to the subluminal velocities of muons of the order of ∼ 3 ns at all zenith angles. Finally, changes introduced in the logarithmic slope of the lateral density function are less than 2%.

  12. Extrapolation of scattering data to the negative-energy region

    CERN Document Server

    Blokhintsev, L D; Mukhamedzhanov, A M; Savin, D A

    2016-01-01

    Explicit analytic expressions are derived for the effective-range function for the case when the interaction is represented by a sum of the short-range square-well and long-range Coulomb potentials. These expressions are then transformed into forms convenient for extrapolating to the negative-energy region and obtaining the information about bound-state properties. Alternative ways of extrapolation are discussed. Analytic properties of separate terms entering these expressions for the effective-range function and the partial-wave scattering amplitude are investigated.

  13. Extended spectrum beta-lactamase detection in gram-negative bacilli of nosocomial origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dechen C Tsering

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Resistance to third generation cephalosporins by acquisition and expression of extended spectrum beta lactamase (ESBL enzymes among gram-negative bacilli is on a rise. The presence of ESBL producing organisms significantly affects the course and outcome of an infection and poses a challenge to infection management worldwide. Materials and Methods: In the period from June 2007 to 2008, we collected 1489 samples from patients suspected of nosocomial infection. The isolates were identified based on colony morphology and biochemical reaction. Gram negative bacilli resistant to third generation cephalosporins were tested for ESBL by double disc synergy test (DDST- a screening test and then phenotypic confirmatory test. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was done by modified Kirby Bauer disc diffusion method. Results: From the sample of 238 gram-negative bacilli, we isolated Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Citrobacter freundii, Proteus mirabilis, Morganella morganii and Enterobacter cloacae. Following both methods, 34% isolates were ESBL-positive. The ESBL producing isolates were significantly resistant (p < 0.01 to ampicillin, piperacillin, piperacillin/tazobactam, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, tetracycline, ciprofloxacin and gentamicin as compared to non-ESBL producers. Multidrug resistance was significantly (p < 0.01 higher (69.14% in ESBL positive isolates than non-ESBL isolates (21.66%. Conclusion: High prevalence of ESBL in our hospital cannot be ignored. ESBL producers can be detected by DDST and phenotypic confirmatory test with equal efficacy. The sensitivity of screening test improved with the use of more than one antibiotic and addition of one or two antibiotics would not increase cost and labor. We recommend DDST using multiple antibiotics in all microbiology units as a routine screening test.

  14. Was there a negative vacuum energy in your past?

    CERN Document Server

    Chapline, George

    2016-01-01

    A model for gravitational collapse where the event horizon is a quantum critical phase transition is extended to provide an explanation for the origin of the observable universe, where the expanding universe that we observe today was proceeded by a flat universe with a negative cosmological constant. In principal this allows one derive all the features of our universe from a single parameter: the magnitude of the pre-big bang negative vacuum energy density. In this paper a simple model for the big bang is introduced which allows us to relate the present day energy density and temperature fluctuations of the CMB, to the present day density of dark matter. This model for the big bang also makes a dramatic prediction: dark matter mostly consists of compact objects with a masses on the order of 104 solar masses. Remarkably this is consistent with numerical simulations for how primordial fluctuations in the density of dark give rise to the observed inhomogeneous distribution of matter in our universe. Our model fo...

  15. Acute effects of capsaicin on energy expenditure and fat oxidation in negative energy balance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilou L H R Janssens

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Addition of capsaicin (CAPS to the diet has been shown to increase energy expenditure; therefore capsaicin is an interesting target for anti-obesity therapy. AIM: We investigated the 24 h effects of CAPS on energy expenditure, substrate oxidation and blood pressure during 25% negative energy balance. METHODS: Subjects underwent four 36 h sessions in a respiration chamber for measurements of energy expenditure, substrate oxidation and blood pressure. They received 100% or 75% of their daily energy requirements in the conditions '100%CAPS', '100%Control', '75%CAPS' and '75%Control'. CAPS was given at a dose of 2.56 mg (1.03 g of red chili pepper, 39,050 Scoville heat units (SHU with every meal. RESULTS: An induced negative energy balance of 25% was effectively a 20.5% negative energy balance due to adapting mechanisms. Diet-induced thermogenesis (DIT and resting energy expenditure (REE at 75%CAPS did not differ from DIT and REE at 100%Control, while at 75%Control these tended to be or were lower than at 100%Control (p = 0.05 and p = 0.02 respectively. Sleeping metabolic rate (SMR at 75%CAPS did not differ from SMR at 100%CAPS, while SMR at 75%Control was lower than at 100%CAPS (p = 0.04. Fat oxidation at 75%CAPS was higher than at 100%Control (p = 0.03, while with 75%Control it did not differ from 100%Control. Respiratory quotient (RQ was more decreased at 75%CAPS (p = 0.04 than at 75%Control (p = 0.05 when compared with 100%Control. Blood pressure did not differ between the four conditions. CONCLUSION: In an effectively 20.5% negative energy balance, consumption of 2.56 mg capsaicin per meal supports negative energy balance by counteracting the unfavorable negative energy balance effect of decrease in components of energy expenditure. Moreover, consumption of 2.56 mg capsaicin per meal promotes fat oxidation in negative energy balance and does not increase blood pressure significantly. TRIAL REGISTRATION

  16. Energy spectrum of thermal counterflow turbulence in superfluid helium-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, J.; Varga, E.; Guo, W.; Vinen, W. F.

    2017-09-01

    Recent preliminary experiments [A. Marakov et al., Phys. Rev. B 91, 094503 (2015)., 10.1103/PhysRevB.91.094503] using triplet-state He2 excimer molecules as tracers of the motion of the normal fluid have shown that, in thermal counterflow turbulence in superfluid 4He, small-scale turbulence in the superfluid component is accompanied, above a critical heat flux, by partially coupled large-scale turbulence in both fluids, with an energy spectrum proportional to k-m, where m is greater than the Kolmogorov value of 5/3. Here we report the results of a more detailed study of this spectrum over a range of temperatures and heat fluxes using the same experimental technique. We show that the exponent m varies systematically with heat flux but is always greater than 5/3. We interpret this as arising from the steady counterflow, which causes large-scale eddies in the two fluids to be pulled in opposite directions, giving rise to dissipation by mutual friction at all wave numbers, mutual friction tending also to oppose the effect of the counterflow. Comparison of the experimental results with a simple theory suggests that this process may be more complicated than we might have hoped, but experiments covering a wider range of heat fluxes, which are technically very difficult, will probably be required before we can arrive at a convincing theory.

  17. Full Spectrum Diffused and Beamed Solar Energy Application Using Optical Fibre

    OpenAIRE

    Majumdar, M. R. Dutta; Das, Debasish

    2007-01-01

    Existing solar energy application systems use small fraction of full spectrum of solar energy. So attempts are made to show how full spectrum solar energy can be used for diffused and beamed form of incident solar energy. Luminescent Solar Concentrator (LSC) principle with optical fibre in diffused sun light and dielectric mirror separation technique with optical fibre in beamed form are discussed. Comparison of both the cases are done. Keywords: full spectrum, solar photonics, diffused solar...

  18. Full Spectrum Diffused and Beamed Solar Energy Application Using Optical Fibre

    OpenAIRE

    Majumdar, M. R. Dutta; Das, Debasish

    2007-01-01

    Existing solar energy application systems use small fraction of full spectrum of solar energy. So attempts are made to show how full spectrum solar energy can be used for diffused and beamed form of incident solar energy. Luminescent Solar Concentrator (LSC) principle with optical fibre in diffused sun light and dielectric mirror separation technique with optical fibre in beamed form are discussed. Comparison of both the cases are done. Keywords: full spectrum, solar photonics, diffused solar...

  19. Dirac and Higher-Spin Equations of Negative Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Dvoeglazov, Valeriy V

    2011-01-01

    It is easy to check that both algebraic equation Det (\\hat p - m) =0 and Det (\\hat p + m) =0 for 4-spinors u- and v- have solutions with p_0= \\pm E_p =\\pm \\sqrt{{\\bf p}^2 +m^2}. The same is true for higher-spin equations. Meanwhile, every book considers the p_0=E_p only for both u- and v- spinors of the (1/2,0)\\oplus (0,1/2)) representation, thus applying the Dirac-Feynman-Stueckelberg procedure for elimination of negative-energy solutions. Recent works of Ziino (and, independently, of several others) show that the Fock space can be doubled. We re-consider this possibility on the quantum field level for both s=1/2 and higher spins particles.

  20. The clonal and mutational evolution spectrum of primary triple negative breast cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sohrab P.; Roth, Andrew; Goya, Rodrigo; Oloumi, Arusha; Ha, Gavin; Zhao, Yongjun; Turashvili, Gulisa; Ding, Jiarui; Tse, Kane; Haffari, Gholamreza; Bashashati, Ali; Prentice, Leah M.; Khattra, Jaswinder; Burleigh, Angela; Yap, Damian; Bernard, Virginie; McPherson, Andrew; Shumansky, Karey; Crisan, Anamaria; Giuliany, Ryan; Heravi-Moussavi, Alireza; Rosner, Jamie; Lai, Daniel; Birol, Inanc; Varhol, Richard; Tam, Angela; Dhalla, Noreen; Zeng, Thomas; Ma, Kevin; Chan, Simon; Griffith, Malachi; Moradian, Annie; Grace Cheng, S.-W.; Morin, Gregg B.; Watson, Peter; Gelmon, Karen; Chia, Stephen; Chin, Suet-Feung; Curtis, Christina; Rueda, Oscar; Pharoah, Paul D; Damaraju, Sambasivarao; Mackey, John; Hoon, Kelly; Harkins, Timothy; Tadigotla, Vasisht; Sigaroudinia, Mahvash; Gascard, Philippe; Tlsty, Thea; Costello, Joseph F; Meyer, Irmtraud M; Eaves, Connie J; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Jones, Steven; Huntsman, David; Hirst, Martin; Caldas, Carlos; Marra, Marco A; Aparicio, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    Primary triple negative breast cancers (TNBC) represent approximately 16% of all breast cancers1 and are a tumour type defined by exclusion, for which comprehensive landscapes of somatic mutation have not been determined. Here we show in 104 early TNBC cases, that at the time of diagnosis these cancers exhibit a wide and continuous spectrum of genomic evolution, with some exhibiting only a handful of somatic aberrations in a few pathways, whereas others contain hundreds of somatic events and multiple pathways implicated. Integration with matched whole transcriptome sequence data revealed that only ~36% of mutations are expressed. By examining single nucleotide variant (SNV) allelic abundance derived from deep re-sequencing (median >20,000 fold) measurements in 2414 somatic mutations, we determine for the first time in an epithelial tumour, the relative abundance of clonal genotypes among cases in the population. We show that TNBC vary widely and continuously in their clonal frequencies at the time of diagnosis, with basal subtype TNBC2,3 exhibiting more variation than non-basal TNBC. Although p53 and PIK3CA/PTEN somatic mutations appear clonally dominant compared with other pathways, in some tumours their clonal frequencies are incompatible with founder status. Mutations in cytoskeletal and cell shape/motility proteins occurred at lower clonal frequencies, suggesting they occurred later during tumour progression. Taken together our results show that future attempts to dissect the biology and therapeutic responses of TNBC will require the determination of individual tumour clonal genotypes. PMID:22495314

  1. On the low energy end of the QCD spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Leutwyler, H

    2008-01-01

    The energy gap of QCD is now understood very well. There is no doubt that the expansion in powers of the two lightest quark masses does represent a very useful tool for the analysis of the low energy structure. Concerning the expansion in powers of m_s, however, the current situation leaves much to be desired. While some of the lattice results indicate, for instance, that the violations of the Okubo-Iizuka-Zweig rule in the quark condensate and in the decay constants are rather modest, others point in the opposite direction. I am confident that the dust will settle soon, so that the effective coupling constants that govern the dependence of the various quantities of physical interest on m_s can be determined, to next-to-next-to-leading order of the chiral expansion. The range of validity of ChPT can be extended by means of dispersive methods. The properties of the physical states occurring in the spectrum of QCD below KKbar threshold can reliably be investigated on this basis. In particular, as shown only rat...

  2. Measurement of the cosmic ray energy spectrum using hybrid events of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Settimo, Mariangela; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E.J.; Albuquerque, IFM; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muiz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A; Anchordoqui, L.; Andring, S.; Anticic, T.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A.M.; Barber, K.B.; Barbosa, A.F.; Bardenet, R.; Baughman, B.; Bauml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J.J.; Becker, K.H.; Belletoile, A.; Bellido, J.A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P.L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blumer, H.; Bohacova, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Boroda, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W.C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buroker, L.; Burton, R.E.; Cabellero-Mora, K.S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Cheng, S.H.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J.A.; Chirinos Diaz, J.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R.W.; Cocciolo, G.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M.R.; Conceicao, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Cooper, M.J.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C.E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B.R.; de Almeida, R.M.; De Domenico, M.; De Donato, C.; de Jong, S.J.; De La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W.J.M.; de Mello Neto, J.R.T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K.D.; del Peral, L.; del Rio, M.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Diaz Castro, M.L.; Diep, P.N.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J.C.; Dong, PN; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, JC; Dova, M.T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C.O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A.C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A.P.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J.M.; Filevich, A.; Filevich, A.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C.E.; Fraenkel, E.D.; Fratu, O.; Frohlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Gaior, R.; Gamarra, R.F.; Gambetta, S.; Garcia, B.; Garcia Roca, S.T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P.L.; Giller, M.; Gitto, J.; Glass, H.; Gold, M.S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gomez Berisso, M.; Gomez Vitale, P.F.; Goncalves, P.; Gonzalez, J.G.; Gookin, B.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A.F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G.P.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T.A.; Harton, J.L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A.E.; Hill, G.C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holmes, V.C.; Homola, P.; Horandel, J.R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovsky, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Jiraskova, S.; Josebachuili, M.; Kadija, K.; Kampert, K.H.; Karhan, P.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kegl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J.L.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R.M.; Klages, H.O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D.H.; Kotera, K.; Krohm, N.; Kromer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, J.K.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leao, M.S.A.B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M.A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lopez, R.; Lopez Aguera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M.C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A.G.; Marin, J.; Marin, V.; Maris, I.C.; Marquez Falcon, H.R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martinez, H.; Martinez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masias Meza, [No Value; Mathes, H.J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J.A.J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P.O.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Mertsch, P.; Messina, S.; Meurer, C.; Meyhandan, R.; Mi'canovi'c, S.; Micheletti, M.I.; Minaya, I.A.; Miramonti, L.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, J.C.; Mostafa, M.; Moura, C.A.; Muller, M.A.; Muller, G.; Munchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J.L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nhung, P.T.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nozka, L.; Oehlschlager, J.; Olinto, A.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parra, A.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I.M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Pfendner, C.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rivera, H.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez, G.; Rouille-d'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A.C.; Ruhle, C.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sanchez, F.; Santo, C.E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E.M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovanek, P.; Schroder, F.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S.J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R.C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Silva Lopez, H.H.; Sima, O.; Smialkowski, A.; Smida, R.; Snow, G.R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y.N.; Stanic, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijarvi, T.; Supanitsky, A.D.; Susa, T.; Sutherland, M.S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Tascau, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Thao, N.T.; Thomas, D.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C.J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tome, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D.B.; Tristram, G.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdes Galicia, J.F.; Valino, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van den Berg, A.M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cardenas, B.; Vazquez, JR; Vazquez, R.A.; Veberic, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villasenor, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A.A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B.J.; Widom, A.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wommer, M.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano Garcia, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Martin, L.

    2012-01-01

    The energy spectrum of ultra-high energy cosmic rays above 10(18)eV is measured using the hybrid events collected by the Pierre Auger Observatory between November 2005 and September 2010. The large exposure of the Observatory allows the measurement of the main features of the energy spectrum with hi

  3. Determination of neutron energy spectrum at KAMINI shielding experiment location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Sujoy; Bagchi, Subhrojit; Prasad, R R; Venkatasubramanian, D; Mohanakrishnan, P; Keshavamurty, R S; Haridas, Adish; Arul, A John; Puthiyavinayagam, P

    2016-09-01

    The neutron spectrum at KAMINI reactor south beam tube end has been determined using multifoil activation method. This beam tube is being used for characterizing neutron attenuation of novel shield materials. Starting from a computed guess spectrum, the spectrum adjustment/unfolding procedure makes use of minimization of a modified constraint function representing (a) least squared deviations between the measured and calculated reaction rates, (b) a measure of sharp fluctuations in the adjusted spectrum and (c) the square of the deviation of adjusted spectrum from the guess spectrum. The adjusted/unfolded spectrum predicts the reaction rates accurately. The results of this new procedure are compared with those of widely used SAND-II code.

  4. Quantum Inequality for Negative Energy Density States of Massive Dirac Field in Four-Dimensional Spacetime

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    舒维星; 吴普训; 余洪伟

    2003-01-01

    Negative energy density and the quantum inequality are examined for the Dirac field. A proof is given of the quantum inequality for negative energy densities in the massive Dirac field produced by the superposition of two single particle electron states.

  5. In vitro Efficacy of Meropenem, Colistin and Tigecycline Against the Extended Spectrum Beta-Lactamase Producing Gram Negative Bacilli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Maria Mushtaq; Usman, Javaid; Hassan, Afreenish; Kaleem, Fatima; Anjum, Rabia

    2015-05-01

    To compare the in vitro efficacy of meropenem, colistin and tigecycline against extended spectrum Betalactamase producing Gram negative bacilli by minimal inhibitory concentration. Cross-sectional descriptive study. Department of Microbiology, Army Medical College, National University of Sciences and Technology, Rawalpindi, from June to December 2010. Routine clinical specimens were subjected to standard microbiological procedures and the isolates were identified to species level. Extended spectrum β-lactamase producing Gram negative bacilli were detected by Jarlier disc synergy method and confirmed by ceftazidime and ceftazidime-clavulanate Etest. Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC(90)) of meropenem, colistin and tigecycline was determined by Etest (AB BIOMERIUX) and the results were interpreted according to the manufacturer's instructions and Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines and Food and Drug Authority recommendations. Results were analyzed by using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 20. A total of 52 non-duplicate extended spectrum Beta-lactamase-producing Gram negative bacilli were included in the study. The MIC(90) of tigecycline (0.75 µg/ml) was lowest as compared to the meropenem (2 µg/ml) and colistin (3 µg/ml). Tigecycline is superior in efficacy against the extended spectrum Beta-lactamase producing Gram negative bacilli as compared to colistin and meropenem.

  6. Spectrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgfeldt Hansen, Leif

    2016-01-01

    The publication functions as a proces description of the development and construction of an urban furniture SPECTRUM in the city of Gwangju, Republic of Korea. It is used as the cataloque for the exhibition of Spectrum.......The publication functions as a proces description of the development and construction of an urban furniture SPECTRUM in the city of Gwangju, Republic of Korea. It is used as the cataloque for the exhibition of Spectrum....

  7. Negative-permittivity plasma generation in negative-permeability space with high-energy metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Osamu; Nakamura, Yoshihiro; Iwai, Akinori; Iio, Satoshi

    2016-10-01

    Plasma generation by electromagnetic waves in negative-permeability space is analyzed using experimental results and theoretical models. Installation of negative-permeability metamaterials triggers drastic changes to the propagation of electromagnetic waves. Unlike usual cases in which permeability is  +1, negative permeability induces evanescent modes in a space without plasma. However, if permittivity becomes negative due to high-electron-density or overdense plasma, electromagnetic waves can propagate because negative-refractive-index states emerge. In this study, reviewing our previous experimental data, we study the underlying physical processes in plasma generation in terms of wave propagation and parameters of wave media. We confirm nonlinear (transition) processes in the phase of density evolution up to the negative permittivity state and negative-refractive-index states in the quasi-steady phase. We also note that such energetic metamaterials are built up when we use plasma, unlike conventional metamaterials composed of solid-state materials.

  8. A Commercialization Roadmap for Carbon-Negative Energy Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, D.

    2016-12-01

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) envisages the need for large-scale deployment of net-negative CO2 emissions technologies by mid-century to meet stringent climate mitigation goals and yield a net drawdown of atmospheric carbon. Yet there are few commercial deployments of BECCS outside of niche markets, creating uncertainty about commercialization pathways and sustainability impacts at scale. This uncertainty is exacerbated by the absence of a strong policy framework, such as high carbon prices and research coordination. Here, we propose a strategy for the potential commercial deployment of BECCS. This roadmap proceeds via three steps: 1) via capture and utilization of biogenic CO2 from existing bioenergy facilities, notably ethanol fermentation, 2) via thermochemical co-conversion of biomass and fossil fuels, particularly coal, and 3) via dedicated, large-scale BECCS. Although biochemical conversion is a proven first market for BECCS, this trajectory alone is unlikely to drive commercialization of BECCS at the gigatonne scale. In contrast to biochemical conversion, thermochemical conversion of coal and biomass enables large-scale production of fuels and electricity with a wide range of carbon intensities, process efficiencies and process scales. Aside from systems integration, primarily technical barriers are involved in large-scale biomass logistics, gasification and gas cleaning. Key uncertainties around large-scale BECCS deployment are not limited to commercialization pathways; rather, they include physical constraints on biomass cultivation or CO2 storage, as well as social barriers, including public acceptance of new technologies and conceptions of renewable and fossil energy, which co-conversion systems confound. Despite sustainability risks, this commercialization strategy presents a pathway where energy suppliers, manufacturers and governments could transition from laggards to leaders in climate change mitigation efforts.

  9. Negative elongation factor controls energy homeostasis in cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Haihui; Qin, Kunhua; Guo, Zhanyong; Ma, Yonggang; April, Craig; Gao, Xiaoli; Andrews, Thomas G; Bokov, Alex; Zhang, Jianhua; Chen, Yidong; Weintraub, Susan T; Fan, Jian-Bing; Wang, Degeng; Hu, Yanfen; Aune, Gregory J; Lindsey, Merry L; Li, Rong

    2014-04-10

    Negative elongation factor (NELF) is known to enforce promoter-proximal pausing of RNA polymerase II (Pol II), a pervasive phenomenon observed across multicellular genomes. However, the physiological impact of NELF on tissue homeostasis remains unclear. Here, we show that whole-body conditional deletion of the B subunit of NELF (NELF-B) in adult mice results in cardiomyopathy and impaired response to cardiac stress. Tissue-specific knockout of NELF-B confirms its cell-autonomous function in cardiomyocytes. NELF directly supports transcription of those genes encoding rate-limiting enzymes in fatty acid oxidation (FAO) and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. NELF also shares extensively transcriptional target genes with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), a master regulator of energy metabolism in the myocardium. Mechanistically, NELF helps stabilize the transcription initiation complex at the metabolism-related genes. Our findings strongly indicate that NELF is part of the PPARα-mediated transcription regulatory network that maintains metabolic homeostasis in cardiomyocytes.

  10. Holographic Description of Negative Null Energy in Squeezed Vacuum States

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Da-Shin

    2016-01-01

    Using the AdS/CFT duality, we study the expectation value of stress tensor in squeezed vacuum states of $2+1$-dimensional quantum critical theories with a general dynamical scaling $z$. The holographic dual theory is the theory of gravity in 3+1-dimensional Lifshitz backgrounds. We then adopt a consistent approach to obtain the boundary stress tensor from bulk construction, which satisfies the trace Ward identity associated with Lifshitz scaling symmetry. The scheme for holographic dual of squeezed vacuum states is found to be the gravity theory in the geometry perturbed by gravitational wave. For small squeezing parameters, the expectation value of stress tensor in squeezed vacuum states is obtained for both strongly coupled quantum critical fields and free relativistic fields. We find that, in both cases with $z=1$, the stress tensor satisfies the averaged null energy condition and is consistent with the quantum interest conjecture. In particular, the negative lower bound on null-contracted stress tensor, w...

  11. Deployment, Design, and Commercialization of Carbon-Negative Energy Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Daniel Lucio

    Climate change mitigation requires gigaton-scale carbon dioxide removal technologies, yet few examples exist beyond niche markets. This dissertation informs large-scale implementation of bioenergy with carbon capture and sequestration (BECCS), a carbon-negative energy technology. It builds on existing literature with a novel focus on deployment, design, commercialization, and communication of BECCS. BECCS, combined with aggressive renewable deployment and fossil emission reductions, can enable a carbon-negative power system in Western North America by 2050, with up to 145% emissions reduction from 1990 levels. BECCS complements other sources of renewable energy, and can be deployed in a manner consistent with regional policies and design considerations. The amount of biomass resource available limits the level of fossil CO2 emissions that can still satisfy carbon emissions caps. Offsets produced by BECCS are more valuable to the power system than the electricity it provides. Implied costs of carbon for BECCS are relatively low ( 75/ton CO2 at scale) for a capital-intensive technology. Optimal scales for BECCS are an order of magnitude larger than proposed scales found in existing literature. Deviations from optimal scaled size have little effect on overall systems costs - suggesting that other factors, including regulatory, political, or logistical considerations, may ultimately have a greater influence on plant size than the techno-economic factors considered. The flexibility of thermochemical conversion enables a viable transition pathway for firms, utilities and governments to achieve net-negative CO 2 emissions in production of electricity and fuels given increasingly stringent climate policy. Primary research, development (R&D), and deployment needs are in large-scale biomass logistics, gasification, gas cleaning, and geological CO2 storage. R&D programs, subsidies, and policy that recognize co-conversion processes can support this pathway to commercialization

  12. Green energy : enabling technologies : international trends in utility wireless spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moroney, W. [Utilities Telecom Council, Washington, DC (United States)

    2009-07-01

    The Utilities Telecom Council (UTC) is an international trade association that represents the interests of electric, gas and water utilities in the area of information and communications technology (ICT). This presentation provided background information on the UTC, with particular reference to its history; reporting relationships of the Board of Directors and the various divisions of the association; and radio spectrum. The UTC has been the leading advocate for critical infrastructure industries access to the spectrum since its creation in 1948. The radio spectrum was outlined in detail, including global efforts; Canadian, American, and European frequency allocations; the need for the spectrum; and the bottom-line. It was concluded that governments around the globe are moving to understand that utilities require access to interference-free radio spectrum if the benefits of intelligence in the grid are to be fully realized in a timely and cost-effective manner. 7 figs.

  13. Energy Efficient Spectrum Sensing for State Estimation over A Wireless Channel

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Xianghui; Zhou, Xiangwei; Cheng, Yu

    2014-01-01

    The performance of remote estimation over wireless channel is strongly affected by sensor data losses due to interference. Although the impact of interference can be alleviated by performing spectrum sensing and then transmitting only when the channel is clear, the introduction of spectrum sensing also incurs extra energy expenditure. In this paper, we investigate the problem of energy efficient spectrum sensing for state estimation of a general linear dynamic system, and formulate an optimiz...

  14. Measurement of the Energy Spectrum of Cosmic Rays with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verzi, Valerio

    The energy spectrum of high-energy cosmic rays measured with the Pierre Auger Observatory is presented. The measurement is based on data collected until 31 December 2012 and extends over three orders of magnitude in energy from 3 × 1017 eV up to the very end of the spectrum. The spectral features are presented together with a detailed description of the recent improvements in determination of the energy scale.

  15. Dynamic Behavior and Quasi-energy Spectrum of Multiband Superlattice Bloch Electrons in Quantum Kicked Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    OUYANG BiYao; ZHAO XianGeng; CHEN ShiGang; LIU Jie

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we study the dynamic behavior and quasi-energy spectrum of multiband superlattice Bloch electrons in quantum kicked potential. We show analytically and numerically the avoided crossing and band suppression about the quasi-energy spectrum, the dynamic nonlocalization, and the electron oscillation behavior between two bands.

  16. Segmentation-free x-ray energy spectrum estimation for computed tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Wei; Niu, Tianye

    2016-01-01

    X-ray energy spectrum plays an essential role in imaging and related tasks. Due to the high photon flux of clinical CT scanners, most of the spectrum estimation methods are indirect and are usually suffered from various limitations. The recently proposed indirect transmission measurement-based method requires at least the segmentation of one material, which is insufficient for CT images of highly noisy and with artifacts. To combat for the bottleneck of spectrum estimation using segmented CT images, in this study, we develop a segmentation-free indirect transmission measurement based energy spectrum estimation method using dual-energy material decomposition. The general principle of the method is to compare polychromatic forward projection with raw projection to calibrate a set of unknown weights which are used to express the unknown spectrum together with a set of model spectra. After applying dual-energy material decomposition using high- and low-energy raw projection data, polychromatic forward projection ...

  17. Revisiting the hardening of the cosmic-ray energy spectrum at TeV energies

    CERN Document Server

    Thoudam, Satyendra

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of cosmic rays by experiments such as ATIC, CREAM, and PAMELA indicate a hardening of the cosmic-ray energy spectrum at TeV energies. In our recent work (Thoudam & H\\"orandel 2012a), we showed that the hardening can be due to the effect of nearby supernova remnants. We showed it for the case of proton and helium. In this paper, we present an improved and detailed version of our previous work, and extend our study to heavier cosmic-ray species such as boron, carbon, oxygen, and iron nuclei. Unlike our previous study, the present work involves a detailed calculation of the background cosmic rays and follows a consistent treatment of cosmic-ray source parameters between the background and the nearby components. Moreover, we also present a detailed comparison of our results on the secondary-to-primary ratios, secondary spectra, and the diffuse gamma-ray spectrum with the results expected from other existing models, which can be checked by future measurements at high energies.

  18. "We Dance and Find Each Other"1: Effects of Dance/Movement Therapy on Negative Symptoms in Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Malin K; Koch, Sabine C; Fuchs, Thomas

    2016-11-10

    The treatment of deficits in social interaction, a shared symptom cluster in persons with schizophrenia (negative symptoms) and autism spectrum disorder (DSM-5 A-criterion), has so far remained widely unsuccessful in common approaches of psychotherapy. The alternative approach of embodiment brings to focus body-oriented intervention methods based on a theoretic framework that explains the disorders on a more basic level than common theory of mind approaches. The randomized controlled trial at hand investigated the effects of a 10-week manualized dance and movement therapy intervention on negative symptoms in participants with autism spectrum disorder. Although the observed effects failed to reach significance at the conventional 0.05 threshold, possibly due to an undersized sample, an encouraging trend towards stronger symptom reduction in the treatment group for overall negative symptoms and for almost all subtypes was found at the 0.10-level. Effect sizes were small but clinically meaningful, and the resulting patterns were in accordance with theoretical expectations. The study at hand contributes to finding an effective treatment approach for autism spectrum disorder in accordance with the notion of embodiment.

  19. Energy-Saving behaviour: Negative spillover to policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimi, Kaitlin T.

    2017-07-01

    Individuals are often asked to reduce their home energy consumption. But new research suggests that reminders of these personal energy savings may undermine public support for national-level policies.

  20. Reduced object related negativity response indicates impaired auditory scene analysis in adults with autistic spectrum disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veema Lodhia

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Auditory Scene Analysis provides a useful framework for understanding atypical auditory perception in autism. Specifically, a failure to segregate the incoming acoustic energy into distinct auditory objects might explain the aversive reaction autistic individuals have to certain auditory stimuli or environments. Previous research with non-autistic participants has demonstrated the presence of an Object Related Negativity (ORN in the auditory event related potential that indexes pre-attentive processes associated with auditory scene analysis. Also evident is a later P400 component that is attention dependent and thought to be related to decision-making about auditory objects. We sought to determine whether there are differences between individuals with and without autism in the levels of processing indexed by these components. Electroencephalography (EEG was used to measure brain responses from a group of 16 autistic adults, and 16 age- and verbal-IQ-matched typically-developing adults. Auditory responses were elicited using lateralized dichotic pitch stimuli in which inter-aural timing differences create the illusory perception of a pitch that is spatially separated from a carrier noise stimulus. As in previous studies, control participants produced an ORN in response to the pitch stimuli. However, this component was significantly reduced in the participants with autism. In contrast, processing differences were not observed between the groups at the attention-dependent level (P400. These findings suggest that autistic individuals have difficulty segregating auditory stimuli into distinct auditory objects, and that this difficulty arises at an early pre-attentive level of processing.

  1. MMR-Vaccine and Regression in Autism Spectrum Disorders: Negative Results Presented from Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Tokio; Kurosawa, Michiko; Inaba, Yutaka

    2007-01-01

    It has been suggested that the measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine (MMR) is a cause of regressive autism. As MMR was used in Japan only between 1989 and 1993, this time period affords a natural experiment to examine this hypothesis. Data on 904 patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) were analyzed. During the period of MMR usage no…

  2. Wavelet spectrum analysis on energy transfer of multi-scale structures in wall turbulence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-yan XIA; Yan TIAN; Nan JIANG

    2009-01-01

    The streamwise velocity components at different vertical heights in wall turbulence were measured. Wavelet transform was used to study the turbulent energy spectra, indicating that the global spectrum results from the weighted average of Fourier spectrum based on wavelet scales. Wavelet transform with more vanishing moments can express the declining of turbulent spectrum. The local wavelet spectrum shows that the physical phenomena such as deformation or breakup of eddies are related to the vertical position in the boundary layer, and the energy-containing eddies exist in a multi-scale form. Moreover, the size of these eddies increases with the measured points moving out of the wall. In the buffer region, the small scale energy-containing eddies with higher frequency are excited. In the outer region, the maximal energy is concentrated in the low-frequency large-scale eddies, and the frequency domain of energy-containing eddies becomes narrower.

  3. If vacuum energy can be negative, why is mass always positive?: Uses of the subdominant trace energy condition

    CERN Document Server

    Bekenstein, Jacob D

    2013-01-01

    Diverse calculations have shown that a relativistic field confined to a cavity by well defined boundary conditions can have a negative Casimir or vacuum energy. Why then can one not make a finite system with negative mass by confining the field in a some way? We recall, and justify in detail, the not so familiar subdominant trace energy condition for ordinary (baryon-electron nonrelativistic) matter. With its help we show, in two ways, that the mass-energy of the cavity structure necessary to enforce the boundary conditions must exceed in magnitude the negative vacuum energy, so that all systems of the type envisaged necessarily have positive mass-energy.

  4. Energy spectrum of cascades generated by muons in Baksan underground scintillation telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakatanov, V. N.; Chudakov, A. E.; Novoseltsev, Y. F.; Novoseltseva, M. V.; Achkasov, V. M.; Semenov, A. M.; Stenkin, Y. V.

    1985-01-01

    Spectrum of cascades generated by cosmic ray muons underground is presented. The mean zenith angle of the muon arrival is theta=35 deg the depth approx. 1000 hg/sq cm. In cascades energy range 700 GeV the measured spectrum is in agreement with the sea-level integral muon spectrum index gamma=3.0. Some decrease of this exponent has been found in the range 4000 Gev.

  5. Anodes - Materials for negative electrodes in electrochemical energy technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holze, Rudolf

    2014-06-01

    The basic concepts of electrodes and electrochemical cells (including both galvanic and electrolytic ones) are introduced and illustrated with practical examples. Particular attention is paid to negative electrodes in primary and secondary cells, fuel cell electrodes and electrodes in redox flow batteries. General features and arguments pertaining to selection, optimization and further development are highlighted.

  6. The Negative Ion Photoelectron Spectrum of meta -Benzoquinone Radical Anion (MBQ •– ): A Joint Experimental and Computational Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Bo; Hrovat, David A.; Deng, S. H. M.; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Xue-Bin; Borden, Weston Thatcher

    2014-03-05

    Negative ion photoelectron (NIPE) spectra of the radical anion of meta-benzoquinone (MBQ, m-OC6H4O) have been obtained at 20 K, using both 355 and 266 nm lasers for electron photodetachment. The spectra show well-resolved peaks and complex spectral patterns. The electron affinity of MBQ is determined from the first resolved peak to be 2.875 ±17 0.010 eV. Single-point, CASPT2/aug-cc-pVTZ//CASPT2/ aug-cc-pVDZ calculations predict accurately the positions of the 0-0 bands in the NIPE spectrum for formation of the four lowest electronic states of neutral MBQ from the 2A2 state of MBQ•-. In addition, the Franck-Condon factors that are computed from the CASPT2/aug-cc-pVDZ optimized geometries,vibrational frequencies, and normal mode vectors, successfully simulate the intensities and frequencies of the vibrational peaks in the NIPE spectrum that are associated with each of these electronic states. The successful simulation of the NIPE spectrum of MBQ•- allows the assignment of 3B2 as the ground state of MBQ, followed by the 1B2 and 1A1 electronic states, respectively 9.0 ± 0.2 and 16.6 ± 0.2 kcal/mol higher in energy than the triplet. These experimental energy differences are in good agreement with the calculated values of 9.7 and 15.7 kcal/mol. The relative energies of these two singlet states in MBQ confirm the previous prediction that their relative energies would be reversed from those in meta-benzoquinodimethane (MBQDM, m-CH2C6H4CH2).

  7. Diminished Social Motivation Negatively Impacts Reputation Management: Autism Spectrum Disorders as a Case in Point

    OpenAIRE

    Coralie Chevallier; Catherine Molesworth; Francesca Happé

    2012-01-01

    Human beings are endowed with a unique motivation to be included in social interactions. This natural social motivation, in turn, is thought to encourage behaviours such as flattery or self-deprecation aimed to ease interaction and to enhance the reputation of the individual who produces them. If this is the case, diminished social interest should affect reputation management. Here, we use Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs)--primarily characterised by pervasive social disinterest--as a model to...

  8. Energy spectrum analysis of blast waves based on an improved Hilbert-Huang transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L.; Wang, F.; Shang, F.; Jia, Y.; Zhao, C.; Kong, D.

    2016-07-01

    Using the improved Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT), this paper investigates the problems of analysis and interpretation of the energy spectrum of a blast wave. It has been previously established that the energy spectrum is an effective feature by which to characterize a blast wave. In fact, the higher the energy spectra in a frequency band of a blast wave, the greater the damage to a target in the same frequency band. However, most current research focuses on analyzing wave signals in the time domain or frequency domain rather than considering the energy spectrum. We propose here an improved HHT method combined with a wavelet packet to extract the energy spectrum feature of a blast wave. When applying the HHT, the signal is first roughly decomposed into a series of intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) by empirical mode decomposition. The wavelet packet method is then performed on each IMF to eliminate noise on the energy spectrum. Second, a coefficient is introduced to remove unrelated IMFs. The energy of each instantaneous frequency can be derived through the Hilbert transform. The energy spectrum can then be obtained by adding up all the components after the wavelet packet filters and screens them through a coefficient to obtain the effective IMFs. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated by 12 groups of experimental data, and an energy attenuation model is established based on the experimental data. The improved HHT is a precise method for blast wave signal analysis. For other shock wave signals from blasting experiments, an energy frequency time distribution and energy spectrum can also be obtained through this method, allowing for more practical applications.

  9. A Modified Energy Detection Based Spectrum Sensing Algorithm for Green Cognitive Radio Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidra Rajput

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Spectrum Sensing is the first and fundamental function of Cognitive Cycle which plays a vital role in the success of CRs (Cognitive Radios. Spectrum Sensing indicate the presence and absence of PUs (Primary Users in RF (Radio Frequency spectrum occupancy measurements. In order to correctly determine the presence and absence of Primary Users, the algorithms in practice include complex mathematics which increases the computational complexity of the algorithm, thus shifted the CRs to operate as ?green? communication systems. In this paper, an energy efficient and computationally less complex, energy detection based Spectrum Sensing algorithm have been proposed. The design goals of the proposed algorithm are to save the processing and sensing energies. At first, by using less MAC (Multiply and Accumulate operation, it saves the processing energy needed to determine the presence and absence of PUs. Secondly, it saves the sensing energy by providing a way to find lowest possible sensing time at which spectrum is to be sensed. Two scenarios have been defined for testing the proposed algorithm i.e. simulate detection capability of Primary Users in ideal and noisy scenarios. Detection of PUs in both of these scenarios have been compared to obtain the probability of detection. Energy Efficiency of the proposed algorithm has been proved by making performance comparison between the proposed (less complex algorithm and the legacy energy detection algorithm. With reduced complexity, the proposed spectrum sensing algorithm can be considered under the paradigm of Green Cognitive Radio Communication

  10. Application of wavelet packet decomposition and its energy spectrum on the coal-rock interface identification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任芳; 杨兆建; 熊诗波; 梁义维

    2003-01-01

    The theory and method of wavelet packet decomposition and its energy spectrum dealing with the coal-rock Interface Identification are presented in the paper. The characteristic frequency band of the coal-rock signal could be identified by wavelet packet decomposition and its energy spectrum conveniently, at the same time, quantification analysis were performed. The result demonstrates that this method is more advantageous and of practical value than traditional Fourier analysis method.

  11. Design of fishnet metamaterials with broadband negative refractive index in the visible spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shiwei; Townsend, Scott; Xie, Yi Min; Huang, Xiaodong; Shen, Jianhu; Li, Qing

    2014-04-15

    We propose a technique capable of designing fishnet metamaterials that have a negative refractive index (NRI) over a broad range in the visible and infrared. The technique relies on optimizing the shape and scale of the fishnet apertures as well as the depth of different layers of the composite. A metamaterial is obtained that exhibits an unbroken 552 nm bandwidth of NRI, covering the entire red and infrared regions. Moreover, two fishnet structures perforated with star-like holes are found to render refractive index negative in the yellow and green spectra.

  12. Extended spectrum β-lactamases, carbapenemases and mobile genetic elements responsible for antibiotics resistance in Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Salabi, Allaaeddin; Walsh, Timothey R; Chouchani, Chedly

    2013-05-01

    Infectious diseases due to Gram-negative bacteria are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Antimicrobial agents represent one major therapeutic tools implicated to treat these infections. The misuse of antimicrobial agents has resulted in the emergence of resistant strains of Gram-negatives in particular Enterobacteriaceae and non-fermenters; they have an effect not only on a human but on the public health when bacteria use the resistance mechanisms to spread in the hospital environment and to the community outside the hospitals by means of mobile genetic elements. Gram-negative bacteria have become increasingly resistant to antimicrobial agents. They have developed several mechanisms by which they can withstand to antimicrobials, these mechanisms include the production of Extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) and carbapenemases, furthermore, Gram-negative bacteria are now capable of spreading such resistance between members of the family Enterobacteriaceae and non-fermenters using mobile genetic elements as vehicles for such resistance mechanisms rendering antibiotics useless. Therefore, addressing the issue of mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance is considered one of most urgent priorities. This review will help to illustrate different resistance mechanisms; ESBLs, carbapenemases encoded by genes carried by mobile genetic elements, which are used by Gram-negative bacteria to escape antimicrobial effect.

  13. Beyond Leptin: Emerging Candidates for the Integration of Metabolic and Reproductive Function during Negative Energy Balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    True, Cadence; Grove, Kevin L; Smith, M Susan

    2011-01-01

    Reproductive status is tightly coupled to metabolic state in females, and ovarian cycling in mammals is halted when energy output exceeds energy input, a metabolic condition known as negative energy balance. This inhibition of reproductive function during negative energy balance occurs due to suppression of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) release in the hypothalamus. The GnRH secretagogue kisspeptin is also inhibited during negative energy balance, indicating that inhibition of reproductive neuroendocrine circuits may occur upstream of GnRH itself. Understanding the metabolic signals responsible for the inhibition of reproductive pathways has been a compelling research focus for many years. A predominant theory in the field is that the status of energy balance is conveyed to reproductive neuroendocrine circuits via the adipocyte hormone leptin. Leptin is stimulatory for GnRH release and lower levels of leptin during negative energy balance are believed to result in decreased stimulatory drive for GnRH cells. However, recent evidence found that restoring leptin to physiological levels did not restore GnRH function in three different models of negative energy balance. This suggests that although leptin may be an important permissive signal for reproductive function as indicated by many years of research, factors other than leptin must critically contribute to negative energy balance-induced reproductive inhibition. This review will focus on emerging candidates for the integration of metabolic status and reproductive function during negative energy balance.

  14. Reducing Spectrum Handoffs and Energy Switching Consumption of MADM-Based Decisions in Cognitive Radio Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Aguilar-Gonzalez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In a cognitive radio network (CRN, the number of spectrum handoffs increases energy consumption of cognitive (or secondary users due to the channel switching process. This might limit the operation of the CRN, especially in scenarios where secondary users terminals are battery-powered. Thus, reducing the number of times a cognitive user involved in a transmission switch to different spectrum holes is required to increase battery life-time. In this regard, available spectrum holes possess different attributes (e.g., bandwidth that can be exploited to satisfy specific secondary users requirements (i.e., connection profile for data transmission while saving energy. Here, three multiple attribute decision-making (MADM algorithms for the spectrum decision functionality are evaluated using real spectrum measurements of TV bands. This is performed by proposing six decision parameters, which are extracted from the spectrum data to characterize its suitability. Then, these are used as inputs of the MADM algorithms to select the most suitable spectrum hole for a cognitive user. Thus, an enhanced MADM-based decision process is proposed to reduce the number of handoffs considering energy consumption due to channel switching (ECCS. Results quantify savings from 30% to 90% in ECCS and spectrum handoffs reductions from 47% to 90%.

  15. Negative Emotional Energy: A Theory of the “Dark-Side” of Interaction Ritual Chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Boyns

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Randall Collins’ theory of interaction ritual chains is widely cited, but has been subject to little theoretical elaboration. One reason for the modest expansion of the theory is the underdevelopment of the concept of emotional energy. This paper examines emotional energy, related particularly to the dynamics of negative experiences. It asks whether or not negative emotions produce emotional energies that are qualitatively distinct from their positive counterparts. The analysis begins by tracing the development of Interaction Ritual Theory, and summarizes its core propositions. Next, it moves to a conceptualization of a “valenced” emotional energy and describes both “positive” and “negative” dimensions. Six propositions outline the central dynamics of negative emotional energy. The role of groups in the formation of positive and negative emotional energy are considered, as well as how these energies are significant sources of sociological motivation.

  16. Low-energy negative muon interaction with matter

    CERN Document Server

    Danev, Petar; Bakalov, Dimitar; Mocchiutti, Emiliano; Stoilov, Mihail; Vacchi, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of negatively charged muons with solid material layers of aluminum, gold, stainless steel, polystyrene and gaseous hydrogen is studied by Monte Carlo methods. Empirical expressions for the functional dependence of the final muon momentum and spatial distribution on the parameters of the media and on initial muon momenta up to 75 MeV/c are derived. These results help restrict to a narrower range the search for optimal parameters in full scale MC simulations of experiments with light gas muonic atoms.

  17. "TIVAL" — A development in spectrum tailoring for intermediate-energy neutron beam production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantine, G.

    1989-07-01

    Beams of intermediate-energy neutrons produced by filtering offer significant advantages over thermal neutrons for boron neutron capture therapy. Preconditioning the spectrum within the reactor prior to filtering can increase the intensity and lower the mean neutron energy, to give reduced proton recoil damage in normal tissue. Aluminium with a small proportion of D 2O has been proposed as a spectrum shifter to achieve this. We describe here calculations that demonstrate considerable further softening of the spectrum by TIVAL, a mixture of aluminium together with small quantities of titanium and vanadium.

  18. Variable enstrophy flux and energy spectrum in two-dimensional turbulence with Ekman friction

    CERN Document Server

    Verma, Mahendra K

    2012-01-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations reveal that in the forward cascade regime, the energy spectrum of two-dimensional turbulence with Ekman friction deviates from Kraichnan's prediction of $k^{-3}$ power spectrum. In this letter we explain this observation using an analytic model based on variable enstrophy flux arising due to Ekman friction. We derive an expression for the enstrophy flux which exhibits a logarithmic dependence in the inertial range for the Ekman-friction dominated flows. The energy spectrum obtained using this enstrophy flux shows a power law scaling for large Reynolds number and small Ekman friction, but has an exponential behaviour for large Ekman friction and relatively small Reynolds number.

  19. Energy spectrum transfer equations of solar wind turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, C.-Y.

    1995-01-01

    The recent studies of transfer equations for solar wind magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence are reviewed with emphasis on the comparison with the statistical observational results. Helios and Voyager missions provide an opportunity to study the the radial evolution of the power spectrum. the cross-helicity the Alfven ratio and the minimum variance direction. Spectrum transfer equations are considered as a tool to explore the nature of this radial evolution of the fluctuations. The transfer equations are derived from incompressible MHD equations. Generally one needs to make assumptions about the nature of the fluctuations and the nature of the turbulent non-linear interactions to obtain numerical results which can be compared with the observations. Some special model results for several simple cases SUCH as for structures or strong mixing. for Alfven waves with weak turbulent interactions. and for a superposition of structures and Alfven waves. are discussed. The difference between the various approaches to derive and handle the transfer equations are also addressed. Finally some theoretical description of the compressible fluctuations are also briefly reviewed.

  20. Cross sections and modelling results for TGF- and positron spectrum produced by a negative stepped lightning leader

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Köhn, C.; Ebert, U.

    2012-01-01

    We model the energy resolved angular distribution of TGFs and of positrons produced by a negative lightning leader stepping upwards in a thundercloud. First we present our new results for doubly differential cross sections for Bremsstrahlung and pair production based on the triply differential cross

  1. Energy Spectrum of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays Observed with the Telescope Array Using a Hybrid Technique

    CERN Document Server

    Abu-Zayyad, T; Allen, M; Anderson, R; Azuma, R; Barcikowski, E; Belz, J W; Bergman, D R; Blake, S A; Cady, R; Cheon, B G; Chiba, J; Chikawa, M; Cho, E J; Cho, W R; Fujii, H; Fujii, T; Fukuda, T; Fukushima, M; Hanlon, W; Hayashi, K; Hayashi, Y; Hayashida, N; Hibino, K; Hiyama, K; Honda, K; Iguchi, T; Ikeda, D; Ikuta, K; Inoue, N; Ishii, T; Ishimori, R; Ito, H; Ivanov, D; Iwamoto, S; Jui, C C H; Kadota, K; Kakimoto, F; Kalashev, O; Kanbe, T; Kasahara, K; Kawai, H; Kawakami, S; Kawana, S; Kido, E; Kim, H B; Kim, H K; Kim, J H; Kitamoto, K; Kitamura, S; Kitamura, Y; Kobayashi, K; Kobayashi, Y; Kondo, Y; Kuramoto, K; Kuzmin, V; Kwon, Y J; Lan, J; Lim, S I; Lundquist, J P; Machida, S; Martens, K; Matsuda, T; Matsuura, T; Matsuyama, T; Matthews, J N; Minamino, M; Miyata, K; Murano, Y; Myers, I; Nagasawa, K; Nagataki, S; Nakamura, T; Nam, S W; Nonaka, T; Ogio, S; Ohnishi, M; Ohoka, H; Oki, K; Oku, D; Okuda, T; Ono, M; Oshima, A; Ozawa, S; Park, I H; Pshirkov, M S; Rodriguez, D C; Roh, S Y; Rubtsov, G; Ryu, D; Sagawa, H; Sakurai, N; Sampson, A L; Scott, L M; Shah, P D; Shibata, F; Shibata, T; Shimodaira, H; Shin, B K; Shin, J I; Shirahama, T; Smith, J D; Sokolsky, P; Springer, R W; Stokes, B T; Stratton, S R; Stroman, T; Suzuki, S; Takahashi, Y; Takeda, M; Taketa, A; Takita, M; Tameda, Y; Tanaka, H; Tanaka, K; Tanaka, M; Thomas, S B; Thomson, G B; Tinyakov, P; Tkachev, I; Tokuno, H; Tomida, T; Troitsky, S; Tsunesada, Y; Tsutsumi, K; Tsuyuguchi, Y; Uchihori, Y; Udo, S; Ukai, H; Urban, F; Vasiloff, G; Wada, Y; Wong, T; Yamakawa, Y; Yamane, R; Yamaoka, H; Yamazaki, K; Yang, J; Yoneda, Y; Yoshida, S; Yoshii, H; Zhou, X; Zollinger, R; Zundel, Z

    2013-01-01

    We measure the spectrum of cosmic rays with energies greater than $10^{18.2}$ eV with the Fluorescence Detectors (FDs) and the Surface Detectors (SDs) of the Telescope Array Experiment using the data taken in our first 2.3-year observation from May 27 2008 to September 7 2010. A hybrid air shower reconstruction technique is employed to improve accuracies in determination of arrival directions and primary energies of cosmic rays using both FD and SD data. The energy spectrum presented here is in agreement with our previously published spectra and the HiRes results.

  2. Diminished social motivation negatively impacts reputation management: autism spectrum disorders as a case in point.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coralie Chevallier

    Full Text Available Human beings are endowed with a unique motivation to be included in social interactions. This natural social motivation, in turn, is thought to encourage behaviours such as flattery or self-deprecation aimed to ease interaction and to enhance the reputation of the individual who produces them. If this is the case, diminished social interest should affect reputation management. Here, we use Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs--primarily characterised by pervasive social disinterest--as a model to investigate the effect of social motivation on reputation management. Children first rated a set of pictures and were then given the opportunity to inflate their initial ratings in front of an experimenter who declared that she had drawn the picture. Contrary to the controls, children with ASD did not enhance their ratings in the drawer's presence. Moreover, participants' flattery behaviour correlated with self-reports of social enjoyment. Our findings point to a link between diminished social interest and reputation management.

  3. Spectrum and Composition of Ultra-high Energy Cosmic Rays from Semi-relativistic Hypernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Ruo-Yu

    2011-01-01

    It has been suggested that hypernova remnants, with a substantial amount of energy in semi-relativistic ejecta, can accelerate intermediate mass or heavy nuclei to ultra-high energies and provide sufficient amount of energy in cosmic rays to account for the observed flux. We here calculate the expected energy spectrum and chemical composition of ultra-high energy cosmic rays from such semi-relativistic hypernovae. With a chemical composition equal to that of the hypernova ejecta and a flat or hard spectrum for cosmic rays at the sources, the spectrum and composition of the propagated cosmic rays observed at the Earth can be compatible with the measurements by the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  4. Influence of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability on the kinetic energy spectrum.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Christopher R. (University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI)

    2010-09-01

    The fluctuating kinetic energy spectrum in the region near the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) is experimentally investigated using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The velocity field is measured at a high spatial resolution in the light gas to observe the effects of turbulence production and dissipation. It is found that the RMI acts as a source of turbulence production near the unstable interface, where energy is transferred from the scales of the perturbation to smaller scales until dissipation. The interface also has an effect on the kinetic energy spectrum farther away by means of the distorted reflected shock wave. The energy spectrum far from the interface initially has a higher energy content than that of similar experiments with a flat interface. These differences are quick to disappear as dissipation dominates the flow far from the interface.

  5. Detection of Extended Spectrum Beta-Lactamases Among Gram Negative Bacilli Recovered from Cattle Feces In Benin City, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Oroboghae OGEFERE

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to determine the prevalence of extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL among Gram negative bacteria isolated from cattle feces in Benin City, Nigeria. A total of 250 Gram negative bacteria isolates were recovered from cattle feces and were processed microbiologically using standard techniques. Emergent colonies were identified and antibacterial susceptibility tests were determined using Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. All bacterial isolates were screened for the presence of ESBL using the double-disc synergy method. A total of 37 (14.8% isolates were positive for ESBL, with 33 (13.2% indicated by ceftazidime, while only 4 (1.6% were indicated by both ceftazidime and cefotaxime (P < 0.0001. Of the Gram negative bacterial isolates recovered, Salmonella species was the most prevalent ESBL-producer with 55.0% prevalence (P = 0.0092, while no isolate of Pseudomonas aeruginosa produced ESBL. ESBL-positive isolates showed poor susceptibility to the tested antibacterial agents in comparison with non-ESBL-producers and imipenem was the most active antibiotic. The prevalence of ESBL among Gram negative bacilli recovered from cattle feces was 14.8%. The study advises prudent use of antibiotics in the treatment of cattle and harps on improved hygiene in managing cattle, as they are potential reservoirs of ESBL-producing organisms.

  6. Half-filled energy bands induced negative differential resistance in nitrogen-doped graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Fei; Lian, Ke-Yan; Qiu, Qi; Luo, Yi

    2015-03-07

    Nitrogen-doping brings novel properties and promising applications into graphene, but the underlying mechanism is still in debate. To determine the key factor in motivating the negative differential resistance (NDR) behaviour of nitrogen-doped graphene, the electronic structure and transport properties of an 11-dimer wide nitrogen-doped armchair graphene nanoribbon (N-AGNR) were systematically studied by first principles calculations. Both the effect of interaction between N-dopants and the effect of doping-sublattice on the NDR were examined for the first time. Taking into account the two effects, N-AGNR becomes metallic or semiconducting depending on the doping configuration, and its Fermi level varies in a large range. NDR was firmly verified not to be intrinsic for N-AGNRs. However, it is totally determined by whether nitrogen-doping induces half-filled energy bands (HFEBs) because it is HFEBs that cross the Fermi level and determine the transport properties of N-AGNR under low biases. With the bias increasing, the transmission spectrum near the Fermi level showed a flag shape, and therefore, the corresponding transport channel is totally suppressed at a certain bias, resulting in the NDR behaviour with a configuration-dependent peak-to-valley current ratio (PVCR) up to 10(4). Our findings give new insights into the microscopic mechanism of chemical doping induced NDR behaviour and will be useful in building NDR-based nanodevices in the future.

