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Sample records for needle biopsy samples

  1. Needle Biopsy

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    ... for a day or two During the needle biopsy Your health care team will position you in ... if you're feeling uncomfortable. After the needle biopsy Once your doctor has collected enough cells or ...

  2. Hepatic mitochondrial function analysis using needle liver biopsy samples.

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    Michael J J Chu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUNDS AND AIM: Current assessment of pre-operative liver function relies upon biochemical blood tests and histology but these only indirectly measure liver function. Mitochondrial function (MF analysis allows direct measurement of cellular metabolic function and may provide an additional index of hepatic health. Conventional MF analysis requires substantial tissue samples (>100 mg obtained at open surgery. Here we report a method to assess MF using <3 mg of tissue obtained by a Tru-cut® biopsy needle making it suitable for percutaneous application. METHODS: An 18G Bard® Max-core® biopsy instrument was used to collect samples. The optimal Tru-cut® sample weight, stability in ice-cold University of Wisconsin solution, reproducibility and protocol utility was initially evaluated in Wistar rat livers then confirmed in human samples. MF was measured in saponin-permeabilized samples using high-resolution respirometry. RESULTS: The average mass of a single rat and human liver Tru-cut® biopsy was 5.60±0.30 and 5.16±0.15 mg, respectively (mean; standard error of mean. Two milligram of sample was found the lowest feasible mass for the MF assay. Tissue MF declined after 1 hour of cold storage. Six replicate measurements within rats and humans (n = 6 each showed low coefficient of variation (<10% in measurements of State-III respiration, electron transport chain (ETC capacity and respiratory control ratio (RCR. Ischemic rat and human liver samples consistently showed lower State-III respiration, ETC capacity and RCR, compared to normal perfused liver samples. CONCLUSION: Consistent measurement of liver MF and detection of derangement in a disease state was successfully demonstrated using less than half the tissue from a single Tru-cut® biopsy. Using this technique outpatient assessment of liver MF is now feasible, providing a new assay for the evaluation of hepatic function.

  3. Inadequate fine needle aspiration biopsy samples: Pathologists versus other specialists

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    Gomez-Macias G

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB is a simple, sensitive, quick and inexpensive method in which operator experience is essential for obtaining the best results. Methods: A descriptive study in which the aspiration biopsy cases of the Pathology and Cytopathology Service of the University Hospital of the UANL (2003-2005 were analyzed. These were divided into three study groups: Group 1, FNAB performed by a pathologist; Group 2, FNAB performed by specialists who are not pathologists, Group 3, FNAB guided by an imaging study with immediate evaluation by a pathologist. The samples were classified as adequate and inadequate for diagnosis, the organ, the size and characteristics of the lesions were taken into consideration. Results: A total of 1905 FNAB were included. In Group 1: 1347 were performed of which 1242 (92.2% were adequate and 105 (7.7% were inadequate. Of the 237 from Group 2, 178 were adequate (75.1% and 59 inadequate (24.8%; in Group 3 there were 321 of which 283 (88.1% were adequate and 38 (11.8% inadequate. A statistically significant difference was found between FNAB performed by Group 1 (p< 0.001 and the other groups. A multivariate analysis was done where the organ punctured, the study groups, the size and characteristics of the lesion by study group were compared, finding that the most important variable was the person who performed the procedure. Conclusion: The experience and training of the person performing the aspiration biopsy, as well as immediate evaluation of the material when it is guided, substantially reduces the number of inadequate samples, improving the sensitivity of the method as well as reducing the need for open biopsies to reach a diagnosis.

  4. Optimizing EUS-guided liver biopsy sampling: comprehensive assessment of needle types and tissue acquisition techniques.

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    Schulman, Allison R; Thompson, Christopher C; Odze, Robert; Chan, Walter W; Ryou, Marvin

    2017-02-01

    EUS-guided liver biopsy sampling using FNA and, more recently, fine-needle biopsy (FNB) needles has been reported with discrepant diagnostic accuracy, in part due to differences in methodology. We aimed to compare liver histologic yields of 4 EUS-based needles and 2 percutaneous needles to identify optimal number of needle passes and suction. Six needle types were tested on human cadaveric tissue: one 19G FNA needle, one existing 19G FNB needle, one novel 19G FNB needle, one 22G FNB needle, and two 18G percutaneous needles (18G1 and 18G2). Two needle excursion patterns (1 vs 3 fanning passes) were performed on all EUS needles. Primary outcome was number of portal tracts. Secondary outcomes were degree of fragmentation and specimen adequacy. Pairwise comparisons were performed using t tests, with a 2-sided P samplings (48 per needle type) were performed. The novel 19G FNB needle had significantly increased mean portal tracts compared with all needle types. The 22G FNB needle had significantly increased portal tracts compared with the 18G1 needle (3.8 vs 2.5, P sampling. Investigations are underway to determine whether these results can be replicated in a clinical setting. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Needle Biopsy of the Lung

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    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Needle Biopsy of the Lung Needle biopsy of the lung ... Needle Biopsy of Lung Nodules? What is Needle Biopsy of the Lung? A lung nodule is relatively ...

  6. [Transabdominal chorionic villus sampling using biopsy forceps or needle: pregnancy outcomes by technique used].

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    Spallina, J; Anselem, O; Haddad, B; Touboul, C; Tsatsaris, V; Le Ray, C

    2014-11-01

    To compare pregnancy outcomes after transabdominal chorionic villus sampling using biopsy forceps or needle. Retrospective bicentric study including all women who had a transabdominal chorionic villus sampling between 2005 and 2009 (172 using biopsy forceps and 160 using needle). The primary endpoint was the rate of fetal loss, after excluding medical abortion due to the result of the biopsy. The secondary endpoint was the rate of premature rupture of the membrane. All cases were reviewed to try to determine the responsibility of the biopsy. The pregnancy outcomes were not different between the two groups: 4 (4.4%) fetal losses in the biopsy forceps group and 6 (7.4%) in the needle group (P=0.52). Only one case (1.2%) of fetal loss can be attributed to the biopsy, using a needle, and none (0%) following a forceps biospy (P=0.29). The rate of premature rupture of the membrane was comparable in the two groups. The pregnancy outcomes following chorionic villus sampling using a biopsy forceps or a needle seem comparable. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Improved transvenous liver biopsy needle

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    Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Matzen, P; Christoffersen, P

    1979-01-01

    A modified type of the standard transvenous cholangiography biopsy needle is described. The modified tranvenous liver biopsy needle caused only minimal artefactual changes of the liver biopsy specimens. The new type of biopsy needle is a modified Menghini needle. The conventional Menghini needle...... should be avoided for transvenous catheter biopsies because of risk of leaving catheter fragments in the liver....

  8. Needle biopsy of histoplasmosis

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    Sinner, W.N.

    1980-12-01

    A case of histoplasmosis, simulating a bronchogenic carcinoma, was needle biopsied. Histoplasma capsulatum organisms were found in great numbers. Needle biopsy established an accurate diagnosis making an exploratory thoracotomy unnecessary and preventing the patient from an already planned lobectomy. Specific treatment with Amphotericin B healed the lesion.

  9. Fine-needle aspiration and core needle biopsy: An update on 2 common minimally invasive tissue sampling modalities.

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    VanderLaan, Paul A

    2016-12-01

    Fine-needle aspiration (FNA) and core needle biopsy (CNB) represent 2 of the most common minimally invasive tissue sampling modalities. Although similar in many ways, there are significant differences in the collection, processing, interpretation, and suitability for ancillary testing that exist between FNA and CNB. This review provides a brief overview of the strengths and weaknesses of FNA compared with CNB, as well as an update regarding the landscape of recently published studies that investigate the organ-specific comparative performance metrics of FNA and CNB. A current understanding of the benefits and limitations of FNA and CNB will help the cytopathologist and the clinician alike to select the right procedure for the right patient at the right time. Cancer Cytopathol 2016;124:862-870. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  10. The Terry Biopsy Needle

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    Bond, Alan F.; Murphy, Fergus A.; Nanson, Eric M.

    1963-01-01

    Six illustrative cases are reported to demonstrate the versatility of the Terry biopsy needle as a useful instrument for obtaining satisfactory biopsy specimens from the liver and from other tissues as well. The apparatus and method of use are described and illustrated. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6aFig. 6bFig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11 PMID:13968726

  11. Ultrasound-guided thyroid nodule fine-needle biopsies--comparison of sample adequacy with different sampling techniques, different needle sizes, and with/without onsite cytological analysis.

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    Cerit, Mahinur; Yücel, Cem; Göçün, Pınar Uyar; Poyraz, Aylar; Cerit, Ethem Turgay; Taneri, Ferit

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic adequacy of thyroid samples obtained by aspiration or capillary biopsy techniques, with 22 or 27 gauge needles, and with or without on-site cytological analysis (OCA). Four hundred patients with thyroid nodules underwent ultrasound (US)-guided fine-needle biopsies. Patients were divided into eight groups according to needle size (22 vs. 27 gauge), biopsy technique (aspiration vs. capillary), and whether or not OCA was performed. Sample adequacy rates were calculated for each group and subgroups and compared using chi-square tests. When all nodes were evaluated (n = 400), the adequacy rate was significantly greater with the capillary than with the aspiration technique (97% vs. 91.5%, p = 0.032) and when OCA was than was not performed (97% vs. 91.5%, p = 0.032). When only solid nodules were evaluated (n = 205) the adequacy rate was also significantly greater with the capillary than with the aspiration technique (98.9% vs. 89.7%, p = 0.008) and when OCA was than was not performed (97.9% vs. 89.6%, p = 0.014). In contrast, the adequacy rate was similar for 22 and 27 gauge needles (94.2% vs. 93.1%, p = 0.733). Optimal results were obtained with the capillary technique and OCA. The capillary technique and OCA should be the preferred approach in thyroid nodule biopsy, optimising adequacy rates and patient comfort.

  12. A percutaneous needle biopsy technique for sampling the supraclavicular brown adipose tissue depot of humans.

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    Chondronikola, M; Annamalai, P; Chao, T; Porter, C; Saraf, M K; Cesani, F; Sidossis, L S

    2015-10-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) has been proposed as a potential target tissue against obesity and its related metabolic complications. Although the molecular and functional characteristics of BAT have been intensively studied in rodents, only a few studies have used human BAT specimens due to the difficulty of sampling human BAT deposits. We established a novel positron emission tomography and computed tomography-guided Bergström needle biopsy technique to acquire human BAT specimens from the supraclavicular area in human subjects. Forty-three biopsies were performed on 23 participants. The procedure was tolerated well by the majority of participants. No major complications were noted. Numbness (9.6%) and hematoma (2.3%) were the two minor complications noted, which fully resolved. Thus, the proposed biopsy technique can be considered safe with only minimal risk of adverse events. Adoption of the proposed method is expected to increase the sampling of the supraclavicular BAT depot for research purposes so as to augment the scientific knowledge of the biology of human BAT.

  13. Sonographically guided fine-needle biopsy of thyroid nodules: the effects of nodule characteristics, sampling technique, and needle size on the adequacy of cytological material

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    Degirmenci, B. [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Kocatepe, Afyonkarahisar (Turkey)]. E-mail: bumin.degirmenci@gmail.com; Haktanir, A. [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Kocatepe, Afyonkarahisar (Turkey); Albayrak, R. [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Kocatepe, Afyonkarahisar (Turkey); Acar, M. [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Kocatepe, Afyonkarahisar (Turkey); Sahin, D.A. [Department of General Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Kocatepe, Afyonkarahisar (Turkey); Sahin, O. [Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Kocatepe, Afyonkarahisar (Turkey); Yucel, A. [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Kocatepe, Afyonkarahisar (Turkey); Caliskan, G. [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Kocatepe, Afyonkarahisar (Turkey)

    2007-08-15

    Aim: To evaluate the effects of sonographic characteristics of thyroid nodules, the diameter of needle used for sampling, and sampling technique on obtaining sufficient cytological material (SCM). Materials and methods: We performed sonography-guided fine-needle biopsy (FNB) in 232 solid thyroid nodules. Size-, echogenicity, vascularity, and localization of all nodules were evaluated by Doppler sonography before the biopsy. Needles of size 20, 22, and 24 G were used for biopsy. The biopsy specimen was acquired using two different methods after localisation. In first method, the needle tip was advanced into the nodule in various positions using a to-and-fro motion whilst in the nodule, along with concurrent aspiration. In the second method, the needle was advanced vigorously using a to-and-fro motion within the nodule whilst being rotated on its axis (capillary-action technique). Results: The mean nodule size was 2.1 {+-} 1.3 cm (range 0.4-7.2 cm). SCM was acquired from 154 (66.4%) nodules by sonography-guided FNB. In 78 (33.6%) nodules, SCM could not be collected. There was no significant difference between nodules with different echogenicity and vascularity for SCM. Regarding the needle size, the lowest rate of SCM was obtained using 20 G needles (56.6%) and the highest rate of adequate material was obtained using 24 G needles (82.5%; p = 0.001). The SCM rate was 76.9% with the capillary-action technique versus 49.4% with the aspiration technique (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Selecting finer needles (24-25 G) for sonography-guided FNB of thyroid nodules and using the capillary-action technique decreased the rate of inadequate material in cytological examination.

  14. Needle muscle biopsy and its application

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    Meng-long CHEN

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Needle muscle biopsy is a straightforward and reliable minimally-invasive technique. During the past century, the needle biopsy can provide adequate samples and the technique has gradually gained wider acceptance. Compared with open biopsy, needle biopsy is less traumatic, with low rate of complications, and is suitable for the identifications and evaluations of muscular dystrophy, inflammatory myopathies and systemic diseases involving muscles, specially for infants and young children. Domestic insiders should be encouraged to apply this technique. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.06.003 

  15. Endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration versus endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle biopsy in sampling pancreatic masses

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    Wang, Jing; Zhao, Shulei; Chen, Yong; Jia, Ruzhen; Zhang, Xiaohua

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: The comparison between endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) and endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle biopsy (EUS-FNB) for the diagnosis of pancreatic masses is still controversial. Many factors can affect the final results. Methods: Databases, such as PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and Science Citation Index updated from 2000 to 2016 were searched to include eligible articles. In the meta-analysis, the main outcome measurements were the diagnostic accuracy, number of needle passes, specimen adequacy, the rate of complications, and technical success. Results: Eight randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were identified, and a total of 921 cases were included in the meta-analysis. The diagnostic accuracy was not significantly different between the FNA and FNB groups. The specimen adequacy was higher in the FNB group compared with the FNA group. The number of needle passes to obtain sufficient tissue was lower in the FNB group. The rate of adverse events and technical success did not significantly differ between the 2 groups. But, the forest plot showed a trend toward lower technical success rate and a trend toward higher diagnostic accuracy in the FNB group, compared with FNA. Conclusion: We provide the evidence that FNB is comparable to FNA in terms of diagnostic accuracy, adverse events, and technical success. FNB gives higher specimen adequacy than that of FNA, despite performance of fewer needle passes. PMID:28700483

  16. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided sampling of solid pancreatic masses: 22-gauge aspiration versus 25-gauge biopsy needles.

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    Yang, Min Jae; Yim, Hyunee; Hwang, Jae Chul; Lee, Dakeun; Kim, Young Bae; Lim, Sun Gyo; Kim, Soon Sun; Kang, Joon Koo; Yoo, Byung Moo; Kim, Jin Hong

    2015-09-29

    Biopsy needles have recently been developed to obtain both cytological and histological specimens during endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). We conducted this study to compare 22-gauge (G) fine needle aspiration (FNA) needles, which have been the most frequently used, and new 25G fine needle biopsy (FNB) needles for EUS-guided sampling of solid pancreatic masses. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of all EUS-guided sampling performed between June 2010 and October 2013. During the study period, 76 patients with pancreatic masses underwent EUS-guided sampling with a 22G FNA needle (n = 38) or a 25G FNB needle (n = 38) for diagnosis. An on-site cytopathologist was not present during the procedure. Technical success, the number of needle passes, cytological diagnostic accuracy, cytological sample quality (conventional smear and liquid-based preparation), histological diagnostic accuracy, and complications were reviewed and compared. There were no significant differences in technical success (100% for both), the mean number of needle passes (5.05 vs. 5.55, P = 0.132), or complications (0% for both) between the 22G FNA group and the 25G FNB group. The 22G FNA and 25G FNB groups exhibited comparable outcomes with respect to cytological diagnostic accuracy (97.4% vs. 89.5%, P = 0.358) and histological diagnostic accuracy (34.2% vs. 52.6%, P = 0.105). In the cytological sample quality analysis, the 25G FNB group exhibited higher scores for the amount of diagnostic cellular material present (22G FNA: 0.92 vs. 25G FNB: 1.32, P = 0.030) and the retention of appropriate architecture (22G FNA: 0.97 vs. 25G FNB: 1.42, P = 0.010) in the liquid-based preparation. The 25G FNB group showed a better histological diagnostic yield for specific tumor discrimination compared with the 22G FNA group (60 % vs. 32.4%, P = 0.018). Use of the 25G FNB needle was technically feasible, safe, efficient, and comparable to use of the standard 22G FNA needle in patients

  17. Lung needle biopsy

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    ... biopsy Lung tissue biopsy References Ettinger DS. Lung cancer and other pulmonary neoplasms. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's ... 2010:chap 47. Read More Aspiration ... by: Denis Hadjiliadis, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine, Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care, Perelman School of Medicine, ...

  18. Core biopsy needle versus standard aspiration needle for endoscopic ultrasound-guided sampling of solid pancreatic masses: a randomized parallel-group study.

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    Lee, Yun Nah; Moon, Jong Ho; Kim, Hee Kyung; Choi, Hyun Jong; Choi, Moon Han; Kim, Dong Choon; Lee, Tae Hoon; Cha, Sang-Woo; Cho, Young Deok; Park, Sang-Heum

    2014-12-01

    An endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided fine needle biopsy (EUS-FNB) device using a core biopsy needle was developed to improve diagnostic accuracy by simultaneously obtaining cytological aspirates and histological core samples. We prospectively compared the diagnostic accuracy of EUS-FNB with standard EUS-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) in patients with solid pancreatic masses. Between January 2012 and May 2013, consecutive patients with solid pancreatic masses were prospectively enrolled and randomized to undergo EUS-FNB using a core biopsy needle or EUS-FNA using a standard aspiration needle at a single tertiary center. The specimen was analyzed by onsite cytology, Papanicolaou-stain cytology, and histology. The main outcome measure was diagnostic accuracy for malignancy. The secondary outcome measures were: the median number of passes required to establish a diagnosis, the proportion of patients in whom the diagnosis was established with each pass, and complication rates. The overall accuracy of combining onsite cytology with Papanicolaou-stain cytology and histology was not significantly different for the FNB (n = 58) and FNA (n = 58) groups (98.3 % [95 %CI 94.9 % - 100 %] vs. 94.8 % [95 %CI 91.9 % - 100 %]; P = 0.671). Compared with FNA, FNB required a significantly lower median number of needle passes to establish a diagnosis (1.0 vs. 2.0; P < 0.001). On subgroup analysis of 111 patients with malignant lesions, the proportion of patients in whom malignancy was diagnosed on the first pass was significantly greater in the FNB group (72.7 % vs. 37.5 %; P < 0.001). The overall accuracy of FNB and FNA in patients with solid pancreatic masses was comparable; however, fewer passes were required to establish the diagnosis of malignancy using FNB.This study was registered on the UMIN Clinical Trial Registry (UMIN000014057). © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Freehand biopsy guided by electromagnetic needle tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ewertsen, C; Nielsen, Marie Kristina Rue; Nielsen, M Bachmann

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the overall accuracy and time spent on biopsy guided by electromagnetic needle tracking in a phantom compared with the standard technique of US-guided biopsy with an attached steering device. Furthermore, to evaluate off-plane biopsy guided by needle tracking.......To evaluate the overall accuracy and time spent on biopsy guided by electromagnetic needle tracking in a phantom compared with the standard technique of US-guided biopsy with an attached steering device. Furthermore, to evaluate off-plane biopsy guided by needle tracking....

  20. Freehand biopsy guided by electromagnetic needle tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ewertsen, C; Nielsen, Marie Kristina Rue; Nielsen, M Bachmann

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the overall accuracy and time spent on biopsy guided by electromagnetic needle tracking in a phantom compared with the standard technique of US-guided biopsy with an attached steering device. Furthermore, to evaluate off-plane biopsy guided by needle tracking.......To evaluate the overall accuracy and time spent on biopsy guided by electromagnetic needle tracking in a phantom compared with the standard technique of US-guided biopsy with an attached steering device. Furthermore, to evaluate off-plane biopsy guided by needle tracking....

  1. Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Thyroid

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    ... Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Thyroid An ultrasound-guided thyroid biopsy uses sound waves ... Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Thyroid? During a fine needle aspiration biopsy of the ...

  2. Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Thyroid

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    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Thyroid ... Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Thyroid? What is Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Thyroid? ...

  3. Comparison between needle biopsy and radical prostatectomy samples in assessing Gleason score and modified Gleason score in prostatic adenocarcinomas

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    Banu DOĞAN GÜN

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Histologic grading is an important predictor of prostatic disease stage and prognosis. We aimed to assess the degree of concordance between pathologic characteristics of the specimens obtained from biopsy and radical prostatectomy materials.Gleason scores and modified Gleason scores calculated for 25 cases of prostatic adenocarcinoma from both needle biopsy and radical prostatectomy specimens were analyzed.Mean Gleason scores for biopsy and radical specimens were 6.4 (SD:±0.7 and 6.64 (SD:±1.3; and corresponding modified Gleason scores were 7.32 (SD:±1.43 and 7.32 (SD:±0.98, respectively. The Gleason scores of biopsy and radical prostatectomy specimens were identical in 48% (12/25 of the cases, while 32% (8/25 of the biopsy specimens were over-and 20% (5/25 of them were undergraded. While assessing modified Gleason scores, the exact degree of concordance of biopsy specimens with radical prostatectomy materials was 56% (14/25 and of the 11 (44% cases not correlated exactly, 6 (24% were over- and 5 (20% were undergraded. When the exact, over- and underestimated scores of Gleason and modified Gleason grading systems were compared statistically, no difference between two groups was seen (p>0.05. Overgrading errors were found to be more than undergrading errors for both of the scoring systems. Using either the modified Gleason or traditional Gleason scoring

  4. Biopsy needle detection in transrectal ultrasound.

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    Ayvaci, Alper; Yan, Pingkun; Xu, Sheng; Soatto, Stefano; Kruecker, Jochen

    2011-01-01

    Using the fusion of pre-operative MRI and real time intra-procedural transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) to guide prostate biopsy has been shown as a very promising approach to yield better clinical outcome than the routinely performed TRUS only guided biopsy. In several situations of the MRI/TRUS fusion guided biopsy, it is important to know the exact location of the deployed biopsy needle, which is imaged in the TRUS video. In this paper, we present a method to automatically detect and segment the biopsy needle in TRUS. To achieve this goal, we propose to combine information from multiple resources, including ultrasound probe stability, TRUS video background model, and the prior knowledge of needle orientation and position. The proposed algorithm was tested on TRUS video sequences which have in total more than 25,000 frames. The needle deployments were successfully detected and segmented in the sequences with high accuracy and low false-positive detection rate.

  5. Comparison of a new aspiration needle device and the Quick-Core biopsy needle for transjugular liver biopsy

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    Toru Ishikawa; Tomoteru Kamimura; Hiroteru Kamimura; Atsunori Tsuchiya; Tadayuki Togashi; Kouji Watanabe; Kei-ichi Seki; Hironobu Ohta; Toshiaki Yoshida; Noriko Ishihara

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate sample adequacy, safety, and needle passes of a new biopsy needle device compared to the Quick-Core biopsy needle for transjugular liver biopsy in patients affected by liver disease.METHODS: Thirty consecutive liver-disease patients who had major coagulation abnormalities and/or relevant ascites underwent transjugular liver biopsy using either a new needle device (18 patients) or the Quick-Core biopsy needle (12 patients). The length of the specimens was measured before fixation. A pathologist reviewed the histological slides for sample adequacy and pathologic diagnoses. The two methods' specimen adequacy and complication rates were assessed.RESULTS: Liver biopsies were technically successful in all 30 (100%) patients, with diagnostic histological core specimens obtained in 30 of 30 (100%) patients, for an overall success rate of 100%. With the new device,18 specimens were obtained, with an average of 1.1passes per patient. Using the Quick-Core biopsy needle,12 specimens were obtained, with an average of 1.8passes per patient. Specimen length was significantly longer with the new needle device than with the QuickCore biopsy needle (P < 0.05). The biopsy tissue was not fragmented in any of the specimens with the new aspiration needle device, but tissue was fragmented in 3 of 12 (25.0%) specimens obtained using the Quick-Core biopsy needle. Complications included cardiac arrhythmia in 3 (10.0%) patients, and transient abdominal pain in 4 (13.3%) patients. There were no cases of subcapsular hematoma, hemoperitoneum, or sepsis, and there was no death secondary to the procedure. In particular, no early or delayed major procedure-related complications were observed in any patient.CONCLUSION: Transjugular liver biopsy is a safe and effective procedure, and there was significant difference in the adequacy of the specimens obtained using the new needle device compared to the QuickCore biopsy needle. Using the new biopsy needle device,the specimens showed

  6. Needle-in-Needle Technique for Percutaneous Retrieval of a Fractured Biopsy Needle during CT-Guided Biopsy of the Thoracic Spine.

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    Shaikh, Hamza; Thawani, Jayesh; Pukenas, Bryan

    2014-10-31

    Common complications related to CT-guided percutaneous thoracic bone biopsy procedures include pneumothorax and muscular hematoma. Serious, but rare complications include paralysis, nerve injury, CSF leak, and aortic injury. Device failure has not been well documented in the literature. We discuss our experience with biopsy needle breakage during retrieval of a core specimen and the technique used to help retrieve an embedded needle using a CT fluoroscopic-guided, needle-in-needle approach. A 43 year-old man with Stage IIIa NSCLC was found to have a T11 vertebral body lesion as seen on PET, CT, and MR imaging. The patient underwent a CT-guided biopsy in the prone position. The T11 vertebral body was localized and cannulated using the percutaneous Bonopty(®) (Apriomed, Upsala, Sweden) needle device. After fine needle aspiration samples were obtained, a core needle biopsy was attempted with a 16-gauge device. The needle fractured 4 cm deep to the skin during removal of a sclerotic lesion, leaving a retained portion within the pedicle and vertebral body. Using CT-guided fluoroscopy, a large diameter Murphy M2 needle was advanced over the distal portion of the fractured Bonopty needle. The Murphy M2 needle was advanced distal to the tip of the Bonopty needle and removed, capturing the broken Bonopty penetration needle along with a core specimen. Larger-bore biopsy needle systems and/or a coaxial system should be used to perform core biopsies in sclerotic lesions to prevent device fracture. If there is device fracture, a larger-bore needle may be used to help capture the fractured needle and prevent open surgery.

  7. Comparison of FNA and fine-needle biopsy for EUS-guided sampling of suspected GI stromal tumors.

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    El Chafic, Abdul Hamid; Loren, David; Siddiqui, Ali; Mounzer, Rawad; Cosgrove, Natalie; Kowalski, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    Subepithelial lesions are found in about 1% of all EGD procedures, and GI stromal tumors are a type of subepithelial lesion commonly encountered. Although the majority of subepithelial lesions are benign, GI stromal tumors have malignant potential, making a definitive diagnosis important. Currently, the criterion standard for the diagnosis of GI stromal tumors is EUS-directed FNA (EUS-FNA). The definitive diagnosis of GI stromal tumors relies on immunohistochemical staining, which depends on enough tissue being submitted to the pathologist. Achieving adequate tissue acquisition from suspected GI stromal tumors by EUS-FNA remains a limitation. Advancements in needle design, however, have improved tissue acquisition and therefore may improve the definitive diagnosis of GI stromal tumors by EUS-FNA. The goal of this study is to compare a fine-needle biopsy (FNB) needle (SharkCore, Medtronics) with FNA needles in definitively diagnosing suspected GI stromal tumors. This is a retrospective, single-center study of consecutive patients with suspected GI stromal tumors by EUS characterization who underwent EUS-FNA or EUS-FNB. A total of 106 patients (53 men, mean [± standard deviation {SD}] age 62.19 ± 16.33 years) were included in the study undergoing EUS-FNA or EUS-FNB of suspected GI stromal tumors. The needle size that was used most often was 22 gauge in both groups. The average size of the lesions was 27.68 ± 15.70 mm; 71.7% of lesions were located in stomach, 19.8% in the esophagus, 5.7% in the duodenum, and 2.8% in the rectosigmoid colon. Ninety-one patients underwent EUS-FNA and 15 patients underwent EUS-FNB. Adequate tissue was procured, allowing immunohistochemical staining in 59 (64.8%) patients in the FNA group and 15 (100%) patients in the FNB group; P = .006. A diagnosis was reached by immunohistochemical staining in 48 (52.7%) patients in the FNA group and 13 (86.7%) patients in the FNB group; P = .01. Tissue was insufficient to make a cytologic

  8. Core Needle Biopsy and Fine Needle Aspiration Alone or in Combination: Diagnostic Accuracy and Impact on Management of Renal Masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cate, Frances; Kapp, Meghan E; Arnold, Shanna A; Gellert, Lan L; Hameed, Omar; Clark, Peter E; Wile, Geoffrey; Coogan, Alice; Giannico, Giovanna A

    2017-06-01

    Fine needle aspiration with and without concurrent core needle biopsy is a minimally invasive method to diagnose and assist in management of renal masses. We assessed the pathological accuracy of fine needle aspiration compared to and associated with core needle biopsy and the impact on management. We performed a single institution, retrospective study of 342 cases from 2001 to 2015 with small and large renal masses (4 or less and greater than 4 cm, respectively). Diagnostic and concordance rates, and the impact on management were analyzed. Adequacy rates for fine needle aspiration only, core needle biopsy only and fine needle aspiration plus core needle biopsy were 21%, 12% and 8% (aspiration vs aspiration plus biopsy p aspiration plus biopsy group adding aspiration to biopsy and biopsy to aspiration reduced the inadequacy rate from 23% to 8% and from 27% to 8% for a total reduction rate of 15% and 19%, respectively, corresponding to 32 cases (9.3%). Rapid on-site examination contributed to a 22.5% improvement in fine needle aspiration adequacy rates. In this cohort 30% of aspiration only, 5% of biopsy only and 12% of aspiration plus biopsy could not be subtyped (aspiration vs biopsy p aspiration vs aspiration plus biopsy p biopsy vs aspiration plus biopsy p = 0.06). The diagnostic concordance rate with surgical resection was 99%. Conversion of an inadequate specimen to an adequate one by a concurrent procedure impacted treatment in at least 29 of 32 patients. Limitations include the retrospective design and accuracy measurement based on surgical intervention. Fine needle aspiration plus core needle biopsy vs at least fine needle aspiration alone may improve diagnostic yield when sampling renal masses but it has subtyping potential similar to that of core needle biopsy only. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Diagnostic value of core biopsy histology and cytology sampling of mediastinal lymph nodes using 21-gauge EBUS-TBNA needle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Preyas J; Saha, Avinandan; Kate, Arvind H; Pandey, Kamlesh; Chavhan, Vinod B; Leuppi, Joerg D; Chhajed, Prashant N

    2016-01-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) is the initial modality of choice in sampling mediastinal lymphadenopathy. It is possible to obtain both cytological and histological samples using both 21-gauge and 22-gauge EBUS-TBNA needles. The current study was undertaken to compare the diagnostic yield of cytology and histology samples obtained by the same EBUS-TBNA 21-gauge needle. One hundred sixty-six consecutive patients who underwent EBUS-TBNA with a 21-gauge EBUS-TBNA needle over a period of 3 years were included in this retrospective analysis. The diagnostic yields of EBUS-TBNA histology (EBUS-TBNA-H) and EBUS-TBNA cytology (EBUS-TBNA-C) specimens were compared using the McNemar test. The overall sensitivity and specificity of EBUS-TBNA were 89% and 100%, respectively. The positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of EBUS-TBNA were 100% and 53%, respectively. The overall sensitivity and specificity of EBUS-TBNA-H were 85% and 100%, respectively. The PPV and NPV of EBUS-TBNA-H were 100% and 43%, respectively. The overall sensitivity and specificity of EBUS-TBNA-C were 65% and 100%, respectively. The PPV and NPV of EBUS-TBNA-C were 100% and 14%, respectively. The diagnostic yield of EBUS-TBNA-H over EBUS-TBNA-C was statistically significant (P < 0.0001). EBUS-TBNA-H with 21-gauge needle significantly improves the diagnostic yield of EBUS-TBNA. EBUS-TBNA-H improves the NPV of EBUS-TBNA. The combination of EBUS-TBNA-H and EBUS-TBNA-C improves the overall diagnostic yield of EBUS-TBNA.

  10. Assessment of molecular testing in fine-needle aspiration biopsy samples: an experience in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shu; Gao, Aibo; Zhang, Bingfei; Zhang, Zhaoxia; Zhao, Yanru; Chen, Pu; Ji, Meiju; Hou, Peng; Shi, Bingyin

    2014-10-01

    Fine-needle aspiration biopsy remains the mainstay for preoperative examination of thyroid nodules; however, it does not provide a definite diagnosis in up to 25% of nodules. Considerable studies have been performed to identify molecular markers to resolve this diagnostic dilemma. The aim of this study was to establish the distribution and frequency of common genetic alterations in a comprehensive set of benign and malignant thyroid nodules, and to determine the feasibility and role of testing for a panel of genetic alterations in improving the accuracy of cytology diagnosis in a Chinese population. This study was conducted in 314 thyroid nodules comprising 104 papillary thyroid carcinomas, 13 suspicious nodules, 52 indeterminate nodules, and 145 benign nodules. Point mutations and RET/PTC rearrangements, were evaluated by pyrosequencing and TaqMan real-time PCR, respectively. After surgery, 115 nodules were confirmed as conventional papillary thyroid carcinoma and 102 (88.70%) of these nodules harbored either the BRAF(V600E) mutation (76.52%) or RET/PTC rearrangements (12.17%). RAS mutation was found in 1 (33.33%) follicular thyroid carcinoma, 1 (14.29%) follicular thyroid adenoma and 4 (10%) goiter nodules. With cytology and molecular testing, the diagnostic accuracy was further increased to 98.82% in papillary thyroid carcinoma diagnosis, and was preoperatively increased to 76.92% and 84.00%, respectively, in nodules with suspicious and indeterminate cytology. In conclusion, molecular testing of a panel of genetic alterations in fine-needle aspiration biopsy can be effectively performed in clinical practice. It enhances the accuracy of cytology and is of particular value for indeterminate nodules in the Chinese population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. CT-guided biopsy of lung lesions: defining the best needle option for a specific diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Marcos Duarte; Marchiori, Edson; Hochhegger, Bruno; Chojniak, Rubens; Gross, Jefferson Luiz

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the performance of fine and cutting needles in computed tomography guided-biopsy of lung lesions suspicious for malignancy and to determine which technique is the best option for a specific diagnosis. METHODS: This retrospective study reviewed the data from 362 (71.6%) patients who underwent fine-needle aspiration biopsy and from 97 (19.7%) patients who underwent cutting-needle biopsy between January 2006 and December 2011. The data concerning demographic and lesion characteristics, procedures, biopsy sample adequacy, specific diagnoses, and complications were collected. The success and complication rates of both biopsy techniques were calculated. RESULTS: Cutting-needle biopsy yielded significantly higher percentages of adequate biopsy samples and specific diagnoses than did fine-needle aspiration biopsy (pneedle biopsy were 93.8%, 97.3%, and 95.2%, respectively; those of fine-needle aspiration biopsy were 82.6%, 81.3%, and 81.8%, respectively (all pfine-needle aspiration biopsy, and that of hematoma was higher for cutting-needle biopsy (both pbiopsy showed that cutting-needle biopsy yielded better results than did fine-needle aspiration biopsy and that there was no significant increase in complication rates to indicate the best option for specific diagnoses. PMID:24838899

  12. Fine needle aspiration biopsy of ophthalmic tumors☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Arun D.; Biscotti, Charles V.

    2012-01-01

    A majority of intraocular tumors can be diagnosed based on clinical examination and ocular imaging studies, which obviate the need for diagnostic ophthalmic fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB). Overall, diagnostic accuracy of ophthalmic FNAB is high but limited cellularity can compromise the diagnostic potential of ophthalmic aspirate samples. The role of ophthalmic FNAB is limited in retinal tumors. Orbital FNAB should be considered in the evaluation of lacrimal gland tumors, orbital metastasis, and lymphoproliferative lesions. Negative cytologic diagnosis of malignancy should not be considered unequivocal proof that an intraocular malignancy does not exist. With improved understanding of genetic prognostic factors of uveal melanoma, ophthalmic FNAB is gaining popularity for prognostic purposes in combination with eye conserving treatment of the primary tumor. In special clinical indications, ancillary studies such as immunohistochemistry and FISH can be performed on ophthalmic FNAB samples. Assistance of an experienced cytopathologist cannot be overemphasized. PMID:23960981

  13. 22G versus 25G biopsy needles for EUS-guided tissue sampling of solid pancreatic masses: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Young Sik; Lee, Kwang Hyuck; Noh, Dong Hyo; Park, Joo Kyung; Lee, Kyu Taek; Lee, Jong Kyun; Jang, Kee-Taek

    2017-09-12

    No comparative study of 22-gauge biopsy needles (PC22) and 25-gauge biopsy needles (PC25) has been conducted. We prospectively compared the diagnostic accuracy of PC22 and PC25 in patients with pancreatic and peripancreatic solid masses. We conducted a randomized noninferiority clinical study from January 2013 to May 2014 at Samsung Medical Center. A cytological and histological specimen of each pass was analyzed separately by an experienced pathologist. The primary outcome was to assess the diagnostic accuracy using the PC22 or PC25. Secondary outcomes included the optimal number of passes for adequate diagnosis, core specimen yield, sample adequacy, and complication rates. Diagnostic accuracy of combining cytology with histology in three cumulative passes was 97.1% (100/103) for the PC22 and 91.3% (94/103) for the PC25 group. Thus, noninferiority of PC25 to PC22 was not shown with a 10% noninferiority margin (difference, -5.8%; 95% CI, -12.1 to -0.5%). In a pairwise comparison with each needle type, two passes was non-inferior to three passes in the PC22 (96.1% vs. 97.1%; difference, -0.97%; 95% CI -6.63 to 4.69%) but noninferiority of two passes to three passes was not shown in the PC25 group (87.4% vs. 91.3%; difference, -3.88%; 95% CI, -13.5 to 5.7%). Non-inferiority of PC25 to PC22 diagnostic accuracy was not observed for solid pancreatic or peripancreatic masses without on-site cytology. PC22 may be a more ideal device because only two PC22 needle passes was sufficient to establish an adequate diagnosis, whereas PC25 required three or more needle passes.

  14. Ultrasonography-guided fine-needle aspiration cytology for thyroid nodules: an emphasis on one-sampling and biopsy techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Wook; Choo, Hye Jung; Park, Ji Sung; Lee, Eun Joo; Kim, Sang Hyo; Jung, Soo Jin; Ryu, Ji Hwa

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the adequacy and efficacy of ultrasonography (US)-guided fine-needle aspiration cytology (US-FNAC) with one-sampling technique (only one specimen through a single needle pass was obtained during the procedure on each thyroid nodule in each study patient) for the cytological diagnosis of thyroid nodules. In this study, US-FNAC techniques, including "free two-hand," "mixed sampling," "flipping-extraction," and "single-needle-pass" procedures were used to collect thyroid cells from July 2007 to June 2009. The cytopathology results and patients' complications were reviewed retrospectively. Of the 1456 thyroid-nodule samples obtained from 977 patients (1.49 per patient), the incidence of adequate and inadequate samplings was 88.5% (1289/1456) and 11.5% (167/1456), respectively. After thyroid surgery in 396 patients, 568 nodules were confirmed as 353 papillary thyroid carcinomas including one diffuse sclerosing variant, five follicular thyroid carcinomas, three medullary thyroid carcinomas, one anaplastic thyroid carcinoma, one metastatic renal cell carcinoma, two poorly differentiated carcinomas, 17 follicular adenomas, two nodular thyroiditis, two pseudonodules related to thyroiditis, and 182 cases of nodular hyperplasia. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, accuracy, false-negative rate, and false-positive rate for the US-FNAC were 94.3%, 91.9%, 96.2%, 88.3%, 93.6%, 3.9%, and 2.6%, respectively. There were no significant patients' complications, but 87 patients (8.9%) reported mild pain during or after the procedure. This study showed a good adequacy and efficacy of US-FNAC for thyroid nodules despite one-sampling. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Freehand versus guided breast biopsy: comparison of accuracy, needle motion, and biopsy time in a tissue model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluvol, Nathan; Kornecki, Anat; Shaikh, Allison; Del Rey Fernandez, David; Taves, Donald H; Fenster, Aaron

    2009-06-01

    Freehand ultrasound-guided breast biopsy may present difficulties in needle visualization within the scanning plane of the ultrasound image. Scanning plane and needle misalignment, an unknown needle insertion site (relative to the ultrasound image), needle trajectory before insertion, and physician experience play roles in the difficulty of these biopsy procedures. The objective of our study was to compare the currently used freehand technique with the use of a needle guidance system that limits needle motion to within the ultrasound scanning plane for breast biopsy. We developed a needle guidance system for breast biopsy that is composed of an electronically tracked passive mechanical arm and braking mechanism. The system was attached to an ultrasound transducer, and biopsy needles were inserted through the guidance arm. Both experienced and inexperienced radiologists performed ultrasound-guided biopsy on simulated breast lesions with and without the guidance system. Success rates were scored on the basis of the presence of lesions in the core biopsy samples. The biopsy procedures were analyzed using procedure time and total needle tip travel distance before firing. The biopsy success rates were greater using the guidance system (p < 0.05) than using the freehand technique. Experienced radiologists and inexperienced radiologists performed biopsy significantly faster using the needle guidance system (p < 0.001). Additionally, needle tip motion was significantly greater when using the freehand technique (p < 0.001) than using the guidance system. Biopsy using the developed needle guidance system is feasible and its use decreases procedure time and decreases needle motion; thus, it has the potential to reduce patient morbidity. Moreover, less operator experience is required for a successful breast biopsy using the needle guidance system than using the freehand technique.

  16. EUS-guided fine-needle core liver biopsy sampling using a novel 19-gauge needle with modified 1-pass, 1 actuation wet suction technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Jose; Khaleel, Huda; Challita, Youssef; Jimenez, Melissa; Baron, Todd H; Walters, Laura; Hathaway, Kelli; Patel, Ketul; Lankarani, Ali; Herman, Michael; Holloman, David; Saab, Sammy

    2017-05-24

    EUS-guided fine-needle core biopsy sampling is a safe and effective technique for diagnosis of focal liver lesions. However, data are limited in its role in parenchymal disease. We evaluated the utility of EUS-guided parenchymal liver biopsy sampling with a modified 1-pass wet suction technique (EUS-modified liver biopsy sampling [EUS-MLB]) in patients with unexplained increase in liver-associated tests. We retrospectively evaluated the safety and efficacy of EUS-MLB in patients referred for EUS to evaluate for biliary obstruction and pancreatic disorders but with associated unexplained liver tests. EUS-MLB was performed during the same session after biliary obstruction was excluded. One hundred sixty-five consecutive patients underwent EUS-MLB. The median age was 52 years (interquartile range [IQR], 42-65). Sixty-eight patients (41%) were men. The median of the maximum intact core tissue length was 2.4 cm (IQR, 1.8-3.5). The median total specimen length (TSL) was 6 cm (IQR, 4.3-8). The median number of complete portal tracts (CPTs) per TSL was 18 (IQR, 13- 24). The mean number of CPTs per sample length was 7.5 cm. Adverse events were uncommon (1.8%) and included abdominal pain and self-limited hematoma. EUS-guided fine-needle biopsy sampling using a novel 19-gauge core needle with a modified 1-pass 1 actuation wet suction technique (EUS-MLB) is a safe and effective way to evaluate patients with unexplained liver tests abnormalities who are undergoing EUS for exclusion of biliary obstruction. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of nodule characteristics on sampling number and duration of thyroid fine-needle aspiration biopsy: size does not matter, but cystic degeneration ratio does.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengic, Ismet; Tureli, Derya; Altas, Hilal; Ozden, Ferhat; Bugdayci, Onur; Aribal, Erkin

    2017-03-01

    Background Ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) of thyroid nodules, though the most accurate method to rule out malignancy, still has an inherent risk of yielding non-diagnostic specimens despite immediate assessment of specimen adequacy by an on-site cytopathologist. Purpose To evaluate the effects of nodule volume and extent of cystic degeneration on total biopsy time and number of aspirations required for obtaining an adequate specimen. Material and Methods A total of 510 patients underwent FNAB by a single radiologist accompanied by a cytopathologist who immediately assessed each sample for specimen adequacy. All sampled nodules were single and had one maximum diameter > 10 mm. Nodule volumes and cystic degeneration ratios were calculated prior to the intervention. Aspirations were repeated until the cytological material was deemed adequate by the cytopathologist; the number of aspirations and total biopsy time were then recorded. Results Nodule volumes did not have significant effect on neither number of aspirations necessary for achieving specimen adequacy ( P > 0.05) nor total biopsy time (r = -0.148 with P = 0.001). Predominantly cystic nodules, compared to predominantly solid nodules, required more sampling per nodule (4.58 ± 1.11 vs. 3.44 ± 1.19 aspirations, P = 0.001) and longer total biopsy time (16.40 ± 6.19 vs. 11.15 ± 6.18 min, P = 0.001). Conclusion Predominantly cystic nodules require allocation of more time for biopsy. To ensure specimen adequacy when immediate specimen evaluation by an on-site cytopathologist is not possible, four samples from predominantly solid nodules and five passes through predominantly cystic nodules are required.

  18. Ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration versus core needle biopsy: comparison of post-biopsy hematoma rates and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, In Hye; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Moon, Hee Jung; Yoon, Jung Hyun; Park, Vivian Y; Kwak, Jin Young

    2017-07-01

    To compare post-biopsy hematoma rates between ultrasound guided-fine needle aspiration and ultrasound guided-core needle biopsy, and to investigate risk factors for post-biopsy hematoma. A total of 5304 thyroid nodules which underwent ultrasound guided biopsy were included in this retrospective study. We compared clinical and US features between patients with and without post-biopsy hematoma. Associations between these features and post-biopsy hematoma were analyzed. Post-biopsy hematoma rate was 0.8% (43/5121) for ultrasound guided-fine needle aspiration and 4.9% (9/183) for ultrasound guided-core needle biopsy (P fine needle aspiration, gender, age, size, presence of vascularity, and suspicious US features were not associated with post-biopsy hematoma according to experience level. Post-biopsy hematoma occurred significantly more with ultrasound guided-core needle biopsy (9/179, 5.0%) than with ultrasound guided-fine needle aspiration (9/1138, 0.8%) (P needle biopsy was the only significant risk factor for post-biopsy hematoma (adjusted Odds Ratio, 6.458, P biopsy hematoma occurred significantly more in ultrasound guided-core needle biopsy than in ultrasound guided-fine needle aspiration and ultrasound guided-core needle biopsy was the only independent factor of post-biopsy hematoma in thyroid nodules.

  19. Accuracy of Core Needle Biopsy Versus Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology for Diagnosing Salivary Gland Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, In Hye; Song, Joon Seon; Sung, Chang Ohk; Roh, Jong-Lyel; Choi, Seung-Ho; Nam, Soon Yuhl; Kim, Sang Yoon; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Baek, Jung Hwan; Cho, Kyung-Ja

    2015-03-01

    Core needle biopsy is a relatively new technique used to diagnose salivary gland lesions, and its role in comparison with fine needle aspiration cytology needs to be refined. We compared the results of 228 ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy and 371 fine needle aspiration procedures performed on major salivary gland tumors with their postoperative histological diagnoses. Core needle biopsy resulted in significantly higher sensitivity and more accurate tumor subtyping, especially for malignant tumors, than fine needle aspiration. No patient developed major complications after core needle biopsy. We recommend ultrasoundguided core needle biopsy as the primary diagnostic tool for the preoperative evaluation of patients with salivary gland lesions, especially when malignancy is suspected.

  20. Laryngeal chondrosarcoma diagnosed by core-needle biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamaru, Satoru; Haba, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of chondrosarcoma of the larynx, diagnosed by a percutaneous core-needle biopsy (CNB). Cartilaginous tumors of the larynx are usually diagnosed by biopsy with direct laryngomicroscopy under general anesthesia. However, patients find it difficult to undergo a biopsy under general anesthesia, for physical, economic, and social reasons. Instead, we can readily detect and sample tumors of the larynx using ultrasound under local anesthesia with reduced stress. Concerning needle-puncture biopsies, including fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) and CNB, some studies have reported needle track dissemination, a possible complication in patients with malignant tumors. Thus, in the head and neck region, we generally use FNAC for biopsies, not CNB. However, it can be difficult to diagnose bone tumors by cytology alone. Regarding primary bone tumors, only one study has reported needle track dissemination by CNB, in osteosarcoma of the femur. Additionally, this complication has not been reported before with chondrosarcoma anywhere in the body. To our knowledge, this is the first report concerning chondrosarcoma of the larynx diagnosed by percutaneous CNB. We recommend CNB as a useful and safe diagnostic technique for primary bone tumors in the head and neck region.

  1. Sampling variability of computer-aided fractal-corrected measures of liver fibrosis in needle biopsy specimens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fabio Grizzi; Carlo Russo; Barbara Franceschini; Mariagrazia Di Rocco; Valter Torri; Emanuela Morenghi; Luigi Rainiero Fassati; Nicola Dioguardi

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To assess the sampling variability of computeraided, fractal-corrected measures of fibrosis in liver biopsies.METHODS: Samples were derived from six to eight different parts of livers removed from 12 patients with clinically and histologically proven cirrhosis undergoing orthotopic liver transplantation. Sirius red-stained sections with a thickness of 2 μm were digitized using a computer-aided image analysis system that automatically measures the surface of fibrosis, as well as its outline perimeter, fractal surface and outline dimensions,wrinkledness, and Hurst coefficient.RESULTS: We found a high degree of inter-sample variability in the measurements of the surface [coefficient of variation (CV) = 43% ± 13%] and wrinkledness (CV = 28% ± 9%) of fibrosis, but the inter-sample variability of Hurst's exponent was low (CV = 14% ± 2%).CONCLUSION: This study suggests that Hurst's exponent might be used in clinical practice as the best histological estimate of fibrosis in the whole organ,and evidences the fact that biopsy sections, which are fundamental for the qualitative diagnosis of chronic hepatitis, play a key role in the quantitative estimate of architectural changes in liver tissue.

  2. Temporal-based needle segmentation algorithm for transrectal ultrasound prostate biopsy procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cool, Derek W; Gardi, Lori; Romagnoli, Cesare; Saikaly, Manale; Izawa, Jonathan I; Fenster, Aaron

    2010-04-01

    Automatic identification of the biopsy-core tissue location during a prostate biopsy procedure would provide verification that targets were adequately sampled and would allow for appropriate intraprocedure biopsy target modification. Localization of the biopsy core requires accurate segmentation of the biopsy needle and needle tip from transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) biopsy images. A temporal-based TRUS needle segmentation algorithm was developed specifically for the prostate biopsy procedure to automatically identify the TRUS image containing the biopsy needle from a collection of 2D TRUS images and to segment the biopsy-core location from the 2D TRUS image. The temporal-based segmentation algorithm performs a temporal analysis on a series of biopsy TRUS images collected throughout needle insertion and withdrawal. Following the identification of points of needle insertion and retraction, the needle axis is segmented using a Hough transform-based algorithm, which is followed by a temporospectral TRUS analysis to identify the biopsy-needle tip. Validation of the temporal-based algorithm is performed on 108 TRUS biopsy sequences collected from the procedures of ten patients. The success of the temporal search to identify the proper images was manually assessed, while the accuracies of the needle-axis and needle-tip segmentations were quantitatively compared to implementations of two other needle segmentation algorithms within the literature. The needle segmentation algorithm demonstrated a >99% accuracy in identifying the TRUS image at the moment of needle insertion from the collection of real-time TRUS images throughout the insertion and withdrawal of the biopsy needle. The segmented biopsy-needle axes were accurate to within 2.3 +/- 2.0 degrees and 0.48 +/- 0.42 mm of the gold standard. Identification of the needle tip to within half of the biopsy-core length (<10 mm) was 95% successful with a mean error of 2.4 +/- 4.0 mm. Needle-tip detection using the temporal

  3. Initial experience with new dedicated needles for laparoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration and histological biopsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, M B; Durup, J; Pless, T;

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND STUDY AIMS: Laparoscopic ultrasonography (LUS) is an important imaging modality during laparoscopic staging of intra-abdominal malignancies, but LUS-assisted biopsy is often difficult or impossible. We report a newly developed inbuilt biopsy system for direct LUS-guided fine......-needle aspiration (FNA) and Tru-cut biopsies. PATIENTS AND METHODS: LUS-guided biopsy was performed in 20 patients with upper gastrointestinal tract tumors. The biopsied lesions had either not been previously detected by other imaging modalities or had been inaccessible, or the biopsy sample had been inadequate....... Primary diagnosis, duration of biopsy procedure, needle monitoring (visibility, penetration, and deviation), complications, technical failures, and pathological findings were prospectively recorded. RESULTS: 44 biopsies were performed with 25 needles (19, 20, and 22-G). Needle monitoring and penetration...

  4. Concordance between HER-2 status determined by qPCR in Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology (FNAC) samples compared with IHC and FISH in Core Needle Biopsy (CNB) or surgical specimens in breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Claudia; Suciu, Voichita; Poterie, Audrey; Lacroix, Ludovic; Miran, Isabelle; Boichard, Amélie; Delaloge, Suzette; Deneuve, Jacqueline; Azoulay, Sandy; Mathieu, Marie-Christine; Valent, Alexander; Michiels, Stefan; Arnedos, Monica; Vielh, Philippe

    2016-11-01

    Determining the status of HER2-neu amplification and overexpression in breast cancer is crucial for prognosis but mostly for treatment purposes. Standard techniques include the determination of IHC in combination with in situ hybridization techniques to confirm a HER2-neu amplification in case of IHC2+ using either a core-needle biopsy or a surgical specimen. qPCR has been also demonstrated to be able to determine HER2 status, mostly in core biopsies or in surgical specimens. Fine-needle aspiration is a reliable, quicker and less invasive technique that is widely used for diagnosis of invasive breast cancer. In this study, we assessed the performance of qPCR in invasive breast carcinomas to determine HER2-neu status by using fine-needle aspiration samples and comparing to standard IHC and FISH. From a total of 154 samples from patients who had nodular breast lesions and attended the 1-day-stop clinic at the Gustave Roussy from March 2013 to October 2014, qPCR was able to determine the HER2 status in a mean of 3.7 days (SD 3.1). The overall concordance with standard HER2-testing was very high: 97% (95% CI 0.94 to 0.99); sensitivity was 96% (0.87-1), specificity 98% (0.95-1) and positive and negative predictive values 88% (0.75-1) and 99% (0.98-1), respectively. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that qPCR performed using fine-needle aspiration samples from a primary tumour is a reliable and fast method to determine HER2/neu status in patients with early breast cancer.

  5. Fine-needle aspiration with selective use of core needle biopsy of major salivary gland tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Erica B; Wagner, Jason M; Alleman, Anthony M; Zhao, Lichao; Conrad, Rachel D; Krempl, Greg A

    2017-05-23

    Preferential use of fine-needle aspiration (FNA) versus core needle biopsy (CNB) for distinguishing benign from malignant major salivary gland tumors is highly debated. The main disadvantage of FNA is lower sensitivity, whereas arguments against CNB include use of a larger bore needle and greater risk of complications. The aim of this study is to evaluate our experience performing ultrasound-guided (UG) FNA with selective use of CNB based on preliminary cytopathology, and to determine whether our preoperative diagnostic approach is more sensitive and specific than FNA alone-and at least as sensitive and specific as CNB alone. Retrospective review of UG needle biopsy sampling of lesions arising in or around parotid and submandibular glands. Ultrasounds of 141 needle biopsies were identified. Patient/lesion/needle biopsy characteristics, preliminary cytopathology, final pathology, imaging studies, and subsequent clinical course and treatment were documented. Needle biopsies performed according to our protocol provided results that guided clinical decision making in 125 of 135 cases, 92.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 86.8%-96.4%) of the time. Using 41 cases that had histologic verification, sensitivity was 100% (95% CI, 79.6%-100%), and specificity was 92.3% (95% CI, 75.9%-97.9%) for detecting malignancy. We definitively characterized 120 lesions as benign (84) or malignant (36). Preoperative needle biopsy diagnoses allowed clinical management to progress 92.6% of the time. The protocol of FNA with selective use of CNB may potentially reduce patient exposure to risks associated with CNB without the tradeoff of lower sensitivity seen with FNA. 4. Laryngoscope, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  6. EFFICACY OF IMMUNOHISTOCHEMISTRY IN PROSTATE NEEDLE BIOPSIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tameem Afroz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Prostate needle biopsies can pose a major diagnostic challenge when it comes to differentiating adenocarcinoma and its variants from its benign mimics. In needle biopsies, when the suspicious focus is small, morphological features may not suffice to differentiate it from its morphologic mimics like atrophy, basal cell hyperplasia, reactive inflammatory changes, seminal vesicles and adenosis. Immunohistochemical marker for basal cells, p63 and prostate cancer specific marker, Alpha-Methylacyl-CoA Racemase (AMACR help in overcoming such diagnostic dilemmas. MATERIALS AND METHODS We analysed 157 prostate core needle biopsies over a period of 2 years. Routine Hematoxylin and Eosin (H and E sections and immunohistochemical markers for basal cells (p63 and prostate cancer specific marker (AMACR were used. Prospective study was done on prostate needle core biopsies. Biopsy was done under ultrasound guidance with an 18-gauge needle. Biopsy was done in patients with raised serum PSA levels for exclusion of prostate carcinoma. RESULTS Over a period of two years, 157 prostate core needle biopsies were studied. 83 were benign lesions comprising 69 benign prostatic hyperplasias, five basal cell hyperplasias, four granulomatous lesions and three showed atrophic changes. Two biopsies morphologically resembled seminal vesicles. Prostate cancer specific marker, AMACR was negative in all, but two lesions. In these two lesions, it showed weak nonspecific staining. Basal cell marker p63 showed a continuous staining pattern highlighting the basal cells in all the 69 cases of benign prostatic hyperplasia, 5 cases of basal hyperplasia showed positivity in all the hyperplastic basal cells. In the two cases of seminal vesicles, it showed intense basal cell positivity. It showed a discontinuous pattern in two of the four granulomatous lesions and showed a weak, but a continuous staining pattern in the atrophic lesions. 74 were adenocarcinomas; the predominant

  7. Concurrent fine needle aspirations and core needle biopsies: a comparative study of substrates for next-generation sequencing in solid organ malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy-Chowdhuri, Sinchita; Chen, Hui; Singh, Rajesh R; Krishnamurthy, Savitri; Patel, Keyur P; Routbort, Mark J; Manekia, Jawad; Barkoh, Bedia A; Yao, Hui; Sabir, Sharjeel; Broaddus, Russell R; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Staerkel, Gregg; Stewart, John; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi

    2017-01-13

    Minimally invasive procedures, such as fine needle aspiration and core needle biopsy, are commonly used for the diagnosis in solid organ malignancies. In the era of targeted therapy, it is crucial for molecular testing to be performed on these limited volume specimens. Although several recent studies have demonstrated the utility of small biopsy specimens for molecular testing, there remains debate as to whether core needle biopsy specimens are more reliable than fine needle aspiration for molecular studies. In this study, we reviewed concurrently acquired fine needle aspiration and core needle biopsy samples (n=24), and compared overall cellularity, tumor fraction, and the results of next-generation sequencing. All somatic mutations detected in core needle biopsy samples were also detected in fine needle aspiration samples. The estimated tumor fraction was significantly higher in fine needle aspiration smears than core needle biopsy samples (P=0.003), whereas the overall DNA yield from smears was significantly lower than that obtained from the core needle biopsy specimens (P=0.01). The normalized average amplicon coverage for the genes analyzed was significantly higher in cytology smears than paired core needle biopsy samples, with lower numbers of failed amplicons and higher overall mutation allelic frequencies seen in the former. We further evaluated 100 malignant fine needle aspiration and core needle biopsy samples, acquired concurrently, for overall cellularity and tumor fraction. Overall cellularity and tumor fraction of fine needle aspiration samples was significantly higher than concurrently acquired core needle biopsy samples (Pcore needle biopsy samples. Cytologic specimens, therefore, should be better integrated into routine molecular diagnostics workflow to maximize limited tissues for clinically relevant genomic testing.Modern Pathology advance online publication, 13 January 2017; doi:10.1038/modpathol.2016.228.

  8. Computed tomography guided needle biopsy: experience from 1,300 procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chojniak, Rubens; Isberner, Rony Klaus; Viana, Luciana Marinho; Yu, Liao Shin; Aita, Alessandro Amorim; Soares, Fernando Augusto [Hospital do Cancer A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia e Patologia

    2006-01-15

    Context and objective: computed tomography (CT) guided biopsy is widely accepted as effective and safe for diagnosis in many settings. Accuracy depends on target organ and needle type. Cutting needles present advantages over fine needles. This study presents experience from CT guided biopsies performed at an oncology center. Design and setting: retrospective study at Hospital do Cancer A. C. Camargo, Sao Paulo.Methods: 1,300 consecutive CT guided biopsies performed between July 1994 and February 2000 were analyzed. Nodules or masses were suspected as primary malignancy in 845 cases (65%) or metastatic lesion in 455 (35%). 628 lesions were thoracic, 281 abdominal, 208 retroperitoneal, 134 musculoskeletal and 49 head/neck. All biopsies were performed by one radiologist or under his supervision: 765 (59%) with 22-gauge fine-needle/aspiration technique and 535 (41%) with automated 16 or 18-gauge cutting-needle biopsy. Results: adequate samples were obtained in 70-92% of fine-needle and 93-100% of cutting-needle biopsies. The specific diagnosis rates were 54-67% for fine-needle and 82-100% for cutting-needle biopsies, according to biopsy site. For any site, sample adequacy and specific diagnosis rate were always better for cutting-needle biopsy. Among 530 lung biopsies, there were 84 pneumothorax (16%) and two hemothorax (0.3%) cases, with thoracic drainage in 24 (4.9%). Among abdominal and retroperitoneal biopsies, there were two cases of major bleeding and one of peritonitis. Conclusion: both types of needle showed satisfactory results, but cutting-needle biopsy should be used when specific diagnosis is desired without greater incidence of complications. (author)

  9. Value of CT-guided core-needle biopsy in diagnosis and classification of malignant lymphomas using automated biopsy gun

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Li; Qiu-Liang Wu; Li-Zhi Liu; Yun-Xian Mo; Chuan-Miao Xie; Lie Zheng; Lin Chen; Pei-Hong Wu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the value of CT-guided core-needle biopsy in diagnosis and classification of malignant lymphomas.METHODS: From January 1999 to October 2004, CT-guided core-needle biopsies were performed in 80 patients with suspected malignant lymphoma. Biopsies were performed with an 18-20 G biopsy-cut (CR Bard, Inc., Covington, GA,USA) needle driven by a spring-loaded Bard biopsy gun.RESULTS: A definite diagnosis and accurate histological subtype were obtained in 61 patients with a success rate of 76.25% (61/80). Surgical sampling was performed in 19 patients (23.75%) with non-diagnostic core-needle biopsies. The success rate of CT-guided core-needle biopsy varied with the histopathologic subtypes in our group.The relatively high success rates of core-needle biopsy were noted in diffuse large B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL, 88.89%) and peripheral T-cell NHL (90%). However,the success rates were relatively low in anaplastic large cell (T/null cell) lymphoma (ALCL, 44.44%) and Hodgkin's disease (HD, 28.57%) in our group.CONCLUSION: CT-guided core-needle biopsy is a reliable means of diagnosing and classifying malignant lymphomas,and can be widely applied in the management of patients with suspected malignant lymphoma.

  10. Core needle biopsy guidance based on EMOCT imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iftimia, Nicusor V.; Park, Jesung; Maguluri, Gopi

    2016-03-01

    We present a novel method, based on encoder mapping OCT imaging, for real-time guidance of core biopsy procedures. This method provides real-time feedback to the interventional radiologist, such that he/she can reorient the needle during the biopsy and sample the most representative area of the suspicious mass that is being investigated. This aspect is very important for tailoring therapy to the specific cancer based on biomarker analysis, which will become one of the next big advances in our search for the optimal cancer therapy. To enable individualized treatment, the genetic constitution and the DNA repair status in the affected areas is needed for each patient. Thus, representative sampling of the tumor is needed for analyzing various biomarkers, which are used as a tool to personalize cancer therapy. The encoder-based OCT enables samping of large size masses and provides full control on the imaging probe, which is passed through the bore of the biopsy guidance needle. The OCT image is built gradually, based on the feedback of an optical encoder which senses the incremental movement of the needle with a few microns resolution. Tissue mapping is independent of the needle speed, while it is advanced through the tissue. The OCT frame is analyzed in real-time and tissue cellularity is reported in a very simple manner (pie chart). Our preliminary study on a rabbit model of cancer has demonstrated the capability of this technology for accurately differentiating between viable cancer and heterogeneous or necrotic tissue.

  11. Sample representativeness and incidence of liver biopsy complications caused by needles of bigger diameter (1.6 mm) and smaller diameter (1.2 mm) in children with cholestatic syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Bošković Aleksandra; Kitić Ivana; Prokić Dragan; Stanković Ivica

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Percutaneous liver biopsy and histomorphological analysis of liver tissue is an important diagnostic procedure in the investigation of neonates and infants with cholestatic syndrome. This study has been aimed at determining whether there is a difference in the incidence of complications after liver biopsy performed by Menghini technique using a needle of 1.6 mm as compared to 1.2 mm diameter and if there is a difference in the sample representativeness of liver tissue afte...

  12. Immunohistochemistry for BRAF(V600E) antibody VE1 performed in core needle biopsy samples identifies mutated papillary thyroid cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescenzi, A; Guidobaldi, L; Nasrollah, N; Taccogna, S; Cicciarella Modica, D D; Turrini, L; Nigri, G; Romanelli, F; Valabrega, S; Giovanella, L; Onetti Muda, A; Trimboli, P

    2014-05-01

    BRAF(V600E) is the most frequent genetic mutation in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) and has been reported as an independent predictor of poor prognosis of these patients. Current guidelines do not recommend the use of BRAF(V600E) mutational analysis on cytologic specimens from fine needle aspiration due to several reasons. Recently, immunohistochemistry using VE1, a mouse anti-human BRAF(V600E) antibody, has been reported as a highly reliable technique in detecting BRAF-mutated thyroid and nonthyroid cancers. The aim of this study was to test the reliability of VE1 immunohistochemistry on microhistologic samples from core needle biopsy (CNB) in identifying BRAF-mutated PTC. A series of 30 nodules (size ranging from 7 to 22 mm) from 30 patients who underwent surgery following CNB were included in the study. All these lesions had had inconclusive cytology. In all cases, both VE1 and BRAF(V600E) genotypes were evaluated. After surgery, final histology demonstrated 21 cancers and 9 benign lesions. CNB correctly diagnosed 20/20 PTC and 5/5 adenomatous nodules. One follicular thyroid cancer and 4 benign lesions were assessed at CNB as uncertain follicular neoplasm. VE1 immunohistochemistry revealed 8 mutated PTC and 22 negative cases. A 100% agreement was found when positive and negative VE1 results were compared with BRAF mutational status. These data are the first demonstration that VE1 immunohistochemistry performed on thyroid CNB samples perfectly matches with genetic analysis of BRAF status. Thus, VE1 antibody can be used on thyroid microhistologic specimens to detect BRAF(V600E)-mutated PTC before surgery.

  13. Guidelines for processing and reporting of prostatic needle biopsies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Th.H. van der Kwast (Theo); C. Lopes; C. Santonja; C.G. Pihl; I. Neetens; P. Martikainen (Pekka); S. di Lollo; L. Bubendorf; R.F. Hoedemaeker

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe reported detection rate of prostate cancer, lesions suspicious for cancer, and prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) in needle biopsies is highly variable. In part, technical factors, including the quality of the biopsies, the tissue processing, and histopatholo

  14. Diagnosis of prostate cancer with needle biopsy: Should all cases ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-06-11

    Jun 11, 2011 ... The sensitivity of PSA was 99.2%. ... Needle biopsy allows appropriate surgical treatment for patients whose .... 715 consecutive breast biopsies with at least two year follow‑up of benign lesions. ... The effects of castration.

  15. Accuracy of Core Needle Biopsy Versus Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology for Diagnosing Salivary Gland Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In Hye Song

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Core needle biopsy is a relatively new technique used to diagnose salivary gland lesions, and its role in comparison with fine needle aspiration cytology needs to be refined. Methods: We compared the results of 228 ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy and 371 fine needle aspiration procedures performed on major salivary gland tumors with their postoperative histological diagnoses. Results: Core needle biopsy resulted in significantly higher sensitivity and more accurate tumor subtyping, especially for malignant tumors, than fine needle aspiration. No patient developed major complications after core needle biopsy. Conclusions: We recommend ultrasoundguided core needle biopsy as the primary diagnostic tool for the preoperative evaluation of patients with salivary gland lesions, especially when malignancy is suspected.

  16. Accuracy of CT-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy for assessment of pediatric musculoskeletal lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hryhorczuk, Anastasia L. [University of Michigan, Department of Radiology, C. S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Harvard University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Boston Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Strouse, Peter J. [University of Michigan, Department of Radiology, C. S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Biermann, J.S. [University of Michigan, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2011-07-15

    CT-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy has been shown in adults to be an effective diagnostic tool for a large number of musculoskeletal malignancies. To characterize our experience with CT-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy of pediatric bone lesions and determine its utility in diagnosing pediatric osseous lesions, in a population where such lesions are commonly benign. From 2000 to 2009, 61 children underwent 63 CT-guided percutaneous biopsies. Radiological, pathological and clinical records were reviewed. Fourteen biopsies (22%) were performed on malignant lesions, while 49 biopsies (78%) were performed on benign lesions. Forty-nine of the 63 biopsies (78%) were adequate; these children underwent no further tissue sampling. Fourteen of the 63 biopsies (22%) were inadequate or non-conclusive. Of these patients, 12 underwent open biopsy. Retrospective analysis of percutaneous biopsies in these patients demonstrates that 9/12 provided clinically relevant information, and 4/12 patients received final diagnoses that confirmed initial core biopsy findings. No malignancies were diagnosed as benign on percutaneous biopsy. Overall, percutaneous core needle biopsy provided accurate diagnostic information in 84% (53/63) of biopsies. Our results demonstrate that CT-guided percutaneous biopsy is safe and beneficial in children. This study supports the use of CT-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy for primary diagnosis of pediatric bone lesions. (orig.)

  17. Suction-modified needle biopsy technique for the human soleus muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, Joshua A; Yu, Alvin; Kreitenberg, Arthur; Haddad, Fadia H; Baker, Michael J; Fox, John C; Adams, Gregory R

    2013-10-01

    The needle biopsy technique for the soleus muscle is of particular interest because of the muscle's unique fiber type distribution, contractile properties, and sensitivity to unloading. Unlike other commonly biopsied muscles, the soleus is not fully superficial and is in close proximity to neurovascular structures, resulting in a more challenging biopsy. Because of this, a standardized protocol for performing needle biopsies on the human soleus muscle that is safe, reliable, and repeatable is presented. Ultrasonography was used on an initial set of 12 subjects to determine the optimal biopsy zone, thereby guiding the location of the incision site. There were 45 subjects recruited who attended 2 separate biopsy sessions. Each biopsy session incorporated 3 passes of the biopsy needle proximal, posterior, and distal using suction from a portable vacuum source producing 3 separate muscle specimens. There were 84 soleus muscle biopsy procedures which were successfully conducted yielding 252 total samples without complication. Ultrasonography was used to confirm biopsy needle infiltration of the soleus muscle. Average sample weight obtained per pass was 61.5 +/- 15.7 mg. Histochemistry and molecular analyses demonstrated a considerably higher amount of slow type I MHC in comparison to the vastus lateralis, providing verification for the successful sampling of the soleus muscle. The procedure presented consists of a detailed protocol to accurately and consistently obtain muscle biopsy samples from the human soleus muscle. We have demonstrated that the human soleus biopsy is a safe, reliable, and repeatable procedure providing ample tissue for multiple types of analyses.