  7. Photodetachment Spectrum of Hydrogen Negative Ion Near a Partially Reflecting Spherical Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afaq, A.; Iqbal, Azmat; Rahman, Amin Ur; Khan, Naveed; Aleem, Fazal-e.-; Ansari, M. Mushraf

    2016-10-01

    Photodetachment of negative ions near surfaces is of great interest in view of its fundamental significance and technological applications. We reinvestigate the dynamics of photoelectrons in H - photodetachment near a partially reflecting spherical surface by the semiclassical closed-orbit theory. Reflection parameter R and curvature K is used to observe inelastic and spherical effects of the surface, respectively. The classical action is evaluated from the photodetached electron trajectories incident normally at the surface, arising simultaneously from the source and its image. The derived analytical formula of photodetachment cross section correctly recovers the results of reflective spherical surface published recently based on theoretical imaging method.

  8. Linac4 low energy beam measurements with negative hydrogen ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrivens, R; Bellodi, G; Crettiez, O; Dimov, V; Gerard, D; Granemann Souza, E; Guida, R; Hansen, J; Lallement, J-B; Lettry, J; Lombardi, A; Midttun, Ø; Pasquino, C; Raich, U; Riffaud, B; Roncarolo, F; Valerio-Lizarraga, C A; Wallner, J; Yarmohammadi Satri, M; Zickler, T

    2014-02-01

    Linac4, a 160 MeV normal-conducting H(-) linear accelerator, is the first step in the upgrade of the beam intensity available from the LHC proton injectors at CERN. The Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) line from the pulsed 2 MHz RF driven ion source, to the 352 MHz RFQ (Radiofrequency Quadrupole) has been built and installed at a test stand, and has been used to transport and match to the RFQ a pulsed 14 mA H(-) beam at 45 keV. A temporary slit-and-grid emittance measurement system has been put in place to characterize the beam delivered to the RFQ. In this paper a description of the LEBT and its beam diagnostics is given, and the results of beam emittance measurements and beam transmission measurements through the RFQ are compared with the expectation from simulations.

  9. Linac4 Low Energy Beam Measurements with Negative Hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Scrivens, R; Crettiez, O; Dimov, V; Gerard, D; Granemann Souza, E; Guida, R; Hansen, J; Lallement, J B; Lettry, J; Lombardi, A; Midttun, O; Pasquino, C; Raich, U; Riffaud, B; Roncarolo, F; Valerio-Lizarraga, C A; Wallner, J; Yarmohammadi Satri, M; Zickler, T

    2014-01-01

    Linac4, a 160 MeV normal-conducting H- linear accelerator, is the first step in the upgrade of the beam intensity available from the LHC proton injectors at CERN. The Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) line from the pulsed 2 MHz RF driven ion source, to the 352 MHz RFQ has been built and installed at a test stand, and has been used to transport and match to the RFQ a pulsed 14 mA H- beam at 45 keV. A temporary slit-and-grid emittance measurement system has been put in place to characterize the beam delivered to the RFQ. In this paper a description of the LEBT and its beam diagnostics is given, and the results of beam emittance measurements and beam transmission measurements through the RFQ are compared with the expectation from simulations.

  10. Linac4 low energy beam measurements with negative hydrogen ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scrivens, R., E-mail: richard.scrivens@cern.ch; Bellodi, G.; Crettiez, O.; Dimov, V.; Gerard, D.; Granemann Souza, E.; Guida, R.; Hansen, J.; Lallement, J.-B.; Lettry, J.; Lombardi, A.; Midttun, Ø.; Pasquino, C.; Raich, U.; Riffaud, B.; Roncarolo, F.; Valerio-Lizarraga, C. A.; Wallner, J.; Yarmohammadi Satri, M.; Zickler, T. [CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2014-02-15

    Linac4, a 160 MeV normal-conducting H{sup −} linear accelerator, is the first step in the upgrade of the beam intensity available from the LHC proton injectors at CERN. The Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) line from the pulsed 2 MHz RF driven ion source, to the 352 MHz RFQ (Radiofrequency Quadrupole) has been built and installed at a test stand, and has been used to transport and match to the RFQ a pulsed 14 mA H{sup −} beam at 45 keV. A temporary slit-and-grid emittance measurement system has been put in place to characterize the beam delivered to the RFQ. In this paper a description of the LEBT and its beam diagnostics is given, and the results of beam emittance measurements and beam transmission measurements through the RFQ are compared with the expectation from simulations.

  11. Electrostatic energy analyzer measurements of low energy zirconium beam parameters in a plasma sputter-type negative ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malapit, Giovanni M; Mahinay, Christian Lorenz S; Poral, Matthew D; Ramos, Henry J

    2012-02-01

    A plasma sputter-type negative ion source is utilized to produce and detect negative Zr ions with energies between 150 and 450 eV via a retarding potential-type electrostatic energy analyzer. Traditional and modified semi-cylindrical Faraday cups (FC) inside the analyzer are employed to sample negative Zr ions and measure corresponding ion currents. The traditional FC registered indistinct ion current readings which are attributed to backscattering of ions and secondary electron emissions. The modified Faraday cup with biased repeller guard ring, cut out these signal distortions leaving only ringings as issues which are theoretically compensated by fitting a sigmoidal function into the data. The mean energy and energy spread are calculated using the ion current versus retarding potential data while the beam width values are determined from the data of the transverse measurement of ion current. The most energetic negative Zr ions yield tighter energy spread at 4.11 eV compared to the least energetic negative Zr ions at 4.79 eV. The smallest calculated beam width is 1.04 cm for the negative Zr ions with the highest mean energy indicating a more focused beam in contrast to the less energetic negative Zr ions due to space charge forces.

  12. [Application of the racial algorithm in energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence overlapped spectrum analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Guo-Qiang; Luo, Yao-Yao; Ge, Liang-Quan; Zhang, Qing-Xian; Gu, Yi; Cheng, Feng

    2014-02-01

    In the energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrum analysis, scintillation detector such as NaI (Tl) detector usually has a low energy resolution at around 8%. The low energy resolution causes problems in spectral data analysis especially in the high background and low counts condition, it is very limited to strip the overlapped spectrum, and the more overlapping the peaks are, the more difficult to peel the peaks, and the qualitative and quantitative analysis can't be carried out because we can't recognize the peak address and peak area. Based on genetic algorithm and immune algorithm, we build a new racial algorithm which uses the Euclidean distance as the judgment of evolution, the maximum relative error as the iterative criterion to be put into overlapped spectrum analysis, then we use the Gaussian function to simulate different overlapping degrees of the spectrum, and the racial algorithm is used in overlapped peak separation and full spectrum simulation, the peak address deviation is in +/- 3 channels, the peak area deviation is no more than 5%, and it is proven that this method has a good effect in energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence overlapped spectrum analysis.

  13. Improving the Accuracy of the Neutron Energy Spectrum Estimation in Electronuclear Installations under Study

    CERN Document Server

    Barashenkov, V S; Soloviev, A G; Sosnin, A N

    2000-01-01

    A time-saving method to build distributions which requires significantly lower volumes of the data samples than building a histogram is proposed. Effectivenes of the method is shown taking an example of the energy spectrum of the neutron source (E < 10.5 MeV) generated in the large uranium block irradiated with high energy protons.

  14. Material grain size characterization method based on energy attenuation coefficient spectrum and support vector regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Zhou, Tong; Song, Yanan

    2016-07-01

    A grain size characterization method based on energy attenuation coefficient spectrum and support vector regression (SVR) is proposed. First, the spectra of the first and second back-wall echoes are cut into several frequency bands to calculate the energy attenuation coefficient spectrum. Second, the frequency band that is sensitive to grain size variation is determined. Finally, a statistical model between the energy attenuation coefficient in the sensitive frequency band and average grain size is established through SVR. Experimental verification is conducted on austenitic stainless steel. The average relative error of the predicted grain size is 5.65%, which is better than that of conventional methods.

  15. Sequential measurements of environmental neutron energy spectrum and neutron dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunomiya, Tomoya; Nakamura, Takashi; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Terunuma, Kazutaka; Hirabayashi, Naoya; Sato, Youichi; Abe, Sigeru; Rasolonjatovo A.H, Danielle [Tohoku Univ., Dept. of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan)

    2003-03-01

    From April 2001, neutron energy spectra and neutron dose were sequentially measured using 5'' -rem counter and {sup 3}He multi-moderator spectrometer (Boner boll) at Kawauchi-campus of Tohoku University. These data were collected about the relation between the dose level and the solar activities. (author)

  16. The negative energy density for a three-single-electron state in the Dirac field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu Wei-Xing; Yu Hong-Wei; Wu Pu-Xun

    2004-01-01

    We examine the energy density produced by a state vector which is the superposition of three single electron states in the Dirac field in the four-dimensional Minkowski spacetime. We derive the conditions on which the energy density can be negative. We then show that the energy density satisfies two quantum inequalities in the ultrarelativistic limit.

  17. The spectrum of high-energy cosmic rays measured with KASCADE-Grande

    CERN Document Server

    Apel, W D; Bekk, K; Bertaina, M; Bluemer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Buchholz, P; Cantoni, E; Chiavassa, A; Cossavella, F; Daumiller, K; de Souza, V; Di Pierro, F; Doll, P; Engel, R; Engler, J; Finger, M; Fuhrmann, D; Ghia, P L; Gils, H J; Glasstetter, R; Grupen, C; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hoerandel, J R; Huber, D; Huege, T; Kampert, K -H; Kang, D; Kickelbick, D; Klages, H O; Link, K; Luczak, P; Ludwig, M; Mathes, H J; Mayer, H J; Melissas, M; Milke, J; Mitrica, B; Morello, C; Navarra, G; Oehlschlaeger, J; Ostapchenko, S; Over, S; Palmieri, N; Petcu, M; Pierog, T; Rebel, H; Roth, M; Schieler, H; Schroeder, F G; Sima, O; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Ulrich, H; Weindl, A; Wochele, J; Wommer, M; Zabierowski, J

    2012-01-01

    The energy spectrum of cosmic rays between 10**16 eV and 10**18 eV, derived from measurements of the shower size (total number of charged particles) and the total muon number of extensive air showers by the KASCADE-Grande experiment, is described. The resulting all-particle energy spectrum exhibits strong hints for a hardening of the spectrum at approximately 2x10**16 eV and a significant steepening at c. 8x10**16 eV. These observations challenge the view that the spectrum is a single power law between knee and ankle. Possible scenarios generating such features are discussed in terms of astrophysical processes that may explain the transition region from galactic to extragalactic origin of cosmic rays.

  18. All-particle cosmic ray energy spectrum measured with 26 IceTop stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, R.; Abdou, Y.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Altmann, D.; Andeen, K.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Baker, M.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Bazo Alba, J. L.; Beattie, K.; Beatty, J. J.; Bechet, S.; Becker, J. K.; Becker, K.-H.; Bell, M.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; BenZvi, S.; Berdermann, J.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bertrand, D.; Besson, D. Z.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blumenthal, J.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Brayeur, L.; Brown, A. M.; Buitink, S.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Carson, M.; Casier, M.; Chirkin, D.; Christy, B.; Clevermann, F.; Cohen, S.; Cowen, D. F.; Cruz Silva, A. H.; D'Agostino, M. V.; Danninger, M.; Daughhetee, J.; Davis, J. C.; De Clercq, C.; Degner, T.; Descamps, F.; Desiati, P.; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G.; DeYoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dreyer, J.; Dumm, J. P.; Dunkman, M.; Eisch, J.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Engdegård, O.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fadiran, O.; Fazely, A. R.; Fedynitch, A.; Feintzeig, J.; Feusels, T.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fischer-Wasels, T.; Flis, S.; Franckowiak, A.; Franke, R.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Gladstone, L.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Goodman, J. A.; Góra, D.; Grant, D.; Groß, A.; Grullon, S.; Gurtner, M.; Ha, C.; Haj Ismail, A.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Han, K.; Hanson, K.; Heereman, D.; Heimann, P.; Heinen, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Hickford, S.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, B.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; Hussain, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Jacobsen, J.; Japaridze, G. S.; Johansson, H.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kiryluk, J.; Kislat, F.; Klein, S. R.; Klepser, S.; Köhne, J.-H.; Kohnen, G.; Kolanoski, H.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krasberg, M.; Kroll, G.; Kunnen, J.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Laihem, K.; Landsman, H.; Larson, M. J.; Lauer, R.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; Meagher, K.; Merck, M.; Mészáros, P.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Middell, E.; Milke, N.; Miller, J.; Montaruli, T.; Morse, R.; Movit, S. M.; Nahnhauer, R.; Nam, J. W.; Naumann, U.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Odrowski, S.; Olivas, A.; Olivo, M.; O'Murchadha, A.; Panknin, S.; Paul, L.; Pérez de los Heros, C.; Pieloth, D.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Rawlins, K.; Redl, P.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Richman, M.; Riedel, B.; Rodrigues, J. P.; Rothmaier, F.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Rutledge, D.; Ruzybayev, B.; Ryckbosch, D.; Sander, H.-G.; Santander, M.; Sarkar, S.; Schatto, K.; Scheel, M.; Schmidt, T.; Schöneberg, S.; Schönwald, A.; Schukraft, A.; Schulte, L.; Schultes, A.; Schulz, O.; Schunck, M.; Seckel, D.; Semburg, B.; Seo, S. H.; Sestayo, Y.; Seunarine, S.; Silvestri, A.; Smith, M. W. E.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Strahler, E. A.; Ström, R.; Stüer, M.; Sullivan, G. W.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Tamburro, A.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Toscano, S.; Tosi, D.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Van Overloop, A.; van Santen, J.; Vehring, M.; Voge, M.; Walck, C.; Waldenmaier, T.; Wallraff, M.; Walter, M.; Wasserman, R.; Weaver, Ch.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whitehorn, N.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Williams, D. R.; Wischnewski, R.; Wissing, H.; Wolf, M.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, C.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Zoll, M.

    2013-04-01

    We report on a measurement of the cosmic ray energy spectrum with the IceTop air shower array, the surface component of the IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the South Pole. The data used in this analysis were taken between June and October, 2007, with 26 surface stations operational at that time, corresponding to about one third of the final array. The fiducial area used in this analysis was 0.122 km2. The analysis investigated the energy spectrum from 1 to 100 PeV measured for three different zenith angle ranges between 0° and 46°. Because of the isotropy of cosmic rays in this energy range the spectra from all zenith angle intervals have to agree. The cosmic-ray energy spectrum was determined under different assumptions on the primary mass composition. Good agreement of spectra in the three zenith angle ranges was found for the assumption of pure proton and a simple two-component model. For zenith angles θ < 30°, where the mass dependence is smallest, the knee in the cosmic ray energy spectrum was observed at about 4 PeV, with a spectral index above the knee of about -3.1. Moreover, an indication of a flattening of the spectrum above 22 PeV was observed.

  19. Isolation of Extended Spectrum β-Lactamase Producing Gram Negative Bacilli from Wound Swab with Their Antimicrobial Susceptibility Pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, T A; Shamsuzzaman, S M

    2016-10-01

    Extended Spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) producing organisms have become the major clinical concern worldwide. The present study was undertaken to see the frequency of ESBLs producing gram-negative bacilli with their antibiogram in post surgical wound swab collected over a period of 12 months from July 2011 to June 2012 at Dhaka Medical College Hospital. Among 200 samples 121(60.5%) gram negative bacilli and 52(26%) gram-positive bacteria were isolated. Escherichia coli (36.42%) was the most predominant gram-negative bacilli followed by Klebsiella species (9.83%) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (8.67%). Thirty four (28.1%) isolates were detected as ESBLs producers by double-disc synergy test (DDST) and the prevalence among Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were 33.33%, 35.29% and 26.67% respectively. All the ESBL producing strains were sensitive to imipenem but they were significantly more resistant to ciprofloxacin, doxycycline, amoxiclav, co-trimoxazole, azithromycin and gentamycin than non-ESBLs producers (p<0.01). The finding suggests more effective strategies are needed to control the spread of these resistant organisms.

  20. The energy spectrum of gravitational waves in a loop quantum cosmological model

    CERN Document Server

    Morais, Joao; Henriques, Alfredo B

    2014-01-01

    We explore the consequences of loop quantum cosmology (inverse-volume corrections) in the spectrum of the gravitational waves using the method of the Bogoliubov coefficients. These corrections are taken into account at the background level of the theory as well as at the first order in the perturbations theory framework. We show that these corrections lead to an intense graviton production during the loop super-inflationary phase prior to the standard slow-roll era, which leave their imprints through new features on the energy spectrum of the gravitational waves as would be measured today, including a new maximum on the low frequency end of the spectrum.

  1. PROBING THE INFLATON: SMALL-SCALE POWER SPECTRUM CONSTRAINTS FROM MEASUREMENTS OF THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND ENERGY SPECTRUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chluba, Jens; Erickcek, Adrienne L.; Ben-Dayan, Ido, E-mail: jchluba@cita.utoronto.ca [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H8 (Canada)

    2012-10-20

    In the early universe, energy stored in small-scale density perturbations is quickly dissipated by Silk damping, a process that inevitably generates {mu}- and y-type spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). These spectral distortions depend on the shape and amplitude of the primordial power spectrum at wavenumbers k {approx}< 10{sup 4} Mpc{sup -1}. Here, we study constraints on the primordial power spectrum derived from COBE/FIRAS and forecasted for PIXIE. We show that measurements of {mu} and y impose strong bounds on the integrated small-scale power, and we demonstrate how to compute these constraints using k-space window functions that account for the effects of thermalization and dissipation physics. We show that COBE/FIRAS places a robust upper limit on the amplitude of the small-scale power spectrum. This limit is about three orders of magnitude stronger than the one derived from primordial black holes in the same scale range. Furthermore, this limit could be improved by another three orders of magnitude with PIXIE, potentially opening up a new window to early universe physics. To illustrate the power of these constraints, we consider several generic models for the small-scale power spectrum predicted by different inflation scenarios, including running-mass inflation models and inflation scenarios with episodes of particle production. PIXIE could place very tight constraints on these scenarios, potentially even ruling out running-mass inflation models if no distortion is detected. We also show that inflation models with sub-Planckian field excursion that generate detectable tensor perturbations should simultaneously produce a large CMB spectral distortion, a link that could potentially be established with PIXIE.

  2. Energy spectrum of argon ions emitted from Filippov type Sahand plasma focus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadnejad, M.; Pestehe, S. J.; Mohammadi, M. A. [Department of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Faculty of Physics, University of Tabriz, Postal Code 5166614766, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Institute for Applied Physics and Astronomy, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-07-15

    The energy and flux of the argon ions produced in Sahand plasma focus have been measured by employing a well-designed Faraday cup. The secondary electron emission effects on the ion signals are simulated and the dimensions of Faraday cup are optimized to minimize these effects. The measured ion energy spectrum is corrected for the ion energy loss and charge exchange in the background gas. The effects of the capacitor bank voltage and working gas pressure on the ion energy spectrum are also investigated. It has been shown that the emitted ion number per energy increases as the capacitor bank voltage increases. Decreasing the working gas pressure leads to the increase in the number of emitted ion per energy.

  3. Energy spectrum of argon ions emitted from Filippov type Sahand plasma focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadnejad, M.; Pestehe, S. J.; Mohammadi, M. A.

    2013-07-01

    The energy and flux of the argon ions produced in Sahand plasma focus have been measured by employing a well-designed Faraday cup. The secondary electron emission effects on the ion signals are simulated and the dimensions of Faraday cup are optimized to minimize these effects. The measured ion energy spectrum is corrected for the ion energy loss and charge exchange in the background gas. The effects of the capacitor bank voltage and working gas pressure on the ion energy spectrum are also investigated. It has been shown that the emitted ion number per energy increases as the capacitor bank voltage increases. Decreasing the working gas pressure leads to the increase in the number of emitted ion per energy.

  4. Energy spectrum of UHECRs measured by newly constructed fluorescence detectors in Telescope Array experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujii Toshihiro

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Telescope Array (TA experiment is the largest hybrid detector to observe ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs in the northern hemisphere. In the TA experiment, we newly designed and constructed 24 fluorescence detectors (FDs located at two stations. We report the energy spectrum of UHECRs with energies above 1017.5 eV from analyzing data collected by the new FDs during the first 3.7 years in monocular mode.

  5. Leptoquark models and the energy spectrum of cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Alikhanov, I

    2011-01-01

    The IceCube Neutrino Observatory has recently placed a new limit on the extremely-high energy (EHE) neutrino flux several orders of magnitude lower than the Greisen--Zatsepin--Kuzmin (GZK) cosmogenic neutrino intensities expected in the case of proton-dominated primary composition. This result favors to the mixed chemical composition models and exclude scenarios with strongly interacting neutrinos proposed so far. Nevertheless we argue that it is possible to construct such models consistently with the IceCube data if to extend the standard model Lagrangian by adding a leptoquark term. It is notable that the resulting Lagrangian couples leptons (not only neutrinos!) to gluons through leptoquark excitations in the subrocess $lg\\rightarrow lq{\\bar q}$ so that leptons of relevant energies in the Earth as well as in Extensive Air Showers will behave as hadrons. The latter may lead, for example, to misinterpretations in identifying the chemical composition of EHE cosmic rays. The EHE primaries will seem heavier due...

  6. Decrypting the charge-resolved kinetic-energy spectrum in the Coulomb explosion of argon clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajeev, R.; Rishad, K. P. M.; Trivikram, T. Madhu; Narayanan, V.; Brabec, T.; Krishnamurthy, M.

    2012-02-01

    Ion emissions from clusters in intense ultrashort laser fields have been studied predominantly using time-of-flight (TOF) spectroscopy so far. Assuming atomic ion emission, arrival time signal is converted to a charge-integrated kinetic-energy spectrum. We present here a Thomson parabola spectrum that decrypts the charge-integrated energy distribution to the charge-resolved kinetic-energy spectra (CRKES). TOF measurements compare well with the spectrum generated by encrypting back the CRKES. A quantitative measure of ionization probabilities of Ar36000 clusters to varied charge states at 7×1015 W cm-2 is compared with three-dimensional microscopic particle-in-cell simulations. A good agreement between these detailed measurements and the simulations shows the possibility for the retrieval of charge distribution within a nanocluster.

  7. Classical Electron Model with Negative Energy Density in Einstein-Cartan Theory of Gravitation

    CERN Document Server

    Ray, S; Ray, Saibal; Bhadra, Sumana

    2002-01-01

    Experimental result regarding the maximum limit of the radius of the electron \\sim 10^{-16} cm and a few of the theoretical works suggest that the gravitational mass which is a priori a positive quantity in Newtonian mechanics may become negative in general theory of relativity. It is argued that such a negative gravitational mass and hence negative energy density also can be obtained with a better physical interpretation in the framework of Einstein-Cartan theory.

  8. Calculation of Bremsstrahlung energy spectrum induced by beta ray

    CERN Document Server

    Fukano, S

    2003-01-01

    Bremsstrahlung energy spectra induced by beta ray from radionuclides sup 3 H, sup 6 sup 3 Ni, sup 1 sup 4 C, sup 1 sup 4 sup 7 Pm, sup 9 sup 0 Sr, sup 3 sup 2 P and sup 9 sup 0 Y are calculated by using numerical data of radiation yield published by Berger et. al. and compared with those obtained from classical approximate expressions of Wu and Segre. The results for sup 3 H, sup 6 sup 3 Ni, sup 1 sup 4 C and sup 1 sup 4 sup 7 Pm are in good agreement with those from Segre's, while spectra from such as sup 3 sup 2 P and sup 9 sup 0 Y are similar to those obtained by using Wu's expression. The result for sup 9 sup 0 Sr is in fair agreement with those from Wu's and Segre's.

  9. Joint Resource Allocation of Spectrum Sensing and Energy Harvesting in an Energy-Harvesting-Based Cognitive Sensor Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Lu, Weidang; Ye, Liang; Li, Feng; Zou, Deyue

    2017-03-16

    The cognitive sensor (CS) can transmit data to the control center in the same spectrum that is licensed to the primary user (PU) when the absence of the PU is detected by spectrum sensing. However, the battery energy of the CS is limited due to its small size, deployment in atrocious environments and long-term working. In this paper, an energy-harvesting-based CS is described, which senses the PU together with collecting the radio frequency energy to supply data transmission. In order to improve the transmission performance of the CS, we have proposed the joint resource allocation of spectrum sensing and energy harvesting in the cases of a single energy-harvesting-based CS and an energy-harvesting-based cognitive sensor network (CSN), respectively. Based on the proposed frame structure, we have formulated the resource allocation as a class of joint optimization problems, which seek to maximize the transmission rate of the CS by jointly optimizing sensing time, harvesting time and the numbers of sensing nodes and harvesting nodes. Using the half searching method and the alternating direction optimization, we have achieved the sub-optimal solution by converting the joint optimization problem into several convex sub-optimization problems. The simulation results have indicated the predominance of the proposed energy-harvesting-based CS and CSN models.

  10. Acceleration of one ampere negative ion beams to energies up to 120 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, C.; Sluyters, T.

    1977-01-01

    One of the objectives of the BNL Neutral Beam Development Group is to accelerate negative hydrogen ion beams to energies of several hundreds of kilovolts. In a first attempt, negative ions, produced from surface plasma sources, are extracted at around 15 keV and accelerated across a single gap to energies of 120 keV. Beam currents in excess of one ampere have been accelerated.

  11. The Cosmic Ray Energy Spectrum Observed with the Surface Detector of the Telescope Array Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Abu-Zayyad, T; Allen, M; Anderson, R; Azuma, R; Barcikowski, E; Belz, J W; Bergman, D R; Blake, S A; Cady, R; Cheon, B G; Chiba, J; Chikawa, M; Cho, E J; Cho, W R; Fujii, H; Fujii, T; Fukuda, T; Fukushima, M; Hanlon, W; Hayashi, K; Hayashi, Y; Hayashida, N; Hibino, K; Hiyama, K; Honda, K; Iguchi, T; Ikeda, D; Ikuta, K; Inoue, N; Ishii, T; Ishimori, R; Ivanov, D; Iwamoto, S; Jui, C C H; Kadota, K; Kakimoto, F; Kalashev, O; Kanbe, T; Kasahara, K; Kawai, H; Kawakami, S; Kawana, S; Kido, E; Kim, H B; Kim, H K; Kim, J H; Kim, J H; Kitamoto, K; Kitamura, S; Kitamura, Y; Kobayashi, K; Kobayashi, Y; Kondo, Y; Kuramoto, K; Kuzmin, V; Kwon, Y J; Lim, S I; Machida, S; Martens, K; Martineau, J; Matsuda, T; Matsuura, T; Matsuyama, T; Matthews, J N; Minamino, M; Miyata, K; Murano, Y; Myers, I; Nagasawa, K; Nagataki, S; Nakamura, T; Nam, S W; Nonaka, T; Ogio, S; Ohnishi, M; Ohoka, H; Oki, K; Oku, D; Okuda, T; Oshima, A; Ozawa, S; Park, I H; Pshirkov, M S; Rodriguez, D C; Roh, S Y; Rubtsov, G; Ryu, D; Sagawa, H; Sakurai, N; Sampson, A L; Scott, L M; Shah, P D; Shibata, F; Shibata, T; Shimodaira, H; Shin, B K; Shin, J I; Shirahama, T; Smith, J D; Sokolsky, P; Sonley, T J; Springer, R W; Stokes, B T; Stratton, S R; Stroman, T; Suzuki, S; Takahashi, Y; Takeda, M; Taketa, A; Takita, M; Tameda, Y; Tanaka, H; Tanaka, K; Tanaka, M; Thomas, S B; Thomson, G B; Tinyakov, P; Tkachev, I; Tokuno, H; Tomida, T; Troitsky, S; Tsunesada, Y; Tsutsumi, K; Tsuyuguchi, Y; Uchihori, Y; Udo, S; Ukai, H; Vasiloff, G; Wada, Y; Wong, T; Wood, M; Yamakawa, Y; Yamane, R; Yamaoka, H; Yamazaki, K; Yang, J; Yoneda, Y; Yoshida, S; Yoshii, H; Zhou, X; Zollinger, R R; Zundel, Z

    2012-01-01

    The Telescope Array (TA) collaboration has measured the energy spectrum of ultra-high energy cosmic rays for energies above 1.6x10^(18) eV in its first three years of operation. The spectrum shows a dip at an energy of 5x10^(18) eV and a steepening at 5x10^(19) eV which is consistent with the expectation from the GZK cutoff. Here we use a new technique that involves generating a complete simulation of the TA surface detector. The procedure starts with shower simulations using the CORSIKA Monte Carlo program where we have solved the problems caused by use of the "thinning" approximation. This simulation method allows us to make an accurate calculation of the acceptance of the detector for the energies concerned.

  12. Energy spectrum of cosmic-ray iron nucleus observed with emulsion chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Y.; Shimada, E.; Ohta, I.; Tasaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Sugimoto, H.; Taira, K.; Tateyama, N.

    1985-01-01

    Energy spectrum of cosmic-ray Fe-nucleus has been measured from 4 GeV per nucleon to beyond 100 GeV per nucleon. The data were obtained using emulsion chambers on a balloon from Sanriku, Japan. The energies were estimated by the opening angle method after calibrated using 1.88 GeV per nucleon Fe collisions. The spectrum of Fe is approximately E-2.5 in the range from 10 to 200 GeV per nucleon. This result is in good agreement with those of other experiments.

  13. Energy spectrum and phase diagrams of two-sublattice hard-core boson model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Stasyuk

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The energy spectrum, spectral density and phase diagrams have been obtained for two-sublattice hard-core boson model in frames of random phase approximation approach. Reconstruction of boson spectrum at the change of temperature, chemical potential and energy difference between local positions in sublattices is studied. The phase diagrams illustrating the regions of existence of a normal phase which can be close to Mott-insulator (MI or charge-density (CDW phase diagrams as well as the phase with the Bose-Einstein condensate (SF phase are built.

  14. Energy spectrum and critical exponents of the free parafermion Z N spin chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaraz, Francisco C.; Batchelor, Murray T.; Liu, Zi-Zhong

    2017-04-01

    Results are given for the ground state energy and excitation spectrum of a simple N-state Z N spin chain described by free parafermions. The model is non-Hermitian for N≥slant 3 with a real ground state energy and a complex excitation spectrum. Although having a simpler Hamiltonian than the superintegrable chiral Potts model, the model is seen to share some properties with it, e.g. the specific heat exponent α =1-2/N and the anisotropic correlation length exponents {ν\\parallel}=1 and {ν\\bot}=2/N .

  15. The high-energy gamma-ray fluence and energy spectrum of GRB 970417a from observations with Milagrito

    CERN Document Server

    Atkins, R; Berley, D; Chen, M L; Coyne, D G; Dingus, B L; Dorfan, D E; Ellsworth, R W; Evans, D; Falcone, A D; Fleysher, L; Fleysher, R; Gisler, G; Sánchez, M M G; Goodman, J A; Haines, T J; Hoffman, C M; Hugenberger, S; Kelley, L A; Klein, S; Leonor, I; McCullough, J F; McEnery, J E; Miller, R S; Mincer, A I; Morales, M F; Némethy, P; Ryan, J M; Samuelson, F W; Shen, B; Shoup, A L; Sinnis, C; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Tümer, T O; Wang, K; Wascko, M O; Westerhoff, S; Williams, D A; Yang, T; Yodh, G B

    2003-01-01

    Evidence of TeV emission from GRB970417a has been previously reported using data from the Milagrito detector. Constraints on the TeV fluence and the energy spectrum are now derived using additional data from a scaler system that recorded the rate of signals from the Milagrito photomultipliers. This analysis shows that if emission from GRB970417a has been observed, it must contain photons with energies above 650 GeV. Some consequences of this observation are discussed.

  16. Scaling-law for the energy dependence of anatomic power spectrum in dedicated breast CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vedantham, Srinivasan; Shi, Linxi; Glick, Stephen J.; Karellas, Andrew [Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: To determine the x-ray photon energy dependence of the anatomic power spectrum of the breast when imaged with dedicated breast computed tomography (CT). Methods: A theoretical framework for scaling the empirically determined anatomic power spectrum at one x-ray photon energy to that at any given x-ray photon energy when imaged with dedicated breast CT was developed. Theory predicted that when the anatomic power spectrum is fitted with a power curve of the form k f{sup -{beta}}, where k and {beta} are fit coefficients and f is spatial frequency, the exponent {beta} would be independent of x-ray photon energy (E), and the amplitude k scales with the square of the difference in energy-dependent linear attenuation coefficients of fibroglandular and adipose tissues. Twenty mastectomy specimens based numerical phantoms that were previously imaged with a benchtop flat-panel cone-beam CT system were converted to 3D distribution of glandular weight fraction (f{sub g}) and were used to verify the theoretical findings. The 3D power spectrum was computed in terms of f{sub g} and after converting to linear attenuation coefficients at monoenergetic x-ray photon energies of 20-80 keV in 5 keV intervals. The 1D power spectra along the axes were extracted and fitted with a power curve of the form k f{sup -{beta}}. The energy dependence of k and {beta} were analyzed. Results: For the 20 mastectomy specimen based numerical phantoms used in the study, the exponent {beta} was found to be in the range of 2.34-2.42, depending on the axis of measurement. Numerical simulations agreed with the theoretical predictions that for a power-law anatomic spectrum of the form k f{sup -{beta}}, {beta} was independent of E and k(E) =k{sub 1}[{mu}{sub g}(E) -{mu}{sub a}(E)]{sup 2}, where k{sub 1} is a constant, and {mu}{sub g}(E) and {mu}{sub a}(E) represent the energy-dependent linear attenuation coefficients of fibroglandular and adipose tissues, respectively. Conclusions: Numerical

  17. Probing the Inflaton: Small-scale Power Spectrum Constraints from Measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background Energy Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chluba, Jens; Erickcek, Adrienne L.; Ben-Dayan, Ido

    2012-10-01

    In the early universe, energy stored in small-scale density perturbations is quickly dissipated by Silk damping, a process that inevitably generates μ- and y-type spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). These spectral distortions depend on the shape and amplitude of the primordial power spectrum at wavenumbers k FIRAS and forecasted for PIXIE. We show that measurements of μ and y impose strong bounds on the integrated small-scale power, and we demonstrate how to compute these constraints using k-space window functions that account for the effects of thermalization and dissipation physics. We show that COBE/FIRAS places a robust upper limit on the amplitude of the small-scale power spectrum. This limit is about three orders of magnitude stronger than the one derived from primordial black holes in the same scale range. Furthermore, this limit could be improved by another three orders of magnitude with PIXIE, potentially opening up a new window to early universe physics. To illustrate the power of these constraints, we consider several generic models for the small-scale power spectrum predicted by different inflation scenarios, including running-mass inflation models and inflation scenarios with episodes of particle production. PIXIE could place very tight constraints on these scenarios, potentially even ruling out running-mass inflation models if no distortion is detected. We also show that inflation models with sub-Planckian field excursion that generate detectable tensor perturbations should simultaneously produce a large CMB spectral distortion, a link that could potentially be established with PIXIE.

  18. Holographic lens spectrum splitting photovoltaic system for increased diffuse collection and annual energy yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorndran, Shelby D.; Wu, Yuechen; Ayala, Silvana; Kostuk, Raymond K.

    2015-09-01

    Concentrating and spectrum splitting photovoltaic (PV) modules have a limited acceptance angle and thus suffer from optical loss under off-axis illumination. This loss manifests itself as a substantial reduction in energy yield in locations where a significant portion of insulation is diffuse. In this work, a spectrum splitting PV system is designed to efficiently collect and convert light in a range of illumination conditions. The system uses a holographic lens to concentrate shortwavelength light onto a smaller, more expensive indium gallium phosphide (InGaP) PV cell. The high efficiency PV cell near the axis is surrounded with silicon (Si), a less expensive material that collects a broader portion of the solar spectrum. Under direct illumination, the device achieves increased conversion efficiency from spectrum splitting. Under diffuse illumination, the device collects light with efficiency comparable to a flat-panel Si module. Design of the holographic lens is discussed. Optical efficiency and power output of the module under a range of illumination conditions from direct to diffuse are simulated with non-sequential raytracing software. Using direct and diffuse Typical Metrological Year (TMY3) irradiance measurements, annual energy yield of the module is calculated for several installation sites. Energy yield of the spectrum splitting module is compared to that of a full flat-panel Si reference module.

  19. Energy-efficient routing, modulation and spectrum allocation in elastic optical networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yanxia; Gu, Rentao; Ji, Yuefeng

    2017-07-01

    With tremendous growth in bandwidth demand, energy consumption problem in elastic optical networks (EONs) becomes a hot topic with wide concern. The sliceable bandwidth-variable transponder in EON, which can transmit/receive multiple optical flows, was recently proposed to improve a transponder's flexibility and save energy. In this paper, energy-efficient routing, modulation and spectrum allocation (EE-RMSA) in EONs with sliceable bandwidth-variable transponder is studied. To decrease the energy consumption, we develop a Mixed Integer Linear Programming (MILP) model with corresponding EE-RMSA algorithm for EONs. The MILP model jointly considers the modulation format and optical grooming in the process of routing and spectrum allocation with the objective of minimizing the energy consumption. With the help of genetic operators, the EE-RMSA algorithm iteratively optimizes the feasible routing path, modulation format and spectrum resources solutions by explore the whole search space. In order to save energy, the optical-layer grooming strategy is designed to transmit the lightpath requests. Finally, simulation results verify that the proposed scheme is able to reduce the energy consumption of the network while maintaining the blocking probability (BP) performance compare with the existing First-Fit-KSP algorithm, Iterative Flipping algorithm and EAMGSP algorithm especially in large network topology. Our results also demonstrate that the proposed EE-RMSA algorithm achieves almost the same performance as MILP on an 8-node network.

  20. Spectrum measurement with the Telescope Array Low Energy Extension (TALE) fluorescence detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zundel, Zachary James

    The Telescope Array (TA) experiment is the largest Ultra High Energy cosmic ray observatory in the northern hemisphere and is designed to be sensitive to cosmic ray air showers above 1018eV. Despite the substantial measurements made by TA and AUGER (the largest cosmic ray observatory in the southern hemisphere), there remains uncertainty about whether the highest energy cosmic rays are galactic or extragalactic in origin. Locating features in the cosmic ray energy spectrum below 1018eV that indicate a transition from galactic to extragalactic sources would clarify the interpretation of measurements made at the highest energies. The Telescope Array Low Energy Extension (TALE) is designed to extend the energy threshold of the TA observatory down to 1016.5eV in order to make such measurements. This dissertation details the construction, calibration, and operation of the TALE flu- orescence detector. A measurement of the flux of cosmic rays in the energy range of 1016.5 -- 1018.5eV is made using the monocular data set taken between September 2013 and January 2014. The TALE fluorescence detector observes evidence for a softening of the cosmic spectrum at 1017.25+/-0.5eV. The evidence of a change in the spectrum motivates continued study of 1016.5 -- 1018.5eV cosmic rays.

  1. Emergence of integron borne PER-1 mediated extended spectrum cephalosporin resistance among nosocomial isolates of Gram-negative bacilli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Prakash Maurya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Pseudomonas extended resistant (PER enzymes are rare type of extended-spectrum beta lactamases (ESBLs that confer third generation cephalosporin resistance. These are often integron borne and laterally transmitted. The aim of the present study was to investigate the emergence of integron borne cephalosporin resistant PER-1 gene in diverse incompatibility (Inc group plasmids among Gram-negative bacteria. Methods: A total of 613 consecutive, non-duplicate, Gram-negative bacteria of Enterobacteriaceae family and non-fermenting Gram-negative bacteria were isolated from different clinical specimens during a period of 18 months. For amplification and detection of blaPER, multiplex PCR was done. For understanding the genetic environment of blaPER-1, integrase gene PCR and cassette PCR (59 be was performed. Gene transferability experiment was carried out and PCR based replicon typing was performed for incompatibility group typing of plasmids using 18 pairs of primers. An inhibitor based method was used for phenotypic detection of intrinsic resistance. Results: Multiplex PCR and sequencing confirmed that 45 isolates were harbouring blaPER-1. Both class 1 and class 2 integrons were observed among them. Integrase and cassette PCR (59 be PCR results confirmed that the resistant determinant was located within class 1 integron. Transformation and conjugation experiments revealed that PER-1 was laterally transferable and disseminated through diverse Inc plasmid type. Efflux pump mediated carbapenem resistance was observed in all isolates. All isolates belonged to heterogenous groups. Interpretation & conclusions: This study demonstrates the dissemination of cephalosporins resistant, integron borne blaPER-1 in hospital setting in this part of the country and emphasizes on the rational use of third generation cephalosporins to slow down the expansion of this rare type of ESBL gene.

  2. Absolute instability from linear conversion of counter-propagating positive and negative energy waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufman, A.N.; Brizard, A.J.; Morehead, J.J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Tracy, E.R. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The resonant interaction of a negative-energy wave with a positive-energy wave gives rise to a linear instability. Whereas a single crossing of rays in a nonuniform medium leads to a convectively saturated instability, we show that a double crossing can yield an absolute instability.

  3. A new neutron energy spectrum unfolding code using a two steps genetic algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahabinejad, H., E-mail: shahabinejad1367@yahoo.com; Hosseini, S.A.; Sohrabpour, M.

    2016-03-01

    A new neutron spectrum unfolding code TGASU (Two-steps Genetic Algorithm Spectrum Unfolding) has been developed to unfold the neutron spectrum from a pulse height distribution which was calculated using the MCNPX-ESUT computational Monte Carlo code. To perform the unfolding process, the response matrices were generated using the MCNPX-ESUT computational code. Both one step (common GA) and two steps GAs have been implemented to unfold the neutron spectra. According to the obtained results, the new two steps GA code results has shown closer match in all energy regions and particularly in the high energy regions. The results of the TGASU code have been compared with those of the standard spectra, LSQR method and GAMCD code. The results of the TGASU code have been demonstrated to be more accurate than that of the existing computational codes for both under-determined and over-determined problems.

  4. A new neutron energy spectrum unfolding code using a two steps genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabinejad, H.; Hosseini, S. A.; Sohrabpour, M.

    2016-03-01

    A new neutron spectrum unfolding code TGASU (Two-steps Genetic Algorithm Spectrum Unfolding) has been developed to unfold the neutron spectrum from a pulse height distribution which was calculated using the MCNPX-ESUT computational Monte Carlo code. To perform the unfolding process, the response matrices were generated using the MCNPX-ESUT computational code. Both one step (common GA) and two steps GAs have been implemented to unfold the neutron spectra. According to the obtained results, the new two steps GA code results has shown closer match in all energy regions and particularly in the high energy regions. The results of the TGASU code have been compared with those of the standard spectra, LSQR method and GAMCD code. The results of the TGASU code have been demonstrated to be more accurate than that of the existing computational codes for both under-determined and over-determined problems.

  5. An Energy-Efficient Game-Theory-Based Spectrum Decision Scheme for Cognitive Radio Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Shelly; Moh, Sangman

    2016-06-30

    A cognitive radio sensor network (CRSN) is a wireless sensor network in which sensor nodes are equipped with cognitive radio. In this paper, we propose an energy-efficient game-theory-based spectrum decision (EGSD) scheme for CRSNs to prolong the network lifetime. Note that energy efficiency is the most important design consideration in CRSNs because it determines the network lifetime. The central part of the EGSD scheme consists of two spectrum selection algorithms: random selection and game-theory-based selection. The EGSD scheme also includes a clustering algorithm, spectrum characterization with a Markov chain, and cluster member coordination. Our performance study shows that EGSD outperforms the existing popular framework in terms of network lifetime and coordination overhead.

  6. Spectrum sensing algorithm based on autocorrelation energy in cognitive radio networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Shengwei; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Shibing

    2016-10-01

    Cognitive radio networks have wide applications in the smart home, personal communications and other wireless communication. Spectrum sensing is the main challenge in cognitive radios. This paper proposes a new spectrum sensing algorithm which is based on the autocorrelation energy of signal received. By taking the autocorrelation energy of the received signal as the statistics of spectrum sensing, the effect of the channel noise on the detection performance is reduced. Simulation results show that the algorithm is effective and performs well in low signal-to-noise ratio. Compared with the maximum generalized eigenvalue detection (MGED) algorithm, function of covariance matrix based detection (FMD) algorithm and autocorrelation-based detection (AD) algorithm, the proposed algorithm has 2 11 dB advantage.

  7. An Energy-Efficient Game-Theory-Based Spectrum Decision Scheme for Cognitive Radio Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelly Salim

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A cognitive radio sensor network (CRSN is a wireless sensor network in which sensor nodes are equipped with cognitive radio. In this paper, we propose an energy-efficient game-theory-based spectrum decision (EGSD scheme for CRSNs to prolong the network lifetime. Note that energy efficiency is the most important design consideration in CRSNs because it determines the network lifetime. The central part of the EGSD scheme consists of two spectrum selection algorithms: random selection and game-theory-based selection. The EGSD scheme also includes a clustering algorithm, spectrum characterization with a Markov chain, and cluster member coordination. Our performance study shows that EGSD outperforms the existing popular framework in terms of network lifetime and coordination overhead.

  8. Prompt neutron fission spectrum mean energies for the fissile nuclides and /sup 252/Cf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holden, N.E.

    1985-01-01

    The international standard for a neutron spectrum is that produced from the spontaneous fission of /sup 252/Cf, while the thermal neutron induced fission neutron spectra for the four fissile nuclides, /sup 233/U, /sup 235/U, /sup 239/Pu, and /sup 241/Pu are of interest from the standpoint of nuclear reactors. The average neutron energies of these spectra are tabulated. The individual measurements are recorded with the neutron energy range measured, the method of detection as well as the average neutron energy for each author. Also tabulated are the measurements of the ratio of mean energies for pairs of fission neutron spectra. 75 refs., 9 tabs. (LEW)

  9. Self-similarity of negative particle production from the Beam Energy Scan Program at STAR

    CERN Document Server

    Tokarev, M V

    2015-01-01

    We present the spectra of negative charged particle production in Au+Au collisions from STAR for the first phase of the RHIC Beam Energy Scan Program measured over a wide range of collision energy sqrt s{NN}=7.7-200 GeV, and transverse momentum of produced particle in different centralities at |eta|<0.5. The spectra demonstrate strong dependence on collision energy which enhances with pT. An indication of self-similarity of negative charged particle production in Au+Au collisions is found. The constituent energy loss as a function of energy and centrality of collisions and transverse momentum of inclusive particle was estimated in the $z$-scaling approach. The energy dependence of the model parameters - the fractal and fragmentation dimensions and "specific heat", was studied.

  10. Primary CR energy spectrum and mass composition by the data of Tunka-133 array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prosin V.V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Cherenkov light array for the registration of extensive air showers (EAS Tunka-133 collected data during 5 winter seasons from 2009 to 2014. The differential energy spectrum of all particles and the dependence of the average maximum depth on the energy in the range of 6 ⋅ 1015–1018 eV measured for 1540 hours of observation are presented.

  11. Design of 200 MeV energy spectrum analytic system of linac in NSRL

    CERN Document Server

    Lu Ping; Li We Imin; Xu Hong Liang; Liu Zu Ping; Pei Yuan Ji; Hong Jun; Wang Jun Hua; He Duo Hui

    2002-01-01

    Energy spectrum analytic system of 200 MeV linear accelerator in NSRL is used to detect the beam energy and to guild the machine adjustment. The author shows the former status of the system, and analyses some of its shortcomings. In the NSRL project-II, the system is redesigned, and has been installed recently. The author also describes the results of physics computation and some newest preliminary experiments

  12. Anisotropy and nonuniversality in scaling laws of the large-scale energy spectrum in rotating turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Amrik; Mininni, Pablo D; Rosenberg, Duane; Pouquet, Annick

    2012-09-01

    Rapidly rotating turbulent flow is characterized by the emergence of columnar structures that are representative of quasi-two-dimensional behavior of the flow. It is known that when energy is injected into the fluid at an intermediate scale Lf, it cascades towards smaller as well as larger scales. In this paper we analyze the flow in the inverse cascade range at a small but fixed Rossby number, Rof≈0.05. Several numerical simulations with helical and nonhelical forcing functions are considered in periodic boxes with unit aspect ratio. In order to resolve the inverse cascade range with reasonably large Reynolds number, the analysis is based on large eddy simulations which include the effect of helicity on eddy viscosity and eddy noise. Thus, we model the small scales and resolve explicitly the large scales. We show that the large-scale energy spectrum has at least two solutions: one that is consistent with Kolmogorov-Kraichnan-Batchelor-Leith phenomenology for the inverse cascade of energy in two-dimensional (2D) turbulence with a ∼k⊥-5/3 scaling, and the other that corresponds to a steeper ∼k⊥-3 spectrum in which the three-dimensional (3D) modes release a substantial fraction of their energy per unit time to the 2D modes. The spectrum that emerges depends on the anisotropy of the forcing function, the former solution prevailing for forcings in which more energy is injected into the 2D modes while the latter prevails for isotropic forcing. In the case of anisotropic forcing, whence the energy goes from the 2D to the 3D modes at low wave numbers, large-scale shear is created, resulting in a time scale τsh, associated with shear, thereby producing a ∼k-1 spectrum for the total energy with the horizontal energy of the 2D modes still following a ∼k⊥-5/3 scaling.

  13. Determination of the Spectral Index in the Fission Spectrum Energy Regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Amy Sarah [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-16

    Neutron reaction cross sections play a vital role in tracking the production and destruction of isotopes exposed to neutron fluence. They are central to the process of reconciling the initial and final atom inventories. Measurements of irradiated samples by radiochemical methods in tangent with an algorithm are used to evaluate the fluence a sample is exposed to over the course of the irradiation. This algorithm is the Isotope Production Code (IPC) created and used by the radiochemistry data assessment team at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). An integral result is calculated by varying the total neutron fluence seen by a sample. A sample, irradiated in a critical assembly, will be exposed to a unique neutron flux defined by the neutron source and distance of the sample from the source. Neutron cross sections utilized are a function of the hardness of the neutron spectrum at the location of irradiation. A spectral index is used an indicator of the hardness of the neutron spectrum. Cross sections fit forms applied in IPC are collapsed from a LANL 30-group energy structure. Several decades of research and development have been performed to formalize the current IPC cross section library. Basis of the current fission spectrum neutron reaction cross section library is rooted in critical assembly experiments performed from the 1950’s through the early 1970’s at LANL. The focus of this report is development of the spectral index used an indicator of the hardness of the neutron spectrum in the fission spectrum energy regime.

  14. Skeletal muscle responses to negative energy balance: effects of dietary protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, John W; McClung, James P; Pasiakos, Stefan M

    2012-03-01

    Sustained periods of negative energy balance decrease body mass due to losses of both fat and skeletal muscle mass. Decreases in skeletal muscle mass are associated with a myriad of negative consequences, including suppressed basal metabolic rate, decreased protein turnover, decreased physical performance, and increased risk of injury. Decreases in skeletal muscle mass in response to negative energy balance are due to imbalanced rates of muscle protein synthesis and degradation. However, the underlying physiological mechanisms contributing to the loss of skeletal muscle during energy deprivation are not well described. Recent studies have demonstrated that consuming dietary protein at levels above the current recommended dietary allowance (0.8 g · kg(-1) · d(-1)) may attenuate the loss of skeletal muscle mass by affecting the intracellular regulation of muscle anabolism and proteolysis. However, the specific mechanism by which increased dietary protein spares skeletal muscle through enhanced molecular control of muscle protein metabolism has not been elucidated. This article reviews the available literature related to the effects of negative energy balance on skeletal muscle mass, highlighting investigations that assessed the influence of varying levels of dietary protein on skeletal muscle protein metabolism. Further, the molecular mechanisms that may contribute to the regulation of skeletal muscle mass in response to negative energy balance and alterations in dietary protein level are described.

  15. Steady shocks around black holes produced by sub-keplerian flows with negative energy

    CERN Document Server

    Molteni, D; Teresi, V

    2006-01-01

    We discuss a special case of formation of axisymmetric shocks in the accretion flow of ideal gas onto a Schwarzschild black hole: when the total energy of the flow is negative. The result of our analysis enlarges the parameter space for which these steady shocks are exhibited in the accretion of gas rotating around relativistic stellar objects. Since keplerian disks have negative total energy, we guess that, in this energy range, the production of the shock phenomenon might be easier than in the case of positive energy. So our outcome reinforces the view that sub-keplerian flows of matter may significantly affect the physics of the high energy radiation emission from black hole candidates. We give a simple procedure to obtain analytically the position of the shocks. The comparison of the analytical results with the data of 1D and 2D axisymmetric numerical simulations confirms that the shocks form and are stable.

  16. Lorentz Invariance Violation and the Observed Spectrum of Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, S. T.; Stecker, F. W.

    2009-01-01

    There has been much interest in possible violations of Lorentz invariance, particularly motivated by quantum gravity theories. It has been suggested that a small amount of Lorentz invariance violation (LIV) could turn of photomeson interactions of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) with photons of the cosmic background radiation and thereby eliminate the resulting sharp steepening in the spectrum of the highest energy CRs predicted by Greisen Zatsepin and Kuzmin (GZK). Recent measurements of the UHECR spectrum reported by the HiRes and Auger collaborations, however, indicate the presence of the GZK effect. We present the results of a detailed calculation of the modification of the UHECR spectrum caused by LIV using the formalism of Coleman and Glashow. We then compare these results with the experimental UHECR data from Auger and HiRes. Based on these data, we find a best fit amount of LIV of 4.5+1:5 ..4:5 x 10(exp -23),consistent with an upper limit of 6 x 10(exp -23). This possible amount of LIV can lead to a recovery of the cosmic ray spectrum at higher energies than presently observed. Such an LIV recovery effect can be tested observationally using future detectors.

  17. The KASCADE-Grande experiment: measurements of the all-particle energy spectrum of cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Arteaga-Velázquez, J C; Bekk, K; Bertaina, M; Blümer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Buchholz, P; Cantoni, E; Chiavassa, A; Cossavella, F; Daumiller, K; de Souza, V; Di Pierro, F; Doll, P; Engel, R; Engler, J; Finger, M; Fuhrmann, D; Ghia, P L; Gils, H J; Glasstetter, R; Grupen, C; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hörandel, J R; Huege, T; Isar, P G; Kampert, K -H; Kickelbick, D; Klages, H O; Link, K; Luczak, P; Ludwig, M; Mathes, H J; Mayer, H J; Melissas, M; Milke, J; Mitrica, B; Morello, C; Navarra, G; Nehls, S; Oehlschläger, J; Ostapchenko, S; Over, S; Palmieri, N; Petcu, M; Pierog, T; Rebel, H; Roth, M; Schieler, H; Schröder, F; Sima, O; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Ulrich, H; Weindl, A; Wochele, J; Wommer, M; Zabierowski, J

    2010-01-01

    The all-particle energy spectrum as measured by the KASCADE-Grande experiment for E = 10^{16} - 10^{18} eV is presented within the framework of the QGSJET II/FLUKA hadronic interaction models. Three different methods were applied based on the muon size and the total number of charged particles individually and in combination. From the study it is found that the spectrum cannot be completely described by a smooth power law due to the presence of characteristic features.

  18. Measurement of the solar neutrino energy spectrum using neutrino-electron scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Fukuda, Y; Ichihara, E; Inoue, K; Ishihara, K; Ishino, H; Itow, Y; Kajita, T; Kameda, J; Kasuga, S; Kobayashi, K; Kobayashi, Y; Koshio, Y; Miura, M; Nakahata, M; Nakayama, S; Okada, A; Okumura, K; Sakurai, N; Shiozawa, M; Suzuki, Y; Takeuchi, Y; Totsuka, Y; Yamada, S; Earl, M; Habig, A; Kearns, E; Messier, M D; Scholberg, K; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Walter, C W; Goldhaber, M; Barszczak, T; Casper, D; Gajewski, W; Halverson, P G; Hsu, J; Kropp, W R; Price, R L; Reines, F; Smy, M B; Sobel, H W; Vagins, M R; Ganezer, K S; Keig, W E; Ellsworth, R W; Tasaka, S; Flanagan, J W; Kibayashi, A; Learned, J G; Matsuno, S; Stenger, V J; Takemori, D; Ishii, T; Kanzaki, J; Kobayashi, T; Mine, S; Nakamura, K; Nishikawa, K; Oyama, Y; Sakai, A; Sakuda, M; Sasaki, O; Echigo, S; Kohama, M; Suzuki, A T; Haines, T J; Blaufuss, E; Kim, B K; Sanford, R; Svoboda, R; Chen, M L; Conner, Z; Goodman, J A; Sullivan, G W; Hill, J; Jung, C K; Martens, K; Mauger, C; McGrew, C; Sharkey, E; Viren, B; Yanagisawa, C; Doki, W; Miyano, K; Okazawa, H; Saji, C; Takahata, M; Nagashima, Y; Takita, M; Yamaguchi, T; Yoshida, M; Kim, S B; Etoh, M; Fujita, K; Hasegawa, A; Hasegawa, T; Hatakeyama, S; Iwamoto, T; Koga, M; Maruyama, T; Ogawa, H; Shirai, J; Suzuki, A; Tsushima, F; Koshiba, M; Nemoto, M; Nishijima, K; Futagami, T; Hayato, Y; Kanaya, Y; Kaneyuki, K; Watanabe, Y; Kielczewska, D; Doyle, R A; George, J S; Stachyra, A L; Wai, L L; Wilkes, R J; Young, K K

    1999-01-01

    A measurement of the energy spectrum of recoil electrons from solar neutrino scattering in the Super--Kamiokande detector is presented. The results shown here are obtained from 504 days of data taken between the 31st of May, 1996 and the 25th of March, 1998. The shape of the measured spectrum is compared with the expectation for solar B8 neutrinos. The comparison takes into account both kinematic and detector related effects in the measurement process. The spectral shape comparison between the observation and the expectation gives a chi-square of 25.3 with 15 degrees of freedom, corresponding to a 4.6% confidence level.

  19. High-energy spectrum and zenith-angle distribution of atmospheric neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Sinegovsky, S I; Sinegovskaya, T S

    2011-01-01

    High-energy neutrinos, arising from decays of mesons produced through the collisions of cosmic ray particles with air nuclei, form the background in the astrophysical neutrino detection problem. An ambiguity in high-energy behavior of pion and especially kaon production cross sections for nucleon-nucleus collisions may affect essentially the calculated neutrino flux. We present results of the calculation of the energy spectrum and zenith-angle distribution of the muon and electron atmospheric neutrinos in the energy range 10 GeV to 10 PeV. The calculation was performed with usage of known hadronic models (QGSJET-II-03, SIBYLL 2.1, Kimel & Mokhov) for two of the primary spectrum parametrizations, by Gaisser & Honda and by Zatsepin & Sokolskaya. The comparison of the calculated muon neutrino spectrum with the IceCube40 experiment data make it clear that even at energies above 100 TeV the prompt neutrino contribution is not so apparent because of tangled uncertainties of the strange (kaons) and charm...

  20. Development of computer software for neutron energy spectrum adjustment in research reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iqbal Masood

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A computer program has been developed for neutron energy spectrum adjustment using the deconvolution method. The BUNKI-based algorithm has been implemented to converge quickly yielding calculated neutron energy spectrum which is in good agreement with theoretical predictions. The foil activation data have been used as an input for each unfolding technique and various activation foils including Au-197, Al-27, Ni-58, Co-59, and Mg-24 covering thermal to fast energy range have been utilized. The group cross-section values were derived from the data given in the pre-processed cross-section libraries in ENDF-6 format of IRDF-90/NMF-G. Firstly, virtual approach was used for neutron energy spectrum adjustment. In this case, the activity of foils before and after the adjustment was almost the same but the flux had the maximum error of 14%. Secondly, the experimental measured activity of the threshold foils was then used for a real system. The activity of the threshold foils before and after the neutron energy adjustment had the maximum error of 33%.

  1. Energy spectrum of the electrons accelerated by reconnection electric field: exponential or power-law?

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, W J; Ding, M D; Fang, C

    2008-01-01

    The direct current (DC) electric field near the reconnection region has been proposed as an effective mechanism to accelerate protons and electrons in solar flares. A power-law energy spectrum was generally claimed in the simulations of electron acceleration by the reconnection electric field. However, in most of the literature, the electric and magnetic fields were chosen independently. In this paper, we perform test particle simulations of electron acceleration in reconnecting magnetic field, where both the electric and magnetic fields are adopted from numerical simulations of the MHD equations. It is found that the accelerated electrons present a truncated power-law energy spectrum with an exponential tail at high energies, which is analogous to the case of diffusive shock acceleration. The influences of the reconnection parameters on the spectral feature are also investigated, such as the longitudinal and transverse components of the magnetic field and the size of the current sheet. It is suggested that t...

  2. The end of the galactic cosmic-ray energy spectrum - a phenomenological view

    CERN Document Server

    Hörandel, J R; Timokhin, A V; Hoerandel, Joerg R.

    2005-01-01

    Two structures in the all-particle energy spectrum of cosmic rays, the knee at 4 PeV and the second knee around 400 PeV are proposed to be explained by a phenomenological model, the poly gonato model, connecting direct and indirect measurements. Within this approach the knee is caused by a successive cut-off of the flux for individual elements starting with protons at 4.5 PeV. The second knee is interpreted as the end of the stable nuclei of the periodic table. To check some key features of this model calculations of the cosmic ray energy spectrum and the propagation path length at energies from 10^14 to 10^19 eV have been performed within the framework of a combined approach based on the diffusion model of cosmic rays and a direct simulation of charged-particle trajectories in the Galaxy.

  3. Measurements of the spectrum and energy dependence of X-ray transition radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, M. L.

    1978-01-01

    The results of experiments designed to test the theory of X-ray transition radiation and to verify the predicted dependence of the characteristic features of the radiation on the radiator dimensions are presented. The X-ray frequency spectrum produced by 5- to 9-GeV electrons over the range 4 to 30 keV was measured with a calibrated single-crystal Bragg spectrometer, and at frequencies up to 100 keV with an NaI scintillator. The interference pattern in the spectrum and the hardening of the radiation with increasing foil thickness are clearly observed. The energy dependence of the total transition-radiation intensity was studied using a radiator with large dimensions designed to yield energy-dependent signals at very high particle energies, up to E/mc-squared approximately equal to 100,000. The results are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  4. Integration of Semiconducting Sulfides for Full-Spectrum Solar Energy Absorption and Efficient Charge Separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Tao-Tao; Liu, Yan; Li, Yi; Zhao, Yuan; Wu, Liang; Jiang, Jun; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2016-05-23

    The full harvest of solar energy by semiconductors requires a material that simultaneously absorbs across the whole solar spectrum and collects photogenerated electrons and holes separately. The stepwise integration of three semiconducting sulfides, namely ZnS, CdS, and Cu2-x S, into a single nanocrystal, led to a unique ternary multi-node sheath ZnS-CdS-Cu2-x S heteronanorod for full-spectrum solar energy absorption. Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) in the nonstoichiometric copper sulfide nanostructures enables effective NIR absorption. More significantly, the construction of pn heterojunctions between Cu2-x S and CdS leads to staggered gaps, as confirmed by first-principles simulations. This band alignment causes effective electron-hole separation in the ternary system and hence enables efficient solar energy conversion.

  5. Negative refraction and energy funneling by hyperbolic materials: An experimental demonstration in acoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    García-Chocano, Victor M.; Christensen, Johan; Sánchez-Dehesa, José

    2014-01-01

    This Letter reports the design, fabrication, and experimental characterization of hyperbolic materials showing negative refraction and energy funneling of airborne sound. Negative refraction is demonstrated using a stack of five holey Plexiglas plates where their thicknesses, layer separation, hole....... Our demonstrations foresee interesting developments based on both phenomena. Acoustic imaging with subwavelength resolution and spot-size converters that harvest and squeeze sound waves irradiating from many directions into a collimated beam are just two possible applications among many....

  6. Consequences of inadequate food energy and negative energy balance in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurpad, A V; Muthayya, S; Vaz, M

    2005-10-01

    Energy deficiency is probably best measured in adults by the body mass index (BMI). Acute energy deficiency (AED) is associated with body weight loss, along with changes in body composition, as well as a reduced BMR and physical activity. Chronic energy deficiency (CED) is an inadequacy in food to which individuals adapt, at some cost. Individuals with this have never 'lost' weight: they have simply grown less. They adapt to the decreased food energy by reductions in their total energy expenditure (TEE), linked mainly to a lower body size, and to their physical activity. It seems unlikely that enhanced metabolic efficiency contributes substantially to energy saving in CED. Supplementation of energy deficient individuals is accompanied by significant fat deposition; this may have deleterious consequences. Women in many developing countries achieve a successful outcome to pregnancy in spite of being chronically undernourished. Reductions in basal metabolism and behavioural changes in the form of diminished physical activity could meet most of the extra energy needed for pregnancy. Milk energy output is maintained within the expected range in undernourished lactating mothers. Energy deficiency in children is best measured by height-for-age for stunting, and weight-for-height for wasting. Deficits in behavioural and functional parameters in children exist with undernutrition, and can be reduced by early nutritional supplementation along with the appropriate environment.

  7. “UROPATHOGENS”: PREVALENCE AND ANTIBIOGRAM OF GRAM NEGATIVE BACILLI WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO EXTEN DED SPECTRUM BETA LACTAMASE PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandana

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: This study was performed on culture and sensitivit y of 6,951 urine samples, received in the Department of Microbiology, Christia n Medical College & Hospital, Ludhiana from out patients and in patients having urinary tra ct infection (UTI .A total of 2,276 samples were found out to be culture positive, out of which 1,727 samples yielded gram negative organisms. Various isolates included 1,237 Escheric hia coli (E. coli, 262 Klebsiella pneumoniae,47 Acinetobacter lwoffi, 39 Proteus mirab ilis,39 Enterobacter aerogenes and 03 Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Extended spectrum beta lacta mase (ESBL production was studied in multidrug resistant E. coli. And Klebsiella pneumoni ae, out of which 28.29% E.coli and 30.53% Klebsiella pneumoniae yielded positive results. Our r esults suggest that the physician should be aware of high prevalence of ESBL producing E.coli and Klebsiella pneumonia which are the two common uropathogens, and should plan their therapy re gime accordingly. However, Acinetobacter species were mainly associate d with nosocomial UTI whereas Enterobacter species were isolated mostly from out pa tients. Various uropathogens causing community acquired as well as nosocomial UTI showed poor response to cephalexin whereas resistant strains from both types of UTI exhibited g ood susceptibility to piperacillin/tazobactum combination.

  8. Improved Measurement of the Branching Fraction and Energy Spectrum of eta' from Upsilon(1S) Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Aquines, O; Adams, G S; Alexander, J P; Anderson, M; Aquines, O; Artuso, M; Asner, D M; Athar, S B; Berkelman, K; Besson, D; Blusk, S; Bonvicini, G; Briere, R A; Brock, I; Butt, J; Cassel, D G; Cawlfield, C; Chen, J; Cinabro, D; Coan, T E; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Csorna, S E; Cummings, J P; Danko, I; Dobbs, S; Duboscq, J E; Dubrovin, M; Dytman, S A; Ecklund, K M; Edwards, K W; Ehrlich, R; Eisenstein, B I; Ernst, J; Ferguson, T; Fields, L; Galik, R S; Gao, K Y; Gao, Y S; Gibbons, L; Gong, D T; Gray, R; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; He, Q; Heltsley, B K; Hertz, D; Hietala, J; Huang, G S; Insler, J; Jones, C D; Kandaswamy, J; Karliner, I; Kim, D; Klein, T; Kreinick, D L; Kubota, Y; Kuznetsov, V E; Lang, B W; Li, J; Li, Z; Lincoln, A; Liu, F; Love, W; Lowrey, N; López, A; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Mehrabyan, S S; Menaa, N; Metreveli, Z V; Miller, D H; Mountain, R; Muramatsu, H; Méndez, H; Naik, P; Napolitano, J; Nisar, S; Onyisi, P U E; Park, C S; Patel, R; Patterson, J R; Pavlunin, V; Pedlar, T K; Peterson, D; Pivarski, J; Poling, R; Potlia, V; Ramírez, J; Randrianarivony, K; Redjimi, R; Riley, D; Rosner, J L; Rubin, P; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Sanghi, B; Savinov, V; Schwarthoff, H; Scott, A W; Sedlack, C; Selen, M; Seth, K K; Severini, H; Shepherd, M R; Shi, X; Shipsey, I P J; Sia, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, A; Stone, S; Stroiney, S; Sun, W M; Tatishvili, G T; Thorndike, E H; Tomaradze, A G; Vogel, H; Wang, J C; Watkins, M E; Weinberger, M; White, E J; Wilksen, T; Wiss, J; Xin, B; Yang, F; Yelton, J; Zhang, K; Zweber, P; al, et

    2006-01-01

    We present an improved measurement of the eta' meson energy spectrum in Upsilon(1S) decays, using 1.2 fb^{-1} of data taken at the Upsilon(1S) center-of-mass energy with the CLEO III detector. We compare our results with models of the eta' gluonic form factor that have been suggested to explain the unexpectedly large B to eta' X_s rate. Models based on perturbative QCD fail to fit the data for large eta' energies, and thus an explanation outside the realm of the Standard Model or an improved understanding of non-perturbative QCD effects may be needed to account for this large rate.

  9. The Cosmic Ray Energy Spectrum and Related Measurements with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abraham, : J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Ahn, E.J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.

    2009-06-01

    These are presentations to be presented at the 31st International Cosmic Ray Conference, in Lodz, Poland during July 2009. It consists of the following presentations: (1) Measurement of the cosmic ray energy spectrum above 10{sup 18} eV with the Pierre Auger Observatory; (2) The cosmic ray flux observed at zenith angles larger than 60 degrees with the Pierre Auger Observatory; (3) Energy calibration of data recorded with the surface detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory; (4) Exposure of the Hybrid Detector of The Pierre Auger Observatory; and (5) Energy scale derived from Fluorescence Telescopes using Cherenkov Light and Shower Universality.

  10. Contribution from individual nearby sources to the spectrum of high-energy cosmic-ray electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedrati, R., E-mail: rafik.sedrati@univ-annaba.org; Attallah, R.

    2014-04-01

    In the last few years, very important data on high-energy cosmic-ray electrons and positrons from high-precision space-born and ground-based experiments have attracted a great deal of interest. These particles represent a unique probe for studying local comic-ray accelerators because they lose energy very rapidly. These energy losses reduce the lifetime so drastically that high-energy cosmic-ray electrons can attain the Earth only from rather local astrophysical sources. This work aims at calculating, by means of Monte Carlo simulation, the contribution from some known nearby astrophysical sources to the cosmic-ray electron/positron spectra at high energy (≥10GeV). The background to the electron energy spectrum from distant sources is determined with the help of the GALPROP code. The obtained numerical results are compared with a set of experimental data.

  11. The Energy Spectrum and the Chemical Composition of Primary Cosmic Rays with Energies from 1014 to 1016 eV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogio, S.; Kakimoto, F.; Kurashina, Y.; Burgoa, O.; Harada, D.; Tokuno, H.; Yoshii, H.; Morizawa, A.; Gotoh, E.; Nakatani, H.; Nishi, K.; Shimoda, S.; Tajima, N.; Yamada, Y.; Kaneko, T.; Murakami, K.; Toyoda, Y.; Matsubara, Y.; Mizumoto, Y.; Shirasaki, Y.; Tsunesada, Y.; Miranda, P.; Velarde, A.

    2004-09-01

    We have measured extensive air showers with primary energies above 6 TeV at Mount Chacaltaya in Bolivia. The data were collected by an air shower array called the Minimum Air Shower (MAS) array starting in 2000 March. We applied an equi-intensity analysis method to the extensive air showers extended over the region of their maximum development. We varied the mixture of protons and iron in our simulations and compared these to the data to determine the mixing ratio of protons as a function of the primary energy. Using this, we derived the primary energy spectrum from 1014 to 5×1016 eV. Consequently, we conclude that the power-law index of the spectrum changes gradually around 1015.5 eV and that the obtained proton ratio decreases with increasing energy. We directly measured the longitudinal development of air showers generated by primaries with energies around the knee. We found that the average mass number of primary cosmic rays shows a steady increase with energy above 1014.5 eV and that the dominant component around the knee is not protons.

  12. Time-dependent density functional study of the electronic potential energy curves and excitation spectrum of the oxygen molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Jingang; Wang, Fan; Ziegler, Tom; Cox, Hazel

    2006-07-28

    Orbital energies, ionization potentials, molecular constants, potential energy curves, and the excitation spectrum of O(2) are calculated using time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) with Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA). The calculated negative highest occupied molecular orbital energy (-epsilon(HOMO)) is compared with the energy difference ionization potential for five exchange correlation functionals consisting of the local density approximation (LDAxc), gradient corrected Becke exchange plus Perdew correlation (B(88X)+P(86C)), gradient regulated asymptotic correction (GRAC), statistical average of orbital potentials (SAOP), and van Leeuwen and Baerends asymptotically correct potential (LB94). The potential energy curves calculated using TDDFT with the TDA at internuclear distances from 1.0 to 1.8 A are divided into three groups according to the electron configurations. The 1pi(u) (4)1pi(g) (2) electron configuration gives rise to the X (3)Sigma(g) (-), a (1)Delta(g), and b (1)Sigma(g) (+) states; the 1pi(u) (3)1pi(g) (3) electron configuration gives rise to the c (1)Sigma(u) (-), C (3)Delta(u), and A (3)Sigma(u) (+) states; and the B (3)Sigma(u) (-), A (1)Delta(u), and f (1)Sigma(u) (+) states are determined by the mixing of two or more electron configurations. The excitation spectrum of the oxygen molecule, calculated with the aforementioned exchange correlation functionals, shows that the results are quite sensitive to the choice of functional. The LDAxc and the B(88X)+P(86C) functionals produce similar spectroscopic patterns with a single strongly absorbing band positioned at 19.82 and 19.72 eV, respectively, while the asymptotically corrected exchange correlation functionals of the SAOP and the LB94 varieties yield similar excitation spectra where the computed strongly absorbing band is located at 16.09 and 16.42 eV, respectively. However, all of the exchange correlation functionals yield only one strongly absorbing band (oscillator strength

  13. Energy spectrum of cosmic ray protons and helium nuclei measured by the ARGO-YBJ experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mari, S.M. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica - Università degli Studi Roma TRE, via della Vasca Navale 84, 00146 Roma (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Sezione di Roma TRE, via della Vasca Navale 84, 00146 Roma (Italy); Montini, P., E-mail: paolo.montini@roma3.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Sezione di Roma TRE, via della Vasca Navale 84, 00146 Roma (Italy)

    2014-04-01

    The ARGO-YBJ experiment is a full-coverage air shower detector operating at the Yangbajing International Cosmic Ray Observatory (Tibet, PR China, 4300 m a.s.l.). The detector was in stable data taking in its full configuration from November 2007 to February 2013. More than 5×10{sup 11} events have been collected and reconstructed. Due to its characteristics (full-coverage, high segmentation, high altitude operation) the ARGO-YBJ experiment is able to investigate the cosmic ray energy spectrum in a wide energy range and offer the possibility of measuring the cosmic ray light component spectrum down to the TeV region, where direct balloon-borne measurements are available. In this work we present the measurement of the proton and helium spectra in the energy range 1–300 TeV by using a large data sample collected between January 2008 and December 2011. - Highlights: • We have measured the light component spectrum of cosmic rays. • The measurement has been performed by the full coverage high altitude ARGO-YBJ experiment. • The measurement covers the energy range 1–300 TeV where direct measurements are available.

  14. All-particle cosmic ray energy spectrum measured with 26 IceTop stations

    CERN Document Server

    Abbasi, R; Abu-Zayyad, T; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Altmann, D; Andeen, K; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Bay, R; Alba, J L Bazo; Beattie, K; Beatty, J J; Bechet, S; Becker, J K; Becker, K -H; Bell, M; Benabderrahmane, M L; BenZvi, S; Berdermann, J; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Brayeur, L; Brown, A M; Buitink, S; Caballero-Mora, K S; Carson, M; Casier, M; Chirkin, D; Christy, B; Clevermann, F; Cohen, S; Cowen, D F; Silva, A H Cruz; D'Agostino, M V; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; De Clercq, C; Degner, T; Descamps, F; Desiati, P; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dreyer, J; Dumm, J P; Dunkman, M; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Engdegård, O; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Franckowiak, A; Franke, R; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Goodman, J A; Góra, D; Grant, D; Groß, A; Grullon, S; Gurtner, M; Ha, C; Ismail, A Haj; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Han, K; Hanson, K; Heimann, P; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, B; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huelsnitz, W; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Johansson, H; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kiryluk, J; Kislat, F; Klein, S R; Klepser, S; Köhne, J -H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Köpke, L; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Krasberg, M; Kroll, G; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Laihem, K; Landsman, H; Larson, M J; Lauer, R; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; Meagher, K; Merck, M; Mészáros, P; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Movit, S M; Nahnhauer, R; Nam, J W; Naumann, U; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Olivo, M; O'Murchadha, A; Panknin, S; Paul, L; Heros, C Pérez de los; Pieloth, D; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Richman, M; Riedel, B; Rodrigues, J P; Rothmaier, F; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Rutledge, D; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Sander, H -G; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Scheel, M; Schmidt, T; Schöneberg, S; Schönwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schulte, L; Schultes, A; Schulz, O; Schunck, M; Seckel, D; Semburg, B; Seo, S H; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Silvestri, A; Smith, M W E; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stößl, A; Strahler, E A; Ström, R; Stüer, M; Sullivan, G W; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Toscano, S; Tosi, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Van Overloop, A; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Walck, C; Waldenmaier, T; Wallraff, M; Walter, M; Wasserman, R; Weaver, Ch; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whitehorn, N; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wischnewski, R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, C; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Zoll, M

    2012-01-01

    We report on a measurement of the cosmic ray energy spectrum with the IceTop air shower array, the surface component of the IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the South Pole. The data used in this analysis were taken between June and October, 2007, with 26 surface stations operational at that time, corresponding to about one third of the final array. The fiducial area used in this analysis was 0.122 km^2. The analysis investigated the energy spectrum from 1 to 100 PeV measured for three different zenith angle ranges between 0{\\deg} and 46{\\deg}. Because of the isotropy of cosmic rays in this energy range the spectra from all zenith angle intervals have to agree. The cosmic-ray energy spectrum was determined under different assumptions on the primary mass composition. Good agreement of spectra in the three zenith angle ranges was found for the assumption of pure proton and a simple two-component model. For zenith angles {\\theta} < 30{\\deg}, where the mass dependence is smallest, the knee in the cosmic ray ener...

  15. Ion irradiation-induced structure damage to botanic samples using the ion transmission energy spectrum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In order to study the mechanism of irradiation-induced damage ofbotanic samples caused by low energy heavy ions, transmission energy spectrum mea-surement was performed. Kidney bean slice samples 100μm in thickness were irradi-ated by 50 kev N+ ions. The irradiation beam current density was about 30μA/cm2,and the irradiation ion doses were 1×1015, 1×1016, 3×1016 and 1×1017 ions@cm-2,respectively. A target set up that could greatly reduce the incident ion current densitywas designed to achieve the damage-free measurement. The 3.2 MeV H+ transmittedion energy spectrum measurement was carried out before and after the irradiation.From the transmission ion energy spectrum, it was found that the kidney bean sliceitself was structurally inhomogeneous compared with the PET films (C10HsO4). Ourresults indicated that the average mass thickness changed little when the N+ iondose was below 3×1016 ions.cm-2, but changed obviously whcn ion dose was beyond3×1016 ions.cm-2.

  16. Thermal-to-electrical energy conversion by diodes under negative illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhanam, Parthiban; Fan, Shanhui

    2016-04-01

    We consider an infrared photodiode under negative illumination, wherein the photodiode is maintained at a temperature T and radiatively exposed to an emissive body colder than itself. We experimentally demonstrate that a diode under such conditions can generate electrical power. We show theoretically that the efficiency of energy conversion can approach the Carnot limit. This work is applicable to waste heat recovery as well as emerging efforts to utilize the cold dark universe as a thermodynamic resource for renewable energy.

  17. For Noble Gases, Energy is Positive for the Gas Phase, Negative for the Liquid Phase

    CERN Document Server

    Asanuma, Nobu-Hiko

    2016-01-01

    We found from experimental data that for noble gases and H$_2$, the energy is positive for the gas phase, and negative for the liquid, possibly except the small vicinity of the critical point, about $(1- T/T_c) \\le 0.005$. The line $E=E_c$, in the supercritical region is found to lie close to the Widom line, where $E_c$ is the critical energy.

  18. Neutron energy spectrum influence on irradiation hardening and microstructural development of tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Makoto; Kiran Kumar, N. A. P.; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Garrison, Lauren M.; Snead, Lance L.; Katoh, Yutai; Hasegawa, Akira

    2016-10-01

    Neutron irradiation to single crystal pure tungsten was performed in the mixed spectrum High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). To investigate the influences of neutron energy spectrum, the microstructure and irradiation hardening were compared with previous data obtained from the irradiation campaigns in the mixed spectrum Japan Material Testing Reactor (JMTR) and the sodium-cooled fast reactor Joyo. The irradiation temperatures were in the range of ∼90-∼800 °C and fast neutron fluences were 0.02-9.00 × 1025 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV). Post irradiation evaluation included Vickers hardness measurements and transmission electron microscopy. The hardness and microstructure changes exhibited a clear dependence on the neutron energy spectrum. The hardness appeared to increase with increasing thermal neutron flux when fast fluence exceeds 1 × 1025 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV). Irradiation induced precipitates considered to be χ- and σ-phases were observed in samples irradiated to >1 × 1025 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV), which were pronounced at high dose and due to the very high thermal neutron flux of HFIR. Although the irradiation hardening mainly caused by defects clusters in a low dose regime, the transmutation-induced precipitation appeared to impose additional significant hardening of the tungsten.

  19. Paranoid delusions in schizophrenia spectrum disorders and depression: the transdiagnostic role of expectations of negative events and negative self-esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentall, Richard P; Rowse, Georgina; Rouse, Georgina; Kinderman, Peter; Blackwood, Nigel; Howard, Rob; Moore, Rosie; Cummins, Sinead; Corcoran, Rhiannon

    2008-05-01

    We aimed to identify transdiagnostic psychological processes associated with persecutory delusions. Sixty-eight schizophrenia patients, 47 depressed patients, and 33 controls were assessed for paranoia, positive and negative self-esteem, estimations of the frequency of negative, neutral, and positive events occurring to the self in the past and in the future and similar estimates for events affecting others in the future. Negative self-esteem and expectations of negative events were strongly associated with paranoia in all groups. Currently deluded patients were asked to rate whether their persecution was deserved on an analogue scale. Mean deservedness scores were higher in deluded-depressed patients than deluded-schizophrenia patients, but patients in both groups used the full range of scores. The findings indicate that negative self-esteem and negative expectations independently contribute to paranoia, but do not support a simple categorical distinction between poor-me (persecution undeserved) and bad-me (persecution deserved) patients.

  20. The knee in the cosmic ray energy spectrum from the simultaneous EAS charged particles and muon density spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijay, Biplab; Banik, Prabir; Bhadra, Arunava

    2016-09-01

    In this work we examine with the help of Monte Carlo simulation whether a consistent primary energy spectrum of cosmic rays emerges from both the experimentally observed total charged particles and muon size spectra of cosmic ray extensive air showers considering primary composition may or may not change beyond the knee of the energy spectrum. It is found that EAS-TOP observations consistently infer a knee in the primary energy spectrum provided the primary is pure unchanging iron whereas no consistent primary spectrum emerges from simultaneous use of the KASCADE observed total charged particle and muon spectra. However, it is also found that when primary composition changes across the knee the estimation of spectral index of total charged particle spectrum is quite tricky, depends on the choice of selection of points near the knee in the size spectrum.

  1. The knee in the cosmic ray energy spectrum from the simultaneous EAS charged particles and muon density spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Bijay, Biplab; Bhadra, Arunava

    2015-01-01

    In this work we examine with the help of Monte Carlo simulation whether a consistent primary energy spectrum of cosmic rays emerges from both the experimentally observed total charged particles and muon size spectra of cosmic ray extensive air showers considering primary composition may or may not change beyond the knee of the energy spectrum. It is found that EAS-TOP observations consistently infer a knee in the primary energy spectrum provided the primary is pure unchanging iron whereas no consistent primary spectrum emerges from simultaneous use of the KASCADE observed total charged particle and muon spectra. However, it is also found that when primary composition changes across the knee the estimation of spectral index of total charged particle spectrum is quite tricky, depends on the choice of selection of points near the knee in the size spectrum.

  2. Method to deduce the energy spectrum by the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maris, I.; Roth, M.; Schmidt, T.; Schuessler, F.; Unger, M. [Univ. Karlsruhe (Germany); Bluemer, J. [Univ. Karlsruhe (Germany); Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Taken into account the great advantage of having a hybrid detector it has been developed a method, simulation independent, to determine the energy of the comic rays recorded by the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory. The method assumes that the cosmic ray flux has the same distribution in zenith angle for all energy ranges. Therefore one can relate the calorimetric measurement of the fluorescence detector of the CR energy with a SD quantity, e.g. shower size at 1000m distance from the core, corrected for the different attenuations in the atmosphere. The method of measuring and calibrating the primary energy and the influence of reconstruction uncertainties on the energy spectrum are presented. (orig.)

  3. Loop Quantum Gravity Effects on the High Energy Cosmic Ray Spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Alfaro, J; Alfaro, Jorge; Palma, Gonzalo A.

    2005-01-01

    Recent observations on ultra high energy cosmic rays (those cosmic rays with energies greater than $\\sim 4 \\times 10^{18}$ eV) suggest an abundant flux of incoming particles with energies above $1 \\times 10^{20}$ eV. These observations violate the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin cutoff. To explain this anomaly we argue that quantum-gravitational effects may be playing a decisive role in the propagation of ultra high energy cosmic rays. We consider the loop quantum gravity approach and provide useful techniques to establish and analyze constraints on the loop quantum gravity parameters arising from observational data. In particular, we study the effects on the predicted spectrum for ultra high energy cosmic rays and conclude that is possible to reconcile observations.

  4. Energy Efficient Cooperative Spectrum Sensing in Cognitive Radio Networks Using Distributed Dynamic Load Balanced Clustering Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthukkumar R.

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive Radio (CR is a promising and potential technique to enable secondary users (SUs or unlicenced users to exploit the unused spectrum resources effectively possessed by primary users (PUs or licenced users. The proven clustering approach is used to organize nodes in the network into the logical groups to attain energy efficiency, network scalability, and stability for improving the sensing accuracy in CR through cooperative spectrum sensing (CSS. In this paper, a distributed dynamic load balanced clustering (DDLBC algorithm is proposed. In this algorithm, each member in the cluster is to calculate the cooperative gain, residual energy, distance, and sensing cost from the neighboring clusters to perform the optimal decision. Each member in a cluster participates in selecting a cluster head (CH through cooperative gain, and residual energy that minimises network energy consumption and enhances the channel sensing. First, we form the number of clusters using the Markov decision process (MDP model to reduce the energy consumption in a network. In this algorithm, CR users effectively utilize the PUs reporting time slots of unavailability. The simulation results reveal that the clusters convergence, energy efficiency, and accuracy of channel sensing increased considerably by using the proposed algorithm.

  5. A quantum algorithm for obtaining the energy spectrum of a physical system without guessing its eigenstates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hefeng

    2014-08-14

    We present a quantum algorithm that provides a general approach for obtaining the energy spectrum of a physical system without making a guess on its eigenstates. In this algorithm, a probe qubit is coupled to a quantum register R which consists of one ancilla qubit and an n-qubit register that represents the system. R is prepared in a general reference state, and a general excitation operator that acts on R is constructed. The probe exhibits a dynamical response only when it is resonant with a transition from the reference state to an excited state of R which contains the eigenstates of the system. By varying the probe's frequency, the energy spectrum and the eigenstates of the system can be obtained.

  6. Calculation of Energy Spectrum of 12C Isotope by Relativistic Cluster model

    CERN Document Server

    Roshanbakht, Nafiseh

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we have calculated the energy spectrum of 12C isotope by cluster model. The experimental results show that the "Hoyle" state at 7.65 MeV in 12C isotope has a well-developed three-alpha structure. Hence, we select a three-body system and for interaction between the clusters we use modified Yukawa potential plus coulomb potential. Then, we solve the relativistic Klein-Gordon equation using Nikiforov-Uvarov method to calculate the energy spectrum. Finally, the calculated results are compared with the experimental data. The results show that the isotope 12C should be considered as consisting of three-alpha cluster and the modified Yukawa potential is adaptable for cluster interactions.

  7. Calculation of energy spectrum of $^{12}$C isotope with modified Yukawa potential by cluster models

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MOHAMMAD REZA SHOJAE; NAFISEH ROSHAN BAKHT

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we have calculated the energy spectrum of 12C isotope in two-cluster models, $3\\alpha$ cluster model and $^8$Be + $\\alpha$ cluster model. We use the modified Yukawa potential for interaction between theclusters and solve the Schrödinger equation using Nikiforov–Uvarov method to calculate the energy spectrum. Then, we increase the accuracy by adding spin-orbit coupling and tensor force and solve them by perturbationtheory in both models. Finally, the calculated results for both models are compared with each other and with the experimental data. The results show that the isotope $^{12}$C should be considered as a three-$\\alpha$ cluster and themodified Yukawa potential is adaptable for cluster interactions.

  8. Microstructural evolution of pure tungsten neutron irradiated with a mixed energy spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyanagi, Takaaki; Kumar, N. A. P. Kiran; Hwang, Taehyun; Garrison, Lauren M.; Hu, Xunxiang; Snead, Lance L.; Katoh, Yutai

    2017-07-01

    Microstructures of single-crystal bulk tungsten (W) and polycrystalline W foil with a strong grain texture were investigated using transmission electron microscopy following neutron irradiation at ∼90-800 °C to 0.03-4.6 displacements per atom (dpa) in the High Flux Isotope Reactor with a mixed energy spectrum. The dominant irradiation defects were dislocation loops and small clusters at ∼90 °C. Additional voids were formed in W irradiated at above 460 °C. Voids and precipitates involving transmutation rhenium and osmium were the dominant defects at more than ∼1 dpa. We found a new phenomenon of microstructural evolution in irradiated polycrystalline W: Re- and Os-rich precipitation along grain boundaries. Comparison of results between this study and previous studies using different irradiation facilities revealed that the microstructural evolution of pure W is highly dependent on the neutron energy spectrum in addition to the irradiation temperature and dose.

  9. The energy spectrum of Forbush decreases during the growth phase of solar cycle 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoryev, V. G.; Starodubtsev, S. A.; Isakov, D. D.

    2014-05-01

    The Forbush decrease energy spectrum, observed during the growth phase of cycle 24 in 2010-2012, was studied based on the measurements performed with the Kuzmin cosmic ray spectrograph. The data of the 24-NM-64 neutron monitor and muon telescopes, installed at water equivalent levels of 0, 7, 20, and 40 m, was used. The performed analysis indicated that a softer energy spectrum was observed during the growth phase of cycle 24 than during the previous cycle (cycle 23). The conclusion was been drawn that a more turbulent magnetic field with the predominant diffusion mechanism in the formation of the Forbush decreases in the cosmic ray intensity exists in the current cycle (cycle 24).

  10. Measurement of the cosmic ray energy spectrum with IceTop-73

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2013-01-01

    We report on the measurement of the all-particle cosmic ray energy spectrum with the IceTop air shower array in the energy range from 1.58 PeV to 1.26 EeV. The IceTop air shower array is the surface component of the IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the geographical South Pole. The analysis was performed using only information from IceTop. The data used in this work were taken from June 1, 2010 to May 13, 2011. During that period the IceTop array consisted of 73 stations compared to 81 in its final configuration. The measured spectrum exhibits a clear deviation from a single power law above the knee around 4PeV and below 1EeV. We observe spectral hardening around 18 PeV and steepening around 130 PeV.

  11. Measurement of the cosmic ray energy spectrum with IceTop-73

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aartsen, M. G.; Abbasi, R.; Abdou, Y.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Altmann, D.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Baker, M.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Bechet, S.; Becker Tjus, J.; Becker, K.-H.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; BenZvi, S.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bernhard, A.; Bertrand, D.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blumenthal, J.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohaichuk, S.; Bohm, C.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Brayeur, L.; Bretz, H.-P.; Brown, A. M.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Carson, M.; Casey, J.; Casier, M.; Chirkin, D.; Christov, A.; Christy, B.; Clark, K.; Clevermann, F.; Coenders, S.; Cohen, S.; Cowen, D. F.; Cruz Silva, A. H.; Danninger, M.; Daughhetee, J.; Davis, J. C.; De Clercq, C.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dunkman, M.; Eagan, R.; Eberhardt, B.; Eisch, J.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fadiran, O.; Fazely, A. R.; Fedynitch, A.; Feintzeig, J.; Feusels, T.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fischer-Wasels, T.; Flis, S.; Franckowiak, A.; Frantzen, K.; Fuchs, T.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Gladstone, L.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Golup, G.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Goodman, J. A.; Góra, D.; Grandmont, D. T.; Grant, D.; Groß, A.; Ha, C.; Haj Ismail, A.; Hallen, P.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Heereman, D.; Heinen, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Hickford, S.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; Hussain, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Jacobsen, J.; Jagielski, K.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jero, K.; Jlelati, O.; Kaminsky, B.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kiryluk, J.; Kläs, J.; Klein, S. R.; Köhne, J.-H.; Kohnen, G.; Kolanoski, H.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krasberg, M.; Krings, K.; Kroll, G.; Kunnen, J.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Landsman, H.; Larson, M. J.; Lesiak-Bzdak, M.; Leuermann, M.; Leute, J.; Lünemann, J.; Macíias, O.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Merck, M.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Middell, E.; Milke, N.; Miller, J.; Mohrmann, L.; Montaruli, T.; Morse, R.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naumann, U.; Niederhausen, H.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Obertacke, A.; Odrowski, S.; Olivas, A.; Omairat, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; Paul, L.; Pepper, J. A.; Pérez de los Heros, C.; Pfendner, C.; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Rädel, L.; Rameez, M.; Rawlins, K.; Redl, P.; Reimann, R.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Richman, M.; Riedel, B.; Rodrigues, J. P.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ruzybayev, B.; Ryckbosch, D.; Saba, S. M.; Salameh, T.; Sander, H.-G.; Santander, M.; Sarkar, S.; Schatto, K.; Scheriau, F.; Schmidt, T.; Schmitz, M.; Schoenen, S.; Schöneberg, S.; Schönwald, A.; Schukraft, A.; Schulte, L.; Schulz, O.; Seckel, D.; Sestayo, Y.; Seunarine, S.; Shanidze, R.; Sheremata, C.; Smith, M. W. E.; Soldin, D.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stasik, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Strahler, E. A.; Ström, R.; Sullivan, G. W.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Tamburro, A.; Tepe, A.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Tešić, G.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Toscano, S.; Unger, E.; Usner, M.; Vallecorsa, S.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Van Overloop, A.; van Santen, J.; Vehring, M.; Voge, M.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Waldenmaier, T.; Wallraff, M.; Weaver, Ch.; Wellons, M.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whitehorn, N.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Williams, D. R.; Wissing, H.; Wolf, M.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, C.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Ziemann, J.; Zierke, S.; Zoll, M.

    2013-08-01

    We report on the measurement of the all-particle cosmic ray energy spectrum with the IceTop air shower array in the energy range from 1.58 PeV to 1.26 EeV. The IceTop air shower array is the surface component of the IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the geographical South Pole. The analysis was performed using only information from IceTop. The data used in this work were taken from June 1, 2010 to May 13, 2011. During that period the IceTop array consisted of 73 stations, compared to 81 in its final configuration. The measured spectrum exhibits a clear deviation from a single power law above the knee around 4 PeV and below 1 EeV. We observe spectral hardening around 18 PeV and steepening around 130 PeV.

  12. Ion collector design for an energy recovery test proposal with the negative ion source NIO1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Variale, V., E-mail: vincenzo.variale@ba.infn.it [INFN-BA, Via Orabona 4, I-70125 Bari (Italy); Cavenago, M. [INFN – LNL, viale dell’Università 2, I-35020 Legnaro (PD) (Italy); Agostinetti, P.; Sonato, P.; Zanotto, L. [Consorzio RFX, Corso Stati Uniti 4, I-35127 Padova (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    Commercial viability of thermonuclear fusion power plants depends also on minimizing the recirculation power used to operate the reactor. The neutral beam injector (NBI) remains one of the most important method for plasma heating and control. For the future fusion power plant project DEMO, a NBI wall plug efficiency at least of 0.45 is required, while efficiency of present NBI project is about 0.25. The D{sup −} beam from a negative ion source is partially neutralized by a gas cell, which leaves more than 40% of energy in residual beams (D{sup −} and D{sup +}), so that an ion beam energy recovery system can significantly contribute to optimize efficiency. Recently, the test negative ion source NIO1 (60 keV, 9 beamlets with 15 mA H{sup −} each) has been designed and built at RFX (Padua) for negative ion production efficiency and the beam quality optimization. In this paper, a study proposal to use the NIO1 source also for a beam energy recovery test experiment is presented and a preliminary design of a negative ion beam collector with simulations of beam energy recovery is discussed.

  13. The influence of negative-energy states on proton-proton bremsstrahlung

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deJong, F; Nakayama, K

    1996-01-01

    We investigate the effect of negative-energy states on proton-proton bremsstrahlung using a manifestly covariant amplitude based on a T-matrix constructed in a spectator model. We show that there is a large cancellation among the zeroth-order, single- and double-scattering diagrams involving negativ

  14. Ion collector design for an energy recovery test proposal with the negative ion source NIO1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Variale, V; Cavenago, M; Agostinetti, P; Sonato, P; Zanotto, L

    2016-02-01

    Commercial viability of thermonuclear fusion power plants depends also on minimizing the recirculation power used to operate the reactor. The neutral beam injector (NBI) remains one of the most important method for plasma heating and control. For the future fusion power plant project DEMO, a NBI wall plug efficiency at least of 0.45 is required, while efficiency of present NBI project is about 0.25. The D(-) beam from a negative ion source is partially neutralized by a gas cell, which leaves more than 40% of energy in residual beams (D(-) and D(+)), so that an ion beam energy recovery system can significantly contribute to optimize efficiency. Recently, the test negative ion source NIO1 (60 keV, 9 beamlets with 15 mA H(-) each) has been designed and built at RFX (Padua) for negative ion production efficiency and the beam quality optimization. In this paper, a study proposal to use the NIO1 source also for a beam energy recovery test experiment is presented and a preliminary design of a negative ion beam collector with simulations of beam energy recovery is discussed.

  15. Energy Spectrum of Helium Confined to a Two-Dimensional Space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIEWen-Fang

    2005-01-01

    Making use of the adiabatic hyperspherical approach, we report a calculation for the energy spectrum of the ground and low-excited states of a two-dimensional helium in a magnetic field. The results show that the ground and low-excited states of helium in low-dimensional space are more stable than those in three-dimensional space and there may exist more bound states.

  16. Energy spectrum of an electron confined in the hexagon-shaped quantum well

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu.; V.; VOROBIEV; V.; R.; VIEIRA; P.; P.; HORLEY; P.; N.; GORLEY; J.; GONZLEZ-HERNNDEZ

    2009-01-01

    Considering the hexagonal-shaped quantum-scale formations on the surface of thin semiconductor films, a methodology was developed to obtain the analytical solution of the Schrdinger equation when impenetrable walls of a quantum well are treated as mirrors. The results obtained allowed the calculation of the space probability distributions and the energy spectrum of the particle confined in a hex-agonal-shaped well.

  17. Energy spectrum and entanglement of two tunnel-coupled Bose-Einstein condensates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Rong; Liang Jiu-Qing

    2007-01-01

    This paper obtains the energy-spectrum and eigenstate corrections of two-mode Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) coupled by quantum tunnelling by perturbation method in both strong and weak tunnelling regions.The population imbalance between two BECs are then studied in terms of the low-lying eigenstates which also characterize the intrinsic entanglement between the two-mode BECs.The strong parity effect in the weak tunnelling region is also investigated.

  18. Energy spectrum of the Dirac equation for the Scharzschild and Kerr fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ternov, I.M.; Gaina, A.B.

    1988-08-01

    We consider the effect of relativistic corrections and rotation of the central body on the structure of the energy spectrum of a particle with spin in the Schwarzchild and Kerr fields. A splitting of levels is obtained, which corresponds to the classical shift of the perihelion of the orbit and precession of the plane of the gravitational spin-orbit interaction and several nonlinear spin effects are calculated.

  19. Energy spectrum of an electron confined in the hexagon-shaped quantum well

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu.V.VOROBIEV; V.R.VlEIRA; P.P.HORLEY; P.N.GORLEY; J.GONZ(A)LEZ-HERN(A)NDEZ

    2009-01-01

    Considering the hexagonal-shaped quantum-scale formations on the surface of thin semiconductor films, a methodology was developed to obtain the analytical solution of the Schr(o)dinger equation when impenetrable walls of a quantum well are treated as mirrors. The results obtained allowed the calcula-tion of the space probability distributions and the energy spectrum of the particle confined in a hex-agonal-shaped well.

  20. Rectal carriage of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing gram-negative bacilli in community settings in Madagascar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perlinot Herindrainy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Extended-spectrum ß-lactamase-producing Enterobacteria (ESBL-PE emerged at the end of the 1980s, causing nosocomial outbreaks and/or hyperendemic situations in hospitals and long-term care facilities. In recent years, community-acquired infections due to ESBL-PE have spread worldwide, especially across developing countries including Madagascar. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to determine the prevalence and risk factors of intestinal carriage of ESBL-PE in the community of Antananarivo. METHODS: Non-hospitalized patients were recruited in three health centers in different socio economic settings. Fresh stool collected were immediately plated on Drigalski agar containing 3 mg/liter of ceftriaxone. Gram-negative bacilli species were identified and ESBL production was tested by a double disk diffusion (cefotaxime and ceftazidime +/- clavulanate assay. Characterization of ESBLs were perfomed by PCR and direct sequencing. Molecular epidemiology was analysed by Rep-PCR and ERIC-PCR. RESULTS: 484 patients were screened (sex ratio  =  1.03, median age 28 years. 53 ESBL-PE were isolated from 49 patients (carrier rate 10.1%. The isolates included Escherichia coli (31, Klebsiella pneumoniae (14, Enterobacter cloacae (3, Citrobacter freundii (3, Kluyvera spp. (1 and Pantoae sp. (1. In multivariate analysis, only the socioeconomic status of the head of household was independently associated with ESBL-PE carriage, poverty being the predominant risk factor. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of carriage of ESBL in the community of Antananarivo is one of the highest reported worldwide. This alarming spread of resistance genes should be stopped urgently by improving hygiene and streamlining the distribution and consumption of antibiotics.

  1. Electron energy distribution functions and negative ion concentrations in tandem and hybrid multicusp negative hydrogen ion sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopkins, M.B. (Dublin City Univ. (Ireland). Dept. of Physics); Bacal, M. (Ecole Polytechnique, 91 - Palaiseau (France). Lab. de Physique des Milieux Ionises); Graham, W.G. (Queen' s Univ., Belfast, Northern Ireland (UK). School of Mathematics and Physics)

    1991-03-14

    The second derivative of a Langmuir probe characteristic is used to establish the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in both a tandem and hybrid multicusp H{sup -} ion source. Moveable probes are used to establish the spatial variation of the EEDF. The negative ion density is measured by laser induced photo-detachment. In the case of the hybrid source the EEDF consists of a cold Maxwellian in the central region of the source; the electron temperature increases with increasing discharge current (rising from 0.3 eV at 1 A to 1.2 eV at 50 A when the pressure is 0.4 Pa). A hot electron tail exists in the EEDF of the driver region adjacent to each filament which is shown to consist of a distinct group of primary electrons at low pressure (0.08 Pa) but becomes degraded mainly through inelastic collisions at higher pressures (0.27 Pa). The tandem source, on the other hand, has a single driver region which extends throughout the central region. The primary electron confinement times are much longer so that even at the lowest pressure considered (0.07 Pa) the primaries are degraded. In both cases the measured EEDF at specific locations and values of discharge operating parameters are used to establish the rate coefficients for the processes of importance in H{sup -} production and destruction. (author).

  2. The Energy Spectrum of Ultra-High-Energy Cosmic Rays Measured by the Telescope Array FADC Fluorescence Detectors in Monocular Mode

    CERN Document Server

    Abu-Zayyad, T; Allen, M; Anderson, R; Azuma, R; Barcikowski, E; Belz, J W; Bergman, D R; Blake, S A; Cady, R; Cheon, B G; Chiba, J; Chikawa, M; Cho, E J; Cho, W R; Fujii, H; Fujii, T; Fukuda, T; Fukushima, M; Hanlon, W; Hayashi, K; Hayashi, Y; Hayashida, N; Hibino, K; Hiyama, K; Honda, K; Iguchi, T; Ikeda, D; Ikuta, K; Inoue, N; Ishii, T; Ishimori, R; Ito, H; Ivanov, D; Iwamoto, S; Jui, C C H; Kadota, K; Kakimoto, F; Kalashev, O; Kanbe, T; Kasahara, K; Kawai, H; Kawakami, S; Kawana, S; Kido, E; Kim, H B; Kim, H K; Kim, J H; Kitamoto, K; Kitamura, S; Kitamura, Y; Kobayashi, K; Kobayashi, Y; Kondo, Y; Kuramoto, K; Kuzmin, V; Kwon, Y J; Lan, J; Lim, S I; Lundquist, J P; Machida, S; Martens, K; Matsuda, T; Matsuura, T; Matsuyama, T; Matthews, J N; Myers, I; Minamino, M; Miyata, K; Murano, Y; Nagataki, S; Nakamura, T; Nam, S W; Nonaka, T; Ogio, S; Ogura, J; Ohnishi, M; Ohoka, H; Oki, K; Oku, D; Okuda, T; Ono, M; Oshima, A; Ozawa, S; Park, I H; Pshirkov, M S; Rodriguez, D C; Roh, S Y; Rubtsov, G; Ryu, D; Sagawa, H; Sakurai, N; Sampson, A L; Scott, L M; Shah, P D; Shibata, F; Shibata, T; Shimodaira, H; Shin, B K; Shin, J I; Shirahama, T; Smith, J D; Sokolsky, P; Sonley, T J; Springer, R W; Stokes, B T; Stratton, S R; Stroman, T A; Suzuki, S; Takahashi, Y; Takeda, M; Taketa, A; Takita, M; Tameda, Y; Tanaka, H; Tanaka, K; Tanaka, M; Thomas, S B; Thomson, G B; Tinyakov, P; Tkachev, I; Tokuno, H; Tomida, T; Troitsky, S; Tsunesada, Y; Tsutsumi, K; Tsuyuguchi, Y; Uchihori, Y; Udo, S; Ukai, H; Vasiloff, G; Wada, Y; Wong, T; Yamakawa, Y; Yamane, R; Yamaoka, H; Yamazaki, K; Yang, J; Yoneda, Y; Yoshida, S; Yoshii, H; Zollinger, R; Zundel, Z

    2013-01-01

    We present a measurement of the energy spectrum of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays performed by the Telescope Array experiment using monocular observations from its two new FADC-based fluorescence detectors. After a short description of the experiment, we describe the data analysis and event reconstruction procedures. Since the aperture of the experiment must be calculated by Monte Carlo simulation, we describe this calculation and the comparisons of simulated and real data used to verify the validity of the aperture calculation. Finally, we present the energy spectrum calculated from the merged monocular data sets of the two FADC-based detectors, and also the combination of this merged spectrum with an independent, previously published monocular spectrum measurement performed by Telescope Array's third fluorescence detector (Abu-Zayyad {\\it et al.}, {Astropart. Phys.} 39 (2012), 109). This combined spectrum corroborates the recently published Telescope Array surface detector spectrum (Abu-Zayyad {\\it et al.}, ...

  3. The Spectrum of Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays and Constraints on Lorentz Invariance Violation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecker, F. W.

    2008-01-01

    There has been much interest in possible violations of Lorentz invariance, particularly motivated by quantum gravity theories. It has been suggested that a small amount of Lorentz invariance violation (LIV) could turn off photomeson interactions of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) with photons of the cosmic background radiation and thereby eliminate the resulting sharp steepening in the spectrum of the highest energy CRs predicted by Greisen Zatsepin and Kuzmin (GZK). Recent measurements of the UHECR spectrum reported by the HiRes and Auger collaborations, however, indicate the presence of the GZK effect. We present the results of a detailed calculation of the modification of the UHECR spectrum caused by LIV using the formalism of Coleman and Glashow. We then use a chi-squared analysis to compare our results with the experimental UHECR data and thereby place limits on the amount of LIV. We also discuss how a small amount of LIV that is consistent with the experimental data can still lead to a recovery of the cosmic ray flux at higher energies than presently observed.

  4. Low Energy Electron and Nuclear Recoil Thresholds in the DRIFT-II Negative Ion TPC for Dark Matter Searches

    CERN Document Server

    Burgos, S; Forbes, J; Ghag, C; Gold, M; Hagemann, C; Kudryavtsev, V A; Lawson, T B; Loomba, D; Majewski, P; Muna, D; Murphy, A St J; Paling, S M; Petkov, A; Plank, S J S; Robinson, M; Sanghi, N; Snowden-Ifft, D P; Spooner, N J C; Turk, J; Tziaferi, E

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the ability to measure and discriminate particle events at the lowest possible energy is an essential requirement in developing new experiments to search for weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter. In this paper we detail an assessment of the potential sensitivity below 10 keV in the 1 m^3 DRIFT-II directionally sensitive, low pressure, negative ion time projection chamber (NITPC), based on event-by-event track reconstruction and calorimetry in the multiwire proportional chamber (MWPC) readout. By application of a digital smoothing polynomial it is shown that the detector is sensitive to sulfur and carbon recoils down to 3.5 and 2.2 keV respectively, and 1.2 keV for electron induced tracks. The energy sensitivity is demonstrated through the 5.9 keV gamma spectrum of 55Fe, where the energy resolution is sufficient to identify the escape peak. In addition to recoil direction reconstruction for WIMP searches this sensitivity suggests new prospects for applications also in KK axion s...

  5. Effects of spatial noncommutativity on energy spectrum of a trapped Bose-Einstein condensate

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Y H; Ge, Zi-Ming; Luo, You-Hua

    2005-01-01

    In noncommutative space, we examine the problem of a noninteracting and harmonically trapped Bose-Einstein condensate, and derive a simple analytic expression for the effect of spatial noncommutativity on energy spectrum of the condensate. It indicates that the ground-state energy incorporating the spatial noncommutativity is reduced to a lower level, which depends upon the noncommutativity parameter $\\theta$. The appeared gap between the noncommutative space and commutative one for the ground-state level of the condensate should be a signal of spatial noncommutativity.

  6. Exact ultra cold neutrons' energy spectrum in gravitational quantum mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedram, Pouria [Islamic Azad University, Department of Physics, Science and Research Branch, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    We find exact energy eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the quantum bouncer in the presence of the minimal length uncertainty and the maximal momentum. This form of Generalized (Gravitational) Uncertainty Principle (GUP) agrees with various theories of quantum gravity and predicts a minimal length uncertainty proportional to {Dirac_h}{radical}({beta}) and a maximal momentum proportional to 1/{radical}({beta}), where {beta} is the deformation parameter. We also find the semiclassical energy spectrum and discuss the effects of this GUP on the transition rate of the ultra cold neutrons in gravitational spectrometers. Then, based on Nesvizhevsky's famous experiment, we obtain an upper bound on the dimensionless GUP parameter. (orig.)

  7. Energy-Based Cooperative Spectrum Sensing of SC-FDMA Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fucheng Yang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a frequency-hopping M-ary frequency-shift keying spectrum sensing network (FH/MFSK SSN for identifying the on/off states of the users supported by a single-carrier frequency-division multiple assess (SC-FDMA primary radio (PR system. Specifically, the spectrums of an uplink interleaved frequency-division multiple access (IFDMA PR system are monitored by a number of cognitive radio sensing nodes (CRSNs. These CRSNs distributedly detect the on/off states of users based on one of the three energy detection schemes. After the local spectrum sensing, the CRSNs transmit their detected states to a fusion centre (FC with the aid of FH/MFSK techniques. At the FC, the on/off states of the users supported the IFDMA PR system are finally classified according to either the conventional equal-gain combining (EGC scheme or the novel erasure-supported EGC (ES-EGC scheme. In this way, the on/off information about the spectrums occupied by an IFDMA PR systemcan be obtained, so that they can be exploited by a cognitive radio (CR system. For local spectrum sensing, in this paper, we consider four synchronisation scenarios concerning the synchronisation between the received IFDMA signals and the CRSNs. The performance of the FH/MFSK SSN associated with various schemes is investigated by simulations. Our studies show that the FH/MFSK SSN constitutes one of the highly reliable spectrum sensing schemes, which are capable of exploiting both the space diversity provided by local CRSNs and the frequency diversity provided by the subcarriers of IFDMA system.

  8. Magnetized retarding field energy analyzer measuring the particle flux and ion energy distribution of both positive and negative ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafalskyi, Dmytro; Dudin, Stanislav; Aanesland, Ane

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents the development of a magnetized retarding field energy analyzer (MRFEA) used for positive and negative ion analysis. The two-stage analyzer combines a magnetic electron barrier and an electrostatic ion energy barrier allowing both positive and negative ions to be analyzed without the influence of electrons (co-extracted or created downstream). An optimal design of the MRFEA for ion-ion beams has been achieved by a comparative study of three different MRFEA configurations, and from this, scaling laws of an optimal magnetic field strength and topology have been deduced. The optimal design consists of a uniform magnetic field barrier created in a rectangular channel and an electrostatic barrier consisting of a single grid and a collector placed behind the magnetic field. The magnetic barrier alone provides an electron suppression ratio inside the analyzer of up to 6000, while keeping the ion energy resolution below 5 eV. The effective ion transparency combining the magnetic and electrostatic sections of the MRFEA is measured as a function of the ion energy. It is found that the ion transparency of the magnetic barrier increases almost linearly with increasing ion energy in the low-energy range (below 200 eV) and saturates at high ion energies. The ion transparency of the electrostatic section is almost constant and close to the optical transparency of the entrance grid. We show here that the MRFEA can provide both accurate ion flux and ion energy distribution measurements in various experimental setups with ion beams or plasmas run at low pressure and with ion energies above 10 eV.