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Guided Vacuum Assisted and Core Needle Biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kılıç, Fahrettin; Eren, Abdulkadir; Tunç, Necmettin; Velidedeoğlu, Mehmet; Bakan, Selim; Aydoğan, Fatih; Çelik, Varol; Gazioğlu, Ertuğrul; Yılmaz, Mehmet Halit

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study to present the results of Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided cutting needle biopsy procedures of suspicious breast lesions that can be solely detected on Magnetic resonance (MR) examination. The study included 48 patients with 48 lesions which were solely be observed in breast MRI, indistinguishable in ultrasonography and mammography, for MR guided vacuum-assisted cutting needle biopsy and 42 patients with 42 lesions for MR guided cutting needle biopsy for the lesions of the same nature. MR imaging was performed using a 1.5-Tesla MRI device. Acquired MR images were determined and biopsy protocol was performed using computer-aided diagnosis system on the workstation. Vacuum biopsies were performed using 10 G or 12 G automatic biopsy systems, cutting needle biopsy procedures were performed using fully automated 12 G biopsy needle. All biopsy procedures were finalized successfully without major complications. The lesions were 54 mass (60%), 28 were non-mass contrast enhancement (31%) and 8 were foci (9%) in the MR examination. Histopathological evaluation revealed 18 malignant (invasive, in-situ ductal carcinoma and lobular carcinoma), 66 benign (apocrine metaplasia, fibrosis, fibroadenomatoid lesion, sclerosing adenosis, fibrocystic disease and mild-to-severe epithelial proliferation) and 6 high-risk (atypical ductal hyperplasia, intraductal papilloma, radial scar) lesions. Magnetic resonance guided vacuum and cutting needle biopsy methods are successful methods fort he evaluation of solely MRI detected suspicious breast lesions. There are several advantages relative to each other in both methods.

  19. Needle core biopsy for breast lesions: An audit of 467 needle core biopsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvi Radhakrishna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast cancer is the commonest cancer among women in urban India. Triple assessment includes clinical, radiological and cytological assessment of breast lesions. Guided core needle biopsy has replaced fine needle aspiration cytology in most of the western countries. In resource poor countries FNAC is still a very valuable and cost effective method to diagnose breast lesions. Pitfalls include increased rates of non diagnostic smears, and inadequate smears. Further procedures may be required and this increases the cost, anxiety and delay in diagnosis. Aims: The aim of this study is to analyze the concordance of radiological and histopathology findings in BI-RADS category 3,4,5 lesions following a core biopsy. Materials and Methods: Data was retrospectively collected from consecutive symptomatic and opportunistic screen detected patients with abnormalities who underwent ultrasound guided interventional procedures from Jan 2010 to Aug 2011. Symptomatic patients underwent clinical examination, mammogram and breast ultrasound. Women under 35 years of age had only breast ultrasound. Core biopsy was performed under ultrasound guidance or clinically by a breast surgeon/ radiologist for BI-RADS category 3,4,5 lesions. Statistical Methods: Chi square test was done to show the strength of association of imaging findings and histopathology results of core biopsy. Results: 437 patients were symptomatic and 30 patients had screen detected abnormalities. The positive predictive value for BI-RADS 5 lesions for malignancy is 93.25% and the negative predictive value of BI-RADS category 3 lesions for cancer is 98.4%. False negative diagnosis on core biopsy was 0.85%. We were able to defer surgery in 60% of the patients with a clear radiological and pathological benign diagnosis. Conclusion: The PPV and NPV for cancer is high with needle core biopsy in BI-RADS 3,4,5 lesions. Where there is no discordance between clinical, radiology and pathology findings

  20. Track seeding in a breast cancer patient after a 14-gauge core needle biopsy: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Su Wan; Ko, Eun Sook; Lee, Byung Hee; Kim, Ki Hwan [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-10-15

    US-guided large-gauge core needle biopsy has replaced fine-needle aspiration and excisional biopsy for sampling suspicious breast lesions. The core needle biopsy has many advantages: it is relatively simple, it can be done with local anesthesia, it enables accurate targeting under sonographic guidance and it leaves no scar. However, one rare disadvantage of this technique is the possible seeding of malignant cells along the needle track. We report here on a case of gross track seeding in a 76-year-old woman, and this was observed 70 days after performing a 14-gauge core needle biopsy.

  1. Current status of core needle biopsy of the thyroid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Jung Hwan [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Thyroid nodules are a common clinical problem. Fine-needle aspiration (FNA) and large-needle biopsy have been used to diagnose thyroid nodules. Before the 1980s, large-needle biopsy was the standard procedure for the thyroid, but FNA became the standard diagnostic tool in the 1980s because it is a safe procedure that leads to accurate diagnoses. With advances in core needle biopsy (CNB) devices (i.e., spring-activated core needles) and development of high-resolution ultrasound, it has become possible to make accurate diagnoses while minimizing complications. Although 18- to 21-gauge core needles can be used to biopsy thyroid nodules, 18-gauge needles are most commonly used in Korea. The relationships among the size of the needle, the number of core specimens, and diagnostic accuracy have not yet been conclusively established, but the general tendency is that thinner needles cause less damage to the normal thyroid, but allow a smaller amount of thyroid tissue to be biopsied to be obtained. These relationships may be validated in the future.

  2. Comparison of sonography with sonographically guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy and core-needle biopsy for initial axillary staging of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Hye Shin; Kim, Sun Mi; Jang, Mijung; La Yun, Bo; Kim, Sung-Won; Kang, Eunyoung; Park, So Yeon; Moon, Woo Kyung; Choi, Hye Young

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the roles of sonography and sonographically guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy and core-needle biopsy for initial axillary staging of breast cancer. Of 220 patients with breast cancer who underwent preoperative or prechemotherapy sonography for axillary staging, 52 patients who underwent sonographically guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy and core-needle biopsy for cortical thickening or a compressed hilum of lymph nodes on sonography were prospectively enrolled. Sonography and fine-needle aspiration biopsy/core-needle biopsy findings were compared with final pathologic results from sentinel lymph node biopsy or axillary lymph node dissection. Forty-eight patients met the final study criteria; we excluded 4 who had received primary systemic chemotherapy and showed negative fine-needle aspiration biopsy/core-needle biopsy results and negative final postoperative pathologic results. The positive predictive value of axillary sonography was 54%. The sensitivity and specificity of fine-needle aspiration biopsy were 73% and 100%, respectively, and those of core-needle biopsy were 77% and 100%. Results did not differ significantly between sonographically guided core-needle biopsy and fine-needle aspiration biopsy. The complication rates of fine-needle aspiration biopsy and core-needle biopsy were both 4%, and fine-needle aspiration biopsy and core-needle biopsy cost $180 and $350, respectively. Both sonographically guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy and core-needle biopsy were useful for axillary staging of breast cancer with high sensitivity. However, fine-needle aspiration biopsy is recommended based on the advantages of low cost and minimal invasiveness.

  3. Comparative Study of Core Needle Biopsy and Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology in Palpable Breast Lumps: Scenario in Developing Nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikku, Gargi; Umap, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of core needle biopsy as a diagnostic tool for palpable breast lumps in developing countries as compared to fine needle aspiration cytology. All patients attending the surgery outpatient department with palpable breast lumps were subjected to fine needle aspiration cytology and core needle biopsy by the same operator in a single session. Fine needle aspiration cytology was performed by the standard technique. Core needle biopsy was done freehand using a 14G manual core biopsy needle. Reporting categories of the two techniques were taken from the standard National Health Service Breast Screening Programme criteria and were compared with the final histopathology results. A total of 107 patients underwent fine needle aspiration cytology and core needle biopsy simultaneously. Histopathology was available for 85 cases. Statistical analysis of fine needle aspiration cytology and core needle biopsy showed no significant difference between the diagnoses offered by core needle biopsy and histopathology while there was a significant difference between fine needle aspiration cytology and histopathology diagnoses. Core needle biopsy detected more breast carcinomas as compared to fine needle aspiration cytology with a sensitivity 95.83% as opposed to 64.58%. Though both the techniques were equally specific (100%), Core needle biopsy was able to correctly categorize borderline / inadequate lesions into definitely benign and malignant categories. We suggest that core needle biopsy should be preferred over fine needle aspiration cytology for the diagnosis of palpable breast lumps with fine needle aspiration cytology being reserved for definitely benign lesions.

  4. Steerable real-time sonographically guided needle biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonocore, E; Skipper, G J

    1981-02-01

    A method for dynamic real-time ultrasonic guidance for percutaneous needle biopsy has been successful in obtaining cytologic and histologic specimens from abdominal masses. The system depends on a real-time ultrasonic transducer that has been rigidly attached to a laterally placed steerable needle holder. Using simple trigonometric functions, a chart has been derived that gives the exact angulation and needle length to produce quick, reliable, guided needle placements. Examples of successful renal, hepatobiliary, and retroperitoneal biopsies are presented. Advantages of this technique include speed, accuracy, low cost, three-dimensional format, and the omission of contrast media and radiation.

  5. Reliability of fine needle aspiration biopsy in large thyroid nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozbıyık, Osman; Öztürk, Şafak; Ünver, Mutlu; Erol, Varlık; Bayol, Ümit; Aydın, Cengiz

    2017-01-01

    Fine needle aspiration biopsy provides one of the most important data that determines the treatment algorithm of thyroid nodules. Nevertheless, the reliability of fine needle aspiration biopsy is controversial in large nodules. The aim of this study was to evaluate the adequacy of fine needle aspiration biopsy in thyroid nodules that are four cm or greater. We retrospectively examined 219 patients files who underwent thyroidectomy for thyroid nodules that were greater than four centimeter between May 2007 and December 2012. Seventy-four patients with hyperthyroidism, and 18 patients without preoperative fine needle aspiration cytology were excluded from the study. Histopathologic results after thyroidectomy were compared with preoperative cytology results, and sensitivity and specificity rates were calculated. False-negativity, sensitivity and specificity rates of fine needle aspiration biopsy of thyroid nodules were found to be 9.7%, 55.5%, and 85%, respectively. Within any nodule of the 127 patients, 28 (22.0%) had thyroid cancer. However, when only nodules of at least 4 cm were evaluated, thyroid cancer was detected in 22 (17.3%) patients. In this study, fine needle aspiration biopsy of large thyroid nodules was found to have a high false-negativity rate. The limitations of fine-needle aspiration biopsy should be taken into consideration in treatment planning of thyroid nodules larger than four centimeters.

  6. Techniques for endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panic, Nikola; Larghi, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Although endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is the method of choice to obtain samples to reach definitive diagnosis of lesions of the gastrointestinal tract and of adjacent organs, it cannot fully characterize certain neoplasms. The lack of cytology expertise has hindered the dissemination of EUS, limiting its widespread use. The obtainment of a tissue specimen through EUS fine-needle biopsy (EUS-FNB) may overcome the limitations of EUS-FNA. EUS-FNB is expected to move the practice of EUS from cytology to histology, expanding the use of EUS and facilitating targeted therapies and monitoring of treatment response in a more biologically driven manner. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Ultrasound guided needle biopsy of skeletal muscle in neuromuscular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindequist, S; Schrøder, H D; Larsen, C

    1990-01-01

    Guided by ultrasonography percutaneous needle biopsy of skeletal muscle was performed in 24 patients, using the one hand held Biopty system and a 2 mm Tru-Cut needle. The specimens were graded with regard to diagnostic quality and utility and almost all specimens (96%) were of highest quality...

  8. Electrical property sensing biopsy needle for prostate cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, V; Schned, A R; Hartov, A; Heaney, J A; Seigne, J; Halter, R J

    2013-11-01

    Significant electrical property differences have been demonstrated to exist between malignant and benign prostate tissues. We evaluated how well a custom designed clinically deployable electrical property sensing biopsy needle is able to discriminate between these tissue types in an ex vivo prostate model. An electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) sensing biopsy (Bx) needle was developed to record resistive (ρR) and reactive (ρX) components of electrical impedance from 100 Hz to 1 MHz. Standard twelve-core biopsy protocols were followed, in which the EIS-Bx device was used to gauge electrical properties prior to extracting tissue cores through biopsy needle firing from 36 ex vivo human prostates. Histopathological assessment of the cores was statistically compared to the impedance spectrum gauged from each core. The magnitudes of the mean resistive and reactive components were significantly higher in cancer tissues (P biopsy procedures. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Curved Needles in CT-Guided Fine Needle Biopsies of Abdominal and Retroperitoneal Small Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Filippo, Massimo; Saba, Luca; Rossi, Enrica; Nizzoli, Rita; Tiseo, Marcello; Pedrazzi, Giuseppe; Brunese, Luca; Rotondo, Antonio; Rossi, Cristina

    2015-12-01

    To demonstrate the advantages of using curved needles in fine needle aspiration (FNA) with CT-guided, for analyzing abdominal and/or retroperitoneal small lesions which are impossible to reach with conventional non-surgical biopsy techniques, particularly in cases in which the cytology sample was not possible to obtain by means of US or CT guide with axial images. An authorization for CT-guided FNA in patients with neoplasms is not required by the institutional review board of our Institute. From April 2012 to November 2014, the study included retrospectively 25 patients (16 M, 9 F) who underwent CT-guided FNA of abdominal and/or retroperitoneal small lesions (biopsy procedure because of the interposition of anatomical obstacles. Patients with suspected lymphomas or sarcomas, pediatric patients and patients with bleeding diathesis were excluded. Cytology reports were used for evaluating suitability. The biological material was considered to be suitable for cytological study, with a diagnostic value in all 25 cases, finding in particular: out of 23 neoplastic lesions (85%), 21 were malignant (90.2%) and 2 were benign (8%). 2 out 25 were non-neoplastic benign lesions (8%). No procedural complications arose in any of the cases (0%). Using curved needles, there is an effective improvement in CT-guided FNA of abdominal and retroperitoneal small lesions which are difficult to achieve with conventional CT or ultrasound guide.

  10. Multimodal optical biopsy probe to improve the safety and diagnostic yield of brain needle biopsies (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desroches, Joannie; Pichette, Julien; Goyette, Andréanne; Tremblay, Marie-Andrée.; Jermyn, Michael; Petrecca, Kevin; Leblond, Frédéric

    2016-03-01

    Brain needle biopsy (BNB) is performed to collect tissue when precise neuropathological diagnosis is required to provide information about tumor type, grade, and growth patterns. The principal risks associated with this procedure are intracranial hemorrhage (due to clipping blood vessels during tissue extraction), incorrect tumor typing/grading due to non-representative or non-diagnostic samples (e.g. necrotic tissue), and missing the lesion. We present an innovative device using sub-diffuse optical tomography to detect blood vessels and Raman spectroscopy to detect molecular differences between tissue types, in order to reduce the risks of misdiagnosis, incorrect tumour grading, and non-diagnostic samples. The needle probe integrates optical fibers directly onto the external cannula of a commercial BNB needle, and can perform measurements for both optical techniques through the same fibers. This integrated optical spectroscopy system uses diffuse reflectance signals to perform a 360-degree reconstruction of the tissue adjacent to the biopsy needle, based on the optical contrast associated with hemoglobin light absorption, thereby localizing blood vessels. Raman spectra measurements are also performed interstitially for tissue characterization. A detailed sensitivity of the system is presented to demonstrate that it can detect absorbers with diameters biopsy needle core, for bulk optical properties consistent with brain tissue. Results from animal experiments are presented to validate blood vessel detection and Raman spectrum measurement without disruption of the surgical workflow. We also present phantom measurements of Raman spectra with the needle probe and a comparison with a clinically validated Raman spectroscopy probe.

  11. Needle localization of small pediatric tumors for surgical biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardaway, B.W.; Hoffer, F.A. [Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Rao, B.N. [Dept. of Surgery, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis Tennessee (United States)

    2000-05-01

    Background. Small pediatric tumors may be difficult to biopsy or resect. Objective. To examine the benefits of needle localization of a variety of small pediatric tumors before surgical biopsy or excision. Materials and methods. Seven patients aged 1-19 years underwent 12 procedures for needle localization of suspected tumor. Two patients had undergone previous biopsies without needle localization with negative results. Computed tomography (four patients) or ultrasonography (three patients) guided needle placement. Each patient had suspected tumor(s) in 1-3 anatomical sites, including thigh (7), lung (2), parasacral region (2), and iliac bone (1). Results. All 12 lesions (9 less than 1 cm{sup 3} in volume) were successfully localized for excision or biopsy. Three small (<1 cm{sup 3}) soft-tissue lesions (two ganglioneuroblastomas and one ganglioneuroma) were excised from one patient, a 0.65-cm{sup 3} residual soft-tissue sarcoma from another; and recurrent bilateral teratomas from a third. Two peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumors were excised with positive margins from a fourth patient. Two lesions contained only fibrosis, as determined by histopathology. Two other patients underwent thoracoscopic removal of lung metastases that were less than 0.1 cm{sup 3}. Conclusion. Needle localization allows effective and less invasive excision or biopsy of a variety of small pediatric soft-tissue lesions. (orig.)

  12. Cutting performance orthogonal test of single plane puncture biopsy needle based on puncture force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yingqiang; Zhang, Qinhe; Liu, Guowei

    2017-04-01

    Needle biopsy is a method to extract the cells from the patient's body with a needle for tissue pathological examination. Many factors affect the cutting process of soft tissue, including the geometry of the biopsy needle, the mechanical properties of the soft tissue, the parameters of the puncture process and the interaction between them. This paper conducted orthogonal experiment of main cutting parameters based on single plane puncture biopsy needle, and obtained the cutting force curve of single plane puncture biopsy needle by studying the influence of the inclination angle, diameter and velocity of the single plane puncture biopsy needle on the puncture force of the biopsy needle. Stage analysis of the cutting process of biopsy needle puncture was made to determine the main influencing factors of puncture force during the cutting process, which provides a certain theoretical support for the design of new type of puncture biopsy needle and the operation of puncture biopsy.

  13. MRI-guided biopsy and fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) in the diagnosis of musculoskeletal lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerimaa, Pekka, E-mail: pekka.kerimaa@ppshp.fi [Department of Radiology, Oulu University Hospital, P.O. Box 50, 90029 OYS (Finland); Marttila, Antti, E-mail: antti.marttila@ppshp.fi [Department of Radiology, Oulu University Hospital, P.O. Box 50, 90029 OYS (Finland); Hyvönen, Pekka, E-mail: pekka.hyvonen@ppshp.fi [Department of Surgery, Oulu University Hospital, P.O. Box 50, 90029 OYS (Finland); Ojala, Risto, E-mail: risto.ojala@ppshp.fi [Department of Radiology, Oulu University Hospital, P.O. Box 50, 90029 OYS (Finland); Lappi-Blanco, Elisa, E-mail: elisa.lappi-blanco@ppshp.fi [Department of Pathology, Oulu University Hospital, P.O. Box 50, 90029 OYS (Finland); Tervonen, Osmo, E-mail: osmo.tervonen@ppshp.fi [Department of Radiology, Oulu University Hospital, P.O. Box 50, 90029 OYS (Finland); Blanco Sequeiros, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.blanco@oulu.fi [Department of Radiology, Oulu University Hospital, P.O. Box 50, 90029 OYS (Finland)

    2013-12-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided musculoskeletal biopsy and the value of fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) when combined with histologic biopsy. Materials and methods: A total of 172 biopsies were performed under MRI guidance, 170 were histologic biopsies. In 112 cases, a fine needle aspiration biopsy was also performed. In two cases, a stand-alone FNAB was performed. The diagnostic performance was evaluated retrospectively by comparing the histopathologic and cytologic diagnosis with the current or final diagnosis after at least one year of clinical and imaging follow-up. A 0.23 T open MRI scanner with an interventional stereotactic guidance system was used. Results: The overall diagnostic accuracy of MRI guided biopsy was 0.95, sensitivity 0.91, specificity 0.98, positive predictive value (ppv) 0.97 and negative predictive value (npv) 0.93. The diagnostic accuracy of trephine biopsy alone was 0.93, sensitivity 0.89, specificity 0.98, ppv 0.97 and npv 0.91 and accuracy for FNAB alone was 0.85, sensitivity 0.80, specificity 0.90, ppv 0.89 and npv 0.82. Conclusions: MRI guidance is a feasible and accurate tool in percutaneous musculoskeletal biopsies. Fine needle biopsy is a useful low-cost supplement to histologic biopsy.

  14. Renal biopsy with 16G needle: a safety study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Ramos, F; Villacampa-Aubá, F; Jiménez-Alcaide, E; García-González, L; Ospina-Galeano, I A; de la Rosa-Kehrmann, F; Rodríguez-Antolín, A; Passas-Martínez, J; Díaz-González, R

    2014-11-01

    The development of percutaneous renal biopsy as a routinary diagnostic procedure for renal masses is topic of discussion for the last few years. However, this technique has been associated with some complications, although infrequent, and morbidity. Our objective is to carry out a descriptive study about complications and outcomes of orthotopic kidney biopsies with 16 G needle. A retrospective review of 180 orthotopic ultrasound-guided renal biopsies performed in our service among January 2008 to May 2010 was carried out. The procedure was developed using an automated biopsy gun (16G needle). Multiple clinical variables, early post-procedure complications and its management were collected. Complication rates as well as the relationship between risk factors and occurrence of complications were studied. Mean age was 55.8 years. The average number of biopsy cylinders per intervention was 2.49. The overall complication rate was 5.6%. An interventionist attitude derived from complication of the procedure was necessary in only 3 patients (1.67%). No surgical interventions were required and no death as consequence of procedure was registered. No relationship between hypertension (P=.09) previous anticoagulation (P=.099) or previous antiaggregation (P=.603) and complications were demonstrated. In 2.8% of biopsies the material obtained was insufficient for diagnosing. Percutaneous ultrasound-guided renal biopsy with 16G needle is a safe technique with high diagnostic performance. Copyright © 2013 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Needle tract seeding following percutaneous biopsy of renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Dwayne T S; Sur, Hariom; Lozinskiy, Mikhail; Wallace, David M A

    2015-09-01

    A 66-year-old man underwent computed tomography-guided needle biopsy of a suspicious renal mass. Two months later he underwent partial nephrectomy. Histology revealed a 30-mm clear cell renal cell carcinoma, up to Fuhrman grade 3. An area of the capsule was interrupted, which corresponded to a hemorrhagic area on the cortical surface. Under microscopy, this area showed a tongue of tumor tissue protruding through the renal capsule. A tumor deposit was found in the perinephric fat. These features suggest that tumor seeding may have occurred during the needle biopsy.

  16. Evaluation of The Value of Core Needle Biopsy in The Diagnosis of a Breast Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asieh Sadat Fattahi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Core needle biopsy (CNB with histological findings is regarded as one of the most important diagnostic measures that make preoperative assessment and planning for appropriate treatment possible. The aim of this study was to determine the sensitivity and specificity of core biopsy results in our patients with benign and malignant breast lumps, especially for borderline breast lesions, by using a classification method.Methods: In this study, 116 patients who were referred to the Surgery Clinic of Ghaem Hospital, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran with breast lump and underwent diagnostic procedures such as mammography and ultrasound were selected. Core needle biopsy (Tru-cut #14 or 16 was performed. After that, excisional biopsy was done. The benign, malignant and unspecified samples obtained by core needle biopsy were evaluated with the samples of the surgical and pathological findings. Then, false positive, false negative, sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy of the core needle biopsy method were calculated. Also, the National Health Service Breast Screening Program (NHSBSP classification was employed.Results: The mean age of the participants in this study was 39±13.13 years and the mean tumor size was 2.7 cm. An average of 3.35 biopsies was taken from all patients. Most of the pathology samples taken from CNB and excisional biopsy were compatible with invasive ductal carcinoma. Of the B type classifications, B5 was the most frequent in both methods. Borderline lesions B3 and B4 had a change in their category after surgery. About 2.5% of the samples in core biopsy were inadequate. Skin bruising was the most common core biopsy complication reported. While, the most common complication of excisional biopsy was hematoma. Accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of the core needle biopsy procedure compared with excisional biopsy was 95.5%, 92.6%, 100%, 100%, and 91

  17. EUS-guided 22-gauge fine-needle aspiration versus core biopsy needle in the evaluation of solid pancreatic neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Daniel S; Jeffus, Susanne K; Sauer, Bryan G; Wang, Andrew Y; Stelow, Edward B; Shami, Vanessa M

    2014-09-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is widely used for diagnosis of pancreatic lesions. The Echotip Procore Needle (Wilson-Cook Medical) is a new 22G fine biopsy needle (FNB) for obtaining core biopsy material at time of EUS. This study aimed to compare the technical and diagnostic performance of conventional FNA and FNB. Thirty-two patients met the design criteria for this prospective paired cohort study. All lesions sampled were solid (non-cystic) pancreatic masses by EUS appearance. Patients were randomized to receive FNA or FNB by first attempt. A cytopathologist performed on-site evaluations. Samples were assessed for accuracy of diagnosis, cellularity, contamination, and sufficiency for ancillary studies. Technical and diagnostic performances were compared. Compared to FNA, there was a statistically significant decreased ability of FNB to achieve a diagnosis (FNA 93.8%, FNB 28.1%, P needle. Regarding operator perceived ease-of-use, FNA outperformed FNB (P biopsy needle was not apparent in our series. Additional studies are needed before routine adoption of 22G FNB can be recommended. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Low coherence interferometry approach for aiding fine needle aspiration biopsies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ernest W.; Gardecki, Joseph; Pitman, Martha; Wilsterman, Eric J.; Patel, Ankit; Tearney, Guillermo J.; Iftimia, Nicusor

    2014-11-01

    We present portable preclinical low-coherence interference (LCI) instrumentation for aiding fine needle aspiration biopsies featuring the second-generation LCI-based biopsy probe and an improved scoring algorithm for tissue differentiation. Our instrument and algorithm were tested on 38 mice with cultured tumor mass and we show the specificity, sensitivity, and positive predictive value of tumor detection of over 0.89, 0.88, and 0.96, respectively.

  19. Ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy in the diagnosis of neuroblastic tumors in children: a retrospective study on 83 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lihui; Mu, Jie; Du, Ping; Wang, Hailing; Mao, Yiran; Xu, Yong; Xin, Xiaojie; Zang, Fenglin

    2017-03-01

    Ultrasound-guided biopsy technique with the large-core needle has widely been applied in the diagnosis of adult abdominopelvic cavity, thyroid, and neck tumors. There are few reports on ultrasound-guided biopsy using large-core needle in pediatric abdominopelvic cavity tumors. This study was to evaluate the ultrasound features and the diagnostic value of ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy for pediatric neuroblastic tumors. The pediatric patients with neuroblastic tumor that underwent ultrasound examination and ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy from January 2009 to November 2015 were reviewed. A minimum of two cores in each case was obtained. The biopsy results were confirmed by subsequent surgical histopathology. The ultrasound features and the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy were evaluated. Eighty-three patients were enrolled into the study. Conventional ultrasound examination showed irregular hypoechoic or mixed echo masses and calcification and liquefied necrosis. The diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy was 96.4% (80/83). Three cases were misdiagnosed because of inadequate tissue sample. No serious complication, infection, or needle track seeding occurred. Ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy seems to be an accurate, minimally invasive, and safe diagnostic method of pediatric neuroblastic tumor.

  20. Computed tomography guided needle biopsy in the head and neck region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aris NTOMOUCHTSIS, Maria PANAGIOTOPOULOU, Kostas PARASKEVOPOULOS,

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY: Introduction: The search for new methods of diagnostic identification of lesions and diseases in cases posing differential diagnostic challenges, as well as the objective of creating the least possible discomfort for patients, have led to the application and use of new technologies. Guided biopsy is a technique used to obtain biopsy samples, avoiding open biopsy and by extension, the possibility of tumour dissemination. Aim: In this paper, we seek to present the experience we have gained from using computed tomography guided needle biopsy in cases involving differential diagnostic difficulties. Material-Method: This technique was applied in cases of lesions in the head and neck region,where neither fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC nor open biopsy could be used to establish diagnosis. In areas where post-operation or post-radiation scars are present,imaging is necessary, especially when suspicion of recurrence is raised. The identification of benign lesions or local recurrence of malignant tumours can help prevent surgical interventions or malpractices. Results: The diagnostic accuracy of computed tomography guided needle biopsy was very high, since in 90% of the cases presented here it helped establish the correct diagnosis. Conclusions:Computed tomography guided needle biopsy is a safe technique in the hands of experienced interventional radiologists and maxillofacial surgeons.

  1. Transthoracic Computed Tomography-Guided Lung Nodule Biopsy: Comparison of Core Needle and Fine Needle Aspiration Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangha, Bippan S; Hague, Cameron J; Jessup, Jennifer; O'Connor, Robert; Mayo, John R

    2016-08-01

    To determine if there is a statistically significant difference in the computed tomography (CT)-guided trans-thoracic needle biopsy diagnostic rate, complication rate, and degree of pathologist confidence in diagnosis between core needle biopsy (CNB) and fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB). A retrospective cohort design was used to compare the diagnostic biopsy rate, diagnostic confidence, and biopsy-related complications of pneumothorax, chest tube placement, pulmonary hemorrhage, hemoptysis, admission to hospital, and length of stay between 251 transthoracic needle biopsies obtained via CNB (126) or FNAB (125). Complication rates were assessed using imaging and clinical follow-up. Final diagnosis was confirmed via surgical pathology or clinical follow-up over a period of up to 10 years. CNB provided diagnostic samples in 91% and FNA in 80% of biopsies, which was statistically significant (P < .05). The sensitivities for CNB and FNAB were 89% (85 of 95) and 95% (84 of 88), respectively. The specificity of CNB was 100% (21 of 21) and for FNAB was 81% (2 of 11) with 2 false positives in the FNAB group. The differences in complication rate was not statistically significant for pneumothorax (50% vs 46%; determined by routine postbiopsy CT), chest tube (2% vs 4%), hemoptysis (4% vs 6%), and pulmonary hemorrhage (38% vs 47%) between FNAB and CNB, respectively. Seven patients requiring chest tube were admitted to hospital, 2 in the FNAB cohort for an average of 2.5 days and 5 in the CNB cohort for an average of 4.6 days. CNB provided more diagnostic samples with no statistical difference in complication rate. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Association of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Biopsy Needle Localization and Tracking Using ROI-RK Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available ROI-RK method is a biopsy needle localization and tracking method. Previous research work has proved that it has a robust performance on different series of simulated 3D US volumes. Unfortunately, in real situations, because of the strong speckle noise of the ultrasound image and the different echogenic properties of the tissues, the real 3D US volumes have more complex background than the simulated images used previously. In this paper, to adapt the ROI-RK method in real 3D US volumes, a line-filter enhancement calculation only in the ROI is added to increase the contrast between the needle and background tissue, decreasing the phenomenon of expansion of the biopsy needle due to reverberation of ultrasound in the needle. To make the ROI-RK method more stable, a self-correction system is also implemented. Real data have been acquired on an ex vivo heart of lamb. The result of the ROI-RK method shows that it is capable to localize and track the biopsy needle in real situations, and it satisfies the demand of real-time application.

  3. Thin-needle aspiration biopsy of the prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koss, L G; Woyke, S; Schreiber, K; Kohlberg, W; Freed, S Z

    1984-05-01

    The authors summarize the current status of thin-needle aspiration biopsy of the prostate and evaluate the accomplishments and limitations of this method of diagnosis. Historical developments, indications, technique, contraindications, complications, cytology of aspirates, diagnostic efficacy of aspirates, and grading of prostatic carcinomas are discussed.

  4. Effects of percutaneous needle liver biopsy on dairy cow behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølgaard, Lene; Damgaard, Birthe Marie; Bjerre-Harpøth, Vibeke;

    2012-01-01

    behavioural changes for up to 19 h – and particularly for behaviour previously associated with pain. Even though the exact welfare impact of percutaneous needle liver biopsies in cows is not known, and the magnitude of the behavioural changes was limited, pain always has negative effects on animal welfare...

  5. Ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy of the thyroid: methods to decrease the rate of unsatisfactory biopsies in the absence of an on-site pathologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naïm, Cyrille; Karam, Ramy; Eddé, Donald

    2013-08-01

    The rate of unsatisfactory samples from ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspirations of thyroid nodules varies widely in the literature. We aimed to evaluate our thyroid ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy technique in the absence of on-site microscopic examination by a pathologist; determine factors that affect the adequacy rate, such as the number of needle passes and needle size; compare our results with the literature; and establish an optimal technique. We performed a retrospective review of cytopathology reports from 252 consecutive thyroid ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsies performed by a radiologist between 2005 and 2010 in our hospital's radiology department. Sample adequacy, the number of needle passes, and needle size were determined. There was an on-site cytologist who prepared slides immediately after fine-needle aspiration but no on-site microscopic assessment of sample adequacy to guide the number of needle passes that should be performed. Cytopathology biopsy reports were classified as either unsatisfactory or satisfactory samples for diagnosis; the latter consisted of benign, malignant, and undetermined diagnoses. Seventy-seven biopsies were performed with 1 needle pass, 124 with 2 needle passes, and 51 with 3 needle passes. The rates of unsatisfactory biopsies were 33.8%, 23.4% (odds ratio [OR] 0.599 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 0.319-1.123]; P = .110), and 13.7% (OR 0.312 [95% CI, 0.124-0.788]; P = .014), respectively. In a hospital in which there is no on-site pathologist, a 3-pass method increases the specimen satisfactory rate by 20% compared with 1 pass, achieves similar rates to the literature, and provides a basis for further improvement of our practice. Copyright © 2013 Canadian Association of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Does Leaving the Biopsy Needle in Povidone-Iodine Solution Reduce Infective Complications after Biopsy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdal Benli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether leaving the biopsy needle used during prostate needle biopsy in 10% povidone-iodine (betadine solution affects the infectious complications forming after biopsy. Material and Method. This study retrospectively evaluated the data of 176 patients with prostate biopsy performed between December 2012 and April 2014. Patients in Group 1 (n=89 were given ofloxacin as a prophylactic antibiotic before biopsy. Patients in Group 2 (n=87 had the biopsy needle left in povidone-iodine solution for 1 minute before each use, in addition to antibiotic prophylaxis. The two groups were compared in terms of infective complications developing after biopsy. Results were analyzed using the Mann–Whitney U test and Fisher’s exact test. Results. The distribution of infective complications after biopsy according to group was as follows. Group 1, not using betadine, had 15.7% fever, 13.5% hospital stay, 12.4% urinary retention, 10.1% prostatitis, and 5.6% sepsis. The distribution of the same complications in Group 2 using betadine was identified as 5.7% fever, 4.6% hospital stay, 3.4% urinary retention, 2.3% prostatitis, and 0% sepsis. The use of betadine was found to significantly reduce the infectious complications after biopsy compared to the control group (p<0.05. Conclusion. At the end of this study leaving the prostate needle in povidone-iodine solution before each use during prostate biopsy was found to reduce the infective complications and hospital stay after biopsy.

  7. Potential causes for obtaining non-diagnostic results from fine needle aspiration biopsy of thyroid nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özel, Deniz; Özel, Betül Duran; Özkan, Fuat

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate factors that could affect the diagnostic result success ratio of fine needle aspiration biopsy of thyroid nodules. 664 patients and 696 nodules were included in this study. Demographic features of age and gender and nodule features of macrocalcification (MC) and internal content (cystic or solid predominance) were evaluated. All biopsies were performed from 1 cm or larger nodules. Three different size needles were used for comparison (22, 23 and 25 G). The patients in each group had a similar number of nodules with MC, and cystic predominance to obtain comparable results. All procedures were performed by the same radiologist, who had 4 years of experience. Histologically adequate material criteria were identified. All pathological specimens were evaluated as diagnostic or non-diagnostic by the same pathology technician. Chi-square, student's t test and univariate analysis were used for statistical analysis. There were no statistically significant differences in demographic features and nodule properties from diagnostic results of fine needle aspiration biopsy of thyroid nodules. On the other hand, 23 G needles offered a better potential for obtaining adequate samples with a statistically significant difference. Obtaining adequate material in fine needle aspiration biopsy from thyroid nodules is a challenging issue and the results are controversial. Since we obtained the best ratio with 23 G needles, we recommend interventional radiologists to use 23 G needles as far as possible and not to consider needles thicker needles than 22 G or thinner than 25 G. Nodule features and demographic features did not have an effect on obtaining adequate cytological material.

  8. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration: How to obtain a core biopsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuccio, Lorenzo; Larghi, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided fine needle aspiration has emerged as the procedure of choice to obtain samples to reach a definitive diagnosis of lesions of the gastrointestinal tract and of adjacent organs. The obtainment of a tissue core biopsy presents several advantages that can substantially contribute to the widespread diffusion of EUS utilization in the community and in countries where cytology expertise may be difficult to be achieved. This article will review the EUS-guided fine needle biopsy techniques developed so far, the clinical results, their limitations as well as their future perspective. PMID:24955336

  9. Changing attitudes toward needle biopsies of breast cancer in Shanghai: experience and current status over the past 8 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Shuang; Liu, Zhe-Bin; Ling, Hong; Chen, Jia-Jian; Shen, Ju-Ping; Yang, Wen-Tao; Shao, Zhi-Min

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic patterns in breast cancer have greatly changed over the past few decades, and core needle biopsy (CNB) has become a reliable procedure for detecting breast cancer without invasive surgery. To estimate the changing diagnostic patterns of breast cancer in urban Shanghai, 11,947 women with breast lesions detected by preoperative needle biopsy between January 1995 and December 2012 were selected from the Shanghai Cancer Data base, which integrates information from approximately 50% of breast cancer patients in Shanghai. The CNB procedure uses an automated prone unit, biopsy gun, and 14-gauge needles under freehand or ultrasound guidance and was performed by experienced radiologists and surgeons specializing in needle biopsies. Diagnosis and classification for each patient were independently evaluated by pathologists. Over the indicated 8-year period, biopsy type consisted of 11,947 ultrasound-guided core needle biopsies (UCNBs), 2,015 ultrasound-guided vacuum-assisted biopsies (UVABs), and 654 stereotactic X-ray-guided vacuum-assisted biopsies (XVABs). For all the 11,947 women included in this study, image-guided needle biopsy was the initial diagnostic procedure. Approximately 81.0% of biopsied samples were histopathologically determined to be malignant lesions, 5.5% were determined to be high-risk lesions, and 13.5% were determined to be benign lesions. The number of patients choosing UCNB increased at the greatest rate, and UCNB has become a standard procedure for histodiagnosis because it is inexpensive, convenient, and accurate. The overall false-negative rate of CNB was 1.7%, and the specific false-negative rates for UCNB, UVAB, and XVAB, were 1.7%, 0%, and 0%, respectively. This study suggests that the use of preoperative needle biopsy as the initial breast cancer diagnostic procedure is acceptable in urban Shanghai. Preoperative needle biopsy is now a standard procedure in the Shanghai Cancer Center because it may reduce the number of surgeries

  10. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy of splenic lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, SangIk; Shin, Yong Moon; Won, Hyung Jin; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Lee, Moon Gyu [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of ultrasound-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy of splenic lesions. This retrospective study included 30 patients who underwent percutaneous core needle biopsy of their splenic lesions using 18- or 20-gauge needles between January 2001 and July 2016 in a single tertiary care center. The characteristics of the splenic lesions were determined by reviewing the ultrasound and computed tomography examinations. Acquisition rate and diagnostic accuracy were calculated, using pathologic results of the splenectomy specimen, clinical course and/or imaging follow-up as a reference standard. Post-procedure complications were identified from electronic medical records, laboratory findings and computed tomography images. Seventy-three specimens were obtained from the 30 patients and splenectomy was performed in 2 patients. Twenty-nine of the 30 patients had focal splenic lesions, while the remaining patient had homogeneous splenomegaly. Acquisition rate and diagnostic accuracy were 80.0% (24/30) and 76.7% (23/30), respectively. Perisplenic hemorrhage without hemodynamic instability developed in one patient. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy of splenic lesions is a safe method for achieving a histopathologic diagnosis and can be considered as an alternative to splenectomy in patients with a high risk of splenectomy-related complications.

  11. Feasibility of fine-needle aspiration biopsy and its applications in superficial cervical lesion biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dong; Xu, Hai-Miao; Li, Ming-Kui; Chen, Li-Yu; Wang, Li-Jing

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the feasibility and value of clinical application of fine-needle aspiration histological biopsy via ultrasound-guided thyroid nodule and enlarged cervical lymph node fine-needle aspiration histological biopsy. Fine-needle aspiration cytological and histological biopsies and surgical treatments were performed on 982 patients with thyroid nodule and 1435 patients with enlarged cervical lymph nodes. A comparative study of the histological and cytological examination results and post-surgical etiology results was subsequently conducted. Among the 982 thyroid nodule patients, the acquisition rates were 89.8% (882/982) for fine-needle aspiration histological biopsy and 96.2% (945/982) for cytological biopsy, while among the 1435 patients with enlarged cervical lymph nodes, the acquisition rate for fine-needle aspiration cytological biopsy was slightly higher than that for histological biopsy, with values of 95.7% (1374/1435) and 91.4% (1312/1435), respectively. For the thyroid nodule patients, when the acquired histological and cytological biopsy results were compared with the post-surgical etiology results, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the histological results were 98.5%, 100%, and 98.9%, respectively, whereas those of the cytological results were 86.8%, 82.9%, and 85.6%, respectively; the differences between the 2 biopsy methods were statistically significant (P < 0.05). For the patients with enlarged cervical lymph nodes, when the acquired histological and cytological biopsy results were compared with the post-surgical etiology results, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the histological results were 96.3%, 99.8%, and 97.6%, respectively, whereas the those of the cytological results were 76.8%, 92.1%, and 82.2%, respectively; again, the differences between the 2 methods were statistically significant (P < 0.05). In conclusion, Fine-needle aspiration histological biopsy is a reliable and highly

  12. A Novel Design of Needle Aspiration Biopsy Monitoring Instrument (NAOMI Tested on a Low Cost Chest Phantom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surakusumah Rino Ferdian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Needle biopsy is a medical intervention method for taking a lung tissue sample that suspected as a cancer. The disadvantage is the physicians directly visualize the anatomical structures in an open surgery for lung cancer biopsy procedure. There is a need to develop an instrument that may help the physician to guarantee the accuracy and efficiency while performing needle aspiration biopsy. Therefore, a needle aspiration biopsy monitoring instrument or named as NAOMI is proposed. It consists of a microcontroller system, an IMU sensor, an ultrasonic ranging module, a bluetooth module, and a 9V lithium battery. The experimental testing consist of performance testing, functional testing using chest phantom, and user acceptances. The results showed that the NAOMI improve the accuracy and efficiency while performing the needle biopsy operation.

  13. A comparison of tonsillar surface swabbing, fine-needle aspiration core sampling, and dissected tonsillar core biopsy culture in children with recurrent tonsillitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Saurav; Sil, Abheek; Sarkar, Soma; Sikder, Biswajit

    2017-06-01

    In recurrent tonsillitis, the pathogenic bacteria are harbored in the tonsil core, and therefore cultures of superficial swab samples are not particularly accurate in identifying specific types of core bacteria. On the other hand, the results of fine-needle aspiration (FNA) cultures of core samples have been closely correlated with the findings of core cultures in excised tonsils, and both methods are far superior to surface swabbing. We conducted a prospective study to compare the accuracy of culture findings from tonsillar tissue obtained by surface swabbing, FNA sampling of the tonsil core in situ, and core sampling of the excised tonsil in children with recurrent tonsillitis. Our patient population was made up of 54 children-22 boys and 32 girls, aged 4 to 14 years (mean: 10.7)-who were undergoing elective tonsillectomy during a 1-year period. On the day of surgery, a surface swab, core FNA sample, and dissected core sample were obtained from each patient and sent for culture. Culture showed that the three methods were in agreement in 34 cases (63.0%). In 9 cases (16.7%) the surface swab culture grew different pathogens from those of the two core cultures, and in 3 other cases (5.6%) the surface swab culture was negative while the two core cultures were positive for the same pathogens. In all, the results of core FNA culture and dissected core culture were in agreement in 46 cases (85.2%); in only 4 cases (7.4%) did the core FNA culture fail to accurately identify the causative pathogens. Overall, the sensitivity and specificity of core FNA sampling were 100 and 50% respectively, compared with 82.9 and 30.8% for the superficial tonsillar swab. We conclude that routine culture of surface swab specimens in patients with chronic or recurrent tonsillitis is neither reliable nor valid. We recommend that core FNA sampling be considered the diagnostic method of choice since it can be done on an outpatient basis, it would reliably allow for culture-directed antibiotic

  14. Differences in pain perception during open muscle biopsy and Bergstroem needle muscle biopsy

    OpenAIRE

    Dengler J; Linke P; Gdynia HJ; Wolf S.; Ludolph AC; Vajkoczy P; Meyer T

    2014-01-01

    Julius Dengler,1 Peter Linke,2 Hans J Gdynia,3 Stefan Wolf,1 Albert C Ludolph,3 Peter Vajkoczy,1 Thomas Meyer2 1Department of Neurosurgery, 2Department of Neurology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany; 3Department of Neurology, Universitätsklinikum Ulm, Ulm, GermanyPurpose: Open surgical muscle biopsy (OB) and percutaneous Bergstroem needle muscle biopsy (NB) are equally accepted procedures. However, there are no data comparing intrapr...

  15. Tumour seeding following percutaneous needle biopsy: The real story

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, E.G. [Department of Radiology, Western Infirmary, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Baxter, G., E-mail: grant.baxter@ggc.scot.nhs.uk [Department of Radiology, Western Infirmary, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15

    The demand for percutaneous needle biopsy is greater than ever before and with the majority of procedures requiring imaging guidance, radiologists have an increasingly important role in the diagnostic work-up of patients with suspected malignancy. All invasive procedures incur potential risks; therefore, clinicians should be aware of the most frequently encountered complications and have a realistic idea of their likelihood. Tumour seeding, whereby malignant cells are deposited along the tract of a biopsy needle, can have disastrous consequences particularly in patients who are organ transplant candidates or in those who would otherwise expect good long-term survival. Fortunately, tumour seeding is a rare occurrence, yet the issue invariably receives a high profile and is often regarded as a major contraindication to certain biopsy procedures. Although its existence is in no doubt, realistic insight into its likelihood across the spectrum of biopsy procedures and multiple anatomical sites is required to permit accurate patient counselling and risk stratification. This review provides a comprehensive overview of tumour seeding and examines the likelihood of this much feared complication across the range of commonly performed diagnostic biopsy procedures. Conclusions have been derived from an extensive analysis of the published literature, and a number of key recommendations should assist practitioners in their everyday practice.

  16. Bone lesion biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone biopsy; Biopsy - bone ... needle is gently pushed and twisted into the bone. Once the sample is obtained, the needle is ... sample is sent to a lab for examination. Bone biopsy may also be done under general anesthesia ...

  17. Content of RNA originating from thyroid in washouts from fine-needle and core-needle aspiration biopsy - preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woliński, Kosma; Stangierski, Adam; Szczepanek-Parulska, Ewelina; Gurgul, Edyta; Wrotkowska, Elżbieta; Biczysko, Maciej; Ruchała, Marek

    2016-01-01

    In the evaluation of molecular markers in washouts from fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) the extremely small amount of material can be a major problem. Some authors tried to use washouts from core-needle aspiration biopsy (CNABs) to gain more material from larger needles. However, according to some studies, CNAB samples are commonly contaminated with blood. The aim of our study was to evaluate the proportion of nucleic acids from thyroid cells in washouts from FNAB and CNAB by measuring the relative expression of cytokeratin 17 (KRT17) on the mRNA level. Relative expression of KRT17 and GADPH (reference gene) in washouts from FNAB and CNAB was measured using real-time PCR technique and compared to the results from surgical specimens. Surgical specimens form 22 nodules, FNAB samples from 20 lesions and CNAB samples from 24 lesions were analysed. The median difference in cycle threshold (Ct) between FNAB samples and surgical specimens was 3.3 (p = 0.047). In CNAB samples KRT17 was undetectable in most cases (median incalculable; proportion of samples with undetectable KRT17 significantly higher than in FNAB samples). Samples obtained with different biopsy techniques had different proportions of contents. The proportionally low content of epithelial cells in CNAB can result in underestimated expression of molecular markers of malignancy. Consequently, the risk of malignancy or unfavourable prognosis can also be underestimated. To conclude, results obtained from samples gained with one biopsy technique cannot be directly related to thresholds, and generally with experiences gained with other techniques, because it can lead to incorrect clinical interpretation of the results. (Endokrynol Pol 2016; 67 (6): 550-553).

  18. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration and biopsy using a 22-gauge needle with side fenestration in pancreatic cystic lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barresi, Luca; Tarantino, Ilaria; Traina, Mario; Granata, Antonino; Curcio, Gabriele; Azzopardi, Neville; Baccarini, Paola; Liotta, Rosa; Fornelli, Adele; Maimone, Antonella; Jovine, Elio; Cennamo, Vincenzo; Fabbri, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Cytologic diagnosis by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration is associated with low sensitivity and adequacy. A newly designed endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle biopsy device, endowed with a side fenestration, is now available. We carried out a study with the aim of evaluating the feasibility, safety, and diagnostic yield of the 22-gauge needle with side fenestration for endoscopic ultrasound fine needle aspiration and biopsy of pancreatic cystic lesions. 58 patients with 60 pancreatic cystic lesions consecutively referred for endoscopic ultrasound guided-fine needle aspiration were enrolled in a prospective, dual centre study, and underwent fine needle aspiration and biopsy with the 22-gauge needle with side fenestration. Fine needle aspiration and biopsy was technically feasible in all cases. In 39/60 (65%) pancreatic cystic lesions, the specimens were adequate for cyto-histologic assessment. In lesions with solid components, and in malignant lesions, adequacy was 94.4% (p = 0.0149) and 100% (p = 0.0069), respectively. Samples were adequate for histologic evaluation in 18/39 (46.1%) cases. There were only 2 (3.3%) mild complications. Fine needle aspiration and biopsy with the 22-gauge needle with side fenestration is feasible, and superior to conventional endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration cytology from cystic fluid, particularly in pancreatic cystic lesions with solid component or malignancy, with a higher diagnostic yield and with no increase in complication rate. Copyright © 2013 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Systematic review of the effectiveness of fine-needle aspiration and/or core needle biopsy for subclassifying lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederiksen, John K; Sharma, Meenal; Casulo, Carla; Burack, W Richard

    2015-02-01

    The World Health Organization system for lymphoma classification relies on histologic findings from excisional biopsies. In contradistinction to expert guidelines, practitioners increasingly rely on fine-needle aspiration cytology and core needle biopsies rather than excisional biopsies to diagnose lymphomas. To determine a rate at which fine-needle aspiration cytology and core needle biopsies, combined with flow cytometry and/or genetic techniques, can provide a diagnosis sufficient for optimal medical management of lymphoma. The English-language literature on fine-needle aspiration cytology and core needle biopsies for lymphoma was reviewed to identify studies that provided interpretations of all specimens regardless of whether these were deemed diagnostic. Forty-two studies (1989-2012) specified the lymphoma subtypes for each diagnosis or indicated a rate at which the methods failed to provide a diagnosis. The median rate at which fine-needle aspiration cytology and core needle biopsies yielded a subtype-specific diagnosis of lymphoma was 74%. Strictly adhering to expert guidelines, which state that follicular lymphoma cannot be graded by these techniques, decreased the diagnostic yield further to 66%. Thus, 25% to 35% of fine-needle aspirates and/or core biopsies of nodes must be followed by an excisional lymph node biopsy to fully classify lymphoma.

  20. Core needle biopsies and surgical excision biopsies in the diagnosis of lymphoma-experience at the Lymph Node Registry Kiel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johl, Alice; Lengfelder, Eva; Hiddemann, Wolfgang; Klapper, Wolfram

    2016-08-01

    Current guidelines of the European Society of Medical Oncology recommend surgical excision biopsies of lymph nodes for the diagnosis of lymphoma whenever possible. However, core needle biopsies are increasingly used. We aimed to understand the common practice to choose the method of biopsy in Germany. Furthermore, we wanted to understand performance of surgical excision and core needle biopsies of lymph nodes in the diagnosis of lymphoma. The files of 1510 unselected, consecutive lymph node specimens from a consultation center for lymphoma diagnosis were analyzed. Core needle biopsies were obtained frequently from lymph nodes localized in mediastinal, abdominal, retroperitoneal, or thoracic regions. Patients undergoing core needle biopsies were significantly older and suffered significantly more often from lymphoma than patients undergoing surgical excision biopsies. Although more immunohistochemical tests were ordered by the pathologist for core needle biopsies specimens than for surgical excision biopsies specimens, core needle biopsies did not yield a definite diagnosis in 8.3 % of cases, compared to 2.8 % for SEB (p = 0.0003). Restricting the analysis to cases with a final diagnosis of follicular lymphoma or diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, core needle biopsies identified a simultaneous low- and high-grade lymphoma (transformation) in 3.3 % of cases, compared to 7.6 % for surgical excision biopsies (p = 0.2317). In Germany, core needle biopsies are preferentially used in elderly patients with a high likelihood of suffering from lymphoma. Core needle appeared inferior to surgical excision biopsies at providing a definite diagnosis and at identifying multiple lymphoma differentiations and transformation.

  1. Histomorphologic Features of Biopsy Sites Following Excisional and Core Needle Biopsies of the Breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layfield, Lester J; Frazier, Shellaine; Schanzmeyer, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Mammographic studies have documented a number of architectural changes occurring around breast biopsy sites. These changes are well described in the radiological literature, but similar studies do not appear to be present in the pathology literature. We reviewed 100 consecutive mastectomy specimens from women who had undergone prior core needle or excisional biopsies. Multiple sections of the needle tract or excisional biopsy site were reviewed and morphologic findings reported. Hemorrhage, fat necrosis, granulation tissue, necrosis of fibrous tissue, and epithelium along with fibrosis and foreign body type giant cells were common features. Less frequent were areas of synovial metaplasia, atypical spindle cells, atypical duct-like structures, single atypical cells, squamous metaplasia, proliferations of abnormal blood vessels, and hemosiderin deposition. The misinterpretation of atypical spindle cells, single atypical cells, atypical duct-like structures and squamous metaplasia could result in the false-positive diagnosis of residual malignancy. Careful attention to the reactive nature of these changes aids in their distinction from carcinoma.

  2. VALIDITY OF CORE NEEDLE BIOPSY IN THE HISTOPATHOLOGICAL VERIFICATION OF PAROTID GLAND LESIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oroz Aleksandar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: An adequate diagnosis of a parotid gland enlargement is crucial for an appropriate treatment. The aim of the study was to evaluate effectiveness and minimal invasiveness of diagnostic procedures of core-needle biopsy. Materials and Methods: This study involved 67 patients, aged 40 to 90 years, with a tumor mass in the submandibular and parotid region. Method used for taking samples of pathological masses was BD Disposable guillotine spring-loaded needle for biopsies on soft tissues. Final diagnoses were established on the basis of surgical-pathological results in 67 cases, and on the basis of histopathological analysis of core-biopsy samples. Results: Compared with results of surgical biopsy, core-needle biopsy had sensitivity of 100% in differentiating benign from malignant lesions and in setting up an adequate diagnosis. Its positive predictive values were 100% in diagnosing malignancy. There were found 28 non-malignant and 39 malignant lesions with fewer disadvantages for patients.

  3. The Value of Hormone Receptor Assessment in Ultrasound Guided Core Needle Biopsy of the Breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Andrej; Milevcić, Drazen; Bosilj, Doroteja; Purković, Sandra; Cujzek, Ivana; Kopjar, Andrina; Radiković, Sandra

    2015-12-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women in Western countries after skin tumors. Successful treatment depends on many factors, relies on clinical examination, diagnostic procedures, pathologic evaluation, and good therapy decision. The Pathologic diagnosis should be the determining factor in the decision on therapeutic approach. There are several methods of obtaining tissue samples. The percutaneous ultrasound guided breast Core needle biopsy (CNB) is one of them. The Aim of this Study is to evaluate our experience in the accuracy of hormone receptors assessment in ultrasound guided CNB. In our institution, in last 12 month 60 women (with 67 lesions) underwent Breast CNB. The CNB was performed with 16 Gauge semiautomatic biopsy needle with 15 Gauge coordinated introducer needle. 3-6 specimen (mean 4) were taken during the procedure. We analyzed five factors (histological type, histological grade, estrogen and progesterone receptor status, and HER2 from the biopsied sample. All results were presented at the Multidisciplinary Oncology Team. In addition to demographic data and morphological features of the lesion, we analyzed five pathological factors (histological type, histological grade, estrogen and progesterone receptor status, and HER2 from the biopsied sample. All results were presented at the Multidisciplinary Oncology Team. Ultrasound-guided CNB has proven to be a reliable technique for performing a biopsy for breast. It is a good and reliable, complication free method, for preoperative staging, operative planning as well for prognostic value. It is a cost-effective method, can be performed quickly and in outpatient population, does not deform the breast and multiple lesions can be biopsied. This technique shows a high sensitivity value and offers many advantages over other imaging methods to guide a biopsy. All advantages have made this technique the most widespread used technique to perform a biopsy for a suspicious breast lesion.

  4. Micromachined bulk PZT tissue contrast sensor for fine needle aspiration biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Gianchandani, Roma Y; Gianchandani, Yogesh B

    2007-02-01

    This paper describes a micromachined piezoelectric sensor, integrated into a cavity at the tip of a biopsy needle, and preliminary experiments to determine if such a device can be used for real-time tissue differentiation, which is needed for needle positioning guidance during fine needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy. The sensor is fabricated from bulk lead zirconate titanate (PZT), using a customized process in which micro electro-discharge machining is used to form a steel tool that is subsequently used for batch-mode ultrasonic micromachining of bulk PZT ceramic. The resulting sensor is 50 microm thick and 200 microm in diameter. It is placed in the biopsy needle cavity, against a steel diaphragm which is 300 microm diameter and has an average thickness of 23 microm. Devices were tested in materials that mimic the ultrasound characteristics of human tissue, used in the training of physicians, and with porcine fat and muscle tissue. In both schemes, the magnitude and frequency of an electrical impedance resonance peak showed tissue-specific characteristics as the needle was inserted. For example, in the porcine tissue, the impedance peak frequency changed approximately 13 MHz from the initial 163 MHz, and the magnitude changed approximately 1600 Omega from the initial 2100 Omega, as the needle moved from fat to muscle. Samples including oils and saline solution were tested for calibration, and an empirical tissue contrast model shows an approximately proportional relationship between measured frequency shift and sample acoustic impedance. These results suggest that the device can complement existing methods for guidance during biopsies.

  5. Breast lesions with discordant results on ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Jin Hee; Ko, Eun Young; Kim, Min Jeong; Lee, Kwan Seop; Lee Yul; Bae, Sang Hoon; Min, Soo Kee [Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-03-15

    We wanted to evaluate the characteristics of those lesions showing insufficient results on ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy. We retrospectively reviewed the pathologic results of 131 lesions from patients who underwent ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy following Mammotome or surgical excisional biopsy from January 2004 to December 2004. Compared with excisional biopsy, ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy showed 14 lesions with discordant results and 9 lesions with indeterminate results. 5 lesions were overestimated and 9 lesions were underestimated on the core needle biopsies. According to the histological tumor types, the papillary tumors showed 66.6% discordance or indetermination, and the phyllodes tumors showed 50% discordance or indetermination. On the results of core needle biopsy, discordant or indeterminate results were frequently reported for papillary and phyllodes tumor. Therefore, excisional biopsy is recommended for these types of tumor.

  6. Prognostic implications of cytopathologic classification of melanocytic uveal tumors evaluated by fine-needle aspiration biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Jay Augsburger

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Determine whether cytopathologic classification of melanocytic uveal tumors evaluated by fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB is a significant prognostic factor for death from metastasis. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of cases of clinically diagnosed uveal melanoma evaluated by fine-needle aspiration biopsy from 1980 to 2006. Main outcome evaluated was death from metastasis. Associations between baseline clinical variables and cytopathologic classification were evaluated using cross-tabulation. Prognostic significance of cytopathologic classification was evaluated by Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards analysis. RESULTS: Of 302 studied biopsies, 260 (86.1% yielded sufficient cells for cytopathologic classification. Eighty of the 260 patients who had a sufficient specimen have already died (P=0.021, 69 from metastatic uveal melanoma. Cell type assigned by cytopathology was strongly associated with metastasis/metastatic death in this series (P=0.0048. Multivariate analysis showed cytopathologic classification to be an independently significant prognostic factor for metastatic death (P=0.0006. None of the 42 patients whose tumor yielded insufficient aspirates (sampled in at least two sites have developed metastasis or died of metastasis thus far. CONCLUSION: In this series, cytopathology of fine-needle aspiration biopsy samples obtained from uveal melanomas was strongly prognostic of death from metastasis. Insufficiently aspirates (2 or more sites sampled proved to be prognostic of a favorable outcome (i.e., not developing metastasis.

  7. Pseudoaneurysm of the Breast after Core Needle Biopsy: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hyun Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Inje University Haeundae Paik Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-08-15

    Pseudoaneurysm of the breast is rare. To date only a, few cases related to blunt trauma, core needle biopsy, vacuum-assisted biopsy, or surgery have been reported. The author reports on a case of pseudoaneurysm after 14-gauge core needle biopsy, which was treated successfully with manual compression.

  8. TWENTY-FIVE-GAUGE CANNULA-ASSISTED FINE-NEEDLE ASPIRATION BIOPSY OF CHOROIDAL MELANOMA: Cytopathological Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Arun D; Aziz, Hassan A; Pelayes, David; Biscotti, Charles V

    2017-09-01

    To report cytopathological observations on the cells retrieved from the 25-G cannula used during prognostic transvitreal fine-needle aspiration biopsy of choroidal melanoma. Transvitreal fine-needle aspiration biopsy of choroidal melanoma was performed through a 25-G valved cannula. Twenty samples from 20 consecutive patients were obtained. Most tumors were treated with plaque radiation therapy (16/20, 80%) following standard clinical guidelines. Four enucleated globes (4/20, 20%) were subjected to a similar transvitreal biopsy before enucleation. Cytopathological analysis of the cells retrieved from the cannula revealed the absence of any cells in 4 of 20 samples (20%). In the remaining 16 samples, definite melanoma cells and atypical cells (probable melanoma cells) were observed in 2 samples each (total 4, 25%). Histiocytes (4/16, 25%) and lymphocytes (1/16, 6%) were also observed. Thirteen samples (13/16, 81%) contained conjunctival epithelial epithelium. Prognostication could be performed on all fine-needle aspiration biopsy samples (20, 100%). Use of a 25-G valved cannula offers potential advantages by isolating the needle tract and by allowing retrieval of the contaminating cells without affecting the prognostic yield of the fine-needle aspiration biopsy sample.

  9. Front-end genomics: using an alternative approach for the recovery of high-quality DNA from core needle biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojica, Wilfrido D; Hou, Tieying; Sykes, Don; Dey-Rao, Rama

    2017-06-01

    Determine whether a simple prewash step will provide adequate amounts of high-quality DNA from core needle biopsies for molecular sequencing studies. The quantitative and qualitative metrics of DNA recovered from core needle biopsies processed either by 1) formalin fixation and paraffin embedding (FFPE), 2) cells recovered after the core needle biopsy was washed, and 3) frozen sections of the core needle biopsy tissue were evaluated and compared to one another. Fairly equivalent amounts of DNA can be obtained from cells recovered from a prewash step relative to the FFPE and frozen section samples. The number of amplifiable DNA in the wash sample was greater than that from the FFPE samples. The average molecular size of DNA in the wash sample was greater than that of both the FFPE and frozen samples. Although more starting material in terms of the number of cells was present in both the FFPE and frozen section samples than the wash samples, equivalent to better results were obtained from the latter with regard to quality. This approach may be a means to better aliquot the diminutive amounts of tissue associated with core needle biopsies, allowing dissociated cells to be dedicated for molecular studies while keeping the tissue intact for morphological studies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  10. Free thyroxine in needle washout after fine needle aspiration biopsy of toxic thyroid nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raikov, Nikolai; Nonchev, Boyan; Chaushev, Borislav; Vjagova, Diyana; Todorov, Svetoslav; Bocheva, Yana; Malceva, Daniela; Vicheva, Snejinka; Raikova, Asyia; Argatska, Antoaneta; Raikov, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    The main diagnostic tool for toxic adenomas (TA) is radionuclide imaging indicated in patients with evidence of thyroid nodules in combination with thyrotoxic syndrome. Thyroid ultrasound and fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) are widely used for the valuation of thyroid masses. There is no literature data concerning the utility of FNAB and related tests for the diagnosis of hyperfunctioning thyroid nodules. The purpose of this study is to determine the levels of free thyroxine (FT4) in the needle washout after FNAB of hot thyroid nodules. The results of our study show that the FT4 levels in needle washout from TA were significantly higher than the surrounding parenchyma and correlated with the hormonal changes in patients with thyroid hyperfunctioning nodules. Further studies on a large number of patients are needed to refine the diagnostic value of this method and evaluate its importance in quantitative risk assessment of thyroid autonomy.

  11. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy: a historical overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Marilin

    2008-11-01

    Fine needle aspiration biopsy is a safe, inexpensive and accurate technique for the diagnosis of benign and malignant conditions. Its increase in popularity in the present days has made it a technique used on daily basis in the majority of medical centers in United States and around the world. However, the situation was not always like this. In its beginnings the procedure suffered from all kinds of criticism and attacks. The purpose of this manuscript is to provide an overview about the development of this technique from its birth to our days.

  12. The effects of sonographic and demographic features and needle size on obtaining adequate cytological material in sonography-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy of thyroid nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    İnci, Mehmet Fatih; Özkan, Fuat; Yüksel, Mürvet; Şalk, İsmail; Şahin, Murat

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of the sonographic characteristics of the nodule, demographic features of patient, and nodule size and needle size used for sampling, on obtaining adequate cytological material (CM) in thyroid fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB). We performed 270 FNAB between September 2010 and June 2012. Size, echogenicity, and localization of all nodules were evaluated by ultrasonography (US) before the biopsy. Nodules were grouped as 3 cm according to their size and as hypoechoic, isoechoic, hyperechoic, or heterogeneous according to their US characteristics. 20-, 22-, and 24-G needles were used for the biopsies. Different sonographic characteristics of the nodules did not affect the needle selection. All specimens were classified as adequate or inadequate CM by a cytopathologist. A total of 270 nodules were biopsied, 184 (68.1 %) specimens were considered as adequate CM and 86 (31.9 %) specimens were considered as inadequate CM. Patient age and the presence of heterogeneous echogenicity were found to have prognostic significance in univariate analysis (p 3 cm and needle size 20-G usage) and variables found to be statistically significant in univariate analysis. Non-diagnostic FNAB remains a significant problem in the evaluation of thyroid nodules and can be as high as 30 %. Inadequate CM rates for elderly patients and heterogeneous nodules were significantly higher than that for other factors. The nodule size and needle size used for sampling did not affect the adequacy of FNAB.

  13. Four Cases of a Cerebral Air Embolism Complicating a Percutaneous Transthoracic Needle Biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Um, Soo Jung; Lee, Soo Keol; Yang, Doo Kyung; Son, Choon Hee; Kim, Ki Nam; Lee, Ki Nam [Dong-A University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yun Seong [Busan National University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-02-15

    A percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy is a common procedure in the practice of pulmonology. An air embolism is a rare but potentially fatal complication of a percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy. We report four cases of a cerebral air embolism that developed after a percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy. Early diagnosis and the rapid application of hyperbaric oxygen therapy is the mainstay of therapy for an embolism. Prevention is the best course and it is essential that possible risk factors be avoided.

  14. Fine needle aspiration biopsy to reestablish cell culture in an animal model of uveal melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Zelia Maria da Silva; Marshall, Jean-Claude; Souza Filho, João Pessoa; Odashiro, Alexandre Nakao; Burnier Jr, Miguel Noel

    2009-01-01

    To access the reliability of fine-needle aspiration biopsy in harvesting a sufficient amount of viable melanoma cells to establish a cell culture and maintain a melanoma cell line from an animal model of uveal melanoma. For this study, fifteen male New Zealand albino rabbits had their right eye surgically inoculated with uveal melanoma cell line 92.1. The animals were immunosupressed with cyclosporine A using a dose schedule previously published. The animals were followed for 12 weeks. Intraocular tumor growth was monitored weekly by indirect ophthalmoscopy. After the fourth week, one animal was sacrificed per week preceded by fine-needle aspiration biopsy using a sharp 25-gauge, 1-inch long needle. Two separate aspirates were made from different areas of the tumor. Each aspirate was flushed to a separate cell culture media and sent for cell culture. The cells were frozen after two weeks when there were at least 1 million cells, which is enough to maintain a cell line. Cells were defrosted for HMB-45 immuno-stains to confirm the melanoma origin. Cell growth was observed from the samples harvested from 11 out of the 15 animals inoculated with uveal melanoma. All cell cultures, after defrost, immunoassayed positive for HMB-45. Fine needle aspiration biopsy seems to be a reliable method to harvest cells from solid intraocular melanomas in an animal model, to establish cell culture and to maintain a melanoma cell line.

  15. A comparison of fine-needle aspiration, core biopsy, and surgical biopsy in the diagnosis of extremity soft tissue masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasraeian, Sina; Allison, Daniel C; Ahlmann, Elke R; Fedenko, Alexander N; Menendez, Lawrence R

    2010-11-01

    Biopsy tissue can be obtained through a fine needle, a wider coring needle, or through an open surgical incision. Though much literature exists regarding the diagnostic yield of these techniques individually, none compare accuracy of diagnosis in the same mass. We asked how the diagnostic accuracy of fine-needle aspiration, core biopsy, and open surgical biopsy compare in regard to identifying malignancy, establishing the exact diagnosis, and guiding the appropriate treatment of soft tissue masses. We prospectively studied 57 patients with palpable extremity soft tissue masses, performing fine-needle aspiration, followed by core biopsy, followed by surgical biopsy of the same mass. Open surgical biopsy was 100% accurate on all accounts. With regard to determining malignancy, fine-needle aspiration and core biopsy had 79.17% and 79.2% sensitivity, 72.7% and 81.8% specificity, 67.9% and 76% positive predictive value, 82.8% and 84.4% negative predictive value, and an overall accuracy of 75.4% and 80.7%, respectively. In regard to determining exact diagnosis, fine-needle aspiration had a 33.3% accuracy and core biopsy had a 45.6% accuracy. With regard to eventual treatment, fine-needle aspiration was 38.6% accurate and core biopsy was 49.1% accurate. In soft tissue mass diagnosis, core biopsy is more accurate than fine-needle aspiration on all accounts, and open biopsy is more accurate than both in determining malignancy, establishing the exact diagnosis, and the guiding appropriate treatment.

  16. ROLE OF NEEDLE SYNOVIAL BIOPSY IN JOINT DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkataraman

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available J oint disease is a common problem affecting all age groups presenting in orthopedic and rheumatology clinics. Diagnostic difficulties are encountered , particularly , in early stages when radiology and blood tests are inconclusive. The role of synovial analysis ( S ynovium and fluid using the Parker Pearson technique was studied in 50 patients with various j oint afflictions. There were 44 cases of monoarthritis and 6 cases of polyarthritis. Synovial fluid could be completely analyzed in 43 out of 50 cases and based on their physical , biochemical and cytological properties they were grouped as – a Non inflammat ory group b Mild to moderate inflammation and c Septic or severe inflammatory group. In this study , there were 6 cases of rheumatoid arthritis , 8 tuberculous arthritis , 16 non - specific synovitis , 4 traumatic arthritis , 4 osteoarthritis , 2 septic arthriti s , 6 normal synovium and one each of gout , villo - nodular synovitis , neuropathic joint and AVN femoral head. With Parker Pearson needle and their technique adequate representative synovial tissue could be obtained for histopathology in 41 out of 50 (82% cases. In the rest 9 cases , it was negative and open biopsy was done t o reach a diagnosis. Closed needle synovial biopsy is a simple , cost effective outpatient procedure and a helpful adjuvant for the diagnosis of joint diseases.

  17. Toward robotic needle steering in lung biopsy: a tendon-actuated approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratchman, Louis B.; Rahman, Mohammed M.; Saunders, Justin R.; Swaney, Philip J.; Webster, Robert J., III

    2011-03-01

    Needle tip dexterity is advantageous for transthoracic lung biopsies, which are typically performed with rigid, straight biopsy needles. By providing intraoperative compensation for trajectory error and lesion motion, tendon-driven biopsy needles may reach smaller or deeper nodules in fewer attempts, thereby reducing trauma. An image-guided robotic system that uses these needles also has the potential to reduce radiation exposure to the patient and physician. In this paper, we discuss the design, workflow, kinematic modeling, and control of both the needle and a compact and inexpensive robotic prototype that can actuate the tendon-driven needle for transthoracic lung biopsy. The system is designed to insert and steer the needle under Computed Tomography (CT) guidance. In a free-space targeting experiment using a discrete proportional control law with digital camera feedback, we show a position error of less than 1 mm achieved using an average of 8.3 images (n=3).

  18. Enzyme immunoassay of oestrogen receptors in needle biopsies from human liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becker, U; Andersen, J; Poulsen, H S;

    1991-01-01

    For quantitative assessments of sex hormone receptors in liver tissue, ligand binding assays are inconvenient, as they require large biopsies (0.5-1.0 g). The present study shows that it is possible to measure oestrogen receptors (ER) quantitatively in needle biopsy specimens as small as 10 mg...... by modifications of a commercial enzyme immunoassay employing monoclonal antibodies. Sucrose gradient centrifugation and the dextran charcoal method served as reference methods. A consecutive series of needle biopsies from patients suspected of liver disease were investigated. The biopsies (n = 37) had a median...... is a convenient tool for further studies of ER in routine needle biopsies from the liver....

  19. Needle biopsy of skeletal muscle: a review of 10 years experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, R H; Round, J M; Jones, D A

    1983-01-01

    Over 1,000 needle biopsies have been carried out at University College Hospital in London. Needle biopsy has been used by us for histochemical and electron microscopic examination of muscle during the diagnosis and treatment of neuropathic and myopathic disorders, for the diagnosis of mitochondrial myopathies, to study the course of recovery in polymyositis, and for investigations into muscle changes in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and other autoimmune conditions. We have developed a microprocessor system for the measurement of muscle fiber areas, and needle biopsy specimens provide suitable material for such measurements. We have also used needle biopsy specimens for studies of protein turnover using stable isotopes and for trace metal and electrolyte analyses. Needle biopsy is safe and rapid. As the patient usually experiences only minimal discomfort and there is no permanent scar, repeat biopsies are well tolerated allowing follow-up studies after treatment.

  20. Positive predictive value of high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia in initial core needle biopsies of prostate adenocarcinoma--a study with complete sampling of hemi-prostates with corresponding negative biopsy findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delatour, Nicolas L D Roustan; Mai, Kien T

    2008-09-01

    High-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN) is a putative premalignant lesion of prostate adenocarcinoma (PCa). The significance of isolated HGPIN in initial biopsy cores as a marker of PCa in repeat biopsies has been extensively investigated, but little is known of the true occurrence of PCa in this setting, because repeat biopsies can miss the focus of cancer. In this study, a hemi-prostate model was used to define the true positive predictive value of HGPIN in core biopsies in predicting PCa. From 132 consecutive resected prostate specimens, 70 hemi-prostates with all corresponding biopsy cores negative for PCa were thoroughly examined. Of the 70 hemi-prostates, 38 had PCa (including 8 with clinically significant PCa), and 11 had HGPIN. In the group of 38 hemi-prostate with PCa, 7 were associated with HGPIN-positive biopsies. No statistically significant difference was found between the hemi-prostates with or without PCa, regarding the presence, microscopic pattern, or multiple core involvement of HGPIN in the biopsies. The positive predictive value of HGPIN in predicting for clinically significant PCa was 27%, the negative predictive value was 87%, the sensitivity was 38%, and the specificity was 91% (P = 0.04, statistically significant). In addition, the positive predictive value of multiple cores with HGPIN in predicting for clinically significant PCa was 75% (negative predictive value 92%). The results of the present study have failed to support HGPIN as a statistically significant predictor for the occurrence of PCa. More importantly, however, HGPIN and multiple core involvement did seem to be a useful marker for clinically significant PCa.

  1. Effect of a Biopsy Center on Adequacy Rates of Thyroid Nodule Fine-Needle Aspiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Vincent A; Kirpalani, Anish; Mnatzakanian, Gevork; Colak, Errol; Vlachou, Paraskevi A

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a biopsy center-a dedicated space with a dedicated ultrasound machine and technologist, staffed daily by a radiologist responsible for performing ultrasound-guided procedures only-on the rate of non-diagnostic or unsatisfactory thyroid fine-needle aspiration (FNA). Three radiologists performed FNA on 1200 nodules in 998 patients between September 2010 and November 2015. We compared rates of nondiagnostic or unsatisfactory FNA before and after implementation of a biopsy center in September 2014 as part of a quality improvement initiative. Before the establishment of our biopsy center, ultrasound-guided procedures were scheduled between diagnostic studies in the main ultrasound department and were performed by a radiologist responsible for both. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the effect of the biopsy center on the odds of obtaining an adequate sample. Rates of nondiagnostic or unsatisfactory FNA decreased significantly from 15.1% to 8.5% (p biopsy center. The odds of obtaining an adequate sample were higher in the biopsy center (odds ratio, 2.07; 95% CI, 1.43-3.01), even after adjusting for patient age, nodule size, the radiologist performing the procedure, and time over the study period. The implementation of a biopsy center was associated with significantly lower rates of nondiagnostic or unsatisfactory thyroid FNA, suggesting target rates of 10% or lower are achievable with quality improvement measures.

  2. Diagnostic value of core needle biopsy and fine-needle aspiration in salivary gland lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoa, Eva; Gürtler, Nicolas; Arnoux, André; Kraft, Marcel

    2016-04-01

    Core needle biopsy (CNB) has gained acceptance as a minimally invasive procedure in the head and neck. Nevertheless, many concerns arise regarding the value and safety of this method in the assessment of salivary gland lesions. This prospective study comprises 111 patients with a salivary gland lesion. The results of ultrasound-guided CNB were compared with those of fine-needle aspiration (FNA) in the 103 histologically verified cases. CNB achieved a higher accuracy than FNA in identifying true neoplasms (98% vs 91%) and detecting malignancy (99% vs 87%), and was also superior to FNA providing a specific diagnosis (93% vs 74%). In both methods, no complications, such as bleeding, infection, nerve injury, or tumor-cell seeding, occurred. CNB is a simple, safe, and highly accurate procedure, which should be considered as an additional diagnostic tool in the assessment of salivary gland lesions. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: E346-E352, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Repeated nondiagnostic result of thyroid fine-needle aspiration biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemiańska, Klaudia; Kopczyński, Janusz; Kowalska, Aldona

    2016-01-01

    Fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) is the most accurate and cost-effective method to evaluate the risk of malignancy of thyroid nodules, but approximately 1-24% of FNABs generate a nondiagnostic result (ND-FNAB). The aim of this study was to determine the predictive factors of a repeated nondiagnostic result of FNAB. A total of 4018 FNABs performed in a territorial referral centre were analysed, of which 288 (7.17%) were nondiagnostic. Medical records were available for 245 biopsies performed in 228 patients. The retrospective analysis of factors that may influence a repeat ND-FNAB, including demographic, clinical and ultrasound characteristics, was performed. A repeat FNAB was performed in 159 nodules giving a diagnostic result in 79.2% of cases. The time between the biopsies ranged from 1 to 611 days (mean 154.4, median 119). The timing of a repeat FNAB did not significantly alter the diagnostic output (p = 0.29). In the univariate analysis, significant predictors of a repeat ND-FNAB were older patient age (p = 0.02), L-thyroxine supplementation (p = 0.05), and a history of (131)I therapy (p < 0.0001). In the multivariate analysis, only a history of (131)I therapy was a statistically significant risk factor for a repeat ND-FNAB (p = 0.002). Patients with a history of (131)I therapy and ND-FNAB should undergo periodic ultrasonographic assessment rather than a repeat biopsy. The interval between repeated FNABs recommended by guidelines does not affect the diagnostic output.

  4. Sixteen Gauge biopsy needles are better and safer than 18 Gauge in native and transplant kidney biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Björn; Mölne, Johan; Hadimeri, Henrik; Hadimeri, Ursula; Stegmayr, Bernd

    2017-02-01

    Background Kidney biopsies are essential for optimal diagnosis and treatment. Purpose To examine if quality and safety aspects differ between types and sizes of biopsy needles in native and transplant kidneys. Material and Methods A total of 1299 consecutive biopsies (1039 native and 260 transplant kidneys) were included. Diagnostic quality, needle size and type, clinical data and complications were registered. Eight-three percent of the data were prospective. Results In native kidney biopsies, 16 Gauge (G) needles compared to 18 G showed more glomeruli per pass (11 vs. 8, P kidney biopsies revealed that 18 G 19-mm side-notch needles resulted in more major (11.3% vs. 3%; odds ratio [OR], 4.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4-12.3) and overall complications (12.4% vs. 4.8%; OR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.1-7.1) in women than in men. If the physician had performed less compared to more than four native kidney biopsies per year, minor (3.5% vs. 1.4%; OR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.1-6.2) and overall complications (11.5% vs. 7.4%; OR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.1-2.5) were more common. In transplant kidney biopsies, 16 G needles compared to 18 G resulted in more glomeruli per pass (12 vs. 8, P Kidney biopsies taken by 16 G needles result in better histological quality and lower frequency of complications compared to 18 G. For native kidney biopsies the performer of the biopsy should do at least four biopsies per year.

  5. The 3DBiopsy Prostate Biopsy System: Preclinical Investigation of a Needle, Actuator, and Specimen Collection Device Allowing Sampling of Individualized Prostate Lengths Between 20 and 60 mm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Nelson N; Mouraviev, Vladimir; Schechter, David; Lucia, M Scott; Smith, Elizabeth E; Arangua, Paul; Hoenemeyer, John; Rosa, Jim; Bawa, Rajan; Crawford, E David

    2017-09-01

    To increase the likelihood of detecting anterior cancers within the prostate and provide a specimen that spans the length of the gland. Newly designed 17- and 15-gauge (G) biopsy needles, a variable actuator, and an integrated pathology system intended for the longer cores were developed and tested for this purpose. Testing was performed comparing 2 common cannula tip grinds, a Vet-point (sharp tip) and a Menghini-point (atraumatic tip), and were tested against 18-G Bard Monopty in porcine kidney. A variable actuator was developed to fire the needle 20-60 mm and tested in cadaver prostates. The aggregate firings for 3 different shot lengths comparing the Vet- with the Menghini-tip cannulas demonstrated 91% vs 85.2% fill (length of specimen/length of core bed, P = .007). A 15-G trocar needle with the Vet-tip cannula also had the best performance, with an aggregate standard deviation of 6.4% across 3 firing ranges and a minimum to maximum specimen length of 81%-105% of potential fill. Cadaver testing with the Vet-tip needles in the actuator for the transrectal (17-G) and transperineal (15-G) biopsies demonstrated mean fills of 93.3% and 76.5%, respectively. The new transrectal ultrasound needle obtained a 2-fold increase in specimen length over the standard Bard device (P actuator, the physician can obtain specimens that include peripheral and anterior zone tissue in 1 core. Determination of cancer location on the longer specimens could enhance focal therapy planning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Determination of Optimum Formalin Fixation Duration for Prostate Needle Biopsies for Immunohistochemistry and Quantum Dot FISH Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyanarayana, Ubaradka G; Birch, Chandler; Nagle, Raymond B; Tomlins, Scott A; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Zhang, Wenjun; Hubbard, Antony; Brunhoeber, Patrick; Wang, Yixin; Tang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Prostate biopsy is the key clinical specimen for disease diagnosis. However, various conditions used during biopsy processing for histologic analysis may affect the performance of diagnostic tests, such as hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, immunohistochemistry (IHC), or in situ hybridization (ISH). One such condition that may affect diagnostic test performance is fixation duration in 10% neutral buffered formalin (NBF). For example, prostate needle biopsies are often <1 mm in diameter and thus overfixed. It is important to understand the impact of tissue fixation duration on diagnostic test performance to enable optimized assay procedures. This study was designed to study the effect of 10% NBF fixation duration of prostate needle biopsy on multiplexed quantum dot (QD) ISH assay of ERG and PTEN, 2 genes commonly altered in prostate cancer. The samples were also evaluated for H&E staining and ERG and PTEN IHC. H&E staining and ERG and PTEN IHC were acceptable for all the durations of fixation tested. For QD ISH, we observed good signals with biopsy samples fixed from 4 to 120 hours. Biopsy specimens fixed between 8 and 72 hours gave the best signal as scored by the study pathologist. In a separate cohort of 18 routinely processed prostate biopsy cores, all cores were stained successfully with the QD ISH assay, and results were 100% concordant to ERG and PTEN IHC. We conclude that 8 to 72 hours duration of fixation for prostate needle biopsies in 10% NBF results in optimal QD ISH assay performance.

  7. Multimodal sparse representation-based classification for lung needle biopsy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yinghuan; Gao, Yang; Yang, Yubin; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Dong

    2013-10-01

    Lung needle biopsy image classification is a critical task for computer-aided lung cancer diagnosis. In this study, a novel method, multimodal sparse representation-based classification (mSRC), is proposed for classifying lung needle biopsy images. In the data acquisition procedure of our method, the cell nuclei are automatically segmented from the images captured by needle biopsy specimens. Then, features of three modalities (shape, color, and texture) are extracted from the segmented cell nuclei. After this procedure, mSRC goes through a training phase and a testing phase. In the training phase, three discriminative subdictionaries corresponding to the shape, color, and texture information are jointly learned by a genetic algorithm guided multimodal dictionary learning approach. The dictionary learning aims to select the topmost discriminative samples and encourage large disagreement among different subdictionaries. In the testing phase, when a new image comes, a hierarchical fusion strategy is applied, which first predicts the labels of the cell nuclei by fusing three modalities, then predicts the label of the image by majority voting. Our method is evaluated on a real image set of 4372 cell nuclei regions segmented from 271 images. These cell nuclei regions can be divided into five classes: four cancerous classes (corresponding to four types of lung cancer) plus one normal class (no cancer). The results demonstrate that the multimodal information is important for lung needle biopsy image classification. Moreover, compared to several state-of-the-art methods (LapRLS, MCMI-AB, mcSVM, ESRC, KSRC), the proposed mSRC can achieve significant improvement (mean accuracy of 88.1%, precision of 85.2%, recall of 92.8%, etc.), especially for classifying different cancerous types.

  8. Fully automated image-guided needle insertion: application to small animal biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayadi, A; Bour, G; Aprahamian, M; Bayle, B; Graebling, P; Gangloff, J; Soler, L; Egly, J M; Marescaux, J

    2007-01-01

    The study of biological process evolution in small animals requires time-consuming and expansive analyses of a large population of animals. Serial analyses of the same animal is potentially a great alternative. However non-invasive procedures must be set up, to retrieve valuable tissue samples from precisely defined areas in living animals. Taking advantage of the high resolution level of in vivo molecular imaging, we defined a procedure to perform image-guided needle insertion and automated biopsy using a micro CT-scan, a robot and a vision system. Workspace limitations in the scanner require the animal to be removed and laid in front of the robot. A vision system composed of a grid projector and a camera is used to register the designed animal-bed with to respect to the robot and to calibrate automatically the needle position and orientation. Automated biopsy is then synchronised with respiration and performed with a pneumatic translation device, at high velocity, to minimize organ deformation. We have experimentally tested our biopsy system with different needles.

  9. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration cytology and biopsy in the evaluation of lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimeno-García, Antonio Z.; Elwassief, Ahmed; Paquin, Sarto C.; Sahai, Anand V.

    2012-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis and subtyping of lymphoma have important prognostic implications and are generally required for treatment planning. Histological assessment, immunophenotyping, and genetic studies are usually necessary. Endoscopic ultrasound guided-fine needle aspiration cytology (EUS-FNAC) is a minimally invasive technique widely used for the evaluation of deep-seated benign and malignant lesions. However, the value of cytological samples in lymphoma diagnosis is still a matter of debate. Endoscopic ultrasound guided-fine needle biopsy (EUS-FNAB) can provide tissue core samples that may help overcome the limitations of cytology. The aim of this review is to summarize the available literature regarding EUS-FNAC and EUS-FNAB for the diagnosis and subtyping of lymphoma. In addition, we discuss its usefulness in the management of primary extra-nodal lymphomas, as well as technical issues that may influence sample quality. PMID:24949331

  10. Needle muscle biopsy: technique validation and histological and histochemical methods for evaluating canine skeletal muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio de Almeida Braga

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the needle muscle biopsy technique using a 6G Bergström percutaneous needle combined with histological and histochemical methods to analyze the skeletal muscle of dogs. There are few studies about canine skeletal muscles and a lack of reports in the literature about tissue collection and analysis for canine species. Evaluation of 32 German Shepherd samples collected from the gluteus medius, at a depth of 3 cm, was performed. The choice of gluteus medius and the 3-cm depth provided good quantity fragments with sufficient sizes (3–5 mm, which permitted optimal visualization of muscle fibers. Myosin ATPase, at pH 9.4, 4.6, and 4.3, and SDH reactions revealed that all muscle samples analyzed had fibers in the classic mosaic arrangement, enabling counting and typification. The mean percentages of fibers were 29.95% for type I and 70.05% for type II. On the basis of these results, we concluded that the percutaneous needle biopsy technique for canine skeletal muscles is a safe and easy procedure that obtains fragments of proper sizes, thereby enabling the study of muscle fibers. Standardization of the muscle of choice and the depth of muscle sample collection significantly contributed to this success. This is an important method to evaluate muscle fiber types of dogs and diagnose important diseases affecting the skeletal muscles.

  11. Accuracy and complications of CT-guided core needle biopsy of peripheral nerve sheath tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pianta, Marcus; Chock, Eric; Schlicht, Stephen [St Vincent' s Hospital, Fitzroy, VIC (Australia); McCombe, David [St Vincent' s Hospital and Victorian Hand Surgery Associates, Victoria (Australia)

    2015-09-15

    This single-centre study retrospectively reviews the complications in patients that have occurred following peripheral nerve sheath tumour biopsy, and assesses whether there is an association with biopsy technique or underlying lesion characteristics. 41 consecutive core needle biopsies of proven peripheral nerve sheath tumours over a 2-year period in a tertiary teaching hospital were reviewed. Patient demographics and symptoms, tumour characteristics and radiological appearances were recorded. Biopsy and surgical histology were correlated, and post-biopsy and surgical complications analyzed. 41 biopsies were performed in 38 patients. 68 % schwannomas, 24 % neurofibromas and 7 % malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours. Biopsy histology correlated with surgery in all cases. 71 % of lesions were surgically excised. 60 % of patients reported pain related to their lesion. Following the biopsy, 12 % reported increased pain, which resolved in all cases. Pain exacerbation was noted in tumours smaller in size, more superficial and in closer proximity of the biopsy needle tip to the traversing nerve. Number of biopsy needle passes was not associated with an increased incidence of procedure-related pain. Core biopsy of a suspected peripheral nerve sheath tumour may be performed safely before excisional surgery to confirm lesion histology and assist prognosis. There is excellent correlation between core biopsy and excised surgical specimen histology. The most common complication of pain exacerbation is seen in a minority and is temporary, and more likely with smaller, more superficial lesions and a closer needle-tip to traversing nerve distance during biopsy. (orig.)

  12. Image-Directed Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Thyroid with Safety-Engineered Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibbitt, Randy R.; Palmer, Dennis J.; Sibbitt, Wilmer L.; Bankhurst, Arthur D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the present study was to integrate safety-engineered devices into outpatient fine needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy of the thyroid in an interventional radiology practice. Materials and Methods The practice center is a tertiary referral center for image directed FNA thyroid biopsies in difficult patients referred by the primary care physician, endocrinologist, or otolaryngologist. As a departmental quality of care and safety improvement program, we instituted integration of safety devices into our thyroid biopsy procedures, and determined the effect on outcome (procedural pain, diagnostic biopsies, inadequate samples, complications, needlesticks to operator, and physician satisfaction) before institution of safety devices (54 patients) and after institution of safety device implementation (56 patients). Safety devices included 1) a patient safety technology - the mechanical aspirating syringe (reciprocating procedure device), and 2) a healthcare worker safety technology (anti-needlestick safety needle). Results FNA of thyroid could be readily performed with the safety devices. Safety-engineered devices resulted in a 49% reduction in procedural pain scores (p<0.0001), a 56% reduction in significant pain (p<0.002), a 21% increase in operator satisfaction (p<0.0001), and a 5% increase in diagnostic specimens (p=0.5). No needlesticks to healthcare workers or patient injuries occurred during the study. Conclusions Safety-engineered devices to improve both patient and healthcare worker safety can be successfully integrated into diagnostic FNA of the thyroid while maintaining outcomes and improving safety. PMID:21057794

  13. Biopsy - biliary tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cytology analysis - biliary tract; Biliary tract biopsy ... A sample for a biliary tract biopsy can be obtained in different ways. A needle biopsy can be done if you have a well-defined tumor. The biopsy site ...

  14. Histopathologic Analysis of Transvitreal Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy Needle Tracts for Uveal Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ryan S; Chevez-Barrios, Patricia; Bretana, Maria E; Wong, Tien P; Teh, Bin S; Schefler, Amy C

    2017-02-01

    Perform the first in vivo examination of fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) scleral tracts to determine the incidence of iatrogenic extension of tumor cells. A prospective, consecutive, observational case series. This study was performed in a clinical/surgical setting at Retina Consultants of Houston and Houston Methodist Hospital, Houston, Texas, and included 10 patients who were scheduled for enucleation as primary treatment for uveal melanoma. Treatment included FNAB, enucleation, and histopathologic analysis. The primary outcomes were tumor location and dimension as identified by B-scans and histopathologic analysis. Tumor type was classified by gene expression profile and American Joint Committee on Cancer staging. Twenty-five- or 27-gauge needles were used for FNAB under direct visualization. Cell blocks of acquired specimens were examined using hematoxylin-eosin stain and double immunostain using HMB45 with red chromogen and Ki67 with brown 3,3'-diaminobenzidine chromogen. Mean follow-up after enucleation was 20.4 months (range 9.9-31.7). All biopsy specimens had adequate yields for genomic analysis. No enucleation specimen contained tumor cells within sclera, pars plana, or pars plicata. One specimen contained a small collection of tumor cells within the anterior vitreous in the quadrant of the biopsy site. No patient developed an orbital recurrence. Four patients developed nonorbital metastatic uveal melanoma during the study period. Three of them died, and 1 is alive with hepatic metastasis. No iatrogenic extension of tumor was reported. FNAB is a safe procedure that produces a high cellular yield for cytologic and genomic analyses with minimal risk of extraocular dissemination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Low cost augmented reality for training of MRI-guided needle biopsy of the spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Sandeep; Kesavadas, Thenkurussi

    2008-01-01

    In needle biopsy of the spine, an Augmented Reality (AR) image guidance system can be very effective in ensuring that while targeting the lesion with the biopsy needle, vital organs near the spine are not damaged and that the approach path is accurate. This procedure requires skill that is hard to master on patients. In this paper, we present a low cost AR based training set-up which consists of a software that uses one static single-camera tracking mechanism to locate the biopsy needle in the patient and which then augments the camera feed of the patient with virtual data providing real-time guidance to the surgeon for insertion of the biopsy needle. The setup is implemented using a phantom model consisting of a set of carefully modeled holes to simulate the needle insertion task. The lack of requirement of elaborate infrared tracking systems and high computing power makes this system very effective for educational and training purposes.

  16. Improving diagnostic yield in brain biopsy: coupling spectroscopic targeting with real-time needle placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, W A; Martin, A; Liu, H; Truwit, C L

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the utility of intraoperative magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) for targeting during brain biopsy using a skull-mounted trajectory guide. From January 1999 to January 2001, 17 patients had intraoperative MRS-guided brain biopsy using a trajectory guide. Ten had turbo spectroscopic imaging (TSI), and seven had both SVS (single-voxel spectroscopy) and TSI. Prospective stereotaxy was used to align the device in a short-bore 1.5-T MR scanner. Areas of elevated choline relative to creatine on SVS and TSI were targeted during the biopsy. Intraoperative imaging confirmed appropriate positioning of the biopsy needle at the time of tissue sampling in all cases. All 17 biopsies (100%) yielded diagnostic tissue. Six patients (34%) had glioblastomas multiforme, three (18%) had anaplastic astrocytomas, three (18%) had anaplastic oligodendrogliomas, two (12%) had radiation necrosis, and one each (6%) had germinoma, ganglioglioma, and astrocytoma. Postoperative imaging confirmed the absence of clinically and radiographically relevant hemorrhage. The findings on SVS correlated with the pathology in all seven cases (100%). In 13 of 17 patients (76%) who had TSI, the spectra correlated well with the permanent pathologic examination. The SVS and TSI spectra were similar in six of seven (86%) cases. Intraoperative MRS-guided brain biopsy using a trajectory guide is a simple, safe, and accurate technique for accessing areas of the brain of diagnostic interest. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2001;13:12-15. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. [Comparative study of core needle biopsy and fine needle aspiration cytology in the diagnosis of neck lymph node diseases with contrast-enhanced ultrasound].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W Z; Yang, G Y; Xu, J P; Zhang, L; Li, J; Zhao, D

    2016-08-07

    To compare the efficacies of core needle biopsy and fine needle aspiration cytology in the diagnosis of neck lymph node diseases with contrast-enhanced ultrasound. A total of 105 patients with enlargement cervical lymph nodes were randomly divided into two groups, 49 in group A and 56 in group B. All patients were firstly examined with contrast-enhanced ultrasound to determine the targeted lymph node and the puncture point. Core needle biopsy was performed in Group A and tissues were fixed by with 10% formaldehyde; Fine needle aspiration cytology was performed in Group B and extracts were smeared and fixed with 95% alcohol. The success rates of sampling were 100.0% in group A and 96.4% in group B. The positive rates of pathological examinations were 97.9% in group A; and 82.1% in group B, with a significant difference between two groups (χ(2) = 6.97, Pneedle biopsy is higher than that of fine needle aspiration cytology for the diagnosis of neck lymph node diseases with contrast-enhanced ultrasound.

  18. [Percutaneous needle biopsy of the distal part of the choledochal duct].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesić, V; Lisanin, L; Lukac, S; Zica, D; Kupresanin, S; Spasić, V; Nikosavić, S

    1996-01-01

    The indication for the biopsy was the finding of stenosis of uncertain etiology even after the endoscopy and the attempt of endoscopic or brush biopsy. The experiences with needle biopsy in 6 patients were presented in the study. The biopsy was done with the needles with diameter less than 1 mm (Chiba needle 0.6-0.95 mm), Otto-cut 0.8 mm and Vacu-cut 0.8 mm. Percutaneous cholangiography that was firstly performed, showed the site of stenosis of common bile duct distal part and simultaneously the other structures of interest for biopsy performance. The needle was guided under radioscopic control in one attempt. In that way, the precise diagnosis of pathologic process, which induced the obstruction in the early disease stage was made in all six patients. On the basis of cited results, the percutaneous needle biopsy was found to be efficient and safe method to reveal the type of lesion in this region, if necessary conditions existed. Percutaneous needle biopsy is a very valuable method, less invasive and less expensive compared to the surgical biopsies and other methods. It demonstrated reliable results in our conditions.

  19. Arterial Bleeding of a Thyroid Mass After Thyroid Fine- Needle Aspiration Biopsy: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chul Hi; Byun, Sung Su; Kim, Jeong Ho; Hwang, Hee Young; Kim, Ha Na; Chung, Dong Jin; Kim, Hyung Sik [Gachon University Gil Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    Thyroid fine needle aspiration biopsy is a very common procedure that is used to assess thyroid nodules; any complications from this procedure are rather rare. We report here on an unusual case of active bleeding with the formation of a large hematoma from a branch of the superior thyroidal artery, and this was caused by a thyroid fine needle aspiration biopsy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of active arterial bleeding after thyroid fine needle aspiration biopsy. The active bleeding was successfully treated by interventional embolization

  20. Performance of combined clinical mammography and needle biopsy: a nationwide study from Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Allan; Rank, Fritz; Dyreborg, Uffe

    2006-01-01

    Clinical mammography and needle biopsy are key tools for non-operative assessment of breast lesions. We evaluated the performance of all combined tests undertaken in Denmark in 2000. Clinical mammography and needle biopsy data were collected and linked to final cancer outcome, to determine...... sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values of clinical mammography, needle biopsy, and combined test. In 2000, 6709 combined tests were performed in 36 mammography clinics in Denmark. The combined test was consistently more sensitive than any single test, increasing the proportion of women correctly...

  1. Transfemoral liver biopsy using a Quick-Core biopsy needle system in living donor liver transplantation recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fen Qiang; Ko, Gi-Young; Sung, Kyu-Bo; Gwon, Dong-Il; Ko, Heung Kyu; Kim, Jong Woo; Yu, Eunsil

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of transfemoral liver biopsy with a Quick-Core biopsy needle in select living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) recipients. Eight LDLT recipients underwent 9 transfemoral liver biopsy sessions. Six patients had undergone modified right lobe (mRL) LDLT, and 2 patients had undergone dual-left lobe LDLT. The indications for transfemoral liver biopsy were a hepatic vein (HV) at an acute angle to the inferior vena cava (IVC) on the coronal plane and a thin (liver parenchyma surrounding the HV to be biopsied on enhanced computed tomography. Under fluoroscopic guidance, the right inferior HV in the mRL or the left HV in the right-sided left lobe with a cranial orientation was negotiated with a 5-Fr catheter via the common femoral vein. Then, a stiffening cannula was introduced into the HV over a stiff guide wire. Needle passage was then performed with an 18- or 19-gauge Quick-Core biopsy needle. Technical success was achieved in all sessions without major complications. The median number of needle passages was 4 (range = 2-6). The median total length of obtained liver specimens in each session was 44 mm (range = 24-75 mm). The median number of portal tracts was 18 (range = 10-29), and the obtained liver specimens were adequate for histological diagnosis in all sessions. In conclusion, transfemoral liver biopsy with a Quick-Core biopsy needle is an effective and safe alternative for obtaining a liver specimen when standard transjugular liver biopsy is not feasible because of an unfavorable HV angle with respect to the IVC and/or a thin liver parenchyma surrounding the HV.

  2. Detection of anti-HLA antibodies with flow cytometry in needle core biopsies of renal transplants recipients with chronic allograft nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Laurent; Guignier, Fredy; Bocrie, Olivier; D'Athis, Philippe; Rageot, David; Rifle, Gérard; Justrabo, Eve; Mousson, Christiane

    2005-05-27

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of detecting anti-HLA antibodies in eluates from needle core biopsies of renal transplants with chronic allograft nephropathy. Two methods of screening, the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and flow cytometry (FlowPRA) were compared. Twenty renal transplants with CAN were removed after irreversible graft failure. To assess the feasibility of detecting anti-HLA antibodies in small samples, needle core biopsies were sampled at the same place as surgical samples and at a second cortical area. Antibodies were eluted with an acid elution kit and anti-class I and class II IgG HLA antibodies detected using ELISA and flow cytometry. Flow cytometry was found to be more sensitive than ELISA for detecting anti-HLA antibodies in eluates from renal transplants with CAN (95% vs. 75% of positive cases). Detection of anti-HLA antibodies showed good agreement between surgical samples and needle core biopsies performed at the same place for anti-class I (80% vs. 65%, r=0.724 PHLA antibodies (70% vs. 55%, r=0.827 PHLA antibodies in needle core biopsies sampled at different sites suggests that immunization to class I donor antigen could be underestimated in needle core biopsy samples. These data indicate that anti-HLA antibodies can be detected in needle core biopsies from renal transplants. Provided further evaluation is done, elution might be a complementary method to detect anti-HLA antibodies when they are bound to the transplant.

  3. Comparison of various needles in renal biopsy : clinical and animal studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, In Hee; Kim, Seung Hyup; Choi, Kuk Myeong; Kim, Hyun Beom; Yeon, Kyung Mo [Seoul National Univ. (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine

    1998-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to compare the efficacy of 14 gauge (G) Vim-Silverman needle biopsy with that of 16G automatic gun biopsy for kidneys and to determine the optimal needle size for renal biopsy. We retrospectively reviewed the pathologic and medical records of 119 (110 native, 9 allograft) patients who had undergone 14G Vim-Silverman needle biopsy and 71 (34 native, 37 allograft) who had undergone 16G automatic gun biopsy. The number of retrieved glomeruli and post-biopsy complications were compared between the two groups. Ex vivo renal biopsies of a dog were performed using an automatic gun mounted with 14G-20G needles and the numbers of retrieved glomeruli were compared. Although significantly more glomeruli were retrieved in the 14G Vim-Silverman needle biopsy group, the number retrieved in the 16G automatic gun biopsy group was sufficient for adequate pathologic interpretation. Experimental study suggests that when an 18G automatic gun in used, sufficient glomeruli are retrieved. (author). 16 refs., 4 tabs., 3 figs.

  4. Diagnostic value of fine needle aspiration and core needle biopsy in special types of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Ryuji; Matsubara, Miyuki; Watarai, Yasuhiko; Yanagihara, Keiko; Yamashita, Koji; Tsuchiya, Shin-Ichi; Takei, Hiroyuki; Naito, Zenya

    2016-07-01

    Although fine needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy is an established tool to assess breast lesions, there has been a trend toward using core needle biopsy (CNB) instead. The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of FNA and CNB in special types of breast cancer. A retrospective review of diagnostic results of pre-operatively performed FNA or CNB, or a combination of the two, was conducted. The cases include histologically proven invasive ductal carcinoma of no special type (NST n = 159), invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC n = 65), mucinous carcinoma (MUC n = 51), and apocrine carcinoma (APO n = 25). The absolute diagnostic sensitivity of FNA to detect malignancy in ILC and APO patients was inferior to that of NST patients (p < 0.001 for ILC and APO). Within each cancer type, the sensitivity of CNB was higher than that of FNA in the ILC and APO patients (p < 0.001 and p < 0.05, respectively). As for NST and MUC patients, FNA and CNB had equivalent sensitivity. The sensitivity of FNA alone significantly improved when combined with CNB in NST, ILC and APO patients (p < 0.05, p < 0.001, and p < 0.05, respectively). Our results suggest that FNA has less diagnostic accuracy than CNB for ILC and APO; thus, the use of CNB should be encouraged when these types of cancer are clinically suspected or when the initial FNA is inconclusive.

  5. Accuracy of core-needle biopsy after contrast-enhanced ultrasound in soft-tissue tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marchi, Armanda; Brach del Prever, Elena Maria; Linari, Alessandra; Pozza, Simona; Verga, Lucia; Albertini, Ugo; Forni, Marco; Gino, Gian Carlo; Comandone, Alessandro; Brach del Prever, Adalberto Maria; Piana, Raimondo; Faletti, Carlo

    2010-11-01

    Percutaneous biopsies are gaining acceptance in the diagnosis of soft-tissue tumours. Sampling in the most representative area is not easy in sarcomas of huge dimension. We hypothesised that ultrasound (US) contrast medium could identify the representative area for focus core-needle biopsy (CNB) METHODS: This is a retrospective cohort series of 115 soft-tissue masses treated from January 2007 to November 2008. Accuracy of US-guided CNB after contrast-enhanced US (CEUS) was determined by comparing the histology of the biopsy with the definitive diagnosis in 105 surgically excised samples (42 benign, 63 malignant) and with the expected outcome in the remaining ten malignant cases not surgically treated. A myxoid component was present in 21 sarcomas (34.4%). Of samples, 94.8% were adequate for diagnosis with 97.1% sensitivity and 92.5% specificity. Sensitivity and specificity in specific histopathological subgroupings were 100%, and in grading definition they were 100% and 96.8%. US-guided CNB is safe and effective. US contrast medium depicts tumour vascular supply and identifies the representative area(s) for sampling. Sensitivity and specificity are also high in subgrouping and grading, including myxoid types. Discussion about biopsy is part of the essential multidisciplinary strategy for these tumours.

  6. Improving needle biopsy accuracy in small renal mass using tumor-specific DNA methylation markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Sameer; Liu, Jie; Alemozaffar, Mehrdad; Nichols, Peter W; Aron, Manju; Weisenberger, Daniel J; Collings, Clayton K; Syan, Sumeet; Hu, Brian; Desai, Mihir; Aron, Monish; Duddalwar, Vinay; Gill, Inderbir; Liang, Gangning; Siegmund, Kimberly D

    2017-01-17

    The clinical management of small renal masses (SRMs) is challenging since the current methods for distinguishing between benign masses and malignant renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) are frequently inaccurate or inconclusive. In addition, renal cancer subtypes also have different treatments and outcomes. High false negative rates increase the risk of cancer progression and indeterminate diagnoses result in unnecessary and potentially morbid surgical procedures. We built a predictive classification model for kidney tumors using 697 DNA methylation profiles from six different subgroups: clear cell, papillary and chromophobe RCC, benign angiomylolipomas, oncocytomas, and normal kidney tissues. Furthermore, the DNA methylation-dependent classifier has been validated in 272 ex vivo needle biopsy samples from 100 renal masses (71% SRMs). In general, the results were highly reproducible (89%, n=70) in predicting identical malignant subtypes from biopsies. Overall, 98% of adjacent-normals (n=102) were correctly classified as normal, while 92% of tumors (n=71) were correctly classified malignant and 86% of benign (n=29) were correctly classified benign by this classification model. Overall, this study provides molecular-based support for using routine needle biopsies to determine tumor classification of SRMs and support the clinical decision-making.

  7. Percutaneous computed tomography-guided core needle biopsy of soft tissue tumors: results and correlation with surgical specimen analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chojniak, Rubens; Grigio, Henrique Ramos; Bitencourt, Almir Galvao Vieira; Pinto, Paula Nicole Vieira; Tyng, Chiang J.; Cunha, Isabela Werneck da; Aguiar Junior, Samuel; Lopes, Ademar, E-mail: chojniak@uol.com.br [Hospital A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-09-15

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of percutaneous computed tomography (CT)-guided core needle biopsy of soft tissue tumors in obtaining appropriate samples for histological analysis, and compare its diagnosis with the results of the surgical pathology as available. Materials and Methods: The authors reviewed medical records, imaging and histological reports of 262 patients with soft-tissue tumors submitted to CT-guided core needle biopsy in an oncologic reference center between 2003 and 2009. Results: Appropriate samples were obtained in 215 (82.1%) out of the 262 patients. The most prevalent tumors were sarcomas (38.6%), metastatic carcinomas (28.8%), benign mesenchymal tumors (20.5%) and lymphomas (9.3%). Histological grading was feasible in 92.8% of sarcoma patients, with the majority of them (77.9%) being classified as high grade tumors. Out of the total sample, 116 patients (44.3%) underwent surgical excision and diagnosis confirmation. Core biopsy demonstrated 94.6% accuracy in the identification of sarcomas, with 96.4% sensitivity and 89.5% specificity. A significant intermethod agreement about histological grading was observed between core biopsy and surgical resection (p < 0.001; kappa = 0.75). Conclusion: CT-guided core needle biopsy demonstrated a high diagnostic accuracy in the evaluation of soft tissue tumors as well as in the histological grading of sarcomas, allowing an appropriate therapeutic planning (author)

  8. The diagnosis of cancer in thyroid fine needle aspiration biopsy. Surgery, repeat biopsy or specimen consultation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Stanek-Widera

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNA is the only diagnostic method that allows a preoperative diagnosis of thyroid carcinoma. An unequivocal diagnosis of a malignant change is achievable only in cases in which all cytological criteria of carcinoma are met. The aim of the study was to evaluate the necessity of repeat thyroid FNA in patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma verified on consultative examination (CE. We analyzed cytology reports of thyroid FNA and CE that resulted in the diagnosis of papillary carcinoma. Evaluation of the correlation of the cytological diagnosis with the histopathology report was based on data obtained after the surgery. Between 2010 and 2015 in the Institute of Oncology (IO there were 184 cancers diagnosed on CE or in thyroid FNA performed primarily in IO. Additionally, 74 patients were subjected to repeat biopsy after confirmation of cancer in CE. Histopathological diagnosis of cancer was obtained in 62 (100% cases that were doubly confirmed with cytological examination. The remaining 12 patients were operated on outside the institute. From 110 FNA primarily performed in the IO, histopathological verification was achievable in 92 cases, from which 92 (100% provided a confirmation of cancer, and the remaining 18 patients were operated on outside the institute. High (100% specificity of cancer diagnosis in FNA established primarily and verified on CE (second independent assessment indicates that repeat FNA in order to confirm the diagnosis is unnecessary.

  9. Photoacoustic and Ultrasonic Image-Guided Needle Biopsy of the Prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0024 TITLE: Photoacoustic and Ultrasonic Image-Guided Needle Biopsy of the Prostate PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Richard...light sources to yield multi-spectral photoacoustic (PA) imaging data in excised prostate tissue. Two types of interstitial sources – a directional...ANSI Std. Z39.18 Photoacoustic and Ultrasonic Image-Guided Needle Biopsy of the Prostate 34 Table of Contents Page 1. Introduction

  10. Prognostic implications of cytopathologic classification of melanocytic uveal tumors evaluated by fine-needle aspiration biopsy

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Determine whether cytopathologic classification of melanocytic uveal tumors evaluated by fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) is a significant prognostic factor for death from metastasis. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of cases of clinically diagnosed uveal melanoma evaluated by fine-needle aspiration biopsy from 1980 to 2006. Main outcome evaluated was death from metastasis. Associations between baseline clinical variables and cytopathologic classification were evaluated using cros...

  11. Comparison of ultrasound-guided core biopsy versus fine-needle aspiration biopsy in the evaluation of salivary gland lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douville, Nicholas J; Bradford, Carol R

    2013-11-01

    Ultrasound-guided core biopsy provides many benefits compared with fine-needle aspiration cytology and has begun to emerge as part of the diagnostic work-up for a salivary gland lesion. Although the increased potential for tumor-seeding and capsule rupture has been extensively discussed, the safety of this procedure is widely accepted based on infrequent reports of tumor-seeding. In fact, a review of the literature shows only 2 cases of salivary tumor seeding following biopsy with larger-gauge needle characteristics, with 2 reported cases of salivary tumor seeding following fine-needle aspiration cytology. However, the follow-up interval of such studies (biopsy over fine-needle aspiration biopsy, which include both improved consistency and diagnostic accuracy, current studies lack adequate patient numbers and follow-up duration to confirm comparable safety profile to currently accepted fine-needle aspiration cytology. In this report we: (1) compare the relative benefits of each procedure, (2) review evidence regarding tumor seeding in each procedure, (3) discuss time course and patient numbers necessary to detect tumor recurrence, and (4) describe how these uncertainties should be factored into clinical considerations. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Mixed germ cell tumor of mediastinum/lung masquerading as hemangioma in fine needle biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rathna Nuti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The histological predominance of one component in a germ cell tumor can lead to a mistaken diagnosis. Here, we describe a mediastinal teratoma with predominant vascular proliferation (>90% which on fine needle biopsy was diagnosed as a pulmonary hemangioma. Later, resection specimen revealed other components constituting ~4%, changing the diagnosis while illustrating theimportance of careful evaluation. A 37-year-old Caucasian male with shortness of breath, weight loss, and history of recently resolved pneumonia was diagnosed with hemangioma, after a computed tomography guided fine needle biopsy of a -16.3-cm mediastinal pulmonary mass revealed abundant benign vascular elements. Following tumor excision, ~94% of the sample exhibited predominant vascular elementsThe mass also exhibited rare focal areas of malignant epithelium in a reticular arrangement and undifferentiated pleomorphic cells associated with vascular invasion. These atypical epithelial cells were positive for CD30, pan CK, AFP, β-HCG and CD 117, thusprocuring a diagnosis of mediastinal mixed germ cell tumor. Although mixed germ cell tumors consist of various tissue types, diagnosis can be easily overlooked if one component dominates. Therefore, obtaining adequate representative neoplasm samples, and sectioning the samples thoroughly, searching for coexisting tissue types is critical for accurate diagnosis.

  13. Mixed germ cell tumor of mediastinum/lung masquerading as hemangioma in fine needle biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuti, Rathna; Bodhireddy, Surender; Thirumala, Seshadri

    2013-01-01

    The histological predominance of one component in a germ cell tumor can lead to a mistaken diagnosis. Here, we describe a mediastinal teratoma with predominant vascular proliferation (>90%) which on fine needle biopsy was diagnosed as a pulmonary hemangioma. Later, resection specimen revealed other components constituting ~4%, changing the diagnosis while illustrating theimportance of careful evaluation. A 37-year-old Caucasian male with shortness of breath, weight loss, and history of recently resolved pneumonia was diagnosed with hemangioma, after a computed tomography guided fine needle biopsy of a -16.3-cm mediastinal pulmonary mass revealed abundant benign vascular elements. Following tumor excision, ~94% of the sample exhibited predominant vascular elementsThe mass also exhibited rare focal areas of malignant epithelium in a reticular arrangement and undifferentiated pleomorphic cells associated with vascular invasion. These atypical epithelial cells were positive for CD30, pan CK, AFP, β-HCG and CD 117, thusprocuring a diagnosis of mediastinal mixed germ cell tumor. Although mixed germ cell tumors consist of various tissue types, diagnosis can be easily overlooked if one component dominates. Therefore, obtaining adequate representative neoplasm samples, and sectioning the samples thoroughly, searching for coexisting tissue types is critical for accurate diagnosis.

  14. Pseudoangiomatous Stromal Hyperplasia in Core Needle Biopsies of Breast Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelten Talu, Canan; Boyaci, Ceren; Leblebici, Cem; Hacihasanoglu, Ezgi; Bozkurt, Erol Rustu

    2017-02-01

    Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH) is a benign lesion of myofibroblasts that is composed of a network of slit-like channels that resemble vascular spaces. The aims of this study were to document the frequency of PASH in core needle biopsy specimens (CNBS) of the breast, to describe which histopathologic findings coexist with PASH and to examine any endothelial cell differentiation. We reevaluated hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections of all CNBS that were obtained during a 1-year period. First, we performed CD34 and CD31 immunostainings to highlight the areas of PASH, then performed D2-40/podoplanin (lymphatic endothelial marker) and Fli-1 (vascular endothelial cell marker) immunostains. The total number of CNBS was 412. Areas of PASH were noted in 37 of the 412 cases (9%), with a mean age of 38.5 years. The lesions that were described in association with PASH were "benign breast parenchyma with stromal fibrosis" (17/37; 46%), "fibroepithelial tumors" (17/37; 46%), "columnar cell changes (CCC)" (2/37; 5%), and "invasive carcinoma" (1/37; 3%). There were 2 cases of CCC within the foci of PASH (direct contact with PASH), and 8 additional cases of CCC that coexisted in the same specimen but were not in direct contact. There was no staining for D2-40 or Fli-1 within PASH foci. PASH lesions occurred with a frequency of 9% in CNBS and were mostly in association with benign breast lesions in premenopausal women. CCC was determined as an accompanying epithelial lesion within or near PASH areas. No obvious immunopositivity compatible with endothelial cell differentiation was revealed.

  15. Thyroid fine-needle aspiration biopsy positively correlates with increased diagnosis of thyroid cancer in South Korean patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yoon Jae; Kim, Do Young; Park, Eun-Cheol; Han, Kyu-Tae

    2017-02-07

    The incidence of thyroid cancer among South Koreans is more than 10-fold greater than its incidence in other countries, although its associated mortality rate is similar. Amidst concerns regarding the over-diagnosis of thyroid cancer related to gradually expanded medical testing in South Korea, we hypothesized that the number of thyroid fine-needle aspiration biopsies has led to increased diagnosis of thyroid cancer. We used data from the National Health Insurance Service National Sample Cohort 2003-2013, which included all medical claims filed for the 1,122,456 people in a nationally representative sample. We performed a Poisson regression analysis using generalized estimating equation to investigate the relationship between the number of thyroid fine-needle aspiration biopsies and the newly diagnosed cases of thyroid cancer. The study included 60 annual patients per 100,000 individuals out of 11,024,548 person-years. The number of biopsies per 100,000 patients positively correlated with increased incidence of thyroid cancer diagnosis (per 100 biopsy cases: RR = 1.108; 95% CI: 1.090-1.126; P biopsies. Our findings suggest that a higher number of thyroid fine-needle aspiration biopsies per 100,000 individuals in a specific Si-Gun-Gu is positively associated with excessively increased diagnosis of thyroid cancer. Regarding the continually increasing thyroid cancer incidence in South Korea, healthcare professionals and policy makers should consider proper guidelines for recognizing the role of thyroid fine-needle aspiration biopsies in the potential over-diagnosis of thyroid cancer.

  16. Prostate Biopsy Sampling Causes Hematogenous Dissemination of Epithelial Cellular Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Ladjevardi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The extent of epithelial cellular material (ECM occurring in venous blood samples after diagnostic core needle biopsy (CNB was studied in 23 patients with CNB diagnosed prostate cancer without provable metastases and 15 patients without cancer. The data show a significant increase of ECM in the peripheral blood sampled 20 seconds or 30 minutes after the last of 10 CNB procedures compared to the number of ECM detectable in the blood samples taken before the performance of CNB. The data indicate that diagnostic CNB of prostate cancer causes an extensive tissue trauma with a potential risk of cancer cell dissemination.

  17. Percutaneous image-guided needle biopsy of clavicle lesions: a retrospective study of diagnostic yield with description of safe biopsy routes in 55 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pressney, I.; Saifuddin, A. [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Department of Radiology, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-21

    To assess the diagnostic yield and diagnostic accuracy of image-guided percutaneous needle biopsy of clavicle lesions and to analyse the diagnostic spectrum of clavicular lesions referred to a tertiary musculoskeletal oncology centre. To further describe safe biopsy routes for biopsy of the unique clavicle bone. A retrospective review of all patients who underwent an image-guided clavicle biopsy during the period from August 2006 to December 2013. A total of 52 patients with 55 consecutive biopsies were identified and included in the study. Image-guided percutaneous biopsy was performed using CT (n = 38) or ultrasound (n = 17). There were 23 males and 29 females, with a mean age of 40 years (range 2 to 87 years). Forty-six of the 55 biopsies (83.6 %) yielded a diagnostic sample and 9 (16.4 %) were non-diagnostic. Thirty of 46 (65.2 %) lesions were malignant and 16 (34.8 %) were benign/non-neoplastic. The most common malignant lesions were metastases, 22 of 30 (73.3 %), followed by primary tumours in 8 of 30 (26.7 %). The most common benign/non-neoplastic lesion was chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (4 of 16, 25 %) followed by Langerhans cell histiocytosis, epithelioid haemangioma and osteomyelitis (each with 2 of 16, 12.5 %). There was complete agreement between the needle and surgical histology specimen in 12 of 13 subjects (92.3 %). No post-biopsy complications were reported. Image-guided percutaneous biopsy has high diagnostic yield and accuracy and the described approaches are a safe means of biopsy for clavicle lesions. (orig.)

  18. Thyroid nodules with initially non-diagnostic, fine-needle aspiration results: comparison of core-needle biopsy and repeated fine-needle aspiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sang Hyun; Baek, Jung Hwan; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Choi, Young Jun; Hong, Min Ji; Song, Dong Eun; Kim, Jae Kyun; Yoon, Jong Ho; Kim, Won Bae

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate the role of core-needle biopsy (CNB) by comparing the results of CNB and repeated fine-needle aspiration (FNA) for thyroid nodules with initially non-diagnostic FNA results. From October 2008 to December 2011, 360 nodules - 180 consecutive repeated FNAs and 180 consecutive CNBs -- from 360 patients (83 men, 277 women; mean age, 54.4 years) with initially non-diagnostic FNA results were analyzed retrospectively. The incidence of non-diagnostic results, inconclusive results, diagnostic surgery, and diagnostic performance of repeated FNA and CNB were assessed, and factors affecting second non-diagnostic results were evaluated. CNB achieved a significantly lower non-diagnostic and inconclusive rate than repeated FNA (1.1 % versus 40.0 %, P needle biopsy achieved a lower number of non-diagnostic and inconclusive results. • Core-needle biopsy achieved better diagnostic performance. • Use of core-needle biopsy could prevent unnecessary diagnostic surgery. • Repeated fine-needle aspiration was significantly associated with a second non-diagnosis.

  19. The contribution of vacuum-assisted modified Menghini type needle to diagnosis of US-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy of the thyroid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birgi, Erdem; Ergun, Onur; Türkmenoğlu, Tuğba Taşkın; Güneş Tatar, İdil; Durmaz, Hasan Ali; Hekimoğlu, Baki

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to determine the contribution of vacuum-assisted modified Menghini type needle to diagnosis of ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) of the thyroid evaluated by a pathologist at the bedside. A total of 147 thyroid nodules in 138 patients (122 women, 16 men) were included in this prospective study. Sonographic features of nodules, number of aspirations, pain and pain severity during the process, hemorrhage, and presence of sample obtained for cell block analysis were recorded and analyzed with the results of aspiration biopsy. Using the 21G modified Menghini type needle, a diagnosis could not be reached in 14.3% of nodules. Adequate samples for cell block analysis were obtained in 47 nodules (32%), 17 of which contributed to the diagnosis. While the difference between diagnostic cytopathology results and the contribution of the cell block were statistically significant, obtainability of cell block samples was not significantly correlated with the number of aspirations or the presence of a cystic component in the nodule. FNAB with 21G vacuum-assisted modified Menghini type needle is a safe procedure with very low complication rates. In addition to the cytologic smear samples, microtissue fragments obtained with this method help pathologists in the diagnosis of thyroid nodules.

  20. CT fluoroscopy guided transpleural cutting needle biopsy of small ({<=}2.5 cm) subpleural pulmonary nodules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prosch, Helmut; Oschatz, Elisabeth; Eisenhuber, Edith; Wohlschlager, Helmut [Otto Wagner Hospital, Department of Radiology, Sanatoriumsstrasse 2, 1140 Vienna (Austria); Mostbeck, Gerhard H., E-mail: gerhard.mostbeck@wienkav.at [Otto Wagner Hospital, Department of Radiology, Sanatoriumsstrasse 2, 1140 Vienna (Austria)

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: Small subpleural pulmonary lesions are difficult to biopsy. While the direct, short needle path has been reported to have a lower rate of pneumothorax, the indirect path provides a higher diagnostic yield. Therefore, we tried to optimize the needle pathway and minimize the iatrogenic pneumothorax risk by evaluating a CT fluoroscopy guided direct approach to biopsy subpleural lesions. Material and methods: Between 01/2005 and 01/2007, CT fluoroscopy guided core biopsies were performed in 24 patients. Using our technique, the tip of the guide needle remains outside the visceral pleura (17 G coaxial guide needle, 18 G Biopsy-gun, 15 or 22 mm needle path). The position of the lesion relative to the needle tip can be optimized using CT fluoroscopy by adjusting the breathing position of the patient. The Biopty gun is fired with the needle tip still outside the pleural space. Cytological smears are analyzed by a cytopathologist on-site, and biopsies are repeated as indicated with the coaxial needle still outside the pleura. Results: Median nodule size was 1.6 cm (0.7-2.3 cm). A definitive diagnosis was obtained in 22 patients by histology and/or cytology. In one patient, only necrotic material could be obtained. In another patient, the intervention had to be aborted as the dyspnoic patient could not follow breathing instructions. An asymptomatic pneumothorax was present in seven patients; chest tube placement was not required. Conclusion: The presented biopsy approach has a high diagnostic yield and is especially advantageous for biopsies of small subpleural lesions in the lower lobes.

  1. [Value of fine needle aspiration cytology and core needle biopsy in the head and neck region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thierauf, J; Hoffmann, T K; Bommer, M; Veit, J A; Lindemann, J

    2015-05-01

    Fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) and core-needle biopsy (CNB) represent 2 minimal invasive methods for further assessment of suspect lesions of the head and neck area. However, only limited data on the direct comparison of both methods has been published. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of FNAC and CNB and to compare their sensitivity and specificity. Between 2005 and 2012, CNB was performed in 86 patients and FNAC in 408 patients. 52 of 86 CNB-patients and 224 of 408 FNAC-patients underwent surgery afterwards and were included into the study (n=276). In order to compare the results of both methods the corresponding final histopathological finding from surgery was considered. The sensitivity of the FNAC-group was higher (85%) compared to the CNB-group (80%), the specificity (87 vs. 94%) as well as the positive predictive value (64 vs. 97%) was lower. The negative predictive value (92 vs. 71%) and also the false negative value of the FNAC (5 vs. 13%) were superior to the results of the CNB-group. Concerning the false positive value the CNB-group showed better results (2 vs. 15%). Both methods are well suited to clarify the dignity of lesions in the head and neck region. In the current case series, FNAC seemed particularly suitable for diagnosis of hematologic diseases and the exclusion of malignancy in suspicious lymph nodes. The GNP has proven to be valid in the detection of tumor recurrences in irradiated or previously operated tissue, furthermore the definitive oncological treatment can be planed, based on the histopathological results obtained by GNP. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Usefulness of Core Needle Biopsy for Thyroid Nodules with Macrocalcifications: Comparison with Fine-Needle Aspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Kyung Sik; Na, Dong Gyu; Seo, Hyobin; Min, Hye Sook; Won, Jae-Kyung; Yun, Tae Jin; Ryoo, Inseon; Kim, Su Chin; Choi, Seung Hong; Sohn, Chul-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study was performed to determine the benefits of core needle biopsy (CNB), as compared with fine-needle aspiration (FNA), for the diagnosis of thyroid nodules with macrocalcifications. Materials and Methods: The institutional review board approved this retrospective study, and informed consent was waived. From February 2010 to March 2012, the study included 147 thyroid nodules with macrocalcification of 145 consecutive patients who underwent simultaneous FNA and CNB for each nodule. Diagnostic accuracy and inconclusive diagnoses, including nondiagnostic reading and atypia of undetermined significance or follicular lesion of undetermined significance reading were compared among FNA, CNB, and a combination of FNA and CNB (FNA/CNB) using McNemar's test; the benefits of CNB were calculated. Results: Compared to FNA, CNB and FNA/CNB showed fewer inconclusive diagnoses (FNA vs. CNB: 62/147 [42.2%] vs. 14/147 [9.5%], p<0.001; FNA vs. FNA/CNB: 62/147 [42.2%] vs. 14/147 [9.5%], p<0.001), resulting in the avoidance of repeat FNA or diagnostic surgery in 48 of 62 patients (77.4%, respectively in CNB and FNA/CNB) who would have undergone these procedures if only FNA was performed. Compared to FNA, FNA/CNB showed higher sensitivity and accuracy (sensitivity: 23/32 [71.9%] vs. 31/32 [96.9%], p=0.008; accuracy: 77/86 [89.5%] vs. 85/86 [98.8%], p=0.008), resulting in avoidance of delayed surgery in eight of nine patients (88.9%) with thyroid cancer in whom the surgery would have been missed if FNA only had been performed. Conclusion: In the workup of thyroid nodules with macrocalcification, compared with FNA alone, FNA/CNB decreases inconclusive diagnoses and increases sensitivity, thereby reducing repeated FNA procedures, diagnostic surgeries, and delayed therapeutic surgeries. PMID:25851539

  3. The Utility of US-Guided Core-Needle Biopsy in the Diagnosis of Thyroid Nodules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Youn; Hong, Soon Won; Kim, Eun Kyung; Kim, Min Jung; Kwak, Jin Young; Moon, Hee Jung; Kim, Ki Whang [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Ultrasonography (US)-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) is widely considered to be the diagnostic technique of choice in the assessment of nodular disease of the thyroid gland. Although the accuracy of FNAB analysis approaches 95% where there is an adequate sample, non-diagnostic sampling occurs in 10-20% of cases. Additionally, equivocal pathological results are obtained in 10-30% of cases, and there are limitations in detecting subtypes of certain diseases, such as lymphoma. Generally, US-guided core needle biopsy (CNB) allows for the procurement of a large, grossly visible specimen and a more precise pathological diagnosis. Therefore, US-guided CNB is indicated in the following situations: 1) when an inadequate specimen is obtained by FNAB, 2) when FNAB yields indeterminate or inadequate information, 3) when targeting of the lesion is difficult because it is diffuse, and 4) when there is a discrepancy between the imaging findings and the FNAB results. In this article, we describe the situations in which US-guided CNB is useful for diagnosing thyroid lesions

  4. Ultrasonography-Guided Fine-Needle Aspiration Biopsy of Predominantly Cystic Thyroid Nodules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Hye Jin; Kim, Dong Wook [Busan Paik Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-02-15

    The aim of this study is to present our biopsy technique and to determine the efficacy of the ultrasound- guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy (US-FNAB) for predominantly cystic thyroid nodules (PCTNs). This study included patients that underwent US-FNABs on PCTNs, and were sampled for the solid component following the aspiration of a cystic component through one needle puncture between January to December of 2008. We retrospectively reviewed the cytopathology results as well as any complication associated with the procedure. Of the 76 PCTNs (range of maximal diameter: 0.4 cm-6.1 cm, mean: 2.39 cm) observed in the 75 patients (females: males = 63: 12, age range: 19-72, mean: 45.3 years old), the incidence rate of adequate and inadequate samples was 90.8% (69/76) and 9.2% (7/76) in the first US-FNAB, respectively. Further, 23 PCTNs were surgically removed in 22 patients, of which 15 PCTNs were benign and 8 were confirmed malignant nodules. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy for USFNAB of PCTNs were 95.2%, 100%, 100%, 76.9%, and 95.8%, respectively. The data suggest that our technique for US-FNAB of PCTNs was effective and accurate.

  5. Primary pancreatic leiomyosarcoma with metastasis to the liver diagnosed by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration and fine needle biopsy: A Case Report and Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Maria Cecilia D; Huang, Xiao; Bain, Andrew; Ylagan, Lourdes

    2016-12-01

    Primary pancreatic leiomyosarcomas are rare tumors of the pancreas that are usually diagnosed after resection or by biopsy. One case in the literature has utilized endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) cytology. We report a second case of a primary pancreatic leiomyosarcoma that yielded diagnostic material on EUS-FNA cytology. A 72-year-old female presented with 3-4 months of abdominal pain. A CT scan showed a large heterogeneous, lobulated pancreatic head and uncinate mass and multiple hypoattenuating liver lesions. An EUS-FNA was performed on one of the liver lesions with a 25-gauge needle, yielding an adequate sample with lesional cells. The initial read was a spindle cell neoplasm. A subsequent endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle biopsy with a 22-gauge needle was performed on the pancreatic head mass to rule out two primaries and to provide tissue for a mitotic index in the case of gastrointestinal tumor. Both the cell block of the EUS-FNA and the core biopsy were equally cellular and showed interlacing spindle cells that stained positive for SMA and negative for DOG-1, CD 117, and CD34. In addition, the core biopsy of the pancreas stained positive for Desmin. A diagnosis of a primary pancreatic leiomyosarcoma was made and the patient was started on systemic chemotherapy. Primary pancreatic leiomyosarcomas are rare pancreatic tumors that may yield diagnostic material by EUS-FNA with a 25-gauge needle. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2016;44:1070-1073. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Diagnostic Value of ERG in Prostate Needle Biopsies Containing Minute Cancer Foci

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    Bachurska Svitlana Y.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prostate carcinoma (PC is the second most diagnosed cancer in men population worldwide. The small amount of the tissue in prostate needle biopsy is often sufficient for the correct interpretation. Novel antibodies, as ERG, could add to the diagnostic value of IHC study in analysing difficult core biopsies.

  7. CT-guided needle biopsy of lung lesions: A survey of severe complication based on 9783 biopsies in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomiyama, Noriyuki [Department of Radiology, Osaka University Graduated School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)]. E-mail: tomiyama@radiol.med.osaka-u.ac.jp; Yasuhara, Yoshifumi [Department of Radiology, National Hospital Organization Ehime National Hospital (Japan); Nakajima, Yasuo [Department of Radiology, St. Marianna University School of Medicine (Japan); Adachi, Shuji [Department of Radiology, Hyogo Medical Center for Adults (Japan); Arai, Yasuaki [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, National Cancer Center (Japan); Kusumoto, Masahiko [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, National Cancer Center (Japan); Eguchi, Kenji [Department of Oncology, Tokai University School of Medicine (Japan); Kuriyama, Keiko [Department of Radiology, Kinki Central Hospital of the Mutual Aid Association of Public School Teachers (Japan); Sakai, Fumikazu [Department of Radiology, Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital (Japan); Noguchi, Masayuki [Department of Pathology, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Tsukuba (Japan); Murata, Kiyoshi [Department of Radiology, Shiga University of Medical Science (Japan); Murayama, Sadayuki [Faculty of Medicine, University of the Ryukyus (Japan); Mochizuki, Teruhito [Department of Radiology, Ehime University School of Medicine (Japan); Mori, Kiyoshi [Department of Thoracic Oncology, Tochigi Cancer Center (Japan); Yamada, Kozo [Department of Thoracic Oncology, Kanagawa Cancer Center (Japan)

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of our study was to update the rate of severe complications following CT-guided needle biopsy in Japan via a mailed survey. Materials and methods: Postal questionnaires regarding CT-guided needle biopsy were sent out to multiple hospitals in Japan. The questions regarded: the total number and duration of CT-guided lung biopsies performed at each hospital, and the complication rates and numbers of pneumothorax, hemothorax, air embolism, tumor seeding, tension pneumothorax and other rare complications. Each severe complication was followed with additional questions. Results: Data from 9783 biopsies was collected from 124 centers. Pneumothorax was the most common complication, and occurred in 2412 (35%) of 6881 cases. A total of 39 (35%) hospitals reported 74 (0.75%) cases with severe complications. There were six cases (0.061%) with air embolism, six cases (0.061%) with tumor seeding at the site of the biopsy route, 10 cases (0.10%) with tension pneumothorax, six cases (0.061%) with severe pulmonary hemorrhage or hemoptysis, nine cases (0.092%) with hemothorax, and 27 cases (0.26%) with others, including heart arrest, shock, and respiratory arrest. From a total of 62 patients with severe complications, 54 patients (0.55%) recovered without sequela, however one patient (0.01%) recovered with hemiplegia due to cerebral infarction, and the remaining seven patients (0.07%) died. Conclusions: This is the first national study documenting severe complications with respect to CT-guided needle biopsy in Japan. The complication rate in Japan is comparable to internationally published figures. We believe this data will improve both clinicians as well as patients understanding of the risk versus benefit of CT-guided needle biopsy, resulting better decisions.

  8. Comparison of fine-needle aspiration and core needle biopsy under ultrasonographic guidance for detecting malignancy and for the tissue-specific diagnosis of salivary gland tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, H-J; Lee, J H; Ko, M-S; Choi, Y J; Yoon, R G; Cho, K J; Nam, S Y; Baek, J H

    2015-06-01

    Diagnostic test accuracy studies for ultrasonography-guided fine-needle aspiration and ultrasonography-guided core needle biopsy have shown inconclusive results due to their heterogenous study designs. Our aim was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasonography-guided fine-needle aspiration versus ultrasonography-guided core needle biopsy for detecting malignant tumors of the salivary gland and for the tissue-specific diagnosis of salivary gland tumors in a single tertiary hospital. This retrospective study was approved by our institutional review board and informed consent was waived. Four hundred twelve patients who underwent ultrasonography-guided fine-needle aspiration (n = 155) or ultrasonography-guided core needle biopsy (n = 257) with subsequent surgical confirmation or clinical follow-up were enrolled. We compared the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasonography-guided fine-needle aspiration and ultrasonography-guided core needle biopsy regarding malignant salivary gland tumors and the correct tissue-specific diagnosis of benign and malignant tumors. We also tested the difference between these procedures according to the operator's experience and lesion characteristics. The inconclusive rates of ultrasonography-guided fine-needle aspiration and ultrasonography-guided core needle biopsy were 19% and 4%, respectively (P needle biopsy for diagnosing malignant tumors was significantly higher than that of ultrasonography-guided fine-needle aspiration (P = .024). The correct tissue-specific diagnosis rates of ultrasonography-guided fine-needle aspiration and ultrasonography-guided core needle biopsy were 95% versus 97% for benign tumors (P = .648) and 67% versus 80% for malignant tumors (P = .310). Trainees showed significantly lower accuracy with ultrasonography-guided fine-needle aspiration than with ultrasonography-guided core needle biopsy for diagnosing malignant tumors (P = .021). There was no difference between the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasonography

  9. Prospective Study for Comparison of Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Tissue Acquisition Using 25- and 22-Gauge Core Biopsy Needles in Solid Pancreatic Masses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Se Woo Park

    Full Text Available Although thicker needles theoretically allow more tissue to be collected, their decreased flexibility can cause mechanical damage to the endoscope, technical failure, and sample blood contamination. The effects of needle gauge on diagnostic outcomes of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle biopsy (EUS-FNB of pancreatic mass lesions remain unknown. This study compared procurement rates of histologic cores obtained from EUS-FNB of pancreatic masses using 25- and 22-gauge core biopsy needles.From March 2014 to July 2014, 66 patients with solid pancreatic mass underwent EUS-FNB with both 25- and 22-gauge core biopsy needles. Among them, 10 patients were excluded and thus 56 patients were eligible for the analyses. Needle sequences were randomly assigned, and two passes were made with each needle, consisting of 10 uniform to-and-fro movements on each pass with 10 mL syringe suction. A pathologist blinded to needle sequence evaluated specimens for the presence of histologic core.The mean patient age was 65.8 ± 9.5 years (range, 44-89 years; 35 patients (62.5% were men. The mean pancreatic mass size was 35.3 ± 17.1 mm (range 14-122.3 mm. Twenty-eight patients (50% had tumors at the pancreas head or uncinate process. There were no significant differences in procurement rates of histologic cores between 25-gauge (49/56, 87.5% and 22-gauge (46/56, 82.1%, P = 0.581 needles or diagnostic accuracy using only histologic cores (98% and 95%. There were no technical failures or procedure-related adverse events.The 25-gauge core biopsy needle could offer acceptable and comparable outcomes regarding diagnostic performance including histologic core procurement rates compared to the 22-gauge core biopsy needle, although the differences were not statistically significant.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01795066.