  9. MAGIC measurement of the Crab Nebula spectrum over three decades in energy

    CERN Document Server

    Zanin, Roberta; Carmona, Emiliano; Colin, Pierre; Cortina, Juan; Jogler, Tobias; Klepser, Stefan; Moralejo, Abelardo; Horns, Dieter; Meyer, M

    2011-01-01

    The Crab Pulsar Wind Nebula is the best studied source of $\\gamma$-ray astrophysics. The contribution of the various soft radiation fields to the Inverse Compton component of its high energy emission, the strenght of the internal magnetic field and the maximum energies reached by primary electrons are however still matter of study. The MAGIC stereoscopic system recorded almost 50 hours of Crab Nebula data in the last two years, between October 2009 and April 2011. Analysis of this data sample using the latest improvements in the MAGIC stereo software provided an unprecedented differential energy spectrum spanning three decades in energy, from 50 GeV up to 45 TeV. At low energies, the MAGIC results, combined with the Fermi/LAT data, yield a precise measurement of the Inverse Compton peak. In addition, we present light curves of the Crab Nebula at different time scales, including a measurement simultaneous to one of the Crab Nebula flares recently detected by both Fermi/LAT and AGILE. Using the MAGIC spectrum t...

  10. Measurements of the energy spectrum of electrons emanating from solid materials irradiated by a picosecond laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Stefano, C. A., E-mail: carlosds@umich.edu; Kuranz, C. C.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Drake, R. P.; Keiter, P. A.; Rasmus, A. M.; Wan, W. C.; Joglekar, A. S.; McKelvey, A.; Zhao, Z.; Klein, S. R. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Seely, J. F. [Artep, Inc., Ellicott City, Mary land 21042 (United States); Williams, G. J.; Park, J.; Chen, H.; Kemp, G. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); MacDonald, M. J. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Pereira, N. R. [Ecopulse, Inc., Springfield, Virginia 22150 (United States); Jarrott, L. C.; Peebles, J. [University of California, San Diego, Energy Research Center, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); and others

    2015-04-15

    In this work, we present the results of experiments observing the properties of the electron stream generated laterally when a laser irradiates a metal. We find that the directionality of the electrons is dependent upon their energies, with the higher-energy tail of the spectrum (∼1 MeV and higher) being more narrowly focused. This behavior is likely due to the coupling of the electrons to the electric field of the laser. The experiments are performed by using the Titan laser to irradiate a metal wire, creating the electron stream of interest. These electrons propagate to nearby spectator wires of differing metals, causing them to fluoresce at their characteristic K-shell energies. This fluorescence is recorded by a crystal spectrometer. By varying the distances between the wires, we are able to probe the divergence of the electron stream, while by varying the medium through which the electrons propagate (and hence the energy-dependence of electron attenuation), we are able to probe the energy spectrum of the stream.

  11. Theory of the Robin quantum wall in a linear potential. I. Energy spectrum, polarization and quantum-information measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olendski, O.

    2016-12-01

    Information-theoretical concepts are employed for the analysis of the interplay between a transverse electric field $\\mathscr{E}$ applied to a one-dimensional surface and Robin boundary condition (BC), which with the help of the extrapolation length $\\Lambda$ zeroes at the interface a linear combination of the quantum mechanical wave function and its spatial derivative, and its influence on the properties of the structure. For doing this, exact analytical solutions of the corresponding Schr\\"{o}dinger equation are derived and used for calculating energies, dipole moments, position $S_x$ and momentum $S_k$ quantum information entropies and their Fisher information $I_x$ and $I_k$ and Onicescu information energies $O_x$ and $O_k$ counterparts. It is shown that the weak (strong) electric field changes the Robin wall into the Dirichlet, $\\Lambda=0$ (Neumann, $\\Lambda=\\infty$), surface. This transformation of the energy spectrum and associated waveforms in the growing field defines an evolution of the quantum-information measures; for example, it is proved that for the Dirichlet and Neumann BCs the position (momentum) quantum information entropy varies as a positive (negative) natural logarithm of the electric intensity what results in their field-independent sum $S_x+S_k$. Analogously, at $\\Lambda=0$ and $\\Lambda=\\infty$ the position and momentum Fisher informations (Onicescu energies) depend on the applied voltage as $\\mathscr{E}^{2/3}$ ($\\mathscr{E}^{1/3}$) and its inverse, respectively, leading to the field-independent product $I_xI_k$ ($O_xO_k$). Peculiarities of their transformations at the finite nonzero $\\Lambda$ are discussed and similarities and differences between the three quantum-information measures in the electric field are highlighted with the special attention being paid to the configuration with the negative extrapolation length.

  12. Assessing instantaneous energy in the EEG: a non-negative, frequency-weighted energy operator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Toole, John M; Temko, Andriy; Stevenson, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    Signal processing measures of instantaneous energy typically include only amplitude information. But measures that include both amplitude and frequency do better at assessing the energy required by the system to generate the signal, making them more sensitive measures to include in electroencephalogram (EEG) analysis. The Teager-Kaiser operator is a frequency-weighted measure that is frequently used in EEG analysis, although the operator is poorly defined in terms of common signal processing concepts. We propose an alternative frequency-weighted energy measure that uses the envelope of the derivative of the signal. This simple envelope- derivative operator has the advantage of being nonnegative, which when applied to a detection application in newborn EEG improves performance over the Teager-Kaiser operator: without post-processing filters, area-under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) is 0.57 for the Teager-Kaiser operator and 0.80 for the envelope-derivative operator. The envelope-derivative operator also satisfies important properties, similar to the Teager-Kaiser operator, such as tracking instantaneous amplitude and frequency.

  13. Characterization of adult ghrelin and ghrelin receptor knockout mice under positive and negative energy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuxiang; Butte, Nancy F; Garcia, Jose M; Smith, Roy G

    2008-02-01

    Ghrelin and the ghrelin receptor (GH secretagogue receptor, GHS-R), are believed to have important roles in energy homeostasis. We describe results from the first studies to be conducted in congenic (N10) adult ghrelin(-/-) and Ghsr(-/-) mice under conditions of both positive (high-fat diet) and negative (caloric restriction) energy balance. In contrast to results from young N2 mutant mice, changes in body weight and energy expenditure are not clearly distinguishable across genotypes. Although respiratory quotient was lower in mice fed a high-fat diet, no differences were evident between littermate wild-type and null genotypes. With normal chow, a modest decrease trend in respiratory quotient was detected in ghrelin(-/-) mice but not in Ghsr(-/-) mice. Under caloric restriction, the weight loss of ghrelin(-/-) and Ghsr(-/-) mice was identical to wild-type littermates, but blood glucose levels were significantly lower. We conclude that adult congenic ghrelin(-/-) and Ghsr(-/-) mice are not resistant to diet-induced obesity but under conditions of negative energy balance show impairment in maintaining glucose homeostasis. These results support our hypothesis that the primary metabolic function of ghrelin in adult mice is to modulate glucose sensing and insulin sensitivity, rather than directly regulate energy intake and energy expenditure.

  14. High energy properties of the flat spectrum radio quasar 4C 50.11

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Jianeng; Liang, Chen; Wang, Zhongxiang

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the $\\gamma$-ray and X-ray properties of the flat spectrum radio quasar (FSRQ) \\4c50 at redshift $z= 1.517$. The {\\it Fermi} Large Area Telescope (LAT) data indicate that this source was in an active state since 2013 July. During the active period, the $\\gamma$-ray flux increased by more than a factor of three and two distinct flares were detected with the variability timescale as short as several hours. The $\\gamma$-ray spectra can be well fitted by a log-parabola. From the fitting, we find a correlation between the peak energy and spectral curvature for the $\\gamma$-ray spectra, which is the first time seen in $\\gamma$-ray emission from a blazar. The {\\it Swift} X-ray Telescope (XRT) data show that the source was variable at X-ray energies, but no evidence shows flux or spectral changes related to the $\\gamma$-ray activity. The broad-band X-ray spectrum obtained with {\\it Swift} XRT and {\\it NuSTAR} is well described by a broken PL model, with an extremely hard spectrum ($\\Gamma_{1} \\sim 0.1$...

  15. Advantages of Real-Time Spectrum Analyzers in High-Energy Physics Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Louis

    2004-11-01

    Typically, particles are injected into the ring at low energy levels and then "ramped up" to higher levels. During ramping, it is important that the horizontal and vertical tune frequencies do not shift, lest they hit upon a resonant combination that causes beam instability or sudden total loss of ring beam current (beam blow up). Beam instabilities can be caused by a number of factors. Non-linearities and/or different response times of independent controls such as beam position monitor (BPM) cables and circuits, magnets for guidance and focusing of the beam, Klystrons or Tetrodes (which provide power to RF cavities that transmit energy to the beam), and vacuum pumps and monitors can all cause beam instabilities. Vibrations and lack of proper shielding are other factors. The challenge for operators and researchers is to correctly identify the factors causing beam instabilities and blow up so that costly accelerator time is not interrupted and experimental results are not compromised. The instrument often used to identify problems in particle accelerator applications is the spectrum analyzer. This paper will discuss the advantages of real time spectrum analyzers (RSA) versus swept frequency spectrum analyzers in HEP applications. The main focus will be on monitoring beam position and stability, especially during ramp-up. Also covered will be use of RSA for chromaticity measurements, Phase Locked Loop (PLL) diagnostics, and vibration analysis.

  16. The energy spectrum of cosmic-ray electrons measured with H.E.S.S.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egberts, Kathrin

    2009-03-30

    The spectrum of cosmic-ray electrons has so far been measured using balloon and satellite-based instruments. At TeV energies, however, the sensitivity of such instruments is very limited due to the low flux of electrons at very high energies and small detection areas of balloon/satellite based experiments. The very large collection area of ground-based imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes gives them a substantial advantage over balloon/ satellite based instruments when detecting very-high-energy electrons (> 300 GeV). By analysing data taken by the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.), this work extends the known electron spectrum up to 4 TeV - a range that is not accessible to direct measurements. However, in contrast to direct measurements, imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes such as H.E.S.S. detect air showers that cosmic-ray electrons initiate in the atmosphere rather than the primary particle. Thus, the main challenge is to differentiate between air showers initiated by electrons and those initiated by the hadronic background. A new analysis technique was developed that determines the background with the support of the machine-learning algorithm Random Forest. It is shown that this analysis technique can also be applied in other areas such as the analysis of diffuse {gamma} rays from the Galactic plane. (orig.)

  17. Negative refraction and energy funneling by hyperbolic materials: an experimental demonstration in acoustics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Chocano, Victor M; Christensen, Johan; Sánchez-Dehesa, José

    2014-04-11

    This Letter reports the design, fabrication, and experimental characterization of hyperbolic materials showing negative refraction and energy funneling of airborne sound. Negative refraction is demonstrated using a stack of five holey Plexiglas plates where their thicknesses, layer separation, hole diameters, and lattice periodicity have been determined to show hyperbolic dispersion around 40 kHz. The resulting hyperbolic material shows a flat band profile in the equifrequency contour allowing the gathering of acoustic energy in a broad range of incident angles and its funneling through the material. Our demonstrations foresee interesting developments based on both phenomena. Acoustic imaging with subwavelength resolution and spot-size converters that harvest and squeeze sound waves irradiating from many directions into a collimated beam are just two possible applications among many.

  18. The photodetachment cross-section and threshold energy of negative ions in carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmy, E. M.; Woo, S. B.

    1974-01-01

    Threshold energy and sunlight photodetachment measurements on negative carbon dioxide ions, using a 2.5 kw light pressure xenon lamp, show that: (1) Electron affinity of CO3(+) is larger than 2.7 e.V. and that an isomeric form of CO3(+) is likely an error; (2) The photodetachment cross section of CO3(-) will roughly be like a step function across the range of 4250 to 2500A, having its threshold energy at 4250A; (3) Sunlight photodetachment rate for CO3(-) is probably much smaller than elsewhere reported; and (4) The probability of having photodetached electrons re-attach to form negative ions is less than 1%. Mass identifying drift tube tests confirm that the slower ion is CO3(-), formed through the O(-) + 2CO2 yields CO3(-) + CO2 reaction.

  19. Energy spectrum of iron nuclei measured inside the MIR space craft using CR-39 track detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenther, W.; Leugner, D.; Becker, E.; Flesch, F.; Heinrich, W.; Huentrup, G.; Reitz, G.; Roecher, H.; Streibel, T

    1999-06-01

    We have exposed stacks of CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors inside the MIR space craft during the EUROMIR95 space mission for almost 6 months. Over this long period a large number of tracks of high LET events was accumulated in the detector foils. The etching and measuring conditions for this experiment were optimized to detect tracks of stopping iron nuclei. We found 185 stopping iron nuclei inside the stack and identified their trajectories through the material of the experiment. Based on the energy-range relation the energy at the surface of the stack was determined. These particles allow the determination of the low energy part of the spectrum of iron nuclei behind shielding material inside the MIR station.

  20. Energy spectrum of iron nuclei measured inside the MIR space craft using CR-39 track detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunther, W; Leugner, D; Becker, E; Flesch, F; Heinrich, W; Huntrup, G; Reitz, G; Rocher, H; Streibel, T

    1999-06-01

    We have exposed stacks of CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors inside the MIR space craft during the EUROMIR95 space mission for almost 6 months. Over this long period a large number of tracks of high LET events was accumulated in the detector foils. The etching and measuring conditions for this experiment were optimized to detect tracks of stopping iron nuclei. We found 185 stopping iron nuclei inside the stack and identified their trajectories through the material of the experiment. Based on the energy-range relation the energy at the surface of the stack was determined. These particles allow the determination of the low energy part of the spectrum of iron nuclei behind shielding material inside the MIR station.

  1. Energy spectrum of iron nuclei measured inside the MIR space craft using CR-39 track detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Guenther, W; Becker, E; Flesch, F; Heinrich, W; Huentrup, G; Reitz, G; Roecher, H; Streibel, T

    1999-01-01

    We have exposed stacks of CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors inside the MIR space craft during the EUROMIR95 space mission for almost 6 months. Over this long period a large number of tracks of high LET events was accumulated in the detector foils. The etching and measuring conditions for this experiment were optimized to detect tracks of stopping iron nuclei. We found 185 stopping iron nuclei inside the stack and identified their trajectories through the material of the experiment. Based on the energy-range relation the energy at the surface of the stack was determined. These particles allow the determination of the low energy part of the spectrum of iron nuclei behind shielding material inside the MIR station.

  2. Classification of vibrational resonances in the energy spectrum of the formaldehyde molecule and Katz's branch points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bykov, A. D.; Duchko, A. N.

    2016-05-01

    The Rayleigh-Schrödinger perturbation theory of high orders and the algebraic Padé-Hermite approximants are used to determine the singular points of a vibrational energy function of the formaldehyde molecule dependent on a complex perturbation parameter as on the argument. It is shown that the Fermi, Darling-Dennison, and other higher-order vibrational resonances are related to Katz's points—common branch points on the complex plane of the energy of two vibrational states. Analysis of Katz's points that connect different vibrational states allows one to reveal essential resonance perturbations, to introduce an additional classification for them, and to determine the polyad structure of an energy spectrum.

  3. Added glasshouses - a positive or a negative energy balance?; Anbau von Wintergaerten - Energiebilanz positiv oder negativ?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquardt, H. [Inst. fuer Weiterbildung und Baupruefung (IWB) an der Hochschule 21, Buxtehude (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Added Glasshouses - a positive or a negative Energy Balance? Calculations show that heated glasshouses with double-pane, argon-filled, low-e glazing and orientation towards the south, compared with not heated glasshouses - need high heat loads [W] during cold winter nights resulting in large heating units, - but, on the other hand the energy consumption of the whole building - applied to the larger interior space by the added glasshouse [kWh/(m{sup 2} x a)] - will go down during the heating period. (orig.)

  4. Space Charge Compensation in the Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport Line with Negative Hydrogen Ions

    CERN Document Server

    Valerio-Lizarraga, C; Leon-Monzon, I; Lettry, J; Midttun, O; Scrivens, R

    2014-01-01

    The space charge effect of low energy, unbunched ion beams can be compensated by the trapping of ions or electrons into the beam potential. This has been studied for the 45 keV negative hydrogen ion beam in the CERN Linac4 Low Energy Beam Tranport (LEBT) using the package IBSimu1, which allows the space charge calculation of the particle trajectories. The results of the beam simulations will be compared to emittance measurements of an H- beam at the CERN Linac4 3 MeV test stand, where the injection of hydrogen gas directly into the beam transport region has been used to modify the space charge compensation degree.

  5. The matrix Hamiltonian for hadrons and the role of negative-energy components

    OpenAIRE

    Simonov, Yu. A.

    2004-01-01

    The world-line (Fock-Feynman-Schwinger) representation is used for quarks in arbitrary (vacuum and valence gluon) field to construct the relativistic Hamiltonian. After averaging the Green's function of the white $q\\bar q$ system over gluon fields one obtains the relativistic Hamiltonian, which is matrix in spin indices and contains both positive and negative quark energies. The role of the latter is studied in the example of the heavy-light meson and the standard einbein technic is extended ...

  6. Neutron field produced by 25 MeV deuteron on thick beryllium for radiobiological study; energy spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Masashi; Mihara, Erika; Sasaki, Michiya; Nakamura, Takashi; Honma, Toshihiko; Kono, Koji; Fujitaka, Kazunobu

    2004-01-01

    Biological data is necessary for estimation of protection from neutrons, but there is a lack of data on biological effects of neutrons for radiation protection. Radiological study on fast neutrons has been done at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences. An intense neutron source has been produced by 25 MeV deuterons on a thick beryllium target. The neutron energy spectrum, which is essential for neutron energy deposition calculation, was measured from thermal to maximum energy range by using an organic liquid scintillator and multi-sphere moderated 3He proportional counters. The spectrum of the gamma rays accompanying the neutron beam was measured simultaneously with the neutron spectrum using the organic liquid scintillator. The transmission by the shield of the spurious neutrons originating from the target was measured to be less than 1% by using the organic liquid scintillator placed behind the collimator. The measured neutron energy spectrum is useful in dose calculations for radiobiology studies.

  7. Detection of extended spectrum beta-lactamases in gram negative bacilli from clinical specimens in a teaching hospital in South eastern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C N Akujobi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial drug resistance seen among many gram-negative bacteria, especially those expressing the extended-spectrum β- lactamase (ESBL enzymes that hydrolyze the expanded- spectrum cephalosporins has been on the increase. This has compromised treatment options and thus a threat to the containment of bacterial infections. To determine the existence of the extended-spectrum β-lactamase enzymes in Nnewi, 250 clinical isolates of members of the family Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas species from Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi were identified by conventional methods. These include Klebsiella species (96, E. coli (90, Pseudomonas species (37, Enterobacter species (13, Proteus species (6, Citrobacter species (5 and Salmonella species (3. Antimicrobial drug susceptibility testing was carried out on all the isolates by the disc diffusion method. Extended Spectrum Beta- lactamases were detected by the double disc synergy test. High level of antimicrobial resistance was noted in test organisms against some of the antimicrobial drugs: Ampicillin + Cloxacillin (93.2%, Tetracycline (90.8%, Streptomycin (82.4%, and Nalidixic acid (62%, and low level of resistance was observed against Ofloxacin (26.4%, Cefotaxime (28.8% and Nitrofurantoin (28.8%. One hundred and forty four isolates (57.6% were suspected ESBL-producers judged by their resistance to any of the third generation cephalosporins used but 40 (16% actually produced the extended spectrum beta- lactamase enzymes. This shows the existence of Extended Spectrum Beta- Lactamase producing gram negative organisms in Nnewi. Considering the treatment difficulties, as well as the high cost of treatment associated with these organisms, concerted efforts are needed to contain their spread.

  8. Capsaicin increases sensation of fullness in energy balance, and decreases desire to eat after dinner in negative energy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssens, Pilou L H R; Hursel, Rick; Westerterp-Plantenga, Margriet S

    2014-06-01

    Addition of capsaicin (CAPS) to the diet has been shown to increase satiety; therefore, CAPS is of interest for anti-obesity therapy. We investigated the effects of CAPS on appetite profile and ad libitum energy intake in relation to energy balance. Fifteen subjects (seven women and eight men, age: 29.7 ± 10.8yrs, BMI: 23.3 ± 2.9 kg/m(2)) underwent four conditions in a randomized crossover design in 36 hour sessions in a respiration chamber; they received 100% of their daily energy requirements in the conditions "100%Control" and "100%CAPS", and 75% of their daily energy requirements in the conditions "75%Control" and "75%CAPS", followed by an ad libitum dinner. In the 100%CAPS and 75%CAPS conditions, CAPS was given at a dose of 2.56 mg (1.03 g of red chili pepper, 39,050 Scoville heat units) with every meal. Satiety (P energy balance, addition of capsaicin to the diet increases satiety and fullness, and tends to prevent overeating when food intake is ad libitum. After dinner, capsaicin prevents the effects of the negative energy balance on desire to eat.

  9. Spectrum splitting using multi-layer dielectric meta-surfaces for efficient solar energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yuhan; Liu, He; Wu, Wei

    2014-06-01

    We designed a high-efficiency dispersive mirror based on multi-layer dielectric meta-surfaces. By replacing the secondary mirror of a dome solar concentrator with this dispersive mirror, the solar concentrator can be converted into a spectrum-splitting photovoltaic system with higher energy harvesting efficiency and potentially lower cost. The meta-surfaces are consisted of high-index contrast gratings (HCG). The structures and parameters of the dispersive mirror (i.e. stacked HCG) are optimized based on finite-difference time-domain and rigorous coupled-wave analysis method. Our numerical study shows that the dispersive mirror can direct light with different wavelengths into different angles in the entire solar spectrum, maintaining very low energy loss. Our approach will not only improve the energy harvesting efficiency, but also lower the cost by using single junction cells instead of multi-layer tandem solar cells. Moreover, this approach has the minimal disruption to the existing solar concentrator infrastructures.

  10. On the low-energy spectrum of spontaneously broken \\Phi^4 theories

    CERN Document Server

    Consoli, Maurizio

    2011-01-01

    The low-energy spectrum of a one-component, spontaneously broken \\Phi^4 theory is generally believed to have the same simple massive form \\sqrt{{\\bf p}^2 + m^2_h} as in the symmetric phase where =0. However, in lattice simulations of the 4D Ising limit of the theory, the two-point connected correlator and the connected scalar propagator show deviations from a standard massive behaviour that do not exist in the symmetric phase. As a support for this observed discrepancy, I present a variational, analytic calculation of the energy spectrum E_1({\\bf p}) in the broken phase. This analytic result, while providing the trend E_1({\\bf p})\\sim \\sqrt{{\\bf p}^2 + m^2_h} at large |{\\bf p}|, gives an energy gap E_1(0)< m_h, even when approaching the infinite-cutoff limit \\Lambda \\to \\infty with that infinitesimal coupling \\lambda \\sim 1/\\ln \\Lambda suggested by the standard interpretation of "triviality" within leading-order perturbation theory. I also compare with other approaches and discuss the more general implicat...

  11. Development of the negative ion source at the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takagi, Akira [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-02-01

    On formation of direct high frequency chopped negative hydrogen ion beam from surface forming type negative hydrogen ion source, incident acceleration due to proton synchrotron was tried for a forming experiment and its application. By overlapping a high frequency pulse onto a bias DC voltage of convertor electrode, control of formation of negative hydrogen ion with high speed RF pulse of 2 MHz could be realized. And, incidence into 12 GeV proton accelerator to catch RF particles with waiting bucket system due to booster synchrotron, was effective for control of longitudinal emittance in the booster synchrotron. As a result, controls of the beam width and shape emitted from the booster synchrotron were possible. On application of high speed chopped negative hydrogen ion beam to accelerator, improvement of beam capture efficiency to the accelerated RF bucket, control of longitudinal emittance of accelerated beam, beam measurement at incidence into the accelerator and so forth were conducted. In this paper, results of the high speed chopped beam formation experiment using surface plasma forming type negative ion source and application of high speed beam chopping method synchronized with high frequency pulse at the National Laboratory of High Energy Physics are described. (G.K.)

  12. “We Dance and Find Each Other”1: Effects of Dance/Movement Therapy on Negative Symptoms in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Hildebrandt, Malin K.; Koch, Sabine C.; Thomas Fuchs

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of deficits in social interaction, a shared symptom cluster in persons with schizophrenia (negative symptoms) and autism spectrum disorder (DSM-5 A-criterion), has so far remained widely unsuccessful in common approaches of psychotherapy. The alternative approach of embodiment brings to focus body-oriented intervention methods based on a theoretic framework that explains the disorders on a more basic level than common theory of mind approaches. The randomized controlled trial at...

  13. The energy spectrum of X-rays from rocket-triggered lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabshahi, S.; Dwyer, J. R.; Cramer, E. S.; Grove, J. E.; Gwon, C.; Hill, J. D.; Jordan, D. M.; Lucia, R. J.; Vodopiyanov, I. B.; Uman, M. A.; Rassoul, H. K.

    2015-10-01

    Although the production of X-rays from natural and rocket-triggered lightning leaders have been studied in detail over the last 10 years, the energy spectrum of the X-rays has never been well measured because the X-rays are emitted in very short but intense bursts that result in pulse pileup in the detectors. The energy spectrum is important because it provides information about the source mechanism for producing the energetic runaway electrons and about the electric fields that they traverse. We have recently developed and operated the first spectrometer for the energetic radiation from lightning. The instrument is part of the Atmospheric Radiation Imagery and Spectroscopy (ARIS) project and will be referred to as ARIS-S (ARIS Spectrometer). It consists of seven 3'' NaI(Tl)/photomultiplier tube scintillation detectors with different thicknesses of attenuators, ranging from no attenuator to more than 1'' of lead placed over the detector (all the detectors are in a 1/8'' thick aluminum box). Using X-ray pulses preceding 48 return strokes in 8 rocket-triggered lightnings, we found that the spectrum of X-rays from leaders is too soft to be consistent with Relativistic Runaway Electron Avalanche. It has a power law dependence on the energies of the photons, and the power index, λ, is between 2.5 and 3.5. We present the details of the design of the instrument and the results of the analysis of the lightning data acquired during the summer of 2012.

  14. Quantum control of isomerization by robust navigation in the energy spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murgida, G. E., E-mail: murgida@tandar.cnea.gov.ar [Centro Atómico Constituyentes, GIyA, CNEA, San Martín, and Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, C1033AAJ Buenos Aires (Argentina); Arranz, F. J., E-mail: fj.arranz@upm.es [Grupo de Sistemas Complejos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Borondo, F., E-mail: f.borondo@uam.es [Departamento de Química, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Ciencias Matemáticas (ICMAT), Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-12-07

    In this paper, we present a detailed study on the application of the quantum control technique of navigation in the energy spectrum to chemical isomerization processes, namely, CN–Li⇆ Li–CN. This technique is based on the controlled time variation of a Hamiltonian parameter, an external uniform electric field in our case. The main result of our work establishes that the navigation involved in the method is robust, in the sense that quite sizable deviations from a pre-established control parameter time profile can be introduced and still get good final results. This is specially relevant thinking of a experimental implementation of the method.

  15. Measurement of turbulent spatial structure and kinetic energy spectrum by exact temporal-to-spatial mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchhave, Preben; Velte, Clara Marika

    2017-01-01

    and spatial structure functions in a way that completely bypasses the need for Taylor’s hypothesis. The spatial statistics agree with the classical counterparts, such as the total kinetic energy spectrum, at least for spatial extents up to the Taylor microscale. The requirements for applying the method......We present a method for converting a time record of turbulent velocity measured at a point in a flow to a spatial velocity record consisting of consecutive convection elements. The spatial record allows computation of dynamic statistical moments such as turbulent kinetic wavenumber spectra...

  16. Fractal energy spectrum of a polariton gas in a Fibonacci quasiperiodic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanese, D; Gurevich, E; Baboux, F; Jacqmin, T; Lemaître, A; Galopin, E; Sagnes, I; Amo, A; Bloch, J; Akkermans, E

    2014-04-11

    We report on the study of a polariton gas confined in a quasiperiodic one-dimensional cavity, described by a Fibonacci sequence. Imaging the polariton modes both in real and reciprocal space, we observe features characteristic of their fractal energy spectrum such as the opening of minigaps obeying the gap labeling theorem and log-periodic oscillations of the integrated density of states. These observations are accurately reproduced solving an effective 1D Schrödinger equation, illustrating the potential of cavity polaritons as a quantum simulator in complex topological geometries.

  17. Angular distribution of high-energy $e^+e^-$ photoproduction close to the end of spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Di Piazza, A

    2012-01-01

    We consider the differential cross section of electron-positron pair production by a high-energy photon in a strong Coulomb field close to the end of the electron or positron spectrum. When the momentum transfer largely exceeds the electron mass, the cross section is obtained analytically in a compact form. Coulomb corrections essentially modify the cross section even for moderate values of the nuclear charge number $Z$. In the same kinematical region, the angular distribution for bound-free pair production, bremsstrahlung, and photorecombination is also obtained.

  18. Energy Spectrum of a Degenerate Fermi Gas at the BEC-BCS Crossover

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A theoretical study of the BCS-BEC crossover is presented. Starting from a two-channel Boson-Fermion resonance model, the BCS-Bogoiubov mean-field method and the Green's function method are adopted. The result shows that we can end up with a BCS-type theory but with a composite order parameter. Calculation shows that the Bose condensate of BCS Cooper pairs is proportional to the molecular BEC of Bose molecules. The resonance superfluid phase is indicated by the energy spectrum with an obvious interpretation of the transition mechanism.

  19. Fractal Energy Spectrum of a Polariton Gas in a Fibonacci Quasiperiodic Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanese, D.; Gurevich, E.; Baboux, F.; Jacqmin, T.; Lemaètre, A.; Galopin, E.; Sagnes, I.; Amo, A.; Bloch, J.; Akkermans, E.

    2014-04-01

    We report on the study of a polariton gas confined in a quasiperiodic one-dimensional cavity, described by a Fibonacci sequence. Imaging the polariton modes both in real and reciprocal space, we observe features characteristic of their fractal energy spectrum such as the opening of minigaps obeying the gap labeling theorem and log-periodic oscillations of the integrated density of states. These observations are accurately reproduced solving an effective 1D Schrödinger equation, illustrating the potential of cavity polaritons as a quantum simulator in complex topological geometries.

  20. “We Dance and Find Each Other”1: Effects of Dance/Movement Therapy on Negative Symptoms in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malin K. Hildebrandt

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of deficits in social interaction, a shared symptom cluster in persons with schizophrenia (negative symptoms and autism spectrum disorder (DSM-5 A-criterion, has so far remained widely unsuccessful in common approaches of psychotherapy. The alternative approach of embodiment brings to focus body-oriented intervention methods based on a theoretic framework that explains the disorders on a more basic level than common theory of mind approaches. The randomized controlled trial at hand investigated the effects of a 10-week manualized dance and movement therapy intervention on negative symptoms in participants with autism spectrum disorder. Although the observed effects failed to reach significance at the conventional 0.05 threshold, possibly due to an undersized sample, an encouraging trend towards stronger symptom reduction in the treatment group for overall negative symptoms and for almost all subtypes was found at the 0.10-level. Effect sizes were small but clinically meaningful, and the resulting patterns were in accordance with theoretical expectations. The study at hand contributes to finding an effective treatment approach for autism spectrum disorder in accordance with the notion of embodiment.

  1. “We Dance and Find Each Other”1: Effects of Dance/Movement Therapy on Negative Symptoms in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Malin K.; Koch, Sabine C.; Fuchs, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of deficits in social interaction, a shared symptom cluster in persons with schizophrenia (negative symptoms) and autism spectrum disorder (DSM-5 A-criterion), has so far remained widely unsuccessful in common approaches of psychotherapy. The alternative approach of embodiment brings to focus body-oriented intervention methods based on a theoretic framework that explains the disorders on a more basic level than common theory of mind approaches. The randomized controlled trial at hand investigated the effects of a 10-week manualized dance and movement therapy intervention on negative symptoms in participants with autism spectrum disorder. Although the observed effects failed to reach significance at the conventional 0.05 threshold, possibly due to an undersized sample, an encouraging trend towards stronger symptom reduction in the treatment group for overall negative symptoms and for almost all subtypes was found at the 0.10-level. Effect sizes were small but clinically meaningful, and the resulting patterns were in accordance with theoretical expectations. The study at hand contributes to finding an effective treatment approach for autism spectrum disorder in accordance with the notion of embodiment. PMID:27834905

  2. High thermal stability of core-shell structures dominated by negative interface energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yong-Fu; Zhao, Ning; Jin, Bo; Zhao, Ming; Jiang, Qing

    2017-03-29

    Nanoscale core/shell structures are of interest in catalysis due to their superior catalytic properties. Here we investigated the thermal stability of the coherent core-shell structures in a thermodynamic way by considering the impact from the core with the bulk melting point Tm(∞) lower or higher than the shell. When a low-Tm(∞) core is adopted, core-shell melting induced by the melting depression of the core does not occur upon heating because of the superheating, although the melting depression of the core can be triggered ultimately by the preferential melting of the high-Tm(∞) shell for small cores. The superheating of the core is contributed by the negative solid-solid interface energy, while the depression is originated from the positive solid-liquid interface energy. Owing to the presence of the negative interface energy, moreover, the low-Tm(∞)-core structure possesses a low difference in thermal expansion between the core and the shell, high activation energy of outward atomic diffusion from the core to shell, and low heat capacity. This result is beneficial for the core-shell structure design for its application in catalysis.

  3. Vacuum and Gravitons of Relic Gravitational Waves, and Regularization of Spectrum and Energy-Momentum Tensor

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Dong-Gang; Chen, Jie-Wen

    2015-01-01

    The spectrum of relic gravitational wave (RGW) contains high-frequency divergences, which should be removed. We present a systematic study of the issue, based on the exact RGW solution that covers the five stages, from inflation to the acceleration, each being a power law expansion. We show that the present RGW consists of vacuum dominating at $f>10^{11}$Hz and graviton dominating at $f<10^{11}$Hz, respectively. The gravitons are produced by the four cosmic transitions, mostly by the inflation-reheating one. We perform adiabatic regularization to remove vacuum divergences in three schemes: at present, at the end of inflation, and at horizon-exit, to the 2-nd adiabatic order for the spectrum, and the 4-th order for energy density and pressure. In the first scheme a cutoff is needed to remove graviton divergences. We find that all three schemes yield the spectra of a similar profile, and the primordial spectrum defined far outside horizon during inflation is practically unaffected. We also regularize the gau...

  4. Energy-Based Collaborative Spectrum Sensing for Cognitive UWB Impulse Radio

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Chiang Wu; Chun-Te Wu

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the issue of collaborative spectrum sensing in cognitive ultra wideband (CUWB) impulse radio. We employ energy-based signal detection method and apply the Neyman-Pearson (NP) decision rule to determine the optimum threshold. Two cooperative spectrum sensing schemes are developed in this paper. The decision fusion scheme is based on hard decision, in which each cooperating cognitive user (CU) sends its own local decision to the fusion center (FC). The FC then makes a final decision according to the majority voting rule. Alternatively, the data fusion scheme is based on soft decision, in which each local CU sends its observed value directly to the FC. The FC combines these values, compares to a threshold and then makes the final decision. The performances of both schemes are studied by using analytical tools and computer simulations. The receiver operating characteristics (ROC), which reveal the probability of detection versus false-alarm curve, are employed to evaluate the system performance under different scenarios.Simulation results demonstrate that the data fusion scheme outperforms the decision fusion scheme and verify that the collaborative spectrum sensing has practical importance in CUWB networks.

  5. Effects of synchrotron radiation spectrum energy on polymethyl methacrylate photosensitivity to deep x-ray lithography

    CERN Document Server

    Mekaru, H; Hattori, T

    2003-01-01

    Since X-ray lithography requires a high photon flux to achieve deep resist exposure, a synchrotron radiation beam, which is not monochromatized, is generally used as a light source. If the synchrotron radiation beam is monochromatized, photon flux will decrease rapidly. Because of this reason, the wavelength dependence of the resist sensitivity has not been investigated for deep X-ray lithography. Measuring the spectrum of a white beam with a Si solid-state detector (SSD) is difficult because a white beam has a high intensity and an SSD has a high sensitivity. We were able to measure the spectrum and the photocurrent of a white beam from a beam line used for deep X-ray lithography by keeping the ring current below 0.05 mA. We evaluated the characteristics of the output beam based on the measured spectrum and photocurrent, and used them to investigate the relationship between the total exposure energy and the dose-processing depth with polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA). We found that it is possible to guess the p...

  6. Negative-energy states in the Dirac-Hartree-Fock problem - The effect of omission of two-electron integrals involving the small component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyall, Kenneth G.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of omission of two-electron integrals involving basis functions for the small component of the wavefunction on the eigenvalue spectrum in the Dirac-Hartree-Fock problem is studied. From an analysis of the Fock matrix it is shown that omission of these integrals moves the negative-energy states down, not up. Their complete omission does not give rise to intruder states. The appearance of intruder states occurs when only some of the core integrals are omitted, due to the nature of particular contraction schemes used for the core basis functions. Use of radially localized functions rather than atomic functions alleviates the intruder state problem.

  7. Evaluation of Kolmogorov - Smirnov Test and Energy Detector Techniques for Cooperative Spectrum Sensing in Real Channel Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Lekomtcev

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The cognitive radio technology allows solving one of the main issues of current wireless communication technologies, namely a deficit of vacant spectrum. A dynamic spectrum access used in the cognitive radio networks (CRN gives an ability to access an unused spectrum in real time. Cooperative spectrum sensing is the most effective method for spectrum holes detecting. It combines sensing information of multiple cognitive radio users. In this paper, an experimental evaluation of spectrum sensing methods based on the Kolmogorov - Smirnov statistical test and Energy Detector using the Universal Software Radio Peripheral (USRP devices synchronized through a MIMO cable and with further processing in the GNU Radio and Matlab software are presented. Three hard decision fusion schemes are analyzed. Simulation comparison between these rules is presented via Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC curves. The influence of real channel with interferences is compared in contrast to commonly assumed AWGN channel model of vacant channel noise.

  8. AMPK: positive and negative regulation, and its role in whole-body energy homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardie, D Grahame

    2015-04-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a sensor of energy status that, when activated by metabolic stress, maintains cellular energy homeostasis by switching on catabolic pathways and switching off ATP-consuming processes. Recent results suggest that activation of AMPK by the upstream kinase LKB1 in response to nutrient lack occurs at the surface of the lysosome. AMPK is also crucial in regulation of whole body energy balance, particularly by mediating effects of hormones acting on the hypothalamus. Recent crystal structures of complete AMPK heterotrimers have illuminated its complex mechanisms of activation, involving both allosteric activation and increased net phosphorylation mediated by effects on phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Finally, AMPK is negatively regulated by phosphorylation of the 'ST loop' within the catalytic subunit.

  9. Lower Bounds on Negative Energy Densities for the Scalar Field in Flat Spacetime

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHU Wei-Xing; YU Hong-Wei; REN Zhong-Zhou; Wu Pu-Xun; LI Fei

    2006-01-01

    We obtain a lower bound on the spacetime-weighted average of the energy density for the scalar field in four-dimensional flat spacetime.The bound takes the form of a quantum inequality.The inequality does not rely on the quantum state and its form is only related to the weights,namely the spacetime sampling functions which are assumed to be smooth,positive and compactly supported.It is found that the inequality is just equal to the temporal quantum energy inequality. When the characteristic length of the temporal sampling function tends to zero,the lower bound becomes divergent.This is consistent with the fact that the spatial restriction on negative energy density does not exist in four-dimensional spacetime.

  10. Establishing and Understanding Adsorption-Energy Scaling Relations with Negative Slopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Hai-Yan; Sun, Keju; Wang, Wei-Qi; Zeng, Zhenhua; Calle-Vallejo, Federico; Li, Wei-Xue

    2016-12-15

    Adsorption-energy scaling relations are widely used for the design of catalytic materials. To date, only linear scaling relations are known in which the slopes are positive. Considering the adsorption energies of F, O, N, C, and B on transition metals, we show here that scaling relations with negative slopes also exist between certain adsorbates. The origin of such unconventional scaling relations is analyzed in terms of common descriptors such as d-band center, work function, number of outer electrons, electronic charge on the adsorbates, integrated crystal orbital overlap populations, and crystal orbital Hamilton populations. Conventional scaling relations are formed between adsorbates such as F, O, N, and C, which create ionic-like bonds with surfaces. Conversely, anomalous scaling relations are established between those and covalently bound adsorbates such as B. This widens the theory of adsorption-energy scaling relations and opens new avenues in physical chemistry and catalysis, for instance, in direct borohydride fuel cells.

  11. The Neutron Energy Spectrum Study from the Phase II Solid Methane Moderator at the LENS Neutron Source

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Yunchang; Snow, W. Mike; Lavelle, Christopher M.; Baxter, David V.; Tong, Xin; Yan, Haiyang; Leuschner, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Neutron energy spectrum measurements from a solid methane moderator were performed at the Low Energy Neutron Source (LENS) at Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) to verify our neutron scattering model of solid methane. The time-of-flight method was used to measure the energy spectrum of the moderator in the energy range of 0.1$meV\\sim$ 1$eV$. Neutrons were counted with a high efficiency $^{3}{He}$ detector. The solid methane moderator was operated in phase II temperature and the ener...

  12. Excitation energy-dependent nature of Raman scattering spectrum in GaInNAs/GaAs quantum well structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erol, Ayse; Akalin, Elif; Sarcan, Fahrettin; Donmez, Omer; Akyuz, Sevim; Arikan, Cetin M; Puustinen, Janne; Guina, Mircea

    2012-11-28

    The excitation energy-dependent nature of Raman scattering spectrum, vibration, electronic or both, has been studied using different excitation sources on as-grown and annealed n- and p-type modulation-doped Ga1 - xInxNyAs1 - y/GaAs quantum well structures. The samples were grown by molecular beam technique with different N concentrations (y = 0%, 0.9%, 1.2%, 1.7%) at the same In concentration of 32%. Micro-Raman measurements have been carried out using 532 and 758 nm lines of diode lasers, and the 1064 nm line of the Nd-YAG laser has been used for Fourier transform-Raman scattering measurements. Raman scattering measurements with different excitation sources have revealed that the excitation energy is the decisive mechanism on the nature of the Raman scattering spectrum. When the excitation energy is close to the electronic band gap energy of any constituent semiconductor materials in the sample, electronic transition dominates the spectrum, leading to a very broad peak. In the condition that the excitation energy is much higher than the band gap energy, only vibrational modes contribute to the Raman scattering spectrum of the samples. Line shapes of the Raman scattering spectrum with the 785 and 1064 nm lines of lasers have been observed to be very broad peaks, whose absolute peak energy values are in good agreement with the ones obtained from photoluminescence measurements. On the other hand, Raman scattering spectrum with the 532 nm line has exhibited only vibrational modes. As a complementary tool of Raman scattering measurements with the excitation source of 532 nm, which shows weak vibrational transitions, attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy has been also carried out. The results exhibited that the nature of the Raman scattering spectrum is strongly excitation energy-dependent, and with suitable excitation energy, electronic and/or vibrational transitions can be investigated.

  13. High energy emission from flat-spectrum radio sources with ˜ kpc-scale structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augusto, Pedro

    Active Galactic Nuclei emit a substantial portion of their bolometric luminosities in X-rays. For example, the knots in radio jets are prominent sources of synchrotron X-rays while the hotspots of the brightest FRIIs emit self-synchrotron or Inverse Compton radiation. Most high-energy studies on flat-spectrum radio sources have been conducted for blazars which are dominant at γ-rays.Augusto et al. (1998) have built a sample of 55 flat-spectrum radio sources dominated by structures (knots, hotspots, etc.) ˜0.1-2 kpc away from the nucleus. Seventeen (31%) of these are detected in X-rays (they tend to be the radio strongest) evenly splitting, morphologically, both at optical (radio) bands: nine QSO/BLLac (core-jets) on one-side; eight Galaxy/Sy2 (CSO/MSO/FRII) on the other. We have identified five confirmed compact/medium symmetric objects (CSO/MSOs) as X-ray emitters. A comparable type of source to CSO/MSOs is the physically similar (1-15 kpc) compact steep spectrum source (CSS), 28/129 (22%) of which are detected in X-rays, from a literature-selected sample (the percentage is smaller than for the 55-source sample due to a lower ). A 95% conf. level relation is found for CSSs: S_X ∝ (S4.85)0.6 and we found undistinguishable radio/X-ray properties for both the 55-source and CSS samples: clearly, their similar morphologies (e.g. knots in jets) stand up stronger than their radical radio spectrum differences.Only two sources among the 55 (4%) have γ-ray detections and they seem quite abnormal (in αxγ values, at least)-one of them is in a Sy2, not in a blazar.

  14. Hints on the high-energy seesaw mechanism from the low-energy neutrino spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casas, J.A.; Jimenez-Alburquerque, F. [Univ. Autonoma de Madrid (Spain). IFT-UAM/CSIC, C-XVI; Ibarra, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2006-12-15

    It is an experimental fact that the mass ratio for the two heavier neutrinos, h=m{sub 3}/m{sub 2}energy seesaw parameters and 2) Which choices, among the allowed ones, produce more naturally the observed pattern of neutrino masses. We have studied in particular if starting with hierarchical neutrino Yukawa couplings, as for the other fermions, one can naturally get the observed henergy) basis-independent quantities. Among the main results, we find that in most cases m{sub 3}/m{sub 2} >> m{sub 3}/m{sub 2}, so m{sub 1} should be extremely tiny. Also, the V{sub R} matrix associated to the neutrino Yukawa couplings has a far from random structure, naturally resembling V{sub CKM}. In fact we show that identifying V{sub R} and V{sub CKM}, as well as neutrino and u-quark Yukawa couplings can reproduce h{sup exp} in a highly non-trivial way, which is very suggestive. The physical implications of these results are also discussed. (orig.)

  15. Neutron dosimetry, moderated energy spectrum, and neutron capture therapy for californium-252 medical sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivard, Mark Joseph

    Examination of neutron dosimetry for 252Cf has been conducted using calculative and experimental means. Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code was used in a distributed computing environment as a parallel virtual machine (PVM) to determine the absorbed neutron dose and neutron energy spectrum from 252Cf in a variety of clinically relevant materials. Herein, a Maxwellian spectrum was used to model the 252Cf neutron emissions within these materials. 252Cf mixed-field dosimetry of Applicator Tube (AT) type sources was measured using 1.0 and 0.05 cm3 tissue-equivalent ion chambers and a miniature GM counter. A dosimetry protocol was formulated similar that of ICRU 45. The 252Cf AT neutron dosimetry was determined in the cylindrical coordinate system formalism recommended by the AAPM Task Group 43. These results demonstrated the overwhelming dependence of dosimetry on the source geometry factor as there was no significant neutron attenuation within the source or encapsulation. Gold foils and TLDs were used to measure the thermal flux in the vicinity of 252Cf AT sources to compare with the results calculated using MCNP. As the fast neutron energy spectrum did not markedly changed at increasing distances from the AT source, neutron dosimetry results obtained with paired ion chambers using fixed sensitivity factors agreed well with MCNP results and those in the literature. Calculations of moderated 252Cf neutron energy spectrum with various loadings of 10B and 157Gd were performed, in addition to analysis of neutron capture therapy dosimetry with these isotopes. Radiological concerns such as personnel exposure and shielding of 252Cf emissions were examined. Feasibility of a high specific-activity 252Cf HDR source was investigated through radiochemical and metallurgical studies using stand-ins such as Tb, Gd and 249Cf. Issues such as capsule burst strength due to helium production for a variety of proposed HDR sources were addressed. A recommended 252Cf source

  16. Application of Wavelet Packet Energy Spectrum to Extract the Feature of the Pulse Signal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dian-guo CAO; Yu-qiang WU; Xue-wen SHI; Peng WANG

    2010-01-01

    The wavelet packet is presented as a new kind of multi-scale analysis technique followed by Wavelet analysis. The fundamental and realization arithmetic of the wavelet packet analysis method are described in this paper. A new application approach of the wavelet packed method to extract the feature of the pulse signal from energy distributing angle is expatiated. It is convenient for the microchip to process and judge by using the wavelet packet analysis method to make the pulse signals quantized and analyzed. Kinds of experiments are simulated in the lab, and the experiments prove that it is a convenient and accurate method to extract the feature of the pulse signal based on wavelet packed-energy spectrum analysis.

  17. Exclusive Measurements of the b to s gamma Transition Rate and Photon Energy Spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Palano, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; /Bergen U.; Brown, David Nathan; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; /British Columbia U.; Khan, A.; /Brunel U.; Blinov, V.E.; Buzykaev, A.R.; /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U., Comp. Sci. Dept. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U.; /more authors..

    2012-08-30

    We use 429 fb{sup -1} of e{sup +}e{sup -} collision data collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector to measure the radiative transition rate of b {yields} s{gamma} with a sum of 38 exclusive final states. The inclusive branching fraction with a minimum photon energy of 1.9 GeV is found to be {Beta}({bar B} {yields} Xs{gamma}) = (3.29 {+-} 0.19 {+-} 0.48) x 10{sup -4} where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. We also measure the first and second moments of the photon energy spectrum and extract the best fit values for the heavy-quark parameters, m{sub b} and {mu}{sub {pi}}{sup 2}, in the kinetic and shape function models.

  18. Evaluation of the beta energy spectrum from a distributed uranium mill tailings source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reif, R H; Martz, D E; Carlson, D S; Turner, J B

    1993-10-01

    The beta energy spectra from uranium mill tailings, 90Sr with different absorber thicknesses, and a uranium metal slab were measured and compared to select an appropriate beta source for calibrating a personal dosimeter to measure shallow dose equivalent when exposed to uranium mill tailings. The measured beta energy spectrum from the 90Sr source, with a 111 mg cm-2 cover thickness, was selected as a possible calibration source for a personnel dosimeter. The dose equivalent rate to the skin at 1 cm from a distributed tailings source of infinite thickness, with a 226Ra activity of 56 Bq g-1 (1.5 x 10(3) pCi g-1), was measured to be 0.024 mSv h-1 (2.4 mrem h-1).

  19. Energy spectrum in high-resolution direct numerical simulations of turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Takashi; Morishita, Koji; Yokokawa, Mitsuo; Uno, Atsuya; Kaneda, Yukio

    2016-12-01

    A study is made about the energy spectrum E (k ) of turbulence on the basis of high-resolution direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of forced incompressible turbulence in a periodic box using a Fourier spectral method with the number of grid points and the Taylor scale Reynolds number Rλ up to 12 2883 and approximately 2300, respectively. The DNS data show that there is a wave-number range (approximately 5 ×10-3 2 /3k-5 /3] =c (kL ) m , where is the mean energy dissipation rate per unit mass; L is the integral length scale; and m ≈-0.12 . The coefficient c is independent of k , but has a Rλ dependence, such as c =C Rλζ , where C ≈0.9 and ζ ≈0.14 .

  20. The All Particle Cosmic-Ray Energy Spectrum Measured with HAWC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampel-Arias, Zigfried; HAWC Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    We present results of a measurement of the all-particle cosmic-ray energy spectrum above 10 TeV with the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory. HAWC is a ground based air shower array deployed on the slopes of Volcán Sierra Negra in the state of Puebla, México. It comprises 300 large light-tight water tanks covering an area of 20,000 square meters. Each tank is instrumented with four photomultipliers to detect particles from extensive air showers produced by gamma rays and cosmic rays upon entering the Earth's atmosphere. HAWC is optimized for the detection of gamma-ray induced air showers, yet the background flux of hadronic air showers is four orders of magnitude greater, allowing for a detailed study of the cosmic-ray flux in the TeV energy range. The primary cosmic-ray energy is determined with a maximum likelihood approach using the particle density as a function of distance to the shower core. Introducing quality cuts to isolate events with shower cores landing on the array, the reconstructed energy distribution is unfolded iteratively. We will report on the energy resolution of the technique and the results of the unfolding.

  1. Measurement of the energy spectrum of cosmic rays above 10{sup 18} eV using the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abraham, J. [National Technological University, Faculty Mendoza (CONICET/CNEA), Mendoza (Argentina); Abreu, P. [LIP and Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisboa (Portugal); Aglietta, M. [Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario (INAF), Universita di Torino and Sezione INFN, Torino (Italy); Ahn, E.J. [Fermilab, Batavia, IL (United States); Allard, D. [Laboratoire AstroParticule et Cosmologie (APC), Universite Paris 7, CNRS-IN2P3, Paris (France); Allen, J. [New York University, New York, NY (United States); Alvarez-Muniz, J. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Ambrosio, M. [Universita di Napoli ' Federico II' and Sezione INFN, Napoli (Italy); Anchordoqui, L. [University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Andringa, S. [LIP and Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisboa (Portugal); Anticic, T. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Anzalone, A. [Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica di Palermo (INAF), Palermo (Italy); Aramo, C. [Universita di Napoli ' Federico II' and Sezione INFN, Napoli (Italy); Arganda, E. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Arisaka, K. [University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Arqueros, F. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Asorey, H. [Centro Atomico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro (CNEA-UNCuyo-CONICET), San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Assis, P. [LIP and Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisboa (Portugal); Aublin, J. [Laboratoire de Physique Nucleaire et de Hautes Energies (LPNHE), Universites Paris 6 et Paris 7, CNRS-IN2P3, Paris (France); Ave, M. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology - Campus North - Institut fuer Kernphysik, Karlsruhe (Germany); University of Chicago, Enrico Fermi Institute, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2010-03-08

    We report a measurement of the flux of cosmic rays with unprecedented precision and statistics using the Pierre Auger Observatory. Based on fluorescence observations in coincidence with at least one surface detector we derive a spectrum for energies above 10{sup 18} eV. We also update the previously published energy spectrum obtained with the surface detector array. The two spectra are combined addressing the systematic uncertainties and, in particular, the influence of the energy resolution on the spectral shape. The spectrum can be described by a broken power law E{sup -g}amma with index gamma=3.3 below the ankle which is measured at log{sub 10}(E{sub ankle}/eV)=18.6. Above the ankle the spectrum is described by a power law with index 2.6 followed by a flux suppression, above about log{sub 10}(E/eV)=19.5, detected with high statistical significance.

  2. Measurement of the energy spectrum of cosmic rays above 1018 eV using the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Allard, D.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Antičić, T.; Anzalone, A.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Arisaka, K.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avila, G.; Bäcker, T.; Badagnani, D.; Balzer, M.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Bauleo, P.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Bellétoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; Benzvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bergmann, T.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanch-Bigas, O.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Busca, N. G.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colombo, E.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Cooper, M. J.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Cotti, U.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Domenico, M.; de Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; de La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; de Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; Decerprit, G.; Del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Della Selva, A.; Delle Fratte, C.; Dembinski, H.; di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; Dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; Duvernois, M. A.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferrero, A.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fleck, I.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fröhlich, U.; Fulgione, W.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; García, B.; García Gámez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garrido, X.; Gelmini, G.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Goggin, L. M.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Góra, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Gozzini, S. R.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hague, J. D.; Halenka, V.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hojvat, C.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Hussain, M.; Iarlori, M.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jiraskova, S.; Kadija, K.; Kaducak, M.; Kampert, K. H.; Karova, T.; Kasper, P.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapik, R.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D.-H.; Krieger, A.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuehn, F.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, K.; Kunka, N.; Kusenko, A.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lago, B. L.; Lautridou, P.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, J.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Lemiere, A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; McEwen, M.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Meurer, C.; Mičanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miller, W.; Miramonti, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, E.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafá, M.; Mueller, S.; Muller, M. A.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nhung, P. T.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Nyklicek, M.; Oehlschläger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliva, P.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parlati, S.; Parra, A.; Parrisius, J.; Parsons, R. D.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pavlidou, V.; Payet, K.; Pech, M.; Pȩkala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Petrovic, J.; Pfendner, C.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Redondo, A.; Revenu, B.; Rezende, F. A. S.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rivière, C.; Rizi, V.; Robledo, C.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-D'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Santander, M.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, F.; Schmidt, T.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovánek, P.; Schroeder, F.; Schulte, S.; Schüssler, F.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Semikoz, D.; Settimo, M.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Siffert, B. B.; Sigl, G.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Strazzeri, E.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Šuša, T.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Tamashiro, A.; Tamburro, A.; Tapia, A.; Tarutina, T.; Taşcău, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Tcherniakhovski, D.; Tegolo, D.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Tristram, G.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Venters, T.; Verzi, V.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Voyvodic, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Winnick, M. G.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Ziolkowski, M.; Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2010-03-01

    We report a measurement of the flux of cosmic rays with unprecedented precision and statistics using the Pierre Auger Observatory. Based on fluorescence observations in coincidence with at least one surface detector we derive a spectrum for energies above 1018 eV. We also update the previously published energy spectrum obtained with the surface detector array. The two spectra are combined addressing the systematic uncertainties and, in particular, the influence of the energy resolution on the spectral shape. The spectrum can be described by a broken power law E- with index γ=3.3 below the ankle which is measured at log(E/eV)=18.6. Above the ankle the spectrum is described by a power law with index 2.6 followed by a flux suppression, above about log(E/eV)=19.5, detected with high statistical significance.