  10. The Ram Relaxation Technique: A Painless Biopsy Method. A Shave Biopsy Approach Without Injectable Anesthesia or Needles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habashy, Jacquiline R; Ghiam, Benjamin; Ram, Ramin

    2017-04-01

    Shave skin biopsies are essential procedures wherein physicians diagnose dermatologic lesions. The protocol for skin biopsies entails a lidocaine/epinephrine injection. This study suggests an alternative, novel method of performing a shave biopsy that avoids pain, needles, and injectable anesthesia, termed the Ram Relaxation Technique (RRT). To present a new technique that physicians may chose to form when faced with dermatological biopsies that are painless and needle free. Randomly selected, patients were presented to the authors' offices with abnormal skin lesions that required a shave biopsy. The patients were offered the choice of having an anesthetic injection (1% lidocaine, 1:100,000 epinephrine) or the alternative method (RRT) before the biopsy. Twenty patients (n = 20, 10 men, 10 women) chose the alternative method (RRT) and were the focus of this study. These patients who chose RRT were asked to scale their pain on a scale of 0 to 10 (0 = no pain, 1-3 = mild, 4-6 = moderate, and 7-10 = severe pain). Fourteen of the 20 patients stated that they experienced no pain (0), 5 experienced mild pain, and 1 patient experienced moderate pain. This study demonstrates an alternative and nearly pain-free method for superficial shave biopsies of the skin for certain patients in the appropriate clinical setting with the appropriate, superficial papule lesions. Dermis lesions, melanocytic lesions, and macular lesions are not ideal candidates given the risk for misdiagnosis, and more pain, respectively.

  11. Office-based core needle biopsy of bone and soft tissue malignancies: an accurate alternative to open biopsy with infrequent complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Sheila C; Potter, Benjamin K; Pitcher, David J; Temple, H Thomas

    2010-10-01

    Biopsy is a critical step in the diagnosis of musculoskeletal malignancy. As an alternative to open biopsy, percutaneous core needle biopsy techniques have been developed. As many studies combine office-based, image-guided, and operative biopsies, the accuracy of office-based core needle biopsy is not well documented. We asked whether (1) office-based core needle biopsy for the diagnosis of malignant musculoskeletal neoplasms would have few complications and diagnostic and accuracy rates comparable to those cited in the literature for core needle biopsy, (2) diagnostic errors related to office-based core needle biopsy would result in surgical treatment errors, and (3) tissue core quantity and tumor type would affect accuracy. We retrospectively reviewed 234 patients with 252 core needle biopsies of malignant bone and soft tissue neoplasms at one institution between 1999 and 2007. Biopsy accuracy and errors were determined on the basis of histologic evaluation of prior or subsequent biopsies and/or resected specimens, when available. We eliminated 19 patients who had needle biopsies: three had the core needle biopsy completed in the operating room and 16 had insufficient documentation or followup, leaving 233 for study. Of the 233 core needle biopsies, 212 (91%) were diagnostic and accurate for malignancy. Fourteen (6%) biopsies were nondiagnostic. Major errors, defined as a benign diagnosis in a malignant tumor, occurred in seven cases (3%). Minor errors, defined as errors in histopathologic diagnosis or grade, occurred in 24 biopsies (10%). All nondiagnostic and major core needle biopsy errors were identified and addressed with either a diagnostic open biopsy or definitive wide local excision, resulting in no surgical treatment errors. Accuracy was not influenced by core number; however, myxoid lesions showed a correlation with biopsy error. There were no biopsy-related complications. Office-based core needle biopsy for diagnosis of malignant musculoskeletal

  12. Ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy in diagnosis of abdominal and pelvic neoplasm in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hailing; Li, Fangxuan; Liu, Juntian; Zhang, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy of abdominal and pelvic masses in adults has gained tremendous popularity. However, the application of the same treatment in children is not as popular because of apprehensions regarding inadequate tissues for the biopsy and accidental puncture of vital organs. Data of the application of ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy in 105 pediatric patients with clinically or ultrasound-diagnosed abdominopelvic masses were reviewed. Diagnostic procedures were conducted in our institution from May 2011 to May 2013. The biopsies were conducted on 86 malignant lesions and 19 benign lesions. 86 malignant tumors comprised neuroblastomas (30 cases), hepatoblastomas (15 cases), nephroblastomas (11 cases), and primitive neuroectodermal tumors/malignant small round cells (6 cases). Among malignant tumor cases, only a pelvic primitive neuroectodermal tumor did not receive a pathological diagnosis. Therefore, the biopsy accuracy was 98.8 % in malignant tumor. However, the biopsies for one neuroblastomas and one malignant small round cell tumor were inadequate for cytogenetic analysis. Therefore, 96.5 % of the malignant tumor patients received complete diagnosis via biopsy. 19 benign tumors comprised mature teratoma (10 cases), hemangioendothelioma (3 cases), paraganglioma (2 cases), and infection (2 cases). The diagnostic accuracy for benign neoplasm was 100 %. Five patients experienced postoperative complications, including pain (2 patients), bleeding from the biopsy site (2 patients), and wound infection (1 patient). Ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy is an efficient, minimally invasive, accurate, and safe diagnostic method that can be applied in the management of abdominal or pelvic mass of pediatric patients.

  13. Transthoracic fine needle aspiration biopsy of subcarinal lesion: oblique approach using biplane fluoroscopic guidance

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    Kim, Sung Tae; Jeon, Seok Chol; Choi, Yo Won; Seo, Heung Suk; Hahm, Chang Kok [School of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-09-15

    To evaluate effectiveness of oblique approach under biplane fluoroscopic guidance in transthoracic fine needle aspiration biopsy. Fourteen consecutive patients underwent transthoracic fine needle aspiration biopsy for subcarinal lesions. Subcarina was the only accessible biopsy site in 13 patients. Subcarinal biopsy was performed to determine the presence of metastasis in an enlarged subcarinal lymph node in the remaining one patient. Before biopsy, we evaluated the size and location of the lesion on preliminary plain chest X-ray film and CT scan. Under dual projection fluoroscopic guidance, biopsy was performed through right posterior intercostal space with the patient prone by using oblique approach. On 15 degree LAO projection the needle was directed to the area anterior to the spine and advanced to the line extending through the posterior wall of the main bronchus. Cytologic diagnosis was made in 12 out of 14 patients(accuracy 85.7%). The final diagnosis consisted of 5 squamous cell carcinoma, 5 small cell carcinoma, 1 adenocarcinoma and 1 adenosquamous carcinoma. Pneumothorax developed in 2 patients(14%) and was managed by chest tube drainage. Mild hemoptysis was observed in 2. Transthoracic fine needle aspiration biopsy using oblique approach under biplane fluoroscopic guidance is a relatively safe and sensitive method for the histologic diagnosis of subcarinal lesion.

  14. Fine needle biopsy of abdominal organs in dogs -- indications, contraindications and performance technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glińska-Suchocka, K; Jankowski, M; Kubiak, K; Spuzak, J; Dzimira, S; Nicpoń, J

    2013-01-01

    Recent years have seen in both human and veterinary medicine the development of numerous techniques allowing for evaluation and classification of changes in individual organs and tissues. Despite introduction of such techniques into diagnostics as among others, CT, MRI, CEUS or elastography, biopsy is still considered a "golden standard" and it is a procedure performed in order to obtain a final diagnosis. There are many biopsy techniques, such as fine needle aspiration biopsy, core biopsy as well as methods of performing a procedure, e.g. blind biopsy, biopsy under USG control and biopsy during laparotomy. In the article usefulness of biopsy techniques in relation to diagnostics of individual abdominal organ, as well as the procedure technique, contraindication and complications are discussed.

  15. Diagnostic accuracy and safety of CT-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in cavitary pulmonary lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang, Yi-Ping, E-mail: yipingzhuang2010@sina.com [Department of Radiology, Jiangsu Cancer Institute and Hospital, No. 42 Baiziting Road, Nanjing 210009, Jiangsu (China); Wang, Hai-Yan, E-mail: mycherishgirl@sohu.com [Department of Radiology, Jiangsu Cancer Institute and Hospital, No. 42 Baiziting Road, Nanjing 210009, Jiangsu (China); Zhang, Jin, E-mail: yari_zj@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Jiangsu Cancer Institute and Hospital, No. 42 Baiziting Road, Nanjing 210009, Jiangsu (China); Feng, Yong, E-mail: fengyong119@sohu.com [Department of Radiology, Jiangsu Cancer Institute and Hospital, No. 42 Baiziting Road, Nanjing 210009, Jiangsu (China); Zhang, Lei, E-mail: motozl163@163.com [Department of Radiology, Jiangsu Cancer Institute and Hospital, No. 42 Baiziting Road, Nanjing 210009, Jiangsu (China)

    2013-01-15

    Objective: CT-guided transthoracic biopsy is a well-established method in the cytologic or histologic diagnosis of pulmonary lesions. The knowledge of its diagnostic performance and complications for cavitary pulmonary lesions is limited. The purpose of this study was to determine the diagnostic accuracy and safety of CT-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) in cavitary pulmonary lesions. Materials and methods: 102 consecutive patients with pulmonary cavitary lesions received CT-guided FNAB with use of an 18-gauge (n = 35) or 20-gauge (n = 67) Chiba for histology diagnosis. The sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy of FNAB were calculated as compared with the final diagnosis. Complications associated with FNAB were observed. The diagnostic accuracy and complications were compared between patients with different lesion sizes and different cavity wall thickness. Results: The overall sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of FNAB were 96.3%, 98.0%, and 96.1%, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and diagnosis accuracy in different lesion size (<2 cm vs ≥2 cm), or different cavity wall thickness (<5 mm vs ≥5 mm) were not different (P > 0.05; 0.235). More nondiagnostic sample was found in wall thickness <5 mm lesions (P = 0.017). Associated complications included pneumothorax in 9 (8.8%) patients and alveolar hemorrhage in 14 patients (13.7%) and hemoptysis in 1 patient (1%). No different rate of complications was found with regard to lesion size, wall thickness, length of the needle path and needle size (P > 0.05). Conclusion: CT-guided FNAB can be effectively ad safely used for patients with pulmonary cavitary lesions.

  16. Bone biopsy (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A bone biopsy is performed by making a small incision into the skin. A biopsy needle retrieves a sample of bone and it ... examination. The most common reasons for bone lesion biopsy are to distinguish between benign and malignant bone ...

  17. Accurate biopsy-needle depth estimation in limited-angle tomography using multi-view geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Sommen, Fons; Zinger, Sveta; de With, Peter H. N.

    2016-03-01

    Recently, compressed-sensing based algorithms have enabled volume reconstruction from projection images acquired over a relatively small angle (θ biopsy needles during image-guided interventions, in which we split the problem into two parts and solve them independently: needle-depth estimation and volume reconstruction. The complete proposed system consists of the previous two steps, preceded by needle extraction. First, we detect the biopsy needle in the projection images and remove it by interpolation. Next, we exploit epipolar geometry to find point-to-point correspondences in the projection images to triangulate the 3D position of the needle in the volume. Finally, we use the interpolated projection images to reconstruct the local anatomical structures and indicate the position of the needle within this volume. For validation of the algorithm, we have recorded a full CT scan of a phantom with an inserted biopsy needle. The performance of our approach ranges from a median error of 2.94 mm for an distributed viewing angle of 1° down to an error of 0.30 mm for an angle larger than 10°. Based on the results of this initial phantom study, we conclude that multi-view geometry offers an attractive alternative to time-consuming iterative methods for the depth estimation of surgical tools during C-arm-based image-guided interventions.

  18. The value of forceps biopsy and core needle biopsy in prediction of pathologic complete remission in locally advanced rectal cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jing-Hua; An, Xin; Lin, Xi; Gao, Yuan-Hong; Liu, Guo-Chen; Kong, Ling-Heng; Pan, Zhi-Zhong; Ding, Pei-Rong

    2015-10-20

    Patients with pathological complete remission (pCR) after treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (nCRT) have better long-term outcome and may receive conservative treatments in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). The study aimed to evaluate the value of forceps biopsy and core needle biopsy in prediction of pCR in LARC treated with nCRT. In total, 120 patients entered this study. Sixty-one consecutive patients received preoperative forceps biopsy during endoscopic examination. Ex vivo core needle biopsy was performed in resected specimens of another 43 consecutive patients. The accuracy for ex vivo core needle biopsy was significantly higher than forceps biopsy (76.7% vs. 36.1%; p core needle biopsy was significantly lower in good responder (TRG 3) than poor responder (TRG ≤ 2) (52.9% vs. 94.1%; p = 0.017). In vivo core needle biopsy was further performed in 16 patients with good response. Eleven patients had residual cancer cells in final resected specimens, among whom 4 (36.4%) patients were biopsy positive. In conclusion, routine forceps biopsy was of limited value in identifying pCR after nCRT. Although core needle biopsy might further identify a subset of patients with residual cancer cells, the accuracy was not substantially increased in good responders.

  19. Assessment of Factors Affecting the Usefulness and Diagnostic Yield of Core Biopsy Needles with a Side Hole in Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Aspiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Tadahisa; Okumura, Fumihiro; Mizushima, Takashi; Nishie, Hirotada; Iwasaki, Hiroyasu; Anbe, Kaiki; Ozeki, Takanori; Kachi, Kenta; Fukusada, Shigeki; Suzuki, Yuta; Sano, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    A barbed puncture needle with a side hole was recently developed to improve sample quality and quantity in endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA). In this study, we retrospectively assessed the usefulness of this puncture needle. Factors affecting diagnostic yield, safety, and diagnostic accuracy were investigated in 76 patients who consecutively underwent EUS-FNA for neoplastic lesions at our hospital between January and December 2013. The procedure was successful in all cases; the rates of sample collection and determination of the correct diagnosis were 92.1% and 89.5%, respectively. The mean number of needle passes required for diagnosis was 1.1. Complications included mild intraluminal bleeding in two patients (2.6%). Multivariate analysis revealed that lesion size (≤20 mm) was significantly associated with a decreased chance of determining the correct diagnosis. Core biopsy needles with a side hole are safe and provide a satisfactory diagnostic yield. However, the side hole may potentially reduce the rate of making the correct diagnosis in small lesions.

  20. Effect on hemostasis of an absorbable hemostatic gelatin sponge after transrectal prostate needle biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Kobatake

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives To examine the usefulness of an absorbable hemostatic gelatin sponge for hemostasis after transrectal prostate needle biopsy. Subjects and Methods The subjects comprised 278 participants who underwent transrectal prostate needle biopsy. They were randomly allocated to the gelatin sponge insertion group (group A: 148 participants and to the non-insertion group (group B: 130 participants. In group A, the gelatin sponge was inserted into the rectum immediately after biopsy. A biopsy-induced hemorrhage was defined as a case in which a subject complained of bleeding from the rectum, and excretion of blood clots was confirmed. A blood test was performed before and after biopsy, and a questionnaire survey was given after the biopsy. Results Significantly fewer participants in group A required hemostasis after biopsy compared to group B (3 (2.0% vs. 11 (8.5%, P=0.029. The results of the blood tests and the responses from the questionnaire did not differ significantly between the two groups. In multivariate analysis, only “insertion of a gelatin sponge into the rectum” emerged as a significant predictor of hemostasis. Conclusion Insertion of a gelatin sponge into the rectum after transrectal prostate needle biopsy significantly increases hemostasis without increasing patient symptoms, such as pain and a sense of discomfort.

  1. Diagnosing non-palpable breast disease : short-term impact on quality of life of large-core needle biopsy versus open breast biopsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkooijen, HM; Buskens, E; Peeters, PHM; Rinkes, IHMB; de Koning, HJ; van Vroonhoven, TJMV

    2002-01-01

    Background: One of the alleged advantages of stereotactic large-core needle biopsy of non-palpable breast lesions is that it entails less inconvenience for the patient. In this prospective study, the quality of life of patients undergoing large-core needle biopsy was compared with that of patients u

  2. Diagnosing non-palpable breast disease : short-term impact on quality of life of large-core needle biopsy versus open breast biopsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkooijen, HM; Buskens, E; Peeters, PHM; Rinkes, IHMB; de Koning, HJ; van Vroonhoven, TJMV

    2002-01-01

    Background: One of the alleged advantages of stereotactic large-core needle biopsy of non-palpable breast lesions is that it entails less inconvenience for the patient. In this prospective study, the quality of life of patients undergoing large-core needle biopsy was compared with that of patients u

  3. Histological Diagnosis of Oral Lesions with Cutting Needle Biopsy: a Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Antonio Rossi dos Santos

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the effectiveness of cutting needle biopsy in the diagnosis of solid oral lesions.Material and Methods: The biopsies were carried out on seven patients who presented with solid oral lesions with sizes ranging from 2 to 6 cm. Specimens were obtained from each lesion before conventional biopsies using a cutting needle with 18-gauge x 9 cm (MD TECH, Gainesville, FL, USA. A total of 64 specimens processed by hematoxylin-eosin staining method, were obtained. Afterwards, the analysis was performed by an oral pathologist, in two different stages, with and without the clinical history of each lesion. Then, these answers were compared with the final histological diagnosis.Results: Results presented by the descriptive analysis showed that the correct diagnosis using cutting needle biopsy without the clinical history of lesions was registered in 37.5% of cases, while with the clinical history in 76.6%.Conclusions: Despite the promising results as a potential technique for biopsies and histological diagnosis of oral lesions, the cutting needle biopsy should be analyzed carefully in those cases.

  4. Percutaneous needle biopsy for indeterminate renal masses: a national survey of UK consultant urologists

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    Arya Manit

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of percutaneous needle biopsy in the evaluation of indeterminate renal masses is controversial and its role in management remains largely unclear. We set to establish current practice on this issue in UK urology departments. Methods We conducted a national questionnaire survey of all consultant urologists in the UK, to establish current practice and attitudes towards percutaneous needle biopsy in the management of indeterminate renal masses. Results 139 (43% consultant urologists never use biopsy, whereas 111 (34% always employ it for the diagnosis of indeterminate renal masses. 75 (23% urologists use biopsy only for a selected patient group. Mass in a solitary kidney, bilateral renal masses and a past history of non-renal cancer were the main indications for use of percutaneous biopsy. The risk of false negative results and biopsy not changing the eventual management of their patients were the commonest reasons not to perform biopsy. Conclusion There is a wide and varied practice amongst UK Consultant Urologists in the use of percutaneous biopsy as part of the management of indeterminate renal masses. The majority of urologists believe biopsy confers no benefit. However there is a need to clarify this issue in the wake of recent published evidence as biopsy results may provide critical information for patients with renal masses in a significant majority. It not only differentiates benign from malignant tissue but can also help in deciding the management option for patients undergoing minimally invasive treatments.

  5. Percutaneous needle biopsy for indeterminate renal masses: a national survey of UK consultant urologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Azhar A; Shergill, Iqbal S; Quereshi, Sheila; Arya, Manit; Vandal, Mohammed T; Gujral, Sandeep S

    2007-01-01

    Background The use of percutaneous needle biopsy in the evaluation of indeterminate renal masses is controversial and its role in management remains largely unclear. We set to establish current practice on this issue in UK urology departments. Methods We conducted a national questionnaire survey of all consultant urologists in the UK, to establish current practice and attitudes towards percutaneous needle biopsy in the management of indeterminate renal masses. Results 139 (43%) consultant urologists never use biopsy, whereas 111 (34%) always employ it for the diagnosis of indeterminate renal masses. 75 (23%) urologists use biopsy only for a selected patient group. Mass in a solitary kidney, bilateral renal masses and a past history of non-renal cancer were the main indications for use of percutaneous biopsy. The risk of false negative results and biopsy not changing the eventual management of their patients were the commonest reasons not to perform biopsy. Conclusion There is a wide and varied practice amongst UK Consultant Urologists in the use of percutaneous biopsy as part of the management of indeterminate renal masses. The majority of urologists believe biopsy confers no benefit. However there is a need to clarify this issue in the wake of recent published evidence as biopsy results may provide critical information for patients with renal masses in a significant majority. It not only differentiates benign from malignant tissue but can also help in deciding the management option for patients undergoing minimally invasive treatments. PMID:17610739

  6. Imaging-guided percutaneous needle biopsy for infectious spondylitis: Factors affecting culture positivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Si Yoon; Kwon, Jong Won [Dept. of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    To evaluate the variable factors affecting the results of percutaneous needle biopsies for infectious spondylitis. In all, 249 patients who underwent both MRI and percutaneous needle biopsies due to a suspicion of infectious spondylitis were evaluated with respect to the following factors: the usage of antibiotics before the procedure, the location of the biopsy, the guiding equipment used, the experience level of the operators, and the number of biopsies performed. The positivity of culture in cases of treated with antibiotics (16.3%) before the biopsy was lower than in the untreated cases (30.5%) (p = 0.004). Biopsies performed at the abscess (43.5%) and with fluoroscopic guidance (27.8%) showed higher culture positivity as well. The experience level of the operators and the number of biopsies had no effect on culture positivity. The usage of antibiotics before the biopsy, the biopsy's location, and the guiding equipment used affect the culture positivity, while the experience levels of the operators and the number of biopsies do not have an effect.

  7. CT-guided core-needle biopsy in the diagnosis of mediastinal lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sklair-Levy, M.; Shaham, D.; Applbaum, Y.H.; Libson, E. [Dept. of Radiology, Hadassah University Hospital, Jerusalem (Israel); Polliack, A.; Gillis, S.; Ben-Yehuda, D. [Dept. of Haematology, Hadassah University Hospital, Jerusalem (Israel); Sherman, Y. [Dept. of Pathology, Hadassah University Hospital, Jerusalem (Israel)

    2000-05-01

    The advent of radiologic guidance techniques for percutaneous biopsy has changed the approach to the routine diagnosis of mediastinal lymphoma. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of CT-guided percutaneous core-needle biopsy (PCNB) in the clinical management of patients with mediastinal lymphoma. The results of 49 CT-guided PCNB of mediastinal lymphoma performed under local anesthesia in 42 ambulatory patients were analyzed. A positive diagnosis of lymphoma was obtained in 30 of 42 patients, with an overall success rate of 71.5 %. The technique was equally successful in the diagnosis of Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. There were no major complications. Percutaneous CT-guided CNB of mediastinal lymphoma is a quick, safe, accurate, and efficient alternative to open biopsy in the evaluation of mediastinal lymphoma, mainly at presentation. It should become the preferred initial diagnostic procedure for obtaining histologic samples in patients with suspected mediastinal lymphoma. (orig.)

  8. Can EGFR mutation status be reliably determined in pre-operative needle biopsies from adenocarcinomas of the lung?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindahl, Kim Hein; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Jonstrup, Søren Peter

    2015-01-01

    The identification of EGFR mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer is important for selecting patients, who may benefit from treatment with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The analysis is usually performed on cytological aspirates and/or histological needle biopsies, representing a small fraction......-operative biopsies (131 histological and 70 cytological) and on the surgical specimens, using PCR. Samples with low tumour cell fraction were assigned to laser micro-dissection (LMD). We found nine (4.5%) patients with EGFR mutation in the lung tumour resections, but failed to identify mutation in one...... of the corresponding pre-operative, cytological specimens. Several (18.4%) analyses of the pre-operative biopsies were inconclusive, especially in case of biopsies undergoing LMD and regarding exon 21 analysis. Discrepancy of mutation status in one patient may reflect intra-tumoural heterogeneity or technical issues...

  9. Stereotactic large-core needle breast biopsy: analysis of pain and discomfort related to the biopsy procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemmer, Judith M.; Heesewijk, Hans P.M. van [St. Antonius Hospital, Department of Radiology, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Kelder, Johannes C. [St. Antonius Hospital, Department of Statistics, Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2008-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine the significance of variables such as duration of the procedure, type of breast tissue, number of passes, depth of the biopsies, underlying pathology, the operator performing the procedure, and their effect on women's perception of pain and discomfort during stereotactic large-core needle breast biopsy. One hundred and fifty consecutive patients with a non-palpable suspicious mammographic lesions were included. Between three and nine 14-gauge breast passes were taken using a prone stereotactic table. Following the biopsy procedure, patients were asked to complete a questionnaire. There was no discomfort in lying on the prone table. There is no relation between type of breast lesion and pain, underlying pathology and pain and performing operator and pain. The type of breast tissue is correlated with pain experienced from biopsy (P = 0.0001). We found out that patients with dense breast tissue complain of more pain from biopsy than patients with more involution of breast tissue. The depth of the biopsy correlates with pain from biopsy (P = 0.0028). Deep lesions are more painful than superficial ones. There is a correlation between the number of passes and pain in the neck (P = 0.0188) and shoulder (P = 0.0366). The duration of the procedure is correlated with pain experienced in the neck (P = 0.0116) but not with pain experienced from biopsy. (orig.)

  10. Transthoracic needle biopsy of thoracic tumours by a colour Doppler ultrasound puncture guiding device.

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, H C; Yu, C. J.; Chang, D B; Yuan, A; Lee, Y. C.; Yang, P C; Kuo, S H; Luh, K T

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Ultrasound guided transthoracic needle aspiration biopsy has recently been used to obtain specimens for histological diagnosis of pulmonary and mediastinal tumours. Conventional real time, grey scale puncture guiding devices cannot differentiate vascular structures, and clear visualisation of the needle shaft or tip within a desired target is not always possible. This study describes a new built-in colour Doppler ultrasound puncture guiding device and assesses the relative safety ...

  11. [Application value of core needle biopsy technique in the pathological diagnosis of locally advanced pancreatic cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Xu; Zhang, Jianwei; Chen, Yingtai; Sun, Yuemin; Wang, Chengfeng

    2015-04-14

    To explore the application value of core needle biopsy technique in the pathological diagnosis of locally advanced pancreatic cancer patients. During April 2007 to April 2014, retrospective analysis was conducted for 36 patients of locally advanced pancreatic cancer to summarize the clinical data of core needle biopsy technique. And the relevant data included clinical features, pathological findings and puncture-related complications. Regular postoperative follow-ups were conducted. All received pathological examination of core needle biopsy. And the pathological diagnoses were pancreatic cancer (n=29), pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (n=2) and chronic pancreatitis (n=5). During the follow-ups, liver metastasis was pathologically confirmed postoperatively at Months 4 and 6 months among 5 chronic pancreatitis patients. The remainder was followed up for over 12 months. There was neither change in size nor metastasis. One case was diagnosed at Peking Union Hospital as autoimmune pancreatitis while another 2 cases had a clinical diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis. The accuracy of core needle puncture was 94.4%. There were 2 cases of postoperative pancreatic fistula in class A. Bleeding complication was absent. The application of core needle biopsy technique is both safe and effective in the pathological diagnosis of locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

  12. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy in the management of choroidal melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCannel, Tara A

    2013-05-01

    Fine-needle aspiration biopsy of choroidal melanoma offers an opportunity to determine the prognosis for metastasis and provide tissue resources for further study to develop molecular-based targeted therapies. Patients increasingly desire as much information as possible about their cancer so that they may plan their lives and investigate new treatments. Physicians who treat choroidal melanoma must become skilled in the technique so that even the smallest tumors, in patients who might benefit most from early treatment, may be safely biopsied. Individualized molecular therapies of the future will be predicated on the results of a patient's fine-needle biopsy. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy for metastatic prognostication was first performed in North America at the Jules Stein Eye Institute, the University of California, Los Angeles in 2004. Subsequent reports from the major ophthalmic oncology centers have since evaluated several platforms for prognostication using mainly DNA-based approaches. Monosomy 3 of the primary tumor is the cytogenetic abnormality most strongly associated with the development of metastasis. The longest clinical follow-up of a cohort of patients at the Jules Stein Eye Institute who underwent biopsy for prognostication reported in 2012 revealed no increase in ocular morbidity or metastatic risk. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy for prognostication in choroidal melanoma is the current standard of care because of new molecular knowledge and a more patient-centered approach to healthcare. Future targeted molecular therapies and metastatic surveillance in patients with choroidal melanoma may be directed by the results of fine-needle aspiration biopsy of the primary tumor.

  13. Tibialis anterior muscle needle biopsy and sensitive biomolecular methods: a useful tool in myotonic dystrophy type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Iachettini

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1 is a neuromuscular disorder caused by a CTG repeat expansion in 3’UTR of DMPK gene. This mutation causes accumulation of toxic RNA in nuclear foci leading to splicing misregulation of specific genes. In view of future clinical trials with antisense oligonucleotides in DM1 patients, it is important to set up sensitive and minimally-invasive tools to monitor the efficacy of treatments on skeletal muscle. A tibialis anterior (TA muscle sample of about 60 mg was obtained from 5 DM1 patients and 5 healthy subjects through a needle biopsy. A fragment of about 40 mg was used for histological examination and a fragment of about 20 mg was used for biomolecular analysis. The TA fragments obtained with the minimally-invasive needle biopsy technique is enough to perform all the histopathological and biomolecular evaluations useful to monitor a clinical trial on DM1 patients.

  14. Tibialis anterior muscle needle biopsy and sensitive biomolecular methods: a useful tool in myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iachettini, S; Valaperta, R; Marchesi, A; Perfetti, A; Cuomo, G; Fossati, B; Vaienti, L; Costa, E; Meola, G; Cardani, R

    2015-10-26

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is a neuromuscular disorder caused by a CTG repeat expansion in 3'UTR of DMPK gene. This mutation causes accumulation of toxic RNA in nuclear foci leading to splicing misregulation of specific genes. In view of future clinical trials with antisense oligonucleotides in DM1 patients, it is important to set up sensitive and minimally-invasive tools to monitor the efficacy of treatments on skeletal muscle. A tibialis anterior (TA) muscle sample of about 60 mg was obtained from 5 DM1 patients and 5 healthy subjects through a needle biopsy. A fragment of about 40 mg was used for histological examination and a fragment of about 20 mg was used for biomolecular analysis. The TA fragments obtained with the minimally-invasive needle biopsy technique is enough to perform all the histopathological and biomolecular evaluations useful to monitor a clinical trial on DM1 patients.

  15. [Ultrasonically-guided percutaneous needle biopsy in the diagnosis of malignant abdominal diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesić, V; Lisanin, Lj; Lukac, S; Zica, D; Kupresanin, S; Spasić, V

    1998-01-01

    In 3-year period 340 percutaneous ultrasonographically guided needle biopsies of abdominal organs and tissues were performed in suspected neoprocesses. Positive cytologic results were obtained in 77.6% and histological in 74.8% of patients. These results were obtained thanks to good choice of a bioptic needle and the technique of performing percutaneous needle biopsy under ultrasonographic control and sometimes in combination with radioscopy, too. Experience of both a biopsy performer and a cytologist or histologist with this kind of material is of great importance. Thanks to early histologic diagnosis, made in this way, percutaneous biopsy is classified as a high sensitive method and as such it forces on to be one of the first methods in algorithm of diagnostic procedures. Even the aim of this paper is to point out not only the authors ultrasonographic experience but also reliability, simplicity and safety of percutaneous guided needle biopsies, what excludes the necessity for more difficult and more expensive diagnostic procedures significantly reducing the examination.

  16. Stereotactic core needle breast biopsy marker migration: An analysis of factors contributing to immediate marker migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Ashali; Khalid, Maria; Qureshi, Muhammad M; Georgian-Smith, Dianne; Kaplan, Jonah A; Buch, Karen; Grinstaff, Mark W; Hirsch, Ariel E; Hines, Neely L; Anderson, Stephan W; Gallagher, Katherine M; Bates, David D B; Bloch, B Nicolas

    2017-05-19

    To evaluate breast biopsy marker migration in stereotactic core needle biopsy procedures and identify contributing factors. This retrospective study analyzed 268 stereotactic biopsy markers placed in 263 consecutive patients undergoing stereotactic biopsies using 9G vacuum-assisted devices from August 2010-July 2013. Mammograms were reviewed and factors contributing to marker migration were evaluated. Basic descriptive statistics were calculated and comparisons were performed based on radiographically-confirmed marker migration. Of the 268 placed stereotactic biopsy markers, 35 (13.1%) migrated ≥1 cm from their biopsy cavity. Range: 1-6 cm; mean (± SD): 2.35 ± 1.22 cm. Of the 35 migrated biopsy markers, 9 (25.7%) migrated ≥3.5 cm. Patient age, biopsy pathology, number of cores, and left versus right breast were not associated with migration status (P> 0.10). Global fatty breast density (P= 0.025) and biopsy in the inner region of breast (P = 0.031) were associated with marker migration. Superior biopsy approach (P= 0.025), locally heterogeneous breast density, and t-shaped biopsy markers (P= 0.035) were significant for no marker migration. Multiple factors were found to influence marker migration. An overall migration rate of 13% supports endeavors of research groups actively developing new biopsy marker designs for improved resistance to migration. • Breast biopsy marker migration is documented in 13% of 268 procedures. • Marker migration is affected by physical, biological, and pathological factors. • Breast density, marker shape, needle approach etc. affect migration. • Study demonstrates marker migration prevalence; marker design improvements are needed.

  17. Diagnostic value of immunohistochemical IMP3 expression in core needle biopsies of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachter, David Lukas; Schlabrakowski, Anne; Hoegel, Josef; Kristiansen, Glen; Hartmann, Arndt; Riener, Marc-Oliver

    2011-06-01

    The oncofetal protein, insulin-like growth factor II messenger ribonucleic acid-binding protein 3 (IMP3), has been analyzed in many different tumors. Various studies have found that IMP3 is a marker for malignancy and is correlated with increased tumor aggressiveness and reduced overall survival. The diagnosis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) in core needle biopsies can be challenging, and immunohistochemical markers are needed. We studied IMP3 expression in 177 core needle biopsies of the pancreas, including 112 PDACs, 55 cases with chronic sclerosing pancreatitis, and 10 biopsies with tumor-free pancreatic tissue without inflammation. An additional 18 biopsies of PDAC metastases (16 liver biopsies and 2 lymph node biopsies) were analyzed. To study IMP3 expression in large tissue sections, 45 pancreatic resection specimens (26 with PDAC and 19 with chronic sclerosing pancreatitis) were investigated. In contrast to normal or inflamed pancreatic tissue, which was negative in 47 of 65 (72.3%) cases and weakly positive in 15 of 65 (23.1%) cases, strong IMP3 expression was found in 99 of 112 (88.4%) PDACs. Therefore, sensitivity and specificity of IMP3 expression in the differential diagnosis of PDAC and chronic sclerosing pancreatitis using core needle biopsies were found to be 88.4% and 94.6%, respectively. These results were confirmed in the pancreas resection specimens. Furthermore, strong IMP3 expression was found in 17 of 18 (94.4%) of the PDAC metastases that were analyzed. Our study shows that IMP3 is an easy to use and potentially new immunohistochemical marker for the diagnosis of PDAC in core needle biopsies.

  18. The Role of Ultrasound Guided FNAB (Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy of Nonpalpable Breast Masses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Haghighi

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Because of the high inci-dence and mortality rate of breast cancers, and high survival rate of patients after detecting masses smaller than 1cm, it is important to do tissue sampling with imaging guidance. Our goal was to determine the role of sonoguided FNAB as a first step to avoid the more invasive and expensive unnecessary core or excisional biopsies. Materials and Methods: This was an observational study. Our cases included the patients referred to our clinic from 1998-2004 to get FNAB for their nonpal-pable breast masses that had been found in imaging and were visible with Ultrasound and classified in cat 3 or 4 BIRads. The number of cases was 500. The in-strument used was ESaote EU4 with 10 MHZ probe. The results of cytological tests were collected and classified into three groups known as: 1-Benign (negative 2-Malignant (positive 3-Indeterminate Our gold standard was excisional biopsy with three years follow up. Results: Sono and mammo guided FNA, core biopsy and needle localization biopsy are three ways to reach nonpalpable breast lesions. According to other studies, the overall accuracy for imaging guided core biopsy is %97 without FP and for FNA is %77 with %5 FP. An inadequate amount of sample is reported in 32% of sonoguided FNAs but in our study, it was not significant. We had normal breast tissue in %2 (n=10 of our cases and they did not develop malig-nancy in three years follow up. The cost of FNA is very low compared with the other two procedures. Also our NPV was %100 and three fourth of our cases had benign pathology (negative for malignancy. Conclusion: According to our results doing FNA as the first step for cat 3 and 4 masses and R/O of malig-nancy in most patients can save money and time. Core biopsy could be reserved only for the other one fourth of patients.

  19. The Role of Core Needle Biopsy for Thyroid Nodules with Initially Indeterminate Results on Previous Fine-Needle Aspiration: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, C H; Baek, J H; Park, C; Choi, Y J; Lee, J H

    2017-07-01

    Sonography-guided fine-needle aspiration leads to relatively frequent cases of indeterminate cytology for the diagnosis of thyroid nodules. Our aim was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of core needle biopsy for the examination of thyroid nodules with initially indeterminate results on fine-needle aspiration. A computerized search of the MEDLINE and Embase databases was performed to identify relevant original articles. Studies investigating the use of core needle biopsy for thyroid nodules with initially indeterminate results on previous fine-needle aspiration were eligible for inclusion. The pooled proportions for nondiagnostic results, inconclusive results, malignancy on core needle biopsy, the ability of core needle biopsy to diagnose malignancy, and the related complications of the procedure were analyzed. The meta-analytic pooling was based on a random-effects model. Nine eligible studies, involving 2240 patients with 2245 thyroid nodules, were included. The pooled proportion for nondiagnostic results was 1.8% (95% CI, 0.4%-3.2%), and the pooled proportion for inconclusive results was 25.1% (95% CI, 15.4%-34.9%). The pooled proportion for malignancy was 18.9% (95% CI, 8.4%-29.5%). With regard to the diagnostic performance for malignancy, the sensitivity of core needle biopsy varied, ranging from 44.7% to 85.0%, but the specificity was 100% in all cases. No major complications of core needle biopsy were observed. The relatively small number of included studies and retrospective nature were limitations. Core needle biopsy has low nondiagnostic result rates and high specificity for the diagnosis of malignancy. It is a safe diagnostic technique with a higher diagnostic yield, especially when molecular testing is not available or fine-needle aspiration did not yield enough cells for molecular testing. © 2017 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  20. Use of Core Needle Biopsy rather than Fine-Needle Aspiration Cytology in the Diagnostic Approach of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagni, Paola; Spunticchia, Flaminia; Barberi, Simona; Caprio, Giuliana; Paglicci, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims In the following study case, we reviewed breast ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy (CNB), using Mammotome (vacuum-assisted breast biopsy) and Tru-cut, carried out on palpable and nonpalpable uncertain breast lumps or malignant large lesions to be submitted to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Material and Methods Examinations were conducted during a 4-year period of clinical activity in a highly specialized center, from December 2009 to December 2013, in 712 patients previously subjected to fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC). Results The results demonstrated that among the 712 breast biopsies, in many cases FNAC was not conclusive, and therefore we proceeded with the echo-guided biopsy, through which we were able to collect sufficient material for the histological examination in order to direct patients to surgery or follow-up. Conclusions CNB is far superior to FNAC, especially in cases of uncertainty, where it is preferable to proceed directly with CNB, which may also determine additional prognostic and predictive markers. Initially FNAC is less expensive, but the actual costs involved tend to be higher for FNAC as it is less accurate and a CNB is often required. In accordance with recent publications, we can confirm the full validity of CNB in the diagnostic approach of breast lesions. PMID:25120471

  1. Use of Core Needle Biopsy rather than Fine-Needle Aspiration Cytology in the Diagnostic Approach of Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Pagni

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: In the following study case, we reviewed breast ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy (CNB, using Mammotome (vacuum-assisted breast biopsy and Tru-cut, carried out on palpable and nonpalpable uncertain breast lumps or malignant large lesions to be submitted to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Material and Methods: Examinations were conducted during a 4-year period of clinical activity in a highly specialized center, from December 2009 to December 2013, in 712 patients previously subjected to fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC. Results: The results demonstrated that among the 712 breast biopsies, in many cases FNAC was not conclusive, and therefore we proceeded with the echo-guided biopsy, through which we were able to collect sufficient material for the histological examination in order to direct patients to surgery or follow-up. Conclusions: CNB is far superior to FNAC, especially in cases of uncertainty, where it is preferable to proceed directly with CNB, which may also determine additional prognostic and predictive markers. Initially FNAC is less expensive, but the actual costs involved tend to be higher for FNAC as it is less accurate and a CNB is often required. In accordance with recent publications, we can confirm the full validity of CNB in the diagnostic approach of breast lesions.

  2. Value of computed tomography-guided core needle biopsy in diagnosis of primary pulmonary lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiwei; Li, Xiaoguang; Chen, Jin; Jin, Zhengyu; Shi, Haifeng; Zhang, Xiaobo; Pan, Jie; Liu, Wei; Yang, Ning; Chen, Jie

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the value of computed tomography (CT)-guided core needle biopsy in diagnosis of primary pulmonary lymphoma and its subtypes. A retrospective analysis of the records of all patients with primary pulmonary lymphoma between January 2005 and August 2011 was performed. There were 25 patients referred to the radiology department for CT-guided core needle biopsy. The success rate and complications were assessed. A definitive diagnosis and accurate histologic subtype were obtained in 21 patients with a success rate of 84.0%. Diagnosis was made in the other four patients with bronchoscopy and surgery. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) was the diagnosis in all patients. Most subtypes were mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphomas (n = 19). The remaining subtypes included three diffuse large B-cell NHLs, two peripheral T-cell lymphomas not otherwise specified, and one anaplastic large cell NHL. The success rate of core needle biopsy was 95% (18 of 19) for MALT lymphomas, 67% (2 of 3) for diffuse large B cell NHLs, and 33% (1 of 3) for other NHLs. The success rate for MALT lymphomas was significantly higher than that of non-MALT lymphomas according to Fisher exact t test (P = .031). No serious complications occurred in any patients. CT-guided core needle biopsy is a reliable procedure to assist in diagnosis and classification of primary pulmonary lymphomas, especially MALT lymphomas. Copyright © 2013 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. False Negative Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy Results in Primary Thyroid Lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In Joong; Kim, Eun Kyung; Koh, Myoung Ju; Kwak, Jin Young; Moon, Hee Jung [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    Ultrasonography-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy (US-FNA) is one of the methods used to diagnose thyroid lymphoma, but it has a relatively high false-negative rate. The authors report a case of a primary thyroid lymphoma associated with underlying lymphocytic thyroiditis that was initially misdiagnosed as lymphocytic thyroiditis based on US-FNA findings

  4. First-Line Use of Core Needle Biopsy for High-Yield Preliminary Diagnosis of Thyroid Nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H C; Kim, Y J; Han, H Y; Yi, J M; Baek, J H; Park, S Y; Seo, J Y; Kim, K W

    2017-02-01

    Although core needle biopsy was introduced as a diagnostic alternative to fine-needle aspiration, the utility and safety of core needle biopsy for thyroid nodules in a large population has yet to be studied comprehensively. We evaluate core needle biopsy yields on a large-scale basis to investigate its potential in the preliminary diagnosis of thyroid nodules. Between March 2005 and December 2013, 2448 initially detected thyroid nodules from 2120 consecutive patients who underwent core needle biopsy were retrospectively evaluated. Of these, 72 thyroid nodules from 63 patients were excluded due to prior fine-needle aspiration attempts. The inconclusive and conclusive result rates, diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and unnecessary surgery rate of core needle biopsy were evaluated. With core needle biopsy as the first-line method, the inconclusive result rate was 11.9% (283/2376) and the conclusive result rate was 88.1% (2093/2376). The diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of core needle biopsy for the diagnosis of malignancy were 96.7% (1160/1200), 89.7% (347/387), 100% (813/813), 100% (347/347), and 95.3% (813/853), respectively. There were no major complications and 12 minor complications. We have demonstrated that first-line use of core needle biopsy may well improve diagnostic accuracy in thyroid nodules, reducing inconclusive or false-negative results and unnecessary operations. Such benefits underscore the promising role of core needle biopsy in managing thyroid nodules and optimizing related surgical decision-making. © 2017 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  5. Comparing endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided fine needle aspiration (FNA) versus fine needle biopsy (FNB) in the diagnosis of solid lesions: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinlin; Wu, Xiaoli; Yin, Ping; Guo, Qiaozhen; Hou, Wei; Li, Yawen; Wang, Yun; Cheng, Bin

    2016-04-12

    Linear endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) allows the visualization, identification, and characterization of the extent of lesions of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and adjacent structures. EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) facilitates a more accurate diagnosis of mediastinal, intra-abdominal, and pancreatic lesions through the collection of the cytological material under direct visualization. Recent reports suggest that histological samples can be obtained by EUS-FNA with a reverse, bevel-tipped needle (the ProCore needle) to collect the core samples (fine needle biopsy, FNB), thereby adding a new dimension to the diagnostic usefulness of this technique. Certain neoplasms, such as lymphoma and stromal tumors, can be assessed by EUS-FNB to confirm the diagnosis. Here, we aimed to carry out a prospective, multicenter, single-blind, randomized, controlled trial to compare EUS-FNB and EUS-FNA. A total of 408 patients will be enrolled from five endoscopic centers. Patients will be divided into two groups: (1) group A, which is the EUS regular needle group (EUS-FNA) and (2) group B, which is the EUS ProCore needle group (EUS-FNB). Patients in group A will be examined with a 22G EchoTip Ultra needle, and patients in group B, with a 22G EchoTip ProCore needle. For all included patients, four EUS-guided passes will be made in each lesion. In the first and second pass, a slow-pull suction method of the stylet will be done. The third and fourth pass will use manual suction of 5 cc. The primary objective is to compare the diagnostic yield of malignancy by EUS-FNA versus EUS-FNB. The trial will compare samples obtained by EUS-FNA versus EUS-FNB for the diagnostic yield of solid lesions. The efficacy of these two sampling methods will be assessed on various lesions, which may provide insights into developing practice guidelines for their future indications. Clinical Trials.gov, NCT02327065 .

  6. Computer-aided morphometry of liver inflammation in needle biopsies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    N Dioguardi; B Franceschini; C Russo; F Grizzi

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To introduce a computer-aided morphometric method for quantifying the necro-inflammatory phase in liver biopsy specimens using fractal geometry and Delaunay's triangulation.METHODS: Two-micrometer thick biopsy sections taken from 78 chronic hepatitis C virus-infected patients were immunohistochemically treated to identify the inflammatory cells. An automatic computer-aided image analysis system was used to define the inflammatory cell network defined on the basis of Delaunay's triangulation,and the inflammatory cells were geometrically classified as forming a cluster (an aggregation of a minimum of three cells) or as being irregularly distributed within the tissue. The phase of inflammatory activity was estimated using Hurst's exponent.RESULTS: The proposed automatic method was rapid and objective. It could not only provide rigorous results expressed by scalar numbers, but also allow the state of the whole organ to be represented by Hurst's exponent with an error of no more than 12%.CONCLUSION: The availability of rigorous metrical measures and the reasonable representativeness of the status of the organ as a whole raise the question as to whether the indication for hepatic biopsy should be revised by establishing clear rules concerning the contraindications suggested by its invasiveness and subjective interpretation.

  7. Automated tru-cut imaging-guided core needle biopsy of canine orbital neoplasia. A prospective feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirla, A; Rondena, M; Bertolini, G

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of imaging-guided core needle biopsy for canine orbital mass diagnosis. A second excisional biopsy obtained during surgery or necropsy was used as the reference standard. A prospective feasibility study was conducted in 23 canine orbital masses at a single centre. A complete ophthalmic examination was always followed by orbital ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) examination of the head. All masses were sampled with the patient still on the CT table using ultrasound (US) guided automatic tru-cut device. The most suitable sampling approach to the orbit was chosen each time based on the CT image analysis. One of the following different approaches was used: trans-orbital, trans-conjunctival or trans-masseteric. In all cases, the imaging-guided biopsy provided a sufficient amount of tissue for the histopathological diagnosis, which concurred with the biopsies obtained using the excisional technique. CT examination was essential for morphological diagnosis and provided detailed topographic information that allowed us to choose the safest orbital approach for the biopsy. US guided automatic tru-cut biopsy based on CT images, performed with patient still on the CT table, resulted in a minimally invasive, relatively easy, and accurate diagnostic procedure in dogs with orbital masses.

  8. Automated tru-cut imaging-guided core needle biopsy of canine orbital neoplasia. A prospective feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirla, A.; Rondena, M.; Bertolini, G.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of imaging-guided core needle biopsy for canine orbital mass diagnosis. A second excisional biopsy obtained during surgery or necropsy was used as the reference standard. A prospective feasibility study was conducted in 23 canine orbital masses at a single centre. A complete ophthalmic examination was always followed by orbital ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) examination of the head. All masses were sampled with the patient still on the CT table using ultrasound (US) guided automatic tru-cut device. The most suitable sampling approach to the orbit was chosen each time based on the CT image analysis. One of the following different approaches was used: trans-orbital, trans-conjunctival or trans-masseteric. In all cases, the imaging-guided biopsy provided a sufficient amount of tissue for the histopathological diagnosis, which concurred with the biopsies obtained using the excisional technique. CT examination was essential for morphological diagnosis and provided detailed topographic information that allowed us to choose the safest orbital approach for the biopsy. US guided automatic tru-cut biopsy based on CT images, performed with patient still on the CT table, resulted in a minimally invasive, relatively easy, and accurate diagnostic procedure in dogs with orbital masses. PMID:27540512

  9. Automated tru-cut imaging-guided core needle biopsy of canine orbital neoplasia. A prospective feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Cirla

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of imaging-guided core needle biopsy for canine orbital mass diagnosis. A second excisional biopsy obtained during surgery or necropsy was used as the reference standard. A prospective feasibility study was conducted in 23 canine orbital masses at a single centre. A complete ophthalmic examination was always followed by orbital ultrasound and computed tomography (CT examination of the head. All masses were sampled with the patient still on the CT table using ultrasound (US guided automatic tru-cut device. The most suitable sampling approach to the orbit was chosen each time based on the CT image analysis. One of the following different approaches was used: trans-orbital, trans-conjunctival or trans-masseteric. In all cases, the imaging-guided biopsy provided a sufficient amount of tissue for the histopathological diagnosis, which concurred with the biopsies obtained using the excisional technique. CT examination was essential for morphological diagnosis and provided detailed topographic information that allowed us to choose the safest orbital approach for the biopsy. US guided automatic tru-cut biopsy based on CT images, performed with patient still on the CT table, resulted in a minimally invasive, relatively easy, and accurate diagnostic procedure in dogs with orbital masses.

  10. Diagnosis of Giant Cell Tumor of Temporomandibular Joint with Ultrasound-guided Core Needle Biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih Yung Yang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Temporomandibular joint (TMJ tumors may initially present with symptoms similar to TMJ internal derangements and myositis of masticatory muscles. However, malignant tumors and specific types of benign tumors, such as giant cell tumors, may need aggressive surgical intervention. The current case is a 41-year-old man who initially presented with right preauricular pain. Computed tomography (CT revealed a destructive bone lesion over the right TMJ with temporal bone destruction. A biopsy conducted with an ultrasound-guided core needle confirmed that the lesion was a giant cell tumor. Giant cell tumors can eventually destroy the surrounding tissue. Magnetic resonance imaging and CT have been traditionally used to evaluate TMJ disorders, whereas ultrasonography provides real-time imaging for evaluating the joint structure, movement, and biopsy guidance. For a TMJ tumor, a precise diagnosis is necessary for adequate planning of treatment. Ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy is a safe and effective method for confirming a diagnosis.

  11. C-arm cone-beam CT combined with a new electromagnetic navigation system for guidance of percutaneous needle biopsies. Initial clinical experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kickuth, R.; Reichling, C.; Bley, T.; Hahn, D.; Ritter, C. [University Hospital of Wuerzburg (Germany). Inst. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2015-07-15

    To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of C-arm fluoroscopic cone-beam computed tomography (CACT) in combination with a new electromagnetic tracking (EMT) system for needle guidance during percutaneous biopsies. 53 patients were referred for biopsy of thoracic (n = 19) and abdominal (n = 34) lesions. CT-like images of the anatomical region of interest (ROI) were generated using a flat panel-based angiographic system. These images were transmitted to an EMT system. A coaxial puncture needle with a sensor in its tip was connected with the navigation system and tracked into an electromagnetic field created via a field generator. Data generated within this field were merged with the CACT images. On a monitor both the anatomical ROI and needle tip position were displayed to enable precise needle insertion into the target. Through the coaxial needle, biopsy specimens for the histologic evaluation were extracted. Number of representative biopsy samples, number of core biopsies/patient, total procedure time, dose-area product, fluoroscopic time, and complications were recorded. 53 CACT/EMT-guided biopsy procedures were performed, 48 of which (91 %) yielded representative tissue samples. Four core biopsies were obtained from each patient. 40 (75 %) lesions were malignant and 13 (25 %) lesions were benign. The total procedure time was 9 ± 5 min (range, 3 - 23 min), fluoroscopic time was 0.8 ± 0.4 min (range, 0.4 - 2 min). The mean dose-area product (cGy cm{sup 2}) was 7373 (range, 895 - 26 904). The rate of complications (1 pneumothorax, 2 hemoptyses) was 6 %. CACT combined with EMT appears to be a feasible and effective technique for the guidance of percutaneous biopsies with a low rate of therapeutically relevant complications.

  12. MR-guided biopsy of the prostate: Comparison of diagnostic specimen quality with 18G and 16G biopsy needles

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    Durmus, Tahir, E-mail: tahir.durmus@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charité Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany); Goldmann, Ulrike, E-mail: ulrike.goldmann@charite.de [Department of Pathology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charité Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany); Baur, Alexander D.J., E-mail: alexander.baur@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charité Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany); Huppertz, Alexander, E-mail: Alexander.huppertz@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charité Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany); Imaging Science Institute, Charité, Berlin (Germany); Schwenke, Carsten, E-mail: carsten.schwenke@scossis.de [SCO:SSiS Statistical Consulting, Berlin (Germany); Hamm, Bernd, E-mail: Bernd.hamm@charite.de [Department of Radiology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charité Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany); Franiel, Tobias, E-mail: tobias.franiel@med.uni-jena.de [Department of Radiology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charité Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany); Department of Radiology – Universitätsklinikum Jena (Germany)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate specimen quality and diagnostic differences between magnetic resonance (MR) compatible 16G and 18G biopsy needles in MR-guided biopsy (MRGB) of the prostate. Materials and methods: Semiautomatic MR compatible biopsy needles with a diameter of 16G (Group A) or 18G (Group B) were used to perform MRGB in 88 patients with suspected prostate cancer. After embedding and staining, length and width of all specimens (140 cores in Group A, 143 in Group B) were measured. Fragmentation, squeezing artifacts, and overall evaluability were evaluated using a quality score from 0 (no tissue) to 3 (optimal tissue quality). Groups were statistically compared; p-values <0.05 were regarded as significant. Results: Demographic data were not significantly different between Group A and B with a mean age of 63 ± 7.3 and 67 ± 5.7 years; and a mean prostate-specific antigen of 12.6 ± 10.3 ng/ml and 13.8 ± 11.6 ng/ml, respectively (p = 0.70). Area of longitudinally sectioned histological specimens was significantly larger in Group A than in Group B with 9.38 mm{sup 2} (8.74; 10.02) and 7.95 mm{sup 2} (7.32; 8.59), respectively (p = 0.002). However, there were significantly more cores without prostate tissue with 18 cores (12.9%) versus 3 cores (2.1%) in Groups A and B, respectively (p = 0.004). Fragmentation, squeezing artifacts, and overall evaluability were not statistically different between the two groups. The rate of prostate cancer in the cores was also not significantly different between Groups A and B (22.1% and 24.5%; p = 0.77). Conclusion: 16G biopsy needles do not provide a relevant diagnostic advantage over 18G needles in MRGB. Therefore, use of 18G needles is not discouraged and may even be preferred as it is not expected to result in a relevant degradation of specimen quality or compromise in prostate cancer detection rate.

  13. Low grade urothelial carcinoma mimicking basal cell hyperplasia and transitional metaplasia in needle prostate biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Arista-Nasr

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose The vast majority of urothelial carcinomas infiltrating the bladder are consistent with high-grade tumors that can be easily recognized as malignant in needle prostatic biopsies. In contrast, the histological changes of low-grade urothelial carcinomas in this kind of biopsy have not been studied. Materials and Methods We describe the clinicopathologic features of two patients with low-grade bladder carcinomas infiltrating the prostate. They reported dysuria and hematuria. Both had a slight elevation of the prostate specific antigen and induration of the prostatic lobes. Needle biopsies were performed. At endoscopy bladder tumors were found in both cases. Results Both biopsies showed nests of basophilic cells and cells with perinuclear clearing and slight atypia infiltrating acini and small prostatic ducts. The stroma exhibited extensive desmoplasia and chronic inflammation. The original diagnosis was basal cell hyperplasia and transitional metaplasia. The bladder tumors also showed low-grade urothelial carcinoma. In one case, the neoplasm infiltrated the lamina propria, and in another, the muscle layer. In both, a transurethral resection was performed for obstructive urinary symptoms. The neoplasms were positive for high molecular weight keratin (34BetaE12 and thrombomodulin. No metastases were found in either of the patients, and one of them has survived for five years. Conclusions The diagnosis of low-grade urothelial carcinoma in prostate needle biopsies is difficult and may simulate benign prostate lesions including basal cell hyperplasia and urothelial metaplasia. It is crucial to recognize low-grade urothelial carcinoma in needle biopsies because only an early diagnosis and aggressive treatment can improve the prognosis for these patients.

  14. Workflow assessment of 3T MRI-guided transperineal targeted prostate biopsy using a robotic needle guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Sang-Eun; Tuncali, Kemal; Tokuda, Junichi; Fedorov, Andriy; Penzkofer, Tobias; Fennessy, Fiona; Tempany, Clare; Yoshimitsu, Kitaro; Magill, John; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided transperineal targeted prostate biopsy has become a valuable instrument for detection of prostate cancer in patients with continuing suspicion for aggressive cancer after transrectal ultrasound guided (TRUS) guided biopsy. The MRI-guided procedures are performed using mechanical targeting devices or templates, which suffer from limitations of spatial sampling resolution and/or manual in-bore adjustments. To overcome these limitations, we developed and clinically deployed an MRI-compatible piezoceramic-motor actuated needle guidance device, Smart Template, which allows automated needle guidance with high targeting resolution for use in a wide closed-bore 3-Tesla MRI scanner. One of the main limitations of the MRI-guided procedure is the lengthy procedure time compared to conventional TRUS-guided procedures. In order to optimize the procedure, we assessed workflow of 30 MRI-guided biopsy procedures using the Smart Template with focus on procedure time. An average of 3.4 (range: 2~6) targets were preprocedurally selected per procedure and 2.2 ± 0.8 biopsies were performed for each target with an average insertion attempt of 1.9 ± 0.7 per biopsy. The average technical preparation time was 14 ± 7 min and the in-MRI patient preparation time was 42 ± 7 min. After 21 ± 7 min of initial imaging, 64 ± 12 min of biopsy was performed yielding an average of 10 ± 2 min per tissue sample. The total procedure time occupying the MRI suite was 138 ± 16 min. No noticeable tendency in the length of any time segment was observed over the 30 clinical cases.

  15. Breast cancer prognosis and isolated tumor cell findings in axillary lymph nodes after core needle biopsy and fine needle aspiration cytology: Biopsy method and breast cancer outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liikanen, J; Leidenius, M; Joensuu, H; Vironen, J; Heikkilä, P; Meretoja, T

    2016-01-01

    It is unknown whether performing a core needle biopsy (CNB) to diagnose breast cancer increases the incidence of isolated tumor cells (ITC) in the axillary sentinel lymph nodes. Patients diagnosed with unilateral invasive pT1 breast cancer (≤2 cm in diameter, n = 1525) at a single center between February 2001 and August 2005 were included in this prospective observational cohort study. The patients were categorized into two groups according to the type of the preoperative breast needle biopsy performed, the CNB and the fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) groups, and followed up for a median of 9.5 years after breast surgery. 868 (56.9%) patients had FNAC and 657 (43.2%) CNB. In the subset of patients with no axillary metastases (pN0, n = 1005) 70 patients had ITC, 37 (4.3%) out of the 546 patients in FNAC group and 33 (5.0%) out of the 459 patients in the CNB group (p = 0.798). The type of tumor biopsy did not influence breast cancer-specific survival (p = 0.461) or local recurrence-free survival (p = 0.814) in univariable survival analyses. Overall, survival favored the CNB group in a univariable analysis, but no difference in survival emerged in a multivariable analysis (p = 0.718). CNB was not associated with a greater incidence of ITC in axillary lymph nodes as compared with FNAC, and did not have an adverse effect on survival outcomes in a patient population treated with modern adjuvant therapies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy of abdominal viscera: Tips to ensure safe and effective biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Woong; Shin, Sang Soo [Chonnam National University Hospital, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju(Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Ultrasound-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy (USPCB) is used extensively in daily clinical practice for the pathologic confirmation of both focal and diffuse diseases of the abdominal viscera. As a guidance tool, US has a number of clear advantages over computerized tomography or magnetic resonance imaging: fewer false-negative biopsies, lack of ionizing radiation, portability, relatively short procedure time, real-time intra-procedural visualization of the biopsy needle, ability to guide the procedure in almost any anatomic plane, and relatively lower cost. Notably, USPCB is widely used to retrieve tissue specimens in cases of hepatic lesions. However, general radiologists, particularly beginners, find USPCB difficult to perform in abdominal organs other than the liver; indeed, a full understanding of the entire USPCB process and specific considerations for specific abdominal organs is necessary to safely obtain adequate specimens. In this review, we discuss some points and techniques that need to be borne in mind to increase the chances of successful USPCB. We believe that the tips and considerations presented in this review will help radiologists perform USPCB to successfully retrieve target tissue from different organs with minimal complications.

  17. Post mortem computed tomography and core needle biopsy in comparison to autopsy in eleven Bernese mountain dogs with histiocytic sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostettler, Franziska C; Wiener, Dominique J; Welle, Monika M; Posthaus, Horst; Geissbühler, Urs

    2015-09-02

    Bernese mountain dogs are reported to have a shorter life expectancy than other breeds. A major reason for this has been assigned to a high tumour prevalence, especially of histiocytic sarcoma. The efforts made by the breeding clubs to improve the longevity with the help of genetic tests and breeding value estimations are impeded by insufficiently reliable diagnoses regarding the cause of death. The current standard for post mortem examination in animals is performance of an autopsy. In human forensic medicine, imaging modalities, such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, are used with increasing frequency as a complement to autopsy. The present study investigates, whether post mortem computed tomography in combination with core needle biopsy is able to provide a definitive diagnosis of histiocytic sarcoma. For this purpose we have analysed the results of post mortem computed tomography and core needle biopsy in eleven Bernese mountain dogs. In the subsequent autopsy, every dog had a definitive diagnosis of histiocytic sarcoma, based on immunohistochemistry. Computed tomography revealed space-occupying lesions in all dogs. Lesion detection by post mortem computed tomography was similar to lesion detection in autopsy for lung tissue (9 cases in computed tomography / 8 cases in autopsy), thoracic lymph nodes (9/8), spleen (6/7), kidney (2/2) and bone (3/3). Hepatic nodules, however, were difficult to detect with our scanning protocol (2/7). Histology of the core needle biopsies provided definitive diagnoses of histiocytic sarcoma in ten dogs, including confirmation by immunohistochemistry in six dogs. The biopsy samples of the remaining dog did not contain any identifiable neoplastic cells. Autolysis was the main reason for uncertain histological diagnoses. Post mortem computed tomography is a fast and effective method for the detection of lesions suspicious for histiocytic sarcoma in pulmonary, thoracic lymphatic, splenic, osseous and renal tissue

  18. Extrapleural paravertebral CT guided fine needle biopsy of subcarinal lymph nodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tantawy, Wahid H., E-mail: tantawyw@yahoo.com [Radiology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, Egypt Abbassyia square, Cairo (Egypt); El-Gemeie, Emad H. [Pathology Department, National Cancer Institute, Fom El Khalige Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University (Egypt); Ibrahim, Ahmed S., E-mail: asibrahima@gmail.com [Radiology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, Egypt Abbassyia square, Cairo (Egypt); Mohamed, Mona A. [Radiology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, Egypt Abbassyia square, Cairo (Egypt)

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To report our experience in CT guided extrapleural paravertebral subcarinal lymph biopsy using a thin 25 gauge (25 G) thin needle without the need of injection of saline to widen the mediastinum. Materials and methods: Biopsy was performed using a 25 G needle which was advanced lateral to the vertebral body between the endothoracic fascia and the parietal pleura to gain access to subcarinal lymph nodes. One hundred and forty one patients were included in the study (74 females, 57 males). No artificial widening of the mediastinum using saline injection was required. The study was performed in the presence of a cytopathologist; sensitivity and specificity rates were calculated. Complications were documented for each case especially for pneumothorax and haemorrhage. Results: Cytopathological diagnosis was reached in all cases. All re-aspirations were done in the same session to reach a primary diagnosis at the time of the biopsy. Imunophenotyping study was done in 94 cases to confirm the primary diagnosis and to classify the malignant lesions. No pneumothorax was encountered. Small haematomas were noted in 5 cases (3.5%). Cytopathology showed a sensitivity of 97.2% and specificity of 100%. By adding immunophenotyping a 100% sensitivity and specificity was achieved. Conclusion: Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) using a 25 gauge needle for subcarinal lymph nodes via a percutaneous extrapleural paravertebral CT guided approach is a safe, minimally invasive, and tolerable procedure yielding a high sensitivity and specificity rates without the need of artificial widening.

  19. Comparison of needles size in pediatric renal biopsy with sono-guided percutaneous-automated gun technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Chul; Park, Jin Yong [Chungnam National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-11-01

    To compare the efficacy of a 20-gauge and an 18-gauge needle in sono-guided percutaneous automated gun biopsy for establishing the specific diagnosis of renal parenchymal disease in pediatric kidneys. In 60 pediatric patients with renal parenchymal diseases, percutaneous sono-guided gun biopsy was performed by an experienced radiologist. In two groups of 30 patients, regardless of their age, two needle passes were performed, using alternately an 18-gauge or a 20-gauge biopsy needle. The core of renal tissue thus obtained was examined with light, immunofluorescent or electron microscopy by the renal pathologist. The mean number of intact glomeruli of whole tissue core per biopsy, as seen on the light microscopy, and post-bioptic complications were compared between the two different needle size groups. The number (mean{+-}1 standard deviation) of glomeruli obtained per biopsy was 17{+-}8 in the 18-gauge needle group, and 14{+-}5 in the 20-gauge group. Between two groups, there was no major post-bioptic complication requiring specific treatment, nor a statistically significant difference in the frequency of minor complications. Even though more glomeruli were obtained with an 18-gauge needle, the number obtained with a 20-gauge needle also permitted adequate pathologic examination. Both an 18-gauge and a 20-gauge needle may thus be suitable for renal biopsy in pediatric patients.

  20. Prospective evaluation of the optimal number of 25-gauge needle passes for endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy of solid pancreatic lesions in the absence of an onsite cytopathologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Rei; Irisawa, Atsushi; Bhutani, Manoop S; Hikichi, Takuto; Takagi, Tadayuki; Sato, Ai; Sato, Masaki; Ikeda, Tsunehiko; Watanabe, Ko; Nakamura, Jun; Tasaki, Kazuhiro; Obara, Katsutoshi; Ohira, Hiromasa

    2012-11-01

    A prior study with 22-gauge needles recommended more than seven needle passes for endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy (EUS-FNA) of solid pancreatic lesions (SPL) without onsite cytopathology for optimal acquisition of cytopathological diagnosis. The feasibility of this recommendation should be re-evaluated considering the later development and popularity of 25-gauge EUS-FNA needles. We aimed to determine the optimal number of needle passes for cytopathological specimen acquisition with 25-gauge needles for EUS-FNA of SPL. A preliminary prospective study of 22 patients with an onsite cytopathology technician showed a sensitivity of 93.3% and a specificity of 100% with four needle passes that was not statistically different from five needle passes. Based on our preliminary study, we fixed the number of needle passes to four (Group A). As a control group, we carried out sampling in consecutive patients using 25-gauge needles with an onsite cytopathologist (Group B). Sampling rate, diagnostic value and complications were evaluated. We enrolled 20 patients in each group. Sampling rate was higher in Group B (20/20, 100%) than in Group A (19/20, 95%), but there was no statistical difference between them (P-value = 0.31). In Group A, sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 100% among 19. In Group B, sensitivity was 94.1%, specificity 100%, accuracy 95%. There were also no statistical differences between the groups. No complications were seen. Our study suggests that four needle passes using a 25-gauge needle may be sufficient for EUS-FNA of SPL where onsite cytology is not available. © 2012 The Authors. Digestive Endoscopy © 2012 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  1. Computed tomography-guided core-needle biopsy of lung lesions: an oncology center experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, Marcos Duarte; Fonte, Alexandre Calabria da; Chojniak, Rubens, E-mail: marcosduarte@yahoo.com.b [Hospital A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. of Radiology and Imaging Diagnosis; Andrade, Marcony Queiroz de [Hospital Alianca, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Gross, Jefferson Luiz [Hospital A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. of Chest Surgery

    2011-03-15

    Objective: The present study is aimed at describing the experience of an oncology center with computed tomography guided core-needle biopsy of pulmonary lesions. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of 97 computed tomography-guided core-needle biopsy of pulmonary lesions performed in the period between 1996 and 2004 in a Brazilian reference oncology center (Hospital do Cancer - A.C. Camargo). Information regarding material appropriateness and the specific diagnoses were collected and analyzed. Results: Among 97 lung biopsies, 94 (96.9%) supplied appropriate specimens for histological analyses, with 71 (73.2%) cases being diagnosed as malignant lesions and 23 (23.7%) diagnosed as benign lesions. Specimens were inappropriate for analysis in three cases. The frequency of specific diagnosis was 83 (85.6%) cases, with high rates for both malignant lesions with 63 (88.7%) cases and benign lesions with 20 (86.7%). As regards complications, a total of 12 cases were observed as follows: 7 (7.2%) cases of hematoma, 3 (3.1%) cases of pneumothorax and 2 (2.1%) cases of hemoptysis. Conclusion: Computed tomography-guided core needle biopsy of lung lesions demonstrated high rates of material appropriateness and diagnostic specificity, and low rates of complications in the present study. (author)

  2. [Value of core needle biopsy in preoperative diagnostics of soft tissue tumors: possibilities and limitations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agaimy, A

    2014-11-01

    The differential diagnosis of soft tissue swellings encompasses a variety of benign, intermediate, low-grade malignant and high-grade neoplastic lesions in addition to tumor-like reactive processes. As treatment of these heterogeneous conditions varies greatly from conservative observation and simple local excision up to extensive radical surgical resection, treatment decisions are based mainly on a precise preoperative histological diagnosis on limited biopsy material. Even for clinically unequivocal sarcomas, the importance of the preoperative histological diagnosis has been increasingly emphasized as different therapeutic regimens have been established for different sarcoma types and the indications for preoperative treatment is influenced by the tumor grade and by the entity itself. Other factors positively influencing the increasing use of core needle biopsy for preoperative tumor diagnosis in soft tissue pathology are the availability of modern high-resolution imaging modalities as well as the establishment of several new second generation immunohistochemical markers and the discovery of entity-specific translocations detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in several sarcoma subtypes. In this review it will be shown that a targeted approach for processing core needle biopsies oriented towards the characteristic topographical, demographic, cytomorphological and architectural features of soft tissue lesions facilitates a precise diagnosis of soft tissue neoplasms in most cases. However, profound knowledge of the different aspects of soft tissue tumor diagnostics and familiarity with the frequent as well as the less common and rare tumor entities and variants is a prerequisite for appropriate interpretation of core needle biopsy findings and for selecting a limited but well-suited marker panel. The utilization of modern immunohistochemistry and/or FISH methods is highly useful for establishing the diagnosis of rare and unusual neoplasms in core

  3. Percutaneous Transthoracic Needle Biopsy of Pulmonary Lesions: a National Survey of Korean Practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Gong Yong; Kwon, Keun Sang [Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Joung Sook [Inje University, Gimhae (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-11-15

    This study surveyed the thoracic radiologists in Korea in order to determine how they performed percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy of pulmonary lesions. Materials and Methods: In May 2006, fifty questionnaires were mailed to the members of the Society of Thoracic Radiology in the Republic of Korea (KSTR), and these doctors worked in academic and community hospitals. The survey consisted of multiple-choice questions regarding the radiologist's approach to a transthoracic needle biopsy (the type of practice, the imaging guidance technique, the biopsy technique, monitoring during the procedure, the assessment of pneumothorax after the procedure and the diagnostic accuracy) on the basis of the guidelines of the British Thoracic Society (BTS) and the European Respiratory Society (ERS)/American Thoracic Society (ATS). Results: A total of 39 (66.1%) KSTR members responded. For the biopsy guidance, 16(41.0%) responder performed the procedure under CT guidance, 19(48.7%) responders performed the procedure under fluoroscopy guidance only and 4(10.3%) responders performed the procedure under either CT or fluoroscopy guidance. Fine-needle aspiration was the procedure of choice for eight (20.5%) respondents, whereas 31(79.5%) preferred performing a cutting needle biopsy. Before doing the procedure, 38(97.4%) institutions performed coagulation tests. All the respondents routinely performed follow-up imaging to determine the presence of a pneumothorax. PTNB has an overall diagnostic sensitivity of 95.8%, a specificity of 100%, a positive predictive value of 100%, a negative predictive value of 93.9% and an accuracy of 92.4%. Although the KSTR members already perform PTNB according to the BTS or ERS/ATS guidelines with excellent results, this survey could be a cornerstone for formulating PTNB guidelines (indications, contraindications, the pre-investigation and post observation after PTNB) in Korea

  4. Comparison of diagnostic yield of core-needle and fine-needle aspiration biopsies of thyroid lesions: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolinski, Kosma; Stangierski, Adam; Ruchala, Marek

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid nodular disease is one of the most commonly observed medical conditions. Cytological evaluation of the specimens obtained with fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) is the most accurate tool for selecting nodules which should be further surgically removed. A major limitation of this method is the high occurrence of non-diagnostic results. This indicates the need for improvement of the thyroid biopsy technique. The aim of this meta-analysis was to compare the diagnostic value of thyroid core-needle biopsies (CNBs) and FNABs. PubMed/MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, Scopus, Cinahl, Academic Search Complete, Web of Knowledge, PubMed Central, PubMed Central Canada and Clinical Key databases were searched. Risk ratios (RRs) of non-diagnostic results were meta-analysed using the random-effects model. Eleven studies were included in the quantitative analysis. CNB yielded significantly more diagnostic results - the pooled risk ratio (RR) of gaining a non-diagnostic result was 0.27 (pneedle biopsy yields a higher proportion of diagnostic results than fine-needle biopsy. • Core-needle biopsies may decrease the amount of unnecessary thyroidectomies. • Probability of gaining non-diagnostic result using core-needle biopsy is almost four times lower.

  5. Sugar and acid interconversion in tomato fruits based on biopsy sampling of locule gel and pericarp tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, R.E.; Woltering, E.J.; Tijskens, L.M.M.

    2016-01-01

    This study deals with quantifying sugar and acids levels important for the perceived taste of tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum). Sugar and acids levels were measured repeatedly on the same tomato using tissue samples obtained with a biopsy needle in combination with HPLC protocols. Biopsies of

  6. Analysis of Fine-Needle Biopsy Versus Fine-Needle Aspiration in Diagnosis of Pancreatic and Abdominal Masses: A Prospective, Multicenter, Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Bin; Zhang, Yueming; Chen, Qian; Sun, Bo; Deng, Zhuang; Shan, Hongbo; Dou, Lizhou; Wang, Jinglin; Li, Yawen; Yang, Xiujiang; Jiang, Tianan; Xu, Guoliang; Wang, Guiqi

    2017-07-19

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided fine needles with side fenestrations are used to collected aspirates for cytology analysis and biopsy samples for histologic analysis. We conducted a large, multicenter study to compare the accuracy of diagnosis via specimens collected with fine-needle biopsy (FNB) versus fine-needle aspiration (FNA) for patients with pancreatic and nonpancreatic masses. We performed a prospective single-blind study at 5 tertiary care centers in China. The study comprised 408 patients undergoing EUS for a solid mass (>1 cm) in the pancreas, abdomen, mediastinum, or pelvic cavity, from December 2014 through January 2016. Patients were randomly assigned to groups (1:1) for assessment by FNA (n = 190) or FNB (n = 187). After lesions were identified by EUS, samples were collected in a total of 4 passes by each needle. All procedures were performed by experienced endosonographers; cytologists and pathologists were blinded to the sample collection method. Patients were followed for at least 48 weeks, and final diagnoses were obtained after surgery, imaging analysis, or resolution of lesion. The primary aim was to compare diagnostic yields of EUS-FNA with EUS-FNB for all solid masses, then separately as pancreatic and nonpancreatic masses. The secondary endpoint was the quality of histologic specimen. Findings from FNB analysis were accurate for 91.44% of all cases, compared with 80.00% for all FNA cases, based on final patient diagnoses (P = .0015). In patients with pancreatic masses (n = 249), findings from histologic analysis of FNBs were accurate for 92.68% of the cases, compared with 81.75% for FNAs (P = .0099). In cytology analysis of pancreatic masses, samples collected by FNB accurately identified 88.62% of all pancreatic lesions, whereas samples collected by FNA accurately identified 79.37% (P = .00468). Analyses of samples of nonpancreatic masses collected by FNA versus FNB produced similar diagnostic yields. In a prospective study of

  7. Use of CT-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in epidermal growth factor receptor mutation analysis in patients with advanced lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang, Yi-Ping; Wang, Hai-Yan; Zhang, Jin; Feng, Yong (Dept. of Radiology, Jiangsu Cancer Inst. and Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China)), email: yipingzhuang2010@sina.com; Shi, Mei-Qi (Dept. of Chemotherapy, Jiangsu Cancer Inst. and Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China))

    2011-12-15

    Background. The safety of using a cutting needle when performing a core-needle biopsy is of major concern, in particular for small lung tumors or tumors near the hilum. Purpose. To investigate the usefulness of CT-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) of the lung in obtaining tumor tissue for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation analysis in advanced lung cancer patients. Material and Methods. Forty-three patients with stage IIIB-IV lung cancer were enrolled. In all patients, CT-guided FNAB was performed using an 18-gauge or 20-gauge Chiba aspiration needle for histology diagnosis and EGFR mutation analysis. Complications associated with CT-guided FNAB were observed, and the specimen mutational assessments were recorded. Results. The obtained tumor samples ranged from 0.5-1.5 cm in length and were adequate for histological and DNA analyses in all patients. No patient had a pneumothorax or hemoptysis. Minor needle tract bleeding appeared in eight patients. Mutation analysis was satisfactorily demonstrated in 23 mutations and 20 non-mutations. Ten and 13 mutations were identified by 18-gauge and 20-gauge needle biopsies, respectively. EFGR mutations, including 12 cases of EGFR exon 19 deletion and 11 cases of exon 21 point mutation, were present in 21 patients with adenocarcinomas, one with squamous cell carcinoma, and one with undifferentiated carcinoma. Conclusion. CT-guided FNAB is a feasible and safe technique for obtaining lung tumor tissues for EGFR gene mutation analysis

  8. Diagnostic Accuracy of MRI-guided Percutaneous Transthoracic Needle Biopsy of Solitary Pulmonary Nodules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Shangang, E-mail: 1198685580@qq.com [University of Jinan-Shandong Academy of Medical Science, Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, School of Medicine and Life Sciences (China); Li, Chengli, E-mail: chenglilichina@yeah.net [Shandong University, Department of Interventional MRI, Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute (China); Yu, Xuejuan, E-mail: yuxuejuan2011@126.com [University of Jinan-Shandong Academy of Medical Science, Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, School of Medicine and Life Sciences (China); Liu, Ming, E-mail: mingliuyxs@163.com [Shandong University, Department of Interventional MRI, Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute (China); Fan, Tingyong, E-mail: FTY681105@sohu.com; Chen, Dong, E-mail: 857984870@qq.com; Zhang, Pinliang, E-mail: zhangpinliang@163.com; Ren, Ruimei, E-mail: liusg708@qq.com [University of Jinan-Shandong Academy of Medical Science, Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute, School of Medicine and Life Sciences (China)

    2015-04-15

    ObjectiveThe purpose of our study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of MRI-guided percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy (PTNB) of solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs).MethodsRetrospective review of 69 patients who underwent MR-guided PTNB of SPNs was performed. Each case was reviewed for complications. The final diagnosis was established by surgical pathology of the nodule or clinical and imaging follow-up. Pneumothorax rate and diagnostic accuracy were compared between two groups according to nodule diameter (≤2 vs. >2 cm) using χ{sup 2} chest and Fisher’s exact test, respectively.ResultsThe success rate of single puncture was 95.6 %. Twelve (17.4 %) patients had pneumothorax, with 1 (1.4 %) requiring chest tube insertion. Mild hemoptysis occurred in 7 (7.2 %) patients. All of the sample material was sufficient for histological diagnostic evaluation. Pathological analysis of biopsy specimens showed 46 malignant, 22 benign, and 1 nondiagnostic nodule. The final diagnoses were 49 malignant nodules and 20 benign nodules basing on postoperative histopathology and clinical follow-up data. One nondiagnostic sample was excluded from calculating diagnostic performance. A sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value in diagnosing SPNs were 95.8, 100, 97.0, 100, and 90.9 %, respectively. Pneumothorax rate, diagnostic sensitivity, and accuracy were not significantly different between the two groups (P > 0.05).ConclusionsMRI-guided PTNB is safe, feasible, and high accurate diagnostic technique for pathologic diagnosis of pulmonary nodules.

  9. Feasibility and Diagnostic Yield of Endoscopic Ultrasonography-Guided Fine Needle Biopsy With a New Core Biopsy Needle Device in Patients With Gastric Subepithelial Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Minju; Min, Byung-Hoon; Lee, Hyuk; Ahn, Sangjeong; Lee, Jun Haeng; Rhee, Poong-Lyul; Kim, Jae J; Sohn, Tae Sung; Kim, Sung; Kim, Kyoung-Mee

    2015-10-01

    As treatment decisions for patients with gastric subepithelial tumors (SETs) largely depend on the histopathologic diagnosis, noninvasive and effective tissue acquisition methods are definitely required for proper management of gastric SETs. Recently, a new endoscopic ultrasonography-guided fine needle biopsy (EUS-FNB) device with ProCore reverse bevel technology was developed. We aimed to elucidate the feasibility and diagnostic yield of EUS-FNB with this new core biopsy needle device in patients with gastric SETs. A prospectively maintained database was retrospectively reviewed to identify consecutive patients who underwent EUS-FNB with a 22-gauge ProCore needle for gastric SETs 2 cm or larger. The main outcome measurement was the diagnostic yield of EUS-FNB. Procedure results were categorized into diagnostic, suggestive, or nondiagnostic. Of the 43 patients, needle punctures were successful in all cases irrespective of tumor location. EUS-FNB procedure results were diagnostic in 86.0%, suggestive in 4.7%, and nondiagnostic in 9.3% of cases, respectively. The diagnostic yield was the highest in fundus (100.0%), followed by body (89.5%), cardia (83.3%), and antrum (50.0%). All 18 patients with cardiac SET were finally diagnosed to have leiomyoma, and 16 patients with diagnostic or suggestive results avoided surgery. A heterogeneous echo pattern on EUS was found in 33.3% of cases with nondiagnostic or suggestive results and in 5.4% with diagnostic results. In multivariate analysis, no independent predictor of unsuccessful EUS-FNB with nondiagnostic or suggestive results was identified. Agreement between EUS-FNB and surgical pathology was 100% with respect to the diagnosis of gastrointestinal stromal tumor. However, there was a significant discrepancy in mitotic counts observed between the EUS-FNB and surgical specimens in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumor. There were no significant procedure-related adverse events during and after the procedures. EUS

  10. MR-guided breast biopsy at 3T: diagnostic yield of large core needle biopsy compared with vacuum-assisted biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meeuwis, Carla [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Rijnstate Hospital, Alysis Zorggroep, Department of Radiology, Arnhem (Netherlands); Veltman, Jeroen [ZGT Almelo, Department of Radiology, Almelo (Netherlands); Hall, Hester N. van [Rijnstate Hospital, Alysis Zorggroep, Department of Radiology, Arnhem (Netherlands); Mus, Roel D.M.; Barentsz, Jelle O.; Mann, Ritse M. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Boetes, Carla [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2012-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate two MR-guided biopsy techniques at 3 T, large core needle breast biopsy (LCNB) and vacuum-assisted breast biopsy (VAB) and to compare the diagnostic yield and rate of complications to determine the optimal biopsy technique at 3 T. 55 LCNB and 64 VAB were consecutively performed. Benign biopsy results were verified by retrospective correlation of histology, with pre-interventional, post-interventional MRI studies and follow-up and were classified as representative or non-representative. Time to follow-up was up to 2 years for the considered non-representative benign lesions. Statistical analysis was performed using the Chi-squared test. LCNB was technically successful in 100% of patients (55/55) and VAB in 98% of patients (63/64). Histopathological analysis resulted in 45 (82%) benign, 3 (5%) high-risk and 7 (13%) malignant lesions for LCNB and 43 (67%) benign, 3 (5%) high-risk and 18 (28%) malignant lesions. Distribution was significantly different (p < 0.001), favouring VAB over LCNB. Because of the substantially higher diagnostic yield and certainty of a benign diagnosis, VAB is the optimal biopsy technique at 3 T. LCNB should be considered when VAB is not feasible. (orig.)

  11. Value of fine-needle aspiration biopsy of salivary gland lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Rikke Kølby; Bjørndal, Kristine; Godballe, Christian;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to assess the utility of fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) in the diagnosis and treatment planning of the lesions of the salivary gland. METHODS: Eight hundred seventy-nine aspiration biopsies of the lesion of the salivary gland over a 10-year period, from...... was 98%, and the negative predictive value was 97%. The overall accuracy was 93%. The correct subtyping of the benign lesions was 97%, and the exact type-specific concordance of the malignant lesions was 71%. CONCLUSION: Considerable benefit to the patient may result from the cautious use of FNAB...

  12. Diagnosis of Metastasis to the Thyroid Gland: Comparison of Core-Needle Biopsy and Fine-Needle Aspiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sang Hyun; Baek, Jung Hwan; Ha, Eun Ju; Choi, Young Jun; Song, Dong Eun; Kim, Jae Kyun; Chung, Ki-Wook; Kim, Tae Yong; Lee, Jeong Hyun

    2016-04-01

    Early detection and diagnosis of metastasis to the thyroid gland is important. This study aims to evaluate the clinical value of core-needle biopsy (CNB) by comparing the results of CNB and fine-needle aspiration (FNA) in patients with clinically suspected metastasis to the thyroid gland. Case series with chart review. Tertiary referral practice. Fifty-two thyroid nodules from 52 patients with clinically suspected metastasis to the thyroid gland (mean age, 62.8 years). Of these 52 patients, FNA was initially used in 41 patients and CNB in 20 patients (11 patients as the initial approach and 9 patients after inconclusive FNA results). Ultrasound features of metastasis to the thyroid gland were evaluated. The diagnostic performance, repeated diagnostic examination rate, and diagnostic surgery rate were evaluated for FNA and CNB. Among these 52 patients, 46 were diagnosed with thyroid metastases and 6 were diagnosed with primary thyroid cancer. Common ultrasound features were an ovoid to round shape (58.7%), ill-defined margin (56.5%), hypoechogenicity (65.2%), and no calcifications (87.0%). Core-needle biopsy achieved a significantly higher sensitivity than FNA (100.0% vs 58.6%, P = .008) without any false-negative results. Both the repeated diagnostic examination rate and the diagnostic surgery rate were significantly lower in CNB than in FNA (5.0% vs 46.3%, P = .001, and 5.0% vs 34.1%, P = .013, respectively). In cases of known rare primary malignancy, nontypical ultrasound features of primary thyroid malignancy, and need for an additional immunohistochemical analysis, CNB may be primarily considered. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  13. The reliability of histological grade in breast cancer core needle biopsies depends on biopsy size: a comparative study with subsequent surgical excisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focke, Cornelia M; Decker, Thomas; van Diest, Paul J

    2016-12-01

    In breast cancer patients undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy, histological grading needs to be performed on core needle biopsies (CNBs) that may not be representative of the whole tumour when they are small. Our aim was to study the influence of biopsy size on agreement rates for histological grade between CNBs and subsequent surgical excision biopsies (SEBs). We calculated agreement and Cohen's κ between CNBs and SEBs of 300 early-stage breast cancers. The number of cores, total core length, total tumour length and tumour/tissue ratio were assessed for each CNB set. Agreement rates for grade were calculated for different classes of core number and tumour/tissue ratio, and for total core lengths and tumour lengths per CNB set in 5-15-mm intervals. Agreement on grade between CNBs and SEBs was 73% (κ = 0.59), with underestimation of grade in CNBs in 26% of cases and overestimation in 1% of cases. There was significantly higher concordance between CNBs and SEBs at a total core length of ≥50 mm than at a total core length of cores than at fewer than three cores (75% versus 58% agreement, P = 0.048). The tumour/tissue ratio, pathological tumour size and radiological tumour size were not statistically different between concordant and discordant cases. Agreement rates for histological grade in CNBs versus SEBs improve with increasing biopsy sample size. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Fine needle aspiration biopsy to reestablish cell culture in an animal model of uveal melanoma

    OpenAIRE

    Correa, Zelia Maria da Silva; Marshall,Jean-Claude; Souza Filho,João Pessoa de; Odashiro, Alexandre Nakao; Burnier, Jr.,Miguel Noel

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: To access the reliability of fine-needle aspiration biopsy in harvesting a sufficient amount of viable melanoma cells to establish a cell culture and maintain a melanoma cell line from an animal model of uveal melanoma. METHODS: For this study, fifteen male New Zealand albino rabbits had their right eye surgically inoculated with uveal melanoma cell line 92.1. The animals were immunosupressed with cyclosporine A using a dose schedule previously published. The animals were followed fo...

  15. Fine needle biopsy of thyroid nodules: correlations between cytology and gistology, technical aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Fedotov

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of comparative preoperative cytological and postoperative histological investigation of 3714 patients with thyroid nodules are presented. The causes of discrepancies are discussed and measures of their diminution are proposed. Great value of fine needle biopsy to differ thyroid nodules but follicular neoplasia into benign and malignant are determined. Its sensitivity in our clinics is 98.7% and specificity – 100%. Necessity of the of the second FNA if the first one is non informative is established.

  16. Changing attitudes toward needle biopsies of breast cancer in Shanghai: experience and current status over the past 8 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao S

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Shuang Hao,1,2 Zhe-Bin Liu,1,2 Hong Ling,1,2 Jia-Jian Chen,1,2 Ju-Ping Shen,1,2 Wen-Tao Yang,2,3 Zhi-Min Shao1,2,4,5 1Department of Breast Surgery, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, 2Department of Oncology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, 3Department of Pathology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, 4Institute of Biomedical Science, Fudan University, 5Key Laboratory of Breast Cancer in Shanghai, Department of Breast Surgery, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Diagnostic patterns in breast cancer have greatly changed over the past few decades, and core needle biopsy (CNB has become a reliable procedure for detecting breast cancer without invasive surgery. To estimate the changing diagnostic patterns of breast cancer in urban Shanghai, 11,947 women with breast lesions detected by preoperative needle biopsy between January 1995 and December 2012 were selected from the Shanghai Cancer Data base, which integrates information from approximately 50% of breast cancer patients in Shanghai. The CNB procedure uses an automated prone unit, biopsy gun, and 14-gauge needles under freehand or ultrasound guidance and was performed by experienced radiologists and surgeons specializing in needle biopsies. Diagnosis and classification for each patient were independently evaluated by pathologists. Over the indicated 8-year period, biopsy type consisted of 11,947 ultrasound-guided core needle biopsies (UCNBs, 2,015 ultrasound-guided vacuum-assisted biopsies (UVABs, and 654 stereotactic X-ray-guided vacuum-assisted biopsies (XVABs. For all the 11,947 women included in this study, image-guided needle biopsy was the initial diagnostic procedure. Approximately 81.0% of biopsied samples were histopathologically determined to be malignant lesions, 5.5% were determined to be high-risk lesions, and 13.5% were determined to be benign lesions. The number of patients choosing UCNB increased at the

  17. Endoscopic ultrasonography-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy using 22-gauge needle in diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Kenichiro; Matsubayashi, Hiroyuki; Fukutomi, Akira; Uesaka, Katsuhiko; Sasaki, Keiko; Ono, Hiroyuki

    2011-11-01

    The effectiveness of endoscopic ultrasonography-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) has not been fully evaluated in the diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP). To evaluate the effectiveness of EUS-FNA using 22-gauge needles in the diagnosis of AIP. EUS-FNA was examined in 85 patients with pancreatic mass, including 64 patients with pancreatic cancer and 21 patients with AIP. We investigated ability of EUS-FNA using 22-gauge needle for the differential diagnosis between AIP and pancreatic cancer. We also compared the factors concerning FNA procedures (number of needle passes, size of lesion, device, and amount of obtained pancreatic tissue) between two diseases. Tissues obtained from 21 patients with AIP, although none of them demonstrated histology suspicious for malignancy, did not show histological evidence definitive for AIP. The amount of obtained pancreatic tissue was almost equal between two diseases in each pancreatic location. Sensitivity, specificity, overall accuracy, and negative predictive value of histological diagnosis of pancreatic cancer were 92.2%, 100%, 94.1%, and 80.8%, respectively. EUS-FNA using 22-gauge needle distinguished benign from malignant pancreatic mass with >90% of accuracy, regardless of the location. Hence, it was helpful for the clinical diagnosis of AIP, however not providing satisfactory samples for the histological diagnosis of AIP. Copyright © 2011 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A portable, low coherence interferometry based instrument for fine needle aspiration biopsy guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iftimia, Nicusor V.; Bouma, Brett E.; Pitman, Martha B.; Goldberg, Brian; Bressner, Jason; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2005-06-01

    A portable, low coherence interferometry (LCI) based instrument for fine-needle aspiration biopsy guidance is presented. The instrument consists of a fiber-based low coherence interferometer, a data acquisition, processing and display unit, and a probe. The probe, consisting of a 250μm diameter single-mode optical fiber inserted within the bore of a fine needle, is used to illuminate tissue and collect light from tissue at the tip of the needle. Light returning out of the probe is detected by the LCI system, which is capable of measuring depth-resolved information (reflectivity, spectra, birefringence) with a spatial resolution of 10μm over a depth range of approximately 1.4mm. The LCI based instrument can be used to guide the fine needle during biopsy procedures to potentially diagnose neoplasms, infections, inflammations, or infiltrations. The design and performance of the instrument, as well as preliminary measurements on excised breast tissue specimens, are presented in detail.

  19. Preservative solution for skeletal muscle biopsy samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt, Yasemin Gulcan; Kurt, Bulent; Ozcan, Omer; Topal, Turgut; Kilic, Abdullah; Muftuoglu, Tuba; Acikel, Cengizhan; Sener, Kenan; Sahiner, Fatih; Yigit, Nuri; Aydin, Ibrahim; Alay, Semih; Ekinci, Safak

    2015-01-01

    Context: Muscle biopsy samples must be frozen with liquid nitrogen immediately after excision and maintained at -80°C until analysis. Because of this requirement for tissue processing, patients with neuromuscular diseases often have to travel to centers with on-site muscle pathology laboratories for muscle biopsy sample excision to ensure that samples are properly preserved. Aim: Here, we developed a preservative solution and examined its protectiveness on striated muscle tissues for a minimum of the length of time that would be required to reach a specific muscle pathology laboratory. Materials and Methods: A preservative solution called Kurt-Ozcan (KO) solution was prepared. Eight healthy Sprague-Dawley rats were sacrificed; striated muscle tissue samples were collected and divided into six different groups. Muscle tissue samples were separated into groups for morphological, enzyme histochemical, molecular, and biochemical analysis. Statistical method used: Chi-square and Kruskal Wallis tests. Results: Samples kept in the KO and University of Wisconsin (UW) solutions exhibited very good morphological scores at 3, 6, and 18 hours, but artificial changes were observed at 24 hours. Similar findings were observed for the evaluated enzyme activities. There were no differences between the control group and the samples kept in the KO or UW solution at 3, 6, and 18 hours for morphological, enzyme histochemical, and biochemical features. The messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) of β-actin gene was protected up to 6 hours in the KO and UW solutions. Conclusion: The KO solution protects the morphological, enzyme histochemical, and biochemical features of striated muscle tissue of healthy rats for 18 hours and preserves the mRNA for 6 hours. PMID:26019417

  20. Preservative solution for skeletal muscle biopsy samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasemin Gulcan Kurt

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context : Muscle biopsy samples must be frozen with liquid nitrogen immediately after excision and maintained at -80 o C until analysis. Because of this requirement for tissue processing, patients with neuromuscular diseases often have to travel to centers with on-site muscle pathology laboratories for muscle biopsy sample excision to ensure that samples are properly preserved. Aim: Here, we developed a preservative solution and examined its protectiveness on striated muscle tissues for a minimum of the length of time that would be required to reach a specific muscle pathology laboratory. Materials and Methods: A preservative solution called Kurt-Ozcan (KO solution was prepared. Eight healthy Sprague-Dawley rats were sacrificed; striated muscle tissue samples were collected and divided into six different groups. Muscle tissue samples were separated into groups for morphological, enzyme histochemical, molecular, and biochemical analysis. Statistical method used: Chi-square and Kruskal Wallis tests. Results: Samples kept in the KO and University of Wisconsin (UW solutions exhibited very good morphological scores at 3, 6, and 18 hours, but artificial changes were observed at 24 hours. Similar findings were observed for the evaluated enzyme activities. There were no differences between the control group and the samples kept in the KO or UW solution at 3, 6, and 18 hours for morphological, enzyme histochemical, and biochemical features. The messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA of β-actin gene was protected up to 6 hours in the KO and UW solutions. Conclusion: The KO solution protects the morphological, enzyme histochemical, and biochemical features of striated muscle tissue of healthy rats for 18 hours and preserves the mRNA for 6 hours.

  1. Diagnostic investigation of parotid neoplasms: a 16-year experience of freehand fine needle aspiration cytology and ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldar, S; Mandalia, U; Skelton, E; Chow, V; Turner, S S; Ramesar, K; Tighe, D; Williams, M; Howlett, D

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to examine the diagnostic yield of fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) and ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy (USCB) in the diagnosis of parotid neoplasia. A 16-year retrospective analysis was performed of patients entered into our pathology database with a final diagnosis of parotid neoplasia. FNAC and USCB data were compared to surgical excision where available. One hundred and twenty FNAC, 313 USCB, and 259 surgical specimens were analyzed from 397 patients. Fifty-six percent of FNAC and 4% of USCB were non-diagnostic. One hundred and thirty-two (33%) patients had a final diagnosis made by USCB and did not undergo surgery. Surgery was performed in 257 (65%) patients, 226 (88%) of whom had a preoperative biopsy. Most lesions were benign, but there were 62 parotid and 13 haematological malignancies diagnosed; false-negative results were obtained in three FNAC and two USCB samples. The sensitivity and specificity of FNAC were 70% and 89%, respectively, and for USCB were 93% and 100%, respectively. This study represents the largest series of patients with a parotid neoplasm undergoing USCB for diagnosis. USCB is highly accurate with a low non-diagnostic rate and should be considered an integral part of parotid assessment. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. A modified triple test for palpable breast masses: the value of ultrasound and core needle biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wai, Christina J; Al-Mubarak, Ghada; Homer, Marc J; Goldkamp, Allison; Samenfeld-Specht, Marja; Lee, Yoojin; Logvinenko, Tanya; Rothschild, Janice G; Graham, Roger A

    2013-03-01

    The original triple test score (TTS)--clinical examination, mammogram, and fine-needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy--has long been used to evaluate palpable breast masses. We modified the original TTS to include ultrasound (US) and core biopsy to determine their role in evaluating palpable breast masses. A retrospective chart review of 320 female patients was performed. We developed a modified triple test score (mTTS) that included physical examination, mammogram and/or US, and FNA and/or core biopsy. For the examination and imaging score, 1-3 points were given for low, moderate, or high suspicion. Biopsy scores were characterized as benign, atypical, or malignant. Final outcome was determined by open biopsy or follow-up greater than 1 year. Physical examination was 92% accurate (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.89-0.96, p core biopsy changed the scores of 24 patients; only three changed clinical management. For patients with a palpable breast mass and a mTTS score of 3-4, no further assessment is necessary. Those with a mTTS of 8-9 can proceed to definitive therapy. Patients with a mTTS of 5-7 require further assessment. US and/or core biopsy added little to the accuracy or predictive value of the original TTS.

  3. Immunohistochemical Staining of Histological Fragments Derived from Salivary Gland Tumour Fine-Needle Biopsy Aspirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, Marie; Munsterhjelm, Berent; Mäkitie, Antti; Leivo, Ilmo

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe a method for analysing histological fragments derived from fine- needle aspirate biopsy (FNAB) of salivary gland tumours (SGTs), and to evaluate the use of immunohistochemistry (IHC) on them. We reviewed all 509 FNAB pathology reports taken from SGTs at Helsinki University Hospital, Finland, between 1999 and 2009. In 51% of the cases (n = 209) "histo-fragments" had been obtained and 31 had been further analysed by IHC. Of these, 25 (81%) were available for review. We evaluated the benefit of IHC by relating its added value to the preoperative cytological diagnosis and its accuracy compared with the postoperative histological diagnosis. Most of the samples analysed by IHC were assigned a malignant diagnosis, with 12 different types of malignancy represented. IHC was advantageous in 76% of the cases. In the 108 studies using IHC in this series, antibodies to 36 different antigens were used. Analysis of histo-fragments in FNABs using IHC can be valuable in specific differential diagnostics and raises diagnostic accuracy in SGTs. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Family and community concerns about post-mortem needle biopsies in a Muslim society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sejvar James J

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Post-mortem needle biopsies have been used in resource-poor settings to determine cause of death and there is interest in using them in Bangladesh. However, we did not know how families and communities would perceive this procedure or how they would decide whether or not to consent to a post-mortem needle biopsy. The goal of this study was to better understand family and community concerns and decision-making about post-mortem needle biopsies in this low-income, predominantly Muslim country in order to design an informed consent process. Methods We conducted 16 group discussions with family members of persons who died during an outbreak of Nipah virus illness during 2004-2008 and 11 key informant interviews with their community and religious leaders. Qualitative researchers first described the post-mortem needle biopsy procedure and asked participants whether they would have agreed to this procedure during the outbreak. Researchers probed participants about the circumstances under which the procedure would be acceptable, if any, their concerns about the procedure, and how they would decide whether or not to consent to the procedure. Results Overall, most participants agreed that post-mortem needle biopsies would be acceptable in some situations, particularly if they benefitted society. This procedure was deemed more acceptable than full autopsy because it would not require major delays in burial or remove organs, and did not require cutting or stitching of the body. It could be performed before the ritual bathing of the body in either the community or hospital setting. However, before consent would be granted for such a procedure, the research team must gain the trust of the family and community which could be difficult. Although consent may only be provided by the guardians of the body, decisions about consent for the procedure would involve extended family and community and religious leaders. Conclusions The possible

  5. The accuracy of frozen section analysis in ultrasound- guided core needle biopsy of breast lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riss Paul

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Limited data are available to evaluate the accuracy of frozen section analysis and ultrasound- guided core needle biopsy of the breast. Methods In a retrospective analysis data of 120 consecutive handheldultrasound- guided 14- gauge automated core needle biopsies (CNB in 109 consecutive patients with breast lesions between 2006 and 2007 were evaluated. Results In our outpatient clinic120 CNB were performed. In 59/120 (49.2% cases we compared histological diagnosis on frozen sections with those on paraffin sections of CNB and finally with the result of open biopsy. Of the cases 42/59 (71.2% were proved to be malignant and 17/59 (28.8% to be benign in the definitive histology. 2/59 (3.3% biopsies had a false negative frozen section result. No false positive results of the intraoperative frozen section analysis were obtained, resulting in a sensitivity, specificity and positive predicting value (PPV and negative predicting value (NPV of 95%, 100%, 100% and 90%, respectively. Histological and morphobiological parameters did not show up relevance for correct frozen section analysis. In cases of malignancy time between diagnosis and definitive treatment could not be reduced due to frozen section analysis. Conclusion The frozen section analysis of suspect breast lesions performed by CNB displays good sensitivity/specificity characteristics. Immediate investigations of CNB is an accurate diagnostic tool and an important step in reducing psychological strain by minimizing the period of uncertainty in patients with breast tumor.

  6. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy of cervical lymph nodes: factors in predicting malignant diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aribaş, B K; Arda, K; Ciledağ, N; Cetindağ, M F; Doğan, K; Sahin, G; Yoloğlu, Z; Aktaş, E

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the predicting factors in malignant diagnosis in ultrasonography guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy of cervical lymph nodes. Design is retrospective follow-up study. Ultrasonography guided fine-needle aspiration biopsies of cervical lymph nodes were performed in 290 patients. The mean age was 45.5 ± 14.4 years (range; 15-85). 207 (71.4%) and 83 (28.6%) were women and men, respectively. Cytopathologist was not present in any biopsy procedure. Factors in predicting malignancy were age, gender, presence of primary malignancy, localization (Level 1-6), hypoechogenicity with loss of echogenic hilum, microcalcification, cystic feature, minimum and maximum sizes, and index value (minimum size/maximum size). Factors were analyzed by univariate and multivariable tests. The mean minimum size and index value of the lymph nodes were 10.4 ± 5.5 mm and 0.58 ± 0.18, respectively. Age, gender, microcalcification, cystic feature, minimum size, and index value were poor predictors in malignancy. Predictors were presence of primary malignancy (p-hypoechogenicity (p-hypoechogenicity. Malignancy rate was relatively low in patients with thyroid malignancy than those with non thyroid malignancies in Level 5. Level 6 was the most difficult area for biopsy due to postoperative changes. Microcalcification was specific only in thyroid carcinoma, whereas cystic parts were more specific in the other malignancies

  7. Percutaneous Fine Needle Biopsy in Pancreatic Tumors: A Study of 42 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Lewitowicz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The technological progress within the range of methods of pancreas imaging and their more common accessibility selects a group of patients requiring a microscopic diagnosis. Percutaneous fine needle aspiration biopsy under the control of ultrasonography (PCFNA/USG is the method commonly used in determining the character of a focal pancreatic lesion. Aim of the Work. An assessment of the accessibility of PCFNA biopsy in the assessment of solid and cystic changes in a pancreas and the correlation of the results of imaging examination, cytological smear and concentration of a serous marker CA19-9. Material and Methodology. In our material we analysed 43 cases of tumors of the pancreas among the patients who were at the average age of 59 ± 10.4 (14 women, 28 men diagnosed by PCFNA biopsy. Results. In a group we are 23 cases of cancer, 12 cases of inflammation and 7 cases of cellular atypia for which 2 cases of IPMN were included. The sensitivity of the method was 92.5% but specificity was 68%. In our opinion PCFNA/USG is a method of the comparable sensitivity and specificity with fine needle aspiration biopsy with EUS control and its efficiency depends to a considerable degree on experience and interdisciplinary collaboration.

  8. Core Needle Biopsy of Breast Cancer Tumors Increases Distant Metastases in a Mouse Model12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathenge, Edward Gitau; Dean, Cheryl Ann; Clements, Derek; Vaghar-Kashani, Ahmad; Photopoulos, Steffany; Coyle, Krysta Mila; Giacomantonio, Michael; Malueth, Benjamin; Nunokawa, Anna; Jordan, Julie; Lewis, John D.; Gujar, Shashi Ashok; Marcato, Paola; Lee, Patrick W.K.; Giacomantonio, Carman Anthony

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Incisional biopsies, including the diagnostic core needle biopsy (CNB), routinely performed before surgical excision of breast cancer tumors are hypothesized to increase the risk of metastatic disease. In this study, we experimentally determined whether CNB of breast cancer tumors results in increased distant metastases and examine important resultant changes in the primary tumor and tumor microenvironment associated with this outcome. METHOD: To evaluate the effect of CNB on metastasis development, we implanted murine mammary 4T1 tumor cells in BALB/c mice and performed CNB on palpable tumors in half the mice. Subsequently, emulating the human scenario, all mice underwent complete tumor excision and were allowed to recover, with attendant metastasis development. Tumor growth, lung metastasis, circulating tumor cell (CTC) levels, variation in gene expression, composition of the tumor microenvironment, and changes in immunologic markers were compared in biopsied and non-biopsied mice. RESULTS: Mice with biopsied tumors developed significantly more lung metastases compared to non-biopsied mice. Tumors from biopsied mice contained a higher frequency of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) accompanied by reduced CD4 + T cells, CD8 + T cells, and macrophages, suggesting biopsy-mediated development of an increasingly immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. We also observed a CNB-dependent up-regulation in the expression of SOX4, Ezh2, and other key epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) genes, as well as increased CTC levels among the biopsy group. CONCLUSION: CNB creates an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment, increases EMT, and facilitates release of CTCs, all of which likely contribute to the observed increase in development of distant metastases. PMID:25425969

  9. New radiofrequency device to reduce bleeding after core needle biopsy: Experimental study in a porcine liver model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Sang Hyeok; Rhim, Hyun Chul; Lee, Min Woo; Song, Kyoung Doo; Kang, Tae Wook; Kim, Young Sun; Lim, Hyo Keun [Dept. of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    To evaluate the in vivo efficiency of the biopsy tract radiofrequency ablation for hemostasis after core biopsy of the liver in a porcine liver model, including situations with bleeding tendency and a larger (16-gauge) core needle. A preliminary study was performed using one pig to determine optimal ablation parameters. For the main experiment, four pigs were assigned to different groups according to heparinization use and biopsy needle caliber. In each pig, 14 control (without tract ablation) and 14 experimental (tract ablation) ultrasound-guided core biopsies were performed using either an 18- or 16-gauge needle. Post-biopsy bleeding amounts were measured by soaking up the blood for five minutes. The results were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test. The optimal parameters for biopsy tract ablation were determined as a 2-cm active tip electrode set at 40-watt with a tip temperature of 70–80℃. The bleeding amounts in all experimental groups were smaller than those in the controls; however they were significant in the non-heparinized pig biopsied with an 18-gauge needle and in two heparinized pigs (p < 0.001). In the heparinized pigs, the mean blood loss in the experimental group was 3.5% and 13.5% of the controls biopsied with an 18- and 16-gauge needle, respectively. Radiofrequency ablation of hepatic core biopsy tract ablation may reduce post-biopsy bleeding even under bleeding tendency and using a larger core needle, according to the result from in vivo porcine model experiments.

  10. New Radiofrequency Device to Reduce Bleeding after Core Needle Biopsy: Experimental Study in a Porcine Liver Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sanghyeok; Lee, Min Woo; Song, Kyoung Doo; Kang, Tae Wook; Kim, Young-sun; Lim, Hyo Keun

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the in vivo efficiency of the biopsy tract radiofrequency ablation for hemostasis after core biopsy of the liver in a porcine liver model, including situations with bleeding tendency and a larger (16-gauge) core needle. Materials and Methods A preliminary study was performed using one pig to determine optimal ablation parameters. For the main experiment, four pigs were assigned to different groups according to heparinization use and biopsy needle caliber. In each pig, 14 control (without tract ablation) and 14 experimental (tract ablation) ultrasound-guided core biopsies were performed using either an 18- or 16-gauge needle. Post-biopsy bleeding amounts were measured by soaking up the blood for five minutes. The results were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test. Results The optimal parameters for biopsy tract ablation were determined as a 2-cm active tip electrode set at 40-watt with a tip temperature of 70–80℃. The bleeding amounts in all experimental groups were smaller than those in the controls; however they were significant in the non-heparinized pig biopsied with an 18-gauge needle and in two heparinized pigs (p < 0.001). In the heparinized pigs, the mean blood loss in the experimental group was 3.5% and 13.5% of the controls biopsied with an 18- and 16-gauge needle, respectively. Conclusion Radiofrequency ablation of hepatic core biopsy tract ablation may reduce post-biopsy bleeding even under bleeding tendency and using a larger core needle, according to the result from in vivo porcine model experiments. PMID:28096727

  11. Vacuum-assisted breast biopsy: A comparison of 11-gauge and 8-gauge needles in benign breast disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kraemer Bernhard

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Minimal invasive breast biopsy is standard care for the diagnosis of suspicious breast lesions. There are different vacuum biopsy (VB systems in use. The aim of the study was to determine the differences between the 8-gauge and the 11-gauge needle with respect to a diagnostic reliability, b complication rate and c subjective perception of pain when used for vacuum-assisted breast biopsy. Methods Between 01/2000 and 09/2004, 923 patients at St. Josefs-Hospital Wiesbaden underwent VB using the Mammotome® (Ethicon Endosurgery, Hamburg. Depending on preoperative detection, the procedure was performed under sonographic or mammographic guidance under local anaesthesia. All patients included in the study were followed up both clinically and using imaging techniques one week after the VB and a second time after a median of 41 months. Excisional biopsy on the ipsilateral breast was an exclusion criteria. Subjective pain scores were recorded on a scale of 0 – 10 (0 = no pain, 10 = unbearable pain. The mean age of the patients was 53 years (30 – 88. Results 123 patients were included in the study in total. 48 patients were biopsied with the 8-gauge needle and 75 with the 11-gauge needle. The use of the 8-gauge needle did not show any significant differences to the 11-gauge needle with regard to diagnostic reliability, complication rate and subjective perception of pain. Conclusion Our data show that there are no relevant differences between the 8-gauge and 11-gauge needle when used for VB. Under sonographic guidance, the use of the 8-gauge needle is recommended for firm breast tissue due to its sharp scalpel point and especially for complete removal of benign lesions. We did not find any advantages in the use of the larger 8-gauge needle compared to the 11-gauge needle in the mammography setting. The utilisation costs of the 8-gauge needle are somewhat higher.

  12. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Optimal Cutting Temperature (OCT) Embedded Core-Needle Biopsy of Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaozheng; Huffman, Kenneth E.; Fujimoto, Junya; Canales, Jamie Rodriguez; Girard, Luc; Nie, Guangjun; Heymach, John V.; Wistuba, Igacio I.; Minna, John D.; Yu, Yonghao

    2017-07-01

    With recent advances in understanding the genomic underpinnings and oncogenic drivers of pathogenesis in different subtypes, it is increasingly clear that proper pretreatment diagnostics are essential for the choice of appropriate treatment options for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Tumor tissue preservation in optimal cutting temperature (OCT) compound is commonly used in the surgical suite. However, proteins recovered from OCT-embedded specimens pose a challenge for LC-MS/MS experiments, due to the large amounts of polymers present in OCT. Here we present a simple workflow for whole proteome analysis of OCT-embedded NSCLC tissue samples, which involves a simple trichloroacetic acid precipitation step. Comparisons of protein recovery between frozen versus OCT-embedded tissue showed excellent consistency with more than 9200 proteins identified. Using an isobaric labeling strategy, we quantified more than 5400 proteins in tumor versus normal OCT-embedded core needle biopsy samples. Gene ontology analysis indicated that a number of proliferative as well as squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC) marker proteins were overexpressed in the tumor, consistent with the patient's pathology based diagnosis of "poorly differentiated SqCC". Among the most downregulated proteins in the tumor sample, we noted a number of proteins with potential immunomodulatory functions. Finally, interrogation of the aberrantly expressed proteins using a candidate approach and cross-referencing with publicly available databases led to the identification of potential druggable targets in DNA replication and DNA damage repair pathways. We conclude that our approach allows LC-MS/MS proteomic analyses on OCT-embedded lung cancer specimens, opening the way to bring powerful proteomics into the clinic. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  13. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Optimal Cutting Temperature (OCT) Embedded Core-Needle Biopsy of Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaozheng; Huffman, Kenneth E.; Fujimoto, Junya; Canales, Jamie Rodriguez; Girard, Luc; Nie, Guangjun; Heymach, John V.; Wistuba, Igacio I.; Minna, John D.; Yu, Yonghao

    2017-10-01

    With recent advances in understanding the genomic underpinnings and oncogenic drivers of pathogenesis in different subtypes, it is increasingly clear that proper pretreatment diagnostics are essential for the choice of appropriate treatment options for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Tumor tissue preservation in optimal cutting temperature (OCT) compound is commonly used in the surgical suite. However, proteins recovered from OCT-embedded specimens pose a challenge for LC-MS/MS experiments, due to the large amounts of polymers present in OCT. Here we present a simple workflow for whole proteome analysis of OCT-embedded NSCLC tissue samples, which involves a simple trichloroacetic acid precipitation step. Comparisons of protein recovery between frozen versus OCT-embedded tissue showed excellent consistency with more than 9200 proteins identified. Using an isobaric labeling strategy, we quantified more than 5400 proteins in tumor versus normal OCT-embedded core needle biopsy samples. Gene ontology analysis indicated that a number of proliferative as well as squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC) marker proteins were overexpressed in the tumor, consistent with the patient's pathology based diagnosis of "poorly differentiated SqCC". Among the most downregulated proteins in the tumor sample, we noted a number of proteins with potential immunomodulatory functions. Finally, interrogation of the aberrantly expressed proteins using a candidate approach and cross-referencing with publicly available databases led to the identification of potential druggable targets in DNA replication and DNA damage repair pathways. We conclude that our approach allows LC-MS/MS proteomic analyses on OCT-embedded lung cancer specimens, opening the way to bring powerful proteomics into the clinic. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  14. Digital PCR Improves Mutation Analysis in Pancreas Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sho, Shonan; Court, Colin M; Kim, Stephen; Braxton, David R; Hou, Shuang; Muthusamy, V Raman; Watson, Rabindra R; Sedarat, Alireza; Tseng, Hsian-Rong; Tomlinson, James S

    2017-01-01

    Applications of precision oncology strategies rely on accurate tumor genotyping from clinically available specimens. Fine needle aspirations (FNA) are frequently obtained in cancer management and often represent the only source of tumor tissues for patients with metastatic or locally advanced diseases. However, FNAs obtained from pancreas ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) are often limited in cellularity and/or tumor cell purity, precluding accurate tumor genotyping in many cases. Digital PCR (dPCR) is a technology with exceptional sensitivity and low DNA template requirement, characteristics that are necessary for analyzing PDAC FNA samples. In the current study, we sought to evaluate dPCR as a mutation analysis tool for pancreas FNA specimens. To this end, we analyzed alterations in the KRAS gene in pancreas FNAs using dPCR. The sensitivity of dPCR mutation analysis was first determined using serial dilution cell spiking studies. Single-cell laser-microdissection (LMD) was then utilized to identify the minimal number of tumor cells needed for mutation detection. Lastly, dPCR mutation analysis was performed on 44 pancreas FNAs (34 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) and 10 fresh (non-fixed)), including samples highly limited in cellularity (100 cells) and tumor cell purity (1%). We found dPCR to detect mutations with allele frequencies as low as 0.17%. Additionally, a single tumor cell could be detected within an abundance of normal cells. Using clinical FNA samples, dPCR mutation analysis was successful in all preoperative FNA biopsies tested, and its accuracy was confirmed via comparison with resected tumor specimens. Moreover, dPCR revealed additional KRAS mutations representing minor subclones within a tumor that were not detected by the current clinical gold standard method of Sanger sequencing. In conclusion, dPCR performs sensitive and accurate mutation analysis in pancreas FNAs, detecting not only the dominant mutation subtype, but also the additional rare

  15. Fine-needle aspiration versus core needle biopsy for diagnosis of thyroid malignancy and neoplasm: a matched cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Yeon; Lee, Hye Sun; Moon, Jieun; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Moon, Hee Jung; Yoon, Jung Hyun; Kwak, Jin Young

    2017-02-01

    To compare the diagnostic performances of fine-needle aspiration (FNA) and core needle biopsy (CNB) in the diagnosis of thyroid malignancy and neoplasm in patients who underwent surgery for thyroid nodules. This retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board, and the need to obtain informed consent was waived. 3192 patients who underwent FNA (n = 3048) or CNB (n = 144) for diagnosis of thyroid nodules and then proceeded with surgery were included. Surgical pathologic diagnosis was the reference standard. Diagnostic performances of FNA and CNB to predict malignancy and neoplasm were compared. Propensity score matching was used to match patients with FNA with those with CNB because there were significant differences in the number of nodules and nodule characteristics between the FNA and CNB groups. Before matching, the sensitivity and accuracy of FNA were significantly higher or comparable with those of CNB, and the specificity, negative predictive value and positive predictive value were comparable. After matching, the diagnostic performances were similar, with the exception of specificity for predicting neoplasm being higher with CNB than with FNA. FNA showed comparable diagnostic performance to CNB; therefore, there may be no benefit in performing CNB to diagnose papillary thyroid carcinoma and neoplasm. • Diagnostic performances of FNA and CNB for thyroid malignancy and neoplasm were compared. • FNA showed comparable performances to CNB both before and after statistical matching. • There may be no benefit in performing CNB, given the comparable performances.

  16. The cost effectiveness of vacuum-assisted versus core-needle versus surgical biopsy of breast lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-García, P; Marco-Doménech, S F; Lizán-Tudela, L; Ibáñez-Gual, M V; Navarro-Ballester, A; Casanovas-Feliu, E

    To determine the cost effectiveness of breast biopsy by 9G vacuum-assisted guided by vertical stereotaxy or ultrasonography in comparison with breast biopsy by 14G core-needle biopsy and surgical biopsy. We analyzed a total of 997 biopsies (181 vacuum-assisted, 626 core, and 190 surgical biopsies). We calculated the total costs (indirect and direct) of the three types of biopsy. We did not calculate intangible costs. We measured the percentage of correct diagnoses obtained with each technique. To identify the most cost-effective option, we calculated the mean ratios for the three types of biopsies. Total costs were €225.09 for core biopsy, €638.90 for vacuum-assisted biopsy, and €1780.01 for surgical biopsy. The overall percentage of correct diagnoses was 91.81% for core biopsy, 94.03% for vacuum-assisted biopsy, and 100% for surgical biopsy; however, these differences did not reach statistical significance (p=0.3485). For microcalcifications, the percentage of correct diagnoses was 50% for core biopsy and 96.77% for vacuum-assisted biopsy (p<0.0001). For nodules, there were no significant differences among techniques. The mean cost-effectiveness ratio considering all lesions was 2.45 for core biopsy, 6.79 for vacuum-assisted biopsy, and 17.80 for surgical biopsy. Core biopsy was the dominant option for the diagnosis of suspicious breast lesions in general. However, in cases with microcalcifications, the low percentage of correct diagnoses achieved by core biopsy (50%) advises against its use in this context, where vacuum-assisted biopsy would be the technique of choice because it is more cost-effective than surgical biopsy, the other technique indicated for biopsying microcalcifications. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparative cost-effectiveness of fine needle aspiration biopsy versus image-guided biopsy, and open surgical biopsy in the evaluation of breast cancer in the era of Affordable Care Act: a changing landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masood, Shahla; Rosa, Marilin; Kraemer, Dale F; Smotherman, Carmen; Mohammadi, Amir

    2015-08-01

    Proven as a time challenged and cost-effective sampling procedure, the use of FNAB has still remained controversial among the scientific community. Currently, other minimally invasive sampling procedures such as ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy (US-FNAB) and image guided core needle biopsy (IG-CNB) have become the preferred sampling procedures for evaluation of breast lesions. However, changes in the medical economy and the current growing emphasis on cost containment in the era of the Affordable Care Act make it necessary to stimulate a renewed interest in the use of FNAB as the initial diagnostic sampling procedure. This study was designed to define the changing trend in the practice of tissue sampling during the last several years, and to assess the comparative effectiveness and appropriateness of the procedure of choice for breast cancer diagnosis. After Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval, the computer database of the Pathology Department, University of Florida, College of Medicine-Jacksonville at UF Health was retrospectively searched to identify all breast biopsy pathology reports issued during the period of January 2004 to December 2011. The inclusion criteria were all women that underwent any of the following biopsy types: FNAB, US-FNAB, IG-CNB, and surgical biopsy (SB). Diagnostic procedures were identified using current procedural terminology (CPT) codes recorded on claims from the UF Health Jacksonville patient accounting application files. The data obtained was used to determine which technique has the best cost-effectiveness in the diagnosis of breast cancer. The outcome variable for this project was a positive breast cancer diagnosis resulting from these methodologies. The predictor variable was the biopsy type used for sampling. The rate of cancer detection for each procedure was also determined. Among the four groups of procedures compared, the lower cost was attributed to FNAB, followed by US-FNAB, and SB. IG-CNB was the most

  18. Thyroid fine-needle aspiration biopsy and thyroid cancer diagnosis: a nationwide population-based study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Ying Huang

    Full Text Available Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine gland malignancy and fine-needle aspiration biopsy is widely used for thyroid nodule evaluation. Repeated aspiration biopsies are needed due to plausible false-negative results. This study aimed to investigate the overall relationship between aspiration biopsy and thyroid cancer diagnosis, and to explore factors related to shorter diagnostic time.This nationwide retrospective cohort study retrieved data from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database in Taiwan. Subjects without known thyroid malignancies and who received the first thyroid aspiration biopsy after 2004 were followed-up from 2004 to 2009 (n = 7700. Chi-square test, Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, and Cox proportional hazards model were used for data analysis.Of 7700 newly-aspirated patients, 276 eventually developed thyroid cancer (malignancy rate 3.6%. Among the 276 patients with thyroid cancer, 61.6% underwent only one aspiration biopsy and 81.2% were found within the first year after the initial aspiration. Cox proportional hazards model revealed that aspiration frequency (HR 1.07, 95% CI 1.06-1.08, ultrasound frequency (HR 1.02, 95% CI 1.01-1.03, older age, male sex, and aspiration biopsies arranged by surgery, endocrinology or otolaryngology subspecialties were all associated with shorter time to thyroid cancer diagnosis.About 17.4% of thyroid cancer cases received more than two aspiration biopsies and 18.8% were diagnosed one year after the first biopsy. Regular follow-up with repeated aspiration or ultrasound may be required for patients with clinically significant thyroid nodules.

  19. Advantages of stereotaxic needle biopsy of brain tumor using interventional magnetic resonance imaging. Report of 12 cases

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    Terao, Tohru; Hashimoto, Takuo; Koyama, Tsutomu; Takahashi, Koichi; Harada, Junta [Jikei Univ., Chiba (Japan). Kashiwa Hospital; Abe, Toshiaki

    1998-12-01

    Interventional MRI, an advanced neuroimaging system, was used to perform stereotaxic needle biopsy of brain tissue (AIRIS, 0.3 Tesla, Hitachi) in 12 patients (9 males, 3 females) with intraparenchymal abnormal lesions. This system permits accurate and safe biopsy of brain tissue in real time. Patient ages ranged from 31 to 79 years (mean 61.5 years). We evaluated the abnormal lesion and dominant hemisphere of these patients preoperatively by using CT, MRI and cerebral angiography. Lesions were located in the left frontal lobe in 3 cases, the right frontal lobe in 1 case, the left temporal lobe in 1 case, the right temporal lobe in 1 case, the left parietal lobe in 2 cases, the right parietal lobe in 1 case, the left occipital lobe in 1 case, the bilateral basal ganglia in 1 case and the corpus callosum in 1 case. The sampling points were in the dominant hemisphere in 7 cases and in the non-dominant hemisphere in 5 cases. The diagnosis based on stereotaxic needle biopsy using this system were 4 gliomas, 1 brain abscess, 1 metastatic brain tumor, 1 granuloma, 2 cerebral infarctions, 2 malignant lymphomas and 1 normal brain tissue. Success rate of biopsy for our 12 cases using this system was 91.7%. Brain hemorrhage was a complication in 1 case but there was no case of meningitis or convulsion. This method is useful in patients with inoperable lesions, including deep lesion or lesions in the brainstem diencephalon or dominant hemisphere, in patients with serious complications, and in geriatric patients. In the future, this MRI system may be applied to minimally invasive therapies such as tumor ablation, cryosurgery, chemoablation, and ventrolateral thalamotomy for parkinsonism. (author)

  20. A randomised study on the efficacy and safety of an automated Tru-Cut needle for percutaneous liver biopsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.R. van Buuren (Henk); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); R.A. de Man (Robert)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: We studied whether the theoretical advantages of a spring-loaded liver biopsy needle exist in clinical practice and if so if they are dependent upon the experience of the physician performing the biopsy. METHODS: In a stratified randomised study we enrolled

  1. 78 FR 66932 - Scientific Information Request on Core Needle and Open Surgical Biopsy for Diagnosis of Breast...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-07

    ... (including multifocal and bilateral disease) following self-examination, physical examination, or screening... and Open Surgical Biopsy for Diagnosis of Breast Lesions AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and... core needle and open surgical biopsy for diagnosis of breast lesions. Scientific information is...

  2. Fine needle aspiration biopsy diagnosis of metastatic neoplasms of the breast. A three-case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Garza-Guajardo

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Metastases to the breast are unusual lesions that make up approximately 2% of all malignant mammary neoplasms and may mimic both benign and malignant primary neoplasms from a clinical point of view, as well as in imaging studies. Arriving at a correct diagnosis is therefore essential in order to establish appropriate management. We present three cases of metastatic neoplasms diagnosed through fine needle aspiration biopsy and immunocytochemistry. The cytological diagnoses were: medulloblastoma in an 18-year-old woman, melanoma in a 26-year-old man, and an exceptional case of ovarian sarcoma originating from a granulosa cell tumor with metastases to both breasts. A metastatic disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a palpable mass in the breast, especially if there is a history of an extramammary malignant neoplasm. Fine needle aspiration biopsy is the method of choice for the management of these cases. Whenever possible the exam of the material obtained should be compared to the previous biopsy, which is usually enough to arrive at a correct diagnosis, thus preventing unnecessary surgical procedures.

  3. [Does neuroendocrine differentiation have prognostic value in prostate core needle biopsies?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaskulski, Jarosław; Gołabek, Tomasz; Kopczyński, Janusz; Orłowsk, Pawel; Bukowczan, Jakub; Dudek, Przemek; Chłosta, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    The biological behaviour of prostate cancer (PCa) varies significantly and cannot be, therefore, predicted. Better understanding of the mechanisms underpinning PCa oncogenesis and progression with its yet-to-be discovered poor prognostic factors is essential in order to optimise and tailor treatment to an individual patient. The aim of this paper was to investigate the association between the rate of focal PCa neuroendocrine activity, tumour cell proliferation index score, and the rate of PCa positive core needle biopsy results. 92 men, with histologically confirmed PCa, which was clinically confined to the prostate and was graded with Gleason score > or =7, had their core needle biopsies under transrectal ultrasonography guidance performed. The PCa neuroendocrine activity was immunohistochemically confirmed using antibodies against Chromogranin-A and neuron specific enolase. The neuroendocrine activity was detected in 14 (13%) out of 92 PCa patients participating in the study. The proliferative index was not increased in non-cancerous prostate cells. There was no relationship between PCa neuroendocrine activity, the number and percentage of PCa positive biopsies, prostate volume, serum PSA concentration, and Gleason score found. No association between selected PCa prognostic factors and neuroendocrine activity could be found in patients with organ confined prostate cancer.

  4. Role of percutaneous needle core biopsy in diagnosis and clinical management of renal masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Rong; Montemayor-Garcia, Celina; Das, Kasturi

    2015-04-01

    Percutaneous needle core biopsies are routinely performed for renal mass diagnosis in some institutions. Because of limited tissue availability, accurate diagnosis can be challenging, and the role of needle core biopsy (NCB) remains debatable in kidney tumor management. In the present study, we reported our experience in diagnosing renal masses via percutaneous NCB and the role it plays in clinical management of these masses. We studied 301 consecutive cases of percutaneous NCBs performed for 280 renal masses from 269 patients between year 2008 and 2011 by reviewing final pathology diagnosis, hematoxylin and eosin slides, and ancillary studies. Diagnostic accuracy was determined by comparing biopsy and nephrectomy diagnoses in a subset of renal masses. Clinical data including demographic information, clinical presentation, radiographic findings, and treatment information were reviewed subsequently if available. The size of renal masses in our study cohort ranged from 0.5 to 24 cm, and 78% of them were small renal masses. Definite diagnoses were rendered in 89% of the renal masses by NCBs, and 23% of them were benign. Renal mass NCB was 100% accurate in diagnosing primary renal malignancy and 93% accurate in determining histologic subtypes. Clinical management was analyzed for 180 renal masses. There was significant difference in clinical management between different diagnostic groups. We conclude that percutaneous NCB is a powerful tool not only for definite tissue diagnosis of renal masses before treatment but also plays an important role in guiding patient management and obtaining material for future molecular studies for targeted therapies.

  5. Inflammation and focal atrophy in prostate needle biopsy cores and association to prostatic adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Ines; Bettin, Alfonso; Reyes, Niradiz

    2016-10-01

    The possible origin of proliferative inflammatory atrophy in the regenerative proliferation of prostate epithelial cells in response to injury caused by inflammation, and their relation to prostate adenocarcinoma have not been defined. Inflammation and focal atrophy are common pathological findings in prostate biopsies, currently not routinely included in surgical pathology reports. The objective of the study was to determine the correlation between inflammation and focal atrophy with prostate adenocarcinoma. Prostate needle biopsies from 203 patients with clinical parameters suspicious for malignancy were evaluated for the presence and extent of chronic inflammation, type and grade of focal atrophy, high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia, and adenocarcinoma. Relations among them and with age were also analyzed. χ(2) tests and binary logistic regression were used to estimate associations. Chronic inflammation was observed in 77.3% of the biopsies, significantly associated to adenocarcinoma (P = .031). Moderate/severe inflammation in at least 1 biopsy core increased the risk of prostate adenocarcinoma (odds ratio, 2.94; 95% confidence interval, 1.27-6.8), whereas glandular localization of inflammation decreased the risk. Focal atrophy was present in 72.9% of the biopsies, proliferative inflammatory atrophy was the most common type, and its grade was significantly associated to inflammation (P atrophy were associated to high levels of inflammation, supporting its previously proposed inflammatory nature. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Microscopic findings in EUS-guided fine needle (SharkCore) biopsies with type 1 and type 2 autoimmune pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Detlefsen, Sönke; Joergensen, Maiken Thyregod; Mortensen, Michael Bau

    2017-01-01

    The International Consensus Diagnostic Criteria (ICDC) for the diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) include the histological criterion that is based on either pancreatic core needle biopsies (CNBs) or surgical specimens. However, CNBs are difficult to obtain by endoscopic ultrasound (EUS......). EUS fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) cytology is usually not sufficient for the diagnosis of AIP, but may sometimes contain tissue microfragments. Another approach is EUS-guided histological fine-needle biopsy (EUS-FNB), using needles such as the SharkCore or ProCore needle. Published data regarding...... EUS-guided SharkCore FNB for the diagnosis of AIP are lacking. We aimed to describe our histological findings in one type 1 and two type 2 AIP patients who underwent EUS SharkCore FNB. The EUS-FNBs of two patients fulfilled the histological level 2 ICDC for type 1 AIP or type 2 AIP. The EUS-FNB of one...

  7. Comparison of needle aspiration and vacuum-assisted biopsy in the ultrasound-guided drainage of lactational breast abscesses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Yun Dan; Kim, You Me [Dankook University College of Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare needle aspiration and vacuum-assisted biopsy in the ultrasound-guided treatment of lactational breast abscesses. Between January 2005 and December 2014, a total of 74 patients presented with lactational breast abscesses. Thirty of these patients underwent treatment with antibioticsalone, while the remaining 44 lactating women with breast abscesses were treated with needle aspiration (n=25) or vacuum-assisted biopsy (n=19). Age, duration of lactation, abscess diameter, pus culture results, the number of interventions, the healing time, and the cure rate were reviewed and compared between these two groups. The Student's t test and the chi-square test were used to compare the variables. No significant difference was found in the cure rate between the needle aspiration group (22/25, 88%) and the vacuum-assisted biopsy group (18/19, 94.7%) (P=0.441). However, the mean healing time was significantly shorter in the vacuum-assisted biopsy group (6.7 days) than in the needle aspiration group (9.0 days) (P=0.001). Vacuum-assisted biopsy is a viable option for the management of lactational breast abscesses and was found to lead to a shorter healing time than needle aspiration. However, further study is necessary to establish the clinical efficacy of vacuum-assisted biopsy in the management of lactational breast abscesses.

  8. Development of a Novel Robot for Transperineal Needle Based Interventions: Focal Therapy, Brachytherapy and Prostate Biopsies

    CERN Document Server

    Long, Jean-Alexandre; Baumann, Michael; Descotes, Jean-Luc; Bolla, Michel; Giraud, Jean-Yves; Rambeaud, Jean-Jacques; Troccaz, Jocelyne; 10.1016/j.juro.2012.06.003

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We report what is to our knowledge the initial experience with a new 3-dimensional ultrasound robotic system for prostate brachytherapy assistance, focal therapy and prostate biopsies. Its ability to track prostate motion intraoperatively allows it to manage motions and guide needles to predefined targets. Materials and Methods: A robotic system was created for transrectal ultrasound guided needle implantation combined with intraoperative prostate tracking. Experiments were done on 90 targets embedded in a total of 9 mobile, deformable, synthetic prostate phantoms. Experiments involved trying to insert glass beads as close as possible to targets in multimodal anthropomorphic imaging phantoms. Results were measured by segmenting the inserted beads in computerized tomography volumes of the phantoms. Results: The robot reached the chosen targets in phantoms with a median accuracy of 2.73 mm and a median prostate motion of 5.46 mm. Accuracy was better at the apex than at the base (2.28 vs 3.83 mm, p <...

  9. Tumour seeding after fine-needle aspiration and core biopsy of the head and neck--a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Keval S V; Ethunandan, Madan

    2016-04-01

    Although fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) and core needle biopsy are essential diagnostic investigations of lumps in the head and neck, seeding along the needle track has long been a concern, and various factors have been implicated. We therefore searched the Medline database for relevant English language papers published between 1970 and 2014, excluding those on the thyroid and parathyroid, and systematically reviewed them to assess the risk. In the 610 articles reviewed we found only 7 reports of seeding (5 after FNAC and 2 after core needle biopsy). Tumours were found between 3 months and 3 years after the procedure in 4 cases, and in 3, tumour cells were found along the needle track between 0 and 33 days after the procedure. The needles varied in size from 18 - 22 gauge (G) and there were 3 to 4 passes. Four cases occurred after investigation of a mass in the salivary glands, and 3 after assessment of a cervical lymph node. Disease was benign in one and malignant in 6. Seeding along the needle track after FNAC or core needle biopsy of a lump in the head and neck is rarely reported, and an accurate estimate of its incidence is difficult to ascertain. Crude estimates suggest 0.00012% and 0.0011% after FNA and core needle biopsy, respectively. A distinction should be made between seeding that is seen shortly after the procedure and the development of tumour along the needle track. Copyright © 2016 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Utility of Fine-Needle Aspiration Biopsy in the Evaluation of Pediatric Head and Neck Masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huyett, Phillip; Monaco, Sara E; Choi, Sukgi S; Simons, Jeffrey P

    2016-05-01

    Fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) has a well-established role in the evaluation of an adult head and neck mass (HNM) but remains underused in children. The objectives of this study were to assess the diagnostic accuracy, safety profile, use of anesthesia, and influence on surgical decision making of FNAB of HNM in the pediatric population. Case series with chart review. Tertiary care children's hospital. In total, 257 consecutive patients with HNM who underwent 338 FNABs from July 2007 to July 2014 were reviewed. Patients ranged in age from 0 to 21 years (mean, 9.3 years); lesions ranged in size from 0.3 to 12.5 cm (mean, 2.4cm). Fine-needle aspiration biopsies were performed in the interventional radiology suite, operating room, clinic, or ward. The most common patient final diagnoses included reactive lymphadenopathy (n = 99, 38.5%), benign thyroid colloid nodule (n = 31, 12.1%), malignancies (n = 21, 8.2%), and atypical mycobacterial infection (n = 15, 5.8%). On surgical histopathologic and clinical follow-up, overall sensitivity of FNAB was 94.6% and specificity was 97.7%. The complication rate was 2.1%, and general anesthesia or sedation was used for 73% of FNAB. Surgery occurred only 9 times following the 191 patients with negative FNAB results, indicating that 95.3% of unnecessary surgeries were avoided with the assistance of the FNAB result. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy is an accurate and safe diagnostic tool for guiding management of persistent lymphadenopathy, thyroid nodules, and other HNM in pediatric patients. Negative FNABs can often obviate the need for surgical intervention. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  11. Results and complications of CT-guided transthoracic fine-needle aspiration biopsy of pulmonary lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Cristiano Dias de; Nunes, Rodolfo Acatauassu; Saito, Eduardo Haruo; Higa, Claudio; Cardona, Zanier Jose Fernando; Santos, Denise Barbosa dos, E-mail: cristianodiaslima@gmail.co [Hospital Universitario Pedro Ernesto (HUPE/UERJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. Cirurgia Toracica

    2011-03-15

    Objective: to analyze the cytological findings of CT-guided percutaneous fine-needle aspiration biopsies of the lung, to demonstrate the diagnostic feasibility of the method in the investigation of pulmonary lesions, and to determine the complications of the procedure, evaluating its safety. Methods: a retrospective analysis of 89 patients with various types of pulmonary lesions who underwent 97 procedures over a period of five years. The patients were divided into groups regarding the indication for the procedure: suspicion of primary lung cancer (stages IIIB or IV); suspicion of lung cancer (stages I, II, or IIIA) and clinical contraindications for surgery; suspicion of pulmonary metastasis from other organs; and pulmonary lesions with benign radiological aspect. All of the procedures were performed with 25-gauge needles and were guided by spiral CT. The final diagnosis was confirmed by surgical biopsy and clinical/oncological follow-up. For the analysis of complications, the total number of procedures was considered. Results: the main indication for the procedure was suspicion of advanced stage primary lung cancer. The accuracy of the method for malignant lesions was 91.5%. The lesion was confirmed as cancer in 73% of the patients. The major complication was pneumothorax (27.8%), which required chest tube drainage in 12.4% of the procedures. Conclusions: the principal indication for CT-guided fine-needle biopsy was suspicion of primary lung cancer in patients who were not surgical candidates. The procedure has high diagnostic feasibility for malignant pulmonary diseases. The most prevalent complication was pneumothorax. However, in most cases, chest tube drainage was unnecessary. No deaths were related to the procedure. (author)

  12. CT-guided biopsy of thoracic lesions with a novel wire-based needle guide device - initial experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroepil, Patric; Bilk, Philip; Quentin, Michael; Miese, Falk R; Lanzman, Rotem S; Scherer, Axel (Dept. of Radiology, Medical Faculty, Univ. Duesseldorf, Duesseldorf (Germany)), email: Patric.Kroepil@med.uni-duesseldorf.de

    2011-10-15

    Background Biopsies guided by computed tomography (CT) play an important role in clinical practice. A short duration, minimal radiation dose and complication rate are of particular interest. Purpose To evaluate the potential of a novel self-manufactured wire-based needle guide device for CT-guided thoracic biopsies with respect to radiation dose, intervention time and complication rate. Material and Methods Forty patients that underwent CT-guided biopsies of thoracic lesions were included in this study and assigned to two groups. Patients in group A (n = 20, mean age 69 +- 8.4 years) underwent biopsies with a novel wire-based needle guide device, while patients in group B (n = 20, mean age 68.4 +- 10.1 years) were biopsied without a needle guide device. The novel self-manufactured needle guide device consists of an iron/zinc wire modelled to a ring with a flexible arm and an eye at the end of the arm to stabilize the biopsy needle in the optimal position during intervention. Predefined parameters (radiation dose, number of acquired CT-slices, duration of intervention, complications) were compared between both groups. Results Mean radiation dose (CTDIvol 192 mGy versus 541 mGy; P = 0.001) and the number of acquired slices during intervention (n = 49 +- 33 vs. n = 126 +- 78; P = 0.001) were significantly lower in group A compared with group B. Intervention time in group A (13.1 min) was significantly lower than in group B (18.5 min, P < 0.01). A pneumothorax as peri-interventional complication was observed less frequent after device assisted biopsies (n = 4 vs. n = 8, n.s.). Conclusion The novel wire-based needle guide device is a promising tool to facilitate CT-guided thoracic biopsies reducing radiation dose, intervention time, and related complications. Further studies are mandatory to confirm these initial results

  13. Predictors of technical success and rate of complications of image-guided percutaneous transthoracic lung needle biopsy of pulmonary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Stephan; Mensel, Birger; Friedrich, Nele; Schäfer, Sophia; Mahlke, Christoph; von Bernstorff, Wolfram; Bock, Karen; Hosten, Norbert; Kühn, Jens-Peter

    2015-01-01

    To investigate predictors of technical success and complications of computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy of potentially malignant pulmonary tumors. From 2008 to 2009, technical success and rate of complications of CT-guided percutaneous transthoracic lung needle biopsies of patients with suspicious pulmonary tumors were retrospectively evaluated. The influence on technical success and rate of complications was assessed for intervention-related predictors (lesion diameter, length of biopsy pathway, number of pleural transgressions, and needle size) and patient-related predictors (age, gender, reduced lung function). In addition, technical success and rate of complications were compared between different interventional radiologists. One hundred thirty-eight patients underwent biopsies by 15 interventional radiologists. The overall technical success rate was 84.1% and was significantly different between interventional radiologists (range 25%-100%; ptechnical success rate. The overall complication rate was 59.4% with 39.1% minor complications and 21.0% major complications. The rate of complications was influenced by lesion diameter and distance of biopsy pathway. Interventional radiologist-related rates of complications were not statistically different. Technical success of percutaneous, transthoracic lung needle biopsies of pulmonary tumors is probably dependent on the interventional radiologist. In addition, lesion diameter and length of biopsy pathway are predictors of the rate of complications.