  3. Cutoff in the TeV Energy Spectrum of Markarian 421 During Strong Flares in 2001

    CERN Document Server

    Krennrich, F; Bond, I H; Bradbury, S M; Buckley, J H; Carter-Lewis, D A; Catanese, M; Cui, W; Dunlea, S; Das, D; De la Calle-Perez, I; Fegan, D J; Fegan, S J; Finley, J P; Gaidos, J A; Gibbs, K; Gillanders, G H; Hall, T A; Hillas, A M; Holder, J; Horan, D; Jordan, M; Kertzman, M P; Kieda, D B; Kildea, J; Knapp, J; Kosack, K; Lang, M J; Le Bohec, S; McKernan, B; Moriarty, P; Müller, D; Ong, R; Pallassini, R; Petry, D; Quinn, J; Reay, N W; Reynolds, P T; Rose, H J; Sembroski, G H; Sidwell, R A; Stanton, N; Swordy, S P; Vasilev, V; Wakely, S P; Weekes, T C

    2001-01-01

    Exceptionally strong and long lasting flaring activity of the blazar Markarian 421 (Mrk 421) occurred between January and March 2001. Based on the excellent signal-to-noise ratio of the data we derive the energy spectrum between 260 GeV - 17 TeV with unprecedented statistical precision. The spectrum is not well described by a simple power law even with a curvature term. Instead the data can be described by a power law with exponential cutoff: $\\rm {{dN}\\over{dE}} \\propto \\rm E^{-2.14 \\pm 0.03_{stat}} \\times e^{-E/E_{0}} m^{-2} s^{-1} TeV^{-1}$ with $\\rm E_{0} = 4.3 \\pm 0.3_{stat} TeV$. Mrk 421 is the second $\\gamma$-ray blazar that unambiguously exhibits an absorption-like feature in its spectral energy distribution at 3-6 TeV suggesting that this may be a universal phenomenon, possibly due to the extragalactic infra-red background radiation.

  4. Hadronic total cross sections at high energy and the QCD spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Giordano, Matteo

    2014-01-01

    We show how to obtain the leading energy dependence of hadronic total cross sections, in the framework of the nonperturbative approach to soft high-energy scattering based on Wilson-loop correlation functions, if certain nontrivial analyticity assumptions are satisfied. The total cross sections turn out to be of "Froissart" type, $\\sigma_{\\rm tot}^{(hh)}(s) \\mathop\\sim B\\log^2 s$ for ${s \\to \\infty}$. We also discuss under which conditions the coefficient $B$ is universal, i.e., independent of the hadrons involved in the scattering process. In the most natural scenarios for universality, $B$ can be related to the stable spectrum of QCD, and is predicted to be $B_{\\rm th}\\simeq 0.22~{\\rm mb}$, in fair agreement with experimental results. If we consider, instead, the stable spectrum of the quenched (i.e., pure-gauge) theory, we obtain a quite larger value $B^{(Q)}_{\\rm th} \\ge 0.42~{\\rm mb}$, suggesting (quite surprisingly) large unquenching effects due to the sea quarks.

  5. Microbial Electrolytic Carbon Capture for Carbon Negative and Energy Positive Wastewater Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lu; Huang, Zhe; Rau, Greg H; Ren, Zhiyong Jason

    2015-07-07

    Energy and carbon neutral wastewater management is a major goal for environmental sustainability, but current progress has only reduced emission rather than using wastewater for active CO2 capture and utilization. We present here a new microbial electrolytic carbon capture (MECC) approach to potentially transform wastewater treatment to a carbon negative and energy positive process. Wastewater was used as an electrolyte for microbially assisted electrolytic production of H2 and OH(-) at the cathode and protons at the anode. The acidity dissolved silicate and liberated metal ions that balanced OH(-), producing metal hydroxide, which transformed CO2 in situ into (bi)carbonate. Results using both artificial and industrial wastewater show 80-93% of the CO2 was recovered from both CO2 derived from organic oxidation and additional CO2 injected into the headspace, making the process carbon-negative. High rates and yields of H2 were produced with 91-95% recovery efficiency, resulting in a net energy gain of 57-62 kJ/mol-CO2 captured. The pH remained stable without buffer addition and no toxic chlorine-containing compounds were detected. The produced (bi)carbonate alkalinity is valuable for wastewater treatment and long-term carbon storage in the ocean. Preliminary evaluation shows promising economic and environmental benefits for different industries.

  6. Energy spectrum and mass composition of primary cosmic radiation in the region above the knee from the GAMMA experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Martirosov, R M; Vardanyan, H S; Erlykin, A D; Nikolskaya, N M; Gallant, Y A; Jones, L W; Babayan, H A

    2012-01-01

    The energy spectrum of the primary cosmic radiation in the energy range 1 - 100 PeV and the extensive air shower (EAS) characteristics obtained on the basis of the expanded data bank of the GAMMA experiment (Mt. Aragats, Armenia) are presented. With increased statistics we confirm our previous results on the energy spectrum. The spectral index above the knee is about -3.1, but at energies beyond 20 PeV a flattening of the spectrum is observed. The existence of the 'bump' at about 70 PeV is confirmed with a significance of more than 4{\\sigma}. In the energy range of 10 - 100 PeV the shower age becomes energy independent and we observe a direct proportionality of the EAS size to the primary energy. This suggests an approximately constant depth of the EAS maximum in this energy range. This is evidence in favour of an increasing average mass of primary particles at energies above 20 PeV. The additional source scenario, which is a possible explanation of the 'bump' in the spectrum, also leads to the conclusion of ...

  7. Negative energy balance increases periprandial ghrelin and growth hormone concentrations in lactating dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Barry J; Allen, Michael S

    2008-02-01

    The reported effects of feeding on growth hormone (GH) secretion in ruminants have been inconsistent, and are likely influenced by energy status of animals. High-producing dairy cows in early lactation and late lactation were used to assess the effects of energy balance on temporal variation of plasma metabolites and hormones. Cows were fed a single diet once daily, and feed was withdrawn for 90 min prior to feeding. Beginning at the time of feed withdrawal, plasma samples were collected via jugular catheters hourly for 24h. Concentrations of non-esterified fatty acids and GH were measured for all samples, while insulin, glucose, and acylated (active) ghrelin were quantified for four sample times around feeding. As expected, calculated energy balance was significantly lower in early lactation than late lactation cows (-43.5 MJ retained/day versus 7.2 MJ retained/day). Following the primary meal of the day, a GH surge was observed in early lactation but not in late lactation cows. This difference was not explained by temporal patterns in non-esterified fatty acid, insulin, or glucose concentrations. However, a preprandial ghrelin surge was observed in early lactation only, suggesting that ghrelin was responsible for the prandial GH surge in this group. Results of a stepwise regression statistical analysis showed that both preprandial ghrelin concentration and energy balance were significant predictors of prandial GH increase over baseline. Adaptations to negative energy balance in lactating dairy cattle likely include enhanced ghrelin secretion and greater GH response to ghrelin.

  8. Nicotine induces negative energy balance through hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez de Morentin, Pablo B; Whittle, Andrew J; Fernø, Johan; Nogueiras, Rubén; Diéguez, Carlos; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; López, Miguel

    2012-04-01

    Smokers around the world commonly report increased body weight after smoking cessation as a major factor that interferes with their attempts to quit. Numerous controlled studies in both humans and rodents have reported that nicotine exerts a marked anorectic action. The effects of nicotine on energy homeostasis have been mostly pinpointed in the central nervous system, but the molecular mechanisms controlling its action are still not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of nicotine on hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and its effect on energy balance. Here we demonstrate that nicotine-induced weight loss is associated with inactivation of hypothalamic AMPK, decreased orexigenic signaling in the hypothalamus, increased energy expenditure as a result of increased locomotor activity, increased thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue (BAT), and alterations in fuel substrate utilization. Conversely, nicotine withdrawal or genetic activation of hypothalamic AMPK in the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus reversed nicotine-induced negative energy balance. Overall these data demonstrate that the effects of nicotine on energy balance involve specific modulation of the hypothalamic AMPK-BAT axis. These targets may be relevant for the development of new therapies for human obesity.

  9. Prevalence and Genotypic Characterization of Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamases Produced by Gram Negative Bacilli at a Tertiary Care Hospital in Rural South Western Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Acaku; Bwanga, Freddie; Boum, Yap; Bazira, Joel

    2014-12-01

    To determine the prevalence and genotypic characterisation of extended spectrum beta-lactamases produced by gram negative bacilli isolated at Mbarara Regional Referral Hospital (MRRH). Gram negative clinical isolates. Laboratory-based descriptive cross-sectional study. MRRH, June and August 2012. Gram negative clinical isolates were sub cultured, and identified using biochemical tests. They were screened for ESBL by using oxyimino-cephalosporins and confirmed by double disc synergy Genotyping was performed using the PCR for TEM, SHV and CTX-M. Susceptibility pattern for the extended spectrum beta-lactamases, (ESBL) - positive isolates to other antibiotic classes was performed by the Kirby Bauer Technique. A total of 484 isolates were included in the study. The commonest ESBL producers were Escherichia coli (34%), followed by unidentified coliforms (19.3%) and Klebsiella spp. (12.7%). Phenotypically, 88/484 were ESBL producers while genotypically 213/ 484 possessed ESBL genes. The ESBL genes were blaCTX-M (146; 70%), blaSHV (72; 34%) and blaTEM (100; 47%). 87of 213 isolates expressed more than one ESBL gene. Of these 36 (7.4%) produced blaCTX-M/blaSHV, 28 (5.8%) blaCTX-M /blaTEM, 4 (0.8%) blaSHV/ blaTEM and 19 (3.9%) blaCTX-M/blaSHV/blaTEM. Sixty two (16%) were phenotypically and genotypically positive, 12 (3%) of the isolates were phenotypically positive but genotypically negative and 140 (37%) isolates were phenotypically negative but genotypically positive. The ESBL producers were highly susceptible to imipenem (95%), nitrofurantoin (66%) but less susceptible to ampicillin (4%) and ticarcillin (7%). ESBL production among the Gram-negative clinical isolates at MRRH is very high with several isolates possessing multiple genes. The ESBL producers are highly susceptible to imipenem, but very resistant to ciprofloxacin.

  10. New Mn II energy levels from STIS-HST spectrum of the HgMn star HD 175640

    CERN Document Server

    Castelli, F; Cowley, C R

    2015-01-01

    The NIST database lists several Mn II lines that were observed in the laboratory but not classified. They cannot be used in spectrum synthesis because their atomic line data are unknown. These lines are concentrated in the 2380-2700 A interval. We aimed to assign energy levels and log gf values to these lines. Semi-empirical line data for Mn II computed by Kurucz were used to synthesize the ultraviolet spectrum of the slow-rotating, HgMn star HD 175640. The spectrum was compared with the high-resolution spectrum observed with the HST-STIS equipment. A UVES spectrum covering the 3050-10000 A region was also examined. We determined a total of 73 new energy levels, 58 from the STIS spectrum of HD 175640 and another 15 from the UVES spectrum. The new energy levels give rise to numerous new computed lines. We have identified more than 50% of the unclassified lines listed in the NIST database and have changed the assignement of another 24 lines. An abundance analysis of the star HD 175640, based on the comparison o...

  11. On geodesics with negative energies in the ergoregions of dirty black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Zaslavskii, O B

    2014-01-01

    We consider behavior of equatorial geodesics with the negative energy in the ergoregion of a generic rotating "dirty" (surrounded by matter) black hole. It is shown that under very simple and generic conditions on the metric coefficients, there are no such circular orbits. This entails that such geodesic must originate and terminate under the event horizon. These results generalize the observation made for the Kerr metric in A. A. Grib, Yu. V. Pavlov, and V. D. Vertogradov, Mod. Phys. Lett. 29, 1450110 (2014) [arXiv:1304.7360].

  12. Component structure of the Positive And Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) in patients with recent-onset schizophrenia and spectrum disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolthaus, JED; Dingemans, PMAJ; Schene, AH; Linszen, DH; Knegtering, H; Holthausen, EAE; Cahn, W; Hijman, R

    2000-01-01

    Rationale: Earlier studies have examined the symptom dimensions of the PANSS (Positive And Negative Syndrome Scale) in patients with chronic schizophrenia. Results have suggested that three to eight component solutions best explain underlying symptom dimensions. Objectives: To examine the component

  13. The Negative Ion Photoelectron Spectrum of Cyclopropane-1,2,3-Trione Radical Anion, (CO) 3 •– — A Joint Experimental and Computational Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Bo; Hrovat, David A.; West, Robert; Deng, Shihu H. M.; Wang, Xue-Bin; Borden, Weston Thatcher

    2014-09-03

    Negative Ion Photoelectron (NIPE) spectra of the radical anion of cyclopropane-1,2,3-trione, (CO)3•-, have been obtained at 20 K, using both 355 and 266 nm lasers for electron photodetachment. The spectra show broadened bands, due to the short lifetimes of both the singlet and triplet states of (CO)3. The smaller intensity of the band with the lower electron binding energy suggests that the singlet is the ground state of (CO)3. From the NIPE spectra, the electron affinity (EA) and the singlet-triplet energy gap of (CO)3 are estimated to be, respectively, EA = 3.1 ± 0.1 eV and ΔEST = -14 ± 3 kcal/mol. High-level, (U)CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVQZ//(U)CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ, calcu-lations give EA = 3.04 eV for the 1A1´ ground state of (CO)3 and ΔEST = -13.8 kcal/mol for the energy gap between the 1A1´ and 3A2 states, in excellent agreement with values from the NIPE spectra. In addition, simulations of the vibrational structures for formation of these states of (CO)3 from the 2A2'' state of (CO)3•- provide a good fit to the shapes of broad bands in the 266 nm NIPE spectrum. The NIPE spectrum of (CO)3•- and the analysis of the spectrum by high-quality electronic structure calculations demonstrate that NIPES can not only access and provide information about transition structures, but NIPES can also access and provide information about hilltops on potential energy surfaces.

  14. Measurement of the Cosmic Ray Energy Spectrum with ARGO-YBJ

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2014-01-01

    The ARGO-YBJ detector, located at high altitude in the Cosmic Ray Observatory of Yangbajing in Tibet (4300 m asl, about 600 g/cm2 of atmospheric depth) provides the opportunity to study, with unprecedented resolution, the cosmic ray physics in the primary energy region between 10^{12} and 10^{16} eV. The preliminary results of the measurement of all-particle and light-component (i.e. protons and helium) energy spectra between approximately 5 TeV and 5 PeV are reported and discussed. The study of such energy region is particularly interesting because not only it allows a better understanding of the so called 'knee' of the energy spectrum and of its origin, but also provides a powerful cross-check among very different experimental techniques. The comparison between direct measurements by balloons/satellites and the results by surface detectors, implying the knowledge of shower development in the atmosphere, also allows to test the hadronic interaction models currently used for understanding particle and cosmic ...

  15. Novel characteristics of energy spectrum for 3D Dirac oscillator analyzed via Lorentz covariant deformed algebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betrouche, Malika; Maamache, Mustapha; Choi, Jeong Ryeol

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the Lorentz-covariant deformed algebra for Dirac oscillator problem, which is a generalization of Kempf deformed algebra in 3 + 1 dimension of space-time, where Lorentz symmetry are preserved. The energy spectrum of the system is analyzed by taking advantage of the corresponding wave functions with explicit spin state. We obtained entirely new results from our development based on Kempf algebra in comparison to the studies carried out with the non-Lorentz-covariant deformed one. A novel result of this research is that the quantized relativistic energy of the system in the presence of minimal length cannot grow indefinitely as quantum number n increases, but converges to a finite value, where c is the speed of light and β is a parameter that determines the scale of noncommutativity in space. If we consider the fact that the energy levels of ordinary oscillator is equally spaced, which leads to monotonic growth of quantized energy with the increment of n, this result is very interesting. The physical meaning of this consequence is discussed in detail. PMID:24225900

  16. Novel characteristics of energy spectrum for 3D Dirac oscillator analyzed via Lorentz covariant deformed algebra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betrouche, Malika; Maamache, Mustapha; Choi, Jeong Ryeol

    2013-11-14

    We investigate the Lorentz-covariant deformed algebra for Dirac oscillator problem, which is a generalization of Kempf deformed algebra in 3 + 1 dimension of space-time, where Lorentz symmetry are preserved. The energy spectrum of the system is analyzed by taking advantage of the corresponding wave functions with explicit spin state. We obtained entirely new results from our development based on Kempf algebra in comparison to the studies carried out with the non-Lorentz-covariant deformed one. A novel result of this research is that the quantized relativistic energy of the system in the presence of minimal length cannot grow indefinitely as quantum number n increases, but converges to a finite value, where c is the speed of light and β is a parameter that determines the scale of noncommutativity in space. If we consider the fact that the energy levels of ordinary oscillator is equally spaced, which leads to monotonic growth of quantized energy with the increment of n, this result is very interesting. The physical meaning of this consequence is discussed in detail.

  17. Research on the Application of the Light-Energy Spectrum Fusion Technique to Land and Resources Survey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This paper introduces how to use remote sensing images including Landsat (MSS and TM) and airborne radioactivity images to identify the type of rocks in the areas covered by vegetation. The relationship between light spectrum (Landsat MSS and TM) and energy spectrum (U, Th and K) is discussed on the basis of correlation analysis, and it is proven that there are correlations between the Landsat MSS or TM data and the U, Th and K data. By using the fusion technique, new images were generated, which contain both the light spectrum and the energy spectrum information.Taking the Lucong basin as the study area, the present paper demonstrates the successful identification of various types of rocks using the fusion technique. Different types of rocks are represented by different colours on the new light-energy spectrum images, so that volcanic rocks of the Jurassic and Cretaceous periods can be discriminated. Another example, in the Lingquan basin in Northeast China, not only the different types of rocks are successfully distinguished, but corrections and modifications are also made on the original geological map after some field investigation. Practice has proven that the light-energy spectrum fusion technique is a good way in lithologic identification.

  18. Space charge compensation in the Linac4 low energy beam transport line with negative hydrogen ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valerio-Lizarraga, Cristhian A., E-mail: cristhian.alfonso.valerio.lizarraga@cern.ch [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Departamento de Investigación en Física, Universidad de Sonora, Hermosillo (Mexico); Lallement, Jean-Baptiste; Lettry, Jacques; Scrivens, Richard [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Leon-Monzon, Ildefonso [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico-Matematicas, Universidad Autónoma de Sinaloa, Culiacan (Mexico); Midttun, Øystein [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway)

    2014-02-15

    The space charge effect of low energy, unbunched ion beams can be compensated by the trapping of ions or electrons into the beam potential. This has been studied for the 45 keV negative hydrogen ion beam in the CERN Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport using the package IBSimu [T. Kalvas et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02B703 (2010)], which allows the space charge calculation of the particle trajectories. The results of the beam simulations will be compared to emittance measurements of an H{sup −} beam at the CERN Linac4 3 MeV test stand, where the injection of hydrogen gas directly into the beam transport region has been used to modify the space charge compensation degree.

  19. Space charge compensation in the Linac4 low energy beam transport line with negative hydrogen ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valerio-Lizarraga, Cristhian A; Lallement, Jean-Baptiste; Leon-Monzon, Ildefonso; Lettry, Jacques; Midttun, Øystein; Scrivens, Richard

    2014-02-01

    The space charge effect of low energy, unbunched ion beams can be compensated by the trapping of ions or electrons into the beam potential. This has been studied for the 45 keV negative hydrogen ion beam in the CERN Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport using the package IBSimu [T. Kalvas et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02B703 (2010)], which allows the space charge calculation of the particle trajectories. The results of the beam simulations will be compared to emittance measurements of an H(-) beam at the CERN Linac4 3 MeV test stand, where the injection of hydrogen gas directly into the beam transport region has been used to modify the space charge compensation degree.

  20. Space charge compensation in the Linac4 low energy beam transport line with negative hydrogen ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valerio-Lizarraga, Cristhian A.; Lallement, Jean-Baptiste; Leon-Monzon, Ildefonso; Lettry, Jacques; Midttun, Øystein; Scrivens, Richard

    2014-02-01

    The space charge effect of low energy, unbunched ion beams can be compensated by the trapping of ions or electrons into the beam potential. This has been studied for the 45 keV negative hydrogen ion beam in the CERN Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport using the package IBSimu [T. Kalvas et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02B703 (2010)], which allows the space charge calculation of the particle trajectories. The results of the beam simulations will be compared to emittance measurements of an H- beam at the CERN Linac4 3 MeV test stand, where the injection of hydrogen gas directly into the beam transport region has been used to modify the space charge compensation degree.

  1. Measurement of the Transverse Energy Spectrum in Proton-Nucleon Collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettoni, Diego

    We describe a measurement of the transverse energy spectrum in proton-nucleon interactions carried out at the CERN SPS using the HELIOS spectrometer. The measurement is of particular interest in that it is performed in a rapidity region away from central rapidity, where experimental data is scarce. In this rapidity region very interesting physics is anticipated and the measurement of the proton -nucleon collisions is essential as a basis to understand the more complicated proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus interactions. Both these topics are part of the experimental programme of HELIOS. The measurement was done using a deuterium target enclosed in an iron tube. The contribution to the transverse energy spectrum from the p-Fe events is discriminated against by reconstructing the primary interaction vertex using drift chamber information. The measured spectrum is corrected via Monte Carlo to deconvolute the effect of reinteractions. We also report, in the first part of the thesis, on the author's contribution to the development of the high-resolution drift chambers employed in the HELIOS detector. High spatial resolution and multi-track resolving power are achieved with the use of a cool gas, such that the electron characteristic energy is close to the thermal limit: this implies a small diffusion coefficient and a consequently good positional accuracy. Of vital importance are the low value of the drift velocity, the fast, differentiating electronics and a careful shaping of the electric field configuration to improve the isochrony of the drift collection. We report on the design and tests of drift chamber prototypes built along the above lines, with which a spatial accuracy of 0.06 mm and a double track resolution of 0.6 mm were measured. We also describe the final drift chamber system and its operation in HELIOS, and we point out the great care with which all systematic effects must be kept under control. The author's personal contribution to this work has been the

  2. Interactions between negative energy balance, metabolic diseases, uterine health and immune response in transition dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Giulia; Irons, Pete C; Webb, Edward C; Chapwanya, Aspinas

    2014-01-30

    The biological cycles of milk production and reproduction determine dairying profitability thus making management decisions dynamic and time-dependent. Diseases also negatively impact on net earnings of a dairy enterprise. Transition cows in particular face the challenge of negative energy balance (NEB) and/or disproportional energy metabolism (fatty liver, ketosis, subacute, acute ruminal acidosis); disturbed mineral utilization (milk fever, sub-clinical hypocalcemia); and perturbed immune function (retained placenta, metritis, mastitis). Consequently NEB and reduced dry matter intake are aggravated. The combined effects of all these challenges are reduced fertility and milk production resulting in diminishing profits. Risk factors such as NEB, inflammation and impairment of the immune response are highly cause-and-effect related. Thus, managing cows during the transition period should be geared toward reducing NEB or feeding specially formulated diets to improve immunity. Given that all cows experience a reduced feed intake and body condition, infection and inflammation of the uterus after calving, there is a need for further research on the immunology of transition dairy cows. Integrative approaches at the molecular, cellular and animal level may unravel the complex interactions between disturbed metabolism and immune function that predispose cows to periparturient diseases.

  3. Pharmacological Correction of the Negative Effect of Acetylsalicylic Acid on the Energy-Generating System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir V. Udut, ScD

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The present paper demonstrates the effect of ASA and its combination with SUC on the energy-producing system of rat heart mitochondria as well as an assessment of SUC preventive application effect on ASA pharmacokinetic parameters. Experiments conducted on outbred male albino rats (200-250 g on a model of a xenobiotic load induced by seven days of intragastric injections of acetylsalicylic acid at a dose of 250 mg/kg have shown inhibition of the oxygen consumption rates in the heart mitochondria as well as a limitation of the succinate-dependent substrate oxidation pathways and a decrease in the mitochondria ATP/ADP coefficient. Succinic acid (50 mg/kg for 7 days was injected as a preventive medication to correct the mitochondrial bioenergetics revealed. A comparative research of the pharmacokinetics of acetylsalicylic acid and acetylsalicylic acid against the background of succinic acid performed on the model of rabbits has shown total similarity in the parameters analyzed. This fact demonstrates the possibility of prevention of mitochondrial dysfunction using the intermediate Krebs cycle. SUC as preventive medication promotes the elimination of ASA-induced negative metabolic shifts in the rat heart mitochondria by normalizing the succinate- and NAD-dependent respiration, oxidative phosphorylation, and therefore, it finds good use in the correction of ASA-induced negative side-effects of an energy-generating system

  4. Spin–orbit-coupled BEC in a double-well potential: Quantum energy spectrum and flat band

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wen-Yuan [School of Physics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); National Laboratory of Science and Technology on Computational Physics, Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); Cao, Hui, E-mail: hcao.physics@gmail.com [National Laboratory of Science and Technology on Computational Physics, Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); Liu, Jie [School of Physics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); National Laboratory of Science and Technology on Computational Physics, Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100084 (China); Fu, Li-Bin, E-mail: lbfu@iapcm.ac.cn [National Laboratory of Science and Technology on Computational Physics, Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-09-04

    Spin–orbit-coupled Bose–Einstein condensates (BECs) provide a powerful platform for studies on physical problems in various fields. Here we study the energy spectrum of a tunable spin–orbit-coupled BEC in a double-well potential with adjustable Raman laser intensity. We find in the single-particle spectrum there is a highly degenerate flat band in the ground state of the BEC, which remains stable against changes of the Raman strength. Many-body interactions between atoms remove this high degeneracy. Analytical results for particular cases are obtained by using the perturbation theory, which are in good agreement with the numerical results. - Highlights: • Energy spectrum of a tunable SOC BEC in a double-well potential is obtained. • Single-particle spectrum shows a highly degenerate flat band in the ground state. • Weak interactions between atoms remove this high degeneracy. • Analytical results are obtained by perturbation theory.

  5. Causal production of the electromagnetic energy flux and role of the negative energies in Blandford-Znajek process

    CERN Document Server

    Toma, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Blandford-Znajek process, the steady electromagnetic energy extraction from a rotating black hole (BH), is widely believed to work for driving relativistic jets in active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts and Galactic microquasars, although it is still under debate how the Poynting flux is causally produced and how the rotational energy of the BH is reduced. We generically discuss the Kerr BH magnetosphere filled with a collisionless plasma screening the electric field along the magnetic field, extending the arguments of Komissarov and our previous paper, and propose a new picture for resolving the issues. For the magnetic field lines threading the equatorial plane in the ergosphere, we find that the inflow of particles with negative energy as measured in the coordinate basis is generated near that plane as a feedback from the Poynting flux production, which appears to be a similar process to the mechanical Penrose process. For the field lines threading the event horizon, we first show that the concept of the...

  6. Joint optimization of spectrum and energy efficiency in cognitive radio networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaowei Wang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we discuss the joint improvement of the energy efficiency (EE and the spectrum efficiency (SE in OFDM-based cognitive radio (CR networks. A multi-objective resource allocation task is formulated to optimize the EE and the SE of the CR system simultaneously with the consideration of the mutual interference and the spectrum sensing errors. We first exploit the EE–SE relations and demonstrate that the EE is a quasiconcave function of the SE, based on which the Pareto optimal set of the multi-objective optimization problem is characterized. To find a unique globally optimal solution, we propose a unified EE–SE tradeoff metric to transform the multi-objective optimization problem into a single-objective one which has a D.C. (difference of two convex functions/sets structure and yields a standard convex optimization problem. We derive a fast method to speed up the time-consuming computation by exploiting the structure of the convex problem. Simulation results validate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed algorithms, which can produce the unique globally optimal solution of the original multi-objective optimization problem.

  7. Correlation between peak energy and Fourier power density spectrum slope in gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Dichiara, S; Amati, L; Frontera, F; Margutti, R

    2016-01-01

    The origin of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) prompt emission still defies explanation, in spite of recent progress made, for example, on the occasional presence of a thermal component in the spectrum along with the ubiquitous non-thermal component that is modelled with a Band function. The combination of finite duration and aperiodic modulations make GRBs hard to characterise temporally. Although correlations between GRB luminosity and spectral hardness on one side and time variability on the other side have long been known, the loose and often arbitrary definition of the latter makes the interpretation uncertain. We characterise the temporal variability in an objective way and search for a connection with rest-frame spectral properties for a number of well-observed GRBs. We studied the individual power density spectra (PDS) of 123 long gamma-ray bursts with measured redshift, rest-frame peak energy Ep,i of the time-averaged nuFnu spectrum, and well-constrained PDS slope alpha detected with Swift, Fermi and past s...

  8. Peculiarities of electron energy spectrum in Coulomb field of super heavy nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Gitman, D M; Ferreira, R; Levin, A D

    2015-01-01

    Just after the Dirac equation was established, a number of physicists tried to comment on and solve the spectral problem for the Dirac Hamiltonian with the Coulomb field of arbitrarily large charge $Z$, especially with $Z$ that is more than the critical value $Z_{\\mathrm{c}}=\\alpha^{-1}\\simeq137,04$, making sometimes contradictory conclusions and presenting doubtful solutions. It seems that there is no consesus on this problem up until now and especially on the way of using corresponding solutions of the Dirac equation in calculating physical processes. That is why in the present article, we turn once again to discussing peculiarities of electron energy spectrum in the Coulomb field of superheavy nucleus. In the beginning, we remind the reader of a long story with a wrong interpretation of the problem in the case of a point nucleus and its present correct solution. We then turn to the spectral problem in the case of a regularized Coulomb field. Under a specific regularization, we derive an exact spectrum equa...

  9. Energy spectrum of cascade showers induced by cosmic ray muons in the range from 50 GeV to 5 TeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashitkov, V. D.; Kirina, T. M.; Klimakov, A. P.; Kokoulin, R. P.; Petrukhin, A. A.; Yumatov, V. I.

    1985-01-01

    The energy spectrum of cascade showers induced by electromagnetic interactions of high energy muons of horizontal cosmic ray flux in iron absorber was measured. The total observation time exceeded 22,000 hours. Both the energy spectrum and angular distributions of cascade showers are fairly described in terms of the usual muon generation processes, with a single power index of the parent meson spectrum over the muon energy range from 150 GeV to 5 TeV.

  10. Energy Harvesting-based Spectrum Access with Incremental Cooperation, Relay Selection and Hardware Noises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. N. Nguyen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose an energy harvesting (EH-based spectrum access model in cognitive radio (CR network. In the proposed scheme, one of available secondary transmitters (STs helps a primary transmitter (PT forward primary signals to a primary receiver (PR. Via the cooperation, the selected ST finds opportunities to access licensed bands to transmit secondary signals to its intended secondary receiver (SR. Secondary users are assumed to be mobile, hence, optimization of energy consumption for these users is interested. The EH STs have to harvest energy from the PT's radio-frequency (RF signals to serve the PT-PR communication as well as to transmit their signals. The proposed scheme employs incremental relaying technique in which the PR only requires the assistance from the STs when the transmission between PT and PR is not successful. Moreover, we also investigate impact of hardware impairments on performance of the primary and secondary networks. For performance evaluation, we derive exact and lower-bound expressions of outage probability (OP over Rayleigh fading channel. Monte-Carlo simulations are performed to verify the theoretical results. The results present that the outage performance of both networks can be enhanced by increasing the number of the ST-SR pairs. In addition, it is also shown that fraction of time used for EH, positions of the secondary users and the hardware-impairment level significantly impact on the system performance.

  11. Measurement of the Crab Nebula spectrum over three decades in energy with the MAGIC telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Aleksić, J; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Babic, A; Bangale, P; Barrio, J A; González, J Becerra; Bednarek, W; Bernardini, E; Biasuzzi, B; Biland, A; Blanch, O; Bonnefoy, S; Bonnoli, G; Borracci, F; Bretz, T; Carmona, E; Carosi, A; Colin, P; Colombo, E; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Covino, S; Da Vela, P; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Caneva, G; De Lotto, B; Wilhelmi, E de Oña; Mendez, C Delgado; Prester, D Dominis; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Einecke, S; Eisenacher, D; Elsaesser, D; Fidalgo, D; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Frantzen, K; Fruck, C; Galindo, D; López, R J García; Garczarczyk, M; Terrats, D Garrido; Gaug, M; Godinović, N; Muñoz, A González; Gozzini, S R; Hadasch, D; Hanabata, Y; Hayashida, M; Herrera, J; Hildebrand, D; Hose, J; Hrupec, D; Idec, W; Kadenius, V; Kellermann, H; Knoetig, M L; Kodani, K; Konno, Y; Krause, J; Kubo, H; Kushida, J; La Barbera, A; Lelas, D; Lewandowska, N; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; Longo, F; López, M; López-Coto, R; López-Oramas, A; Lorenz, E; Lozano, I; Makariev, M; Mallot, K; Maneva, G; Mankuzhiyil, N; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Marcote, B; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Menzel, U; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Moralejo, A; Munar-Adrover, P; Nakajima, D; Neustroev, V; Niedzwiecki, A; Nilsson, K; Nishijima, K; Noda, K; Orito, R; Overkemping, A; Paiano, S; Palatiello, M; Paneque, D; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Paredes-Fortuny, X; Persic, M; Poutanen, J; Moroni, P G Prada; Prandini, E; Puljak, I; Reinthal, R; Rhode, W; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Garcia, J Rodriguez; Rügamer, S; Saito, T; Saito, K; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schultz, C; Schweizer, T; Shore, S N; Sillanpää, A; Sitarek, J; Snidaric, I; Sobczynska, D; Spanier, F; Stamerra, A; Steinbring, T; Storz, J; Strzys, M; Takalo, L; Takami, H; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Terzić, T; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Thaele, J; Tibolla, O; Torres, D F; Toyama, T; Treves, A; Vogler, P; Will, M; Zanin, R

    2014-01-01

    The MAGIC stereoscopic system collected 69 hours of Crab Nebula data between October 2009 and April 2011. Analysis of this data sample using the latest improvements in the MAGIC stereoscopic software provided an unprecedented precision of spectral and night-by-night light curve determination at gamma rays. We derived a differential spectrum with a single instrument from 50 GeV up to almost 30 TeV with 5 bins per energy decade. In the low energies, MAGIC results, combined with the Fermi-LAT data, show a flat Inverse Compton peak. The Fermi-LAT and MAGIC spectral data were fit from 1 GeV to 30 TeV with a log-parabola, yielding a peak position at (53 $\\pm$ 3) GeV with a $\\chi^2_{red}$ = 82/27 (error probably underestimated due to the bad fit quality), showing that the log-parabola is not a good representation of the Inverse Compton peak of the Crab Nebula. There is no hint of the integral flux variability on daily scales at energies above 300 GeV if accounting for systematic uncertainties of the measurement. We ...

  12. A measurement of the energy loss spectrum of 150 GeV muons in iron

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, E; Dawson, J; Fuess, T A; Guarino, V; Hill, N; Magill, S; May, E; Nodulman, L; Price, L E; Proudfoot, J; Stanek, R; Underwood, D G; Wagner, R; Wicklund, B; Blanchot, G; Bosman, M; Casado, M P; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Efthymiopoulos, I; Ivanyushenkov, Yu M; Juste, A; Miralles, L; Orteu, S; Padilla, C; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Ronceux, B; Teubert, F; Anderson, K J; Blucher, E; Evans, H; Merritt, F S; Pilcher, J E; Sanders, H; Shochet, M J; Tang, F; Turcot, A S; Wagner, D; Arsenescu, R; Constantinescu, S; Blaj, C; Boldea, V; Dita, S; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Badaud, F; Bouhemaid, N; Brette, P; Brossard, M; Chadelas, R; Chevaleyre, J C; Crouau, M; Daudon, F; Dugne, J J; Michel, B; Montarou, G; Muanza, G S; Pallin, D; Plothow-Besch, Hartmute; Poirot, S; Reinmuth, G; Says, L P; Vazeille, F; Cobal, M; Gildemeister, O; Nessi, Marzio; Henriques, A; Poggioli, Luc; Sonderegger, P; Karapetian, G V; Astvatsaturov, A R; Borisov, O N; Budagov, Yu A; Chirikov-Zorin, I E; Chlachidze, G; Glagolev, V V; Kakurin, S; Kolomoets, V; Kovtun, V E; Kukhtin, V V; Lebedev, A; Liba, I; Lomakina, O V; Lomakin, Yu F; Malyukov, S N; Minashvili, I A; Pantea, D; Pukhov, O; Romanov, V; Rusakovitch, N A; Senchyshyn, V G; Semenov, V; Sissakian, A N; Shchelchkov, V; Shevtsov, A; Studenov, S; Tokár, S; Topilin, N D; Vinogradov, V; Vorozhtsov, S B; Yarygin, G; Cogswell, F; Downing, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Haney, M; Simaitis, V J; Thaler, J J; Amaral, P; Amorim, A; Carvalho, J; David, M; Gómez, A; Maio, A; Martins, J P; Onofre, A; Wolters, H; Bromberg, C; Huston, J; Miller, R; Richards, R; Yosef, C; Alifanov, A; Bogush, A A; Golubev, V B; Rumyantsev, V; Kulchitskii, Yu A; Angelini, C; Autiero, D; Cavasinni, V; Costanzo, D; De Santo, A; Del Prete, T; Di Girolamo, B; Flaminio, Vincenzo; Lami, S; Lazzeroni, C; Mazzoni, E; Renzoni, G; Davidek, T; Dolejsi, J; Dolezal, Z; Leitner, R; Soustruznik, K; Suk, M; Tas, P; Trka, Z; Valkár, S; Zdrazil, M; Lokajícek, M; Némécek, S; Karyukhin, A N; Klioukhine, V I; Khokhlov, Yu A; Kopikov, S V; Kostrikov, M E; Kulagin, M; Lapin, V; Protopopov, Yu; Sidorov, V; Solodkov, A A; Starchenko, E A; Surkov, A; Zaitsev, A; Calôba, L P; Gaspar, M; Marroquin, F; Pereira, A; Seixas, J M; Berglund, S R; Bohm, C; Johansson, E K; Hellman, S; Holmgren, S O; Jon-And, K; Selldén, B; Tardell, S; Yamdagni, N; Ferrer, A; Honoré, P F; Albiol, F; De, K; Gallas, E J; Li, J; Sawyer, L; Stephens, R; Turcotte, M; White, A; Hakopian, H H; Grabskii, V; Mnatzakanian, E A; Vartapetian, A H

    1997-01-01

    The energy loss spectrum of 150 GeV muons has been measured with a prototype of the ATLAS hadron calorimeter in the H8 beam of the CERN SPS.\\\\ The differential probability $dP/dv$ per radiation length of a fractional energy loss $v = \\Delta E_{\\mu} / E_{\\mu}$ has been measured in the range $v = 0.01 \\div 0.95 $; it is then compared with the theoretical predictions for energy losses due to bremsstrahlung and production of electron-positron pairs or of energetic knock-on electrons.\\\\ The integrated probability $\\int_{0.01}^{0.95} (dP/dv) dv$ is $(1.610\\pm0.015_{stat.}\\pm0.105_{syst.})\\cdot10^{-3}$ in agreement with the theoretical predictions of $1.556\\cdot10^{-3}$ and $1.619\\cdot10^{-3}$. %7.8.96 - start Agreement with theory is also found in two intervals of $v$ where production of electron-positron pairs and knock-on electrons dominates. In the region of bremsstrahlung dominance ($v = 0.12\\div0.95$) the measured integrated probability $(1.160\\pm0.040_{stat}\\pm0.075_{syst})\\cdot 10^{-4}$ is in agreement with ...

  13. Analysis of the low-energy electron-recoil spectrum of the CDMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, Z; Arrenberg, S; Bailey, C N; Balakishiyeva, D; Baudis, L; Bauer, D A; Beaty, J; Brink, P L; Bruch, T; Bunker, R; Cabrera, B; Caldwell, D O; Cooley, J; Cushman, P; De Jongh, F; Dragowsky, M R; Duong, L; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Filippini, J; Fritts, M; Golwala, S R; Grant, D R; Hall, J; Hennings-Yeomans, R; Hertel, S; Holmgren, D; Hsu, L; Huber, M E; Kamaev, O; Kiveni, M; Kos, M; Leman, S W; Mahapatra, R; Mandic, V; Moore, D; McCarthy, K A; Mirabolfathi, N; Nelson, H; Ogburn, R W; Pyle, M; Qiu, X; Ramberg, E; Rau, W; Reisetter, A; Saab, T; Sadoulet, B; Sander, J; Schnee, R W; Seitz, D N; Serfass, B; Sundqvist, K M; Wang, G; Yellin, S; Yoo, J; Young, B A

    2009-01-01

    We report on the analysis of the low-energy electron-recoil spectrum from the CDMS II experiment using data with an exposure of 443.2 kg-days. The analysis provides details on the observed counting rate and possible background sources in the energy range of 2 - 8.5 keV. We find no significant excess in the counting rate above background, and compare this observation to the recent DAMA results. In the framework of a conversion of a dark matter particle into electromagnetic energy, our 90% confidence level upper limit of 0.246 events/kg/day at 3.15 keV is lower than the total rate above background observed by DAMA by 8.9$\\sigma$. In absence of any specific particle physics model to provide the scaling in cross section between NaI and Ge, we assume a Z^2 scaling. With this assumption the observed rate in DAMA differs from the upper limit in CDMS by 6.8$\\sigma$. Under the conservative assumption that the modulation amplitude is 6% of the total rate we obtain upper limits on the modulation amplitude a factor of ~2...

  14. Equilibrium energy spectrum of point vortex motion with remarks on ensemble choice and ergodicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esler, J. G.

    2017-01-01

    The dynamics and statistical mechanics of N chaotically evolving point vortices in the doubly periodic domain are revisited. The selection of the correct microcanonical ensemble for the system is first investigated. The numerical results of Weiss and McWilliams [Phys. Fluids A 3, 835 (1991), 10.1063/1.858014], who argued that the point vortex system with N =6 is nonergodic because of an apparent discrepancy between ensemble averages and dynamical time averages, are shown to be due to an incorrect ensemble definition. When the correct microcanonical ensemble is sampled, accounting for the vortex momentum constraint, time averages obtained from direct numerical simulation agree with ensemble averages within the sampling error of each calculation, i.e., there is no numerical evidence for nonergodicity. Further, in the N →∞ limit it is shown that the vortex momentum no longer constrains the long-time dynamics and therefore that the correct microcanonical ensemble for statistical mechanics is that associated with the entire constant energy hypersurface in phase space. Next, a recently developed technique is used to generate an explicit formula for the density of states function for the system, including for arbitrary distributions of vortex circulations. Exact formulas for the equilibrium energy spectrum, and for the probability density function of the energy in each Fourier mode, are then obtained. Results are compared with a series of direct numerical simulations with N =50 and excellent agreement is found, confirming the relevance of the results for interpretation of quantum and classical two-dimensional turbulence.

  15. Spread Spectrum Based Energy Efficient Collaborative Communication in Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghani, Anwar; Naqvi, Husnain; Sher, Muhammad; Khan, Muazzam Ali; Khan, Imran; Irshad, Azeem

    2016-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks consist of resource limited devices. Most crucial of these resources is battery life, as in most applications like battle field or volcanic area monitoring, it is often impossible to replace or recharge the power source. This article presents an energy efficient collaborative communication system based on spread spectrum to achieve energy efficiency as well as immunity against jamming, natural interference, noise suppression and universal frequency reuse. Performance of the proposed system is evaluated using the received signal power, bit error rate (BER) and energy consumption. The results show a direct proportionality between the power gain and the number of collaborative nodes as well as BER and signal-to-noise ratio (Eb/N0). The analytical and simulation results of the proposed system are compared with SISO system. The comparison reveals that SISO perform better than collaborative communication in case of small distances whereas collaborative communication performs better than SISO in case of long distances. On the basis of these results it is safe to conclude that collaborative communication in wireless sensor networks using wideband systems improves the life time of nodes in the networks thereby prolonging the network's life time.

  16. [Trends in the prevalence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing gram-negative bacilli in a teaching hospital in Madrid, Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Vélez, Abel Ernesto; Díaz-Agero Pérez, Cristina; Robustillo-Rodela, Ana; Pita-López, María José; Cornejo-Gutiérrez, Ana María; Pedrero-Pérez, Pelayo; Monge-Jodra, Vicente

    2013-07-07

    The pprevalence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing gram-negative bacilli has increased in recent years. The aim of this study is to estimate the prevalence of infection/colonization due to theses microorganisms per 100 admissions and its trend during the period 2007-2010. Prospective observational study of all patients admitted from January 2007 to December 2010 infected or colonized with ESBL-producing gram-negative bacilli at Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal. The prevalence of infection/colonization of ESBL-producing gram-negative rods was calculated according to the recommendations for metrics for multidrug-resistant organisms in healthcare settings of The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America and the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee. To analyse trends, Poisson regression was used (Joinpoint Regression Program Version 3.4.3, U.S. National Institutes of Health). Through the study period there was an upward trend of prevalence of all the ESBL-producing gram-negative bacilli. The Poisson trend analysis indentified a significant inflection point in August 2009 (p=0.014). The inflection point in the prevalence of the ESBL-producing gram-negative bacilli trend can be explained by a slowdown in the prevalence of some microorganisms such as ESBL-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  17. Two-atom energy spectrum in a harmonic trap near a Feshbach resonance at higher partial waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Akira; Liang, Yi; Bhaduri, Rajat K.

    2009-09-01

    Two atoms in an optical lattice may be made to interact strongly at higher partial waves near a Feshbach resonance. These atoms, under appropriate constraints, could be bosonic or fermionic. The universal l=2 energy spectrum for such a system, with a caveat, is presented in this paper and checked with the spectrum obtained by direct numerical integration of the Schrödinger equation. The results reported here extend those of Yip for p -wave resonance [S.-K. Yip, Phys. Rev. A 78, 013612 (2008)], while exploring the limitations of a universal expression for the spectrum for the higher partial waves.

  18. Optimization of the wavelength shifter ratio in a polystyrene based plastic scintillator through energy spectrum analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ye Won; Kim, Myung Soo; Yoo, Hyun Jun; Lee, Dae Hee; Cho, Gyu Seong [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Myung Kook [Neutron Instrumentation Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    The scintillation efficiency of the polystyrene based plastic scintillator depends on the ratio of the wavelength shifters, organic fluors (PPO and POPOP). Thus, 24 samples of the plastic scintillator were fabricated in order to find out the optimum ratio of the wavelength shifters in the plastic scintillator. The fabricated plastic scintillators were trimmed through a cutting and polishing process. They were used in gamma energy spectrum measurement with the {sup 137}Cs emitting monoenergy photon with 662 keV for the comparison of the scintillation efficiency. As a result, it was found out that the scintillator sample with 1.00 g of PPO (2,5-Diphenyloxazole) and 0.50 g of POPOP (1,4-Bis(5-phnyl-2oxidazolyl)benzene) dissolved in 100 g of styrene solution has the optimum ratio in terms of the light yield of the polystyrene based plastic scintillator.

  19. Energy spectrum of secondary protons above the atmosphere measured by the instruments NINA and NINA-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidoli, V.; Casolino, M.; de Pascale, M.; Furano, G.; Iannucci, A.; Morselli, A.; Picozza, P.; Sparvoli, R.; Bakaldin, A.; Galper, A.; Koldashov, S.; Korotkov, M.; Leonov, A.; Mikhailov, V.; Voronov, S.; Boezio, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Vacchi, A.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.; Ambriola, M.; Cafagna, F.; Circella, M.; de Marzo, C.; Adriani, O.; Papini, P.; Spillantini, P.; Straulino, S.; Vannuccini, E.; Ricci, M.; Castellini, G.

    2002-10-01

    In this paper we report on the energy spectrum of protons of albedo origin measured by the instruments NINA and NINA-2 at different geomagnetic locations, and the behaviour of the proton flux as a function of altitude out of the South Atlantic Anomaly. The instrument NINA was used on board the satellite Resurs-01-N4 between 1998 and 1999, at an altitude of about 830 km. The NINA-2 apparatus, on board the satellite MITA, was put into orbit in July 2000, at an altitude of about 450 km. A detailed understanding of the fluxes of charged particles in near Earth orbit is important to reach an accurate theoretical description of the Earth’s magnetic field, but also as input for the calculation of the back-ground for scientific instruments aboard satellites, like the future AGILE and GLAST g

  20. Turbulent magnetic energy spectrum and the cancellation function of solar photospheric magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Marschalkó, G

    2014-01-01

    A simple analytical relation of form {\\alpha} = 2 {\\kappa} -1 between the magnetic energy spectral exponent {\\alpha} of the turbulent magnetic field in the solar photosphere and its magnetic flux cancellation exponent {\\kappa}, valid under certain restrictive assumptions, is tested and extended outside its range of validity in a series of Monte Carlo simulations. In these numerical tests artificial "magnetograms" are constructed in 1D and 2D by superposing a discrete set of Fourier modes of the magnetic field distribution with amplitudes following a power law spectrum and measuring the cancellation function on these simulated magnetograms. Our results confirm the validity of the analytical relation and extend it to the domain {\\alpha} 0 as {\\alpha} ---> - infinity. The observationally derived upper limit of 0.38 on {\\kappa} implies {\\alpha} < -0.24 in the granular size range, apparently at odds with a small scale dynamo driven in the inertial range.

  1. Polynomial potentials determined from the energy spectrum and transition dipole moments that give the largest hyperpolarizabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Nathan J.; Kuzyk, Mark G.

    2016-12-01

    We attempt to get a polynomial solution to the inverse problem, that is, to determine the form of the mechanical Hamiltonian when given the energy spectrum and transition dipole moment matrix. Our approach is to determine the potential in the form of a polynomial by finding an approximate solution to the inverse problem, then to determine the hyperpolarizability for that system's Hamiltonian. We find that the largest hyperpolarizabilities approach the apparent limit of previous potential optimization studies, but we do not find real potentials for the parameter values necessary to exceed this apparent limit. We also explore half potentials with positive exponent, which cannot be expressed as a polynomial except for integer powers. This yields a simple closed potential with only one parameter that scans nearly the full range of the intrinsic hyperpolarizability. The limiting case of vanishing exponent yields the largest intrinsic hyperpolarizability.

  2. Cross-Spectrum PM Noise Measurements, Thermal Energy and Metamaterial Filters

    CERN Document Server

    Gruson, Yannick; Rohde, Ulrich L; Poddar, Ajay K; Rubiola, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Virtually all commercial instruments for the measurement of the oscillator PM noise make use of the Cross Spectrum method (arXiv:1004.5539 [physics.ins-det], 2010). High sensitivity is achieved by correlation and averaging on two equal channels which measure the same input, and reject the background of the instrument. We show that a systematic error is always present if the thermal energy of the input power splitter is not accounted for. Such error can result in noise under estimation up to a few dB in the lowest-noise quartz oscillators, and in a complete nonsense in the case of cryogenic oscillators. As another alarming fact, the presence of metamaterial components in the oscillator results in unpredictable behavior and large errors, even in well controlled experimental conditions. We observed a spread of 40 dB in the phase noise spectra of an oscillator, just replacing the output filter.

  3. Energy spectrum measurement of high power and high energy(6 and 9 MeV) pulsed x-ray source for industrial use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takagi, Hiroyuki [Hitachi, Ltd. Power Systems Company, Ibaraki (Japan); Murata, Isao [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Osaka (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Industrial X-ray CT system is normally applied to non-destructive testing (NDT) for industrial product made from metal. Furthermore there are some special CT systems, which have an ability to inspect nuclear fuel assemblies or rocket motors, using high power and high energy (more than 6 MeV) pulsed X-ray source. In these case, pulsed X-ray are produced by the electron linear accelerator, and a huge number of photons with a wide energy spectrum are produced within a very short period. Consequently, it is difficult to measure the X-ray energy spectrum for such accelerator-based X-ray sources using simple spectrometry. Due to this difficulty, unexpected images and artifacts which lead to incorrect density information and dimensions of specimens cannot be avoided in CT images. For getting highly precise CT images, it is important to know the precise energy spectrum of emitted X-rays. In order to realize it we investigated a new approach utilizing the Bayesian estimation method combined with an attenuation curve measurement using step shaped attenuation material. This method was validated by precise measurement of energy spectrum from a 1 MeV electron accelerator. In this study, to extend the applicable X-ray energy range we tried to measure energy spectra of X-ray sources from 6 and 9 MeV linear accelerators by using the recently developed method. In this study, an attenuation curves are measured by using a step-shaped attenuation materials of aluminum and steel individually, and the each X-ray spectrum is reconstructed from the measured attenuation curve by the spectrum type Bayesian estimation method. The obtained result shows good agreement with simulated spectra, and the presently developed technique is adaptable for high energy X-ray source more than 6 MeV.

  4. Hindbrain DPP-IV inhibition improves glycemic control and promotes negative energy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mietlicki-Baase, Elizabeth G; McGrath, Lauren E; Koch-Laskowski, Kieran; Krawczyk, Joanna; Pham, Tram; Lhamo, Rinzin; Reiner, David J; Hayes, Matthew R

    2017-01-22

    The beneficial glycemic and food intake-suppressive effects of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) have made this neuroendocrine system a leading target for pharmacological approaches to the treatment of diabetes and obesity. One strategy to increase the activity of endogenous GLP-1 is to prevent the rapid degradation of the hormone by the enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV). However, despite the expression of both DPP-IV and GLP-1 in the brain, and the clear importance of central GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) signaling for glycemic and energy balance control, the metabolic effects of central inhibition of DPP-IV activity are unclear. To test whether hindbrain DPP-IV inhibition suppresses blood glucose, feeding, and body weight gain, the effects of 4th intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of the FDA-approved DPP-IV inhibitor sitagliptin were evaluated. Results indicate that hindbrain delivery of sitagliptin improves glycemic control in a GLP-1R-dependent manner, suggesting that this effect is due at least in part to increased endogenous brainstem GLP-1 activity after sitagliptin administration. Furthermore, 4th ICV injection of sitagliptin reduced 24h body weight gain and energy intake, with a selective suppression of high-fat diet, but not chow, intake. These data reveal a novel role for hindbrain GLP-1R activation in glycemic control and also demonstrate that DPP-IV inhibition in the caudal brainstem promotes negative energy balance.

  5. Analysis of effectiveness of spectrum of energy and image quality evaluation by aluminium filter in the added compound filtration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Hyun [Dept. of Dignostic Radiology, Seoul National University hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jae Ho [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Ansan College, Ansan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    This study analysed the effectiveness of aluminium(Al) filter in the added compound filtration for the removal of characteristic radiation by energy spectrum and image evaluation. 0.1, 0.2, 0.3 mm copper with and without 1 mm Al were evaluated. The energy spectrum was measured using the GATE and evaluated separately by each energy. Image quality was evaluated by PSNR, MAE, MSE, CNR, SNR and qualitative analysis was performed by seven items for resolution and contrast from chest x-ray criteria of National Cancer Screening and Cardiovascular evaluation table. In the analysis of the quality of the energy per photon spectrum with the exception of a low energy region, without Al were superior in all area. PSNR MAE, MSE, CNR, SNR and qualitative analysis were the same or slightly better. PSNR was over 30 dB and all significant and the p>0.05 in the T-test of qualitative analysis. The energy spectrum and image quality have little difference between before and after use of Al filter. Therefore, it is effective to use the Al filter for the radiation dose management with the compensation capability of DR system.

  6. Energy analysis of a DEAP based cylindrical actuator coupled with a radial negative stiffness spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavanne, Jonathan; Civet, Yoan; Perriard, Yves

    2017-04-01

    The main problem to obtain considerable deformation with dielectric electro-active polymer based technology is the electrical breakdown. A simple solution consists in pre-stretching the elastomer before activating it which cancels the snap-through effect and thus avoid reaching the electrical limit. Due to the stress characteristic of the DEAP, it could be demonstrated that a spring with a negative stiffness provides the best strain. In this paper, a new design of a monostable spring with a negative stiffness is suggested for a DEAP tubular shape actuator. The particularity of the proposed solution is the radial direction of the displacement with a special load characteristic. In order to determine the performance of the system, the mechanical and electrical behaviour are investigated through analytical models with the assumption that the axial stretch stays constant. A finite element method is used to validate these latter and maximal error lower than 2% is reported. The energy chain conversion is developed in detail which allows studying all the energies transferred from both the electrical input and any pre-stretch solution to the membrane during a cycle of activation. From these models, the negative stiffness spring is compared to the common solution, i.e a constant pressure or a linear positive spring, to pre-stretch a cylindrical EAP. The results show that the linear spring always removes the snap-through behaviour contrary to the constant pressure. Depending on the geometry, the monostable solution cancels also this latter and owns a better energy transfer from the power supply to the elastomer (around 50% against 40% for the linear spring) or a better stroke compared to the linear spring. Furthermore, due to the hollow in its stress characteristic, the cylindrical shaped actuator associated to a linear spring or the proposed spring allows increasing the strain. Through the different analytical models, the definition of the electrical breakdown and the

  7. Negative energy balance alters global gene expression and immune responses in the uterus of postpartum dairy cows

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wathes, D. Claire; Cheng, Zhangrui; Chowdhury, Waliul; Fenwick, Mark A; Fitzpatrick, Richard; Morris, Dermot G; Patton, Joe; Murphy, John J

    2009-01-01

    .... Persistent endometritis often develops, associated with reduced fertility. We used a model of differential feeding and milking regimes to produce cows in differing negative energy balance status in early lactation...