  14. Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Aspiration Biopsy in Infracentimetric Thyroid Nodules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Su; In, Hyun Sin; Eun, Choong Ki [Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University School of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-03-15

    The aim of this study is to determine the efficacy of ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy (US-FNAB) of thyroid nodules that are equal to or less than 1 cm at the maximum diameter. The US-FNABs performed on thyroid nodules from March to August 2009 were included in this study. We retrospectively evaluated the cytopathologic results as well as any complications associated with the procedure. Of the 241 thyroid nodules (range: 0.1 - 1.0 cm, mean size: 5.8 mm) in 184 patients (female: male = 164:20, mean age: 49.0 years, age range: 18 - 77 years old), the incidence of an inadequate sample was 14.1% (34/241) for the US-FNABs. Eighty six nodules were surgically removed in 62 patients, of which 15 were confirmed to be benign nodules and 71 were confirmed to be malignant nodules. The number of true positive, false positive, true negative and false negative results for US-FNAB were 59, 0, 10 and 3%, respectively, and the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy were 95.2%, 100%, 100%, 76.9% and 95.8%, respectively. All the false negative cases were less than 3 mm at the maximal diameter. There were no serious complications in all the patients. US-FNAB was effective for the cases of thyroid nodule under 1 cm at the maximal diameter. However, a false negative result of US-FNAB should be considered for the cases of very small nodules that are less than 3 mm at the maximal diameter

  15. CT-guided percutaneous fine-needle aspiration biopsy of pulmonary nodules measuring 10 mm or less

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Y.L. [Joint Department of Medical Imaging, Thoracic Division, University Health Network and Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)], E-mail: yuenli_ng@hotmail.com; Patsios, D.; Roberts, H.; Walsham, A.; Paul, N.S.; Chung, T.; Herman, S.; Weisbrod, G. [Joint Department of Medical Imaging, Thoracic Division, University Health Network and Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2008-03-15

    Aim: To determine the value of computed tomography (CT)-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) of small pulmonary nodules measuring 10 mm or less. Material and Methods: CT-guided FNABs of 55 nodules, measuring 10 mm or less, were performed between January 2003 and February 2006. A coaxial technique was used, with an outer 19 G Bard Truguide needle and inner 22 G disposable Greene biopsy needle. Adequacy of specimens was assessed on-site by a cytotechnologist. The sizes of the nodules, distance from pleura, number of pleural punctures and aspirates, complications encountered, cytological diagnosis, and outcome were recorded. Results: The mean nodule diameter was 9 mm (range 5-10 mm). The average distance from the costal pleura was 31 mm (range 0-88 mm). In 50 of the 55 FNABs, the pleura was crossed once. An average of four aspirates was performed per case. Twenty-five FNABs (45.5%) were adequate for diagnosis (24 malignant and one tuberculosis). In 11 cases, where no definite diagnosis was made following FNAB, the outcome was not affected. In 10 cases, samples were insufficient for diagnosis and the nodules were subsequently diagnosed as malignant. Eight cases were excluded in the final analysis as follow-up details were unavailable. The sensitivity for malignancy and overall accuracy were 67.7 and 78.8%, respectively. Pneumothorax occurred in 29 (52.7%) patients, with five (9.1%) requiring thoracostomy tubes. Conclusion: CT-guided FNAB is a useful tool in the diagnosis and management of small pulmonary nodules, despite the lower diagnostic accuracy and higher complication rate than those of larger pulmonary lesions.

  16. Liver biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biopsy - liver; Percutaneous biopsy ... the biopsy needle to be inserted into the liver. This is often done by using ultrasound. The ... the chance of damage to the lung or liver. The needle is removed quickly. Pressure will be ...

  17. Bone Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Bone Biopsy Bone biopsy uses a needle and imaging ... the limitations of Bone Biopsy? What is a Bone Biopsy? A bone biopsy is an image-guided ...

  18. Thyroid nodules with isolated macrocalcification: Malignancy and diagnostic efficacy of fine-needle aspiration and core needle biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Dong Gyu; Kim, Dae Sik; Kim, Soo Jin [Dept. of Radiology, Human Medical Imaging and Intervention Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ryoo, Jae Wook [Dept. of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, So Lyung [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    This study was performed to determine the malignancy risk of thyroid nodules with isolated macrocalcification and to evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of fine-needle aspiration (FNA) and core needle biopsy (CNB). From May 2008 to December 2014, a total of 44 patients with isolated macrocalcifications were enrolled from 4,081 consecutive patients who underwent FNA or CNB at a single institution. We assessed the malignancy risk of nodules with isolated macrocalcification. We compared the diagnostic results between FNA and CNB, and the diagnostic efficacy of each procedure was evaluated by the rate of inconclusive results. We compared the diagnostic performance for malignancy between FNA and CNB with a criterion of malignant or atypia/follicular lesion of undetermined significance (indeterminate) diagnostic results. We investigated whether the ultrasonographic feature of isolated macrocalcification was predictive of malignancy. The malignancy risk of nodules with isolated macrocalcification was 16.1% in 31 nodules with final diagnoses and 11.4% in all nodules. CNB demonstrated a significantly lower rate of nondiagnostic and inconclusive results than FNA (7.7% vs. 53.8%, P=0.002 and 15.4% vs. 57.7%, P=0.003, respectively) in 26 nodules that underwent both FNA and CNB. CNB showed a marginally higher diagnostic performance for identifying malignancy than FNA (P=0.067). The ultrasonographic features of the anterior margin of isolated macrocalcification were not predictive of malignancy (P>0.999). Thyroid nodules with isolated macrocalcification had a low to intermediate malignancy risk and should not be considered benign nodules. CNB showed a higher diagnostic efficacy than FNA in these nodules.

  19. Comparison of diagnostic quality of kidney biopsy obtained using 16g and 18g needles in patients with diffuse renal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komal Arora

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the diagnostic quality and complication rates of 16G and 18G needles in biopsy of the kidney, we performed renal biopsy using a biopsy gun under ultrasound guidance in 50 patients who were prospectively and evenly assigned to one of the two needle biopsy methods from April 2007 until May 2008. Two cores of renal biopsy specimen were obtained in each case and subjected to histopathological and immunoflourescence (IF examination. Pain associated with the procedure was assessed using a visual analog scale. The number of glomeruli retrieved using the 16G needle ranged from 0 to 30 (mean 9.42 ± 5.5 and those retrieved using 18G needle ranged from 0 to 19 (mean 7.72 ± 4.4, P <0.05. The quality of biopsy was poorer with 18G needle as compared with 16G needles because of a higher amount of fragmentation and crushing artifact. There was no difference in the compli-cation rates between the two needles (2% each. The 16G needle was associated with significantly more pain than the 18G needle. We conclude that our study demonstrates the benefit of the larger 16G needle in providing more tissue and glomeruli, which is more diagnostically useful. However, the use of 16G needle was associated with significantly more pain than the 18G needle, and may be a better compromise for diagnostic usefulness and patient acceptability.

  20. What is the added value of combined core biopsy and fine needle aspiration in the diagnostic process of renal tumours?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barwari, K; Kummerlin, I P; ten Kate, F J; Algaba, F; Trias, I; Wijkstra, H; De la Rosette, J J; Laguna, P

    2013-08-01

    Non-diagnostic results still hinder the routine use of core biopsy (CB) and fine needle aspiration (FNA) in the diagnostic process of renal tumours. Furthermore, substantial interobserver variability has been reported. We assessed the added value of combining the results of CB and FNA by five pathologists in the ex vivo diagnosis of renal mass. Two ex vivo core biopsies were taken followed by two FNA passes from extirpated tumours. All samples were evaluated by five blinded pathologists. A consensus diagnosis of the surgical specimen was the index for comparison. For each pathologist, the number of non-diagnostic (non-conclusive or undetermined biology and failed biopsies), correct and incorrect scored cases of each technique was assessed. When a non-diagnostic CB or FNA had a correct diagnostic counterpart, this was considered as of added value. Of the 57 assessed tumours, 53 were malignant. CB was non-diagnostic in 4-10 cases (7-17.5%). FNA established the correct diagnosis in 1-7 of these cases. FNA was non-diagnostic in 2-6 cases (3.5-10.5%), and the counterpart CB established the correct diagnosis in 1-6 of these cases. For the 5 pathologists, accuracy of CB and FNA varied between 82.5-93% and 89.5-96.5%, respectively. Combination of both types of biopsy resulted in 55-57 correct results (accuracy 96.5-100%), i.e., an increase in accuracy of 3.5-14%. Combining the result of CB and FNA in renal mass biopsy leads to a higher diagnostic accuracy. Recommendations on which technique used should be adapted to local expertise and logistic possibilities.

  1. An assessment of fine-needle sampling techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titoria, Puneet; Siva, Thiru M; Malik, Tass

    2010-07-01

    Fine-needle cytology sampling, when adequate, is highly sensitive and specific for tissue-type diagnosis, with figures of 94% and 88%, respectively. This study explores the technique of sampling to reduce interoperator variability and ensure maximal tissue yield. Apple cortical tissue was sampled as a proxy of human lymph node. A total of 200 samples, by four methods, with 50 by each sampling method, were taken using blue venepuncture needles and weighed to assess tissue yield. Results were analysed using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey's HSD test. Comparable yields, by mass, were achieved by both straight lance and coring techniques (P > 0.05). Significantly greater yield was achieved with a multiplanar technique (P sampling increases mass yield of tissue in fine-needle sampling. Coring appears to have little bearing on yield.

  2. [Pediatric lymphomas diagnosis after needle biopsy in Abidjan: value of cytology versus MYC translocation examination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Gnangoran Victor; Toutain, Jérôme; Enoh, Jacob; Tre-Yavo, Mireille; Dachary, Dominique; Couitchere, Line; Koffi, Kouakou Emmanuel; Doukoure, Brahima; Ando, Joseph; De Mascarel, Antoine; Merlio, Jean-Philippe

    2012-02-01

    In Africa, lymphomas are widely represented by pediatric Burkitt lymphomas. In Abidjan, cytology performed after needle biopsy may be an examination of choice for pediatric lymphomas because of its low cost. We evaluated the value of this cytological examination in comparison with MYC rearrangement assessment. A cytological examination was performed after needle biopsy of masses suspected for lymphoma. The reliability of this cytological examination was assessed versus a cytogenetic technique of fluorescence in situ hybridization with a probe targeting locus 8q24 (MYC) which is recurrently rearranged in Burkitt lymphomas. Thirty-four patients were enrolled in this study. The median age was 8 years old. The main locations of the suspicious masses were maxillofacial and abdominal. Thirty cytological examinations identified cytological aspects of Burkitt lymphoma. Among these cases, the cytogenetic technique identified 24 cytogenetic rearrangements compatible with a translocation involving MYC as described in Burkitt lymphoma. Six cytological examinations identified cytological aspects of Burkitt lymphoma without MYC translocation. Two cytological examinations were not compatible with Burkitt lymphoma and a normal MYC status was observed. Two cytological examinations were technically not contributive. The cytological examination showed good performance, notably with excellent sensitivity. The cytological examinations compatible with a Burkitt lymphoma without MYC translocation (6/30=20.0%) could be explained by the absence of translocation involving locus 8q24 (MYC) in some endemic Burkitt lymphomas. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Lymphography and percutaneous fine needle node aspiration biopsy in the staging of bladder carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccon-Gibod, L; Katz, M; Cochand, B; Le Portz, B; Steg, A

    1984-01-01

    Forty-two patients with infiltrating bladder tumor were submitted to pedal lymphography with percutaneous fine needle node aspiration biopsy on an out patient basis. Of 41 evaluable patients, 59% had a positive lymphangiogram. Adequate material was obtained in 81% of the patients. Of 12 patients with a normal lymphography, none had a positive aspiration whereas 40% of the positive lymphangiograms correlated with a positive aspiration. The high rate of positive lymphangiogram negative aspirate is attributed to inflammatory changes due to previous TUR of the tumor. Twenty-one patients were submitted to radical cystectomy: 12 negative aspirations correlated with 11 negative lymphadenectomies, and 4 positive aspirations with 4 positive lymphadenectomies. There was no mortality and only mild morbidity in this series. Lymphography with fine needle percutaneous node aspiration biopsy has a role in the pre-operative staging of bladder carcinoma. Positive pelvic wall lymph nodes upgrade bladder carcinoma from a local to a systemic disease that is no longer amenable to any form of local treatment. Nodal assessment is therefore critical to treatment planning in order to spare the N+ patients unnecessary radical surgery. Pelvic lymph nodes have been evaluated, in the past, radiologically by bipedal lymphography or C.A.T. scanning. The high false positive and negative rates of these procedures (Benson et al., 1981; Boccon-Gibod et al., 1982) preclude their routine use (Correa 1982; Walsh et al., 1980).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. CT-guided cutting needle biopsy of lung lesions - Safety and efficacy of an out-patient service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charig, M.J.; Phillips, A.J

    2000-12-01

    AIM: To determine the safety and efficacy of CT-guided cutting needle biopsy of lung lesions as an out-patient procedure. MATERIALS AND METHODS:A total of 185 consecutive biopsies were performed under CT guidance on 183 patients between January 1991 and December 1998 using 20-gauge (n= 33), 18-gauge (n= 151) or 14-gauge (n= 1) core biopsy needles. A chest radiograph was taken after observation in the Radiology department for 1 h and asymptomatic patients were discharged. RESULTS: The histology was malignant in 150 biopsies (81.1%) and benign in 23 (12.4%) with 12 false-negative results (6.5%); there were no false-positive results. The sensitivity was 92.6%; specificity 100%; negative predictive value 65.7%; and overall accuracy 93.5%. Pneumothoraces occurred in 48 patients (25.9%); one required aspiration only and four required insertion of an intercostal drain. One patient developed a pneumothorax after discharge. Small haemoptyses occurred in 13 patients without pneumothorax (7.0%), one of whom was admitted. In-patient treatment was required in 10 patients (5.4%). CONCLUSION: Computed tomography-guided cutting needle biopsy of pulmonary lesions is a safe technique with a diagnostic accuracy and complication rate comparable to reported figures for fine needle aspiration biopsy. It can be safely performed on an out-patient basis. Charig, M.J., Phillips, A.J. (2000)

  5. Diagnostic performance of percutaneous lung biopsy using automated biopsy needles under CT-fluoroscopic guidance for ground-glass opacity lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimatsu, R; Miura, H; Yamada, K; Takahata, A; Matsumoto, T; Hasebe, T

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The goal of our study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of percutaneous lung biopsy under CT-fluoroscopic guidance for ground-glass opacity (GGO) lesions. Methods: 85 percutaneous needle lung biopsies were performed in 73 patients. Specimens were obtained by core biopsy utilising an automated cutting needle and were evaluated histologically. Final diagnosis was confirmed by independent surgical pathology, independent culture results or clinical follow-up. Results: Rates of adequate specimens obtained and of precise diagnosis by needle biopsy were 92.9% (79/85) and 90.6% (77/85) of evaluated lung lesions, respectively. Precise diagnosis was achieved in 87.1% (27/31) of lesions ≤10 mm in diameter, 90.0% (36/40) of lesions >10 mm to ≤20 mm and 100.0% (14/14) of lesions >20 mm. Precision in diagnosing GGO lesions according to the GGO component was 73.9% (17/23) for pure GGO lesions and 96.8% (60/62) for part-solid GGO lesions. Obtaining a precise diagnosis did not differ significantly according to the lesion size (p=0.3840), but differences were significant according to the GGO component (p=0.0047). Malignancy was accurately diagnosed in 35 of 36 malignant lesions for which surgery was later performed. The specific cell type determined from specimens obtained by needle biopsy was exactly the same as the final histological diagnosis obtained after surgery in 20 lesions. Conclusion: Tissue-core lung biopsy under CT-fluoroscopic guidance for a GGO lesion provides a high degree of diagnostic accuracy but is less reliable for determining the specific cell type. Advances in knowledge: Percutaneous lung biopsy under CT-fluoroscopic guidance for GGO is useful in differentiating malignancy. PMID:23385998

  6. Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Aspiration Biopsy of Multiple Thyroid Nodules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Dae; Bae, Il Hun; Lee, Seung Young; Han, Gi Seok; Cha, Sang Hun; Kim, Sung Jin; Park, Kil Sun; Koong, Sung Soo; Lee, Ok Jun [Chungbuk National University College of Medicine, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-09-15

    To standardize the number of nodules which necessitates ultrasound-guided, fine-needle, aspiration biopsy in patients who have multiple thyroid nodules with the same sonographic characteristics as each other. From February, 2002 to March, 2004, among patients whose diagnosis was confirmed by ultrasound-guided, fine-needle, aspiration biopsy, 545 nodules of 203 patients were found in sonography with more than two thyroid nodules. Each thyroid gland nodule was classified on a score from 0 to 2 points on the basis of the following 5 characteristics: internal content, margin, echogenicity, shape and calcification in sonography. When the score of all characteristics was the same, by deciding on nodules with the same sonographic characteristics and with the score of at least one characteristic being different, we divided the nodules with different sonographic characteristics in a patient. By methods such as given in the preceding descriptions, patients with multiple thyroid nodules were separated into two groups: one in which all nodules had the same sonographic characteristics and another in which nodules have at least one different sonographic characteristic. Then, each pathologic result was searched for the same case and different case in each patient group. Among the 203 patients who were diagnosed with multiple thyroid nodules in ultrasonography, 79 patients (38.9%) had nodules with the same ultrasonographic characteristics and 124 patients (61.1%) had nodules with at least one different ultrasonographic characteristic. All 79 patient's nodules with the same ultrasonographic characteristics in each patient showed the same pathologic result in all cases (100.0%) and there was no case showing a different pathologic result. Otherwise, among the 124 patient's nodules with different ultrasonographic characteristics, each patient showed the same pathologic result in 111 (89.5%) and different pathologic result in 13 (10.5%). In patients who have multiple thyroid

  7. Sentinel lymph node biopsy in patients with a needle core biopsy diagnosis of ductal carcinoma in situ: is it justified?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Doyle, B

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: The incidence of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) has increased markedly with the introduction of population-based mammographic screening. DCIS is usually diagnosed non-operatively. Although sentinel lymph node biopsy (SNB) has become the standard of care for patients with invasive breast carcinoma, its use in patients with DCIS is controversial. AIM: To examine the justification for offering SNB at the time of primary surgery to patients with a needle core biopsy (NCB) diagnosis of DCIS. METHODS: A retrospective analysis was performed of 145 patients with an NCB diagnosis of DCIS who had SNB performed at the time of primary surgery. The study focused on rates of SNB positivity and underestimation of invasive carcinoma by NCB, and sought to identify factors that might predict the presence of invasive carcinoma in the excision specimen. RESULTS: 7\\/145 patients (4.8%) had a positive sentinel lymph node, four macrometastases and three micrometastases. 6\\/7 patients had invasive carcinoma in the final excision specimen. 55\\/145 patients (37.9%) with an NCB diagnosis of DCIS had invasive carcinoma in the excision specimen. The median invasive tumour size was 6 mm. A radiological mass and areas of invasion <1 mm, amounting to "at least microinvasion" on NCB were predictive of invasive carcinoma in the excision specimen. CONCLUSIONS: SNB positivity in pure DCIS is rare. In view of the high rate of underestimation of invasive carcinoma in patients with an NCB diagnosis of DCIS in this study, SNB appears justified in this group of patients.

  8. Comparison of the Analgesic Efficacy of Lidocaine/Prilocaine (EMLA Cream and Needle-Free Delivery of Lidocaine During Fine-Needle Aspiration Biopsy of Thyroid Nodules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alptekin Gürsoy

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Efficacy of eutectic mixture of local anesthetic (EMLA cream and the needle-free injection of local anesthesia for reducing pain associated with fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB of thyroid nodules has been previously reported. However, there has not been a direct comparison of the analgesic efficacy of these methods. The aim of this study was to compare the analgesic efficacy of EMLA cream and needle-free injection of lidocaine for FNAB-associated pain. Materials and Methods: A total of 138 patients having their first ultrasonography-guided thyroid nodule biopsy were randomly assigned to receive either EMLA cream (n=68 or needle-free injection of lidocaine (n=70 before FNAB of thyroid nodules. Four needle passes for biopsy of each nodule were performed. Patients rated pain associated with the procedure according to a 100-mm visual analog scale (VAS, an 11-point numeric rating scale (NRS, and 4-category verbal rating scale (VRS. Results: There were no significant differences between groups in age, sex, thyroid volume, nodule size, or nodule site. Significant differences between groups were noted in ratings of all three pain scales. When the effectiveness of EMLA was compared with that of needle-free injection of lidocaine, the mean VAS score was 23.4±20.5 mm versus 12.7±15.5 mm (p=0.001, and the mean NRS score was 2.8±2.1 points versus 1.6±1.7 points (p<0.001. There was also a significant difference between groups in VRS score (p=0.001. Conclusions: Needle-free injection of lidocaine provides more effective and faster analgesia than EMLA cream application during the FNAB. Turk Jem 2009; 13: 5-7

  9. Endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of pancreatic masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinga, Mariana; Gheorghe, Cristian; Dumitrescu, Marius; Gheorghe, Liana; Nicolaie, Tudor

    2004-03-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) represents a highly sensitive method for the detection of pancreatic masses. When available, EUS-guided fine needle aspiration (FNA) is the best technique for the diagnosis and staging of pancreatic cancer due to its ability to obtain tissue for diagnosis. The standardized indications for pancreatic EUS-FNA comprise the definite diagnosis of malignancy and histopathological confirmation of adenocarcinoma before surgical resection, chemo/radiotherapy, or celiac plexus neurolysis. The technique of performing EUS-FNA is described in detail, from the vizualization of the target lesion and adequate placement of the transducer to allow optimal needle access, to needle penetration and sampling of the targeted lesion. We report a series of 9 patients who underwent EUS-FNA and shortly review the indications, technique, results and impact of EUS-FNA on the management of these patients.

  10. Biopsy needle advancement during bone marrow aspiration increases mesenchymal stem cell concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne E Peters

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Point-of-care kits to concentrate bone marrow (BM derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are used clinically in horses. A maximal number of MSCs per ml of marrow aspirated might be desired prior to use of a point-of-care system to concentrate MSCs. Our objective was to test a method to increase the number of MSCs per ml of marrow collected. We collected 2 BM aspirates using 2 different collection techniques from 12 horses. The first collection technique was to aspirate BM from a single site without advancement of the biopsy needle. The second collection technique was to aspirate marrow from multiple sites within the same sternal puncture by advancing the needle 5 mm 3 times for BM aspiration from 4 sites. Numbers of MSCs in collected BM were assessed by total nucleated cell count (TNCC of BM after aspiration, total Colony-Forming-Unit-fibroblast (CFU-F assay, and total MSC number at each culture passage. The BM aspiration technique of 4 needle advancements during BM aspiration resulted in higher initial nucleated cell counts, more CFU-Fs, and more MSCs at the first passage. There were no differences in the number of MSCs at later passages. Multiple advancements of the BM needle during BM aspiration resulted in increased MSC concentration at the time of BM collection. If a point-of-care kit is used to concentrate MSCs, multiple advancements may result in higher MSC numbers in the BM concentrate after preparation by the point-of-care kit. For culture expanded MSCs beyond the first cell passage, the difference is of questionable clinical relevance.

  11. Comparing Endoscopic Ultrasound-Fine-needle Aspiration and Endoscopic Ultrasound-Fine-needle Biopsy for Solid Lesions: A Multicenter, Randomized Trial-The New York Endoscopic Research Outcomes Group (NYERO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagula, Satish; Pourmand, Kamron; Aslanian, Harry; Bucobo, Juan Carlos; Gonda, Tamas; Gonzalez, Susana; Goodman, Adam; Gross, Seth A; Ho, Sammy; DiMaio, Christopher J; Kim, Michelle; Pais, Shireen; Poneros, John; Robbins, David; Schnoll-Sussman, Felice; Sethi, Amrita; Buscaglia, Jonathan M

    2017-06-15

    Endoscopic ultrasound with fine-needle aspiration (FNA) is the standard of care for tissue sampling of solid lesions adjacent to the gastrointestinal tract. Fine-needle biopsy (FNB) may provide higher diagnostic yield with fewer needle passes. The aim of this study was to assess the difference in diagnostic yield between FNA and FNB. This is a multicenter, prospective randomized clinical trial from 6 large tertiary care centers. Patients referred for tissue sampling of solid lesions were randomized to either FNA or FNB of the target lesion. Demographics, size, location, number of needle passes, and final diagnosis were recorded. After enrollment, 135 patients were randomized to FNA (49.3%), and 139 patients were randomized to FNB (50.7%).The following lesions were sampled: mass (n = 210, 76.6%), lymph nodes (n = 46, 16.8%), and submucosal tumors (n = 18, 6.6%). Final diagnosis was malignancy (n = 192, 70.1%), reactive lymphadenopathy (n = 30, 11.0%), and spindle cell tumors (n = 24, 8.8%). FNA had a diagnostic yield of 91.1% compared with 88.5% for FNB (P = .48). There was no difference between FNA and FNB when stratified by the presence of on-site cytopathology or by type of lesion sampled. A median of 1 needle pass was needed to obtain a diagnostic sample for both needles. FNA and FNB obtained a similar diagnostic yield with a comparable number of needle passes. On the basis of these results, there is no significant difference in the performance of FNA compared with FNB in the cytologic diagnosis of solid lesions adjacent to the gastrointestinal tract. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01698190. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Optimal Diagnostic Yield Achieved With On-site Pathology Evaluation of Fine-Needle Aspiration-Assisted Core Biopsies for Pediatric Osseous Lesions: A Single-Center Experience.

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    Patel, Kalyani; Kinnear, Darryl; Quintanilla, Norma M; Hicks, John; Castro, Eumenia; Curry, Choladda; Dormans, John; Ashton, Daniel J; Hernandez, J Alberto; Wu, Hao

    2017-05-01

    - Image-guided, fine-needle aspiration-assisted core needle biopsy with an on-site evaluation by a pathologist (FNACBP) of osseous lesions is not a common practice in pediatric institutions. - To evaluate the diagnostic adequacy and accuracy of FNACBP for pediatric osseous lesions and to compare the adequacy with procedures that do not use fine-needle aspiration. - Six-year, retrospective review of 144 consecutive children biopsied for osseous lesions with and without fine-needle aspiration assistance. - Pathologic diagnosis was achieved in 79% (57 of 72) of the core biopsies without an on-site evaluation, 78% (32 of 41) of the open biopsies (9 with intraoperative consultation), and 97% (30 of 31) of the FNACBPs as the initial diagnostic procedure. Three FNACBP cases were preceded by nondiagnostic open biopsies. Among 34 lesions sampled by FNACBP, 33 (97%) succeeded with diagnostic tissue, with most (30 of 33; 91%) being neoplasms, including 16 malignant (48%), 13 benign (39%), and 1 indeterminate (3%) lesions. The most-common diagnoses were osteosarcoma (9 of 33; 27%) and Langerhans cell histiocytosis (7 of 33; 21%). In cases with follow-up information available, 93% (28 of 30) of the FNACBP-rendered diagnoses were clinically useful, allowing initiation of appropriate therapy. The FNACBP procedure had 100% specificity, sensitivity, and positive predictive value for all 14 malignant lesions, with the sensitivity being 88% in benign lesions. Most FNACBP procedures (32 of 34; 94%) yielded adequate material for ancillary testing. A gradual upward trend was observed for the choice of FNACBP as an initial diagnostic procedure for osseous lesions. - The FNACBP procedure yields sufficient material for diagnosis and ancillary studies in pediatric, osseous lesions and may be considered an initial-diagnostic procedure of choice.

  13. Breath-hold after forced expiration before removal of the biopsy needle decreased the rate of pneumothorax in CT-guided transthoracic lung biopsy

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    Min, Lingfeng; Xu, Xingxiang [Subei People' s Hospital of Jiangsu Province, Clinical Medical School of Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225001, Jiangsu (China); Song, Yong [Jinling Hospital, Nanjing University School of Medical, Nanjing 210002, Jiangsu (China); Issahar, Ben-Dov [Pulmonary Institute, Sheba Medical Center, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Wu, Jingtao; Zhang, Le; Huang, Qian [Subei People' s Hospital of Jiangsu Province, Clinical Medical School of Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225001, Jiangsu (China); Chen, Mingxiang, E-mail: chenmx1129@126.com [Subei People' s Hospital of Jiangsu Province, Clinical Medical School of Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225001, Jiangsu (China)

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: To assess the effect of a breath-hold after forced expiration on the rate of pneumothorax after computed tomography (CT)-guided transthoracic needle biopsy of pulmonary lesions. Materials and methods: Between January 2008 and December 2011, percutaneous CT-guided lung biopsy was performed in 440 patients. Two hundred and twenty-one biopsies were performed without (control group) and two hundred and nineteen biopsies were performed with (study group) the study maneuver – a breath-hold after forced expiratory approach. Multivariate analysis was performed between groups for risk factors for pneumothorax, including patient demographics, lesion characteristics, and biopsy technique. Results: A reduced number of pneumothoraces (18 [8.2%] vs 35 [15.8%]; P = 0.014) but no significant difference in rate of drainage catheter insertions (2 [0.9%] vs (4 [1.8%]; P = 0.418) were noted in the study group as compared with the control group. By logistic regression analysis, three factors significantly and independently affected the risk for pneumothorax including lesion size (transverse and longitudinal diameter), distance from pleura and utilizing or avoiding the breath-hold after deep expiration maneuver. Conclusion: Breath-holding after forced expiration before removal of the biopsy needle during the percutaneous CT-guided transthoracic lung biopsy almost halved the rate of overall pneumothorax. Small lesion size (longitudinal diameter) and the distance from pleura were also predictors of pneumothorax in our study.

  14. Fine needle aspiration biopsy: role in diagnosis of pediatric head and neck masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anne, Samantha; Teot, Lisa A; Mandell, David L

    2008-10-01

    To assess the feasibility and role of fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) as a diagnostic tool in children with neck masses. Retrospective chart review. Tertiary care children's hospital. Consecutive series of 71 children with a head and neck mass who underwent FNAB as the primary diagnostic modality. FNAB was performed and interpreted by a pediatric cytopathologist. Rapid on-site analysis was performed to allow immediate assessment of specimen adequacy and to attain a preliminary diagnosis, after which routine cytologic staining was performed. Flow cytometry was performed on cytological specimens when malignancy was suspected, and open biopsy was performed when the cytologic diagnosis was in question. Technical feasibility of FNAB in children, complications, cytopathological diagnoses, accuracy of rapid on-site analysis, need for subsequent diagnostic evaluations, clinical outcomes and follow-up. Mean age was 8.4 years (S.D. 5.3 years), with mean follow-up of 4.1 months (S.D. 9.6 months). FNAB was performed under general anesthesia in 54 cases (76%). There were no technical complications. On-site rapid interpretation was completed in 55 cases, 18/55 confirmed adequacy of specimen only, 37/55 yielded a preliminary diagnosis, and in 34/37 cases, was same as final cytopathologic result. Overall, FNAB biopsy demonstrated 64 benign lesions, 3 malignant diagnoses, 2 follicular thyroid neoplasms, and 2 non-diagnostic specimens. FNAB was the only pathological test performed in 54 (76%) cases. The most common diagnosis was reactive lymphoid hyperplasia (n = 39), followed by benign granulomatous disease (n = 8). Flow cytometry was performed on 7 specimens (non-diagnostic in 5, negative for malignancy in 2). Of the 15 cases with surgical specimens, 3 revealed a pathologic diagnosis different from initial FNAB. There were no cases in which FNAB missed a malignancy, and there were 2 cases where FNAB suggested malignancy, with benign disease subsequently found on open biopsy

  15. Application of transrectal ultrasound-guided repeat needle biopsy in the diagnosis of prostate cancer in Chinese population: A retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Transrectal ultrasound-guided repeat needle biopsy (TUGRNB is widely used for diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa. However, significance of TUGRNB in Chinese population was rarely reported. A retrospective study was conducted to evaluate the significance of TUGRNB applied in prediction of PCa in Chinese population. Materials and Methods: A total of 960 from January 2009 to December 2012 were included. Repeat needle biopsy rate and PCa positive detection rate were evaluated. Relationship between prostate specific antigen (PSA levels and PCa positive rates was analyzed. Results: PCa positive detection rate after initial needle biopsy was 28.4%, which was lower than the rate of repeat needle biopsy (40%. The rate for immediate transurethral resection (TUR, surgery after initial needle biopsy, was 27.1%, however with a low PCa positive detection rate (0.66%. The repeat needle biopsy rate was lower compared with the initial biopsy rate (P 20 ng/ml, PCa positive rate was significantly higher than those with PSA < 20 ng/ml (P < 0.05. Conclusion: PCa positive detection rate following repeat needle biopsy in Chinese population was higher, although the repeated needle biopsy rate was still in a low level. TUGRNB should attract more attention in the diagnosis of PCa.

  16. The reliability of ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy in the evaluation of non-palpable solid breast lesions using 18-gauge needles

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    Lim, Sung Chul; Kim, Young Sook [Chosun University College of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Sneige, Nour [The University of Texas M.D. Andreson Carcer Canter, Houston (United States)

    2003-04-01

    Ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy (US CNB) is increasingly used in the histologic evaluation of non-palpable solid breast lesions. We retrospectively investigated the diagnostic accuracy of this technique, using an 18-gauge needle in 422 non-palpable breast lesions. 583 female patients with an average age 56 (range, 22-90) years underwent 590 US CNBs. Between January 1994 and December 1999, using 18-gauge needles, an average of four cores per lesion was obtained. Three hundred and eighty-five lesions were subsequently surgically excised; for 14 of these, the pathologic diagnosis was breast carcinoma metastasis, while 23 with benign diagnoses were clinically followed up for {>=}2.5 years and were considered for analysis. Of the 422 lesions, 340 (80.6%) were malignant [308 invasive, 24 ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), 7 DCIS with undetermined invasion and 1 DCIS vs. lobular carcinoma in situ], 67 (15.9%) were benign [30 fibroadenoma (FA) and 37 other diagnoses], and five (1.2%) were fibroepithelial lesions. The remaining ten samples (2,4%) included six cases of atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH), two of atypical hyperplasia (AH), and two of lobular neoplasia. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of CNBs were 99%, 100%, 100%, and 96%, respectively. Two cases of invasive carcinoma were missed at CNB; there was no false-positive diagnosis. Five of six ADHs and one of two AHs were found to be carcinomas (3 DCIS and 3 infiltrating duct carcinomas). Sixteen of 24 (66.7%) cases of DCIS were found at excision to be invasion carcinomas. Of 31 FAs, two (6.5%) were found to be low-grade phyllodes tumor (PT). The five fibroepithelial lesions were shown at excision to be either PT (n=4) or FA (n=1). US CNB using an 18-gauge needle is a safe and reliable means of diagnosing breast carcinoma. Because of the high prevalence of ductal carcinoma is these lesions; findings of ADH/AH at US CNB indicate that surgical excision is needed

  17. A meta-analysis of endoscopic ultrasound–fine-needle aspiration compared to endoscopic ultrasound–fine-needle biopsy: diagnostic yield and the value of onsite cytopathological assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Ali; Grimm, Ian S.; Ali, Bilal; Nollan, Richard; Tombazzi, Claudio; Ismail, Mohammad Kashif; Baron, Todd H.

    2017-01-01

    Background The diagnostic yield of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) is variable, and partly dependent upon rapid onsite evaluation (ROSE) by a cytopathologist. Second generation fine-needle biopsy (FNB) needles are being increasingly used to obtain core histological tissue samples. Aims Studies comparing the diagnostic yield of EUS guided FNA versus FNB have reached conflicting conclusions. We therefore conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to compare the diagnostic yield of FNA with FNB, and specifically evaluating the diagnostic value of ROSE while comparing the two types of needles. Methods We searched several databases from inception to 10 April 2016 to identify studies comparing diagnostic yield of second generation FNB needles with standard FNA needles. Risk ratios (RR) were calculated for categorical outcomes of interest (diagnostic adequacy, diagnostic accuracy, and optimal quality histological cores obtained). Standard mean difference (SMD) was calculated for continuous variables (number of passes required for diagnosis). These were pooled using random effects model of meta-analysis to account for heterogeneity. Meta-regression was conducted to evaluate the effect of ROSE on various outcomes of interest. Results Fifteen studies with a total of 1024 patients were included in the analysis. We found no significant difference in diagnostic adequacy [RR 0.98 (0.91, 1.06), (I 2 = 51 %)]. Although not statistically significant (P = 0.06), by meta-regression, in the absence of ROSE, FNB showed a relatively better diagnostic adequacy. For solid pancreatic lesions only, there was no difference in diagnostic adequacy [RR 0.96 (0.86, 1.09), (I 2 = 66 %)]. By meta-regression, in the absence of ROSE, FNB was associated with better diagnostic adequacy (P = 0.02). There was no difference in diagnostic accuracy [RR 0.99 (0.95, 1.03), (I 2 = 27 %)] or optimal quality core histological sample

  18. Uncommon primary tumors of the orbit diagnosed by computed tomography-guided core needle biopsy: report of two cases

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    Tyng, Chiang Jeng; Matushita Junior, Joao Paulo Kawaoka; Bitencourt, Almir Galvao Vieira; Amoedo, Mauricio Kauark; Barbosa, Paula Nicole Vieira; Chojniak, Rubens, E-mail: almirgvb@yahoo.com.br [A.C.Camargo Cancer Center, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Imagem; Neves, Flavia Branco Cerqueira Serra [Hospital do Servidor Publico Estadual, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Div. de Oftalmologia

    2014-11-15

    Computed tomography-guided percutaneous biopsy is a safe and effective alternative method for evaluating selected intra-orbital lesions where the preoperative diagnosis is important for the therapeutic planning. The authors describe two cases of patients with uncommon primary orbital tumors whose diagnosis was obtained by means of computed tomography-guided core needle biopsy, with emphasis on the technical aspects of the procedure. (author)

  19. Interobserver agreement of gleason score and modified gleason score in needle biopsy and in surgical specimen of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio G. Veloso

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Gleason score, which has a high interobserver variability, is used to classify prostate cancer. The most recent consensus valued the tertiary Gleason pattern and recommended its use in the final score of needle biopsies (modified Gleason score. This pattern is considered to be of high prognostic value in surgical specimens. This study emphasized the evaluation of the modified score agreement in needle biopsies and in surgical specimen, as well as the interobserver variability of this score MATERIALS AND METHODS: Three pathologists evaluated the slides of needle biopsies and surgical specimens of 110 patients, reporting primary, secondary and tertiary Gleason patterns and after that, traditional and modified Gleason scores were calculated. Kappa test (K assessed the interobserver agreement and the agreement between the traditional and modified scores of the biopsy and of the surgical specimen RESULTS: Interobserver agreement in the biopsy was K = 0.36 and K = 0.35, and in the surgical specimen it was K = 0.46 and K = 0.36, for the traditional and modified scores, respectively. The tertiary Gleason grade was found in 8%, 0% and 2% of the biopsies and in 8%, 0% and 13% of the surgical specimens, according to observers 1, 2 and 3, respectively. When evaluating the agreement of the traditional and modified Gleason scores in needle biopsy with both scores of the surgical specimen, a similar agreement was found through Kappa CONCLUSION: Contrary to what was expected, the modified Gleason score was not superior in the agreement between the biopsy score and the specimen, or in interobserver reproducibility, in this study.

  20. Comparison of Ultrasound-Guided Core Needle Biopsy and Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Aspiration for Solid Pancreatic Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sur, Young Keun; Kim, Young Chul; Kim, Jai Keun; Lee, Jei Hee; Yoo, Byung Moo; Kim, Young Bae

    2015-12-01

    The objective of our study was to compare the diagnostic yield of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) using a 25-gauge needle and ultrasound (US)-guided core needle biopsy (CNB) using an 18-gauge core needle for diagnosis of solid pancreatic lesions. This retrospective study was approved by our Institutional Review Board, and the requirement for informed consent was waived. Patients who underwent either EUS-guided FNA or US-guided CNB for a solid pancreatic lesion from January 2008 to December 2012 were included and reviewed. Fine-needle aspirations and CNBs were performed by experienced endoscopists and radiologists. The diagnostic yield, accuracy, technical failure rate, sensitivity, and specificity for malignancy were calculated and compared. A total of 106 biopsy attempts were undertaken in 89 patients (EUS-guided FNA, n = 70; US-guided CNB, n = 36). Biopsy specimens were successfully obtained in 98 biopsy attempts (EUS-guided FNA, n = 63; US-guided CNB, n = 35). The accuracy, technical failure rate, sensitivity, and specificity of EUS-guided FNA for malignancy (73.02%, 10.00%, 77.78%, and 44.44%, respectively) was not significantly different from those of US-guided CNB (88.57%, 2.78%, 87.10%, and 100%, respectively; P ≥ .089). Diagnostic performance did not differ between the modalities according to the size and the location of the lesion in the pancreas. However, the diagnostic yield of US-guided CNB (86.11%) was higher than that of EUS-guided FNA (65.71%, P = .035). The diagnostic yield of US-guided CNB for solid pancreatic lesions is superior to that of EUS-guided FNA. © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging-targeted, 3D transrectal ultrasound-guided fusion biopsy for prostate cancer: Quantifying the impact of needle delivery error on diagnosis

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    Martin, Peter R., E-mail: pmarti46@uwo.ca [Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Cool, Derek W. [Department of Medical Imaging, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7, Canada and Robarts Research Institute, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Romagnoli, Cesare [Department of Medical Imaging, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Fenster, Aaron [Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Medical Imaging, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Robarts Research Institute, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Ward, Aaron D. [Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-targeted, 3D transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided “fusion” prostate biopsy intends to reduce the ∼23% false negative rate of clinical two-dimensional TRUS-guided sextant biopsy. Although it has been reported to double the positive yield, MRI-targeted biopsies continue to yield false negatives. Therefore, the authors propose to investigate how biopsy system needle delivery error affects the probability of sampling each tumor, by accounting for uncertainties due to guidance system error, image registration error, and irregular tumor shapes. Methods: T2-weighted, dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted, and diffusion-weighted prostate MRI and 3D TRUS images were obtained from 49 patients. A radiologist and radiology resident contoured 81 suspicious regions, yielding 3D tumor surfaces that were registered to the 3D TRUS images using an iterative closest point prostate surface-based method to yield 3D binary images of the suspicious regions in the TRUS context. The probabilityP of obtaining a sample of tumor tissue in one biopsy core was calculated by integrating a 3D Gaussian distribution over each suspicious region domain. Next, the authors performed an exhaustive search to determine the maximum root mean squared error (RMSE, in mm) of a biopsy system that gives P ≥ 95% for each tumor sample, and then repeated this procedure for equal-volume spheres corresponding to each tumor sample. Finally, the authors investigated the effect of probe-axis-direction error on measured tumor burden by studying the relationship between the error and estimated percentage of core involvement. Results: Given a 3.5 mm RMSE for contemporary fusion biopsy systems,P ≥ 95% for 21 out of 81 tumors. The authors determined that for a biopsy system with 3.5 mm RMSE, one cannot expect to sample tumors of approximately 1 cm{sup 3} or smaller with 95% probability with only one biopsy core. The predicted maximum RMSE giving P ≥ 95% for each

  2. Taking label-free optical spectroscopy techniques into the operating theatre: biopsy needles and surgical guidance probes (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblond, Frédéric

    2017-02-01

    Recent advances will be described relating to the development and clinical translation of optical spectroscopy techniques designed to guide surgical interventions in brain and prostate oncology applications. The use of molecular imaging guidance systems can enable true intra-operative tissue identification, increasing the effectiveness of cancer surgery and potentially positively impacting patient survival. Surgical resection is a fundamental cancer treatment, but its effectiveness is reduced by the inability to rapidly and accurately identify cancer margins. We will introduce a portable intraoperative label-free multimodal optical spectroscopy system combining intrinsic fluorescence, diffuse reflectance, and Raman spectroscopy that can identify cancer in situ during surgery. We will show that this on-line guidance system can detect primary cancer such as glioma as well as metastatic melanoma and cancer of the lung and colon with an accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of 97%, 100%, and 93% respectively. Moreover, a method will be presented, along with preliminary tissue classification results, based on the interrogation of whole human prostates from prostatectomies. The development and in vivo validation of an optical brain needle biopsy instrument will be presented demonstrating its ability to detect bulk tumor using Raman spectroscopy with the goal of reducing the number of non-diagnostic samples during a procedure. The extraction of tissue can cause life-threatening hemorrhage because of significant blood vessel injury during the procedure. We will demonstrate that a sub-diffuse optical tomography technique integrated with a commercial biopsy needle can detect the presence of blood vessels to limit the hemorrhage risk.

  3. Imaging-Guided Core-Needle Breast Biopsy: Impact of Meditation and Music Interventions on Patient Anxiety, Pain, and Fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soo, Mary Scott; Jarosz, Jennifer A; Wren, Anava A; Soo, Adrianne E; Mowery, Yvonne M; Johnson, Karen S; Yoon, Sora C; Kim, Connie; Hwang, E Shelley; Keefe, Francis J; Shelby, Rebecca A

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the impact of guided meditation and music interventions on patient anxiety, pain, and fatigue during imaging-guided breast biopsy. After giving informed consent, 121 women needing percutaneous imaging-guided breast biopsy were randomized into three groups: (1) guided meditation; (2) music; (3) standard-care control group. During biopsy, the meditation and music groups listened to an audio-recorded, guided, loving-kindness meditation and relaxing music, respectively; the standard-care control group received supportive dialogue from the biopsy team. Immediately before and after biopsy, participants completed questionnaires measuring anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory Scale), biopsy pain (Brief Pain Inventory), and fatigue (modified Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue). After biopsy, participants completed questionnaires assessing radiologist-patient communication (modified Questionnaire on the Quality of Physician-Patient Interaction), demographics, and medical history. The meditation and music groups reported significantly greater anxiety reduction (P values pain during biopsy, compared with the music group (P = .03). No significant difference in patient-perceived quality of radiologist-patient communication was noted among groups. Listening to guided meditation significantly lowered biopsy pain during imaging-guided breast biopsy; meditation and music reduced patient anxiety and fatigue without compromising radiologist-patient communication. These simple, inexpensive interventions could improve women's experiences during core-needle breast biopsy. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Malignant-looking thyroid nodules with size reduction: Core needle biopsy results

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    Lee, Ha Young; Baek, Jung Hwan; Ha, Eun Jun; Park, Jee Won; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Song, Dong Eun; Shong, Young Kee [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether malignant-looking thyroid nodules with size reduction were malignant or not. From November 2010 to July 2011, we retrospectively enrolled 16 patients with 16 nodules (11 females and five males; mean age, 55 years) who underwent core needle biopsy (CNB), and whose thyroid nodules had malignant ultrasonographic (US) features, although they showed size reduction (>20% decrease in maximum diameter) during the follow-up period (mean, 37±27 months). The histologic findings of the CNB specimen were reviewed and correlated with the US findings. US studies were analyzed for their internal content, shape, margin, echogenicity, the presence of microcalcification and macrocalcification, inner isoechoic rim, and low-echoic halo. All nodules were confirmed as benign by CNB. Pathologic analysis was available for 12 CNB specimens. US imaging showed central hypoechogenicity or marked hypoechogenicity in all cases and a peripheral isoechoic rim in 15 nodules. US-pathologic correlation showed that the central hypoechoic area was primarily composed of fibrosis (12/12) and hemorrhage (8/12) and that the isoechoic rim was composed of follicular cells. In our study, the CNB results of all of the malignant-looking thyroid nodules with size reduction were benign and were primarily composed of internal fibrosis and hemorrhage. Understanding these US and pathologic features could prevent repeated fine-needle aspiration or unnecessary diagnostic surgery.

  5. Malignant-looking thyroid nodules with size reduction: core needle biopsy results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ha Young Lee

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate whether malignant-looking thyroid nodules with size reduction were malignant or not. Methods From November 2010 to July 2011, we retrospectively enrolled 16 patients with 16 nodules (11 females and five males; mean age, 55 years who underwent core needle biopsy (CNB, and whose thyroid nodules had malignant ultrasonographic (US features, although they showed size reduction (>20% decrease in maximum diameter during the follow-up period (mean, 37±27 months. The histologic findings of the CNB specimen were reviewed and correlated with the US findings. US studies were analyzed for their internal content, shape, margin, echogenicity, the presence of microcalcification and macrocalcification, inner isoechoic rim, and low-echoic halo. Results All nodules were confirmed as benign by CNB. Pathologic analysis was available for 12 CNB specimens. US imaging showed central hypoechogenicity or marked hypoechogenicity in all cases and a peripheral isoechoic rim in 15 nodules. US-pathologic correlation showed that the central hypoechoic area was primarily composed of fibrosis (12/12 and hemorrhage (8/12 and that the isoechoic rim was composed of follicular cells. Conclusion In our study, the CNB results of all of the malignant-looking thyroid nodules with size reduction were benign and were primarily composed of internal fibrosis and hemorrhage. Understanding these US and pathologic features could prevent repeated fine-needle aspiration or unnecessary diagnostic surgery.

  6. Complications and prostate cancer diagnosis rate of TRUS prostate biopsies using 16 and 18G needles by Clavien scoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Serkan; Akif Diri, Mehmet; Bagcioglu, Murat; Karakan, Tolga; Aydın, Arif

    2017-05-16

    We aimed to compare the 18 and 16-Gauge (G) needles used in transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS)-guided needle biopsy for cancer detection rates and complications using the Clavien Scoring System. The 80 patients who were included in the study were randomized and divided into two groups. Group 1 (n = 36) had a TRUS-guided prostate biopsy with an 18G needle and Group 2 had a 16G needle (n = 44). The hematuria, bleeding assessment, and infection events were evaluated on a daily basis. These complications were graded according to the Clavien Scoring. In Group 1, only five (13%) patients were diagnosed with prostate cancer, and three patients were reported to have atypical small acinar proliferation (ASAP). In Group 2, 16 (36%) patients were diagnosed with prostate cancer and one patient was reported to have ASAP. The difference in the prostate cancer detection rate between the groups was statistically significant. According to the Clavien grading system, the complications were at the Grade 1 level in 25 people in Group 1 in 29 people in Group 2. Grade 2 level complications were not observed in either group. While one person was Grade 3 in Group 1, two people in Group 2 had this rate. There were no significant differences between the groups. We found that cancer detection rate increased by increasing the thickness of the needle used in TRUS-guided prostate biopsy without any increase in the complications.

  7. Comparison of Histologic Core Portions Acquired from a Core Biopsy Needle and a Conventional Needle in Solid Mass Lesions: A Prospective Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ban Seok; Cho, Chang-Min; Jung, Min Kyu; Jang, Jung Sik; Bae, Han Ik

    2017-07-15

    The superiority of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle biopsy (EUS-FNB) over EUS-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) remains controversial. Given the lack of studies analyzing histologic specimens acquired from EUS-FNB or EUS-FNA, we compared the proportion of the histologic core obtained from both techniques. A total of 58 consecutive patients with solid mass lesions were enrolled and randomly assigned to the EUS-FNA or EUS-FNB groups. The opposite needle was used after the failure of core tissue acquisition using the initial needle with up to three passes. Using computerized analyses of the scanned histologic slide, the overall area and the area of the histologic core portion in specimens obtained by the two techniques were compared. No significant differences were identified between the two groups with respect to demographic and clinical characteristics. Fewer needle passes were required to obtain core specimens in the FNB group (pcore (11.8%±19.5% vs 8.0%±11.1%, p=0.376) or in the diagnostic accuracy (80.6% vs 81.5%, p=0.935) between two groups. The proportion of histologic core and the diagnostic accuracy were comparable between the FNB and FNA groups. However, fewer needle passes were required to establish an accurate diagnosis in EUS-FNB.

  8. Can EGFR mutation status be reliably determined in pre-operative needle biopsies from adenocarcinomas of the lung?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindahl, Kim Hein; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Jonstrup, Søren Peter;

    2015-01-01

    The identification of EGFR mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer is important for selecting patients, who may benefit from treatment with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The analysis is usually performed on cytological aspirates and/or histological needle biopsies, representing a small fraction...

  9. Use of spirometry to predict risk of pneumothorax in CT-guided needle biopsy of the lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Rio, F.; Pino, J.M.; Diaz-Lobato, S.; Villamor, S. [Autonoma Univ., Madrid (Spain)] [and others

    1996-01-01

    Our goal was to assess the usefulness of spirometry to estimate the risk of pneumothorax in patients undergoing percutaneous needle biopsy with CT guidance for solitary pulmonary nodule (SPN). We studied the results of 51 consecutive percutaneous needle biopsies with CT guidance for SPN obtained between 1988 and 1990. Forty-five men and six women, aged 65 {+-} 11 (36-86) years, were included in the study. All biopsies were performed under CT guidance, with 90 mm 25G needles (0.5 mm thickness) fitted into luer-type syringes. The number of needle pass attempts never exceeded three. A spirometry before biopsy was performed in all patients. Pneumothorax occurred in only 10 cases (19%). The patients with pneumothorax showed lower lesion size, forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume (FEV{sub 1}), and FEV{sub 1}/FVC ratio. The contribution of these factors to pneurnothorax was analyzed by a logistic regression model. The FEV{sub 1} was most strongly associated with the incidence of pneumothorax. We developed an equation for predicting the risk of this complication. We conclude that decreasing FEV{sub 1} is associated with a higher neurnothorax rate. 15 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Is stereotactic large-core needle biopsy beneficial prior to surgical treatment in BI-RADS 5 lesions?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoorntje, LE; Peeters, PHM; Mali, WPTM; Rinkes, IHMB

    2004-01-01

    Introduction. Due to screening mammography, more nonpalpable mammographic lesions warrant histological evaluation. Stereotactic large-core needle biopsy (SLCNB) has been shown to be as effective in diagnosing these lesions as diagnostic surgical excision, and has become the preferred diagnostic proc

  11. Immunohistochemical staining for thyroid peroxidase (TPO) of needle core biopsies in the diagnosis of scintigraphically cold thyroid nodules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yousaf, U.; Christensen, Lars Høj; Rasmussen, A.K.

    2008-01-01

    , but the procedure has its limitations in a routine setting. PURPOSE: To improve diagnosis and reduce surgery rate, the FNAC procedure was replaced by needle core biopsy (NCB), which was routinely stained for TPO by the monoclonal antibody mAb 47. MATERIALS AND METHODS: During a 5-year period 427 consecutive...... of cold thyroid nodules of the nonoxyphilic type Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6...

  12. Is stereotactic large-core needle biopsy beneficial prior to surgical treatment in BI-RADS 5 lesions?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoorntje, LE; Peeters, PHM; Mali, WPTM; Rinkes, IHMB

    2004-01-01

    Introduction. Due to screening mammography, more nonpalpable mammographic lesions warrant histological evaluation. Stereotactic large-core needle biopsy (SLCNB) has been shown to be as effective in diagnosing these lesions as diagnostic surgical excision, and has become the preferred diagnostic proc

  13. Diagnosis of intrathoracic lesions: are sequential fine-needle aspiration (FNA) and core needle biopsy (CNB) combined better than either investigation alone?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aviram, G. [Department of Radiology, Tel-Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)]. E-mail: aviramgalit@hotmail.com; Greif, J. [Department of Pulmonology, Tel-Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Man, A. [Department of Pulmonology, Tel-Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Schwarz, Y. [Department of Pulmonology, Tel-Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Marmor, S. [Department of Pathology, Tel-Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Graif, M. [Department of Radiology, Tel-Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Blachar, A. [Department of Radiology, Tel-Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2007-03-15

    Aim: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of sequential computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous fine-needle aspiration (FNA) and core-needle biopsy (CNB) in comparison with FNA and CNB performed separately for diagnosing intrathoracic lesions. Subjects and methods: Five hundred and eighty-two consecutive patients with thoracic lesions who underwent same-session sequential CT-guided FNA and CNB procedures were studied. The final diagnosis, which was achieved by either agreement of percutaneous procedures with clinical follow-up, bronchoscopy or thoracotomy was available for all cases. The diagnostic yield of the combined FNA + CNB procedures was compared with that of each alone. Results: Adequate samples were obtained in 541 (93%) of FNAs and 513 (88%) of CNBs. Of 582 lesions, 419 (72%) were malignant and 163 (28%) were benign. For malignant lesions, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the procedures were: 376/419 (89.7%), 136/163 (83.4%), and 88% for FNA; 317/419 (75.6%), 138/163 (84.7%), and 78% for CNB; 400/419 (95.5%), 154/163 (94.5%), and 95% for FNA + CNB. The sequential procedures showed significantly better sensitivity, specificity and accuracy compared with either FNA or CNB separately (p < 0.003). For the 163 benign lesions, 76 (47%) had a specific benign pathological diagnosis. The diagnosis was obtained in 16/76 (21%) by FNA, in 54/76 (71%) by CNB, and in 60/76 (79%) by FNA + CNB. There was no significant difference between the results of the sequential procedures and CNB alone (p > 0.05). Conclusions: Sequential FNA and CNB improve the diagnostic accuracy of percutaneous CT-guided procedures in malignant lesions. There was only mild improvement, which was not statistically significant, for the diagnosis of benign specific lesions by the sequential procedures compared with the yield of CNB alone.

  14. APPLICATION OF LIQUID-BASED CYTOLOGY TO FINE-NEEDLE ASPIRATION BIOPSIES OF THE THYROID GLAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido eFadda

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available FNAB (fine-needle aspiration biopsy is regarded as an important tool for diagnosing thyroid lesions because of its simplicity, safety and cost-effectiveness. Its role in correctly characterizing the group of indeterminate lesions or follicular-patterned neoplasms (FN might be more decisive. LBC (Liquid-based cytology is a technique based on the use of a semi-automated device that has gained popularity as a method of collecting and processing both gynecologic and non-gynecologic cytologic specimens. It achieves a diagnostic sensitivity as accurate as conventional preparations especially for its excellent cell preservation and for the lack of background which decrease the amount of inadequate diagnoses. Moreover, the cellular material which has been stored in the preservative solution could be effectively used for the application of immunocytochemical and molecular techniques used especially for the Follicular proliferations . In many cases the cytologic features are similar in both methods but the colloid film and the lymphocytic component are more easily evaluated on direct smears whereas nuclear details and colloid globules are better evaluated in LBC slides. The LBC processed biopsies represent a valid alternative to conventional cytology. The possibility of applying special techniques enhance the efficacy of the cytological diagnosis of thyroid lesions.

  15. Application of liquid-based cytology to fine-needle aspiration biopsies of the thyroid gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Esther Diana; Zannoni, Gian Franco; Moncelsi, Stefania; Stigliano, Egidio; Santeusanio, Giuseppe; Lombardi, Celestino Pio; Pontecorvi, Alfredo; Fadda, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Fine-needle aspiration biopsy is regarded as an important tool for diagnosing thyroid lesions because of its simplicity, safety, and cost-effectiveness. Its role in correctly characterizing the group of indeterminate lesions or follicular-patterned neoplasms (FN) might be more decisive. Liquid-based cytology (LBC) is a technique based on the use of a semi-automated device that has gained popularity as a method of collecting and processing both gynecologic and non-gynecologic cytologic specimens. It achieves a diagnostic sensitivity as accurate as conventional preparations especially for its excellent cell preservation and for the lack of background which decrease the amount of inadequate diagnoses. Moreover, the cellular material which has been stored in the preservative solution could be effectively used for the application of immunocytochemical and molecular techniques especially for the Follicular proliferations. In many cases the cytologic features are similar in both methods but the colloid film and the lymphocytic component are more easily evaluated on direct smears whereas nuclear details and colloid globules are better evaluated in LBC slides. The LBC-processed biopsies represent a valid alternative to conventional cytology. The possibility of applying special techniques enhance the efficacy of the cytological diagnosis of thyroid lesions.

  16. Paraffin-gel tissue-mimicking material for ultrasound-guided needle biopsy phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Sílvio L; Pavan, Theo Z; Junior, Jorge E; Carneiro, Antonio A O

    2013-12-01

    Paraffin-gel waxes have been investigated as new soft tissue-mimicking materials for ultrasound-guided breast biopsy training. Breast phantoms were produced with a broad range of acoustical properties. The speed of sound for the phantoms ranged from 1425.4 ± 0.6 to 1480.3 ± 1.7 m/s at room temperature. The attenuation coefficients were easily controlled between 0.32 ± 0.27 dB/cm and 2.04 ± 0.65 dB/cm at 7.5 MHz, depending on the amount of carnauba wax added to the base material. The materials do not suffer dehydration and provide adequate needle penetration, with a Young's storage modulus varying between 14.7 ± 0.2 kPa and 34.9 ± 0.3 kPa. The phantom background material possesses long-term stability and can be employed in a supine position without changes in geometry. These results indicate that paraffin-gel waxes may be promising materials for training radiologists in ultrasound biopsy procedures.

  17. Recommendations for excision following core needle biopsy of the breast: a contemporary evaluation of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Benjamin C; Collins, Laura C

    2016-01-01

    Pathologists frequently encounter non-malignant histological findings in percutaneous core needle biopsies (CNBs). Standards for the management of patients with lesions such as atypical ductal hyperplasia, atypical lobular hyperplasia, and lobular carcinoma in situ, as well as other benign lesions, are not well defined, and recommendations for surgical biopsy or continued clinical and radiological follow-up are inconsistent. The frequency with which these lesions are 'upgraded' to carcinoma in excision specimens is widely variable in the literature. Many CNB studies lack careful radiological-pathological correlation, clear criteria for excision, and clinical follow-up for patients on whom excision was not performed. This review of the recent literature emphasizes studies with radiological-pathological correlation, with the goal of developing a contemporary, evidence-based approach to the management of non-malignant lesions of the breast diagnosed on CNB. The data supporting an emerging consensus on which lesions may not require excision are highlighted. The management of non-malignant lesions diagnosed on magnetic resonance imaging-guided CNB is also discussed.

  18. [Hepatic fine needle aspiration biopsy. Experience in the study of hepatic masses at the Salvador Zubiran National Institute of Nutrition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeles-Angeles, A; Gamboa-Domínguez, A; Velázquez Fernández, D; Muñoz-Fernández, L

    1994-01-01

    The results of 114 fine-needle aspiration biopsies (FNAB) of the liver performed during six years (1987-1992) at the Departament of Pathology of the Instituto Nacional de la Nutrición Salvador Zubirán are presented. All were done by radiologists under ultrasonographic (three cases) or computerized tomographic guidance (111 cases). In order to determine the diagnostic accuracy, diagnoses made by FNAB were compared with those made by histological examination (coarse biopsies or surgical specimens) and/or by other diagnostic procedures including the clinical follow-up. Six cases were excluded because clinical information was not available. In 92 cases (85.2%) a correct diagnosis was made, in six (5.5%) the sample was inadequate and in 10 (9.3%) the diagnosis made by FNAB was incorrect. The diagnoses made were as follows: hepatocarcinoma 44, metastatic carcinoma 27, inflammatory lesions 12, regeneration 10, normal eight, unclassified carcinoma five, and lymphoma two. The sensitivity was 96.2, specificity 93.1, positive predictive value 97.4, negative predictive value 90.0, accuracy 95.3 and prevalence 73.1. There were three false negative and two false positive for carcinoma. These figures are similar to those found by other authors. No relevant complications were observed. It is concluded that FNAB of the liver is a safe, inexpensive and reliable method in the diagnoses of liver masses.

  19. Biopsies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Biopsies - Overview A biopsy is the removal of tissue ... What are the limitations of biopsies? What are biopsies? A biopsy is the removal of tissue in ...

  20. Diagnostic utility of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy for glomus tumor of the stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Shin; Kikuchi, Kaoru; Chinen, Kenji; Murakami, Takahiro; Kunishima, Fumihito

    2015-06-14

    A 52-year-old man was referred for further investigation of a gastric submucosal tumor on the greater curvature of the antrum. Endoscopic ultrasonography demonstrated a hypoechoic solid mass, which was primarily connected to the muscular layer of the stomach. We performed endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy. The pathological examination showed proliferation of oval-shaped cells with nest formation, which stained strongly positive for muscle actin, and negative for c-kit, CD34, CD56, desmin, S-100, chromogranin, and neuron-specific enolase. Therefore, we performed laparoscopy and endoscopy cooperative surgery based on the preoperative diagnosis of glomus tumor of the stomach. The final histological diagnosis confirmed the preoperative diagnosis. Although preoperative diagnosis of glomus tumor of the stomach is difficult with conventional images and endoscopic biopsy, endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy is an essential tool to gain histological evidence of glomus tumor of the stomach for early diagnosis.

  1. Predicting factors for conversion from fluoroscopy guided Percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy to cone-beam CT guided Percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kang Ji; Han, Young Min; Jin, Gong Yong; Song, Ji Soo [Chonbuk National Univ., Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    To evaluate the predicting factors for conversion from fluoroscopy guided percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy (PTNB) to cone-beam CT guided PTNB. From January 2011 to December 2012, we retrospectively identified 38 patients who underwent cone-beam CT guided PTNB with solid pulmonary lesions, and 76 patients who underwent fluoroscopy guided PTNB were matched to the patients who underwent cone-beam CT guided PTNB for age, sex, and lesion location. We evaluated predicting factors such as, long-axis diameter, short-axis diameter, anterior-posterior diameter, and CT attenuation value of the solid pulmonary lesion affecting conversion from fluoroscopy guided PTNB to cone-beam CT guided PTNB. Pearson χ{sup 2} test, Fisher exact test, and independent t test were used in statistical analyses; in addition, we also used receiver operating characteristics curve to find the proper cut-off values affecting the conversion to cone-beam CT guided PTNB. Short-axis, long-axis, anterior-posterior diameter and CT attenuation value of the solid pulmonary lesion in patients who underwent fluoroscopy guided PTNB were 2.70 ± 1.57 cm, 3.40 ± 1.92 cm, 3.06 ± 1.81 cm, and 35.67 ± 15.70 Hounsfield unit (HU), respectively. Short-axis, long-axis, anterior-posterior diameter and CT attenuation value of the solid pulmonary lesion in patients who underwent cone-beam CT guided PTNB were 1.60 ± 1.30 cm, 2.20 ± 1.45 cm, 1.91 ± 1.99 cm, and 18.32 ± 23.11 HU, respectively. Short-axis, long-axis, anterior-posterior diameter, and CT attenuation value showed a significantly different mean value between the 2 groups (p = 0.001, p < 0.001, p = 0.003, p < 0.001, respectively). Odd ratios of CT attenuation value and short-axis diameter of the solid pulmonary lesion were 0.952 and 0.618, respectively. Proper cut-off values affecting the conversion to cone-beam CT guided PTNB were 1.65 cm (sensitivity 68.4%, specificity 71.1%) in short-axis diameter and 29.50 HU (sensitivity 65.8%, specificity 65

  2. Development and preliminary evaluation of a motorized needle guide template for MRI-guided targeted prostate biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Sang-Eun; Tokuda, Junichi; Tuncali, Kemal; Tempany, Clare M; Zhang, Elizabeth; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2013-11-01

    To overcome the problems of limited needle insertion accuracy and human error in the use of a conventional needle guide template in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided prostate intervention, we developed a motorized MRI-compatible needle guide template that resembles a transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate template. The motorized template allows automated, gapless needle guidance in a 3T MRI scanner with minimal changes in the current clinical procedure. To evaluate the impact of the motorized template on MRI, signal-to-noise ratio and distortion were measured under various system configurations. A maximum of 44% signal-to-noise ratio decrease was found when the ultrasonic motors were running, and a maximum of 0.4% image distortion was observed due to the presence of the motorized template. To measure needle insertion accuracy, we performed four sets of five random target needle insertions mimicking four biopsy procedures, which resulted in an average in-plane targeting error of 0.94 mm with a standard deviation of 0.34 mm. The evaluation studies indicated that the presence and operation of the motorized template in the MRI bore create insignificant image degradation, and provide submillimeter targeting accuracy. The automated needle guide that is directly controlled by navigation software eliminates human error so that the safety of the procedure can be improved.

  3. The Significance of Minimally Invasive Core Needle Biopsy and Immunohistochemistry Analysis in 235 Cases with Breast Lesions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun Niu; Tieju Liu; Xuchen Cao; Xiumin Ding; Li Wei; Yuxia Gao; Jun Liu

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate core needle biopsy (CNB) as a mini-mally invasive method to examine breast lesions and discuss the clinical significance of subsequent immunohistochemistry (IHC)analysis.METHODS The clinical data and pathological results of 235 pa-tients with breast lesions, who Received CNB before surgery, were analyzed and compared. Based on the results of CNB done before surgery, 87 out of 204 patients diagnosed as invasive carcinoma were subjected to immunodetection for p53, c-erbB-2, ER and PR.The morphological change of cancer tissues in response to chemo-therapy was also evaluated.RESULTS In total of 235 cases receiving CNB examination, 204 were diagnosed as invasive carcinoma, reaching a 100% consistent rate with the surgical diagnosis. Sixty percent of the cases diag-nosed as non-invasive carcinoma by CNB was identified to have the presence of invading elements in surgical specimens, and simi-larly, 50% of the cases diagnosed as atypical ductal hyperplasia by CNB was confirmed to be carcinoma by the subsequent result of excision biopsy. There was no significant difference between the CNB biopsy and regular surgical samples in positive rate of im-munohistochemistry analysis (p53, c-erbB-2, ER and PR; P > 0.05).However, there was significant difference in the expression rate of p53 and c-erbB-2 between the cases with and without morphologi-cal change in response to chemotherapy (P < 0.05). In most cases with p53 and c-erbB-2 positive, there was no obvious morphologi-cal change after chemotherapy. CONCLUSION CNB is a cost-effective diagnostic method with minimal invasion for breast lesions, although it still has some limi-tations. Immunodetection on CNB tissue is expected to have great significance in clinical applications.

  4. Diagnostic accuracy and complication rate of CT-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy of lung lesions: A study based on the experience of the cytopathologist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massimiliano Priola, Adriano; Priola, Sandro Massimo; Cataldi, Aldo; Paze, Francesco (Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Univ. of Turin, S. Luigi Gonzaga Hospital, Turin (Italy)), e-mail: adriano.priola@inwind.it; Di Franco, Marisa (Dept. of Pharmacology, S. Luigi Gonzaga Hospital, Orbassano, Turin (Italy)); Marci, Valerio (Dept. of Pathology, S. Luigi Gonzaga Hospital, Orbassano, Turin (Italy)); Berruti, Alfredo (Dept. of Oncology, S. Luigi Gonzaga Hospital, Orbassano, Turin (Italy))

    2010-06-15

    Background: CT-guided transthoracic needle biopsy is a well-established technique for the diagnosis of focal lung lesions. Fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) requires the presence of a cytopathologist on-site to assess the adequacy of samples. For this reason FNAB is less and less used, and core biopsy is the first-line procedure when an experienced cytopathologist is not immediately available. Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy and complication rate of CT-guided FNAB of lung lesions according to the experience of the cytopathologist on-site. Material and Methods: A total of 321 consecutive biopsies were considered. Immediate cytological assessment was performed by an experienced cytopathologist for the first 165 procedures (group A) and by two training pathologists for the remaining 156 biopsies (group B). At the time of FNAB the pathologist assigned a semiquantitative score (0-3) to each specimen to assess its diagnostic quality. All variables between the two groups were analyzed by chi-square and Student's t test. A P value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: For all procedures, overall diagnostic accuracy was 80% for cytology alone, with no statistical difference between the two groups for diagnostic accuracy and sample score assigned. In all, 75% of the cytological samples (75% group A, 74% group B) obtained a higher score with a specific diagnosis of histotype. A post biopsy pneumothorax was detected in 27% of biopsies (25% group A, 28% group B). Thirteen patients (4.0%) required chest tube insertion for treatment. For all cases, the pneumothorax rate was significantly affected by the number of samples obtained (P=0.02), but not by the pleural punctures (P=0.15). There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups concerning the number of needle passes and complication rate (P>0.05). Conclusion: The efficacy and safety of CT-guided FNAB is not significantly affected by the training level of the cytopathologist

  5. Tongue biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biopsy - tongue ... A tongue biopsy can be done using a needle. You will get numbing medicine at the place where the ... provider will gently stick the needle into the tongue and remove a tiny piece of tissue. Some ...

  6. Benign Papillomas of the Breast Diagnosed on Large-Gauge Vacuum Biopsy compared with 14 Gauge Core Needle Biopsy - Do they require surgical excision?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seely, Jean M; Verma, Raman; Kielar, Ania; Smyth, Karl R; Hack, Kalesha; Taljaard, Monica; Gravel, Denis; Ellison, Erin

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate whether biopsy with vacuum-assisted biopsy (VAB) devices improves histologic underestimation rates of benign papillomas when compared to smaller bore core needle biopsy (CNB) devices. Patients with biopsy-proven benign papillomas with surgical resection or minimum 12 months follow-up were selected. Two breast pathologists reviewed all pathology slides of percutaneous and excisional biopsy specimens. Histologic underestimation rates for lesions biopsied with 10-12 Gauge (G) VAB were compared to those with 14G CNB. A total of 107 benign papillomas in 107 patients from two centers were included. There were 60 patients (mean age 57 years, SD 10.3 years) diagnosed with VAB and 47 patients (mean age 57.6 years, SD 11.3 years) with 14G CNB who underwent surgical excision or imaging follow-up. The upgrade rate to ductal carcinoma in situ or invasive carcinoma was 1.6% (1/60) with VAB and 8.5% (4/47) with 14G. Upgrade to atypia was 3.3% (2/60) after VAB and 10.6% (5/47) with CNB. The total underestimation rates were 5% (3/60) with VAB and 19.1% (9/47) with CNB. The odds of an upgrade to malignancy was 5.5 times higher with a 14G needle than VAB (95% CI: 0.592-50.853, p = 0.17). We observed a lower but not statistically significant upgrade rate to malignancy and atypia with the use of the 10-12 G VAB as compared with 14G CNB. When a papilloma without atypia is diagnosed with vacuum biopsy there is a high likelihood that it is benign; however, if surgical excision is not performed, long-term follow-up is still required. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Role of Axillary Ultrasound, Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology and Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy in clinically N0 Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Gaurav; Janaki, P D; Smitha, N V; Anupama, Rajanbabu; Sundaram, P Shanmugha; Nataraj, Y S; Vijaykumar, D K

    2016-12-01

    This study evaluates the combined role of axillary ultrasound, fine needle aspiration cytology and sentinel lymph node biopsy in clinically N0 axilla. Between January 2014 and June 2015, 150 women with early breast cancer underwent axillary ultrasound as a first investigation for nodal status. Suspicious nodes were subjected to image guided fine needle aspiration cytology. Non-suspicious and fine needle aspiration cytology negative axillary nodes proceeded to sentinel lymph node biopsy at time of primary breast surgery. All confirmed positive (cytology and frozen) cases proceeded to axillary lymph node dissection. 52 women had positive axillary nodes at final histology. Axillary ultrasound with fine needle aspiration cytology identified 27 patients with positive axillary nodal status and had a sensitivity of 84.36 % (27/32) and specificity of 87.5 % (14/16). Intraoperative frozen analysis identified a further 13 cases with sensitivity of 56.52 % (13/23) and specificity of 97.56 % (80/82). Overall 76.92 % (40/52) patients with positive axillary metastasis were identified peri-operatively using combination of axillary ultrasound, cytology and sentinel lymph node biopsy.

  8. Percutaneous CT-guided needle biopsies of musculoskeletal tumors: a 5-year analysis of non-diagnostic biopsies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Connie Y.; Huang, Ambrose J.; Bredella, Miriam A.; Torriani, Martin; Rosenthal, Daniel I. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Halpern, Elkan F. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Institute for Technology Assessment, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Springfield, Dempsey S. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Orthopedics, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-12-15

    To study non-diagnostic CT-guided musculoskeletal biopsies and take steps to minimize them. Specifically we asked: (1) What malignant diagnoses have a higher non-diagnostic rate? (2) What factors of a non-diagnostic biopsy may warrant more aggressive pursuit? (3) Do intra-procedural frozen pathology (FP) or point-of-care (POC) cytology reduce the non-diagnostic biopsy rate ?This study was IRB-approved and HIPAA-compliant. We retrospectively reviewed 963 consecutive CT-guided musculoskeletal biopsies. We categorized pathology results as malignant, benign, or non-diagnostic and recorded use of FP or POC cytology. Initial biopsy indication, final diagnosis, method of obtaining the final diagnosis of non-diagnostic biopsies, age of the patient, and years of biopsy attending experience were recorded. Groups were compared using Pearson's χ{sup 2} test or Fisher's exact test. In all, 140 of 963 (15 %) biopsies were non-diagnostic. Lymphoma resulted in more non-diagnostic biopsies (P < 0.0001). While 67% of non-diagnostic biopsies yielded benign diagnoses, 33% yielded malignant diagnoses. Patients whose percutaneous biopsy was indicated due to the clinical context without malignancy history almost always generated benign results (96 %). Whereas 56% of biopsies whose indication was an imaging finding of a treatable lesion were malignant, 20% of biopsies whose indication was a history of malignancy were malignant. There was no statistically significant difference in the nondiagnostic biopsy rates of pediatric versus adult patients (P = 0.8) and of biopsy attendings with fewer versus more years of experience (P = 0.5). The non-diagnostic rates of biopsies with FP (8 %), POC cytology (25 %), or neither (24 %) were significantly different (P < 0.0001). Lymphoma is the malignant diagnosis most likely to result in a non-diagnostic biopsy. If the clinical and radiologic suspicion for malignancy is high, repeat biopsy is warranted. If the clinical context suggests a

  9. EUS – Fine- Needle Aspiration Biopsy (FNAB in the Diagnosis of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalogeraki Alexandra

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Solid masses of the pancreas represent a variety of benign and malignant neoplasms of the exocrine and endocrine tissues of the pancreas. A tissue diagnosis is often required to direct therapy in the face of uncertain diagnosis or if the patient is not a surgical candidate either due to advanced disease or comorbidities. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS is a relatively new technology that employs endoscopy and high-frequency ultrasound (US. EUS involves imaging of the pancreatic head and the uncinate from the duodenum and imaging of the body and tail from the stomach. It has been shown to be a highly sensitive method for the detection of pancreatic masses. It is superior to extracorporeal US and computed tomographic (CT scans, especially when the pancreatic tumor is smaller than 2-3 cm. Although EUS is highly sensitive in detecting pancreatic solid masses, its ability to differentiate between inflammatory masses and malignant disease is limited. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP brushing, CT-guided biopsies, and transabdominal ultrasound (US have been the standard nonsurgical methods for obtaining a tissue diagnosis of pancreatic lesions, but a substantial false-negative rate has been reported. Transabdominal US-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy (US-FNAB has been used for tissue diagnosis in patients with suspected pancreatic carcinoma. It has been shown to be highly specific, with no false-positive diagnoses. With the advent of curvilinear echoendoscopes, transgastric and transduodenal EUS-FNAB of the pancreas have become a reality EUS with FNAB has revolutionized the ability to diagnose and stage cancers of the gastrointestinal tract and assess the pancreas. Gastrointestinal cancers can be looked at with EUS and their depth of penetration into the intestinal wall can be determined. Any suspicious appearing lymph nodes can be biopsied using EUS/FNAB. The pancreas is another organ that is well visualized with EUS. Abnormalities

  10. The accuracy of ultrasound guided 14-gauge core needle breast biopsy: Correlation with surgical excision or long term follow-up

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    Sumaporn Makkun

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound-guided 14-gauge core-needle breast biopsy (CNB correlation with surgical excision or long term follow-up. Methods: One hundred and fifteen breast lesions which had undergone ultrasound-guided 14-gauge core-needle breast biopsy from May 2003 to Aug 2010 in the Breast Diagnostic Center, King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital were included in this study. Clinical history, palpability of the lesion, site of the lesion, the prebiopsy lesion size, ultrasound characteristic, level of suspicion according to the BIRADS classification, number of samples taken and pathologic results of CNB were reviewed and correlated with pathologic results of subsequent open surgery. For benign lesions without surgery, we correlated the result of CNB with stability of the lesion at or more than two-year interval follow-up. The accuracy rate, sensitivity, specificity, false positive rate, false negative rate, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were accessed. The falsenegative diagnoses of core needle biopsy were reviewed in detail. Procedural complications were also observed. Results: Among 115 lesions, 114 lesions were in female and 1 lesion was in male with their mean age of 50.87 years old (ranging from 27-72, 91 lesions were palpable (79.13%, 24 were non-palpable (20.87%. The prebiopsy size was 3.2 cm in diameter ranging from 0.5-20.0 cm. The pathologic results for the CNB were malignancy in 77.39% (89 lesions, high-risk in 0.87% (1 lesion and benign in 21.17% (25 lesions. Five patients were negative for malignancy by core needle biopsy but positive for malignancy by surgical procedure. The sensitivity was 94.68%. The specificity was 100%. The false negative rate was 5.3%. The positive predictive value was 100%. The negative predictive value was 80.76%. The accuracy was 95.65%. There was no false positive case. Conclusions: Core needle biopsy under ultrasound guidance is a minimally

  11. Assessment of percutaneous laparoscopic ultrasonography-guided core needle biopsy for the advanced diagnosis of unresectable pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maemura, Kosei; Shinchi, Hiroyuki; Mataki, Yuko; Kurahara, Hiroshi; Iino, Satoshi; Sakoda, Masahiko; Ueno, Shinichi; Takao, Sonshin; Natsugoe, Shoji

    2015-01-31

    Before the initiation of cytotoxic therapy for locally unresectable pancreatic cancer, staging laparoscopy is an important diagnostic method for both the detection of occult small lesions and the extraction of a tumor sample for advanced pathological examination using core needle biopsy (CNB) under laparoscopic ultrasonography (LUS) guidance. This study aimed to evaluate the safety and usefulness of LUS-guided CNB in pancreatic cancer. Consecutive patients with locally unresectable pancreatic cancer who underwent staging laparoscopy were retrospectively analyzed. LUS-guided CNB was performed percutaneously under a laparoscopic view. The clinical results of the LUS-guided CNB group and the non-LUS-guided CNB group were compared. Forty-eight patients who underwent staging laparoscopy by LUS-guided CNB or endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration were identified. LUS-guided CNB was performed in 25 patients. The mean tumor size in the LUS-guided CNB group was significantly larger than that in the non-LUS-guided CNB group. No significant difference was observed between the two groups in operating time or bleeding volume. The rates of malignancy diagnosis and histological classification subtyping were significantly higher in the LUS-guided CNB group. Histologically differentiated adenocarcinoma was identified in 15 patients using samples acquired by LUS-guided CNB. There was no uncontrollable bleeding or other complications, and a significant difference in the occurrence of peritoneal dissemination after laparoscopic examination was observed between the two groups. LUS-guided CNB enables the safe acquisition of sufficient tissue volumes for certain pathological analyses required to determine treatment strategies for locally unresectable advanced pancreatic cancer.

  12. Core Needle Biopsy of the Thyroid: 2016 Consensus Statement and Recommendations from Korean Society of Thyroid Radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Dong Gyu; Jung, So Lyung; Kim, Ji-hoon; Sung, Jin Yong; Kim, Kyu Sun; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Shin, Jung Hee; Choi, Yoon Jung; Ha, Eun Ju; Lim, Hyun Kyung; Kim, Soo Jin; Hahn, Soo Yeon; Lee, Kwang Hwi; Choi, Young Jun; Youn, Inyoung; Kim, Young Joong; Ahn, Hye Shin; Ryu, Ji Hwa; Baek, Seon Mi; Sim, Jung Suk; Jung, Chan Kwon; Lee, Joon Hyung

    2017-01-01

    Core needle biopsy (CNB) has been suggested as a complementary diagnostic method to fine-needle aspiration in patients with thyroid nodules. Many recent CNB studies have suggested a more advanced role for CNB, but there are still no guidelines on its use. Therefore, the Task Force Committee of the Korean Society of Thyroid Radiology has developed the present consensus statement and recommendations for the role of CNB in the diagnosis of thyroid nodules. These recommendations are based on evidence from the current literature and expert consensus. PMID:28096731

  13. Core needle biopsy of the thyroid: 2016 consensus statement and recommendations from Korea society of thyroid radiology

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    Na, Dong Gyu [Dept. of Radiology, Human Medical Imaging and Intervention Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Jung Hwan; Lee, Jeong Hyun [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2017-01-15

    Core needle biopsy (CNB) has been suggested as a complementary diagnostic method to fine-needle aspiration in patients with thyroid nodules. Many recent CNB studies have suggested a more advanced role for CNB, but there are still no guidelines on its use. Therefore, the Task Force Committee of the Korean Society of Thyroid Radiology has developed the present consensus statement and recommendations for the role of CNB in the diagnosis of thyroid nodules. These recommendations are based on evidence from the current literature and expert consensus.

  14. Establishing an accurate diagnosis of a parotid lump: evaluation of the current biopsy methods - fine needle aspiration cytology, ultrasound-guided core biopsy, and intraoperative frozen section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlett, D C; Skelton, E; Moody, A B

    2015-09-01

    The optimum technique for histological confirmation of the nature of a parotid mass remains controversial. Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC), which has traditionally been used, is associated with high non-diagnostic and false negative rates, and ultrasound (US)-guided core biopsy and frozen section have been explored as alternatives. US-guided core biopsy is more invasive than FNAC, but is safe, well-tolerated, and associated with improved diagnostic performance. Although frozen section offers better specificity than FNAC, it has a number of important drawbacks and cannot be considered as a primary diagnostic tool. US-guided core biopsy should be considered as the initial diagnostic technique of choice, and in units where the accuracy of FNAC is good it can be used when FNAC is equivocal or non-diagnostic. Copyright © 2015 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Impact of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle biopsy for diagnosis of pancreatic masses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Julio Iglesias-Garcia; Enrique Dominguez-Munoz; Antonio Lozano-Leon; Ihab Abdulkader; Jose Larino-Noia; Jose Antunez; Jeronimo Forteza

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of histological evaluation of pancreatic tissue samples obtained by a modified method for recovering and processing the endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided fine needle aspiration (FNA) material in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic solid masses.METHODS: Sixty-two consecutive patients with pancreatic masses were prospectively studied. EUS was performed by the linear scanning Pentax FG-38UX echoendoscope. Three FNAs (22G needle) were carried out during each procedure. The materials obtained with first and second punctures were processed for cytological study. Materials of the third puncture were recovered into 10% formol solution by careful injection of saline solution through the needle, and processed for histological study.RESULTS: Length of the core specimen obtained for histological analysis was 6.5 + 5.3 mm (range 1-22 mm).Cytological and histological samples were considered as adequate in 51 (82.3%) and 52 cases (83.9%), respectively. Overall sensitivity of both pancreatic cytology and histology for diagnosis of malignancy was 68.4%. Contrary to cytology, histology was able to diagnose tumours other than adenocarcinomas, and all cases of inflammatory masses. Combination of cytology and histology allowed obtaining an adequate sample in 56 cases (90.3%),with a global sensitivity of 84.21%, specificity of 100%and an overall accuracy of 90.32%. The complication rate was 1.6%.CONCLUSION: Adequate pancreatic core specimens for histological examination can be obtained by EUS-guided FNA. This technique is mainly useful for the diagnosis of different types of pancreatic tumours and evaluation of benign diseases.

  16. Liver needle biopsy in Iraninan pediatric patients: Diagnostic significance and pattern of liver diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monajemzadeh Maryam

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed at determining the pattern of liver disease in the Iranian children referred to the Medical Center of Children affiliated with the Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Materials and Methods: In a cross-sectional study conducted over 2 years, 425 liver needle biopsies were sent to the pathology laboratory of our center. Slides were prepared from paraffin-embedded blocks, stained by routine H & E and special stains and were then reviewed. The frequency of each disorder, separately and in combination with the age group or gender of the patients was calculated and compared with other similar studies. Results: The male to female ratio was 1.42:1. The age range was between 1 month and 18 years old and 41.4% were less than 2 years old. The most common histological diagnosis was iron overload due to major thalassemia (17.5% followed by biliary atresia (9.7%, no significant pathologic change (8.7%, neonatal hepatitis (8.7%, chronic hepatitis (8.5%, cirrhosis (6.5%, metabolic disease (5.5% and progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (5%. Results of the hemosiderosis grading in patients with thalassemia revealed no or minimal, mild, medium, or marked increase in 10%, 27.1%, 10%, 21.4% and 31.5% of the cases, respectively and the degree of iron deposition rose in parallel with age and also the stage of fibrosis (p< 0.05. Conclusion: A liver biopsy is a useful and practical tool for the appropriate diagnosis of pediatric liver diseases. Also, we found that in non thalassemic children, biliary atresia, chronic hepatitis and neonatal hepatitis, in the stated order, are the most prevalent histologic diagnoses in Iranian pediatrics.

  17. Element bioimaging of liver needle biopsy specimens from patients with Wilson's disease by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachmöller, Oliver; Aichler, Michaela; Schwamborn, Kristina; Lutz, Lisa; Werner, Martin; Sperling, Michael; Walch, Axel; Karst, Uwe

    2016-05-01

    A laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) method is developed and applied for the analysis of paraffin-embedded liver needle biopsy specimens of patients with Wilson's disease (WD), a rare autosomal recessive disorder of the copper metabolism causing various hepatic, neurological and psychiatric symptoms due to a copper accumulation in the liver and the central nervous system. The sample set includes two WD liver samples and one negative control sample. The imaging analysis was performed with a spatial resolution of 10 μm. Besides copper, iron was monitored because an elevated iron concentration in the liver is known for WD. In addition to this, both elements were quantified using an external calibration based on matrix-matched gelatine standards. The presented method offers low limits of detection of 1 and 5 μg/g for copper and iron, respectively. The high detection power and good spatial resolution allow the analysis of small needle biopsy specimen using this method. The two analyzed WD samples can be well differentiated from the control sample due to their inhomogeneous copper distribution and high copper concentrations of up to 1200 μg/g. Interestingly, the WD samples show an inverse correlation of regions with elevated copper concentrations and regions with high iron concentrations.

  18. Nose biopsy: a comparison between two sampling techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Nili; Osyntsov, Lidia; Olchowski, Judith; Kordeluk, Sofia; Plakht, Ygal

    2016-06-01

    Pre operative biopsy is important in obtaining preliminary information that may help in tailoring the optimal treatment. The aim of this study was to compare two sampling techniques of obtaining nasal biopsy-nasal forceps and nasal scissors in terms of pathological results. Biopsies of nasal lesions were taken from patients undergoing nasal surgery by two techniques- with nasal forceps and with nasal scissors. Each sample was examined by a senior pathologist that was blinded to the sampling method. A grading system was used to rate the crush artifact in every sample (none, mild, moderate, severe). A comparison was made between the severity of the crush artifact and the pathological results of the two techniques. One hundred and forty-four samples were taken from 46 patients. Thirty-one were males and the mean age was 49.6 years. Samples taken by forceps had significantly higher grades of crush artifacts compared to those taken by scissors. The degree of crush artifacts had a significant influence on the accuracy of the pre operative biopsy. Forceps cause significant amount of crush artifacts compared to scissors. The degree of crush artifact in the tissue sample influences the accuracy of the biopsy.

  19. A successful case of liver biopsy via the right femoral vein using the Quick-Core biopsy needle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michimoto, Kenkichi; Shimizu, Kanichiro; Kameoka, Yoshihiko; Kurata, Naoki; Tokashiki, Tadashi; Sadaoka, Shunichi; Fukuda, Kunihiko

    2015-05-01

    A 35-year-old male with ascites and coagulopathy underwent transjugular liver biopsy (TJLB) for severe hepatic dysfunction. However, the acute angle of the inferior vena cava and hepatic veins (HVs) prevented insertion of a 14-gauge inner stiffening metallic cannula into the HV. He then underwent successful liver biopsy by right femoral vein access (transfemoral liver biopsy) using a TJLB device without complications and was pathologically diagnosed with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

  20. [Correlation of cytologic and pathohistologic findings in ultrasonically-guided thin-needle biopsy of abdominal and retroperitoneal organs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokun, R; Tatomirović, Z; Lakić-Trajković, Z; Lisanin, L; Pesić, V; Zica, D; Lukac, S; Kupresanin, S; Spasić, V; Ilić, S; Dimitrijević, J

    1997-01-01

    The ultrasonically guided fine needle biopsy is cheap, very sensitive and specific method for the diagnosis of nonpalpable deep-seated lesions. During 1992 in the institute of Radiology of Military Medical Academy in Belgrade 87 biopsies of abdominal and 81 biopsies of retroperitoneal organs were performed for the cytological and histopathologic analysis. Deficient material was obtained in 15.4% of the cases. A good correlation between cytologic and histopathologic findings was observed, with diagnostic concordance in 90.8%. In 9 cases with falsely positive cytological diagnosis at the first examination, the diagnosis of malignancy was later confirmed by other diagnosis procedures. Diagnostic difficulties and the significance of adequate biopsy were particularly stressed.

  1. Clinical application of CT and CT-guided percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy in patients with indeterminate pulmonary nodules

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    Cardoso, Luciana Vargas; Souza Júnior, Arthur Soares, E-mail: fabianonatividade@terra.com.br [Rio Preto-Ultra-X Radiological Diagnosis Institute, São José do Rio Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-15

    Objective: To investigate the clinical application of CT and CT-guided percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy (CT-PTNB) in patients with indeterminate pulmonary nodules (IPNs). Methods: We retrospectively studied 113 patients with PNs undergoing CT and CT-PTNB. Variables such as gender, age at diagnosis, smoking status, CT findings, and CT-PTNB techniques were analyzed. Data analysis was performed with the Student's t-test for independent samples the chi-square test, and normal approximation test for comparison of two proportions. Results: Of the 113 patients studied, 68 (60.2%) were male and 78 (69%) were smokers. The diameter of malignant lesions ranged from 2.6 cm to 10.0 cm. Most of the IPNs (85%) were located in the peripheral region. The biopsied IPNs were found to be malignant in 88 patients (77.8%) and benign in 25 (22.2%). Adenocarcinoma was the most common malignant tumor, affecting older patients. The IPN diameter was significantly greater in patients with malignant PNs than in those with benign IPNs (p < 0.001). Having regular contour correlated significantly with an IPN being benign (p = 0.022), whereas spiculated IPNs and bosselated IPNs were more often malignant (in 50.7% and 28.7%, respectively). Homogeneous attenuation and necrosis were more common in patients with malignant lesions (51.9% and 26.9%, respectively). Conclusions: In our sample, CT and CT-PTNB were useful in distinguishing between malignant and benign IPNs. Advanced age and smoking were significantly associated with malignancy. Certain CT findings related to IPNs (larger diameter, spiculated borders, homogeneous attenuation, and necrosis) were associated with malignancy. (author)

  2. Endoscopic ultrasound with fine needle aspiration and biopsy in lung cancer and isolated mediastinal lymphadenopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nadarajan, P

    2010-03-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound with fine-needle aspiration and biopsy (EUS-FNAB) is well established in diagnosing and staging lung cancer in patients with mediastinal adenopathy. EUS-FNAB is highly sensitive, less invasive and has lower complication rates when compared to surgical staging of mediastinal nodes. In this study we describe our experience of EUS-FNAB in lung cancer and other causes of mediastinal lymphadenopathy. EUS-FNAB was performed for assessment of PET positive mediastinal lymph nodes between January 2007 and March 2009 in AMNCH. The endpoints of our study were sensitivity and specificity of EUS-FNAB, morbidity and length of hospital stay. Thirty four patients underwent EUS-FNAB during the study period for both diagnosis and staging. Thirty patients had positive lymph node invasion and 4 had no evidence of malignant invasion. In these 4 patients negative cytology was confirmed on mediastinoscopy giving EUS-FNAB a sensitivity and specificity of 100%. EUS-FNAB upstaged the disease in 12 patients. EUS-FNAB is a reliable tool for mediastinal staging in lung cancer, significantly reducing the need for surgical staging procedures in patients with suspected mediastinal involvement.

  3. Cutaneous Sinus Formation Is a Rare Complication of Thyroid Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülhan Akbaba

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB is essential in the diagnosis and management of thyroid nodules. In this paper, we report a rare complication, cutaneous sinus formation, after diagnostic FNAB guided by palpation. Sixty-three-year-old female patient was admitted with the complaints of hoarseness and discharge from the anterior neck wall which were present for the last 6 months. The patient underwent a near total thyroidectomy 17 years ago. Recurrent nodular goiter was detected six months before and a diagnostic FNAB guided by palpation was performed. Two weeks later the patient had wound discharge and hoarseness. Physical examination of the patient revealed a sinus, which was located superior to the thyroidectomy incision. A 1 cm nodule was palpated in the left side of her neck. A cervical ultrasonography (USG showed a 9 × 7 mm nodule in the remnant thyroid and a 9.5 × 3.5 mm fistulized fluid collection. The patient underwent sinus tract and remnant thyroid removal. This case report presents a cutaneous sinus formation deriving from the granulation tissue, probably due to the silk suture reaction in the previous surgery, by the FNAB guided by palpation procedure. We suggest USG guided FNAB to achieve more accurate and safe diagnosis in evaluating the thyroid nodules.

  4. Optimal timing for a repeat fine-needle aspiration biopsy of thyroid nodule following an initial nondiagnostic fine-needle aspiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deniwar, Ahmed; Hammad, AbdulRahman Y; Ali, Daniah Bu; Alsaleh, Nuha; Lahlouh, Maha; Sholl, Andrew B; Moroz, Krzysztof; Aslam, Rizwan; Thethi, Tina; Kandil, Emad

    2017-02-01

    In the case of a nondiagnostic thyroid fine-needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy result, recent guidelines from the Bethesda system recommend repeat thyroid FNA after 3 months to prevent false-positive results. We aimed to examine our institutional data to determine whether the 3-month period affects the diagnostic yield of repeat biopsies. A retrospective review of patient records over a 5-year period at our institution was performed. Patients who required repeat FNA due to nondiagnostic results were included. The time between the FNA biopsies, adequacy of the FNA specimens, as well as the surgical pathology diagnosis were analyzed. We identified 317 patients who required a repeat FNA. Of these, 96 (30.3%) patients had repeat FNAs less than 3 months after initial biopsy, while 221 (69.7%) patients had repeat FNAs in greater than 3 months. One hundred five patients were referred to our clinic with an initial nondiagnostic biopsy from an outside institution. Repeat FNA was nondiagnostic in 35 patients (11.04%) in the total study population. There was no difference in satisfactory diagnostic yield between repeat FNAs performed greater than 3 months (201 patients, 90.95%) or less than 3 months (81 patients, 84.38%) after the initial biopsy (P = .117). Of the 35 patients with repeat nondiagnostic biopsy, 17 patients underwent diagnostic lobectomy and 3 (17.6%) patients were found to have malignant disease. Early (biopsy interval would alleviate stress on patients with benign nodules and expedite surgical intervention in patients with malignancy. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Preoperative Assessment of TERT Promoter Mutation on Thyroid Core Needle Biopsies Supports Diagnosis of Malignancy and Addresses Surgical Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescenzi, A; Trimboli, P; Modica, D C; Taffon, C; Guidobaldi, L; Taccogna, S; Rainer, A; Trombetta, M; Papini, E; Zelano, G

    2016-03-01

    In the last decade, several molecular markers have been proposed to improve the diagnosis of thyroid nodules. Among these, mutations in the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter have been correlated to malignant tumors, characterized by highest recurrence and decreased patients' survival. This suggests an important role of TERT mutational analysis in the clinical diagnosis and management of thyroid cancer patients. The aim of the study was to demonstrate the adequacy of core needle biopsy (CNB) for the preoperative assessment of TERT mutational status, to reach a more accurate definition of malignancy and a more appropriate surgical planning. Indeed, CNB is gaining momentum for improving diagnosis of thyroid nodules deemed inconclusive by fine needle aspirate (FNA). The study included 50 patients submitted to CNB due to inconclusive FNA report. TERT mutational status was correlated with BRAF mutation, definitive histology, and post-operative TNM staging of the neoplasia. C228T mutation of the TERT promoter was reported in 10% of the papillary carcinomas (PTC) series. When compared with final histology, all cases harboring TERT mutation resulted as locally invasive PTCs. The prevalence of TERT mutated cases was 17.6% among locally advanced PTCs. TERT analysis on CNB allows the assessment of the pathological population on paraffin sections before DNA isolation, minimizing the risk of false negatives due to poor sampling that affects FNA, and gathering aggregate information about morphology and TERT mutational status. Data indicating a worse outcome of the tumor might be used to individualize treatment decision, surgical option, and follow-up design. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. MRI findings of cancers preoperatively diagnosed as pure DCIS at core needle biopsy

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    Huang, Yu-Ting (Dept. of Medical Imaging and Intervention, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan County (China)); Cheung, Yun-Chung (Dept. of Medical Imaging and Intervention, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan County (China); College of Medicine, Chang Gung Univ. Taoyuan County (China)), email: alex2143@adm.cgmh.org.tw; Lo, Yung-Feng; Kuo, Wen-Ling (Dept. of Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan County (China)); Ueng, Shir-Hwa (Dept. of Pathology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan County (China)); Chen, Shin-Cheh (College of Medicine, Chang Gung Univ., Taoyuan County (China); Dept. of Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan County (China))

    2011-12-15

    Background. Under-estimation of invasion components occur occasionally at core needle diagnosed ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) that may change the prognosis or treatment planning. Purpose. To determine whether enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of biopsy-proven ductal cancers in situ help predict the under-estimation of invasive breast cancers. Material and Methods. After a retrospective review of the enhanced MRI features on preoperative proven breast ductal cancers in situ by biopsy, tumor morphology (mass and non-mass), enhancing curve patterns, and non-mass enhanced appearances were compared between pure ductal cancers in situ and invasive ductal cancers (IDCs) after surgery. A statistical analysis was performed, and P values <0.05 were deemed significant. Results. Twenty-five breast cancers from 24 women were analyzed. Eleven DCIS remained as DCISs, and 14 were upgraded to IDC after surgery. Eight of 14 IDCs (57%) and one of 11 DCISs (9%) presented as mass lesions; otherwise six (43%) IDCs and 10 (91%) DCISs were non-mass lesions (P = 0.013). Among the non-mass cancers, six of 10 DCISs (60%) were focally enhanced and six of 6 IDCs (100%) were segmentally enhanced. The overall cancer sizes measured on enhanced MRI were moderately correlated with histopathology, with a Spearman's rank correlation coefficient of 0.656 (P = 0.001). The mean diameter of the IDCs was larger than that of the pure DCISs on enhanced MRI (2.69 +- 1.42 cm for IDC and 1.62 +- 1.03 cm for DCIS; P = 0.048). The cut-off size was optimally selected at 1.95 cm with a 64% sensitivity and a 77% specificity, using a receiver-operating characteristic curve. The enhancement curves, with washout or persistent rising, were statistically insignificant (P = 0.085 and 0.93, respectively). Conclusion. Enhanced MRI provided informative morphology and size features that might help to predict the underestimation of invasiveness in preoperative biopsy-proven DCIS

  7. Thyroid fine needle aspiration biopsy: Do we really need an on-site cytopathologist?

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    Cengic, Ismet, E-mail: ismetcengic@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Marmara University, School of Medicine, Fevzi Cakmak Mahallesi Mimar Sinan Caddesi No: 41, 34899 Ust Kaynarca Pendik, Istanbul (Turkey); Tureli, Derya, E-mail: deryatureli@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Marmara University, School of Medicine, Fevzi Cakmak Mahallesi Mimar Sinan Caddesi No: 41, 34899 Ust Kaynarca Pendik, Istanbul (Turkey); Ahiskali, Rengin, E-mail: renginiara@gmail.com [Department of Pathology, Marmara University, School of Medicine, Fevzi Cakmak Mahallesi Mimar Sinan Caddesi No: 41, 34899 Ust Kaynarca Pendik, Istanbul (Turkey); Bugdayci, Onur, E-mail: onurbug@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Marmara University, School of Medicine, Fevzi Cakmak Mahallesi Mimar Sinan Caddesi No: 41, 34899 Ust Kaynarca Pendik, Istanbul (Turkey); Aydin, Hilal, E-mail: hilalaltasaydin@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Marmara University, School of Medicine, Fevzi Cakmak Mahallesi Mimar Sinan Caddesi No: 41, 34899 Ust Kaynarca Pendik, Istanbul (Turkey); Aribal, Erkin, E-mail: earibal@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Marmara University, School of Medicine, Fevzi Cakmak Mahallesi Mimar Sinan Caddesi No: 41, 34899 Ust Kaynarca Pendik, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: The aim of this single center study is to evaluate the effectiveness of performing ultrasound-guided thyroid fine-needle aspiration biopsies (FNAB) performed by the radiologist alone without an on-site cytopathologist. Materials and methods: In this prospective randomized study, 203 patients with single nodules measuring 10 mm or more underwent ultrasound-guided FNAB: 102 patients underwent FNAB performed by the radiologist accompanied by a cytopathologist (control group); 101 patients underwent FNAB by the radiologist alone (study group). In both groups biopsy time, specimen adequacy ratio, total aspiration number, cytopathologist's cytological diagnosis time (t1), cytopathologist's total time consumption (t2) were evaluated. Results: Mean total biopsy time was 8.74 ± 2.31 min in the study group and was significantly shorter than the control group's 11.97 ± 6.75 min (p = 0.004). The average number of aspirations per patient in the study group was 4.00 ± 0; compared to the control group's 3.56 ± 1.23 this was significantly higher (p = 0.001). t1 of the study group was 307.48 ± 226.32 s; compared to 350.14 ± 247.64 s in the control group, there was no statistically significant difference (p = 0.137). t2 of the study group was 672.93 ± 270.45 s; compared to the control group (707.03 ± 258.78 s) there was no statistically significant difference (p = 0.360). Diagnostic adequacy of aspirated specimens was reassessed in the pathology laboratory. In the study group, 84 out of 101 aspirations and in the control group 89 out of 102 aspirations was determined as adequate with no statistically significant difference (p = 0.302). Conclusions: We believe that in centers where a cytopathologist is not available, ultrasound-guided thyroid FNAB can be adequately performed by an experienced radiologist who was effectively trained in smear preparation.

  8. Magnetic resonance metabolic profiling of breast cancer tissue obtained with core needle biopsy for predicting pathologic response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Soo Choi

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine whether metabolic profiling of core needle biopsy (CNB samples using high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS could be used for predicting pathologic response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. After institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained, CNB tissue samples were collected from 37 malignant lesions in 37 patients before NAC treatment. The metabolic profiling of CNB samples were performed by HR-MAS MRS. Metabolic profiles were compared according to pathologic response to NAC using the Mann-Whitney test. Multivariate analysis was performed with orthogonal projections to latent structure-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA. Various metabolites including choline-containing compounds were identified and quantified by HR-MAS MRS in all 37 breast cancer tissue samples obtained by CNB. In univariate analysis, the metabolite concentrations and metabolic ratios of CNB samples obtained with HR-MAS MRS were not significantly different between different pathologic response groups. However, there was a trend of lower levels of phosphocholine/creatine ratio and choline-containing metabolite concentrations in the pathologic complete response group compared to the non-pathologic complete response group. In multivariate analysis, the OPLS-DA models built with HR-MAS MR metabolic profiles showed visible discrimination between the pathologic response groups. This study showed OPLS-DA multivariate analysis using metabolic profiles of pretreatment CNB samples assessed by HR- MAS MRS may be used to predict pathologic response before NAC, although we did not identify the metabolite showing statistical significance in univariate analysis. Therefore, our preliminary results raise the necessity of further study on HR-MAS MR metabolic profiling of CNB samples for a large number of cancers.

  9. COMPARATIVE EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF HO-YAG LASER AND TRUE-CUT BIOPSY NEEDLE IN MYOCARDIAL REVASCULARIZATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王立清; 胡盛寿; 常欣; 吴清玉; 李澎; 謝峰; 郭加强

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To study the mechanism and effects of blood perfusion on acute ischemic region of myocardium through channel created by Ho-Yag laser and True-cut biopsy needles with myocardial contrast echocardiography.``Methods. We partially ligated the left anterior descending coronary artery of canine hearts between the 1st and 2nd diagonal branches to produce two groups of acute myocardial ischemia models and then performed transmvocardial revascularization (TMR) on this region with Ho-Yag laser and True-cut biopsy needles. Myocardial contrast echocardiography was performed with a new generation of ultrasound contrast agent and second harmonic imaging of this region before, during ischemia and after revascularization. Pictures were taken with "R" wave trig ger skill.``Results. Acoustic density (dB) in the ischemic region (anterior wall) with myocardial contrast echocardiography decreased obviously after the left anterior descending artery was ligated (Laser group: 5.40 ± 1.81, Needle group: 7.11 ±2.51) compared with that before (Laser group: 11.69 ± 1.61, Needle group: 12. 96 ±2.88,P < 0. 01 ) . dB inreased remarkably after TMR by either laser or True-cut biopsy needle (Laser group:11.02 ± 2.01, Needle group: 10. 01 ± 4.45. P < 0. 01 ) compared to that during ischemia and approximated to that before ischemia ( P > 0. 05). We found that the acoustic density of the contrast developed one picture (one cardiac cycle) ahead in the transmyocardial revascularization region than that in the lateral and other region of the left ventricle wall in the scan of both groups.``Conclusions. Acute ischemic myocardium can be perfused immediately by oxygenated blood from the left ventricle through channels created with both Ho-Yag laser and True-cut biopsy needles. Evidence of blood perfusion through these channels mainly during systolic phase was detected, and myocardial contrast ultrasound using intravenous perfluorocarbon-exposed sonicated dextrose albumin was regarded

  10. Pleomorphic Adenoma of the Breast: A Diagnosis Using an Ultrasound-Guided Core-Needle Biopsy Case Report

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    Kim, In Wha; Yun, Jung Hyun; Kim, Tae Heon; Lee, Kyung Po; Jung, Hea Kyung; Ko, Kyung Hee; Lee, Jong Tae [CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, College of Medicine, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-08-15

    Pleomorphic adenoma is a tumor rarely seen in the breast. To date, only about 70 cases have been reported in the literature. Many reports have used fine-needle aspiration biopsy in the preoperative diagnosis of these lesions. However, pleomorphic adenoma is sometimes mistaken for a malignant tumor because of its cytologic features. In this study, we present a 56-year-old woman with a palpable breast mass. Ultrasound indicated a 15 mm oval-shaped hypoechoic mass with complex echogenicity in the palpable region. Ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy (US-CNB) revealed a pleomorphic adenoma of the breast, which was confirmed through surgical excision. Although pleomorphic adenoma is rarely seen in the breast, results demonstrate the usefulness and accuracy of US-CNB in diagnosing pleomorphic adenoma of the breast.

  11. Spectral-domain low coherence interferometry/optical coherence tomography system for fine needle breast biopsy guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iftimia, N. V.; Mujat, M.; Ustun, T.; Ferguson, R. D.; Danthu, V.; Hammer, D. X.

    2009-02-01

    A novel technology and instrumentation for fine needle aspiration (FNA) breast biopsy guidance is presented. This technology is based on spectral-domain low coherence interferometry (SD-LCI). The method, apparatus, and preliminary in vitro/in vivo results proving the viability of the method and apparatus are presented in detail. An advanced tissue classification algorithm, preliminarily tested on breast tissue specimens and a mouse model of breast cancer is presented as well. Over 80% sensitivity and specificity in differentiating all tissue types and 93% accuracy in differentiating fatty tissue from fibrous or tumor tissue was obtained with this technology and apparatus. These results suggest that SD-LCI could help for more precise needle placement during the FNA biopsy and therefore could substantially reduce the number of the nondiagnostic aspirates and improve the sensitivity and specificity of the FNA procedures.

  12. Metastatic renal cell carcinoma from a native kidney of a renal transplant patient diagnosed by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA biopsy

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    Yaseen Alastal

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA biopsy sampling of enlarged lymph nodes is increasingly used to diagnose metastatic tumors, especially of the gastrointestinal tract and the lungs. Herein, we describe the diagnosis of metastatic renal cell carcinoma from a native kidney of a 54 year-old male patient, who had a 5-years history of renal transplant, by EUS-FNA of mediastinal and celiac lymph nodes. Histological and immunohistochemical findings confirmed the origin of metastatic tumor. EUS-FNA with proper cytological evaluation can be useful in the diagnosis of metastatic renal cell carcinoma in renal transplant patients. 

  13. Image guided versus palpation guided core needle biopsy of palpable breast masses: a prospective study

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    Smriti Hari

    2016-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: Our results showed that in palpable breast masses, image guided biopsy was superior to palpation guided biopsy in terms of sensitivity, false negative rate and repeat biopsy rates.

  14. Adenomyoepithelioma of the breast with hemorrhagic change diagnosed as papiloma on core needle biopsy: A case report

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    Nam, Kyung Sun; Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Soung Hee; Bae, Kyung Eun; Lee, Ji Hae; Kang, Mi Jin; Jeong, Myeong Ja; Kim, Soo Hyun; Kim, Jae Hyung [Dept. of Radiology, Sanggye Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Adenomyoepithelioma (AME) is a rare disease entity that represents biphasic proliferation of ductal epithelial and myoepithelial cells. AME can be confused with other neoplasms including malignancy because AME has various cytologic characteristics and nonspecific radiologic features. We describe an unusual AME with hemorrhagic change that was diagnosed as papilloma on core needle biopsy three times previously. The imaging features of AME are also discussed here.

  15. The role of MRI in image-guided needle biopsy of focal bone and soft tissue neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, M M Y; Saifuddin, A

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays a critical role in the management pathway of both soft tissue and bone neoplasms, from diagnosis through to post-treatment follow-up. There are a wide range of surgical, oncological, and combined treatment regimes but these rely on accurate histopathological diagnosis. This article reviews the role of MRI in the planning of image-guided needle biopsy for suspected soft tissue and bone tumors.

  16. Pleomorphic rhabdomyosarcoma of the heart metastatic to bone. Report of a case with fine needle aspiration biopsy findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, S Z; Smilari, T F; Teichberg, S; Hajdu, S I

    1995-01-01

    Pleomorphic rhabdomyosarcoma is an extremely rare and highly malignant neoplasm. We report an unusual case of a 14-year-old boy with skeletal metastases from a primary cardiac tumor. Fine needle aspiration biopsy of a lytic lesion in the right iliac wing showed a pleomorphic population of clusters and single cells with hyperchromatic nuclei; granular, pink cytoplasm; and isolated, large cells with whiplike or globoid cytoplasmic processes and occasional striations. Histologic, ultrastructural and radiologic features are also presented.

  17. [Assessment of amylase and lipase levels following puncture biopsy and fine needle aspiration guided by endoscopic ultrasound in pancreatic lesions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Membrillo-Romero, Alejandro; Gonzalez-Lanzagorta, Rubén; Rascón-Martínez, Dulce María

    2016-12-14

    Puncture biopsy and fine needle aspiration guided by endoscopic ultrasound has been used as an effective technique and is quickly becoming the procedure of choice for diagnosis and staging in patients suspected of having pancreatic cancer. This procedure has replaced retrograde cholangiopancreatography and brush cytology due to its higher sensitivity for diagnosis, and lower risk of complications. To assess the levels of pancreatic enzymes amylase and lipase, after the puncture biopsy and fine needle aspiration guided by endoscopic ultrasound in pancreatic lesions and the frequency of post-puncture acute pancreatitis. A longitudinal and descriptive study of consecutive cases was performed on outpatients submitted to puncture biopsy and fine needle aspiration guided by endoscopic ultrasound in pancreatic lesions. Levels of pancreatic enzymes such as amylase and lipase were measured before and after the pancreatic puncture. Finally we documented post-puncture pancreatitis cases. A total of 100 patients who had been diagnosed with solid and cystic lesions were included in the study. Significant elevation was found at twice the reference value for lipase in 5 cases (5%) and for amylase in 2 cases (2%), none had clinical symptoms of acute pancreatitis. Eight (8%) of patients presented with mild nonspecific pain with no enzyme elevation compatible with pancreatitis. Pancreatic biopsy needle aspiration guided by endoscopic ultrasound was associated with a low rate of elevated pancreatic enzymes and there were no cases of post-puncture pancreatitis. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  18. Cancer incidence of larger thyroid nodules and the diagnostic value of palpation and ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy

    OpenAIRE

    Umut Rıza Gündüz; Arif Aslaner; Rojbin Karakoyun Demirci; Hasan Çalış; Osman Zekai Öner; Nurullah Bülbüller

    2014-01-01

    In this prospective study, we aimed to determine the cancer incidence of thyroid nodules larger than 3cm and compare the efficacy of palpation and ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB). The study was conducted at General Surgery Departments of Istanbul Okmeydanı and Antalya Training and Research Hospitals of Turkey from March 2008 to December 2011. In our clinics, between the years 2008 and 2011, both palpation and ultrasound guided FNAB were performed in all 55 patients havi...

  19. Diagnosis of multiple myeloma on based the material obtained by fine needle aspiration biopsy of the lungs

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    Bokun Radojka

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The patient presented in this paper was admitted to the hospital for the evaluation of radiologically revealed shadow in both lungs. In the course of diagnostic procedures, fine needle aspiration biopsy of the intrathoracic mass was performed. Cytologic analysis of the smear was performed because of clinical suspicion of plasma cell proliferative disease that was confirmed by bone marrow aspiration. Thus, the cytologic finding of intrathoracic lesion preceded the diagnosis of multiple myeloma.

  20. A Case of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor That Underwent Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Aspiration with a 25-Gauge Biopsy Needle

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    Minoru Tomizawa

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA is performed to obtain specimens for pathological analysis. For this procedure, 19-gauge (19G, 22-guage (22G, and 25-guage (25G needles are available. The needles are classified into aspiration type and biopsy type. A 56-year-old woman underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy that showed a 38-mm-diameter submucosal tumor. The elevated lesion was diagnosed as a submucosal tumor of the stomach. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed a low-density area on the luminal surface of the gastric wall, which was covered with a thin layer of gastric mucosa. EUS showed a hypoechoic lesion in the submucosal layer. Color Doppler image showed a pulsating vascular signal extending into the center of the hypoechoic lesion from the periphery. EUS-FNA was performed with a 25G biopsy needle. The specimen tissue consisted of spindle-shaped cells. The cells were positive for CD117 and CD34. The submucosal tumor was diagnosed as a gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

  1. A Case of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor That Underwent Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Aspiration with a 25-Gauge Biopsy Needle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomizawa, Minoru; Shinozaki, Fuminobu; Motoyoshi, Yasufumi; Sugiyama, Takao; Yamamoto, Shigenori; Ishige, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is performed to obtain specimens for pathological analysis. For this procedure, 19-gauge (19G), 22-guage (22G), and 25-guage (25G) needles are available. The needles are classified into aspiration type and biopsy type. A 56-year-old woman underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy that showed a 38-mm-diameter submucosal tumor. The elevated lesion was diagnosed as a submucosal tumor of the stomach. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed a low-density area on the luminal surface of the gastric wall, which was covered with a thin layer of gastric mucosa. EUS showed a hypoechoic lesion in the submucosal layer. Color Doppler image showed a pulsating vascular signal extending into the center of the hypoechoic lesion from the periphery. EUS-FNA was performed with a 25G biopsy needle. The specimen tissue consisted of spindle-shaped cells. The cells were positive for CD117 and CD34. The submucosal tumor was diagnosed as a gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

  2. Clinical Application of Ultrasound-Guided Thyroid Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy and Thinprep Cytology Test in Diagnosis of Thyroid Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ying; Lu, Yao; li, chenxi

    2016-10-01

    Purpose: To study the clinical application value of ultrasound guided thyroid fine needle aspiration biopsy and thinprep cytology testing in diagnosis of thyroid disease. Methods: A total of 78 patients with thyroid nodules were enrolled, 34 males and 44 females, aged 33-64 years old with mean age of 47.6 years. All underwent thyroid module fine needle puncture after surgery to assess cell pathology and histopathological features. Results: Sufficient specimens were obtained from all of 78 patients, the cytological results of 73 cases (93.6 %) being consistent with pathological results. While 20 cases (25.6 %) were malignant tumors, 44 (56.4 %) were benign and 9 (11.5 %) were non-tumor lesions. The sensitivity of benign and malignant thyroid nodule by thyroid fine needle puncture was 90.9 %, specificity was 98.1 % and the positive predictive value was 96.3 %. Conclusions: It is demonstrated that ultrasound-guided thyroid fine needle aspiration biopsy and thinprep cytology testing have diagnostic value in clinical application for thyroid disease,showing good diagnostic coincidence rates with histopathological examination. They can thus be regarded as safe and effective for preoperative diagnosis and providing an appropriate basis for selection of surgery. Creative Commons Attribution License

  3. A 5-year-old girl with a congenital ganglioneuroma diagnosed by fine needle aspiration biopsy: a case report

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    Ponce-Camacho Marco

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Ganglioneuroma is a rare, benign, neuroblastic tumor arising mainly from the central or peripheral autonomic nervous system, especially the sympathetic system. The most affected anatomical sites are the posterior mediastinum, retroperitoneum, adrenal gland and head and neck soft tissue. In the current literature, reports of ganglioneuroma diagnosed by fine-needle aspiration and its cytological appearance are scarce. Case Presentation A 5-year-old girl presented with a mass in the cervical region since birth. Laboratory routine tests were within normal limits, ultrasonography demonstrated a solid and well-circumscribed lesion in the soft tissues of the cervical region. Fine needle aspiration biopsy was carried out, and the obtained smears showed a mixture of mature ganglion cells and groups of spindle cells suggestive of schwann cell origin. A diagnosis of ganglioneuroma was suggested. Core biopsy and surgical resection confirmed this diagnosis. Conclusion Congenital ganglioneuroma of the cervical region is an uncommon soft tissue benign neoplasm of neuroblastic origin, and it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of head and neck pediatric soft tissue tumors. Fine needle aspiration biopsy technique is a reliable method that can be used with confidence when dealing with pediatric soft tissue tumors.

  4. [Pain during transrectal ultrasound guided needle biopsy of the prostate: comparison of the use or not of lidocaine gel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz Pérez, Gilmer A; Meza Montoya, Luis; Morante Deza, Carlos; Pow-Sang Godoy, Mariela; Destefano Urrutia, Víctor

    2009-02-01

    The prostate biopsy guided by ultrasound is the method of choice for early diagnosis of prostate cancer, is a safe whose main trouble is that it feels discomfort during the procedure. From July 2004 until March 2005 we prospectively studied 114 patients who underwent transrectal ultrasound guided needle biopsy of the prostate, they were divided in two groups: in one group we used lidocaina gel 2% inside the rectum before the procedure and in the other group we did not use it. We compared the pain that patients felt during the procedure with a pain scale. We did not find differences between both groups, but the patients in whom we used a new needle felt less pain than the patients in whom we used a re-esterilized one. The use of lidocaine gel intrarectal 2% before a prostate biopsy guided by ultrasound did not diminish the sensation of pain from the procedure in our patients, which was increased by the use of sterilized needles.

  5. Comparison of Different Techniques of Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Biopsy of Liver in a Swine Model

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    Hamidian Jahromi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background The quality of liver biopsy specimens obtained with different fine needle biopsy (FNB techniques has not been compared. Objectives This study was performed to evaluate the diagnostic quality of three different liver FNB biopsy techniques. Materials and Methods Two sequential biopsy series were performed on piglets. Three biopsy techniques were compared: capillary-FNB, core-FNB (CFNB and vacuum-assisted CFNB (VACFNB in a swine model. Initially, 30 liver biopsies were performed (ten for each technique. The cellularity and quantity of blood in specimens were measured and compared. In the second series, 54 additional biopsies using CFNB and VACFNB techniques (27 each in a separate piglet were evaluated in the same fashion. Results In the first series, cellularity and blood levels were significantly lower in capillary-FNB compared with CFNB (P < 0.001 and P = 0.011, respectively. There was no significant difference between CFNB and VACFNB in cellularity and blood (P = 0.15 and P = 0.1, respectively. In the second series, cellularity was significantly higher in CFNB compared with VACFNB (P < 0.001 with no significant difference in blood (P = 0.5. Conclusions Among these three different FNB techniques, CFNB technique provided the greatest cellularity. Capillary-FNB technique was inferior among all with the lowest quality of obtained material for cytopathological interpretation.

  6. Use of a novel through-the-needle biopsy forceps in endoscopic ultrasound

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    Shakhatreh, Mohammad H.; Naini, Sohrab Rahimi; Brijbassie, Alan A.; Grider, Douglas J.; Shen, Perry; Yeaton, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: Pancreatic cysts are becoming more common. Their differential diagnosis includes benign, premalignant, and malignant lesions. Distinguishing the type of cyst helps in the management decision making. We report on a novel tissue acquisition device for pancreatic cysts. Methods: Data on two patients who underwent endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) – guided fine-needle aspiration with a new micro forceps device are presented. Results: Two patients had large pancreatic cystic lesions in the pancreatic head. Linear EUS was performed, and tissue samples were obtained with the Moray micro forceps through a 19-gauge needle. In both patients, mucinous columnar epithelium lined the cystic walls. One patient underwent surgical resection, and the other elected surveillance. Examination of the surgical specimen from the first patient confirmed the cyst was a side-branch intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN), gastric type. Conclusions: The Moray micro forceps is a new tool that can be used to help determine the nature of pancreatic cysts and aid in their risk stratification and management. PMID:27092324

  7. Thyroid Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsies in Children: Study of Cytological-Histological Correlation and Immunostaining with Thyroid Peroxidase Monoclonal Antibodies

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    Bauer Andrew

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Context. There is limited data comparing results of fine needle aspiration biopsies (FNABs to histological diagnosis in children. Design. FNABs were performed in 707 children and cytological results were compared to histology in 165 cases. The usefulness of immunostaining with anti-TPO monoclonal antibodies (MoAb47 on FNAB samples was examined in 54 operated patients. Results. Among unsatisfactory, benign, suspicious, and malignant FNAB, the histological diagnoses were benign in 12/12 (100%, 69/70 (98.5%, 40/50 (80.0%, and 0/33 (0%, respectively. After surgery, malignancy was established in 44/165 (26.6% cases. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were 95.4%, 55.8%, 61.7%, and 95% with standard FNAB; and 100%, 75%, 73.3, and 100% with MoAb47. Among suspicious FNAB, positive MoAb47 staining was a reliable marker for exclusion of malignancy. Conclusion. Benign and malignant FNAB accurately predict histological diagnosis. In suspicious FNAB, MoAb47 immunostaining may be a useful adjunct to standard cytology.

  8. Core-needle biopsy under CT fluoroscopy guidance and fine-needle aspiration cytology: Comparison of diagnostic yield in the diagnosis of lung and mediastinum tumors. Analysis of frequency and types of complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szlęzak, Przemysław; Srutek, Ewa; Gorycki, Tomasz; Kowalewski, Janusz; Studniarek, Michał

    2014-01-01

    Patients with pathological tissue mass in thoracic cage found with imaging require histopathological or cytological confirmation of malignancy before treatment. The tissue material essential for patomorphological evaluation can be acquired with fine-needle aspiration biopsies (FNAB) controlled with CT and core-needle biopsy (CNB) under real-time CT fluoroscopy guidance. The purpose of this work is to carry out a retrospective analysis of the two methods with regards to their informativity, frequency and the kind of complications. From January, 2012 to May 2013, 76 core-needle biopsies of lung and mediastinum tumors were conducted and compared with 86 fine-needle aspiration biopsies(FNAB) of lung and mediastinum tumors, including 30 patients who underwent FNAB and were referred to CNB in order to specify the diagnosis. Complete histopathological diagnosis was made in 91% with the use of CNB and in 37% when FNAB was the chosen method. Early complications were observed in 32% patients who underwent BG and in group of 11% who underwent FNAB. Late complications, however, appeared in 29% patients after CNB and 13% after FNAB. In 24 cases CNB specified the complete diagnosis. Core-needle biopsy in comparison to fine-needle aspiration biopsy has more frequent rate of negligible complications, however, it offers higher diagnostic yield for diagnostic of lung and mediastinum neoplastic disease and allows for more precise diagnosis of focal lesions.

  9. Diagnostic efficacy of computed tomography-guided transthoracic needle aspiration and biopsy in patients with pulmonary disease

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    Tuna T

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Tibel Tuna,1 Sevket Ozkaya,2 Adem Dirican,2 Serhat Findik,3 Atilla G Atici,3 Levent Erkan31Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Samsun Chest Diseases and Thoracic Surgery Hospital, 2Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Medical Park Samsun Hospital, 3Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Samsun Ondokuzmayis University, Samsun, TurkeyBackground: Computed tomography-guided transthoracic needle aspiration (TTNA and biopsy (TTNB is a well established, safe, and rapid method of reaching a definitive diagnosis for most thoracic lesions. The present study aimed to determine the roles of TTNA and TTNB in the diagnosis of pulmonary diseases and to compare the results using these two techniques.Methods: TTNB and TTNA were performed in 105 patients admitted to our clinic due to peripheral pulmonary lesions between May 2005 and November 2007. Needle biopsies were performed using 18-gauge Tru-Cut® biopsy needles and aspirations was performed using 18-20-22-gauge Chiba needles.Results: Malignant lesions diagnosed by TTNB were non-small cell lung carcinoma (51 patients, 73%, small cell lung carcinoma (nine patients, 13%, malignant tissue (three patients, 5%, lymphoma (two patients, 3%, thymoma (two patients, 3%, plasmacytoma (one patient, 1%, rhabdomyosarcoma (one patient, 1%, and metastasis (one patient, 1%. The malignant lesions diagnosed by TTNA were non-small cell lung carcinoma in eleven patients (92% and malignant tissue in one patient (8%. Three (100% of the benign lesions diagnosed by TTNB were granulomas and two (100% benign lesions diagnosed by TTNA were infarctions. When the diagnostic value of TTNB and TTNA was compared, TTNB was significantly superior. Malignant lesions were identified in 70 (84% and benign lesions were identified in three (4% of the 83 patients in the TTNB group. Ten (12% patients in the TTNB group could not be diagnosed. Malignant lesions were found in 12 (55% and benign lesions were found in two (9% of the 22

  10. Subtyping of renal cortical neoplasms in fine needle aspiration biopsies using a decision tree based on genomic alterations detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    OpenAIRE

    Gowrishankar, Banumathy; Cahill, Lynnette; Arndt, Alexandra E; Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat; Lin, Oscar; Chadalavada, Kalyani; Chaganti, Seeta; Nanjangud, Gouri J; Murty, Vundavalli V; Chaganti, Raju S K; Reuter, Victor E.; Houldsworth, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To improve the overall accuracy of diagnosis in needle biopsies of renal masses, especially small renal masses (SRMs), using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and to develop a renal cortical neoplasm classification decision tree based on genomic alterations detected by FISH. Patients and Methods Ex vivo fine needle aspiration biopsies of 122 resected renal cortical neoplasms were subjected to FISH using a series of seven-probe sets to assess gain or loss of 10 chromosomes ...

  11. Efficacy of ultrasound-guided core-needle biopsy in the diagnosis of hepatic alveolar echinococcosis: a retrospective analysis

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    Bulakci Mesut

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study retrospectively analyzed the clinical data, laboratory results, imaging findings, and histopathological features of 28 patients who underwent ultrasound-guided core-needle biopsy from a hepatic lesion and were diagnosed with alveolar echinococcosis. Results: Among 28 patients included in the study, 16 were females and 12 were males. The mean age of the studied population was 53 ± 16 years, and the age range was 18–79 years. The most common presenting symptom was abdominal pain, which was observed in 14 patients. A total of 36 lesions were detected in the patients’ livers, out of which 7 had a cystic appearance. Hepatic vascular involvement, bile duct involvement, and other organ involvement were depicted in 14, 5, and 7 patients, respectively. The average number of cores taken from the lesions was 2.7, ranging between 2 and 5. In histopathological evaluation, PAS+ parasitic membrane structures were visualized on a necrotic background in all cases. Regarding seven patients, who were operated, the pathological findings of preoperative percutaneous biopsies were in perfect agreement with the pathological examinations after surgical resections. None of the patients developed major complications after biopsy. Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided core-needle biopsy is a minimally invasive, reliable, and effective diagnostic tool for the definitive diagnosis of hepatic alveolar echinococcosis.

  12. CT-guided core needle biopsy of pleural lesions: Evaluating diagnostic yield and associated complications

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    Niu, Xiang Ke [Dept. of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of Chengdu University, Chengdu (China); Bhetuwal, Anup; Yang, Han Feng [Dept. of Radiology, Sichuan Key Laboratory of Medical Imaging, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong (China)

    2015-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and complications of CT-guided core needle biopsy (CT-guided CNB) of pleural lesion and the possible effects of influencing factors. From September 2007 to June 2013, 88 consecutive patients (60 men and 28 women; mean [+/- standard deviation] age, 51.1 +/- 14.4 years; range, 19-78 years) underwent CT-guided CNB, which was performed by two experienced chest radiologists in our medical center. Out of 88 cases, 56 (63%) were diagnosed as malignant, 28 (31%) as benign and 4 (5%) as indeterminate for CNB of pleural lesions. The final diagnosis was confirmed by either histopathological diagnosis or clinical follow-up. The diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and complication rates were statistically evaluated. Influencing factors (patient age, sex, lesion size, pleural-puncture angle, patient position, pleural effusion, and number of pleural punctures) were assessed for their effect on accuracy of CT-guided CNB using univariate and subsequent multivariate analysis. Diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV were 89.2%, 86.1%, 100%, 100%, and 67.8%, respectively. The influencing factors had no significant effect in altering diagnostic accuracy. As far as complications were concerned, occurrence of pneumothorax was observed in 14 (16%) out of 88 patients. Multivariate analysis revealed lesion size/pleural thickening as a significant risk factor (odds ratio [OR]: 8.744, p = 0.005) for occurrence of pneumothorax. Moreover, presence of pleural effusion was noted as a significant protective factor (OR: 0.171, p = 0.037) for pneumothorax. CT-guided CNB of pleural lesion is a safe procedure with high diagnostic yield and low risk of significant complications.

  13. Diagnostic performance of core needle biopsy in identifying breast phyllodes tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhi-Rui; Wang, Chen-Chen; Sun, Xiang-Jie; Yang, Zhao-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Background A retrospective analysis of diagnoses was performed in patients with phyllodes tumors of the breast (PTB) who received preoperative core needle biopsy (CNB) and had breast surgery at Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center from January 1, 2002 to April 1, 2013. The resulting data allowed us to compare the accordance between CNB and excision diagnoses of PTB patients and evaluate the accuracy of CNB in preoperative diagnosis. Methods Data from 128 patients with PTB who had undergone preoperative CNB and breast surgery were retrospectively analyzed. We reviewed the medical history, clinical follow-up data, and CNB diagnostic data. A diagnostic test was used to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of CNB in diagnosing benign, borderline, and malignant phyllodes tumors. Results The accuracy of CNB for diagnosing PTB was 13.3% (17/128). Of the remaining patients, 98 (75.5% of the PTB patients) were diagnosed with fibroadenoma or fibroepithelial lesions. The sensitivity of CNB at diagnosing benign, borderline, and malignant phyllodes tumors were 4.9% (2/41), 4.2% (3/71), and 25.0% (4/16), respectively, whereas the corresponding specificity were 92.0%, 98.2%, and 100%, respectively. Some clinical features, such as large tumor size, rapid growth, or surgical history of fibroadenomas, were indicative of an increased possibility of PTB. Conclusions CNB provides a pathological basis for the preoperative diagnosis of PTB, but it has a poor accuracy and offers limited guidance for surgical decisions. Considering CNB along with multiple histologic features may improve the ability to accurately diagnose PTB. An integrated assessment using CNBs in combination with clinical data and imaging features is suggested as a reliable strategy to assist PTB diagnosis. PMID:28066593

  14. [Diagnostic value of ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy for soft tissue tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Jia; Fang, Zhi-wei; Zhao, Ai-lian; Li, Ji-you

    2013-03-01

    To study the diagnostic value and pitfalls of ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy (CNB) of soft tissue tumors. One hundred and six cases of CNB specimens encountered during the period from 2007 to 2012 were enrolled into the study. The pathologic diagnosis using CNB was compared with that using surgical specimens. Diagnostic accuracy was analyzed using Chi-square test, with respect to the histologic pattern (such as spindle cell and myxoid), biologic behavior (benign versus malignant) and immunohistochemical results. The 59 cases of sarcoma were subdivided into three grades according to FNCLCC grading system. Histologic diagnosis could be made in 84.0% (89/106) cases. Thirteen cases were non-diagnostic on CNB. There were 4 cases on CNB showing diagnostic discrepancy with surgical specimens. Four cases of "benign lesions" on CNB found to be myxoid liposarcoma and lipoma-like liposarcoma upon resection. In general, myxoid pattern (9/17) seen on CNB showed less diagnostic correlation with surgical specimens, as compared to spindle cell and other histologic patterns (P < 0.01). The rate of diagnostic correlation was 79.7% (49/59) for the 59 cases of sarcoma studied, with grade 2 and grade 3 sarcoma showing better correlation (in contrast to 7/17 for grade 1 sarcoma) (P < 0.01). Comparative analysis showed no significant difference between benign/borderline tumors and sarcomas. The application of immunohistochemical study did not result in significant improvement in diagnostic accuracy on CNB. Ultrasound-guided CNB is a reliable tool in pathologic diagnosis of soft tissue tumors and shows a high accuracy rate especially for high-grade sarcoma. Tumors with myxoid pattern, lipomatous tumors and grade 1 sarcomas are associated with lower diagnostic accuracy on CNB. Correlation with clinicoradiologic findings would also be helpful in diagnostic evaluation and surgical planning.

  15. Negative Predictive Value of Transthoracic Core-Needle Biopsy: A Multicenter Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine-Delaruelle, Clara; Souquet, Pierre-Jean; Gamondes, Delphine; Pradat, Eric; De Leusse, Aurélie; Ferretti, Gilbert R; Couraud, Sébastien

    2015-08-01

    Specimens collected by CT scan-guided transthoracic core-needle biopsy (TTNB) are frequently used for the diagnosis of lung nodules, but the clinical value of negative results has not been sufficiently investigated. We sought to determine the negative predictive value (NPV) of TTNB specimens and investigate predictive factors of negative results. All consecutive TTNBs performed in three centers between 2006 and 2012 were included. The medical charts of patients with nonmalignant TTNB specimens were reviewed and classified as true or false negatives. Binary logistic regression was used for multivariate analysis. Overall, findings from 980 TTNB specimens were included. Malignant disease was found in 79% (n = 777) of the cases, nonmalignant disease in 6% (n = 54), and "negative" results in 15% (n = 149). For the diagnosis of malignant disease, NPV was 51%. Estimated sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 89%, 99%, and 90%, respectively. The complication rate was 34% (life-threatening complication in 6%). In multivariate analysis, predictive factors for a false-negative result were radiologist experience (adjusted OR [AOR], 0.996; 95% CI, [0.994-0.998]), occurrence of a complication during the procedure (AOR, 1.958; 95% CI, [1.202-3.187]), and moderate to high maximum standardized uptake value on PET scan (AOR, 7.657; 95% CI, [1.737-33.763]). In 24 cases, a second TTNB was performed at the same target. The complication rate was 33%, and TTNB specimens provided diagnosis in 95% of cases with a 67% NPV. One-half of all "negative" TTNB specimen results were falsely negative for malignant diagnosis. Findings in tissue collected from a second TTNB at the same target provided a final diagnosis in most cases without increasing complication rates.

  16. Value of flexible bronchoscopy for the preoperative assessment of NSCLC diagnosed using percutaneous core needle biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Kyung-Wook; Kim, Hyeong Ryul; Kim, Dong Kwan; Kim, Yong-Hee; Park, Seung-Il; Choi, Se Hoon; Choi, Chang-Min

    2014-10-01

    We aimed to investigate the value of routine flexible bronchoscopy (FB) for the preoperative assessment of early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) diagnosed using percutaneous core needle biopsy (PCNB). We enrolled 688 NSCLC patients who were treated at our hospital between January 2003 and December 2012 and who met the following criteria: (1) early-stage lung cancer (stage I or II); (2) lung cancer had been diagnosed using PCNB; and (3) no evidence of endobronchial disease in the airways other than the primary cancer site on both chest computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography-CT (PET-CT). All NSCLC patients were from the same tertiary referral center, where FB is routinely performed preoperatively for this disease, and their medical records were reviewed retrospectively. Of the 688 patients included in the study, 451 (65.6%) were male and the median age was 65 years. Pathology analysis revealed that adenocarcinoma was the most frequently observed cell type (516/688, 75.0%). The distribution of preoperative clinical staging for the 688 patients was (1) IA (54.5%, 375/688); (2) IB (22.1%, 152/688); (3) IIA (18.2%, 125/688); and (4) IIB (5.2%, 36/688). The majority of these patients (95.2%, 655/688) underwent surgical resection. Unsuspected malignant endobronchial lesion on FB was found in only two cases (0.3%), and the surgical strategy had to be modified for both of these patients. Preoperative FB is not beneficial for screening the airways of almost any patient with early-stage NSCLC, provided that neither PET-CT nor CT reveal any evidence of endobronchial malignant involvement other than at the primary cancer site. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. COMPARATIVE EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF HO-YAG LASER AND TRUE-CUT BIOPSY NEEDLE IN MYOCARDIAL REVASCULARIZATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王立清; 胡盛寿; 常欣; 吴清玉; 李澎; 谢峰; 郭加强

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To study the mechanism and effects of blood perfusion on acute ischemic region of myocardiumthrough channel created by Ho-Yag laser and True-cut biopsy needles with myocardial contrast echocardiography. Methods. We partially ligated the left anterior descending coronary artery of canine hearts between the 1st and 2nd diagonal branches to produce two groups of acute myocardial ischemia models and then performed transmyocardial revascularization (TMR) on this region with Ho-Yag laser and True-cut biopsy needles. Myocardial contrast echocardiography was performed with a new generation of ultrasound contrast agent and second harmonicimaging of this region before, during ischemia and after revascularization. Pictures were taken with “R” wave trigger skill. Results. Acoustic density (dB) in the iscbemic region (anterior wall) with myocardial contrast echocardiogra-phy decreased obviously after the left anterior descending artery was ligated (Laser group: 5.40 ± 1.81, Needlegroup: 7.11 ± 2. 51 ) compared with that before (Laser group: 11.69 ± 1.61, Needle group: 12. 96 ± 2. 88,P 0. 05). We found that the acoustic density of the contrast developed one picture (one cardiac cycle) ahead in the transmyocardial revascularization region than that in the lateral and other region of the left ventricle wall in the scan of both groups. Conclusions. Acute ischemic myocardium can be perfused immediately by oxygenated blood from the left ventricle through channels created with both Ho-Yag laser and True-cut biopsy needles. Evidence of blood perfusion through these channels mainly during systolic phase was detected, and myocardial contrast ultrasound using intravenous peffluorocarbon-exposed sonicated dextrose albumin was regarded as a reliable method in the study of transmyocardial revaseularization.