  8. On the Evolution of and High-Energy Emission from GHz-Peaked-Spectrum Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stawarz, L.; Ostorero, L.; Begelman, M.C.; Moderski, R.; Kataoka, J.; Wagner, S.

    2007-12-18

    Here we discuss evolution and broad-band emission of compact (< kpc) lobes in young radio sources. We propose a simple dynamical description for these objects, consisting of a relativistic jet propagating into a uniform gaseous medium in the central parts of an elliptical host. In the framework of the proposed model, we follow the evolution of ultrarelativistic electrons injected from a terminal hotspot of a jet to expanding lobes, taking into account their adiabatic energy losses as well as radiative cooling. This allows us to discuss the broad-band lobe emission of young radio sources. In particular, we argue that the observed spectral turnover in the radio synchrotron spectra of these objects cannot originate from the synchrotron self-absorption process but is most likely due to free-free absorption effects connected with neutral clouds of interstellar medium engulfed by the expanding lobes and photoionized by active centers. We also find a relatively strong and complex high-energy emission component produced by inverse-Compton up-scattering of various surrounding photon fields by the lobes electrons. We argue that such high energy radiation is strong enough to account for several observed properties of GHz-peaked-spectrum (GPS) radio galaxies at UV and X-ray frequencies. In addition, this emission is expected to extend up to GeV (or possibly even TeV) photon energies and can thus be probed by several modern {gamma}-ray instruments. In particular, we suggest that GPS radio galaxies should constitute a relatively numerous class of extragalactic sources detected by GLAST.

  9. Implicit Discrimination of Basic Facial Expressions of Positive/Negative Emotion in Fragile X Syndrome and Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Hayley; Moss, Joanna; Anderson, Giles M; Oliver, Chris; McCleery, Joseph P

    2015-07-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) and autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are characterized by impaired social functioning. We examined the spontaneous discrimination of happy and disgusted facial expressions, from neutral faces, in individuals with FXS (n  =  13, Mage  =  19.70) and ASD (n  =  15, Mage  =  11.00) matched on adaptive behavior and verbal abilities measured by the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale. Eye gaze to the eyes and mouth of neutral faces was also measured. Results suggest individuals with FXS and ASD distinguish facial expressions spontaneously in the same way. Individuals with FXS looked significantly less at the eye region of neutral faces than individuals with ASD. These results provide insight into similarities and differences in face processing in two neurodevelopmental disorders noted for their similarities in social behavior.

  10. Tropheryma whippelii as a cause of afebrile culture-negative endocarditis: the evolving spectrum of Whipple's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, David C; Burrows, Lori L; Korithoski, Bryan; Salit, Irving E; Butany, Jagdish; David, Tirone E; Conly, John M

    2003-08-01

    With the advent of molecular diagnostics culture-negative endocarditis caused by the organism Tropheryma whippelii is an increasingly described entity. We describe two patients with afebrile, culture-negative endocarditis caused by T. whippelii who had neither the gastrointestinal nor arthritic manifestations of Whipple's disease. Whipple's disease is a systemic illness caused by the organism Tropheryma whippelii and is typically characterized by diarrhea, weight loss, and arthropathy [Clin. Microbiol. Rev. 2001;14:561-583; Medicine (Baltimore) 1997;76:170-184]. Whipple's endocarditis is relatively common in autopsy studies [Can. J. Cardiol. 1996;12:831-834] but has rarely been diagnosed before death. With the advent of molecular diagnostic tools such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Tropheryma whippelii as a cause of culture-negative endocarditis has become increasingly recognized [Clin. Infect. Dis. 2001;33:1309-1316; Ann. Intern. Med. 1999;131:112-116; Infection 2001;29:44-47; Ann. Intern. Med. 2000;132:595]. With this increased recognition has come the realization that Whipple's endocarditis can occur without other common manifestations of Whipple's disease [Ann. Intern. Med. 1999;131:112-116; Infection 2001;29:44-47; Ann. Intern. Med. 2000;132:595]. We report here two cases of Whipple's endocarditis without discrete febrile illness, gastrointestinal manifestations, or arthritic manifestations, diagnosed by PCR of resected valvular material.

  11. The Energy Spectrum of Atmospheric Neutrinos between 2 and 200 TeV with the AMANDA-II Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    IceCube Collaboration; Abbasi, R.

    2010-05-11

    The muon and anti-muon neutrino energy spectrum is determined from 2000-2003 AMANDA telescope data using regularised unfolding. This is the first measurement of atmospheric neutrinos in the energy range 2-200 TeV. The result is compared to different atmospheric neutrino models and it is compatible with the atmospheric neutrinos from pion and kaon decays. No significant contribution from charm hadron decays or extraterrestrial neutrinos is detected. The capabilities to improve the measurement of the neutrino spectrum with the successor experiment IceCube are discussed.

  12. The quantum Kirchhoff equation and quantum current and energy spectrum of a homogeneous mesoscopic dissipation transmission line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    On the basis of quantization of charge, the loop equations of quantum circuits are investigated by using the Heisenberg motion equation for a mesoscopic dissipation transmission line. On the supposition that the system has a symmetry under translation in charge space, the quantum current and the quantum energy spectrum in the mesoscopic transmission line are given by solving their eigenvalue equations. Results show that the quantum current and the quantum energy spectrum are not only related to the parameters of the transmission line, but also dependent on the quantized character of the charge obviously.

  13. The energy spectrum of atmospheric neutrinos between 2 and 200 TeV with the AMANDA-II detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, R.; Abdou, Y.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Andeen, K.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Baker, M.; Barwick, S. W.; Bay, R.; Bazo Alba, J. L.; Beattie, K.; Beatty, J. J.; Bechet, S.; Becker, J. K.; Becker, K.-H.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; Berdermann, J.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bertrand, D.; Besson, D. Z.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Bradley, L.; Braun, J.; Buitink, S.; Carson, M.; Chirkin, D.; Christy, B.; Clem, J.; Clevermann, F.; Cohen, S.; Colnard, C.; Cowen, D. F.; D'Agostino, M. V.; Danninger, M.; De Clercq, C.; Demirörs, L.; Depaepe, O.; Descamps, F.; Desiati, P.; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G.; DeYoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dreyer, J.; Dumm, J. P.; Duvoort, M. R.; Ehrlich, R.; Eisch, J.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Engdegård, O.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fadiran, O.; Fazely, A. R.; Fedynitch, A.; Feusels, T.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Foerster, M. M.; Fox, B. D.; Franckowiak, A.; Franke, R.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Ganugapati, R.; Geisler, M.; Gerhardt, L.; Gladstone, L.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Goodman, J. A.; Grant, D.; Griesel, T.; Groß, A.; Grullon, S.; Gunasingha, R. M.; Gurtner, M.; Ha, C.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Han, K.; Hanson, K.; Helbing, K.; Herquet, P.; Hickford, S.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Hubert, D.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hülß, J.-P.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; Hussain, S.; Imlay, R. L.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobsen, J.; Japaridze, G. S.; Johansson, H.; Joseph, J. M.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemming, N.; Kenny, P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kislat, F.; Klein, S. R.; Knops, S.; Köhne, J.-H.; Kohnen, G.; Kolanoski, H.; Köpke, L.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Kowarik, T.; Krasberg, M.; Krings, T.; Kroll, G.; Kuehn, K.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Lafebre, S.; Laihem, K.; Landsman, H.; Lauer, R.; Lehmann, R.; Lennarz, D.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Majumdar, P.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; Matusik, M.; Meagher, K.; Merck, M.; Mészáros, P.; Meures, T.; Middell, E.; Milke, N.; Montaruli, T.; Morse, R.; Movit, S. M.; Münich, K.; Nahnhauer, R.; Nam, J. W.; Naumann, U.; Nießen, P.; Nygren, D. R.; Odrowski, S.; Olivas, A.; Olivo, M.; Ono, M.; Panknin, S.; Paul, L.; Pérez de los Heros, C.; Petrovic, J.; Piegsa, A.; Pieloth, D.; Porrata, R.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Prikockis, M.; Przybylski, G. T.; Rawlins, K.; Redl, P.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rodrigues, J. P.; Roth, P.; Rothmaier, F.; Rott, C.; Roucelle, C.; Ruhe, T.; Rutledge, D.; Ruzybayev, B.; Ryckbosch, D.; Sander, H.-G.; Sarkar, S.; Schatto, K.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, D.; Schukraft, A.; Schultes, A.; Schulz, O.; Schunck, M.; Seckel, D.; Semburg, B.; Seo, S. H.; Sestayo, Y.; Seunarine, S.; Silvestri, A.; Slipak, A.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stephens, G.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stoyanov, S.; Strahler, E. A.; Straszheim, T.; Sullivan, G. W.; Swillens, Q.; Taboada, I.; Tamburro, A.; Tarasova, O.; Tepe, A.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Tosi, D.; Turčan, D.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Van Overloop, A.; van Santen, J.; Voigt, B.; Walck, C.; Waldenmaier, T.; Wallraff, M.; Walter, M.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whitehorn, N.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wikström, G.; Williams, D. R.; Wischnewski, R.; Wissing, H.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, C.; Xu, X. W.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zarzhitsky, P.

    2010-08-01

    The muon and anti-muon neutrino energy spectrum is determined from 2000-2003 AMANDA telescope data using regularised unfolding. This is the first measurement of atmospheric neutrinos in the energy range 2-200 TeV. The result is compared to different atmospheric neutrino models and it is compatible with the atmospheric neutrinos from pion and kaon decays. No significant contribution from charm hadron decays or extraterrestrial neutrinos is detected. The capabilities to improve the measurement of the neutrino spectrum with the successor experiment IceCube are discussed.

  14. Obscured flat spectrum radio active galactic nuclei as sources of high-energy neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, G.; Buitink, S.; Correa, P.; de Vries, K. D.; Gentile, G.; Tavares, J. León; Scholten, O.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vereecken, M.; Winchen, T.

    2016-11-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) are believed to be one of the main source candidates for the high-energy (TeV-PeV) cosmic neutrino flux recently discovered by the IceCube neutrino observatory. Nevertheless, several correlation studies between AGN and the cosmic neutrinos detected by IceCube show no significance. Therefore, in this article we consider a specific subclass of AGN for which an increased neutrino production is expected. This subclass contains AGN for which their high-energy jet is pointing toward Earth. Furthermore, we impose the condition that the jet is obscured by gas or dust surrounding the AGN. A method is presented to determine the total column density of the obscuring medium, which is probed by determining the relative x-ray attenuation with respect to the radio flux as obtained from the AGN spectrum. The total column density allows us to probe the interaction of the jet with the surrounding matter, which leads to additional neutrino production. Finally, starting from two different source catalogs, this method is applied to specify a sample of low redshift radio galaxies for which an increased neutrino production is expected.

  15. Obscured flat spectrum radio AGN as sources of high-energy neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Maggi, G; Correa, P; de Vries, K D; Gentile, G; Tavares, J Leon; Scholten, O; van Eijndhoven, N; Vereecken, M; Winchen, T

    2016-01-01

    Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) are believed to be one of the main source candidates for the high-energy (TeV-PeV) cosmic neutrino flux recently discovered by the IceCube neutrino observatory. Nevertheless, several correlation studies between AGN and the cosmic neutrinos detected by IceCube show no significance. Therefore, in this article we consider a specific sub-class of AGN for which an increased neutrino production is expected. This sub-class contains AGN for which their high-energy jet is pointing toward Earth. Furthermore, we impose the condition that the jet is obscured by gas or dust surrounding the AGN. A method is presented to determine the total column density of the obscuring medium, which is probed by determining the relative X-ray attenuation with respect to the radio flux as obtained from the AGN spectrum. The total column density allows us to probe the interaction of the jet with the surrounding matter which leads to additional neutrino production. Finally, starting from two different source cat...

  16. Energy/bandwidth-Saving Cooperative Spectrum Sensing for Two-hopWRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Tuo Zhou

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A two-hop wireless regional area network (WRAN providing monitoring services operating in Television White Space (TVWS, i.e., IEEE P802.22b, may employ a great number of subscriber customer-premises equipments (S-CPEs possibly without mains power supply, leading to requirement of cost-effective and power-saving design. This paper proposes a framework of cooperative spectrum sensing (CSS and an energy/bandwidth saving CSS scheme to P802.22b. In each round of sensing, S-CPEs with SNRs lower than a predefined threshold are excluded from reporting sensing results. Numerical results show that the fused missed-detection probability and false alarmprobability could remainmeeting sensing requirements, and the overall fused error probability changes very little. With 10 S-CPEs, it is possible to save more than 40% of the energy/bandwidth on a Rayleigh channel. The principle proposed can apply to other advanced sensing technologies capable of detecting primary signals with low average SNR.

  17. Polynomial potentials determined from the energy spectrum and transition dipole moments that give the largest hyperpolarizabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Dawson, Nathan J

    2016-01-01

    We attempt to get a polynomial solution to the inverse problem, that is, to determine the form of the mechanical Hamiltonian when given the energy spectrum and transition dipole moment matrix. This is related to the famous problem of "hearing the shape of a drumhead," as originally stated by Koch [see Mark Kac, "Can One Hear the Shape of a Drum?" Mathematical Monthly vol. 73, 1 (1966)]. The ideal energy spacing to get hyperpolarizabilities at the limit can be determined from Monte Carlo techniques [see M. C. Kuzyk and M. G. Kuzyk, "Monte Carlo Studies of the Fundamental Limits of the Intrinsic Hyperpolarizability," J. Opt. Soc. Am. B vol. 23, 103 (2008).]; but, there is no reliable way to get the underlying Hamiltonian. Our approach is to determine the potential in the form of a polynomial by finding an approximate solution to the inverse problem, then to determine the hyperpolarizability for that system's Hamiltonian. We find that the largest hyperpolarizabilities approach the apparent limit of previous pote...

  18. The Spectrum of Thorium from 250 nm to 5500 nm: Ritz Wavelengths and Optimized Energy Levels

    CERN Document Server

    Redman, Stephen L; Sansonetti, Craig J

    2013-01-01

    We have made precise observations of a thorium-argon hollow cathode lamp emission spectrum in the region between 350 nm and 1175 nm using a high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer. Our measurements are combined with results from seven previously published thorium line lists (Giacchetti et al. 1974; Zalubas & Corliss 1974; Zalubas 1976; Palmer & Engleman 1983; Engleman et al. 2003; Lovis & Pepe 2007; Kerber et al. 2008) to re-optimize the energy levels of neutral, singly-, and doubly-ionized thorium (Th I, Th II, and Th III). Using the optimized level values, we calculate accurate Ritz wavelengths for 19679 thorium lines between 250 nm and 5500 nm (40000 1/cm to 1800 1/cm). We have also found 102 new thorium energy levels. A systematic analysis of previous measurements in light of our new results allows us to identify and propose corrections for systematic errors in Palmer & Engleman (1983) and typographical errors and incorrect classifications in Kerber et al. (2008). We also found a la...

  19. Dimensionality effect on two-electron energy spectrum: A fractional-dimension-based formulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, R.; Gutiérrez, W.; Mikhailov, I. [Escuela de Física, Universidad Industrial de Santander, A.A. 678, Bucaramanga (Colombia); Fulla, M.R. [Escuela de Física, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, A.A. 3840, Medellín (Colombia); Marín, J.H., E-mail: jhmarin@unal.edu.co [Escuela de Física, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, A.A. 3840, Medellín (Colombia)

    2015-07-17

    We analyze the spectrum of two-electron quantum dot with anisotropic parabolic confinement by using the fractional-dimension formulation which allows us to reduce the two-particle problem to two equations for independent particles in an effective space with variable dimension, ranging between two and three for ellipsoidal-shaped quantum dots and between one and two for elliptical-shaped quantum disks. The dependencies of energy levels on the heterostructure sizes for quantum dots, disks and wires are presented. - Highlights: • We report the two-electron eigenenergies in a quantum dot with anisotropic parabolic confinement. • Our model is versatile enough to consider changes in the dimension space from 3 to 2 and 2 to 1. • The two-electron structure is calculated in integer and fractional dimensional spaces. • The two-electron energy structure is sensitive to the quantum dot size and morphology changes. • The electron–electron Coulomb interaction is strongly dependent on the space dimensionality.

  20. Determination and production of an optimal neutron energy spectrum for boron neutron capture therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleuel, Darren Leo

    An accelerator-based neutron irradiation facility employing an electrostatic quadrupole (ESQ) accelerator for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) has been proposed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. In this dissertation, the properties of an ideal neutron beam for delivering a maximized dose to a glioblastoma multiforme tumor in a reasonable time while minimizing the dose to healthy tissue is examined. A variety of materials, beam shaping assemblies, and neutron sources were considered to deliver a neutron spectrum as close to the calculated idealized spectrum as possible. Several optimization studies were performed to determine the best proton energy and moderator material to maximize the efficacy of an accelerator-based BNCT facility utilizing the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction as a neutron source. A new, faster method of performing such an optimization was developed, known as the "Ubertally" method, in which data from a single Monte Carlo simulation is reweighted to produce results for any neutron spatial, energy and angular source distribution. Results were confirmed experimentally at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's 88″ cyclotron. Thermal fluxes in this experiment were found to be approximately 30% lower than expected, but the depth-dose profile was confirmed to within 8% maximum deviation. A final beam shaping assembly is then recommended. Utilizing a material known as Fluental as a moderating material, deep-seated tumor doses 50% higher than that delivered by clinical trials at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) are predicted. The final recommended design should contain a 37 cm thickness of Fluental(TM) moderator, a 1--2 cm gamma shield, an Al2O3 reflector, a V-shaped aluminum-backed or copper-backed source with heavy water cooling, and a 13 cm lithiated polyethylene delimiter. This design would be operated at 2.4 MeV proton energy at 20 mA to conduct treatments in less than an hour and a half. However, this design may be easily altered

  1. Prevalence of multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacilli producing extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) and ESBL genes in solid organ transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Men, T-Y; Wang, J-N; Li, H; Gu, Y; Xing, T-H; Peng, Z-H; Zhong, L

    2013-02-01

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) gram-negative bacilli pose a serious and rapidly emerging threat to recipients of solid organ transplants (SOTs). However, extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs), as one of the cardinal mechanisms of resistance to antimicrobial agents in SOT recipients, remain obscure. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of strains producing ESBLs in SOT patients with MDR gram-negative bacilli infections and to identify the ESBL genes carried by them. Isolates from various clinical specimens of SOT recipients were identified using the VITEK 2 system, and their antibiotic sensitivity was determined by the 2-fold agar dilution method. Isolates suspected of producing ESBL enzymes were tested by an ESBL phenotypic confirmatory method, and the ESBL genotypes were determined by the polymerase chain reaction and sequencing. A total of 80 MDR gram-negative strains were isolated from 350 SOT recipients. Among these strains, 42 (52.5%) had an ESBL-positive phenotype; 33 (42.3%) patients with ESBL-positive infection were found. Molecular analysis showed that most of the isolates harbored blaCTX-M-9 (78.6%), blaTEM (81.0%), and blaSHV (69.0%) genes. All the ESBL-producing strains were susceptible to carbapenems. MDR gram-negative isolates from SOT recipients are frequently ESBL producers. TEM and CTX-M9 were the predominant ESBL types. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  2. Spectrum and anisotropy of cosmic rays at TeV-PeV-energies and contribution of nearby sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sveshnikova, L. G.; Strelnikova, O. N.; Ptuskin, V. S.

    2013-12-01

    The role of nearby galactic sources, the supernova remnants, in formation of observed energy spectrum and large-scale anisotropy of high-energy cosmic rays is studied. The list of these sources is made up based on radio, X-ray and gamma-ray catalogues. The distant sources are treated statistically as ensemble of sources with random positions and ages. The source spectra are defined based on the modern theory of cosmic ray acceleration in supernova remnants while the propagation of cosmic rays in the interstellar medium is described in the frameworks of galactic diffusion model. Calculations of dipole component of anisotropy are made to reproduce the experimental procedure of "two-dimensional" anisotropy measurements. The energy dependence of particle escape time in the process of acceleration in supernova remnants and the arm structure of sources defining the significant features of anisotropy are also taken into account. The essential new trait of the model is a decreasing number of core collapse SNRs being able to accelerate cosmic rays up to the given energy, that leads to steeper total cosmic ray source spectrum in comparison with the individual source spectrum. We explained simultaneously the new cosmic ray data on the fine structure of all particle spectrum around the knee and the amplitude and direction of the dipole component of anisotropy in the wide energy range 1 TeV-1 EeV. Suggested assumptions do not look exotic, and they confirm the modern understanding of cosmic ray origin.

  3. Cosmic-ray energy spectrum and composition up to the ankle - the case for a second Galactic component

    CERN Document Server

    Thoudam, S; van Vliet, A; Achterberg, A; Buitink, S; Falcke, H; Hörandel, J R

    2016-01-01

    We have carried out a detailed study to understand the observed energy spectrum and composition of cosmic rays with energies up to ~10^18 eV. Our study shows that a single Galactic component with subsequent energy cut-offs in the individual spectra of different elements, optimised to explain the observed spectra below ~10^14 eV and the knee in the all-particle spectrum, cannot explain the observed all-particle spectrum above ~2x10^16 eV. We discuss two approaches for a second component of Galactic cosmic rays -- re-acceleration at a Galactic wind termination shock, and supernova explosions of Wolf-Rayet stars, and show that the latter scenario can explain almost all observed features in the all-particle spectrum and the composition up to ~10^18 eV, when combined with a canonical extra-galactic spectrum expected from strong radio galaxies or a source population with similar cosmological evolution. In this two-component Galactic model, the knee at ~ 3x10^15 eV and the second knee at ~10^17 eV in the all-particl...

  4. Energy-dependent motion of TonB in the Gram-negative bacterial inner membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Lorne D; Zhou, Yongyao; Smallwood, Chuck R; Lill, Yoriko; Ritchie, Ken; Yip, Wai Tak; Newton, Salete M; Klebba, Phillip E

    2013-07-09

    Gram-negative bacteria acquire iron with TonB-dependent uptake systems. The TonB-ExbBD inner membrane complex is hypothesized to transfer energy to outer membrane (OM) iron transporters. Fluorescence microscopic characterization of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-TonB hybrid proteins revealed an unexpected, restricted localization of TonB in the cell envelope. Fluorescence polarization measurements demonstrated motion of TonB in living cells, which likely was rotation. By determining the anisotropy of GFP-TonB in the absence and presence of inhibitors, we saw the dependence of its motion on electrochemical force and on the actions of ExbBD. We observed higher anisotropy for GFP-TonB in energy-depleted cells and lower values in bacteria lacking ExbBD. However, the metabolic inhibitors did not change the anisotropy of GFP-TonB in ΔexbBD cells. These findings demonstrate that TonB undergoes energized motion in the bacterial cell envelope and that ExbBD couples this activity to the electrochemical gradient. The results portray TonB as an energized entity in a regular array underlying the OM bilayer, which promotes metal uptake through OM transporters by a rotational mechanism.

  5. Low-energy outer-shell photodetachment of the negative ion of boron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kedong; Zatsarinny, Oleg; Bartschat, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    The photodetachment of the negative ion of boron, B-(2s22p2)3P, is investigated by employing the B-spline R-matrixmethod for photon energies ranging from threshold to 12 eV. A multi-configuration Hartree-Fock method with nonorthogonal, term-dependent orbitals is employed to generate accurate initial bound-state and final continuum-state wavefunctions. The close-coupling expansion includes all principal scattering channels for photodetachment from both the 2p and 2s orbitals. The calculated photodetachment cross sections are in good agreement with the available experimental data. Several prominent resonance features are predicted, thereby providing new challenges in the study of this highly correlated process. To classify the resonance structure, both the partial cross sections and the main contributions of the individual scattering channels are discussed. The presented cross sections, along with the asymmetry parameter β for the angular distribution, are believed to be the most comprehensive and accurate dataset currently available for the B- photodetachment process at low energies. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  6. Low energy electron induced reactions in fluorinated acetamide - probing negative ions and neutral stable counterparts*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopyra, Janina; König-Lehmann, Constanze; Illenberger, Eugen; Warneke, Jonas; Swiderek, Petra

    2016-06-01

    Electron impact to trifluoroacetamide (CF3CONH2, TFAA) in the energy range 0-12 eV leads to a variety of negative fragment ions which are formed via dissociative electron attachment (DEA). The underlying reactions range from single bond cleavages to remarkably complex reactions that lead to loss of the neutral units HF, H2O and HNCO as deduced from their directly observed ionic counterparts (M - H2O)-, (M - HF)- and (M - HNCO)-. Also formed are the pseudo-halogen ions CN- and OCN-. All these reactions proceed dominantly via a resonance located near 1 eV, i.e., electrons at subexcitation energies trigger reactions involving multiple bond cleavages. The electron induced generation of the neutral molecules HF, H2O and HNCO in condensed TFAA films is probed by temperature controlled thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS) which can be viewed as a complementary techniques to gas-phase experiments in DEA to directly probe the neutral counterparts. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Advances in Positron and Electron Scattering", edited by Paulo Limao-Vieira, Gustavo Garcia, E. Krishnakumar, James Sullivan, Hajime Tanuma and Zoran Petrovic.

  7. Tailoring the negative-refractive-index metamaterials composed of semiconductor-metal-semiconductor gold ring/disk cavity heptamers to support strong Fano resonances in the visible spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadivand, Arash; Pala, Nezih

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we investigated numerically the plasmon response of a planar negative-index metamaterial composed of symmetric molecular orientations of Au ring/disk nanocavities in a heptamer cluster. Using the plasmon hybridization theory and considering the optical response of an individual nanocluster, we determined the accurate geometrical sizes for a ring/disk nanocavity heptamer. It is shown that the proposed well-organized nanocluster can be tailored to support strong and sharp Fano resonances in the visible spectrum. Surrounding and filling the heptamer clusters by various metasurfaces with different chemical characteristics, and illuminating the structure with an incident light source, we proved that this configuration reflects low losses and isotropic features, including a pronounced Fano dip in the visible spectrum. Technically, employing numerical methods and tuning the geometrical sizes of the structure, we tuned and induced the Fano dip in the visible range, while the dark and bright plasmon resonance extremes are blueshifted to shorter wavelengths dramatically. Considering the calculated transmission window, we quantified the effective refractive index for the structure, while the substance of the substrate material was varied. Using Si, GaP, and InP semiconductors as substrate materials, we calculated and compared the corresponding figure of merit (FOM) for different regimes. The highest possible FOM was obtained for the GaP-Au-GaP negative-refractive-index metamaterial composed of ring/disk nanocavity heptamers as 62.4 at λ∼690  nm (arounnd the position of the Fano dip). Despite the outstanding symmetric nature of the suggested heptamer array, we provided sharp Fano dips by the appropriate tuning of the geometrical and chemical parameters. This study yields a method to employ ring/disk nanocavity heptamers as a negative-refractive-index metamaterial in designing highly accurate localization of surface plasmon resonance sensing devices and

  8. Origin of the ankle in the ultra-high energy cosmic ray spectrum and of the extragalactic protons below it

    CERN Document Server

    Farrar, Glennys R; Anchordoqui, Luis A

    2015-01-01

    The sharp change in slope of the ultra-high energy cosmic ray (UHECR) spectrum around 10^{18.6} eV (the ankle), combined with evidence of a light but extragalactic component near and below the ankle which evolves to intermediate composition above, has proved exceedingly challenging to understand theoretically. We show that for a range of source conditions, photo-disintegration of ultra-high energy nuclei in the region surrounding a UHECR accelerator naturally accounts for the observed spectrum and composition of the entire extragalactic component, which dominates above about 10^{17.5} eV. The mechanism has a clear signature in the spectrum and flavors of neutrinos.

  9. Measuring extensive air showers with Cherenkov light detectors of the Yakutsk array: the energy spectrum of cosmic rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, A A; Knurenko, S P; Sleptsov, I Ye [Shafer Institute for Cosmophysical Research and Aeronomy, Yakutsk 677980 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: ivanov@ikfia.ysn.ru

    2009-06-15

    The energy spectrum of cosmic rays in the range E{approx}10{sup 15} eV to 6x10{sup 19} eV is studied in this paper using air Cherenkov light detectors of the Yakutsk array. The total flux of photons produced by the relativistic electrons (including positrons as well, hereafter) of extensive air showers in the atmosphere is used as an energy estimator of the primary particle initiating a shower. The resultant differential flux of cosmic rays exhibits, in agreement with previous measurements, a knee and ankle feature at energies of 3x10{sup 15} and {approx}10{sup 19} eV, respectively. A comparison of observational data with simulations is made in the knee and ankle regions in order to choose the models of galactic and extragalactic components of cosmic rays that describe well the energy spectrum measured.

  10. A simple setup to measure muon lifetime and electron energy spectrum of muon decay and its Monte Carlo simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Yushi; Mei, Yefeng; Zhang, Zhao; Ning, Chuangang

    2016-01-01

    We designed a simple setup to measure the muon lifetime and the electron energy spectra of muon decay. A low cost coincidental circuit was designed to select the signals of muon decay events detected by a plastic scintillator detector. It triggered a digital oscilloscope to record the signals of muon decay events for measuring the muon lifetime and electron energy spectrum. A Landau-distribution energy loss method was introduced to conduct the energy calibration of the system. The experimental results were well reproduced by the Monte Carlo simulation. The software and hardware of the system are completely open to students, thus more helpful for instruction and motivation.

  11. Quantum dynamics study of energy requirement on reactivity for the HBr + OH reaction with a negative-energy barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuping; Li, Yida; Wang, Dunyou

    2017-01-01

    A time-dependent, quantum reaction dynamics approach in full dimensional, six degrees of freedom was carried out to study the energy requirement on reactivity for the HBr + OH reaction with an early, negative energy barrier. The calculation shows both the HBr and OH vibrational excitations enhance the reactivity. However, even this reaction has a negative energy barrier, the calculation shows not all forms of energy are equally effective in promoting the reactivity. On the basis of equal amount of total energy, the vibrational energies of both the HBr and OH are more effective in enhancing the reactivity than the translational energy, whereas the rotational excitations of both the HBr and OH hinder the reactivity. The rate constants were also calculated for the temperature range between 5 to 500 K. The quantal rate constants have a better slope agreement with the experimental data than quasi-classical trajectory results.

  12. A rigorous description of the energy spectrum of the isopropanol molecule taking into account the internal rotation of hydroxyl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burenin, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    Using the methods of a group chain, a rigorous algebraic model is constructed to describe the energy spectrum of the isopropanol molecule (CH3)2CHOH with an allowance for the internal rotation of hydroxyl. The model is rigorous in the sense that its correctness is limited only by the correctness of a chosen symmetry of internal dynamics of the molecule.

  13. Measurement of the energy spectrum of cosmic rays above 10(18) eV using the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abraham, J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Allard, D.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Anticic, T.; Anzalone, A.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Arisaka, K.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avila, G.; Baecker, T.; Badagnani, D.; Balzer, M.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Bauleo, P.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Belletoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bergmann, T.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanch-Bigas, O.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Bluemer, H.; Bohacova, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Busca, N. G.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colombo, E.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceicao, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Cooper, M. J.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Cotti, U.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; De Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; Decerprit, G.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Della Selva, A.; Delle Fratte, C.; Dembinski, H.; Di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Diaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; DuVernois, M. A.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Etchegoyen, A.; San Luis, P. Facal; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferrero, A.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipcic, A.; Fleck, I.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Froehlich, U.; Fulgione, W.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; Garcia, B.; Garcia Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garrido, X.; Gelmini, G.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Goggin, L. M.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gomez Berisso, M.; Goncalves, P.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gora, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Gozzini, S. R.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hague, J. D.; Halenka, V.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hojvat, C.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Horandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Hrabovsky, M.; Huege, T.; Hussain, M.; Iarlori, M.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jiraskova, S.; Kadija, K.; Kaducak, M.; Kampert, K. H.; Karova, T.; Kasper, P.; Kegl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapik, R.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D. -H.; Krieger, A.; Kroemer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuehn, F.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, K.; Kunka, N.; Kusenko, A.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lago, B. L.; Lautridou, P.; Leao, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, J.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Lemiere, A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Lopez, R.; Lopez Agueera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martinez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; McEwen, M.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Meurer, C.; Micanovic, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miller, W.; Miramonti, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Ragaigne, D. Monnier; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, E.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafa, M.; Mueller, S.; Muller, M. A.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nhung, P. T.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nozka, L.; Nyklicek, M.; Oehlschlaeger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliva, P.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Selmi-Dei, D. Pakk; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parlati, S.; Parra, A.; Parrisius, J.; Parsons, R. D.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pavlidou, V.; Payet, K.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Petrovic, J.; Pfendner, C.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Redondo, A.; Revenu, B.; Rezende, F. A. S.

    2010-01-01

    We report a measurement of the flux of cosmic rays with unprecedented precision and Statistics using the Pierre Auger Observatory Based on fluorescence observations in coincidence with at least one Surface detector we derive a spectrum for energies above 10(18) eV We also update the previously publi

  14. Development of the negative ion beams relevant to ITER and JT-60SA at Japan Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanada, M., E-mail: hanada.masaya@jaea.go.jp; Kojima, A.; Tobari, H.; Nishikiori, R.; Hiratsuka, J.; Kashiwagi, M.; Umeda, N.; Yoshida, M.; Ichikawa, M.; Watanabe, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1 Mukouyama, Naka-shi, Ibaraki-ken 319-0913 (Japan); Yamano, Y. [Saitama University, Saitama, Saitama-ken 338-8570 (Japan); Grisham, L. R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    In order to realize negative ion sources and accelerators to be applicable to International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and JT-60 Super Advanced, a large cesium (Cs)-seeded negative ion source and a multi-aperture and multi-stage electric acceleration have been developed at Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). Long pulse production and acceleration of the negative ion beams have been independently carried out. The long pulse production of the high current beams has achieved 100 s at the beam current of 15 A by modifying the JT-60 negative ion source. The pulse duration time is increased three times longer than that before the modification. As for the acceleration, a pulse duration time has been also extended two orders of magnitudes from 0.4 s to 60 s. The developments of the negative ion source and acceleration at JAEA are well in progress towards the realization of the negative ion sources and accelerators for fusion applications.

  15. Development of the negative ion beams relevant to ITER and JT-60SA at Japan Atomic Energy Agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanada, M; Kojima, A; Tobari, H; Nishikiori, R; Hiratsuka, J; Kashiwagi, M; Umeda, N; Yoshida, M; Ichikawa, M; Watanabe, K; Yamano, Y; Grisham, L R

    2016-02-01

    In order to realize negative ion sources and accelerators to be applicable to International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and JT-60 Super Advanced, a large cesium (Cs)-seeded negative ion source and a multi-aperture and multi-stage electric acceleration have been developed at Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). Long pulse production and acceleration of the negative ion beams have been independently carried out. The long pulse production of the high current beams has achieved 100 s at the beam current of 15 A by modifying the JT-60 negative ion source. The pulse duration time is increased three times longer than that before the modification. As for the acceleration, a pulse duration time has been also extended two orders of magnitudes from 0.4 s to 60 s. The developments of the negative ion source and acceleration at JAEA are well in progress towards the realization of the negative ion sources and accelerators for fusion applications.

  16. Measurement of the Crab Nebula spectrum over three decades in energy with the MAGIC telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksić, J.; Ansoldi, S.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Babic, A.; Bangale, P.; Barrio, J. A.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Bernardini, E.; Biasuzzi, B.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bonnefoy, S.; Bonnoli, G.; Borracci, F.; Bretz, T.; Carmona, E.; Carosi, A.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Covino, S.; Da Vela, P.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Caneva, G.; De Lotto, B.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Delgado Mendez, C.; Doert, M.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Einecke, S.; Eisenacher, D.; Elsaesser, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Frantzen, K.; Fruck, C.; Galindo, D.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Garrido Terrats, D.; Gaug, M.; Godinović, N.; González Muñoz, A.; Gozzini, S. R.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Hayashida, M.; Herrera, J.; Hildebrand, D.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Idec, W.; Kadenius, V.; Kellermann, H.; Kodani, K.; Konno, Y.; Krause, J.; Kubo, H.; Kushida, J.; La Barbera, A.; Lelas, D.; Lewandowska, N.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; López, M.; López-Coto, R.; López-Oramas, A.; Lorenz, E.; Lozano, I.; Makariev, M.; Mallot, K.; Maneva, G.; Mankuzhiyil, N.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Marcote, B.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Menzel, U.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moralejo, A.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Nakajima, D.; Niedzwiecki, A.; Nilsson, K.; Nishijima, K.; Noda, K.; Nowak, N.; Orito, R.; Overkemping, A.; Paiano, S.; Palatiello, M.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Paredes-Fortuny, X.; Persic, M.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Preziuso, S.; Puljak, I.; Reinthal, R.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Rodriguez Garcia, J.; Rügamer, S.; Saggion, A.; Saito, T.; Saito, K.; Satalecka, K.; Scalzotto, V.; Scapin, V.; Schultz, C.; Schweizer, T.; Shore, S. N.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Snidaric, I.; Sobczynska, D.; Spanier, F.; Stamatescu, V.; Stamerra, A.; Steinbring, T.; Storz, J.; Strzys, M.; Takalo, L.; Takami, H.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Thaele, J.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Toyama, T.; Treves, A.; Uellenbeck, M.; Vogler, P.; Wagner, R. M.; Zanin, R.; Horns, D.; Martín, J.; Meyer, M.

    2015-03-01

    The MAGIC stereoscopic system collected 69 hours of Crab Nebula data between October 2009 and April 2011. Analysis of this data sample using the latest improvements in the MAGIC stereoscopic software provided an unprecedented precision of spectral and night-by-night light curve determination at gamma rays. We derived a differential spectrum with a single instrument from 50 GeV up to almost 30 TeV with 5 bins per energy decade. At low energies, MAGIC results, combined with Fermi-LAT data, show a flat and broad Inverse Compton peak. The overall fit to the data between 1 GeV and 30 TeV is not well described by a log-parabola function. We find that a modified log-parabola function with an exponent of 2.5 instead of 2 provides a good description of the data (χred2 = 35 / 26). Using systematic uncertainties of the MAGIC and Fermi-LAT measurements we determine the position of the Inverse Compton peak to be at (53 ±3stat +31syst -13syst) GeV, which is the most precise estimation up to date and is dominated by the systematic effects. There is no hint of the integral flux variability on daily scales at energies above 300 GeV when systematic uncertainties are included in the flux measurement. We consider three state-of-the-art theoretical models to describe the overall spectral energy distribution of the Crab Nebula. The constant B-field model cannot satisfactorily reproduce the VHE spectral measurements presented in this work, having particular difficulty reproducing the broadness of the observed IC peak. Most probably this implies that the assumption of the homogeneity of the magnetic field inside the nebula is incorrect. On the other hand, the time-dependent 1D spectral model provides a good fit of the new VHE results when considering a 80 μG magnetic field. However, it fails to match the data when including the morphology of the nebula at lower wavelengths.

  17. Burning minor actinides in a HTR energy spectrum and effects on the final radiotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pohl, Christoph, E-mail: christoph.pohl@de.tuv.com [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Allelein, Hans-Josef [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, 52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    The production of nuclear energy with existing nuclear reactors is equivalent to the use of low enriched uranium. But the neutron capture of the large corresponding U-238 fuel fraction also generates a build-up of plutonium isotopes and minor actinides as Neptunium, Americium and Curium. These actinides are dominant for the long time assessment of final disposal therefore a minimization of the long living isotopes is aspired. Burning the actinides in a high temperature helium cooled graphite moderated reactor (HTR) is one of these options. Using plutonium isotopes to sustain the criticality of the system is intended to avoid highly enriched uranium because of international regulations and low enriched uranium because of the build up of new actinides from neutron capture in U-238. Also fractions of plutonium isotopes are build up to minor actinides but for this absorption the overall number of actinides keeps constant. Nevertheless for the final assessment the activity and toxicity of all important actinides have to be taken into account. This paper comprises calculations for plutonium/minor actinides/thorium fuel compositions, their correlated final burn-up and the long term activity and toxicity for a generic pebble bed HTR based on the reference design of the 400 MW PBMR. In particular the behaviour of the different minor actinide isotopes in the higher thermal energy spectrum of a HTR will be discussed. Thorium based fuel - as a promising alternative to uranium based fuel - offers several advantages as a minimized build up of new Pu and MA, a higher thermal conductivity and melting point. Combining the thorium fuel with a significant fraction of minor actinides and an isotope fraction consistent with burned LWR fuel the total amount of the minor actinides stays nearly unchanged while the isotope composition significantly changes. This behaviour with respect to the initial heavy metal load and the influence on the long term activity and toxicity will be discussed.

  18. Research on seasonal correlation of wavelet packet energy spectrum and temperature of Runyang Suspension Bridge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING YouLiang; LI AiQun; SUN Jun; DENG Yang

    2009-01-01

    In order to establish an environmental-condition-normalized structural damage alarming method, the seasonal correlation analysis of wavelet packet energy spectrum (WPES) and temperature of Runyang Suspension Bridge is performed by means of the 236-day health monitoring data. The analysis results reveal that the measured WPES has remarkable seasonal correlation with the environmental tempera-ture. The seasonal change of environmental temperature accounts for the variation of the damage alarming parameter Ip of the dominant frequency bands with an averaged variance of 200%. The statis-tical modeling technique using a 6th-order polynomial is adopted to formulate the correlation between the WPES and temperature, on the basis of which the abnormal changes of measured damage alarming parameter Ip are detected using the mean value control chart. It is found that the proposed method can effectively eliminate temperature complications from the time series of WPES and exhibit good capa-bility for detecting the damage-induced 10% variances of the damage alarming parameter Ip. And the proposed WPES-based method is superior the modal frequency and hence is more suitable for online real-time damage alarming for long-span bridges.

  19. Combined diversity and improved energy detection in cooperative spectrum sensing with faded reporting channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas Nallagonda

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we evaluate the performance of cooperative spectrum sensing (CSS where each cognitive radio (CR employs an improved energy detector (IED with multiple antennas and uses selection combining (SC for detecting the primary user (PU in noisy and faded sensing (S channels. We derive an expression for the probability of false alarm and expressions for probability of missed detection in non-faded (AWGN and Rayleigh faded sensing environments in terms of cumulative distribution function (CDF. Each CR transmits its decision about PU via noisy and faded reporting (R channel to fusion center (FC. In this paper we assume that S-channels are noisy and Rayleigh faded while several cases of fading are considered for R-channels such as: (i Hoyt (or Nakagami-q, (ii Rayleigh, (iii Rician (or Nakagami-n, and (iv Weibull. A Binary Symmetric channel (BSC with a fixed error probability (r in the R-channel is also considered. The impact of fading in R-channel, S-channel and several network parameters such as IED parameter, normalized detection threshold, number of CRs, and number of antennas on missed detection and total error probability is assessed. The effects of Hoyt, Rician, and Weibull fading parameters on overall performance of IED-CSS are also highlighted.

  20. Research on seasonal correlation of wavelet packet energy spectrum and temperature of Runyang Suspension Bridge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    In order to establish an environmental-condition-normalized structural damage alarming method,the seasonal correlation analysis of wavelet packet energy spectrum(WPES)and temperature of Runyang Suspension Bridge is performed by means of the 236-day health monitoring data.The analysis results reveal that the measured WPES has remarkable seasonal correlation with the environmental tempera-ture.The seasonal change of environmental temperature accounts for the variation of the damage alarming parameter Ip of the dominant frequency bands with an averaged variance of 200%.The statis-tical modeling technique using a 6th-order polynomial is adopted to formulate the correlation between the WPES and temperature,on the basis of which the abnormal changes of measured damage alarming parameter Ip are detected using the mean value control chart.It is found that the proposed method can effectively eliminate temperature complications from the time series of WPES and exhibit good capa-bility for detecting the damage-induced 10% variances of the damage alarming parameter Ip.And the proposed WPES-based method is superior the modal frequency and hence is more suitable for online real-time damage alarming for long-span bridges.

  1. Young adolescents who combine alcohol and energy drinks have a higher risk of reporting negative behavioural outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holubcikova, Jana; Kolarcik, Peter; Madarasova Geckova, Andrea; Joppova, Eva; van Dijk, Jitse P; Reijneveld, Sijmen A

    2017-04-01

    To explore whether young adolescents consuming alcohol and energy drinks combined were more likely to report negative behavioural outcomes than their peers who drink only one type of these beverages or are abstinent. We analysed data on a representative sample of Slovak adolescents 8502 adolescents (mean age 13.21, 49.4 % boys) from the 2014 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children cross-sectional study. We assessed the associations of alcohol and energy drinks consumption with negative outcomes and their potential synergy, as measured by the synergy index (SI). Adolescents consuming both alcohol and energy drinks were at higher risk of negative behavioural outcomes than their peers who drank only alcohol or energy drinks or were non-consumers. Consumers of alcohol and energy drinks were highly prone to be involved in fighting-the joint association of alcohol and energy drinks consumption was greater than sum of its associations separately in relation to fighting (SI 1.49; 95 % confidence interval 1.03-2.16). Preventive strategies should aim at increasing awareness of negative behavioural outcomes-especially aggressive behaviour associated with alcohol and energy drinks consumption among young adolescents.

  2. Recent results from Yakutsk experiment: development of EAS, energy spectrum and primary particle mass composition in the energy region of 10^15-10^19 eV

    CERN Document Server

    Knurenko, S P; Pravdin, M I; Sabourov, A V; Sleptsov, I Ye

    2006-01-01

    Experimental data obtained at the Yakutsk array after the modernization in 1993 are analyzed. The characteristics of EAS longitudinal and radial development found from the charged particle flux and EAS Cherenkov light registered at the Yakutsk complex array are presented. The energy spectrum of EAS obtained from Cherenkov light and an estimate of the PCR mass composition are presented.

  3. Cosmic ray energy spectrum measurement with the Antarctic Muon and Neutrino Detector Array (AMANDA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirkin, Dmitry Aleksandrovich

    AMANDA-II is a neutrino telescope composed of 677 optical sensors organized along 19 strings buried deep in the Antarctic ice cap. It is designed to detect Cherenkov light produced by cosmic-ray- and neutrino-induced charged leptons. The majority of events recorded by AMANDA-II are caused by muons which are produced in the atmosphere by high-energy cosmic rays. The leading uncertainties in simulating such events come from the choice of the high-energy model used to describe the first interaction of the cosmic rays, uncertainties in our knowledge and implementation of the ice properties at the depth of the detector, and individual optical module sensitivities. Contributions from uncertainties in the atmospheric conditions and muon cross sections in ice are smaller. The downgoing muon simulation was substantially improved by using the extensive air shower generator CORSIKA to describe the shower development in the atmosphere, and by writing a new software package for the muon propagation (MMC), which reduced computational and algorithm errors below the level of uncertainties of the muon cross sections in ice. A method was developed that resulted in a flux measurement of cosmic rays with energies 1.5--200 TeV per nucleon (95% of primaries causing low-multiplicity events in AMANDA-II have energies in this range) independent of ice model and optical module sensitivities. Predictions of six commonly used high-energy interaction models (QGSJET, VENUS, NEXUS, DPMJET, HDPM, and SIBYLL) are compared to data. The best agreement with direct measurements is achieved with QGSJET, VENUS, and NEXUS. Assuming a power-law energy spectrum (phi0,i · E -gammai) for cosmic-ray components from hydrogen to iron (i = H,..., Fe) and their mass distribution according to Wiebel-South (Wiebel-South & Biermann, 1999), phi 0,i and gammai were corrected to achieve the best description of the data. For the hydrogen component, values of phi0,H = 0.106 +/- 0.007 m-2 sr-1s-1TeV-1 , gammaH = 2

  4. Spectrum of EGFR gene copy number changes and KRAS gene mutation status in Korean triple negative breast cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoonjung Kim

    Full Text Available Anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR therapy has been tried in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC patients without evaluation of molecular and clinical predictors in several randomized clinical studies. Only fewer than 20% of metastatic TNBCs showed response to anti-EGFR therapy. In order to increase the overall response rate, first step would be to classify TNBC into good or poor responders according to oncogenic mutation profiles. This study provides the molecular characteristics of TNBCs including EGFR gene copy number changes and mutation status of EGFR and KRAS gene in Korean TNBC patients. Mutation analysis for EGFR, KRAS, BRAF and TP53 from a total of 105 TNBC tissue samples was performed by direct sequencing, peptide nucleic acid-mediated PCR clamping method and real-time PCR. Copy number changes of EGFR gene were evaluated using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. Out of all 105 TNBCs, 15.2% (16/105 showed EGFR copy number changes. Among them, increased or decreased EGFR copy number was detected in 13 (5 single copy gain, 2 amplification and 4 high-copy number amplification and 3 cases (3 hemizygous deletion, respectively. The mutation frequencies of KRAS, EGFR and TP53 gene were 1.9% (G12V and G12D, 1.0% (exon 19 del and 31.4%, respectively. There was no BRAF V600E mutation found. Future studies are needed to evaluate the clinical outcomes of TNBC patients who undergo anti-EGFR therapy according to the genetic status of EGFR.

  5. Complementary Effects of Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy and Pulsed Radiofrequency Energy on Cutaneous Wound Healing in Diabetic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin; Kao, Huang-Kai; Dong, Ziqing; Jiang, Zhaohua; Guo, Lifei

    2017-01-01

    Negative-pressure wound therapy and pulsed radiofrequency energy are two clinical modalities used to treat soft-tissue wounds. They are purported to affect healing differently. The aim of this experimental study was to contrast the two modalities at a mechanistic level and to investigate whether their combined therapy could achieve additive and complementary effects on wound healing. Full-thickness dorsal cutaneous wounds of diabetic, db/db, mice were treated with either negative-pressure wound therapy, pulsed radiofrequency energy, or combined therapies. Macroscopic healing kinetics were examined. Epidermal regeneration (proliferation rate and length of reepithelialization) and neovascularization (blood vessel density) were investigated. Messenger RNA levels indicative of angiogenic (basic fibroblast growth factor), profibrotic (transforming growth factor-β), epidermal proliferative (keratinocyte growth factor), and extracellular matrix remodeling (collagen 1) processes were measured in wound tissues. All three treatment groups displayed faster wound healing. The negative-pressure wound therapy/pulsed radiofrequency energy combined therapy led to significantly faster healing than either the negative-pressure wound therapy or pulsed radiofrequency energy therapy alone. Epidermal regeneration and neovascularization were enhanced in all three groups. The two negative-pressure wound therapy groups (alone and combined with pulsed radiofrequency energy) demonstrated more significant increases in expression of all assayed growth factors than the pulsed radiofrequency energy group. Furthermore, the combined therapy exhibited a more profound elevation in collagen 1 expression than either of the two therapies alone. Combining the negative-pressure wound therapy and pulsed radiofrequency energy modalities can achieve additive benefits in cutaneous healing, and the two therapies can be easily used together to complement each other in clinical wound treatments.

  6. Negative energy balance affects imprint stability in oocytes recovered from postpartum dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Doherty, Alan M; O'Gorman, Aoife; al Naib, Abdullah; Brennan, Lorraine; Daly, Edward; Duffy, Pat; Fair, Trudee

    2014-09-01

    Ovarian follicle development in post-partum, high-producing dairy cows, occurs in a compromised endogenous metabolic environment (referred to as negative energy balance, NEB). Key events that occur during oocyte/follicle growth, such as the vital process of genomic imprinting, may be detrimentally affected by this altered ovarian environment. Imprinting is crucial for placental function and regulation of fetal growth, therefore failure to establish and maintain imprints during oocyte growth may contribute to early embryonic loss. Using ovum pick-up (OPU), oocytes and follicular fluid samples were recovered from cows between days 20 and 115 post-calving, encompassing the NEB period. In a complimentary study, cumulus oocyte complexes were in vitro matured under high non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations and in the presence of the methyl-donor S-adenosylmethionine (SAM). Pyrosequencing revealed the loss of methylation at several imprinted loci in the OPU derived oocytes. The loss of DNA methylation was observed at the PLAGL1 locus in oocytes, following in vitro maturation (IVM) in the presence of elevated NEFAs and SAM. Finally, metabolomic analysis of postpartum follicular fluid samples revealed significant differences in several branched chain amino acids, with fatty acid profiles bearing similarities to those characteristic of lactating dairy cows. These results provide the first evidence that (1) the postpartum ovarian environment may affect maternal imprint acquisition and (2) elevated NEFAs during IVM can lead to the loss of imprinted gene methylation in bovine oocytes.

  7. Low-energy outer-shell photodetachment of the negative ion of boron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kedong; Zatsarinny, Oleg; Bartschat, Klaus

    2016-05-01

    The photodetachment of the negative ion of boron, B-(2s2 2p2) 3 P , was investigated by employing the B-spline R-matrix method for photon energies ranging from threshold to 12 eV. A multi-configuration Hartree-Fock method with nonorthogonal, term-dependent orbitals was used to generate accurate initial bound-state and final continuum-state wavefunctions. The close-coupling expansion included all principal scattering channels for photodetachment from both the 2p and 2s orbitals. The resulting equation were solved using a parallelized version of the BSR computer code. The calculated photodetachment cross sections are in good agreement with the available experimental data. Several prominent resonance features are predicted, thereby providing new challenges in the study of this highly correlated process. To classify the resonance structure, both the partial cross sections and the main contributions of the individual scattering channels are discussed. Work supported by the China Scholarship Council and the United States National Science Foundation under Grants PHY-1403245 and PHY-1520970, and by the XSEDE allocation PHY-090031.

  8. Declarative verbal memory impairments in middle-aged women who are caregivers of offspring with autism spectrum disorders: The role of negative affect and testosterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Martínez, A; González-Bono, E; Salvador, A; Moya-Albiol, L

    2016-01-01

    Caring for offspring diagnosed with a chronic psychological disorder such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is used in research as a model of chronic stress. This chronic stress has been reported to have deleterious effects on caregivers' cognition, particularly in verbal declarative memory. Moreover, such cognitive decline may be mediated by testosterone (T) levels and negative affect, understood as depressive mood together with high anxiety and anger. This study aimed to compare declarative memory function in middle-aged women who were caregivers for individuals with ASD (n = 24; mean age = 45) and female controls (n = 22; mean age = 45), using a standardised memory test (Rey's Auditory Verbal Learning Test). It also sought to examine the role of care recipient characteristics, negative mood and T levels in memory impairments. ASD caregivers were highly sensitive to proactive interference and verbal forgetting. In addition, they had higher negative affect and T levels, both of which have been associated with poorer verbal memory performance. Moreover, the number of years of caregiving affected memory performance and negative affect, especially, in terms of anger feelings. On the other hand, T levels in caregivers had a curvilinear relationship with verbal memory performance; that is, increases in T were associated with improvements in verbal memory performance up to a certain point, but subsequently, memory performance decreased with increasing T. Chronic stress may produce disturbances in mood and hormonal levels, which in turn might increase the likelihood of developing declarative memory impairments although caregivers do not show a generalised decline in memory. These findings should be taken into account for understanding the impact of cognitive impairments on the ability to provide optimal caregiving.

  9. The energy spectrum, time history, and IPN error ellipse of GRB051103, a possible extragalactic SGR giant flare

    CERN Document Server

    Hurley, K; Perley, D; Mitrofanov, I G; Golovin, D V; Kozyrev, A S; Litvak, M L; Sanin, A B; Boynton, W; Fellows, C; Harshmann, K; Ohno, M; Yamaoka, K; Nakagawa, Y E; Smith, D M; Cline, T; Gehrels, N; Krimm, H; Palmer, D M; Duncan, R C; Wigger, C; Hajdas, W; Atteia, J -L; Ricker, G; Vanderspek, R; Rau, A; Von Kienlin, A

    2009-01-01

    GRB051103 is considered to be a candidate soft gamma repeater (SGR) extragalactic giant magnetar flare by virtue of its time history, localization, and energy spectrum. We have derived a refined interplanetary network localization for this burst which reduces the size of the error box by over a factor of two. We examine its time history for evidence of a periodic component, which would be one signature of an SGR giant flare, and conclude that this component is neither detected nor detectable under reasonable assumptions. We analyze the time-resolved energy spectra of this event with improved time- and energy resolution, and conclude that although the spectrum is very hard, its temporal evolution at late times cannot be determined, which further complicates the giant flare association.

  10. Measurement of the top-quark mass from the b jet energy spectrum with the CMS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Guerrero Ibarra, Daniel Fernando

    2016-01-01

    A first measurement of the top-quark mass is presented based on the peak position of the energy spectrum of b jets produced from top-quark decays. This novel technique follows a recent theoretical proposal aiming to minimize systematic uncertainties related to the modeling of top quark production. The analysis is performed selecting top-antitop events with electron-muon final states in proton-proton collision data at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV with the CMS detector, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. The energy peak position is obtained by fitting the observed energy spectrum, and is translated to a top-quark mass estimation using relativistic kinematics, calibrated with Monte Carlo simulation.

  11. Measurement of the Electron Energy Spectrum and its Moments in Inclusive B->X e nu Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Gaillard, J M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Le Clerc, C; Levi, M E; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, Michael T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Ford, K; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Gary, J W; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S M; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Clark, P J; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Smith, J G; Van Hoek, W C; Zhang, L; Harton, J L; Hu, T; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Schubert, J; Schubert, Klaus R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Grenier, P; Thiebaux, C; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Khan, A; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Taylor, G P; Grenier, G J; Lee, S J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gamet, R; Kay, M; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Mohanty, G B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flächer, H U; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hart, P A; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L M; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Raven, G; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Allmendinger, T; Brau, B; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; La Vaissière, C de; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, P; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Anulli, F; Biasini, M; Peruzzi, I M; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Del Gamba, V; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martínez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lü, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Varnes, E W; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai-Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B J; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Xella, S M; Aleksan, Roy; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Langer, M; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmüller, O L; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; De Nardo, Gallieno; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Elsen, E E; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Vavra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Young, C C; Burchat, Patricia R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bóna, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R V; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Di Lodovico, F; Mihályi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Sekula, S J; Tan, P; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2004-01-01

    We report a measurement of the inclusive electron energy spectrum for semileptonic decays of B mesons in a data sample of 52 million Y4S -> BBar decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B-meson factory at SLAC. We determine the branching fraction, first, second, and third moments of the spectrum for lower cut-offs on the electron energy between 0.6 and 1.5 GeV. We measure the partial branching fraction to be Br(B -> X e nu, E_e>0.6 GeV) = (10.36 +-0.06(stat.) +-0.23(sys))%.

  12. The miRNAome of the postpartum dairy cow liver in negative energy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Attia; Lynn, David J; O'Boyle, Padraic; Seoighe, Cathal; Morris, Dermot

    2014-04-12

    Negative energy balance (NEB) is an altered metabolic state in high yielding cows that occurs during the first few weeks postpartum when energy demands for lactation and maintenance exceed the energy supply from dietary intake. NEB can, in turn, lead to metabolic disorders and to reduced fertility. Alterations in the expression of more than 700 hepatic genes have previously been reported in a study of NEB in postpartum dairy cows. miRNAs (microRNA) are known to mediate many alterations in gene expression post transcriptionally. To study the hepatic miRNA content of postpartum dairy cows, including their overall abundance and differential expression, in mild NEB (MNEB) and severe NEB (SNEB), short read RNA sequencing was carried out. To identify putative targets of differentially expressed miRNAs among differentially expressed hepatic genes reported previously in dairy cows in SNEB computational target identification was employed. Our results indicate that the dairy cow liver expresses 53 miRNAs at a lower threshold of 10 reads per million. Of these, 10 miRNAs accounted for greater than 95% of the miRNAome (miRNA content). Of the highly expressed miRNAs, miR-122 constitutes 75% followed by miR-192 and miR-3596. Five out of thirteen let-7 miRNA family members are also among the highly expressed miRNAs. miR-143, down-regulated in SNEB, was found to have 4 putative up-regulated gene targets associated with SNEB including LRP2 (low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 2), involved in lipid metabolism and up-regulated in SNEB. This is the first liver miRNA-seq profiling study of moderate yielding dairy cows in the early postpartum period. Tissue specific miR-122 and liver enriched miR-192 are two of the most abundant miRNAs in the postpartum dairy cow liver. miR-143 is significantly down-regulated in SNEB and putative targets of miRNA-143 which are up-regulated in SNEB, include a gene involved in lipid metabolism.

  13. Alterations in hepatic miRNA expression during negative energy balance in postpartum dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Attia; Waters, Sinead; O'Boyle, Padraig; Seoighe, Cathal; Morris, Dermot G

    2014-01-15

    Negative energy balance (NEB), an altered metabolic state, occurs in early postpartum dairy cattle when energy demands to support lactation exceed energy intake. During NEB the liver undergoes oxidative stress and increased breakdown of fatty acids accompanied by changes in gene expression. It is now known that micro RNAs (miRNA) can have a role in mediating such alterations in gene expression through repression or degradation of target mRNAs. miRNA expression is known to be altered by metabolism and environmental factors and miRNAs are implicated in expression modulation of metabolism related genes. miRNA expression was profiled in the liver of moderate yielding dairy cattle under severe NEB (SNEB) and mild NEB (MNEB) using the Affymetrix Gene Chip miRNA_2.0 array with 679 probe sets for Bos-taurus miRNAs. Ten miRNAs were found to be differentially expressed using the 'samr' statistical package (delta = 0.6) at a q-value FDR of genes were also identified among 418 differentially expressed hepatic genes previously reported for the same animal model. Among these, GPR37 (G protein-coupled receptor 37), HEYL (hairy/enhancer-of-split related with YRPW motif-like), DNJA1, CD14 (Cluster of differentiation 14) and GNS (glucosamine (N-acetyl)-6-sulfatase) are known to be associated with hepatic metabolic disorders. In addition miR-140 and miR-2885 have binding sites on the most down-regulated of these genes, FADS2 (Fatty acid desaturase 2) which encodes an enzyme critical in lipid biosynthesis. Furthermore, HNF3-gamma (Hepatocyte nuclear factor 3-gamma), a hepatic transcription factor (TF) that is involved in IGF-1 expression regulation and maintenance of glucose homeostasis is a putative target of miR-31. This study shows that SNEB affects liver miRNA expression and these miRNAs have putative targets in hepatic genes down-regulated under this condition. This study highlights the potential role of miRNAs in transcription regulation of hepatic gene expression during SNEB in

  14. Parametrized energy spectrum of cosmic-ray protons with kinetic energies down to 1 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, L. C.

    1985-01-01

    A new estimation of the interstellar proton spectrum is made in which the source term of primary protons is taken from shock acceleration theory and the cosmic ray propagation calculation is based on a proposed nonuniform galactic disk model.

  15. Two-dimensional angular energy spectrum of electrons accelerated by the ultra-short relativistic laser pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borovskiy, A. V. [Department of Computer Science and Cybernetics, Baikal State University of Economics and Law, 11 Lenin Street, Irkutsk 664003 (Russian Federation); Galkin, A. L. [Coherent and Nonlinear Optics Department, A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the RAS, 38 Vavilov Street, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Department of Physics of MBF, Pirogov Russian National Research Medical University, 1 Ostrovitianov Street, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Kalashnikov, M. P., E-mail: galkin@kapella.gpi.ru [Max-Born-Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short-Time Spectroscopy, 2a Max-Born-Strasse, Berlin 12489 (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    The new method of calculating energy spectra of accelerated electrons, based on the parameterization by their initial coordinates, is proposed. The energy spectra of electrons accelerated by Gaussian ultra-short relativistic laser pulse at a selected angle to the axis of the optical system focusing the laser pulse in a low density gas are theoretically calculated. The two-peak structure of the electron energy spectrum is obtained. Discussed are the reasons for its appearance as well as an applicability of other models of the laser field.

  16. Energy Dependence of Near-relativistic Electron Spectrum at Geostationary Orbit during the SEP Events of 2005

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A. Chandrasekhar Reddy; Jatin Rathod; Girija Rajaram; Radharani Alyana; D. S. Misra; C. G. Patil; M. Y. S. Prasad; A. G. Ananth

    2008-03-01

    In view of the renewed interest in the study of energetic particles in the outer radiation belt of the earth, we feel it will be helpful in looking for the energy dependence of the electron energy spectrum at geostationary orbit. This may give us some insight into how we can safeguard geostationary satellites from functional anomalies of the deep dielectric charging type, which are caused by charge accumulation and subsequent discharge of relativistic electrons. In this study we examine whether there is any energy dependence in relativistic electron enhancements at geosynchronous altitudes during solar energetic proton events of 2005.

  17. Application of the BINS superheated drop detector spectrometer to the {sup 9}Be(p,xn) neutron energy spectrum determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Fulvio, A.; Ciolini, R.; Mirzajani, N.; Romei, C.; D' Errico, F. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Nucleare e della Produzione, Universita di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Bedogni, R. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Esposito, J.; Zafiropoulos, D.; Colautti, P. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro (Padova) (Italy)

    2013-07-18

    In the framework of TRASCO-BNCT project, a Bubble Interactive Neutron Spectrometer (BINS) device was applied to the characterization of the angle-and energy-differential neutron spectra generated by the {sup 9}Be(p,xn)reaction. The BINS spectrometer uses two superheated emulsion detectors, sequentially operated at different temperatures and thus provides a series of six sharp threshold responses, covering the 0.1-10 MeV neutron energy range. Spectrum unfolding of the data was performed by means of MAXED code. The obtained angle, energy-differential spectra were compared with those measured with a Bonner sphere spectrometer, a silicon telescope spectrometer and literature data.

  18. Energy spectrum and specific heat of two-dimensional electron systems with spin-orbit interaction in a magnetic field parallel to the conducting layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchenko, O. S.; Kopeliovich, A. I.

    2016-03-01

    The energy spectrum of a quasi-two-dimensional electron gas in an in-plane magnetic field is studied using the perturbation theory and quasiclassical approach in the presence of the Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling. The existence of the intersection of energy sublevels in electron spectrum is demonstrated. The reciprocal mass tensor of electrons is analyzed. The heat capacity of the degenerate electron gas is examined, and its relations with the key features of the spectrum are shown.

  19. Effects of roughness and temperature on low-energy hydrogen positive and negative ion reflection from silicon and carbon surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, N; Kato, S; Miyamoto, T; Nishiura, M; Tsumori, K; Matsumoto, Y; Kenmotsu, T; Okamoto, A; Kitajima, S; Sasao, M; Wada, M; Yamaoka, H

    2014-02-01

    Angle-resolved energy distribution functions of positive and negative hydrogen ions produced from a rough-finished Si surface under 1 keV proton irradiation have been measured. The corresponding distribution from a crystalline surface and a carbon surface are also measured for comparison. Intensities of positive and negative ions from the rough-finished Si are substantially smaller than those from crystalline Si. The angular distributions of these species are broader for rough surface than the crystalline surface. No significant temperature dependence for positive and negative ion intensities is observed for all samples in the temperature range from 300 to 400 K.

  20. Valence band energy spectrum of HgTe quantum wells with an inverted band structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkov, G. M.; Aleshkin, V. Ya.; Rut, O. E.; Sherstobitov, A. A.; Germanenko, A. V.; Dvoretski, S. A.; Mikhailov, N. N.

    2017-07-01

    The energy spectrum of the valence band in HgTe /CdxHg1 -xTe quantum wells of a width (8 -20 ) nm has been studied experimentally by magnetotransport effects and theoretically in the framework of a four-band k P method. Comparison of the Hall density with the density found from a period of the Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) oscillations clearly shows that the degeneracy of states of the top of the valence band is equal to 2 at the hole density p top of the valence band consists of four spin-degenerate extremes located at k ≠0 (valleys) which gives the total degeneracy K =8 . It is shown that taking into account the "mixing of states" at the interfaces leads to the removal of the spin degeneracy that reduces the degeneracy to K =4 . Accounting for any additional asymmetry, for example, due to the difference in the mixing parameters at the interfaces, the different broadening of the boundaries of the well, etc., leads to reduction of the valleys degeneracy, making K =2 . It is noteworthy that for our case twofold degeneracy occurs due to degeneracy of two single-spin valleys. The hole effective mass (mh) determined from analysis of the temperature dependence of the amplitude of the SdH oscillations shows that mh is equal to (0.25 ±0.02 ) m0 and weakly increases with the hole density. Such a value of mh and its dependence on the hole density are in a good agreement with the calculated effective mass.

  1. Investigation on the energy spectrums of electrons in atmospheric pressure argon plasma jets and their dependences on the applied voltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinxian; Tan, Zhenyu; Liu, Yadi; Li, Xiaotong; Pan, Jie; Wang, Xiaolong

    2017-08-01

    This work presents a systematical investigation on the spatiotemporal evolution of the energy spectrum of electrons in atmospheric pressure argon plasma jets and its dependence on the applied voltage. The investigations are carried out by means of the numerical simulation based on a particle-in-cell Monte-Carlo collision model. The characteristics of the spatiotemporal evolution of the energy spectrum of electrons (ESE) in the discharge space have been presented, and especially the mechanisms of inducing these characteristics have also been revealed. The present work shows the following conclusions. In the evolution of ESE, there is a characteristic time under each applied voltage. Before the characteristic time, the peak value of ESE decreases, the peak position shifts toward high energy, and the distribution of ESE becomes wider and wider, but the reverse is true after the characteristic time. The formation of these characteristics can be mainly attributed to the transport of electrons toward a low electric field as well as a balance between the energy gained from the electric field including the effect of space charges and the energy loss due to inelastic collisions in the process of electron transport. The characteristic time decreases with the applied voltage. In addition, the average energy of electrons at the characteristic time can be increased by enhancing the applied voltage. The results presented in this work are of importance for regulating and controlling the energy of electrons in the plasma jets applied to plasma medicine.

  2. An Energy-Efficient Spectrum-Aware Reinforcement Learning-Based Clustering Algorithm for Cognitive Radio Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustapha, Ibrahim; Mohd Ali, Borhanuddin; Rasid, Mohd Fadlee A; Sali, Aduwati; Mohamad, Hafizal

    2015-08-13

    It is well-known that clustering partitions network into logical groups of nodes in order to achieve energy efficiency and to enhance dynamic channel access in cognitive radio through cooperative sensing. While the topic of energy efficiency has been well investigated in conventional wireless sensor networks, the latter has not been extensively explored. In this paper, we propose a reinforcement learning-based spectrum-aware clustering algorithm that allows a member node to learn the energy and cooperative sensing costs for neighboring clusters to achieve an optimal solution. Each member node selects an optimal cluster that satisfies pairwise constraints, minimizes network energy consumption and enhances channel sensing performance through an exploration technique. We first model the network energy consumption and then determine the optimal number of clusters for the network. The problem of selecting an optimal cluster is formulated as a Markov Decision Process (MDP) in the algorithm and the obtained simulation results show convergence, learning and adaptability of the algorithm to dynamic environment towards achieving an optimal solution. Performance comparisons of our algorithm with the Groupwise Spectrum Aware (GWSA)-based algorithm in terms of Sum of Square Error (SSE), complexity, network energy consumption and probability of detection indicate improved performance from the proposed approach. The results further reveal that an energy savings of 9% and a significant Primary User (PU) detection improvement can be achieved with the proposed approach.

  3. The Energy Spectrum of Telescope Array's Middle Drum Detector and the Direct Comparison to the High Resolution Fly's Eye Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Abu-Zayyad, T; Allen, M; Anderson, R; Azuma, R; Barcikowski, E; Belz, J W; Bergman, D R; Blake, S A; Cady, R; Cheon, B G; Chiba, J; Chikawa, M; Cho, E J; Cho, W R; Fujii, H; Fujii, T; Fukuda, T; Fukushima, M; Gorbunov, D; Hanlon, W; Hayashi, K; Hayashi, Y; Hayashida, N; Hibino, K; Hiyama, K; Honda, K; Iguchi, T; Ikeda, D; Ikuta, K; Inoue, N; Ishii, T; Ishimori, R; Ivanov, D; Iwamoto, S; Jui, C C H; Kadota, K; Kakimoto, F; Kalashev, O; Kanbe, T; Kasahara, K; Kawai, H; Kawakami, S; Kawana, S; Kido, E; Kim, H B; Kim, H K; Kim, J H; Kim, J H; Kitamoto, K; Kitamura, S; Kitamura, Y; Kobayashi, K; Kobayashi, Y; Kondo, Y; Kuramoto, K; Kuzmin, V; Kwon, Y J; Lim, S I; Machida, S; Martens, K; Martineau, J; Matsuda, T; Matsuura, T; Matsuyama, T; Matthews, J N; Minamino, M; Miyata, K; Murano, Y; Nagataki, S; Nakamura, T; Nam, S W; Nonaka, T; Ogio, S; Ohnishi, M; Ohoka, H; Oki, K; Oku, D; Okuda, T; Oshima, A; Ozawa, S; Park, I H; Pshirkov, M S; Rodriguez, D C; Roh, S Y; Rubtsov, G; Ryu, D; Sagawa, H; Sakurai, N; Sampson, A L; Scott, L M; Shah, P D; Shibata, F; Shibata, T; Shimodaira, H; Shin, B K; Shin, J I; Shirahama, T; Smith, J D; Sokolsky, P; Sonley, T J; Springer, R W; Stokes, B T; Stratton, S R; Stroman, T; Suzuki, S; Takahashi, Y; Takeda, M; Taketa, A; Takita, M; Tameda, Y; Tanaka, H; Tanaka, K; Tanaka, M; Thomas, S B; Thomson, G B; Tinyakov, P; Tkachev, I; Tokuno, H; Tomida, T; Troitsky, S; Tsunesada, Y; Tsutsumi, K; Tsuyuguchi, Y; Uchihori, Y; Udo, S; Ukai, H; Vasiloff, G; Wada, Y; Wong, T; Wood, M; Yamakawa, Y; Yamane, R; Yamaoka, H; Yamazaki, K; Yang, J; Yoneda, Y; Yoshida, S; Yoshii, H; Zollinger, R; Zundel, Z

    2012-01-01

    The Telescope Array's Middle Drum fluorescence detector was instrumented with telescopes refurbished from the High Resolution Fly's Eye's HiRes-1 site. The data observed by Middle Drum in monocular mode was analyzed via the HiRes-1 profile-constrained geometry reconstruction technique and utilized the same calibration techniques enabling a direct comparison of the energy spectra and energy scales between the two experiments. The spectrum measured using the Middle Drum telescopes is based on a three-year exposure collected between December 16, 2007 and December 16, 2010. The calculated difference between the spectrum of the Middle Drum observations and the published spectrum obtained by the data collected by the HiRes-1 site allows the HiRes-1 energy scale to be transferred to Middle Drum. The HiRes energy scale is applied to the entire Telescope Array by making a comparison between Middle Drum monocular events and hybrid events that triggered both Middle Drum and the Telescope Array's scintillator Ground Arra...

  4. Extended Spectrum β-Lactamases among Gram-negative bacteria of nosocomial origin from an Intensive Care Unit of a tertiary health facility in Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harthug Stig

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Resistance to third generation cephalosporins due to acquisition and expression of extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL enzymes among Gram-negative bacteria is on the increase. Presence of ESBL producing organisms has been reported to significantly affect the course and outcome of an infection. Therefore infections due to ESBL isolates continue to pose a challenge to infection management worldwide. The aim of this study was to determine the existence and to describe phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of ESBLs in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU setting in Tanzania. Methods Between October 2002 and April 2003, clinical information and samples were collected from patients suspected to have nosocomial infections in an Intensive Care Unit of a tertiary hospital in Tanzania. The isolates were identified, tested for antimicrobial susceptibility and analysed for presence of ESBL genes. Results Thirty-nine Gram-negative bacteria were isolated from clinical samples of 39 patients. These isolates included 13 Escherichia coli, 12 Enterobacter spp, 5 Pseudomonas spp, 4 Proteus spp, 2 Klebsiella. pneumoniae, 2 Citrobacter freundii and 1 Chryseomonas luteola. Eleven (28.2% of these isolates were ESBL producing. The ESBL genes characterised were SHV-12, SHV-28 and CTX-M-15. The ESBL producing isolates were more resistant to gentamicin and ciprofloxacin than non-ESBL producing isolates. Conclusion This study shows the presence of ESBL genes among Gram-negative bacteria in the ICU setting in Tanzania. There is a need to institute strict hospital infection control policy and a regular surveillance of resistance to antimicrobial agents.

  5. Negative energy, debts, and disinformation from the viewpoint of analytic number theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslov, V. P.

    2016-07-01

    The number zero and negative numbers are added to analytical number theory which includes transcendents. New solutions of Diophantine equations are applied to thermodynamics, information theory and biology.

  6. Wideband energy reflectance measurements: effects of negative middle ear pressure and application of a pressure compensation procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaver, Mark D; Sun, Xiao-Ming

    2013-07-01

    The wideband energy reflectance (ER) technique has become popular as a tool for evaluating middle ear function. Negative middle ear pressure (MEP) is a prevalent form of middle ear dysfunction, which may impact application of ER measurements in differential diagnosis. A negative MEP may be countervailed by application of an equivalent negative ear canal pressure. The present study examined ER in the same ears under normal and experimentally induced negative MEP conditions. Thirty-five subjects produced at least one negative MEP each (-40 to -225 daPa). Negative MEP significantly altered ER in a frequency-specific manner that varied with MEP magnitude. ER increased for low- to mid-frequencies with the largest change (~0.20 to 0.40) occurring between 1 and 1.5 kHz. ER decreased for frequencies above 3 kHz with the largest change (~-0.10 to -0.25) observed between 4.5 and 5.5 kHz. Magnitude of changes increased as MEP became more negative, as did the frequencies at which maximum changes occurred, and the frequency at which enhancement transitioned to reduction. Ear canal pressure compensation restored ER to near baseline values. This suggests that the compensation procedure adequately mitigates the effects of negative MEP on ER. Theoretical issues and clinical implications are discussed.

  7. Energy and spectrum efficiency in rural areas based on cognitive radio technology

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masonta, MT

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The rapid growth and development observed in wireless communications has resulted in the overcrowding of the radio spectrum used as a communication medium in wireless networks. In many countries, governmental agencies regulate the use of the radio...

  8. Low energy magnetic excitation spectrum of the unconventional ferromagnet CeRh$_{3}$B$_{2}$

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The magnetic excitation spectrum of the unconventional ferromagnet CeRh$_{3}$B$_{2}$ was measured by inelastic neutron scattering on single crystal sample in the magnetically ordered and paramagnetic phases. The spin-wave excitation spectrum evidences high exchange interaction along the c-axis about two orders of magnitude higher than the ones in the basal plane of the hexagonal structure. Both strong out of plane and small in plane anisotropies are found. This latter point confirms that cons...

  9. Improvement of energy efficiency via spectrum optimization of excitation sequence for multichannel simultaneously triggered airborne sonar system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qing-Hao; Yao, Zhen-Jing; Peng, Han-Yang

    2009-12-01

    Both the energy efficiency and correlation characteristics are important in airborne sonar systems to realize multichannel ultrasonic transducers working together. High energy efficiency can increase echo energy and measurement range, and sharp autocorrelation and flat cross correlation can help eliminate cross-talk among multichannel transducers. This paper addresses energy efficiency optimization under the premise that cross-talk between different sonar transducers can be avoided. The nondominated sorting genetic algorithm-II is applied to optimize both the spectrum and correlation characteristics of the excitation sequence. The central idea of the spectrum optimization is to distribute most of the energy of the excitation sequence within the frequency band of the sonar transducer; thus, less energy is filtered out by the transducers. Real experiments show that a sonar system consisting of eight-channel Polaroid 600 series electrostatic transducers excited with 2 ms optimized pulse-position-modulation sequences can work together without cross-talk and can measure distances up to 650 cm with maximal 1% relative error.

  10. Some problems of the theory of quantum statistical systems with an energy spectrum of the fractional-power type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alisultanov, Z. Z.; Meilanov, R. P.

    2012-10-01

    We consider the problem of the effective interaction potential in a quantum many-particle system leading to the fractional-power dispersion law. We show that passing to fractional-order derivatives is equivalent to introducing a pair interparticle potential. We consider the case of a degenerate electron gas. Using the van der Waals equation, we study the equation of state for systems with a fractional-power spectrum. We obtain a relation between the van der Waals constant and the phenomenological parameter α, the fractional-derivative order. We obtain a relation between energy, pressure, and volume for such systems: the coefficient of the thermal energy is a simple function of α. We consider Bose—Einstein condensation in a system with a fractional-power spectrum. The critical condensation temperature for 1 ideal system, where α = 2.

  11. Suppression of the Low-l Multipoles of the CMB Anisotropy Spectrum as the Dark Energy Effect on Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Zhe; Wang, Sai; Li, Xin

    2011-01-01

    Confirmed by the WMAP 7-year results, the quadrupole $C_{\\ell}(\\ell=2)$ moment of the angular power spectrum of the Cosmic Microwave Background(CMB) temperature fluctuations has an anomalously low amplitude compared to the prediction of the standard inflationary scenario and the $\\Lambda$-CDM model. In this paper, we try to take into account the effect of a cosmological-constant type dark energy during the inflation period in the early universe. This is accommodated by a new dispersion relation in a four dimensional de Sitter space, i.e. $\\omega^2= k^2+\\epsilon^{*2}_{\\gamma}$. A modified inflation model of a minimally-coupled scalar field is proposed as a possible dark-energy explanation of the low-$\\ell$ multipole suppression of the CMB spectrum. For $\\epsilon^{*2}_{\\gamma}\\sim 10^{-5} (\\textmd{GeV}^2)$, a smaller theoretical value of $C_{\\ell}(\\ell=2)$ is obtained.

  12. Beam collimation and energy spectrum compression of laser-accelerated proton beams using solenoid field and RF cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, J.; Gu, Y. Q.; Zhu, B.; Hong, W.; Zhao, Z. Q.; Zhou, W. M.; Cao, L. F.

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a new method of laser produced proton beam collimation and spectrum compression using a combination of a solenoid field and a RF cavity. The solenoid collects laser-driven protons efficiently within an angle that is smaller than 12 degrees because it is mounted few millimeters from the target, and collimates protons with energies around 2.3 MeV. The collimated proton beam then passes through a RF cavity to allow compression of the spectrum. Particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations demonstrate the proton beam transport in the solenoid and RF electric fields. Excellent energy compression and collection efficiency of protons are presented. This method for proton beam optimization is suitable for high repetition-rate laser acceleration proton beams, which could be used as an injector for a conventional proton accelerator.

  13. Universal breaking point asymptotic for energy spectrum of Riemann waves in weakly nonlinear non-dispersive media

    CERN Document Server

    Kartashova, Elena

    2013-01-01

    In this Letter we study the form of the energy spectrum of Riemann waves in weakly nonlinear non-dispersive media. For quadratic and cubic nonlinearity we demonstrate that the deformation of an Riemann wave over time yields an exponential energy spectrum which turns into power law asymptotic with the slope being approximately -8/3 at the last stage of evolution before breaking. We argue, that this is the universal asymptotic behaviour of Riemann waves in any nonlinear non-dispersive medium at the point of breaking. The results reported in this Letter can be used in various non-dispersive media, e.g. magneto-hydro dynamics, physical oceanography, nonlinear acoustics.

  14. Influence of a Transverse Electric Field on the Alternating Currents Rectification Effect in Superstructures with Non-additive Energy Spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.I. Konchenkov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available It is investigated the effect of mutual rectification of alternating currents, induced by an electric field of two uniformly polarized electromagnetic waves with different frequencies in two-dimensional superlattice with non-additive energy spectrum under the influence of a constant transverse electric field. The possibility of control of constant component of electric current (amplification, change of sign, suppression by the transverse electric field is shown. The abilities of the practical use of the results are discussed.

  15. Rigorous description of an energy spectrum of the isopropanol molecule taking into account the internal rotation of methyl tops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burenin, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    By using the group chain methods, a rigorous algebraic model is constructed to describe the energy spectrum of the isopropanol molecule (CH3)2CHOH with an allowance for the internal motion of hydroxil and two identical methyl tops. The model is rigorous in the sense that its correctness is limited only by the correctness of a symmetry chosen to describe internal dynamics of the molecule.

  16. Experimental determination of the energy response of alanine pellets in the high dose rate 192Ir spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeken, B.; Cuypers, R.; Goossens, J.; Van den Weyngaert, D.; Verellen, D.

    2011-10-01

    An experimental determination of the energy correction factor for alanine/paraffin pellets in the 192Ir spectrum at varying distances from the source is presented. Alanine dosimeters were irradiated in water under full scatter conditions with a high dose rate (HDR) 192Ir source (Flexisource), using a dedicated holder. Up to six line sources (catheters) fit in a regular pattern at fixed radial distances from the holder axis, the alanine detector being placed at the centre of the holder. The HDR source was stepping every 0.5 cm within a trocar needle within ± 3.0 cm around the medial plane through the detector in order to achieve dose homogeneity within the detector volume. The energy correction factor of alanine/paraffin pellets in 192Ir relative to 60Co was experimentally determined as the inverse ratio of the dose to water measured in water around the 192Ir source to the dose to water calculated in water using the TG-43 formalism. The pellets were read out with a Bruker EMXmicro spectrometer (X-band). The amplitude of the central line in the alanine absorption spectrum from pellets irradiated within the 192Ir spectrum was directly compared with the amplitude from 60Co-irradiated pellets. The energy correction factors of Harwell pellets irradiated in the 192Ir spectrum are 1.029 ± 0.02, 1.027 ± 0.02 and 1.045 ± 0.02 at a mean weighted source-detector distance of 2.0, 2.9 and 5.3 cm, respectively. The experimentally obtained values for the energy response are 1.3% lower compared to the theoretical values for radial distances smaller than 3 cm.

  17. Young adolescents who combine alcohol and energy drinks have a higher risk of reporting negative behavioural outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holubcikova, Jana; Kolarcik, Peter; Madarasova Geckova, Andrea; Joppova, Eva; van Dijk, Jitse P; Reijneveld, Sijmen A

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To explore whether young adolescents consuming alcohol and energy drinks combined were more likely to report negative behavioural outcomes than their peers who drink only one type of these beverages or are abstinent. METHODS: We analysed data on a representative sample of Slovak adolesce

  18. Young adolescents who combine alcohol and energy drinks have a higher risk of reporting negative behavioural outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holubcikova, Jana; Kolarcik, Peter; Geckova, Andrea Madarasova; Joppova, Eva; van Dijk, Jitse P.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.

    To explore whether young adolescents consuming alcohol and energy drinks combined were more likely to report negative behavioural outcomes than their peers who drink only one type of these beverages or are abstinent. We analysed data on a representative sample of Slovak adolescents 8502 adolescents

  19. Influence of incoherent scattering on stochastic deflection of high-energy negative particle beams in bent crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirillin, I.V. [Akhiezer Institute for Theoretical Physics, National Science Center ' ' Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology' ' , Kharkov (Ukraine); Shul' ga, N.F. [Akhiezer Institute for Theoretical Physics, National Science Center ' ' Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology' ' , Kharkov (Ukraine); V.N. Karazin Kharkov National University, Kharkov (Ukraine); Bandiera, L. [INFN Sezione di Ferrara, Ferrara (Italy); Guidi, V.; Mazzolari, A. [INFN Sezione di Ferrara, Ferrara (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Ferrara, Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Ferrara (Italy)

    2017-02-15

    An investigation on stochastic deflection of high-energy negatively charged particles in a bent crystal was carried out. On the basis of analytical calculation and numerical simulation it was shown that there is a maximum angle at which most of the beam is deflected. The existence of a maximum, which is taken in the correspondence of the optimal radius of curvature, is a novelty with respect to the case of positively charged particles, for which the deflection angle can be freely increased by increasing the crystal length. This difference has to be ascribed to the stronger contribution of incoherent scattering affecting the dynamics of negative particles that move closer to atomic nuclei and electrons. We therefore identified the ideal parameters for the exploitation of axial confinement for negatively charged particle beam manipulation in future high-energy accelerators, e.g., ILC or muon colliders. (orig.)

  20. Calculation of negative electron affinity and aqueous anion hardness using kohn-Sham HOMO and LUMO energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Proft, Frank; Sablon, Nick; Tozer, David J; Geerlings, Paul

    2007-01-01

    An important chemical property emerging from density-functional theory is the hardness, which can be evaluated as half of the difference between the vertical ionisation energy and electron affinity of the system. For many gas phase molecules, however, the electron affinity is negative and standard ways of evaluating this property are troublesome. In this contribution, we investigate an unconventional approximation for the electron affinity, based on the Kohn-Sham orbital energies of the frontier orbitals and the ionisation potential. It is shown that, for a large series of molecules possessing negative electron affinities, this methodology yields reasonable values for this quantity and that the correlation of the computed values with the experimental affinities from electron transmission spectroscopy is superior to other theoretical approaches. In a second part of this contribution, the hardness of a series of stable negative ions is evaluated in aqueous solution.

  1. Study of the very high energy gamma-ray spectrum from the Galactic Center and future prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Belikov, Alexander V; Silk, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Ground-based gamma ray observations of the Galactic Center region have revealed a high energy gamma ray source spatially coincident with the gravitational centroid of our Galaxy. The pointlike emission detected by H.E.S.S. exhibits an energy cut-off at about 10 TeV. We identify the parameters of the best fit of the exponential and the super-exponential cutoff models to the spectrum of the pointlike source and find that super-exponential one provides a similar quality of the fit to the spectrum of the pointlike source as the best-fit exponential cutoff model, while a dark matter interpretation does not provide as good a fit in the whole energy range of the signal. Based on the magnitude of the flux we derive constraints in the plane of the slope of the density profile $\\gamma$ and the critical radius, below which the density is assumed to be constant, $r_c$. Motivated by recent results on the spectrum and morphology from H.E.S.S. and by the possible observation of a super-exponential cutoff, we forecast the ob...

  2. Energy spectrum of the hydrogen atom in a space with one compactified extra dimension, R3 ×S1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureš, Martin

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the consequences of one extra compactified dimension for the energy spectrum of the non-relativistic hydrogen atom with a potential defined by Gauss' law, i.e. proportional to 1 /| x | 2 in non-compactified 4d space. The calculations were performed numerically by diagonalizing the Hamiltonian in two different sets of basis vectors. The energy levels and electron probability density are plotted as a function of the compactification radius. The occurrence of several physical effects is discussed and interpreted.

  3. Post-exercise substrate utilization after a high glucose vs. high fructose meal during negative energy balance in the obese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittelbach, T J; Mattes, R D; Gretebeck, R J

    2000-10-01

    To assess the effects of negative energy balance on the metabolic response of a meal containing either glucose or fructose as the primary source of carbohydrate after exercise in obese individuals in energy balance, or negative energy balance. Fourteen adults with mean body mass index (BMI) 30.3 +/- 1 kg/m2, age 26 +/- 2 years, and weight 93.5 +/- 5.4 kg, adhered to an energy-balanced (EB) or a negative energy-balanced (NEB) diet for 6 days. On Day 7, subjects exercised at 70% VO2peak for 40 minutes then consumed either high glucose (50 g of glucose, HG) or high fructose (50 g of fructose, HF) liquid meal. Substrate utilization was measured by indirect calorimetry for 3 hours. Blood samples were collected before exercise and 0, 30, 60, 120, and 180 minutes after consuming the meal. The HG produced 15.9% greater glycemic (p fructose in supplements/meals may provide no additional benefit in terms of substrate utilization during a weight loss program involving diet and exercise.

  4. The Neutron Energy Spectrum Study from the Phase II Solid Methane Moderator at the LENS Neutron Source

    CERN Document Server

    Shin, Yunchang; Lavelle, Christopher M; Baxter, David V; Tong, Xin; Yan, Haiyang; Leuschner, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Neutron energy spectrum measurements from a solid methane moderator were performed at the Low Energy Neutron Source (LENS) at Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) to verify our neutron scattering model of solid methane. The time-of-flight method was used to measure the energy spectrum of the moderator in the energy range of 0.1$meV\\sim$ 1$eV$. Neutrons were counted with a high efficiency $^{3}{He}$ detector. The solid methane moderator was operated in phase II temperature and the energy spectra were measured at the temperatures of 20K and 4K. We have also tested our newly-developed scattering kernels for phase II solid methane by calculating the neutron spectral intensity expected from the methane moderator at the LENS neutron source using MCNP (Monte Carlo N-particle Transport Code). Within the expected accuracy of our approximate approach, our model predicts both the neutron spectral intensity and the optimal thickness of the moderator at both temperatures. The predictions are compared to the measur...

  5. Measurement of the very-forward energy spectrum in pp collisions at √(s) = 13 TeV with CMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baur, Sebastian; Akbiyik, Melike; Baus, Colin; Katkov, Igor; Ulrich, Ralf; Woehrmann, Hauke [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The energy spectrum dN/dE in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of √(s)=13 TeV is measured with the CASTOR calorimeter of CMS at pseudorapidities -5.2>η>-6.6. The spectrum of the total energy, as well as the hadronic and electromagnetic energy, is presented and compared to models used to describe high-energy hadronic interactions. The performance also of model used to describe ultra-high energy cosmic ray air showers is tested, and the possible impact of the measurement on the air shower development is illustrated.

  6. Effect of muon-nuclear inelastic scattering on high-energy atmospheric muon spectrum at large depth underwater

    CERN Document Server

    Sinegovsky, S I; Lokhtin, K S; Takahashi, N

    2007-01-01

    The energy spectra of hadron cascade showers produced by the cosmic ray muons travelling through water as well as the muon energy spectra underwater at the depth up to 4 km are calculated with two models of muon inelastic scattering on nuclei, the recent hybrid model (two-component, 2C) and the well-known generalized ector-meson-dominance model for the comparison. The 2C model involves photonuclear interactions at low and moderate virtualities as well as the hard scattering including the weak neutral current processes. For the muon scattering off nuclei substantial uclear effects, shadowing, nuclear binding and Fermi motion of nucleons are taken into account. It is shown that deep nderwater muon energy spectrum calculated with the 2C model are noticeably distorted at energies above 100 TeV as compared to that obtained with the GVMD model.

  7. Energy dependence of negatively charged pion production in proton-proton interactions at the CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)663936; Dominik, Wojciech; Gaździck, Marek

    2016-01-01

    This thesis presents inclusive spectra of the negatively charged pions produced in inelastic proton-proton interactions measured at five beam momenta: 20, 31, 40, 80 and 158 GeV/c. The measurements were conducted in the NA61/SHINE experiment at CERN using a system of five Time Projection Chambers. The negatively charged pion spectra were calculated based on the negatively charged hadron spectra. Contribution of hadrons other than the primary pions was removed using EPOS simulations. The results were corrected for effects related to detection, acceptance, reconstruction efficiency and the analysis technique. Two-dimensional spectra were derived as a function of rapidity and transverse momentum or transverse mass. The spectra were parametrised by widths of the rapidity distributions, inverse slope parameters of the transverse mass distributions, mean transverse masses and the total pion multiplicities. The negatively charged pion spectra in proton-proton interactions belong to a broad NA61/SHINE programme of se...

  8. Single-wave-number representation of nonlinear energy spectrum in elastic-wave turbulence of the Föppl-von Kármán equation: energy decomposition analysis and energy budget.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Naoto; Takaoka, Masanori

    2014-12-01

    A single-wave-number representation of a nonlinear energy spectrum, i.e., a stretching-energy spectrum, is found in elastic-wave turbulence governed by the Föppl-von Kármán (FvK) equation. The representation enables energy decomposition analysis in the wave-number space and analytical expressions of detailed energy budgets in the nonlinear interactions. We numerically solved the FvK equation and observed the following facts. Kinetic energy and bending energy are comparable with each other at large wave numbers as the weak turbulence theory suggests. On the other hand, stretching energy is larger than the bending energy at small wave numbers, i.e., the nonlinearity is relatively strong. The strong correlation between a mode a(k) and its companion mode a(-k) is observed at the small wave numbers. The energy is input into the wave field through stretching-energy transfer at the small wave numbers, and dissipated through the quartic part of kinetic-energy transfer at the large wave numbers. Total-energy flux consistent with energy conservation is calculated directly by using the analytical expression of the total-energy transfer, and the forward energy cascade is observed clearly.

  9. Binding Energies of Negatively Charged Donors in a Gaussian Potential Quantum Dot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Wen-Fang

    2005-01-01

    @@ We investigate a negatively charged donor centre (D-) trapped by a quantum dot, which is subjected to a Gaussian potential confinement. Calculations are carried out by using the method of numerical diagonalization of Hamiltonian within the effective-mass approximation. The dependence of the ground state of the negatively charged donor on the dot size and the potential depth is studied. The same calculations performed with the parabolic approximation of the Gaussian potential lead to the results that are qualitatively and quantitatively different.

  10. A novel neutron energy spectrum unfolding code using particle swarm optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabinejad, H.; Sohrabpour, M.

    2017-07-01

    A novel neutron Spectrum Deconvolution using Particle Swarm Optimization (SDPSO) code has been developed to unfold the neutron spectrum from a pulse height distribution and a response matrix. The Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) imitates the bird flocks social behavior to solve complex optimization problems. The results of the SDPSO code have been compared with those of the standard spectra and recently published Two-steps Genetic Algorithm Spectrum Unfolding (TGASU) code. The TGASU code have been previously compared with the other codes such as MAXED, GRAVEL, FERDOR and GAMCD and shown to be more accurate than the previous codes. The results of the SDPSO code have been demonstrated to match well with those of the TGASU code for both under determined and over-determined problems. In addition the SDPSO has been shown to be nearly two times faster than the TGASU code.

  11. Sharp vorticity gradients in two-dimensional turbulence and the energy spectrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, E.A.; Naulin, Volker; Nielsen, Anders Henry;

    2010-01-01

    Formation of sharp vorticity gradients in two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamic turbulence and their influence on the turbulent spectra are considered. The analog of the vortex line representation as a transformation to the curvilinear system of coordinates moving together with the di-vorticity lines...... is developed and compressibility of this mapping appears as the main reason for the formation of the sharp vorticity gradients at high Reynolds numbers. In the case of strong anisotropy the sharp vorticity gradients can generate spectra which fall off as k −3 at large k, which appear to take the same form...... as the Kraichnan spectrum for the enstrophy cascade. For turbulence with weak anisotropy the k dependence of the spectrum due to the sharp gradients coincides with the Saffman spectrum: E(k) ~ k −4. Numerical investigations of decaying turbulence reveal exponential growth of di-vorticity with a spatial distributed...

  12. THz frequency spectrum of protein-solvent interaction energy using a recurrence plot-based Wiener-Khinchin method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karain, Wael

    2016-10-01

    The dynamics of a protein and the water surrounding it are coupled via nonbonded energy interactions. This coupling can exhibit a complex, nonlinear, and nonstationary nature. The THz frequency spectrum for this interaction energy characterizes both the vibration spectrum of the water hydrogen bond network, and the frequency range of large amplitude modes of proteins. We use a Recurrence Plot based Wiener-Khinchin method RPWK to calculate this spectrum, and the results are compared to those determined using the classical auto-covariance-based Wiener-Khinchin method WK. The frequency spectra for the total nonbonded interaction energy extracted from molecular dynamics simulations between the β-Lactamase Inhibitory Protein BLIP, and water molecules within a 10 Å distance from the protein surface, are calculated at 150, 200, 250, and 310 K, respectively. Similar calculations are also performed for the nonbonded interaction energy between the residues 49ASP, 53TYR, and 142PHE in BLIP, with water molecules within 10 Å from each residue respectively at 150, 200, 250, and 310 K. A comparison of the results shows that RPWK performs better than WK, and is able to detect some frequency data points that WK fails to detect. This points to the importance of using methods capable of taking the complex nature of the protein-solvent energy landscape into consideration, and not to rely on standard linear methods. In general, RPWK can be a valuable addition to the analysis tools for protein molecular dynamics simulations. Proteins 2016; 84:1549-1557. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Differential energy spectrum and angular distribution of hadrons at mountain altitudes at energies E gt 10 sup 3 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avakyan, V.V.; Mamidzhanyan, E.A.; Ovsepyan, G.G.; Ter-Antonyan, S.V. (Erevan Physics Institute (SU))

    1989-07-01

    The absolute differential energy spectrum and angular distribution of hadrons is presented for altitude 3250 meters above sea level. Experimental data obtained with high statistical accuracy are compared with a Monte Carlo calculation of the passage of the primary cosmic radiation through the atmosphere. The theoretical and statistical analysis is carried out of the influence of the selection of events on the basis of the shower accompaniment on the measured physical characteristics of the flux of hadrons. The dependence of the cross section for inelastic interaction of nucleons with air nuclei on energy is determined.

  14. Measurement of neutron energy spectrum at the radial channel No. 4 of the Dalat reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Son, Pham Ngoc; Tan, Vuong Huu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Several compositions of neutron filters have been installed at the channel No. 4 of the Dalat research reactor to produce quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams. However, this neutron facility has been proposed to enhance the quality of the experimental instruments, and to characterize the neutron spectrum parameters for new filtered neutron beams of 2 keV, 24 keV, 59 keV and 133 keV. Case description In order to meet the demand of neutron spectrum information for calculation and desi...

  15. The WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey: the selection function and z=0.6 galaxy power spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Blake, Chris; Colless, Matthew; Couch, Warrick; Croom, Scott; Davis, Tamara; Drinkwater, Michael J; Forster, Karl; Glazebrook, Karl; Jelliffe, Ben; Jurek, Russell J; Li, I-hui; Madore, Barry; Martin, Chris; Pimbblet, Kevin; Poole, Gregory B; Pracy, Michael; Sharp, Rob; Wisnioski, Emily; Woods, David; Wyder, Ted

    2010-01-01

    We report one of the most accurate measurements of the three-dimensional large-scale galaxy power spectrum achieved to date, using 56,159 redshifts of bright emission-line galaxies at effective redshift z=0.6 from the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey at the Anglo-Australian Telescope. We describe in detail how we construct the survey selection function allowing for the varying target completeness and redshift completeness. We measure the total power with an accuracy of approximately 5% in wavenumber bands of dk=0.01 h/Mpc. A model power spectrum including non-linear corrections, combined with a linear galaxy bias factor and a simple model for redshift-space distortions, provides a good fit to our data for scales k < 0.4 h/Mpc. The large-scale shape of the power spectrum is consistent with the best-fitting matter and baryon densities determined by observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation. By splitting the power spectrum measurement as a function of tangential and radial wavenumbers we delineate t...

  16. ADAPTIVE FULL-SPECTRUM SOLAR ENERGY SYSTEMS CROSS-CUTTING R&D ON ADAPTIVE FULL-SPECTRUM SOLAR ENERGY SYSTEMS FOR MORE EFFICIENT AND AFFORDABLE USE OF SOLAR ENERGY IN BUILDINGS AND HYBRID PHOTOBIOREACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byard D. Wood; Jeff D. Muhs

    2004-08-01

    This RD&D project is a three year team effort to develop a hybrid solar lighting (HSL) system that transports daylight from a paraboloidal dish concentrator to a luminaire via a bundle of small core or a large core polymer fiber optics. The luminaire can be a device to distribute sunlight into a space for the production of algae or it can be a device that is a combination of daylighting and electric lighting for space/task lighting. In this project, the sunlight is collected using a one-meter paraboloidal concentrator dish with two-axis tracking. For the second generation (alpha) system, the secondary mirror is an ellipsoidal mirror that directs the visible light into a bundle of small-core fibers. The IR spectrum is filtered out to minimize unnecessary heating at the fiber entrance region. This report describes the following investigations of various aspects of the system. Taken as a whole, they confirm significant progress towards the technical feasibility and commercial viability of this technology. (1) TRNSYS Modeling of a Hybrid Lighting System: Building Energy Loads and Chromaticity Analysis; (2) High Lumens Screening Test Setup for Optical Fibers; (3) Photo-Induced Heating in Plastic Optical Fiber Bundles; (4) Low-Cost Primary Mirror Development; (5) Potential Applications for Hybrid Solar Lighting; (6) Photobioreactor Population Experiments and Productivity Measurements; and (7) Development of a Microalgal CO2-Biofixation Photobioreactor.

  17. Effect of high energy electrons on H⁻ production and destruction in a high current DC negative ion source for cyclotron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onai, M; Etoh, H; Aoki, Y; Shibata, T; Mattei, S; Fujita, S; Hatayama, A; Lettry, J

    2016-02-01

    Recently, a filament driven multi-cusp negative ion source has been developed for proton cyclotrons in medical applications. In this study, numerical modeling of the filament arc-discharge source plasma has been done with kinetic modeling of electrons in the ion source plasmas by the multi-cusp arc-discharge code and zero dimensional rate equations for hydrogen molecules and negative ions. In this paper, main focus is placed on the effects of the arc-discharge power on the electron energy distribution function and the resultant H(-) production. The modelling results reasonably explains the dependence of the H(-) extraction current on the arc-discharge power in the experiments.

  18. Modelling the Multi-band Afterglow of GRB 091127: Evidence of a Hard Electron Energy Spectrum with an Injection Break

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Qiang; Zong, Hong-Shi

    2016-01-01

    The afterglow of GRBs is believed to originate from the synchrotron emission of shock-accelerated electrons produced by the interaction between the outflow and the external medium. The accelerated electrons are usually assumed to follow a power law energy distribution with an index of $p$. Observationally, although most GRB afterglows have a $p$ larger than 2, there are still a few GRBs suggestive of a hard ($p<2$) electron spectrum. GRB 091127, with well-sampled broad-band afterglow data, shows evidence of a hard electron spectrum and strong spectral evolution, with a spectral break moving from high to lower energies. The spectral break evolves very fast and cannot be explained by the cooling break in the standard afterglow model, unless evolving microphysical parameters are assumed. Besides, the multi-band afterglow light curves show an achromatic break at around 33 ks. Based on the model of a hard electron spectrum with an injection break, we interpret the observed spectral break as the synchrotron freq...

  19. A multiple-time-scale turbulence model based on variable partitioning of the turbulent kinetic energy spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S.-W.; Chen, C.-P.

    1989-01-01

    A multiple-time-scale turbulence model of a single point closure and a simplified split-spectrum method is presented. In the model, the effect of the ratio of the production rate to the dissipation rate on eddy viscosity is modeled by use of the multiple-time-scales and a variable partitioning of the turbulent kinetic energy spectrum. The concept of a variable partitioning of the turbulent kinetic energy spectrum and the rest of the model details are based on the previously reported algebraic stress turbulence model. Example problems considered include: a fully developed channel flow, a plane jet exhausting into a moving stream, a wall jet flow, and a weakly coupled wake-boundary layer interaction flow. The computational results compared favorably with those obtained by using the algebraic stress turbulence model as well as experimental data. The present turbulence model, as well as the algebraic stress turbulence model, yielded significantly improved computational results for the complex turbulent boundary layer flows, such as the wall jet flow and the wake boundary layer interaction flow, compared with available computational results obtained by using the standard kappa-epsilon turbulence model.

  20. On the nature of the pseudogap in the low-energy spectrum of noncubic Kondo insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kagan, Y. (Kurchatov Institute, Kurchatov Sq., 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation)); Kikoin, K.A. (Kurchatov Institute, Kurchatov Sq., 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation)); Prokof' ev, N.V. (University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Rd., Vancouver B.C., V6T 1Z1 (Canada))

    1994-04-01

    It is shown that the soft crystal electric field excitations in noncubic crystals interact strongly with the heavy fermions provided [Delta][sub CEF][<=]T[sub K]. This interaction results in forming the gap in the fermion spectrum which can be suppressed by an external magnetic field applied along the easy magnetization axis. ((orig.))

  1. Implementation of spectrum analysis in mesoscale modeling for wind energy assessment studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stathopoulos, C.; Barranger, N.; Larsén, Xiaoli Guo;

    2012-01-01

    Spectral analysis of wind speed is a key parameter for the characterization of the physical processes generating the fields. Especially, the mesoscale power spectrum is an important measure of accuracy of wind forecasting and extreme wind estimation for modern wind farms, which are of the size of...

  2. Caffeine and carbohydrate supplementation during exercise when in negative energy balance: effects on performance, metabolism, and salivary cortisol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slivka, Dustin; Hailes, Walter; Cuddy, John; Ruby, Brent

    2008-12-01

    The ingestion of carbohydrate (+CHO) and caffeine (+CAF) during exercise is a commonly used ergogenic practice. Investigations are typically conducted with subjects who are in a rested state after an overnight fast. However, this state of positive energy balance is not achieved during many work and exercise circumstances. The aim of this study was to evaluate the substrate use and performance effects of caffeine and carbohydrate consumed alone and in combination while participants were in negative energy balance. Male participants (n = 9; 23 +/- 3 years; 74.1 +/- 10.6 kg) completed 4 trials in random order: -CAF/-CHO, -CAF/+CHO, +CAF/-CHO, and +CAF/+CHO. Diet and exercise were prescribed for 2 days before each trial to ensure negative energy balance. For each trial, before and after 2 h of cycling at 50% of maximal watts, a saliva sample and a muscle biopsy (vastus lateralis) were obtained. A simulated 20 km time trial was then performed. The respiratory exchange ratio was higher (p 0.05), or any of the other trials. When co-ingested with carbohydrate, caffeine increased fat use and decreased nonmuscle glycogen carbohydrate use over carbohydrate alone when participants are in negative energy balance; however, caffeine had no effect on the 20 km cycling time trial performance.

  3. Measurement of the B --> X_s gamma Branching Fraction and Photon Energy Spectrum using the Recoil Method

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Garra Tico, J; Graugès-Pous, E; López, L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lopes-Pegna, D; Lynch, G; Orimoto, T J; Osipenkov, I L; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Tanabé, T; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo-Sánchez, P; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schröder, T; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Vitug, G M; Zhang, L; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Ayad, R; Gabareen, A M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Klose, V; Kobel, M J; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Lombardo, V; Thiebaux, C; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Watson, J E; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Santoro, V; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Nash, J A; Panduro-Vazquez, W; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Bquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flächer, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Mclachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, Gallieno; Fabozzi, F; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gagliardi, N; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; La Vaissière, C de; Hamon, O; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Pérez, A; Prendki, J; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Biesiada, J; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Baracchini, E; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, o R; Adye, T; Castelli, G; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Röthel, W; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Y`che, C; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Allen, e M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Vavra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Miyashita, T S; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martínez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Neal, H

    2007-01-01

    We present a measurement of the branching fraction and photon energy spectrum for the decay B --> X_s gamma using data from the BaBar experiment. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 210 fb^{-1}, from which approximately 680 000 BB events are tagged by a fully reconstructed hadronic decay of one of the B mesons. In the decay of the second B meson, an isolated high--energy photon is identified. We measure BR(B --> X_s gamma) = (3.66 +- 0.85_{stat} +- 0.60_{syst}) x 10^{-4} for photon energies E_gamma above 1.9 GeV in the B rest frame. From the measured spectrum we calculate the first and second moments for different minimum photon energies, which are used to extract the heavy-quark parameters m_b and mu_{pi}^2. In addition, measurements of the direct CP asymmetry and isospin asymmetry are presented.

  4. Measurement of the B to Xs gammaBranching Fraction and Photon Energy Spectrum usingthe Recoil Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.

    2007-12-04

    We present a measurement of the branching fraction and photon energy spectrum for the decay B {yields} X{sub s}{gamma} using data from the BABAR experiment. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 210 fb{sup -1}, from which approximately 680,000 B{bar B} events are tagged by a fully reconstructed hadronic decay of one of the B mesons. In the decay of the second B meson, an isolated high-energy photon is identified. We measure {Beta}(B {yields} X{sub s}{gamma}) = (3.66 {+-} 0.85{sub stat} {+-} 0.60{sub syst}) x 10{sup -4} for photon energies E{sub {gamma}} above 1.9 GeV in the B rest frame. From the measured spectrum we calculate the first and second moments for different minimum photon energies, which are used to extract the heavy-quark parameters m{sub b} and {mu}{sub {pi}}{sup 2}. In addition, measurements of the direct CP asymmetry and isospin asymmetry are presented.