  18. Institutional experience of PTH evaluation on fine-needle washing after aspiration biopsy to locate hyperfunctioning parathyroid tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Massimo GIUSTI; Mara DOLCINO; Lara VERA; Carla GHIARA; Francesca MASSARO; Laura FAZZUOLI; Diego FERONE; Michele MUSSAP; Francesco MINUTO

    2009-01-01

    Assaying parathyroid hormone (PTH) in the washing liquid after fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) seems to be a valid approach to locate parathyroid tissue. PTH-FNAB was evaluated in 47 patients with a clinical picture of primary hyper-parathyroidism (PHP) and ultrasonography (US) suggestive of parathyroid lesion. The patients were subdivided into two groups on the basis of the absence or presence of US thyroid alterations. The result of PTH-FNAB was compared with those of cytology, scintigraphy and, in 24 patients, surgical outcome. PTH-FNAB samples with a value higher than that recorded in the serum and higher than our institutional cut-off were deemed to be probable samples of parathyroid tissue. Cytology proved diagnostic for benign thyroid lesions, non-diagnostic for thyroid lesions, hyperplastic parathyroid tissue, undetermined or malignant thyroid lesions and other lesions in 45%, 30%, 17%, 4%, and 4% of cases, respectively. In 47% of cases, PTH-FNAB indicated that the sample had been taken in parathyroid tissue. In patients without US alterations, the diagnostic accuracy of PTH-FNAB was greater than that of scintigraphy. After surgery, comparison between the results of PTH-FNAB and scintigraphy, in terms of positive predictive value (PPV), revealed the superiority of PTH-FNAB; PPV was 94% for FNAB and 71% for scintigraphy, while sen-sitivity was 83% and 69%, respectively. PTH-FNAB evaluation after FNAB appears to be more diagnostic than cytology and scintigraphy. Of all the procedures used, PTH-FNAB appears to be the method of choice when the target is US suggestive and reachable. PTH-FNAB appears to be a useful method of guiding surgical intervention.

  19. Usual and unusual histologic patterns of high Gleason score 8 to 10 adenocarcinoma of the prostate in needle biopsy tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottipati, Srinivas; Warncke, Jason; Vollmer, Robin; Humphrey, Peter A

    2012-06-01

    High Gleason score 8 to 10 adenocarcinoma is the most aggressive and potentially lethal form of prostate cancer. The 2005 International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP)-modified Gleason grading scheme defines several gland arrangements of high Gleason grade patterns 4 and 5. The aim of this investigation was to quantitate the frequency of the ISUP-defined high Gleason grade patterns in needle biopsy tissue, to determine the common admixtures and to characterize patterns not presented in the 2005 ISUP report. For patients who underwent radical prostatectomy, we analyzed for association of specific high-grade patterns in needle biopsy with extraprostatic extension in radical prostatectomy tissues. A total of 268 prostate needle biopsy cases with Gleason score of 8 to 10 were examined. A mean of 3.6 patterns (range, 1 to 8) were identified per case and only 12% of cases had a pure single pattern. Ill-defined glands with poorly formed lumina (at 57%) and fused microacinar glands (at 53%) comprised the predominant and most frequently admixed patterns. Single cells and single signet ring cells were present in 53% and 31% of cases, respectively. Additional patterns in order of frequency included cords (35%), cribriform glands (25%), sheets of cells (19%), chains (4%), glomeruloid (3%), comedonecrosis (2%), and hypernephromatoid (1 case=0.3%). Gleason score 8 to 10 carcinomas are typically extensive in needle core tissue, with a mean of 4.4 positive cores (range, 1 to 15 cores) per case. Only 14 cases (5%) had high-grade minimal carcinoma measuring ISUP report include single file growth, solid cylinders, and nested patterns. The single file pattern was present in 40% of cases, and the small solid nested pattern was detected in 24% of cases. One case displayed solid cylinders. Only the single file pattern was associated with extraprostatic extension at radical prostatectomy (P=0.005). These results show that the 2005 ISUP-defined patterns of high Gleason score 8 to 10

  20. An evaluation of the diagnostic efficacy of fine needle aspiration biopsy in patients operated for a thyroid nodular goiter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janczak D

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Dariusz Janczak,1,2 Wiktor Pawlowski,1 Tadeusz Dorobisz,1,3 Dawid Janczak,4 Karolina Dorobisz,5 Michal Lesniak,1 Agnieszka Ziomek,1 Mariusz Chabowski1,2 1Department of Surgery, 4th Military Teaching Hospital, 2Department of Clinical Nursing, Division of Nursing in Surgical Procedures, 3Department of Clinical Basics of Physiotherapy, 4Department of Palliative Care Nursing, Faculty of Health Science, 5Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Wroclaw Medical University, Wroclaw, Poland Background: Thyroid cancer (TC comprises 1% of all carcinomas and is the most common malignancy of the endocrine system. The disease is more common in women, with its peak morbidity observed in 40–50-year-old patients. The main risk factors include radiation, iodine deficiency, hereditary background, and genetic mutations. Among all diagnosed thyroid nodules, 5%–30% will evolve into cancer. The gold-standard procedure in the preoperative evaluation of a nodular goiter, apart from ultrasonography, is fine needle aspiration (FNA biopsy. The FNA biopsy is favored for its simplicity, safety, and high specificity and sensitivity rates. Aim: The aim of our study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy of FNA based on the patients’ register. Materials and methods: In the Department of Surgery at the 4th Military Teaching Hospital in Wroclaw, 2,133 patients underwent thyroid surgery for thyroid goiter between 1996 and 2015. One hundred and eight cases of TC were diagnosed and of these, 66 patients had a preoperative FNA. Results: Fourteen FNA biopsies (21% revealed cancer, all of which were confirmed in the postoperative histopathology, although six cases of FNA-diagnosed cancer revealed a different histological type postoperatively. Eighteen FNA biopsies (27% were suspected of being malignant. A disturbingly high rate of “benign” FNA biopsies (32 cases; 48% revealed TC after surgery. Conclusion: It is of great importance that the quality and quantity of

  1. Physical exam in asymptomatic people drivers the detection of thyroid nodules undergoing ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh Ospina, Naykky; Maraka, Spyridoula; Espinosa De Ycaza, Ana E; Ahn, Hyeong Sik; Castro, M Regina; Morris, John C; Montori, Victor M; Brito, Juan P

    2016-11-01

    Understanding epidemiology and the factors leading to thyroid nodule diagnosis might help alter the course of the thyroid cancer epidemic. Population-based study using the Rochester Epidemiology Project database between 2003 and 2006. Patients with thyroid nodules who underwent ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy were included. We identified 453 patients with 520 thyroid nodules undergoing ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration. Patients were mostly women (n: 349, 77 %) with a mean age of 52 (standard deviation 17) years. The age-adjusted and sex-adjusted incidence of ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration-thyroid nodules between 2003 and 2006 was 89 (95 % confidence interval, 80-97) per 100,000 person-years; the incidence in women was 130 (95 % confidence interval, 117-144), and for men 43 (95 % confidence interval, 35-52) per 100,000 person-years. The incidence of ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration-thyroid nodules increased by 42 %, from 68 (95 % confidence interval, 54-82) in 2003 to 97 (95 % confidence interval, 80-113) per 100,000 person-years in 2006. The group with the highest incidence was patients between 70 and 79 years of age, 258 per 100,000 person-years. Most ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration-thyroid nodules were found in asymptomatic patients (n: 371, 82 %) by physical examination (n: 197, 43 %) or on imaging studies performed for non-thyroid issues (n: 108, 24 %). Women were more likely to have nodules detected by palpation (45 %), whereas imaging and physical examination contributed similarly in men (39 and 38 %). There is a large and rapid increase in the ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration-thyroid nodules, particularly among women and elderly patients which mirrors the trends observed in thyroid cancer. Most thyroid nodules were found in asymptomatic patients as a result of routine physical examination or imaging.

  2. Comparison of power Doppler and thermography for the selection of thyroid nodules in which fine-needle aspiration biopsy is indicated

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lucia D'Arbo Alves

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To compare two methods-power Doppler and thermography-for the analysis of nodule vascularization and subsequent selection of nodules to be biopsied. Materials and Methods: A total of 510 subjects with thyroid nodules were analyzed by power Doppler and submitted to fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB. Thirty-seven patients were submitted to nodule excision (29 due to carcinoma or suspected carcinoma and 8 by patient choice. Among those patients, power Doppler had raised the suspicion of malignancy in 39 lesions, compared with 48 for FNAB. Another group, comprising 110 patients, underwent thermography, which raised the suspicion of malignancy in 124 thyroid nodules, as did FNAB. Malignant nodules were excised in all 110 of those patients (95 underwent nodulectomy and 15 underwent thyroidectomy, malignancy being confirmed by intraoperative examination of frozen biopsy samples. Results: In relation to the FNAB findings, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of power Doppler were 95.16%, 23.52%, 96.22%, 16.70%, and 89.51%, respectively, compared with 100%, 58.06%, 87.73%, 100%, and 89.51%, respectively, for thermography. Conclusion: Thermography was more precise than was power Doppler for the selection of thyroid nodules to be biopsied.

  3. Comparison of power Doppler and thermography for the selection of thyroid nodules in which fine-needle aspiration biopsy is indicated*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Maria Lucia D'Arbo; Gabarra, Manoel Henrique Cintra

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare two methods-power Doppler and thermography-for the analysis of nodule vascularization and subsequent selection of nodules to be biopsied. Materials and Methods A total of 510 subjects with thyroid nodules were analyzed by power Doppler and submitted to fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB). Thirty-seven patients were submitted to nodule excision (29 due to carcinoma or suspected carcinoma and 8 by patient choice). Among those patients, power Doppler had raised the suspicion of malignancy in 39 lesions, compared with 48 for FNAB. Another group, comprising 110 patients, underwent thermography, which raised the suspicion of malignancy in 124 thyroid nodules, as did FNAB. Malignant nodules were excised in all 110 of those patients (95 underwent nodulectomy and 15 underwent thyroidectomy), malignancy being confirmed by intraoperative examination of frozen biopsy samples. Results In relation to the FNAB findings, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of power Doppler were 95.16%, 23.52%, 96.22%, 16.70%, and 89.51%, respectively, compared with 100%, 58.06%, 87.73%, 100%, and 89.51%, respectively, for thermography. Conclusion Thermography was more precise than was power Doppler for the selection of thyroid nodules to be biopsied. PMID:27818545

  4. Can We Predict Phyllodes Tumor among Fibroepithelial Lesions with Cellular Stroma Diagnosed at Breast Core Needle Biopsy?

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    Jung, Hae Kyoung; Ko, Kyung Hee; Rho, Ji Young [Dept. of Radiology, CHA University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Hee Jung; Kim, Eun Kyung; Kim, Min Jung; Park, Byeong Woo [Dept. of Radiology, Yensei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    To evaluate the surgical outcomes of fibroepithelial lesion with cellular stroma (FELCS) diagnosed at sonography guided core needle biopsy of breast masses, and to determine whether the clinical and imaging features of this lesion could predict the presence of a phyllodes tumor. We retrospectively reviewed the pathologic results of sonography guided core needle biopsy of solid breast masses. A total of 55 FELCS diagnosed with this procedure that underwent subsequent surgical excision were included in this study; their medical records and radiologic images were retrospectively reviewed. The results of the surgical excision revealed 22 (40%) phyllodes tumors and 33 (60%) non-phyllodes tumors: 30 (54.6%) fibroadenomas, 1 (1.8%) adenosis, 1 (1.8%) fibrocystic changes and 1 (1.8%) fibroadenomatous hyperplasia. Lesion size and patient age were significantly different between phyllodes tumors and nonphyllodes tumors groups (32.2 {+-} 14.07 mm/22.4 {+-} 13.64 mm, p=0.0078, 43.5 {+-} 11.60 years/36.5 {+-} 10.25 years, p=0.0207). Among the sonographic features, only cleft was significantly more visible in phyllodes tumors than in non-phyllodes tumors (n=14 (70%)/n=6 (30%), p=0.0016). The size of the lesions, the age of the patients, and the sonographic features of cleft were the significant helpful variables to predict phyllodes tumors among FELCS diagnosed at breast core biopsy.

  5. Fine Needle Aspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FNA), also called fine needle biopsy, is a type of biopsy that can be used to diagnose many types ... in which case another FNA or a different type of biopsy procedure may needed. Because the needle is so ...

  6. Ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy of parathyroid gland and lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimashkieh Haytham

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parathyroid gland and their tumors comprise a small proportion of non-palpable neck masses that are investigated by ultrasound (US guided fine needle aspiration biopsy. We reviewed our institution's cases of US guided FNAB of parathyroid gland and their lesions to determine the role of cytology for the preoperative diagnosis of parathyroid gland and their lesions. Method All cases of FNAB of parathyroid gland and lesions in the last 10 years were reviewed in detail with respect to clinical history and correlated with the histopathologic findings in available cases. The cytologic parameters that were evaluated included cellularity assessed semiquantitatively as scant, intermediate or abundant (500 cells, cellular distribution (loose clusters, single cells/naked nuclei, rounded clusters, two- and three-dimensional clusters, and presence of prominent vascular proliferation, cellular characteristics (cell size, nuclear shape, presence/absence of a nucleolus, degree of mitosis, amount of cytoplasm, and appearance of nuclear chromatin, and background (colloid-like material and macrophages. Immunostaining for parathyroid hormone (PTH was performed on selected cases using either destained Pap smears or cell block sections. Results Twenty cases of US-guided FNAB of parathyroid glands and their lesions including 13 in the expected locations in the neck, 3 in intrathyroid region, 3 in thyroid bed, and 1 metastatic to liver were studied. Majority of the cases showed intermediate cellularity (51–500 cells with round to oval cells that exhibited a stippled nuclear chromatin, without significant pleomorphism or mitotic activity. The cells were arranged in loose two dimensional groups with many single cells/naked nuclei around the groups. Occasionally macrophages and colloid like material was also encountered. There was no significant difference in the cytomorphologic features between normal gland, hyperplasia adenoma, or carcinoma

  7. Preoperative ultrasound-guided needle biopsy of 63 uterine tumors having high signal intensity upon T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Ryo; Kashima, Katsunori; Asatani, Mina; Nishino, Koji; Nishikawa, Nobumichi; Sekine, Masayuki; Serikawa, Takehiro; Enomoto, Takayuki

    2014-07-01

    The differential diagnosis between uterine sarcoma and benign leiomyoma is difficult when made only by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); it usually requires an additional preoperative diagnostic procedure. We report our results using ultrasound-guided needle biopsy for these types of uterine tumors. Ultrasound-guided needle biopsy was performed on 63 patients with uterine smooth muscle tumors suspected of malignancy by MRI. We compared the results of presurgical biopsy against the postsurgical pathology of the tumor. Among 63 patients with a high signal intensity of the uterine tumor on T2-weighted MRI (1 case was undetermined), 12 cases (19.3%) were diagnosed by the needle biopsy as malignant, and 51 cases (80.6%) were benign. Among the 12 diagnosed as malignant tumors, 11 had surgery performed, and one was treated with chemotherapy. Among the 51 patients diagnosed with a benign tumor, 27 had surgery performed, and 24 were put on a wait-and-see clinical follow-up schedule. One of the 27 surgical patients with a benign tumor had a postsurgical diagnosis of a low-grade endometrial stromal sarcoma. In the 38 cases where surgery was performed, we found the sensitivity, specificity, and the positive and negative predictive values of the needle biopsy were 91.7%, 100%, 100%, and 96.2%, respectively. Ultrasound-guided needle biopsy may be a reliable preoperative diagnostic procedure for uterine tumors with suspected malignancy.

  8. Fine-needle aspiration and core biopsy in the diagnosis of breast lesions: A comparison and review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Suvradeep; Dey, Pranab

    2016-01-01

    In recent times, the diagnosis of breast lesions has mostly become dependent on core needle biopsies (CNBs) with a gradual reduction in the rate of performing fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC). Both the procedures have their pros and cons and outsmart each other taking into account different parameters. Both the methods are found to be fraught with loopholes, taking into account different performance indices, diagnostic accuracy and concordance, patient benefit, and cost-effectiveness. Unlike the popular belief of an absolute superiority of CNB over FNAC, the literature review does not reveal a very distinct demarcation in many aspects. We recommend judicious use of these diagnostic modalities in resource-limited settings and screening programs taking into account parameters such as palpability and availability of an experienced cytopathologist. PMID:27651820

  9. Diagnostic impact of color Doppler ultrasound-guided core biopsy on fine-needle aspiration of anterior mediastinal masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hung-Jen; Liao, Wei-Chih; Liang, Shinn-Jye; Li, Chia-Hsiang; Tu, Chih-Yen; Hsu, Wu-Huei

    2014-12-01

    Although lymphoma and thymoma are common etiologies of anterior mediastinal masses (AMMs), smaller percentages and numbers of patients with these diseases have been enrolled in previous ultrasound-guided biopsy studies. To date, there has been no study of color Doppler sonographic features to support the differentiation of AMMs. For this retrospective cohort study, a search of the database of the China Medical University Hospital using the clinical coding "ultrasound-guided biopsy" was conducted for the period December 2003 to February 2013. We selected patients diagnosed with AMMs (not cysts) using radiographic records. This search yielded a list of 80 cases. Real-time ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy (CNB) was performed in all but 5 patients without a sufficient safety range. In 89% (67/75) of these ultrasound-guided CNB cases, the diagnostic accuracy achieved subclassification. Fine-needle aspiration cytology achieved subclassification in only 10% of cases. On color Doppler sonography, 71% of lymphomas were characterized as "rich vascular with central/crisscross collocations" and 29% as "avascular or localized/scattered peripheral vessels." However, decreased proportions of "rich vascular with central/crisscross collocations" were found in lung cancer (4% [1/23], odds ratio = 0.018, 95% confidence interval: 0.002-0.154, p Fine-needle aspiration cytology itself cannot aid in the diagnosis. Color Doppler sonographic evaluation of AMMs followed by real-time CNB is a more efficient method. Copyright © 2014 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparison of cone-beam CT-guided and CT fluoroscopy-guided transthoracic needle biopsy of lung nodules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rotolo, Nicola; Imperatori, Andrea; Arlant, Veronica; Dominioni, Lorenzo [Insubria University, Center for Thoracic Surgery, Varese (Italy); Floridi, Chiara; Fontana, Federico; Ierardi, Anna Maria; Mangini, Monica; De Marchi, Giuseppe; Fugazzola, Carlo; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo [Insubria University, Radiology Department, Varese (Italy); Novario, Raffaele [Insubria University, Medical Physics Department, Varese (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    To compare the diagnostic performance of cone-beam CT (CBCT)-guided and CT fluoroscopy (fluoro-CT)-guided technique for transthoracic needle biopsy (TNB) of lung nodules. The hospital records of 319 consecutive patients undergoing 324 TNBs of lung nodules in a single radiology unit in 2009-2013 were retrospectively evaluated. The newly introduced CBCT technology was used to biopsy 123 nodules; 201 nodules were biopsied by conventional fluoro-CT-guided technique. We assessed the performance of the two biopsy systems for diagnosis of malignancy and the radiation exposure. Nodules biopsied by CBCT-guided and by fluoro-CT-guided technique had similar characteristics: size, 20 ± 6.5 mm (mean ± standard deviation) vs. 20 ± 6.8 mm (p = 0.845); depth from pleura, 15 ± 15 mm vs. 15 ± 16 mm (p = 0.595); malignant, 60 % vs. 66 % (p = 0.378). After a learning period, the newly introduced CBCT-guided biopsy system and the conventional fluoro-CT-guided system showed similar sensitivity (95 % and 92 %), specificity (100 % and 100 %), accuracy for diagnosis of malignancy (96 % and 94 %), and delivered non-significantly different median effective doses [11.1 mSv (95 % CI 8.9-16.0) vs. 14.5 mSv (95 % CI 9.5-18.1); p = 0.330]. The CBCT-guided and fluoro-CT-guided systems for lung nodule biopsy are similar in terms of diagnostic performance and effective dose, and may be alternatively used to optimize the available technological resources. (orig.)

  11. Initial CT-guided needle biopsy of extremity skeletal lesions: Diagnostic performance and experience of a tertiary musculoskeletal center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nouh, Mohamed Ragab, E-mail: mragab73@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Alexandria University (Egypt); Department of Radiology, Al-Razi Hospital, Sulibikhate 13001 (Kuwait); Abu Shady, Hamdy Mohamed, E-mail: hamdi_abushadi@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Al-Razi Hospital, Sulibikhate 13001 (Kuwait)

    2014-02-15

    Introduction: Appendicular long bones are the target for a wide spectrum of bony lesions with variable clinical presentations. Biopsy procedures are needed for subsequent proper patient's management. Most of the available literature globally assessed musculoskeletal biopsies with inclusion of repeat biopsy results. We thought to retrospectively assess the diagnostic performance of initial CT-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy (PCNB) of extremity long bone lesions in a tertiary musculoskeletal referral center. Patients and methods: We retrospectively analyzed the outcome of initial CT-guided PCNB of 49 patients who presented with extremity long bone lesions which were biopsied in our hospital during a 36 months’ time period. The diagnostic performance was assessed in terms of diagnostic yield and accuracy. Results: There were 34 males and 15 females with a mean age of 33.69 years (range from 4 to 77 years). The overall diagnostic yield of initial biopsies was 87.75% with a diagnostic accuracy of 82.85% derived from the surgically proven cases. The higher diagnostic yield was recorded with malignancy, presence of extra-osseous soft-tissue component as well as mixed and sclerotic lesions. The pathologies of the non-diagnostic biopsies included large-cell lymphoma, giant-cell tumor, langerhans cell histiocytosis, osteoid osteoma and a non-ossifying fibroma. Conclusion: Initial CT-guided PCNB in extremities’ long bones lesions showed high diagnostic performance in malignant, mixed and/or sclerotic lesions as well as lesions with extra-osseous exophytic tissue growth. Lack of extra-osseous components, benign and lytic lesions all had worse diagnostic performance.

  12. Practical guidelines for ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy of soft-tissue lesions: Transformation from beginner to specialist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Yoon; Chung, Hye Won; Oh, Tack Sun; Lee, Jong Seok [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy (US-CNB) is an important step in the diagnosis of musculoskeletal soft-tissue lesions. To maximize efficacy and minimize the complications of US-CNB, it is critical to collaborate with a multidisciplinary team and to understand the particular considerations of US-CNB for these lesions. The purpose of this article is to provide a systematic review and step-by-step tips for using US-CNB to diagnose musculoskeletal soft-tissue lesions.

  13. Step-by-step of ultrasound-guided core-needle biopsy of the breast: review and technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Dahmer Rocha

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound-guided core-needle biopsy has high sensitivity in the diagnosis of breast cancer. The present study is aimed at detailing the main steps of such procedure, including indications, advantages, limitations, follow-up and description of the technique, besides presenting a checklist including the critical steps required for an appropriate practice of the technique. In the recent years, an increasing number of patients have required breast biopsy, indicating the necessity of a proportional increase in the number of skilled professionals to carry out the procedures and histological diagnoses. A multidisciplinary approach involving the tripod clinical practice-radiology-pathology is responsible for the highest rate of accuracy of the technique and must always be adopted.

  14. Parotid incidentaloma identified by combined {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose whole-body positron emission tomography and computed tomography: findings at grayscale and power Doppler ultrasonography and ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy or core-needle biopsy

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    Lee, Sang Kwon; Rho, Byung Hak [Keimyung University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Dongsan Medical Center, Daegu (Korea); Won, Kyoung Sook [Keimyung University School of Medicine, Nuclear Medicine, Dongsan Medical Center, Daegu (Korea)

    2009-09-15

    Twelve parotid incidentalomas in 10 consecutive subjects (nine with a known malignancy elsewhere and one presumptively healthy subject) identified by combined {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose whole-body positron emission tomography and computed tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT) were investigated, with the aim of calculating maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) of each FDG-avid focus, and identifying corresponding sonographic and pathologic findings. The results of ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) (n = 9) and core-needle biopsy (CNB) (n = 3) were Warthin tumor in 10 cases, and pleomorphic adenoma and chronic inflammation in one each. SUV{sub max} was 7.0-21.0 g/mL (average 13.7 g/mL) for Warthin tumor, 6.8 g/mL for pleomorphic adenoma, and 7.3 g/mL for chronic inflammation. Each FDG-avid focus corresponded to ovoid (n = 11) or lobulated (n = 1) hypoechoic mass on grayscale ultrasonography (US) and hypervascular mass, except one with chronic inflammation, on power Doppler (PD) US. Parotid incidentaloma identified by {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT during workup of various malignancies elsewhere does not necessarily signify primary or metastatic malignancy, but indicates a high likelihood of benign lesions, particularly Warthin tumor. Such lesions should be evaluated thoroughly by US and ultrasound-guided FNAB or CNB if parotid disease would change the patient's treatment plan. (orig.)

  15. Lymph node biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biopsy - lymph nodes; Open lymph node biopsy; Fine needle aspiration biopsy; Sentinel lymph node biopsy ... A lymph node biopsy is done in an operating room in a hospital. Or, it is done at an outpatient surgical center. The ...

  16. Comparison of palpation-versus ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsies in the evaluation of thyroid nodules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peker Kamil

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to compare the results of palpation-versus ultrasound-guided thyroid fine-needle aspiration (FNA biopsies. Findings Clinical data, cytology and histopathology results were retrospectively analyzed on all patients who underwent thyroid FNA biopsy in our outpatient endocrinology clinic between January 1998 and April 2003. The same investigators performed all thyroid FNAs (ASC and cytological evaluations (KP. Subjects in the ultrasound-guided group were older, otherwise there were no differences in baseline characteristics (gender, thyroid function, the frequency of multinodular goiter, nodule diameter and nodule location between groups. Cytology results in nodules aspirated by palpation (n = 202 versus ultrasound guidance (n = 184 were as follows: malignant 2.0% versus 2.7% (p = 0.74, benign 69.8% versus 79.9% (p = 0.02, indeterminate 1.0% versus 4.9% (p = 0.02, inadequate 27.2% versus 12.5% (p Conclusion We demonstrate that ultrasound guidance for thyroid FNA significantly decreases inadequate for evaluation category. We also confirm the high sensitivity and specificity of thyroid FNA biopsy in the diagnosis of thyroid cancer. Where available, we recommend universal application of ultrasound guidance for thyroid FNA biopsy as a standard component of this diagnostic technique.

  17. Core-needle biopsy versus repeat fine-needle aspiration for thyroid nodules initially read as atypia/follicular lesion of undetermined significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young Jun; Baek, Jung Hwan; Suh, Chong Hyun; Shim, Woo Hyun; Jeong, Boseul; Kim, Jae Kyun; Song, Dong Eun; Kim, Tae Yong; Chung, Ki-Wook; Lee, Jeong Hyun

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of core-needle biopsy (CNB) by comparing the results of CNB and repeat fine-needle aspiration (FNA) for thyroid nodules that are initially read as atypia/follicular lesion of undetermined significance (AUS/FLUS) on FNA. Among 2631 initial AUS/FLUS FNA results, 505 consecutive nodules (295 repeat FNAs and 210 CNBs) were retrospectively analyzed. The primary outcome was inconclusive (ie, nondiagnostic or AUS/FLUS). The secondary outcomes included inconclusive results of the subcategory, risk factors for inconclusive results, and diagnostic performance. CNB demonstrated significantly fewer inconclusive results than repeat FNA for the overall nodules (40.9% vs 63%; p < .001). Repeat FNA and group FLUS were significant risk factors for inconclusive results (odds ratio = 1.92; p =.001 and odds ratio = 2.08; p <.001, respectively). All diagnostic performances using CNB were higher than repeat FNAs. CNB is more useful than repeat FNAs for reducing inconclusive results and improving the diagnostic performance of thyroid nodules with initial AUS/FLUS FNA results. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 39: 361-369, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Cytomorphologic characteristics of fine needle core biopsy of multicystic peritoneal mesothelioma: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Anna M Collins; Nayar, Ritu; De Frias, Denise; Lin, Xiaoqi

    2010-03-01

    Multicystic peritoneal mesothelioma (MPM) is an uncommon cystic mesothelial proliferative lesion. It occurs predominantly in women of reproductive age and most commonly arises in the pelvis. The preoperative diagnosis of MPM is difficult to establish based on clinical and radiographic findings, and has therefore traditionally been diagnosed following surgical resection. Due to differing management of MPM and its differential diagnoses including both benign and malignant lesions, it would be beneficial to diagnose MPM preoperatively. We report a case of MPM in a middle aged female that was diagnosed by fine needle core biopsy and touch preparations, allowing for appropriate clinical management. The cytomorphologic features of needle core biopsy, immunocytochemical studies and differential diagnosis are discussed. Furthermore, despite its infrequency, the current case emphasizes the importance of the inclusion of this entity in the differential diagnosis of cystic lesions of the abdomen and pelvis at the time of on-site evaluation and final diagnosis, in order to avoid misinterpretation of strips of benign mesothelial cells as inadequate for diagnosis.

  19. Percutaneous transthoracic biopsy for thoracic lesions: comparison of the utility of fine needle aspiration (FNA), percutaneous curring needle biopsy (PCNB) and combination of both methods

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    Yoon, Won Sang; Choi, Young Hi; Kim, Tae Hoon; Seo, Jae Cheol; Na, Hye Myong; Ha, Mina Ha [College of Medicine, Dankook Univ., Chonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-01

    To assess the diagnostic role of FNA, PCNB, and a combination of both methods in patients who underwent percutaneous transthoracic biopsy for a malignant or benign intrathoracic lesion. We retrospectively reviewed the findings of 213 patients with an intrathoracic mass or consolidation who underwnt FNA (Group A, n=98), PCNB(Group B, n=31) or a combination of both methods (Group C, n=84). Under fluoroscopic guidance, diagnoses were based on the findings of surgery, biopsy at another site or clinical and radiologic follow-up. In the differential diagnosis of benign and malignant disease, and in the diagnosis of small-cell lung cancer, pulmonary tuberculosis, non-tuberculous infectious disease and benign mass, sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were statistically analysed in each group. Among 213 patients, lesions were malignant in 134 and benign in 79. In group A, sensitivity and specificity were 90.1% and 100% for malignant lesions, and 91.5% and 90.1% for benign, while in group B, the corresponding findings were 90.4% and 100% and 90.0% and 90.1 %. In group C, corresponding rates of 95.1% and 100% (p<0.05) and 100% and 92% (p<0.05) were recorded. In group C, accuracy and sensitivity were higher than in group A or (p<0.05). Post-procedural pneumothorax occurred in 15.3% of group A, 13.3% of group B, and 20.6% of group C, while hemoptysis was found in 7.1% of group A, 13.3 % group B, and 2.9% of group C. Among the three groups, the complication rate showed no statistically significant variation (p<0.05). In the specific diagnosis of small-cell lung cancer, the sensitivity and specificity of FNA and PCNB were, respectively, 100%, and 98.5%, and 90.0% and 98.0% (p<0.05); for tuberculosis, the corresponding figures were 35.0% and 100%, and 20.0% and 97.2 (p<0.05). FNA was better in the diagnosis of non-tuberculous infectious disease, while PCNB was better in the specific diagnosis of benign masses, without statistical significance. FNA is superior to PCNB in the

  20. CT-guided core needle biopsy of mediastinal nodes through a transpulmonary approach: retrospective analysis of the procedures conducted over six years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zhongyuan; Liang, Zhiwen; Li, Pengcheng; Wang, Qiong

    2017-08-01

    To retrospectively evaluate the diagnostic performance and complications of a CT-guided core needle cutting biopsy of mediastinal nodes through a transpulmonary approach. From January 2009 to December 2014, we used a coaxial positioning system and an 18G cutting-type biopsy device to perform CT-guided percutaneous transpulmonary needle biopsies of mediastinal nodes for 127 patients. The diagnostic performance, complication rate, influencing factors, distribution of mediastinal nodes and pathological diagnoses were investigated. Among 127 patients, pathologic analyses showed that all of the biopsies were technically successful. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were all 100%. As for complications, the ratios for pneumothorax and hemoptysis were 33.9% and 4.7%, respectively. Multivariate analyses revealed that the distance from the pleura to the target lesion (P = 0.008) and the numbers of visceral pleura injuries (P = 0.006) were the two most significant risk factors for pneumothorax, and that the distance from the pleura to the target lesion (P = 0.004) was the most significant risk factor for hemoptysis. CT-guided core needle cutting biopsy of mediastinal nodes through a transpulmonary approach is a safe and efficient diagnostic method. • CT-guided core needle biopsy is an accurate technique for diagnosing mediastinal nodes. • The rates of complications are similar to those for pulmonary lesion biopsy. • Pneumothorax risk factors include distance from pleura to target lesion and number of visceral pleura. • Distance from pleura to target lesion is the risk factor for hemoptysis. • CT-guided core needle biopsy is an important diagnostic method for mediastinal nodes.

  1. Reliability of fine needle aspiration and ex tempore biopsy in the diagnosis of salivary glands lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajanin Radoslav

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Interpretation of cytological material obtained by fine needle aspiration (FNA of salivary glands is one of the most challenging areas in cytopathology. FNA is performed easily, it is minimally invasive, inexpensive, fast, reliable and provides valuable information to clinicians about the nature of the lesion and therapeutic modalities. Ex tempore diagnosis, frozen section (FS is a diagnostic tool that is essential in determining the modalities of surgical treatment of lesions of the salivary glands. Today this method is used in determining the status of resection margins and infiltration of adjacent anatomical structures. The aim of this study was to present our experiences in the application of FNA and FS in the diagnosis of salivary gland lesions and to determine the sensitivity, specificity, predictive value, and diagnostic reliability of these methods. Methods. The study included 36 patients. In all the patients, cytological analysis was done before surgery and histological analysis of the surgical material. In 23 of the patients the FS diagnostics was done. Then we compared FNA and FS findings with histopathological findings. Results. Correlation of cytological and histological diagnosis showed sensitivity of 83.3%, specificity 96.67%, positive predictive value 83.3%, negative predictive value of 96.77% and diagnostic accuracy of 97.2%. Based on the relationship between FS diagnosis and histopathological diagnosis, the sensitivity was 100%, specificity 96.67%, while positive predictive value and diagnostic accuracy were 100% each. Conclusion. The study confirmed that FNA is a sensitive, reliable diagnostic method for differentiation of lesions of the salivary glands. In cases with no posibility to definite differentiation in FNA samples, and with the need to assess the resection margins and invasion of anatomical structures, it is recommended to use FS diagnostics.

  2. Histological diagnosis of gastric submucosal tumors: A pilot study of endoscopic ultrasonography-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy vs mucosal cutting biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikehara, Hisatomo; Li, Zhaoliang; Watari, Jiro; Taki, Masato; Ogawa, Tomohiro; Yamasaki, Takahisa; Kondo, Takashi; Toyoshima, Fumihiko; Kono, Tomoaki; Tozawa, Katsuyuki; Ohda, Yoshio; Tomita, Toshihiko; Oshima, Tadayuki; Fukui, Hirokazu; Matsuda, Ikuo; Hirota, Seiichi; Miwa, Hiroto

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare the usefulness of endoscopic ultrasonography-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy (EUS-FNAB) without cytology and mucosal cutting biopsy (MCB) in the histological diagnosis of gastric submucosal tumor (SMT). METHODS: We prospectively compared the diagnostic yield, feasibility, and safety of EUS-FNAB and those of MCB based on endoscopic submucosal dissection. The cases of 20 consecutive patients with gastric SMT ≥ 1 cm in diameter. who underwent both EUS-FNAB and MCB were investigated. RESULTS: The histological diagnoses were gastrointestinal stromal tumors (n = 7), leiomyoma (n = 6), schwannoma (n = 2), aberrant pancreas (n = 2), and one case each of glomus tumor, metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma, and no-diagnosis. The tumors’ mean size was 23.6 mm. Histological diagnosis was made in 65.0% of the EUS-FNABs and 60.0% of the MCBs, a nonsignificant difference. There were no significant differences in the diagnostic yield concerning the tumor location or tumor size between the two methods. However, diagnostic specimens were significantly more frequently obtained in lesions with intraluminal growth than in those with extraluminal growth by the MCB method (P = 0.01). All four SMTs with extraluminal growth were diagnosed only by EUS-FNAB (P = 0.03). No complications were found in either method. CONCLUSION: MCB may be chosen as an alternative diagnostic modality in tumors showing the intraluminal growth pattern regardless of tumor size, whereas EUS-FNAB should be performed for SMTs with extraluminal growth. PMID:26468338

  3. Post-brushing and fine-needle aspiration biopsy follow-up and treatment options for patients with pancreatobiliary lesions: The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel F. I. Kurtycz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Papanicolaou Society of Cytopathology (PSC has developed a set of guidelines for pancreatobiliary cytology including indications for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA biopsy, techniques of EUS-FNA, terminology and nomenclature for pancreatobiliary cytology, ancillary testing and post-procedure management. All documents are based on the expertise of the authors, a review of the literature and discussions of the draft document at several national and international meetings over an 18 month period and synthesis of online comments of the draft document on the PSC web site (www.papsociety.org. This document selectively presents the results of these discussions and focuses on the follow-up and treatment options for patients after procedures performed for obtaining cytology samples for the evaluation of biliary strictures and solid and cystic masses in the pancreas. These recommendations follow the six-tiered terminology and nomenclature scheme proposed by committee III.

  4. Magnetic resonance-guided upper abdominal biopsies in a high-field wide-bore 3-T MRI system: feasibility, handling, and needle artefacts

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    Kuehn, Jens-Peter; Langner, Soenke; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Hosten, Norbert; Puls, Ralf [Ernst Moritz Arndt University of Greifswald, Department of Radiology, Greifswald (Germany); Evert, Matthias [Ernst Moritz Arndt University of Greifswald, Department of Pathology, Greifswald (Germany); Kickhefel, Antje [Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen (Germany)

    2010-10-15

    To investigate the feasibility and handling of abdominal MRI-guided biopsies in a 3-T MRI system. Over a 1-year period, 50 biopsies were obtained in 47 patients with tumours of the upper abdominal organs guided by 3-T MRI with a large-bore diameter of 70 cm. Lesions in liver (47), spleen (1) and kidney (2) were biopsied with a coaxial technique using a 16-G biopsy needle guided by a T1-weighted three-dimensional gradient recalled echo volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (T1w-3D-GRE-VIBE) sequence. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, complication rate, interventional complexity, room/intervention time and needle artefacts were determined. A sensitivity of 0.93, specificity of 1.0 and accuracy of 0.94 were observed. Three patients required a rebiopsy. There was a minor complications rate of 13.6%, and no major complications were observed. Histopathology revealed 38 malignant lesions, and 3-month follow-up confirmed 9 benign lesions. Mean lesion diameter was 3.4 {+-} 3.1 cm (50% being smaller than 2 cm). Mean needle tract length was 10.8 {+-} 3.3 cm. Median room time was 42.0 {+-} 19.8 min and intervention time 9.3 {+-} 8.1 min. Needle artefact size was about 9-fold greater for perpendicular access versus access parallel to the main magnetic field. Biopsies of the upper abdomen can be performed with great technical success and easy handling because of the large-bore diameter. The MRI-guided biopsy needle had an acceptable susceptibility artefact at 3 T. However future research must aim to reduce the susceptibility effects of the biopsy systems. (orig.)

  5. Extra-pleuric coaxial system for CT-guided percutaneous fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) of small (≤20 mm) lung nodules: a novel technique using multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capasso, Raffaella; Nizzoli, Rita; Tiseo, Marcello; Pedrazzi, Giuseppe; Brunese, Luca; Rotondo, Antonio; De Filippo, Massimo

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the study is to present the diagnostic feasibility, usefulness, and safety of a novel technique for coaxial CT-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy of small (≤20 mm in diameter) lung nodules. A 18-gauge (G) (1.2 × 40 mm) needle is inserted through the skin in the depth of the thoracic wall tissues remaining outside the pleura. Its positioning is planned and adjusted using multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) images along the 18-G guide needle axis tracing a reference outline extended from the needle tip to the target nodule. When the insertion of the 18-G extra-pleuric needle (EPN) proves to be precise, a 22-G Chiba needle is then passed through the outer 18-G EPN until it reaches the thoracic lesion for the sampling procedure. Patient population included 153 males and 94 females, with a mean age of 61.3 ± 21.6 years. Mean nodule diameter was 14.1 ± 2.2 mm. The lesion depth from pleural plane ranged from 0 mm to 127 mm. An average of 1.29 aspirates were performed per lesion. The most common complication was pneumothorax in 27 cases; there were no cases of PNX requiring chest tube insertion. Intrapulmonary bleeding along the needle track was observed in 32 patients. Exploiting the advantage of MPR images, our novel technique of extra-pleuric coaxial system with a 18-G EPN allows the operator to multiple samplings of small (≤20 mm) target lesions in various locations with a thinner (22-G Chiba) needle, thus reducing the degree of pleural, parenchymal, or adjacent organs damage.

  6. [Evaluation of the efficacy and the limitation of ultrasound-guided core-needle biopsy, core-needle aspiration and fine-needle aspiration in micro-nodules of thyroid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shaohang; Niu, Lijuan

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and the limitation of ultrasound-guided core-needle biopsy, ultrasound-guided core-needle aspiration and ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration in micro-nodules of thyroid. A retrospective was performed in 92 patients with suspectable malignent micro-nodules in thyroid. Of them, 52 patients underwent US-CNB and US-FNA and 40 patients underwent US-CNA and US-FNA. The diagnoses for the micro-nodules were identified by histopathlogical examination after surgery. Among 52 cases with both US-CNB and US-FNA, 41 got nondiagnostic US-CNB and 11 cases successfully got the correct diagnoses of US-CNB; 6 cases got the incorrect diagnosis of US-FNA and 46 cases got the correct diagnosis of US-FNA. Of 40 cases with US-CNA and US-FNA, unsatisfactory specimen of US-CNA occurred in 14 cases and satisfactory specimen of US-CNA were got in 26 cases; unsatisfactory specimen of US-FNA occurred in 4 cases and satisfactory specimen of US-FNA. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of US-FNA in 92 cases for the diagnosis of malignancy were 93.4%, 86.7%, 97.3%, 72.2% and 92.3%, respectively. US-FNA is the most valuable method for the diagnosis of suspectable malignent micro-nodules in thyroid before operation.

  7. Development and evaluation of a prediction model for underestimated invasive breast cancer in women with ductal carcinoma in situ at stereotactic large core needle biopsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne C E Diepstraten

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We aimed to develop a multivariable model for prediction of underestimated invasiveness in women with ductal carcinoma in situ at stereotactic large core needle biopsy, that can be used to select patients for sentinel node biopsy at primary surgery. METHODS: From the literature, we selected potential preoperative predictors of underestimated invasive breast cancer. Data of patients with nonpalpable breast lesions who were diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ at stereotactic large core needle biopsy, drawn from the prospective COBRA (Core Biopsy after RAdiological localization and COBRA2000 cohort studies, were used to fit the multivariable model and assess its overall performance, discrimination, and calibration. RESULTS: 348 women with large core needle biopsy-proven ductal carcinoma in situ were available for analysis. In 100 (28.7% patients invasive carcinoma was found at subsequent surgery. Nine predictors were included in the model. In the multivariable analysis, the predictors with the strongest association were lesion size (OR 1.12 per cm, 95% CI 0.98-1.28, number of cores retrieved at biopsy (OR per core 0.87, 95% CI 0.75-1.01, presence of lobular cancerization (OR 5.29, 95% CI 1.25-26.77, and microinvasion (OR 3.75, 95% CI 1.42-9.87. The overall performance of the multivariable model was poor with an explained variation of 9% (Nagelkerke's R(2, mediocre discrimination with area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.66 (95% confidence interval 0.58-0.73, and fairly good calibration. CONCLUSION: The evaluation of our multivariable prediction model in a large, clinically representative study population proves that routine clinical and pathological variables are not suitable to select patients with large core needle biopsy-proven ductal carcinoma in situ for sentinel node biopsy during primary surgery.

  8. A sensitivity and specificity comparison of fine needle aspiration cytology and core needle biopsy in evaluation of suspicious breast lesions: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mei; He, Xiaoning; Chang, Yaping; Sun, Guangwen; Thabane, Lehana

    2017-02-01

    Breast cancer detections for women with suspicious lesions mainly depend on two non-operative pathological tests-fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) and core needle biopsy (CNB). The aim of this systematic review was to compare the sensitivity and specificity of CNB and FNAC in this setting. The data sources included MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) till February 2016. We included prospective series of studies which directly compared the accuracy of FNAC and CNB. We used forest plots to display the sensitivity and specificity of FNAC and CNB respectively. Pre-specified subgroup analyses and sensitivity analysis were conducted. Ultimately, 12 articles (1802 patients) were included in the final analysis. The pooled analysis shows that the sensitivity of CNB is better than that of FNAC [87% (95% CI, 84%-88%, I(2) = 88.5%) versus 74% (95% CI, 72%-77%, I(2) = 88.3%)] and the specificity of CNB is similar to that of FNAC [98% (95% CI, 96%-99%, I(2) = 76.2%) versus 96% (95% CI, 94%-98%, I(2) = 39.0%)]. For subgroup analysis, the sensitivities of both tests are better for palpable lesions than that of non-palpable lesions. Sensitivity analysis shows the robustness of the primary analysis. Our study suggests that both of FNAC and CNB have good clinical performance. In similar circumstances, the sensitivity of CNB is better than that of FNAC, while their specificities are similar. FNAC could be still considered the first choice to evaluate suspicious nonpalpable breast lesions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. HER2 testing on core needle biopsy specimens from primary breast cancers: interobserver reproducibility and concordance with surgically resected specimens

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    Yamamoto Sohei

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate evaluation of human epidermal growth factor receptor type-2 (HER2 status based on core needle biopsy (CNB specimens is mandatory for identification of patients with primary breast cancer who will benefit from primary systemic therapy with trastuzumab. The aim of the present study was to validate the application of HER2 testing with CNB specimens from primary breast cancers in terms of interobserver reproducibility and comparison with surgically resected specimens. Methods A total of 100 pairs of archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded CNB and surgically resected specimens of invasive breast carcinomas were cut into sections. All 100 paired sections were subjected to HER2 testing by immunohistochemistry (IHC and 27 paired sections were subjected to that by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH, the results being evaluated by three and two observers, respectively. Interobserver agreement levels in terms of judgment and the concordance of consensus scores between CNB samples and the corresponding surgically resected specimens were estimated as the percentage agreement and κ statistic. Results In CNB specimens, the percentage interobserver agreement of HER2 scoring by IHC was 76% (κ = 0.71 for 3 × 3 categories (0-1+ versus 2+ versus 3+ and 90% (κ = 0.80 for 2 × 2 categories (0-2+ versus 3+. These levels were close to the corresponding ones for the surgically resected specimens: 80% (κ = 0.77 for 3 × 3 categories and 92% (κ = 0.88 for 2 × 2 categories. Concordance of consensus for HER2 scores determined by IHC between CNB and the corresponding surgical specimens was 87% (κ = 0.77 for 3 × 3 categories, and 94% (κ = 0.83 for 2 × 2 categories. Among the 13 tumors showing discordance in the mean IHC scores between the CNB and surgical specimens, the results of consensus for FISH results were concordant in 11. The rate of successful FISH analysis and the FISH positivity rate in cases with a HER2 IHC score of

  10. Prostate needle biopsies: interobserver variation and clinical consequences of histopathological re-evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Kasper Drimer; Toft, Birgitte Grønkaer; Røder, Martin Andreas;

    2011-01-01

    pathology reports and with histopathology of the radical prostatectomy specimen. The consequences of re-evaluation for clinical workup and treatment of patients according to local algorithms were determined. For Gleason score (GS), complete agreement between primary report and re-evaluation was found in 76......-evaluations in 19.7% and 13.1% of patients, respectively. Gleason scoring based on the radical prostatectomy specimen was higher than in both primary reports and re-evaluation of biopsies. Although a relatively high degree of concordance was found between biopsy assessments, the significant trend towards higher...... Gleason scoring at re-evaluation, leading to frequent changes in clinical assessments and surgical strategy, justifies re-evaluation of PCa biopsies in patients with primary GS ≤ 6....

  11. Prostate needle biopsies: interobserver variation and clinical consequences of histopathological re-evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Kasper Drimer; Toft, Birgitte Grønkaer; Brasso, Klaus;

    2011-01-01

    pathology reports and with histopathology of the radical prostatectomy specimen. The consequences of re-evaluation for clinical workup and treatment of patients according to local algorithms were determined. For Gleason score (GS), complete agreement between primary report and re-evaluation was found in 76......-evaluations in 19.7% and 13.1% of patients, respectively. Gleason scoring based on the radical prostatectomy specimen was higher than in both primary reports and re-evaluation of biopsies. Although a relatively high degree of concordance was found between biopsy assessments, the significant trend towards higher...... Gleason scoring at re-evaluation, leading to frequent changes in clinical assessments and surgical strategy, justifies re-evaluation of PCa biopsies in patients with primary GS = 6....

  12. Test Feasibility of Next-Generation Sequencing Assays in Clinical Mutation Detection of Small Biopsy and Fine Needle Aspiration Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Gang; Tsai, Harrison; Tseng, Li-Hui; Illei, Peter; Gocke, Christopher D; Eshleman, James R; Netto, George; Lin, Ming-Tseh

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate preanalytic factors contributing to failure of next-generation sequencing (NGS) assays. AmpliSeq Cancer Hotspot Panel was conducted in 1,121 of 1,152 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues submitted to a clinical laboratory, including 493 small biopsy or fine needle aspiration (FNA) specimens (44%) and 25 metastatic bone specimens (2.2%). Single nucleotide mutations and/or insertion/deletion mutations were detected in 702 specimens. Thirty-eight specimens (3.4%) were reported as "no results" due to NGS assay failure. Higher failure rates were observed in specimens submitted for lung cancer panel and melanoma panel (3.1% and 3.7% vs 1.0% colorectal cancer panel), metastatic bone specimens (36% vs 2.6% nonbone specimens), referred specimens (5.0% vs 1.8% in-house specimens), and small biopsy and FNA specimens (5.8% and 3.1% vs 0.7% resection/excision specimens). Test feasibility was higher in in-house specimens than referred specimens (99.1% vs 96.9% in resection specimens, 94.4% vs 87.3% in small biopsy specimens, and 94.3% vs 58.8% in FNA specimens). NGS assays demonstrated clinical utility in solid tumor specimens, including those taken by biopsy or FNA. Preanalytic factors identified by this study that may contribute to NGS assay failure highlight the need for pathologists to revisit tissue processing protocols in order to better optimize cancer mutational profiling. © American Society for Clinical Pathology, 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. The negative predictive value of ultrasound-guided 14-gauge core needle biopsy of breast masses: a validation study of 339 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Charlie; Lewis, Darrell R; Nasute, Paola; Hayes, Malcolm; Warren, Linda J; Gordon, Paula B

    2012-10-31

    To determine the negative predictive value of sonographically guided 14-gauge core needle biopsy of breast masses, with detailed analysis of any false-negative cases. We reviewed 669 cases of sonographically guided 14-gauge core needle biopsies that had benign pathologic findings. Given a benign pathology on core biopsy, true-negatives had either benign pathology on surgical excision or at least 2 years of stable imaging and/or clinical follow-up; false-negatives had malignant histology on surgical excision. Follow-up was available for 339 breast lesions; 117 were confirmed to be benign via surgical excision, and 220 were stable after 2 years or more of imaging or clinical follow-up (mean follow-up time 33.1 months, range 24-64 months). The negative predictive value was determined to be 99.4%. There were 2 false-negative cases, giving a false-negative rate of 0.1%. There was no delay in diagnosis in either case because the radiologist noted discordance between imaging and core biopsy pathology, and recommended surgical excision despite the benign core biopsy pathology. Sonographically guided 14-gauge core needle biopsy provides a high negative predictive value in assessing breast lesions. Radiologic/pathologic correlation should be performed to avoid delay in the diagnosis of carcinoma.

  14. Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Aspiration Biopsy of Thyroid Nodules: is it Necessary to Use Local Anesthesia for the Application of One Needle Puncture?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Wook [Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Rho, Myung Ho [Myongji Hospital, Kwandong University College of Medicine, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ki Nam [Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    This study was designed to evaluate the difference in the degree of patient pain for an ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy (USFNAB) of a thyroid nodule with one needle puncture with and without local anesthesia. A total of 50 patients participated in the study. We examined prospective patients who would undergo US-FNABs of two thyroid nodules (larger than 10 mm maximum diameter), which were located in separate thyroid lobes. For one of these thyroid nodules, US-FNAB was performed following the administration of local anesthesia; for the other nodule, no anesthesia was administered. The application of anesthesia was alternatively administered between patients (either prior to the first US-FNAB procedure or prior to the second procedure). For all patients, the degree of pain during and after each US-guided FNAB was evaluated according to a 4-category verbal rating scale (VRS), an 11-point numeric rating scale (NRS) and a 100-mm visual analogue scale (VAS). The mean maximum diameters of thyroid nodules examined by US-FNAB with the use of local anesthesia and with no local anesthesia were 13.6 mm and 13.0 mm, respectively. There was no significant difference in nodule size (p > 0.05) between two groups. For the VRS, there were 27 patients with a higher pain score when local anesthesia was used and four patients with a higher pain score when no local anesthesia was administered. Nineteen patients had equivalent pain score for both treatments. This finding was statistically significant (p < 0.001). For the NRS, there were 33 patients with a higher pain score when local anesthesia was used and 10 patients with a higher pain score when no local anesthesia was administered. Seven patients had an equivalent pain score for each treatment. This finding was statistically significant (p < 0.001). For the VAS, there were 35 patients with a higher pain score when local anesthesia was used and 11 patients with a higher pain score where no local anesthesia was

  15. The value of examination of multiple levels of mammary needle core biopsy specimens taken for investigation of lesions other than calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Andrew H S; Villena Salinas, Nadia M; Hodi, Zsolt; Rakha, Emad A; Ellis, Ian O

    2012-12-01

    It is a standard practice to examine multiple levels of needle core biopsies taken for mammographic calcification, but there is almost no evidence on the value of levels in core biopsies taken for other reasons. This study aimed to assess the value of levels for needle core biopsies taken for investigation of lesions other than calcification. A secondary aim was to assess interobserver agreement of diagnosis. For each of the 375 breast core biopsies with three levels the first level was reviewed and a diagnosis made. Then levels 2 and 3 were reviewed and a final diagnosis was made. The diagnosis after examining three levels was different from that in the initial level in 4 of 272 (1.5%, 95% CI 0.04% to 3%) core biopsies taken for reasons other than calcification and in 13 of 103 (13%, 95% CI 6% to 19%) biopsies taken for investigation of calcification. Interobserver agreement of the original diagnosis at the time of reporting and the final diagnosis at the review for this study was 96% (κ 0.947). This study confirms the value of levels of biopsies taken to investigate mammographic calcification, but suggests that routine levels are of limited value for breast core biopsies taken for other reasons.

  16. A Review of the Use of Fine-Needle Aspiration Biopsy of Mammary Tumors for Diagnosis and Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Edneia; Fuentes-Martinez, Nelson; Skoog, Lambert

    2017-01-01

    The article "Aspiration Biopsy of Mammary Tumors in Diagnosis and Research - A Critical Review of 2,200 Cases" by Zajicek et al. [Acta Cytol 1967;11:169-175] is composed of two separate parts as can be seen from the title. Both are, however, of great historical interest. The first describes the early days of fine-needle aspiration cytology diagnosis of breast lesions in particular carcinomas. The results are still impressive with a diagnostic accuracy close to 90%. The second deals with the effect of negative pressure on cell viability during the aspiration procedure. These studies were aimed at evaluating the usefulness of aspirated tumor cells to analyze the effects of therapy and the origin of tumor cells. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Is it possible to predict low-volume and insignificant prostate cancer by core needle biopsies?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Kasper Drimer; Toft, Birgitte Grønkaer; Røder, Martin Andreas;

    2013-01-01

    M: tumour ≤5% of total prostate volume and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) ≤10 ng/mL. In all definitions, Gleason score (GS) was ≤6 and the tumour was organ confined. Biopsies alone performed poorly as a predictor of unifocal and unilateral cancer in the prostatectomy specimens with positive predictive...

  18. Fine-Needle Aspiration Biopsy of Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Related Hepatocellular Nodular Lesions in Cirrhosis: Controversies, Challenges, and Expectations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Aileen

    2011-01-01

    The role of hepatic fine-needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy has evolved. Advances in imaging modalities have obviated the need for tissue confirmation in most hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs). There is risk of needle-tract seeding. Increasingly, small nodules are being detected on ultrasound surveillance of high-risk patients. Diagnostic challenges associated with cirrhosis include distinction of benign hepatocellular nodules, namely, large regenerative nodules and dysplastic nodules, from reactive hepatocytes; and distinction of well-differentiated HCCs from benign hepatocellular nodules. This paper will discuss (i) controversies regarding preoperative/pretransplantation FNA diagnosis of HCC, (ii) update of biological evolution, nomenclature, and histopathologic criteria for diagnosis of precancerous nodules and small HCCs, and (iii) algorithmic approach to FNA diagnosis of hepatocellular nodules. Optimal results depend on dedicated radiologist-cytopathologist team, on-site cytology service; combined cytohistologic approach, immunohistochemistry, and clinicopathologic correlation. Hepatic FNA is likely to be incorporated as a point of care as we move towards personalized medicine. PMID:21789263

  19. A boosted Bayesian multiresolution classifier for prostate cancer detection from digitized needle biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Scott; Feldman, Michael; Tomaszewski, John; Madabhushi, Anant

    2012-05-01

    Diagnosis of prostate cancer (CaP) currently involves examining tissue samples for CaP presence and extent via a microscope, a time-consuming and subjective process. With the advent of digital pathology, computer-aided algorithms can now be applied to disease detection on digitized glass slides. The size of these digitized histology images (hundreds of millions of pixels) presents a formidable challenge for any computerized image analysis program. In this paper, we present a boosted Bayesian multiresolution (BBMR) system to identify regions of CaP on digital biopsy slides. Such a system would serve as an important preceding step to a Gleason grading algorithm, where the objective would be to score the invasiveness and severity of the disease. In the first step, our algorithm decomposes the whole-slide image into an image pyramid comprising multiple resolution levels. Regions identified as cancer via a Bayesian classifier at lower resolution levels are subsequently examined in greater detail at higher resolution levels, thereby allowing for rapid and efficient analysis of large images. At each resolution level, ten image features are chosen from a pool of over 900 first-order statistical, second-order co-occurrence, and Gabor filter features using an AdaBoost ensemble method. The BBMR scheme, operating on 100 images obtained from 58 patients, yielded: 1) areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.84, 0.83, and 0.76, respectively, at the lowest, intermediate, and highest resolution levels and 2) an eightfold savings in terms of computational time compared to running the algorithm directly at full (highest) resolution. The BBMR model outperformed (in terms of AUC): 1) individual features (no ensemble) and 2) a random forest classifier ensemble obtained by bagging multiple decision tree classifiers. The apparent drop-off in AUC at higher image resolutions is due to lack of fine detail in the expert annotation of CaP and is not an artifact of the

  20. Combined Fluoroscopy- and CT-Guided Transthoracic Needle Biopsy Using a C-Arm Cone-Beam CT System: Comparison with Fluoroscopy-Guided Biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, Joo Yeon; Kim, Yoo Kyung; Shim, Sung Shine; Lim, Soo Mee [School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of combined fluoroscopy- and CT-guided transthoracic needle biopsy (FC-TNB) using a cone beam CT system in comparison to fluoroscopy-guided TNB (F-TNB). We retrospectively evaluated 74 FC-TNB cases (group A) and 97 F-TNB cases (group B) to compare their respective diagnostic accuracies according to the size and depth of the lesion, as well as complications, procedure time, and radiation dose. The sensitivity for malignancy and diagnostic accuracy for small (< 30 mm in size) and deep ({>=} 50 mm in depth) lesions were higher in group A (91% and 94%, 92% and 94%) than in group B (73% and 81%, 84% and 88%), however not statistically significant (p > 0.05). Concerning lesions {>=} 30 mm in size and < 50 mm in depth, both groups displayed similar results (group A, 91% and 92%, 80% and 87%: group B, 90% and 92%, 86% and 90%). Pneumothorax occurred 26% of the time in group A and 14% for group B. The mean procedure time and patient skin dose were significantly higher in group A (13.6 {+-} 4.0 minutes, 157.1 {+-} 76.5 mGy) than in group B (9.0 {+-} 3.5 minutes, 21.9 {+-} 15.2 mGy) (p < 0.05). Combined fluoroscopy- and CT-guided TNB allows the biopsy of small (< 30 mm) and deep lesions ({>=} 50 mm) with high diagnostic accuracy and short procedure times, whereas F-TNB is still a useful method for large and superficial lesions with a low radiation dose

  1. Combined use of fine-needle aspiration biopsy, MIBI scans and frozen section biopsy offers the best diagnostic accuracy in the assessment of the hypofunctioning solitary thyroid nodule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurtado-Lopez, Luis Mauricio; Arellano-Montano, Sara; Torres-Acosta, Evelyn Migdalia; Zaldivar-Ramirez, Felipe Rafael; Duarte-Torres, Reyna Margarita; Alonso-de-Ruiz, Patricia; Martinez-Duncker, Ivan [Thyroid Clinic, General Hospital of Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico); Martinez-Duncker, Carlos [Thyroid Clinic, General Hospital of Mexico, Mexico City (Mexico); Molecular Nuclear Medicine, Hospital Infantil de Mexico, Mexico (Mexico)

    2004-09-01

    The probability of malignancy is increased in hypofunctioning solitary thyroid nodules (HFNs). Fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNA), {sup 99m}Tc-methoxyisobutylisonitrile (MIBI) and frozen section biopsy (FS) have limited independent diagnostic accuracy for the differential diagnosis of HFNs. The goal of this study was to assess the accuracy of the three independent diagnostic methods in distinguishing between benign and malignant disease. A total of 130 patients with an HFN on the {sup 99m}Tc-pertechnetate scan were included in this study. FNA, MIBI scans, FS, thyroidectomy and histological analysis of surgical specimens for final diagnosis were performed in all patients. Of the 130 patients, 80 (61.54%) had benign lesions and 50 (38.46%), malignant lesions. FNA was diagnostic in 78/130 (60%) patients and non-diagnostic in 52/130 (40%) patients. None of the patients with a negative MIBI scan had a final histological diagnosis of malignancy, and MIBI scans were negative in 38.46% of patients with non-diagnostic FNA results. FS was diagnostic in 104/130 (80%) patients and non-diagnostic in 26/130 (20%) patients. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values and positive and negative likelihood ratios were 81.3%, 97.8%, 96%, 88%, 36.95 and 0.19 respectively for FNA; 100%, 61.3%, 61.7%, 100%, 2.58 and 0 respectively for MIBI; and 80.5%, 100%, 100%, 89%, 0 and 0.2 respectively for FS. Use of both MIBI scans and FS in patients with non-diagnostic FNA rendered a specificity and sensitivity of 100%. MIBI scans exclude malignancy in a significant proportion of patients with non-diagnostic FNAs (38% in this study). Cystic nodules with a positive MIBI scan should be further investigated even when the FNA result indicates a benign lesion. Combined use of FNA, MIBI and FS offers the best diagnostic accuracy. (orig.)

  2. Flow cytometry of fine-needle-aspiration biopsies : a new method to monitor the intrahepatic immunological environment in chronic viral hepatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprengers, D; van der Molen, R G; Kusters, J G; Kwekkeboom, J; van der Laan, L J W; Niesters, H G M; Kuipers, E J; De Man, R A; Schalm, S W; Janssen, H L A

    2005-01-01

    SUMMARY: Information about the character and grade of the intrahepatic immune response in viral hepatitis is important for the evaluation of disease stage and effect of therapy. Complications like haemorrhage limit the frequent performance of tissue-needle biopsies (TB), and the cells of peripheral

  3. Rapid needle-out patient-rollover approach after cone beam CT-guided lung biopsy: effect on pneumothorax rate in 1,191 consecutive patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Im [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Kyung Hee University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Chang Min; Goo, Jin Mo [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, Cancer Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Min [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    To investigate the effect of rapid needle-out patient-rollover approach on the incidence of pneumothorax and drainage catheter placement due to pneumothorax in C-arm Cone-beam CT (CBCT)-guided percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy (PTNB) of lung lesions. From May 2011 to December 2012, 1227 PTNBs were performed in 1191 patients with a 17-gauge coaxial needle. 617 biopsies were performed without (conventional-group) and 610 with rapid-rollover approach (rapid-rollover-group). Overall pneumothorax rates and incidences of pneumothorax requiring drainage catheter placement were compared between two groups. There were no significant differences in overall pneumothorax rates between conventional and rapid-rollover groups (19.8 % vs. 23.1 %, p = 0.164). However, pneumothorax rate requiring drainage catheter placement was significantly lower in rapid-rollover-group (1.6 %) than conventional-group (4.2 %) (p = 0.010). Multivariate analysis revealed male, age > 60, bulla crossed, fissure crossed, pleura to target distance > 1.3 cm, emphysema along needle tract, and pleural punctures ≥ 2 were significant risk factors of pneumothorax (p < 0.05). Regarding pneumothorax requiring drainage catheter placement, fissure crossed, bulla crossed, and emphysema along needle tract were significant risk factors (p < 0.05), whereas rapid-rollover approach was an independent protective factor (p = 0.002). The rapid needle-out patient-rollover approach significantly reduced the rate of pneumothorax requiring drainage catheter placement after CBCT-guided PTNB. (orig.)

  4. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy (EUS-FNA) in insulinomas: Indications and clinical relevance in a single investigator cohort of 47 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kann, Peter Herbert; Moll, Roland; Bartsch, Detlef; Pfützner, Andreas; Forst, Thomas; Tamagno, Gianluca; Goebel, Joachim N; Fourkiotis, Verena; Bergmann, Simona Raluca; Collienne, Maike

    2017-04-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the role and relevance of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnostic work-up of insulinomas. We have analysed the frequency, clinical indications, success rate (obtaining diagnostic tissue), diagnostic accuracy (in comparison to the pathological diagnosis after surgery), complications, and tolerability of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy and the localization and size of the lesions in 47 consecutive patients (29 females, 18 males; 46 ± 15 years) who had surgery for insulinoma following fasting test and were explored by single investigator EUS 1994-2015. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy was performed in 21 % (10/47) of the patients. The clinical indications for endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy were non-conclusive result of fasting test (n = 7), missing toxicology (n = 2), suspected malignancy at EUS (n = 1), suspicious extra-pancreatic localization of the lesion (n = 1). The diagnostic success rate of the procedure was 80 % (8/10 cases), the diagnostic accuracy of the fine-needle aspiration biopsy 70 % (7/10 cases). The lesions undergoing endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy were localized in the cauda (n = 5), corpus (n = 2), caput/processus uncinatus (n = 3), the diameter of the tumors was 21 ± 18 (10-70) mm. Only one accidental vascular puncture without any clinical complication occurred and all patients tolerated the procedure well. In the majority of cases, positive fasting test, negative toxicology, and detection of a typical pancreatic lesion at endoscopic ultrasound is sufficient for the diagnosis of insulinoma and the definition of the appropriate surgical strategy. Based on our data, we suggest including endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnostic work-up of organic hyperinsulinism in selected patients with

  5. Inflammatory pseudotumor of the liver and spleen diagnosed by percutaneous needle biopsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tsukasa Kawaguchi; Kiyoshi Mochizuki; Takashi Kizu; Masanori Miyazaki; Takayuki Yakushijin; Shusaku Tsutsui; Eiichi Morii; Tetsuo Takehara

    2012-01-01

    An inflammatory pseudotumor (IPT) is a relatively rare lesion characterized by chronic infiltration of inflammatory cells and areas of fibrosis. IPTs are difficult to diagnose because of the absence of specific symptoms or of characteristic hematological or radiological findings. In this study, a case of a woman aged over 70 years was reported, who presented with a general malaise lasting more than two months. A computed tomography scan demonstrated a diffusely spread lesion of the liver with a portal vein occlusion and a splenic lesion surrounded by a soft density layer. Since the percutaneous liver biopsy showed findings that suggested an IPT, although the radiological findings did not exclude the possibility of a malignancy, we performed a percutaneous spleen biopsy to enable a more definitive diagnosis. The microscopic findings from the spleen specimen lead us to a diagnosis of IPT involving the liver and spleen. Subsequent Subsequent steroid pulse therapy was effective, and rapid resolution of the disease was observed.

  6. Getting the Most Out of Liver Biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidbury, Jonathan A

    2017-05-01

    Histopathologic evaluation of liver biopsy specimens yields information that is not otherwise obtainable and is frequently essential for diagnosing hepatic disease. Percutaneous needle biopsy, laparoscopic biopsy, and surgical biopsy each have their own set of advantages and disadvantages. Care should be taken to ensure an adequate amount of tissue is collected for meaningful histologic evaluation. Because sampling error is a limitation of hepatic biopsy, multiple liver lobes should be biopsied. This article discusses the indications for liver biopsy, associated risks, advantages and disadvantages of different biopsy techniques, and strategies to get the most useful information possible out of this process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Serum Chrome levels sampled with steel needle vs. plastic IV cannula

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penny, Jeannette Østergaard; Overgaard, Søren

    2010-01-01

      Modern Metal-on-metal (MoM) joint articulations releases metal ions to the body. Research tries to establish how much this elevates metal ion levels and whether it causes adverse effects. The steel needle that samples the blood may introduce additional chromium to the sample thereby causing bias....... This study aimed to test that theory. Method: We compared serum chromium values for two sampling methods, steel needle and IV plastic cannula, as well as sampling sequence in 16 healthy volunteers. Results: We found statistically significant chromium contamination from the steel needle with mean differences...... between the two methods of 0.073 ng/mL, for the first sample, and 0.033 ng/mL for the second. No difference was found between the first and second plastic sample. The first steel needle sample contained an average of 0.047 ng/mL more than the second. This difference was only borderline significant...

  8. Computed tomography-guided needle aspiration and biopsy of pulmonary lesions - A single-center experience in 1000 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poulou, Loukia S.; Tsagouli, Paraskevi; Thanos, Loukas [Dept. of Medical Imaging and Interventional Radiology, General Hospital of Chest Diseases ' Sotiria' , Athens (Greece)], e-mail: ploukia@hotmail.com; Ziakas, Panayiotis D. [Program of Outcomes Research, Div. of Infectious Diseases, Warren Alpert Medical School, Brown Univ., RI, and Div. of Infectious Diseases, Rhode Island Hospital, Rhode Island (United States); Politi, Dimitra [Dept. of Cythopathology, General Hospital of Chest Diseases ' Sotiria' Athens (Greece); Trigidou, Rodoula [Dept. of Pathology, General Hospital of Chest Diseases ' Sotiria' Athens (Greece)

    2013-07-15

    Background: Computed tomography (CT)-guided fine needle aspiration (FNA)