  5. β LACTA test performance for detection of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Gram-negative bacilli directly on bronchial aspirates samples: a validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallah, S; Benzerara, Y; Tankovic, J; Woerther, P-L; Bensekri, H; Mainardi, J-L; Arlet, G; Vimont, S; Garnier, M

    2017-08-03

    Incidence of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Gram-negative bacilli (ESBL-PE-GNB)-related infections is worryingly increasing worldwide. ESBL-PE-GNB detection directly on bronchial aspirate samples (BAS) performed for suspected pneumonia may help save empirical carbapenems. Our objectives were to optimize β-LACTA™ test (BLT) realization and evaluate BLT performance for ESBL-PE-GNB detection directly on BAS. We studied BLT technical optimization using BAS of different matrix types spiked with increasing concentrations of CTX-M-15-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae; in vitro validation of BLT diagnostic performance on 17 ESBL enzymes, belonging to CTX-M, SHV, TEM, OXA, GES, VEB and PER groups; and clinical validation of BLT performance on 126 BAS prospectively collected from seven intensive care units. After optimization, BLT detected with 100% sensitivity the presence of CTX-M-15-producing K. pneumoniae spiked in sterile BAS for inoculums upon two or more GNB per field upon microscopic Gram staining examination (MGSE). The BLT accurately detected the 17 ESBLs tested at 10(6) CFU/mL and all ESBLs except Pseudomonas aeruginosa-related OXA-14 at 10(4) CFU/mL. Among the 126 BAS of the validation cohort, 21 (17%) gave positive BLT (ten in BAS positive and 11 in BAS negative on MGSE). All BLT-positive BAS grew with ESBL-PE-GNB, including five hyper-L2-producing Stenotrophomonas maltophilia strains. BLT detected ESBL-PE-GNB directly on clinical BAS positive for GNB on MGSE and/or growing with ≥10(4) CFU/mL with 100% sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values. BLT is an accurate tool for ESBL-PE-GNB detection directly on BAS. Further studies are needed to evaluate the impact of BLT-guided early antimicrobial de-escalation strategies. Copyright © 2017 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of capsaicin, green tea and CH-19 sweet pepper on appetite and energy intake in humans in negative and positive energy balance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinbach, Helene Christine; Møller, P.; Smeets, A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Background & aims Bioactive ingredients have been shown to reduce appetite and energy intake. The magnitude of these effects might depend on energy balance why it was investigated how capsaicin, green tea, CH-19 sweet pepper as well as green tea and capsaicin affect appetite and energy in...... ingredients may therefore be helpful in reducing energy intake and might support weight loss periods by relatively sustaining satiety and suppressing hunger.......Summary Background & aims Bioactive ingredients have been shown to reduce appetite and energy intake. The magnitude of these effects might depend on energy balance why it was investigated how capsaicin, green tea, CH-19 sweet pepper as well as green tea and capsaicin affect appetite and energy...... the effects on appetite, energy intake, body weight and heart rate were assessed. Results CH-19 sweet pepper and a combination of capsaicin and green tea reduced energy intake during positive energy balance. Capsaicin and green tea suppressed hunger and increased satiety more during negative than during...

  7. Transformation of a wave energy spectrum from encounter to absolute domain when observing from an advancing ship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulrik Dam

    2017-01-01

    The article presents a practical approach to transform a wave energy spectrum from encounter domain to absolute domain. This problem has its specific relevance, when shipboard sea state estimation is conducted by the buoy analogy; notably for some particular implementation solving for the sea state......” the waves (beam to head sea) but in following sea conditions there exists no unique solution to the problem. Instead, a reasonable approach valid for practical engineering must be applied, and the article outlines one viable solution that can be used to transform a wave spectrum from encounter to absolute...... domain. Specifically, two pseudo algorithms are presented, and good performance is achieved with both algorithms when they are tested at different operational scenarios....

  8. The cosmic ray proton plus helium energy spectrum measured by the ARGO-YBJ experiment in the energy range 3-300 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    :,; Bernardini, P; Bi, X J; Cao, Z; Catalanotti, S; Chen, S Z; Chen, T L; Cui, S W; Dai, B Z; D'Amone, A; Danzengluobu,; De Mitri, I; Piazzoli, B D'Ettorre; Di Girolamo, T; Di Sciascio, G; Feng, C F; Feng, Zhaoyang; Feng, Zhenyong; Gou, Q B; Guo, Y Q; He, H H; Hu, Haibing; Hu, Hongbo; Iacovacci, M; Iuppa, R; Jia, H Y; Labaciren,; Li, H J; Liu, C; Liu, J; Liu, M Y; Lu, H; Ma, L L; Ma, X H; Mancarella, G; Mari, S M; Marsella, G; Mastroianni, S; Montini, P; Ning, C C; Perrone, L; Pistilli, P; Salvini, P; Santonico, R; Settanta, G; Shen, P R; Sheng, X D; Shi, F; Surdo, A; Tan, Y H; Vallania, P; Vernetto, S; Vigorito, C; Wang, H; Wu, C Y; Wu, H R; Xue, L; Yang, Q Y; Yang, X C; Yao, Z G; Yuan, A F; Zha, M; Zhang, H M; Zhang, L; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhao, J; Zhaxiciren,; Zhaxisangzhu,; Zhou, X X; Zhu, F R; Zhu, Q Q

    2015-01-01

    The ARGO-YBJ experiment is a full-coverage air shower detector located at the Yangbajing Cosmic Ray Observatory (Tibet, People's Republic of China, 4300 m a.s.l.). The high altitude, combined with the full-coverage technique, allows the detection of extensive air showers in a wide energy range and offer the possibility of measuring the cosmic ray proton plus helium spectrum down to the TeV region, where direct balloon/space-borne measurements are available. The detector has been in stable data taking in its full configuration from November 2007 to February 2013. In this paper the measurement of the cosmic ray proton plus helium energy spectrum is presented in the region 3-300 TeV by analyzing the full collected data sample. The resulting spectral index is $\\gamma = -2.64 \\pm 0.01$. These results demonstrate the possibility of performing an accurate measurement of the spectrum of light elements with a ground based air shower detector.

  9. Energy-Based Analysis of Mechanisms of Earthquake-Induced Landslide Using Hilbert-Huang Transform and Marginal Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Gang; Zhang, Li-Min; Zhang, Jian-Jing; Ouyang, Fang

    2017-09-01

    Based on the Hilbert-Huang Transform and its marginal spectrum, an energy-based method is proposed to analyse the dynamics of earthquake-induced landslides and a case study is presented to illustrate the proposed method. The results show that the seismic Hilbert energy in the sliding mass of a landslide is larger than that in the sliding bed when subjected to seismic excitations, causing different dynamic responses between the sliding mass and the sliding bed. The seismic Hilbert energy transits from the high-frequency components to the low-frequency components when the seismic waves propagate through the weak zone, causing a nonuniform seismic Hilbert energy distribution in the frequency domain. Shear failure develops first at the crest and toe of the sliding mass due to resonance effects. Meanwhile, the seismic Hilbert energy in the frequency components of 3-5 Hz, which is close to the natural frequency of the slope, is largely dissipated in the initiation and failure processes of the landslide. With the development of dynamic failure, the peak energy transmission ratios in the weak zone decrease gradually. This study offers an energy-based interpretation for the initiation and progression of earthquake-induced landslides with the shattering-sliding failure type.

  10. Large Eddy Simulations Analysis of the Energy Spectrum Without Mutual Friction in Superfluid 4 He: HVBK Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtaoui, M.; Merahi, L.

    2017-01-01

    The reliability of the filtered on the Hall-Vinen-Bekarevich-Khalatnikov (HVBK) model without mutual friction force is now investigated via some large eddy simulations of freely decaying isotropic superfluid turbulence. The filtered HVBK model is solved using a fully pseudo-spectral method, which is an extension of the classical Rogallo's method to the two-fluid model. Furthermore, in this paper, we analyze the evolution of various terms constituting the HVBK momentum equations using the balance equation for the energy-spectrum function. Our results are presented in both cases with and without mutual friction force. LES predictions have shown that this mutual friction decreases the energy dissipation of the normal part and the energy transfer is more significant when this force is taken into account.

  11. Measurement of the energy spectrum of cosmic-ray induced neutrons aboard an ER-2 high-altitude airplane

    CERN Document Server

    Goldhagen, P E; Kniss, T; Reginatto, M; Singleterry, R C; Van Steveninck, W; Wilson, J W

    2002-01-01

    Crews working on present-day jet aircraft are a large occupationally exposed group with a relatively high average effective dose from galactic cosmic radiation. Crews of future high-speed commercial aircraft flying at higher altitudes would be even more exposed. To help reduce the significant uncertainties in calculations of such exposures, the atmospheric ionizing radiation (AIR) project, an international collaboration of 15 laboratories, made simultaneous radiation measurements with 14 instruments on five flights of a NASA ER-2 high-altitude aircraft. The primary AIR instrument was a highly sensitive extended-energy multisphere neutron spectrometer with lead and steel shells placed within the moderators of two of its 14 detectors to enhance response at high energies. Detector responses were calculated for neutrons and charged hadrons at energies up to 100 GeV using MCNPX. Neutron spectra were unfolded from the measured count rates using the new MAXED code. We have measured the cosmic-ray neutron spectrum (t...

  12. The 9Be(d,n) 10B-reaction as intense neutron source with continuous energy spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, F. M.; Domogala, G.; Freiesleben, H.; Paul, H. J.; Puhlvers, S.; Sohlbach, H.

    1986-06-01

    Neutron energy spectra produced by deuterons of 3 to 8 MeV in a thick 9Be-target were measured at various scattering angles. Significant angle dependences were observed. Angular distributions of the most energetic neutrons produced in thin 9Be targets can be described quantitatively in DWBA, which is an indication for a direct reaction mechanism. As a consequence all but 0°-neutrons are polarized to a certain extent. Also presented is the neutron energy spectrum of 7Li(d,n) 8Be at 0° produced in a thick 7Li-target. The potential of these intense 0°-neutron beams with continuous energy distributions is demonstrated by a measurement of the neutron absorption cross section of natural carbon.

  13. Ab initio ground state phenylacetylene-argon intermolecular potential energy surface and rovibrational spectrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cybulski, Hubert; Fernandez, Berta; Henriksen, Christian

    2012-01-01

    We evaluate the phenylacetylene-argon intermolecular potential energy surface by fitting a representative number of ab initio interaction energies to an analytic function. These energies are calculated at a grid of intermolecular geometries, using the CCSD(T) method and the aug-cc-pVDZ basis set ...

  14. Mammary gene expression profiles during an intramammary challenge reveal potential mechanisms linking negative energy balance with impaired immune response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moyes, Kasey; Drackley, J K; Morin, D E;

    2010-01-01

    Our objective was to compare mammary tissue gene expression profiles during a Streptococcus uberis (S. uberis) mastitis challenge between lactating cows subjected to dietary-induced negative energy balance (NEB; n = 5) and cows fed ad libitum to maintain positive energy balance (PEB; n = 5......) in order to better understand the mechanisms associated with NEB and risk of mastitis during the transition period. The NEB cows were feed-restricted to 60% of calculated net energy for lactation requirements for 7 d, and cows assigned to PEB were fed the same diet for ad libitum intake. Five days after...... feed restriction, one rear mammary quarter of each cow was inoculated with 5,000 cfu of S. uberis (O140J). At 20 h post-inoculation, S. uberis-infected mammary quarters from all cows were biopsied for RNA extraction. Energy balance (NEB vs. PEB) resulted in 287 differentially expressed genes (DEG; FDR...

  15. Energy flux pattern of inverse Goos-Hanchen shift in photonic crystals with negative index of refraction

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Jinbing; Chen, Jiabi; Jiang, Qiang; Wang, Yan; Zhuang, Songlin

    2015-01-01

    The energy flux patterns of inverse Goos-Hanchen (GH) shift around the interface between air and negatively refractive photonic crystal (NRPhC) with different surface terminations is investigated. Results show that NRPhC exhibits inverse GH shift in TM and TE polarization, and the localization and pattern of energy flux differ in TM and TE polarizations and are strongly affected by surface termination. This is different to the condition of negative permittivity materials (i.e., metal), which only presents inverse GH shift in TM polarization. In the case of TE polarization, the energy flux pattern exhibits the flux of backward wave whose localization changes from the surface to inside of NRPhC with the variation of surface termination. In the case of TM polarization, the energy flux pattern is always confined within the surface of NRPhC, whereas its pattern changes from the flux of backward wave to vortices at the surface of NRPhC, which is different to the energy flux of TM polarization of metal. By properly ...

  16. The inelastic neutron scattering spectrum of chromous acid at high energy transfers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomkinson, J.; Taylor, A. D.; Howard, J.; Eckert, J.; Goldstone, J. A.

    1985-02-01

    The inelastic incoherent neutron scattering spectrum of chromous acid, at 77 K, is presented. It is dominated by the intense bending mode at 1254 cm-1 with some modes at lower frequencies showing indications of dispersion. The antisymmetric stretch νas(OHS) {‖1>-‖2>} was assigned to a broad band centered at ˜2050 cm-1, significantly displaced for the IR assignment (1650 cm-1). The breadth of the band is due to the dispersion, and kinematic coupling, that is anticipated for this compound. These new data allows us to fit chromous acid more clearly into the general trend of hydrogen bonded compounds. Chromous acid compares very well in its overall INS spectrum with the isomorphous sodium bifluoride, except that the kinematic coupling between νas(OHO) and the symmetric stretch does not occur in this compound.

  17. High-efficiency solar energy conversion with spectrum splitting prismatic lens (and other configurations)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostoleris, Harry; Maragliano, Carlo; Chiesa, Matteo; Stefancich, Marco

    2016-09-01

    Optical spectrum splitting systems that divide light between independent solar cells of different band gaps have received increasing attention in recent years as an alternative to expensive multijunction cells for high-efficiency PV. Most research, however, has focused on dichroic filters and other photonic structures that are expensive to manufacture. This has the effect of transferring the cost of the system from the PV cells to the optics. As a low-cost spectrum splitting approach we designed a prismatic lens that simultaneously splits and concentrates light and can be fabricated by injection molding. We present experimental results of a two-cell demonstration system, and calculations for low-cost configurations of commercial solar cells, enabled by the removal of lattice-matching requirements.

  18. Low-energy magnetic excitation spectrum of the unconventional ferromagnet CeRh3B2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, S.; Panarin, J.; Givord, F.; Murani, A. P.; Boucherle, J. X.; Lejay, P.

    2010-09-01

    The magnetic excitation spectrum of the unconventional ferromagnet CeRh3B2 was measured by inelastic neutron scattering on single-crystal sample in the magnetically ordered and paramagnetic phases. The spin-wave excitation spectrum evidences high exchange interaction along the c axis about two orders of magnitude higher than the ones in the basal plane of the hexagonal structure. Both strong out-of-plane and small in-plane anisotropies are found. This latter point confirms that considering the J=5/2 multiplet alone is not adequate for describing the ground state of CeRh3B2 . Quasielastic scattering measured above TCurie is also strongly anisotropic between the basal plane and the c axis and suggests localized magnetism.

  19. A multiple-time-scale turbulence model based on variable partitioning of turbulent kinetic energy spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S.-W.; Chen, C.-P.

    1988-01-01

    The paper presents a multiple-time-scale turbulence model of a single point closure and a simplified split-spectrum method. Consideration is given to a class of turbulent boundary layer flows and of separated and/or swirling elliptic turbulent flows. For the separated and/or swirling turbulent flows, the present turbulence model yielded significantly improved computational results over those obtained with the standard k-epsilon turbulence model.

  20. Measurement of the energy spectrum of cosmic rays with the 26 station configuration of the IceTop detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kislat, Fabian

    2011-09-27

    IceTop is an instrument at the geographic South Pole designed to detect cosmic ray air showers, particle cascades in the atmosphere initiated by high-energy cosmic rays. It is the surface component of the IceCube neutrino telescope. Since its completion in December 2010, IceTop consists of 81 detector stations covering an area of one square kilometer on the ice surface above IceCube. Each IceTop station consists of two ice-filled tanks in which the Cherenkov light emitted by charged air shower particles is measured. In this dissertation, an analysis of data taken in 2007 with 26 IceTop stations operational at that time is presented. First, properties of air showers like core position, direction and shower size were reconstructed from the measured signals. The core position can be determined to an accuracy of up to 6m and a direction resolution of up to 0.3 is achieved. The shower size is a measure of the energy of the primary particle and a resolution of up to 10% is achieved at high energies. In the next step the relation between primary energy and shower size, as well as resolution and efficiency are determined from Monte Carlo simulations of air showers and the IceTop detector. Here, an assumption was made about the chemical composition of cosmic rays. The informations obtained in these simulations are then used to unfold the spectrum of measured shower sizes in order to obtain the all-particle cosmic ray energy spectrum. This is done independently for particles from three different zenith angle intervals. The result of the unfolding depends on the assumed primary composition. Due to the isotropy of cosmic rays, results obtained in different zenith angle intervals must agree. While with the chosen analysis technique a simultaneous determination of primary particle mass and energy is limited due to systematic uncertainties, it has already been shown that the requirement of isotropy can be used to constrain the range of possible assumptions on the chemical

  1. Measurements of the neutron dose and energy spectrum on the International Space Station during expeditions ISS-16 to ISS-21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M B; Akatov, Yu; Andrews, H R; Arkhangelsky, V; Chernykh, I V; Ing, H; Khoshooniy, N; Lewis, B J; Machrafi, R; Nikolaev, I; Romanenko, R Y; Shurshakov, V; Thirsk, R B; Tomi, L

    2013-01-01

    As part of the international Matroshka-R and Radi-N experiments, bubble detectors have been used on board the ISS in order to characterise the neutron dose and the energy spectrum of neutrons. Experiments using bubble dosemeters inside a tissue-equivalent phantom were performed during the ISS-16, ISS-18 and ISS-19 expeditions. During the ISS-20 and ISS-21 missions, the bubble dosemeters were supplemented by a bubble-detector spectrometer, a set of six detectors that was used to determine the neutron energy spectrum at various locations inside the ISS. The temperature-compensated spectrometer set used is the first to be developed specifically for space applications and its development is described in this paper. Results of the dose measurements indicate that the dose received at two different depths inside the phantom is not significantly different, suggesting that bubble detectors worn by a person provide an accurate reading of the dose received inside the body. The energy spectra measured using the spectrometer are in good agreement with previous measurements and do not show a strong dependence on the precise location inside the station. To aid the understanding of the bubble-detector response to charged particles in the space environment, calculations have been performed using a Monte-Carlo code, together with data collected on the ISS. These calculations indicate that charged particles contribute space.

  2. Energy losses of positive and negative charged particles in electron gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diachenko, M. M.; Kholodov, R. I.

    2017-02-01

    A heavy charged particle propagation through electron gas has been studied using combination of non-relativistic quantum mechanics and the Green’s functions method. The energy loss of a charged particle has been found in the case of large transferred momentum taking into account the interference term in the expression for the rate. The dependence of the energy loss of a charged particles in electron gas with nonzero temperature on the sign of the charge has been obtained.

  3. Restrictions on negative energy density for the Dirac field in flat spacetime

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu Wei-Xing; Yu Hong-Wei; Li Fei; Wu Pu-Xun; Ren Zhong-Zhou

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates the quantum Dirac field in n + 1-dimensional flat spacetime and derives a lower bound in the form of quantum inequality on the energy density averaged against spacetime sampling functions. The stateindependent quantum inequality derived in the present paper is similar to the temporal quantum energy inequality and it is stronger for massive field than for massless one. It also presents the concrete results of the quantum inequality in 2 and 4-dimensional spacetimes.

  4. Exact third-order density perturbation and one-loop power spectrum in general dark energy models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seokcheon Lee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Under the standard perturbation theory (SPT, we obtain the fully consistent third-order density fluctuation and kernels for the general dark energy models without using the Einstein–de Sitter (EdS universe assumption for the first time. We also show that even though the temporal and spatial components of the SPT solutions cannot be separable, one can find the exact solutions to any order in general dark energy models. With these exact solutions, we obtain the less than % error correction of one-loop matter power spectrum compared to that obtained from the EdS assumption for k=0.1 hMpc−1 mode at z=0(1,1.5. Thus, the EdS assumption works very well at this scale. However, if one considers the correction for P13, the error is about 6 (9, 11% for the same mode at z=0(1,1.5. One absorbs P13 into the linear power spectrum in the renormalized perturbation theory (RPT and thus one should use the exact solution instead of the approximation one. The error on the resummed propagator N of RPT is about 14 (8, 6% at z=0(1,1.5 for k=0.4 hMpc−1. For k=1 hMpc−1, the error correction of the total matter power spectrum is about 3.6 (4.6, 4.5% at z=0(1,1.5. Upcoming observation is required to archive the sub-percent accuracy to provide the strong constraint on the dark energy and this consistent solution is prerequisite for the model comparison.

  5. Measurement of the energy spectrum of cosmic-ray induced neutrons aboard an ER-2 high-altitude airplane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldhagen, P; Reginatto, M; Kniss, T; Wilson, J W; Singleterry, R C; Jones, I W; Van Steveninck, W

    2002-01-01

    Crews working on present-day jet aircraft are a large occupationally exposed group with a relatively high average effective dose from galactic cosmic radiation. Crews of future high-speed commercial aircraft flying at higher altitudes would be even more exposed. To help reduce the significant uncertainties in calculations of such exposures, the atmospheric ionizing radiation (AIR) project, an international collaboration of 15 laboratories, made simultaneous radiation measurements with 14 instruments on five flights of a NASA ER-2 high-altitude aircraft. The primary AIR instrument was a highly sensitive extended-energy multisphere neutron spectrometer with lead and steel shells placed within the moderators of two of its 14 detectors to enhance response at high energies. Detector responses were calculated for neutrons and charged hadrons at energies up to 100 GeV using MCNPX. Neutron spectra were unfolded from the measured count rates using the new MAXED code. We have measured the cosmic-ray neutron spectrum (thermal to >10 GeV), total neutron fluence rate, and neutron effective dose and dose equivalent rates and their dependence on altitude and geomagnetic cutoff. The measured cosmic-ray neutron spectra have almost no thermal neutrons, a large "evaporation" peak near 1 MeV and a second broad peak near 100 MeV which contributes about 69% of the neutron effective dose. At high altitude, geomagnetic latitude has very little effect on the shape of the spectrum, but it is the dominant variable affecting neutron fluence rate, which was eight times higher at the northernmost measurement location than it was at the southernmost. The shape of the spectrum varied only slightly with altitude from 21 km down to 12 km (56-201 g cm-2 atmospheric depth), but was significantly different on the ground. In all cases, ambient dose equivalent was greater than effective dose for cosmic-ray neutrons.

  6. The Spreading of Social Energy: How Exposure to Positive and Negative Social News Affects Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Ziqing; Yu, Rongjun

    2016-01-01

    Social news, unlike video games or TV programs, conveys real-life interactions. Theoretically, social news in which people help or harm each other and violate rules should influence both prosocial and violation behaviors. In two experiments, we demonstrated the spreading effects of social news in a social interaction context emphasizing social conventions and a nonsocial interaction context emphasizing moral norms. Across the two studies, the results showed that positive social news increased cooperation (decreased defection) but had no effect on cheating, whereas negative social news increased cheating but with no change in cooperation (or defection). We conclude that there is a spreading impact of positive social news in the conventional norm domain and of negative social news in the moral norm domain.

  7. The WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey: the selection function and z = 0.6 galaxy power spectrum

    OpenAIRE

    Blake, Chris; Brough, Sarah; Colless, Matthew; Couch, Warrick; Croom, Scott; Davis, Tamara; Drinkwater, Michael J.; Forster, Karl; Glazebrook, Karl; Jelliffe, Ben; Jurek, Russell J; Li, I-hui; Madore, Barry; Martin, Chris; Pimbblet, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    We report one of the most accurate measurements of the three-dimensional large-scale galaxy power spectrum achieved to date, using 56 159 redshifts of bright emission-line galaxies at effective redshift z ≈ 0.6 from the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey at the Anglo-Australian Telescope. We describe in detail how we construct the survey selection function allowing for the varying target completeness and redshift completeness. We measure the total power with an accuracy of approximately 5 per cent in...

  8. Separation of coexisting dynamical regimes in multistate intermittency based on wavelet spectrum energies in an erbium-doped fiber laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hramov, Alexander E; Koronovskii, Alexey A; Moskalenko, Olga I; Zhuravlev, Maksim O; Jaimes-Reategui, Rider; Pisarchik, Alexander N

    2016-05-01

    We propose a method for the detection and localization of different types of coexisting oscillatory regimes that alternate with each other leading to multistate intermittency. Our approach is based on consideration of wavelet spectrum energies. The proposed technique is tested in an erbium-doped fiber laser with four coexisting periodic orbits, where external noise induces intermittent switches between the coexisting states. Statistical characteristics of multistate intermittency, such as the mean duration of the phases for every oscillation type, are examined with the help of the developed method. We demonstrate strong advantages of the proposed technique over previously used amplitude methods.

  9. First estimate of the primary cosmic ray energy spectrum above 3-EeV from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommers, Paul; /Utah U.

    2005-07-01

    Measurements of air showers are accumulating at an increasing rate while construction proceeds at the Pierre Auger Observatory. Although the southern site is only half complete, the cumulative exposure is already similar to those achieved by the largest forerunner experiments. A measurement of the cosmic ray energy spectrum in the southern sky is reported here. The methods are simple and robust, exploiting the combination of fluorescence detector (FD) and surface detector (SD). The methods do not rely on detailed numerical simulation or any assumption about the chemical composition.

  10. A New Nonrelativistic Atomic Energy Spectrum of Energy Dependent Potential for Heavy Quarkouniom in Noncommutative Spaces and Phases Symmetries

    OpenAIRE

    Abdelmadjid Maireche

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this search work is to study a three dimensional space-phase modified Schrödinger equation with energy dependent potential plus three terms: , and is carried out. Together with the Boopp’s shift method and standard perturbation theory the new energy spectra shown to be dependent with new atomic quantum in the non-commutative three dimensional real spaces and phases symmetries (NC-3D: RSP) and we have also constructed the corresponding deformed noncommutative Hamiltonia...

  11. On the spectrum of Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays and the Gamma Ray Burst Origin Hypothesis

    CERN Document Server

    Scully, S T

    2002-01-01

    It has been suggested that cosmological gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) can produce the observed flux of cosmic rays at the highest energies. However, recent studies of GRBs indicate that their redshift distribution likely follows that of the average star formation rate and that GRBs were more numerous at high redshifts. As a consequence, we show that photomeson production energy losses suffered by ultrahigh energy cosmic rays coming from GRBs would produce too sharp a spectral high energy cutoff to be consistent with the air shower data.

  12. Propagation of high-energy cosmic rays in extragalactic turbulent magnetic fields: resulting energy spectrum and composition

    CERN Document Server

    Globus, N; Parizot, E

    2007-01-01

    We extend previous studies of mixed-composition extragalactic cosmic-ray source models, by investigating the influence of a non-negligible extragalactic magnetic field on the propagated cosmic-ray spectrum and composition. We study the transport of charged particles in turbulent fields and the transition from a ballistic to a diffusive propagation regime. We introduce a method allowing a fast integration of the particle trajectories, which allows us to calculate extragalactic cosmic-ray spectra in the general case, without using either the diffusive or the rectilinear approximation. We find that the main features of the mixed-composition models -- regarding the interpretation of the ankle and the non-monotonous evolution of the average cosmic-ray mass -- remain essentially unchanged as long as the magnetic field intensity does not exceed a few nG.

  13. Energy spectrum measurement and dose rate estimation of natural neutrons in Tibet region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴建华; 徐勇军; 刘森林; 汪传高

    2015-01-01

    In this work, natural neutron spectra at nine sites in Tibet region were measured using a multi-sphere neutron spectrometer. The altitude-dependence of the spectra total fluence rate and ambient dose equivalent rate were analyzed. From the normalized natural neutron spectra at different altitudes, the spectrum fractions for neutrons of greater than 0.1 MeV do not differ obviously, while those of the thermal neutrons differ greatly from each other. The total fluence rate, effective dose rate and the ambient dose equivalent rate varied with the altitude according to an exponential law.

  14. Realization and Comparison of Several Regression Algorithms for Electron Energy Spectrum Reconstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Gui; LIN Hui; WU Ai-Dong; SONG Gang; WU Yi-Can

    2008-01-01

    To determine the electron energy spectra for medical accelerator effectively, we investigate a nonlinear programming model with several nonlinear regression algorithms, including Levenberg-Marquardt, Quasi-Newton, Gradient, Conjugate Gradient, Newton, Principal-Axis and NMinimize algorithms. The local relaxation-bound method is also developed to increase the calculation accuracy. The testing results demonstrate that the above methods could reconstruct the electron energy spectra effectively. Especially, further with the local relaxationbound method the Levenberg Marquardt, Newton and N Minimize algorithms could precisely obtain both the electron energy spectra and the photon contamination. Further study shows that ignoring about 4% photon contamination would increase error greatly, and it also inaccurately makes the electron energy spectra 'drift' to the low energy.

  15. Energy Spectrum of Two-Component Bose-Einstein Condensates in Optical Lattices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Jiu-Rong; LIU Jin-Ming; JING Hui; WANG Yu-Zhu

    2005-01-01

    With the method of Green's function, we investigate the energy spectra of two-component ultracold bosonic atoms in optical lattices. We find that there are two energy bands for each component. The critical condition of the superfluid-Mott insulator phase transition is determined by the energy band structure. We also find that the nearest neighboring and on-site interactions fail to change the structure of energy bands, but shift the energy bands only.According to the conditions of the phase transitions, three stable superfluid and Mott insulating phases can be found by adjusting the experiment parameters. We also discuss the possibility of observing these new phases and their transitions in further experiments.

  16. Irrigating poplar energy crops with landfill leachate negatively affects soil micro- and meso-fauna

    Science.gov (United States)

    David R. Coyle; Jill A. Zalesny; Ronald S. Zalesny Jr.; Adam H. Wiese

    2011-01-01

    Increased municipal solid waste generated worldwide combined with substantial demand for renewable energy has prompted testing and deployment of woody feedstock production systems that reuse and recycle wastewaters as irrigation and fertilization. Populus selections are ideal for such systems given their fast growth, extensive root systems, and high...

  17. Factors That Influence Human Behavior And Negatively Affect Energy Consumption In USMC Ground Units During Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Boston: Prentice Hall Bulanow, Peter, Paul Tabler, and Shawn Charchan. 2011. Expeditionary Energy Assessment: Environmental Control Unit Alternatives...U.S. ARMY Rapid Equipping Force. Kotter, John P., and Leonard Schlesinger. 2008. “Choosing Strategies for Change.” Harvard Business Review 86.7

  18. Capacity Development and Strengthening for Energy Policy formulation and implementation of Sustainable Energy Projects in Indonesia CASINDO. Deliverable No. 13. Integration of Renewable Energy Technologies in the national curriculum SPECTRUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamphuis, E. [ETC Nederland, Leusden (Netherlands); Permana, I. [Technical Education Development Centre TEDC, Bandung (Indonesia)

    2011-11-15

    The overall objective of the CASINDO programme is to establish a self-sustaining and self-developing structure at both the national and regional level to build and strengthen human capacity to enable the provinces of North Sumatra, Yogyakarta, Central Java, West Nusa Tenggara and Papua to formulate sound policies for renewable energy and energy efficiency and to develop and implement sustainable energy projects. This report focuses on the achievements for settling a national curriculum for Renewable Energy Technologies (RET) within the framework of national programme SPECTRUM, which includes all curricula of the medium technical schools in Indonesia.

  19. Influence of hadronic interaction models and the cosmic ray spectrum on the high-energy atmospheric muon and neutrino flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desiati Paolo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The recent observations of muon charge ratio up to about 10 TeV and of atmospheric neutrinos up to energies of about 400 TeV has triggered a renewed interest into the high-energy interaction models and cosmic ray primary composition. A reviewed calculation of lepton spectra produced in cosmic ray induced extensive air showers is carried out with a primary cosmic ray spectrum that fits the latest direct measurements below the knee. In order to achieve this, we used a full Monte Carlo method to derive the inclusive differential spectra (yields of muons, muon neutrinos and electron neutrinos at the surface for energies between 80 GeV and hundreds of PeV. Using these results the differential flux and the flavor ratios of leptons were calculated. The air shower simulator CORSIKA 6.990 was used for showering and propagation of the secondary particles through the atmosphere, employing the established high energy hadronic interaction models SIBYLL 2.1, QGSJet-01 and QGSJet-II-03. We show that the performance of the interaction models allows makes it possible to predict the spectra within experimental uncertainties, while SIBYLL generally yields a higher flux at the surface than the QGSJet models. The calculation of the flavor and charge ratios has lead to inconsistent results, mainly influenced by the different representations of the K/π ratio within the models. The influence of the knee of cosmic rays is reflected in the secondary spectra at energies between 100 and 200 TeV. Furthermore, we could quantify systematic uncertainties of atmospheric muon- and neutrino fluxes, associated to the models of the primary cosmic ray spectrum and the interaction models. For most recent parametrizations of the cosmic ray primary spectrum, atmospheric muons can be determined with an uncertainty smaller than +15/-13% of the average flux. Uncertainties of the muon and electron neutrino fluxes can be calculated within an average error of +32/-22% and +25

  20. Energy spectrum of 50-250 MeV/nucleon iron nuclei inside the MIR space craft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenther, W. E-mail: guenther@hig.physik.uni_siegen.de; Leugner, D.; Becker, E.; Heinrich, W.; Reitz, G

    2002-10-01

    Stacks of CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors were mounted inside the MIR spacecraft during the EUROMIR95 space mission for a period of 6 months. This long exposure time resulted in a large number of tracks of HZE-particles in the detector foils. All trajectories of stopping iron nuclei could be reconstructed by optimizing the etching conditions so that an automatic track measurement using image analysis techniques was possible. We found 185 stopping iron nuclei and used the energy-range relation to calculate their energies at the stack surface. The measured spectrum of iron nuclei inside the MIR station is compared to results of model predictions considering the effect of the solar modulation for the mission period, the geomagnetic shielding effect for the MIR orbit and the shielding by material of the spacecraft walls and its instrumentation.

  1. Whole blood transcriptome analysis reveals potential competition in metabolic pathways between negative energy balance and response to inflammatory challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvier-Muller, Juliette; Allain, Charlotte; Tabouret, Guillaume; Enjalbert, Francis; Portes, David; Noirot, Céline; Rupp, Rachel; Foucras, Gilles

    2017-05-24

    Negative Energy Balance (NEB) is considered to increase susceptibility to mastitis. The objective of this study was to improve our understanding of the underlying mechanisms by comparing transcriptomic profiles following NEB and a concomitant mammary inflammation. Accordingly, we performed RNA-seq analysis of blood cells in energy-restricted ewes and control-diet ewes at four different time points before and after intra mammary challenge with phlogogenic ligands. Blood leucocytes responded to NEB by shutting down lipid-generating processes, including cholesterol and fatty acid synthesis, probably under transcriptional control of SREBF 1. Furthermore, fatty acid oxidation was activated and glucose oxidation and transport inhibited in response to energy restriction. Among the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in response to energy restriction, 64 genes were also differential in response to the inflammatory challenge. Opposite response included the activation of cholesterol and fatty acid synthesis during the inflammatory challenge. Moreover, activation of glucose oxidation and transport coupled with the increase of plasma glucose concentration in response to the inflammatory stimuli suggested a preferential utilization of glucose as the energy source during this stress. Leucocyte metabolism therefore undergoes strong metabolic changes during an inflammatory challenge, which could be in competition with those induced by energy restriction.

  2. RNA-seq analysis of differential gene expression in liver from lactating dairy cows divergent in negative energy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Matthew; Waters, Sinéad; Morris, Dermot; Kenny, David; Lynn, David; Creevey, Chris

    2012-05-20

    The liver is central to most economically important metabolic processes in cattle. However, the changes in expression of genes that drive these processes remain incompletely characterised. RNA-seq is the new gold standard for whole transcriptome analysis but so far there are no reports of its application to analysis of differential gene expression in cattle liver. We used RNA-seq to study differences in expression profiles of hepatic genes and their associated pathways in individual cattle in either mild negative energy balance (MNEB) or severe negative energy balance (SNEB). NEB is an imbalance between energy intake and energy requirements for lactation and body maintenance. This aberrant metabolic state affects high-yielding dairy cows after calving and is of considerable economic importance because of its negative impact on fertility and health in dairy herds. Analysis of changes in hepatic gene expression in SNEB animals will increase our understanding of NEB and contribute to the development of strategies to circumvent it. RNA-seq analysis was carried out on total RNA from liver from early post partum Holstein Friesian cows in MNEB (n = 5) and SNEB (n = 6). 12,833 genes were deemed to be expressed (>4 reads per gene per animal), 413 of which were shown to be statistically significantly differentially expressed (SDE) at a false discovery rate (FDR) of 0.1% and 200 of which were SDE (FDR of 0.1%) with a ≥ 2-fold change between MNEB and SNEB animals. GOseq/KEGG pathway analysis showed that SDE genes with ≥ 2- fold change were associated (P gene expression in the liver of SNEB cows. Changes in gene expression were found in this pathway that have not been previously been identified in SNEB cows.

  3. Broad Energy Range Neutron Spectroscopy using a Liquid Scintillator and a Proportional Counter: Application to a Neutron Spectrum Similar to that from an Improvised Nuclear Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yanping; Randers-Pehrson, Gerhard; Marino, Stephen A; Garty, Guy; Harken, Andrew; Brenner, David J

    2015-09-11

    A novel neutron irradiation facility at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF) has been developed to mimic the neutron radiation from an Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) at relevant distances (e.g. 1.5 km) from the epicenter. The neutron spectrum of this IND-like neutron irradiator was designed according to estimations of the Hiroshima neutron spectrum at 1.5 km. It is significantly different from a standard reactor fission spectrum, because the spectrum changes as the neutrons are transported through air, and it is dominated by neutron energies from 100 keV up to 9 MeV. To verify such wide energy range neutron spectrum, detailed here is the development of a combined spectroscopy system. Both a liquid scintillator detector and a gas proportional counter were used for the recoil spectra measurements, with the individual response functions estimated from a series of Monte Carlo simulations. These normalized individual response functions were formed into a single response matrix for the unfolding process. Several accelerator-based quasi-monoenergetic neutron source spectra were measured and unfolded to test this spectroscopy system. These reference neutrons were produced from two reactions: T(p,n)(3)He and D(d,n)(3)He, generating neutron energies in the range between 0.2 and 8 MeV. The unfolded quasi-monoenergetic neutron spectra indicated that the detection system can provide good neutron spectroscopy results in this energy range. A broad-energy neutron spectrum from the (9)Be(d,n) reaction using a 5 MeV deuteron beam, measured at 60 degrees to the incident beam was measured and unfolded with the evaluated response matrix. The unfolded broad neutron spectrum is comparable with published time-of-flight results. Finally, the pair of detectors were used to measure the neutron spectrum generated at the RARAF IND-like neutron facility and a comparison is made to the neutron spectrum of Hiroshima.

  4. SiO x-graphite as negative for high energy Li-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerfi, A.; Charest, P.; Dontigny, M.; Trottier, J.; Lagacé, M.; Hovington, P.; Vijh, A.; Zaghib, K.

    Negative electrodes containing SiO x were investigated as alternative negative electrodes to carbon for Li-ion batteries. The results obtained on the effect of binders and carbon additives on the electrochemical performance (i.e., reversible capacity, coulombic efficiency, charge-discharge rate capability) of the SiO x-graphite electrode and SiO x electrode are presented. SEM analysis that utilizes facilities for in situ and ex situ studies were applied to better understand the performance and cycle life of the SiO x-based electrodes. The SEM analysis clearly showed that the SiO x particles expand and contract during charge-discharge cycling, and that some of the particles undergo mechanical degradation during this process. The SiO x-graphite electrode with polyimide binder exhibited a stable capacity of 600 mAh g -1 during high-rate charge-discharge from C/4 to 1 C. These results suggest that the use of a flexible binder like polyimide and reasonably small SiO x particles (nano-particles) facilitates improved cycle life and higher rate capability.

  5. Ion acceleration with a narrow energy spectrum by nanosecond laser-irradiation of solid target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altana, C., E-mail: altana@lns.infn.it [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Lanzalone, G. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Università degli Studi di Enna “Kore,” Via delle Olimpiadi, 94100 Enna (Italy); Mascali, D.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Schillaci, F.; Tudisco, S. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Muoio, A. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università degli Studi di Messina, Viale F. D’Alcontres 31, 98166 Messina (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    In laser-driven plasma, ion acceleration of aluminum with the production of a quasi-monoenergetic beam has occurred. A useful device to analyze the ions is the Thomson parabolas spectrometer, a well-known diagnostic that is able to obtain information on charge-to-mass ratio and energy distribution of the charged particles. At the LENS (Laser Energy for Nuclear Science) laboratory of INFN-LNS in Catania, experimental measures were carried out; the features of LENS are: Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with 2 J laser energy, 1064 nm fundamental wavelengths, and 6 ns pulse duration.

  6. A new method of reconstructing very-high-energy gamma-ray spectra: the Template Background Spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandes, M V; Kosack, K; Raue, M; Rowell, G

    2014-01-01

    Very-high-energy (VHE, E>0.1 TeV) gamma-ray emission regions with angular extents comparable to the field-of-view of current imaging air-Cherenkov telescopes (IACT) require additional observations of source-free regions to estimate the background contribution to the energy spectrum. This reduces the effective observation time and deteriorates the sensitivity. A new method of reconstructing spectra from IACT data without the need of additional observations of source-free regions is developed. Its application is not restricted to any specific IACT or data format. On the basis of the template background method, which defines the background in air-shower parameter space, a new spectral reconstruction method from IACT data is developed and studied, the Template Background Spectrum (TBS); TBS is tested on published H.E.S.S. data and H.E.S.S. results. Good agreement is found between VHE gamma-ray spectra reported by the H.E.S.S. collaboration and those re-analysed with TBS. This includes analyses of point-like sourc...

  7. Off-axis holographic lens spectrum-splitting photovoltaic system for direct and diffuse solar energy conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorndran, Shelby D; Chrysler, Benjamin; Wheelwright, Brian; Angel, Roger; Holman, Zachary; Kostuk, Raymond

    2016-09-20

    This paper describes a high-efficiency, spectrum-splitting photovoltaic module that uses an off-axis volume holographic lens to focus and disperse incident solar illumination to a rectangular shaped high-bandgap indium gallium phosphide cell surrounded by strips of silicon cells. The holographic lens design allows efficient collection of both direct and diffuse illumination to maximize energy yield. We modeled the volume diffraction characteristics using rigorous coupled-wave analysis, and simulated system performance using nonsequential ray tracing and PV cell data from the literature. Under AM 1.5 illumination conditions the simulated module obtained a 30.6% conversion efficiency. This efficiency is a 19.7% relative improvement compared to the more efficient cell in the system (silicon). The module was also simulated under a typical meteorological year of direct and diffuse irradiance in Tucson, Arizona, and Seattle, Washington. Compared to a flat panel silicon module, the holographic spectrum splitting module obtained a relative improvement in energy yield of 17.1% in Tucson and 14.0% in Seattle. An experimental proof-of-concept volume holographic lens was also fabricated in dichromated gelatin to verify the main characteristics of the system. The lens obtained an average first-order diffraction efficiency of 85.4% across the aperture at 532 nm.

  8. Fault feature extraction of planet gear in wind turbine gearbox based on spectral kurtosis and time wavelet energy spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Yun; Wang, Tianyang; Li, Zheng; Chu, Fulei

    2017-01-01

    Planetary transmission plays a vital role in wind turbine drivetrains, and its fault diagnosis has been an important and challenging issue. Owing to the complicated and coupled vibration source, time-variant vibration transfer path, and heavy background noise masking effect, the vibration signal of planet gear in wind turbine gearboxes exhibits several unique characteristics: Complex frequency components, low signal-to-noise ratio, and weak fault feature. In this sense, the periodic impulsive components induced by a localized defect are hard to extract, and the fault detection of planet gear in wind turbines remains to be a challenging research work. Aiming to extract the fault feature of planet gear effectively, we propose a novel feature extraction method based on spectral kurtosis and time wavelet energy spectrum (SK-TWES) in the paper. Firstly, the spectral kurtosis (SK) and kurtogram of raw vibration signals are computed and exploited to select the optimal filtering parameter for the subsequent band-pass filtering. Then, the band-pass filtering is applied to extrude periodic transient impulses using the optimal frequency band in which the corresponding SK value is maximal. Finally, the time wavelet energy spectrum analysis is performed on the filtered signal, selecting Morlet wavelet as the mother wavelet which possesses a high similarity to the impulsive components. The experimental signals collected from the wind turbine gearbox test rig demonstrate that the proposed method is effective at the feature extraction and fault diagnosis for the planet gear with a localized defect.

  9. Exact Third-Order Density Perturbation and One-Loop Power Spectrum in General Dark Energy Models

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Seokcheon; Biern, Sang Gyu

    2014-01-01

    Under the standard perturbation theory (SPT), we obtain the fully consistent third-order density fluctuation and kernels for the general dark energy models without using the Einstein-de Sitter (EdS) universe assumption for the first time. We also show that even though the temporal and spatial components of the SPT solutions can not be separable, one can find the exact solutions to any order in general dark energy models. With these exact solutions, we obtain the less than \\% error correction of one-loop matter power spectrum compared to that obtained from the EdS assumption for $k = 0.1 {\\rm h\\, Mpc}^{-1}$ mode at $z = 0$ (1, 1.5). Thus, the EdS assumption works very well at this scale. However, if one considers the correction for $P_{13}$, the error is about 6 (9, 11) \\% for the same mode at $z = 0$ (1, 1.5). One absorbs $P_{13}$ into the linear power spectrum in the renormalized perturbation theory (RPT) and thus one should use the exact solution instead of the approximation one. The error on the resummed p...

  10. Fault feature extraction of planet gear in wind turbine gearbox based on spectral kurtosis and time wavelet energy spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Yun; Wang, Tianyang; Li, Zheng; Chu, Fulei

    2017-09-01

    Planetary transmission plays a vital role in wind turbine drivetrains, and its fault diagnosis has been an important and challenging issue. Owing to the complicated and coupled vibration source, time-variant vibration transfer path, and heavy background noise masking effect, the vibration signal of planet gear in wind turbine gearboxes exhibits several unique characteristics: Complex frequency components, low signal-to-noise ratio, and weak fault feature. In this sense, the periodic impulsive components induced by a localized defect are hard to extract, and the fault detection of planet gear in wind turbines remains to be a challenging research work. Aiming to extract the fault feature of planet gear effectively, we propose a novel feature extraction method based on spectral kurtosis and time wavelet energy spectrum (SK-TWES) in the paper. Firstly, the spectral kurtosis (SK) and kurtogram of raw vibration signals are computed and exploited to select the optimal filtering parameter for the subsequent band-pass filtering. Then, the band-pass filtering is applied to extrude periodic transient impulses using the optimal frequency band in which the corresponding SK value is maximal. Finally, the time wavelet energy spectrum analysis is performed on the filtered signal, selecting Morlet wavelet as the mother wavelet which possesses a high similarity to the impulsive components. The experimental signals collected from the wind turbine gearbox test rig demonstrate that the proposed method is effective at the feature extraction and fault diagnosis for the planet gear with a localized defect.

  11. Measurement of x-ray energy spectrum by using HPGe detection in 14.5 GHz ECR ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Cheol Ho; Chang, Dae Sik; Oh, Byung Hoon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Chang Seog; Kim, Yong Kyun [Institute for Basic Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    The Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source is used to produce intense, high charge state ion beams of intermediate and heavy mass elements. It is widely used to produce ion beams for accelerator, atomic physics research and industrial application. The basic principle of the ECR ion source is the resonance absorption of energy by electron from microwave that has the same frequency as the electron's frequency in the resonance zone. The ECR ion source produces soft and hard x-rays because of efficient heating of electrons. The x-rays are created by electron-ion collisions in the ECR plasma or, when free electrons collide with ECR plasma chamber wall. The generated x-rays are influenced by various input parameters of the ECR ion source. In this study, The x-ray spectrum was measured by using a 14.5 GHz ECR ion source at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). ECR ion source is used to generate ion beams of heavy mass elements. KAERI has a 14.5 GHz ECR ion source to produce high current ion beam. In this study, experimental condition is provided to generate stable plasma through x-ray spectrum measurement. In the future, x-rays spectra will be measured at various operation conditions such as gas-pressure, trim coil and solenoid current.

  12. High-energy properties of the high-redshift flat spectrum radio quasar PKS 2149-306

    CERN Document Server

    D'Ammando, F

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the gamma-ray and X-ray properties of the flat spectrum radio quasar PKS 2149-306 at redshift z = 2.345. A strong gamma-ray flare from this source was detected by the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope satellite in 2013 January, reaching on January 20 a daily peak flux of (301$\\pm$36)$\\times$10$^{-8}$ ph/cm$^2$/s in the 0.1-100 GeV energy range. This flux corresponds to an apparent isotropic luminosity of (1.5$\\pm$0.2)$\\times$10$^{50}$ erg/s, comparable to the highest values observed by a blazar so far. During the flare the increase of flux was accompanied by a significant change of the spectral properties. Moreover significant flux variations on a 6-h time-scale were observed, compatible with the light crossing time of the event horizon of the central black hole. The broad band X-ray spectra of PKS 2149-306 observed by Swift-XRT and NuSTAR are well described by a broken power-law model, with a very hard spectrum ($\\Gamma$$_1$ $\\sim$ 1) below the break energy, at ...

  13. The high energy X-ray spectrum of 4U 1700-37 observed from OSO 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, J. F.; Coe, M. J.; Crannell, C. J.; Dennis, B. R.; Frost, K. J.; Orwig, L. E.; Maurer, G. S.

    1980-01-01

    The most intense hard X-ray source in the confused region in Scorpius has been identified as 4U 1700-37 (=HD 153919). Observations extending over three binary periods in 1978 September were carried out with the high-energy X-ray spectrometer on OSO 8. The 3.4 day modulation is seen above 20 keV with the intensity during eclipse being consistent with zero flux. The photonumber spectrum from 20 to 150 keV is well represented by a single power law with a photonumber spectral index of -2.77 + or - 0.35 or by a thermal bremsstrahlung spectrum with kT = 27 (+15, -7)keV. The counting rate above 20 keV outside of eclipse shows no evidence for the 96.8 minute X-ray modulation previously reported at lower energies. Despite the difficulties that exist in reconciling both the lack of periodic modulation in the emitted X-radiation and the orbital dynamics of the system with our currently accepted theories of the evolution and physical properties of neutron stars, the observed properties of 4U 1700-37 are all consistent with the source being a spherically accreting neutron star rather than a black hole.

  14. Measurement of the energy spectrum of underground muons at Gran Sasso with a transition radiation detector

    CERN Document Server

    Ambrosio, M

    1993-01-01

    We have measured directly the residual energy of cosmic ray muons crossing the MACRO detector at the Gran Sasso Laboratory. For this measurement we have used a transition radiation detector consisting of three identical modules, each of about 12 m^2 area, operating in the energy region from 100 GeV to 1 TeV. The results presented here were obtained with the first module collecting data for more than two years. The average single muon energy is found to be 320 +/- 4 (stat.) +/- 11 (syst.) GeV in the rock depth range 3000-6500 hg/cm^2. The results are in agreement with calculations of the energy loss of muons in the rock above the detector.

  15. Energy analysis reveals the negative effect of delays in passive movement mirror therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orand, Abbas; Miyasaka, Hiroyuki; Tomita, Yutaka; Tanino, Genichi; Sonoda, Shigeru

    2014-06-01

    Wavelet transform energy analyses of the mean and standard error of the electromyogram (EMG) and electroencephalogram (EEG) of eight subjects were investigated in passive movement mirror therapies with no delay (in-phase) and with delay (out-of-phase) situations in two frequency bands of 7.81-15.62 and 15.62-31.25 Hz. It was found that the energy levels of EEG at electrode C4 in the in-phase situation were lower than those in out-of-phase situations, while the energy levels of flexor and extensor forearm muscle groups were larger. With two exceptions, this pattern could be seen in all other subjects. The difference between the in-phase (D0) and out-of-phase situations (D025 and D05) for the frequency range of 15.62-31.25 Hz was found to be significant at a significance level of 0.05 (paired t-test analysis). The respective elevation and decline of EEG and EGM with regard to the increase of the delay may indicate the necessity for synchronization of passive movement and mirror therapy.

  16. Quantum Geometry: Relativistic energy approach to cooperative electron-nucleary-transition spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ольга Юрьевна Хецелиус

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available An advanced relativistic energy approach is presented and applied to calculating parameters of electron-nuclear 7-transition spectra of nucleus in the atom. The intensities of the spectral satellites are defined in the relativistic version of the energy approach (S-matrix formalism, and gauge-invariant quantum-electrodynamical perturbation theory with the Dirac-Kohn-Sham density-functional zeroth approximation.

  17. The Energy Spectrum of the Blazar Markarian 421 Above 130 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Carson, J E; Ong, R A; Ball, J; Bramel, D A; Covault, C E; Driscoll, D; Fortin, P; Gingrich, D M; Hanna, D S; Lindner, T; Müller, C; Jarvis, A; Mukherjee, R; Ragan, K; Scalzo, R A; Williams, D A; Zweerink, J

    2006-01-01

    Markarian 421 (Mrk 421) was the first blazar detected at gamma-ray energies above 300 GeV, and it remains one of only twelve TeV blazars detected to date. TeV gamma-ray measurements of its flaring activity and spectral variability have placed constraints on models of the high-energy emission from blazars. However, observations between 50 and 300 GeV are rare, and the high-energy peak of the spectral energy distribution (SED), predicted to be in this range, has never been directly detected. We present a detection of Mrk 421 above 100 GeV as made by the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) during a multiwavelength campaign in early 2004. STACEE is a ground-based atmospheric Cherenkov telescope using the wavefront sampling technique to detect gamma rays at lower energies than achieved by most imaging Cherenkov telescopes. We also outline a method for reconstructing gamma-ray energies using a solar heliostat telescope. This technique was applied to the 2004 data, and we present the differe...

  18. Analysis of Thermal and Chemical Effets on Negative Valve Overlap Period Energy Recovery for Low-Temperature Gasoline Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekoto, Dr Isaac [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Peterson, Dr. Brian [University of Edinburgh; Szybist, James P [ORNL; Northrop, Dr. William [University of Minnesota

    2015-01-01

    A central challenge for efficient auto-ignition controlled low-temperature gasoline combustion (LTGC) engines has been achieving the combustion phasing needed to reach stable performance over a wide operating regime. The negative valve overlap (NVO) strategy has been explored as a way to improve combustion stability through a combination of charge heating and altered reactivity via a recompression stroke with a pilot fuel injection. The study objective was to analyze the thermal and chemical effects on NVO-period energy recovery. The analysis leveraged experimental gas sampling results obtained from a single-cylinder LTGC engine along with cylinder pressure measurements and custom data reduction methods used to estimate period thermodynamic properties. The engine was fueled by either iso-octane or ethanol, and operated under sweeps of NVO-period oxygen concentration, injection timing, and fueling rate. Gas sampling at the end of the NVO period was performed via a custom dump-valve apparatus, with detailed sample speciation by in-house gas chromatography. The balance of NVO-period input and output energy flows was calculated in terms of fuel energy, work, heat loss, and change in sensible energy. Experiment results were complemented by detailed chemistry single-zone reactor simulations performed at relevant mixing and thermodynamic conditions, with results used to evaluate ignition behavior and expected energy recovery yields. For the intermediate bulk-gas temperatures present during the NVO period (900-1100 K), weak negative temperature coefficient behavior with iso-octane fueling significantly lengthened ignition delays relative to similar ethanol fueled conditions. Faster ethanol ignition chemistry led to lower recovered fuel intermediate yields relative to similar iso-octane fueled conditions due to more complete fuel oxidation. From the energy analysis it was found that increased NVO-period global equivalence ratio, either from lower NVOperiod oxygen

  19. Effect of energy band gap in graphene on negative refraction through the veselago lens and electron conductance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahal, Dipendra; Gumbs, Godfrey

    2017-01-01

    A remarkable property of intrinsic graphene is that upon doping, electrons and holes travel through the monolayer thick material with constant velocity which does not depend on energy up to about 0.3 eV (Dirac fermions), as though the electrons and holes are massless particles and antiparticles which move at the Fermi velocity vF. Consequently, there is Klein tunneling at a p-n junction, in which there is no backscattering at normal incidence of massless Dirac fermions. However, this process yielding perfect transmission at normal incidence is expected to be affected when the group velocity of the charge carriers is energy dependent and there is non-zero effective mass for the target particle. We investigate how away from normal incidence the combined effect of incident electron energy ɛ and band gap parameter Δ can determine whether a p-n junction would allow focusing of an electron beam by behaving like a Veselago lens with negative refractive index. We demonstrate that there is a specific region in ɛ - Δ space where the index of refraction is negative, i.e., where monolayer graphene behaves as a metamaterial. Outside this region, the refractive index may be positive or there may be no refraction at all. We compute the ballistic conductance across a p-n junction as a function of Δ and ɛ and compare our results with those for a single electrostatic potential barrier and multiple barriers.

  20. Current long-term negative average annual energy balance of the earth leads to the new little ice age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdussamatov Habibullo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The average annual decreasing rate of the total solar irradiance (TSI is increasing from the 22-nd to the 23-rd and 24-th cycles, because the Sun since the 1990 is in the phase decline of quasi-bicentennial variation. The portion of the solar energy absorbed by the Earth is decreasing. Decrease in the portion of TSI absorbed by the Earth since 1990 remains uncompensated by the Earth's radiation into space at the previous high level over a time interval determined by the thermal inertia of the Ocean. A long-term negative deviation of the Earth’s average annual energy balance from the equilibrium state is dictating corresponding variations in it’s the energy state. As a result, the Earth will have a negative average annual energy balance also in the future. This will lead to the beginning of the decreasing in the Earth's temperature and of the epoch of the Little Ice Age after the maximum phase of the 24-th solar cycle approximately since the end of 2014. The influence of the consecutive chain of the secondary feedback effects (the increase in the Bond albedo and the decrease in the concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere due to cooling will lead to an additional reduction of the absorbed solar energy and reduce the greenhouse effect. The start of the TSI’s Grand Minimum is anticipated in the solar cycle 27±1 in 2043±11 and the beginning of the phase of deep cooling of the 19th Little Ice Age for the past 7,500 years around 2060±11.